WorldWideScience

Sample records for calculated conformer energies

  1. Conformational Transitions and Convergence of Absolute Binding Free Energy Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapelosa, Mauro; Gallicchio, Emilio; Levy, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    The Binding Energy Distribution Analysis Method (BEDAM) is employed to compute the standard binding free energies of a series of ligands to a FK506 binding protein (FKBP12) with implicit solvation. Binding free energy estimates are in reasonably good agreement with experimental affinities. The conformations of the complexes identified by the simulations are in good agreement with crystallographic data, which was not used to restrain ligand orientations. The BEDAM method is based on λ -hopping Hamiltonian parallel Replica Exchange (HREM) molecular dynamics conformational sampling, the OPLS-AA/AGBNP2 effective potential, and multi-state free energy estimators (MBAR). Achieving converged and accurate results depends on all of these elements of the calculation. Convergence of the binding free energy is tied to the level of convergence of binding energy distributions at critical intermediate states where bound and unbound states are at equilibrium, and where the rate of binding/unbinding conformational transitions is maximal. This finding mirrors similar observations in the context of order/disorder transitions as for example in protein folding. Insights concerning the physical mechanism of ligand binding and unbinding are obtained. Convergence for the largest FK506 ligand is achieved only after imposing strict conformational restraints, which however require accurate prior structural knowledge of the structure of the complex. The analytical AGBNP2 model is found to underestimate the magnitude of the hydrophobic driving force towards binding in these systems characterized by loosely packed protein-ligand binding interfaces. Rescoring of the binding energies using a numerical surface area model corrects this deficiency. This study illustrates the complex interplay between energy models, exploration of conformational space, and free energy estimators needed to obtain robust estimates from binding free energy calculations. PMID:22368530

  2. Efficient free energy calculations for compounds with multiple stable conformations separated by high energy barriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hritz, J.; Oostenbrink, C.

    2009-01-01

    Compounds with high intramolecular energy barriers represent challenging targets for free energy calculations because of the difficulty to obtain sufficient conformational sampling. Existing approaches are therefore computationally very demanding, thus preventing practical applications for such

  3. Conformation of antifreeze glycoproteins as determined from conformational energy calculations and fully assigned proton NMR spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, C.A.; Rao, B.N.N.

    1986-01-01

    The 1 H NMR spectra of AFGP's ranging in molecular weight from 2600 to 30,000 Daltons isolated from several different species of polar fish have been measured. The spectrum of AFGP 1-4 from Pagothenia borchgrevinki with an average of 30 repeating subunits has a single resonance for each proton of the glycotripeptide repeating unit, (ala-[gal-(β-1→3) galNAc-(α--O-]thr-ala)/sub n/. Its 1 H NMR spectrum including resonances of the amide protons has been completely assigned. Coupling constants and nuclear Overhauser enhancements (n.O.e.) between protons on distant residues imply conformational order. The 2600 dalton molecular weight glycopeptides (AFGP-8) have pro in place of ala at certain specific points in the sequence and AFGP-8R of Eleginus gracilis has arg in place of one thr. The resonances of pro and arg were assigned by decoupling. The resonances of the carboxy and amino terminals have distinct chemical shifts and were assigned in AFGP-8 of Boreogadus saida by titration. n.O.e. between α--protons and amide protons of the adjacent residue (sequential n.O.e.) were used in assignments of additional resonances and to assign the distinctive resonances of thr followed by pro. Conformational energy calculations on the repeating glycotripeptide subunit of AFGP show that the α--glucosidic linkage has a fixed conformation while the β--linkage is less rigid. A conformational model for AFGP 1-4, which is based on the calculations has the peptide in an extended left-handed helix with three residues per turn similar to polyproline II. The model is consistent with CD data, amide proton coupling constants, temperature dependence of amide proton chemical shifts

  4. The calculations of small molecular conformation energy differences by density functional method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topol, I. A.; Burt, S. K.

    1993-03-01

    The differences in the conformational energies for the gauche (G) and trans(T) conformers of 1,2-difluoroethane and for myo-and scyllo-conformer of inositol have been calculated by local density functional method (LDF approximation) with geometry optimization using different sets of calculation parameters. It is shown that in the contrast to Hartree—Fock methods, density functional calculations reproduce the correct sign and value of the gauche effect for 1,2-difluoroethane and energy difference for both conformers of inositol. The results of normal vibrational analysis for1,2-difluoroethane showed that harmonic frequencies calculated in LDF approximation agree with experimental data with the accuracy typical for scaled large basis set Hartree—Fock calculations.

  5. Accurate calculation of conformational free energy differences in explicit water: the confinement-solvation free energy approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esque, Jeremy; Cecchini, Marco

    2015-04-23

    The calculation of the free energy of conformation is key to understanding the function of biomolecules and has attracted significant interest in recent years. Here, we present an improvement of the confinement method that was designed for use in the context of explicit solvent MD simulations. The development involves an additional step in which the solvation free energy of the harmonically restrained conformers is accurately determined by multistage free energy perturbation simulations. As a test-case application, the newly introduced confinement/solvation free energy (CSF) approach was used to compute differences in free energy between conformers of the alanine dipeptide in explicit water. The results are in excellent agreement with reference calculations based on both converged molecular dynamics and umbrella sampling. To illustrate the general applicability of the method, conformational equilibria of met-enkephalin (5 aa) and deca-alanine (10 aa) in solution were also analyzed. In both cases, smoothly converged free-energy results were obtained in agreement with equilibrium sampling or literature calculations. These results demonstrate that the CSF method may provide conformational free-energy differences of biomolecules with small statistical errors (below 0.5 kcal/mol) and at a moderate computational cost even with a full representation of the solvent.

  6. Quantum-chemical calculation of energies and spectral characteristics of conformers in derivatives of phenylphosphine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuvashev, D.D.; Ratovskii, G.V.; Zakzhevskii, V.G.

    1987-01-01

    The phenylphosphines PhPX 2 calculated by the MNDO method are characterized by two potential minima corresponding to the bisector and gonal conformations. For X = Cl, F, and C=N the bisector conformer predominates considerably, but for X = H and CH 3 the populations of the conformers are approximately the same. The characteristics of the electron transitions of the conformers found, determined by the CNDO/S method, differ substantially, which makes it possible to analyze the conformational compositions of arylphosphines by means of UV spectroscopy. In excited ππ* states the gonal conformation is characterized by a substantial donor effect of the PX 2 group, whereas the bisector conformation gives a certain acceptor effect

  7. Conformational energy calculations on polypeptides and proteins: use of a statistical mechanical procedure for evaluating structure and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheraga, H A; Paine, G H

    1986-01-01

    We are using a variety of theoretical and computational techniques to study protein structure, protein folding, and higher-order structures. Our earlier work involved treatments of liquid water and aqueous solutions of nonpolar and polar solutes, computations of the stabilities of the fundamental structures of proteins and their packing arrangements, conformations of small cyclic and open-chain peptides, structures of fibrous proteins (collagen), structures of homologous globular proteins, introduction of special procedures as constraints during energy minimization of globular proteins, and structures of enzyme-substrate complexes. Recently, we presented a new methodology for predicting polypeptide structure (described here); the method is based on the calculation of the probable and average conformation of a polypeptide chain by the application of equilibrium statistical mechanics in conjunction with an adaptive, importance sampling Monte Carlo algorithm. As a test, it was applied to Met-enkephalin.

  8. Calculation of relative free energies for ligand-protein binding, solvation, and conformational transitions using the GROMOS software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riniker, Sereina; Christ, Clara D; Hansen, Halvor S; Hünenberger, Philippe H; Oostenbrink, Chris; Steiner, Denise; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2011-11-24

    The calculation of the relative free energies of ligand-protein binding, of solvation for different compounds, and of different conformational states of a polypeptide is of considerable interest in the design or selection of potential enzyme inhibitors. Since such processes in aqueous solution generally comprise energetic and entropic contributions from many molecular configurations, adequate sampling of the relevant parts of configurational space is required and can be achieved through molecular dynamics simulations. Various techniques to obtain converged ensemble averages and their implementation in the GROMOS software for biomolecular simulation are discussed, and examples of their application to biomolecules in aqueous solution are given. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  9. Ligand induced change of β2 adrenergic receptor from active to inactive conformation and its implication for the closed/open state of the water channel: insight from molecular dynamics simulation, free energy calculation and Markov state model analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Qifeng; Pérez-Sánchez, Horacio; Zhang, Yang; Shao, Yonghua; Shi, Danfeng; Liu, Huanxiang; Yao, Xiaojun

    2014-08-14

    The reported crystal structures of β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR) reveal that the open and closed states of the water channel are correlated with the inactive and active conformations of β2AR. However, more details about the process by which the water channel states are affected by the active to inactive conformational change of β2AR remain illusive. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the dynamical inactive and active conformational change of β2AR induced by inverse agonist ICI 118,551. Markov state model analysis and free energy calculation are employed to explore the open and close states of the water channel. The simulation results show that inverse agonist ICI 118,551 can induce water channel opening during the conformational transition of β2AR. Markov state model (MSM) analysis proves that the energy contour can be divided into seven states. States S1, S2 and S5, which represent the active conformation of β2AR, show that the water channel is in the closed state, while states S4 and S6, which correspond to the intermediate state conformation of β2AR, indicate the water channel opens gradually. State S7, which represents the inactive structure of β2AR, corresponds to the full open state of the water channel. The opening mechanism of the water channel is involved in the ligand-induced conformational change of β2AR. These results can provide useful information for understanding the opening mechanism of the water channel and will be useful for the rational design of potent inverse agonists of β2AR.

  10. Low-Mode Conformational Search Method with Semiempirical Quantum Mechanical Calculations: Application to Enantioselective Organocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamachi, Takashi; Yoshizawa, Kazunari

    2016-02-22

    A conformational search program for finding low-energy conformations of large noncovalent complexes has been developed. A quantitatively reliable semiempirical quantum mechanical PM6-DH+ method, which is able to accurately describe noncovalent interactions at a low computational cost, was employed in contrast to conventional conformational search programs in which molecular mechanical methods are usually adopted. Our approach is based on the low-mode method whereby an initial structure is perturbed along one of its low-mode eigenvectors to generate new conformations. This method was applied to determine the most stable conformation of transition state for enantioselective alkylation by the Maruoka and cinchona alkaloid catalysts and Hantzsch ester hydrogenation of imines by chiral phosphoric acid. Besides successfully reproducing the previously reported most stable DFT conformations, the conformational search with the semiempirical quantum mechanical calculations newly discovered a more stable conformation at a low computational cost.

  11. Willmore energy estimates in conformal Berger spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros, Manuel; Ferrandez, Angel

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The Willmore energy is computed in a wide class of surfaces. → Isoperimetric inequalities for the Willmore energy of Hopf tori are obtained. → The best possible lower bound is achieved on isoareal Hopf tori. - Abstract: We obtain isoperimetric inequalities for the Willmore energy of Hopf tori in a wide class of conformal structures on the three sphere. This class includes, on the one hand, the family of conformal Berger spheres and, on the other hand, a one parameter family of Lorentzian conformal structures. This allows us to give the best possible lower bound of Willmore energies concerning isoareal Hopf tori.

  12. Vibrational spectrum, ab initio calculations, conformational stabilities and assignment of fundamentals of 1,2-dibromopropane

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPlante, Arthur J.; Stidham, Howard D.

    2009-10-01

    The mid and far infrared and the Raman spectrum of 1,2-dibromopropane is reported in solid, liquid and gas. Several bands reported by earlier workers are not present in the spectrum of the purified material. Ab initio calculations of optimized geometry, energy, dipole moment, molar volume, vibrational spectrum and normal coordinate calculation were performed using the density functional B3LYP/6-311++g(3df,2pd), and the results used to assist a complete assignment of the 81 fundamental modes of vibrations of the three conformers of 1,2-dibromopropane. Relative energies found conformer A the lowest with G and G' at 815.6 and 871.4 cm -1 higher. The temperature dependence of the Raman spectrum of the liquid was investigated in the CCC bending region and the relative energies determined. It was found that the G' and G conformers lie 236 ± 11 and 327 ±11 cm -1, respectively above the A conformer, leading to the room temperature composition of the liquid as A, 65 ± 1; G', 21 ± 1; G, 14 ± 1%. It is apparent that the calculated highest energy conformer G' is stabilized more than the G conformer in the liquid. The G' conformer has the lowest molar volume effectively changing the interaction distance between conformers in the liquid, and enhancing the effect of its dipole moment.

  13. Conformal mapping calculation of railgun skin inductance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huerta, M.A.; Nearing, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper considers the common rail arrangement consisting of two long, parallel, rectangular rails. The authors calculate the inductance per unit length L' in the short flight time limit where the skin depth is much smaller than any rail dimensions, the current is all on the rail surface, and the magnetic field does not penetrate the rails. The authors give the solution based on the Schwartz-Christoffel transformation that maps the boundaries of the problem into a simpler shape

  14. Conformal Gravity: Dark Matter and Dark Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Nesbet

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This short review examines recent progress in understanding dark matter, dark energy, and galactic halos using theory that departs minimally from standard particle physics and cosmology. Strict conformal symmetry (local Weyl scaling covariance, postulated for all elementary massless fields, retains standard fermion and gauge boson theory but modifies Einstein–Hilbert general relativity and the Higgs scalar field model, with no new physical fields. Subgalactic phenomenology is retained. Without invoking dark matter, conformal gravity and a conformal Higgs model fit empirical data on galactic rotational velocities, galactic halos, and Hubble expansion including dark energy.

  15. On gravitational energy in conformal teleparallel gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, J. G.; Ulhoa, S. C.

    2017-07-01

    The paper deals with the definition of gravitational energy in conformal teleparallel gravity. The total energy is defined by means of the field equations which allow a local conservation law. Then such an expression is analyzed for a homogeneous and isotropic Universe. This model is implemented by the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) line element. The energy of the Universe in the absence of matter is identified with the dark energy, however it can be expanded for curved models defining such an energy as the difference between the total energy and the energy of the perfect fluid which is the matter field in the FRW model.

  16. Calculating zeros: Non-equilibrium free energy calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oostenbrink, Chris; Gunsteren, Wilfred F. van

    2006-01-01

    Free energy calculations on three model processes with theoretically known free energy changes have been performed using short simulation times. A comparison between equilibrium (thermodynamic integration) and non-equilibrium (fast growth) methods has been made in order to assess the accuracy and precision of these methods. The three processes have been chosen to represent processes often observed in biomolecular free energy calculations. They involve a redistribution of charges, the creation and annihilation of neutral particles and conformational changes. At very short overall simulation times, the thermodynamic integration approach using discrete steps is most accurate. More importantly, reasonable accuracy can be obtained using this method which seems independent of the overall simulation time. In cases where slow conformational changes play a role, fast growth simulations might have an advantage over discrete thermodynamic integration where sufficient sampling needs to be obtained at every λ-point, but only if the initial conformations do properly represent an equilibrium ensemble. From these three test cases practical lessons can be learned that will be applicable to biomolecular free energy calculations

  17. NMR investigation and theoretical calculations of the solvent effect on the conformation of valsartan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chashmniam, Saeed; Tafazzoli, Mohsen

    2017-11-01

    Structure and conformational properties of valsartan were studied by advanced NMR techniques and quantum calculation methods. Potential energy scanning using B3LYP/6-311++g** and B3LYP-D3/6-311++g** methods were performed and four conformers (V1-V4) at minimum points of PES diagram were observed. According to the NMR spectra in acetone-d6, there are two conformers (M and m) with m/M = 0.52 ratio simultaneously and energy barriers of the two conformers were predicted from chemical shifts and multiplicities. While, intramolecular hydrogen bond at tetrazole ring and carboxylic groups prevent the free rotation on N6sbnd C11 bond in M-conformer, this bond rotates freely in m-conformer. On the other hand, intramolecular hydrogen bond at carbonyl and carboxylic acid can be observed at m-conformer. So, different intramolecular hydrogen bond is the reason for the stability of both M and m structures. Quite interestingly, 1H NMR spectra in CDCl3 show two distinct conformers (N and n) with unequal ratio which are differ from M-m conformers. Also, intramolecular hydrogen bond seven-member ring involving five-membered tetrazole ring and carboxylic acid group observed in both N and n-conformers Solvent effect, by using a set of polar and non-polar solvents including DMSO-d6, methanol-d4, benzene-d6, THF-d8, nitromethane-d3, methylene chloride-d2 and acetonitrile-d3 were investigated. NMR parameters include chemical shifts and spin-spin coupling constants were obtained from a set of 2D NMR spectra (H-H COSY, HMQC and HMBC). For this purpose, several DFT functionals from LDA, GGA and hybrid categories were used which the hybrid method showed better agreement with experiment values.

  18. Energy of knots and conformal geometry

    CERN Document Server

    O'Hara, Jun

    2003-01-01

    Energy of knots is a theory that was introduced to create a "canonical configuration" of a knot - a beautiful knot which represents its knot type. This book introduces several kinds of energies, and studies the problem of whether or not there is a "canonical configuration" of a knot in each knot type. It also considers this problems in the context of conformal geometry. The energies presented in the book are defined geometrically. They measure the complexity of embeddings and have applications to physical knotting and unknotting through numerical experiments. Contents: In Search of the "Optima

  19. Conformational analysis of capsaicin using 13C, 15N MAS NMR, GIAO DFT and GA calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siudem, Paweł; Paradowska, Katarzyna; Bukowicki, Jarosław

    2017-10-01

    Capsaicin produced by plants from genus Capsicum exerts multiple pharmacological effects and has found applications in food and pharmaceutical industry. The alkaloid was studied by a combined approach: solid-state NMR, GA conformational search and GIAO DFT methods. The 13C CPMAS NMR spectra were recorded using variable contact time and dipolar dephasing experiments. The results of cross-polarization (CP) kinetics, such as TCP values and long T1ρH (100-200 ms), indicated that the capsaicin molecule is fairly mobile, especially at the end of the aliphatic chain. The15N MAS NMR spectrum showed one narrow signal at -255 ppm. Genetic algorithm (GA) search with multi modal optimization was used to find low-energy conformations of capsaicin. Theoretical GIAO DFT calculations were performed using different basis sets to characterize five selected conformations. 13C CPMAS NMR was used as a validation method and the experimental chemical shifts were compared with those calculated for selected stable conformers. Conformational analysis suggests that the side chain can be bent or extended. A comparison of the experimental and the calculated chemical shifts indicates that solid capsaicin does not have the same structure as those established by PWXRD.

  20. Landfill Gas Energy Benefits Calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains the LFG Energy Benefits Calculator to estimate direct, avoided, and total greenhouse gas reductions, as well as environmental and energy benefits, for a landfill gas energy project.

  1. Biogas - the calculable energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kith, Károly; Nagy, Orsolya; Balla, Zoltán; Tamás, András

    2015-04-01

    EU actions against climate change are rising energy prices, both have emphasized the use of renewable energy,increase investments and energy efficiency. A number of objectives formulated in the EC decree no. 29/2009 by 2020. This document is based on the share of renewable energies in energy consumption should be increased to 20% (EC, 2009). The EU average is 20% but the share of renewables vary from one member state to another. In Hungary in 2020, 14.65% renewable energy share is planned to be achieved. According to the latest Eurostat data, the share of renewable energy in energy consumption of the EU average was 14.1%, while in Hungary, this share was 9.6% in 2012. (EUROSTAT, 2014). The use of renewable energy plant level is influenced by several factors. The most important of these is the cost savings and efficiency gains. Hungarian investments in renewable energy production usually have high associated costs and the payback period is substantially more than five years, depending on the support rate. For example, the payback period is also influenced by the green electricity generated feed prices, which is one of the lowest in Hungary compared the Member States of the European Union. Consequently, it is important to increase the production of green energy. Nowadays, predictable biogas energy is an outstanding type of decentralized energy production. It follows directly that agricultural by-products can be used to produce energy and they also create jobs by the construction of a biogas plant. It is important to dispose of and destroy hazardous and noxious substances in energy production. It follows from this that the construction of biogas plants have a positive impact, in addition to green energy which is prepared to reduce the load on the environment. The production of biogas and green electricity is one of the most environment friendly forms of energy production. Biogas production also has other important ecological effects, such as the substitution of

  2. Consistent force field modeling of matrix isolated molecules. V. Minimum energy path potential to the conformer conversion of 1,2-difluoroethane: Ar 364, ab initio calculation of electric multipole moments and electric polarization contribution to the conversion barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunde, R.; Ha, T.-K.; Günthard, H. H.

    1990-08-01

    In this paper results of consistent force field modeling (CFF) of the potential function to conversion of the gauche (g) to the trans (t) conformer of 1,2-difluoroethane (DFE) isolated in an argon matrix will be reported. Starting point are locally stable configurations gDFE:Ar 364 (defect GH1) and tDFE:Ar 364 (TH1) obtained in previous work from CFF modeling of a cube shaped Ar 364 fragment containing one DFE molecule in its center. Using the dihedral angle of DFE as an independent parameter the minimum energy path of the conversion process gDFE:Ar 364→tDFE:Ar 364 will be determined by CFF energy minimization. Determination of the minimum energy path is found to require large numbers of energy minimization steps and to lead to a rather complicated motion of the molecule with respect to the crystal fragment. Surprisingly the molecule-matrix interactions lead to a reduction of the g-t barrier by ≈500 cal/mol and to a stabilization of the trans species by ≈500 cal/mol. This finding is a consequence of a delicate interplay of matrix-molecule and matrix-matrix interactions. Calculation of the electric polarization energy (induced dipole-first-order polarization approximation) is based on extended ab initio calculations of dipole and quadrupole moments and a bond polarizability estimate of the first-order polarizability of DFE as a function of the internal rotation angle, on Fourier expansion of multipole components and use of symmetry for reduction of the order of the linear system defining the (self-consistent) induced dipole moments of all Ar atoms. Electric polarization is found to alter the potential function of the conversion process in a profound way: the g-t barrier and the t-g energy difference are increased to ≈3000 cal/mol and to ≈1500 cal/mol respectively (≈2500 and ≈530 cal/mol respectively for free DFE). Further applications of the technique developed in this work to related problems of matrix isolated molecules, e.g., vibrational matrix

  3. Exploring the conformational energy landscape of proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nienhaus, G.U. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)]|[Universitaet Ulm (Germany); Mueller, J.D.; McMahon, B.H. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Proteins possess a complex energy landscape with a large number of local minima called conformational substates that are arranged in a hierarchical fashion. Here we discuss experiments aimed at the elucidation of the energy landscape in carbonmonoxy myoglobin (MbCO). In the highest tier of the hierarchy, a few taxonomic substates exist. Because of their small number, these substates are accessible to detailed structural investigations. Spectroscopic experiments are discussed that elucidate the role of protonations of amino acid side chains in creating the substates. The lower tiers of the hierarchy contain a large number of statistical substates. Substate interconversions are observed in the entire temperature range from below 1 K up to the denaturation temperature, indicating a wide spectrum of energy barriers that separate the substates.

  4. Theoretical study of γ-aminobutyric acid conformers: Intramolecular interactions and ionization energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke-Dong; Wang, Mei-Ting; Meng, Ju

    2014-10-01

    Allowing for all combinations of internal single-bond rotamers, 1,296 unique trial structures of γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) are obtained. All of these structures are optimized at the M06-2X level of theory and a total of 68 local minimal conformers are found. The nine low-lying conformers are used for further studies. According to the calculated relative Gibbs free energies at M06-2X level of theory, we find that the dispersion is important for the relative energy of GABA. The intramolecular hydrogen bonds and hyperconjugative interaction and their effects on the conformational stability are studied. The results show that both of them have great influence on the conformers. The vertical ionization energies (VIE) are calculated and match the experimental data well. The results show that the neutral GABA in the gas phase is a multi-conformer system and at least four conformations exist.

  5. Conformational study of sarcosine as probed by matrix-isolation FT-IR spectroscopy and molecular orbital calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez-Zavaglia, Andrea; Fausto, R.

    2003-01-01

    Sarcosine (N-methylglycine) has been studied by matrix-isolation FT-IR spectroscopy and molecular orbital calculations undertaken at the DFT/B3LYP and MP2 levels of theory with the 6-311++G(d, p) and 6-31++G(d, p) basis set, respectively. Eleven different conformers were located in the potential energy surface (PES) of sarcosine, with the ASC conformer being the ground conformational state. This form is analogous to the glycine most stable conformer and is characterized by a NH...O= intramole...

  6. Sampling the potential energy surface of a DNA duplex damaged by a food carcinogen: Force field parameterization by ab initio quantum calculations and conformational searching using molecular mechanics computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiangyang

    1999-07-01

    The heterocyclic amine 2-amino-3-methylimidazo (4, 5-f) quinoline (IQ) is one of a number of carcinogens found in barbecued meat and fish. It induces tumors in mammals and is probably involved in human carcinogenesis, because of great exposure to such food carcinogens. IQ is biochemically activated to a derivative which reacts with DNA to form a covalent adduct. This adduct may deform the DNA and consequently cause a mutation. which may initiate carcinogenesis. To understand this cancer initiating event, it is necessary to obtain atomic resolution structures of the damaged DNA. No such structures are available experimentally due to synthesis difficulties. Therefore, we employ extensive molecular mechanics and dynamics calculations for this purpose. The major IQ-DNA adduct in the specific DNA sequence d(5'G1G2C G3CCA3') - d(5'TGGCGCC3') with IQ modified at G3 is studied. The d(5'G1G2C G3CC3') sequence has recently been shown to be a hot-spot for mutations when IQ modification is at G3. Although this sequence is prone to -2 deletions via a ``slippage mechanism'' even when unmodified, a key question is why IQ increases the mutation frequency of the unmodified DNA by about 104 fold. Is there a structural feature imposed by IQ that is responsible? The molecular mechanics and dynamics program AMBER for nucleic acids with the latest force field was chosen for this work. This force field has been demonstrated to reproduce well the B-DNA structure. However, some parameters, the partial charges, bond lengths and angles, dihedral parameters of the modified residue, are not available in the AMBER database. We parameterized the force field using high level ab initio quantum calculations. We created 800 starting conformations which uniformly sampled in combination at 18° intervals three torsion angles that govern the IQ-DNA orientations, and energy minimized them. The most important structures are abnormal; the IQ damaged guanine is rotated out of its standard B

  7. Mapping the conformational free energy of aspartic acid in the gas phase and in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comitani, Federico; Rossi, Kevin; Ceriotti, Michele; Sanz, M Eugenia; Molteni, Carla

    2017-04-14

    The conformational free energy landscape of aspartic acid, a proteogenic amino acid involved in a wide variety of biological functions, was investigated as an example of the complexity that multiple rotatable bonds produce even in relatively simple molecules. To efficiently explore such a landscape, this molecule was studied in the neutral and zwitterionic forms, in the gas phase and in water solution, by means of molecular dynamics and the enhanced sampling method metadynamics with classical force-fields. Multi-dimensional free energy landscapes were reduced to bi-dimensional maps through the non-linear dimensionality reduction algorithm sketch-map to identify the energetically stable conformers and their interconnection paths. Quantum chemical calculations were then performed on the minimum free energy structures. Our procedure returned the low energy conformations observed experimentally in the gas phase with rotational spectroscopy [M. E. Sanz et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 12, 3573 (2010)]. Moreover, it provided information on higher energy conformers not accessible to experiments and on the conformers in water. The comparison between different force-fields and quantum chemical data highlighted the importance of the underlying potential energy surface to accurately capture energy rankings. The combination of force-field based metadynamics, sketch-map analysis, and quantum chemical calculations was able to produce an exhaustive conformational exploration in a range of significant free energies that complements the experimental data. Similar protocols can be applied to larger peptides with complex conformational landscapes and would greatly benefit from the next generation of accurate force-fields.

  8. Mapping the conformational free energy of aspartic acid in the gas phase and in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comitani, Federico; Rossi, Kevin; Ceriotti, Michele; Sanz, M. Eugenia; Molteni, Carla

    2017-04-01

    The conformational free energy landscape of aspartic acid, a proteogenic amino acid involved in a wide variety of biological functions, was investigated as an example of the complexity that multiple rotatable bonds produce even in relatively simple molecules. To efficiently explore such a landscape, this molecule was studied in the neutral and zwitterionic forms, in the gas phase and in water solution, by means of molecular dynamics and the enhanced sampling method metadynamics with classical force-fields. Multi-dimensional free energy landscapes were reduced to bi-dimensional maps through the non-linear dimensionality reduction algorithm sketch-map to identify the energetically stable conformers and their interconnection paths. Quantum chemical calculations were then performed on the minimum free energy structures. Our procedure returned the low energy conformations observed experimentally in the gas phase with rotational spectroscopy [M. E. Sanz et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 12, 3573 (2010)]. Moreover, it provided information on higher energy conformers not accessible to experiments and on the conformers in water. The comparison between different force-fields and quantum chemical data highlighted the importance of the underlying potential energy surface to accurately capture energy rankings. The combination of force-field based metadynamics, sketch-map analysis, and quantum chemical calculations was able to produce an exhaustive conformational exploration in a range of significant free energies that complements the experimental data. Similar protocols can be applied to larger peptides with complex conformational landscapes and would greatly benefit from the next generation of accurate force-fields.

  9. Full conformational landscape of 3-Methoxyphenol revealed by room temperature mm-wave rotational spectroscopy supported by quantum chemical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roucou, Anthony; Fontanari, Daniele; Dhont, Guillaume; Jabri, Atef; Bray, Cédric; Hindle, Francis; Mouret, Gaël; Bocquet, Robin; Cuisset, Arnaud

    2018-03-30

    Room temperature millimeter-wave rotational spectroscopy supported by high level of theory calculations have been employed to fully characterise the conformational landscape of 3-Methoxyphenol, a semi-volatile polar oxygenated aromatic compound precursor of secondary organic aerosols in the atmosphere arising from biomass combustion. While previous rotationally-resolved spectroscopic studies in the microwave and in the UV domains failed to observe the complete conformational landscape, the 70 - 330 GHz rotational spectrum measured in this study reveals the ground state rotational signatures of the four stable conformations theoretically predicted. Moreover, rotational transitions in the lowest energy vibrationally excited states were assigned for two conformers. While the inertial defect of methoxyphenol does not signicantly change between conformers and isomers, the excitation of the methoxy out-of-plane bending is the main contribution to the non-planarity of the molecule. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Confab - Systematic generation of diverse low-energy conformers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Boyle Noel M

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many computational chemistry analyses require the generation of conformers, either on-the-fly, or in advance. We present Confab, an open source command-line application for the systematic generation of low-energy conformers according to a diversity criterion. Results Confab generates conformations using the 'torsion driving approach' which involves iterating systematically through a set of allowed torsion angles for each rotatable bond. Energy is assessed using the MMFF94 forcefield. Diversity is measured using the heavy-atom root-mean-square deviation (RMSD relative to conformers already stored. We investigated the recovery of crystal structures for a dataset of 1000 ligands from the Protein Data Bank with fewer than 1 million conformations. Confab can recover 97% of the molecules to within 1.5 Å at a diversity level of 1.5 Å and an energy cutoff of 50 kcal/mol. Conclusions Confab is available from http://confab.googlecode.com.

  11. Peptide Free Energy Landscapes Calibrated by Molecular Orbital Calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Ono, S.; Kuroda, M.; Higo, J.; Kamiya, N.; Nakajima, N.; Nakamura, H.

    2002-01-01

    Free energy landscapes of peptide conformations werecalibrated by ab initiomolecular orbital calculations, after enhancedconformational sampling using the multicanonical molecular dynamicssimulations. Three different potentials of mean force for an isolateddipeptide were individually obtained using the conventional force fields,AMBER parm94, AMBER parm96, and CHARMm22. Each potential ofmean force was calibrated based on the umbrella sampling algorithm fromthe adiabatic energy map that was cal...

  12. Study on the Application of the Combination of TMD Simulation and Umbrella Sampling in PMF Calculation for Molecular Conformational Transitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Free energy calculations of the potential of mean force (PMF based on the combination of targeted molecular dynamics (TMD simulations and umbrella samplings as a function of physical coordinates have been applied to explore the detailed pathways and the corresponding free energy profiles for the conformational transition processes of the butane molecule and the 35-residue villin headpiece subdomain (HP35. The accurate PMF profiles for describing the dihedral rotation of butane under both coordinates of dihedral rotation and root mean square deviation (RMSD variation were obtained based on the different umbrella samplings from the same TMD simulations. The initial structures for the umbrella samplings can be conveniently selected from the TMD trajectories. For the application of this computational method in the unfolding process of the HP35 protein, the PMF calculation along with the coordinate of the radius of gyration (Rg presents the gradual increase of free energies by about 1 kcal/mol with the energy fluctuations. The feature of conformational transition for the unfolding process of the HP35 protein shows that the spherical structure extends and the middle α-helix unfolds firstly, followed by the unfolding of other α-helices. The computational method for the PMF calculations based on the combination of TMD simulations and umbrella samplings provided a valuable strategy in investigating detailed conformational transition pathways for other allosteric processes.

  13. Ab initio calculation of conformation and vibrational spectrum for the pyrosulfate ion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyekjær, Jane Dannow; Berg, Rolf W.; Johansen, Helge

    2003-01-01

    Theoretical calculations have been performed and applied to determine the most likely geometry for the pyrosulfate ion. The main question was to determine as to whether the system has C-2 or C-2, conformation. The present study favors C-2 symmetry. Bond lengths and angles have been calculated for...

  14. Conformal fields in prostate radiotherapy: A comparison between measurement, calculation and simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seied R Mahdavi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The objective of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of a treatment planning system (TPS for calculating the dose distribution parameters in conformal fields (CF. Dosimetric parameters of CF′s were compared between measurement, Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP4C and TPS calculation. Materials and Methods: Field analyzer water phantom was used for obtaining percentage depth dose (PDD curves and beam profiles (BP of different conformal fields. MCNP4C was used to model conformal fields dose specification factors and head of linear accelerator varian model 2100C/D. Results: Results showed that the distance to agreement (DTA and dose difference (DD of our findings were well within the acceptance criteria of 3 mm and 3%, respectively. Conclusions: According to this study it can be revealed that TPS using equivalent tissue air ratio calculation method is still convenient for dose prediction in non small conformal fields normally used in prostate radiotherapy. It was also showed that, since there is a close correlation with Monte Carlo simulation, measurements and TPS, Monte Carlo can be further confirmed for implementation and calculation dose distribution in non standard and complex conformal irradiation field for treatment planning systems.

  15. Hawking–Hayward quasi-local energy under conformal transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prain, Angus; Faraoni, Valerio; Lapierre-Léonard, Marianne; Vitagliano, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    We derive a formula describing the transformation of the Hawking–Hayward quasi-local energy under a conformal rescaling of the spacetime metric. A known formula for the transformation of the Misner–Sharp–Hernandez mass is recovered as a special case. (paper)

  16. Evaluating conformational free energies: the colony energy and its application to the problem of loop prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Zhexin; Soto, Cinque S; Honig, Barry

    2002-05-28

    In this paper, we introduce a method to account for the shape of the potential energy curve in the evaluation of conformational free energies. The method is based on a procedure that generates a set of conformations, each with its own force-field energy, but adds a term to this energy that favors conformations that are close in structure (have a low rmsd) to other conformations. The sum of the force-field energy and rmsd-dependent term is defined here as the "colony energy" of a given conformation, because each conformation that is generated is viewed as representing a colony of points. The use of the colony energy tends to select conformations that are located in broad energy basins. The approach is applied to the ab initio prediction of the conformations of all of the loops in a dataset of 135 nonredundant proteins. By using an rmsd from a native criterion based on the superposition of loop stems, the average rmsd of 5-, 6-, 7-, and 8-residue long loops is 0.85, 0.92, 1.23, and 1.45 A, respectively. For 8-residue loops, 60 of 61 predictions have an rmsd of less than 3.0 A. The use of the colony energy is found to improve significantly the results obtained from the potential function alone. (The loop prediction program, "Loopy," can be downloaded at http://trantor.bioc.columbia.edu.)

  17. Using the fast fourier transform in binding free energy calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trung Hai; Zhou, Huan-Xiang; Minh, David D L

    2018-04-30

    According to implicit ligand theory, the standard binding free energy is an exponential average of the binding potential of mean force (BPMF), an exponential average of the interaction energy between the unbound ligand ensemble and a rigid receptor. Here, we use the fast Fourier transform (FFT) to efficiently evaluate BPMFs by calculating interaction energies when rigid ligand configurations from the unbound ensemble are discretely translated across rigid receptor conformations. Results for standard binding free energies between T4 lysozyme and 141 small organic molecules are in good agreement with previous alchemical calculations based on (1) a flexible complex ( R≈0.9 for 24 systems) and (2) flexible ligand with multiple rigid receptor configurations ( R≈0.8 for 141 systems). While the FFT is routinely used for molecular docking, to our knowledge this is the first time that the algorithm has been used for rigorous binding free energy calculations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Conformational analysis of 9,10-dihydroanthracenes. Molecular mechanics calculations and /sup 13/C NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabideau, P.W.; Mooney, J.L.; Lipkowitz, K.B.

    1986-12-24

    The conformational analyses of 9, 10-dihydroanthracene and several of its methylated and ethylated derivatives are studied by empirical force field calculations (MM2 and MMPI). The computational results are considered in light of previous and current carbon NMR data. Model compounds are examined which involve fixed, planar, and boat-shaped conformations about the central ring, and these /sup 13/C NMR data are then compared with flexible systems. It is concluded that carbon chemical shifts and carbon-hydrogen coupling constants are consistent with the results of molecular mechanics calculations which indicate a greater tendency for planarity around the central ring than previously considered.

  19. Wormhole supported by dark energy admitting conformal motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhar, Piyali [Government General Degree College, Singur, Department of Mathematics, Hooghly, West Bengal (India); Rahaman, Farook; Banerjee, Ayan [Jadavpur University, Department of Mathematics, Kolkata, West Bengal (India); Manna, Tuhina [St. Xavier' s College, Department of Mathematics and Statistics (Commerce Evening), Kolkata, West Bengal (India)

    2016-12-15

    In this article, we study the possibility of sustaining static and spherically symmetric traversable wormhole geometries admitting conformal motion in Einstein gravity, which presents a more systematic approach to search a relation between matter and geometry. In wormhole physics, the presence of exotic matter is a fundamental ingredient and we show that this exotic source can be dark energy type which support the existence of wormhole spacetimes. In this work we model a wormhole supported by dark energy which admits conformal motion. We also discuss the possibility of the detection of wormholes in the outer regions of galactic halos by means of gravitational lensing. Studies of the total gravitational energy for the exotic matter inside a static wormhole configuration are also performed. (orig.)

  20. Conformal Invariance, Dark Energy, and CMB Non-Gaussianity

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Mottola, Emil

    2012-01-01

    We show that in addition to simple scale invariance, a universe dominated by dark energy naturally gives rise to correlation functions possessing full conformal invariance. This is due to the mathematical isomorphism between the conformal group of certain three dimensional slices of de Sitter space and the de Sitter isometry group SO(4,1). In the standard homogeneous, isotropic cosmological model in which primordial density perturbations are generated during a long vacuum energy dominated de Sitter phase, the embedding of flat spatial R^3 sections in de Sitter space induces a conformal invariant perturbation spectrum and definite prediction for the shape of the non-Gaussian CMB bispectrum. In the case in which the density fluctuations are generated instead on the de Sitter horizon, conformal invariance of the S^2 horizon embedding implies a different but also quite definite prediction for the angular correlations of CMB non-Gaussianity on the sky. Each of these forms for the bispectrum is intrinsic to the sym...

  1. Particles and energy fluxes from a conformal field theory perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabbri, A.; Navarro-Salas, J.; Olmo, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    We analyze the creation of particles in two dimensions under the action of conformal transformations. We focus our attention on Mobius transformations and compare the usual approach, based on the Bogoliubov coefficients, with an alternative but equivalent viewpoint based on correlation functions. In the latter approach the absence of particle production under full Mobius transformations is manifest. Moreover, we give examples, using the moving-mirror analogy, to illustrate the close relation between the production of quanta and energy

  2. Vanillin and isovanillin: Comparative vibrational spectroscopic studies, conformational stability and NLO properties by density functional theory calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, V.; Parimala, K.

    This study is a comparative analysis of FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of vanillin (3-methoxy-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde) and isovanillin (3-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde). The molecular structure, vibrational wavenumbers, infrared intensities, Raman scattering activities were calculated for both molecules using the B3LYP density functional theory (DFT) with the standard 6-311++G∗∗ basis set. The computed values of frequencies are scaled using multiple scaling factors to yield good coherence with the observed values. The calculated harmonic vibrational frequencies are compared with experimental FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. The geometrical parameters and total energies of vanillin and isovanillin were obtained for all the eight conformers (a-h) from DFT/B3LYP method with 6-311++G∗∗ basis set. The computational results identified the most stable conformer of vanillin and isovanillin as in the "a" form. Non-linear properties such as electric dipole moment (μ), polarizability (α), and hyperpolarizability (β) values of the investigated molecules have been computed using B3LYP quantum chemical calculation. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that charge transfer occurs within the molecules.

  3. Energy flow in non-equilibrium conformal field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Denis; Doyon, Benjamin

    2012-09-01

    We study the energy current and its fluctuations in quantum gapless 1d systems far from equilibrium modeled by conformal field theory, where two separated halves are prepared at distinct temperatures and glued together at a point contact. We prove that these systems converge towards steady states, and give a general description of such non-equilibrium steady states in terms of quantum field theory data. We compute the large deviation function, also called the full counting statistics, of energy transfer through the contact. These are universal and satisfy fluctuation relations. We provide a simple representation of these quantum fluctuations in terms of classical Poisson processes whose intensities are proportional to Boltzmann weights.

  4. Spontaneous Broken Local Conformal Symmetry and Dark Energy Candidate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Lu-Xin

    2013-01-01

    The local conformal symmetry is spontaneously broken down to the Local Lorentz invariance symmetry through the approach of nonlinear realization. The resulting effective Lagrangian, in the unitary gauge, describes a cosmological vector field non-minimally coupling to the gravitational field. As a result of the Higgs mechanism, the vector field absorbs the dilaton and becomes massive, but with an independent energy scale. The Proca type vector field can be modelled as dark energy candidate. The possibility that it further triggers Lorentz symmetry violation is also pointed out

  5. Poly (3, 4-ethylendioxithiophene) (PEDOT) oxidation: activation energy and conformational energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otero, T F; Romero, M C

    2008-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of films of the conducting polymer PEDOT-C1O4 after electrochemical reduction by polarization at increasing cathodic potential was studied by potential steps. The response i/t presents a maximum at intermediate oxidation times. At the maximum the reaction occurs under chemical kinetic control following the expected current variations from the Chemical and Electrochemical Kinetics, when reactant concentrations or temperatures are changed. The obtained activation energy of the oxidation present two ranges as a function of the cathodic potential of prepolarization: constant values after prepolarization at low cathodic potentials and a lineal variation after prepolarization at increasing high cathodic potentials. According with the conformational relaxation model during electrochemical reduction the polymer shrinks, closes and packs the conformational structure. The activation energy for the subsequent oxidation includes two terms: the constant chemical activation energy and the conformational energy required to relax the packed polymeric structure. The conformational energy only appears after prepolarization at more cathodic potentials than the closing potential where more packed conformations were obtained. The conformational activation energy accounts the energetic requirements to relax and unfold the polymeric chains generating the required free volume to lodge balancing counterions; meanwhile the chemical activation energy accounts the energetic requirements for the electrochemical reaction to occur.

  6. Assignment of Side-Chain Conformation Using Adiabatic Energy Mapping, Free Energy Perturbation, and Molecular Dynamic Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimurer, Thomas M.; Günther, Peter H.; Sørensen, Morten Dahl

    1999-01-01

    adiabatic mapping, conformational change, essentialdynamics, free energy simulations, Kunitz type inhibitor *ga3(VI)......adiabatic mapping, conformational change, essentialdynamics, free energy simulations, Kunitz type inhibitor *ga3(VI)...

  7. How Many Conformations of Enzymes Should Be Sampled for DFT/MM Calculations? A Case Study of Fluoroacetate Dehalogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanwei Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM method (e.g., density functional theory (DFT/MM is important in elucidating enzymatic mechanisms. It is indispensable to study “multiple” conformations of enzymes to get unbiased energetic and structural results. One challenging problem, however, is to determine the minimum number of conformations for DFT/MM calculations. Here, we propose two convergence criteria, namely the Boltzmann-weighted average barrier and the disproportionate effect, to tentatively address this issue. The criteria were tested by defluorination reaction catalyzed by fluoroacetate dehalogenase. The results suggest that at least 20 conformations of enzymatic residues are required for convergence using DFT/MM calculations. We also tested the correlation of energy barriers between small QM regions and big QM regions. A roughly positive correlation was found. This kind of correlation has not been reported in the literature. The correlation inspires us to propose a protocol for more efficient sampling. This saves 50% of the computational cost in our current case.

  8. Energy Landscape of Pentapeptides in a Higher-Order (ϕ,ψ Conformational Subspace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim M. ElSawy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential energy landscape of pentapeptides was mapped in a collective coordinate principal conformational subspace derived from principal component analysis of a nonredundant representative set of protein structures from the PDB. Three pentapeptide sequences that are known to be distinct in terms of their secondary structure characteristics, (Ala5, (Gly5, and Val.Asn.Thr.Phe.Val, were considered. Partitioning the landscapes into different energy valleys allowed for calculation of the relative propensities of the peptide secondary structures in a statistical mechanical framework. The distribution of the observed conformations of pentapeptide data showed good correspondence to the topology of the energy landscape of the (Ala5 sequence where, in accord with reported trends, the α-helix showed a predominant propensity at 298 K. The topography of the landscapes indicates that the stabilization of the α-helix in the (Ala5 sequence is enthalpic in nature while entropic factors are important for stabilization of the β-sheet in the Val.Asn.Thr.Phe.Val sequence. The results indicate that local interactions within small pentapeptide segments can lead to conformational preference of one secondary structure over the other where account of conformational entropy is important in order to reveal such preference. The method, therefore, can provide critical structural information for ab initio protein folding methods.

  9. Narrowband NIR-Induced In Situ Generation of the High-Energy Trans Conformer of Trichloroacetic Acid Isolated in Solid Nitrogen and its Spontaneous Decay by Tunneling to the Low-Energy Cis Conformer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. F. G. Apóstolo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The monomeric form of trichloroacetic acid (CCl3COOH; TCA was isolated in a cryogenic nitrogen matrix (15 K and the higher energy trans conformer (O=C–O–H dihedral: 180° was generated in situ by narrowband near-infrared selective excitation the 1st OH stretching overtone of the low-energy cis conformer (O=C–O–H dihedral: 0°. The spontaneous decay, by tunneling, of the generated high-energy conformer into the cis form was then evaluated and compared with those observed previously for the trans conformers of acetic and formic acids in identical experimental conditions. The much faster decay of the high-energy conformer of TCA compared to both formic and acetic acids (by ~35 and ca. 25 times, respectively was found to correlate well with the lower energy barrier for the trans→cis isomerization in the studied compound. The experimental studies received support from quantum chemistry calculations undertaken at the DFT(B3LYP/cc-pVDZ level of approximation, which allowed a detailed characterization of the potential energy surface of the molecule and the detailed assignment of the infrared spectra of the two conformers.

  10. Independent dose calculation of the Tps Iplan in radiotherapy conformed with MLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adrada, A.; Tello, Z.; Medina, L.; Garrigo, E.; Venencia, D.

    2014-08-01

    The systems utilization of independent dose calculation in three dimensional-Conformal Radiation Therapy (3D-Crt) treatments allows a direct verification of the treatments times. The utilization of these systems allows diminishing the probability of errors occurrence generated by the treatment planning system (Tps), allowing a detailed analysis of the dose to delivering and review of the normalization point (Np) or prescription. The independent dose calculation is realized across the knowledge of dosimetric parameters of the treatment machine and particular characteristics of every individual field. The aim of this work is develops a calculation system of punctual doses for isocentric fields conformed with multi-leaf collimation systems (MLC), where the dose calculation is in conformity with the suggested ones by ICRU Report No. 42, 1987. Calculation software was realized in C ++ under a free platform of programming (Code::Blocks). The system uses files in format Rtp, exported from the Tps to systems of record and verification (Lantis). This file contains detailed information of the dose, Um, position of the MLC sheets and collimators for every field of treatment. The size of equivalent field is obtained from the positions of every sheet; the effective depth of calculation can be introduced from the dosimetric report of the Tps or automatically from the DFS of the field. The 3D coordinates of the isocenter and the Np for the treatment plan must be introduced manually. From this information the system looks the dosimetric parameters and calculates the Um. The calculations were realized in two accelerators a NOVALIS Tx (Varian) with 120 sheets of high definition (hd-MLC) and a PRIMUS Optifocus (Siemens) with 82 sheets. 705 patients were analyzed for a total of 1082, in plans made for both equipment s, the average uncertainty with regard to the calculation of the Tps is-0.43% ± 2.42% in a range between [-7.90 %, 7.50 %]. The major uncertainty was in Np near of the

  11. Conformational and structural analysis of 2-allyl-1,2-benzisothiazol-3(2 H)-one 1,1-dioxide as probed by matrix-isolation spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Zavaglia, Andrea; Kaczor, Agnieszka; Coelho, Daniela; Cristiano, M. Lurdes S.; Fausto, Rui

    2009-02-01

    2-Allyl-1,2-benzisothiazol-3(2 H)-one 1,1-dioxide (ABIOD) has been studied by matrix-isolation infrared spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. A conformational search on the B3LYP/6 -311++G(3df,3pd) potential energy surface of the molecule demonstrated the existence of three conformers, Sk, Sk' and C, with similar energies, differing in the orientation of the allyl group. The calculations predicted the Sk form as the most stable in the gaseous phase, whereas the Sk' and C conformers have calculated relative energies of ca. 0.6 and 0.8-3.0 kJ mol -1, respectively (depending on the level of theory). In agreement with the relatively large (>6 kJ mol -1) calculated barriers for conformational interconversion, the three conformers could be efficiently trapped in an argon matrix at 10 K, the experimental infrared spectrum of the as-deposited matrix fitting well the simulated spectrum built from the calculated spectra for individual conformers scaled by their predicted populations at the temperature of the vapour of the compound prior to matrix deposition. Upon annealing the matrix at 24 K, however, both Sk and Sk' conformers were found to convert to the more polar C conformer, indicating that this latter form becomes the most stable ABIOD conformer in the argon matrix.

  12. Thermodynamic calculation of a district energy cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoehlein, B.; Bauer, A.; Kraut, G.; Scherberich, F.D.

    1975-08-01

    This paper presents a calculation model for a nuclear district energy circuit. Such a circuit means the combination of a steam reforming plant with heat supply from a high-temperature nuclear reactor and a methanation plant with heat production for district heating or electricity production. The model comprises thermodynamic calculations for the endothermic methane reforming reaction as well as the exothermic CO-hydrogenation in adiabatic reactors and allows the optimization of the district energy circuit under consideration. (orig.) [de

  13. Study on fusion energy conformity with global environmental issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Kenichi

    1998-01-01

    Global environmental conformity has been one of the most important issues discussed recently as being required for all human activities. From this point of view, this report investigates whether nuclear fusion can be a benign energy source for the global environment. First of all, we chose the following global environmental problems: (1) Global warming, (2) Acid rain, (3) Ozonosphere destruction, (4) Air pollution, (5) Environmental hormones, (6) Radiation and radioactive materials, (7) Electromagnetic waves, and (8) Heat drainage from an energy source. Secondly, these problems were fully surveyed in terms of their relationships with proposed nuclear fusion power plant. Finally, as a result of this discussion, it was confirmed that a fusion power plant would not produce any new problems, but would partially contribute to solving some of the environmental problems. (author)

  14. Interaction of fisetin with human serum albumin by fluorescence, circular dichroism spectroscopy and DFT calculations: binding parameters and conformational changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matei, Iulia; Ionescu, Sorana; Hillebrand, Mihaela

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between fisetin, an antioxidant and neuroprotective flavonoid, and human serum albumin (HSA) is investigated by means of fluorescence (steady-state, synchronous, time-resolved) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The formation of a 1:1 complex with a constant of about 10 5 M -1 was evidenced. Foerster's resonance energy transfer and competitive binding with site markers warfarin and ibuprofen were considered and discussed. Changes in the CD band of HSA indicate a decrease in the α-helix content upon binding. An induced CD signal for bound fisetin was observed and rationalized in terms of density functional theory calculations. - Highlights: → Fisetin-BSA system was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy. → Binding parameters, association constant and number of sites were estimated. → Binding site of fisetin was identified by competitive experiments. → Conformational changes in HSA and fisetin were evidenced by circular dichroism. → TDDFT calculated CD spectra supported the experimental data.

  15. Interaction of fisetin with human serum albumin by fluorescence, circular dichroism spectroscopy and DFT calculations: binding parameters and conformational changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matei, Iulia; Ionescu, Sorana [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Bucharest, Bd. Regina Elisabeta 4-12, 030018 Bucharest (Romania); Hillebrand, Mihaela, E-mail: mihh@gw-chimie.math.unibuc.ro [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Bucharest, Bd. Regina Elisabeta 4-12, 030018 Bucharest (Romania)

    2011-08-15

    The interaction between fisetin, an antioxidant and neuroprotective flavonoid, and human serum albumin (HSA) is investigated by means of fluorescence (steady-state, synchronous, time-resolved) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The formation of a 1:1 complex with a constant of about 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} was evidenced. Foerster's resonance energy transfer and competitive binding with site markers warfarin and ibuprofen were considered and discussed. Changes in the CD band of HSA indicate a decrease in the {alpha}-helix content upon binding. An induced CD signal for bound fisetin was observed and rationalized in terms of density functional theory calculations. - Highlights: > Fisetin-BSA system was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy. > Binding parameters, association constant and number of sites were estimated. > Binding site of fisetin was identified by competitive experiments. > Conformational changes in HSA and fisetin were evidenced by circular dichroism. > TDDFT calculated CD spectra supported the experimental data.

  16. Loss of conformational entropy in protein folding calculated using realistic ensembles and its implications for NMR-based calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxa, Michael C.; Haddadian, Esmael J.; Jumper, John M.; Freed, Karl F.; Sosnick, Tobin R.

    2014-01-01

    The loss of conformational entropy is a major contribution in the thermodynamics of protein folding. However, accurate determination of the quantity has proven challenging. We calculate this loss using molecular dynamic simulations of both the native protein and a realistic denatured state ensemble. For ubiquitin, the total change in entropy is TΔSTotal = 1.4 kcal⋅mol−1 per residue at 300 K with only 20% from the loss of side-chain entropy. Our analysis exhibits mixed agreement with prior studies because of the use of more accurate ensembles and contributions from correlated motions. Buried side chains lose only a factor of 1.4 in the number of conformations available per rotamer upon folding (ΩU/ΩN). The entropy loss for helical and sheet residues differs due to the smaller motions of helical residues (TΔShelix−sheet = 0.5 kcal⋅mol−1), a property not fully reflected in the amide N-H and carbonyl C=O bond NMR order parameters. The results have implications for the thermodynamics of folding and binding, including estimates of solvent ordering and microscopic entropies obtained from NMR. PMID:25313044

  17. SAMPL5: 3D-RISM partition coefficient calculations with partial molar volume corrections and solute conformational sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchko, Tyler; Blinov, Nikolay; Limon, Garrett C; Joyce, Kevin P; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2016-11-01

    Implicit solvent methods for classical molecular modeling are frequently used to provide fast, physics-based hydration free energies of macromolecules. Less commonly considered is the transferability of these methods to other solvents. The Statistical Assessment of Modeling of Proteins and Ligands 5 (SAMPL5) distribution coefficient dataset and the accompanying explicit solvent partition coefficient reference calculations provide a direct test of solvent model transferability. Here we use the 3D reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) statistical-mechanical solvation theory, with a well tested water model and a new united atom cyclohexane model, to calculate partition coefficients for the SAMPL5 dataset. The cyclohexane model performed well in training and testing ([Formula: see text] for amino acid neutral side chain analogues) but only if a parameterized solvation free energy correction was used. In contrast, the same protocol, using single solute conformations, performed poorly on the SAMPL5 dataset, obtaining [Formula: see text] compared to the reference partition coefficients, likely due to the much larger solute sizes. Including solute conformational sampling through molecular dynamics coupled with 3D-RISM (MD/3D-RISM) improved agreement with the reference calculation to [Formula: see text]. Since our initial calculations only considered partition coefficients and not distribution coefficients, solute sampling provided little benefit comparing against experiment, where ionized and tautomer states are more important. Applying a simple [Formula: see text] correction improved agreement with experiment from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text], despite a small number of outliers. Better agreement is possible by accounting for tautomers and improving the ionization correction.

  18. SAMPL5: 3D-RISM partition coefficient calculations with partial molar volume corrections and solute conformational sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchko, Tyler; Blinov, Nikolay; Limon, Garrett C.; Joyce, Kevin P.; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2016-11-01

    Implicit solvent methods for classical molecular modeling are frequently used to provide fast, physics-based hydration free energies of macromolecules. Less commonly considered is the transferability of these methods to other solvents. The Statistical Assessment of Modeling of Proteins and Ligands 5 (SAMPL5) distribution coefficient dataset and the accompanying explicit solvent partition coefficient reference calculations provide a direct test of solvent model transferability. Here we use the 3D reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) statistical-mechanical solvation theory, with a well tested water model and a new united atom cyclohexane model, to calculate partition coefficients for the SAMPL5 dataset. The cyclohexane model performed well in training and testing (R=0.98 for amino acid neutral side chain analogues) but only if a parameterized solvation free energy correction was used. In contrast, the same protocol, using single solute conformations, performed poorly on the SAMPL5 dataset, obtaining R=0.73 compared to the reference partition coefficients, likely due to the much larger solute sizes. Including solute conformational sampling through molecular dynamics coupled with 3D-RISM (MD/3D-RISM) improved agreement with the reference calculation to R=0.93. Since our initial calculations only considered partition coefficients and not distribution coefficients, solute sampling provided little benefit comparing against experiment, where ionized and tautomer states are more important. Applying a simple pK_{ {a}} correction improved agreement with experiment from R=0.54 to R=0.66, despite a small number of outliers. Better agreement is possible by accounting for tautomers and improving the ionization correction.

  19. Good Practices in Free-energy Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Jarzynski, Christopher; Chipot, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    As access to computational resources continues to increase, free-energy calculations have emerged as a powerful tool that can play a predictive role in drug design. Yet, in a number of instances, the reliability of these calculations can be improved significantly if a number of precepts, or good practices are followed. For the most part, the theory upon which these good practices rely has been known for many years, but often overlooked, or simply ignored. In other cases, the theoretical developments are too recent for their potential to be fully grasped and merged into popular platforms for the computation of free-energy differences. The current best practices for carrying out free-energy calculations will be reviewed demonstrating that, at little to no additional cost, free-energy estimates could be markedly improved and bounded by meaningful error estimates. In energy perturbation and nonequilibrium work methods, monitoring the probability distributions that underlie the transformation between the states of interest, performing the calculation bidirectionally, stratifying the reaction pathway and choosing the most appropriate paradigms and algorithms for transforming between states offer significant gains in both accuracy and precision. In thermodynamic integration and probability distribution (histogramming) methods, properly designed adaptive techniques yield nearly uniform sampling of the relevant degrees of freedom and, by doing so, could markedly improve efficiency and accuracy of free energy calculations without incurring any additional computational expense.

  20. Binary cluster collision dynamics and minimum energy conformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muñoz, Francisco [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany); Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y Nanotecnología, CEDENNA, Avenida Ecuador 3493, Santiago (Chile); Rogan, José; Valdivia, J.A. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y Nanotecnología, CEDENNA, Avenida Ecuador 3493, Santiago (Chile); Varas, A. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Nano-Bio Spectroscopy Group, ETSF Scientific Development Centre, Departamento de Física de Materiales, Universidad del País Vasco UPV/EHU, Av. Tolosa 72, E-20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Kiwi, Miguel, E-mail: m.kiwi.t@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y Nanotecnología, CEDENNA, Avenida Ecuador 3493, Santiago (Chile)

    2013-10-15

    The collision dynamics of one Ag or Cu atom impinging on a Au{sub 12} cluster is investigated by means of DFT molecular dynamics. Our results show that the experimentally confirmed 2D to 3D transition of Au{sub 12}→Au{sub 13} is mostly preserved by the resulting planar Au{sub 12}Ag and Au{sub 12}Cu minimum energy clusters, which is quite remarkable in view of the excess energy, well larger than the 2D–3D potential barrier height. The process is accompanied by a large s−d hybridization and charge transfer from Au to Ag or Cu. The dynamics of the collision process mainly yields fusion of projectile and target, however scattering and cluster fragmentation also occur for large energies and large impact parameters. While Ag projectiles favor fragmentation, Cu favors scattering due to its smaller mass. The projectile size does not play a major role in favoring the fragmentation or scattering channels. By comparing our collision results with those obtained by an unbiased minimum energy search of 4483 Au{sub 12}Ag and 4483 Au{sub 12}Cu configurations obtained phenomenologically, we find that there is an extra bonus: without increase of computer time collisions yield the planar lower energy structures that are not feasible to obtain using semi-classical potentials. In fact, we conclude that phenomenological potentials do not even provide adequate seeds for the search of global energy minima for planar structures. Since the fabrication of nanoclusters is mainly achieved by synthesis or laser ablation, the set of local minima configurations we provide here, and their distribution as a function of energy, are more relevant than the global minimum to analyze experimental results obtained at finite temperatures, and is consistent with the dynamical coexistence of 2D and 3D liquid Au clusters conformations obtained previously.

  1. The free energy profile of tubulin straight-bent conformational changes, with implications for microtubule assembly and drug discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili X Peng

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available αβ-tubulin dimers need to convert between a 'bent' conformation observed for free dimers in solution and a 'straight' conformation required for incorporation into the microtubule lattice. Here, we investigate the free energy landscape of αβ-tubulin using molecular dynamics simulations, emphasizing implications for models of assembly, and modulation of the conformational landscape by colchicine, a tubulin-binding drug that inhibits microtubule polymerization. Specifically, we performed molecular dynamics, potential-of-mean force simulations to obtain the free energy profile for unpolymerized GDP-bound tubulin as a function of the ∼12° intradimer rotation differentiating the straight and bent conformers. Our results predict that the unassembled GDP-tubulin heterodimer exists in a continuum of conformations ranging between straight and bent, but, in agreement with existing structural data, suggests that an intermediate bent state has a lower free energy (by ∼1 kcal/mol and thus dominates in solution. In agreement with predictions of the lattice model of microtubule assembly, lateral binding of two αβ-tubulins strongly shifts the conformational equilibrium towards the straight state, which is then ∼1 kcal/mol lower in free energy than the bent state. Finally, calculations of colchicine binding to a single αβ-tubulin dimer strongly shifts the equilibrium toward the bent states, and disfavors the straight state to the extent that it is no longer thermodynamically populated.

  2. Calculations of energy consumption in ventilation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreslins, Andris; Ramata, Anna [Riga Technical University (Latvia)], e-mail: kreslins@rbf.rtu.lv, email: Anna.Ramata@rtu.lv

    2011-07-01

    Energy cost is an important economic factor in the food industry production process. With the rising price of energy, a reduction in energy consumption would greatly impact production and the end product. The aim of this study was to develop a methodology for optimizing energy consumption. A comparison between a traditional ventilation system and a mechanical system was carried out; the necessary enthalpy for heating the air supply and thermal energy consumption were calculated and compared for both systems during the heating season, from October to April, using climatological data for Latvia. Results showed that energy savings of 46% to 87% can be achieved by applying the methodology in the design of industrial buildings; in addition, a well-designed ventilation system increases the workers' productivity. This study presented a methodology which can optimize energy consumption in the food industry sector.

  3. Multicavity SCRF calculation of ion hydration energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diercksen, B.H.F.; Karelson, M.; Tamm, T.

    1994-01-01

    The hydration energies of the proton, hydroxyl ion, and several inorganic ions were calculated using the multicavity self-consistent reaction field (MCa SCRF) method developed for the quantum-mechanical modeling of rotationally or flexible systems in dielectric media. The ionic complexes H 3 O + (H2O) 4 , OH - (H2O) 4 , NH + 4 (H2O) 4 , and Hal - (H2O) 4 , where Hal = F, Cl, or Br, have been studied. Each complex was divided between five spheres, corresponding to the central ion and four water molecules in their first coordination sphere, respectively. Each cavity was surrounded by a polarizable medium with the dielectric permittivity of water at room temperature (80). The ionic hydration energies of ions were divided into specific and nonspecific parts. After accounting for the cavity-formation energy using scaled particle theory, good agreement between the total calculated and experimental hydration energies was obtained for all ions studied

  4. Spectroscopic and DFT studies of calix[4]arene: time-dependent DFT calculations for elucidating the variation in the excitation energies with geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boo, Bong Hyun; Kwak, Hae Ran; Hong, Seung Ki [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chan Jo [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); No, Kwang Hyun [Sookmyung Womens University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    We have searched low-lying conformers of calix[4]arene and found one global minimum having a cone shape, together with three conformers such as partial cone-shape conformers. We then elucidated the thermodynamics for the conformational changes by performing density-functional theory (DFT) calculations. The time-dependent DFT calculation enabled us to assign the absorption spectrum and to reveal a variation of the excitation energies with geometry.

  5. Calculating Free Energies Using Average Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darve, Eric; Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A new, general formula that connects the derivatives of the free energy along the selected, generalized coordinates of the system with the instantaneous force acting on these coordinates is derived. The instantaneous force is defined as the force acting on the coordinate of interest so that when it is subtracted from the equations of motion the acceleration along this coordinate is zero. The formula applies to simulations in which the selected coordinates are either unconstrained or constrained to fixed values. It is shown that in the latter case the formula reduces to the expression previously derived by den Otter and Briels. If simulations are carried out without constraining the coordinates of interest, the formula leads to a new method for calculating the free energy changes along these coordinates. This method is tested in two examples - rotation around the C-C bond of 1,2-dichloroethane immersed in water and transfer of fluoromethane across the water-hexane interface. The calculated free energies are compared with those obtained by two commonly used methods. One of them relies on determining the probability density function of finding the system at different values of the selected coordinate and the other requires calculating the average force at discrete locations along this coordinate in a series of constrained simulations. The free energies calculated by these three methods are in excellent agreement. The relative advantages of each method are discussed.

  6. Total energy calculations and bonding at interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louie, S.G.

    1984-08-01

    Some of the concepts and theoretical techniques employed in recent ab initio studies of the electronic and structural properties of surfaces and interfaces are discussed. Results of total energy calculations for the 2 x 1 reconstructed diamond (111) surface and for stacking faults in Si are reviewed. 30 refs., 8 figs

  7. Experimental verification of stored energy calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hann, C.R.; Christensen, J.A.; Lanning, D.D.; Marshall, R.K.; Williford, R.E.

    1975-01-01

    A description is provided of irradiation tests designed to provide data needed to verify existing steady state fuel performance codes. The tests are being conducted in the Halden Reactor, and are designed to provide data pertinent to stored energy calculations over a range of linear heat ratings utilized in contemporary power reactors

  8. Total energy calculations for structural phase transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Y.Y.; Chan, C.T.; Ho, K.M.; Harmon, B.N.

    1990-01-01

    The structural integrity and physical properties of crystalline solids are frequently limited or enhanced by the occurrence of phase transformations. Martensitic transformations involve the collective displacement of atoms from one ordered state to another. Modern methods to determine the microscopic electronic changes as the atoms move are now accurate enough to evaluate the very small energy differences involved. Extensive first principles calculations for the prototypical martensitic transformation from body-centered cubic (bcc) to closepacked 9R structure in sodium metal are described. The minimum energy coordinate or configuration path between the bcc and 9R structures is determined as well as paths to other competing close-packed structures. The energy barriers and important anharmonic interactions are identified and general conclusions drawn. The calculational methods used to solve the Schrodinger equation include pseudopotentials, fast Fourier transforms, efficient matrix diagnonalization, and supercells with many atoms

  9. Computing conformational free energy differences in explicit solvent: An efficient thermodynamic cycle using an auxiliary potential and a free energy functional constructed from the end points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Robert C; Deng, Nanjie; Levy, Ronald M; Ishizuka, Ryosuke; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki

    2017-06-05

    Many biomolecules undergo conformational changes associated with allostery or ligand binding. Observing these changes in computer simulations is difficult if their timescales are long. These calculations can be accelerated by observing the transition on an auxiliary free energy surface with a simpler Hamiltonian and connecting this free energy surface to the target free energy surface with free energy calculations. Here, we show that the free energy legs of the cycle can be replaced with energy representation (ER) density functional approximations. We compute: (1) The conformational free energy changes for alanine dipeptide transitioning from the right-handed free energy basin to the left-handed basin and (2) the free energy difference between the open and closed conformations of β-cyclodextrin, a "host" molecule that serves as a model for molecular recognition in host-guest binding. β-cyclodextrin contains 147 atoms compared to 22 atoms for alanine dipeptide, making β-cyclodextrin a large molecule for which to compute solvation free energies by free energy perturbation or integration methods and the largest system for which the ER method has been compared to exact free energy methods. The ER method replaced the 28 simulations to compute each coupling free energy with two endpoint simulations, reducing the computational time for the alanine dipeptide calculation by about 70% and for the β-cyclodextrin by > 95%. The method works even when the distribution of conformations on the auxiliary free energy surface differs substantially from that on the target free energy surface, although some degree of overlap between the two surfaces is required. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Incorporation of protein flexibility and conformational energy penalties in docking screens to improve ligand discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Marcus; Coleman, Ryan G.; Fraser, James S.; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2014-07-01

    Proteins fluctuate between alternative conformations, which presents a challenge for ligand discovery because such flexibility is difficult to treat computationally owing to problems with conformational sampling and energy weighting. Here we describe a flexible docking method that samples and weights protein conformations using experimentally derived conformations as a guide. The crystallographically refined occupancies of these conformations, which are observable in an apo receptor structure, define energy penalties for docking. In a large prospective library screen, we identified new ligands that target specific receptor conformations of a cavity in cytochrome c peroxidase, and we confirm both ligand pose and associated receptor conformation predictions by crystallography. The inclusion of receptor flexibility led to ligands with new chemotypes and physical properties. By exploiting experimental measures of loop and side-chain flexibility, this method can be extended to the discovery of new ligands for hundreds of targets in the Protein Data Bank for which similar experimental information is available.

  11. Semiempirical and ab initio calculations versus dynamic NMR on conformational analysis of cyclohexyl-N,N-dimethylcarbamate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basso Ernani A.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Axial-equatorial conformational proportions for cyclohexyl-N,N-dimethyl carbamate have been measured, for the first time, by the Eliel method, ¹H and 13C dynamic nuclear magnetic resonance (DNMR. The results were compared against those determined by theoretical calculations. By the Eliel method at least five experimentally independent measureables were used in CCl4, CDCl3 and CD3CN. The ¹H and 13C low temperature experiments were performed in CF2Br2/CD2Cl2 . Semiempirical methods MNDO, AM1 and PM3 and ab initio molecular orbital calculations at the HF/STO-3G and HF/6-31G(d,p levels have been performed on the axial and equatorial conformers populations. All applied methods correctly predict the equatorial conformer preference over the axial one. The resulting equatorial preferences determined by NMR data and theoretical calculations are in good agreement.

  12. Connecting free energy surfaces in implicit and explicit solvent: an efficient method to compute conformational and solvation free energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Nanjie; Zhang, Bin W; Levy, Ronald M

    2015-06-09

    The ability to accurately model solvent effects on free energy surfaces is important for understanding many biophysical processes including protein folding and misfolding, allosteric transitions, and protein–ligand binding. Although all-atom simulations in explicit solvent can provide an accurate model for biomolecules in solution, explicit solvent simulations are hampered by the slow equilibration on rugged landscapes containing multiple basins separated by barriers. In many cases, implicit solvent models can be used to significantly speed up the conformational sampling; however, implicit solvent simulations do not fully capture the effects of a molecular solvent, and this can lead to loss of accuracy in the estimated free energies. Here we introduce a new approach to compute free energy changes in which the molecular details of explicit solvent simulations are retained while also taking advantage of the speed of the implicit solvent simulations. In this approach, the slow equilibration in explicit solvent, due to the long waiting times before barrier crossing, is avoided by using a thermodynamic cycle which connects the free energy basins in implicit solvent and explicit solvent using a localized decoupling scheme. We test this method by computing conformational free energy differences and solvation free energies of the model system alanine dipeptide in water. The free energy changes between basins in explicit solvent calculated using fully explicit solvent paths agree with the corresponding free energy differences obtained using the implicit/explicit thermodynamic cycle to within 0.3 kcal/mol out of ∼3 kcal/mol at only ∼8% of the computational cost. We note that WHAM methods can be used to further improve the efficiency and accuracy of the implicit/explicit thermodynamic cycle.

  13. First calculation of the deuteron binding energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaegger, B.

    2012-01-01

    No universal constant characterizing the nuclear force has yet been found as for gravity and electromagnetism. The neutron is globally neutral with a zero net charge. The charges contained in a neutron may be separated by the electric field of a nearby proton and therefore being attracted by electrostatic induction in the same way as a rubbed plastic pen attracts small pieces of paper. There is also a magnetic force that may repel the nucleons like magnets in the proper relative orientation. In the deuteron, the heavy hydrogen nucleus, the induced electrostatic attraction is equilibrated by the magnetic repulsion between the opposite and colinear moments of the nucleons. Equilibrium is calculated by minimizing the electromagnetic interaction potential, giving a binding energy of 1.6 MeV, not much lower than the experimental value, 2.2 MeV. No fitting parameter is used: it is a true ab initio calculation

  14. Total energy calculations from self-energy models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Friera, P.

    2001-06-01

    Density-functional theory is a powerful method to calculate total energies of large systems of interacting electrons. The usefulness of this method, however, is limited by the fact that an approximation is required for the exchange-correlation energy. Currently used approximations (LDA and GGA) are not sufficiently accurate in many physical problems, as for instance the study of chemical reactions. It has been shown that exchange-correlation effects can be accurately described via the self-energy operator in the context of many-body perturbation theory. This is, however, a computationally very demanding approach. In this thesis a new scheme for calculating total energies is proposed, which combines elements from many-body perturbation theory and density-functional theory. The exchange-correlation energy functional is built from a simplified model of the self-energy, that nevertheless retains the main features of the exact operator. The model is built in such way that the computational effort is not significantly increased with respect to that required in a typical density-functional theory calculation. (author)

  15. CONFORMATIONAL SEARCH BY POTENTIAL-ENERGY ANNEALING - ALGORITHM AND APPLICATION TO CYCLOSPORINE-A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANSCHAIK, RC; VANGUNSTEREN, WF; BERENDSEN, HJC

    A major problem in modelling (biological) macromolecules is the search for low-energy conformations. The complexity of a conformational search problem increases exponentially with the number of degrees of freedom which means that a systematic search can only be performed for very small structures.

  16. Microscopic calculations of λ single particle energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usmani, Q. N.

    1998-01-01

    Λ binding energy data for total baryon number A ≤ 208 and for Λ angular momenta ell Λ ≤ 3 are analyzed in terms of phenomenological (but generally consistent with meson-exchange) ΛN and ΛNN potentials. The Fermi-Hypernetted-Chain technique is used to calculate the expectation values for the Λ binding to nuclear matter. Accurate effective ΛN and ΛNN potentials are obtained which are folded with the core nucleus nucleon densities to calculate the Λ single particle potential U Λ (r). We use a dispersive ΛNN potential but also include an explicit ρ dependence to allow for reduced repulsion in the surface, and the best fits have a large ρ dependence giving consistency with the variational Monte Carlo calculations for Λ 5 He. The exchange fraction of the ΛN space-exchange potential is found to be 0.2-0.3 corresponding to m Λ * ≅ (0.74-0.82)m Λ . Charge symmetry breaking is found to be significant for heavy hypernuclei with a large neutron excess, with a strength consistent with that obtained from the A = 4 hypernuclei

  17. Calculation of the effective chemical shielding anisotropy in L-alanyl-L-alanine, conformational and charge dependence study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Benda, Ladislav; Bouř, Petr; Buděšínský, Miloš; Müller, N.; Sychrovský, Vladimír

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 1 (2007), s. 31-31 ISSN 1211-5894. [Discussions in Structural Molecular Biology /6./. 29.03.2007-31.03.2007, Nové Hrady] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : NMR cross-correlated relaxations * peptide conformation * ab-initio calculations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  18. Ab initio calculations of the structure and conformations of 2,6-lutidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porcinai, S.; Foggi, P.

    1997-01-01

    Ab initio molecular orbital calculations at the SCF level have been utilized to determine the structure and the electronic and vibrational properties of 2,6-lutidine (2,6-dimethyl-pyridine) in the ground electronic state. Comparative calculations have been performed on the parent molecule pyridine. Structure predictions of both molecules are in good agreement with experimental data. The most stable rotamer of 2,6-lutidine has C 2v symmetry with one of the C-H bonds of both the methyl groups lying in the plane of the aromatic ring and pointing in the opposite direction with respect to the nitrogen atom. This is the result of the minimization of competing forces deriving from steric hindrance and electronic stabilization. Vibrational frequencies and oscillator strengths of C-H stretching in the fundamental region have been calculated for both pyridine and the most stable rotamer of 2,6-lutidine and compared to IR data obtained in pure liquids. The potential energy profile of the C-H bond in and out of plane has been investigated up to five times the equilibrium distance. The trend of the potential curves confirms that the C-H bond lying in the plane has a higher dissociation energy than that of the in-plane bonds as observed in experiments on vibrational overtones

  19. Rotational Spectrum, Conformational Composition, and Quantum Chemical Calculations of Cyanomethyl Formate (HC(O)OCH2C≡N), a Compound of Potential Astrochemical Interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samdal, Svein; Møllendal, Harald; Carles, Sophie

    2015-08-27

    The rotational spectrum of cyanomethyl formate (HC(O)OCH2C≡N) has been recorded in the 12–123 GHz spectral range. The spectra of two conformers were assigned. The rotamer denoted I has a symmetry plane and two out-of plane hydrogen atoms belonging to the cyanomethyl (CH2CN) moiety. In the conformer called II, the cyanomethyl group is rotated 80.3° out of this plane. Conformer I has an energy that is 1.4(6) kJ/mol lower than the energy of II according to relative intensity measurements. A large number of rotational transitions have been assigned for the ground and vibrationally excited states of the two conformers and accurate spectroscopic constants have been obtained. These constants should predict frequencies of transitions outside the investigated spectral range with a very high degree of precision. It is suggested that cyanomethyl formate is a potential interstellar compound. This suggestion is based on the fact that its congener methyl formate (HC(O)OCH3) exists across a large variety of interstellar environments and the fact that cyanides are very prevalent in the Universe. The experimental work has been augmented by high-level quantum chemical calculations. The CCSD/cc-pVQZ calculations are found to predict structures of the two forms that are very close to the Born–Oppenheimer equilibrium structures. MP2/cc-pVTZ predictions of several vibration–rotation interaction constants were generally found to be rather inaccurate. A gas-phase reaction between methyl formate and the cyanomethyl radical CH2CN to produce a hydrogen atom and cyanomethyl formate was mimicked using MP2/cc-pVTZ calculations. It was found that this reaction is not favored thermodynamically. It is also conjectured that the possible formation of cyanomethyl formate might be catalyzed and take place on interstellar particles.

  20. Free-Energy Calculations. A Mathematical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    conductance, defined as the ratio of ionic current through the channel to applied voltage, can be calculated in MD simulations by way of applying an external electric field to the system and counting the number of ions that traverse the channel per unit time. If the current is small, a voltage significantly higher than the experimental one needs to be applied to collect sufficient statistics of ion crossing events. Then, the calculated conductance has to be extrapolated to the experimental voltage using procedures of unknown accuracy. Instead, we propose an alternative approach that applies if ion transport through channels can be described with sufficient accuracy by the one-dimensional diffusion equation in the potential given by the free energy profile and applied voltage. Then, it is possible to test the assumptions of the equation, recover the full voltage/current dependence, determine the reliability of the calculated conductance and reconstruct the underlying (equilibrium) free energy profile, all from MD simulations at a single voltage. We will present the underlying theory, model calculations that test this theory and simulations on ion conductance through a channel that has been extensively studied experimentally. To our knowledge this is the first case in which the complete, experimentally measured dependence of the current on applied voltage has been reconstructed from MD simulations.

  1. Conformational locking by design: relating strain energy with luminescence and stability in rigid metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shustova, Natalia B; Cozzolino, Anthony F; Dincă, Mircea

    2012-12-05

    Minimization of the torsional barrier for phenyl ring flipping in a metal-organic framework (MOF) based on the new ethynyl-extended octacarboxylate ligand H(8)TDPEPE leads to a fluorescent material with a near-dark state. Immobilization of the ligand in the rigid structure also unexpectedly causes significant strain. We used DFT calculations to estimate the ligand strain energies in our and all other topologically related materials and correlated these with empirical structural descriptors to derive general rules for trapping molecules in high-energy conformations within MOFs. These studies portend possible applications of MOFs for studying fundamental concepts related to conformational locking and its effects on molecular reactivity and chromophore photophysics.

  2. Calculations of nuclear energies using the energy density formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pu, W.W.T.

    1975-01-01

    The energy density formalism (EDF) is used to investigate two problems. In this formalism the energy of the nucleus is expressed as a functional of its density. The nucleus energy is obtained by minimizing the functional with respect to the density. The first problem has to do with the stability of nuclei having shapes of different degrees of central depression (bubble shapes). It is shown that the bubble shapes are energetically favorable only for unrealistically large nuclei. Particularly, the super heavy nucleus that has been suggested (Z = 114, N = 184) prefers a shape with constant central density. These results are in good agreement with earlier calculations using the liquid drop model. The second problem concerns an anomaly detected experimentally in the isotope shift of mercury. The isotope shifts among a long chain of mercury isotopes show a sudden change as the neutron number is reduced. In particular, the experimental result suggests that the effective size of the charge distributions of 183 Hg and 185 Hg are as large as that of 196 Hg. Such sudden changes in other nuclei have been attributed to a sudden onset of permanent quadruple deformation. In the case of mercury there is no experimental evidence for deformed shapes. It was, therefore, suggested that the proton distribution might develop a central depression in the lighter isotopes. The EDF is used to investigate the mercury isotope shift anomaly following the aforementioned suggestion. Specifically, nucleon densities with different degrees of central depression are generated. Energies corresponding to these densities are obtained. To allow for shell effects, nucleon densities are obtained from single-particle wave functions. Calculations are made for a few mercury isotopes, especially for 184 Hg. The results are that in all cases the energy is lower for densities corresponding to a solid spherical shape

  3. Conformational Control of Energy Transfer: A Mechanism for Biocompatible Nanocrystal-Based Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Kay, Euan R.; Lee, Jungmin; Nocera, Daniel; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2012-01-01

    Fold-up fluorophore: A new paradigm for designing self-referencing fluorescent nanosensors is demonstrated by interfacing a pH-triggered molecular conformational switch with quantum dots. Analytedependent, large-amplitude conformational motion controls the distance between the nanocrystal energy donor and an organic FRET acceptor. The result is a fluorescence signal capable of reporting pH values from individual endosomes in living cells.

  4. Danish Sector Guide for Calculation of the Actual Energy Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Lone Hedegaard

    2016-01-01

    , the innovation network for sustainable construction, InnoBYG started work on a Danish sector guide for the calculation of actual energy consumption in relation to upgrading of buildings. The focus was to make a common guide for energy calculations that can be used by consultants performing calculations...... consumption compared with the estimated energy demand by calculation. The paper concludes that the result of an energy calculation should not be given as a single figure but rather as a spread between the best and worst case for the assumed conditions. Finally, a brief update on current actions is given...... related to the sector guide for calculation of actual energy consumption. Keywords – Energy calculations, actual energy consumption, energy perfomance...

  5. Structure-activity relationships of pyrethroid insecticides. Part 2. The use of molecular dynamics for conformation searching and average parameter calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Brian D.; George, Ashley R.; Ford, Martyn G.; Livingstone, David J.

    1992-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on a number of conformationally flexible pyrethroid insecticides. The results indicate that molecular dynamics is a suitable tool for conformational searching of small molecules given suitable simulation parameters. The structures derived from the simulations are compared with the static conformation used in a previous study. Various physicochemical parameters have been calculated for a set of conformations selected from the simulations using multivariate analysis. The averaged values of the parameters over the selected set (and the factors derived from them) are compared with the single conformation values used in the previous study.

  6. Measurement of conformability and adhesion energy of polymeric ultrathin film to skin model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugano, Junki; Fujie, Toshinori; Iwata, Hiroyasu; Iwase, Eiji

    2018-06-01

    We measured the conformability and adhesion energy of a polymeric ultrathin film “nanosheet” with hundreds of nanometer thickness to a skin model with epidermal depressions. To compare the confirmability of the nanosheets with different thicknesses and/or under different attaching conditions, we proposed a measurement method using skin models with the same surface profile and defined the surface strain εS as the quantified value of the conformability. Then, we measured the adhesion energy of the nanosheet at each conformability through a vertical tensile test. Experimental results indicate that the adhesion energy does not depend on the liquid used in wetting the nanosheet before attaching to the skin model and increases monotonously as the surface strain εS increases.

  7. Energy levels and quantum states of [Leu]enkephalin conformations based on theoretical and experimental investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdali, Salim; Jensen, Morten Østergaard; Bohr, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a theoretical and experimental study of [Leu]enkephalin conformations with respect to the quantum estates of the atomic structure of the peptide. Results from vibrational absorption measurements and quantum calculations are used to outline a quantum picture and to assign vibr...

  8. Energy conditions of non-singular black hole spacetimes in conformal gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toshmatov, Bobir [Silesian University in Opava, Faculty of Philosophy and Science, Institute of Physics, Opava (Czech Republic); Ulugh Beg Astronomical Institute, Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Bambi, Cosimo [Fudan University, Department of Physics, Center for Field Theory and Particle Physics, Shanghai (China); Eberhard-Karls Universitaet Tuebingen, Theoretical Astrophysics, Tuebingen (Germany); Ahmedov, Bobomurat [Ulugh Beg Astronomical Institute, Tashkent (Uzbekistan); National University of Uzbekistan, Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Abdujabbarov, Ahmadjon [Ulugh Beg Astronomical Institute, Tashkent (Uzbekistan); National University of Uzbekistan, Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Tashkent University of Information Technologies, Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Stuchlik, Zdenek [Silesian University in Opava, Faculty of Philosophy and Science, Institute of Physics, Opava (Czech Republic)

    2017-08-15

    Conformal gravity can elegantly solve the problem of spacetime singularities present in Einstein's gravity. For every physical spacetime, there is an infinite family of conformally equivalent singularity-free metrics. In the unbroken phase, every non-singular metric is equivalent and can be used to infer the physical properties of the spacetime. In the broken phase, a Higgs-like mechanism should select a certain vacuum, which thus becomes the physical one. However, in the absence of the complete theoretical framework we do not know how to select the right vacuum. In this paper, we study the energy conditions of non-singular black hole spacetimes obtained in conformal gravity assuming they are solutions of Einstein's gravity with an effective energy-momentum tensor. We check whether such conditions can be helpful to select the vacuum of the broken phase. (orig.)

  9. Energy conditions of non-singular black hole spacetimes in conformal gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toshmatov, Bobir; Bambi, Cosimo; Ahmedov, Bobomurat; Abdujabbarov, Ahmadjon; Stuchlik, Zdenek

    2017-01-01

    Conformal gravity can elegantly solve the problem of spacetime singularities present in Einstein's gravity. For every physical spacetime, there is an infinite family of conformally equivalent singularity-free metrics. In the unbroken phase, every non-singular metric is equivalent and can be used to infer the physical properties of the spacetime. In the broken phase, a Higgs-like mechanism should select a certain vacuum, which thus becomes the physical one. However, in the absence of the complete theoretical framework we do not know how to select the right vacuum. In this paper, we study the energy conditions of non-singular black hole spacetimes obtained in conformal gravity assuming they are solutions of Einstein's gravity with an effective energy-momentum tensor. We check whether such conditions can be helpful to select the vacuum of the broken phase. (orig.)

  10. Experimental conformational energy maps of proteins and peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, Govardhan A; Nagendra, H G; Balaji, Vitukudi N; Rao, Shashidhar N

    2017-06-01

    We have presented an extensive analysis of the peptide backbone dihedral angles in the PDB structures and computed experimental Ramachandran plots for their distributions seen under a various constraints on X-ray resolution, representativeness at different sequence identity percentages, and hydrogen bonding distances. These experimental distributions have been converted into isoenergy contour plots using the approach employed previously by F. M. Pohl. This has led to the identification of energetically favored minima in the Ramachandran (ϕ, ψ) plots in which global minima are predominantly observed either in the right-handed α-helical or the polyproline II regions. Further, we have identified low energy pathways for transitions between various minima in the (ϕ,ψ) plots. We have compared and presented the experimental plots with published theoretical plots obtained from both molecular mechanics and quantum mechanical approaches. In addition, we have developed and employed a root mean square deviation (RMSD) metric for isoenergy contours in various ranges, as a measure (in kcal.mol -1 ) to compare any two plots and determine the extent of correlation and similarity between their isoenergy contours. In general, we observe a greater degree of compatibility with experimental plots for energy maps obtained from molecular mechanics methods compared to most quantum mechanical methods. The experimental energy plots we have investigated could be helpful in refining protein structures obtained from X-ray, NMR, and electron microscopy and in refining force field parameters to enable simulations of peptide and protein structures that have higher degree of consistency with experiments. Proteins 2017; 85:979-1001. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Low-energy calculations for nuclear photodisintegration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deflorian S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Standard Solar Model a central role in the nucleosynthesis is played by reactions of the kind XZ1A11+XZ2A22→YZ1+Z2A1+A2+γ${}_{{Z_1}}^{{A_1}}{X_1} + {}_{{Z_2}}^{{A_2}}{X_2} \\to {}_{{Z_1} + {Z_2}}^{{A_1} + {A_2}}Y + \\gamma $, which enter the proton-proton chains. These reactions can also be studied through the inverse photodisintegration reaction. One option is to use the Lorentz Integral Transform approach, which transforms the continuum problem into a bound state-like one. A way to check the reliability of such methods is a direct calculation, for example using the Kohn Variational Principle to obtain the scattering wave function and then directly calculate the response function of the reaction.

  12. Conformational changes in glycine tri- and hexapeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yakubovich, Alexander V.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2006-01-01

    conformations and calculated the energy barriers for transitions between them. Using a thermodynamic approach, we have estimated the times of the characteristic transitions between these conformations. The results of our calculations have been compared with those obtained by other theoretical methods...... also investigated the influence of the secondary structure of polypeptide chains on the formation of the potential energy landscape. This analysis has been performed for the sheet and the helix conformations of chains of six amino acids....

  13. To the calculation of energy resolution of ionization calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchajkin, V.V.; Lagutin, A.A.

    1976-01-01

    The question of energy resolution of the ionization calorimeter is considered analytically. A method is discussed for calculating the probability characteristics (mean value and dispersion) of energy losses of an electron-photon shower by ionization in the calorimeter volume

  14. Conformational analysis by theoretical calculations of distinctin, an antimicrobial peptide isolated from Phyllomedusa distincta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munhoz, Victor H. de Oliveira; Alcantara, Antonio F. de Carvalho; Pilo-Veloso, Dorila

    2008-01-01

    Various studies demonstrate that different frog species produce distinct classes of biologically active peptides. These peptides can act as alternative agents against pathogenic bacteria and fungi by membrane permeability. Although studies have recently demonstrated that this process is utterly related to the secondary structure adopted by the peptide (in this case, the α-helical structure) when in contact with the bacterial membrane, the detailed mechanism is still unknown. In this work we describe a conformational analysis of distinctin, a heterodimeric peptide isolated from the skin of Phyllomedusa distincta, an anuran found in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. The study yielded a stable geometry with a high content of the α-helical structure both in chains 1 and 2 of distinctin, showing strong interaction between them. (author)

  15. Dynamic energy landscapes of riboswitches help interpret conformational rearrangements and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Quarta

    Full Text Available Riboswitches are RNAs that modulate gene expression by ligand-induced conformational changes. However, the way in which sequence dictates alternative folding pathways of gene regulation remains unclear. In this study, we compute energy landscapes, which describe the accessible secondary structures for a range of sequence lengths, to analyze the transcriptional process as a given sequence elongates to full length. In line with experimental evidence, we find that most riboswitch landscapes can be characterized by three broad classes as a function of sequence length in terms of the distribution and barrier type of the conformational clusters: low-barrier landscape with an ensemble of different conformations in equilibrium before encountering a substrate; barrier-free landscape in which a direct, dominant "downhill" pathway to the minimum free energy structure is apparent; and a barrier-dominated landscape with two isolated conformational states, each associated with a different biological function. Sharing concepts with the "new view" of protein folding energy landscapes, we term the three sequence ranges above as the sensing, downhill folding, and functional windows, respectively. We find that these energy landscape patterns are conserved in various riboswitch classes, though the order of the windows may vary. In fact, the order of the three windows suggests either kinetic or thermodynamic control of ligand binding. These findings help understand riboswitch structure/function relationships and open new avenues to riboswitch design.

  16. Calculation of transportation energy for biomass collection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanai, G.; Takekura, K.; Kato, H.; Kobayashi, Y.; Yakushido, K. [National Agricultural Research Center, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    This paper reported on a study at a rice straw facility in Japan that produces bioethanol. Simulation modeling and calculations methods were used to examine the characteristics of field-to-facility transportation. Fuel consumption was found to be influenced by the conversion rate from straw to ethanol, the quantity of straw collected, and the ratio of the field area to that around the facility. Standard conditions were assumed based on reported data and actual observations for 15 ML/yr ethanol production, 0.3 kL output of ethanol from 1 t dry straw, 53.6 day/yr working days, 2.7 t truck load capacity, and 0.128 as the ratio of field to the area around the facility. According to calculations, a quantity of 50 kt dry straw requires 2.78 L of fuel to transport 1 t of dry straw, 109.5 trucks, and a 19.1 km collection area radius. The fuel consumption for transportation was found to be proportional to the quantity of straw to the 0.5 power, but inversely proportional to the ratio of field to the 0.5 power. The rate of increase in the number of trucks needed to collect straw increases with the decrease in the ratio of the field to area surface around the facility.

  17. Calculation of molecular free energies in classical potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farhi, Asaf; Singh, Bipin

    2016-01-01

    Free energies of molecules can be calculated by quantum chemistry computations or by normal mode classical calculations. However, the first can be computationally impractical for large molecules and the second is based on the assumption of harmonic dynamics. We present a novel, accurate and complete calculation of molecular free energies in standard classical potentials. In this method we transform the molecule by relaxing potential terms which depend on the coordinates of a group of atoms in that molecule and calculate the free energy difference associated with the transformation. Then, since the transformed molecule can be treated as non-interacting systems, the free energy associated with these atoms is analytically or numerically calculated. This two-step calculation can be applied to calculate free energies of molecules or free energy difference between (possibly large) molecules in a general environment. We demonstrate the method in free energy calculations for methanethiol and butane molecules in vacuum and solvent. We suggest the potential application of free energy calculation of chemical reactions in classical molecular simulations. (paper)

  18. Entropy and energy quantization: Planck thermodynamic calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mota e Albuquerque, Ivone Freire da.

    1988-01-01

    This dissertation analyses the origins and development of the concept of entropy and its meaning of the second Law of thermodynamics, as well as the thermodynamics derivation of the energy quantization. The probabilistic interpretation of that law and its implication in physics theory are evidenciated. Based on Clausius work (which follows Carnot's work), we analyse and expose in a original way the entropy concept. Research upon Boltzmann's work and his probabilistic interpretation of the second Law of thermodynamics is made. The discuss between the atomistic and the energeticist points of view, which were actual at that time are also commented. (author). 38 refs., 3 figs

  19. A pH-induced conformational switch in a tyrosine kinase inhibitor identified by electronic spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattab, Muhammad; Wang, Feng; Clayton, Andrew H A

    2017-11-24

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are a major class of drug utilised in the clinic. During transit to their cognate kinases, TKIs will encounter different pH environments that could have a major influence on TKI structure. To address this, we report UV-Vis spectroscopic and computational studies of the TKI, AG1478, as a function of pH. The electronic absorption spectrum of AG1478 shifted by 10 nm (from 342 nm to 332 nm) from acid to neutral pH and split into two peaks (at 334 nm and 345 nm) in highly alkaline conditions. From these transitions, the pKa value was calculated as 5.58 ± 0.01. To compute structures and spectra, time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations were performed along with conductor-like polarizable continuum model (CPCM) to account for implicit solvent effect. On the basis of the theoretical spectra, we could assign the AG1478 experimental spectrum at acidic pH to a mixture of two twisted conformers (71% AG1478 protonated at quinazolyl nitrogen N(1) and 29% AG1478 protonated at quinazolyl nitrogen N(3)) and at neutral pH to the neutral planar conformer. The AG1478 absorption spectrum (pH 13.3) was fitted to a mixture of neutral (70%) and NH-deprotonated species (30%). These studies reveal a pH-induced conformational transition in a TKI.

  20. Poster - 21: Verification of Monitor Unit Calculations for Breast Field-In-Field Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosztyla, Robert; Pierce, Greg; Ploquin, Nicolas; Roumeliotis, Michael; Schinkel, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the source of systematic monitor unit (MU) calculation discrepancies between RadCalc and Eclipse treatment planning software for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy field-in-field breast treatments. Methods: Data were reviewed for 28 patients treated with a field-in-field breast technique with MU calculations from RadCalc that were larger than MU calculations from Eclipse for at least one field. The distance of the calculation point from the jaws was measured in each field’s beam’s-eye-view and compared with the percentage difference in MU (%ΔMU) between RadCalc and Eclipse. 10×10, 17×13 and 20×20 cm 2 beam profiles were measured using the Profiler 2 diode array for 6-MV photon beams and compared with profiles calculated with Eclipse and RadCalc using a gamma analysis (3%, 3 mm). Results: The mean %ΔMU was 1.3%±0.3%. There was a statistically-significant correlation between %ΔMU and the distance of the calculation point from the Y jaw (r=−0.43, p<0.001). RadCalc profiles differed from measured profiles, especially near the jaws. The gamma pass rate for 6-MV fields of 17×13 cm 2 field size was 95%±1% for Eclipse-generated profiles and 53%±20% for RadCalc-generated profiles (p=0.01). Conclusions: Calculations using RadCalc for field-in-field breast plans resulted in MUs that were larger than expected from previous clinical experience with wedged plans with calculation points far from the jaws due to the position of the calculation point near the jaws in the beam’s-eye-view of each field.

  1. Poster - 21: Verification of Monitor Unit Calculations for Breast Field-In-Field Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosztyla, Robert; Pierce, Greg; Ploquin, Nicolas; Roumeliotis, Michael; Schinkel, Colleen [Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: To determine the source of systematic monitor unit (MU) calculation discrepancies between RadCalc and Eclipse treatment planning software for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy field-in-field breast treatments. Methods: Data were reviewed for 28 patients treated with a field-in-field breast technique with MU calculations from RadCalc that were larger than MU calculations from Eclipse for at least one field. The distance of the calculation point from the jaws was measured in each field’s beam’s-eye-view and compared with the percentage difference in MU (%ΔMU) between RadCalc and Eclipse. 10×10, 17×13 and 20×20 cm{sup 2} beam profiles were measured using the Profiler 2 diode array for 6-MV photon beams and compared with profiles calculated with Eclipse and RadCalc using a gamma analysis (3%, 3 mm). Results: The mean %ΔMU was 1.3%±0.3%. There was a statistically-significant correlation between %ΔMU and the distance of the calculation point from the Y jaw (r=−0.43, p<0.001). RadCalc profiles differed from measured profiles, especially near the jaws. The gamma pass rate for 6-MV fields of 17×13 cm{sup 2} field size was 95%±1% for Eclipse-generated profiles and 53%±20% for RadCalc-generated profiles (p=0.01). Conclusions: Calculations using RadCalc for field-in-field breast plans resulted in MUs that were larger than expected from previous clinical experience with wedged plans with calculation points far from the jaws due to the position of the calculation point near the jaws in the beam’s-eye-view of each field.

  2. Conformational explosion: Understanding the complexity of short chain para-dialkylbenzene potential energy surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Piyush; Hewett, Daniel M.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2018-05-01

    The single-conformation ultraviolet and infrared spectroscopy of three short-chain para-dialkylbenzenes (para-diethylbenzene, para-dipropylbenzene, and para-dibutylbenzene) is reported for the jet-cooled, isolated molecules. The present study builds off previous work on single-chain n-alkylbenzenes, where an anharmonic local mode Hamiltonian method was developed to account for stretch-bend Fermi resonance in the alkyl CH stretch region [D. P. Tabor et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 224310 (2016)]. The jet-cooled molecules are interrogated using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) excitation, fluorescence dip infrared spectroscopy, and dispersed fluorescence. The LIF spectra in the S1 ← S0 origin region show a dramatic increase in the number of resolved transitions with increasing length of the alkyl chains, reflecting an explosion in the number of unique low-energy conformations formed when two independent alkyl chains are present. Since the barriers to isomerization of the alkyl chain are similar in size, this results in an "egg carton" shaped potential energy surface. A combination of electronic frequency shift and alkyl CH stretch infrared spectra is used to generate a consistent set of conformational assignments. Using these experimental techniques in conjunction with computational methods, subsets of origin transitions in the LIF excitation spectrum can be classified into different conformational families. Two conformations are resolved in para-diethylbenzene, seven in para-dipropylbenzene, and about nineteen in para-dibutylbenzene. These chains are largely independent of each other as there are no new single-chain conformations induced by the presence of a second chain. A cursory LIF excitation scan of para-dioctylbenzene shows a broad congested spectrum at frequencies consistent with interactions of alkyl chains with the phenyl π cloud.

  3. Calculation of pole profiles for the design of particle accelerators magnets. Equivalent current and conformal representation methods; Calcul de profils polaires destines a des aimants d'accelerateurs de particules. Methode des courants et methode des transformations conformes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaidane, S [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-04-01

    These two methods allow the determination of the shape of the poles in magnets, for a given field distribution in the air-gap. First method: The principle of the method consists to create the desired law of field by means of current sheets in which one can adjust the density given in a polynomial form. For the right distribution of these currents, the equipotential corresponding to the magnetic potential of the excitation coils is calculated. The pole profile of the H or C magnet identified with this equipotential line will finally take the place of the distribution of the current sheets used in the calculation. Steel permeability is assumed to be infinite and Foucault current effects are neglected in the case of variable fields. Second method: It consists to find a conformal representation that maps the pole profile plane upon the upper half of another plane where the equipotentials are two half straight lines, and where the field problems are easier to solve. Steel permeability is also considered to be infinite and the coils far from the pole faces. This known method has been applied to be compared with the first one. (author) [French] Ces deux methodes consistent a determiner la forme des pieces polaires d'aimants pour une distribution de champ determinee a l'avance dans l'entrefer. Premiere methode: Le principe de la methode consiste a creer la loi de champ desiree par l'intermediaire de nappes de courant dont on peut ajuster la densite exprimee sous une forme polynominale. Pour une distribution convenable de ces courants, on calcule l'equipotentielle correspondant au potentiel magnetique des bobines d'excitation. Le profil polaire d'un aimant en H ou C identifie a l'equipotentielle se substitue finalement a la repartition des nappes de courant utilisee dans la methode de calcul. La permeabilite de l'acier est supposee infinie et les courants de Foucault sont negliges dans le cas des champs variables. Seconde methode: Elle consiste a trouver une transformation

  4. Raman spectroscopy, ab-initio model calculations, and conformational, equilibria in ionic liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    2009-01-01

    spectroscopy and ab-initio molecular orbital calculations. A discussion is given, based mainly on some recent FT- Raman spectroscopic results on the model ionic liquid system of 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium ([C4C1Im]+X-) salts. The rotational isomerism of the [C4C1Im]+ cation is described: the presence of anti.......3 Brief introduction to ab-initio model calculations .... 312 12.4 Case study on Raman spectroscopy and structure of imidazolium-based ionic liquids ..... 312 12.5 Raman spectra and structure of [C4C1Im]+ liquids ..... 315 12.6 Normal mode analysis and rotational isomerism of the [C4C1Im]+ cation...

  5. Raman spectroscopy, ab-initio model calculations, and conformational, equilibria in ionic liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, Rolf W.

    2009-01-01

    A review of the recent developments in the study and understanding of room temperature ionic liquids are given. An intimate picture of how and why these liquids are not crystals at ambient conditions is attempted, based on evidence from crystallographical results combined with vibrational spectroscopy and ab-initio molecular orbital calculations. A discussion is given, based mainly on some recent FT- Raman spectroscopic results on the model ionic liquid system of 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium ...

  6. Significance of calculated cluster conformations of benzene: comment on a publication by D. E. Williams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Waal, B.W.

    1981-01-01

    Results of potential-energy minimization, applied to clusters of benzene molecules, have been reported recently by Williams [Acta Cryst. (1980), A36, 715-723]. Two stable tridecamer clusters were found and compared with a 13-molecule fragment from crystalline orthorhombic benzene. In this comment

  7. Guidelines for the analysis of free energy calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimovich, Pavel V; Shirts, Michael R; Mobley, David L

    2015-05-01

    Free energy calculations based on molecular dynamics simulations show considerable promise for applications ranging from drug discovery to prediction of physical properties and structure-function studies. But these calculations are still difficult and tedious to analyze, and best practices for analysis are not well defined or propagated. Essentially, each group analyzing these calculations needs to decide how to conduct the analysis and, usually, develop its own analysis tools. Here, we review and recommend best practices for analysis yielding reliable free energies from molecular simulations. Additionally, we provide a Python tool, alchemical-analysis.py, freely available on GitHub as part of the pymbar package (located at http://github.com/choderalab/pymbar), that implements the analysis practices reviewed here for several reference simulation packages, which can be adapted to handle data from other packages. Both this review and the tool covers analysis of alchemical calculations generally, including free energy estimates via both thermodynamic integration and free energy perturbation-based estimators. Our Python tool also handles output from multiple types of free energy calculations, including expanded ensemble and Hamiltonian replica exchange, as well as standard fixed ensemble calculations. We also survey a range of statistical and graphical ways of assessing the quality of the data and free energy estimates, and provide prototypes of these in our tool. We hope this tool and discussion will serve as a foundation for more standardization of and agreement on best practices for analysis of free energy calculations.

  8. The effect of tensile stress on the conformational free energy landscape of disulfide bonds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmesh Anjukandi

    Full Text Available Disulfide bridges are no longer considered to merely stabilize protein structure, but are increasingly recognized to play a functional role in many regulatory biomolecular processes. Recent studies have uncovered that the redox activity of native disulfides depends on their C-C-S-S dihedrals, χ2 and χ'2. Moreover, the interplay of chemical reactivity and mechanical stress of disulfide switches has been recently elucidated using force-clamp spectroscopy and computer simulation. The χ2 and χ'2 angles have been found to change from conformations that are open to nucleophilic attack to sterically hindered, so-called closed states upon exerting tensile stress. In view of the growing evidence of the importance of C-C-S-S dihedrals in tuning the reactivity of disulfides, here we present a systematic study of the conformational diversity of disulfides as a function of tensile stress. With the help of force-clamp metadynamics simulations, we show that tensile stress brings about a large stabilization of the closed conformers, thereby giving rise to drastic changes in the conformational free energy landscape of disulfides. Statistical analysis shows that native TDi, DO and interchain Ig protein disulfides prefer open conformations, whereas the intrachain disulfide bridges in Ig proteins favor closed conformations. Correlating mechanical stress with the distance between the two a-carbons of the disulfide moiety reveals that the strain of intrachain Ig protein disulfides corresponds to a mechanical activation of about 100 pN. Such mechanical activation leads to a severalfold increase of the rate of the elementary redox S(N2 reaction step. All these findings constitute a step forward towards achieving a full understanding of functional disulfides.

  9. Accuracy of pencil-beam redefinition algorithm dose calculations in patient-like cylindrical phantoms for bolus electron conformal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Robert L; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Chu, Connel; Fields, Robert S; Sprunger, Conrad P

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the improved accuracy of the pencil beam redefinition algorithm (PBRA) compared to the pencil beam algorithm (PBA) for bolus electron conformal therapy using cylindrical patient phantoms based on patient computed tomography (CT) scans of retromolar trigone and nose cancer. PBRA and PBA electron dose calculations were compared with measured dose in retromolar trigone and nose phantoms both with and without bolus. For the bolus treatment plans, a radiation oncologist outlined a planning target volume (PTV) on the central axis slice of the CT scan for each phantom. A bolus was designed using the planning.decimal(®) (p.d) software (.decimal, Inc., Sanford, FL) to conform the 90% dose line to the distal surface of the PTV. Dose measurements were taken with thermoluminescent dosimeters placed into predrilled holes. The Pinnacle(3) (Philips Healthcare, Andover, MD) treatment planning system was used to calculate PBA dose distributions. The PBRA dose distributions were calculated with an in-house C++ program. In order to accurately account for the phantom materials a table correlating CT number to relative electron stopping and scattering powers was compiled and used for both PBA and PBRA dose calculations. Accuracy was determined by comparing differences in measured and calculated dose, as well as distance to agreement for each measurement point. The measured doses had an average precision of 0.9%. For the retromolar trigone phantom, the PBRA dose calculations had an average ± 1σ dose difference (calculated - measured) of -0.65% ± 1.62% without the bolus and -0.20% ± 1.54% with the bolus. The PBA dose calculation had an average dose difference of 0.19% ± 3.27% without the bolus and -0.05% ± 3.14% with the bolus. For the nose phantom, the PBRA dose calculations had an average dose difference of 0.50% ± 3.06% without bolus and -0.18% ± 1.22% with the bolus. The PBA dose calculations had an average dose difference of 0.65%

  10. Rotational Spectrum, Conformational Composition, Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding, and Quantum Chemical Calculations of Mercaptoacetonitrile (HSCH2C≡N), a Compound of Potential Astrochemical Interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møllendal, Harald; Samdal, Svein; Guillemin, Jean-Claude

    2016-03-31

    The microwave spectra of mercaptoacetonitrile (HSCH2C≡N) and one deuterated species (DSCH2C≡N) were investigated in the 7.5-124 GHz spectral interval. The spectra of two conformers denoted SC and AP were assigned. The H-S-C-C chain of atoms is synclinal in SC and anti-periplanar in AP. The ground state of SC is split into two substates separated by a comparatively small energy difference resulting in closely spaced transitions with equal intensities. Several transitions of the parent species of SC deviate from Watson's Hamiltonian. Only slight improvements were obtained using a Hamiltonian that takes coupling between the two substates into account. Deviations from Watson's Hamiltonian were also observed for the parent species of AP. However, the spectrum of the deuterated species, which was investigated only for the SC conformer, fits satisfactorily to Watson's Hamiltonian. Relative intensity measurements found SC to be lower in energy than AP by 3.8(3) kJ/mol. The strength of the intramolecular hydrogen bond between the thiol and cyano groups was estimated to be ∼2.1 kJ/mol. The microwave work was augmented by quantum chemical calculations at CCSD and MP2 levels using basis sets of minimum triple-ζ quality. Mercaptoacetonitrile has astrochemical interest, and the spectra presented herein should be useful for a potential identification of this compound in the interstellar medium. Three different ways of generating mercaptoacetonitrile from compounds already found in the interstellar medium were explored by quantum chemical calculations.

  11. Simple Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) Calculator Documentation | Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ;M, performance and fuel costs. Note that this doesn't include financing issues, discount issues ). This means that the LCOE is the minimum price at which energy must be sold for an energy project to the balance between debt-financing and equity-financing, and an assessment of the financial risk

  12. Sophisticated Calculation of the 1oo4-architecture for Safety-related Systems Conforming to IEC61508

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayek, A; Al Bokhaiti, M; Schwarz, M H; Boercsoek, J

    2012-01-01

    With the publication and enforcement of the standard IEC 61508 of safety related systems, recent system architectures have been presented and evaluated. Among a number of techniques and measures to the evaluation of safety integrity level (SIL) for safety-related systems, several measures such as reliability block diagrams and Markov models are used to analyze the probability of failure on demand (PFD) and mean time to failure (MTTF) which conform to IEC 61508. The current paper deals with the quantitative analysis of the novel 1oo4-architecture (one out of four) presented in recent work. Therefore sophisticated calculations for the required parameters are introduced. The provided 1oo4-architecture represents an advanced safety architecture based on on-chip redundancy, which is 3-failure safe. This means that at least one of the four channels have to work correctly in order to trigger the safety function.

  13. The dependence of the electronic coupling on energy gap and bridge conformation - Towards prediction of the distance dependence of electron transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eng, Mattias P.; Albinsson, Bo

    2009-01-01

    The attenuation factor, β, for the distance dependence of electron exchange reactions is a sensitive function of the donor-bridge energy gap and bridge conformation. In this work the electronic coupling for electron and triplet excitation energy transfer has been investigated for five commonly used repeating bridge structures. The investigated bridge structures are OF (oligo fluorene), OP (oligo phenylene), OPE (oligo p-phenyleneethynylene), OPV (oligo phenylenevinylene), and OTP (oligo thiophene). Firstly, the impact of the donor-bridge energy gap was investigated by performing calculations with a variety of donors appended onto bridges that were kept in a planar conformation. This resulted in, to our knowledge, the first presented sets of bridge specific parameters to be inserted into the commonly used McConnell model. Secondly, since at experimental conditions large conformational flexibility is expected, a previously developed model that takes conformational disorder of the bridge into account has been applied to the investigated systems [M.P. Eng, T. Ljungdahl, J. Martensson, B. Albinsson, J. Phys. Chem. B 110 (2006) 6483]. This model is based on Boltzmann averaging and has been shown to describe the temperature dependence of the attenuation factor through OPE-bridges. Together, the parameters describing the donor-bridge energy gap dependence, for planar bridge structures, and the Boltzmann averaging procedure, describing the impact of rotational disorder, have the potential to a priori predict attenuation factors for electron and excitation energy transfer reactions through bridged donor-acceptor systems

  14. All unitary ray representations of the conformal group SU(2,2) with positive energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, G.

    1975-12-01

    We find all those unitary irreducible representations of the infinitely - sheeted covering group G tilde of the conformal group SU(2,2)/Z 4 which have positive energy P 0 >= O. They are all finite component field representations and are labelled by dimension d and a finite dimensional irreducible representation (j 1 , j 2 ) of the Lorentz group SL(2C). They all decompose into a finite number of unitary irreducible representations of the Poincare subgroup with dilations. (orig.) [de

  15. Conformal symmetry breaking and the energy-momentum tensor in four dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus, E.; Sibold, K.

    1993-01-01

    We derive the conformal transformation properties of the energy-momentum tensor for the massless φ 4 -theory in four dimensions. For this purpose the consistency conditions arising from Weyl-transformations are essential. The breaking of Weyl-invariance can be completely absorbed by making the coupling of the elementary theory local and by introducing an external field which couples to the composite operators φ 2 . Only then can one stay in a completely local framework. (orig.)

  16. Millimeter and Submillimeter Wave Spectroscopy of Higher Energy Conformers of 1,2-PROPANEDIOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharenko, Olena; Bossa, Jean-Baptiste; Lewen, Frank; Schlemmer, Stephan; Müller, Holger S. P.

    2017-06-01

    We have performed a study of the millimeter/submillimeter wave spectrum of four higher energy conformers of 1,2-propanediol (continuation of the previous study on the three lowest energy conformers. The present analysis of rotational transitions carried out in the frequency range 38 - 400 GHz represents a significant extension of previous microwave work. The new data were combined with previously-measured microwave transitions and fitted using a Watson's S-reduced Hamiltonian. The final fits were within experimental accuracy, and included spectroscopic parameters up to sixth order of angular momentum, for the ground states of the four higher energy conformers following previously studied ones: g'Ga, gG'g', aGg' and g'Gg. The present analysis provides reliable frequency predictions for astrophysical detection of 1,2-propanediol by radio telescope arrays at millimeter wavelengths. J.-B. Bossa, M.H. Ordu, H.S.P. Müller, F. Lewen, S. Schlemmer, A&A 570 (2014) A12)

  17. Excited state conformational dynamics in carotenoids: dark intermediates and excitation energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Warren F; Bishop, Michael M; Roscioli, Jerome D; Ghosh, Soumen; Frank, Harry A

    2015-04-15

    A consideration of the excited state potential energy surfaces of carotenoids develops a new hypothesis for the nature of the conformational motions that follow optical preparation of the S2 (1(1)Bu(+)) state. After an initial displacement from the Franck-Condon geometry along bond length alternation coordinates, it is suggested that carotenoids pass over a transition-state barrier leading to twisted conformations. This hypothesis leads to assignments for several dark intermediate states encountered in femtosecond spectroscopic studies. The Sx state is assigned to the structure reached upon the onset of torsional motions near the transition state barrier that divides planar and twisted structures on the S2 state potential energy surface. The X state, detected recently in two-dimensional electronic spectra, corresponds to a twisted structure well past the barrier and approaching the S2 state torsional minimum. Lastly, the S(∗) state is assigned to a low lying S1 state structure with intramolecular charge transfer character (ICT) and a pyramidal conformation. It follows that the bent and twisted structures of carotenoids that are found in photosynthetic light-harvesting proteins yield excited-state structures that favor the development of an ICT character and optimized energy transfer yields to (bacterio)chlorophyll acceptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Precise calculation of the energies of heavy hydrogenlike ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driker, M.N.; Ivanova, E.P.; Ivanov, L.N.

    1983-01-01

    Energies of the 1s, 2s, and 2p states are calculated for hydrogenlike ions with z = 30--170. The calculation is based on Dirac's equation taking into account radiation effects and the finiteness of the nucleus. The hyperfine splitting constants are calculated taking the finiteness of the nucleus into account, and derivatives are taken with respect to the volume of the nucleus for all S-state characteristics

  19. Equivalence of Stress and Energy Calculations of Mean Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole Bøcker; Brown, L. M.

    1977-01-01

    Calculations of the mean stress in a plastically deformed matrix containing randomly distributed elastic inclusions are considered. The mean stress for an elastically homogeneous material is calculated on the basis of an energy consideration which completely accounts for elastic interactions....... The result is shown to be identical to that obtained from a stress calculation. The possibility of including elastic interactions in the case of elastic inhomogeneity is discussed....

  20. Conformers and non-covalent interactions studied by laser spectroscopies and ab initio calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullrich, Susanne

    2001-07-01

    The model peptides, formanilide and acetanilide, and their weakly bound complexes were studied in the gas-phase using resonance enhanced multi-photon ionisation (REMPI) and zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) photoelectron spectroscopy. Both, cis- and trans-isomers of formanilide, were observed under molecular beam conditions. Trans-formanilide displayed predominantly in-plane vibrational excitation indicative of a planar geometry with modest geometry changes upon excitation and ionisation. In cis-formanilide the side-chain is twisted compared to the phenyl plane in the S{sub 0} state, but planar in the S{sub 1} and D{sub 0} states, revealed in characteristic side-chain torsional and out-of-plane bending excitations. Additionally, the ZEKE spectra provide evidence that excess cationic charge is delocalised from the aromatic ring to the side chain. The work on trans-formanilide was extended to its van der Waals complex with Argon with the purpose of investigating the torsional potential of the side-chain and probing charge delocalisation. Complexation of amides with water is of considerable interest since water is not only present as a bulk solvent surrounding a peptide but also attached to specific binding sites in its interior. Evidence was found for the existence of a NH- and CO-bound isomer of trans-formanilide in the neutral, S{sub 0} and S{sub 1}, states, with the ZEKE spectrum of the cationic 'CO-bound' complex indicating a strong preference for the NH binding site. (author)

  1. Perturbation method for calculating impurity binding energy in an ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nilanjan Sil

    2017-12-18

    Dec 18, 2017 ... Abstract. In the present paper, we have studied the binding energy of the shallow donor hydrogenic impurity, which is confined in an inhomogeneous cylindrical quantum dot (CQD) of GaAs-AlxGa1−xAs. Perturbation method is used to calculate the binding energy within the framework of effective mass ...

  2. Calculated stacking-fault energies of elemental metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosengaard, N. M.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1993-01-01

    -sphere approximations. The results are in excellent agreement with recent layer Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker Green's-function calculations where stacking-fault energies for Ni, Cu, Rh, Pd, Ag, Ir, and Au were found by means of the the so-called force theorem. We find that the self-consistent fault energies for all the metals...

  3. Conformational Explosion: Understanding the Complexity of the Para-Dialkylbenzene Potential Energy Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Piyush; Hewett, Daniel M.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2017-06-01

    This talk focuses on the single-conformation spectroscopy of small-chain para-dialkylbenzenes. This work builds on previous studies from our group on long-chain n-alkylbenzenes that identified the first folded structure in octylbenzene. The dialkylbenzenes are representative of a class of molecules that are common components of coal and aviation fuel and are known to be present in vehicle exhaust. We bring the molecules para-diethylbenzene, para-dipropylbenzene and para-dibutylbenzene into the gas phase and cool the molecules in a supersonic expansion. The jet-cooled molecules are then interrogated using laser-induced fluorescence excitation, fluorescence dip IR spectroscopy (FDIRS) and dispersed fluorescence. The LIF spectra in the S_{0}-S_{1} origin region show dramatic increases in the number of resolved transitions with increasing length of alkyl chains, reflecting an explosion in the number of unique low-energy conformations formed when two independent alkyl chains are present. Since the barriers to isomerization of the alkyl chain are similar in size, this results in an 'egg carton' shape to the potential energy surface. We use a combination of electronic frequency shift and alkyl CH stretch infrared spectra to generate a consistent set of conformational assignments.

  4. Energy mesh optimization for multi-level calculation schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosca, P.; Taofiki, A.; Bellier, P.; Prevost, A.

    2011-01-01

    The industrial calculations of third generation nuclear reactors are based on sophisticated strategies of homogenization and collapsing at different spatial and energetic levels. An important issue to ensure the quality of these calculation models is the choice of the collapsing energy mesh. In this work, we show a new approach to generate optimized energy meshes starting from the SHEM 281-group library. The optimization model is applied on 1D cylindrical cells and consists of finding an energy mesh which minimizes the errors between two successive collision probability calculations. The former is realized over the fine SHEM mesh with Livolant-Jeanpierre self-shielded cross sections and the latter is performed with collapsed cross sections over the energy mesh being optimized. The optimization is done by the particle swarm algorithm implemented in the code AEMC and multigroup flux solutions are obtained from standard APOLLO2 solvers. By this new approach, a set of new optimized meshes which encompass from 10 to 50 groups has been defined for PWR and BWR calculations. This set will allow users to adapt the energy detail of the solution to the complexity of the calculation (assembly, multi-assembly, two-dimensional whole core). Some preliminary verifications, in which the accuracy of the new meshes is measured compared to a direct 281-group calculation, show that the 30-group optimized mesh offers a good compromise between simulation time and accuracy for a standard 17 x 17 UO 2 assembly with and without control rods. (author)

  5. Calculation Tool for Determining the Net Energy Gain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Jacob Birck; Svendsen, Svend

    2002-01-01

    is dependent on both the U-values and the g-values. Beyond this it is dependent on the orientation of the windows and the climate and the actual period. This makes it difficult to choose the glazings and windows that are optimal with regard to energy performance in a given case. These facts have aroused a need...... for simple and accurate methods to determine and compare the energy performance of different window products. When choosing windows for new buildings or retrofitting a calculation tool that in a simple way determines the net energy gain from the specific windows in the actual building will ease the selection...... of the best window solution. Such a tool combined with a database with window products can make calculations of the heat loss or energy demand corresponding to the requirements in the new building code easier and more correct. In the paper, methods to determine energy performance data and the net energy gain...

  6. A novel lattice energy calculation technique for simple inorganic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaya, Cemal [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Cumhuriyet University, 58140 Sivas (Turkey); Kaya, Savaş, E-mail: savaskaya@cumhuriyet.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Cumhuriyet University, 58140 Sivas (Turkey); Banerjee, Priyabrata [Surface Engineering and Tribology Group, CSIR-Central Mechanical Engineering Research Institute, Mahatma Gandhi Avenue, Durgapur 713209 (India)

    2017-01-01

    In this pure theoretical study, a hitherto unexplored equation based on Shannon radii of the ions forming that crystal and chemical hardness of any crystal to calculate the lattice energies of simple inorganic ionic crystals has been presented. To prove the credibility of this equation, the results of the equation have been compared with experimental outcome obtained from Born-Fajans-Haber- cycle which is fundamentally enthalpy-based thermochemical cycle and prevalent theoretical approaches proposed for the calculation of lattice energies of ionic compounds. The results obtained and the comparisons made have demonstrated that the new equation is more useful compared to other theoretical approaches and allows to exceptionally accurate calculation of lattice energies of inorganic ionic crystals without doing any complex calculations.

  7. Big bounce, slow-roll inflation, and dark energy from conformal gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegenberg, Jack; Rahmati, Shohreh; Seahra, Sanjeev S.

    2017-02-01

    We examine the cosmological sector of a gauge theory of gravity based on the SO(4,2) conformal group of Minkowski space. We allow for conventional matter coupled to the spacetime metric as well as matter coupled to the field that gauges special conformal transformations. An effective vacuum energy appears as an integration constant, and this allows us to recover the late time acceleration of the Universe. Furthermore, gravitational fields sourced by ordinary cosmological matter (i.e. dust and radiation) are significantly weakened in the very early Universe, which has the effect of replacing the big bang with a big bounce. Finally, we find that this bounce is followed by a period of nearly exponential slow roll inflation that can last long enough to explain the large scale homogeneity of the cosmic microwave background.

  8. New conformity indices based on the calculation of distances between the target volume and the volume of reference isodose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J M; Park, S-Y; Ye, S-J; Kim, J H; Carlson, J

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To present conformity indices (CIs) based on the distance differences between the target volume (TV) and the volume of reference isodose (VRI). Methods: The points on the three-dimensional surfaces of the TV and the VRI were generated. Then, the averaged distances between the points on the TV and the VRI were calculated (CIdistance). The performance of the presented CIs were evaluated by analysing six situations, which were a perfect match, an expansion and a reduction of the distance from the centroid to the VRI compared with the distance from the centroid to the TV by 10%, a lateral shift of the VRI by 3 cm, a rotation of the VRI by 45° and a spherical-shaped VRI having the same volume as the TV. The presented CIs were applied to the clinical prostate and head and neck (H&N) plans. Results: For the perfect match, CIdistance was 0 with 0 as the standard deviation (SD). When expanding and reducing, CIdistance was 10 and −10 with SDs 11. The average value of the CIdistance in the prostate and H&N plans was 0.13 ± 7.44 and 6.04 ± 23.27, respectively. Conclusion: The performance of the CIdistance was equal or better than those of the conventional CIs. Advances in knowledge: The evaluation of target conformity by the distances between the surface of the TV and the VRI could be more accurate than evaluation with volume information. PMID:25225915

  9. Calculation of CO2 emissions from the italian energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contaldi, M.; La Motta, S.

    2001-01-01

    The calculation of CO2 emissions from the Italian energy system is the object of this work. The inventory method used is the Reference Approach from the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC, 1996 revised Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories) and the energy consumption data are taken from the Italian Energy Balance edited by the Ministry of Industry. The years analysed are those from 1990 to 2000 [it

  10. Spectra and structure of silicon containing compounds. XXXII. Raman and infrared spectra, conformational stability, vibrational assignment and ab initio calculations of n-propylsilane-d0 and Si-d3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durig, James R; Pan, Chunhua; Guirgis, Gamil A

    2003-03-15

    The infrared (3100-40 cm(-1)) and Raman (3100-20 cm(-1)) spectra of gaseous and solid n-propylsilane, CH(3)CH(2)CH(2)SiH(3) and the Si-d(3) isotopomer, CH(3)CH(2)CH(2)SiD(3), have been recorded. Additionally, the Raman spectra of the liquids have been recorded and qualitative depolarization values obtained. Both the anti and gauche conformers have been identified in the fluid phases but only the anti conformer remains in the solid. Variable temperature (-105 to -150 degrees C) studies of the infrared spectra of n-propylsilane dissolved in liquid krypton have been recorded and the enthalpy difference has been determined to be 220+/-22 cm(-1) (2.63+/-0.26 kJ mol(-1)) with the anti conformer the more stable form. A similar value of 234+/-23 cm(-1) (2.80+/-0.28 kJ mol(-1)) was obtained for deltaH for the Si-d(3) isotopomer. At ambient temperature it is estimated that there is 30+/-2% of the gauche conformer present. The potential function governing the conformation interchange has been estimated from the far infrared spectral data, the enthalpy difference, and the dihedral angle of the gauche conformer, which is compared to the one predicted from ab initio MP2/6-31G(d) calculations. The barriers to conformational interchange are: 942, 970 and 716 cm(-1) for the anti to gauche, gauche to gauche, and gauche to anti conformers, respectively. Relatively complete vibrational assignments are proposed for both the n-propylsilane-d(0) and Si-d(3) molecules based on the relative infrared and Raman spectral intensities, infrared band contours, depolarization ratios, and normal coordinate calculations. The geometrical parameters, harmonic force constants, vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities, Raman activities and depolarization ratios, and energy differences have been obtained for the anti and gauche conformers from ab initio MP2/6-31G(d) calculations. Structural parameters and energy differences have also been obtained utilizing the larger 6-311 + G(d,p) and 6-311 + G(2

  11. Spectra and structure of silicon containing compounds. XXXII. Raman and infrared spectra, conformational stability, vibrational assignment and ab initio calculations of n-propylsilane-d 0 and Si-d 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durig, James R.; Pan, Chunhua; Guirgis, Gamil A.

    2003-03-01

    The infrared (3100-40 cm -1) and Raman (3100-20 cm -1) spectra of gaseous and solid n-propylsilane, CH 3CH 2CH 2SiH 3 and the Si-d 3 isotopomer, CH 3CH 2CH 2SiD 3, have been recorded. Additionally, the Raman spectra of the liquids have been recorded and qualitative depolarization values obtained. Both the anti and gauche conformers have been identified in the fluid phases but only the anti conformer remains in the solid. Variable temperature (-105 to -150 °C) studies of the infrared spectra of n-propylsilane dissolved in liquid krypton have been recorded and the enthalpy difference has been determined to be 220±22 cm -1 (2.63±0.26 kJ mol -1) with the anti conformer the more stable form. A similar value of 234±23 cm -1 (2.80±0.28 kJ mol -1) was obtained for Δ H for the Si-d 3 isotopomer. At ambient temperature it is estimated that there is 30±2% of the gauche conformer present. The potential function governing the conformation interchange has been estimated from the far infrared spectral data, the enthalpy difference, and the dihedral angle of the gauche conformer, which is compared to the one predicted from ab initio MP2/6-31G(d) calculations. The barriers to conformational interchange are: 942, 970 and 716 cm -1 for the anti to gauche, gauche to gauche, and gauche to anti conformers, respectively. Relatively complete vibrational assignments are proposed for both the n-propylsilane-d 0 and Si-d 3 molecules based on the relative infrared and Raman spectral intensities, infrared band contours, depolarization ratios, and normal coordinate calculations. The geometrical parameters, harmonic force constants, vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities, Raman activities and depolarization ratios, and energy differences have been obtained for the anti and gauche conformers from ab initio MP2/6-31G(d) calculations. Structural parameters and energy differences have also been obtained utilizing the larger 6-311+G(d,p) and 6-311+G(2d,2p) basis sets. From the isolated

  12. Enhanced conformational sampling to visualize a free-energy landscape of protein complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Shinji; Nakamura, Haruki; Higo, Junichi

    2016-06-15

    We introduce various, recently developed, generalized ensemble methods, which are useful to sample various molecular configurations emerging in the process of protein-protein or protein-ligand binding. The methods introduced here are those that have been or will be applied to biomolecular binding, where the biomolecules are treated as flexible molecules expressed by an all-atom model in an explicit solvent. Sampling produces an ensemble of conformations (snapshots) that are thermodynamically probable at room temperature. Then, projection of those conformations to an abstract low-dimensional space generates a free-energy landscape. As an example, we show a landscape of homo-dimer formation of an endothelin-1-like molecule computed using a generalized ensemble method. The lowest free-energy cluster at room temperature coincided precisely with the experimentally determined complex structure. Two minor clusters were also found in the landscape, which were largely different from the native complex form. Although those clusters were isolated at room temperature, with rising temperature a pathway emerged linking the lowest and second-lowest free-energy clusters, and a further temperature increment connected all the clusters. This exemplifies that the generalized ensemble method is a powerful tool for computing the free-energy landscape, by which one can discuss the thermodynamic stability of clusters and the temperature dependence of the cluster networks. © 2016 The Author(s).

  13. Calculation of the surface free energy of fcc copper nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Ming; Lai Yanqing; Tian Zhongliang; Liu Yexiang

    2009-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations with the modified analytic embedded-atom method we calculate the Gibbs free energy and surface free energy for fcc Cu bulk, and further obtain the Gibbs free energy of nanoparticles. Based on the Gibbs free energy of nanoparticles, we have investigated the heat capacity of copper nanoparticles. Calculation results indicate that the Gibbs free energy and the heat capacity of nanoparticles can be divided into two parts: bulk quantity and surface quantity. The molar heat capacity of the bulk sample is lower compared with the molar heat capacity of nanoparticles, and this difference increases with the decrease in the particle size. It is also observed that the size effect on the thermodynamic properties of Cu nanoparticles is not really significant until the particle is less than about 20 nm. It is the surface atoms that decide the size effect on the thermodynamic properties of nanoparticles

  14. Calculating solution redox free energies with ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical minimum free energy path method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Xiancheng; Hu Hao; Hu Xiangqian; Yang Weitao

    2009-01-01

    A quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical minimum free energy path (QM/MM-MFEP) method was developed to calculate the redox free energies of large systems in solution with greatly enhanced efficiency for conformation sampling. The QM/MM-MFEP method describes the thermodynamics of a system on the potential of mean force surface of the solute degrees of freedom. The molecular dynamics (MD) sampling is only carried out with the QM subsystem fixed. It thus avoids 'on-the-fly' QM calculations and thus overcomes the high computational cost in the direct QM/MM MD sampling. In the applications to two metal complexes in aqueous solution, the new QM/MM-MFEP method yielded redox free energies in good agreement with those calculated from the direct QM/MM MD method. Two larger biologically important redox molecules, lumichrome and riboflavin, were further investigated to demonstrate the efficiency of the method. The enhanced efficiency and uncompromised accuracy are especially significant for biochemical systems. The QM/MM-MFEP method thus provides an efficient approach to free energy simulation of complex electron transfer reactions.

  15. Calculation of transformers leakage reactance using electromagnetic energy technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feiz, J.; Mohseni, H.; Sabet Marzooghi, S.; Naderian Jahromi, A.

    2004-01-01

    Determination of transformer leakage reactance using magnetic cores has long been an area of interest to engineers involved in the design of power and distribution transformers. This is required for predicting the performance of transformers before actual assembly of the transformers. In this paper a closed form solution technique applicable to the leakage reactance calculations for transformers is presented. An emphasis is on the development of a simple method to calculate the leakage reactance of the distribution transformers and smaller transformers. Energy technique procedure for computing the leakage reactances in distribution transformers is presented. This method is very efficient compared with the use of flux element and image technique and is also remarkably accurate. Examples of calculated leakage inductances and the short circuit impedance are given for illustration. For validation, the results are compared with the results obtained using test. This paper presents a novel technique for calculation of the leakage inductance in different parts of the transformer using the electromagnetic stored energy

  16. Cohesion energy calculations for ternary ionic novel crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez P, G.; Cabrera, E.; Mijangos, R.R.; Valdez, E.; Duarte, C.

    2001-01-01

    The present work calculates the value of the link energy of a crystalline ternary structure newly formed by alkali halides. The ternary structure prepared with different concentrations of KCl x KBrRbCl 2 maintains a very good miscibility and stability. The calculation is based on the use of a generalization of the Vegard law (which generally is valid for binary compounds) for calculating the values of the lattice constant and the repulsive m exponent. The value of the lattice parameter given by X-ray diffractometry agrees with the close approximation of the calculated value of the method used. It also compares the value of energy cohesion obtained by the Born expression with more complex approximations. (Author)

  17. Neutron energy spectra calculations in the low power research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omar, H.; Khattab, K.; Ghazi, N.

    2011-01-01

    The neutron energy spectra have been calculated in the fuel region, inner and outer irradiation sites of the zero power research reactor using the MCNP-4C code and the combination of the WIMS-D/4 transport code for generation of group constants and the three-dimensional CITATION diffusion code for core analysis calculations. The neutron energy spectrum has been divided into three regions and compared with the proposed empirical correlations. The calculated thermal and fast neutron fluxes in the low power research reactor MNSR inner and outer irradiation sites have been compared with the measured results. Better agreements have been noticed between the calculated and measured results using the MCNP code than those obtained by the CITATION code. (author)

  18. Calculation of the band gap energy of ionic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguado, A.; Lopez, J.M.; Alonso, J.A.; Ayuela, A.; Rivas S, J.F.; Berrondo, M.

    1998-01-01

    The band gap of alkali halides, alkaline-earth oxides, Al 2 O 3 and SiO 2 crystals has been calculated using the perturbed-ion model supplemented with some assumptions for the treatment of excited states. The gap is calculated in several ways: as a difference between one-electron energy eigenvalues and as a difference between the total energies of appropriate electronic states of the crystal, both at the HF level and with inclusion of Coulomb correlation effects. The results compare well with experimental band gap energies and with other theoretical calculations, suggesting that the picture of bonding and excitation given by the model can be useful in ionic materials. (Author)

  19. Searching for dark matter-dark energy interactions: Going beyond the conformal case

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Bruck, Carsten; Mifsud, Jurgen

    2018-01-01

    We consider several cosmological models which allow for nongravitational direct couplings between dark matter and dark energy. The distinguishing cosmological features of these couplings can be probed by current cosmological observations, thus enabling us to place constraints on these specific interactions which are composed of the conformal and disformal coupling functions. We perform a global analysis in order to independently constrain the conformal, disformal, and mixed interactions between dark matter and dark energy by combining current data from: Planck observations of the cosmic microwave background radiation anisotropies, a combination of measurements of baryon acoustic oscillations, a supernova type Ia sample, a compilation of Hubble parameter measurements estimated from the cosmic chronometers approach, direct measurements of the expansion rate of the Universe today, and a compilation of growth of structure measurements. We find that in these coupled dark-energy models, the influence of the local value of the Hubble constant does not significantly alter the inferred constraints when we consider joint analyses that include all cosmological probes. Moreover, the parameter constraints are remarkably improved with the inclusion of the growth of structure data set measurements. We find no compelling evidence for an interaction within the dark sector of the Universe.

  20. A new approach to the electron self energy calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, H.; Lindgren, I.; Salomonson, S.

    1993-01-01

    We present a new practical way to calculate the first order self energy in any model potential (local or non-local). The main idea is to introduce a new straightforward way of renormalization to avoid the usual potential expansion implying a large number of diagrams in higher order QED effects. The renormalization procedure is based on defining the divergent mass term in coordinate space and decomposing it into a divergent sum over finite partial wave contributions. The unrenormalized bound self energy is equally decomposed into a partial wave (l) sum. For each partial wave the difference is taken and the sum becomes convergent. The comparably rapid asymptotic behaviour of the method is l -3 . The method is applied to lithium-like uranium, and the self energy in a Coulomb field, the finite nucleus effect and the screened self energy is calculated to an accuracy of at least one tenth of an eV. (orig.)

  1. Shielding calculation for treatment rooms of high energy linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elleithy, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    A review of German Institute of Standardization (DIN) scheme of the shielding calculation and the essential data required has been done for X-rays and electron beam in the energy range from 1 MeV to 50 MeV. Shielding calculation was done for primary and secondary radiations generated during X-ray operation of Linac. In addition, shielding was done against X-rays generated (Bremsstrahlung) by useful electron beams. The calculations also covered the neutrons generated from the interactions of useful X-rays (at energies above 8 MeV) with the surrounding. The present application involved the computation of shielding against the double scattered components of X-rays and neutrons in the maze area and the thickness of the paraffin wax of the room door. A new developed computer program was designed to assist shielding thickness calculations for a new Linac installation or in replacing an existing machine. The program used a combination of published tables and figures in computing the shielding thickness at different locations for all possible radiation situations. The DIN published data of 40 MeV accelerator room was compared with the program calculations. It was found that there is good agreement between both calculations. The developed program improved the accuracy and speed of calculation

  2. Model calculation for energy loss in ion-surface collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miraglia, J.E.; Gravielle, M.S.

    2003-01-01

    The so-called local plasma approximation is generalized to deal with projectiles colliding with surfaces of amorphous solids and with a specific crystalline structure (plannar channeling). Energy loss of protons grazingly colliding with aluminum, SnTe alloy, and LiF surfaces is investigated. The calculations agree quite well with previous theoretical results and explain the experimental findings of energy loss for aluminum and SnTe alloy, but they fall short to explain the data for LiF surfaces

  3. On calculations of the ground state energy in quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimov, G.V.

    1991-02-01

    In nonrelativistic quantum mechanics the Wick-ordering method called the oscillator representation suggested to calculate the ground-state energy for a wide class of potentials allowing the existence of a bound state. The following examples are considered: the orbital excitations of the ground-state in the Coulomb plus linear potential, the Schroedinger equation with a ''relativistic'' kinetic energy √p 2 +m 2 , the Coulomb three-body problem. (author). 22 refs, 2 tabs

  4. Calculated energy response of lithium fluoride finger-tip dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johns, T.F.

    1965-07-01

    Calculations have been made of the energy response of the lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters being used at A.E.E. Winfrith for the measurement of radiation doses to the finger-tips of people handling radio-active materials. It is shown that the energy response is likely to be materially affected if the sachet in which the powder is held contains elements with atomic numbers much higher than 9 (e.g. if the sachet is made from polyvinyl chloride). (author)

  5. Conformational and vibrational analysis of 5-hydroxy 2-nitrobenzaldehyde by AB initio hartree-fock, density functional theory calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cinakli, S.; Sert, Y.; Boeyuekata, M.; Ucun, F.

    2010-01-01

    The vibrational spectra of benzaldehyde and its derivatives have been studied earlier. The substitution of a functional group changes the spectra markedly. Recent spectroscopic studies of the benzaldehyde and their derivatives have been motivated because the vibrational spectra are very useful for understanding of specific biological process and in the analysis of relatively complex systems. The optimized molecular structure, vibrational frequencies and corresponding vibrational assignments, the total energy calculations, relative energies, the mean vibrational deviations of the two planar O-cis and O-trans roomers of 5-Hydroxy 2-nitrobenzaldehydes have been calculated using ab initio Hartree Fock (HF) and Density Functional Theory (B3LYP) with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. All computations have been performed on personal computer using the Gaussian 03 program package. The calculations were adapted to Cs symmetries of all the molecules. The O-trans rotomers with lower energy of all the molecules have been found as preferential rotomers in the ground state.

  6. Replica Exchange Gaussian Accelerated Molecular Dynamics: Improved Enhanced Sampling and Free Energy Calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Ming M; McCammon, J Andrew; Miao, Yinglong

    2018-04-10

    Through adding a harmonic boost potential to smooth the system potential energy surface, Gaussian accelerated molecular dynamics (GaMD) provides enhanced sampling and free energy calculation of biomolecules without the need of predefined reaction coordinates. This work continues to improve the acceleration power and energy reweighting of the GaMD by combining the GaMD with replica exchange algorithms. Two versions of replica exchange GaMD (rex-GaMD) are presented: force constant rex-GaMD and threshold energy rex-GaMD. During simulations of force constant rex-GaMD, the boost potential can be exchanged between replicas of different harmonic force constants with fixed threshold energy. However, the algorithm of threshold energy rex-GaMD tends to switch the threshold energy between lower and upper bounds for generating different levels of boost potential. Testing simulations on three model systems, including the alanine dipeptide, chignolin, and HIV protease, demonstrate that through continuous exchanges of the boost potential, the rex-GaMD simulations not only enhance the conformational transitions of the systems but also narrow down the distribution width of the applied boost potential for accurate energetic reweighting to recover biomolecular free energy profiles.

  7. Calculating Casimir energies in renormalizable quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milton, Kimball A.

    2003-01-01

    Quantum vacuum energy has been known to have observable consequences since 1948 when Casimir calculated the force of attraction between parallel uncharged plates, a phenomenon confirmed experimentally with ever increasing precision. Casimir himself suggested that a similar attractive self-stress existed for a conducting spherical shell, but Boyer obtained a repulsive stress. Other geometries and higher dimensions have been considered over the years. Local effects, and divergences associated with surfaces and edges were studied by several authors. Quite recently, Graham et al. have reexamined such calculations, using conventional techniques of perturbative quantum field theory to remove divergences, and have suggested that previous self-stress results may be suspect. Here we show that the examples considered in their work are misleading; in particular, it is well known that in two space dimensions a circular boundary has a divergence in the Casimir energy for massless fields, while for general spatial dimension D not equal to an even integer the corresponding Casimir energy arising from massless fields interior and exterior to a hyperspherical shell is finite. It has also long been recognized that the Casimir energy for massive fields is divergent for curved boundaries. These conclusions are reinforced by a calculation of the relevant leading Feynman diagram in D and in three dimensions. There is therefore no doubt of the validity of the conventional finite Casimir calculations

  8. Computer calculations of activation energy for pyrolysis from thermogravimetric curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, R.

    1994-01-01

    A BASIC programme to determine energy of activation for the degradation of polymers has been described. The calculations are based on the results of thermogravimetric curves. This method is applicable for those polymers which produce volatile products upon thermal degradation. (author)

  9. Ab initio calculation of electron excitation energies in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louie, S.G.

    1996-02-01

    Progress in the first-principles calculation of electron excitation energies in solids is discussed. Quasiparticle energies are computed by expanding the electron self energy to first order in the screened Coulomb interaction in the so-called GW approximation. The method was applied to explain and predict spectroscopic properties of a variety of systems. Several illustrative applications to semiconductors, materials under pressure, chemisorption, and point defects in solids are presented. A recent reformulation of the method employing mixed- space functions and imaginary time techniques is also discussed

  10. User guide – COE Calculation Tool for Wave Energy Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chozas, Julia Fernandez; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Jensen, Niels Ejner Helstrup

    Aalborg University together with Energinet.dk and Julia F. Chozas Consulting Engineer, have released a freely available online spreadsheet to evaluate the Levelised Cost of Energy (LCOE) for wave energy projects. The open-access tool calculates the LCOE based on the power production of a Wave...... Energy Converter (WEC) at a particular location. Production data may derive from laboratory testing, numerical modelling or from sea trials. The tool has been developed as a transparent and simple model that evaluates WEC’s economic feasibility in a range of locations, while scaling WEC’s features...

  11. mPW1PW91 Calculated Conformational Study of Calix[n]arene (n = 4,5,6): Hydrogen Bond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kwang Ho; Choe, Jong In

    2009-01-01

    We have performed mPW1PW91 calculations to investigate the conformational characteristics and hydrogen bonds of p-tert-butylcalix[4]arene, p-tert-butylcalix[5]arene, calix[6]arene and p-tertbutylcalix[ 6]arene. The structures of the different conformers of 1-3 were optimized by using mPW1PW91/ 6-31+G(d,p) method. The relative stability of the four conformers of 1 is in the following order: cone (most stable) > partial-cone > 1,2-alternate > 1,3-alternate. The relative stability of the conformers of 2 is in the following order: cone (most stable) > 1,2-alternate > partial-cone > 1,3-alternate. The relative stability of the various conformers of 3 is in the following order: cone (pinched: most stable) > partial-cone > cone (winged) ∼ 1,2-alternate ∼ 1,2,3-alternate > 1,4-alternate > 1,3-alternate > 1,3,5-alternate. The structures of the various conformers of 4 were optimized by using the mPW1PW91/6-31G(d,p) method followed by single point calculation of mPW1PW91/6-31+G(d,p). The relative stability of the conformers of 4 is in the following order: cone (pinched) > 1,2-alternate > cone (winged) > 1,4-alternate ∼ partial-cone > 1,2,3-alternate > 1,3,5-alternate > 1,3-alternate

  12. Noether symmetries, energy-momentum tensors, and conformal invariance in classical field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pons, Josep M.

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of classical field theory, we first review the Noether theory of symmetries, with simple rederivations of its essential results, with special emphasis given to the Noether identities for gauge theories. With this baggage on board, we next discuss in detail, for Poincare invariant theories in flat spacetime, the differences between the Belinfante energy-momentum tensor and a family of Hilbert energy-momentum tensors. All these tensors coincide on shell but they split their duties in the following sense: Belinfante's tensor is the one to use in order to obtain the generators of Poincare symmetries and it is a basic ingredient of the generators of other eventual spacetime symmetries which may happen to exist. Instead, Hilbert tensors are the means to test whether a theory contains other spacetime symmetries beyond Poincare. We discuss at length the case of scale and conformal symmetry, of which we give some examples. We show, for Poincare invariant Lagrangians, that the realization of scale invariance selects a unique Hilbert tensor which allows for an easy test as to whether conformal invariance is also realized. Finally we make some basic remarks on metric generally covariant theories and classical field theory in a fixed curved background.

  13. Unsupervised Calculation of Free Energy Barriers in Large Crystalline Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinburne, Thomas D.; Marinica, Mihai-Cosmin

    2018-03-01

    The calculation of free energy differences for thermally activated mechanisms in the solid state are routinely hindered by the inability to define a set of collective variable functions that accurately describe the mechanism under study. Even when possible, the requirement of descriptors for each mechanism under study prevents implementation of free energy calculations in the growing range of automated material simulation schemes. We provide a solution, deriving a path-based, exact expression for free energy differences in the solid state which does not require a converged reaction pathway, collective variable functions, Gram matrix evaluations, or probability flux-based estimators. The generality and efficiency of our method is demonstrated on a complex transformation of C 15 interstitial defects in iron and double kink nucleation on a screw dislocation in tungsten, the latter system consisting of more than 120 000 atoms. Both cases exhibit significant anharmonicity under experimentally relevant temperatures.

  14. Method for calculating annual energy efficiency improvement of TV sets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varman, M.; Mahlia, T.M.I.; Masjuki, H.H.

    2006-01-01

    The popularization of 24 h pay-TV, interactive video games, web-TV, VCD and DVD are poised to have a large impact on overall TV electricity consumption in the Malaysia. Following this increased consumption, energy efficiency standard present a highly effective measure for decreasing electricity consumption in the residential sector. The main problem in setting energy efficiency standard is identifying annual efficiency improvement, due to the lack of time series statistical data available in developing countries. This study attempts to present a method of calculating annual energy efficiency improvement for TV set, which can be used for implementing energy efficiency standard for TV sets in Malaysia and other developing countries. Although the presented result is only an approximation, definitely it is one of the ways of accomplishing energy standard. Furthermore, the method can be used for other appliances without any major modification

  15. Method for calculating annual energy efficiency improvement of TV sets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varman, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Malaya, Lembah Pantai, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Mahlia, T.M.I. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Malaya, Lembah Pantai, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)]. E-mail: indra@um.edu.my; Masjuki, H.H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Malaya, Lembah Pantai, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2006-10-15

    The popularization of 24 h pay-TV, interactive video games, web-TV, VCD and DVD are poised to have a large impact on overall TV electricity consumption in the Malaysia. Following this increased consumption, energy efficiency standard present a highly effective measure for decreasing electricity consumption in the residential sector. The main problem in setting energy efficiency standard is identifying annual efficiency improvement, due to the lack of time series statistical data available in developing countries. This study attempts to present a method of calculating annual energy efficiency improvement for TV set, which can be used for implementing energy efficiency standard for TV sets in Malaysia and other developing countries. Although the presented result is only an approximation, definitely it is one of the ways of accomplishing energy standard. Furthermore, the method can be used for other appliances without any major modification.

  16. Ground state hydrogen conformations and vibrational analysis of 1,2-dihdroxyanthraquinone (alizarin) molecule by AB initio Hartree-Fock and density functional theory calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delta, E.; Ucun, F.; Saglam, A.

    2010-01-01

    The ground state hydrogen conformations of 1,2-dihydroxyanthraquinone (alizarin) molecule have been investigated using ab initio Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (B3LYP) methods with 6-31G(d,p) basis set. The calculations indicate that the compound in the ground state exist with the doubly bonded O atom linked intra molecularly by the two hydrogen bonds. The vibrational analyses of the ground state conformation of the compound were also made and its optimized geometry parameters were given.

  17. Impact of arsenic/phosphorus substitution on the intrinsic conformational properties of the phosphodiester backbone of DNA investigated using ab initio quantum mechanical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, Elizabeth J; Mackerell, Alexander D

    2011-04-20

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is composed of five major elements carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, and phosphorus. The substitution of any of these elements in DNA would be anticipated to have major biological implications. However, recent studies have suggested that the substitution of arsenic into DNA (As-DNA) in bacteria may be possible. To help evaluate this possibility, ab initio quantum mechanical calculations are used to show that arsenodiester and phosphodiester linkages have similar geometric and conformational properties. Based on these results, it is suggested that the As-DNA will have similar conformational properties to phosphorus-based DNA, including the maintenance of base stacking.

  18. Analysis of daylight calculated using the EnergyPlus programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Greici; Ghisi, Enedir [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Departamento de Engenharia Civil, Laboratorio de Eficiencia Energetica em Edificacoes, Caixa Postal 476, Florianopolis - SC 88040-900 (Brazil)

    2010-09-15

    In order to properly evaluate the thermal energy performance of buildings it is also necessary to analyse the use of daylight, since this influences the thermal load of a building. In this context, the aim of this study was to evaluate the calculation of internal illuminances carried out using the EnergyPlus simulation programme. The analysis was carried out through a comparison of the Useful Daylight Illuminances (UDI) and the daylight factor (DF) estimated using the EnergyPlus programme with the results from another two programmes: Daysim/Radiance and TropLux. Also, the external horizontal illuminance estimated using EnergyPlus was compared with that measured in Florianopolis, Santa Catarina State, Brazil, between 2003 and 2005. The simulations were carried out for three different rooms: one square (5 m x 5 m x 3 m), one shallow rectangular (10 m x 5 m x 3 m) and one deep rectangular (5 m x 10 m x 3 m). From this analysis it was verified that the EnergyPlus programme has a problem related to both the DF and the external illuminance values. A comparison between the DF values calculated using the three programmes shows that there is a problem in EnergyPlus related to solving the internal reflection, such that the greater the importance of the portion of light reflected, the greater the difference found between the programmes. A comparison between the calculated and measured external horizontal illuminances shows differences greater than 100% both for the diffuse and direct illuminances indicating that the EnergyPlus programme overestimates these values. (author)

  19. Daily conformity drinking motivations are associated with increased odds of consuming alcohol mixed with energy drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden-Carmichael, Ashley N; Lau-Barraco, Cathy

    2018-04-01

    Recent research indicates that individuals drank more heavily and experienced more harms on days they consumed alcohol mixed with energy drinks (AmEDs). Limited research, thus far, has examined predictors of AmED use on a daily level. Drinking motives, or reasons for drinking, are shown to discern AmED users from non-users, but the extent to which daily drinking motives covary with AmED use has not been tested. The current study used a daily diary design to determine how motives differ between AmED and other drinking occasions. Participants included 122 college students (73.8% women) with a mean age of 20.39years. Participants completed up to 14 daily surveys, resulting in 389 drinking days (40days involved AmED use). Participants reported on their drinking motives at baseline as well as on each drinking day. Multilevel models revealed that, after controlling for other motives, AmED use was more likely on days where conformity motives were higher than usual and was less likely when enhancement motives were higher. Daily social and coping motives as well as all motives measured at baseline were unassociated with AmED use. Our findings suggest that conformity motives, or drinking to fit in with others, are the most salient drinking motive predicting AmED use on a drinking day. Given that conformity motives are often less associated with alcohol use outcomes in general, these findings highlight AmEDs as a unique alcoholic beverage. Clinicians and interventionists working with frequent AmED users should consider the unique conditions under which AmEDs are consumed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Low-energy levels calculation for 193Ir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahn, Guilherme Soares; Zamboni, Cibele Bugno; Genezini, Frederico Antonio; Mesa-Hormaza, Joel; Cruz, Manoel Tiago Freitas da

    2006-01-01

    In this work, a model based on single particle plus pairing residual interaction was used to study the low-lying excited states of the 193 Ir nucleus. In this model, the deformation parameters in equilibrium were obtained by minimizing the total energy calculated by the Strutinsky prescription; the macroscopic contribution to the potential was taken from the Liquid Droplet Model, with the shell and paring corrections used as as microscopic contributions. The nuclear shape was described using the Cassinian ovoids as base figures; the single particle energy spectra and wave functions for protons and neutrons were calculated in a deformed Woods-Saxon potential, where the parameters for neutrons were obtained from the literature and the parameters for protons were adjusted in order to describe the main sequence of angular momentum and parity of the band heads, as well as the proton binding energy of 193 Ir. The residual pairing interaction was calculated using the BCS prescription with Lipkin-Nogami approximation. The results obtained for the first three band heads (the 3/2 + ground state, the 1/2 + excited state at E ∼ 73 keV and the the 11/2 - isomeric state at E ∼ 80 keV) showed a very good agreement, but the model so far greatly overestimated the energy of the next band head, a 7/2 - at E ∼ 299 keV. (author)

  1. Application of Indenting Method for Calculation of Activation Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong-Seog; Kim, Tae-Ryong

    2006-01-01

    For the calculation of activation energy of cable materials, we used to apply the break-elongation test in accordance with ASTM D412(Stand Test Methods for Rubber Properties in Tension). For the cable jacket and insulation which have regular thickness, break-elongation test had been preferred since it showed linear character in the activation energy curve. But, for the cable which has irregular thickness or rugged surface of cable inside, break-elongation test show scattered data which can not be used for the calculation of activation energy. It is not easy to prepare break-elongation specimen for the cable smaller than 13mm diameter in accordance with ASTM D412. In the cases of above, we sometime use TGA method which heat the specimen from 50 .deg. C to 700 .deg. C at heating rates of 10, 15, 20 .deg. C/min. But, TGA is suspected for the representative of natural aging in the plant since it measure the weight decreasing rate during burning which may have different aging mechanism with that of natural aging. To solve above problems, we investigated alternatives such as indenter test. Indenter test is very convenient since it does not ask for a special test specimen as the break-elongation test does. Regular surface of cable outside is the only requirement of indenter test. Experience of activation energy calculation by using the indenter test is described herein

  2. Torsional energy levels of CH3OH+/CH3OD+/CD3OD+ studied by zero-kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Zuyang; Gao, Shuming; Wang, Jia; Mo, Yuxiang

    2014-01-01

    The torsional energy levels of CH 3 OH + , CH 3 OD + , and CD 3 OD + have been determined for the first time using one-photon zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy. The adiabatic ionization energies for CH 3 OH, CH 3 OD, and CD 3 OD are determined as 10.8396, 10.8455, and 10.8732 eV with uncertainties of 0.0005 eV, respectively. Theoretical calculations have also been performed to obtain the torsional energy levels for the three isotopologues using a one-dimensional model with approximate zero-point energy corrections of the torsional potential energy curves. The calculated values are in good agreement with the experimental data. The barrier height of the torsional potential energy without zero-point energy correction was calculated as 157 cm −1 , which is about half of that of the neutral (340 cm −1 ). The calculations showed that the cation has eclipsed conformation at the energy minimum and staggered one at the saddle point, which is the opposite of what is observed in the neutral molecule. The fundamental C–O stretch vibrational energy level for CD 3 OD + has also been determined. The energy levels for the combinational excitation of the torsional vibration and the fundamental C–O stretch vibration indicate a strong torsion-vibration coupling

  3. Torsional energy levels of CH₃OH⁺/CH₃OD⁺/CD₃OD⁺ studied by zero-kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zuyang; Gao, Shuming; Wang, Jia; Mo, Yuxiang

    2014-10-14

    The torsional energy levels of CH3OH(+), CH3OD(+), and CD3OD(+) have been determined for the first time using one-photon zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy. The adiabatic ionization energies for CH3OH, CH3OD, and CD3OD are determined as 10.8396, 10.8455, and 10.8732 eV with uncertainties of 0.0005 eV, respectively. Theoretical calculations have also been performed to obtain the torsional energy levels for the three isotopologues using a one-dimensional model with approximate zero-point energy corrections of the torsional potential energy curves. The calculated values are in good agreement with the experimental data. The barrier height of the torsional potential energy without zero-point energy correction was calculated as 157 cm(-1), which is about half of that of the neutral (340 cm(-1)). The calculations showed that the cation has eclipsed conformation at the energy minimum and staggered one at the saddle point, which is the opposite of what is observed in the neutral molecule. The fundamental C-O stretch vibrational energy level for CD3OD(+) has also been determined. The energy levels for the combinational excitation of the torsional vibration and the fundamental C-O stretch vibration indicate a strong torsion-vibration coupling.

  4. Models for calculation of dissociation energies of homonuclear diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, L.; Winn, J.S.

    1979-08-01

    The variation of known dissociation energies of the transition metal diatomics across the Periodic Table is rather irregular like the bulk sublimation enthalpy, suggesting that the valence-bond model for bulk metallic systems might be applicable to the gaseous diatomic molecules and the various intermediate clusters. Available dissociation energies were converted to valence-state bonding energies considering various degrees of promotion to optimize the bonding. The degree of promotion of electrons to increase the number of bonding electrons is smaller than for the bulk, but the trends in bonding energy parallel the behavior found for the bulk metals. Thus using the established trends in bonding energies for the bulk elements, it was possible to calculate all unknown dissociation energies to provide a complete table of dissociation energies for all M 2 molecules from H 2 to Lr 2 . For solids such as Mg, Al, Si and most of the transition metals, large promotion energies are offset by strong bonding between the valence state atoms. The main question is whether bonding in the diatomics is adequate to sustain extensive promotion. The most extreme example for which a considerable difference would be expected between the bulk and the diatomics would be that of the Group IIA and IIB metals. The first section of this paper which deals with the alkaline earths Mg and Ca demonstrates a significant influence of the excited valence state even for these elements. The next section then expands the treatment to transition metals

  5. Application of a genetic algorithm in the conformational analysis of methylene-acetal-linked thymine dimers in DNA: Comparison with distance geometry calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckers, Mischa L.M.; Buydens, Lutgarde M.C.; Pikkemaat, Jeroen A.; Altona, Cornelis

    1997-01-01

    The three-dimensional spatial structure of a methylene-acetal-linked thymine dimer present in a 10 base-pair (bp) sense-antisense DNA duplex was studied with a genetic algorithm designed to interpret NOE distance restraints. Trial solutions were represented by torsion angles. This means that bond angles for the dimer trial structures are kept fixed during the genetic algorithm optimization. Bond angle values were extracted from a 10 bp sense-antisense duplex model that was subjected to energy minimization by means of a modified AMBER force field. A set of 63 proton-proton distance restraints defining the methylene-acetal-linked thymine dimer was available. The genetic algorithm minimizes the difference between distances in the trial structures and distance restraints. A large conformational search space could be covered in the genetic algorithm optimization by allowing a wide range of torsion angles. The genetic algorithm optimization in all cases led to one family of structures. This family of the methylene-acetal-linked thymine dimer in the duplex differs from the family that was suggested from distance geometry calculations. It is demonstrated that the bond angle geometry around the methylene-acetal linkage plays an important role in the optimization

  6. Impurities in semiconductors: total energy and infrared absorption calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yndurain, F.

    1987-01-01

    A new method to calculate the electronic structure of infinite nonperiodic system is discussed. The calculations are performed using atomic pseudopotentials and a basis of atomic Gaussiam wave functions. The Hartree-Fock self consistent equations are solved in the cluster-Bethe lattice system. Electron correlation is partially included in second order pertubation approximation. The formalism is applied to hydrogenated amorphous silicon. Total energy calculations of finite clusters of silicon atom in the presence of impurities, are also presented. The results show how atomic oxygen breaks the covalent silicon silicon bond forming a local configuration similar to that of SiO 2 . Calculations of the infrared absorption due to the presence of atomic oxygen in cristalline silicon are presented. The Born Hamiltonian to calculate the vibrational modes of the system and a simplied model to describe the infrared absorption mechanism are used. The interstitial and the the substitutional cases are considered and analysed. The position of the main infrared absorption peak, their intensities and their isotope shifts are calculated. The results are satisfactory agreement with the available data. (author) [pt

  7. Calculating Free Energies Using Scaled-Force Molecular Dynamics Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darve, Eric; Wilson, Micahel A.; Pohorille, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    One common objective of molecular simulations in chemistry and biology is to calculate the free energy difference between different states of the system of interest. Examples of problems that have such an objective are calculations of receptor-ligand or protein-drug interactions, associations of molecules in response to hydrophobic, and electrostatic interactions or partition of molecules between immiscible liquids. Another common objective is to describe evolution of the system towards a low energy (possibly the global minimum energy), 'native' state. Perhaps the best example of such a problem is folding of proteins or short RNA molecules. Both types of problems share the same difficulty. Often, different states of the system are separated by high energy barriers, which implies that transitions between these states are rare events. This, in turn, can greatly impede exploration of phase space. In some instances this can lead to 'quasi non-ergodicity', whereby a part of phase space is inaccessible on timescales of the simulation. A host of strategies has been developed to improve efficiency of sampling the phase space. For example, some Monte Carlo techniques involve large steps which move the system between low-energy regions in phase space without the need for sampling the configurations corresponding to energy barriers (J-walking). Most strategies, however, rely on modifying probabilities of sampling low and high-energy regions in phase space such that transitions between states of interest are encouraged. Perhaps the simplest implementation of this strategy is to increase the temperature of the system. This approach was successfully used to identify denaturation pathways in several proteins, but it is clearly not applicable to protein folding. It is also not a successful method for determining free energy differences. Finally, the approach is likely to fail for systems with co-existing phases, such as water-membrane systems, because it may lead to spontaneous

  8. EELOSS: the program for calculation of electron energy loss data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shun-ichi

    1980-10-01

    A computer code EELOSS has been developed to obtain the electron energy loss data required for shielding and dosimetry of beta- and gamma-rays in nuclear plants. With this code, the following data are obtainable for any energy from 0.01 to 15 MeV in any medium (metal, insulator, gas, compound, or mixture) composed of any choice of 69 elements with atomic number 1 -- 94: a) Collision stopping power, b) Restricted collision stopping power, c) Radiative stopping power, and d) Bremsstrahlung production cross section. The availability of bremsstrahlung production cross section data obtained by the EELOSS code is demonstrated by the comparison of calculated gamma-ray spectrum with measured one in Pb layer, where electron-photon cascade is included implicitly. As a result, it is concluded that the uncertainty in the bremsstrahlung production cross sections is negligible in the practical shielding calculations of gamma rays of energy less than 15 MeV, since the bremsstrahlung production cross sections increase with the gamma-ray energy and the uncertainty for them decreases with increasing the gamma-ray energy. Furthermore, the accuracy of output data of the EELOSS code is evaluated in comparison with experimental data, and satisfactory agreements are observed concerning the stopping power. (J.P.N.)

  9. Improved initial guess for minimum energy path calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smidstrup, Søren; Pedersen, Andreas; Stokbro, Kurt; Jónsson, Hannes

    2014-01-01

    A method is presented for generating a good initial guess of a transition path between given initial and final states of a system without evaluation of the energy. An objective function surface is constructed using an interpolation of pairwise distances at each discretization point along the path and the nudged elastic band method then used to find an optimal path on this image dependent pair potential (IDPP) surface. This provides an initial path for the more computationally intensive calculations of a minimum energy path on an energy surface obtained, for example, by ab initio or density functional theory. The optimal path on the IDPP surface is significantly closer to a minimum energy path than a linear interpolation of the Cartesian coordinates and, therefore, reduces the number of iterations needed to reach convergence and averts divergence in the electronic structure calculations when atoms are brought too close to each other in the initial path. The method is illustrated with three examples: (1) rotation of a methyl group in an ethane molecule, (2) an exchange of atoms in an island on a crystal surface, and (3) an exchange of two Si-atoms in amorphous silicon. In all three cases, the computational effort in finding the minimum energy path with DFT was reduced by a factor ranging from 50% to an order of magnitude by using an IDPP path as the initial path. The time required for parallel computations was reduced even more because of load imbalance when linear interpolation of Cartesian coordinates was used

  10. Monte Carlo calculations for intermediate-energy standard neutron field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joneja, O.P.; Subbukutty, K.; Iyengar, S.B.D.; Navalkar, M.P.

    Intermediate-Energy Standard Neutron Field (ISNF) which produces a well characterised spectrum in the energy range of interest for fast reactors including breeders, has been set up at NBS using thin enriched 235 U fission sources. A proposal has been made for setting up a similar facility at BARC using however, easily available natural U instead of enriched U sources, to start with. In order to simulate the neutronics of such a facility Monte Carlo method of calculations has been adopted and developed. The results of these calculations have been compared with those of NBS and it is found that there may be a maximum difference of 10% in spectrum characteristics for the two cases of using thick and thin fission sources. (K.B.)

  11. Conformational Analysis of Contrast Media for X-Ray Diagnostic Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solieman, A.H.M.

    2010-01-01

    The conformational analysis of iodinated non-ionic contrast agent, Iobitridol, was carried out using theoretical calculations to explore its conformational space, and to study different aspects connected with application of different search techniques. Monte Carlo (MC), random search (RS) and molecular dynamics (MD) based conformational search techniques were used to extract a reasonable-size sample that adequately represents and has an average behavior of the entire conformational ensemble.While MC is good for quick search for lowest energy conformer, RS is better in obtaining conformational sample that cover the whole conformational space and MD is the best for investigation of isomeric preferences inside the conformational ensemble at thermal equilibrium. Conformational analysis of the produced gas phase samples reveals that RS and MD methods could sufficiently present the 18 distinct isomeric classes that constitute the total conformational space of the Iobitridol. S samples of conformational space of Iobitridol are extensively studied, as it hypothetically cover the total conformational space. They are used to test the suitability of different methods (charge distribution methods, energy calculation methods) for Iobitridol molecular computations and internal structure forces (steric hindrance, resonance interaction), as well as dependences among the internal coordinates (dihedral angles correlations and coincidences). The atomic partial charge distribution is found to greatly affect the energy calculation for the molecular mechanics based conformational energy distributions. Further energy minimization of conformational sample by the quantum molecular orbital methods is crucial to obtain charge independent as well as energy balanced conformational sample.

  12. Calculation of the energy of stacking faults in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefebvre, J.-M.; Soullard, J.

    1976-01-01

    Energy computations of some (100), (110) and (111), planar defects were performed using an ionic bond model for stoichiometric uranium dioxyde. The repulsive contribution to the fault was estimated in two different ways, i.e. using the Born-Mayer classical treatment, or potentials derived from shell model calculations. The stability of the various defect configurations has been studied; on the basis of the numerical values, it may be concluded that dislocation dissociation is unlikely in stoichiometric uranium dioxyde. (Auth.)

  13. Calculated surface-energy anomaly in the 3d metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldén, M.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Mirbt, S.

    1992-01-01

    Local-spin-density theory and a Green’s-function technique based on the linear muffin-tin orbitals method have been used to calculate the surface energy of the 3d metals. The theory explains the variation of the values derived from measurements of the surface tension of liquid metals including...... the pronounced anomaly occurring between vanadium and nickel in terms of a decrease in the d contribution caused by spin polarization....

  14. Non-Equilibrium Properties from Equilibrium Free Energy Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Calculating free energy in computer simulations is of central importance in statistical mechanics of condensed media and its applications to chemistry and biology not only because it is the most comprehensive and informative quantity that characterizes the eqUilibrium state, but also because it often provides an efficient route to access dynamic and kinetic properties of a system. Most of applications of equilibrium free energy calculations to non-equilibrium processes rely on a description in which a molecule or an ion diffuses in the potential of mean force. In general case this description is a simplification, but it might be satisfactorily accurate in many instances of practical interest. This hypothesis has been tested in the example of the electrodiffusion equation . Conductance of model ion channels has been calculated directly through counting the number of ion crossing events observed during long molecular dynamics simulations and has been compared with the conductance obtained from solving the generalized Nernst-Plank equation. It has been shown that under relatively modest conditions the agreement between these two approaches is excellent, thus demonstrating the assumptions underlying the diffusion equation are fulfilled. Under these conditions the electrodiffusion equation provides an efficient approach to calculating the full voltage-current dependence routinely measured in electrophysiological experiments.

  15. Calculation and Measurement of Low-Energy Radiative Moller Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Charles; DarkLight Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    A number of current nuclear physics experiments have come to rely on precise knowledge of electron-electron (Moller) and positron-electron (Bhabha) scattering. Some of these experiments, having lepton beams on targets containing atomic electrons, use these purely-QED processes as normalization. In other scenarios, with electron beams at low energy and very high intensity, Moller scattering and radiative Moller scattering have such enormous cross-sections that the backgrounds they produce must be understood. In this low-energy regime, the electron mass is also not negligible in the calculation of the cross section. This is important, for example, in the DarkLight experiment (100 MeV). As a result, we have developed a new event generator for the radiative Moller and Bhabha processes, with new calculations that keep all terms of the electron mass. The MIT High Voltage Research Laboratory provides us a unique opportunity to study this process experimentally and compare it with our work, at a low beam energy of 2.5 MeV where the effects of the electron mass are significant. We are preparing a dedicated apparatus consisting of a magnetic spectrometer in order to directly measure this process. An overview of the calculation and the status of the experiment will be presented.

  16. Direct measurement of conformational strain energy in protofilaments curling outward from disassembling microtubule tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, Jonathan W; Geyer, Elisabeth A; Bailey, Megan E; Rice, Luke M; Asbury, Charles L

    2017-06-19

    Disassembling microtubules can generate movement independently of motor enzymes, especially at kinetochores where they drive chromosome motility. A popular explanation is the 'conformational wave' model, in which protofilaments pull on the kinetochore as they curl outward from a disassembling tip. But whether protofilaments can work efficiently via this spring-like mechanism has been unclear. By modifying a previous assay to use recombinant tubulin and feedback-controlled laser trapping, we directly demonstrate the spring-like elasticity of curling protofilaments. Measuring their mechanical work output suggests they carry ~25% of the energy of GTP hydrolysis as bending strain, enabling them to drive movement with efficiency similar to conventional motors. Surprisingly, a β-tubulin mutant that dramatically slows disassembly has no effect on work output, indicating an uncoupling of disassembly speed from protofilament strain. These results show the wave mechanism can make a major contribution to kinetochore motility and establish a direct approach for measuring tubulin mechano-chemistry.

  17. Extended conformal algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goddard, Peter

    1990-01-01

    The algebra of the group of conformal transformations in two dimensions consists of two commuting copies of the Virasoro algebra. In many mathematical and physical contexts, the representations of ν which are relevant satisfy two conditions: they are unitary and they have the ''positive energy'' property that L o is bounded below. In an irreducible unitary representation the central element c takes a fixed real value. In physical contexts, the value of c is a characteristic of a theory. If c < 1, it turns out that the conformal algebra is sufficient to ''solve'' the theory, in the sense of relating the calculation of the infinite set of physically interesting quantities to a finite subset which can be handled in principle. For c ≥ 1, this is no longer the case for the algebra alone and one needs some sort of extended conformal algebra, such as the superconformal algebra. It is these algebras that this paper aims at addressing. (author)

  18. The structure and conformations of piracetam (2-oxo-1-pyrrolidineacetamide): Gas-phase electron diffraction and quantum chemical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksenafontov, Denis N.; Moiseeva, Natalia F.; Khristenko, Lyudmila V.; Karasev, Nikolai M.; Shishkov, Igor F.; Vilkov, Lev V.

    2010-12-01

    The geometric structure of piracetam was studied by quantum chemical calculations (DFT and ab initio), gas electron diffraction (GED), and FTIR spectroscopy. Two stable mirror symmetric isomers of piracetam were found. The conformation of pyrrolidine ring is an envelope in which the C4 atom deviates from the ring plane, the angle between the planes (C3 sbnd C4 sbnd C5) and (C2 sbnd C3 sbnd C5) is 154.1°. The direction of the deviation is the same as that of the side acetamide group. The piracetam molecule is stabilized in the gas phase by an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the N9H 2 group and the oxygen O6, bonded to C2. The principal structural parameters ( re, Å and ∠e, degrees; uncertainties are 3 σLS values) were found to be: r(С3 sbnd С4) = 1.533(1), r(C4 sbnd C5) = 1.540(1), r(N1 sbnd C5) = 1.456(1), r(C2 sbnd C3) = 1.520(1), r(N1 sbnd C7) = 1.452(1), r(C7 sbnd C8) = 1.537(1), r(N1 sbnd C2) = 1.365(2), r(C8 sbnd N9) = 1.360(2), r(C2 dbnd O6) = 1.229(1), r(C8 dbnd O10) = 1.221(1), ∠C2 sbnd N1 sbnd C5 = 113.4(6), ∠N1 sbnd C2 sbnd C3 = 106.9(6), ∠N1 sbnd C7 sbnd C8 = 111.9(6), ∠C7 sbnd C8 sbnd N9 = 112.5(6), ∠N1 sbnd C2 sbnd O6 = 123.0(4), ∠C3 sbnd N1 sbnd C7 = 120.4(4), ∠C7 sbnd C8 sbnd O10 = 120.2(4), ∠C5 sbnd N1 sbnd C2 sbnd O6 = 170(6), ∠C3 sbnd C2 sbnd N1 sbnd C7 = 178(6), ∠C2 sbnd N1 sbnd C7 sbnd C8 = 84.2, ∠N1 sbnd C7 sbnd C8 sbnd O10 = 111.9.

  19. Calculated intensity of high-energy neutron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustapha, B.; Nolen, J.A.; Back, B.B.

    2004-01-01

    The flux, energy and angular distributions of high-energy neutrons produced by in-flight spallation and fission of a 400 MeV/A 238 U beam and by the break-up of a 400 MeV/A deuteron beam are calculated. In both cases very intense secondary neutron beams are produced, peaking at zero degrees, with a relatively narrow energy spread. Such secondary neutron beams can be produced with the primary beams from the proposed rare isotope accelerator driver linac. The break-up of a 400 kW deuteron beam on a liquid-lithium target can produce a neutron flux of >10 10 neutrons/cm 2 /s at a distance of 10 m from the target

  20. Graphical Calculation of Estimated Energy Expenditure in Burn Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egro, Francesco M; Manders, Ernest C; Manders, Ernest K

    2018-03-01

    Historically, estimated energy expenditure (EEE) has been related to the percent of body surface area burned. Subsequent evaluations of these estimates have indicated that the earlier formulas may overestimate the amount of caloric support necessary for burn-injured patients. Ireton-Jones et al derived 2 equations for determining the EEE required to support burn patients, 1 for ventilator-dependent patients and 1 for spontaneously breathing patients. Evidence has proved their reliability, but they remain challenging to apply in a clinical setting given the difficult and cumbersome mathematics involved. This study aims to introduce a graphical calculation of EEE in burn patients that can be easily used in the clinical setting. The multivariant linear regression analysis from Ireton-Jones et al yielded equations that were rearranged into the form of a simple linear equation of the type y = mx + b. By choosing an energy expenditure and the age of the subject, the weight was calculated. The endpoints were then calculated, and a graph was mapped by means of Adobe FrameMaker. A graphical representation of Ireton-Jones et al's equations was obtained by plotting the weight (kg) on the y axis, the age (years) on the x axis, and a series of parallel lines representing the EEE in burn patients. The EEE has been displayed graphically on a grid to allow rapid determination of the EEE needed for a given patient of a designated weight and age. Two graphs were plotted: 1 for ventilator-dependent patients and 1 for spontaneously breathing patients. Correction factors for sex, the presence of additional trauma, and obesity are indicated on the graphical calculators. We propose a graphical tool to calculate caloric requirements in a fast, easy, and portable manner.

  1. Conformation of the azo bond and its influence on the molecular and crystal structures, IR and Raman spectra, and electron properties of 6-methyl-3,5-dinitro-2-[(E)-phenyldiazenyl]pyridine - Quantum chemical DFT calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, J.; Bryndal, I.; Lorenc, J.; Hermanowicz, K.; Janczak, J.; Hanuza, J.

    2018-02-01

    The crystal and molecular structures of 6-methyl-3,5-dinitro-2-[(E)-phenyldiazenyl]pyridine have been determined by X-ray diffraction and quantum chemical DFT calculations. The crystal is monoclinic, space group Cc (No. 9) with Z = 4 with the unit cell parameters: a = 12.083(7), b = 12.881(6), c = 8.134(3) Å and β = 97.09(5)°. The azo-bridge appears in the trans conformation in which C2-N2-N2‧-C1‧ torsion angle takes a value - 178.6(3)°, whereas the dihedral angle between the planes of the phenyl and pyridine rings is 3.5(2)°. The IR and Raman spectra measured in the temperature range 80-350 K and quantum chemical calculations with the use of B3LYP/6-311G(2d,2p) approach confirmed the trans configuration of the azo-bridge as the most stable energetically and allowed determination of the energy other virtual structures. The observed effects were used in the discussion of vibrational dynamics of the studied compound. The energy gap between cis and trans conformers equals to 1.054 eV (0.03873 Hartree). The electron absorption and emission spectra have been measured and analyzed on the basis of DFT calculations. The life time of the excited state is 12 μs and the Stokes shift is close to 5470 cm- 1.

  2. Elucidation of the conformational free energy landscape in H.pylori LuxS and its implications to catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharyya Moitrayee

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the major challenges in understanding enzyme catalysis is to identify the different conformations and their populations at detailed molecular level in response to ligand binding/environment. A detail description of the ligand induced conformational changes provides meaningful insights into the mechanism of action of enzymes and thus its function. Results In this study, we have explored the ligand induced conformational changes in H.pylori LuxS and the associated mechanistic features. LuxS, a dimeric protein, produces the precursor (4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentanedione for autoinducer-2 production which is a signalling molecule for bacterial quorum sensing. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations on H.pylori LuxS in its various ligand bound forms and analyzed the simulation trajectories using various techniques including the structure network analysis, free energy evaluation and water dynamics at the active site. The results bring out the mechanistic details such as co-operativity and asymmetry between the two subunits, subtle changes in the conformation as a response to the binding of active and inactive forms of ligands and the population distribution of different conformations in equilibrium. These investigations have enabled us to probe the free energy landscape and identify the corresponding conformations in terms of network parameters. In addition, we have also elucidated the variations in the dynamics of water co-ordination to the Zn2+ ion in LuxS and its relation to the rigidity at the active sites. Conclusions In this article, we provide details of a novel method for the identification of conformational changes in the different ligand bound states of the protein, evaluation of ligand-induced free energy changes and the biological relevance of our results in the context of LuxS structure-function. The methodology outlined here is highly generalized to illuminate the linkage between structure and function in

  3. Higher order energy transfer. Quantum electrodynamical calculations and graphical representation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, R.D.

    2000-01-01

    In Chapter 1, a novel method of calculating quantum electrodynamic amplitudes is formulated using combinatorial theory. This technique is used throughout instead of conventional time-ordered methods. A variety of hyperspaces are discussed to highlight isomorphism between a number of A generalisation of Pascal's triangle is shown to be beneficial in determining the form of hyperspace graphs. Chapter 2 describes laser assisted resonance energy transfer (LARET), a higher order perturbative contribution to the well-known process resonance energy transfer, accommodating an off resonance auxiliary laser field to stimulate the migration. Interest focuses on energy exchanges between two uncorrelated molecular species, as in a system where molecules are randomly oriented. Both phase-weighted and standard isotropic averaging are required for the calculations. Results are discussed in terms of a laser intensity-dependent mechanism. Identifying the applied field regime where LARET should prove experimentally significant, transfer rate increases of up to 30% are predicted. General results for three-center energy transfer are elucidated in chapter 3. Cooperative and accretive mechanistic pathways are identified with theory formulated to elicit their role in a variety of energy transfer phenomena and their relative dominance. In multichromophoric the interplay of such factors is analysed with regard to molecular architectures. The alignments and magnitudes of donor and acceptor transition moments and polarisabilities prove to have profound effects on achievable pooling efficiency for linear configurations. Also optimum configurations are offered. In ionic lattices, although both mechanisms play significant roles in pooling and cutting processes, only the accretive is responsible for sensitisation. The local, microscopic level results are used to gauge the lattice response, encompassing concentration and structural effects. (author)

  4. Stored energy calculation: the state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, M.E.; Lanning, D.D.; Olsen, A.R.; Williford, R.E.; Hann, C.R.

    1978-05-01

    The report is the result of an investigation to determine the current state of the art of fuel temperature, gap conductance, and stored energy calculations. Major emphasis was placed on the propagation of input and model uncertainties. To support this study a comparison was made to the observed variability of experimental data for fuel centerline temperature and gap conductance values. The uncertainty analysis was performed by identifying major thermal models and collecting them into an abstract of a thermal performance code. Uncertainties in the calculations were determined using the method of propagation of uncertainties with a first order Taylor series approximation to the nonlinear functions. Output uncertainty results are presented for the beginning of fuel life, the end of life, and throughout a typical power history. Also presented is an influence and importance analysis for the input parameters. It is concluded that the relative uncertainty in stored energy is approximately +-20 percent at beginning of fuel life, and increases to +-25 to 40 percent contact. The foregoing are 3 sigma (99.9 percent) confidence intervals. The most important contributors to stored energy uncertainty are linear heat rating and fuel thermal conductivity

  5. Calculation steps. Building integrated energy supply; Beregningsgang. Bygningsintegreret energiforsyning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Rasmus L.; Noergaard, J.; Daniels, O.; Justesen, R.O.

    2011-08-15

    In the future, buildings will not only act as consumers of energy but as producers as well. For these ''prosumers'', energy production by use of solar panels, photovoltaics and heat pumps etc will be essential. The objective of this project was to find the most optimal combinations of building insulation and use of renewable energy sources in existing buildings in terms of economics and climate impacts. Five houses were analyzed based on different personal load, consumption profiles, solar orientation and proposed building envelope improvements and use of combinations of renewable energy systems. The analysis was conducted by making a large number of simulations. The present report describes the applied simulation models, and explains the results and computer codes. The parameter variations are described for each house as well as the common calculation steps for each house. The results are presented in case sheets, as performance graphs, and top-50 lists for the best cases regarding CO{sub 2} emission, energy consumption and economics. (ln)

  6. How to deal with multiple binding poses in alchemical relative protein-ligand binding free energy calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaus, Joseph W; Harder, Edward; Lin, Teng; Abel, Robert; McCammon, J Andrew; Wang, Lingle

    2015-06-09

    Recent advances in improved force fields and sampling methods have made it possible for the accurate calculation of protein–ligand binding free energies. Alchemical free energy perturbation (FEP) using an explicit solvent model is one of the most rigorous methods to calculate relative binding free energies. However, for cases where there are high energy barriers separating the relevant conformations that are important for ligand binding, the calculated free energy may depend on the initial conformation used in the simulation due to the lack of complete sampling of all the important regions in phase space. This is particularly true for ligands with multiple possible binding modes separated by high energy barriers, making it difficult to sample all relevant binding modes even with modern enhanced sampling methods. In this paper, we apply a previously developed method that provides a corrected binding free energy for ligands with multiple binding modes by combining the free energy results from multiple alchemical FEP calculations starting from all enumerated poses, and the results are compared with Glide docking and MM-GBSA calculations. From these calculations, the dominant ligand binding mode can also be predicted. We apply this method to a series of ligands that bind to c-Jun N-terminal kinase-1 (JNK1) and obtain improved free energy results. The dominant ligand binding modes predicted by this method agree with the available crystallography, while both Glide docking and MM-GBSA calculations incorrectly predict the binding modes for some ligands. The method also helps separate the force field error from the ligand sampling error, such that deviations in the predicted binding free energy from the experimental values likely indicate possible inaccuracies in the force field. An error in the force field for a subset of the ligands studied was identified using this method, and improved free energy results were obtained by correcting the partial charges assigned to the

  7. How To Deal with Multiple Binding Poses in Alchemical Relative Protein–Ligand Binding Free Energy Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in improved force fields and sampling methods have made it possible for the accurate calculation of protein–ligand binding free energies. Alchemical free energy perturbation (FEP) using an explicit solvent model is one of the most rigorous methods to calculate relative binding free energies. However, for cases where there are high energy barriers separating the relevant conformations that are important for ligand binding, the calculated free energy may depend on the initial conformation used in the simulation due to the lack of complete sampling of all the important regions in phase space. This is particularly true for ligands with multiple possible binding modes separated by high energy barriers, making it difficult to sample all relevant binding modes even with modern enhanced sampling methods. In this paper, we apply a previously developed method that provides a corrected binding free energy for ligands with multiple binding modes by combining the free energy results from multiple alchemical FEP calculations starting from all enumerated poses, and the results are compared with Glide docking and MM-GBSA calculations. From these calculations, the dominant ligand binding mode can also be predicted. We apply this method to a series of ligands that bind to c-Jun N-terminal kinase-1 (JNK1) and obtain improved free energy results. The dominant ligand binding modes predicted by this method agree with the available crystallography, while both Glide docking and MM-GBSA calculations incorrectly predict the binding modes for some ligands. The method also helps separate the force field error from the ligand sampling error, such that deviations in the predicted binding free energy from the experimental values likely indicate possible inaccuracies in the force field. An error in the force field for a subset of the ligands studied was identified using this method, and improved free energy results were obtained by correcting the partial charges assigned to the

  8. Advancing Drug Discovery through Enhanced Free Energy Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Robert; Wang, Lingle; Harder, Edward D; Berne, B J; Friesner, Richard A

    2017-07-18

    A principal goal of drug discovery project is to design molecules that can tightly and selectively bind to the target protein receptor. Accurate prediction of protein-ligand binding free energies is therefore of central importance in computational chemistry and computer aided drug design. Multiple recent improvements in computing power, classical force field accuracy, enhanced sampling methods, and simulation setup have enabled accurate and reliable calculations of protein-ligands binding free energies, and position free energy calculations to play a guiding role in small molecule drug discovery. In this Account, we outline the relevant methodological advances, including the REST2 (Replica Exchange with Solute Temperting) enhanced sampling, the incorporation of REST2 sampling with convential FEP (Free Energy Perturbation) through FEP/REST, the OPLS3 force field, and the advanced simulation setup that constitute our FEP+ approach, followed by the presentation of extensive comparisons with experiment, demonstrating sufficient accuracy in potency prediction (better than 1 kcal/mol) to substantially impact lead optimization campaigns. The limitations of the current FEP+ implementation and best practices in drug discovery applications are also discussed followed by the future methodology development plans to address those limitations. We then report results from a recent drug discovery project, in which several thousand FEP+ calculations were successfully deployed to simultaneously optimize potency, selectivity, and solubility, illustrating the power of the approach to solve challenging drug design problems. The capabilities of free energy calculations to accurately predict potency and selectivity have led to the advance of ongoing drug discovery projects, in challenging situations where alternative approaches would have great difficulties. The ability to effectively carry out projects evaluating tens of thousands, or hundreds of thousands, of proposed drug candidates

  9. "Invisible" conformers of an antifungal disulfide protein revealed by constrained cold and heat unfolding, CEST-NMR experiments, and molecular dynamics calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fizil, Ádám; Gáspári, Zoltán; Barna, Terézia; Marx, Florentine; Batta, Gyula

    2015-03-23

    Transition between conformational states in proteins is being recognized as a possible key factor of function. In support of this, hidden dynamic NMR structures were detected in several cases up to populations of a few percent. Here, we show by two- and three-state analysis of thermal unfolding, that the population of hidden states may weight 20-40 % at 298 K in a disulfide-rich protein. In addition, sensitive (15) N-CEST NMR experiments identified a low populated (0.15 %) state that was in slow exchange with the folded PAF protein. Remarkably, other techniques failed to identify the rest of the NMR "dark matter". Comparison of the temperature dependence of chemical shifts from experiments and molecular dynamics calculations suggests that hidden conformers of PAF differ in the loop and terminal regions and are most similar in the evolutionary conserved core. Our observations point to the existence of a complex conformational landscape with multiple conformational states in dynamic equilibrium, with diverse exchange rates presumably responsible for the completely hidden nature of a considerable fraction. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  10. “Invisible” Conformers of an Antifungal Disulfide Protein Revealed by Constrained Cold and Heat Unfolding, CEST-NMR Experiments, and Molecular Dynamics Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fizil, Ádám; Gáspári, Zoltán; Barna, Terézia; Marx, Florentine; Batta, Gyula

    2015-01-01

    Transition between conformational states in proteins is being recognized as a possible key factor of function. In support of this, hidden dynamic NMR structures were detected in several cases up to populations of a few percent. Here, we show by two- and three-state analysis of thermal unfolding, that the population of hidden states may weight 20–40 % at 298 K in a disulfide-rich protein. In addition, sensitive 15N-CEST NMR experiments identified a low populated (0.15 %) state that was in slow exchange with the folded PAF protein. Remarkably, other techniques failed to identify the rest of the NMR “dark matter”. Comparison of the temperature dependence of chemical shifts from experiments and molecular dynamics calculations suggests that hidden conformers of PAF differ in the loop and terminal regions and are most similar in the evolutionary conserved core. Our observations point to the existence of a complex conformational landscape with multiple conformational states in dynamic equilibrium, with diverse exchange rates presumably responsible for the completely hidden nature of a considerable fraction. PMID:25676351

  11. Free Energy Calculations using a Swarm-Enhanced Sampling Molecular Dynamics Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burusco, Kepa K; Bruce, Neil J; Alibay, Irfan; Bryce, Richard A

    2015-10-26

    Free energy simulations are an established computational tool in modelling chemical change in the condensed phase. However, sampling of kinetically distinct substates remains a challenge to these approaches. As a route to addressing this, we link the methods of thermodynamic integration (TI) and swarm-enhanced sampling molecular dynamics (sesMD), where simulation replicas interact cooperatively to aid transitions over energy barriers. We illustrate the approach by using alchemical alkane transformations in solution, comparing them with the multiple independent trajectory TI (IT-TI) method. Free energy changes for transitions computed by using IT-TI grew increasingly inaccurate as the intramolecular barrier was heightened. By contrast, swarm-enhanced sampling TI (sesTI) calculations showed clear improvements in sampling efficiency, leading to more accurate computed free energy differences, even in the case of the highest barrier height. The sesTI approach, therefore, has potential in addressing chemical change in systems where conformations exist in slow exchange. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Calculation of absolute protein-ligand binding free energy using distributed replica sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodinger, Tomas; Howell, P Lynne; Pomès, Régis

    2008-10-21

    Distributed replica sampling [T. Rodinger et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2, 725 (2006)] is a simple and general scheme for Boltzmann sampling of conformational space by computer simulation in which multiple replicas of the system undergo a random walk in reaction coordinate or temperature space. Individual replicas are linked through a generalized Hamiltonian containing an extra potential energy term or bias which depends on the distribution of all replicas, thus enforcing the desired sampling distribution along the coordinate or parameter of interest regardless of free energy barriers. In contrast to replica exchange methods, efficient implementation of the algorithm does not require synchronicity of the individual simulations. The algorithm is inherently suited for large-scale simulations using shared or heterogeneous computing platforms such as a distributed network. In this work, we build on our original algorithm by introducing Boltzmann-weighted jumping, which allows moves of a larger magnitude and thus enhances sampling efficiency along the reaction coordinate. The approach is demonstrated using a realistic and biologically relevant application; we calculate the standard binding free energy of benzene to the L99A mutant of T4 lysozyme. Distributed replica sampling is used in conjunction with thermodynamic integration to compute the potential of mean force for extracting the ligand from protein and solvent along a nonphysical spatial coordinate. Dynamic treatment of the reaction coordinate leads to faster statistical convergence of the potential of mean force than a conventional static coordinate, which suffers from slow transitions on a rugged potential energy surface.

  13. Development of nuclear models for higher energy calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozoian, M.; Siciliano, E.R.; Smith, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    Two nuclear models for higher energy calculations have been developed in the regions of high and low energy transfer, respectively. In the former, a relativistic hybrid-type preequilibrium model is compared with data ranging from 60 to 800 MeV. Also, the GNASH exciton preequilibrium-model code with higher energy improvements is compared with data at 200 and 318 MeV. In the region of low energy transfer, nucleon-nucleus scattering is predominately a direct reaction involving quasi-elastic collisions with one or more target nucleons. We discuss various aspects of quasi-elastic scattering which are important in understanding features of cross sections and spin observables. These include (1) contributions from multi-step processes; (2) damping of the continuum response from 2p-2h excitations; (3) the ''optimal'' choice of frame in which to evaluate the nucleon-nucleon amplitudes; and (4) the effect of optical and spin-orbit distortions, which are included in a model based on the RPA the DWIA and the eikonal approximation. 33 refs., 15 figs

  14. Independent dose calculation of the Tps Iplan in radiotherapy conformed with MLC; Calculo independiente de dosis del TPS Iplan en radioterapia conformada con MLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adrada, A.; Tello, Z.; Medina, L.; Garrigo, E.; Venencia, D., E-mail: jorge.alberto.adrada@gmail.com [Instituto Privado de Radioterapia, Obispo Oro 423, X5000BFI Cordoba (Argentina)

    2014-08-15

    The systems utilization of independent dose calculation in three dimensional-Conformal Radiation Therapy (3D-Crt) treatments allows a direct verification of the treatments times. The utilization of these systems allows diminishing the probability of errors occurrence generated by the treatment planning system (Tps), allowing a detailed analysis of the dose to delivering and review of the normalization point (Np) or prescription. The independent dose calculation is realized across the knowledge of dosimetric parameters of the treatment machine and particular characteristics of every individual field. The aim of this work is develops a calculation system of punctual doses for isocentric fields conformed with multi-leaf collimation systems (MLC), where the dose calculation is in conformity with the suggested ones by ICRU Report No. 42, 1987. Calculation software was realized in C ++ under a free platform of programming (Code::Blocks). The system uses files in format Rtp, exported from the Tps to systems of record and verification (Lantis). This file contains detailed information of the dose, Um, position of the MLC sheets and collimators for every field of treatment. The size of equivalent field is obtained from the positions of every sheet; the effective depth of calculation can be introduced from the dosimetric report of the Tps or automatically from the DFS of the field. The 3D coordinates of the isocenter and the Np for the treatment plan must be introduced manually. From this information the system looks the dosimetric parameters and calculates the Um. The calculations were realized in two accelerators a NOVALIS Tx (Varian) with 120 sheets of high definition (hd-MLC) and a PRIMUS Optifocus (Siemens) with 82 sheets. 705 patients were analyzed for a total of 1082, in plans made for both equipment s, the average uncertainty with regard to the calculation of the Tps is-0.43% ± 2.42% in a range between [-7.90 %, 7.50 %]. The major uncertainty was in Np near of the

  15. Ab initio calculation of molecular energies including parity violating interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakasov, A.; Ha Taekyu; Quack, M.

    1995-01-01

    A new approach, RHF-CIS, based on the perturbation of the ground state RHF wave function by the CIS excitations, has been implemented for evaluation of energy of parity violating interaction in molecules, E pv . The earlier approach, RHF-SDE, was based on the perturbation of the RHF ground states by the single-determinant ''excitations'' (SDE). The results obtained show the dramatic difference between E pv values in the RHF-CIS framework and those in the RHF-SDE framework: the E pv values of the RHF-CIS formalism are more than one order of magnitude greater compared to the RHF-SDE formalism as well as the corresponding tensor components. The maximal total value obtained for hydrogen peroxide in the RHF-CIS framework is 3.661 X 10 -19 E H (DZ ** basis set) while the maximal E pv value for the RHF-SDE formalism is just 3.635 X 10 -20 E H (TZ basis set). It is remarkable that both in the RFH-CIS and in the RHF-SDE approaches the diagonal tensor components of E pv strictly follow the geometry of a molecule and are always different from zero at chiral conformations. The zeros of the total E pv at chiral geometries are now found to be the results of the interplay between the diagonal tensor components values. We have carried out exhaustive analysis of the RHF-SDE formalism and found that it is not sufficiently accurate for studies of E pv . To this end, we have completely reproduced the previous work, which has been done in the RHF-SDE frame-work, and developed it further, studying how the RHF-SDE results vary when changing size and quality of basis sets. This last resource does not save the RHF-SDE formalism for evaluations of E pv from the general failure. Packages of FORTRAN routines called ENWEAK/RHFSDE-93 and ENWEAK/RHFCIS-94 have been developed which run on top of an ab initio MO package. We used 6-31G and 6-31G**, DZ and DZ**, TZ and TZ**, and (10s, 6p,**) basis sets. We will discuss the importance of the present results for possible measurement of the parity

  16. Energy level alignment and molecular conformation at rubrene/Ag interfaces: Impact of contact contaminations on the interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Sumona, E-mail: sumona.net.09@gmail.com [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Wang, C.-H. [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Mukherjee, M. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • Impact of contact contaminations on the energy level alignment and molecular conformation at rubrene/Ag interfaces. • Adventitious contamination layer was acted as a spacer layer between Ag substrate surface and rubrene molecular layer. • Hole injection barrier height and interface dipole at rubrene/Ag interfaces depend on the cleanliness of Ag substrate. • Molecular conformation as well as orientation controlled by the cleanliness of Ag surface. • Resulted different surface morphology of rubrene thin films on unclean and clean Ag substrate. - Abstract: This paper addresses the impact of electrode contaminations on the interfacial energy level alignment, the molecular conformation, orientation and surface morphology deposited organic film at organic semiconductor/noble metal interfaces by varying of film thickness from sub-monolayer to multilayer, which currently draws significant attention with regard to its application in organic electronics. The UHV clean Ag and unclean Ag were employed as substrate whereas rubrene was used as an organic semiconducting material. The photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and UPS) was engaged to investigate the evolution of interfacial energetics; polarization dependent near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) was employed to understand the molecular conformation as well as orientation whereas atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to investigate the surface morphologies of the films. The adventitious contamination layer was acted as a spacer layer between clean Ag substrate surface and rubrene molecular layer. As a consequence, hole injection barrier height, interface dipole as well as molecular-conformation, molecular-orientation and surface morphology of rubrene thin films were found to depend on the cleanliness of Ag substrate. The results have important inferences about the understanding of the impact of substrate contamination on the energy level alignment, the molecular conformation

  17. NMR investigation and theoretical calculations of the effect of solvent on the conformational analysis of 4',7-di-hydroxy-8-prenylflavan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcântara Antônio Flávio de Carvalho

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The NMR conformational study of 4',7-di-hydroxy-8-prenylflavan 1 was carried out in acetone-d6, DMSO-d6 and CDCl3 which enabled the proposition of three conformations, namely 1a, 1b and 1c, differing in the position of the prenyl group. Geometry optimizations performed using AM1 method showed that 1a (deltaHf = -86.2 kcal/mol is as stable as 1b (deltaHf = -85.1 kcal/mol and 1c (deltaHf = -85.4 kcal/mol. When the solvent was included, the calculations showed that the solute-solvent interactions could be explained either in the light of the electronic intermolecular delocalization or the electrostatic character between solute and solvent. Theoretical calculations (HF/6-31G*, deltaFT/BLYP/6-31G*, and deltaFT/B3LYP/6-31G* showed that the combination of these types of interactions present in each solute-solvent system, dependent on the chemical properties of the solvent, lead to different spatial arrangements of the prenyl group, which in turn determined the conformation of 1.

  18. Energy conservation for houses and its calculation methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S H

    1981-04-01

    The concept of energy conservation of houses has been developed and began to be applied widely since the first oil crisis. Now we can say definitely that insulating a house is the most effective way of saving energy, and the renewable energy sources are useful only when the demand for space heating and hot water is minimized by insulating. If a house is well insulated, it will need a much smaller, simpler and cheaper heating system. So it will be less efficient to put a solar collector and wind generator on a poorly insulated house. Architects and engineers should have a certain level of practical knowledge of insulation for house to persuade customers using insulating materials and structure. Moreover, it is very essential to amend the existing building codes in order to facilitate this basic necessity. For instance, the Building Regulations of Denmark requires a U-value of 0.4 W/m/sup 2/ degC for heavy weight external wall. If the cavity wall has outer and inner leaf of just normal brick with internal finish of 20 mm cement mortar, which is a typical wall construction for houses in Korea, the thickness of insulation materials to the cavity can be calculated in order to fullfil the U-value of 0.4 W/m/sup 2/ degC in addition to the cavity of the external heavy wall: expanded polyurethane 58 mm, urea formaldehyde foam 67 mm, expanded polystyrene 78 mm, mineral wool 94 mm. The economic feasibility of solar heating system has been calculated. By applying 25% of the year inflation ratio for fuel cost, the result turns out economically comparable with solar heating systems.

  19. Calculation of the intermediate energy activation cross section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furihata, Shiori; Yoshizawa, Nobuaki [Mitsubishi Research Inst., Inc., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    We discussed the activation cross section in order to predict accurately the activation of soil around an accelerator with high energy and strong intensity beam. For the assessment of the accuracy of activation cross sections estimated by a numerical model, we compared the calculated cross section with various experimental data, for Si(p,x){sup 22}Na, Al(p,x){sup 22}Na, Fe(p,x){sup 22}Na, Si(p,x){sup 7}Be, O(p,x){sup 3}H, Al(p,x){sup 3}H and Si(p,x){sup 3}H reactions. We used three computational codes, i.e., quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) plus statistical decay model (SDM), HETC-3STEP and the semiempirical method developed by Silberberg et.al. It is observed that the codes are accurate above 1GeV, except for {sup 7}Be production. We also discussed the difference between the activation cross sections of proton- and neutron-induced reaction. For the incident energy at 40MeV, it is found that {sup 3}H production cross sections of neutron-induced reaction are ten times as large as those of proton-induced reaction. It is also observed that the choice of the activation cross sections seriously affects to the estimate of saturated radioactivity, if the maximum energy of neutron flux is below 100MeV. (author)

  20. Combined experimental powder X-ray diffraction and DFT data to obtain the lowest energy molecular conformation of friedelin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Djalma Menezes de; Mussel, Wagner da Nova; Duarte, Lucienir Pains; Silva, Gracia Divina de Fatima; Duarte, Helio Anderson; Gomes, Elionai Cassiana de Lima; Guimaraes, Luciana; Vieira Filho, Sidney A.

    2012-01-01

    Friedelin molecular conformers were obtained by Density Functional Theory (DFT) and by ab initio structure determination from powder X-ray diffraction. Their conformers with the five rings in chair-chair-chair-boat-boat, and with all rings in chair, are energy degenerated in gas-phase according to DFT results. The powder diffraction data reveals that rings A, B and C of friedelin are in chair, and rings D and E in boat-boat, conformation. The high correlation values among powder diffraction data, DFT and reported single crystal data indicate that the use of conventional X-ray diffractometer can be applied in routine laboratory analysis in the absence of a single-crystal diffractometer. (author)

  1. Combined experimental powder X-ray diffraction and DFT data to obtain the lowest energy molecular conformation of friedelin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Djalma Menezes de; Mussel, Wagner da Nova; Duarte, Lucienir Pains; Silva, Gracia Divina de Fatima; Duarte, Helio Anderson; Gomes, Elionai Cassiana de Lima [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Guimaraes, Luciana [Universidade Federal de Sao Joao Del-Rei (UFSJ), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Naturais; Vieira Filho, Sidney A., E-mail: bibo@ef.ufop.br [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Farmacia

    2012-07-01

    Friedelin molecular conformers were obtained by Density Functional Theory (DFT) and by ab initio structure determination from powder X-ray diffraction. Their conformers with the five rings in chair-chair-chair-boat-boat, and with all rings in chair, are energy degenerated in gas-phase according to DFT results. The powder diffraction data reveals that rings A, B and C of friedelin are in chair, and rings D and E in boat-boat, conformation. The high correlation values among powder diffraction data, DFT and reported single crystal data indicate that the use of conventional X-ray diffractometer can be applied in routine laboratory analysis in the absence of a single-crystal diffractometer. (author)

  2. Molecular structure and conformational composition of 1,3-dihydroxyacetone studied by combined analysis of gas-phase electron diffraction data, rotational constants, and results of theoretical calculations. Ideal gas thermodynamic properties of 1,3-dihydroxyacetone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorofeeva, Olga V; Vogt, Natalja; Vogt, Jürgen; Popik, Mikhail V; Rykov, Anatolii N; Vilkov, Lev V

    2007-07-19

    The molecular structure of 1,3-dihydroxyacetone (DHA) has been studied by gas-phase electron diffraction (GED), combined analysis of GED and microwave (MW) data, ab initio, and density functional theory calculations. The equilibrium re structure of DHA was determined by a joint analysis of the GED data and rotational constants taken from the literature. The anharmonic vibrational corrections to the internuclear distances (re-ra) and to the rotational constants (B(i)e-B(i)0) needed for the estimation of the re structure were calculated from the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ cubic force field. It was found that the experimental data are well reproduced by assuming that DHA consists of a mixture of three conformers. The most stable conformer of C2v symmetry has two hydrogen bonds, whereas the next two lowest energy conformers (Cs and C1 symmetry) have one hydrogen bond and their abundance is about 30% in total. A combined analysis of GED and MW data led to the following equilibrium structural parameters (re) of the most abundant conformer of DHA (the uncertainties in parentheses are 3 times the standard deviations): r(C=O)=1.215(2) A, r(C-C)=1.516(2) A, r(C-O)=1.393(2) A, r(C-H)=1.096(4) A, r(O-H)=0.967(4) A, angleC-C=O=119.9(2) degrees, angleC-C-O=111.0(2) degrees, angleC-C-H=108.2(7) degrees, angleC-O-H=106.5(7) degrees. These structural parameters reproduce the experimental B(i)0 values within 0.05 MHz. The experimental structural parameters are in good agreement with those obtained from theoretical calculations. Ideal gas thermodynamic functions (S degrees (T), C degrees p(T), and H degrees (T)-H degrees (0)) of DHA were calculated on the basis of experimental and theoretical molecular parameters obtained in this work. The enthalpy of formation of DHA, -523+/-4 kJ/mol, was calculated by the atomization procedure using the G3X method.

  3. Strict calculation of electron energy distribution functions in inhomogeneous plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, R.

    1996-01-01

    It is objective of the paper to report on strict calculations of the velocity or energy distribution function function and related macroscopic properties of the electrons from appropriate electron kinetic equations under various plasma conditions and to contribute to a better understanding of the electron behaviour in inhomogeneous plasma regions. In particular, the spatial relaxation of plasma electrons acted upon by uniform electric fields, the response of plasma electrons on spatial disturbances of the electric field, the electron kinetics under the impact of space charge field confinement in the dc column plasma and the electron velocity distribution is stronger field as occurring in the electrode regions of a dc glow discharge is considered. (author)

  4. Measuring the mechanical properties of molecular conformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, S. P.; Taylor, S.; Baran, J. D.; Champness, N. R.; Larsson, J. A.; Moriarty, P.

    2015-09-01

    Scanning probe-actuated single molecule manipulation has proven to be an exceptionally powerful tool for the systematic atomic-scale interrogation of molecular adsorbates. To date, however, the extent to which molecular conformation affects the force required to push or pull a single molecule has not been explored. Here we probe the mechanochemical response of two tetra(4-bromophenyl)porphyrin conformers using non-contact atomic force microscopy where we find a large difference between the lateral forces required for manipulation. Remarkably, despite sharing very similar adsorption characteristics, variations in the potential energy surface are capable of prohibiting probe-induced positioning of one conformer, while simultaneously permitting manipulation of the alternative conformational form. Our results are interpreted in the context of dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations which reveal significant differences in the diffusion barriers for each conformer. These results demonstrate that conformational variation significantly modifies the mechanical response of even simple porpyhrins, potentially affecting many other flexible molecules.

  5. Variationally Optimized Free-Energy Flooding for Rate Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, James; Valsson, Omar; Tiwary, Pratyush; Parrinello, Michele

    2015-08-01

    We propose a new method to obtain kinetic properties of infrequent events from molecular dynamics simulation. The procedure employs a recently introduced variational approach [Valsson and Parrinello, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 090601 (2014)] to construct a bias potential as a function of several collective variables that is designed to flood the associated free energy surface up to a predefined level. The resulting bias potential effectively accelerates transitions between metastable free energy minima while ensuring bias-free transition states, thus allowing accurate kinetic rates to be obtained. We test the method on a few illustrative systems for which we obtain an order of magnitude improvement in efficiency relative to previous approaches and several orders of magnitude relative to unbiased molecular dynamics. We expect an even larger improvement in more complex systems. This and the ability of the variational approach to deal efficiently with a large number of collective variables will greatly enhance the scope of these calculations. This work is a vindication of the potential that the variational principle has if applied in innovative ways.

  6. Energy balance calculations and assessment of two thermochemical sulfur cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leger, D.; Lessart, P.; Manaud, J.P.; Benizri, R.; Courvoisier, P.

    1978-01-01

    Thermochemical cyclic processes which include the highly endothermal decomposition of sulphuric acid are promising for hydrogen production by water-splitting. Our study is directed toward two cycles of this family, each involving the formation and decomposition of sulphuric acid and including other reactions using iron sulphide for the first and oxides and bromides of copper and magnesium for the second. Thermochemical analyses of the two cycles are undertaken. Thermodynamic studies of the reactions are carried out, taking into account possible side-reactions. The concentration of reactants, products and by-products resulting from simultaneous equilibria are calculated, the problems of separation thoroughly studied and the flow-diagrams of the processes drawn up. Using as heat source the helium leaving a 3000 MWth high temperature nuclear reactor and organizing internal heat exchange the enthalpy diagrams are drawn up and the net energy balances evaluated. The overall thermal efficiencies are about 28%, a value corresponding to non-optimized process schemes. Possible improvements aiming at energy-saving and increased efficiency are indicated

  7. Individualised calculation of tissue imparted energy in breast tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geeraert, N.; Klausz, R.; Muller, S.; Bosmans, H.; Bloch, I.

    2016-01-01

    The imparted energy to the glandular tissue in the breast (glandular imparted energy, GIE) is proposed for an improved assessment of the individual radiation-induced risk resulting from X-ray breast imaging. GIE is computed from an estimation of the quantity and localisation of glandular tissue in the breast. After a digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) acquisition, the volumetric glandular content (volumetric breast density, VBD) is computed from the central X-ray projection. The glandular tissue distribution is determined by labelling the DBT voxels to ensure the conservation of the VBD. Finally, the GIE is calculated by Monte Carlo computation on the resulting tissue-labelled DBT volume. For verification, the method was applied to 10 breast-shaped digital phantoms made of different glandular spheres in an adipose background, and to a digital anthropomorphic phantom. Results were compared to direct GIE computations on the phantoms considered as 'ground-truth'. The major limitations in accuracy are those of DBT, in particular the limited z-resolution. However, for most phantoms, the results can be considered as acceptable. (authors)

  8. Research on energy transmission calculation problem on laser detecting submarine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Li, Yingchao; Zhang, Lizhong; Wang, Chao; An, Yan

    2014-12-01

    The laser detection and identification is based on the method of using laser as the source of signal to scan the surface of ocean. If the laser detection equipment finds out the target, it will immediately reflect the returning signal, and then through receiving and disposing the returning signal by the receiving system, to realize the function of detection and identification. Two mediums channels should be though in the process of laser detection transmission, which are the atmosphere and the seawater. The energy loss in the process of water transport, mainly considering the surface reflection and scattering attenuation and internal attenuation factors such as seawater. The energy consumption though atmospheric transmission, mainly considering the absorption of atmospheric and the attenuation causing by scattering, the energy consumption though seawater transmission, mainly considering the element such as surface reflection, the attenuation of scattering and internal attenuation of seawater. On the basis of the analysis and research, through the mode of establishment of atmospheric scattering, the model of sea surface reflection and the model of internal attenuation of seawater, determine the power dissipation of emitting lasers system, calculates the signal strength that reaches the receiver. Under certain conditions, the total attenuation of -98.92 dB by calculation, and put forward the related experiment scheme by the use of Atmospheric analog channel, seawater analog channel. In the experiment of the theory, we use the simulation pool of the atmosphere and the sea to replace the real environment where the laser detection system works in this kind of situation. To start with, we need to put the target in the simulating seawater pool of 10 meters large and then control the depth of the target in the sea level. We, putting the laser detection system in position where it is 2 kilometers far from one side, secondly use the equipment to aim at the target in some

  9. Calculation of 3D genome structures for comparison of chromosome conformation capture experiments with microscopy: An evaluation of single-cell Hi-C protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lando, David; Stevens, Tim J; Basu, Srinjan; Laue, Ernest D

    2018-01-01

    Single-cell chromosome conformation capture approaches are revealing the extent of cell-to-cell variability in the organization and packaging of genomes. These single-cell methods, unlike their multi-cell counterparts, allow straightforward computation of realistic chromosome conformations that may be compared and combined with other, independent, techniques to study 3D structure. Here we discuss how single-cell Hi-C and subsequent 3D genome structure determination allows comparison with data from microscopy. We then carry out a systematic evaluation of recently published single-cell Hi-C datasets to establish a computational approach for the evaluation of single-cell Hi-C protocols. We show that the calculation of genome structures provides a useful tool for assessing the quality of single-cell Hi-C data because it requires a self-consistent network of interactions, relating to the underlying 3D conformation, with few errors, as well as sufficient longer-range cis- and trans-chromosomal contacts.

  10. Multiple binding modes of ibuprofen in human serum albumin identified by absolute binding free energy calculations

    KAUST Repository

    Evoli, Stefania

    2016-11-10

    Human serum albumin possesses multiple binding sites and transports a wide range of ligands that include the anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen. A complete map of the binding sites of ibuprofen in albumin is difficult to obtain in traditional experiments, because of the structural adaptability of this protein in accommodating small ligands. In this work, we provide a set of predictions covering the geometry, affinity of binding and protonation state for the pharmaceutically most active form (S-isomer) of ibuprofen to albumin, by using absolute binding free energy calculations in combination with classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and molecular docking. The most favorable binding modes correctly reproduce several experimentally identified binding locations, which include the two Sudlow\\'s drug sites (DS2 and DS1) and the fatty acid binding sites 6 and 2 (FA6 and FA2). Previously unknown details of the binding conformations were revealed for some of them, and formerly undetected binding modes were found in other protein sites. The calculated binding affinities exhibit trends which seem to agree with the available experimental data, and drastically degrade when the ligand is modeled in a protonated (neutral) state, indicating that ibuprofen associates with albumin preferentially in its charged form. These findings provide a detailed description of the binding of ibuprofen, help to explain a wide range of results reported in the literature in the last decades, and demonstrate the possibility of using simulation methods to predict ligand binding to albumin.

  11. Hydrogen abstraction from n-butanol by the methyl radical: high level ab initio study of abstraction pathways and the importance of low energy rotational conformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsikadakos, D; Hardalupas, Y; Taylor, A M K P; Hunt, P A

    2012-07-21

    Hydrogen abstraction reactions by the methyl radical from n-butanol have been investigated at the ROCBS-QB3 level of theory. Reaction energies and product geometries for the most stable conformer of n-butanol (ROH) have been computed, the reaction energies order α channel more stable than the β-channel? Why do the two C(γ)-H H-abstraction TS differ in energy? The method and basis set dependence of the TS barriers is investigated. The Boltzmann probability distribution for the n-butanol conformers suggests that low energy conformers are present in approximately equal proportions to the most stable conformer at combustion temperatures where ĊH(3) radicals are present. Thus, the relative significance of the various H-abstraction channels has been assessed for a selection of higher energy conformers (ROH'). Key results include finding that higher energy n-butanol conformers (E(ROH') > E(ROH)) can generate lower energy product radicals, E(ROH') < E(ROH). Moreover, higher energy conformers can also have a globally competitive TS energy for H-abstraction.

  12. Higher-Order Scheme-Independent Calculations of Physical Quantities in the Conformal Phase of a Gauge Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryttov, Thomas A.; Shrock, Robert

    2017-01-01

    , adjoint, and symmetric rank-2 tensor representation are considered. We present scheme-independent calculations of the anomalous dimension $\\gamma_{\\bar\\psi\\psi,IR}$ to $O(\\Delta_f^4)$ and $\\beta'_{IR}$ to $O(\\Delta_f^5)$ at this IRFP, where $\\Delta_f$ is an $N_f$-dependent expansion parameter. Comparisons...... are made with conventional $n$-loop calculations and lattice measurements. As a test of the accuracy of the $\\Delta_f$ expansion, we calculate $\\gamma_{\\bar\\psi\\psi,IR}$ to $O(\\Delta_f^3)$ in ${\\cal N}=1$ SU($N_c$) supersymmetric quantum chromodynamics and find complete agreement, to this order...

  13. Calculation of almost all energy levels of baryons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Everaldo de Souza

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available It is considered that the effective  interaction between any two quarks of a baryon can be approximately described by a simple harmonic potential. The problem is firstly solved in Cartesian coordinates in order to find the energy levels irrespective of their angular momenta. Then, the problem is also solved in polar cylindrical coordinates in order to take into account the angular momenta of the levels. Comparing the two solutions, a correspondence is made between the angular momenta and parities for almost all experimentally determined levels. The agreement with the experimental data is quite impressive and, in general, the discrepancy between calculated and experimental values is below 5%. A couple of levels of $Delta$, $N$, $Sigma^{pm}$, and $Omega$ present discrepacies between 6.7% and 12.5% ($N(1655$, $N(1440$, $N(1675$, $N(1685$, $N(1700$, $N(1710$, $N(1720$, $N(1990$, $N(2600$, $Delta(1700$, $Delta(2000$, $Delta(2300$, $Sigma^{pm}(1189$, $Lambda(1520$, $Omega(1672$ and $Omega(2250$.Received: 6 June 2011, Accepted: 13 July 2011; Edited by: D. Restrepo; Reviewed by: J. H. Muñoz, Universidad del Tolima, Ibagué, Colombia and Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisica; DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4279/PIP.030003Cite as: M. E. de Souza, Papers in Physics 3, 030003 (2011

  14. Calculating activation energies for temperature compensation in circadian rhythms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodenstein, C; Heiland, I; Schuster, S

    2011-01-01

    Many biological species possess a circadian clock, which helps them anticipate daily variations in the environment. In the absence of external stimuli, the rhythm persists autonomously with a period of approximately 24 h. However, single pulses of light, nutrients, chemicals or temperature can shift the clock phase. In the case of light- and temperature-cycles, this allows entrainment of the clock to cycles of exactly 24 h. Circadian clocks have the remarkable property of temperature compensation, that is, the period of the circadian rhythm remains relatively constant within a physiological range of temperatures. For several organisms, temperature-regulated processes within the circadian clock have been identified in recent years. However, how these processes contribute to temperature compensation is not fully understood. Here, we theoretically investigate temperature compensation in general oscillatory systems. It is known that every oscillator can be locally temperature compensated around a reference temperature, if reactions are appropriately balanced. A balancing is always possible if the control coefficient with respect to the oscillation period of at least one reaction in the oscillator network is positive. However, for global temperature compensation, the whole physiological temperature range is relevant. Here, we use an approach which leads to an optimization problem subject to the local balancing principle. We use this approach to analyse different circadian clock models proposed in the literature and calculate activation energies that lead to temperature compensation

  15. The correlation of cathodic peak potentials of vitamin K(3) derivatives and their calculated electron affinities. The role of hydrogen bonding and conformational changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Hamid Reza; Panisch, Robin; Madej, M Gregor; Bats, Jan W; Lancaster, C Roy D; Schwalbe, Harald

    2009-06-01

    2-methyl-1,4-naphtoquinone 1 (vitamin K(3), menadione) derivatives with different substituents at the 3-position were synthesized to tune their electrochemical properties. The thermodynamic midpoint potential (E(1/2)) of the naphthoquinone derivatives yielding a semi radical naphthoquinone anion were measured by cyclic voltammetry in the aprotic solvent dimethoxyethane (DME). Using quantum chemical methods, a clear correlation was found between the thermodynamic midpoint potentials and the calculated electron affinities (E(A)). Comparison of calculated and experimental values allowed delineation of additional factors such as the conformational dependence of quinone substituents and hydrogen bonding which can influence the electron affinities (E(A)) of the quinone. This information can be used as a model to gain insight into enzyme-cofactor interactions, particularly for enzyme quinone binding modes and the electrochemical adjustment of the quinone motif.

  16. Enhanced Sampling in Free Energy Calculations: Combining SGLD with the Bennett's Acceptance Ratio and Enveloping Distribution Sampling Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Gerhard; Miller, Benjamin T; Boresch, Stefan; Wu, Xiongwu; Brooks, Bernard R

    2012-10-09

    One of the key requirements for the accurate calculation of free energy differences is proper sampling of conformational space. Especially in biological applications, molecular dynamics simulations are often confronted with rugged energy surfaces and high energy barriers, leading to insufficient sampling and, in turn, poor convergence of the free energy results. In this work, we address this problem by employing enhanced sampling methods. We explore the possibility of using self-guided Langevin dynamics (SGLD) to speed up the exploration process in free energy simulations. To obtain improved free energy differences from such simulations, it is necessary to account for the effects of the bias due to the guiding forces. We demonstrate how this can be accomplished for the Bennett's acceptance ratio (BAR) and the enveloping distribution sampling (EDS) methods. While BAR is considered among the most efficient methods available for free energy calculations, the EDS method developed by Christ and van Gunsteren is a promising development that reduces the computational costs of free energy calculations by simulating a single reference state. To evaluate the accuracy of both approaches in connection with enhanced sampling, EDS was implemented in CHARMM. For testing, we employ benchmark systems with analytical reference results and the mutation of alanine to serine. We find that SGLD with reweighting can provide accurate results for BAR and EDS where conventional molecular dynamics simulations fail. In addition, we compare the performance of EDS with other free energy methods. We briefly discuss the implications of our results and provide practical guidelines for conducting free energy simulations with SGLD.

  17. Monte carlo calculation of energy deposition and ionization yield for high energy protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, W.E.; McDonald, J.C.; Coyne, J.J.; Paretzke, H.G.

    1985-01-01

    Recent calculations of event size spectra for neutrons use a continuous slowing down approximation model for the energy losses experienced by secondary charged particles (protons and alphas) and thus do not allow for straggling effects. Discrepancies between the calculations and experimental measurements are thought to be, in part, due to the neglect of straggling. A tractable way of including stochastics in radiation transport calculations is via the Monte Carlo method and a number of efforts directed toward simulating positive ion track structure have been initiated employing this technique. Recent results obtained with our updated and extended MOCA code for charged particle track structure are presented here. Major emphasis has been on calculating energy deposition and ionization yield spectra for recoil proton crossers since they are the most prevalent event type at high energies (>99% at 14 MeV) for small volumes. Neutron event-size spectra can be obtained from them by numerical summing and folding techniques. Data for ionization yield spectra are presented for simulated recoil protons up to 20 MeV in sites of diameters 2-1000 nm

  18. High energy asymptotics of multi-colour QCD and two-dimensional conformal field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipatov, L.N.; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron

    1993-04-01

    In the multi-colour limit of perturbative QCD the holomorphic factorization of wave functions of compound states of n reggeized gluons in the impact parameter space is shown. The conformally invariant Hamiltonian for each holomorphic factor has a nontrivial integral of motion. The odderon in QCD is the simplest example of the composite system with these properties. (orig.)

  19. Absolute binding free energy calculations of CBClip host–guest systems in the SAMPL5 blind challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofoleanu, Florentina; Pickard, Frank C.; König, Gerhard; Huang, Jing; Damjanović, Ana; Baek, Minkyung; Seok, Chaok; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report the absolute binding free energy calculations of CBClip complexes in the SAMPL5 blind challenge. Initial conformations of CBClip complexes were obtained using docking and molecular dynamics simulations. Free energy calculations were performed using thermodynamic integration (TI) with soft-core potentials and Bennett’s acceptance ratio (BAR) method based on a serial insertion scheme. We compared the results obtained with TI simulations with soft-core potentials and Hamiltonian replica exchange simulations with the serial insertion method combined with the BAR method. The results show that the difference between the two methods can be mainly attributed to the van der Waals free energies, suggesting that either the simulations used for TI or the simulations used for BAR, or both are not fully converged and the two sets of simulations may have sampled difference phase space regions. The penalty scores of force field parameters of the 10 guest molecules provided by CHARMM Generalized Force Field can be an indicator of the accuracy of binding free energy calculations. Among our submissions, the combination of docking and TI performed best, which yielded the root mean square deviation of 2.94 kcal/mol and an average unsigned error of 3.41 kcal/mol for the ten guest molecules. These values were best overall among all participants. However, our submissions had little correlation with experiments. PMID:27677749

  20. Calculation of the yearly energy performance of heating systems based on the European Building Energy Directive and related CEN Standards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Bjarne W.; de Carli, Michele

    2011-01-01

    According to the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (EPBD) all new European buildings (residential, commercial, industrial, etc.) must since 2006 have an energy declaration based on the calculated energy performance of the building, including heating, ventilating, cooling and lighting syst......–20% of the building energy demand. The additional loss depends on the type of heat emitter, type of control, pump and boiler. Keywords: Heating systems; CEN standards; Energy performance; Calculation methods......According to the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (EPBD) all new European buildings (residential, commercial, industrial, etc.) must since 2006 have an energy declaration based on the calculated energy performance of the building, including heating, ventilating, cooling and lighting...... systems. This energy declaration must refer to the primary energy or CO2 emissions. The European Organization for Standardization (CEN) has prepared a series of standards for energy performance calculations for buildings and systems. This paper presents related standards for heating systems. The relevant...

  1. Classification of methods for annual energy harvesting calculations of photovoltaic generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rus-Casas, C.; Aguilar, J.D.; Rodrigo, P.; Almonacid, F.; Pérez-Higueras, P.J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The paper presents a novel classification of methods for annual energy harvesting calculation of grid-connected PV systems. • The methods are classified in direct and indirect methods. • Direct methods directly calculate the energy. Indirect methods calculate the energy from the power. • The classification can help the PV professionals in order to choose the most suitable method for each application. - Abstract: Estimating the energy provided by the generators of grid-connected photovoltaic systems is important in order to analyze their economic viability and supervise their operation. The energy harvesting calculation of a photovoltaic generator is not trivial; there are a lot of methods for this calculation. The aim of this paper is to develop a novel classification of methods for annual energy harvesting calculation of a generator of a grid-connected photovoltaic system. The methods are classified in two groups: (1) those that indirectly calculate the energy, i.e. they first calculate the power and from this, they calculate the energy, and (2) those that directly calculate the energy. Furthermore, the indirect methods are grouped in two categories: those that first calculate the I–V curve of the generator and from this, they calculate the power, and those that directly calculate the power. The study has shown that the existing methods differ in simplicity and accuracy, so that the proposed classification is useful in order to choose the most suitable method for each specific application

  2. Stereochemistry of Complex Marine Natural Products by Quantum Mechanical Calculations of NMR Chemical Shifts: Solvent and Conformational Effects on Okadaic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto J. Domínguez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Marine organisms are an increasingly important source of novel metabolites, some of which have already inspired or become new drugs. In addition, many of these molecules show a high degree of novelty from a structural and/or pharmacological point of view. Structure determination is generally achieved by the use of a variety of spectroscopic methods, among which NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance plays a major role and determination of the stereochemical relationships within every new molecule is generally the most challenging part in structural determination. In this communication, we have chosen okadaic acid as a model compound to perform a computational chemistry study to predict 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts. The effect of two different solvents and conformation on the ability of DFT (density functional theory calculations to predict the correct stereoisomer has been studied.

  3. Alternative definitions of the frozen energy in energy decomposition analysis of density functional theory calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Paul R; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2016-02-28

    In energy decomposition analysis (EDA) of intermolecular interactions calculated via density functional theory, the initial supersystem wavefunction defines the so-called "frozen energy" including contributions such as permanent electrostatics, steric repulsions, and dispersion. This work explores the consequences of the choices that must be made to define the frozen energy. The critical choice is whether the energy should be minimized subject to the constraint of fixed density. Numerical results for Ne2, (H2O)2, BH3-NH3, and ethane dissociation show that there can be a large energy lowering associated with constant density orbital relaxation. By far the most important contribution is constant density inter-fragment relaxation, corresponding to charge transfer (CT). This is unwanted in an EDA that attempts to separate CT effects, but it may be useful in other contexts such as force field development. An algorithm is presented for minimizing single determinant energies at constant density both with and without CT by employing a penalty function that approximately enforces the density constraint.

  4. Assessment of conformity and suitability for use of the energy subsystem of interoperable high-speed lines; Konformitaetsbewertung und EG-Pruefverfahren fuer das Teilsystem Energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrends, D. [Steglitzer Damm, Deutschen Bahn, Berlin (Germany); Brodkorb, A.; Matthes, R. [Siemens AG, Erlangen (Germany)

    2003-05-01

    The directive 96/48/EG governs the conformity assessment of conformity of interoperability constituents and of suitability for use of subsystems of the trans-European high-speed rail system. The assessment of the overhead contact line type SICAT H 1.0 and the energy subsystem of the new high-speed line Belgian boundary-Rotterdam-Hoofddop (HSL Zuid) in the Netherlands establish examples for the application of the technical specification for the energy subsystem. (orig.) [German] Die Richtlinie 96/48/EG regelt die Bewertung der Konformitaet von Komponenten und das EG-Pruefverfahren von Teilsystemen des interoperablen transeuropaeischen Hochgeschwindigkeitsbahnsystems. Beispiele fuer diese beiden Vorgaenge sind die Bewertung der Oberleitungsbauart SICAT H 1.0 und die Pruefung der Energieversorgung der Hochgeschwindigkeitsstrecke belgische Grenze-Rotterdam-Hoofddop (HSL Zuid) in den Niederlanden. (orig.)

  5. High energy physics signatures from inflation and conformal symmetry of de Sitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kehagias, A.; Riotto, A.

    2015-01-01

    During inflation, the geometry of spacetime is described by a (quasi-)de Sitter phase. Inflationary observables are determined by the underlying (softly broken) de Sitter isometry group SO(1, 4) which acts like a conformal group on R 3 : when the fluctuations are on super-Hubble scales, the correlators of the scalar fields are constrained by conformal invariance. Heavy fields with mass m larger than the Hubble rate H correspond to operators with imaginary dimensions in the dual Euclidean three-dimensional conformal field theory. By making use of the dS/CFT correspondence we show that, besides the Boltzmann suppression expected from the thermal properties of de Sitter space, the generic effect of heavy fields in the inflationary correlators of the light fields is to introduce power-law suppressed corrections of the form O(H 2 / m 2 ). This can be seen, for instance, at the level of the four-point correlator for which we provide the correction due to a massive scalar field exchange. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Practical ambiguities during calculation of energy ratios and their impacts on life cycle assessment calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yongli; Colosi, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    The energy ratio metrics are increasingly important means of assessing the efficiency of energy production for emerging biofuels platforms, making comparisons among multiple alternatives, and formulating policies to foster commercialization of sustainable energy systems. However, these metrics are susceptible to inadvertent or meaningful mathematical manipulation, whereby the same dataset can be used to compute dramatically different values of energy return on investment (EROI). In this study, previously published life cycle assessment (LCA) data for algal biofuels, corn ethanol, and switchgrass ethanol are used to demonstrate how seven seemingly reasonable EROI formulations give rise to a wide range of output values. It is then demonstrated that production of bioelectricity, and to a lesser extent, other co-products, significantly increases EROI ambiguity. Overall, the EROI results are used to illustrate how EROI ambiguity makes it difficult to properly assess the energetic favorability of a particular energy system or to make accurate comparisons among multiple systems. It is then recommended that all future biofuels studies restrict themselves to usage of “EROI 1 ”, which documents all input and outputs as explicit terms, to mitigate EROI ambiguity and improve policy decision-making. - Highlights: ► Energy ratios are appealing but potentially ambiguous sustainability metrics. ► Various ratio formulations can give different metrics for the same dataset. ► Production of electricity or other co-products exacerbates ratio ambiguity

  7. Impact of domain knowledge on blinded predictions of binding energies by alchemical free energy calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mey, Antonia S. J. S.; Jiménez, Jordi Juárez; Michel, Julien

    2018-01-01

    The Drug Design Data Resource (D3R) consortium organises blinded challenges to address the latest advances in computational methods for ligand pose prediction, affinity ranking, and free energy calculations. Within the context of the second D3R Grand Challenge several blinded binding free energies predictions were made for two congeneric series of Farsenoid X Receptor (FXR) inhibitors with a semi-automated alchemical free energy calculation workflow featuring FESetup and SOMD software tools. Reasonable performance was observed in retrospective analyses of literature datasets. Nevertheless, blinded predictions on the full D3R datasets were poor due to difficulties encountered with the ranking of compounds that vary in their net-charge. Performance increased for predictions that were restricted to subsets of compounds carrying the same net-charge. Disclosure of X-ray crystallography derived binding modes maintained or improved the correlation with experiment in a subsequent rounds of predictions. The best performing protocols on D3R set1 and set2 were comparable or superior to predictions made on the basis of analysis of literature structure activity relationships (SAR)s only, and comparable or slightly inferior, to the best submissions from other groups.

  8. Improvements to the nuclear model code GNASH for cross section calculations at higher energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, P.G.; Chadwick, M.B.

    1994-01-01

    The nuclear model code GNASH, which in the past has been used predominantly for incident particle energies below 20 MeV, has been modified extensively for calculations at higher energies. The model extensions and improvements are described in this paper, and their significance is illustrated by comparing calculations with experimental data for incident energies up to 160 MeV

  9. Development and validation of continuous energy adjoint-weighted calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truchet, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    A key issue in nowadays Reactor Physics is to propagate input data uncertainties (e.g. nuclear data, manufacturing tolerances, etc.) to nuclear codes final results (e.g. k(eff), reaction rate, etc.). In order to propagate uncertainties, one typically assumes small variations around a reference and evaluates at first sensitivity profiles. Problem is that nuclear Monte Carlo codes are not - or were not until very recently - able to straightforwardly process such sensitivity profiles, even thought they are considered as reference codes. First goal of this PhD thesis is to implement a method to calculate k(eff)-sensitivity profiles to nuclear data or any perturbations in TRIPOLI-4, the CEA Monte Carlo neutrons transport code. To achieve such a goal, a method has first been developed to calculate the adjoint flux using the Iterated Fission Probability (IFP) principle that states that the adjoint flux at a given phase space point is proportional to the neutron importance in a just critical core after several power iterations. Thanks to our developments, it has been made possible, for the fist time, to calculate the continuous adjoint flux for an actual and complete reactor core configuration. From that new feature, we have elaborated a new method able to forwardly apply the exact perturbation theory in Monte Carlo codes. Exact perturbation theory does not rely on small variations which makes possible to calculate very complex experiments. Finally and after a deep analysis of the IFP method, this PhD thesis also reproduces and improves an already used method to calculate adjoint weighted kinetic parameters as well as reference migrations areas. (author) [fr

  10. Supersonic Jet Studies of Benzyl Alcohols: Minimum Energy Conformations and Torsional Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-13

    New York: 1980. (46) Bernstein, E. R.; Law, K.; Schauer, M. J. Chem. Phys. 1984, 80, 207. (47) Hanzlik , R. P.; Schaefer , A. R.; Moon , J. B.; Judson , C...M. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1987 , 109 , 4926 . -32- Table I. Conformations of substituted benzenes as established by laser jet spectroscopy. jY x 1 ortho T...Chem. Soc. 1987 , 109 , 3453. -29- (11) Breen, P. J.; Bernstein, E. R.; Seeman, J. I. J. Chem, Phys. 1987 , 87, 3269. (12) Breen, P. J.; Warren, J. A

  11. Calculation of exit dose for conformal and dynamically‐wedged fields, based on water‐equivalent path length measured with an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glegg, Martin; Metwaly, Mohamed; Currie, Garry; Elliott, Alex

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we use the quadratic calibration method (QCM), in which an EPID image is converted into a matrix of equivalent path lengths (EPLs) and, therefore, exit doses, so as to model doses in conformal and enhanced dynamic wedge (EDW) fields. The QCM involves acquiring series of EPID images at a reference field size for different thicknesses of homogeneous solid water blocks. From these, a set of coefficients is established that is used to compute the EPL of any other irradiated material. To determine the EPL, the irradiated area must be known in order to establish the appropriate scatter correction. A method was devised for the automatic calculation of areas from the EPID image that facilitated the calculation of EPL for any field and exit dose. For EDW fields, the fitting coefficients were modified by utilizing the linac manufacturer's golden segmented treatment tables (GSTT) methodology and MU fraction model. The nonlinear response of the EPL with lower monitor units (MUs) was investigated and slight modification of the algorithm performed to account for this. The method permits 2D dose distributions at the exit of phantom or patient to be generated by relating the EPL with an appropriate depth dose table. The results indicate that the inclusion of MU correction improved the EPL determination. The irradiated field areas can be accurately determined from EPID images to within ± 1% uncertainty. Cross‐plane profiles and 2D dose distributions of EPID predicted doses were compared with those calculated with the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) and those measured directly with MapCHECK 2 device. Comparison of the 2D EPID dose maps to those from TPS and MapCHECK shows that more than 90% of all points passed the gamma index acceptance criteria of 3% dose difference and 3 mm distance to agreement (DTA), for both conformal and EDW study cases. We conclude that the EPID QCM is an accurate and convenient method for in vivo dosimetry and may, therefore

  12. A Variational Approach to Enhanced Sampling and Free Energy Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrinello, Michele

    2015-03-01

    The presence of kinetic bottlenecks severely hampers the ability of widely used sampling methods like molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo to explore complex free energy landscapes. One of the most popular methods for addressing this problem is umbrella sampling which is based on the addition of an external bias which helps overcoming the kinetic barriers. The bias potential is usually taken to be a function of a restricted number of collective variables. However constructing the bias is not simple, especially when the number of collective variables increases. Here we introduce a functional of the bias which, when minimized, allows us to recover the free energy. We demonstrate the usefulness and the flexibility of this approach on a number of examples which include the determination of a six dimensional free energy surface. Besides the practical advantages, the existence of such a variational principle allows us to look at the enhanced sampling problem from a rather convenient vantage point.

  13. Variational Approach to Enhanced Sampling and Free Energy Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsson, Omar; Parrinello, Michele

    2014-08-01

    The ability of widely used sampling methods, such as molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo simulations, to explore complex free energy landscapes is severely hampered by the presence of kinetic bottlenecks. A large number of solutions have been proposed to alleviate this problem. Many are based on the introduction of a bias potential which is a function of a small number of collective variables. However constructing such a bias is not simple. Here we introduce a functional of the bias potential and an associated variational principle. The bias that minimizes the functional relates in a simple way to the free energy surface. This variational principle can be turned into a practical, efficient, and flexible sampling method. A number of numerical examples are presented which include the determination of a three-dimensional free energy surface. We argue that, beside being numerically advantageous, our variational approach provides a convenient and novel standpoint for looking at the sampling problem.

  14. Accelerating atomistic calculations of quantum energy eigenstates on graphic cards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Walter; Pecchia, A.; Lopez, M.; Auf der Maur, M.; Di Carlo, A.

    2014-10-01

    Electronic properties of nanoscale materials require the calculation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors of large matrices. This bottleneck can be overcome by parallel computing techniques or the introduction of faster algorithms. In this paper we report a custom implementation of the Lanczos algorithm with simple restart, optimized for graphical processing units (GPUs). The whole algorithm has been developed using CUDA and runs entirely on the GPU, with a specialized implementation that spares memory and reduces at most machine-to-device data transfers. Furthermore parallel distribution over several GPUs has been attained using the standard message passing interface (MPI). Benchmark calculations performed on a GaN/AlGaN wurtzite quantum dot with up to 600,000 atoms are presented. The empirical tight-binding (ETB) model with an sp3d5s∗+spin-orbit parametrization has been used to build the system Hamiltonian (H).

  15. Molecular conformational analysis, vibrational spectra and normal coordinate analysis of trans-1,2-bis(3,5-dimethoxy phenyl)-ethene based on density functional theory calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Lynnette; Sajan, D; Chaitanya, K; Isac, Jayakumary

    2014-03-25

    The conformational behavior and structural stability of trans-1,2-bis(3,5-dimethoxy phenyl)-ethene (TDBE) were investigated by using density functional theory (DFT) method with the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) basis set combination. The vibrational wavenumbers of TDBE were computed at DFT level and complete vibrational assignments were made on the basis of normal coordinate analysis calculations (NCA). The DFT force field transformed to natural internal coordinates was corrected by a well-established set of scale factors that were found to be transferable to the title compound. The infrared and Raman spectra were also predicted from the calculated intensities. The observed Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Fourier transform (FT) Raman vibrational wavenumbers were analyzed and compared with the theoretically predicted vibrational spectra. Comparison of the simulated spectra with the experimental spectra provides important information about the ability of the computational method to describe the vibrational modes. Information about the size, shape, charge density distribution and site of chemical reactivity of the molecules has been obtained by mapping electron density isosurface with electrostatic potential surfaces (ESP). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Kinetic-energy functionals studied by surface calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitos, Levente; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Kollár, J.

    1998-01-01

    The self-consistent jellium model of metal surfaces is used to study the accuracy of a number of semilocal kinetic-energy functionals for independent particles. It is shown that the poor accuracy exhibited by the gradient expansion approximation and most of the semiempirical functionals in the lo...... density, high gradient limit may be subtantially improved by including locally a von Weizsacker term. Based on this, we propose a simple one-parameter Pade's approximation, which reproduces the exact Kohn-Sham surface kinetic energy over the entire range of metallic densities....

  17. Quantum computing applied to calculations of molecular energies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pittner, Jiří; Veis, L.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 241, - (2011), 151-phys ISSN 0065-7727. [National Meeting and Exposition of the American-Chemical-Society (ACS) /241./. 27.03.2011-31.03.2011, Anaheim] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : molecular energie * quantum computers Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  18. Accurate magnetic field calculations for contactless energy transfer coils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonntag, C.L.W.; Spree, M.; Lomonova, E.A.; Duarte, J.L.; Vandenput, A.J.A.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a method for estimating the magnetic field intensity from hexagon spiral windings commonly found in contactless energy transfer applications is presented. The hexagonal structures are modeled in a magneto-static environment using Biot-Savart current stick vectors. The accuracy of the

  19. Atom probe tomography simulations and density functional theory calculations of bonding energies in Cu3Au

    KAUST Repository

    Boll, Torben; Zhu, Zhiyong; Al-Kassab, Talaat; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2012-01-01

    In this article the Cu-Au binding energy in Cu3Au is determined by comparing experimental atom probe tomography (APT) results to simulations. The resulting bonding energy is supported by density functional theory calculations. The APT simulations

  20. The Suppression of Energy Discretization Errors in Multigroup Transport Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, Edward

    2013-01-01

    The Objective of this project is to develop, implement, and test new deterministric methods to solve, as efficiently as possible, multigroup neutron transport problems having an extremely large number of groups. Our approach was to (i) use the standard CMFD method to 'coarsen' the space-angle grid, yielding a multigroup diffusion equation, and (ii) use a new multigrid-in-space-and-energy technique to efficiently solve the multigroup diffusion problem. The overall strategy of (i) how to coarsen the spatial an energy grids, and (ii) how to navigate through the various grids, has the goal of minimizing the overall computational effort. This approach yields not only the fine-grid solution, but also coarse-group flux-weighted cross sections that can be used for other related problems.

  1. Accurate magnetic field calculations for contactless energy transfer coils

    OpenAIRE

    Sonntag, C.L.W.; Spree, M.; Lomonova, E.A.; Duarte, J.L.; Vandenput, A.J.A.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a method for estimating the magnetic field intensity from hexagon spiral windings commonly found in contactless energy transfer applications is presented. The hexagonal structures are modeled in a magneto-static environment using Biot-Savart current stick vectors. The accuracy of the models are evaluated by mapping the current sticks and the hexagon spiral winding tracks to a local twodimensional plane, and comparing their two-dimensional magnetic field intensities. The accurac...

  2. Visual Method for Spectral Energy Distribution Calculation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this work, we propose to use 'The Geometer's Sketchpad' to the fitting of a spectral energy distribution of blazar based on three effective spectral indices, αRO, αOX, and αRX and the flux density in the radio band. It can make us to see the fitting in detail with both the peak frequency and peak luminosity given ...

  3. Relativistic Calculations and Measurements of Energies, Auger Rates, and Lifetimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    Research and Industry, Denton, Texas, 8-10 November 1982. 7. B. Crasemann: "Efectos Relativ’sticos y de QED Sobre las Transiciones Rayos - X y Auger Entre...INNER-SHELL IONIZATION BY PROTONS X -RAY EMISSION BREIT INTERACTION AUGER TRANSITIONS DIRAC-HARTREE-SLATER COMPUTATIONS SYNCHROTRON RADIATION RESONANT...computations, including relativistic and quantum- electrodynamic effects, of atomic energy levels and of x -ray and Auger transitions in atoms with one or

  4. Distinguishing Binders from False Positives by Free Energy Calculations: Fragment Screening Against the Flap Site of HIV Protease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Molecular docking is a powerful tool used in drug discovery and structural biology for predicting the structures of ligand–receptor complexes. However, the accuracy of docking calculations can be limited by factors such as the neglect of protein reorganization in the scoring function; as a result, ligand screening can produce a high rate of false positive hits. Although absolute binding free energy methods still have difficulty in accurately rank-ordering binders, we believe that they can be fruitfully employed to distinguish binders from nonbinders and reduce the false positive rate. Here we study a set of ligands that dock favorably to a newly discovered, potentially allosteric site on the flap of HIV-1 protease. Fragment binding to this site stabilizes a closed form of protease, which could be exploited for the design of allosteric inhibitors. Twenty-three top-ranked protein–ligand complexes from AutoDock were subject to the free energy screening using two methods, the recently developed binding energy analysis method (BEDAM) and the standard double decoupling method (DDM). Free energy calculations correctly identified most of the false positives (≥83%) and recovered all the confirmed binders. The results show a gap averaging ≥3.7 kcal/mol, separating the binders and the false positives. We present a formula that decomposes the binding free energy into contributions from the receptor conformational macrostates, which provides insights into the roles of different binding modes. Our binding free energy component analysis further suggests that improving the treatment for the desolvation penalty associated with the unfulfilled polar groups could reduce the rate of false positive hits in docking. The current study demonstrates that the combination of docking with free energy methods can be very useful for more accurate ligand screening against valuable drug targets. PMID:25189630

  5. Transport calculation of medium-energy protons and neutrons by Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Syuuichi; Hirayama, Hideo; Katoh, Kazuaki.

    1978-09-01

    A Monte Carlo transport code, ARIES, has been developed for protons and neutrons at medium energy (25 -- 500 MeV). Nuclear data provided by R.G. Alsmiller, Jr. were used for the calculation. To simulate the cascade development in the medium, each generation was represented by a single weighted particle and an average number of emitted particles was used as the weight. Neutron fluxes were stored by the collisions density method. The cutoff energy was set to 25 MeV. Neutrons below the cutoff were stored to be used as the source for the low energy neutron transport calculation upon the discrete ordinates method. Then transport calculations were performed for both low energy neutrons (thermal -- 25 MeV) and secondary gamma-rays. Energy spectra of emitted neutrons were calculated and compared with those of published experimental and calculated results. The agreement was good for the incident particles of energy between 100 and 500 MeV. (author)

  6. Qgui: A high-throughput interface for automated setup and analysis of free energy calculations and empirical valence bond simulations in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksen, Geir Villy; Andberg, Tor Arne Heim; Åqvist, Johan; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2015-07-01

    Structural information and activity data has increased rapidly for many protein targets during the last decades. In this paper, we present a high-throughput interface (Qgui) for automated free energy and empirical valence bond (EVB) calculations that use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for conformational sampling. Applications to ligand binding using both the linear interaction energy (LIE) method and the free energy perturbation (FEP) technique are given using the estrogen receptor (ERα) as a model system. Examples of free energy profiles obtained using the EVB method for the rate-limiting step of the enzymatic reaction catalyzed by trypsin are also shown. In addition, we present calculation of high-precision Arrhenius plots to obtain the thermodynamic activation enthalpy and entropy with Qgui from running a large number of EVB simulations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Impact of dietary fiber energy on the calculation of food total energy value in the Brazilian Food Composition Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Elizabete Wenzel de; Grande, Fernanda; Giuntini, Eliana Bistriche; Lopes, Tássia do Vale Cardoso; Dan, Milana Cara Tanasov; Prado, Samira Bernardino Ramos do; Franco, Bernadette Dora Gombossy de Melo; Charrondière, U Ruth; Lajolo, Franco Maria

    2016-02-15

    Dietary fiber (DF) contributes to the energy value of foods and including it in the calculation of total food energy has been recommended for food composition databases. The present study aimed to investigate the impact of including energy provided by the DF fermentation in the calculation of food energy. Total energy values of 1753 foods from the Brazilian Food Composition Database were calculated with or without the inclusion of DF energy. The energy values were compared, through the use of percentage difference (D%), in individual foods and in daily menus. Appreciable energy D% (⩾10) was observed in 321 foods, mainly in the group of vegetables, legumes and fruits. However, in the Brazilian typical menus containing foods from all groups, only D%foods, when individually considered. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Liquid 4He: Modified LOCV ground-state energy calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skjetne, B.; Ostgaard, E.

    1996-01-01

    The ground-state energetics of liquid 4 He is studied in a constrained variational approach, where the significance of neglecting terms beyond second order in the cluster expansion is estimated in a crude way. An adjustment to the conditions of healing on the two-body correlation function excludes from the global average field the effects of pairwise clustering to higher orders. To this end, open-quotes virtualclose quotes particles beyond nearest neighbors are included in the average correlation volume. Results within the scope of such modifications are consistent with GFMC and QDMC calculations, falling within the range -7.25 ± 0.05 K when recent interaction models are used

  9. Use of an expert system for energy cost calculations in the pulp and paper industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viinikainen, S.; Malinen, H.

    1991-12-01

    In this paper, an application for the calculation of energy prices and product energy costs in the pulp and paper industry by using the Xi Plus expert system is presented. The use of expert systems in the energy field and also the Xi Plus expert system and its general features are also discussed. The application has been made after collecting data from several sources. It runs in an IBM AT compatible microcomputer therefore being easily used in mills. The name of the application is PRODUCT ENERGY COST. It has a three level structure: the mill level, the department level and the main equipment level. Currently, the mill level and, in the energy production area, the department level (power plant) and the equipment level (boilers, turbines) are used. The application consists of four knowledge base groups. Altogether there are 52 separate knowledge bases having 534 rules or demons. The knowledge base groups are: BASIC DATA, ENERGY USE, ENERGY PRODUCTION and ENERGY COSTS. The application can be used for various heat and electrical energy price calculations or for energy cost calculations for different pulp and paper products. In this study, the energy prices for kraft pulp, TMP, newsprint and fine paper in different operating conditions and the associated energy costs of the products are calculated. Also, in some cases a sensitivity analysis is done. The expert system is quite suitable for this type of calculation and the method could be further developed for specific industrial needs, e.g. to enhance the energy management systems

  10. Free energies of binding from large-scale first-principles quantum mechanical calculations: application to ligand hydration energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Stephen J; Pittock, Chris; Tautermann, Christofer S; Fox, Thomas; Christ, Clara; Malcolm, N O J; Essex, Jonathan W; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton

    2013-08-15

    Schemes of increasing sophistication for obtaining free energies of binding have been developed over the years, where configurational sampling is used to include the all-important entropic contributions to the free energies. However, the quality of the results will also depend on the accuracy with which the intermolecular interactions are computed at each molecular configuration. In this context, the energy change associated with the rearrangement of electrons (electronic polarization and charge transfer) upon binding is a very important effect. Classical molecular mechanics force fields do not take this effect into account explicitly, and polarizable force fields and semiempirical quantum or hybrid quantum-classical (QM/MM) calculations are increasingly employed (at higher computational cost) to compute intermolecular interactions in free-energy schemes. In this work, we investigate the use of large-scale quantum mechanical calculations from first-principles as a way of fully taking into account electronic effects in free-energy calculations. We employ a one-step free-energy perturbation (FEP) scheme from a molecular mechanical (MM) potential to a quantum mechanical (QM) potential as a correction to thermodynamic integration calculations within the MM potential. We use this approach to calculate relative free energies of hydration of small aromatic molecules. Our quantum calculations are performed on multiple configurations from classical molecular dynamics simulations. The quantum energy of each configuration is obtained from density functional theory calculations with a near-complete psinc basis set on over 600 atoms using the ONETEP program.

  11. New method of ionization energy calculation for two-electron ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ershov, D.K.

    1997-01-01

    A new method for calculation of the ionization energy of two-electron ions is proposed. The method is based on the calculation of the energy of second electron interaction with the field of an one-electron ion the potential of which is well known

  12. Calculations for very low energy scattering of positrons by molecular hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, J.N. [School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: james.cooper@maths.nottingham.ac.uk; Armour, E.A.G. [School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2008-02-15

    We give a progress report on ongoing calculations of phase shifts for very low energy elastic scattering of positrons by molecular hydrogen, using the generalised Kohn variational method. Further, provisional calculations of Z{sub eff} for molecular hydrogen at low energies are presented and discussed. The preliminary nature of the work is emphasised throughout.

  13. Hot-electron-mediated desorption rates calculated from excited-state potential energy surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thomas; Gavnholt, Jeppe; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    We present a model for desorption induced by (multiple) electronic transitions [DIET (DIMET)] based on potential energy surfaces calculated with the delta self-consistent field extension of density-functional theory. We calculate potential energy surfaces of CO and NO molecules adsorbed on variou...

  14. Finite element calculation of the interaction energy of shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Seung Yong

    2004-01-01

    Strain energy due to the mechanical interaction between self-accommodation groups of martensitic phase transformation is called interaction energy. Evaluation of the interaction energy should be accurate since the energy appears in constitutive models for predicting the mechanical behavior of shape memory alloy. In this paper, the interaction energy is evaluated in terms of theoretical formulation and explicit finite element calculation. A simple example with two habit plane variants was considered. It was shown that the theoretical formulation assuming elastic interaction between the self-accommodation group and matrix gives larger interaction energy than explicit finite element calculation in which transformation softening is accounted for

  15. Virial-statistic method for calculation of atom and molecule energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisov, Yu.A.

    1977-01-01

    A virial-statistical method has been applied to the calculation of the atomization energies of the following molecules: Mo(CO) 6 , Cr(CO) 6 , Fe(CO) 5 , MnH(CO) 5 , CoH(CO) 4 , Ni(CO) 4 . The principles of this method are briefly presented. Calculation results are given for the individual contributions to the atomization energies together with the calculated and experimental atomization energies (D). For the Mo(CO) 6 complex Dsub(calc) = 1759 and Dsub(exp) = 1763 kcal/mole. Calculated and experimental combination heat values for carbonyl complexes are presented. These values are shown to be adequately consistent [ru

  16. Conformal Nets II: Conformal Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Arthur; Douglas, Christopher L.; Henriques, André

    2017-08-01

    Conformal nets provide a mathematical formalism for conformal field theory. Associated to a conformal net with finite index, we give a construction of the `bundle of conformal blocks', a representation of the mapping class groupoid of closed topological surfaces into the category of finite-dimensional projective Hilbert spaces. We also construct infinite-dimensional spaces of conformal blocks for topological surfaces with smooth boundary. We prove that the conformal blocks satisfy a factorization formula for gluing surfaces along circles, and an analogous formula for gluing surfaces along intervals. We use this interval factorization property to give a new proof of the modularity of the category of representations of a conformal net.

  17. New directions in low energy electron molecule collision calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, P.G.; Noble, C.J.

    1982-01-01

    New theoretical and computational methods for studying low energy electron molecule collisions are discussed. Having considered the fixed-nuclei approximation and the form of the expansion of the total collision wavefunction, the various approximations which have been made are examined, including the static plus model exchange approximation, the static exchange approximation and the close coupling approximation, particular attention being paid to methods of including the molecular charge polarisation. Various ways which have been developed to solve the resultant equations are discussed and it is found that there is increasing emphasis being given to methods which combine the advantages of discrete multi-centre analytic bases with single centre numerical bases. (U.K.)

  18. Conformational Dynamics and Binding Free Energies of Inhibitors of BACE-1: From the Perspective of Protonation Equilibria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Olivia Kim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACE-1 is the β-secretase responsible for the initial amyloidogenesis in Alzheimer's disease, catalyzing hydrolytic cleavage of substrate in a pH-sensitive manner. The catalytic mechanism of BACE-1 requires water-mediated proton transfer from aspartyl dyad to the substrate, as well as structural flexibility in the flap region. Thus, the coupling of protonation and conformational equilibria is essential to a full in silico characterization of BACE-1. In this work, we perform constant pH replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations on both apo BACE-1 and five BACE-1-inhibitor complexes to examine the effect of pH on dynamics and inhibitor binding properties of BACE-1. In our simulations, we find that solution pH controls the conformational flexibility of apo BACE-1, whereas bound inhibitors largely limit the motions of the holo enzyme at all levels of pH. The microscopic pKa values of titratable residues in BACE-1 including its aspartyl dyad are computed and compared between apo and inhibitor-bound states. Changes in protonation between the apo and holo forms suggest a thermodynamic linkage between binding of inhibitors and protons localized at the dyad. Utilizing our recently developed computational protocol applying the binding polynomial formalism to the constant pH molecular dynamics (CpHMD framework, we are able to obtain the pH-dependent binding free energy profiles for various BACE-1-inhibitor complexes. Our results highlight the importance of correctly addressing the binding-induced protonation changes in protein-ligand systems where binding accompanies a net proton transfer. This work comprises the first application of our CpHMD-based free energy computational method to protein-ligand complexes and illustrates the value of CpHMD as an all-purpose tool for obtaining pH-dependent dynamics and binding free energies of biological systems.

  19. A calculation of Zsub(eff) for low-energy positron-hydrogen-molecule scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armour, E.A.G.; Baker, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    The value of Zsub(eff), the effective number of electrons per molecule available to the positron for annihilation, is calculated for low-energy positron-hydrogen-molecule scattering using the scattering wavefunctions obtained in recent detailed ab initio calculations. The results are higher than those obtained in previous calculations but much lower than the experimental value. (author)

  20. Calculation of the Energy Dependence of Dosimeter Response to Ionizing Photons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; McLaughlin, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    Using a program in BASIC applied to a desk-top calculator, simplified calculations provide approximate energy dependence correction factors of dosimeter readings of absorbed dose according to Bragg-Gray cavity theories. Burlin's general cavity theory is applied in the present calculations, and ce...

  1. Conformal Collineations of the Ricci and Energy-Momentum Tensors in Static Plane Symmetric Space-Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, S. S.; Hussain, T.; Bokhari, A. H.; Khan, F.

    2018-04-01

    We provide a complete classification of static plane symmetric space-times according to conformal Ricci collineations (CRCs) and conformal matter collineations (CMCs) in both the degenerate and nondegenerate cases. In the case of a nondegenerate Ricci tensor, we find a general form of the vector field generating CRCs in terms of unknown functions of t and x subject to some integrability conditions. We then solve the integrability conditions in different cases depending upon the nature of the Ricci tensor and conclude that the static plane symmetric space-times have a 7-, 10- or 15-dimensional Lie algebra of CRCs. Moreover, we find that these space-times admit an infinite number of CRCs if the Ricci tensor is degenerate. We use a similar procedure to study CMCs in the case of a degenerate or nondegenerate matter tensor. We obtain the exact form of some static plane symmetric space-time metrics that admit nontrivial CRCs and CMCs. Finally, we present some physical applications of our obtained results by considering a perfect fluid as a source of the energy-momentum tensor.

  2. Calculations for nuclear data evaluation for Nb, Zr and W in the high energy region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitsuki, Hirohiko; Maruyama, Shin-ichi; Ishibashi, Kenji [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    Neutron total cross sections on Nb, Zr and W were calculated in the high energy region. In this calculation, we used the neutron optical-model potentials derived from those for proton incidence with introducing the symmetry term. Proton-induced activation yields for Nb and Zr was calculated by means of HETC/KFA2 and QMD plus SDM at incident energies up to 5 GeV. (author)

  3. MONTE CARLO CALCULATION OF THE ENERGY RESPONSE OF THE NARF HURST-TYPE FAST- NEUTRON DOSIMETER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vries, T. W.

    1963-06-15

    The response function for the fast-neutron dosimeter was calculated by the Monte Carlo technique (Code K-52) and compared with a calculation based on the Bragg-Gray principle. The energy deposition spectra so obtained show that the response spectra become softer with increased incident neutron energy ahove 3 Mev. The K-52 calculated total res nu onse is more nearly constant with energy than the BraggGray response. The former increases 70 percent from 1 Mev to 14 Mev while the latter increases 135 percent over this energy range. (auth)

  4. Large scale free energy calculations for blind predictions of protein-ligand binding: the D3R Grand Challenge 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Nanjie; Flynn, William F; Xia, Junchao; Vijayan, R S K; Zhang, Baofeng; He, Peng; Mentes, Ahmet; Gallicchio, Emilio; Levy, Ronald M

    2016-09-01

    We describe binding free energy calculations in the D3R Grand Challenge 2015 for blind prediction of the binding affinities of 180 ligands to Hsp90. The present D3R challenge was built around experimental datasets involving Heat shock protein (Hsp) 90, an ATP-dependent molecular chaperone which is an important anticancer drug target. The Hsp90 ATP binding site is known to be a challenging target for accurate calculations of ligand binding affinities because of the ligand-dependent conformational changes in the binding site, the presence of ordered waters and the broad chemical diversity of ligands that can bind at this site. Our primary focus here is to distinguish binders from nonbinders. Large scale absolute binding free energy calculations that cover over 3000 protein-ligand complexes were performed using the BEDAM method starting from docked structures generated by Glide docking. Although the ligand dataset in this study resembles an intermediate to late stage lead optimization project while the BEDAM method is mainly developed for early stage virtual screening of hit molecules, the BEDAM binding free energy scoring has resulted in a moderate enrichment of ligand screening against this challenging drug target. Results show that, using a statistical mechanics based free energy method like BEDAM starting from docked poses offers better enrichment than classical docking scoring functions and rescoring methods like Prime MM-GBSA for the Hsp90 data set in this blind challenge. Importantly, among the three methods tested here, only the mean value of the BEDAM binding free energy scores is able to separate the large group of binders from the small group of nonbinders with a gap of 2.4 kcal/mol. None of the three methods that we have tested provided accurate ranking of the affinities of the 147 active compounds. We discuss the possible sources of errors in the binding free energy calculations. The study suggests that BEDAM can be used strategically to discriminate

  5. Induced quantum conformal gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novozhilov, Y.V.; Vassilevich, D.V.

    1988-11-01

    Quantum gravity is considered as induced by matter degrees of freedom and related to the symmetry breakdown in the low energy region of a non-Abelian gauge theory of fundamental fields. An effective action for quantum conformal gravity is derived where both the gravitational constant and conformal kinetic term are positive. Relation with induced classical gravity is established. (author). 15 refs

  6. Calculations of energy levels and lifetimes of low-lying states of barium and radium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzuba, V. A.; Ginges, J. S. M.

    2006-01-01

    We use the configuration-interaction method and many-body perturbation theory to perform accurate calculations of energy levels, transition amplitudes, and lifetimes of low-lying states of barium and radium. Calculations for radium are needed for the planning of measurements of parity- and time-invariance-violating effects which are strongly enhanced in this atom. Calculations for barium are used to control the accuracy of the calculations

  7. Application of wavelet scaling function expansion continuous-energy resonance calculation method to MOX fuel problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, W.; Wu, H.; Cao, L.

    2012-01-01

    More and more MOX fuels are used in all over the world in the past several decades. Compared with UO 2 fuel, it contains some new features. For example, the neutron spectrum is harder and more resonance interference effects within the resonance energy range are introduced because of more resonant nuclides contained in the MOX fuel. In this paper, the wavelets scaling function expansion method is applied to study the resonance behavior of plutonium isotopes within MOX fuel. Wavelets scaling function expansion continuous-energy self-shielding method is developed recently. It has been validated and verified by comparison to Monte Carlo calculations. In this method, the continuous-energy cross-sections are utilized within resonance energy, which means that it's capable to solve problems with serious resonance interference effects without iteration calculations. Therefore, this method adapts to treat the MOX fuel resonance calculation problem natively. Furthermore, plutonium isotopes have fierce oscillations of total cross-section within thermal energy range, especially for 240 Pu and 242 Pu. To take thermal resonance effect of plutonium isotopes into consideration the wavelet scaling function expansion continuous-energy resonance calculation code WAVERESON is enhanced by applying the free gas scattering kernel to obtain the continuous-energy scattering source within thermal energy range (2.1 eV to 4.0 eV) contrasting against the resonance energy range in which the elastic scattering kernel is utilized. Finally, all of the calculation results of WAVERESON are compared with MCNP calculation. (authors)

  8. Full charge-density calculation of the surface energy of metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitos, Levente; Kollár, J..; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1994-01-01

    of a spherically symmetrized charge density, while the Coulomb and exchange-correlation contributions are calculated by means of the complete, nonspherically symmetric charge density within nonoverlapping, space-filling Wigner-Seitz cells. The functional is used to assess the convergence and the accuracy......We have calculated the surface energy and the work function of the 4d metals by means of an energy functional based on a self-consistent, spherically symmetric atomic-sphere potential. In this approach the kinetic energy is calculated completely within the atomic-sphere approximation (ASA) by means...... of the linear-muffin-tin-orbitals (LMTO) method and the ASA in surface calculations. We find that the full charge-density functional improves the agreement with recent full-potential LMTO calculations to a level where the average deviation in surface energy over the 4d series is down to 10%....

  9. Effect of Atomic Charges on Octanol–Water Partition Coefficient Using Alchemical Free Energy Calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Ogata

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The octanol–water partition coefficient (logPow is an important index for measuring solubility, membrane permeability, and bioavailability in the drug discovery field. In this paper, the logPow values of 58 compounds were predicted by alchemical free energy calculation using molecular dynamics simulation. In free energy calculations, the atomic charges of the compounds are always fixed. However, they must be recalculated for each solvent. Therefore, three different sets of atomic charges were tested using quantum chemical calculations, taking into account vacuum, octanol, and water environments. The calculated atomic charges in the different environments do not necessarily influence the correlation between calculated and experimentally measured ∆Gwater values. The largest correlation coefficient values of the solvation free energy in water and octanol were 0.93 and 0.90, respectively. On the other hand, the correlation coefficient of logPow values calculated from free energies, the largest of which was 0.92, was sensitive to the combination of the solvation free energies calculated from the calculated atomic charges. These results reveal that the solvent assumed in the atomic charge calculation is an important factor determining the accuracy of predicted logPow values.

  10. Conformal house

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryttov, Thomas Aaby; Sannino, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    fixed point. As a consistency check we recover the previously investigated bounds of the conformal windows when restricting to a single matter representation. The earlier conformal windows can be imagined to be part now of the new conformal house. We predict the nonperturbative anomalous dimensions...... at the infrared fixed points. We further investigate the effects of adding mass terms to the condensates on the conformal house chiral dynamics and construct the simplest instanton induced effective Lagrangian terms...

  11. Virtual and solution conformations of oligosaccharides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cumming, D.A.; Carver, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    The possibility that observed nuclear Overhauser enhancements and bulk longitudinal relaxation times, parameters measured by 1 H NMR and often employed in determining the preferred solution conformation of biologically important molecules, are the result of averaging over many conformational states is quantitatively evaluated. Of particular interest was to ascertain whether certain 1 H NMR determined conformations are virtual in nature; i.e., the fraction of the population of molecules actually found at any time within the subset of conformational space defined as the solution conformation is vanishingly small. A statistical mechanics approach was utilized to calculate an ensemble average relaxation matrix from which (NOE)'s and (T 1 )'s are calculated. Model glycosidic linkages in four oligosaccharides were studied. The nature of the resultant population distributions is such that 50% of the molecular population is found within 1% of available microstates, while 99% of the molecular population occupies about 10% of the ensemble microstates, a number roughly equal to that sterically allowed. From this analysis the authors conclude that in many cases quantitative interpretation of NMR relaxation data, which attempts to define a single set of allowable torsion angle values consistent with the observed data, will lead to solution conformations that are either virtual or reflect torsion angle values possessed by a minority of the molecular population. Observed values of NMR relaxation data are the result of the complex interdependence of the population distribution and NOE (or T 1 ) surfaces in conformational space. In conformational analyses, NMR data can therefore be used to test different population distributions calculated from empirical potential energy functions

  12. Quantum-chemical study on the bioactive conformation of epothilones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Verónica A

    2010-12-27

    Herein, I report a DFT study on the bioactive conformation of epothilone A based on the analysis of 92 stable conformations of free and bound epothilone to a reduced model of tubulin receptor. The equilibrium structures and relative energies were studied using B3LYP and X3LYP functionals and the 6-31G(d) standard basis set, which was considered appropriate for the size of the systems under study. Calculated relative energies of free and bound epothilones led me to propose a new model for the bioactive conformation of epothilone A, which accounts for several structure-activity data.

  13. Verification of the DUCT-III for calculation of high energy neutron streaming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masukawa, Fumihiro; Nakano, Hideo; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Sasamoto, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Tayama, Ryu-ichi; Handa, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Katsumi [Hitachi Engineering Co., Ltd., Hitachi, Ibaraki (Japan); Hirayama, Hideo [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Shin, Kazuo [Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    A large number of radiation streaming calculations under a variety of conditions are required as a part of shielding design for a high energy proton accelerator facility. Since sophisticated methods are very time consuming, simplified methods are employed in many cases. For accuracy evaluation of a simplified code DUCT-III for high energy neutron streaming calculations, two kinds of benchmark problems based on the experiments were analyzed. Through comparison of the DUCT-III calculations with both the measurements and the sophisticated Monte Carlo calculations, DUCT-III was seen reliable enough for applying to the shielding design for the Intense Proton Accelerator Facility. (author)

  14. Verification of the DUCT-III for calculation of high energy neutron streaming

    CERN Document Server

    Masukawa, F; Hayashi, K; Hirayama, H; Nakano, H; Nakashima, H; Sasamoto, N; Shin, K; Tayama, R I

    2003-01-01

    A large number of radiation streaming calculations under a variety of conditions are required as a part of shielding design for a high energy proton accelerator facility. Since sophisticated methods are very time consuming, simplified methods are employed in many cases. For accuracy evaluation of a simplified code DUCT-III for high energy neutron streaming calculations, two kinds of benchmark problems based on the experiments were analyzed. Through comparison of the DUCT-III calculations with both the measurements and the sophisticated Monte Carlo calculations, DUCT-III was seen reliable enough for applying to the shielding design for the Intense Proton Accelerator Facility.

  15. Approximated calculation of the vacuum wave function and vacuum energy of the LGT with RPA method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hui Ping

    2004-01-01

    The coupled cluster method is improved with the random phase approximation (RPA) to calculate vacuum wave function and vacuum energy of 2 + 1 - D SU(2) lattice gauge theory. In this calculating, the trial wave function composes of single-hollow graphs. The calculated results of vacuum wave functions show very good scaling behaviors at weak coupling region l/g 2 >1.2 from the third order to the sixth order, and the vacuum energy obtained with RPA method is lower than the vacuum energy obtained without RPA method, which means that this method is a more efficient one

  16. Efficiency of free-energy calculations of spin lattices by spectral quantum algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Master, Cyrus P.; Yamaguchi, Fumiko; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2003-01-01

    Ensemble quantum algorithms are well suited to calculate estimates of the energy spectra for spin-lattice systems. Based on the phase estimation algorithm, these algorithms efficiently estimate discrete Fourier coefficients of the density of states. Their efficiency in calculating the free energy per spin of general spin lattices to bounded error is examined. We find that the number of Fourier components required to bound the error in the free energy due to the broadening of the density of states scales polynomially with the number of spins in the lattice. However, the precision with which the Fourier components must be calculated is found to be an exponential function of the system size

  17. Polarizable atomistic calculation of site energy disorder in amorphous Alq3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Yuki

    2010-02-01

    A polarizable molecular dynamics simulation and calculation scheme for site energy disorder is presented in amorphous tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)aluminum (Alq(3)) by means of the charge response kernel (CRK) method. The CRK fit to the electrostatic potential and the tight-binding approximation are introduced, which enables modeling of the polarizable electrostatic interaction for a large molecule systematically from an ab initio calculation. The site energy disorder for electron and hole transfers is calculated in amorphous Alq(3) and the effect of the polarization on the site energy disorder is discussed.

  18. EPP Energy Efficiency Calculation and Influencing Factor Analysis: Cases in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingmin Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency power plant (EPP promotes the use of energy efficiency power plant technology and energy efficient equipment, coupled with its low-input, zero pollution, zero emissions, and other advantages, having an important role in the control of energy consumption and energy saving. In order to carry out scientific EPP investment decisions, the level of energy efficiency is an important basis for investment decisions. This paper introduces total factor energy efficiency (TFEE in energy efficiency calculation of EPP, constructs energy efficiency calculation model considering environmental benefits, and takes the micro and macro cases in China for analysis; the results show that the TFEE of both single energy efficiency project and EPP are at a relatively high level (above 0.7, and there is a huge gap between calculation results considering and without considering the environmental benefit. In order to discuss energy efficiency influencing factors, the paper analyzes generalized technological advances variation feature of China typical provinces implementing EPP based on generalized technological advances decomposition model by Malmquist index, finding that the steady growth of M index in these provinces is derived from the management level of implementation of EPP and the large-scale production capacity of formation and management. We hope the models and conclusions could provide some references on EPP energy efficiency calculation and decision.

  19. THE CALCULATION OF THE ENERGY RECOVERY ELECTRIFIED URBAN TRANSPORT DURING THE INSTALLATION DRIVE FOR TRACTION SUBSTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Sulim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available At present a great attention is paid to increasing of energy efficiency at operated electrified urban transport. Perspective direction for increasing energy efficiency at that type of transport is the application of regenerative braking. For additional increasing of energy efficiency there were suggested the use of capacitive drive on tires of traction substation. One of the main task is the analysis of energy recovery application  with drive and without it.These analysis demonstrated that the calculation algorithms don’t allow in the full volume to carry out calculations of amount and cost of energy recovery without drive and with it. That is why we see the current interest to this topic. The purpose of work is to create methods of algorithms calculation for definite amount and cost of consumed, redundant and recovery energy of electrified urban transport due to definite regime of motion on wayside. There is algorithm developed, which allow to calculate amount and cost of consumed, redundant and recovery energy of electrified urban transport on wayside during the installation capacitive drive at traction substation. On the basis of developed algorithm for the definite regime of wagon motion of subway there were fulfilled the example of energy recovery amount and its cost calculation, among them with limited energy intensity drive, when there are 4 trains on wayside simultaneously.

  20. Conformational Change in the Mechanism of Inclusion of Ketoprofen in β-Cyclodextrin: NMR Spectroscopy, Ab Initio Calculations, Molecular Dynamics Simulations, and Photoreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzzo, T; Mandaliti, W; Nepravishta, R; Aramini, A; Bodo, E; Daidone, I; Allegretti, M; Topai, A; Paci, M

    2016-10-11

    Inclusion of drugs in cyclodextrins (CDs) is a recognized tool for modifying several properties such as solubility, stability, bioavailability, and so on. The photoreactive behavior of the β-CD/ketoprofen (KP) complex upon UV exposure showed a significant increase in photodecarboxylation, whereas the secondary degradation products by hydroxylation of the benzophenone moiety were inhibited. The results may account for an improvement of KP photophysical properties upon inclusion, thus better fostering its topical use. To correlate the structural details of the inclusion with these results, an NMR spectroscopic study of KP upon inclusion in β-CD was performed. Effects of the magnetically anisotropic centers of KP, changing their orientations upon inclusion and giving chemical shift variations, were specifically correlated with the results of the molecular dynamic simulations and ab initio calculations. In the large variety of papers focusing on the structural analysis of β-CD complexes, this work represents one of the few examples in which a detailed analysis of these simultaneous upfield-downfield NMR shifts of the same aromatic molecule upon inclusion is reported. Interestingly, the results demonstrate that the observed upfield and downfield shifts upon inclusion are not related to any direct magnetic role of β-CD. The conformational change of KP upon the inclusion process consists of a slight reduction in the angle between the two phenyl rings and in a remarkable reduction in the mobility of the carboxyl group, the latter being one of the main contributions to the NMR resonance shifts. These structural details help in understanding the features of the inclusion complex and, eventually, the driving force for its formation.

  1. The calculation of surface free energy based on embedded atom method for solid nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Wenhua; Hu Wangyu; Su Kalin; Liu Fusheng

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A new solution for accurate prediction of surface free energy based on embedded atom method was proposed. ► The temperature dependent anisotropic surface energy of solid nickel was obtained. ► In isotropic environment, the approach does not change most predictions of bulk material properties. - Abstract: Accurate prediction of surface free energy of crystalline metals is a challenging task. The theory calculations based on embedded atom method potentials often underestimate surface free energy of metals. With an analytical charge density correction to the argument of the embedding energy of embedded atom method, an approach to improve the prediction for surface free energy is presented. This approach is applied to calculate the temperature dependent anisotropic surface energy of bulk nickel and surface energies of nickel nanoparticles, and the obtained results are in good agreement with available experimental data.

  2. Sustainable manufacturing by calculating the energy demand during turning of AISI 1045 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, R.; Nasrullah, B.; Suyuti, M. A.; Apollo

    2018-01-01

    Sustainable development will become important issues for many fields, including production, industry, and manufacturing. In order to achieve sustainable development, industry should be able to perform of sustainable production processes and environmentally friendly. Therefore, there is need to minimize the energy demand in the machining process. This paper presents a calculation method of energy consumption in the machining process, especially turning process which calculated by summing the number of energy consumption, such as the electric energy consumed during the machining preparation, the electrical energy during the cutting processes, and the electrical energy to produce a cutting tool. A case study was performed on dry turning of mild carbon steel using coated carbide. This approach can be used to determine the total amount of electrical energy consumed in the specific machining process. It concluded that the energy consumption will be an increase for using the high cutting speed as well as for the feed rate was increased.

  3. Possible explanations for the gap between calculated and measured energy consumption of new houses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Jesper; Rose, Jørgen; Knudsen, Henrik N.

    2017-01-01

    The overall aim to reduce CO2 emissions has brought the energy requirements for new houses into focus. The question is whether the stepwise tightening of the energy requirements for new houses has had the expected impact on the actual realized energy consumption. In the news media, headlines...... at regular intervals state that new houses do not perform as expected with regard to energy consumption based on a simple comparison to the building class (energy frame). The gap is sometimes explained by a higher indoor temperature than used in the standard calculation or more generally by resident...... data show that a significant share of the houses consumes more energy in a simple comparison with the theoretical energy frame based on standard assumptions. The objective of the study was to find and evaluate possible explanations/reasons for this gap between the theoretical calculated energy demand...

  4. Calculation of Relative Binding Free Energy in the Water-Filled Active Site of Oligopeptide-Binding Protein A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Manuela; de Beer, Stephanie B A; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2016-04-15

    The periplasmic oligopeptide binding protein A (OppA) represents a well-known example of water-mediated protein-ligand interactions. Here, we perform free-energy calculations for three different ligands binding to OppA, using a thermodynamic integration approach. The tripeptide ligands share a high structural similarity (all have the sequence KXK), but their experimentally-determined binding free energies differ remarkably. Thermodynamic cycles were constructed for the ligands, and simulations conducted in the bound and (freely solvated) unbound states. In the unbound state, it was observed that the difference in conformational freedom between alanine and glycine leads to a surprisingly slow convergence, despite their chemical similarity. This could be overcome by increasing the softness parameter during alchemical transformations. Discrepancies remained in the bound state however, when comparing independent simulations of the three ligands. These difficulties could be traced to a slow relaxation of the water network within the active site. Fluctuations in the number of water molecules residing in the binding cavity occur mostly on a timescale larger than the simulation time along the alchemical path. After extensive simulations, relative binding free energies that were converged to within thermal noise could be obtained, which agree well with available experimental data.

  5. A Python tool to set up relative free energy calculations in GROMACS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimovich, Pavel V; Mobley, David L

    2015-11-01

    Free energy calculations based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have seen a tremendous growth in the last decade. However, it is still difficult and tedious to set them up in an automated manner, as the majority of the present-day MD simulation packages lack that functionality. Relative free energy calculations are a particular challenge for several reasons, including the problem of finding a common substructure and mapping the transformation to be applied. Here we present a tool, alchemical-setup.py, that automatically generates all the input files needed to perform relative solvation and binding free energy calculations with the MD package GROMACS. When combined with Lead Optimization Mapper (LOMAP; Liu et al. in J Comput Aided Mol Des 27(9):755-770, 2013), recently developed in our group, alchemical-setup.py allows fully automated setup of relative free energy calculations in GROMACS. Taking a graph of the planned calculations and a mapping, both computed by LOMAP, our tool generates the topology and coordinate files needed to perform relative free energy calculations for a given set of molecules, and provides a set of simulation input parameters. The tool was validated by performing relative hydration free energy calculations for a handful of molecules from the SAMPL4 challenge (Mobley et al. in J Comput Aided Mol Des 28(4):135-150, 2014). Good agreement with previously published results and the straightforward way in which free energy calculations can be conducted make alchemical-setup.py a promising tool for automated setup of relative solvation and binding free energy calculations.

  6. High energy ion range and deposited energy calculation using the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck splitting of the Boltzmann transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozolevski, I.E.

    2001-01-01

    We consider the splitting of the straight-ahead Boltzmann transport equation in the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck equation, decomposing the differential cross-section into a singular part, corresponding to small energy transfer events, and in a regular one, which corresponds to large energy transfer. The convergence of implantation profile, nuclear and electronic energy depositions, calculated from the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck equation, to the respective exact distributions, calculated from Monte-Carlo method, was exanimate in a large-energy interval for various values of splitting parameter and for different ion-target mass relations. It is shown that for the universal potential there exists an optimal value of splitting parameter, for which range and deposited energy distributions, calculated from the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck equation, accurately approximate the exact distributions and which minimizes the computational expenses

  7. Phosphorylation-induced conformational changes in short peptides probed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer in the 10A domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Harekrushna; Nau, Werner M

    2007-03-26

    Phosphorylation-induced conformational changes in short polypeptides were probed by a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) method by employing a short-distance FRET pair (R(0) approximately 10 A) based on tryptophan as natural donor and a 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-ene-labeled asparagine (Dbo) as synthetic acceptor. Two substrates for kinases, LeuArgArgTrpSerLeuGly-Dbo (peptide I) and TrpLysArgThrLeuArgArg-Dbo (peptide II), were investigated, with serine and threonine, respectively, as phosphorylation sites. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence experiments in H(2)O revealed a decrease in FRET efficiency for peptide I and an increase for peptide II; this suggested that the effective distances between donor and acceptor increased and decreased, respectively. The same trends and similar absolute variations in effective donor-acceptor distances were observed in propylene glycol, a less polar and highly viscous solvent; this suggested that the variations are due to intrinsic structural preferences. Fitting of the time-resolved decay traces according to a distribution function model (Gaussian distribution) provided the mean donor-acceptor distances, which showed an increase upon phosphorylation for peptide I (from 9.7 to 10.5 A) and a decrease for peptide II (from 10.9 to 9.3 A) in H(2)O. The broadness (half-width) of the distributions, which provides a measure of the rigidity of the peptides, remained similar upon phosphorylation of peptide I (3.0 versus 3.1 A), but decreased for peptide II (from 3.1 to 0.73 A in H(2)O); this suggests a more compact, structured conformation upon phosphorylation of the latter peptide. The elongation of the peptide backbone (by ca. 0.7 A) for peptide I is attributed to an increase in steric demand upon phosphorylation, which favors an extended conformation. The contraction (by ca. 1.4 A) and structural rigidification of peptide II is attributed to attractive Coulombic interactions and hydrogen bonding between the

  8. Conformational restrictions in ligand binding to the human intestinal di-/tripeptide transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Våbenø, Jon; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Steffansen, Bente

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a computational method aiding the design of dipeptidomimetic pro-moieties targeting the human intestinal di-/tripeptide transporter hPEPT1. First, the conformation in which substrates bind to hPEPT1 (the bioactive conformation) was identified...... to change the peptide backbone conformation (DeltaE(bbone)) from the global energy minimum conformation to the identified bioactive conformation was calculated for 20 hPEPT1 targeted model prodrugs with known K(i) values. Quantitatively, an inverse linear relationship (r(2)=0.81, q(2)=0.80) was obtained...

  9. An investigation of fission models for high-energy radiation transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, T.W.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; Neef, R.D.

    1983-07-01

    An investigation of high-energy fission models for use in the HETC code has been made. The validation work has been directed checking the accuracy of the high-energy radiation transport computer code HETC to investigate the appropriate model for routine calculations, particularly for spallation neutron source applications. Model calculations are given in terms of neutron production, fission fragment energy release, and residual nuclei production for high-energy protons incident on thin uranium targets. The effect of the fission models on neutron production from thick uranium targets is also shown. (orig.)

  10. Calculated microdose spectra for intermediate energy neutrons (1 to 100 keV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Affan, I.A.M.; Watt, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    Basic formulae for calculation of energy deposition events due to insiders, starters, stoppers and crossers, using the continuous slowing down approximation have been modified to allow for the enhanced energy deposition in spherical volumes due to elastic scattering interactions which reduce the penetration depth of the charged particle recoils. Energy deposition spectra have been obtained for energies of 1, 10, 50, 100 keV in 0.2 μm and 1 μm tissue-equivalent spheres. From these, frequency and dose distributions in lineal energy and in specific energy density have been calculated. Also calculated for different neutron energies are values of zeta, the energy average of event size, as a function of the diameter of the sensitive site. The structure of the energy event distributions can be interpreted in terms of the basic physics. The effect of the modifications to the basic formulae is to increase the number of energy deposition events due to insiders and to decrease the number of starters, stoppers and crossers. The degree of the effect increases with decreasing neutron energy, increasing sphere size, and the change is most significant for low energy deposition events. (author)

  11. Calculated microdose spectra for intermediate energy neutrons (1 to 100 keV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Affan, I.A.M.; Watt, D.E. (Dundee Univ. (UK). Dept. of Medical Biophysics); Colautti, P.; Talpo, G. (Laboratori Nazionali dell' Infn, 35020, Legnaro (Padova) (Italy))

    1983-01-01

    Basic formulae for calculation of energy deposition events due to insiders, starters, stoppers and crossers, using the continuous slowing down approximation have been modified to allow for the enhanced energy deposition in spherical volumes due to elastic scattering interactions which reduce the penetration depth of the charged particle recoils. Energy deposition spectra have been obtained for energies of 1, 10, 50, 100 keV in 0.2 ..mu..m and 1 ..mu..m tissue-equivalent spheres. From these, frequency and dose distributions in lineal energy and in specific energy density have been calculated. Also calculated for different neutron energies are values of zeta, the energy average of event size, as a function of the diameter of the sensitive site. The structure of the energy event distributions can be interpreted in terms of the basic physics. The effect of the modifications to the basic formulae is to increase the number of energy deposition events due to insiders and to decrease the number of starters, stoppers and crossers. The degree of the effect increases with decreasing neutron energy, increasing sphere size, and the change is most significant for low energy deposition events.

  12. Calculating systems-scale energy efficiency and net energy returns: A bottom-up matrix-based approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, Adam R.; Dale, Michael; Barnhart, Charles J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we expand the work of Brandt and Dale (2011) on ERRs (energy return ratios) such as EROI (energy return on investment). This paper describes a “bottom-up” mathematical formulation which uses matrix-based computations adapted from the LCA (life cycle assessment) literature. The framework allows multiple energy pathways and flexible inclusion of non-energy sectors. This framework is then used to define a variety of ERRs that measure the amount of energy supplied by an energy extraction and processing pathway compared to the amount of energy consumed in producing the energy. ERRs that were previously defined in the literature are cast in our framework for calculation and comparison. For illustration, our framework is applied to include oil production and processing and generation of electricity from PV (photovoltaic) systems. Results show that ERR values will decline as system boundaries expand to include more processes. NERs (net energy return ratios) tend to be lower than GERs (gross energy return ratios). External energy return ratios (such as net external energy return, or NEER (net external energy ratio)) tend to be higher than their equivalent total energy return ratios. - Highlights: • An improved bottom-up mathematical method for computing net energy return metrics is developed. • Our methodology allows arbitrary numbers of interacting processes acting as an energy system. • Our methodology allows much more specific and rigorous definition of energy return ratios such as EROI or NER

  13. Discrete lattice plane broken bond interfacial energy calculations and the use of the dividing surface concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanujan, R.V.

    2003-01-01

    The concept of the dividing surface has been extensively used to define the relationships between thermodynamic quantities at the interface between two phases; it is also useful in calculations of interfacial energy (γ). However, in the original formulation, the two phases are continuum phases, the atomistic nature of the interface was not considered. It is, therefore, useful to examine the use of the dividing surface in the context of atomistic interfacial energy calculations. The case of a planar fcc:hcp interface is considered and the dividing surface positions which are useful in atomistic interfacial energy calculations are stated, one position equates γ to the excess internal energy, the other position allows us to use the Gibbs adsorption equation. An example of a calculation using the convenient dividing surface positions is presented

  14. First-principles calculations of the vacancy formation energy in transition and noble metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korzhavyi, P.A.; Abrikosov, Igor A.; Johansson, Börje

    1999-01-01

    approach and include electrostatic multipole corrections to the atomic sphere approximation. The results are in excellent agreement with available full-potential calculations and with the vacancy formation energies obtained in positron annihilation measurements. The variation of the vacancy formation...

  15. Ligand Conformational and Solvation/Desolvation Free Energy in Protein-Ligand Complex Formation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolář, Michal; Fanfrlík, Jindřich; Hobza, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 16 (2011), s. 4718-4724 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA ČR GAP208/11/0295 Grant - others:Korea Science and Engineering Foundation(KR) R32-2008-000-10180-0; European Science Fund(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/03.0058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : solvation free energy * SMD * HIV protease inhibitors Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.696, year: 2011

  16. Conformal symmetry and string theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, A.

    1987-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the study of various aspects of the 2-dimensional conformal field theory and its applications to strings. We make a short review of the conformal field theory and its supersymmetric extension, called superconformal field theory. We present an elegant superspace formulation of these theories and solve the condition for the closure of the superconformal algebra. The we go on to classify the superconformal field theories according to these solutions. We prove that N ≥ 5 superconformal algebra, with N being the number of supersymmetries, does not have central charge. We find the primary representations of all the interesting superconformal algebra. We study the quantization of the superconformal theories and derive the constraints on the central charge of the algebra that has to be satisfied for a consistent quantum theory. This quantization process also determines the ground state energy of the system and the spectrum of the model. We study the global aspects of the conformal symmetry and its role in the construction of consistent heterotic string theories. We prove the uniqueness of heterotic superstring theories in 10 dimensions in the fermionic constructions. We show how the vertex operators are closely associated with the primary field representation of the conformal algebra. We utilize these vertex operator constructions to obtain tree amplitudes in the 10-dimensional heterotic string theory. We show by explicit calculation at the 3-point level that the scattering amplitudes derived from the heterotic superstring are same as the ones obtained from 10-dimensional supergravity theories

  17. Efficiency calculations for the direct energy conversion system of the Cadarache neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    A prototype energy conversion system is presently in operation at Cadarache, France. Such a device is planned for installation on each six neutral beam injectors for use in the Tore Supra experiment in 1989. We present calculations of beam performance that may influence design considerations. The calculations are performed with the DART charged particle beam code. We investigate the effects of cold plasma, direct energy conversion and neutral beam production. 4 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs

  18. Window Energy Rating System and Calculation of Energy Performance of Windows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Jacob Birck; Svendsen, Svend

    The goal of reducing the energy consumption in buildings is the background for the introduction of an energy rating system of fenestration products in Denmark. The energy rating system requires that producers declare, among other things, the heat loss coefficient, U, and the total solar energy...... development, e.g. when the resulting effects of a reduced frame area are evaluated....

  19. Gamma-point lattice free energy estimates from O(1) force calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, Johannes; Vegge, Tejs

    2008-01-01

    We present a new method for estimating the vibrational free energy of crystal (and molecular) structures employing only a single force calculation, for a particularly displaced configuration, in addition to the calculation of the ground state configuration. This displacement vector is the sum...

  20. Specification and comparative calculation of enthalpies and Gibbs formation energies of anhydrous lanthanide nitrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del' Pino, Kh.; Chukurov, P.M.; Drakin, S.I.

    1980-01-01

    Analyzed are the results of experimental depermination of formation enthalpies of waterless nitrates of lanthane cerium, praseodymium, neodymium and samarium. Using method of comparative calculation computed are enthalpies of formation of waterless lanthanide and yttrium nitrates. Calculated values of enthalpies and Gibbs energies of waterless lanthanide nitrate formation are tabulated

  1. Calculating the energy spectrum of neutrons from tritium target of the NG-150 type generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortash, A.I.; Kuznetsov, V.S.

    1987-01-01

    Calculation procedure of neutron spectra yielding from the NG-150 generator target chamber with regard to deutron moderation is suggested. Using the suggested procedure, neutron spectra for different escape angles formed in the tritium target are calculated. The spectrum of neutrons scattered in cooling water is calculated. The mean energy of neutrons escaping at the angle of 0 deg equalling 14.5 MeV is obtained

  2. Quantitative assessment of force fields on both low-energy conformational basins and transition-state regions of the (phi-psi) space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Z.; Ensing, B.; Moore, P.B.

    2011-01-01

    The free energy surfaces (FESs) of alanine dipeptide are studied to illustrate a new strategy to assess the performance of classical molecular mechanics force field on the full range of the (phi-psi) conformational space. The FES is obtained from metadynamics simulations with five commonly used

  3. Approximate calculation of electronic energy levels of axially symmetric quantum dot and quantum ring by using energy dependent effective mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu-Min, Liu; Zhong-Yuan, Yu; Xiao-Min, Ren

    2009-01-01

    Calculations of electronic structures about the semiconductor quantum dot and the semiconductor quantum ring are presented in this paper. To reduce the calculation costs, for the quantum dot and the quantum ring, their simplified axially symmetric shapes are utilized in our analysis. The energy dependent effective mass is taken into account in solving the Schrödinger equations in the single band effective mass approximation. The calculated results show that the energy dependent effective mass should be considered only for relatively small volume quantum dots or small quantum rings. For large size quantum materials, both the energy dependent effective mass and the parabolic effective mass can give the same results. The energy states and the effective masses of the quantum dot and the quantum ring as a function of geometric parameters are also discussed in detail. (general)

  4. Calculation of embodied energy in Sino-USA trade: 1997–2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Ranran; Long, Ruyin; Yue, Ting; Shi, Haihong

    2014-01-01

    In order to find efficient trade measures to reduce China's energy consumption and to provide theoretical support for the climate talks between China and America, we investigate the impact of Sino-USA trade on energy consumption from the perspective of embodied energy. An Environmental Input–Output Life Cycle Assessment (EIO-LCA) model was established to calculate the total energy consumption coefficient, the direct consumption coefficient and the complete consumption coefficient of the sectors of the national economies of China and America. After taking into consideration the data of every sector of the national economy in Sino-USA trade, energy embodied in the import and export trade between China and America was calculated to verify the real energy flows in Sino-USA trade. The research results suggest the following: China is the net exporter of embodied energy in Sino-USA trade, and coal, crude oil and natural gas are the major components. In 1997–2011, the net exports of China's embodied energy totaled 1523,082,200 t of standard coal, the amount of China's energy consumption increased by 895,527,900 t of standard coal, and America's energy consumption decreased by 11,871,200 t of standard coal as a result of Sino-USA trade. On this basis, corresponding policies and recommendations are proposed. - Highlights: • An EIO-LCA model is established to examine China's embodied energy in Sino-USA trade. • Embodied energy is calculated from the perspective of energy sources. • China is found to be the net exporter of embodied energy in Sino-USA trade. • Coal, crude oil and natural gas are the major components of China's net embodied energy exports. • China's energy consumption has increased and America's has shifted to China in Sino-USA trade

  5. A comment on the calculation of the total-factor energy efficiency (TFEE) index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Ming-Chung

    2013-01-01

    This study provides a no-output growth model to conveniently calculate the total-factor energy efficiency (TFEE) index originally proposed by Hu and Wang (2006). The TFEE index serves as a very well-known and popular means of estimating overall energy efficiency. While many previous studies have used the indicator of energy inefficiency, including the indicator of energy intensity (i.e., Energy input/Gross Domestic Product (GDP)) to measure energy efficiency, Hu and Kao (2007) point out that the indicator of energy intensity is not only a partial-factor energy efficiency indicator, but that this partial-factor ratio is also quite inappropriate for analyzing the impact of changing energy use over time. The TFEE index overcomes the disadvantage of the indicator of energy intensity as mentioned above, but five steps are needed to calculate the TFEE score. In this study, we provide a no-output growth model to conveniently calculate the TFEE score. Furthermore, we extend this no-output growth model to an output growth model. This study concludes that the output growth model not only makes it easier to calculate the TFEE index than the model proposed by Hu and Wang (2006) and Hu and Kao (2007), but that it can also obtain better TFEE scores. - Highlights: ► The comment is on the total-factor energy efficiency (TFEE) index. ► Two extension models are no-output growth model and output growth model. ► The model in this study makes it easier to calculate the TFEE index.

  6. Computational Chemistry Laboratory: Calculating the Energy Content of Food Applied to a Real-Life Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbiric, Dora; Tribe, Lorena; Soriano, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    In this laboratory, students calculated the nutritional value of common foods to assess the energy content needed to answer an everyday life application; for example, how many kilometers can an average person run with the energy provided by 100 g (3.5 oz) of beef? The optimized geometries and the formation enthalpies of the nutritional components…

  7. Incorporating the effect of ionic strength in free energy calculations using explicit ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donnini, S; Mark, AE; Juffer, AH; Villa, Alessandra

    2005-01-01

    The incorporation of explicit ions to mimic the effect of ionic strength or to neutralize the overall charge on a system in free energy calculations using molecular dynamics simulations is investigated. The difference in the free energy of hydration between two triosephosphate isomerase inhibitors

  8. Zero-point energy constraint in quasi-classical trajectory calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhen; Bowman, Joel M

    2006-04-27

    A method to constrain the zero-point energy in quasi-classical trajectory calculations is proposed and applied to the Henon-Heiles system. The main idea of this method is to smoothly eliminate the coupling terms in the Hamiltonian as the energy of any mode falls below a specified value.

  9. CSA C873 Building Energy Estimation Methodology - A simplified monthly calculation for quick building optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legault, A.; Scott, L.; Rosemann, A.L.P.; Hopkins, M.

    2014-01-01

    CSA C873 Building Energy Estimation Methodology (BEEM) is a new series of (10) standards that is intended to simplify building energy calculations. The standard is based upon the German DIN Standard 18599 that has 8 years of proven track record and has been modified for the Canadian market. The BEEM

  10. Calculation of isotopic mass and energy production by a matrix operator method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.E.

    1976-08-01

    The Volterra method of the multiplicative integral is used to determine the isotopic density, mass, and energy production in linear systems. The solution method, assumptions, and limitations are discussed. The method allows a rapid accurate calculation of the change in isotopic density, mass, and energy production independent of the magnitude of the time steps, production or decay rates, or flux levels

  11. A calculation of internal kinetic energy and polarizability of compressed argon from the statistical atom model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seldam, C.A. ten; Groot, S.R. de

    1952-01-01

    From Jensen's and Gombás' modification of the statistical Thomas-Fermi atom model, a theory for compressed atoms is developed by changing the boundary conditions. Internal kinetic energy and polarizability of argon are calculated as functions of pressure. At 1000 atm. an internal kinetic energy of

  12. REFINED ALGORITHMS OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY LOSSES CALCULATION IN 0,38 KV NETWORKS IN REAL TIME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroshnyk A.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available An approach for closer definition of electrical energy losses size in air lines due to the accounting of environment temperature influence and flowing current size on the wire resistance is offered. Multifunctional microprocessor devices for energy losses calculation are elaborated.

  13. Porous TiO2 Conformal Coating on Carbon Nanotubes as Energy Storage Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Litao; Xu, Yun; Zhou, Meng; Chen, Gen; Deng, Shuguang; Smirnov, Sergei; Luo, Hongmei; Zou, Guifu

    2015-01-01

    The controllable synthesis of strongly coupled inorganic materials/carbon nanotubes (CNTs) hybrids represents a long-standing challenge for developing advanced catalysts and energy-storage materials. Here we report a simple sol-gel method for facile synthesis of TiO 2 /CNTs hybrid. The porous anatase TiO 2 nanoparticles are uniformly coated on the CNTs conducting network, which leads to remarkably improved electrochemical performances such as exceptional cycling stability, good high rate durability, and reduced resistance. This hybrid exhibits a reversible capacity as high as 200 mA·h g −1 at a current density of 0.1 A g −1 as an anode in lithium-ion battery (LIB). As a supercapacitor (SC), it shows a specific supercapacitance of 145 F g −1 in 0.5 M H 2 SO 4 electrolyte, higher than that of the previously reported TiO 2 based supercapacitors. Moreover, this hybrid also exhibits excellent durability after 1000 cycles for both LIBs and SCs. Such superior performance and cycling durability demonstrate the reinforced synergistic effects between the porous TiO 2 and interweaved CNTs network, indicating a great application potential for such hybrid materials in high power LIBs and SCs

  14. SU-E-T-632: Preliminary Study On Treating Nose Skin Using Energy and Intensity Modulated Electron Beams with Monte Carlo Based Dose Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, L; Eldib, A; Li, J; Price, R; Ma, C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Uneven nose surfaces and air cavities underneath and the use of bolus present complexity and dose uncertainty when using a single electron energy beam to plan treatments of nose skin with a pencil beam-based planning system. This work demonstrates more accurate dose calculation and more optimal planning using energy and intensity modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) delivered with a pMLC. Methods: An in-house developed Monte Carlo (MC)-based dose calculation/optimization planning system was employed for treatment planning. Phase space data (6, 9, 12 and 15 MeV) were used as an input source for MC dose calculations for the linac. To reduce the scatter-caused penumbra, a short SSD (61 cm) was used. Our previous work demonstrates good agreement in percentage depth dose and off-axis dose between calculations and film measurement for various field sizes. A MERT plan was generated for treating the nose skin using a patient geometry and a dose volume histogram (DVH) was obtained. The work also shows the comparison of 2D dose distributions between a clinically used conventional single electron energy plan and the MERT plan. Results: The MERT plan resulted in improved target dose coverage as compared to the conventional plan, which demonstrated a target dose deficit at the field edge. The conventional plan showed higher dose normal tissue irradiation underneath the nose skin while the MERT plan resulted in improved conformity and thus reduces normal tissue dose. Conclusion: This preliminary work illustrates that MC-based MERT planning is a promising technique in treating nose skin, not only providing more accurate dose calculation, but also offering an improved target dose coverage and conformity. In addition, this technique may eliminate the necessity of bolus, which often produces dose delivery uncertainty due to the air gaps that may exist between the bolus and skin

  15. Methodology to Calculate the Costs of a Floating Offshore Renewable Energy Farm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Castro-Santos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper establishes a general methodology to calculate the life-cycle cost of floating offshore renewable energy devices, applying it to wave energy and wind energy devices. It is accounts for the contributions of the six main phases of their life-cycle: concept definition, design and development, manufacturing, installation, exploitation and dismantling, the costs of which have been defined. Moreover, the energy produced is also taken into account to calculate the Levelized Cost of Energy of a floating offshore renewable energy farm. The methodology proposed has been applied to two renewable energy devices: a floating offshore wave energy device and a floating offshore wind energy device. Two locations have been considered: Aguçadoura and São Pedro de Moel, both in Portugal. Results indicate that the most important cost in terms of the life-cycle of a floating offshore renewable energy farm is the exploitation cost, followed by the manufacturing and the installation cost. In addition, the best area in terms of costs is the same independently of the type of floating offshore renewable energy considered: Aguçadoura. However, the results in terms of Levelized Cost of Energy are different: Aguçadoura is better when considering wave energy technology and the São Pedro de Moel region is the best option when considering floating wind energy technology. The method proposed aims to give a direct approach to calculate the main life-cycle cost of a floating offshore renewable energy farm. It helps to assess its feasibility and evaluating the relevant characteristics that influence it the most.

  16. Conformal Tachyons

    CERN Document Server

    Tomaschitz, R

    2000-01-01

    We study tachyons conformally coupled to the background geometry of a Milne universe. The causality of superluminal signal transfer is scrutinized in this context. The cosmic time of the comoving frame determines a distinguished time order for events connected by superluminal signals. An observer can relate his rest frame to the galaxy frame, and compare so the time order of events in his proper time to the cosmic time order. All observers can in this way arrive at identical conclusions on the causality of events connected by superluminal signals. An unambiguous energy concept for tachyonic rays is defined by means of the cosmic time of the comoving reference frame, without resorting to an antiparticle interpretation. On that basis we give an explicit proof that no signals can be sent into the past of observers. Causality violating signals are energetically forbidden, as they would have negative energy in the rest frame of the emitting observer. If an observer emits a superluminal signal, the tachyonic respon...

  17. Calculation of the Coulomb nuclear energy for the 1fsub(7/2) shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminski, V.A.; Shpikovski, S.

    1980-01-01

    Calculated was the Coulomb energy for nuclei with half-filled 1fsub(7/2) shell i.e. for configurations, where quasiparticle basis can serve as a total basis for precise calculations. Presented are calculation results of vector and tensor components of the Coulomb energy for Ca-Se-Ti-V isobaric pairs, as well as experimental and theoretical values for the Coulomb displacements. To estimate the Coulomb energies used were wave functions of a Hamiltonian taking account of pair and quadrupole interactions. There is good agreement with experimental data. Quasiparticle consideration is useful for calculating matrix elements of half-filled shells and for the cases of such an isospin value, where the technique of genealogical coefficients becomes extremely cumbersome

  18. Comparison of stress and total energy methods for calculation of elastic properties of semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, M A; Schulz, S; O'Reilly, E P

    2013-01-16

    We explore the calculation of the elastic properties of zinc-blende and wurtzite semiconductors using two different approaches: one based on stress and the other on total energy as a function of strain. The calculations are carried out within the framework of density functional theory in the local density approximation, with the plane wave-based package VASP. We use AlN as a test system, with some results also shown for selected other materials (C, Si, GaAs and GaN). Differences are found in convergence rate between the two methods, especially in low symmetry cases, where there is a much slower convergence for total energy calculations with respect to the number of plane waves and k points used. The stress method is observed to be more robust than the total energy method with respect to the residual error in the elastic constants calculated for different strain branches in the systems studied.

  19. Wave packet methods for the direct calculation of energy-transfer moments in molecular collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, K.S.; Schatz, G.C.; Balint-Kurti, G.G.

    1999-01-01

    The authors present a new wave packet based theory for the direct calculation of energy-transfer moments in molecular collision processes. This theory does not contain any explicit reference to final state information associated with the collision dynamics, thereby avoiding the need for determining vibration-rotation bound states (other than the initial state) for the molecules undergoing collision and also avoiding the calculation of state-to-state transition probabilities. The theory applies to energy-transfer moments of any order, and it generates moments for a wide range of translational energies in a single calculation. Two applications of the theory are made that demonstrate its viability; one is to collinear He + H 2 and the other to collinear He + CS 2 (with two active vibrational modes in CS 2 ). The results of these applications agree well with earlier results based on explicit calculation of transition probabilities

  20. Calculation of energy transfer by fission fragments from plane uranium layer to thin wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikulev, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    Energy transfer from a flat fissile uranium slab to a fine wire via fission fragments is calculated. The rate of energy transfer versus the thicknesses of the slab and protecting aluminum film, as well as the wire-slab gap, is found. An expression for the absorption coefficient of the wire is derived, and the effect the thickness of the wire has on the energy transfer process is studied. The amount of the edge effect for a finite-size uranium slab is demonstrated with calculations for vacuum conditions and for argon under a pressure of 0.25 atm [ru

  1. Accuracy estimation for intermediate and low energy neutron transport calculation with Monte Carlo code MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotegawa, Hiroshi; Sasamoto, Nobuo; Tanaka, Shun-ichi

    1987-02-01

    Both ''measured radioactive inventory due to neutron activation in the shield concrete of JPDR'' and ''measured intermediate and low energy neutron spectra penetrating through a graphite sphere'' are analyzed using a continuous energy model Monte Carlo code MCNP so as to estimate calculational accuracy of the code for neutron transport in thermal and epithermal energy regions. Analyses reveal that MCNP calculates thermal neutron spectra fairly accurately, while it apparently over-estimates epithermal neutron spectra (of approximate 1/E distribution) as compared with the measurements. (author)

  2. Energy-depth relation of electrons in bulk targets by Monte-Carlo calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaber, M.; Fitting, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    Monte-Carlo calculations are used to calculate the energy of penetrating electrons as a function of the depth in thick targets of Ti, Fe, Cu, As, In, and Au. It is shown that the mean energy ratio anti E(z)/E 0 decays exponentially with depth z and depends on the backscattering coefficient eta/sub B/ of the bulk material and the maximum range R(E 0 ) of the primary electrons with initial energy E 0 . Thereby a normalized plot anti E/E 0 as a function of the reduced depth z/R becomes possible. (author)

  3. Calculating energy and labor impacts of capital readjustments due to changes in personal consumption. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pleszkun, A.R.

    1979-05-01

    Previous work on the energy and labor impacts of energy-consumption policies has included the effect of respending of money saved, but not the capital implications of this respending. Here the capital effects are fully accounted for, and turn out to be negligible for a specified conservation scenario and a specified capital expansion model (..delta..C = kC). The robustness of this conclusion is discussed. The implication is that inclusion of only the respending effect is adequate for calculating energy and labor impacts and provides an accuracy to within +- 1% of the total impacts. Operationally, this result obviates the requirement for detailed and expensive calculations.

  4. Transportation Conformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    This section provides information on: current laws, regulations and guidance, policy and technical guidance, project-level conformity, general information, contacts and training, adequacy review of SIP submissions

  5. Calorific energy deposited by gamma radiations in a test reactor. Calorimetric measurements and calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mecheri, K.-F.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the calorific energy deposited by gamma radiations in the experimental devices irradiated in the test reactors of the Grenoble Nuclear Study Centre. A theoretical study briefly recalls to mind the various sorts of nuclear reactions that occur in a reactor, from the special angle of their ability to deposit calorific energy in the materials. A special study with the help of a graphite calorimeter made it possible to show the possible effect of the various parameters intervening in this energy absorption: the nature of the materials, their geometry, the spectrum of the incident gamma rays and the fact that the variation of this spectrum is due to the position of the measuring point with respect to the reactor core or to the presence of structures around the measuring instrument. The results of the calculations made with the help of the Mercury IV and ANISN codes are compared with those of the determinations in order to ascertain that very are adapted to the forecasts of energy deposition in the various materials. The conclusion was reached that in order to calculate with accuracy the depositifs of gamma energy in the experimental devices, it is necessary either to introduce the build-up calculation for the low energy photons, in the Mercury IV calculation code or to associate the DOT code to the ANISN calculation code [fr

  6. Faddeev and Glauber calculations at intermediate energies in a model for n+d scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elster, Ch.; Lin, T.; Gloeckle, W.; Jeschonnek, S.

    2008-01-01

    Obtaining cross sections for nuclear reactions at intermediate energies based on the Glauber formulation has a long tradition. Only recently the energy regime of a few hundred MeV has become accessible to ab initio Faddeev calculations of three-body scattering. In order to go to higher energies, the Faddeev equation for three-body scattering is formulated and directly solved without employing a partial wave decomposition. In the simplest form the Faddeev equation for interacting scalar particles is a three-dimensional integral equation in five variables, from which the total cross section, the cross sections for elastic scattering and breakup reactions, as well as differential cross sections are obtained. The same observables are calculated based on the Glauber formulation. The first order Glauber calculation and the Glauber rescattering corrections are compared in detail with the corresponding terms of the Faddeev multiple scattering series for projectile energies between 100 MeV and 2 GeV

  7. Conformational determination of [Leu]enkephalin based on theoretical and experimental VA and VCD spectral analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdali, Salim; Jalkanen, Karl J.; Cao, X.

    2004-01-01

    Conformational determination of [Leu]enkephalin in DMSO-d6 is carried out using VA and VCD spectral analyses. Conformational energies, vibrational frequencies and VA and VCD intensities are calculated using DFT at B3LYP/6-31G* level of theory. Comparison between the measured spectra...

  8. Free Energy Minimization Calculation of Complex Chemical Equilibria. Reduction of Silicon Dioxide with Carbon at High Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai, C. M.; Hutchinson, S. G.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the calculation of free energy in reactions between silicon dioxide and carbon. Describes several computer programs for calculating the free energy minimization and their uses in chemistry classrooms. Lists 16 references. (YP)

  9. How Many Conformations Need To Be Sampled To Obtain Converged QM/MM Energies? The Curse of Exponential Averaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryde, Ulf

    2017-11-14

    Combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations is a popular approach to study enzymatic reactions. They are often based on a set of minimized structures obtained on snapshots from a molecular dynamics simulation to include some dynamics of the enzyme. It has been much discussed how the individual energies should be combined to obtain a final estimate of the energy, but the current consensus seems to be to use an exponential average. Then, the question is how many snapshots are needed to reach a reliable estimate of the energy. In this paper, I show that the question can be easily be answered if it is assumed that the energies follow a Gaussian distribution. Then, the outcome can be simulated based on a single parameter, σ, the standard deviation of the QM/MM energies from the various snapshots, and the number of required snapshots can be estimated once the desired accuracy and confidence of the result has been specified. Results for various parameters are presented, and it is shown that many more snapshots are required than is normally assumed. The number can be reduced by employing a cumulant approximation to second order. It is shown that most convergence criteria work poorly, owing to the very bad conditioning of the exponential average when σ is large (more than ∼7 kJ/mol), because the energies that contribute most to the exponential average have a very low probability. On the other hand, σ serves as an excellent convergence criterion.

  10. Comparison between calculation and measurement of energy deposited by 800 MeV protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewe, W.E.

    1980-01-01

    The High Energy Transport Code, HETC, was obtained from the Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and altered as necessary to run on a CDC 7600 using the LTSS software in use at LLNL. HETC was then used to obtain calculated estimates of energy deposited, for comparison with a series of benchmark experiments done by LLNL. These experiments used proton beams of various energies incident on well-defined composite targets in good geometry. In this report, two aspects of the comparison between calculated and experimental energy depositions from an 800 MeV proton beam are discussed. Both aspects involve the fact that workers at SAI had previously used their version of HETC to calculate this experiment and reported their comparison with the measured data. The first aspect addressed is that their calculated data and LLNL calculations do not agree, suggesting an error in the conversion process from the RSIC code. The second aspect is not independent of the first, but is of sufficient importance to merit separate emphasis. It is that the SAI calculations agree well with experiments at the detector plate located some distance from the shower plate, whereas the LLNL calculations show a clearcut discrepancy there in comparison with the experiment. A contract was let in January 1980 by LLNL with SAI in order to obtain full details on the two cited aspects of the comparison between calculated and experimental energy depositions from an 800 MeV proton beam. The ensuing discussion is based on the final report of that contracted work

  11. AlaScan: A Graphical User Interface for Alanine Scanning Free-Energy Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadoss, Vijayaraj; Dehez, François; Chipot, Christophe

    2016-06-27

    Computation of the free-energy changes that underlie molecular recognition and association has gained significant importance due to its considerable potential in drug discovery. The massive increase of computational power in recent years substantiates the application of more accurate theoretical methods for the calculation of binding free energies. The impact of such advances is the application of parent approaches, like computational alanine scanning, to investigate in silico the effect of amino-acid replacement in protein-ligand and protein-protein complexes, or probe the thermostability of individual proteins. Because human effort represents a significant cost that precludes the routine use of this form of free-energy calculations, minimizing manual intervention constitutes a stringent prerequisite for any such systematic computation. With this objective in mind, we propose a new plug-in, referred to as AlaScan, developed within the popular visualization program VMD to automate the major steps in alanine-scanning calculations, employing free-energy perturbation as implemented in the widely used molecular dynamics code NAMD. The AlaScan plug-in can be utilized upstream, to prepare input files for selected alanine mutations. It can also be utilized downstream to perform the analysis of different alanine-scanning calculations and to report the free-energy estimates in a user-friendly graphical user interface, allowing favorable mutations to be identified at a glance. The plug-in also assists the end-user in assessing the reliability of the calculation through rapid visual inspection.

  12. Extended wave-packet model to calculate energy-loss moments of protons in matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archubi, C. D.; Arista, N. R.

    2017-12-01

    In this work we introduce modifications to the wave-packet method proposed by Kaneko to calculate the energy-loss moments of a projectile traversing a target which is represented in terms of Gaussian functions for the momentum distributions of electrons in the atomic shells. These modifications are introduced using the Levine and Louie technique to take into account the energy gaps corresponding to the different atomic levels of the target. We use the extended wave-packet model to evaluate the stopping power, the energy straggling, the inverse mean free path, and the ionization cross sections for protons in several targets, obtaining good agreements for all these quantities on an extensive energy range that covers low-, intermediate-, and high-energy regions. The extended wave-packet model proposed here provides a method to calculate in a very straightforward way all the significant terms of the inelastic interaction of light ions with any element of the periodic table.

  13. Measurements and Monte Carlo calculations of photon energy distributions in MAYAK PA workplaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smetanin, M.; Vasilenko, E.; Semenov, M.; Xanthos, S.; Takoudis, G.; Clouvas, A.; Silva, J.; Potiriadis, C.

    2008-01-01

    Photon energy distributions were measured in different workplaces of the Mayak Production Association (MPA), which was the first plutonium production plant in the former Soviet Union. In situ gamma spectrometry measurements were performed with a portable germanium detector. The spectral stripping method is used for the conversion of the in situ gamma-ray spectra to photon fluence rate energy distribution. This method requires the simulation of the portable germanium detector, which has been performed based on the MCNP code of Los Alamos. Measured photon fluence rate energy distributions were compared with calculated photon energy distributions (with the MCNP code) in two different workplaces: in the first workplace the geometry exposure was known. On the contrary, in the second workplace, as in most workplaces of MPA, the exposure geometry was unknown. The results obtained from the comparison between the experimental and calculated photon fluence rate energy distributions are presented and discussed. (authors)

  14. Calculation of the atomic states energies in the Thomas - Fermi approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Fedotkin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A method for calculating the energies of levels for many-electron neutral atoms is proposed. In this case, in addition to the Coulomb field of the nucleus, an important contribution to the energy is connected with the interaction between the electrons. This interaction is taken into account approximately by perturbation theory in the framework of the Thomas - Fermi statistical model. Using the Taytz approximation for the mean potential the analytical expressions for the energies of s-states are obtained with principal quantum numbers n = 1, 2, 3, 4. The energies are calculated for the nuclear charges in the interval 1 < Z ≤ 100. A good agreement with the experimental values of the energies was obtained.

  15. Workers’ Conformism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Ivantchev

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Conformism was studied among 46 workers with different kinds of occupations by means of two modified scales measuring conformity by Santor, Messervey, and Kusumakar (2000 – scale for perceived peer pressure and scale for conformism in antisocial situations. The hypothesis of the study that workers’ conformism is expressed in a medium degree was confirmed partly. More than a half of the workers conform in a medium degree for taking risk, and for the use of alcohol and drugs, and for sexual relationships. More than a half of the respondents conform in a small degree for anti-social activities (like a theft. The workers were more inclined to conform for risk taking (10.9%, then – for the use of alcohol, drugs and for sexual relationships (8.7%, and in the lowest degree – for anti-social activities (6.5%. The workers who were inclined for the use of alcohol and drugs tended also to conform for anti-social activities.

  16. Conformationally averaged vertical detachment energy of finite size NO3(-)·nH2O clusters: a route connecting few to many.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Arup Kumar; Samanta, Alok Kumar; Maity, Dilip Kumar

    2011-04-07

    We report conformationally averaged VDEs (VDE(w)(n)) for different sizes of NO(3)(-)·nH(2)O clusters calculated by using uncorrelated HF, correlated hybrid density functional (B3LYP, BHHLYP) and correlated ab intio (MP2 and CCSD(T)) theory. It is observed that the VDE(w)(n) at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p), B3LYP/Aug-cc-Pvtz and CCSD(T)/6-311++G(d,p) levels is very close to the experimentally measured VDE. It is shown that the use of calculated results of the conformationally averaged VDE for small-sized solvated negatively-charged clusters and a microscopic theory-based general expression for the same provides a route to obtain the VDE for a wide range of cluster sizes, including bulk.

  17. Calculation of the Local Free Energy Landscape in the Restricted Region by the Modified Tomographic Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changjun

    2016-03-31

    The free energy landscape is the most important information in the study of the reaction mechanisms of the molecules. However, it is difficult to calculate. In a large collective variable space, a molecule must take a long time to obtain the sufficient sampling during the simulation. To save the calculation quantity, decreasing the sampling region and constructing the local free energy landscape is required in practice. However, the restricted region in the collective variable space may have an irregular shape. Simply restricting one or more collective variables of the molecule cannot satisfy the requirement. In this paper, we propose a modified tomographic method to perform the simulation. First, it divides the restricted region by some hyperplanes and connects the centers of hyperplanes together by a curve. Second, it forces the molecule to sample on the curve and the hyperplanes in the simulation and calculates the free energy data on them. Finally, all the free energy data are combined together to form the local free energy landscape. Without consideration of the area outside the restricted region, this free energy calculation can be more efficient. By this method, one can further optimize the path quickly in the collective variable space.

  18. Influence of simulation assumptions and input parameters on energy balance calculations of residential buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodoo, Ambrose; Tettey, Uniben Yao Ayikoe; Gustavsson, Leif

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we modelled the influence of different simulation assumptions on energy balances of two variants of a residential building, comprising the building in its existing state and with energy-efficient improvements. We explored how selected parameter combinations and variations affect the energy balances of the building configurations. The selected parameters encompass outdoor microclimate, building thermal envelope and household electrical equipment including technical installations. Our modelling takes into account hourly as well as seasonal profiles of different internal heat gains. The results suggest that the impact of parameter interactions on calculated space heating of buildings is somewhat small and relatively more noticeable for an energy-efficient building in contrast to a conventional building. We find that the influence of parameters combinations is more apparent as more individual parameters are varied. The simulations show that a building's calculated space heating demand is significantly influenced by how heat gains from electrical equipment are modelled. For the analyzed building versions, calculated final energy for space heating differs by 9–14 kWh/m"2 depending on the assumed energy efficiency level for electrical equipment. The influence of electrical equipment on calculated final space heating is proportionally more significant for an energy-efficient building compared to a conventional building. This study shows the influence of different simulation assumptions and parameter combinations when varied simultaneously. - Highlights: • Energy balances are modelled for conventional and efficient variants of a building. • Influence of assumptions and parameter combinations and variations are explored. • Parameter interactions influence is apparent as more single parameters are varied. • Calculated space heating demand is notably affected by how heat gains are modelled.

  19. Quantifying polypeptide conformational space: sensitivity to conformation and ensemble definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, David C; Lim, Carmay

    2006-08-24

    Quantifying the density of conformations over phase space (the conformational distribution) is needed to model important macromolecular processes such as protein folding. In this work, we quantify the conformational distribution for a simple polypeptide (N-mer polyalanine) using the cumulative distribution function (CDF), which gives the probability that two randomly selected conformations are separated by less than a "conformational" distance and whose inverse gives conformation counts as a function of conformational radius. An important finding is that the conformation counts obtained by the CDF inverse depend critically on the assignment of a conformation's distance span and the ensemble (e.g., unfolded state model): varying ensemble and conformation definition (1 --> 2 A) varies the CDF-based conformation counts for Ala(50) from 10(11) to 10(69). In particular, relatively short molecular dynamics (MD) relaxation of Ala(50)'s random-walk ensemble reduces the number of conformers from 10(55) to 10(14) (using a 1 A root-mean-square-deviation radius conformation definition) pointing to potential disconnections in comparing the results from simplified models of unfolded proteins with those from all-atom MD simulations. Explicit waters are found to roughen the landscape considerably. Under some common conformation definitions, the results herein provide (i) an upper limit to the number of accessible conformations that compose unfolded states of proteins, (ii) the optimal clustering radius/conformation radius for counting conformations for a given energy and solvent model, (iii) a means of comparing various studies, and (iv) an assessment of the applicability of random search in protein folding.

  20. The calculation of nucleus-nucleus interaction cross sections at high energy in the Glauber approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gal'perin, A.G.; Uzhinskij, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    Total, inelastic and elastic cross sections of nucleus-nucleus (AA)-interactions at high energy (HE) are calculated on the base of Glauber approach. The calculation scheme is realized as a set of routines. The statistical average method is used in calculations. Program runs in an interactive regime. User is prompted about charge and mass numbers of nuclei and NN-interaction characters at the energy he is interested in: total cross section, the slope parameter of differential cross section of elastic scattering and ratio of real part to imaginary part of elastic scattering amplitude at zero momentum transfer. These data can be extracted from proper compilations. Results of calculations are displayed and are written on user defined output file. The program runs on PC. 21 refs., 1 tab

  1. Relativistic deformed mean-field calculation of binding energy differences of mirror nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koepf, W.; Barreiro, L.A.

    1996-01-01

    Binding energy differences of mirror nuclei for A=15, 17, 27, 29, 31, 33, 39 and 41 are calculated in the framework of relativistic deformed mean-field theory. The spatial components of the vector meson fields and the photon are fully taken into account in a self-consistent manner. The calculated binding energy differences are systematically smaller than the experimental values and lend support to the existence of the Okamoto-Nolen-Schiffer anomaly found decades ago in nonrelativistic calculations. For the majority of the nuclei studied, however, the results are such that the anomaly is significantly smaller than the one obtained within state-of-the-art nonrelativistic calculations. (author). 35 refs

  2. Extrapolation procedures for calculating high-temperature gibbs free energies of aqueous electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tremaine, P.R.

    1979-01-01

    Methods for calculating high-temprature Gibbs free energies of mononuclear cations and anions from room-temperature data are reviewed. Emphasis is given to species required for oxide solubility calculations relevant to mass transport situations in the nuclear industry. Free energies predicted by each method are compared to selected values calculated from recently reported solubility studies and other literature data. Values for monatomic ions estimated using the assumption anti C 0 p(T) = anti C 0 p(298) agree best with experiment to 423 K. From 423 K to 523 K, free energies from an electrostatic model for ion hydration are more accurate. Extrapolations for hydrolyzed species are limited by a lack of room-temperature entropy data and expressions for estimating these entropies are discussed. (orig.) [de

  3. Calculation of neutron and gamma ray energy spectra for fusion reactor shield design: comparison with experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, R.T.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barnes, J.M.; Chapman, G.T.

    1980-08-01

    Integral experiments that measure the transport of approx. 14 MeV D-T neutrons through laminated slabs of proposed fusion reactor shield materials have been carried out. Measured and calculated neutron and gamma ray energy spectra are compared as a function of the thickness and composition of stainless steel type 304, borated polyethylene, and Hevimet (a tungsten alloy), and as a function of detector position behind these materials. The measured data were obtained using a NE-213 liquid scintillator using pulse-shape discrimination methods to resolve neutron and gamma ray pulse height data and spectral unfolding methods to convert these data to energy spectra. The calculated data were obtained using two-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport methods in a complex calculational network that takes into account the energy-angle dependence of the D-T neutrons and the nonphysical anomalies of the S/sub n/ method

  4. Annotated references on shielding experiment and calculation of high energy particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, H.; Ban, S.; Nakamura, T.

    1990-12-01

    The literature on shielding experiment and calculation of high energy particles above 20 MeV has been surveyed. The survey covers thirteen journals, from 1965 up to 1989. For each paper, applicable information is listed on type and energy of the projectile, the accelerator used, composition and thickness of the target and shielding materials, shielding geometry, the experimental and calculational methods, and the quantities obtained. The references on shielding experiment and on shielding calculation are accessed through two indices which list the projectile-target and shielding material combination, shielding geometry and the projectile energy range. The literature on neutron, photon and hadron production from thick target bombarded by charged particles has been surveyed mainly from 1984 as a complement of the previous work. (author)

  5. Dose calculation methods in photon beam therapy using energy deposition kernels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahnesjoe, A.

    1991-01-01

    The problem of calculating accurate dose distributions in treatment planning of megavoltage photon radiation therapy has been studied. New dose calculation algorithms using energy deposition kernels have been developed. The kernels describe the transfer of energy by secondary particles from a primary photon interaction site to its surroundings. Monte Carlo simulations of particle transport have been used for derivation of kernels for primary photon energies form 0.1 MeV to 50 MeV. The trade off between accuracy and calculational speed has been addressed by the development of two algorithms; one point oriented with low computional overhead for interactive use and one for fast and accurate calculation of dose distributions in a 3-dimensional lattice. The latter algorithm models secondary particle transport in heterogeneous tissue by scaling energy deposition kernels with the electron density of the tissue. The accuracy of the methods has been tested using full Monte Carlo simulations for different geometries, and found to be superior to conventional algorithms based on scaling of broad beam dose distributions. Methods have also been developed for characterization of clinical photon beams in entities appropriate for kernel based calculation models. By approximating the spectrum as laterally invariant, an effective spectrum and dose distribution for contaminating charge particles are derived form depth dose distributions measured in water, using analytical constraints. The spectrum is used to calculate kernels by superposition of monoenergetic kernels. The lateral energy fluence distribution is determined by deconvolving measured lateral dose distributions by a corresponding pencil beam kernel. Dose distributions for contaminating photons are described using two different methods, one for estimation of the dose outside of the collimated beam, and the other for calibration of output factors derived from kernel based dose calculations. (au)

  6. Calculating economy-wide energy intensity decline rate: The role of sectoral output and energy shares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baksi, Soham; Green, Chris

    2007-01-01

    We specify formulas for computing the rate of decline in economy-wide energy intensity by aggregating its two determinants-technical efficiency improvements in the various sectors of the economy, and shifts in economic activity among these sectors. The formulas incorporate the interdependence between sectoral shares, and establish a one-to-one relation between sectoral output and energy shares. This helps to eliminate future energy intensity decline scenarios which involve implausible values of either sectoral share. An illustrative application of the formulas is provided, using within-sector efficiency improvement estimates suggested by Lightfoot-Green and Harvey

  7. Analytic calculation of depolarization due to large energy spread in high-energy electron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buon, J.

    1989-08-01

    A new semiclassical and stochastic model of spin diffusion is used to obtain numerical predictions for depolarization enhancement due to beam energy spread. It confirms the results of previous models for the synchrotron sidebands of spin resonances. A satisfactory agreement is obtained with the width of a synchrotron satellite observed at SPEAR. For HERA, TRISTAN, and LEP at Z 0 energy, the depolarization enhancement is of the order of a few units and increases very rapidly with the energy spread. Large reduction of polarization degree is expected in these rings

  8. Conformational analysis by intersection: CONAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smellie, Andrew; Stanton, Robert; Henne, Randy; Teig, Steve

    2003-01-15

    As high throughput techniques in chemical synthesis and screening improve, more demands are placed on computer assisted design and virtual screening. Many of these computational methods require one or more three-dimensional conformations for molecules, creating a demand for a conformational analysis tool that can rapidly and robustly cover the low-energy conformational spaces of small molecules. A new algorithm of intersection is presented here, which quickly generates (on average heuristics are applied after intersection to generate a small representative collection of conformations that span the conformational space. In a study of approximately 97,000 randomly selected molecules from the MDDR, results are presented that explore these conformations and their ability to cover low-energy conformational space. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Comput Chem 24: 10-20, 2003

  9. Atomic structure calculation of energy levels and oscillator strengths in Ti ion, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Keishi

    1983-10-01

    Energy levels and oscillator strengths are calculated for 3s-3p and 3p-3d transition arrays in Ti X, isoelectronic to Al I. The energy levels are obtained by the Slater-Condon theory of atomic structure, including explicitly the strong configuration interactions. The results are presented both in numerical tables and in diagrams. In the tables, the observed data are included for comparison, where available. The calculated weighted oscillator strengths (gf-value) are also displayed in figures, where the weighted oscillator strengths are plotted as a function of wavelength. (author)

  10. Calculation of the fifth atomic energy research dynamic benchmark with APROS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puska Eija Karita; Kontio Harii

    1998-01-01

    The band-out presents the model used for calculation of the fifth atomic energy research dynamic benchmark with APROS code. In the calculation of the fifth atomic energy research dynamic benchmark the three-dimensional neutronics model of APROS was used. The core was divided axially into 20 nodes according to the specifications of the benchmark and each six identical fuel assemblies were placed into one one-dimensional thermal hydraulic channel. The five-equation thermal hydraulic model was used in the benchmark. The plant process and automation was described with a generic WWER-440 plant model created by IVO Power Engineering Ltd. - Finland. (Author)

  11. Logarithmic conformal field theory through nilpotent conformal dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moghimi-Araghi, S.; Rouhani, S.; Saadat, M.

    2001-01-01

    We study logarithmic conformal field theories (LCFTs) through the introduction of nilpotent conformal weights. Using this device, we derive the properties of LCFTs such as the transformation laws, singular vectors and the structure of correlation functions. We discuss the emergence of an extra energy momentum tensor, which is the logarithmic partner of the energy momentum tensor

  12. Calculation of thermal-diffusion coefficients from plane-wave fluctuations in the heat energy density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, B.J.

    1994-01-01

    A method to calculate the thermal diffusivity D T from spontaneous fluctuations in the local heat energy density is presented. Calculations of the thermal diffusivity are performed for the Lennard-Jones fluid, carbon dioxide, and water. The results for the Lennard-Jones fluid are in agreement with calculations of the thermal conductivity using Green-Kubo relations and nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics techniques. The results for carbon dioxide and water give thermal diffusivities within a factor of 2 of the experimental values

  13. Development of continuous energy Monte Carlo burn-up calculation code MVP-BURN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Keisuke; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Sasaki, Makoto

    2001-01-01

    Burn-up calculations based on the continuous energy Monte Carlo method became possible by development of MVP-BURN. To confirm the reliably of MVP-BURN, it was applied to the two numerical benchmark problems; cell burn-up calculations for High Conversion LWR lattice and BWR lattice with burnable poison rods. Major burn-up parameters have shown good agreements with the results obtained by a deterministic code (SRAC95). Furthermore, spent fuel composition calculated by MVP-BURN was compared with measured one. Atomic number densities of major actinides at 34 GWd/t could be predicted within 10% accuracy. (author)

  14. Ab initio calculations on collisions of low energy electrons with polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rescigno, T.N.

    1991-01-01

    The Kohn variational method is one of simplest, and oldest, techniques for performing scattering calculations. Nevertheless, a number of formal problems, as well as practical difficulties associated with the computation of certain required matrix elements, delayed its application to electron--molecule scattering problems for many years. This paper will describe the recent theoretical and computational developments that have made the ''complex'' Kohn variational method a practical tool for carrying out calculations of low energy electron--molecule scattering. Recent calculations on a number of target molecules will also be summarized. 41 refs., 7 figs

  15. Application of an excited state LDA exchange energy functional for the calculation of transition energy of atoms within time-independent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamim, Md; Harbola, Manoj K, E-mail: sami@iitk.ac.i, E-mail: mkh@iitk.ac.i [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 016 (India)

    2010-11-14

    Transition energies of a new class of excited states (two-gap systems) of various atoms are calculated in time-independent density functional formalism by using a recently proposed local density approximation exchange energy functional for excited states. It is shown that the excitation energies calculated with this functional compare well with those calculated with exact exchange theories.

  16. Application of an excited state LDA exchange energy functional for the calculation of transition energy of atoms within time-independent density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamim, Md; Harbola, Manoj K

    2010-01-01

    Transition energies of a new class of excited states (two-gap systems) of various atoms are calculated in time-independent density functional formalism by using a recently proposed local density approximation exchange energy functional for excited states. It is shown that the excitation energies calculated with this functional compare well with those calculated with exact exchange theories.

  17. A dielectric matrix calculation of the surface-plasmon energy for the silicon (100) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsyth, A.J.; Smith, A.E.; Josefsson, T.W.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: As an extension of previous work, we present preliminary calculations for the dielectric properties of the silicon (100) surface. In particular, the |q|→0 and |q|=2π/a(1,0,0) surface loss function, and corresponding surface plasmon energies have been calculated within a simple model for the silicon surface. The results have been obtained from the Adler and Wiser dielectric matrix (DM). The bandstructure used for the calculation was based on the highly successful empirical pseudopotential method of Cohen and Chelikovsky. We have used a 59 plane wave basis for the bandstructure, and have chosen a DM size of 59 x 59. Results are compared and contrasted with volume plasmon calculations, free electron calculations and experiment

  18. Detailed calculations on low-energy positron-hydrogen-molecule and helium-antihydrogen scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armour, E A G; Cooper, J N; Gregory, M R; Todd, A C [School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Jonsell, S [Department of Physics, University of Swansea, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Plummer, M, E-mail: edward.armour@nottingham.ac.u [Computational Science and Engineering, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we consider two scattering processes: low-energy positron-hydrogen-molecule and helium-antihydrogen scattering. In the positron-hydrogen-molecule scattering calculations, we use the Kohn variational method to calculate Z{sub eff}, the number of target electrons available to the positron for annihilation. In the helium-antihydrogen scattering calculations, we use the Rayleigh-Ritz variational method to calculate a wave function for the leptons as a function of the distance between the helium and the antihydrogen. This is used, together with the associated nuclear wave function and the wave function for {alpha} p-bar + Ps{sup -}, to calculate the cross section for the rearrangement reaction He + H-bar {yields} {alpha} p-bar + Ps{sup -}, using the T-matrix and a form of the distorted wave approximation. For both processes, positron-electron correlation is taken into account accurately using Hylleraas-type functions.

  19. The logarithmic conformal field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahimi Tabar, M.R.; Aghamohammadi, A.; Khorrami, M.

    1997-01-01

    We study the correlation functions of logarithmic conformal field theories. First, assuming conformal invariance, we explicitly calculate two- and three-point functions. This calculation is done for the general case of more than one logarithmic field in a block, and more than one set of logarithmic fields. Then we show that one can regard the logarithmic field as a formal derivative of the ordinary field with respect to its conformal weight. This enables one to calculate any n-point function containing the logarithmic field in terms of ordinary n-point functions. Finally, we calculate the operator product expansion (OPE) coefficients of a logarithmic conformal field theory, and show that these can be obtained from the corresponding coefficients of ordinary conformal theory by a simple derivation. (orig.)

  20. Calculation of Energy Band Diagram of a Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Cendula, P.; Tilley, S. D.; Gimenez, S.; Schmid, M.; Bisquert, J.; Graetzel, M.; Schumacher, J. O.

    2014-01-01

    A physical model is presented for a semiconductor electrode of a photoelectrochemical (PEC) cell, accounting for the potential drop in the Helmholtz layer. Hence both band edge pinning and unpinning are naturally included in our description. The model is based on the continuity equations for charge carriers and direct charge transfer from the energy bands to the electrolyte. A quantitative calculation of the position of the energy bands and the variation of the quasi-Fermi levels in the semic...

  1. Calculation of W for low energy electrons in tissue-equivalent gas. [<10 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dayashankar, [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Div. of Radiation Protection

    1977-11-01

    The mean energy expended per ion pair formed (W-value) in the tissue-equivalent gas for incident electrons of energy up to 10 keV has been calculated in the continuous slowing-down approximation. The effect of secondary and tertiary electrons has been considered by utilizing recent measurements of Opal et al., (1971, J. Chem. Phys., 55,4100) on the energy spectra of low-energy secondary electrons and the Mott formula for the spectra of high-energy secondaries. The results, which are provisional in nature due to the limitations on the accuracy of the input cross-section data and the neglect of the discrete nature of energy loss process, are compared with the available measurements.

  2. The importance of geospatial data to calculate the optimal distribution of renewable energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Paula; Masó, Joan

    2013-04-01

    Specially during last three years, the renewable energies are revolutionizing the international trade while they are geographically diversifying markets. Renewables are experiencing a rapid growth in power generation. According to REN21 (2012), during last six years, the total renewables capacity installed grew at record rates. In 2011, the EU raised its share of global new renewables capacity till 44%. The BRICS nations (Brazil, Russia, India and China) accounted for about 26% of the total global. Moreover, almost twenty countries in the Middle East, North Africa, and sub-Saharan Africa have currently active markets in renewables. The energy return ratios are commonly used to calculate the efficiency of the traditional energy sources. The Energy Return On Investment (EROI) compares the energy returned for a certain source and the energy used to get it (explore, find, develop, produce, extract, transform, harvest, grow, process, etc.). These energy return ratios have demonstrated a general decrease of efficiency of the fossil fuels and gas. When considering the limitations of the quantity of energy produced by some sources, the energy invested to obtain them and the difficulties of finding optimal locations for the establishment of renewables farms (e.g. due to an ever increasing scarce of appropriate land) the EROI becomes relevant in renewables. A spatialized EROI, which uses variables with spatial distribution, enables the optimal position in terms of both energy production and associated costs. It is important to note that the spatialized EROI can be mathematically formalized and calculated the same way for different locations in a reproducible way. This means that having established a concrete EROI methodology it is possible to generate a continuous map that will highlight the best productive zones for renewable energies in terms of maximum energy return at minimum cost. Relevant variables to calculate the real energy invested are the grid connections between

  3. Conformal Infinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frauendiener Jörg

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available The notion of conformal infinity has a long history within the research in Einstein's theory of gravity. Today, ``conformal infinity'' is related with almost all other branches of research in general relativity, from quantisation procedures to abstract mathematical issues to numerical applications. This review article attempts to show how this concept gradually and inevitably evolved out of physical issues, namely the need to understand gravitational radiation and isolated systems within the theory of gravitation and how it lends itself very naturally to solve radiation problems in numerical relativity. The fundamental concept of null-infinity is introduced. Friedrich's regular conformal field equations are presented and various initial value problems for them are discussed. Finally, it is shown that the conformal field equations provide a very powerful method within numerical relativity to study global problems such as gravitational wave propagation and detection.

  4. Conformal Infinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauendiener, Jörg

    2004-01-01

    The notion of conformal infinity has a long history within the research in Einstein's theory of gravity. Today, "conformal infinity" is related to almost all other branches of research in general relativity, from quantisation procedures to abstract mathematical issues to numerical applications. This review article attempts to show how this concept gradually and inevitably evolved from physical issues, namely the need to understand gravitational radiation and isolated systems within the theory of gravitation, and how it lends itself very naturally to the solution of radiation problems in numerical relativity. The fundamental concept of null-infinity is introduced. Friedrich's regular conformal field equations are presented and various initial value problems for them are discussed. Finally, it is shown that the conformal field equations provide a very powerful method within numerical relativity to study global problems such as gravitational wave propagation and detection.

  5. Conformal Infinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frauendiener Jörg

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The notion of conformal infinity has a long history within the research in Einstein's theory of gravity. Today, 'conformal infinity' is related to almost all other branches of research in general relativity, from quantisation procedures to abstract mathematical issues to numerical applications. This review article attempts to show how this concept gradually and inevitably evolved from physical issues, namely the need to understand gravitational radiation and isolated systems within the theory of gravitation, and how it lends itself very naturally to the solution of radiation problems in numerical relativity. The fundamental concept of null-infinity is introduced. Friedrich's regular conformal field equations are presented and various initial value problems for them are discussed. Finally, it is shown that the conformal field equations provide a very powerful method within numerical relativity to study global problems such as gravitational wave propagation and detection.

  6. General Conformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The General Conformity requirements ensure that the actions taken by federal agencies in nonattainment and maintenance areas do not interfere with a state’s plans to meet national standards for air quality.

  7. Conformal Infinity

    OpenAIRE

    Frauendiener, J?rg

    2000-01-01

    The notion of conformal infinity has a long history within the research in Einstein's theory of gravity. Today, 'conformal infinity' is related to almost all other branches of research in general relativity, from quantisation procedures to abstract mathematical issues to numerical applications. This review article attempts to show how this concept gradually and inevitably evolved from physical issues, namely the need to understand gravitational radiation and isolated systems within the theory...

  8. Continuous Energy, Multi-Dimensional Transport Calculations for Problem Dependent Resonance Self-Shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downar, T.

    2009-01-01

    The overall objective of the work here has been to eliminate the approximations used in current resonance treatments by developing continuous energy multi-dimensional transport calculations for problem dependent self-shielding calculations. The work here builds on the existing resonance treatment capabilities in the ORNL SCALE code system. The overall objective of the work here has been to eliminate the approximations used in current resonance treatments by developing continuous energy multidimensional transport calculations for problem dependent self-shielding calculations. The work here builds on the existing resonance treatment capabilities in the ORNL SCALE code system. Specifically, the methods here utilize the existing continuous energy SCALE5 module, CENTRM, and the multi-dimensional discrete ordinates solver, NEWT to develop a new code, CENTRM( ) NEWT. The work here addresses specific theoretical limitations in existing CENTRM resonance treatment, as well as investigates advanced numerical and parallel computing algorithms for CENTRM and NEWT in order to reduce the computational burden. The result of the work here will be a new computer code capable of performing problem dependent self-shielding analysis for both existing and proposed GENIV fuel designs. The objective of the work was to have an immediate impact on the safety analysis of existing reactors through improvements in the calculation of fuel temperature effects, as well as on the analysis of more sophisticated GENIV/NGNP systems through improvements in the depletion/transmutation of actinides for Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiatives.

  9. Calculation of the energy of explosives with a partial reaction model. Comparison with cylinder test data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchidrian, Jose A.; Lopez, Lina M. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid - E.T.S.I. Minas, Rios Rosas 21, E-28003 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-02-15

    The energy delivered by explosives is described by means of the useful expansion work along the isentrope of the detonation products. A thermodynamic code (W-DETCOM) is used, in which a partial reaction model has been implemented. In this model, the reacted fraction of the explosive in the detonation state is used as a fitting factor so that the calculated detonation velocity meets the experimental value. Calculations based on such a model have been carried out for a number of commercial explosives of ANFO and emulsion types. The BKW (Becker-Kistiakowsky-Wilson) equation of state is used for the detonation gases with the Sandia parameter set (BKWS). The energy delivered in the expansion (useful work) is calculated, and the values obtained are compared with the Gurney energies from cylinder test data at various expansion ratios. The expansion work values obtained are much more realistic than those from an ideal detonation calculation and, in most cases, the values predicted by the calculation are in good agreement with the experimental ones. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. Comparison of Measured Dark Current Distributions with Calculated Damage Energy Distributions in HgCdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, C. J.; Marshall, P. W.; Howe, C. L.; Reed, R. A.; Weller, R. A.; Mendenhall, M.; Waczynski, A.; Ladbury, R.; Jordan, T. M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a combined Monte Carlo and analytic approach to the calculation of the pixel-to-pixel distribution of proton-induced damage in a HgCdTe sensor array and compares the results to measured dark current distributions after damage by 63 MeV protons. The moments of the Coulombic, nuclear elastic and nuclear inelastic damage distributions were extracted from Monte Carlo simulations and combined to form a damage distribution using the analytic techniques first described in [1]. The calculations show that the high energy recoils from the nuclear inelastic reactions (calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX [2]) produce a pronounced skewing of the damage energy distribution. While the nuclear elastic component (also calculated using the MCNPX) contributes only a small fraction of the total nonionizing damage energy, its inclusion in the shape of the damage across the array is significant. The Coulombic contribution was calculated using MRED [3-5], a Geant4 [4,6] application. The comparison with the dark current distribution strongly suggests that mechanisms which are not linearly correlated with nonionizing damage produced according to collision kinematics are responsible for the observed dark current increases. This has important implications for the process of predicting the on-orbit dark current response of the HgCdTe sensor array.

  11. Evaluation of the HTTR criticality and burnup calculations with continuous-energy and multigroup cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Min-Han; Wang, Jui-Yu [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Section 2, Kung-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Sheu, Rong-Jiun, E-mail: rjsheu@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Section 2, Kung-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Department of Engineering System and Science, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Section 2, Kung-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Liu, Yen-Wan Hsueh [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Section 2, Kung-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Department of Engineering System and Science, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Section 2, Kung-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2014-05-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) in Japan is a helium-cooled graphite-moderated reactor designed and operated for the future development of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. Two detailed full-core models of HTTR have been established by using SCALE6 and MCNP5/X, respectively, to study its neutronic properties. Several benchmark problems were repeated first to validate the calculation models. Careful code-to-code comparisons were made to ensure that two calculation models are both correct and equivalent. Compared with experimental data, the two models show a consistent bias of approximately 20–30 mk overestimation in effective multiplication factor for a wide range of core states. Most of the bias could be related to the ENDF/B-VII.0 cross-section library or incomplete modeling of impurities in graphite. After that, a series of systematic analyses was performed to investigate the effects of cross sections on the HTTR criticality and burnup calculations, with special interest in the comparison between continuous-energy and multigroup results. Multigroup calculations in this study were carried out in 238-group structure and adopted the SCALE double-heterogeneity treatment for resonance self-shielding. The results show that multigroup calculations tend to underestimate the system eigenvalue by a constant amount of ∼5 mk compared to their continuous-energy counterparts. Further sensitivity studies suggest the differences between multigroup and continuous-energy results appear to be temperature independent and also insensitive to burnup effects.

  12. Evaluation of the HTTR criticality and burnup calculations with continuous-energy and multigroup cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, Min-Han; Wang, Jui-Yu; Sheu, Rong-Jiun; Liu, Yen-Wan Hsueh

    2014-01-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) in Japan is a helium-cooled graphite-moderated reactor designed and operated for the future development of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. Two detailed full-core models of HTTR have been established by using SCALE6 and MCNP5/X, respectively, to study its neutronic properties. Several benchmark problems were repeated first to validate the calculation models. Careful code-to-code comparisons were made to ensure that two calculation models are both correct and equivalent. Compared with experimental data, the two models show a consistent bias of approximately 20–30 mk overestimation in effective multiplication factor for a wide range of core states. Most of the bias could be related to the ENDF/B-VII.0 cross-section library or incomplete modeling of impurities in graphite. After that, a series of systematic analyses was performed to investigate the effects of cross sections on the HTTR criticality and burnup calculations, with special interest in the comparison between continuous-energy and multigroup results. Multigroup calculations in this study were carried out in 238-group structure and adopted the SCALE double-heterogeneity treatment for resonance self-shielding. The results show that multigroup calculations tend to underestimate the system eigenvalue by a constant amount of ∼5 mk compared to their continuous-energy counterparts. Further sensitivity studies suggest the differences between multigroup and continuous-energy results appear to be temperature independent and also insensitive to burnup effects

  13. SU-F-T-81: Treating Nose Skin Using Energy and Intensity Modulated Electron Beams with Monte Carlo Based Dose Calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, L; Fan, J; Eldib, A; Price, R; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Treating nose skin with an electron beam is of a substantial challenge due to uneven nose surfaces and tissue heterogeneity, and consequently could have a great uncertainty of dose accuracy on the target. This work explored the method using Monte Carlo (MC)-based energy and intensity modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT), which would be delivered with a photon MLC in a standard medical linac (Artiste). Methods: The traditional treatment on the nose skin involves the usage of a bolus, often with a single energy electron beam. This work avoided using the bolus, and utilized mixed energies of electron beams. An in-house developed Monte Carlo (MC)-based dose calculation/optimization planning system was employed for treatment planning. Phase space data (6, 9, 12 and 15 MeV) were used as an input source for MC dose calculations for the linac. To reduce the scatter-caused penumbra, a short SSD (61 cm) was used. A clinical case of the nose skin, which was previously treated with a single 9 MeV electron beam, was replanned with the MERT method. The resultant dose distributions were compared with the plan previously clinically used. The dose volume histogram of the MERT plan is calculated to examine the coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) and critical structure doses. Results: The target coverage and conformality in the MERT plan are improved as compared to the conventional plan. The MERT can provide more sufficient target coverage and less normal tissue dose underneath the nose skin. Conclusion: Compared to the conventional treatment technique, using MERT for the nose skin treatment has shown the dosimetric advantages in the PTV coverage and conformality. In addition, this technique eliminates the necessity of the cutout and bolus, which makes the treatment more efficient and accurate.

  14. Proton affinity of diastereoisomers of modified prolines using the kinetic method and density functional theory calculations: role of the cis/trans substituent on the endo/exo ring conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzache, S; Pepe, C; Karoyan, P; Fournier, F; Tabet, J-C

    2005-01-01

    The proton affinity (PA) of cis/trans-3-prolinoleucines and cis/trans-3-prolinoglutamic acids have been studied by the kinetic method and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Several conformations of the neutral and the protonated modified prolines, in particular the endo and exo ring conformations, were analyzed with respect to their contribution to the PA values. When the substituent is an alkyl, both the diastereoisomers have the same PA value. However, the PA values for the diastereoisomers are different when the substituted chain contains functional groups (e.g. a carboxyl group). This variation in PA values could be attributed to the existence of intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Approximate energy correction for particle number summetry breaking in constrained Hartree-Fock plus BCS calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redon, N.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, M.

    1989-01-01

    An approximate restoration of the particle number symmetry, a la Lipkin-Nogami, is numerically investigated in the context of Constrained Hartree-Fock plus BCS calculations. Its effect is assessed in a variety of physical situations like potential energy landscapes in transitional nuclei, shape isomerism at low spin and fission barriers of actinide nuclei

  16. Development of load calculation techniques on screw and screw press energy consumption

    OpenAIRE

    Татарьянц, Максим Сергеевич; Завинский, Сергей Иванович; Трошин, Алексей Георгиевич

    2015-01-01

    The process of pressing of wood chips in screw machines is researched. It is defined processes taking place in different parts of the screw, formulas allowing to calculate the loads acting on the screw flights, as well as to determine the power required for compression. The unit costs of energy consumption and raw materials in the degree of heat pressing are determined

  17. A Simple Method to Calculate the Temperature Dependence of the Gibbs Energy and Chemical Equilibrium Constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Francisco M.

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the Gibbs energy and important quantities such as Henry's law constants, activity coefficients, and chemical equilibrium constants is usually calculated by using the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation. Although, this is a well-known approach and traditionally covered as part of any physical chemistry course, the required…

  18. Program TOTELA calculating basic cross sections in intermediate energy region by using systematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukahori, Tokio; Niita, Koji

    2000-01-01

    Program TOTELA can calculate neutron- and proton-induced total, elastic scattering and reaction cross sections and angular distribution of elastic scattering in the intermediate energy region from 20 MeV to 3 GeV. The TOTELA adopts the systematics modified from that by Pearlstein to reproduce the experimental data and LA150 evaluation better. The calculated results compared with experimental data and LA150 evaluation are shown in figures. The TOTELA results can reproduce those data almost well. The TOTELA was developed to fill the lack of experimental data of above quantities in the intermediate energy region and to use for production of JENDL High Energy File. In the case that there is no experimental data of above quantities, the optical model parameters can be fitted by using TOTELA results. From this point of view, it is also useful to compare the optical model calculation by using RIPL with TOTELA results, in order to verify the parameter quality. Input data of TOTELA is only atomic and mass numbers of incident particle and target nuclide and input/output file names. The output of TOTELA calculation is in ENDF-6 format used in the intermediate energy nuclear data files. It is easy to modify the main routine by users. Details are written in each subroutine and main routine

  19. Performance of SOPPA-based methods in the calculation of vertical excitation energies and oscillator strengths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Pitzner-Frydendahl, Henrik Frank; Buse, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    methods, the original SOPPA method as well as SOPPA(CCSD) and RPA(D) in the calculation of vertical electronic excitation energies and oscillator strengths is investigated for a large benchmark set of 28 medium-size molecules with 139 singlet and 71 triplet excited states. The results are compared...

  20. Calculation of the effective D-d neutron energy distribution incident on a cylindrical shell sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotoh, Hiroshi

    1977-07-01

    A method is proposed to calculate the effective energy distribution of neutrons incident on a cylindrical shell sample placed perpendicularly to the direction of the deuteron beam bombarding a deuterium metal target. The Monte Carlo method is used and the Fortran program is contained. (auth.)

  1. Marginal cost calculation of energy production in hydro thermoelectric systems considering the transmission system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, M.V.F.; Gorenstin, B.G.; Alvarenga Filho, S.

    1989-01-01

    The alternatives for calculation of energy marginal cost in hydroelectric systems, considering the transmission one, was analysed, including fundamental concepts; generation/transmission systems, represented by linear power flow model; production marginal costs in hydrothermal systems and computation aspects. (C.G.C.). 11 refs, 5 figs

  2. The calculation of the optical gap energy of ZnXO (X = Bi, Sn and Fe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benramache Said

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new mathematical model has been developed to calculate the optical properties of nano materials a function of their size and structure. ZnO has good characterizatics in optical, electrical, and structural crystallisation; We will demonstrate that the direct optical gap energy of ZnO films grown by US and SP spray deposition can be calculated by investigating the correlation between solution molarity, doping levels of doped films and their Urbache energy. A simulation model has been developed to calculate the optical band gap energy of undoped and Bi, Sn and Fe doped ZnO thin films. The measurements by thus proposed models are in agreement with experimental data, with high correlation coefficients in the range 0.94-0.99. The maximum calculated enhancement of the optical gap energy of Sn doped ZnO thin films is always higher than the enhancement attainable with an Fe doped film, where the minimum error was found for Bi and Sn doped ZnO thin films to be 2,345 and 3,072%, respectively. The decrease in the relative errors from undoped to doped films can be explained by the good optical properties which can be observed in the fewer number of defects as well as less disorder.

  3. A Novel Energy Yields Calculation Method for Irregular Wind Farm Layout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Peng; Hu, Weihao; Soltani, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Due to the increasing size of offshore wind farm, the impact of the wake effect on energy yields become more and more evident. The Seafloor topography would limit the layout of the wind farm so that irregular layout is usually adopted inlarge scale offshore wind farm. However, the calculation...

  4. 5 CFR 591.220 - How does OPM calculate energy utility cost indexes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... cost indexes? 591.220 Section 591.220 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS ALLOWANCES AND DIFFERENTIALS Cost-of-Living Allowance and Post Differential-Nonforeign Areas Cost-Of-Living Allowances § 591.220 How does OPM calculate energy utility cost indexes? (a) OPM...

  5. Code package for calculation of damage effects of medium-energy protons in metal targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulter, C.A.

    1976-12-01

    A program package was developed to calculate radiation damage effects produced in a metal target by protons in the 100-MeV to 3.5-GeV energy range. A detailed description is given of the control cards and data cards required to use the code package

  6. User guide - COE calculation tool for wave energy converters. Draft version 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Chozas, J.; Kofoed, J.P. [Aalborg Univ., Aalborg (Denmark); Helstrup Jensen, N.E. [Energinet.dk, Fredericia (Denmark)

    2013-08-15

    Aalborg University together with Energinet.dk and Julia F. Chozas Consulting Engineer, have released a freely available online spreadsheet to evaluate the Levelised Cost of Energy (LCOE) for wave energy projects. The open-access tool calculates the LCOE based on the power production of a Wave Energy Converter (WEC) at a particular location. Production data may derive from laboratory testing, numerical modelling or from sea trials. The tool has been developed as a transparent and simple model that evaluates WEC's economic feasibility in a range of locations, while scaling WEC's features to the selected site. (Author)

  7. Practical methodologies for the calculation of capacity in electricity markets for wind energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botero B, Sergio; Giraldo V, Luis Alfonso; Isaza C, Felipe

    2008-01-01

    Determining the real capacity of the generators in a power market is an essential task in order to estimate the actual system reliability, and to estimate the reward for generators due to their capacity in the firm energy market. In the wind power case, which is an intermittent resource, several methodologies have been proposed to estimate the capacity of a wind power emplacement, not only for planning but also for firm energy remuneration purposes. This paper presents some methodologies that have been proposed or implemented around the world in order to calculate the capacity of this energy resource.

  8. A calculation program for harvesting and transportation costs of energy wood; Energiapuun korjuun ja kuljetuksen kustannuslaskentaohjelmisto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuitto, P.J.

    1996-12-31

    VTT Energy is compiling a large and versatile calculation program for harvesting and transportation costs of energy wood. The work has been designed and will be carried out in cooperation with Metsaeteho and Finntech Ltd. The program has been realised in Windows surroundings using SQLWindows graphical database application development system, using the SQLBase relational database management system. The objective of the research is to intensify and create new possibilities for comparison of the utilization costs and the profitability of integrated energy wood production chains with each other inside the chains

  9. A calculation program for harvesting and transportation costs of energy wood; Energiapuun korjuun ja kuljetuksen kustannuslaskentaohjelmisto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuitto, P J

    1997-12-31

    VTT Energy is compiling a large and versatile calculation program for harvesting and transportation costs of energy wood. The work has been designed and will be carried out in cooperation with Metsaeteho and Finntech Ltd. The program has been realised in Windows surroundings using SQLWindows graphical database application development system, using the SQLBase relational database management system. The objective of the research is to intensify and create new possibilities for comparison of the utilization costs and the profitability of integrated energy wood production chains with each other inside the chains

  10. Neutron quality parameters versus energy below 4 MeV from microdosimetric calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinchcomb, T.G.; Borak, T.B.

    1983-01-01

    Charged-particle production by neutrons and the resulting energy-deposition spectra in micron-sized spheres of tissue of varying diameters were calculated from thermal energies to 4 MeV. These data were used to obtain dose-average values of several quality-indicating parameters as functions of neutron energy and of tissue sphere diameter. The contrast among the parameters is shown and discussed. Applications are made to two neutron spectra, one a fission spectrum in air and the other a moderated spectrum at the center of an irradiated cube of water

  11. Extended calculations of energies, transition rates, and lifetimes for F-like Kr XXVIII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C. Y.; Si, R.; Yao, K.; Gu, M. F.; Wang, K.; Chen, C. Y.

    2018-02-01

    The excitation energies, lifetimes, wavelengths and E1, E2, M1 and M2 transition rates for the lowest 389 levels of the 2l7, 2l63l‧, 2l64l‧, and 2l65l‧ configurations from second-order many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) calculations, and the results for the lowest 200 states of the 2l7, 2l63l‧, and 2l64l‧ configurations from multi-configuration Dirac-Hartree-Fock (MCDHF) calculations in F-like Kr XXVIII are presented in this work. The relative differences between our two sets of level energies are mostly within 0.005% for the lowest 200 levels. Comparisons are made with experimental and other available theoretical results to assess the reliability and accuracy of the present calculations. We believe them to be the most complete and accurate results for Kr XXVIII at present.

  12. Conformal solids and holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, A.; Garcia-Saenz, S.; Nicolis, A.; Penco, R.

    2017-12-01

    We argue that a SO( d) magnetic monopole in an asymptotically AdS space-time is dual to a d-dimensional strongly coupled system in a solid state. In light of this, it would be remiss of us not to dub such a field configuration solidon. In the presence of mixed boundary conditions, a solidon spontaneously breaks translations (among many other symmetries) and gives rise to Goldstone excitations on the boundary — the phonons of the solid. We derive the quadratic action for the boundary phonons in the probe limit and show that, when the mixed boundary conditions preserve conformal symmetry, the longitudinal and transverse sound speeds are related to each other as expected from effective field theory arguments. We then include backreaction and calculate the free energy of the solidon for a particular choice of mixed boundary conditions, corresponding to a relevant multi-trace deformation of the boundary theory. We find such free energy to be lower than that of thermal AdS. This suggests that our solidon undergoes a solid-to-liquid first order phase transition by melting into a Schwarzschild-AdS black hole as the temperature is raised.

  13. Conformational study of glyoxal bis(amidinohydrazone) by ab initio methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannfors, B.; Koskinen, J. T.; Pietilä, L.-O.

    1997-08-01

    We report the first ab initio molecular orbital study on the ground state of the endiamine tautomer of glyoxal bis(amidinohydrazone) (or glyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone), GBG) free base. The calculations were performed at the following levels of theory: Hartree-Fock, second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory and density functional theory (B-LYP and B3-LYP) as implemented in the Gaussian 94 software. The standard basis set 6-31G(d) was found to be sufficient. The default fine grid of Gaussian 94 was used in the density functional calculations. Molecular properties, such as optimized structures, total energies and the electrostatic potential derived (CHELPG) atomic charges, were studied as functions of C-C and N-N conformations. The lowest energy conformation was found to be all- trans, in agreement with the experimental solid-state structure. The second conformer with respect to rotation around the central C-C bond was found to be the cis conformer with an MP2//HF energy of 4.67 kcal mol -1. For rotation around the N-N bond the energy increased monotonically from the trans conformation to the cis conformation, the cis energy being very high, 22.01 kcal mol -1 (MP2//HF). The atomic charges were shown to be conformation dependent, and the bond charge increments and especially the conformational changes of the bond charge increments were found to be easily transferable between structurally related systems.

  14. The calculation of energy storage flywheels of fiber composites with electric energy converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canders, W R

    1982-01-01

    The computation and the design of energy storage flywheels with electromechanical energy converters are considered in the present study. The most important stress parameters for flywheels of unidirectional laminate are determined, and criteria for the dimensioning of the flywheel are presented, taking into account centrifugal and compressive stresses. The required high speed of the flywheel is the dominating factor, which has to be considered also in the design of the driving engine for the storage device. The computation of the design characteristics of an outside-rotor motor with permanent-magnet excitation as an integral component of the storage device is discussed. The significance of the obtained results is illustrated with the aid of design examples and an application example in the area of vehicular technology.

  15. Monte Carlo calculation of the energy deposited in the KASCADE GRANDE detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihai, Constantin

    2004-01-01

    The energy deposited by protons, electrons and positrons in the KASCADE GRANDE detectors is calculated with a simple and fast Monte Carlo method. The KASCADE GRANDE experiment (Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Germany), based on an array of plastic scintillation detectors, has the aim to study the energy spectrum of the primary cosmic rays around and above the 'knee' region of the spectrum. The reconstruction of the primary spectrum is achieved by comparing the data collected by the detectors with simulations of the development of the extensive air shower initiated by the primary particle combined with detailed simulations of the detector response. The simulation of the air shower development is carried out with the CORSIKA Monte Carlo code. The output file produced by CORSIKA is further processed with a program that estimates the energy deposited in the detectors by the particles of the shower. The standard method to calculate the energy deposit in the detectors is based on the Geant package from the CERN library. A new method that calculates the energy deposit by fitting the Geant based distributions with simpler functions is proposed in this work. In comparison with the method based on the Geant package this method is substantially faster. The time saving is important because the number of particles involved is large. (author)

  16. Developing a Decision Support Tool for Waste to Energy Calculations Using Energy Return on Investment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    began with. There are multiple methods to accomplish this process, from the standard V- models to complex waterfall methods, but ultimately each...required data and data sources. The team conducted stakeholder analysis and functional decomposition of the requisite model before constructing its...decomposition of the requisite model before constructing its additional module to the tool. This study shows the viability of waste-to-energy technologies to

  17. Learning Approach on the Ground State Energy Calculation of Helium Atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Syed Naseem Hussain

    2010-01-01

    This research investigated the role of learning approach on the ground state energy calculation of Helium atom in improving the concepts of science teachers at university level. As the exact solution of several particles is not possible here we used approximation methods. Using this method one can understand easily the calculation of ground state energy of any given function. Variation Method is one of the most useful approximation methods in estimating the energy eigen values of the ground state and the first few excited states of a system, which we only have a qualitative idea about the wave function.The objective of this approach is to introduce and involve university teacher in new research, to improve their class room practices and to enable teachers to foster critical thinking in students.

  18. Calculation of quantum-mechanical system energy spectra using path integrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evseev, A.M.; Dmitriev, V.P.

    1977-01-01

    A solution of the Feynman quantum-mechanical integral connecting a wave function (psi (x, t)) at a moment t+tau (tau → 0) with the wave function at the moment t is provided by complex variable substitution and subsequent path integration. Time dependence of the wave function is calculated by the Monte Carlo method. The Fourier inverse transformation of the wave function by path integration calculated has been applied to determine the energy spectra. Energy spectra are presented of a hydrogen atom derived from wave function psi (x, t) at different x, as well as boson energy spectra of He, Li, and Be atoms obtained from psi (x, t) at X = O

  19. Calculation of energy costs of composite biomass stirring at biogas stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suslov, D. Yu; Temnikov, D. O.

    2018-03-01

    The paper is devoted to the study of the equipment to produce biogas fuel from organic wastes. The bioreactor equipped with a combined stirring system ensuring mechanical and bubbling stirring is designed. The method of energy cost calculation of the combined stirring system with original design is suggested. The received expressions were used in the calculation of the stirring system installed in the 10 m3 bioreactor: power consumed by the mixer during the start-up period made Nz =9.03 kW, operating power of the mixer made NE =1.406 kW, compressor power for bubbling stirring made NC =18.5 kW. Taking into account the operating mode of single elements of the stirring system, the energy cost made 4.38% of the total energy received by the biogas station.

  20. Monte-Carlo calculation of irradiation dose content beyond shielding of high-energy accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhov, N.V.; Frolov, V.V.

    1975-01-01

    The MARS programme, designed for calculating the three-dimensional internuclear cascade in defence of the accelerators by the Monte Carlo method, is described. The methods used to reduce the dispersion and the system of semi-empirical formulas made it possible to exceed the parameters of the existing programmes. By means of a synthesis of the results, registered by MARS and HAMLET programmes, the dosage fields for homogeneous and heterogeneous defence were evaluated. The results of the calculated absorbed and equivalent dose behind the barrier, irradiated by a proton beam, having the energy of Esub(o)=1/1000 GeV are exposed. The dependence of the high- and low-energy neutron, proton, pion, kaon, muonium and γ-quantum dosage on the initial energy and thickness, on the material and the composition of the defence is investigated

  1. CRPA calculations for neutrino-nucleus scattering. From very low energies to the quasielastic peak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jachowicz, Natalie; Pandey, Vishvas; Martini, Marco; Gonzalez-Jimenez, Raul; Van Cuyck, Tom; Van Dessel, Nils

    2016-01-01

    We present continuum random phase approximation calculations (CRPA) for neutrino-induced quasielastic scattering off atomic nuclei. The validity of our formalism is checked by a careful confrontation of its results with semi-inclusive double-differential electron scattering data. We pay special attention to excitations in the giant resonance region. The CRPA is well-suited for the description of interactions in this energy range. We aim at providing a uniform description of one-nucleon knockout processes over the whole energy range from threshold to the quasielastic peak. Our calculations point to the fact that low-energy and giant-resonance excitations provide a non-negligible contribution to the interaction strength, especially at forward lepton-scattering angles. (author)

  2. Calculation of Energy Diagram of Asymmetric Graded-Band-Gap Semiconductor Superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monastyrskii, Liubomyr S; Sokolovskii, Bogdan S; Alekseichyk, Mariya P

    2017-12-01

    The paper theoretically investigates the peculiarities of energy diagram of asymmetric graded-band-gap superlattices with linear coordinate dependences of band gap and electron affinity. For calculating the energy diagram of asymmetric graded-band-gap superlattices, linearized Poisson's equation has been solved for the two layers forming a period of the superlattice. The obtained coordinate dependences of edges of the conduction and valence bands demonstrate substantial transformation of the shape of the energy diagram at changing the period of the lattice and the ratio of width of the adjacent layers. The most marked changes in the energy diagram take place when the period of lattice is comparable with the Debye screening length. In the case when the lattice period is much smaller that the Debye screening length, the energy diagram has the shape of a sawtooth-like pattern.

  3. Conformation radiotherapy and conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Kozo

    1999-01-01

    In order to coincide the high dose region to the target volume, the 'Conformation Radiotherapy Technique' using the multileaf collimator and the device for 'hollow-out technique' was developed by Prof. S. Takahashi in 1960. This technique can be classified a type of 2D-dynamic conformal RT techniques. By the clinical application of this technique, the late complications of the lens, the intestine and the urinary bladder after radiotherapy for the maxillary cancer and the cervical cancer decreased. Since 1980's the exact position and shape of the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues can be easily obtained by the tremendous development of the CT/MRI imaging technique. As a result, various kinds of new conformal techniques such as the 3D-CRT, the dose intensity modulation, the tomotherapy have been developed since the beginning of 1990'. Several 'dose escalation study with 2D-/3D conformal RT' is now under way to improve the treatment results. (author)

  4. Validation of tautomeric and protomeric binding modes by free energy calculations. A case study for the structure based optimization of d-amino acid oxidase inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgován, Zoltán; Ferenczy, György G.; Steinbrecher, Thomas; Szilágyi, Bence; Bajusz, Dávid; Keserű, György M.

    2018-02-01

    Optimization of fragment size d-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) inhibitors was investigated using a combination of computational and experimental methods. Retrospective free energy perturbation (FEP) calculations were performed for benzo[d]isoxazole derivatives, a series of known inhibitors with two potential binding modes derived from X-ray structures of other DAAO inhibitors. The good agreement between experimental and computed binding free energies in only one of the hypothesized binding modes strongly support this bioactive conformation. Then, a series of 1-H-indazol-3-ol derivatives formerly not described as DAAO inhibitors was investigated. Binding geometries could be reliably identified by structural similarity to benzo[d]isoxazole and other well characterized series and FEP calculations were performed for several tautomers of the deprotonated and protonated compounds since all these forms are potentially present owing to the experimental pKa values of representative compounds in the series. Deprotonated compounds are proposed to be the most important bound species owing to the significantly better agreement between their calculated and measured affinities compared to the protonated forms. FEP calculations were also used for the prediction of the affinities of compounds not previously tested as DAAO inhibitors and for a comparative structure-activity relationship study of the benzo[d]isoxazole and indazole series. Selected indazole derivatives were synthesized and their measured binding affinity towards DAAO was in good agreement with FEP predictions.

  5. A Method for Extracting the Free Energy Surface and Conformational Dynamics of Fast-Folding Proteins from Single Molecule Photon Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy holds the promise of providing direct measurements of protein folding free energy landscapes and conformational motions. However, fulfilling this promise has been prevented by technical limitations, most notably, the difficulty in analyzing the small packets of photons per millisecond that are typically recorded from individual biomolecules. Such limitation impairs the ability to accurately determine conformational distributions and resolve sub-millisecond processes. Here we develop an analytical procedure for extracting the conformational distribution and dynamics of fast-folding proteins directly from time-stamped photon arrival trajectories produced by single molecule FRET experiments. Our procedure combines the maximum likelihood analysis originally developed by Gopich and Szabo with a statistical mechanical model that describes protein folding as diffusion on a one-dimensional free energy surface. Using stochastic kinetic simulations, we thoroughly tested the performance of the method in identifying diverse fast-folding scenarios, ranging from two-state to one-state downhill folding, as a function of relevant experimental variables such as photon count rate, amount of input data, and background noise. The tests demonstrate that the analysis can accurately retrieve the original one-dimensional free energy surface and microsecond folding dynamics in spite of the sub-megahertz photon count rates and significant background noise levels of current single molecule fluorescence experiments. Therefore, our approach provides a powerful tool for the quantitative analysis of single molecule FRET experiments of fast protein folding that is also potentially extensible to the analysis of any other biomolecular process governed by sub-millisecond conformational dynamics. PMID:25988351

  6. Toward understanding as photosynthetic biosignatures: light harvesting and energy transfer calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Y.; Umemura, M.; Shoji, M.; Shiraishi, K.; Kayanuma, M.; Yabana, K.

    2014-03-01

    Among several proposed biosignatures, red edge is a direct evidence of photosynthetic life if it is detected (Kiang et al 2007). Red edge is a sharp change in reflectance spectra of vegetation in NIR region (about 700-750 nm). The sign of red edge is observed by Earthshine or remote sensing (Wolstencroft & Raven 2002, Woolf et al 2002). But, why around 700-750 nm? The photosynthetic organisms on Earth have evolved to optimize the sunlight condition. However, if we consider about photosynthetic organism on extrasolar planets, they should have developed to utilize the spectra of its principal star. Thus, it is not strange even if it shows different vegetation spectra. In this study, we focused on the light absorption mechanism of photosynthetic organisms on Earth and investigated the fundamental properties of the light harvesting mechanisms, which is the first stage for the light absorption. Light harvesting complexes contain photosynthetic pigments like chlorophylls. Effective light absorption and the energy transfer are accomplished by the electronic excitations of collective photosynthetic pigments. In order to investigate this mechanism, we constructed an energy transfer model by using a dipole-dipole approximation for the interactions between electronic excitations. Transition moments and transition energies of each pigment are calculated at the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) level (Marques & Gross 2004). Quantum dynamics simulation for the excitation energy transfer was calculated by the Liouvelle's equation. We adopted the model to purple bacteria, which has been studied experimentally and known to absorb lower energy. It is meaningful to focus on the mechanism of this bacteria, since in the future mission, M planets will become a important target. We calculated the oscillator strengths in one light harvesting complex and confirmed the validity by comparing to the experimental data. This complex is made of an inner and an outer ring. The

  7. Metadyn View: Fast web-based viewer of free energy surfaces calculated by metadynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hošek, Petr; Spiwok, Vojtěch

    2016-01-01

    Metadynamics is a highly successful enhanced sampling technique for simulation of molecular processes and prediction of their free energy surfaces. An in-depth analysis of data obtained by this method is as important as the simulation itself. Although there are several tools to compute free energy surfaces from metadynamics data, they usually lack user friendliness and a build-in visualization part. Here we introduce Metadyn View as a fast and user friendly viewer of bias potential/free energy surfaces calculated by metadynamics in Plumed package. It is based on modern web technologies including HTML5, JavaScript and Cascade Style Sheets (CSS). It can be used by visiting the web site and uploading a HILLS file. It calculates the bias potential/free energy surface on the client-side, so it can run online or offline without necessity to install additional web engines. Moreover, it includes tools for measurement of free energies and free energy differences and data/image export.

  8. Calculation of Quasi-Particle Energies of Aromatic Self-Assembled Monolayers on Au(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Lu, Deyu; Galli, Giulia

    2009-04-14

    We present many-body perturbation theory calculations of the electronic properties of phenylene diisocyanide self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on a gold surface. Using structural models obtained within density functional theory (DFT), we have investigated how the SAM molecular energies are modified by self-energy corrections and how they are affected by the presence of the surface. We have employed a combination of GW (G = Green's function; W = screened Coulomb interaction) calculations of the SAM quasi-particle energies and a semiclassical image potential model to account for surface polarization effects. We find that it is essential to include both quasi-particle corrections and surface screening in order to provide a reasonable estimate of the energy level alignment at a SAM-metal interface. In particular, our results show that within the GW approximation the energy distance between phenylene diisocyanide SAM energy levels and the gold surface Fermi level is much larger than that found within DFT, e.g., more than double in the case of low packing densities of the SAM.

  9. Comparison of calculated energy flux of internal tides with microstructure measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Falahat

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Vertical mixing caused by breaking of internal tides plays a major role in maintaining the deep-ocean stratification. This study compares observations of dissipation from microstructure measurements to calculations of the vertical energy flux from barotropic to internal tides, taking into account the temporal variation due to the spring-neap tidal cycle. The dissipation data originate from two surveys in the Brazil Basin Tracer Release Experiment (BBTRE, and one over the LArval Dispersal along the Deep East Pacific Rise (LADDER3, supplemented with a few stations above the North-Atlantic Ridge (GRAVILUCK and in the western Pacific (IZU. A good correlation is found between logarithmic values of energy flux and local dissipation in BBTRE, suggesting that the theory is able to predict energy fluxes. For the LADDER3, the local dissipation is much smaller than the calculated energy flux, which is very likely due to the different topographic features of BBTRE and LADDER3. The East Pacific Rise consists of a few isolated seamounts, so that most of the internal wave energy can radiate away from the generation site, whereas the Brazil Basin is characterised by extended rough bathymetry, leading to a more local dissipation. The results from all four field surveys support the general conclusion that the fraction of the internal-tide energy flux that is dissipated locally is very different in different regions.

  10. Quantum complex rotation and uniform semiclassical calculations of complex energy eigenvalues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, J.N.L.; Smith, A.D.

    1983-01-01

    Quantum and semiclassical calculations of complex energy eigenvalues have been carried out for an exponential potential of the form V 0 r 2 exp(-r) and Lennard-Jones (12,6) potential. A straightforward method, based on the complex coordinate rotation technique, is described for the quantum calculation of complex eigenenergies. For singular potentials, the method involves an inward and outward integration of the radial Schroedinger equation, followed by matching of the logarithmic derivatives of the wave functions at an intermediate point. For regular potentials, the method is simpler, as only an inward integration is required. Attention is drawn to the World War II researches of Hartree and co-workers who anticipated later quantum mechanical work on the complex rotation method. Complex eigenenergies are also calculated from a uniform semiclassical three turning point quantization formula, which allows for the proximity of the outer pair of complex turning points. Limiting cases of this formula, which are valid for very narrow or very broad widths, are also used in the calculations. We obtain good agreement between the semiclassical and quantum results. For the Lennard-Jones (12,6) potential, we compare resonance energies and widths from the complex energy definition of a resonance with those obtained from the time delay definition

  11. Computational scheme for pH-dependent binding free energy calculation with explicit solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juyong; Miller, Benjamin T; Brooks, Bernard R

    2016-01-01

    We present a computational scheme to compute the pH-dependence of binding free energy with explicit solvent. Despite the importance of pH, the effect of pH has been generally neglected in binding free energy calculations because of a lack of accurate methods to model it. To address this limitation, we use a constant-pH methodology to obtain a true ensemble of multiple protonation states of a titratable system at a given pH and analyze the ensemble using the Bennett acceptance ratio (BAR) method. The constant pH method is based on the combination of enveloping distribution sampling (EDS) with the Hamiltonian replica exchange method (HREM), which yields an accurate semi-grand canonical ensemble of a titratable system. By considering the free energy change of constraining multiple protonation states to a single state or releasing a single protonation state to multiple states, the pH dependent binding free energy profile can be obtained. We perform benchmark simulations of a host-guest system: cucurbit[7]uril (CB[7]) and benzimidazole (BZ). BZ experiences a large pKa shift upon complex formation. The pH-dependent binding free energy profiles of the benchmark system are obtained with three different long-range interaction calculation schemes: a cutoff, the particle mesh Ewald (PME), and the isotropic periodic sum (IPS) method. Our scheme captures the pH-dependent behavior of binding free energy successfully. Absolute binding free energy values obtained with the PME and IPS methods are consistent, while cutoff method results are off by 2 kcal mol(-1) . We also discuss the characteristics of three long-range interaction calculation methods for constant-pH simulations. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  12. New sampling method in continuous energy Monte Carlo calculation for pebble bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Isao; Takahashi, Akito; Mori, Takamasa; Nakagawa, Masayuki.

    1997-01-01

    A pebble bed reactor generally has double heterogeneity consisting of two kinds of spherical fuel element. In the core, there exist many fuel balls piled up randomly in a high packing fraction. And each fuel ball contains a lot of small fuel particles which are also distributed randomly. In this study, to realize precise neutron transport calculation of such reactors with the continuous energy Monte Carlo method, a new sampling method has been developed. The new method has been implemented in the general purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP to develop a modified version MCNP-BALL. This method was validated by calculating inventory of spherical fuel elements arranged successively by sampling during transport calculation and also by performing criticality calculations in ordered packing models. From the results, it was confirmed that the inventory of spherical fuel elements could be reproduced using MCNP-BALL within a sufficient accuracy of 0.2%. And the comparison of criticality calculations in ordered packing models between MCNP-BALL and the reference method shows excellent agreement in neutron spectrum as well as multiplication factor. MCNP-BALL enables us to analyze pebble bed type cores such as PROTEUS precisely with the continuous energy Monte Carlo method. (author)

  13. Conformal Gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooft, G.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamical degree of freedom for the gravitational force is the metric tensor, having 10 locally independent degrees of freedom (of which 4 can be used to fix the coordinate choice). In conformal gravity, we split this field into an overall scalar factor and a nine-component remainder. All unrenormalizable infinities are in this remainder, while the scalar component can be handled like any other scalar field such as the Higgs field. In this formalism, conformal symmetry is spontaneously broken. An imperative demand on any healthy quantum gravity theory is that black holes should be described as quantum systems with micro-states as dictated by the Hawking-Bekenstein theory. This requires conformal symmetry that may be broken spontaneously but not explicitly, and this means that all conformal anomalies must cancel out. Cancellation of conformal anomalies yields constraints on the matter sector as described by some universal field theory. Thus black hole physics may eventually be of help in the construction of unified field theories. (author)

  14. Numerical renormalization group calculation of impurity internal energy and specific heat of quantum impurity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merker, L.; Costi, T. A.

    2012-08-01

    We introduce a method to obtain the specific heat of quantum impurity models via a direct calculation of the impurity internal energy requiring only the evaluation of local quantities within a single numerical renormalization group (NRG) calculation for the total system. For the Anderson impurity model we show that the impurity internal energy can be expressed as a sum of purely local static correlation functions and a term that involves also the impurity Green function. The temperature dependence of the latter can be neglected in many cases, thereby allowing the impurity specific heat Cimp to be calculated accurately from local static correlation functions; specifically via Cimp=(∂Eionic)/(∂T)+(1)/(2)(∂Ehyb)/(∂T), where Eionic and Ehyb are the energies of the (embedded) impurity and the hybridization energy, respectively. The term involving the Green function can also be evaluated in cases where its temperature dependence is non-negligible, adding an extra term to Cimp. For the nondegenerate Anderson impurity model, we show by comparison with exact Bethe ansatz calculations that the results recover accurately both the Kondo induced peak in the specific heat at low temperatures as well as the high-temperature peak due to the resonant level. The approach applies to multiorbital and multichannel Anderson impurity models with arbitrary local Coulomb interactions. An application to the Ohmic two-state system and the anisotropic Kondo model is also given, with comparisons to Bethe ansatz calculations. The approach could also be of interest within other impurity solvers, for example, within quantum Monte Carlo techniques.

  15. Binding free energy calculations to rationalize the interactions of huprines with acetylcholinesterase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Érica C M; Oliva, Mónica; Andrés, Juan

    2018-05-01

    In the present study, the binding free energy of a family of huprines with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is calculated by means of the free energy perturbation method, based on hybrid quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics potentials. Binding free energy calculations and the analysis of the geometrical parameters highlight the importance of the stereochemistry of huprines in AChE inhibition. Binding isotope effects are calculated to unravel the interactions between ligands and the gorge of AChE. New chemical insights are provided to explain and rationalize the experimental results. A good correlation with the experimental data is found for a family of inhibitors with moderate differences in the enzyme affinity. The analysis of the geometrical parameters and interaction energy per residue reveals that Asp72, Glu199, and His440 contribute significantly to the network of interactions between active site residues, which stabilize the inhibitors in the gorge. It seems that a cooperative effect of the residues of the gorge determines the affinity of the enzyme for these inhibitors, where Asp72, Glu199, and His440 make a prominent contribution.

  16. Binding free energy calculations to rationalize the interactions of huprines with acetylcholinesterase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Érica C. M.; Oliva, Mónica; Andrés, Juan

    2018-05-01

    In the present study, the binding free energy of a family of huprines with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is calculated by means of the free energy perturbation method, based on hybrid quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics potentials. Binding free energy calculations and the analysis of the geometrical parameters highlight the importance of the stereochemistry of huprines in AChE inhibition. Binding isotope effects are calculated to unravel the interactions between ligands and the gorge of AChE. New chemical insights are provided to explain and rationalize the experimental results. A good correlation with the experimental data is found for a family of inhibitors with moderate differences in the enzyme affinity. The analysis of the geometrical parameters and interaction energy per residue reveals that Asp72, Glu199, and His440 contribute significantly to the network of interactions between active site residues, which stabilize the inhibitors in the gorge. It seems that a cooperative effect of the residues of the gorge determines the affinity of the enzyme for these inhibitors, where Asp72, Glu199, and His440 make a prominent contribution.

  17. Calculation of Activation Energy by OIT Method for aging evaluation of NPP cable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kyung-Heun; Kim, Jong-Seog; Cho, Bok-Gee

    2006-01-01

    Extending the lifetime of nuclear power plant is one of the most important concerns in the world nuclear industry. Cables are one of the long live items which have not been considered to be replaced during the design life of NPP. In order to simulate the natural aging in nuclear power plant, a study on accelerated aging needs to be conducted and to carry out the accelerated aging test, we must calculate the activation energy of the cable if we don't have the activation energy information. The activation energy is the most important element and it can be calculated by indentor modulus and elongation data and so on. But there is often only a limited quantity of material available in the deposit for testing, so it is important the samples for any destructive test are conserved as much as possible. But if there is only a limited quantity of the material, OIT(Oxidation Induction Time) is very useful with calculating activation energy and evaluation of the cable lifetime

  18. Alternative Approaches to Calculate Benefits of an Energy Imbalance Market With Wind and Solar Energy: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby, B.; King, J.; Milligan, M.

    2012-06-01

    The anticipated increase in variable generation in the Western Interconnection over the next several years has raised concerns about how to maintain system balance, especially in smaller Balancing Authority Areas (BAAs). Given renewable portfolio standards in the West, it is possible that more than 50 gigawatts of wind capacity will be installed by 2020. Significant quantities of solar generation are likely to be added as well. The consequent increase in variability and uncertainty that must be managed by the conventional generation fleet and responsive loads has resulted in a proposal for an Energy Imbalance Market (EIM). This paper extends prior work to estimate the reserve requirements for regulation, spinning, and non-spinning reserves with and without the EIM. We also discuss alternative approaches to allocating reserve requirements and show that some apparently attractive allocation methods have undesired consequences.

  19. Transformation of potential energy surfaces for estimating isotopic shifts in anharmonic vibrational frequency calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, Patrick; Oschetzki, Dominik; Rauhut, Guntram, E-mail: rauhut@theochem.uni-stuttgart.de [Institut für Theoretische Chemie, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Berger, Robert [Clemens-Schöpf Institut für Organische Chemie and Biochemie, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Petersenstrasse 22, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-05-14

    A transformation of potential energy surfaces (PES) being represented by multi-mode expansions is introduced, which allows for the calculation of anharmonic vibrational spectra of any isotopologue from a single PES. This simplifies the analysis of infrared spectra due to significant CPU-time savings. An investigation of remaining deviations due to truncations and the so-called multi-level approximation is provided. The importance of vibrational-rotational couplings for small molecules is discussed in detail. In addition, an analysis is proposed, which provides information about the quality of the transformation prior to its execution. Benchmark calculations are provided for a set of small molecules.

  20. MCNP6 Fission Cross Section Calculations at Intermediate and High Energies

    OpenAIRE

    Mashnik, Stepan G.; Sierk, Arnold J.; Prael, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    MCNP6 has been Validated and Verified (V&V) against intermediate- and high-energy fission cross-section experimental data. An error in the calculation of fission cross sections of 181Ta and a few nearby target nuclei by the CEM03.03 event generator in MCNP6 and a "bug: in the calculation of fission cross sections with the GENXS option of MCNP6 while using the LAQGSM03.03 event generator were detected during our V&V work. After fixing both problems, we find that MCNP6 using CEM03.03 and LAQGSM...

  1. Calculation of Bremsstrahlung radiation of electrons on atoms in wide energy range of photons

    CERN Document Server

    Romanikhin, V P

    2002-01-01

    The complete spectra of the Bremsstrahlung radiation on the krypton atoms within the range of the photon energies of 10-25000 eV and lanthanum near the potential of the 4d-shell ionization is carried out. The atoms summarized polarizability is calculated on the basis of the simple semiclassical approximation of the local electron density and experimental data on the photoabsorption. The comparison with the calculational results is carried out through the method of distorted partial waves (PDWA) for Kr and with the experimental data on La

  2. Free energy calculations on Transthyretin dissociation and ligand binding from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper; Hamelberg, Donald; McCammon, J. Andrew

    experimental results have helped to explain this aberrant behavior of TTR, however, structural insights of the amyloidgenic process are still lacking. Therefore, we have used all-atom molecular dynamics simulation and free energy calculations to study the initial phase of this process. We have calculated......Many questions about the nature of aggregation and the proteins that are involved in these events are still left unanswered. One of the proteins that is known to form amyloids is Transthyretine (TTR), the secondary transporter of thyroxine and transporter of retinol-binding-protein. Several...

  3. Calculation of low-energy reactor neutrino spectra reactor for reactor neutrino experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riyana, Eka Sapta; Suda, Shoya; Ishibashi, Kenji; Matsuura, Hideaki [Dept. of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, Kyushu (Japan); Katakura, Junichi [Dept. of Nuclear System Safety Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Nagaoka (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Nuclear reactors produce a great number of antielectron neutrinos mainly from beta-decay chains of fission products. Such neutrinos have energies mostly in MeV range. We are interested in neutrinos in a region of keV, since they may take part in special weak interactions. We calculate reactor antineutrino spectra especially in the low energy region. In this work we present neutrino spectrum from a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) reactor core. To calculate neutrino spectra, we need information about all generated nuclides that emit neutrinos. They are mainly fission fragments, reaction products and trans-uranium nuclides that undergo negative beta decay. Information in relation to trans-uranium nuclide compositions and its evolution in time (burn-up process) were provided by a reactor code MVP-BURN. We used typical PWR parameter input for MVP-BURN code and assumed the reactor to be operated continuously for 1 year (12 months) in a steady thermal power (3.4 GWth). The PWR has three fuel compositions of 2.0, 3.5 and 4.1 wt% {sup 235}U contents. For preliminary calculation we adopted a standard burn-up chain model provided by MVP-BURN. The chain model treated 21 heavy nuclides and 50 fission products. The MVB-BURN code utilized JENDL 3.3 as nuclear data library. We confirm that the antielectron neutrino flux in the low energy region increases with burn-up of nuclear fuel. The antielectron-neutrino spectrum in low energy region is influenced by beta emitter nuclides with low Q value in beta decay (e.g. {sup 241}Pu) which is influenced by burp-up level: Low energy antielectron-neutrino spectra or emission rates increase when beta emitters with low Q value in beta decay accumulate. Our result shows the flux of low energy reactor neutrinos increases with burn-up of nuclear fuel.

  4. Conformal and Nearly Conformal Theories at Large N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnoplskiy, Grigory M.

    In this thesis we present new results in conformal and nearly conformal field theories in various dimensions. In chapter two, we study different properties of the conformal Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) in continuous dimension d. At first we study conformal QED using large Nf methods, where Nf is the number of massless fermions. We compute its sphere free energy as a function of d, ignoring the terms of order 1/Nf and higher. For finite Nf we use the epsilon-expansion. Next we use a large Nf diagrammatic approach to calculate the leading corrections to CT, the coefficient of the two-point function of the stress-energy tensor, and CJ, the coefficient of the two-point function of the global symmetry current. We present explicit formulae as a function of d and check them versus the expectations in 2 and 4 - epsilon dimensions. In chapter three, we discuss vacuum stability in 1 + 1 dimensional conformal field theories with external background fields. We show that the vacuum decay rate is given by a non-local two-form. This two-form is a boundary term that must be added to the effective in/out Lagrangian. The two-form is expressed in terms of a Riemann-Hilbert decomposition for background gauge fields, and is given by its novel "functional'' version in the gravitational case. In chapter four, we explore Tensor models. Such models possess the large N limit dominated by the melon diagrams. The quantum mechanics of a real anti-commuting rank-3 tensor has a large N limit similar to the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev (SYK) model. We also discuss the quantum mechanics of a complex 3-index anti-commuting tensor and argue that it is equivalent in the large N limit to a version of SYK model with complex fermions. Finally, we discuss models of a commuting tensor in dimension d. We study the spectrum of the large N quantum field theory of bosonic rank-3 tensors using the Schwinger-Dyson equations. We compare some of these results with the 4 - epsilon expansion, finding perfect agreement. We

  5. Quantum mechanical electronic structure calculation reveals orientation dependence of hydrogen bond energy in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Abhisek; Datta, Saumen

    2017-06-01

    Hydrogen bond plays a unique role in governing macromolecular interactions with exquisite specificity. These interactions govern the fundamental biological processes like protein folding, enzymatic catalysis, molecular recognition. Despite extensive research work, till date there is no proper report available about the hydrogen bond's energy surface with respect to its geometric parameters, directly derived from proteins. Herein, we have deciphered the potential energy landscape of hydrogen bond directly from the macromolecular coordinates obtained from Protein Data Bank using quantum mechanical electronic structure calculations. The findings unravel the hydrogen bonding energies of proteins in parametric space. These data can be used to understand the energies of such directional interactions involved in biological molecules. Quantitative characterization has also been performed using Shannon entropic calculations for atoms participating in hydrogen bond. Collectively, our results constitute an improved way of understanding hydrogen bond energies in case of proteins and complement the knowledge-based potential. Proteins 2017; 85:1046-1055. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. An optimized ultra-fine energy group structure for neutron transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huria, Harish; Ouisloumen, Mohamed

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an optimized energy group structure that was developed for neutron transport calculations in lattices using the Westinghouse lattice physics code PARAGON. The currently used 70-energy group structure results in significant discrepancies when the predictions are compared with those from the continuous energy Monte Carlo methods. The main source of the differences is the approximations employed in the resonance self-shielding methodology. This, in turn, leads to ambiguous adjustments in the resonance range cross-sections. The main goal of developing this group structure was to bypass the self-shielding methodology altogether thereby reducing the neutronic calculation errors. The proposed optimized energy mesh has 6064 points with 5877 points spanning the resonance range. The group boundaries in the resonance range were selected so that the micro group cross-sections matched reasonably well with those derived from reaction tallies of MCNP for a number of resonance absorbers of interest in reactor lattices. At the same time, however, the fast and thermal energy range boundaries were also adjusted to match the MCNP reaction rates in the relevant ranges. The resulting multi-group library was used to obtain eigenvalues for a wide variety of reactor lattice numerical benchmarks and also the Doppler reactivity defect benchmarks to establish its adequacy. (authors)

  7. Time-dependent density functional calculation of the energy loss of antiprotons colliding with metallic nanoshells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quijada, M.; Borisov, A.G.; Muino, R.D.

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory is used to study the interaction between antiprotons and metallic nanoshells. The ground state electronic properties of the nanoshell are obtained in the jellium approximation. The energy lost by the antiproton during the collision is calculated and compared to that suffered by antiprotons traveling in metal clusters. The resulting energy loss per unit path length of material in thin nanoshells is larger than the corresponding quantity for clusters. It is shown that the collision process can be interpreted as the antiproton crossing of two nearly bi-dimensional independent metallic systems. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Using the probability method for multigroup calculations of reactor cells in a thermal energy range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, I.E.; Pustoshilova, V.S.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of using the transmission probability method with performance inerpolation for determining spatial-energy neutron flux distribution in cells of thermal heterogeneous reactors is considered. The results of multigroup calculations of several uranium-water plane and cylindrical cells with different fuel enrichment in a thermal energy range are given. A high accuracy of results is obtained with low computer time consumption. The use of the transmission probability method is particularly reasonable in algorithms of the programmes compiled computer with significant reserve of internal memory

  9. TRANGE: computer code to calculate the energy beam degradation in target stack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellido, Luis F.

    1995-07-01

    A computer code to calculate the projectile energy degradation along a target stack was developed for an IBM or compatible personal microcomputer. A comparison of protons and deuterons bombarding uranium and aluminium targets was made. The results showed that the data obtained with TRANGE were in agreement with other computers code such as TRIM, EDP and also using Williamsom and Janni range and stopping power tables. TRANGE can be used for any charged particle ion, for energies between 1 to 100 MeV, in metal foils and solid compounds targets. (author). 8 refs., 2 tabs

  10. Simple and effective procedure for conformational search of macromolecules. Application to Met- and Leu-Enkephalin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meirovitch, H.; Meirovitch, E. (Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)); Michel, A.G. (Institut de Recherches Serrier, Suresnes (France)); Vasquez, M. (Protein Design Lab., Mountain View, CA (United States))

    1994-06-23

    A simple and efficient method for searching the conformational space of macromolecules is presented. With this method an initial set of relatively low-energy structures is generated, and their energies are further minimized with a procedure that enables escaping from local energy minima. Illustrative calculations are described for Met- and Leu-enkephalin. 37 refs., 1 tab.

  11. Measurement and calculation of fast neutron flux in a zero-energy reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, D.H.; Fox, W.N.; Hyder, H.R.

    1963-05-01

    An activation technique for measuring relative fast neutron fluxes is described which has some advantages over the normal method using U238 fission. The technique is based on the formation of Rh 103 after inelastic scattering of neutrons above 100 keV in energy. This isomer decays with a 57.4 minute half-life giving an easily measurable γ-activity. The energy dependence of the inelastic scattering cross-section of Rh 103 is similar to that of the fission cross-section of U 238 thus making the results of direct relevance to reactor calculations. Using the Rh 103 activation technique, measurements have been made of the fast neutron flux distribution in a typical pressure tube heavy water lattice and are compared in this report with theoretical calculations using the MONTE CARLO method. (author)

  12. An efficient parallel algorithm for the calculation of canonical MP2 energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Jon; Pulay, Peter

    2002-09-01

    We present the parallel version of a previous serial algorithm for the efficient calculation of canonical MP2 energies (Pulay, P.; Saebo, S.; Wolinski, K. Chem Phys Lett 2001, 344, 543). It is based on the Saebo-Almlöf direct-integral transformation, coupled with an efficient prescreening of the AO integrals. The parallel algorithm avoids synchronization delays by spawning a second set of slaves during the bin-sort prior to the second half-transformation. Results are presented for systems with up to 2000 basis functions. MP2 energies for molecules with 400-500 basis functions can be routinely calculated to microhartree accuracy on a small number of processors (6-8) in a matter of minutes with modern PC-based parallel computers. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Comput Chem 23: 1150-1156, 2002

  13. 4He binding energy calculation including full tensor-force effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, A. C.

    1989-09-01

    The four-body equations of Alt, Grassberger, and Sandhas are solved in the version where the (2)+(2) subamplitudes are treated exactly by convolution, using one-term separable Yamaguchy nucleon-nucleon potentials in the 1S0 and 3S1-3D1 channels. The resulting jp=1/2+ and (3/2+ three-body subamplitudes are represented in a separable form using the energy-dependent pole expansion. Converged bound-state results are calculated for the first time using the full interaction, and are compared with those obtained from a simplified treatment of the tensor force. The Tjon line that correlates three-nucleon and four-nucleon binding energies is shown using different nucleon-nucleon potentials. In all calculations the Coulomb force has been neglected.

  14. High-throughput DFT calculations of formation energy, stability and oxygen vacancy formation energy of ABO3 perovskites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Antoine A.; Wolverton, Chris

    2017-10-01

    ABO3 perovskites are oxide materials that are used for a variety of applications such as solid oxide fuel cells, piezo-, ferro-electricity and water splitting. Due to their remarkable stability with respect to cation substitution, new compounds for such applications potentially await discovery. In this work, we present an exhaustive dataset of formation energies of 5,329 cubic and distorted perovskites that were calculated using first-principles density functional theory. In addition to formation energies, several additional properties such as oxidation states, band gap, oxygen vacancy formation energy, and thermodynamic stability with respect to all phases in the Open Quantum Materials Database are also made publicly available. This large dataset for this ubiquitous crystal structure type contains 395 perovskites that are predicted to be thermodynamically stable, of which many have not yet been experimentally reported, and therefore represent theoretical predictions. The dataset thus opens avenues for future use, including materials discovery in many research-active areas.

  15. Calculation of positron binding energies using the generalized any particle propagator theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, Jonathan; Charry, Jorge A.; Flores-Moreno, Roberto; Varella, Márcio T. do N.; Reyes, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    We recently extended the electron propagator theory to any type of quantum species based in the framework of the Any-Particle Molecular Orbital (APMO) approach [J. Romero, E. Posada, R. Flores-Moreno, and A. Reyes, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 074105 (2012)]. The generalized any particle molecular orbital propagator theory (APMO/PT) was implemented in its quasiparticle second order version in the LOWDIN code and was applied to calculate nuclear quantum effects in electron binding energies and proton binding energies in molecular systems [M. Díaz-Tinoco, J. Romero, J. V. Ortiz, A. Reyes, and R. Flores-Moreno, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 194108 (2013)]. In this work, we present the derivation of third order quasiparticle APMO/PT methods and we apply them to calculate positron binding energies (PBEs) of atoms and molecules. We calculated the PBEs of anions and some diatomic molecules using the second order, third order, and renormalized third order quasiparticle APMO/PT approaches and compared our results with those previously calculated employing configuration interaction (CI), explicitly correlated and quantum Montecarlo methodologies. We found that renormalized APMO/PT methods can achieve accuracies of ∼0.35 eV for anionic systems, compared to Full-CI results, and provide a quantitative description of positron binding to anionic and highly polar species. Third order APMO/PT approaches display considerable potential to study positron binding to large molecules because of the fifth power scaling with respect to the number of basis sets. In this regard, we present additional PBE calculations of some small polar organic molecules, amino acids and DNA nucleobases. We complement our numerical assessment with formal and numerical analyses of the treatment of electron-positron correlation within the quasiparticle propagator approach

  16. Analysis of Wind Data, Calculation of Energy Yield Potential, and Micrositing Application with WAsP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Topaloğlu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The parameters required for building a wind power plant have been calculated using the fuzzy logic method by means of Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP in this study. Overall objectives of the program include analysis of raw data, evaluation of wind and climate, construction of a wind atlas, and estimation of wind power potential. With the analysis performed in the application, the average wind velocity, average power density, energy potential from micrositing, capacity factor, unit cost price, and period of redemption have been calculated, which are needed by the project developer during the decision-making stage and intended to be used as the input unit in the fuzzy logic-based system designed. It is aimed at processing the parameters calculated by the designed fuzzy logic-based decision-making system at the rule base and generating a compatibility factor that will allow for making the final decision in building wind power plants.

  17. Calculations of energy levels and electromagnetic properties for tellurium pair isotopes, by unified method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, R.R.P.

    1988-01-01

    Calculations with the Unified Model (vibrator coupled to two particles), of the energy levels and the eletromagnetic properties have been performed and compared with the twelve pair isotopes from tellurium with A between 112 and 134. The results were analysed using as particles interaction: pairing and SDI (Surface Delta Interaction). The SDI and 3 fonons collective states were used in the fittings, and a syntematic comparison between the theoretical and experimental results was made. The dependence of the results with the model parameters was determined, through large variation sof them. Calculations using 4 fonons have been made, and the importance of the introduced variations in the results was discussed. Calculations have been made in the VAX Computer of the Pelletron at IFUSP. (author) [pt

  18. Calculations of the energy spectra of Zn, Ga and Ge isotopes by the shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakakura, M.; Shikata, Y.; Arima, A.; Sebe, T.

    1979-01-01

    The effective Hamiltonian which was determined empirically by Koops and Glaudemans is tested in shell model calculations for the 65-68 Zn, 67-69 Ga, and 68-70 Ge nuclei in the full (1p 3 / 2 , 0f 5 / 2 , 1p 1 / 2 )n space. The resulting energy spectra are compared with the experimental spectra and results of previous calculations. The overall agreement with experiment is as satisfactory for these nuclei as for the Ni and Cu isotopes, by which the Hamiltonian was determined. It is noticed that the spectra of 67 Zn and 67 , 69 Ga calculated in this work are similar to those provided by the Alaga model. (orig.) [de

  19. Calculation of Multisphere Neutron Spectrometer Response Functions in Energy Range up to 20 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Martinkovic, J

    2005-01-01

    Multisphere neutron spectrometer is a basic instrument of neutron measurements in the scattered radiation field at charged-particles accelerators for radiation protection and dosimetry purposes. The precise calculation of the spectrometer response functions is a necessary condition of the propriety of neutron spectra unfolding. The results of the response functions calculation for the JINR spectrometer with LiI(Eu) detector (a set of 6 homogeneous and 1 heterogeneous moderators, "bare" detector within cadmium cover and without it) at two geometries of the spectrometer irradiation - in uniform monodirectional and uniform isotropic neutron fields - are given. The calculation was carried out by the code MCNP in the neutron energy range 10$^{-8}$-20 MeV.

  20. Precise calculations in simulations of the interaction of low energy neutrons with nano-dispersed media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artem’ev, V. A.; Nezvanov, A. Yu.; Nesvizhevsky, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss properties of the interaction of slow neutrons with nano-dispersed media and their application for neutron reflectors. In order to increase the accuracy of model simulation of the interaction of neutrons with nanopowders, we perform precise quantum mechanical calculation of potential scattering of neutrons on single nanoparticles using the method of phase functions. We compare results of precise calculations with those performed within first Born approximation for nanodiamonds with the radius of 2–5 nm and for neutron energies 3 × 10 -7 –10 -3 eV. Born approximation overestimates the probability of scattering to large angles, while the accuracy of evaluation of integral characteristics (cross sections, albedo) is acceptable. Using Monte-Carlo method, we calculate albedo of neutrons from different layers of piled up diamond nanopowder

  1. Precise calculations in simulations of the interaction of low energy neutrons with nano-dispersed media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artem'ev, V. A.; Nezvanov, A. Yu.; Nesvizhevsky, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss properties of the interaction of slow neutrons with nano-dispersed media and their application for neutron reflectors. In order to increase the accuracy of model simulation of the interaction of neutrons with nanopowders, we perform precise quantum mechanical calculation of potential scattering of neutrons on single nanoparticles using the method of phase functions. We compare results of precise calculations with those performed within first Born approximation for nanodiamonds with the radius of 2-5 nm and for neutron energies 3 × 10-7-10-3 eV. Born approximation overestimates the probability of scattering to large angles, while the accuracy of evaluation of integral characteristics (cross sections, albedo) is acceptable. Using Monte-Carlo method, we calculate albedo of neutrons from different layers of piled up diamond nanopowder.

  2. Precise calculations in simulations of the interaction of low energy neutrons with nano-dispersed media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artem’ev, V. A., E-mail: niitm@inbox.ru [Research Institute of Materials Technology (Russian Federation); Nezvanov, A. Yu. [Moscow State Industrial University (Russian Federation); Nesvizhevsky, V. V. [Institut Max von Laue—Paul Langevin (France)

    2016-01-15

    We discuss properties of the interaction of slow neutrons with nano-dispersed media and their application for neutron reflectors. In order to increase the accuracy of model simulation of the interaction of neutrons with nanopowders, we perform precise quantum mechanical calculation of potential scattering of neutrons on single nanoparticles using the method of phase functions. We compare results of precise calculations with those performed within first Born approximation for nanodiamonds with the radius of 2–5 nm and for neutron energies 3 × 10{sup -7}–10{sup -3} eV. Born approximation overestimates the probability of scattering to large angles, while the accuracy of evaluation of integral characteristics (cross sections, albedo) is acceptable. Using Monte-Carlo method, we calculate albedo of neutrons from different layers of piled up diamond nanopowder.

  3. Energy Payback Time Calculation for a Building Integrated Semitransparent Thermal (BISPVT) System with Air Duct

    OpenAIRE

    Kanchan Mudgil; Deepali Kamthania

    2013-01-01

    This paper evaluates the energy payback time (EPBT) of building integrated photovoltaic thermal (BISPVT) system for Srinagar, India. Three different photovoltaic (PV) modules namely mono crystalline silicon (m-Si), poly crystalline silicon (p-Si), and amorphous silicon (a-Si) have been considered for calculation of EPBT. It is found that, the EPBT is lowest in m-Si. Hence, integration of m-Si PV modules on the roof of a room is economical.

  4. Microscopic classical equations of motion calculations of high-energy heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panos, C.N.

    1979-01-01

    Classical microscopic nonrelativistic calculations are made for collisions between equal-mass-nuclei projectile and target with A/sub P/ = A/sub T/ = 20 for laboratory energies E/sub L/ = 117, 400, and 800 MeV/A/sub P/ and also between nuclei with A/sub P/ = A/sub T/ = 40 for E/sub L/ = 400 MeV/A/sub P/. For a given initial configuration of the projectile and target nucleons the trajectories of all nucleons are calculated classically with two-body forces between all pairs of nucleons. The implementation of the CEOM calculations is discussed in detail. More limited relativistic calculations for single initial configurations are also made. The configurations representing the initial nuclei are chosen to have a reasonable radius and kinetic energy; however, they do not saturate with the two-body potentials used. The trajectory information is analyzed to give a large number of position and momentum dependent quantities such as densities, rapidity distributions, inclusive double differential cross sections, etc. The results show that a central collision (b = 0) proceeds in three stages, an initial transparent stage, a strongly interacting stage where the dissipation is large, and finally an expansion stage for which there is considerable dissipation. Appreciable potential energy effects were found for b = 0; however, the final distributions were very similar for the scattering equivalent potentials. For lower energies (E/sub L/ approx. = 100 MeV) there is some evidence of fusion into large fragments. The thermal models for b = 0 are tested. Noncentral collisions show typical nonequilibrium and transparency features. The multiplicity distribution is obtained for A/sub P/ = A/sub T/ = 20 and E/sub L/ = 800 MeV. A comparison of the impact parameter-integrated inclusive double differential cross sections is made with the experimental data for A/sub P/ = A/sub T/ = 20, E/sub L/ = 800 MeV and shows fair agreement

  5. Bimodality emerges from transport model calculations of heavy ion collisions at intermediate energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, S.; Das Gupta, S.; Chaudhuri, G.

    2016-04-01

    This work is a continuation of our effort [S. Mallik, S. Das Gupta, and G. Chaudhuri, Phys. Rev. C 91, 034616 (2015)], 10.1103/PhysRevC.91.034616 to examine if signatures of a phase transition can be extracted from transport model calculations of heavy ion collisions at intermediate energy. A signature of first-order phase transition is the appearance of a bimodal distribution in Pm(k ) in finite systems. Here Pm(k ) is the probability that the maximum of the multiplicity distribution occurs at mass number k . Using a well-known model for event generation [Botzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) plus fluctuation], we study two cases of central collision: mass 40 on mass 40 and mass 120 on mass 120. Bimodality is seen in both the cases. The results are quite similar to those obtained in statistical model calculations. An intriguing feature is seen. We observe that at the energy where bimodality occurs, other phase-transition-like signatures appear. There are breaks in certain first-order derivatives. We then examine if such breaks appear in standard BUU calculations without fluctuations. They do. The implication is interesting. If first-order phase transition occurs, it may be possible to recognize that from ordinary BUU calculations. Probably the reason this has not been seen already is because this aspect was not investigated before.

  6. Improving the Efficiency of Free Energy Calculations in the Amber Molecular Dynamics Package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaus, Joseph W; Pierce, Levi T; Walker, Ross C; McCammont, J Andrew

    2013-09-10

    Alchemical transformations are widely used methods to calculate free energies. Amber has traditionally included support for alchemical transformations as part of the sander molecular dynamics (MD) engine. Here we describe the implementation of a more efficient approach to alchemical transformations in the Amber MD package. Specifically we have implemented this new approach within the more computational efficient and scalable pmemd MD engine that is included with the Amber MD package. The majority of the gain in efficiency comes from the improved design of the calculation, which includes better parallel scaling and reduction in the calculation of redundant terms. This new implementation is able to reproduce results from equivalent simulations run with the existing functionality, but at 2.5 times greater computational efficiency. This new implementation is also able to run softcore simulations at the λ end states making direct calculation of free energies more accurate, compared to the extrapolation required in the existing implementation. The updated alchemical transformation functionality will be included in the next major release of Amber (scheduled for release in Q1 2014) and will be available at http://ambermd.org, under the Amber license.

  7. Weather data for simplified energy calculation methods. Volume IV. United States: WYEC data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, A.R.; Moreno, S.; Deringer, J.; Watson, C.R.

    1984-08-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a source of weather data for direct use with a number of simplified energy calculation methods available today. Complete weather data for a number of cities in the United States are provided for use in the following methods: degree hour, modified degree hour, bin, modified bin, and variable degree day. This report contains sets of weather data for 23 cities using Weather Year for Energy Calculations (WYEC) source weather data. Considerable overlap is present in cities (21) covered by both the TRY and WYEC data. The weather data at each city has been summarized in a number of ways to provide differing levels of detail necessary for alternative simplified energy calculation methods. Weather variables summarized include dry bulb and wet bulb temperature, percent relative humidity, humidity ratio, wind speed, percent possible sunshine, percent diffuse solar radiation, total solar radiation on horizontal and vertical surfaces, and solar heat gain through standard DSA glass. Monthly and annual summaries, in some cases by time of day, are available. These summaries are produced in a series of nine computer generated tables.

  8. Towards accurate free energy calculations in ligand protein-binding studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbrecher, Thomas; Labahn, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Cells contain a multitude of different chemical reaction paths running simultaneously and quite independently next to each other. This amazing feat is enabled by molecular recognition, the ability of biomolecules to form stable and specific complexes with each other and with their substrates. A better understanding of this process, i.e. of the kinetics, structures and thermodynamic properties of biomolecule binding, would be invaluable in the study of biological systems. In addition, as the mode of action of many pharmaceuticals is based upon their inhibition or activation of biomolecule targets, predictive models of small molecule receptor binding are very helpful tools in rational drug design. Since the goal here is normally to design a new compound with a high inhibition strength, one of the most important thermodynamic properties is the binding free energy DeltaG(0). The prediction of binding constants has always been one of the major goals in the field of computational chemistry, because the ability to reliably assess a hypothetical compound's binding properties without having to synthesize it first would save a tremendous amount of work. The different approaches to this question range from fast and simple empirical descriptor methods to elaborate simulation protocols aimed at putting the computation of free energies onto a solid foundation of statistical thermodynamics. While the later methods are still not suited for the screenings of thousands of compounds that are routinely performed in computational drug design studies, they are increasingly put to use for the detailed study of protein ligand interactions. This review will focus on molecular mechanics force field based free energy calculations and their application to the study of protein ligand interactions. After a brief overview of other popular methods for the calculation of free energies, we will describe recent advances in methodology and a variety of exemplary studies of molecular dynamics

  9. GEDAE-LaB: A Free Software to Calculate the Energy System Contributions during Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertuzzi, Rômulo; Melegati, Jorge; Bueno, Salomão; Ghiarone, Thaysa; Pasqua, Leonardo A; Gáspari, Arthur Fernandes; Lima-Silva, Adriano E; Goldman, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to describe the functionality of free software developed for energy system contributions and energy expenditure calculation during exercise, namely GEDAE-LaB. Eleven participants performed the following tests: 1) a maximal cycling incremental test to measure the ventilatory threshold and maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2max); 2) a cycling workload constant test at moderate domain (90% ventilatory threshold); 3) a cycling workload constant test at severe domain (110% V̇O2max). Oxygen uptake and plasma lactate were measured during the tests. The contributions of the aerobic (AMET), anaerobic lactic (LAMET), and anaerobic alactic (ALMET) systems were calculated based on the oxygen uptake during exercise, the oxygen energy equivalents provided by lactate accumulation, and the fast component of excess post-exercise oxygen consumption, respectively. In order to assess the intra-investigator variation, four different investigators performed the analyses independently using GEDAE-LaB. A direct comparison with commercial software was also provided. All subjects completed 10 min of exercise at moderate domain, while the time to exhaustion at severe domain was 144 ± 65 s. The AMET, LAMET, and ALMET contributions during moderate domain were about 93, 2, and 5%, respectively. The AMET, LAMET, and ALMET contributions during severe domain were about 66, 21, and 13%, respectively. No statistical differences were found between the energy system contributions and energy expenditure obtained by GEDAE-LaB and commercial software for both moderate and severe domains (P > 0.05). The ICC revealed that these estimates were highly reliable among the four investigators for both moderate and severe domains (all ICC ≥ 0.94). These findings suggest that GEDAE-LaB is a free software easily comprehended by users minimally familiarized with adopted procedures for calculations of energetic profile using oxygen uptake and lactate accumulation during exercise. By

  10. Free energy calculations, enhanced by a Gaussian ansatz, for the "chemical work" distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulougouris, Georgios C

    2014-05-15

    The evaluation of the free energy is essential in molecular simulation because it is intimately related with the existence of multiphase equilibrium. Recently, it was demonstrated that it is possible to evaluate the Helmholtz free energy using a single statistical ensemble along an entire isotherm by accounting for the "chemical work" of transforming each molecule, from an interacting one, to an ideal gas. In this work, we show that it is possible to perform such a free energy perturbation over a liquid vapor phase transition. Furthermore, we investigate the link between a general free energy perturbation scheme and the novel nonequilibrium theories of Crook's and Jarzinsky. We find that for finite systems away from the thermodynamic limit the second law of thermodynamics will always be an inequality for isothermal free energy perturbations, resulting always to a dissipated work that may tend to zero only in the thermodynamic limit. The work, the heat, and the entropy produced during a thermodynamic free energy perturbation can be viewed in the context of the Crooks and Jarzinsky formalism, revealing that for a given value of the ensemble average of the "irreversible" work, the minimum entropy production corresponded to a Gaussian distribution for the histogram of the work. We propose the evaluation of the free energy difference in any free energy perturbation based scheme on the average irreversible "chemical work" minus the dissipated work that can be calculated from the variance of the distribution of the logarithm of the work histogram, within the Gaussian approximation. As a consequence, using the Gaussian ansatz for the distribution of the "chemical work," accurate estimates for the chemical potential and the free energy of the system can be performed using much shorter simulations and avoiding the necessity of sampling the computational costly tails of the "chemical work." For a more general free energy perturbation scheme that the Gaussian ansatz may not be

  11. Experimental validation of decay heat calculation codes and associated nuclear data libraries for fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, Fujio; Wada, Masayuki; Ikeda, Yujiro

    2001-01-01

    Validity of decay heat calculations for safety designs of fusion reactors was investigated by using decay heat experimental data on thirty-two fusion reactor relevant materials obtained at the 14-MeV neutron source facility of FNS in JAERI. Calculation codes developed in Japan, ACT4 and CINAC version 4, and nuclear data bases such as JENDL/Act-96, FENDL/A-2.0 and Lib90 were used for the calculation. Although several corrections in algorithms for both the calculation codes were needed, it was shown by comparing calculated results with the experimental data that most of activation cross sections and decay data were adequate. In cases of type 316 stainless steel and copper which were important for ITER, prediction accuracy of decay heat within ±10% was confirmed. However, it was pointed out that there were some problems in parts of data such as improper activation cross sections, e,g., the 92 Mo(n, 2n) 91g Mo reaction in FENDL, and lack of activation cross section data, e.g., the 138 Ba(n, 2n) 137m Ba reaction in JENDL. Modifications of cross section data were recommended for 19 reactions in JENDL and FENDL. It was also pointed out that X-ray and conversion electron energies should be included in decay data. (author)

  12. Experimental validation of decay heat calculation codes and associated nuclear data libraries for fusion energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekawa, Fujio; Wada, Masayuki; Ikeda, Yujiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-01-01

    Validity of decay heat calculations for safety designs of fusion reactors was investigated by using decay heat experimental data on thirty-two fusion reactor relevant materials obtained at the 14-MeV neutron source facility of FNS in JAERI. Calculation codes developed in Japan, ACT4 and CINAC version 4, and nuclear data bases such as JENDL/Act-96, FENDL/A-2.0 and Lib90 were used for the calculation. Although several corrections in algorithms for both the calculation codes were needed, it was shown by comparing calculated results with the experimental data that most of activation cross sections and decay data were adequate. In cases of type 316 stainless steel and copper which were important for ITER, prediction accuracy of decay heat within {+-}10% was confirmed. However, it was pointed out that there were some problems in parts of data such as improper activation cross sections, e,g., the {sup 92}Mo(n, 2n){sup 91g}Mo reaction in FENDL, and lack of activation cross section data, e.g., the {sup 138}Ba(n, 2n){sup 137m}Ba reaction in JENDL. Modifications of cross section data were recommended for 19 reactions in JENDL and FENDL. It was also pointed out that X-ray and conversion electron energies should be included in decay data. (author)

  13. Continuous energy Monte Carlo calculations for randomly distributed spherical fuels based on statistical geometry model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Isao [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan); Mori, Takamasa; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Itakura, Hirofumi

    1996-03-01

    The method to calculate neutronics parameters of a core composed of randomly distributed spherical fuels has been developed based on a statistical geometry model with a continuous energy Monte Carlo method. This method was implemented in a general purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP, and a new code MCNP-CFP had been developed. This paper describes the model and method how to use it and the validation results. In the Monte Carlo calculation, the location of a spherical fuel is sampled probabilistically along the particle flight path from the spatial probability distribution of spherical fuels, called nearest neighbor distribution (NND). This sampling method was validated through the following two comparisons: (1) Calculations of inventory of coated fuel particles (CFPs) in a fuel compact by both track length estimator and direct evaluation method, and (2) Criticality calculations for ordered packed geometries. This method was also confined by applying to an analysis of the critical assembly experiment at VHTRC. The method established in the present study is quite unique so as to a probabilistic model of the geometry with a great number of spherical fuels distributed randomly. Realizing the speed-up by vector or parallel computations in future, it is expected to be widely used in calculation of a nuclear reactor core, especially HTGR cores. (author).

  14. A novel method of calculating the energy deposition curve of nanosecond pulsed surface dielectric barrier discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Kun; Wang, Xinying; Lu, Jiayu; Cui, Quansheng; Pang, Lei; Di, Dongxu; Zhang, Qiaogen

    2015-01-01

    To obtain the energy deposition curve is very important in the fields to which nanosecond pulse dielectric barrier discharges (NPDBDs) are applied. It helps the understanding of the discharge physics and fast gas heating. In this paper, an equivalent circuit model, composed of three capacitances, is introduced and a method of calculating the energy deposition curve is proposed for a nanosecond pulse surface dielectric barrier discharge (NPSDBD) plasma actuator. The capacitance C d and the energy deposition curve E R are determined by mathematically proving that the mapping from C d to E R is bijective and numerically searching one C d that satisfies the requirement for E R to be a monotonically non-decreasing function. It is found that the value of capacitance C d varies with the amplitude of applied pulse voltage due to the change of discharge area and is dependent on the polarity of applied voltage. The bijectiveness of the mapping from C d to E R in nanosecond pulse volumetric dielectric barrier discharge (NPVDBD) is demonstrated and the feasibility of the application of the new method to NPVDBD is validated. This preliminarily shows a high possibility of developing a unified approach to calculate the energy deposition curve in NPDBD. (paper)

  15. Unconstrained Enhanced Sampling for Free Energy Calculations of Biomolecules: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yinglong; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Free energy calculations are central to understanding the structure, dynamics and function of biomolecules. Yet insufficient sampling of biomolecular configurations is often regarded as one of the main sources of error. Many enhanced sampling techniques have been developed to address this issue. Notably, enhanced sampling methods based on biasing collective variables (CVs), including the widely used umbrella sampling, adaptive biasing force and metadynamics, have been discussed in a recent excellent review (Abrams and Bussi, Entropy, 2014). Here, we aim to review enhanced sampling methods that do not require predefined system-dependent CVs for biomolecular simulations and as such do not suffer from the hidden energy barrier problem as encountered in the CV-biasing methods. These methods include, but are not limited to, replica exchange/parallel tempering, self-guided molecular/Langevin dynamics, essential energy space random walk and accelerated molecular dynamics. While it is overwhelming to describe all details of each method, we provide a summary of the methods along with the applications and offer our perspectives. We conclude with challenges and prospects of the unconstrained enhanced sampling methods for accurate biomolecular free energy calculations. PMID:27453631

  16. Free-energy calculations for semi-flexible macromolecules: Applications to DNA knotting and looping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovan, Stefan M.; Scharein, Robert G.; Hanke, Andreas; Levene, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    We present a method to obtain numerically accurate values of configurational free energies of semiflexible macromolecular systems, based on the technique of thermodynamic integration combined with normal-mode analysis of a reference system subject to harmonic constraints. Compared with previous free-energy calculations that depend on a reference state, our approach introduces two innovations, namely, the use of internal coordinates to constrain the reference states and the ability to freely select these reference states. As a consequence, it is possible to explore systems that undergo substantially larger fluctuations than those considered in previous calculations, including semiflexible biopolymers having arbitrary ratios of contour length L to persistence length P. To validate the method, high accuracy is demonstrated for free energies of prime DNA knots with L/P = 20 and L/P = 40, corresponding to DNA lengths of 3000 and 6000 base pairs, respectively. We then apply the method to study the free-energy landscape for a model of a synaptic nucleoprotein complex containing a pair of looped domains, revealing a bifurcation in the location of optimal synapse (crossover) sites. This transition is relevant to target-site selection by DNA-binding proteins that occupy multiple DNA sites separated by large linear distances along the genome, a problem that arises naturally in gene regulation, DNA recombination, and the action of type-II topoisomerases

  17. Free-energy calculations for semi-flexible macromolecules: Applications to DNA knotting and looping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovan, Stefan M. [Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75083 (United States); Scharein, Robert G. [Hypnagogic Software, Vancouver, British Columbia V6K 1V6 (Canada); Hanke, Andreas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at Brownsville, Brownsville, Texas 78520 (United States); Levene, Stephen D., E-mail: sdlevene@utdallas.edu [Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75083 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75083 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75083 (United States)

    2014-11-07

    We present a method to obtain numerically accurate values of configurational free energies of semiflexible macromolecular systems, based on the technique of thermodynamic integration combined with normal-mode analysis of a reference system subject to harmonic constraints. Compared with previous free-energy calculations that depend on a reference state, our approach introduces two innovations, namely, the use of internal coordinates to constrain the reference states and the ability to freely select these reference states. As a consequence, it is possible to explore systems that undergo substantially larger fluctuations than those considered in previous calculations, including semiflexible biopolymers having arbitrary ratios of contour length L to persistence length P. To validate the method, high accuracy is demonstrated for free energies of prime DNA knots with L/P = 20 and L/P = 40, corresponding to DNA lengths of 3000 and 6000 base pairs, respectively. We then apply the method to study the free-energy landscape for a model of a synaptic nucleoprotein complex containing a pair of looped domains, revealing a bifurcation in the location of optimal synapse (crossover) sites. This transition is relevant to target-site selection by DNA-binding proteins that occupy multiple DNA sites separated by large linear distances along the genome, a problem that arises naturally in gene regulation, DNA recombination, and the action of type-II topoisomerases.

  18. Calculation of the surface energy of hcp-metals with the empirical electron theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Baoqin; Liu Wei; Li Zhilin

    2009-01-01

    A brief introduction of the surface model based on the empirical electron theory (EET) and the dangling bond analysis method (DBAM) is presented in this paper. The anisotropy of spatial distribution of covalent bonds of hexagonal close-packed (hcp) metals such as Be, Mg, Sc, Ti, Co, Zn, Y, Zr, Tc, Cd, Hf, and Re, has been analyzed. And under the first-order approximation, the calculated surface energy values for low index surfaces of these hcp-metals are in agreement with experimental and other theoretical values. Correlated analysis showed that the anisotropy of surface energy of hcp-metals was related with the ratio of lattice constants (c/a). The calculation method for the research of surface energy provides a good basis for models of surface science phenomena, and the model may be extended to the surface energy estimation of more metals, alloys, ceramics, and so on, since abundant information about the valence electronic structure (VES) is generated from EET.

  19. Evaluated Nuclear Data Library for Transport Calculations at Energies up to 150 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korovin, Yu.A.; Konobeyev, A.Yu.; Pilnov, G.B.; Stankovskiy, A.Yu.

    2005-01-01

    A new evaluated nuclear data library has been created. The library consists of two sub-libraries for neutron and proton incident particles. The first version of neutron sub-library has been completed and described in the present paper. The library contains nuclear data for transport, heating, and shielding applications for 242 nuclides ranging in atomic number from 8 to 82 in the energy region of primary neutrons from 10-5 eV to 150 MeV. Data below 20 MeV are taken mainly from ENDF/B-VI (Revision 8) and for some nuclides, from the JENDL-3.3 and JEFF-3.0 libraries. The evaluation of emitted particle energy and angular distributions at the energies above 20 MeV was performed with the help of the ALICE/ASH code and the analysis of available experimental data. The total cross sections, elastic cross sections, and elastic scattering angular distributions were calculated with the help of the coupled channel model. The results of the calculation were adjusted to the data from ENDF/B-VI, JENDL-3.3m or JEFF-3.0 at the neutron energy equal to 20 MeV. The library is written in ENDF/B-VI format using the MF=3/MT=5 and MF=6/MT=5 representations

  20. Monte Carlo dose calculation improvements for low energy electron beams using eMC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fix, Michael K; Frei, Daniel; Volken, Werner; Born, Ernst J; Manser, Peter; Neuenschwander, Hans

    2010-01-01

    The electron Monte Carlo (eMC) dose calculation algorithm in Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems) is based on the macro MC method and is able to predict dose distributions for high energy electron beams with high accuracy. However, there are limitations for low energy electron beams. This work aims to improve the accuracy of the dose calculation using eMC for 4 and 6 MeV electron beams of Varian linear accelerators. Improvements implemented into the eMC include (1) improved determination of the initial electron energy spectrum by increased resolution of mono-energetic depth dose curves used during beam configuration; (2) inclusion of all the scrapers of the applicator in the beam model; (3) reduction of the maximum size of the sphere to be selected within the macro MC transport when the energy of the incident electron is below certain thresholds. The impact of these changes in eMC is investigated by comparing calculated dose distributions for 4 and 6 MeV electron beams at source to surface distance (SSD) of 100 and 110 cm with applicators ranging from 6 x 6 to 25 x 25 cm 2 of a Varian Clinac 2300C/D with the corresponding measurements. Dose differences between calculated and measured absolute depth dose curves are reduced from 6% to less than 1.5% for both energies and all applicators considered at SSD of 100 cm. Using the original eMC implementation, absolute dose profiles at depths of 1 cm, d max and R50 in water lead to dose differences of up to 8% for applicators larger than 15 x 15 cm 2 at SSD 100 cm. Those differences are now reduced to less than 2% for all dose profiles investigated when the improved version of eMC is used. At SSD of 110 cm the dose difference for the original eMC version is even more pronounced and can be larger than 10%. Those differences are reduced to within 2% or 2 mm with the improved version of eMC. In this work several enhancements were made in the eMC algorithm leading to significant improvements in the accuracy of the dose calculation

  1. Monte Carlo dose calculation improvements for low energy electron beams using eMC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, Michael K; Frei, Daniel; Volken, Werner; Neuenschwander, Hans; Born, Ernst J; Manser, Peter

    2010-08-21

    The electron Monte Carlo (eMC) dose calculation algorithm in Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems) is based on the macro MC method and is able to predict dose distributions for high energy electron beams with high accuracy. However, there are limitations for low energy electron beams. This work aims to improve the accuracy of the dose calculation using eMC for 4 and 6 MeV electron beams of Varian linear accelerators. Improvements implemented into the eMC include (1) improved determination of the initial electron energy spectrum by increased resolution of mono-energetic depth dose curves used during beam configuration; (2) inclusion of all the scrapers of the applicator in the beam model; (3) reduction of the maximum size of the sphere to be selected within the macro MC transport when the energy of the incident electron is below certain thresholds. The impact of these changes in eMC is investigated by comparing calculated dose distributions for 4 and 6 MeV electron beams at source to surface distance (SSD) of 100 and 110 cm with applicators ranging from 6 x 6 to 25 x 25 cm(2) of a Varian Clinac 2300C/D with the corresponding measurements. Dose differences between calculated and measured absolute depth dose curves are reduced from 6% to less than 1.5% for both energies and all applicators considered at SSD of 100 cm. Using the original eMC implementation, absolute dose profiles at depths of 1 cm, d(max) and R50 in water lead to dose differences of up to 8% for applicators larger than 15 x 15 cm(2) at SSD 100 cm. Those differences are now reduced to less than 2% for all dose profiles investigated when the improved version of eMC is used. At SSD of 110 cm the dose difference for the original eMC version is even more pronounced and can be larger than 10%. Those differences are reduced to within 2% or 2 mm with the improved version of eMC. In this work several enhancements were made in the eMC algorithm leading to significant improvements in the accuracy of the dose

  2. Absolute Hydration Free Energy of Proton from First Principles Electronic Structure Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhan, Chang-Guo; Dixon, David A.

    2001-01-01

    The absolute hydration free energy of the proton, DGhyd298(H+), is one of the fundamental quantities for the thermodynamics of aqueous systems. Its exact value remains unknown despite extensive experimental and computational efforts. We report a first-principles determination of DGhyd298(H+) by using the latest developments in electronic structure theory and massively parallel computers. DGhyd298(H+) is accurately predicted to be -262.4 kcal/mol based on high-level, first-principles solvation-included electronic structure calculations. The absolute hydration free energies of other cations can be obtained by using appropriate available thermodynamic data in combination with this value. The high accuracy of the predicted absolute hydration free energy of proton is confirmed by applying the same protocol to predict DGhyd298(Li+)

  3. Atom probe tomography simulations and density functional theory calculations of bonding energies in Cu3Au

    KAUST Repository

    Boll, Torben

    2012-10-01

    In this article the Cu-Au binding energy in Cu3Au is determined by comparing experimental atom probe tomography (APT) results to simulations. The resulting bonding energy is supported by density functional theory calculations. The APT simulations are based on the Müller-Schottky equation, which is modified to include different atomic neighborhoods and their characteristic bonds. The local environment is considered up to the fifth next nearest neighbors. To compare the experimental with simulated APT data, the AtomVicinity algorithm, which provides statistical information about the positions of the neighboring atoms, is applied. The quality of this information is influenced by the field evaporation behavior of the different species, which is connected to the bonding energies. © Microscopy Society of America 2012.

  4. An intranuclear cascade calculation of high-energy heavy-ion interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yariv, Y.; Fraenkel, Z.

    1979-01-01

    The intranuclear cascade model of Chen is extended to high-energy reactions between two heavy ions. The results of the calculations are compared with experimental results for the inclusive proton and pion cross sections, two-particle correlations, particle multiplicity distributions and spallation cross section distributions from light ( 12 C+ 12 C) to heavy( 40 Ar + 238 U) projectile-target systems in the laboratory bombarding energy range E/A=250-1000 MeV. The comparison shows that the model is fairly successful in reproducing the various aspects of high-energy reactions between heavy ions. It is also shown that the assumption that high particle multiplicities are indicative of ''central'' (small impact parameter) collisions are well founded for heavy projectile-target systems. (B.G.)

  5. Research on a wavefront aberration calculation method for a laser energy gradient attenuator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Tingting; Han, Xu; Chen, Chi; Fu, Yuegang; Li, Ming

    2013-01-01

    When a laser energy gradient attenuator is working, there is an inhomogeneous temperature distribution in the whole of the glass because of the non-uniform light energy absorption. This will lead to optical performance reduction. An integrated opto-thermal–mechanical method is proposed to calculate the wavefront aberration for analysis of the thermal effect of the system. Non-sequential optical analysis is used for computing the absorbed energy distribution. The finite element analysis program solves the temperature distribution and the deformations of nodes on the surfaces. An interface routine is created to fit the surface shape and the index field, and extended Zernike polynomials are introduced to get a higher fitting precision. Finally, the parameters are imported to the CodeV optical design program automatically, and the user defined gradient index material is ray traced to obtain the wavefront aberration. The method can also be used in other optical systems for thermal effect analysis. (letter)

  6. Molecular mechanics calculations of proteins. Comparison of different energy minimization strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, I T; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    1997-01-01

    A general strategy for performing energy minimization of proteins using the SYBYL molecular modelling program has been developed. The influence of several variables including energy minimization procedure, solvation, dielectric function and dielectric constant have been investigated in order...... to develop a general method, which is capable of producing high quality protein structures. Avian pancreatic polypeptide (APP) and bovine pancreatic phospholipase A2 (BP PLA2) were selected for the calculations, because high quality X-ray structures exist and because all classes of secondary structure...... for this protein. Energy minimized structures of the trimeric PLA2 from Indian cobra (N.n.n. PLA2) were used for assessing the impact of protein-protein interactions. Based on the above mentioned criteria, it could be concluded that using the following conditions: Dielectric constant epsilon = 4 or 20; a distance...

  7. Gamma-ray energy buildup factor calculations and shielding effects of some Jordanian building structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharaf, J. M.; Saleh, H.

    2015-05-01

    The shielding properties of three different construction styles, and building materials, commonly used in Jordan, were evaluated using parameters such as attenuation coefficients, equivalent atomic number, penetration depth and energy buildup factor. Geometric progression (GP) method was used to calculate gamma-ray energy buildup factors of limestone, concrete, bricks, cement plaster and air for the energy range 0.05-3 MeV, and penetration depths up to 40 mfp. It has been observed that among the examined building materials, limestone offers highest value for equivalent atomic number and linear attenuation coefficient and the lowest values for penetration depth and energy buildup factor. The obtained buildup factors were used as basic data to establish the total equivalent energy buildup factors for three different multilayer construction styles using an iterative method. The three styles were then compared in terms of fractional transmission of photons at different incident photon energies. It is concluded that, in case of any nuclear accident, large multistory buildings with five layers exterior walls, style A, could effectively attenuate radiation more than small dwellings of any construction style.

  8. Affinity and specificity of serine endopeptidase-protein inhibitor interactions. Empirical free energy calculations based on X-ray crystallographic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krystek, S; Stouch, T; Novotny, J

    1993-12-05

    An empirical function was used to calculate free energy change (delta G) of complex formation between the following inhibitors and enzymes: Kunitz inhibitor (BPTI) with trypsin, trypsinogen and kallikrein; turkey ovomucoid 3rd domain (OMTKY3) with alpha-chymotrypsin and the Streptomyces griseus protease B; the potato chymotrypsin inhibitor with the protease B; and the barely chymotrypsin inhibitor and eglin-c with subtilisin and thermitase. Using X-ray coordinates of the nine complexes, we estimated the contributions that hydrophobic effect, electrostatic interactions and side-chain conformational entropy make towards the stability of the complexes. The calculated delta G values showed good agreement with the experimentally measured ones, the only exception being the kallikrein/BPTI complex whose X-ray structure was solved at an exceptionally low pH. In complexes with different enzymes, the same inhibitor residues contributed identically towards complex formation (delta G(residue) Spearman rank correlation coefficient 0.7 to 1.0). The most productive enzyme-contacting residues in OMTKY3, eglin-c, and the chymotrypsin inhibitors were found in analogous positions on their respective binding loops; thus, our calculations identified a functional (energetic) motif that parallels the well-known structural similarity of the binding loops. The delta G values calculated for BPTI complexed with trypsin (-21.7 kcal) and trypsinogen (-23.4 kcal) were similar and close to the experimental delta G value of the trypsin/BPTI complex (-18.1 kcal), lending support to the suggestion that the 10(7) difference in the observed stabilities (KA) of these two complexes reflects the energetic cost of conformational changes induced in trypsinogen during the pre-equilibrium stages of complex formation. In almost all of the complexes studied, the stabilization free energy contributed by the inhibitors was larger than that donated by the enzymes. In the trypsin-BPTI complex, the calculated

  9. The fifth Atomic Energy Research dynamic benchmark calculation with HEXTRAN-SMABRE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haenaelaeinen, Anitta

    1998-01-01

    The fifth Atomic Energy Research dynamic benchmark is the first Atomic Energy Research benchmark for coupling of the thermohydraulic codes and three-dimensional reactor dynamic core models. In VTT HEXTRAN 2.7 is used for the core dynamics and SMABRE 4.6 as a thermohydraulic model for the primary and secondary loops. The plant model for SMABRE is based mainly on two input models. the Loviisa model and standard WWER-440/213 plant model. The primary circuit includes six separate loops, totally 505 nodes and 652 junctions. The reactor pressure vessel is divided into six parallel channels. In HEXTRAN calculation 176 symmetry is used in the core. In the sequence of main steam header break at the hot standby state, the liquid temperature is decreased symmetrically in the core inlet which leads to return to power. In the benchmark, no isolations of the steam generators are assumed and the maximum core power is about 38 % of the nominal power at four minutes after the break opening in the HEXTRAN-SMABRE calculation. Due to boric acid in the high pressure safety injection water, the power finally starts to decrease. The break flow is pure steam in the HEXTRAN-SMABRE calculation during the whole transient even in the swell levels in the steam generators are very high due to flashing. Because of sudden peaks in the preliminary results of the steam generator heat transfer, the SMABRE drift-flux model was modified. The new model is a simplified version of the EPRI correlation based on test data. The modified correlation behaves smoothly. In the calculations nuclear data is based on the ENDF/B-IV library and it has been evaluated with the CASMO-HEX code. The importance of the nuclear data was illustrated by repeating the benchmark calculation with using three different data sets. Optimal extensive data valid from hot to cold conditions were not available for all types of fuel enrichments needed in this benchmark.(Author)

  10. Calculated energy distributions for light 0.25--18-keV ions scattered from solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, J.E.; Harms, A.A.; Karapetsas, S.K.

    1975-01-01

    Scattered energy distributions are calculated for light ions incident on Nb and Mo surfaces of interest for controlled nulcear fusion reactors. The scattered energy is found to vary as a function of the reflection coefficient between a multiple-collision limit at low energies and a single-collision Rutherford scattering limit at high energies. High-energy peaking of the scattered particle distributions is also found for low incident energies

  11. Conformational elasticity can facilitate TALE-DNA recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Hongxing; Sun, Jiya; Baldwin, Enoch P; Segal, David J; Duan, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Sequence-programmable transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins have emerged as a highly efficient tool for genome engineering. Recent crystal structures depict a transition between an open unbound solenoid and more compact DNA-bound solenoid formed by the 34 amino acid repeats. How TALEs switch conformation between these two forms without substantial energetic compensation, and how the repeat-variable di-residues (RVDs) discriminate between the cognate base and other bases still remain unclear. Computational analysis on these two aspects of TALE-DNA interaction mechanism has been conducted in order to achieve a better understanding of the energetics. High elasticity was observed in the molecular dynamics simulations of DNA-free TALE structure that started from the bound conformation where it sampled a wide range of conformations including the experimentally determined apo and bound conformations. This elastic feature was also observed in the simulations starting from the apo form which suggests low free energy barrier between the two conformations and small compensation required upon binding. To analyze binding specificity, we performed free energy calculations of various combinations of RVDs and bases using Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (PBSA) and other approaches. The PBSA calculations indicated that the native RVD-base structures had lower binding free energy than mismatched structures for most of the RVDs examined. Our theoretical analyses provided new insight on the dynamics and energetics of TALE-DNA binding mechanism. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. TASK 2.5.4 DEVELOPMENT OF AN ENERGY SAVINGS CALCULATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, William A [ORNL; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL; Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL; Huang, Joe [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Erdem, Ender [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Ronnen, Levinson [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2010-03-01

    California s major energy utilities and the California Energy Commission (CEC) are seeking to allocate capital that yields the greatest return on investment for energy infrastructure that meets any part of the need for reliable supplies of energy. The utilities are keenly interested in knowing the amount of electrical energy savings that would occur if cool roof color materials are adopted in the building market. To meet this need the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) have been collaborating on a Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) project to develop an industry-consensus energy-savings calculator. The task was coordinated with an ongoing effort supported by the DOE to develop one calculator to achieve both the DOE and the EPA objectives for deployment of cool roof products. Recent emphasis on domestic building energy use has made the work a top priority by the Department of Energy s (DOE) Building Technologies Program. The Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) tool is designed to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors, contractors and practitioners easily run complex simulations. The latest web technologies and usability design were employed to provide an easy input interface to an annual simulation of hour-by-hour, whole-building performance using the world-class simulation tools DOE-2.1E and AtticSim. Building defaults were assigned based on the best available statistical evidence and can provide energy and cost savings after the user selects nothing more than the building location. A key goal for the tool is to promote the energy benefits of cool color tile, metal and asphalt shingle roof products and other energy saving systems. The RSC tool focuses on applications for the roof and attic; however, the code conducts a whole building simulation that puts the energy and heat flows of the roof and attic into the perspective of the whole house. An annual simulation runs in about 30 sec. In addition to cool

  13. High energy nuclear reactions ('Spallation') and their application in calculation of the Acceleration Driven Systems (ADS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, Pedro Carlos Russo

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a study of high energy nuclear reactions which are fundamental to dene the source term in accelerator driven systems. These nuclear reactions, also known as spallation, consist in the interaction of high energetic hadrons with nucleons in the atomic nucleus. The phenomenology of these reactions consist in two step. In the rst, the proton interacts through multiple scattering in a process called intra-nuclear cascade. It is followed by a step in which the excited nucleus, coming from the intranuclear cascade, could either, evaporates particles to achieve a moderate energy state or fission. This process is known as competition between evaporation and fission. In this work the main nuclear models, Bertini and Cugnon are reviewed, since these models are fundamental for design purposes of the source term in ADS, due to lack of evaluated nuclear data for these reactions. The implementation and validation of the calculation methods for the design of the source is carried out to implement the methodology of source design using the program MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended), devoted to calculation of transport of these particles and the validation performed by an international cooperation together with a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) of the International Atomic Energy Agency and available jobs, in order to qualify the calculations on nuclear reactions and the de-excitation channels involved, providing a state of the art of design and methodology for calculating external sources of spallation for source driven systems. The CRISP, is a brazilian code for the phenomenological description of the reactions involved and the models implemented in the code were reviewed and improved to continue the qualification process. Due to failure of the main models in describing the production of light nuclides, the multifragmentation reaction model was studied. Because the discrepancies in the calculations of production of these nuclides are attributes to the

  14. Continuous energy Monte Carlo method based homogenization multi-group constants calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Mancang; Wang Kan; Yao Dong

    2012-01-01

    The efficiency of the standard two-step reactor physics calculation relies on the accuracy of multi-group constants from the assembly-level homogenization process. In contrast to the traditional deterministic methods, generating the homogenization cross sections via Monte Carlo method overcomes the difficulties in geometry and treats energy in continuum, thus provides more accuracy parameters. Besides, the same code and data bank can be used for a wide range of applications, resulting in the versatility using Monte Carlo codes for homogenization. As the first stage to realize Monte Carlo based lattice homogenization, the track length scheme is used as the foundation of cross section generation, which is straight forward. The scattering matrix and Legendre components, however, require special techniques. The Scattering Event method was proposed to solve the problem. There are no continuous energy counterparts in the Monte Carlo calculation for neutron diffusion coefficients. P 1 cross sections were used to calculate the diffusion coefficients for diffusion reactor simulator codes. B N theory is applied to take the leakage effect into account when the infinite lattice of identical symmetric motives is assumed. The MCMC code was developed and the code was applied in four assembly configurations to assess the accuracy and the applicability. At core-level, A PWR prototype core is examined. The results show that the Monte Carlo based multi-group constants behave well in average. The method could be applied to complicated configuration nuclear reactor core to gain higher accuracy. (authors)

  15. Simultaneous escaping of explicit and hidden free energy barriers: application of the orthogonal space random walk strategy in generalized ensemble based conformational sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lianqing; Chen, Mengen; Yang, Wei

    2009-06-21

    To overcome the pseudoergodicity problem, conformational sampling can be accelerated via generalized ensemble methods, e.g., through the realization of random walks along prechosen collective variables, such as spatial order parameters, energy scaling parameters, or even system temperatures or pressures, etc. As usually observed, in generalized ensemble simulations, hidden barriers are likely to exist in the space perpendicular to the collective variable direction and these residual free energy barriers could greatly abolish the sampling efficiency. This sampling issue is particularly severe when the collective variable is defined in a low-dimension subset of the target system; then the "Hamiltonian lagging" problem, which reveals the fact that necessary structural relaxation falls behind the move of the collective variable, may be likely to occur. To overcome this problem in equilibrium conformational sampling, we adopted the orthogonal space random walk (OSRW) strategy, which was originally developed in the context of free energy simulation [L. Zheng, M. Chen, and W. Yang, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 105, 20227 (2008)]. Thereby, generalized ensemble simulations can simultaneously escape both the explicit barriers along the collective variable direction and the hidden barriers that are strongly coupled with the collective variable move. As demonstrated in our model studies, the present OSRW based generalized ensemble treatments show improved sampling capability over the corresponding classical generalized ensemble treatments.

  16. Relative Binding Free Energy Calculations in Drug Discovery: Recent Advances and Practical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cournia, Zoe; Allen, Bryce; Sherman, Woody

    2017-12-26

    Accurate in silico prediction of protein-ligand binding affinities has been a primary objective of structure-based drug design for decades due to the putative value it would bring to the drug discovery process. However, computational methods have historically failed to deliver value in real-world drug discovery applications due to a variety of scientific, technical, and practical challenges. Recently, a family of approaches commonly referred to as relative binding free energy (RBFE) calculations, which rely on physics-based molecular simulations and statistical mechanics, have shown promise in reliably generating accurate predictions in the context of drug discovery projects. This advance arises from accumulating developments in the underlying scientific methods (decades of research on force fields and sampling algorithms) coupled with vast increases in computational resources (graphics processing units and cloud infrastructures). Mounting evidence from retrospective validation studies, blind challenge predictions, and prospective applications suggests that RBFE simulations can now predict the affinity differences for congeneric ligands with sufficient accuracy and throughput to deliver considerable value in hit-to-lead and lead optimization efforts. Here, we present an overview of current RBFE implementations, highlighting recent advances and remaining challenges, along with examples that emphasize practical considerations for obtaining reliable RBFE results. We focus specifically on relative binding free energies because the calculations are less computationally intensive than absolute binding free energy (ABFE) calculations and map directly onto the hit-to-lead and lead optimization processes, where the prediction of relative binding energies between a reference molecule and new ideas (virtual molecules) can be used to prioritize molecules for synthesis. We describe the critical aspects of running RBFE calculations, from both theoretical and applied perspectives

  17. Response surface methodology to simplify calculation of wood energy potency from tropical short rotation coppice species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haqiqi, M. T.; Yuliansyah; Suwinarti, W.; Amirta, R.

    2018-04-01

    Short Rotation Coppice (SRC) system is an option to provide renewable and sustainable feedstock in generating electricity for rural area. Here in this study, we focussed on application of Response Surface Methodology (RSM) to simplify calculation protocols to point out wood chip production and energy potency from some tropical SRC species identified as Bauhinia purpurea, Bridelia tomentosa, Calliandra calothyrsus, Fagraea racemosa, Gliricidia sepium, Melastoma malabathricum, Piper aduncum, Vernonia amygdalina, Vernonia arborea and Vitex pinnata. The result showed that the highest calorific value was obtained from V. pinnata wood (19.97 MJ kg-1) due to its high lignin content (29.84 %, w/w). Our findings also indicated that the use of RSM for estimating energy-electricity of SRC wood had significant term regarding to the quadratic model (R2 = 0.953), whereas the solid-chip ratio prediction was accurate (R2 = 1.000). In the near future, the simple formula will be promising to calculate energy production easily from woody biomass, especially from SRC species.

  18. Gaussian optics calculations of the parameters of a magnetic sector energy analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaluzec, N.J.

    1978-01-01

    The design of a magnetic deflection system for use as an electron energy loss spectrometer can be a complex process if one takes the most general approach. However, for application to materials research the design process can be reduced to three basic steps. First, the qualitative features of the overall system are defined--i.e., incident electron energy, required resolution, type of magnet, the desired focal properties, etc. Secondly, the design parameters necessary to meet these requirements are calculated using the appropriate equations. Finally, once the magnetic field has been specified, ray-tracing techniques can be employed to verify the system response to the conditions defined in the first two steps. The calculation of the parameters of a uniform field magnetic sector analyzer capable of energy resolutions of 20 ppM or better are considered. Higher resolution is attainable; however, for most materials work, more important considerations are the attainment of double focusing to improve S/N, the minimization of aberrations and the achievement of a flat image plane to facilitate parallel data recording

  19. CALCULATING ENERGY STORAGE DUE TO TOPOLOGICAL CHANGES IN EMERGING ACTIVE REGION NOAA AR 11112

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarr, Lucas; Longcope, Dana

    2012-01-01

    The minimum current corona model provides a way to estimate stored coronal energy using the number of field lines connecting regions of positive and negative photospheric flux. This information is quantified by the net flux connecting pairs of opposing regions in a connectivity matrix. Changes in the coronal magnetic field, due to processes such as magnetic reconnection, manifest themselves as changes in the connectivity matrix. However, the connectivity matrix will also change when flux sources emerge or submerge through the photosphere, as often happens in active regions. We have developed an algorithm to estimate the changes in flux due to emergence and submergence of magnetic flux sources. These estimated changes must be accounted for in order to quantify storage and release of magnetic energy in the corona. To perform this calculation over extended periods of time, we must additionally have a consistently labeled connectivity matrix over the entire observational time span. We have therefore developed an automated tracking algorithm to generate a consistent connectivity matrix as the photospheric source regions evolve over time. We have applied this method to NOAA Active Region 11112, which underwent a GOES M2.9 class flare around 19:00 on 2010 October 16th, and calculated a lower bound on the free magnetic energy buildup of ∼8.25 × 10 30 erg over 3 days.

  20. Final results of the fifth three-dimensional dynamic Atomic Energy Research benchmark problem calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadek, J.

    1999-01-01

    The paper gives a brief survey of the fifth three-dimensional dynamic Atomic Energy Research benchmark calculation results received with the code DYN3D/ATHLET at NRI Rez. This benchmark was defined at the seventh Atomic Energy Research Symposium (Hoernitz near Zittau, 1997). Its initiating event is a symmetrical break of the main steam header at the end of the first fuel cycle and hot shutdown conditions with one stuck out control rod group. The calculations were performed with the externally coupled codes ATHLET Mod.1.1 Cycle C and DYN3DH1.1/M3. The standard WWER-440/213 input deck of ATHLET code was adopted for benchmark purposes and for coupling with the code DYN3D. The first part of paper contains a brief characteristics of NPP input deck and reactor core model. The second part shows the time dependencies of important global and local parameters. In comparison with the results published at the eighth Atomic Energy Research Symposium (Bystrice nad Pernstejnem, 1998), the results published in this paper are based on improved ATHLET descriptions of control and safety systems. (Author)

  1. Energy-level alignment in organic dye-sensitized TiO2 from GW calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umari, P; Giacomazzi, L; De Angelis, F; Pastore, M; Baroni, Stefano

    2013-07-07

    The electronic energy levels of some representative isolated and oxide-supported organic dyes, relevant for photovoltaic applications, are investigated using many-body perturbation theory within the GW approximation. We consider a set of all-organic dyes (denominated L0, L2, L3, and L4) featuring the same donor and anchor groups and differing for the linker moieties. We first calculate the energy levels of the isolated molecules, thus allowing us to address the effects of the different linker groups, and resulting in good agreement with photo-electron spectroscopic and electrochemical data. We then consider the L0 dye adsorbed on the (101) surface of anatase-TiO2. We find a density of occupied states in agreement with experimental photo-electron data. The HOMO-LUMO energy gap of the L0 dye is found to be reduced by ~1 eV upon adsorption. Our results validate the reliability of GW calculations for photovoltaic applications and point to their potential as a powerful tool for the screening and rational design of new components of electrochemical solar cells.

  2. First lattice calculation of the B-meson binding and kinetic energies

    CERN Document Server

    Crisafulli, M; Martinelli, G; Sachrajda, Christopher T C

    1995-01-01

    We present the first lattice calculation of the B-meson binding energy \\labar and of the kinetic energy -\\lambda_1/2 m_Q of the heavy-quark inside the pseudoscalar B-meson. This calculation has required the non-perturbative subtraction of the power divergences present in matrix elements of the Lagrangian operator \\bar h D_4 h and of the kinetic energy operator \\bar h \\vec D^2 h. The non-perturbative renormalisation of the relevant operators has been implemented by imposing suitable renormalisation conditions on quark matrix elements, in the Landau gauge. Our numerical results have been obtained from several independent numerical simulations at \\beta=6.0 and 6.2, and using, for the meson correlators, the results obtained by the APE group at the same values of \\beta. Our best estimate, obtained by combining results at different values of \\beta, is \\labar =190 \\err{50}{30} MeV. For the \\overline{MS} running mass, we obtain \\overline {m}_b(\\overline {m}_b) =4.17 \\pm 0.06 GeV, in reasonable agreement with previous...

  3. BFEE: A User-Friendly Graphical Interface Facilitating Absolute Binding Free-Energy Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Haohao; Gumbart, James C; Chen, Haochuan; Shao, Xueguang; Cai, Wensheng; Chipot, Christophe

    2018-03-26

    Quantifying protein-ligand binding has attracted the attention of both theorists and experimentalists for decades. Many methods for estimating binding free energies in silico have been reported in recent years. Proper use of the proposed strategies requires, however, adequate knowledge of the protein-ligand complex, the mathematical background for deriving the underlying theory, and time for setting up the simulations, bookkeeping, and postprocessing. Here, to minimize human intervention, we propose a toolkit aimed at facilitating the accurate estimation of standard binding free energies using a geometrical route, coined the binding free-energy estimator (BFEE), and introduced it as a plug-in of the popular visualization program VMD. Benefitting from recent developments in new collective variables, BFEE can be used to generate the simulation input files, based solely on the structure of the complex. Once the simulations are completed, BFEE can also be utilized to perform the post-treatment of the free-energy calculations, allowing the absolute binding free energy to be estimated directly from the one-dimensional potentials of mean force in simulation outputs. The minimal amount of human intervention required during the whole process combined with the ergonomic graphical interface makes BFEE a very effective and practical tool for the end-user.

  4. Conformality lost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, David B.; Lee, Jong-Wan; Son, Dam T.; Stephanov, Mikhail A.

    2009-01-01

    We consider zero-temperature transitions from conformal to nonconformal phases in quantum theories. We argue that there are three generic mechanisms for the loss of conformality in any number of dimensions: (i) fixed point goes to zero coupling, (ii) fixed point runs off to infinite coupling, or (iii) an IR fixed point annihilates with a UV fixed point and they both disappear into the complex plane. We give both relativistic and nonrelativistic examples of the last case in various dimensions and show that the critical behavior of the mass gap behaves similarly to the correlation length in the finite temperature Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) phase transition in two dimensions, ξ∼exp(c/|T-T c | 1/2 ). We speculate that the chiral phase transition in QCD at large number of fermion flavors belongs to this universality class, and attempt to identify the UV fixed point that annihilates with the Banks-Zaks fixed point at the lower end of the conformal window.

  5. [Energy and memory efficient calculation of the accommodation demand in the artificial accommodation system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, J A; Beck, C; Harms, H; Stiller, P; Guth, H; Stachs, O; Bretthauer, G

    2010-12-01

    Presbyopia and cataract are gaining more and more importance in the ageing society. Both age-related complaints are accompanied with a loss of the eye's ability to accommodate. A new approach to restore accommodation is the Artificial Accommodation System, an autonomous micro system, which will be implanted into the capsular bag instead of a rigid intraocular lens. The Artificial Accommodation System will, depending on the actual demand for accommodation, autonomously adapt the refractive power of its integrated optical element. One possibility to measure the demand for accommodation non-intrusively is to analyse eye movements. We present an efficient algorithm, based on the CORDIC technique, to calculate the demand for accommodation from magnetic field sensor data. It can be shown that specialised algorithms significantly shorten calculation time without violating precision requirements. Additionally, a communication strategy for the wireless exchange of sensor data between the implants of the left and right eye is introduced. The strategy allows for a one-sided calculation of the demand for accommodation, resulting in an overall reduction of calculation time by 50 %. The presented methods enable autonomous microsystems, such as the Artificial Accommodation System, to save significant amounts of energy, leading to extended autonomous run-times. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Monte Carlo calculation of scattered radiation from applicators in low energy clinical electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabbari, N.; Hashemi-Malayeri, B.; Farajollahi, A. R.; Kazemnejad, A.

    2007-01-01

    In radiotherapy with electron beams, scattered radiation from an electron applicator influences the dose distribution in the patient. The contribution of this radiation to the patient dose is significant, even in modern accelerators. In most of radiotherapy treatment planning systems, this component is not explicitly included. In addition, the scattered radiation produced by applicators varies based on the applicator design as well as the field size and distance from the applicators. The aim of this study was to calculate the amount of scattered dose contribution from applicators. We also tried to provide an extensive set of calculated data that could be used as input or benchmark data for advanced treatment planning systems that use Monte Carlo algorithms for dose distribution calculations. Electron beams produced by a NEPTUN 10PC medical linac were modeled using the BEAMnrc system. Central axis depth dose curves of the electron beams were measured and calculated, with and without the applicators in place, for different field sizes and energies. The scattered radiation from the applicators was determined by subtracting the central axis depth dose curves obtained without the applicators from that with the applicator. The results of this study indicated that the scattered radiation from the electron applicators of the NEPTUN 10PC is significant and cannot be neglected in advanced treatment planning systems. Furthermore, our results showed that the scattered radiation depends on the field size and decreases almost linearly with depth. (author)

  7. Assessing the stability of free-energy perturbation calculations by performing variations in the method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, Francesco; Ryde, Ulf

    2018-03-01

    We have calculated relative binding affinities for eight tetrafluorophenyl-triazole-thiogalactoside inhibitors of galectin-3 with the alchemical free-energy perturbation approach. We obtain a mean absolute deviation from experimental estimates of only 2-3 kJ/mol and a correlation coefficient (R 2) of 0.5-0.8 for seven relative affinities spanning a range of up to 11 kJ/mol. We also studied the effect of using different methods to calculate the charges of the inhibitor and different sizes of the perturbed group (the atoms that are described by soft-core potentials and are allowed to have differing coordinates). However, the various approaches gave rather similar results and it is not possible to point out one approach as consistently and significantly better than the others. Instead, we suggest that such small and reasonable variations in the computational method can be used to check how stable the calculated results are and to obtain a more accurate estimate of the uncertainty than if performing only one calculation with a single computational setup.

  8. Conventional method for the calculation of the global energy cost of buildings; Methode conventionnelle de calcul du cout global energetique des batiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-05-01

    A working group driven by Electricite de France (EdF), Chauffage Fioul and Gaz de France (GdF) companies has been built with the sustain of several building engineering companies in order to clarify the use of the method of calculation of the global energy cost of buildings. This global cost is an economical decision help criterion among others. This press kit presents, first, the content of the method (input data, calculation of annual expenses, calculation of the global energy cost, display of results and limitations of the method). Then it fully describes the method and its appendixes necessary for its implementation: economical and financial context, general data of the project in progress, environmental data, occupation and comfort level, variants, investment cost of energy systems, investment cost for the structure linked with the energy system, investment cost for other invariant elements of the structure, calculation of consumptions (space heating, hot water, ventilation), maintenance costs (energy systems, structure), operation and exploitation costs, tariffs and consumption costs and taxes, actualized global cost, annualized global cost, comparison between variants. The method is applied to a council building of 23 flats taken as an example. (J.S.)

  9. Recent advancements in conformal gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Brien, James G.; Chaykov, Spasen S.; Moss, Robert J.; Dentico, Jeremy; Stulge, Modestas; Stefanski, Brian

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, due to the lack of direct observed evidence of cold dark matter, coupled with the shrinking parameter space to search for new dark matter particles, there has been increased interest in Alternative Gravitational theories. This paper, addresses three recent advances in conformal gravity, a fourth order renormalizable metric theory of gravitation originally formulated by Weyl, and later advanced by Mannheim and Kazanas. The first section of the paper applies conformal gravity to the rotation curves of the LITTLE THINGS survey, extending the total number of rotation curves successfully fit by conformal gravity to well over 200 individual data sets without the need for additional dark matter. Further, in this rotation curve study, we show how MOND and conformal gravity compare for each galaxy in the sample. Second, we look at the original Zwicky problem of applying the virial theorem to the Coma cluster in order to get an estimate for the cluster mass. However, instead of using the standard Newtonian potential, here we use the weak field approximation of conformal gravity. We show that in the conformal case we can get a much smaller mass estimate and thus there is no apparent need to include dark matter. We then show that this calculation is in agreement with the observational data from other well studied clusters. Last, we explore the calculation of the deflection of starlight through conformal gravity, as a first step towards applying conformal gravity to gravitaitonal lensing. (paper)

  10. Conformers, infrared spectrum, UV-induced photochemistry, and near-IR-induced generation of two rare conformers of matrix-isolated phenylglycine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borba, Ana; Gómez-Zavaglia, Andrea; Fausto, Rui

    2014-10-01

    The conformational space of α-phenylglycine (PG) have been investigated theoretically at both the DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) and MP2/6-311++G(d,p) levels of approximation. Seventeen different minima were found on the investigated potential energy surfaces, which are characterized by different dominant intramolecular interactions: type I conformers are stabilized by hydrogen bonds of the type N-H...O=C, type II by a strong O-H...N hydrogen bond, type III by weak N-H...O-H hydrogen bonds, and type IV by a C=O...H-C contact. The calculations indicate also that entropic effects are relevant in determining the equilibrium populations of the conformers of PG in the gas phase, in particular in the case of conformers of type II, where the strong intramolecular O-H...N hydrogen bond considerably diminishes entropy by reducing the conformational mobility of the molecule. In consonance with the relative energies of the conformers and barriers for conformational interconversion, only 3 conformers of PG were observed for the compound isolated in cryogenic Ar, Xe, and N2 matrices: the conformational ground state (ICa), and forms ICc and IITa. All other significantly populated conformers existing in the gas phase prior to deposition convert either to conformer ICa or to conformer ICc during matrix deposition. The experimental observation of ICc had never been achieved hitherto. Narrowband near-IR irradiation of the first overtone of νOH vibrational mode of ICa and ICc in nitrogen matrices (at 6910 and 6930 cm-1, respectively) led to selective generation of two additional conformers of high-energy, ITc and ITa, respectively, which were also observed experimentally for the first time. In addition, these experiments also provided the key information for the detailed vibrational characterization of the 3 conformers initially present in the matrices. On the other hand, UV irradiation (λ = 255 nm) of PG isolated in a xenon matrix revealed that PG undergoes facile photofragmentation

  11. Conformers, infrared spectrum, UV-induced photochemistry, and near-IR-induced generation of two rare conformers of matrix-isolated phenylglycine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borba, Ana; Fausto, Rui; Gómez-Zavaglia, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The conformational space of α-phenylglycine (PG) have been investigated theoretically at both the DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) and MP2/6-311++G(d,p) levels of approximation. Seventeen different minima were found on the investigated potential energy surfaces, which are characterized by different dominant intramolecular interactions: type I conformers are stabilized by hydrogen bonds of the type N–H···O=C, type II by a strong O–H···N hydrogen bond, type III by weak N–H···O–H hydrogen bonds, and type IV by a C=O···H–C contact. The calculations indicate also that entropic effects are relevant in determining the equilibrium populations of the conformers of PG in the gas phase, in particular in the case of conformers of type II, where the strong intramolecular O–H···N hydrogen bond considerably diminishes entropy by reducing the conformational mobility of the molecule. In consonance with the relative energies of the conformers and barriers for conformational interconversion, only 3 conformers of PG were observed for the compound isolated in cryogenic Ar, Xe, and N 2 matrices: the conformational ground state (ICa), and forms ICc and IITa. All other significantly populated conformers existing in the gas phase prior to deposition convert either to conformer ICa or to conformer ICc during matrix deposition. The experimental observation of ICc had never been achieved hitherto. Narrowband near-IR irradiation of the first overtone of νOH vibrational mode of ICa and ICc in nitrogen matrices (at 6910 and 6930 cm −1 , respectively) led to selective generation of two additional conformers of high-energy, ITc and ITa, respectively, which were also observed experimentally for the first time. In addition, these experiments also provided the key information for the detailed vibrational characterization of the 3 conformers initially present in the matrices. On the other hand, UV irradiation (λ = 255 nm) of PG isolated in a xenon matrix revealed that PG

  12. A practical approach for the calculation of the activation energy of the sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouchly Vaclav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Newly developed software for calculation of activation energy (Qs in the following of sintering using the Wang and Raj model is presented. To demonstrate the practical potential of the software and to evaluate the behaviour of the Qs during the sintering process, alumina and cubic zirconia ceramic compacts were prepared from nanometric powders. The results obtained with both materials are in agreement with previously published data calculated by different approaches. In the interval of interest (relative densities from 60 % to almost 100 % of theoretical density, both materials show similar behaviour. Three distinct regions can be seen: the initial constant values of Qs 868 kJ/mol and 762 kJ/mol for alumina and cubic zirconia, respectively; a region containing linear drop of Qs and the final region of constant Qs values 625 kJ/mol and 645 kJ/mol for alumina and cubic zirconia, respectively.

  13. Energy-efficient and preservable windows. Measurements and calculations; Energieffektive bevaringsverdige vinduer. Maalinger og beregninger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homb, Anders; Uvsloekk, Sivert

    2012-11-01

    SINTEF has carried out a project for Cultural Heritage and Enova to document specific qualities of energy-efficient and preservable windows. The work has been based on an older type two-rams window with simple frames and one glass divided into three squares of horizontal crossbars. There were produced two kinds of commodity window, respectively, with single glazing with Insulating. Measurements and calculations have been performed with two different distances from the outer glass to the last frame. The project had the following contents: Measurements of the U-value, Calculation of U-value of accurate and simplified method, Measurements of air density and drying ability, Measurement and evaluation of sound insulation, Estimation of the heat balance (eb)

  14. Blinded evaluation of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) ligands binding using molecular docking and free energy calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selwa, Edithe; Elisée, Eddy; Zavala, Agustin; Iorga, Bogdan I.

    2018-01-01

    Our participation to the D3R Grand Challenge 2 involved a protocol in two steps, with an initial analysis of the available structural data from the PDB allowing the selection of the most appropriate combination of docking software and scoring function. Subsequent docking calculations showed that the pose prediction can be carried out with a certain precision, but this is dependent on the specific nature of the ligands. The correct ranking of docking poses is still a problem and cannot be successful in the absence of good pose predictions. Our free energy calculations on two different subsets provided contrasted results, which might have the origin in non-optimal force field parameters associated with the sulfonamide chemical moiety.

  15. Calculations of nucleus-nucleus microscopic optical potentials at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, K.M.; Kuhtina, I.N.; Lukyanov, K.V.; Lukyanov, V.K.; Zemlyanaya, E.V.; Slowinski, B.

    2006-01-01

    Three types of microscopic nucleus-nucleus optical potentials are constructed using three patterns for their real and imaginary parts. Two of these patterns are the real V H and imaginary W H parts of the potential which reproduces the high-energy amplitude of scattering in the microscopic Glauber-Sitenko theory. Another template VDF is calculated within the standard double-folding model with the exchange term included. For either of the three tested potentials, the contribution of real and imaginary patterns is adjusted by introducing two fitted factors. Correspondingly, using numerical code ECIS, the elastic differential cross-sections were fitted to the experimental data on scattering of the 16,17 O heavy-ions at about hundred Mev/nucleon on various target-nuclei. The relativization effect is also included. The tables of the obtained factors which renormalize the strengths of the real and (or) imaginary parts of the calculated microscopic potentials are given

  16. Monte Carlo calculations of neutron and gamm-ray energy spectra for fusion-reactor shield design: comparison with experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, R.T.; Barnes, J.M.

    1983-08-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray spectra resulting from the interactions of approx. 14-MeV neutrons in laminated slabs of stainless steel type-304 and borated polyethylene have been calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP. The calculated spectra are compared with measured data as a function of slab thickness and material composition and as a function of detector location behind the slabs. Comparisons of the differential energy spectra are made for neutrons with energies above 850 keV and for gamma rays with energies above 750 keV. The measured neutron spectra and those calculated using Monte Carlo methods agree within 5% to 50% depending on the slab thickness and composition and neutron energy. The agreement between the measured and calculated gamma-ray energy spectra is also within this range. The MCNP data are also in favorable agreement with attenuated data calculated previously by discrete ordinates transport methods and the Monte Carlo code SAM-CE

  17. Simulation calculation for the energy deposition profile and the transmission fraction of intense pulsed electron beam at various incident angles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Hailiang; Qiu Aici; Zhang Jiasheng; Huang Jianjun; Sun Jianfeng

    2002-01-01

    The incident angles have a heavy effect on the intense pulsed electron beam energy deposition profile, energy deposition fraction and beam current transmission fraction in material. The author presents electron beam energy deposition profile and energy deposition fraction versus electron energy (0.5-2.0 MeV), at various incident angles for three aluminum targets of various thickness via theoretical calculation. The intense pulsed electron beam current transmission fractions versus electron energy (0.4-1.4 MeV) at various incident angles for three thickness of carbon targets were also theoretically calculated. The calculation results indicate that the deposition energy in unit mass of material surface layer increase with the rise of electron beam incident angle, and electron beam with low incident angle (closer to normal incident angle) penetrates deeper into the target material. The electron beams deposit more energy in unit mass of material surface layer at 60 degree-70 degree incident angle

  18. Relativistic coupled-cluster calculations of 20Ne, 40Ar, 84Kr, and 129Xe: Correlation energies and dipole polarizabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mani, B. K.; Angom, D.; Latha, K. V. P.

    2009-01-01

    We have carried out a detailed and systematic study of the correlation energies of inert gas atoms Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe using relativistic many-body perturbation theory and relativistic coupled-cluster theory. In the relativistic coupled-cluster calculations, we implement perturbative triples and include these in the correlation energy calculations. We then calculate the dipole polarizability of the ground states using perturbed coupled-cluster theory.

  19. Calculation of nuclear data for incident energies to 200 MeV with the FKK-GNASH code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadwick, M.B.; Young, P.G.

    1993-02-01

    We describe how the FKK-GNASH code system has been extended to calculate nucleon-induced reactions up to 200 MeV, and used to predict (p,xn) and (p,xp) cross sections on 208 Pb at incident energies of 25, 45, 80 and 160 MeV, for an intermediate energy code intercomparison. Details of the reaction mechanisms calculated by FKK-GNASH are given, and the calculational procedure is described

  20. Fluorescein isothiocyanate: Molecular characterization by theoretical calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casanovas, Jordi [Departament de Quimica, Escola Politecnica Superior, Universitat de Lleida, c/Jaume II No 69, Lleida E-25001 (Spain); Jacquemin, Denis [Laboratoire de Chimie Theorique Appliquee, Facultes Universitaires Notre-Dame de la Paix, rue de Bruxelles, 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium)], E-mail: denis.jacquemin@fundp.ac.be; Perpete, Eric A. [Laboratoire de Chimie Theorique Appliquee, Facultes Universitaires Notre-Dame de la Paix, rue de Bruxelles, 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Aleman, Carlos [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, E. T. S. d' Enginyeria Industrial de Barcelona, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain)], E-mail: carlos.aleman@upc.edu

    2008-12-10

    Quantum mechanical calculations have been used to investigate the conformation, molecular geometry, basicity and spectroscopic properties of fluorescein isothiocyanate in both the gas-phase and aqueous solution. Specifically, calculations have been performed considering the neutral, monoanionic and dianionic forms of this important fluorescent compound. Results reveal that for the neutral form multiple conformational states are possible, all them with significant contributions, and the stability of the different conformers is similar in the gas-phase and aqueous solution. Calculation of the excitation energies revealed that spectroscopic properties are very sensitive to the relaxation effect in solution. A good agreement has been reached obtained between the experimental and theoretical values derived from time-dependent density functional theory methods for the neutral form, whereas for charged species the calculations fail to accurately reproduce the measured trends.