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Sample records for calcrete-gypcrete uranium model

  1. Possible variations on the calcrete-gypcrete uranium model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genetic models and favorability criteria for calcrete and gypcrete uranium deposits based upon Yeelirrie and other occurrences in Western Australia and upon Langer Henirich and others in Namibia-South West Africa are summarized. Viable analogues of these world-class deposits have not yet been found in USA even though several of the favorable conditions occur in the southwest. A principal deterrent to economic concentration has been tectonic instability. But even in the most favorable areas it is not clear that climates have ever been sufficiently similar to that of the valley-calcrete region of Western Australia. Extensive, thick valley (nonpedogenic) calcretes such as those which host the carnotite in Australia and in Namibia have not been documented here. Nevertheless, submarginal occurrances of carnotite have been found in southwestern United States in small bodies of nonpedogenic and mixed pedogenic-nonpedogenic calcrete. Much of the study is based upon occurrences of carnotite-bearing calcrete and calcrete-gypcrete in the Republic of South Africa. Several of these are described briefly. Some reference is also made to new occurrences and to new data on previously described occurrences on the Namib Desert. Possible variations on the Western Australian and Namibia-South West Africa models which are considered are capillary rise of U in solution, addition of new uraniferous sediment over a calcrete, lateral access of U into a pedogenic calcrete, reworking of U from a weekly mineralized pedogenic calcrete or gypcrete into a new or reconstituted calcrete, or into an unrelated environment for fixation of U

  2. NURE uranium deposit model studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program has sponsored uranium deposit model studies by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (Bendix), the US Geological Survey (USGS), and numerous subcontractors. This paper deals only with models from the following six reports prepared by Samuel S. Adams and Associates: GJBX-1(81) - Geology and Recognition Criteria for Roll-Type Uranium Deposits in Continental Sandstones; GJBX-2(81) - Geology and Recognition Criteria for Uraniferous Humate Deposits, Grants Uranium Region, New Mexico; GJBX-3(81) - Geology and Recognition Criteria for Uranium Deposits of the Quartz-Pebble Conglomerate Type; GJBX-4(81) - Geology and Recognition Criteria for Sandstone Uranium Deposits in Mixed Fluvial-Shallow Marine Sedimentary Sequences, South Texas; GJBX-5(81) - Geology and Recognition Criteria for Veinlike Uranium Deposits of the Lower to Middle Proterozoic Unconformity and Strata-Related Types; GJBX-6(81) - Geology and Recognition Criteria for Sandstone Uranium Deposits of the Salt Wash Type, Colorado Plateau Province. A unique feature of these models is the development of recognition criteria in a systematic fashion, with a method for quantifying the various items. The recognition-criteria networks are used in this paper to illustrate the various types of deposits

  3. An analytic uranium sources model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents a method for estimating uranium resources as a continuous function of extraction costs and describing the uncertainty in the resulting fit. The estimated functions provide convenient extrapolations of currently available data on uranium extraction cost and can be used to predict the effect of resource depletion on future uranium supply costs. As such, they are a useful input for economic models of the nuclear energy sector. The method described here pays careful attention to minimizing built-in biases in the fitting procedure and defines ways to describe the uncertainty in the resulting fits in order to render the procedure and its results useful to the widest possible variety of potential users. (author)

  4. Geomigration model of uranium transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on geologic structure and radiation environment in the vicinity of the tailings storage facility (TSF) of Kara-Balta uranium hydrometallurgical factory in Kyrgyzstan were used to design a mathematical model of physical processes of wind erosion from the surface of TSF. Numerical calculations have been performed to describe prevalence of contamination due to wind erosion in the environs of Kara-Balta

  5. Improved mathematical model for uranium metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved mathematical model for uranium metabolism in the primate was developed. Animal and human literature data were the basis for building the model consisting of six compartments: plasma, red cells, short-term bone component, long-term bone component, kidney, and urine. In this model, there is a feedback from the red cells and bone compartments to plasma, and the model is applicable to uranium only from the time it is absorbed into blood. An analytical mathematical solution is proposed that will permit estimation of the distribution of uranium among the various compartments. To verify the model and determine the required time constants, single non-toxic doses of uranium were administered to baboons and plasma, red cells, and urine samples subsequently analyzed. Samples of human skeleton were also measured for normal levels of uranium. These measurements will be used to test whether the model accurately predicts long-term bond concentration. Uranium exists in the mammalian body as the hexavalent uranyl ion which tends to complex with plasma proteins or bicarbonates. Animal experiments indicate that after an iv injection, uranium leaves the bloodstream very rapidly; at 40 min after injection, 50% has been excreted in the urine, with little uranium in tissue other than kidney and bone. The distribution of uranium in humans is similar to that in animals. There was no significant concentration of uranium in any of 21 human tissues and organs, apart from bone and kidney, examined at autopsy

  6. Economic model of the US uranium market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An economic model of the US uranium market is developed using annual data for the period 1966-81. The model consists of five stochastic equations explaining uranium consumption, forward commitments, mine production, contract prices, and spot prices. A forecasting exercise is also undertaken. By way of essential background information, however, an analysis of current trends in the international uranium market is given, followed by a summary of historical price movements in the US uranium market. A brief discussion on the current state of the US market precedes the statistical analysis. 19 footnotes and references, 3 tables

  7. A Mine-Based Uranium Market Clearing Model

    OpenAIRE

    Aris Auzans; Erich A. Schneider; Robert Flanagan; Tkaczyk, Alan H.

    2014-01-01

    Economic analysis and market simulation tools are used to evaluate uranium (U) supply shocks, sale or purchase of uranium stockpiles, or market effects of new uranium mines or enrichment technologies. This work expands on an existing U market model that couples the market for primary U from uranium mines with those of secondary uranium, e.g., depleted uranium (DU) upgrading or highly enriched uranium (HEU) down blending, and enrichment services. This model accounts for the interdependence bet...

  8. Documentation of the Uranium Market Model (UMM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Uranium Market Model is used to make projections of activity in the US uranium mining and milling industry. The primary data sources were EIA, the Nuclear Assurance Corporation, and, to a lesser extent, Nuexco and Nuclear Resources International. The Uranium Market Model is a microeconomic simulation model in which uranium supplied by the mining and milling industry is provided to meet the demand for uranium by electric utilities with nuclear power plants. Uranium is measured on a U3O8 (uranium oxide) equivalent basis. The model considers every major production center and utility on a worldwide basis (with Centrally Planned Economies considered in a limited way), and makes annual projections for each major uranium production and consumption region in the world. Typically, nine regions are used: the United States, Canada, Australia, South Africa, Other Africa, Europe, Latin America, the Far East, and Other. Production centers and utilities are identified as being in one of these regions. In general, the model can accommodate any user-provided set of regional definitions and data

  9. Fractal kinetic model for heap leaching of uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By using fractal dimensions of the full particle size distribution instead of average particle size, the analytical models describing heap leaching of uranium ore which were presented by Mellado et al, were improved. Meanwhile, the relationships between the model parameters of the fractal kinetic model for heap leaching of uranium ore and the fractal dimension of uranium ore were determined by column leaching experiments, and then a fractal kinetic model for heap leaching of uranium ore was established, and was further verified by column leaching experiments. The result shows that the fractal kinetic model can well reflect the law of uranium metal leaching of heap leaching of uranium ore. (authors)

  10. Improved ionic model of liquid uranium dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gryaznov, [No Value; Iosilevski, [No Value; Yakub, E; Fortov, [No Value; Hyland, GJ; Ronchi, C

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents a model for liquid uranium dioxide, obtained by improving a simplified ionic model, previously adopted to describe the equation of state of this substance [1]. A "chemical picture" is used for liquid UO2 of stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric composition. Several ionic species a

  11. Uraniferous surficial deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a result of the discovery of uranium in surficial deposits of Tertiary to Recent age, in Australia and Southern Africa, increasing attention is being paid to the location and understanding of the genesis of these deposits. The paper discusses the definitions and terminology currently in use and a classification of these deposits is presented. It is concluded that in order to obtain a measure of clarity, the terms calcrete, gypcrete and dolocrete should not be used to describe the uraniferous valley-fill deposits of Southern Africa and Australia

  12. Modeling of uranium bioleaching by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A mathematical model for the mesophilic bioleaching of uraninite is introduced. ► New rate expressions are used for the iron precipitation and uranium leaching rates. ► Good fits of the model are obtained, while the values of the parameters are within the range expected. ► The model can be applied to other bioleaching processes under the same conditions. - Abstract: In this paper, a mathematical model for the mesophilic bioleaching of uraninite is developed. The case of constant temperature, pH, and initial ore concentration is considered. The model is validated by comparing the calculated and measured values of uranium extraction, ferric and ferrous iron in solution, and cell concentration. Good fits of the model were obtained, while the values of the parameters were within the range expected. New rate expressions were used for the iron precipitation and uranium leaching rates. The rates of chemical leaching and ferric precipitation are related to the ratio of ferric to ferrous in solution. The fitted parameters can be considered applicable only to this study. In contrast, the model equation is general and can be applied to bioleaching under the same conditions.

  13. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article includes a historical preface about uranium, discovery of portability of sequential fission of uranium, uranium existence, basic raw materials, secondary raw materials, uranium's physical and chemical properties, uranium extraction, nuclear fuel cycle, logistics and estimation of the amount of uranium reserves, producing countries of concentrated uranium oxides and percentage of the world's total production, civilian and military uses of uranium. The use of depleted uranium in the Gulf War, the Balkans and Iraq has caused political and environmental effects which are complex, raising problems and questions about the effects that nuclear compounds left on human health and environment.

  14. Modelling a uranium ore bioleaching process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dynamic simulation model for the bioleaching of uranium ore in a stope leaching process has been developed. The model incorporates design and operating conditions, reaction kinetics enhanced by Thiobacillus ferroxidans present in the leaching solution and transport properties. Model predictions agree well with experimental data with an average deviation of about ± 3%. The model is sensitive to small errors in the estimates of fragment size and ore grade. Because accurate estimates are difficult to obtain a parameter estimation approach was developed to update the value of fragment size and ore grade using on-line plant information

  15. Modelling study on uranium migration in rocks under weathering condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A modelling study has been completed to understand the effect of rock alteration on uranium migration at the Koongarra ore deposit, Australia. The model considers the weathering process, the mechanism and rate of chlorite alteration, a major mineral of the host rock, and assumes the presence of reversible sorption sites of chlorite and the presence of reversible and irreversible sorption sites of the weathering products. One- and two-dimensional, calculated uranium concentrations were compared with those observed. Good agreement between the calculated and observed uranium concentration profiles was obtained only when an appropriate fraction of uranium is fixed to the irreversible sorption sites of Fe-minerals produced during weathering of chlorite. On the other hand, the conventional Kd model failed to estimate an adequate uranium concentration profile. The results suggest that the fixation of uranium to Fe-minerals has dominated the migration of uranium in the vicinity of the Koongarra ore deposit

  16. A Mine-Based Uranium Market Clearing Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aris Auzans

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Economic analysis and market simulation tools are used to evaluate uranium (U supply shocks, sale or purchase of uranium stockpiles, or market effects of new uranium mines or enrichment technologies. This work expands on an existing U market model that couples the market for primary U from uranium mines with those of secondary uranium, e.g., depleted uranium (DU upgrading or highly enriched uranium (HEU down blending, and enrichment services. This model accounts for the interdependence between the primary U supply on the U market price, the economic characteristics of each individual U mine, sources of secondary supply, and the U enrichment market. This work defines a procedure for developing an aggregate supply curve for primary uranium from marginal cost curves for individual firms (Uranium mines. Under this model, market conditions drive individual mines’ startup and short- and long-term shutdown decisions. It is applied to the uranium industry for the period 2010–2030 in order to illustrate the evolution of the front end markets under conditions of moderate growth in demand for nuclear fuel. The approach is applicable not only to uranium mines but also other facilities and reactors within the nuclear economy that may be modeled as independent, decision-making entities inside a nuclear fuel cycle simulator.

  17. Radiological modeling software for underground uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian Institute for Radiation Safety (CAIRS) has developed computer simulation software for modeling radiological parameters in underground uranium mines. The computer program, called 3d RAD, allows radiation protection professionals and mine ventilation engineers to quickly simulate radon and radon progeny activity concentrations and potential alpha energy concentrations in complex mine networks. The simulation component of 3d RAD, called RSOLVER, is an adaptation of an existing modeling program called VENTRAD, originally developed at Queen's University, Ontario. Based on user defined radiation source terms and network physical properties, radiological parameters in the network are calculated iteratively by solving Bateman's Equations in differential form. The 3d RAD user interface was designed in cooperation with the Canada Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology (CANMET) to improve program functionality and to make 3d RAD compatible with the CANMET ventilation simulation program, 3d CANVENT. The 3d RAD program was tested using physical data collected in Canadian uranium mines. 3d RAD predictions were found to agree well with theoretical calculations and simulation results obtained from other modeling programs such as VENTRAD. Agreement with measured radon and radon progeny levels was also observed. However, the level of agreement was found to depend heavily on the precision of source term data, and on the measurement protocol used to collect radon and radon progeny levels for comparison with the simulation results. The design and development of 3d RAD was carried out under contract with the Saskatchewan government

  18. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the worldwide revival of nuclear energy comes the question of uranium reserves. For more than 20 years, nuclear energy has been neglected and uranium prospecting has been practically abandoned. Therefore, present day production covers only 70% of needs and stocks are decreasing. Production is to double by 2030 which represents a huge industrial challenge. The FBR-type reactors technology, which allows to consume the whole uranium content of the fuel, is developing in several countries and will ensure the long-term development of nuclear fission. However, the implementation of these reactors (the generation 4) will be progressive during the second half of the 21. century. For this reason an active search for uranium ores will be necessary during the whole 21. century to ensure the fueling of light water reactors which are huge uranium consumers. This dossier covers all the aspects of natural uranium production: mineralogy, geochemistry, types of deposits, world distribution of deposits with a particular attention given to French deposits, the exploitation of which is abandoned today. Finally, exploitation, ore processing and the economical aspects are presented. Contents: 1 - the uranium element and its minerals: from uranium discovery to its industrial utilization, the main uranium minerals (minerals with tetravalent uranium, minerals with hexavalent uranium); 2 - uranium in the Earth's crust and its geochemical properties: distribution (in sedimentary rocks, in magmatic rocks, in metamorphic rocks, in soils and vegetation), geochemistry (uranium solubility and valence in magmas, uranium speciation in aqueous solution, solubility of the main uranium minerals in aqueous solution, uranium mobilization and precipitation); 3 - geology of the main types of uranium deposits: economical criteria for a deposit, structural diversity of deposits, classification, world distribution of deposits, distribution of deposits with time, superficial deposits, uranium

  19. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author discusses the contribution made by various energy sources in the production of electricity. Estimates are made of the future nuclear contribution, the future demand for uranium and future sales of Australian uranium. Nuclear power growth in the United States, Japan and Western Europe is discussed. The present status of the six major Australian uranium deposits (Ranger, Jabiluka, Nabarlek, Koongarra, Yeelerrie and Beverley) is given. Australian legislation relevant to the uranium mining industry is also outlined

  20. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development, prospecting, research, processing and marketing of South Africa's uranium industry and the national policies surrounding this industry form the headlines of this work. The geology of South Africa's uranium occurences and their positions, the processes used in the extraction of South Africa's uranium and the utilisation of uranium for power production as represented by the Koeberg nuclear power station near Cape Town are included in this publication

  1. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A discussion is given of uranium as an energy source in The Australian economy. Figures and predictions are presented on the world supply-demand position and also figures are given on the added value that can be achieved by the processing of uranium. Conclusions are drawn about Australia's future policy with regard to uranium (R.L.)

  2. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The geological setting of uranium resources in the world can be divided in two basic categories of resources and are defined as reasonably assured resources, estimated additional resources and speculative resources. Tables are given to illustrate these definitions. The increasing world production of uranium despite the cutback in the nuclear industry and the uranium requirements of the future concluded these lecture notes

  3. Model for the development of economic uranium mineralization in the Alligator Rivers Uranium Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major uranium deposits occur in the Alligator Rivers Uranium Field (ARUF) within the Lower Proterozoic Cahill Formation. These are: Nabarlek, Jabiluka, Ranger and Koongarra. These deposits and many prospects occur within zones of major disruption and extensive retrogressive metamorphism. Uraninite and galena ages from this uranium field indicate two periods of possible mineralization or mobilization at approximately 1600 and approximately 900 m.y. A number of recent field, mineralogical and chemical results were investigated and evaluated and from this a model has been derived for mineralization in the ARUF

  4. Decision model for assessment of sandstone uranium deposits. National Uranium Resource Evaluation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program is an estimation of the uranium resources of the United States. To achieve this objective, a geologic evaluation and resource assessment program was initiated using NTMS 20 quadrangles as the basic work unit. The evaluation activity commences with data collection within th 20 quadrangles in order to identify and delineate geologic environments that are favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits. A favorable environment is depicted as a geologic setting that has the potential for containing at least 100 tons of U3O8 in rocks whose uranium grade exceeds 100 ppM. Geologic field reconnaissance, hydrochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance, aerial radiometric and magnetic surveys, and logging are the principal means by which favorable environments are identified. The principal investigator of each evaluation team is required to classify a favorable environments according to a preliminary classification of uranium occurrences and favorable environments. Based on this information the uranium potential in each quadrangle is estimated. The scope of this study is limited to development of an assessment procedure and a Bayesian decision model for estimating the endowed area A/sub e/ for three sandstone type uranium deposits: Wyoming roll-type, South Texas roll-type, and Uravan/Salt Wash tabular type deposits

  5. A nuclear analytical model for uranium zirconium hydride reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear analytical model and codes for the uranium zirconium hydride reactor are outlined. The criticality and control rods effeciency of abroad TRIGA reactor are obtained using this model and codes. The results are satisfactory

  6. Research on forecasting models of cost of natural uranium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The forecasting model is established for the product cost of long term or short term on the basis of the history data of natural uranium, focusing on the relationship between the factors such as the ore grade, excavate rate, digging depth and ore properties, and the product cost of natural uranium. Another forecasting model is founded for sub-product cost using symbolic statistical linear regression method. The models described above are applied to the product cost of some uranium mine corporation. The method is easy, practical and reliable with reference value. (authors)

  7. Validation of the WATEQ4 geochemical model for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the Geochemical Modeling and Nuclide/Rock/Groundwater Interactions Studies Program, a study was conducted to partially validate the WATEQ4 aqueous speciation-solubility geochemical model for uranium. The solubility controls determined with the WATEQ4 geochemical model were in excellent agreement with those laboratory studies in which the solids schoepite [UO2(OH)2 . H2O], UO2(OH)2, and rutherfordine ((UO2CO3) were identified as actual solubility controls for uranium. The results of modeling solution analyses from laboratory studies of uranyl phosphate solids, however, identified possible errors in the characterization of solids in the original solubility experiments. As part of this study, significant deficiencies in the WATEQ4 thermodynamic data base for uranium solutes and solids were corrected. Revisions included recalculation of selected uranium reactions. Additionally, thermodynamic data for the hydroxyl complexes of U(VI), including anionic (VI) species, were evaluated (to the extent permitted by the available data). Vanadium reactions were also added to the thermodynamic data base because uranium-vanadium solids can exist in natural ground-water systems. This study is only a partial validation of the WATEQ4 geochemical model because the available laboratory solubility studies do not cover the range of solid phases, alkaline pH values, and concentrations of inorganic complexing ligands needed to evaluate the potential solubility of uranium in ground waters associated with various proposed nuclear waste repositories. Further validation of this or other geochemical models for uranium will require careful determinations of uraninite solubility over the pH range of 7 to 10 under highly reducing conditions and of uranyl hydroxide and phosphate solubilities over the pH range of 7 to 10 under oxygenated conditions

  8. Diffusion model of the non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Emily, E-mail: emily.moore@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN-DPC-SCCME, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Guéneau, Christine, E-mail: christine.gueneau@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN-DPC-SCCME, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Crocombette, Jean-Paul, E-mail: jean-paul.crocombette@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN DEN, Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Physique, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2013-07-15

    Uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}), which is used in light water reactors, exhibits a large range of non-stoichiometry over a wide temperature scale up to 2000 K. Understanding diffusion behavior of uranium oxides under such conditions is essential to ensure safe reactor operation. The current understanding of diffusion properties is largely limited by the stoichiometric deviations inherent to the fuel. The present DICTRA-based model considers diffusion across non-stoichiometric ranges described by experimentally available data. A vacancy and interstitial model of diffusion is applied to the U–O system as a function of its defect structure derived from CALPHAD-type thermodynamic descriptions. Oxygen and uranium self and tracer diffusion coefficients are assessed for the construction of a mobility database. Chemical diffusion coefficients of oxygen are derived with respect to the Darken relation and migration energies of defects are evaluated as a function of stoichiometric deviation. - Graphical abstract: Complete description of Oxygen–Uranium diffusion as a function of composition at various temperatures according to the developed Dictra model. - Highlights: • Assessment of a uranium–oxygen diffusion model with Dictra. • Complete description of U–O diffusion over wide temperature and composition range. • Oxygen model includes terms for interstitial and vacancy migration. • Interaction terms between defects help describe non-stoichiometric domain of UO{sub 2±x}. • Uranium model is separated into mobility terms for the cationic species.

  9. Diffusion model of the non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium dioxide (UO2), which is used in light water reactors, exhibits a large range of non-stoichiometry over a wide temperature scale up to 2000 K. Understanding diffusion behavior of uranium oxides under such conditions is essential to ensure safe reactor operation. The current understanding of diffusion properties is largely limited by the stoichiometric deviations inherent to the fuel. The present DICTRA-based model considers diffusion across non-stoichiometric ranges described by experimentally available data. A vacancy and interstitial model of diffusion is applied to the U–O system as a function of its defect structure derived from CALPHAD-type thermodynamic descriptions. Oxygen and uranium self and tracer diffusion coefficients are assessed for the construction of a mobility database. Chemical diffusion coefficients of oxygen are derived with respect to the Darken relation and migration energies of defects are evaluated as a function of stoichiometric deviation. - Graphical abstract: Complete description of Oxygen–Uranium diffusion as a function of composition at various temperatures according to the developed Dictra model. - Highlights: • Assessment of a uranium–oxygen diffusion model with Dictra. • Complete description of U–O diffusion over wide temperature and composition range. • Oxygen model includes terms for interstitial and vacancy migration. • Interaction terms between defects help describe non-stoichiometric domain of UO2±x. • Uranium model is separated into mobility terms for the cationic species

  10. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canada produced one-third of the Western World's uranium production in 1989, twice as much from Saskatchewan as from Ontario, where mine closures have led to the loss of over 2,000 jobs. Canadian production in 1990 was about 8.8 Gg U. In 1990, Canada's primary producers were Denison Mines, Rio Algom, Cluff Mining, and Cameco. In Saskatchewan, there are three operations: Key Lake, Rabbit Lake/Collins Bay, and Cluff Lake. Canada stands fourth in uranium resources, but because of favourable geology remains the focus of much exploration activity, which cost about C$60 in 1989. Large stockpiles overhang the market, so new sources of uranium will not be needed before the mid 1990's, but long-term prospects seem good

  11. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uranium production industry is well into its third recession during the nuclear era (since 1945). Exploration is drastically curtailed, and many staffs are being reduced. Historical market price production trends are discussed. A total of 3.07 million acres of land was acquired for exploration; drastic decrease. Surface drilling footage was reduced sharply; an estimated 250 drill rigs were used by the uranium industry during 1980. Land acquisition costs increased 8%. The domestic reserve changes are detailed by cause: exploration, re-evaluation, or production. Two significant discoveries of deposits were made in Mohave County, Arizona. Uranium production during 1980 was 21,850 short tons U3O8; an increase of 17% from 1979. Domestic and foreign exploration highlights were given. Major producing areas for the US are San Juan basin, Wyoming basins, Texas coastal plain, Paradox basin, northeastern Washington, Henry Mountains, Utah, central Colorado, and the McDermitt caldera in Nevada and Oregon. 3 figures, 8 tables

  12. Advances in the exploration model for Athabasca unconformity uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper covers the genetic model of ore formation and exploration techniques Uranerz Exploration and Mining is presently using to explore for unconformity uranium deposits in the deeper parts of the Athabasca Basin. The main objectives of this paper are: 1) to present a genetic model for unconformity uranium deposits which is being used in our current exploration strategy, and 2) to present the sequence of exploration techniques used by Uranerz to explore for uranium in areas of the Athabasca Basin with up to 1000 m of sandstone cover. The Athabasca unconformity deposits are located in northern Saskatchewan, Canada. Within the Precambrian Athabasca Basin, exploration companies have discovered 18 uranium deposits. These contain more than 500 million kilograms of uranium, with average grades ranging from 0.3 to 12%. Uranerz discovered the Key Lake deposits in 1975, currently the largest and richest open pit uranium mine in the world. Uranerz also holds interests in the Rabbit Lake, Midwest Lake and McArthur River deposits, all in Saskatchewan, and is also actively exploring for uranium worldwide. The first discovery in the eastern Athabasca Basin was in 1968 at Rabbit Lake, followed by Key Lake in 1975. Both deposits had surficial indicators, such as radioactive boulders, strong geochemical anomalies in the surrounding lakes and swamps, and well-defined geophysical signatures. After the Key Lake discovery, an exploration model was devised which incorporated the underlying graphitic horizon and its strong electro-magnetic signature. Since then, there have been numerous new discoveries made by systematically drilling along these electro-magnetic conductors. The advancements in geophysical and geochemical techniques have led to discoveries at increasing depths. In 1988, the McArthur River deposit was discovered at a depth of 500 m. (author). 6 refs

  13. Paleodrainage-unconformity model as guide to uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper considers a uranium occurrence model that shows how early Eocene and Oligocene depositional patterns and paleography can be used to identify favorable host rocks and to suggest where uraniferous ground water passed through these rocks. The uranium in the ground water was derived mostly from volcanic ash of the Oligocene White River Group. This model accounts for most known uranium deposits and occurrences in eastern Wyoming, western South Dakota, and western Nebraska. All major deposits in Eocene sandstones are in rocks of the fan-channel facies that were identified by sand grain size and shape studies, and most deposits are basinward of present-day major mountain valleys. Deposits occur only where rocks of this facies are less than 300 m (980 ft) below the reconstructed basal Oligocene surface, a distance calculated from roll-front migration and erosion rates. Uranium deposits in other than Eocene rocks also are related to the configuration of the pre-Oligocene surface. White River channel sandstones have deposits and occurrences along a 200-km (125-mi) section of a major Oligocene river in eastern Wyoming and Nebraska. Oligocene trans-mountain drainages localized uranium occurrences in Precambrian granitic rocks in the Laramie Mountains. Deposits in Cretaceous rocks in northern Colorado and along the flanks of the Black Hills lie beneath the axes of Oligocene channels. The channels were the major conduits that localized the movement of the uranium-bearing solutions. Rocks underlying the divides between the channels are unfavorable for uranium deposits where the channels are parallel to the regional dip, because the divides have a thick impervious lateritic soil cover

  14. Diffusion model of the non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Emily; Guéneau, Christine; Crocombette, Jean-Paul

    2013-07-01

    Uranium dioxide (UO2), which is used in light water reactors, exhibits a large range of non-stoichiometry over a wide temperature scale up to 2000 K. Understanding diffusion behavior of uranium oxides under such conditions is essential to ensure safe reactor operation. The current understanding of diffusion properties is largely limited by the stoichiometric deviations inherent to the fuel. The present DICTRA-based model considers diffusion across non-stoichiometric ranges described by experimentally available data. A vacancy and interstitial model of diffusion is applied to the U-O system as a function of its defect structure derived from CALPHAD-type thermodynamic descriptions. Oxygen and uranium self and tracer diffusion coefficients are assessed for the construction of a mobility database. Chemical diffusion coefficients of oxygen are derived with respect to the Darken relation and migration energies of defects are evaluated as a function of stoichiometric deviation.

  15. A biokinetic and dosimetric model for the metabolism of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments involving injection and inhalation of uranium compounds into several animal species as well as those associated with humans are described and analyzed. A revised biokinetic and dosimetric model for the metabolism of uranium suitable for bioassay procedures is proposed. The model consists of a systematic part coupled to a model of the respiratory tract. The model has been tested against human data which incorporates in vivo measurements over the chest and measurements of urine, feces, and autopsy and biopsy samples.In particular the lung model of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, Publication 30 ( ICRP-30 ), has been modified in order to provide a model which more nearly predicts urinary excretion in accord with the experiences in humans and animals. We have also tested the data against the new ICRP (LUDEP) lung model. (author). 55 refs., 14 tabs., 33 figs

  16. Thermodynamic modeling of the in situ leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermodynamic model of uranium in situ leaching process at the stage of acidification was investigated. It was demonstrated that in the frontal zone of acid leaching solutions reduction of U(VI) up to U(IV) was possible due to the behavior of oxidation-reduction processes with the ferrous ions involved. At the same time uranium is precipitated as U(OH)4. In order to eliminate the negative influence of ferrous iron ions, artificial oxidizers were proposed to be used not only at the stage of active leaching of cells but also at acidification stage of new process cells. (author)

  17. Uranium(VI) speciation: modelling, uncertainty and relevance to bioavailability models. Application to uranium uptake by the gills of a freshwater bivalve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of varying solution composition on the interactions between uranium(VI) and excised gills of the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea have been investigated in well defined solution media. A significant reduction in the uptake of uranium was observed on increasing the concentrations of the uranium complexing ligands citrate and carbonate. Saturation kinetics as a function of uranium concentration at a pH value of 5.0 were observed, indicating that the uptake of uranium is a facilitated process, probably involving one or several trans-membrane transport systems. A relatively small change in the uptake of uranium was found as a function of pH (factor of ca. 2), despite the extremely large changes to the solution speciation of uranium within the range of pH investigated (5.0 - 7.5). A comprehensive review of the thermodynamic data relevant to the solution composition domain employed for this study was performed. Estimates of the uncertainties for the formation constants of aqueous uranium(VI) species were integrated into a thermodynamic database. A computer program was written to predict the equilibrium distribution of uranium(VI) in simple aqueous systems, using thermodynamic parameter mean-values. The program was extended to perform Monte Carlo and Quasi Monte Carlo uncertainty analyses, incorporating the thermodynamic database uncertainty estimates, to quantitatively predict the uncertainties inherent in predicting the solution speciation of uranium. The use of thermodynamic equilibrium modelling as a tool for interpreting the bioavailability of uranium(VI) was investigated. Observed uranium(VI) uptake behaviour was interpreted as a function of the predicted changes to the solution speciation of uranium. Different steady-state or pre-equilibrium approaches to modelling uranium uptake were tested. Alternative modelling approaches were also tested, considering the potential changes to membrane transport system activity or sorption characteristics on

  18. Modelling Singhbhum uranium mineralization in the light of Proterozoic uranium metallogeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In mineral deposit modelling, a conceptual or genetic model is preferred to other ones when it is not dogmatic. The characteristics and genesis of major Proterozoic uranium deposits, such as the quartz-pebble conglomerate -type deposits, Franceville deposit, copper belt type deposits, Beaverlodge lake deposits, unconformity - type deposits, the fluidized hematite breccia deposit of Olympic dam, and the albitite - type deposits are discussed. They are grouped into four principal genetic types: (a) palaeoplacer - type, (b) (diagenetic - ) metamorphic - type, (c) the hydrothermal hematitic breccia type, and (d) metasomatic - type. There may be some amount of overprinting of a principal mechanism of ore formation by the features of a later process. In 'a' the original depositional and diagenetic features are still considerably maintained. Type 'b' is generally polygenetic and their genetic history is not always traceable. Type 'c' is hydrothermal, but atypical is being hematite-rich and the nature and origin of the ore fluid and the source of ore-elements in the hydrothermal fluid are far from clear. Albitite - uranium is also an important ore type in the Proterozoic, but far less discussed in the geological literature in English. 'a' and 'b' and 'd' are divisible into sub-types, depending on details. Occurrence along a zone of pronounced ductile (-brittle) shearing close to an Archean-Proterozoic boundary, ore participation in the metamorphic-metasomatic petrography and the ore bodies obeying the L-S structures, confirm an earlier conclusion that the uranium mineralization along the Singhbhum copper-uranium belt belongs to the metamorphic-metasomatic type. It rather belongs to the Beaverlodge lake sub-type. (author). 42 refs., 7 figs

  19. Updated Conceptual Model for the 300 Area Uranium Groundwater Plume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zachara, John M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Last, George V.; Peterson, Robert E.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.

    2012-11-01

    The 300 Area uranium groundwater plume in the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit is residual from past discharge of nuclear fuel fabrication wastes to a number of liquid (and solid) disposal sites. The source zones in the disposal sites were remediated by excavation and backfilled to grade, but sorbed uranium remains in deeper, unexcavated vadose zone sediments. In spite of source term removal, the groundwater plume has shown remarkable persistence, with concentrations exceeding the drinking water standard over an area of approximately 1 km2. The plume resides within a coupled vadose zone, groundwater, river zone system of immense complexity and scale. Interactions between geologic structure, the hydrologic system driven by the Columbia River, groundwater-river exchange points, and the geochemistry of uranium contribute to persistence of the plume. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently completed a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) to document characterization of the 300 Area uranium plume and plan for beginning to implement proposed remedial actions. As part of the RI/FS document, a conceptual model was developed that integrates knowledge of the hydrogeologic and geochemical properties of the 300 Area and controlling processes to yield an understanding of how the system behaves and the variables that control it. Recent results from the Hanford Integrated Field Research Challenge site and the Subsurface Biogeochemistry Scientific Focus Area Project funded by the DOE Office of Science were used to update the conceptual model and provide an assessment of key factors controlling plume persistence.

  20. Modeling and analysis of uranium isotope enrichment by chemical exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A theoretical study of uranium isotopes separation by chemical exchange, starting with an accurate mathematical model, is presented. The experimental data used in this study were obtained by reverse break-through operation and the numerical algorithm, developed for simulation in a previous study, was adapted to be suitable for this kind of processes. The model parameters were identified from experimental data and simulations were carried out for different experimental conditions. (author)

  1. Modelling of contaminant release from a uranium mine tailings site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Uranium mining and milling continuing from the early 1960's until 1990 close to the town of Seelingstaedt in Eastern Germany resulted in 4 tailings impoundments with a total tailings volume of about 105 Mio. m3. Leakage from these tailings impoundments enters the underlying aquifers and is discharged into surface water streams. High concentration of salts, uranium and several heavy metals are released from the tailings. At present the tailings impoundments are reshaped and covered. For the identification of suitable remediation options predictions of the contaminant release for different remediation scenarios have to be made. A compartment model representing the tailings impoundments and the surrounding aquifers for the calculation of contaminant release and transport was set up using the software GOLDSIM. This compartment model describes the time dependent hydraulic conditions within the tailings and the surrounding aquifers taking into account hydraulic and geotechnical processes influencing the hydraulic properties of the tailings material. A simple geochemical approach taking into account sorption processes as well as retardation by applying a kd-approach was implemented to describe the contaminant release and transport within the hydraulic system. For uranium as the relevant contaminant the simple approach takes into account additional geochemical conditions influencing the mobility. Alternatively the model approach allows to include the results of detailed geochemical modelling of the individual tailings zones which is than used as source term for the modelling of the contaminant transport in the aquifer and to the receiving streams. (authors)

  2. An atomic model for neutral and singly ionized uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maceda, E. L.; Miley, G. H.

    1979-01-01

    A model for the atomic levels above ground state in neutral, U(0), and singly ionized, U(+), uranium is described based on identified atomic transitions. Some 168 states in U(0) and 95 in U(+) are found. A total of 1581 atomic transitions are used to complete this process. Also discussed are the atomic inverse lifetimes and line widths for the radiative transitions as well as the electron collisional cross sections.

  3. Modelling uranium leaching from agricultural soils to groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphate (P) fertilizers are typically applied annually to agricultural fields, partly in inorganic form.(e.g. Ca(H2PO4)2 ). Mineral P-fertilizers contain some natural alpha-activity due to the presence of 238U (among other alpha emitters). Uranium concentrations in P-bearing fertilizers have been reported to be in the range of 300 to 9200 Bq kg-1 of fertilizer (for both 238U and 234U). The migration of U and other elements in soils depends on a large number of processes, including their interactions with other aqueous components and the solid phase (e.g., cation exchange, surface complexation) as well as time-variable water fluxes and water contents between the soil surface and the groundwater table. Predicting U transport hence requires an advanced reactive transport model integrating water flow, multiple solute transport and biogeochemical reactions. At SCK-CEN, a new reactive transport code for transient flow conditions, HP1, was recently developed. The HP1 code results from the coupling of the HYDRUS-1D water flow and solute transport model with the PHREEQC geochemical speciation model. The capabilities of the HP1 code are illustrated considering natural uranium leaching from agricultural soils to groundwater. The objectives of the study are (1) to provide insight into the complex system of interacting biogeochemical processes that govern uranium mobility in soils using a new state-of-the-art coupled transport model (HP1), with special emphasis on effects of the imposed water flow boundary condition (steady-state infiltration versus atmospheric) on the migration of U in an acid sandy soil profile, and (2) to use the calculated uranium fluxes from soils to groundwater as yardsticks or reference levels for alternative or complementary safety indicators such as radionuclide fluxes from surface repositories for low- and intermediate level short-lived waste

  4. Investigating the thermodynamic stability of Bacillus subtilis spore-uranium(VI) adsorption though surface complexation modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrold, Z.; Hertel, M.; Gorman-Lewis, D.

    2012-12-01

    Dissolved uranium speciation, mobility, and remediation are increasingly important topics given continued and potential uranium (U) release from mining operations and nuclear waste. Vegetative bacterial cell surfaces are known to adsorb uranium and may influence uranium speciation in the environment. Previous investigations regarding U(VI) adsorption to bacterial spores, a differentiated and dormant cell type with a tough proteinaceous coat, include U adsorption affinity and XAFS data. We investigated the thermodynamic stability of aerobic, pH dependent uranium adsorption to bacterial spore surfaces using purified Bacillus subtilis spores in solution with 5ppm uranium. Adsorption reversibility and kinetic experiments indicate that uranium does not precipitate over the duration of the experiments and equilibrium is reached within 20 minutes. Uranium-spore adsorption edges exhibited adsorption at all pH measured between 2 and 10. Maximum adsorption was achieved around pH 7 and decreased as pH increased above 7. We used surface complexation modeling (SCM) to quantify uranium adsorption based on balanced chemical equations and derive thermodynamic stability constants for discrete uranium-spore adsorption reactions. Site specific thermodynamic stability constants provide insight on interactions occurring between aqueous uranium species and spore surface ligands. The uranium adsorption data and SCM parameters described herein, also provide a basis for predicting the influence of bacterial spores on uranium speciation in natural systems and investigating their potential as biosorption agents in engineered systems.

  5. Risk evaluation of uranium mining: A geochemical inverse modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rillard, J.; Zuddas, P.; Scislewski, A.

    2011-12-01

    It is well known that uranium extraction operations can increase risks linked to radiation exposure. The toxicity of uranium and associated heavy metals is the main environmental concern regarding exploitation and processing of U-ore. In areas where U mining is planned, a careful assessment of toxic and radioactive element concentrations is recommended before the start of mining activities. A background evaluation of harmful elements is important in order to prevent and/or quantify future water contamination resulting from possible migration of toxic metals coming from ore and waste water interaction. Controlled leaching experiments were carried out to investigate processes of ore and waste (leached ore) degradation, using samples from the uranium exploitation site located in Caetité-Bahia, Brazil. In experiments in which the reaction of waste with water was tested, we found that the water had low pH and high levels of sulphates and aluminium. On the other hand, in experiments in which ore was tested, the water had a chemical composition comparable to natural water found in the region of Caetité. On the basis of our experiments, we suggest that waste resulting from sulphuric acid treatment can induce acidification and salinization of surface and ground water. For this reason proper storage of waste is imperative. As a tool to evaluate the risks, a geochemical inverse modelling approach was developed to estimate the water-mineral interaction involving the presence of toxic elements. We used a method earlier described by Scislewski and Zuddas 2010 (Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 74, 6996-7007) in which the reactive surface area of mineral dissolution can be estimated. We found that the reactive surface area of rock parent minerals is not constant during time but varies according to several orders of magnitude in only two months of interaction. We propose that parent mineral heterogeneity and particularly, neogenic phase formation may explain the observed variation of the

  6. Pre implanted mouse embryos as model for uranium toxicology studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The search of 'in vitro' toxicology model that can predict toxicology effects 'in vivo' is a permanent challenge. A toxicology experimental model must to fill to certain requirements: to have a predictive character, an appropriate control to facilitate the interpretation of the data among the experimental groups, and to be able to control the independent variables that can interfere or modify the results that we are analyzing. The preimplantation embryos posses many advantages in this respect: they are a simple model that begins with the development of only one cell. The 'in vitro' model reproduces successfully the 'in vivo' situation. Due to the similarity that exists among the embryos of mammals during this period the model is practically valid for other species. The embryo is itself a stem cell, the toxicology effects are early observed in his clonal development and the physical-chemical parameters are easily controllable. The purpose of the exhibition is to explain the properties of the pre implanted embryo model for toxicology studies of uranium and to show our experimental results. The cultivation 'in vitro' of mouse embryos with uranylo nitrate demonstrated that the uranium causes from the 13 μgU/ml delay of development, decrease the number of cells per embryo and hipoploidy in the embryonic blastomere. (author)

  7. Controlling intake of uranium in the workplace: Applications of biokinetic modeling and occupational monitoring data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leggett, Richard Wayne [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL; McGinn, Wilson [ORNL; Meck, Dr. Robert A. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    2012-01-01

    This report provides methods for interpreting and applying occupational uranium monitoring data. The methods are based on current international radiation protection guidance, current information on the chemical toxicity of uranium, and best available biokinetic models for uranium. Emphasis is on air monitoring data and three types of bioassay data: the concentration of uranium in urine; the concentration of uranium in feces; and the externally measured content of uranium in the chest. Primary Reference guidance levels for prevention of chemical effects and limitation of radiation effects are selected based on a review of current scientific data and regulatory principles for setting standards. Generic investigation levels and immediate action levels are then defined in terms of these primary guidance levels. The generic investigation and immediate actions levels are stated in terms of radiation dose and concentration of uranium in the kidneys. These are not directly measurable quantities, but models can be used to relate the generic levels to the concentration of uranium in air, urine, or feces, or the total uranium activity in the chest. Default investigation and immediate action levels for uranium in air, urine, feces, and chest are recommended for situations in which there is little information on the form of uranium taken into the body. Methods are prescribed also for deriving case-specific investigation and immediate action levels for uranium in air, urine, feces, and chest when there is sufficient information on the form of uranium to narrow the range of predictions of accumulation of uranium in the main target organs for uranium: kidneys for chemical effects and lungs for radiological effects. In addition, methods for using the information herein for alternative guidance levels, different from the ones selected for this report, are described.

  8. In-situ production cost model for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a recently completed research project for the U.S. Bureau of Mines -Twin Cities Research Center, a computerized costing procedure for uranium in-situ leach mining was developed by the NUS Corporation. This costing procedure, termed a cost model, employs a process engineering approach for estimating total project costs as well as equipment and manpower requirements for uranium in-situ leaching operations in either Texas or Wyoming. The Bureau recently added the capability to apply the model for New Mexico deposits. NUS also provided consulting support for this modification. Both capital and operating costs are generated by the model along with the overall production cost/pound U3O3 subject to a known rate of return. Conversely, rate of return on equity can be solved for, subject to a given price of yellowcake. During the course of the research effort, sensitivity tests were conducted for numerous key parameters to determine the cost influence attributable to incremental changes in parameter values. The results of these sensitivity tests along with a description of the in-situ leaching cost model have been documented. In this paper, the various features and capabilities of the cost model are highlighted, along with a review of the sensitivity analysis findings

  9. Development of a mathematical model for the dissolution of uranium dioxide. II. Statistical model for the dissolution of uranium dioxide tablets in nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have derived a statistical model for the dissolution of uranium dioxide tablets for the 6 to 12 M concentration range and temperatures from 800C to the boiling point. The model differs qualitatively from the dissolution model for ground uranium dioxide. In the indicated range of experimental conditions, the mean-square deviation of the curves for the model from the experimental curves is not greater than 6%

  10. Effect of twinning on texture evolution of depleted uranium using a viscoplastic self-consistent model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ductility and fracture toughness is a major stumbling block in using depleted uranium as a structural material. The ability to correctly model deformation of uranium can be used to create process path methods to improve its structural design ability. The textural evolution of depleted uranium was simulated using a visco-plastic self consistent model and analyzed by comparing pole figures of the simulations and experimental samples. Depleted uranium has the same structure as alpha uranium, which is an orthorhombic phase of uranium. Both deformation slip and twin systems were compared. The VPSC model was chosen to simulate this material because the model encompasses both low-symmetry materials as well as twinning in materials. This is of particular interest since depleted uranium has a high propensity for twinning, which dominates deformation and texture evolution. Simulated results were compared to experimental results to measure the validity of the model. One specific twin system, the {176}[512] twin, was of specific notice. The VPSC model was used to simulate the influence of this twin on depleted uranium and was compared with a mechanically shocked depleted uranium sample. Under high strain rate shock deformation conditions, the {176}[512] twin system appears to be a dominant deformation system. By simulating a compression process using the VPSC model with the {176}[512] twin as the dominant deformation mode, a favorable comparison could be made between the experimental and simulated textures. (authors)

  11. Geological characteristics and metallogenetic model of Zhuguang uranium ore concentrated area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors mainly discuss the geological background and metallogenic mechanism of large and high-grade uranium deposits in Zhuguang region. New progresses have been made in regional metallogenic regularities and metallogenic theories and a series of new outcoming have been achieved: (1) The pre-Sinian uranium-rich crystalline basement aged at 1.9-2.2 Ga has been determined in the region for the first time. The discovery contributes greatly to the uranium metallogenic potential in Zhuguang area. (2) For the first time, authors propose that uranium and material sources in Zhuguang region were mainly derived from the uranium-rich thermal fluid chambers of crust-mantle mixed-melting origin, rather than from the wall rocks of uranium deposits, as considered by traditional views. (3) The stage and sequence of magmatic activity, and genetic type of magmatic rocks in Zhuguang region have been redetermined. (4) Four NE-trending tectonic belts, i. e. Nanxiong, Baishun, Changjiang and Jilong have been determined as Mesozoic extensional taphrogeny zones, which are the regional crust-cutting tectonic belts controlling the basins, magmatic activities and uranium mineralization. (5) For the first time, uranium deposits in Zhuguang region are divided into two types: the pneumatolytic-hydrothermal fracturing alteration-micro vein dissemination type uranium deposits and the vein-filled type uranium deposits. And a deep-sourced metallogenic model of uranium deposits in the region has been set up

  12. Characteristics and model of sandstone type uranium deposit in south of Songliao basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Through analyzing the uranium deposit tectonic environment, upper cretaceous sequence stratigraphy, depositional system, evolutionary characteristics of sand bodies, the effect of subsequent transformation and the characteristic of uranium deposit, the sandstone type uranium deposit in southern basin is different from typical interlayer oxidation zone sandstone type uranium deposit. The formation and evolution of sandstone-type uranium deposit are controlled by structure fensters; the favorable sedimentary facies type is braided river facies, and the ore body is braided river sand body. The size of uranium deposits is controlled by the local oxidation zone with the characteristics of sandstone type uranium deposit in partial oxidation zone. Uranium ore bodies which distribute in the roof wings of structure fenstes, and occur in gray layers between the upper and lower oxidation zone, showing tabular, and the plate of uranium ore body is controlled by the local oxidation zone. Based on the geological features of sandstone-type uranium deposits, the metallogenic model of local oxidation zones sandstone-type uranium deposits has been set up in the south of Songliao Baisn. (authors)

  13. Modelling the leaching behaviour of an uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The leaching behaviour of a uranium ore, with sulfuric acid and sodium chlorate, has been investigated in agitated tanks. Data from conventional leaching studies has been supplemented with mineralogical characterisation and SEM analysis of selected samples. A technique known as block leaching was also used, which allows individual grains of both the ore and gangue minerals to be studied before and after leaching under different conditions. As a result of the experimental investigation a detailed description of the leaching behaviour of the ore has been compiled. The experimental data have been used to prepare a leaching model that describes uranium extraction as a function of residence time, acid strength, temperature and redox potential. In addition, the dissolution behaviour of the key gangue minerals as a function of leaching conditions has been determined. On the basis of ore and gangue mineral dissolution, the consumption of acid has been predicted with good agreement with experimental data. Although the model is largely empirically based, it provides a useful tool for optimising plant operation (author)

  14. Monte Carlo modeling of spallation targets containing uranium and americium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron production and transport in spallation targets made of uranium and americium are studied with a Geant4-based code MCADS (Monte Carlo model for Accelerator Driven Systems). A good agreement of MCADS results with experimental data on neutron- and proton-induced reactions on 241Am and 243Am nuclei allows to use this model for simulations with extended Am targets. It was demonstrated that MCADS model can be used for calculating the values of critical mass for 233,235U, 237Np, 239Pu and 241Am. Several geometry options and material compositions (U, U + Am, Am, Am2O3) are considered for spallation targets to be used in Accelerator Driven Systems. All considered options operate as deep subcritical targets having neutron multiplication factor of k∼0.5. It is found that more than 4 kg of Am can be burned in one spallation target during the first year of operation

  15. Cost study on waste management at three model Canadian uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A waste management cost study was initiated to determine the capital and operating costs of three different uranium waste management systems which incorporate current technologies being used in Canadian uranium mining operations. Cost estimates were to be done to a thirty percent level of accuracy and were to include all waste management related costs of a uranium ore processing facility. Each model is based on an annual uranium production of 1,923,000 kg U (5,000,000 lbs U3O8) with a total operating life of 20 years for the facility. The three models, A, B, and C, are based on three different uranium ore grades, 0.10 percent U3O8, 0.475 percent U3O8 and 1.5 percent U3O8 respectively. Yellowcake production is assumed to start in January 1984. Model A is based on a conceptual 7,180 tonne per day uranium ore processing facility and waste management system typical of uranium operations in the Elliot Lake area of northern Ontario with an established infrastructure. Model B is a 1.512 tonne per day operation based on a remote uranium operation typical of the Athabasca Basin properties in northern Saskatchewan. Model C is a 466 tonne per day operation processing a high-grade uranium ore containing arsenic and heavy metal concentrations typical of some northern Saskatchewan deposits

  16. Uranium metallogenic model related to CO2 and hydrocarbon in granite type uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is concerned with the inseparable connections between the uranium migration, enrichment rule and the geochemical characteristics of CO2 and hydrocarbon gas, as well as the relations between the deposit locations and the gas abnormal distribution in rocky body, which are based on the analysis of some data and phenomena in 11 typical deposits in 2 granite type uranium ore fields, including the observations of 250 rocky fluid inclusion sections and the analyzed data of which 2470 are in gas composition, 200 in uranium content, 50 in thermometry. All the conclusions are drawn from different angles for the first time and this new exploration and advancement fills up the blank of gas geochemistry study in uranium deposits or other metal deposits

  17. Geology characteristics and prospecting model discussing of sodic-metasomatic type uranium deposits in Longshoushan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkali-metasomatic type uranium deposits is an important uranium ore type in Longshoushan ore belt. In this paper, it introduces ore features and forming mechanism of Alkali-metasomatic type uranium deposits in Longshoushan. By discussing the features and forming reason of ore bearing area crypto-explosive breccia, it sets up the prospecting model which makes crypto-explosive breccia to be prospecting target. (authors)

  18. A possible metallogenic model and analysis of potential resources of Xiangshan uranium ore field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on analysis of metallogenic dynamics process, geological characteristics and geochemistry of Xiangshan uranium ore field, uranium metallogenic model is discussed to guide uranium metallogenic prognosis and analysis of re- sources potential. REE geochemical characteristics, diagenetic and mineralization ages indicate that volcanic rock series in Xiangshan derived from melt of crust materials and are products of pulsating events of the same magma chamber. Di- agenesis of granitic porphyry and metallogenesis are consecutive geological events. On basis of research of fluids of wall rock alteration, REE geochemical feature and regional distribution characteristics of uranium abundance, regional uranium bearing strata are considered as the primary source for metallogenic substances, Xiangshan volcanic basin became uranium accumulative area with the help of volcanism and magmatism. Hydrothermal solution in post magmatism is rich in uranium. Interaction between fluid and rock promotes evolution of hydrothermal solution in post magmatism into metallogenic fluid, further produces process of uranium metallogenesis, eventually forms two-later spatial structure of 'volcanic lava and granitic porphyry' of uranium metallogenesis. There are greater exploration space and resources potential in the north and west parts of the ore field. Caldera, volcanic neck and volcanic pipe, and their peripheries are worth exploration. Total uranium resources of Xiangshan ore field are optimistically predicted to super-large size. (authors)

  19. Thermo-chemical modelling of uranium-free nitride fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A production process for americium-bearing, uranium-free nitride fuels was modelled using the newly developed ALCHYMY thermochemical database. The results suggested that the practical difficulties with yield and purity are of a kinetic rather than a thermodynamical nature. We predict that the immediate product of the typical decarburisation step is not methane, but hydrogen cyanide. HCN may then undergo further reactions upon cooling, explaining the difficulty in observing any carbophoric molecules in the gaseous off stream. The thermal stability of nitride fuels in different environments was also estimated. We show that sintering of nitride compounds containing americium should be performed under nitrogen atmosphere in order to the avoid the excessive losses of americium reported from sintering under inert gas. Addition of nitrogen in small amounts to fuel pin filling gas also appears to significantly improve the in-pile stability of transuranium nitride fuels. (author)

  20. An occupational medical program for a 'model' uranium mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic purpose of occupational health programs in uranium milling are to insure that no employee receives an exposure to carcinogenic, mutagenic, teratogenic, highly toxic, pneumoconiosis-producing, or dangerous physical agents that could result in chronic or acute injury and to assure that significant concentrations or levels of the above are not present in either the plant or general environment. This paper defines a model mill as consisting of crushing, sizing, acid leach, separation, solvent extraction, drying and packaging operations and describes the employee health hazards associated with each. It also describes a type program consisting of a balanced combination of exposure monitoring and survey, air samples, personnel dosimetry, bioassay, training, medical surveillance, and emergency planning based on the employee exposure situation. Experience with such a program is also discussed, and some techniques of practically meeting the regulatory requirements and protecting the worker are outlined. (Auth.)

  1. Reactive transport of uranium with bacteria in fractured rock: Model development and sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Woo; Baik, Min-Hoon; Jung, Haeryong; Jeong, Jong-Tae

    2013-09-01

    A numerical model for the reactive transport of uranium and bacteria in fractured rock was newly developed. The conceptual model consists of four phases (fracture, fracture surface, matrix pore, and matrix solid) and eight constituents (solutes in the fracture, on the fracture surface, on mobile bacteria, on immobile bacteria, in the rock matrix pores and on the rock matrix solids, and bacteria in the fracture and on the fracture surface). In addition to the kinetic sorption/desorption of uranium and bacteria, uranium reduction reaction accompanying with bacteria growth was considered in the reactive transport. The non-linear reactive transport equations were numerically solved using the symmetric sequential iterative scheme of the operator-splitting method. The transport and kinetic reaction modules in the developed model were separately verified, and the results were reasonably acceptable. From the sensitivity analysis, the uranium transport was generally more sensitive to the sorption rate rather than desorption rate of U(VI). Considering a uranium reduction reaction, bacteria could considerably retard the uranium transport no matter the uranium sorption/desorption rates. As the affinity of U(VI) onto the bacteria becomes higher than that onto a rock fracture surface, a biofilm effect, rather than a colloidal effect, of the bacteria becomes more influential on the uranium transport.

  2. Origin and Superposition Metallogenic Model of the Sandstone-type Uranium Deposit in the Northeastern Ordos Basin, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ziying; CHEN Anping; FANG Xiheng; OU Guangxi; XIA Yuliang; SUN Ye

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with the metallogenic model of the sandstone type uranium deposit in thenortheastern Ordos Basin from aspects of uranium source, migration and deposition. A superpositionmetallogenie model has been established due to complex uranium mineralization processes withsuperposition of oil-gas reduction and thermal reformation.

  3. Metallogenic regularities and models of Longshoushan uranium metallogenic belt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Longshoushan metallogenic zone two important uranium metallogenic series have been identified: the metallogenic series of multistage, multi source and poly genesis related with the migmatization and magmatism in Zhongtiao period; and the metallogenic series related with the evolution of the granite magma in late Caledonian period. During the former period uranium deposits of the pegmatoidal alas kite type occurred. During the latter one uranium deposits of the sodium metasomatic type and silicic vein type occurred. These deposits are originated from the special stage of development and evolution of the Earth crust in this area. Uranium metallogenesis is closely related with the evolution of granite magma, hydrothermal solution and the condition of the wall rocks, uranium mineralization in space are controlled by the structures of different orders

  4. Geochemical modeling of uranium mill tailings: a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liner failure was not found to be a problem when various acidic tailings solutions leached through liner materials for periods up to 3 y. On the contrary, materials that contained over 30% clay showed a decrease in permeability with time in the laboratory columns. The decreases in permeability noted above are attributed to pore plugging resulting from the precipitation of minerals and solids. This precipitation takes place due to the increase in pH of the tailings solution brought about by the buffering capacity of the soil. Geochemical modeling predicts, and x-ray characterization confirms, that precipitation of solids from solution is occurring in the acidic tailings solution/liner interactions studied. X-ray diffraction identified gypsum and alunite group minerals, such as jarosite, as having precipitated after acidic tailings solutions reacted with clay liners. The geochemical modeling and experimental work described above were used to construct an equilibrium conceptual model consisting of minerals and solid phases. This model was developed to represent a soil column. A computer program was used as a tool to solve the system of mathematical equations imposed by the conceptual chemical model. The combined conceptual model and computer program were used to predict aqueous phase compositions of effluent solutions from permeability cells packed with geologic materials and percolated with uranium mill tailings solutions. An initial conclusion drawn from these studies is that the laboratory experiments and geochemical modeling predictions were capable of simulating field observations. The same mineralogical changes and contaminant reductions observed in the laboratory studies were found at a drained evaporation pond (Lucky Mc in Wyoming) with a 10-year history of acid attack. 24 references, 5 figures 5 tables

  5. Model of percolation leaching for non-weathered uranium bearing ores for scale up purpose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium bearing sandstone ore in Pa Lua area (Nong Son basin) is a kind of low uranium content ore. Technological method with high potential of application is percolation leaching. This article introduces the setting up a model of percolation leaching for non-weathered uranium bearing ores for scale up purpose. It is possible to calculate efficiency of leaching uranium from ores when changing technological parameters such as acid concentration, height of ore body and effect of differences in distribution of particle size. This tool can help calculation for the design of a system of ore processing to meet certain requirements on the yield to facilitate design and calculation for the pilot of uranium ore processing in the future. (author)

  6. Towards a Model for Albitite-Type Uranium

    OpenAIRE

    Andy Wilde

    2013-01-01

    Albitite-type uranium deposits are widely distributed, usually of low grade (<1% U3O8), but are often large and collectively contain over 1 million tonnes of U3O8. Uranium is hosted in a wide range of metamorphic lithologies, whose only common characteristic is that they have been extensively mylonitised. Ore minerals are disseminated and rarely in megascopic veins, within and adjacent to albitised mylonites. Grain size is uniformly fine, generally less than 50 microns. Scanning electr...

  7. Geologic-hydrogeochemical prospecting criteria and prospecting model for uranium deposits in southern Hunan and northern Guangxi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution and hydrogeochemical environments of uranium deposits in southern Hunan and northern Guangxi are controlled by a NNE-trending strike-slipping fault system. Summarizing the geologic and hydrogeochemical characteristics of uranium deposits, the author proposes the geologic-hydrogeochemical prospecting model of uranium deposits and corresponding evaluation criteria

  8. Column Testing and 1D Reactive Transport Modeling to Evaluate Uranium Plume Persistence Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. H.; Morrison, S.; Morris, S.; Tigar, A.; Dam, W. L.; Dayvault, J.

    2015-12-01

    At many U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management sites, 100 year natural flushing was selected as a remedial option for groundwater uranium plumes. However, current data indicate that natural flushing is not occurring as quickly as expected and solid-phase and aqueous uranium concentrations are persistent. At the Grand Junction, Colorado office site, column testing was completed on core collected below an area where uranium mill tailings have been removed. The total uranium concentration in this core was 13.2 mg/kg and the column was flushed with laboratory-created water with no uranium and chemistry similar to the nearby Gunnison River. The core was flushed for a total of 91 pore volumes producing a maximum effluent uranium concentration of 6,110 μg/L at 2.1 pore volumes and a minimum uranium concentration of 36.2 μg/L at the final pore volume. These results indicate complex geochemical reactions at small pore volumes and a long tailing affect at greater pore volumes. Stop flow data indicate the occurrence of non-equilibrium processes that create uranium concentration rebound. These data confirm the potential for plume persistence, which is occurring at the field scale. 1D reactive transport modeling was completed using PHREEQC (geochemical model) and calibrated to the column test data manually and using PEST (inverse modeling calibration routine). Processes of sorption, dual porosity with diffusion, mineral dissolution, dispersion, and cation exchange were evaluated separately and in combination. The calibration results indicate that sorption and dual porosity are major processes in explaining the column test data. These processes are also supported by fission track photographs that show solid-phase uranium residing in less mobile pore spaces. These procedures provide valuable information on plume persistence and secondary source processes that may be used to better inform and evaluate remedial strategies, including natural flushing.

  9. Formation-evolution model of uranium-productive basins and its recognition criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the study of geologic-tectonic setting and dynamic evolution of important uranium-productive basins both abroad and at home, six types of uranium-productive basins have been distinguished, and each type by typical representative of this type are nominated, namely Chu-Sarysu and Syr-Darya type, Central Kyzylkam type, Zaural and West-Siberia type, Zabaikel type, Bohemia type and South Texas type. The formation-evolution model of each type has been established and recognition criteria have been proposed. Finally, the difference between each type is discussed and some ideas for prospecting uranium-productive basins have been proposed. (author)

  10. Reproduction of a model of lung injury induced by depleted uranium inhalation in canine

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Bin; Duan, Yun-You; He, Wen-Bo; Feng, Hua-Song; Ning, Hao-Yong; Ju-yi WEN; Yang, Zhi-Hua; Xiu-jie PAN; Zhen-shan CAO; Mao-xiang ZHU; Xu, Qin-Zhi; Ping-kun ZHOU; Xin-min DING

    2011-01-01

    Objective To reproduce a canine model of subacute lung injury induced by depleted uranium inhalation.Methods Twenty-six dogs were randomized into the control group(CG,n=6),low-dose group(LG,n=10).and high-dose group(HG,n=10).All of them underwent tracheal intubation.In control group,0.2ml/kg of normal saline was intratracheally given.In low dosage group,10mg/kg of depleted uranium(LG),and in high dose group 100mg/ml of depleted uranium(HG) was introduced.The survival time of animals was obser...

  11. Towards a Model for Albitite-Type Uranium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Wilde

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Albitite-type uranium deposits are widely distributed, usually of low grade (<1% U3O8, but are often large and collectively contain over 1 million tonnes of U3O8. Uranium is hosted in a wide range of metamorphic lithologies, whose only common characteristic is that they have been extensively mylonitised. Ore minerals are disseminated and rarely in megascopic veins, within and adjacent to albitised mylonites. Grain size is uniformly fine, generally less than 50 microns. Scanning electron microscopy reveals that spatial association between uranium and various Ti-bearing phases is common. Gangue minerals include albite, carbonates (calcite and dolomite, and sodic pyroxene and amphibole. The ore rarely contains economic metals apart from uranium, phosphorous at Itataia being an exception. There is widespread evidence of hydrothermal zirconium mobility and hydrothermal zircon and other Zr phases are frequent and in some cases abundant gangue minerals. Positive correlations are noted between uranium and various high field strength elements. The group remains poorly described and understood, but a link to iron-oxide copper-gold (IOCG deposits and/or carbonatite and/or alkaline magmatism is plausible.

  12. Toxicity of Depleted Uranium Dust Particles: Results of a New Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depleted uranium (DU) is mostly composed of U-238, a naturally radioactive isotope. Concerning chemical toxicity, uranium, being a heavy metal, is known to have toxic effects on specific organs in the body, the kidneys in particular. Its effects are similar to those of other heavy metals, such as lead and cadmium. Scientific evidence resulting both from in vitro and in vivo analyses shows that current models of the mechanisms of toxicity of uranium dust are not fully satisfactory. They should be refined in order to obtain more effective responses and predictions regarding health effects. In particular, radiotoxicity potential of Depleted Uranium dust originated by military use of this material for ammunition must be re-evaluated taking into account the bystander effect, the dose enhancing effect and other minor phenomena. Uranium dust has both chemical and radiological toxicity: the synergistic aspect of the two effects has to be accounted for, in order to arrive to a complete description of the phenomenon. The combination of the two different toxicities (chemical and radiological) of depleted uranium is attempted here for the first time, approaching the long-term effects of Depleted Uranium, and in particular the carcinogenetic effects. A case study (Balkan war, 1999) is discussed. (Author)

  13. Mathematical models and computer programme of cost prediction of natural uranium products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the structure of the natural uranium products in china, the dependence of cost on output, and the influence of uranium grade of ore, precessing recovery, price index and labour productivity on the cost, on the basis of estimating the tendency of change of variable factors in future using the past and present data, the mathematical models for prediction were derived and the software for minicomputer use was made by using TURTH BASIC language

  14. Multicomponent reactive transport modeling at the Ratones uranium mine, Cáceres (Spain)

    OpenAIRE

    Marcuello, A.; Gómez, P.; Carrera, Jesús; Ayora, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    [EN] Flooding of abandoned mines may have a major impact in groundwater quality. Predicting the long-term evolution of the water quality is, therefore, a relevant matter for environmental management. The Ratones uranium mine was abandoned and flooded in 1974. Due to its reducing underground environment uranium concentration is very low, although some points show high concentration in Fe and As. Within the works prior to a remediation strategy, reactive transport modelling were perfor...

  15. Uranium(VI) speciation: modelling, uncertainty and relevance to bioavailability models. Application to uranium uptake by the gills of a freshwater bivalve; Speciation de l'uranium(6), modelisation, incertitude et implication pour les modeles de biodisponibilite. Application a l'accumulation dans les branchies d'un bivalve d'eau douce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denison, F.H

    2004-07-01

    The effects of varying solution composition on the interactions between uranium(VI) and excised gills of the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea have been investigated in well defined solution media. A significant reduction in the uptake of uranium was observed on increasing the concentrations of the uranium complexing ligands citrate and carbonate. Saturation kinetics as a function of uranium concentration at a pH value of 5.0 were observed, indicating that the uptake of uranium is a facilitated process, probably involving one or several trans-membrane transport systems. A relatively small change in the uptake of uranium was found as a function of pH (factor of ca. 2), despite the extremely large changes to the solution speciation of uranium within the range of pH investigated (5.0 - 7.5). A comprehensive review of the thermodynamic data relevant to the solution composition domain employed for this study was performed. Estimates of the uncertainties for the formation constants of aqueous uranium(VI) species were integrated into a thermodynamic database. A computer program was written to predict the equilibrium distribution of uranium(VI) in simple aqueous systems, using thermodynamic parameter mean-values. The program was extended to perform Monte Carlo and Quasi Monte Carlo uncertainty analyses, incorporating the thermodynamic database uncertainty estimates, to quantitatively predict the uncertainties inherent in predicting the solution speciation of uranium. The use of thermodynamic equilibrium modelling as a tool for interpreting the bioavailability of uranium(VI) was investigated. Observed uranium(VI) uptake behaviour was interpreted as a function of the predicted changes to the solution speciation of uranium. Different steady-state or pre-equilibrium approaches to modelling uranium uptake were tested. Alternative modelling approaches were also tested, considering the potential changes to membrane transport system activity or sorption characteristics on

  16. Model-Based Analysis of the Role of Biological, Hydrological and Geochemical Factors Affecting Uranium Bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium contamination is a serious concern at several sites motivating the development of novel treatment strategies such as the Geobacter-mediated reductive immobilization of uranium. However, this bioremediation strategy has not yet been optimized for the sustained uranium removal. While several reactive-transport models have been developed to represent Geobacter-mediated bioremediation of uranium, these models often lack the detailed quantitative description of the microbial process (e.g., biomass build-up in both groundwater and sediments, electron transport system, etc.) and the interaction between biogeochemical and hydrological process. In this study, a novel multi-scale model was developed by integrating our recent model on electron capacitance of Geobacter (Zhao et al., 2010) with a comprehensive simulator of coupled fluid flow, hydrologic transport, heat transfer, and biogeochemical reactions. This mechanistic reactive-transport model accurately reproduces the experimental data for the bioremediation of uranium with acetate amendment. We subsequently performed global sensitivity analysis with the reactive-transport model in order to identify the main sources of prediction uncertainty caused by synergistic effects of biological, geochemical, and hydrological processes. The proposed approach successfully captured significant contributing factors across time and space, thereby improving the structure and parameterization of the comprehensive reactive-transport model. The global sensitivity analysis also provides a potentially useful tool to evaluate uranium bioremediation strategy. The simulations suggest that under difficult environments (e.g., highly contaminated with U(VI) at a high migration rate of solutes), the efficiency of uranium removal can be improved by adding Geobacter species to the contaminated site (bioaugmentation) in conjunction with the addition of electron donor (biostimulation). The simulations also highlight the interactive effect of

  17. Root uptake of uranium by a higher plant model (Phaseolus vulgaris) bioavailability from soil solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laroche, L.; Henner, P.; Camilleri, V.; Garnier-Laplace, J. [CEA Cadarache (DEI/SECRE/LRE), Laboratory of Radioecology and Ecotoxicology, Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2004-07-01

    Uranium behaviour in soils is controlled by actions and interactions between physicochemical and biological processes that also determine its bioavailability. In soil solution, uranium(+VI) aqueous speciation undergoes tremendous changes mainly depending on pH, carbonates, phosphates and organic matter. In a first approach to identify bioavailable species of U to plants, cultures were performed using hydroponics, to allow an easy control of the composition of the exposure media. The latter, here an artificial soil solution, was designed to control the uranium species in solution. The geochemical speciation code JCHESS using a database compiled from the OECD/NEA thermochemical database project and verified was used to perform the solution speciation calculations. On this theoretical basis, three domains were defined for short-duration well-defined laboratory experiments in simplified conditions: pH 4.9, 5.8 and 7 where predicted dominant species are uranyl ions, hydroxyl complexes and carbonates respectively. For these domains, biokinetics and characterization of transmembrane transport according to a classical Michaelis Menten approach were investigated. The Free Ion Model (or its derived Biotic Ligand Model) was tested to determine if U uptake is governed by the free uranyl species or if other metal complexes can be assimilated. The effect of different variables on root assimilation efficiency and phyto-toxicity was explored: presence of ligands such as phosphates or carbonates and competitive ions such as Ca{sup 2+} at the 3 pH. According to previous experiments, uranium was principally located in roots whatever the pH and no difference in uranium uptake was evidenced between the main growth stages of the plant. Within the 3 studied chemical domains, results from short-term kinetics evidenced a linear correlation between total uranium concentration in bean roots and that in exposure media, suggesting that total uranium in soil solution could be a good predictor

  18. SASSE MODELING OF A URANIUM MOLYBDENUM SEPARATION FLOWSHEET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurinat, J

    2007-05-31

    H-Canyon Engineering (HCE) is evaluating the feasibility of processing material from the Super Kukla Prompt Burst Reactor, which operated at the Nevada Test Site from 1964 to 1978. This material is comprised of 90 wt % uranium (U) (at approximately 20% 235U enrichment) alloyed with 10 wt % molybdenum (Mo). The objective is to dissolve the material in nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) in the H-Canyon dissolvers and then to process the dissolved material through H-Canyon First and Second Cycle solvent extraction. The U product from Second Cycle will be sent to the highly enriched uranium (HEU) blend down program. In the blend down program, enriched U from the 1EU product stream will be blended with natural U at a ratio of 1 part enriched U per 3.5 parts natural U to meet a reactor fuel specification of 4.95% 235U before being shipped for use by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in its nuclear plants. The TVA specification calls for <200 mg Mo/g U (200 ppm). Since natural U has about 10 mg Mo/g U, the required purity of the 1EU product prior to blending is about 800 mg Mo/g U, allowing for uncertainties. HCE requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) define a flowsheet for the safe and efficient processing of the U-10Mo material. This report presents a computational model of the solvent extraction portion of the proposed flowsheet. The two main objectives of the computational model are to demonstrate that the Mo impurity requirement can be met and to show that the solvent feed rates in the proposed flowsheet, in particular to 1A and 1D Banks, are adequate to prevent refluxing of U and thereby ensure nuclear criticality safety. SASSE (Spreadsheet Algorithm for Stagewise Solvent Extraction), a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet that supports Argonne National Laboratory's proprietary AMUSE (Argonne Model for Universal Solvent Extraction) code, was selected to model the U/Mo separation flowsheet. SASSE spreadsheet models of H-Canyon First and Second Cycle

  19. Texas Panhandle soil-crop-beef food chain for uranium: a dynamic model validated by experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-term simulations of uranium transport in the soil-crop-beef food chain were performed using the BIOTRAN model. Experimental data means from an extensive Pantex beef cattle study are presented. Experimental data were used to validate the computer model. Measurements of uranium in air, soil, water, range grasses, feed, and cattle tissues are compared to simulated uranium output values in these matrices when the BIOTRAN model was set at the measured soil and air values. The simulations agreed well with experimental data even though metabolic details for ruminants and uranium chemical form in the environment remain to be studied. 16 references, 7 figures, 2 tables

  20. Texas Panhandle soil-crop-beef food chain for uranium: a dynamic model validated by experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-term simulations of uranium transport in the soil-crop-beef food chain were performed using the BIOTRAN model. Experimental data means from an extensive Pantex beef cattle study are presented. Experimental data were used to validate the computer model. Measurements of uranium in air, soil, water, range grasses, feed, and cattle tissues are compared to simulated uranium output values in these matrices when the BIOTRAN model was set at the measured soil and air values. The simulations agreed well with experimental data even though metabolic details for ruminants and uranium chemical form in the environment remain to be studied

  1. Precambrian uranium-bearing quartz-pebble conglomerates: exploration model and United States resource potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houston, R.S.; Karlstrom, K.E.

    1979-11-01

    Uranium has been discovered in fluvial quartz-pebble conglomerates in most of the Precambrian shield areas of the world, including the Canadian, African, South American, Indian, Baltic, and Australian shields. Occurrences in these and other areas are shown. Two of these occurrences, the Huronian supergroup of Canada and the Witwatersrand deposit of South Africa contain 20 to 30 percent of the planet's known uranium reserves. Thus it is critical that we understand the origin of these deposits and develop exploration models that can aid in finding new deposits. Inasmuch as these uranium-bearing conglomerates are confined almost entirely to rocks of Precambrian age, Part I of this review begins with a discussion of Precambrian geology as it applies to the conglomerates. This is followed by a discussion of genetic concepts, a discussion of unresolved problems, and finally a suggested exploration model. Part II summarizes known and potential occurrences of Precambrian fossil placers in the world and evaluates them in terms of the suggested exploration model. Part III discusses the potential for important Precambrian fossil-placer uranium deposits in the United States and includes suggestions that may be helpful in establishing an exploration program in this country. Part III also brings together new (1975-1978) data on uranium occurrences in the Precambrian of the Wyoming Province. Part IV is a complete bibliography of Precambrian fossil placers, divided according to geographical areas. In total, this paper is designed to be a comprehensive review of Precambrian uranium-bearing fossil placers which will be of use to uranium explorationists and to students of Precambrian geology.

  2. Precambrian uranium-bearing quartz-pebble conglomerates: exploration model and United States resource potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium has been discovered in fluvial quartz-pebble conglomerates in most of the Precambrian shield areas of the world, including the Canadian, African, South American, Indian, Baltic, and Australian shields. Occurrences in these and other areas are shown. Two of these occurrences, the Huronian supergroup of Canada and the Witwatersrand deposit of South Africa contain 20 to 30 percent of the planet's known uranium reserves. Thus it is critical that we understand the origin of these deposits and develop exploration models that can aid in finding new deposits. Inasmuch as these uranium-bearing conglomerates are confined almost entirely to rocks of Precambrian age, Part I of this review begins with a discussion of Precambrian geology as it applies to the conglomerates. This is followed by a discussion of genetic concepts, a discussion of unresolved problems, and finally a suggested exploration model. Part II summarizes known and potential occurrences of Precambrian fossil placers in the world and evaluates them in terms of the suggested exploration model. Part III discusses the potential for important Precambrian fossil-placer uranium deposits in the United States and includes suggestions that may be helpful in establishing an exploration program in this country. Part III also brings together new (1975-1978) data on uranium occurrences in the Precambrian of the Wyoming Province. Part IV is a complete bibliography of Precambrian fossil placers, divided according to geographical areas. In total, this paper is designed to be a comprehensive review of Precambrian uranium-bearing fossil placers which will be of use to uranium explorationists and to students of Precambrian geology

  3. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GAO was asked to address several questions concerning a number of proposed uranium enrichment bills introduced during the 100th Congress. The bill would have restructured the Department of Energy's uranium enrichment program as a government corporation to allow it to compete more effectively in the domestic and international markets. Some of GAO's findings discussed are: uranium market experts believe and existing market models show that the proposed DOE purchase of a $750 million of uranium from domestic producers may not significantly increase production because of large producer-held inventories; excess uranium enrichment production capacity exists throughout the world; therefore, foreign producers are expected to compete heavily in the United States throughout the 1990s as utilities' contracts with DOE expire; and according to a 1988 agreement between DOE's Offices of Nuclear Energy and Defense Programs, enrichment decommissioning costs, estimated to total $3.6 billion for planning purposes, will be shared by the commercial enrichment program and the government

  4. Hydrogeochemical modelling of an active system of uranium fixation by organic soils and sediments (Needle's Eye, Scotland)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium accumulation in organic-rich sediments can be closely modelled by assuming that the dominant effect of the uranium-organic matter interaction is the direct or indirect reduction of uranyl compounds to form U(IV) minerals, especially uraninite-pitchblende. Application of this model to the Needle's Eye (Scotland) site where uranium is actively accumulating in Quaternary sediments demonstrates that uranium accumulation is both effective and rapid in environments involving shallow, organic-rich, reducing horizons. The period of uranium deposit formation at Needle's Eye is estimated to be as short as 5000 years. The transport of uranium to the site of deposition by oxidizing groundwaters and the channelling of these oxidizing uraniferous groundwaters are identified as important factors involved in the rapid accumulation of uranium. The regional hydrogeological model indicates that a fault in the area appears to act as a hydraulic screen for the uraniferous groundwaters. On one side of the fault the Quaternary sediments are well drained whilst on the other the flow of groundwater seeps out creating a major flux just at the bottom of the organic-rich layers. The local hydrogeological model shows that the groundwater flow is vertical in this area. A third significant factor in the development of these uranium accumulations is the presence of a significant nearby source of leachable primary uranium. In the case of the Needle's Eye site this is in the form of some thirty 185 ± 20 Ma, pitchblende-bearing veins. 32 refs., 10 figs., 8 tabs

  5. Effects of drop testing on scale model shipping containers shielded with depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three scale model shipping containers shielded with depleted uranium were dropped onto an essentially unyielding surface from various heights to determine their margins to failure. This report presents the results of a thorough posttest examination of the models to check for basic structural integrity, shielding integrity, and deformations. Because of unexpected behavior exhibited by the depleted uranium shielding, several tests were performed to further characterize its mechanical properties. Based on results of the investigations, recommendations are made for improved container design and for applying the results to full-scale containers. Even though the specimens incorporated specific design features, the results of this study are generally applicable to any container design using depleted uranium

  6. Advantages of integration of uranium exploration data in GIS and models as tools for decision support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In many areas where uranium has been or is explored, an enormous amount of data on geology and hydrogeology is available. When these uranium exploration data are stored in a structured way, they can be made useful for other purposes dm uranium exploration only. For instance, in case of environmental pollution, which is often a side-effect of uranium activities such as mining and leaching, the data can be used to develop a computer model of the environment. With such a model impacts can be calculated of different scenarios for cleaning up or isolation of the pollution. A GIS can be used to store the data, to visualize the data (map production) and to analyse the data, but also to calculate input for the models. The advantages of using GIS and models as tools for decision support are explained with the Contaminant Transport Information System (CTIS) as a case study. The CTIS has been developed for remediation operations in the uranium mining area Straz pod Ralskem and Hamr in the Czech Republic. The CTIS consists of a GIS database, a regional groundwater flow model and a local contaminant transport model as well as interfaces for data transfer between the components of the information system. The power of the CTIS lies in the fact that the modelling necessary for the design of a remediation operation can be carried out efficiently by using one of the two models, depending on the specific question. Thus alternative remediation scenarios can be judged easily and fairly on their consequences and effectiveness. (author)

  7. Predictive geochemical modeling of uranium and other contaminants in laboratory columns in relatively oxidizing, carbonate-rich solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonate heap leaching of uranium-contaminated soils and sediments represents a viable, cost-effective remediation technology. Column experiments have been conducted using 0.1, 0.25, and 0.5 M Na2CO3/NaHCO3 solutions for leaching uranium from soils located adjacent to an incinerator at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) site. Results from column experiments and geochemical modeling are used to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of heap leaching. Leach efficiencies of up to 72 wt.% of total uranium in CaO-agglomerated soil result from dissolution of uranium (U(VI)-dominated) minerals, formation of the soluble complex UO2(CO3)34-, and uranium desorption from clay minerals, ferric hydroxides, and humic acids. Parameters that control the extent of uranium extraction include pH, Eh, temperature, carbonate concentration, lixiviant-flow rate, pore-solution chemistry, solid phases, and soil texture

  8. Standard model for safety analysis report of hexafluoride power plants from natural uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standard model for safety analysis report for hexafluoride production power plants from natural uranium is presented, showing the presentation form, the nature and the degree of detail, of the minimal information required by the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission - CNEN. (E.G.)

  9. Bio sorption of Uranium by baker's yeast in the presence of Lead and Cadmium and modeling of equilibrium data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bio sorption technology is one of the novel technologies used for removal and recovery of radioactive metals from aqueous solutions. Scheduled researches are required for this technique. In this research, bio sorption of uranium, lead and cadmium by immobilized baker's yeast on calcium alginate was investigated. Equilibrium parameters in single systems and binary systems (uranium-lead and uranium-cadmium) were studied. The obtained results in single systems showed that the uranium uptake capacity is higher than that of lead and cadmium. Also, according to the observations in binary systems, the uranium uptake capacity was decreased by interferences of lead or cadmium ions. Nevertheless, uranium uptake capacity in these binary systems is high (more than 130 mg g-1 in uranium-lead and 200 mg g-1 in uranium-cadmium binary systems). The equilibrium isotherms were modeled by Langmuir, Freundlich and combination Langmuir-Freundlich models in single systems and the competitive Langmuir, modified extended Langmuir, extended Freundlich and combination Langmuir-Freundlich models in binary systems. According to the results, the Freundlich model in single systems and the extended Freundlich model in binary systems were found to be better than the others.

  10. Discussion on ore-controlling factors and metallogenic model of uranium ore-formation in Xieersu depression, south Songliao Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the geologic characteristics of Xieersu depression, uranium mineralization in this area is believed to be sandstone type of epigenic of multi times superimposition and the ore-formation is mainly controlled by the factors such as the uranium source, the development of interlayer oxidation zone, the variation of hydrodynamic conditions, etc.. A preliminary metallogenetic model has been set up. (authors)

  11. Statistical model of global uranium resources and long-term availability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monnet Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Most recent studies on the long-term supply of uranium make simplistic assumptions on the available resources and their production costs. Some consider the whole uranium quantities in the Earth's crust and then estimate the production costs based on the ore grade only, disregarding the size of ore bodies and the mining techniques. Other studies consider the resources reported by countries for a given cost category, disregarding undiscovered or unreported quantities. In both cases, the resource estimations are sorted following a cost merit order. In this paper, we describe a methodology based on “geological environments”. It provides a more detailed resource estimation and it is more flexible regarding cost modelling. The global uranium resource estimation introduced in this paper results from the sum of independent resource estimations from different geological environments. A geological environment is defined by its own geographical boundaries, resource dispersion (average grade and size of ore bodies and their variance, and cost function. With this definition, uranium resources are considered within ore bodies. The deposit breakdown of resources is modelled using a bivariate statistical approach where size and grade are the two random variables. This makes resource estimates possible for individual projects. Adding up all geological environments provides a repartition of all Earth's crust resources in which ore bodies are sorted by size and grade. This subset-based estimation is convenient to model specific cost structures.

  12. Transport modelling in the natural analogue study of the Cigar Lake uranium deposit (Saskatchewan, Canada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinson; Yu, Ji-Wei; Neretnieks, Ivars

    1996-02-01

    A near-field release model is developed both conceptually and mathematically. The model is tested against known helium release from the Cigar Lake uranium ore deposit. The release and transport of various aqueous species (including some radionuclides) in the deposit are studied by using this model. The uranium release rate predicted by the model is extremely low, which is consistent with field observations. In modelling the release of three other radionuclides ( 3H, 14C and 36Cl), the in situ generation and decay are taken into account. The measured concentration gradients of hydrogen was used to estimate the net rate of radiolysis. The simultaneously formed oxidising species are found in sulphates formed by oxidation of sulphides. There is a good agreement of the estimated rate of formation of the reducing component hydrogen and the oxidising component as found in the sulphate.

  13. Reactive transport modelling of uranium migration in an Organic ILLL waste disposal cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Organic wastes are present in intermediate and long lived (ILLL) radioactive waste. Under radiolysis and alkaline leaching, organic matters can be degraded and solubilised. The induced chemical species can modify the water chemistry and the mineralogy of the materials of interest: concrete (container, lining and engineered barrier) and Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock (COx). Furthermore, the organic species can also complex radionuclides, such as uranium, and increase their migration distance. This study is focused on an organic ILLL waste cell, where organic inventory is composed of cellulose, polymer polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and other polymers. The following species are considered to be released in solution: isosaccharinic acid (Isa, from cellulose), phtalic acid (and hydrochloric acid, from PVC), adipic acid (from PUR), oxalic acid and acetic acid. Reactive transport modelling is used to investigate the chemical evolution of the waste disposal cell and the migration of organics and uranium in saturated concrete materials and surrounding host rock up to 105 years long. The reactive transport code HYTEC is used for simulation with a one radial dimension mesh and the Andra Thermochimie DataBase (version 8) is used for chemical speciation calculations. Modelling is performed considering characteristics of continuous and homogeneous porous medium applied on each cell compartment. Beyond the representation of the cell concrete components and the near-field clay stone degradation, this study aims to represent at best (i) the organic-uranium complexation considering binary and hydroxo ternary complexes included in the TDB and (ii) the sorption processes relative to uranium and organics on the different cell materials: i) the different processes of organic sorption on: a. cement pastes (as a function of degradation) with model from Pointeau et al. (2004 and 2008) for Isa; b. clays stone phases, with a Kd model developed on

  14. Data-process-criteria model for roll-type uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roll-type uranium deposits occur in reduced sandstones along linear, crescent-shaped oxidation-reduction boundaries. Roll-type deposits have been particularly important sources of uranium in the United States, but deposits are also known in South America, U.S.S.R., Australia, and other countries. Economic deposits commonly contain a few to more than 25 million pounds U at mining grades between 0.10 and 0.25 percent U. A data-process-criteria (DPC) model for roll-type uranium deposits, based largely upon published deposit geologic characteristics (data) and interpretations of their causative geologic processes, is presented. From the data and process interpretations, geologic characteristics (recognition criteria) have been selected that are most useful and reliable in the exploration for and evaluation of roll-type uranium occurrences. All criteria require field observations and include considerations of regional geologic setting (geometry, size, and composition and erosion of uplifts and basins), structure, stratigraphy, and characteristics of the potential host sandstones, including dimensions, depositional environment, lithology, reductants and alteration. This model is applicable to resource evaluations and exploration in any sandstone environment, but particularly in intermountaine basins. The use of genetic or process interpretations promotes the identification of previously unrecognized criteria and greater confidence in (a) the selection of recognition criteria and (b) in assigning relative importances to the favorability of each criterion. The use of only field-observable geologic characteristics as recognition criteria insures greatest reliability in exploration, evaluation, and resource studies. (author)

  15. Modeling study of gaseous Rn-222, Xe-133, and He-4 for uranium exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeter, H.W.

    1980-01-01

    This work presents one-dimensional mathematical models to simulate the transport of gaseous radon-222 (Rn-222), xenon-133 (Xe-133), and helium-4 (He-4) away from uranium ore deposits. The resulting concentrations of indicator nuclides in the overburden are used to infer the detectability of ore deposits by emanation methods. In the case of homogeneous, non-radioactive formations, Rn-222 and some of its daughter products are calculated to be detectable at distances of several tens of meters from a planar uranium ore deposit (1 m tickness, 0.6% U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, 20% emanation). Models of He-4 diffuson in rock yield highly uncertain results because measurements of diffusion coefficients in actual rock types are lacking and because the flux of helium from deep within the earth is generally unknown. Comparisons of model results to field data suggest that He-4 diffusion coefficients of 10/sup -4/ to 10/sup -5/ cm/sup 2//sec are appropriate. It is speculated that moisture in the rock column could reduce the coefficient significantly compared to the dry-soil case. Inhomogeneity in rock formations is simulated by a multiple-layer model. A comparison of fluorometric uranium data to gamma spectra measurements suggests the migration and deposition of Ra-226 near the water table. Modeling results are improved when this process is taken into account. A constant soil gas velocity of 1 x 10/sup -4/ cm/sec causes indicator concentrations to change by several orders of magnitude. If steady upward soil gas motion exists in nature, the detectability of uranium ore by emanation methods will be significantly different from that indicated by pure diffusion models. Barometric influences on gas transport are simulated by time-dependent numerical models.

  16. Modeling study of gaseous Rn-222, Xe-133, and He-4 for uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents one-dimensional mathematical models to simulate the transport of gaseous radon-222 (Rn-222), xenon-133 (Xe-133), and helium-4 (He-4) away from uranium ore deposits. The resulting concentrations of indicator nuclides in the overburden are used to infer the detectability of ore deposits by emanation methods. In the case of homogeneous, non-radioactive formations, Rn-222 and some of its daughter products are calculated to be detectable at distances of several tens of meters from a planar uranium ore deposit (1 m tickness, 0.6% U3O8, 20% emanation). Models of He-4 diffuson in rock yield highly uncertain results because measurements of diffusion coefficients in actual rock types are lacking and because the flux of helium from deep within the earth is generally unknown. Comparisons of model results to field data suggest that He-4 diffusion coefficients of 10-4 to 10-5 cm2/sec are appropriate. It is speculated that moisture in the rock column could reduce the coefficient significantly compared to the dry-soil case. Inhomogeneity in rock formations is simulated by a multiple-layer model. A comparison of fluorometric uranium data to gamma spectra measurements suggests the migration and deposition of Ra-226 near the water table. Modeling results are improved when this process is taken into account. A constant soil gas velocity of 1 x 10-4 cm/sec causes indicator concentrations to change by several orders of magnitude. If steady upward soil gas motion exists in nature, the detectability of uranium ore by emanation methods will be significantly different from that indicated by pure diffusion models. Barometric influences on gas transport are simulated by time-dependent numerical models

  17. An approach to the mathematical modelling of the uranium series redistribution within ore bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distributions of the uranium series isotopes in the Koongarra ore body were predicted by a simple one-dimensional model of isotopic migration parameters. Controlling the predictions were the retardation factors and the groundwater flow rates. The conditions modelled were a groundwater flow rate of 1 meter per year, retardation factors of 1 x 104 for 238U and of 1.2 x 104 for 234U, and 230Th is immobile. For this set of conditions, an exceptionally good agreement was observed between field-measured isotope ratios and ''predicted'' isotope ratios. A multiphase model adequately describes the redistribution of uranium and daughter radionuclides in the weathered zone of the ore bodies. It redistributes U, Th and Ra isotopes among an aqueous phase, an amorphous iron phase, a crystalline phase and a phase of clay and quartz. 28 refs., 26 figs., 8 tabs

  18. SASSE MODELING OF A URANIUM MOLYBDENUM SEPARATION FLOWSHEET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H-Canyon Engineering (HCE) is evaluating the feasibility of processing material from the Super Kukla Prompt Burst Reactor, which operated at the Nevada Test Site from 1964 to 1978. This material is comprised of 90 wt % uranium (U) (at approximately 20% 235U enrichment) alloyed with 10 wt % molybdenum (Mo). The objective is to dissolve the material in nitric acid (HNO3) in the H-Canyon dissolvers and then to process the dissolved material through H-Canyon First and Second Cycle solvent extraction. The U product from Second Cycle will be sent to the highly enriched uranium (HEU) blend down program. In the blend down program, enriched U from the 1EU product stream will be blended with natural U at a ratio of 1 part enriched U per 3.5 parts natural U to meet a reactor fuel specification of 4.95% 235U before being shipped for use by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in its nuclear plants. The TVA specification calls for 3 concentrations for aluminum nitrate (Al(NO3))3 in the feed to 1A Bank. (Unlike Savanah River Site (SRS) fuels, the U/Mo material contains no aluminum (Al). As a result, higher HNO3 concentrations are required in the 1AF to provide the necessary salting.) The TVA limit for the final blended product is 200 (micro)g Mo/g U, which translates to approximately 800 mg Mo/g U for the Second Cycle product solution. SASSE calculations give a Mo impurity level of 4 (micro)g Mo/g U in the Second Cycle product solution, conservatively based on Mo organic-to-aqueous distributions measured during minibank testing for previous processing of Piqua reactor fuel. The calculated impurity level is slightly more than two orders of magnitude lower than the required level. The Piqua feed solution contained a significant concentration of Al(NO3)3, which is not present in the feed solution for the proposed flowsheet. Measured distribution data indicate that, without Al(NO3)3 or other salting agents present, Mo extracts into the organic phase to a much lesser extent, so that

  19. Kinetic reactive transport modelling of column tests for uranium In Situ Recovery (ISR) mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Joint interpretation and geochemical modelling of batch and column tests. • Numerical simulation of the acid leaching sequence of uranium ore material. • Coupled reactive transport model constrained with experimentally calibrated kinetics. • Factors controlling leaching reactions and uranium recovery efficiency. - Abstract: The In Situ Recovery (ISR) mining method consists in mining ore by in situ chemical leaching with acid or alkaline solutions. Numerical modelling of the interaction between solution and rock is examined in order to improve the management of this process. Three different phenomena have to be taken into account in a numerical reactive transport simulation of uranium ISR mining: (1) the geochemical reactions; (2) the kinetics of these reactions, and (3) the hydrodynamic transport rate compared to the reaction kinetics. Two ‘classical’ types of leaching experiments were performed: (1) tests in batch reactors; and (2) extraction in flow-through columns. A comprehensive interpretation of the complete leaching test results (mineralogy of the samples and chemical analysis of leachates) led to the development of a conceptual model with reasonable assumptions about dissolution and precipitation reactions during the acid leach of the columns. This conceptual model was tested and validated by numerical modelling of the two types of laboratory experiments. Batch experiments were simulated with the geochemical code CHESS in order to model the leachate solutions and to calibrate the geochemical reaction paths and their kinetic laws. Column experiments were simulated with the coupled hydrodynamic and geochemical code HYTEC by using kinetic laws calibrated on batch experiments. The geochemical models with kinetics successfully simulated the trend of leachate’ chemistry in the two types of experimental tests (batch and column). Numerical simulation of leaching tests enabled us to translate the chemical release sequence, observed during

  20. Improvement of the laboratory model that simulates the migration of depleted uranium in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To improve the migration model of depleted uranium and confirm the reliability of the laboratory model. Methods: The improved laboratory model of DU migrating in soils has been set up. Method of stratified sampling has been adopted. The uranium element content and 235U/238U were determined by ICP-MS and the depths of DU migration identified. Results: The depth of DU migration was 9 cm ∼ 11 cm, 25 cm ∼ 29 cm, and 35 cm or more, corresponding to the rain pH of 5.6, 4.0, and 3.0 respectively. The depth of DU migration in Chinese experiment module of DU, French DU testing field, battle ground in Kosovo was Over 25 cm, 30 cm and 10 cm-20 cm. Conclusion: Acid rain has promoted the migration of depleted uranium. The migration depths in experiments coincide with the depth measured on the spots polluted by DU, which illustrates the laboratory model has been designed successfully in the main. (authors)

  1. Research on geological modeling and integrated prognosis technologies for uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to continuously rapid development of China's national economy, the demand on energy is increasing urgently, therefore, nuclear power become one of the necessary to the sustainable development of China's future energy. With more and more effort on uranium exploration, undiscovered uranium mineralization near surface and in subsurface is getting less, and it is more and more difficult to find U deposit directly by traditional surface survey. To meet the higher demand in the evaluation and prognosis of U resources, this paper introduces detailedly and systematically the uranium geological modeling and the prognosis technologies through integrated geological data. Guided by geodynamics, metallogenic dynamics and U metallogenetic theory, the geotectonic, geophysical, geochemical and remote sensing data of the known U deposits has been studied to summarize the prognosis factors and build geological models of U deposits. The model and prognosis factors are then transformed into evaluation and prognosis model in GIS. With GIS we can, estimate U resource amount in analogy districts in the outlined U metallogenetic prognosis zone. All the above study have resulted in an integrate set of operating method and technical flow for U resource potential evaluation. (author)

  2. Modeling the migration of radioactive contaminants in groundwater of in situ leaching uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioactive contamination of groundwater from in situ leaching (ISL) of uranium mining is a widespread environmental problem. This paper analyzed the monitor results of groundwater contaminations for a in situ leaching uranium mine. A dynamic model of contaminants transport in groundwater in ISL well field was established. The processes and mechanisms of contaminant transport in groundwater were simulated numerically for a ISL well field. A small quantity of U and SO42- migrate to outside of well field during ISL production stage. But the migration velocity and distance of contaminations is small, and the concentration is low. Contaminants migrate as anomalistic tooth-shape. The migration trend of U and SO42- is consistent. Numerical modeling can provide an effective approach to analyse the transport mechanism, and forecast and control the migration of contaminants in groundwater in ISL well field. (authors)

  3. Geological-economic evaluation model for pithead heap-leaching uranium deposits of hard-rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By analyzing the technical flow of pithead heap-leaching uranium deposits of hard-rock type, the authors analyze its 14 cost items such as ore mining fee and major materials fee etc., and set up a geological-economic evaluation model. Under this geological-evaluation model a computer evaluating program is made in Ziyuan and Lujing uranium ore-fields. The results of static evaluation show that or mining fee is the main part and amortization of both building and equipment and major materials fee are the secondary parts in the total cost of pithead heap-leaching mining. The computer program may assist decision-making in the way of helping decision-makers to select scientificaly the average grade of ore in pithead heap-leaching mining under a total cost. (authors)

  4. Recovery of uranium from UCF liquid waste by anion exchange resin CG-400: Breakthrough curves, elution behavior and modeling studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Amberlite CG-400 anion exchange resin has been used for the recovery of uranium. ► The breakthrough curves and elution behaviors of CG-400 resin have been studied in detailed. ► The mathematical models have been used to analyze the experimental data. ► The CG-400 resin has been applied successfully for uranium recovery from UCF liquid waste. - Abstract: Continuous fixed-bed column studies were carried out by using Amberlite CG-400 anion exchange resin for the recovery of uranium from aqueous solutions (synthetic solutions and uranium conversion facility (UCF) liquid waste). Effects of operating parameters such as flow rate and bed height were studied. The breakthrough capacity decreases with increasing flow rate, but this dependence was not significant with a long column. The maximum breakthrough capacity of uranium ions were achieved by CG-400 resin at a flow rate of 0.2 mL min−1 and bed height 9.1 cm (4 g resin). The elution behavior of uranium from CG-400 resin by various eluents have been investigated and the results show that 0.5 mol L−1 HNO3 is a good eluent for uranium recovery. The Adams–Bohart, Thomas, Yoon–Nelson and Dose–Response models were applied to the experimental data to determine the characteristic parameters of the column for process design using linear regression. The breakthrough curve calculated from the Dose–Response model was in best agreement with the experimental data

  5. Uranium deposits of Gabon and Oklo reactors. Metallogenic model for rich deposits of the lower proterozoic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The geology of the Franceville basin (Gabon) is examined: stratigraphy, tectonics and geodynamics. The mobile zone of the Ogooue is specially studied: lithology, metamorphism and tectonics, isotopic geochronologic data are given. The different uranium deposits are described. A whole chapter is devoted to the study of Oklo natural nuclear reactor. A metallogenic model is proposed evidencing conditions required for deposit genesis. Tectonics, microstructures sedimentology, organic matter, diagenesis and uraniferous mineralizations are examined

  6. Studying uranium migration in natural environment: experimental approach and geochemical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study deals with characterizing uranium migration in a limited zone of Le Bouchet site, a former uranium ore treatment facility, which is dismantled and the rehabilitation of which is under process. Some wastes are packed in a rehabilitated disposal nearby, called the Itteville site. In the framework of the monitoring of the deposit environment (air, water, sediment) set by prefectorial decrees, a piezometer (PZPK) located downstream to the latter, has shown total dissolved uranium peaks each winter since the 1990's. PZPK collects both the interstitial water of a calcareous peat formation, between the surface and 3 m, and an alluvial aquifer near 6 m of depth. Firstly, a hydrogeochemical characterization of the site has evidenced the uranium source term, which is present in the peat soil near 0.8 m, hence excluding any leaching from the waste disposal. Actually, a few microparticles of uranium oxide and mixed uranium-thorium oxide have been detected, but they do not represent the major part of the source term. Secondly, water chemistry of the peat soil water and PZPK has been monitored every two months from 2004 to 2007 in order to understand the reasons of the seasonal fluctuations of [U]tot.diss.. Completed with geochemical modeling and a bacterial identification by 16S rDNA sequence analysis, water chemistry data showed an important sulfate-reducing bacterial activity in summertime, leading to reducing conditions and therefore, a total dissolved uranium content limited by the low solubility of uraninite UIVO2(s). In wintertime, the latter bacterial activity being minimal and the effective pluviometry more important, conditions are more oxidant, which favors U(VI), more soluble, notably as the Ca2UO2(CO3)3(aq) complex, evidenced by TRLFS. Finally, bacterial activity has been reproduced in laboratory in order to better characterize its impact on uranium solubility in the peat soil. Various parameters were tested (C sources, temperature, nutrients) to

  7. Development and test of models in the natural analogue studies of the Cigar Lake uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the model of steady-state near-field mass transport, the model concepts are essentially the same as those in the models developed for a nuclear waste repository. The validity of the model is tested against known helium release. The models shows that the release of Uranium is negligibly low, the release of sulfate is roughly balanced by the release of dissolved hydrogen, indicating possible water radiolysis. The release of radionuclides is in agreement with field observations. In the model of radiation energy deposition, the issue of water radiolysis is addressed directly by calculating the radiation energy deposited in the pore water in the ore body. In the test of the models of coupled solute transport with geochemical reactions, the observed hematisation in the clay halo adjacent to the ore is simulated. The model results show that, at a certain rate of oxidant production, hematite can possibly precipitate in the clay adjacent to the ore body, as observed. The model results also reveal a threshold of oxidant production rate for hematisation. In general, the three models are capable of predicting the most prominent features observed in the deposit. All models point to a certain extent of water radiolysis in the ore body. In addition, the existence of a negligibly permeable clay halo and the presence of reducing minerals like pyrite in the ore and nearby are of vital importance for the preservation of the Uranium ore. 107 refs, 7 figs, 5 tabs

  8. Experimental study and numerical modelling of geochemical reactions occurring during uranium in situ recovery (ISR) mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The in situ Recovery (ISR) method consists of ore mining by in situ chemical leaching with acid or alkaline solutions. ISR takes place underground and is therefore limited to the analysis of the pumped solutions, hence ISR mine management is still empirical. Numerical modelling has been considered to achieve more efficient management of this process. Three different phenomena have to be taken into account for numerical simulations of uranium ISR mining: (1) geochemical reactions; (2) the kinetics of these reactions, and (3) hydrodynamic transport with respect to the reaction kinetics. Leaching tests have been conducted on ore samples from an uranium mine in Tortkuduk (Kazakhstan) where ISR is conducted by acid leaching. Two types of leaching experiments were performed: (1) tests in batch reactors; and (2) extraction in flow through columns. The assumptions deduced from the leaching tests were tested and validated by modelling the laboratory experiments with the numerical codes CHESS and HYTEC, both developed at the Geosciences research center of Mines ParisTech. A well-constrained 1D hydrogeochemical transport model of the ISR process at laboratory-scale was proposed. It enables to translate the chemical release sequence that is observed during experiments into a geochemical reaction sequence. It was possible to highlight the controlling factors of uranium dissolution, and the precipitation of secondary mineral phase in the deposit, as well as the determination of the relative importance of these factors. (author)

  9. Double-layer structure model of the uranium generating bed in the land basins of the northwestern China and its significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper puts forward a double layer structure model of uranium generating bed in the land basins of Northwestern China, i.e. uranium ganerating bed = source layer of uranium+gathering uranium layer. The mechanism of its formation: Feldspar was hydromicatized. Some feldspar, quarts detrital silicate minerals were replaced to redden by the authigenesis of hematite and goethite. In the course of the oxidation, a little uranium is released from the detrital minerals. Because of the oxidation environment, the released uranium wasn't able to be precipitated, only to diffuse to the adjacent grey bed which has low Eh value with uranium-bearing 'stagnant water' fixed in pores during the dewatering process of the diagenesis and form minable uranium deposit. The significance of the model for uranium prospecting are as follows: (1) Uranium source range is much expanded concerning ruanium prospecting in sandstone. (2) For the potential assessment of basin and the selection of potential area, the model is an important prospecting criterion. (3) By using the main criterion uranium-generating bed-arkosic red beds well, the buried ore bodies can be found provided that arkosic red beds were regarded as a significant criterion of uranium-generating bed

  10. Conceptual Model of Uranium in the Vadose Zone for Acidic and Alkaline Wastes Discharged at the Hanford Site Central Plateau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J.; Szecsody, James E.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2014-09-01

    Historically, uranium was disposed in waste solutions of varying waste chemistry at the Hanford Site Central Plateau. The character of how uranium was distributed in the vadose zone during disposal, how it has continued to migrate through the vadose zone, and the magnitude of potential impacts on groundwater are strongly influenced by geochemical reactions in the vadose zone. These geochemical reactions can be significantly influenced by the disposed-waste chemistry near the disposal location. This report provides conceptual models and supporting information to describe uranium fate and transport in the vadose zone for both acidic and alkaline wastes discharged at a substantial number of waste sites in the Hanford Site Central Plateau. The conceptual models include consideration of how co-disposed acidic or alkaline fluids influence uranium mobility in terms of induced dissolution/precipitation reactions and changes in uranium sorption with a focus on the conditions near the disposal site. This information, when combined with the extensive information describing uranium fate and transport at near background pH conditions, enables focused characterization to support effective fate and transport estimates for uranium in the subsurface.

  11. Building Conceptual Models of Field-Scale Uranium Reactive Transport in a Dynamic Vadose Zone-Aquifer-River System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subsurface simulation is being used to build, test, and couple conceptual process models to better understand controls on a 0.4 km by 1.0 km uranium plume that has persisted above the drinking water standard in the groundwater of the Hanford 300 Area over the last 15 years. At this site, uranium-contaminated sediments in the vadose zone and aquifer are subject to significant variations in water levels and velocities driven by the diurnal, weekly, seasonal, and episodic Columbia River stage dynamics. Groundwater flow reversals typically occur twice a day with significant exchange of river water and groundwater in the near-river aquifer. Mixing of the dilute solution chemistry of the river with the groundwater complicates the uranium sorption behavior as the mobility of U(VI) has been shown experimentally to be a function of pH, carbonate, calcium, and uranium. Furthermore, uranium mass transfer between solid and aqueous phases has been observed to be rate-limited in the context of the high groundwater velocities resulting from the river stage fluctuations and the highly transmissive sediments (hydraulic conductivities ∼1500 m/d). One- and two-dimensional vertical cross-sectional simulations of variably-saturated flow and reactive transport, based on laboratory-derived models of distributed rate mass transfer and equilibrium multicomponent surface complexation, are used to assess uranium transport at the dynamic vadose zone aquifer interface as well as changes to uranium mobility due to incursions of river water into the aquifer

  12. A mathematical model for prediction of pertraction of uranium in hollow fiber contactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mathematical model has been developed to predict the transport of uranium through Dispersed Liquid Membrane (DLM) configuration in hollow fiber contactor using TBP as extractant in dodecane diluent with sodium carbonate as strippant. The prediction of the model has been substantiated with experimental results. Parametric studies have been conducted and a few of them have been presented here. The model takes into account complexation reaction at the aqueous-organic interface at the pores of hollow fiber lumens and predicts the rate of change of concentration in the aqueous feed phase flowing through the lumens in re-circulating mode. (author)

  13. Uranium fission track length distribution modelling for retracing chronothermometrical history of minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spontaneous fission of uranium 238 isotope contained in certain minerals creates damage zones called latent tracks, that can be etched chemically. The observation of these etched tracks and the measurement of their characteristics using an optical microscope are the basis of several applications in the domain of the earth sciences. First, the determination of their densities permits dating a mineral and establishing uranium mapping of rocks. Second, the measurement of their lengths can be a good source of information for retracing the thermal and tectonic history of the sample. The study of the partial annealing of tracks in apatite appears to be the ideal indicator for the evaluation of petroleum potential of a sedimentary basin. To allow the development of this application, it is necessary to devise a theoretical model of track length distributions. The model which is proposed takes into account the most realistic hypotheses concerning registration, etching and observation of tracks. The characteristics of surface tracks (projected lengths, depths, inclination angles, real lengths) and confined tracks (Track IN Track and Track IN Cleavage) are calculated. Surface tracks and confined tracks are perfectly complementary for chrono-thermometric interpretation of complex geological histories. The method is applied to the case of two samples with different tectonic history, issued from the cretaceous alcalin magmatism from the Pyrenees (Bilbao, Spain). A graphic method of distribution deconvolution is proposed. Finally, the uranium migration, depending on the hydrothermal alteration, is studied on the granite from Auriat (France)

  14. Studying uranium migration in natural environment: experimental approach and geochemical modeling; Etude de la migration de l'uranium en milieu naturel: approche experimentale et modelisation geochimique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phrommavanh, V.

    2008-10-15

    The present study deals with characterizing uranium migration in a limited zone of Le Bouchet site, a former uranium ore treatment facility, which is dismantled and the rehabilitation of which is under process. Some wastes are packed in a rehabilitated disposal nearby, called the Itteville site. In the framework of the monitoring of the deposit environment (air, water, sediment) set by prefectorial decrees, a piezometer (PZPK) located downstream to the latter, has shown total dissolved uranium peaks each winter since the 1990's. PZPK collects both the interstitial water of a calcareous peat formation, between the surface and 3 m, and an alluvial aquifer near 6 m of depth. Firstly, a hydrogeochemical characterization of the site has evidenced the uranium source term, which is present in the peat soil near 0.8 m, hence excluding any leaching from the waste disposal. Actually, a few microparticles of uranium oxide and mixed uranium-thorium oxide have been detected, but they do not represent the major part of the source term. Secondly, water chemistry of the peat soil water and PZPK has been monitored every two months from 2004 to 2007 in order to understand the reasons of the seasonal fluctuations of [U]tot.diss.. Completed with geochemical modeling and a bacterial identification by 16S rDNA sequence analysis, water chemistry data showed an important sulfate-reducing bacterial activity in summertime, leading to reducing conditions and therefore, a total dissolved uranium content limited by the low solubility of uraninite U{sup IV}O{sub 2}(s). In wintertime, the latter bacterial activity being minimal and the effective pluviometry more important, conditions are more oxidant, which favors U(VI), more soluble, notably as the Ca{sub 2}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}(aq) complex, evidenced by TRLFS. Finally, bacterial activity has been reproduced in laboratory in order to better characterize its impact on uranium solubility in the peat soil. Various parameters were tested

  15. Model of a Generic Natural Uranium Conversion Plant ? Suggested Measures to Strengthen International Safeguards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffo-Caiado, Ana Claudia [ORNL; Begovich, John M [ORNL; Ferrada, Juan J [ORNL

    2009-11-01

    This is the final report that closed a joint collaboration effort between DOE and the National Nuclear Energy Commission of Brazil (CNEN). In 2005, DOE and CNEN started a collaborative effort to evaluate measures that can strengthen the effectiveness of international safeguards at a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP). The work was performed by DOE s Oak Ridge National Laboratory and CNEN. A generic model of a NUCP was developed and typical processing steps were defined. Advanced instrumentation and techniques for verification purposes were identified and investigated. The scope of the work was triggered by the International Atomic Energy Agency s 2003 revised policy concerning the starting point of safeguards at uranium conversion facilities. Prior to this policy only the final products of the uranium conversion plant were considered to be of composition and purity suitable for use in the nuclear fuel cycle and therefore, subject to the IAEA safeguards control. DOE and CNEN have explored options for implementing the IAEA policy, although Brazil understands that the new policy established by the IAEA is beyond the framework of the Quadripartite Agreement of which it is one of the parties, together with Argentina, the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC) and the IAEA. Two technical papers on this subject were published at the 2005 and 2008 INMM Annual Meetings.

  16. Reliable modeling of the electronic spectra of realistic uranium complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecmer, Paweł; Govind, Niranjan; Kowalski, Karol; de Jong, Wibe A.; Visscher, Lucas

    2013-07-01

    We present an EOMCCSD (equation of motion coupled cluster with singles and doubles) study of excited states of the small [UO2]2+ and [UO2]+ model systems as well as the larger UVIO2(saldien) complex. In addition, the triples contribution within the EOMCCSDT and CR-EOMCCSD(T) (completely renormalized EOMCCSD with non-iterative triples) approaches for the [UO2]2+ and [UO2]+ systems as well as the active-space variant of the CR-EOMCCSD(T) method—CR-EOMCCSd(t)—for the UVIO2(saldien) molecule are investigated. The coupled cluster data were employed as benchmark to choose the "best" appropriate exchange-correlation functional for subsequent time-dependent density functional (TD-DFT) studies on the transition energies for closed-shell species. Furthermore, the influence of the saldien ligands on the electronic structure and excitation energies of the [UO2]+ molecule is discussed. The electronic excitations as well as their oscillator dipole strengths modeled with TD-DFT approach using the CAM-B3LYP exchange-correlation functional for the [UVO2(saldien)]- with explicit inclusion of two dimethyl sulfoxide molecules are in good agreement with the experimental data of Takao et al. [Inorg. Chem. 49, 2349 (2010), 10.1021/ic902225f].

  17. An improved mathematical model for prediction of air quantity to minimise radiation levels in underground uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventilation is the primary means of controlling radon and its daughter concentrations in an underground uranium mine environment. Therefore, prediction of air quantity is the vital component for planning and designing of ventilation systems to minimise the radiation exposure of miners in underground uranium mines. This paper comprehensively describes the derivation and verification of an improved mathematical model for prediction of air quantity, based on the growth of radon daughters in terms of potential alpha energy concentration (PAEC), to reduce the radiation levels in uranium mines. The model also explains the prediction of air quantity depending upon the quality of intake air to the stopes. This model can be used to evaluate the contribution of different sources to radon concentration in mine atmosphere based on the measurements of radon emanation and exhalation. Moreover, a mathematical relationship has been established for quick prediction of air quantity to achieve the desired radon daughter concentration in the mines. - Highlights: • Proposed an improved model to predict air quantity for underground uranium mines. • The model predicts the air quantity depending on the quality of intake air to the stope. • The model will be useful for designing ventilation systems of underground uranium mines. • The mathematical model was used to identify the main sources of radon in mine air. • Established a relationship between air quantity and potential alpha energy concentration

  18. Reproduction of a model of lung injury induced by depleted uranium inhalation in canine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin ZHANG

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To reproduce a canine model of subacute lung injury induced by depleted uranium inhalation.Methods Twenty-six dogs were randomized into the control group(CG,n=6,low-dose group(LG,n=10.and high-dose group(HG,n=10.All of them underwent tracheal intubation.In control group,0.2ml/kg of normal saline was intratracheally given.In low dosage group,10mg/kg of depleted uranium(LG,and in high dose group 100mg/ml of depleted uranium(HG was introduced.The survival time of animals was observed in one month after intratracheal introduction of various agents,and chest CT scan was performed in the survived animals.They were sacrificed for pathological examination of lung tissues on the 31st day post of them intratracheal introduction of various agents.Results During the observation period,no animal died in CG,one dog in LG died on the 22nd day and 9 of them survived longer than 30 days.All the animals in HG group died within 30 days with a mean survival time of 11.2±8.9 days(median=12d.In comparison with the HG,significant difference on survival time was found between LG and CG,while no significant difference was found between the latter 2 groups(P=0.439.Pathologically,changes were noted in lung tissue of LG,such as escape of inflammatory cells into alveoli,hemorrhage and hyaline membrane formation in alveolar space,dilatation and congestion of alveolar capillaries,and infiltration of inflammatory cells in interstitial tissue.CT scanning revealed patchy effusion and solid consolidation in the left lung.Conclusion The canine model of subacute lung injury induced by a dose of 2mg/kg depleted uranium introduced through tracheal intubation is suitable for the study of subacute toxicity induced by depleted uranium.

  19. Modeling accidental releases to the atmosphere of a dense reactive chemical (Uranium hexafluoride)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Steven R.; Chang, Joseph C.; Zhang, Xiaoming J.

    In order to model the atmospheric transport and dispersion of dense reactive chemicals such as uranium hexafluoride (UF 6), it is necessary to include algorithms that account for heat exchanges due to chemical reactions and phase changes. UF 6 may be released accidentally at uranium-enrichment plants as a warm gas from a pipeline rupture, or as a flashing liquid from a pressurized tank or line break. The resulting plume is initially very dense due to the large molecular weight of UF 6, but may become lighter-than-air as the UF 6 reacts with water vapor to form HF, which has a molecular weight less than that of air, and which may cause an increase in plume temperature due to the exothermic reaction. The major chemical and thermodynamic processes related to UF 6 have been incorporated in a modified version of an existing dense gas model, HGSYSTEM. The same general approach could be used to include other reactive chemicals in the modeling system. New modules that are applicable to any type of chemical release have also been added to HGSYSTEM to account for building downwash, lift-off of warm plumes from the ground, and deposition. The revised HGSYSTEM/UF 6 model has been evaluated with field data from UF 6 tests. The sensitivities of the model predictions to variations in input parameters have been assessed.

  20. Radon dispersion modeling and dose assessment for uranium mine ventilation shaft exhausts under neutral atmospheric stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, the roles of atmospheric wind profiles in the neutral atmosphere and surface roughness parameters in a complex terrain were examined to determine their impacts on radon (222Rn) dispersion from an actual uranium mine ventilation shaft. Simulations were completed on 222Rn dispersion extending from the shaft to a vulnerable distance, near the location of an occupied farmhouse. The eight dispersion scenarios for the ventilation shaft source included four downwind velocities (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 m s−1) and two underlying surface roughness characteristics (0.1 m and 1.0 m). 222Rn distributions and elevated pollution regions were identified. Effective dose estimation methods involving a historical weighting of wind speeds in the direction of interest coupled to the complex dispersion model were proposed. Using this approach, the radiation effects on the residents assumed to be outside at the location of the farm house 250 m downwind from the ventilation shaft outlet were computed. The maximum effective dose rate calculated for the residents at the outside of the farm house was 2.2 mSv y−1, which is less than the low limit action level of 3–10 mSv y−1 recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) occupational exposure action level for radon. - Highlights: • Modeling of radon dispersion from uranium mine shafts. • Rn modeling methods include complex meteorology and geography. • Dose computation methods involving historical wind speeds weighting are proposed. • Rn dose rate for the residents near uranium mine shafts are calculated and assessed

  1. A dynamic uranium-leaching model for process-control studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modelling of the uranium-leaching process, and the logging of data from a plant for the evaluation of the model, are reported. A phenomenological approach was adopted in the development of the model. A set of eight chemical reactions was chosen to represent the complex chemistry of the process, and kinetic expressions for these reactions were incorporated in differential equations representing mass and energy balances. These equations were coded in FORTRAN to form a program that simulated the process, and that allowed averaged and continuous data from the plant to be compared with the model. This allowed the model to be 'tuned', and to reveal a number of minor problems with the control infrastructure on the plant. 7 figs., 21 refs

  2. Modelling the closure-related geochemical evolution of groundwater at a former uranium mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, J. G.; Mayer, K. U.; Blowes, D. W.; Frind, E. O.; Molson, J. W. H.; Kahnt, R.; Jenk, U.

    2001-11-01

    A newly developed reactive transport model was used to evaluate the potential effects of mine closure on the geochemical evolution in the aquifer downgradient from a mine site. The simulations were conducted for the Königstein uranium mine located in Saxony, Germany. During decades of operation, uranium at the former mine site had been extracted by in situ acid leaching of the ore underground, while the mine was maintained in a dewatered condition. One option for decommissioning is to allow the groundwater level to rise to its natural level, flooding the mine workings. As a result, pore water containing high concentrations of dissolved metals, radionuclides, and sulfate may be released. Additional contamination may arise due to the dissolution of minerals contained in the aquifer downgradient of the mine. On the other hand, dissolved metals may be attenuated by reactions within the aquifer. The geochemical processes and interactions involved are highly non-linear and their impact on the quality of the groundwater and surface water downstream of the mine is not always intuitive. The multicomponent reactive transport model MIN3P, which can describe mineral dissolution-precipitation reactions, aqueous complexation, and oxidation-reduction reactions, is shown to be a powerful tool for investigating these processes. The predictive capabilities of the model are, however, limited by the availability of key geochemical parameters such as the presence and quantities of primary and secondary mineral phases. Under these conditions, the model can provide valuable insight by means of sensitivity analyses.

  3. Canadian uranium fuel fabrication study: 1. Intake, retention and excretion monitoring results. 2. Comparison of results with metabolic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-five workers from two uranium fuel fabrication facilities, who had exposure histories of 2.5 to 21 years, were selected for examination of their uranium intakes, retention and excretion characteristics by means of personal air sampling, thorax measurement, and urinalysis, respectively. The aim of the study was to examine the feasibility of using a simple set of measurements of the above parameters to estimate doses to the workers in relation to the dose limits specified in the Atomic Energy Control Regulations. Significant correlation coefficients between uranium excretion and lung burden were observed. Moderate correlations were also found between uranium excretion and estimated pulmonary deposition for one facility's subjects. No correlation was observed between pulmonary deposition, as calculated from air sampling data, and retention of uranium in the lung. The personal air samples (PAS) and lung burden data collected from Company A in this study (Part I) have been used with standard ICRP models to calculate urinary excretion and these results compared to measured values. It was found that neither Class W or Class Y compounds would fit the data, but a combination of 50% Class W and Class Y, with modification to the retention of uranium in tissues and organs, would give reasonable results. However, a revised lung model alone was also shown to give good agreement between results and models. This revised lung model does not result in a committed effective dose equivalent per unit intake significantly different from that calculated for Class Y uranium, but gives significantly different excretion rates. The implications of this result for internal contamination monitoring and dose assessment are discussed

  4. Seepage and transport modelling for a uranium tailings dam in northern Saskatchewan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disposal facilities for uranium tailings are commonly designed as surface or shallow subsurface facilities. To design such facilities, an understanding of contaminant transport processes under both saturated and unsaturated flow conditions is required. In this paper, a saturated-unsaturated finite element model to simulate the movement and distribution of contaminants in groundwater flow systems is presented. The finite element solution of the governing equations is based on the Galerkin weighted-residual method. The nonlinearity of the seepage equation in the unsaturated zone is solved by iterative techniques. The physical properties of several materials relevant to saturated-unsaturated flow modelling are presented. The modelling results of a representative section through the tailings dam of the Cluff Lake Mine tailings impoundment are presented as an example of how modelling techniques may be applied to design

  5. Turbulent precipitation of uranium oxalate in a vortex reactor - experimental study and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Industrial oxalic precipitation processed in an un-baffled magnetically stirred tank, the Vortex Reactor, has been studied with uranium simulating plutonium. Modelling precipitation requires a mixing model for the continuous liquid phase and the solution of population balance for the dispersed solid phase. Being chemical reaction influenced by the degree of mixing at molecular scale, that commercial CFD code does not resolve, a sub-grid scale model has been introduced: the finite mode probability density functions, and coupled with a model for the liquid energy spectrum. Evolution of the dispersed phase has been resolved by the quadrature method of moments, first used here with experimental nucleation and growth kinetics, and an aggregation kernel based on local shear rate. The promising abilities of this local approach, without any fitting constant, are strengthened by the similarity between experimental results and simulations. (author)

  6. A model for radiation energy deposition in natural uranium-bearing systems and its consequences to water radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water radiolysis is of great concern in the concept of final disposal of nuclear waste in geological formations. In this paper, a model is developed for radiation energy deposition and its consequences to water radiolysis. The model concepts are based on radiation energy deposition in the porewater and other constituents of a uranium ore (the Cigar Lake uranium deposit). Radiation is randomly generated within grains of uranium minerals in the ore, by the Monte Carlo method. The radiation energy is then allowed to deposit into the various constituents of the ore. The fraction of the total radiation energy absorbed by water is obtained, and the oxidant production rate is calculated with G-values of water. When back-reactions of the oxidants and reductants projected by other researchers in similar systems are accounted for, the calculated oxidant production rate is in agreement with that predicted by mass transport models. (orig.)

  7. A mathematical model for estimation of distribution in the solvent stripping of uranium from TBP/n-paraffin ammonium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ammonium nitrate bearing effluent after ADU precipitation can be recycled as strippant in the stripping process of solvent extraction during uranium refining process. The nature of stripping of uranium with various concentration of ammonium nitrate as strippant was studied experimentally and a suitable theoretical model developed for the estimation of Distribution coefficient. The theoretical values of equilibrium constant distribution coefficient was estimated after employing the correction factors due to the activity coefficients each species at higher ionic strength. The activity coefficients of salts in aqueous solution were estimated the correlations developed by 'Bromley' for activity coefficients of multiple salt solutions. The model equations were developed by the mass balance of uranium at equilibrium for biphasic system. Solubility of TBP in water is not considered in the equation so developed. Also the model does not take into account for the ideality of organic phase

  8. Mathematical modeling and simulation of fluorination reaction of Uranium dioxide and evaluation of existing gas-solid reaction models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study a mathematical model is developed in order to simulate fluorination reaction of uranium dioxide leading to produce uranium hexafluoride. The model considers homogeneous reaction for intermediate solid and heterogeneous one for unreacted shrinking core. Also, this study tries to clearly show the shortcoming of those foregoing models that take surface reactions for both solids. In fact, one may not trust the accuracy of those models due to ignoring the importance of the diffusion phenomena into the intermediate solid and taking place the reaction within it. On the other hand, by neglecting the undeniable effects of operating conditions, including temperature and particle size on gas concentration distribution and reaction rates may introduce large deviations. For this mentioned purposes, the governing equations are derived on the basis of the mass conservation law and have been solved numerically. Besides, for the first time, some dimensionless equations and groups are introduced to predict the reaction rates and the amount of the main and the intermediate products for using numerical procedure. Comparing the results with the corresponding experimental ones represents the desirable accuracy of the model. After validation of the model, the effect of some operational variables such as temperature and initial particle size have been investigated on the reaction rates and the conversions

  9. Modeling spallation reactions in tungsten and uranium targets with the Geant4 toolkit*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greiner Walter

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We study primary and secondary reactions induced by 600 MeV proton beams in monolithic cylindrical targets made of natural tungsten and uranium by using Monte Carlo simulations with the Geant4 toolkit [1–3]. Bertini intranuclear cascade model, Binary cascade model and IntraNuclear Cascade Liège (INCL with ABLA model [4] were used as calculational options to describe nuclear reactions. Fission cross sections, neutron multiplicity and mass distributions of fragments for 238U fission induced by 25.6 and 62.9 MeV protons are calculated and compared to recent experimental data [5]. Time distributions of neutron leakage from the targets and heat depositions are calculated.

  10. A combined modeling program for evaluating the cover design at a uranium mill tailings disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors describe a modeling program for evaluating the performance of a proposed cover at a uranium mill tailings disposal location applied to the site's design. In this application, the volume of leachate from the base of the proposed tailings impoundment was estimated by a fundamental Darcian-style analysis, and with the HELP (Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance) computer model. The potential impacts to the local ground water regime were assessed initially by diluting the leachate flux, predicted by the HELP model, with the estimated volume of ground water available for dilution. Following this, the potential for leachate attenuation from chemical precipitation was simulated with the geochemical speciation code PHREEQE (pH redox equilibrium equations). The volume and estimated composition of the leachate was mixed with the volume and chemical character of the existing ground water by using the mixing mode of PHREEQE

  11. Modeling spallation reactions in tungsten and uranium targets with the Geant4 toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyshkin, Yury; Pshenichnov, Igor; Mishustin, Igor; Greiner, Walter

    2012-02-01

    We study primary and secondary reactions induced by 600 MeV proton beams in monolithic cylindrical targets made of natural tungsten and uranium by using Monte Carlo simulations with the Geant4 toolkit [1-3]. Bertini intranuclear cascade model, Binary cascade model and IntraNuclear Cascade Liège (INCL) with ABLA model [4] were used as calculational options to describe nuclear reactions. Fission cross sections, neutron multiplicity and mass distributions of fragments for 238U fission induced by 25.6 and 62.9 MeV protons are calculated and compared to recent experimental data [5]. Time distributions of neutron leakage from the targets and heat depositions are calculated. This project is supported by Siemens Corporate Technology.

  12. Development and validation of a model of uranium release to groundwater from legacy disposals at the UK Low Level Waste Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A previous radiological assessment of the UK Low Level Waste Repository (LLWR) has considered how the prevailing reducing chemical conditions in disposal trenches, may limit uranium release through the extreme low solubility of U(IV) solids. This study considers the additional effects that the physical and chemical nature of the uranium wastes may have on the release of uranium. Fluoride process residues produced by refining of uranium metal comprise the majority of the legacy inventory. Based on historic records and descriptions of the uranium wastes a conceptual model has been developed which bounds the release rate of uranium present as inclusions and dissolved in the solid residues by the dissolution rate of a magnesium fluoride matrix. The model is represented in a 3-dimensional groundwater flow and geochemical model. Initial findings indicate that the model correctly represents the range of fluoride and uranium concentrations that are measured in leachate from the LLWR trenches. Incorporation of this model in future safety assessments, together with a reduction in the derived inventory of uranium, is likely to result in a significant lowering of the peak groundwater dose to acceptable levels, even in the case that the site re-oxidizes. The study builds confidence in the inherent safety features that are provided by the sparingly soluble uranium waste residues and the reducing chemical conditions of the LLWR trenches. (authors)

  13. A two-dimensional, finite-difference model of the oxidation of a uranium carbide fuel pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oxidation of spent uranium carbide fuel, a candidate fuel for Generation IV nuclear reactors, is an important process in its potential reprocessing cycle. However, the oxidation of uranium carbide in air is highly exothermic. A model has therefore been developed to predict the temperature rise, as well as other useful information such as reaction completion times, under different reaction conditions in order to help in deriving safe oxidation conditions. Finite difference-methods are used to model the heat and mass transfer processes occurring during the reaction in two dimensions and are coupled to kinetics found in the literature

  14. A mathematical model for recovery of uranium from acidic nuclear waste using DLM in hollow fiber contractor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mathematical model has been developed to predict the transport of uranium through a Dispersion liquid Membrane in Hollow fiber contactor and validated with experiments. Acidic waste of uranium (U) processing plant has been used as feed with the objective of polishing of streams and recycle/safe disposal of effluent Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) dissolved in dodecane was used as carrier agent and Sodium bi carbonate was used as strippant. The model predicts the rate of transport of U from feed phase to the strip phase through film diffusion and interfacial equilibrium distribution

  15. Reaction model for fluorination of uranium dioxide using improved unreacted shrinking core model for expanding spherical particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gas-solid reaction model is developed to represent the fluorination of uranium dioxide (UO2), which consists of a two-step reaction: the formation of a solid intermediate of uranyl fluoride (UO2F2) on the core of unreacted UO2 and the consumption of UO2F2. The model is an extension of the unreacted shrinking core model with a shrinking spherical particle and takes into account particle expansion resulting from the density difference between UO2 and UO2F2. This model successfully represents the initial expansion of the particle by the formation of the low-density UO2F2 intermediate. The accuracy of this model is higher than that of the original model, which does not allow particle expansion. (author)

  16. Model for the behaviour of thorium and uranium fuels at pelletization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, a model for the behaviour of thorium-uranium-mixed oxide microspheres in the pelletizing process is presented. This model was developed in a program whose objective was to demonstrate the viability of producing fissile material through the utilization of thorium in pressurized water reactors. This is important because it allows the saving of the strategic uranium reserves, and makes it possible the nuclear utilization of the large brazilian thorium reserves. The objective was to develop a model for optimizing physical properties of the microspheres, such as density, fracture strength and specific surface, so as to produce fuel pellets with microstructure, density, open porosity and impurity content, in accordance with the fuel specification. And, therefore, to adjust the sol-gel processing parameters in order to obtain these properties, and produce pellets with an optimized microstructure, adequate to a stable behaviour under irradiation. The model made it clear that to achieve this objective, it is necessary to produce microspheres with density and specific surface as small as possible. By changing the sol-gel processing parameters, microspheres with the desired properties were produced, and the model was experimentally verified by manufacturing fuel pellets with optimized microstructures, density, open porosity and impurity content, meeting the specifications for this new nuclear fuel for pressurized water reactors. Furthermore it was possible to obtain mathematical expressions that enables to calculate from the microspheres properties and the utilized compaction pressure, the sinter density that will be obtained in the sintered pellet and the necessary compaction pressure to reach the sintered density specified for the fuel. (author)

  17. A Field and Modeling Study of Windblown Particles from a Uranium Mill Tailings Pile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwendiman, L. C.; Sehmel, G. A.; Horst, T. W.; Thomas, C. W.; Perkins, R. W.

    1980-06-01

    An extensive field study whose primary objective was to obtain knowledge and understanding of the nature and quantity of windblown particles from uranium mill tailings piles was conducted in the Ambrosia Lake District of New Mexico. The following major field tasks were undertaken: determination of physical, chemical, and radioactivity characteristics of mill tailings particles; an investigation of the nature and quantity of tailings particles in soil in the vicinity of tailings piles; and the determination of the nature and flux of particles being transported by wind as a function of wind speed and height. Results of the field study are presented. Particle size distributions and associated radioactivity were measured. Radioactivity relationships showed uranium daughters in mill tailings to be in essential radioactive equilibrium for the carbonate leach process but thorium-230 tends to be leached into the slurry water for the acid process mill tailings. One objective of the study was to relate windblown particle concentrations, fluxes, and particle sizes to wind speed. Hundreds of samples were taken and analyses were performed, but relationships between wind speed, airborne particle sizes and concentrations were found to be vague and inconclusive. A resuspension, deposition, and transport model was developed and applied using site meteorology. Ground deposition patterns predicted were similar to those found.

  18. Mathematical Modeling for the Extraction of Uranium and Molybdenum with Emulsion Liquid Membrane, Including Industrial Application and Cost Evaluation of the Uranium Recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emulsion liquid membrane systems are double emulsion drops. Two immiscible phases are separated by a third phase which is immiscible with the other two phases. The liquid membrane systems were classified into two types: (1) carrier mediated mass transfer, (2) mass transfer without any reaction involved. Uranium extraction, molybdenum extraction and solvent extraction were used as purposed elements for each type of the membrane systems in the derivation of their mathematical models. Mass transfer in emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) systems has been modeled by several differential and algebraic equations. The models take into account the following : mass transfer of the solute from the bulk external phase to the external phase-membrane interface; an equilibrium reaction between the solute and the carrier to form the solute-carrier complex at the interface; mass transfer by diffusion of the solute-carrier complex in the membrane phase to the membrane-internal phase interface; another equilibrium reaction of the solute-carrier complex to release the solute at the membrane-internal phase interface into the internal phase. Models with or without the consideration of film resistances were developed and compared. The models developed in this study can predict the extraction rate through emulsion liquid membranes theoretically. All parameters required in the models can be determined before an experimental extraction run. Experimental data from literature (uranium extraction) and (molybdenum extraction and solvent extraction) were used to test the models. The agreements between the theoretical predictions and the experimental data were very good. The advantages of emulsion liquid membrane systems over traditional methods were discussed. The models developed in this research can be used directly for the design of emulsion liquid membrane systems. The results of this study represent a very significant step toward the practical applications of the emulsion liquid membrane

  19. Lung cancer from radon and smoking: a multistage model for the WISMUT uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In the world's third-largest uranium-mining province located in areas of Saxony and Thuringia in the former German Democratic Republic, the WISMUT Company conducted extensive uranium mining starting in 1946. Up to 1990, when mining activities were discontinued, most of the 400,000 employees had been exposed to uranium ore dust and radon and its progeny. It is well established that, besides smoking, such exposures are associated with an increased risk of lung cancer. From about 130,000 known miners a huge cohort of 59,000 miners has been formed and in an epidemiological analysis lung cancer risks have been evaluated (Grosche et al., 2006). We will present an alternative approach using a biologically-based multistage carcinogenesis model quantifying the lung-cancer risk related to both the exposure to radon and smoking habits. This mechanistic technique allows for extrapolation to the low exposures that are important for present-day radiation protection purposes and the transfer of risk across populations. The model is applied to a sub-cohort of about 35,000 persons who were employed at WISMUT after 1955, with known annual exposures estimated from the job-exposure matrix (Lehmann et al., 2004). Unfortunately, detailed information on smoking is missing for most miners. However, this information has been retrieved in two case-control studies, one of which was nested in the cohort while the other was not (Brueske-Hohlfeld et al., 2006). For these studies, the relevant smoking parameters are assembled in so-called smoking spectra that are next projected onto the entire cohort using a Monte-Carlo sampling method. Individual smoking habits that are randomly assigned to the cohort members, together with the information on annual exposure to radon, is used as an input for the multistage model. Model parameters related to radon and tobacco exposure are fitted with a maximum-likelihood technique. We will show results of the observed and expected lung

  20. Assessment of co-contaminant effects on uranium and thorium speciation in freshwater using geochemical modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofts, Stephen; Fevrier, Laureline; Horemans, Nele; Gilbin, Rodolphe; Bruggeman, Christophe; Vandenhove, Hildegarde

    2015-11-01

    Speciation modelling of uranium (as uranyl) and thorium, in four freshwaters impacted by mining activities, was used to evaluate (i) the influence of the co-contaminants present on the predicted speciation, and (ii) the influence of using nine different model/database combinations on the predictions. Generally, co-contaminants were found to have no significant effects on speciation, with the exception of Fe(III) in one system, where formation of hydrous ferric oxide and adsorption of uranyl to its surface impacted the predicted speciation. Model and database choice on the other hand clearly influenced speciation prediction. Complexes with dissolved organic matter, which could be simulated by three of the nine model/database combinations, were predicted to be important in a slightly acidic, soft water. Model prediction of uranyl and thorium speciation needs to take account of database comprehensiveness and cohesiveness, including the capability of the model and database to simulate interactions with dissolved organic matter. Measurement of speciation in natural waters is needed to provide data that may be used to assess and improve model capabilities and to better constrain the type of predictive modelling work presented here. PMID:26225834

  1. Uranium hexafluoride public risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, D.R.; Hui, T.E.; Yurconic, M.; Johnson, J.R.

    1994-08-01

    The limiting value for uranium toxicity in a human being should be based on the concentration of uranium (U) in the kidneys. The threshold for nephrotoxicity appears to lie very near 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissue. There does not appear to be strong scientific support for any other improved estimate, either higher or lower than this, of the threshold for uranium nephrotoxicity in a human being. The value 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney is the concentration that results from a single intake of about 30 mg soluble uranium by inhalation (assuming the metabolism of a standard person). The concentration of uranium continues to increase in the kidneys after long-term, continuous (or chronic) exposure. After chronic intakes of soluble uranium by workers at the rate of 10 mg U per week, the concentration of uranium in the kidneys approaches and may even exceed the nephrotoxic limit of 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissue. Precise values of the kidney concentration depend on the biokinetic model and model parameters assumed for such a calculation. Since it is possible for the concentration of uranium in the kidneys to exceed 3 {mu}g per gram tissue at an intake rate of 10 mg U per week over long periods of time, we believe that the kidneys are protected from injury when intakes of soluble uranium at the rate of 10 mg U per week do not continue for more than two consecutive weeks. For long-term, continuous occupational exposure to low-level, soluble uranium, we recommend a reduced weekly intake limit of 5 mg uranium to prevent nephrotoxicity in workers. Our analysis shows that the nephrotoxic limit of 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissues is not exceeded after long-term, continuous uranium intake at the intake rate of 5 mg soluble uranium per week.

  2. Multicomponent geochemical reactive transport models for uranium migration through compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Current performance assessment (PA) models for radionuclide migration through the near field of a high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository usually rely on the use of Kd and fixed solubility models. The conditions under which such assumptions hold for uranium are explored here for the 0.75 m thick compacted bentonite barrier of a spent-fuel repository in granite designed according to the Spanish reference concept. Uranium migration is simulated with a reactive transport model with CORE2D V4. Most of the available U thermodynamic sorption data correspond to U(VI) while data for the sorption of U(IV) are limited. The right selection of the uranium sorbing and the form of U in the spent fuel, U(IV) or U(VI), is also relevant for U migration. The first scenario assumes that the U in the canister is mostly in the form of UO2:2H2O(am) which dissolves at a very slow rate. The computed concentrations of dissolved UO22+ are too small. The most abundant aqueous U species under reducing conditions is U(OH)4(aq) while the concentration of free UO22+ is very small. Therefore, the total concentration of sorbed UO22+ is very small. Most of the U is sorbed at strong sorption sites. The mass of U sorbed by surface complexation increases when the sorption of U4+ is considered. The apparent Kd of U ranges from 2x103 to 6x104 L/Kg. The first scenario leads to unrealistically small concentrations of dissolved U. Therefore, a second scenario was tested in which U is assumed to be in the of a partly-oxidized uranium mineral, U4O9. Goethite precipitates in the canister at the same time as U4O9 dissolves in the canister. Coffinite precipitates in the canister and in the bentonite, although the amount precipitated in bentonite is very small compared to that in the canister. The concentration of dissolved UO22+ in the canister increases continuously as the dissolution of U4O9 progresses. At the end of the simulation after 106 years the

  3. The development of a model for the simulation of the radiometric sorting of gold and uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of a model to simulate the radiometric sorting of gold- and uranium-bearing ores is outlined. The developed program indicates the optimum mass, reject percentage, and expected reject gold and uranium grades for a radiometric sorter. It achieves this by statistical analysis of the data gathered from a large sample of rocks in the required size range for a particular mine. The program can be used in the optimization of existing sorters, as a design tool for new radiometric sorters, and in feasibility studies on radiometric sorting. 10 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Dynamic energy-based modeling of uranium and cadmium joint toxicity to Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margerit, Adrien; Gomez, Elena; Gilbin, Rodolphe

    2016-03-01

    Toxicokinetic - toxicodynamic energy-based models offer new alternatives to the commonly used approaches for the analysis of mixture toxicity data. Based on the Dynamic Energy Budget theory, DEBtox models enable the description of several endpoints over time simultaneously under the same framework. However, such model still has to be faced with experimental data in a multi-contamination context. In this study, the predictive capacities of a DEBtox model to describe the uranium and cadmium joint toxicity over the entire growth and reproduction period of the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was examined. The two reference additivity approaches, Concentration Addition and Response addition, implemented in the DEBtox model were tested. Assuming no interaction between the two toxicants through Response addition, the DEBtox model allowed a rather accurate fit of the U and Cd joint effects on the growth and reproduction of C. elegans: an interaction between the two metals at the toxicokinetic or toxicodynamic level seems thus unlikely or has only minor consequences. Interestingly, this study underlines that even if the compounds of a mixture share the same DEBtox physiological mode of action (in this case a decrease in assimilation), the Response addition approach may provide a better fit of joint toxicity data than the Concentration addition approach. Moreover, the present work highlighted limitations in the model predictions which are related to the simplifications of the DEBtox framework and its adaptations to the physiology of C. elegans and which lead to an overestimation of the U and Cd joint toxicity in some cases. PMID:26741545

  5. Multi-coupling dynamic model and 3d simulation program for in-situ leaching of uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The in-situ leaching of uranium mining is a very complicated non-linear dynamic system, which involves couplings and positive/negative feedback among many factors and processes. A comprehensive, coupled multi-factors and processes dynamic model and simulation method was established to study the in-situ leaching of uranium mining. The model accounts for most coupling among various processes as following: (1) rock texture mechanics and its evolution, (2)the incremental stress rheology of rock deformation, (3) 3-D viscoelastic/ plastic multi-deformation processes, (4) hydrofracturing, (5) tensorial (anisotropic) fracture and rock permeability, (6) water-rock interactions and mass-transport (both advective and diffusive), (7) dissolution-induced chemical compaction, (8) multi-phase fluid flow. A 3-D simulation program was compiled based on Fortran and C++. An example illustrating the application of this model to simulating acidification, production and terminal stage of in situ leaching of uranium mining is presented for the some mine in Xinjiang, China. This model and program can be used for theoretical study, mine design, production management, the study of contaminant transport and restoration in groundwater of in-situ leaching of uranium mining. (authors)

  6. Uranium(VI) retention on quartz and kaolinite. Experiments and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of uranium in the geosphere is an important issue for safety performance assessment of nuclear waste repositories, or in the context of contaminated sites due to mining activity related to nuclear field. Under aerobic conditions, the fate of uranium is mainly governed by the ability of minerals to sorb U(VI) aqueous species. Hence, a thorough understanding of U(VI) sorption processes on minerals is required to provide a valuable prediction of U(VI) migration in the environment. In this study, we performed sorption/desorption experiments of U(VI) on quartz and kaolinite, for systems favouring the formation in solution (i) of UO22+ and monomeric hydrolysis products or (ii) of di-/tri-meric uranyl aqueous species, and / or U(VI)-colloids or UO2(OH)2 precipitates, or (iii) of uranyl-carbonate complexes. Particular attention was paid to determine the surface characteristics of the solids and their modification due to dissolution/precipitation processes during experiments. A double layer surface complexation model was applied to our experimental data in order to derive surface complexation equilibria and intrinsic constants which allow a valuable description of U(VI) retention over a wide range of pH, ionic strength, initial concentration of uranium [0.1-10μM] and solid - solution equilibration time. U(VI) sorption on quartz was successfully modeled by using two sets of adsorption equilibria, assuming (i) the formation of the surface complexes SiOUO2+, SiOUO2OH and SiO(UO2)3(OH)5, or (ii) the formation of the mono-dentate complex SiO(UO2)3(OH)5 and of the bidentate complex (SiO)2UO2. Assumptions on the density of each type of surface sites of kaolinite and on their acid-base properties were made from potentiometric titrations of kaolinite suspensions. We proposed on such a basis a set of surface complexation equilibria which accounts for U(VI) uptake on kaolinite over a wide range of chemical conditions, with aluminol edge sites as predominant surface

  7. Models to optimize the evaluation and extraction of uranium from sedimentary ore deposits with applications to in-situ leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With increasing demands for nuclear power supplies, more efficient means of evaluation and extraction of sedimentary uranium ore deposits, which form 96% of the US reserves, are required. Fixation of uranium in the sediments seemed to be controlled by sorption and/or reduction by organic matter, H2S, clays, zeolites, and carbonates. The basic strategies of the carbonate and acid leach systems are discussed. By monitoring effluent uranium and Rn-222 and cumulative uranium and Rn-222 extracted, it is shown that predictions can be made concerning mining efficiency, degree of secular equilibrium, future profitability, and mining duration. Dissolution Eh-pH diagrams constructed by assuming an infinite source of uraninite in water with various complexing agents are shown to agree more accurately with kinetic data of uraninite dissolution than conventional stability Eh-pH diagrams. It is proposed that carbonate leach systems be operated at pH values between 9.0 and 10.0 and sulfate acid leach systems may be operated at pH as high as 3.0. Utilizing evidence that uraninite dissolution is not diffusion limited and that in-situ leach solutions are quite undersaturated with respect to uranium, it is shown that uraninite dissolution is independent of hydrological parameters with the exception of the flow rate which regulates oxidant introduction to the ore body. The optimum well spacing in an in-situ leach system is found to be a complex function of flow rate, the mobilization inhibiting factor (MIF), the rate of total oxidation of the acquifer, and the ability of the well system and the aquifer to confine the system. The results of the research are used to generate models to optimize parameters in the in-situ leach. The models are found to predict values in good agreement with literature values for uranium in-situ leach operations

  8. Empirical and physics based mathematical models of uranium hydride decomposition kinetics with quantified uncertainties.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salloum, Maher N.; Gharagozloo, Patricia E.

    2013-10-01

    Metal particle beds have recently become a major technique for hydrogen storage. In order to extract hydrogen from such beds, it is crucial to understand the decomposition kinetics of the metal hydride. We are interested in obtaining a a better understanding of the uranium hydride (UH3) decomposition kinetics. We first developed an empirical model by fitting data compiled from different experimental studies in the literature and quantified the uncertainty resulting from the scattered data. We found that the decomposition time range predicted by the obtained kinetics was in a good agreement with published experimental results. Secondly, we developed a physics based mathematical model to simulate the rate of hydrogen diffusion in a hydride particle during the decomposition. We used this model to simulate the decomposition of the particles for temperatures ranging from 300K to 1000K while propagating parametric uncertainty and evaluated the kinetics from the results. We compared the kinetics parameters derived from the empirical and physics based models and found that the uncertainty in the kinetics predicted by the physics based model covers the scattered experimental data. Finally, we used the physics-based kinetics parameters to simulate the effects of boundary resistances and powder morphological changes during decomposition in a continuum level model. We found that the species change within the bed occurring during the decomposition accelerates the hydrogen flow by increasing the bed permeability, while the pressure buildup and the thermal barrier forming at the wall significantly impede the hydrogen extraction.

  9. Model for water factor measurements with fission-neutron logging tools. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 1977 and 1978, a Fission Neutron Water Factor Model was designed and constructed by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (BFEC) for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) at the Grand Junction facility. This model features seven water-filled boreholes with different diameters. All of these boreholes penetrate, in order from the top of the model, a 5-foot-thick (1.52 m), uniform, concrete upper ''barren zone''; a 6-foot-thick (1.83 m), uniform, uranium-enriched, concrete ''ore zone''; and a 4-foot-thick (1.22 m), uniform, concrete lower ''barren zone''. The response of a fission neutron logging tool in a water-filled borehole is affected by variations in the borehole diameter. This diameter-dependent effect can be deduced from logs run in several different boreholes of the Fission Neutron Water Factor Model. This report describes the construction of the Fission Neutron Water Factor Model and also presents values for model parameters which are of interest in fission-neutron logging

  10. Uranium conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FOI, has performed a study on uranium conversion processes that are of importance in the production of different uranium compounds in the nuclear industry. The same conversion processes are of interest both when production of nuclear fuel and production of fissile material for nuclear weapons are considered. Countries that have nuclear weapons ambitions, with the intention to produce highly enriched uranium for weapons purposes, need some degree of uranium conversion capability depending on the uranium feed material available. This report describes the processes that are needed from uranium mining and milling to the different conversion processes for converting uranium ore concentrate to uranium hexafluoride. Uranium hexafluoride is the uranium compound used in most enrichment facilities. The processes needed to produce uranium dioxide for use in nuclear fuel and the processes needed to convert different uranium compounds to uranium metal - the form of uranium that is used in a nuclear weapon - are also presented. The production of uranium ore concentrate from uranium ore is included since uranium ore concentrate is the feed material required for a uranium conversion facility. Both the chemistry and principles or the different uranium conversion processes and the equipment needed in the processes are described. Since most of the equipment that is used in a uranium conversion facility is similar to that used in conventional chemical industry, it is difficult to determine if certain equipment is considered for uranium conversion or not. However, the chemical conversion processes where UF6 and UF4 are present require equipment that is made of corrosion resistant material

  11. FIREPLUME model for plume dispersion from fires: Application to uranium hexafluoride cylinder fires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides basic documentation of the FIREPLUME model and discusses its application to the prediction of health impacts resulting from releases of uranium hexafluoride (UF6) in fires. The model application outlined in this report was conducted for the Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted UF6. The FIREPLUME model is an advanced stochastic model for atmospheric plume dispersion that predicts the downwind consequences of a release of toxic materials from an explosion or a fire. The model is based on the nonbuoyant atmospheric dispersion model MCLDM (Monte Carlo Lagrangian Dispersion Model), which has been shown to be consistent with available laboratory and field data. The inclusion of buoyancy and the addition of a postprocessor to evaluate time-varying concentrations lead to the current model. The FIREPLUME model, as applied to fire-related UF6 cylinder releases, accounts for three phases of release and dispersion. The first phase of release involves the hydraulic rupture of the cylinder due to heating of the UF6 in the fire. The second phase involves the emission of material into the burning fire, and the third phase involves the emission of material after the fire has died during the cool-down period. The model predicts the downwind concentration of the material as a function of time at any point downwind at or above the ground. All together, five fire-related release scenarios are examined in this report. For each scenario, downwind concentrations of the UF6 reaction products, uranyl fluoride and hydrogen fluoride, are provided for two meteorological conditions: (1) D stability with a 4-m/s wind speed, and (2) F stability with a 1-m/s wind speed

  12. Transport model for uranium corrosion by water vapor underneath multilayer diffusion barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrosion of uranium beneath metallic coatings is a problem of great practical importance. reaction of U with H2O vapor that can diffuse through a porous metallic coating results in the formation of a UO2 film, which is sandwiched between the substrate and coating and can cause a loss of adhesion. In some cases, moist polymers are in contact with the metallic coatings and serve as moisture sources for corrosion as well as diffusion barriers. This paper discusses the derivation of a simple, approximate equation which predicts the diffusion controlled growth of UO2 beneath such multilayer diffusion barriers. The equation is based upon the resistors in series analogy commonly used in mass and heat transfer calculations, and reduces to the classical parabolic growth law in the absence of coatings and moist polymer. Calculations and a simple Fortran program are presented. Assuming diffusivities for the oxide, metallic coating, and polymer of about 7.5 x 10-9 cm2/s, a typical porous diffusivity value, and using typical moisture content data for the polymer, oxide thicknesses were calculated as a function to time. In the absence of the metallic film and polymer, a uranium oxide layer having a thickness of about 12 microns would form in 20 years (100% relative humidity, 250C); underneath a 2.5 micron thick metallic film the oxide growth would be inhibited, so an oxide layer of only 8 microns would form in the same time. Underneath both a metallic film and moist polymer the oxide thickness would be less than 1 micron after 20 years of exposure. Predictions based upon this simple model are subject to the shortcomings of the several assumptions

  13. Control of remediation of uranium deposit Straz with use of numerical modelling approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical mining of uranium on the deposit Straz has caused large contamination of groundwater of cretaceous collectors in Straz block of Northbohemian cretaceous table. The low cenomanian aquifer where the uranium deposit is placed is mainly afflicted. In the cenomanian collector there is now more than 4.8 mil. t dissolved solids mainly SO42-, Al, Fe, NH4+ etc. The total salinity reaches up to 80 g/l. The upper laying turonian collector is drinking water reservoir for larger region. Its contamination is weaker than in cenomanian collector. Use of complex 3D Transport - Reaction Model can be divided into two separate parts. First modelling step is a quantification of overflow between individual mesh elements calculated out of calibrated mixed-hybrid flow model. Two different types of mathematical models are used to accomplish the task: Flow model based on a primary formulation of finite element method, which calculates spatial distribution of piezometric head and flow velocity vectors in selected points of area considered (finite element mesh nodes). This model exactly describes hydraulic situation in area studied; Flow model based on mixed-hybrid formulation of finite element method. This model strictly complies with exact water balance at inter-element faces. In the second part transport-reaction model based on finite volume method is used for calculations using pre-calculated advective velocity field in the area considered. The finite-element mesh covering about 40 km2 consists of about 16,000 spatial elements. In the leaching fields area the length of the triangular edge is 100-150 meters, vertically the horizon is split into 9-13 layers. The geological boundary-lines were constructed from a database containing information about almost 10 thousand wells. Permeability parameters are defined on the bases of hydrogeological model calculations (calibration) and their vertical distribution is defined more precisely using the GTIS (Geotechnological Information

  14. A screening model for depleted uranium testing using environmental radiation monitoring data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information from an ecological risk assessment of depleted uranium test areas at Yuma Proving Ground (YPG) was used to update the required environmental radiation monitoring (ERM) plan. Data to be collected for the ERM can also be used to evaluate the potential for adverse radiological and toxicological effects to terrestrial reptiles and mammals in the affected areas. We developed a spreadsheet-based screening model that incorporates the ERM data and associated uncertainties. The purpose of the model is to provide a conservative estimate of radiological exposure of terrestrial, biota to DU using the ERM data. The uncertainty in the estimate is also predicted so that the variation in the radiological exposure can be used in assessing potential adverse effects from DU testing. Toxicological effects are evaluated as well as radiological effects in the same program using the same data. Our presentation shows an example data set, model calculations, and the report of expected radiation dose rates and probable kidney burdens of select mammals and reptiles. The model can also be used in an inverse mode to calculate the soil concentration required to give either a radiological dose that would produce a potential adverse effect such as fatal cancer or a toxicological dose that would result in nephrotoxic effects in mammals

  15. Data from a uranium ore body on release of dissolved species: comparison with a near field release model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Swedish repository for spent fuel the canisters containing the uranium oxide fuel are surrounded by compacted bentonite clay which has a low hydraulic conductivity. The transport through the clay will be dominated by diffusion. The water flow in the fractured rock is very small and it is likely that the dissolution rate of the fuel will be solubility limited. Release and transport models based on this assumption have long been used in performance assessments including that used for the Swedish KBS-3 type repository design. In the uranium ore body at Cigar Lake there is a striking similarity between the ore body and a repository. The ore is uranium oxide and it is surrounded on the top side by a dense clay which has a much lower hydraulic conductivity than the surrounding rock. We have used the same principles as for the near field release models for the repository to calculate the dissolution rate of uranium and other species at Cigar lake. At this location a large number of measurements on the water composition in and around the ore body have been made. At one location in the ore body itself the first water samples contained a very high concentration of helium, hydrogen and sulphate. This decreased with continued sampling. (authors). 25 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  16. Modeling and Speciation Study of Uranium(VI) and Technetium(VII) Coextraction with DEHiBA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeyaert, Pauline; Dumas, Thomas; Guillaumont, Dominique; Kvashnina, Kristina; Sorel, Christian; Miguirditchian, Manuel; Moisy, Philippe; Dufrêche, Jean-François

    2016-07-01

    The N,N-dialkylamide DEHiBA (N,N-di-2-ethylhexyl-isobutyramide) is a promising alternative extractant to TBP (tri-n-butylphosphate) to selectively extract uranium(VI) from plutonium(IV) and spent nuclear fuel fission products. Extraction of technetium, present as pertechnetic acid (HTcO4) in the spent fuel solution, by DEHiBA was studied for different nitric acid and uranium concentrations. The uranium(VI) and technetium(VII) coextraction mechanism with DEHiBA was investigated to better understand the behavior of technetium in the solvent extraction process. Uranium and technetium distribution ratios were first determined from batch experiments. On the basis of these data, a thermodynamic model was developed. This model takes into account deviations from ideality in the aqueous phase using the simple solution concept. A good representation of uranium and technetium distribution data was obtained when considering the formation of (DEHiBA)i(HNO3)j(HTcO4)k complexes, as well as mixed (DEHiBA)2(UO2)(NO3)(TcO4) and (DEHiBA)3(UO2)(NO3)(TcO4)(HNO3) complexes, where one pertechnetate anion replaces one nitrate in the uranium coordination sphere in the two complexes (DEHiBA)2(UO2)(NO3)2 and (DEHiBA)3(UO2)(NO3)2(HNO3). Combination of complementary spectroscopic techniques (FT-IR and X-ray absorption) supported by theoretical calculations (density functional theory) enabled full characterization of the formation of mixed uranium-technetium species (DEHiBA)2(UO2)(NO3)(TcO4) in the organic phase for the first time. The structural parameters of this complex are reported in the paper and lead to the conclusion that the pertechnetate group coordinates the uranyl cation in a monodentate fashion in the inner coordination sphere. This study shows how combining a macroscopic approach (distribution data acquisition and modeling) with molecular-scale investigations (FT-IR and X-ray absorption analysis supported by theoretical calculations) can provide a new insight into the description

  17. Geochemical modelling for the unconformity-related uranium mineralization. A case study from Baskati area, Madhya Pradesh, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Signatures of concealed unconformity-related uranium mineralization at the contact of Chhotanagpur Granite Gneissic Complex (CGGC)/Mahakoshal and Lower Vindhyan Semri sequence have come to light at Baskati, in Vindhyan-Mahakoshal Basin, following a multiprolonged exploratory efforts. Systematic lithogeochemical sampling brought out uranium halos with concentration sufficiently above the normal background along reactivated faults/fractures occurring parallel and oblique to the unconformity contact. Alteration features like haematitization, chloritization and illitization have also been observed in surroundings of these reactivated faults/fractures. Geochemical modelling indicates a hypogene source for mineralizing fluids. Based on geochemical modelling supported by geology, structure and lithogeochemistry, unconformity-related U mineralization model has been envisaged and the target area has been narrowed down for sub-surface exploration. (author)

  18. Geochemical modelling of the unconformity related uranium mineralisation - A case study from Baskati area, Madhya Pradesh, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    reactivation of faults. A lead was provided by reflection of radioactivity in phosphatic breccia occurring at structurally higher level along a reactivated basement fracture in the cover sequence rocks, at Baskati. Occurrence of phosphate along this fracture is incidental, which could adsorb some uranium and provide surface signal. Subsequently, number of such reactivated fractures have been brought to light including one along the unconformity contact. The unconformity is concealed over a majority of length but faulted along some segments. Such segments are sealed by compaction of silica represented by development of silicified zone probably hindering the mineralizing solutions to reach the outcrop level especially along the unconformity contact. Keeping in view the parallelism of major E-W trending fracture system dissecting both basement and cover sequence with signature of reactivation, uranium mineralisation and spatial distribution of mineralised zones in proximity of CGGC - Vindhyan contact, an unconformity related model of U-mineralisation has been envisaged. The concept has been evolved by geochemical modeling. Systematic close grid lithogeochemical sampling across the Basement-Vindhyan contact has been carried out and samples collected from various litho units were analysed for major, minor and trace elements besides U and Th with an objective to depict uranium and other alteration halos. Interpretative studies revealed that the basement granites near Baskati are geochemically evolved (K2O/Na2O > 4) and enriched in uranium (avg. 10 ppm) with higher U/Th (max. up to 17.67), indicating these as source rocks having labile uranium. Silicified zone developed along the unconformity contact shows anomalous uranium (avg. 15 ppm, with U/Th max. up to 15) indicating concentration of uranium along the unconformity surface. U lithogeochemical maps reveal prominent uranium halos (>10 ppm) distributed as patchy rings along the unconformity contact and over the Vindhyan sediments

  19. Modeling of Fission Neutrons as a Signature for Detection of Highly Enriched Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the results of modeling intended to evaluate the feasibility of using neutrons from induced fission in highly enriched uranium (HEU) as a means of detecting clandestine HEU, even when it is embedded in absorbing surroundings, such as commercial cargo. We characterized radiation from induced fission in HEU, which consisted of delayed neutrons at all energies and prompt neutrons at energies above a threshold. We found that for the candidate detector and for the conditions we considered, a distinctive HEU signature should be detectable, given sufficient detector size, and should be robust over a range of cargo content. In the modeled scenario, an intense neutron source was used to induce fissions in a spherical shell of HEU. To absorb, scatter, and moderate the neutrons, we place one layer of simulated cargo between the source and target and an identical layer between the target and detector. The resulting neutrons and gamma rays are resolved in both time and energy to reveal the portion arising from fission. We predicted the dominant reaction rates within calcium fluoride and liquid organic scintillators. Finally, we assessed the relative effectiveness of two common neutron source energies

  20. Modeling of Fission Neutrons as a Signature for Detection of Highly Enriched Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolford, J K; Frank, M I; Descalle, M

    2004-03-09

    We present the results of modeling intended to evaluate the feasibility of using neutrons from induced fission in highly enriched uranium (HEU) as a means of detecting clandestine HEU, even when it is embedded in absorbing surroundings, such as commercial cargo. We characterized radiation from induced fission in HEU, which consisted of delayed neutrons at all energies and prompt neutrons at energies above a threshold. We found that for the candidate detector and for the conditions we considered, a distinctive HEU signature should be detectable, given sufficient detector size, and should be robust over a range of cargo content. In the modeled scenario, an intense neutron source was used to induce fissions in a spherical shell of HEU. To absorb, scatter, and moderate the neutrons, we place one layer of simulated cargo between the source and target and an identical layer between the target and detector. The resulting neutrons and gamma rays are resolved in both time and energy to reveal the portion arising from fission. We predicted the dominant reaction rates within calcium fluoride and liquid organic scintillators. Finally, we assessed the relative effectiveness of two common neutron source energies.

  1. Conceptual model of ecosystems in landscape of Uranium Mining of Andujar (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study analyzes the site of uranium mining to Andujar and its ecosystems: aquatic and terrestrial. Socioeconomic description, chemical risks, radiological risks, radionuclide transfer, and ecological consequences studies are presented as well. (Author)

  2. Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

  3. Kinetics and equilibrium modeling of uranium(VI) sorption by bituminous shale from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Oil shales are sedimentary rocks containing a polymeric matter in a mineral matrix. • Sorption potential of bituminous shale (BS) for uranium recovery was investigated. • U(VI) sorption increased with decreasing pH and increasing temperature. • Kinetic data were analyzed based on single and two resistance diffusion models. • The results fit well to the McKay equation assuming film and intraparticle diffusion. - Abstract: Sorption of U(VI) onto a bituminous shale (BS) from a nuclear power plant project site in Black Sea region was investigated for potential risk assessment when it releases into the environment with contaminated ground and surface water. The sorption characteristics of the BS for U(VI) recovery were evaluated as a function of contact time, adsorbent dosage, initial concentration, pH and temperature. Kinetic results fit better with pseudo-second-order model rather than pseudo-first-order. The possibility of diffusion process was analyzed based on Weber–Morris intra-particle diffusion model. The McKay equation assuming film- and intraparticle diffusion better predicted the data than the Vermeulen approximation presuming surface diffusion. Equilibrium sorption data were modeled according to the Langmuir, Dubinin–Radushkevich (D–R) and Freundlich isotherm equations. Sorption capacity increased from 0.10 to 0.15 mmol g−1 in 298–318 K temperature range. FT-IR analysis and pH dependent sorption studies conducted in hydroxide and carbonate media revealed that U(VI) species were sorbed in uranyl and its hydroxo forms on the BS. Desorption studies showed that U(VI) leaching with Black Sea water was negligible from the loaded BS. The activation parameters (Ea, ΔH∗ and ΔG∗) estimated from diffusion coefficients indicated the presence of an energy barrier in the sorption system. However, thermodynamic functions derived from sorption equilibrium constants showed that overall sorption process was spontaneous in nature and

  4. Daily uranium excretion in German peacekeeping personnel serving on the Balkans compared to ICRP model prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeh, U; Li, W B; Höllriegl, V; Giussani, A; Schramel, P; Roth, P; Paretzke, H G

    2007-01-01

    An investigation was performed to assess a possible health risk of depleted uranium (DU) for residents and German peacekeeping personnel serving on the Balkans. In order to evaluate a possible DU intake, the urinary uranium excretions of volunteers were collected and analysed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). In total, more than 1300 urine samples from soldiers, civil servants and unexposed controls of different genders and ages were analysed to determine uranium excretion parameters. All participating volunteers, aged 3-92 y, were grouped according to their gender and age for evaluation. The results of the investigation revealed no significant difference between the unexposed controls and the peacekeeping personnel. In addition, the geometric means of the daily urinary excretion in peacekeeping personnel, ranging from 3 to 23 ng d(-1) for different age groups, fall toward the lower end of renal uranium excretion values published for unexposed populations in literature. The measured data were compared with the International Commission on Radiological Protection prediction for the intake of natural uranium by unexposed members of the public. The two data sets are in good agreement, indicating that no relevant intake of additional uranium, either natural or DU, has appeared for German peacekeeping personnel serving on the Balkans. PMID:17567762

  5. Uranium: biokinetics and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report was achieved as a part of a collaboration with the Fuel Cycle Direction. Its aim was to give the state of the art about: the behaviour of uranium in the human organism (biokinetics) after ingestion, its toxicity (mainly renal) and the current regulation about its incorporation. Both in the upstream and in the downstream of the fuel cycle, uranium remains, quantitatively, the first element in the cycle which is, at the present time, temporarily disposed or recycled. Such a considerable quantity of uranium sets the problem of its risk on the health. In the long term, the biosphere may be affected and consequently the public may ingest water or food contaminated with uranium. In this way, radiological and chemical toxicity risk may be activated. This report emphasizes: the necessity of confirming some experimental and epidemiological biokinetic data used or not in the ICRP models. Unsolved questions remain about the gastrointestinal absorption according to chemical form (valency state, mixtures...), mass and individual variations (age, disease) further a chronic ingestion of uranium. It is well established that uranium is mainly deposited in the skeleton and the kidney. But the skeleton kinetics following a chronic ingestion and especially in some diseases has to be more elucidated; the necessity of taking into account uranium at first as a chemical toxic, essentially in the kidney and determining the threshold of functional lesion. In this way, it is important to look for some specific markers; the problem of not considering chemical toxicity of uranium in the texts regulating its incorporation

  6. Radon dispersion modeling and dose assessment for uranium mine ventilation shaft exhausts under neutral atmospheric stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Dong; Wang, Hanqing; Kearfott, Kimberlee J; Liu, Zehua; Mo, Shunquan

    2014-03-01

    In the present study, the roles of atmospheric wind profiles in the neutral atmosphere and surface roughness parameters in a complex terrain were examined to determine their impacts on radon ((222)Rn) dispersion from an actual uranium mine ventilation shaft. Simulations were completed on (222)Rn dispersion extending from the shaft to a vulnerable distance, near the location of an occupied farmhouse. The eight dispersion scenarios for the ventilation shaft source included four downwind velocities (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 m s(-1)) and two underlying surface roughness characteristics (0.1 m and 1.0 m). (222)Rn distributions and elevated pollution regions were identified. Effective dose estimation methods involving a historical weighting of wind speeds in the direction of interest coupled to the complex dispersion model were proposed. Using this approach, the radiation effects on the residents assumed to be outside at the location of the farm house 250 m downwind from the ventilation shaft outlet were computed. The maximum effective dose rate calculated for the residents at the outside of the farm house was 2.2 mSv y(-1), which is less than the low limit action level of 3-10 mSv y(-1) recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) occupational exposure action level for radon. PMID:24378730

  7. Uranium immobilization and nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considerable information useful in nuclear waste storage can be gained by studying the conditions of uranium ore deposit formation. Further information can be gained by comparing the chemistry of uranium to nuclear fission products and other radionuclides of concern to nuclear waste disposal. Redox state appears to be the most important variable in controlling uranium solubility, especially at near neutral pH, which is characteristic of most ground water. This is probably also true of neptunium, plutonium, and technetium. Further, redox conditions that immobilize uranium should immobilize these elements. The mechanisms that have produced uranium ore bodies in the Earth's crust are somewhat less clear. At the temperatures of hydrothermal uranium deposits, equilibrium models are probably adequate, aqueous uranium (VI) being reduced and precipitated by interaction with ferrous-iron-bearing oxides and silicates. In lower temperature roll-type uranium deposits, overall equilibrium may not have been achieved. The involvement of sulfate-reducing bacteria in ore-body formation has been postulated, but is uncertain. Reduced sulfur species do, however, appear to be involved in much of the low temperature uranium precipitation. Assessment of the possibility of uranium transport in natural ground water is complicated because the system is generally not in overall equilibrium. For this reason, Eh measurements are of limited value. If a ground water is to be capable of reducing uranium, it must contain ions capable of reducing uranium both thermodynamically and kinetically. At present, the best candidates are reduced sulfur species

  8. The Impacts of Uranium and Thorium on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Viscosity Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) vitrifies high level liquid waste (HLLW) into borosilicate glass for stabilization and permanent disposal. The viscosity of the borosilicate glass melt as a function of temperature is the single most important variable affecting the melt rate and pour ability of the glass. The viscosity determines the rate of melting of the raw feed, the rate of glass bubble release (foaming and fining), the rate of homogenization, the adequacy of heat transfer, the devitrification rate, and thus, the quality (in terms of glass homogeneity) of the final glass product. If the viscosity is too low, excessive convection currents can occur during melting, increasing corrosion/erosion of the melter materials of construction (refractory and electrodes) and making control of the melter more difficult. The lowest glass viscosities allowed in the DWPF melter have, therefore, been determined to be approximately 20 poise. DWPF glasses must pour continuously into a large steel canister for ultimate storage in a geologic repository, but glasses with a viscosity greater than or equal to 500 poise do not readily pour. Moreover, too high a viscosity can reduce product quality by causing voids in the final glass. A conservative range of 20-110 poise at a melt temperature, Tmelt or Tm, of 1150 degrees C was, therefore, established for DWPF production. In summary, a uranium term is not needed in the DWPF viscosity model as long as the U3O8 concentrations of the glasses being melted are less than or equal to 5.76 wt percent, the maximum value examined in this study. The fact that a U-plus-6 term is not needed in the DWPF viscosity model is consistent with the fact that U-plus-6 has four bridging and two non-bridging oxygen bonds. Therefore, the impact of the number of bridging and non-bridging oxygens is approximately equal at U3O8 concentrations of less than or equal to 5.76 wt percent. Uranium may not have an impact at

  9. A Model to Reproduce the Response of the Gaseous Fission Product Monitor (GFPM) in a CANDUR 6 Reactor (An Estimate of Tramp Uranium Mass in a Candu Core)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a Canada Deuterium Uranium (Candu) reactor, the fuel bundles produce gaseous and volatile fission products that are contained within the fuel matrix and the welded zircaloy sheath. Sometimes a fuel sheath can develop a defect and release the fission products into the circulating coolant. To detect fuel defects, a Gaseous Fission Product Monitoring (GFPM) system is provided in Candu reactors. The (GFPM) is a gamma ray spectrometer that measures fission products in the coolant and alerts the operator to the presence of defected fuel through an increase in measured fission product concentration. A background fission product concentration in the coolant also arises from tramp uranium. The sources of the tramp uranium are small quantities of uranium contamination on the surfaces of fuel bundles and traces of uranium on the pressure tubes, arising from the rare defected fuel element that released uranium into the core. This paper presents a dynamic model that reproduces the behaviour of a GFPM in a Candu 6 plant. The model predicts the fission product concentrations in the coolant from the chronic concentration of tramp uranium on the inner surface of the pressure tubes (PT) and the surface of the fuel bundles (FB) taking into account the on-power refuelling system. (authors)

  10. Ground water contamination from an inactive uranium mill tailings pile. I. Application of a chemical mixing model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-pH process waters contained in a number of inactive and abandoned uranium mill tailings in the US represent potential sources of radionuclide and trace metal contamination of ground water. Detailed investigations at a typical site at Riverton, Wyoming, indicate that chemical transport occurs from initial dewatering of the tailings, downward infiltration due to precipitation, and ground water intrusion into the base of the tailings pile. Except for elevated uranium and molybdenum concentrations, current radionuclide and trace metal transport is limited by near neutral pH conditions of the ground water. Significant reactions include the dissolution of calcite, production of CO2, and precipitation of gypsum and the hydroxides of iron and aluminum. A geochemical mixing model employing the PHREEQE computer code is used to estimate current rates of the ground water contamination by tailings water. A maximum mixing of 1.7% of pore water is a factor of 2 less than steady state estimates based on hydraulic parameters

  11. Assessment of current atomic scale modelling methods for the investigation of nuclear fuels under irradiation: Example of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We focus here on the assessment of the description of interatomic interactions in uranium dioxide using, on the one hand, electronic structure methods, in particular in the Density Functional Theory (DFT) framework, and on the other hand, empirical potential methods. These two types of methods are complementary, the former enabling results to be obtained from a minimal amount of input data and further insight into the electronic and magnetic properties to be achieved, while the latter are irreplaceable for studies where a large number of atoms need to be considered. We consider basic properties as well as specific ones, which are important for the description of nuclear fuel under irradiation. These are especially energies, which are the main data passed on to higher scale models. For this exercise, we limit ourselves to uranium dioxide (UO2) because of the extensive amount of studies available on this system. (authors)

  12. Model investigations for trace analysis of iodine, uranium, and technetium in saturated sodium chloride leaching solutions of stored radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the development of a time and cost saving chromatographic technique, which allows the matrix to be separated and the most important species to be analyzed in a leaching solution of vitrified radioactive waste. Uranium, iodine, and technetium were chosen for the model technique to be elaborated. In a first step, iodide and pertechnetate were separated from the matrix by the strongly basic AG 1X 8 anion exchange resin and then separated from each other by selective elution. The uranyl ions eluted with the sodium chloride matrix were separated from the excess of sodium chloride in a second step, again by adsorption to the strongly basic resin. The ion-selective electrode was found to be a suitable tool for iodide analysis. Pertechnetate was analysed by means of liquid scintillation. Uranium was determined by ICP-AES. (orig./RB)

  13. Cytotoxic and phenotypic effects of uranium and lead on osteoblastic cellular models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is involved in the evaluation of bio-hazard associated with the use of uranium in nuclear activities and industrial research. The uranium, known in the literature as potentially carcinogenic or toxic for reproduction, can become a public health problem with the views of the various possibilities of human infections (military of the Gulf War, Finnish populations exposed to drinking water contaminated by example). The skeleton represents the organ of long-term storage of uranium and can be a target of its toxicity. Lead sharing this way of fixing in the bone matrix and have the same adverse effects on bone formation. The osteoblasts, cells responsible in bone formation, are specific targets of these two metals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acute toxicity of speciation controlled uranium and lead on osteoblasts culture. The intracellular accumulation, distribution and speciation were then studied to explain the observed toxicity. A cell death and phenotypic disorder were highlighted. The speciation is seen as crucial in biological effects of these metals. The most toxic species of both metals have been identified. The accumulation or cell distribution could not alone explain the impact of speciation on the toxicity observed. However, a phenomenon of intracellular precipitation of uranium and lead has been stressed and could be involved in a detoxification mechanism. (author)

  14. Gebel Gattar prospect, an obvious model of intra granitic uranium mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebel Gattar area is situated in the northern Eastern desert, SW Hurghada city and is considered as an area of high potentiality for workable uranium deposits. The field radiometric prospect has started in May 1984. The geologic, structural and radiometric studies have resulted in the northern parts of the pluton and are controlled by some important structural features, namely NNE-SSW, ENE-WSW, NW-SE and to a lesser extent the N-S faults. The uranium content of the fresh granites in the area ranges from 20 to 30 ppm and thus could be considered as uraniferous granites. The mineralized samples are ranging from 1000 to 5000 ppm, while hand piked sample could reach as much as 14000 ppm. Detailed mineralogical studies proved the presence of various types of secondary uranium minerals presented mainly by molybdates, vanadates, silicate and sulphates. Exploratory tunneling works during 1990 to 1992 demonstrated that the uranium mineralization is still persistent from level 900 m (asl) to level 660 m (asl) which is nearly the wadi level. The alteration of the rocks especially hematitization, kaolination and partial silicificant is still well noticed and the gaping of the fault zone is more open and shows an increasing width. Moreover, secondary uranium minerals are still present indicating persistence of the oxidizing conditions. 5 figs., 4 tabs

  15. MUICYCL and MUIFAP: models tracking minor uranium isotopes in the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two computer programs have been written to provide information on the buildup of minor uranium isotopes in the nuclear fuel cycle. The Minor Uranium Isotope Cycle Program, MUICYCL, tracks fuel through a multiyear campaign cycle of enrichment, reactor burnup, reprocessing, enrichment, etc. MUICYCL facilities include preproduction stockpiles, U235 escalation, and calculation of losses. The Minor Uranium Isotope Flowsheet Analyzer Program, MUIFAP, analyzes one minor isotope in one year of an enrichment operation. The formulation of the enrichment cascade, reactors, and reprocessing facility is presented. Input and output descriptions and sample cases are presented. The programs themselves are documented by short descriptions of each routine, flowcharts, definitions of common blocks and variables, and internal documentation. The programs are written in FORTRAN for use in batch mode

  16. Czechoslovak uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data and knowledge related to the prospecting, mining, processing and export of uranium ores in Czechoslovakia are presented. In the years between 1945 and January 1, 1991, 98,461.1 t of uranium were extracted. In the period 1965-1990 the uranium industry was subsidized from the state budget to a total of 38.5 billion CSK. The subsidies were put into extraction, investments and geologic prospecting; the latter was at first, ie. till 1960 financed by the former USSR, later on the two parties shared costs on a 1:1 basis. Since 1981 the prospecting has been entirely financed from the Czechoslovak state budget. On Czechoslovak territory uranium has been extracted from deposits which may be classified as vein-type deposits, deposits in uranium-bearing sandstones and deposits connected with weathering processes. The future of mining, however, is almost exclusively being connected with deposits in uranium-bearing sandstones. A brief description and characteristic is given of all uranium deposits on Czechoslovak territory, and the organization of uranium mining in Czechoslovakia is described as is the approach used in the world to evaluate uranium deposits; uranium prices and actual resources are also given. (Z.S.) 3 figs

  17. Proposition of a new genetic model for the Itataia uranium deposit, state of Ceara, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Itataia uranium deposit is located within the central portion of the state of Ceara, being characterized mainly by collophanitic and feldspathic lithologies with some graphite concentrations. The mineralization occurs mainly in collophanitic rocks displaying compact texture and disseminates into marbles and feldspathic rocks. The characterization, within the structural- stratigraphic framework of Itataia, of a supergenic enrichment process through the remobilization and reconcentration of syngenetic uranium in marine carbonate rocks is proposed and discussed through the interpretation of Drill-hoel, geochemical seismic and structural data. (D.M.)

  18. Modelling uranium solubilities in aqueous solutions: Validation of a thermodynamic data base for the EQ3/6 geochemical codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental solubilities of U4+ and UO22+ that are reported in the literature have been collected. Data on oxides, hydroxides and carbonates have been selected for this work. They include results both at 25 degrees C and at higher temperatures. The literature data have been compared with calculated uranium solubilities obtained with the EQ3/6 geochemical modelling programs and an uranium thermodynamic data base selected for the Swedish nuclear waste management program. This verification/validiation exercise has shown that more experimental data is needed to determine the chemical composition of anionic uranyl hydroxo complexes as well as their equilibrium constants of formation. There is also a need for more solubility data on well characterised alkaline or alkaline-earth uranates. For the uranyl carbonate system, the calculated results agree reasonably well with the experimental literature values, which span over a wide range of pH, (CO32-)T, CO2(g)-pressure, and T. The experimental solubility of UO2(s) agrees also well with the EQ3/6 calculations for pH greater than 6. However, in more acidic solutions the experimental solubilities are higher than the calculated values. This is due to the formation of polynuclear hydroxo complexes of uranium, which are not well characterised, and are not included in the thermodynamic data base used in this study. (authors)

  19. Experimental study and kinetic modeling of the hydro-fluorination of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A kinetic study of hydro-fluorination of uranium dioxide was performed between 375 and 475 C under partial pressures of HF between 42 and 720 mbar. The reaction was followed by thermogravimetry in isothermal and isobaric conditions. The kinetic data obtained coupled with a characterization of the powder before, during and after reaction by SEM, EDS, BET and XRD showed that the powder grains of UO2 are transformed according a model of instantaneous germination, anisotropic growth and internal development. The rate limiting step of the growth process is the diffusion of HF in the UF4 layer. A mechanism of growth of the UF4 layer has been proposed. In the temperature and pressure range studied, the reaction is of first order with respect to HF and follows an Arrhenius law. A rate equation was determined and used to perform kinetic simulations which have shown a very good correlation with experience. Coupling of this rate equation with heat and mass transport phenomena allowed to perform simulations at the scale of a powder's agglomerate. They have shown that some structures of agglomerates influence the rate of diffusion of the gases in the porous medium and thereby influence the reaction rate. Finally kinetic simulations on powder's beds and pellets were carried out and compared with experimental rates. The experimental and simulated kinetic curves have the same paces, but improvements in the simulations are needed to accurately predict rates: the coupling between the three scales (grain, agglomerate, oven) would be a good example. (author)

  20. Modeling the interaction of light intensity, nutrient concentration and uranium toxicity in Lemna minor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    on (heterotrophic) animals, where usually only one food source with constant composition is taken into account. Reproduction can in most cases be modeled simplistically as continuous production of offspring in the final developmental stage. A DEB model for a (photoautotrophic) plant should take into account both light and nutrients as energy input. Additionally, reproduction takes place differently than in animals (e.g., vegetative reproduction). Until now, no plant model based on DEB has been developed yet. We here present the first DEB model for a plant. It explicitly takes light as an input of energy into account, which enables us to study the interaction of light intensity and radionuclides. As study organism, we chose Lemna minor,because of its advantages of being a relatively simple higher plant. We discuss the interaction of light intensity, nutrient concentration and radionuclides using uranium toxicity as a case study. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  1. Modeling the interaction of light intensity, nutrient concentration and uranium toxicity in Lemna minor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmer, E.; Horemans, N.; Vandenhove, H. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN (Belgium); Cedergreen, N. [University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Jager, T. [Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-07-01

    focused on (heterotrophic) animals, where usually only one food source with constant composition is taken into account. Reproduction can in most cases be modeled simplistically as continuous production of offspring in the final developmental stage. A DEB model for a (photoautotrophic) plant should take into account both light and nutrients as energy input. Additionally, reproduction takes place differently than in animals (e.g., vegetative reproduction). Until now, no plant model based on DEB has been developed yet. We here present the first DEB model for a plant. It explicitly takes light as an input of energy into account, which enables us to study the interaction of light intensity and radionuclides. As study organism, we chose Lemna minor,because of its advantages of being a relatively simple higher plant. We discuss the interaction of light intensity, nutrient concentration and radionuclides using uranium toxicity as a case study. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  2. Effects of technological learning and uranium price on nuclear cost: Preliminary insights from a multiple factors learning curve and uranium market modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper studies the effects of returns to scale, technological learning, i.e. learning-by-doing and learning-by-searching, and uranium price on the prospects of nuclear cost decrease. We use an extended learning curve specification, named multiple factors learning curve (MFLC). In a first stage, we estimate a single MFLC. In a second stage, we estimate the MFLC under the framework of simultaneous system of equations which takes into account the uranium supply and demand. This permits not only to enhance the reliability of the estimation by incorporating the uranium price formation mechanisms in the MFLC via the price variable, but also to give preliminary insights about uranium supply and demand behaviors and the associated effects on the nuclear expansion. Results point out that the nuclear cost has important prospects for decrease via capacity expansion, i.e. learning-by-doing effects. In contrast, they show that the learning-by-searching as well as the scale effects have a limited effect on the cost decrease prospects. Conversely, results also show that uranium price exerts a positive and significant effect on nuclear cost, implying that when the uranium price increases, the nuclear power generation cost decreases. Since uranium is characterized by important physical availability, and since it represents only a minor part in the total nuclear cost, we consider that in a context of increasing demand for nuclear energy the latter result can be explained by the fact that the positive learning effects on the cost of nuclear act in a way to dissipate the negative ones that an increase in uranium price may exert. Further, results give evidence of important inertia in the supply and demand sides as well as evidence of slow correlation between the uranium market and oil market which may limit the inter-fuels substituability effects, that is, nuclear capacity expansion and associated learning-by-doing benefits. - Highlights: → We study the prospects of nuclear cost

  3. Transfer modelling and toxicity evaluation of the effluent from an installation of cleansing and uranium recovery using a battery of bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnaire, Béatrice; Boyer, Patrick; Bonzom, Jean-Marc; Lecomte-Pradines, Catherine; Simon, Olivier; Gilbin, Rodolphe

    2011-01-01

    On July 7, 2008, a leak of effluent from an Installation of Cleansing and Uranium Recovery (Tricastin, France) led to the spillage of uranium in a stream. The acute toxicity of the effluent was evaluated, and compared to the toxicity of uranium nitrate in bioassays using several organisms: Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Daphnia magna, Chironomus riparius and Danio rerio. A sediment bioassay was also performed on C. riparius using water and sediment sampled along the river. Results showed that effluent EC(50) 72 h was 0.65 mg U/l for algae and LC(50) 48 h was 1.67 mg U/l for daphnia, while values obtained for uranium nitrate were higher. The LC(50) 96 h of effluent to C. riparius was 22.7 mg U/l, similar to value for uranium nitrate; the sediment collected was not toxic to C. riparius larvae. The LOEC of effluent and uranium nitrate on HT(50) of D. rerio were similar (0.03 mg U/l), but larvae were more sensitive to uranium nitrate than to effluent. Our results suggest that other substances contained in the effluent could potentially be toxic to wildlife in association with uranium. In parallel, the modelling of the transfers based on uranium measurements in the surface water was used to fill data gaps and assess the impact along the river. These results provided an estimate of exposure conditions that occurred along the river. This approach allowed us to see that the risk to ecosystem during this incident was certainly low and concerned a short period of time, but it could have existed at least for some species. PMID:21107686

  4. Application of droplet evaporation model to the expansion cooling of an atomic uranium beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By using the technique of laser induced fluorescence to measure the velocity distribution function of an atomic uranium beam produced by evaporation from a spherical surface by electron bombardment, we have observed the phenomenon of vapour expansion cooling. Agreement between the theoretical analysis and experimental results is satisfactory. (author)

  5. Modeling Uranium Transport in Koongarra, Australia: The Effect of a Moving Weathering Zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijnse, A.; Weerd, van de H.; Hassanizadeh, S.M.

    2001-01-01

    Natural analogues are an important source of long-term data and may be viewed as naturally occurring experiments that often include processes, phenomena, and scenarios that are important to nuclear waste disposal safety assessment studies. The Koongarra uranium deposit in the Alligator Rivers region

  6. Ore deposit models - 3. Genetic considerations relating to some uranium ore deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandstone ores of major economic importance include classical 'roll fronts', 'tabular bodies' and 'channel-type' ore deposits. In such ores, deposition of uranium occurrs at an oxidation-reduction front. Uranium is reduced and precipitated from solution at an Eh close to that of the Fe2+/Fe3+ boundary, so it is visibly associated with the iron oxidation/reduction front. It is suggested that autogenous enrichment of syngenetic uranium deposits in carbonaceous pelites (mudstones) involves the following stages: first, syngenetic concentration of uranium in the carbonaceous pelites; second, metamorphism and folding at a temperature of about 2500C; third, due to radiogenic heat, development of a thermal anomaly; fourth, (since the solubility of UO2 as a function of temperature goes through a maximum), collection of UO2 by circulating pore water from the fringes of the temperature anomaly, and its precipitation towards the interior of the mineralized zone; lastly, a temperature fall due to cessation of orogeny responsible for metamorphism or to reduction of cover rock thickness by erosion. Cycles of activity may occur. (N.D.H.)

  7. Descriptive models of major uranium deposits in China - Some results of the Workshop on Uranium Resource Assessment sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, Austria, in cooperation with China National Nuclear Corporation, Beijing, and the U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, Colorado, and Reston, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, W.I.; Feng, S.; Zuyi, C.; McCammon, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    Four major types of uranium deposits occur in China: granite, volcanic, sandstone, and carbonaceous-siliceous-pelitic rock. These types are major sources of uranium in many parts of the world and account for about 95 percent of Chinese production. Descriptive models for each of these types record the diagnostic regional and local geologic features of the deposits that are important to genetic studies, exploration, and resource assessment. A fifth type of uranium deposit, metasomatite, is also modeled because of its high potential for production. These five types of uranium deposits occur irregularly in five tectonic provinces distributed from the northwest through central to southern China. ?? 1993 Oxford University Press.

  8. The role of GIS in spatial modeling of multi-disciplinary geoscientific data for uranium exploration over the Kunjar-Darjing basin, Odisha

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of Geographical Information System (GIS) for identifying the spatial locations of uranium exploration target areas using multi-disciplinary geoscientific data is presented in this paper. The data sets used in this study are Airborne Gamma Ray Spectrometric (AGRS), Aeromagnetic (AM), Satellite images, regional ground gravity and geochemical surveys over one of the promising mobile Proterozoic Kunjar-Darjing Basins to the west of Singhbum Uranium Province (SUP), Odisha, India. Analysis of the geochemical data indicated unconformity related uranium mineralization along the unconformity between Kunjar-Darjing sediments and the S-type per-aluminous Tamparkola granite with labile uranium. All the data sets are processed and interpreted independently in terms of geology based on characteristics such as intensity, frequency and texture of the images generated. Various ratio maps generated from AGRS data were used as training points for spatial modeling by building relationships (topology) with the structures and geology interpreted from the magnetic and gravity datasets. Index overlay method is adapted in spatial modeling. The study shows that integrating the geological, geophysical, geochemical and other geodata in a GIS environment provides valuable guidelines for geological mapping as well as identifying target areas for uranium exploration. The GIS study facilitated in identifying potential target areas for uranium exploration along the regional faults D1 and D2 around the villages Kelo, Tarnra, northeast of Kunjar, Nuarali and Betajharan. (author)

  9. Development of a Kelp-Type Structure Module in a Coastal Ocean Model to Assess the Hydrodynamic Impact of Seawater Uranium Extraction Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiping Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid growth of global energy demand, interest in extracting uranium from seawater for nuclear energy has been renewed. While extracting seawater uranium is not yet commercially viable, it serves as a “backstop” to the conventional uranium resources and provides an essentially unlimited supply of uranium resource. With recent technology advances, extracting uranium from seawater could be economically feasible only when the extraction devices are deployed at a large scale (e.g., several hundred km2. There is concern however that the large scale deployment of adsorbent farms could result in potential impacts to the hydrodynamic flow field in an oceanic setting. In this study, a kelp-type structure module based on the classic momentum sink approach was incorporated into a coastal ocean model to simulate the blockage effect of a farm of passive uranium extraction devices on the flow field. The module was quantitatively validated against laboratory flume experiments for both velocity and turbulence profiles.Model results suggest that the reduction in ambient currents could range from 4% to 10% using adsorbent farm dimensions and mooring densities previously described in the literature and with typical drag coefficients.

  10. Uranium isotopes and dissolved organic carbon in loess permafrost: Modeling the age of ancient ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Stephanie A.; Paces, James B.; O'Donnell, J.A.; Jorgenson, M.T.; Kanevskiy, M.Z.; Aiken, George R.; Shur, Y.; Harden, Jennifer W.; Striegl, Rob

    2015-01-01

    The residence time of ice in permafrost is an indicator of past climate history, and of the resilience and vulnerability of high-latitude ecosystems to global change. Development of geochemical indicators of ground-ice residence times in permafrost will advance understanding of the circumstances and evidence of permafrost formation, preservation, and thaw in response to climate warming and other disturbance. We used uranium isotopes to evaluate the residence time of segregated ground ice from ice-rich loess permafrost cores in central Alaska. Activity ratios of 234U vs. 238U (234U/238U) in water from thawed core sections ranged between 1.163 and 1.904 due to contact of ice and associated liquid water with mineral surfaces over time. Measured (234U/238U) values in ground ice showed an overall increase with depth in a series of five neighboring cores up to 21 m deep. This is consistent with increasing residence time of ice with depth as a result of accumulation of loess over time, as well as characteristic ice morphologies, high segregated ice content, and wedge ice, all of which support an interpretation of syngenetic permafrost formation associated with loess deposition. At the same time, stratigraphic evidence indicates some past sediment redistribution and possibly shallow thaw among cores, with local mixing of aged thaw waters. Using measures of surface area and a leaching experiment to determine U distribution, a geometric model of (234U/238U) evolution suggests mean ages of up to ∼200 ky BP in the deepest core, with estimated uncertainties of up to an order of magnitude. Evidence of secondary coatings on loess grains with elevated (234U/238U) values and U concentrations suggests that refinement of the geometric model to account for weathering processes is needed to reduce uncertainty. We suggest that in this area of deep ice-rich loess permafrost, ice bodies have been preserved from the last glacial period (10–100 ky BP), despite subsequent

  11. Genome-Based Models to Optimize In Situ Bioremediation of Uranium and Harvesting Electrical Energy from Waste Organic Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovley, Derek R

    2012-12-28

    The goal of this research was to provide computational tools to predictively model the behavior of two microbial communities of direct relevance to Department of Energy interests: 1) the microbial community responsible for in situ bioremediation of uranium in contaminated subsurface environments; and 2) the microbial community capable of harvesting electricity from waste organic matter and renewable biomass. During this project the concept of microbial electrosynthesis, a novel form of artificial photosynthesis for the direct production of fuels and other organic commodities from carbon dioxide and water was also developed and research was expanded into this area as well.

  12. Uranium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alltime high for uranium concentrate production is expected to be reached in 1980. The average grade of ore fed to process will be up about 10% from last year. Some curtailments in uranium processing were announced, but three new processing plants began production in 1980. The prospects for 1981 are not as encouraging. The continuation of low prices and slow demand for U3O8 are expected to be reflected in a significant reduction in overall production and in the postponement of some plans for expansion and construction of uranium processing facilities. Increases in production capacity will occur when Plateau Resource's 750 TPD mill at Ticaboo, Utah, starts up early next year, and additional production of byproduct uranium is expected from western phosphate operations and from the southern states. These increases in capacity, however, will not offset the cutbacks in uranium processing already in force together with the additional curtailments anticipated during the course of 1981

  13. Modeling Uranium Transport in Koongarra, Australia: The Effect of a Moving Weathering Zone

    OpenAIRE

    Leijnse, A.; Weerd, van, M.; Hassanizadeh, S.M

    2001-01-01

    Natural analogues are an important source of long-term data and may be viewed as naturally occurring experiments that often include processes, phenomena, and scenarios that are important to nuclear waste disposal safety assessment studies. The Koongarra uranium deposit in the Alligator Rivers region of Australia is one of the best-studied natural analogue sites. The deposit has been subjected to chemical weathering over several million years, during which many climatological, hydrological, an...

  14. Linking atomic and mesoscopic scales for the modelling of the transport properties of uranium dioxide under irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertolus, Marjorie, E-mail: marjorie.bertolus@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DEC/SESC, Centre de Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Freyss, Michel; Dorado, Boris; Martin, Guillaume; Hoang, Kiet; Maillard, Serge; Skorek, Richard; Garcia, Philippe; Valot, Carole [CEA, DEN, DEC/SESC, Centre de Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Chartier, Alain; Van Brutzel, Laurent; Fossati, Paul [CEA, DEN, DPC/SCCME, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Grimes, Robin W.; Parfitt, David C.; Bishop, Clare L.; Murphy, Samuel T.; Rushton, Michael J.D. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Staicu, Dragos; Yakub, Eugen; Nichenko, Sergii [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); and others

    2015-07-15

    This article presents a synthesis of the investigations at the atomic scale of the transport properties of defects and fission gases in uranium dioxide, as well as of the transfer of results from the atomic scale to models at the mesoscopic scale, performed during the F-BRIDGE European project (2008–2012). We first present the mesoscale models used to investigate uranium oxide fuel under irradiation, and in particular the cluster dynamics and kinetic Monte Carlo methods employed to model the behaviour of defects and fission gases in UO{sub 2}, as well as the parameters of these models. Second, we describe briefly the atomic scale methods employed, i.e. electronic structure calculations and empirical potential methods. Then, we show the results of the calculation of the data necessary for the mesoscale models using these atomic scale methods. Finally, we summarise the links built between the atomic and mesoscopic scale by listing the data calculated at the atomic scale which are to be used as input in mesoscale modelling. Despite specific difficulties in the description of fuel materials, the results obtained in F-BRIDGE show that atomic scale modelling methods are now mature enough to obtain precise data to feed higher scale models and help interpret experiments on nuclear fuels. These methods bring valuable insight, in particular the formation, binding and migration energies of point and extended defects, fission product localization, incorporation energies and migration pathways, elementary mechanisms of irradiation induced processes. These studies open the way for the investigation of other significant phenomena involved in fuel behaviour, in particular the thermochemical and thermomechanical properties and their evolution in-pile, complex microstructures, as well as of more complex fuels.

  15. Linking atomic and mesoscopic scales for the modelling of the transport properties of uranium dioxide under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents a synthesis of the investigations at the atomic scale of the transport properties of defects and fission gases in uranium dioxide, as well as of the transfer of results from the atomic scale to models at the mesoscopic scale, performed during the F-BRIDGE European project (2008–2012). We first present the mesoscale models used to investigate uranium oxide fuel under irradiation, and in particular the cluster dynamics and kinetic Monte Carlo methods employed to model the behaviour of defects and fission gases in UO2, as well as the parameters of these models. Second, we describe briefly the atomic scale methods employed, i.e. electronic structure calculations and empirical potential methods. Then, we show the results of the calculation of the data necessary for the mesoscale models using these atomic scale methods. Finally, we summarise the links built between the atomic and mesoscopic scale by listing the data calculated at the atomic scale which are to be used as input in mesoscale modelling. Despite specific difficulties in the description of fuel materials, the results obtained in F-BRIDGE show that atomic scale modelling methods are now mature enough to obtain precise data to feed higher scale models and help interpret experiments on nuclear fuels. These methods bring valuable insight, in particular the formation, binding and migration energies of point and extended defects, fission product localization, incorporation energies and migration pathways, elementary mechanisms of irradiation induced processes. These studies open the way for the investigation of other significant phenomena involved in fuel behaviour, in particular the thermochemical and thermomechanical properties and their evolution in-pile, complex microstructures, as well as of more complex fuels

  16. DFT modeling of adsorption onto uranium metal using large-scale parallel computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a dearth of atomistic simulations involving the surface chemistry of 7-uranium which is of interest as the key fuel component of a breeder-burner stage in future fuel cycles. Recent availability of high-performance computing hardware and software has rendered extended quantum chemical surface simulations involving actinides feasible. With that motivation, data for bulk and surface 7-phase uranium metal are calculated in the plane-wave pseudopotential density functional theory method. Chemisorption of atomic hydrogen and oxygen on several un-relaxed low-index faces of 7-uranium is considered. The optimal adsorption sites (calculated cohesive energies) on the (100), (110), and (111) faces are found to be the one-coordinated top site (8.8 eV), four-coordinated center site (9.9 eV), and one-coordinated top 1 site (7.9 eV) respectively, for oxygen; and the four-coordinated center site (2.7 eV), four-coordinated center site (3.1 eV), and three-coordinated top2 site (3.2 eV) for hydrogen. (authors)

  17. Transport, chemistry, and thermodynamics of uranium hexafluoride in the atmosphere—evaluation of models using field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Shyam K.; Chambers, Douglas B.; Radonjic, Zivorad; Park, Shin

    Accidental releases of uranium hexafluoride (UF 6) can occur from nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Upon release to the atmosphere, UF 6 enters into exothermic chemical reactions with atmospheric water vapor producing hydrogen fluoride (HF) and uranyl fluoride (UO 2F 2); HF undergoes further polymerization, depolymerization, and hydrolysis. A number of models have been used in the past to simulate the transport of UF 6 and its reaction products in the atmosphere. Performances of two models, HGSYSTEM/UF 6 and SAIC were assessed by comparing model predictions with field measurements. Field data for UF 6 were available from three experimental releases made at Bordeaux in France between 1986 and 1989; an accidental release at Gore, Oklahoma; and an accidental release at the Comurhex Plant in France. The Gore and Comurhex data are of questionable quality since they were from a real accident. The Bordeaux data are of better quality since they were from a research-grade study. Predictions from the HGSYSTEM/UF 6 model were within an order of magnitude of the observations, with most within a factor of two of the observations. Most predictions from the SAIC model were within an order of magnitude of the observations, but the model also over-predicted beyond an order of magnitude for a few observations. Detailed sensitivity analyses were also conducted on all modules of the HGSYSTEM/UF 6 and SAIC models. At large distances from the source, the output concentration of total uranium is most sensitive to meteorological parameters; and at distances close to the source, it is most sensitive to certain source-specific and meteorological parameters.

  18. Predictive geochemical modeling of interactions between uranium-mill-tailings solutions and sediments in a flow-through system: model formulations and preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, S.R.; Felmy, A.R.; Serne, R.J.; Gee, G.W.

    1983-08-01

    An equilibrium thermodynamic conceptual model consisting of minerals and solid phases was developed to represent a soil column. A computer program was used as a tool to solve the system of mathematical equations imposed by the conceptual chemical model. The combined conceptual model and computer program were used to predict aqueous phase compositions of effluent solutions from permeability cells packed with geologic materials and percolated with uranium mill tailings solutions. Initial calculations of ion speciation and mineral solubility and our understanding of the chemical processes occurring in the modeled system were used to select solid phases for inclusion in the conceptual model. The modeling predictions were compared to the analytically determined column effluent concentrations. Hypotheses were formed, based on modeling predictions and laboratory evaluations, as to the probable mechanisms controlling the migration of selected contaminants. An assemblage of minerals and other solid phases could be used to predict the concentrations of several of the macro constituents (e.g., Ca, SO/sub 4/, Al, Fe, and Mn) but could not be used to predict trace element concentrations. These modeling conclusions are applicable to situations where uranium mill tailings solutions of low pH and high total dissolved solids encounter either clay liners or natural geologic materials that contain inherent acid neutralizing capacities. 116 references, 22 figures, 6 tables.

  19. Predictive geochemical modeling of interactions between uranium-mill-tailings solutions and sediments in a flow-through system: model formulations and preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An equilibrium thermodynamic conceptual model consisting of minerals and solid phases was developed to represent a soil column. A computer program was used as a tool to solve the system of mathematical equations imposed by the conceptual chemical model. The combined conceptual model and computer program were used to predict aqueous phase compositions of effluent solutions from permeability cells packed with geologic materials and percolated with uranium mill tailings solutions. Initial calculations of ion speciation and mineral solubility and our understanding of the chemical processes occurring in the modeled system were used to select solid phases for inclusion in the conceptual model. The modeling predictions were compared to the analytically determined column effluent concentrations. Hypotheses were formed, based on modeling predictions and laboratory evaluations, as to the probable mechanisms controlling the migration of selected contaminants. An assemblage of minerals and other solid phases could be used to predict the concentrations of several of the macro constituents (e.g., Ca, SO4, Al, Fe, and Mn) but could not be used to predict trace element concentrations. These modeling conclusions are applicable to situations where uranium mill tailings solutions of low pH and high total dissolved solids encounter either clay liners or natural geologic materials that contain inherent acid neutralizing capacities. 116 references, 22 figures, 6 tables

  20. Tramp uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many utilities have implemented a no leaker philosophy for fuel performance and actively pursue removing leaking fuel assemblies from their reactor cores whenever a leaking fuel assembly is detected. Therefore, the only source for fission product activity in the RCS when there are no leaking fuel assemblies is tramp uranium. A technique has been developed that strips uranium impurities from ZrCl4. Unless efforts are made to remove natural uranium impurities from reactor materials, the utilities will not be able to reduce the RCS specific 131I activity in PWRs to below the lower limit of ∼1.0 x 10-4 μCi/g

  1. Characterization and transport modeling of uranium particle from Fernald area tree bark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-natural uranium (U) isotopic compositions have been reported in tree bark from southwest Ohio. Atmospheric releases of U from the nearby former Fernald Feed Materials Processing Center are thought to be the source (GSA Abstr progr 45:78612, 2013). This study employed scanning electron microscopy equipped with backscatter detection and energy dispersive absorption X-ray spectrometry to identify and chemically characterize a 14 μm U-rich particle found in tree bark growing within 1 km of the FFMPC. Simple atmospheric dispersion calculations demonstrate that a ∼5 μm diameter U-rich particle can be transported up to 38 km by wind. (author)

  2. Using proteomic data to assess a genome-scale "in silico" model of metal reducing bacteria in the simulation of field-scale uranium bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabusaki, S.; Fang, Y.; Wilkins, M. J.; Long, P.; Rifle IFRC Science Team

    2011-12-01

    A series of field experiments in a shallow alluvial aquifer at a former uranium mill tailings site have demonstrated that indigenous bacteria can be stimulated with acetate to catalyze the conversion of hexavalent uranium in a groundwater plume to immobile solid-associated uranium in the +4 oxidation state. While this bioreduction of uranium has been shown to lower groundwater concentrations below actionable standards, a viable remediation methodology will need a mechanistic, predictive and quantitative understanding of the microbially-mediated reactions that catalyze the reduction of uranium in the context of site-specific processes, properties, and conditions. At the Rifle IFRC site, we are investigating the impacts on uranium behavior of pulsed acetate amendment, acetate-oxidizing iron and sulfate reducing bacteria, seasonal water table variation, spatially-variable physical (hydraulic conductivity, porosity) and geochemical (reactive surface area) material properties. The simulation of three-dimensional, variably saturated flow and biogeochemical reactive transport during a uranium bioremediation field experiment includes a genome-scale in silico model of Geobacter sp. to represent the Fe(III) terminal electron accepting process (TEAP). The Geobacter in silico model of cell-scale physiological metabolic pathways is comprised of hundreds of intra-cellular and environmental exchange reactions. One advantage of this approach is that the TEAP reaction stoichiometry and rate are now functions of the metabolic status of the microorganism. The linkage of in silico model reactions to specific Geobacter proteins has enabled the use of groundwater proteomic analyses to assess the accuracy of the model under evolving hydrologic and biogeochemical conditions. In this case, the largest predicted fluxes through in silico model reactions generally correspond to high abundances of proteins linked to those reactions (e.g. the condensation reaction catalyzed by the protein

  3. Uranium ore deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main uranium deposits and occurrences in the Argentine Republic are described, considering, in principle, their geologic setting, the kind of 'model' of the mineralization and its possible origin, and describing the ore species present in each case. The main uraniferous accumulations of the country include the models of 'sandstong type', veintype and impregnation type. There are also other kinds of accumulations, as in calcrete, etc. The main uranium production has been registered in the provinces of Mendoza, Salta, La Rioja, Chubut, Cordoba and San Luis. In each case, the minerals present are mentioned, having been recognized 37 different species all over the country (M.E.L.)

  4. Uranium exploration techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is discussed under the headings: introduction (genetic description of some uranium deposits; typical concentrations of uranium in the natural environment); sedimentary host rocks (sandstones; tabular deposits; roll-front deposits; black shales); metamorphic host rocks (exploration techniques); geologic techniques (alteration features in sandstones; favourable features in metamorphic rocks); geophysical techniques (radiometric surveys; surface vehicle methods; airborne methods; input surveys); geochemical techniques (hydrogeochemistry; petrogeochemistry; stream sediment geochemistry; pedogeochemistry; emanometry; biogeochemistry); geochemical model for roll-front deposits; geologic model for vein-like deposits. (U.K.)

  5. Thermodynamic modeling of the behavior of Uranium and Arsenic in mineralized Shaazgai-Nuur Lake (Northwest Mongolia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskova, O. L.; Isupov, V. P.; Vladimirov, A. G.; Shvartsev, S. L.; Kolpakova, M. N.

    2015-11-01

    Highly mineralized closed lakes on the territory of ore regions of Mongolia are of special interest in relation to the search for nonconventional sources of metals. Water of soda Shaazgai-Nuur Lake contains ~1 mg/L U, and the content of the undesirable admixture of As is up to 300 μg/L. Uranium and Arsenic speciation in solution and in the bottom sediments of the lake was estimated using thermodynamic modeling, and a method of their separation was suggested. Calculation of the models of sorption of these elements by goethite and calcite showed that at pH 9.4 typical of natural water it could be effective only at a high concentration of FeOOH sorbent. In this case, at pH 8 (the area of U sorption), As may be removed by simple filtering of solutions from the suspension upon additional coagulation.

  6. Uranium ISR mine closure - general concepts and model-based simulation of natural attenuation for South-Australian mine sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Heathgate operates the Beverley uranium mine and is currently developing the nearby Beverley Four Mile project on behalf of a Quasar Resources-Alliance Resources joint venture. Both sites are located on the arid plane between the Flinders Rangers and Lake Frome, approximately 550 km North of Adelaide in South Australia. In-situ recovery (ISR) technology has been thoroughly adapted to the local conditions and is applied in a moderately acidic milieu, mobilizing uranium in the mineralized aquifers by oxidation with hydrogen peroxide mainly. In particular, the optimization of ISR technology under the local constraints resulted in a stringent minimization of waste water volumes from U processing (discharged to abandoned wellfields in isolated 'bathtub' aquifers) without producing radioactive solid waste. Natural attenuation (NA) is acknowledged as an appropriate control measure for ISR mines to avoid impacts on the aquifer environment surrounding the ISR wellfields. Data from the Beverley operation in a series of confined, nearly stagnant aquifers indicate that NA has considerably reduced the impact of ISR on groundwater and that a return approaching pre-mining conditions can be expected to occur in time. In order to demonstrate the effect of NA in post-mining scenarios for the new operation a comprehensive work program including: ' Groundwater flow modelling ' Geochemical laboratory test work ' Geochemical modelling (reactive transport) and ' Ongoing, iterative NA modelling validation and assessment has been established, also considering comprehensive mineralogical data from core investigations. In both the Beverley and the Beverley Four Mile deposits, uranium is found as coffinite in fine to coarse grained quartzose sands, whereas both ISR chemistry and NA are mainly defined by the most reactive minerals pyrite (reducing), calcite (neutralizing), kaolinite (neutralizing) as well as other silt/clay minerals with some ion-exchange capacities. A reactive

  7. Uranium Market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main fuel component for commercial nuclear power reactors is Uranium. When compared to fossil fuels, it has a competitive edge due to factors such as economics and environmental conditions and in particular due to its international market availability. Uranium world demand reached to 67 320 tU in 2004, which was covered with additional sources. To project the uranium markets behavior requires to know and to accept some conditions tied to the demand, such as the electrical world consumption, the greenhouse effect; water desalination, production of hydrogen, industrial heat, the innovative development of nuclear reactors, and the average time of 10 years between the beginning of exploration programs and definition of deposits, which it owes mainly to the difficulty of achieving the legal, environmental and local community authorizations, to open new mining centers. Uranium market future projections, made by IAEA experts in 2001, that considered middle and high demand scenarios, concluded that cumulatively to year 2050, with regard to demand it will be required 5.4 and 7.6 million tons of uranium respectively, and with regard to the uranium price, it should present a sustained increase. In the last years the situation of the uranium market has changed dramatically. In August 2006 the price of uranium reached to USD 106/kgU in the spot market, surpassing all the made projections. The increase in price that has stayed in rise in the last five years is reactivating the prospection and exploration efforts anywhere in the world, and competition between prospective areas of potential resources mainly in less explored territories

  8. Uranium, depleted uranium, biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physicists, chemists and biologists at the CEA are developing scientific programs on the properties and uses of ionizing radiation. Since the CEA was created in 1945, a great deal of research has been carried out on the properties of natural, enriched and depleted uranium in cooperation with university laboratories and CNRS. There is a great deal of available data about uranium; thousands of analyses have been published in international reviews over more than 40 years. This presentation on uranium is a very brief summary of all these studies. (author)

  9. Modelling study on buffering pH and retaining U using a simplified uranium mill tailings pile example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Diederik; Simunek, Jirka

    2014-05-01

    The hypothetical problem that is presented here considers the release and migration of uranium from a simplified uranium mill tailings pile towards a river. The modeling exercise with the coupled reactive transport model HP2 illustrates the effect of the geochemical conceptual model for sorption on (i) the buffering of the pH in the soil/aquifer system and (ii) the retention of U in the soil. The HP2 module, which couples the PHREEQC geochemical code with HYDRUS (2D/3D), is a two-dimensional equivalent of the one-dimensional HP1 program that was first released in 2005 (Jacques et al., 2008), and used successfully in many applications. Sorption of U is described using a multi-site cation exchange model (see Jacques et al., 2008). This sorption model also buffers the acid pH due to proton exchange. Two scenarios are considered: a soil with a relatively low (8.1 × 10-3 mol/kg) and relatively high (8.1 × 10-2 mol/kg) sorption capacity. In the third scenario, specific sorption of U and other cations and anions on Fe-oxides is described using a non-electrostatic surface complexation model with a very low capacity (8.1 × 10-4 mol/kg), in addition to low exchange complexation. Proton exchange on the cation exchanger buffers the acidity by replacing calcium with protons on the exchanger; the spatial extent of the pH-perturbed region is smaller in the scenario with the higher exchange capacity. Specific sorption has only a small effect on the pH-perturbed zone, although it is important to note that its capacity is one order of magnitude lower than in the scenario with the low sorption capacity. U reaches the river system within 1000 d in scenarios with low and high exchange capacities. Only in the scenario with specific sorption, U migration within the ground water system is retarded, compared to the other two cases. The results of the three scenarios do not seem to be intuitive, especially the equally fast movement of U in the scenario with a high exchange capacity

  10. Uranium loans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When NUEXCO was organized in 1968, its founders conceived of a business based on uranium loans. The concept was relatively straightforward; those who found themselves with excess supplies of uranium would deposit those excesses in NUEXCO's open-quotes bank,close quotes and those who found themselves temporarily short of uranium could borrow from the bank. The borrower would pay interest based on the quantity of uranium borrowed and the duration of the loan, and the bank would collect the interest, deduct its service fee for arranging the loan, and pay the balance to those whose deposits were borrowed. In fact, the original plan was to call the firm Nuclear Bank Corporation, until it was discovered that using the word open-quotes Bankclose quotes in the name would subject the firm to various US banking regulations. Thus, Nuclear Bank Corporation became Nuclear Exchange Corporation, which was later shortened to NUEXCO. Neither the nuclear fuel market nor NUEXCO's business developed quite as its founders had anticipated. From almost the very beginning, the brokerage of uranium purchases and sales became a more significant activity for NUEXCO than arranging uranium loans. Nevertheless, loan transactions have played an important role in the international nuclear fuel market, requiring the development of special knowledge and commercial techniques

  11. Box-Behnken design in modeling of solid-phase tea waste extraction for the removal of uranium from water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the solid-phase tea waste procedure was used for separation, preconcentration and determination of uranium from water samples by UV-Vis spectrophotometer. In addition, Box-Behnken experimental design was employed to investigated the influence of six variables including pH, mass of adsorbent, eluent volume, amount of 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN); and sample and eluent flow rates on the extraction of analyte. High determination coefficient (R2) of 0.972 and adjusted-R2 of 0.943 showed the satisfactory adjustment of the polynomial regression model. This method was used for the extraction of uranium from real water samples.

  12. Metallogenic model of the Las Termas uranium deposit at Fiambala, Province of Catamarca, Argentina; Modelo metalogenetico del yacimiento de uranio Las Termas, Fiambala, Catamarca, Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morello, O.; Rubinstein, N.; Hongn, F.; Ferreira, L.; Anesa, J.; Arias, A.

    2011-07-01

    The Las Termas uranium-ore deposit, located in the geological province of Sierras Pampeanas, Argentina, is contained within the Precambrian metamorphic basement close to the contact with the Los Ratones Carboniferous granite. This deposit was originally linked to greisenization associated with Carboniferous magmatic activity. Nevertheless, recent data concerning pitchblende-type uraninite (113.6 Ma and 51.4 Ma) and the spatial relationship between the mineralization and Cretaceous rifting volcanism lead us to suggest a new genetic model, developed in two stages. During the first stage Carboniferous greisenization included the leaching of uranium from granite, whilst during the second stage Cretaceous rift-magmatism led to a hydrothermal system, which would have been responsible for uranium mineralization. (Author)

  13. The migration of uranium through sandstone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three column experiments are described in which the migration of uranium through Clashach Sandstone was studied. A priori predictions of uranium migration in the experiments were made using an equilibrium chemical transport model. The experimental results showed that, even under oxidising conditions, the migration of uranium is strongly retarded owing to the affinity of uranium for mineral surfaces. For the relatively simple chemical system investigated, the chemical transport model was successful in predicting the migration of uranium and its distribution along the column. (author)

  14. Uranium resources and uranium supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of natural uranium is currently considered unproblematic. Out of concern about the sufficient availability of uranium, an international working group of OECD-NEA, in which the Federal Office for Geosciences and Resources (BGR) participates as a German partner, has conducted analyses of uranium availability since 1965. Its findings are published biannually in the so-called 'Red Book', 'Uranium, Resources, Production, and Demand'. Changes in the political situation worldwide have profoundly influenced the military importance of uranium and thus also greatly improved its accessibility. As a consequence, there was a decline in production in the nineties from approx. 57,000 t of U in 1989 to, at present (2001), approx. 35,000 t annually. Estimates of the worldwide requirement of natural uranium in 2015 range between approx. 55,000 t and 80,000 t of U, because of the unforeseeable extent of the use of nuclear power, as against approx. 63,000 t of U in 2001. The most recent statistics published in the 1999 Red Bock show low-cost reserves (up to Dollar 40 per kg of U) of 1325 million t, and 2234 t of uranium at extraction costs of up to t Dollar 80 per kg. This indicates a statistical range of reserves of approx. 35 years. It should be noted that these figures are snapshots of a dynamic system. A resumption of extensive exploration and technical developments could greatly influence the resource situation. In the nineties, for instance, there is a net increase in uranium reserves of approx. 700,000 t of U as a consequence of exploration activities. (orig.)

  15. Analysis and exploitation of bacterial population from natural uranium-rich soils: selection of a model specie

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well known that soils play a key role in controlling the mobility of toxic metals and this property is greatly influenced by indigenous bacterial communities. This study has been conducted on radioactive and controls soils, collected in natural uraniferous areas (Limousin). A physico-chemical and mineralogical analysis of soils samples was carried out.The structure of bacterial communities was estimated by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE). The community structure is remarkably more stable in the uranium-rich soils than in the control ones, indicating that uranium exerts a high selection from the soils was constructed and screened for uranium resistance in order to study bacteria-uranium interactions. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that a phylo-genetically diverse set of uranium-resistant species ware able to chelate uranium at the cell surface. (author)

  16. Uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The economic and environmental sustainability of uranium mining has been analysed by Monash University researcher Dr Gavin Mudd in a paper that challenges the perception that uranium mining is an 'infinite quality source' that provides solutions to the world's demand for energy. Dr Mudd says information on the uranium industry touted by politicians and mining companies is not necessarily inaccurate, but it does not tell the whole story, being often just an average snapshot of the costs of uranium mining today without reflecting the escalating costs associated with the process in years to come. 'From a sustainability perspective, it is critical to evaluate accurately the true lifecycle costs of all forms of electricity production, especially with respect to greenhouse emissions, ' he says. 'For nuclear power, a significant proportion of greenhouse emissions are derived from the fuel supply, including uranium mining, milling, enrichment and fuel manufacture.' Dr Mudd found that financial and environmental costs escalate dramatically as the uranium ore is used. The deeper the mining process required to extract the ore, the higher the cost for mining companies, the greater the impact on the environment and the more resources needed to obtain the product. It is clear that there is a strong sensitivity of energy and water consumption and greenhouse emissions to ore grade, and that ore grades are likely to continue to decline gradually in the medium to long term. These issues are critical to the current debate over nuclear power and greenhouse emissions, especially with respect to ascribing sustainability to such activities as uranium mining and milling. For example, mining at Roxby Downs is responsible for the emission of over one million tonnes of greenhouse gases per year and this could increase to four million tonnes if the mine is expanded.'

  17. Assessment of uranium and selenium speciation in human and bacterial biological models to probe changes in their structural environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avoscan, L.; Milgram, S.; Untereiner, G.; Collins, R.; Khodja, H.; Carriere, M.; Gouget, B. [Lab. Pierre Sue, CEA-CNRS UMR 9956, CEA/Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Coves, J. [Inst. de Biologie Structurale - J.-P. Ebel, Lab. des Proteines Membranaires, Grenoble (France); Hazemann, J.L. [Lab. de Geophysique Interne et Tectonopbysique, UMR CNRS/Univ. Joseph Fourier, Saint-Martin-D' Heres (France)

    2009-07-01

    This study illustrates the potential of physicochemical techniques to speciate uranium (U) and selenium (Se) in biological samples. Speciation, defined he0re as the study of structural environment, of both toxic elements, was characterized at several levels in biological media and directly in human cells or bacteria once the metal(loid)s were internalized. External speciation that is extracellular speciation in culture media was predicted by thermodynamic equilibrium computer modelling using the JChess software and validated by spectroscopic measurements (XANES and EXAFS). Internal speciation that is intracellular speciation in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells was studied in vitro with a soil bacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 and ROS 17/2.8 osteoblasts, human cells responsible for bone formation. XANES, EXAFS, HPLC-ICP-MS and SDS-PAGE coupled to particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) permitted the identification and quantification of complexes formed with organic or inorganic molecules and/or larger proteins. (orig.)

  18. The new uranium mining boom. Challenge and lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book presents the results from the Uranium Mining and Hydrogeology Conference (UMH VI) held in September 2011, in Freiberg, Germany. The following subjects are dealt with in depth: uranium mining, phosphate mining and uranium recovery. Cleaning up technologies for water and soil are also discussed at length. Analystics and sensors for uranium and radon and modelling round up this comprehensive volume. (orig.)

  19. Atomistic modeling of high temperature uranium-zirconium alloy structure and thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, A. P.; Beeler, B.; Deo, C.; Baskes, M. I.; Okuniewski, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    A semi-empirical Modified Embedded Atom Method (MEAM) potential is developed for application to the high temperature body-centered-cubic uranium-zirconium alloy (γ-U-Zr) phase and employed with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the high temperature thermo-physical properties of U-Zr alloys. Uranium-rich U-Zr alloys (e.g. U-10Zr) have been tested and qualified for use as metallic nuclear fuel in U.S. fast reactors such as the Integral Fast Reactor and the Experimental Breeder Reactors, and are a common sub-system of ternary metallic alloys like U-Pu-Zr and U-Zr-Nb. The potential was constructed to ensure that basic properties (e.g., elastic constants, bulk modulus, and formation energies) were in agreement with first principles calculations and experimental results. After which, slight adjustments were made to the potential to fit the known thermal properties and thermodynamics of the system. The potentials successfully reproduce the experimental melting point, enthalpy of fusion, volume change upon melting, thermal expansion, and the heat capacity of pure U and Zr. Simulations of the U-Zr system are found to be in good agreement with experimental thermal expansion values, Vegard's law for the lattice constants, and the experimental enthalpy of mixing. This is the first simulation to reproduce the experimental thermodynamics of the high temperature γ-U-Zr metallic alloy system. The MEAM potential is then used to explore thermodynamics properties of the high temperature U-Zr system including the constant volume heat capacity, isothermal compressibility, adiabatic index, and the Grüneisen parameters.

  20. The nature of contaminant uranium phases at Fernald

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium-contaminated soils at the Fernald Site in Ohio have been examined using transmission electron microscopy. The uranium-bearing phases were identified as calcium uranyl phosphate (meta-autunite), uranium oxide (uraninite), uranium metaphosphate [U(PO3)4], uranium calcium oxide, uranium silicate (boltwoodite), and uranium silicide. Uranium have been deposited on the soil through chemical spills and from the operation of an incinerator plant at the site. The uranium metaphosphate phase was found predominantly at an incinerator site at Fernald. Carbonate leaching in an oxygen environment has removed some of the U(IV) phases, however [U(PO3)4] has not been removed by any of the chemical remediation technologies. The identified phases have been included in geochemical modeling of the uranium, these studies show that meta-autunite is the solubility controlling phase for uranium in Fernald soils

  1. A coupled transport and solid mechanics formulation with improved reaction kinetics parameters for modeling oxidation and decomposition in a uranium hydride bed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salloum, Maher N.; Shugard, Andrew D.; Kanouff, Michael P.; Gharagozloo, Patricia E.

    2013-03-01

    Modeling of reacting flows in porous media has become particularly important with the increased interest in hydrogen solid-storage beds. An advanced type of storage bed has been proposed that utilizes oxidation of uranium hydride to heat and decompose the hydride, releasing the hydrogen. To reduce the cost and time required to develop these systems experimentally, a valid computational model is required that simulates the reaction of uranium hydride and oxygen gas in a hydrogen storage bed using multiphysics finite element modeling. This SAND report discusses the advancements made in FY12 (since our last SAND report SAND2011-6939) to the model developed as a part of an ASC-P&EM project to address the shortcomings of the previous model. The model considers chemical reactions, heat transport, and mass transport within a hydride bed. Previously, the time-varying permeability and porosity were considered uniform. This led to discrepancies between the simulated results and experimental measurements. In this work, the effects of non-uniform changes in permeability and porosity due to phase and thermal expansion are accounted for. These expansions result in mechanical stresses that lead to bed deformation. To describe this, a simplified solid mechanics model for the local variation of permeability and porosity as a function of the local bed deformation is developed. By using this solid mechanics model, the agreement between our reacting bed model and the experimental data is improved. Additionally, more accurate uranium hydride oxidation kinetics parameters are obtained by fitting the experimental results from a pure uranium hydride oxidation measurement to the ones obtained from the coupled transport-solid mechanics model. Finally, the coupled transport-solid mechanics model governing equations and boundary conditions are summarized and recommendations are made for further development of ARIA and other Sandia codes in order for them to sufficiently implement the model.

  2. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canada is the world's largest producer and exporter of uranium, most of which is enriched elsewhere for use as fuel in LWRs. The feasibility of a Canadian uranium-enrichment enterprise is therefore a perennial question. Recent developments in uranium-enrichment technology, and their likely impacts on separative work supply and demand, suggest an opportunity window for Canadian entry into this international market. The Canadian opportunity results from three particular impacts of the new technologies: 1) the bulk of the world's uranium-enrichment capacity is in gaseous diffusion plants which, because of their large requirements for electricity (more than 2000 kW·h per SWU), are vulnerable to competition from the new processes; 2) the decline in enrichment costs increases the economic incentive for the use of slightly-enriched uranium (SEU) fuel in CANDU reactors, thus creating a potential Canadian market; and 3) the new processes allow economic operation on a much smaller scale, which drastically reduces the investment required for market entry and is comparable with the potential Canadian SEU requirement. The opportunity is not open-ended. By the end of the century the enrichment supply industry will have adapted to the new processes and long-term customer/supplier relationships will have been established. In order to seize the opportunity, Canada must become a credible supplier during this century

  3. Solubility measurement of uranium in uranium-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short-term equilibration study involving two uranium-contaminated soils at the Fernald site was conducted as part of the In Situ Remediation Integrated Program. The goal of this study is to predict the behavior of uranium during on-site remediation of these soils. Geochemical modeling was performed on the aqueous species dissolved from these soils following the equilibration study to predict the on-site uranium leaching and transport processes. The soluble levels of total uranium, calcium, magnesium, and carbonate increased continually for the first four weeks. After the first four weeks, these components either reached a steady-state equilibrium or continued linearity throughout the study. Aluminum, potassium, and iron, reached a steady-state concentration within three days. Silica levels approximated the predicted solubility of quartz throughout the study. A much higher level of dissolved uranium was observed in the soil contaminated from spillage of uranium-laden solvents and process effluents than in the soil contaminated from settling of airborne uranium particles ejected from the nearby incinerator. The high levels observed for soluble calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate are probably the result of magnesium and/or calcium carbonate minerals dissolving in these soils. Geochemical modeling confirms that the uranyl-carbonate complexes are the most stable and dominant in these solutions. The use of carbonate minerals on these soils for erosion control and road construction activities contributes to the leaching of uranium from contaminated soil particles. Dissolved carbonates promote uranium solubility, forming highly mobile anionic species. Mobile uranium species are contaminating the groundwater underlying these soils. The development of a site-specific remediation technology is urgently needed for the FEMP site

  4. A thermodynamically-based model for predicting microbial growth and community composition coupled to system geochemistry: Application to uranium bioreduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istok, J. D.; Park, M.; Michalsen, M.; Spain, A. M.; Krumholz, L. R.; Liu, C.; McKinley, J.; Long, P.; Roden, E.; Peacock, A. D.; Baldwin, B.

    2010-03-01

    'Bioimmobilization' of redox-sensitive heavy metals and radionuclides is being investigated as a way to remediate contaminated groundwater and sediments. In one approach, growth-limiting substrates are added to the subsurface to stimulate the activity of targeted groups of indigenous microorganisms and create conditions favorable for the microbially-mediated reductive precipitation ('bioreduction') of targeted contaminants. We present a theoretical framework for modeling this process that modifies conventional geochemical reaction path modeling to include thermodynamic descriptions for microbial growth and may be called biogeochemical reaction path modeling. In this approach, the actual microbial community is represented by a synthetic microbial community consisting of a collection of microbial groups; each with a unique growth equation that couples a specific pair of energy yielding redox reactions. The growth equations and their computed standard-state free energy yields are appended to the thermodynamic database used in conventional geochemical reaction path modeling, providing a direct coupling between chemical species participating in both microbial growth and geochemical reactions. To compute the biogeochemical reaction paths, growth substrates are reacted incrementally with the defined geochemical environment and the coupled equations are solved simultaneously to predict reaction paths that display changing microbial biomass, community composition (i.e. the fraction of total biomass in each microbial group), and the aqueous and mineral composition of the system, including aqueous speciation and oxidation state of the targeted contaminants. The approach, with growth equations derived from the literature using well-known bioenergetics principles, was used to predict the results of a laboratory microcosm experiment and an in situ field experiment that investigated the bioreduction of uranium. Predicted effects of ethanol or acetate addition on uranium

  5. Long term contaminant migration and impacts from uranium mill tailings. Comparison of computer models using a hypothetical dataset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Working Group of BIOMOVS II was initiated in Vienna in 1991 with the primary objective of comparing models which can be used to assess the long term impact of radioactive releases from uranium mill tailings, involving multiple pathways, multiple contaminants and multiple environmental receptors. A secondary objective was to examine how these models can be used to assess the fate of stable toxic elements. This is an interim report of the Working Group describing: development of a basic scenario describing a tailings system; application of models in deterministic calculations of contaminant concentrations in biosphere media, and related radiation doses, contaminant intakes and health risks; comparison of model results and review of the modelling. A hypothetical scenario has been developed for contaminant releases from a uranium mill tailings facility. The assumptions for the tailings facility and its environs have been chosen to facilitate the evaluation of potentially important processes incorporated into models. The site description is therefore idealised and does not represent any particular facility or type of facility. Atmospheric and groundwater release source terms have been chosen to facilitate comparison of models and should not be considered realistic. The time and effort taken over derivation of the scenario description and the associated preliminary modelling has been an important and valuable learning exercise. It also reflects the importance of gaining a clear picture of what is being modelled so that comparisons of model results are meaningful. Work within the exercise has contributed to new model development and to improvements and extensions to existing models. The scenario is a simplified description of a real facility and the releases which might occur. No allowance has been made for engineered features on the tailings disposal system which might reduce releases. The source terms have been chosen so as to test the models

  6. 300 Area Uranium Leach and Adsorption Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to measure the leaching and adsorption characteristics of uranium in six near-surface sediment samples collected from the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. Scanning electron micrographs of the samples showed that the uranium contamination in the sediments is most likely present as co-precipitates and/or discrete uranium particles. Molecular probe techniques also confirm the presence of crystalline discrete uranium bearing phases. In all cases, the uranium is present as oxidized uranium (uranyl [U(VI)]). Results from the column leach tests showed that uranium leaching did not follow a constant solubility paradigm. Four of the five contaminated sediments showed a large near instantaneous release of a few percent of the total uranium followed by a slower continual release. Steady-state uranium leachate concentrations were never measured and leaching characteristics and trends were not consistent among the samples. Dissolution kinetics were slow, and the measured leach curves most likely represent a slow kinetically controlled desorption or dissolution paradigm. Batch adsorption experiments were performed to investigate the effect of pH and uranium and carbonate solution concentrations on uranium adsorption onto the uncontaminated sediment. Uranium adsorption Kd values ranged from 0 to > 100 ml/g depending on which solution parameter was being adjusted. Results of the experiments showed that carbonate solution concentration has the greatest impact on uranium adsorption in the 300 Area. Solution pH was shown to be important in laboratory tests; however, the sediment will dominate the field pH and minimize its overall effect in the 300 Area sediments. Results also showed that uranium sorption onto the background sediment is linear up to uranium concentrations of 3 mg/L, well above the values found in the upper unconfined aquifer. Therefore, the linear Kd model is defensible in predicting the fate of uranium in the 300 Area aquifer

  7. Uranium bombs

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGroot, Gerard

    2009-11-01

    Enrico Fermi was a brilliant physicist, but he did occasionally get things wrong. In 1934 he famously bombarded a sample of uranium with neutrons. The result was astounding: the experiment had, Fermi concluded, produced element 93, later called neptunium. The German physicist Ida Noddack, however, came to an even more spectacular conclusion, namely that Fermi had split the uranium nucleus to produce lighter elements. Noddack's friend Otto Hahn judged that idea preposterous and advised her to keep quiet, since ridicule could ruin a female physicist. She ignored that advice, and was, indeed, scorned.

  8. Uranium and thorium concentrations in an estuary affected by phosphate fertilizer processing: experimental results and a modelling study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Odiel river, in southwest Spain, forms an estuarine system which is affected by waste disposal from a fertilizer complex. Uranium and thorium concentrations in waters and suspended matter, activity ratios and distribution coefficients, kd, have been measured along the river during two different tidal states. The results have shown that a radioactive impact is being delivered to the river, as well as a significant variability depending on the sampling point and the tidal state. Thus, a quantitative study of the distribution of radionuclides can be carried out best by means of a mathematical model. The model includes the partition of radiotracers between four phases (water, suspended matter and two sediment fractions) and has been designed for non-equilibrium conditions. Thus, radiotracer transfers are described in terms of kinetic transfer coefficients instead of kds. The model simultaneously solves the hydrodynamic equations, the suspended matter equation (including deposition and resuspension processes) and the equations which describe the time evolution of radionuclide concentrations in each one of the four phases. The model has yielded good results in predicting U and Th concentrations in water and suspended matter, distribution coefficients and Th/U mass ratios. (author)

  9. Thermodynamic properties and phase transitions of α, γ and liquid uranium: QMD and classical MD modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanilkin, Alexey; Migdal, Kirill; Pokatashkin, Pavel; Sergeev, Oleg

    2015-06-01

    The application of molecular dynamics allows us to take into account the influence of thermal properties on thermodynamic properties and phase transitions. In this work different uranium phases are investigated at finite temperatures by means quantum and classical molecular dynamics. In order to verify simulations the lattice constants, elastic modulus, isotherms, Gruniesen coefficient and heat expansion are calculated for α, γ and liquid phases. The results are in good agreement with experimental data. The stability of high temperature γ phase is discussed. The diffusion coefficient is calculated for liquid phase at different densities and pressure. The boundaries of phase stability are estimated based on QMD results. Furthermore hugoniot calculated is in a good agreement with other calculations and experimental data up to 2TPa. In order to investigate phase transitions EAM interatomic potentials are derived by force-matching method. Different parameterizations are used for different part of phase diagram to improve the reproduction of QMD data. The coexistence and transition rates of two phases are investigated based on Z- and two phase methods.

  10. Prediction of the longterm release of contaminants from the Ronneburg uranium mine after flooding on the basis of hydrological and hydrogeochemical model calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the remediation of the uranium mining operations of the former GDR a mine near Gera (Thuringia) is being prepared for flooding. A hydrogeological and a geochemical model of the site was developed which can account for the complex system of drifts and shafts in the mine. With the help of model calculations the effects of planned underground remediation measures could be predicted. (orig.)

  11. The Namibian Uranium Mining Model: Voluntary sector initiatives underpinned by a regulatory safety net ensures best practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: As a developing country, Namibia is facing the challenges of poverty, unemployment, a growing demand for energy, a life expectancy that has decreased from 65 years at Independence to 50 years now, and about 100 000 orphans that need education, health and housing. It is heavily reliant on capital intensive natural resource extraction such as uranium mining and although the worldwide recession is relentlessly affecting all economies the demand for uranium appears to be least affected. Namibia has extensive deposits of low-grade uranium and is regarded as a region of global importance for this source of energy. Namibia has a long history of uranium mining, dating back to 1976, when Rio Tinto's Roessing uranium mine opened. After 30 years of production and imminent closure, Roessing is responding to the recent increase in demand for uranium by launching an expansion programme. Paladin Energy's Langer Heinrich Uranium project came online in early 2007 and these mines account for about 9 % of the world's uranium and are set to maintain their current production. Two more projects are expected to come on stream. This includes, Areva's Trekkopje, in 2009, followed by Valencia in 2010. If the baseline feasibility and environmental impacts studies are accepted, three other mines, Swakopmund Uranium, Bannerman and Reptile Uranium show potential and may come on line in 2014. Other projects are currently in exploration stages and analysts expect that uranium exploration and mining activities could have a significant impact on the Namibian economy during the next few years. In Southern African countries, legislative frameworks are generally broad and fragmented and are not conducive to sustainable development. Voluntary product stewardship schemes have arisen out of the need for the industry to balance their pursuit of economic gain with environmental and social concerns and by doing so, demonstrate their contribution to sustainable development even in a climate of

  12. Turbulent precipitation of uranium oxalate in a vortex reactor - experimental study and modelling; Precipitation turbulente d'oxalate d'uranium en reacteur vortex - etude experimentale et modelisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer de Gelicourt, Y

    2004-03-15

    Industrial oxalic precipitation processed in an un-baffled magnetically stirred tank, the Vortex Reactor, has been studied with uranium simulating plutonium. Modelling precipitation requires a mixing model for the continuous liquid phase and the solution of population balance for the dispersed solid phase. Being chemical reaction influenced by the degree of mixing at molecular scale, that commercial CFD code does not resolve, a sub-grid scale model has been introduced: the finite mode probability density functions, and coupled with a model for the liquid energy spectrum. Evolution of the dispersed phase has been resolved by the quadrature method of moments, first used here with experimental nucleation and growth kinetics, and an aggregation kernel based on local shear rate. The promising abilities of this local approach, without any fitting constant, are strengthened by the similarity between experimental results and simulations. (author)

  13. Modelling of contaminant migration in acidic groundwater plumes at uranium tailings impoundments: ADNEUT3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the creation and application of ADNEUT3, the latest addition to the ADNEUT (Acid-Drainage NEUTralization) family of computer programs for simulating acid-drainage transport and neutralization. The creation of ADNEUT3 involved the expansion of ADNEUT1 to allow variable input conditions such as changing input solution with time, variable initial amounts of minerals through the simulated streamtube, variable velocities through the streamtube, and variable solubilities for relevant minerals dependent on aqueous chemical composition. Concepts for simulating acid-drainage neutralization are reviewed and ADNEUT3 is then applied to a field-study site of acidic contaminant migration from the Nordic Main uranium-tailings impoundment near Elliot Lake, Ontario. A sensitivity study is first implemented to calibrate ADNEUT3 to the results of the 1979 to 1983 field studies. Then ADNEUT3 is used to define probable past conditions at the site which are not reliably known. In particular, ADNEUT3 is used to help identify: 1) the approximate year when acidic seepage began leaving the tailings impoundment (1966-1967), 2) the past chemical composition of the seepage (somewhat more acidic for a short period of time), and 3) the location of the source area within the tailings for the acidic seepage (near the impoundment dam, close to the field site). Finally, ADNEUT3 is used to predict future contaminant migration. Results indicate that hundreds of years are required under present conditions for the most acidic water with associated high levels of contaminants to migrate about 100 m from the tailings impoundment. The cause of this slow movement is the significant neutralization capacity of the aquifer. If acid production within the tailings decreases in the future, migration rates of contaminants will also decrease

  14. Geochemical interactions between uranium-tailings fluids and subjacent bedrock. Canon City, Colorado: use of the computer model MINTEQ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contamination of domestic water wells by Mo, Se, SO4 and U has been documented in the vicinity of a uranium mill near Canon City, Colorado. Fluids collected from the tailings ponds were passed through cores of the subjacent calcite-bearing sandstone to determine the effect of pH and Eh on the mobility of Al, Ca, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Se, SO4, V, U, and Zn. During Experiment 27 the pH initially increased from 2.3 to 8.0 as calcite in the core dissolved. Concurrently, iron hydroxide precipitated in the micro-environment surrounding the carbonate grains, effectively reducing the area of calcite exposed to the acidic eluent. This led to a decrease in pH to 3.4. Experiment 27 was modeled using the mass transfer computer program, MINTEQ. The pH was modeled by dissolving decreasing amounts of calcite to simulate the acidification of the system, while Eh was set at the levels measured in the experiments. Mn was adequately described by the dissolution of manganiferous calcite, but an adequate model for dissolved Ca required both calcite dissolution and ion-exchange of Ca by Na. Al was simulated by the solubility constraint imposed by an amorphous aluminum hydroxide above a pH of 6.0, ad by AIOHSO4 in more acidic regimes. Fe was modeled by the precipitation of an amorphous hydroxide. Zn was modeled using triple-layer sorption routine with an amorphous iron hydroxide phase as the sobent, but Cu could not be modeled using the same values for the triple-layer parameters. Se sorption is affected by both the mass of sorbent in the system and by competition for surface sites with sulfate ion. The experiments suggest that Se may be the best tracer of the escape and movement of raffinate in the aquifer at Canon City

  15. System-Scale Model of Aquifer, Vadose Zone, and River Interactions for the Hanford 300 Area - Application to Uranium Reactive Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rockhold, Mark L.; Bacon, Diana H.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Parker, Kyle R.; Waichler, Scott R.; Williams, Mark D.

    2013-10-01

    This report represents a synthesis and integration of basic and applied research into a system-scale model of the Hanford 300 Area groundwater uranium plume, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Richland Operations (DOE-RL) office. The report integrates research findings and data from DOE Office of Science (DOE-SC), Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM), and DOE-RL projects, and from the site remediation and closure contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, LLC (WCH). The three-dimensional, system-scale model addresses water flow and reactive transport of uranium for the coupled vadose zone, unconfined aquifer, and Columbia River shoreline of the Hanford 300 Area. The system-scale model of the 300 Area was developed to be a decision-support tool to evaluate processes of the total system affecting the groundwater uranium plume. The model can also be used to address “what if” questions regarding different remediation endpoints, and to assist in design and evaluation of field remediation efforts. For example, the proposed cleanup plan for the Hanford 300 Area includes removal, treatment, and disposal of contaminated sediments from known waste sites, enhanced attenuation of uranium hot spots in the vadose and periodically rewetted zone, and continued monitoring of groundwater with institutional controls. Illustrative simulations of polyphosphate infiltration were performed to demonstrate the ability of the system-scale model to address these types of questions. The use of this model in conjunction with continued field monitoring is expected to provide a rigorous basis for developing operational strategies for field remediation and for defining defensible remediation endpoints.

  16. Uranium industry annual 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  17. Uranium industry annual 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs

  18. Uranium industry annual, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Uranium Industry Annual 1991, data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2. A feature article entitled ''The Uranium Industry of the Commonwealth of Independent States'' is included in this report

  19. Biosorption of uranium(VI) from aqueous solutions by Ca-pretreated Cystoseira indica alga: Breakthrough curves studies and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghasemi, Morteza [Faculty of Nuclear Engineering, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Keshtkar, Ali Reza, E-mail: akeshtkar@aeoi.org.ir [Nuclear Fuel Cycle School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dabbagh, Reza [Nuclear Science Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jaber Safdari, S. [Nuclear Fuel Cycle School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    Uranium(VI) biosorption from aqueous solutions containing 60 mg l{sup -1} metal concentration by Ca-pretreated Cystoseira indica alga was studied in a packed bed column with 1.5 cm internal diameter. The effect of bed height and flow rate on biosorption process was investigated and the experimental breakthrough curves were obtained. Results showed that by increasing the bed height, the breakthrough and exhaustion times increased and the slope of breakthrough curves decreased. Also, it was observed that the controlled-rate step shifted from external to internal mass transfer limitations, as the flow rate increased. The maximum uptake capacity, 318.15 mg g{sup -1}, and total metal removal, 59.32%, were obtained at flow rate of 2.3 ml min{sup -1} and bed height of 6 cm. The column was regenerated using 0.1 M HCl solution and sorption-desorption studies were carried out for three cycles. The obtained results confirmed that reusability of this biosorbent is possible. The results obtained agreed well with the bed depth service time model. In addition, for estimations of the parameters necessary for the design of a large-scale packed bed column, the experimental data were also fitted to the Thomas, Yan and Belter models and were found to agree with the experimental data fairly well.

  20. Biosorption of uranium(VI) from aqueous solutions by Ca-pretreated Cystoseira indica alga: Breakthrough curves studies and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium(VI) biosorption from aqueous solutions containing 60 mg l-1 metal concentration by Ca-pretreated Cystoseira indica alga was studied in a packed bed column with 1.5 cm internal diameter. The effect of bed height and flow rate on biosorption process was investigated and the experimental breakthrough curves were obtained. Results showed that by increasing the bed height, the breakthrough and exhaustion times increased and the slope of breakthrough curves decreased. Also, it was observed that the controlled-rate step shifted from external to internal mass transfer limitations, as the flow rate increased. The maximum uptake capacity, 318.15 mg g-1, and total metal removal, 59.32%, were obtained at flow rate of 2.3 ml min-1 and bed height of 6 cm. The column was regenerated using 0.1 M HCl solution and sorption-desorption studies were carried out for three cycles. The obtained results confirmed that reusability of this biosorbent is possible. The results obtained agreed well with the bed depth service time model. In addition, for estimations of the parameters necessary for the design of a large-scale packed bed column, the experimental data were also fitted to the Thomas, Yan and Belter models and were found to agree with the experimental data fairly well.

  1. Modelling uranium leaching from agricultural soils to groundwater as a criterion for comparison with complementary safety indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naturally occurring radionuclides can also end up in soils and groundwater due to human practices, such as application of certain fertilizers in agriculture. Many mineral fertilizers, particularly (super)phosphates, contain small amounts of 238U and 230Th which eventually may be leached from agricultural soils to underlying water resources. Field soils that receive P-fertilizers accumulate U and Th and their daughter nuclides, which eventually may leach to groundwater. Our objective was to numerically assess U migration in soils. Calculations were based on a new reactive transport model, HP1, which accounts for interactions between U and organic matter, phosphate, and carbonate. Solid phase interactions were simulated using a surface complexation module. Furthermore, all geochemical processes were coupled with a model accounting for dynamic changes in the soil water content and the water flux. The capabilities of the code in calculating natural U fluxes to groundwater were illustrated using a semi-synthetic 200-year long time series of climatological data for Belgium. Based on an average fertilizer application, the input of phosphate and uranium in the soil was defined. This paper discusses calculated U distributions in the soil profile as well as calculated U fluxes leached from a 100-cm deep soil profile. The calculated long-term leaching rates originating from fertilization are significantly higher after 200 years than estimated release rates from low-level nuclear waste repositories. (author)

  2. INTRAVAL phase 2, test case 8, Alligator Rivers Natural Analogue: Modelling of uranium transport in the weathered zone at Koongarra (Australia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study on the title subject is to test the simulation package METROPOL, developed at RIVM, to simulate transport of radionuclides, over large time scales. At the Koongarra site secondary uranium mineralization and dispersed uranium is present from the surface down to the base of weathering, some 25 meters deep. Field data are analyzed to choose a modelling approach, to estimate model inputs and to test model results. Field data show that three layers can be distinguished in the Koongarra area: (1) a top layer which is fully weathered, (2) an intermediate layer which is partially weathered (the transition zone) and (3) a lower layer which is unweathered. The groundwater velocities are largest in the transition zone which has been moving downward as the weathering process proceeds. The finite element code METROPOL has been adapted to account for the movement of the transition zone and to describe the dissolution of uranium in the orebody by a non-equilibrium relation. In simulations taking into account the downward movement of the transition zone, the dispersion patterns at all depths are simulated. These simulations result in a pseudo steady state situation like is found in Koongarra. Despite the fact that the model results presented are not fully in agreement with the dispersion patterns found in Koongarra, it is expected that the present situation in Koongarra may be obtained by changing some of the model parameters. In this study it was shown that over large timescales geologic processes may have a large impact on the transport of radionuclides, and that the movement of the transition zone will have a large impact on the uranium concentration distribution. The simulation results are strongly influenced by the parameters values, which are difficult to estimate for a period of some million years. The largest uncertainties are associated with the boundary conditions. Continuation of natural analogue studies in the framework of nuclear waste

  3. Development and testing of a model for the supergene distribution of uranium and accompanying elements around a known uranium deposit associated with an alkaline intrusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report deals with secondary geochemical dispersion in a subarct environment (Ilimaussaq Complex, south Greenland) of uranium and accompanying elements around a U deposit in which the refractory mineral steenstrupine is the main U-bearing mineral. Weathering profiles, including soils, and sediments in rivers, lakes and fjords have been sampled and studied. Chemical weathering is not well developed. The coarse-grained agpaitic nepheline syenites of the Ilimaussaq Complex are covered by debris of crumbling material and practically without vegetation, but soil profiles and vegetation are developed on glacial deposits and on weathered basement granite. 480 samples have been analysed for 22 elements and the data treated by multivariable analyses with main emphasis on principal component analysis. It was found that U and the other elements have been dispersed during weathering. The sediments in rivers and fjords show low correlation of U with those elements that are associated with U Ilimaussaq. Principal component analysis of the total sample materia of soils and lake and river sediments based on 17 elements makes the identification of the area containing the U deposit possible in the first three dimensions. The elements used are those which correlate with Th in this type of deposit. The statistical significance is however low when singlesample populations, as for instance the C-horizons of soils, are used. 41 refs. (EG)

  4. Uranium market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuxco's estimates of uranium output from operating US centers plus facilities under construction are tabulated through 1990. Buyer inventories will continue to grow through the end of 1982 and will fall off thereafter. The relative inventory level will remain at two years or above through 1984, and will consistently drop thereafter. This is an indication of the market available for imports and for new US production. 1 table

  5. Depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Mohamed ElBaradei, issued today the following statement: The IAEA has been involved in United Nations efforts relating to the impact of the use of depleted uranium (DU) ammunition in Kosovo. It has supported the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) in the assessment which it is making, at the request of the Secretary-General, of that impact. In this connection, in November 2000, Agency experts participated in a UNEP-led fact-finding mission in Kosovo. DU is only slightly radioactive, being about 40% as radioactive as natural uranium. Chemically and physically, DU behaves in the same way as natural uranium. The chemical toxicity is normally the dominant factor for human health. However, it is necessary to carefully assess the impact of DU in the special circumstances in which it was used, e.g. to determine whether it was inhaled or ingested or whether fragments came into close contact with individuals. It is therefore essential, before an authoritative conclusion can be reached, that a detailed survey of the territory in which DU was used and of the people who came in contact with the depleted uranium in any form be carried out. In the meantime it would be prudent, as recommended by the leader of the November UNEP mission, to adopt precautionary measures. Depending on the results of the survey further measures may be necessary. The Agency, within its statutory responsibilities and on the basis of internationally accepted radiation safety standards, will continue to co-operate with other organizations, in particular WHO and UNEP, with a view to carrying out a comprehensive assessment. Co-operation by and additional information from NATO will be prerequisites. The experience gained from such an assessment could be useful for similar studies that may be carried out elsewhere in the Balkans or in the Gulf. (author)

  6. Inhalation hazards to uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project is investigating levels of uranium mine air contaminants, using both large and small experimental animals to model human respiratory system disease. Lung cancer and deaths by degenerative lung disease have reached epidemic proportions among uranium miners, but the cause-effect relationships for these diseases are based on inadequate epidemiological data. This project identifies agents or combinations of agents (both chemical and radiological) and their exposure levels that produce respiratory tract lesions, including respiratory epithelial carcinoma, pneumonconiosis and emphysema

  7. Comparison of estimation and simulation methods for modeling block 1 of anomaly no.3 in Narigan Uranium mineral deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geostatistical methods are applied for modeling the mineral deposits at the final stage of the detailed exploration. By applying the results of these models, the technical and economic feasibility studies are conducted for the deposits. The geostatistical modeling methods are usually consist of estimation and simulation methods. The estimation techniques, such as Kriging, construct spatial relation (geological continuation model) between data, by providing the best unique guesses for unknown features. However, when applying this technique for a grid of drill-holes over a deposit, an obvious discrepancy exists between the real geological features and the Kriging estimation map. Because of the limited number of sampled data applied for Kriging, it could not appear as the same as the real features. Also the spatial continuity estimated by the Kriging maps, are smoother than the real unknown features. On the other hand, the objective of simulation is to provide some functions or sets of variable values, to be compatible with the existing information. This means that the simulated values have an average and the variance similar to the raw data and may even be the same as the measurements. we studied the Anomaly No.3 of Narigan uranium mineral deposit, located in the central Iran region and applied the Kriging estimation and the sequential Gaussian simulation methods, and finally by comparing the results we concluded that the Kriging estimation method is more reliable for long term planning of a mine. Because of the reconstructing random structures, the results of the simulation methods indicate that they could also be applied for short term planning in mine exploitation.

  8. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that in 1990 the Department of Energy began a two-year project to illustrate the technical and economic feasibility of a new uranium enrichment technology-the atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process. GAO believes that completing the AVLIS demonstration project will provide valuable information about the technical viability and cost of building an AVLIS plant and will keep future plant construction options open. However, Congress should be aware that DOE still needs to adequately demonstrate AVLIS with full-scale equipment and develop convincing cost projects. Program activities, such as the plant-licensing process, that must be completed before a plant is built, could take many years. Further, an updated and expanded uranium enrichment analysis will be needed before any decision is made about building an AVLIS plant. GAO, which has long supported legislation that would restructure DOE's uranium enrichment program as a government corporation, encourages DOE's goal of transferring AVLIS to the corporation. This could reduce the government's financial risk and help ensure that the decision to build an AVLIS plant is based on commercial concerns. DOE, however, has no alternative plans should the government corporation not be formed. Further, by curtailing a planned public access program, which would have given private firms an opportunity to learn about the technology during the demonstration project, DOE may limit its ability to transfer AVLIS to the private sector

  9. Brazilian uranium exploration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General information on Brazilian Uranium Exploration Program, are presented. The mineralization processes of uranium depoits are described and the economic power of Brazil uranium reserves is evaluated. (M.C.K.)

  10. Uranium in carbonatites: USA. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is an analysis of the uranium potential of carbonatites in the US and includes suggestions for a number of genetic models for uranium in carbonatite. These models are applied to the evaluation of the Bearpaw Mountains, Montana, Powderhorn, Colorado, and Magnet Cove, Arkansas carbonatite bodies. Carbonatites comprise only a small fraction of a percent of the rock record but have received an inordinate amount of attention because of their disproportionate number of ore deposits and exotic composition. Uranium is commonly present in carbonatites in quantities greater than the crustal abundance of about 3 ppM U. As a consequence, there are numerous reports of uranium anomalies and low grade uranium mineralization in carbonatites. At present, uranium is mined as a byproduct at the Palabora, South Africa, carbonatite. Accumulated data suggest that several different genetic types of uranium mineralization in carbonatites may have exploration potential. The uraniferous dikes and fenites of the Bearpaw Mountains, Montana, contain pyrochlore having 23 to 30 percent U3O8. The geological setting of this carbonatite suggests that the dikes and associated fenites may represent the apices of a differentiated uraniferous carbonatite body at depth with greater uranium potential than surface indications. Local enrichments of uranium are observed at the Powderhorn, Colorado, carbonatite. However, these occurrences are sporadic and of minor importance. The Magnet Cove, Arkansas, carbonatite is considered to have no uranium potential

  11. In Vivo Nanodetoxication for Acute Uranium Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Guzmán

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Accidental exposure to uranium is a matter of concern, as U(VI is nephrotoxic in both human and animal models, and its toxicity is associated to chemical toxicity instead of radioactivity. We synthesized different PAMAM G4 and G5 derivatives in order to prove their interaction with uranium and their effect on the viability of red blood cells in vitro. Furthermore, we prove the effectiveness of the selected dendrimers in an animal model of acute uranium intoxication. The dendrimer PAMAM G4-Lys-Fmoc-Cbz demonstrated the ability to chelate the uranyl ion in vivo, improving the biochemical and histopathologic features caused by acute intoxication with uranium.

  12. Cytotoxic and phenotypic effects of uranium and lead on osteoblastic cellular models; Effets cytotoxiques et phenotypiques de l'uranium et du plomb sur des modeles cellulaires osteoblastiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milgram, S

    2008-04-15

    This study is involved in the evaluation of bio-hazard associated with the use of uranium in nuclear activities and industrial research. The uranium, known in the literature as potentially carcinogenic or toxic for reproduction, can become a public health problem with the views of the various possibilities of human infections (military of the Gulf War, Finnish populations exposed to drinking water contaminated by example). The skeleton represents the organ of long-term storage of uranium and can be a target of its toxicity. Lead sharing this way of fixing in the bone matrix and have the same adverse effects on bone formation. The osteoblasts, cells responsible in bone formation, are specific targets of these two metals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acute toxicity of speciation controlled uranium and lead on osteoblasts culture. The intracellular accumulation, distribution and speciation were then studied to explain the observed toxicity. A cell death and phenotypic disorder were highlighted. The speciation is seen as crucial in biological effects of these metals. The most toxic species of both metals have been identified. The accumulation or cell distribution could not alone explain the impact of speciation on the toxicity observed. However, a phenomenon of intracellular precipitation of uranium and lead has been stressed and could be involved in a detoxification mechanism. (author)

  13. Uranium industry annual, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium industry data collected in the EIA-858 survey provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of annual activities of the industry and include some information about industry plans over the next several years. This report consists of two major sections. The first addresses uranium raw materials activities and covers the following topics: exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment. The second major section is concerned with the following uranium marketing activities: uranium purchase commitments, uranium prices, procurement arrangements, uranium imports and exports, enrichment services, inventories, secondary market activities utility market requirements and related topics

  14. A Model to Reproduce the Response of the Gaseous Fission Product Monitor (GFPM) in a CANDU{sup R} 6 Reactor (An Estimate of Tramp Uranium Mass in a Candu Core)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostofian, Sara; Boss, Charles [AECL Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga Ontario L5K 1B2 (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    In a Canada Deuterium Uranium (Candu) reactor, the fuel bundles produce gaseous and volatile fission products that are contained within the fuel matrix and the welded zircaloy sheath. Sometimes a fuel sheath can develop a defect and release the fission products into the circulating coolant. To detect fuel defects, a Gaseous Fission Product Monitoring (GFPM) system is provided in Candu reactors. The (GFPM) is a gamma ray spectrometer that measures fission products in the coolant and alerts the operator to the presence of defected fuel through an increase in measured fission product concentration. A background fission product concentration in the coolant also arises from tramp uranium. The sources of the tramp uranium are small quantities of uranium contamination on the surfaces of fuel bundles and traces of uranium on the pressure tubes, arising from the rare defected fuel element that released uranium into the core. This paper presents a dynamic model that reproduces the behaviour of a GFPM in a Candu 6 plant. The model predicts the fission product concentrations in the coolant from the chronic concentration of tramp uranium on the inner surface of the pressure tubes (PT) and the surface of the fuel bundles (FB) taking into account the on-power refuelling system. (authors)

  15. Field-scale model for the natural attenuation of uranium at the Hanford 300 Area using high-performance computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Glenn E.; Lichtner, Peter C.

    2010-09-01

    High-resolution, three-dimensional, reactive flow and transport simulations are carried out to describe the migration of hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] at the Hanford 300 Area bordering the Columbia River and to better understand the persistence of the uranium plume at the site. The computer code PFLOTRAN developed under a DOE SciDAC-2 project is employed in the simulations that are executed on ORNL's Cray XT4/XT5 supercomputer Jaguar. The conceptual model used in the simulations is based on the recognition of three distinct phases or time periods in the evolution of the U(VI) plume. These correspond to (1) initial waste emplacement; (2) initial presence of both labile and nonlabile U(VI) with an evolved U(VI) plume extending from the source region to the river boundary, representing present-day conditions; and (3) the complete removal of all nonlabile U(VI) and labile U(VI) in the vadose zone. This work focuses primarily on modeling Phase II using equilibrium and multirate sorption models for labile U(VI) and a continuous source release of nonlabile U(VI) in the South Process Pond through dissolution of metatorbernite as a surrogate mineral. For this case, rapid fluctuations in the Columbia River stage combined with the slow release of nonlabile U(VI) from contaminated sediment are found to play a predominant role in determining the migration behavior of U(VI) with sorption only a second-order effect. Nevertheless, a multirate model was essential in explaining breakthrough curves obtained from laboratory column experiments using the same sediment and is demonstrated to be important in Phase III. The calculations demonstrate that U(VI) is discharged to the river at a highly fluctuating rate in a ratchet-like behavior as the river stage rises and falls. The high-frequency fluctuations must be resolved in the model to calculate the flux of U(VI) at the river boundary. By time averaging the instantaneous flux to average out noise superimposed on the river stage

  16. Box-Behnken design in modeling of solid-phase tea waste extraction for the removal of uranium from water samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khajeh, Mostafa; Jahanbin, Elham; Ghaffari-Moghaddam, Mansour; Moghaddam, Zahra Safaei [Zabol Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Chemistry; Bohlooli, Mousa [Zabol Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Biology

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the solid-phase tea waste procedure was used for separation, preconcentration and determination of uranium from water samples by UV-Vis spectrophotometer. In addition, Box-Behnken experimental design was employed to investigated the influence of six variables including pH, mass of adsorbent, eluent volume, amount of 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN); and sample and eluent flow rates on the extraction of analyte. High determination coefficient (R{sup 2}) of 0.972 and adjusted-R{sup 2} of 0.943 showed the satisfactory adjustment of the polynomial regression model. This method was used for the extraction of uranium from real water samples.

  17. Acid rock drainage in the uranium mining and milling site of Pocos de Caldas, Brazil -- duration assessment, pollutant generation modelling and remediation strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This geochemical modeling work was carried out to simulate the acid drainage generation from one of the waste-rock piles at the Pocos de Caldas uranium mining site. The mathematical code STEADQYL was used. The estimated results were in good agreement for sulphate and uranium concentrations and the duration of the acid water generation was estimated to be about 500 years. The effect of covering the dump with a material that minimized oxygen diffusion was assessed. Projections indicated that covering the dump with a 1.0 m thickness of a material (like clay), which had an oxygen diffusion coefficient of 109m2·s1, would reduce the pollutant concentrations to acceptable values. The estimated cost, when using this strategy, would be about US $10 million. (author)

  18. Surface Complexation Modeling of Uranium(Vi) Sorbed Onto Zirconium Oxophosphate Versus Temperature: Thermodynamic And Structural Approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almazan-Torres, M.G.; Drot, R.; Mercier-Bion, F.; Catalette, H.; Auwer, C.Den; Simoni, E.

    2009-05-11

    This work presents an investigation of the interaction mechanisms between uranyl ions and a solid phosphate, the zirconium oxophosphate: Zr{sub 2}O(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}. Both thermodynamic and structural points of view are developed. Indeed, prior to any simulation of the retention data, it is necessary to precisely characterize the system under study in order to gain information at a molecular scale. First, the intrinsic surface properties of this synthetic compound have been investigated for different temperatures ranging from 25 to 90 C. Mass and potentiometric titrations show that the surface site density remains constant between 25 and 90 C, while the experimental point of zero charge slightly decreases from 4.8 to 4.5 with an increasing temperature. The potentiometric titration data are simulated, for each temperature, using the constant capacitance model and taking into account two surface sites ({triple_bond}Zr{_}O and {triple_bond}P{_}O) with a total surface site density equal to 7.0 sites nm{sup -2}. For both reactive sites, the intrinsic protonation constants do not change with the temperature, while the deprotonation ones increase. These results led to the determination of the associated enthalpy and entropy changes according to the van't Hoff relation. Second, the speciation of U(VI) at the solid/solution interface has been studied using two complementary spectroscopic techniques probing the sorbed uranyl ions: time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS). The substrate presents two different reactive surface sites against uranium retention, which are constituted by the oxygen atoms of the surface PO{sub 4} groups and the oxygen atoms linked to the zirconium atoms. Two inner-sphere complexes are thus present on the substrate, their relative proportion depending on the pH value of the suspension. The effects of the temperature (25-90 C) on the surrounding uranium were checked using the TRLFS

  19. Surface complexation modeling of uranium(VI) sorbed onto zirconium oxophosphate versus temperature: thermodynamic and structural approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almazan-Torres, M G; Drot, R; Mercier-Bion, F; Catalette, H; Den Auwer, C; Simoni, E

    2008-07-01

    This work presents an investigation of the interaction mechanisms between uranyl ions and a solid phosphate, the zirconium oxophosphate: Zr2O(PO4)2. Both thermodynamic and structural points of view are developed. Indeed, prior to any simulation of the retention data, it is necessary to precisely characterize the system under study in order to gain information at a molecular scale. First, the intrinsic surface properties of this synthetic compound have been investigated for different temperatures ranging from 25 to 90 degrees C. Mass and potentiometric titrations show that the surface site density remains constant between 25 and 90 degrees C, while the experimental point of zero charge slightly decreases from 4.8 to 4.5 with an increasing temperature. The potentiometric titration data are simulated, for each temperature, using the constant capacitance model and taking into account two surface sites ([TRIPLE BOND]ZrO and [TRIPLE BOND]PO) with a total surface site density equal to 7.0 sites nm(-2). For both reactive sites, the intrinsic protonation constants do not change with the temperature, while the deprotonation ones increase. These results led to the determination of the associated enthalpy and entropy changes according to the van't Hoff relation. Second, the speciation of U(VI) at the solid/solution interface has been studied using two complementary spectroscopic techniques probing the sorbed uranyl ions: time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS). The substrate presents two different reactive surface sites against uranium retention, which are constituted by the oxygen atoms of the surface PO4 groups and the oxygen atoms linked to the zirconium atoms. Two inner-sphere complexes are thus present on the substrate, their relative proportion depending on the pH value of the suspension. The effects of the temperature (25-90 degrees C) on the surrounding uranium were checked using the TRLFS technique. The

  20. Integrating Apparent Conductance in Resistivity Sounding to Constrain 2D Gravity Modeling for Subsurface Structure Associated with Uranium Mineralization across South Purulia Shear Zone, West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkoprovo Biswas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available South Purulia Shear Zone (SPSZ is an important area for the prospect of uranium mineralization and no detailed geophysical investigations have been carried out in this region. To delineate the subsurface structure in the present area, vertical electrical soundings using Schlumberger array and gravity survey were carried out along a profile perpendicular to the SPSZ. Apparent conductance in the subsurface revealed a possible connection from SPSZ to Raghunathpur. The gravity model reveals the presence of a northerly dipping low density zone (most likely the shear zone extending up to Raghunathpur under a thin cover of granitic schist of Chotanagpur Granite Gneissic Complex (CGGC. The gravity model also depicts the depth of the zone of density low within this shear zone at ~400 m near Raghunathpur village and this zone truncates with a steep slope. Integration of resistivity and gravity study revealed two possible contact zones within this low density zone in the subsurface at depth of 40 m and 200 m. Our study reveals a good correlation with previous studies in Raghunathpur area characterized by medium to high hydro-uranium anomaly. Thus the conducting zone coinciding with the low gravity anomaly is inferred to be a possible uranium mineralized zone.

  1. The application of laser two-way depletion model in AVLIS for uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Changjiang Yu [The Institution of Physics and Chemistry Engineering in Nuclear Industry, Tianjin (China); Min Yan; Dewu Wang; Chuntong Ying [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing, BJ (China). Dept. of Engineering Physics

    1996-12-31

    We propose a two-way depletion model to be applied in AVLIS, and the problem of small isotope shifts is avoided. The higher selectivity and lower waste composition can be obtained disregarding the power broadening effect. This model makes the product and waste compositions ({sup C} p and {sup C} w) of AVLIS satisfy the requirements {sup c} p > 3.5%, {sup C} w < 0.25 easily. (author) 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. An improved model to evaluate the oxidation kinetics of uranium dioxide during dry storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During dry air storage, the oxidation of the spent fuel in case of cladding and container failure (accidental scenario) could be detrimental for further handling of the spent fuel rod and for the safety of the facilities. Recently, the phase transition sequence during the first step of parabolic oxidation kinetic has been challenged again and two well-distinguished intermediate products, U4O9 and U3O7 have been identified. Moreover, these observations have shown that the three phases (UO2, U4O9 and U3O7) occur together. Starting from a previous model of grain oxidation based on finite difference approach, a new model, describing the parabolic oxidation kinetic, has been developed based on the oxygen atom diffusion. This model allows in one hand to take into account the occurrence of the three phases and in another hand to describe accurately the plateau behaviour. A comparison between the model and literature data obtained on non-irradiated powders has been carried out and shows that this model can describe the weight gain evolution as a function of time for different temperatures. The diffusion coefficients of oxygen in the two phases (U4O9 and U3O7) were obtained by fitting the model results to experimental data. The comparison with the values given in literature is quite good

  3. Field-scale model for the natural attenuation of uranium at the Hanford 300 area using high performance computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtner, Peter C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hammond, Glenn E [PNNL

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional reactive flow and transport simulations are carried out to better understand the persistence of uranium [U(VI)] at the Hanford 300 Area bordering the Columbia River. The massively parallel code PFLOTRAN developed under a DOE SciDAC-2 project is employed in the simulations. The calculations were carried out on 4096 processor cores on ORNL's Jaguar XT4 & 5 Cray supercomputers with run times on the order of 6 hours, equivalent to several years if performed on a single processor with sufficient memory. A new conceptual model is presented for understanding present-day and future attenuation rates of U(VI) at the 300 Area site. Unique to the conceptual model is the recognition of three distinct phases in the evolution of the site corresponding to: (I) initial emplacement of waste; (II) present-day conditions of slow leaching of U(VI) from the Hanford sediments; and (III) the complete removal of non-labile U(VI) from the source region. This work focuses on Phase II. Both labile and non-labile forms of U(VI) are included in the model as sorbed and mineralized forms of U(VI), respectively. The non-labile form plays an important role in providing a long-term source of U(VI) as it slowly leaches out of the Hanford sediment. Rapid fluctuations in the Columbia River stage on hourly, weekly and seasonal time scales are found to' playa major role in determining the migration behavior of U(VI). The calculations demonstrate that U(VI) is released into the Columbia River at a highly fluctuating rate in a ratchet-like behavior with nonzero U(VI) flux occurring only during flow from contaminated sediment into the river. The cumulative flux, however, is found to increase approximately linearly with time. The flow rate and U(VI) flux into the Columbia River predicted by the model is highly sensitive to the value used in the conductance boundary condition at the river-sediment interface. By fitting the conductance to the measured piezometric head at well 399

  4. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ''Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,'' is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2

  5. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-28

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

  6. Benchmark experiment on the model of fusion reactor blanket with uranium neutron multiplier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benchmark experiment on the model of thermonuclear reactor blanket with 14 MeV neutron source is described. The model design corresponds to the known concept of the fast hybrid blanket with 238U neutron multiplier and main tritium production on 6Li. Detailed measurements of the following process velocities were carried out: tritium production on lithium isotopes; reactions modelling tritium production; (n, γ) and (n, 2n) processes for 238U; fission reactions for 235,238U, 239Pu, 237Np. Neutron flux integral measurements were performed by a set of threshold detectors on the basic of the 115In(n, n'), 204Pb(n, n'), 64Zn(n, p), 27Al(n, p), 56Fe(n, p), 107Ag(n, 2n), 63Cu(n, 2n) and 64(n, 2n) reactions

  7. Uranium internal exposure evaluation based on urine assay data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The difficulties in assessing internal exposures to uranium from urine assay data are described. A simplified application of the ICRP-30 and ICRP Lung Model concepts to the estimation of uranium intake is presented. A discussion follows on the development of a computer code utilizing the ICRP-30-based uranium elimination model with the existing urine assay information. The calculated uranium exposures from 1949 through 1983 are discussed. 13 references, 1 table

  8. Uranium recovery from slags of metallic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Center of the Nuclear Fuel of the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research - IPEN finished the program of attainment of fuel development for research reactors the base of Uranium Scilicet (U3 Si2) from Hexafluoride of Uranium (UF6) with enrichment 20% in weight of 235U. In the process of attainment of the league of U 3 Si 2 we have as Uranium intermediate product the metallic one whose attainment generates a slag contend Uranium. The present work shows the results gotten in the process of recovery of Uranium in slags of calcined slags of Uranium metallic. Uranium the metallic one is unstable, pyrophoricity and extremely reactive, whereas the U3O8 is a steady oxide of low chemical reactivity, what it justifies the process of calcination of slags of Uranium metallic. The calcination of the Uranium slag of the metallic one in oxygen presence reduces Uranium metallic the U3O8. Experiments had been developed varying it of acid for Uranium control and excess, nitric molar concentration gram with regard to the stoichiometric leaching reaction of temperature of the leaching process. The 96,0% income proves the viability of the recovery process of slags of Uranium metallic, adopting it previous calcination of these slags in nitric way with low acid concentration and low temperature of leaching. (author)

  9. Column Testing and 1D Reactive Transport Modeling to Evaluate Uranium Plume Persistence Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Raymond H. [Navarro Research and Engineering, Inc.; Morrison, Stan [Navarro Research and Engineering, Inc.; Morris, Sarah [Navarro Research and Engineering, Inc.; Tigar, Aaron [Navarro Research and Engineering, Inc.; Dam, William [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management; Dayvault, Jalena [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management

    2016-04-26

    Motivation for Study: Natural flushing of contaminants at various U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management sites is not proceeding as quickly as predicted (plume persistence) Objectives: Help determine natural flushing rates using column tests. Use 1D reactive transport modeling to better understand the major processes that are creating plume persistence Approach: Core samples from under a former mill tailings area Tailings have been removed. Column leaching using lab-prepared water similar to nearby Gunnison River water. 1D reactive transport modeling to evaluate processes

  10. INTRAVAL phase 2, test case 8. Alligator Rivers Natural Analogue. Modelling of uranium transport in the weathered zone at Koongarra, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary results of modelling of the dispersion of uranium in the weathered and transition zones are given. In the course of the Alligator Rivers Analogue Project (ARAP) more insight was gained about the formation of the dispersion fan and about the hydrology at Koongarra. The here applied transport modelling strategy takes into account those results. First, a general explanation of Natural Analogue is given, next to a brief description of the ARAP test case, carried out within the INTRAVAL phase 2. INTRAVAL is an international project concerned with the use of mathematical models for predicting the potential transport of radioactive solutes in the geosphere. Following is the analysis of chemical data, necessary for the choice of the modelling approach, for estimation of model inputs and for testing model results. Subsequently, the modelling strategy is expounded and a description is given of METROPOL, the transport code, used for modelling. 11 figs., 2 tabs., 1 appendix, 17 refs

  11. Thermodynamic Model for Uranium Release from Hanford Site Tank Residual Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thermodynamic model of U phase solubility and paragenesis was developed for Hanford tank residual waste that will remain after tank closure. The model was developed using a combination of waste composition data, waste leach test data, and thermodynamic modeling of the leach test data. The testing and analyses were conducted using actual Hanford tank residual waste. Positive identification of the U phases by X-ray diffraction (XRD) was generally not possible because solids in the waste were amorphous, or below the detection limit of XRD for both as-received residual waste and leached residual waste. Three leachant solutions were used in the studies, dionized water, CaCO3 saturated solution, and Ca(OH)2 saturated solution. Thermodynamic modeling verified that equilibrium between U phases in the initial residual waste samples and the leachants was attained in less than a month. The paragenetic sequence of secondary phases that occur as waste leaching progresses for two closure scenarios was identified. These results have significant implications for tank closure design.

  12. Mathematical modeling of the uranium dioxide powder compaction process at manufacture of nuclear fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mathematical elastoplastic model of ceramic powder compaction has been proposed. Simulation results of the stressed-deformed state of the compacted powder are presented in the paper. According to the simulation results, the main factors affecting the fuel pellet density distribution are friction between the powder and die and geometry of punches

  13. Surface complexation modeling of uranium(VI) sorbed onto lanthanum monophosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordoñez-Regil, E; Drot, R; Simoni, E

    2003-07-15

    Sorption/desorption are basic processes in the field of contaminant transport. In order to develop mechanistically accurate thermodynamic sorption models, the simulation of retention data has to take into account molecular scale informations provided by structural investigations. In this way, the uranyl sorption constants onto lanthanum monophosphate (LaPO(4)) were determined on the basis of a previously published structural investigation. The surface complexation modeling of U(VI) retention onto LaPO(4) has been performed using the constant capacitance model included in the FITEQLv3.2 program. The electrical behavior of the solid surface was investigated using electrophoretic measurements and potentiometric titration experiments. The point of zero charge was found to be 3.5 and surface complexation modeling has made it possible to calculate the surface acidity constants. The fitting procedure was done with respect to the spectroscopic results, which have shown that LaPO(4) presents two kinds of reactive surface sites (lanthanum atoms and phosphate groups). The uranyl sorption edges were determined for two surface coverages: 40 and 20% of the surface sites that are occupied, assuming complete sorption. The modeling of these experimental data was realized by considering two uranyl species ("free" uranyl and uranyl nitrate complex) sorbed only onto phosphate surface groups according to the previously published structural investigation. The obtained sorption constants present similar values for both surface complexes and make it possible to fit both sorption edges: logK(U)=9.4 for z.tbnd;P(OH)(2)+UO(2)(2+)z.tbnd;P(OH)(2)UO(2)(2+) and logK(UN)=9.7 for z.tbnd;P(OH)(2)+UO(2)NO(3)(+)z.tbnd;P(OH)(2)UO(2)NO(3)(+). PMID:12909028

  14. Modeling non-steady state radioisotope transport in the vadose zone - A case study using uranium isotopes at Peña Blanca, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, T. L.; Luo, S.; Goldstein, S. J.; Murrell, M. T.; Chu, W. L.; Dobson, P. F.

    2009-10-01

    Current models using U- and Th-series disequilibria to study radioisotope transport in groundwater systems mostly consider a steady-state situation. These models have limited applicability to the vadose zone (UZ) where the concentration and migratory behavior of radioisotopes in fluid are often transitory. We present here, as a first attempt of its kind, a model simulating the non-steady state, intermittent fluid transport in vadose layers. It provides quantitative constraints on in-situ migration of dissolved and colloidal radioisotopes in terms of retardation factor and rock-water interaction (or water transit) time. For uranium, the simulation predicts that intermittent flushing in the UZ leads to a linear relationship between reciprocal U concentration and 234U/ 238U ratio in percolating waters, with the intercept and slope bearing information on the rates of dissolution and α-recoil of U isotopes, respectively. The general validity of the model appears to be borne out by the measurement of uranium isotopes in UZ waters collected at various times over a period during 1995-2006 from a site in the Peña Blanca mining district, Mexico, where the Nopal I uranium deposit is located. Enhanced 234U/ 238U ratios in vadose-zone waters resulting from lengthened non-flushing time as prescribed by the model provide an interpretative basis for using 234U/ 238U in cave calcites to reconstruct the regional changes in hydrology and climate. We also provide a theoretical account of the model's potential applications using radium isotopes.

  15. Modeling non-steady state radioisotope transport in the vadose zone--A case study using uranium isotopes at Pena Blanca, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ku, T. L.; Luo, S.; Goldstein, S. J.; Murrell, M. T.; Chu, W. L.; Dobson, P. F.

    2009-06-01

    Current models using U- and Th-series disequilibria to study radioisotope transport in groundwater systems mostly consider a steady-state situation. These models have limited applicability to the vadose zone (UZ) where the concentration and migratory behavior of radioisotopes in fluid are often transitory. We present here, as a first attempt of its kind, a model simulating the non-steady state, intermittent fluid transport in vadose layers. It provides quantitative constraints on in-situ migration of dissolved and colloidal radioisotopes in terms of retardation factor and rock-water interaction (or water transit) time. For uranium, the simulation predicts that intermittent flushing in the UZ leads to a linear relationship between reciprocal U concentration and {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U ratio in percolating waters, with the intercept and slope bearing information on the rates of dissolution and {alpha}-recoil of U isotopes, respectively. The general validity of the model appears to be borne out by the measurement of uranium isotopes in UZ waters collected at various times over a period during 1995-2006 from a site in the Pena Blanca mining district, Mexico, where the Nopal I uranium deposit is located. Enhanced {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U ratios in vadose-zone waters resulting from lengthened non-flushing time as prescribed by the model provide an interpretative basis for using {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U in cave calcites to reconstruct the regional changes in hydrology and climate. We also provide a theoretical account of the model's potential applications using radium isotopes.

  16. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter discusses the development of uranium enrichment processes. In the introduction there is a brief history of uranium enrichment, followed by a summary of the criteria used for the assessment of an isotope separation process, e.g. the separation factor, separative power, and the power consumption of a separating element. This is followed by a discussion of the two main processes used, i.e. gaseous diffusion and centrifugation. The reason for the change from diffusion to centrifugation in the UK, mainly on power costs, is discussed. The development potential of centrifuges is also assessed. Other processes which have been developed up to pilot stage are described, e.g. the Becker jet nozzle and the South African process. This is followed by a description of some plasma-based methods. The next topic is concerned with chemical exchange methods and an attempt is made to assess their potential in the enrichment scene from published information. This chapter concludes with a discussion of the advanced laser isotope-separation methods. The two approaches, i.e. the atomic and the molecular routes are discussed again using published information. This information is insufficient to give a complete assessment of the methods, especially the molecular route, but is enough to give indications of their potential

  17. Maximum permissible concentrations of uranium in air

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, N

    1973-01-01

    The retention of uranium by bone and kidney has been re-evaluated taking account of recently published data for a man who had been occupationally exposed to natural uranium aerosols and for adults who had ingested uranium at the normal dietary levels. For life-time occupational exposure to uranium aerosols the new retention functions yield a greater retention in bone and a smaller retention in kidney than the earlier ones, which were based on acute intakes of uranium by terminal patients. Hence bone replaces kidney as the critical organ. The (MPC) sub a for uranium 238 on radiological considerations using the current (1959) ICRP lung model for the new retention functions is slightly smaller than for earlier functions but the (MPC) sub a determined by chemical toxicity remains the most restrictive.

  18. Estimates of parameter and scenario uncertainties in shallow-land disposal of uranium wastes using deterministic and probabilistic safety assessment models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety and uncertainty analyses for the shallow-land disposal of uranium wastes were performed using the deterministic and probabilistic safety assessment models. The analyses for uranium accumulated with 4.5% enrichment show that the doses in residence scenario are of great importance in the safety assessment owing to the influence of daughters built up by uranium decay chain. The dose in residence scenario is sensitive to the release condition of radionuclides from the facilities over long-term period. The parameter uncertainties for the important pathways in residence scenario are estimated from the probabilistic analyses using the statistical methodology. The uncertainty analysis indicates that the influence of parameter uncertainty is the most remarkable in the estimation for the inhalation of radon gas with residence. The parameter importance in each exposure pathway is estimated from using the partial rank correlation coefficients (PRCCs) between variable parameters and the evaluated doses. The important parameters identified by the PRCCs are depth of intrusion, infiltration rate, thickness of covered soil, diffusion coefficient of radon in soil etc. for the inhalation exposure of radon. (author)

  19. Uranium processing and properties

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Covers a broad spectrum of topics and applications that deal with uranium processing and the properties of uranium Offers extensive coverage of both new and established practices for dealing with uranium supplies in nuclear engineering Promotes the documentation of the state-of-the-art processing techniques utilized for uranium and other specialty metals

  20. Irradiated uranium reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Task concerned with reprocessing of irradiated uranium covered the following activities: implementing the method and constructing the cell for uranium dissolving; implementing the procedure for extraction of uranium, plutonium and fission products from radioactive uranium solutions; studying the possibilities for using inorganic ion exchangers and adsorbers for separation of U, Pu and fission products

  1. Issues in uranium availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this publication is to show the process by which information about uranium reserves and resources is developed, evaluated and used. The following three papers in this volume have been abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base: (1) uranium reserve and resource assessment; (2) exploration for uranium in the United States; (3) nuclear power, the uranium industry, and resource development

  2. Uranium industry annual 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report consists of two major sections. The first addresses uranium raw materials activities and covers the following topics: exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment. The second major section is concerned with the following uranium marketing activities: uranium purchase commitments, uranium prices, procurement arrangements, uranium imports and exports, enrichment services, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and related topics. A glossary and appendices are included to assist the reader in interpreting the substantial array of statistical data in this report and to provide background information about the survey

  3. Formation-evolution model of uranium-productive basin and its recognition criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on geologic-tectonic setting and dynamic evolution of important U-productive basins both at home and abroad, authors distinguish six type of U-productive basins, and nominate each type by typical representative of this type, namely Chu-Sarysu and Syr-Darya type, Central Kyzylkum type, Zaural and West-Siberia type, Zabaikal type, Bohemia type, and South Texas type. The formation-evolution model of each type of U-productive basin has been established and recognition criteria have been proposed. Finially, the difference between each type U-productive basin is discussed and some assumption on prospecting for U-productive basins is proposed. (authors)

  4. Uranium Contamination in the 300 Area: Emergent Data and their Impact on the Source Term Conceptual Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Christopher F.; Um, Wooyong; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2008-09-30

    The primary objectives of this characterization activity were to: 1) determine the extent of uranium contamination in the sediments, 2) quantify the leachable (labile) concentration of uranium in the sediments, and 3) create a data set that could be used to correlate the present data to existing 300 Area data. In order to meet these objectives, sediments collected from wells 399-2-5 (C5708), 299-3-22 (C5706) and 299-4-14 (C5707) were analyzed for moisture content, 1:1 sediment:water extracts (which provide soil pH, electrical conductivity [EC], cation, and anion data), total carbon and inorganic carbon content, 8 M nitric acid extracts (which provide a measure of the total leachable sediment content of the contaminants), microwave-assisted digestion (which results in total digestion of the sediment), and carbonate leaches (which provide an assessment of the concentration of labile uranium present in the sediments). Additionally, pore waters present in select samples were extracted using ultracentrifugation. The mobility characteristics of uranium vary within the multiple subsurface zones that contain residual contaminant uranium. Principal subsurface zones include 1) the vadose zone, 2) a zone through which the water table rises and falls, 3) the aquifer, and 4) a zone where groundwater and river water interact beneath the river shoreline. Principal controls on mobilization include the form of the residual uranium (e.g., crystalline minerals, amorphous precipitates/coatings, sorbed onto sediment), the transporting medium (e.g., water infiltration from the land surface, groundwater), and the rate of exchange between the form and transporting medium. The bicarbonate content of aqueous media strongly influences the rate of exchange, with relatively higher content enhancing mobility. Groundwater has a higher bicarbonate content than river water or other freshwater sources, such as utility and potable water systems. The variety of processes affecting the mobility of

  5. Surface complexation modeling of uranium (Vi) retained onto zirconium diphosphate in presence of organic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the field of nuclear waste disposal, predictions regarding radionuclide migration through the geosphere, have to take account the effects of natural organic matter. This work presents an investigation of interaction mechanisms between U (Vi) and zirconium diphosphate (ZrP2O7) in presence of organic acids (citric acid and oxalic acid). The retention reactions were previously examined using a batch equilibrium method. Previous results showed that U (Vi) retention was more efficient when citric acid or oxalic acid was present in solid surface at lower ph values. In order to determine the retention equilibria for both systems studied, a phosphorescence spectroscopy study was carried out. The experimental data were then fitted using the Constant Capacitance Model included in the FITEQL4.0 code. Previous results concerning surface characterization of ZrP2O7 (surface sites density and surface acidity constants) were used to constraint the modeling. The best fit for U (Vi)/citric acid/ZrP2O7 and U (Vi)/oxalic acid/ZrP2O7 systems considered the formation of a ternary surface complex. (Author)

  6. Fabrication of uranium-americium mixed oxide fuels: thermodynamical modeling and materials properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel irradiation in pressurized water reactors lead to the formation of fission products and minor actinides (Np, Am, Cm) which can be transmuted in fast neutrons reactors. In this context, the aim of this work was to study the fabrication conditions of the U1-yAmyO2+x fuels which exhibit particular thermodynamical properties requiring an accurate monitoring of the oxygen potential during the sintering step. For this reason, a thermodynamical model was developed to assess the optimum sintering conditions for these materials. From these calculations, U1-yAmyO2+x (y=0.10; 0.15; 0.20; 0.30) were sintered in two range of atmosphere. In hyper-stoichiometric conditions at low temperature, porous and multiphasic compounds are obtained whereas in reducing conditions at high temperature materials are dense and monophasic. XAFS analyses were performed in order to obtain additional experimental data for the thermodynamical modeling refinement. These characterizations also showed the reduction of Am(+IV) to Am(+III) and the partial oxidation of U(+IV) to U(+V) due to a charge compensation mechanism occurring during the sintering. Finally, taking into account the high - activity of Am, self-irradiation effects were studied for two types of microstructures and two Am contents (10 and 15%). For each composition, a lattice parameter increase was observed without structural change coupled with a macroscopic swelling of the pellet diameter up to 1.2% for the dense compounds and 0.6% for the tailored porosity materials. (author)

  7. Complexation modelling of uranium and other actinides by organic compounds of natural or synthetic origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The future of nuclear wastes raises a lot of questions. Their resolution require an accurate knowledge of the physical, chemical and biological processes which affect the properties of radioelements constituting the wastes. 3 research themes have been approached. The experimental methods used are: neutronic activation analysis, UV-visible spectrophotometry and time-resolved induced laser spectro-fluorimetry. A part of the phenomena has been modelled by ionic strength correction models (as Davies or MSA). The main results have revealed: 1)the bio-sorption capacities of the microorganism (Mycobacterium phlei) for UO22+ and NpO2+ (in conditions where the specific adsorption capacities Qe(UO22+)=60 and Qe(NpO2+)=444 moles cations/g dry biomass 2)the retention capacities, in various leaching conditions, by this bacteria of the ions initially adsorbed 3)the complexation properties of 2 siderophores for the cations UO22+, U4+ and Th4+. The thermodynamical equilibrium constants were determined for one of the siderophore: the pyoverdine A; they were such that KUO22+≤KU4+≤KTh4+ 4)in very acidic media (HCl and HClO4 until 12 M), the behaviour of the acylisoxazolone HPBI (1-phenyl-4-benzoyl-5-isoxazolone) and the value of its acidity thermodynamical constant is such that 0.13≤KATh≤0.32 at 25 degrees Celsius 5)the variations of the fluorescence properties of the uranyl cation in terms of the acidity of the concentrated media (HClO4 and CF3SO3H) in which they are in solution; it seems that a complexation between the uranyl ion and the counter-ions present in solution occur. (O.M.)

  8. The End of Cheap Uranium

    CERN Document Server

    Dittmar, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Historic data from many countries demonstrate that on average no more than 50-70% of the uranium in a deposit could be mined. An analysis of more recent data from Canada and Australia leads to a mining model with an average deposit extraction lifetime of 10+- 2 years. This simple model provides an accurate description of the extractable amount of uranium for the recent mining operations. Using this model for all larger existing and planned uranium mines up to 2030, a global uranium mining peak of at most 58 +- 4 ktons around the year 2015 is obtained. Thereafter we predict that uranium mine production will decline to at most 54 +- 5 ktons by 2025 and, with the decline steepening, to at most 41 +- 5 ktons around 2030. This amount will not be sufficient to fuel the existing and planned nuclear power plants during the next 10-20 years. In fact, we find that it will be difficult to avoid supply shortages even under a slow 1%/year worldwide nuclear energy phase-out scenario up to 2025. We thus suggest that a world...

  9. Depleted Uranium Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper considers radiological and toxic impact of the depleted uranium on the human health. Radiological influence of depleted uranium is less for 60 % than natural uranium due to the decreasing of short-lived isotopes uranium-234 and uranium-235 after enrichment. The formation of radioactive aerosols and their impact on the human are mentioned. Use of the depleted uranium weapons has also a chemical effect on intake due to possible carcinogenic influence on kidney. Uranium-236 in the substance of the depleted uranium is determined. The fact of beta-radiation formation in the uranium-238 decay is regarded. This effect practically is the same for both depleted and natural uranium. Importance of toxicity of depleted uranium, as the heavier chemical substance, has a considerable contribution to the population health. The paper analyzes risks regarding the use of the depleted uranium weapons. There is international opposition against using weapons with depleted uranium. Resolution on effects of the use of armaments and ammunitions containing depleted uranium was five times supported by the United Nations (USA, United Kingdom, France and Israel did not support). The decision for banning of depleted uranium weapons was supported by the European Parliament

  10. Uptake and clearance of uranium by misgurnus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author studied the bioconcentration and clearance of uranium in misgurnus and determined bioconcentration factors (BCF) as well as uptake and depuration rate constants. The test was performed under semi-static conditions. The depuration of uranium was best described by a two-compartment first order kinetic model

  11. URANIUM DECONTAMINATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, J.S.; Carroll, J.L.

    1959-12-22

    A process is described for reducing the extractability of ruthenium, zirconium, and niobium values into hexone contained in an aqueous nitric acid uranium-containing solution. The solution is made acid-deficient, heated to between 55 and 70 deg C, and at that temperature a water-soluble inorganic thiosulfate is added. By this, a precipitate is formed which carries the bulk of the ruthenium, and the remainder of the ruthenium as well as the zirconium and niobium are converted to a hexone-nonextractable form. The rutheniumcontaining precipitate can either be removed from the solu tion or it can be dissolved as a hexone-non-extractable compound by the addition of sodium dichromate prior to hexone extraction.

  12. Natural uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This sheet belongs to a collection which relates to the use of radionuclides essentially in unsealed sources. Its goal is to gather on a single document the most relevant information as well as the best prevention practices to be implemented. These sheets are made for the persons in charge of radiation protection: users, radioprotection-skill persons, labor physicians. Each sheet treats of: 1 - the radio-physical and biological properties; 2 - the main uses; 3 - the dosimetric parameters; 4 - the measurement; 5 - the protection means; 6 - the areas delimitation and monitoring; 7 - the personnel classification, training and monitoring; 8 - the effluents and wastes; 9 - the authorization and declaration administrative procedures; 10 - the transport; and 11 - the right conduct to adopt in case of incident or accident. This sheet deals specifically with natural uranium

  13. Simmer model of a low-enriched uranium non-power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IRSN has started to use the coupled neutronics - fluid dynamics code SIMMER to study core-disruptive accident induced by insertions of large reactivities sufficient to very short period power excursions in fuel plate-type and water-moderated experimental research reactors. Until now, French safety analysis retain thermal energy released and mechanical yields, deduced from analysis of destructive test programs SPERT-I and BORAX-I to demonstrate the behavior of such reactors and design their structures and containment. The present research program models the design basis accident of a low enriched fuel currently used in experimental research reactors contrary to SPERT-I or BORAX-I. The objective is to analyze the effects of counter reactivities and how these would limit the generated thermal energy in the fuel. This part demands a close coupling to the fluid dynamics analysis. The consequences of the nuclear power excursion, the changes of state of the fuel and the coolant, and ultimately the mechanical energy released are calculated by SIMMER. For large step-wise reactivity introductions, the Doppler effect limits the power excursion before energy is released high enough to melt a large part of the fuel. Moreover, it has been shown that imposing an external reactivity as a step-wise or time dependant reactivity introduction yields results quite different from those of the physical movement of control rods. (author)

  14. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Geochemical modelling of secondary uranium ore formation. Final Report - Volume 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the present study was to establish how the uranyl phosphate zone at the Koongarra site was formed. The overall approach taken in the present study employed theoretical chemical mass transfer calculations and models that permit investigation and reconstruction of the kinds of waters that could produce the uranyl phosphate zone. These calculations have used the geological and mineralogical data for the Koongarra weathered zone (Volumes 2, 8, and 9 of this series), to constrain the initial compositions and reactions undergone by groundwater during the formation of the uranyl phosphate zone. In carrying out these calculations the present-day analyses of Koongarra waters are used only as a guide to the possible initial composition of the fluids associated with the formation of the phosphate zone. Aqueous speciation, saturation state and chemical mass transfer calculations were carried out using the computer programs EQ3NR and EQ6 (Wolery, 1983; Wolery et al., 1984) and a thermodynamic database generated at The Johns Hopkins University over the last eight years which is tabulated in the Appendix 1 to Volume 12 of this series. Despite uncertainties in the thermodynamic characterisation of species, all the above calculations suggest that the uranyl phosphate zone at Koongarra has not formed from present-day groundwaters (Volume 12 of this series). The present-day groundwaters in the weathered zone (eg. at 13 m depth) appear to be undersaturated with respect to saleeite. Furthermore, as present-day groundwaters descend below the water table they rapidly lose their atmospheric oxygen imprint, as is typical of most groundwaters, and become even more reducing in character. Under these circumstances, the groundwaters become more undersaturated with respect to saleeite than the shallow groundwaters. Because much of the phosphate zone is currently below the water table, under saturated zone conditions, it is suggested in the present study that the uranyl phosphate

  15. Computer modelling of the chemical speciation of caesium, uranium(VI) and neptunium(V) in human duodenal fluids under fasting conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model simulating the human duodenal contents under physiologically realistic, fasting conditions was developed using the joint expert speciation system (JESS) computer program and database and used to investigate the chemical speciation of caesium, uranium(VI) and neptunium(V). Over the pH range 5.0-9.0, and the concentration range 5x10-15-5x10-5 mol dm-3, caesium was predicted to occur predominantly as the absorbable free monovalent cation Cs+ (∼95%) with species such as CsHPO4- and CsCl representing the remainder. The presence or absence of sulphate at 2.1x10-3 mol dm-3 did not influence the predicted speciation. Uranium was predicted to be present entirely as a soluble, highly charged species, both in the absence and in the presence of sulphate. Between pH 5.0 and ∼6.5 the UO2H2(PO4)22- predominated, above this pH carbonate species, either UO2(CO3)46- or, possibly, UO2(CO3)58-. At pH 8.0, and in the presence of sulphate, neptunium(V) was predicted to exist solely as the tetrasulphate species, whilst in the absence of sulphate, an array of negatively charged soluble carbonate species predominated. Studies over the pH range 5.0-9.0 predicted the formation of a spectrum of negatively charged carbonate and phosphate species, ∼40% of the total neptunium was predicted to be present as the electrically net-neutral species NpO2HCO3 at pH6.0, ∼20% at pH 7.0, ∼10% at pH 7.5 and ∼1% at pH 8.0. The observed speciation patterns of uranium and neptunium did not change over the concentration range 5x10-15-5x10-5 mol dm-3 and no solid species were predicted to occur under the conditions simulated. Whether the predicted electrically net-neutral neptunium species or the uranium pentacarbonate species do actually occur under true physiological conditions remains to be established. The observed speciation patterns for caesium and uranium are consistent with the observed absorption of these elements by humans; however, the observations for neptunium appear to be

  16. Morphology Characterization of Uranium Particles From Laser Ablated Uranium Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    In the study, metallic uranium and uranium dioxide material were ablated by laser beam in order to simulate the process of forming the uranium particles in pyrochemical process. The morphology characteristic of uranium particles and the surface of

  17. FINAL REPORT: Mechanistically-Base Field Scale Models of Uranium Biogeochemistry from Upscaling Pore-Scale Experiments and Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Brian D.

    2013-11-04

    Biogeochemical reactive transport processes in the subsurface environment are important to many contemporary environmental issues of significance to DOE. Quantification of risks and impacts associated with environmental management options, and design of remediation systems where needed, require that we have at our disposal reliable predictive tools (usually in the form of numerical simulation models). However, it is well known that even the most sophisticated reactive transport models available today have poor predictive power, particularly when applied at the field scale. Although the lack of predictive ability is associated in part with our inability to characterize the subsurface and limitations in computational power, significant advances have been made in both of these areas in recent decades and can be expected to continue. In this research, we examined the upscaling (pore to Darcy and Darcy to field) the problem of bioremediation via biofilms in porous media. The principle idea was to start with a conceptual description of the bioremediation process at the pore scale, and apply upscaling methods to formally develop the appropriate upscaled model at the so-called Darcy scale. The purpose was to determine (1) what forms the upscaled models would take, and (2) how one might parameterize such upscaled models for applications to bioremediation in the field. We were able to effectively upscale the bioremediation process to explain how the pore-scale phenomena were linked to the field scale. The end product of this research was to produce a set of upscaled models that could be used to help predict field-scale bioremediation. These models were mechanistic, in the sense that they directly incorporated pore-scale information, but upscaled so that only the essential features of the process were needed to predict the effective parameters that appear in the model. In this way, a direct link between the microscale and the field scale was made, but the upscaling process

  18. Uranium management activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the missions of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Office (ORO) has been the management of the Department's uranium materials. This mission has been accomplished through successful integration of ORO's uranium activities with the rest of the DOE complex. Beginning in the 1980's, several of the facilities in that complex have been shut down and are in the decommissioning process. With the end of the Cold War, the shutdown of many other facilities is planned. As a result, inventories of uranium need to be removed from the Department facilities. These inventories include highly enriched uranium (HEU), low enriched uranium (LEU), normal uranium (NU), and depleted uranium (DU). The uranium materials exist in different chemical forms, including metals, oxides, solutions, and gases. Much of the uranium in these inventories is not needed to support national priorities and programs. (author)

  19. Uranium Provinces in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Three uranium provinces are recognized in China, the Southeast China uranium province, the Northeast China-lnner Mongolia uranium province and the Northwest China (Xinjiang) uranium province. The latter two promise good potential for uranium resources and are major exploration target areas in recent years. There are two major types of uranium deposits: the Phanerozoic hydrothermal type (vein type) and the Meso-Cenozoic sandstone type in different proportions in the three uranium provinces. The most important reason or prerequisite for the formation of these uranium provinces is that Precambrian uranium-enriched old basement or its broken parts (median massifs) exists or once existed in these regions, and underwent strong tectonomagmatic activation during Phanerozoic time. Uranium was mobilized from the old basement and migrated upwards to the upper structural level together with the acidic magma originating from anatexis and the primary fluids, which were then mixed with meteoric water and resulted in the formation of Phanerozoic hydrothermal uranium deposits under extensional tectonic environments. Erosion of uraniferous rocks and pre-existing uranium deposits during the Meso-Cenozoic brought about the removal of uranium into young sedimentary basins. When those basins were uplifted and slightly deformed by later tectonic activity, roll-type uranium deposits were formed as a result of redox in permeable sandstone strata.

  20. Uranium industry annual 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-22

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  1. Uranium industry annual 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey.'' Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry's activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry's plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs

  2. Uranium industry annual 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey.'' Data collected on the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry's activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry's plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ''Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,'' is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2

  3. Bulk division of metallogenetic region and uranium metallogenetic regularities in Heilongjiang basin and its adjacent areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the base of the study in the working area, a conclusion is made that there are 36 combined types of tectonic-material and 6 basic tectonic units. According to radioactive geochemical quantitative and qualitative factors, which are relevant to rock composition and geological formation, 5 radioactive geochemical provinces and 8 radioactive geochemical differentiation regions could be marked out. The working area contains three hydrogeological fold belts and two hydrogeological artesian basins. It could also be divided into 9 metallogenetic provinces or 30 metallogenetic regions, or 206 ore districts. On the other hand, the area could be divided into 2 uranium metallogenetic provinces, 2 potential uranium metallogenetic provinces and 3 uraniferous provinces, which contain uranium properties or potential uranium properties or uraniferous properties. The authors systematically summary the geological environment and indicators of prospecting and predicting of fluorine-molybdenum-uranium formation, hydromorphic uranium deposit formation and poly-genetic uranium deposit formation which contains uranium-coal model, uranium-asphalt model, uranium-sulfuret model, etc. The metallogenetic potential among Aerdan uranium province, Aoliaokema uranium province, Bulieya-Jiamusi-Xingkai potential uranium province and Xihuote-Alin uranium province are assessed. On this base, the authors delineate 23 uranium metallogenetic prospective areas needing further exploration efforts. 8 uranium metallogenetic prospective areas in China are marked out, which are areas of interest for searching for exogenetic and epigenetic sandstone uranium deposits

  4. Uranium: one utility's outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The perspective of the Arizona Public Service Company (APS) on the uncertainty of uranium as a fuel supply is discussed. After summarizing the history of nuclear power and the uranium industries, a projection is made for the future uranium market. An uncrtain uranium market is attributed to various determining factors that include international politics, production costs, non-commercial government regulation, production-company stability, and questionable levels of uranium sales. APS offers its solutions regarding type of contract, choice of uranium producers, pricing mechanisms, and aids to the industry as a whole. 5 references, 10 figures, 1 table

  5. Uranium: a basic evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All energy sources and technologies, including uranium and the nuclear industry, are needed to provide power. Public misunderstanding of the nature of uranium and how it works as a fuel may jeopardize nuclear energy as a major option. Basic chemical facts about uranium ore and uranium fuel technology are presented. Some of the major policy decisions that must be made include the enrichment, stockpiling, and pricing of uranium. Investigations and lawsuits pertaining to uranium markets are reviewed, and the point is made that oil companies will probably have to divest their non-oil energy activities. Recommendations for nuclear policies that have been made by the General Accounting Office are discussed briefly

  6. Enriching recycled uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reviews the progress of the use of recycled uranium during the period 1985-8. This article was originally presented as a paper at the 1988 Uranium Institute symposium (which was held in London). A description is given of the differences between natural and recycled uranium, and the presence of U236 in recycled uranium. The concept of equivalent reactivity is described, as well as the cost benefit of using recycled uranium. A summary of Urenco tests and trials with reprocessed uranium is given. Enrichment, UF6 conversion and fuel fabrication are also discussed. (U.K.)

  7. Uranium health physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the papers delivered at the Summer School on Uranium Health Physics held in Pretoria on the 14 and 15 April 1980. The following topics were discussed: uranium producton in South Africa; radiation physics; internal dosimetry and radiotoxicity of long-lived uranium isotopes; uranium monitoring; operational experience on uranium monitoring; dosimetry and radiotoxicity of inhaled radon daughters; occupational limits for inhalation of radon-222, radon-220 and their short-lived daughters; radon monitoring techniques; radon daughter dosimeters; operational experience on radon monitoring; and uranium mill tailings management

  8. Bacterial reduction of soluble uranium: the first step of in situ immobilization of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mobility of uranium in groundwater is a problem of considerable magnitude. One approach would be to control the distribution of uranium by converting the water-soluble uranium ion to one that is less soluble. This study focuses on the use of Desulfovibrio gigas, D. baculatus, D. vulgaris, D. desulfuricans, Pseudomonas putida, a denitrifying Pseudomonas strain and mixed cultures from sludge or uranium mill tailing sites for the bioconversion of uranyl, U(VI), to uraninite, U(IV). In general, 82% to 92% of U(VI) was reduced in pure cultures, while 45% to 99% of added uranium was transformed by diverse bacteria present in the groundwater. The oxyanions of selenium and vanadium had little effect on the uranium reduction by bacteria, while arsenic and molybdenum at 1.0 mM inhibited reduction of uranium. The product of uranium metabolism was U collected in needle-like crystals. A model is proposed for in situ bioremediation of uranium in groundwater at uranium mill tailing sites. (author) 4 figs., 5 tabs., 21 refs

  9. Surface complexation modeling of uranium(VI) sorbed onto zirconium oxo-phosphate versus temperature: Thermodynamic and structural approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almazan-Torres, M. G.; Drot, R.; Mercier-Bion, F.; Simoni, E. [Univ Paris 11, CNRS/IN2P3/UMR8608, Inst Phys Nucl, F-91406 Orsay, (France); Catalette, H. [EDF R et D, Dept Mat et Mecan Composants, F-77818 Moret Sur Loing, (France); Den Auwer, C. [CEA Marcoule DEN/DRCP/SCPS, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze, (France)

    2008-07-01

    This work presents an investigation of the interaction mechanisms between uranyl ions and a solid phosphate, the zirconium oxo-phosphate: Zr{sub 2}O(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}. Both thermodynamic and structural points of view are developed. Indeed, prior to any simulation of the retention data, it is necessary to precisely characterize the system under study in order to gain information at a molecular scale. First, the intrinsic surface properties of this synthetic compound have been investigated for different temperatures ranging from 25 to 90 degrees C. Mass and potentiometric titrations show that the surface site density remains constant between 25 and 90 degrees C, while the experimental point of zero charge slightly decreases from 4.8 to 4.5 with an increasing temperature. The potentiometric titration data are simulated, for each temperature, using the constant capacitance model and taking into account two surface sites ( (triple bond)Zr-O and (triple bond)P-O) with a total surface site density equal to 7.0 sites nm{sup -2}. For both reactive sites, the intrinsic protonation constants do not change with the temperature, while the deprotonation ones increase. These results led to the determination of the associated enthalpy and entropy changes according to the Van't Hoff relation. Second, the speciation of U(VI) at the solid/solution interface has been studied using two complementary spectroscopic techniques probing the sorbed uranyl ions: time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRUS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS). The substrate presents two different reactive surface sites against titanium retention, which are constituted by the oxygen atoms of the surface PO{sub 4} groups and the oxygen atoms linked to the zirconium atoms. Two inner-sphere complexes are thus present on the substrate, their relative proportion depending on the pH value of the suspension. The effects of the temperature (25-90 degrees C) on the surrounding uranium were

  10. Surface complexation modeling of uranium(VI) sorbed onto zirconium oxo-phosphate versus temperature: Thermodynamic and structural approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents an investigation of the interaction mechanisms between uranyl ions and a solid phosphate, the zirconium oxo-phosphate: Zr2O(PO4)2. Both thermodynamic and structural points of view are developed. Indeed, prior to any simulation of the retention data, it is necessary to precisely characterize the system under study in order to gain information at a molecular scale. First, the intrinsic surface properties of this synthetic compound have been investigated for different temperatures ranging from 25 to 90 degrees C. Mass and potentiometric titrations show that the surface site density remains constant between 25 and 90 degrees C, while the experimental point of zero charge slightly decreases from 4.8 to 4.5 with an increasing temperature. The potentiometric titration data are simulated, for each temperature, using the constant capacitance model and taking into account two surface sites ( (triple bond)Zr-O and (triple bond)P-O) with a total surface site density equal to 7.0 sites nm-2. For both reactive sites, the intrinsic protonation constants do not change with the temperature, while the deprotonation ones increase. These results led to the determination of the associated enthalpy and entropy changes according to the Van't Hoff relation. Second, the speciation of U(VI) at the solid/solution interface has been studied using two complementary spectroscopic techniques probing the sorbed uranyl ions: time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRUS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS). The substrate presents two different reactive surface sites against titanium retention, which are constituted by the oxygen atoms of the surface PO4 groups and the oxygen atoms linked to the zirconium atoms. Two inner-sphere complexes are thus present on the substrate, their relative proportion depending on the pH value of the suspension. The effects of the temperature (25-90 degrees C) on the surrounding uranium were checked using the TRUS technique. The

  11. Atomistic Model of Uranium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ru-song Li; Bing He; Quan-hu Zhang

    2011-01-01

    The electronic state and potential data of U2 molecules are performed by first principle calculations with B3LYP hybrid exchange-correlation functional,the valence electrons of U atom are treated with the (5s4p3d4f)/[3s3p2d2f] contraction basis sets,and the cores are approximated with the relativistic effective core potential.The results show that the ground electronic state is X9∑g+.The pair potential data are fitted with a Murrell-Sorbie analytical potential function.The U-U embedded atom method (EAM) interatomic potential is determined based on the generalized gradient approximation calculation within the framework of the density functional theory using Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof exchange-correlation functional at the spin-polarized level.The physical properties,such as the cohesive energy,the lattice constant,the bulk modulus,the shear modulus,the sc/fcc relative energy,the hcp/fcc relative energy,the shear modulus and the monovacancy formation energy are used to evaluate the EAM potential parameters.The U-U pair potential determined by the first principle calculations is in agreement with that defined by the EAM potential parameters.The EAM calculated formation energy of the monovacancy in the fcc structure is also found to be in close agreement with DFT calculation.

  12. Uranium: myths and realities the depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium is an element whose name causes worry. The uranium properties are very unknown for people. However the element plays an important roll in the Earth as responsible of numerous natural phenomena, which are vital for life evolution. An example of the low knowledge about uranium has been the Balkan syndrome. A relation between cancers and the use of depleted uranium in ammunition in the Balkan War has been pretended to be established. From the beginning, this hypothesis could have been discarded as it has been confirmed and stated in recent reports of UNEP Commissions who have studied this matter. (Author)

  13. Uranium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The domestic uranium industry is in a state of stagflation. Costs continue to rise while the market for the product remains stagnant. During the last 12 months, curtailments and closures of mines and mills have eliminated over 5000 jobs in the industry, plus many more in those industries that furnish supplies and services. By January 1982, operations at four mills and the mines that furnish them ore will have been terminated. Other closures may follow, depending on cost trends, duration of current contracts, the degree to which mills have been amortized, the feasibility of placing mines on standby, the grade of the ore, and many other factors. Open-pit mines can be placed on standby without much difficulty, other than the possible cost of restoration before all the ore has been removed. There are a few small, dry, underground mines that could be mothballed; however, the major underground producers are wet sandstone mines that in most cases could not be reopened after a prolonged shutdown; mills can be mothballed for several years. Figure 8 shows the location of all the production centers in operation, as well as those that have operated or are on standby. Table 1 lists the same production centers plus those that have been deferred, showing nominal capacity of conventional mills in tons of ore per calendar day, and the industry production rate for those mills as of October 1, 1981

  14. INTRAVAL phase 2, test case 8. Alligator Rivers Natural Analogue - Modelling of uranium transport in the weathered zone at Koongarra (Australia). Progress report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Weerd H; Hassanizadeh SM; Richardson-van der Poel MA; LBG

    1993-01-01

    A study of uranium transport in the Koongarra site of Alligator Rivers Uranium deposit (Australia) is carried out. The analysis of the solid phase uranium concentration measured at various depths provides a useful picture of the dispersion process. Results of this analysis seem to support the hypo

  15. Removal of uranium from uranium plant wastewater using zero-valent iron in an ultrasonic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Libo; Peng, Jinhui; Ma, Aiyuan; Xia, Hong Ying; Guo, Wen Qian; Yu, Xia [Yunnan Provincial Key Laboratory of Intensification Metallurgy, Kunming (China); Hu, Jinming; Yang, Lifeng [Nuclear Group Two Seven Two Uranium Industry Limited Liability Company, Hengyang (China)

    2016-06-15

    Uranium removal from uranium plant wastewater using zero-valent iron in an ultrasonic field was investigated. Batch experiments designed by the response surface methodology (RSM) were conducted to study the effects of pH, ultrasonic reaction time, and dosage of zero-valent iron on uranium removal efficiency. From the experimental data obtained in this work, it was found that the ultrasonic method employing zero-valent iron powder effectively removes uranium from uranium plant wastewater with a uranium concentration of 2,772.23 μg/L. The pH ranges widely from 3 to 7 in the ultrasonic field, and the prediction model obtained by the RSM has good agreement with the experimental results.

  16. Uranium from phosphate ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics are described briefly: the way phosphate fertilizers are made; how uranium is recovered in the phosphate industry; and how to detect covert uranium recovery operations in a phsophate plant

  17. Uranium exploration in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Australia has more low-cost uranium in deposits than any other country, but finding it is not easy. While the price for uranium has been low, little was found but now exploration is starting to increase.

  18. DEPLETED URANIUM TECHNICAL WORK

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Depleted Uranium Technical Work is designed to convey available information and knowledge about depleted uranium to EPA Remedial Project Managers, On-Scene Coordinators, contractors, and other Agency managers involved with the remediation of sites contaminated with this mater...

  19. Uranium mining in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mining of uranium in Australia is criticised in relation to it's environmental impact, economics and effects on mine workers and Aborigines. A brief report is given on each of the operating and proposed uranium mines in Australia

  20. International trade in uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is discussed under the following headings: need for security of uranium supply; pressures on international trade; mechanism of international trade; non-proliferation and uranium trade; means of increasing security of supply. (U.K.)

  1. Brazilian uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimatives of uranium reserves carried out in Figueira, Itataia, Lagoa Real and Espinharas, in Brazil are presented. The samples testing allowed to know geological structures, and the characteristics of uranium mineralization. (M.C.F.)

  2. Uranium in Niger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents government policy in the enhancement of uranium resources, existing mining companies and their productions, exploitation projects and economical outcome related to the uranium mining and auxiliary activities

  3. Assessing the Renal Toxicity of Capstone Depleted Uranium Oxides and Other Uranium Compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary target for uranium toxicity is the kidney. The most frequently used guideline for uranium kidney burdens is the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) value of 3 (micro)g U/g kidney, a value that is based largely upon chronic studies in animals. In the present effort, we have developed a risk model equation to assess potential outcomes of acute uranium exposure. Twenty-seven previously published case studies in which workers were acutely exposed to soluble compounds of uranium (as a result of workplace accidents) were analyzed. Kidney burdens of uranium for these individuals were determined based on uranium in the urine, and correlated with health effects observed over a period of up to 38 years. Based upon the severity of health effects, each individual was assigned a score (- to +++) and then placed into an Effect Group. A discriminant analysis was used to build a model equation to predict the Effect Group based on the amount of uranium in the kidneys. The model equation was able to predict the Effect Group with 85% accuracy. The risk model was used to predict the Effect Group for Soldiers exposed to DU as a result of friendly fire incidents during the 1991 Gulf War. This model equation can also be used to predict the Effect Group of new cases in which acute exposures to uranium have occurred

  4. Radiation damage of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Study of radiation damage covered the following: Kinetics of electric resistance of uranium and uranium alloy with 1% of molybdenum dependent on the second phase and burnup rate; Study of gas precipitation and diffusion of bubbles by transmission electron microscopy; Numerical analysis of the influence of defects distribution and concentration on the rare gas precipitation in uranium; study of thermal sedimentation of uranium alloy with molybdenum; diffusion of rare gas in metal by gas chromatography method

  5. Governing uranium in China

    OpenAIRE

    Patton Schell, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear power is playing an increasingly prominent role in China's long-term strategic energy calculus. In response, China is responding by producing more uranium domestically, buying more uranium on the international market, and investing heavily in overseas uranium properties. At the same time, China has been updating its nuclear regulations over the last three decades, resulting in a myriad of regulatory agencies with widely varying responsibilities related to implementing uranium regulati...

  6. Uranium in fossil bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt has been made to determine the uranium content and thus the age of certain fossil bones Haritalyangarh (Himachal Pradesh), India. The results indicate that bones rich in apatite are also rich in uranium, and that the radioactivity is due to radionuclides in the uranium series. The larger animals apparently have a higher concentration of uranium than the small. The dating of a fossil jaw (elephant) places it in the Pleistocene. (Auth.)

  7. Bicarbonate leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alkaline leach process for extracting uranium from uranium ores is reviewed. This process is dependent on the chemistry of uranium and so is independent on the type of mining system (conventional, heap or in-situ) used. Particular reference is made to the geochemical conditions at Crownpoint. Some supporting data from studies using alkaline leach for remediation of uranium-contaminated sites is presented

  8. Uranium mining: Saskatchewan status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper gives the status of uranium mining by Areva in Saskatchewan. Uranium production now meets 85% of world demand for power generation. 80% of world production of uranium comes from top 5 countries: Kazakhstan, Canada, Australia, Niger and Namibia. Saskatchewan is currently the only Canadian province with active uranium mines and mills and the largest exploration programs. Several mine projects are going through the environmental assessment process. Public opinion is in favour of mining activities in Saskatchewan.

  9. Uranium resources, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The specific character of uranium as energy resources, the history of development of uranium resources, the production and reserve of uranium in the world, the prospect regarding the demand and supply of uranium, Japanese activity of exploring uranium resources in foreign countries and the state of development of uranium resources in various countries are reported. The formation of uranium deposits, the classification of uranium deposits and the reserve quantity of each type are described. As the geological environment of uranium deposits, there are six types, that is, quartz medium gravel conglomerate deposit, the deposit related to the unconformity in Proterozoic era, the dissemination type magma deposit, pegmatite deposit and contact deposit in igneaus rocks and metamorphic rocks, vein deposit, sandstone type deposit and the other types of deposit. The main features of respective types are explained. The most important uranium resources in Japan are those in the Tertiary formations, and most of the found reserve belongs to this type. The geological features, the state of yield and the scale of the deposits in Ningyotoge, Tono and Kanmon Mesozoic formation are reported. Uranium minerals, the promising districts in the world, and the matters related to the exploration and mining of uranium are described. (Kako, I.)

  10. Uranium and thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present article is devoted to uranium and thorium content in fluorite. In order to obtain the comprehensive view on uranium and thorium distribution in fluorite 100 fluorite samples of various geologic deposits and ores of Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan and some geologic deposits of Russia were studied. The uranium and thorium content in fluorite of geologic deposits of various mineralogical and genetic type was defined.

  11. Acidic aqueous uranium electrodeposition for target fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct irradiation of targets inside nuclear research or multiple purpose reactors is a common route to produce 99Mo-99mTc radioisotopes. The electroplating of low enriched uranium over nickel substrate might be a potential alternative to produce targets of 235U. The electrochemistry of uranium at low temperature might be beneficial for an alternative route to produce 99Mo irradiation LEU targets. Electrodeposition of uranium can be made using ionic and aqueous solutions producing uranium oxide deposits. The performance of uranium electrodeposition is relatively low because a big competition with H2 evolution happens inside the window of electrochemical reduction potential. This work explores possibilities of electroplating uranium as UO22+ (Uranium-VI) in order to achieve electroplating uranium in a sufficient amount to be commercially irradiated in the future Brazilian RMB reactor. Electroplated nickel substrate was followed by cathodic current electrodeposition from aqueous UO2(NO3)2 solution. EIS tests and modeling showed that a film formed differently in the three tested cathodic potentials. At the lower level, (-1.8V) there was an indication of a double film formation, one overlaying the other with ionic mass diffusion impaired at the interface with nickel substrate as showed by the relatively lower admittance of Warburg component. (author)

  12. Combined Estimation of Hydrogeologic Conceptual Model, Parameter, and Scenario Uncertainty with Application to Uranium Transport at the Hanford Site 300 Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Philip D.; Ye, Ming; Rockhold, Mark L.; Neuman, Shlomo P.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2007-07-30

    This report to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) describes the development and application of a methodology to systematically and quantitatively assess predictive uncertainty in groundwater flow and transport modeling that considers the combined impact of hydrogeologic uncertainties associated with the conceptual-mathematical basis of a model, model parameters, and the scenario to which the model is applied. The methodology is based on a n extension of a Maximum Likelihood implementation of Bayesian Model Averaging. Model uncertainty is represented by postulating a discrete set of alternative conceptual models for a site with associated prior model probabilities that reflect a belief about the relative plausibility of each model based on its apparent consistency with available knowledge and data. Posterior model probabilities are computed and parameter uncertainty is estimated by calibrating each model to observed system behavior; prior parameter estimates are optionally included. Scenario uncertainty is represented as a discrete set of alternative future conditions affecting boundary conditions, source/sink terms, or other aspects of the models, with associated prior scenario probabilities. A joint assessment of uncertainty results from combining model predictions computed under each scenario using as weight the posterior model and prior scenario probabilities. The uncertainty methodology was applied to modeling of groundwater flow and uranium transport at the Hanford Site 300 Area. Eight alternative models representing uncertainty in the hydrogeologic and geochemical properties as well as the temporal variability were considered. Two scenarios represent alternative future behavior of the Columbia River adjacent to the site were considered. The scenario alternatives were implemented in the models through the boundary conditions. Results demonstrate the feasibility of applying a comprehensive uncertainty assessment to large-scale, detailed groundwater flow

  13. Dissolution of sludges containing uranium dioxide and metallic uranium in nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dissolution in nitric acid of sludges containing uranium oxide and uranium has been modeled. That study has shown that it was necessary to continuously feed the dissolver to have an appropriate control of the reaction. If a unique procedure is deemed preferable, NH03 6M has been used

  14. Effective use of uranium resources in light water reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have proposed an idea of recycling uranium recovered from spent fuels of light water reactors (LWRs), where the recovered uranium is to be re-enriched by a centrifuge cascade conventionally treating natural uranium. The idea is of making it possible to reuse the fuels reproduced in a multi-cycle of re-enrichment. The uranium recycle not only economizes on uranium resources but also gets rid of accumulation of spent fuel masses. In this work, we consider additional processes for effective use of uranium, which are of re-enriching the depleted uranium. The still-more-depleted uranium is advantageous as the matrix of MOX fuels used in LWRs for the purpose of surplus plutonium disposition, because a decrease of 235U in MOX fuel is made up by increasing a dose of plutonium. However, the depleted uranium derived from the cascade enriching the recovered uranium issues a little troublesome problem of 236U concerning its existence and deliveries to the product and the waste. We made a work to investigate the burn-up performance of these remade uranium fuels in model reactors of 1.1GWe-grade PWR and the mass balance in fuel recycles. The results suggest a strategy of effective use of uranium resources in the LWR system. (author)

  15. A modelling exercise on the importance of ternary alkaline earth carbonate species of uranium(VI) in the inorganic speciation of natural waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The U(VI) speciation in natural waters has been modelled through a modelling exercise. • The results evidence the importance of alkaline earth U(VI) carbonate complexes. • Possible solubility-controlling phases were reported and discussed. • The differences were related to the choice and reliability of thermodynamic data. • Databases need to be improved for reliable U(VI) speciation calculations. - Abstract: Predictive modelling of uranium speciation in natural waters can be achieved using equilibrium thermodynamic data and adequate speciation software. The reliability of such calculations is highly dependent on the equilibrium reactions that are considered as entry data, and the values chosen for the equilibrium constants. The working group “Speciation” of the CETAMA (Analytical methods establishment committee of the French Atomic Energy commission, CEA) has organized a modelling exercise, including four participants, in order to compare modellers’ selections of data and test thermodynamic data bases regarding the calculation of U(VI) inorganic speciation. Six different compositions of model waters were chosen so that to check the importance of ternary alkaline earth carbonate species of U(VI) on the aqueous speciation, and the possible uranium solid phases as solubility-limiting phases. The comparison of the results from the participants suggests (i) that it would be highly valuable for end-users to review thermodynamic constants of ternary carbonate species of U(VI) in a consistent way and implement them in available speciation data bases, and (ii) stresses the necessary care when using data bases to avoid biases and possible erroneous calculations

  16. Model for the behaviour of thorium and uranium fuels at pelletization; Modelo para o comportamento de microesferas combustiveis de torio e uranio na peletizacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira Neto, Ricardo Alberto

    2000-11-15

    In this work, a model for the behaviour of thorium-uranium-mixed oxide microspheres in the pelletizing process is presented. This model was developed in a program whose objective was to demonstrate the viability of producing fissile material through the utilization of thorium in pressurized water reactors. This is important because it allows the saving of the strategic uranium reserves, and makes it possible the nuclear utilization of the large brazilian thorium reserves. The objective was to develop a model for optimizing physical properties of the microspheres, such as density, fracture strength and specific surface, so as to produce fuel pellets with microstructure, density, open porosity and impurity content, in accordance with the fuel specification. And, therefore, to adjust the sol-gel processing parameters in order to obtain these properties, and produce pellets with an optimized microstructure, adequate to a stable behaviour under irradiation. The model made it clear that to achieve this objective, it is necessary to produce microspheres with density and specific surface as small as possible. By changing the sol-gel processing parameters, microspheres with the desired properties were produced, and the model was experimentally verified by manufacturing fuel pellets with optimized microstructures, density, open porosity and impurity content, meeting the specifications for this new nuclear fuel for pressurized water reactors. Furthermore it was possible to obtain mathematical expressions that enables to calculate from the microspheres properties and the utilized compaction pressure, the sinter density that will be obtained in the sintered pellet and the necessary compaction pressure to reach the sintered density specified for the fuel. (author)

  17. Monte Carlo modelling for the in vivo lung monitoring of enriched uranium: Results of an international comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to assess the reliability of Monte Carlo (MC)-based numerical calibration of in vivo counting systems the EURADOS network supported a comparison of MC simulation of well-defined experiments. This action also provided training for the use of voxel phantoms. In vivo measurements of enriched uranium in a thoracic phantom have been carried out and the needed information to simulate these measurements was distributed to 17 participants. About half of the participants managed to simulate the measured counting efficiency without support from the organisers. Following additional support all participants managed to simulate the counting efficiencies within a typical agreement of ±5% with experiment.

  18. Application of a catchment evolution model to the prediction of long-term erosion on the spoil heap at Ranger uranium mine. Supervising Scientist report 132

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a need to assess the long-term stability of engineered landforms associated with the rehabilitation of Ranger Uranium Mine, Northern Territory, Australia, as it is a requirement that mill tailings must be contained for periods in excess of 1000 years. The geomorphic model, SIBERIA, is calibrated on hydrology and erosion data collected by a combination of monitoring and rainfall simulation experiments on the waste rock dumps of Ranger. Preliminary analysis of Ranger's preferred above-grade and below-grade rehabilitation options suggests that erosion of the order of 7-8 m will occur on the structure in a period of 1000 years. This depth of erosion may be sufficient to compromise the integrity of the containment. It is shown that SIBERIA has significant advantages over steady-state erosion models. Suggestions are made for the design that will enhance the stability of the structure and extend the structural life of the containment

  19. Biogeochemistry of uranium minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cyclic behaviour in the earth's crust is probably easier to demonstrate for uranium than for most elements. The chenmical basis of that behaviour is described with the roles which organisms can play during their life and as organic residues - after their death. The way in which this behaviour has led to the redistribution of uranium in rocks (to form ore bodies in favourable cases) is considered together with the related topic of biogeochemical prospecting for uranium. Many of the same considerations are relevant to the recovery of uranium by leaching from broken rock and to the way in which the cycling of uranium may affect the environment. (Auth.)

  20. Uranium speciation in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed knowledge of the nature of uranium complexes formed after the uptake by plants is an essential prerequisite to describe the migration behavior of uranium in the environment. This study focuses on the determination of uranium speciation after uptake of uranium by lupine plants. For the first time, time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy were used to determine the chemical speciation of uranium in plants. Differences were detected between the uranium speciation in the initial solution (hydroponic solution and pore water of soil) and inside the lupine plants. The oxidation state of uranium did not change and remained hexavalent after it was taken up by the lupine plants. The chemical speciation of uranium was identical in the roots, shoot axis, and leaves and was independent of the uranium speciation in the uptake solution. The results indicate that the uranium is predominantly bound as uranyl(VI) phosphate to the phosphoryl groups. Dandelions and lamb's lettuce showed uranium speciation identical to lupine plants. (orig.)

  1. Mathematical model for the assessment of the behaviour of the contaminants from an uranium mill tailing (application to the BIOMOVS UMT scenario)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental contamination from surface repositories (ECOSR) is a time dependent, multi compartmental model. Initially, it was developed for the BIOMOVS II Uranium Mill Tailing exercise. A sector averaged Gaussian plume atmospheric dispersion model was used, with a single vertical point source. Plume depletion (by wet and dry deposition), radioactive decay and in-growth of daughter products during transport were considered. ECOSR 2.01 uses a 1D non-steady-state groundwater transport model, a finite element hydrodynamic numerical model using 1D advection, 1D dispersion, retention and radioactive decay. Solid and liquid phase are assumed in equilibrium, soil concentration are calculated through the distribution factor Kd. The distribution factor should be variable in time and space. Variations of the contamination of surface, agricultural soil are given by atmospheric deposition, irrigation with contaminated water (which will infiltrate to groundwater), and radioactive decay. The river and lake were modeled by non-steady state finite model incorporating dilution, sedimentation, diffusion and advection. Contamination of vegetation and animals is modeled by a simple steady state model using distribution coefficients. External and internal (air, contaminated food and drinking water) irradiation of the critical group are assessed by NRPB dose conversion factors

  2. Complex approach to modelling of evolution of multi-recycled uranium isotope composition in closed fuel cycle of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiated uranium fuel contains more then 90% of uranium, but at the present time the level of nuclear science and technology makes us mostly to postpone the using of recycling uranium up to far future or not at all. Only small number of states has the experience in using of recycling uranium and this experience is limited to one recycle. At the same time multiple recycling decreases the need in uranium mining and improves the utilization of uranium resources. Calculations result that in VVER-1000 irradiated fuel residual 235U concentration remains more than in natural uranium up to burnup level ∝ 60 MW.day/kg of heavy metals (h.m.). Utilization of reprocessed uranium as a source is more complicated due to 232U and 236U isotopes presenting in irradiated fuel. Some other uranium isotopes effect on the fuel reprocessing and fabrication is significantly less. 232U effect on neutron physical parameters is negligible due to very small concentration in reprocessed uranium. However introduction of this isotope may lead to an increase radiation dose rate to personnel because the hard gamma rays from its decay daughters. To limit this dose rate at the fuel fabrication plant 232U concentration in reprocessed uranium was restricted at the level 2.10-7 wt. %. Taking into account the enhanced technologies of fuel pin fabrication this restriction can become softer. 236U is a parasitic neutron absorber and to compensate this effect fuel with recycled uranium must be enriched more than that free from 236U. 234U concentration in reprocessed uranium is relatively small in comparison with 236U and need not compensation, but in the future this option can become necessary. (orig.)

  3. 31 CFR 540.317 - Uranium feed; natural uranium feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Uranium feed; natural uranium feed... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.317 Uranium feed; natural uranium feed....

  4. Uranium recovery from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present publication describes the development work of a process to recover uranium from seawater and the proposition of a commercial demonstration plant. The essential components of this process are verified in the laboratory scale as well as in some field tests. A detailed engineering design for a model plant in a semi-technical scale to allow field tests in the marine environment is also presented. These field tests are expected to produce more realistic data on the technical and economical feasibility of the proposed technology. Production cost estimates based on state-of-the-art technology lie around 250 Dollar/1b U3O8. However, the effect of a corresponding uranium price increase on electricity costs are comparable to cost increases in coal operated power plants caused by the desulfurisation of coal. Further reductions of the production costs in the range below 150 Dollar/1b U3O8 seem possible through special research efforts in the area of sorber development and concept design. (orig.)

  5. Spectroscopy and chemistry of uranium IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different fundamental research papers on uranium IV are presented, some were never edited. Molecular spectroscopy was used for identification and structural study of uranium IV in aqueous or organic solutions. The fields studied are: coordination, stereochemistry, electronic structure and chemical properties. For interpretation of results some studies were made with solid compounds or with thorium compounds or thorium complexes. Knowledge of actinides chemistry is improved, uranium and thorium being models for 5 f ions, extractive chemistry is better understood and new applications are possible

  6. A new opportunity for Australian uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study analyses the outlook for the world uranium industry and includes projections of uranium demand, supply and prices over the next decade and a comparison with other forecasts. The potential increases in Australian output are quantified, under both continuation of the three mine policy and an open mine policy, as well as the potential impact on the world uranium market, using the well known ORANI model of the Australian economy. It is estimated that Australian output could almost double by 2004 if the three mine policy were abolished. 53 refs., 20 tabs., 6 figs

  7. Rupture of Model 48Y UF6 cylinder and release of uranium hexafluoride, Sequoyah Fuels Facility, Gore, Oklahoma, January 4, 1986. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At 11:30 a.m. on January 4, 1986, a Model 48Y UF6 cylinder filled with uranium hexafluoride (UF6) ruptured while it was being heated in a steam chest at the Sequoyah Fuels Conversion Facility near Gore, Oklahoma. One worker died because he inhaled hydrogen fluoride fumes, a reaction product of UF6 and airborne moisture. Several other workers were injured by the fumes, but none seriously. Much of the facility complex and some offsite areas to the south were contaminated with hydrogen fluoride and a second reaction product, uranyl fluoride. The interval of release was approximately 40 minutes. The cylinder, which had been overfilled, ruptured while it was being heated because of the expansion of UF6 as it changed from the solid to the liquid phase. The maximum safe capacity for the cylinder is 27,560 pounds of product. Evidence indicates that it was filled with an amount exceeding this limit. 18 figs

  8. Assembly and Irradiation Modeling of Residual Stresses in Low-Enriched Uranium Foil-Based Annular Targets for Molybdenum-99 Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srisharan G. Govindarajan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers a composite cylindrical structure, with low-enriched uranium (LEU foil enclosed between two aluminum 6061-T6 cylinders. A recess is cut all around the outer circumference of the inner tube to accommodate the LEU foil of open-cross section. To obtain perfect contact at the interfaces of the foil and the tubes, an internal pressure is applied to the inner tube, thereby plastically and elastically deforming it. The residual stresses resulting from the assembly process are used along with a thermal stress model to predict the stress margins in the cladding during irradiation. The whole process was simulated as a steady-state two-dimensional problem using the commercial finite element code Abaqus FEA. The irradiation behavior of the annular target has been presented, and the effect of the assembly residual stresses has been discussed.

  9. The geology and mineralogy of the uranium occurrence at Hoehensteinweg near Poppenreuth (NE Bavaria) - a model of its mode of formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uranium mineralization consists of U oxides, U titanates, U silicates and secondary U minerals, arranged roughly in order of crystallization. These ores are associated with muscovite, chlorite and smectite. The non-uranium mineralization consists of scheelite, arsenopyrite, native gold, pyrite/chalcopyrite, Bi/Pb-selenides, sulphides and iron sulphides. Scheelite only occurs in the outermost part of the granite (e.g. at Tirschenreuth). Isotope disequilibria show that further redeposition of uranium minerals probably took place in joints and alteration zones in recent or sub-recent times. The uranium mineralization is, on the basis of its geological setting, comparable with the Spanish deposits of Iberian type. (orig./HP)

  10. Aqueous uranium concentrations in the natural environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Published geochemical data from groundwater and surface water throughout the world has been compiled in order to compare the concentration of naturally occurring dissolved uranium to lithology, sampling depth, pH, Eh, HCO3, SO4 and PO4 concentrations. The sole criterion used for the selection of data from the review articles was that each article contain raw data on naturally occurring uranium concentrations relative to other groundwater chemical components. A total of 1286 chemical data entries were used in the statistical comparisons. Although this database is not exhaustive, it is likely that the ranges of uranium concentrations in the data set are representative of the ranges occurring in nature. Finally, the observed uranium concentration distributions were compared with published results of model calculations and of used nuclear fuel leach tests. Models tend to predict a wider range of concentrations than observed (particularly the high values), and the leach test concentrations tend to fall within the upper half of the observations

  11. The uranium cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In identifying uranium provinces, and, more importantly, mineralized zones within these provinces, it is of paramount importance to attempt to trace the geochemical behaviour of an element through all stages of Earth's evolution. Aspects that need to be addressed in this regard include solar abundance levels and fractionation processes during accretion, changing patterns of crustal evolution, effects of an evolving atmosphere, and the weathering cycle. Abundance patterns and partition coefficients of some of the siderophile elements in mantle rocks lend support to a multistage accretionary process. Lack of a terrestrial record in the first 500 Ma necessitates that lunar models be invoked, which suggests that early fractionation of a mafic/ultramafic magma resulted in an anorthositic crust. Fractionation of the mantle and transfer of materials to the upper levels must be central to any model invoked for development of the crust. Given high heat flow conditions in the early Archaean it would seem inescapable that the process of sea floor spreading and plate tectonics was an ongoing process. If the plate tectonic model is taken back to 3500 Ma, and assuming current speading rates, then about half of the mantle has passed through the irreversible differentiation cycle. Arguments in support of recycled material must be balanced against mantle metasomatism effects. With the associated advent of partial melting of the mantle material a partitioning of minor and trace elements into the melt fraction would take place. The early primitive mafic and ultramafic komatiites exemplify this feature by concentrating U and Th by a factor of 5 compared to chondritic abundances. It is of tantamount importance to understand the generation of the magmas in order to predict which are the 'fertile' bodies in terms of radioelement concentrations. In that the granitoid magmas image their source compositions, the association of high radioelements will primarily be source-dependent. Uranium

  12. Microbial interactions with uranium: implications for uranium bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accidental release of uranium into the environment has the potential of inducing chemical and radiological toxicity. In situ bioremediation of uranium by microbial processes has been shown to be effective for immobilizing uranium in contaminated sites. Such microbial processes are important components of biogeochemical cycles and regulate the mobility and fate of uranium in the environment. This talk focuses on the spectrum of mechanisms displayed by various microorganisms in order to alleviate uranium toxicity which forms the basis of uranium bioremediation. (author)

  13. Uranium enrichment. Principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium enrichment industry is a more than 60 years old history and has developed without practically no cost, efficiency or profit constraints. However, remarkable improvements have been accomplished since the Second World War and have led to the development of various competing processes which reflect the diversity of uranium compositions and of uranium needs. Content: 1 - general considerations: uranium isotopes, problem of uranium enrichment, first realizations (USA, Russia, Europe, Asia, other countries), present day situation, future needs and market evolution; 2 - principles of isotopic separation: processes classification (high or low enrichment), low elementary enrichment processes, equilibrium time, cascade star-up and monitoring, multi-isotopes case, uranium reprocessing; 3 - enrichment and proliferation. (J.S.)

  14. Uranium Newsletter. No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new Uranium Newsletter is presented as an IAEA annual newsletter. The organization of the IAEA and its involvement with uranium since its founding in 1957 is described. The ''Red Book'' (Uranium Resources, Production and Demand) is mentioned. The Technical Assistance Programme of the IAEA in this field is also briefly mentioned. The contents also include information on the following meetings: The Technical Committee Meeting on Uranium Deposits in Magmatic and Metamorphic Rocks, Advisory Group Meeting on the Use of Airborne Radiometric Data, and the Technical Committee Meeting on Metallogenesis. Recent publications are listed. Current research contracts in uranium exploration are mentioned. IAEA publications on uranium (in press) are listed also. Country reports from the following countries are included: Australia, Brazil, Canada, China (People's Republic of), Denmark, Finland, Germany (Federal Republic of), Malaysia, Philippines, Portugal, South Africa (Republic of), Spain, Syrian Arab Republic, United Kingdom, United States of America, Zambia, and Greece. There is also a report from the Commission of European Communities

  15. Uses of depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The depleted uranium is that in which percentage of uranium-235 fission executable is less than 0.2% or 0.3%. It is usually caused by the process of reprocessing the nuclear fuel burning, and also mixed with some other radioactive elements such as uranium 236, 238 and plutonium 239. The good features of the depleted uranium are its high density, low price and easily mined. So, the specifications for depleted uranium make it one of the best materials in case you need to have objects small in size, but quite heavy regarding its size. Uses of deplet ed uranium were relatively increased in domestic industrial uses as well as some uses in nuclear industry in the last few years. So it has increased uses in many areas of military and peaceful means such as: in balancing the giant air crafts, ships and missiles and in the manufacture of some types of concrete with severe hardness. (author)

  16. Uranium purchases report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data reported by domestic nuclear utility companies in their responses to the 1991 and 1992 ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey,'' Form EIA-858, Schedule B ''Uranium Marketing Activities,are provided in response to the requirements in the Energy Policy Act 1992. Data on utility uranium purchases and imports are shown on Table 1. Utility enrichment feed deliveries and secondary market acquisitions of uranium equivalent of US DOE separative work units are shown on Table 2. Appendix A contains a listing of firms that sold uranium to US utilities during 1992 under new domestic purchase contracts. Appendix B contains a similar listing of firms that sold uranium to US utilities during 1992 under new import purchase contracts. Appendix C contains an explanation of Form EIA-858 survey methodologies with emphasis on the processing of Schedule B data

  17. Geochemical exploration for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Technical Report is designed mainly to introduce the methods and techniques of uranium geochemical exploration to exploration geologists who may not have had experience with geochemical exploration methods in their uranium programmes. The methods presented have been widely used in the uranium exploration industry for more than two decades. The intention has not been to produce an exhaustive, detailed manual, although detailed instructions are given for a field and laboratory data recording scheme and a satisfactory analytical method for the geochemical determination of uranium. Rather, the intention has been to introduce the concepts and methods of uranium exploration geochemistry in sufficient detail to guide the user in their effective use. Readers are advised to consult general references on geochemical exploration to increase their understanding of geochemical techniques for uranium

  18. Uranium: A Dentist's perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Toor, R. S. S.; Brar, G S

    2012-01-01

    Uranium is a naturally occurring radionuclide found in granite and other mineral deposits. In its natural state, it consists of three isotopes (U-234, U-235 and U-238). On an average, 1% – 2% of ingested uranium is absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract in adults. The absorbed uranium rapidly enters the bloodstream and forms a diffusible ionic uranyl hydrogen carbonate complex (UO2HCO3+) which is in equilibrium with a nondiffusible uranyl albumin complex. In the skeleton, the uranyl ion repla...

  19. Uranium in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1974 the Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources (EMR) established a Uranium Resource Appraisal Group (URAG) within EMR to audit annually Canada's uranium resources for the purpose of implementing the federal government's uranium export policy. A major objective of this policy was to ensure that Canadian uranium supplies would be sufficient to meet the needs of Canada's nuclear power program. As projections of installed nuclear power growth in Canada over the long term have been successively revised downwards (the concern about domestic security of supply is less relevant now than it was 10 years ago) and as Canadian uranium supply capabilities have expanded significantly. Canada has maintained its status as the western world's leading exporter of uranium and has become the world's leading producer. Domestic uranium resource estimates have increased to 551 000 tonnes U recoverable from mineable ore since URAG completed its last formal assessment (1982). In 1984, Canada's five primary uranium producers employed some 5800 people at their mining and milling operations, and produced concentrates containing some 11 170 tU. It is evident from URAG's 1984 assessment that Canada's known uranium resources, recoverable at uranium prices of $150/kg U or less, are more than sufficient to meet the 30-year fuelling requirements of those reactors that are either in opertaion now or committed or expected to be in-service by 1995. A substantial portion of Canada's identified uranium resources, recoverable within the same price range, is thus surplus to Canadian needs and available for export. Sales worth close to $1 billion annually are assured. Uranium exploration expenditures in Canada in 1983 and 1984 were an estimated $41 million and $35 million, respectively, down markedly from the $128 million reported for 1980. Exploration drilling and surface development drilling in 1983 and 1984 were reported to be 153 000 m and 197 000 m, respectively, some 85% of which was in

  20. Uranium industry annual, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents data on US uranium raw materials and marketing activities of the domestic uranium industry. It contains aggregated data reported by US companies on the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' (1988), Form EIA-858, and historical data from prior data collections and other pertinent sources. The report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), the independent agency for data collection and analysis with the US Department of Energy

  1. Biogeochemistry of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possible receipt of uranium from poor ores with application of biotechnology and use of microorganisms is presented. A particular attention is paid to mechanisms of bacterium leaching of uranium and to factors that influence the efficiency of this process and also, to tolerance of microorganisms to toxic metals. Processes of uranium biosorption from a sea water by algae, mushrooms and bacteria are also described. 36 refs. (author)

  2. Simulating distinguish enriched uranium from depleted uranium by activation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detecting uranium material is an important work in arms control Active detection is an efficient method for uranium material. The paper focuses on the feasibility that can distinguish the enriched uranium and the depleted uranium by MCNP program. It can distinguish the enriched uranium and the depleted uranium by the curve of relationship between fission rate of uranium material and thickness of moderator.Advantages of 252Cf and 14 MeV neutron sources are discussed in detecting uranium material through calculation. The results show that 252Cf neutron source is better than 14 MeV one. Delayed neutrons are more easily detected than delayed gamma ray at measurement aspect. (authors)

  3. Uranium: biokinetics and toxicity; Biocinetique et toxicite de l'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menetrier, F.; Renaud-Salis, V.; Flury-Herard, A

    2000-07-01

    This report was achieved as a part of a collaboration with the Fuel Cycle Direction. Its aim was to give the state of the art about: the behaviour of uranium in the human organism (biokinetics) after ingestion, its toxicity (mainly renal) and the current regulation about its incorporation. Both in the upstream and in the downstream of the fuel cycle, uranium remains, quantitatively, the first element in the cycle which is, at the present time, temporarily disposed or recycled. Such a considerable quantity of uranium sets the problem of its risk on the health. In the long term, the biosphere may be affected and consequently the public may ingest water or food contaminated with uranium. In this way, radiological and chemical toxicity risk may be activated. This report emphasizes: the necessity of confirming some experimental and epidemiological biokinetic data used or not in the ICRP models. Unsolved questions remain about the gastrointestinal absorption according to chemical form (valency state, mixtures...), mass and individual variations (age, disease) further a chronic ingestion of uranium. It is well established that uranium is mainly deposited in the skeleton and the kidney. But the skeleton kinetics following a chronic ingestion and especially in some diseases has to be more elucidated; the necessity of taking into account uranium at first as a chemical toxic, essentially in the kidney and determining the threshold of functional lesion. In this way, it is important to look for some specific markers; the problem of not considering chemical toxicity of uranium in the texts regulating its incorporation.

  4. CHEMICAL TOXICITY OF URANIUM

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Uranium, occurs naturally in the earth’s crust, is an alpha emitter radioactive element from the actinide group. For this reason, U-235 and U-238, are uranium isotopes with long half lives, have got radiological toxicity. But, for natural-isotopic-composition uranium (NatU), there is greater risk from chemical toxicity than radiological toxicity. When uranium is get into the body with anyway, also its chemical toxicity must be thought. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(3.000): 215-220

  5. Uranium and drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium is provoking public anxiety based on the radioactivity of several isotopes and the connection to nuclear technology. Drinking water contains at the most geogenic uranium in low concentrations that might be interesting in the frame of chemical of toxicology, but not due to radiological impact. The contribution gives an overview on the uranium content in drinking water and health effects for the human population based on animal tests. These experiments indicate a daily tolerable intake of 0.2 microgram per kg body mass. The actual limiting value for uranium in drinking water is 0.3 microgram per kg body mass water (drinking water regulation from 2001).

  6. CHEMICAL TOXICITY OF URANIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sermin Cam

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Uranium, occurs naturally in the earth’s crust, is an alpha emitter radioactive element from the actinide group. For this reason, U-235 and U-238, are uranium isotopes with long half lives, have got radiological toxicity. But, for natural-isotopic-composition uranium (NatU, there is greater risk from chemical toxicity than radiological toxicity. When uranium is get into the body with anyway, also its chemical toxicity must be thought. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(3.000: 215-220

  7. International trade in uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two reports are presented; one has been prepared by the Uranium Institute and is submitted by the United Kingdom delegation, the other by the United States delegation. The report of the Uranium Institute deals with the influence of the government on international trade in uranium. This influence becomes apparent predominantly by export and import restrictions, as well as by price controls. The contribution submitted by the United States is a uranium market trend analysis, with pricing methods and contracting modes as well as the effect of government policies being investigated in the light of recent developments

  8. Phospholyl-uranium complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After having reported a bibliographical study on penta-methylcyclopentadienyl uranium complexes, and a description of the synthesis and radioactivity of uranium (III) and (IV) boron hydrides compounds, this research thesis reports the study of mono and bis-tetramethyl-phospholyl uranium complexes comprising chloride, boron hydride, alkyl and alkoxide ligands. The third part reports the comparison of structures, stabilities and reactions of homologue complexes in penta-methylcyclopentadienyl and tetramethyl-phospholyl series. The last part addresses the synthesis of tris-phospholyl uranium (III) and (IV) complexes.

  9. Uranium production from phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to estimates of the world's uranium consumption, exploitation of most rich sources is expected by the 1980's. Forecasts show that the rate of uranium consumption will increase towards the end of the century. It is therefore desirable to exploit poor sources not yet in use. In the near future, the most reasonable source for developing uranium is phosphate rock. Uranium reserves in phosphates are estimated at a few million tons. Production of uranium from phosphates is as a by-product of phosphate rock processing and phosphoric acid production; it will then be possible to save the costs incurred in crushing and dissolving the rock when calculating uranium production costs. Estimates show that the U.S. wastes about 3,000 tons of uranium per annum in phosphoric acid based fertilisers. Studies have also been carried out in France, Yugoslavia and India. In Israel, during the 1950's, a small plant was operated in Haifa by 'Chemical and Phosphates'. Uranium processes have also been developed by linking with the extraction processes at Arad. Currently there is almost no activity on this subject because there are no large phosphoric acid plants which would enable production to take place on a reasonable scale. Discussions are taking place about the installation of a plant for phosphoric acid production utilising the 'wet process', producing 200 to 250,000 tons P2O5 per annum. It is necessary to combine these facilities with uranium production plant. (author)

  10. Heating uranium alloy billets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data were obtained for the surface heat transfer coefficient of uranium and the alloys of uranium-0.75 wt percent titanium, uranium-6 wt percent niobium, and uranium-7.5 wt percent niobium-2.5 wt percent zirconium. Samples were heated to 8500C in both a molten salt bath and an argon-purged air furnace, then the samples were cooled in air. Surface heat transfer coefficients were calculated from the experimental data for both heating and cooling of the metals. 4 fig, 4 tables

  11. Biosorption of uranium by chemically modified Rhodotorula glutinis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai Jing, E-mail: baijing@impcas.ac.c [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yao Huijun [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Fan Fangli; Lin Maosheng [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang Lina; Ding Huajie; Lei Fuan; Wu Xiaolei [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Li, Xiaofei [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Guo Junsheng; Qin Zhi [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2010-11-15

    The present paper reports the biosorption of uranium onto chemically modified yeast cells, Rhodotorula glutinis, in order to study the role played by various functional groups in the cell wall. Esterification of the carboxyl groups and methylation of the amino groups present in the cells were carried out by methanol and formaldehyde treatment, respectively. The uranium sorption capacity increased 31% for the methanol-treated biomass and 11% for the formaldehyde-treated biomass at an initial uranium concentration of 140 mg/L. The enhancement of uranium sorption capacity was investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analysis, with amino and carboxyl groups were determined to be the important functional groups involved in uranium binding. The biosorption isotherms of uranium onto the raw and chemically modified biomass were also investigated with varying uranium concentrations. Langmuir and Freundlich models were well able to explain the sorption equilibrium data with satisfactory correlation coefficients higher than 0.9. -- Research highlights: {yields} Uranium biosorption on to chemically modified yeast cells {yields} Cells before and after uranium sorption were investigate by FTIR spectroscopy {yields} Amino and carboxyl groups were important functional groups involved in uranium binding {yields} The sorption equilibrium date of raw and chemically modified biomass fitted well with Langmuir and Freundlich models

  12. Identifying Field-scale Bioremediation Status from Geochemical and Geophysical Data Using Dynamic Linear Models with Switching: Development and Application at a Uranium Contaminated Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Hubbard, S. S.; Williams, K. H.

    2011-12-01

    Many field bioremediation experiments have been carried out at the uranium-contaminated Rifle Integrated Field Research Center (IFRC) site in Rifle, Colorado. The experiments include continuously injecting acetate and bromide for a period of 1~2 months and subsequently collecting multiple geochemical samples from downstream monitoring wells. Surface spectral induced polarization data along several two-dimensional (2D) profiles have also been collected to obtain information on the spatial distribution of biogeochemical transformations induced by bioremediation. The biogeochemical reactions vary over space and time during the contaminated aquifer transitions from iron to sulfate reduction following introduction of the electron donor. Developing methods to identify the onset and distribution of these transitions could improve our ability to assess remediation efficacy and sustainability. In this study, we develop a dynamic linear model with switching to identify bioremediation transitions using time-lapse aqueous geochemical data (such as Fe(II), sulfate, sulfide, acetate, uranium, chloride, and bromide concentrations) and spectral induced polarization data. We consider the multivariate geochemical concentrations as hidden random processes (observed at borehole locations but unknown at other locations) and the time-lapse geophysical data as observations at each location along the 2D profiles. The connection between the geophysical observations and geochemical time-series is determined by design matrices, which vary depending upon redox status. We describe the unknown biogeochemical events as categorical random variables. We take a Bayesian approach to estimate unknown parameters by first assigning suitable priors to the unknowns and then drawing many samples from their joint posterior distribution using Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. The developed approach can provide us a wide range of information on bioremediation for evaluating the effectiveness of

  13. Near resonant propagation of laser pulse in an uranium vapour; Modele de propagation non resonnante de faisceaux laser dans une vapeur atomique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauthier, P.; Godard, A.; Lamare, J. de; Comte, M. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Procedes d' Enrichissement (DCC/DPE/SLCS), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2000-07-01

    The SILVA enrichment process relies on the difference in the excitation frequencies of the electron transitions between uranium isotopes {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U. Light emitted by lasers can be tuned exactly to these frequencies, resulting in the selective excitation and ionization of the target isotope, namely isotope {sup 235}U. Subsequently, ions are separated from the {sup 238}U atoms by an electrical field and received on dedicated collectors Pr. In a SILVA plant, laser beams would have to propagate over a long distance in the work-medium, resulting in possible severe temporal and spatial beam distortions. Such effects may drastically reduce the efficiency of the photo-ionization and hence require close attention. Coupled Maxwell-Schroedinger equations describe changes in the material system as well as the temporal and spatial re-shaping of the laser pulses as they propagate through uranium vapour. This system of equations combines Maxwell's wave equation with Schroedinger quantum-mechanical description of field-matter interaction. However, the method suffers from a serious drawback: in the SILVA conditions, it leads to prohibitive computation times. In this context, this article presents an alternative formulation for the induced atomic polarization of an undamped two-level system obviating the need to solve the Schroedinger equation to describe, the propagation of a laser pulse in a near resonant atomic vapor. The method is based on the use of an intensity dependent index of refraction inferred from a quasi-adiabatic approximation. As an example, the final section of the paper discusses the complex time re-shaping undergone by a 5 ns near resonant (frequency shift D = 6 GHz) laser pulse as it propagates through an optically dense medium (N = 4.1013 at/cm{sup 3}). In this case, the quasi-adiabatic and Schroedinger models are shown to be in fairly good agreement.

  14. Kinetic analysis and modeling of oleate and ethanol stimulated uranium (VI) bio-reduction in contaminated sediments under sulfate reduction conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microcosm tests with uranium contaminated sediments were performed to explore the feasibility of using oleate as a slow-release electron donor for U(VI) reduction in comparison to ethanol. Oleate degradation proceeded more slowly than ethanol with acetate produced as an intermediate for both electron donors under a range of initial sulfate concentrations. A kinetic microbial reduction model was developed and implemented to describe and compare the reduction of sulfate and U(VI) with oleate or ethanol. The reaction path model considers detailed oleate/ethanol degradation and the production and consumption of intermediates, acetate and hydrogen. Although significant assumptions are made, the model tracked the major trend of sulfate and U(VI) reduction and describes the successive production and consumption of acetate, concurrent with microbial reduction of aqueous sulfate and U(VI) species. The model results imply that the overall rate of U(VI) bioreduction is influenced by both the degradation rate of organic substrates and consumption rate of intermediate products.

  15. Uranium industry annual 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U3O8 (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U3O8 (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world's largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U3O8 (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market

  16. Uranium industry annual 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world`s largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market.

  17. A validation study of the intertran model for assessing risks of transportation accidents: Road transport of uranium hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The INTERTRAN code was developed by the IAEA in order to provide member states with a simple and rapide method of assessing the risk involved in the transportation of radioactive materials and one which was applicable on a worldwide scale. Before being used, this code must be validated and the CEA thus compared the results obtained with the conventional risk assessment methods used by the CEPN with those derived from INTERTRAN. This paper gives the results of the studies made on the subject of road transportation of uranium hexafluoride in France. The conventional accident risk assessment method gave a figure of 8.84 x 10-4 deaths/year, whereas INTERTRAN announces 1.78 x 10-2. To these figures should be added 3.38 x 10-2 deaths/year, which is the intrinsic road risk, whatever the goods carried. In relation to conventional estimates, the INTERTRAN forecasts are five times lower for the U risk and twenty times higher for the HF risk. The chemical risk is indeed the most prevalent one in this case. Other comparisons are needed to validate this code

  18. Balance of the uranium market. Contribution to an economic analysis. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The second volume of this thesis on the economic analysis of the uranium market contrains all the technical decriptions concerning reactors and fuel cycle and also detailed results of the two models on uranium supply and demand

  19. Uranium from phosphate ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphate rock, the major raw material for phosphate fertilizers, contains uranium that can be recovered when the rock is processed. This makes it possible to produce uranium in a country that has no uranium ore deposits. The author briefly describes the way that phosphate fertilizers are made, how uranium is recovered in the phosphate industry, and how to detect uranium recovery operations in a phosphate plant. Uranium recovery from the wet-process phosphoric acid involves three unit operations: (1) pretreatment to prepare the acid; (2) solvent extraction to concentrate the uranium; (3) post treatment to insure that the acid returning to the acid plant will not be harmful downstream. There are 3 extractants that are capable of extracting uranium from phosphoric acid. The pyro or OPPA process uses a pyrophosphoric acid that is prepared on site by reacting an organic alcohol (usually capryl alcohol) with phosphorous pentoxide. The DEPA-TOPO process uses a mixture of di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (DEPA) and trioctyl phosphine oxide (TOPO). The components can be bought separately or as a mixture. The OPAP process uses octylphenyl acid phosphate, a commercially available mixture of mono- and dioctylphenyl phosphoric acids. All three extractants are dissolved in kerosene-type diluents for process use

  20. Uranium and Thorium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Warren I.

    1978-01-01

    The results of President Carter's policy on non-proliferation of nuclear weapons are expected to slow the growth rate in energy consumption, put the development of the breeder reactor in question, halt plans to reprocess and recycle uranium and plutonium, and expand facilities to supply enriched uranium. (Author/MA)

  1. Depleted uranium in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, depleted uranium ammunition is regarded as nuclear weapons and meets with fierce opposition. The fact that US Marines mistakenly fired bullets containing depleted uranium on an island off Okinawa during training exercises in December 1995 and January 1996, also contributes. The overall situation in this area in Japan is outlined. (P.A.)

  2. Uranium Measurements and Attributes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It may be necessary to find the means to determine unclassified attributes of uranium in nuclear weapons or their components for future transparency initiatives. We briefly describe the desired characteristics of attribute measurement systems for transparency. The determination of uranium attributes; in particular, by passive gamma-ray detection is a formidable challenge

  3. Australia and uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief justification of the Australian Government's decision to mine and export Australian Uranium is presented along with a description of the Alligator River Region in the Northern Territory where the major mines are to be located. Aboriginal interests and welfare in the region, the proposed Kakadu National Park and the economic benefits resulting from uranium development are also briefly covered. (J.R.)

  4. Rheinbraun's Australian uranium business

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The leaflet argues against the mining activities of the Rheinische Braunkohlenwerke AG in Germany and especially against uranium mining in Australia. The ethno-ecological impact on flora and fauna, aborigines and miners are pointed out. Uranium mining and lignite mining are compared. (HSCH)

  5. World uranium production outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An outlook on the uranium trade (concentrate and hexafluoride) between the Western world and the the former Comecon countries. The flow from East to West is increased. Up to 1998 existing lower-cost reserves appear to supply enough uranium. Later, the supply gap will require greater output from development of known reserves at costs higher than $30/lb. 4 figs., 1 ref

  6. Fermentation and hydrogen metabolism affect uranium reduction by clostridia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Weimin; Francis, Arokiasamy J

    2013-01-01

    Previously, it has been shown that not only is uranium reduction under fermentation condition common among clostridia species, but also the strains differed in the extent of their capability and the pH of the culture significantly affected uranium(VI) reduction. In this study, using HPLC and GC techniques, metabolic properties of those clostridial strains active in uranium reduction under fermentation conditions have been characterized and their effects on capability variance of uranium reduction discussed. Then, the relationship between hydrogen metabolism and uranium reduction has been further explored and the important role played by hydrogenase in uranium(VI) and iron(III) reduction by clostridia demonstrated. When hydrogen was provided as the headspace gas, uranium(VI) reduction occurred in the presence of whole cells of clostridia. This is in contrast to that of nitrogen as the headspace gas. Without clostridia cells, hydrogen alone could not result in uranium(VI) reduction. In alignment with this observation, it was also found that either copper(II) addition or iron depletion in the medium could compromise uranium reduction by clostridia. In the end, a comprehensive model was proposed to explain uranium reduction by clostridia and its relationship to the overall metabolism especially hydrogen (H2) production. PMID:25937978

  7. EPR of uranium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the electron paramagnetic resonance data on the uranium ions is given. After a general account of the electronic structure of the uranium free atoms and ions, the influence of the external fields (magnetic field, crystal fields) is discussed. The main information obtained from EPR studies on the uranium ions in crystals are emphasized: identification of the valence and of the ground electronic state, determination of the structure of the centers, crystal field effects, role of the intermediate coupling and of the J-mixing, role of the covalency, determination of the nuclear spin, maqnetic dipole moment and electric quadrupole moment of the odd isotopes of uranium. These data emphasize the fact that the actinide group has its own identity and this is accutely manifested at the beginning of the 5fsup(n) series encompassed by the uranium ions. (authors)

  8. Foreign uranium supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Known foreign uranium resources are concentrated in a few countries. The resources of many countries are largely unassessed, but the known uranium countries appear to have the best potential for future expansion. Availability of supply from known resources will depend on resolution of national policies regarding uranium production, ownership and export, and actions of the mining industry. Foreign uranium demand projections have decreased markedly in the last few years, and currently planned and attainable production should be adequate through the 1980's. Longer term resources and supply outlook are still a major concern to both those planning electric supply systems based on converter reactors and those considering reprocessing and recycle of uranium and plutonium and development of breeder reactors. Work continues to clarify long-term supply in several countries and internationally, but more effort, and time, will be needed to clarify these issues

  9. Management of depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large stocks of depleted uranium have arisen as a result of enrichment operations, especially in the United States and the Russian Federation. Countries with depleted uranium stocks are interested in assessing strategies for the use and management of depleted uranium. The choice of strategy depends on several factors, including government and business policy, alternative uses available, the economic value of the material, regulatory aspects and disposal options, and international market developments in the nuclear fuel cycle. This report presents the results of a depleted uranium study conducted by an expert group organised jointly by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency. It contains information on current inventories of depleted uranium, potential future arisings, long term management alternatives, peaceful use options and country programmes. In addition, it explores ideas for international collaboration and identifies key issues for governments and policy makers to consider. (authors)

  10. Method of recovering uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium is recovered from a carbonate leach solution containing a dissolved uranium salt and a monovalent ion. The pH of the leach solution is adjusted to about 5 to about 7.5, and preferably to about 6 to about 7. Phosphate ion is then added to typical in-situ leach solutions in an amount from about 10 to about 30 mole % in excess of the amount needed to stoichiometrically react with the uranium in said solution. This results in the precipitation of a compound made up of the monovalent ion, uranium, and the phosphate ion, which is insoluble in the solution. The precipitate is then separated from the solution preferably by means of a centrifuge or a vortex clarifier. It can then be dissolved in acid, and the uranium extracted into an organic solvent such as DEHPA-TOPA in kerosene

  11. Uranium deposit research, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research on uranium deposits in Canada, conducted as a prerequisite for assessment of the Estimated Additional Resources of uranium, revealed that (a) the uranium-gold association in rudites of the Huronian Supergroup preferably occurs in the carbon layers; (b) chloritized ore at the Panel mine, Elliot Lake, Ontario, occurs locally in tectonically disturbed areas in the vicinity of diabase dykes; (c) mineralization in the Black Sturgeon Lake area, Ontario, formed from solutions in structural and lithological traps; (d) the Cigar Lake deposit, Saskatchewan, has two phases of mineralization: monomineralic and polymetallic; (e) mineralization of the JEB (Canoxy Ltd.) deposit is similar to that at McClean Lake; (f) the uranium-carbon assemblage was identified in the Claude deposit, Carswell Structure; and (g) the Otish Mountains area, Quebec, should be considered as a significant uranium-polymetallic metallogenic province

  12. Jabiluka uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Jabiluka uranium and gold deposit located in the Northern Territory of Australia is the world's largest known primary uranium deposits and as such has the potential to become one of the most important uranium projects in the world. Despite the financial and structural challenges facing the major owner Pancontinental Mining Limited and the changing political policies in Australia, Jabiluka is well situated for development during the 1990's. With the availability of numerous financial and development alternatives, Jabiluka could, by the turn of the century, take its rightful place among the first rank of world uranium producers. The paper discusses ownership, location, property rights, licensing, environmental concerns, marketing and development, capital costs, royalties, uranium policy considerations, geologic exploration history, regional and site geology, and mining and milling operations

  13. Migration of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium migration is treated as a process leading to mobilization and concentration of uranium in ore deposits. During the formation of global zonation, uranium migration contributed to the enrichment of this radioactive metal in the Earth's crust. The process of upper mantle and crust fractionation and differentiation is the first cycle of the mobilization process which led to uranium enrichment in rocks in some areas of the upper Earth's crust that could be considered as the primordial uranium provinces. Uranium migration is related to the structural history of sial Earth's crust and sial magmatism. During orogeny conditions could be created for development of progressive metamorphism and for magma generation. The latter is the best process for uranium mobilization. The effectiveness of this process depends on the composition of the primordial rocks and the intensity of the process. The importance of the magmatism for uranium mobilization is due to the magmatic differentiation. Selectively mobilized felsitic parts of the rocks migrate and form felsitic magmatic portions, which mobilize uranium. Solutions are the best uranium mobilization agents. Their generation starts with water separation from local permeable reservoirs and finishes with water dissociation from minerals during their dehydration. Such solutions could be endogenous or exogenous, depending on the igneous or sedimentary rocks which have been deformed. Some of the solutions can have mixed origin, if deformed magmatic rocks contain exogenous water in pores and cracks and endogenous water in minerals. The mobilizing ability of the solutions depends on their energy, which could derive from their chemical compositions and from physical conditions of the geological environment. The movement of the mineralized solutions can be due to steam pressure and the pressure difference between the starting and the final point of the juvenile solutions, gravity for meteoric waters, convection in geoconvection cells

  14. A quantitative Monte Carlo modelling of the uranium and plutonium X-ray fluorescence (XRF) response from a hybrid K-edge/K-XRF densitometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlizov, A.N., E-mail: berlizov@kinr.kiev.u [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Institute for Nuclear Research, 47, Prospekt Nauki, MSP 03680, Kiev (Ukraine); Institute for Transuranium Elements, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Sharikov, D.A., E-mail: sharikov@tpu.r [Institute for Transuranium Elements, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30, Lenin Avenue, 634050, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Ottmar, H., E-mail: herbert.ottmar@t-online.d [Institute for Transuranium Elements, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Eberle, H., E-mail: heinrich.eberle@ec.europa.e [Institute for Transuranium Elements, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Galy, J., E-mail: jean.galy@ec.europa.e [Institute for Transuranium Elements, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Luetzenkirchen, K., E-mail: klaus-richard.luetzenkirchen@ec.europa.e [Institute for Transuranium Elements, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2010-03-21

    A mathematical simulation approach based on the general purpose Monte Carlo N-particle transport code MCNP was developed to predict the response of the XRF branch of the hybrid K-edge/K-XRF densitometer (HKED). The respective MCNP models for two different versions of HKED instruments currently in use were set up and experimentally validated. The setting up of the models involved comprehensive simulations of a bremsstrahlung photon source, the examination of different particle transport models, as well as the examination of different photon attenuation and X-ray fluorescence data libraries. The computation speed was significantly increased through the extensive use of the variance reduction techniques. The models were validated through the series of benchmarking experiments performed with a representative set of uranium, plutonium and mixed U/Pu reference solutions. The models and simulation approach developed are intended for: (i) establishing a consistent mathematical calibration approach for the XRF branch of the HKED instruments, which will require minimum calibration effort and time, (ii) extending the applicability of the HKED method to non-standard samples (e.g. U/Pu mixtures with unusual element ratios) and non-standard sample matrices (e.g. HM matrices from the pyro-processing of irradiated nuclear fuel) without investing a great deal of extra calibration work, and (iii) improving the accuracy of the measurements through the modelling of special measurement effects (e.g. the secondary excitation effect, the interference with X-ray escape peaks, the inconsistent unfolding of the overlapping peaks and peak background delineation in the measured XRF spectrum), which are difficult or sometimes impossible to account for experimentally.

  15. Leukaemia among uranium miners - late effects of exposure to uranium dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with on recent observations among Czech uranium miners by 1999. Results of leukaemia study in a cohort of nearly 10 000 uranium miners based on 29 observed cases show significant association to chronic exposure. The largest contribution is from the uranium dust. Although there are estimates to the red bone marrow, it seems to be more practical to use a model based on modified duration of exposure, where non-hewer exposure are accounted by 50%. The evaluation of leukaemia subtypes is limited by low numbers. More accurate results can be expected in an extended follow-up or by pooling several studies. (authors)

  16. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Oklahoma City Quadrangle, Oklahoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reconnaissance and detailed geologic and radiometric investigations were conducted throughout the Oklahoma City Quadrangle, Oklahoma, to evaluate the uranium favorability using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. Surface and subsurface studies were augmented by data from aerial radiometric surveys, hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance studies, basement-rock computer modeling studies, and Track Etch surveys. The results indicate that there are no environments favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits. Environments considered unfavorable for uranium deposits include beach placers, all sandstones at the surface, limestones, and evaporites. Some shallow subsurface sandstones in the vicinity of faulted oil fields may have important uranium deposits of the type found at Cement, Oklahoma (which is just outside the quadrangle limits). Subsurface phosphatic shales and marine black shales may also have uranium deposits. Environments of these types are unevaluated because of their inaccessibility

  17. Application of water flow and geochemical models to support the remediation of acid rock drainage from the uranium mining site of Pocos de Caldas, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: This paper discusses the use of two numerical models (HYDRUS-2D and STEADQL-v4) for simulating water flow and relevant geochemical processes in one of the waste rock piles of the first uranium mine in Brazil, in order to facilitate the selection of appropriate remediation strategies. The long time scale required for the oxidation of sulfidic wastes (at least 600 years) implies the need to implement permanent remediation actions. The best remediation scheme should depend on the water flow regime inside the waste pile and on the geochemical processes that occur as a result of the interactions between water and the waste (especially oxidative dissolution of pyrite). Accurate modeling of the waste site, which contains a wide range of grain and rock sizes at different degrees of water saturation and is subject to reactive multicomponent transport, entails considerable physical, mathematical and numerical challenges. This paper describes the approach used to obtain a detailed representation of the system involving both unsaturated/ saturated flow (most of the physical properties of the waste were estimated from measured data) and the geochemical network reactions (including equilibrium and kinetics reactions). (authors)

  18. Reaction-Based Reactive Transport Modeling of Iron Reduction and Uranium Immobilization at Area 2 of the NABIR Field Research Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgos, W.D.

    2009-09-02

    This report summarizes research conducted in conjunction with a project entitled “Reaction-Based Reactive Transport Modeling of Iron Reduction and Uranium Immobilization at Area 2 of the NABIR Field Research Center”, which was funded through the Integrative Studies Element of the former NABIR Program (now the Environmental Remediation Sciences Program) within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research. Dr. William Burgos (The Pennsylvania State University) was the overall PI/PD for the project, which included Brian Dempsey (Penn State), Gour-Tsyh (George) Yeh (Central Florida University), and Eric Roden (formerly at The University of Alabama, now at the University of Wisconsin) as separately-funded co-PIs. The project focused on development of a mechanistic understanding and quantitative models of coupled Fe(III)/U(VI) reduction in FRC Area 2 sediments. The work builds on our previous studies of microbial Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, and was directly aligned with the Scheibe et al. ORNL FRC Field Project at Area 2.

  19. Comparison of two numerical modelling approaches to a field experiment of unsaturated radon transport in a covered uranium mill tailings soil (Lavaugrasse, France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uncertainties on the mathematical modelling of radon transport in an unsaturated covered uranium mill tailings (UMT) soil at field scale can have a great impact on the estimation of the average measured radon flux to the atmosphere at the landfill cover, which must be less than the threshold value 0.74 Bq.m-2.s-1recommended by the federal standard (EPA 40 CFR 192). These uncertainties are usually attributed to the numerical errors from the numerical schemes dealing with soil layering and to inadequate representations of the modelling of physical processes at the soil/plant/atmosphere interface and of the soil hydraulic and transport properties, as well as their parameterization. In this work, we compare one-dimensional simulation results from two numerical models of two-phase (water-air) porous media flow and radon transport to the data of radon activity exhalation flux and depth-volumetric concentration measured during a field campaign from June to November of 1999 in a two-layered soil of 1.3 m thickness (i.e., cover material/UMT: 0.5/0.8 m) of an experimental pond located at the Lavaugrasse UMT-landfill site (France). The first numerical modelling approach is a coupled finite volume compositional (i.e., water, radon, air) transport model (TOUGH2/EOS7Rn code, Saadi et al., 2013), while the second one is a decoupled finite difference one-component (i.e., radon) transport model (TRACI code, Ferry et al., 2001). Transient simulations during six month of hourly rainfall and atmospheric pressure variations showed that calculations from the one-component transport model usually overestimate both measured radon exhalation flux and depth-concentration. However, considering the effective unsaturated pore air-component diffusivity to be different from that of the radon-component in the compositional transport model allowed to significantly enhancing the modelling of these radon experimental data. The time-averaged radon flux calculated by EOS7Rn (3.42 Bq.m-2.s-1) was 34

  20. Comparison of two numerical modelling approaches to a field experiment of unsaturated radon transport in a covered uranium mill tailings soil (Lavaugrasse, France).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saâdi, Zakaria; Guillevic, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Uncertainties on the mathematical modelling of radon ((222)Rn) transport in an unsaturated covered uranium mill tailings (UMT) soil at field scale can have a great impact on the estimation of the average measured radon exhalation rate to the atmosphere at the landfill cover. These uncertainties are usually attributed to the numerical errors from numerical schemes dealing with soil layering, and to inadequate modelling of physical processes at the soil/plant/atmosphere interface and of the soil hydraulic and transport properties, as well as their parameterization. In this work, we demonstrate how to quantify these uncertainties by comparing simulation results from two different numerical models to experimental data of radon exhalation rate and activity concentration in the soil-gas measured in a covered UMT-soil near the landfill site Lavaugrasse (France). The first approach is based on the finite volume compositional (i.e., water, radon, air) transport model TOUGH2/EOS7Rn (Transport Of Unsaturated Groundwater and Heat version 2/Equation Of State 7 for Radon; Saâdi et al., 2014), while the second one is based on the finite difference one-component (i.e., radon) transport model TRACI (Transport de RAdon dans la Couche Insaturée; Ferry et al., 2001). Transient simulations during six months of variable rainfall and atmospheric air pressure showed that the model TRACI usually overestimates both measured radon exhalation rate and concentration. However, setting effective unsaturated pore diffusivities of water, radon and air components in soil-liquid and gas to their physical values in the model EOS7Rn, allowed us to enhance significantly the modelling of these experimental data. Since soil evaporation has been neglected, none of these two models was able to simulate the high radon peaks observed during the dry periods of summer. However, on average, the radon exhalation rate calculated by EOS7Rn was 34% less than that was calculated by TRACI, and much closer to the

  1. Uranium rich granite and uranium productive granite in south China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper briefly introduces the differences between uranium rich granite and uranium productive granite in the 5 provinces of South China, and discusses their main characteristics in 4 aspects, the uranium productive granite is highly developed in fracture, very strong in alteration, often occurred as two-mica granite and regularly developed with intermediate-basic and acid dikes. The above characteristics distinguish the uranium productive granite from the uranium rich granite. (authors)

  2. Biosorption of uranium by human black hair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naturally available low cost materials have gained importance as effective alternative to conventional sorbents for the removal of metal ions from water. The present study describes the use of black hair waste as a sorbent for the removal of uranium ions from an aqueous medium. Alkali treatment of the biomass resulted in a significant increase in its uptake capacity. The optimum pH and contact time for uranium removal were 4.5 and 2 h respectively. It was observed that the experimental data fits well in Ho's pseudo-second order kinetic model. Binding of uranium to the biomass was confirmed using FT-IR spectroscopy. Thus, the present study could demonstrate the utility of human black hair to remove uranium from aqueous medium. - Highlights: • First study on the use of black hair as a natural biosorbent for uranium sorption. • Alkali treatment of hair increased the loading capacity of biomass. • Good Kd at low equilibrium uranium concentration was achieved. • A qmax of 62.5 mg g−1 was derived using Langmuir isotherm. • Eco-friendly and cost-effective method for environmental application

  3. The potential evaluation of granite type uranium resources in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the comprehensive analysis of uranium metallogenic characteristics, this paper summarized and generalized the metallogenic regularity and main control factors of granite-type uranium deposit. Through building typical deposit model, dividing prognosis type, extracting information of geology, geophysics, geochemistry and remote sensing, the uranium resources was located and quantitatively evaluated in the prediction area at scale of 1 : 50000 - 1 : 250000, the deploying suggestions has been proposed as focusing the exploration in Taoshan-Zhuguang assessment region, building about 10 granite type mine based and search uranium prospects in East Tibet. (authors)

  4. Re-examining uranium supply and demand: New insights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we derive a simultaneous system of equations which aims at analysing the uranium supply and demand. In addition to reviewing and updating previous studies dealing with the uranium market analysis, in particular , the contribution of the paper lies in putting attention to some questions which are still either controversial or unanswered. They are especially related to the controversial hypothesis of the interdependence between uranium market and other commodities markets, both, with respect to the demand side, i.e. oil and coal markets, and the supply side, i.e. gold market. The paper also casts lights on electricity and uranium price effects on uranium demand as well as on the simultaneous interdependencies that may exist between nuclear consumption and nuclear installed capacity. The model is estimated for three different time periods which takes into account the major events that have influenced the nuclear-uranium development, that is, that have constrained the growth rate of nuclear generating capacity, i.e. oil crisis and nuclear accidents. This permits to show if uranium market reaction is independent or it is correlated with specific events associated with each time periods. The model was estimated by using the 3SLS method that correct for the presence of contemporaneously error terms correlation and for the existence of simultaneity bias in the model. Main results give evidence of significant correlation between uranium price and competing fossil fuel prices. They also point-out that uranium price is significantly correlated with the supply forces where supply is significantly dependent on gold prices. Moreover, results show that the electricity prices have a significant effect on the uranium demand only in the post-1990 period, probably following the worldwide electricity prices increasing trend. Further, our estimations show that uranium demand is significantly correlated with uranium price only in the period of nuclear major expansion. As

  5. Configurational analysis of uranium-doped thorium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, A. E.; Ruiz-Hernandez, S. E.; de Leeuw, N. H.

    2015-04-01

    While thorium dioxide is already used industrially in high temperature applications, more insight is needed about the behaviour of the material as part of a mixed-oxide (MOX) nuclear fuel, incorporating uranium. We have developed a new interatomic potential model, commensurate with a prominent existing UO2 potential, to conduct configurational analyses of uranium-doped ThO2 supercells. Using the GULP and Site Occupancy Disorder (SOD) computational codes, we have analysed the distribution of low concentrations of uranium in the bulk material, but have not observed the formation of uranium clusters or a single dominant configuration.

  6. Re-examining uranium supply and demand. New insights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahouli, Sondes [Universite de Nantes, Laboratoire d' Economie et de Management de Nantes Atlantique (LEMNA), Institut d' Economie et de Management de Nantes - I.A.E., Chemin de la Censive du Tertre - B.P. 52231, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France)

    2011-01-15

    In this paper, we derive a simultaneous system of equations which aims at analysing the uranium supply and demand. In addition to reviewing and updating previous studies dealing with the uranium market analysis, in particular, the contribution of the paper lies in putting attention to some questions which are still either controversial or unanswered. They are especially related to the controversial hypothesis of the interdependence between uranium market and other commodities markets, both, with respect to the demand side, i.e. oil and coal markets, and the supply side, i.e. gold market. The paper also casts lights on electricity and uranium price effects on uranium demand as well as on the simultaneous interdependencies that may exist between nuclear consumption and nuclear installed capacity. The model is estimated for three different time periods which takes into account the major events that have influenced the nuclear-uranium development, that is, that have constrained the growth rate of nuclear generating capacity, i.e. oil crisis and nuclear accidents. This permits to show if uranium market reaction is independent or it is correlated with specific events associated with each time periods. The model was estimated by using the 3SLS method that correct for the presence of contemporaneously error terms correlation and for the existence of simultaneity bias in the model. Main results give evidence of significant correlation between uranium price and competing fossil fuel prices. They also point-out that uranium price is significantly correlated with the supply forces where supply is significantly dependent on gold prices. Moreover, results show that the electricity prices have a significant effect on the uranium demand only in the post-1990 period, probably following the worldwide electricity prices increasing trend. Further, our estimations show that uranium demand is significantly correlated with uranium price only in the period of nuclear major expansion. As

  7. Re-examining uranium supply and demand: New insights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahouli, Sondes, E-mail: sondes.kahouli@univ-nantes.f [Universite de Nantes, Laboratoire d' Economie et de Management de Nantes Atlantique (LEMNA), Institut d' Economie et de Management de Nantes-I.A.E., Chemin de la Censive du Tertre-B.P. 52231, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France)

    2011-01-15

    In this paper, we derive a simultaneous system of equations which aims at analysing the uranium supply and demand. In addition to reviewing and updating previous studies dealing with the uranium market analysis, in particular , the contribution of the paper lies in putting attention to some questions which are still either controversial or unanswered. They are especially related to the controversial hypothesis of the interdependence between uranium market and other commodities markets, both, with respect to the demand side, i.e. oil and coal markets, and the supply side, i.e. gold market. The paper also casts lights on electricity and uranium price effects on uranium demand as well as on the simultaneous interdependencies that may exist between nuclear consumption and nuclear installed capacity. The model is estimated for three different time periods which takes into account the major events that have influenced the nuclear-uranium development, that is, that have constrained the growth rate of nuclear generating capacity, i.e. oil crisis and nuclear accidents. This permits to show if uranium market reaction is independent or it is correlated with specific events associated with each time periods. The model was estimated by using the 3SLS method that correct for the presence of contemporaneously error terms correlation and for the existence of simultaneity bias in the model. Main results give evidence of significant correlation between uranium price and competing fossil fuel prices. They also point-out that uranium price is significantly correlated with the supply forces where supply is significantly dependent on gold prices. Moreover, results show that the electricity prices have a significant effect on the uranium demand only in the post-1990 period, probably following the worldwide electricity prices increasing trend. Further, our estimations show that uranium demand is significantly correlated with uranium price only in the period of nuclear major expansion. As

  8. Carbothermic synthesis of carbides of uranium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partial pressures of carbon monoxide, uranium and plutonium over different phase regions relevant to the carbothermic synthesis of carbides of uranium and plutonium are calculated using recent models and thermodynamic data for the compounds in U-C-O and Pu-C-O systems. The experimental parameters for the preparation of uranium carbides and a two step synthesis involving carbothermic reduction of the oxide to the dicarbide followed by hydrogen stripping of carbon to produce uranium monocarbide are discussed. (author). 31 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs

  9. Study of uranium(VI) and radium(II) sorption at trace level on kaolinite using a multisite ion exchange model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinoso-Maset, Estela; Ly, Jacques

    2016-06-01

    Uranium and the long-lived decay product radium-226 are abundantly present in mine wastes produced during uranium extraction activities. In the case of release to the surrounding environment, these radionuclides are at trace level compared to groundwater solutes, and the presence, content and properties of clay minerals in the host environment influence the extent of radionuclide sorption and, in turn, migration. Since clays are known to have the distinctive property of retaining ions, the aim of this work was to study the sorption of trace U(VI) and Ra(II) on a common phyllosilicate mineral, kaolinite, in the presence of excess K, a common groundwater cation, in order to obtain a thermodynamic database that describes the ion exchange equilibria occurring at the mineral-solution interface. Following a detailed experimental protocol using chemical and radiochemical analytical techniques, batch experiments over a wide pH range (from 2 to 11) and fixed concentration (ca. 10(-9) M), and additional adsorption isotherms at two different solution pH (6.2 and 10.4) over a concentration range (10(-10) to 10(-4) M) were carried out to measure the distribution coefficient (Kd) of U(VI) and Ra(II) sorption on kaolinite. The experimental sorption data was processed according to a general multisite sorbent/multispecies sorbate ion exchange model, which allowed deducing the charge of adsorbed species and the stoichiometry of the associated adsorption equilibria on kaolinite's surface sites. Aqueous speciation calculations predicted Ra(II) as Ra(2+) over the working pH range, and its adsorption curves and isotherms were explained using three sorption sites. Adsorption of U(VI) occurred on four sorption sites and was governed by its solution speciation, with positively charged hydroxylated (UO2(2+) and UO2(OH)(+)) and silicate (UO2(H3SiO4)(+)) species being adsorbed between pH 2 and 6, whereas its negatively charged forms (UO2(OH)3(-) and UO2(OH)4(2-)) dominated U(VI) sorption at

  10. Uranium deposits in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Africa is not only known for its spectacular diamond, gold, copper, chromium, platinum and phosphorus deposits but also for its uranium deposits. At least two uranium provinces can be distinguished - the southern, with the equatorial sub-province; and the south Saharan province. Uranium deposits are distributed either in cratons or in mobile belts, the first of sandstone and quartz-pebble conglomerate type, while those located in mobile belts are predominantly of vein and similar (disseminated) type. Uranium deposits occur within Precambrian rocks or in younger platform sediments, but close to the exposed Precambrian basement. The Proterozoic host rocks consist of sediments, metamorphics or granitoids. In contrast to Phanerozoic continental uranium-bearing sediments, those in the Precambrian are in marginal marine facies but they do contain organic material. The geology of Africa is briefly reviewed with the emphasis on those features which might control the distribution of uranium. The evolution of the African Platform is considered as a progressive reduction of its craton area which has been affected by three major Precambrian tectonic events. A short survey on the geology of known uranium deposits is made. However, some deposits and occurrences for which little published material is available are treated in more detail. (author)

  11. Uranium resource assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this investigation is to examine what is generally known about uranium resources, what is subject to conjecture, how well do the explorers themselves understand the occurrence of uranium, and who are the various participants in the exploration process. From this we hope to reach a better understanding of the quality of uranium resource estimates as well as the nature of the exploration process. The underlying questions will remain unanswered. But given an inability to estimate precisely our uranium resources, how much do we really need to know. To answer this latter question, the various Department of Energy needs for uranium resource estimates are examined. This allows consideration of whether or not given the absence of more complete long-term supply data and the associated problems of uranium deliverability for the electric utility industry, we are now threatened with nuclear power plants eventually standing idle due to an unanticipated lack of fuel for their reactors. Obviously this is of some consequence to the government and energy consuming public. The report is organized into four parts. Section I evaluates the uranium resource data base and the various methodologies of resource assessment. Part II describes the manner in which a private company goes about exploring for uranium and the nature of its internal need for resource information. Part III examines the structure of the industry for the purpose of determining the character of the industry with respect to resource development. Part IV arrives at conclusions about the emerging pattern of industrial behavior with respect to uranium supply and the implications this has for coping with national energy issues

  12. Uranium enrichment capacity: public versus private ownership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continual growth of conventional nuclear capacity requires an assured supply of enriched uranium and, hence, potential expansion of domestic uranium enrichment capacity. The question of ownership of new enrichment capacity, i.e., public or private, entails not only the social-opportunity costs of alternative investments but also technical parameters of uranium utilization and advanced reactor development. Inclusion of risk preferences in both the public and private sectors produces interesting results in terms of optimal investment strategies with respect to choice of technology and scale of investment. Utilization of a nuclear fuel cycle requirements process model allows explicit specification of production technology. Integration of process model output with a least-cost investment model permits flexibility in parametric analysis. Results indicate minimum incentive for Government subsidy of a private enrichment sector through 2000 given moderate to low nuclear growth assumptions. The long-run scenario, to 2020, exhibits potentially greater incentives for private enrichment investment

  13. The uranium in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uranium is a natural element omnipresent in the environment, with a complex chemistry more and more understood. Many studies are always today devoted to this element to better improve the uranium behavior in the environment. To illustrate this knowledge and for the public information the CEA published this paper. It gathers in four chapters: historical aspects and properties of the uranium, the uranium in the environment and the impacts, the metrology of the uranium and its migration. (A.L.B.)

  14. Modeling the mobility of uranium from NORM-rich bedrock using multivariate statistical techniques - The mobility of uranium from U-containing bedrock materials as a function of pH: Implications for tunnel construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to amendments made to the Norwegian Pollution Control Act in 2011, naturally occurring radioactive material is now to be considered as an environmental contaminant, in addition to organic pollutants and trace metals. Environmental contamination is strongly correlated with the mobility and bioavailability of metals and radionuclides in natural systems. In order to determine the risk of environmental contamination from e.g. uranium (U) in alum shale areas, it is of particular importance to determine the mobility of U and trace metals found in the rock materials and their binding mechanisms. By determining the speciation and mobility of uranium and trace metals, better predictions can be made on the transport of contaminants in the environment from intervention like road and tunnel construction. The substrate media analyzed in this work was collected from a future tunnel construction site that is being built in the Gran municipality on National road Rv4 in Norway. The bedrock in the Gran municipality is rich in U-bearing minerals. Therefore, there is high potential for environmental contamination from the rock material removed for tunnel construction purposes. The present work focuses upon the effects of pH and the contact time (substrate media: solution) on the mobility of uranium. In order to identify the effects of pH and contact time on mobility, sample cores collected from an area rich in alum shale were subjected to an extended leaching experiment. In this experiment, the substrate materials were treated with five different pH solutions and were analyzed for different contact times. In addition, the results were compared to data from a sequential extraction experiment. In the leaching experiment, the mobilization of uranium in all of the substrate material was affected by the pH of solution. All of the samples were capable of quickly buffering pH solutions with a pH as low as 4 to neutral-alkaline conditions, attributed to the carbonate minerals

  15. Modeling the mobility of uranium from NORM-rich bedrock using multivariate statistical techniques - The mobility of uranium from U-containing bedrock materials as a function of pH: Implications for tunnel construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmers, Tari; Fjermestad, Halldis; Salbu, Brit; Skipperud, Lindis [Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, 1432 Aas (Norway); Meland, Sondre; Hagelia, Per [Norwegian Public Roads Administration, P.O. Box 8142, 0033 Oslo (Norway)

    2014-07-01

    According to amendments made to the Norwegian Pollution Control Act in 2011, naturally occurring radioactive material is now to be considered as an environmental contaminant, in addition to organic pollutants and trace metals. Environmental contamination is strongly correlated with the mobility and bioavailability of metals and radionuclides in natural systems. In order to determine the risk of environmental contamination from e.g. uranium (U) in alum shale areas, it is of particular importance to determine the mobility of U and trace metals found in the rock materials and their binding mechanisms. By determining the speciation and mobility of uranium and trace metals, better predictions can be made on the transport of contaminants in the environment from intervention like road and tunnel construction. The substrate media analyzed in this work was collected from a future tunnel construction site that is being built in the Gran municipality on National road Rv4 in Norway. The bedrock in the Gran municipality is rich in U-bearing minerals. Therefore, there is high potential for environmental contamination from the rock material removed for tunnel construction purposes. The present work focuses upon the effects of pH and the contact time (substrate media: solution) on the mobility of uranium. In order to identify the effects of pH and contact time on mobility, sample cores collected from an area rich in alum shale were subjected to an extended leaching experiment. In this experiment, the substrate materials were treated with five different pH solutions and were analyzed for different contact times. In addition, the results were compared to data from a sequential extraction experiment. In the leaching experiment, the mobilization of uranium in all of the substrate material was affected by the pH of solution. All of the samples were capable of quickly buffering pH solutions with a pH as low as 4 to neutral-alkaline conditions, attributed to the carbonate minerals

  16. Production of uranium peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention provides a process for recovering uranium values as uranium peroxide from an aqueous uranyl solution containing dissolved vanadium and sodium impurities. It consists of treating the uranyl solution with hydrogen peroxide in an amount equal to at least 0.5 part H2O2 per part of vanadium (V2O5) in solution in excess of the stoichiometric (1.26 parts/part U3O8) amount required to form the uranium peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide treatment is carried out in three phases. (auth)

  17. Uranium assay in milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powder milk, and fresh milk from buffalo and dairy cattle in North India, were irradiated with a thermal neutron flux of 1017 n cm-2. Neutron dose was calculated by counting tracks on an etched K-43 glass dosimeter. The uranium concentration in milk is low when compared with concentrations in other food stuffs, and its radiotoxicity to humans is considerably lower than chemical toxicity. If a human consumes 1 litre of milk/day, containing .1 μg uranium/litre, for 60 yrs, total intake of uranium would be only 2 mg compared to a maximum permissible intake of 40mg. (U.K.)

  18. Depleted uranium management alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process

  19. Uranium mining and milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report uranium mining and milling are reviewed. The fuel cycle, different types of uranium geological deposits, blending of ores, open cast and underground mining, the mining cost and radiation protection in mines are treated in the first part of this report. In the second part, the milling of uranium ores is treated, including process technology, acid and alkaline leaching, process design for physical and chemical treatment of the ores, and the cost. Each chapter is clarified by added figures, diagrams, tables, and flowsheets. (HK)

  20. Liquefaction of uranium tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerical methods for assessing the liquefaction potential of soils are reviewed with a view to their application to uranium tailings. The method can be divided into two categories: total stress analysis, where changes in pore pressure are not considered in the soil model, and effective stress analysis, where changes in pore pressure are included in the soil model. Effective stress analysis is more realistic, but few computer programs exist for such analysis in two or three dimensions. A simple linearized, two-dimensional, finite element effective stress analysis which incorporates volumetric compaction due to shear motion is described and implemented. The new program is applied to the assessment of liquefaction potential of tailings in the Quirke Mine tailings area near Elliot Lake, Ontario. The results are compared with those of a total stress analysis. Both analyses indicate liquefaction would occur if a magnitude 6.0 earthquake were to occur near the area. However, the extent of liquefaction predicted by the effective stress analysis is much less than that predicted by the total stress analysis. The results of both methods are sensitive to assumed material properties and to the method used to determine the cyclic shear strength of the tailings. Further analysis, incorporating more in situ and/or laboratory data, is recommended before conclusions can be made concerning the dynamic stability of these tailings

  1. Uranium production economics in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review of the economics of production of uranium in Australia provides a detailed description of eleven important uranium deposits including capital and production costs estimates and supply curves. For each mine a detailed assessment has been made of its potential production capacity to the year 2000. Socio-economic factors that play an all-too-important role in the Australian uranium industry are extensively reviewed to provide an insight into the factors affecting Australia's ability to supply. The study is based on a detailed computer-based economic engineering model where all major costs such as labor, consumables and capital recovery charges are analyzed for each mine, and levellised break-even prices determined. It is argued that at the present low market prices, the three on-going operations are profitable, and at least three other deposits could be brought to viable production, given the necessary Government approval. Several other deposits appear to be marginal at the set Australian export floor price of US$26 per pound. Annual production could be raised from about 6,000 tonnes of U3O8 to 16,000 tonnes by the turn of century, with the development of three additional deposits. It is concluded that, if Australian producers were allowed to compete freely on the international market, annual production would pass the 10,000 tonne/annum mark between 1995 and 2000. 35 figs., 38 tabs., 81 refs

  2. Plutonium in depleted uranium penetrators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depleted Uranium (DU) penetrators used in the recent Balkan conflicts have been found to be contaminated with trace amounts of transuranic materials such as plutonium. This contamination is usually a consequence of DU fabrication being carried out in facilities also using uranium recycled from spent military and civilian nuclear reactor fuel. Specific activities of 239+240 Plutonium generally in the range 1 to 12 Bq/kg have been found to be present in DU penetrators recovered from the attack sites of the 1999 NATO bombardment of Kosovo. A DU penetrator recovered from a May 1999 attack site at Bratoselce in southern Serbia and analysed by University College Dublin was found to contain 43.7 +/- 1.9 Bq/kg of 239+240 Plutonium. This analysis is described. An account is also given of the general population radiation dose implications arising from both the DU itself and from the presence of plutonium in the penetrators. According to current dosimetric models, in all scenarios considered likely ,the dose from the plutonium is estimated to be much smaller than that due to the uranium isotopes present in the penetrators. (author)

  3. Test emission of uranium hexafluoride in atmosphere. Results interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To permit the modelization of gaseous uranium hexafluoride behaviour in atmosphere, a validation test has been executed the 10 April 1987. The experimental conditions, the main results and a comparison with a diffusion model are given in this report

  4. 10 CFR 51.51 - Uranium fuel cycle environmental data-Table S-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... uranium mining and milling, the production of uranium hexafluoride, isotopic enrichment, fuel fabrication... 10 percent of 10 CFR 20 for total processing 26 annual fuel requirements for model LWR. Fission and... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Uranium fuel cycle environmental data-Table S-3....

  5. Investigations on uranium sorption on bentonite and montmorillonite, respectively, and uranium in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    composition of the octahedral sheet, provided further evidence on the mechanism of uranium(VI) sorption on montmorillonit. The uranium(VI) sorption was found to be controlled by the cationic composition of the octahedral sheet and by the dissolution rate of montmorillonite. Higher Mg contents in the octahedral sheet enhance the dissolution kinetics of Montmorillonite and thus lower uranium(VI) sorption with time and vice versa. In addition to Al and Fe octahedron, Mg octahedron contributes to the sorption of uranium(VI) (here 20 up to 50 % depending on Mg content in Montmorillonite). These observations allowed to propose a model for the mechanism of uranium(VI) sorption on the edge surface of montmorillonite. At lower octahedral Mg contents (here SWy- and STx-montmorillonites), at which the distance between Mg octahedra becomes larger, uranium(VI) binds monodentately to AlAl-OH, AlFe-OH, AlMg-OH, FeFe-OH, and FeMg-OH pairs and the Mg octahedra contribute up to approximately 20 % to the sorption of uranium(VI). At high Mg contents in the octahedral sheet, where the distance between Mg octahedra becomes small and MgMg-OH pairs can occur, uranium(VI) forms monodentate surface complexes with AlAl-OH, AlFe-OH, AlMg-OH, FeFe-OH, FeMg-OH, and MgMg-OH pairs and the Mg octahedra can even stronger contribute to uranium(VI) sorption (up to about 50 %). The second focus of this work concerned the environmental analytics of uranium. In this regard, extensive investigations of environmental samples from tailings disposal sites near Mailuu-Suu city (Kyrgyzstan) were carried out. Previous radiological examinations in Mailuu-Suu showed that uranium can migrate from tailings as a result of rain events to the ground water and river water and eventually to the foods [Vandenhove et al., 2006]. Therefore, it was very important to investigate, uranium speciation in water samples and the processes which controlling uranium releases from tailings into the aquatic system. The results showed that

  6. Uranium in granites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent research activities of the Canadian Uranium in Granites Study are presented in 18 papers and 3 abstracts. 'Granites' is used as a generic term for granitoids, granitic rocks, and plutonic rocks

  7. Uranium purchases report 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data reported by domestic nuclear utility companies in their responses to the 1991 through 1993 ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey,'' Form EIA-858, Schedule B,'' Uranium Marketing Activities,'' are provided in response to the requirements in the Energy Policy Act 1992. Appendix A contains an explanation of Form EIA-858 survey methodologies with emphasis on the processing of Schedule B data. Additional information published in this report not included in Uranium Purchases Report 1992, includes a new data table. Presented in Table 1 are US utility purchases of uranium and enrichment services by origin country. Also, this report contains additional purchase information covering average price and contract duration. Table 2 is an update of Table 1 and Table 3 is an update of Table 2 from the previous year's report. The report contains a glossary of terms

  8. Uranium hydrothermal deposits

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    René, Miloš

    New York : Nova Science Publishers, 2012 - (Vasiliev, A.; Sidorov, M.), s. 211-244 ISBN 978-1-62081-207-5 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : uranium * hydrothermal deposits * uraninite Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  9. Uranium Location Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A GIS compiled locational database in Microsoft Access of ~15,000 mines with uranium occurrence or production, primarily in the western United States. The metadata...

  10. 300 AREA URANIUM CONTAMINATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    (smbullet) Uranium fuel production (smbullet) Test reactor and separations experiments (smbullet) Animal and radiobiology experiments conducted at the. 331 Laboratory Complex (smbullet) .Deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning,. and demolition of 300 Area facilities

  11. Uranium in alkaline rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, M.; Wollenberg, H.; Strisower, B.; Bowman, H.; Flexser, S.; Carmichael, I.

    1978-04-01

    Geologic and geochemical criteria were developed for the occurrence of economic uranium deposits in alkaline igneous rocks. A literature search, a limited chemical analytical program, and visits to three prominent alkaline-rock localities (Ilimaussaq, Greenland; Pocos de Caldas, Brazil; and Powderhorn, Colorado) were made to establish criteria to determine if a site had some uranium resource potential. From the literature, four alkaline-intrusive occurrences of differing character were identified as type-localities for uranium mineralization, and the important aspects of these localities were described. These characteristics were used to categorize and evaluate U.S. occurrences. The literature search disclosed 69 U.S. sites, encompassing nepheline syenite, alkaline granite, and carbonatite. It was possible to compare two-thirds of these sites to the type localities. A ranking system identified ten of the sites as most likely to have uranium resource potential.

  12. Ontario's uranium mining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report traces the Ontario uranium mining industry from the first discovery of uranium north of Sault Ste. Marie through the uranium boom of the 1950's when Elliot Lake and Bancroft were developed, the cutbacks of the 1960s, the renewed enthusiasm in exploration and development of the 1970s to the current position when continued production for the domestic market is assured. Ontario, with developed mines and operational expertise, will be in a position to compete for export markets as they reopen. The low level of expenditures for uranium exploration and the lack of new discoveries are noted. The report also reviews and places in perspective the development of policies and regulations governing the industry and the jurisdictional relationships of the Federal and Provincial governments

  13. The uranium market prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A historical analysis of the uranium market points out the cyclical nature of the market and suggests that the spot price, exploration levels, and mill capacity utilization rate are dependent on economic factors. An examination of the current uranium market suggests that the effects of the forecasted surplus supply, the diminishing returns in exploration and the long lead times and high costs of development may mean that future production levels are uncertain. The general prospects for the uranium industry are also uncertain because of barriers to trade, environmental regulations and public opinion. The paper concludes that by the use of long term contracts, appropriate inventory policy and greater discussion between producers and consumers the prospects for the uranium market can be made more certain and further imbalances in demand and supply can be avoided. (author)

  14. Selective separation of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for the selective separation of uranium from elements accompanying it in a uranium-containing ore is claimed. It comprises preparing a uranium-containing solution; adding hydrochloric acid in an amount sufficient to form complex anions of the type (UO2Clsub(n))sup(2-n) where n is 3 or 4, or sulfuric acid in an amount sufficient to form complex anions of the type UO2(SO4)sub(m)sup(2-2m) where m is 2 or 3; adding a cationic surface active agent which forms a difficultly soluble precipitate with the complex anion; subjecting the solution to a gas flotation step to produce a foam fraction containing the pecipitate and a liquid fraction; separating the two fractions; and recovering uranium from the foam fraction

  15. Uranium determination in zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method used for the spectrometric uranium determination with 2-(2-thiolase)-5-diethylaminophenol was modified for its application in the zirconium samples analysis with an uranium content of the 0.1% order. The samples, previously dissolved in nitric acid, were submitted to a separative stage of liquid-liquid extraction, with a trioctylphosphine (TOPO) oxide diluted in cyclohexane. A sodium fluoride aqueous solution was necessary to be aggregated in the spectrometric determination so as to complex the zirconium vestiges, which could be present, originated by the Zr/U high relation of the initial sample. Under the established working conditions, different spectrometric assays, dyes absorption spectra and its uranium complex, complex stability, PH influence determination of the dyes-uranium relation, calculation of the complex's apparent formation constant and its molar absorption, were performed. (Author)

  16. Uranium in alkaline rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geologic and geochemical criteria were developed for the occurrence of economic uranium deposits in alkaline igneous rocks. A literature search, a limited chemical analytical program, and visits to three prominent alkaline-rock localities (Ilimaussaq, Greenland; Pocos de Caldas, Brazil; and Powderhorn, Colorado) were made to establish criteria to determine if a site had some uranium resource potential. From the literature, four alkaline-intrusive occurrences of differing character were identified as type-localities for uranium mineralization, and the important aspects of these localities were described. These characteristics were used to categorize and evaluate U.S. occurrences. The literature search disclosed 69 U.S. sites, encompassing nepheline syenite, alkaline granite, and carbonatite. It was possible to compare two-thirds of these sites to the type localities. A ranking system identified ten of the sites as most likely to have uranium resource potential

  17. Uranium hexafluoride purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium hexafluoride might contain a large amount of impurities after manufacturing or handling. Three usual methods of purification of uranium hexafluoride were presented: selective sorption, sublimation, and distillation. Since uranium hexafluoride usually is contaminated with hydrogen fluoride, a theoretical study of the phase equilibrium properties was performed for the binary system UF6-HF. A large deviation from the ideal solution behaviour was observed. A purification unity based on a constant reflux batch distillation process was developed. A procedure was established in order to design the re boiler, condenser and packed columns for the UF6-HF mixture separation. A bench scale facility for fractional distillation of uranium hexafluoride was described. Basic operations for that facility and results extracted from several batches were discussed. (author)

  18. Uranium conversion and enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description is given of the Atomic Energy Corporation's uranium conversion and enrichment plants at Valinda ba, including a brief discussion of problems encountered and plans for future developments. (author)

  19. Migration and gamma ray assessment of uranium on a gold tailings disposal facility / Jaco Koch

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, Jaco

    2014-01-01

    This project aims to quantify natural gamma radiation in gold tailings disposal facilities (TDFs) relative to uranium concentration data in order to use natural gamma detection methods as alternative methods for uranium resource estimation modelling in gold tailings. Uranium migration within the New Machavie TDF was also investigated as migration affects both the grade of the TDF as a uranium resource and poses a threat to the environment. In order to determine the most appropr...

  20. Uranium in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1988 Canada's five uranium producers reported output of concentrate containing a record 12,470 metric tons of uranium (tU), or about one third of total Western world production. Shipments exceeded 13,200 tU, valued at $Cdn 1.1 billion. Most of Canada's uranium output is available for export for peaceful purposes, as domestic requirements represent about 15 percent of production. The six uranium marketers signed new sales contracts for over 11,000 tU, mostly destined for the United States. Annual exports peaked in 1987 at 12,790 tU, falling back to 10,430 tU in 1988. Forward domestic and export contract commitments were more than 70,000 tU and 60,000 tU, respectively, as of early 1989. The uranium industry in Canada was restructured and consolidated by merger and acquisition, including the formation of Cameco. Three uranium projects were also advanced. The Athabasca Basin is the primary target for the discovery of high-grade low-cost uranium deposits. Discovery of new reserves in 1987 and 1988 did not fully replace the record output over the two-year period. The estimate of overall resources as of January 1989 was down by 4 percent from January 1987 to a total (measured, indicated and inferred) of 544,000 tU. Exploration expenditures reached $Cdn 37 million in 1987 and $59 million in 1988, due largely to the test mining programs at the Cigar Lake and Midwest projects in Saskatchewan. Spot market prices fell to all-time lows from 1987 to mid-1989, and there is little sign of relief. Canadian uranium production capability could fall below 12,000 tU before the late 1990s; however, should market conditions warrant output could be increased beyond 15,000 tU. Canada's known uranium resources are more than sufficient to meet the 30-year fuel requirements of those reactors in Canada that are now or are expected to be in service by the late 1990s. There is significant potential for discovering additional uranium resources. Canada's uranium production is equivalent, in

  1. Ranger uranium environmental enquiry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The submission is divided into three sections. Section A considers the international implications of the development of uranium resources including economic and resource aspects and environmental and social aspects. Section B outlines the government's position on export controls over uranium and its effect on the introduction of nuclear power in Australia. Section C describes the licensing and regulatory functions that would be needed to monitor the environmental and health aspects of the Ranger project. (R.L.)

  2. Uranium purchases report 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    US utilities are required to report to the Secretary of Energy annually the country of origin and the seller of any uranium or enriched uranium purchased or imported into the US, as well as the country of origin and seller of any enrichment services purchased by the utility. This report compiles these data and also contains a glossary of terms and additional purchase information covering average price and contract duration. 3 tabs

  3. Recovery of uranium values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process is provided for the recovery of uranium from an organic extractant phase containing an amine. The extractant phase is contacted in a number of mixing stages with an acidic aqueous stripping phase containing sulphate ions, and the phases are passed together through a series of mixing stages while maintaining a dispersion of droplets of one phase in the other. Uranium is precipitated from the final stage by raising the pH. An apparatus having several mixing chambers is described

  4. Uranium project. Geochemistry prospection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geochemistry studies the distribution of the chemicals elements in the terrestrial crust and its ways to migrate. The terminology used in this report is the following one: 1) Principles of the prospection geochemistry 2) Stages of the prospection geochemistry 3)utility of the prospection geochemistry 4) geochemistry of uranium 5) procedures used within the framework of uranium project 6) Average available 7) Selection of the zones of prospection geochemistry 8) Stages of the prospection, Sample preparation and analisis 9) Presentation of the results

  5. Uranium tailings bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bibliography containing 1,212 references is presented with its focus on the general problem of reducing human exposure to the radionuclides contained in the tailings from the milling of uranium ore. The references are divided into seven broad categories: uranium tailings pile (problems and perspectives), standards and philosophy, etiology of radiation effects, internal dosimetry and metabolism, environmental transport, background sources of tailings radionuclides, and large-area decontamination

  6. Separation of uranium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention provides a method for separating uranium isotopes comprising the steps of selectively irradiating a photochemically-reactive uranyl source material at a wavelength selective to a desired isotope of uranium at an effective temperature for isotope spectral line splitting below about 77 K, further irradiating the source material within the fluorescent lifetime of the selectively irradiated source material to selectively photochemically reduce the selectively excited isotopic species, and chemically separating the reduced isotope species from the remaining uranyl salt compound

  7. Automated uranium assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precise, timely inventories of enriched uranium stocks are vital to help prevent the loss, theft, or diversion of this material for illicit use. A wet-chemistry analyzer has been developed at LLL to assist in these inventories by performing automated analyses of uranium samples from different stages in the nuclear fuel cycle. These assays offer improved accuracy, reduced costs, significant savings in manpower, and lower radiation exposure for personnel compared with present techniques

  8. Uranium determination in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In our laboratory, a procedure has been assessed to determine uranium content of water in normal situations. The method proposed without sample pre-treatment, is simple and rapid. Uranium mass is measured by fluorimetry. For calculation of detection limit (Ld) and quantification level (Lq) we used blank samples and the results were analyzed for different statistical test. The calculation of total propagated uncertainty and sources contribution on real samples are presented. (author)

  9. Uranium leads political stakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Until the announcement by the federal Environment Minister Peter Garrett that the government would permit uranium mining at Beverly Four Mile, South Australia, there had been little news flow from the sector over the past year. Uranium was the first to turn down, even before the United States sub-prime mortgage crisis began to cause shock waves through the global economy, a report by BGF Equities analyst Warwick Grigor shows.

  10. Production of sized particles of uranium oxides and uranium oxyfluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for converting uranium hexafluoride to uranium dioxide of a relatively large particle size in a fluidized bed reactor by mixing uranium hexafluoride with a mixture of steam and hydrogen to form a mixture of uranium oxide and uranium oxyfluoride seed particles of varying sizes, separating the larger particles from the smaller particles in a cyclone separator, recycling the smaller seed particles through the ejector to increase their size, and introducing the larger seed particles from the cyclone separator into a fluidized bed reactor where the seed particles serve as nuclei on which coarser particles of uranium dioxide are formed. (Patent Office Record)

  11. Dissolution kinetics of uranium from a low grade uranium ore in acid lixiviant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinetic studies on uranium dissolution were carried out on an uranium ore sample from Narwapahar, Jharkhand and a pre-concentrate obtained by physical beneficiation of the ore sample. The dissolution was effected by leaching the feed sample with sulphuric acid at a pH of 1.6-1.8 at 50 deg C with pyrolusite (MnO2) as the oxidant. The uranium dissolution was monitored at fixed time intervals by drawing samples and analyzing for the U3O8 content. It was continued up to a cumulative contact time of 12 hours. The experimental data was analyzed using 'shrinking unreacted core' (SUC) model. During the initial stages, the leaching was found to be chemical-reaction controlled and subsequently diffusion controlled. The rate constants for the uranium dissolution under the two different mechanisms have been estimated. (author)

  12. Production of uranium peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of recovering uranium values as uranium peroxide from an aqueous uranyl solution containing dissolved vanadium and sodium impurities, characterized by treating the uranyl solution with hydrogen peroxide in an amount sufficient to have an excess of at least 0.5 parts H2O2 per part vanadium (V2O5) above the stoichio-metric amount required to form the uranium peroxide, the hydrogen peroxide treatment being carried out in three sequential phases consisting of: 1) a precipitation phase in which the hydrogen peroxide is added to the uranyl solution to precipitate the uranium peroxide and the pH of the reaction media maintained in the range of 3.0 to 7.0 for a period of 5 to 180 60 minutes after the hydrogen peroxide addition; 2) a digestion phase in which the pH of the reaction medium is maintained in the range of 3.0 to 7.0 for a period of 5 to 180 minutes and 3) a final phase in which the pH of the reaction media is maintained in the range of 4.0 to 7.0 for a period of 1 to 60 minutes during which time the uranium peroxide is separated from the reaction solution containing the dissolved vanadium and sodium impurities, the excess hydrogen peroxide aforesaid being maintained until the uranium peroxide is separated from the reaction mixture

  13. Kvanefjeld uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Kvanefjeld uranium project is to evaluate the possibility of a uranium production from the deposit at Narssaq, South Greenland. The project comprises investigations in the fields of geology, mining, process chemistry and technology, economy and environment protection. The predominant uraniferous rock is a nepheline syenite called lujavrite in which the main uranium mineral is steenstrupine. The deposit can be mined in an open pit. Calculations have shown a resource of 56 million tonnes of ore with an average grade of 365 ppm corresponding to 20,400 tonnes of uranium. The uranium is extracted by a sodium carbonate solution at 260degC in an autoclave. A pilot plant has been established including ball mill, continuous pipe autoclave and a belt filter for separation of leach liquor and residue. The uranium is finally precipitated as UO2 by reduction in an autoclave at 260degC. With the existing ore sample, recoveries of more than 80% have been obtained. The carbonate leaching causes a low solubility of most contaminants in the tailings. A draft project has been prepared for an industrial plant in Greenland. The total investments have been calculated at 3 x 109 Dkr. Electrical energy is assumed to be supplied by a hydropower plant at Johan Dahl Land. The mine and mill are expected to employ 500-600 persons. (author)

  14. The decay and fission of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the Bernai liquid drop alpha particle model, the nuclear structure of uranium contains a core of 38 alpha particles comprised of 5 concentric layers. The innermost core of 4 alpha particles corresponding to the oxygen 16 nuclide is enclosed by 4 more alpha particles giving the structure of the sulphur 32 nuclide. The third layer of 6 alpha particles completes the 14 alpha particle model of nickel 56. The fourth and fifth layers each contain 12 alpha particles. It will be shown that the fifth layer forms a barrier to the natural radioactive decay of uranium isotopes. Furthermore, it appears that whist the fourth layer sets a limit on the minimum size of the larger daughter fragment of the thermal neutron induced fission of a uranium isotope, the third layer sets a limit on the minimum size of the smaller fragment

  15. Uranium mining in Canada and Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study compared the impact of taxation on the economic viability and competitive position of uranium mining in Canada and Australia. The evaluation is based on four types of uranium deposit and four hypothetical project models. The deposits are assumed to have been discovered and delineated, and are awaiting a mine development decision. The models, initially appraised on a before-tax basis, are then subjected to taxation in each of six jurisdictions. Several taxation criteria are assessed in each case, including after-tax measures of investment incentive, discounted tax revenues, effective tax rates, intergovernmental tax shares, and comparative tax levels. The impact of taxation is shown to be both high and variable. The taxation systems in Saskatchewan and Australia's Northern Territory generate the most government revenue and provide the lowest incentive for investment. Canada's Northwest Territories and Ontario provide the best investment incentive and collect the least amount of taxes. South Australia and Western Australia tend to be positioned between these extremes. The study demonstrates that only the very best uranium mining projects have a chance of being developed under current market conditions, and even these can be rendered uneconomic by excessive taxation regimes. It follows that exceptionally good quality targets will have to be identified to provide the economic justification for uranium exploration. These realities will likely restrict uranium exploration and development activities for some time, not an unexpected response to a market situation where low prices have been caused largely by excess supply. (L.L.)

  16. US Transuranium and Uranium Registries case study on accidental exposure to uranium hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries’ (USTUR) whole-body donor (Case 1031) was exposed to an acute inhalation of uranium hexafluoride (UF6) produced from an explosion at a uranium processing plant 65 years prior to his death. The USTUR measurements of tissue samples collected at the autopsy indicated long-term retention of inhaled slightly enriched uranium material (0.85% 235U) in the deep lungs and thoracic lymph nodes. In the present study, the authors combined the tissue measurement results with historical bioassay data, and analysed them with International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) respiratory tract models and the ICRP Publication 69 systemic model for uranium using maximum likelihood and Bayesian statistical methods. The purpose of the analysis was to estimate intakes and model parameter values that best describe the data, and evaluate their effect on dose assessment. The maximum likelihood analysis, which used the ICRP Publication 66 human respiratory tract model, resulted in a point estimate of 79 mg of uranium for the occupational intake composed of 86% soluble, type F material and 14% insoluble, type S material. For the Bayesian approach, the authors applied the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, but this time used the revised human respiratory tract model, which is currently being used by ICRP to calculate new dose coefficients for workers. The Bayesian analysis estimated that the mean uranium intake was 160 mg, and calculated the case-specific lung dissolution parameters with their associated uncertainties. The parameters were consistent with the inhaled uranium material being predominantly soluble with a small but significant insoluble component. The 95% posterior range of the rapid dissolution fraction (the fraction of deposited material that is absorbed to blood rapidly) was 0.12 to 0.91 with a median of 0.37. The remaining fraction was absorbed slowly, with a 95% range of 0.000 22 d−1 to 0.000 36

  17. US Transuranium and Uranium Registries case study on accidental exposure to uranium hexafluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avtandilashvili, Maia; Puncher, Matthew; McComish, Stacey L; Tolmachev, Sergei Y

    2015-03-01

    The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries' (USTUR) whole-body donor (Case 1031) was exposed to an acute inhalation of uranium hexafluoride (UF6) produced from an explosion at a uranium processing plant 65 years prior to his death. The USTUR measurements of tissue samples collected at the autopsy indicated long-term retention of inhaled slightly enriched uranium material (0.85% (235)U) in the deep lungs and thoracic lymph nodes. In the present study, the authors combined the tissue measurement results with historical bioassay data, and analysed them with International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) respiratory tract models and the ICRP Publication 69 systemic model for uranium using maximum likelihood and Bayesian statistical methods. The purpose of the analysis was to estimate intakes and model parameter values that best describe the data, and evaluate their effect on dose assessment. The maximum likelihood analysis, which used the ICRP Publication 66 human respiratory tract model, resulted in a point estimate of 79 mg of uranium for the occupational intake composed of 86% soluble, type F material and 14% insoluble, type S material. For the Bayesian approach, the authors applied the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, but this time used the revised human respiratory tract model, which is currently being used by ICRP to calculate new dose coefficients for workers. The Bayesian analysis estimated that the mean uranium intake was 160 mg, and calculated the case-specific lung dissolution parameters with their associated uncertainties. The parameters were consistent with the inhaled uranium material being predominantly soluble with a small but significant insoluble component. The 95% posterior range of the rapid dissolution fraction (the fraction of deposited material that is absorbed to blood rapidly) was 0.12 to 0.91 with a median of 0.37. The remaining fraction was absorbed slowly, with a 95% range of 0.000 22 d(-1) to 0.000 36

  18. Modelling the behaviour of uranium-series radionuclides in soils and plants taking into account seasonal variations in soil hydrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a previous paper, a mathematical model for the behaviour of 79Se in soils and plants was described. Subsequently, a review has been published relating to the behaviour of 238U-series radionuclides in soils and plants. Here, we bring together those two strands of work to describe a new mathematical model of the behaviour of 238U-series radionuclides entering soils in solution and their uptake by plants. Initial studies with the model that are reported here demonstrate that it is a powerful tool for exploring the behaviour of this decay chain or subcomponents of it in soil-plant systems under different hydrological regimes. In particular, it permits studies of the degree to which secular equilibrium assumptions are appropriate when modelling this decay chain. Further studies will be undertaken and reported separately examining sensitivities of model results to input parameter values and also applying the model to sites contaminated with 238U-series radionuclides. - Highlights: • Kinetic model of radionuclide transport in soils and uptake by plants. • Takes soil hydrology and redox conditions into account. • Applicable to the whole U-238 chain, including Rn-222, Pb-210 and Po-210. • Demonstrates intra-season and inter-season variability on timescales up to thousands of years

  19. Tectonic metallogenesis of uranium and its time-space evolution in uranium metallogenic provinces of south China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper discusses grade-sequences and clusters of linear structures and ore-concentrating structures controlling uranium mineralization. Time-space evolutional model of uranium in metalogenic provinces is suggested. The time-bound interval of uranium commercial concentration is about 35 Ma. It is just in the transitional period between two tectonic episodes of Yanshanian and Himalayan tectonic cycles respectively, and it is consistent with maximum mobility period and residual mobility period of the Diwa stage. Economic concentration of uranium took place in Mesozoic period which was a relatively stable period for the continental crust changing from the stage of compression into tension under the action of plate tectonics. With the strong tectonic reactivation in Mesozoic and Cenozoic period, uranium was further increased in the tectonic-geochemical environments of uranium-rich strata (body). Under the mutual action of various uranium sources, fluid sources and heat sources, uranium in the particular tectono-geochemical barriers was enriched and uranium deposits were formed

  20. Geology of Superior Ridge uranium deposits, Ventura County, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epigenetic uranium deposits with potential commercial value have been found in the lower part of the upper Eocene to lower Miocene Sespe Formation near Ojai, in Ventura County, California. This report describes the geological and geochemical setting of these deposits and postulates a model for their origin. Several uranium deposits are located on Superior Ridge, a topographic high about 3 miles long located just south of White Ledge Peak and 6 to 9 miles west of Ojai (Photo 1). A single uranium deposit on Laguna Ridge is located about 3 miles south of Superior Ridge, and was included with the Superior Ridge deposits in the White Ledge Peak district. A few small deposits are known to exist in other parts of Ventura County. A preliminary model for uranium mineralization in the Sespe Formation postulated that the organic material necessary for concentrating the uranium by chemical reduction or precipitation originated as terrestrial humic acid or humate

  1. Technico-Economical study of retreated uranium reenrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent fuel from nuclear power plants is reprocessed at La Hague reprocessing plant in France. Recovered and stored reprocessed uranium has an energy potential unutilized so far. A modelisation is proposed in this paper for evaluating the economic interest reprocessed uranium reenrichment for using it again in a power plant. After briefly recalling the fuel cycle in light water reactors and reprocessed uranium specificities, a mathematical model for multi-isotope enrichment gives a differential system governing isotopic separation. Different solutions are proposed and compared. A. de la Garza analytical model's is retained. An economic value is attributed to reprocessed uranium. Results are presented as curves for determining the sensitivity of this value to simulation parameters (natural uranium cost, enrichment required by the electricity board etc.)

  2. Translocation of uranium from water to foodstuff while cooking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Rice can efficiently uptake uranium from water contaminated with uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UO2(NO3) 2.6 H2O), while cooking. • Unusual uranium uptake to the extent of about 1000 ppm is observed when rice is cooked in highly concentrated uranium contaminated water (1240 ppm). • Nature of interaction of uranium with carbohydrates is probed using small monosaccharides like glucose and mannose. • Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry showed UO22+ to be the most stable species in water in such solutions which can form complexes with sugars. • The species (UO22+) is also observed in the case of water exposed to the common mineral, uranium oxide (UO2) and similar type of complexation is observed with sugars. - Abstract: The present work report the unusual uranium uptake by foodstuff, especially those rich in carbohydrates like rice when they are cooked in water, contaminated with uranium. The major staple diet in South Asia, rice, was chosen to study its interaction with UO22+, the active uranium species in water, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Highest uptake limit was checked by cooking rice at very high uranium concentration and it was found to be good scavenger of uranium. To gain insight into the mechanism of uptake, direct interaction of UO22+ with monosaccharides was also studied, using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry taking mannose as a model. The studies have been done with dissolved uranium salt, uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UO2(NO3)2·6H2O), as well as the leachate of a stable oxide of uranium, UO2(s), both of which exist as UO22+ in water. Among the eight different rice varieties investigated, Karnataka Ponni showed the maximum uranium uptake whereas unpolished Basmati rice showed the minimum. Interaction with other foodstuffs (potato, carrot, peas, kidney beans and lentils) with and without NaCl affected the extent of chemical interaction but was not consistent with the carbohydrate content. Uranium

  3. The Purex thermodynamics of plutonium(IV) and uranium(VI) macroconcentrations coextraction into tri-n butylphosphate: new data and new models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modern worldwide Purex technology (spent nuclear fuel reprocessing) is based on solvent extraction of actinides (U, Pu) in a system with aqueous nitric acid solutions and organic (n-paraffins) solutions of tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP). To the creation of a universal mathematical process model contributes - first of all - the knowledge of uranium(VI), plutonium(IV) and nitric acid equilibrated distribution data. Further should be included the field of all the technological (''know-how'') operations, in particular, so-called strong-and-weak-acid and high-and-ambient-temperature scrubs of the actinide bearing organic phase. To enrich the Purex data base with additional information the new original values of equilibrium distribution coefficients of Pu(IV) (0.06-28 g/l), U(VI) (0.18-150 g/l) and nitric acid (0.01-10.5 mol/l) (in all the cases - equilibrated aqueous phase concentrations) - at reliable organic solution homogeneity (i.e. without ''third'' phase formation phenomena) were obtained. Those results include data at 25 and 60 C, of 20 and 30 vol% TBP (in n-dodecane). All the analyses of the metal content were performed using original gamma-spectrometric procedure of simultaneous U and Pu determination. Using both obtained data and known results (no less than 700 ''systems'' type of ''U(VI)-Pu(IV)-water-nitric acid-TBP-n-dodecane'') the simple regressive equations (two third-power polynominal series) were developed, which with an accuracy better than ±8% permit to calculate the distribution of the three mentioned components. The developed equations of the concentration dependence of the distribution coefficients (D) for all the components have the general form: where i+k+m≤3; n=Pu, U, HNO3. The high-performance models are recommended for development of operating programs - as a modifier of today's Purex performance. ((orig.))

  4. Redox reactivity and coordination chemistry of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study and the understanding of actinides chemistry have important implications in the nuclear field both for the development of new actinides materials and the retreatment of the nuclear wastes. One of the major issues in that chemistry is that the actinides elements are known to undergo redox reaction and to form assemblies of different size and different topologies. In that context uranium can be a good model of the heavier radioelement because it is much less radioactive. So, this work concerns the synthesis and the study of the spectroscopy and the magnetic properties of several uranium based polymetallic assemblies synthesized by taking advantage of the redox properties and the coordination chemistry of uranium. The hydrolysis reactivity of trivalent uranium has been studied in absence of sterically hindered ligands and led to the synthesis of oxo/hydroxo uranium assemblies with different sizes by changing the starting complex or the reaction conditions. By following the same strategy, the controlled oxidation of trivalent uranium complexes led to an original azido/nitrido uranium complex. The coordination chemistry of the pentavalent uranyl polymer {[UO2py5][KI2py3]}n has also been studied with different ligand and in different conditions and led to several cation-cation complexes for which the stability is sufficient for studying there dismutation by proton NMR. By changing the ancillary ligands stable monomeric complexes of pentavalent uranyl complexes were also obtained. The magnetic properties of all the complexes, monomers and polymetallic complexes were studied and an antiferromagnetic coupling was observed for the cation-cation pentavalent uranyl dimer [UO2(dbm)2(K18C6)]2. (author)

  5. Anticorrosion protection of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium in atmospheric conditions is non-stable. Sloughing products are being generated on its surface during storage or use. These corrosion products make many difficulties because of necessity to provide personnel safety. Besides, uranium corrosion may cause damage in parts. The first works devoted to uranium corrosion were performed in the framework of the USA Manhattan Project in the early forties of last century. Various methods of uranium protection were investigated, among them the galvanic one was the most studied. Later on the galvanic technology was patented. The works on this problem remains urgent up to the present time. In Russia, many methods of uranium corrosion protection, mainly against atmospheric corrosion, were tried on. In particular, such methods as diffusion zinc and paint coating were investigated. In the first case, a complex intermetallic U-Zn compound was formed but its protection was not reliable enough, this protection system was inconvenient and uncertain and that is why an additional paint coating was necessary. In the case of paint coatings another problem appeared. It was necessary to find such a coating where gas-permeability would prevail over water-permeability. Otherwise significant uranium corrosion occurs. This circumstance together with low mechanical resistance of paint coatings does not allow to use paint coating for long-term protection of uranium. Currently, there are following methods of uranium protection: ion-plasma, galvanic and thermo-vacuum annealing. These are described in this paper. In the end the issue of corrosion protection in reactor core zones is addressed. Here the greatest difficulties are caused when enriched uranium heated up to 500 deg. C needs anticorrosion protection. In this case various metal coatings are not reliable because of brittle inter-metallide formation. The reliable protection may be provided only up to the temperature plus 400 - 500 deg. C with the help of galvanic copper coating since

  6. Study of uranium plating measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In neutron physics experiments, the measurement for plate-thickness of uranium can directly affect uncertainties of experiment results. To measure the plate-thickness of transform target (enriched uranium plating and depleted uranium plating), the back to back ionization chamber, small solid angle device and Au-Si surface barrier semi-conductor, were used in the experiment study. Also, the uncertainties in the experiment were analyzed. Because the inhomo-geneous of uranium lay of plate can quantitively affect the result, the homogeneity of uranium lay is checked, the experiment result reflects the homogeneity of uranium lay is good. (authors)

  7. Uranium. Suppl. Vol. A3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This supplement volume 'Uranium' deals with uranium technology, from winning to the fabrication of nuclear fuels containing uranium and their use in various reactor types. Alternative reprocessing methods for ores are described e.g. winning from phosphate ores and sea water, production of uranium compounds (oxide, carbide, nitride etc., hexafluoride for isotope separation) and of uranium-metals and -alloys as well as the utilization of metallic and other compounds of uranium - single or embedded - as nuclear fuels and their fabrication. The behaviour of the nuclear fuel and the way it modifies during reactor operation are described in an extra volume (supplement volume A4). (RB)

  8. Uranium currently selling very badly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surplus offers and declining revenue have caused exploratory and uranium mining activities to slow down. The same applies to research activities on the profitability of leading uranium-carrying rock or recovering uranium from seawater, which have been cut off worldwide. Prices for natural uranium are plunging deep as a consequence of surplus offers. There is little hope among uranium producers that the situation might change in the near future. For the projected Wackersdorf fuel reprocessing facility, this means that one argument of supporters, - lack of uranium for fuel fabrication - has lost its basis. (DG)

  9. Potential health and environmental hazards of uranium mine wastes. Volume 3. Appendixes. Report to the congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contents include: summary of federal laws potentially affecting uranium mining; federal water programs and right activities; congressionally approved compacts that apportion water; state laws, regulations, and guides for uranium mining; active uranium mines in the United States; inactive uranium mines in the United States; general observations of uranium mine sites in Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, and Wyoming; influence of mine drainage on seepage to groundwater and surface water outflow; computation of mass emission factors for wind erosion; aquatic dosimetry and health effects models and parameter values; Airborne pathway modeling; and health risk assessment methodology

  10. Conceptual model for water management in Brazilian semi-arid regions: From intervention to sustainability, I. Case of Lagoa Real uranium plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The world water lack problem has been already diagnosed and is acknowledged as one of the greatest challenges for this century. The scientific literature, documents and either nationals or internationals official reports like the Brazilian Water Agency (ANA) and UNESCO point out the main shortages and general management practices. Also in Brazil, it is a multi-facet problem that envelops several social agents for many decades and has tragic consequences in some regions of the country, like is the case of the northeastern semi-arid region. This work presents the strategies for expertise integration to attend demands for the establishment of partnerships that include several institutions, with different experiences in the region, to improve the acquaintance with dry climate in Brazilian semi-arid. The general objective was developing a conceptual model of technical multi-institutional arrangements as tools for aquifer management, promoting sustainable use of groundwater in the semi-arid region. A conceptual model is shown, based on technical, political and socio-economical dimensions of sustainability that exchange information among them and with management requirements. This process must be turned in more productive agricultural systems with the introduction of new technology that respect the family arrangement of the production units. It is also expected that validation of this conceptual model allows an applicable alternative to other areas in the future, respected of course all the geo-socio-economical constraints of each site. The newest uranium plant being operated in Brazil is located at a semi-arid region, in the municipalities of Lagoa Real and Caetite, State of Bahia, northeast region of Brazil, which shows rainfall rates of 800 mm/a. Its known resources were estimated as being of 85,000 tU at below $80/kgU cost category. The ore is mined by open pit methods and uranium is extracted by acid heap leaching. The conceptual operation plan did not include liquid

  11. Retention and reduction of uranium on pyrite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the hypothesis of a storage of the spent fuel in a deep geological formation, understanding the uranium dispersion in the environment is important. Pyrite is a reducing mineral present in the Callovo-Oxfordian argilites, the geological formation actually studied for such a storage. However, pyrite impact on uranium migration has already been poorly studied. The aim of the study was to understand the mechanisms of uranium(VI) retention and reduction on the pyrite surface (FeS2). Solution chemistry was therefore coupled with solid spectroscopic studies (XPS and Raman spectroscopy). All uranium-pyrite interactions experiments were performed under an anoxic atmosphere, in a glove box. Pyrite dissolution under anoxic conditions releases sulfoxy-anions and iron(II), which can then be adsorbed on the pyrite surface. This adsorption was confirmed by interaction experiments using iron(II) isotopic dilution. Uranium(VI) is retained by an exchange reaction with iron(II) adsorbed on sulphur sites, with a maximal amount of sorbed uranium at pH ≥ 5.5. Cobalt(II) and europium(III) are also adsorbed on the pyrite surface above pH 5.5 confirming then that reduction is not required for species to adsorb on pyrite. When the concentration of uranium retained is lower than 4 x 10-9 mol g-1, an oxidation-reduction reaction leads to the formation of a uranium (VI) (IV) mixed oxide and to solid sulphur (d.o. ≥ -I). During this reaction, iron remains mostly at the +II oxidation degree. The reaction products seem to passivate the pyrite surface: at higher amounts of retained uranium, the oxidation-reduction reaction is no longer observed. The surface is saturated by the retention of (3.4 ± 0.8) x 10-7 mol L-1 of uranium(VI). Modelling of uranium sorption at high surface coverage (≥ 4 x 10-9 mol g-1) by the Langmuir model yields an adsorption constant of 8 x 107 L mol-1. Finally, a great excess of uranium(VI) above the saturation concentration allows the observation of an oxidation

  12. Determination of low concentration of uranium in uranium amalgam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the strong interference in the determination of low concentrations of uranium in uranium amalgam by spectrophotometry, a new and rapid method has been developed for the removal of the interference of mercury(II) ion in the range of low uranium concentration by reducing Hg(II) to Hg in the sample dissolved in nitric acid with ascorbic acid. The separated uranium in the solution is determined by spectrophotometry in the concentration range of 0.25 approximately 5 mg/g uranium amalgam. The average error is about 2%. Very low concentrations of uranium (approximately 0.25 mg/g) in the uranium amalgam can be determined directly by fluorometric method. No interference effect has been observed at the mercury to uranium ratio up to 105; the average error is about 10%. (author)

  13. Australia's uranium export potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the period 1954-71 in Australia approximately 9000 MT of U3O8 was produced from five separate localities. Of this, 7000 MT was exported to the United Kingdom and United States and the balance stockpiled by the Australian Atomic Energy Commission (AAEC). Australia's uranium ore reserves occur in eight deposits in three states and the Northern Territory. However, 83% of Australia's reserves are contained in four deposits in lower Proterozoic rocks in the East Alligator River region of the Northern Territory. The AAEC has calculated Australia's recoverable uranium reserves by eliminating estimated losses during the mining and milling of the ores. AAEC has estimated reasonably assured resources of 289,000 MT of uranium at a recovery cost of less than US$80 per kilogram uranium. The companies have collectively announced a larger ore reserve than the Australian Atomic Energy Commission. This difference is a result of the companies adopting different ore reserve categories. On August 25, 1977, the federal government announced that Australia would develop its uranium resources subject to stringent environmental controls, recognition of Aboriginal Land Rights, and international safeguards. Australian uranium production should gradually increase from 1981 onward, growing to 10,000 to 15,000 MT by 1985-86. Further increases in capacity may emerge during the second half of the 1980s when expansion plans are implemented. Exploration for uranium has not been intensive due to delays in developing the existing deposits. It is likely that present reserves can be substantially upgraded if more exploration is carried out. 6 figures, 3 tables

  14. Mathematical model of a record type device for valued components recovery from end process gases of uranium hexafluoride production

    OpenAIRE

    Bereza, V. N.; Dyadik, Valery Feodosievich; Baydali, Sergey Anatolievich

    2007-01-01

    Mathematical model of the device for valued components recovery from end gases of sublimate production including hydrodynamics, thermodynamics and kinetics of interaction process of solid and gaseous phases realized in the package MATLAB has been presented. Static and dynamic characteristics of the device as a control object necessary for control algorithm synthesis are obtained and analyzed

  15. New development stage of China's uranium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the early 1980s China adjusted its uranium industry to better meet the market economy requirements. Until 1997, the adjustment has been completed. The technical and managerial improvements result in a more efficient uranium production. In 1996 a series of events related to the nuclear power development of China manifests very favorable situation for the uranium industry. The first two nuclear power plants with a total installed capacity of 2100 MW in the mainland of China have been operating safely and steadily for several years. The additional nuclear power projects to be constructed for the rest of this century are implemented in an all-round way. Four plants with eight reactors of a total of 6900 MW have entered their construction period in succession. In 1996 a commercial ISL mine in Xinjiang with annual capacity 100 tU was completed, and the larger scale of ISL mine is expected to be constructed by 2000. The Benxi uranium mine in northeast China was put into production. It applies some new mining and processing technologies and improved management, which might serve as a new model of uranium mines in China. (author)

  16. Comparison of two numerical modelling approaches to a field experiment of unsaturated radon transport in a covered uranium mill tailings soil (Lavaugrasse, France)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saadi, Zakaria; Guillevic, Jerome [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), PRP-DGE/SEDRAN/BRN, 31 avenue de la Division Leclerc, B.P. 17, 92262, Fontenay-aux-Roses, Cedex (France)

    2014-07-01

    Uncertainties on the mathematical modelling of radon transport in an unsaturated covered uranium mill tailings (UMT) soil at field scale can have a great impact on the estimation of the average measured radon flux to the atmosphere at the landfill cover, which must be less than the threshold value 0.74 Bq.m{sup -2}.s{sup -1}recommended by the federal standard (EPA 40 CFR 192). These uncertainties are usually attributed to the numerical errors from the numerical schemes dealing with soil layering and to inadequate representations of the modelling of physical processes at the soil/plant/atmosphere interface and of the soil hydraulic and transport properties, as well as their parameterization. In this work, we compare one-dimensional simulation results from two numerical models of two-phase (water-air) porous media flow and radon transport to the data of radon activity exhalation flux and depth-volumetric concentration measured during a field campaign from June to November of 1999 in a two-layered soil of 1.3 m thickness (i.e., cover material/UMT: 0.5/0.8 m) of an experimental pond located at the Lavaugrasse UMT-landfill site (France). The first numerical modelling approach is a coupled finite volume compositional (i.e., water, radon, air) transport model (TOUGH2/EOS7Rn code, Saadi et al., 2013), while the second one is a decoupled finite difference one-component (i.e., radon) transport model (TRACI code, Ferry et al., 2001). Transient simulations during six month of hourly rainfall and atmospheric pressure variations showed that calculations from the one-component transport model usually overestimate both measured radon exhalation flux and depth-concentration. However, considering the effective unsaturated pore air-component diffusivity to be different from that of the radon-component in the compositional transport model allowed to significantly enhancing the modelling of these radon experimental data. The time-averaged radon flux calculated by EOS7Rn (3.42 Bq

  17. Coupled reaction-diffusion equations to model the fission gas release in the irradiation of the uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A semi linear model of weakly coupled parabolic p.d.e. with reaction-diffusion is investigated. The system describes fission gas transfer from grain interior of UO2 to grain boundaries. The problem is studied in a bounded domain. Using the upper-lower solutions method, two monotone sequences for the finite differences equations are constructed. Reasons are mentioned that allow to affirm that in the proposed functional sector the algorithm converges to the unique solution of the differential system. (author)

  18. Large ore-concentrated area of uranium deposits and uranium metellogeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of large ore-concentrated are results from the anomalous concentration of multi-mineral resources and large amount of ore materials during the process of geologic evolution history. Different ore-concentrated areas are characterized by different typical mineral resources and typical ore deposits. By taking uranium deposit as an example, the author recognizes 14 large ore-concentrated areas of uranium deposit in the world, and studies the time-space constraints of large ore-concentrated areas of uranium deposits and their relation with geodynamic evolution, and on the above basis, discusses the unusual concentration of ore elements in large ore-concentrated areas of uranium deposits, as well as proposes the characteristics of 'unusual concentration in certain points and areas' and 'explosion metallogeny in a short period of time' of multiple mineral resources. According to the three basic 'links', i.e. 'source, transportation and precipitation', the author proposes the metallogeny of large ore-concentrated areas of uranium deposits. Of them, the study on the deep-source metallogeny, water-rock intereaction of special alkaline fluid and precipitation environment has made a foundation for the establishment of prospecting model of large uranium ore-concentration areas

  19. EXAFS studies of silicate glasses containing uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium silicate glasses containing hexavalent uranium ions have been studied using the EXAFS technique. The U6+ ions appear in the uranyl configuration with two oxygen atoms at 1.85 A and four to five at 2.2-2.3 A. In the glasses (0.25Na2O.0.75SiO2)sub(1-x)(UO3)sub(x) with x = 0.02 to x = 0.1, planar (or nearly planar) uranium containing clusters, with U-U distances of 3.3 A, are observed. A layered model is proposed to describe these glasses. (Auth.)

  20. Estimation of uranium GI absorption fractions for children and adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium is ubiquitously found in drinking water and food. The gastrointestinal tract absorption fraction (f1) is an important parameter in risk assessment of uranium burdens from ingestion. Although absorption of uranium from ingestion has been studied extensively in the past, human data concerning children and adults are still limited. In a previous study based on measurements of uranium concentration in 73 bone-ash samples collected by Health Canada, the absorption fractions for uranium ingestion were determined to be 0.093 ± 0.113 for infants, and 0.050 ± 0.032 for young children ranging from 1 to 7 y of age. To extend the study, a total of 69 bone-ash samples were selected for children and adults ranging from 7 to 25 y of age and residing in the same Canadian community that is known to have an elevated level of uranium in its drinking water supply. For each bone-ash sample, the total uranium concentration was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. To solve uranium transfer in the biokinetic model for uranium given in International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 69 with estimated daily uranium intake, the program WinSAAM v3.0.1 was used. The absorption fractions were determined to be 0.030 ± 0.022 for children (7-18 y) and 0.021 ± 0.015 for adults (18-25 y). For anyone more than 18 y of age, the estimated f1 value for uranium agree well with the ICRP recommended value of 0.02. Published by Oxford Univ. Press on behalf of the Canadian Government 2010. (authors)

  1. Translocation of uranium from water to foodstuff while cooking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnapriya, K C; Baksi, Ananya; Chaudhari, Swathi; Gupta, Soujit Sen; Pradeep, T

    2015-10-30

    The present work report the unusual uranium uptake by foodstuff, especially those rich in carbohydrates like rice when they are cooked in water, contaminated with uranium. The major staple diet in South Asia, rice, was chosen to study its interaction with UO2(2+), the active uranium species in water, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Highest uptake limit was checked by cooking rice at very high uranium concentration and it was found to be good scavenger of uranium. To gain insight into the mechanism of uptake, direct interaction of UO2(2+) with monosaccharides was also studied, using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry taking mannose as a model. The studies have been done with dissolved uranium salt, uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UO2(NO3)2·6H2O), as well as the leachate of a stable oxide of uranium, UO2(s), both of which exist as UO2(2+) in water. Among the eight different rice varieties investigated, Karnataka Ponni showed the maximum uranium uptake whereas unpolished Basmati rice showed the minimum. Interaction with other foodstuffs (potato, carrot, peas, kidney beans and lentils) with and without NaCl affected the extent of chemical interaction but was not consistent with the carbohydrate content. Uranium interaction with D-mannose monitored through ESI-MS, under optimized instrumental parameters, identified the peaks corresponding to uranyl adduct with mannose monomer, dimer and trimer and the species were confirmed by MS/MS studies. The product ion mass spectra showed peaks illustrating water loss from the parent ion as the collision energy was increased, an evidence for the strong interaction of uranium with mannose. This study would constitute the essential background for understanding interaction of uranium with various foods. Extension of this work would involve identification of foodstuff as green heavy metal scavengers. PMID:25956648

  2. Uranium hexafluoride handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office, and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are co-sponsoring this Second International Conference on Uranium Hexafluoride Handling. The conference is offered as a forum for the exchange of information and concepts regarding the technical and regulatory issues and the safety aspects which relate to the handling of uranium hexafluoride. Through the papers presented here, we attempt not only to share technological advances and lessons learned, but also to demonstrate that we are concerned about the health and safety of our workers and the public, and are good stewards of the environment in which we all work and live. These proceedings are a compilation of the work of many experts in that phase of world-wide industry which comprises the nuclear fuel cycle. Their experience spans the entire range over which uranium hexafluoride is involved in the fuel cycle, from the production of UF6 from the naturally-occurring oxide to its re-conversion to oxide for reactor fuels. The papers furnish insights into the chemical, physical, and nuclear properties of uranium hexafluoride as they influence its transport, storage, and the design and operation of plant-scale facilities for production, processing, and conversion to oxide. The papers demonstrate, in an industry often cited for its excellent safety record, continuing efforts to further improve safety in all areas of handling uranium hexafluoride

  3. Uranium deposits of Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazil is a country of vast natural resources, including numerous uranium deposits. In support of the country's nuclear power program, Brazil has developed the most active uranium industry in South America. Brazil has one operating reactor (Angra 1, a 626-MWe PWR), and two under construction. The country's economic challenges have slowed the progress of its nuclear program. At present, the Pocos de Caldas district is the only active uranium production. In 1990, the Cercado open-pit mine produced approximately 45 metric tons (MT) U3O8 (100 thousand pounds). Brazil's state-owned uranium production and processing company, Uranio do Brasil, announced it has decided to begin shifting its production from the high-cost and nearly depleted deposits at Pocos de Caldas, to lower-cost reserves at Lagoa Real. Production at Lagoa Real is schedules to begin by 1993. In addition to these two districts, Brazil has many other known uranium deposits, and as a whole, it is estimated that Brazil has over 275,000 MT U3O8 (600 million pounds U3O8) in reserves

  4. Microbial reduction of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reduction of the soluble, oxidized form of uranium, U(VI), to insoluble U(IV) is an important mechanism for the immobilization of uranium in aquatic sediments and for the formation of some uranium ores. U(VI) reduction had generally been regarded as an abiologial reaction in which sulphide, molecular hydrogen or organic compounds function as the reductant. Microbial involvement in U(VI) reduction has been considered to be limited to indirect effects, such as microbial metabolism providing the reduced compounds for abiological U(VI) reduction and microbial cell walls providing a surface to stimulate abiological U(VI) reduction. We report here, however, that dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can obtain energy for growth by electron transport to U(VI). This novel form of microbial metabolism can be much faster than commonly cited abiological mechanisms for U(VI) reduction. Not only do these findings expand the known potential terminal electron acceptors for microbial energy transduction, they offer a likely explanation for the deposition of uranium in aquatic sediments and aquifers, and suggest a method for biological remediation of environments contaminated with uranium. (author)

  5. Uranium hexafluoride handling. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    The United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office, and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are co-sponsoring this Second International Conference on Uranium Hexafluoride Handling. The conference is offered as a forum for the exchange of information and concepts regarding the technical and regulatory issues and the safety aspects which relate to the handling of uranium hexafluoride. Through the papers presented here, we attempt not only to share technological advances and lessons learned, but also to demonstrate that we are concerned about the health and safety of our workers and the public, and are good stewards of the environment in which we all work and live. These proceedings are a compilation of the work of many experts in that phase of world-wide industry which comprises the nuclear fuel cycle. Their experience spans the entire range over which uranium hexafluoride is involved in the fuel cycle, from the production of UF{sub 6} from the naturally-occurring oxide to its re-conversion to oxide for reactor fuels. The papers furnish insights into the chemical, physical, and nuclear properties of uranium hexafluoride as they influence its transport, storage, and the design and operation of plant-scale facilities for production, processing, and conversion to oxide. The papers demonstrate, in an industry often cited for its excellent safety record, continuing efforts to further improve safety in all areas of handling uranium hexafluoride. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  6. Uranium tailings sampling manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this manual is to describe the requisite sampling procedures for the application of uniform high-quality standards to detailed geotechnical, hydrogeological, geochemical and air quality measurements at Canadian uranium tailings disposal sites. The selection and implementation of applicable sampling procedures for such measurements at uranium tailings disposal sites are complicated by two primary factors. Firstly, the physical and chemical nature of uranium mine tailings and effluent is considerably different from natural soil materials and natural waters. Consequently, many conventional methods for the collection and analysis of natural soils and waters are not directly applicable to tailings. Secondly, there is a wide range in the physical and chemical nature of uranium tailings. The composition of the ore, the milling process, the nature of tailings depositon, and effluent treatment vary considerably and are highly site-specific. Therefore, the definition and implementation of sampling programs for uranium tailings disposal sites require considerable evaluation, and often innovation, to ensure that appropriate sampling and analysis methods are used which provide the flexibility to take into account site-specific considerations. The following chapters describe the objective and scope of a sampling program, preliminary data collection, and the procedures for sampling of tailings solids, surface water and seepage, tailings pore-water, and wind-blown dust and radon

  7. Experimental study and model development for 'uranium dioxide-epoxy resin' heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to characterize nuclear fuels, samples are currently embedded in an epoxy polymer resin. In storage conditions, the presence of organic products in contact with highly radioactive material generates gas due to a radiolysis phenomenon. Samples management imposes the definition of a fuel and resin separation process. This work aims at developing a tool for the optimal design and control of a suitable heat treatment process. This development is based on experiments and on the modeling of the resin pyrolysis reactions coupled to mass, heat and momentum transfers. One of the difficulties of the study lies to the needed process control on various scales: i) on a global scale to represent the treatment conditions and ii) on a local scale to represent the conditions close to fuel material. This study uses a combined modeling - simulation approach with experiments carried out with the help of a thermo-balance for kinetic data acquisition, on the one hand and in an experimental oven, on the other hand. The process will be performed in two stages, resin pyrolysis and residue (Char) oxidation. Nuclear fuel can be oxidized during both stages. Indeed, the pyrolysis degrades the resin and generated pyrolysis gases, which produce an oxidizing atmosphere. Oxidation of pyrolysis residue can modify the structure of spent fuel and liberate fission gases. The resin pyrolysis produced non-condensable gases, steam, tar and char. The final hydrogen content in the char has to be as low as possible and close to zero to be sure that the radiolysis phenomenon will never occur during of nuclear fuel storage. The process development has been carried out in stages. The first step is to investigate the overall kinetics of epoxy degradation and the determination of the generated gas kinetics. The influence of the presence of nuclear fuel is investigated with epoxy-UO2 mixture. The results showed no significant effect of the nuclear fuel presence. The second part is the coupling of kinetic

  8. Fission Enhanced diffusion of uranium in zirconia

    CERN Document Server

    Bérerd, N; Moncoffre, N; Sainsot, P; Faust, H; Catalette, H

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with the comparison between thermal and Fission Enhanced Diffusion (FED) of uranium into zirconia, representative of the inner face of cladding tubes. The experiments under irradiation are performed at the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble using the Lohengrin spectrometer. A thin $^{235}UO\\_2$ layer in direct contact with an oxidized zirconium foil is irradiated in the ILL high flux reactor. The fission product flux is about 10$^{11}$ ions cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ and the target temperature is measured by an IR pyrometer. A model is proposed to deduce an apparent uranium diffusion coefficient in zirconia from the energy distribution broadening of two selected fission products. It is found to be equal to 10$^{-15}$ cm$^2$ s$^{-1}$ at 480$\\circ$C and compared to uranium thermal diffusion data in ZrO$\\_2$ in the same pressure and temperature conditions. The FED results are analysed in comparison with literature data.

  9. Leukaemia among Czech uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study presents recent findings in an extended cohort of miners, now including nearly 10 000 uranium and 2 000 tin miners and followed up to 1999. A total of 30 cases of leukaemia were observed among Czech uranium miners, corresponding to standardized mortality ratio of 1.5, 90% CI: 1.0-2.1. The risk is analyzed in relation to cumulated dose from radon, external gamma radiation and alpha radiation from long lived radionuclides contained in mining aerosol. Doses to red bone marrow were estimated using measurements of external gamma activities since the early 1960s and measurements of long lived radionuclides in the aerosol since the 1970s. The red bone marrow dose from inhaled long lived radionuclides is estimated by applying respiratory tract model and relevant biokinetic models. The substantial point is that the dose is cumulated even after the underground work has stopped. Another important point is the difference of the exposure by job category. By extrapolating available exposure data and applying models based on ICRP-66 and ICRP-68, individual doses were estimated using working histories, job matrix, and time since exposure. The cumulated red bone marrow dose includes external gamma radiation, dose from radon and its progeny, and committed equivalent dose from long lived alpha-emitters in dependence on the individual length of follow-up. The mean cumulated dose is 158 mSv. Among uranium miners, about 52% of the total dose is due to inhalation of uranium and its decay products with aerosol in mines, about 33% is due to gamma radiation, and some 15% of the dose is from radon and its progeny. The risk coefficient (excess relative risk per sievert) corresponding to these estimates in the present study is 3.1 (90% CI: 1.3 - 5.4). The estimated risk is subject to a considerable uncertainty, due to small numbers and the uncertainty in the estimated dose. However, the magnitude of the risk is consistent with estimates from other studies. (orig.)

  10. Uranium markets after the hangover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, H. (Hugh Douglas and Co. Ltd., San Francisco, CA (USA))

    1982-07-01

    A report is given on the current depressed state of the world's uranium markets and on the prospects for recovery. The impact on the uranium industry of low prices and reduced demand are outlined.

  11. Uranium analysis. Fluorine ionometric determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorine determination in uranium, applicable for fluorine content between 10 to 2000 ppm, by dissolution in nitric acid, uranium (VI) citric complex formation, ionometry, potential is compared with a calibration curve

  12. Model equations for Calculating Rn-gas Concentrations in Air of Uranium Exploratory Tunnels, Allouga, West-Central Sinai , Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabal Allouga area is located some 40 km due east from Abu Zenima town on the east coast of the Gulf of Suez, West-Central Sinai, Egypt. A network of exploratory tunnels totaling 670m in length and approximately 2x2 m in cross section, were excavated within a paleosol clayey bed. They host (Fe, Mn)-, Cu-, and U-mineralizations. Portions of the tunnels are naturally ventilated and others portions are non-ventilated and show ground water seepage through fractures. Model equations were developed for calculating the Rn-gas concentrations in the air of the tunnels under dry conditions where Rn-gas transport is mainly by air flow through porous media as well as for wet conditions where Rn-gas transport is mainly by ground water flow into the tunnels. Under dry conditions the model calculated Rn-gas concentrations(15.2-60.6 PCi/1) are consistent with measured values by active techniques (3.26-22.85 pCi/1) and by SSNTD techniques (19-69.1 pCi/1) when the Rn-emanation coefficient (alpha= 0.05-0.2), the emanating rock thickness (X=10 cm) and U-concentration averages 30 ppm. Under wet and non-ventilated conditions the model calculated Rn-gas concentrations (159-1248 pCi/1) are consistent with the measured values by active techniques (231-1348 pCi/1) and by SSNTD techniques (144-999pCi/1), when the Rn-emanation coefficient (alpha=0.1-0.25), the ground water flow (F=0.04-0.10 ml/s-1cm-2) and U-concertrations (100-250ppm)

  13. Long term contaminant migration and impacts from uranium mill tailings. Comparison of computer models using a realistic dataset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the final report of the Working Group describing: the enhancement of the previously devised V1 scenario to produce a V2 scenario which includes more detailed source term and other site specific data; the application of models in deterministic and probabilistic mode to calculate contaminant concentrations in biosphere media, and related radiation doses, contaminant intakes and health risks, including estimates of uncertainties; the comparison and analysis of the resulting calculations. A series of scenarios was developed based on data provided by Working Group members from a range of actual tailings disposal sites, culminating in the V2.2 and V2.3 scenarios. The V2.2 and V2.3 scenarios are identical in all respects, except that the V2.2 considers radioactive (U-238 chain) contaminants, whilst the V2.3 considers stable elements (As, Ni, Pb). Since the scenarios are based on data obtained from a range of actual sites, they should be considered to be generically realistic rather than representative of a particular single site. In both scenarios, the contaminants of interest are assumed to be released in leachate from a tailings pile into an underlying aquifer. They are transported in groundwater through the aquifer to a well. Water is abstracted from the well and used for: watering beef cattle; human consumption; and irrigating leafy vegetables. The beef and leafy vegetables are consumed by humans living in the area. The same contaminants are also released into the atmosphere due to the wind erosion of the pile and then deposited upon the soil, pasture and leafy vegetables. In addition, for the V2.2 scenario, Rn-222 is assumed to be released to atmosphere from the pile. Unlike the V1 scenario, no consideration is given to surface water exposure pathways. Results show that there is exceedingly good agreement between participants' deterministic and probabilistic estimates of total dose or intake. They agree within a factor of two to three for both scenarios. Even

  14. Study of influence of anion and extractant on distribution coefficient of uranium salts by the method of mathematic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations of extraction equilibria in the systems with uranyl nitrate and halogenacetates and oxygen-containing organic solvents are done. On the basis of data calculated multiple-factor analysis of the influence of anion and extractant on distribution function of uranyl salts between aqueous and organic phases is realized. Superiorities of multiple-factor analysis for exposure of effective qualitative and quantitative compositions of extraction mixtures are shown. Possibilities of theoretical investigations using mathematical modeling in studying uranyl salts extraction mechanism by different extractants are considered

  15. The Toxicity of Depleted Uranium

    OpenAIRE

    Wayne Briner

    2010-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is an emerging environmental pollutant that is introduced into the environment primarily by military activity. While depleted uranium is less radioactive than natural uranium, it still retains all the chemical toxicity associated with the original element. In large doses the kidney is the target organ for the acute chemical toxicity of this metal, producing potentially lethal tubular necrosis. In contrast, chronic low dose exposure to depleted uranium may not produce a c...

  16. Uranium resources, production and demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power-generating capacity will continue to expand, albeit at a slower pace than during the past fifteen years. This expansion must be matched by an adequately increasing supply of uranium. This report compares uranium supply and demand data in free market countries with the nuclear industry's natural uranium requirements up to the year 2000. It also reviews the status of uranium exploration, resources and production in 46 countries

  17. Radiation damage of metal uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is concerned with the role of dispersion second phase in uranium and burnup rate. The role of dispersion phases in radiation stability of metal uranium was studies by three methods: variation of electric conductivity dependent on the neutron flux and temperature of pure uranium for different states of dispersion second phase; influence of dispersion phase on the radiation creep; transmission electron microscopy of fresh and irradiated uranium

  18. Risk evaluation of uranium mining: a new kinetic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Release of uranium and associated heavy metals is the main environmental concern regarding exploitation and processing of U-ore. Increasing uranium mining activities potentially increase the risks linked to radiation exposure. As a tool to evaluate these risks, a geochemical inverse modeling approach was developed to estimate the water-mineral interaction in the presence of uranium. Our methodology is based on the estimation of dissolution rate and reactive surface area of the different minerals participating in the reaction by reconstructing the chemical evolution of the interacting fluids. We found that the reactive surface area of parent-rock minerals changes over several orders of magnitude during the investigated reaction time. We propose that the formation of coatings on dissolving mineral surfaces significantly reduces reactivity. Our results show that negatively charged uranium complexes decrease when alkalinity and rock buffer capacity is similarly lower, indicating that the dissolved carbonate is an important parameter impacting uranium mobility. (authors)

  19. Anion exchange kinetics of uranium in sulphate media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments have shown that the sorption of uranium from acidic sulphate solutions onto strong base-anion exchange resins is particle diffusion controlled in the uranium concentration range 0.0001 to 0.004 M. A simplified diffusion model, based on Fick's Law, fits the kinetic data at each concentration. The rate of sorption falls significantly at lowered solution concentration. This corresponds with a lowered equilibrium loading of uranium and can be predicted with the Nernst-Planck equations using the measured self diffusion coefficient of uranium (1.65 x 10-8 cm2/s) and sulphate ions. The importance of this lowering of uranium sorption on the design of ion exchange equipment is stressed. (author)

  20. Speciation of uranium(VI) at the solid/solution interface: sorption modeling on zirconium silicate and zirconium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomenech, C.; Drot, R.; Simoni, E. [Univ. Paris 11 - Inst. de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay, Groupe de Radiochimie, Orsay (France)

    2003-07-01

    In the field of nuclear waste storage, knowledge of the sorption behavior of radionuclides onto mineral surfaces is of fundamental importance in order to evaluate environmental impacts. We have studied uranyl ion sorption mechanisms onto zirconium silicate and zirconium oxide with a double approach, coupling both macroscopic and structural investigations. The spectroscopic results, reported in a previous paper, allowed a complete determination of the different species involved in the studied sorption reactions. This paper presents the results of the macroscopic part of the study. Surface characterizations of the solids were first carried out: determination of the pH of the point of zero charge, of the surface site densities and of the surface acidity constants. The experimental retention data were then interpreted in terms of a constant capacitance model using the FITEQL code. Results from structural investigation were used to constrain the modeling. This coupled approach led to accurate reactions stoichiometry and associated sorption constants values, since they were determined with respect to different experimental results, both macroscopic and microscopic. (orig.)