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Sample records for calcium-sensing receptor structural

  1. Structural mechanism of ligand activation in human calcium-sensing receptor

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    Geng, Yong; Mosyak, Lidia; Kurinov, Igor; Zuo, Hao; Sturchler, Emmanuel; Cheng, Tat Cheung; Subramanyam, Prakash; Brown, Alice P.; Brennan, Sarah C.; Mun, Hee-chang; Bush, Martin; Chen, Yan; Nguyen, Trang X.; Cao, Baohua; Chang, Donald D.; Quick, Matthias; Conigrave, Arthur D.; Colecraft, Henry M.; McDonald, Patricia; Fan, Qing R.

    2016-07-19

    Human calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that maintains extracellular Ca2+homeostasis through the regulation of parathyroid hormone secretion. It functions as a disulfide-tethered homodimer composed of three main domains, the Venus Flytrap module, cysteine-rich domain, and seven-helix transmembrane region. Here, we present the crystal structures of the entire extracellular domain of CaSR in the resting and active conformations. We provide direct evidence that L-amino acids are agonists of the receptor. In the active structure, L-Trp occupies the orthosteric agonist-binding site at the interdomain cleft and is primarily responsible for inducing extracellular domain closure to initiate receptor activation. Our structures reveal multiple binding sites for Ca2+and PO43-ions. Both ions are crucial for structural integrity of the receptor. While Ca2+ions stabilize the active state, PO43-ions reinforce the inactive conformation. The activation mechanism of CaSR involves the formation of a novel dimer interface between subunits.

  2. Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia and calcium sensing receptor

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    Mrgan, Monija; Nielsen, Sanne; Brixen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) is a lifelong, benign autosomal dominant disease characterized by hypercalcemia, normal to increased parathyroid hormone level, and a relatively low renal calcium excretion. Inactivation of the calcium-sensing receptor in heterozygous patients results in...

  3. Extracellular calcium-sensing receptor: structural and functional features and association with diseases

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    Hauache O.M.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The recently cloned extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaR is a G protein-coupled receptor that plays an essential role in the regulation of extracellular calcium homeostasis. This receptor is expressed in all tissues related to this control (parathyroid glands, thyroid C-cells, kidneys, intestine and bones and also in tissues with apparently no role in the maintenance of extracellular calcium levels, such as brain, skin and pancreas. The CaR amino acid sequence is compatible with three major domains: a long and hydrophilic aminoterminal extracellular domain, where most of the activating and inactivating mutations described to date are located and where the dimerization process occurs, and the agonist-binding site is located, a hydrophobic transmembrane domain involved in the signal transduction mechanism from the extracellular domain to its respective G protein, and a carboxyterminal intracellular tail, with a well-established role for cell surface CaR expression and for signal transduction. CaR cloning was immediately followed by the association of genetic human diseases with inactivating and activating CaR mutations: familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia and neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism are caused by CaR-inactivating mutations, whereas autosomal dominant hypoparathyroidism is secondary to CaR-activating mutations. Finally, we will comment on the development of drugs that modulate CaR function by either activating (calcimimetic drugs or antagonizing it (calcilytic drugs, and on their potential therapeutic implications, such as medical control of specific cases of primary and uremic hyperparathyroidism with calcimimetic drugs and a potential treatment for osteoporosis with a calcilytic drug.

  4. Etelcalcetide (AMG 416), a peptide agonist of the calcium-sensing receptor, preserved cortical bone structure and bone strength in subtotal nephrectomized rats with established secondary hyperparathyroidism.

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    Li, Xiaodong; Yu, Longchuan; Asuncion, Frank; Grisanti, Mario; Alexander, Shawn; Hensley, Kelly; Han, Chun-Ya; Niu, Qing-Tian; Dwyer, Denise; Villasenor, Kelly; Stolina, Marina; Dean, Charles; Ominsky, Michael S; Ke, Hua Zhu; Tomlinson, James E; Richards, William G

    2017-12-01

    Sustained elevation of parathyroid hormone (PTH) is catabolic to cortical bone, as evidenced by deterioration in bone structure (cortical porosity), and is a major factor for increased fracture risk in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Etelcalcetide (AMG 416), a novel peptide agonist of the calcium-sensing receptor, reduces PTH levels in subtotal nephrectomized (Nx) rats and in hemodialysis patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) in clinical studies; however, effects of etelcalcetide on bone have not been determined. In a rat model of established SHPT with renal osteodystrophy, etelcalcetide or vehicle was administered by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection to subtotal Nx rats with elevated PTH (>750pg/mL) once per day for 6weeks. Sham-operated rats receiving vehicle (s.c.) served as non-SHPT controls. Prior to treatment, significant increases in serum creatinine (2-fold), blood urea nitrogen (BUN, 3-fold), PTH (5-fold), fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23; 13-fold) and osteocalcin (12-fold) were observed in SHPT rats compared to non-SHPT controls. Elevations in serum creatinine and BUN were unaffected by treatment with vehicle or etelcalcetide. In contrast, etelcalcetide significantly decreased PTH, FGF23 and osteocalcin, whereas vehicle treatment did not. Cortical bone porosity increased and bone strength decreased in vehicle-treated SHPT rats compared to non-SHPT controls. Cortical bone structure improved and energy to failure was significantly greater in SHPT rats treated with etelcalcetide compared to vehicle. Mineralization lag time and marrow fibrosis were significantly reduced by etelcalcetide. In conclusion, etelcalcetide reduced bone turnover, attenuated mineralization defect and marrow fibrosis, and preserved cortical bone structure and bone strength by lowering PTH in subtotal Nx rats with established SHPT. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Calcium sensing receptor signalling in physiology and cancer.

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    Brennan, Sarah C; Thiem, Ursula; Roth, Susanne; Aggarwal, Abhishek; Fetahu, Irfete Sh; Tennakoon, Samawansha; Gomes, Ana Rita; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Bruggeman, Frank; Mentaverri, Romuald; Riccardi, Daniela; Kallay, Enikö

    2013-07-01

    The calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) is a class C G-protein-coupled receptor that is crucial for the feedback regulation of extracellular free ionised calcium homeostasis. While extracellular calcium (Ca(2+)o) is considered the primary physiological ligand, the CaSR is activated physiologically by a plethora of molecules including polyamines and l-amino acids. Activation of the CaSR by different ligands has the ability to stabilise unique conformations of the receptor, which may lead to preferential coupling of different G proteins; a phenomenon termed 'ligand-biased signalling'. While mutations of the CaSR are currently not linked with any malignancies, altered CaSR expression and function are associated with cancer progression. Interestingly, the CaSR appears to act both as a tumour suppressor and an oncogene, depending on the pathophysiology involved. Reduced expression of the CaSR occurs in both parathyroid and colon cancers, leading to loss of the growth suppressing effect of high Ca(2+)o. On the other hand, activation of the CaSR might facilitate metastasis to bone in breast and prostate cancer. A deeper understanding of the mechanisms driving CaSR signalling in different tissues, aided by a systems biology approach, will be instrumental in developing novel drugs that target the CaSR or its ligands in cancer. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 12th European Symposium on Calcium. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. NFAT regulates calcium-sensing receptor-mediated TNF production

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    abdullah, huda ismail; Pedraza, Paulina L.; Hao, Shoujin; Rodland, Karin D.; McGiff, John C.; Ferreri, Nicholas R.

    2006-05-01

    Because nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) has been implicated in TNF production as well as osmoregulation and salt and water homeostasis, we addressed whether calcium-sensing receptor (CaR)-mediated TNF production in medullary thick ascending limb (mTAL) cells was NFAT dependent. TNF production in response to addition of extracellular Ca2+ (1.2 mM) was abolished in mTAL cells transiently transfected with a dominant-negative CaR construct (R796W) or pretreated with the phosphatidylinositol phospholipase C (PI-PLC) inhibitor U-73122. Cyclosporine A (CsA), an inhibitor of the serine/threonine phosphatase calcineurin, and a peptide ligand, VIVIT, that selectively inhibits calcineurin-NFAT signaling, also prevented CaR-mediated TNF production. Increases in calcineurin activity in cells challenged with Ca2+ were inhibited after pretreatment with U-73122 and CsA, suggesting that CaR activation increases calcineurin activity in a PI-PLC-dependent manner. Moreover, U-73122, CsA, and VIVIT inhibited CaR-dependent activity of an NFAT construct that drives expression of firefly luciferase in transiently transfected mTAL cells. Collectively, these data verify the role of calcineurin and NFAT in CaR-mediated TNF production by mTAL cells. Activation of the CaR also increased the binding of NFAT to a consensus oligonucleotide, an effect that was blocked by U-73122 and CsA, suggesting that a calcineurin- and NFAT-dependent pathway increases TNF production in mTAL cells. This mechanism likely regulates TNF gene transcription as U-73122, CsA, and VIVIT blocked CaR-dependent activity of a TNF promoter construct. Elucidating CaR-mediated signaling pathways that regulate TNF production in the mTAL will be crucial to understanding mechanisms that regulate extracellular fluid volume and salt balance.

  7. Calcium-sensing receptor in breast physiology and cancer

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    Wonnam Kim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR is expressed in normal breast epithelial cells and in breast cancer cells. During lactation, activation of the CaSR in mammary epithelial cells increases calcium transport into milk and inhibits parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP secretion into milk and into the circulation. The ability to sense changes in extracellular calcium allows the lactating breast to actively participate in the regulation of systemic calcium and bone metabolism, and to coordinate calcium usage with calcium availability during milk production. Interestingly, as compared to normal breast cells, in breast cancer cells, the regulation of PTHrP secretion by the CaSR becomes rewired due to a switch in its G-protein usage such that activation of the CaSR increases instead of decreases PTHrP production. In normal cells the CaSR couples to Gi to inhibit cAMP and PTHrP production, whereas in breast cancer cells, it couples to Gs to stimulate cAMP and PTHrP production. Activation of the CaSR on breast cancer cells regulates breast cancer cell proliferation, death and migration, in part, by stimulating PTHrP production. In this article, we discuss the biology of the CaSR in the normal breast and in breast cancer, and review recent findings suggesting that the CaSR activates a nuclear pathway of PTHrP action that stimulates cellular proliferation and inhibits cell death, helping cancer cells adapt to elevated extracellular calcium levels. Understanding the diverse actions mediated by the CaSR may help us better understand lactation physiology, breast cancer progression and osteolytic bone metastases.

  8. CALCIUM-SENSING RECEPTOR GENE: REGULATION OF EXPRESSION

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    Geoffrey Noel Hendy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The human calcium-sensing receptor gene (CASR has 8 exons, and localizes to chromosome 3q. Exons 1A and 1B encode alternative 5’-untranslated regions (UTRs that splice to exon 2 encoding the AUG initiation codon. Exons 2-7 encode the CaSR protein of 1078 amino acids. Promoter P1 has TATA and CCAAT boxes upstream of exon 1A, and promoter P2 has Sp1/3 motifs at the start site of exon 1B. Exon 1A transcripts from the P1 promoter are reduced in parathyroid tumors and colon carcinomas. Studies of colon carcinomas and neuroblastomas have emphasized the importance of epigenetic changes – promoter methylation of the GC-rich P2 promoter, histone acetylation – as well as involvement of microRNAs in bringing about CASR gene silencing and reduced CaSR expression. Functional cis-elements in the CASR promoters responsive to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH2D], proinflammatory cytokines, and the transcription factor glial cells missing-2 (GCM2 have been characterized. Reduced levels of CaSR and reduced responsiveness to active vitamin D in parathyroid neoplasia and colon carcinoma may blunt the tumor suppressor activity of the CaSR. The hypocalcemia of critically ill patients with burn injury or sepsis is associated with CASR gene upregulation by TNF-alpha and IL-1beta via kappaB elements, and by IL-6 via Stat1/3 and Sp1/3 elements in the CASR gene promoters, respectively. The CASR is transactivated by GCM2 – the expression of which is essential for parathyroid gland development. Hyperactive forms of GCM2 may contribute to later parathyroid hyperactivity or tumorigenesis. The expression of the CaSR––the calciostat––is regulated physiologically and pathophysiologically at the gene level.

  9. The calcium-sensing receptor and the hallmarks of cancer.

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    Tennakoon, Samawansha; Aggarwal, Abhishek; Kállay, Enikö

    2016-06-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) plays a pivotal role in systemic calcium metabolism by regulating parathyroid hormone secretion and urinary calcium excretion. The CaSR is ubiquitously expressed, implying a wide range of functions regulated by this receptor. Abnormal CaSR function affects the development of both calciotropic disorders such as hyperparathyroidism, and non-calciotropic disorders such as cardiovascular disease and cancer, which are the leading causes of mortality worldwide. The CaSR is able to bind a plethora of ligands; it interacts with multiple G protein subtypes, and regulates highly divergent downstream signalling pathways, depending on the cellular context. The CaSR is a key regulator for such diverse processes as hormone secretion, gene expression, inflammation, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Due to this pleiotropy, the CaSR is able to regulate cell fate and is implicated in the development of many types of benign or malignant tumours of the breast, prostate, parathyroid, and colon. In cancer, the CaSR appears to have paradoxical roles, and depending on the tissue involved, it is able to prevent or promote tumour growth. In tissues like the parathyroid or colon, the CaSR inhibits proliferation and induces terminal differentiation of the cells. Therefore, loss of the receptor, as seen in colorectal or parathyroid tumours, confers malignant potential, suggestive of a tumour suppressor role. In contrast, in prostate and breast tumours the expression of the CaSR is increased and it seems that it favours metastasis to the bone, acting as an oncogene. Deciphering the molecular mechanism driving the CaSR in the different tissues could lead to development of new allosteric drug compounds that selectively target the CaSR and have therapeutic potential for cancer. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium and Cell Fate. Guest Editors: Jacques Haiech, Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, Thierry Capiod and Olivier Mignen

  10. The calcium-sensing receptor and the reproductive system

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    Isabella Ellinger

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Active placental transport of maternal serum calcium (Ca2+ to the offspring is pivotal for proper development of the fetal skeleton as well as various organ systems. Moreover, extracellular Ca2+ levels impact on distinct processes in mammalian reproduction. The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR translates changes in extracellular Ca2+-concentrations into cellular reactions. This review summarizes current knowledge on the expression of CaSR and its putative functions in reproductive organs. CaSR was detected in placental cells mediating materno-fetal Ca2+-transport such as the the murine intraplacental yolk sac and the human syncytiotrophoblast. As shown in casr knock-out mice, ablation of CaSR downregulates transplacental Ca2+-transport. Receptor expression was reported in human and rat ovarian surface epithelial cells, where CaSR activation stimulates cell proliferation. In follicles of various species a role of CaSR activation in oocyte maturation was suggested. Based on studies in avian follicles, the activation of CaSR expressed in granulosa cells may support the survival of follicles after their selection. CaSR in rat and equine sperms was functionally linked to sperm motility and sperm capacitation. Implantation involves complex interactions between the blastocyst and the uterine epithelium. During early pregnancy, CaSR expression at the implantation site as well as in decidual cells indicates that CaSR is important for blastocyst implantation and decidualization in the rat uterus. Localization of CaSR in human extravillous cytotrophoblasts suggests a role of CaSR in placentation. Overall, evidence for functional involvement of CaSR in physiologic mammalian reproductive processes exists. Moreover, several studies reported altered expression of CaSR in cells of reproductive tissues under pathologic conditions. However, in many tissues we still lack knowledge on physiological ligands activating CaSR, CaSR-linked G-proteins, activated

  11. Association of Calcium-Sensing Receptor (CASR rs 1801725 with Colorectal Cancer

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    Fateme Rostami

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium induces apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells and subsequently prevents colorectal cancer through ion calcium receptor. Calcium-sensing receptor mutation reduces the expression of this receptor, and subsequently in reduces calcium transportation. Many studies have shown that Calcium-sensing receptor gene polymorphism may increase the risk of colorectal cancer. The purpose of this study is to assess the prevalence of calcium-sensing receptor polymorphisms (rs 1801725 in Iran society and to examine the role of this polymorphism in the increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC.Materials and Methods: The research was a case-control study. 105 patients with colorectal cancer and 105 controls were randomly studied using polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism. χ2 test and software 16- SPSS were used for statistical analysis.Results: In patient samples, the frequency of the genotypes TT, GT, GG in gene CASR rs 1801725 was respectively 64.8, 32.4, and 2.9 and the frequency of this polymorphism in control samples was respectively 51.2, 45.7, and 2.9. Frequency of allele G in patient samples was 0/48 and frequency of allele T was 0.25. In addition, Frequency of allele G in control samples was 0.74 and Frequency of allele T was calculated 0.19.Conclusion: The results show that calcium-sensing receptor variant (1801725 rs is not associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer.

  12. Activation of the calcium sensing receptor stimulates gastrin and gastric acid secretion in healthy participants

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    Gastric acid secretion is a complex process regulated by neuronal and hormonal pathways. Ex vivo studies in human gastric tissues indicate that the calcium sensing receptor (CaR), expressed on the surface of G and parietal cells, may be involved in this regulation. We sought to determine whether cin...

  13. The Role of the Calcium-sensing Receptor in Cancer

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    Rodland, Karin D.

    2004-03-01

    The cell surface calcium receptor (Ca2+ receptor) is a particularly difficult receptor to study because its primary physiological ligand, Ca2+, affects numerous biological processes both within and outside of cells. Because of this, distinguishing effects of extracellular Ca2+ mediated by the Ca2+ receptor from those mediated by other mechanisms is challenging. Certain pharmacological approaches, however, when combined with appropriate experimental designs, can be used to more confidently identify cellular responses regulated by the Ca2+ receptor and select those that might be targeted therapeutically. The Ca2+ receptor on parathyroid cells, because it is the primary mechanism regulating secretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH), is one such target. Calcimimetic compounds, which active this Ca2+ receptor and lower circulating levels of PTH, have been developed for treating hyperparathyroidism. The converse pharmaceutical approach, involving calcilytic compounds that block parathyroid cell Ca2+ receptors and stimulate PTH secretion thereby providing an anabolic therapy for osteoporosis, still awaits clinical validation. Although Ca2+ receptors are expressed throughout the body and in many tissues that are not intimately involved in systemic Ca2+ homeostasis, their physiological and/or pathological significance remains speculative and their value as therapeutic targets is unknown.

  14. Calcium sensing receptor as a novel mediator of adipose tissue dysfunction: mechanisms and potential clinical implications

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    Roberto Bravo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is currently a serious worldwide public health problem, reaching pandemic levels. For decades, dietary and behavioral approaches have failed to prevent this disease from expanding, and health authorities are challenged by the elevated prevalence of co-morbid conditions. Understanding how obesity-associated diseases develop from a basic science approach is recognized as an urgent task to face this growing problem. White adipose tissue is an active endocrine organ, with a crucial influence on whole-body homeostasis. White adipose tissue dysfunction plays a key role linking obesity with its associated diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and some cancers. Among the regulators of white adipose tissue physiology, the calcium-sensing receptor has arisen as a potential mediator of white adipose tissue dysfunction. Expression of the receptor has been described in human preadipocytes, adipocytes, and the human adipose cell lines LS14 and SW872. The evidence suggests that calcium-sensing receptor activation in the visceral (i.e. unhealthy white adipose tissue is associated with an increased proliferation of adipose progenitor cells and elevated adipocyte differentiation. In addition, exposure of adipose cells to calcium-sensing receptor activators in vitro elevates proinflammatory cytokine expression and secretion. An increased proinflammatory environment in white adipose tissue plays a key role in the development of white adipose tissue dysfunction that leads to peripheral organ fat deposition and insulin resistance, among other consequences. We propose that calcium-sensing receptor may be one relevant therapeutic target in the struggle to confront the health consequences of the current worldwide obesity pandemic.

  15. Pathogenic role of calcium-sensing receptors in the development and progression of pulmonary hypertension

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    Tang, Haiyang; Yamamura, Aya; Yamamura, Hisao; Song, Shanshan; Dustin R Fraidenburg; Chen, Jiwang; Gu, Yali; Pohl, Nicole M.; Zhou, Tong; Jiménez-Pérez, Laura; Ayon, Ramon J.; Desai, Ankit A.; Goltzman, David; Rischard, Franz; Khalpey, Zain

    2016-01-01

    An increase in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]cyt) in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC) is a major trigger for pulmonary vasoconstriction and a critical stimulation for PASMC proliferation and migration. Previously, we demonstrated that expression and function of calcium sensing receptors (CaSR) in PASMC from patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) and animals with experimental pulmonary hypertension (PH) were greater than in PASMC from normal su...

  16. Vitamin D Receptor and Calcium Sensing Receptor Polymorphisms and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer in European Populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jenab, Mazda; McKay, James; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Hendrik B.; van Duijnhoven, Franzel J. B.; Ferrari, Pietro; Slimani, Nadia; Jansen, Eugene H. J. M.; Pischon, Tobias; Rinaldi, Sabina; Tjonneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Overvad, Kim; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Engel, Pierre; Kaaks, Rudolf; Linseisen, Jakob; Boeing, Heiner; Fisher, Eva; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Dilis, Vardis; Oustoglou, Erifili; Berrino, Franco; Vineis, Paolo; Mattiello, Amalia; Masala, Giovanna; Tumino, Rosario; Vrieling, Alina; van Gils, Carla H.; Peeters, Petra H.; Brustad, Magritt; Lund, Eiliv; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Barricarte, Aurelio; Rodriguez Suarez, Laudina; Molina, Esther; Dorronsoro, Miren; Sala, Nuria; Hallmans, Goran; Palmqvist, Richard; Roddam, Andrew; Key, Timothy J.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Bingham, Sheila; Boffetta, Paolo; Autier, Philippe; Byrnes, Graham; Norat, Teresa; Riboli, Elio

    Increased levels of vitamin D and calcium may play a protective role in colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. It has been suggested that these effects may be mediated by genetic variants of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and the calcium sensing receptor (CASR). However, current epidemiologic evidence from

  17. Biased agonism of the calcium-sensing receptor

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    Thomsen, Alex Rojas Bie; Hvidtfeldt, Maja; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2012-01-01

    After the discovery of molecules modulating G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are able to selectively affect one signaling pathway over others for a specific GPCR, thereby "biasing" the signaling, it has become obvious that the original model of GPCRs existing in either an "on" or "off......" conformation is too simple. The current explanation for this biased agonism is that GPCRs can adopt multiple active conformations stabilized by different molecules, and that each conformation affects intracellular signaling in a different way. In the present study we sought to investigate biased agonism...

  18. Parathyroid-specific interaction of the calcium-sensing receptor and Gaq

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    Pi, Min; Chen, Ling; Huang, MinZhao; Luo, Qiang; Quarles, L. Darryl

    2008-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor regulates various parathyroid gland functions, including hormone secretion, gene transcription, and chief cell hyperplasia through Gαq- and Gαi-dependent signaling pathways. To determine the specific function of Gαq in these processes, we generated transgenic mice using the human parathyroid hormone promoter to drive overexpression of a dominant negative Gαqloop minigene to selectively disrupt Gαq function in the parathyroid gland. The Gαqloop mRNA was highly expr...

  19. Extracellular Ca2+ is a danger signal activating the NLRP3 inflammasome through G protein-coupled calcium sensing receptors

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    Rossol, Manuela; Pierer, Matthias; Raulien, Nora

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome enables monocytes and macrophages to release high levels of interleukin-1ß during inflammatory responses. Concentrations of extracellular calcium can increase at sites of infection, inflammation or cell activation. Here we show that increased extracellular...... calcium activates the NLRP3 inflammasome via stimulation of G protein-coupled calcium sensing receptors. Activation is mediated by signalling through the calcium-sensing receptor and GPRC6A via the phosphatidyl inositol/Ca(2+) pathway. The resulting increase in the intracellular calcium concentration...

  20. The calcium-sensing receptor and calcimimetics in blood pressure modulation

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    Smajilovic, Sanela; Yano, Shozo; Jabbari, Reza

    2011-01-01

    Calcium is a crucial second messenger in the cardiovascular system. However, calcium may also be an extracellular first messenger through a G-protein-coupled receptor that senses extracellular concentration (Ca(2+)(o)), the calcium-sensing receptor (CaR). The most prominent physiological function...... of the CaR is to maintain the extracellular Ca(2+) level in a very tight range by regulating the circulating levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH). This control over PTH and Ca(2+) levels is partially lost in patients suffering from primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Allosteric modulators of the Ca....... This review will summarize the current knowledge on the possible functions of the CaR and calcimimetics on blood pressure regulation....

  1. Diverse roles of extracellular calcium-sensing receptor in the central nervous system

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    Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra; Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya

    2010-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), upon activation by Ca(2+) or other physiologically relevant polycationic molecules, performs diverse functions in the brain. The CaSR is widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) and is characterized by a robust increase in its...... expression, activation, signaling, and functions. In normal physiology as well as in pathologic conditions, CaSR is activated by signals arising from mineral ions, amino acids, polyamines, glutathione, and amyloid-beta in conjunction with Ca(2+) and other divalent cationic ligands. CaSR activation regulates...... membrane excitability of neurons and glia and affects myelination, olfactory and gustatory signal integration, axonal and dendritic growth, and gonadotrophin-releasing hormonal-neuronal migration. Insofar as the CaSR is a clinically important therapeutic target for parathyroid disorders, development of its...

  2. Kokumi substances, enhancers of basic tastes, induce responses in calcium-sensing receptor expressing taste cells.

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    Yutaka Maruyama

    Full Text Available Recently, we reported that calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR is a receptor for kokumi substances, which enhance the intensities of salty, sweet and umami tastes. Furthermore, we found that several γ-glutamyl peptides, which are CaSR agonists, are kokumi substances. In this study, we elucidated the receptor cells for kokumi substances, and their physiological properties. For this purpose, we used Calcium Green-1 loaded mouse taste cells in lingual tissue slices and confocal microscopy. Kokumi substances, applied focally around taste pores, induced an increase in the intracellular Ca(2+ concentration ([Ca(2+](i in a subset of taste cells. These responses were inhibited by pretreatment with the CaSR inhibitor, NPS2143. However, the kokumi substance-induced responses did not require extracellular Ca(2+. CaSR-expressing taste cells are a different subset of cells from the T1R3-expressing umami or sweet taste receptor cells. These observations indicate that CaSR-expressing taste cells are the primary detectors of kokumi substances, and that they are an independent population from the influenced basic taste receptor cells, at least in the case of sweet and umami.

  3. Activation of calcium-sensing receptor increases TRPC3 expression in rat cardiomyocytes

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    Feng, Shan-Li [Department of Clinical Laboratory, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Sun, Ming-Rui [Department of Pharmacology, Qiqihaer Medical College, Qiqihaer 160001 (China); Li, Ting-Ting; Yin, Xin [Department of Clinical Laboratory, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Xu, Chang-Qing [Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Sun, Yi-Hua, E-mail: syh200415@126.com [Department of Clinical Laboratory, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China)

    2011-03-11

    Research highlights: {yields} Calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) activation stimulates TRP channels. {yields} CaR promoted transient receptor potential C3 (TRPC3) expression. {yields} Adult rat ventricular myocytes display capacitative calcium entry (CCE), which was operated by TRPCs. {yields} TRPC channels activation induced by CaR activator sustained the increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} to evoke cardiomyocytes apoptosis. -- Abstract: Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are expressed in cardiomyocytes, which gate a type of influx of extracellular calcium, the capacitative calcium entry. TRP channels play a role in mediating Ca{sup 2+} overload in the heart. Calcium-sensing receptors (CaR) are also expressed in rat cardiac tissue and promote the apoptosis of cardiomyocytes by Ca{sup 2+} overload. However, data about the link between CaR and TRP channels in rat heart are few. In this study, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting were used to examine the expression of the TRP canonical proteins TRPC1 and TRPC3 in adult and neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Laser scan confocal microscopy was used to detect intracellular [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} levels in isolated adult rat ventricular myocytes. The results showed that, in adult rat cardiomyocytes, the depletion of Ca{sup 2+} stores in the endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) by thapsigargin induced a transient increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in the absence of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} and the subsequent restoration of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} sustained the increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} for a few minutes, whereas, the persisting elevation of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was reduced in the presence of the TRPC inhibitor SKF96365. The stimulation of CaR by its activator gadolinium chloride (GdCl{sub 3}) or spermine also resulted in the same effect and the duration of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase was also shortened in the absence of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}. In adult and neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, GdCl{sub 3

  4. 14-3-3 Proteins Buffer Intracellular Calcium Sensing Receptors to Constrain Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Grant

    Full Text Available Calcium sensing receptors (CaSR interact with 14-3-3 binding proteins at a carboxyl terminal arginine-rich motif. Mutations identified in patients with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia, autosomal dominant hypocalcemia, pancreatitis or idiopathic epilepsy support the functional importance of this motif. We combined total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and biochemical approaches to determine the mechanism of 14-3-3 protein regulation of CaSR signaling. Loss of 14-3-3 binding caused increased basal CaSR signaling and plasma membrane levels, and a significantly larger signaling-evoked increase in plasma membrane receptors. Block of core glycosylation with tunicamycin demonstrated that changes in plasma membrane CaSR levels were due to differences in exocytic rate. Western blotting to quantify time-dependent changes in maturation of expressed wt CaSR and a 14-3-3 protein binding-defective mutant demonstrated that signaling increases synthesis to maintain constant levels of the immaturely and maturely glycosylated forms. CaSR thus operates by a feed-forward mechanism, whereby signaling not only induces anterograde trafficking of nascent receptors but also increases biosynthesis to maintain steady state levels of net cellular CaSR. Overall, these studies suggest that 14-3-3 binding at the carboxyl terminus provides an important buffering mechanism to increase the intracellular pool of CaSR available for signaling-evoked trafficking, but attenuates trafficking to control the dynamic range of responses to extracellular calcium.

  5. Calcium-sensing receptor (CASR) is involved in porcine in vitro fertilisation and early embryo development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C; Liu, Y; Larsen, K; Hou, Y P; Callesen, H

    2017-07-17

    It has been demonstrated that extracellular calcium is necessary in fertilisation and embryo development but the mechanism is still not well understood. The present study mainly focussed on the extracellular calcium effector called the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR) and examined its expression in porcine gametes and embryos and its function during fertilisation and early embryo development. By using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, CASR was found to be expressed in porcine oocytes, spermatozoa and embryos at different developmental stages. Functionally, medium supplementation with a CASR agonist or an antagonist during in vitro fertilisation (IVF) and in vitro culture (IVC) was tested. During fertilisation, the presence of a CASR agonist increased sperm penetration rate and decreased polyspermy rate leading to an increased normal fertilisation rate. During embryo development, for the IVF embryos, agonist treatment during IVC significantly increased cleavage rate and blastocyst formation rate compared with the control group. Furthermore, parthenogenetically activated embryos showed similar results with lower cleavage and blastocyst formation rates in the antagonist group than in the other groups. It was concluded that CASR, as the effector of extracellular calcium, modulates porcine fertilisation and early embryo development.

  6. Prostate cancer in African-American men and polymorphism in the calcium-sensing receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Gary G; John, Esther M; Rowland, Glovioell; Ingles, Sue A

    2010-06-15

    Prospective epidemiologic studies indicate that the risk for advanced prostate cancer is increased among men with high levels of serum calcium. Because serum calcium levels are influenced by the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), we examined prostate cancer in African-American men in relation to three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CaSR gene, A986S, R990G and Q1011E. This is the first study of CaSR polymorphisms and risk of prostate cancer. The CaSR genotypes were not associated with prostate cancer overall. However, we observed significant heterogeneity by disease stage for the Q1011E polymorphism (p = 0.02). Advanced cases were significantly less likely than controls or localized cases to be homozygous for the minor allele of the Q1011E polymorphism (1 vs. 5%). Cases with advanced disease were six times less likely to carry two copies of the minor allele than were controls (OR = 0.16, p = 0.02) or localized cases (OR = 0.15, p = 0.01) and were significantly older at diagnosis (68.8 ± 5.7 vs. 64.0 ± 9.0 y for the QQ and EE genotypes, p = 0.004). We genotyped three CaSR SNPs for 458 African-American prostate cancer cases and 248 controls from a population-based case-control study, the California Collaborative Prostate Cancer Study. The CaSR Q1011E minor allele, which is common in populations with African ancestry, may be associated with a less aggressive form of prostate cancer among African-American men.

  7. Clinical Expression of Calcium Sensing Receptor Polymorphism (A986S) in Normocalcemic and Asymptomatic Hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Soto, G; Romero, E; Castrillón, J L P; Jauregui, O I; de Luis Román, D

    2016-03-01

    Normocalcemic and asymptomatic hyperparathyroidism diagnosis are becoming more common. However, their pathophysiology is incompletely known. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical effect of calcium-sensing receptor polymorphism (A986S) in normocalcemic and asymtomatic HPT. Prospective study conducted with 61 consecutive normocalcemic and asymptomatic HPT patients was followed up during a minimum period of 1 year. Secondary causes of hyperparathyroidism were ruled out. Calcium and phosphorus metabolism parameters were evaluated in at least 2 determinations during follow-up to classify as normocalcemic or asymptomatic hyperparathyroidism. Bone mineral density and A986S polymorphism genotype were also analyzed. Thiry-eight patients (62.3%) had the genotype A986A, and 23 (36.7%) patients had A986S (20 patients, 32.8%) or S986S (3 patients, 4.9%). Age, sex, and genotype distributions were comparable in both normocalcemic and asymptomatic hyperparathyroidism. In normocalcemic patients, S allele genotype was associated to statistically significant higher level of intact PTH: 92.0 (SD 18.5) vs. 110.6 (SD 24.4) pg/ml, phyperparathyroidism, A986A genotype resulted in a statistically significant higher level of intact PTH, alkaline phosphatase and procollagen amino-terminal propeptide; but only serum calcium remained as an independent predictor of serum intact PTH levels after a multiple linear regression. Bone mineral densitometry between genotypes did not show statistically significant differences. A986S polymorphism of CaSR is an independent predictor of PTH level in normocalcemic hyperparathyroidism patients, but not in asymptomatic hyperparathyroidism. More studies are needed to evaluate the effect of other polymorphisms in normocalcemic and asymptomatic hyperparathyroidism. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Calcium intake, polymorphisms of the calcium-sensing receptor, and recurrent/aggressive prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Moritz; Shui, Irene M; Wilson, Kathryn M; Penney, Kathryn L; Mucci, Lorelei A; Kibel, Adam S

    2015-12-01

    To assess whether calcium intake and common genetic variants of the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR) are associated with either aggressive prostate cancer (PCa) or disease recurrence after prostatectomy. Calcium intake at diagnosis was assessed, and 65 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CASR were genotyped in 886 prostatectomy patients. We investigated the association between calcium intake and CASR variants with both PCa recurrence and aggressiveness (defined as Gleason score ≥4 + 3, stage ≥pT3, or nodal-positive disease). A total of 285 men had aggressive disease and 91 experienced recurrence. A U-shaped relationship between calcium intake and both disease recurrence and aggressiveness was observed. Compared to the middle quintile, the HR for disease recurrence was 3.07 (95% CI 1.41-6.69) for the lowest quintile and 3.21 (95% CI 1.47-7.00) and 2.97 (95% CI 1.37-6.45) for the two upper quintiles, respectively. Compared to the middle quintile, the OR for aggressive disease was 1.80 (95% CI 1.11-2.91) for the lowest quintile and 1.75 (95% CI 1.08-2.85) for the highest quintile of calcium intake. The main effects of CASR variants were not associated with PCa recurrence or aggressiveness. In the subgroup of patients with moderate calcium intake, 31 SNPs in four distinct blocks of high linkage disequilibrium were associated with PCa recurrence. We observed a protective effect of moderate calcium intake for PCa aggressiveness and recurrence. While CASR variants were not associated with these outcomes in the entire cohort, they may be associated with disease recurrence in men with moderate calcium intakes.

  9. Pathogenic role of calcium-sensing receptors in the development and progression of pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Haiyang; Yamamura, Aya; Yamamura, Hisao; Song, Shanshan; Fraidenburg, Dustin R; Chen, Jiwang; Gu, Yali; Pohl, Nicole M; Zhou, Tong; Jiménez-Pérez, Laura; Ayon, Ramon J; Desai, Ankit A; Goltzman, David; Rischard, Franz; Khalpey, Zain; Black, Stephan M; Garcia, Joe G N; Makino, Ayako; Yuan, Jason X J

    2016-05-01

    An increase in cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC) is a major trigger for pulmonary vasoconstriction and a critical stimulation for PASMC proliferation and migration. Previously, we demonstrated that expression and function of calcium sensing receptors (CaSR) in PASMC from patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) and animals with experimental pulmonary hypertension (PH) were greater than in PASMC from normal subjects and control animals. However, the mechanisms by which CaSR triggers Ca(2+) influx in PASMC and the implication of CaSR in the development of PH remain elusive. Here, we report that CaSR functionally interacts with TRPC6 to regulate [Ca(2+)]cyt in PASMC. Downregulation of CaSR or TRPC6 with siRNA inhibited Ca(2+)-induced [Ca(2+)]cyt increase in IPAH-PASMC (in which CaSR is upregulated), whereas overexpression of CaSR or TRPC6 enhanced Ca(2+)-induced [Ca(2+)]cyt increase in normal PASMC (in which CaSR expression level is low). The upregulated CaSR in IPAH-PASMC was also associated with enhanced Akt phosphorylation, whereas blockade of CaSR in IPAH-PASMC attenuated cell proliferation. In in vivo experiments, deletion of the CaSR gene in mice (casr(-/-)) significantly inhibited the development and progression of experimental PH and markedly attenuated acute hypoxia-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction. These data indicate that functional interaction of upregulated CaSR and upregulated TRPC6 in PASMC from IPAH patients and animals with experimental PH may play an important role in the development and progression of sustained pulmonary vasoconstriction and pulmonary vascular remodeling. Blockade or downregulation of CaSR and/or TRPC6 with siRNA or miRNA may be a novel therapeutic strategy to develop new drugs for patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Pathogenic role of calcium-sensing receptors in the development and progression of pulmonary hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Haiyang; Yamamura, Aya; Yamamura, Hisao; Song, Shanshan; Fraidenburg, Dustin R.; Chen, Jiwang; Gu, Yali; Pohl, Nicole M.; Zhou, Tong; Jiménez-Pérez, Laura; Ayon, Ramon J.; Desai, Ankit A.; Goltzman, David; Rischard, Franz; Khalpey, Zain; Black, Stephan M.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Makino, Ayako

    2016-01-01

    An increase in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]cyt) in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC) is a major trigger for pulmonary vasoconstriction and a critical stimulation for PASMC proliferation and migration. Previously, we demonstrated that expression and function of calcium sensing receptors (CaSR) in PASMC from patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) and animals with experimental pulmonary hypertension (PH) were greater than in PASMC from normal subjects and control animals. However, the mechanisms by which CaSR triggers Ca2+ influx in PASMC and the implication of CaSR in the development of PH remain elusive. Here, we report that CaSR functionally interacts with TRPC6 to regulate [Ca2+]cyt in PASMC. Downregulation of CaSR or TRPC6 with siRNA inhibited Ca2+-induced [Ca2+]cyt increase in IPAH-PASMC (in which CaSR is upregulated), whereas overexpression of CaSR or TRPC6 enhanced Ca2+-induced [Ca2+]cyt increase in normal PASMC (in which CaSR expression level is low). The upregulated CaSR in IPAH-PASMC was also associated with enhanced Akt phosphorylation, whereas blockade of CaSR in IPAH-PASMC attenuated cell proliferation. In in vivo experiments, deletion of the CaSR gene in mice (casr−/−) significantly inhibited the development and progression of experimental PH and markedly attenuated acute hypoxia-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction. These data indicate that functional interaction of upregulated CaSR and upregulated TRPC6 in PASMC from IPAH patients and animals with experimental PH may play an important role in the development and progression of sustained pulmonary vasoconstriction and pulmonary vascular remodeling. Blockade or downregulation of CaSR and/or TRPC6 with siRNA or miRNA may be a novel therapeutic strategy to develop new drugs for patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:26968768

  11. Polymorphisms in the calcium-sensing receptor gene are associated with clinical outcome of neuroblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Masvidal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neuroblastic tumors include the neuroblastomas, ganglioneuroblastomas, and ganglioneuromas. Clinical behavior of these developmental malignancies varies from regression to aggressive growth with metastatic dissemination. Several clinical, histological, genetic, and biological features are associated with this diversity of clinical presentations. The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR is a G-protein coupled receptor with a key role in calcium homeostasis. We have previously reported that it is expressed in benign, differentiated neuroblastic tumors, but silenced by genetic and epigenetic events in unfavorable neuroblastomas. We have now analyzed three functionally relevant polymorphisms clustered at the signal transduction region of the CaSR (rs1801725, rs1042636 and rs1801726 to assess if genetic variants producing a less active receptor are associated with more aggressive disease course. METHODS: Polymorphisms were analyzed in DNA samples from 65 patients using specific Taqman Genotyping Assays. RESULTS: Mildly inactivating variant rs1801725 was associated with clinical stage 4 (P = 0.002 and the histological subgroup of undifferentiated neuroblastomas (P = 0.046. Patients harboring this polymorphism had significantly lower overall (P = 0.022 and event-free survival (P = 0.01 rates than those who were homozygous for the most common allele among Caucasians. However, this single locus genotype was not independently associated with outcome in multivariate analyses. Conversely, the tri-locus haplotype TAC was independently associated with an increased risk of death in the entire cohort (Hazard Ratio = 2.45; 95% Confidence Interval [1.14-5.29]; P = 0.022 and also in patients diagnosed with neuroblastomas (Hazard Ratio = 2.74; 95% Confidence Interval [1.20-6.25]; P = 0.016. CONCLUSIONS: The TAC haplotype includes the moderately inactivating variant rs1801725 and absence of the gain-of-function rs1042636

  12. Probing intermolecular protein-protein interactions in the calcium-sensing receptor homodimer using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Hansen, Jakob L; Sheikh, Søren P

    2002-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) belongs to family C of the G-protein coupled receptor superfamily. The receptor is believed to exist as a homodimer due to covalent and non-covalent interactions between the two amino terminal domains (ATDs). It is well established that agonist binding to family C......-induced intermolecular movements in the CaR homodimer using the new bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique, BRET2, which is based on the transference of energy from Renilla luciferase (Rluc) to the green fluorescent protein mutant GFP2. We tagged CaR with Rluc and GFP2 at different intracellular locations....... Stable and highly receptor-specific BRET signals were obtained in tsA cells transfected with Rluc- and GFP2-tagged CaRs under basal conditions, indicating that CaR is constitutively dimerized. However, the signals were not enhanced by the presence of agonist. These results could indicate that at least...

  13. Calcium, calcium-sensing receptor and growth control in the colonic mucosa

    OpenAIRE

    Varani, James

    2011-01-01

    A role for calcium in epithelial growth control is well-established in the colon and other tissues. In the colon, Ca2+ “drives” the differentiation process. This results in sequestration of ß-catenin in the cell surface / cytoskeletal complex, leaving ß-catenin unavailable to serve as a growth-promoting transcription enhancer in the nucleus. The signaling events that lead from Ca2+ stimulation to differentiation are not fully understood. A critical role for the extracellular calcium-sensing r...

  14. A homozygous inactivating calcium-sensing receptor mutation, Pro339Thr, is associated with isolated primary hyperparathyroidism: correlation between location of mutations and severity of hypercalcaemia

    OpenAIRE

    Hannan, Fadil Mohammed; Nesbit, M. Andrew; Christie, Paul; Lissens, Willy; Vanderschueren, Bart; Bex, Marie; Bouillon, Roger; Thakker, Rajesh V.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background: Inactivating mutations of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), a G-protein coupled receptor with extracellular (ECD), transmembrane (TMD) and intracellular (ICD) domains, cause familial hypocalciuric hypercalcaemia, neonatal severe primary hyperparathyroidism, and occasionally primary hyperparathyroidism in adults. Objective: To investigate a patient with typical symptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism for CaSR abnormalities. Patient and Design: A 51-year...

  15. The agonist-binding domain of the calcium-sensing receptor is located at the amino-terminal domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, H; Jensen, Anders A.; Sheppard, P O

    1999-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor that displays 19-25% sequence identity to the gamma-aminobutyric acid type B (GABAB) and metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors. All three groups of receptors have a large amino-terminal domain (ATD), which for the mGlu receptors...... has been shown to bind the endogenous agonist. To investigate whether the agonist-binding domain of the CaR also is located in the ATD, we constructed a chimeric receptor named Ca/1a consisting of the ATD of CaR and the seven transmembrane region and C terminus of mGlu1a. The Ca/1a receptor stimulated......-type CaR (EC50 values of 3.2, 4.7, and 4.1 mM, respectively). For the mGlu1a receptor, it has been shown that Ser-165 and Thr-188, which are located in the ATD, are involved in the agonist binding. An alignment of CaR with the mGlu receptors showed that these two amino acid residues have been conserved...

  16. Strontium is a biased agonist of the calcium-sensing receptor in rat medullary thyroid carcinoma 6-23 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Alex Rojas Bie; Worm, Jesper; Jacobsen, Stine Engesgaard

    2012-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR)-specific allosteric modulator cinacalcet has revolutionized the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism in patients with chronic kidney disease. However, its application is limited to patients with end-stage renal disease because of hypocalcemic side effects...... of CaSR is poorly understood, the objective of the present study was to investigate biased signaling of CaSR by using rat medullary thyroid carcinoma 6-23 cells as a model of thyroid parafollicular C-cells. By doing concentration-response experiments we focused on the ability of two well known Ca......SR-stimulated signaling bias, which may be used to develop novel drugs for the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism....

  17. Calcium Overload Accelerates Phosphate-Induced Vascular Calcification Via Pit-1, but not the Calcium-Sensing Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masumoto, Asuka; Sonou, Tomohiro; Ohya, Masaki; Yashiro, Mitsuru; Nakashima, Yuri; Okuda, Kouji; Iwashita, Yuko; Mima, Toru; Negi, Shigeo; Shigematsu, Takashi

    2017-07-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is a risk factor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). CKD-mineral and bone metabolism disorder is an important problem in patients with renal failure. Abnormal levels of serum phosphate and calcium affect CKD-mineral and bone metabolism disorder and contribute to bone disease, VC, and cardiovascular disease. Hypercalcemia is a contributing factor in progression of VC in patients with CKD. However, the mechanisms of how calcium promotes intracellular calcification are still unclear. This study aimed to examine the mechanisms underlying calcium-induced calcification in a rat aortic tissue culture model. Aortic segments from 7-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were cultured in serum-supplemented medium for 10 days. We added high calcium (HiCa; calcium 3.0 mM) to high phosphate (HPi; phosphate 3.8 mM) medium to accelerate phosphate and calcium-induced VC. We used phosphonoformic acid and the calcimimetic R-568 to determine whether the mechanism of calcification involves Pit-1 or the calcium-sensing receptor. Medial VC was significantly augmented by HPi+HiCa medium compared with HPi alone (300%, p<0.05), and was associated with upregulation of Pit-1 protein. Pit-1 protein concentrations in HPi+HiCa medium were greater than those in HPi medium. Phosphonoformic acid completely negated the augmentation of medial VC induced by HPi+HiCa. R-568 had no additive direct effect on medial VC. These results indicated that exposure to HPi+HiCa accelerates medial VC, and this is mediated through Pit-1, not the calcium-sensing receptor.

  18. A novel mutation in the calcium-sensing receptor gene in an Irish pedigree showing familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Elamin, Wael F

    2010-01-01

    Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by asymptomatic and non-progressive hypercalcemia due to mutations of the calcium-sensing receptor gene. Disorders of calcium metabolism are very common in the elderly, and they can coexist with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia in affected families.

  19. Normalization of serum calcium by cinacalcet in a patient with hypercalcaemia due to a de novo inactivating mutation of the calcium-sensing receptor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, H.J.L.M.; Karperien, M.; Hamdy, N.A.; Boer, H. de; Hermus, A.R.M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Familial benign hypocalciuric hypercalcaemia (FHH) results from a heterozygous inactivating mutation of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) and is characterized by hypercalcaemia, hypocalciuria and inappropriately normal plasma levels of parathyroid hormone. In a minority of patients, a loss of

  20. Molecular Basis of the Extracellular Ligands Mediated Signaling by the Calcium Sensing Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ca2+-sensing receptors (CaSRs play a central role in regulating extracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]o homeostasis and many (pathophysiological processes in multiple organs. This regulation is orchestrated by a cooperative response to extracellular stimuli such as small changes in Ca2+, Mg2+, amino acids and other ligands. In addition, CaSR is a pleiotropic receptor regulating several intracellular signaling pathways, including calcium mobilization and intracellular calcium oscillation. Nearly 200 mutations and polymorphisms have been found in CaSR in relation to a variety of human disorders associated with abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis. In this review, we summarize efforts directed at identifying binding sites for calcium and amino acids. Both homotropic cooperativity among multiple calcium binding sites and heterotropic cooperativity between calcium and amino acid were revealed using computational modeling, predictions, and site-directed mutagenesis coupled with functional assays. The hinge region of the bilobed Venus flytrap (VFT domain of CaSR plays a pivotal role in coordinating multiple extracellular stimuli, leading to cooperative responses from the receptor. We further highlight the extensive number of disease-associated mutations that have also been shown to affect CaSR’s cooperative action via several types of mechanisms. These results provide insights into the molecular bases of the structure and functional cooperativity of this receptor and other members of family C of the G protein-coupled receptors (cGPCRs in health and disease states, and may assist in the prospective development of novel receptor-based therapeutics.

  1. The Calcium-Sensing Receptor Is Necessary for the Rapid Development of Hypercalcemia in Human Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwendolen Lorch

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR is responsible for the regulation of extracellular calcium (Ca2+o homeostasis. CaR activation has been shown to increase proliferation in several cancer cell lines; however, its presence or function has never been documented in lung cancer. We report that Ca2+o-activated CaR results in MAPK-mediated stimulation of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP production in human lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC lines and humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy (HHM in vivo. Furthermore, a single nucleotide polymorphism in CaR identified from a hypercalcemia-inducing lung SCC reduced the receptor's activation threshold leading to increased PTHrP expression and secretion. Increasing the expression of either wild-type CaR or a CaR variant with a single nucleotide polymorphism in the cytoplasmic domain was both necessary and sufficient for lung SCC to induce HHM. Because lung cancer patients who frequently develop HHM and PTHrP expression in lung cancer has been only partially explained, the significance of our findings indicates that CaR variants may provide a positive feedback between PTHrP and calcium and result in the syndrome of HHM.

  2. Calcium-sensing receptors signal constitutive macropinocytosis and facilitate the uptake of NOD2 ligands in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canton, Johnathan; Schlam, Daniel; Breuer, Christian; Gütschow, Michael; Glogauer, Michael; Grinstein, Sergio

    2016-04-06

    Macropinocytosis can be induced in several cell types by stimulation with growth factors. In selected cell types, notably macrophages and dendritic cells, macropinocytosis occurs constitutively, supporting the uptake of antigens for subsequent presentation. Despite their different mode of initiation and contrasting physiological roles, it is tacitly assumed that both types of macropinocytosis are mechanistically identical. We report that constitutive macropinocytosis is stringently calcium dependent, while stimulus-induced macropinocytosis is not. Extracellular calcium is sensed by G-protein-coupled calcium-sensing receptors (CaSR) that signal macropinocytosis through Gα-, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and phospholipase C. These pathways promote the recruitment of exchange factors that stimulate Rac and/or Cdc42, driving actin-dependent formation of ruffles and macropinosomes. In addition, the heterologous expression of CaSR in HEK293 cells confers on them the ability to perform constitutive macropinocytosis. Finally, we show that CaSR-induced constitutive macropinocytosis facilitates the sentinel function of macrophages, promoting the efficient delivery of ligands to cytosolic pattern-recognition receptors.

  3. Autoantibodies against the calcium-sensing receptor and cytokines in autoimmune polyglandular syndromes types 2, 3 and 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, E Helen; Kahaly, George J; Porter, Julie A; Frommer, Lara; Weetman, Anthony P

    2018-01-01

    The frequency of autoimmunity against the parathyroid glands in patients with polyglandular autoimmunity that is not due to autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS1) is unclear. To investigate this, this study aimed to determine the prevalence of autoantibodies against parathyroid autoantigens, calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and NACHT leucine-rich-repeat protein 5 (NALP5), in a large group of patients with non-APS1 polyendocrine autoimmunity. Possible occult APS1 was investigated by cytokine autoantibody measurement and AIRE gene analysis. Subjects were 178 patients with APS2, 3 or 4, and 80 healthy blood donors. Autoantibodies against the CaSR, NALP5 and cytokines were measured by immunoprecipitation, radioligand binding assays or ELISA, respectively. Four patient samples (2.2%), but none of the controls, were positive for CaSR autoantibodies. NALP5 autoantibodies were not detected in any participant. Eleven patients (6.2%) had cytokine autoantibodies, but none of the control samples was positive. None of the patients with cytokine autoantibodies had any known or novel mutations in the AIRE gene. The low prevalence of CaSR autoantibodies indicate a very low level of subclinical parathyroid autoimmunity in APS types 2, 3 and 4. In addition, autoantibodies against cytokines constitute an uncommon feature of non-APS1 polyglandular autoimmunity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The calcium-sensing receptor R990G polymorphism is associated with increased risk of hypertriglyceridemia in obese Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yong-Han; Kong, Wei-Lan; Wang, Guan; Zhao, Yue; Bi, Ming-Xin; Na, Li-Xin; Wang, Mao-Qing; Perry, Ben; Li, Ying

    2014-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is involved in lipid metabolism; however, whether CaSR polymorphisms affect lipid metabolism in obesity is still unclear. The present study aimed to determine the effects of CaSR polymorphisms on HTG risk in obese Chinese. A total of 972 subjects with HTG and 1197 with normal triglyceride (NTG) were stratified by body mass index (BMI) into normal weight, overweight or obesity subgroups. After 12-h fasting, CaSR polymorphisms in exon 7 were determined in the blood. Serum lipids and glucose, as well as height, body weight and waist circumference were measured. The anthropometric and metabolic characteristics of the NTG subjects were re-evaluated 3 years later. There were no genotypic or allelic distribution differences for the A986S or Q1011E polymorphisms between the NTG and HTG groups. However, the G/G genotypic and G allelic distributions of the CaSR R990G polymorphism in the HTG group were higher than the NTG group (pHTG group was significantly higher than in the NTG group (p=0.001), and showed an increased risk of HTG at baseline [OR=2.55, 95% CI=1.65-3.92, pHTG (β=0.927, pHTG, especially in obese Chinese, and may be a potential genetic predictor of diseases related to HTG. © 2013.

  5. In vivo imaging of human breast cancer mouse model with high level expression of calcium sensing receptor at 3T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baio, Gabriella; Tagliafico, Alberto; Neumaier, Carlo Emanuele [National Cancer Institute, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, IST, Genoa (Italy); Fabbi, Marina; Carbotti, Grazia [National Cancer Institute, Unit of Immunological Therapy, IST, Genoa (Italy); Emionite, Laura; Cilli, Michele [National Cancer Institute, Animal Facility, IST, Genoa (Italy); Salvi, Sandra; Truini, Mauro [National Cancer Institute, Department of Pathology, IST, Genoa (Italy); Ghedin, Piero; Prato, Sabina [General Electric, GE, Milano (Italy)

    2012-03-15

    To demonstrate that manganese can visualise calcium sensing receptor (CaSR)-expressing cells in a human breast cancer murine model, as assessed by clinical 3T magnetic resonance (MR). Human MDA-MB-231-Luc or MCF7-Luc breast cancer cells were orthotopically grown in NOD/SCID mice to a minimum mass of 5 mm. Mice were evaluated on T1-weighted sequences before and after intravenous injection of MnCl{sub 2}. To block the CaSR-activated Ca{sup 2+} channels, verapamil was injected at the tumour site 5 min before Mn{sup 2+} administration. CaSR expression in vivo was studied by immunohistochemistry. Contrast enhancement was observed at the tumour periphery 10 min after Mn{sup 2+} administration, and further increased up to 40 min. In verapamil-treated mice, no contrast enhancement was observed. CaSR was strongly expressed at the tumour periphery. Manganese enhanced magnetic resonance imaging can visualise CaSR-expressing breast cancer cells in vivo, opening up possibilities for a new MR contrast agent. (orig.)

  6. Cross talk between the calcium-sensing receptor and the vitamin D system in prevention of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enikö Kallay

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available There is epidemiological evidence for the cancer preventive effect of dietary calcium (Ca2+ and vitamin D. This effect is strongest in colorectal cancer (CRC. The active vitamin D metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3, bound to its receptor, the vitamin D receptor (VDR regulates the expression of hundreds of different genes in a cell- and tissue-specific manner. While Ca2+ acts through multiple mechanisms and pathways, some of its effects are mediated by the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR. The joint action of Ca2+ and 1,25D3 is due to the fact that both regulate some of the main processes involved in the development of various cancers, such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, migration, and inflammation. Moreover, 1,25D3, bound to VDR can induce translation of the CaSR, while the amount and activity of the CaSR affects 1,25D3 signalling. However, the complexity of the cross-talk between the CaSR and the vitamin D system goes beyond regulating similar pathways and affecting each other’s expression. Our aim was to review some of the mechanisms that drive the cross-talk between the vitamin D system and the CaSR with a special focus on the interaction in colorectal cancer cells. We evaluated the molecular evidence that supports the epidemiological observation that both vitamin D and calcium are needed for protection against malignant transformation of the colon and that their effect is modulated by the presence of a functional CaSR.

  7. A Genetic Polymorphism (rs17251221 in the Calcium-Sensing Receptor is Associated with Breast Cancer Susceptibility and Prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR is a typical G protein coupled receptor. The rs17251221 SNP is located in an intron of the CaSR gene, and the G allele is considered a gain of function mutation. Previous studies revealed that rs17251221 polymorphisms contribute to the risk of developing certain types of cancers. This study investigated the rs17251221 SNP in breast cancer by analyzing the correlation of the rs17251221 genotype with breast cancer susceptibility, clinicopathological features and prognosis. Methods: A TaqMan assay was used to genotype the rs17251221 SNP in a case-control study. The expression levels of CaSR in breast cancer tissues were determined using quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR and western blot analysis. The association of the rs17251221 genotype and the clinicopathological characteristics, as well as the prognosis of the breast cancer patient, was assessed statistically. Results: We found that the AG and GG genotypes were associated with lower mRNA and protein levels of CaSR compared to the AA genotype in breast cancer tissues. We also found that the AG and GG genotypes were associated with breast cancer susceptibility, the patient's age at diagnosis, tumor size, lymph node metastasis and estrogen receptor status of breast cancer tissue. More importantly, we found that the genotypes were prognostic markers for both disease-free survival and overall survival of breast cancer. Conclusion: The rs17251221 SNP is a risk factor associated with breast cancer susceptibility, as well as a prognostic indicator. Our data suggest that rs17251221 may be a potential therapeutic target in breast cancer.

  8. The role of vitamin D, estrogen, calcium sensing receptor genotypes and serum calcium in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szendroi, Attila; Speer, Gabor; Tabak, Adam; Kosa, Janos P; Nyirady, Peter; Majoros, Attila; Romics, Imre; Lakatos, Peter

    2011-06-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among men in developed countries. Estrogen receptor-alpha (ER-α), vitamin D receptor (VDR), and the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), partly through their effects on calcium levels are implicated in the proliferation and carcinogenesis in the prostate gland. VDR, ER-α and CaSR genes show polymorphisms in humans that appear to have clinical significance in many pathological conditions, such as prostate cancer. Our aim was to evaluate the role of ER-α (PvuII, XbaI), VDR (BsmI) and CaSR (A986S) gene polymorphisms and serum calcium levels in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer. Two hundred four patients with prostate cancer and 102 healthy controls were recruited into a hospital-based case control study. After genotyping, the relationship between the individual genotypes and prostate cancer was investigated. Both the ER-α XbaI and the VDR BsmI polymorphisms were significantly related to the risk of prostate cancer. An age adjusted logistic regression limited to controls and patients not receiving bisphosphonate therapy showed that higher corrected serum calcium and the VDR Bb/BB genotypes independently increased the risk of prostate cancer. ER-α XbaI and VDR BsmI genetic polymorphisms had a significant association with the risk of prostate cancer. Both VDR BsmI genotypes and serum calcium levels were independently related to the risk of prostate cancer, suggesting an influence of VDR on the development of this malignancy.

  9. The calcium-sensing receptor promotes urinary acidification to prevent nephrolithiasis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renkema, K.Y.; Velic, A.; Dijkman, H.B.; Verkaart, S.A.J.; Kemp, J.W.C.M. van der; Nowik, M.; Timmermans, K.; Doucet, A.; Wagner, C.A.; Bindels, R.J.M.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.

    2009-01-01

    Hypercalciuria increases the risk for urolithiasis, but renal adaptive mechanisms reduce this risk. For example, transient receptor potential vanilloid 5 knockout (TPRV5(-/-)) mice lack kidney stones despite urinary calcium (Ca(2+)) wasting and hyperphosphaturia, perhaps as a result of their

  10. A novel mutation in the calcium-sensing receptor gene in an Irish pedigree showing familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elamin Wael F

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by asymptomatic and non-progressive hypercalcemia due to mutations of the calcium-sensing receptor gene. Disorders of calcium metabolism are very common in the elderly, and they can coexist with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia in affected families. Case presentation We describe an Irish family with hypercalcemia and hypocalciuria. The proband, an 80-year-old Irish woman, presented with hypercalcemia, relative hypocalciuria, and an elevated parathormone level. She also had chronic kidney disease stage 3 and vitamin D deficiency. Two of her sons were also found to be hypercalcemic and hypocalciuric. DNA sequencing identified a novel missense inactivating mutation in the calcium sensing-receptor gene of the proband and her two hypercalcemic sons. Conclusion Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia due to a novel mutation in the calcium-sensing receptor gene was diagnosed in the proband and her two sons. Disorders of calcium metabolism can be multifarious in the elderly. We suggest that testing first degree relatives for calcium levels and DNA sequencing may have a role in the assessment of elderly patients with parathormone-related hypercalcemia.

  11. Calcium sensing receptor initiating cystathionine-gamma-lyase/hydrogen sulfide pathway to inhibit platelet activation in hyperhomocysteinemia rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuwen; Zhao, Ziqing; Shi, Sa; Gao, Fei; Wu, Jichao; Dong, Shiyun; Zhang, Weihua; Liu, Yanhong; Zhong, Xin

    2017-09-15

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy, high homocysteine) induces the injury of endothelial cells (ECs). Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) protects ECs and inhibits the activation of platelets. Calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) regulates the production of endogenous H2S. However, whether CaSR inhibits the injury of ECs and the activation of platelets by regulating the endogenous cystathionine-gamma-lyase (CSE, a major enzyme that produces H2S)/H2S pathway in hyperhomocysteinemia has not been previously investigated. Here, we tested the ultrastructure alterations of ECs and platelets, the changes in the concentration of serum homocysteine and the parameters of blood of hyperhomocysteinemia rats were measured. The aggregation rate and expression of P-selectin of platelets were assessed. Additionally, the expression levels of CaSR and CSE in the aorta of rats were examined by western blotting. The mitochondrial membrane potential and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured; the expression of phospho-calmodulin kinases II (p-CaMK II) and Von Willebrand Factor (vWF) of cultured ECs from rat thoracic aortas were measured. We found that the aggregation rate and the expression of P-selectin of platelets increased, and the expression of CaSR and CSE decreased in HHcy rats. In the ECs of HHcy group, the ROS production increased and the mitochondrial membrane potential decreased markedly, the expression of CSE and the p-CaMK II increased after treatment with CaSR agonist while decreased upon administration of U73122 (PLC-specific inhibitor) and 2-APB (IP3 Receptor inhibitor). CaSR agonist or NaHS significantly reversed the ECs injured and platelet aggregation caused by hyperhomocysteinemia. Our results demonstrate that CaSR regulates the endogenous CSE/H2S pathway to inhibit the activation of platelets which concerts the protection of ECs in hyperhomocysteinemia. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Interaction of CPCCOEt with a chimeric mGlu1b and calcium sensing receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, H; Jensen, Anders A.; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P

    1999-01-01

    R) and a chimeric receptor consisting of the agonist binding amino-terminal domain (ATD) of CaR and the seven transmembrane (7TM) domain of mGlu1b (named Ca/1b). CPCCOEt inhibited responses of (S)-glutamic acid and Ca2+ at mGlu1b and Ca/1b, applied at EC50 values, with IC50 values of 10.2 microM and 13.4 micro...

  13. Calcium-sensing receptor is a physiologic multimodal chemosensor regulating gastric G-cell growth and gastrin secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jianying; Petersen, Clark D.; Coy, David H.; Jiang, Jian-Kang; Thomas, Craig J.; Pollak, Martin R.; Wank, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is the major sensor and regulator of extracellular Ca2+, whose activity is allosterically regulated by amino acids and pH. Recently, CaR has been identified in the stomach and intestinal tract, where it has been proposed to function in a non-Ca2+ homeostatic capacity. Luminal nutrients, such as Ca2+ and amino acids, have been recognized for decades as potent stimulants for gastrin and acid secretion, although the molecular basis for their recognition remains unknown. The expression of CaR on gastrin-secreting G cells in the stomach and their shared activation by Ca2+, amino acids, and elevated pH suggest that CaR may function as the elusive physiologic sensor regulating gastrin and acid secretion. The genetic and pharmacologic studies presented here comparing CaR-null mice and wild-type littermates support this hypothesis. Gavage of Ca2+, peptone, phenylalanine, Hepes buffer (pH 7.4), and CaR-specific calcimimetic, cinacalcet, stimulated gastrin and acid secretion, whereas the calcilytic, NPS 2143, inhibited secretion only in the wild-type mouse. Consistent with known growth and developmental functions of CaR, G-cell number was progressively reduced between 30 and 90 d of age by more than 65% in CaR-null mice. These studies of nutrient-regulated G-cell gastrin secretion and growth provide definitive evidence that CaR functions as a physiologically relevant multimodal sensor. Medicinals targeting diseases of Ca2+ homeostasis should be reviewed for effects outside traditional Ca2+-regulating tissues in view of the broader distribution and function of CaR. PMID:20876097

  14. Calcium-sensing receptor activates the NLRP3 inflammasome in LS14 preadipocytes mediated by ERK1/2 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Espessailles, Amanda; Mora, Yuly A; Fuentes, Cecilia; Cifuentes, Mariana

    2018-01-18

    The study of the mechanisms that trigger inflammation in adipose tissue is key to understanding and preventing the cardiometabolic consequences of obesity. We have proposed a model where activation of the G protein-coupled calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) leads to inflammation and dysfunction in adipose cells. Upon activation, CaSR can mediate the expression and secretion of proinflammatory factors in human preadipocytes, adipocytes and adipose tissue explants. One possible pathway involved in CaSR-induced inflammation is the activation of the NLR family, pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, that promotes maturation and secretion of interleukin (IL)-1β. The present work aimed to study whether CaSR mediates the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in the human adipose cell model LS14. We assessed NLRP3 inflammasome priming and assembly after cinacalcet-induced CaSR activation and evaluated if this activation is mediated by downstream ERK1/2 signaling in LS14 preadipocytes. Exposure to 2µM cinacalcet elevated mRNA expression of NLRP3, CASP-1 and IL-1β, as well as an increase in pro-IL-1β protein. In addition, CaSR activation triggered NLRP3 inflammasome assembly, as evidenced by a 25% increase in caspase-1 activity and 63% IL-1β secretion. CaSR silencing (siRNA) abolished the effect. Upstream ERK pathway inhibition decreased cinacalcet-dependent activation of NLRP3 inflammasome. We propose CaSR-dependent NLRP3 inflammasome activation in preadipocytes through ERK signaling as a novel mechanism for the development of adipose dysfunction, that may favor the cardiovascular and metabolic consequences of obesity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report linking the inflammatory effect of CaSR to NLRP3 inflammasome induction in adipose cells. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Switching of G-protein Usage by the Calcium-sensing Receptor Reverses Its Effect on Parathyroid Hormone-related Protein Secretion in Normal Versus Malignant Breast Cells*

    OpenAIRE

    Mamillapalli, Ramanaiah; VanHouten, Joshua; Zawalich, Walter; Wysolmerski, John

    2008-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor that signals in response to extracellular calcium and regulates parathyroid hormone secretion. The CaR is also expressed on normal mammary epithelial cells (MMECs), where it has been shown to inhibit secretion of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) and participate in the regulation of calcium and bone metabolism during lactation. In contrast to normal breast cells, the CaR has been reported to s...

  16. Determination and Modulation of Total and Surface Calcium-Sensing Receptor Expression in Monocytes In Vivo and In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paccou, Julien; Boudot, Cédric; Mary, Aurélien; Kamel, Said; Drüeke, Tilman Bernhard; Fardellone, Patrice; Massy, Ziad; Brazier, Michel; Mentaverri, Romuald

    2013-01-01

    Expression of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) has previously been demonstrated in human circulating monocytes (HCM). The present study was designed to measure CaSR expression in HCM and to examine its potential modulation by pro-inflammatory cytokines, Ca2+, vitamin D sterols in U937 cell line. Twenty healthy volunteers underwent blood sampling with subsequent isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) at 3 visits. Flow cytometry analysis (FACS) was performed initially (V1) and 19 days later (V2) to examine intra- and intersubject fluctuations of total and surface CaSR expression in HCM and 15 weeks later (V3) to study the effect of vitamin D supplementation. In vitro experiments were conducted to assess the effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines, calcidiol, calcitriol and Ca2+ on CaSR expression in U937 cell line. By FACS analysis, more than 95% of HCM exhibited cell surface CaSR staining. In contrast, CaSR staining failed to detect surface CaSR expression in other PBMC. After cell permeabilization, total CaSR expression was observed in more than 95% of all types of PBMC. Both total and surface CaSR expression in HCM showed a high degree of intra-assay reproducibility (<3%) and a moderate intersubject fluctuation. In response to vitamin D supplementation, there was no significant change for both total and surface CaSR expression. In the in vitro study, U937 cells showed strong total and surface CaSR expression, and both were moderately increased in response to calcitriol exposure. Neither total nor surface CaSR expression was modified by increasing Ca2+ concentrations. Total CaSR expression was concentration dependently decreased by TNFα exposure. In conclusion, CaSR expression can be easily measured by flow cytometry in human circulating monocytes. In the in vitro study, total and surface CaSR expression in the U937 cell line were increased by calcitriol but total CaSR expression was decreased by TNFα stimulation. PMID:24098349

  17. Calcium Sensing Receptor Regulating Smooth Muscle Cells Proliferation Through Initiating Cystathionine-Gamma-Lyase/Hydrogen Sulfide Pathway in Diabetic Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Hydrogen sulfide (H2S inhibits the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs. However, how cystathionine-gamma-lyase (CSE, a major enzyme that produces H2S, is regulated remains unknown. Whether calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR inhibits the proliferation of VSMCs by regulating the endogenous CSE/H2S pathway in diabetic rat has not been previously investigated. Methods and Results: The morphological and ultrastructure alterations were tested by transmission electron microscopy, changes in the H2S concentration and the relaxation of the mesenteric secondary artery loop of diabetic rats were determined by Multiskan spectrum microplate spectrophotometer and isometric force transducer. Additionally, the expression levels of CaSR, CSE and Cyclin D1 in the mesenteric arteries of rats were examined by western blotting. The intracellular calcium concentration, the expression of p-CaMK II (phospho-calmodulin kinases II, CSE activity, the concentration of endogenous H2S and the proliferation of cultured VSMCs from rat thoracic aortas were measured by using confocal microscope, western blotting, microplate spectrophotometer, MTT and BrdU, respectively. The VSMC layer thickened, the H2S concentration dropped, the relaxation of the mesenteric secondary artery rings weakened, and the expression of CaSR and CSE decreased whereas the expression of Cyclin D1 increased in diabetic rats compared with the control group. The [Ca2+]i of VSMCs increased upon treatment with CaSR agonists (10 µM Calindol and 2.5 mM CaCl2, while it decreased upon administration of calhex231, U73122 and 2-APB. The expression of p-CaMK II and CSE increased upon treatment with CaSR agonists in VSMCs. CSE activity and the endogenous H2S concentration decreased in response to high glucose, while it increased with treatment of CaSR agonists. The proliferation rate increased in response to high glucose, and CaSR agonists or NaHS significantly reversed the proliferation of VSMCs

  18. Antagonizing amyloid-β/calcium-sensing receptor signaling in human astrocytes and neurons: a key to halt Alzheimer′s disease progression?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Dal Prà

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes′ roles in late-onset Alzheimer′s disease (LOAD promotion are important, since they survive soluble or fibrillar amyloid-β peptides (Aβs neurotoxic effects, undergo alterations of intracellular and intercellular Ca 2+ signaling and gliotransmitters release via the Aβ/α7-nAChR (α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor signaling, and overproduce/oversecrete newly synthesized Aβ42 oligomers, NO, and VEGF-A via the Aβ/CaSR (calcium-sensing receptor signaling. Recently, it was suggested that the NMDAR (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor inhibitor nitromemantine would block the synapse-destroying effects of Aβ/α7-nAChR signaling. Yet, this and the progressive extracellular accrual and spreading of Aβ42 oligomers would be stopped well upstream by NPS 2143, an allosteric CaSR antagonist (calcilytic.

  19. Calcium sensing in exocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Wu, Bingbing; Han, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    Neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones are released through regulated exocytosis of synaptic vesicles and large dense core vesicles. This complex and highly regulated process is orchestrated by SNAREs and their associated proteins. The triggering signal for regulated exocytosis is usually...... an increase in intracellular calcium levels. Besides the triggering role, calcium signaling modulates the precise amount and kinetics of vesicle release. Thus, it is a central question to understand the molecular machineries responsible for calcium sensing in exocytosis. Here we provide an overview of our...

  20. Pharmacology of AMG 416 (Velcalcetide), a novel peptide agonist of the calcium-sensing receptor, for the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Sarah; Baruch, Amos; Dong, Jin; Tomlinson, James E; Alexander, Shawn T; Janes, Julie; Hunter, Tom; Yin, Qun; Maclean, Derek; Bell, Gregory; Mendel, Dirk B; Johnson, Randolph M; Karim, Felix

    2013-08-01

    A novel peptide, AMG 416 (formerly KAI-4169, and with a United States Adopted Name: velcalcetide), has been identified that acts as an agonist of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR). This article summarizes the in vitro and in vivo characterization of AMG 416 activity and the potential clinical utility of this novel compound. AMG 416 activates the human CaSR in vitro, acting by a mechanism distinct from that of cinacalcet, the only approved calcimimetic, since it can activate the CaSR both in the presence or the absence of physiologic levels of extracellular calcium. Administration of AMG 416 in vivo into either normal or renally compromised rats results in dose-dependent reductions in parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels and corresponding decreases in serum calcium, regardless of the baseline level of PTH. Treatment of 5/6 nephrectomized rats with AMG 416 resulted in dramatic improvements in their metabolic profile, including lower PTH and serum creatinine levels, reduced amounts of vascular calcification, attenuated parathyroid hyperplasia, and greater expression of the parathyroid gland regulators CaSR, vitamin D receptor, and FGF23 receptor compared with vehicle-treated animals. No drug accumulation was observed under this dosing regimen, and the terminal half-life of AMG 416 was estimated to be 2-4.5 hours. As a long-acting CaSR agonist, AMG 416 is an innovative new therapy for the treatment of hemodialysis patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism.

  1. Analysis of α-Klotho, Fibroblast Growth Factor-, Vitamin-D and Calcium-Sensing Receptor in 70 Patients with Secondary Hyperparathyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joerg Latus

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Secondary hyperparathyroidism (sHPT is known as a very common complication in patients with chronic kidney disease, and G-protein-coupled calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR, Vitamin D receptor (VDR and Fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR/Klotho complexes seem to be involved in its development. Methods: Hyperplastic parathyroid glands from 70 sHPT patients and normal parathyroid tissue from 7 patients were obtained during parathyroidectomy. Conventional morphological and immunohistochemical analysis of parathyroid glands was performed after dividing each slide in a 3x3 array. Results: The presence of lipocytes in the normal parathyroid gland and tissue architecture (nodal in patients with sHPT allows for discrimination between normal parathyroid glands and parathyroid glands of patients with sHPT. Protein expression of Klotho, FGFR, CaSR and VDR was higher in the normal parathyroid glands compared to the sHPT group (p0.05. Conclusions: CaSR, VDR and an impaired Klotho-FGFR-axis seem to be the major players in the development of sHPT. Whether the detected correlation between FGFR and VDR and the shift to a more mixed nuclear/cytoplasmic staining of VDR will yield new insights into the pathogenesis of the disease has to be evaluated in further studies.

  2. Functional importance of the Ala(116)-Pro(136) region in the calcium-sensing receptor. Constitutive activity and inverse agonism in a family C G-protein-coupled receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Spalding, T A; Burstein, E S

    2000-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) belongs to family C of the G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily. To date 14 activating mutations in CaR showing increased sensitivity to Ca(2+) have been identified in humans with autosomal dominant hypocalcemia. Four of these activating mutations are found......, suppressed the elevated basal response of the constitutively activated Ca/1a mutants demonstrating inverse agonist activity of CPCCOEt. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the Ala(116)-Pro(136) region is of key importance for the maintenance of the inactive conformation of CaR....

  3. Conditionally immortalized human proximal tubular epithelial cells isolated from the urine of a healthy subject express functional calcium-sensing receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Mise, Annarita; Tamma, Grazia; Ranieri, Marianna; Svelto, Maria; Heuvel, Bert van den; Levtchenko, Elena N; Valenti, Giovanna

    2015-06-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is a G protein-coupled receptor, which plays an essential role in regulating Ca(2+) homeostasis. Here we show that conditionally immortalized proximal tubular epithelial cell line (ciPTEC) obtained by immortalizing and subcloning cells exfoliated in the urine of a healthy subject expresses functional endogenous CaSR. Immunolocalization studies of polarized ciPTEC revealed the apical localization of the receptor. By Western blotting of ciPTEC lysates, both monomeric and dimeric forms of CaSR at 130 and ∼250 kDa, respectively, were detected. Functional studies indicated that both external calcium and the positive CaSR allosteric modulator, NPS-R568, induced a significant increase in cytosolic calcium, proving a high sensitivity of the endogenous receptor to its agonists. Calcium depletion from the endoplasmic reticulum using cyclopiazonic acid abolished the increase in cytosolic calcium elicited by NPS-R568, confirming calcium exit from intracellular stores. Activation of CaSR by NPS-R significantly reduced the increase in cAMP elicited by forskolin (FK), a direct activator of adenylate cyclase, further confirming the functional expression of the receptor in this cell line. CaSR expressed in ciPTEC was found to interact with Gq as a downstream effector, which in turn can cause release of calcium from intracellular stores via phospholipase C activation. We conclude that human proximal tubular ciPTEC express functional CaSR and respond to its activation with a release of calcium from intracellular stores. These cell lines represent a valuable tool for research into the disorder associated with gain or loss of function of the CaSR by producing cell lines from patients. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Heterogeneous disease modeling for Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium in case-control studies: application to renal stones and calcium-sensing receptor polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, D C; Grover, V K; Smith, C A; Cole, D E C

    2009-03-01

    Renal stone formation due to hypercalciuria is a relatively common disorder with clear evidence for genetic predisposition, but cryptic phenotypic heterogeneity has hampered identification of candidate genes. The R990G single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the calcium sensing receptor (CASR) gene has been associated with hypercalciuria in stone formers and shows the appropriate functional phenotype in cell culture. In our preliminary association analysis of a case-control cohort, however, we observed significant Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium (HWD) for the cases (n= 223), but not controls (n= 676) at the R990G locus, pointing us toward the general disease model incorporating HWD. Because there is an adjacent CASR SNP, A986S, which is in negative linkage disequilibrium with R990G, we extended the general disease model to enable testing of a two-site hypothesis. In our data set, there is no lack of fit (P= .345) for the single-locus model for the R990G genotype, and likelihood ratio testing favors a recessive effect with an eight-fold increase in risk (P < .001) for GG homozygotes, relative to wild-type, based on a population prevalence of 2%. Addition of the A986S genotype provides no additional information either by itself or when included in our two-site model.

  5. Population pharmacokinetics analysis of AMG 416, an allosteric activator of the calcium-sensing receptor, in subjects with secondary hyperparathyroidism receiving hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ping; Melhem, Murad; Xiao, Jim; Kuchimanchi, Mita; Perez Ruixo, Juan Jose

    2015-06-01

    This study characterizes the population pharmacokinetics of AMG 416, an allosteric activator of the calcium-sensing receptor, in subjects with secondary hyperparathyroidism receiving hemodialysis. AMG 416 doses ranging from 2.5 to 60 mg were administered intravenously as single or multiple thrice weekly (TIW) doses at the end of hemodialysis during rinseback. The influence of demographics, concomitant medications, and other disease-related biomarkers on pharmacokinetic parameters was explored. The predictability of the final model was evaluated using bootstrapping and visual predictive checks. A 3-compartment linear pharmacokinetic model that accounts for the hemodialysis clearance best described the data. Plasma clearance (interindividual variability) was 0.564 L/h (14.0%CV). The hemodialysis clearance was 22.2 L/h. The volume of distribution at steady-state was approximately 624 L (82%CV). The mean time to achieve 90% steady-state predialysis concentrations with 3- and 6-hour hemodialysis TIW was 46 and 32 days, respectively. No statistically significant (P AMG 416 exhibits linear and stationary pharmacokinetics within the range of doses evaluated. Within the range of covariate values investigated, pharmacokinetically driven adjustments of AMG 416 dosing on the basis of these covariates were not warranted. © 2015, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  6. Review article: loss of the calcium-sensing receptor in colonic epithelium is a key event in the pathogenesis of colon cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rogers, Ailín C

    2012-03-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is expressed abundantly in normal colonic epithelium and lost in colon cancer, but its exact role on a molecular level and within the carcinogenesis pathway is yet to be described. Epidemiologic studies show that inadequate dietary calcium predisposes to colon cancer; this may be due to the ability of calcium to bind and upregulate the CaSR. Loss of CaSR expression does not seem to be an early event in carcinogenesis; indeed it is associated with late stage, poorly differentiated, chemo-resistant tumors. Induction of CaSR expression in neoplastic colonocytes arrests tumor progression and deems tumors more sensitive to chemotherapy; hence CaSR may be an important target in colon cancer treatment. The CaSR has a complex role in colon cancer; however, more investigation is required on a molecular level to clarify its exact function in carcinogenesis. This review describes the mechanisms by which the CaSR is currently implicated in colon cancer and identifies areas where further study is needed.

  7. Involvement of the calcium-sensing receptor in mineral trioxide aggregate-induced osteogenic gene expression in murine MC3T3-E1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukawa, Takuya; Hayashi, Makoto; Tanabe, Natsuko; Tsuda, Hiromasa; Suzuki, Yusuke; Kawato, Takayuki; Suzuki, Naoto; Maeno, Masao; Ogiso, Bunnai

    2017-07-26

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has excellent biocompatibility as well as bioactivity, including an ability to induce osteoblast differentiation. We examined the effects of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) on osteogenic gene expression induced by MTA. MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured with or without (control) MTA. The expression levels of Runx2, type I collagen, and CaSR genes were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and their products were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The levels were increased significantly in cells exposed to MTA compared with control. Next, MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured with MTA and EGTA (a calcium chelator), because calcium ions were released continuously from MTA into the culture. Expression levels were decreased to control levels by MTA plus EGTA. NPS2143 (a CaSR antagonist) also reduced MTA-induced gene expression. These results suggest that MTA induced osteogenic gene expressions of Runx2 and type I collagen via CaSR in MC3T3-E1 cells.

  8. The Intron 4 Polymorphism in the Calcium-Sensing Receptor Gene in Diabetes Mellitus and its Chronic Complications, Diabetic Nephropathy and Non-Diabetic Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viera Železníková

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Calcium-Sensing Receptor (CaSR significantly affects calcium-phosphate metabolism in kidneys, and it is implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus (DM due to its expression in pancreatic F-cells. The role of CaSR as one of the players in pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease (CKD has been speculated. Methods: 158 Type 2 diabetic patients divided into three groups according to occurrence and type of kidney complications, 66 nondiabetic patients CKD, and 93 healthy subjects were enrolled into the study to analyze the role of two CaSR polymorphisms (in the codon 990 and in the intron 4 in ethiopathogenesis of DM and CKD. The Type 2 diabetic groups consisted of 48 patients without any kidney abnormalities, 58 patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN, and 52 patients with nondiabetic renal disease (NDRD. The distribution of genotype and allele frequencies was studied using PCR with the TaqMan Discrimination Assay or followed by the Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism method, respectively. Results: We have found that the intron 4 polymorphism is a risk factor for the development of DM and CKD, except DN, while the codon 990 does not show any disease association. Conclusion: We conclude that CaSR is a general factor in pancreas and kidney pathologies. i 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  9. Up-regulation of the parathyroid calcium-sensing receptor after burn injury in sheep: a potential contributory factor to postburn hypocalcemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphey, E D; Chattopadhyay, N; Bai, M; Kifor, O; Harper, D; Traber, D L; Hawkins, H K; Brown, E M; Klein, G L

    2000-12-01

    To test the hypothesis that the hypocalcemia and hypoparathyroidism that follow severe burn injury are related to up-regulation of the parathyroid gland calcium-sensing receptor (CaR), which may reduce the set-point for suppression of circulating parathyroid hormone by blood calcium. A controlled but unblinded study. An investigational intensive care unit. Female range ewes. Sheep were subjected to a 40% total body surface area burn under anesthesia (n = 9) or sham burn receiving anesthesia and fluid resuscitation only (n = 8) and were killed 48 hrs postburn. Blood ionized calcium, magnesium, and creatinine, and urinary calcium, magnesium, and creatinine were monitored for 48 hrs. After the sheep were killed, parathyroids (burn group, n = 3; sham group, n = 4) and kidneys (n = 4, each group) were harvested, snap frozen in liquid nitrogen, and analyzed for CaR messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) by Northern blot, and were analyzed for CaR cell-surface staining by immunocytochemistry with a polyclonal CaR-specific antiserum (parathyroids only). Bumed sheep were hypocalcemic and hypomagnesemic compared with sham-burned control sheep. CaR mRNA was increased by 50% (p sheep. These findings are consistent with up-regulation of the parathyroid CaR and a related decrease in set-point for calcium suppression of parathyroid hormone secretion that may contribute to the previously reported postburn hypoparathyroidism and hypocalcemia.

  10. Critical Cysteine Residues in Both the Calcium-Sensing Receptor and the Allosteric Activator AMG 416 Underlie the Mechanism of Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Shawn T; Hunter, Thomas; Walter, Sarah; Dong, Jin; Maclean, Derek; Baruch, Amos; Subramanian, Raju; Tomlinson, James E

    2015-11-01

    AMG 416 is a novel D-amino acid-containing peptide agonist of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) that is being evaluated for the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism in chronic kidney disease patients receiving hemodialysis. The principal amino acid residues and their location in the CaSR that accommodate AMG 416 binding and mode of action have not previously been reported. Herein we establish the importance of a pair of cysteine residues, one from AMG 416 and the other from the CaSR at position 482 (Cys482), and correlate the degree of disulfide bond formation between these residues with the pharmacological activity of AMG 416. KP-2067, a form of the CaSR agonist peptide, was included to establish the role of cysteine in vivo and in disulfide exchange. Studies conducted with AMG 416 in pigs showed a complete lack of pharmacodynamic effect and provided a foundation for determining the peptide agonist interaction site within the human CaSR. Inactivity of AMG 416 on the pig CaSR resulted from a naturally occurring mutation encoding tyrosine for cysteine (Cys) at position 482 in the pig CaSR. Replacing Cys482 in the human CaSR with serine or tyrosine ablated AMG 416 activity. Decidedly, a single substitution of cysteine for tyrosine at position 482 in the native pig CaSR provided a complete gain of activity by the peptide agonist. Direct evidence for this disulfide bond formation between the peptide and receptor was demonstrated using a mass spectrometry assay. The extent of disulfide bond formation was found to correlate with the extent of receptor activation. Notwithstanding the covalent basis of this disulfide bond, the observed in vivo pharmacology of AMG 416 showed readily reversible pharmacodynamics. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  11. Excessive signal transduction of gain-of-function variants of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR are associated with increased ER to cytosol calcium gradient.

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    Marianna Ranieri

    Full Text Available In humans, gain-of-function mutations of the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR gene are the cause of autosomal dominant hypocalcemia or type 5 Bartter syndrome characterized by an abnormality of calcium metabolism with low parathyroid hormone levels and excessive renal calcium excretion. Functional characterization of CaSR activating variants has been so far limited at demonstrating an increased sensitivity to external calcium leading to lower Ca-EC50. Here we combine high resolution fluorescence based techniques and provide evidence that for the efficiency of calcium signaling system, cells expressing gain-of-function variants of CaSR monitor cytosolic and ER calcium levels increasing the expression of the Sarco-Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium-ATPase (SERCA and reducing expression of Plasma Membrane Calcium-ATPase (PMCA. Wild-type CaSR (hCaSR-wt and its gain-of-function (hCaSR-R990G; hCaSR-N124K variants were transiently transfected in HEK-293 cells. Basal intracellular calcium concentration was significantly lower in cells expressing hCaSR-wt and its gain of function variants compared to mock. In line, FRET studies using the D1ER probe, which detects [Ca2+]ER directly, demonstrated significantly higher calcium accumulation in cells expressing the gain of function CaSR variants compared to hCaSR-wt. Consistently, cells expressing activating CaSR variants showed a significant increase in SERCA activity and expression and a reduced PMCA expression. This combined parallel regulation in protein expression increases the ER to cytosol calcium gradient explaining the higher sensitivity of CaSR gain-of-function variants to external calcium. This control principle provides a general explanation of how cells reliably connect (and exacerbate receptor inputs to cell function.

  12. The extracellular calcium-sensing receptor is required for cholecystokinin secretion in response to L-phenylalanine in acutely isolated intestinal I cells.

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    Liou, Alice P; Sei, Yoshitatsu; Zhao, Xilin; Feng, Jianying; Lu, Xinping; Thomas, Craig; Pechhold, Susanne; Raybould, Helen E; Wank, Stephen A

    2011-04-01

    The extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) has recently been recognized as an L-amino acid sensor and has been implicated in mediating cholecystokinin (CCK) secretion in response to aromatic amino acids. We investigated whether direct detection of L-phenylalanine (L-Phe) by CaSR results in CCK secretion in the native I cell. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting of duodenal I cells from CCK-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) transgenic mice demonstrated CaSR gene expression. Immunostaining of fixed and fresh duodenal tissue sections confirmed CaSR protein expression. Intracellular calcium fluxes were CaSR dependent, stereoselective for L-Phe over D-Phe, and responsive to type II calcimimetic cinacalcet in CCK-eGFP cells. Additionally, CCK secretion by an isolated I cell population was increased by 30 and 62% in response to L-Phe in the presence of physiological (1.26 mM) and superphysiological (2.5 mM) extracellular calcium concentrations, respectively. While the deletion of CaSR from CCK-eGFP cells did not affect basal CCK secretion, the effect of L-Phe or cinacalcet on intracellular calcium flux was lost. In fact, both secretagogues, as well as superphysiological Ca(2+), evoked an unexpected 20-30% decrease in CCK secretion compared with basal secretion in CaSR(-/-) CCK-eGFP cells. CCK secretion in response to KCl or tryptone was unaffected by the absence of CaSR. The present data suggest that CaSR is required for hormone secretion in the specific response to L-Phe by the native I cell, and that a receptor-mediated mechanism may inhibit hormone secretion in the absence of a fully functional CaSR.

  13. Chemotactic and proangiogenic role of calcium sensing receptor is linked to secretion of multiple cytokines and growth factors in breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells.

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    Hernández-Bedolla, Marco Antonio; Carretero-Ortega, Jorge; Valadez-Sánchez, Margarita; Vázquez-Prado, José; Reyes-Cruz, Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer metastasis to the bone, potentially facilitated by chemotactic and angiogenic cytokines, contributes to a dramatic osteolytic effect associated with this invasive behavior. Based on the intrinsic ability of calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) to control hormonal secretion and considering its expression in the breast, we hypothesized that CaSR plays a chemotactic and proangiogenic role in highly invasive MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells by promoting secretion of multiple cytokines. In this study, we show that MDA-MB-231 cells stimulated with R-568 calcimimetic and extracellular calcium secreted multiple cytokines and growth factors that induced endothelial cell migration and in vitro angiogenesis. These effects were dependent on the activity of CaSR as demonstrated by the inhibitory effect of either anti-CaSR blocking monoclonal antibodies or calcilytic NPS-2143. Moreover, CaSR knockdown prevented the proangiogenic effect of CaSR agonists. Importantly, CaSR promoted secretion of pleiotropic molecules like GM-CSF, EGF, MDC/CCL22, FGF-4 and IGFBP2, all known to be chemotactic mediators with putative angiogenic factor properties. In contrast, constitutive secretion of IL-6 and β-NGF was attenuated by CaSR. In the case of normal mammary cells, secretion of IL-6 was stimulated by CaSR, whereas a constitutive secretion of RANTES, Angiogenin and Oncostatin M was attenuated by this receptor. Taken together, our results indicate that an altered secretion of chemotactic and proangiogenic cytokines in breast cancer cells is modulated by CaSR, which can be considered a potential target in the therapy of metastatic breast cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Excessive Signal Transduction of Gain-of-Function Variants of the Calcium-Sensing Receptor (CaSR) Are Associated with Increased ER to Cytosol Calcium Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Mise, Annarita; Vezzoli, Giuseppe; Soldati, Laura; Svelto, Maria; Valenti, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    In humans, gain-of-function mutations of the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR) gene are the cause of autosomal dominant hypocalcemia or type 5 Bartter syndrome characterized by an abnormality of calcium metabolism with low parathyroid hormone levels and excessive renal calcium excretion. Functional characterization of CaSR activating variants has been so far limited at demonstrating an increased sensitivity to external calcium leading to lower Ca-EC50. Here we combine high resolution fluorescence based techniques and provide evidence that for the efficiency of calcium signaling system, cells expressing gain-of-function variants of CaSR monitor cytosolic and ER calcium levels increasing the expression of the Sarco-Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium-ATPase (SERCA) and reducing expression of Plasma Membrane Calcium-ATPase (PMCA). Wild-type CaSR (hCaSR-wt) and its gain-of-function (hCaSR-R990G; hCaSR-N124K) variants were transiently transfected in HEK-293 cells. Basal intracellular calcium concentration was significantly lower in cells expressing hCaSR-wt and its gain of function variants compared to mock. In line, FRET studies using the D1ER probe, which detects [Ca2+]ER directly, demonstrated significantly higher calcium accumulation in cells expressing the gain of function CaSR variants compared to hCaSR-wt. Consistently, cells expressing activating CaSR variants showed a significant increase in SERCA activity and expression and a reduced PMCA expression. This combined parallel regulation in protein expression increases the ER to cytosol calcium gradient explaining the higher sensitivity of CaSR gain-of-function variants to external calcium. This control principle provides a general explanation of how cells reliably connect (and exacerbate) receptor inputs to cell function. PMID:24244430

  15. A phase 2 study of MK-5442, a calcium-sensing receptor antagonist, in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis after long-term use of oral bisphosphonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosman, F; Gilchrist, N; McClung, M; Foldes, J; de Villiers, T; Santora, A; Leung, A; Samanta, S; Heyden, N; McGinnis, J P; Rosenberg, E; Denker, A E

    2016-01-01

    In women with osteoporosis treated with alendronate for >12 months and oral bisphosphonates for >3 of the last 4 years, switching to MK-5442, a calcium receptor antagonist, stimulated endogenous parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion and increased bone turnover marker levels, but produced a decline in bone mineral density (BMD) at all sites. This study assessed the effects of switching from long-term oral bisphosphonate therapy to the calcium-sensing receptor antagonist MK-5442 on BMD and bone turnover markers (BTMs) in post-menopausal women with osteoporosis. This randomized, active and placebo-controlled, dose-ranging study enrolled 526 postmenopausal women, who had taken alendronate (ALN) for ≥12 months preceding the trial and any oral bisphosphonate for ≥3 of the preceding 4 years and had spine or hip BMD T-scores ≤-2.5 or ≤-1.5 with ≥1 prior fragility fracture. Women were randomized to continue ALN 70 mg weekly or switch to MK-5442 (5, 7.5, 10, or 15 mg daily) or placebo. Switching from ALN to MK-5442 produced a dose-dependent parathyroid hormone (PTH) pulse of threefold to sixfold above baseline at 1 h, with PTH levels that remained twofold to threefold above baseline at 4 h and returned to baseline by 24 h. Switching to MK-5442 or placebo increased BTM levels compared to baseline within 3 months and MK-5442 10 mg increased BTM levels compared to placebo by 6 months. With all MK-5442 doses and placebo, spine and hip BMD declined from baseline, and at 12 months, BMD levels were below those who continued ALN (all groups P osteoporosis.

  16. Identification of an l-Phenylalanine Binding Site Enhancing the Cooperative Responses of the Calcium-sensing Receptor to Calcium*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen; Huang, Yun; Jiang, Yusheng; Mulpuri, Nagaraju; Wei, Ling; Hamelberg, Donald; Brown, Edward M.; Yang, Jenny J.

    2014-01-01

    Functional positive cooperative activation of the extracellular calcium ([Ca2+]o)-sensing receptor (CaSR), a member of the family C G protein-coupled receptors, by [Ca2+]o or amino acids elicits intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) oscillations. Here, we report the central role of predicted Ca2+-binding site 1 within the hinge region of the extracellular domain (ECD) of CaSR and its interaction with other Ca2+-binding sites within the ECD in tuning functional positive homotropic cooperativity caused by changes in [Ca2+]o. Next, we identify an adjacent l-Phe-binding pocket that is responsible for positive heterotropic cooperativity between [Ca2+]o and l-Phe in eliciting CaSR-mediated [Ca2+]i oscillations. The heterocommunication between Ca2+ and an amino acid globally enhances functional positive homotropic cooperative activation of CaSR in response to [Ca2+]o signaling by positively impacting multiple [Ca2+]o-binding sites within the ECD. Elucidation of the underlying mechanism provides important insights into the longstanding question of how the receptor transduces signals initiated by [Ca2+]o and amino acids into intracellular signaling events. PMID:24394414

  17. Tumor expression of calcium sensing receptor and colorectal cancer survival: Results from the nurses' health study and health professionals follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momen-Heravi, Fatemeh; Masugi, Yohei; Qian, Zhi Rong; Nishihara, Reiko; Liu, Li; Smith-Warner, Stephanie A; Keum, NaNa; Zhang, Lanjing; Tchrakian, Nairi; Nowak, Jonathan A; Yang, Wanshui; Ma, Yanan; Bowden, Michaela; da Silva, Annacarolina; Wang, Molin; Fuchs, Charles S; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Ng, Kimmie; Wu, Kana; Giovannucci, Edward; Ogino, Shuji; Zhang, Xuehong

    2017-12-15

    Although experimental evidence suggests calcium-sensing receptor (CASR) as a tumor-suppressor, the prognostic role of tumor CASR expression in colorectal carcinoma remains unclear. We hypothesized that higher tumor CASR expression might be associated with improved survival among colorectal cancer patients. We evaluated tumor expression levels of CASR by immunohistochemistry in 809 incident colorectal cancer patients within the Nurses' Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models to estimate multivariable hazard ratio (HR) for the association of tumor CASR expression with colorectal cancer-specific and all-cause mortality. We adjusted for potential confounders including tumor biomarkers such as microsatellite instability, CpG island methylator phenotype, LINE-1 methylation level, expressions of PTGS2, VDR and CTNNB1 and mutations of KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA. There were 240 colorectal cancer-specific deaths and 427 all-cause deaths. The median follow-up of censored patients was 10.8 years (interquartile range: 7.2, 15.1). Compared with patients with no or weak expression of CASR, the multivariable HRs for colorectal cancer-specific mortality were 0.80 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.55-1.16] in patients with moderate CASR expression and 0.50 (95% CI: 0.32-0.79) in patients with intense CASR expression (p-trend = 0.003). The corresponding HRs for overall mortality were 0.85 (0.64-1.13) and 0.81 (0.58-1.12), respectively. Higher tumor CASR expression was associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer-specific mortality. This finding needs further confirmation and if confirmed, may lead to better understanding of the role of CASR in colorectal cancer progression. © 2017 UICC.

  18. Physiological studies in heterozygous calcium sensing receptor (CaSR gene-ablated mice confirm that the CaSR regulates calcitonin release in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovacs Christopher S

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The calcium sensing receptor (CaSR regulates serum calcium by suppressing secretion of parathyroid hormone; it also regulates renal tubular calcium excretion. Inactivating mutations of CaSR raise serum calcium and reduce urine calcium excretion. Thyroid C-cells (which make calcitonin express CaSR and may, therefore, be regulated by it. Since calcium stimulates release of calcitonin, the higher blood calcium caused by inactivation of CaSR should increase serum calcitonin, unless CaSR mutations alter the responsiveness of calcitonin to calcium. To demonstrate regulatory effects of CaSR on calcitonin release, we studied calcitonin responsiveness to calcium in normal and CaSR heterozygous-ablated (Casr+/- mice. Casr+/- mice have hypercalcemia and hypocalciuria, and live normal life spans. Each mouse received either 500 μl of normal saline or one of two doses of elemental calcium (500 μmol/kg or 5 mmol/kg by intraperitoneal injection. Ionized calcium was measured at baseline and 10 minutes, and serum calcitonin was measured on the 10 minute sample. Results At baseline, Casr+/- mice had a higher blood calcium, and in response to the two doses of elemental calcium, had greater increments and peak levels of ionized calcium than their wild type littermates. Despite significantly higher ionized calcium levels, the calcitonin levels of Casr+/- mice were consistently lower than wild type at any ionized calcium level, indicating that the dose-response curve of calcitonin to increases in ionized calcium had been significantly blunted or shifted to the right in Casr+/- mice. Conclusions These results confirm that the CaSR is a physiological regulator of calcitonin; therefore, in response to increases in ionized calcium, the CaSR inhibits parathyroid hormone secretion and stimulates calcitonin secretion.

  19. Nonclinical Pharmacokinetics, Disposition, and Drug-Drug Interaction Potential of a Novel d-Amino Acid Peptide Agonist of the Calcium-Sensing Receptor AMG 416 (Etelcalcetide).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Raju; Zhu, Xiaochun; Kerr, Savannah J; Esmay, Joel D; Louie, Steven W; Edson, Katheryne Z; Walter, Sarah; Fitzsimmons, Michael; Wagner, Mylo; Soto, Marcus; Pham, Roger; Wilson, Sarah F; Skiles, Gary L

    2016-08-01

    AMG 416 (etelcalcetide) is a novel synthetic peptide agonist of the calcium-sensing receptor composed of a linear chain of seven d-amino acids (referred to as the d-amino acid backbone) with a d-cysteine linked to an l-cysteine via a disulfide bond. AMG 416 contains four basic d-arginine residues and is a +4 charged peptide at physiologic pH with a mol. wt. of 1048.3 Da. The pharmacokinetics (PK), disposition, and potential of AMG 416 to cause drug-drug interaction were investigated in nonclinical studies with two single (14)C-labels placed either at a potentially metabolically labile acetyl position or on the d-alanine next to d-cysteine in the interior of the d-amino acid backbone. After i.v. dosing, the PK and disposition of AMG 416 were similar in male and female rats. Radioactivity rapidly distributed to most tissues in rats with intact kidneys, and renal elimination was the predominant clearance pathway. No strain-dependent differences were observed. In bilaterally nephrectomized rats, minimal radioactivity (1.2%) was excreted via nonrenal pathways. Biotransformation occurred primarily via disulfide exchange with endogenous thiol-containing molecules in whole blood rather than metabolism by enzymes, such as proteases or cytochrome P450s; the d-amino acid backbone remained unaltered. A substantial proportion of the plasma radioactivity was covalently conjugated to albumin. AMG 416 presents a low risk for P450 or transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions because it showed no interactions in vitro. These studies demonstrated a (14)C label on either the acetyl or the d-alanine in the d-amino acid backbone would be appropriate for clinical studies. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  20. Velcalcetide (AMG 416), a novel peptide agonist of the calcium-sensing receptor, reduces serum parathyroid hormone and FGF23 levels in healthy male subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Kevin J; Bell, Gregory; Pickthorn, Karen; Huang, Saling; Vick, Andrew; Hodsman, Peter; Peacock, Munro

    2014-02-01

    Velcalcetide, also known as AMG 416, is a novel, long-acting selective peptide agonist of the calcium sensing receptor. It is being developed as an intravenous treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) in hemodialysis patients with chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder. To assess the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of velcalcetide in healthy male volunteers. The study was a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, single-dose, dose-escalation study in healthy males aged 18-45 years conducted at a single center. Each cohort included eight subjects randomized 6:2 to velcalcetide or placebo. Velcalcetide at 0.5, 2, 5 and 10 mg or placebo was administered intravenously. Measurements included plasma ionized calcium (iCa), serum total calcium, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), phosphorus and fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23), 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, calcitonin and urine creatinine, calcium and phosphorus and plasma pharmacokinetics for velcalcetide. Vital signs, safety biochemical and hematological indices, and adverse events were monitored throughout the study. Intravenous administration of velcalcetide was well tolerated with no adverse reaction of nausea, vomiting or diarrhea reported. Velcalcetide mediated dose-dependent decreases in serum iPTH at 30 min, FGF23 at 24 h and iCa at 12 h post dose (P<0.05) and in urine fractional excretion of phosphorus and increases in tubular reabsorption of phosphorus. Velcalcetide plasma exposure increased in a dose-related manner and the terminal elimination of half-life was comparable across the dose range evaluated and ranged from 18.4 to 20.0 h. Single IV doses of velcalcetide were well tolerated and associated with rapid, sustained, dose-dependent reductions in serum PTH. The results support further evaluation of velcalcetide as a treatment for SHPT in hemodialysis patients.

  1. Induction of calcium sensing receptor in human colon cancer cells by calcium, vitamin D and aquamin: Promotion of a more differentiated, less malignant and indolent phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Navneet; Aslam, Muhammad N; Varani, James; Chakrabarty, Subhas

    2015-07-01

    The calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) is a robust promoter of differentiation in colonic epithelial cells and functions as a tumor suppressor. Cancer cells that do not express CaSR (termed CaSR null) are highly malignant while acquisition of CaSR expression in these cells circumvents the malignant phenotype. We hypothesize that chemopreventive agents mediate their action through the induction of CaSR. Here, we compare the effectiveness of Ca(2+), vitamin D, and Aquamin (a marine algae product containing Ca(2+), magnesium and detectable levels of 72 additional minerals) on the induction of CaSR in the CBS and HCT116 human colon carcinoma cell lines and the corresponding CaSR null cells isolated from these lines. All three agonists induced CaSR mRNA and protein expression and inhibited cellular proliferation in the parental and CaSR null cells. Aquamin was found to be most potent in this regard. Induction of CaSR expression by these agonists resulted in demethylation of the CaSR gene promoter with a concurrent increase in CaSR promoter reporter activity. However, demethylation per se did not induce CaSR transcription. Induction of CaSR expression resulted in a down-regulated expression of tumor inducers and up-regulated expression of tumor suppressors. Again, Aquamin was found to be most potent in these biologic effects. This study provides a rationale for the use of a multi-mineral approach in the chemoprevention of colon cancer and suggests that induction of CaSR may be a measure of the effectiveness of chemopreventive agents. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Serum calcium and the calcium-sensing receptor polymorphism rs17251221 in relation to coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, cancer and mortality: the Tromsø Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorde, Rolf; Schirmer, Henrik; Njølstad, Inger; Løchen, Maja-Lisa; Bøgeberg Mathiesen, Ellisiv; Kamycheva, Elena; Figenschau, Yngve; Grimnes, Guri

    2013-07-01

    Serum calcium measured in 27,158 subjects in 1994 and the calcium-sensing receptor polymorphism rs17251221 genotyped in 9,404 subjects were related to cardiovascular risk factors, incident myocardial infarction (MI), type 2 diabetes (T2DM), cancer and death during follow-up until 2008-2010. In a Cox regression model with adjustment for age, gender, smoking and body mass index, subjects with serum calcium 2.50-2.60 mmol/L had a significantly increased risk of incident MI [n = 1,802, hazards ratio (HR) 1.40, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.18, 1.66] and T2DM (n = 705, HR 1.49, 95 % CI 1.15, 1.94) and a significantly reduced risk of cancer (n = 2,222, HR 0.73, 95 % CI 0.62, 0.86) as compared to subjects with serum calcium 2.20-2.29 mmol/L. For rs17251221 there was a mean difference in serum calcium of 0.05 mmol/L between major and minor homozygote genotypes. No consistent, significant relation between rs17251221 and risk factors or the major hard endpoints were found. The minor homozygote genotype (high serum calcium) had a significant twofold increased risk (HR 2.32, 95 % CI 1.24, 4.36) for prostate cancer, as compared to the major homozygote. This may be clinically important if confirmed in other cohorts.

  3. Calcium-Sensing Receptor and Aquaporin 2 Interplay in Hypercalciuria-Associated Renal Concentrating Defect in Humans. An In Vivo and In Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procino, Giuseppe; Mastrofrancesco, Lisa; Tamma, Grazia; Lasorsa, Domenica Rita; Ranieri, Marianna; Stringini, Gilda; Emma, Francesco; Svelto, Maria; Valenti, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    One mechanism proposed for reducing the risk of calcium renal stones is activation of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) on the apical membranes of collecting duct principal cells by high luminal calcium. This would reduce the abundance of aquaporin-2 (AQP2) and in turn the rate of water reabsorption. While evidence in cells and in hypercalciuric animal models supports this hypothesis, the relevance of the interplay between the CaR and AQP2 in humans is not clear. This paper reports for the first time a detailed correlation between urinary AQP2 excretion under acute vasopressin action (DDAVP treatment) in hypercalciuric subjects and in parallel analyzes AQP2-CaR crosstalk in a mouse collecting duct cell line (MCD4) expressing endogenous and functional CaR. In normocalciurics, DDAVP administration resulted in a significant increase in AQP2 excretion paralleled by an increase in urinary osmolality indicating a physiological response to DDAVP. In contrast, in hypercalciurics, baseline AQP2 excretion was high and did not significantly increase after DDAVP. Moreover DDAVP treatment was accompanied by a less pronounced increase in urinary osmolality. These data indicate reduced urinary concentrating ability in response to vasopressin in hypercalciurics. Consistent with these results, biotinylation experiments in MCD4 cells revealed that membrane AQP2 expression in unstimulated cells exposed to CaR agonists was higher than in control cells and did not increase significantly in response to short term exposure to forskolin (FK). Interestingly, we found that CaR activation by specific agonists reduced the increase in cAMP and prevented any reduction in Rho activity in response to FK, two crucial pathways for AQP2 translocation. These data support the hypothesis that CaR–AQP2 interplay represents an internal renal defense to mitigate the effects of hypercalciuria on the risk of calcium precipitation during antidiuresis. This mechanism and possibly reduced medulla tonicity

  4. Calcium-sensing receptor and aquaporin 2 interplay in hypercalciuria-associated renal concentrating defect in humans. An in vivo and in vitro study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Procino

    Full Text Available One mechanism proposed for reducing the risk of calcium renal stones is activation of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaR on the apical membranes of collecting duct principal cells by high luminal calcium. This would reduce the abundance of aquaporin-2 (AQP2 and in turn the rate of water reabsorption. While evidence in cells and in hypercalciuric animal models supports this hypothesis, the relevance of the interplay between the CaR and AQP2 in humans is not clear. This paper reports for the first time a detailed correlation between urinary AQP2 excretion under acute vasopressin action (DDAVP treatment in hypercalciuric subjects and in parallel analyzes AQP2-CaR crosstalk in a mouse collecting duct cell line (MCD4 expressing endogenous and functional CaR. In normocalciurics, DDAVP administration resulted in a significant increase in AQP2 excretion paralleled by an increase in urinary osmolality indicating a physiological response to DDAVP. In contrast, in hypercalciurics, baseline AQP2 excretion was high and did not significantly increase after DDAVP. Moreover DDAVP treatment was accompanied by a less pronounced increase in urinary osmolality. These data indicate reduced urinary concentrating ability in response to vasopressin in hypercalciurics. Consistent with these results, biotinylation experiments in MCD4 cells revealed that membrane AQP2 expression in unstimulated cells exposed to CaR agonists was higher than in control cells and did not increase significantly in response to short term exposure to forskolin (FK. Interestingly, we found that CaR activation by specific agonists reduced the increase in cAMP and prevented any reduction in Rho activity in response to FK, two crucial pathways for AQP2 translocation. These data support the hypothesis that CaR-AQP2 interplay represents an internal renal defense to mitigate the effects of hypercalciuria on the risk of calcium precipitation during antidiuresis. This mechanism and possibly reduced

  5. Mammary-Specific Ablation of the Calcium-Sensing Receptor During Lactation Alters Maternal Calcium Metabolism, Milk Calcium Transport, and Neonatal Calcium Accrual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamillapalli, Ramanaiah; VanHouten, Joshua; Dann, Pamela; Bikle, Daniel; Chang, Wenhan; Brown, Edward

    2013-01-01

    To meet the demands for milk calcium, the lactating mother adjusts systemic calcium and bone metabolism by increasing dietary calcium intake, increasing bone resorption, and reducing renal calcium excretion. As part of this adaptation, the lactating mammary gland secretes PTHrP into the maternal circulation to increase bone turnover and mobilize skeletal calcium stores. Previous data have suggested that, during lactation, the breast relies on the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) to coordinate PTHrP secretion and milk calcium transport with calcium availability. To test this idea genetically, we bred BLG-Cre mice with CaSR-floxed mice to ablate the CaSR specifically from mammary epithelial cells only at the onset of lactation (CaSR-cKO mice). Loss of the CaSR in the lactating mammary gland did not disrupt alveolar differentiation or milk production. However, it did increase the secretion of PTHrP into milk and decreased the transport of calcium from the circulation into milk. CaSR-cKO mice did not show accelerated bone resorption, but they did have a decrease in bone formation. Loss of the mammary gland CaSR resulted in hypercalcemia, decreased PTH secretion, and increased renal calcium excretion in lactating mothers. Finally, loss of the mammary gland CaSR resulted in decreased calcium accrual by suckling neonates, likely due to the combination of increased milk PTHrP and decreased milk calcium. These results demonstrate that the mammary gland CaSR coordinates maternal bone and calcium metabolism, calcium transport into milk, and neonatal calcium accrual during lactation. PMID:23782944

  6. Activating mutations in the calcium-sensing receptor: genetic and clinical spectrum in 25 patients with autosomal dominant hypocalcaemia - a German survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raue, Friedhelm; Pichl, Josef; Dörr, Helmuth-G; Schnabel, Dirk; Heidemann, Peter; Hammersen, Gerhard; Jaursch-Hancke, Cornelia; Santen, Reinhard; Schöfl, Christof; Wabitsch, Martin; Haag, Christine; Schulze, Egbert; Frank-Raue, Karin

    2011-12-01

    Autosomal dominant hypocalcaemia or hypoparathyroidism is caused by activating mutations of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR). Treatment with calcium and vitamin D often worsens hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis, and renal impairment can result. Our aim was to describe the phenotypic variance of this rare disorder in a large series and to evaluate the outcome after long-term treatment. Nationwide retrospective collaborative study. We describe 25 patients (14 men and 11 women), 20 belonging to 11 families and five single cases. Activating CaSR mutations and clinical and biochemical findings were evaluated. Nine different missense mutations of the CaSR, including one novel variant (M734T), were found. Twelve patients (50%) were symptomatic, 9 (36%) had basal ganglia calcifications and 3 (12%) had nephrocalcinosis. Serum calcium was decreased (1·87 ± 0·13 mm), and PTH was decreased (n = 19) or inappropriately low (n = 4). The occurrence of hypocalcaemic symptoms at diagnosis was related to the degree of hypocalcaemia. The occurrence of features like calcification of basal ganglia or kidney calcification did not correlate with the severity of hypocalcaemia or the age at diagnosis. The most common treatment was calcitriol (median dosage 0·6 μg/day), and the mean duration of therapy was 7·1 years (max. 26 years). Hypercalcaemic episodes rarely occurred, and the rate of kidney calcifications was remarkably low (12%). This series increases the limited knowledge of mutations and phenotypes of this rare disorder. Mutation analysis of the CaSR gene facilitates patient and family management. Low dosages of calcitriol resulted in less frequent renal calcifications. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Molecular genetic analysis of the calcium sensing receptor gene in patients clinically suspected to have familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia: phenotypic variation and mutation spectrum in a Danish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Peter H; Christensen, Signe E; Heickendorff, Lene; Brixen, Kim; Mosekilde, Leif

    2007-11-01

    The autosomal dominantly inherited condition familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) is characterized by elevated plasma calcium levels, relative or absolute hypocalciuria, and normal to moderately elevated plasma PTH. The condition is difficult to distinguish clinically from primary hyperparathyroidism and is caused by inactivating mutations in the calcium sensing receptor (CASR) gene. We sought to define the mutation spectrum of the CASR gene in a Danish FHH population and to establish genotype-phenotype relationships regarding the different mutations. A total of 213 subjects clinically suspected to have FHH, and 121 subjects enrolled as part of a family-screening program were studied. Genotype-phenotype relationships were established in 66 mutation-positive index patients and family members. We determined CASR gene mutations, and correlating levels of plasma calcium (albumin corrected), ionized calcium (pH 7.4), and PTH were measured. We identified 22 different mutations in 39 FHH families. We evaluated data on circulating calcium and PTH for 11 different mutations, representing a spectrum of clinical phenotypes, ranging from calcium concentrations moderately above the upper reference limit, to calcium levels more than 20% above the upper reference limit. Furthermore, the mean plasma PTH concentration was within the normal range in eight of 11 studied mutations, but mild to moderately elevated in families with the mutations p.C582Y, p.C582F, and p.G553R. The present data add 19 novel mutations to the catalog of inactivating CASR mutations and illustrate a variety of biochemical phenotypes in patients with the molecular genetic diagnosis FHH.

  8. Calcium sensing receptor expression in ovine amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells and the potential role of R-568 during osteogenic differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Di Tomo

    Full Text Available Amniotic fluid-derived stem (AFS cells have been identified as a promising source for cell therapy applications in bone traumatic and degenerative damage. Calcium Sensing Receptor (CaSR, a G protein-coupled receptor able to bind calcium ions, plays a physiological role in regulating bone metabolism. It is expressed in different kinds of cells, as well as in some stem cells. The bone CaSR could potentially be targeted by allosteric modulators, in particular by agonists such as calcimimetic R-568, which may potentially be helpful for the treatment of bone disease. The aim of our study was first to investigate the presence of CaSR in ovine Amniotic Fluid Mesenchymal Stem Cells (oAFMSCs and then the potential role of calcimimetics in in vitro osteogenesis. oAFMSCs were isolated, characterized and analyzed to examine the possible presence of CaSR by western blotting and flow cytometry analysis. Once we had demonstrated CaSR expression, we worked out that 1 µM R-568 was the optimal and effective concentration by cell viability test (MTT, cell number, Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP and Alizarin Red S (ARS assays. Interestingly, we observed that basal diffuse CaSR expression in oAFMSCs increased at the membrane when cells were treated with R-568 (1 µM, potentially resulting in activation of the receptor. This was associated with significantly increased cell mineralization (ALP and ARS staining and augmented intracellular calcium and Inositol trisphosphate (IP3 levels, thus demonstrating a potential role for calcimimetics during osteogenic differentiation. Calhex-231, a CaSR allosteric inhibitor, totally reversed R-568 induced mineralization. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time that CaSR is expressed in oAFMSCs and that calcimimetic R-568, possibly through CaSR activation, can significantly improve the osteogenic process. Hence, our study may provide useful information on the mechanisms regulating osteogenesis in oAFMSCs, perhaps

  9. Inhibition of hydrogen sulfide on the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells involved in the modulation of calcium sensing receptor in high homocysteine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuwen; Wang, Xiyao [Department of Clinical Laboratory, The second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150081 (China); Liang, Xiaohui [Department of Radiology, Central Hospital of the Red Cross, Harbin 150080 (China); Wu, Jichao; Dong, Shiyun; Li, Hongzhu [Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150081 (China); Jin, Meili [Department of Clinical Laboratory, The second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150081 (China); Sun, Dianjun [Center for Endemic Disease Control, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Zhang, Weihua [Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150081 (China); Zhong, Xin, E-mail: xzhong1111@163.com [Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150081 (China)

    2016-09-10

    Hyperhomocysteinemia induces the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) inhibits the phenotype switch of VSMCs and calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) regulated the production of endogenous H{sub 2}S. However, whether CaSR inhibits the proliferation of VSMCs by regulating the endogenous cystathionine-gamma-lyase (CSE, a major enzyme that produces H{sub 2}S) pathway in high homocysteine (HHcy) has not been previously investigated. The intracellular calcium concentration, the concentration of H{sub 2}S, the cell viability, the proliferation and the expression of proteins of cultured VSMCs from rat thoracic aortas were measured, respectively. The results showed that the [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and the expression of p-CaMK and CSE increased upon treatment with CaSR agonist. In HHcy, the H{sub 2}S concentration decrease, the proliferation and migration rate increased, the expression of Cyclin D1, PCNA, Osteopontin and p-Erk1/2 increased while the α-SM actin, P21{sup Cip/WAK−1} and Calponin decreased. The CaSR agonist or exogenous H{sub 2}S significantly reversed the changes of VSMCs caused by HHcy. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that CaSR regulate the endogenous CSE/H{sub 2}S is related to the PLC-IP{sub 3} receptor and CaM signal pathways which inhibit the proliferation of VSMCs, and the latter is involved in the Erk1/2 dependent signal pathway in high homocysteine. - Highlights: • CaSR activation increased the production of endogenous H{sub 2}S in high homocysteine VSMCs. • CaSR modulated the CSE/H{sub 2}S are related to the PLC-IP{sub 3}R and Ca{sup 2+}-CaM signal pathways. • Inhibition of H{sub 2}S on the proliferation of VSMCs is involved in the Erk1/2 pathway. • Explore the potential roles of CaSR in regulating VSMCs proliferation in high homocysteine.

  10. The regulation of K- and L-cell activity by GLUT2 and the calcium-sensing receptor CasR in rat small intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Oliver J; Schindler, Marcus; Patel, Sonal

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal enteroendocrine cells (IECs) secrete gut peptides in response to both nutrients and non-nutrients. Glucose and amino acids both stimulate gut peptide secretion. Our hypothesis was that the facilitative glucose transporter, GLUT2, could act as a glucose sensor and the calcium-sensing receptor, CasR, could detect amino acids in the intestine to modify gut peptide secretion. We used isolated loops of rat small intestine to study the secretion of gluco-insulinotropic peptide (GIP), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY) secretion stimulated by luminal perfusion of nutrients or bile acid. Inhibition of the sodium-dependent glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1) with phloridzin partially inhibited GIP, GLP-1 and PYY secretion by 45%, suggesting another glucose sensor might be involved in modulating peptide secretion. The response was completely abolished in the presence of the GLUT2 inhibitors phloretin or cytochalasin B. Given that GLUT2 modified gut peptide secretion stimulated by glucose, we investigated whether it was involved in the secretion of gut peptide by other gut peptide secretagogues. Phloretin completely abolished gut peptide secretion stimulated by artificial sweetener (sucralose), dipeptide (glycylsarcosine), lipid (oleoylethanolamine), short chain fatty acid (propionate) and major rat bile acid (taurocholate) indicating a fundamental position for GLUT2 in the gut peptide secretory mechanism. We investigated how GLUT2 was able to influence gut peptide secretion mediated by a diverse range of stimulators and discovered that GLUT2 affected membrane depolarisation through the closure of K+ATP-sensitive channels. In the absence of SGLT1 activity (or presence of phloridzin), the secretion of GIP, GLP-1 and PYY was sensitive to K+ATP-sensitive channel modulators tolbutamide and diazoxide. l-Amino acids phenylalanine (Phe), tryptophan (Trp), asparagine (Asn), arginine (Arg) and glutamine (Gln) also stimulated GIP, GLP-1 and PYY

  11. Role of post-translational modifications on structure, function and pharmacology of class C G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov-Lauritsen, Lenea; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2015-01-01

    taste receptors (T1R1-3), one calcium-sensing (CaS) receptor, one GPCR, class C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6) receptor, and seven orphan receptors. G protein-coupled receptors undergo a number of post-translational modifications, which regulate their structure, function and/or pharmacology. Here, we...

  12. Hipercalcemia hipocalciúrica debida a una mutación de novo del gen del receptor sensor de calcio Hypocalciuric hypercalcemia due to de novo mutation of the calcium sensing receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Sarli

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo es presentar el inusual caso clínico de una paciente de 34 años que consultó para establecer diagnóstico de certeza y conducta terapéutica ante una hipercalcemia asintomática, detectada en un examen bioquímico de rutina. La elevación de la calcemia en ausencia de inhibición de la secreción de parathormona orientó hacia una patología paratiroidea. La persistencia de la hipercalcemia concomitante con hipocalciuria y coincidente con una relación clearance de calcio/clearance de creatinina inferior a 0.01, hicieron sospechar el diagnóstico de hipercalcemia hipocalciúrica familiar. La falta de antecedentes familiares llevó a realizar un estudio molecular de la paciente y su grupo familiar. Los resultados de los estudios nos permitieron concluir que la paciente es portadora de una mutación de novo (inactivante del gen del receptor sensor del calcio. Se incluyen los datos del estudio molecular y una breve revisión bibliográfica del tema.The aim of this paper is to refer the unusual case of a 34 years old woman who consulted because of asymptomatic hypercalcemia, detected in a biochemical routine examination. The elevated values of serum calcium without blunted parathyroid hormone secretion suggested a parathyroid pathology. The concomitance of hypocalciuria with hypercalcemia and a calcium clearance/creatinine clearance ratio less than 0.01 reverted the diagnosis of familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia, the first option. The absence of familial background led to the molecular study of the patient and her family. The latter confirmed the diagnosis of a de novo inactivating mutation of the calcium sensing receptor. Details on the molecular study and a brief review of this subject are included.

  13. Characterisation of vitamin D-related molecules and calcium-sensing receptor in human Fallopian tube during the menstrual cycle and in ectopic pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refaat, Bassem; Ahmad, Jawwad; Idris, Shakir; Kamfar, Fadi Fayez; Ashshi, Ahmed Mohamed; Batwa, Sarah Abdullah; Malibary, Faizah Ahmed

    2017-04-01

    This is a prospective observational study that measures the expression of vitamin D (VD) metabolising and signalling molecules and Ca2+ sensing receptor (CaSR) in human Fallopian tube (FT) during the menstrual cycle and ectopic pregnancy (EP). Fresh FTs were obtained during total abdominal hysterectomy at the follicular (n = 16) and midluteal (n = 16) phases. Specimens from remote and implantation sites as well as trophoblastic tissues were also freshly collected from each FT with EP (n = 10). All women had normal serum VD and ionised Ca2+. The expression of VD synthesising (CYP27B1) and catalysing (CYP24A1) enzymes, binding protein (VDBP), receptor (VDR), retinoid X receptor (RXR) and CaSR was measured by immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR. All molecules, except VDBP, were significantly increased (P < 0.05) in midluteal compared with follicular samples. Remote EP sites showed significantly (P < 0.05) lower expression of CYP27B1, CYP24A1, VDR and RXR and a higher expression of VDBP and CaSR (P < 0.05) compared with midluteal samples. Significant differences were observed by immunohistochemistry between implantation and remote sites from EP for all molecules, which were also localised in the trophoblastic tissues. In conclusion, VD and calcium are under cycle-dependent regulations within human FT and they appear to play a role in tubal biology through paracrine/autocrine mode of signalling. Furthermore, EP was associated with alterations in the expression of all the studied molecules by the tubal epithelium. Further studies are needed to explore the roles of VD in tubal biology and pathogenesis of EP.

  14. Role of Ca2+ and L-Phe in regulating functional cooperativity of disease-associated "toggle" calcium-sensing receptor mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhang

    Full Text Available The Ca(2+-sensing receptor (CaSR regulates Ca(2+ homeostasis in the body by monitoring extracellular levels of Ca(2+ ([Ca(2+]o and amino acids. Mutations at the hinge region of the N-terminal Venus flytrap domain (VFTD produce either receptor inactivation (L173P, P221Q or activation (L173F, P221L related to hypercalcemic or hypocalcemic disorders. In this paper, we report that both L173P and P221Q markedly impair the functional positive cooperativity of the CaSR as reflected by [Ca(2+]o-induced [Ca(2+]i oscillations, inositol-1-phosphate (IP1 accumulation and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2 activity. In contrast, L173F and P221L show enhanced responsiveness of these three functional readouts to [Ca(2+]o. Further analysis of the dynamics of the VFTD mutants using computational simulation studies supports disruption in the correlated motions in the loss-of-function CaSR mutants, while these motions are enhanced in the gain-of-function mutants. Wild type (WT CaSR was modulated by L-Phe in a heterotropic positive cooperative way, achieving an EC50 similar to those of the two activating mutations. The response of the inactivating P221Q mutant to [Ca(2+]o was partially rescued by L-Phe, illustrating the capacity of the L-Phe binding site to enhance the positive homotropic cooperativity of CaSR. L-Phe had no effect on the other inactivating mutant. Moreover, our results carried out both in silico and in intact cells indicate that residue Leu(173, which is close to residues that are part of the L-Phe-binding pocket, exhibited impaired heterotropic cooperativity in the presence of L-Phe. Thus, Pro(221 and Leu(173 are important for the positive homo- and heterotropic cooperative regulation elicited by agonist binding.

  15. Persistent downregulation of calcium-sensing receptor mRNA in rat parathyroids when severe secondary hyperparathyroidism is reversed by an isogenic kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Ewa; Garfia, Bartolome; Recio, Fernando Luque; Rodriguez, Mariano; Olgaard, Klaus

    2002-08-01

    Experimental severe secondary hyperparathyroidism (HPT) is reversed within 1 wk after reversal of uremia by an isogenic kidney transplantation (KT) in the uremic rats. Abnormal parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion in uremia is related to downregulation of CaR and vitamin D receptor (VDR) in the parathyroid glands (PG). The aim of this investigation was to examine the expression of CaR and VDR genes after reversal of uremia and HPT in KT rats. 5/6 nephrectomized rats were kept on a normal or high-phosphorus (hP) diet for 8 wk to induce severe HPT (n = 8 in each group). In another group of seven uremic hP rats, uremia was reversed by an isogenic KT and PG were harvested within 1 wk posttransplant. Plasma urea, creatinine, total calcium, phosphorus, and PTH levels were measured. Parathyroid CaR and VDR mRNA were measured by quantitative PCR. Uremic hP rats had significantly elevated levels of creatinine, urea, and phosphorus (P rats. After KT, the levels were normalized from day 3 to 7: creatinine from 0.117 +/- 0.016 to 0.050 +/- 0.002 mmol/L; urea from 23 +/- 4 to 7 +/- 0.3 mmol/L; phosphorus from 3.9 +/- 0.6 to 1.5 +/- 0.06 mmol/L; calcium from 1.8 +/- 0.2 to 2.5 +/- 0.02 mmol/L. Plasma PTH levels fell from 849 +/- 224 to a normal level of 38 +/- 9 pg/ml (P rats on a standard diet, CaR mRNA was similar to that of normal control rats, whereas VDR mRNA was significantly decreased. In uremic rats kept on hP diet, CaR mRNA was significantly decreased to 26 +/- 7% of control rats (P = 0.01) and VDR mRNA reduced to 36 +/- 11% (P rats, both CaR mRNA and VDR mRNA remained severely reduced (CaR, 39 +/- 7%; VDR, 9 +/- 3%; P rats. In conclusion, circulating plasma PTH levels normalized rapidly after KT, despite persisting downregulation of CaR and VDR gene expression. This indicates that upregulation of CaR mRNA and VDR mRNA is not necessary to induce the rapid normalization of PTH secretion from hyperplastic parathyroid glands.

  16. Calcium-sensing beyond neurotransmitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Han, Weiping

    2009-01-01

    Neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones are released through the regulated exocytosis of SVs (synaptic vesicles) and LDCVs (large dense-core vesicles), a process that is controlled by calcium. Synaptotagmins are a family of type 1 membrane proteins that share a common domain structure. Most....... Also, we discuss potential roles of synaptotagmins in non-traditional endocrine systems....... synaptotagmins are located in brain and endocrine cells, and some of these synaptotagmins bind to phospholipids and calcium at levels that trigger regulated exocytosis of SVs and LDCVs. This led to the proposed synaptotagmin-calcium-sensor paradigm, that is, members of the synaptotagmin family function...... as calcium sensors for the regulated exocytosis of neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones. Here, we provide an overview of the synaptotagmin family, and review the recent mouse genetic studies aimed at understanding the functions of synaptotagmins in neurotransmission and endocrine-hormone secretion...

  17. International evaluation of unrecognizably uglifying human faces in late and severe secondary hyperparathyroidism in chronic kidney disease. Sagliker syndrome. A unique catastrophic entity, cytogenetic studies for chromosomal abnormalities, calcium-sensing receptor gene and GNAS1 mutations. Striking and promising missense mutations on the GNAS1 gene exons 1, 4, 10, 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Ismail; Sagliker, Yahya; Demirhan, Osman; Tunc, Erdal; Inandiklioglu, Nihal; Tasdemir, Deniz; Acharya, Vidya; Zhang, Ling; Golea, Ovidia; Sabry, Alaa; Ookalkar, Dhananjay S; Capusa, Cristina; Radulescu, Dana; Garneata, Liliana; Mircescu, Gabriel; Ben Maiz, Hedi; Chen, Cheng Hsu; Prado Rome, Jorge; Benzegoutta, Mansour; Paylar, Nuray; Eyuboglu, Kamil; Karatepe, Ersin; Esenturk, Mustafa; Yavascan, Onder; Grzegorzevska, Alicza; Shilo, Valery; Mazdeh, Mitra Mahdavi; Francesco, Ramos Carillo; Gouda, Zaghloul; Adam, Siddik Momin; Emir, Idris; Ocal, Faith; Usta, Erol; Kiralp, Necati; Sagliker, Cemal; Ozkaynak, Piril Sagliker; Sagliker, Hasan Sabit; Bassuoni, Mahmoud; Sekin, Oktay

    2012-01-01

    Hypotheses explaining pathogenesis of secondary hyperparathyroidism (SH) in late and severe CKD as a unique entity called Sagliker syndrome (SS) are still unclear. This international study contains 60 patients from Turkey, India, Malaysia, China, Romania, Egypt, Tunisia, Taiwan, Mexico, Algeria, Poland, Russia, and Iran. We examined patients and first degree relatives for cytogenetic chromosomal abnormalities, calcium sensing receptor (Ca SR) genes in exons 2 and 3 abnormalities and GNAS1 genes mutations in exons 1, 4, 5, 7, 10, 13. Our syndrome could be a new syndrome in between SH, CKD, and hereditary bone dystrophies. We could not find chromosomal abnormalities in cytogenetics and on Ca SR gene exons 2 and 3. Interestingly, we did find promising missense mutations on the GNAS1 gene exons 1, 4, 10, 4. We finally thought that those catastrophic bone diseases were severe SH and its late treatments due to monetary deficiencies and iatrogenic mistreatments not started as early as possible. This was a sine qua non humanity task. Those brand new striking GNAS1 genes missense mutations have to be considered from now on for the genesis of SS. Copyright © 2012 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Calcium nutrition and extracellular calcium sensing: relevance for the pathogenesis of osteoporosis, cancer and cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterlik, Meinrad; Kállay, Enikoe; Cross, Heide S

    2013-01-22

    Through a systematic search in Pubmed for literature, on links between calcium malnutrition and risk of chronic diseases, we found the highest degree of evidence for osteoporosis, colorectal and breast cancer, as well as for hypertension, as the only major cardiovascular risk factor. Low calcium intake apparently has some impact also on cardiovascular events and disease outcome. Calcium malnutrition can causally be related to low activity of the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR). This member of the family of 7-TM G-protein coupled receptors allows extracellular Ca2+ to function as a "first messenger" for various intracellular signaling cascades. Evidence demonstrates that Ca2+/CaSR signaling in functional linkage with vitamin D receptor (VDR)-activated pathways (i) promotes osteoblast differentiation and formation of mineralized bone; (ii) targets downstream effectors of the canonical and non-canonical Wnt pathway to inhibit proliferation and induce differentiation of colorectal cancer cells; (iii) evokes Ca2+ influx into breast cancer cells, thereby activating pro-apoptotic intracellular signaling. Furthermore, Ca2+/CaSR signaling opens Ca2+-sensitive K+ conductance channels in vascular endothelial cells, and also participates in IP(3)-dependent regulation of cytoplasmic Ca2+, the key intermediate of cardiomyocyte functions. Consequently, impairment of Ca2+/CaSR signaling may contribute to inadequate bone formation, tumor progression, hypertension, vascular calcification and, probably, cardiovascular disease.

  19. Structural biology of GABAB receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangaj, Aurel; Fan, Qing R

    2017-10-12

    Metabotropic GABAB receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that mediates slow and prolonged inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain. It functions as a constitutive heterodimer composed of the GABAB1 and GABAB2 subunits. Each subunit contains three domains; the extracellular Venus flytrap module, seven-helix transmembrane region and cytoplasmic tail. In recent years, the three-dimensional structures of GABAB receptor extracellular and intracellular domains have been elucidated. These structures reveal the molecular basis of ligand recognition, receptor heterodimerization and receptor activation. Here we provide a brief review of the GABAB receptor structures, with an emphasis on describing the different ligand-bound states of the receptor. We will also compare these with the known structures of related GPCRs to shed light on the molecular mechanisms of activation and regulation in the GABAB system, as well as GPCR dimers in general. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [GABA receptors: structure and functions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiurenkov, I N; Perfilova, V N

    2010-10-01

    Data on the structure, localization, physiology, and pharmacology of GABA receptors are reviewed. These receptors belong to cis-loop receptors and consist of 16 subunits in various combinations and occur in both central nervous system and peripheral organs. There are a great number of their allosteric modulators, agonists and antagonists. Activation of GABA receptors is accompanied by changes in the permeability of plasmatic membranes for chloride ions, which is followed by depolarization (presynaptic inhibition) or hyperpolarization (postsynaptic inhibition). GABA receptors contain some topographically different binding sites, intended for the interaction both with the main mediator (GABA) and with allosteric regulators such as benzodiazepines, barbiturates, convulsants, ethanol, and neurosteroids.

  1. [GABAC receptors: structure and functions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfilova, V N; Tiurenkov, I N

    2011-01-01

    Data on the structure, localization, physiology and pharmacology of GABA(C) receptors are reviewed. Thece receptors belong to cys-loop receptors and consist of rho1-3 subunits representing pentamers with five subunits that form a chloride channel. They are found in both central nervous system and peripheral organs. The pentamer can be homomeric, consisting of five similar protomers (e.g., p1), or heteromeric (pseudo-homomeric), consisting of rho1 and rho2 subunits. Chloride channel function also depends on the GABA(C) receptor subunit composition. The activation of GABAc receptors is accompanied by a change in the permeability of plasmatic membranes for C1 ions, which is followed by depolarization (presynaptic inhibition) or hyperpolarization (postsynaptic inhibition). There are a great number of the allosteric modulators, agonists and antagonists of GABA(C) receptors.

  2. [The insuline receptor: structure and function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meyts, P

    2005-01-01

    About 35 years after the first in vitro studies of the insulin receptor, considerable progress has been accomplished in the structural biology of the insulin-receptor interaction, and of the receptor tyrosine kinase family in general. This brief review attempts to assemble the various pieces of the puzzle, despite the lack of a detailed crystallographic structure of the insulin-receptor complex, and to establish a model that explains the mechanism of receptor activation, its negative cooperativity, and the triggering of intracellular signalling pathways.

  3. Structural Mapping of Adenosine Receptor Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespers, Willem; Schiedel, Anke C; Heitman, Laura H

    2018-01-01

    The four adenosine receptors (ARs), A1, A2A, A2B, and A3, constitute a subfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with exceptional foundations for structure-based ligand design. The vast amount of mutagenesis data, accumulated in the literature since the 1990s, has been recently supplemente...

  4. Novel strategies in drug discovery of the calcium-sensing receptor based on biased signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Alex Rojas Bie; Smajilovic, Sanela; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2012-01-01

    A hallmark of chronic kidney disease is hyperphosphatemia due to renal phosphate retention. Prolonged parathyroid gland exposure to hyperphosphatemia leads to secondary hyperparathyroidism characterized by hyperplasia of the glands and excessive secretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH), which cause...... by virtue of it not affecting calcitonin secretion. The present review will focus on recent advancements in understanding signaling and biased signaling of the CaSR, and how that may be utilized to discover new and smarter drugs targeting the CaSR....... targeting the CaSR and can be used to effectively control and reduce PTH secretion in PTH-related diseases. Cinacalcet is a positive allosteric modulator of the CaSR and affects PTH secretion from parathyroid glands by shifting the calcium-PTH concentration-response curve to the left. One major disadvantage...

  5. Role of the calcium-sensing receptor in reducing the risk for calcium stones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renkema, K.Y.; Bindels, R.J.M.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.

    2011-01-01

    The tight control of blood Ca2+ levels within a narrow range is essential for the performance of vital physiologic functions. Muscle contraction, neuronal excitation, and intracellular signaling processes acquisitively require Ca2+. It is the concerted action of intestine, bone, and kidney that

  6. Structure of Leptin Receptor Related with Obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toleikis, Zigmantas

    The hormone leptin is central to obesity, but the molecular processes underlying the activation of the leptin receptor are unknown. To further the understanding of the system, an atomic resolution structure of this cytokine type I receptor in the unbound inactive form and in the activated bound...... form is a necessity. Here, the solution state structures of two of the seven extracellular domains of the receptor are presented: the D2 and the D5CA domains. The latter is a double-mutant (C604A, C613A). The function of the D2 domain is unknown, but data indicate that it increases the signaling...... of the receptor, while the D5 domain is the central leptin-binding domain, implicated in the first steps of activation. Both domains are characterized by a fibronectin type III fold and both contain a conserved WSXWS motif (X represents an unconserved amino acid residue), a distinct feature of the cytokine...

  7. Structural Studies of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahsavar, Azadeh; Gajhede, Michael; Kastrup, Jette

    2016-01-01

    -resolution structure of a nAChR is yet to be determined, structural studies are to a large extent based on acetylcholine binding proteins (AChBPs) that despite low overall sequence identity display high degree of conservation of overall structure and amino acids at the ligand-binding site. Further, AChBPs reproduce...... relative binding affinities of ligands at nAChRs. Over the past decade, AChBPs have been used extensively as models for nAChRs and have aided the understanding of drug receptor interactions at nAChRs significantly. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  8. 3D structure of muscle dihydropyridine receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Samsó

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Excitation contraction coupling, the rapid and massive Ca2+ release under control of an action potential that triggers muscle contraction, takes places at specialized regions of the cell called triad junctions. There, a highly ordered supramolecular complex between the dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR and the ryanodine receptor (RyR1 mediates the quasi‐instantaneous conversion from T‐tubule depolarization into Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR. The DHPR has several key modules required for EC coupling: the voltage sensors and II‐III loop in the alpha1s subunit, and the beta subunit. To gain insight into their molecular organization, this review examines the most updated 3D structure of the DHPR as obtained by transmission electron microscopy and image reconstruction. Although structure determination of a heteromeric membrane protein such as the DHPR is challenging, novel technical advances in protein expression and 3D labeling facilitated this task. The 3D structure of the DHPR complex consists of a main body with five irregular corners around its perimeter encompassing the transmembrane alpha 1s subunit besides the intracellular beta subunit, an extended extracellular alpha 2 subunit, and a bulky intracellular II‐III loop. The structural definition attained at 19 Å resolution enabled docking of the atomic coordinates of structural homologs of the alpha1s and beta subunits. These structural features, together with their relative location with respect to the RyR1, are discussed in the context of the functional data.

  9. Molecular basis for amino acid sensing by family C G-protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorph, Petrine; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Family C of human G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is constituted by eight metabotropic glutamate receptors, two gamma-aminobutyric acid type B (GABA(B1-2)) subunits forming the heterodimeric GABA(B) receptor, the calcium-sensing receptor, three taste1 receptors (T1R1-3), a promiscuous L...

  10. Structure-Function Studies on the Prolactin Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haxholm, Gitte Wolfsberg

    information on the intracellular domains (ICDs) of these receptors. The overall aim of this study was to obtain an improved understanding of cytokine receptor signaling through structure-function studies on the prolactin receptor (PRLR). The primary focus of this thesis was to structurally characterize...

  11. Class I Cytokine Receptors: Structure and function in the Membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bugge, Katrine Østergaard

    Class I cytokine receptors are involved in important biological functions of both physiological and pathological nature in mammals. However, the molecular details of the cross-membrane signal transduction through these receptors remain obscure. One of the major reasons for this is the lack...... ample material of high quality for structural studies with NMR spectroscopy of several class I cytokine receptor TMDs. Furthermore, the structure of a class I cytokine receptor TMD in DHPC micelles was solved with solution-state NMR spectroscopy. Additionally, since structural studies of intact proteins...... receptor. This integrative structure opens up for interpreting these receptors in their intact form and offers unique insights on the topology of single-pass transmembrane receptors with intrinsically disordered domains. Dimerization of the TMDs of class I cytokine receptors has been shown to be important...

  12. Melanocortin 1 Receptor: Structure, Function and Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Marissa Wolf Horrell

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R is a melanocytic Gs protein coupled receptor that regulates skin pigmentation, UV responses, and melanoma risk. It is a highly polymorphic gene, and loss of function correlates with a fair, UV-sensitive, and melanoma-prone phenotype due to defective epidermal melanization and sub-optimal DNA repair. MC1R signaling, achieved through adenylyl cyclase activation and generation of the second messenger cAMP, is hormonally controlled by the positive agonist melanocortin, the negative agonist agouti signaling protein, and the neutral antagonist β-defensin 3. Activation of cAMP signaling up-regulates melanin production and deposition in the epidermis which functions to limit UV penetration into the skin and enhances nucleotide excision repair, the genomic stability pathway responsible for clearing UV photolesions from DNA to avoid mutagenesis. Herein we review MC1R structure and function and summarize our laboratory’s findings on the molecular mechanisms by which MC1R signaling impacts nucleotide excision repair.

  13. Melanocortin 1 Receptor: Structure, Function, and Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf Horrell, Erin M.; Boulanger, Mary C.; D’Orazio, John A.

    2016-01-01

    The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) is a melanocytic Gs protein coupled receptor that regulates skin pigmentation, UV responses, and melanoma risk. It is a highly polymorphic gene, and loss of function correlates with a fair, UV-sensitive, and melanoma-prone phenotype due to defective epidermal melanization and sub-optimal DNA repair. MC1R signaling, achieved through adenylyl cyclase activation and generation of the second messenger cAMP, is hormonally controlled by the positive agonist melanocortin, the negative agonist agouti signaling protein, and the neutral antagonist β-defensin 3. Activation of cAMP signaling up-regulates melanin production and deposition in the epidermis which functions to limit UV penetration into the skin and enhances nucleotide excision repair (NER), the genomic stability pathway responsible for clearing UV photolesions from DNA to avoid mutagenesis. Herein we review MC1R structure and function and summarize our laboratory’s findings on the molecular mechanisms by which MC1R signaling impacts NER. PMID:27303435

  14. The venus kinase receptor (VKR) family: structure and evolution.

    OpenAIRE

    Vanderstraete, Mathieu; Gouignard, Nadège; Ahier, Arnaud; Morel, Marion; Vicogne, Jérôme; Dissous, Colette

    2013-01-01

    International audience; BACKGROUND: Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) form a family of transmembrane proteins widely conserved in Metazoa, with key functions in cell-to-cell communication and control of multiple cellular processes. A new family of RTK named Venus Kinase Receptor (VKR) has been described in invertebrates. The VKR receptor possesses a Venus Fly Trap (VFT) extracellular module, a bilobate structure that binds small ligands to induce receptor kinase activity. VKR was shown to be hi...

  15. Structure of a streptococcal adhesion carbohydrate receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassels, F.J.; Fales, H.M.; London, J.; Carlson, R.W.; van Halbeek, H. (National Institute of Dental Research, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-08-25

    Interactions between complementary protein and carbohydrate structures on different genera of human oral bacteria have been implicated in the formation of dental plaque. The carbohydrate receptor on Streptococcus sanguis H1 that is specific for the adhesion on Capnocytophaga ochracea ATCC 33596 has been isolated from the streptococcal cell wall, purified, and structurally characterized. The hexasaccharide repeating unit of the polysaccharide was purified by reverse-phase, amino-bonded silica, and gel permeation high performance liquid chromatography. Earlier studies established that the repeating unit was a hexasaccharide composed of rhamnose, galactose, and glucose in the ration of 2:3:1, respectively. In the present study, determination of absolute configuration by gas chromatography of the trimethylsilyl (+)-2-butyl glycosides revealed that the rhamnose residues were of the L configuration while the hexoses were all D. 252Californium plasma desorption mass spectrometry of the native, the acetylated and the reduced and acetylated hexasaccharide determined that the molecular mass of the native hexasaccharide was 959, and that the 2 rhamnose residues were linked to each other at the nonreducing terminus of the linear molecule. Methylation analysis revealed the positions of the glycosidic linkages in the hexasaccharide and showed that a galactose residue was present at the reducing end. The structural characterization of the hexasaccharide was completed by one and two dimensional 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Complete 1H and 13C assignments for each glycosyl residue were established by two-dimensional (1H,1H) correlation spectroscopy, homonuclear Hartmann-Hahn, and (13C,1H) correlation experiments. The configurations of the glycosidic linkages were inferred from the chemical shifts and coupling constants of the anomeric 1H and 13C resonances.

  16. ROR nuclear receptors: structures, related diseases, and drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Luo, Xiao-yu; Wu, Dong-hai; Xu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-regulated transcription factors that regulate metabolism, development and immunity. The NR superfamily is one of the major classes of drug targets for human diseases. Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor (ROR) α, β and γ belong to the NR superfamily, and these receptors are still considered as 'orphan' receptors because the identification of their endogenous ligands has been controversial. Recent studies have demonstrated that these receptors are regulated by synthetic ligands, thus emerge as important drug targets for the treatment of multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, etc. Studying the structural basis and ligand development of RORs will pave the way for a better understanding of the roles of these receptors in human diseases. Here, we review the structural basis, disease relevance, strategies for ligand identification, and current status of development of therapeutic ligands for RORs.

  17. Structure of the δ-opioid receptor bound to naltrindole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granier, Sébastien; Manglik, Aashish; Kruse, Andrew C; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Thian, Foon Sun; Weis, William I; Kobilka, Brian K

    2012-05-16

    The opioid receptor family comprises three members, the µ-, δ- and κ-opioid receptors, which respond to classical opioid alkaloids such as morphine and heroin as well as to endogenous peptide ligands like endorphins. They belong to the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily, and are excellent therapeutic targets for pain control. The δ-opioid receptor (δ-OR) has a role in analgesia, as well as in other neurological functions that remain poorly understood. The structures of the µ-OR and κ-OR have recently been solved. Here we report the crystal structure of the mouse δ-OR, bound to the subtype-selective antagonist naltrindole. Together with the structures of the µ-OR and κ-OR, the δ-OR structure provides insights into conserved elements of opioid ligand recognition while also revealing structural features associated with ligand-subtype selectivity. The binding pocket of opioid receptors can be divided into two distinct regions. Whereas the lower part of this pocket is highly conserved among opioid receptors, the upper part contains divergent residues that confer subtype selectivity. This provides a structural explanation and validation for the 'message-address' model of opioid receptor pharmacology, in which distinct 'message' (efficacy) and 'address' (selectivity) determinants are contained within a single ligand. Comparison of the address region of the δ-OR with other GPCRs reveals that this structural organization may be a more general phenomenon, extending to other GPCR families as well.

  18. Structure of a Streptococcal Adhesin Carbohydrate Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-08-01

    from the cell wall polysac- dental plaque. The carbohydrate receptor on Strepto- charide of S. sanguis HI is: a-L-Rhap-( 1--2)-a-i-Rhap- coccus sanguis ...8217H) correlation experi- Streptococctzs sanguis , Actinomyces uiscosis, and Actinomyces ments. The configurations of the glycosidic linkages naeslundii...to act as ad-sequence of the glycosyl residues was determined by a hesin receptors have been studied in detail to date. S. sanguis This investigation

  19. Furosemide stimulation of parathormone in humans: role of the calcium-sensing receptor and the renin-angiotensin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Marie-Eve; Forni Ogna, Valentina; Maillard, Marc; Stoudmann, Candice; Zweiacker, Carole; Anex, Christiane; Wuerzner, Grégoire; Burnier, Michel; Bonny, Olivier

    2015-12-01

    Interactions between sodium and calcium regulating systems are poorly characterized but clinically important. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels are increased shortly after furosemide treatment by an unknown mechanism, and this effect is blunted by the previous administration of a calcimimetic in animal studies. Here, we explored further the possible underlying mechanisms of this observation in a randomized crossover placebo-controlled study performed in 18 human males. Volunteers took either cinacalcet (60 mg) or placebo and received a 20 mg furosemide injection 3 h later. Plasma samples were collected at 15-min intervals and analyzed for intact PTH, calcium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, phosphate, plasma renin activity (PRA), and aldosterone up to 6 h after furosemide injection. Urinary electrolyte excretion was also monitored. Subjects under placebo presented a sharp increase in PTH levels after furosemide injection. In the presence of cinacalcet, PTH levels were suppressed and marginal increase of PTH was observed. No significant changes in electrolytes and urinary excretion were identified that could explain the furosemide-induced increase in PTH levels. PRA and aldosterone were stimulated by furosemide injection but were not affected by previous cinacalcet ingestion. Expression of NKCC1, but not NKCC2, was found in parathyroid tissue. In conclusion, our results indicate that furosemide acutely stimulates PTH secretion in the absence of any detectable electrolyte changes in healthy adults. A possible direct effect of furosemide on parathyroid gland needs further studies.

  20. Calcium-sensing receptors signal constitutive macropinocytosis and facilitate the uptake of NOD2 ligands in macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Canton, Johnathan; Schlam, Daniel; Breuer, Christian; G?tschow, Michael; Glogauer, Michael; Grinstein, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Macropinocytosis can be induced in several cell types by stimulation with growth factors. In selected cell types, notably macrophages and dendritic cells, macropinocytosis occurs constitutively, supporting the uptake of antigens for subsequent presentation. Despite their different mode of initiation and contrasting physiological roles, it is tacitly assumed that both types of macropinocytosis are mechanistically identical. We report that constitutive macropinocytosis is stringently calcium de...

  1. Crystal structure of a prolactin receptor antagonist bound to the extracellular domain of the prolactin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, L Anders; Bondensgaard, Kent; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Leif

    2008-01-01

    The crystal structure of the complex between an N-terminally truncated G129R human prolactin (PRL) variant and the extracellular domain of the human prolactin receptor (PRLR) was determined at 2.5A resolution by x-ray crystallography. This structure represents the first experimental structure...

  2. Structure and function of the androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, A O; Klaasen, P; Kuiper, G G; van der Korput, J A; Bolt, J; de Boer, W; Smit, A; Faber, P W; van Rooij, H C; Geurts van Kessel, A

    1989-01-01

    The androgen receptor in several species (human, rat, calf) is a monomeric protein with a molecular mass of 100-110 kDa. The steroid binding domain is confined to a region of 30 kDa, while the DNA-binding domain has the size of approx. 10 kDa. A 40 kDa fragment containing both the DNA and steroid binding domain displayed a higher DNA binding activity than did the intact 100 kDa molecule. cDNA encoding the major part of the human androgen receptor was isolated. The cDNA contains an open reading frame of 2,277 bp but still lacks part of the 5'-coding sequence. Homology with the progesterone and glucocorticoid receptor was about 80% in the DNA binding domain and 50% in the steroid binding domain. The present data provide evidence that the androgen receptor belongs to the superfamily of ligand responsive transcriptional regulators and consists of three distinct domains each with a specialized function.

  3. Crystal structure of NL63 respiratory coronavirus receptor-binding domain complexed with its human receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Kailang; Li, Weikai; Peng, Guiqing; Li, Fang; (Harvard-Med); (UMM-MED)

    2010-03-04

    NL63 coronavirus (NL63-CoV), a prevalent human respiratory virus, is the only group I coronavirus known to use angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as its receptor. Incidentally, ACE2 is also used by group II SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). We investigated how different groups of coronaviruses recognize the same receptor, whereas homologous group I coronaviruses recognize different receptors. We determined the crystal structure of NL63-CoV spike protein receptor-binding domain (RBD) complexed with human ACE2. NL63-CoV RBD has a novel {beta}-sandwich core structure consisting of 2 layers of {beta}-sheets, presenting 3 discontinuous receptor-binding motifs (RBMs) to bind ACE2. NL63-CoV and SARS-CoV have no structural homology in RBD cores or RBMs; yet the 2 viruses recognize common ACE2 regions, largely because of a 'virus-binding hotspot' on ACE2. Among group I coronaviruses, RBD cores are conserved but RBMs are variable, explaining how these viruses recognize different receptors. These results provide a structural basis for understanding viral evolution and virus-receptor interactions.

  4. VPAC receptors: structure, molecular pharmacology and interaction with accessory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvineau, Alain; Laburthe, Marc

    2012-05-01

    The vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a neuropeptide with wide distribution in both central and peripheral nervous systems, where it plays important regulatory role in many physiological processes. VIP displays a large biological functions including regulation of exocrine secretions, hormone release, fetal development, immune responses, etc. VIP appears to exert beneficial effect in neuro-degenerative and inflammatory diseases. The mechanism of action of VIP implicates two subtypes of receptors (VPAC1 and VPAC2), which are members of class B receptors belonging to the super-family of GPCR. This article reviews the current knowledge regarding the structure and molecular pharmacology of VPAC receptors. The structure-function relationship of VPAC1 receptor has been extensively studied, allowing to understand the molecular basis for receptor affinity, specificity, desensitization and coupling to adenylyl cyclase. Those studies have clearly demonstrated the crucial role of the N-terminal ectodomain (N-ted) of VPAC1 receptor in VIP recognition. By using different approaches including directed mutagenesis, photoaffinity labelling, NMR, molecular modelling and molecular dynamic simulation, it has been shown that the VIP molecule interacts with the N-ted of VPAC1 receptor, which is itself structured as a 'Sushi' domain. VPAC1 receptor also interacts with a few accessory proteins that play a role in cell signalling of receptors. Recent advances in the structural characterization of VPAC receptor and more generally of class B GPCRs will lead to the design of new molecules, which could have considerable interest for the treatment of inflammatory and neuro-degenerative diseases. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  5. Illuminating the structure and function of Cys-loop receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Lynch, Joseph W

    2008-01-01

    transitional and steady state conformations and serves as a real time correlate of the channel structure and its function. Voltage-clamp fluorometry experiments on Cys-loop receptors have yielded a large body of data concerning the mechanisms by which agonists, antagonists and modulators act on these receptors...... insight into the structure of Cys-loop receptors. However, data from these experiments only provide 'snapshots' of the proteins under investigation. They cannot provide information about the various conformations the protein adopts during transition from the closed to the open and desensitized states...

  6. LYRA, a webserver for lymphocyte receptor structural modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Michael Schantz; Anderson, Mads Valdemar; Jespersen, Martin Closter

    2015-01-01

    The accurate structural modeling of B- and T-cell receptors is fundamental to gain a detailed insight in the mechanisms underlying immunity and in developing new drugs and therapies. The LYRA (LYmphocyte Receptor Automated modeling) web server (http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/LYRA/) implements...... a complete and automated method for building of B- and T-cell receptor structural models starting from their amino acid sequence alone. The webserver is freely available and easy to use for non-specialists. Upon submission, LYRA automatically generates alignments using ad hoc profiles, predicts......- and T-cell receptors, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, LYRA is the first automated server for the prediction of TCR structure....

  7. Structural basis of ligand interaction with atypical chemokine receptor 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson, Martin; Wang, Liwen; van Gils, Noortje; Stephens, Bryan S.; Zhang, Penglie; Schall, Thomas J.; Yang, Sichun; Abagyan, Ruben; Chance, Mark R.; Kufareva, Irina; Handel, Tracy M.

    2017-01-01

    Chemokines drive cell migration through their interactions with seven-transmembrane (7TM) chemokine receptors on cell surfaces. The atypical chemokine receptor 3 (ACKR3) binds chemokines CXCL11 and CXCL12 and signals exclusively through β-arrestin-mediated pathways, without activating canonical G-protein signalling. This receptor is upregulated in numerous cancers making it a potential drug target. Here we collected over 100 distinct structural probes from radiolytic footprinting, disulfide trapping, and mutagenesis to map the structures of ACKR3:CXCL12 and ACKR3:small-molecule complexes, including dynamic regions that proved unresolvable by X-ray crystallography in homologous receptors. The data are integrated with molecular modelling to produce complete and cohesive experimentally driven models that confirm and expand on the existing knowledge of the architecture of receptor:chemokine and receptor:small-molecule complexes. Additionally, we detected and characterized ligand-induced conformational changes in the transmembrane and intracellular regions of ACKR3 that elucidate fundamental structural elements of agonism in this atypical receptor.

  8. Structural basis of ligand interaction with atypical chemokine receptor 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavsson, Martin; Wang, Liwen; van Gils, Noortje; Stephens, Bryan S.; Zhang, Penglie; Schall, Thomas J.; Yang, Sichun; Abagyan, Ruben; Chance, Mark R.; Kufareva, Irina; Handel, Tracy M.

    2017-01-18

    Chemokines drive cell migration through their interactions with seven-transmembrane (7TM) chemokine receptors on cell surfaces. The atypical chemokine receptor 3 (ACKR3) binds chemokines CXCL11 and CXCL12 and signals exclusively through β-arrestin-mediated pathways, without activating canonical G-protein signalling. This receptor is upregulated in numerous cancers making it a potential drug target. Here we collected over 100 distinct structural probes from radiolytic footprinting, disulfide trapping, and mutagenesis to map the structures of ACKR3:CXCL12 and ACKR3:small-molecule complexes, including dynamic regions that proved unresolvable by X-ray crystallography in homologous receptors. The data are integrated with molecular modelling to produce complete and cohesive experimentally driven models that confirm and expand on the existing knowledge of the architecture of receptor:chemokine and receptor:small-molecule complexes. Additionally, we detected and characterized ligand-induced conformational changes in the transmembrane and intracellular regions of ACKR3 that elucidate fundamental structural elements of agonism in this atypical receptor.

  9. Crystal structure of the human σ1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Hayden R; Zheng, Sanduo; Gurpinar, Esin; Koehl, Antoine; Manglik, Aashish; Kruse, Andrew C

    2016-04-28

    The human σ1 receptor is an enigmatic endoplasmic-reticulum-resident transmembrane protein implicated in a variety of disorders including depression, drug addiction, and neuropathic pain. Recently, an additional connection to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis has emerged from studies of human genetics and mouse models. Unlike many transmembrane receptors that belong to large, extensively studied families such as G-protein-coupled receptors or ligand-gated ion channels, the σ1 receptor is an evolutionary isolate with no discernible similarity to any other human protein. Despite its increasingly clear importance in human physiology and disease, the molecular architecture of the σ1 receptor and its regulation by drug-like compounds remain poorly defined. Here we report crystal structures of the human σ1 receptor in complex with two chemically divergent ligands, PD144418 and 4-IBP. The structures reveal a trimeric architecture with a single transmembrane domain in each protomer. The carboxy-terminal domain of the receptor shows an extensive flat, hydrophobic membrane-proximal surface, suggesting an intimate association with the cytosolic surface of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane in cells. This domain includes a cupin-like β-barrel with the ligand-binding site buried at its centre. This large, hydrophobic ligand-binding cavity shows remarkable plasticity in ligand recognition, binding the two ligands in similar positions despite dissimilar chemical structures. Taken together, these results reveal the overall architecture, oligomerization state, and molecular basis for ligand recognition by this important but poorly understood protein.

  10. A structural view of coronavirus-receptor interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reguera, Juan; Mudgal, Gaurav; Santiago, César; Casasnovas, José M

    2014-12-19

    In the coronavirus (CoV), the envelope spike (S) glycoprotein is responsible for CoV cell entry and host-to-host transmission. The S is a multifunctional glycoprotein that mediates both attachment of CoV particles to cell surface receptor molecules as well as membrane penetration by fusion. Receptor-binding domains (RBD) have been identified in the S of diverse CoV; they usually contain antigenic determinants targeted by antibodies that neutralize CoV infections. To penetrate host cells, the CoV can use various cell surface molecules, although they preferentially bind to ectoenzymes. Several crystal structures have determined the folding of CoV RBD and the mode by which they recognize cell entry receptors. Here we review the CoV-receptor complex structures reported to date, and highlight the distinct receptor recognition modes, common features, and key determinants of the binding specificity. Structural studies have established the basis for understanding receptor recognition diversity in CoV, its evolution and the adaptation of this virus family to different hosts. CoV responsible for recent outbreaks have extraordinary potential for cross-species transmission; their RBD bear large platforms specialized in recognition of receptors from different species, which facilitates host-to-host circulation and adaptation to man. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Structural Analysis of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type G Receptor Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, John; Karalewitz, Andrew; Benefield, Desire A.; Mushrush, Darren J.; Pruitt, Rory N.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Barbieri, Joseph T.; Lacy, D. Borden (Vanderbilt); (MCW)

    2010-10-19

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) binds peripheral neurons at the neuromuscular junction through a dual-receptor mechanism that includes interactions with ganglioside and protein receptors. The receptor identities vary depending on BoNT serotype (A-G). BoNT/B and BoNT/G bind the luminal domains of synaptotagmin I and II, homologous synaptic vesicle proteins. We observe conditions under which BoNT/B binds both Syt isoforms, but BoNT/G binds only SytI. Both serotypes bind ganglioside G{sub T1b}. The BoNT/G receptor-binding domain crystal structure provides a context for examining these binding interactions and a platform for understanding the physiological relevance of different Syt receptor isoforms in vivo.

  12. Molecular cloning, expression, and sequence analysis of GPRC6A, a novel family C G-protein-coupled receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorph, Petrine; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2004-01-01

    with a significant homology to the human calcium-sensing receptor (CaR, 34% aa sequence identity), the taste receptor 1 (T1R1, 28%), and the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1, 24%), places GPRC6A in family C of the GPCRs. Interestingly, GPRC6A bears the highest resemblance with an odorant goldfish 5...

  13. Structure of the [delta]-opioid receptor bound to naltrindole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granier, Sébastien; Manglik, Aashish; Kruse, Andrew C.; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Thian, Foon Sun; Weis, William I.; Kobilka, Brian K. (Stanford-MED)

    2012-07-11

    The opioid receptor family comprises three members, the {mu}-, {delta}- and {kappa}-opioid receptors, which respond to classical opioid alkaloids such as morphine and heroin as well as to endogenous peptide ligands like endorphins. They belong to the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily, and are excellent therapeutic targets for pain control. The {delta}-opioid receptor ({delta}-OR) has a role in analgesia, as well as in other neurological functions that remain poorly understood. The structures of the {mu}-OR and {kappa}-OR have recently been solved. Here we report the crystal structure of the mouse {delta}-OR, bound to the subtype-selective antagonist naltrindole. Together with the structures of the {mu}-OR and {kappa}-OR, the {delta}-OR structure provides insights into conserved elements of opioid ligand recognition while also revealing structural features associated with ligand-subtype selectivity. The binding pocket of opioid receptors can be divided into two distinct regions. Whereas the lower part of this pocket is highly conserved among opioid receptors, the upper part contains divergent residues that confer subtype selectivity. This provides a structural explanation and validation for the 'message-address' model of opioid receptor pharmacology, in which distinct 'message' (efficacy) and 'address' (selectivity) determinants are contained within a single ligand. Comparison of the address region of the {delta}-OR with other GPCRs reveals that this structural organization may be a more general phenomenon, extending to other GPCR families as well.

  14. Lessons from crystal structures of kainate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllerud, Stine; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Pickering, Darryl S

    2017-01-01

    -length structure has been determined of GluK2 by cryo electron microscopy to 7.6 Å resolution as well as 84 high-resolution crystal structures of N-terminal domains and ligand-binding domains, including agonist and antagonist bound structures, modulatory ions and mutations. However, there are still many unanswered...

  15. Structure-Based Rational Design of Adenosine Receptor Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-de-Terán, Hugo; Sallander, Jessica; Sotelo, Eddy

    2017-01-01

    The family of adenosine receptors (ARs) is focus of several medicinal chemistry programs aimed to find new potent and selective drugs. Each receptor subtype has been proposed as a relevant drug target in the treatment of, e.g., cardiovascular or inflammatory diseases, asthma or Parkinson's disease. Until recently, most of these efforts have been dominated by ligand-based or empirical approaches. However, the latest advances in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) crystallography allowed for a thorough structural characterization of the A2AAR subtype, which has been crystalized with a number of agonists and antagonists. Consequently, the ligand discovery of AR ligands has been enriched with a number of structure-based approaches. These include the generation of higher-confident homology models for the remaining AR subtypes, virtual screening identification of novel chemotypes, structure-based lead-optimization programs, rationalization of selectivity profiles, or the structural characterization of novel binding sites that enable the design of novel allosteric modulators. Computational methodologies have importantly contributed to the success of these structure-based approaches, and the recent advances in the field are also analyzed in this review. We conclude that the design of adenosine receptor ligands has improved dramatically with the consideration of structure- based approaches, which is paving the way to a better understanding of the biology and pharmacological modulation of this relevant family of receptors.

  16. Structural Studies of G Protein-Coupled Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dandan; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Beili

    2015-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest and the most physiologically important membrane protein family that recognizes a variety of environmental stimuli, and are drug targets in the treatment of numerous diseases. Recent progress on GPCR structural studies shed light on molecular mechanisms of GPCR ligand recognition, activation and allosteric modulation, as well as structural basis of GPCR dimerization. In this review, we will discuss the structural features of GPCRs and structural insights of different aspects of GPCR biological functions.

  17. Glutamate Receptor Ion Channels: Structure, Regulation, and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollmuth, Lonnie P.; McBain, Chris J.; Menniti, Frank S.; Vance, Katie M.; Ogden, Kevin K.; Hansen, Kasper B.; Yuan, Hongjie; Myers, Scott J.; Dingledine, Ray

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptor family encodes 18 gene products that coassemble to form ligand-gated ion channels containing an agonist recognition site, a transmembrane ion permeation pathway, and gating elements that couple agonist-induced conformational changes to the opening or closing of the permeation pore. Glutamate receptors mediate fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system and are localized on neuronal and non-neuronal cells. These receptors regulate a broad spectrum of processes in the brain, spinal cord, retina, and peripheral nervous system. Glutamate receptors are postulated to play important roles in numerous neurological diseases and have attracted intense scrutiny. The description of glutamate receptor structure, including its transmembrane elements, reveals a complex assembly of multiple semiautonomous extracellular domains linked to a pore-forming element with striking resemblance to an inverted potassium channel. In this review we discuss International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology glutamate receptor nomenclature, structure, assembly, accessory subunits, interacting proteins, gene expression and translation, post-translational modifications, agonist and antagonist pharmacology, allosteric modulation, mechanisms of gating and permeation, roles in normal physiological function, as well as the potential therapeutic use of pharmacological agents acting at glutamate receptors. PMID:20716669

  18. Structure and dynamics of the M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruse, Andrew C.; Hu, Jianxin; Pan, Albert C.; Arlow, Daniel H.; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.; Rosemond, Erica; Green, Hillary F.; Liu, Tong; Chae, Pil Seok; Dror, Ron O.; Shaw, David E.; Weis, William I.; Wess, Jürgen; Kobilka, Brian K. (Stanford); (NIH); (D.E. Shaw); (Hanyang); (UTSMC)

    2012-03-01

    Acetylcholine, the first neurotransmitter to be identified, exerts many of its physiological actions via activation of a family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) known as muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). Although the five mAChR subtypes (M1-M5) share a high degree of sequence homology, they show pronounced differences in G-protein coupling preference and the physiological responses they mediate. Unfortunately, despite decades of effort, no therapeutic agents endowed with clear mAChR subtype selectivity have been developed to exploit these differences. We describe here the structure of the G{sub q/11}-coupled M3 mAChR ('M3 receptor', from rat) bound to the bronchodilator drug tiotropium and identify the binding mode for this clinically important drug. This structure, together with that of the G{sub i/o}-coupled M2 receptor, offers possibilities for the design of mAChR subtype-selective ligands. Importantly, the M3 receptor structure allows a structural comparison between two members of a mammalian GPCR subfamily displaying different G-protein coupling selectivities. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations suggest that tiotropium binds transiently to an allosteric site en route to the binding pocket of both receptors. These simulations offer a structural view of an allosteric binding mode for an orthosteric GPCR ligand and provide additional opportunities for the design of ligands with different affinities or binding kinetics for different mAChR subtypes. Our findings not only offer insights into the structure and function of one of the most important GPCR families, but may also facilitate the design of improved therapeutics targeting these critical receptors.

  19. The repertoire of olfactory C family G protein-coupled receptors in zebrafish: candidate chemosensory receptors for amino acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngai John

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vertebrate odorant receptors comprise at least three types of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs: the OR, V1R, and V2R/V2R-like receptors, the latter group belonging to the C family of GPCRs. These receptor families are thought to receive chemosensory information from a wide spectrum of odorant and pheromonal cues that influence critical animal behaviors such as feeding, reproduction and other social interactions. Results Using genome database mining and other informatics approaches, we identified and characterized the repertoire of 54 intact "V2R-like" olfactory C family GPCRs in the zebrafish. Phylogenetic analysis – which also included a set of 34 C family GPCRs from fugu – places the fish olfactory receptors in three major groups, which are related to but clearly distinct from other C family GPCRs, including the calcium sensing receptor, metabotropic glutamate receptors, GABA-B receptor, T1R taste receptors, and the major group of V2R vomeronasal receptor families. Interestingly, an analysis of sequence conservation and selective pressure in the zebrafish receptors revealed the retention of a conserved sequence motif previously shown to be required for ligand binding in other amino acid receptors. Conclusion Based on our findings, we propose that the repertoire of zebrafish olfactory C family GPCRs has evolved to allow the detection and discrimination of a spectrum of amino acid and/or amino acid-based compounds, which are potent olfactory cues in fish. Furthermore, as the major groups of fish receptors and mammalian V2R receptors appear to have diverged significantly from a common ancestral gene(s, these receptors likely mediate chemosensation of different classes of chemical structures by their respective organisms.

  20. NMDA receptor structures reveal subunit arrangement and pore architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chia-Hsueh; Lü, Wei; Michel, Jennifer Carlisle; Goehring, April; Du, Juan; Song, Xianqiang; Gouaux, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Summary N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are Hebbian-like coincidence detectors, requiring binding of glycine and glutamate in combination with the relief of voltage-dependent magnesium block to open an ion conductive pore across the membrane bilayer. Despite the importance of the NMDA receptor in the development and function of the brain, a molecular structure of an intact receptor has remained elusive. Here we present x-ray crystal structures of the GluN1/GluN2B NMDA receptor with the allosteric inhibitor, Ro25-6981, partial agonists and the ion channel blocker, MK-801. Receptor subunits are arranged in a 1-2-1-2 fashion, demonstrating extensive interactions between the amino terminal and ligand binding domains. The transmembrane domains harbor a closed-blocked ion channel, a pyramidal central vestibule lined by residues implicated in binding ion channel blockers and magnesium, and a ~2-fold symmetric arrangement of ion channel pore loops. These structures provide new insights into the architecture, allosteric coupling and ion channel function of NMDA receptors. PMID:25008524

  1. NMDA receptor structures reveal subunit arrangement and pore architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chia-Hsueh; Lü, Wei; Michel, Jennifer Carlisle; Goehring, April; Du, Juan; Song, Xianqiang; Gouaux, Eric

    2014-07-10

    N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are Hebbian-like coincidence detectors, requiring binding of glycine and glutamate in combination with the relief of voltage-dependent magnesium block to open an ion conductive pore across the membrane bilayer. Despite the importance of the NMDA receptor in the development and function of the brain, a molecular structure of an intact receptor has remained elusive. Here we present X-ray crystal structures of the Xenopus laevis GluN1-GluN2B NMDA receptor with the allosteric inhibitor, Ro25-6981, partial agonists and the ion channel blocker, MK-801. Receptor subunits are arranged in a 1-2-1-2 fashion, demonstrating extensive interactions between the amino-terminal and ligand-binding domains. The transmembrane domains harbour a closed-blocked ion channel, a pyramidal central vestibule lined by residues implicated in binding ion channel blockers and magnesium, and a ∼twofold symmetric arrangement of ion channel pore loops. These structures provide new insights into the architecture, allosteric coupling and ion channel function of NMDA receptors.

  2. Novel lysophosphoplipid receptors: their structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makide, Kumiko; Uwamizu, Akiharu; Shinjo, Yuji; Ishiguro, Jun; Okutani, Michiyo; Inoue, Asuka; Aoki, Junken

    2014-10-01

    It is now accepted that lysophospholipids (LysoGPs) have a wide variety of functions as lipid mediators that are exerted through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) specific to each lysophospholipid. While the roles of some LysoGPs, such as lysophosphatidic acid and sphingosine 1-phosphate, have been thoroughly examined, little is known about the roles of several other LysoGPs, such as lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS), lysophosphatidylthreonine, lysophosphatidylethanolamine, lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), and lysophosphatidylglycerol. Recently, a GPCR was found for LPI (GPR55) and three GPCRs (GPR34/LPS1, P2Y10/LPS2, and GPR174/LPS3) were found for LysoPS. In this review, we focus on these newly identified GPCRs and summarize the actions of LysoPS and LPI as lipid mediators. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Structural organization of G-protein-coupled receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomize, Andrei L.; Pogozheva, Irina D.; Mosberg, Henry I.

    1999-07-01

    Atomic-resolution structures of the transmembrane 7-α-helical domains of 26 G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) (including opsins, cationic amine, melatonin, purine, chemokine, opioid, and glycoprotein hormone receptors and two related proteins, retinochrome and Duffy erythrocyte antigen) were calculated by distance geometry using interhelical hydrogen bonds formed by various proteins from the family and collectively applied as distance constraints, as described previously [Pogozheva et al., Biophys. J., 70 (1997) 1963]. The main structural features of the calculated GPCR models are described and illustrated by examples. Some of the features reflect physical interactions that are responsible for the structural stability of the transmembrane α-bundle: the formation of extensive networks of interhelical H-bonds and sulfur-aromatic clusters that are spatially organized as 'polarity gradients' the close packing of side-chains throughout the transmembrane domain; and the formation of interhelical disulfide bonds in some receptors and a plausible Zn2+ binding center in retinochrome. Other features of the models are related to biological function and evolution of GPCRs: the formation of a common 'minicore' of 43 evolutionarily conserved residues; a multitude of correlated replacements throughout the transmembrane domain; an Na+-binding site in some receptors, and excellent complementarity of receptor binding pockets to many structurally dissimilar, conformationally constrained ligands, such as retinal, cyclic opioid peptides, and cationic amine ligands. The calculated models are in good agreement with numerous experimental data.

  4. Structural Analysis of the Histamine H1 Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiroishi, Mitsunori; Kobayashi, Takuya

    2017-01-01

    The crystal structure of the human histamine H1 receptor (H1R) has been determined in complex with its inverse agonist doxepin, a first-generation antihistamine. The crystal structure showed that doxepin sits deeply inside the ligand-binding pocket and predominantly interacts with residues highly conserved among other aminergic receptors. This binding mode is considered to result in the low selectivity of the first-generation antihistamines for H1R. The crystal structure also revealed the mechanism of receptor inactivation by the inverse agonist doxepin. On the other hand, the crystal structure elucidated the anion-binding site near the extracellular portion of the receptor. This site consists of residues not conserved among other aminergic receptors, which are specific for H1R. Docking simulation and biochemical experimentation demonstrated that a carboxyl group on the second-generation antihistamines interacts with the anion-binding site. These results imply that the anion-binding site is a key site for the development of highly selective antihistamine drugs.

  5. Structure and activation of the TSH receptor transmembrane domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez Miguel, Ricardo; Sanders, Jane; Furmaniak, Jadwiga; Smith, Bernard Rees

    2017-12-01

    The thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) is the target autoantigen for TSHR-stimulating autoantibodies in Graves' disease. The TSHR is composed of: a leucine-rich repeat domain (LRD), a hinge region or cleavage domain (CD) and a transmembrane domain (TMD). The binding arrangements between the TSHR LRD and the thyroid-stimulating autoantibody M22 or TSH have become available from the crystal structure of the TSHR LRD-M22 complex and a comparative model of the TSHR LRD in complex with TSH, respectively. However, the mechanism by which the TMD of the TSHR and the other glycoprotein hormone receptors (GPHRs) becomes activated is unknown. We have generated comparative models of the structures of the inactive (TMD_In) and active (TMD_Ac) conformations of the TSHR, follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) and luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR) TMDs. The structures of TMD_Ac and TMD_In were obtained using class A GPCR crystal structures for which fully active and inactive conformations were available. Most conserved motifs observed in GPCR TMDs are also observed in the amino acid sequences of GPHR TMDs. Furthermore, most GPCR TMD conserved helix distortions are observed in our models of the structures of GPHR TMDs. Analysis of these structures has allowed us to propose a mechanism for activation of GPHR TMDs. Insight into the mechanism of activation of the TSHR by both TSH and TSHR autoantibodies is likely to be useful in the development of new treatments for Graves' disease.

  6. LYRA, a webserver for lymphocyte receptor structural modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausen, Michael Schantz; Anderson, Mads Valdemar; Jespersen, Martin Closter; Nielsen, Morten; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-07-01

    The accurate structural modeling of B- and T-cell receptors is fundamental to gain a detailed insight in the mechanisms underlying immunity and in developing new drugs and therapies. The LYRA (LYmphocyte Receptor Automated modeling) web server (http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/LYRA/) implements a complete and automated method for building of B- and T-cell receptor structural models starting from their amino acid sequence alone. The webserver is freely available and easy to use for non-specialists. Upon submission, LYRA automatically generates alignments using ad hoc profiles, predicts the structural class of each hypervariable loop, selects the best templates in an automatic fashion, and provides within minutes a complete 3D model that can be downloaded or inspected online. Experienced users can manually select or exclude template structures according to case specific information. LYRA is based on the canonical structure method, that in the last 30 years has been successfully used to generate antibody models of high accuracy, and in our benchmarks this approach proves to achieve similarly good results on TCR modeling, with a benchmarked average RMSD accuracy of 1.29 and 1.48 Å for B- and T-cell receptors, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, LYRA is the first automated server for the prediction of TCR structure. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Structure and function of the human megalin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dagil, Robert

    Megalin is an endocytic lipoprotein receptor expressed widely throughout the body, ranging from the proximal tubule in the kidneys to the cochlea in the inner ear. Megalin is known to bind over 50 different ligands and is involved in protein clearance of the renal ultrafiltrate via endocytosis...... was studied using NMR spectroscopy. The structure of the tenth CR domain from the human megalin receptor was solved using NMR spectroscopy and a HADDOCK model of the complex between this domain and gentamicin was determined. The structural complex showed that a Trp residue and three Asp residues from megalin...

  8. Structural basis of receptor sharing by interleukin 17 cytokines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ely, Lauren K.; Fischer, Suzanne; Garcia, K. Christopher; Stanford-MED

    2010-02-19

    Interleukin 17 (IL-17)-producing helper T cells (T{sub H}-17 cells), together with their effector cytokines, including members of the IL-17 family, are emerging as key mediators of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. Here we present the crystal structure of a complex of IL-17 receptor A (IL-17RA) bound to IL-17F in a 1:2 stoichiometry. The mechanism of complex formation was unique for cytokines and involved the engagement of IL-17 by two fibronectin-type domains of IL-17RA in a groove between the IL-17 homodimer interface. Binding of the first receptor to the IL-17 cytokines modulated the affinity and specificity of the second receptor-binding event, thereby promoting heterodimeric versus homodimeric complex formation. IL-17RA used a common recognition strategy to bind to several members of the IL-17 family, which allows it to potentially act as a shared receptor in multiple different signaling complexes.

  9. 5-HT2C Receptor Structures Reveal the Structural Basis of GPCR Polypharmacology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Yao; Mccorvy, John D.; Harpsøe, Kasper

    2018-01-01

    . The competing challenges of developing selective 5-HT2C receptor ligands or creating drugs with a defined polypharmacological profile, especially aimed at G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), remain extremely difficult. Here, we solved two structures of the 5-HT2C receptor in complex with the highly promiscuous...... the structural basis of polypharmacology at canonical GPCRs and illustrates how understanding characteristic patterns of ligand-receptor interaction and activation may ultimately facilitate drug design at multiple GPCRs.......Drugs frequently require interactions with multiple targets—via a process known as polypharmacology—to achieve their therapeutic actions. Currently, drugs targeting several serotonin receptors, including the 5-HT2C receptor, are useful for treating obesity, drug abuse, and schizophrenia...

  10. Vitamin D receptors and parathyroid glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Christine S; Ruppe, Mary D; Grubbs, Elizabeth G

    2011-01-01

    To describe the function and metabolism of the vitamin D hormone and the role of the vitamin D receptor and the calcium-sensing receptor in the secretion of parathyroid hormone. A review of the literature was undertaken regarding the function and metabolism of vitamin D; the role of the vitamin D receptor and calcium-sensing receptor in the secretion of parathyroid hormone; and the contemporary research regarding the interaction of vitamin D and parathyroid hormone in patients with vitamin D deficiency, primary hyperparathyroidism, and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Over the last several years, great interest has been generated about the interaction of vitamin D and the parathyroid glands, gastrointestinal tract, kidney, and bone in relation to calcium and parathyroid hormone levels. Vitamin D has an important role in calcium and parathyroid hormone metabolism. Likewise, the vitamin D axis appears to be involved with the development of both primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism. The specific mechanism by which vitamin D interacts with the parathyroid gland to bring about observed effects is not yet fully understood. Future studies investigating the relationship of the vitamin D receptor, calcium-sensing receptor, and parathyroid glands are needed to enhance our knowledge of vitamin D deficiency and primary and secondary vitamin D deficiency.

  11. Crystal structure of mouse coronavirus receptor-binding domain complexed with its murine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Guiqing; Sun, Dawei; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Qian, Zhaohui; Holmes, Kathryn V.; Li, Fang (Cornell); (UMM-MED); (Colorado)

    2011-09-28

    Coronaviruses have evolved diverse mechanisms to recognize different receptors for their cross-species transmission and host-range expansion. Mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV) uses the N-terminal domain (NTD) of its spike protein as its receptor-binding domain. Here we present the crystal structure of MHV NTD complexed with its receptor murine carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1a (mCEACAM1a). Unexpectedly, MHV NTD contains a core structure that has the same {beta}-sandwich fold as human galectins (S-lectins) and additional structural motifs that bind to the N-terminal Ig-like domain of mCEACAM1a. Despite its galectin fold, MHV NTD does not bind sugars, but instead binds mCEACAM1a through exclusive protein-protein interactions. Critical contacts at the interface have been confirmed by mutagenesis, providing a structural basis for viral and host specificities of coronavirus/CEACAM1 interactions. Sugar-binding assays reveal that galectin-like NTDs of some coronaviruses such as human coronavirus OC43 and bovine coronavirus bind sugars. Structural analysis and mutagenesis localize the sugar-binding site in coronavirus NTDs to be above the {beta}-sandwich core. We propose that coronavirus NTDs originated from a host galectin and retained sugar-binding functions in some contemporary coronaviruses, but evolved new structural features in MHV for mCEACAM1a binding.

  12. Crystal Structures of the β2-Adrenergic Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, William I.; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.; Rasmussen, Søren G. F.; Choi, Hee-Jung; Thian, Foon Sun; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Yao, Xiao-Jie; Day, Peter W.; Parnot, Charles; Fung, Juan J.; Ratnala, Venkata R. P.; Kobilka, Brian K.; Cherezov, Vadim; Hanson, Michael A.; Kuhn, Peter; Stevens, Raymond C.; Edwards, Patricia C.; Schertler, Gebhard F. X.; Burghammer, Manfred; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Fischetti, Robert F.; Masood, Asna; Rohrer, Daniel K.

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of membrane proteins in the human genome, and are responsible for the majority of signal transduction events involving hormones and neuro-transmitters across the cell membrane. GPCRs that bind to diffusible ligands have low natural abundance, are relatively unstable in detergents, and display basal G protein activation even in the absence of ligands. To overcome these problems two approaches were taken to obtain crystal structures of the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR), a well-characterized GPCR that binds cate-cholamine hormones. The receptor was bound to the partial inverse agonist carazolol and co-crystallized with a Fab made to a three-dimensional epitope formed by the third intracellular loop (ICL3), or by replacement of ICL3 with T4 lysozyme. Small crystals were obtained in lipid bicelles (β2AR-Fab) or lipidic cubic phase (β2AR-T4 lysozyme), and diffraction data were obtained using microfocus technology. The structures provide insights into the basal activity of the receptor, the structural features that enable binding of diffusible ligands, and the coupling between ligand binding and G-protein activation.

  13. Structure-Based Drug Design of Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists to Explore Oxosteroid Receptor Selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordqvist, Anneli; O'Mahony, Gavin; Fridén-Saxin, Maria; Fredenwall, Marlene; Hogner, Anders; Granberg, Kenneth L; Aagaard, Anna; Bäckström, Stefan; Gunnarsson, Anders; Kaminski, Tim; Xue, Yafeng; Dellsén, Anita; Hansson, Eva; Hansson, Pia; Ivarsson, Ida; Karlsson, Ulla; Bamberg, Krister; Hermansson, Majlis; Georgsson, Jennie; Lindmark, Bo; Edman, Karl

    2017-01-05

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a nuclear hormone receptor involved in the regulation of body fluid and electrolyte homeostasis. In this study we explore selectivity triggers for a series of nonsteroidal MR antagonists to improve selectivity over other members of the oxosteroid receptor family. A biaryl sulfonamide compound was identified in a high-throughput screening (HTS) campaign. The compound bound to MR with pKi =6.6, but displayed poor selectivity over the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and the progesterone receptor (PR). Following X-ray crystallography of MR in complex with the HTS hit, a compound library was designed that explored an induced-fit hypothesis that required movement of the Met852 side chain. An improvement in MR selectivity of 11- to 79-fold over PR and 23- to 234-fold over GR was obtained. Given the U-shaped binding conformation, macrocyclizations were explored, yielding a macrocycle that bound to MR with pKi =7.3. Two protein-ligand X-ray structures were determined, confirming the hypothesized binding mode for the designed compounds. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists in therapeutic and structural perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Jos H M; Kruse, Chris G

    2008-01-01

    The observed antiobesity effect of rimonabant (1) in a pharmacological rodent model 10 years ago has led to a surge in the search for novel cannabinoid CB1 antagonists as a new therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity. Rimonabant showed clinical efficacy in the treatment of obesity and also improved cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists have also good prospects in other therapeutic areas, including smoking and alcohol addiction as well as cognitive impairment. Solvay's research achievements in this fast-moving field are reported in relation with the current state of the art. Several medicinal chemistry strategies have been pursued. The application of the concept of conformational constraint led to the discovery of more rigid analogs of the prototypic CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant. Replacement of the central heterocyclic pyrazole ring in rimonabant yielded imidazoles, triazoles, and thiazoles as selective CB1 receptor antagonists. Dedicated medium-throughput screening efforts delivered one 3,4-diarylpyrazoline hit. Its poor pharmacokinetic properties were successfully optimized which led to the discovery of orally active and highly CB1/CB2 receptor selective analogs in this series. Regioisomeric 1,5-diarylpyrazolines, 1,2-diarylimidazolines, and water-soluble imidazoles have been designed as novel CB1 receptor antagonist structure classes. Copyright 2008 The Japan Chemical Journal Forum and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The venus kinase receptor (VKR) family: structure and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) form a family of transmembrane proteins widely conserved in Metazoa, with key functions in cell-to-cell communication and control of multiple cellular processes. A new family of RTK named Venus Kinase Receptor (VKR) has been described in invertebrates. The VKR receptor possesses a Venus Fly Trap (VFT) extracellular module, a bilobate structure that binds small ligands to induce receptor kinase activity. VKR was shown to be highly expressed in the larval stages and gonads of several invertebrates, suggesting that it could have functions in development and/or reproduction. Results Analysis of recent genomic data has allowed us to extend the presence of VKR to five bilaterian phyla (Platyhelminthes, Arthropoda, Annelida, Mollusca, Echinodermata) as well as to the Cnidaria phylum. The presence of NveVKR in the early-branching metazoan Nematostella vectensis suggested that VKR arose before the bilaterian radiation. Phylogenetic and gene structure analyses showed that the 40 receptors identified in 36 animal species grouped monophyletically, and likely evolved from a common ancestor. Multiple alignments of tyrosine kinase (TK) and VFT domains indicated their important level of conservation in all VKRs identified up to date. We showed that VKRs had inducible activity upon binding of extracellular amino-acids and molecular modeling of the VFT domain confirmed the structure of the conserved amino-acid binding site. Conclusions This study highlights the presence of VKR in a large number of invertebrates, including primitive metazoans like cnidarians, but also its absence from nematodes and chordates. This little-known RTK family deserves to be further explored in order to determine its evolutionary origin, its possible interest for the emergence and specialization of Metazoa, and to understand its function in invertebrate development and/or reproductive biology. PMID:23721482

  16. Crystal Structure of the Human Laminin Receptor Precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamieson,K.; Wu, J.; Hubbard, S.; Meruelo, D.

    2008-01-01

    The human laminin receptor (LamR) interacts with many ligands, including laminin, prions, Sindbis virus, and the polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), and has been implicated in a number of diseases. LamR is overexpressed on tumor cells, and targeting LamR elicits anti-cancer effects. Here, we report the crystal structure of human LamR, which provides insights into its function and should facilitate the design of novel therapeutics targeting LamR.

  17. Androgen receptor: structure, role in prostate cancer and drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, MH Eileen; Li, Jun; Xu, H Eric; Melcher, Karsten; Yong, Eu-leong

    2015-01-01

    Androgens and androgen receptors (AR) play a pivotal role in expression of the male phenotype. Several diseases, such as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) and prostate cancer, are associated with alterations in AR functions. Indeed, androgen blockade by drugs that prevent the production of androgens and/or block the action of the AR inhibits prostate cancer growth. However, resistance to these drugs often occurs after 2–3 years as the patients develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In CRPC, a functional AR remains a key regulator. Early studies focused on the functional domains of the AR and its crucial role in the pathology. The elucidation of the structures of the AR DNA binding domain (DBD) and ligand binding domain (LBD) provides a new framework for understanding the functions of this receptor and leads to the development of rational drug design for the treatment of prostate cancer. An overview of androgen receptor structure and activity, its actions in prostate cancer, and how structural information and high-throughput screening have been or can be used for drug discovery are provided herein. PMID:24909511

  18. Genomic organization of a receptor from sea anemones, structurally and evolutionary related to glycoprotein hormone receptors from mamals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vibede, N; Hauser, Frank; Williamson, M

    1998-01-01

    Abstract Cnidarians (e.g., sea anemones and corals) are the lowest animal group having a nervous system. Previously, we cloned a receptor from sea anemones that showed a strong structural similarity to the glycoprotein hormone (TSH, FSH, LH/CG) receptors from mammals. Here, we determine the genomic...... organization of this sea anemone receptor. The receptor gene contains eight introns that are all localized within a region coding for the large extracellular N terminus. These introns occur at the same positions and have the same intron phasing as eight introns in the genes coding for the mammalian...... glycoprotein hormone receptors, indicating that the cnidarian and mammalian receptor genes are evolutionarily related. As with the mammalian receptor genes, the sea anemone receptor gene does not contain introns in the region coding for the transmembrane and intracellular domains. Southern blot analyses show...

  19. A combined computational and structural model of the full-length human prolactin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bugge, Katrine Østergaard; Papaleo, Elena; Haxholm, Gitte Wolfsberg

    2016-01-01

    The prolactin receptor is an archetype member of the class I cytokine receptor family, comprising receptors with fundamental functions in biology as well as key drug targets. Structurally, each of these receptors represent an intriguing diversity, providing an exceptionally challenging target...... for structural biology. Here, we access the molecular architecture of the monomeric human prolactin receptor by combining experimental and computational efforts. We solve the NMR structure of its transmembrane domain in micelles and collect structural data on overlapping fragments of the receptor with small...

  20. The structure and function of G-protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Daniel M; Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup; Kobilka, Brian K

    2009-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediate most of our physiological responses to hormones, neurotransmitters and environmental stimulants, and so have great potential as therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. They are also fascinating molecules from the perspective of membrane......-protein structure and biology. Great progress has been made over the past three decades in understanding diverse GPCRs, from pharmacology to functional characterization in vivo. Recent high-resolution structural studies have provided insights into the molecular mechanisms of GPCR activation and constitutive...

  1. Structure of the agonist-bound neurotensin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jim F; Noinaj, Nicholas; Shibata, Yoko; Love, James; Kloss, Brian; Xu, Feng; Gvozdenovic-Jeremic, Jelena; Shah, Priyanka; Shiloach, Joseph; Tate, Christopher G; Grisshammer, Reinhard

    2012-10-25

    Neurotensin (NTS) is a 13-amino-acid peptide that functions as both a neurotransmitter and a hormone through the activation of the neurotensin receptor NTSR1, a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). In the brain, NTS modulates the activity of dopaminergic systems, opioid-independent analgesia, and the inhibition of food intake; in the gut, NTS regulates a range of digestive processes. Here we present the structure at 2.8 Å resolution of Rattus norvegicus NTSR1 in an active-like state, bound to NTS(8-13), the carboxy-terminal portion of NTS responsible for agonist-induced activation of the receptor. The peptide agonist binds to NTSR1 in an extended conformation nearly perpendicular to the membrane plane, with the C terminus oriented towards the receptor core. Our findings provide, to our knowledge, the first insight into the binding mode of a peptide agonist to a GPCR and may support the development of non-peptide ligands that could be useful in the treatment of neurological disorders, cancer and obesity.

  2. Structural and Functional Attributes of the Interleukin-36 Receptor*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Guanghui; Ybe, Joel A.; Saha, Siddhartha S.; Caviness, Gary; Raymond, Ernest; Ganesan, Rajkumar; Mbow, M. Lamine; Kao, C. Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Signal transduction by the IL-36 receptor (IL-36R) is linked to several human diseases. However, the structure and function of the IL-36R is not well understood. A molecular model of the IL-36R complex was generated and a cell-based reporter assay was established to assess the signal transduction of recombinant subunits of the IL-36R. Mutational analyses and functional assays have identified residues of the receptor subunit IL-1Rrp2 needed for cytokine recognition, stable protein expression, disulfide bond formation and glycosylation that are critical for signal transduction. We also observed that, overexpression of ectodomain (ECD) of Il-1Rrp2 or IL-1RAcP exhibited dominant-negative effect on IL-36R signaling. The presence of IL-36 cytokine significantly increased the interaction of IL-1Rrp2 ECD with the co-receptor IL-1RAcP. Finally, we found that single nucleotide polymorphism A471T in the Toll-interleukin 1 receptor domain (TIR) of the IL-1Rrp2 that is present in ∼2% of the human population, down-regulated IL-36R signaling by a decrease of interaction with IL-1RAcP. PMID:27307043

  3. Structural and Functional Attributes of the Interleukin-36 Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Guanghui; Ybe, Joel A; Saha, Siddhartha S; Caviness, Gary; Raymond, Ernest; Ganesan, Rajkumar; Mbow, M Lamine; Kao, C Cheng

    2016-08-05

    Signal transduction by the IL-36 receptor (IL-36R) is linked to several human diseases. However, the structure and function of the IL-36R is not well understood. A molecular model of the IL-36R complex was generated and a cell-based reporter assay was established to assess the signal transduction of recombinant subunits of the IL-36R. Mutational analyses and functional assays have identified residues of the receptor subunit IL-1Rrp2 needed for cytokine recognition, stable protein expression, disulfide bond formation and glycosylation that are critical for signal transduction. We also observed that, overexpression of ectodomain (ECD) of Il-1Rrp2 or IL-1RAcP exhibited dominant-negative effect on IL-36R signaling. The presence of IL-36 cytokine significantly increased the interaction of IL-1Rrp2 ECD with the co-receptor IL-1RAcP. Finally, we found that single nucleotide polymorphism A471T in the Toll-interleukin 1 receptor domain (TIR) of the IL-1Rrp2 that is present in ∼2% of the human population, down-regulated IL-36R signaling by a decrease of interaction with IL-1RAcP. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Structure and function of platelet receptors initiating blood clotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Elizabeth E; Andrews, Robert K

    2014-01-01

    At the clinical level, recent studies reveal the link between coagulation and other pathophysiological processes, including platelet activation, inflammation, cancer, the immune response, and/or infectious diseases. These links are likely to underpin the coagulopathy associated with risk factors for venous thromboembolic (VTE) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT). At the molecular level, the interactions between platelet-specific receptors and coagulation factors could help explain coagulopathy associated with aberrant platelet function, as well as revealing new approaches targeting platelet receptors in diagnosis or treatment of VTE or DVT. Glycoprotein (GP)Ibα, the major ligand-binding subunit of the platelet GPIb-IX-V complex, that binds the adhesive ligand, von Willebrand factor (VWF), is co-associated with the platelet-specific collagen receptor, GPVI. The GPIb-IX-V/GPVI adheso-signaling complex not only initiates platelet activation and aggregation (thrombus formation) in response to vascular injury or disease but GPIbα also regulates coagulation through a specific interaction with thrombin and other coagulation factors. Here, we discuss the structure and function of key platelet receptors involved in thrombus formation and coagulation in health and disease, with a particular focus on platelet GPIbα.

  5. Structure of human Aichi virus and implications for receptor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ling; Wang, Xiangxi; Ren, Jingshan; Kotecha, Abhay; Walter, Thomas S; Yuan, Shuai; Yamashita, Teruo; Tuthill, Tobias J; Fry, Elizabeth E; Rao, Zihe; Stuart, David I

    2016-09-05

    Aichi virus (AiV), an unusual and poorly characterized picornavirus, classified in the genus Kobuvirus, can cause severe gastroenteritis and deaths in children below the age of five years, especially in developing countries(1,2). The seroprevalence of AiV is approximately 60% in children under the age of ten years and reaches 90% later in life(3,4). There is no available vaccine or effective antiviral treatment. Here, we describe the structure of AiV at 3.7 Å. This first high-resolution structure for a kobuvirus is intermediate between those of the enteroviruses and cardioviruses, with a shallow, narrow depression bounded by the prominent VP0 CD loops (linking the C and D strands of the β-barrel), replacing the depression known as the canyon, frequently the site of receptor attachment in enteroviruses. VP0 is not cleaved to form VP2 and VP4, so the 'VP2' β-barrel structure is complemented with a unique extended structure on the inside of the capsid. On the outer surface, a polyproline helix structure, not seen previously in picornaviruses is present at the C terminus of VP1, a position where integrin binding motifs are found in some other picornaviruses. A peptide corresponding to this polyproline motif somewhat attenuates virus infectivity, presumably blocking host-cell attachment. This may guide cellular receptor identification.

  6. Structural Dynamics of Insulin Receptor and Transmembrane Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatulian, Suren A

    2015-09-15

    The insulin receptor (IR) is a (αβ)2-type transmembrane tyrosine kinase that plays a central role in cell metabolism. Each αβ heterodimer consists of an extracellular ligand-binding α-subunit and a membrane-spanning β-subunit that comprises the cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase (TK) domain and the phosphorylation sites. The α- and β-subunits are linked via a single disulfide bridge, and the (αβ)2 tetramer is formed by disulfide bonds between the α-chains. Insulin binding induces conformational changes in IR that reach the intracellular β-subunit followed by a protein phosphorylation and activation cascade. Defects in this signaling process, including IR dysfunction caused by mutations, result in type 2 diabetes. Rational drug design aimed at treatment of diabetes relies on knowledge of the detailed structure of IR and the dynamic structural transformations during transmembrane signaling. Recent X-ray crystallographic studies have provided important clues about the mode of binding of insulin to IR, the resulting structural changes and their transmission to the TK domain, but a complete understanding of the structural basis underlying insulin signaling has not been achieved. This review presents a critical analysis of the current status of the structure-function relationship of IR, with a comparative assessment of the other IR family receptors, and discusses potential advancements that may provide insight into the molecular mechanism of insulin signaling.

  7. Crystal Structure of an LSD-Bound Human Serotonin Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wacker, Daniel; Wang, Sheng; McCorvy, John D.; Betz, Robin M.; Venkatakrishnan, A.J.; Levit, Anat; Lansu, Katherine; Schools, Zachary L.; Che, Tao; Nichols, David E.; Shoichet, Brian K.; Dror, Ron O.; Roth, Bryan L. (UNCSM); (UNC); (Stanford); (Stanford-MED); (UCSF)

    2017-01-01

    The prototypical hallucinogen LSD acts via serotonin receptors, and here we describe the crystal structure of LSD in complex with the human serotonin receptor 5-HT2B. The complex reveals conformational rearrangements to accommodate LSD, providing a structural explanation for the conformational selectivity of LSD’s key diethylamide moiety. LSD dissociates exceptionally slow from both 5-HT2BR and 5-HT2AR—a major target for its psychoactivity. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations suggest that LSD’s slow binding kinetics may be due to a “lid” formed by extracellular loop 2 (EL2) at the entrance to the binding pocket. A mutation predicted to increase the mobility of this lid greatly accelerates LSD’s binding kinetics and selectively dampens LSD-mediated β-arrestin2 recruitment. This study thus reveals an unexpected binding mode of LSD; illuminates key features of its kinetics, stereochemistry, and signaling; and provides a molecular explanation for LSD’s actions at human serotonin receptors.

  8. Crystal Structure of an LSD-Bound Human Serotonin Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Daniel; Wang, Sheng; McCorvy, John D; Betz, Robin M; Venkatakrishnan, A J; Levit, Anat; Lansu, Katherine; Schools, Zachary L; Che, Tao; Nichols, David E; Shoichet, Brian K; Dror, Ron O; Roth, Bryan L

    2017-01-26

    The prototypical hallucinogen LSD acts via serotonin receptors, and here we describe the crystal structure of LSD in complex with the human serotonin receptor 5-HT2B. The complex reveals conformational rearrangements to accommodate LSD, providing a structural explanation for the conformational selectivity of LSD's key diethylamide moiety. LSD dissociates exceptionally slow from both 5-HT2BR and 5-HT2AR-a major target for its psychoactivity. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations suggest that LSD's slow binding kinetics may be due to a "lid" formed by extracellular loop 2 (EL2) at the entrance to the binding pocket. A mutation predicted to increase the mobility of this lid greatly accelerates LSD's binding kinetics and selectively dampens LSD-mediated β-arrestin2 recruitment. This study thus reveals an unexpected binding mode of LSD; illuminates key features of its kinetics, stereochemistry, and signaling; and provides a molecular explanation for LSD's actions at human serotonin receptors. PAPERCLIP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Three-dimensional structure of poliovirus receptor bound to poliovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belnap, David M.; McDermott, Brian M.; Filman, David J.; Cheng, Naiqian; Trus, Benes L.; Zuccola, Harmon J.; Racaniello, Vincent R.; Hogle, James M.; Steven, Alasdair C.

    2000-01-01

    Poliovirus initiates infection by binding to its cellular receptor (Pvr). We have studied this interaction by using cryoelectron microscopy to determine the structure, at 21-Å resolution, of poliovirus complexed with a soluble form of its receptor (sPvr). This density map aided construction of a homology-based model of sPvr and, in conjunction with the known crystal structure of the virus, allowed delineation of the binding site. The virion does not change significantly in structure on binding sPvr in short incubations at 4°C. We infer that the binding configuration visualized represents the initial interaction that is followed by structural changes in the virion as infection proceeds. sPvr is segmented into three well-defined Ig-like domains. The two domains closest to the virion (domains 1 and 2) are aligned and rigidly connected, whereas domain 3 diverges at an angle of ≈60°. Two nodules of density on domain 2 are identified as glycosylation sites. Domain 1 penetrates the “canyon” that surrounds the 5-fold protrusion on the capsid surface, and its binding site involves all three major capsid proteins. The inferred pattern of virus–sPvr interactions accounts for most mutations that affect the binding of Pvr to poliovirus. PMID:10618373

  10. Crystal Structure of the Human Cannabinoid Receptor CB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Tian; Vemuri, Kiran; Pu, Mengchen; Qu, Lu; Han, Gye Won; Wu, Yiran; Zhao, Suwen; Shui, Wenqing; Li, Shanshan; Korde, Anisha; Laprairie, Robert B; Stahl, Edward L; Ho, Jo-Hao; Zvonok, Nikolai; Zhou, Han; Kufareva, Irina; Wu, Beili; Zhao, Qiang; Hanson, Michael A; Bohn, Laura M; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Stevens, Raymond C; Liu, Zhi-Jie

    2016-10-20

    Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) is the principal target of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a psychoactive chemical from Cannabis sativa with a wide range of therapeutic applications and a long history of recreational use. CB1 is activated by endocannabinoids and is a promising therapeutic target for pain management, inflammation, obesity, and substance abuse disorders. Here, we present the 2.8 Å crystal structure of human CB1 in complex with AM6538, a stabilizing antagonist, synthesized and characterized for this structural study. The structure of the CB1-AM6538 complex reveals key features of the receptor and critical interactions for antagonist binding. In combination with functional studies and molecular modeling, the structure provides insight into the binding mode of naturally occurring CB1 ligands, such as THC, and synthetic cannabinoids. This enhances our understanding of the molecular basis for the physiological functions of CB1 and provides new opportunities for the design of next-generation CB1-targeting pharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Nuclear hormone receptor co-repressors: Structure and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Peter J.; Fairall, Louise; Schwabe, John W.R.

    2012-01-01

    Co-repressor proteins, such as SMRT and NCoR, mediate the repressive activity of unliganded nuclear receptors and other transcription factors. They appear to act as intrinsically disordered “hub proteins” that integrate the activities of a range of transcription factors with a number of histone modifying enzymes. Although these co-repressor proteins are challenging targets for structural studies due to their largely unstructured character, a number of structures have recently been determined of co-repressor interaction regions in complex with their interacting partners. These have yielded considerable insight into the mechanism of assembly of these complexes, the structural basis for the specificity of the interactions and also open opportunities for targeting these interactions therapeutically. PMID:21925568

  12. The Evolution and Structure of Atypical T Cell Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Victoria L; Miller, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    The T cell receptor structure and genetic organization have been thought to have been stable in vertebrate evolution relative to the immunoglobulins. For the most part, this has been true and the content and organization of T cell receptor genes has been fairly conserved over the past 400 million years of gnathostome evolution. Analyses of TCRδ chains in a broad range of vertebrate lineages over the past decade have revealed a remarkable and previously unrealized degree of plasticity. This plasticity can generally be described in two forms. The first is broad use of antibody heavy chain variable genes in place of the conventional Vδ. The second form containing an unusual three extracellular domain structures has evolved independently in both cartilaginous fishes and mammals. Two well-studied vertebrate lineages, the eutherian mammals such as mice and humans and teleost fishes, lack any of these alternative TCR forms, contributing to why they went undiscovered for so long after the initial description of the conventional TCR chains three decades ago. This chapter describes the state of knowledge of these unusual TCR forms, both their structure and genetics, and current ideas on their function.

  13. Structure and activation of the TSH receptor transmembrane domain

    OpenAIRE

    N??ez Miguel, Ricardo; Sanders, Jane; Furmaniak, Jadwiga; Smith, Bernard Rees

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) is the target autoantigen for TSHR-stimulating autoantibodies in Graves? disease. The TSHR is composed of: a leucine-rich repeat domain (LRD), a hinge region or cleavage domain (CD) and a transmembrane domain (TMD). The binding arrangements between the TSHR LRD and the thyroid-stimulating autoantibody M22 or TSH have become available from the crystal structure of the TSHR LRD?M22 complex and a comparative model of the TSHR LRD in complex...

  14. Common structural basis for constitutive activity of the ghrelin receptor family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Birgitte; Holliday, Nicholas D; Bach, Anders

    2004-01-01

    Three members of the ghrelin receptor family were characterized in parallel: the ghrelin receptor, the neurotensin receptor 2 and the orphan receptor GPR39. In transiently transfected COS-7 and human embryonic kidney 293 cells, all three receptors displayed a high degree of ligand......-independent signaling activity. The structurally homologous motilin receptor served as a constitutively silent control; upon agonist stimulation, however, it signaled with a similar efficacy to the three related receptors. The constitutive activity of the ghrelin receptor and of neurotensin receptor 2 through the G...... demonstrated that the epitope-tagged ghrelin receptor was constitutively internalized but could be trapped at the cell surface by an inverse agonist, whereas GPR39 remained at the cell surface. Mutational analysis showed that the constitutive activity of both the ghrelin receptor and GPR39 could systematically...

  15. Structure of the LDL receptor extracellular domain at endosomalpH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudenko, Gabby; Henry, Lisa; Henderson, Keith; Ichtchenko,Konstantin; Brown, Michael S.; Goldstein, Joseph L.; Deisenhofer, Johann

    2002-09-05

    The structure of the low-density lipoprotein receptor extracellular portion has been determined. The document proposes a mechanism for the release of lipoprotein in the endosome. Without this release, the mechanism of receptor recycling cannot function.

  16. Crystal structure of the mineralocorticoid receptor DNA binding domain in complex with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, William H; Youn, Christine; Ortlund, Eric A

    2014-01-01

    The steroid hormone receptors regulate important physiological functions such as reproduction, metabolism, immunity, and electrolyte balance. Mutations within steroid receptors result in endocrine disorders and can often drive cancer formation and progression. Despite the conserved three-dimensional structure shared among members of the steroid receptor family and their overlapping DNA binding preference, activation of individual steroid receptors drive unique effects on gene expression. Here, we present the first structure of the human mineralocorticoid receptor DNA binding domain, in complex with a canonical DNA response element. The overall structure is similar to the glucocorticoid receptor DNA binding domain, but small changes in the mode of DNA binding and lever arm conformation may begin to explain the differential effects on gene regulation by the mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors. In addition, we explore the structural effects of mineralocorticoid receptor DNA binding domain mutations found in type I pseudohypoaldosteronism and multiple types of cancer.

  17. Phosphotyrosine phosphatase R3 receptors: Origin, evolution and structural diversification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier U Chicote

    Full Text Available Subtype R3 phosphotyrosine phosphatase receptors (R3 RPTPs are single-spanning membrane proteins characterized by a unique modular composition of extracellular fibronectin repeats and a single cytoplasmatic protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP domain. Vertebrate R3 RPTPs consist of five members: PTPRB, PTPRJ, PTPRH and PTPRO, which dephosphorylate tyrosine residues, and PTPRQ, which dephosphorylates phophoinositides. R3 RPTPs are considered novel therapeutic targets in several pathologies such as ear diseases, nephrotic syndromes and cancer. R3 RPTP vertebrate receptors, as well as their known invertebrate counterparts from animal models: PTP52F, PTP10D and PTP4e from the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster and F44G4.8/DEP-1 from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, participate in the regulation of cellular activities including cell growth and differentiation. Despite sharing structural and functional properties, the evolutionary relationships between vertebrate and invertebrate R3 RPTPs are not fully understood. Here we gathered R3 RPTPs from organisms covering a broad evolutionary distance, annotated their structure and analyzed their phylogenetic relationships. We show that R3 RPTPs (i have probably originated in the common ancestor of animals (metazoans, (ii are variants of a single ancestral gene in protostomes (arthropods, annelids and nematodes; (iii a likely duplication of this ancestral gene in invertebrate deuterostomes (echinodermes, hemichordates and tunicates generated the precursors of PTPRQ and PTPRB genes, and (iv R3 RPTP groups are monophyletic in vertebrates and have specific conserved structural characteristics. These findings could have implications for the interpretation of past studies and provide a framework for future studies and functional analysis of this important family of proteins.

  18. What Do Structures Tell Us About Chemokine Receptor Function and Antagonism?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kufareva, Irina; Gustavsson, Martin; Zheng, Yi; Stephens, Bryan S.; Handel, Tracy M. (UCSD)

    2017-05-22

    Chemokines and their cell surface G protein–coupled receptors are critical for cell migration, not only in many fundamental biological processes but also in inflammatory diseases and cancer. Recent X-ray structures of two chemokines complexed with full-length receptors provided unprecedented insight into the atomic details of chemokine recognition and receptor activation, and computational modeling informed by new experiments leverages these insights to gain understanding of many more receptor:chemokine pairs. In parallel, chemokine receptor structures with small molecules reveal the complicated and diverse structural foundations of small molecule antagonism and allostery, highlight the inherent physicochemical challenges of receptor:chemokine interfaces, and suggest novel epitopes that can be exploited to overcome these challenges. The structures and models promote unique understanding of chemokine receptor biology, including the interpretation of two decades of experimental studies, and will undoubtedly assist future drug discovery endeavors.

  19. Structural basis for ligand recognition of incretin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Underwood, Christina Rye; Parthier, Christoph; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen

    2010-01-01

    The glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) receptor and the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor are homologous G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Incretin receptor agonists stimulate the synthesis and secretion of insulin from pancreatic β-cells and are therefore promising agents...... analysis of the ECDs of incretin receptors and related GPCRs has shed new light on the process of ligand recognition and binding and provided a basis to disclose some of the mechanisms underlying receptor activation at high resolution....

  20. Distinct Second Extracellular Loop Structures of the Brain Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor: Implication in Ligand Binding and Receptor Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Joong-Youn; Rudd, James; Ding, Tomas T.

    2010-01-01

    The G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) second extracellular loop (E2) is known to play an important role in receptor structure and function. The brain cannabinoid (CB1) receptor is unique in that it lacks the inter-loop E2 disulfide linkage to the transmembrane (TM) helical bundle, a characteristic of many GPCRs. Recent mutation studies of the CB1 receptor, however, suggest the presence of an alternative intra-loop disulfide bond between two E2 Cys residues. Considering the oxidation state of these Cys residues, we determine the molecular structures of the 17-residue E2 in the dithiol form (E2dithiol) and in the disulfide form (E2disulfide) of the CB1 receptor in a fully hydrated 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) bilayer, employing a combination of simulated annealing (SA) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation approaches. We characterize the CB1 receptor models with these two E2 forms, CB1(E2dithiol) and CB1(E2disulfide), by analyzing interaction energy, contact number, core crevice and cross-correlation. The results show that the distinct E2 structures interact differently with the TM helical bundle and uniquely modify the TM helical topology, suggesting that E2 plays a critical role in stabilizing receptor structure, regulating ligand binding, and ultimately modulating receptor activation. Further studies on the role of E2 of the CB1 receptor are warranted; particularly comparisons of the ligand-bound form with the present ligand-free form. PMID:21120862

  1. Receptor tyrosine kinase structure and function in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg A. Karpov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs are membrane proteins that control the flow of information through signal transduction pathways, impacting on different aspects of cell function. RTKs are characterized by a ligand-binding ectodomain, a single transmembrane α-helix, a cytosolic region comprising juxtamembrane and kinase domains followed by a flexible C-terminal tail. Somatic and germline RTK mutations can induce aberrant signal transduction to give rise to cardiovascular, developmental and oncogenic abnormalities. RTK overexpression occurs in certain cancers, correlating signal strength and disease incidence. Diverse RTK activation and signal transduction mechanisms are employed by cells during commitment to health or disease. Small molecule inhibitors are one means to target RTK function in disease initiation and progression. This review considers RTK structure, activation, and signal transduction and evaluates biological relevance to therapeutics and clinical outcomes.

  2. Receptor structure-based discovery of non-metabolite agonists for the succinate receptor GPR91.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trauelsen, Mette; Rexen Ulven, Elisabeth; Hjorth, Siv A; Brvar, Matjaz; Monaco, Claudia; Frimurer, Thomas M; Schwartz, Thue W

    2017-12-01

    Besides functioning as an intracellular metabolite, succinate acts as a stress-induced extracellular signal through activation of GPR91 (SUCNR1) for which we lack suitable pharmacological tools. Here we first determined that the cis conformation of the succinate backbone is preferred and that certain backbone modifications are allowed for GPR91 activation. Through receptor modeling over the X-ray structure of the closely related P2Y1 receptor, we discovered that the binding pocket is partly occupied by a segment of an extracellular loop and that succinate therefore binds in a very different mode than generally believed. Importantly, an empty side-pocket is identified next to the succinate binding site. All this information formed the basis for a substructure-based search query, which, combined with molecular docking, was used in virtual screening of the ZINC database to pick two serial mini-libraries of a total of only 245 compounds from which sub-micromolar, selective GPR91 agonists of unique structures were identified. The best compounds were backbone-modified succinate analogs in which an amide-linked hydrophobic moiety docked into the side-pocket next to succinate as shown by both loss- and gain-of-function mutagenesis. These compounds displayed GPR91-dependent activity in altering cytokine expression in human M2 macrophages similar to succinate, and importantly were devoid of any effect on the major intracellular target, succinate dehydrogenase. These novel, synthetic non-metabolite GPR91 agonists will be valuable both as pharmacological tools to delineate the GPR91-mediated functions of succinate and as leads for the development of GPR91-targeted drugs to potentially treat low grade metabolic inflammation and diabetic complications such as retinopathy and nephropathy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  3. Comprehensive, structurally-informed alignment and phylogeny of vertebrate biogenic amine receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie J. Spielman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic amine receptors play critical roles in regulating behavior and physiology in both vertebrates and invertebrates, particularly within the central nervous system. Members of the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR family, these receptors interact with endogenous bioamine ligands such as dopamine, serotonin, and epinephrine, and are targeted by a wide array of pharmaceuticals. Despite the clear clinical and biological importance of these receptors, their evolutionary history remains poorly characterized. In particular, the relationships among biogenic amine receptors and any specific evolutionary constraints acting within distinct receptor subtypes are largely unknown. To advance and facilitate studies in this receptor family, we have constructed a comprehensive, high-quality sequence alignment of vertebrate biogenic amine receptors. In particular, we have integrated a traditional multiple sequence approach with robust structural domain predictions to ensure that alignment columns accurately capture the highly-conserved GPCR structural domains, and we demonstrate how ignoring structural information produces spurious inferences of homology. Using this alignment, we have constructed a structurally-partitioned maximum-likelihood phylogeny from which we deduce novel biogenic amine receptor relationships and uncover previously unrecognized lineage-specific receptor clades. Moreover, we find that roughly 1% of the 3039 sequences in our final alignment are either misannotated or unclassified, and we propose updated classifications for these receptors. We release our comprehensive alignment and its corresponding phylogeny as a resource for future research into the evolution and diversification of biogenic amine receptors.

  4. EBI2, GPR18 and GPR17--three structurally related, but biologically distinct 7TM receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, Kristine; Benned-Jensen, Tau; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2011-01-01

    have been deorphanized, many remain orphan, and these orphan receptors constitute a large pool of potential drug targets. This review focuses on one of these orphan targets, the Epstein-Barr Virus-induced receptor 2, EBI2 (or GPR183), together with two structurally related receptors, GPR17 and GPR18...

  5. "Mirror image" antagonists of thrombin-induced platelet activation based on thrombin receptor structure.

    OpenAIRE

    Hung, D T; Vu, T K; Wheaton, V I; Charo, I F; Nelken, N A; Esmon, N.; Esmon, C T; Coughlin, S R

    1992-01-01

    Platelet activation by thrombin plays a critical role in hemostasis and thrombosis. Based on structure-activity studies of a cloned platelet thrombin receptor, we designed two "mirror image" antagonists of thrombin and thrombin receptor function. First, "uncleavable" peptides mimicking the receptor domain postulated to interact with thrombin were found to be potent thrombin inhibitors. Second, proteolytically inactive mutant thrombins designed to bind but not cleave the thrombin receptor were...

  6. Receptor Quaternary Organization Explains G Protein-Coupled Receptor Family Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James H. Felce

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The organization of Rhodopsin-family G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs at the cell surface is controversial. Support both for and against the existence of dimers has been obtained in studies of mostly individual receptors. Here, we use a large-scale comparative study to examine the stoichiometric signatures of 60 receptors expressed by a single human cell line. Using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer- and single-molecule microscopy-based assays, we found that a relatively small fraction of Rhodopsin-family GPCRs behaved as dimers and that these receptors otherwise appear to be monomeric. Overall, the analysis predicted that fewer than 20% of ∼700 Rhodopsin-family receptors form dimers. The clustered distribution of the dimers in our sample and a striking correlation between receptor organization and GPCR family size that we also uncover each suggest that receptor stoichiometry might have profoundly influenced GPCR expansion and diversification.

  7. Lamin B Receptor: Interplay between Structure, Function and Localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolakaki, Eleni; Mylonis, Ilias; Giannakouros, Thomas

    2017-08-31

    Lamin B receptor (LBR) is an integral protein of the inner nuclear membrane, containing a hydrophilic N-terminal end protruding into the nucleoplasm, eight hydrophobic segments that span the membrane and a short, nucleoplasmic C-terminal tail. Two seemingly unrelated functions have been attributed to LBR. Its N-terminal domain tethers heterochromatin to the nuclear periphery, thus contributing to the shape of interphase nuclear architecture, while its transmembrane domains exhibit sterol reductase activity. Mutations within the transmembrane segments result in defects in cholesterol synthesis and are associated with diseases such as the Pelger-Huët anomaly and Greenberg skeletal dysplasia, whereas no such harmful mutations related to the anchoring properties of LBR have been reported so far. Recent evidence suggests a dynamic regulation of LBR expression levels, structural organization, localization and function, in response to various signals. The molecular mechanisms underlying this dynamic behavior have not yet been fully unraveled. Here, we provide an overview of the current knowledge of the interplay between the structure, function and localization of LBR, and hint at the interconnection of the two distinct functions of LBR.

  8. Lamin B Receptor: Interplay between Structure, Function and Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Nikolakaki

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Lamin B receptor (LBR is an integral protein of the inner nuclear membrane, containing a hydrophilic N-terminal end protruding into the nucleoplasm, eight hydrophobic segments that span the membrane and a short, nucleoplasmic C-terminal tail. Two seemingly unrelated functions have been attributed to LBR. Its N-terminal domain tethers heterochromatin to the nuclear periphery, thus contributing to the shape of interphase nuclear architecture, while its transmembrane domains exhibit sterol reductase activity. Mutations within the transmembrane segments result in defects in cholesterol synthesis and are associated with diseases such as the Pelger–Huët anomaly and Greenberg skeletal dysplasia, whereas no such harmful mutations related to the anchoring properties of LBR have been reported so far. Recent evidence suggests a dynamic regulation of LBR expression levels, structural organization, localization and function, in response to various signals. The molecular mechanisms underlying this dynamic behavior have not yet been fully unraveled. Here, we provide an overview of the current knowledge of the interplay between the structure, function and localization of LBR, and hint at the interconnection of the two distinct functions of LBR.

  9. The Design and Structure of Outer Membrane Receptors from Peroxisomes, Mitochondria, and Chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahi, Rashmi; Kubiszewski-Jakubiak, Szymon; Whelan, James; Vrielink, Alice

    2015-10-06

    The eukaryotic cell is defined by compartments that allow specialization of function. This compartmental structure generates a new concept in cell biology compared with the simpler prokaryotic cell structure, namely the specific targeting of proteins to intracellular compartments. Protein targeting is achieved by the action of specialized signals on proteins destined for organelles that are recognized by cognate receptors. An understanding of the specificity of targeting signal recognition leading to import requires an understanding of the receptor structures. Here, we focus on the structures of receptors of different import machineries located on the outer membrane of three organelles: peroxisomes, mitochondria, and chloroplasts. This review provides an overview of the structural features of outer membrane import receptors that recognize targeting signals. Finally, we briefly discuss combinatorial approaches that might aid in understanding the structural factors mediating receptor targeting signal recognition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Promiscuous Seven Transmembrane Receptors Sensing L-α-amino Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smajilovic, Sanela; Wellendorph, Petrine; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2014-01-01

    A number of nutrient sensing seven trans-membrane (7TM) receptors have been identified and characterized over the past few years. While the sensing mechanisms to carbohydrates and free fatty acids are well understood, the molecular basis of amino acid sensing has recently come to the limelight. T....... The present review describes the current status of promiscuous L-α-amino acid sensors, the calcium sensing receptor (CaSR), the GPRC6A receptor, the T1R1/T1R3 receptor and also their molecular pharmacology, expression pattern and physiological significance....

  11. Nuclear hormone receptor architecture - form and dynamics: The 2009 FASEB Summer Conference on Dynamic Structure of the Nuclear Hormone Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, Iain J; Nardulli, Ann M

    2009-12-31

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) represent a large and diverse family of ligand-activated transcription factors involved in regulating development, metabolic homeostasis, salt balance and reproductive health. The ligands for these receptors are typically small hydrophobic molecules such as steroid hormones, thyroid hormone, vitamin D3 and fatty acid derivatives. The first NHR structural information appeared approximately 20 years ago with the solution and crystal structures of the DNA binding domains and was followed by the structure of the agonist and antagonist bound ligand binding domains of different NHR members. Interestingly, in addition to these defined structural features, it has become clear that NHRs also possess significant structural plasticity. Thus, the dynamic structure of the NHRs was the topic of a recent stimulating and informative FASEB Summer Research Conference held in Vermont.

  12. Structure-based receptor MIMICS targeted against bacterial superantigen toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Goutam [Santa Fe, NM; Hong-Geller, Elizabeth [Los Alamos, NM; Shiflett, Patrick R [Los Alamos, NM; Lehnert, Nancy M [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-08-18

    The invention provides therapeutic compositions useful in the treatment of bacterial superantigen mediated conditions, such as Toxic Shock Syndrome. The compositions comprise genetically engineered bifunctional polypeptides containing a specific T-cell receptor binding domain and a specific MHC class II receptor binding domain, each targeting non-overlapping epitopes on a superantigen molecule against which they are designed. The anti-superantigen "receptor mimetics" or "chimeras" are rationally designed to recreate the modality of superantigen binding directly to both the TCR and the MHC-II receptor, and are capable of acting as decoys for superantigen binding, effectively out-competing the host T-cell and MHC-II receptors, the natural host receptors.

  13. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) Receptor Structure and GnRH Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Colleen A; Manilall, Ashmeetha

    2017-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) regulates reproduction. The human GnRH receptor lacks a cytoplasmic carboxy-terminal tail but has amino acid sequence motifs characteristic of rhodopsin-like, class A, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). This review will consider how recent descriptions of X-ray crystallographic structures of GPCRs in inactive and active conformations may contribute to understanding GnRH receptor structure, mechanism of activation and ligand binding. The structures confirmed that ligands bind to variable extracellular surfaces, whereas the seven membrane-spanning α-helices convey the activation signal to the cytoplasmic receptor surface, which binds and activates heterotrimeric G proteins. Forty non-covalent interactions that bridge topologically equivalent residues in different transmembrane (TM) helices are conserved in class A GPCR structures, regardless of activation state. Conformation-independent interhelical contacts account for a conserved receptor protein structure and their importance in the GnRH receptor structure is supported by decreased expression of receptors with mutations of residues in the network. Many of the GnRH receptor mutations associated with congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, including the Glu2.53(90) Lys mutation, involve amino acids that constitute the conserved network. Half of the ~250 intramolecular interactions in GPCRs differ between inactive and active structures. Conformation-specific interhelical contacts depend on amino acids changing partners during activation. Conserved inactive conformation-specific contacts prevent receptor activation by stabilizing proximity of TM helices 3 and 6 and a closed G protein-binding site. Mutations of GnRH receptor residues involved in these interactions, such as Arg3.50(139) of the DRY/S motif or Tyr7.53(323) of the N/DPxxY motif, increase or decrease receptor expression and efficiency of receptor coupling to G protein signaling, consistent with the native residues

  14. Structure, function and physiological consequences of virally encoded chemokine seven transmembrane receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Smit, M J; Waldhoer, M

    2008-01-01

    A number of human and animal herpes viruses encode G-protein coupled receptors with seven transmembrane (7TM) segments-most of which are clearly related to human chemokine receptors. It appears, that these receptors are used by the virus for immune evasion, cellular transformation, tissue targeting...... pathogenesis is still poorly understood. Here we focus on the current knowledge of structure, function and trafficking patterns of virally encoded chemokine receptors and further address the putative roles of these receptors in virus survival and host -cell and/or -immune system modulation. Finally, we...

  15. Structural and functional characterization of the zebrafish lamin B receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schild-Prüfert, Kristina; Giegerich, Marieke; Schäfer, Matthias; Winkler, Christoph; Krohne, Georg

    2006-08-01

    The lamin B receptor (LBR) is an integral membrane protein of the inner nuclear membrane that is interacting with B-type lamins, chromatin and DNA. The complete loss of the protein in mouse mutants causes a reduced viability of embryos, and viable animals develop abnormalities of the skeleton. Here, we present the molecular characterization of the zebrafish LBR (zLBR) gene and the functional analysis of LBR during zebrafish embryogenesis. We found that the coding region of the LBR mRNA of zebrafish as well as of mammals is contained in 13 exons. At the protein level, human and zebrafish LBR exhibit a high sequence identity (57% and higher) in 8 of the 13 exons. Knockdown of zLBR by microinjection of 0.5-1.0 mM morpholino antisense oligonucleotides (MO) into 1- to 2-cell stage embryos reduced the amount of endogenous zLBR protein to approximately 10-20%. The viability of MO-injected embryos within 24 h was reduced to 70-77%. Surviving 1-day-old embryos exhibited morphological alterations including reduced growth of head structures, retardation of tail growth and a bent backbone and tail. Expression analysis of the transcription factors no tail (ntl) and goosecoid (gsc) by in situ hybridization suggests that these malformations are caused by altered cell migration during gastrulation. Our data indicate that the LBR of zebrafish and mammals are both required for correct development.

  16. Immunologic analysis of human breast cancer progesterone receptors. 2. Structure, phosphorylation, and processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, L.L.; Sheridan, P.L.; Krett, N.L.; Francis, M.D.; Toft, D.O.; Edwards, D.P.; Horwitz, K.B.

    1987-09-22

    The authors have used a monoclonal antibody (MAb) directed against chick oviduct progesterone receptors (PR), that cross-reacts with human PR, to analyze PR structure and phosphorylation. This MAb, designated PR-6, interacts only with B receptors (M/sub r/ 120,000) of T47D human breast cancer cells; it has no affinity for A receptors (M/sub r/ 94,000) or for proteolytic fragments from either protein. The antibody immunoprecipitates native B receptors and was used to study the structure of native untransformed 8S and transformed 4S receptors, using sucrose density gradient analysis, photoaffinity labeling, and gel electrophoresis. The independence of A- and B-receptor complexes was confirmed by the fining that purified, transformed B receptors bind well to DNA-cellulose. Additional studies focused on the covalent modifications of receptors. The previously described shifts in apparent molecular weight of nuclear PR following R5020 treatment using in situ photoaffinity labeling. To show whether these shifts can be explained by receptor phosphorylation, untreated cells and hormone-treated cells were metabolically labeled with (/sup 32/P)orthophosphate, and the B receptors were isolated by immunoprecipitation with PR-6 and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gel electrophoresis. In both treatment states, B receptors were labeled in vivo with /sup 32/P, thus demonstrating directly that human PR are phosphoproteins. Since B receptors were labeled in the absence of hormone and also after their in vivo transformation by hormone, they appear to be substrates for two phosphorylation reactions, one in the untransformed state and another after they are tightly bound to chromatin. The second phosphorylation may account for the mobility shift of the receptors on SDS gels. On the basis of these data a model of human PR structure and subcellular receptor dynamics is presented.

  17. Structure of the retinoid X receptor α-liver X receptor β (RXRα-LXRβ) heterodimer on DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lou, Xiaohua; Toresson, Gudrun; Benod, Cindy; Suh, Ji Ho; Philips, Kevin J; Webb, Paul; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake [Karolinska; (Houston)

    2014-03-11

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are conditional transcription factors with common multidomain organization that bind diverse DNA elements. How DNA sequences influence NR conformation is poorly understood. Here we report the crystal structure of the human retinoid X receptor α–liver X receptor β (RXRα–LXRβ) heterodimer on its cognate element, an AGGTCA direct repeat spaced by 4 nt. The complex has an extended X-shaped arrangement, with DNA- and ligand-binding domains crossed, in contrast to the parallel domain arrangement of other NRs that bind an AGGTCA direct repeat spaced by 1 nt. The LXRβ core binds DNA via canonical contacts and auxiliary DNA contacts that enhance affinity for the response element. Comparisons of RXRα–LXRβs in the crystal asymmetric unit and with previous NR structures reveal flexibility in NR organization and suggest a role for RXRα in adaptation of heterodimeric complexes to DNA.

  18. Structural basis for androgen receptor interdomain and coactivator interactions suggests a transition in nuclear receptor activation function dominance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bin; Gampe, Robert T; Kole, Adam J; Hnat, Andrew T; Stanley, Thomas B; An, Gang; Stewart, Eugene L; Kalman, Rebecca I; Minges, John T; Wilson, Elizabeth M

    2004-11-05

    The androgen receptor (AR) is required for male sex development and contributes to prostate cancer cell survival. In contrast to other nuclear receptors that bind the LXXLL motifs of coactivators, the AR ligand binding domain is preferentially engaged in an interdomain interaction with the AR FXXLF motif. Reported here are crystal structures of the ligand-activated AR ligand binding domain with and without bound FXXLF and LXXLL peptides. Key residues that establish motif binding specificity are identified through comparative structure-function and mutagenesis studies. A mechanism in prostate cancer is suggested by a functional AR mutation at a specificity-determining residue that recovers coactivator LXXLL motif binding. An activation function transition hypothesis is proposed in which an evolutionary decline in LXXLL motif binding parallels expansion and functional dominance of the NH(2)-terminal transactivation domain in the steroid receptor subfamily.

  19. Structure of the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor bound to an antagonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haga, Kazuko; Kruse, Andrew C.; Asada, Hidetsugu; Yurugi-Kobayashi, Takami; Shiroishi, Mitsunori; Zhang, Cheng; Weis, William I.; Okada, Tetsuji; Kobilka, Brian K.; Haga, Tatsuya; Kobayashi, Takuya (Stanford-MED); (Kyoto); (Gakushuin); (Kyushu)

    2012-03-15

    The parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system regulates the activity of multiple organ systems. Muscarinic receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate the response to acetylcholine released from parasympathetic nerves. Their role in the unconscious regulation of organ and central nervous system function makes them potential therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. The M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 receptor) is essential for the physiological control of cardiovascular function through activation of G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels, and is of particular interest because of its extensive pharmacological characterization with both orthosteric and allosteric ligands. Here we report the structure of the antagonist-bound human M2 receptor, the first human acetylcholine receptor to be characterized structurally, to our knowledge. The antagonist 3-quinuclidinyl-benzilate binds in the middle of a long aqueous channel extending approximately two-thirds through the membrane. The orthosteric binding pocket is formed by amino acids that are identical in all five muscarinic receptor subtypes, and shares structural homology with other functionally unrelated acetylcholine binding proteins from different species. A layer of tyrosine residues forms an aromatic cap restricting dissociation of the bound ligand. A binding site for allosteric ligands has been mapped to residues at the entrance to the binding pocket near this aromatic cap. The structure of the M2 receptor provides insights into the challenges of developing subtype-selective ligands for muscarinic receptors and their propensity for allosteric regulation.

  20. Structure-function relationships for the interleukin 2 receptor system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Robb

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available Receptors for interleukin 2 (IL-2 esit in at least three forms which differ in their subunit compositio, their affinity for ligand and their ability to mediate a cellular reponse. Type I receptors occur following cellular acitivation and consist of the 55,000 m. w. glycoprotein Tac. These receptors bind IL-2 with a low affinity, do not internalize ligand and have not been definitively associated with any response. Type II receptors, on the other hand, conssit of one or more glycoproteins of 70,000 m. w. which have been termed "beta ([beta] chains." They bind IL-2 with an intermediate affinity and rapidly internalize the ligand. [Beta] proteins mediate many cellular IL-2-dependent reponses, including the short-term activation of natural killer cells and the induction of Tac protein expression. Type III receptors consist of a ternary complex of the Tac protein, the [beta] chain(s and IL-2. They are characterized by a paricularly high affinity for ligand association. Type III receptors also internalize ligand and mediate IL-2-dependent responses at low factor concentrations. The identification of two independent IL-2-binding molecules, Tac and [beta], thus provides the elusive molecular explanation for the differences in IL-2 receptor affinity and suggests the potential for selective therapeutic manipulation of IL-2 reponses.

  1. [Opioid receptors of the CNS: function, structure and distribution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slamberová, R

    2004-01-01

    Even though the alkaloids of opium, such as morphine and codeine, were isolated at the beginning of 19th century, the opioid receptors were not determined until 1970's. The discovery of endogenous opioid peptides, such as endorphins, enkephalins and dynorphins, has helped to differentiate between the specific opioid receptor subtypes, mu, delta and kappa, that are used up to now. Opioid receptors are distributed in the central nervous system unevenly. Each receptor subtype has its own specific and nonspecific agonists and antagonists. Opioides, as exogenous opioid receptor agonists, are drugs that are often used in medicine for their analgesic effects, but they are also some of the most heavily abused drugs in the world. Opioides may also induce long-term changes in the numbers and binding activities of opioid receptors. Some of our studies in fact demonstrate that prenatal morphine exposure can alter opioid receptors of adult rats. This may begin to provide insight into the sources of some of the morphological and behavioral changes in the progeny of mothers that received or abused opioides during pregnancy.

  2. Structural Basis for Receptor Activity-Modifying Protein-Dependent Selective Peptide Recognition by a G Protein-Coupled Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booe, Jason M; Walker, Christopher S; Barwell, James; Kuteyi, Gabriel; Simms, John; Jamaluddin, Muhammad A; Warner, Margaret L; Bill, Roslyn M; Harris, Paul W; Brimble, Margaret A; Poyner, David R; Hay, Debbie L; Pioszak, Augen A

    2015-06-18

    Association of receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMP1-3) with the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) enables selective recognition of the peptides calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and adrenomedullin (AM) that have diverse functions in the cardiovascular and lymphatic systems. How peptides selectively bind GPCR:RAMP complexes is unknown. We report crystal structures of CGRP analog-bound CLR:RAMP1 and AM-bound CLR:RAMP2 extracellular domain heterodimers at 2.5 and 1.8 Å resolutions, respectively. The peptides similarly occupy a shared binding site on CLR with conformations characterized by a β-turn structure near their C termini rather than the α-helical structure common to peptides that bind related GPCRs. The RAMPs augment the binding site with distinct contacts to the variable C-terminal peptide residues and elicit subtly different CLR conformations. The structures and accompanying pharmacology data reveal how a class of accessory membrane proteins modulate ligand binding of a GPCR and may inform drug development targeting CLR:RAMP complexes. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes: localization and structure/function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brann, M R; Ellis, J; Jørgensen, H

    1993-01-01

    Based on the sequence of the five cloned muscarinic receptor subtypes (m1-m5), subtype selective antibody and cDNA probes have been prepared. Use of these probes has demonstrated that each of the five subtypes has a markedly distinct distribution within the brain and among peripheral tissues....... The distributions of these subtypes and their potential physiological roles are discussed. By use of molecular genetic manipulation of cloned muscarinic receptor cDNAs, the regions of muscarinic receptors that specify G-protein coupling and ligand binding have been defined in several recent studies. Overall...

  4. Molecular genetic analysis of the calcium sensing receptor gene in patients clinically suspected to have familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia: phenotypic variation and mutation spectrum in a Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Peter H; Christensen, Signe E; Heickendorff, Lene

    2007-01-01

    : A total of 213 subjects clinically suspected to have FHH, and 121 subjects enrolled as part of a family-screening program were studied. Genotype-phenotype relationships were established in 66 mutation-positive index patients and family members. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: We determined CASR gene mutations...

  5. Progesterone receptor structure and protease activity in primary human endometrial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feil, P D; Clarke, C L; Satyaswaroop, P G

    1988-03-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were used to investigate progesterone receptor structure (isoforms) in 33 primary human endometrial tumors. The monoclonal antibodies recognized on protein blots two progesterone receptor proteins with molecular weights of 116,000 and 81,000. The Mr 116,000 protein appeared as a triplet, while a single band was found for the Mr 81,000 protein. The triplet/singlet structure was found in all progesterone receptor-positive tumors, regardless of the degree of tumor differentiation. Protease activity, which gave rise to a false-negative pattern on protein blots, was found in approximately one-half of the tumors in which it was investigated. Inclusion of a cocktail of protease inhibitors during sample preparation resulted in the maintenance of the triplet/singlet progesterone receptor structure. Mixing experiments using a progesterone receptor-rich human endometrial carcinoma (EnCa 101), which lacks protease activity, and protease-containing primary tumor homogenates indicated that the protease was leupeptin sensitive. Interestingly, while the proteolytic activity reduced or eliminated the triplet/singlet progesterone receptor structure seen on protein blot analysis, it did not affect progesterone receptor concentration measured by Scatchard analysis. Sample preparation in the presence of protease inhibitors is therefore a requisite for structural analysis of the progesterone receptor in endometrial tumors.

  6. Interactions between Intracellular Domains as Key Determinants of the Quaternary Structure and Function of Receptor Heteromers*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Gemma; Ferré, Sergi; Cordomi, Arnau; Moreno, Estefania; Mallol, Josefa; Casadó, Vicent; Cortés, Antoni; Hoffmann, Hanne; Ortiz, Jordi; Canela, Enric I.; Lluís, Carme; Pardo, Leonardo; Franco, Rafael; Woods, Amina S.

    2010-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) heteromers are macromolecular complexes with unique functional properties different from those of its individual protomers. Little is known about what determines the quaternary structure of GPCR heteromers resulting in their unique functional properties. In this study, using resonance energy transfer techniques in experiments with mutated receptors, we provide for the first time clear evidence for a key role of intracellular domains in the determination of the quaternary structure of GPCR heteromers between adenosine A2A, cannabinoid CB1, and dopamine D2 receptors. In these interactions, arginine-rich epitopes form salt bridges with phosphorylated serine or threonine residues from CK1/2 consensus sites. Each receptor (A2A, CB1, and D2) was found to include two evolutionarily conserved intracellular domains to establish selective electrostatic interactions with intracellular domains of the other two receptors, indicating that these particular electrostatic interactions constitute a general mechanism for receptor heteromerization. Mutation experiments indicated that the interactions of the intracellular domains of the CB1 receptor with A2A and D2 receptors are fundamental for the correct formation of the quaternary structure needed for the function (MAPK signaling) of the A2A-CB1-D2 receptor heteromers. Analysis of MAPK signaling in striatal slices of CB1 receptor KO mice and wild-type littermates supported the existence of A1-CB1-D2 receptor heteromer in the brain. These findings allowed us to propose the first molecular model of the quaternary structure of a receptor heteromultimer. PMID:20562103

  7. Lamin B Receptor: Interplay between Structure, Function and Localization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eleni Nikolakaki; Ilias Mylonis; Thomas Giannakouros

    2017-01-01

    Lamin B receptor (LBR) is an integral protein of the inner nuclear membrane, containing a hydrophilic N-terminal end protruding into the nucleoplasm, eight hydrophobic segments that span the membrane and a short...

  8. Ligand-biased ensemble receptor docking (LigBEnD): a hybrid ligand/receptor structure-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Polo C.-H.; Abagyan, Ruben; Totrov, Maxim

    2017-09-01

    Ligand docking to flexible protein molecules can be efficiently carried out through ensemble docking to multiple protein conformations, either from experimental X-ray structures or from in silico simulations. The success of ensemble docking often requires the careful selection of complementary protein conformations, through docking and scoring of known co-crystallized ligands. False positives, in which a ligand in a wrong pose achieves a better docking score than that of native pose, arise as additional protein conformations are added. In the current study, we developed a new ligand-biased ensemble receptor docking method and composite scoring function which combine the use of ligand-based atomic property field (APF) method with receptor structure-based docking. This method helps us to correctly dock 30 out of 36 ligands presented by the D3R docking challenge. For the six mis-docked ligands, the cognate receptor structures prove to be too different from the 40 available experimental Pocketome conformations used for docking and could be identified only by receptor sampling beyond experimentally explored conformational subspace.

  9. DMPD: Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 receptor adaptor proteins. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17667936 Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 receptor adaptor proteins... (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 receptor adaptor proteins. ...PubmedID 17667936 Title Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 receptor adaptor proteins

  10. Structure of the full-length glucagon class B G-protein-coupled receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Haonan; Qiao, Anna; Yang, Dehua; Yang, Linlin; Dai, Antao; de Graaf, C.; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Zhang, Hui; Han, Gye Won; Grant, Thomas D.; Sierra, Raymond G.; Weierstall, Uwe; Nelson, Garrett; Liu, Wei; Wu, Yanhong; Ma, Limin; Cai, Xiaoqing; Lin, Guangyao; Wu, Xiaoai; Geng, Zhi; Dong, Yuhui; Song, Gaojie; Griffin, Patrick R.; Lau, Jesper; Cherezov, Vadim; Yang, Huaiyu; Hanson, Michael A.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Zhao, Qiang; Jiang, Hualiang; Wang, Ming Wei; Wu, Beili

    2017-01-01

    The human glucagon receptor, GCGR, belongs to the class B G-protein-coupled receptor family and plays a key role in glucose homeostasis and the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes. Here we report the 3.0 Å crystal structure of full-length GCGR containing both the extracellular domain and

  11. Transcriptional and Functional Characterization of the G Protein-Coupled Receptor Repertoire of Gastric Somatostatin Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Kristoffer L; Engelstoft, Maja S; Lund, Mari L

    2015-01-01

    In the stomach, somatostatin (SST) acts as a general paracrine negative regulator of exocrine secretion of gastric acid and pepsinogen and endocrine secretion of gastrin, ghrelin, and histamine. Using reporter mice expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) under control of the SST promotor, we have...... expressed and/or enriched. 1) The metabolite receptors calcium-sensing receptor and free fatty acid receptor 4 (GPR120) functioned as positive and negative regulators, respectively. 2) Among the neurotransmitter receptors, adrenergic receptors α1a, α2a, α2b, and β1 were all highly expressed...

  12. A strategy using NMR peptide structures of thromboxane A2 receptor as templates to construct ligand-recognition pocket of prostacyclin receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruan Ke-He

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Prostacyclin receptor (IP and thromboxane A2 receptor (TP belong to rhodopsin-type G protein-coupling receptors and respectively bind to prostacyclin and thromboxane A2 derived from arachidonic acid. Recently, we have determined the extracellular loop (eLP structures of the human TP receptor by 2-D 1H NMR spectroscopy using constrained peptides mimicking the individual eLP segments. The studies have identified the segment along with several residues in the eLP domains important to ligand recognition, as well as proposed a ligand recognition pocket for the TP receptor. Results: The IP receptor shares a similar primary structure in the eLPs with those of the TP receptor. Forty percent residues in the second eLPs of the receptors are identical, which is the major region involved in forming the ligand recognition pocket in the TP receptor. Based on the high homology score, the eLP domains of the IP receptor were constructed by the homology modeling approach using the NMR structures of the TP eLPs as templates, and then configured to the seven transmembrane (TM domains model constructed using the crystal structure of the bovine rhodopsin as a template. A NMR structure of iloprost was docked into the modeled IP ligand recognition pocket. After dynamic studies, the segments and residues involved in the IP ligand recognition were proposed. A key residue, Arg173 involved in the ligand recognition for the IP receptor, as predicted from the modeling, was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. Conclusion: A 3-D model of the human IP receptor was constructed by homology modeling using the crystal structure of bovine rhodopsin TM domains and the NMR structures of the synthetic constrained peptides of the eLP domains of the TP receptor as templates. This strategy can be applied to molecular modeling and the prediction of ligand recognition pockets for other prostanoid receptors.

  13. Cardiac nuclear receptors: architects of mitochondrial structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Rick B; Kelly, Daniel P

    2017-04-03

    The adult heart is uniquely designed and equipped to provide a continuous supply of energy in the form of ATP to support persistent contractile function. This high-capacity energy transduction system is the result of a remarkable surge in mitochondrial biogenesis and maturation during the fetal-to-adult transition in cardiac development. Substantial evidence indicates that nuclear receptor signaling is integral to dynamic changes in the cardiac mitochondrial phenotype in response to developmental cues, in response to diverse postnatal physiologic conditions, and in disease states such as heart failure. A subset of cardiac-enriched nuclear receptors serve to match mitochondrial fuel preferences and capacity for ATP production with changing energy demands of the heart. In this Review, we describe the role of specific nuclear receptors and their coregulators in the dynamic control of mitochondrial biogenesis and energy metabolism in the normal and diseased heart.

  14. Structure of the murine constitutive androstane receptor complexed to androstenol: a molecular basis for inverse agonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shan, L.; Vincent, J.; Brunzelle, J.S.; Dussault, I.; Lin, M.; Ianculescu, I.; Sherman, M.A.; Forman, B.M.; Fernandez, E. (Tennesse)

    2010-03-08

    The nuclear receptor CAR is a xenobiotic responsive transcription factor that plays a central role in the clearance of drugs and bilirubin while promoting cocaine and acetaminophen toxicity. In addition, CAR has established a 'reverse' paradigm of nuclear receptor action where the receptor is active in the absence of ligand and inactive when bound to inverse agonists. We now report the crystal structure of murine CAR bound to the inverse agonist androstenol. Androstenol binds within the ligand binding pocket, but unlike many nuclear receptor ligands, it makes no contacts with helix H12/AF2. The transition from constitutive to basal activity (androstenol bound) appears to be associated with a ligand-induced kink between helices H10 and H11. This disrupts the previously predicted salt bridge that locks H12 in the transcriptionally active conformation. This mechanism of inverse agonism is distinct from traditional nuclear receptor antagonists thereby offering a new approach to receptor modulation.

  15. Functional and structural stability of the epidermal growth factor receptor in detergent micelles and phospholipid nanodiscs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mi, Li-Zhi; Grey, Michael J; Nishida, Noritaka

    2008-01-01

    , recombinant EGFR constructs containing the extracellular, transmembrane, juxtamembrane, and kinase domains are overexpressed and purified from human embryonic kidney 293 cell cultures. The oligomerization state, overall structure, and functional stability of the purified EGF-bound receptor are characterized...

  16. Crystal Structures of the M1 and M4 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thal, David M.; Sun, Bingfa; Feng, Dan; Nawaratne, Vindhya; Leach, Katie; Felder, Christian C.; Bures, Mark G.; Evans, David A.; Weis, William I.; Bachhawat, Priti; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Sexton, Patrick M.; Kobilka, Brian K.; Christopoulos, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Summary Muscarinic M1–M5 acetylcholine receptors are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that regulate many vital functions of the central and peripheral nervous systems. In particular, the M1 and M4 receptor subtypes have emerged as attractive drug targets for treatments of neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia, but the high conservation of the acetylcholine-binding pocket has spurred current research into targeting allosteric sites on these receptors. Here, we report the first crystal structures of the M1 and M4 muscarinic receptors bound to the inverse agonist, tiotropium. Comparison of these structures to each other, as well as the previously reported M2 and M3 receptor structures, reveals differences in the orthosteric and allosteric binding sites that contribute to a role in drug selectivity at this important receptor family. We also report identification of a cluster of residues that form a network linking the orthosteric and allosteric sites of the M4 receptor, which provides new insight into how allosteric modulation may be transmitted between the two spatially distinct domains. PMID:26958838

  17. The role of proline residues in the structure and function of human MT2 melatonin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazna, Petr; Grycova, Lenka; Balik, Ales; Zemkova, Hana; Friedlova, Eliska; Obsilova, Veronika; Obsil, Tomas; Teisinger, Jan

    2008-11-01

    Melatonin functions as an essential regulator of various physiological processes in all vertebrate species. In mammals, two G protein-coupled melatonin receptors (GPCR) mediate some melatonin's actions: MT1 and MT2. Transmembrane domains (TM) of most GPCRs contain a set of highly conserved proline residues that presumably play important structural and functional roles. As TM segments of MT2 receptor display several interesting differences in expression of specific proline residues compared to other rhodopsin-like receptors (rGPCRs), we investigated the role of proline residues in the structure and function of this receptor. All prolines in TM segments of MT2 receptor were individually replaced with alanine and/or glycine. In addition, the unusual NAxxY motif located in TM7 was mutated to generate highly conserved NPxxY motif found in the majority of rGPCR proteins. Following transient expression in CHO-K1 cells, binding properties of the mutant receptors and their ability to transduce signals were analyzed using (125)I-mel- and [(35)S]GTPgammaS-binding assays, respectively. The impact of the performed mutations on the receptor structure was assessed by molecular dynamic simulations of MT2 receptors embedded in the fully hydrated phospholipid bilayer. Our results indicate that residues P174, P212 and P266 are important for the ligand binding and/or signaling of the human MT2 receptor. We also show that changes within the unusual NAxxY sequence in the TM7 (mutations A305P and A305V) produce defective MT2 receptors indicating an important role of this motif in the function of melatonin receptors.

  18. X-ray structures define human P2X3 receptor gating cycle and antagonist action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansoor, Steven E.; Lü, Wei; Oosterheert, Wout; Shekhar, Mrinal; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Gouaux, Eric

    2016-10-01

    P2X receptors are trimeric, non-selective cation channels activated by ATP that have important roles in the cardiovascular, neuronal and immune systems. Despite their central function in human physiology and although they are potential targets of therapeutic agents, there are no structures of human P2X receptors. The mechanisms of receptor desensitization and ion permeation, principles of antagonism, and complete structures of the pore-forming transmembrane domains of these receptors remain unclear. Here we report X-ray crystal structures of the human P2X3 receptor in apo/resting, agonist-bound/open-pore, agonist-bound/closed-pore/desensitized and antagonist-bound/closed states. The open state structure harbours an intracellular motif we term the ‘cytoplasmic cap’, which stabilizes the open state of the ion channel pore and creates lateral, phospholipid-lined cytoplasmic fenestrations for water and ion egress. The competitive antagonists TNP-ATP and A-317491 stabilize the apo/resting state and reveal the interactions responsible for competitive inhibition. These structures illuminate the conformational rearrangements that underlie P2X receptor gating and provide a foundation for the development of new pharmacological agents.

  19. Lamin B Receptor: Interplay between Structure, Function and Localization

    OpenAIRE

    Eleni Nikolakaki; Ilias Mylonis; Thomas Giannakouros

    2017-01-01

    Lamin B receptor (LBR) is an integral protein of the inner nuclear membrane, containing a hydrophilic N-terminal end protruding into the nucleoplasm, eight hydrophobic segments that span the membrane and a short, nucleoplasmic C-terminal tail. Two seemingly unrelated functions have been attributed to LBR. Its N-terminal domain tethers heterochromatin to the nuclear periphery, thus contributing to the shape of interphase nuclear architecture, while its transmembrane domains exhibit sterol redu...

  20. Structural Perspectives of Insulin Receptor Isoform-Selective Insulin Analogs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jiráček, Jiří; Žáková, Lenka

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, Jul 27 (2017), č. článku 167. ISSN 1664-2392 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-19018S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : insulin receptor * insulin binding * analog * diabetes * glucose Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.675, year: 2016 http:// journal .frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fendo.2017.00167/full

  1. Structural Disorder in the Complex of Human Pregnane X Receptor and the Macrolide Antibiotic Rifampicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrencik, Jill E.; Orans, Jillian; Moore, Linda B.; Xue, Yu; Peng, Li; Collins, Jon L.; Wisely, G. Bruce; Lambert, Millard H.; Kliewer, Steven A.; Redinbo, Matthew R. (U. of Texas-SMED); (UNC)

    2010-07-13

    The human nuclear xenobiotic receptor, pregnane X receptor (PXR), detects a variety of structurally distinct endogenous and xenobiotic compounds and controls expression of genes central to drug and cholesterol metabolism. The macrolide antibiotic rifampicin, a front-line treatment for tuberculosis, is an established PXR agonist and, at 823 Da, is one of the largest known ligands for the receptor. We present the 2.8 {angstrom} crystal structure of the ligand-binding domain of human PXR in complex with rifampicin. We also use structural and mutagenesis data to examine the origins of the directed promiscuity exhibited by the PXRs across species. Three structurally flexible loops adjacent to the ligand-binding pocket of PXR are disordered in this crystal structure, including the 200-210 region that is part of a sequence insert novel to the promiscuous PXRs relative to other members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. The 4-methyl-1-piperazinyl ring of rifampicin, which would lie adjacent to the disordered protein regions, is also disordered and not observed in the structure. Taken together, our results indicate that one wall of the PXR ligand-binding cavity can remain flexible even when the receptor is in complex with an activating ligand. These observations highlight the key role that structural flexibility plays in PXR's promiscuous response to xenobiotics.

  2. Muscarinic receptors as model targets and antitargets for structure-based ligand discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Andrew C; Weiss, Dahlia R; Rossi, Mario; Hu, Jianxin; Hu, Kelly; Eitel, Katrin; Gmeiner, Peter; Wess, Jürgen; Kobilka, Brian K; Shoichet, Brian K

    2013-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) regulate virtually all aspects of human physiology and represent an important class of therapeutic drug targets. Many GPCR-targeted drugs resemble endogenous agonists, often resulting in poor selectivity among receptor subtypes and restricted pharmacologic profiles. The muscarinic acetylcholine receptor family exemplifies these problems; thousands of ligands are known, but few are receptor subtype-selective and nearly all are cationic in nature. Using structure-based docking against the M2 and M3 muscarinic receptors, we screened 3.1 million molecules for ligands with new physical properties, chemotypes, and receptor subtype selectivities. Of 19 docking-prioritized molecules tested against the M2 subtype, 11 had substantial activity and 8 represented new chemotypes. Intriguingly, two were uncharged ligands with low micromolar to high nanomolar Ki values, an observation with few precedents among aminergic GPCRs. To exploit a single amino-acid substitution among the binding pockets between the M2 and M3 receptors, we selected molecules predicted by docking to bind to the M3 and but not the M2 receptor. Of 16 molecules tested, 8 bound to the M3 receptor. Whereas selectivity remained modest for most of these, one was a partial agonist at the M3 receptor without measurable M2 agonism. Consistent with this activity, this compound stimulated insulin release from a mouse β-cell line. These results support the ability of structure-based discovery to identify new ligands with unexplored chemotypes and physical properties, leading to new biologic functions, even in an area as heavily explored as muscarinic pharmacology.

  3. Crystal structure of the human beta2 adrenergic G-protein-coupled receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup; Choi, Hee-Jung; Rosenbaum, Daniel M

    2007-01-01

    Structural analysis of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) for hormones and neurotransmitters has been hindered by their low natural abundance, inherent structural flexibility, and instability in detergent solutions. Here we report a structure of the human beta2 adrenoceptor (beta2AR), which....... These differences may be responsible for the relatively high basal activity and structural instability of the beta2AR, and contribute to the challenges in obtaining diffraction-quality crystals of non-rhodopsin GPCRs....

  4. Concomitant action of structural elements and receptor phosphorylation determines arrestin-3 interaction with the free fatty acid receptor FFA4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butcher, Adrian J; Hudson, Brian D; Shimpukade, Bharat

    2014-01-01

    In addition to being nutrients, free fatty acids act as signaling molecules by activating a family of G protein-coupled receptors. Among these is FFA4, previously called GPR120, which responds to medium and long chain fatty acids, including health-promoting ω-3 fatty acids, which have been...... implicated in the regulation of metabolic and inflammatory responses. Here we show, using mass spectrometry, mutagenesis, and phosphospecific antibodies, that agonist-regulated phosphorylation of the human FFA4 receptor occurred primarily at five residues (Thr(347), Thr(349), Ser(350), Ser(357), and Ser(360...... phosphorylation thus operates in concert with structural elements within the C-terminal tail of FFA4 to allow for the recruitment of arrestin-3. Importantly, these mechanisms of arrestin-3 recruitment operate independently from Gq/11 coupling, thereby offering the possibility that ligands showing stimulus bias...

  5. Structure of the CCR5 Chemokine Receptor-HIV Entry Inhibitor Maraviroc Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Qiuxiang; Zhu, Ya; Li, Jian; Chen, Zhuxi; Han, Gye Won; Kufareva, Irina; Li, Tingting; Ma, Limin; Fenalti, Gustavo; Li, Jing; Zhang, Wenru; Xie, Xin; Yang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Hualiang; Cherezov, Vadim; Liu, Hong; Stevens, Raymond C.; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Beili [Scripps; (Chinese Aca. Sci.); (UCSD)

    2013-10-21

    The CCR5 chemokine receptor acts as a co-receptor for HIV-1 viral entry. Here we report the 2.7 angstrom–resolution crystal structure of human CCR5 bound to the marketed HIV drug maraviroc. The structure reveals a ligand-binding site that is distinct from the proposed major recognition sites for chemokines and the viral glycoprotein gp120, providing insights into the mechanism of allosteric inhibition of chemokine signaling and viral entry. A comparison between CCR5 and CXCR4 crystal structures, along with models of co-receptor–gp120-V3 complexes, suggests that different charge distributions and steric hindrances caused by residue substitutions may be major determinants of HIV-1 co-receptor selectivity. These high-resolution insights into CCR5 can enable structure-based drug discovery for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  6. John Daly Lecture: Structure-guided Drug Design for Adenosine and P2Y Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth A. Jacobson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We establish structure activity relationships of extracellular nucleosides and nucleotides at G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, e.g. adenosine receptors (ARs and P2Y receptors (P2YRs, respectively. We synthesize selective agents for use as pharmacological probes and potential therapeutic agents (e.g. A3AR agonists for neuropathic pain. Detailed structural information derived from the X-ray crystallographic structures within these families enables the design of novel ligands, guides modification of known agonists and antagonists, and helps predict polypharmacology. Structures were recently reported for the P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12R, an anti-thrombotic target. Comparison of agonist-bound and antagonist-bound P2Y12R indicates unprecedented structural plasticity in the outer portions of the transmembrane (TM domains and the extracellular loops. Nonphosphate-containing ligands of the P2YRs, such as the selective P2Y14R antagonist PPTN, are desired for bioavailability and increased stability. Also, A2AAR structures are effectively applied to homology modeling of closely related A1AR and A3AR, which are not yet crystallized. Conformational constraint of normally flexible ribose with bicyclic analogues increased the ligand selectivity. Comparison of rigid A3AR agonist congeners allows the exploration of interaction of specific regions of the nucleoside analogues with the target and off-target GPCRs, such as biogenic amine receptors. Molecular modeling predicts plasticity of the A3AR at TM2 to accommodate highly rigidified ligands. Novel fluorescent derivatives of high affinity GPCR ligands are useful tool compounds for characterization of receptors and their oligomeric assemblies. Fluorescent probes are useful for characterization of GPCRs in living cells by flow cytometry and other methods. Thus, 3D knowledge of receptor binding and activation facilitates drug discovery.

  7. Crystal structure of the β2 adrenergic receptor-Gs protein complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup; DeVree, Brian T; Zou, Yaozhong

    2011-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are responsible for the majority of cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters as well as the senses of sight, olfaction and taste. The paradigm of GPCR signalling is the activation of a heterotrimeric GTP binding protein (G protein) by an agonist......-occupied receptor. The β(2) adrenergic receptor (β(2)AR) activation of Gs, the stimulatory G protein for adenylyl cyclase, has long been a model system for GPCR signalling. Here we present the crystal structure of the active state ternary complex composed of agonist-occupied monomeric β(2)AR and nucleotide-free Gs...... by a GPCR....

  8. GPCR engineering yields high-resolution structural insights into beta2-adrenergic receptor function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Daniel M; Cherezov, Vadim; Hanson, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    The beta2-adrenergic receptor (beta2AR) is a well-studied prototype for heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that respond to diffusible hormones and neurotransmitters. To overcome the structural flexibility of the beta2AR and to facilitate its...... crystallization, we engineered a beta2AR fusion protein in which T4 lysozyme (T4L) replaces most of the third intracellular loop of the GPCR ("beta2AR-T4L") and showed that this protein retains near-native pharmacologic properties. Analysis of adrenergic receptor ligand-binding mutants within the context...

  9. Pharmacology and crystal structure of novel 2,3-quinoxalinediones at kainate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllerud, Stine; Pallesen, Jakob Staun; Pasini, Diletta

    2017-01-01

    , within the KA receptor family (GluK1-5) only compounds with selectivity towards GluK1 exist [1]. Thus, there is an unmet need for Tool compounds with selectivity towards the remaining KA receptor subunits. Here we report the pharmacology of a series of novel N1-substituted 2,3-quinoxalinediones, as well....... Functional electrophysiological (TEVC) experiments indeed showed these compounds to be antagonists at cloned, homomeric KA receptors. The structure and pharmacology will be valuable for design of new and more GluK3-selective quinoxalinedione analogues....

  10. The type I interferon receptor: structure, function, and evolution of a family business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogensen, K E; Lewerenz, M; Reboul, J; Lutfalla, G; Uzé, G

    1999-10-01

    Recent results indicate that coherent models of how multiple interferons (IFN) are recognized and signal selectively through a common receptor are now feasible. A proposal is made that the IFN receptor, with its subunits IFNAR-1 and IFNAR-2, presents two separate ligand binding sites, and this double structure is both necessary and sufficient to ensure that the different IFN are recognized and can act selectively. The key feature is the duplication of the extracellular domain of the IFNAR-1 subunit and the configurational geometry that this imposes on the intracellular domains of the receptor subunits and their associated tyrosine kinases.

  11. The genomic structure of the human UFO receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, A S; Schleithoff, L; Faust, M; Bartram, C R; Janssen, J W

    1993-02-01

    Using a DNA transfection-tumorigenicity assay we have recently identified the UFO oncogene. It encodes a tyrosine kinase receptor characterized by the juxtaposition of two immunoglobulin-like and two fibronectin type III repeats in its extracellular domain. Here we describe the genomic organization of the human UFO locus. The UFO receptor is encoded by 20 exons that are distributed over a region of 44 kb. Different isoforms of UFO mRNA are generated by alternative splicing of exon 10 and differential usage of two imperfect polyadenylation sites resulting in the presence or absence of 1.5-kb 3' untranslated sequences. Primer extension and S1 nuclease analyses revealed multiple transcriptional initiation sites including a major site 169 bp upstream of the translation start site. The promoter region is GC rich, lacks TATA and CAAT boxes, but contains potential recognition sites for a variety of trans-acting factors, including Sp1, AP-2 and the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein. Proto-UFO and its oncogenic counterpart exhibit identical cDNA and promoter regions sequences. Possible modes of UFO activation are discussed.

  12. Structural basis for specific ligation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ?

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Chyuan-Chuan; Baiga, Thomas J.; Downes, Michael; La Clair, James J.; Atkins, Annette R.; Richard, Stephane B.; Fan, Weiwei; Stockley-Noel, Theresa A.; Bowman, Marianne E; Noel, Joseph P.; Evans, Ronald M.

    2017-01-01

    Clinical treatments for metabolic diseases rely on agents with high selectivity to specific targets often within a class of structurally and functionally related proteins. In this paper, we uncover physical and chemical features governing selective small-molecule binding to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) ? concomitant with distinct conformational changes in the receptor, key to therapeutic modulation of lipid catabolism, transport, and storage. These studies reveal the subt...

  13. Biophysical approaches to G protein-coupled receptors: Structure, function and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chollet, André; Turcatti, Gerardo

    1999-05-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) represent a large family of drug targets for which there is no high-resolution structural information. In order to understand the mechanisms of ligand recognition and receptor activation, there is a strong need for novel biophysical methods. In this Perspective we provide an overview of recent experimental approaches used to explore the molecular architecture and dynamics of GPCR and their interactions with ligands and G proteins using biophysical, non-crystallographic, methods.

  14. Identification of highly selective and potent orexin receptor 1 antagonists derived from a dual orexin receptor 1/2 antagonist based on the structural framework of pyrazoylethylbenzamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futamura, Aya; Nozawa, Dai; Araki, Yuko; Tamura, Yunoshin; Tokura, Seiken; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Tokumaru, Yuichi; Kakihara, Sora; Aoki, Takeshi; Ohtake, Norikazu

    2017-10-15

    The design, synthesis, and structure activity relationships of the novel class of pyrazolylethylbenzamide orexin receptor 1-selective antagonists are described. Further derivatization of the prototype dual orexin receptor 1/2 antagonist lead (1) by installing a (S)-methyl group into the ethyl linker moiety between the pyrazole ring and benzamide resulted in an increase of the antagonist potency against orexin receptor 1/2 receptors. Optimization of the benzamide and pyrazole parts of compounds 2 and 9b led to the identification of N-ethyl-5-fluoro-N-{(2S)-1-[5-(4-fluorophenyl)-2H-tetrazol-2-yl]propan-2-yl}-2-(pyrimidin-2-yl)benzamide (24), which exhibited excellent antagonistic activity against orexin receptor 1 with an IC50 of 2.01nM and a 265-fold selectivity for orexin receptor 1 over orexin receptor 2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Structural Basis for Antibody Discrimination between Two Hormones That Recognize the Parathyroid Hormone Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinstry, William J.; Polekhina, Galina; Diefenbach-Jagger, Hannelore; Ho, Patricia W.M.; Sato, Koh; Onuma, Etsuro; Gillespie, Matthew T.; Martin, T. John; Parker, Michael W.; (SVIMR-A); (Chugai); (Melbourne)

    2009-08-18

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) plays a vital role in the embryonic development of the skeleton and other tissues. When it is produced in excess by cancers it can cause hypercalcemia, and its local production by breast cancer cells has been implicated in the pathogenesis of bone metastasis formation in that disease. Antibodies have been developed that neutralize the action of PTHrP through its receptor, parathyroid hormone receptor 1, without influencing parathyroid hormone action through the same receptor. Such neutralizing antibodies against PTHrP are therapeutically effective in animal models of the humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy and of bone metastasis formation. We have determined the crystal structure of the complex between PTHrP (residues 1-108) and a neutralizing monoclonal anti-PTHrP antibody that reveals the only point of contact is an {alpha}-helical structure extending from residues 14-29. Another striking feature is that the same residues that interact with the antibody also interact with parathyroid hormone receptor 1, showing that the antibody and the receptor binding site on the hormone closely overlap. The structure explains how the antibody discriminates between the two hormones and provides information that could be used in the development of novel agonists and antagonists of their common receptor.

  16. Effect of Receptor Structure and Length on the Wrapping of a Nanoparticle by a Lipid Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haizhen Zhang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles have been considered as a type of powerful tool to deliver drugs and genes into cells for disease diagnosis and therapies. It has been generally accepted that the internalization of nanoparticles into cells is mostly realized by receptor-mediated endocytosis. However, for the influence of structural factors of receptors on endocytosis, this is still largely unknown. In this paper, computer simulations are applied to investigate the effects of structure (i.e., the number of constituent chains of the receptor and the length of the receptor on the wrapping behavior of nanoparticles by the lipid membrane, which is a key step of receptor-medicated endocytosis. It is found that these structural factors of receptors have strong effects on the nanoparticle’s final interaction configuration with the membrane in the simulations, such as adhering on the membrane surface or being partly or fully wrapped by the membrane. Furthermore, in some cases, the rupture of the lipid membrane occurs. These results are helpful for the understanding of endocytosis and the preparation of advanced nanoscale drug-delivery vectors.

  17. A new crystal structure fragment-based pharmacophore method for G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fidom, Kimberley; Isberg, Vignir; Hauser, Alexander Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a new method for the building of pharmacophores for G protein-coupled receptors, a major drug target family. The method is a combination of the ligand- and target-based pharmacophore methods and founded on the extraction of structural fragments, interacting ligand moiety...... for new targets. A validating retrospective virtual screening of histamine H1 and H3 receptor pharmacophores yielded area-under-the-curves of 0.88 and 0.82, respectively. The fragment-based method has the unique advantage that it can be applied to targets for which no (homologous) crystal structures...... and receptor residue pairs, from crystal structure complexes. We describe the procedure to collect a library with more than 250 fragments covering 29 residue positions within the generic transmembrane binding pocket. We describe how the library fragments are recombined and inferred to build pharmacophores...

  18. Reduction of False Positives in Structure-Based Virtual Screening When Receptor Plasticity Is Considered

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaw Awuni

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Structure-based virtual screening for selecting potential drug candidates is usually challenged by how numerous false positives in a molecule library are excluded when receptor plasticity is considered. In this study, based on the binding energy landscape theory, a hypothesis that a true inhibitor can bind to different conformations of the binding site favorably was put forth, and related strategies to defeat this challenge were devised; reducing false positives when receptor plasticity is considered. The receptor in the study is the influenza A nucleoprotein, whose oligomerization is a requirement for RNA binding. The structural flexibility of influenza A nucleoprotein was explored by molecular dynamics simulations. The resultant distinctive structures and the crystal structure were used as receptor models in docking exercises in which two binding sites, the tail-loop binding pocket and the RNA binding site, were targeted with the Otava PrimScreen1 diversity-molecule library using the GOLD software. The intersection ligands that were listed in the top-ranked molecules from all receptor models were selected. Such selection strategy successfully distinguished high-affinity and low-affinity control molecules added to the molecule library. This work provides an applicable approach for reducing false positives and selecting true ligands from molecule libraries.

  19. Heterologous production, characterization and isolation of selected G protein-coupled receptors for structural studies

    OpenAIRE

    Shukla, Arun Kumar

    2006-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play regulatory roles in many different physiological processes and they represent one of the most important class of drug targets. However, due to the lack of three-dimensional structures, structure based drug design has not been possible. The major bottleneck in getting three-dimensional crystal structure of GPCRs is to obtain milligram quantities of pure, homogenous and stable protein. Therefore, during my Ph.D. thesis, I focused on expression, character...

  20. Structure of the nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor in complex with a peptide mimetic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Aaron A.; Liu, Wei; Chun, Eugene; Katritch, Vsevolod; Wu, Huixian; Vardy, Eyal; Huang, Xi-Ping; Trapella, Claudio; Guerrini, Remo; Calo, Girolamo; Roth, Bryan L.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C. (Ferrara); (Scripps); (UNC)

    2012-07-11

    Members of the opioid receptor family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are found throughout the peripheral and central nervous system, where they have key roles in nociception and analgesia. Unlike the 'classical' opioid receptors, {delta}, {kappa} and {mu} ({delta}-OR, {kappa}-OR and {mu}-OR), which were delineated by pharmacological criteria in the 1970s and 1980s, the nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) peptide receptor (NOP, also known as ORL-1) was discovered relatively recently by molecular cloning and characterization of an orphan GPCR. Although it shares high sequence similarity with classical opioid GPCR subtypes ({approx}60%), NOP has a markedly distinct pharmacology, featuring activation by the endogenous peptide N/OFQ, and unique selectivity for exogenous ligands. Here we report the crystal structure of human NOP, solved in complex with the peptide mimetic antagonist compound-24 (C-24) (ref. 4), revealing atomic details of ligand-receptor recognition and selectivity. Compound-24 mimics the first four amino-terminal residues of the NOP-selective peptide antagonist UFP-101, a close derivative of N/OFQ, and provides important clues to the binding of these peptides. The X-ray structure also shows substantial conformational differences in the pocket regions between NOP and the classical opioid receptors {kappa} (ref. 5) and {mu} (ref. 6), and these are probably due to a small number of residues that vary between these receptors. The NOP-compound-24 structure explains the divergent selectivity profile of NOP and provides a new structural template for the design of NOP ligands.

  1. Structural Organization of a Full-Length Gp130/LIF-R Cytokine Receptor Transmembrane Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skiniotis, G.; Lupardus, P.J.; Martick, M.; Walz, T.; Garcia, K.C.

    2009-05-26

    gp130 is a shared receptor for at least nine cytokines, and can signal either as a homodimer, or as a heterodimer with Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Receptor (LIF-R). Here we biophysically and structurally characterize the full-length, transmembrane form of a quaternary cytokine receptor complex consisting of gp130, LIF-R, the cytokine Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF), and its alpha receptor (CNTF-R{alpha}). Thermodynamic analysis indicates that, unlike the cooperative assembly of the symmetric gp130/Interleukin-6/IL-6R{alpha} hexameric complex, CNTF/CNTF-R{alpha} heterodimerizes gp130 and LIF-R via non-cooperative energetics to form an asymmetric 1:1:1:1 complex. Single particle electron microscopic (EM) analysis of the full-length gp130/LIF-R/CNTF-R{alpha}/CNTF quaternary complex elucidates an asymmetric structural arrangement, in which the receptor extracellular and transmembrane segments join as a continuous, rigid unit, poised to sensitively transduce ligand engagement to the membrane-proximal intracellular signaling regions. These studies also enumerate the organizing principles for assembly of the 'tall' class of gp130-family cytokine receptor complexes including LIF, IL-27, IL-12, and others.

  2. Structurally related nucleotides as selective agonists and antagonists at P2Y1 receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Moro, Stefano; Hoffmann, Carsten; Kim, Yong-Chul; Kim, Hak Sung; Ravi, R. Gnana; Harden, T. Kendall; Boyer, José L.

    2015-01-01

    The P2Y1 receptor responds to adenine nucleotides and is present in platelets, heart, smooth muscles prostate, ovary, and brain. A selective antagonist may be useful as an antithrombotic agent. We have analyzed the binding site of this G protein-coupled receptor using ligand design, site-directed mutagenesis, and homology modeling based on rhodopsin. We have designed and synthesized a series of deoxyadenosine 3′,5′-bisphosphate derivatives that act as antagonists, or, in some cases with small structural changes, as agonists or partial agonists. The 2-position accommodates Cl or thioethers, whereas the N6-position is limited to Me or Et. 2′-Substitution with OH or OMe increases agonist efficacy over 2′-H. Using molecular modeling of the binding site, the oxygen atoms of the ribose moiety were predicted to be non-essential, i.e. no specific H-bonds with the receptor protein appear in the model. We have, therefore, substituted this moiety with carbocylics, smaller and larger rings, conformationally constrained rings, and acyclics, with retention of affinity for the receptor. With simplified pharmacophores we are exploring the steric and electronic requirements of the receptor binding site, and the structural basis of receptor activation. PMID:11347970

  3. Structural predictions of neurobiologically relevant G-protein coupled receptors and intrinsically disordered proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Giulia; Dibenedetto, Domenica; Calandrini, Vania; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Carloni, Paolo

    2015-09-15

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and intrinsic disordered proteins (IDPs) are key players for neuronal function and dysfunction. Unfortunately, their structural characterization is lacking in most cases. From one hand, no experimental structure has been determined for the two largest GPCRs subfamilies, both key proteins in neuronal pathways. These are the odorant (450 members out of 900 human GPCRs) and the bitter taste receptors (25 members) subfamilies. On the other hand, also IDPs structural characterization is highly non-trivial. They exist as dynamic, highly flexible structural ensembles that undergo conformational conversions on a wide range of timescales, spanning from picoseconds to milliseconds. Computational methods may be of great help to characterize these neuronal proteins. Here we review recent progress from our lab and other groups to develop and apply in silico methods for structural predictions of these highly relevant, fascinating and challenging systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. High-resolution crystal structure of the human CB1 cannabinoid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Zhenhua; Yin, Jie; Chapman, Karen; Grzemska, Magdalena; Clark, Lindsay; Wang, Junmei; Rosenbaum, Daniel M

    2016-11-16

    The human cannabinoid G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) CB1 and CB2 mediate the functional responses to the endocannabinoids anandamide and 2-arachidonyl glycerol (2-AG), as well as the widely consumed plant (phyto)cannabinoid Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)(1). The cannabinoid receptors have been the targets of intensive drug discovery efforts owing to the therapeutic potential of modulators for controlling pain(2), epilepsy(3), obesity(4), and other maladies. Although much progress has recently been made in understanding the biophysical properties of GPCRs, investigations of the molecular mechanisms of the cannabinoids and their receptors have lacked high-resolution structural data. We used GPCR engineering and lipidic cubic phase (LCP) crystallization to determine the structure of the human CB1 receptor bound to the inhibitor taranabant at 2.6 Å resolution. The extracellular surface of CB1, including the highly conserved membrane-proximal amino-terminal (N-terminal) region, is distinct from other lipid-activated GPCRs and forms a critical part of the ligand binding pocket. Docking studies further demonstrate how this same pocket may accommodate the cannabinoid agonist THC. Our CB1 structure provides an atomic framework for studying cannabinoid receptor function, and will aid the design and optimization of cannabinoid system modulators for therapeutic ends.

  5. The Structure of the Mouse Serotonin 5-HT3 Receptor in Lipid Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryashev, Mikhail; Castaño-Díez, Daniel; Deluz, Cédric; Hassaine, Gherici; Grasso, Luigino; Graf-Meyer, Alexandra; Vogel, Horst; Stahlberg, Henning

    2016-01-05

    The function of membrane proteins is best understood if their structure in the lipid membrane is known. Here, we determined the structure of the mouse serotonin 5-HT3 receptor inserted in lipid bilayers to a resolution of 12 Å without stabilizing antibodies by cryo electron tomography and subtomogram averaging. The reconstruction reveals protein secondary structure elements in the transmembrane region, the extracellular pore, and the transmembrane channel pathway, showing an overall similarity to the available X-ray model of the truncated 5-HT3 receptor determined in the presence of a stabilizing nanobody. Structural analysis of the 5-HT3 receptor embedded in a lipid bilayer allowed the position of the membrane to be determined. Interactions between the densely packed receptors in lipids were visualized, revealing that the interactions were maintained by the short horizontal helices. In combination with methodological improvements, our approach enables the structural analysis of membrane proteins in response to voltage and ligand gating. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Tertiary and quaternary structure of lung beta-adrenergic receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, C.M.; Venter, J.C.

    1986-05-01

    Guinea pig lung beta/sub 2/-adrenergic receptors (..beta..AR)specifically labeled with a photoaffinity probe, (/sup 125/I)-iodocyanopindolol diazirine, have a molecular mass (M/sub r/) of 68 kDa on SDS-PAGE. When labeled ..beta..AR are subjected to limited proteolysis in the membrane, water soluble fragments of M/sub r/ = 43, 30, 27 and 25 kDA are produced. These data indicate that over 50 percent of the ..beta..AR protrudes from the membrane into the extracellular space. Purification of ..beta..AR by sequential chromatography on alprenolol-Sepharose, DEAE-Sepharose and size exclusion HPLC indicates that the ..beta..AR is extracted from membranes as an oligomeric complex. Two peaks of ..beta..AR that correspond to apparent molecular weights of 370,000 (t=36 min) and 170,000 (t=43 min) elute from HPLC columns. Radioiodination of these fractions and analysis by SDS-PAGE indicates that peak 36 contains ..beta..AR (68 kDa) purified to homogeneity; peak 43 contains ..beta..AR plus other proteins. If ..beta..AR from DEAE columns are allowed to stand at 4/sup 0/C for 7 days prior to HPLC purification, all ..beta..AR elute in peak 43. These data suggest that ..beta..AR are isolated from membranes as dissociable oligomeric complexes. Target size analysis (TSA) of intact ..beta..AR in situ supports the idea of ..beta..AR oligomers. Application of TSA to ..beta..AR indicates that the ..beta..AR has a functional molecular size of 124,000 daltons in the membrane and 270,000 daltons when solubilized with digitonin.

  7. Crystal structure of the Sema-PSI extracellular domain of human RON receptor tyrosine kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinlin L Chao

    Full Text Available Human RON (Recepteur d'Origine Nantais receptor tyrosine kinase is a cell surface receptor for Macrophage Stimulating Protein (MSP. RON mediates signal transduction pathways that regulate cell adhesion, invasion, motility and apoptosis processes. Elevated levels of RON and its alternatively spliced variants are implicated in the progression and metastasis of tumor cells. The binding of MSP α/β heterodimer to the extracellular region of RON receptor induces receptor dimerization and activation by autophosphorylation of the intracellular kinase domains. The ectodomain of RON, containing the ligand recognition and dimerization domains, is composed of a semaphorin (Sema, Plexins-Semaphorins-Integrins domain (PSI, and four Immunoglobulins-Plexins-Transcription factor (IPT domains. High affinity association between MSP and RON is mediated by the interaction between MSP β-chain and RON Sema, although RON activation requires intact RON and MSP proteins. Here, we report the structure of RON Sema-PSI domains at 1.85 Å resolution. RON Sema domain adopts a seven-bladed β-propeller fold, followed by disulfide bond rich, cysteine-knot PSI motif. Comparison with the homologous Met receptor tyrosine kinase reveals that RON Sema-PSI contains distinguishing secondary structural features. These define the receptors' exclusive selectivity towards their respective ligands, RON for MSP and Met for HGF. The RON Sema-PSI crystal packing generates a homodimer with interface formed by the Sema domain. Mapping of the dimer interface using the RON homology to Met, MSP homology to Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF, and the structure of the Met/HGF complex shows the dimer interface overlapping with the putative MSPβ binding site. The crystallographically determined RON Sema-PSI homodimer may represent the dimer assembly that occurs during ligand-independent receptor activation and/or the inhibition of the constitutive activity of RONΔ160 splice variant by the soluble RON

  8. Structure of CC chemokine receptor 2 with orthosteric and allosteric antagonists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yi; Qin, Ling; Ortiz Zacarías, Natalia V.; de Vries, Henk; Han, Gye Won; Gustavsson, Martin; Dabros, Marta; Zhao, Chunxia; Cherney, Robert J.; Carter, Percy; Stamos, Dean; Abagyan, Ruben; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C.; IJzerman, Adriaan P.; Heitman, Laura H.; Tebben, Andrew; Kufareva, Irina; Handel , Tracy M. (Vertex Pharm); (Leiden-MC); (USC); (BMS); (UCSD)

    2016-12-07

    CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) is one of 19 members of the chemokine receptor subfamily of human class A G-protein-coupled receptors. CCR2 is expressed on monocytes, immature dendritic cells, and T-cell subpopulations, and mediates their migration towards endogenous CC chemokine ligands such as CCL2 (ref. 1). CCR2 and its ligands are implicated in numerous inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases2 including atherosclerosis, multiple sclerosis, asthma, neuropathic pain, and diabetic nephropathy, as well as cancer3. These disease associations have motivated numerous preclinical studies and clinical trials4 (see http://www.clinicaltrials.gov) in search of therapies that target the CCR2–chemokine axis. To aid drug discovery efforts5, here we solve a structure of CCR2 in a ternary complex with an orthosteric (BMS-681 (ref. 6)) and allosteric (CCR2-RA-[R]7) antagonist. BMS-681 inhibits chemokine binding by occupying the orthosteric pocket of the receptor in a previously unseen binding mode. CCR2-RA-[R] binds in a novel, highly druggable pocket that is the most intracellular allosteric site observed in class A G-protein-coupled receptors so far; this site spatially overlaps the G-protein-binding site in homologous receptors. CCR2-RA-[R] inhibits CCR2 non-competitively by blocking activation-associated conformational changes and formation of the G-protein-binding interface. The conformational signature of the conserved microswitch residues observed in double-antagonist-bound CCR2 resembles the most inactive G-protein-coupled receptor structures solved so far. Like other protein–protein interactions, receptor–chemokine complexes are considered challenging therapeutic targets for small molecules, and the present structure suggests diverse pocket epitopes that can be exploited to overcome obstacles in drug design.

  9. Structural Basis for Agonism and Antagonism for a Set of Chemically Related Progesterone Receptor Modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusher, Scott J.; Raaijmakers, Hans C. A.; Vu-Pham, Diep; Dechering, Koen; Lam, Tsang Wai; Brown, Angus R.; Hamilton, Niall M.; Nimz, Olaf; Bosch, Rolien; McGuire, Ross; Oubrie, Arthur; de Vlieg, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    The progesterone receptor is able to bind to a large number and variety of ligands that elicit a broad range of transcriptional responses ranging from full agonism to full antagonism and numerous mixed profiles inbetween. We describe here two new progesterone receptor ligand binding domain x-ray structures bound to compounds from a structurally related but functionally divergent series, which show different binding modes corresponding to their agonistic or antagonistic nature. In addition, we present a third progesterone receptor ligand binding domain dimer bound to an agonist in monomer A and an antagonist in monomer B, which display binding modes in agreement with the earlier observation that agonists and antagonists from this series adopt different binding modes. PMID:21849509

  10. From atomic structures to neuronal functions of g protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palczewski, Krzysztof; Orban, Tivadar

    2013-07-08

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are essential mediators of signal transduction, neurotransmission, ion channel regulation, and other cellular events. GPCRs are activated by diverse stimuli, including light, enzymatic processing of their N-termini, and binding of proteins, peptides, or small molecules such as neurotransmitters. GPCR dysfunction caused by receptor mutations and environmental challenges contributes to many neurological diseases. Moreover, modern genetic technology has helped identify a rich array of mono- and multigenic defects in humans and animal models that connect such receptor dysfunction with disease affecting neuronal function. The visual system is especially suited to investigate GPCR structure and function because advanced imaging techniques permit structural studies of photoreceptor neurons at both macro and molecular levels that, together with biochemical and physiological assessment in animal models, provide a more complete understanding of GPCR signaling.

  11. Understanding single-pass transmembrane receptor signaling from a structural viewpoint—what are we missing?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bugge, Katrine Østergaard; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Kragelund, Birthe Brandt

    2016-01-01

    Single-pass transmembrane receptors are involved in essential processes of both physiological and pathological nature and represent more than 1300 proteins in the human genome. Despite the high biological relevance of these receptors, the mechanisms of the signal transductions they facilitate...... are incompletely understood. One major obstacle is the lack of structures of the transmembrane domains that connect the extracellular ligand-binding domains to the intracellular signaling platforms. Over a period of almost 20 years since the first structure was reported, only 21 of these receptors have become...... associated with their characterization and the challenges left to be overcome. Without an increased and focused effort to bring this class of proteins on par with the remaining membrane protein field, a serious lag in their biological understanding looms. Design of pharmaceutical agents, prediction...

  12. Receptor structure-based discovery of non-metabolite agonists for the succinate receptor GPR91

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trauelsen, Mette; Rexen Ulven, Elisabeth; Hjorth, Siv A

    2017-01-01

    therefore binds in a very different mode than generally believed. Importantly, an empty side-pocket is identified next to the succinate binding site. All this information formed the basis for a substructure-based search query, which, combined with molecular docking, was used in virtual screening of the ZINC...... database to pick two serial mini-libraries of a total of only 245 compounds from which sub-micromolar, selective GPR91 agonists of unique structures were identified. The best compounds were backbone-modified succinate analogs in which an amide-linked hydrophobic moiety docked into the side-pocket next...

  13. A comparative structural bioinformatics analysis of the insulin receptor family ectodomain based on phylogenetic information.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel E Rentería

    Full Text Available The insulin receptor (IR, the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R and the insulin receptor-related receptor (IRR are covalently-linked homodimers made up of several structural domains. The molecular mechanism of ligand binding to the ectodomain of these receptors and the resulting activation of their tyrosine kinase domain is still not well understood. We have carried out an amino acid residue conservation analysis in order to reconstruct the phylogeny of the IR Family. We have confirmed the location of ligand binding site 1 of the IGF1R and IR. Importantly, we have also predicted the likely location of the insulin binding site 2 on the surface of the fibronectin type III domains of the IR. An evolutionary conserved surface on the second leucine-rich domain that may interact with the ligand could not be detected. We suggest a possible mechanical trigger of the activation of the IR that involves a slight 'twist' rotation of the last two fibronectin type III domains in order to face the likely location of insulin. Finally, a strong selective pressure was found amongst the IRR orthologous sequences, suggesting that this orphan receptor has a yet unknown physiological role which may be conserved from amphibians to mammals.

  14. Structural linkage between ligand discrimination and receptor activation by type I interferons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christoph; Moraga, Ignacio; Levin, Doron; Krutzik, Peter O; Podoplelova, Yulia; Trejo, Angelica; Lee, Choongho; Yarden, Ganit; Vleck, Susan E; Glenn, Jeffrey S; Nolan, Garry P; Piehler, Jacob; Schreiber, Gideon; Garcia, K Christopher

    2011-08-19

    Type I Interferons (IFNs) are important cytokines for innate immunity against viruses and cancer. Sixteen human type I IFN variants signal through the same cell-surface receptors, IFNAR1 and IFNAR2, yet they can evoke markedly different physiological effects. The crystal structures of two human type I IFN ternary signaling complexes containing IFNα2 and IFNω reveal recognition modes and heterotrimeric architectures that are unique among the cytokine receptor superfamily but conserved between different type I IFNs. Receptor-ligand cross-reactivity is enabled by conserved receptor-ligand "anchor points" interspersed among ligand-specific interactions that "tune" the relative IFN-binding affinities, in an apparent extracellular "ligand proofreading" mechanism that modulates biological activity. Functional differences between IFNs are linked to their respective receptor recognition chemistries, in concert with a ligand-induced conformational change in IFNAR1, that collectively control signal initiation and complex stability, ultimately regulating differential STAT phosphorylation profiles, receptor internalization rates, and downstream gene expression patterns. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Structural and Biochemical Characterisation of LysM Receptor-like kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Jeryl Xin Jie

    2017-01-01

    to better understand how legumes can functionally distinguish mutualistic microbes from pathogens. Using in vitro biochemical and structural tools in conjunction with in planta genetic and functional screens, the role of two LysM-RLKs in L. japonicus have been uncovered. The receptors that perceive chitin...

  16. The Receptor Concept in 3D: From Hypothesis and Metaphor to GPCR–Ligand Structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, A.J.; de Graaf, C.; Timmerman, H.

    2014-01-01

    The first mentioning of the word “receptor” for the structure with which a bioactive compound should react for obtaining its specific influence on a physiological system goes back to the years around 1900. The receptor concept was adapted from the lock and key theory for the enzyme substrate and

  17. Structural insight into antibody-mediated antagonism of the Glucagon-like peptide-1 Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennen, Stephanie; Kodra, János T.; Soroka, Vladyslav; Krogh, Berit O.; Wu, Xiaoai; Kaastrup, Peter; Ørskov, Cathrine; Rønn, Sif G.; Schluckebier, Gerd; Barbateskovic, Silvia; Gandhi, Prafull S.; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    The Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a member of the class B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family and a well-established target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) of GLP-1R is important for GLP-1 binding and the crystal structure of the GLP-1/ECD complex was reported previously. The first structure of a class B GPCR transmembrane (TM) domain was solved recently, but the full length receptor structure is still not well understood. Here we describe the molecular details of antibody-mediated antagonism of the GLP-1R using both in vitro pharmacology and x-ray crystallography. We showed that the antibody Fab fragment (Fab 3F52) blocked the GLP-1 binding site of the ECD directly and thereby acts as a competitive antagonist of native GLP-1. Interestingly, Fab 3F52 also blocked a short peptide agonist believed to engage primarily the transmembrane and extracellular loop region of GLP-1R, whereas functionality of an allosteric small-molecule agonist was not inhibited. This study has implications for the structural understanding of the GLP-1R and related class B GPCRs, which is important for the development of new and improved therapeutics targeting these receptors. PMID:27196125

  18. Regulation of structural plasticity and neurogenesis during stress and diabetes; protective effects of glucocorticoid receptor antagonists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, P.J.; Fitzsimons, C.P.; Vreugdenhil, E.; Hu, P.; Oomen, C.; Revsin, Y.; Joëls, M.; de Kloet, E.R.; Gravanis, A.G.; Mellon, S.H.

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, we will review changes in structural plasticity of the adult hippocampus during stress and exposure to glucocorticoids (GCs). We further discuss the protective and normalizing role of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist treatment under these conditions and its implications for

  19. X-ray structures define human P2X3 receptor gating cycle and antagonist action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mansoor, Steven E.; Lü, Wei; Oosterheert, W.; Shekhar, Mrinal; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Gouaux, Eric

    2016-01-01

    P2X receptors are trimeric, non-selective cation channels activated by ATP that have important roles in the cardiovascular, neuronal and immune systems. Despite their central function in human physiology and although they are potential targets of therapeutic agents, there are no structures of human

  20. Pyrazolo Derivatives as Potent Adenosine Receptor Antagonists: An Overview on the Structure-Activity Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Lee Cheong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past few decades, medicinal chemistry research towards potent and selective antagonists of human adenosine receptors (namely, A1, A2A, A2B, and A3 has been evolving rapidly. These antagonists are deemed therapeutically beneficial in several pathological conditions including neurological and renal disorders, cancer, inflammation, and glaucoma. Up to this point, many classes of compounds have been successfully synthesized and identified as potent human adenosine receptor antagonists. In this paper, an overview of the structure-activity relationship (SAR profiles of promising nonxanthine pyrazolo derivatives is reported and discussed. We have emphasized the SAR for some representative structures such as pyrazolo-[4,3-e]-1,2,4-triazolo-[1,5-c]pyrimidines; pyrazolo-[3,4-c] or -[4,3-c]quinolines; pyrazolo-[4,3-d]pyrimidinones; pyrazolo-[3,4-d]pyrimidines and pyrazolo-[1,5-a]pyridines. This overview not only clarifies the structural requirements deemed essential for affinity towards individual adenosine receptor subtypes, but it also sheds light on the rational design and optimization of existing structural templates to allow us to conceive new, more potent adenosine receptor antagonists.

  1. Discovery of benzhydrylpiperazine derivatives as CB1 receptor inverse agonists via privileged structure-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Tao; Wang, Jue; Peng, Hongli; Fang, Guanghua; Li, Min; Xiong, Bing; Xie, Xin; Zhang, Yongliang; Wang, Xin; Shen, Jingkang

    2010-03-01

    The present study describes the identification via privileged structure-based approach of the benzhydrylpiperazine moiety as a potential scaffold to develop novel CB(1) receptor modulators. Efficient structural optimization of the initial four hit compounds led to a high quality lead series, represented by compound 6c. Compound 6c is a highly potent and selective CB(1) receptor inverse agonist that is able to reduce body weight in diet-induced obese Sprague-Dawley rats. The preparation of privileged structure-based library, the progression from hit to lead, the structure-activity relationships in the lead series and in vitro and in vivo activity of compound 6c are discussed. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Functional and Structural Overview of G-Protein-Coupled Receptors Comprehensively Obtained from Genome Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makiko Suwa

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of the functional mechanisms of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs is very important for GPCR-related drug design. We have developed an integrated GPCR database (SEVENS http://sevens.cbrc.jp/ that includes 64,090 reliable GPCR genes comprehensively identified from 56 eukaryote genome sequences, and overviewed the sequences and structure spaces of the GPCRs. In vertebrates, the number of receptors for biological amines, peptides, etc. is conserved in most species, whereas the number of chemosensory receptors for odorant, pheromone, etc. significantly differs among species. The latter receptors tend to be single exon type or a few exon type and show a high ratio in the numbers of GPCRs, whereas some families, such as Class B and Class C receptors, have long lengths due to the presence of many exons. Statistical analyses of amino acid residues reveal that most of the conserved residues in Class A GPCRs are found in the cytoplasmic half regions of transmembrane (TM helices, while residues characteristic to each subfamily found on the extracellular half regions. The 69 of Protein Data Bank (PDB entries of complete or fragmentary structures could be mapped on the TM/loop regions of Class A GPCRs covering 14 subfamilies.

  3. Crystal structure of the human OX2 orexin receptor bound to the insomnia drug suvorexant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jie; Mobarec, Juan Carlos; Kolb, Peter; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.

    2015-03-01

    The orexin (also known as hypocretin) G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) respond to orexin neuropeptides in the central nervous system to regulate sleep and other behavioural functions in humans. Defects in orexin signalling are responsible for the human diseases of narcolepsy and cataplexy; inhibition of orexin receptors is an effective therapy for insomnia. The human OX2 receptor (OX2R) belongs to the β branch of the rhodopsin family of GPCRs, and can bind to diverse compounds including the native agonist peptides orexin-A and orexin-B and the potent therapeutic inhibitor suvorexant. Here, using lipid-mediated crystallization and protein engineering with a novel fusion chimaera, we solved the structure of the human OX2R bound to suvorexant at 2.5 Å resolution. The structure reveals how suvorexant adopts a π-stacked horseshoe-like conformation and binds to the receptor deep in the orthosteric pocket, stabilizing a network of extracellular salt bridges and blocking transmembrane helix motions necessary for activation. Computational docking suggests how other classes of synthetic antagonists may interact with the receptor at a similar position in an analogous π-stacked fashion. Elucidation of the molecular architecture of the human OX2R expands our understanding of peptidergic GPCR ligand recognition and will aid further efforts to modulate orexin signalling for therapeutic ends.

  4. Structural Dynamics of the Glycine-binding Domain of the N-Methyl-d-Aspartate Receptor*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolino, Drew M.; Cooper, David; Ramaswamy, Swarna; Jaurich, Henriette; Landes, Christy F.; Jayaraman, Vasanthi

    2015-01-01

    N-Methyl-d-aspartate receptors mediate the slow component of excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. These receptors are obligate heteromers containing glycine- and glutamate-binding subunits. The ligands bind to a bilobed agonist-binding domain of the receptor. Previous x-ray structures of the glycine-binding domain of NMDA receptors showed no significant changes between the partial and full agonist-bound structures. Here we have used single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) to investigate the cleft closure conformational states that the glycine-binding domain of the receptor adopts in the presence of the antagonist 5,7-dichlorokynurenic acid (DCKA), the partial agonists 1-amino-1-cyclobutanecarboxylic acid (ACBC) and l-alanine, and full agonists glycine and d-serine. For these studies, we have incorporated the unnatural amino acid p-acetyl-l-phenylalanine for specific labeling of the protein with hydrazide derivatives of fluorophores. The single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer data show that the agonist-binding domain can adopt a wide range of cleft closure states with significant overlap in the states occupied by ligands of varying efficacy. The difference lies in the fraction of the protein in a more closed-cleft form, with full agonists having a larger fraction in the closed-cleft form, suggesting that the ability of ligands to select for these states could dictate the extent of activation. PMID:25404733

  5. Structural dynamics of the glycine-binding domain of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolino, Drew M; Cooper, David; Ramaswamy, Swarna; Jaurich, Henriette; Landes, Christy F; Jayaraman, Vasanthi

    2015-01-09

    N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptors mediate the slow component of excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. These receptors are obligate heteromers containing glycine- and glutamate-binding subunits. The ligands bind to a bilobed agonist-binding domain of the receptor. Previous x-ray structures of the glycine-binding domain of NMDA receptors showed no significant changes between the partial and full agonist-bound structures. Here we have used single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) to investigate the cleft closure conformational states that the glycine-binding domain of the receptor adopts in the presence of the antagonist 5,7-dichlorokynurenic acid (DCKA), the partial agonists 1-amino-1-cyclobutanecarboxylic acid (ACBC) and L-alanine, and full agonists glycine and D-serine. For these studies, we have incorporated the unnatural amino acid p-acetyl-L-phenylalanine for specific labeling of the protein with hydrazide derivatives of fluorophores. The single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer data show that the agonist-binding domain can adopt a wide range of cleft closure states with significant overlap in the states occupied by ligands of varying efficacy. The difference lies in the fraction of the protein in a more closed-cleft form, with full agonists having a larger fraction in the closed-cleft form, suggesting that the ability of ligands to select for these states could dictate the extent of activation. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) maintains pulmonary structure and regulates the response to cigarette smoke

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, Lisa; Herr, Christian; Niederstra?er, Julia; Beisswenger, Christoph; Bals, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) is highly expressed in the lung but its physiological functions in this organ is still not completely understood. To determine the contribution of RAGE to physiological functions of the lung, we analyzed pulmonary mechanics and structure of wildtype and RAGE deficient (RAGE-/-) mice. RAGE deficiency spontaneously resulted in a loss of lung structure shown by an increased mean chord length, increased respiratory system compliance, decrease...

  7. Spectrins: a structural platform for stabilization and activation of membrane channels, receptors and transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machnicka, Beata; Czogalla, Aleksander; Hryniewicz-Jankowska, Anita; Bogusławska, Dżamila M; Grochowalska, Renata; Heger, Elżbieta; Sikorski, Aleksander F

    2014-02-01

    This review focuses on structure and functions of spectrin as a major component of the membrane skeleton. Recent advances on spectrin function as an interface for signal transduction mediation and a number of data concerning interaction of spectrin with membrane channels, adhesion molecules, receptors and transporters draw a picture of multifaceted protein. Here, we attempted to show the current depiction of multitask role of spectrin in cell physiology. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Reciprocal influences between cell cytoskeleton and membrane channels, receptors and transporters. Guest Editor: Jean Claude Hervé. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of anchor structure and glycosylation of Fcγ receptor III on ligand binding affinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ning; Chen, Wei; Jothikumar, Prithiviraj; Patel, Jaina M.; Shashidharamurthy, Rangaiah; Selvaraj, Periasamy; Zhu, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Isoforms of the Fcγ receptor III (FcγRIII or CD16) are cell surface receptors for the Fc portion of IgG and important regulators of humoral immune responses. Different ligand binding kinetics of FcγRIII isoforms are obtained in three dimensions by surface plasmon resonance and in two dimensions by a micropipette adhesion frequency assay. We show that the anchor structure of CD16 isoforms isolated from the cell membrane affects their binding affinities in a ligand-specific manner. Changing the receptor anchor structure from full to partial to none decreases the ligand binding affinity for human IgG1 (hIgG1) but increases it for murine IgG2a (mIgG2a). Removing N-glycosylation from the CD16 protein core by tunicamycin also increases the ligand binding affinity. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that deglycosylation at Asn-163 of CD16 removes the steric hindrance for the CD16-hIgG1 Fc binding and thus increases the binding affinity. These results highlight an unexpected sensitivity of ligand binding to the receptor anchor structure and glycosylation and suggest their respective roles in controlling allosterically the conformation of the ligand binding pocket of CD16. PMID:27582391

  9. Structural Basis for Receptor-Mediated Selective Autophagy of Aminopeptidase I Aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinori Yamasaki

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Selective autophagy mediates the degradation of various cargoes, including protein aggregates and organelles, thereby contributing to cellular homeostasis. Cargo receptors ensure selectivity by tethering specific cargo to lipidated Atg8 at the isolation membrane. However, little is known about the structural requirements underlying receptor-mediated cargo recognition. Here, we report structural, biochemical, and cell biological analysis of the major selective cargo protein in budding yeast, aminopeptidase I (Ape1, and its complex with the receptor Atg19. The Ape1 propeptide has a trimeric coiled-coil structure, which tethers dodecameric Ape1 bodies together to form large aggregates. Atg19 disassembles the propeptide trimer and forms a 2:1 heterotrimer, which not only blankets the Ape1 aggregates but also regulates their size. These receptor activities may promote elongation of the isolation membrane along the aggregate surface, enabling sequestration of the cargo with high specificity.

  10. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and the structural basis of neuromuscular transmission: insights from Torpedo postsynaptic membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, Nigel

    2013-11-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor, at the neuromuscular junction, is a neurotransmitter-gated ion channel that has been fine-tuned through evolution to transduce a chemical signal into an electrical signal with maximum efficiency and speed. It is composed from three similar and two identical polypeptide chains, arranged in a ring around a narrow membrane pore. Central to the design of this assembly is a hydrophobic gate in the pore, more than 50 Å away from sites in the extracellular domain where ACh binds. Although the molecular properties of the receptor have been explored intensively over the last few decades, only recently have structures emerged revealing its complex architecture and illuminating how ACh entering the binding sites opens the distant gate. Postsynaptic membranes isolated from the (muscle-derived) electric organ of the Torpedo ray have underpinned most of the structural studies: the membranes form tubular vesicles having receptors arranged on a regular surface lattice, which can be imaged directly in frozen physiological solutions. Advances in electron crystallographic techniques have also been important, enabling analysis of the closed- and open-channel forms of the receptor in unreacted tubes or tubes reacted briefly with ACh. The structural differences between these two forms show that all five subunits participate in a concerted conformational change communicating the effect of ACh binding to the gate, but that three of them (αγ, β and δ) play a dominant role. Flexing of oppositely facing pore-lining α-helices is the principal motion determining the closed/open state of the gate. These results together with the findings of biochemical, biophysical and other structural studies allow an integrated description of the receptor and of its mode of action at the synapse.

  11. Recent advances in structure of progestins and their binding to progesterone receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabeza, Marisa; Heuze, Yvonne; Sánchez, Araceli; Garrido, Mariana; Bratoeff, Eugene

    2015-02-01

    The role of progesterone in women's cancers as well as the knowledge of the progesterone receptor (PR) structure has prompted the design of different therapies. The aim of this review is to describe the basic structure of PR agonists and antagonists as well as the recent treatments for illness associated with the progesterone receptor. The rational design for potent and effective drugs for the treatment of female cancer must consider the structural changes of the androgen and progestogen skeleton which are an indicator of their activity as progestins or antiprogestins. The presence of a hydroxyl group at C-17 in the progesterone skeleton brings about a loss of progestational activity whereas acetylation induces a progestational effect. The incorporation of an ethynyl functional group to the testosterone framework results in a loss of androgenic activity with a concomitant enhancement of the progestational effect. On the other hand, an ester function at C-3 of dehydroepiandrosterone skeleton induces partial antagonism to the PR.

  12. Phytoestrogens and Mycoestrogens Induce Signature Structure Dynamics Changes on Estrogen Receptor α

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueyan Chen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disrupters include a broad spectrum of chemicals such as industrial chemicals, natural estrogens and androgens, synthetic estrogens and androgens. Phytoestrogens are widely present in diet and food supplements; mycoestrogens are frequently found in grains. As human beings and animals are commonly exposed to phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens in diet and environment, it is important to understand the potential beneficial or hazardous effects of estrogenic compounds. Many bioassays have been established to study the binding of estrogenic compounds with estrogen receptor (ER and provided rich data in the literature. However, limited assays can offer structure information with regard to the ligand/ER complex. Our current study surveys the global structure dynamics changes for ERα ligand binding domain (LBD when phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens bind. The assay is based on the structure dynamics information probed by hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and offers a unique viewpoint to elucidate the mechanism how phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens interact with estrogen receptor. The cluster analysis based on the hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX assay data reveals a unique pattern when phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens bind with ERα LBD compared to that of estradiol and synthetic estrogen modulators. Our study highlights that structure dynamics could play an important role in the structure function relationship when endocrine disrupters interact with estrogen receptors.

  13. Insulin receptor signaling in the development of neuronal structure and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cline Hollis T

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sensory experience plays a crucial role in regulating neuronal shape and in developing synaptic contacts during brain formation. These features are required for a neuron to receive, integrate, and transmit signals within the neuronal network so that animals can adapt to the constant changing environment. Insulin receptor signaling, which has been extensively studied in peripheral organ systems such as liver, muscle and adipocyte, has recently been shown to play important roles in the central nervous system. Here we review the current understanding of the underlying mechanisms that regulate structural and functional aspects of circuit development, particularly with respect to the role of insulin receptor signaling in synaptic function and the development of dendritic arbor morphology. The potential link between insulin receptor signaling malfunction and neurological disorders will also be discussed.

  14. NMR and computational methods in the structural and dynamic characterization of ligand-receptor interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghitti, Michela; Musco, Giovanna; Spitaleri, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The recurrent failures in drug discovery campaigns, the asymmetry between the enormous financial investments and the relatively scarce results have fostered the development of strategies based on complementary methods. In this context in recent years the rigid lock-and-key binding concept had to be revisited in favour of a dynamic model of molecular recognition accounting for conformational changes of both the ligand and the receptor. The high level of complexity required by a dynamic description of the processes underlying molecular recognition requires a multidisciplinary investigation approach. In this perspective, the combination of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with molecular docking, conformational searches along with molecular dynamics simulations has given new insights into the dynamic mechanisms governing ligand receptor interactions, thus giving an enormous contribution to the identification and design of new and effective drugs. Herein a succinct overview on the applications of both NMR and computational methods to the structural and dynamic characterization of ligand-receptor interactions will be presented.

  15. Discovery of a novel accessory structure of the pitviper infrared receptor organ (serpentes: viperidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilmar Bolívar-G

    Full Text Available The facial pits of rattlesnakes, copperheads, lanceheads, bushmasters and other American and Asian pitvipers (Crotalinae are highly innervated and densely vascularized infrared (IR receptor organs. For over a century, studies have focused on a small sample of model species from North America and Asia. Based on an expanded survey of Central and South American crotalines, we report a conspicuous accessory structure composed of well-defined papillae that project from the anterior orbital adnexa. The papillae are continuous with the inner chamber of the IR receptor organ and our histological and ultrastructural data suggest that they possess a well-developed nervous network and extensive vascularization; however, they lack the characteristic IR-sensitive terminal nerve masses found in the IR-receptive pit membrane. The function of the IR receptor organ papillae is unknown.

  16. Discovery of a novel accessory structure of the pitviper infrared receptor organ (serpentes: viperidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolívar-G, Wilmar; Antoniazzi, Marta M; Grant, Taran; Jared, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The facial pits of rattlesnakes, copperheads, lanceheads, bushmasters and other American and Asian pitvipers (Crotalinae) are highly innervated and densely vascularized infrared (IR) receptor organs. For over a century, studies have focused on a small sample of model species from North America and Asia. Based on an expanded survey of Central and South American crotalines, we report a conspicuous accessory structure composed of well-defined papillae that project from the anterior orbital adnexa. The papillae are continuous with the inner chamber of the IR receptor organ and our histological and ultrastructural data suggest that they possess a well-developed nervous network and extensive vascularization; however, they lack the characteristic IR-sensitive terminal nerve masses found in the IR-receptive pit membrane. The function of the IR receptor organ papillae is unknown.

  17. receptores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salete Regina Daronco Benetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se trata de un estudio etnográfico, que tuvo lo objetivo de interpretar el sistema de conocimiento y del significado atribuidos a la sangre referente a la transfusión sanguínea por los donadores y receptores de un banco de sangre. Para la colecta de las informaciones se observaron los participantes y la entrevista etnográfica se realizó el análisis de dominio, taxonómicos y temáticos. Los dominios culturales fueron: la sangre es vida: fuente de vida y alimento valioso; creencias religiosas: fuentes simbólicas de apoyos; donación sanguínea: un gesto colaborador que exige cuidarse, gratifica y trae felicidad; donación sanguínea: fuente simbólica de inseguridad; estar enfermo es una condición para realizar transfusión sanguínea; transfusión sanguínea: esperanza de vida; Creencias populares: transfusión sanguínea como riesgo para la salud; donadores de sangre: personas benditas; donar y recibir sangre: como significado de felicidad. Temática: “líquido precioso que origina, sostiene, modifica la vida, provoca miedo e inseguridad”.

  18. Structure of the intact PPAR-Υ-RXR-α nuclear receptor complex on DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, Vikas; Huang, Pengxiang; Hamuro, Yoshitomo; Raghuram, Srilatha; Wang, Yongjun; Burris, Thomas P; Rastinejad, Fraydoon [Penn. Bio.; (ExSAR); (UV)

    2009-01-09

    Nuclear receptors are multi-domain transcription factors that bind to DNA elements from which they regulate gene expression. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) form heterodimers with the retinoid X receptor (RXR), and PPAR-{gamma} has been intensively studied as a drug target because of its link to insulin sensitization. Previous structural studies have focused on isolated DNA or ligand-binding segments, with no demonstration of how multiple domains cooperate to modulate receptor properties. Here we present structures of intact PPAR-{gamma} and RXR-{alpha} as a heterodimer bound to DNA, ligands and coactivator peptides. PPAR-{gamma} and RXR-{alpha} form a non-symmetric complex, allowing the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of PPAR-{gamma} to contact multiple domains in both proteins. Three interfaces link PPAR-{gamma} and RXR-{alpha}, including some that are DNA dependent. The PPAR-{gamma} LBD cooperates with both DNA-binding domains (DBDs) to enhance response-element binding. The A/B segments are highly dynamic, lacking folded substructures despite their gene-activation properties.

  19. Artonin E and Structural Analogs from Artocarpus Species Abrogates Estrogen Receptor Signaling in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imaobong Etti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing rate of mortality ensued from breast cancer has encouraged research into safer and efficient therapy. The human Estrogen receptor α has been implicated in the majority of reported breast cancer cases. Molecular docking employing Glide, Schrodinger suite 2015, was used to study the binding affinities of small molecules from the Artocarpus species after their drug-like properties were ascertained. The structure of the ligand-binding domain of human Estrogen receptor α was retrieved from Protein Data Bank while the structures of compounds were collected from PubChem database. The binding interactions of the studied compounds were reported as well as their glide scores. The best glide scored ligand, was Artonin E with a score of −12.72 Kcal when compared to other studied phytomolecules and it evoked growth inhibition of an estrogen receptor positive breast cancer cells in submicromolar concentration (3.8–6.9 µM in comparison to a reference standard Tamoxifen (18.9–24.1 µM within the tested time point (24–72 h. The studied ligands, which had good interactions with the target receptor, were also drug-like when compared with 95% of orally available drugs with the exception of Artoelastin, whose predicted physicochemical properties rendered it less drug-like. The in silico physicochemical properties, docking interactions and growth inhibition of the best glide scorer are indications of the anti-breast cancer relevance of the studied molecules.

  20. Nuclear receptor engineering based on novel structure activity relationships revealed by farnesyl pyrophosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyanka, Ritu; Das, Sharmistha; Samuels, Herbert H; Cardozo, Timothy

    2010-11-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) comprise the second largest protein family targeted by currently available drugs, acting via specific ligand interactions within the ligand binding domain (LBD). Recently, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) was shown to be a unique promiscuous NR ligand, activating a subset of NR family members and inhibiting wound healing in skin. The current study aimed at visualizing the unique basis of FPP interaction with multiple receptors in order to identify general structure-activity relationships that operate across the NR family. Docking of FPP to the 3D structures of the LBDs of a diverse set of NRs consistently revealed an electrostatic FPP pyrophosphate contact with an NR arginine conserved in the NR family, a hydrophobic farnesyl contact with NR helix-12 and a ligand binding pocket volume between 300 and 430 Å(3) as the minimal requirements for FPP activation of any NR. Lack of any of these structural features appears to render a given NR resistant to FPP activation. We used these structure-activity relationships to rationally design and successfully engineer several mutant human estrogen receptors that retain responsiveness to estradiol but no longer respond to FPP.

  1. Structure-activity analysis of synthetic alpha-thrombin-receptor-activating peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Obberghen-Schilling, E; Rasmussen, U B; Vouret-Craviari, V; Lentes, K U; Pavirani, A; Pouysségur, J

    1993-06-15

    , second or third N-terminal residue leads to a loss of activity, suggesting that a defined spacing of more than one structural component may be important for ligand-receptor interaction. Finally, we did not observe an antagonistic effect of the inactive peptides on phospholipase C activation or DNA synthesis induced by alpha-thrombin (1 nM) or SFLLRNP (3 microM).

  2. Broad-spectrum amino acid-sensing class C G-protein coupled receptors: molecular mechanisms, physiological significance and options for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conigrave, Arthur D; Hampson, David R

    2010-09-01

    In this article, we consider the molecular mechanisms that underlie broad-spectrum amino acid sensing by a discrete subgroup of class C G-protein-coupled receptors that includes the calcium-sensing receptor, GPRC6A and heterodimers composed of two closely related receptor subunits, T1R(1) and T1R(3). We consider their physiological significance highlighting their diverse spectrum of cellular responses and the phenotypes of global and conditional knock-out mice. In addition, we consider strategies for the development of new drugs that target these receptors. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Structures of the E. coli translating ribosome with SRP and its receptor and with the translocon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomaa, Ahmad; Boehringer, Daniel; Leibundgut, Marc; Ban, Nenad

    2016-01-01

    Co-translational protein targeting to membranes is a universally conserved process. Central steps include cargo recognition by the signal recognition particle and handover to the Sec translocon. Here we present snapshots of key co-translational-targeting complexes solved by cryo-electron microscopy at near-atomic resolution, establishing the molecular contacts between the Escherichia coli translating ribosome, the signal recognition particle and the translocon. Our results reveal the conformational changes that regulate the latching of the signal sequence, the release of the heterodimeric domains of the signal recognition particle and its receptor, and the handover of the signal sequence to the translocon. We also observe that the signal recognition particle and the translocon insert-specific structural elements into the ribosomal tunnel to remodel it, possibly to sense nascent chains. Our work provides structural evidence for a conformational state of the signal recognition particle and its receptor primed for translocon binding to the ribosome-nascent chain complex.

  4. The urokinase receptor and its structural homologue C4.4A in human cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, B; Ploug, M

    2008-01-01

    in the human genome. The structural relationship between the two proteins is, however, not reflected at the functional level. Whereas uPAR has a well-established role in regulating and focalizing uPA-mediated plasminogen activation to the surface of those cells expressing the receptor, the biological function...... of C4.4A remains elusive. Nonetheless, both uPAR and C4.4A have been implicated in human pathologies such as wound healing and cancer. A large body of experimental evidence thus demonstrates that high levels of uPAR in resected tumour tissue as well as in plasma are associated with poor prognosis......The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) and its structural homologue C4.4A are multidomain members of the Ly6/uPAR/alpha-neurotoxin protein domain family. Both are glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane glycoproteins encoded by neighbouring genes located on chromosome 19q13...

  5. Resistance to malaria through structural variation of red blood cell invasion receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Ellen M; Band, Gavin; Busby, George B J; Kivinen, Katja; Le, Quang Si; Clarke, Geraldine M; Bojang, Kalifa A; Conway, David J; Jallow, Muminatou; Sisay-Joof, Fatoumatta; Bougouma, Edith C; Mangano, Valentina D; Modiano, David; Sirima, Sodiomon B; Achidi, Eric; Apinjoh, Tobias O; Marsh, Kevin; Ndila, Carolyne M; Peshu, Norbert; Williams, Thomas N; Drakeley, Chris; Manjurano, Alphaxard; Reyburn, Hugh; Riley, Eleanor; Kachala, David; Molyneux, Malcolm; Nyirongo, Vysaul; Taylor, Terrie; Thornton, Nicole; Tilley, Louise; Grimsley, Shane; Drury, Eleanor; Stalker, Jim; Cornelius, Victoria; Hubbart, Christina; Jeffreys, Anna E; Rowlands, Kate; Rockett, Kirk A; Spencer, Chris C A; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P

    2017-06-16

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum invades human red blood cells by a series of interactions between host and parasite surface proteins. By analyzing genome sequence data from human populations, including 1269 individuals from sub-Saharan Africa, we identify a diverse array of large copy-number variants affecting the host invasion receptor genes GYPA and GYPB We find that a nearby association with severe malaria is explained by a complex structural rearrangement involving the loss of GYPB and gain of two GYPB-A hybrid genes, which encode a serologically distinct blood group antigen known as Dantu. This variant reduces the risk of severe malaria by 40% and has recently increased in frequency in parts of Kenya, yet it appears to be absent from west Africa. These findings link structural variation of red blood cell invasion receptors with natural resistance to severe malaria. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. Structural dynamics and energetics underlying allosteric inactivation of the cannabinoid receptor CB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Jonathan F; Farrens, David L

    2015-07-07

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are surprisingly flexible molecules that can do much more than simply turn on G proteins. Some even exhibit biased signaling, wherein the same receptor preferentially activates different G-protein or arrestin signaling pathways depending on the type of ligand bound. Why this behavior occurs is still unclear, but it can happen with both traditional ligands and ligands that bind allosterically outside the orthosteric receptor binding pocket. Here, we looked for structural mechanisms underlying these phenomena in the marijuana receptor CB1. Our work focused on the allosteric ligand Org 27569, which has an unusual effect on CB1-it simultaneously increases agonist binding, decreases G--protein activation, and induces biased signaling. Using classical pharmacological binding studies, we find that Org 27569 binds to a unique allosteric site on CB1 and show that it can act alone (without need for agonist cobinding). Through mutagenesis studies, we find that the ability of Org 27569 to bind is related to how much receptor is in an active conformation that can couple with G protein. Using these data, we estimated the energy differences between the inactive and active states. Finally, site-directed fluorescence labeling studies show the CB1 structure stabilized by Org 27569 is different and unique from that stabilized by antagonist or agonist. Specifically, transmembrane helix 6 (TM6) movements associated with G-protein activation are blocked, but at the same time, helix 8/TM7 movements are enhanced, suggesting a possible mechanism for the ability of Org 27569 to induce biased signaling.

  7. T cell receptors are structures capable of initiating signaling in the absence of large conformational rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Ricardo A; Shore, David A; Vuong, Mai T; Yu, Chao; Zhu, Xueyong; Pereira-Lopes, Selma; Brouwer, Heather; Fennelly, Janet A; Jessup, Claire M; Evans, Edward J; Wilson, Ian A; Davis, Simon J

    2012-04-13

    Native and non-native ligands of the T cell receptor (TCR), including antibodies, have been proposed to induce signaling in T cells via intra- or intersubunit conformational rearrangements within the extracellular regions of TCR complexes. We have investigated whether any signatures can be found for such postulated structural changes during TCR triggering induced by antibodies, using crystallographic and mutagenesis-based approaches. The crystal structure of murine CD3ε complexed with the mitogenic anti-CD3ε antibody 2C11 enabled the first direct structural comparisons of antibody-liganded and unliganded forms of CD3ε from a single species, which revealed that antibody binding does not induce any substantial rearrangements within CD3ε. Saturation mutagenesis of surface-exposed CD3ε residues, coupled with assays of antibody-induced signaling by the mutated complexes, suggests a new configuration for the complex within which CD3ε is highly exposed and reveals that no large new CD3ε interfaces are required to form during antibody-induced signaling. The TCR complex therefore appears to be a structure that is capable of initiating intracellular signaling in T cells without substantial structural rearrangements within or between the component subunits. Our findings raise the possibility that signaling by native ligands might also be initiated in the absence of large structural rearrangements in the receptor.

  8. Toward Understanding the Structural Basis of Partial Agonism at the Dopamine D3 Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michino, Mayako; Boateng, Comfort A; Donthamsetti, Prashant; Yano, Hideaki; Bakare, Oluyomi M; Bonifazi, Alessandro; Ellenberger, Michael P; Keck, Thomas M; Kumar, Vivek; Zhu, Clare; Verma, Ravi; Deschamps, Jeffrey R; Javitch, Jonathan A; Newman, Amy Hauck; Shi, Lei

    2017-01-26

    Both dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) partial agonists and antagonists have been implicated as potential medications for substance use disorders. In contrast to antagonists, partial agonists may cause fewer side effects since they maintain some dopaminergic tone and may be less disruptive to normal neuronal functions. Here, we report three sets of 4-phenylpiperazine stereoisomers that differ considerably in efficacy: the (R)-enantiomers are antagonists/weak partial agonists, whereas the (S)-enantiomers are much more efficacious. To investigate the structural basis of partial agonism, we performed comparative microsecond-scale molecular dynamics simulations starting from the inactive state of D3R in complex with these enantiomers. Analysis of the simulation results reveals common structural rearrangements near the ligand binding site induced by the bound (S)-enantiomers, but not by the (R)-enantiomers, that are features of partially activated receptor conformations. These receptor models bound with partial agonists may be useful for structure-based design of compounds with tailored efficacy profiles.

  9. Crystal structures of agonist-bound human cannabinoid receptor CB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Tian; Vemuri, Kiran; Nikas, Spyros P; Laprairie, Robert B; Wu, Yiran; Qu, Lu; Pu, Mengchen; Korde, Anisha; Jiang, Shan; Ho, Jo-Hao; Han, Gye Won; Ding, Kang; Li, Xuanxuan; Liu, Haiguang; Hanson, Michael A; Zhao, Suwen; Bohn, Laura M; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Stevens, Raymond C; Liu, Zhi-Jie

    2017-07-27

    The cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) is the principal target of the psychoactive constituent of marijuana, the partial agonist Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC). Here we report two agonist-bound crystal structures of human CB1 in complex with a tetrahydrocannabinol (AM11542) and a hexahydrocannabinol (AM841) at 2.80 Å and 2.95 Å resolution, respectively. The two CB1-agonist complexes reveal important conformational changes in the overall structure, relative to the antagonist-bound state, including a 53% reduction in the volume of the ligand-binding pocket and an increase in the surface area of the G-protein-binding region. In addition, a 'twin toggle switch' of Phe200(3.36) and Trp356(6.48) (superscripts denote Ballesteros-Weinstein numbering) is experimentally observed and appears to be essential for receptor activation. The structures reveal important insights into the activation mechanism of CB1 and provide a molecular basis for predicting the binding modes of Δ(9)-THC, and endogenous and synthetic cannabinoids. The plasticity of the binding pocket of CB1 seems to be a common feature among certain class A G-protein-coupled receptors. These findings should inspire the design of chemically diverse ligands with distinct pharmacological properties.

  10. Structure--Function Studies on Receptor Activation of Photoactive Yellow Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaledhonkar, Sandip; Dai, Shuo; Rathod, Rachana; Hoff, Wouter; Xie, Aihua; Xie Collaboration; Hoff Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Biological signaling in cells starts with detection of stimuli from ever changing environment, results in relay of signal, and finishes with particular cellular response. Photoactive yellow protein (PYP) from a salt loving Halorhodospira halophila bacterium is a blue light photoreceptor protein for negative phototaxis and a structural prototype of PAS domain superfamily of signaling and regulatory proteins. Upon absorption of a blue photon by its negatively charged p-coumaric acid (pCA) chromophore, the receptor state (off-state) undergoes photocyclic process, leading to large amplitude protein quake that results in PYP receptor activation. To understand the structural basis of receptor activation we employ time-resolved FTIR spectroscopic techniques combined with site-specific mutation to search for a key residue involved in protein quake. We will discuss the strategies and experimental results in light of hydrogen bonding network, active site structure and protein quake in PYP. The signaling mechanism leaned from PYP may have implication to understand signal transduction in other proteins.

  11. Crystal structure of the[mu]-opioid receptor bound to a morphinan antagonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manglik, Aashish; Kruse, Andrew C.; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Thian, Foon Sun; Mathiesen, Jesper M.; Sunahara, Roger K.; Pardo, Leonardo; Weis, William I.; Kobilka, Brian K.; Granier, Sébastien (Michigan-Med); (Stanford-MED); (UAB, Spain)

    2012-06-27

    Opium is one of the world's oldest drugs, and its derivatives morphine and codeine are among the most used clinical drugs to relieve severe pain. These prototypical opioids produce analgesia as well as many undesirable side effects (sedation, apnoea and dependence) by binding to and activating the G-protein-coupled {mu}-opioid receptor ({mu}-OR) in the central nervous system. Here we describe the 2.8 {angstrom} crystal structure of the mouse {mu}-OR in complex with an irreversible morphinan antagonist. Compared to the buried binding pocket observed in most G-protein-coupled receptors published so far, the morphinan ligand binds deeply within a large solvent-exposed pocket. Of particular interest, the {mu}-OR crystallizes as a two-fold symmetrical dimer through a four-helix bundle motif formed by transmembrane segments 5 and 6. These high-resolution insights into opioid receptor structure will enable the application of structure-based approaches to develop better drugs for the management of pain and addiction.

  12. Tumour necrosis factor and its receptor: a basic structural analysis of two counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltgen, Marco; Tilz, Gernot P

    2008-08-01

    Inflammation of vessels is partially caused by tumour necrosis factor (TNF). Although the pharmacological understanding of the main inflammatory protein data is well characterised, basic structural information is rare. For this reason, we developed a method for the representation and analysis of the macromolecular interface between TNF and its receptor, enabling a better understanding of their interaction. In this paper we use structural information on the TNF-receptor complex in the protein (PDB) database as input to calculate an interface contact matrix, based on the distance between individual residues of each counterpart. The two-dimensional matrix is a plot of pairwise interactions between adjacent residues of the two chains in the protein complex. The residue names within each chain are plotted on the respective axis and an entry is made wherever two residues come into close contact. The matrix elements are annotated with physicochemical properties. The interface contact matrix is linked to a 3D visualisation of the macromolecular structure in such a way that mouse clicking on the appropriate part of the interface contact matrix highlights the corresponding residues in the 3D structure. Additionally the residues in the matrix are used to define the molecular surface at the interface. The interface contact matrix enables an overview representation of the residue distribution at the macromolecular interface and an evaluation of interfacial 'hot spots'. The selection of the residues in the interface contact matrix and the highlighting in the 3D structure allow an easy retrieval of the desired information out of the wealth of structural information. The representation with molecular surfaces shows complementary shapes. Many forms of treatment have been developed to reduce excessive TNF activity and their success is based on knowledge of the active sites of TNF. Our macromolecular interface analysis system will help us to define better receptor and acceptor

  13. Structural basis for receptor recognition of vitamin-B(12)-intrinsic factor complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian Brix Folsted; Madsen, Mette; Storm, Tina

    2010-01-01

    Cobalamin (Cbl, vitamin B(12)) is a bacterial organic compound and an essential coenzyme in mammals, which take it up from the diet. This occurs by the combined action of the gastric intrinsic factor (IF) and the ileal endocytic cubam receptor formed by the 460-kilodalton (kDa) protein cubilin...... and the 45-kDa transmembrane protein amnionless. Loss of function of any of these proteins ultimately leads to Cbl deficiency in man. Here we present the crystal structure of the complex between IF-Cbl and the cubilin IF-Cbl-binding-region (CUB(5-8)) determined at 3.3 A resolution. The structure provides...

  14. Structure of the human histamine H1 receptor complex with doxepin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamura, Tatsuro; Shiroishi, Mitsunori; Weyand, Simone; Tsujimoto, Hirokazu; Winter, Graeme; Katritch, Vsevolod; Abagyan, Ruben; Cherezov, Vadim; Liu, Wei; Han, Gye Won; Kobayashi, Takuya; Stevens, Raymond C; Iwata, So

    2011-06-22

    The biogenic amine histamine is an important pharmacological mediator involved in pathophysiological processes such as allergies and inflammations. Histamine H(1) receptor (H(1)R) antagonists are very effective drugs alleviating the symptoms of allergic reactions. Here we show the crystal structure of the H(1)R complex with doxepin, a first-generation H(1)R antagonist. Doxepin sits deep in the ligand-binding pocket and directly interacts with Trp 428(6.48), a highly conserved key residue in G-protein-coupled-receptor activation. This well-conserved pocket with mostly hydrophobic nature contributes to the low selectivity of the first-generation compounds. The pocket is associated with an anion-binding region occupied by a phosphate ion. Docking of various second-generation H(1)R antagonists reveals that the unique carboxyl group present in this class of compounds interacts with Lys 191(5.39) and/or Lys 179(ECL2), both of which form part of the anion-binding region. This region is not conserved in other aminergic receptors, demonstrating how minor differences in receptors lead to pronounced selectivity differences with small molecules. Our study sheds light on the molecular basis of H(1)R antagonist specificity against H(1)R. ©2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved

  15. Structure-Based Understanding of Binding Affinity and Mode of Estrogen Receptor α Agonists and Antagonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehan Lee

    Full Text Available The flexible hydrophobic ligand binding pocket (LBP of estrogen receptor α (ERα allows the binding of a wide variety of endocrine disruptors. Upon ligand binding, the LBP reshapes around the contours of the ligand and stabilizes the complex by complementary hydrophobic interactions and specific hydrogen bonds with the ligand. Here we present a framework for quantitative analysis of the steric and electronic features of the human ERα-ligand complex using three dimensional (3D protein-ligand interaction description combined with 3D-QSAR approach. An empirical hydrophobicity density field is applied to account for hydrophobic contacts of ligand within the LBP. The obtained 3D-QSAR model revealed that hydrophobic contacts primarily determine binding affinity and govern binding mode with hydrogen bonds. Several residues of the LBP appear to be quite flexible and adopt a spectrum of conformations in various ERα-ligand complexes, in particular His524. The 3D-QSAR was combined with molecular docking based on three receptor conformations to accommodate receptor flexibility. The model indicates that the dynamic character of the LBP allows accommodation and stable binding of structurally diverse ligands, and proper representation of the protein flexibility is critical for reasonable description of binding of the ligands. Our results provide a quantitative and mechanistic understanding of binding affinity and mode of ERα agonists and antagonists that may be applicable to other nuclear receptors.

  16. Novel indole and azaindole (pyrrolopyridine) cannabinoid (CB) receptor agonists: design, synthesis, structure-activity relationships, physicochemical properties and biological activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaazer, A.R.; Lange, J.H.M.; van der Neut, M.A.W.; Mulder, A.; den Boon, F.S.; Werkman, T.R.; Kruse, C.G.; Wadman, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    The discovery, synthesis and structure-activity relationship (SAR) of a novel series of cannabinoid 1 (CB1) and cannabinoid 2 (CB2) receptor ligands are reported. Based on the aminoalkylindole class of cannabinoid receptor agonists, a biphenyl moiety was introduced as novel lipophilic indole 3-acyl

  17. The structure of cytomegalovirus immune modulator UL141 highlights structural Ig-fold versatility for receptor binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemčovičová, Ivana [La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, 9420 Athena Circle, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, SK 84505 Bratislava (Slovakia); Zajonc, Dirk M., E-mail: dzajonc@liai.org [La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, 9420 Athena Circle, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    The crystal structure of Human cytomegalovirus immune modulator UL141 was solved at 3.25 Å resolution. Here, a detailed analysis of its intimate dimerization interface and the biophysical properties of its receptor (TRAIL-R2 and CD155) binding interactions are presented. Natural killer (NK) cells are critical components of the innate immune system as they rapidly detect and destroy infected cells. To avoid immune recognition and to allow long-term persistence in the host, Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) has evolved a number of genes to evade or inhibit immune effector pathways. In particular, UL141 can inhibit cell-surface expression of both the NK cell-activating ligand CD155 as well as the TRAIL death receptors (TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2). The crystal structure of unliganded HCMV UL141 refined to 3.25 Å resolution allowed analysis of its head-to-tail dimerization interface. A ‘dimerization-deficient’ mutant of UL141 (ddUL141) was further designed, which retained the ability to bind to TRAIL-R2 or CD155 while losing the ability to cross-link two receptor monomers. Structural comparison of unliganded UL141 with UL141 bound to TRAIL-R2 further identified a mobile loop that makes intimate contacts with TRAIL-R2 upon receptor engagement. Superposition of the Ig-like domain of UL141 on the CD155 ligand T-cell immunoreceptor with Ig and ITIM domains (TIGIT) revealed that UL141 can potentially engage CD155 similar to TIGIT by using the C′C′′ and GF loops. Further mutations in the TIGIT binding site of CD155 (Q63R and F128R) abrogated UL141 binding, suggesting that the Ig-like domain of UL141 is a viral mimic of TIGIT, as it targets the same binding site on CD155 using similar ‘lock-and-key’ interactions. Sequence alignment of the UL141 gene and its orthologues also showed conservation in this highly hydrophobic (L/A)X{sub 6}G ‘lock’ motif for CD155 binding as well as conservation of the TRAIL-R2 binding patches, suggesting that these host–receptor

  18. Molecular and Structural Characterization of a Novel Escherichia coli Interleukin Receptor Mimic Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo G. Moriel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI is a disease of extremely high incidence in both community and nosocomial settings. UTIs cause significant morbidity and mortality, with approximately 150 million cases globally per year. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC is the primary cause of UTI and is generally treated empirically. However, the rapidly increasing incidence of UTIs caused by multidrug-resistant UPEC strains has led to limited available treatment options and highlights the urgent need to develop alternative treatment and prevention strategies. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis to define the regulation, structure, function, and immunogenicity of recently identified UPEC vaccine candidate C1275 (here referred to as IrmA. We showed that the irmA gene is highly prevalent in UPEC, is cotranscribed with the biofilm-associated antigen 43 gene, and is regulated by the global oxidative stress response OxyR protein. Localization studies identified IrmA in the UPEC culture supernatant. We determined the structure of IrmA and showed that it adopts a unique domain-swapped dimer architecture. The dimeric structure of IrmA displays similarity to those of human cytokine receptors, including the interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R, interleukin-4 receptor (IL-4R, and interleukin-10 receptor (IL-10R binding domains, and we showed that purified IrmA can bind to their cognate cytokines. Finally, we showed that plasma from convalescent urosepsis patients contains high IrmA antibody titers, demonstrating the strong immunogenicity of IrmA. Taken together, our results indicate that IrmA may play an important role during UPEC infection.

  19. Molecular and Structural Characterization of a Novel Escherichia coli Interleukin Receptor Mimic Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriel, Danilo G; Heras, Begoña; Paxman, Jason J; Lo, Alvin W; Tan, Lendl; Sullivan, Matthew J; Dando, Samantha J; Beatson, Scott A; Ulett, Glen C; Schembri, Mark A

    2016-03-15

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a disease of extremely high incidence in both community and nosocomial settings. UTIs cause significant morbidity and mortality, with approximately 150 million cases globally per year. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the primary cause of UTI and is generally treated empirically. However, the rapidly increasing incidence of UTIs caused by multidrug-resistant UPEC strains has led to limited available treatment options and highlights the urgent need to develop alternative treatment and prevention strategies. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis to define the regulation, structure, function, and immunogenicity of recently identified UPEC vaccine candidate C1275 (here referred to as IrmA). We showed that the irmA gene is highly prevalent in UPEC, is cotranscribed with the biofilm-associated antigen 43 gene, and is regulated by the global oxidative stress response OxyR protein. Localization studies identified IrmA in the UPEC culture supernatant. We determined the structure of IrmA and showed that it adopts a unique domain-swapped dimer architecture. The dimeric structure of IrmA displays similarity to those of human cytokine receptors, including the interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R), interleukin-4 receptor (IL-4R), and interleukin-10 receptor (IL-10R) binding domains, and we showed that purified IrmA can bind to their cognate cytokines. Finally, we showed that plasma from convalescent urosepsis patients contains high IrmA antibody titers, demonstrating the strong immunogenicity of IrmA. Taken together, our results indicate that IrmA may play an important role during UPEC infection. Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) is the primary cause of urinary tract infection (UTI), a disease of major significance to human health. Globally, the incidence of UPEC-mediated UTI is strongly associated with increasing antibiotic resistance, making this extremely common infection a major public health concern. In this report, we describe

  20. Modeling structure of G protein-coupled receptors in huan genome

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yang

    2016-01-26

    G protein-coupled receptors (or GPCRs) are integral transmembrane proteins responsible to various cellular signal transductions. Human GPCR proteins are encoded by 5% of human genes but account for the targets of 40% of the FDA approved drugs. Due to difficulties in crystallization, experimental structure determination remains extremely difficult for human GPCRs, which have been a major barrier in modern structure-based drug discovery. We proposed a new hybrid protocol, GPCR-I-TASSER, to construct GPCR structure models by integrating experimental mutagenesis data with ab initio transmembrane-helix assembly simulations, assisted by the predicted transmembrane-helix interaction networks. The method was tested in recent community-wide GPCRDock experiments and constructed models with a root mean square deviation 1.26 Å for Dopamine-3 and 2.08 Å for Chemokine-4 receptors in the transmembrane domain regions, which were significantly closer to the native than the best templates available in the PDB. GPCR-I-TASSER has been applied to model all 1,026 putative GPCRs in the human genome, where 923 are found to have correct folds based on the confidence score analysis and mutagenesis data comparison. The successfully modeled GPCRs contain many pharmaceutically important families that do not have previously solved structures, including Trace amine, Prostanoids, Releasing hormones, Melanocortins, Vasopressin and Neuropeptide Y receptors. All the human GPCR models have been made publicly available through the GPCR-HGmod database at http://zhanglab.ccmb.med.umich.edu/GPCR-HGmod/ The results demonstrate new progress on genome-wide structure modeling of transmembrane proteins which should bring useful impact on the effort of GPCR-targeted drug discovery.

  1. Structure, signaling mechanism and regulation of the natriuretic peptide receptor guanylate cyclase.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misono, K. S.; Philo, J. S.; Arakawa, T.; Ogata, C. M.; Qiu, Y.; Ogawa, H.; Young, H. S. (Biosciences Division); (Univ. of Nevada); (Alliance Protein Labs.)

    2011-06-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and the homologous B-type natriuretic peptide are cardiac hormones that dilate blood vessels and stimulate natriuresis and diuresis, thereby lowering blood pressure and blood volume. ANP and B-type natriuretic peptide counterbalance the actions of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and neurohormonal systems, and play a central role in cardiovascular regulation. These activities are mediated by natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPRA), a single transmembrane segment, guanylyl cyclase (GC)-linked receptor that occurs as a homodimer. Here, we present an overview of the structure, possible chloride-mediated regulation and signaling mechanism of NPRA and other receptor GCs. Earlier, we determined the crystal structures of the NPRA extracellular domain with and without bound ANP. Their structural comparison has revealed a novel ANP-induced rotation mechanism occurring in the juxtamembrane region that apparently triggers transmembrane signal transduction. More recently, the crystal structures of the dimerized catalytic domain of green algae GC Cyg12 and that of cyanobacterium GC Cya2 have been reported. These structures closely resemble that of the adenylyl cyclase catalytic domain, consisting of a C1 and C2 subdomain heterodimer. Adenylyl cyclase is activated by binding of G{sub s}{alpha} to C2 and the ensuing 7{sup o} rotation of C1 around an axis parallel to the central cleft, thereby inducing the heterodimer to adopt a catalytically active conformation. We speculate that, in NPRA, the ANP-induced rotation of the juxtamembrane domains, transmitted across the transmembrane helices, may induce a similar rotation in each of the dimerized GC catalytic domains, leading to the stimulation of the GC catalytic activity.

  2. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human antidiuretic hormone receptor gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seibold, A.; Brabet, P.; Rosenthal, W.; Birnbaumer, M. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States))

    1992-11-01

    Applying a genomic DNA-expression approach, the authors cloned the gene and cDNA coding for the human antidiuretic hormone receptor, also called vasopressin V2 receptor' (V2R). The nucleotide sequence of both cloned DNAs provided the information to elucidate the structure of the isolated transcriptional unit. The structure of this gene is unusual in that it is the first G protein-coupled receptor gene that contains two very small intervening sequences, the second of which separates the region encoding the seventh transmembrane region from the rest of the open reading frame. The sequence information was used to synthesize appropriate oligonucleotides to be used as primers in the PCR. The V2R gene was localized by PCR using DNA from hybrid cells as template. The gene was found to reside in the q28-qter portion of the human X chromosome, a region identified as the locus for congential nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. 27 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Crystal structure of the β2 adrenergic receptor-Gs protein complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, Søren G.F.; DeVree, Brian T; Zou, Yaozhong; Kruse, Andrew C; Chung, Ka Young; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Thian, Foon Sun; Chae, Pil Seok; Pardon, Els; Calinski, Diane; Mathiesen, Jesper M; Shah, Syed T.A.; Lyons, Joseph A; Caffrey, Martin; Gellman, Samuel H; Steyaert, Jan; Skiniotis, Georgios; Weis, William I; Sunahara, Roger K; Kobilka, Brian K [Brussels; (Trinity); (Michigan); (Stanford-MED); (Michigan-Med); (UW)

    2011-12-07

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are responsible for the majority of cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters as well as the senses of sight, olfaction and taste. The paradigm of GPCR signalling is the activation of a heterotrimeric GTP binding protein (G protein) by an agonist-occupied receptor. The β2 adrenergic receptor2AR) activation of Gs, the stimulatory G protein for adenylyl cyclase, has long been a model system for GPCR signalling. Here we present the crystal structure of the active state ternary complex composed of agonist-occupied monomeric β2AR and nucleotide-free Gs heterotrimer. The principal interactions between the β2AR and Gs involve the amino- and carboxy-terminal α-helices of Gs, with conformational changes propagating to the nucleotide-binding pocket. The largest conformational changes in the β2AR include a 14Å outward movement at the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane segment 6 (TM6) and an α-helical extension of the cytoplasmic end of TM5. The most surprising observation is a major displacement of the α-helical domain of Gαs relative to the Ras-like GTPase domain. This crystal structure represents the first high-resolution view of transmembrane signalling by a GPCR.

  4. Structural Probing and Molecular Modeling of the A₃ Adenosine Receptor: A Focus on Agonist Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciancetta, Antonella; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2017-03-11

    Adenosine is an endogenous modulator exerting its functions through the activation of four adenosine receptor (AR) subtypes, termed A₁, A2A, A2B and A₃, which belong to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily. The human A₃AR (hA₃AR) subtype is implicated in several cytoprotective functions. Therefore, hA₃AR modulators, and in particular agonists, are sought for their potential application as anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and cardioprotective agents. Structure-based molecular modeling techniques have been applied over the years to rationalize the structure-activity relationships (SARs) of newly emerged A₃AR ligands, guide the subsequent lead optimization, and interpret site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) data from a molecular perspective. In this review, we showcase selected modeling-based and guided strategies that were applied to elucidate the binding of agonists to the A₃AR and discuss the challenges associated with an accurate prediction of the receptor extracellular vestibule through homology modeling from the available X-ray templates.

  5. Crystal Structure of the Receptor-Binding Domain from Newly Emerged Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yaoqing; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Yang, Yang; Agnihothram, Sudhakar S.; Liu, Chang; Lin, Yi-Lun; Baric, Ralph S.

    2013-01-01

    The newly emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has infected at least 77 people, with a fatality rate of more than 50%. Alarmingly, the virus demonstrates the capability of human-to-human transmission, raising the possibility of global spread and endangering world health and economy. Here we have identified the receptor-binding domain (RBD) from the MERS-CoV spike protein and determined its crystal structure. This study also presents a structural comparison of MERS-CoV RBD with other coronavirus RBDs, successfully positioning MERS-CoV on the landscape of coronavirus evolution and providing insights into receptor binding by MERS-CoV. Furthermore, we found that MERS-CoV RBD functions as an effective entry inhibitor of MERS-CoV. The identified MERS-CoV RBD may also serve as a potential candidate for MERS-CoV subunit vaccines. Overall, this study enhances our understanding of the evolution of coronavirus RBDs, provides insights into receptor recognition by MERS-CoV, and may help control the transmission of MERS-CoV in humans. PMID:23903833

  6. Electrospun Gelatin/β-TCP Composite Nanofibers Enhance Osteogenic Differentiation of BMSCs and In Vivo Bone Formation by Activating Ca2+-Sensing Receptor Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuehui Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate- (CaP- based composite scaffolds have been used extensively for the bone regeneration in bone tissue engineering. Previously, we developed a biomimetic composite nanofibrous membrane of gelatin/β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP and confirmed their biological activity in vitro and bone regeneration in vivo. However, how these composite nanofibers promote the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs is unknown. Here, gelatin/β-TCP composite nanofibers were fabricated by incorporating 20 wt% β-TCP nanoparticles into electrospun gelatin nanofibers. Electron microscopy showed that the composite β-TCP nanofibers had a nonwoven structure with a porous network and a rough surface. Spectral analyses confirmed the presence and chemical stability of the β-TCP and gelatin components. Compared with pure gelatin nanofibers, gelatin/β-TCP composite nanofibers caused increased cell attachment, proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, and osteogenic gene expression in rat BMSCs. Interestingly, the expression level of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR was significantly higher on the composite nanofibrous scaffolds than on pure gelatin. For rat calvarial critical sized defects, more extensive osteogenesis and neovascularization occurred in the composite scaffolds group compared with the gelatin group. Thus, gelatin/β-TCP composite scaffolds promote osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs in vitro and bone regeneration in vivo by activating Ca2+-sensing receptor signaling.

  7. Electrospun Gelatin/β-TCP Composite Nanofibers Enhance Osteogenic Differentiation of BMSCs and In Vivo Bone Formation by Activating Ca (2+) -Sensing Receptor Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuehui; Meng, Song; Huang, Ying; Xu, Mingming; He, Ying; Lin, Hong; Han, Jianmin; Chai, Yuan; Wei, Yan; Deng, Xuliang

    2015-01-01

    Calcium phosphate- (CaP-) based composite scaffolds have been used extensively for the bone regeneration in bone tissue engineering. Previously, we developed a biomimetic composite nanofibrous membrane of gelatin/β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) and confirmed their biological activity in vitro and bone regeneration in vivo. However, how these composite nanofibers promote the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) is unknown. Here, gelatin/β-TCP composite nanofibers were fabricated by incorporating 20 wt% β-TCP nanoparticles into electrospun gelatin nanofibers. Electron microscopy showed that the composite β-TCP nanofibers had a nonwoven structure with a porous network and a rough surface. Spectral analyses confirmed the presence and chemical stability of the β-TCP and gelatin components. Compared with pure gelatin nanofibers, gelatin/β-TCP composite nanofibers caused increased cell attachment, proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, and osteogenic gene expression in rat BMSCs. Interestingly, the expression level of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) was significantly higher on the composite nanofibrous scaffolds than on pure gelatin. For rat calvarial critical sized defects, more extensive osteogenesis and neovascularization occurred in the composite scaffolds group compared with the gelatin group. Thus, gelatin/β-TCP composite scaffolds promote osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs in vitro and bone regeneration in vivo by activating Ca(2+)-sensing receptor signaling.

  8. The first structure-activity relationship studies for designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Choo, Hyunah; Huang, Xi-Ping; Yang, Xiaobao; Stone, Orrin; Roth, Bryan L; Jin, Jian

    2015-03-18

    Over the past decade, two independent technologies have emerged and been widely adopted by the neuroscience community for remotely controlling neuronal activity: optogenetics which utilize engineered channelrhodopsin and other opsins, and chemogenetics which utilize engineered G protein-coupled receptors (Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs (DREADDs)) and other orthologous ligand-receptor pairs. Using directed molecular evolution, two types of DREADDs derived from human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors have been developed: hM3Dq which activates neuronal firing, and hM4Di which inhibits neuronal firing. Importantly, these DREADDs were not activated by the native ligand acetylcholine (ACh), but selectively activated by clozapine N-oxide (CNO), a pharmacologically inert ligand. CNO has been used extensively in rodent models to activate DREADDs, and although CNO is not subject to significant metabolic transformation in mice, a small fraction of CNO is apparently metabolized to clozapine in humans and guinea pigs, lessening the translational potential of DREADDs. To effectively translate the DREADD technology, the next generation of DREADD agonists are needed and a thorough understanding of structure-activity relationships (SARs) of DREADDs is required for developing such ligands. We therefore conducted the first SAR studies of hM3Dq. We explored multiple regions of the scaffold represented by CNO, identified interesting SAR trends, and discovered several compounds that are very potent hM3Dq agonists but do not activate the native human M3 receptor (hM3). We also discovered that the approved drug perlapine is a novel hM3Dq agonist with >10 000-fold selectivity for hM3Dq over hM3.

  9. Kek-6: A truncated-Trk-like receptor for Drosophila neurotrophin 2 regulates structural synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulian-Benitez, Suzana; Bishop, Simon; Foldi, Istvan; Wentzell, Jill; Okenwa, Chinenye; Forero, Manuel G; Zhu, Bangfu; Moreira, Marta; Phizacklea, Mark; McIlroy, Graham; Li, Guiyi; Gay, Nicholas J; Hidalgo, Alicia

    2017-08-01

    Neurotrophism, structural plasticity, learning and long-term memory in mammals critically depend on neurotrophins binding Trk receptors to activate tyrosine kinase (TyrK) signaling, but Drosophila lacks full-length Trks, raising the question of how these processes occur in the fly. Paradoxically, truncated Trk isoforms lacking the TyrK predominate in the adult human brain, but whether they have neuronal functions independently of full-length Trks is unknown. Drosophila has TyrK-less Trk-family receptors, encoded by the kekkon (kek) genes, suggesting that evolutionarily conserved functions for this receptor class may exist. Here, we asked whether Keks function together with Drosophila neurotrophins (DNTs) at the larval glutamatergic neuromuscular junction (NMJ). We tested the eleven LRR and Ig-containing (LIG) proteins encoded in the Drosophila genome for expression in the central nervous system (CNS) and potential interaction with DNTs. Kek-6 is expressed in the CNS, interacts genetically with DNTs and can bind DNT2 in signaling assays and co-immunoprecipitations. Ligand binding is promiscuous, as Kek-6 can also bind DNT1, and Kek-2 and Kek-5 can also bind DNT2. In vivo, Kek-6 is found presynaptically in motoneurons, and DNT2 is produced by the muscle to function as a retrograde factor at the NMJ. Kek-6 and DNT2 regulate NMJ growth and synaptic structure. Evidence indicates that Kek-6 does not antagonise the alternative DNT2 receptor Toll-6. Instead, Kek-6 and Toll-6 interact physically, and together regulate structural synaptic plasticity and homeostasis. Using pull-down assays, we identified and validated CaMKII and VAP33A as intracellular partners of Kek-6, and show that they regulate NMJ growth and active zone formation downstream of DNT2 and Kek-6. The synaptic functions of Kek-6 could be evolutionarily conserved. This raises the intriguing possibility that a novel mechanism of structural synaptic plasticity involving truncated Trk-family receptors

  10. Kek-6: A truncated-Trk-like receptor for Drosophila neurotrophin 2 regulates structural synaptic plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Ulian-Benitez

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Neurotrophism, structural plasticity, learning and long-term memory in mammals critically depend on neurotrophins binding Trk receptors to activate tyrosine kinase (TyrK signaling, but Drosophila lacks full-length Trks, raising the question of how these processes occur in the fly. Paradoxically, truncated Trk isoforms lacking the TyrK predominate in the adult human brain, but whether they have neuronal functions independently of full-length Trks is unknown. Drosophila has TyrK-less Trk-family receptors, encoded by the kekkon (kek genes, suggesting that evolutionarily conserved functions for this receptor class may exist. Here, we asked whether Keks function together with Drosophila neurotrophins (DNTs at the larval glutamatergic neuromuscular junction (NMJ. We tested the eleven LRR and Ig-containing (LIG proteins encoded in the Drosophila genome for expression in the central nervous system (CNS and potential interaction with DNTs. Kek-6 is expressed in the CNS, interacts genetically with DNTs and can bind DNT2 in signaling assays and co-immunoprecipitations. Ligand binding is promiscuous, as Kek-6 can also bind DNT1, and Kek-2 and Kek-5 can also bind DNT2. In vivo, Kek-6 is found presynaptically in motoneurons, and DNT2 is produced by the muscle to function as a retrograde factor at the NMJ. Kek-6 and DNT2 regulate NMJ growth and synaptic structure. Evidence indicates that Kek-6 does not antagonise the alternative DNT2 receptor Toll-6. Instead, Kek-6 and Toll-6 interact physically, and together regulate structural synaptic plasticity and homeostasis. Using pull-down assays, we identified and validated CaMKII and VAP33A as intracellular partners of Kek-6, and show that they regulate NMJ growth and active zone formation downstream of DNT2 and Kek-6. The synaptic functions of Kek-6 could be evolutionarily conserved. This raises the intriguing possibility that a novel mechanism of structural synaptic plasticity involving truncated Trk

  11. Structure modeling of all identified G protein-coupled receptors in the human genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, encoded by about 5% of human genes, comprise the largest family of integral membrane proteins and act as cell surface receptors responsible for the transduction of endogenous signal into a cellular response. Although tertiary structural information is crucial for function annotation and drug design, there are few experimentally determined GPCR structures. To address this issue, we employ the recently developed threading assembly refinement (TASSER method to generate structure predictions for all 907 putative GPCRs in the human genome. Unlike traditional homology modeling approaches, TASSER modeling does not require solved homologous template structures; moreover, it often refines the structures closer to native. These features are essential for the comprehensive modeling of all human GPCRs when close homologous templates are absent. Based on a benchmarked confidence score, approximately 820 predicted models should have the correct folds. The majority of GPCR models share the characteristic seven-transmembrane helix topology, but 45 ORFs are predicted to have different structures. This is due to GPCR fragments that are predominantly from extracellular or intracellular domains as well as database annotation errors. Our preliminary validation includes the automated modeling of bovine rhodopsin, the only solved GPCR in the Protein Data Bank. With homologous templates excluded, the final model built by TASSER has a global C(alpha root-mean-squared deviation from native of 4.6 angstroms, with a root-mean-squared deviation in the transmembrane helix region of 2.1 angstroms. Models of several representative GPCRs are compared with mutagenesis and affinity labeling data, and consistent agreement is demonstrated. Structure clustering of the predicted models shows that GPCRs with similar structures tend to belong to a similar functional class even when their sequences are diverse. These results demonstrate the usefulness

  12. Structural basis for chemokine recognition and activation of a viral G protein-coupled receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burg, John S.; Ingram, Jessica R.; Venkatakrishnan, A.J.; Jude, Kevin M.; Dukkipati, Abhiram; Feinberg, Evan N.; Angelini, Alessandro; Waghray, Deepa; Dror, Ron O.; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Garcia, K. Christopher (Stanford); (Stanford-MED); (Whitehead); (MIT)

    2015-03-05

    Chemokines are small proteins that function as immune modulators through activation of chemokine G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Several viruses also encode chemokines and chemokine receptors to subvert the host immune response. How protein ligands activate GPCRs remains unknown. We report the crystal structure at 2.9 angstrom resolution of the human cytomegalovirus GPCR US28 in complex with the chemokine domain of human CX3CL1 (fractalkine). The globular body of CX3CL1 is perched on top of the US28 extracellular vestibule, whereas its amino terminus projects into the central core of US28. The transmembrane helices of US28 adopt an active-state-like conformation. Atomic-level simulations suggest that the agonist-independent activity of US28 may be due to an amino acid network evolved in the viral GPCR to destabilize the receptor’s inactive state.

  13. Loss of progesterone receptor-mediated actions induce preterm cellular and structural remodeling of the cervix and premature birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellon, Steven M; Dobyns, Abigail E; Beck, Hailey L; Kurtzman, James T; Garfield, Robert E; Kirby, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    A decline in serum progesterone or antagonism of progesterone receptor function results in preterm labor and birth. Whether characteristics of premature remodeling of the cervix after antiprogestins or ovariectomy are similar to that at term was the focus of the present study. Groups of pregnant rats were treated with vehicle, a progesterone receptor antagonist (onapristone or mifepristone), or ovariectomized on day 17 postbreeding. As expected, controls given vehicle delivered at term while rats delivered preterm after progesterone receptor antagonist treatment or ovariectomy. Similar to the cervix before term, the preterm cervix of progesterone receptor antagonist-treated rats was characterized by reduced cell nuclei density, decreased collagen content and structure, as well as a greater presence of macrophages per unit area. Thus, loss of nuclear progesterone receptor-mediated actions promoted structural remodeling of the cervix, increased census of resident macrophages, and preterm birth much like that found in the cervix at term. In contrast to the progesterone receptor antagonist-induced advance in characteristics associated with remodeling, ovariectomy-induced loss of systemic progesterone did not affect hypertrophy, extracellular collagen, or macrophage numbers in the cervix. Thus, the structure and macrophage census in the cervix appear sufficient for premature ripening and birth to occur well before term. With progesterone receptors predominantly localized on cells other than macrophages, the findings suggest that interactions between cells may facilitate the loss of progesterone receptor-mediated actions as part of a final common mechanism that remodels the cervix in certain etiologies of preterm and with parturition at term.

  14. Differential CLE peptide perception by plant receptors implicated from structural and functional analyses of TDIF-TDR interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhijie; Chakraborty, Sayan; Xu, Guozhou; Kobe, Bostjan

    2017-04-06

    Tracheary Element Differentiation Inhibitory Factor (TDIF) belongs to the family of post-translationally modified CLE (CLAVATA3/embryo surrounding region (ESR)-related) peptide hormones that control root growth and define the delicate balance between stem cell proliferation and differentiation in SAM (shoot apical meristem) or RAM (root apical meristem). In Arabidopsis, Tracheary Element Differentiation Inhibitory Factor Receptor (TDR) and its ligand TDIF signaling pathway is involved in the regulation of procambial cell proliferation and inhibiting its differentiation into xylem cells. Here we present the crystal structures of the extracellular domains (ECD) of TDR alone and in complex with its ligand TDIF resolved at 2.65 Åand 2.75 Å respectively. These structures provide insights about the ligand perception and specific interactions between the CLE peptides and their cognate receptors. Our in vitro biochemical studies indicate that the interactions between the ligands and the receptors at the C-terminal anchoring site provide conserved binding. While the binding interactions occurring at the N-terminal anchoring site dictate differential binding specificities between different ligands and receptors. Our studies will open different unknown avenues of TDR-TDIF signaling pathways that will enhance our knowledge in this field highlighting the receptor ligand interaction, receptor activation, signaling network, modes of action and will serve as a structure function relationship model between the ligand and the receptor for various similar leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR-RLKs).

  15. Structure of the human [kappa]-opioid receptor in complex with JDTic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Huixian; Wacker, Daniel; Mileni, Mauro; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Vardy, Eyal; Liu, Wei; Thompson, Aaron A.; Huang, Xi-Ping; Carroll, F. Ivy; Mascarella, S. Wayne; Westkaemper, Richard B.; Mosier, Philip D.; Roth, Bryan L.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C. (VCU); (Scripps); (UNC); (Res. Tri. Inst.)

    2013-04-25

    Opioid receptors mediate the actions of endogenous and exogenous opioids on many physiological processes, including the regulation of pain, respiratory drive, mood, and - in the case of {kappa}-opioid receptor ({kappa}-OR) - dysphoria and psychotomimesis. Here we report the crystal structure of the human {kappa}-OR in complex with the selective antagonist JDTic, arranged in parallel dimers, at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. The structure reveals important features of the ligand-binding pocket that contribute to the high affinity and subtype selectivity of JDTic for the human {kappa}-OR. Modelling of other important {kappa}-OR-selective ligands, including the morphinan-derived antagonists norbinaltorphimine and 5'-guanidinonaltrindole, and the diterpene agonist salvinorin A analogue RB-64, reveals both common and distinct features for binding these diverse chemotypes. Analysis of site-directed mutagenesis and ligand structure-activity relationships confirms the interactions observed in the crystal structure, thereby providing a molecular explanation for {kappa}-OR subtype selectivity, and essential insights for the design of compounds with new pharmacological properties targeting the human {kappa}-OR.

  16. Structure-based drug design targeting the cell membrane receptor GPBAR1: exploiting the bile acid scaffold towards selective agonism

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Leva, Francesco Saverio; Festa, Carmen; Renga, Barbara; Sepe, Valentina; Novellino, Ettore; Fiorucci, Stefano; Zampella, Angela; Limongelli, Vittorio

    2015-11-01

    Bile acids can regulate nutrient metabolism through the activation of the cell membrane receptor GPBAR1 and the nuclear receptor FXR. Developing an exogenous control over these receptors represents an attractive strategy for the treatment of enterohepatic and metabolic disorders. A number of dual GPBAR1/FXR agonists are known, however their therapeutic use is limited by multiple unwanted effects due to activation of the diverse downstream signals controlled by the two receptors. On the other hand, designing selective GPBAR1 and FXR agonists is challenging since the two proteins share similar structural requisites for ligand binding. Here, taking advantage of our knowledge of the two targets, we have identified through a rational drug design study a series of amine lithocholic acid derivatives as selective GPBAR1 agonists. The presence of the 3α-NH2 group on the steroidal scaffold is responsible for the selectivity over FXR unveiling unprecedented structural insights into bile acid receptors activity modulation.

  17. High-resolution crystal structure of an engineered human beta2-adrenergic G protein-coupled receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherezov, Vadim; Rosenbaum, Daniel M; Hanson, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors constitute the largest family of eukaryotic signal transduction proteins that communicate across the membrane. We report the crystal structure of a human beta2-adrenergic receptor-T4 lysozyme fusion protein bound...... to the partial inverse agonist carazolol at 2.4 angstrom resolution. The structure provides a high-resolution view of a human G protein-coupled receptor bound to a diffusible ligand. Ligand-binding site accessibility is enabled by the second extracellular loop, which is held out of the binding cavity by a pair...

  18. Novel Computational Methodologies for Structural Modeling of Spacious Ligand Binding Sites of G-Protein-Coupled Receptors: Development and Application to Human Leukotriene B4 Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Ishino, Yoko; Harada, Takanori

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a novel method to predict the activated structures of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with high accuracy, while aiming for the use of the predicted 3D structures in in silico virtual screening in the future. We propose a new method for modeling GPCR thermal fluctuations, where conformation changes of the proteins are modeled by combining fluctuations on multiple time scales. The core idea of the method is that a molecular dynamics simulation is used to calculate avera...

  19. Structure and Mechanism of Receptor Sharing by the IL-10R2 Common Chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sung-il; Jones, Brandi C.; Logsdon, Naomi J.; Harris, Bethany D.; Deshpande, Ashlesha; Radaeva, Svetlana; Halloran, Brian A.; Gao, Bin; Walter, Mark R. (NIH); (UAB)

    2010-07-19

    IL-10R2 is a shared cell surface receptor required for the activation of five class 2 cytokines (IL-10, IL-22, IL-26, IL-28, and IL-29) that play critical roles in host defense. To define the molecular mechanisms that regulate its promiscuous binding, we have determined the crystal structure of the IL-10R2 ectodomain at 2.14 {angstrom} resolution. IL-10R2 residues required for binding were identified by alanine scanning and used to derive computational models of IL-10/IL-10R1/IL-10R2 and IL-22/IL-22R1/IL-10R2 ternary complexes. The models reveal a conserved binding epitope that is surrounded by two clefts that accommodate the structural and chemical diversity of the cytokines. These results provide a structural framework for interpreting IL-10R2 single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with human disease.

  20. Structural Characterization of the p75 Neurotrophin Receptor: A Stranger in the TNFR Superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, M

    2017-01-01

    Although p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) was the founding member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily (TNFRSF), it is an atypical TNFRSF protein. p75NTR like TNF-R1 and Fas-R contain an extracellular domain with four cysteine-rich domains (CRD) and a death domain (DD) in the intracellular region. While TNFRSF proteins are activated by trimeric TNFSF ligands, p75NTR forms dimers activated by dimeric neurotrophins that are structurally unrelated to TNFSF proteins. In addition, although p75NTR shares with other members the interaction with the TNF receptor-associated factors to activate the NF-κB and cell death pathways, p75NTR does not interact with the DD-containing proteins FADD, TRADD, or MyD88. By contrast, the DD of p75NTR is able to recruit several protein interactors via a full catalog of DD interactions not described before in the TNFRSF. p75-DD forms homotypic symmetrical DD-DD complexes with itself and with the related p45-DD; forms heterotypic DD-CARD interactions with the RIP2-CARD domain, and forms a new interaction between a DD and RhoGDI. All these features, in addition to its promiscuous interactions with several ligands and coreceptors, its processing by α- and γ-secretases, the dimeric nature of its transmembrane domain and its "special" juxtamembrane region, make p75NTR a truly stranger in the TNFR superfamily. In this chapter, I will summarize the known structural aspects of p75NTR and I will analyze from a structural point of view, the similitudes and differences between p75NTR and the other members of the TNFRSF. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A structure-activity analysis of biased agonism at the dopamine D2 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shonberg, Jeremy; Herenbrink, Carmen Klein; López, Laura; Christopoulos, Arthur; Scammells, Peter J; Capuano, Ben; Lane, J Robert

    2013-11-27

    Biased agonism offers an opportunity for the medicinal chemist to discover pathway-selective ligands for GPCRs. A number of studies have suggested that biased agonism at the dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) may be advantageous for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. As such, it is of great importance to gain insight into the SAR of biased agonism at this receptor. We have generated SAR based on a novel D2R partial agonist, tert-butyl (trans-4-(2-(3,4-dihydroisoquinolin-2(1H)-yl)ethyl)cyclohexyl)carbamate (4). This ligand shares structural similarity to cariprazine (2), a drug awaiting FDA approval for the treatment of schizophrenia, yet displays a distinct bias toward two different signaling end points. We synthesized a number of derivatives of 4 with subtle structural modifications, including incorporation of cariprazine fragments. By combining pharmacological profiling with analytical methodology to identify and to quantify bias, we have demonstrated that efficacy and biased agonism can be finely tuned by minor structural modifications to the head group containing the tertiary amine, a tail group that extends away from this moiety, and the orientation and length of a spacer region between these two moieties.

  2. Crystal Structures of Human Orexin 2 Receptor Bound to the Subtype-Selective Antagonist EMPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suno, Ryoji; Kimura, Kanako Terakado; Nakane, Takanori; Yamashita, Keitaro; Wang, Junmei; Fujiwara, Takaaki; Yamanaka, Yasuaki; Im, Dohyun; Horita, Shoichiro; Tsujimoto, Hirokazu; Tawaramoto, Maki S; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Nango, Eriko; Tono, Kensuke; Kameshima, Takashi; Hatsui, Takaki; Joti, Yasumasa; Yabashi, Makina; Shimamoto, Keiko; Yamamoto, Masaki; Rosenbaum, Daniel M; Iwata, So; Shimamura, Tatsuro; Kobayashi, Takuya

    2018-01-02

    Orexin peptides in the brain regulate physiological functions such as the sleep-wake cycle, and are thus drug targets for the treatment of insomnia. Using serial femtosecond crystallography and multi-crystal data collection with a synchrotron light source, we determined structures of human orexin 2 receptor in complex with the subtype-selective antagonist EMPA (N-ethyl-2-[(6-methoxy-pyridin-3-yl)-(toluene-2-sulfonyl)-amino]-N-pyridin-3-ylmethyl-acetamide) at 2.30-Å and 1.96-Å resolution. In comparison with the non-subtype-selective antagonist suvorexant, EMPA contacted fewer residues through hydrogen bonds at the orthosteric site, explaining the faster dissociation rate. Comparisons among these OX 2 R structures in complex with selective antagonists and previously determined OX 1 R/OX 2 R structures bound to non-selective antagonists revealed that the residue at positions 2.61 and 3.33 were critical for the antagonist selectivity in OX 2 R. The importance of these residues for binding selectivity to OX 2 R was also revealed by molecular dynamics simulation. These results should facilitate the development of antagonists for orexin receptors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) maintains pulmonary structure and regulates the response to cigarette smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Lisa; Herr, Christian; Niederstraßer, Julia; Beisswenger, Christoph; Bals, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) is highly expressed in the lung but its physiological functions in this organ is still not completely understood. To determine the contribution of RAGE to physiological functions of the lung, we analyzed pulmonary mechanics and structure of wildtype and RAGE deficient (RAGE-/-) mice. RAGE deficiency spontaneously resulted in a loss of lung structure shown by an increased mean chord length, increased respiratory system compliance, decreased respiratory system elastance and increased concentrations of serum protein albumin in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. Pulmonary expression of RAGE was mainly localized on alveolar epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages. Primary murine alveolar epithelial cells isolated from RAGE-/- mice revealed an altered differentiation and defective barrier formation under in vitro conditions. Stimulation of interferone-y (IFNy)-activated alveolar macrophages deficient for RAGE with Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands resulted in significantly decreased release of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Exposure to chronic cigarette smoke did not affect emphysema-like changes in lung parenchyma in RAGE-/- mice. Acute cigarette smoke exposure revealed a modified inflammatory response in RAGE-/- mice that was characterized by an influx of macrophages and a decreased keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) release. Our data suggest that RAGE regulates the differentiation of alveolar epithelial cells and impacts on the development and maintenance of pulmonary structure. In cigarette smoke-induced lung pathology, RAGE mediates inflammation that contributes to lung damage.

  4. Receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE maintains pulmonary structure and regulates the response to cigarette smoke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Wolf

    Full Text Available The receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE is highly expressed in the lung but its physiological functions in this organ is still not completely understood. To determine the contribution of RAGE to physiological functions of the lung, we analyzed pulmonary mechanics and structure of wildtype and RAGE deficient (RAGE-/- mice. RAGE deficiency spontaneously resulted in a loss of lung structure shown by an increased mean chord length, increased respiratory system compliance, decreased respiratory system elastance and increased concentrations of serum protein albumin in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. Pulmonary expression of RAGE was mainly localized on alveolar epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages. Primary murine alveolar epithelial cells isolated from RAGE-/- mice revealed an altered differentiation and defective barrier formation under in vitro conditions. Stimulation of interferone-y (IFNy-activated alveolar macrophages deficient for RAGE with Toll-like receptor (TLR ligands resulted in significantly decreased release of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Exposure to chronic cigarette smoke did not affect emphysema-like changes in lung parenchyma in RAGE-/- mice. Acute cigarette smoke exposure revealed a modified inflammatory response in RAGE-/- mice that was characterized by an influx of macrophages and a decreased keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC release. Our data suggest that RAGE regulates the differentiation of alveolar epithelial cells and impacts on the development and maintenance of pulmonary structure. In cigarette smoke-induced lung pathology, RAGE mediates inflammation that contributes to lung damage.

  5. Structural Probing and Molecular Modeling of the A3 Adenosine Receptor: A Focus on Agonist Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Ciancetta

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine is an endogenous modulator exerting its functions through the activation of four adenosine receptor (AR subtypes, termed A1, A2A, A2B and A3, which belong to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR superfamily. The human A3AR (hA3AR subtype is implicated in several cytoprotective functions. Therefore, hA3AR modulators, and in particular agonists, are sought for their potential application as anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and cardioprotective agents. Structure-based molecular modeling techniques have been applied over the years to rationalize the structure–activity relationships (SARs of newly emerged A3AR ligands, guide the subsequent lead optimization, and interpret site-directed mutagenesis (SDM data from a molecular perspective. In this review, we showcase selected modeling-based and guided strategies that were applied to elucidate the binding of agonists to the A3AR and discuss the challenges associated with an accurate prediction of the receptor extracellular vestibule through homology modeling from the available X-ray templates.

  6. Structural analysis of the evolution of steroid specificity in the mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ollikainen Noah

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The glucocorticoid receptor (GR and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR evolved from a common ancestor. Still not completely understood is how specificity for glucocorticoids (e.g. cortisol and mineralocorticoids (e.g. aldosterone evolved in these receptors. Results Our analysis of several vertebrate GRs and MRs in the context of 3D structures of human GR and MR indicates that with the exception of skate GR, a cartilaginous fish, there is a deletion in all GRs, at the position corresponding to Ser-949 in human MR. This deletion occurs in a loop before helix 12, which contains the activation function 2 (AF2 domain, which binds coactivator proteins and influences transcriptional activity of steroids. Unexpectedly, we find that His-950 in human MR, which is conserved in the MR in chimpanzee, orangutan and macaque, is glutamine in all teleost and land vertebrate MRs, including New World monkeys and prosimians. Conclusion Evolution of differences in the responses of the GR and MR to corticosteroids involved deletion in the GR of a residue corresponding to Ser-949 in human MR. A mutation corresponding to His-950 in human MR may have been important in physiological changes associated with emergence of Old World monkeys from prosimians.

  7. [Brain dopamine receptors: structure, functional role, and modulation by psychotropic substances].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raevskiĭ, K S

    1997-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular neurobiology led to a new understanding on mammalian brain dopaminergic system which plays a major role in the regulation of motor, cognitive, emotional, neuroendocrine functions as well as in the pathogenesis of several pathological conditions, including neurodegenerative diseases, affective disorders, schizophrenia, drug addiction etc. Functional, biochemical and pharmacological heterogeneity of dopamine receptors, which were divided into D1-like (D1 and D5 subtypes) and D2-like (D2, D3 and D4) families of receptors has been postulated. The article reviews the recent advances including author's own results concerning the structure and function of main dopaminergic brain system, i.e. nigrostriatal and mesolimbic. The problem of autoreceptor regulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission, particularly, the processes of dopamine synthesis, release and metabolism has been specially discussed. An involvement of D2 and D3 dopamine autoreceptors in the control of these processes and differences in the mode of action of typical and atypical neuroleptics demonstrating various affinities to D2 and D3 dopamine receptors are analysed in detail. Dopamine and its metabolites have been determined on freely moving rats using brain microdialysis and high performance liquid chromatography. It is hypothesized that dopamine D3 autoreceptor is preferentially involved in the regulation of dopamine release while D2 one is responsible for the control of dopamine synthesis and metabolism in rat basal ganglia in vivo.

  8. Macrophage Receptor with Collagenous Structure (MARCO Is Processed by either Macropinocytosis or Endocytosis-Autophagy Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seishiro Hirano

    Full Text Available The Macrophage Receptor with COllagenous structure (MARCO protein is a plasma membrane receptor for un-opsonized or environmental particles on phagocytic cells. Here, we show that MARCO was internalized either by ruffling of plasma membrane followed by macropinocytosis or by endocytosis followed by fusion with autophagosome in CHO-K1 cells stably transfected with GFP-MARCO. The macropinocytic process generated large vesicles when the plasma membrane subsided. The endocytosis/autophagosome (amphisome generated small fluorescent puncta which were visible in the presence of glutamine, chloroquine, bafilomycin, ammonia, and other amines. The small puncta, but not the large vesicles, co-localized with LC3B and lysosomes. The LC3-II/LC3-I ratio increased in the presence of glutamine, ammonia, and chloroquine in various cells. The small puncta trafficked between the peri-nuclear region and the distal ends of cells back and forth at rates of up to 2-3 μm/sec; tubulin, but not actin, regulated the trafficking of the small puncta. Besides phagocytosis MARCO, an adhesive plasma membrane receptor, may play a role in incorporation of various extracellular materials into the cell via both macropinocytic and endocytic pathways.

  9. Structure of Human M-type Phospholipase A2 Receptor Revealed by Cryo-Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yue; Cao, Longxing; Tang, Hua; Shi, Xiangyi; He, Yongning

    2017-12-08

    M-type phospholipase A2 receptor (M-PLA2R) is a member of the mannose receptor family and known as the receptor of secretory phospholipase A2s. It has also been identified as the major autoantigen of idiopathic membranous nephropathy, one of the most common causes for nephrotic syndrome in adults. Here we determine the structure of human M-PLA2R ectodomain by cryo-electron microscopy. The results show that the ectodomain has high internal flexibility and forms a compact dual-ring-shaped conformation at acidic pH and adopts extended conformations at basic pH. The inter-domain interactions of human M-PLA2R are explored by the binding studies with individual domains, showing the mechanism of the conformational change. In addition, the biochemical data suggest that mouse M-PLA2R recognizes mouse secretory phospholipase A2-G1B only at physiological or basic pH, rather than at acidic pH. These results suggest that the pH-dependent conformational change might play important roles in the functional activities of M-PLA2R such as ligand binding and release, and may also be relevant to the immunogenicity in membranous nephropathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Structural Insights into the Abscisic Acid Stereospecificity by the ABA Receptors PYR/PYL/RCAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoqiang; Yu, Lin; Zhang, Qi; Xin, Qi; Wu, Wei; Gong, Zhizhong; Chen, Zhongzhou

    2013-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid ((+)-ABA) plays a key role in many processes. The biological and biochemical activities of unnatural (−)-ABA have been extensively investigated since 1960s. However, the recognition mechanism by which only a few members among PYR/PYL/RCAR (PYLs) family can bind (−)-ABA remains largely unknown. Here we systematically characterized the affinity of PYLs binding to the (−)-ABA and reported the crystal structures of apo-PYL5, PYL3-(−)-ABA and PYL9-(+)-ABA. PYL5 showed the strongest binding affinity with (−)-ABA among all the PYLs. PYL9 is a stringently exclusive (+)-ABA receptor with interchangeable disulfide bonds shared by a subclass of PYLs. PYL3 is a dual receptor to both ABA enantiomers. The binding orientation and pocket of (−)-ABA in PYLs are obviously different from those of (+)-ABA. Steric hindrance and hydrophobic interaction are the two key factors in determining the stereospecificity of PYLs binding to (−)-ABA, which is further confirmed by gain-of-function and loss-of-function mutagenesis. Our results provide novel insights of the bioactivity of ABA enantiomers onto PYLs, and shed light on designing the selective ABA receptors agonists. PMID:23844015

  11. Structure-Activity Relationships in Human Toll-like Receptor 7-Active Imidazoquinoline Analogues

    OpenAIRE

    Shukla, Nikunj M.; Malladi, Subbalakshmi S.; Mutz, Cole A.; Balakrishna, Rajalakshmi; David, Sunil A.

    2010-01-01

    Engagement of toll-like receptors serve to link innate immune responses with adaptive immunity and can be exploited as powerful vaccine adjuvants for eliciting both primary and anamnestic immune responses. TLR7 agonists are highly immunostimulatory without inducing dominant proinflammatory cytokine responses. A structure-activity study was conducted on the TLR7-agonistic imidazoquinolines, starting with 1-(4-amino-2-((ethylamino)methyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-c]quinolin-1-yl)-2-methylpropan-2-ol as a...

  12. Identification of ionotrophic purinergic receptors in Huh-7 cells and their response towards structural proteins of HCV genotype 3a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Kaneez

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hepatitis C virus (HCV is a major health problem in developing countries including Pakistan. Chronic HCV infection results in progressive liver disease including fibrosis, cirrhosis, insulin resistance and eventually hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Ionotrophic purinergic (P2X receptors are identified to involve in a spectrum of physiological and pathophysiological processes. However, the role of P2X receptors in HCV liver associated diseases still remains to be investigated. The current study was designed to identify the presence of P2X receptors in human liver cells. Furthermore, it investigates the response of P2X receptors towards HCV structural proteins (E1E2. To determine that how many isoforms of P2X receptors are expressed in human liver cells, human hepatoma cell line (Huh-7 was used. Transcripts (mRNA of five different isoforms of P2X receptors were identified in Huh-7 cells. To examine the gene expression of identified isoforms of P2X receptors in presence of HCV structural proteins E1E2, Huh-7/E1E2 cell line (stably expressing HCV structural proteins E1E2 was used. The results showed significant increase (6.2 fold in gene expression of P2X4 receptors in Huh-7/E1E2 cells as compared to control Huh-7 cells. The findings of present study confirmed the presence of transcripts of five different isoforms of P2X receptors in human liver cells and suggest that P2X4 receptors could be represented an important component of the purinergic signaling complex in HCV induced liver pathogenesis.

  13. Structure of unliganded HSV gD reveals a mechanism for receptor-mediated activation of virus entry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krummenacher, Claude; Supekar, Vinit M.; Whitbeck, J. Charles; Lazear, Eric; Connolly, Sarah A.; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.; Cohen, Gary H.; Wiley, Don C.; Carfi, Andrea (UPENN); (IRBM); (CHLMM)

    2010-07-19

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) entry into cells requires binding of the envelope glycoprotein D (gD) to one of several cell surface receptors. The 50 C-terminal residues of the gD ectodomain are essential for virus entry, but not for receptor binding. We have determined the structure of an unliganded gD molecule that includes these C-terminal residues. The structure reveals that the C-terminus is anchored near the N-terminal region and masks receptor-binding sites. Locking the C-terminus in the position observed in the crystals by an intramolecular disulfide bond abolished receptor binding and virus entry, demonstrating that this region of gD moves upon receptor binding. Similarly, a point mutant that would destabilize the C-terminus structure was nonfunctional for entry, despite increased affinity for receptors. We propose that a controlled displacement of the gD C-terminus upon receptor binding is an essential feature of HSV entry, ensuring the timely activation of membrane fusion.

  14. Structure-function relationships of curaremimetic neurotoxin loop 2 and of a structurally similar segment of rabies virus glycoprotein in their interaction with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lentz, T.L. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States))

    1991-11-12

    Peptides corresponding to portions of curaremimetic neurotoxin loop 2 and to a structurally similar segment of rabies virus glycoprotein were synthetically modified in order to gain information on structure-function relationships of neurotoxin loop 2 interactions with the acetylcholine receptor. Binding of synthetic peptides to the acetylcholine receptor of Torpedo electric organ membranes was assessed by measuring their ability to inhibit the binding of {sup 125}I-{alpha}-bungarotoxin to the receptor. The peptides showing the highest affinity for the receptor were a peptide corresponding to the sequence of loop 2 (residues 25-44) of Ophiophagus hannah (king cobra) toxin b and the structurally similar segment of CVS rabies virus glycoprotein. These affinities were comparable to those of d-tubocurarine and suberyldicholine. These results demonstrate the importance of loop 2 in the neurotoxin interaction with the receptor. N- and C-terminal deletions of the loop 2 peptides and substitution of residues invariant or highly conserved among neurotoxins were performed in order to determine the role of individual residues in binding. Residues 25-40 are the most crucial in the interaction with the acetylcholine receptor. Since this region of the glycoprotein contains residues corresponding to all of the functionally invariant neurotoxin residues, it may interact with the acetylcholine receptor through a mechanism similar to that of the neurotoxins.

  15. Structure and Dynamics of the Liver Receptor Homolog 1-PGC1α Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Suzanne G; Okafor, C Denise; Tuntland, Micheal L; Whitby, Richard J; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Stec, Józef; Griffin, Patrick R; Ortlund, Eric A

    2017-07-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated gamma coactivator 1-α (PGC1α) regulates energy metabolism by directly interacting with transcription factors to modulate gene expression. Among the PGC1α binding partners is liver receptor homolog 1 (LRH-1; NR5A2), an orphan nuclear hormone receptor that controls lipid and glucose homeostasis. Although PGC1α is known to bind and activate LRH-1, mechanisms through which PGC1α changes LRH-1 conformation to drive transcription are unknown. Here, we used biochemical and structural methods to interrogate the LRH-1-PGC1α complex. Purified, full-length LRH-1, as well as isolated ligand binding domain, bound to PGC1α with higher affinity than to the coactivator, nuclear receptor coactivator-2 (Tif2), in coregulator peptide recruitment assays. We present the first crystal structure of the LRH-1-PGC1α complex, which depicts several hydrophobic contacts and a strong charge clamp at the interface between these partners. In molecular dynamics simulations, PGC1α induced correlated atomic motion throughout the entire LRH-1 activation function surface, which was dependent on charge-clamp formation. In contrast, Tif2 induced weaker signaling at the activation function surface than PGC1α but promoted allosteric signaling from the helix 6/β-sheet region of LRH-1 to the activation function surface. These studies are the first to probe mechanisms underlying the LRH-1-PGC1α interaction and may illuminate strategies for selective therapeutic targeting of PGC1α-dependent LRH-1 signaling pathways. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  16. Reconstitution of homomeric GluA2(flop) receptors in supported lipid membranes: functional and structural properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranovic, Jelena; Ramanujan, Chandra S; Kasai, Nahoko; Midgett, Charles R; Madden, Dean R; Torimitsu, Keiichi; Ryan, John F

    2013-03-22

    AMPA receptors (AMPARs) are glutamate-gated ion channels ubiquitous in the vertebrate central nervous system, where they mediate fast excitatory neurotransmission and act as molecular determinants of memory formation and learning. Together with detailed analyses of individual AMPAR domains, structural studies of full-length AMPARs by electron microscopy and x-ray crystallography have provided important insights into channel assembly and function. However, the correlation between the structure and functional states of the channel remains ambiguous particularly because these functional states can be assessed only with the receptor bound within an intact lipid bilayer. To provide a basis for investigating AMPAR structure in a membrane environment, we developed an optimized reconstitution protocol using a receptor whose structure has previously been characterized by electron microscopy. Single-channel recordings of reconstituted homomeric GluA2(flop) receptors recapitulate key electrophysiological parameters of the channels expressed in native cellular membranes. Atomic force microscopy studies of the reconstituted samples provide high-resolution images of membrane-embedded full-length AMPARs at densities comparable to those in postsynaptic membranes. The data demonstrate the effect of protein density on conformational flexibility and dimensions of the receptors and provide the first structural characterization of functional membrane-embedded AMPARs, thus laying the foundation for correlated structure-function analyses of the predominant mediators of excitatory synaptic signals in the brain.

  17. Structure and Dimerization Properties of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor PAS-A Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dalei; Potluri, Nalini; Kim, Youngchang

    2013-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that binds to xenobiotics and responds by regulating the expression of gene programs required for detoxification and metabolism. AHR and its heterodimerization partner aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) belong to the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)–PER-ARNT-SIM (PAS) family of transcription factors. Here we report the 2.55-Å-resolution crystal structure of the mouse AHR PAS-A domain, which represents the first AHR-derived protein structure. The AHR PAS-A domain forms a helix-swapped homodimer in the crystal and also in solution. Through a detailed mutational analysis of all interface residues, we identified several hydrophobic residues that are important for AHR dimerization and function. Our crystallographic visualization of AHR PAS-A dimerization leads us to propose a mode of heterodimerization with ARNT that is supported by both biochemical and cell-based data. Our studies also highlight the residues of other mammalian bHLH-PAS proteins that are likely involved in their homo- or heterodimerization. PMID:24001774

  18. Structural basis for subtype-specific inhibition of the P2X7 receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasawa, Akira; Kawate, Toshimitsu (Cornell)

    2016-12-09

    The P2X7 receptor is a non-selective cation channel activated by extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Chronic activation of P2X7 underlies many health problems such as pathologic pain, yet we lack effective antagonists due to poorly understood mechanisms of inhibition. Here we present crystal structures of a mammalian P2X7 receptor complexed with five structurally-unrelated antagonists. Unexpectedly, these drugs all bind to an allosteric site distinct from the ATP-binding pocket in a groove formed between two neighboring subunits. This novel drug-binding pocket accommodates a diversity of small molecules mainly through hydrophobic interactions. Functional assays propose that these compounds allosterically prevent narrowing of the drug-binding pocket and the turret-like architecture during channel opening, which is consistent with a site of action distal to the ATP-binding pocket. These novel mechanistic insights will facilitate the development of P2X7-specific drugs for treating human diseases.

  19. Loss of Insulin Receptor in Osteoprogenitor Cells Impairs Structural Strength of Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Thrailkill

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D is associated with decreased bone mineral density, a deficit in bone structure, and subsequently an increased risk of fragility fracture. These clinical observations, paralleled by animal models of T1D, suggest that the insulinopenia of T1D has a deleterious effect on bone. To further examine the action of insulin signaling on bone development, we generated mice with an osteoprogenitor-selective (osterix-Cre ablation of the insulin receptor (IR, designated OIRKO. OIRKO mice exhibited an 80% decrease in IR in osteoblasts. Prenatal elimination of IR did not affect fetal survival or gross morphology. However, loss of IR in mouse osteoblasts resulted in a postnatal growth-constricted phenotype. By 10–12 weeks of age, femurs of OIRKO mice were more slender, with a thinner diaphyseal cortex and, consequently, a decrease in whole bone strength when subjected to bending. In male mice alone, decreased metaphyseal trabecular bone, with thinner and more rodlike trabeculae, was also observed. OIRKO mice did not, however, exhibit abnormal glucose tolerance. The skeletal phenotype of the OIRKO mouse appeared more severe than that of previously reported bone-specific IR knockdown models, and confirms that insulin receptor expression in osteoblasts is critically important for proper bone development and maintenance of structural integrity.

  20. The structure and organization of the human follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gromoll, J; Pekel, E.; Nieschlag, E. [Institute of Reproductive Medicine of the Univ., Muenster (Germany)

    1996-07-15

    The structure and organization of the human follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene were determined by either screening a phage library of human genomic DNA or applying the long PCR technique to amplify different exon pairs with their corresponding introns. The FSHR gene spans a region of 54 kb and consists of 10 exons and 9 introns. Most of the extracellular domain is encoded by 9 exons, ranging in length between 69 and 251 bp; the C-terminal part of the extracellular domain, the transmembrane domain, and the intracellular domain are encoded by the large exon 10 (1234 bp). Overall the gene encodes 695 amino acids. The structure of the human FSHR displays a striking similarity to that of the previously characterized rat FSHR gene, with a high degree of conservation in exon sizes and exon/intron junctions. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  1. Improvement in Aqueous Solubility of Retinoic Acid Receptor (RAR) Agonists by Bending the Molecular Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Michiaki; Ichikawa, Yuki; Tomoshige, Shusuke; Makishima, Makoto; Muranaka, Atsuya; Uchiyama, Masanobu; Yamaguchi, Takao; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Ishikawa, Minoru

    2016-08-05

    Aqueous solubility is a key requirement for many functional molecules, e. g., drug candidates. Decrease of the partition coefficient (log P) by chemical modification, i.e., introduction of hydrophilic group(s) into molecules, is a classical strategy for improving aqueous solubility. We have been investigating alternative strategies for improving the aqueous solubility of pharmaceutical compounds by disrupting intermolecular interactions. Here, we show that introducing a bend into the molecular structure of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) agonists by changing the substitution pattern from para to meta or ortho dramatically enhances aqueous solubility by up to 890-fold. We found that meta analogs exhibit similar hydrophobicity to the parent para compound, and have lower melting points, supporting the idea that the increase of aqueous solubility was due to decreased intermolecular interactions in the solid state as a result of the structural changes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Structure and interactions of the human programmed cell death 1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaoxiao; Veverka, Vaclav; Radhakrishnan, Anand; Waters, Lorna C; Muskett, Frederick W; Morgan, Sara H; Huo, Jiandong; Yu, Chao; Evans, Edward J; Leslie, Alasdair J; Griffiths, Meryn; Stubberfield, Colin; Griffin, Robert; Henry, Alistair J; Jansson, Andreas; Ladbury, John E; Ikemizu, Shinji; Carr, Mark D; Davis, Simon J

    2013-04-26

    PD-1, a receptor expressed by T cells, B cells, and monocytes, is a potent regulator of immune responses and a promising therapeutic target. The structure and interactions of human PD-1 are, however, incompletely characterized. We present the solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based structure of the human PD-1 extracellular region and detailed analyses of its interactions with its ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2. PD-1 has typical immunoglobulin superfamily topology but differs at the edge of the GFCC' sheet, which is flexible and completely lacks a C" strand. Changes in PD-1 backbone NMR signals induced by ligand binding suggest that, whereas binding is centered on the GFCC' sheet, PD-1 is engaged by its two ligands differently and in ways incompletely explained by crystal structures of mouse PD-1 · ligand complexes. The affinities of these interactions and that of PD-L1 with the costimulatory protein B7-1, measured using surface plasmon resonance, are significantly weaker than expected. The 3-4-fold greater affinity of PD-L2 versus PD-L1 for human PD-1 is principally due to the 3-fold smaller dissociation rate for PD-L2 binding. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that the PD-1/PD-L1 interaction is entropically driven, whereas PD-1/PD-L2 binding has a large enthalpic component. Mathematical simulations based on the biophysical data and quantitative expression data suggest an unexpectedly limited contribution of PD-L2 to PD-1 ligation during interactions of activated T cells with antigen-presenting cells. These findings provide a rigorous structural and biophysical framework for interpreting the important functions of PD-1 and reveal that potent inhibitory signaling can be initiated by weakly interacting receptors.

  3. Role of Structural Dynamics at the Receptor G Protein Interface for Signal Transduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander S Rose

    Full Text Available GPCRs catalyze GDP/GTP exchange in the α-subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins (Gαßγ through displacement of the Gα C-terminal α5 helix, which directly connects the interface of the active receptor (R* to the nucleotide binding pocket of G. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and kinetic analysis of R* catalysed G protein activation have suggested that displacement of α5 starts from an intermediate GDP bound complex (R*•GGDP. To elucidate the structural basis of receptor-catalysed displacement of α5, we modelled the structure of R*•GGDP. A flexible docking protocol yielded an intermediate R*•GGDP complex, with a similar overall arrangement as in the X-ray structure of the nucleotide free complex (R*•Gempty, however with the α5 C-terminus (GαCT forming different polar contacts with R*. Starting molecular dynamics simulations of GαCT bound to R* in the intermediate position, we observe a screw-like motion, which restores the specific interactions of α5 with R* in R*•Gempty. The observed rotation of α5 by 60° is in line with experimental data. Reformation of hydrogen bonds, water expulsion and formation of hydrophobic interactions are driving forces of the α5 displacement. We conclude that the identified interactions between R* and G protein define a structural framework in which the α5 displacement promotes direct transmission of the signal from R* to the GDP binding pocket.

  4. Serotonin 5-HT7 receptor agents: structure-activity relationships and potential therapeutic applications in central nervous system disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopoldo, Marcello; Lacivita, Enza; Berardi, Francesco; Perrone, Roberto; Hedlund, Peter B.

    2010-01-01

    Since its discovery in the 1940s in serum, the mammalian intestinal mucosa, and in the central nervous system, serotonin (5-HT) has been shown to be involved in virtually all cognitive and behavioral human functions, and alterations in its neurochemistry have been implicated in the etiology of a plethora of neuropsychiatric disorders. The cloning of 5-HT receptor subtypes has been of importance in enabling them to be classified as specific protein molecules encoded by specific genes. The 5-HT7 receptor is the most recently classified member of the serotonin receptor family. Since its identification, it has been the subject of intense research efforts driven by its presence in functionally relevant regions of the brain. The availability of some selective antagonists and agonists, in combination with genetically modified mice lacking the 5-HT7 receptor, has allowed for a better understanding of the pathophysiological role of this receptor. This paper reviews data on localization and pharmacological properties of the 5-HT7 receptor, and summarizes the results of structure-activity relationship studies aimed at the discovery of selective 5-HT7 receptor ligands. Additionally, an overview of the potential therapeutic applications of 5-HT7 receptor agonists and antagonists in central nervous system disorders is presented. PMID:20923682

  5. Insulin/receptor binding: the last piece of the puzzle? What recent progress on the structure of the insulin/receptor complex tells us (or not) about negative cooperativity and activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meyts, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Progress in solving the structure of insulin bound to its receptor has been slow and stepwise, but a milestone has now been reached with a refined structure of a complex of insulin with a "microreceptor" that contains the primary binding site. The insulin receptor is a dimeric allosteric enzyme that belongs to the family of receptor tyrosine kinases. The insulin binding process is complex and exhibits negative cooperativity. Biochemical evidence suggested that insulin, through two distinct binding sites, crosslinks two receptor sites located on each α subunit. The structure of the unliganded receptor ectodomain showed a symmetrical folded-over conformation with an antiparallel disposition. Further work resolved the detailed structure of receptor site 1, both without and with insulin. Recently, a missing piece in the puzzle was added: the C-terminal portion of insulin's B-chain known to be critical for binding and negative cooperativity. Here I discuss these findings and their implications. © 2015 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Conserved waters mediate structural and functional activation of family A (rhodopsin-like) G protein-coupled receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angel, T.; Chance, M; Palczewski, K

    2009-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors with seven transmembrane {alpha}-helices (GPCRs) comprise the largest receptor superfamily and are involved in detecting a wide variety of extracellular stimuli. The availability of high-resolution crystal structures of five prototypical GPCRs, bovine and squid rhodopsin, engineered A2A-adenosine, {beta}1- and {beta}2-adrenergic receptors, permits comparative analysis of features common to these and likely all GPCRs. We provide an analysis of the distribution of water molecules in the transmembrane region of these GPCR structures and find conserved contacts with microdomains demonstrated to be involved in receptor activation. Colocalization of water molecules associating with highly conserved and functionally important residues in several of these GPCR crystal structures supports the notion that these waters are likely to be as important to proper receptor function as the conserved residues. Moreover, in the absence of large conformational changes in rhodopsin after photoactivation, we propose that ordered waters contribute to the functional plasticity needed to transmit activation signals from the retinal-binding pocket to the cytoplasmic face of rhodopsin and that fundamental features of the mechanism of activation, involving these conserved waters, are shared by many if not all family A receptors.

  7. Crystal Structure of the Frizzled-Like Cysteine-Rich Domain of the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase MuSK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stiegler, A.; Burden, S; Hubbard, S

    2009-01-01

    Muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) is an essential receptor tyrosine kinase for the establishment and maintenance of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Activation of MuSK by agrin, a neuronally derived heparan-sulfate proteoglycan, and LRP4 (low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-4), the agrin receptor, leads to clustering of acetylcholine receptors on the postsynaptic side of the NMJ. The ectodomain of MuSK comprises three immunoglobulin-like domains and a cysteine-rich domain (Fz-CRD) related to those in Frizzled proteins, the receptors for Wnts. Here, we report the crystal structure of the MuSK Fz-CRD at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution. The structure reveals a five-disulfide-bridged domain similar to CRDs of Frizzled proteins but with a divergent C-terminal region. An asymmetric dimer present in the crystal structure implicates surface hydrophobic residues that may function in homotypic or heterotypic interactions to mediate co-clustering of MuSK, rapsyn, and acetylcholine receptors at the NMJ.

  8. NMDA Receptors Regulate the Structural Plasticity of Spines and Axonal Boutons in Hippocampal Interneurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Perez-Rando

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs are present in both pyramidal neurons and interneurons of the hippocampus. These receptors play an important role in the adult structural plasticity of excitatory neurons, but their impact on the remodeling of interneurons is unknown. Among hippocampal interneurons, somatostatin-expressing cells located in the stratum oriens are of special interest because of their functional importance and structural characteristics: they display dendritic spines, which change density in response to different stimuli. In order to understand the role of NMDARs on the structural plasticity of these interneurons, we have injected acutely MK-801, an NMDAR antagonist, to adult mice which constitutively express enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP in these cells. We have behaviorally tested the animals, confirming effects of the drug on locomotion and anxiety-related behaviors. NMDARs were expressed in the somata and dendritic spines of somatostatin-expressing interneurons. Twenty-four hours after the injection, the density of spines did not vary, but we found a significant increase in the density of their en passant boutons (EPB. We have also used entorhino-hippocampal organotypic cultures to study these interneurons in real-time. There was a rapid decrease in the apparition rate of spines after MK-801 administration, which persisted for 24 h and returned to basal levels afterwards. A similar reversible decrease was detected in spine density. Our results show that both spines and axons of interneurons can undergo remodeling and highlight NMDARs as regulators of this plasticity. These results are specially relevant given the importance of all these players on hippocampal physiology and the etiopathology of certain psychiatric disorders.

  9. Structural insights into the interaction between the Cripto CFC domain and the ALK4 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvanese, Luisa; Saporito, Angela; Oliva, Romina; D' Auria, Gabriella; Pedone, Carlo; Paolillo, Livio; Ruvo, Menotti; Marasco, Daniela; Falcigno, Lucia

    2009-03-01

    The protein Cripto is the founding member of the extra-cellular EGF-CFC growth factors, which are composed of two adjacent cysteine-rich domains: the EGF-like and the CFC. Members of the EGF-CFC family play key roles in embryonic development and are also implicated in tumourigenesis. Cripto is highly over-expressed in many tumours, while it is poorly detectable in normal tissues. Although both Cripto domains are involved in its tumourigenic activity, the CFC domain appears to play a crucial role. Indeed, through this domain, Cripto interferes with the onco-suppressive activity of Activins, either by blocking the Activin receptor ALK4 or by antagonising proteins of the TGF-beta family. We have undertaken the chemical synthesis and the structural characterisation of human CFC Cripto domain. Using a combined NMR and computational approach, supported by binding studies by SPR, we have investigated the molecular basis of the interaction between h-CFC and ALK4. Binding studies indicate that the synthetic h-CFC interacts with the ALK4 receptor with a K(D) in micro M range, whereas it does not recognise the ActRIIB receptor. The NMR study shows that the h-CFC overall topology is determined by the presence of three disulfide bridges and that residues H120 and W124 are located between the first strand and the first loop with the side chains externally exposed. A model of the CFC-ALK4 complex has also been obtained by molecular docking and shows that all residues indicated by prior mutagenesis studies can contribute to the ALK4-CFC interaction at the protein-protein interface.

  10. Ligand and structure-based methodologies for the prediction of the activity of G protein-coupled receptor ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanzi, Stefano; Tikhonova, Irina G.; Harden, T. Kendall; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2009-11-01

    Accurate in silico models for the quantitative prediction of the activity of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligands would greatly facilitate the process of drug discovery and development. Several methodologies have been developed based on the properties of the ligands, the direct study of the receptor-ligand interactions, or a combination of both approaches. Ligand-based three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships (3D-QSAR) techniques, not requiring knowledge of the receptor structure, have been historically the first to be applied to the prediction of the activity of GPCR ligands. They are generally endowed with robustness and good ranking ability; however they are highly dependent on training sets. Structure-based techniques generally do not provide the level of accuracy necessary to yield meaningful rankings when applied to GPCR homology models. However, they are essentially independent from training sets and have a sufficient level of accuracy to allow an effective discrimination between binders and nonbinders, thus qualifying as viable lead discovery tools. The combination of ligand and structure-based methodologies in the form of receptor-based 3D-QSAR and ligand and structure-based consensus models results in robust and accurate quantitative predictions. The contribution of the structure-based component to these combined approaches is expected to become more substantial and effective in the future, as more sophisticated scoring functions are developed and more detailed structural information on GPCRs is gathered.

  11. Ligand and structure-based methodologies for the prediction of the activity of G protein-coupled receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanzi, Stefano; Tikhonova, Irina G; Harden, T Kendall; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2009-11-01

    Accurate in silico models for the quantitative prediction of the activity of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligands would greatly facilitate the process of drug discovery and development. Several methodologies have been developed based on the properties of the ligands, the direct study of the receptor-ligand interactions, or a combination of both approaches. Ligand-based three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships (3D-QSAR) techniques, not requiring knowledge of the receptor structure, have been historically the first to be applied to the prediction of the activity of GPCR ligands. They are generally endowed with robustness and good ranking ability; however they are highly dependent on training sets. Structure-based techniques generally do not provide the level of accuracy necessary to yield meaningful rankings when applied to GPCR homology models. However, they are essentially independent from training sets and have a sufficient level of accuracy to allow an effective discrimination between binders and nonbinders, thus qualifying as viable lead discovery tools. The combination of ligand and structure-based methodologies in the form of receptor-based 3D-QSAR and ligand and structure-based consensus models results in robust and accurate quantitative predictions. The contribution of the structure-based component to these combined approaches is expected to become more substantial and effective in the future, as more sophisticated scoring functions are developed and more detailed structural information on GPCRs is gathered.

  12. Structure-activity relationships for the antifungal activity of selective estrogen receptor antagonists related to tamoxifen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arielle Butts

    Full Text Available Cryptococcosis is one of the most important invasive fungal infections and is a significant contributor to the mortality associated with HIV/AIDS. As part of our program to repurpose molecules related to the selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM tamoxifen as anti-cryptococcal agents, we have explored the structure-activity relationships of a set of structurally diverse SERMs and tamoxifen derivatives. Our data provide the first insights into the structural requirements for the antifungal activity of this scaffold. Three key molecular characteristics affecting anti-cryptococcal activity emerged from our studies: 1 the presence of an alkylamino group tethered to one of the aromatic rings of the triphenylethylene core; 2 an appropriately sized aliphatic substituent at the 2 position of the ethylene moiety; and 3 electronegative substituents on the aromatic rings modestly improved activity. Using a cell-based assay of calmodulin antagonism, we found that the anti-cryptococcal activity of the scaffold correlates with calmodulin inhibition. Finally, we developed a homology model of C. neoformans calmodulin and used it to rationalize the structural basis for the activity of these molecules. Taken together, these data and models provide a basis for the further optimization of this promising anti-cryptococcal scaffold.

  13. Structural insights into human peroxisome proliferator activated receptor delta (PPAR-delta selective ligand binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda A H Batista

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs δ, α and γ are closely related transcription factors that exert distinct effects on fatty acid and glucose metabolism, cardiac disease, inflammatory response and other processes. Several groups developed PPAR subtype specific modulators to trigger desirable effects of particular PPARs without harmful side effects associated with activation of other subtypes. Presently, however, many compounds that bind to one of the PPARs cross-react with others and rational strategies to obtain highly selective PPAR modulators are far from clear. GW0742 is a synthetic ligand that binds PPARδ more than 300-fold more tightly than PPARα or PPARγ but the structural basis of PPARδ:GW0742 interactions and reasons for strong selectivity are not clear. Here we report the crystal structure of the PPARδ:GW0742 complex. Comparisons of the PPARδ:GW0742 complex with published structures of PPARs in complex with α and γ selective agonists and pan agonists suggests that two residues (Val312 and Ile328 in the buried hormone binding pocket play special roles in PPARδ selective binding and experimental and computational analysis of effects of mutations in these residues confirms this and suggests that bulky substituents that line the PPARα and γ ligand binding pockets as structural barriers for GW0742 binding. This analysis suggests general strategies for selective PPARδ ligand design.

  14. Novel computational methodologies for structural modeling of spacious ligand binding sites of G-protein-coupled receptors: development and application to human leukotriene B4 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishino, Yoko; Harada, Takanori

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a novel method to predict the activated structures of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with high accuracy, while aiming for the use of the predicted 3D structures in in silico virtual screening in the future. We propose a new method for modeling GPCR thermal fluctuations, where conformation changes of the proteins are modeled by combining fluctuations on multiple time scales. The core idea of the method is that a molecular dynamics simulation is used to calculate average 3D coordinates of all atoms of a GPCR protein against heat fluctuation on the picosecond or nanosecond time scale, and then evolutionary computation including receptor-ligand docking simulations functions to determine the rotation angle of each helix of a GPCR protein as a movement on a longer time scale. The method was validated using human leukotriene B4 receptor BLT1 as a sample GPCR. Our study demonstrated that the proposed method was able to derive the appropriate 3D structure of the active-state GPCR which docks with its agonists.

  15. Novel Computational Methodologies for Structural Modeling of Spacious Ligand Binding Sites of G-Protein-Coupled Receptors: Development and Application to Human Leukotriene B4 Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Ishino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a novel method to predict the activated structures of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs with high accuracy, while aiming for the use of the predicted 3D structures in in silico virtual screening in the future. We propose a new method for modeling GPCR thermal fluctuations, where conformation changes of the proteins are modeled by combining fluctuations on multiple time scales. The core idea of the method is that a molecular dynamics simulation is used to calculate average 3D coordinates of all atoms of a GPCR protein against heat fluctuation on the picosecond or nanosecond time scale, and then evolutionary computation including receptor-ligand docking simulations functions to determine the rotation angle of each helix of a GPCR protein as a movement on a longer time scale. The method was validated using human leukotriene B4 receptor BLT1 as a sample GPCR. Our study demonstrated that the proposed method was able to derive the appropriate 3D structure of the active-state GPCR which docks with its agonists.

  16. Loss of progesterone receptor-mediated actions induce preterm cellular and structural remodeling of the cervix and premature birth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M Yellon

    Full Text Available A decline in serum progesterone or antagonism of progesterone receptor function results in preterm labor and birth. Whether characteristics of premature remodeling of the cervix after antiprogestins or ovariectomy are similar to that at term was the focus of the present study. Groups of pregnant rats were treated with vehicle, a progesterone receptor antagonist (onapristone or mifepristone, or ovariectomized on day 17 postbreeding. As expected, controls given vehicle delivered at term while rats delivered preterm after progesterone receptor antagonist treatment or ovariectomy. Similar to the cervix before term, the preterm cervix of progesterone receptor antagonist-treated rats was characterized by reduced cell nuclei density, decreased collagen content and structure, as well as a greater presence of macrophages per unit area. Thus, loss of nuclear progesterone receptor-mediated actions promoted structural remodeling of the cervix, increased census of resident macrophages, and preterm birth much like that found in the cervix at term. In contrast to the progesterone receptor antagonist-induced advance in characteristics associated with remodeling, ovariectomy-induced loss of systemic progesterone did not affect hypertrophy, extracellular collagen, or macrophage numbers in the cervix. Thus, the structure and macrophage census in the cervix appear sufficient for premature ripening and birth to occur well before term. With progesterone receptors predominantly localized on cells other than macrophages, the findings suggest that interactions between cells may facilitate the loss of progesterone receptor-mediated actions as part of a final common mechanism that remodels the cervix in certain etiologies of preterm and with parturition at term.

  17. Molecular cloning of a novel, putative G protein-coupled receptor from sea anemones structurally related to members of the FSH, TSH, LH/CG receptor family from mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nothacker, H P; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1993-01-01

    hormone (FSH, TSH, LH/CG) receptor family from mammals, including a very large, extracellular N terminus (18-25% sequence identity) and a 7 transmembrane region (44-48% sequence identity). As with the mammalian glycoprotein hormone receptor genes, the sea anemone receptor gene yields transcripts which can...... be alternatively spliced, thereby yielding a shortened receptor variant only containing the large extracellular (soluble) N terminus. All this is strong evidence that the putative glycoprotein hormone receptor from sea anemones is evolutionarily related to those from mammals. This is the first report showing......Using oligonucleotide probes derived from consensus sequences of known vertebrate and invertebrate G protein-coupled receptors, we have cloned the cDNA for a presumed G protein-coupled receptor from sea anemones. This receptor shows a striking structural homology with members of the glycoprotein...

  18. Crystal structure of a multi-domain human smoothened receptor in complex with a super stabilizing ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianjun; Zhao, Fei; Wu, Yiran; Yang, Jun; Han, Gye Won; Zhao, Suwen; Ishchenko, Andrii; Ye, Lintao; Lin, Xi; Ding, Kang; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Griffin, Patrick R.; Gati, Cornelius; Nelson, Garrett; Hunter, Mark S.; Hanson, Michael A.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C.; Tan, Wenfu; Tao, Houchao; Xu, Fei

    2017-05-01

    The Smoothened receptor (SMO) belongs to the Class Frizzled of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily, constituting a key component of the Hedgehog signalling pathway. Here we report the crystal structure of the multi-domain human SMO, bound and stabilized by a designed tool ligand TC114, using an X-ray free-electron laser source at 2.9 Å. The structure reveals a precise arrangement of three distinct domains: a seven-transmembrane helices domain (TMD), a hinge domain (HD) and an intact extracellular cysteine-rich domain (CRD). This architecture enables allosteric interactions between the domains that are important for ligand recognition and receptor activation. By combining the structural data, molecular dynamics simulation, and hydrogen-deuterium-exchange analysis, we demonstrate that transmembrane helix VI, extracellular loop 3 and the HD play a central role in transmitting the signal employing a unique GPCR activation mechanism, distinct from other multi-domain GPCRs.

  19. Structure-Based Prediction of Subtype Selectivity of Histamine H3 Receptor Selective Antagonists in Clinical Trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Soo-Kyung; Fristrup, Peter; Abrol, Ravinder

    2011-01-01

    applications, including treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), epilepsy, and obesity.(1) However, many of these drug candidates cause undesired side effects through the cross-reactivity with other histamine receptor subtypes. In order to develop improved selectivity......Histamine receptors (HRs) are excellent drug targets for the treatment of diseases, such as schizophrenia, psychosis, depression, migraine, allergies, asthma, ulcers, and hypertension. Among them, the human H3 histamine receptor (hH3HR) antagonists have been proposed for specific therapeutic...... and activity for such treatments, it would be useful to have the three-dimensional structures for all four HRs. We report here the predicted structures of four HR subtypes (H1, H2, H3, and H4) using the GEnSeMBLE (GPCR ensemble of structures in membrane bilayer environment) Monte Carlo protocol,(2) sampling...

  20. Grid inhomogeneous solvation theory: Hydration structure and thermodynamics of the miniature receptor cucurbit[7]uril

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Crystal N.; Kurtzman Young, Tom; Gilson, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    The displacement of perturbed water upon binding is believed to play a critical role in the thermodynamics of biomolecular recognition, but it is nontrivial to unambiguously define and answer questions about this process. We address this issue by introducing grid inhomogeneous solvation theory (GIST), which discretizes the equations of inhomogeneous solvation theory (IST) onto a three-dimensional grid situated in the region of interest around a solute molecule or complex. Snapshots from explicit solvent simulations are used to estimate localized solvation entropies, energies, and free energies associated with the grid boxes, or voxels, and properly summing these thermodynamic quantities over voxels yields information about hydration thermodynamics. GIST thus provides a smoothly varying representation of water properties as a function of position, rather than focusing on hydration sites where solvent is present at high density. It therefore accounts for full or partial displacement of water from sites that are highly occupied by water, as well as for partly occupied and water-depleted regions around the solute. GIST can also provide a well-defined estimate of the solvation free energy and therefore enables a rigorous end-states analysis of binding. For example, one may not only use a first GIST calculation to project the thermodynamic consequences of displacing water from the surface of a receptor by a ligand, but also account, in a second GIST calculation, for the thermodynamics of subsequent solvent reorganization around the bound complex. In the present study, a first GIST analysis of the molecular host cucurbit[7]uril is found to yield a rich picture of hydration structure and thermodynamics in and around this miniature receptor. One of the most striking results is the observation of a toroidal region of high water density at the center of the host's nonpolar cavity. Despite its high density, the water in this toroidal region is disfavored energetically and

  1. Grid inhomogeneous solvation theory: hydration structure and thermodynamics of the miniature receptor cucurbit[7]uril.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Crystal N; Young, Tom Kurtzman; Gilson, Michael K

    2012-07-28

    The displacement of perturbed water upon binding is believed to play a critical role in the thermodynamics of biomolecular recognition, but it is nontrivial to unambiguously define and answer questions about this process. We address this issue by introducing grid inhomogeneous solvation theory (GIST), which discretizes the equations of inhomogeneous solvation theory (IST) onto a three-dimensional grid situated in the region of interest around a solute molecule or complex. Snapshots from explicit solvent simulations are used to estimate localized solvation entropies, energies, and free energies associated with the grid boxes, or voxels, and properly summing these thermodynamic quantities over voxels yields information about hydration thermodynamics. GIST thus provides a smoothly varying representation of water properties as a function of position, rather than focusing on hydration sites where solvent is present at high density. It therefore accounts for full or partial displacement of water from sites that are highly occupied by water, as well as for partly occupied and water-depleted regions around the solute. GIST can also provide a well-defined estimate of the solvation free energy and therefore enables a rigorous end-states analysis of binding. For example, one may not only use a first GIST calculation to project the thermodynamic consequences of displacing water from the surface of a receptor by a ligand, but also account, in a second GIST calculation, for the thermodynamics of subsequent solvent reorganization around the bound complex. In the present study, a first GIST analysis of the molecular host cucurbit[7]uril is found to yield a rich picture of hydration structure and thermodynamics in and around this miniature receptor. One of the most striking results is the observation of a toroidal region of high water density at the center of the host's nonpolar cavity. Despite its high density, the water in this toroidal region is disfavored energetically and

  2. A bioinformatics search for selective histamine h4 receptor antagonists through structure-based virtual screening strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Fenila; Thangam, Elden Berla; Suresh, Muthaiyan Xavier

    2012-05-01

    The prevalence of allergic disease is increasing dramatically in the developed world. Studies of allergic diseases have clearly demonstrated that histamine plays an important role in the pathogenesis of the early-phase allergic response. Histamine effects are mediated by H1, H2, H3, and H4 receptors. The presence of the histamine H4 receptors on leukocytes and mast cells suggests that the new histamine receptor H4 plays an important role in the modulation of the immune system. Thus, histamine H4 receptor is an attractive target for anti-allergic therapy. In our present study, we have generated a histamine H4 receptor model using I-TASSER based on human B2-adrenergic G-protein-coupled receptor. Structurally similar compounds of the three known antagonists JNJ777120, thioperamide, and Vuf6002 were retrieved from PubChem, and database was prepared. Virtual screening of those databases was performed, and six compounds with high docking score were identified. Also the binding mode revealed that all the six compounds had interaction with Asp94 of the receptor. Our results serve as a starting point in the development of novel lead compounds in anti-allergic therapy. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Relationship of structure and function of DNA-binding domain in vitamin D receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Lin-Yan; Zhang, Yan-Qiong; Chen, Meng-Di; Liu, Chang-Bai; Wu, Jiang-Feng

    2015-07-07

    While the structure of the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) has been determined in great detail, the roles of its domains and how to bind the motif of its target genes are still under debate. The VDR DBD consists of two zinc finger modules and a C-terminal extension (CTE), at the end of the C-terminal of each structure presenting α-helix. For the first zinc finger structure, N37 and S-box take part in forming a dimer with 9-cis retinoid X receptor (RXR), while V26, R50, P-box and S-box participate in binding with VDR response elements (VDRE). For the second zinc finger structure, P61, F62 and H75 are essential in the structure of the VDR homodimer with the residues N37, E92 and F93 of the downstream of partner VDR, which form the inter-DBD interface. T-box of the CTE, especially the F93 and I94, plays a critical role in heterodimerization and heterodimers-VDRE binding. Six essential residues (R102, K103, M106, I107, K109, and R110) of the CTE α-helix of VDR construct one interaction face, which packs against the DBD core of the adjacent symmetry mate. In 1,25(OH)2D3-activated signaling, the VDR-RXR heterodimer may bind to DR3-type VDRE and ER9-type VDREs of its target gene directly resulting in transactivation and also bind to DR3-liked nVDRE of its target gene directly resulting in transrepression. Except for this, 1α,25(OH)2D3 ligand VDR-RXR may bind to 1αnVDRE indirectly through VDIR, resulting in transrepression of the target gene. Upon binding of 1α,25(OH)2D3, VDR can transactivate and transrepress its target genes depending on the DNA motif that DBD binds.

  4. Relationship of Structure and Function of DNA-Binding Domain in Vitamin D Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-Yan Wan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While the structure of the DNA-binding domain (DBD of the vitamin D receptor (VDR has been determined in great detail, the roles of its domains and how to bind the motif of its target genes are still under debate. The VDR DBD consists of two zinc finger modules and a C-terminal extension (CTE, at the end of the C-terminal of each structure presenting α-helix. For the first zinc finger structure, N37 and S-box take part in forming a dimer with 9-cis retinoid X receptor (RXR, while V26, R50, P-box and S-box participate in binding with VDR response elements (VDRE. For the second zinc finger structure, P61, F62 and H75 are essential in the structure of the VDR homodimer with the residues N37, E92 and F93 of the downstream of partner VDR, which form the inter-DBD interface. T-box of the CTE, especially the F93 and I94, plays a critical role in heterodimerization and heterodimers–VDRE binding. Six essential residues (R102, K103, M106, I107, K109, and R110 of the CTE α-helix of VDR construct one interaction face, which packs against the DBD core of the adjacent symmetry mate. In 1,25(OH2D3-activated signaling, the VDR-RXR heterodimer may bind to DR3-type VDRE and ER9-type VDREs of its target gene directly resulting in transactivation and also bind to DR3-liked nVDRE of its target gene directly resulting in transrepression. Except for this, 1α,25(OH2D3 ligand VDR-RXR may bind to 1αnVDRE indirectly through VDIR, resulting in transrepression of the target gene. Upon binding of 1α,25(OH2D3, VDR can transactivate and transrepress its target genes depending on the DNA motif that DBD binds.

  5. Accurate Prediction of Complex Structure and Affinity for a Flexible Protein Receptor and Its Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker, Gert-Jan; Kamiya, Narutoshi; Araki, Mitsugu; Fukuda, Ikuo; Okuno, Yasushi; Nakamura, Haruki

    2017-06-13

    In order to predict the accurate binding configuration as well as the binding affinity for a flexible protein receptor and its inhibitor drug, enhanced sampling with multicanonical molecular dynamics (McMD) simulation and thermodynamic integration (TI) were combined as a general drug docking method. CDK2, cyclin-dependent kinase 2, is involved in the cell cycle regulation. Malfunctions in CDK2 can cause tumorigenesis, and thus it is a potential drug target. Here, we performed a long McMD simulation for docking the inhibitor CS3 to CDK2 starting from the unbound structure. Subsequently, a potential binding/unbinding pathway was given from the multicanonical ensemble, and the binding free energy was readily computed by TI along the pathway. Using this combination, the correct binding configuration of CS3 to CDK2 was obtained, and its affinity coincided well with the experimental value.

  6. Structural basis for EGF receptor inhibition by the therapeutic antibody IMC-11F8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiqing; Kussie, Paul; Ferguson, Kathryn M

    2008-02-01

    Therapeutic anticancer strategies that target and inactivate the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are under intense study in the clinic. Here we describe the mechanism of EGFR inhibition by an antibody drug IMC-11F8. IMC-11F8 is a fully human antibody that has similar antitumor potency as the chimeric cetuximab/Erbitux and might represent a safer therapeutic alternative. We report the X-ray crystal structure of the Fab fragment of IMC-11F8 (Fab11F8) in complex with the entire extracellular region and with isolated domain III of EGFR. We compare this to our previous study of the cetuximab/EGFR interaction. Fab11F8 interacts with a remarkably similar epitope, but through a completely different set of interactions. Both the similarities and differences in binding of these two antibodies have important implications for the development of inhibitors that could exploit this same mechanism of EGFR inhibition.

  7. Structural determinants of efficacy at A3 adenosine receptors: modification of the ribose moiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jeong, Lak Shin; Moon, Hyung Ryong; Kim, Hea Ok; Choi, Won Jun; Shin, Dae Hong; Elhalem, Eleonora; Comin, Maria J; Melman, Neli; Mamedova, Liaman; Gross, Ariel S; Rodriguez, Juan B; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2004-03-01

    We have found previously that structural features of adenosine derivatives, particularly at the N6- and 2-positions of adenine, determine the intrinsic efficacy as A3 adenosine receptor (AR) agonists. Here, we have probed this phenomenon with respect to the ribose moiety using a series of ribose-modified adenosine derivatives, examining binding affinity and activation of the human A3 AR expressed in CHO cells. Both 2'- and 3'-hydroxyl groups in the ribose moiety contribute to A3 AR binding and activation, with 2'-OH being more essential. Thus, the 2'-fluoro substitution eliminated both binding and activation, while a 3'-fluoro substitution led to only a partial reduction of potency and efficacy at the A3 AR. A 5'-uronamide group, known to restore full efficacy in other derivatives, failed to fully overcome the diminished efficacy of 3'-fluoro derivatives. The 4'-thio substitution, which generally enhanced A3 AR potency and selectivity, resulted in 5'-CH2OH analogues (10 and 12) which were partial agonists of the A3 AR. Interestingly, the shifting of the N6-(3-iodobenzyl)adenine moiety from the 1'- to 4'-position had a minor influence on A3 AR selectivity, but transformed 15 into a potent antagonist (16) (Ki = 4.3 nM). Compound 16 antagonized human A3 AR agonist-induced inhibition of cyclic AMP with a K(B) value of 3.0 nM. A novel apio analogue (20) of neplanocin A, was a full A3 AR agonist. The affinities of selected, novel analogues at rat ARs were examined, revealing species differences. In summary, critical structural determinants for human A3 AR activation have been identified, which should prove useful for further understanding the mechanism of receptor activation and development of more potent and selective full agonists, partial agonists and antagonists for A3 ARs.

  8. Structure-activity relationships of constrained phenylethylamine ligands for the serotonin 5-HT2 receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vignir Isberg

    Full Text Available Serotonergic ligands have proven effective drugs in the treatment of migraine, pain, obesity, and a wide range of psychiatric and neurological disorders. There is a clinical need for more highly 5-HT2 receptor subtype-selective ligands and the most attention has been given to the phenethylamine class. Conformationally constrained phenethylamine analogs have demonstrated that for optimal activity the free lone pair electrons of the 2-oxygen must be oriented syn and the 5-oxygen lone pairs anti relative to the ethylamine moiety. Also the ethyl linker has been constrained providing information about the bioactive conformation of the amine functionality. However, combined 1,2-constriction by cyclization has only been tested with one compound. Here, we present three new 1,2-cyclized phenylethylamines, 9-11, and describe their synthetic routes. Ligand docking in the 5-HT2B crystal structure showed that the 1,2-heterocyclized compounds can be accommodated in the binding site. Conformational analysis showed that 11 can only bind in a higher-energy conformation, which would explain its absent or low affinity. The amine and 2-oxygen interactions with D3.32 and S3.36, respectively, can form but shift the placement of the core scaffold. The constraints in 9-11 resulted in docking poses with the 4-bromine in closer vicinity to 5.46, which is polar only in the human 5-HT2A subtype, for which 9-11 have the lowest affinity. The new ligands, conformational analysis and docking expand the structure-activity relationships of constrained phenethylamines and contributes towards the development of 5-HT2 receptor subtype-selective ligands.

  9. The natural product magnolol as a lead structure for the development of potent cannabinoid receptor agonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Fuchs

    Full Text Available Magnolol (4-allyl-2-(5-allyl-2-hydroxyphenylphenol, the main bioactive constituent of the medicinal plant Magnolia officinalis, and its main metabolite tetrahydromagnolol were recently found to activate cannabinoid (CB receptors. We now investigated the structure-activity relationships of (tetrahydromagnolol analogs with variations of the alkyl chains and the phenolic groups and could considerably improve potency. Among the most potent compounds were the dual CB1/CB2 full agonist 2-(2-methoxy-5-propyl-phenyl-4-hexylphenol (61a, K(i CB1:0.00957 µM; K(i CB2:0.0238 µM, and the CB2-selective partial agonist 2-(2-hydroxy-5-propylphenyl-4-pentylphenol (60, K(i CB1:0.362 µM; K(i CB2:0.0371 µM, which showed high selectivity versus GPR18 and GPR55. Compound 61b, an isomer of 61a, was the most potent GPR55 antagonist with an IC50 value of 3.25 µM but was non-selective. The relatively simple structures, which possess no stereocenters, are easily accessible in a four- to five-step synthetic procedure from common starting materials. The central reaction step is the well-elaborated Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction, which is suitable for a combinatorial chemistry approach. The scaffold is versatile and may be fine-tuned to obtain a broad range of receptor affinities, selectivities and efficacies.

  10. Crystal structure of the adenosine A2A receptor bound to an antagonist reveals a potential allosteric pocket

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Bingfa; Bachhawat, Priti; Chu, Matthew Ling-Hon; Wood, Martyn; Ceska, Tom; Sands, Zara A.; Mercier, Joel; Lebon, Florence; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Kobilka, Brian K.

    2017-01-01

    The A2AR is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that plays important roles in cardiovascular physiology and immune function. The A2AR is also a target for the treatment of Parkinson?s disease, where A2AR antagonists have been shown to enhance signaling through the D2 dopamine receptor. Here we present the crystal structure of the A2AR bound to a novel bitopic antagonist. As a result of structural changes needed to accommodate the bound antagonist, crystals could not be grown in lipidic cubic ...

  11. The structure and function of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor and its ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Dan

    2012-05-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)amide (GLP-1) is a 30-residue peptide hormone released from intestinal L cells following nutrient consumption. It potentiates the glucose-induced secretion of insulin from pancreatic beta cells, increases insulin expression, inhibits beta-cell apoptosis, promotes beta-cell neogenesis, reduces glucagon secretion, delays gastric emptying, promotes satiety and increases peripheral glucose disposal. These multiple effects have generated a great deal of interest in the discovery of long-lasting agonists of the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) in order to treat type 2 diabetes. This review article summarizes the literature regarding the discovery of GLP-1 and its physiological functions. The structure, function and sequence-activity relationships of the hormone and its natural analogue exendin-4 (Ex4) are reviewed in detail. The current knowledge of the structure of GLP-1R, a Family B GPCR, is summarized and discussed, before its known interactions with the principle peptide ligands are described and summarized. Finally, progress in discovering non-peptide ligands of GLP-1R is reviewed. GLP-1 is clearly an important hormone linking nutrient consumption with blood sugar control, and therefore knowledge of its structure, function and mechanism of action is of great importance. © 2011 The Author. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  12. A Combined Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Research of Quinolinone Derivatives as Androgen Receptor Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuwei; Bai, Fang; Cao, Hong; Li, Jiazhong; Liu, Huanxiang; Gramatica, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Antiandrogens bicalutamide, flutamide and enzalutamide etc. have been used in clinical trials to treat prostate cancer by binding to and antagonizing androgen receptor (AR). Although initially effective, the drug resistance problem will emerge eventually, which results in a high medical need for novel AR antagonist exploitation. Here in this work, to facilitate the rational design of novel AR antagonists, we studied the structure-activity relationships of a series of 2-quinolinone derivatives and investigated the structural requirements for their antiandrogenic activities. Different modeling methods, including 2D MLR, 3D CoMFA and CoMSIA, were implemented to evolve QSAR models. All these models, thoroughly validated, demonstrated satisfactory results especially for the good predictive abilities. The contour maps from 3D CoMFA and CoMSIA models provide visualized explanation of key structural characteristics relevant to the antiandrogenic activities, which is summarized to a position-specific conclusion at the end. The obtained results from this research are practically useful for rational design and screening of promising chemicals with high antiandrogenic activities.

  13. Binding affinity of triphenyl acrylonitriles to estrogen receptors: quantitative structure-activity relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolboacă, Sorana D; Marta, Monica M; Jäntschi, Lorentz

    2010-01-01

    The quantitative structure-activity relationship approach was applied to understand the relative binding affinity of triphenyl acrylonitriles to estrogen receptors. A sample of previously studied triphenyl acrylonitriles was divided into training (18 compounds) and test sets (7 compounds) using a stratified random approach. The molecular descriptor family on vertices cutting (MDFV) approach was used in order to translate the structural information into descriptors. The relationship between binding activity and structural descriptors was identified using the multiple linear regression procedure. An optimal three-parameter equation with a determination coefficient of 0.9580 and a cross-validation leave-one-out parameter of 0.9408 was identified. The optimal model was assessed on a test set and a determination coefficient of 0.9004 was obtained. The MDFV model proved not to be significantly different from the previously reported model in terms of goodness-of-fit. In terms of information criteria (Akaike's, Bayesian, Amemiya, and Hannan-Quinn) and Kubinyi function, the MDFV model proved to perform better than the previously reported model. The optimal MDFV model was able to explain approximately 96% of the total variance in the estrogenic binding relative affinity of triphenyl acrylonitriles and to have estimation and prediction abilities. Although there were no significant differences in terms of goodness-of-fit, the MDFV model proved to exhibit better information parameters compared to the previously reported model using the same number of molecular descriptors.

  14. Structural plasticity of GABAergic axons is regulated by network activity and GABAA receptor activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eSchuemann

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Coordinated changes at excitatory and inhibitory synapses are essential for normal brain development and function. It is well established that excitatory neurons undergo structural changes, but our knowledge about inhibitory structural plasticity is rather scarce. Here we present a quantitative analysis of the dynamics of GABAergic boutons in the dendritic region of the hippocampal CA1 area using time-lapse two-photon imaging in organotypic hippocampal cultures from GAD65-GFP mice. We show that ~20% of inhibitory boutons are not stable. They are appearing, disappearing and reappearing at specific locations along the inhibitory axon and reflect immature or incomplete synapses. Furthermore, we observed that persistent boutons show large volume fluctuations over several hours, suggesting that presynaptic content of inhibitory synapses is not constant. Our data show that inhibitory boutons are highly dynamic structures and suggest that inhibitory axons are continuously probing potential locations for inhibitory synapse formation by redistributing presynaptic material along the axon.In addition, we found that neuronal activity affects the exploratory dynamics of inhibitory axons. Blocking network activity rapidly reduces the number of transient boutons, whereas enhancing activity reduces the number of persistent inhibitory boutons, possibly reflecting enhanced competition between boutons along the axon. The latter effect requires signaling through GABAA receptors. We propose that activity-dependent regulation of bouton dynamics contributes to inhibitory synaptic plasticity.

  15. Phocid Seal Leptin: Tertiary Structure and Hydrophobic Receptor Binding Site Preservation during Distinct Leptin Gene Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, John A.; Hauton, Chris; Bennett, Kimberley A.; Hall, Ailsa J.

    2012-01-01

    The cytokine hormone leptin is a key signalling molecule in many pathways that control physiological functions. Although leptin demonstrates structural conservation in mammals, there is evidence of positive selection in primates, lagomorphs and chiropterans. We previously reported that the leptin genes of the grey and harbour seals (phocids) have significantly diverged from other mammals. Therefore we further investigated the diversification of leptin in phocids, other marine mammals and terrestrial taxa by sequencing the leptin genes of representative species. Phylogenetic reconstruction revealed that leptin diversification was pronounced within the phocid seals with a high dN/dS ratio of 2.8, indicating positive selection. We found significant evidence of positive selection along the branch leading to the phocids, within the phocid clade, but not over the dataset as a whole. Structural predictions indicate that the individual residues under selection are away from the leptin receptor (LEPR) binding site. Predictions of the surface electrostatic potential indicate that phocid seal leptin is notably different to other mammalian leptins, including the otariids. Cloning the grey seal leptin binding domain of LEPR confirmed that this was structurally conserved. These data, viewed in toto, support a hypothesis that phocid leptin divergence is unlikely to have arisen by random mutation. Based upon these phylogenetic and structural assessments, and considering the comparative physiology and varying life histories among species, we postulate that the unique phocid diving behaviour has produced this selection pressure. The Phocidae includes some of the deepest diving species, yet have the least modified lung structure to cope with pressure and volume changes experienced at depth. Therefore, greater surfactant production is required to facilitate rapid lung re-inflation upon surfacing, while maintaining patent airways. We suggest that this additional surfactant requirement

  16. Phocid seal leptin: tertiary structure and hydrophobic receptor binding site preservation during distinct leptin gene evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Hammond

    Full Text Available The cytokine hormone leptin is a key signalling molecule in many pathways that control physiological functions. Although leptin demonstrates structural conservation in mammals, there is evidence of positive selection in primates, lagomorphs and chiropterans. We previously reported that the leptin genes of the grey and harbour seals (phocids have significantly diverged from other mammals. Therefore we further investigated the diversification of leptin in phocids, other marine mammals and terrestrial taxa by sequencing the leptin genes of representative species. Phylogenetic reconstruction revealed that leptin diversification was pronounced within the phocid seals with a high dN/dS ratio of 2.8, indicating positive selection. We found significant evidence of positive selection along the branch leading to the phocids, within the phocid clade, but not over the dataset as a whole. Structural predictions indicate that the individual residues under selection are away from the leptin receptor (LEPR binding site. Predictions of the surface electrostatic potential indicate that phocid seal leptin is notably different to other mammalian leptins, including the otariids. Cloning the grey seal leptin binding domain of LEPR confirmed that this was structurally conserved. These data, viewed in toto, support a hypothesis that phocid leptin divergence is unlikely to have arisen by random mutation. Based upon these phylogenetic and structural assessments, and considering the comparative physiology and varying life histories among species, we postulate that the unique phocid diving behaviour has produced this selection pressure. The Phocidae includes some of the deepest diving species, yet have the least modified lung structure to cope with pressure and volume changes experienced at depth. Therefore, greater surfactant production is required to facilitate rapid lung re-inflation upon surfacing, while maintaining patent airways. We suggest that this additional

  17. Crystal structure of the urokinase receptor in a ligand-free form

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Xiang; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Yuan, Cai

    2012-01-01

    The urokinase receptor urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a surface receptor capable of not only focalizing urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA)-mediated fibrinolysis to the pericellular micro-environment but also promoting cell migration and chemotaxis. Consistent with...

  18. Probing the structure of the affinity-purified and lipid-reconstituted torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamouda, Ayman K; Chiara, David C; Blanton, Michael P; Cohen, Jonathan B

    2008-12-02

    The Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is the only member of the Cys-loop superfamily of ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs) that is available in high abundance in a native membrane preparation. To study the structure of the other LGICs using biochemical and biophysical techniques, detergent solubilization, purification, and lipid reconstitution are usually required. To assess the effects of purification on receptor structure, we used the hydrophobic photoreactive probe 3-trifluoromethyl-3-(m-[(125)I]iodophenyl)diazirine ([(125)I]TID) to compare the state-dependent photolabeling of the Torpedo nAChR before and after purification and reincorporation into lipid. For the purified nAChR, the agonist-sensitive photolabeling within the M2 ion channel domain of positions M2-6, M2-9, and M2-13, the agonist-enhanced labeling of deltaThr274 (deltaM2-18) within the delta subunit helix bundle, and the labeling at the lipid-protein interface (alphaMu4) were the same as for the nAChR in native membranes. However, addition of agonist did not enhance [(125)I]TID photolabeling of deltaIle288 within the deltaM2-M3 loop. These results indicate that after purification and reconstitution of the Torpedo nAChR, the difference in structure between the resting and desensitized states within the M2 ion channel domain was preserved, but not the agonist-dependent change of structure of the deltaM2-M3 loop. To further characterize the pharmacology of [(125)I]TID binding sites in the nAChR in the desensitized state, we examined the effect of phencyclidine (PCP) on [(125)I]TID photolabeling. PCP inhibited [(125)I]TID labeling of amino acids at the cytoplasmic end of the ion channel (M2-2 and M2-6) while potentiating labeling at M2-9 and M2-13 and allosterically modulating the labeling of amino acids within the delta subunit helix bundle.

  19. Structure and functional interaction of the extracellular domain of human GABA[subscript B] receptor GBR2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Yong; Xiong, Dazhi; Mosyak, Lidia; Malito, David L.; Kniazeff, Julie; Chen, Yan; Burmakina, Svetlana; Quick, Matthias; Bush, Martin; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Fan, Qing R. (CNRS-UMR); (Columbia)

    2012-10-24

    Inhibitory neurotransmission is mediated primarily by GABA. The metabotropic GABA{sub B} receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor central to mammalian brain function. Malfunction of GABA{sub B} receptor has been implicated in several neurological disorders. GABA{sub B} receptor functions as a heterodimeric assembly of GBR1 and GBR2 subunits, where GBR1 is responsible for ligand-binding and GBR2 is responsible for G protein coupling. Here we demonstrate that the GBR2 ectodomain directly interacts with the GBR1 ectodomain to increase agonist affinity by selectively stabilizing the agonist-bound conformation of GBR1. We present the crystal structure of the GBR2 ectodomain, which reveals a polar heterodimeric interface. We also identify specific heterodimer contacts from both subunits, and GBR1 residues involved in ligand recognition. Lastly, our structural and functional data indicate that the GBR2 ectodomain adopts a constitutively open conformation, suggesting a structural asymmetry in the active state of GABA{sub B} receptor that is unique to the GABAergic system.

  20. Structure analysis of the IL-5 ligand-receptor complex reveals a wrench-like architecture for IL-5Rα.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Edwin; Kotzsch, Alexander; Saremba, Stefan; Nickel, Joachim; Schmitz, Werner; Sebald, Walter; Mueller, Thomas D

    2011-12-07

    Interleukin-5 (IL-5) is the key mediator for the function of eosinophil granulocytes, whose deregulation is characteristic of hypereosinophilic diseases and presumably contributes to allergic asthma. IL-5 signaling involves two transmembrane receptors, IL-5Rα and the common β chain, which upon formation of the ternary complex activate the JAK/STAT signaling cascade. To investigate the mechanism underlying ligand-receptor recognition, we determined the structure of IL-5 bound to the extracellular domain of IL-5Rα. IL-5 makes contact with all three fibronectin III-like domains of IL-5Rα, with the receptor architecture resembling a wrench. Mutagenesis data provide evidence that this wrench-like architecture is likely preformed. The structure demonstrates that for steric reasons, homodimeric IL-5 can bind only one receptor molecule, even though two equivalent receptor-binding sites exist. In regard to strong efforts being made to develop IL-5 antagonists for treating asthma and hypereosinophilic diseases, the advances in molecular understanding provided by this structure are of greatest value. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A novel dualistic profile of an allosteric AMPA receptor modulator identified through studies on recombinant receptors, mouse hippocampal synapses and crystal structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, G B; Harbak, Barbara; Hede, S E

    2015-01-01

    -mediated neurotransmission. The aim of this study was to investigate functional and structural aspects of a novel analog of the AMPA receptor PAM cyclothiazide (CTZ) on recombinant and native glutamate receptors. We expressed rat GluA4flip and flop in Xenopus oocytes and characterized NS1376 and CTZ under two......-electrode voltage-clamp. The dose-response analyses revealed dual effects of NS1376. The modulator induced 30-fold and 42-fold reductions in glutamate potency and increased the glutamate efficacy by 3.2-fold and 5.3-fold at GluA4flip and GluA4flop, respectively. Rapid application of glutamate to excised outside...

  2. Binding site structure of one LRP-RAP complex: implications for a common ligand-receptor binding motif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Gitte A; Andersen, Olav M; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J

    2006-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) interacts with more than 30 ligands of different sizes and structures that can all be replaced by the receptor-associated protein (RAP). The double module of complement type repeats, CR56, of LRP binds many ligands including all three...... domains of RAP and alpha2-macroglobulin, which promotes the catabolism of the Abeta-peptide implicated in Alzheimer's disease. To understand the receptor-ligand cross-talk, the NMR structure of CR56 has been solved and ligand binding experiments with RAP domain 1 (RAPd1) have been performed. From chemical...... shift perturbations of both binding partners upon complex formation, a HADDOCK model of the complex between CR56 and RAPd1 has been obtained. The binding residues are similar to a common binding motif suggested from alpha2-macroglobulin binding studies and provide evidence for an understanding...

  3. Disadvantage of Social Sensitivity: Interaction of Oxytocin Receptor Genotype and Child Maltreatment on Brain Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannlowski, Udo; Kugel, Harald; Grotegerd, Dominik; Redlich, Ronny; Opel, Nils; Dohm, Katharina; Zaremba, Dario; Grögler, Anne; Schwieren, Juliane; Suslow, Thomas; Ohrmann, Patricia; Bauer, Jochen; Krug, Axel; Kircher, Tilo; Jansen, Andreas; Domschke, Katharina; Hohoff, Christa; Zwitserlood, Pienie; Heinrichs, Markus; Arolt, Volker; Heindel, Walter; Baune, Bernhard T

    2016-09-01

    Oxytocin has received much attention as a prosocial and anxiolytic neuropeptide. In human studies, the G-allele of a common variant (rs53576) in the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) has been associated with protective properties such as reduced stress response and higher receptiveness for social support. In contrast, recent studies suggest a detrimental role of the rs53576 G-allele in the context of childhood maltreatment. To further elucidate the role of OXTR, gene by maltreatment interactions on brain structure and function were investigated. Three hundred nine healthy participants genotyped for OXTR rs53576 underwent structural as well as functional magnetic resonance imaging during a common emotional face-matching task. Childhood maltreatment was assessed with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). Gray matter volumes were investigated by means of voxel-based morphometry across the entire brain. Structural magnetic resonance imaging data revealed a strong interaction of rs53576 genotype and CTQ scores, mapping specifically to the bilateral ventral striatum. GG homozygotes but not A-allele carriers showed strong gray matter reduction with increasing CTQ scores. In turn, lower ventral striatum gray matter volumes were associated with lower reward dependence, a prosocial trait. Furthermore, the G-allele was associated with increased amygdala responsiveness to emotional facial expressions. The findings suggest that the G-allele constitutes a vulnerability factor for specific alterations of limbic brain structure in individuals with adverse childhood experiences, complemented by increased limbic responsiveness to emotional interpersonal stimuli. While oxytocinergic signaling facilitates attachment and bonding in supportive social environments, this attunement for social cues may turn disadvantageous under early adverse conditions. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cloning and structural analysis of partial acetylcholine receptor subunit genes from the parasitic nematode Teladorsagia circumcincta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, J; Hoekstra, R; Roos, M H; Wiley, L J; Weiss, A S; Sangster, N C; Tait, A

    2001-06-28

    Nematode nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are the sites of action for the anthelmintic drug levamisole. Recent findings indicate that the molecular mechanism of levamisole resistance may involve changes in the number and/or functions of target nAChRs. Accordingly, we have used an RT-PCR approach to isolate and characterise partial cDNA clones (tca-1 and tca-2) encoding putative nAChR subunits from the economically important trichostrongyloid, Teladorsagia circumcincta. The predicted tca-1 gene product is a 248 aa fragment (TCA-1) which contains structural motifs typical of ligand-binding (alpha-) subunits, and which shows very high sequence similarities (98.8 and 97.2% amino acid identities) to the alpha-subunits encoded by tar-1 and hca-1 from Trichostrongylus colubriformis and Haemonchus contortus, respectively. Sequence analyses of partial tca-1 cDNAs from one levamisole-resistant and two susceptible populations of T. circumcincta revealed polymorphism at the predicted amino acid level, but there was no apparent association of any particular tca-1 allele with resistance. tca-2 encodes a 67 aa fragment (TCA-2) containing the TM4 transmembrane domain and carboxyl terminus of a putative nAChR structural (non-alpha) subunit. The deduced amino acid sequence of TCA-2 shows highest similarity (75% amino acid identity) to ACR-2, a structural subunit involved in forming levamisole-gated ion channels in Caenorhabditis elegans, but low similarity (43% identity) to the corresponding regions of TAR-1 and HCA-1. tca-2 is the first nAChR subunit gene of this type to be isolated from parasitic nematodes, and it provides a basis for further characterisation of structural subunits in trichostrongyloids.

  5. Structure-activity relations in binding of perfluoroalkyl compounds to human thyroid hormone T3 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiao-Min; Zhang, Yin-Feng; Guo, Liang-Hong; Qin, Zhan-Fen; Lv, Qi-Yan; Zhang, Lian-Ying

    2015-02-01

    Perfluoroalkyl compounds (PFCs) have been shown to disrupt thyroid functions through thyroid hormone receptor (TR)-mediated pathways, but direct binding of PFCs with TR has not been demonstrated. We investigated the binding interactions of 16 structurally diverse PFCs with human TR, their activities on TR in cells, and the activity of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in vivo. In fluorescence competitive binding assays, most of the 16 PFCs were found to bind to TR with relative binding potency in the range of 0.0003-0.05 compared with triiodothyronine (T3). A structure-binding relationship for PFCs was observed, where fluorinated alkyl chain length longer than ten, and an acid end group were optimal for TR binding. In thyroid hormone (TH)-responsive cell proliferation assays, PFOS, perfluorohexadecanoic acid, and perfluorooctadecanoic acid exhibited agonistic activity by promoting cell growth. Furthermore, similar to T3, PFOS exposure promoted expression of three TH upregulated genes and inhibited three TH downregulated genes in amphibians. Molecular docking analysis revealed that most of the tested PFCs efficiently fit into the T3-binding pocket in TR and formed a hydrogen bond with arginine 228 in a manner similar to T3. The combined in vitro, in vivo, and computational data strongly suggest that some PFCs disrupt the normal activity of TR pathways by directly binding to TR.

  6. Bioinformatics analysis of the structural and evolutionary characteristics for toll-like receptor 15

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinlan Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs play important role in the innate immune system. TLR15 is reported to have a unique role in defense against pathogens, but its structural and evolution characterizations are still poorly understood. In this study, we identified 57 completed TLR15 genes from avian and reptilian genomes. TLR15 clustered into an individual clade and was closely related to family 1 on the phylogenetic tree. Unlike the TLRs in family 1 with the broken asparagine ladders in the middle, TLR15 ectodomain had an intact asparagine ladder that is critical to maintain the overall shape of ectodomain. The conservation analysis found that TLR15 ectodomain had a highly evolutionarily conserved region on the convex surface of LRR11 module, which is probably involved in TLR15 activation process. Furthermore, the protein–protein docking analysis indicated that TLR15 TIR domains have the potential to form homodimers, the predicted interaction interface of TIR dimer was formed mainly by residues from the BB-loops and αC-helixes. Although TLR15 mainly underwent purifying selection, we detected 27 sites under positive selection for TLR15, 24 of which are located on its ectodomain. Our observations suggest the structural features of TLR15 which may be relevant to its function, but which requires further experimental validation.

  7. Structural basis for the cooperative allosteric activation of the free fatty acid receptor GPR40

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Jun; Byrne, Noel; Wang, John; Bricogne, Gerard; Brown, Frank K.; Chobanian, Harry R.; Colletti, Steven L.; Di Salvo, Jerry; Thomas-Fowlkes, Brande; Guo, Yan; Hall, Dawn L.; Hadix, Jennifer; Hastings, Nicholas B.; Hermes, Jeffrey D.; Ho, Thu; Howard, Andrew D.; Josien, Hubert; Kornienko, Maria; Lumb, Kevin J.; Miller, Michael W.; Patel, Sangita B.; Pio, Barbara; Plummer, Christopher W.; Sherborne, Bradley S.; Sheth, Payal; Souza, Sarah; Tummala, Srivanya; Vonrhein, Clemens; Webb, Maria; Allen, Samantha J.; Johnston, Jennifer M.; Weinglass, Adam B.; Sharma, Sujata; Soisson, Stephen M. (Merck); (Globel Phasing)

    2017-06-05

    Clinical studies indicate that partial agonists of the G-protein-coupled, free fatty acid receptor 1 GPR40 enhance glucose-dependent insulin secretion and represent a potential mechanism for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Full allosteric agonists (AgoPAMs) of GPR40 bind to a site distinct from partial agonists and can provide additional efficacy. We report the 3.2-Å crystal structure of human GPR40 (hGPR40) in complex with both the partial agonist MK-8666 and an AgoPAM, which exposes a novel lipid-facing AgoPAM-binding pocket outside the transmembrane helical bundle. Comparison with an additional 2.2-Å structure of the hGPR40–MK-8666 binary complex reveals an induced-fit conformational coupling between the partial agonist and AgoPAM binding sites, involving rearrangements of the transmembrane helices 4 and 5 (TM4 and TM5) and transition of the intracellular loop 2 (ICL2) into a short helix. These conformational changes likely prime GPR40 to a more active-like state and explain the binding cooperativity between these ligands.

  8. Structural model of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor isotypes bound to acetylcholine and nicotine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abagyan Ruben

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nicotine is a psychoactive drug presenting a diverse array of biological activities, some positive, such as enhancement of cognitive performances, others negative, such as addiction liability. Ligands that discriminate between the different isotypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs could present improved pharmacology and toxicity profile. Results Based on the recent crystal structure of a soluble acetylcholine binding protein from snails, we have built atomic models of acetylcholine and nicotine bound to the pocket of four different human nAChR subtypes. The structures of the docked ligands correlate with available biochemical data, and reveal that the determinants for isotype selectivity are relying essentially on four residues, providing diversity of the ligand binding pocket both in terms of Van der Waals boundary, and electrostatic potential. We used our models to screen in silico a large compound database and identify a new ligand candidate that could display subtype selectivity. Conclusion The nAChR-agonist models should be useful for the design of nAChR agonists with diverse specificity profiles.

  9. Crystal structures of complexes of vitamin D receptor ligand-binding domain with lithocholic acid derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuno, Hiroyuki; Ikura, Teikichi; Morizono, Daisuke; Orita, Isamu; Yamada, Sachiko; Shimizu, Masato; Ito, Nobutoshi

    2013-01-01

    The secondary bile acid lithocholic acid (LCA) and its derivatives act as selective modulators of the vitamin D receptor (VDR), although their structures fundamentally differ from that of the natural hormone 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3)]. Here, we have determined the crystal structures of the ligand-binding domain of rat VDR (VDR-LBD) in ternary complexes with a synthetic partial peptide of the coactivator MED1 (mediator of RNA polymerase II transcription subunit 1) and four ligands, LCA, 3-keto LCA, LCA acetate, and LCA propionate, with the goal of elucidating their agonistic mechanism. LCA and its derivatives bind to the same ligand-binding pocket (LBP) of VDR-LBD that 1,25(OH)2D3 binds to, but in the opposite orientation; their A-ring is positioned at the top of the LBP, whereas their acyclic tail is located at the bottom of the LBP. However, most of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions observed in the complex with 1,25(OH)2D3 are reproduced in the complexes with LCA and its derivatives. Additional interactions between VDR-LBD and the C-3 substituents of the A-ring are also observed in the complexes with LCA and its derivatives. These may result in the observed difference in the potency among the LCA-type ligands. PMID:23723390

  10. Identification and Structure-Function Analysis of Subfamily Selective G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase Inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homan, Kristoff T.; Larimore, Kelly M.; Elkins, Jonathan M.; Szklarz, Marta; Knapp, Stefan; Tesmer, John J.G. [Michigan; (Oxford)

    2015-02-13

    Selective inhibitors of individual subfamilies of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) would serve as useful chemical probes as well as leads for therapeutic applications ranging from heart failure to Parkinson’s disease. To identify such inhibitors, differential scanning fluorimetry was used to screen a collection of known protein kinase inhibitors that could increase the melting points of the two most ubiquitously expressed GRKs: GRK2 and GRK5. Enzymatic assays on 14 of the most stabilizing hits revealed that three exhibit nanomolar potency of inhibition for individual GRKs, some of which exhibiting orders of magnitude selectivity. Most of the identified compounds can be clustered into two chemical classes: indazole/dihydropyrimidine-containing compounds that are selective for GRK2 and pyrrolopyrimidine-containing compounds that potently inhibit GRK1 and GRK5 but with more modest selectivity. The two most potent inhibitors representing each class, GSK180736A and GSK2163632A, were cocrystallized with GRK2 and GRK1, and their atomic structures were determined to 2.6 and 1.85 Å spacings, respectively. GSK180736A, developed as a Rho-associated, coiled-coil-containing protein kinase inhibitor, binds to GRK2 in a manner analogous to that of paroxetine, whereas GSK2163632A, developed as an insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor inhibitor, occupies a novel region of the GRK active site cleft that could likely be exploited to achieve more selectivity. However, neither compound inhibits GRKs more potently than their initial targets. This data provides the foundation for future efforts to rationally design even more potent and selective GRK inhibitors.

  11. Structure-activity relationship of N-(phenylalkyl)cinnamides as novel NR2B subtype-selective NMDA receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamiz, A P; Cai, S X; Zhou, Z L; Yuen, P W; Schelkun, R M; Whittemore, E R; Weber, E; Woodward, R M; Keana, J F

    1999-08-26

    A novel series of N-(phenylalkyl)cinnamides related to N-(4-phenylbutyl)-3,4-dihydroxy-beta-cyanocinnamide (6, an EGFR-K inhibitor with high antiproliferative activity) was synthesized and tested for antagonism at N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subtypes. Potency and subunit selectivity were assayed by electrical recordings in Xenopus oocytes expressing three binary combinations of cloned rat NMDA receptor subunits: NR1A expressed in combination with either NR2A, NR2B, or NR2C. The N-(phenylalkyl)cinnamides are selective antagonists of NR1A/2B receptors. Assayed under steady-state conditions, N-(4-phenylbutyl)-4-hydroxycinnamide (16) has an IC(50) value of 77 nM and >1000-fold selectivity with respect to NR1A/2A and NR1A/2C receptors. Potency at alpha(1) adrenergic receptors is low for the four cinnamides tested. Inhibition of NR1A/2B receptors does not correlate with EGFR and ErbB2/neu tyrosine kinase inhibitor activity. The N-(phenylalkyl)cinnamide series we describe provides a novel and structurally diverse framework for designing new NR2B-selective NMDA antagonists as potential CNS therapeutics.

  12. Crystal structure of the ligand-binding domain of the promiscuous EphA4 receptor reveals two distinct conformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singla, Nikhil; Goldgur, Yehuda; Xu, Kai; Paavilainen, Sari; Nikolov, Dimitar B.; Himanen, Juha P. (MSKCC); (Turku)

    2010-09-08

    Eph receptors and their ephrin ligands are important mediators of cell-cell communication. They are divided in two subclasses based on their affinities for each other and on sequence conservation. Receptor-ligand binding within each subclass is fairly promiscuous, while binding cross the subclasses happens rarely. EphA4 is an exception to this general rule, since it has long been known to bind both A- and B-class ephrin ligands but the reason for this exceptional behavior has not been worked out at molecular level. Recent structural and biochemical studies on EphA4 ligand-binding domain alone and in complex with its ligands have addressed this question. However, the published structures of EphA4/ephrin complexes differ considerably from each other and strikingly different explanations for the exceptional promiscuity of EphA4 were proposed. To address these contradictory findings, we have determined a crystal structure of the EphA4 ligand-binding domain at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution and show that the receptor has an unprecedented ability to exist in two very different, well-ordered conformations even in the unbound state. Our results suggest that the ligand promiscuity of the Ephs is directly correlated with the structural flexibility of the ligand-binding surface of the receptor.

  13. Structural Changes in the Lectin Domain of CD23, the Low-Affinity IgE Receptor, upon Calcium Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurzburg, Beth A.; Tarchevskaya, Svetlana S.; Jardetzky, Theodore S. (NWU)

    2010-03-08

    CD23, the low-affinity receptor for IgE (Fc{var_epsilon}RII), regulates IgE synthesis and also mediates IgE-dependent antigen transport and processing. CD23 is a unique Fc receptor belonging to the C-type lectin-like domain superfamily and binds IgE in an unusual, non-lectin-like manner, requiring calcium but not carbohydrate. We have solved the high-resolution crystal structures of the human CD23 lectin domain in the presence and absence of Ca{sup 2+}. The crystal structures differ significantly from a previously determined NMR structure and show that calcium binding occurs at the principal binding site, but not at an auxiliary site that appears to be absent in human CD23. Conformational differences between the apo and Ca{sup 2+} bound structures suggest how IgE-Fc binding can be both calcium-dependent and carbohydrate-independent.

  14. Broad-spectrum L-amino acid sensing by class 3 G-protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conigrave, Arthur D; Hampson, David R

    2006-12-01

    The sensing of nutrients is essential to the control of growth and metabolism. Although the sensing mechanisms responsible for the detection and coordination of metabolic responses to some nutrients, most notably glucose, are well understood, the molecular basis of amino acid sensing by cells and tissues is only now emerging. In this article, we consider evidence that some members of G-protein-coupled receptor class 3 are broad-spectrum amino acid sensors that couple changes in extracellular amino acid levels to the activation of intracellular signaling pathways. In particular, we consider both the molecular basis of specific and broad-spectrum amino acid sensing by different members of class 3 and the physiological significance of broad spectrum amino acid sensing by the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor, heterodimeric taste receptors and the recently "deorphanized" receptor GPRC6A and its goldfish homolog, the 5.24 chemoreceptor.

  15. Structural Basis of Native CXCL7 Monomer Binding to CXCR2 Receptor N-Domain and Glycosaminoglycan Heparin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron J. Brown

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available CXCL7, a chemokine highly expressed in platelets, orchestrates neutrophil recruitment during thrombosis and related pathophysiological processes by interacting with CXCR2 receptor and sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAG. CXCL7 exists as monomers and dimers, and dimerization (~50 μM and CXCR2 binding (~10 nM constants indicate that CXCL7 is a potent agonist as a monomer. Currently, nothing is known regarding the structural basis by which receptor and GAG interactions mediate CXCL7 function. Using solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy, we characterized the binding of CXCL7 monomer to the CXCR2 N-terminal domain (CXCR2Nd that constitutes a critical docking site and to GAG heparin. We found that CXCR2Nd binds a hydrophobic groove and that ionic interactions also play a role in mediating binding. Heparin binds a set of contiguous basic residues indicating a prominent role for ionic interactions. Modeling studies reveal that the binding interface is dynamic and that GAG adopts different binding geometries. Most importantly, several residues involved in GAG binding are also involved in receptor interactions, suggesting that GAG-bound monomer cannot activate the receptor. Further, this is the first study that describes the structural basis of receptor and GAG interactions of a native monomer of the neutrophil-activating chemokine family.

  16. Kinetics of human cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor antagonists: Structure-kinetics relationships (SKR) and implications for insurmountable antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lizi; de Vries, Henk; Yang, Xue; Lenselink, Eelke B; Kyrizaki, Athina; Barth, Francis; Louvel, Julien; Dreyer, Matthias K; van der Es, Daan; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Heitman, Laura H

    2017-11-02

    While equilibrium binding affinities and in vitro functional antagonism of CB1 receptor antagonists have been studied in detail, little is known on the kinetics of their receptor interaction. In this study, we therefore conducted kinetic assays for nine 1-(4,5-diarylthiophene-2-carbonyl)-4-phenylpiperidine-4-carboxamide derivatives and included the CB1 antagonist rimonabant as a comparison. For this we newly developed a dual-point competition association assay with [3H]CP55940 as the radioligand. This assay yielded Kinetic Rate Index (KRI) values from which structure-kinetics relationships (SKR) of hCB1 receptor antagonists could be established. The fast dissociating antagonist 6 had a similar receptor residence time (RT) as rimonabant, i.e. 19 and 14 min, respectively, while the slowest dissociating antagonist (9) had a very long RT of 2222 min, i.e. pseudo-irreversible dissociation kinetics. In functional assays, 9 displayed insurmountable antagonism, while the effects of the shortest RT antagonist 6 and rimonabant were surmountable. Taken together, this study shows that hCB1 receptor antagonists can have very divergent RTs, which are not correlated to their equilibrium affinities. Furthermore, their RTs appear to define their mode of functional antagonism, i.e. surmountable vs. insurmountable. Finally, based on the recently resolved hCB1 receptor crystal structure, we propose that the differences in RT can be explained by a different binding mode of antagonist 9 from short RT antagonists that is able to displace unfavorable water molecules. Taken together, these findings are of importance for future design and evaluation of potent and safe hCB1 receptor antagonists. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Minor structural changes in nicotinoid insecticides confer differential subtype selectivity for mammalian nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizawa, Motohiro; Casida, John E

    1999-01-01

    The major nitroimine insecticide imidacloprid (IMI) and the nicotinic analgesics epibatidine and ABT-594 contain the 6-chloro-3-pyridinyl moiety important for high activity and/or selectivity. ABT-594 has considerable nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subtype specificity which might carry over to the chloropyridinyl insecticides. This study considers nine IMI analogues for selectivity in binding to immuno-isolated α1, α3 and α7 containing nicotinic AChRs and to purported α4β2 nicotinic AChRs.α1- and α3-Containing nicotinic AChRs (both immuno-isolated by mAb 35, from Torpedo and human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, respectively) are between two and four times more sensitive to DN-IMI than to (−)-nicotine.With immuno-isolated α3 nicotinic AChRs, the tetrahydropyrimidine analogues of IMI with imine or nitromethylene substituents are 3–4 fold less active than (−)-nicotine. The structure-activity profile with α3 nicotinic AChRs from binding assays is faithfully reproduced in agonist potency as induction of 86rubidium ion efflux in intact cells.α7-Containing nicotinic AChRs of SH-SY5Y cells (immuno-isolated by mAb 306) and rat brain membranes show maximum sensitivity to the tetrahydropyrimidine analogue of IMI with the nitromethylene substituent.The purported α4β2 nicotinic AChRs [mouse (Chao & Casida, 1997) and rat brain] are similar in sensitivity to DN-IMI, the tetrahydropyrimidine nitromethylene and nicotine.The commercial insecticides (IMI, acetamiprid and nitenpyram) have low to moderate potency at the α3 and purported α4β2 nicotinic AChRs and are essentially inactive at α1 and α7 nicotinic AChRs.In conclusion, the toxicity of the analogues and metabolites of nicotinoid insecticides in mammals may involve action at multiple receptor subtypes with selectivity conferred by minor structural changes. PMID:10369463

  18. Structure-Function Basis of Attenuated Inverse Agonism of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers for Active-State Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takezako, Takanobu; Unal, Hamiyet; Karnik, Sadashiva S; Node, Koichi

    2015-09-01

    Ligand-independent signaling by the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) can be activated in clinical settings by mechanical stretch and autoantibodies as well as receptor mutations. Transition of the AT1R to the activated state is known to lower inverse agonistic efficacy of clinically used AT1R blockers (ARBs). The structure-function basis for reduced efficacy of inverse agonists is a fundamental aspect that has been understudied not only in relation to the AT1R but also regarding other homologous receptors. Here, we demonstrate that the active-state transition in the AT1R indeed attenuates an inverse agonistic effect of four biphenyl-tetrazole ARBs through changes in specific ligand-receptor interactions. In the ground state, tight interactions of four ARBs with a set of residues (Ser109(TM3), Phe182(ECL2), Gln257(TM6), Tyr292(TM7), and Asn295(TM7)) results in potent inverse agonism. In the activated state, the ARB-AT1R interactions shift to a different set of residues (Val108(TM3), Ser109(TM3), Ala163(TM4), Phe182(ECL2), Lys199(TM5), Tyr292(TM7), and Asn295(TM7)), resulting in attenuated inverse agonism. Interestingly, V108I, A163T, N295A, and F182A mutations in the activated state of the AT1R shift the functional response to the ARB binding toward agonism, but in the ground state the same mutations cause inverse agonism. Our data show that the second extracellular loop is an important regulator of the functional states of the AT1R. Our findings suggest that the quest for discovering novel ARBs, and improving current ARBs, fundamentally depends on the knowledge of the unique sets of residues that mediate inverse agonistic potency in the two states of the AT1R. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  19. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) screening for exon copy number variation in the calcium sensing receptor gene: no large rearrangements identified in patients with calcium metabolic disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Peter H; Christensen, Signe E; Wallace, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background. Mutation screening of the CASR by DNA sequencing is commonly used in the diagnosis of disorders of calcium metabolism, such as familial hypocalciuric hypercalcaemia (FHH). Exon copy number variation is not detected by currently used molecular genetic screening methods, and might....... Patients and methods. The study included 257 patient samples referred to our laboratory for molecular genetic analysis of the CASR gene. A total of 245 were patients suspected to have FHH, while the remaining 12 samples represent patients with a phenotype of idiopathic hypocalcaemia/hypoparathyroidism. All...

  20. Structural, mutational and biophysical studies reveal a canonical mode of molecular recognition between immune receptor TIGIT and nectin-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samanta, Dibyendu; Guo, Haisu; Rubinstein, Rotem; Ramagopal, Udupi A.; Almo, Steven C.

    2017-01-01

    In addition to antigen-specific stimulation of T cell receptor (TCR) by a peptide-MHC complex, the functional outcome of TCR engagement is regulated by antigen-independent costimulatory signals. Costimulatory signals are provided by an array of interactions involving activating and inhibitory receptors expressed on T cells and their cognate ligands on antigen presenting cells. T cell immunoglobulin and ITIM domain (TIGIT), a recently identified immune receptor expressed on T and NK cells, upon interaction with either of its two ligands, nectin-2 or poliovirus receptor (PVR), inhibits activation of T and NK cells. Here we report the crystal structure of the human TIGIT ectodomain, which exhibits the classic two-layer β-sandwich topology observed in other immunoglobulin super family (IgSF) members. Biophysical studies indicate that TIGIT is monomeric in solution but can form a dimer at high concentrations, consistent with the observation of a canonical immunoglobulin-like dimer interface in the crystalline state. Based on existing structural data, we present a model of the TIGIT:nectin-2 complex and utilized complementary biochemical studies to map the nectin-binding interface on TIGIT. Our data provide important structural and biochemical determinants responsible for the recognition of nectin-2 by TIGIT. Defining the TIGIT:nectin-2 binding interface provides the basis for rational manipulation of this molecular interaction for the development of immunotherapeutic reagents in autoimmunity and cancer.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations and structure-based network analysis reveal structural and functional aspects of G-protein coupled receptor dimer interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltoumas, Fotis A.; Theodoropoulou, Margarita C.; Hamodrakas, Stavros J.

    2016-06-01

    A significant amount of experimental evidence suggests that G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) do not act exclusively as monomers but also form biologically relevant dimers and oligomers. However, the structural determinants, stoichiometry and functional importance of GPCR oligomerization remain topics of intense speculation. In this study we attempted to evaluate the nature and dynamics of GPCR oligomeric interactions. A representative set of GPCR homodimers were studied through Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics simulations, combined with interface analysis and concepts from network theory for the construction and analysis of dynamic structural networks. Our results highlight important structural determinants that seem to govern receptor dimer interactions. A conserved dynamic behavior was observed among different GPCRs, including receptors belonging in different GPCR classes. Specific GPCR regions were highlighted as the core of the interfaces. Finally, correlations of motion were observed between parts of the dimer interface and GPCR segments participating in ligand binding and receptor activation, suggesting the existence of mechanisms through which dimer formation may affect GPCR function. The results of this study can be used to drive experiments aimed at exploring GPCR oligomerization, as well as in the study of transmembrane protein-protein interactions in general.

  2. Selective Allosteric Antagonists for the G Protein-Coupled Receptor GPRC6A Based on the 2-Phenylindole Privileged Structure Scaffold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Henrik; Boesgaard, Michael Worch; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Lenea

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent a biological target class of fundamental importance in drug therapy. The GPRC6A receptor is a newly deorphanized class C GPCR that we recently reported for the first allosteric antagonists based on the 2-arylindole privileged structure scaffold (e.g., 1......, and 34b as antagonists at the GPRC6A receptor in the low micromolar range and show that 7 and 34b display >9-fold selectivity for the GPRC6A receptor over related GPCRs, making 7 and 34b the most potent and selective antagonists for the GPRC6A receptor reported to date....

  3. The computational-based structure of Dwarf14 provides evidence for its role as potential strigolactone receptor in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaiji Noura

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Strigolactones (SLs are recently identified plant hormones modulating root and shoot branching. Besides their endogenous role within the producing organism, SLs are also key molecules in the communication of plants with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi and parasitic weeds. In fact SLs are exuded into the rhizosphere where they act as a host-derived signal, stimulating the germination of the seeds of parasitic plants which would not survive in the absence of a host root to colonize. Similarly, their perception by AM fungi causes extensive hyphal branching; this is a prerequisite for effective root colonization, since it increases the number of potential contact points with the host surface. In spite of the crucial and multifaceted biological role of SLs, there is no information on the receptor(s which bind(s such active molecules, neither in the producing plants, or in parasitic weeds or AM fungi. Results In this work, we applied homology modelling techniques to investigate the structure of the protein encoded by the gene Dwarf14, which was first identified in rice as conferring SLs insensitivity when mutated. The best sequence identity was with bacterial RsbQ. Both proteins belong to the superfamily of alpha/beta-fold hydrolases, some members of which play a role in the metabolism or signalling of plant hormones. The Dwarf14 (D14 structure was refined by means of molecular dynamics simulations. In order to support the hypothesis that D14 could be an endogenous SLs receptor, we performed docking experiments with a natural ligand. Conclusions It is suggested that D14 interacts with and thereby may act as a receptor for SLs in plants. This hypothesis offers a starting point to experimentally study the mechanism of its activity in vivo by means of structural, molecular and genetic approaches. Lastly, knowledge of the putative receptor structure will boost the research on analogues of the natural substrates as required for

  4. Crystal structure of the lamprey variable lymphocyte receptor C reveals an unusual feature in its N-terminal capping module.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Kanda

    Full Text Available Jawless vertebrates represented by lampreys and hagfish use variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs as antigen receptors to mount adaptive immune responses. VLRs generate diversity that is comparable to immunoglobulins and T-cell receptors by a gene conversion-like mechanism, which is mediated by cytosine deaminases. Currently, three types of VLRs, VLRA, VLRB, and VLRC, have been identified in lampreys. Crystal structures of VLRA and VLRB in complex with antigens have been reported recently, but no structural information is available for VLRC. Here, we present the first crystal structure of VLRC from the Japanese lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum. Similar to VLRA and VLRB, VLRC forms a typical horseshoe-like solenoid structure with a variable concave surface. Strikingly, its N-terminal cap has a long loop with limited sequence variability that protrudes toward the concave surface, which is the putative antigen-binding surface. Furthermore, as predicted previously, its C-terminal cap lacks a highly variable protruding loop that plays an important role in antigen recognition by lamprey VLRA and VLRB. Recent work suggests that VLRC+ lymphocytes in jawless vertebrates might be akin to γδ T cells in jawed vertebrates. Structural features of lamprey VLRC described here suggest that it may recognize antigens in a unique manner.

  5. Crystal Structure of the Lamprey Variable Lymphocyte Receptor C Reveals an Unusual Feature in Its N-Terminal Capping Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Ryo; Sutoh, Yoichi; Kasamatsu, Jun; Maenaka, Katsumi; Kasahara, Masanori; Ose, Toyoyuki

    2014-01-01

    Jawless vertebrates represented by lampreys and hagfish use variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs) as antigen receptors to mount adaptive immune responses. VLRs generate diversity that is comparable to immunoglobulins and T-cell receptors by a gene conversion-like mechanism, which is mediated by cytosine deaminases. Currently, three types of VLRs, VLRA, VLRB, and VLRC, have been identified in lampreys. Crystal structures of VLRA and VLRB in complex with antigens have been reported recently, but no structural information is available for VLRC. Here, we present the first crystal structure of VLRC from the Japanese lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum). Similar to VLRA and VLRB, VLRC forms a typical horseshoe-like solenoid structure with a variable concave surface. Strikingly, its N-terminal cap has a long loop with limited sequence variability that protrudes toward the concave surface, which is the putative antigen-binding surface. Furthermore, as predicted previously, its C-terminal cap lacks a highly variable protruding loop that plays an important role in antigen recognition by lamprey VLRA and VLRB. Recent work suggests that VLRC+ lymphocytes in jawless vertebrates might be akin to γδ T cells in jawed vertebrates. Structural features of lamprey VLRC described here suggest that it may recognize antigens in a unique manner. PMID:24465760

  6. LSD and structural analogs: pharmacological evaluation at D1 dopamine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, V J; Lawler, C P; Fox, D R; Neve, K A; Nichols, D E; Mailman, R B

    1995-04-01

    The hallucinogenic effects of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) have been attributed primarily to actions at serotonin receptors. A number of studies conducted in the 1970s indicated that LSD also has activity at dopamine (DA) receptors. These latter studies are difficult to interpret, however, because they were completed before the recognition of two pharmacologically distinct DA receptor subtypes, D1 and D2. The availability of subtype-selective ligands (e.g., the D1 antagonist SCH23390) and clonal cell lines expressing a homogeneous receptor population now permits an assessment of the contributions of DA receptor subtypes to the DA-mediated effects of LSD. The present study investigated the binding and functional properties of LSD and several lysergamide and analogs at dopamine D1 and D2 receptors. Several of these compounds have been reported previously to bind with high affinity to serotonin 5HT2 (i.e., 3H-ketanserin) sites in the rat frontal cortex (K0.5 5-30 nM). All tested compounds also competed for both D1-like (3H-SCH 23390) and D2-like (3H-spiperone plus unlabeled ketanserin) DA receptors in rat striatum, with profiles indicative of agonists (nH LSD and analogs for D2 like receptors was similar to their affinity for 5HT2 sites. The affinity for D1 like receptors was slightly lower (2- to 3-fold), although LSD and several analogs bound to D1 receptors with affinity similar to the prototypical D1 partial agonist SKF38393 (K0.5 ca. 25 nM). A second series of experiments tested the binding and functional properties of LSD and selected analogs in C-6 glioma cells expressing the rhesus macaque D1A receptor.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Discovery of novel GPVI receptor antagonists by structure-based repurposing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis Taylor

    Full Text Available Inappropriate platelet aggregation creates a cardiovascular risk that is largely managed with thienopyridines and aspirin. Although effective, these drugs carry risks of increased bleeding and drug 'resistance', underpinning a drive for new antiplatelet agents. To discover such drugs, one strategy is to identify a suitable druggable target and then find small molecules that modulate it. A good and unexploited target is the platelet collagen receptor, GPVI, which promotes thrombus formation. To identify inhibitors of GPVI that are safe and bioavailable, we docked a FDA-approved drug library into the GPVI collagen-binding site in silico. We now report that losartan and cinanserin inhibit GPVI-mediated platelet activation in a selective, competitive and dose-dependent manner. This mechanism of action likely underpins the cardioprotective effects of losartan that could not be ascribed to its antihypertensive effects. We have, therefore, identified small molecule inhibitors of GPVI-mediated platelet activation, and also demonstrated the utility of structure-based repurposing.

  8. Combined Ligand/Structure-Based Virtual Screening and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Steroidal Androgen Receptor Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwei Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The antiandrogens, such as bicalutamide, targeting the androgen receptor (AR, are the main endocrine therapies for prostate cancer (PCa. But as drug resistance to antiandrogens emerges in advanced PCa, there presents a high medical need for exploitation of novel AR antagonists. In this work, the relationships between the molecular structures and antiandrogenic activities of a series of 7α-substituted dihydrotestosterone derivatives were investigated. The proposed MLR model obtained high predictive ability. The thoroughly validated QSAR model was used to virtually screen new dihydrotestosterones derivatives taken from PubChem, resulting in the finding of novel compounds CID_70128824, CID_70127147, and CID_70126881, whose in silico bioactivities are much higher than the published best one, even higher than bicalutamide. In addition, molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD simulations, and MM/GBSA have been employed to analyze and compare the binding modes between the novel compounds and AR. Through the analysis of the binding free energy and residue energy decomposition, we concluded that the newly discovered chemicals can in silico bind to AR with similar position and mechanism to the reported active compound and the van der Waals interaction is the main driving force during the binding process.

  9. Combined Ligand/Structure-Based Virtual Screening and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Steroidal Androgen Receptor Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuwei; Han, Rui; Zhang, Huimin; Liu, Hongli; Li, Jiazhong; Liu, Huanxiang; Gramatica, Paola

    2017-01-01

    The antiandrogens, such as bicalutamide, targeting the androgen receptor (AR), are the main endocrine therapies for prostate cancer (PCa). But as drug resistance to antiandrogens emerges in advanced PCa, there presents a high medical need for exploitation of novel AR antagonists. In this work, the relationships between the molecular structures and antiandrogenic activities of a series of 7α-substituted dihydrotestosterone derivatives were investigated. The proposed MLR model obtained high predictive ability. The thoroughly validated QSAR model was used to virtually screen new dihydrotestosterones derivatives taken from PubChem, resulting in the finding of novel compounds CID_70128824, CID_70127147, and CID_70126881, whose in silico bioactivities are much higher than the published best one, even higher than bicalutamide. In addition, molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and MM/GBSA have been employed to analyze and compare the binding modes between the novel compounds and AR. Through the analysis of the binding free energy and residue energy decomposition, we concluded that the newly discovered chemicals can in silico bind to AR with similar position and mechanism to the reported active compound and the van der Waals interaction is the main driving force during the binding process.

  10. Structure-activity relationships in human toll-like receptor 7-active imidazoquinoline analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Nikunj M; Malladi, Subbalakshmi S; Mutz, Cole A; Balakrishna, Rajalakshmi; David, Sunil A

    2010-06-10

    Engagement of toll-like receptors serve to link innate immune responses with adaptive immunity and can be exploited as powerful vaccine adjuvants for eliciting both primary and anamnestic immune responses. TLR7 agonists are highly immunostimulatory without inducing dominant proinflammatory cytokine responses. A structure-activity study was conducted on the TLR7-agonistic imidazoquinolines, starting with 1-(4-amino-2-((ethylamino)methyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-c]quinolin-1-yl)-2-methylpropan-2-ol as a lead. Modifications of the secondary amine of the C2 ethylaminomethylene side chain are poorly tolerated. The 4-amino group must be retained for activity. Replacement of the imidazole ring of the scaffold with triazole or cyclic urea led to complete loss of activity. A systematic exploration of N(1)-benzyl-C2-alkyl substituents showed a very distinct relationship between alkyl length and TLR7-agonistic potency with the optimal compound bearing a C2-n-butyl group. Transposition of the N(1) and C2 substituents led to the identification of an extremely active TLR7-agonistic compound with an EC(50) value of 8.6 nM. The relative potencies in human TLR7-based primary reporter gene assays were paralleled by interferon-alpha induction activities in whole human blood models.

  11. Dynamics and Structure-Function Relationships of the Lamin B Receptor (LBR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Giannios

    Full Text Available The lamin B receptor (LBR is a multi-spanning membrane protein of the inner nuclear membrane that is often employed as a "reporter" of nuclear envelope dynamics. We show here that the diffusional mobility of full-length LBR exhibits significant regional variation along the nuclear envelope, consistent with the existence of discrete LBR microdomains and the occurrence of multiple, asymmetrically-spaced anastomoses along the nuclear envelope-endoplasmic reticulum interface. Interestingly, a commonly used fusion protein that contains the amino-terminal region and the first transmembrane domain of LBR exhibits reduced mobility at the nuclear envelope, but behaves similarly to full-length LBR in the endoplasmic reticulum. On the other hand, carboxy-terminally truncated mutants that retain the first four transmembrane domains and a part or the whole of the amino-terminal region of LBR are generally hyper-mobile. These results suggest that LBR dynamics is structure and compartment specific. They also indicate that native LBR is probably "configured" by long-range interactions that involve the loops between adjacent transmembrane domains and parts of the amino-terminal region.

  12. Dynamics and Structure-Function Relationships of the Lamin B Receptor (LBR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannios, Ioannis; Chatzantonaki, Eleftheria; Georgatos, Spyros

    2017-01-01

    The lamin B receptor (LBR) is a multi-spanning membrane protein of the inner nuclear membrane that is often employed as a "reporter" of nuclear envelope dynamics. We show here that the diffusional mobility of full-length LBR exhibits significant regional variation along the nuclear envelope, consistent with the existence of discrete LBR microdomains and the occurrence of multiple, asymmetrically-spaced anastomoses along the nuclear envelope-endoplasmic reticulum interface. Interestingly, a commonly used fusion protein that contains the amino-terminal region and the first transmembrane domain of LBR exhibits reduced mobility at the nuclear envelope, but behaves similarly to full-length LBR in the endoplasmic reticulum. On the other hand, carboxy-terminally truncated mutants that retain the first four transmembrane domains and a part or the whole of the amino-terminal region of LBR are generally hyper-mobile. These results suggest that LBR dynamics is structure and compartment specific. They also indicate that native LBR is probably "configured" by long-range interactions that involve the loops between adjacent transmembrane domains and parts of the amino-terminal region.

  13. Solution structure and molecular interactions of lamin B receptor Tudor domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liokatis, Stamatis; Edlich, Christian; Soupsana, Katerina; Giannios, Ioannis; Panagiotidou, Parthena; Tripsianes, Konstantinos; Sattler, Michael; Georgatos, Spyros D; Politou, Anastasia S

    2012-01-06

    Lamin B receptor (LBR) is a polytopic protein of the nuclear envelope thought to connect the inner nuclear membrane with the underlying nuclear lamina and peripheral heterochromatin. To better understand the function of this protein, we have examined in detail its nucleoplasmic region, which is predicted to harbor a Tudor domain (LBR-TD). Structural analysis by multidimensional NMR spectroscopy establishes that LBR-TD indeed adopts a classical β-barrel Tudor fold in solution, which, however, features an incomplete aromatic cage. Removal of LBR-TD renders LBR more mobile at the plane of the nuclear envelope, but the isolated module does not bind to nuclear lamins, heterochromatin proteins (MeCP2), and nucleosomes, nor does it associate with methylated Arg/Lys residues through its aromatic cage. Instead, LBR-TD exhibits tight and stoichiometric binding to the "histone-fold" region of unassembled, free histone H3, suggesting an interesting role in histone assembly. Consistent with such a role, robust binding to native nucleosomes is observed when LBR-TD is extended toward its carboxyl terminus, to include an area rich in Ser-Arg residues. The Ser-Arg region, alone or in combination with LBR-TD, binds both unassembled and assembled H3/H4 histones, suggesting that the TD/RS interface may operate as a "histone chaperone-like platform."

  14. Prostaglandin E2 receptor expression in the rat trigeminal-vascular system and other brain structures involved in pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myren, Maja; Olesen, Jes; Gupta, Saurabh

    2012-01-01

    receptors in both peripheral and central structures involved in pain transmission and perception in migraine: dura mater, cerebral arteries, trigeminal ganglion, trigeminal nucleus caudalis, periaqueductal grey, thalamus, hypothalamus, cortex, pituitary gland, hippocampus and cerebellum. In the trigeminal......Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) is considered to be a key mediator in migraine pathophysiology. PGE(2) acts via four receptors (EP(1)-EP(4)) but their distribution in the brain districts implicated in migraine has yet to be delineated. We quantified amount of mRNA and protein expression for the EP...... than in dorsal root ganglia (peripheral control), whereas the EP(2) mRNA and protein were highly abundant in the pituitary gland. EP(3) mRNA was mainly found in thalamus and hypothalamus. The most robust mRNA and protein expression for EP(4) receptor was seen in the dorsal root ganglion. In conclusion...

  15. Structure of the Human Dopamine D3 Receptor in Complex with a D2/D3 Selective Antagonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien, Ellen Y.T.; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Qiang; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Hanson, Michael A.; Shi, Lei; Newman, Amy Hauck; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C. (Cornell); (Scripps); (NIDA); (Columbia); (UCSD); (Receptos)

    2010-11-30

    Dopamine modulates movement, cognition, and emotion through activation of dopamine G protein-coupled receptors in the brain. The crystal structure of the human dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) in complex with the small molecule D2R/D3R-specific antagonist eticlopride reveals important features of the ligand binding pocket and extracellular loops. On the intracellular side of the receptor, a locked conformation of the ionic lock and two distinctly different conformations of intracellular loop 2 are observed. Docking of R-22, a D3R-selective antagonist, reveals an extracellular extension of the eticlopride binding site that comprises a second binding pocket for the aryl amide of R-22, which differs between the highly homologous D2R and D3R. This difference provides direction to the design of D3R-selective agents for treating drug abuse and other neuropsychiatric indications.

  16. Structural basis of GC-1 selectivity for thyroid hormone receptor isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webb Paul

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thyroid receptors, TRα and TRβ, are involved in important physiological functions such as metabolism, cholesterol level and heart activities. Whereas metabolism increase and cholesterol level lowering could be achieved by TRβ isoform activation, TRα activation affects heart rates. Therefore, β-selective thyromimetics have been developed as promising drug-candidates for treatment of obesity and elevated cholesterol level. GC-1 [3,5-dimethyl-4-(4'-hydroxy-3'-isopropylbenzyl-phenoxy acetic acid] has ability to lower LDL cholesterol with 600- to 1400-fold more potency and approximately two- to threefold more efficacy than atorvastatin (Lipitor© in studies in rats, mice and monkeys. Results To investigate GC-1 specificity, we solved crystal structures and performed molecular dynamics simulations of both isoforms complexed with GC-1. Crystal structures reveal that, in TRα Arg228 is observed in multiple conformations, an effect triggered by the differences in the interactions between GC-1 and Ser277 or the corresponding asparagine (Asn331 of TRβ. The corresponding Arg282 of TRβ is observed in only one single stable conformation, interacting effectively with the ligand. Molecular dynamics support this model: our simulations show that the multiple conformations can be observed for the Arg228 in TRα, in which the ligand interacts either strongly with the ligand or with the Ser277 residue. In contrast, a single stable Arg282 conformation is observed for TRβ, in which it strongly interacts with both GC-1 and the Asn331. Conclusion Our analysis suggests that the key factors for GC-1 selectivity are the presence of an oxyacetic acid ester oxygen and the absence of the amino group relative to T3. These results shed light into the β-selectivity of GC-1 and may assist the development of new compounds with potential as drug candidates to the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and obesity.

  17. Quantitative structure-activity relationships for estrogen receptor binding affinity of phenolic chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jian-Ying; Aizawa, Takako

    2003-03-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) binding affinities of 25 compounds including 15 industrial phenolic chemicals, two phytoestrogens, three natural steroids and one man-made steroid were detected by a binding competition assay. The 17 industrial phenolic chemicals were selected as objective compounds because they are possibly released from epoxy and polyester-styrene resins used in lacquer coatings of concrete tank and lining of steel pipe in water supply system. A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) for structurally diverse phenols, nine alkylphenols with only one alkyl group, four hydroxyl biphenyls, bisphenol A and four natural and man-made estrogens was established by applying a quantum chemical modeling method. Logarithm of octanol-water coefficient (logPow), molecular volume (V(m)), and energies of the highest occupied molecular orbital ( epsilon (HOMO)) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital ( epsilon (LUMO)) were selected as hydrophobic, steric (V(m)), and electronic chemical descriptors, respectively. Chemicals capable of ER binding had large V(m) and high epsilon (HOMO), while the effects of logPow and epsilon (LUMO) on the binding affinity could not be identified. The QSAR made successful predictions for the three phytoestrogens. Also, the successful prediction of ER-binding affinity for biochanin A, another phytoestrogen, two indicators of pH (phenolphthalin and phenolphthalein) and one alkylphenolic chemical with three alkyl groups (4-methyl-2,6-di-butyl-phenol), by amending the V(m) in the above-mentioned QSAR according to the electron-density distribution (or HOMO density) is an additional step in the elucidation of chemical steric and electronic parameters for predicting the binding affinities of phenolic compounds.

  18. Allosteric Modulators of the CB1 Cannabinoid Receptor: A Structural Update Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Paula; Goya, Pilar; Jagerovic, Nadine; Hernandez-Folgado, Laura

    2016-01-01

    In 2005, the first evidence of an allosteric binding site at the CB1R was provided by the identification of three indoles of the company Organon that were allosteric enhancers of agonist binding affinity and, functionally, allosteric inhibitors of agonist activity. Since then, structure-activity relationships of indoles as CB1R modulators have been reported. Targeting the allosteric site on CB1R, new families structurally based on urea and on 3-phenyltropane analogs of cocaine have been discovered as CB1R-negative allosteric modulators (NAMs), respectively, by Prosidion and by the Research Triangle Park. Endogenous allosteric ligands of different nature have been identified more recently. Thus, the therapeutic neuroprotection application of lipoxin A4, an arachidonic acid derivative, as an allosteric enhancer of CB1R activity has been confirmed in vivo. It was also the case of the steroid hormone, pregnenolone, whose negative allosteric effects on Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) were reproduced in vivo in a behavioral tetrad model and in food intake and memory impairment assays. Curiously, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonist fenofibrate or polypeptides such as pepcan-12 have been shown to act on the endocannabinoid system through CB1R allosteric modulation. The mechanistic bases of the effects of the phytocannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) are still not fully explained. However, there is evidence that CBD behaves as an NAM of Δ9-THC- and 2-AG. Allosteric modulation at CB1R offers new opportunities for therapeutic applications. Therefore, further understanding of the chemical features required for allosteric modulation as well as their orthosteric probe dependence may broaden novel approaches for fine-tuning the signaling pathways of the CB1R.

  19. Structural features discriminate androgen receptor N/C terminal and coactivator interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askew, Emily B; Minges, John T; Hnat, Andrew T; Wilson, Elizabeth M

    2012-01-30

    Human androgen receptor (AR) transcriptional activity involves interdomain and coactivator interactions with the agonist-bound AR ligand binding domain (LBD). Structural determinants of the AR NH(2)- and carboxyl-terminal interaction between the AR NH(2)-terminal FXXLF motif and activation function 2 (AF2) in the LBD were shown previously by crystallography. In this report, we provide evidence for a region in AR LBD helix 12 outside the AF2 binding cleft that facilitates interactions with the FXXLF and LXXLL motifs. Mutagenesis of glutamine 902 to alanine in AR LBD helix 12 (Q902A) disrupted AR FXXLF motif binding to AF2, but enhanced coactivator LXXLL motif binding. Functional compensation for defective FXXLF motif binding by AR-Q902A was suggested by the slower dissociation rate of bound androgen. Functional importance of glutamine 902 was indicated by the charged residue germline mutation Q902R that caused partial androgen insensitivity, and a similar somatic mutation Q902K reported in prostate cancer, both of which increased the androgen dissociation rate and decreased AR transcriptional activity. High affinity equilibrium androgen binding was retained by alanine substitution mutations at Tyr-739 in AR LBD helix 5 or Lys-905 in helix 12 structurally adjacent to AF2, whereas transcriptional activity decreased and the androgen dissociation increased. Deleterious effects of these loss of function mutations were rescued by the helix stabilizing AR prostate cancer somatic mutation H874Y. Sequence NH(2)-terminal to the AR FXXLF motif contributed to the AR NH(2)- and carboxyl-terminal interaction based on greater AR-2-30 FXXLF motif peptide binding to the agonist-bound AR LBD than a shorter AR-20-30 FXXLF motif peptide. We conclude that helix 12 residues outside the AF2 binding cleft modulate AR transcriptional activity by providing flexibility to accommodate FXXLF or LXXLL motif binding. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Identification and Structure-Function Study of Positive Allosteric Modulators of Kainate Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anja Probst; Fièvre, Sabine; Frydenvang, Karla

    2017-01-01

    Kainate receptors (KARs) consist of a class of ionotropic glutamate receptors, which exert diverse pre- and postsynaptic functions through complex signaling regulating the activity of neural circuits. Whereas numerous small-molecule positive allosteric modulators of the ligand-binding domain of (...

  1. Crystal structure of the human urokinase plasminogen activator receptor bound to an antagonist peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llinas, Paola; Le Du, Marie Hélène; Gårdsvoll, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    . This knowledge combined with the discovery of a convergent binding motif shared by the antagonist peptide and uPA allowed us to build a model of the human uPA-uPAR complex. This model reveals that the receptor-binding module of uPA engages the uPAR central cavity, thus leaving the external receptor surface...

  2. Primary structure of rat cardiac beta-adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors obtained by automated DNA sequence analysis: further evidence for a multigene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gocayne, J; Robinson, D A; FitzGerald, M G; Chung, F Z; Kerlavage, A R; Lentes, K U; Lai, J; Wang, C D; Fraser, C M; Venter, J C

    1987-12-01

    Two cDNA clones, lambda RHM-MF and lambda RHB-DAR, encoding the muscarinic cholinergic receptor and the beta-adrenergic receptor, respectively, have been isolated from a rat heart cDNA library. The cDNA clones were characterized by restriction mapping and automated DNA sequence analysis utilizing fluorescent dye primers. The rat heart muscarinic receptor consists of 466 amino acids and has a calculated molecular weight of 51,543. The rat heart beta-adrenergic receptor consists of 418 amino acids and has a calculated molecular weight of 46,890. The two cardiac receptors have substantial amino acid homology (27.2% identity, 50.6% with favored substitutions). The rat cardiac beta receptor has 88.0% homology (92.5% with favored substitutions) with the human brain beta receptor and the rat cardiac muscarinic receptor has 94.6% homology (97.6% with favored substitutions) with the porcine cardiac muscarinic receptor. The muscarinic cholinergic and beta-adrenergic receptors appear to be as conserved as hemoglobin and cytochrome c but less conserved than histones and are clearly members of a multigene family. These data support our hypothesis, based upon biochemical and immunological evidence, that suggests considerable structural homology and evolutionary conservation between adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors. To our knowledge, this is the first report utilizing automated DNA sequence analysis to determine the structure of a gene.

  3. Structural basis of RNA recognition and activation by innate immune receptor RIG-I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Fuguo; Ramanathan, Anand; Miller, Matthew T.; Tang, Guo-Qing; Gale, Jr., Michael; Patel, Smita S.; Marcotrigiano, Joseph (Rutgers); (RWJ-Med); (UW-MED)

    2012-05-29

    Retinoic-acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I; also known as DDX58) is a cytoplasmic pathogen recognition receptor that recognizes pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) motifs to differentiate between viral and cellular RNAs. RIG-I is activated by blunt-ended double-stranded (ds)RNA with or without a 5'-triphosphate (ppp), by single-stranded RNA marked by a 5'-ppp and by polyuridine sequences. Upon binding to such PAMP motifs, RIG-I initiates a signalling cascade that induces innate immune defences and inflammatory cytokines to establish an antiviral state. The RIG-I pathway is highly regulated and aberrant signalling leads to apoptosis, altered cell differentiation, inflammation, autoimmune diseases and cancer. The helicase and repressor domains (RD) of RIG-I recognize dsRNA and 5'-ppp RNA to activate the two amino-terminal caspase recruitment domains (CARDs) for signalling. Here, to understand the synergy between the helicase and the RD for RNA binding, and the contribution of ATP hydrolysis to RIG-I activation, we determined the structure of human RIG-I helicase-RD in complex with dsRNA and an ATP analogue. The helicase-RD organizes into a ring around dsRNA, capping one end, while contacting both strands using previously uncharacterized motifs to recognize dsRNA. Small-angle X-ray scattering, limited proteolysis and differential scanning fluorimetry indicate that RIG-I is in an extended and flexible conformation that compacts upon binding RNA. These results provide a detailed view of the role of helicase in dsRNA recognition, the synergy between the RD and the helicase for RNA binding and the organization of full-length RIG-I bound to dsRNA, and provide evidence of a conformational change upon RNA binding. The RIG-I helicase-RD structure is consistent with dsRNA translocation without unwinding and cooperative binding to RNA. The structure yields unprecedented insight into innate immunity and has a broader impact on other areas of biology, including

  4. Single particle cryoelectron tomography characterization of the structure and structural variability of poliovirus-receptor-membrane complex at 30-Angstroms resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostina, Mihnea; Bubeck, Doryen; Schwartz, Cindi; Nicastro, Daniela; Filman, David J.; Hogle, James M.

    2007-01-01

    As a long-term goal we want to use cryoelectron tomography to understand how non-enveloped viruses, such as picornaviruses, enter cells and translocate their genomes across membranes. To this end, we developed new image-processing tools using an in vitro system to model viral interactions with membranes. The complex of poliovirus with its membrane-bound receptors was reconstructed by averaging multiple sub-tomograms, thereby producing three-dimensional maps of surprisingly high resolution (30Å). Recognizable images of the complex could be produced by averaging as few as 20 copies. Additionally, model-free reconstructions of free poliovirus particles, clearly showing the major surface features, could be calculated from 60 virions. All calculations were designed to avoid artifacts caused by missing information typical for tomographic data (“missing wedge”). To investigate structural and conformational variability we applied a principal component analysis classification to specific regions. We show that the missing wedge causes a bias in classification, and that this bias can be minimized by supplementation with data from the Fourier transform of the averaged structure. After classifying images of the receptor into groups with high similarity, we were able to see differences in receptor density consistent with the known variability in receptor glycosylation. PMID:17897840

  5. Anion complexation with cyanobenzoyl substituted first and second generation tripodal amide receptors: crystal structure and solution studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Md Najbul; Gogoi, Abhijit; Das, Gopal

    2015-09-14

    Anion complexation properties of two new tripodal amide receptors have been extensively studied here. Two tripodal receptors have been synthesized from the reaction of cyanobenzoyl acid chloride with two tri-amine building blocks such as (i) tris(2-aminoethyl)amine and (ii) tris(2-(4-aminophenoxy)ethyl)amine, which resulted in the first (L1) and second (L2) generation tripodal amides respectively. A detailed comparison of their coordination behavior with anions is also described by crystallographic and solution state experiments. The crystal structure demonstrates various types of spatial orientations of tripodal arms in two receptors and concomitantly interacts with anions distinctively. Intramolecular H-bonding between amide N–H and CO prevents opening of the receptor cavity in the crystal, which leads to a locked conformation of L1 having C(3v) symmetry and makes amide hydrogen unavailable for the anion which results in side cleft anion binding. However, in L2 we conveniently shift the anion binding sites to a distant position which increases cavity size as well as rules out any intramolecular H-bonding between amide N–H and CO. The crystal structure shows a different orientation of the arms in L2; it adopts a quasi-planar arrangement with C(2v) symmetry. In the crystal structure two arms are pointed in the same direction and while extending the contact the third arm is H-bonded with the apical N-atom through a –CN group, making a pseudo capsular cavity where the anion interacts. Most importantly spatial reorientation of the receptor L2 from a C(2v) symmetry to a folded conformation with a C(3v) symmetry was observed only in the presence of an octahedral SiF6(2-) anion and forms a sandwich type complex. Receptors L1 and L2 are explored for their solution state anion binding abilities. The substantial changes in chemical shifts were observed for the amide (-NH) and aromatic hydrogen (-CH) (especially for F(-)), indicating the role of these hydrogens in

  6. Structural characterization of the main immunogenic region of the Torpedo acetylcholine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morell, Stuart W; Trinh, Vu B; Gudipati, Eswari; Friend, Alexander; Page, Nelson A; Agius, Mark A; Richman, David P; Fairclough, Robert H

    2014-03-01

    To develop antigen-specific immunotherapies for autoimmune diseases, knowledge of the molecular structure of targeted immunological hotspots will guide the production of reagents to inhibit and halt production of antigen specific attack agents. To this end we have identified three noncontiguous segments of the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) α-subunit that contribute to the conformationally sensitive immunological hotspot on the AChR termed the main immunogenic region (MIR): α(1-12), α(65-79), and α(110-115). This region is the target of greater than 50% of the anti-AChR Abs in serum from patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) and animals with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). Many monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) raised in one species against an electric organ AChR cross react with the neuromuscular AChR MIR in several species. Probing the Torpedo AChR α-subunit with mAb 132A, a disease inducing anti-MIR mAb raised against the Torpedo AChR, we have determined that two of the three MIR segments, α(1-12) and α(65-79), form a complex providing the signature components recognized by mAb 132A. These two segments straddle a third, α(110-115), that seems not to contribute specific side chains for 132A recognition, but is necessary for optimum antibody binding. This third segment appears to form a foundation upon which the three-dimensional 132A epitope is anchored. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Structure, expression and regulation of the cannabinoid receptor gene (CB1) in Huntington's disease transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaw, Elizabeth A; Hu, Haibei; Gomez, Geraldine T; Hebb, Andrea L O; Kelly, Melanie E M; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M

    2004-12-01

    Loss of cannabinoid receptors (CB1) occurs prior to neurodegeneration in Huntington's disease (HD). The levels and distribution of CB1 RNA were equivalent in 3-week-old mice regardless of genotype demonstrating that the specific factors and appropriate chromatin structure that lead to the transcription of CB1 were present in the striatum of young R6/2 and R6/1 transgenic HD mice. The expression of the mutant HD transgene led progressively to decreased steady-state levels of CB1 mRNA in neurons of the lateral striatum, which was dependent on the size of the CAG repeat and relative expression of the gene encoding mutant huntingtin (HD). Although it is known that the coding region of CB1 is contained within a single exon in mice, rats and humans, the 5'-untranslated region of the mouse gene remained to be defined. CB1 mRNA is encoded by two exons separated by an 18.4-kb intron. Transcription of CB1 occurred at multiple sites within a GC-rich promoter region upstream of exon 1 encoding the 5'-UTR of CB1. There was no difference in the selection of specific transcription initiation sites associated with higher levels of CB1 expression in the striatum compared to the cortex or between the striata of wild-type and HD transgenic mice. The progressive decline in CB1 mRNA levels in R6 compared to wild-type mice was due to decreased transcription, which is consistent with the hypothesis that mutant huntingtin exerts its effects by altering transcription factor activity. The cell-specific conditions that allow for increased transcription of CB1 in the lateral striatum compared to other forebrain regions from all transcription start sites were affected by the expression of mutant huntingtin in a time-dependent manner.

  8. CB1 Cannabinoid Receptors Mediate Cognitive Deficits and Structural Plasticity Changes During Nicotine Withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravia, Rocio; Flores, África; Plaza-Zabala, Ainhoa; Busquets-Garcia, Arnau; Pastor, Antoni; de la Torre, Rafael; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Marsicano, Giovanni; Ozaita, Andrés; Maldonado, Rafael; Berrendero, Fernando

    2017-04-01

    Tobacco withdrawal is associated with deficits in cognitive function, including attention, working memory, and episodic memory. Understanding the neurobiological mechanisms involved in these effects is crucial because cognitive deficits during nicotine withdrawal may predict relapse in humans. We investigated in mice the role of CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1Rs) in memory impairment and spine density changes induced by nicotine withdrawal precipitated by the nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine. Drugs acting on the endocannabinoid system and genetically modified mice were used. Memory impairment during nicotine withdrawal was blocked by the CB1R antagonist rimonabant or the genetic deletion of CB1R in forebrain gamma-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) neurons (GABA-CB1R). An increase of 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), but not anandamide, was observed during nicotine withdrawal. The selective inhibitor of 2-AG biosynthesis O7460 abolished cognitive deficits of nicotine abstinence, whereas the inhibitor of 2-AG enzymatic degradation JZL184 did not produce any effect in cognitive impairment. Moreover, memory impairment was prevented by the selective mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor temsirolimus and the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin. Mature dendritic spines on CA1 pyramidal hippocampal neurons decreased 4 days after the precipitation of nicotine withdrawal, when the cognitive deficits were still present. Indeed, a correlation between memory performance and mature spine density was found. Interestingly, these structural plasticity alterations were normalized in GABA-CB1R conditional knockout mice and after subchronic treatment with rimonabant. These findings underline the interest of CB1R as a target to improve cognitive performance during early nicotine withdrawal. Cognitive deficits in early abstinence are associated with increased relapse risk. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Structure of Human G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 in Complex with the Kinase Inhibitor Balanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesmer, John J.G.; Tesmer, Valerie M.; Lodowski, David T.; Steinhagen, Henning; Huber, Jochen (Sanofi); (Michigan); (Texas)

    2010-07-19

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) is a pharmaceutical target for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases such as congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, and hypertension. To better understand how nanomolar inhibition and selectivity for GRK2 might be achieved, we have determined crystal structures of human GRK2 in complex with G{beta}{gamma} in the presence and absence of the AGC kinase inhibitor balanol. The selectivity of balanol among human GRKs is assessed.

  10. The structure and function of the urokinase receptor, a membrane protein governing plasminogen activation on the cell surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Rønne, E; Danø, K

    1995-01-01

    PA receptor, uPAR, is a cell-surface protein which plays an important role in the localization and regulation of these processes. In the present article a number of established conclusions concerning the structure and function of uPAR are presented, and in addition various models are discussed which might...... with the continuous identification of inhibitory reagents, this knowledge should open the possibility to interfere with the resulting, degradative events....

  11. A characteristic back support structure in the bisphenol A-binding pocket in the human nuclear receptor ERRγ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui Liu

    Full Text Available The endocrine disruptor bisphenol A (BPA affects various genes and hormones even at merely physiological levels. We recently demonstrated that BPA binds strongly to human nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor (ERR γ and that the phenol-A group of BPA is in a receptacle pocket with essential amino acid residues to provide structural support at the backside. This led BPA to bind to ERRγ in an induced-fit-type binding mode, for example, with a rotated motion of Val313 to support the Tyr326-binding site. A similar binding mechanism appears to occur at the binding site of the BPA phenol-B ring. X-ray crystal analysis of the ERRγ-ligand-binding domain/BPA complex suggested that the ERRγ receptor residues Leu342, Leu345, Asn346, and Ile349 function as intrinsic binding sites of the BPA phenol-B, whereas Leu265, Leu268, Ile310, Val313, Leu324, Tyr330, Lys430, Ala431, and His434 work as structural elements to assist these binding sites. In the present study, by evaluating the mutant receptors replaced by a series of amino acids, we demonstrated that a finely assembled structural network indeed exists around the two adjacent Leu342-Asn346 and Leu345-Ile349 ridges on the same α-helix 7 (H7, constructing a part of the binding pocket structure with back support residues for the BPA phenol-B ring. The results reveal that the double-layer binding sites, namely, the ordinary ligand binding sites and their back support residues, substantiate the strong binding of BPA to ERRγ. When ERRγ-Asn346 was replaced by the corresponding Gly and Tyr in ERRα and ERRβ, respectively, the binding affinity of BPA and even 4-hydroxytamxifen (4-OHT is much reduced. Asn346 was found to be one of the residues that make ERRγ to be exclusive to BPA.

  12. A novel dualistic profile of an allosteric AMPA receptor modulator identified through studies on recombinant receptors, mouse hippocampal synapses and crystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, G B; Harbak, B; Hede, S E; Gouliaev, A H; Olsen, L; Frydenvang, K; Egebjerg, J; Kastrup, J S; Holm, M M

    2015-12-03

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptors receive increasing interest as therapeutic drugs and have long served as important experimental tools in the study of the molecular mechanisms underlying glutamate-mediated neurotransmission. The aim of this study was to investigate functional and structural aspects of a novel analog of the AMPA receptor PAM cyclothiazide (CTZ) on recombinant and native glutamate receptors. We expressed rat GluA4flip and flop in Xenopus oocytes and characterized NS1376 and CTZ under two-electrode voltage-clamp. The dose-response analyses revealed dual effects of NS1376. The modulator induced 30-fold and 42-fold reductions in glutamate potency and increased the glutamate efficacy by 3.2-fold and 5.3-fold at GluA4flip and GluA4flop, respectively. Rapid application of glutamate to excised outside-out patches showed that NS1376 markedly attenuated desensitization, supporting the increased efficacy observed in the oocytes. Furthermore, when applied to acutely isolated mouse brain slices, NS1376 reduced the field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) in the hippocampus to 51.6 ± 4.3% of baseline, likely as a consequence of reduced glutamate potency. However, the modulator displayed no effects on a sub-maximal long-term potentiation (LTP) protocol. We confirmed that CTZ increases presynaptic transmitter release, a property which was not shared by NS1376. Finally, we obtained detailed molecular information through X-ray structures, docking and molecular dynamics, which revealed that NS1376 interacts at the dimer interface of the ligand-binding domain in a manner overall similar to CTZ. NS1376 reveals that minor structural changes in CTZ can result in an altered modulatory profile, both enhancing agonist efficacy while markedly reducing agonist potency. These unique properties add new aspects to the complexity of allosteric modulations in neuronal systems. Copyright

  13. Structure-activity relationships of constrained phenylethylamine ligands for the serotonin 5-ht2 receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isberg, Vignir; Paine, James; Leth-Petersen, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Serotonergic ligands have proven effective drugs in the treatment of migraine, pain, obesity, and a wide range of psychiatric and neurological disorders. There is a clinical need for more highly 5-HT2 receptor subtype-selective ligands and the most attention has been given to the phenethylamine......-activity relationships of constrained phenethylamines and contributes towards the development of 5-HT2 receptor subtype-selective ligands....

  14. NMR Insights into the Structure-Function Relationships in the Binding of Melanocortin Analogues to the MC1R Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Maurício; Zamora-Carreras, Héctor; Raposinho, Paula D; Oliveira, Maria Cristina; Pantoja-Uceda, David; Correia, João D G; Jiménez, M Angeles

    2017-07-15

    Linear and cyclic analogues of the α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) targeting the human melanocortin receptor 1 (MC1R) are of pharmacological interest for detecting and treating melanoma. The central sequence of α-MSH (His-Phe-Arg-Trp) has been identified as being essential for receptor binding. To deepen current knowledge on the molecular basis for α-MSH bioactivity, we aimed to understand the effect of cycle size on receptor binding. To that end, we synthesised two macrocyclic isomeric α-MSH analogues, c[NH-NO₂-C₆H₃-CO-His-DPhe-Arg-Trp-Lys]-Lys-NH₂ (CycN-K6) and c[NH-NO₂-C₆H₃-CO-His-DPhe-Arg-Trp-Lys-Lys]-NH₂ (CycN-K7). Their affinities to MC1R receptor were determined by competitive binding assays, and their structures were analysed by ¹H and 13C NMR. These results were compared to those of the previously reported analogue c[S-NO₂-C₆H₃-CO-His-DPhe-Arg-Trp-Cys]-Lys-NH₂ (CycS-C6). The MC1R binding affinity of the 22-membered macrocyclic peptide CycN-K6 (IC50 = 155 ± 16 nM) is higher than that found for the 25-membered macrocyclic analogue CycN-K7 (IC50 = 495 ± 101 nM), which, in turn, is higher than that observed for the 19-membered cyclic analogue CycS-C6 (IC50 = 1770 ± 480 nM). NMR structural study indicated that macrocycle size leads to changes in the relative dispositions of the side chains, particularly in the packing of the Arg side chain relative to the aromatic rings. In contrast to the other analogues, the 22-membered cycle's side chains are favorably positioned for receptor interaction.

  15. Structure-dependent binding and activation of perfluorinated compounds on human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lianying [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, 18 Shuangqing Road, Beijing 100085 (China); College of Life Science, Dezhou University, Dezhou 253023 (China); Ren, Xiao-Min; Wan, Bin [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, 18 Shuangqing Road, Beijing 100085 (China); Guo, Liang-Hong, E-mail: LHGuo@rcees.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, 18 Shuangqing Road, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) have been shown to disrupt lipid metabolism and even induce cancer in rodents through activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). Lines of evidence showed that PPARα was activated by PFCs. However, the information on the binding interactions between PPARγ and PFCs and subsequent alteration of PPARγ activity is still limited and sometimes inconsistent. In the present study, in vitro binding of 16 PFCs to human PPARγ ligand binding domain (hPPARγ-LBD) and their activity on the receptor in cells were investigated. The results showed that the binding affinity was strongly dependent on their carbon number and functional group. For the eleven perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs), the binding affinity increased with their carbon number from 4 to 11, and then decreased slightly. The binding affinity of the three perfluorinated sulfonic acids (PFSAs) was stronger than their PFCA counterparts. No binding was detected for the two fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs). Circular dichroim spectroscopy showed that PFC binding induced distinctive structural change of the receptor. In dual luciferase reporter assays using transiently transfected Hep G2 cells, PFCs acted as hPPARγ agonists, and their potency correlated with their binding affinity with hPPARγ-LBD. Molecular docking showed that PFCs with different chain length bind with the receptor in different geometry, which may contribute to their differences in binding affinity and transcriptional activity. - Highlights: • Binding affinity between PFCs and PPARγ was evaluated for the first time. • The binding strength was dependent on fluorinated carbon chain and functional group. • PFC binding induced distinctive structural change of the receptor. • PFCs could act as hPPARγ agonists in Hep G2 cells.

  16. Structural and biophysical characterisation of G protein-coupled receptor ligand binding using resonance energy transfer and fluorescent labelling techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Richard J; Milligan, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between ligands and the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to which they bind has long been the focus of intensive investigation. The signalling cascades triggered by receptor activation, due in most cases to ligand binding, are of great physiological and medical importance; indeed, GPCRs are targeted by in excess of 30% of small molecule therapeutic medicines. Attempts to identify further pharmacologically useful GPCR ligands, for receptors with known and unknown endogenous ligands, continue apace. In earlier days direct assessment of such interactions was restricted largely to the use of ligands incorporating radioactive isotope labels as this allowed detection of the ligand and monitoring its interaction with the GPCR. This use of such markers has continued with the development of ligands labelled with fluorophores and their application to the study of receptor-ligand interactions using both light microscopy and resonance energy transfer techniques, including homogenous time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Details of ligand-receptor interactions via X-ray crystallography are advancing rapidly as methods suitable for routine production of substantial amounts and stabilised forms of GPCRs have been developed and there is hope that this may become as routine as the co-crystallisation of serine/threonine kinases with ligands, an approach that has facilitated widespread use of rapid structure-based ligand design. Conformational changes involved in the activation of GPCRs, widely predicted by biochemical and biophysical means, have inspired the development of intramolecular FRET-based sensor forms of GPCRs designed to investigate the events following ligand binding and resulting in a signal propagation across the cell membrane. Finally, a number of techniques are emerging in which ligand-GPCR binding can be studied in ways that, whilst indirect, are able to monitor its results in an unbiased and integrated manner. This article is part

  17. Insights into Basal Signaling Regulation, Oligomerization, and Structural Organization of the Human G-Protein Coupled Receptor 83.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Müller

    Full Text Available The murine G-protein coupled receptor 83 (mGPR83 is expressed in the hypothalamus and was previously suggested to be involved in the regulation of metabolism. The neuropeptide PEN has been recently identified as a potent GPR83 ligand. Moreover, GPR83 constitutes functionally relevant hetero-oligomers with other G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR such as the ghrelin receptor (GHSR or GPR171. Previous deletion studies also revealed that the long N-terminal extracellular receptor domain (eNDo of mGPR83 may act as an intra-molecular ligand, which participates in the regulation of basal signaling activity, which is a key feature of GPCR function. Here, we investigated particular amino acids at the eNDo of human GPR83 (hGPR83 by side-directed mutagenesis to identify determinants of the internal ligand. These studies were accompanied by structure homology modeling to combine functional insights with structural information. The capacity for hetero-oligomer formation of hGPR83 with diverse family A GPCRs such as the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R was also investigated, with a specific emphasis on the impact of the eNDo on oligomerization and basal signaling properties. Finally, we demonstrate that hGPR83 exhibits an unusual basal signaling for different effectors, which also supports signaling promiscuity. hGPR83 interacts with a variety of hypothalamic GPCRs such as the MC4R or GHSR. These interactions are not dependent on the ectodomain and most likely occur at interfaces constituted in the transmembrane regions. Moreover, several amino acids at the transition between the eNDo and transmembrane helix 1 were identified, where mutations lead also to biased basal signaling modulation.

  18. Functional and Structural Characterization of a Receptor-Like Kinase Involved in Germination and Cell Expansion in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Wu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR-RLKs are widespread in different plant species and play important roles in growth and development. Germination inhibition is vital for the completion of seed maturation and cell expansion is a fundamental cellular process driving plant growth. Here, we report genetic and structural characterizations of a functionally uncharacterized LRR-RLK, named GRACE (Germination Repression and Cell Expansion receptor-like kinase. Overexpression of GRACE in Arabidopsis exhibited delayed germination, enlarged cotyledons, rosette leaves and stubbier petioles. Conversely, these phenotypes were reversed in the T-DNA insertion knock-down mutant grace-1 plants. A crystal structure of the extracellular domain of GRACE (GRACE-LRR determined at the resolution of 3.0 Å revealed that GRACE-LRR assumed a right-handed super-helical structure with an island domain (ID. Structural comparison showed that structure of the ID in GRACE-LRR is strikingly different from those observed in other LRR-RLKs. This structural observation implies that GRACE might perceive a new ligand for signaling. Collectively, our data support roles of GRACE in repressing seed germination and promoting cell expansion of Arabidopsis, presumably by perception of unknown ligand(s.

  19. Modeling ligand recognition at the P2Y12 receptor in light of X-ray structural information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoletta, Silvia; Sabbadin, Davide; von Kügelgen, Ivar; Hinz, Sonja; Katritch, Vsevolod; Hoffmann, Kristina; Abdelrahman, Aliaa; Straßburger, Jens; Baqi, Younis; Zhao, Qiang; Stevens, Raymond C.; Moro, Stefano; Müller, Christa E.; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2015-08-01

    The G protein-coupled P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12R) is an important antithrombotic target and of great interest for pharmaceutical discovery. Its recently solved, highly divergent crystallographic structures in complex either with nucleotides (full or partial agonist) or with a nonnucleotide antagonist raise the question of which structure is more useful to understand ligand recognition. Therefore, we performed extensive molecular modeling studies based on these structures and mutagenesis, to predict the binding modes of major classes of P2Y12R ligands previously reported. Various nucleotide derivatives docked readily to the agonist-bound P2Y12R, but uncharged nucleotide-like antagonist ticagrelor required a hybrid receptor resembling the agonist-bound P2Y12R except for the top portion of TM6. Supervised molecular dynamics (SuMD) of ticagrelor binding indicated interactions with the extracellular regions of P2Y12R, defining possible meta-binding sites. Ureas, sulfonylureas, sulfonamides, anthraquinones and glutamic acid piperazines docked readily to the antagonist-bound P2Y12R. Docking dinucleotides at both agonist- and antagonist-bound structures suggested interactions with two P2Y12R pockets. Thus, our structure-based approach consistently rationalized the main structure-activity relationships within each ligand class, giving useful information for designing improved ligands.

  20. Capturing state-dependent dynamic events of GABAA-receptors: a microscopic look into the structural and functional insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payghan, Pavan V; Bera, Indrani; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay; Ghoshal, Nanda

    2016-08-01

    The γ-amino butyric acid type A receptors (GABAA-Rs) are the key players in the mammalian brain that meditate fast inhibitory neurotransmission events. The structural integrity of these ligand-gated ion channel controls chloride ion permeability, which in turn monitors important pharmacological functions. Despite ample studies on GABAA-Rs, there was a need for a study on full-length receptor structures, devoted to track structure-function correlations based on their dynamic behavior consideration. We have employed molecular dynamics simulations accompanied by other biophysical methods to shed light on sequential and unaddressed questions like How GABAA-R structure facilitates the entry of GABA molecules at its two orthosteric binding sites? After entry, what structural features and changes monitor site-wise GABA binding differences? In the same context, what are the roles and responsibilities of loops such as C and F? On physiologically relevant time scales, how open to close state transition occurs? How salt bridges such as E155-R207 and E153-R207 maintain state-dependent C-loop structures? In an attempt, our simulation study unravels the complete course of GABA binding-unbinding pathway. This provides us with the relevant understanding of state-dependent dynamic events of GABAA-Rs.

  1. Structures of the signal recognition particle receptor from the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus: implications for the targeting step at the membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Pascal F; Tsuruta, Hiro; de Leon, Gladys P; Napetschnig, Johanna; Walter, Peter; Stroud, Robert M

    2008-01-01

    In all organisms, a ribonucleoprotein called the signal recognition particle (SRP) and its receptor (SR) target nascent proteins from the ribosome to the translocon for secretion or membrane insertion. We present the first X-ray structures of an archeal FtsY, the receptor from the hyper-thermophile Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu), in its free and GDP*magnesium-bound forms. The highly charged N-terminal domain of Pfu-FtsY is distinguished by a long N-terminal helix. The basic charges on the surface of this helix are likely to regulate interactions at the membrane. A peripheral GDP bound near a regulatory motif could indicate a site of interaction between the receptor and ribosomal or SRP RNAs. Small angle X-ray scattering and analytical ultracentrifugation indicate that the crystal structure of Pfu-FtsY correlates well with the average conformation in solution. Based on previous structures of two sub-complexes, we propose a model of the core of archeal and eukaryotic SRP*SR targeting complexes.

  2. Structures of the Signal Recognition Particle Receptor From the Archaeon Pyrococcus Furiosus: Implications for the Targeting Step at the Membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egea, P.F.; Tsuruta, H.; Leon, G.P.de; Napetschnig, J.; Walter, P.; Stroud, R.M.

    2009-05-18

    In all organisms, a ribonucleoprotein called the signal recognition particle (SRP) and its receptor (SR) target nascent proteins from the ribosome to the translocon for secretion or membrane insertion. We present the first X-ray structures of an archeal FtsY, the receptor from the hyper-thermophile Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu), in its free and GDP {center_dot} magnesium-bound forms. The highly charged N-terminal domain of Pfu-FtsY is distinguished by a long N-terminal helix. The basic charges on the surface of this helix are likely to regulate interactions at the membrane. A peripheral GDP bound near a regulatory motif could indicate a site of interaction between the receptor and ribosomal or SRP RNAs. Small angle X-ray scattering and analytical ultracentrifugation indicate that the crystal structure of Pfu-FtsY correlates well with the average conformation in solution. Based on previous structures of two sub-complexes, we propose a model of the core of archeal and eukaryotic SRP {center_dot} SR targeting complexes.

  3. The structure of adeno-associated virus serotype 3B (AAV-3B): Insights into receptor binding and immune evasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, Thomas F.; Xie, Qing; Chapman, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) are leading candidate vectors for human gene therapy. AAV serotypes have broad cellular tropism and use a variety of cellular receptors. AAV serotype 3 binds to heparan sulfate proteoglycan prior to cell entry and is serologically distinct from other serotypes. The capsid features that distinguish AAV-3B from other serotypes are poorly understood. The structure of AAV-3B has been determined to 2.6Å resolution from twinned crystals of an infectious virus. The most distinctive structural features are located in regions implicated in receptor and antibody binding, providing insights into the cell entry mechanisms and antigenic nature of AAVs. We show that AAV-3B has a lower affinity for heparin than AAV-2, which can be rationalized by the distinct features of the AAV-3B capsid. The structure of AAV-3B provides an additional foundation for the future engineering of improved gene therapy vectors with modified receptor binding or antigenic characteristics. PMID:20444480

  4. Virus-resembling nano-structures for near infrared fluorescence imaging of ovarian cancer HER2 receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Yadir A.; Bahmani, Baharak; Singh, Sheela P.; Vullev, Valentine I.; Kundra, Vikas; Anvari, Bahman

    2015-10-01

    Ovarian cancer remains the dominant cause of death due to malignancies of the female reproductive system. The capability to identify and remove all tumors during intraoperative procedures may ultimately reduce cancer recurrence, and lead to increased patient survival. The objective of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of an optical nano-structured system for targeted near infrared (NIR) imaging of ovarian cancer cells that over-express the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), an important biomarker associated with ovarian cancer. The nano-structured system is comprised of genome-depleted plant-infecting brome mosaic virus doped with NIR chromophore, indocyanine green, and functionalized at the surface by covalent attachment of monoclonal antibodies against the HER2 receptor. We use absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering to characterize the physical properties of the constructs. Using fluorescence imaging and flow cytometry, we demonstrate the effectiveness of these nano-structures for targeted NIR imaging of HER2 receptors in vitro. These functionalized nano-materials may provide a platform for NIR imaging of ovarian cancer.

  5. Structures of the signal recognition particle receptor from the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus: implications for the targeting step at the membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal F Egea

    Full Text Available In all organisms, a ribonucleoprotein called the signal recognition particle (SRP and its receptor (SR target nascent proteins from the ribosome to the translocon for secretion or membrane insertion. We present the first X-ray structures of an archeal FtsY, the receptor from the hyper-thermophile Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu, in its free and GDP*magnesium-bound forms. The highly charged N-terminal domain of Pfu-FtsY is distinguished by a long N-terminal helix. The basic charges on the surface of this helix are likely to regulate interactions at the membrane. A peripheral GDP bound near a regulatory motif could indicate a site of interaction between the receptor and ribosomal or SRP RNAs. Small angle X-ray scattering and analytical ultracentrifugation indicate that the crystal structure of Pfu-FtsY correlates well with the average conformation in solution. Based on previous structures of two sub-complexes, we propose a model of the core of archeal and eukaryotic SRP*SR targeting complexes.

  6. Adaptability and selectivity of human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) pan agonists revealed from crystal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyama, Takuji; Toyota, Kenji; Waku, Tsuyoshi; Hirakawa, Yuko; Nagasawa, Naoko [The Takara Bio Endowed Division, Department of Biomolecular Recognition, Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, Open Laboratories of Advanced Bioscience and Biotechnology, 6-2-3 Furuedai, Suita, Osaka 565-0874 (Japan); Kasuga, Jun-ichi; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Miyachi, Hiroyuki [Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Morikawa, Kosuke, E-mail: morikako@protein.osaka-u.ac.jp [The Takara Bio Endowed Division, Department of Biomolecular Recognition, Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, Open Laboratories of Advanced Bioscience and Biotechnology, 6-2-3 Furuedai, Suita, Osaka 565-0874 (Japan)

    2009-08-01

    The structures of the ligand-binding domains (LBDs) of human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARα, PPARγ and PPARδ) in complexes with a pan agonist, an α/δ dual agonist and a PPARδ-specific agonist were determined. The results explain how each ligand is recognized by the PPAR LBDs at an atomic level. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) belong to the nuclear hormone receptor family, which is defined as transcriptional factors that are activated by the binding of ligands to their ligand-binding domains (LBDs). Although the three PPAR subtypes display different tissue distribution patterns and distinct pharmacological profiles, they all are essentially related to fatty-acid and glucose metabolism. Since the PPARs share similar three-dimensional structures within the LBDs, synthetic ligands which simultaneously activate two or all of the PPARs could be potent candidates in terms of drugs for the treatment of abnormal metabolic homeostasis. The structures of several PPAR LBDs were determined in complex with synthetic ligands, derivatives of 3-(4-alkoxyphenyl)propanoic acid, which exhibit unique agonistic activities. The PPARα and PPARγ LBDs were complexed with the same pan agonist, TIPP-703, which activates all three PPARs and their crystal structures were determined. The two LBD–ligand complex structures revealed how the pan agonist is adapted to the similar, but significantly different, ligand-binding pockets of the PPARs. The structures of the PPARδ LBD in complex with an α/δ-selective ligand, TIPP-401, and with a related δ-specific ligand, TIPP-204, were also determined. The comparison between the two PPARδ complexes revealed how each ligand exhibits either a ‘dual selective’ or ‘single specific’ binding mode.

  7. Rosetta Broker for membrane protein structure prediction: concentrative nucleoside transporter 3 and corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 test cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latek, Dorota

    2017-08-03

    Membrane proteins are difficult targets for structure prediction due to the limited structural data deposited in Protein Data Bank. Most computational methods for membrane protein structure prediction are based on the comparative modeling. There are only few de novo methods targeting that distinct protein family. In this work an example of such de novo method was used to structurally and functionally characterize two representatives of distinct membrane proteins families of solute carrier transporters and G protein-coupled receptors. The well-known Rosetta program and one of its protocols named Broker was used in two test cases. The first case was de novo structure prediction of three N-terminal transmembrane helices of the human concentrative nucleoside transporter 3 (hCNT3) homotrimer belonging to the solute carrier 28 family of transporters (SLC28). The second case concerned the large scale refinement of transmembrane helices of a homology model of the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 (CRFR1) belonging to the G protein-coupled receptors family. The inward-facing model of the hCNT3 homotrimer was used to propose the functional impact of its single nucleotide polymorphisms. Additionally, the 100 ns molecular dynamics simulation of the unliganded hCNT3 model confirmed its validity and revealed mobility of the selected binding site and homotrimer interface residues. The large scale refinement of transmembrane helices of the CRFR1 homology model resulted in the significant improvement of its accuracy with respect to the crystal structure of CRFR1, especially in the binding site area. Consequently, the antagonist CP-376395 could be docked with Autodock VINA to the CRFR1 model without any steric clashes. The presented work demonstrated that Rosetta Broker can be a versatile tool for solving various issues referring to protein biology. Two distinct examples of de novo membrane protein structure prediction presented here provided important insights into three

  8. Synthesis and structure-activity relationship of novel diarylpyrazole imide analogues as CB1 cannabinoid receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kwang-Seop; Kim, Min Ju; Seo, Hee Jeong; Lee, Sung-Han; Jung, Myung Eun; Kim, Soo-Un; Kim, Jeongmin; Lee, Jinhwa

    2009-04-15

    A myriad of research groups have been engaged in searching for novel CB1 receptor antagonists, since SR141716A (rimonabant), a CB1 receptor antagonist, was discovered for an obesity treatment. In this research, extended series, based on the 1,5-diarylpyrazole template of rimonabant, was synthesized and tested for CB1 receptor binding affinity. In the present study, N-piperidinylcarboxamide group of rimonabant was replaced with the corresponding sulfonamide, imide, N-methyl imide and methylenediamide, respectively. The SAR studies to optimize the CB1 binding affinity led to the potent imide derivatives. The in vivo efficacy test of a derivative (16f) gave a promising result for this novel scaffold. In order to explore physicochemical properties (hydrophobic, steric and electronic) of the representative imide derivatives responsible for their CB1 receptor binding affinity, quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) studies were performed. Hansch QSAR models, which were moderate in the explanation for SAR, were generated with hydrophobic, steric and electronic properties of substituents. Especially, the Taft Es-based parabolic model was obtained with the best correlation result (r(2)=0.846).

  9. Structural and functional divergence of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptors in early sarcopterygians: lungfish and Xenopus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice K V Tam

    Full Text Available The evolutionary trajectories of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH receptor remain enigmatic since the discovery of physiologically functional GHRH-GHRH receptor (GHRHR in non-mammalian vertebrates in 2007. Interestingly, subsequent studies have described the identification of a GHRHR(2 in chicken in addition to the GHRHR and the closely related paralogous receptor, PACAP-related peptide (PRP receptor (PRPR. In this article, we provide information, for the first time, on the GHRHR in sarcopterygian fish and amphibians by the cloning and characterization of GHRHRs from lungfish (P. dolloi and X. laevis. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses demonstrated structural resemblance of lungfish GHRHR to their mammalian orthologs, while the X. laevis GHRHR showed the highest homology to GHRHR(2 in zebrafish and chicken. Functionally, lungfish GHRHR displayed high affinity towards GHRH in triggering intracellular cAMP and calcium accumulation, while X. laevis GHRHR(2 was able to react with both endogenous GHRH and PRP. Tissue distribution analyses showed that both lungfish GHRHR and X. laevis GHRHR(2 had the highest expression in brain, and interestingly, X. laevis(GHRHR2 also had high abundance in the reproductive organs. These findings, together with previous reports, suggest that early in the Sarcopterygii lineage, GHRHR and PRPR have already established diverged and specific affinities towards their cognate ligands. GHRHR(2, which has only been found in xenopus, zebrafish and chicken hitherto, accommodates both GHRH and PRP.

  10. Hydrophobic cluster analysis of G protein-coupled receptors: a powerful tool to derive structural and functional information from 2D-representation of protein sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentes, K U; Mathieu, E; Bischoff, R; Rasmussen, U B; Pavirani, A

    1993-01-01

    Current methods for comparative analyses of protein sequences are 1D-alignments of amino acid sequences based on the maximization of amino acid identity (homology) and the prediction of secondary structure elements. This method has a major drawback once the amino acid identity drops below 20-25%, since maximization of a homology score does not take into account any structural information. A new technique called Hydrophobic Cluster Analysis (HCA) has been developed by Lemesle-Varloot et al. (Biochimie 72, 555-574), 1990). This consists of comparing several sequences simultaneously and combining homology detection with secondary structure analysis. HCA is primarily based on the detection and comparison of structural segments constituting the hydrophobic core of globular protein domains, with or without transmembrane domains. We have applied HCA to the analysis of different families of G-protein coupled receptors, such as catecholamine receptors as well as peptide hormone receptors. Utilizing HCA the thrombin receptor, a new and as yet unique member of the family of G-protein coupled receptors, can be clearly classified as being closely related to the family of neuropeptide receptors rather than to the catecholamine receptors for which the shape of the hydrophobic clusters and the length of their third cytoplasmic loop are very different. Furthermore, the potential of HCA to predict relationships between new putative and already characterized members of this family of receptors will be presented.

  11. Family structure and phylogenetic analysis of odorant receptor genes in the large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Peng

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemosensory receptors, which are all G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, come in four types: odorant receptors (ORs, vomeronasal receptors, trace-amine associated receptors and formyl peptide receptor-like proteins. The ORs are the most important receptors for detecting a wide range of environmental chemicals in daily life. Most fish OR genes have been identified from genome databases following the completion of the genome sequencing projects of many fishes. However, it remains unclear whether these OR genes from the genome databases are actually expressed in the fish olfactory epithelium. Thus, it is necessary to clone the OR mRNAs directly from the olfactory epithelium and to examine their expression status. Results Eighty-nine full-length and 22 partial OR cDNA sequences were isolated from the olfactory epithelium of the large yellow croaker, Larimichthys crocea. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis classified the vertebrate OR genes into two types, with several clades within each type, and showed that the L. crocea OR genes of each type are more closely related to those of fugu, pufferfish and stickleback than they are to those of medaka, zebrafish and frog. The reconciled tree showed 178 duplications and 129 losses. The evolutionary relationships among OR genes in these fishes accords with their evolutionary history. The fish OR genes have experienced functional divergence, and the different clades of OR genes have evolved different functions. The result of real-time PCR shows that different clades of ORs have distinct expression levels. Conclusion We have shown about 100 OR genes to be expressed in the olfactory epithelial tissues of L. crocea. The OR genes of modern fishes duplicated from their common ancestor, and were expanded over evolutionary time. The OR genes of L. crocea are closely related to those of fugu, pufferfish and stickleback, which is consistent with its evolutionary position. The different expression

  12. Structural characteristics of anabolic androgenic steroids contributing to binding to the androgen receptor and to their anabolic and androgenic activities. Applied modifications in the steroidal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragkaki, A G; Angelis, Y S; Koupparis, M; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, A; Kokotos, G; Georgakopoulos, C

    2009-02-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are synthetic derivatives of testosterone introduced for therapeutic purposes providing enhanced anabolic potency with reduced androgenic effects. Androgens mediate their action through their binding to the androgen receptor (AR) which is mainly expressed in androgen target tissues, such as the prostate, skeletal muscle, liver and central nervous system. This paper reviews some of the wide spectrum of testosterone and synthetic AAS structure modifications related to the intended enhancement in anabolic activity. The structural features of steroids necessary for effective binding to the AR and those which contribute to the stipulation of the androgenic and anabolic activities are also presented.

  13. Predicted 3D structures of olfactory receptors with details of odorant binding to OR1G1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Kyung; Goddard, William A.

    2014-12-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) are responsible for mediating the sense of smell; they allow humans to recognize an enormous number of odors but the connection between binding and perception is not known. We predict the ensemble of low energy structures for the human OR1G1 (hOR1G1) and also for six other diverse ORs, using the G protein-coupled receptor Ensemble of Structures in Membrane BiLayer Environment complete sampling method that samples 13 trillion different rotations and tilts using four different templates to predict the 24 structures likely to be important in binding and activation. Our predicted most stable structures of hOR1G1 have a salt-bridge between the conserved D3.49 and K6.30 in the D(E)RY region, that we expect to be associated with an inactive form. The hOR1G1 structure also has specific interaction in transmembrane domains (TMD) 3-6 (E3.39 and H6.40), which is likely an important conformational feature for all hORs because of the 94 to 98 % conservation among all hOR sequences. Of the five ligands studied (nonanal, 9-decen-1-ol, 1-nonanol, camphor, and n-butanal), we find that the 4 expected to bind lead to similar binding energies with nonanol the strongest.

  14. High-Performance Prediction of Human Estrogen Receptor Agonists Based on Chemical Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Asako

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Many agonists for the estrogen receptor are known to disrupt endocrine functioning. We have developed a computational model that predicts agonists for the estrogen receptor ligand-binding domain in an assay system. Our model was entered into the Tox21 Data Challenge 2014, a computational toxicology competition organized by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences. This competition aims to find high-performance predictive models for various adverse-outcome pathways, including the estrogen receptor. Our predictive model, which is based on the random forest method, delivered the best performance in its competition category. In the current study, the predictive performance of the random forest models was improved by strictly adjusting the hyperparameters to avoid overfitting. The random forest models were optimized from 4000 descriptors simultaneously applied to 10,000 activity assay results for the estrogen receptor ligand-binding domain, which have been measured and compiled by Tox21. Owing to the correlation between our model’s and the challenge’s results, we consider that our model currently possesses the highest predictive power on agonist activity of the estrogen receptor ligand-binding domain. Furthermore, analysis of the optimized model revealed some important features of the agonists, such as the number of hydroxyl groups in the molecules.

  15. High-Performance Prediction of Human Estrogen Receptor Agonists Based on Chemical Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asako, Yuki; Uesawa, Yoshihiro

    2017-04-23

    Many agonists for the estrogen receptor are known to disrupt endocrine functioning. We have developed a computational model that predicts agonists for the estrogen receptor ligand-binding domain in an assay system. Our model was entered into the Tox21 Data Challenge 2014, a computational toxicology competition organized by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences. This competition aims to find high-performance predictive models for various adverse-outcome pathways, including the estrogen receptor. Our predictive model, which is based on the random forest method, delivered the best performance in its competition category. In the current study, the predictive performance of the random forest models was improved by strictly adjusting the hyperparameters to avoid overfitting. The random forest models were optimized from 4000 descriptors simultaneously applied to 10,000 activity assay results for the estrogen receptor ligand-binding domain, which have been measured and compiled by Tox21. Owing to the correlation between our model's and the challenge's results, we consider that our model currently possesses the highest predictive power on agonist activity of the estrogen receptor ligand-binding domain. Furthermore, analysis of the optimized model revealed some important features of the agonists, such as the number of hydroxyl groups in the molecules.

  16. Molecular Cloning, Genomic Organization and Developmental Regulation of a Novel Receptor from Drosophila melanogaster Structurally Related to Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptors from Vertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauser, Frank; Søndergaard, Leif; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J.P.

    1998-01-01

    RH) receptors from vertebrates. Using the polymerase chain reaction, withDrosophilacDNA as a template, and oligonucleotide probes coding for the presumed exons of this gene, we were able to clone the cDNA coding for this receptor. The transmembrane region of the receptor shows 36% amino acid residue identity...

  17. Structure-function similarities between a plant receptor-like kinase and the human interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaus-Heisen, D.; Nurisso, A.; Pietraszewska-Bogiel, A.; Mbengue, M.; Camut, S.; Timmers, T.; Pichereaux, C.; Rossignol, M.; Gadella, T.W.J.; Imberty, A.; Lefebvre, B.; Cullimore, J.V.

    2011-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis has previously shown that plant receptor-like kinases (RLKs) are monophyletic with respect to the kinase domain and share an evolutionary origin with the animal interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase/Pelle-soluble kinases. The lysin motif domain-containing receptor-like

  18. A role for information collection, management, and integration in structure-function studies of G-protein coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lei; Javitch, Jonathan A

    2006-01-01

    Elucidation of protein function is greatly facilitated by the availability of an atomic resolution structure or a reliable molecular model. The difficulty of obtaining atomic resolution structures of membrane proteins in general, and of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) in particular, has made the information available from sequence analysis, mutagenesis, and the literature on related GPCRs exceptionally important. Here, we review previous studies of GPCR structure-function from the perspectives of sequence analysis, management of mutagenesis and ligand binding data, and literature data mining. The knowledge derived from these information resources not only constitutes the prerequisites for reliable molecular modeling, but also can provide other insights into GPCR functions. Finally, we review approaches for information integration and applying knowledge discovery techniques to structure-function studies of GPCRs, including molecular modeling itself.

  19. In vitro and in silico assessment of the structure-dependent binding of bisphenol analogues to glucocorticoid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Tiehua; Guan, Tianzhu; Yu, Hansong; Li, Tiezhu

    2017-03-01

    Widespread use of bisphenol A (BPA) and other bisphenol analogues has attracted increasing attention for their potential adverse effects. As environmental endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs), bisphenols (BPs) may activate a variety of nuclear receptors, including glucocorticoid receptor (GR). In this work, the binding of 11 BPs to GR was investigated by fluorescence polarization (FP) assay in combination with molecular dynamics simulations. The human glucocorticoid receptor was prepared as a soluble recombinant protein. A fluorescein-labeled dexamethasone derivative (Dex-fl) was employed as tracer. Competitive displacement of Dex-fl from GR by BPs showed that the binding affinities of bisphenol analogues were largely dependent on their characteristic functional groups. In order to further understand the relationship between BPs structures and their GR-mediated activities, molecular docking was utilized to explore the binding modes at the atomic level. The results confirmed that structural variations of bisphenol analogues contributed to different interactions of BPs with GR, potentially causing distinct toxic effects. Comparison of the calculated binding energies vs. experimental binding affinities yielded a good correlation (R 2 = 0.8266), which might be helpful for the design of environmentally benign materials with reduced toxicities. In addition, the established FP assay based on GR exhibited the potential to offer an alternative to traditional methods for the detection of bisphenols.

  20. Structure-function analysis of STRUBBELIG, an Arabidopsis atypical receptor-like kinase involved in tissue morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Vaddepalli

    Full Text Available Tissue morphogenesis in plants requires the coordination of cellular behavior across clonally distinct histogenic layers. The underlying signaling mechanisms are presently being unraveled and are known to include the cell surface leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase STRUBBELIG in Arabidopsis. To understand better its mode of action an extensive structure-function analysis of STRUBBELIG was performed. The phenotypes of 20 EMS and T-DNA-induced strubbelig alleles were assessed and homology modeling was applied to rationalize their possible effects on STRUBBELIG protein structure. The analysis was complemented by phenotypic, cell biological, and pharmacological investigations of a strubbelig null allele carrying genomic rescue constructs encoding fusions between various mutated STRUBBELIG proteins and GFP. The results indicate that STRUBBELIG accepts quite some sequence variation, reveal the biological importance for the STRUBBELIG N-capping domain, and reinforce the notion that kinase activity is not essential for its function in vivo. Furthermore, individual protein domains of STRUBBELIG cannot be related to specific STRUBBELIG-dependent biological processes suggesting that process specificity is mediated by factors acting together with or downstream of STRUBBELIG. In addition, the evidence indicates that biogenesis of a functional STRUBBELIG receptor is subject to endoplasmic reticulum-mediated quality control, and that an MG132-sensitive process regulates its stability. Finally, STRUBBELIG and the receptor-like kinase gene ERECTA interact synergistically in the control of internode length. The data provide genetic and molecular insight into how STRUBBELIG regulates intercellular communication in tissue morphogenesis.

  1. Crystal Structure of the Ligand Binding Suppressor Domain of Type 1 Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosanac, Ivan; Yamazaki, Haruka; Matsu-ura, Toru; Michikawa, Takayuki; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Ikura, Mitsuhiko (U. of Texas-SMED)

    2010-11-10

    Binding of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) to the amino-terminal region of IP{sub 3} receptor promotes Ca{sup 2+} release from the endoplasmic reticulum. Within the amino terminus, the first 220 residues directly preceding the IP{sub 3} binding core domain play a key role in IP{sub 3} binding suppression and regulatory protein interaction. Here we present a crystal structure of the suppressor domain of the mouse type 1 IP{sub 3} receptor at 1.8 {angstrom}. Displaying a shape akin to a hammer, the suppressor region contains a Head subdomain forming the {beta}-trefoil fold and an Arm subdomain possessing a helix-turn-helix structure. The conserved region on the Head subdomain appeared to interact with the IP{sub 3} binding core domain and is in close proximity to the previously proposed binding sites of Homer, RACK1, calmodulin, and CaBP1. The present study sheds light onto the mechanism underlying the receptor's sensitivity to the ligand and its communication with cellular signaling proteins.

  2. Differences in Organizational Structure of Insulin Receptor on Rat Adipocyte and Liver Plasma Membranes: Role of Disulfide Bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, John B.; Smith, Robert M.; Jarett, Leonard

    1980-08-01

    Binding of 125I-labeled insulin to rat liver and adipocyte plasma membranes has been investigated after treatment of the membranes with agents that modify disulfide bonds or sulfhydryl groups. Dithiothreitol, a disulfide-reducing agent, produced a bimodal response in adipocyte plasma membranes with dose-dependent increases in binding occurring over the range of 0-1 mM dithiothreitol; 5 mM dithiothreitol produced decreased binding. Insulin binding reached its maximal increase at 1 mM and was 3 times control values. Scatchard analysis of the 1 mM dithiothreitol effect revealed a straight line plot indicative of one class of sites with a Ka of 1.0× 108 M-1 which is intermediate between the two Kas obtained from the curvilinear Scatchard plot of control membranes. There was a 20-fold increase in the number of intermediate-affinity receptors compared to high-affinity receptors. The increased 125I-labeled insulin binding after dithiothreitol treatment was reversed by oxidized glutathione in a dose-dependent manner. Interposition of treatment with N-ethylmaleimide, an alkylating agent, prevented oxidized glutathione from reversing the dithiothreitol effect. Reduced glutathione produced the same effect as dithiothreitol. Liver plasma membranes treated with up to 1 mM dithiothreitol exhibited a maximum increase in insulin binding of 20% compared to control. Dithiothreitol at 5 mM decreased insulin binding below that of control membranes. The results indicate that the dithiothreitol effect on insulin binding to adipocyte plasma membranes is due to disruption of disulfide bonds, and that the structural organization of the insulin receptor on the plasma membranes is different for liver and for adipose tissue. The data imply that the insulin receptors on the plasma membrane of adipocytes possess at least two functionally distinct subclasses of disulfide bond but liver insulin receptors do not.

  3. Synthesis and structure-activity relationship of 1,2,4-triazole-containing diarylpyrazolyl carboxamide as CB1 cannabinoid receptor-ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hee Jeong; Kim, Min Ju; Lee, Suk Ho; Lee, Sung-Han; Jung, Myung Eun; Kim, Mi-Soon; Ahn, Kwangwoo; Kim, Jeongmin; Lee, Jinhwa

    2010-02-01

    Numerous research groups have been engaged in searching for novel CB1 receptor antagonists, since SR141716A (rimonabant), a CB1 receptor antagonist, proved to be efficacious in human for the treatment of obesity. In the present study, a series of 1,2,4-triazole-containing diarylpyrazolyl carboxamides based on the 1,5-diarylpyrazole template of rimonabant, was synthesized and tested for CB1 receptor binding affinity. The structure-activity relationship studies demonstrated that incorporation of 1,2,4-triazole ring onto the pyrazole scaffold via a methylene linker led to a significant improvement for CB1 receptor binding affinity. Importantly, these analogues also exhibited excellent selectivity for CB1 receptor over CB2 receptor. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Structure-function relationship in the binding of snake neurotoxins to the torpedo membrane receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicheportiche, R; Vincent, J P; Kopeyan, C; Schweitz, H; Lazdunski, M

    1975-05-20

    The Cys30-Cus34 bridge present in all long neutotoxins (71-74 amino acids, 5 disulfide bridges), but not in short toxins (60-63 amino acids, 4 disulfide bridges), is exposed at the surface since it can be reduced rapidly and selectively by sodium borohydride. Reduction and alkylation of the Cys30-Cys34 bridge of Naja haje neurotoxin III hardly alter the conformational properties of this model long toxin. Although alkylation by iodoacetic acid of th -SH groups liberated by reduction abolishes the toxicity, alkylation by iodoacetamide or ethylenimine does not affect the curarizing efficacy of the toxin. The Cys30-Cys34 bridge is not very important for the toxic activity of long neurotoxins. Reduction of the Cys30-Cys34 bridge followed by alkylation with radioactive iodoacetamide gave a labeled and active toxin which is a convenient derivative for binding experiments to the toxin receptor in membranes of the Torpedo electric organ. The binding capacity of these membrane is 1200 pmol of toxin/mg of membrane protein. The dissociation constant of the modified toxin-receptor complex at pH 7.4, 20 degrees is 10 minus 8m. Reduction with carbroxamidomethylation of the Cys30-Cys34 bridge decreases the affinity of the native Naja haje toxin only by a factor of 15. Carboxymethylation after reduction prevents binding to the membrane receptor. The binding properties of the derivative obtained by reduction and aminoethylation of Cys30-Cys34 are very similar to those of native neurotoxin III; the affinity is decreased only by a factor of 5. Binding properties to Toredo membrane of long neurotoxins (Naja haje neurotoxin III) and short neurotoxins (Naje haje toxin I and Naja mossambica toxin I) have been compared. Dissociation constants of receptor-long neurotoxin and receptor-short neurotoxin complexes are very similar (5.7 minus 8.2 times 10(-10) M at pH 7.4, 20degrees. However, the kinetics of complex formation and complex dissociation are quite different. Short neurotoxins

  5. Synthesis and structure-activity studies on acidic amino acids and related diacids as NMDA receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, T N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Ebert, B

    1994-01-01

    The 3-isoxazolol amino acids (S)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4- isoxazolyl)propionic acid [(S)-AMPA, 2] and (R,S)-2-amino-2-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)acetic acid (AMAA, 5a) (Figure 1) are potent and specific agonists at the AMPA and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) subtypes, respectively......, of (S)-glutamic acid (1) receptors. A number of amino acids and diacids structurally related to AMAA were synthesized and tested electrophysiologically and in receptor-binding assays. The hydroxymethyl analogue 7c of AMAA was an NMDA agonist approximately equipotent with AMAA in the [3H...... by molecular mechanics calculations. Compound 7a possesses extra steric bulk and shows significant restriction of conformational flexibility compared to AMAA and 7c, which may be determining factors for the observed differences in biological activity. Although the nitrogen atom of quinolinic acid (6) has very...

  6. The crystal structure of the interleukin 21 receptor bound to interleukin 21 reveals that a sugar chain interacting with the WSXWS motif is an integral part of the interleukin 21 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamming, Ole Jensen; Kang, Lishan; Svensson, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin (IL) 21 is a class I cytokine, which exerts pleiotropic effects on both innate and adaptive immune responses. It signals through a heterodimeric receptor complex consisting of the IL-21 receptor (IL-21R) and the common gamma chain (gC). A hallmark of the class I cytokine receptors...... to be a consensus sequence for C-mannosylation. Here we present the crystal structure of IL-21 bound to IL-21R and reveal that the WSXWS motif of IL-21R is C-mannosylated on the first tryptophan. We furthermore demonstrate that a sugar chain bridge the two fibronectin domains which constitute the extracellular...

  7. The structure features of umami hexapeptides for the T1R1/T1R3 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaqin; Zhang, Lujia; Miao, Xiaodan; Li, Yanyu; Liu, Yuan

    2017-04-15

    Umami is thought to be initiated by binding tastants to G-protein-coupled receptors in taste cells, while the structure and mechanism of the receptors are not clear. In this study, we summarized umami peptides and classified them roughly into two groups: the first group contains dipeptides and tripeptides with terminal Glu or Asp, while the second peptides comprises more amino acids without significant features. The research on the structure and taste characteristics of second group peptides are less studied, so we focus on this group. In this work, nine flavor peptides were newly identified from Takifugu obscurus, and among them, the umami hexapeptides KGRYER belong to the second group. Five hexapeptides from this study, our previous work and references were chosen to build a Three Dimensional Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship model with q2 value as 0.964 successfully. Then the relationship between the structure and intensity of umami peptides were illustrated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Structure of Epstein-Barr Virus Glycoprotein 42 Suggests a Mechanism for Triggering Receptor-Activated Virus Entry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirschner, Austin N.; Sorem, Jessica; Longnecker, Richard; Jardetzky, Theodore S.; (NWU); (Stanford-MED)

    2009-05-26

    Epstein-Barr virus requires glycoproteins gH/gL, gB, and gp42 to fuse its lipid envelope with B cells. Gp42 is a type II membrane protein consisting of a flexible N-terminal region, which binds gH/gL, and a C-terminal lectin-like domain that binds to the B-cell entry receptor human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II. Gp42 triggers membrane fusion after HLA binding, a process that requires simultaneous binding to gH/gL and a functional hydrophobic pocket in the lectin domain adjacent to the HLA binding site. Here we present the structure of gp42 in its unbound form. Comparisons to the previously determined structure of a gp42:HLA complex reveals additional N-terminal residues forming part of the gH/gL binding site and structural changes in the receptor binding domain. Although the core of the lectin domain remains similar, significant shifts in two loops and an {alpha} helix bordering the essential hydrophobic pocket suggest a structural mechanism for triggering fusion.

  9. Structures of Rhodopsin Kinase in Different Ligand States Reveal Key Elements Involved in G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Puja; Wang, Benlian; Maeda, Tadao; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Tesmer, John J.G. (Case Western); (Michigan)

    2008-10-08

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate activated heptahelical receptors, leading to their uncoupling from G proteins. Here we report six crystal structures of rhodopsin kinase (GRK1), revealing not only three distinct nucleotide-binding states of a GRK but also two key structural elements believed to be involved in the recognition of activated GPCRs. The first is the C-terminal extension of the kinase domain, which was observed in all nucleotide-bound GRK1 structures. The second is residues 5-30 of the N terminus, observed in one of the GRK1{center_dot}(Mg{sup 2+}){sub 2} {center_dot}ATP structures. The N terminus was also clearly phosphorylated, leading to the identification of two novel phosphorylation sites by mass spectral analysis. Co-localization of the N terminus and the C-terminal extension near the hinge of the kinase domain suggests that activated GPCRs stimulate kinase activity by binding to this region to facilitate full closure of the kinase domain.

  10. Structure-based drug design approach to target toll-like receptor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathways are the first line of defence against many microbial organisms. The question of how TLRs recognize endogenous ligands remains controversial. Several studies have shown that TLRs are implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus ...

  11. Lymphocyte activation receptors:new structural paradigms in group V of C-type animal lectins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavlíček, J.; Kavan, Daniel; Pompach, Petr; Novák, Petr; Lukšan, Ondřej; Bezouška, Karel

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 6 (2004), s. 1124-1126 ISSN 0300-5127 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5020403 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : lectin -type receptor * ligand identification * lymphocyte Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.267, year: 2004

  12. New insights into the structure of Class B G protein-coupled receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollenstein, H.; de Graaf, C.; Bortolato, A.; Wang, M-W; Marshall, F.; Stevens, R.C.

    2014-01-01

    The secretin-like (class B) family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are key players in hormonal homeostasis and are interesting drug targets for the treatment of several metabolic disorders (such as type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis, and obesity) and nervous system diseases (such as migraine,

  13. Structure and ligand interactions of the urokinase receptor (uPAR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, Magnus; Hansen, Line V.; Jacobsen, Benedikte

    2008-01-01

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR or CD87) is a glycolipid-anchored membrane glycoprotein, which is responsible for focalizing plasminogen activation to the cell surface through its high-affinity binding to the serine protease uPA. This tight interaction (KD less than 1 nM) ...

  14. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human anti-mullerian hormone type II receptor gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Visser (Jenny); A. McLuskey; T. van Beers (T.); D.O. Weghuis (D. Olde); A.H.M. Geurts van Kessel (Ad); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton); A.P.N. Themmen (Axel)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractUsing the rat anti-müllerian hormone type II receptor (AMHRII) cDNA as a probe, two overlapping lambda phage clones containing the AMHRII gene were isolated from a human genomic library. Sequence analysis of the exons was performed and the exon/intron boundaries were determined. The

  15. The three-dimensional structure of the N-terminal domain of corticotropin-releasing factor receptors: sushi domains and the B1 family of G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Marilyn H; Grace, Christy R R; Riek, Roland; Vale, Wylie W

    2006-07-01

    The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors, CRF-R1 and CRF-R2, belong to the B1 subfamily of G protein-coupled Receptors (GPCRs), including