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Sample records for calcium silicides

  1. Reprocessing RERTR silicide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor Program is one element of the United States Government's nonproliferation effort. High-density, low-enrichment, aluminum-clad uranium silicide fuels may be substituted for the highly enriched aluminum-clad alloy fuels now in use. Savannah River Laboratory has performed studies which demonstrate reprocessability of spent RERTR silicide fuels at Savannah River Plant. Results of dissolution and feed preparation tests and solvent extraction processing demonstrations with both unirradiated and irradiated uranium silicide fuels are presented

  2. Metal silicide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lih-Juann; Wu, Wen-Wei

    2015-07-01

    The growth, properties and applications of metal silicide nanowires (NWs) have been extensively investigated. The investigations have led to significant advance in the understanding of one-dimensional (1D) metal silicide systems. For example, CoSi is paramagnetic in bulk form, but ferromagnetic in NW geometry. In addition, the helimagnetic phase and skyrmion state in MnSi are stabilized by NW morphology. The influencing factors on the growth of silicide phase have been elucidated for Ni-Si, Pt-Si, and Mn-Si systems. Promising results were obtained for spintronics, non-volatile memories, field emitter, magnetoresistive sensor, thermoelectric generator and solar cells. However, the main thrust has been in microelectronic devices and integrated circuits. Transistors of world-record small size have been fabricated. Reconfigurable Si NW transistors, dually active Si NW transistors and circuits with equal electron and hole transport have been demonstrated. Furthermore, multifunctional devices and logic gates with undoped Si NWs were reported. It is foreseen that practical applications will be realized in the near future.

  3. High temperature structural silicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural silicides have important high temperature applications in oxidizing and aggressive environments. Most prominent are MoSi2-based materials, which are borderline ceramic-intermetallic compounds. MoSi2 single crystals exhibit macroscopic compressive ductility at temperatures below room temperature in some orientations. Polycrystalline MoSi2 possesses elevated temperature creep behavior which is highly sensitive to grain size. MoSi2-Si3N4 composites show an important combination of oxidation resistance, creep resistance, and low temperature fracture toughness. Current potential applications of MoSi2-based materials include furnace heating elements, molten metal lances, industrial gas burners, aerospace turbine engine components, diesel engine glow plugs, and materials for glass processing

  4. On Silicides in High Temperature Titanium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ramachandra

    1986-04-01

    Full Text Available High temperature titanium alloys like IMI 685 contain small amounts of silicon (~ 0.25 wt. per cent to improve creep resistance. Different types of silicides, namely Ti5Si3 (TiZr5Si3(S1 and (TiZr6 Si3 (S2, have been observed to precipitate in various silicon-bearing titanium alloys depending upon their composition and heat treatment. The precipitation of silicides, their orientation relationship with the matrix in different alloys, and the beneficial influence of thermo-mechanical treatment on the distribution of silicides have been pointed out. The effect of silicides on mechanical properties and fracture of the commercial alloy IMI 685 is also indicated.

  5. LEU silicide programs at Babcock and Wilcox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low enriched silicide development project at Babcock and Wilcox has matured into a production operation that has resulted in the completion of fuel elements for three research reactors; ORR, R-2 Studsvik and SAPHIR. Characteristic anomalies of silicide fuel which make the fabrication of fuel plates and elements more difficult than UAlx, have either been avoided, eliminated or significantly improved. One such anomaly is the reaction between uranium silicide fuel and aluminum matrix material. A detailed analysis was performed to characterize the extent of this reaction. Data suggests that a solid state diffusion of aluminum atoms into the uranium silicide lattice results in the formation of several intermediate Al-Si-U phases before forming a stable UAl4 phase

  6. Nanoscale contact engineering for Si/Silicide nanowire devices

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yung-chen

    2012-01-01

    Metal silicides have been used in silicon technology as contacts to achieve high device performance and desired device functions. The growth and applications of silicide materials have recently attracted increasing interest for nanoscale device applications. Nanoscale silicide materials have been demonstrated with various synthetic approaches. Solid state reaction wherein high quality silicides form through diffusion of metal atoms into silicon nano-templates and the subsequent phase transfor...

  7. Robust micromachining of compliant mechanisms using silicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce an innovative sacrificial surface micromachining process that enhances the mechanical robustness of freestanding microstructures and compliant mechanisms. This process facilitates the fabrication, and improves the assembly yield of the out-of-plane micro sensors and actuators. Fabrication of a compliant mechanism using conventional sacrificial surface micromachining results in a non-planar structure with a step between the structure and its anchor. During mechanism actuation or assembly, stress accumulation at the structure step can easily exceed the yield strength of the material and lead to the structure failure. Our process overcomes this topographic issue by virtually eliminating the step between the structure and its anchor, and achieves planarization without using chemical mechanical polishing. The process is based on low temperature and post-CMOS compatible nickel silicide technology. We use a layer of amorphous silicon (a-Si) as a sacrificial layer, which is locally converted to nickel silicide to form the anchors. High etch selectivity between silicon and nickel silicide in the xenon difluoride gas (sacrificial layer etchant) enables us to use the silicide to anchor the structures to the substrate. The formed silicide has the same thickness as the sacrificial layer; therefore, the structure is virtually flat. The maximum measured step between the anchor and the sacrificial layer is about 10 nm on a 300 nm thick sacrificial layer. (paper)

  8. New silicides for new niobium protective coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efforts to improve at high temperature the oxidation resistance of pure niobium or commercial niobium alloys have led to the development of a pack cementation process for the co-deposition of Si, Ti, Cr and Fe. Owing to the knowledge of the quaternary Nb(Ti)-T-Cr-Si phase diagrams (T=Fe or Co or Ni) and of the crystallographic features of phases present in the silicide coatings, new protective coatings have been applied on pure niobium and Cb752 alloy. The results of the crystallographic study of three new silicides isostructural with Nb3Fe3CrSi6, in which Nb is substituted by Ti and Fe by Co or Ni are reported. The oxidation performances of two new coatings mainly consisting of such a silicide are also outlined. (orig.)

  9. On Silicides in High Temperature Titanium Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Ramachandra, C.; Vakil Singh; P. Rama Rao

    1986-01-01

    High temperature titanium alloys like IMI 685 contain small amounts of silicon (~ 0.25 wt. per cent) to improve creep resistance. Different types of silicides, namely Ti5Si3 (TiZr)5Si3(S1) and (TiZr)6 Si3 (S2), have been observed to precipitate in various silicon-bearing titanium alloys depending upon their composition and heat treatment. The precipitation of silicides, their orientation relationship with the matrix in different alloys, and the beneficial influence of thermo-mechanical treatm...

  10. On the kinetics of platinum silicide formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, Erik J.; Wolters, Rob A.M.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the kinetics of platinum silicide formation for thin Pt films (50 nm) on monocrystalline <100> silicon is investigated via in situ resistance measurements under isothermal (197–275 °C) conditions. For Pt2Si diffusion limited growth was observed. For PtSi formation, however, no linear r

  11. Challenges of nickel silicidation in CMOS technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breil, Nicolas [IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center (SRDC), East Fishkill, NY (United States); Lavoie, Christian [IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY (United States); Ozcan, Ahmet [IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center (SRDC), East Fishkill, NY (United States); Baumann, Frieder [IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center (SRDC), East Fishkill, NY (United States); Klymko, Nancy [IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center (SRDC), East Fishkill, NY (United States); Nummy, Karen [IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center (SRDC), East Fishkill, NY (United States); Sun, Bing [IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center (SRDC), East Fishkill, NY (United States); Jordan-Sweet, Jean [IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY (United States); Yu, Jian [IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center (SRDC), East Fishkill, NY (United States); Zhu, Frank [IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center (SRDC), East Fishkill, NY (United States); Narasimha, Shreesh [IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center (SRDC), East Fishkill, NY (United States); Chudzik, Michael [IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center (SRDC), East Fishkill, NY (United States)

    2015-04-01

    In our paper, we review some of the key challenges associated with the Ni silicidation process in the most recent CMOS technologies. The introduction of new materials (e.g.SiGe), and of non-planar architectures bring some important changes that require fundamental investigation from a material engineering perspective. Following a discussion of the device architecture and silicide evolution through the last CMOS generations, we focus our study on a very peculiar defect, termed NiSi-Fangs. We describe a mechanism for the defect formation, and present a detailed material analysis that supports this mechanism. We highlight some of the possible metal enrichment processes of the nickel monosilicide such as oxidation or various RIE (Reactive Ion Etching) plasma process, leading to a metal source available for defect formation. Furthermore, we investigate the NiSi formation and re-formation silicidation differences between Si and SiGe materials, and between (1 0 0) and (1 1 1) orientations. Finally, we show that the thermal budgets post silicidation can lead to the formation of NiSi-Fangs if the structure and the processes are not optimized. Beyond the understanding of the defect and the discussion on the engineering solutions used to prevent its formation, the interest of this investigation also lies in the fundamental learning within the Ni–Pt–Si–Ge system and some additional perspective on Ni-based contacts to advanced microelectronic devices.

  12. Synthesis and design of silicide intermetallic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, J.J.; Castro, R.G.; Butt, D.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The overall objective of this program is to develop structural silicide-based materials with optimum combinations of elevated temperature strength/creep resistance, low temperature fracture toughness, and high temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance for applications of importance to the U.S. processing industry. A further objective is to develop silicide-based prototype industrial components. The ultimate aim of the program is to work with industry to transfer the structural silicide materials technology to the private sector in order to promote international competitiveness in the area of advanced high temperature materials and important applications in major energy-intensive U.S. processing industries. The program presently has a number of developing industrial connections, including a CRADA with Schuller International Inc. targeted at the area of MoSi{sub 2}-based high temperature materials and components for fiberglass melting and processing applications. The authors are also developing an interaction with the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) to develop silicides for high temperature radiant gas burner applications, for the glass and other industries. Current experimental emphasis is on the development and characterization of MoSi{sub 2}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and MoSi{sub 2}-SiC composites, the plasma spraying of MoSi{sub 2}-based materials, and the joining of MoSi{sub 2} materials to metals.

  13. Irradiation behavior of miniature experimental uranium silicide fuel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium silicides, because of their relatively high uranium density, were selected as candidate dispersion fuels for the higher fuel densities required in the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program. Irradiation experience with this type of fuel, however, was limited to relatively modest fission densities in the bulk from, on the order of 7 x 1020 cm-3, far short of the approximately 20 x 1020 cm-3 goal established for the RERTR program. The purpose of the irradiation experiments on silicide fuels on the ORR, therefore, was to investigate the intrinsic irradiation behavior of uranium silicide as a dispersion fuel. Of particular interest was the interaction between the silicide particles and the aluminum matrix, the swelling behavior of the silicide particles, and the maximum volume fraction of silicide particles that could be contained in the aluminum matrix

  14. Palladium silicide - a new contact for semiconductor radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicide layers can be used as low resistance contacts in semiconductor devices. The formation of a metal rich palladium silicide Pd2Si is discussed. A palladium film 100A thick is deposited at 3000C and the resulting silicide layer used as an ohmic contact in an n + p silicon detector. This rugged contact has electrical characteristics comparable with existing evaporated gold contacts and enables the use of more reproducible bonding techniques. (author)

  15. Formation and properties of nanometer-thick platinum silicide layers

    OpenAIRE

    Conforto, Egle

    1996-01-01

    Platinum silicide films are widely used in silicon devices for ohmic and Schottky contacts. It has been demonstrated in the recent years that Schottky barriers employing ultra-thin platinum silicide films (thickness < 10 nm) are useful for photodetection in the near infrared. We have studied the formation of thin platinum silicide films and their electrical properties as a function of the annealing temperature in presence of an interfacial native sili...

  16. Production of Mo-99 using low-enriched uranium silicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last several years, uranium silicide fuels have been under development as low-enriched uranium (LEU) targets for Mo-99. The use of LEU silicide is aimed at replacing the UAlx alloy in the highly-enriched uranium dissolution process. A process to recover Mo-99 from low-enriched uranium silicide is being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The uranium silicide is dissolved in alkaline hydrogen peroxide. Experiments performed to determine the optimum dissolution procedure are discussed, and the results of dissolving a portion of a high-burnup (>40%) U3Si2 miniplate are presented. Future work related to Mo-99 separation and waste disposal are also discussed

  17. Fusion silicide coatings for tantalum alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, R. V.; Stetson, A. R.

    1972-01-01

    Calculation of the performance of fusion silicide coatings under simulated atmospheric reentry conditions to a maximum temperature of 1810 K (2800 F). Both recently developed and commercially available coatings are included. Data are presented on oxidation rate with and without intentional defecting, the influence of the coatings on the ductile-brittle bend transition temperature, and the mechanical properties. Coatings appear capable of affording protection for at least 100 simulated cycles to 2600 F and 63 cycles to 2800 F.

  18. Microanalysis of tungsten silicide/polysilicon interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of a thin (10-30 Angstrom) oxide (native oxide) layer on a silicon surface prior to the deposition of another film on that surface can contribute to difficulties with subsequent device processing steps, e.g. contact metallization and high-temperature annealing or oxidation. Thus the in situ process capability of native oxide removal affords advantage over the conventional method of aqueous hydrofluoric acid cleaning prior to a film deposition step. The paper describes such a technique, in which an in situ pre-deposition clean with C2F6 gas, using reactive ion etching (RIE) prior to tungsten silicide deposition, is employed. This technique allows post-silicide deposition high-temperature heat treatment and wet oxidation without loss of film adhesion or other obvious degradative effects. We also report the use of Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) to show that this procedure has been effective in the removal of the oxide layer prior to silicide deposition. This study includes definition of the RIE etch parameters which provide acceptable etch selectivity of the oxide to silicon, and avoidance of excessive fluoropolymer formation on the silicon surface

  19. Silicides and germanides for nano-CMOS applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kittl, J.A. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)], E-mail: kittlj@imec.be; Opsomer, K.; Torregiani, C.; Demeurisse, C.; Mertens, S.; Brunco, D.P.; Van Dal, M.J.H.; Lauwers, A. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2008-12-05

    An overview of silicides and germanides for nano-CMOS applications is presented. The historical evolution describing the migration from the use of Ti silicide to Co silicide to Ni silicide as contacting material is first discussed. These changes in silicide material were mainly motivated by the inability to form the target low resistivity silicide phase in small structures due to low nucleation density. This issue was found first for the low resistivity C54 TiSi{sub 2} at linewidths below 200 nm and later for the low resistivity CoSi{sub 2}, at linewidths below 40 nm. A detailed description of scalability and thermal stability issues for NiSi is then presented. No nucleation issues were found in small structures for NiSi, which grows by diffusion or interface limited kinetics with Ni as main moving species. However, silicidation can be excessive in small structures due to Ni diffusion from surrounding areas, resulting in thicker films than targeted in small devices. This can be controlled by using a silicidation process with two rapid thermal processing steps, the first one to control the amount of Ni reacted and the second one to convert the silicide to the target low resistivity monosilicide phase. One of the main issues for applications of NiSi is its low thermal stability: thin NiSi films agglomerate at relatively low temperatures. The process window and thermal stability of Ni and Pt-based films reacted with Si, Si:Ge and Si:C substrates is reviewed. Addition of Ge is shown to degrade thermal stability while addition of C or Pt improves it. Contact resistivity considerations and implementation of dual band-edge silicides are discussed, as well as promising results for the extension of Ni-based silicides to future nodes. Finally a brief overview of germanides is presented discussing NiGe and PdGe as main candidates.

  20. High temperature protective silicide coatings for titanium-niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accomplished investigation of heat resistance of silicide coatings on titanium - (30-50)% niobium alloys has revealed that the coatings ensure reliable corrosion protection up to 1100 deg due to formation of heat resistant disilicides and a silicon dioxide layer on alloy surface. Silicide coatings possess particular ductility

  1. Infrared spectra of semiconducting silicides nanolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baleva, M; Atanassov, A [Faculty of Physics, St. Kl. Ohridski University of Sofia, 5 J. Bourchier Blvd., 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Marinova, M [Solid State Physics Section, Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)], E-mail: baleva@phys.uni-sofia.bg

    2008-05-01

    The infrared absorption is studied of samples consisting of a Si matrix with unburied nanolayers of the semiconducting silicides {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} and Mg{sub 2}Si. Features additional to those due to the transversal optical phonons of the compounds are observed. The features are interpreted in the framework of the appearance of surface and interface phonon polaritons, which absorb the light. Insofar as the frequencies of the longitudinal optical (LO) phonon-polariton modes are close to those of the LO phonon frequencies, the infrared transmittance of nanolayers can be regarded as a method for direct determination of these frequencies.

  2. Thermoelectric performance of higher manganese silicide nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleemi, M. [Department of Materials and Nano Physics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Kista, Stockholm (Sweden); Famengo, A.; Fiameni, S.; Boldrini, S.; Battiston, S. [CNR, Institute for Energetics and Interphases (IENI-CNR), Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padua (Italy); Johnsson, M. [Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Muhammed, M.; Toprak, M.S. [Department of Materials and Nano Physics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Kista, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Fabrication of p-type higher manganese silicide by mechanical alloying. • Different concentrations Ytterbium (Yb) was used to form HMS nanocomposites. • HMS nanostructures were preserved by using spark plasma sintering (SPS). • HMS–Yb nanocomposites showed improved electrical performance. - Abstract: Higher manganese silicides (HMS) are proven to be promising candidates as p-type thermoelectric material in the temperature range of 400–700 K. In this work, a series of nanostructured (NS) bulk MnSi{sub 1.73} with different levels of Ytterbium inclusions were fabricated via ball milling and the solid state reaction was completed by spark plasma sintering (SPS). Nanopowders and SPS consolidated Yb–HMS nanocomposites (NC) were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to reveal the crystal structure and morphology respectively. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was used to investigate the material composition in bulk grains. Yb was observed to stay as nanoinclusions at the grain boundaries. TE transport properties, including Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistivity, and thermal diffusivity as well as charge carrier concentrations were evaluated. Thermal conductivity decreased with increasing Yb content, while the electrical conductivity improved for the highest Yb content. A highest figure of merit (ZT) of 0.42 at 600 °C was achieved for 1% Yb–HMS NC sample.

  3. Rare earth silicide nanowires on silicon surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth, structure and electronic properties of rare earth silicide nanowires are investigated on planar and vicinal Si(001) und Si(111) surfaces with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES). On all surfaces investigated within this work hexagonal disilicides are grown epitaxially with a lattice mismatch of -2.55% up to +0.83% along the hexagonal a-axis. Along the hexagonal c-axis the lattice mismatch is essentially larger with 6.5%. On the Si(001)2 x 1 surface two types of nanowires are grown epitaxially. The socalled broad wires show a one-dimensional metallic valence band structure with states crossing the Fermi level. Along the nanowires two strongly dispersing states at the anti J point and a strongly dispersing state at the anti Γ point can be observed. Along the thin nanowires dispersing states could not be observed. Merely in the direction perpendicular to the wires an intensity variation could be observed, which corresponds to the observed spacial structure of the thin nanowires. The electronic properties of the broad erbium silicide nanowires are very similar to the broad dysprosium silicide nanowires. The electronic properties of the DySi2-monolayer and the Dy3Si5-multilayer on the Si(111) surface are investigated in comparison to the known ErSi2/Si(111) and Er3Si5/Si(111) system. The positions and the energetic locations of the observed band in the surface Brillouin zone will be confirmed for dysprosium. The shape of the electron pockets in the vector k parallel space is elliptical at the anti M points, while the hole pocket at the anti Γ point is showing a hexagonal symmetry. On the Si(557) surface the structural and electronic properties depend strongly on the different preparation conditions likewise, in particular on the rare earth coverage. At submonolayer coverage the thin nanowires grow in wide areas of the sample surface, which are oriented in the same

  4. Thermal compatibility studies of unirradiated uranium silicide dispersed in aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powder metallurgy dispersions of uranium silicides in an aluminum matrix have been developed by the international Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors program as a new generation of proliferation-resistant fuels. A major issue of concern is the compatibility of the fuel with the matrix material and the dimensional stability of this fuel type. A total of 45 miniplate-type fuel plates were annealed at 4000C for up to 1981 hours. A data base for the thermal compatibility of unirradiated uranium silicide dispersed in aluminum was established. No modification tested of a standard fuel plate showed any significant reduction of the plate swelling. The cause of the thermal growth of silicide fuel plates was determined to be a two-step process: (1) the reaction of the uranium silicide with aluminum to form U(AlSi)3 and (2) the release of hydrogen and subsequent creep and pillowing of the fuel plate. 9 references, 4 figures, 6 tables

  5. Phase transformations in Higher Manganese Silicides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allam, A. [MADIREL, UMR 7246 CNRS - Universite Aix-Marseille, av Normandie-Niemen, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); IM2NP, UMR 7334 CNRS - Universite Aix-Marseille, av Normandie-Niemen, Case 142, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Boulet, P. [MADIREL, UMR 7246 CNRS - Universite Aix-Marseille, av Normandie-Niemen, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Nunes, C.A. [Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais (DEMAR), Escola de Engenharia de Lorena (EEL), Universidade de Sao Paulo - USP, Caixa Postal 116, 12600-970 Lorena, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Sopousek, J.; Broz, P. [Masaryk University, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, Kolarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Masaryk University, Central European Institute of Technology, CEITEC, Kamenice 753/5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Record, M.-C., E-mail: m-c.record@univ-cezanne.fr [IM2NP, UMR 7334 CNRS - Universite Aix-Marseille, av Normandie-Niemen, Case 142, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France)

    2013-02-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phase transitions of the Higher Manganese Silicides were investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The samples were characterised by XRD, DTA and DSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mn{sub 27}Si{sub 47} is the stable phase at room temperature and under atmospheric pressure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At around 800 Degree-Sign C, Mn{sub 27}Si{sub 47} is transformed into Mn{sub 15}Si{sub 26}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phase transition is of a second order. - Abstract: This work is an investigation of the phase transformations of the Higher Manganese Silicides in the temperature range [100-1200 Degree-Sign C]. Several complementary experimental techniques were used, namely in situ X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). The evolution of both the lattice parameters and the thermal expansion coefficients was determined from in situ XRD measurements. The stability of the samples was investigated by thermal analysis (DTA) and Cp measurements (DSC). This study shows that Mn{sub 27}Si{sub 47} which is the stable phase at room temperature and under atmospheric pressure undergoes a phase transformation at around 800 Degree-Sign C. Mn{sub 27}Si{sub 47} is transformed into Mn{sub 15}Si{sub 26}. This phase transformation seems to be of a second order one. Indeed it was not evidenced by DTA and by contrast it appears on the Cp curve.

  6. Rare earth silicide nanowires on silicon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanke, Martina

    2008-11-10

    The growth, structure and electronic properties of rare earth silicide nanowires are investigated on planar and vicinal Si(001) und Si(111) surfaces with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES). On all surfaces investigated within this work hexagonal disilicides are grown epitaxially with a lattice mismatch of -2.55% up to +0.83% along the hexagonal a-axis. Along the hexagonal c-axis the lattice mismatch is essentially larger with 6.5%. On the Si(001)2 x 1 surface two types of nanowires are grown epitaxially. The socalled broad wires show a one-dimensional metallic valence band structure with states crossing the Fermi level. Along the nanowires two strongly dispersing states at the anti J point and a strongly dispersing state at the anti {gamma} point can be observed. Along the thin nanowires dispersing states could not be observed. Merely in the direction perpendicular to the wires an intensity variation could be observed, which corresponds to the observed spacial structure of the thin nanowires. The electronic properties of the broad erbium silicide nanowires are very similar to the broad dysprosium silicide nanowires. The electronic properties of the DySi{sub 2}-monolayer and the Dy{sub 3}Si{sub 5}-multilayer on the Si(111) surface are investigated in comparison to the known ErSi{sub 2}/Si(111) and Er{sub 3}Si{sub 5}/Si(111) system. The positions and the energetic locations of the observed band in the surface Brillouin zone will be confirmed for dysprosium. The shape of the electron pockets in the (vector)k {sub parallel} space is elliptical at the anti M points, while the hole pocket at the anti {gamma} point is showing a hexagonal symmetry. On the Si(557) surface the structural and electronic properties depend strongly on the different preparation conditions likewise, in particular on the rare earth coverage. At submonolayer coverage the thin nanowires grow in wide areas

  7. Irradiation behavior of experimental miniature uranium silicide fuel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium silicides, because of their relatively high uranium density, were selected as candidate dispersion fuels for the higher fuel densities required in the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program. Irradiation experience with this type of fuel, however, was limited to relatively modest fission densities in the bulk form, on the order of 7 x 1020 cm-3, far short of he approximately 20 x 1020 cm-3 goal established for the RERTR Program. The purpose of the irradiation experiments on silicide fuels in the ORR, therefore, was to investigate the intrinsic irradiation behavior of uranium silicide as a dispersion fuel. Of particular interest was the interaction between the silicide particles and the aluminum matrix, the swelling behavior of the silicide particles, and the maximum volume fraction of silicide particles that could be contained in the aluminum matrix. The first group of experimental 'mini' fuel plates have recently reached the program's goal burnup and are in various stages of examination. Although the results to date indicate some limitations, it appears that within the range of parameters examined thus far the uranium silicide dispersion holds promise for satisfying most of the needs of the RERTR Program. The twelve experimental silicide dispersion fuel plates that were irradiated to approximately their goal exposure show the 30-vol % U3Si-Al plates to be in a stage of relatively rapid fission-gas-driven swelling at a fission density of 2 x 1020 cm-3. This fuel swelling will likely result in unacceptably large plate-thickness increases. The U3Si plates appear to be superior in this respect; however, they, too, are starting to move into the rapid fuel-swelling stage. Analysis of the currently available post irradiation data indicates that a 40-vol % dispersed fuel may offer an acceptable margin to the onset of unstable thickness changes at exposures of 2 x 1021 fission/cm3. The interdiffusion between fuel and matrix aluminum was found

  8. Plasmon dispersion in dysprosium silicide nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By depositing Dy at around half monolayer coverage on single domain Si(001) surfaces miscut by 4 towards [110], we have grown DySi2 nanowires in the submonolayer regime. Their plasmon spectrum has been studied by a combination of high resolution EELS and spot profile analysis of LEED in one instrument (ELS-LEED) which enables us to measure characteristic losses with high momentum resolution. Ultraclean conditions (P≤1 x 10-10 mbar during Dy deposition) allowed growth of high quality structures with minimal oxidation of Dy. Deposition of Dy at 500 C results in the formation of single DySi2 nanowires on each terrace, leaving the periodicity of the clean Si surface unchanged. In contrast, deposition at room temperature and subsequent annealing to 500 C reduces the average terrace width by up to 20%. Clearest results in EELS were obtained for a silicide layer with 0.4 ML of Dy deposited at 500 C. Broad loss features in the range between 0 and 1 eV with typical dipole characteristics were detected, their position being strongly dependent on momentum transfer. As expected these characteristic losses have no dispersion normal to the wires, while parallel to the wires the dispersion is non-linear and goes to zero at zero momentum transfer. Thus the typical behavior of onedimensional surface plasmons is found

  9. Submicron Features in Higher Manganese Silicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatir Sadia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The world energy crisis had increased the demand for alternative energy sources and as such is one of the topics at the forefront of research. One way for reducing energy consumption is by thermoelectricity. Thermoelectric effects enable direct conversion of thermal into electrical energy. Higher manganese silicide (HMS, MnSi1.75 is one of the promising materials for applications in the field of thermoelectricity. The abundance and low cost of the elements, combined with good thermoelectric properties and high mechanical and chemical stability at high temperatures, make it very attractive for thermoelectric applications. Recent studies have shown that Si-rich HMS has improved thermoelectric properties. The most interesting of which is the unusual reduction in thermal conductivity. In the current research, transmission (TEM and scanning (SEM electron microscopy as well as X-ray diffraction methods were applied for investigation of the govern mechanisms resulting in very low thermal conductivity values of an Si-rich HMS composition, following arc melting and hot-pressing procedures. In this paper, it is shown that there is a presence of sub-micron dislocations walls, stacking faults, and silicon and HMS precipitates inside each other apparent in the matrix, following a high temperature (0.9 Tm hot pressing for an hour. These are not just responsible for the low thermal conductivity values observed but also indicate the ability to create complicate nano-structures that will last during the production process and possibly during the application.

  10. Si-Ge Nano-Structured with Tungsten Silicide Inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Jon; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Dynys, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Traditional silicon germanium high temperature thermoelectrics have potential for improvements in figure of merit via nano-structuring with a silicide phase. A second phase of nano-sized silicides can theoretically reduce the lattice component of thermal conductivity without significantly reducing the electrical conductivity. However, experimentally achieving such improvements in line with the theory is complicated by factors such as control of silicide size during sintering, dopant segregation, matrix homogeneity, and sintering kinetics. Samples are prepared using powder metallurgy techniques; including mechanochemical alloying via ball milling and spark plasma sintering for densification. In addition to microstructural development, thermal stability of thermoelectric transport properties are reported, as well as couple and device level characterization.

  11. Reaction layers structure of silicide coatings on niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on fused silicide coatings that are used to protect niobium alloys against high temperature oxidation. Quantitative electron microprobe analysis was used to characterize the complex multilayer structure of Si-20w/oFE-20w/oCR fused silicide coating on four niobium containing alloys: niobium, Cb752, WC3009, and Nb-46.5 Ti. The outer coating layer structure on all four alloys was similar, consisting of either two or three phases. The three phase outer coating layer on the niobium, WC3009, and the Nb-Ti substrate alloys was determined to be made of two MSi phases and one MSi2 phase. This outer MSi2 phase contained base alloy elements. Coated samples were compared using cyclic oxidation testing. The fused silicide coating structure and protectiveness were determined to be a function of the base alloy composition

  12. Oxidation resistance of composite silicide coatings on niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the oxidation of NbSi2-MoSi2 composite silicide coatings produced by diffusive siliconizing of molybdenum films on a niobium surface. Molybdenum-coated niobium was siliconized and an x-ray microspectral analysis of the composite silicide coating showed the phase composition to be an ca 80-um-thick outer molybdenum disilicide film with a characteristic coarsely crystalline columnar structure, and inner ca 20-um film of niobium disilicide consisting of the tiny columnar crystals, and a substrate/coating interface comprising a thin, 2-3 um film of lower silicide, i.e., Nb5Si3. The average grain sizes, unit cell parameters, and x-ray determined densities of the Mo films obtained by various methods are shown

  13. Transition Metal Silicide Nanowires Growth and Electrical Characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Zu-Lin; LIANG S.; DENG Luo-Gen

    2009-01-01

    We report the characterization of self-assembled epitaxially grown transition metal,Fe,Co,Ni,silicide nanowires(TM-NW)growth and electrical transport properties.NWs grown by reactive deposition epitaxy on various silicon surfaces show a dimension of 10nm by 5nm,and several micrometers in length.NW orientations strongly depend on substrate crystal orientation,and follow the substrate symmetry.By using conductive-AFM(c-AFM),the electron transport properties of one single NW were measured,the resistivity of crystalline nickel silicide NW was estimated to be 2×10~(-2) Ω·cm.

  14. Oxidation behavior of molybdenum silicides and their composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A key materials issue associated with the future of high-temperature structural silicides is the resistance of these materials to oxidation at low temperatures. Oxidation tests were conducted on Mo-based silicides over a wide temperature range to evaluate the effects of alloy composition and temperature on the protective scaling characteristics and testing regime for the materials. The study included Mo5Si3 alloys that contained several concentrations of B. In addition, oxidation characteristics of MoSi2-Si3N4 composites that contained 20--80 vol.% Si3N4 were evaluated at 500--1,400 C

  15. TiSi2 integrity within a doped silicide process step

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degradation of arsenic implanted titanium silicide (TiSi2) thin films as a result of thermal processing for shallow junction formation is investigated. Significant arsenic diffusion from the silicide overlayer into the silicon substrate has been detected by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry at drive-in temperatures > 1,050 C. Cross-sectional transmission electron micrographs have shown the silicide film become increasingly non-uniform as the thermal budget increases, ultimately leading to discontinuities forming in the silicide film. This observed degradation of the titanium silicide film is also supported by sheet resistance measurements which show the film to degrade significantly above a threshold thermal budget

  16. Making of fission 99Mo from LEU silicide(s): A radiochemists' view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present-day industrial scale production of 99Mo is fission based and involves thermal-neutron irradiation in research reactors of highly enriched uranium (HEU, > 20 % 235U) containing targets, followed by radiochemical processing of the irradiated targets resulting in the final product: a 99Mo containing chemical compound of molybdenum. In 1978 a program (RERTR) was started to develop a substitute for HEU reactor fuel i.e. a low enriched uranium (LEU, 235U) one. In the wake of that program studies were undertaken to convert HEU into LEU based 99Mo production. Both new targets and radiochemical treatments leading to 99Mo compounds were proposed. One of these targets is based on LEU silicide, U3Si2. Present paper aims at comparing LEU U3Si2 and LEU U3Si with another LEU target i.e. target material and arriving at some preferences pertaining to 99Mo production. (author)

  17. Silicon and silicide nanowires applications, fabrication, and properties

    CERN Document Server

    Tu, King-Ning

    2013-01-01

    This book comprises theoretical and experimental analysis of various properties of silicon nanocrystals, research methods and preparation techniques, and some promising applications. It comprises nine chapters. The first three are based on processing, the next three on properties, and the last three on applications of nanowires of silicon and silicides.

  18. A swelling model of LEU silicide fuel for KMRR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A lot of efforts have been made internationally to understand the irradiation behavior and the safety characteristics of uranium silicide fuel. One of the important irradiation performance characteristics of the silicide dispersion fuel element is the diametral increase resulting from fuel swelling. This paper represents an attempt to develop the physical model for the swelling, DFSWELL, by modelling the basic irradiation behavior observed from in-reactor experiments. The most important part of developing the swelling model is the identification of the controlling physical processes. The swelling of the silicide fuel is comprised of the volume change due to three major components; (i) the formation of an interfacial layer between the fuel particle and matrix, (ii) the accumulation of gas bubble nucleation, (iii) the accumulation of solid fission products. In this study, the swelling of the fuel element is quantitatively estimated by considering temperature, fission rate, solid fission product build-up and gas bubble behavior. The DFSWELL model which takes into account the above physical components predicts well the absolute magnitude of silicide fuel swelling in accordance with the power histories in comparison with the experimental data

  19. Nickel silicides in semiconductor processing: thermal budget considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel silicide (NiSi) is emerging to be the choice material for contact application in semiconductor device processing for 65 nm technology node and beyond. However, process integration issues are yet to be completely understood and addressed. The focus of present work is to facilitate better understanding of the influence of thermal budget on nickel silicide solid-state reaction. The reaction couple consists of single-crystal silicon wafers with nickel layers deposited on them. Requirements for low temperature anneal and improved within wafer sheet resistance uniformity pose challenges for conventional lamp-based rapid thermal processing (RTP) due to lamp response effects on temperature controllability. Extendibility of such a system is presented with emphasis on process chamber technology. Low temperature 'spike' anneal is demonstrated for temperatures 2Si changes as a function of thermal exposure during the first anneal step; this plays an important role in determining the thermal stability of the low resistance mono-silicide during integration. It is postulated that lowering the Ni2Si/Si interface energy favors the delay (in temperature) of the agglomeration of the NiSi. RTP performance stability of less than 1 deg. C is presented for a sub-300 deg. C process. Understanding and resolving the issues around process monitoring methodologies for low temperature anneal are important. The ability to monitor the total thermal exposure down to sub-200 deg. C regime may be necessary for successful integration of nickel silicide in device manufacturing flow

  20. Deposition of aluminide and silicide based protective coatings on niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compare aluminide and alumino-silicide composite coatings on niobium using halide activated pack cementation (HAPC) technique for improving its oxidation resistance. The coated samples are characterized by SEM, EDS, EPMA and hardness measurements. We observe formation of NbAl3 in aluminide coating of Nb, though the alumino-silicide coating leads to formation primarily of NbSi2 in the inner layer and a ternary compound of Nb-Si-Al in the outer layer, as reported earlier (Majumdar et al. ). Formation of niobium silicide is preferred over niobium aluminide during alumino-silicide coating experiments, indicating Si is more strongly bonded to Nb than Al, although equivalent quantities of aluminium and silicon powders were used in the pack chemistry. We also employ first-principles density functional pseudopotential-based calculations to calculate the relative stability of these intermediate phases and the adhesion strength of the Al/Nb and Si/Nb interfaces. NbSi2 exhibits much stronger covalent character as compared to NbAl3. The ideal work of adhesion for the relaxed Al/Nb and Si/Nb interfaces are calculated to be 3226 mJ/m2 and 3545 mJ/m2, respectively, indicating stronger Nb-Si bonding across the interface.

  1. Deposition of aluminide and silicide based protective coatings on niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, S.; Arya, A.; Sharma, I. G.; Suri, A. K.; Banerjee, S.

    2010-11-01

    We compare aluminide and alumino-silicide composite coatings on niobium using halide activated pack cementation (HAPC) technique for improving its oxidation resistance. The coated samples are characterized by SEM, EDS, EPMA and hardness measurements. We observe formation of NbAl3 in aluminide coating of Nb, though the alumino-silicide coating leads to formation primarily of NbSi2 in the inner layer and a ternary compound of Nb-Si-Al in the outer layer, as reported earlier (Majumdar et al. [11]). Formation of niobium silicide is preferred over niobium aluminide during alumino-silicide coating experiments, indicating Si is more strongly bonded to Nb than Al, although equivalent quantities of aluminium and silicon powders were used in the pack chemistry. We also employ first-principles density functional pseudopotential-based calculations to calculate the relative stability of these intermediate phases and the adhesion strength of the Al/Nb and Si/Nb interfaces. NbSi2 exhibits much stronger covalent character as compared to NbAl3. The ideal work of adhesion for the relaxed Al/Nb and Si/Nb interfaces are calculated to be 3226 mJ/m2 and 3545 mJ/m2, respectively, indicating stronger Nb-Si bonding across the interface.

  2. Nanoscale contact engineering for Silicon/Silicide nanowire devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yung-Chen

    Metal silicides have been used in silicon technology as contacts to achieve high device performance and desired device functions. The growth and applications of silicide materials have recently attracted increasing interest for nanoscale device applications. Nanoscale silicide materials have been demonstrated with various synthetic approaches. Solid state reaction wherein high quality silicides form through diffusion of metal atoms into silicon nano-templates and the subsequent phase transformation caught significant attention for the fabrication of nanoscale Si devices. Very interestingly, studies on the diffusion and phase transformation processes at nanoscale have indicated possible deviations from the bulk and the thin film system. Here we studied growth kinetics, electronic properties and device applications of nanoscale silicides formed through solid state reaction. We have grown single crystal PtSi nanowires and PtSi/Si/PtSi nanowire heterostructures through solid state reaction. TEM studies show that the heterostructures have atomically sharp interfaces free of defects. Electrical measurement of PtSi nanowires shows a low resistivity of ˜28.6 μΩ·cm and a high breakdown current density beyond 108 A/cm2. Furthermore, using single-crystal PtSi/Si/PtSi nanowire heterostructures with atomically clean interfaces, we have fabricated p-channel enhancement mode transistors with the best reported performance for intrinsic silicon nanowires to date. In our results, silicide can provide a clean and no Fermi level pinning interface and then silicide can form Ohmic-contact behavior by replacing the source/drain metal with PtSi. It has been proven by our experiment by contacting PtSi with intrinsic Si nanowires (no extrinsic doping) to achieve high performance p-channel device. By utilizing the same approach, single crystal MnSi nanowires and MnSi/Si/MnSi nanowire heterojunction with atomically sharp interfaces can also been grown. Electrical transport studies on Mn

  3. Ni based silicides for 45 nm CMOS and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauwers, Anne [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)]. E-mail: lauwersa@imec.be; Kittl, Jorge A. [IMEC, Texas Instruments (Belgium); Van Dal, Mark J.H. [IMEC, Philips Research Leuven (Belgium); Chamirian, Oxana [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Pawlak, Malgorzata A. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Potter, Muriel de [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Lindsay, Richard [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Raymakers, Toon [Philips Research Laboratories, Prof. Holstlaan 4, 5656 AA Eindhoven (Netherlands); Pages, Xavier [IMEC, ASM Belgium (Belgium); Mebarki, Bencherki [Applied Materials (Belgium); Mandrekar, Tushar [Applied Materials Inc., Santa Clara, CA (United States); Maex, Karen [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2004-12-15

    Material issues that impact the applicability of Ni based silicides to CMOS flows were studied, including the excessive silicidation of narrow features, the growth kinetics of Ni{sub 2}Si and NiSi on single-crystalline and poly-crystalline silicon and the thermal degradation mechanisms. Ni{sub 2}Si was found to grow by diffusion controlled kinetics with an activation energy of about 1.55 eV on single-crystalline Si. As a result, the excessive silicidation in small features can be reduced in a 2-step Ni-silicide process by reducing the thermal budget of the first RTP step. The mechanisms of thermal degradation of NiSi were studied. Thin NiSi films were found to degrade morphologically while still in the monosilicide phase. Thick NiSi films degrade morphologically at low temperatures and by transformation to NiSi{sub 2} at high temperatures. The reaction of Ni with SiGe substrates and the effect of Ge on the thermal degradation of the Ni-germanosilicide were investigated. Activation energies for the thermal degradation of Ni(SiGe) on SiGe were found to be significantly smaller than the values found for the thermal degradation of NiSi on pure Si. The effect of alloying Ni with Pt or Ta was studied. NiSi films alloyed with Pt or Ta are found to be thermally more stable compared to pure NiSi. Alloying with Pt was found to improve the thermal stability of NiSi on narrow poly-Si gates. The kinetics of Ni{sub 2}Si and NiSi formation on poly silicon were determined as well as their dependence on dopants. The presence of B in high doses was found to slow down the silicide formation significantly. Dopant segregation to the NiSi/oxide interface was observed, which is believed to be responsible for the observed shifts in work function. The sheet resistance of fully Ni-silicided 100 nm poly Si/oxide stacks is found to be stable up to 800 deg. C.

  4. Ni based silicides for 45 nm CMOS and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Material issues that impact the applicability of Ni based silicides to CMOS flows were studied, including the excessive silicidation of narrow features, the growth kinetics of Ni2Si and NiSi on single-crystalline and poly-crystalline silicon and the thermal degradation mechanisms. Ni2Si was found to grow by diffusion controlled kinetics with an activation energy of about 1.55 eV on single-crystalline Si. As a result, the excessive silicidation in small features can be reduced in a 2-step Ni-silicide process by reducing the thermal budget of the first RTP step. The mechanisms of thermal degradation of NiSi were studied. Thin NiSi films were found to degrade morphologically while still in the monosilicide phase. Thick NiSi films degrade morphologically at low temperatures and by transformation to NiSi2 at high temperatures. The reaction of Ni with SiGe substrates and the effect of Ge on the thermal degradation of the Ni-germanosilicide were investigated. Activation energies for the thermal degradation of Ni(SiGe) on SiGe were found to be significantly smaller than the values found for the thermal degradation of NiSi on pure Si. The effect of alloying Ni with Pt or Ta was studied. NiSi films alloyed with Pt or Ta are found to be thermally more stable compared to pure NiSi. Alloying with Pt was found to improve the thermal stability of NiSi on narrow poly-Si gates. The kinetics of Ni2Si and NiSi formation on poly silicon were determined as well as their dependence on dopants. The presence of B in high doses was found to slow down the silicide formation significantly. Dopant segregation to the NiSi/oxide interface was observed, which is believed to be responsible for the observed shifts in work function. The sheet resistance of fully Ni-silicided 100 nm poly Si/oxide stacks is found to be stable up to 800 deg. C

  5. Weld embrittlement in a silicide-coated tantalum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Certain weld configurations of Ta-10W alloy can become severely embrittled after a silicide coating procedure. The source of this embrittlement is shown to be a result of pronounced carbide precipitation at grain boundaries in the fusion zones of the weld. The source of carbon is the nitrocellulose lacquer that is contained in the slurry of metal powders used to provide the silicide coating. In certain weld configurations, the nitrocellulose can flash ahead of the remainder of the coating mixture, and the carbon constituent can diffuse down grain boundaries in subsequent thermal treatments. It is demonstrated that this embrittlement can be avoided if lacquers other than nitrocellulose are used or if weld configurations containing tight-fitting overlaps are avoided. The possible role of hydrogen embrittlement is also discussed. (author)

  6. RA-3 core with uranium silicide fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following on with studies on uranium silicide fuel elements, this paper reports some comparisons between the use of standard ECN [U3O8] fuel elements and type P-06 [from U3Si2] fuel elements in the RA-3 core.The first results showed that the calculated overall mean burn up is in agreement with that reported for the facility, which gives more confidence to the successive ones. Comparing the mentioned cores, the silicide one presents several advantages such as: -) a mean burn up increase of 18 %; -) an extraction burn up increase of 20 %; -) 37.4 % increase in full power days, for mean burn up. All this is meritorious for this fuel. Moreover, grouped and homogenized libraries were prepared for CITVAP code that will be used for planning experiments and other bidimensional studies. Preliminary calculations were also performed. (author)

  7. Tailoring of nickel silicide contacts on silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Co-deposition technique by means of simultaneous ion beam sputtering of nickel and silicon onto SiC was performed for tailoring of Ni-silicide/SiC contacts. The prepared samples were analysed by means of XRD and XPS in order to obtain information about the surface and interface chemistry. Depth profiling was used in order to analyse in-depth information and chemical distribution of the specimens. XRD results showed that the main phase formed is Ni2Si. The XPS analysis confirmed the formation of the silicide on the surface and showed details about the chemical composition of the layer and layer/substrate interface. Moreover, the XPS depth profiles with detailed analysis of XPS peaks suggested that tailoring of C distribution could be monitored by the co-deposition technique employed

  8. Development and Oxidation Resistance of B-doped Silicide Coatings on Nb-based Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halide-activated pack cementation was utilized to deposit B-doped silicide coating. The pack powders were consisted of 3 Wt.%NH4Cl, 7 Wt.%Si, 90 Wt.%Al2O3+TiB2. B-doped silicide coating was consisted of two layers, an outer layer of NbSi2 and an inner layer of Nb5Si3. Isothermal oxidation resistance of B-doped silicide coating was tested at 1250 .deg. C in static air. B-doped silicide coating had excellent oxidation resistance, because continuous SiO2 scale which serves as obstacle of oxygen diffusion was formed after oxidation

  9. A study of CoSix silicide formed by recoil implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work investigated the formation of CoSix silicides on n-Si by recoil implantation through a thin cobalt layer using an inert gas ion beam. The results suggest the formation of a very shallow (35 to 45 nm) silicide surface layer under the specific conditions of preparation. The surface layer resistivity was comparable to values reported for Co2Si and CoSi, although below the surface, the resistivity decreased. This appeared to suggest a change-over from cobalt-rich silicides near the surface to a more conducting silicide (CoSi2) at the interface. (author)

  10. Nickel silicides and germanides: Phases formation, kinetics and thermal expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin film germanide reactions are often declared to be the same as silicides reactions which were far more studied. In this paper, we present a comparative study of the phase formation and kinetics of nickel silicides and nickel germanides by several experimental techniques. The samples, composed of a nanometric nickel film (50 nm) deposited on silicon or germanium substrates, have been examined by several 'in situ' real time measurements: X-ray diffraction (XRD), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). These original DSC and 'in situ' XRD measurements have allowed us to determine the interfacial reaction rate for Ni2Si using a linear-parabolic law. During the relatively fast DSC ramp, the growth is mainly controlled by the interface while isothermal heat treatments lead to a mainly diffusion control. In contrary to what is usually found for nickel silicide and germanides, a simultaneous growth of Ni5Ge3 and NiGe has been found during 'in situ' XRD measurements. The different behavior between the Ni-Si system (sequential formation) and the Ni-Ge system (simultaneous formation) is interpreted in term of diffusion and interface controlled growth. In addition, in devices, the film stability and the stress of the silicides or the germanides can be affected by an important physical characteristic that is the anisotropy of dilatation coefficient. In this work, the lattice parameters and linear thermal expansion coefficients (γa, γb and γc) of the orthorhombic Ni(Si1-XGeX) compounds with 0 ≤ X ≤ 1 were determined from high temperature X-ray diffraction data (298-1073 K). A negative thermal expansion coefficient of the b lattice parameter of Ni(Si1-XGeX) for all the studied Ge concentration was observed: the magnitude of this negative thermal expansion coefficient is decreasing with increasing Ge concentration

  11. Detailed analysis of uranium silicide dispersion fuel swelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swelling of U3Si and U3Si2 is analyzed. The growth of fission gas bubbles appears to be affected by fission rate, fuel loading, and micro structural change taking place in the fuel compounds during irradiation. Several mechanisms are explored to explain the observations. The present work is aimed at a better understanding of the basic swelling phenomenon in order to accurately model irradiation behavior of uranium silicide dispersion fuel. (orig.)

  12. Stacked Metal Silicide/Silicon Far-Infrared Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maserjian, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    Selective doping of silicon in proposed metal silicide/silicon Schottky-barrier infrared photodetector increases maximum detectable wavelength. Stacking layers to form multiple Schottky barriers increases quantum efficiency of detector. Detectors of new type enhance capabilities of far-infrared imaging arrays. Grows by molecular-beam epitaxy on silicon waferscontaining very-large-scale integrated circuits. Imaging arrays of detectors made in monolithic units with image-preprocessing circuitry.

  13. Fracture of niobium-base silicide coated alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanical properties and character of fracture of Nb-W-Mo-Zr-C alloy composition with complex by composition and structure silicide coating under different states of stage-by-stage coating are studied. Structural features, character of fracture from ductile to quasibrittle transcrystalline one and, respectively, the composition plasticity level are defined by interrelation of fracture processes in coating, matrix plastic flow and possibility and way of stress relaxation on their boundary

  14. Silicidation of Niobium Deposited on Silicon by Physical Vapor Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coumba Ndoye, Kandabara Tapily, Marius Orlowski, Helmut Baumgart, Diefeng Gu

    2011-07-01

    Niobium was deposited by physical vapor deposition (PVD) using e-beam evaporation on bare (100) silicon substrates and SiO2 surfaces. The formation of niobium silicide was investigated by annealing PVD Nb films in the temperatures range 400–1000°C. At all elevated annealing temperatures the resistivity of Nb silicide is substantially higher than that of Nb. The Nb silicidation as a function of temperature has been investigated and different NbXSiy compounds have been characterized. It has been observed that the annealing of the Nb film on Si is accompanied by a strong volume expansion of about 2.5 of the resulting reacted film. The films' structural properties were studied using X-Ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM), which was not previously presented in the context of the extant NbSi literature. The X-Ray diffraction characterization of the Nb on Si sample annealed at 1000°C, showed the presence of hexagonal Nb5Si3 phases, with a dominant peak at the (200) plane, and NbSi2 phases. Fractal dimension calculations indicate a distinct transition from Stranski-Krastanov to Volmer-Weber film growth for NbSi formation at the annealing temperature of 600°C and above.

  15. Fuel management strategy for the new equilibrium silicide core design of RSG GAS (MPR-30)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design procedure and fuel management strategy were proposed for converting the oxide core of RSG GAS (MPR-30) to the new equilibrium silicide core using higher uranium loading. The obtained silicide core gave significant extension of the core cycle length and thus increasing the reactor availability and utilisation. (author)

  16. Mechanoactivation of chromium silicide formation in the SiC-Cr-Si system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlasova M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The processes of simultaneous grinding of the components of a SiC-Cr-Si mixture and further temperature treatment in the temperature range 1073-1793 K were studied by X-ray phase analysis, IR spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and X-ray microanalysis. It was established that, during grinding of the mixture, chromium silicides form. A temperature treatment completes the process. Silicide formation proceeds within the framework of the diffusion of silicon into chromium. In the presence of SiO2 in the mixture, silicide formation occurs also as a result of the reduction of silica by silicon and silicon carbide. The sintering of synthesized composite SiC-chromium silicides powders at a high temperature under a high pressure (T = 2073 K, P = 5 GPa is accompanied by the destruction of cc-SiC particles, the cc/3 transition in silicon carbide and deformation distortions of the lattices of chromium silicides.

  17. Calcium - urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003603.htm Calcium - urine To use the sharing features on this ... enable JavaScript. This test measures the amount of calcium in urine. All cells need calcium in order ...

  18. Calcium supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007477.htm Calcium supplements To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. WHO SHOULD TAKE CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS? Calcium is an important mineral for the ...

  19. Mechanochemical synthesis and spark plasma sintering of the cerium silicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Ce5Si3, Ce3Si2, CeSi, CeSi2−x and CeSi2 were mechanochemically synthesized. • Temperature and pressure were monitored to investigate reaction progress. • All syntheses proceeded through a MSR event followed by rapid solid-state diffusion. • Milling time before MSR correlates well with effective heat of formation. • Some synthesized material was densified by spark plasma sintering. - Abstract: The cerium silicides, Ce5Si3, Ce3Si2, CeSi, CeSi2−y, and CeSi2−x, have been prepared from the elements by mechanochemical processing in a planetary ball mill. Preparation of the cerium silicide Ce5Si4 was unsuccessfully attempted and potential reasons for this are discussed. Temperature and pressure of the milling vial were monitored in situ to gain insight into the mechanochemical reaction kinetics, which include a mechanically-induced self-propagating reaction (MSR). Some prepared powders were consolidated by spark plasma sintering to high density. Starting materials, as-milled powders, and consolidated samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results obtained help elucidate key questions in mechanochemical processing of intermetallics, showing first phase formation similar to thin films, MSR ignition times that are composition- and milling speed-dependent, and sensitivity of stable compound formation on the impact pressure. The results demonstrate mechanochemical synthesis as a viable technique for rare earth silicides

  20. Mechanochemical synthesis and spark plasma sintering of the cerium silicides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alanko, Gordon A.; Jaques, Brian; Bateman, Allyssa [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Butt, Darryl P., E-mail: darrylbutt@boisestate.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Boulevard, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Ce{sub 5}Si{sub 3}, Ce{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, CeSi, CeSi{sub 2−x} and CeSi{sub 2} were mechanochemically synthesized. • Temperature and pressure were monitored to investigate reaction progress. • All syntheses proceeded through a MSR event followed by rapid solid-state diffusion. • Milling time before MSR correlates well with effective heat of formation. • Some synthesized material was densified by spark plasma sintering. - Abstract: The cerium silicides, Ce{sub 5}Si{sub 3}, Ce{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, CeSi, CeSi{sub 2−y}, and CeSi{sub 2−x}, have been prepared from the elements by mechanochemical processing in a planetary ball mill. Preparation of the cerium silicide Ce{sub 5}Si{sub 4} was unsuccessfully attempted and potential reasons for this are discussed. Temperature and pressure of the milling vial were monitored in situ to gain insight into the mechanochemical reaction kinetics, which include a mechanically-induced self-propagating reaction (MSR). Some prepared powders were consolidated by spark plasma sintering to high density. Starting materials, as-milled powders, and consolidated samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results obtained help elucidate key questions in mechanochemical processing of intermetallics, showing first phase formation similar to thin films, MSR ignition times that are composition- and milling speed-dependent, and sensitivity of stable compound formation on the impact pressure. The results demonstrate mechanochemical synthesis as a viable technique for rare earth silicides.

  1. Immobilization of Uranium Silicide in Sintered Iron-Phosphate Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is a continuation of a previous one performed in vitrification of uranium silicide in borosilicate and iron-silicate glasses, by sintering.We present the results obtained with an iron-phosphate glass developed at our laboratory and we compare this results with those obtained with the above mentioned glasses. The main objective was to develop a method as simple as possible, so as to get a monolithic glass block with the appropriate properties to be disposed in a deep geological repository.The thermal transformation of the uranium silicide was characterized by DTA/TG analysis and X-ray diffraction.We determined the evolution of the crystalline phases and the change in weight.Calcined uranium silicide was mixed with natural U3O8, the amount of U3O8 was calculated to simulate an isotopic dilution of 4%.This material was mixed with powdered iron-phosphate glass (in wt.%: 64,9 P2O5; 22,7 Fe2O3; 8,1 Al2O3; 4,3 Na2O) in different proportions (in wt%): 7%, 10% y 15%.The powders were pressed and sintered at temperatures between 585 y 670 °C. Samples of the sintered pellet were prepared for the lixiviation tests (MCC-1P: monolithic samples; deionised water; 90° C; 7, 14 and 28 days).The samples showed a quite good durability (0,6 g.m-2.day-1), similar to borosilicate glasses.The microstructure of the glass samples showed that the uranium particles are much better integrated to the glass matrix in the iron-phosphate glasses than in the borosilicate or iron-silicate glasses.We can conclude that the sintered product obtained could be a good alternative for the immobilization of nuclear wastes with high content of uranium, as the ones arising from the conditioning of research reactors spent fuels

  2. Calcium Oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    Dupont, Geneviève; Combettes, Laurent; Bird, Gary S.; Putney, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Calcium signaling results from a complex interplay between activation and inactivation of intracellular and extracellular calcium permeable channels. This complexity is obvious from the pattern of calcium signals observed with modest, physiological concentrations of calcium-mobilizing agonists, which typically present as sequential regenerative discharges of stored calcium, a process referred to as calcium oscillations. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the underlyin...

  3. Exploitation of a self-limiting process for reproducible formation of ultrathin Ni1-xPtx silicide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This letter reports on a process scheme to obtain highly reproducible Ni1-xPtx silicide films of 3-6 nm thickness formed on a Si(100) substrate. Such ultrathin silicide films are readily attained by sputter deposition of metal films, metal stripping in wet chemicals, and final silicidation by rapid thermal processing. This process sequence warrants an invariant amount of metal intermixed with Si in the substrate surface region independent of the initial metal thickness, thereby leading to a self-limiting formation of ultrathin silicide films. The crystallographic structure, thickness, uniformity, and morphological stability of the final silicide films depend sensitively on the initial Pt fraction.

  4. Postirradiation analysis of experimental uranium-silicide dispersion fuel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-enriched uranium silicide dispersion fuel plates were irradiated to maximum burnups of 96% of 235U. Fuel plates containing 33 v/o U3Si and U3Si2 behaved very well up to this burnup. Plates containing 33 v/o U3 Si-Al pillowed between 90 and 96% burnup of the fissile atoms. More highly loaded U3Si Al plates, up to 50 v/o, were found to pillow at lower burnups. Plates containing 40 v/o U3Si showed an increased swelling rate around 85% burnup. (author)

  5. Pt redistribution during Ni(Pt) silicide formation

    OpenAIRE

    Demeulemeester, Jelle; Smeets, D.; Van Bockstael, C; Detavernier, C.; Comrie, C. M.; Barradas, N. P.; Vieira, A; Vantomme, André

    2008-01-01

    We report on a real-time Rutherford backscattering spectrometry study of the erratic redistribution of Pt during Ni silicide formation in a solid phase reaction. The inhomogeneous Pt redistribution in Ni(Pt)Si films is a consequence of the low solubility of Pt in Ni2Si compared to NiSi and the limited mobility of Pt in NiSi. Pt further acts as a diffusion barrier and resides in the Ni2Si grain boundaries, significantly slowing down the Ni2Si and NiSi growth kinetics. Moreover, the observed in...

  6. Postirradiation analysis of experimental uranium-silicide dispersion fuel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-enriched uranium silicide dispersion fuel plates were irradiated to maximum burnups of 96% of 235U. Fuel plates containing 33 v/o U3Si and U3Si2 behaved very well up to this burnup. Plates containing 33 v/o U3Si-Al pillowed between 90 and 96% burnup of the fissile atoms. More highly loaded U3Si-Al plates, up to 50 v/o were found to pillow at lower burnups. Plates containing 40 v/o U3Si showed an increase swelling rate around 85% burnup. 5 refs., 10 figs

  7. Safety assessment of KUR low-enriched uranium silicide core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) is a light-water moderated and cooled tank-type reactor operated at the rated thermal power of 5 MW. The operation of KUR with highly enriched uranium fuel ended on February 23, 2006 after its successful operation for 42 years. Since then, the conversion processes to the use of low-enriched uranium fuel have been performed. The operation of KUR with low-enriched uranium fuel is due to begin in the second half of FY2009. This report describes the abnormal transient and accident analysis for the safety assessment of KUR silicide core which have been carried out as a part of KUR silicide fuel project. The following 10 cases for the anticipated operational transients and accidents have been selected and analyzed for the safety assessment. Anticipated operational transients: (1) Due to reactivity or power distribution changes in the core. 1) Uncontrolled control rod withdrawal (from zero power, during natural circulation operation, during steady-state operation), 2) Reactivity insertion by cold water insertion, 3) Reactivity insertion by removal of irradiation samples. (2) Due to heat generation or heat removal changes in the core. 1) Primary coolant pump failure and flow coast down, 2) Secondary coolant pump failure and flow coast down, 3) Loss of commercial electric power supply. Accidents: Due to the effluent of primary coolant or the significant change of heat removal in the core. 1) Reactivity insertion by mishandling of a fuel assembly, 2) Effluent of primary coolant due to pipe rapture, 3) Primary coolant pump abrupt failure without coast down, 4) Flow channel blockage in the core. The transient analysis for the safety assessment of KUR silicide core after the earthquake was also carried out in present study. The analyses have been performed by THYDE-W, EUREA-2/RR and COOLOD-N2. Various operational conditions were studied to obtain critical results in the analyses. The results show that all cases meet the safety criteria

  8. Transient and End Silicide Phase Formation in Thin Film Ni/polycrystalline-Si Reactions for Fully Silicided Gate Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kittl,J.; Pawlak, M.; Torregiani, C.; Lauwers, A.; Demeurisse, C.; Vrancken, C.; Absil, P.; Biesemans, S.; Coia, C.; et. al

    2007-01-01

    The Ni/polycrystalline-Si thin film reaction was monitored by in situ x-ray diffraction during ramp annealings, obtaining a detailed view of the formation and evolution of silicide phases in stacks of interest for fully silicided gate applications. Samples consisted of Ni (30-170 nm)/polycrystalline-Si (100 nm)/SiO2 (10-30 nm) stacks deposited on (100) Si. The dominant end phase (after full silicidation) was found to be well controlled by the deposited Ni to polycrystalline-Si thickness ratio (tNi/tSi), with formation of NiSi2 ( {approx} 600 C), NiSi ( {approx} 400 C), Ni3Si2 ( {approx} 500 C), Ni2Si, Ni31Si12 ( {approx} 420 C), and Ni3Si ( {approx} 600 C) in stacks with tNi/tSi of 0.3, 0.6, 0.9, 1.2, 1.4, and 1.7, respectively. NiSi and Ni31Si12 were observed to precede formation of NiSi2 and Ni3Si, respectively, as expected for the phase sequence conventionally reported. Formation of Ni2Si was observed at early stages of the reaction. These studies revealed, in addition, the formation of transient phases that appeared and disappeared in narrow temperature ranges, competing with formation of the phases expected in the conventional phase sequence. These included the transient formation of NiSi and Ni31Si12 in stacks in which these phases are not expected to form (e.g., tNi/tSi of 1.7 and 0.9, respectively), at temperatures similar to those in which these phases normally grow.

  9. Nonuniformity effects in a hybrid platinum silicide imaging device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereniak, Eustace L.; Perry, David L.

    1992-05-01

    The objective of this project was twofold. The first objective was to characterize the Hughes Aircraft Company CRC-365 platinum silicide imaging device in a starting infrared sensor system. The CRC-365 is a hybrid 256 x 256 IR focal plane array that operates in the 3-5 micrometer thermal infrared band. A complete sensor and computer interface were built for these tests, using, plans provided by the Rome Laboratory at Hanscom AFB. Testing of the device revealed largely satisfactory performance, with notable exception in the areas of temporal response, temporal noise, and electrical crosstalk. The second objective of this research was to advance the understanding of how detector nonuniformity effects reduce the performance of sensors of this type. Notable accomplishments in this area included a complete linear analysis of corrected thermal imaging in platinum silicide sensors, a nonlinear analysis of the CRC-365's expected performance, analysis of its actual performance when operated with nonuniformity correction, and the development of a new figure of merit. It was demonstrated that the CRC-365 is capable of maintaining background-noise-limited performance over at least a 40 K target temperature range, when operated with two-point nonuniformity correction.

  10. Atomic size effects studied by transport in single silicide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccoli, I.; Edler, F.; Pfnür, H.; Appelfeller, S.; Dähne, M.; Holtgrewe, K.; Sanna, S.; Schmidt, W. G.; Tegenkamp, C.

    2016-03-01

    Ultrathin metallic silicide nanowires with extremely high aspect ratios can be easily grown, e.g., by deposition of rare earth elements on semiconducting surfaces. These wires play a pivotal role in fundamental research and open intriguing perspectives for CMOS applications. However, the electronic properties of these one-dimensional systems are extremely sensitive to atomic-sized defects, which easily alter the transport characteristics. In this study, we characterized comprehensively TbSi2 wires grown on Si(100) and correlated details of the atomic structure with their electrical resistivities. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) as well as all transport experiments were performed in situ using a four-tip STM system. The measurements are complemented by local spectroscopy and density functional theory revealing that the silicide wires are electronically decoupled from the Si template. On the basis of a quasiclassical transport model, the size effect found for the resistivity is quantitatively explained in terms of bulk and surface transport channels considering details of atomic-scale roughness. Regarding future applications the full wealth of these robust nanostructures will emerge only if wires with truly atomically sharp interfaces can be reliably grown.

  11. The Formation and Growth Process of Ru Silicide on Si(111) Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toramaru, Masamitsu; Kobayashi, Naoto; Ohno, Shinya; Shudo, Kenichi; Miyamoto, Yasuyoshi; Kawamura, Norikazu

    Formation process of nanoscale ruthenium silicide islands on a Si(111) surfaces was studied with scanning tunneling microscopy for the first time. The ruthenium silicide islands were formed and grown on the only disorder-region, and small island grew up in three dimensions by incorporation of clusters including Ru exist on disorder-region and silicon atoms during thermal annealing. As the sizes of islands approaches 400 nm2 or more, the growth in two dimensional in a plane was limited, and it grew up in the direction of height. We will discuss about the formation process of ruthenium silicide on a Si(111) surface.

  12. Pt silicide/poly-Si Schottky diodes as temperature sensors for bolometers

    OpenAIRE

    Yuryev, V. A.; Chizh, K. V.; Chapnin, V.A.; Mironov, S.A.; Dubkov, V. P.; Uvarov, O. V.; Kalinushkin, V. P.; Senkov, V. M.; Nalivaiko, O. Y.; Novikau, A. G.; Gaiduk, P. I.

    2015-01-01

    Platinum silicide Schottky diodes formed on films of polycrystalline Si doped by phosphorus are demonstrated to be efficient and manufacturable CMOS-compatible temperature sensors for microbolometer detectors of radiation. Thin-film platinum silicide/poly-Si diodes have been produced by a CMOS-compatible process on artificial Si$_3$N$_4$/SiO$_2$/Si(001) substrates simulating the bolometer cells. Layer structure and phase composition of the original Pt/poly-Si films and the Pt silicide/poly-Si...

  13. Formation and Oxidation Resistance of Silicide Coatings for Mo and Mo-Based Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The forming process of silicide coatings on pure Mo and Mo-base alloys, obtained by the gasphase deposition method, has been studied by examining the microstructure of coatings and the relationship between coating thickness and process parameters. It was shown that the growth of coatings was diffusion-controlled, the diffusion of silicon to be coated into Mo or Mo-base alloys was mainly responsible for the formation of silicide. The relationship between initial silicide thickness and oxidation resistance was also investigated, and the equation of service life of the coatings at high temperature in air is presented.

  14. Influence Of The Gas Multipurpose Reactor Core Conversion From Oxide To Silicide On The GAMMA Density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to prepare the reactor core conversion from oxide to silicide, analysis of the gamma heat generation in the fuel plate and its influence on the gamma density in the reactor core using the GAMSET computer code have been done. The heat generation was evaluated for oxide (U3O8-Al) and silicide (U3Si2-Al) plate for different uranium loading. The calculation result shows that the heat generation in the silicide fuel plate contains 400 gram of U-235 per fuel element increase of 10.64% related to the normal oxide plate. This means that the gamma density in the reactor core will consequently decrease. Regarding this result, it can be concluded that the core conversion from oxide to silicide fuel with higher uranium loading will be followed by the heat generation increases in the fuel plate and the gamma density decreases in the reactor core

  15. Formation of interface silicides at room temperature in pulsed laser deposited Ti thin films on Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interface characterization of pulsed laser deposited (PLD) Ti thin films on Si substrates using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and grazing incidence X-ray reflectivity (GIXRR) reveals the growth of titanium silicides (predominantly C54-TiSi2) layers at room temperature. These silicides nucleate and grow only at higher temperatures if deposited by other physical vapor deposition techniques. The films have been subjected to isothermal and isochronal annealing under vacuum with a view to enhancing interface reaction and interdiffusion. The silicide phase formation at room temperature is due to the energetic Ti species available in PLD plume. The silicides formed in PLD have exhibited high thermal stability

  16. Stress Evolution During Ni-Si Compound Formation for Fully Silicided (FUSI) Gates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torregiani,C.; Van Bockstael, C.; Detavernier, C.; Lavoie, C.; Lauwers, A.; Maex, K.; Kittl, J.

    2007-01-01

    The stress (force) evolution during the formation of different Ni silicide phases was monitored by in situ curvature measurements, for the reaction of thin Ni films of various thicknesses with 100 nm polycrystalline-Si deposited on oxidized (1 0 0) Si substrates. The silicide phase formation was also monitored by in situ X-ray diffraction, allowing to match and interpret the stress evolution in terms of the formation of the different silicide phases. We found that stresses developed during the formation of the different silicides can be explained qualitatively in terms of the corresponding volume changes at the reacting interfaces. Furthermore, the matching between XRD and force curve reveals that the highest compressive stress is related to the formation of the Ni31Si12 phase, and that the stress formed is relaxed when the reaction is completed.

  17. Measurement of thermal conductivity of uranium silicide - aluminum dispersion fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In conjunction with reducing enrichment program for JMTR, thermal conductivity of uranium silicide - aluminum (U3Si2-Al) dispersion fuel was measured in the temperature range of 25degC ∼ 400degC for the safety evaluation of low enriched uranium fuel. Since thermal conductivity is determined as the product of thermal diffusivity, heat capacity and density, these three properties were individually measured. Thermal diffusivity and heat capacity of the specimen were measured by the laser flash method. Temperature dependence of density was obtained by measuring the thermal linear expansion with differential dilatometer. Obtained results show that conductivity of the U3Si2-Al dispersion fuel slightly increases as temperature increases, and tends to reach the maximum around 300degC. (author)

  18. Capping of rare earth silicide nanowires on Si(001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The capping of Tb and Dy silicide nanowires grown on Si(001) was studied using scanning tunneling microscopy and cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Several nanometers thick amorphous Si films deposited at room temperature allow an even capping, while the nanowires maintain their original structural properties. Subsequent recrystallization by thermal annealing leads to more compact nanowire structures and to troughs in the Si layer above the nanowires, which may even reach down to the nanowires in the case of thin Si films, as well as to V-shaped stacking faults forming along (111) lattice planes. This behavior is related to strain due to the lattice mismatch between the Si overlayer and the nanowires

  19. Status of the atomized uranium silicide fuel development at KAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, C.K.; Kim, K.H.; Park, H.D.; Kuk, I.H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-08-01

    While developing KMRR fuel fabrication technology an atomizing technique has been applied in order to eliminate the difficulties relating to the tough property of U{sub 3}Si and to take advantage of the rapid solidification effect of atomization. The comparison between the conventionally comminuted powder dispersion fuel and the atomized powder dispersion fuel has been made. As the result, the processes, uranium silicide powdering and heat treatment for U{sub 3}Si transformation, become simplified. The workability, the thermal conductivity and the thermal compatibility of fuel meat have been investigated and found to be improved due to the spherical shape of atomized powder. In this presentation the overall developments of atomized U{sub 3}Si dispersion fuel and the planned activities for applying the atomizing technique to the real fuel fabrication are described.

  20. Capping of rare earth silicide nanowires on Si(001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelfeller, Stephan; Franz, Martin; Kubicki, Milan; Reiß, Paul; Niermann, Tore; Schubert, Markus Andreas; Lehmann, Michael; Dähne, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The capping of Tb and Dy silicide nanowires grown on Si(001) was studied using scanning tunneling microscopy and cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Several nanometers thick amorphous Si films deposited at room temperature allow an even capping, while the nanowires maintain their original structural properties. Subsequent recrystallization by thermal annealing leads to more compact nanowire structures and to troughs in the Si layer above the nanowires, which may even reach down to the nanowires in the case of thin Si films, as well as to V-shaped stacking faults forming along {111} lattice planes. This behavior is related to strain due to the lattice mismatch between the Si overlayer and the nanowires.

  1. Pt redistribution during Ni(Pt) silicide formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a real-time Rutherford backscattering spectrometry study of the erratic redistribution of Pt during Ni silicide formation in a solid phase reaction. The inhomogeneous Pt redistribution in Ni(Pt)Si films is a consequence of the low solubility of Pt in Ni2Si compared to NiSi and the limited mobility of Pt in NiSi. Pt further acts as a diffusion barrier and resides in the Ni2Si grain boundaries, significantly slowing down the Ni2Si and NiSi growth kinetics. Moreover, the observed incorporation of a large amount of Pt in the NiSi seeds indicates that Pt plays a major role in selecting the crystallographic orientation of these seeds and thus in the texture of the resulting Ni1-xPtxSi film

  2. Postirradiation analysis of experimental uranium-silicide dispersion fuel plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofman, G.L.; Neimark, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    Low-enriched uranium silicide dispersion fuel plates were irradiated to maximum burnups of 96% of /sup 235/U. Fuel plates containing 33 v/o U/sub 3/Si and U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ behaved very well up to this burnup. Plates containing 33 v/o U/sub 3/Si-Al pillowed between 90 and 96% burnup of the fissile atoms. More highly loaded U/sub 3/Si-Al plates, up to 50 v/o were found to pillow at lower burnups. Plates containing 40 v/o U/sub 3/Si showed an increase swelling rate around 85% burnup. 5 refs., 10 figs.

  3. Attempt to produce silicide fuel elements in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the successful experiment to produce U3Si2 powder and U3Si2-Al fuel plates using depleted U and Si of semiconductor quality, silicide fuel was synthesized using x-Al available at the Fuel Element Production Installation (FEPI) at Serpong, Indonesia. Two full-size U3Si2-Al fuel elements, having similar specifications to the ones of U3O8-Al for the RSG-GAS (formerly known as MPR-30), have been produced at the FEPI. All quality controls required have been imposed to the feeds, intermediate, as well as final products throughout the production processes of the two fuel elements. The current results show that these fuel elements are qualified from fabrication point of view, therefore it is expected that they will be permitted to be tested in the RSG-GAS, sometime by the end of 1989, for normal (∝50%) and above normal burn-up. (orig.)

  4. Capping of rare earth silicide nanowires on Si(001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appelfeller, Stephan; Franz, Martin; Kubicki, Milan; Dähne, Mario [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Reiß, Paul; Niermann, Tore; Lehmann, Michael [Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universität Berlin, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Schubert, Markus Andreas [IHP–Leibniz-Institut für innovative Mikroelektronik, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany)

    2016-01-04

    The capping of Tb and Dy silicide nanowires grown on Si(001) was studied using scanning tunneling microscopy and cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Several nanometers thick amorphous Si films deposited at room temperature allow an even capping, while the nanowires maintain their original structural properties. Subsequent recrystallization by thermal annealing leads to more compact nanowire structures and to troughs in the Si layer above the nanowires, which may even reach down to the nanowires in the case of thin Si films, as well as to V-shaped stacking faults forming along (111) lattice planes. This behavior is related to strain due to the lattice mismatch between the Si overlayer and the nanowires.

  5. SiGeHBTs on Bonded SOI Incorporating Buried Silicide Layers

    OpenAIRE

    Bain, M.; El Mubarek, H A; Bonar, J. M.; Wang, Y.; Buiu, O.; Gamble, H.; Armstrong, B M; Hemment, P L; Hall, S.; Ashburn, P.

    2005-01-01

    A technology is described for fabricating SiGe hetero-junction bipolar transistors (HBTs) on wafer-bonded silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates that incorporate buried tungsten silicide layers for collector resistance reduction or buried groundplanes for crosstalk suppression. The physical structure of the devices is characterized using cross section transmission electron microscopy, and the electrical properties of the buried tungsten silicide layer are characterized using sheet resistance m...

  6. SiGe HBTs on bonded SOI incorporating buried silicide layers

    OpenAIRE

    Bain, M.; El Mubarek, A. W.; Bonar, J. M.; Wang, Y.; Buiu, O.; Gamble, H.; Armstrong, B M; Hemment, P. L. F.; Hall, Steven; Ashburn, Peter

    2005-01-01

    A technology is described for fabricating SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) on wafer-bonded silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates that incorporate buried tungsten silicide layers for collector resistance reduction or buried groundplanes for crosstalk suppression. The physical structure of the devices is characterized using cross section transmission electron microscopy, and the electrical properties of the buried tungsten silicide layer are characterized using sheet resistance me...

  7. Advanced Lightweight Silicide and Nitride Based Materials for Turbo-Engine Applications.

    OpenAIRE

    Drawin, S.; Justin, J.F.

    2011-01-01

    International audience Refractory metal silicides and nitride-based ceramics combine two properties that may lead to substantial reductions in aircraft fuel consumption : compared to the most advanced nickel-based superalloys presently used in aeronautical turbines, they can withstand higher temperatures and may have lower densities. Niobium silicide-based alloys and silicon nitride / molybdenum disilicide composites are currently being developed for turbine hot section components for both...

  8. Deposition of magnesium silicide nanoparticles by the combination of vacuum evaporation and hydrogen plasma treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stuchlík, Jiří; Stuchlíková, The-Ha; Artemenko, Anna; Remeš, Zdeněk

    Tokyo : The Japan Society of Applied Physics, 2015 - (Asano, T.), "011301-1"-"011301-5" ISBN 978-4-86348-491-7. [International Conference and Summer School on Advanced Silicide Technology 2014. Tokyo (JP), 19.07.2014-21.07.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-05053S; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14011; GA MŠk LH12236 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : plasma treatment * silicides Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  9. Facile Preparation of a Platinum Silicide Nanoparticle-Modified Tip Apex for Scanning Kelvin Probe Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Chun-Ting; Chen, Yu-Wei; Su, James; Wu, Chien-Ting; Hsiao, Chien-Nan; Shiao, Ming-Hua; Chang, Mao-Nan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we propose an ultra-facile approach to prepare a platinum silicide nanoparticle-modified tip apex (PSM tip) used for scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM). We combined a localized fluoride-assisted galvanic replacement reaction (LFAGRR) and atmospheric microwave annealing (AMA) to deposit a single platinum silicide nanoparticle with a diameter of 32 nm on the apex of a bare silicon tip of atomic force microscopy (AFM). The total process was completed in an ambient environment...

  10. Thermoelectric characteristics of Pt-silicide/silicon multi-layer structured p-type silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electric and thermoelectric properties of silicide/silicon multi-layer structured devices were investigated with the variation of silicide/silicon heterojunction numbers from 3 to 12 layers. For the fabrication of silicide/silicon multi-layered structure, platinum and silicon layers are repeatedly sputtered on the (100) silicon bulk substrate and rapid thermal annealing is carried out for the silicidation. The manufactured devices show ohmic current–voltage (I–V) characteristics. The Seebeck coefficient of bulk Si is evaluated as 195.8 ± 15.3 μV/K at 300 K, whereas the 12 layered silicide/silicon multi-layer structured device is evaluated as 201.8 ± 9.1 μV/K. As the temperature increases to 400 K, the Seebeck coefficient increases to 237.2 ± 4.7 μV/K and 277.0 ± 1.1 μV/K for bulk and 12 layered devices, respectively. The increase of Seebeck coefficient in multi-layered structure is mainly attributed to the electron filtering effect due to the Schottky barrier at Pt-silicide/silicon interface. At 400 K, the thermal conductivity is reduced by about half of magnitude compared to bulk in multi-layered device which shows the efficient suppression of phonon propagation by using Pt-silicide/silicon hetero-junctions. - Highlights: • Silicide/silicon multi-layer structured is proposed for thermoelectric devices. • Electric and thermoelectric properties with the number of layer are investigated. • An increase of Seebeck coefficient is mainly attributed the Schottky barrier. • Phonon propagation is suppressed with the existence of Schottky barrier. • Thermal conductivity is reduced due to the suppression of phonon propagation

  11. Neutronic design for the conversion of ETRR-2 Reactor from oxide fuel to silicide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutronic design of Egypt second research reactor (ETRR-2) core conversion from oxide (U3 O8 - Al) fuel to silicide (U3Si2-Al) was carried out. The silicide fuel was chosen for the core conversion because of its high maximum fuel meat density (4.8 gu/cm3) which expected to increase the operation cycle length to meet the higher reactor availability and utilization. Analysis of ETRR-2 core was done first for the conversion from oxide (U3 O8 - Al) core, through a series of mixed oxide-silicide cores, to an all silicide (U3Si2 - Al) core with the same meat density of 3.017 gU/cm3. The second analysis was done for the conversion from low meat density (3.017/gU/cm3) silicide core, through a series of lower-higher meat density silicide cores , to an all higher meat density (3.54 gU/cm3) silicide core. The standard computer codes such as WIMSD4 code and diffusion code CITVAP (new version of CITATION II developed by INVAP's nuclear engineering division) were used in core neutronic calculations. The calculation results show the safe operation conditions of the intermediate or transition cores and equilibrium cores. With higher density silicide fuel, ETRR-2 core operation cycle length was increased from 15 (full power days)FPDs to 20 FPDs which reduce the total cost of fuel element, number of spent fuel elements, and times of core refueling. Also, the reactor utilization and production of radioisotopes can be increased.

  12. Research on behaviour of the irradiated uranium silicide for fission Mo-99 production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper shows the results of purification of Mo-99 obtained by U-235 fission contained in uranium silicide (Si2U3) targets. These are the first tests carried out with irradiated targets. The separation method was previously developed employing non-irradiated uranium silicide with and with tracer addition. These tests were made trying to preserve the stages of the present method for fission Mo-99 production in the Argentine Republic. (author)

  13. Information for irradiation and post-irradiation of the silicide fuel element prototype P-07

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Included in the 'Silicides' Project, developed by the Nuclear Fuels Department of the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA), it is foreseen the qualification of this type of fuel for research reactors in order to be used in the Argentine RA-3 reactor and to confirm the CNEA as an international supplier. The paper presents basic information on several parameters corresponding to the new silicide prototype, called P-07, to be taken into account for its irradiation, postirradiation and qualification. (author)

  14. Synthesis of Co-silicides and fabrication of microwavepower device using MEVVA source implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Tonghe(张通和); WU; Yuguang(吴瑜光); QIAN; Weidong(钱卫东); LIU; Yaodong(刘要东); ZHANG; Xu(张旭)

    2002-01-01

    Co synthesis silicides with good properties were prepared using MEVVA ion implantation with flux of 25-125 mA/cm2 to does of 5×1017/cm2. The structure of the silicides was investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM analysis shows that if the ion dose is greater than 2×1017/cm2, a continuous silicide layer will be formed. The sheet resistance of Co silicide decreases with an increase in ion flux and ion dose. The formation of silicides with CoSi and CoSi2 are identified by XRD analysis. After annealing, the sheet resistance decreases further. A continuous silicide layer with a width of 90-133 nm is formed. The optimal implantation condition is that the ion flux and dose are 50 mA/cm2 and 5×1017/cm2, respectively. The optimal annealing temperature and time are 900℃ and 10 s, respectively. The ohmic contact for power microwave transistors is fabricated using Co ion implantation technique for the first time. The emitter contact resistance and noise of the transistors decrease markedly; the microwave property has been improved obviously.

  15. On the size-dependent magnetism and all-optical magnetization switching of transition-metal silicide nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glushkov, G. I.; Tuchin, A. V.; Popov, S. V.; Bityutskaya, L. A., E-mail: me144@phys.vsu.ru [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    Theoretical investigations of the electronic structure, synthesis, and all-optical magnetization switching of transition-metal silicide nanostructures are reported. The magnetic moment of the nanostructures is studied as a function of the silicide cluster size and configuration. The experimentally demonstrated magnetization switching of nanostructured nickel silicide by circularly polarized light makes it possible to create high-speed storage devices with high density data recording.

  16. Effects of temperature dependent pre-amorphization implantation on NiPt silicide formation and thermal stability on Si(100)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozcan, Ahmet S.; Wall, Donald [IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center, 2070 Route 52, Hopewell Junction, New York 12533 (United States); Jordan-Sweet, Jean; Lavoie, Christian [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States)

    2013-04-29

    Using temperature controlled Si and C ion implantation, we studied the effects of pre-amorphization implantation on NiPt alloy silicide phase formation. In situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction and resistance measurements were used to monitor phase and morphology evolution in silicide films. Results show that substrate amorphization strongly modulate the nucleation of silicide phases, regardless of implant species. However, morphological stability of the thin films is mainly enhanced by C addition, independently of the amorphization depth.

  17. Nickel silicide thin films as masking and structural layers for silicon bulk micro-machining by potassium hydroxide wet etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper studies the feasibility of using titanium and nickel silicide thin films as mask materials for silicon bulk micro-machining. Thin films of nickel silicide were found to be more resistant to wet etching in potassium hydroxide. The use of nickel silicide as a structural material, by fabricating micro-beams of varying dimensions, is demonstrated. The micro-structures were realized using these thin films with wet etching using potassium hydroxide solution on (1 0 0) and (1 1 0) silicon substrates. These results show that nickel silicide is a suitable alternative to silicon nitride for silicon bulk micro-machining

  18. Theory of Interface States at Silicon / Transition - - Silicide Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hunhwa

    The Si/NiSi(,2)(111) interface is of both fundamental and techno- logical interest: From the fundamental point of view, it is the best characterized of all semiconductor/metal interfaces, with two well-determined geometries (A and B) involving nearly perfect bonding. (This is because Si and NiSi(,2) have nearly the same lattice spacing.) Consequently, a theoretical treatment of this system makes sense--as it would not for messier systems--and one can have some confidence that the theoretical predictions are relevant to experimental observa- tions. From the technological point of view, Si/NiSi(,2) is representative of the class of semiconductor/metal interfaces that are currently of greatest interest in regard to electronic devices--Si/transition -metal-silicide interfaces. The calculations of this dissertation are for the intrinsic interface states of Si/NiSi(,2)-A geometry. These calculations also provide a foundation for later studies of defects at this interface, and for studies of other related systems, such as CoSi(,2). The calculations employ empirical tight-binding Hamiltonians for both Si and NiSi(,2) (with the parameters fitted to prior calculations of the bulk band structures, which appear to be in agreement with the available experimental data on bulk Si and NiSi(,2)). They also employ Green's function techniques--in particular, the subspace Hamiltonian technique. Our principal results are the following: (1) Interface state disper- sion curves are predicted along the symmetry lines (')(GAMMA)(')M, (')M(')K and (')K(')(GAMMA) of the surface Brillouin zone. (2) A prominent band of interface states is found which disperses downward from an energy within the Si band gap to an energy below the Si valence band edge E(,(upsilon)) as the planar wavevector (')k increases from (')(GAMMA) ((')k = 0) to (')M or (')K (symmetry points at boundary of the surface Brillouin zone). This band of inter- face states should be observable. It produces a peak in the surface

  19. Mixing of Al into uranium silicides reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SEM observations have shown that irradiation induced interaction of the aluminum cladding with uranium silicide reactor fuels strongly affects both fission gas and fuel swelling behaviors during fuel burn-up. The authors have used ion beam mixing, by 1.5 MeV Kr, to study this phenomena. RBS and the 27Al(p, γ) 28Si resonance nuclear reaction were used to measure radiation induced mixing of Al into U3Si and U3Si2 after irradiation at 300 C. Initially U mixes into the Al layer and Al mixes into the U3Si. At a low dose, the Al layer is converted into UAl4 type compound while near the interface the phase U(Al.93Si.07)3 grows. Under irradiation, Al diffuses out of the UAl4 surface layer, and the lower density ternary, which is stable under irradiation, is the final product. Al mixing into U3Si2 is slower than in U3Si, but after high dose irradiation the Al concentration extends much farther into the bulk. In both systems Al mixing and diffusion is controlled by phase formation and growth. The Al mixing rates into the two alloys are similar to that of Al into pure uranium where similar aluminide phases are formed

  20. New Manganese Silicide Mineral Phase in an Interplanetary Dust Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Keller, L. P.; Clemett, S. J.; Jones, J. H.; Palma, R. L.; Pepin, R. O.; Kloeck, W.; Zolensky, M. E.; Messenger, S.

    2008-01-01

    Comet 26P/Grigg-Skjellerup was identified as a source of an Earth-crossing dust stream with low Earth-encounter velocities, with peak anticipated fluxes during April in 2003 and 2004 [1]. In response to this prediction, NASA performed dedicated stratospheric dust collections using high altitude aircraft to target potential interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) from this comet stream in April 2003. Several IDPs from this collection have shown unusually low noble gas abundances [2] consistent with the predicted short space exposure ages of Grigg-Skjellerup dust particles [1]. High abundances of large D enrichments [3] and presolar grains [4] in IDPs from this collection are also consistent with an origin from the comet Grigg-Skjellerup. Here we report a new mineral from one of the cluster IDPs of the "Grigg-Skjellerup" collection, L2055. Our report focuses on an unusual manganese-iron-chromium silicide phase that, to our knowledge, has not been observed previously in nature. This unique phase may also shed light on the genesis of the enigmatic low-Fe,Mn-enriched (LIME) olivine that has been previously reported in IDPs and meteorites [5].

  1. KUR core conversion to use LEU silicide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As one of possible future programs for the Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR), the Research Reactor Institute of Kyoto University (KURRI) has a plan for core conversion to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. A feasibility study for this conversion started in November, 1983, as a part of the joint study between KURRI and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).Thermal-hydraulic analysis on the use of LEU fuels in the KUR was performed in 1984, and neutronic calculation in 1985. The conversion is to be from the current highly enriched uranium HEU (93.15%, UAl-alloy 0.586 gU/cm3) to LEU (19.75%, U3Si2-Al, 3.2 gU/cm3). The results indicate that the core can be converted without significant difficulties. Prior to the safety review application for the full core conversion with LEU silicide fuel, we are planning to demonstrate the use of two full size LEU suicide fuel elements among the current HEU elements. The safety analysis report for the two-element demonstration is to be submitted to the government shortly. The full core conversion is anticipated in 1993.(author)

  2. Nanoscale investigation of the interface situation of plated nickel and thermally formed nickel silicide for silicon solar cell metallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Adhesion of metallization of fully plated nickel–copper contacts on silicon solar cells can be achieved by formation of nickel silicide at the cost of degraded cell performance. • Understanding of silicide growth mechanisms and controlled growth may lead to high performance together with excellent adhesion. • Silicide formation is well known from CMOS production from PVD-Ni on flat surfaces. Yet the deposition methods and therefore layer characteristics and the surface topography are different for plated metallization. • TEM analysis is performed for differently processed samples. • A nickel silicide growth model is created for plated Ni on textured silicon solar cells. - Abstract: In the context of nickel silicide formation from plated nickel layers for solar cell metallization, there are several open questions regarding contact adhesion and electrical properties. Nanoscale characterization by transmission electron microscopy has been employed to support these investigations. Interfacial oxides and silicide phases were investigated on differently prepared samples by different analytical methods associated with transmission electron microscopy analysis. Processing variations included the pre-treatment of samples before nickel plating, the used plating solution and the thermal budget for the nickel–silicon solid-state reaction. It was shown that interface oxides of only few nm thickness on both silicon and nickel silicide are present on the samples, depending on the chosen process sequence, which have been shown to play an important role in adhesion of nickel on silicide in an earlier publication. From sample pretreatment variations, conclusions about the role of an interfacial oxide in silicide formation and its influence on phase formation were drawn. Such an oxide layer hinders silicide formation except for pinhole sites. This reduces the availability of Ni and causes a silicide with low Ni content to form. Without an interfacial oxide

  3. Strategy for silicon based hot-wire chemical vapor deposition without wire silicide formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laukart, Artur, E-mail: artur.laukart@ist.fraunhofer.de; Harig, Tino; Höfer, Markus; Schäfer, Lothar

    2015-01-30

    Silicide formation of wires during hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) of silicon based coatings is a key challenge which has to be overcome before HWCVD can be transferred successfully into industry. Silicide formation of tungsten wires is not occurring at temperatures of approximately 1900 °C and above when maintaining a silane partial pressure below approximately 1 Pa. Proceeding silicide formation at the cold ends where the wires are electrically contacted was completely prevented by continuously moving the cold ends of the wires into the hot deposition zone, resulting in a retransformation of the tungsten phase. Thus the maintenance period of a HWCVD manufacturing tool can be freed from wire lifetime.

  4. Anisotropic thermal expansion of Ni, Pd and Pt germanides and silicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geenen, F. A.; Knaepen, W.; Moens, F.; Brondeel, L.; Leenaers, A.; Van den Berghe, S.; Detavernier, C.

    2016-07-01

    Silicon or germanium-based transistors are nowadays used in direct contact with silicide or germanide crystalline alloys for semiconductor device applications. Since these compounds are formed at elevated temperatures, accurate knowledge of the thermal expansion of both substrate and the contact is important to address temperature depending effects such as thermal stress. Here we report the linear coefficients of thermal expansion of Ni-, Pd- and Pt-based mono-germanides, mono-silicides and di-metal-silicides as determined by powder-based x-ray diffraction between 300 and 1225 K. The investigated mono-metallic compounds, all sharing the MnP crystal structure, as well as Pd2Si and Pt2Si exhibit anisotropic expansion. By consequence, this anisotropic behaviour should be taken into account for evaluating the crystal unit’s cell at elevated temperatures.

  5. Kinetics and mechanism of hydrogen evolution reaction on cobalt silicides in alkaline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cathodic polarisation curves and impedance spectra for cobalt silicides Co2Si and CoSi2 in 0.5–2 M KOH at ambient temperature were obtained. It was shown that electrocatalytic activity of both silicides in hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is higher than that of cobalt. The dependences of equivalent circuit elements on the electrode potential were analysed. The conclusion was made that the atomic hydrogen adsorption on the surface of cobalt silicides is described by the Langmuir isotherm, and hydrogen evolution proceeds through the Volmer–Heyrovsky mechanism (at α1 ≠ α2 for Co2Si and α1 = α2 for CoSi2; α1 and α2 are the transfer coefficients for the Volmer and Heyrovsky steps respectively). The Heyrovsky reaction is probably the rate-determining step. The values of the kinetic parameters of HER on Co2Si and CoSi2 in 1 M KOH were estimated

  6. Self-organized patterns along sidewalls of iron silicide nanowires on Si(110) and their origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron silicide (cubic FeSi2) nanowires have been grown on Si(110) by reactive deposition epitaxy and investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy and scanning/transmission electron microscopy. On an otherwise uniform nanowire, a semi-periodic pattern along the edges of FeSi2 nanowires has been discovered. The origin of such growth patterns has been traced to initial growth of silicide nanodots with a pyramidal Si base at the chevron-like atomic arrangement of a clean reconstructed Si(110) surface. The pyramidal base evolves into a comb-like structure along the edges of the nanowires. This causes the semi-periodic structure of the iron silicide nanowires along their edges

  7. Analysis of impurity effect on Silicide fuels of the RSG-GAS core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simulation of impurity effect on silicide fuel of the RSG-GAS core has been done. The aim of this research is to know impurity effect of the U-234 and U-236 isotopes in the silicide fuels on the core criticality. The silicide fuels of 250 g U loading and 19.75 of enrichment is used in this simulation. Cross section constant of fuels and non-structure material of core are generated by WIMSD/4 computer code, meanwhile impurity concentration was arranged from 0.01% to 2%. From the result of analysis can be concluded that the isotopes impurity in the fuels could make trouble in the core and the core can not be operated at critical after a half of its cycle length (350 MW D)

  8. Self-organized patterns along sidewalls of iron silicide nanowires on Si(110) and their origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Debolina; Mahato, J. C.; Bisi, Bhaskar; Dev, B. N., E-mail: msbnd@iacs.res.in [Department of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Kolkata 700032 (India); Satpati, B. [Surface Physics and Material Science Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2014-11-10

    Iron silicide (cubic FeSi{sub 2}) nanowires have been grown on Si(110) by reactive deposition epitaxy and investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy and scanning/transmission electron microscopy. On an otherwise uniform nanowire, a semi-periodic pattern along the edges of FeSi{sub 2} nanowires has been discovered. The origin of such growth patterns has been traced to initial growth of silicide nanodots with a pyramidal Si base at the chevron-like atomic arrangement of a clean reconstructed Si(110) surface. The pyramidal base evolves into a comb-like structure along the edges of the nanowires. This causes the semi-periodic structure of the iron silicide nanowires along their edges.

  9. Comparison of JRR-4 core neutronic performance between silicide fuel and TRIGA fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutronic analyses on the JRR-4 core loaded with 20 wt% Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuels have been performed using SRAC code system. The LEU fuels studied in this work are ETR type silicide one and TRIGA one. For each type of them, parametrical analyses were done as the function of uranium loading in the fuel element to see changes of core excess reactivity, thermal neutron flux, fuel burnup and so on. From many cell and whole core calculations, following results have obtained. (a) A uranium density of 3.8 g/cm3 is a good value of the Silicide fuel for JRR-4. (b) In the case of TRIGA fuel, a uranium weight fraction of 40% to the total TRIGA fuel pin weight is one of adequate values. (c) The silicide core shows a good performance on the thermal neutron flux (d) and the TRIGA core can achieve a very high burnup. (author)

  10. Role of Ti3Al/silicides on tensile properties of Timetal 834 at various temperatures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K V Sai Srinadh; Nidhi Singh; V Singh

    2007-12-01

    Extremely fine coherent precipitates of ordered Ti3Al and relatively coarse incoherent precipitates of 2 silicide exist together in the near -titanium alloy, Timetal 834, in the dual phase matrix of primary and transformed . In order to assess the role of these precipitates, three heat treatments viz. WQ, WQ–A and WQ–OA, were given to have no precipitates, Ti3Al and silicide and only silicide precipitates in the respective conditions. Tensile properties in the above three heat treated conditions were determined at room temperature, 673 K and 873 K. It was observed that largely Ti3Al precipitates were responsible for increase in the yield strength and decrease in ductility in this alloy.

  11. Nanoscale investigation of the interface situation of plated nickel and thermally formed nickel silicide for silicon solar cell metallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondon, A.; Wang, D.; Zuschlag, A.; Bartsch, J.; Glatthaar, M.; Glunz, S. W.

    2014-12-01

    In the context of nickel silicide formation from plated nickel layers for solar cell metallization, there are several open questions regarding contact adhesion and electrical properties. Nanoscale characterization by transmission electron microscopy has been employed to support these investigations. Interfacial oxides and silicide phases were investigated on differently prepared samples by different analytical methods associated with transmission electron microscopy analysis. Processing variations included the pre-treatment of samples before nickel plating, the used plating solution and the thermal budget for the nickel-silicon solid-state reaction. It was shown that interface oxides of only few nm thickness on both silicon and nickel silicide are present on the samples, depending on the chosen process sequence, which have been shown to play an important role in adhesion of nickel on silicide in an earlier publication. From sample pretreatment variations, conclusions about the role of an interfacial oxide in silicide formation and its influence on phase formation were drawn. Such an oxide layer hinders silicide formation except for pinhole sites. This reduces the availability of Ni and causes a silicide with low Ni content to form. Without an interfacial oxide a continuous nickel silicide of greater depth, polycrystalline modification and expected phase according to thermal budget is formed. Information about the nature of silicide growth on typical solar cell surfaces could be obtained from silicide phase and geometric observations, which were supported by FIB tomography. The theory of isotropic NiSi growth and orientation dependent NiSi2 growth was derived. By this, a very well performing low-cost metallization for silicon solar cells has been brought an important step closer to industrial introduction.

  12. Progress in alkaline peroxide dissolution of low-enriched uranium metal and silicide targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports recent progress on two alkaline peroxide dissolution processes: the dissolution of low-enriched uranium metal and silicide (U3Si2) targets. These processes are being developed to substitute low-enriched for high-enriched uranium in targets used for production of fission-product 9'9Mo. Issues that are addressed include (1) dissolution kinetics of silicide targets, (2) 99Mo lost during aluminum dissolution, (3) modeling of hydrogen peroxide consumption, (4) optimization of the uranium foil dissolution process, and (5) selection of uranium foil barrier materials. Future work associated with these two processes is also briefly discussed. (author)

  13. Silicide Nanopowders as Low-Cost and High-Performance Thermoelectric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Renkun

    2013-06-01

    Thermoelectric devices directly convert heat into electricity and are very attractive for waste heat recovery and solar energy utilization. If thermoelectric devices can be made sufficiently efficient and inexpensive, then they will become a transformative energy technology that can tap a significant portion (10-20%) of the vast amount of heat existing in nature as well as industrial processes. Nanopowders of Earth-abundant, silicide-based materials, such as Mg2Si and its alloys, provide a unique opportunity to realize this goal. This article will present an overview of recent advances in the synthesis and thermoelectric properties of silicide-based nanostructured materials.

  14. Mechanoactivation of chromium silicide formation in the SiC-Cr-Si system

    OpenAIRE

    Vlasova M.; Kakazey M.; Gonzales-Rodriguez J.G.; Dominguez G.; Ristić Momčilo M.; Scherbina O.; Tomila T.; Isaeva L.; Timofeeva I.I.; Bukov A.

    2002-01-01

    The processes of simultaneous grinding of the components of a SiC-Cr-Si mixture and further temperature treatment in the temperature range 1073-1793 K were studied by X-ray phase analysis, IR spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and X-ray microanalysis. It was established that, during grinding of the mixture, chromium silicides form. A temperature treatment completes the process. Silicide formation proceeds within the framework of the diffusion of silicon into chromium. In the presence of SiO2 ...

  15. Low enriched aluminide and silicide fuel element technology at B and W (USA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babcock and Wilcox is fabricating full size fuel elements with low enriched uranium silicide and uranium aluminide. BandW also provides high enrichred U3O8 and UA Lsub(x) for United States Research Reactors, and Test Research and Training Reactors (TRTR). BandW and Argonne National Laboratry (ANL) are actively involved in the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program and have undertaken a joint effort in which BandW is fabricating two Oak Ridge Reactor (ORR ) elements with uranium silicide fuel. During plate development, fuel plates were fabricated with compacts containing U3SiAl and U3Si2 fuel. (author)

  16. Carbon mediated reduction of silicon dioxide and growth of copper silicide particles in uniform width channels

    OpenAIRE

    Pizzocchero, Filippo; Bøggild, Peter; Booth, Tim

    2013-01-01

    We show that surface arc-discharge deposited carbon plays a critical intermediary role in the breakdown of thermally grown oxide diffusion barriers of 90 nm on a silicon wafer at 1035°C in an Ar/H2 atmosphere, resulting in the formation of epitaxial copper silicide particles in ≈ 10 μm wide channels, which are aligned with the intersections of the (100) surface of the wafer and the {110} planes on an oxidized silicon wafer, as well as endotaxial copper silicide nanoparticles within the wafer ...

  17. Effect of copper on phase formation process in boron-silicide layers on niobium and tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of copper additions on regularities of growth, phase- and structure formation of borosilicide coatings produced by siliconizing preliminarily borated niobium and tantalum was studied. Rolled sheets of niobium and tantalum with impurity content less than 0.02 % (mass) were used for the coating application. Copper introduction into saturating medium affects growth rate, phase- and structure formation of silicide phases on niobium and tantalum. It also permits obtaining alternating boride and silicide layers, which is probably the only way of the composition fabrication, which can be of interest, when developing coatings with preset properties

  18. Physical and electrical properties of ultra-thin nickel silicide Schottky diodes on Si (100)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physical and electrical properties of Ni silicides, reactively formed by a thin Ni layer of 3 nm, have been investigated. The existence of NiSi2 phase has been confirmed at low temperature annealing by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The silicides have shown flat surfaces up to an annealing temperature of 800 °C and a stable sheet resistance can be achieved. The Schottky barrier heights extracted from diode characteristics have shown stable values against annealing temperature owing to the stability of the film with an ideality factor nearly to unit.

  19. Silicon Framework-Based Lithium Silicides at High Pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shoutao; Wang, Yanchao; Yang, Guochun; Ma, Yanming

    2016-07-01

    The bandgap and optical properties of diamond silicon (Si) are not suitable for many advanced applications such as thin-film photovoltaic devices and light-emitting diodes. Thus, finding new Si allotropes with better bandgap and optical properties is desirable. Recently, a Si allotrope with a desirable bandgap of ∼1.3 eV was obtained by leaching Na from NaSi6 that was synthesized under high pressure [Nat. Mater. 2015, 14, 169], paving the way to finding new Si allotropes. Li is isoelectronic with Na, with a smaller atomic core and comparable electronegativity. It is unknown whether Li silicides share similar properties, but it is of considerable interest. Here, a swarm intelligence-based structural prediction is used in combination with first-principles calculations to investigate the chemical reactions between Si and Li at high pressures, where seven new compositions (LiSi4, LiSi3, LiSi2, Li2Si3, Li2Si, Li3Si, and Li4Si) become stable above 8.4 GPa. The Si-Si bonding patterns in these compounds evolve with increasing Li content sequentially from frameworks to layers, linear chains, and eventually isolated Si ions. Nearest-neighbor Si atoms, in Cmmm-structured LiSi4, form covalent open channels hosting one-dimensional Li atom chains, which have similar structural features to NaSi6. The analysis of integrated crystal orbital Hamilton populations reveals that the Si-Si interactions are mainly responsible for the structural stability. Moreover, this structure is dynamically stable even at ambient pressure. Our results are also important for understanding the structures and electronic properties of Li-Si binary compounds at high pressures. PMID:27302244

  20. Review of research and development work into silicide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Available data on the behaviour of silicide fuels under irradiation were judged as satisfactory (Safety Evaluation Report - NUREG - 1313) to initiate, in 1989, the procedure of conversion authorisation for OSIRIS reactor. Nevertheless, it was believed essential to check the performance of fuel elements manufactured according to the specifications for the OSIRIS reactor under irradiation and in defined conditions. To schedule specific experiments to answer the safety authority team specific questions. In addition, the question of increasing the density (above the reference density of 4.8 Utot/cm3) was examined in collaboration with CERCA as part of a research program. All these reflections led the CEA to undertake a large-scale irradiation programme. Analytical experiments have shown: No cladding failure was detected during the experiment; The thick core plate expanding is similar as nominal thickness core plates; The tests carried out confirm that U3Si2 fuel (4,8 g Utot/cm3) performs well under irradiation; Some of the manufacturing tolerances without any doubt can be increased without altering performance under irradiation. This will not take place for a further 1 or 2 years. e are waiting for the analysis of the results from the EPSILON irradiation experiment to make possible modifications to the OSIRIS cladding failure detection thresholds detection system. Once the tests presently scheduled have been completed, it might be possible to use a fuel with a uranium density about 30% greater than the reference fuel. This will make possible to meet economical targets. The aim of converting ORPHEE and RHF type reactors cannot be achieved merely by optimising actual technology because of the additional density increasing. Now the question is to be sure that research into density increasing should be continued. If so, for which purpose and for which reactors? It is not planed in the next ten years to implement and qualify a new manufacture process. Then an international

  1. Water splitting and electricity with semiconducting silicides in sunlight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demuth, Martin [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Bioanorganische Chemie, Muelheim an der Ruhr (Germany); H2 Solar GmbH, Loerrach (Germany); Kerpen, Klaus; Kuklya, Andriy; Wuestkamp, Marc-Andre [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kohlenforschung, Muelheim an der Ruhr (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Generation of hydrogen and oxygen from water is described using mainly the semiconductor titanium disilicide as catalyst and halogen light which closely mimics solar radiation. The reactions are carried out under non-aerobic conditions, i.e., under nitrogen. High efficiencies are reached at 1.1-1.2 bar pressure. In the first phase of these reactions the catalytically active centers are built up. During this phase of reaction the kinetics of the water splitting process is growing in and leads to a linear dependence in the further course of the reactions which consists of >96% water splitting to yield hydrogen and oxygen in a 2:1 ratio. Hydrogen is partially and reversibly stored physically, depending on temperature. Oxygen behaves differently since it is stored entirely under the applied reaction conditions (50-80 C and light) and can be liberated from storage upon heating the slurries in the dark. This allows convenient separation of hydrogen and oxygen. The stability of titanium disilicide has been positively tested over several months. This material is abundant and inexpensive besides that it absorbs most of the solar radiation. Further, XRD and XPS studies show that titanium disilicide is 80% crystalline and the oxide formation is limited to a few molecular layers in depth. By using labeled water it was shown that labeled dioxygen appears in the gas phase of such reactions, this showing definitively that hydrogen evolution occuring here stems from photochemical splitting of water. Further, water splitting is part of a project which involves photoelectrochemistry and in which the silicides are used as light-receiving electrode and transition metal-coated anodes serve to split water. (orig.)

  2. Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... before being swallowed; do not swallow them whole. Drink a full glass of water after taking either the regular or chewable tablets or capsules. Some liquid forms of calcium carbonate must be shaken well before use.Do not ...

  3. Calcium Electroporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gibot, Laure; Madi, Moinecha;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calcium electroporation describes the use of high voltage electric pulses to introduce supraphysiological calcium concentrations into cells. This promising method is currently in clinical trial as an anti-cancer treatment. One very important issue is the relation between tumor cell kill...... efficacy-and normal cell sensitivity. METHODS: Using a 3D spheroid cell culture model we have tested the effect of calcium electroporation and electrochemotherapy using bleomycin on three different human cancer cell lines: a colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT29), a bladder transitional cell carcinoma (SW780......), and a breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB231), as well as on primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDF-n). RESULTS: The results showed a clear reduction in spheroid size in all three cancer cell spheroids three days after treatment with respectively calcium electroporation (p<0.0001) or...

  4. Calcium Calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Latvia - Lebanon - Libya - Lithuania - Luxembourg - Macedonia, Republic of - Malaysia - Malta - Mexico - Moldova - Morocco - Netherlands - New Zealand - Nigeria - ... and Statistics Popular content Calcium content of common foods What is Osteoporosis? The Board Introduction to Bone ...

  5. Real-time monitoring of the silicidation process of tungsten filaments at high temperature used as catalysers for silane decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scope of this work is the systematic study of the silicidation process affecting tungsten filaments at high temperature (1900 °C) used for silane decomposition in the hot-wire chemical vapour deposition technique (HWCVD). The correlation between the electrical resistance evolution of the filaments, Rfil(t), and the different stages of the their silicidation process is exposed. Said stages correspond to: the rapid formation of two WSi2 fronts at the cold ends of the filaments and their further propagation towards the middle of the filaments; and, regarding the hot central portion of the filaments: an initial stage of silicon dissolution into the tungsten bulk, with a random duration for as-manufactured filaments, followed by the inhomogeneous nucleation of W5Si3 (which is later replaced by WSi2) and its further growth towards the filaments core. An electrical model is used to obtain real-time information about the current status of the filaments silicidation process by simply monitoring their Rfil(t) evolution during the HWCVD process. It is shown that implementing an annealing pre-treatment to the filaments leads to a clearly repetitive trend in the monitored Rfil(t) signatures. The influence of hydrogen dilution of silane on the filaments silicidation process is also discussed. - Highlights: • The silicidation process of tungsten filaments at 1900 °C has been elucidated. • The silicidation process is correlated with the electrical resistance evolution. • Hydrogen dilution of silane delays the precipitation of silicides. • A thermal treatment of the filaments makes the silicidation process repeatable. • Raman spectroscopy and EDX analysis allow the tungsten silicides identification

  6. Schottky barrier MOSFET structure with silicide source/drain on buried metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ding-Yu; Sun Lei; Zhang Sheng-Dong; Wang Yi; Liu Xiao-Yan; Han Ru-Qi

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel Schottky barrier MOSFET structure, in which the silicide source/drain is designed on the buried metal (SSDOM). The source/drain region consists of two layers of silicide materials. Two Schottky barriers are formed between the silicide layers and the silicon channel. In the device design, the top barrier is lower and the bottom is higher. The lower top contact barrier is to provide higher on-state current, and the higher bottom contact barrier to reduce the off-state current. To achieve this, ErSi is proposed for the top silicide and CoSi2 for the bottom in the n-channel case. The 50 nm n-channel SSDOM is thus simulated to analyse the performance of the SSDOM device. In the simulations, the top contact barrier is 0.2e V (for ErSi) and the bottom barrier is 0.6 eV (for CoSi2).Compared with the corresponding conventional Schottky barrier MOSFET structures (CSB), the high on-state current of the SSDOM is maintained, and the off-state current is efficiently reduced. Thus, the high drive ability (1.2 mA/μm at Vds = 1 V, Vgs = 2 V) and the high Ion/Imin ratio (106) are both achieved by applying the SSDOM structure.

  7. Mechanism for silicide formation in Ag(Cu)/Si and Ag(Co)/Si upon annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ag(Co) alloy and Ag(Cu) alloy films were prepared on HF-cleaned Si by using DC magnetron sputtering and were then annealed in vacuum (3 X 10-5 Torr) to investigate the effects of Co and Cu precipitation on the material properties of the Ag alloy films and on the reaction between alloy element (Co, Cu) and Si. The annealing of a Ag(Cu)/Si structure for 30 min at 200 .deg. C produced a uniform Cu3Si layer at the Ag(Cu)-Si interface, as a result of reaction of the segregated Cu with Si. This lowered the resistivity from 5.3 to 3.2 μΩ-cm, and also led to improved adhesion properties. In contrast, the annealing of a Ag(Co)/Si structure at 400 .deg. C produced a cobalt silicide in the Ag(Co) film, resulting from reaction of the diffused Si with Co precipitates, probably at the grain boundaries. The Co silicide formed at 400 .deg. C slightly increased the resistivity, which continued to decrease at temperatures of 500 .deg. C and higher. The different diffusing species in formation of Co silicide and Cu silicide may be attributed to the difference in the temperature of silicde formation and the mobility of the species.

  8. Electronic structure of dysprosium silicide films grown on a Si(1 1 1) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thickness-dependent electronic structures of Dy silicide films grown on a Si(1 1 1) surface have been investigated by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Two (1x1) periodic bands, both of them cross the Fermi level, have been observed in the silicide films formed by Dy coverages of 1.0 monolayer and below, and more than five (√(3)x√(3)) periodic bands have been observed in thicker films. Taking the (2√(3)x2√(3)) periodic structure of Dy atoms in the submonolayer silicide film into account, the periodicity of the two metallic bands indicate that they mainly originate from the orbitals of Si atoms, which form a (1x1) structure. Of the (√(3)x√(3)) periodic bands observed in thick films, four of them are well explained by the folding of the (1x1) bands into a (√(3)x√(3)) periodicity. Regarding the other band, the three (√(3)x√(3)) periodic bands would originate from the electronic states related to the inner Si layers that form a (√(3)x√(3)) structure, and the one observed in the 3.0 ML film only might originate from the electron located at the interface between bulk Si and the Dy silicide film.

  9. High pressure studies on uranium and thorium silicide compounds: Experiment and theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yagoubi, S.; Heathman, S.; Svane, A.;

    2013-01-01

    , for ThSi, USi and USi2, respectively. At ambient conditions, the uranium silicides crystallize in tetragonal structures (space groups: I4/mmm for USi and I41/amd for USi2), while ThSi adopts an orthorhombic structure (space group: Pbnm) (including an anharmonic analysis of the silicon). These...

  10. Nanoscale metal-silicide films prepared by surfactant sputtering and analyzed by RBS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surfactant sputtering has been applied to modify the surface structure of Si substrates and to produce ultrathin metal-silicide films with nickel and platinum surfactants, utilizing the steady state coverage of a Si-substrate surface with surfactant atoms simultaneously during sputter erosion by combined ion irradiation and surfactant atom deposition. Si (1 0 0) substrates were eroded using 5 keV Xe-ions and 10-30 keV Ar ions at incident angles of 65o and 70o with fluences of up to 2 x 1018/cm2 under continuous sputter deposition of platinum and nickel from targets irradiated simultaneously by the same ion beam. These surfactant atoms form metal-silicides in the surface near region and strongly modify the substrate sputter yield and the surface nanostructure. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were carried out to observe a transition of surface topography from ripple to relief patterns, granular patterns or smooth surfaces. The Si and metal sputter yield as function of the steady state metal coverage were determined by combination of Rutherford-backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) and profilometry. The composition and the depth distributions of metal-silicide films were analyzed via high-resolution RBS and transmission electron microscopy. We show that RBS results in comparison with SRIM and TRIDYN sputter yield simulations allows us to identify the silicide surface structure on the nanometer scale.

  11. Quantitative determination of crystalline phases in the silicide fuel by the Rietveld method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium silicide has been used as nuclear fuel in modern research reactors. The nuclear fuel is based on a dispersion of uranium silicide and aluminum powder to form a fuel meat fabricated according to powder metallurgy techniques. The U3Si2 powder should attend technical specifications referring to the major crystalline constituent, which must be more than 80 wt% of U3Si2. IPEN/CNEN-SP currently produces the U3Si2-Al fuel to supply the IEA-R1 research reactor, which operates at 3.5 MW in order to produce primary radioisotopes used in nuclear medicine. The uranium concentration in the fuel should be increased from 3.0 gU/cm3 to 4.8 gU/cm3 in order to guarantee future fuel supplying for a new research reactor designed for radioisotope production, the Brazilian Multipurpose Research Reactor - RMB, which is planned to be constructed in the country. The new fuel will operate under much more severe conditions than the ones found currently in IEA-R1 reactor. So, the increasing of uranium concentration into the fuel requests urgent development of a new technology to qualify the uranium silicide powder produced by IPEN-CNEN/SP, referring to the characterization of crystalline phases. This paper describes a methodology developed to quantify crystalline phases in the silicide fuel powder, which is based in the Rietveld method for crystalline structures refinement. (author)

  12. Synthesis and characterization of silicide coating on niobium alloy produced using molten salt method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nb based alloys are promising structural materials for high temperature reactors due to their strength at higher temperatures. However Nb based alloys undergoes substantial oxidation at high temperatures. In order to improve its oxidation resistance property at high temperatures (>400 °C) a protective layer must be provided to avoid direct contact of the component to atmospheric oxygen. In the present work, attempts have been made to obtain silicide coatings on Nb alloy using molten salt method. In this method, deposition of silicon is a multistep process. Metallic Si produced by the subsequent reactions in the molten salt diffuses and an oxidation resistant silicide coating forms on the surface of substrate. To study the variation in the thickness of coated layer on the Nb alloy, experiments were carried out at different temperature and time periods. These silicide coated samples were characterized using optical, SEM and XRD techniques. Based on these results mechanism of silicide coating on Nb alloys has been discussed in detail. (author)

  13. Mechanical properties of niobium alloy with molybdenum-hafnium-silicide coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of bending loading permits studying mechanical characteristics (σ σ0.2 and deflection f) in the composite of niobium alloy with silicide coating on molybdenum and hafnium base. Results of mechanical characteristics are compared with microstructural peculiarities of the failure development. Criteria which determine strength and plastic properties of the composite as dependent on the structural state are established

  14. A thermodynamic assessment for synthesizing transition metal silicides by the combustion synthesis process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transition metal silicides have important applications in various disciplines. These include uses as interconnects in chips, as coatings, as heating elements, etc. As their uses increased, various processing techniques were adopted to produce them. These vary from chemical/physical vapor deposition, rapid thermal processing, and sputtering for thin film processing; traditional vacuum casting and powder metallurgical routes are used to produce bulk samples. In this paper, the authors are interested in those transition metal silicides which have the potential for use in the bulk form, possibly in the aerospace or other demanding applications. The primary requirements are high refractoriness, low density, high strength and good oxidation resistance. It is the oxidation resistance that makes the silicides better candidates as compared to the other intermetallics. Meschter argued that most engineering materials retain substantial strength up to 80% of their melting points. Therefore, for an operating temperature of 1500C, the melting point of the typical candidate may be 1950C, while the limit in density can be defined by the density of Ni (8.75 gn/cc). As an alterative, combustion synthesis (CS) processing may prove to be a viable route for producing these transition metal silicides. In this process, and exothermic reaction is initiated in a compact containing stoichiometric mixture of elemental powders

  15. Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease; CPPD disease; Acute CPPD arthritis; Pseudogout ... Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis is caused by the collection of salt called calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD). The buildup ...

  16. Exchange reactions of plutonium with silicides and estimation of the enthalpy of the formation of Pu5Si3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An approximate ΔHof,298 value has been determined for Pu5Si3 through a study of exchange reactions of selected metal silicides with plutonium. The reactions were carried out by arc-melting. Results show that Pu5Si3 is intermediate in stability between V3Si and Mo3Si, and has a ΔHof,298 of -52±13 kJ/g-atom. Estimates of ΔHof,298 for the higher plutonium silicides are: Pu3Si2 -54, PuSi -60, Pu3Si5 -58, and PuSi2 -56 kJ/g-atom with uncertainties of ±18 kJ/g-atom. The plutonium silicides are found to be more stable than both the thorium and uranium silicides. (orig.)

  17. Calcium and bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone strength and calcium ... calcium (as well as phosphorus) to make healthy bones. Bones are the main storage site of calcium in ... your body does not absorb enough calcium, your bones can get weak or will not grow properly. ...

  18. Get Enough Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Calcium Print This Topic En español Get Enough Calcium Browse Sections The Basics Overview Foods and Vitamins ... 2 of 4 sections Take Action! Take Action: Calcium Sources Protect your bones – get plenty of calcium ...

  19. Calcium carbonate overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tums overdose; Calcium overdose ... Calcium carbonate can be dangerous in large amounts. ... Some products that contain calcium carbonate are certain: ... and mineral supplements Other products may also contain calcium ...

  20. Photoluminescence from neodymium silicide thin films formed by MEVVA ion source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Neodymium silicides were synthesized by Nd ion implanted into Si substrates with the aid of a metal vaporvacuum arc (MEVVA) ion source. The blender of Nd5Si4 and NdSi2was formed in a neodymium-implanted silicon thinfilm during the as-implanted state, but there was only single neodymium silicide compound in the post-annealed state,and the phase changed from NdSi2 to Nd5Si4 with increasing annealing temperature. The blue-violetluminescence excited by ultra-violet was observed at the room temperature (RT), and the intensity of photoluminescence(PL) increased with increasing the neodymium ion fluence. Moreover,the photoluminescence was closely dependent onthe temperature of rapid thermal annealing (RTA). A mechanism ofphotoluminescence was discussed.

  1. Development of fused slurry silicide coatings for tantalum reentry heat shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, R. V.; Stetson, A. R.

    1972-01-01

    A fused slurry silicide coating was developed to provide atmospheric reentry protection for the 90Ta-lOW alloy. Overlaying the silicide with a highly refractory glass greatly improved total lifetime and reliability of the coating system. Low pressure, slow cycle lifetimes in excess of 100 cycles were consistently recorded for 1700 K - 13 and 1300 N/sq m test conditions. A minimum of 25 cycles was obtained for 1810 K - 1300 N/sq m conditions. About 50 simulated reentry cycles (variable temperature, pressure, and stress) were endured by coated 1-inch miniature heat shield panels when exposed to a maximum of 1700 K and either internal or external pressure conditions.

  2. Development of a fused slurry silicide coating for the protection of tantalum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, C. M.; Perkins, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    Results are reported of a research program to develop a reliable high-performance, fused slurry silicide protective coating for a tantalum-10 tungsten alloy for use at 1427 to 1538 C at 0.1 to 10 torr air pressure under cyclic temperature conditions. A review of silicide coating performance under these conditions indicated that the primary wear-out mode is associated with widening of hairline fissures in the coating. Consideration has been given to modifying the oxidation products that form on the coating surface to provide a seal for these fissures and to minimize their widening. On the basis of an analysis of the phase relationships between silica and various other oxides, a coating having the slurry composition 2.5Mn-33Ti-64.5Si was developed that is effective in the pressure range from 1 to 10 torr.

  3. Mössbauer spectroscopy study of surfactant sputtering induced Fe silicide formation on a Si surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, C.; Zhang, K.; Hofsäss, H.; Brüsewitz, C.; Vetter, U.; Bharuth-Ram, K.

    2015-12-01

    The formation of Fe silicides in surface ripple patterns, generated by erosion of a Si surface with keV Ar and Xe ions and simultaneous co-deposition of Fe, was investigated with conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. For the dot and ripple patterns studied, we find an average Fe concentration in the irradiated layer between 6 and 25 at.%. The Mössbauer spectra clearly show evidence of the formation of Fe disilicides with Fe content close to 33 at.%, but very little evidence of the formation of metallic Fe particles. The results support the process of ion-induced phase separation toward an amorphous Fe disilicide phase as pattern generation mechanism. The observed amorphous phase is in agreement with thermodynamic calculations of amorphous Fe silicides.

  4. Leakage current and deep levels in CoSi{sub 2} silicided junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Codegoni, D. [ST Microelectronics Via Olivetti 2, 20041 Agrate Brianza, Milan (Italy); Carnevale, G.P. [ST Microelectronics Via Olivetti 2, 20041 Agrate Brianza, Milan (Italy); De Marco, C. [ST Microelectronics Via Olivetti 2, 20041 Agrate Brianza, Milan (Italy); Mica, I. [ST Microelectronics Via Olivetti 2, 20041 Agrate Brianza, Milan (Italy); Polignano, M.L. [ST Microelectronics Via Olivetti 2, 20041 Agrate Brianza, Milan (Italy)]. E-mail: marialuisa.polignano@st.com

    2005-12-05

    In this work the leakage current of junctions with a self-aligned cobalt silicide is studied. It is shown that junctions with a self-aligned CoSi{sub 2} layer show a leakage current excess which is strongly reduced by increasing the PAI energy. This indicates that the observed leakage current excess is related to the CoSi{sub 2} formation conditions. The mechanism responsible for the leakage of CoSi{sub 2} junctions is investigated by current versus temperature measurements and by deep level transient spectroscopy. In addition, the role of the mechanical stress is investigated by comparing different isolation structures and by numerical stress calculations. It is concluded that the shallow trench isolation (STI) induced stress and the cobalt silicide formation concur to produce a junction leakage current increase by creating a deep level in silicon located close to midgap. This level can possibly identified with a level ascribed to a point defect excess.

  5. Synthesis of silicon nanotubes with cobalt silicide ends using anodized aluminum oxide template

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon nanotubes (SiNTs) are compatible with Si-based semiconductor technology. In particular, the small diameters and controllable structure of such nanotubes are remaining challenges. Here we describe a method to fabricate SiNTs intrinsically connected with cobalt silicide ends based on highly ordered anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates. Size and growth direction of the SiNTs can be well controlled via the templates. The growth of SiNTs is catalyzed by the Co nanoparticles reduced on the pore walls of the AAO after annealing, with a controllable thickness at a given growth temperature and time. Simultaneously, cobalt silicide forms on the bottom side of the SiNTs.

  6. Babcock and Wilcox plate fabrication experience with uranium silicide spherical fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is written to present the fuel fabrication experience of Babcock and Wilcox using atomized spherical uranium silicide powder. The intent is to demonstrate the ability to fabricate fuel plates using spherical powder and to provide useful information proceeding into the next phase of work using this type of fuel. The limited quantity of resources- spherical powder and time, did not allow for much process optimizing in this work scope. However, the information contained within provides optimism for the future of spherical uranium silicide fuel plate fabrication at Babcock and Wilcox.The success of assembling fuel elements with spherical powder will enable Babcock and Wilcox to reduce overall costs to its customers while still maintaining our reputation for providing high quality research and test reactor products. (author)

  7. RA-3 reactor core with uranium silicide fuel elements P-07 type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the studies on the utilization of fuel elements (FE) containing uranium silicide, core of the RA-3 was analyzed with several calculation models. At first, the present situation, i.e. the core charged with normal FE (U3O8), has been analyzed to validate the simulation methodology comparing with experimental results and to establish reference data to 5 and 10 MW able to be compared with future new situations. Also, CITVAP's nuclear data libraries to be used in irradiation experiment planning were completed. The results were satisfactory and were applied to the study of the core containing P-07 FE [U3Si2], in face of a future core change. Comparing with the performance of the U3O8FE, the silicides ones show the following advantages: - average burnup: 45 % greater; -extraction burnup increase 12 %; and, -the residence time [in full power days] could be a 117 % greater. (author)

  8. Formation of rare earth silicide clusters on Si(111)7 x 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magic clusters on surfaces are of high interest because of their fascinating quantum properties and their possible application in future nanodevices. Here, the formation process as well as the structural and electronic properties of dysprosium silicide clusters on the Si(111)7 x 7 surface were studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The dysprosium silicide clusters were grown by molecular beam epitaxy using the 7 x 7 reconstructed Si(111) surface as a template for cluster formation using submonolayer metal coverages and moderate annealing temperatures. It was found that the clusters grow self-organized preferentially on the faulted halves of the 7 x 7 unit cells, and a variety of cluster shapes could be observed. At appropriate growth conditions, the formation of magic clusters, which appear centered on the 7 x 7 half unit cells, could be achieved.

  9. Silicide Coating Fabricated by HAPC/SAPS Combination to Protect Niobium Alloy from Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jia; Fu, Qian-Gang; Guo, Li-Ping; Wang, Lu

    2016-06-22

    A combined silicide coating, including inner NbSi2 layer and outer MoSi2 layer, was fabricated through a two-step method. The NbSi2 was deposited on niobium alloy by halide activated pack cementation (HAPC) in the first step. Then, supersonic atmospheric plasma spray (SAPS) was applied to obtain the outer MoSi2 layer, forming a combined silicide coating. Results show that the combined coating possessed a compact structure. The phase constitution of the combined coating prepared by HAPC and SAPS was NbSi2 and MoSi2, respectively. The adhesion strength of the combined coating increased nearly two times than that for single sprayed coating, attributing to the rougher surface of the HAPC-bond layer whose roughness increased about three times than that of the grit-blast substrate. After exposure at 1200 °C in air, the mass increasing rate for single HAPC-silicide coating was 3.5 mg/cm(2) because of the pest oxidation of niobium alloy, whereas the combined coating displayed better oxidation resistance with a mass gain of only 1.2 mg/cm(2). Even more, the combined coating could significantly improve the antioxidation ability of niobium based alloy at 1500 °C. The good oxidation resistance of the combined silicide coating was attributed to the integrity of the combined coating and the continuous SiO2 protective scale provided by the oxidation of MoSi2. PMID:27243944

  10. Neutronic study on conversion of SAFARI-1 to LEU silicide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper marks the initial study into the technical and economic feasibility of converting the SAFARI-1 reactor in South Africa to LEU silicide fuel. Several MTR assembly geometries and LEU uranium densities have been studied and compared with MEU and HEU fuels. Two factors of primary importance for conversion of SAFARI-1 to LEU fuel are the economy of the fuel cycle and the performance of the incore and excore irradiation positions

  11. Behavior of silicon in nitric media. Application to uranium silicides fuels reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium silicides are used in some research reactors. Reprocessing them is a solution for their cycle end. A list of reprocessing scenarios has been set the most realistic being a nitric dissolution close to the classic spent fuel reprocessing. This uranium silicide fuel contains a lot of silicon and few things are known about polymerization of silicic acid in concentrated nitric acid. The study of this polymerization allows to point out the main parameters: acidity, temperature, silicon concentration. The presence of aluminum seems to speed up heavily the polymerization. It has been impossible to find an analytical technique smart and fast enough to characterize the first steps of silicic acid polymerization. However the action of silicic species on emulsions stabilization formed by mixing them with an organic phase containing TBP has been studied, Silicon slows down the phase separation by means of oligomeric species forming complex with TBP. The existence of these intermediate species is short and heating can avoid any stabilization. When non irradiated uranium silicide fuel is attacked by a nitric solution, aluminum and uranium are quickly dissolved whereas silicon mainly stands in solid state. That builds a gangue of hydrated silica around the uranium silicide particulates without preventing uranium dissolution. A small part of silicon passes into the solution and polymerize towards the highly poly-condensed forms, just 2% of initial silicon is still in molecular form at the end of the dissolution. A thermal treatment of the fuel element, by forming inter-metallic phases U-Al-Si, allows the whole silicon to pass into the solution and next to precipitate. The behavior of silicon in spent fuels should be between these two situations. (author)

  12. Carbon mediated reduction of silicon dioxide and growth of copper silicide particles in uniform width channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pizzocchero, Filippo; Bøggild, Peter; Booth, Tim

    2013-01-01

    channels, which are aligned with the intersections of the (100) surface of the wafer and the {110} planes on an oxidized silicon wafer, as well as endotaxial copper silicide nanoparticles within the wafer bulk. We apply energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, in combination with scanning and transmission...... electron microscopy of focused ion beam fabricated lammelas and trenches in the structure to elucidate the process of their formation....

  13. Formation of silicide based oxidation resistant coating over Mo-30 wt. % W alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicide based oxidation resistant coatings were developed over Mo-30 W alloy using halide activated pack cementation process. Coated samples were characterized by SEM, optical microscopy, EDX and hardness measurements. Isothermal oxidation tests of coated alloy performed at 1000 deg C for 25h revealed a smaller weight gain at the initial stage of oxidation followed by no weight change indicating the protective nature of the coating. (author)

  14. Calculation of xenon 135 poisoning reactivity of RSG-GAS silicide fuelled

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculation of xenon 135 poisoning reactivity of RSG-GAS silicide fuelled. One of the important reactivity effects during reactor operation is a xenon poisoning, the reactivity depends on the power and time operation of reactor. The calculation was performed for RSG-GAS oxide 2,96 gr U/cc, silicide 2,96 gr U/cc silicide 3,55 gr U/cc fuelled using Xen Sam code, that is the xen sam code reform. In Xen Sam code, the xenon concentration is obtained by solving the simultaneous differential equation by means of limit different method. The results showed that the calculation values are close to the experiments. The equilibrium xenon reactivity will be higher if there is the increasing in the uranium density, while there is no significant change in the peak of xenon and dead time of the reactor. It shown that there is no influence in xenon reactivity for the same power levels and operation time more than 50 hours. At the other hand, if the operation time lest than 50 hours, there will be influences in equilibrium xenon reactivity, peak xenon and dead time reactor. For different power levels with the same operation time will be a significant influence to the xenon reactivity

  15. Pt silicide/poly-Si Schottky diodes as temperature sensors for bolometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuryev, V. A., E-mail: vyuryev@kapella.gpi.ru; Chizh, K. V.; Chapnin, V. A.; Mironov, S. A.; Dubkov, V. P.; Uvarov, O. V.; Kalinushkin, V. P. [A. M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilov Street, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Senkov, V. M. [P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 53 Leninskiy Avenue, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Nalivaiko, O. Y. [JSC “Integral” – “Integral” Holding Management Company, 121A, Kazintsa I. P. Street, Minsk 220108 (Belarus); Novikau, A. G.; Gaiduk, P. I. [Belarusian State University, 4 Nezavisimosti Avenue, 220030 Minsk (Belarus)

    2015-05-28

    Platinum silicide Schottky diodes formed on films of polycrystalline Si doped by phosphorus are demonstrated to be efficient and manufacturable CMOS-compatible temperature sensors for microbolometer detectors of radiation. Thin-film platinum silicide/poly-Si diodes have been produced by a CMOS-compatible process on artificial Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}/Si(001) substrates simulating the bolometer cells. Layer structure and phase composition of the original Pt/poly-Si films and the Pt silicide/poly-Si films synthesized by a low-temperature process have been studied by means of the scanning transmission electron microscopy; they have also been explored by means of the two-wavelength X-ray structural phase analysis and the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Temperature coefficient of voltage for the forward current of a single diode is shown to reach the value of about −2%/ °C in the temperature interval from 25 to 50 °C.

  16. Pt silicide/poly-Si Schottky diodes as temperature sensors for bolometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuryev, V. A.; Chizh, K. V.; Chapnin, V. A.; Mironov, S. A.; Dubkov, V. P.; Uvarov, O. V.; Kalinushkin, V. P.; Senkov, V. M.; Nalivaiko, O. Y.; Novikau, A. G.; Gaiduk, P. I.

    2015-05-01

    Platinum silicide Schottky diodes formed on films of polycrystalline Si doped by phosphorus are demonstrated to be efficient and manufacturable CMOS-compatible temperature sensors for microbolometer detectors of radiation. Thin-film platinum silicide/poly-Si diodes have been produced by a CMOS-compatible process on artificial Si3N4/SiO2/Si(001) substrates simulating the bolometer cells. Layer structure and phase composition of the original Pt/poly-Si films and the Pt silicide/poly-Si films synthesized by a low-temperature process have been studied by means of the scanning transmission electron microscopy; they have also been explored by means of the two-wavelength X-ray structural phase analysis and the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Temperature coefficient of voltage for the forward current of a single diode is shown to reach the value of about -2%/ °C in the temperature interval from 25 to 50 °C.

  17. Effect of TiOx on the formation of titanium silicide layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Al/TiOx/Si, Ti/TiOx/Si, and Mo/TiOx/Si interfaces are studied, before and after thermal treatment, by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and scanning electron microscopy. The metal layer is selected with regard to the formation of a titanium silicide layer. The reductive nature of the metal was found to be very significant in the interdiffusion of Si and Ti (from titanium oxide). This interdiffusion has the advantage to form a thin titanium silicide layer, which is known to have low contact resistivity. The SIMS, RBS, XPS, and XRD analyses show that after annealing for 10 min at 850 deg. C under hydrogen ambient, titanium silicide interfacial layers such as Ti5Si3 and TiSi2 C54 were formed in the case of Al/TiOx/Si and Ti/TiOx/Si structures, respectively. There is no significant reaction between Mo and TiOx and no Ti and Si interfacial reaction in the Mo/TiOx/Si system. With thermodynamic considerations, we confirm all the results found in this study

  18. Durability of Silicide-Based Thermoelectric Modules at High Temperatures in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funahashi, Ryoji; Matsumura, Yoko; Barbier, Tristan; Takeuchi, Tomonari; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.; Katsuyama, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Takazawa, Hiroyuki; Combe, Emmanuel

    2015-08-01

    Thermoelectric modules consisting of n-type Mn2.7Cr0.3Si4Al2 and p-type MnSi1.75 legs have been fabricated by use of composite pastes of Ag with Pt or Pd. For the module prepared by Ni-B plating and with Ag paste, the specific power density reached 370 mW/cm2 at a heat-source temperature of 873 K. Ni-B plating 5 μm thick on the surfaces of the silicide legs reduced both the internal resistance and degradation of the power generated by silicide modules at temperatures up to 873 K in air. This is because of oxidation of Al diffusing into the n-type legs and reaching the Ag electrodes on both the hot and cold sides. Ni-B plating can suppress Al diffusion into n-type legs. However, cracking was observed parallel to the contact surface in the middle of the Ni-B plating layer on the p-type legs. It was also found that incorporating Pt or Pd into the Ag paste effectively suppressed degradation of the contact resistance between the silicide legs and the Ag electrodes.

  19. Palladium silicide formation under the influence of nitrogen and oxygen impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, K. T.; Lien, C.-D.; Nicolet, M.-A.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of impurities on the growth of the Pd2Si layer upon thermal annealing of a Pd film on 100 line-type and amorphous Si substrates is investigated. Nitrogen and oxygen impurities are introduced into either Pd or Si which are subsequently annealed to form Pd2Si. The complementary techniques of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, and N-15(p, alpha)C-12 or O-18(p, alpha)N-15 nuclear reaction, are used to investigate the behavior of nitrogen or oxygen and the alterations each creates during silicide formation. Both nitrogen and oxygen retard the silicide growth rate if initially present in Si. When they are initially in Pd, there is no significant retardation; instead, an interesting snow-plowing effect of N or O by the reaction interface of Pd2Si is observed. By using N implanted into Si as a marker, Pd and Si appear to trade roles as the moving species when the silicide front reaches the nitrogen-rich region.

  20. Calcium paradox and calcium entry blockers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Slade, A.M.; Nayler, W.G.; Meijler, F.L.

    1984-01-01

    Reperfusion of isolated hearts with calcium-containing solution after a short period of calcium-free perfusion results in irreversible cell damage (calcium paradox). This phenomenon is characterized by an excessive influx of calcium into the cells, the rapid onset of myocardial contracture, exhausti

  1. Safeguarding subcriticality during loading and shuffling operations in the higher density of the RSG-GAS's silicide core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The core conversion program of the RSG-GAS reactor is to convert the all-oxide to all-silicide core. The silicide equilibrium core with fuel meat density of 3.55 gU cm-3 is an optimal core for RSG-GAS reactor and it can significantly increase the operation cycle length from 25 to 32 full power days. Nevertheless, the subcriticality of the shutdown core and the shutdown margin are lower than of the oxide core. Therefore, the deviation of subcriticality condition in the higher silicide core caused by the fuel loading and shuffling error should be reanalysed. The objective of this work is to analyse the sufficiency of the subcriticality condition of the shutdown core to face the worst condition caused by an error during loading and shuffling operations. The calculations were carried out using the 2-dimensional multigroup neutron diffusion code of Batan-FUEL. In the fuel handling error, the calculated results showed that the subcriticality condition of the shutdown higher density silicide equilibrium core of RSG-GAS can be maintained. Therefore, all fuel management steps are fixed in the present reactor operation manual can be applied in the higher silicide equilibrium core of RSG-GAS reactor. (author)

  2. Thin Ni silicide formation by low temperature-induced metal atom reaction with ion implanted amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have extended our recent work on buried silicide formation by Ni diffusion into a buried amorphous silicon layer to the case where silicide formation is at lower temperatures on silicon substrates which have been preamorphized. The reaction of metal atoms from a 12 nm Ni film evaporated on top of a 65 nm thick surface amorphous layer formed by 35 keV Si+ ion implantation has been investigated at temperature ≤400C. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) with channeling, cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM), x-ray diffraction and four-point-probe measurements were used to determine structure, interfacial morphology, composition and resistivity of the silicide films. It has been found that an increased rate of silicidation occurs for amorphous silicon with respect to crystalline areas permitting a selective control of the silicon area to be contacted during silicide growth. Vacuum furnace annealing at 360C for 8 hours followed by an additional step at 400C for one hour produces a continuos NiSi2 layer with a resistivity 44 μΩ cm

  3. A two-step annealing process for Ni silicide formation in an ultra-thin body RF SOI MOSFET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Chang-Geun [Nano-Bio Electric Devices Team, IT Convergence Technology Research Division, ETRI, 161 Gajeong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: cgahn@etri.re.kr; Kim, Tae-Youb; Yang, Jong-Heon; Baek, In-Bok [Nano-Bio Electric Devices Team, IT Convergence Technology Research Division, ETRI, 161 Gajeong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Won-ju [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seongjae [Quantum Photonic Science Research Center and BK21 Program Division of Advanced Research and Education in Physics, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-02-15

    A two-step annealing process for Ni silicide formation in an ultra-thin body (UTB) RF SOI MOSFET is proposed to prevent a dramatic increase of the gate leakage current from the in-diffusion of Ni into the channel. The first step of the annealing process was performed at a low temperature for di-nickel silicide (Ni{sub 2}Si) formation, resulting in no in-diffusion of Ni into the channel. Next, the second step of the annealing process was performed at 500 deg. C for the formation of mono-nickel silicide (NiSi). Finally, the optimized Ni silicide SD with low resistance (5 {omega}/{open_square}) and a low leakage current was achieved on the UTB. Using the proposed two-step silicide process, UTB RF MOSFET with a gate length of 50 nm a 20-nm UTB was successfully fabricated and showed the good RF properties with a cut-off frequency of 138 GHz.

  4. Calcium and bones (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the growth, maintenance, and reproduction of the human ... body, are continually being re-formed and incorporate calcium into their structure. Calcium is essential for the ...

  5. Coronary Calcium Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Coronary Calcium Scan? A coronary calcium scan is a test ... you have calcifications in your coronary arteries. Coronary Calcium Scan Figure A shows the position of the ...

  6. Calcium hydroxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrate - calcium; Lime milk; Slaked lime ... Calcium hydroxide ... These products contain calcium hydroxide: Cement Limewater Many industrial solvents and cleaners (hundreds to thousands of construction products, flooring strippers, brick cleaners, cement ...

  7. Calcium source (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getting enough calcium to keep bones from thinning throughout a person's life may be made more difficult if that person has ... as a tendency toward kidney stones, for avoiding calcium-rich food sources. Calcium deficiency also effects the ...

  8. Calcium in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet - calcium ... Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the human body. It helps form and maintain healthy teeth and bones. A proper level of calcium in the body over a lifetime can help ...

  9. Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD) Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD) Fast Facts The risk of ... young people, too. Proper diagnosis depends on detecting calcium pyrophosphate crystals in the fluid of an affected ...

  10. Investigation of diffusion silicide coatings interaction with substrate out of the molybdenum alloy TsM6 at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Researched have been the growth kinetics, structure and composition of the intermediate phases, being formed during the reaction of the MoSi2-based coating with the TsM6 molybdenum alloy at 1300, 1600 and 1800 deg C in the vacuum and in the inert gas medium. It is established that during the annealing of the TsM6 alloy silicide coatings in the 1300-1800 deg C temperature range, the molybdenum disilicide reacts with the alloy base, whereupon lower-silicide-based phases appear. The annealing of the MoB boron-substratum silicide coatings causes the formation of the Mo2B phase at the alloy-MoB boundary and a Mosub(x)(BSi)sub(y) complicated composition phase at the MoB-Mo5Si3 boundary

  11. X-ray photoemission spectromicroscopy of titanium silicide formation in patterned microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S.; Solak, H.; Cerrina, F. [Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Stoughton, WI (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Titanium silicide has the lowest resistivity of all the refractory metal silicides and has good thermal stability as well as excellent compatibility with Al metallization. It is used as an intermediate buffer layer between W vias and the Si substrate to provide good electrical contact in ULSI technology, whose submicron patterned features form the basis of the integrated circuits of today and tomorrow, in the self aligned silicide (salicide) formation process. TiSi{sub 2} exists in two phases: a metastable C49 base-centered orthorhombic phase with specific resistivity of 60-90 {mu}{Omega}-cm that is formed at a lower temperature (formation anneal) and the stable 12-15 {mu}{Omega}-cm resistivity face-centered orthorhombic C54 phase into which C49 is transformed with a higher temperature (conversion anneal) step. C54 is clearly the target for low resistivity VLSI interconnects. However, it has been observed that when dimensions shrink below 1/mic (or when the Ti thickness drops below several hundred angstroms), the transformation of C49 into C54 is inhibited and agglomeration often occurs in fine lines at high temperatures. This results in a rise in resistivity due to incomplete transformation to C54 and because of discontinuities in the interconnect line resulting from agglomeration. Spectromicroscopy is an appropriate tool to study the evolution of the TiSi2 formation process because of its high resolution chemical imaging ability which can detect bonding changes even in the absence of changes in the relative amounts of species and because of the capability of studying thick {open_quotes}as is{close_quotes} industrial samples.

  12. The fabrication and performance of Canadian silicide dispersion fuel for test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel fabrication effort is now concentrated on the commissioning of large-scale process equipment, defining product specifications, developing a quality assurance plan, and setting up a mini-computer material accountancy system. In the irradiation testing program, full-size NRU assemblies containing 20% enriched silicide dispersion fuel have been Irradiated successfully to burnups in the range 65-80 atomic percent. Irradiations have also been conducted on mini-elements having 1.2 mm diameter holes In their mid-sections, some drilled before irradiation and others after irradiation to 22-83 atomic percent burnup. Uranium was lost to the coolant in direct proportion to the surface area of exposed core material. Pre-irradiation in the intact condition appeared to reduce in-reactor corrosion. Fuel cores developed for the NRU reactor are dimensionally very stable, swelling by only 6-8% at the very high burnup of 93 atomic percent. Two important factors contributing to this good performance are cylindrical clad restraint and coarse silicide particles. Thermal ramping tests were conducted on irradiated silicide aspersion fuels. Small segments of fuel cores released 85Kr starting at about 520 deg. C and peaking at about 680 deg C. After a holding period of 1 hour at 720 deg. C a secondary 85Kr peak occurred during cooling (at about 330 deg. C) probably due to thermal contraction cracking. Whole mini-elements irradiated to 93 atomic percent burnup were also ramped thermally, with encouraging results. After about 0.25 h at 530 deg. C the aluminum cladding developed very localized small blisters, some with penetrating pin-hole cracks preventing gross pillowing or ballooning. (author)

  13. The new ternary silicide Gd5CoSi2: Structural, magnetic and magnetocaloric properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gd5CoSi2 was prepared by annealing at 1003 K. Its investigation by the X-ray powder diffraction shows that the ternary silicide crystallizes in a tetragonal structure deriving from the Cr5B3-type (I4/mcm space group; a=7.5799(4) and c=13.5091(12) A as unit cell parameters). The Rietveld refinement shows a mixed occupancy on the (8h) site between Si and Co atoms. Magnetization and specific heat measurements performed on Gd5CoSi2 reveal a ferromagnetic behaviour below TC=168 K. This magnetic ordering is associated to an interesting magnetocaloric effect; the adiabatic temperature change ΔTad is about 3.1 and 5.9 K, respectively, for a magnetic field change of 2 and 4.6 T. -- Graphical abstract: The adiabatic temperature change ΔTad was determined by combining the heat capacity measurements and the magnetization data. As expected, a peak near the Curie temperature of the Gd5CoSi2 ternary silicide is observed, with a maximum of ΔTad around 3.1 and 5.9 K for ΔH=2 and 4.6 T, respectively. Display Omitted Research Highlights: → We prepare and characterize for the first time the ternary silicide Gd5CoSi2. → Gd5CoSi2 crystallizes in the tetragonal structure deriving from the Cr5B3-type. → Gd5CoSi2 shows a ferromagnetic behaviour below 168 K associated with magnetocaloric properties.

  14. High pressure studies on uranium and thorium silicide compounds: Experiment and theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagoubi, S., E-mail: said.yagoubi@u-psud.fr [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Postfach 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); LEEL SIS2M UMR 3299 CEA-CNRS, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Departement de Chimie, Universite Paris-Sud 11, 91405 Orsay (France); Heathman, S. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Postfach 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Svane, A. [Department of Physics, University of Aarhus, DK 8000, Aarhus C (Denmark); Vaitheeswaran, G. [ACRHEM, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500 046, Andhra Pradesh (India); Heines, P.; Griveau, J.-C. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Postfach 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Le Bihan, T. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38043 Grenoble (France); Idiri, M.; Wastin, F.; Caciuffo, R. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Postfach 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-01-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High pressure studies on uranium and thorium silicide compounds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bulk modulus B{sub 0} at ambient pressure are obtained from the measured P-V relations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimental results are well reproduced by the calculated equation of state. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electronic densities of states are calculated for ThSi, USi and USi2. - Abstract: The actinide silicides ThSi, USi and USi{sub 2} have been studied under high pressure using both theory and experiment. High pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments were performed on polycrystalline samples in diamond anvil cells at room temperature and for pressures up to 54, 52 and 26 GPa, for ThSi, USi and USi{sub 2}, respectively. At ambient conditions, the uranium silicides crystallize in tetragonal structures (space groups: I4/mmm for USi and I4{sub 1}/amd for USi{sub 2}), while ThSi adopts an orthorhombic structure (space group: Pbnm) (including an anharmonic analysis of the silicon). These structures are found to be stable with no structural transitions observed up to the highest pressures achieved. The zero-pressure bulk modulus B{sub 0} and its pressure derivative B{sub 0}{sup Prime} at ambient pressure are obtained from the measured P-V relations. The experiments are accompanied by first principles calculations using the full-potential linear muffin-tin orbital method within the generalized gradient approximation for exchange-correlation effects. Experimental results are well reproduced by the calculated equation of state and ground state properties.

  15. Combustion synthesis of molybdenum silicides and borosilicides for ultrahigh-temperature structural applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mohammad Shafiul

    Molybdenum silicides and borosilicides are promising structural materials for gas-turbine power plants. A major challenge, however, is to simultaneously achieve high oxidation resistance and acceptable mechanical properties at high temperatures. For example, molybdenum disilicide (MoSi2) has excellent oxidation resistance and poor mechanical properties, while Mo-rich silicides such as Mo5Si3 (called T 1) have much better mechanical properties but poor oxidation resistance. One approach is based on the fabrication of MoSi2-T 1 composites that combine high oxidation resistance of MoSi2 and good mechanical properties of T1. Another approach involves the addition of boron to Mo-rich silicides for improving their oxidation resistance through the formation of a borosilicate surface layer. In particular, Mo 5SiB2 (called T2) phase is considered as an attractive material. In the thesis, MoSi2-T1 composites and materials based on T2 phase are obtained by mechanically activated SHS. Use of SHS compaction (quasi-isostatic pressing) significantly improves oxidation resistance of the obtained MoSi2-T1 composites. Combustion of Mo-Si-B mixtures for the formation of T2 phase becomes possible if the composition is designed for the addition of more exothermic reactions leading to the formation of molybdenum boride. These mixtures exhibit spin combustion, the characteristics of which are in good agreement with the spin combustion theory. Oxidation resistance of the obtained Mo-Si-B materials is independent on the concentration of Mo phase in the products so that the materials with a higher Mo content are preferable because of better mechanical properties. Also, T2 phase has been obtained by the chemical oven combustion synthesis technique.

  16. Effect of Annealing Temperature on the Formation of Silicides and the Surface Morphologies of PtSi Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The effect of annealing temperature on the formation of the PtSi phase, distribution of silicides and the surface morphologies of silicides films is investigated by XPS, AFM. It is shown that the phase sequences of the films change from Pt-Pt2Si-PtSi-Si to Pt+Pt2Si+PtSi-PtSi-Si or Pt+Pt2Si+PtSi-PtSi-Si with an increase of annealing temperature and the reason for the formation of mixed layers is discussed.

  17. Electrochemical deposition of coating from carbide, boride and silicide of IV-VIA group metals in ion melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prehistory of the development of methods of production of metal-like refractory coatings (titanium, tantalum, niobium, vanadium, zirconium carbides, borides and silicides) with the help of high-temperature electrochemical synthesis (HTES) in ionic melts is described. A review is made on studies into the process of HTES of refractory metal borides, carbides and silicides, manufacture conditions for the coatings and electrolyte compositions (oxide, oxide-fluoride, chloride, chloride-fluoride melts). Structure and properties of coatings produced by the method of HTES are under consideration

  18. Silicidation of Mo-alloyed ytterbium: Mo alloying effects on microstructure evolution and contact properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we investigated the effects of Mo addition to Yb as a contact material with Si for metal–oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) to mitigate oxidation problems, a persistent problem for rare-earth metal-based contacts (such as Yb/Si and Er/Si). Our thorough materials characterization using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction unravels Mo segregation during silicidation and its effect against oxidation. I–V characteristics, measured from Schottky diodes produced from the samples, reflect such microstructure evolution and demonstrate a strong improvement in contact properties at high temperatures

  19. Estimations on uranium silicide fuel prototypes for their irradiation and postirradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 'Silicide' project includes the qualification of this type of research reactor fuel to be used i.e. in the Argentine RA-3 and to confirm CNEA's role as an international supplier. The present paper shows complementary basic information for P-04 prototype post-irradiation, which is already under way, and some parameter values related to the new P-06 prototype to be taken into account for planning its irradiation and post-irradiation. The reliability of these values has been evaluated through comparison with experimental results. The reported results contribute, also, to a parallel study on the nuclear data libraries used in calculations for this type of reactor. (author)

  20. Tungsten silicide contacts to polycrystalline silicon and silicon-germanium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, G. [Northern Ireland Semiconductor Research Centre, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Queen' s University, Ashby Building, Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5AH, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: g.srinivasan@ee.qub.ac.uk; Bain, M.F. [Northern Ireland Semiconductor Research Centre, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Queen' s University, Ashby Building, Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5AH, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Bhattacharyya, S. [Northern Ireland Semiconductor Research Centre, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Queen' s University, Ashby Building, Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5AH, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Baine, P. [Northern Ireland Semiconductor Research Centre, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Queen' s University, Ashby Building, Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5AH, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Armstrong, B.M. [Northern Ireland Semiconductor Research Centre, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Queen' s University, Ashby Building, Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5AH, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Gamble, H.S. [Northern Ireland Semiconductor Research Centre, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Queen' s University, Ashby Building, Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5AH, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); McNeill, D.W. [Northern Ireland Semiconductor Research Centre, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Queen' s University, Ashby Building, Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5AH, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2004-12-15

    Silicon-germanium alloy layers will be employed in the source-drain engineering of future MOS transistors. The use of this technology offers advantages in reducing series resistance and decreasing junction depth resulting in reduction in punch-through and SCE problems. The contact resistance of metal or metal silicides to the raised source-drain material is a serious issue at sub-micron dimensions and must be minimised. In this work, tungsten silicide produced by chemical vapour deposition has been investigated as a contact metallization scheme to both boron and phosphorus doped polycrystalline Si{sub 1-} {sub x} Ge {sub x} , with 0 {<=}x {<=} 0.3. Cross bridge Kelvin resistor (CKBR) structures were fabricated incorporating CVD WSi{sub 2} and polycrystalline SiGe. Tungsten silicide contacts to control polysilicon CKBR structures have been shown to be of high quality with specific contact resistance {rho} {sub c} values 3 x 10{sup -7} ohm cm{sup 2} and 6 x 10{sup -7} ohm cm{sup 2} obtained to boron and phosphorus implanted samples respectively. The SiGe CKBR structures show that the inclusion of Ge yields a reduction in {rho} {sub c} for both dopant types. The boron doped SiGe exhibits a reduction in {rho} {sub c} from 3 x 10{sup -7} to 5 x 10{sup -8} ohm cm{sup 2} as Ge fraction is increased from 0 to 0.3. The reduction in {rho} {sub c} has been shown to be due to (i) the lowering of the tungsten silicide Schottky barrier height to p-type SiGe resulting from the energy band gap reduction, and (ii) increased activation of the implanted boron with increased Ge fraction. The phosphorus implanted samples show less sensitivity of {rho} {sub c} to Ge fraction with a lowest value in this work of 3 x 10{sup -7} ohm cm{sup 2} for a Ge fraction of 0.3. The reduction in specific contact resistance to the phosphorus implanted samples has been shown to be due to increased dopant activation alone.

  1. Modeling the band structure of the higher manganese silicides starting from Mn$_4$Si$_7$

    OpenAIRE

    V., Vijay Shankar; Tseng, Yu-Chih; Kee, Hae-Young

    2016-01-01

    The higher manganese silicides (HMS), with the chemical formula MnSi$_x$($x \\approx 1.73 - 1.75$), have been attracted a lot of attention due to their potential application as thermoelectric materials. While the electronic band structures of HMS have been previously studied using first principle calculations, the relation between crystal structures of Mn and Si atoms and their band structures is not well understood. Here we study Mn$_4$Si$_7$ using first principle calculations and show that a...

  2. Transient behavior of silicide plate-type fuel during reactivity initiated accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of transient experiments using a low enriched uranium silicide mini-plate fuel (19 w/o 235U, 4.8gU/c.c.) for research reactors are described. Studies were addressed mainly to clarifying 1) fuel failure threshold and failure mechanism, and 2) dimensional stability of the fuel plate at the temperature ranged from 140degC to 970degC. The pulse irradiation of the mini-plate fuels was performed in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). (author)

  3. Synthesis of metallic silicide fullerenes and the characteristics thereof by mass spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN YiChi; GUO Liang; ZHU LiQun

    2007-01-01

    Direct current arc discharge is used for the study on the synthesis of metallofullerenes (MFs) to discover whether there exist metallic silicide fullerenes and silicon fullerenes. The resultant components are isolated by the multistage high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and analyzed with the Time-of-Flight (TOF) mass spectrometry. Results show that there exist fullerenes such as SiC69, YSi2C64, YSi2C78, Y3Si2C78 as well as Y2Si2C90 which are structurally similar to (Y2C2)@C82.

  4. Synthesis of metallic silicide fullerenes and the characteristics thereof by mass spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Direct current arc discharge is used for the study on the synthesis of metallo-fullerenes (MFs) to discover whether there exist metallic silicide fullerenes and silicon fullerenes. The resultant components are isolated by the multistage high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and analyzed with the Time-of-Flight (TOF) mass spectrometry. Results show that there exist fullerenes such as SiC69, YSi2C64, YSi2C78, Y3Si2C78 as well as Y2Si2C90 which are structurally similar to (Y2C2)@C82.

  5. Neutronic calculations of PARR-1 cores using leu-silicide fuel. [leu (low enriched uranium)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arshad, M.; Bakhtyar, S.; Hayat, T.; Salahuddin, A.

    1991-08-01

    Detailed neutronic calculations have been carried out for different PARR-1 cores utilizing Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) silicide fuel and operating at an upgraded power of 9 MW. The calculations include the search for critical loadings in open and stall ends of the pool, neutronic analysis of the first full power operation and the equilibrium cores. The burnup study of the equilibrium core and calculations for discharged fuel inventory have also been carried out. Further, the reactivity coefficients of the first full power operation core are evaluated for use in the accident analysis.

  6. Oxidation resistant silicide coatings for Nbss/Nb5Si3 in-situ composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxidation protective silicide coatings for the new Nbss/Nb5Si3 in-situ composites were prepared by molten salt method. The experiment results indicated that the majority phase in the coating was NbSi2. More Nb5Si3 was formed at the interface between the substrate and NbSi2 layer during the oxidation. The oxidation resistance of the composites was improved by the coating, significantly. The improvement in the oxidation resistance of the composites maybe mainly attributed to the formation of large amount of SiO2 and Al2O3 on surface of coating. (orig.)

  7. Calcium and Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home › Patients › Treatment › Calcium/Vitamin D Calcium/Vitamin D Getting enough calcium and vitamin D is essential ... counter medications and calcium supplements. What is Vitamin D and What Does it Do? Vitamin D plays ...

  8. Uranium silicide pellet fabrication by powder metallurgy for accident tolerant fuel evaluation and irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harp, Jason M.; Lessing, Paul A.; Hoggan, Rita E.

    2015-11-01

    In collaboration with industry, Idaho National Laboratory is investigating uranium silicide for use in future light water reactor fuels as a more accident resistant alternative to uranium oxide base fuels. Specifically this project was focused on producing uranium silicide (U3Si2) pellets by conventional powder metallurgy with a density greater than 94% of the theoretical density. This work has produced a process to consistently produce pellets with the desired density through careful optimization of the process. Milling of the U3Si2 has been optimized and high phase purity U3Si2 has been successfully produced. Results are presented from sintering studies and microstructural examinations that illustrate the need for a finely ground reproducible particle size distribution in the source powder. The optimized process was used to produce pellets for the Accident Tolerant Fuel-1 irradiation experiment. The average density of these pellets was 11.54 ± 0.06 g/cm3. Additional characterization of the pellets by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction has also been performed. Pellets produced in this work have been encapsulated for irradiation, and irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor is expected soon.

  9. Uranium silicide pellet fabrication by powder metallurgy for accident tolerant fuel evaluation and irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In collaboration with industry, Idaho National Laboratory is investigating uranium silicide for use in future light water reactor fuels as a more accident resistant alternative to uranium oxide base fuels. Specifically this project was focused on producing uranium silicide (U3Si2) pellets by conventional powder metallurgy with a density greater than 94% of the theoretical density. This work has produced a process to consistently produce pellets with the desired density through careful optimization of the process. Milling of the U3Si2 has been optimized and high phase purity U3Si2 has been successfully produced. Results are presented from sintering studies and microstructural examinations that illustrate the need for a finely ground reproducible particle size distribution in the source powder. The optimized process was used to produce pellets for the Accident Tolerant Fuel-1 irradiation experiment. The average density of these pellets was 11.54 ±0.06 g/cm3. Additional characterization of the pellets by scaning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction has also been performed. As a result, pellets produced in this work have been encapsulated for irradiation, and irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor is expected soon

  10. Effect of annealing on magnetic properties and silicide formation at Co/Si interface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shivani Agarwal; V Ganesan; A K Tyagi; I P Jain

    2006-11-01

    The interaction of Co (30 nm) thin films on Si (100) substrate in UHV using solid state mixing technique has been studied. Cobalt was deposited on silicon substrate using electron beam evaporation at a vacuum of 4 × 10-8 Torr having a deposition rate of about 0.1 Å/s. Reactivity at Co/Si interface is important for the understanding of silicide formation in thin film system. In the present paper, cobalt silicide films were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) in terms of the surface and interface morphologies and depth profile, respectively. The roughness of the samples was found to increase up to temperature, 300°C and then decreased with further rise in temperature, which was due to the formation of crystalline CoSi2 phase. The effect of mixing on magnetic properties such as coercivity, remanence etc at interface has been studied using magneto optic Kerr effect (MOKE) techniques at different temperatures. The value of coercivity of pristine sample and 300°C annealed sample was found to be 66 Oe and 40 Oe, respectively, while at high temperature i.e. 748°C, the hysteresis disappears which indicates the formation of CoSi2 compound.

  11. Magnesium and Manganese Silicides For Efficient And Low Cost Thermo-Electric Power Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, Sudhir B. [Brimrose Technology Corporation; Kutcher, Susan W. [Brimrose Technology Corporation; Rosemeier, Cory A. [Brimrose Technology Corporation; Mayers, David [Brimrose Technology Corporation; Singh, Jogender [Pennsylvania State University

    2013-12-02

    Thermoelectric Power Generation (TEPG) is the most efficient and commercially deployable power generation technology for harvesting wasted heat from such things as automobile exhausts, industrial furnaces, and incinerators, and converting it into usable electrical power. We investigated the materials magnesium silicide (Mg2Si) and manganese silicide (MnSi) for TEG. MgSi2 and MnSi are environmentally friendly, have constituent elements that are abundant in the earth's crust, non-toxic, lighter and cheaper. In Phase I, we successfully produced Mg2Si and MnSi material with good TE properties. We developed a novel technique to synthesize Mg2Si with good crystalline quality, which is normally very difficult due to high Mg vapor pressure and its corrosive nature. We produced n-type Mg2Si and p-type MnSi nanocomposite pellets using FAST. Measurements of resistivity and voltage under a temperature gradient indicated a Seebeck coefficient of roughly 120 V/K on average per leg, which is quite respectable. Results indicated however, that issues related to bonding resulted in high resistivity contacts. Determining a bonding process and bonding material that can provide ohmic contact from room temperature to the operating temperature is an essential part of successful device fabrication. Work continues in the development of a process for reproducibly obtaining low resistance electrical contacts.

  12. Mitigation of interfacial silicide reactions for electroplated CoPt films on Si substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oniku, Ololade D.; Arnold, David P.

    2015-12-01

    We report in this paper the influence of film thickness on the material and magnetic properties of electroplated CoPt permanent magnets. Layers of CoPt magnets with film thicknesses ranging from 0.5 μm to 5 μm are deposited into photoresist molds (3.5 mm x 3.5 mm square and 5 μm x 50 μm arrays) on a (100)Si substrate coated with 10 nm/100 nm Ti/Cu adhesion/seed layer. Results show an unexpected reduction in magnetic properties for films below 2 μm thick. This effect is determined to be a consequence of metal-silicide reactions at the substrate interface during annealing leading to the formation of a non-magnetic layer at the interface. Subsequently, a TiN diffusion-barrier layer is added to inhibit the silicide reaction and thereby maintain strong magnetic properties (Hci ∼800 kA/m, Mr/Ms = 0.8) in micron- thick electroplated CoPt layers.

  13. Prediction of Stable Ruthenium Silicides from First-Principles Calculations: Stoichiometries, Crystal Structures, and Physical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuanzhao; Kuang, Xiaoyu; Jin, Yuanyuan; Lu, Cheng; Zhou, Dawei; Li, Peifang; Bao, Gang; Hermann, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    We present results of an unbiased structure search for stable ruthenium silicide compounds with various stoichiometries, using a recently developed technique that combines particle swarm optimization algorithms with first-principles calculations. Two experimentally observed structures of ruthenium silicides, RuSi (space group P2(1)3) and Ru2Si3 (space group Pbcn), are successfully reproduced under ambient pressure conditions. In addition, a stable RuSi2 compound with β-FeSi2 structure type (space group Cmca) was found. The calculations of the formation enthalpy, elastic constants, and phonon dispersions demonstrate the Cmca-RuSi2 compound is energetically, mechanically, and dynamically stable. The analysis of electronic band structures and densities of state reveals that the Cmca-RuSi2 phase is a semiconductor with a direct band gap of 0.480 eV and is stabilized by strong covalent bonding between Ru and neighboring Si atoms. On the basis of the Mulliken overlap population analysis, the Vickers hardness of the Cmca structure RuSi2 is estimated to be 28.0 GPa, indicating its ultra-incompressible nature. PMID:26576622

  14. Prospect of Uranium Silicide fuel element with hypostoichiometric (Si ≤3.7%)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt to obtain high uranium-loading in silicide dispersion fuel element using the fabrication technology applicable nowadays can reach Uranium-loading slightly above 5 gU/cm3. It is difficult to achieve a higher uranium-loading than that because of fabricability constraints. To overcome those difficulties, the use of uranium silicide U3Si based is considered. The excess of U is obtained by synthesising U3Si2 in Si-hypostoichiometric stage, without applying heat treatment to the ingot as it can generate undesired U3Si. The U U will react with the matrix to form U alx compound, that its pressure is tolerable. This experiment is to consider possibilities of employing the U3Si2 as nuclear fuel element which have been performed by synthesising U3Si2-U with the composition of 3.7 % weigh and 3 % weigh U. The ingot was obtained and converted into powder form which then was fabricated into experimental plate nuclear fuel element. The interaction between free U and Al-matrix during heat-treatment is the rolling phase of the fuel element was observed. The study of the next phase will be conducted later

  15. Facile Preparation of a Platinum Silicide Nanoparticle-Modified Tip Apex for Scanning Kelvin Probe Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Ting; Chen, Yu-Wei; Su, James; Wu, Chien-Ting; Hsiao, Chien-Nan; Shiao, Ming-Hua; Chang, Mao-Nan

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we propose an ultra-facile approach to prepare a platinum silicide nanoparticle-modified tip apex (PSM tip) used for scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM). We combined a localized fluoride-assisted galvanic replacement reaction (LFAGRR) and atmospheric microwave annealing (AMA) to deposit a single platinum silicide nanoparticle with a diameter of 32 nm on the apex of a bare silicon tip of atomic force microscopy (AFM). The total process was completed in an ambient environment in less than 3 min. The improved potential resolution in the SKPM measurement was verified. Moreover, the resolution of the topography is comparable to that of a bare silicon tip. In addition, the negative charges found on the PSM tips suggest the possibility of exploring the use of current PSM tips to sense electric fields more precisely. The ultra-fast and cost-effective preparation of the PSM tips provides a new direction for the preparation of functional tips for scanning probe microscopy. PMID:26471480

  16. Preliminary investigations on the use of uranium silicide targets for fission Mo-99 production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cols, H.; Cristini, P.; Marques, R.

    1997-08-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) of Argentine Republic owns and operates an installation for production of molybdenum-99 from fission products since 1985, and, since 1991, covers the whole national demand of this nuclide, carrying out a program of weekly productions, achieving an average activity of 13 terabecquerel per week. At present they are finishing an enlargement of the production plant that will allow an increase in the volume of production to about one hundred of terabecquerel. Irradiation targets are uranium/aluminium alloy with 90% enriched uranium with aluminium cladding. In view of international trends held at present for replacing high enrichment uranium (HEU) for enrichment values lower than 20 % (LEU), since 1990 the authors are in contact with the RERTR program, beginning with tests to adapt their separation process to new irradiation target conditions. Uranium silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) was chosen as the testing material, because it has an uranium mass per volume unit, so that it allows to reduce enrichment to a value of 20%. CNEA has the technology for manufacturing miniplates of uranium silicide for their purposes. In this way, equivalent amounts of Molybdenum-99 could be obtained with no substantial changes in target parameters and irradiation conditions established for the current process with Al/U alloy. This paper shows results achieved on the use of this new target.

  17. Geometry-dependent phase, stress state and electrical properties in nickel-silicide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. C.; Lai, W. T.; Hsiao, Y. Y.; Chen, I. H.; George, T.; Li, P. W.

    2016-05-01

    We report that the geometry of single-crystalline Si nanowires (NWs) prior to salicidation at 500 °C is the key factor controlling the phase, stress state, and electrical resistivity of the resulting Ni x Si y NWs of width less than 100 nm. This is a radical departure from previous observations of a single phase formation for nickel silicides generated from the silicidation of bulk Si substrates. The phase transition from NiSi for large NWs ( W Si NW  =  250–450 nm) to Ni2Si for small NWs ( W Si NW  =  70–100 nm) is well correlated with the observed volumetric expansion and electrical resistivity variation with the NW width. For the extremely small dimensions of Ni x Si y NWs, we propose that the preeminent, kinetics-based Zhang and d’Heurle model for salicidation be modified to a more thermodynamically-governed, volume-expansion dependent Ni x Si y phase formation. A novel, plastic deformation mechanism is proposed to explain the observed, geometry-dependent Ni x Si y NW phase formation that also strongly influences the electrical performance of the NWs.

  18. Study of temperature dependent zirconium silicide phases in Zr/Si structure by differential scanning calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) technique is employed to study the formation of different silicide compounds of Zr thin-film deposited on a 100 μm-thick Si (1 0 0) substrate by dc sputtering. A detailed analysis shows that silicide layers start growing at  ∼246 °C that changes to stable ZrSi2 at 627 °C via some compounds with different stoichiometric ratios of Zr and Si. It is further observed that oxygen starts reacting with Zr at  ∼540 °C but a stoichiometric ZrO2 film is formed after complete consumption of Zr metal at 857 °C. A further rise in temperature changes a part of ZrSi2 to Zr-Silicate. The synchrotron radiation-based grazing incidence x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies also corroborate the above findings. Atomic force microscopy is also carried out on the samples. It is evident from the observations that an intermixing and nucleation of Zr and Si occur at lower temperature prior to the formation of the interfacial silicate layer. Zr-Silicate formation takes place only at a higher temperature. (paper)

  19. Two-dimensional electronic structure of dysprosium silicide nanowires on Si(557)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rare earth silicide nanostructures are of high interest because of their extremely low Schottky barriers on n-Si(111) and the formation of nanowires with one-dimensional metallicity on Si(001). In this work, the self-organized growth of monolayer-thick dysprosium silicide nanowires on Si(557) has been studied by scanning tunnelling microscopy and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. The bare Si(557) surface is characterized by (111) and (112) facets. Accordingly, we observed the nanowires forming on the (111) facets. For coverages of 2A dysprosium, nanowire lengths exceeding 1μm and widths around 5 nm were found. Their electronic structure shows a strong dispersion both parallel and perpendicular to the nanowires, which is assigned to the band structure of DySi2 monolayers on Si(111). At higher coverages similar nanowires are observed at the (111) facets, which show characteristic structural properties of the multilayer growth and also the Dy3Si5 multilayer band structure

  20. Importance of Calcium

    OpenAIRE

    TANDOĞAN, Berivan; ULUSU, N. Nuray

    2005-01-01

    Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body. Calcium regulates many cellular processes and has important structural roles in living organisms. Skeletal muscle structure and function, polymerisation of fibrin and the conduction of impulses in the nervous system are regulated by calcium. Calcium is an important intracellular messenger in protozoa, plants, and animals. Calcium-transporting systems which are located in the plasma membrane and in the organelles, regulate the ionic concentrati...

  1. Formation of Mg silicides on amorphous Si. Origin and role of high pressure in the film growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growth of Mg film on amorphous Si (a-Si) at room temperature in UHV conditions was studied in situ with optical differential reflection spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. The phase composition of the film was also studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The mechanism of silicide film growth on a-Si is considered. The origin of internal stress within the growing film and its role in the silicide film growth process are discussed. Due to high pressure occurring within the growing film, the first phase to form is the hexagonal silicide phase h-Mg2Si. According to the DRS data, the phase h-Mg2Si is semiconducting. The new peak in the differential reflectance spectrum is assigned to the h-Mg2Si. At later stages of Mg deposition the cubic silicide phase c-Mg2Si grows. - Highlights: • The film growth by UHV deposition of Mg on amorphous Si layer was studied. • Two Mg2Si phases, hexagonal and cubic, were formed on amorphous Silicon. • The metastable h-Mg2Si forms first, due to very high stress inside the film. • The stress is induced by chemical forces during intermixing of Mg with Si. • The film growth stages are clearly seen by Differential Reflectance Spectroscopy

  2. Aluminium alloyed iron-silicide/silicon solar cells: A simple approach for low cost environmental-friendly photovoltaic technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Dalapati, Goutam; Masudy-Panah, Saeid; Kumar, Avishek; Cheh Tan, Cheng; Ru Tan, Hui; Chi, Dongzhi

    2015-12-01

    This work demonstrates the fabrication of silicide/silicon based solar cell towards the development of low cost and environmental friendly photovoltaic technology. A heterostructure solar cells using metallic alpha phase (α-phase) aluminum alloyed iron silicide (FeSi(Al)) on n-type silicon is fabricated with an efficiency of 0.8%. The fabricated device has an open circuit voltage and fill-factor of 240 mV and 60%, respectively. Performance of the device was improved by about 7 fold to 5.1% through the interface engineering. The α-phase FeSi(Al)/silicon solar cell devices have promising photovoltaic characteristic with an open circuit voltage, short-circuit current and a fill factor (FF) of 425 mV, 18.5 mA/cm2, and 64%, respectively. The significant improvement of α-phase FeSi(Al)/n-Si solar cells is due to the formation p+-n homojunction through the formation of re-grown crystalline silicon layer (~5-10 nm) at the silicide/silicon interface. Thickness of the regrown silicon layer is crucial for the silicide/silicon based photovoltaic devices. Performance of the α-FeSi(Al)/n-Si solar cells significantly depends on the thickness of α-FeSi(Al) layer and process temperature during the device fabrication. This study will open up new opportunities for the Si based photovoltaic technology using a simple, sustainable, and los cost method.

  3. Influence of Al addition on phase transformation and thermal stability of nickel silicides on Si(0 0 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The presence of Al slows down the Ni2Si–NiSi phase transformation but significantly promotes the NiSi2−xAlx formation. ► The behavior of phase transformation strongly depends on the Al concentration of the initial Ni1−xAlx alloys. ► The Ni0.91Al0.09/Si system exhibits remarkably improved thermal stability, even after high temperature annealing for 1000 s. ► The relationship between microstructures, electrical property, and thermal stability of Ni(Al) silicides is discussed. -- Abstract: The influence of Al addition on the phase transformation and thermal stability of Ni silicides on (0 0 1)Si has been systematically investigated. The presence of Al atoms is found to slow down the Ni2Si–NiSi phase transformation but significantly promote the NiSi2−xAlx formation during annealing. The behavior of phase transformation strongly depends on the Al concentration of the initial Ni1−xAlx alloys. Compared to the Ni0.95Pt0.05/Si and Ni0.95Al0.05/Si system, the Ni0.91Al0.09/Si sample exhibits remarkably enhanced thermal stability, even after high temperature annealing for 1000 s. The relationship between microstructures, electrical property, and thermal stability of Ni silicides is discussed to elucidate the role of Al during the Ni1−xAlx alloy silicidation. This work demonstrated that thermally stable Ni1−xAlx alloy silicides would be a promising candidate as source/drain (S/D) contacts in advanced complementary metal–oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices

  4. Understanding and Improving High-Temperature Structural Properties of Metal-Silicide Intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce S. Kang

    2005-10-10

    The objective of this project was to understand and improve high-temperature structural properties of metal-silicide intermetallic alloys. Through research collaboration between the research team at West Virginia University (WVU) and Dr. J.H. Schneibel at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), molybdenum silicide alloys were developed at ORNL and evaluated at WVU through atomistic modeling analyses, thermo-mechanical tests, and metallurgical studies. In this study, molybdenum-based alloys were ductilized by dispersing MgAl2O4 or MgO spinel particles. The addition of spinel particles is hypothesized to getter impurities such as oxygen and nitrogen from the alloy matrix with the result of ductility improvement. The introduction of fine dispersions has also been postulated to improve ductility by acting as a dislocation source or reducing dislocation pile-ups at grain boundaries. The spinel particles, on the other hand, can also act as local notches or crack initiation sites, which is detrimental to the alloy mechanical properties. Optimization of material processing condition is important to develop the desirable molybdenum alloys with sufficient room-temperature ductility. Atomistic analyses were conducted to further understand the mechanism of ductility improvement of the molybdenum alloys and the results showed that trace amount of residual oxygen may be responsible for the brittle behavior of the as-cast Mo alloys. For the alloys studied, uniaxial tensile tests were conducted at different loading rates, and at room and elevated temperatures. Thermal cycling effect on the mechanical properties was also studied. Tensile tests for specimens subjected to either ten or twenty thermal cycles were conducted. For each test, a follow-up detailed fractography and microstructural analysis were carried out. The test results were correlated to the size, density, distribution of the spinel particles and processing time. Thermal expansion tests were carried out using thermo

  5. Modified fused silicide coatings for tantalum (Ta-10W) reentry heat shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, C. M.; Perkins, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Results are presented of a program of research to develop a reliable, high performance, fused slurry silicide coating for the Ta-10W alloy. The effort was directed toward developing new and improved formulations for use at 2600 to 2800 F (1700 to 1811 K) in an atmospheric reentry thermal protection system with a 100-mission capability. Based on a thorough characterization of isothermal and cyclic oxidation behavior, bend transition temperatures, room- and elevated-temperature tensile properties, and creep behavior, a 2.5 Mn-33Ti-64.5Si coating (designated MTS) provides excellent protection for the Ta-10W alloy in simulated reentry environments. An extensive analysis of the oxidation behavior and characteristics of the MTS coating in terms of fundamental mechanisms also is presented.

  6. Formation of pinhole-free epitaxial yttrium silicide on silicon (111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the growth of structurally continuous, pinhole-free epitaxial YSi2-x films on Si(111) substrates as thin as 30 Angstrom. This is accomplished by depositing both yttrium and silicon in the appropriate stoichiometric ratio onto substrates held near room temperature, which is apparently below the activation energy for the nucleation of a reaction between a deposited Y film and a Si substrate. Diffusion of Si atoms from an evaporation source into a thin Y layer occurs below this barrier energy, allowing the layer by layer formation of YSi2-x without the removal of silicon from the substrate, maintaining a relatively low interface free energy between the growing silicide film and the Si(111) substrate. Samples have been annealed to 500-900 degrees C to improve epitaxy without the creation of pinholes. Use of the template method allows for the growth of thicker films also free of pinholes

  7. The fabrication of metal silicide nanodot arrays using localized ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jin; Kim, Tae-Gon; Min, Byung-Kwon; Lee, Sang Jo, E-mail: bkmin@yonsei.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-03

    We propose a process for fabricating nanodot arrays with a pitch size of less than 25 nm. The process consists of localized ion implantation in a metal thin film on a Si wafer using a focused ion beam (FIB), followed by chemical etching. This process utilizes the etching resistivity changes of the ion beam irradiated region that result from metal silicide formation by ion implantation. To control the nanodot diameter, a threshold ion dose model is proposed using the Gaussian distribution of the ion beam intensities. The process is verified by fabricating nanodots with various diameters. The mechanism of etching resistivity is investigated via x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES).

  8. Rare-earth silicide thin films on the Si(111) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, S.; Dues, C.; Schmidt, W. G.; Timmer, F.; Wollschläger, J.; Franz, M.; Appelfeller, S.; Dähne, M.

    2016-05-01

    Rare-earth induced layered structures on the Si(111) surface are investigated by a combined approach consisting of ab initio thermodynamics, electron and x-ray diffraction experiments, angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy. Our density functional theory calculations predict the occurrence of structures with different periodicity, depending on the rare-earth availability. Microscopic structural models are assigned to the different silicide phases on the basis of stability criteria. The thermodynamically stable theoretical models are then employed to interpret the experimental results. The agreement between the simulated and measured scanning tunneling microscopy images validates the proposed structural models. The electronic properties of the surfaces are discussed on the basis of the calculated electronic band structure and photoelectron spectroscopy data.

  9. Fabrication of uranium silicide dispersion fuel by atomization for research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomizing technology has been developed to eliminate the difficulties in comminution of the tough U3Si and to take advantage of the spherical shape and the rapid solidification. The comparison between the conventional dispersion fuel with comminuted powder and the newly developed fuel with atomized powder has been made. As a result, the processes, powdering uranium silicide and heat treatment to U3Si, become simplified. The extruding pressure of blended powder with atomized powder was lower than that of blended powder with comminuted powder. The elongation of the atomization processed fuel meat was much higher than that of comminution processed fuel meats. It appears that the loading density of U3Si in fuel meat can be increased by using atomized U3Si powder. The thermal conductivity and the thermal compatibility of fuel meat have been investigated and found to be much improved due to the spherical shape of atomized powder. (author)

  10. Hydrogen generation systems utilizing sodium silicide and sodium silica gel materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Andrew P.; Melack, John M.; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2015-07-14

    Systems, devices, and methods combine reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The reactant materials can sodium silicide or sodium silica gel. The hydrogen generation devices are used in fuels cells and other industrial applications. One system combines cooling, pumping, water storage, and other devices to sense and control reactions between reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. Multiple inlets of varied placement geometries deliver aqueous solution to the reaction. The reactant materials and aqueous solution are churned to control the state of the reaction. The aqueous solution can be recycled and returned to the reaction. One system operates over a range of temperatures and pressures and includes a hydrogen separator, a heat removal mechanism, and state of reaction control devices. The systems, devices, and methods of generating hydrogen provide thermally stable solids, near-instant reaction with the aqueous solutions, and a non-toxic liquid by-product.

  11. Hydrogen generation systems and methods utilizing sodium silicide and sodium silica gel materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Andrew P.; Melack, John M.; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2015-08-11

    Systems, devices, and methods combine thermally stable reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen and a non-toxic liquid by-product. The reactant materials can sodium silicide or sodium silica gel. The hydrogen generation devices are used in fuels cells and other industrial applications. One system combines cooling, pumping, water storage, and other devices to sense and control reactions between reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. Springs and other pressurization mechanisms pressurize and deliver an aqueous solution to the reaction. A check valve and other pressure regulation mechanisms regulate the pressure of the aqueous solution delivered to the reactant fuel material in the reactor based upon characteristics of the pressurization mechanisms and can regulate the pressure of the delivered aqueous solution as a steady decay associated with the pressurization force. The pressure regulation mechanism can also prevent hydrogen gas from deflecting the pressure regulation mechanism.

  12. Chemical vapour deposition of tungsten and tungsten silicide layers for applications in novel silicon technology

    CERN Document Server

    Li, F X

    2002-01-01

    This work was a detailed investigation into the Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) of tungsten and tungsten silicide for potential applications in integrated circuit (IC) and other microelectronic devices. These materials may find novel applications in contact schemes for transistors in advanced ICs, buried high conductivity layers in novel Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) technology and in power electronic devices. The CVD techniques developed may also be used for metal coating of recessed or enclosed features which may occur in novel electronic or electromechanical devices. CVD of tungsten was investigated using the silicon reduction reaction of WF sub 6. W layers with an optimum self-limiting thickness of 100 nm and resistivity 20 mu OMEGA centre dot cm were produced self-aligned to silicon. A hydrogen passivation technique was developed as part of the wafer pre-clean schedule and proved essential in achieving optimum layer thickness. Layers produced by this approach are ideal for intimate contact to shallow junct...

  13. Calcium in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... best source. Milk and dairy products such as yogurt, cheeses, and buttermilk contain a form of calcium ... the amount of calcium in a dairy product. Yogurt, most cheeses, and buttermilk are excellent sources of ...

  14. Fenoprofen calcium overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenoprofen calcium is a type of medicine called a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. It is a prescription pain medicine used to relieve symptoms of arthritis . Fenoprofen calcium overdose occurs when someone takes more than the ...

  15. Calcium channel blocker overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002580.htm Calcium channel blocker overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Calcium channel blockers are a type of medicine used ...

  16. Fenoprofen calcium overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002649.htm Fenoprofen calcium overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Fenoprofen calcium is a type of medicine called a nonsteroidal ...

  17. Discovery of Brownleeite: a New Manganese Silicide Mineral in an Interplanetary Dust Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Clemett, Simon J.; Messenger, Scott; Jones, John H.; Palma, Russell L.; Pepin, Robert O.; Klock, Wolfgang; Zolensky, Michael E.; Tatsuoka, Hirokazu

    2011-01-01

    The Earth accretes approximately 40,000 tons of cosmic dust annually, originating mainly from the disintegration of comets and collisions among asteroids. This cosmic dust, also known as interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), is a subject of intense interest since it is made of the original building blocks of our Solar System. Although the specific parent bodies of IDPs are unknown, the anhydrous chondritic-porous IDPs (CP-IDPs) subset has been potentially linked to a cometary source. The CP-IDPs are extremely primitive materials based on their unequilibrated mineralogy, C-rich chemistry, and anomalous isotopic signatures. In particular, some CP-IDPs escaped the thermal, aqueous and impact shock processing that has modified or destroyed the original mineralogy of meteorites. Thus, the CP-IDPs represent some of the most primitive solar system materials available for laboratory study. Most CP-IDPs are comprised of minerals that are common on Earth. However, in the course of an examination of one of the CP-IDPs, we encountered three sub-micrometer sized grains of manganese silicide (MnSi), a phase that has heretofore not been found in nature. In the seminar, we would like to focus on IDP studies and this manganese silicide phase that has been approved as the first new mineral identified from a comet by the International Mineralogical Association (IMA) in 2008. The mineral is named in honour of Donald E. Brownlee, an American astronomer and a founder of the field of cosmic dust research who is the principal investigator of the NASA Stardust Mission that collected dust samples from Comet 81P/Wild-2 and returned them to Earth. Much of our current view and understanding of the early solar system would not exist without the pioneering work of professor Don Brownlee in the study of IDPs.

  18. In Situ Study of the Formation of Silicide Phases in Amorphous Co–Si Mixed Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Bockstael, C.; De Keyser, K; Demeulemeester, J; Vantomme, A; Van Meirhaeghe, R; Detavernier, C; Jordan-Sweet, J; Lavoie, C

    2010-01-01

    We investigate Co silicide phase formation when extra Si is added within an as deposited 50 nm Co film. The addition of Si is investigated for both the Co/SiO{sub 2} and Co/Si(1 0 0) system. A series of 10 Co-Si mixed films with a Si content varying from 21 to 59 at.% was prepared and investigated during annealing with in situ X-ray diffraction. The oxide system is used as reference system to identify phases that initially crystallize in an amorphous mixture of a given composition. Multiple phases can nucleate, and the temperature of crystallization depends on the Co-Si atomic ratio. Upon heating of the Co(Si)/Si system, the first reaction is a similar crystallization reaction of the Co(Si) mixture. Once the first phase is formed, one has the normal system of a silicide phase in contact with an unlimited amount of Si from the substrate, and the sequential phase formation towards CoSi{sub 2} is established. For deposited layers of composition ranging from 48%Si to 52%Si, the CoSi is the first phase to form and increasing the amount of Si leads to a remarkable improvement of the thermal stability of CoSi on Si(1 0 0). CoSi{sub 2} nucleation was extensively delayed by 150 C compared to the reaction observed from a pure Co film on Si(1 0 0). Electron backscatter diffraction measurements reveal that in this range, the gradual Si increase systematically leads to bigger CoSi grains (up to 20 {micro}m). This shows that the grain size of the CoSi precursor strongly affects the nucleation of the following CoSi{sub 2} phase. Laser-light scattering measurements suggest that adding more than 42%Si reduces the roughness of the CoSi{sub 2} layer.

  19. Calcium and magnesium disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, Jesse P

    2014-07-01

    Hypocalcemia is a clinical disorder that can be life threatening to the cow (milk fever) and predisposes the animal to various other metabolic and infectious disorders. Calcium homeostasis is mediated primarily by parathyroid hormone, which stimulates bone calcium resorption and renal calcium reabsorption. Parathyroid hormone stimulates the production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D to enhance diet calcium absorption. High dietary cation-anion difference interferes with tissue sensitivity to parathyroid hormone. Hypomagnesemia reduces tissue response to parathyroid hormone. PMID:24980727

  20. Calcium and Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  1. Calcium en cardioplegie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Meijler, F.L.

    1985-01-01

    Coronary perfusion with a calcium-free solution, followed by reperfusion with a calcium containing solution, may result in acute myocardial cell death and in irreversible loss of the e1ectrical and mechanical activity of the heart. This phenomenon is known as the calcium paradox. A number of cardiop

  2. Effect of P+ ions on the microstructure and the nature of the formed silicides in the Cr/Si system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the phosphorus on the microstructure and on the nature of the formed silicide in the annealed Cr/Si system is studied. The chromium layer is deposited by electron gun evaporation on the undoped and P+ doped monocrystalline silicon. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) investigation of the samples, annealed at 475 deg. C for different times, shows that the presence of phosphorus leads to the formation of CrSi2 disilicide, free of defects, and Cr3Si silicide for lower and higher annealing times, respectively. In the case of undoped substrate the formed CrSi2 disilicide is stable and contains a high concentration of stacking faults when the chromium is partially consumed

  3. Selective silicide or boride film formation by reaction of vapor phase TiCl4 with silicon or boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods for selectively forming titanium silicide and titanium boride by vapor phase reaction of titanium chloride precursors with silicon or boron substrate surfaces are examined. By passing TiCl4 through a heated chamber packed with titanium metal turnings within the reactor tube, a reduced titanium halide is generated. It was found that the silicide or boride formation in the reactor can thus be controlled at a much lower temperature. Also, excessive silicon erosion normally encountered at the higher operating temperature (> 775 degrees C) required for the direct TiCl4 reaction is minimized. Characterization of the resulting films was conducted by use of scanning and transmission electron microscopy, sheet resistance measurements, and x-ray diffraction

  4. Oxidation-resistant Ge-doped silicide coating on Cr-Cr2Nb alloys by pack cementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The halide-activated pack cementation process was modified to produce a Ge-doped silicide diffusion coating on Cr-Cr2Nb alloys in a single processing step. The morphology and composition of the coating depended both on the pack composition and processing schedule and also on the composition and microstructure of the substrate. Higher Ge content in the pack suppressed the formation of CrSi2 and reduced the growth kinetics of the coating. Ge was not homogeneously distributed in the coatings. Under cyclic and isothermal oxidation conditions, the Ge-doped silicide coating protected the Cr-Nb alloys from significant oxidation and from pesting by the formation of a Ge-doped silica film. (orig.)

  5. Production Cycle for Large Scale Fission Mo-99 Separation by the Processing of Irradiated LEU Uranium Silicide Fuel Element Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Abdel-Hadi Ali Sameh

    2013-01-01

    Uranium silicide fuels proved over decades their exceptional qualification for the operation of higher flux material testing reactors with LEU elements. The application of such fuels as target materials, particularly for the large scale fission Mo-99 producers, offers an efficient and economical solution for the related facilities. The realization of such aim demands the introduction of a suitable dissolution process for the applied U3Si2 compound. Excellent results are achieved by the oxidiz...

  6. Pack cementation Cr-Al coating of steels and Ge-doped silicide coating of Cr-Nb alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Y.R.; Zheng, M.H.; Rapp, R.A. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Carbon steels or low-alloy steels used in utility boilers, heat exchangers, petrochemical plants and coal gasification systems are subjected to high temperature corrosion attack such as oxidation, sulfidation and hot corrosion. The pack cementation coating process has proven to be an economical and effective method to enhance the corrosion resistance by modifying the surface composition of steels. With the aid of a computer program, STEPSOL, pack cementation conditions to produce a ferrite Cr-Al diffusion coating on carbon-containing steels by using elemental Cr and Al powders have been calculated and experimentally verified. The cyclic oxidation kinetics for the Cr-Al coated steels are presented. Chromium silicide can maintain high oxidation resistance up to 1100{degrees}C by forming a SiO{sub 2} protective scale. Previous studies at Ohio State University have shown that the cyclic oxidation resistance of MOSi{sub 2} and TiSi{sub 2} can be further improved by Ge addition introduced during coating growth. The halide-activated pack cementation process was modified to produce a Ge-doped silicide diffusion coating in a single processing step for the ORNL-developed Cr-Nb advanced intermetallic alloy. The oxidation behavior of the silicide-coated Cr-Nb alloy was excellent: weight gain of about 1 mg/cm{sup 2} upon oxidation at 1100{degrees}C in air for 100 hours.

  7. Dimensional stability of low enriched uranium silicide plate-type fuel for research reactors at transient conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki; Fujishiro, Toshio; Horiki, Oichiro; Soyama, Kazuhiko; Ichikawa, Hiroki; Kodaira, Tsuneo (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment)

    1992-03-01

    This paper describes the result of transient experiments using low enriched uranium silicide plate-type fuel for research reactors. The pulse irradiation was carried out at Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The results obtained were: (1) At fuel plate temperature of below 400degC, a good dimensional stability of the tested fuel was kept. No fuel failure occurred. (2) At a plate temperature of about 540degC, a local crack was initiated on the Al-3% Mg alloy cladding. Once the cladding temperature exceeded the melting point of 640degC, the fuel plate was degraded much by increased bowing and cracking of the denuded fuel meat occurred after relocation of molten Al cladding. Despite of these degradation, neither fragmentation of the fuel plate nor mechanical energy generation occurred up to the cladding temperature of 971degC. (3) At the temperatures of around 925degC, the reaction of silicide particles with molten Al in the matrix and that of cladding occurred, forming Al riched U (Al, Si) compounds and Si riched (U, Si) compounds at the outermost surface of the silicide particles. (author).

  8. Dimensional stability of low enriched uranium silicide plate-type fuel for research reactors at transient conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the result of transient experiments using low enriched uranium silicide plate-type fuel for research reactors. The pulse irradiation was carried out at Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The results obtained were: (1) At fuel plate temperature of below 400degC, a good dimensional stability of the tested fuel was kept. No fuel failure occurred. (2) At a plate temperature of about 540degC, a local crack was initiated on the Al-3% Mg alloy cladding. Once the cladding temperature exceeded the melting point of 640degC, the fuel plate was degraded much by increased bowing and cracking of the denuded fuel meat occurred after relocation of molten Al cladding. Despite of these degradation, neither fragmentation of the fuel plate nor mechanical energy generation occurred up to the cladding temperature of 971degC. (3) At the temperatures of around 925degC, the reaction of silicide particles with molten Al in the matrix and that of cladding occurred, forming Al riched U (Al, Si) compounds and Si riched (U, Si) compounds at the outermost surface of the silicide particles. (author)

  9. Nano-Borides and Silicide Dispersed Composite Coating on AISI 304 Stainless Steel by Laser-Assisted HVOF Spray Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prashant; Majumdar, Jyotsna Dutta

    2014-10-01

    The study concerned a detailed microstructural investigation of nano-borides (Cr2B and Ni3B) and nano-silicide (Ni2Si) dispersed γ-nickel composite coating on AISI 304 stainless steel by HVOF spray deposition of the NiCrBSi precursor powder and subsequent laser surface melting. A continuous wave diode laser with an applied power of 3 kW and scan speed of 20 mm/s in argon shroud was employed. The characterization of the surface in terms of microstructure, microtexture, phases, and composition were carried out and compared with the as-coated (high-velocity oxy-fuel sprayed) surface. Laser surface melting led to homogenization and refinement of microstructures with the formation of few nano-silicides of nickel along with nano-borides of nickel and chromium (Ni3B, Cr2B, and Cr2B3). A detailed microtexture analysis showed the presence of no specific texture in the as-sprayed and laser-melted surface of Cr2B and Ni3B phases. The average microhardness was improved to 750-900 VHN as compared to 250 VHN of the as-received substrate. Laser surface melting improved the microhardness further to as high as 1400 VHN due to refinement of microstructure and the presence of silicides.

  10. Calcium absorption and achlorhydria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defective absorption of calcium has been thought to exist in patients with achlorhydria. The author compared absorption of calcium in its carbonate form with that in a pH-adjusted citrate form in a group of 11 fasting patients with achlorhydria and in 9 fasting normal subjects. Fractional calcium absorption was measured by a modified double-isotope procedure with 0.25 g of calcium used as the carrier. Mean calcium absorption (+/- S.D.) in the patients with achlorhydria was 0.452 +/- 0.125 for citrate and 0.042 +/- 0.021 for carbonate (P less than 0.0001). Fractional calcium absorption in the normal subjects was 0.243 +/- 0.049 for citrate and 0.225 +/- 0.108 for carbonate (not significant). Absorption of calcium from carbonate in patients with achlorhydria was significantly lower than in the normal subjects and was lower than absorption from citrate in either group; absorption from citrate in those with achlorhydria was significantly higher than in the normal subjects, as well as higher than absorption from carbonate in either group. Administration of calcium carbonate as part of a normal breakfast resulted in completely normal absorption in the achlorhydric subjects. These results indicate that calcium absorption from carbonate is impaired in achlorhydria under fasting conditions. Since achlorhydria is common in older persons, calcium carbonate may not be the ideal dietary supplement

  11. EXERCISE ENHANCING CALCIUM ABSORPTION MECHANISM

    OpenAIRE

    Muliani

    2013-01-01

    Calcium has important role in many biological processes therefore calcium homeostasis should be maintained. Imbalance in calcium homeostasis would affects the bone metabolism, neuromuscular function, blood coagulation, cell proliferation and signal transduction. Homeostasis of calcium is maintained by three major organs: gastrointestinal tract, bone and kidney. Intestinal calcium absorption is the sole mechanism to supply calcium to the body. Calcium absorption controlled by calcitropic hormo...

  12. Reactivity insertion transient analysis for KUR low-enriched uranium silicide fuel core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A simulation model for KUR LEU silicide core was established. • Safety analyses for reactivity insertion transients were performed by EUREKA-2/RR. • Accidental control rod withdrawal transients were analyzed. • Cold water injection induced reactivity insertion transients were analyzed. • Reactivity insertion transients due to removal of irradiation samples were analyzed. - Abstract: The purpose of this study is to realize the full core conversion from the use of High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuels to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuels in Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR). Although the conversion of nuclear energy sources is required to keep the safety margins and reactor reliability based on KUR HEU core, the uranium density (3.2 gU/cm3) and enrichment (20%) of LEU fuel (U3Si2–AL) are quite different from the uranium density (0.58 gU/ (cm3)) and enrichment (93%) of HEU fuel (U–Al), which may result in the changes of heat transfer response and neutronic characteristic in the core. So it is necessary to objectively re-assess the feasibility of LEU silicide fuel core in KUR by using various numerical simulation codes. This paper established a detailed simulation model for the LEU silicide core and provided the safety analyses for the reactivity insertion transients in the core by using EUREKA-2/RR code. Although the EUREKA-2/RR code is a proven and trusted code, its validity was further confirmed by the comparison with the predictions from another two thermal hydraulic codes, COOLOD-N2 and THYDE-W at steady state operation. The steady state simulation also verified the feasibility of KUR to be operated at rated thermal power of 5 MW. In view of the core loading patterns, the operational conditions and characteristics of the reactor protection system in KUR, the accidental control rod withdrawal transients at natural circulation and forced circulation modes, the cold water injection induced reactivity insertion transient and the

  13. Rate Theory Modeling and Simulations of Silicide Fuel at LWR Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Yinbin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ye, Bei [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mei, Zhigang [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hofman, Gerard [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Yacout, Abdellatif [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-12-10

    Uranium silicide (U3Si2) fuel has higher thermal conductivity and higher uranium density, making it a promising candidate for the accident-tolerant fuel (ATF) used in light water reactors (LWRs). However, previous studies on the fuel performance of U3Si2, including both experimental and computational approaches, have been focusing on the irradiation conditions in research reactors, which usually involve low operation temperatures and high fuel burnups. Thus, it is important to examine the fuel performance of U3Si2 at typical LWR conditions so as to evaluate the feasibility of replacing conventional uranium dioxide fuel with this silicide fuel material. As in-reactor irradiation experiments involve significant time and financial cost, it is appropriate to utilize modeling tools to estimate the behavior of U3Si2 in LWRs based on all those available research reactor experimental references and state-of-the-art density functional theory (DFT) calculation capabilities at the early development stage. Hence, in this report, a comprehensive investigation of the fission gas swelling behavior of U3Si2 at LWR conditions is introduced. The modeling efforts mentioned in this report was based on the rate theory (RT) model of fission gas bubble evolution that has been successfully applied for a variety of fuel materials at devious reactor conditions. Both existing experimental data and DFT-calculated results were used for the optimization of the parameters adopted by the RT model. Meanwhile, the fuel-cladding interaction was captured by the coupling of the RT model with simplified mechanical correlations. Therefore, the swelling behavior of U3Si2 fuel and its consequent interaction with cladding in LWRs was predicted by the rate theory modeling, providing valuable information for the development of U3Si2 fuel as an accident

  14. Dengue and Calcium

    OpenAIRE

    Shivanthan, Mitrakrishnan C; Rajapakse, Senaka

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is potentially fatal unless managed appropriately. No specific treatment is available and the mainstay of treatment is fluid management with careful monitoring, organ support, and correction of metabolic derangement. Evidence with regards to the role of calcium homeostasis in dengue is limited. Low blood calcium levels have been demonstrated in dengue infection and hypocalcemia maybe more pronounced in more severe forms. The cause of hypocalcemia is likely to be multifactorial. Calcium...

  15. Measurements of intracellular calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) has been measured in cultured cells by using Fura-2 load cells and a computer-controlled Perkin Elmer LS-5B spectrofluorometer. Increased [Ca2+]i in cells exposed to extracellular bilirubin was observed both with and without extracellular calcium. However, the increase was considerable larger with extracellular calcium. The enhancement of [Ca2+]i became smaller with decreasing bilirubin/BSA (bovine serum albumine) ratio. 5 refs., 5 figs

  16. The ability of silicide coating to delay the catastrophic oxidation of vanadium under severe conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaia, N.; Mathieu, S.; Rouillard, F.; Vilasi, M.

    2015-02-01

    V-4Cr-4Ti vanadium alloy is a potential cladding material for sodium-cooled fast-neutron reactors (SFRs). However, its affinity for oxygen and the subsequent embrittlement that oxygen induces causes a need for an oxygen diffusion barrier, which can be obtained by manufacturing a multi-layered silicide coating. The present work aims to evaluate the effects of thermal cycling (using a cyclic oxidation device) and tensile and compressive stresses (using the three-point flexure test) on the coated alloy system. Tests were performed in air up to 1100 °C, which is 200 °C higher than the accidental temperature for SFR applications. The results showed that the VSi2 coating was able to protect the vanadium substrate from oxidation for more than 400 1-h cycles between 1100 °C and room temperature. The severe bending applied to the coated alloy at 950 °C using a load of 75 MPa did not lead to specimen breakage. It can be suggested that the VSi2 coating has mechanical properties compatible with the V-4Cr-4Ti alloy for SFR applications.

  17. Molybdenum, Tungsten, and Aluminium Substitution for Enhancement of the Thermoelectric Performance of Higher Manganese Silicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhi Truong, D. Y.; Berthebaud, David; Gascoin, Franck; Kleinke, Holger

    2015-10-01

    An easy and efficient process involving ball milling under soft conditions and spark plasma sintering was used to synthesize higher manganese silicide (HMS)-based compounds, for example MnSi1.75Ge0.02, with different molybdenum, tungsten, and aluminium substitution. The x-ray diffraction patterns of the samples after sintering showed the main phase to be HMS with the presence of some side products. Molybdenum substitution enlarges the unit cells more than tungsten substitution, owing to its greater solubility in the HMS structure, whereas substitution with aluminium did not substantially alter the cell parameters. The electrical resistivity of HMS-based compounds was reduced by <10% by this substitution, because of increased carrier concentrations. Changes of the Seebeck coefficient were insignificant after molybdenum and aluminium substitution whereas tungsten substitution slightly reduced the thermopower of the base material by approximately 8% over the whole temperature range; this was ascribed to reduced carrier mobility as a result of enhanced scattering. Substitution with any combination of two of these elements resulted in no crucial modification of the electrical properties of the base material. Large decreases of lattice thermal conductivity were observed, because of enhanced phonon scattering, with the highest reduction up to 25% for molybdenum substitution; this resulted in a 20% decrease of total thermal conductivity, which contributed to improvement of the figure of merit ZT of the HMS-based materials. The maximum ZT value was approximately 0.40 for the material with 2 at.% molybdenum substitution at the Mn sites.

  18. The Comparison Of Silicon Analysis For The Uranium Silicide Fuel Using Spectrophotometrical And Gravimetrical Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of silicon content in the uranium silicide fuel spectro-photometrical and gravimetrical method have been performed. The nitrous oxide-acetylene was used in the atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) on the wave length of 251.6 nm, and the mixture of ammonium hepta molybdate complexes and SnC12 as reductor were applied during analysis by UV-VIS spectrophotometry (UV-VIS) on the wave length of 757.5 mm. The reagent of HCLO4 and HNO3 were used for determining Si content by gravimetrical methods. The results of this comparison is as follows: the accuracy result is around 96.37 % + 0.24 % for the Si concentration up to 300 ppm (the AAS), is 138.60 % = 0.43 % for the Si concentration range between 0.1-1.5 ppm (UV-VIS), and is 51.13 % + 0.8 % for 1 gram of Si (gravimetry). The results also show that the lowest analytical error is obtained by AAS method

  19. Burnup determination of silicide MTR fuel elements (20% 235U) in the LFR laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LFR facility is a radiochemical laboratory designed and constructed with a hot-cells line, a glove-box and a fume hood, all of them suited to work radioactive materials. At the beginning of the LFR operation a series of dissolutions of MTR irradiated silicide fuel elements was performed, and determined its isotopic composition of 235U, 239Pu and 148Nd (the last one as burn up monitor), by the thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). These assays are linked to the IAEA RLA/4/018 Regional Project 'Management of Spent Fuel from Research Reactors'. It is concluded that this technique of burn up measurement is powerful and accurate when properly applied, and permit to validate the calculation codes when isotopic dilution is performed. It is worth noticed the LFR capacity to carry on different research and development programs in the nuclear fuel cycle field, such as the previously mentioned absolute burn up measurements, or the evaluation of radioactive waste immobilization processes and researches on burnable poisons. (author)

  20. A Computational Study on the Ground and Excited States of Nickel Silicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoendorff, George; Morris, Alexis R; Hu, Emily D; Wilson, Angela K

    2015-09-17

    Nickel silicide has been studied with a range of computational methods to determine the nature of the Ni-Si bond. Additionally, the physical effects that need to be addressed within calculations to predict the equilibrium bond length and bond dissociation energy within experimental error have been determined. The ground state is predicted to be a (1)Σ(+) state with a bond order of 2.41 corresponding to a triple bond with weak π bonds. It is shown that calculation of the ground state equilibrium geometry requires a polarized basis set and treatment of dynamic correlation including up to triple excitations with CR-CCSD(T)L resulting in an equilibrium bond length of only 0.012 Å shorter than the experimental bond length. Previous calculations of the bond dissociation energy resulted in energies that were only 34.8% to 76.5% of the experimental bond dissociation energy. It is shown here that use of polarized basis sets, treatment of triple excitations, correlation of the valence and subvalence electrons, and a Λ coupled cluster approach is required to obtain a bond dissociation energy that deviates as little as 1% from experiment. PMID:26301835

  1. The whole-core LEU silicide fuel demonstration in the JMTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aso, Tomokazu; Akashi, Kazutomo; Nagao, Yoshiharu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    The JMTR was fully converted to LEU silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) fuel with cadmium wires as burnable absorber in January, 1994. The reduced enrichment program for the JMTR was initiated in 1979, and the conversion to MEU (enrichment ; 45%) aluminide fuel was carried out in 1986 as the first step of the program. The final goal of the program was terminated by the present LEU conversion. This paper describes the results of core physics measurement through the conversion phase from MEU fuel core to LEU fuel core. Measured excess reactivities of the LEU fuel cores are mostly in good agreement with predicted values. Reactivity effect and burnup of cadmium wires, therefore, were proved to be well predicted. Control rod worth in the LEU fuel core is mostly less than that in the MEU fuel core. Shutdown margin was verified to be within the safety limit. There is no significant difference in temperature coefficient of reactivity between the MEU and LEU fuel cores. These results verified that the JMTR was successfully and safely converted to LEU fuel. Extension of the operating cycle period was achieved and reduction of spend fuel elements is expected by using the fuel with high uranium density.

  2. Status of core conversion with LEU silicide fuel in JRR-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Teruo; Ohnishi, Nobuaki; Shirai, Eiji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    Japan Research Reactor No.4 (JRR-4) is a light water moderated and cooled, 93% enriched uranium ETR-type fuel used and swimming pool type reactor with thermal output of 3.5MW. Since the first criticality was achieved on January 28, 1965, JRR-4 has been used for shielding experiments, radioisotope production, neutron activation analyses, training for reactor engineers and so on for about 30 years. Within the framework of the RERTR Program, the works for conversion to LEU fuel are now under way, and neutronic and thermal-hydraulic calculations emphasizing on safety and performance aspects are being carried out. The design and evaluation for the core conversion are based on the Guides for Safety Design and Evaluation of research and testing reactor facilities in Japan. These results show that the JRR-4 will be able to convert to use LEU fuel without any major design change of core and size of fuel element. LEU silicide fuel (19.75%) will be used and maximum neutron flux in irradiation hole would be slightly decreased from present neutron flux value of 7x10{sup 13}(n/cm{sup 2}/s). The conversion works are scheduled to complete in 1998, including with upgrade of the reactor building and utilization facilities.

  3. Ion-beam nanopatterning of silicon surfaces under codeposition of non-silicide-forming impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, B.; Yoo, S.; Kim, J.-S.; Kang, S. J.; Muñoz-García, J.; Cuerno, R.

    2016-03-01

    We report experiments on surface nanopatterning of Si targets which are irradiated with 2-keV Ar+ ions impinging at near-glancing incidence, under concurrent codeposition of Au impurities simultaneously extracted from a gold target by the same ion beam. Previous recent experiments by a number of groups suggest that silicide formation is a prerequisite for pattern formation in the presence of metallic impurities. In spite of the fact that Au is known not to form stable compounds with the Si atoms, ripples nonetheless emerge in our experiments with nanometric wavelengths and small amplitudes, and with an orientation that changes with distance to the Au source. We provide results of sample analysis through Auger electron and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopies for their space-resolved chemical composition, and through atomic force, scanning transmission electron, and high-resolution transmission microscopies for their morphological properties. We discuss these findings in the light of current continuum models for this class of systems. The composition of and the dynamics within the near-surface amorphized layer that ensues is expected to play a relevant role to account for the unexpected formation of these surface structures.

  4. Experimental studies of thermal and chemical interactions between oxide and silicide nuclear fuels with water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Given some transient power/cooling mismatch is a nuclear reactor and its inability to establish the necessary core cooling, energetic fuel-coolant interactions (FCI's commonly called 'vapor explosions') could occur as a result of the core melting and coolant contact. Although a large number of studies have been done on energetic FCI's, very few experiments have been performed with the actual fuel materials postulated to be produced in severe accidents. Because of the scarcity of well-characterized FCI data for uranium allows in noncommercial reactors (cermet and silicide fuels), we have conducted a series of experiments to provide a data base for the foregoing materials. An existing 1-D shock-tube facility was modified to handle depleted radioactive materials (U3O8-Al, and U3Si2-Al). Our objectives have been to determine the effects of the initial fuel composition and temperature and the driving pressure (triggering) on the explosion work output, dynamic pressures, transient temperatures, and the hydrogen production. Experimental results indicate limited energetics, mainly thermal interactions, for these fuel materials as compared to aluminum where more chemical reactions occur between the molten aluminum and water

  5. Prompt Neutron Decay Constant Determination Of Silicide Transition Core Using Noise Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chairman of BATAN had decided to replace the Oxide fuel element type of RSG-GAS into silicide element type step by step. The replacement will create core transitions. Kinetic characteristic of the transition cores have to be monitored in order to know the deviation of core behavior. For that reason, the kinetic parameters have to be measured. Prompt neutron decay constant (alpha) is one of the kinetic parameters that has to be monitored continuously in the transition cores. In order not to disturb the normal operation of reactor, alpha parameter should be measured by using noise analysis method. The voltage of neutron flux at power of 15 MW is connected to preamplifier and filter then to the Dynamic Signal Analyzer Version-2 and then the auto power spectral density (APSD) was determined by using Fast Fourier transform. From the APSD curve of each channel of JKT03, the cut off frequency of each channel can be determined by using linear regression technique such that the prompt neutron decay constant can be estimated

  6. Experimental studies of thermal and chemical interactions between oxide and silicide nuclear fuels with water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    farahani, A.A.; Corradini, M.L. [Univ. of Wisconsi, Madison, WI (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Given some transient power/cooling mismatch is a nuclear reactor and its inability to establish the necessary core cooling, energetic fuel-coolant interactions (FCI`s commonly called `vapor explosions`) could occur as a result of the core melting and coolant contact. Although a large number of studies have been done on energetic FCI`s, very few experiments have been performed with the actual fuel materials postulated to be produced in severe accidents. Because of the scarcity of well-characterized FCI data for uranium allows in noncommercial reactors (cermet and silicide fuels), we have conducted a series of experiments to provide a data base for the foregoing materials. An existing 1-D shock-tube facility was modified to handle depleted radioactive materials (U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al, and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al). Our objectives have been to determine the effects of the initial fuel composition and temperature and the driving pressure (triggering) on the explosion work output, dynamic pressures, transient temperatures, and the hydrogen production. Experimental results indicate limited energetics, mainly thermal interactions, for these fuel materials as compared to aluminum where more chemical reactions occur between the molten aluminum and water.

  7. Enhanced power factor of higher manganese silicide via melt spin synthesis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the thermoelectric properties of the higher manganese silicide MnSi1.75 synthesized by means of a one-step non-equilibrium method. The ultrahigh cooling rate generated from the melt-spin technique is found to be effective in reducing second phases, which are inevitable during the traditional solid state diffusion processes. Aside from being detrimental to thermoelectric properties, second phases skew the revealing of the intrinsic properties of this class of materials, for example, the optimal level of carrier concentration. With this melt-spin sample, we are able to formulate a simple model based on a single parabolic band that can well describe the carrier concentration dependence of the Seebeck coefficient and power factor of the data reported in the literature. An optimal carrier concentration around 5 × 1020 cm−3 at 300 K is predicted according to this model. The phase-pure melt-spin sample shows the largest power factor at high temperature, resulting in the highest zT value among the three samples in this paper

  8. Status of core conversion with LEU silicide fuel in JRR-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Research Reactor No.4 (JRR-4) is a light water moderated and cooled, 93% enriched uranium ETR-type fuel used and swimming pool type reactor with thermal output of 3.5MW. Since the first criticality was achieved on January 28, 1965, JRR-4 has been used for shielding experiments, radioisotope production, neutron activation analyses, training for reactor engineers and so on for about 30 years. Within the framework of the RERTR Program, the works for conversion to LEU fuel are now under way, and neutronic and thermal-hydraulic calculations emphasizing on safety and performance aspects are being carried out. The design and evaluation for the core conversion are based on the Guides for Safety Design and Evaluation of research and testing reactor facilities in Japan. These results show that the JRR-4 will be able to convert to use LEU fuel without any major design change of core and size of fuel element. LEU silicide fuel (19.75%) will be used and maximum neutron flux in irradiation hole would be slightly decreased from present neutron flux value of 7x1013(n/cm2/s). The conversion works are scheduled to complete in 1998, including with upgrade of the reactor building and utilization facilities

  9. Crystal structure of the ternary silicide Gd2Re3Si5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaliia Fedyna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A single crystal of the title compound, the ternary silicide digadolinium trirhenium pentasilicide, Gd2Re3Si5, was isolated from an alloy of nominal composition Gd20Re30Si50 synthesized by arc melting and investigated by X-ray single-crystal diffraction. Its crystal structure belongs to the U2Mn3Si5 structure type. All atoms in the asymmetric lie on special positions. The Gd site has site symmetry m..; the two Mn atoms have site symmetries m.. and 2.22; the three Si atoms have site symmetries m.., ..2 and 4.. . The coordination polyhedra of the Gd atoms have 21 vertices, while those of the Re atoms are cubooctahedra and 13-vertex polyhedra. The Si atoms are arranged as tricapped trigonal prisms, bicapped square antiprisms, or 11-vertex polyhedra. The crystal structure of the title compound is also related to the structure types CaBe2Ge2 and W5Si3. It can be represented as a stacking of Gd-centred polyhedra of composition [GdSi9]. The Re atoms form infinite chains with an Re—Re distance of 2.78163 (5 Å and isolated squares with an Re—Re distance of 2.9683 (6 Å.

  10. Oxidation behavior of niobium aluminide intermetallics protected by aluminide and silicide diffusion coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isothermal and cyclic oxidation behavior of a new class of damage-tolerant niobium aluminide (Nb3Al-xTi-yCr) intermetallics is studied between 650 C and 850 C. Protective diffusion coatings were deposited by pack cementation to achieve the siliciding or aluminizing of substrates with or without intervening Mo or Ni layers, respectively. The compositions and microstructures of the resulting coatings and oxidized surfaces were characterized. The isothermal and cyclic oxidation kinetics indicate that uncoated Nb-40Ti-15Al-based intermetallics may be used up to ∼750 C. Alloying with Cr improves the isothermal oxidation resistance between 650 C and 850 C. The most significant improvement in oxidation resistance is achieved by the aluminization of electroplated Ni interlayers. The results suggest that the high-temperature limit of niobium aluminide-based alloys may be increased to 800 C to 850 C by aluminide-based diffusion coatings on ductile Ni interlayers. Indentation fracture experiments also indicate that the ductile nickel interlayers are resistant to crack propagation in multilayered aluminide-based coatings

  11. Magnetic structure of the ferromagnetic new ternary silicide Nd5CoSi2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, C; Gaudin, E; Gorsse, S; Porcher, F; André, G; Chevalier, B

    2012-04-01

    Nd(5)CoSi(2) was obtained from the elements by arc-melting followed by annealing at 883 K. Its investigation by single-crystal x-ray and neutron powder diffraction shows that this ternary silicide crystallizes as Nd(5)Si(3) in a tetragonal structure deriving from the Cr(5)B(3)-type (I4/mcm space group; a = 7.7472(2) and c = 13.5981(5) Å as unit cell parameters). The structural refinements confirm the mixed occupancy on the 8h site between Si and Co atoms, as already observed for Gd(5)CoSi(2). Magnetization and specific heat measurements reveal a ferromagnetic behavior below T(C) = 55 K for Nd(5)CoSi(2). This magnetic ordering is further evidenced by neutron powder diffraction investigation revealing between 1.8 K and T(C) a canted ferromagnetic structure in the direction of the c-axis described by a propagation vector k = (0 0 0). At 1.8 K, the two Nd(3+) ions carry ordered magnetic moments equal respectively to 1.67(7) and 2.37(7) μ(B) for Nd1 and Nd2; these two moments exhibit a canting angle of θ = 4.3(6)°. This magnetic structure presents some similarities with that reported for Nd(5)Si(3). PMID:22392874

  12. Characterization of novel heterophasic powdered silicide-type material for high-temperature protection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novel multicomponent heterophasic powdered material of silicide-type is presented. The powdered material is intended for forming high-temperature protective multifunction coatings able to protect different hot-loaded structural elements of aerospace industry from refractory metals alloys under severe oxidizing conditions in high-enthalpy and super/hypersonic oxygen-containing gas flows. The powdered material base on complexly composition of Si-Ti-Mo system modified with B,Y,W. Technological conception of its obtaining and powder making process are examined. The powders were worked out in accordance with early performed functional structural model of special materials for coatings with the increased self-healing ability. The coatings can be deposited from the specially prepared abovementioned powders by plasma spraying processes or any one of other coating methods ensuring the conservation of morphological peculiarities of microstructure and phase composition of powdered material (detonation spraying technique, from slurry ...). Finally the results of some properties of novel heterophasic silicidetype powders and some properties of protective coating deposited on the niobium base alloys by means of plasma spraying technique are presented. (author)

  13. Lanthanide silicide-carbide phases of composition La5Si3Csub(x)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alloys of lanthanide elements (La, Ce, Nd, Gd, Ho, Er and Y) with silicon have been prepared around the composition Ln5Si3. These have been investigated by single-crystal and powder x-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, thermal analysis, micro hardness and hydrolytic techniques. For the light lanthanides (La, Ce), no Cr5B3-type phase was observed, but several new phases have been identified. The Nd-compound has a complicated behaviour and is a borderline element between the light and heavy lanthanides. Lanthanides heavier than Nd produce the 5:3 silicide, crystallizing in the Mn5Si3 (D88)-type structure. The solubility of carbon and its effect on the D88 structure have been investigated by x-ray, metallographic and hardness measurements. Also, the corrosion products arising from attack by H2O vapour and by HNO3 have been analysed. X-ray single-crystal analysis was achieved for two ordered superstructures, Er28Si16C4 and Er90Si54C18, despite serious problems from absorption and the presence of heavy atoms. A neutron powder profile analysis for these structures failed because of the screening effect and low resolution. The addition of carbon to the D88 structure in the range x = 0 to 2 in Ln5Si3Csub(x) produces quite complex phase changes which are reported and discussed. (author)

  14. Calcium D-saccharate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, André Castilho; Hedegaard, Martina Vavrusova; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

    2016-01-01

    Molar conductivity of saturated aqueous solutions of calcium d-saccharate, used as a stabilizer of beverages fortified with calcium d-gluconate, increases strongly upon dilution, indicating complex formation between calcium and d-saccharate ions, for which, at 25 °C, Kassoc = 1032 ± 80, ΔHassoc......° = -34 ± 6 kJ mol-1, and ΔSassoc° = -55 ± 9 J mol-1 K-1, were determined electrochemically. Calcium d-saccharate is sparingly soluble, with a solubility product, Ksp, of (6.17 ± 0.32) × 10-7 at 25 °C, only moderately increasing with the temperature: ΔHsol° = 48 ± 2 kJ mol-1, and ΔSassoc° = 42 ± 7 J mol-1...... K-1. Equilibria in supersaturated solutions of calcium d-saccharate seem only to adjust slowly, as seen from calcium activity measurements in calcium d-saccharate solutions made supersaturated by cooling. Solutions formed by isothermal dissolution of calcium d-gluconate in aqueous potassium d...

  15. Serum Calcium Level in Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Hazari, Mohammed Abdul Hannan; Arifuddin, Mehnaaz Sameera; Muzzakar, Syed; Reddy, Vontela Devender

    2012-01-01

    Background: The alterations in extracellular calcium level may influence intracellular calcium level and possibly play a role in the pathogenesis of essential hypertension. Aim: The purpose was to find out the association between serum calcium levels and hypertension; and to compare the serum calcium levels between normotensive controls, hypertensive subjects on calcium channel blockers, and hypertensive subjects on antihypertensive medication other than calcium channel blockers. Materials an...

  16. HYPERTHERMIA, INTRACELLULAR FREE CALCIUM AND CALCIUM IONOPHORES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STEGE, GJJ; WIERENGA, PK; KAMPINGA, HH; KONINGS, AWT

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that heat-induced increase of intracellular calcium does not correlate with hyperthermic cell killing. Six different cell lines were investigated; in four (EAT, HeLa S3, L5178Y-R and L5178Y-S) heat treatments killing 90% of the cells did not affect the levels of intracellular free calciu

  17. Synthesis and characterization of β-phase iron silicide nano-particles by chemical reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • β-FeSi2 nano-particle was synthesized by reducing with Mg and by diluting with MgO. • XRD profile shows the iron di-silicide phase to be semiconducting β-FeSi2. • HRTEM and FESEM images indicate the β-FeSi2average particle size to be 60–70 nm. • Absorption, reflectance and PL spectroscopy show band gap to be direct 0.87 eV. • Nano-β-FeSi2is p-type with hole density of 4.38 × 1018 cm−3 and mobility 8.9 cm2/V s. - Abstract: Nano-particles of β-FeSi2 have been synthesized by chemical reduction of a glassy phase of [Fe2O3, 4SiO2] by Mg-metal where MgO is used as diluent to prevent the agglomeration of nano crystallites into micro-particles and also act as a negative catalyst for the formation of other phases. The sample is characterized by XRD, FESEM, HRTEM, EDX, ultra-violet-visible-infrared and PL spectroscopy and electronic properties have been investigated by Hall measurement. XRD profile shows that the synthesized powder consists of purely β-FeSi2 semiconducting phase. The average crystallite size of β-FeSi2 is determined to be around 65.4 nm from XRD peaks as well as from FESEM also. The optical absorption and PL spectroscopy shows that synthesized β-FeSi2 phase is a direct band gap semiconductor with a value of 0.87 eV. Hall measurements show that β-FeSi2 nano-particles is p-type with hole concentration of 4.38 × 1018 cm−3 and average hole mobility of 8.9 cm2/V s at 300 K

  18. Fuel loading and homogeneity analysis of HFIR design fuel plates loaded with uranium silicide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twelve nuclear reactor fuel plates were analyzed for fuel loading and fuel loading homogeneity by measuring the attenuation of a collimated X-ray beam as it passed through the plates. The plates were identical to those used by the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) but were loaded with uranium silicide rather than with HFIR's uranium oxide fuel. Systematic deviations from nominal fuel loading were observed as higher loading near the center of the plates and underloading near the radial edges. These deviations were within those allowed by HFIR specifications. The report begins with a brief background on the thermal-hydraulic uncertainty analysis for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Reactor that motivated a statistical description of fuel loading and homogeneity. The body of the report addresses the homogeneity measurement techniques employed, the numerical correction required to account for a difference in fuel types, and the statistical analysis of the resulting data. This statistical analysis pertains to local variation in fuel loading, as well as to ''hot segment'' analysis of narrow axial regions along the plate and ''hot streak'' analysis, the cumulative effect of hot segment loading variation. The data for all twelve plates were compiled and divided into 20 regions for analysis, with each region represented by a mean and a standard deviation to report percent deviation from nominal fuel loading. The central regions of the plates showed mean values of about +3% deviation, while the edge regions showed mean values of about -7% deviation. The data within these regions roughly approximated random samplings from normal distributions, although the chi-square (χ2) test for goodness of fit to normal distributions was not satisfied

  19. Ab initio studies of structural, electronic, magnetic and mechanical properties of alkali earth metal silicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkali earth metal silicides MSi (M = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba) are multi-phase compound and exist simultaneously in CrB, CsCl, NaCl or rock salt (RS) and zinc blende (zb) structures. In the CrB and CsCl phases, their behavior is metallic in the non-magnetic (NM) as well as the ferromagnetic (FM) structure. The total spin magnetic moment of these compounds in the zb phase is more than that in the corresponding RS phase; therefore, detailed studies for the zb phase are presented in this paper. This study includes structural, electronic and mechanical properties by using the full potential linear augmented plain wave scheme with local orbitals. Ferromagnetic CaSi, SrSi and BaSi show true half-metallic character. For a better understanding of the half-metallicity in the above-mentioned sp-type compounds, their band structures have been calculated and densities of state plots have been produced. The FM structures are more stable and harder than the corresponding NM structures. The magnetic moment corresponding to equilibrium lattice constants is calculated as 2 µB for FM CaSi, SrSi and BaSi, which are in accordance with the earlier work on the sp-type compounds CaC, SrC and BaC. The FM character changes to the paramagnetic character as the lattice parameter decreases. The general trend is that the values of the elastic constants C11, C12 and C44 increase with increasing hydrostatic pressure

  20. Effects of ball milling on microstructures and thermoelectric properties of higher manganese silicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The already low κL of HMS can be suppressed further by decreasing the grain size. • The ball milling process can lead to the formation of secondary MnSi and W/C-rich phases. • The formation of the MnSi ad W/C rich phases is found to suppress the thermoelectric power factor. - Abstract: Bulk nanostructured higher manganese silicide (HMS) samples with different grain size are prepared by melting, subsequent ball milling (BM), and followed by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The effects of BM time on the microstructures and thermoelectric properties of these samples are investigated. It is found that BM effectively reduces the grain size to about 90 nm in the sample after SPS, which leads to a decrease in both the thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity. By prolonging the BM time, MnSi and tungsten/carbon-rich impurity phases are formed due to the impact-induced decomposition of HMS and contamination from the tungsten carbide jar and balls during the BM, respectively. These impurities result in a reduced Seebeck coefficient and increased thermal conductivity above room temperature. The measured size-dependent lattice thermal conductivities agree qualitatively with the reported calculation results based on a combined phonon and diffuson model. The size effects are found to be increasingly significant as temperature decreases. Because of the formation of the impurity phases and a relatively large grain size, the ZT values are not improved in the ball-milled HMS samples. These findings suggest the need of alternative approaches for the synthesis of pure HMS with further reduced grain size and controlled impurity doping in order to enhance the thermoelectric figure-of-merit of HMS via nanostructuring

  1. M(5)-silicon (M= titanium, niobium, molybdenum) based transition-metal silicides for high temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhihong

    2007-12-01

    Transition metal silicides are being considered for future engine turbine components at temperatures up to 1600ºC. Although significant improvement in high temperature strength, room temperature fracture toughness has been realized in the past decade, further improvement in oxidation resistance is needed. Oxidation mechanism of Ti5Si3-based alloys was investigated. Oxidation behavior of Ti5Si3-based alloy strongly depends on the atmosphere. Presence of Nitrogen alters the oxidation behavior of Ti5Si3 by nucleation and growth of nitride subscale. Ti5Si3.2 and Ti5Si3C0.5 alloys exhibited an excellent oxidation resistance in nitrogen bearing atmosphere due to limited dissolution of nitrogen and increased Si/Ti activity ratio. MoSi2 coating developed by pack cementation to protect Mo-based Mo-Si-B composites was found to be effective up to 1500ºC. Shifting coating composition to T1+T2+Mo3Si region showed the possibility to extend the coating lifetime above 1500ºC by more than ten times via formation of slow growing Mo3Si or T2 interlayer without sacrificing the oxidation resistance of the coating. The phase equilibria in the Nb-rich portion of Nb-B system has been evaluated experimentally using metallographic analysis and differential thermal analyzer (DTA). It was shown that Nbss (solid solution) and NbB are the only two primary phases in the 0-40 at.% B composition range, and the eutectic reaction L ↔ Nbss + NbB was determined to occur at 2104+/-5°C by DTA.

  2. Neuronal calcium sparks and intracellular calcium “noise”

    OpenAIRE

    Melamed-Book, Naomi; Kachalsky, Sylvia G.; Kaiserman, Igor; Rahamimoff, Rami

    1999-01-01

    Intracellular calcium ions are involved in many forms of cellular function. To accommodate so many control functions, a complex spatiotemporal organization of calcium signaling has developed. In both excitable and nonexcitable cells, calcium signaling was found to fluctuate. Sudden localized increases in the intracellular calcium concentration—or calcium sparks—were found in heart, striated and smooth muscle, Xenopus Laevis oocytes, and HeLa and P12 cells. In the nervous system, intracellular...

  3. Calcium addition in straw gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risnes, H.; Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk;

    2003-01-01

    The present work focuses on the influence of calcium addition in gasification. The inorganic¿organic element interaction as well as the detailed inorganic¿inorganic elements interaction has been studied. The effect of calcium addition as calcium sugar/molasses solutions to straw significantly...... affected the ash chemistry and the ash sintering tendency but much less the char reactivity. Thermo balance test are made and high-temperature X-ray diffraction measurements are performed, the experimental results indicate that with calcium addition major inorganic¿inorganic reactions take place very late...... calcium binds silicon primarily as calcium silicates and less as potassium calcium silicates....

  4. Calcium binding by dietary fibre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietary fibre from plants low in phytate bound calcium in proportion to its uronic-acid content. This binding by the non-cellulosic fraction of fibre reduces the availability of calcium for small-intestinal absorption, but the colonic microbial digestion of uronic acids liberates the calcium. Thus the ability to maintain calcium balance on high-fibre diets may depend on the adaptive capacity on the colon for calcium. (author)

  5. [Calcium suppletion for patients who use gastric acid inhibitors: calcium citrate or calcium carbonate?].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, H.J. de; Gans, R.O.; Huls, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Various calcium supplements are available for patients who have an indication for calcium suppletion. American guidelines and UpToDate recommend prescribing calcium citrate to patients who use antacids The rationale for this advice is that water-insoluble calcium carbonate needs acid for adequate ab

  6. Oxide mediated liquid-solid growth of high aspect ratio aligned gold silicide nanowires on Si(110) substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon nanowires grown using the vapor-liquid-solid method are promising candidates for nanoelectronics applications. The nanowires grow from an Au-Si catalyst during silicon chemical vapor deposition. In this paper, the effect of temperature, oxide at the interface and substrate orientation on the nucleation and growth kinetics during formation of nanogold silicide structures is explained using an oxide mediated liquid-solid growth mechanism. Using real time in situ high temperature transmission electron microscopy (with 40 ms time resolution), we show the formation of high aspect ratio (∼15.0) aligned gold silicide nanorods in the presence of native oxide at the interface during in situ annealing of gold thin films on Si(110) substrates. Steps observed in the growth rate and real time electron diffraction show the existence of liquid Au-Si nano-alloy structures on the surface besides the un-reacted gold nanostructures. These results might enable us to engineer the growth of nanowires and similar structures with an Au-Si alloy as a catalyst.

  7. Technical report: technical development on the silicide plate-type fuel experiment at nuclear safety research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to a reduction of fuel enrichment from 45 w/o 235U to 20 w/o, an aluminide plate-type fuel used currently in the domestic research and material testing reactors will be replaced by a silicide plate-type one. One of the major concern arisen from this alternation is to understand the fuel behavior under simulated reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions, this is strongly necessary from the safety and licensing point of view. The in-core RIA experiments are, therefore, carried out at Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The silicide plate-type fuel consisted of the ternary alloy of U-Al-Si as a meat with uranium density up to 4.8 g/cm3 having thickness by 0.51 mm and the binary alloy of Al-3%Mg as a cladding by thickness of 0.38 mm. Comparison of the physical properties of this metallic plate fuel with the UO2-zircaloy fuel rod used conventionally in commercial light water reactors shows that the heat conductivity of the former is of the order of about 13 times greater than the latter, however the melting temperature is only one-half (1570degC). Prior to in-core RIA experiments, there were some difficulties lay in our technical path. This report summarized the technical achievements obtained through our four years work. (J.P.N.)

  8. Effects of nitrogen annealing on surface structure, silicide formation and magnetic properties of ultrathin films of Co on Si(100)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ganesh K Rajan; Shivaraman Ramaswamy; C Gopalakrishnan; D John Thiruvadigal

    2012-02-01

    Effects of nitrogen annealing on structural and magnetic properties of Co/Si (100) up to 700°C has been studied in this paper. Ultrathin Co films having a constant thickness of 50 Å were grown on Si (100) substrates using electron-beam evaporation under very high vacuum conditions at room temperature. Subsequently, the samples were annealed at temperatures ranging from 100–700°C in a nitrogen environment at atmospheric pressure. Sample quality and surface morphology were examined using atomic force microscopy. Silicide formation and the resultant variation in crystallographic arrangement were studied using X-ray diffractometer. The magnetization measurements done using a vibrating sample magnetometer indicate a decrease in coercivity and retentivity values with increase in annealing temperature. Resistivity of the samples measured using a four-point probe set up shows a decrease in resistivity with increase in annealing temperature. Formation of various silicide phases at different annealing temperatures and the resultant variation in the magnetic susceptibility has been thoroughly studied and quantified in this work.

  9. Surface effect on the electronic and the magnetic properties of rock-salt alkaline-earth metal silicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An all electron ab-initio method was employed to study the electronic and the magnetic properties of the (001) surface of alkaline-earth metal silicides, CaSi, SrSi, and BaSi, in the rock-salt structure. The three compounds retain their ferromagnetic metallic properties at the surface. Due to the surface effects, the magnetism of the topmost layer is changed as compared with the bulk. This is a short-range effect. In CaSi, the magnetism of the surface layer is noticeably reduced, as compared with the bulk: magnetic moments (MMs) on both Ca and Si atoms are reduced. In SrSi (001), the polarization of electrons in the surface atoms is similar to that in the bulk atoms, and the values of MMs on the component atoms in the topmost layer do not change as much as in CaSi. In BaSi (001), the magnetic properties of Si surface atoms are enhanced slightly, and the magnetism of Ba atoms is not affected considerably by the surface effect. The calculated densities of states confirm the short-range effect of the surface on the electronic properties of the metal silicides.

  10. Thermal Stability and Growth Behavior of Erbium Silicide Nanowires Self-Assembled on a Vicinal Si(001) Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Tao; SONG Jun-Qiang; LI Juan; CAI Qun

    2011-01-01

    Erbium silicide nanowires are self-assembled on vicinal Si(Ool) substrates after electron beam evaporation and post annealing at 63(fC In-situ scanning tunneling microscopy investigations manifest that the nanowires will successively shrink and transform into a nanoisland with annealing prolonged. Meanwhile, a structural transition from hexagonal AIB2 phase to tetragonal ThSi'2 phase is revealed with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It is also found that the nanowires gradually expand to embed into the substrates during the growth process, which has much influence on the shape instability of nanowires. Additionally, a multiple deposition-annealing treatment is given as a novel growth method to strengthen the controlled fabrication of nanowires.%@@ Erbium silicide nanowires are self-assembled on vicinal Si(001) substrates after electron beam evaporation and post annealing at 630℃ In-situ scanning tunneling microscopy investigations manifest that the nanowires will successively shrink and transform into a nanoisland with annealing prolonged.Meanwhile, a structural transition from hexagonal AlB phase to tetragonal ThSi phase is revealed with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy.It is also found that the nanowires gradually expand to embed into the substrates during the growth process, which has much influence on the shape instability of nanowires.Additionally, a multiple deposition- annealing treatment is given as a novel growth method to strengthen the controlled fabrication of nanowires.

  11. Calcium in plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Schwartau

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the review on the role of calcium in many physiological processes of plant organisms, including growth and development, protection from pathogenic influences, response to changing environmental factors, and many other aspects of plant physiology. Initial intake of calcium ions is carried out by Ca2+-channels of plasma membrane and they are further transported by the xylem owing to auxins’ attractive ability. The level of intake and selectivity of calcium transport to ove-ground parts of the plant is controlled by a symplast. Ca2+enters to the cytoplasm of endoderm cells through calcium channels on the cortical side of Kaspary bands, and is redistributed inside the stele by the symplast, with the use of Ca2+-АТPases and Ca2+/Н+-antiports. Owing to regulated expression and activity of these calcium transporters, calclum can be selectively delivered to the xylem. Important role in supporting calcium homeostasis is given to the vacuole which is the largest depo of calcium. Regulated quantity of calcium movement through the tonoplast is provided by a number of potential-, ligand-gated active transporters and channels, like Ca2+-ATPase and Ca2+/H+ exchanger. They are actively involved in the inactivation of the calcium signal by pumping Ca2+ to the depo of cells. Calcium ATPases are high affinity pumps that efficiently transfer calcium ions against the concentration gradient in their presence in the solution in nanomolar concentrations. Calcium exchangers are low affinity, high capacity Ca2+ transporters that are effectively transporting calcium after raising its concentration in the cell cytosol through the use of protons gradients. Maintaining constant concentration and participation in the response to stimuli of different types also involves EPR, plastids, mitochondria, and cell wall. Calcium binding proteins contain several conserved sequences that provide sensitivity to changes in the concentration of Ca2+ and when you

  12. Influence of layout parameters on snapback characteristic for a gate-grounded NMOS device in 0.13-μm silicide CMOS technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Yuxi; Li Jiao; Ran Feng; Cao Jialin; Yang Dianxiong

    2009-01-01

    r of the GGNMOS devices under high ESD current stress, and design area-efficient ESD protection circuits to sustain the required ESD level.Optimized layout rules for ESD protection in 0.13-μm silicide CMOS technology are also presented.

  13. Narrow bandgap semiconducting silicides: Intrinsic infrared detectors on a silicon chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, John E.

    1990-01-01

    Work done during the final report period is presented. The main technical objective was to achieve epitaxial growth on silicon of two semiconducting silicides, ReSi2 and CrSi2. ReSi2 thin films were grown on (001) silicon wafers by vacuum evaporation of rhenium onto hot substrates in ultrahigh vacuum. The preferred epitaxial relationship was found to be ReSi2(100)/Si(001) with ReSi2(010) parallel to Si(110). The lattice matching consists of a common unit mesh of 120 A(sup 2) area, and a mismatch of 1.8 percent. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the existence of rotation twins corresponding to two distinct but equivalent azimuthal orientations of the common unit mesh. MeV He(+) backscattering spectrometry revealed a minimum channeling yield of 2 percent for an approximately 1,500 A thick film grown at 650 C. Although the lateral dimension of the twins is on the order of 100 A, there is a very high degree of alignment between the ReSi2(100) and the Si(001) planes. Highly oriented films of CrSi2 were grown on (111) silicon substrates, with the matching crystallographic faces being CrSi2(001)/Si(111). The reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) patterns of the films consist of sharp streaks, symmetrically arranged. The predominant azimuthal orientation of the films was determined to be CrSi2(210) parallel to Si(110). This highly desirable heteroepitaxial relationship has been obtained previously by others; it may be described with a common unit mesh of 51 A(sup 2) and mismatch of 0.3 percent. RHEED also revealed the presence of limited film regions of a competing azimuthal orientation, CrSi2(110) parallel to Si(110). A channeling effect for MeV He(+) ions was not found for this material. Potential commercial applications of this research may be found in silicon-integrated infrared detector arrays. Optical characterizations showed that semiconducting ReSi2 is a strong absorber of infrared radiation, with the adsorption constant increasing above 2 x

  14. Synthesis and characterization of β-phase iron silicide nano-particles by chemical reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Sabyasachi [Department of Electronics & Electrical Communication Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Gogurla, Narendar [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Banerji, Pallab [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Guha, Prasanta K. [Department of Electronics & Electrical Communication Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Pramanik, Panchanan, E-mail: pramanik1946@gmail.com [Department of Basic Science, MCKV Institute of Engineering, Howrah, Liluah 711204 (India)

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • β-FeSi{sub 2} nano-particle was synthesized by reducing with Mg and by diluting with MgO. • XRD profile shows the iron di-silicide phase to be semiconducting β-FeSi{sub 2}. • HRTEM and FESEM images indicate the β-FeSi{sub 2}average particle size to be 60–70 nm. • Absorption, reflectance and PL spectroscopy show band gap to be direct 0.87 eV. • Nano-β-FeSi{sub 2}is p-type with hole density of 4.38 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} and mobility 8.9 cm{sup 2}/V s. - Abstract: Nano-particles of β-FeSi{sub 2} have been synthesized by chemical reduction of a glassy phase of [Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 4SiO{sub 2}] by Mg-metal where MgO is used as diluent to prevent the agglomeration of nano crystallites into micro-particles and also act as a negative catalyst for the formation of other phases. The sample is characterized by XRD, FESEM, HRTEM, EDX, ultra-violet-visible-infrared and PL spectroscopy and electronic properties have been investigated by Hall measurement. XRD profile shows that the synthesized powder consists of purely β-FeSi{sub 2} semiconducting phase. The average crystallite size of β-FeSi{sub 2} is determined to be around 65.4 nm from XRD peaks as well as from FESEM also. The optical absorption and PL spectroscopy shows that synthesized β-FeSi{sub 2} phase is a direct band gap semiconductor with a value of 0.87 eV. Hall measurements show that β-FeSi{sub 2} nano-particles is p-type with hole concentration of 4.38 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} and average hole mobility of 8.9 cm{sup 2}/V s at 300 K.

  15. Gravimetric Determination of Calcium as Calcium Carbonate Hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrickson, Charles H.; Robinson, Paul R.

    1979-01-01

    The gravimetric determination of calcium as calcium carbonate is described. This experiment is suitable for undergraduate quantitative analysis laboratories. It is less expensive than determination of chloride as silver chloride. (BB)

  16. CALCIUM SOAP LUBRICANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Alaz, Izer; Tugce, Nefise; Devrim, Balköse

    2014-01-01

    The article studies the properties of calcium stearate (CaSt2) and lubricants produced on its basis. These lubricants were prepared using sodium stearate and calcium chloride by subsidence from aqueous solutions. The CaSt2 and the light fraction of crude oil were mixed together to obtain lubricating substances. The article shows that CaSt2 had the melting temperature of 142.8 C that is higher than the melting temperature of crude oil (128 C). The compositions of obtained lubricants were stu...

  17. CALCIUM-INDUCED SUPRAMOLECULAR STRUCTURES IN THE CALCIUM CASEINATE SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The molecular details deciphering the spontaneous calcium-induced protein aggregation process in the calcium caseinate system remain obscure. Understanding this complex process could lead to potential new applications of this important food ingredient. In this work, we studied calcium-induced supra...

  18. A sensor for calcium uptake

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Sean; Meyer, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria — the cell’s power plants — increase their energy production in response to calcium signals in the cytoplasm. A regulator of the elusive mitochondrial calcium channel has now been identified.

  19. Children's Bone Health and Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Trials Resources and Publications Children's Bone Health and Calcium: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links ... straight, walk, run, and lead an active life. Calcium is one of the key dietary building blocks ...

  20. Calcium ion channel and epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yudan Lü; Weihong Lin; Dihui Ma

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between calcium ion channel and epilepsy for well investigating the pathogenesis of epilepsy and probing into the new therapeutic pathway of epilepsy.DATA SOURCES: A computer-based online research Calcium ion channel and epilepsy related articles published between January 1994 and December 2006 in the CKNI and Wanfang database with the key words of "calcium influxion, epilepsy, calcium-channel blocker". The language was limited to Chinese. At the same time,related articles published between January 1993 and December 2006 in Pubmed were searched for on online with the key words of "calcium influxion, epilepsy" in English.STUDY SELECTION: The materials were selected firstly. Inclusive criteria: ① Studies related to calcium ion channel and the pat1hogenesis of epilepsy. ② Studies on the application of calcium ion channel blocker in the treatment of epilepsy. Exclusive criteria: repetitive or irrelated studies.DATA EXTRACTION: According to the criteria, 123 articles were retrieved and 93 were excluded due to repetitive or irrelated studies. Altogether 30 articles met the inclusive criteria, 11 of them were about the structure and characters of calcium ion channel, 10 about calcium ion channel and the pathogenesis of epilepsy and 9 about calcium blocker and the treatment of epilepsy.DATA SYNTHESIS: Calcium ion channels mainly consist of voltage dependent calcium channel and receptor operated calcium channel. Depolarization caused by voltage gating channel-induced influxion is the pathological basis of epileptic attack, and it is found in many studies that many anti-epileptic drugs have potential and direct effect to rivalizing voltage-dependent calcium ion channel.CONCLUSION: Calcium influxion plays an important role in the seizure of epilepsy. Some calcium antagonists seen commonly are being tried in the clinical therapy of epilepsy that is being explored, not applied in clinical practice. If there are enough evidences to

  1. Interdiffusion and growth of chromium silicide at the interface of Cr/Si(As) system during rapid thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the solid-state reaction between a thin film of chromium and silicon has been studied using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and the sheet resistance measurements. The thickness of 100 nm chromium layer has been deposited by electronic bombardment on Si (100) substrates, part of them had previously been implanted with arsenic ions of 1015 at/cm2 doses and an energy of 100 keV. The samples were heat treated under rapid thermal annealing at 500 oC for time intervals ranging from 15 to 60 s. The rapid thermal annealing leads to a reaction at the interface Cr/Si inducing the formation and the growth of the unique silicide CrSi2, but no other phase can be detected. For samples implanted with arsenic, the saturation value of the sheet resistance is approximately 1.5 times higher than for the non-implanted case.

  2. Theoretical investigation of superconductivity in ternary silicide NaAlSi with layered diamond-like structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tütüncü, H. M.; Karaca, Ertuǧrul; Srivastava, G. P.

    2016-04-01

    We have investigated the electronic structure, phonon modes and electron-phonon coupling to understand superconductivity in the ternary silicide NaAlSi with a layered diamond-like structure. Our electronic results, using the density functional theory within a generalized gradient approximation, indicate that the density of states at the Fermi level is mainly governed by Si p states. The largest contributions to the electron-phonon coupling parameter involve Si-related vibrations both in the x-y plane as well as along the z-axis in the x-z plane. Our results indicate that this material is an s-p electron superconductor with a medium level electron-phonon coupling parameter of 0.68. Using the Allen-Dynes modification of the McMillan formula we obtain the superconducting critical temperature of 6.98 K, in excellent agreement with experimentally determined value of 7 K.

  3. Analysis of optical and magnetooptical spectra of Fe5Si3 and Fe3Si magnetic silicides using spectral magnetoellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optical, magnetooptical, and magnetic properties of polycrystalline (Fe5Si3/SiO2/Si(100)) and epitaxial Fe3Si/Si(111) films are investigated by spectral magnetoellipsometry. The dispersion of the complex refractive index of Fe5Si3 is measured using multiangle spectral ellipsometry in the range of 250–1000 nm. The dispersion of complex Voigt magnetooptical parameters Q is determined for Fe5Si3 and Fe3Si in the range of 1.6–4.9 eV. The spectral dependence of magnetic circular dichroism for both silicides has revealed a series of resonance peaks. The energies of the detected peaks correspond to interband electron transitions for spin-polarized densities of electron states (DOS) calculated from first principles for bulk Fe5Si3 and Fe3Si crystals

  4. Solar Imagery - Chromosphere - Calcium

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of full-disk images of the sun in Calcium (Ca) II K wavelength (393.4 nm). Ca II K imagery reveal magnetic structures of the sun from about...

  5. Impregnating Coal With Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Voecks, Gerald E.; Gavalas, George R.

    1991-01-01

    Relatively inexpensive process proposed for impregnating coal with calcium carbonate to increase rates of gasification and combustion of coal and to reduce emission of sulfur by trapping sulfur in calcium sulfide. Process involves aqueous-phase reactions between carbon dioxide (contained within pore network of coal) and calcium acetate. Coal impregnated with CO2 by exposing it to CO2 at high pressure.

  6. Acidosis and Urinary Calcium Excretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, R Todd; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Chambrey, Régine;

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis is associated with increased urinary calcium excretion and related sequelae, including nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis. The increased urinary calcium excretion induced by metabolic acidosis predominantly results from increased mobilization of calcium out of bone and...... renal tubule and then discuss why not all gene defects that cause renal tubular acidosis are associated with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis....

  7. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Bradleigh; Tyerman, Stephen D.; Burton, Rachel A.; Gilliham, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact the development, physical traits and disease susceptibility of fruit through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g., blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples). This review works toward an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved knowledge of the calcium

  8. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Bradleigh; Tyerman, Stephen D; Burton, Rachel A; Gilliham, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact the development, physical traits and disease susceptibility of fruit through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g., blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples). This review works toward an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved knowledge of the calcium

  9. Calcium and calcitonin responses to calcium infusion in type I diabetes mellitus.

    OpenAIRE

    Amado, J. A.; C. Gomez; Obaya, S.; Otero, M; Gonzalez-Macias, J

    1987-01-01

    We studied calcium and calcium and calcitonin responses to intravenous calcium infusion (3 mg of elemental calcium/kg of body weight in 10 minutes) in 21 type I diabetic males and 17 age-matched normal males. Baseline total calcium, parathyroid hormone and calcitonin levels were normal in the diabetic group, but ionized calcium was lowered. Cortical bone status and osteocalcin levels were normal, suggesting a normal osteoblastic function. Total calcium and ionized calcium responses to calcium...

  10. DISTILLATION OF CALCIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, J.

    1954-07-27

    This invention relates to an improvement in the process for the purification of caicium or magnesium containing an alkali metal as impurity, which comprises distiiling a batch of the mixture in two stages, the first stage distillation being carried out in the presence of an inert gas at an absolute pressure substantially greater than the vapor pressure of calcium or maguesium at the temperature of distillation, but less than the vaper pressure at that temperature of the alkali metal impurity so that only the alkali metal is vaporized and condensed on a condensing surface. A second stage distilso that substantially only the calcium or magnesium distills under its own vapor pressure only and condenses in solid form on a lower condensing surface.

  11. Vertically grown multiwalled carbon nanotube anode and nickel silicide integrated high performance microsized (1.25 μl) microbial fuel cell

    KAUST Repository

    Mink, Justine E.

    2012-02-08

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are an environmentally friendly method for water purification and self-sustained electricity generation using microorganisms. Microsized MFCs can also be a useful power source for lab-on-a-chip and similar integrated devices. We fabricated a 1.25 μL microsized MFC containing an anode of vertically aligned, forest type multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with a nickel silicide (NiSi) contact area that produced 197 mA/m 2 of current density and 392 mW/m 3 of power density. The MWCNTs increased the anode surface-to-volume ratio, which improved the ability of the microorganisms to couple and transfer electrons to the anode. The use of nickel silicide also helped to boost the output current by providing a low resistance contact area to more efficiently shuttle electrons from the anode out of the device. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  12. Mechanical properties of C40-based ternary Mo(Si,Al)2 and quaternary (Mo,Zr)(Si,Al)2 silicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Refractory silicides with transition metals are of interest as structural materials operating at very high temperatures to improve energy efficiency. MoSi2 is particularly attractive because of its high melting point (2,030 C), relatively low density (6.24 g/cm3), superior oxidation resistance and high thermal conductivity. Nevertheless, MoSi2 still has several problems which must be overcome before structural application. In this paper an attempt to improve the ductility, toughness and high-temperature strength of C40-based MoSi2 silicides was made by controlling additional Al and Zr contents in order to change the ductility, species of the constituent phase and the volume fraction of each phase

  13. Program description for the qualification of CNEA - Argentina as a supplier of LEU silicide fuel and post-irradiation examinations plan for the first prototype irradiated in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report we present a description of the ongoing and future stages of the program for the qualification of CNEA, Argentina, as a supplier of low enriched uranium silicide fuel elements for research reactor. Particularly we will focus on the characteristics of the future irradiation experiment on a new detachable prototype, the post-irradiation examinations (PIE) plan for the already irradiated prototype PO4 and an overview of the recently implemented PIE facilities and equipment. The program is divided in several steps, some of which have been already completed. It concludes: development of the uranium silicide fissile material, irradiation and PIE of several full-scale prototypes. Important investments have been already carried out in the facilities for the FE production and PIE. (author)

  14. Models of calcium signalling

    CERN Document Server

    Dupont, Geneviève; Kirk, Vivien; Sneyd, James

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses the ways in which mathematical, computational, and modelling methods can be used to help understand the dynamics of intracellular calcium. The concentration of free intracellular calcium is vital for controlling a wide range of cellular processes, and is thus of great physiological importance. However, because of the complex ways in which the calcium concentration varies, it is also of great mathematical interest.This book presents the general modelling theory as well as a large number of specific case examples, to show how mathematical modelling can interact with experimental approaches, in an interdisciplinary and multifaceted approach to the study of an important physiological control mechanism. Geneviève Dupont is FNRS Research Director at the Unit of Theoretical Chronobiology of the Université Libre de Bruxelles;Martin Falcke is head of the Mathematical Cell Physiology group at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin;Vivien Kirk is an Associate Professor in the Depar...

  15. The Laser Ablation as a perspective technique for the deposition of metal-silicide nanoparticles in situ embedded in PECVD of Si:H thin films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stuchlíková, The-Ha; Fajgar, Radek; Koštejn, Martin; Dřínek, Vladislav; Remeš, Zdeněk; Stuchlík, Jiří

    Tokyo: The Japan Society of Applied Physics, 2015 - (Asano, T.), "011302-1"-"011302-5" ISBN 978-4-86348-491-7. [International Conference and Summer School on Advanced Silicide Technology 2014. Tokyo (JP), 19.07.2014-21.07.2014] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12236 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:67985858 Keywords : PECVD * amorphous silicon * reactive laser ablation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  16. Silicene versus two-dimensional ordered silicide: atomic and electronic structure of Si-(√19×√19)R23.4◦/Pt(111)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Švec, Martin; Hapala, Prokop; Ondráček, Martin; Merino, P.; Blanco-Rey, M.; Mutombo, Pingo; Vondráček, Martin; Polyak, Yaroslav; Cháb, Vladimír; Martín Gago, J.A.; Jelínek, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 20 (2014), "201412-1"-"201412-5". ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-02079S Grant ostatní: SAFMAT(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/22132 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : silicene * silicide * surface alloy * STM * photoemission spectroscopy * ARUPS * DFT Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.736, year: 2014

  17. Behavior of silicon in nitric media. Application to uranium silicides fuels reprocessing; Comportement du silicium en milieu nitrique. Application au retraitement des combustibles siliciures d'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheroux, L

    2001-07-01

    Uranium silicides are used in some research reactors. Reprocessing them is a solution for their cycle end. A list of reprocessing scenarios has been set the most realistic being a nitric dissolution close to the classic spent fuel reprocessing. This uranium silicide fuel contains a lot of silicon and few things are known about polymerization of silicic acid in concentrated nitric acid. The study of this polymerization allows to point out the main parameters: acidity, temperature, silicon concentration. The presence of aluminum seems to speed up heavily the polymerization. It has been impossible to find an analytical technique smart and fast enough to characterize the first steps of silicic acid polymerization. However the action of silicic species on emulsions stabilization formed by mixing them with an organic phase containing TBP has been studied, Silicon slows down the phase separation by means of oligomeric species forming complex with TBP. The existence of these intermediate species is short and heating can avoid any stabilization. When non irradiated uranium silicide fuel is attacked by a nitric solution, aluminum and uranium are quickly dissolved whereas silicon mainly stands in solid state. That builds a gangue of hydrated silica around the uranium silicide particulates without preventing uranium dissolution. A small part of silicon passes into the solution and polymerize towards the highly poly-condensed forms, just 2% of initial silicon is still in molecular form at the end of the dissolution. A thermal treatment of the fuel element, by forming inter-metallic phases U-Al-Si, allows the whole silicon to pass into the solution and next to precipitate. The behavior of silicon in spent fuels should be between these two situations. (author)

  18. Electrophoretic deposition of magnesium silicates on titanium implants: Ion migration and silicide interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afshar-Mohajer, M. [Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Material Processing, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Yaghoubi, A., E-mail: yaghoubi@siswa.um.edu.my [Center for High Impact Research, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Ramesh, S., E-mail: ramesh79@um.edu.my [Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Material Processing, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Bushroa, A.R.; Chin, K.M.C.; Tin, C.C. [Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Material Processing, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Chiu, W.S. [Low Dimensional Materials Research Center, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia)

    2014-07-01

    Magnesium silicates (Mg{sub x}SiO{sub y}) and in particular forsterite (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) owing to their low thermal expansion mismatch with metals are promising materials for bioactive coating of implants. Here, we report the electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of forsterite onto titanium substrates using different precursors. Unlike bulk samples which achieve full stoichiometry only beyond 1400 °C, non-stoichiometric magnesium silicate rapidly decomposes into magnesium oxide nanowires during sintering. Elemental mapping and X-ray diffraction suggest that oxygen diffusion followed by ion exchange near the substrate leads to formation of an interfacial Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} layer. Pre-annealed forsterite powder on the other hand shows a comparatively lower diffusion rate. Overall, magnesium silicate coatings do not exhibit thermally induced microcracks upon sintering as opposed to calcium phosphate bioceramics which are currently in use.

  19. Electrophoretic deposition of magnesium silicates on titanium implants: Ion migration and silicide interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnesium silicates (MgxSiOy) and in particular forsterite (Mg2SiO4) owing to their low thermal expansion mismatch with metals are promising materials for bioactive coating of implants. Here, we report the electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of forsterite onto titanium substrates using different precursors. Unlike bulk samples which achieve full stoichiometry only beyond 1400 °C, non-stoichiometric magnesium silicate rapidly decomposes into magnesium oxide nanowires during sintering. Elemental mapping and X-ray diffraction suggest that oxygen diffusion followed by ion exchange near the substrate leads to formation of an interfacial Ti5Si3 layer. Pre-annealed forsterite powder on the other hand shows a comparatively lower diffusion rate. Overall, magnesium silicate coatings do not exhibit thermally induced microcracks upon sintering as opposed to calcium phosphate bioceramics which are currently in use.

  20. Morphological and electrical properties of self-assembled iron silicide nanoparticles on Si(0 0 1) and Si(1 1 1) substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, G.; Dózsa, L.; Erdélyi, R.; Vértesy, Z.; Osváth, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Epitaxial iron silicide nanostructures are grown by solid phase epitaxy on Si(0 0 1) and Si(1 1 1), and by reactive deposition epitaxy on Si(0 0 1) substrates. The formation process is monitored by reflection high-energy electron diffraction. The morphology, size, and electrical properties of the nanoparticles are investigated by scanning electron microscopy, by electrically active scanning probe microscopy, and by confocal Raman spectroscopy. The results show that the shape, size, orientation, and density of the nanoobjects can be tuned by self-assembly, controlled by the lattice misfit between the substrates and iron silicides. The size distribution and shape of the grown nanoparticles depend on the substrate orientation, on the initial thickness of the evaporated iron, on the temperature and time of the annealing, and on the preparation method. The so-called Ostwald ripening phenomena, which state that the bigger objects develop at the expense of smaller ones, controls the density of the nanoparticles. Raman spectra show the bigger objects do not contain β-FeSi2 phase. The different shape nanoparticles exhibit small, about 100 mV barrier compared to the surrounding silicon. The local leakage current of the samples measured by conductive AFM using a Pt coated Si tip is localized in a few nanometers size sites, and the sites which we assume are very small silicide nanoparticles or point defects.

  1. Simultaneous aluminizing and chromizing of steels to form (Fe,Cr){sub 3}Al coatings and Ge-doped silicide coatings of Cr-Zr base alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, M.; He, Y.R.; Rapp, R.A. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-01

    A halide-activated cementation pack involving elemental Al and Cr powders has been used to achieve surface compositions of approximately Fe{sub 3}Al plus several percent Cr for low alloy steels (T11, T2 and T22) and medium carbon steel (1045 steel). A two-step treatment at 925 C and 1150 C yields the codeposition and diffusion of aluminum and chromium to form dense and uniform ferrite coatings of about 400 {micro}m thickness, while preventing the formation of a blocking chromium carbide at the substrate surfaces. Upon cyclic oxidation in air at 700 C, the coated steel exhibits a negligible 0.085 mg/cm{sup 2} weight gain for 1900 one-hour cycles. Virtually no attack was observed on coated steels tested at ABB in simulated boiler atmospheres at 500 C for 500 hours. But coatings with a surface composition of only 8 wt% Al and 6 wt% Cr suffered some sulfidation attack in simulated boiler atmospheres at temperatures higher than 500 C for 1000 hours. Two developmental Cr-Zr based Laves phase alloys (CN129-2 and CN117(Z)) were silicide/germanide coated. The cross-sections of the Ge-doped silicide coatings closely mimicked the microstructure of the substrate alloys. Cyclic oxidation in air at 1100 C showed that the Ge-doped silicide coating greatly improved the oxidation resistance of the Cr-Zr based alloys.

  2. Interaction transfer of silicon atoms forming Co silicide for Co/√(3)×√(3)R30°-Ag/Si(111) and related magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Cheng-Hsun-Tony; Fu, Tsu-Yi; Tsay, Jyh-Shen, E-mail: jstsay@phy.ntnu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China)

    2015-05-07

    Combined scanning tunneling microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and surface magneto-optic Kerr effect studies were employed to study the microscopic structures and magnetic properties for ultrathin Co/√(3)×√(3)R30°-Ag/Si(111). As the annealing temperature increases, the upward diffusion of Si atoms and formation of Co silicides occurs at temperature above 400 K. Below 600 K, the √(3)×√(3)R30°-Ag/Si(111) surface structure persists. We propose an interaction transferring mechanism of Si atoms across the √(3)×√(3)R30°-Ag layer. The upward transferred Si atoms react with Co atoms to form Co silicide. The step height across the edge of the island, a separation of 0.75 nm from the analysis of the 2 × 2 structure, and the calculations of the normalized Auger signal serve as strong evidences for the formation of CoSi{sub 2} at the interface. The interaction transferring mechanism for Si atoms enhances the possibility of interactions between Co and Si atoms. The smoothness of the surface is advantage for that the easy axis of magnetization for Co/√(3)×√(3)R30°-Ag/Si(111) is in the surface plane. This provides a possible way of growing flat magnetic layers on silicon substrate with controllable silicide formation and shows potential applications in spintronics devices.

  3. Reverse calcium affinity purification of Fab with calcium derivatized hydroxyapatite

    OpenAIRE

    Gagnon, Pete; Cheung, Chia-wei; Yazaki, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    This study introduces the application of calcium-derivatized hydroxyapatite for purification of Fab. Fab binds to native hydroxyapatite but fails to bind to the calcium derivatized form. IgG, Fc, and most other protein contaminants bind to the calcium form. This supports Fab purification by a simple flow-through method that achieves greater than 95% purity from papain digests and mammalian cell culture supernatants. Alternatively, Fab can be concentrated on native hydroxyapatite then eluted s...

  4. Glycochenodeoxycholic acid inhibits calcium phosphate precipitation in vitro by preventing the transformation of amorphous calcium phosphate to calcium hydroxyapatite.

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu, S M; Wen, G.; Hirakawa, N; Soloway, R D; Hong, N K; Crowther, R S

    1991-01-01

    Calcium hydroxyapatite can be a significant component of black pigment gallstones. Diverse molecules that bind calcium phosphate inhibit hydroxyapatite precipitation. Because glycine-conjugated bile acids, but not their taurine counterparts, bind calcium phosphate, we studied whether glycochenodeoxycholic acid inhibits calcium hydroxyapatite formation. Glycochenodeoxycholic acid (2 mM) totally inhibited transformation of amorphous calcium phosphate microprecipitates to macroscopic crystalline...

  5. Atomically precise self-organization of perfectly ordered gadolinium–silicide nanomeshes controlled by anisotropic electromigration-induced growth on Si(1 1 0)-16 × 2 surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Ie-Hong, E-mail: ihhong@mail.ncyu.edu.tw [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiayi University, Chiayi 60004, Taiwan (China); Institute of Optoelectronics and Solid State Electronics, National Chiayi University, Chiayi 60004, Taiwan (China); Chen, Tsung-Ming; Tsai, Yung-Feng [Institute of Optoelectronics and Solid State Electronics, National Chiayi University, Chiayi 60004, Taiwan (China)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • This work provides a clear understanding of the template-directed self-organization mechanism of a perfectly ordered Gd-silicide nanomesh on a double-domain Si(1 1 0)-16 × 2 and identifies that the anisotropic electromigration is the driving force governing the two-dimensional self-ordering of the atomically precise silicide nanomesh. • The ability to self-organize a variety of the perfectly ordered silicide nanomeshes on Si(1 1 0) with atomic precision represents a promising route for the optimal bottom-up fabrication of well-defined crossbar nanocircuits, which opens the possibility for their utilizations in crossbar nanoarchitectures and Si-based magnetoelectronic nanodevices. - Abstract: Detailed scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM and STS) studies for the effects of thermal migration and electromigration on the growth of gadolinium–silicide nanomeshes on double-domain Si(1 1 0)-16 × 2 surfaces are presented to identify the driving force for the self-organization of a perfectly ordered silicide nanomesh on Si(1 1 0). STM results clearly show that the anisotropic electromigration effect is crucial for the control of the spatial uniformity of a self-ordered silicide nanomesh on Si(1 1 0). This two-dimensional self-ordering driven by the anisotropic-electromigration-induced growth allows the sizes and positions of crossed nanowires to be precisely controlled within a variation of ±0.2 nm over a mesoscopic area, and it can be straightforwardly applied to other metals (e.g., Au and Ce) to grow a variety of highly regular silicide nanomeshes for the applications as nanoscale interconnects. Moreover, the STS results show that the anisotropic electromigration-induced growth causes the metallic horizontal nanowires to cross over the semiconducting oblique nanowires, which opens the possibility for the atomically precise bottom-up fabrication of well-defined crossbar nanoarchitectures.

  6. Atomically precise self-organization of perfectly ordered gadolinium–silicide nanomeshes controlled by anisotropic electromigration-induced growth on Si(1 1 0)-16 × 2 surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • This work provides a clear understanding of the template-directed self-organization mechanism of a perfectly ordered Gd-silicide nanomesh on a double-domain Si(1 1 0)-16 × 2 and identifies that the anisotropic electromigration is the driving force governing the two-dimensional self-ordering of the atomically precise silicide nanomesh. • The ability to self-organize a variety of the perfectly ordered silicide nanomeshes on Si(1 1 0) with atomic precision represents a promising route for the optimal bottom-up fabrication of well-defined crossbar nanocircuits, which opens the possibility for their utilizations in crossbar nanoarchitectures and Si-based magnetoelectronic nanodevices. - Abstract: Detailed scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM and STS) studies for the effects of thermal migration and electromigration on the growth of gadolinium–silicide nanomeshes on double-domain Si(1 1 0)-16 × 2 surfaces are presented to identify the driving force for the self-organization of a perfectly ordered silicide nanomesh on Si(1 1 0). STM results clearly show that the anisotropic electromigration effect is crucial for the control of the spatial uniformity of a self-ordered silicide nanomesh on Si(1 1 0). This two-dimensional self-ordering driven by the anisotropic-electromigration-induced growth allows the sizes and positions of crossed nanowires to be precisely controlled within a variation of ±0.2 nm over a mesoscopic area, and it can be straightforwardly applied to other metals (e.g., Au and Ce) to grow a variety of highly regular silicide nanomeshes for the applications as nanoscale interconnects. Moreover, the STS results show that the anisotropic electromigration-induced growth causes the metallic horizontal nanowires to cross over the semiconducting oblique nanowires, which opens the possibility for the atomically precise bottom-up fabrication of well-defined crossbar nanoarchitectures

  7. Calcium – how and why?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J K Jaiswal

    2001-09-01

    Calcium is among the most commonly used ions, in a multitude of biological functions, so much so that it is impossible to imagine life without calcium. In this article I have attempted to address the question as to how calcium has achieved this status with a brief mention of the history of calcium research in biology. It appears that during the origin and early evolution of life the Ca2+ ion was given a unique opportunity to be used in several biological processes because of its unusual physical and chemical properties.

  8. Calcium addition in straw gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risnes, H.; Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk; Moilanen, A.; Norby, P.; Papadakis, K.; Posselt, D.; Sørensen, L. H.

    2003-01-01

    The present work focuses on the influence of calcium addition in gasification. The inorganic¿organic element interaction as well as the detailed inorganic¿inorganic elements interaction has been studied. The effect of calcium addition as calcium sugar/molasses solutions to straw significantly...... affected the ash chemistry and the ash sintering tendency but much less the char reactivity. Thermo balance test are made and high-temperature X-ray diffraction measurements are performed, the experimental results indicate that with calcium addition major inorganic¿inorganic reactions take place very late...

  9. Calcium Phosphate Biomaterials: An Update

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Current calcium phosphate (CaP) biomaterials for bone repair, substitution, augmentation and regeneration include hydroxyapatite ( HA ) from synthetic or biologic origin, beta-tricalcium phosphate ( β-TCP ) , biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP), and are available as granules, porous blocks, components of composites (CaP/polymer) cements, and as coatings on orthopedic and dental implants. Experimental calcium phosphate biomaterials include CO3- and F-substituted apatites, Mg-and Zn-substituted β-TCP, calcium phosphate glasses. This paper is a brief review of the different types of CaP biomaterials and their properties such as bioactivity, osteoconductivity, osteoinductivity.

  10. 21 CFR 573.240 - Calcium periodate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... with calcium hydroxide or calcium oxide to form a substance consisting of not less than 60 percent by... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium periodate. 573.240 Section 573.240 Food... Additive Listing § 573.240 Calcium periodate. The food additive calcium periodate may be safely used...

  11. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and... Listing § 573.260 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely used as an anticaking agent in animal feed, provided that the amount of calcium silicate does...

  12. Calcium measurement methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CarloAlberto Redi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Rightly stressed by prof. Wolfgang Walz in the Preface to the series Neuromethods series, the “careful application of methods is probably the most important step in the process of scientific inquiry”. Thus, I strongly suggest to all those interested in calcium signaling and especially to the new-comers in the hot topic of neuroscience (which has so much space even in science-society debate for its implications in legal issues and in the judge-decision process to take profit from this so well edited book. I am saying this since prof. Verkhratsky and prof. Petersen......

  13. Extracellular calcium sensing and extracellular calcium signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, E. M.; MacLeod, R. J.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    , localized changes in Ca(o)(2+) within the ECF can originate from several mechanisms, including fluxes of calcium ions into or out of cellular or extracellular stores or across epithelium that absorb or secrete Ca(2+). In any event, the CaR and other receptors/sensors for Ca(o)(2+) and probably for other extracellular ions represent versatile regulators of numerous cellular functions and may serve as important therapeutic targets.

  14. Compartmentalization of the submembrane calcium activity during calcium influx and its significance in transmitter release.

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, S M; Llinás, R R

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative modeling indicates that, in presynaptic terminals, the intracellular calcium concentration profile during inward calcium current is characterized by discrete peaks of calcium immediately adjacent to the calcium channels. This restriction of intracellular calcium concentration suggests a remarkably well specified intracellular architecture such that calcium, as a second messenger, may regulate particular intracellular domains with a great degree of specificity.

  15. Program for qualifying CNEA (National Atomic Energy Commission) as a manufacturer of low enriched uranium silicide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This report presents the program for the production and irradiation of a low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel element containing a dispersion of U3Si2 particles in an Al matrix, with a total uranium content of 4.8 g/cm3. The project is being carried out by the Nuclear Fuels Department of the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) of Argentina and aims at qualifying our organization as manufacturer of LEU fuel elements for research reactors. The program involves the design, fissile material production, components fabrication and inspection, assembly, irradiation and postirradiation tests of two prototypes. The meat will be a dispersion of U3Si2 in an Al matrix with a total uranium content of 4.8 g/cm3. The irradiations will be performed at the RA-3. The first prototype is conceived in such a way to facilitate the posterior disassembly and PIE examinations. The second one will have the design of the future normal fuel elements of the RA-3. This project relies on the experience in CNEA in the production of standard fuel elements for the RA-3 and of uranium silicide mini plates successfully tested at the Oak Ridge Research Reactor within the RERTR program (Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors). Important investments have already been made in the installations for fuel elements production and PIE

  16. Electron microscopy studies of lutetium doped erbium silicide (Er0.9Lu0.1)5Si4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Examination of bulk microstructures of lutetium doped erbium silicide (Er0.9Lu0.1)5Si4 (space group: Pnma) using scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) reveals the existence of thin plates of a hexagonal phase (space group: P63/mcm) where the stoichiometric ratio in moles between the rare earths and Si is 5 to 3, i. e the 5:3 phase. The orientation relationship between the matrix and the plates was determined as [010]m ∼ -parallel [-1010]p. This observation adds credence to the assumption that all linear features noted in alloys of the rare-earth intermetallic family R5(SixGe1-x)4 are of the stoichiometric ratio 5:3 and possess a common orientation relationship with the parent 5:4 alloys. - Highlights: → The linear features observed in the (Er0.9Lu0.1)5Si4 sample are hexagonal 5:3 plates. → Thickness of 5:3 plates in 5:4 alloys made by tri-arc pulling is greater than made by arc-melting. → The orientation relationship between 5:3 plates and the matrix is [010]m ∼ ||[-1010]p.

  17. A comparison of the metallurgical behaviour of dispersion fuels with uranium silicides and U6Fe as dispersants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past few years metallurgical studies have been carried out to develop fuel dispersions with U-densities up to 7.0 Mg U m-3. Uranium silicides have been considered to be the prime candidates as dispersants; U6Fe being a potential alternative on account of its higher U-density. The objective of this paper is to compare the metallurgical behaviour of these two material combinations with regard to the following aspects: (1) preparation of the compounds U3Si, U3Si2 and U6Fe; (2) powder metallurgical processing to miniature fuel element plates; (3) reaction behaviour under equilibrium conditions in the relevant portions of the ternary U-Si-Al and U-Fe-Al systems; (4) dimensional stability of the fuel plates after prolonged thermal treatment; (5) thermochemical behaviour of fuel plates at temperatures near the melting point of the cladding. Based on this data, the possible advantages of each fuel combination are discussed. (author)

  18. Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Balance › Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health March 2012 Download PDFs ... helps keep your bones strong. Why are vitamin D and calcium important to bone health? Vitamin D ...

  19. Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000490.htm Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones To use the sharing ... and maintain strong bones. How Much Calcium and Vitamin D Do I Need? Amounts of calcium are ...

  20. Calcium transport in turtle bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unidirectional 45Ca fluxes were measured in the turtle bladder under open-circuit and short-circuit conditions. In the open-circuited state net calcium flux (JnetCa) was secretory (serosa to mucosa). Ouabain reversed JnetCa to an absorptive flux. Amiloride reduced both fluxes such that JnetCa was not significantly different from zero. Removal of mucosal sodium caused net calcium absorption; removal of serosal sodium caused calcium secretion. When bladders were short circuited, JnetCa decreased to approximately one-third of control value but remained secretory. When ouabain was added under short-circuit conditions, JnetCa was similar in magnitude and direction to ouabain under open-circuited conditions (i.e., absorptive). Tissue 45Ca content was ≅30-fold lower when the isotope was placed in the mucosal bath, suggesting that the apical membrane is the resistance barrier to calcium transport. The results obtained in this study are best explained by postulating a Ca2+-ATPase on the serosa of the turtle bladder epithelium and a sodium-calcium antiporter on the mucosa. In this model, the energy for calcium movement would be supplied, in large part, by the Na+-K+-ATPase. By increasing cell sodium, ouabain would decrease the activity of the mucosal sodium-calcium exchanger (or reverse it), uncovering active calcium transport across the serosa

  1. An Improved Calcium Flame Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Robert S.

    1985-01-01

    Indicates that the true red color of calcium can be obtained (using the procedure described by Sorm and Logowski) if the calcium ion solution is mixed with an equal volume of saturated ammonium bromide solution. Suggestions for flame tests of other elements are also noted. (JN)

  2. CALCIUM ENHANCES ANTIINFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF ASPIRIN

    OpenAIRE

    Choksi Krishna; Shenoy Ashoka M; A. R. Shabharaya; Lala Minaxi

    2011-01-01

    The objective of present study is to evaluate the effects of calcium carbonate and calcium gluconate on acute and subacute inflammation and to study their possible interactions with Aspirin. Calcium carbonate (10 mg/kg) and calcium gluconate (5 mg/kg) were administered individually and also co-administered along with sub therapeutic dose Aspirin (50mg/kg) to study their interaction. The inflammation was induced by carrageenan or a foreign body. Both calcium carbonate and calcium gluconate cou...

  3. Limestone reaction in calcium aluminate cement–calcium sulfate systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports a study of ternary blends composed of calcium aluminate cement, calcium sulfate hemihydrate and limestone. Compressive strength tests and hydration kinetics were studied as a function of limestone and calcium sulfate content. The phase evolution and the total porosity were followed and compared to thermodynamic simulation to understand the reactions involved and the effect of limestone on these binders. The reaction of limestone leads to the formation of hemicarboaluminate and monocarboaluminate. Increasing the ratio between sulfate and aluminate decreases the extent of limestone reaction

  4. Calcium binding protein-mediated regulation of voltage-gated calcium channels linked to human diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nasrin NFJATBAKHSH; Zhong-ping FENG

    2011-01-01

    Calcium ion entry through voltage-gated calcium channels is essential for cellular signalling in a wide variety of cells and multiple physiological processes. Perturbations of voltage-gated calcium channel function can lead to pathophysiological consequences. Calcium binding proteins serve as calcium sensors and regulate the calcium channel properties via feedback mechanisms. This review highlights the current evidences of calcium binding protein-mediated channel regulation in human diseases.

  5. Calcium carbonate and calcium sulfate in Martian meteorite EETA79001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, J. L.; Wentworth, S. J.

    1987-01-01

    Chips of glassy Lithology C of EETA79001 were studied by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to determine the mineralogy and petrogenesis of the glass that was shown by others to contain trapped Mars-like gases. Calcium carbonite was identified as massive to acicular crystals for which Ca, C, and O were the major elements. Calcium sulfate was identified as prismatic-acicular crystals with Ca and S as the major elements.

  6. Beryllium Silicide Clusters, BenSin, Be2nSin (n = 1 - 4) and possible MgB2-like Superconductivity in some of them

    OpenAIRE

    Isikaku-Ironkwe, O. P.

    2012-01-01

    The symmetry of the Periodic Table makes it possible to predict certain properties of similar elements and compounds using one of them as a template. Magnesium diboride, MgB2, presents a useful template in the search for similar materials. Starting from electronegativity, valence electron and atomic number equivalency, we identify many potential similar materials. One of them is the beryllium silicide, Be2nSin cluster system. We establish that though not yet produced in bulk, Be2Si exists. We...

  7. Modification by H-termination in growth process of titanium silicide on Si(0 0 1)-2 x 1 observed with scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formation processes of titanium silicide on hydrogen-terminated H/Si(0 0 1)-2 x 1 surface are studied at the atomic scale with a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Square-shaped nanoislands were observed on the Ti/H/Si(0 0 1) surface after annealed at 873-1073 K. These are the epitaxial nanoislands moderately grown due to the local orientation relationship between C49-TiSi2 and Si(0 0 1), because passivation by surface hydrogen on Si(0 0 1) suppresses active and complex bond formation of Ti-Si.

  8. The effect of silicide ceramic coatings on the high-temperature strength and plasticity of niobium alloys of the Nb-W-Mo-Zr system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study is made into short-term rupture strength and plasticity of 5VMTs alloy of Nb-W-Mo-Zr system and a 5VMTs-silicide ceramic coating composite material in vacuum, inert environment and in the air within a temperature range of 290-2070 K. The kinetics of defect generation and development both in the protective coating and the matrix is studied. The values of limiting plastic strains are determined at which the composite materials preserves its carrying capacity in high temperature aggressive and oxidizing gaseous media

  9. M5Si3(M=Ti, Nb, Mo) Based Transition-Metal Silicides for High Temperature Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhihong Tang

    2007-12-01

    Transition metal silicides are being considered for future engine turbine components at temperatures up to 1600 C. Although significant improvement in high temperature strength, room temperature fracture toughness has been realized in the past decade, further improvement in oxidation resistance is needed. Oxidation mechanism of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3}-based alloys was investigated. Oxidation behavior of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3}-based alloy strongly depends on the atmosphere. Presence of Nitrogen alters the oxidation behavior of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} by nucleation and growth of nitride subscale. Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3.2} and Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3}C{sub 0.5} alloys exhibited an excellent oxidation resistance in nitrogen bearing atmosphere due to limited dissolution of nitrogen and increased Si/Ti activity ratio. MoSi{sub 2} coating developed by pack cementation to protect Mo-based Mo-Si-B composites was found to be effective up to 1500 C. Shifting coating composition to T1+T2+Mo{sub 3}Si region showed the possibility to extend the coating lifetime above 1500 C by more than ten times via formation of slow growing Mo{sub 3}Si or T2 interlayer without sacrificing the oxidation resistance of the coating. The phase equilibria in the Nb-rich portion of Nb-B system has been evaluated experimentally using metallographic analysis and differential thermal analyzer (DTA). It was shown that Nb{sub ss} (solid solution) and NbB are the only two primary phases in the 0-40 at.% B composition range, and the eutectic reaction L {leftrightarrow} Nb{sub SS} + NbB was determined to occur at 2104 {+-} 5 C by DTA.

  10. Electrical properties of amorphous and epitaxial Si-rich silicide films composed of W-atom-encapsulated Si clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the electrical properties and derived the energy band structures of amorphous Si-rich W silicide (a-WSin) films and approximately 1-nm-thick crystalline WSin epitaxial films (e-WSin) on Si (100) substrates with composition n = 8–10, both composed of Sin clusters each of which encapsulates a W atom (WSin clusters). The effect of annealing in the temperature range of 300–500 °C was also investigated. The Hall measurements at room temperature revealed that a-WSin is a nearly intrinsic semiconductor, whereas e-WSin is an n-type semiconductor with electron mobility of ∼8 cm2/V s and high sheet electron density of ∼7 × 1012 cm−2. According to the temperature dependence of the electrical properties, a-WSin has a mobility gap of ∼0.1 eV and mid gap states in the region of 1019 cm−3 eV−1 in an optical gap of ∼0.6 eV with considerable band tail states; e-WSin has a donor level of ∼0.1 eV with sheet density in the region of 1012 cm−2 in a band gap of ∼0.3 eV. These semiconducting band structures are primarily attributed to the open band-gap properties of the constituting WSin cluster. In a-WSin, the random network of the clusters generates the band tail states, and the formation of Si dangling bonds results in the generation of mid gap states; in e-WSin, the original cluster structure is highly distorted to accommodate the Si lattice, resulting in the formation of intrinsic defects responsible for the donor level

  11. Estimation of presynaptic calcium currents and endogenous calcium buffers at the frog neuromuscular junction with two different calcium fluorescent dyes

    OpenAIRE

    Samigullin, Dmitry; Fatikhov, Nijaz; Khaziev, Eduard; Skorinkin, Andrey; Nikolsky, Eugeny; Bukharaeva, Ellya

    2015-01-01

    At the frog neuromuscular junction, under physiological conditions, the direct measurement of calcium currents and of the concentration of intracellular calcium buffers—which determine the kinetics of calcium concentration and neurotransmitter release from the nerve terminal—has hitherto been technically impossible. With the aim of quantifying both Ca2+ currents and the intracellular calcium buffers, we measured fluorescence signals from nerve terminals loaded with the low-affinity calcium dy...

  12. Variability of calcium absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Variability in calcium absorption was estimated in three groups of normal subjects in whom Ca absorption was measured by standard isotopic-tracer methods at interstudy intervals ranging from 1 to 4 mo. Fifty absorption tests were performed in 22 subjects. Each was done in the morning after an overnight fast with an identical standard breakfast containing a Ca load of approximately 250 mg. Individual fractional absorption values were normalized to permit pooling of the data. The coefficient of variation (CVs) for absorption for the three groups ranged from 10.57 to 12.79% with the size of the CV increasing with interstudy duration. One other published study presenting replicate absorption values was analyzed in a similar fashion and was found to have a CV of absorption of 9.78%. From these data we estimate that when the standard double-isotope method is used to measure Ca absorption there is approximately 10% variability around any given absorption value within an individual human subject and that roughly two-thirds of this represents real biological variability in absorption

  13. Calcium-sensitive immunoaffinity chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Maiken L; Lindhardt Madsen, Kirstine; Skjoedt, Karsten;

    2014-01-01

    homogeneity may be impossible due to contamination with abundant antigens. In this study, we purified the scarce, complement-associated plasma protein complex, collectin LK (CL-LK, complex of collectin liver 1 and kidney 1), by immunoaffinity chromatography using a calcium-sensitive anti-collectin-kidney-1 m......Ab. This antibody was characterized by binding to CL-LK at hypo- and physiological calcium concentrations and dissociated from CK-LK at hyperphysiological concentrations of calcium. We purified CL-LK from plasma to a purity of 41% and a yield of 38%, resulting in a purification factor of more than 88......,000 in a single step. To evaluate the efficiency of this new purification scheme, we purified CL-LK using the same calcium-sensitive mAb in combination with acidic elution buffer and by using calcium-dependent anti-CL-K1 mAbs in combination with EDTA elution buffer. We found that calcium...

  14. Revealing lithium-silicide phase transformations in nano-structured silicon-based lithium ion batteries via in situ NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, K; Salager, E; Kerr, C J; Fraser, A E; Ducati, C; Morris, A J; Hofmann, S; Grey, C P

    2014-01-01

    Nano-structured silicon anodes are attractive alternatives to graphitic carbons in rechargeable Li-ion batteries, owing to their extremely high capacities. Despite their advantages, numerous issues remain to be addressed, the most basic being to understand the complex kinetics and thermodynamics that control the reactions and structural rearrangements. Elucidating this necessitates real-time in situ metrologies, which are highly challenging, if the whole electrode structure is studied at an atomistic level for multiple cycles under realistic cycling conditions. Here we report that Si nanowires grown on a conducting carbon-fibre support provide a robust model battery system that can be studied by (7)Li in situ NMR spectroscopy. The method allows the (de)alloying reactions of the amorphous silicides to be followed in the 2nd cycle and beyond. In combination with density-functional theory calculations, the results provide insight into the amorphous and amorphous-to-crystalline lithium-silicide transformations, particularly those at low voltages, which are highly relevant to practical cycling strategies. PMID:24488002

  15. "Caged calcium" in Aplysia pacemaker neurons. Characterization of calcium-activated potassium and nonspecific cation currents

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    We have studied calcium-activated potassium current, IK(Ca), and calcium-activated nonspecific cation current, INS(Ca), in Aplysia bursting pacemaker neurons, using photolysis of a calcium chelator (nitr-5 or nitr-7) to release "caged calcium" intracellularly. A computer model of nitr photolysis, multiple buffer equilibration, and active calcium extrusion was developed to predict volume-average and front-surface calcium concentration transients. Changes in arsenazo III absorbance were used to...

  16. Effect of Preharvest Calcium Treatments on Sweet Cherry Fruit Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Deniz EROGUL

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the effects of different foliar calcium compounds on fruit cracking and quality of sweet cherry variety ‘0900 Ziraat’ were investigated. Calcium caseinate, calcium chloride, calcium hydroxide and calcium nitrate were used as foliar sprays. Calcium applications reduced the cracking index 38% to 66% compared to cherries that did not receive foliar treatment. The most efficient applications for decreasing cracking were calcium hydroxide and calcium chloride. Calcium chloride and c...

  17. Stochastic Simulation of Cardiac Ventricular Myocyte Calcium Dynamics and Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Tuan, Hoang-Trong Minh; Williams, George S.B.; Chikando, Aristide C.; Sobie, Eric A.; Lederer, W. Jonathan; Jafri, M. Saleet

    2011-01-01

    A three dimensional model of calcium dynamics in the rat ventricular myocyte was developed to study the mechanism of calcium homeostasis and pathological calcium dynamics during calcium overload. The model contains 20,000 calcium release units (CRUs) each containing 49 ryanodine receptors. The model simulates calcium sparks with a realistic spontaneous calcium spark rate. It suggests that in addition to the calcium spark-based leak, there is an invisible calcium leak caused by the stochastic ...

  18. Aging and calcium as an environmental factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, T

    1985-12-01

    Calcium deficiency is a constant menace to land-abiding animals, including mammals. Humans enjoying exceptional longevity on earth are especially susceptible to calcium deficiency in old age. Low calcium and vitamin D intake, short solar exposure, decreased intestinal absorption, and falling renal function with insufficient 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D biosynthesis all contribute to calcium deficiency, secondary hyperparathyroidism, bone loss and possibly calcium shift from the bone to soft tissue, and from the extracellular to the intracellular compartment, blunting the sharp concentration gap between these compartments. The consequences of calcium deficiency might thus include not only osteoporosis, but also arteriosclerosis and hypertension due to the increase of calcium in the vascular wall, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and senile dementia due to calcium deposition in the central nervous system, and a decrease in cellular function, because of blunting of the difference in extracellular-intracellular calcium, leading to diabetes mellitus, immune deficiency and others (Fig. 6). PMID:2943880

  19. Transport of Calcium Ions into Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhaolong; Zhang, Dayong; He, Xiaolan; Huang, Yihong; Shao, Hongbo

    2016-06-01

    To uptake calcium ions of mitochondria is of significant functional connotation for cells, because calcium ions in mitochondria are involved in energy production, regulatory signals transfer, and mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening and even programmed cell death of apoptosis, further playing more roles in plant productivity and quality. Cytoplasmic calcium ions access into outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) from voltage dependent anion-selective channel (VDAC) and were absorbed into inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) by mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU), rapid mitochondrial calcium uptake (RaM) or mitochondrial ryanodine receptor (mRyR). Although both mitochondria and the mechanisms of calcium transport have been extensively studied, but there are still long-standing or even new challenges. Here we review the history and recent discoveries of the mitochondria calcium ions channel complex involved calcium assimilation, and discuss the role of calcium ions into mitochondria. PMID:27252588

  20. Electrical properties of amorphous and epitaxial Si-rich silicide films composed of W-atom-encapsulated Si clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Naoya, E-mail: okada-naoya@aist.go.jp [Japan Science and Technology Agency, PRESTO, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Nanoelectronics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan); Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Uchida, Noriyuki [Nanoelectronics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan); Kanayama, Toshihiko [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2015-03-07

    We investigated the electrical properties and derived the energy band structures of amorphous Si-rich W silicide (a-WSi{sub n}) films and approximately 1-nm-thick crystalline WSi{sub n} epitaxial films (e-WSi{sub n}) on Si (100) substrates with composition n = 8–10, both composed of Si{sub n} clusters each of which encapsulates a W atom (WSi{sub n} clusters). The effect of annealing in the temperature range of 300–500 °C was also investigated. The Hall measurements at room temperature revealed that a-WSi{sub n} is a nearly intrinsic semiconductor, whereas e-WSi{sub n} is an n-type semiconductor with electron mobility of ∼8 cm{sup 2}/V s and high sheet electron density of ∼7 × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2}. According to the temperature dependence of the electrical properties, a-WSi{sub n} has a mobility gap of ∼0.1 eV and mid gap states in the region of 10{sup 19 }cm{sup −3} eV{sup −1} in an optical gap of ∼0.6 eV with considerable band tail states; e-WSi{sub n} has a donor level of ∼0.1 eV with sheet density in the region of 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2} in a band gap of ∼0.3 eV. These semiconducting band structures are primarily attributed to the open band-gap properties of the constituting WSi{sub n} cluster. In a-WSi{sub n}, the random network of the clusters generates the band tail states, and the formation of Si dangling bonds results in the generation of mid gap states; in e-WSi{sub n}, the original cluster structure is highly distorted to accommodate the Si lattice, resulting in the formation of intrinsic defects responsible for the donor level.

  1. Characterization of complex carbide–silicide precipitates in a Ni–Cr–Mo–Fe–Si alloy modified by welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel based alloys of the type Hastelloy-N™ are ideal candidate materials for molten salt reactors, as well as for applications such as pressure vessels, due to their excellent resistance to creep, oxidation and corrosion. In this work, the authors have attempted to understand the effects of welding on the morphology, chemistry and crystal structure of the precipitates in the heat affected zone (HAZ) and the weld zone of a Ni–Cr–Mo–Fe–Si alloy similar to Hastelloy-N™ in composition, by using characterization techniques such as scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Two plates of a Ni–Cr–Mo–Fe–Si alloy GH-3535 were welded together using a TiG welding process without filler material to achieve a joint with a curved molten zone with dendritic structure. It is evident that the primary precipitates have melted in the HAZ and re-solidified in a eutectic-like morphology, with a chemistry and crystal structure only slightly different from the pre-existing precipitates, while the surrounding matrix grains remained unmelted, except for the zones immediately adjacent to the precipitates. In the molten zone, the primary precipitates were fully melted and dissolved in the matrix, and there was enrichment of Mo and Si in the dendrite boundaries after solidification, and re-precipitation of the complex carbides/silicides at some grain boundaries and triple points. The nature of the precipitates in the molten zone varied according to the local chemical composition. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Ni-based alloy with Cr, Mo, Si, Fe and C was welded, examined with SEM, EBSD, and TEM. • Original Ni2(Mo,Cr)4(Si,C) carbides changed from equiaxed to lamellar shape in HAZ. • Composition and crystal structure remained almost unchanged in HAZ. • Original carbides changed to lamellar Ni3(Mo,Cr)3(Si,C) in some cases in weld metal. • Precipitates were mostly incoherent, but semi-coherent in some cases in weld metal

  2. Characterization of complex carbide–silicide precipitates in a Ni–Cr–Mo–Fe–Si alloy modified by welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, D., E-mail: dhb@ansto.gov.au; Davis, J.; Drew, M.; Harrison, R.P.; Edwards, L.

    2015-07-15

    Nickel based alloys of the type Hastelloy-N™ are ideal candidate materials for molten salt reactors, as well as for applications such as pressure vessels, due to their excellent resistance to creep, oxidation and corrosion. In this work, the authors have attempted to understand the effects of welding on the morphology, chemistry and crystal structure of the precipitates in the heat affected zone (HAZ) and the weld zone of a Ni–Cr–Mo–Fe–Si alloy similar to Hastelloy-N™ in composition, by using characterization techniques such as scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Two plates of a Ni–Cr–Mo–Fe–Si alloy GH-3535 were welded together using a TiG welding process without filler material to achieve a joint with a curved molten zone with dendritic structure. It is evident that the primary precipitates have melted in the HAZ and re-solidified in a eutectic-like morphology, with a chemistry and crystal structure only slightly different from the pre-existing precipitates, while the surrounding matrix grains remained unmelted, except for the zones immediately adjacent to the precipitates. In the molten zone, the primary precipitates were fully melted and dissolved in the matrix, and there was enrichment of Mo and Si in the dendrite boundaries after solidification, and re-precipitation of the complex carbides/silicides at some grain boundaries and triple points. The nature of the precipitates in the molten zone varied according to the local chemical composition. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Ni-based alloy with Cr, Mo, Si, Fe and C was welded, examined with SEM, EBSD, and TEM. • Original Ni{sub 2}(Mo,Cr){sub 4}(Si,C) carbides changed from equiaxed to lamellar shape in HAZ. • Composition and crystal structure remained almost unchanged in HAZ. • Original carbides changed to lamellar Ni{sub 3}(Mo,Cr){sub 3}(Si,C) in some cases in weld metal. • Precipitates were mostly incoherent, but semi-coherent in some cases in weld

  3. Optimizing calcium selective fluorimetric nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisiel, Anna; Kłucińska, Katarzyna; Gniadek, Marianna; Maksymiuk, Krzysztof; Michalska, Agata

    2015-11-01

    Recently it was shown that optical nanosensors based on alternating polymers e.g. poly(maleic anhydride-alt-1-octadecene) were characterized by a linear dependence of emission intensity on logarithm of concentration over a few of orders of magnitude range. In this work we focus on the material used to prepare calcium selective nanosensors. It is shown that alternating polymer nanosensors offer competitive performance in the absence of calcium ionophore, due to interaction of the nanospheres building blocks with analyte ions. The emission increase corresponds to increase of calcium ions contents in the sample within the range from 10(-4) to 10(-1) M. Further improvement in sensitivity (from 10(-6) to 10(-1) M) and selectivity can be achieved by incorporating calcium ionophore in the nanospheres. The optimal results were obtained for core-shell nanospheres, where the core was prepared from poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride) and the outer layer from poly(maleic anhydride-alt-1-octadecene). Thus obtained chemosensors were showing linear dependence of emission on logarithm of calcium ions concentration within the range from 10(-7) to 10(-1) M. PMID:26452839

  4. Isomorfic Substitutions of Calcium by Strontium in Calcium Hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By means of homogeneous precipitation it has been possible to synthesize crystalline solid solutions of calcium strontium hydroxyapatite from aqueous solutions. The lattice constants for the solid solutions were measured in the range Ca9Sr(PO4)6(OH)2 - CaSr9(PO4)6(OH)2. The investigations show that the discrimination of strontium against calcium is considerably smaller than reported elsewhere (1). Strontium is preferentially built into the c-axis direction of the apatite lattice

  5. Effect of anions or foods on absolute bioavailability of calcium from calcium salts in mice by pharmacokinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Ueda, Yukari; Taira, Zenei

    2013-01-01

    We studied the absolute bioavailability of calcium from calcium L-lactate in mice using pharmacokinetics, and reviewed the absolute bioavailability of calcium from three other calcium salts in mice previously studied: calcium chloride, calcium acetate, and calcium ascorbate. The results showed that calcium metabolism is linear between intravenous administration of 15 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg, and is not affected by anions. Results after oral calcium administration of 150 mg/kg showed that the intes...

  6. Calcium release-activated calcium current in rat mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoth, M; Penner, R

    1993-06-01

    1. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings of membrane currents and fura-2 measurements of free intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) were used to study the biophysical properties of a calcium current activated by depletion of intracellular calcium stores in rat peritoneal mast cells. 2. Calcium influx through an inward calcium release-activated calcium current (ICRAC) was induced by three independent mechanisms that result in store depletion: intracellular infusion of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) or extracellular application of ionomycin (active depletion), and intracellular infusion of calcium chelators (ethylene glycol bis-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) or 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA)) to prevent reuptake of leaked-out calcium into the stores (passive depletion). 3. The activation of ICRAC induced by active store depletion has a short delay (4-14 s) following intracellular infusion of InsP3 or extracellular application of ionomycin. It has a monoexponential time course with a time constant of 20-30 s and, depending on the complementary Ca2+ buffer, a mean normalized amplitude (at 0 mV) of 0.6 pA pF-1 (with EGTA) and 1.1 pA pF-1 (with BAPTA). 4. After full activation of ICRAC by InsP3 in the presence of EGTA (10 mM), hyperpolarizing pulses to -100 mV induced an instantaneous inward current that decayed by 64% within 50 ms. This inactivation is probably mediated by [Ca2+]i, since the decrease of inward current in the presence of the fast Ca2+ buffer BAPTA (10 mM) was only 30%. 5. The amplitude of ICRAC was dependent on the extracellular Ca2+ concentration with an apparent dissociation constant (KD) of 3.3 mM. Inward currents were nonsaturating up to -200 mV. 6. The selectivity of ICRAC for Ca2+ was assessed by using fura-2 as the dominant intracellular buffer (at a concentration of 2 mM) and relating the absolute changes in the calcium-sensitive fluorescence (390 nm excitation) with the calcium current integral

  7. The heat capacity and entropy of the lithium silicides Li17Si4 and Li16.42Si4 in the temperature range from (2 to 873) K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • High quality experimental heat capacities of the new lithium rich silicides Li17Si4 and Li16.42Si4 are reported. • Two different calorimeters have been used to cover the broad temperature range from (2 to 873) K. • Samples were prepared and characterized (XRD) by the original authors who firstly described these new silicide phases in 2013. • Supply of polynomial heat capacity functions for four temperature intervals. • Calculation of standard entropies and entropies of formation of the lithium silicides. - Abstract: This work presents the heat capacities and standard entropies of the recently described lithium rich silicide phases Li17Si4 and Li16.42Si4 as a function of temperature in the range from (2 to 873) K. The measurements were carried out using two different calorimeters. The heat capacities were determined in the range from T = (2 to 300) K by a relaxation technique using a Physical Properties Measurement System (PPMS) from Quantum Design, and in the range from T = (283 to 873) K by means of a Sensys DSC from Setaram applying the Cp-by-step method. The experimental data are given with an accuracy of (1 to 2)% above T = 20 K and the error increases up to 7% below T = 20 K. The results of the measurements at low temperatures permit the calculation of additional thermodynamic parameters such as the standard entropy as well as the temperature coefficients of electronic and lattice contributions to the heat capacity. Additionally, differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) measurements were carried out to verify the phase transition temperatures of the studied lithium silicide phases. The results represent a significant contribution to the data basis for thermodynamic calculations (e.g. CALPHAD) and to the understanding of the phase equilibria in the (Li + Si) system, especially in the lithium rich region

  8. Calcium phosphate in catheter encrustation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, A J; Harries, J E; Hukins, D W; Kennedy, A P; Sutton, T M

    1987-02-01

    Encrusted catheters from nine female patients were the source of samples of deposits which were examined by X-ray diffraction, atomic absorption spectroscopy, infra-red spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. In eight samples the only crystalline phase which could be clearly distinguished by X-ray diffraction was ammonium magnesium orthophosphate hexahydrate, NH4MgPO4 X 6H2O, which occurs naturally as the mineral struvite. However, atomic absorption spectroscopy revealed an appreciable concentration of calcium in all samples. Calcium phosphates have previously been detected in catheter deposits. Infra-red and EXAFS spectra were consistent with the calcium phosphate being present as a poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite. Thus the deposits appear to consist of a mixture of crystalline struvite and a form of hydroxyapatite which is not fully crystalline. PMID:3030487

  9. The effect of variable calcium and very low calcium diets on human calcium metabolism. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, J.

    1971-01-01

    The effects of a very low calcium diet, with variable high and low protein intake, on the dynamics of calcium metabolism and the mechanism of calciuretics, are examined. The experiment, using male subjects, was designed to study the role of intestinal calcium absorption on urinary calcium excretion, and the rate of production of endogeneously secreted calcium in the gastrointestinal tract. The study showed an average of 70% fractional absorption rate during very low calcium intake, and that a decrease in renal tubular reabsorption of calcium is responsible for calciuretic effects of high protein intake. The study also indicates that there is a tendency to develop osteoporosis after long periods of low calcium intake, especially with a concurrent high protein intake.

  10. Tumoral calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A report of two patients in which a soft tissue mass, initially regarded as a malignant tumor, was shown to be the result of calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease. The first case, a woman aged 71 years, presented with a mass involving the right fifth finger. In the second case, also a women aged 71 years, the lesion involved the tissues adjacent to the right hip. Each lesion consisted of a mass of highly cellular tissue containing deposits of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals. The clinical, radiological, and pathological features of the two cases are compared with those of seven similar cases reported in the literature. (orig.)

  11. Complex formation ions calcium with macromolecules pectin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In clause the mechanism of sorption of ions of calcium by macromolecules of pectin is opened. Is shown, that the linkage of ions of calcium descends on acid bunches of pectin, and process carries cooperative character

  12. Mechanism of store-operated calcium entry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Devkanya Dutta

    2000-12-01

    Activation of receptors coupled to the phospholipase C/IP3 signalling pathway results in a rapid release of calcium from its intracellular stores, eventually leading to depletion of these stores. Calcium store depletion triggers an influx of extracellular calcium across the plasma membrane, a mechanism known as the store-operated calcium entry or capacitative calcium entry. Capacitative calcium current plays a key role in replenishing calcium stores and activating various physiological processes. Despite considerable efforts, very little is known about the molecular nature of the capacitative channel and the signalling pathway that activates it. This review summarizes our current knowledge about store operated calcium entry and suggests possible hypotheses for its mode of activation.

  13. Dairy Dilemma: Are You Getting Enough Calcium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dairy Dilemma Dairy Dilemma Are You Getting Enough Calcium? You may be avoiding dairy products because of ... But dairy products are a major source of calcium, vitamin D and other nutrients that are important ...

  14. Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can break easily, even without an obvious injury. Vitamin D helps your body absorb calcium. Eat foods that provide the right amounts of calcium, vitamin D, and protein. This kind of diet will give ...

  15. Calcium channel blockers and Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Tan; Yulin Deng; Hong Qing

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by two pathological hallmarks: amyloid plaques and neurofi-brillary tangles. In addition, calcium homeostasis is disrupted in the course of human aging. Recent research shows that dense plaques can cause functional alteration of calcium signals in mice with Alzheimer's disease. Calcium channel blockers are effective therapeutics for treating Alzheimer's disease. This review provides an overview of the current research of calcium channel blockers in-volved in Alzheimer's disease therapy.

  16. Calcium channel blockers and Alzheimer's disease★

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Yi; Deng, Yulin; Qing, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by two pathological hallmarks: amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. In addition, calcium homeostasis is disrupted in the course of human aging. Recent research shows that dense plaques can cause functional alteration of calcium signals in mice with Alzheimer's disease. Calcium channel blockers are effective therapeutics for treating Alzheimer's disease. This review provides an overview of the current research of calcium channel blockers involved in...

  17. Teaching Calcium-Induced Calcium Release in Cardiomyocytes Using a Classic Paper by Fabiato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Willmann

    2008-01-01

    This teaching paper utilizes the materials presented by Dr. Fabiato in his review article entitled "Calcium-induced release of calcium from the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum." In the review, supporting evidence of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is presented. Data concerning potential objections to the CICR theory are discussed as well. In…

  18. Electrophysical properties of calcium orthovanadate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electron conductivity, dielectric permeability and magnetic susceptibility of calcium orthovanadate are studied. It is shown that structural transformations bring about changes in the nature of electrophysical properties of Ca3(VO4)2 and cause the charge redistribution in VO43- anion groups

  19. High pressure synthesis and crystal structure of a ternary superconductor Ca2Al3Si4 containing layer structured calcium sub-network isomorphous with black phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Zintl compound CaAl2Si2 is peritectically decomposed to a mixture of Ca2Al3Si4 and aluminum metal at temperatures above 600 °C under a pressure of 5 GPa. The new ternary compound Ca2Al3Sl4 crystalizes with the space group Cmc21 and the lattice parameters a=5.8846(8), b=14.973(1), and c=7.7966(5) Å. The structure is composed of aluminum silicide framework [Al3Si4] and layer structured [Ca2] network interpenetrating with each other. The electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) shows the formation of solid solutions Ca2Al3−xSi4+x (x2] sub-network is isomorphous with black phosphorus. The new ternary compound shows superconductivity with a transition temperature (Tc) of 6.4 K. The band structure calculation suggests that the superconductivity should occur through the conduction bands mainly composed of 3p orbitals of the aluminum silicide framework. - Graphical abstract: A new ternary superconductor Ca2Al3Si4 has been prepared under high pressure and high temperature conditions, which includes layer structured calcium sub-network isomorphous with black phosphorus. Highlights: ► A typical Zintl compound CaAl2Si2 melts congruently at ambient pressure. ► Under high pressure CaAl2Si2 decomposes to Ca2Al3Si4 and Al at ∼600 °C. ► Ca2Al3Si4 contains Ca sub-network isomorphous with black phosphorus. ► Ca2Al3Si4 shows superconductivity with a transition temperature of 6.4 K.

  20. 21 CFR 582.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.1217 Section 582.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  1. 21 CFR 182.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium phosphate. 182.1217 Section 182.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  2. 21 CFR 582.5217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.5217 Section 582.5217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  3. 21 CFR 582.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 582.1191 Section 582.1191 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  4. 21 CFR 582.5191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 582.5191 Section 582.5191 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  5. 21 CFR 73.1070 - Calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 73.1070 Section 73.1070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1070 Calcium carbonate. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive calcium carbonate is a fine,...

  6. 21 CFR 582.1205 - Calcium hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium hydroxide. 582.1205 Section 582.1205 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1205 Calcium hydroxide. (a) Product. Calcium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  7. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2227 Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate....

  8. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  9. Calcium dynamics in vascular smooth muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Amberg, Gregory C.; Navedo, Manuel F.

    2013-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells are ultimately responsible for determining vascular luminal diameter and blood flow. Dynamic changes in intracellular calcium are a critical mechanism regulating vascular smooth muscle contractility. Processes influencing intracellular calcium are therefore important regulators of vascular function with physiological and pathophysiological consequences. In this review we discuss the major dynamic calcium signals identified and characterized in vascular smooth muscle cells....

  10. Lactulose stimulates calcium absorption in postmenopausal women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, E.G.H.M. van den; Muijs, T.; Dokkum, W. van; Schaafsma, G.

    1999-01-01

    Animal studies have indicated that calcium absorption is increased by lactulose, a synthetic disaccharide. Therefore, the influence of lactulose on calcium absorption was measured in postmenopausal women who may benefit from the possible enhancing effect of lactulose on calcium absorption. Twelve po

  11. Study of the phase composition of silicide coatings, based on layered Nb-Mo structures, obtained by vacuum-arc deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozovan, A. A.; Betsofen, S. Ya; Lenkovets, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    A multilayer composite ∼1000 μm in thickness, formed by niobium and molybdenum layers (number of layers n = 230), is obtained by vacuum-arc deposition with subsequent siliconization of the surface layers at a temperature of 1200 °C. Layer-by-layer phase analysis is performed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. It is found that in the surface layers ∼130 μm in thickness, single-phase silicides (Nb x Mo1- x )Si2 are formed with the hexagonal C40 structure (Strukturbericht designations). Alternating layers of solid solutions based on niobium and molybdenum with a body-centered cubic (BCC) lattice are observed within the composite. The formation of solid solutions caused by heating of the coating leads to convergence of the values of the linear thermal expansion coefficient and Young's modulus at the interface between the layers.

  12. Thermite reduction of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiO{sub 2} powder mixtures for combustion synthesis of Ta-based silicides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, C.L., E-mail: clyeh@fcu.edu.tw [Department of Aerospace and Systems Engineering, Feng Chia University, 100 Wenhwa Rd., Seatwen, Taichung 40724, Taiwan (China); Huang, Y.S. [Department of Aerospace and Systems Engineering, Feng Chia University, 100 Wenhwa Rd., Seatwen, Taichung 40724, Taiwan (China)

    2011-05-26

    Highlights: > Solid state combustion involving thermite reduction of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} and SiO{sub 2} was firstly performed for the formation of tantalum silicides, including TaSi{sub 2}, Ta{sub 5}Si{sub 3}, Ta{sub 2}Si, and Ta{sub 3}Si. > Two thermite mixtures, Al-Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} and Al-Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}-SiO{sub 2}, were adopted and their influence on the combustion characteristics and phase constituents of the final products was studied. > A high degree of phase evolution forming Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-added TaSi{sub 2} and Ta{sub 5}Si{sub 3} was achieved by adopting the thermite mixture of Al-Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} in the Ta-Si combustion system. > Variations of the combustion temperature and flame-front velocity with sample stoichiometry were presented. - Abstract: Tantalum silicides (including TaSi{sub 2}, Ta{sub 5}Si{sub 3}, Ta{sub 2}Si, and Ta{sub 3}Si) were prepared by solid state combustion of the Ta-Si reaction system involving thermite reduction of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} and SiO{sub 2}. The thermite-based combustion is self-sustaining and contributes to the in situ formation of tantalum silicides along with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The combustion front temperature and propagation velocity increased with the extent of thermite reactions for the systems adopting the thermite mixture of Al-Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}, while both of them decreased for those using Al, Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and SiO{sub 2} as the thermite reagents. Among four silicide compounds, a better degree of phase evolution was observed for TaSi{sub 2} and Ta{sub 5}Si{sub 3} when compared to that of Ta{sub 2}Si and Ta{sub 3}Si. The XRD analysis indicated the presence of a small amount of Ta{sub 5}Si{sub 3} in the TaSi{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite. On the formation of Ta{sub 5}Si{sub 3} with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, the minor phase was Ta{sub 2}Si for the Al-Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}-containing system. In addition to Ta{sub 2}Si, an intermediate phase TaSi{sub 2} was detected when the Al-Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}-SiO{sub 2} mixture was

  13. Production of heat-resistant metal-ceramic coatings on the basis of titanium silicide and nitride by thermoreactive electrospark surface strengthening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coatings on the basis of Ti5Si3 titanium silicide have been produced using the Thermoreactive Electrospark Surface Strengthening (TRESS) method. Their formation took place by applying a charge exothermic layer of specified composition (Ti-Si, Ti-Si3N4) onto a substrate and the subsequent chemical conversion in it that is maintained by energy of pulsed discharges. A series of investigations of structure, composition and properties (microhardness, thickness, integrity, and wear-resistance) of TRESS-coatings on OT4-1 titanium alloy was carried out. A dependence of depth of chemical conversion in charge layers on energy processing mode was found. It was established that the coatings produced during optimal processing mode (E = 0,3 J) facilitate an increase in microhardness, wear-resistance and heat-resistance of OT4-1 alloy

  14. Safety evaluation report related to the evaluation of low-enriched uranium silicide-aluminum dispersion fuel for use in non-power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-enriched uranium silicide-aluminum dispersion plate-type fuels have been extensively researched and developed under the international program, Reduced Enrichment in Research and Test Reactors. The international effort was led by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in the United States. This evaluation is based primarily on reports issued by ANL that discuss and summarize the developmental tests and experiments, including postirradiation examinations, of both miniature and full-sized plates of prototypical fuel compositions. This evaluation concludes that plate-type fuels suitable and acceptable for use in research and test reactors can be fabricated with U3Si2-Al dispersion compacts with uranium densities up to 4.8 g/cm3. 4 refs., 1 fig

  15. Assessment of processing routes and strength of a 3-phase molybdenum boron silicide (Mo5Si3-Mo5SiB2-Mo3Si)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High temperature components such as furnace elements are often fabricated from MoSi2. Molybdenum boron silicides consisting of Mo5Si3, Mo3Si, and Mo5SiB2 are an interesting alternative to MoSi2. At present, the mechanical properties of these new Mo-Si-B intermetallics have not been fully explored. One reason for this is simply the unavailability of sufficiently large parts with a sound microstructure. The goal of this work was therefore to explore the processing of these materials by several different routes such as powder and ingot metallurgy, and examine the resulting microstructures. In addition, some post-processing (hot isostatic forging, extrusion) was carried out. The flexure strength of the differently processed materials was characterized and interpreted in terms of their microstructures

  16. BASIC program to compute uranium density and void volume fraction in laboratory-scale uranium silicide aluminum dispersion plate-type fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BASIC program simple and easy to operate has been developed to compute uranium density and void volume fraction for laboratory-scale uranium silicide aluminum dispersion plate-type fuel, so called miniplate. An example of the result of calculation is given in order to demonstrate how the calculated void fraction correlates with the microstructural distribution of the void in a miniplate prepared in our laboratory. The program is also able to constitute data base on important parameters for miniplates from experimentally-determined values of density, weight of each constituent and dimensions of miniplates. Utility programs pertinent to the development of the BASIC program are also given which run in the popular MS-DOS environment. All the source lists are attached and brief description for each program is made. (author)

  17. Safety evaluation report related to the evaluation of low-enriched uranium silicide-aluminum dispersion fuel for use in non-power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    Low-enriched uranium silicide-aluminum dispersion plate-type fuels have been extensively researched and developed under the international program, Reduced Enrichment in Research and Test Reactors. The international effort was led by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in the United States. This evaluation is based primarily on reports issued by ANL that discuss and summarize the developmental tests and experiments, including postirradiation examinations, of both miniature and full-sized plates of prototypical fuel compositions. This evaluation concludes that plate-type fuels suitable and acceptable for use in research and test reactors can be fabricated with U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al dispersion compacts with uranium densities up to 4.8 g/cm/sup 3/. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Structural chemistry and magnetic behaviour of the ternary silicides UCuxSi2-x (0.28≤x≤0.96)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ternary silicides UCuxSi2-x with 0.28≤x≤0.96 have been prepared and investigated by X-ray powder diffraction, electron diffraction, electrical resistivity and magnetization measurements. A structural change occurs with the sequence α-ThSi2 (tetragonal)→AlB2 (hexagonal)→Ni2In (hexagonal) as x increases, respectively, for x≅0.5 and x>0.84. The existence of Ni2In-type, evidenced by transmission electron microscopy, is explained by a crystallographic order between copper and silicon atoms. This system exhibits an interesting magnetic phase diagram: (i) for xN around 43-40 K. (orig.)

  19. Sodium/Calcium Exchangers Selectively Regulate Calcium Signaling in Mouse Taste Receptor Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Szebenyi, Steven A.; Laskowski, Agnieszka I.; Medler, Kathryn F.

    2010-01-01

    Taste cells use multiple signaling mechanisms to generate appropriate cellular responses to discrete taste stimuli. Some taste stimuli activate G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that cause calcium release from intracellular stores while other stimuli depolarize taste cells to cause calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). While the signaling mechanisms that initiate calcium signals have been described in taste cells, the calcium clearance mechanisms (CCMs) that contrib...

  20. Calcium electroporation in three cell lines; a comparison of bleomycin and calcium, calcium compounds, and pulsing conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gissel, Hanne; Hojman, Pernille;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Electroporation with calcium (calcium electroporation) can induce ATP depletion-associated cellular death. In the clinical setting, the cytotoxic drug bleomycin is currently used with electroporation (electrochemotherapy) for palliative treatment of tumors. Calcium electroporation...... offers several advantages over standard treatment options: calcium is inexpensive and may readily be applied without special precautions, as is the case with cytostatic drugs. Therefore, details on the use of calcium electroporation are essential for carrying out clinical trials comparing calcium...... electroporation and electrochemotherapy. METHODS: The effects of calcium electroporation and bleomycin electroporation (alone or in combination) were compared in three different cell lines (DC-3F, transformed Chinese hamster lung fibroblast; K-562, human leukemia; and murine Lewis Lung Carcinoma). Furthermore...

  1. Effect of anions or foods on absolute bioavailability of calcium from calcium salts in mice by pharmacokinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Zenei Taira, Zenei

    2013-01-01

    Yukari Ueda, Zenei TairaFaculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokushima Bunri University, Tokushima, JapanAbstract: We studied the absolute bioavailability of calcium from calcium L-lactate in mice using pharmacokinetics, and reviewed the absolute bioavailability of calcium from three other calcium salts in mice previously studied: calcium chloride, calcium acetate, and calcium ascorbate. The results showed that calcium metabolism is linear between intravenous administration of 15 mg/kg and 30 ...

  2. Silicides for VLSI applications

    CERN Document Server

    Murarka, Shyam P

    1983-01-01

    Most of the subject matter of this book has previously been available only in the form of research papers and review articles. I have not attempted to refer to all the published papers. The reader may find it advantageous to refer to the references listed.

  3. Calcium signals and calcium channels in osteoblastic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, R. L.; Akanbi, K. A.; Farach-Carson, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) channels are present in non-excitable as well as in excitable cells. In bone cells of the osteoblast lineage, Ca2+ channels play fundamental roles in cellular responses to external stimuli including both mechanical forces and hormonal signals. They are also proposed to modulate paracrine signaling between bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts at local sites of bone remodeling. Calcium signals are characterized by transient increases in intracellular Ca2+ levels that are associated with activation of intracellular signaling pathways that control cell behavior and phenotype, including patterns of gene expression. Development of Ca2+ signals is a tightly regulated cellular process that involves the concerted actions of plasma membrane and intracellular Ca2+ channels, along with Ca2+ pumps and exchangers. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge concerning the structure, function, and role of Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ signals in bone cells, focusing on the osteoblast.

  4. Computational study of a calcium release-activated calcium channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Keka; Shantappa, Anil

    2016-05-01

    The naturally occurring proteins that form hole in membrane are commonly known as ion channels. They play multiple roles in many important biological processes. Deletion or alteration of these channels often leads to serious problems in the physiological processes as it controls the flow of ions through it. The proper maintenance of the flow of ions, in turn, is required for normal health. Here we have investigated the behavior of a calcium release-activated calcium ion channel with pdb entry 4HKR in Drosophila Melanogaster. The equilibrium energy as well as molecular dynamics simulation is performed first. The protein is subjected to molecular dynamics simulation to find their energy minimized value. Simulation of the protein in the environment of water and ions has given us important results too. The solvation energy is also found using Charmm potential.

  5. Substitution of calcium by strontium within selected calcium phosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokita, E.; Hermes, C.; Nolting, H.-F.; Ryczek, J.

    1993-06-01

    Sr incorporation in the molecules of amorphous calcium phosphate, apatitic tricalcium phosphate, hydroxyapatite, octacalcium phosphate and dicalcium phosphate dihydrate was investigated. The concentration of Sr ranged from 225 to 1010 μ g / g, i.e. it overlapped with the physiological range of Sr concentrations in human bone. The leading experimental technique was extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) at the Sr K edge. Results of these studies demonstrated the following: (1) Sr incorporation in the calcium phosphates is compound-dependent, (2) the coordination of incorporated Sr atoms in the Ca-P molecules is similar to that of Ca atoms, but interatomic distances are ≈0.015 nm larger, (3) in apatitic tricalcium phosphate, hydroxyapatite and octacalcium phosphate lattices Sr atoms may occupy selected Ca sites, which was not the case for dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, (4) in the apatite lattice Sr atoms are coordinated by 6 PO 4 tetrahedrals and (5) EXAFS spectra at the K edge of the incorporated Sr may be used to distinguish the structures of amorphous calcium phosphate, dicalcium phosphate dihydrate as well as apatite and its derivatives (apatitic tricalcium phosphate, octacalcium phosphate).

  6. USING CALCIUM CARBONATE WHISKERS AS PAPERMAKING FILLER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu Chen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Whiskers, having large length/diameter ratio, are fiber-shaped single crystals. The technical possibility of using calcium carbonate whiskers as papermaking filler to replace conventional powder-like calcium carbonate was investigated. The results showed that it may be feasible to use calcium carbonate whisker as papermaking filler. Compared with conventional precipitated calcium carbonate, calcium carbonate whisker had higher retention efficiency. The use of calcium carbonate whisker also favorably affected the strength properties of paper sheets. A model was proposed to suggest the mechanism for paper strength improvement. The whiskers filled in paper sheets could increase the friction between fibers, thus increasing bonding strength. Moreover, the strength properties of paper were further improved because calcium carbonate whiskers were partly embedded in pulp fiber walls.

  7. CALCIUM ENHANCES ANTIINFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF ASPIRIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choksi Krishna

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of present study is to evaluate the effects of calcium carbonate and calcium gluconate on acute and subacute inflammation and to study their possible interactions with Aspirin. Calcium carbonate (10 mg/kg and calcium gluconate (5 mg/kg were administered individually and also co-administered along with sub therapeutic dose Aspirin (50mg/kg to study their interaction. The inflammation was induced by carrageenan or a foreign body. Both calcium carbonate and calcium gluconate could not show significant anti-inflammatory activity on their own in acute as well as subacute inflammation models. Aspirin at sub-anti-inflammatory dose (50mg/Kg when co-administered along with calcium salts produced the significant anti-inflammatory response which was comparable to anti-inflammatory response of aspirin at therapeutic dose (200mg/Kg. Also co-adminostration minimized the gastro-toxicity of aspirin.

  8. [Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koitschev, C; Kaiserling, E; Koitschev, A

    2003-08-01

    Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPPD) of the temporomandibular joint is rare. The disorder is characterized by the presence of crystal deposits within the affected joint. The deposition of crystals in adjacent soft tissue may lead to the formation of pseudotumors. This form of the disease is called tophaceous pseudogout and typically affects the temporomandibular joint. It is difficult to differentiate the disease, particularly from malignant tumors, on the clinical and radiographic findings alone. The diagnosis is based on histological identification of the calcium pyrophosphate crystals. We present an unusually advanced case of tophaceous pseudogout of the temporomandibular joint. The etiology, clinical and diagnostic criteria as well as treatment options are discussed on the basis of our own experience and a review of the literature. PMID:12942180

  9. Testosterone increases urinary calcium excretion and inhibits expression of renal calcium transport proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hsu, Yu-Juei; Dimke, Henrik Anthony; Schoeber, Joost P H;

    2010-01-01

    Although gender differences in the renal handling of calcium have been reported, the overall contribution of androgens to these differences remains uncertain. We determined here whether testosterone affects active renal calcium reabsorption by regulating calcium transport proteins. Male mice had...... higher urinary calcium excretion than female mice and their renal calcium transporters were expressed at a lower level. We also found that orchidectomized mice excreted less calcium in their urine than sham-operated control mice and that the hypocalciuria was normalized after testosterone replacement...... calcium transport. Thus, our study shows that gender differences in renal calcium handling are, in part, mediated by the inhibitory actions of androgens on TRPV5-mediated active renal calcium transport....

  10. Influence of calcium oxalate crystal accumulation on the calcium content of seeds from Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Paul A

    2012-04-01

    Crystals of calcium oxalate often form in cells adjacent to the vascular bundles in the tissues along the xylem stream. This spatial crystal pattern suggests a role for calcium oxalate formation in regulating calcium transport and partitioning to edible organs such as seeds. To investigate this potential role, microscopic and biochemical comparisons were conducted on the different tissues of Medicago truncatula wild-type and the calcium oxalate defective (cod) 5 which lacks the ability to accumulate prismatic crystals in the cells adjacent to the vascular bundles. Calcium measurements showed that cod5 seeds had more calcium and cod5 pods contained less calcium than the corresponding wild-type tissues. Roots, stems, and leaves from cod5 and wild-type had similar calcium content. Although cod5 was devoid of prismatic crystals, cod5 pods were observed to form druse crystals of calcium oxalate not found in wild-type pods. Taken together these findings suggest a functional role for calcium oxalate formation in regulating calcium transport to the seeds. Regulating calcium uptake at the roots also appeared to be another point of control in determining seed calcium content. Overall, regulating the long distance transport and partitioning of calcium to the seeds appears to be a complex process with multiple points of control. PMID:22325887

  11. Serum calcium in pulmonary tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Subhash C. Sharma

    1981-01-01

    Serum calcium was studied serially in 94 patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. An equal number of age- and sex-matched patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were controls. Seventy patients in the study group were normocalcaemic and 10 were hypercalcaemic. These 10 were on a higher supplement of vitamin D than the 70 normocalcaemic patients. There was a positive correlation between the daily vitamin intake and the degree and duration of hypercalcaemia. None of the controls...

  12. Drying dichloromethane over calcium hydride

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Lucas Kinard, Kurtis Kasper & Antonios Mikos ### Abstract This protocol describes the drying of dichloromethane by a simple 10 step procedure. One can implement this protocol using common lab glass and lab equipment. First, dichloromethane is refluxed with calcium hydride to remove water. Then, dichloromethane is distilled to separate it from the byproducts of the reflux reaction. This procedure can be implemented in 1 day. ### Introduction In many instances i...

  13. CCN3 and calcium signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chang Long

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The CCN family of genes consists presently of six members in human (CCN1-6 also known as Cyr61 (Cystein rich 61, CTGF (Connective Tissue Growth Factor, NOV (Nephroblastoma Overexpressed gene, WISP-1, 2 and 3 (Wnt-1 Induced Secreted Proteins. Results obtained over the past decade have indicated that CCN proteins are matricellular proteins, which are involved in the regulation of various cellular functions, such as proliferation, differentiation, survival, adhesion and migration. The CCN proteins have recently emerged as regulatory factors involved in both internal and external cell signaling. CCN3 was reported to physically interact with fibulin-1C, integrins, Notch and S100A4. Considering that, the conformation and biological activity of these proteins are dependent upon calcium binding, we hypothesized that CCN3 might be involved in signaling pathways mediated by calcium ions. In this article, we review the data showing that CCN3 regulates the levels of intracellular calcium and discuss potential models that may account for the biological effects of CCN3.

  14. The role of calcium in human aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beto, Judith A

    2015-01-01

    Calcium is an essential nutrient that is necessary for many functions in human health. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body with 99% found in teeth and bone. Only 1% is found in serum. The serum calcium level is tightly monitored to remain within normal range by a complex metabolic process. Calcium metabolism involves other nutrients including protein, vitamin D, and phosphorus. Bone formation and maintenance is a lifelong process. Early attention to strong bones in childhood and adulthood will provide more stable bone mass during the aging years. Research has shown that adequate calcium intake can reduce the risk of fractures, osteoporosis, and diabetes in some populations. The dietary requirements of calcium and other collaborative nutrients vary slightly around the world. Lactose intolerance due to lactase deficiency is a common cause of low calcium intake. Strategies will be discussed for addressing this potential barrier to adequate intake. The purpose of this narrative review is a) to examine the role of calcium in human health, b) to compare nutrient requirements for calcium across lifecycle groups and global populations, c) to review relationships between calcium intake, chronic disease risk, and fractures, and d) to discuss strategies to address diet deficiencies and lactose intolerance. PMID:25713787

  15. Rapid screening assay for calcium bioavailability studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium bioavailability has been studied by numerous techniques. The authors report here the use of the gamma emitting isotope of calcium (47Ca) in a whole body retention assay system. In this system, calcium sources are administered by oral gavage and subsequent counts are determined and corrected for isotopic decay. Unlike iron and zinc retention curves, which exhibit a 2-3 day equilibration period, calcium reaches equilibration after 24 hours. Autoradiographic analysis of the femurs indicate that the newly absorbed calcium is rapidly distributed to the skeletal system. Moreover, the isotope is distributed along the entire bone. Comparisons of calcium bioavailability were made using intrinsic/extrinsic labeled milk from two species i.e. rat and goat as well as CaCO3. In addition, extrinsic labeled cow milk was examined. In the rat, the extrinsic labeled calcium from milk was better absorbed than the intrinsic calcium. This was not the case in goat milk or the calcium carbonate which exhibited no significant differences. Chromatographic analysis of the labeled milk indicates a difference in distribution of the 47Ca. From these data, the authors recommend the use of this assay system in calcium bioavailability studies. The labeling studies and comparisons indicate caution should be used, however, in labeling techniques and species milk comparison

  16. STIM1 is a Calcium Sensor Specialized for Digital Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Bird, Gary S.; Hwang, Sung-Yong; Smyth, Jeremy T.; Fukushima, Miwako; Boyles, Rebecca R.; Putney, James W.

    2009-01-01

    When cells are activated by calcium-mobilizing agonists at low, physiological concentrations, the resulting calcium signals generally take the form of repetitive regenerative discharges of stored calcium, termed calcium oscillations [1]. These intracellular calcium oscillations have long fascinated biologists as representing a mode of digitized intracellular signaling. Recent work has highlighted the role of calcium influx as an essential component of calcium oscillations [2]. This influx occ...

  17. Fortification of all-purpose wheat-flour tortillas with calcium lactate, calcium carbonate, or calcium citrate is acceptable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanchik-Cerpovicz, Joelle E; McKemie, Rebecca J

    2007-03-01

    Fortification helps provide adequate nutrients for individuals not meeting daily needs. Foods may be fortified with calcium to assist individuals with lactose intolerance and others preferring not to consume traditional forms of dairy. This study examined the quality of all-purpose wheat-flour tortillas fortified with calcium lactate, calcium carbonate, or calcium citrate. These tortillas were compared to similarly prepared nonfortified flour tortillas (control) and commercial nonfortified flour tortillas. Calcium-fortified tortillas contained 114 mg elemental calcium per standard serving (48 g tortilla), an 8.6-fold increase compared to nonfortified tortillas. Moisture contents and rollabilities of all tortillas were similar. Consumers (N=87) evaluated each tortilla in duplicate using a hedonic scale and reported liking the appearance, texture, flavor, aftertaste, and overall acceptability of all tortillas. However, the appearance of control tortillas was preferred over commercial tortillas (Ptortillas or those fortified with calcium carbonate was preferred over the control (Ptortillas, suggesting that appearance and aftertaste may not influence willingness to purchase. Overall, this study shows that fortification of flour tortillas with various forms of calcium is a feasible alternative calcium source. PMID:17324671

  18. Binding of calcium and carbonate to polyacrylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribello, Gareth A; Liew, CheeChin; Parrinello, Michele

    2009-05-21

    Polyacrylate molecules can be used to slow the growth of calcium carbonate. However, little is known about the mechanism by which the molecules impede the growth rate. A recent computational study (Bulo et al. Macromolecules 2007, 40, 3437) used metadynamics to investigate the binding of calcium to polyacrylate chains and has thrown some light on the coiling and precipitation of these polymers. We extend these simulations to examine the binding of calcium and carbonate to polyacrylate chains. We show that calcium complexed with both carbonate and polyacrylate is a very stable species. The free energies of calcium-carbonate-polyacrylate complexes, with different polymer configurations, are calculated, and differences in the free energy of the binding of carbonate are shown to be due to differences in the amount of steric hindrance about the calcium, which prevents the approach of the carbonate ion. PMID:19400592

  19. Biphasic calcium phosphate in periapical surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Suneelkumar, Chinni; Datta, Krithika; Manali R Srinivasan; Kumar, Sampath T

    2008-01-01

    Calcium phosphate ceramics like hydroxyapatite and β -tricalcium phosphate (β -TCP) possess mineral composition that closely resembles that of the bone. They can be good bone substitutes due to their excellent biocompatibility. Biphasic calcium phosphate is a bone substitute which is a mixture of hydroxyapatite and β -tricalcium phosphate in fixed ratios. Studies have demonstrated the osteoconductive potential of this composition. This paper highlights the clinical use of biphasic calcium pho...

  20. Gravity, Calcium, And Bone: Update, 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Morey-Holton, Emily

    1992-01-01

    Report reviews short-term flight and ground-based experiments on effects of 1 g and 0 g on skeletal adaptation, calcium metabolism, and growth processes. Results indicate two principal components of calcium metabolism-calcium endocrine system and bone - respond within days to changes in orientation of body in gravitation and to weightlessness. Effects of spaceflight or bed rest on biomechanics of bones more severe than on total body bone mass.

  1. Gravity, calcium, and bone - Update, 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Morey-Holton, Emily

    1990-01-01

    Recent results obtained on skeletal adaptation, calcium metabolism, and bone browth during short-term flights and ground simulated-microgravity experiments are presented. Results demonstrate that two principal components of calcium metabolism respond within days to changes in body position and to weightlessness: the calcium endocrine system and bone characteristics. Furthermore, results of recent studies imply that bone biomechanics are more severely affected by spaceflight exposures than is the bone mass.

  2. Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia and calcium sensing receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mrgan, Monija; Nielsen, Sanne; Brixen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) is a lifelong, benign autosomal dominant disease characterized by hypercalcemia, normal to increased parathyroid hormone level, and a relatively low renal calcium excretion. Inactivation of the calcium-sensing receptor in heterozygous patients results in...... FHH, while in homozygous patients as well as in compound heterozygous or dominant negative heterozygous patients, it may result in neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism (NSHPT). Parathyroid surgery is not indicated in FHH and does not lower plasma calcium unless total parathyroidectomy is performed, in...

  3. Overbased Calcium sulfonate Detergent Technology Overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Qing-gao; MUIR Ronald J.

    2009-01-01

    Overbased calcium sulfonate is used widely as detergent in automotive and marine lubricants, as well as various industrial oil applications. In this paper, the process to produce overbased calcium sulfonate is overviewed. The sulfonate structure and molecular weight and its molecular weight distribution, the enclosed calcium carbonate nanoparticle size and crystalline structure, properties of the carrier oil, all influence its properties, such as stability, viscosity, and detergency of the system.

  4. Calcium hydroxide isotope effect in calcium isotope enrichment by ion exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jepson, B.E.; Shockey, G.C.

    1984-01-01

    The enrichment of calcium isotopes has been observed in ion-exchange chromatography with an aqueous phase of calcium hydroxide and a solid phase of sulfonic acid resin. The band front was exceedingly sharp as a result of the acid-base reaction occuring at the front of the band. Single-stage separation coefficients were found to be epsilon(/sup 44/Ca//sup 40/Ca) = 11 x 10 /sup -4/ and epsilon(/sup 48/Ca//sup 40/Ca) = 18 x 10/sup -4/. The maximum column separation factors achieved were 1.05 for calcium-44 and 1.09 for calcium-48 with the heavy isotopes enriching in the fluid phase. The calcium isotope effect between fully hydrated aqueous calcium ions and undissociated aqueous calcium hydroxide was estimated. For the calcium-44/40 isotope pair the separation coefficient was 13 x 10/sup -4/. 20 references, 2 figures.

  5. Calcium carboorthovanadate - a new compound with the apa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on calcium carboorthovanadate, Ca10(VO4)6CO3, a new compound with an appatite structure based on calcium orthovanadate, are reported. The synthesis has been conducted in a stoichiometric mixture of finely ground calcium carbonate and calcium orthovanadate. It is found that calcium carboorthovanadate belongs to the hexagonal syngony and has an apatite structure. An analysis of the infrared spectra of initial compounds and calcium carboorthovanadate confirmed the presence of carbonate (CO3)2- and orthovanadate (VO4)3 groupings in the latter. On heating in air, beginning with 450 deg C calcium carboorthovanadate decomposes at a slow rate into calcium oxide, calcium orthovanadate, and carbon dioxide

  6. Calcium supplements: do they help or harm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, Joann E; Bassuk, Shari S

    2014-01-01

    Current recommendations for calcium intake call for 1,000 mg per day for women ages 19-50 and 1,200 mg per day for women over age 50 to ensure bone health. Given recent concerns that calcium supplements may raise risk for cardiovascular disease and kidney stones, women should aim to meet this recommendation primarily by eating a calcium-rich diet and taking calcium supplements only if needed to reach the RDA goal (often only approximately 500 mg per day in supplements is required). PMID:23880796

  7. Presynaptic calcium signalling in cerebellar mossy fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Jörntell, Henrik; Midtgaard, Jens

    2010-01-01

    appeared to be isolated from one another in terms of calcium signalling. CGP55845 application showed that GABA B receptors mediated presynaptic inhibition of the calcium signal over the entire firing frequency range of mossy fibres. A paired-pulse depression of the calcium signal lasting more than 1 s...... affected burst firing in mossy fibres; this paired-pulse depression was reduced by GABA B antagonists. While our results indicated that a presynaptic rosette electrophysiologically functioned as a unit, topical GABA application showed that calcium signals in the branches of complex rosettes could be...

  8. Peroxisome is a reservoir of intracellular calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raychaudhury, Bikramjit; Gupta, Shreedhara; Banerjee, Shouvik; Datta, Salil C

    2006-07-01

    We have examined fura 2-loaded purified peroxisomes under confocal microscope to prove that this mammalian organelle is a store of intracellular calcium pool. Presence of calcium channel and vanadate sensitive Ca(2+)-ATPase in the purified peroxisomal membrane has been demonstrated. We have further observed that machineries to maintain calcium pool in this mammalian organelle are impaired during infection caused by Leishmania donovani. Results reveal that peroxisomes have a merit to play a significant role in the metabolism of intracellular calcium. PMID:16713100

  9. How calcium makes endocytic receptors attractive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian B F; Moestrup, Søren K

    2014-01-01

    receptor. Endosomal acidification and calcium efflux lead to the essential ligand-receptor affinity switch and separation. Recent data, including crystal structures of receptor-ligand complexes, now reveal how calcium, in different types of domain scaffolds, functions in a common way as a removable...... 'lynchpin' that stabilizes favorable positioning of ligand-attractive receptor residues. In addition to explaining how calcium depletion can cause ligand-receptor dissociation, the new data add further insight into how acidification contributes to dissociation through structural changes that affect the...... receptor calcium sites....

  10. Calcium wave of Brain Astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell Bell, A. H.

    1997-03-01

    Time lapse confocal scanning laser microscopy was used to study hippocampal astrocyte cultures loaded with a calcium indicator, Fluo3-AM (4 uM). kThe neurotransmitter kainate (100uM) overwhelms the Na+-buffering capacity of astrocytes within 100 sec resulting in reversal of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. This results in a subcellular site where Ca2+ entering the cytoplasm contributes to a long-distance Ca2+ wave which travels at 20 um/sec without decrement. Image analysis has shown calcium waves not only at a high Kainate dose, but also at a low Kainate dose, e.g. 10uM. These are, however, shortlived and burried in an extremely noisy background and only detectable by analyzing the calcium waves images for spatio-temporal coherence. As the kainate dose increases, more large scale coherent structures with visible geometric features (spiral waves and target waves) can be observed. Multiple spiral waves are produced when the Kainate dose increases to 100 uM. These waves travel at a constant velocity across entire microscope fields for long time periods (>30 mins). Na+ channels have no effect on the Kainate wave. Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels are not involved and Ca2+ enters through reversal of the exchanger. Ca2+ release from stores does not contribute to the kainate wave. Removal of Na+ or Ca2+ from outside and the specific Na+/Ca2+ exchange inhibitor benzamil (10 uM) inhibit the kainate wave. A functional antibody to alpha6-Integrin which is localized to membrane regions between cells inhibits the spread of the kainate wave in a dose and time-dependent manner. Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleach (FRAP) techniques indicate that gap junctions remain open between cells. This would imply that Ca2+ or IP3 need not pass through the gap junction, but reversal of the exchanger would propel the Ca2+ wave at the cell surface.

  11. Calcium and magnesium silicate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deep geological disposals are planed to discard long-lived intermediate-level and high-level radioactive wastes. Clay-based geological barriers are expected to limit the ingress of groundwater and to reduce the mobility of radioelements. In the interaction zone between the cement and the clay based material alteration can occur. Magnesium silicate hydrates (M-S-H) have been observed due to the reaction of magnesium sulfate containing groundwater with cements or in the interaction zone between low-pH type cement and clays. M-S-H samples synthesized in the laboratory showed that M-S-H has a variable composition within 0.7 ≤ Mg/Si ≤ 1.5. TEM/EDS analyses show an homogeneous gel with no defined structure. IR and 29Si NMR data reveal a higher polymerization degree of the silica network in M-S-H compared to calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H). The presence of mainly Q3 silicate tetrahedrons in M-S-H indicates a sheet like or a triple-chain silica structure while C-S-H is characterised by single chain-structure. The clear difference in the silica structure and the larger ionic radius of Ca2+ (1.1 Angstrom) compared to Mg2+ (0.8 Angstrom) make the formation of an extended solid solution between M-S-H and C-S-H gel improbable. In fact, the analyses of synthetic samples containing both magnesium and calcium in various ratios indicate the formation of separate M-S-H and C-S-H gels with no or very little uptake of magnesium in CS-H or calcium in M-S-H

  12. Calcium Absorption from Fortified Ice Cream Formulations Compared with Calcium Absorption from Milk

    OpenAIRE

    van der Hee, Regine M.; Miret, Silvia; Slettenaar, Marieke; Duchateau, Guus S.M.J.E.; Rietveld, Anton G.; Wilkinson, Joy E.; Quail, Patricia J.; Berry, Mark J.; Dainty, Jack R.; Teucher, Birgit; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2009-01-01

    Objective Optimal bone mass in early adulthood is achieved through appropriate diet and lifestyle, thereby protecting against osteoporosis and risk of bone fracture in later life. Calcium and vitamin D are essential to build adequate bones, but calcium intakes of many population groups do not meet dietary reference values. In addition, changes in dietary patterns are exacerbating the problem, thereby emphasizing the important role of calcium-rich food products. We have designed a calcium-fort...

  13. Association of Urinary Calcium Excretion with Serum Calcium and Vitamin D Levels

    OpenAIRE

    A Rathod; Bonny, O; Guessous, I; Suter, P M; Conen, D; Erne, P; Binet, I; Gabutti, L; Gallino, A; Muggli, F; Hayoz, D; Pechere-Bertschi, A; Paccaud, F.; Burnier, M.; Bochud, M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Population-based data on urinary calcium excretion are scarce. The association of serum calcium and circulating levels of vitamin D [25(OH)D2 or D3] with urinary calcium excretion in men and women from a population-based study was explored. DESIGN, SETTINGS, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: Multivariable linear regression was used to explore factors associated with square root-transformed 24-hour urinary calcium excretion (milligrams per 24 hours) taken as the dep...

  14. Drosophila mushroom body Kenyon cells generate spontaneous calcium transients mediated by PLTX-sensitive calcium channels.

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Shaojuan Amy; Campusano, Jorge M.; Su, Hailing; O'Dowd, Diane K.

    2005-01-01

    Spontaneous calcium oscillations in mushroom bodies of late stage pupal and adult Drosophila brains have been implicated in memory consolidation during olfactory associative learning. This study explores the cellular mechanisms regulating calcium dynamics in Kenyon cells, principal neurons in mushroom bodies. Fura-2 imaging shows that Kenyon cells cultured from late stage Drosophila pupae generate spontaneous calcium transients in a cell autonomous fashion, at a frequency similar to calcium o...

  15. The Electronic Structure of Calcium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jan, J.-P.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1981-01-01

    The electronic structure of calcium under pressure is re-examined by means of self-consistent energy band calculations based on the local density approximation and using the linear muffin-tin orbitals (LMTO) method with corrections to the atomic sphere approximation included. At zero pressure.......149 Ryd, respectively, relative to the s band, give the best possible agreement. Under increasing pressure the s and p electrons are found to transfer into the d band, and Ca undergoes metal-semimetal-metal electronic transitions. Calculations of the bandstructure and the electronic pressure, including...

  16. Physicochemical investigation of calcium bromtechnetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium hexabromotechnetate is extracted for the first time and its composition corresponding to the CaTcBr6 formula is determined. Using the thermal analysis method the anhydrous salt stability boundaries are found. The X-ray phase analysis has shown the compound to be isostructural with (NH4)2TcI6 and has a rhombic b.c.c. crystal lattice with the following parameters: a=10.39+-0.01, b=7.34+-0.01 and c=7.45+-0.001A. At 380-420 deg C CaTcBr6 decomposes to Tc, CaBr2 and Br

  17. Calcium Imaging Perspectives in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chidananda Nagamangala Kanchiswamy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The calcium ion (Ca2+ is a versatile intracellular messenger. It provides dynamic regulation of a vast array of gene transcriptions, protein kinases, transcription factors and other complex downstream signaling cascades. For the past six decades, intracellular Ca2+ concentration has been significantly studied and still many studies are under way. Our understanding of Ca2+ signaling and the corresponding physiological phenomenon is growing exponentially. Here we focus on the improvements made in the development of probes used for Ca2+ imaging and expanding the application of Ca2+ imaging in plant science research.

  18. Barium calcium hydroxyapatite solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The replacement of calcium by barium in the hydroxyapatite structure by solid-state reaction at different temperatures and by precipitation from an aqueous system has been investigated by X-ray diffraction and i.r. absorption analyses. The products obtained by solid-state reaction at 1200 deg C are solid solutions over the range of barium concentration 60 to 100 atom %. The lattice dimensions and the i.r. frequencies of the solid solutions vary linearly with the atom % of barium. Only small amounts of barium can be incorporated in hydroxyapatite by precipitation from the aqueous system. (author)

  19. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for lunch; and beans, salsa, taco sauce, and cheese for dinner. Create mini-pizzas by topping whole-wheat English muffins or bagels with pizza sauce and low-fat mozzarella or soy cheese. Try whole-grain crackers with low-fat cheese ...

  20. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eliminates in urine, feces, and sweat. These include consumption of alcohol- and caffeine-containing beverages as well as intake ... and older 2,000 mg Pregnant and breastfeeding teens 3,000 mg Pregnant and breastfeeding adults 2, ...

  1. Calcium and Vitamin D: Important at Every Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... supported by your browser. Home Bone Basics Nutrition Calcium and Vitamin D: Important at Every Age Publication ... Osteoporosis Program For Your Information The Role of Calcium Calcium is needed for our heart, muscles, and ...

  2. Clinical validation of dialysable calcium in relation to other methods of serum calcium measurement.

    OpenAIRE

    Prince, R. L.; Langton, S R

    1985-01-01

    Dialysable calcium (CaD) values were measured by a simple technique not interfered with by protein bound calcium and validation attempted by comparison with concentrations of ionised calcium (CaI) and clinical categorisation. CaD values were also compared with total calcium (CaT) and albumin adjusted calcium (CaA) concentrations. The normal ranges for CaD, CaT, CaA, and CaI were calculated from the results in healthy blood donors. In 50 normal subjects CaD was more highly correlated with CaI ...

  3. An Intracellular Calcium Oscillations Model Including Mitochondrial Calcium Cycling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Xiao-Min; LIU Zeng-Rong

    2005-01-01

    @@ Calcium is a ubiquitous second messenger. Mitochondria contributes significantly to intracellular Ca2+ dynamics.The experiment of Kaftan et al. [J. Biol. Chem. 275(2000) 25465] demonstrated that inhibiting mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake can reduce the frequency of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration oscillations of gonadotropes. By considering the mitochondrial Ca2+ cycling we develop a three-variable model of intracellular Ca2+ oscillations based on the models of Atri et al. [Biophys. J. 65 (1993) 1727] and Falcke et al. [Biophys. J. 77 (1999) 37]. The model reproduces the fact that mitochondrial Ca2+ cycling increases the frequency of cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations, which accords with Kaftan's results. Moreover the model predicts that when the mitochondria overload with Ca2+, the cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations vanish, which may trigger apoptosis.

  4. Bone Up on the Need for Calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Peggy

    1987-01-01

    Most grade-schoolers drink milk at each meal, but teens, especially girls, often switch to carbonated soda at mealtime just as they should be building up their bone bank of calcium. Why calcium is important and how to get enough of it are covered. (MT)

  5. 21 CFR 182.8217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium phosphate. 182.8217 Section 182.8217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This...

  6. Calcium, snails, and birds: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mänd

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that wild birds breeding in acidified areas have difficulties with obtaining sufficient calcium for their eggshells, and that the cause of it is the shortage of land snails. Many birds have to search for Ca-rich snail shells on a daily basis during egg production. Molluscs depend on litter calcium, which has decreased due to acidification of the environment. Calcium limitation may be a widespread phenomenon also in non-acidified, naturally Ca-poor areas. The problem is that while in the latter areas the time for development of specific adaptations may have been sufficient, then in acidified areas, on the contrary, calcium shortage is a recent phenomenon. Therefore, since the extent of calcium limitation in non-acidified areas is hard to derive from observational data, experimental approach is needed. We provide experimental evidence that specific calcium deficit does affect reproductive traits also in the birds breeding in naturally base-poor habitats. Our study was conducted in a heterogeneous woodland area in Estonia containing deciduous forest patches as well as base-poor pine forest with low snail abundance. Ca supplementation, using snail shell and chicken eggshell fragments, was carried out for pied flycatchers and great tits. Extra calcium affected positively several reproductive traits like egg volume and eggshell thickness, start of breeding, and fledglings’ parameters. The negative relationship between calcium availability and lay-date suggests that birds adjust their breeding tactics to conditions of Ca deficiency, for example, by postponing laying.

  7. Calcium Free Asbestos for Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snitzer, B. A.

    1983-01-01

    Organic-acid salt removes unwanted calcium without weakening asbestos. Asbestos mixed with disodium ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (disodium EDTA) in water and agitated for 2 hours. After disodium EDTA solution is drained away, asbestos contains only 0.02 to 0.1 percent calcium. Fiber structure of asbestos unaffected.

  8. Stochastic models of intracellular calcium signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellular signaling operates in a noisy environment shaped by low molecular concentrations and cellular heterogeneity. For calcium release through intracellular channels–one of the most important cellular signaling mechanisms–feedback by liberated calcium endows fluctuations with critical functions in signal generation and formation. In this review it is first described, under which general conditions the environment makes stochasticity relevant, and which conditions allow approximating or deterministic equations. This analysis provides a framework, in which one can deduce an efficient hybrid description combining stochastic and deterministic evolution laws. Within the hybrid approach, Markov chains model gating of channels, while the concentrations of calcium and calcium binding molecules (buffers) are described by reaction–diffusion equations. The article further focuses on the spatial representation of subcellular calcium domains related to intracellular calcium channels. It presents analysis for single channels and clusters of channels and reviews the effects of buffers on the calcium release. For clustered channels, we discuss the application and validity of coarse-graining as well as approaches based on continuous gating variables (Fokker–Planck and chemical Langevin equations). Comparison with recent experiments substantiates the stochastic and spatial approach, identifies minimal requirements for a realistic modeling, and facilitates an understanding of collective channel behavior. At the end of the review, implications of stochastic and local modeling for the generation and properties of cell-wide release and the integration of calcium dynamics into cellular signaling models are discussed

  9. Stochastic Kinetics of Intracellular Calcium Oscillations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈昌胜; 曾仁端

    2003-01-01

    A stochastic model of intracellular calcium oscillations is put forward by taking into account the random opening-closing of Ca2+ channels in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. The numerical results of the stochastic model show simple and complex calcium oscillations, which accord with the experiment results.

  10. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Anticaking Agents § 172.410 Calcium...

  11. Engineering calcium oxalate crystal formation in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many plants accumulate crystals of calcium oxalate. Just how these crystals form remains unknown. To gain insight into the mechanisms regulating calcium oxalate crystal formation, a crystal engineering approach was initiated utilizing the non-crystal accumulating plant, Arabidopsis. The success of t...

  12. Stochastic models of intracellular calcium signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rüdiger, Sten, E-mail: sten.ruediger@physik.hu-berlin.de

    2014-01-10

    Cellular signaling operates in a noisy environment shaped by low molecular concentrations and cellular heterogeneity. For calcium release through intracellular channels–one of the most important cellular signaling mechanisms–feedback by liberated calcium endows fluctuations with critical functions in signal generation and formation. In this review it is first described, under which general conditions the environment makes stochasticity relevant, and which conditions allow approximating or deterministic equations. This analysis provides a framework, in which one can deduce an efficient hybrid description combining stochastic and deterministic evolution laws. Within the hybrid approach, Markov chains model gating of channels, while the concentrations of calcium and calcium binding molecules (buffers) are described by reaction–diffusion equations. The article further focuses on the spatial representation of subcellular calcium domains related to intracellular calcium channels. It presents analysis for single channels and clusters of channels and reviews the effects of buffers on the calcium release. For clustered channels, we discuss the application and validity of coarse-graining as well as approaches based on continuous gating variables (Fokker–Planck and chemical Langevin equations). Comparison with recent experiments substantiates the stochastic and spatial approach, identifies minimal requirements for a realistic modeling, and facilitates an understanding of collective channel behavior. At the end of the review, implications of stochastic and local modeling for the generation and properties of cell-wide release and the integration of calcium dynamics into cellular signaling models are discussed.

  13. Particularities of thermal expansion of calcium vanadates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temperature dependence of unit cell parameters of calcium vanadates Ca(VO3)2, Ca2V2O7 and Ca3(VO4)2 is studied. It is shown that lattice parameters of meta- and pyrovanadates change monotonously. Lattice parameters of calcium orthovanadate change sharply and unmonotonously at 400-500 deg C

  14. Elements from chlorine to calcium nuclear reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kunz, Wunibald

    1968-01-01

    Nuclear Tables: Part II Nuclear Reactions, Volume 3: The Elements from Chlorine to Calcium contains tabulations of the nuclear reaction values of elements chlorine, argon, potassium, and calcium. These tabulations provide the calculated Q-values of the elements and their isotopes. This book will be of value to general chemistry researchers.

  15. ALG-2, a multifunctional calcium binding protein?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarabykina, Svetlana; Mollerup, Jens; Winding Gojkovic, P.;

    2004-01-01

    ALG-2 was originally discovered as a pro-apoptotic protein in a genetic screen. Due to its ability to bind calcium with high affinity it was postulated to provide a link between the known effect of calcium in programmed cell death and the molecular death execution machinery. This review article...

  16. Progress of p-channel bottom-gate poly-Si thin-film transistor by nickel silicide seed-induced lateral crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sol Kyu; Seok, Ki Hwan; Park, Jae Hyo; Kim, Hyung Yoon; Chae, Hee Jae; Jang, Gil Su; Lee, Yong Hee; Han, Ji Su; Joo, Seung Ki

    2016-06-01

    Excimer laser annealing (ELA) is known to be the most common crystallization technology for the fabrication of low-temperature polycrystalline-silicon (poly-Si) thin-film transistors (TFTs) in the mass production industry. This technology, however, cannot be applied to bottom-gate (BG) TFTs, which are well developed for the liquid-crystal display (LCD) back-planes, because strong laser energy of ELA can seriously damage the other layers. Here, we propose a novel high-performance BG poly-Si TFT using Ni silicide seed-induced lateral crystallization (SILC). The SILC technology renders it possible to ensure low damage in the layers, smooth surface, and longitudinal large grains in the channel. It was observed that the electrical properties exhibited a steep subthreshold slope of 110 mV/dec, high field-effect mobility of 304 cm2/Vsec, high I on/ I off ratio of 5.9 × 107, and a low threshold voltage of -3.9 V.

  17. The silicides YT2Si2 (T = Co, Ni, Cu, Ru, Rh, Pd). A systematic study by 89Y solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ThCr2Si2-type silicides YT2Si2 (T = Co, Ni, Cu, Ru, Rh, Pd) were synthesized from the elements by arc-melting. They were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, and the structures were refined on the basis of single-crystal X-ray diffractometer data. The course of the lattice parameters shows a distinct anomaly for YRu2Si2 which has by far the smallest c/a ratio along with elongated Y-Si distances. Systematic 89Y solid-state NMR spectra show large Knight shifts arising from unpaired conduction electron spin density near the Fermi edge. The Knight shift decreases with increasing valence electron count (VEC), reflecting the sensitivity of this parameter to electronic properties. The particularly strong structural distortion observed in YRu2Si2 manifests itself in a sizeable magnetic shielding anisotropy. Electronic structure calculations for YRu2Si2 and YRh2Si2 reveal similar projected density of states (PDOS) shapes with an energy upshift of the Fermi level in YRh2Si2 due to the extra electron brought in by Rh. As a consequence, the PDOS at the Fermi energy is twice as large in the Ru compound as in the Rh compound. While both compounds show the major bonding interaction within the T2Si2 layers, YRh2Si2 exhibits significantly stronger Y-Si bonding. (orig.)

  18. The Use Of 6/1 Pattern In The Fuel Loading Of 2.96GU/CC Silicide RSG-Gas Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Change of the RSG-GAS loading pattern from 6/1 or 6/2 pattern to 5/1 pattern has been reduced a generated energy for each cycle operation. Therefore, it is necessary to research fuel loading pattern of RSG-Gas. Loading pattern proposed in this research is 6/1 meaning 6's fuel element and 1 control element loading in the reactor for each cycle operation. To know neutronic characteristic of 2.96 g U/cc silicide RSG-Gas core using 6/1 loading pattern, the calculation of 2 dimensional of core had been done using SRAC-ASM BURN computer code. Calculation results showed that core with 6/1 loading pattern can increase the energy for each cycle operation about 180,6 MWD, the core operation more effective 24,15 day, and fuel discharge burn-up increase average of 5.716%235U for each fuel compared core with 5/1 loading pattern. The core with 6/1 loading pattern is more efficient in the use of the fuel, because with different 2 fuel element/years, the raised energy was higher about 726.762 MWD/y equivalent to 1 cycle operation

  19. Calcium Forms,Subcelluar Distribution and Ultrastructure of Pulp Cells as Influenced by Calcium Deficiency in Apple (Malus pumila) Fruits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian-hui; ZHOU Wei

    2004-01-01

    Calcium in Red Fuji and Starkrimson apples during storage were fractionated by sequent extracting. Localization and distribution of calcium and influence of calcium nutrition on cell ultrastructure were observed by transmission electron microscopy combined with in situ precipitation of calcium with an improved method of potassium pyroantimonate technique. Results indicated that spraying calcium solution on surface of young fruits increased contents of calcium in all forms. During storage, contents of soluble calcium and pectic calcium declined and thosein calcium phosphate, calcium oxalate and calcium silicate increased. Calcium contents of Red Fuji in all forms were higher than those of Starkrimson, indicating that calcium accumulating capability of Red Fuji fruits preceded that of Starkrimson. Under transmission electron microscopy, calcium antimonite precipitates (CaAP) was mainly distributed in cell wall, tonoplast, nuclear membrane and nucleoplasm,much more CaAP deposited in vacuole. Calcium deficiency during storage leads to decrease of CaAP in locations mentioned above, disappearance of compartmentation, and entrance of CaAP to cytoplasm. Transformation from soluble calcium and pectic calcium to calcium phosphate,oxalate and damages of biomembranes structuraly and functionally resulted from calcium deficiency during storage were the crucial causation of physiological disorder.

  20. Application of Calcium Phosphate Materials in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jabr S. Al-Sanabani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate materials are similar to bone in composition and in having bioactive and osteoconductive properties. Calcium phosphate materials in different forms, as cements, composites, and coatings, are used in many medical and dental applications. This paper reviews the applications of these materials in dentistry. It presents a brief history, dental applications, and methods for improving their mechanical properties. Notable research is highlighted regarding (1 application of calcium phosphate into various fields in dentistry; (2 improving mechanical properties of calcium phosphate; (3 biomimetic process and functionally graded materials. This paper deals with most common types of the calcium phosphate materials such as hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate which are currently used in dental and medical fields.

  1. Diagnosis and assessment of skeletal related disease using calcium 41

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillegonds, Darren J.; Vogel, John S.; Fitzgerald, Robert L.; Deftos, Leonard J.; Herold, David; Burton, Douglas W.

    2012-05-15

    A method of determining calcium metabolism in a patient comprises the steps of administering radioactive calcium isotope .sup.41Ca to the patient, allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and reaction of the radioactive calcium isotope .sup.41Ca by the patient, obtaining a sample of the radioactive calcium isotope .sup.41Ca from the patient, isolating the calcium content of the sample in a form suitable for precise measurement of isotopic calcium concentrations, and measuring the calcium content to determine parameters of calcium metabolism in the patient.

  2. Calcium: a code coupling tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today, the calculation performances of computers allow the precise and global simulation of complex industrial processes such as the functioning of a nuclear reactor core. One can question the need for the elaboration of new global numerical models in order to make use of the overall capability of computers. Another less time consuming solution consist in the coupling of existing well validated numerical models in order to make them working together. This paper presents the basic principles of the coupling of numerical codes, the tools required, the Calcium tool for codes coupling and an example of application of this tool in the coupling of the THYC (EdF), COCCINELLE (EdF) and CATHARE (CEA-EdF-Framatome) codes for the modeling of the thermal-hydraulic and neutronic behaviour of a reactor core during accidental situation. (J.S.)

  3. Production of precipitated calcium carbonate from calcium silicates and carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibilities for reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the pulp and paper industry by calcium carbonation are presented. The current precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) production uses mined, crushed calcium carbonate as raw materials. If calcium silicates were used instead, carbon dioxide emissions from the calcination of carbonates would be eliminated. In Finland, there could, thus, be a potential for eliminating 200 kt of carbon dioxide emissions per year, considering only the PCC used in the pulp and paper industry. A preliminary investigation of the feasibility to produce PCC from calcium silicates and the potential to replace calcium carbonate as the raw material was made. Calcium carbonate can be manufactured from calcium silicates by various methods, but only a few have been experimentally verified. The possibility and feasibility of these methods as a replacement for the current PCC production process was studied by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations using HSC software and process modelling using Aspen Plus[reg]. The results from the process modelling showed that a process that uses acetic acid for extraction of the calcium ions is a high potential option for sequestering carbon dioxide by mineral carbonation. The main obstacle seems to be the limited availability and relatively high price of wollastonite, which is a mineral with high calcium silicate content. An alternative is to use the more common, but also more complex, basalt rock instead

  4. Effect of calcium intake on urinary oxalate excretion in calcium stone-forming patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishiura J.L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Dietary calcium lowers the risk of nephrolithiasis due to a decreased absorption of dietary oxalate that is bound by intestinal calcium. The aim of the present study was to evaluate oxaluria in normocalciuric and hypercalciuric lithiasic patients under different calcium intake. Fifty patients (26 females and 24 males, 41 ± 10 years old, whose 4-day dietary records revealed a regular low calcium intake (<=500 mg/day, received an oral calcium load (1 g/day for 7 days. A 24-h urine was obtained before and after load and according to the calciuria under both diets, patients were considered as normocalciuric (NC, N = 15, diet-dependent hypercalciuric (DDHC, N = 9 or diet-independent hypercalciuric (DIHC, N = 26. On regular diet, mean oxaluria was 30 ± 14 mg/24 h for all patients. The 7-day calcium load induced a significant decrease in mean oxaluria compared to the regular diet in NC and DIHC (20 ± 12 vs 26 ± 7 and 27 ± 18 vs 32 ± 15 mg/24 h, respectively, P<0.05 but not in DDHC patients (22 ± 10 vs 23 ± 5 mg/24 h. The lack of an oxalate decrease among DDHC patients after the calcium load might have been due to higher calcium absorption under higher calcium supply, with a consequent lower amount of calcium left in the intestine to bind with oxalate. These data suggest that a long-lasting regular calcium consumption <500 mg was not associated with high oxaluria and that a subpopulation of hypercalciuric patients who presented a higher intestinal calcium absorption (DDHC tended to hyperabsorb oxalate as well, so that oxaluria did not change under different calcium intake.

  5. Transgenic plants with increased calcium stores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Sarah (Inventor); Tsou, Pei-Lan (Inventor); Robertson, Dominique (Inventor); Boss, Wendy (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention provides transgenic plants over-expressing a transgene encoding a calcium-binding protein or peptide (CaBP). Preferably, the CaBP is a calcium storage protein and over-expression thereof does not have undue adverse effects on calcium homeostasis or biochemical pathways that are regulated by calcium. In preferred embodiments, the CaBP is calreticulin (CRT) or calsequestrin. In more preferred embodiments, the CaBP is the C-domain of CRT, a fragment of the C-domain, or multimers of the foregoing. In other preferred embodiments, the CaBP is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum by operatively associating the transgene encoding the CaBP with an endoplasmic reticulum localization peptide. Alternatively, the CaBP is targeted to any other sub-cellular compartment that permits the calcium to be stored in a form that is biologically available to the plant. Also provided are methods of producing plants with desirable phenotypic traits by transformation of the plant with a transgene encoding a CaBP. Such phenotypic traits include increased calcium storage, enhanced resistance to calcium-limiting conditions, enhanced growth and viability, increased disease and stress resistance, enhanced flower and fruit production, reduced senescence, and a decreased need for fertilizer production. Further provided are plants with enhanced nutritional value as human food or animal feed.

  6. Calcium: A Nutrient Deserving a Special Issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan J. Whiting

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Interest in calcium has continued since the 1980s when its role in promoting bone growth and retention was established in clinical trials of children and postmenopausal women. The human nutrition functions now attributed to calcium have expanded beyond bone health to include other conditions such as body weight maintenance. While most efforts have been focused on the findings that dietary intakes are low, there are emerging data on safety concerns of excess amounts. This Special Issue on calcium nutrition, spanning the lifecycle from critically ill neonates through to older adults, has been written by some of the leading researchers in this field.

  7. Sorption of UO22+ on calcium carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorption of uranyl ions on calcium carbonate from aqueous solutions featuring different concentration of calcium nitrate was studied experimentally. It is shown that uranium sorption decreases with calcium concentration growth in solution, irrespective of the ratio of solid phase and solution masses. Specific sorption of uranium per unit of the sorbent surface depends linearly on the ratio of UO22+ and Ca2+ ions activities in solution with proportionality factor (sorption equilibrium constant) 1.71 ± 0.16 mol/m2 at 20 deg C

  8. Calcium signaling in physiology and pathophysiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He-ping CHENG; Sheng WEI; Li-ping WEI; Alexei VERKHRATSKY

    2006-01-01

    Calcium ions are the most ubiquitous and pluripotent cellular signaling molecules that control a wide variety of cellular processes.The calcium signaling system is represented by a relatively limited number of highly conserved transporters and channels,which execute Ca2+ movements across biological membranes and by many thousands of Ca2+-sensitive effectors.Molecular cascades,responsible for the generation of calcium signals,are tightly controlled by Ca2+ ions themselves and by genetic factors,which tune the expression of different Ca2+-handling molecules according to adaptational requirements.Ca2+ ions determine normal physiological reactions and the development of many pathological processes.

  9. Modulation of Intracellular Calcium Levels by Calcium Lactate Affects Colon Cancer Cell Motility through Calcium-Dependent Calpain

    OpenAIRE

    Pasupathi Sundaramoorthy; Jae Jun Sim; Yeong-Su Jang; Siddhartha Kumar Mishra; Keun-Yeong Jeong; Poonam Mander; Oh Byung Chul; Won-Sik Shim; Seung Hyun Oh; Ky-Youb Nam; Hwan Mook Kim

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cell motility is a key phenomenon regulating invasion and metastasis. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) plays a major role in cellular adhesion and metastasis of various cancers. The relationship between dietary supplementation of calcium and colon cancer has been extensively investigated. However, the effect of calcium (Ca2+) supplementation on calpain-FAK-motility is not clearly understood. We sought to identify the mechanism of FAK cleavage through Ca2+ bound lactate (CaLa), its downstrea...

  10. Development of new ORIGEN2 data library sets for research reactors with light water cooled oxide and silicide LEU (20 w/o) fuels based on JENDL-3.3 nuclear data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liem, Peng Hong, E-mail: liemph@nais.ne.jp [Nippon Advanced Information Service (NAIS Co., Inc.), 416 Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1112 (Japan); Sembiring, Tagor Malem [Center for Reactor Technology and Nuclear Safety Indonesian National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN), Puspiptek Complex, Building No. 80, Serpong, Tangerang 15310 (Indonesia)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • We developed new ORIGEN2 data library sets for research reactors based on JENDL-3.3. • The sets cover oxide and silicide LEU fuels with meat density up to 4.74 g U/cm{sup 3}. • Two kinds of data library sets are available: fuel region and non-fuel regions. • We verified the new data library sets with other codes. • We validated the new data library against a non-destructive test. -- Abstract: New sets of ORIGEN2 data library dedicated to research/testing reactors with light water cooled oxide and silicide LEU fuel plates based on JENDL-3.3 nuclear data were developed, verified and validated. The new sets are considered to be an extension of the most recent release of ORIGEN2.2UPJ code, i.e. the ORLIBJ33 library sets. The newly generated ORIGEN2 data library sets cover both oxide and silicide LEU fuels with fuel meat density range from 2.96 to 4.74 g U/cm{sup 3} used in the present and future operation of the Indonesian 30 MWth RSG GAS research reactor. The new sets are expected applicable also for other research/testing reactors which utilize similar fuels or have similar neutron spectral indices. In addition to the traditional ORIGEN2 library sets for fuel depletion analyses in fuel regions, in the new data library sets, new ORIGEN2 library sets for irradiation/activation analyses were also prepared which cover all representative non-fuel regions of RSG GAS such as reflector elements, irradiation facilities, etc. whose neutron spectra are significantly softer than fuel regions. Verification with other codes as well as validation with a non-destructive test result showed promising results where a good agreement was confirmed.

  11. Structures of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases reveal mechanism of activation by calcium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wernimont, Amy K; Artz, Jennifer D.; Jr, Patrick Finerty; Lin, Yu-Hui; Amani, Mehrnaz; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Senisterra, Guillermo; Vedadi, Masoud; Tempel, Wolfram; Mackenzie, Farrell; Chau, Irene; Lourido, Sebastian; Sibley, L. David; Hui, Raymond (Toronto); (WU-MED)

    2010-09-21

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) have pivotal roles in the calcium-signaling pathway in plants, ciliates and apicomplexan parasites and comprise a calmodulin-dependent kinase (CaMK)-like kinase domain regulated by a calcium-binding domain in the C terminus. To understand this intramolecular mechanism of activation, we solved the structures of the autoinhibited (apo) and activated (calcium-bound) conformations of CDPKs from the apicomplexan parasites Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. In the apo form, the C-terminal CDPK activation domain (CAD) resembles a calmodulin protein with an unexpected long helix in the N terminus that inhibits the kinase domain in the same manner as CaMKII. Calcium binding triggers the reorganization of the CAD into a highly intricate fold, leading to its relocation around the base of the kinase domain to a site remote from the substrate binding site. This large conformational change constitutes a distinct mechanism in calcium signal-transduction pathways.

  12. Calcium and caffeine interaction in increased calcium balance in ovariectomized rats

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Tavares da Silva; Neuza Maria Brunoro Costa; Frederico Souzalima Caldoncelli Franco; Antônio José Natali

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the effects of caffeine intake associated with inadequate or adequate calcium intake in laparotomized or ovariectomized rats by means of the calcium balance. Forty adults Wistar rats were ovariectomized or laparotomized. METHODS: The animals (n=40) were randomly placed in eight groups receiving the AIN-93 diet with 100% or 50% of the recommended calcium intake with or without added caffeine (6mg/kg/day). The animals were kept in individuals metabolic cages a...

  13. Technology obtaining of nitrogen fertilizer from the calcium is containing waste of production of calcium saltpetre

    OpenAIRE

    Власян, Світлана Варужанівна; Шестозуб, Анатолій Борисович; Волошин, Микола Дмитрович

    2013-01-01

    The new technology of obtaining nitrogen fertilizer from calcium-containing sludge of calcium saltpeter production is considered in the paper. The main objective of the research is the development of processing technology of sludge of calcium saltpeter production into alkaline nitrogen fertilizer, analysis of the composition of initial material and finished product, testing of fertilizer by means of vegeta­tive studies and determination of expenditure of drying agent that is exhaust gases of ...

  14. In vivo Calcium Imaging of Evoked Calcium Waves in the Embryonic Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Yuryev, Mikhail; Pellegrino, Christophe; Jokinen, Ville; Andriichuk, Liliia; Khirug, Stanislav; Khiroug, Leonard; Rivera, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of intracellular calcium fluxes are instrumental in the proliferation, differentiation, and migration of neuronal cells. Knowledge thus far of the relationship between these calcium changes and physiological processes in the developing brain has derived principally from ex vivo and in vitro experiments. Here, we present a new method to image intracellular calcium flux in the cerebral cortex of live rodent embryos, whilst attached to the dam through the umbilical cord. Using this ...

  15. Phase-field study on the segregation mechanism of Cr to lamellar interface in C40-NbSi2/C11b-MoSi2 duplex silicide

    OpenAIRE

    Yamazaki, Toshihiro; Koizumi, Yuichiro; Chiba, Akihiko; Hagihara, Koji; Nakano, Takayoshi; Yuge, Koretaka; Kishida, Kyosuke; Inui, Haruyuki

    2013-01-01

    Cr-segregation to a lamellar interface in NbSi2/MoSi2 duplex silicide has been examined by a newly developed phase-field model. The model can take into account the segregation energy evaluated by a first principles calculation to reflect the chemical interaction between solute atoms and the interface in addition to the elastic interaction. Cr segregation occurs at the interface in the case with segregation energy whereas no segregation occurs in the case with only elastic interaction. However...

  16. New Scandium Platinum Silicides: ScPt2Si with `Inverse? MgCuAl2 Structure, and Sc5Pt9Si7, a Variant of the Zr2Fe12P7-Type

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Walter

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Two new scandium platinum silicides, ScPt2Si (orthorhombic, Cmcm, a = 3.6653(6) ?, b = 9.831(1) ?, c = 6.967(1) ?, Z = 4) and Sc5Pt9Si7 (hexagonal, P?6, a = 9.9418(5) ?, c = 3.8832(2) ?, Z = 1) were prepared by reaction of the elements in an electric arc furnace and subsequent annealing. The crystal structures were solved and refined from single crystal diffraction data. ScPt2Si crystallizes with an `inverse? MgCuAl2 structure while Sc5Pt9Si7 forms a variant of the Zr2Fe...

  17. Calcium and Cancer Prevention: Strengths and Limits of the Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... calcium carbonate has about 40 percent elemental calcium, meaning that 500 mg of calcium carbonate actually contains ... in this trial also contained vitamin D (400 international units [ IU ]). During ... and calcium in relation to prostate cancer risk among more than 142, ...

  18. Effects of Adding Chymosin to Milk on Calcium Homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ulla Kristine; Jensen, Lars Thorbjørn; Mosekilde, Leif;

    2014-01-01

    Calcium intake and absorption is important for bone health. In a randomized double-blind cross-over trial, we investigated effects of adding chymosin to milk on the intestinal calcium absorption as measured by renal calcium excretion and indices of calcium homeostasis. The primary outcome of the...

  19. Assessment of calcium content of lumbarspine by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessment of calcium content of lumbar spine by computed tomography was performed on 76 patients without bone disease and 15 patients with chronic renal failure. Calcium content of medulla and cortex was calculated by CT number. Relationship between calcium content of medulla, cortex and age was discussed. The necessity of midline scan of lumbar spine to obtain the accurate calcium was also stressed. (author)

  20. 21 CFR 172.120 - Calcium disodium EDTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium disodium EDTA. 172.120 Section 172.120 Food... Food Preservatives § 172.120 Calcium disodium EDTA. The food additive calcium disodium EDTA (calcium... 100 Promote color retention. 1 By weight of egg yolk portion. (2) With disodium EDTA...

  1. Astrocyte calcium signaling: the third wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazargani, Narges; Attwell, David

    2016-01-27

    The discovery that transient elevations of calcium concentration occur in astrocytes, and release 'gliotransmitters' which act on neurons and vascular smooth muscle, led to the idea that astrocytes are powerful regulators of neuronal spiking, synaptic plasticity and brain blood flow. These findings were challenged by a second wave of reports that astrocyte calcium transients did not mediate functions attributed to gliotransmitters and were too slow to generate blood flow increases. Remarkably, the tide has now turned again: the most important calcium transients occur in fine astrocyte processes not resolved in earlier studies, and new mechanisms have been discovered by which astrocyte [Ca(2+)]i is raised and exerts its effects. Here we review how this third wave of discoveries has changed our understanding of astrocyte calcium signaling and its consequences for neuronal function. PMID:26814587

  2. Obtainment of calcium carbonate from mussels shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mussels and oyster shell are discarded at environment, and this accumulation is causing negative consequences to ecosystem. Calcium carbonate is main constituent of the shell chemical composition. Aiming to reduce environmental aggression and generate income to shellfish producer, there was the possibility of using these shells as an alternative to commercial calcium carbonate. For this physics, chemicals and thermal properties were evaluated, using X-ray fluorescence, thermogravimetric analysis, size distribution, abrasiveness and scanning electronic microscopy. The results indicate that mussels shells have an initial degradation temperature higher than commercial calcium carbonate e same lost weight behavior and 95% of shell chemical composition is calcium carbonate. The sample size distribution was influenced by grinding condition and time as well as its abrasiveness. (author)

  3. Modeling and analysis of calcium bromide hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lottes, Steven A.; Lyczkowski, Robert W.; Panchal, Chandrakant B.; Doctor, Richard D. [Energy Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2009-05-15

    The main focus of this paper is the modeling, simulation, and analysis of the calcium bromide hydrolysis reactor stage in the calcium-bromine thermochemical water-splitting cycle for nuclear hydrogen production. One reactor concept is to use a spray of calcium bromide into steam, in which the heat of fusion supplies the heat of reaction. Droplet models were built up in a series of steps incorporating various physical phenomena, including droplet flow, heat transfer, phase change, and reaction, separately. Given the large heat reservoir contained in a pool of molten calcium bromide that allows bubbles to rise easily, using a bubble column reactor for the hydrolysis appears to be a feasible and promising alternative to the spray reactor concept. The two limiting cases of bubble geometry, spherical and spherical-cap, are considered in the modeling. Results for both droplet and bubble modeling with COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS trademark are presented, with recommendations for the path forward. (author)

  4. Discrete stochastic modeling of calcium channel dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Baer, M E; Levine, H; Tsimring, L S; Baer, Markus; Falcke, Martin; Levine, Herbert; Tsimring, Lev S.

    1999-01-01

    We propose a simple discrete stochastic model for calcium dynamics in living cells. Specifically, the calcium concentration distribution is assumed to give rise to a set of probabilities for the opening/closing of channels which release calcium thereby changing those probabilities. We study this model in one dimension, analytically in the mean-field limit of large number of channels per site N, and numerically for small N. As the number of channels per site is increased, the transition from a non-propagating region of activity to a propagating one changes in nature from one described by directed percolation to that of deterministic depinning in a spatially discrete system. Also, for a small number of channels a propagating calcium wave can leave behind a novel fluctuation-driven state, in a parameter range where the limiting deterministic model exhibits only single pulse propagation.

  5. Discrete Stochastic Modeling of Calcium Channel Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a discrete stochastic model for calcium dynamics in living cells. A set of probabilities for the opening/closing of calcium channels is assumed to depend on the calcium concentration. We study this model in one dimension, analytically in the limit of a large number of channels per site N , and numerically for small N . As the number of channels per site is increased, the transition from a nonpropagating region of activity to a propagating one changes from one described by directed percolation to that of deterministic depinning in a spatially discrete system. Also, for a small number of channels a propagating calcium wave can leave behind a novel fluctuation-driven state. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  6. Synthesis of calcium hydroxyapatite from calcium carbonate and different orthophosphate sources: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Calcium hydroxyapatite was synthesized from CaCO3 and four orthophosphates. ► Only H3PO4 led to the complete precipitation of orthophosphate species. ► H3PO4 was also the most efficient for calcium dissolution. ► Reaction pathway was dissolution-precipitation accompanied by agglomeration step. - Abstract: The synthesis of calcium hydroxyapatite (Ca-HA) starting from calcium carbonate and different orthophosphate sources, including orthophosphoric acid, potassium, sodium and ammonium dihydrogen orthophosphates, was investigated under ambient conditions. The reaction started with calcium carbonate dissolution in an acid medium, followed by rapid precipitation of calcium cations with orthophosphate species to form calcium phosphate based particles which were in the size range of 0.4–1 μm. These particles then agglomerated into much larger ones, up to 350 μm in diameter (aggregates). These aggregates possessed an unstable porous structure which was responsible for the porosity of the final products. The highest specific surface area and pore volume were obtained with potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate. On the other hand, orthophosphoric acid led to the highest dissolution of calcium carbonate and the complete precipitation of orthophosphate species. Under ambient conditions, calcium phosphate based solid products of low crystallinity were formed. Different intermediates were identified and a reaction pathway proposed.

  7. Characterization of Calcium Compounds in Opuntia ficus indica as a Source of Calcium for Human Diet

    OpenAIRE

    Isela Rojas-Molina; Elsa Gutiérrez-Cortez; Moustapha Bah; Alejandra Rojas-Molina; César Ibarra-Alvarado; Eric Rivera-Muñoz; Alicia del Real; Ma. de los Angeles Aguilera-Barreiro

    2015-01-01

    Analyses of calcium compounds in cladodes, soluble dietary fiber (SDF), and insoluble dietary fiber (IDF) of Opuntia ficus indica are reported. The characterization of calcium compounds was performed by using Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive Spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, and infrared spectroscopy. Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and titrimetric methods were used for quantification of total calcium and calcium compounds. Whewellite (CaC2O4·H2O), weddellite (CaC2O4·(H2O)2.375),...

  8. Relating a calcium indicator signal to the unperturbed calcium concentration time-course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abarbanel Henry DI

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optical indicators of cytosolic calcium levels have become important experimental tools in systems and cellular neuroscience. Indicators are known to interfere with intracellular calcium levels by acting as additional buffers, and this may strongly alter the time-course of various dynamical variables to be measured. Results By investigating the underlying reaction kinetics, we show that in some ranges of kinetic parameters one can explicitly link the time dependent indicator signal to the time-course of the calcium influx, and thus, to the unperturbed calcium level had there been no indicator in the cell.

  9. Calcium entry into guinea-pig jejunum cells after calcium stores depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacaud, P; Bolton, T B

    1991-01-01

    1) Membrane currents were recorded under voltage-clamp from cells using patch-clamp pipettes. Cells were dialysed with potassium-free caesium solution to block any Ca-activated K-current. The pipette solution contained Indo-1 and the ratio of the emissions from this dye at 480 and 405 nm was used to estimate the free calcium concentration in the cell. 2) Carbachol applied to the cell evoked at -50 mV an initial increase in the intracellular calcium concentration (Cai) followed by a smaller sustained rise (plateau); the changes in inward cationic current (ICarb) closely followed changes in Cai. Calcium entry blockers did not affect these responses. 3) The initial peak in Cai produced by carbachol was due to calcium store release: it was present in calcium-free solution, and unchanged at +50 mV, but it was abolished by prior application of caffeine (10 mM) to the cell or by inclusion of heparin (which blocks D-myoinositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors) in the pipette. 4) The sustained rise (plateau) in Cai produced by carbachol was due to the entry of calcium into the cell down its electrochemical gradient as it was affected by changing the cell membrane potential or the calcium concentration in the bathing solution. As the sustained rise in Cai produced by caffeine had similar properties it was suggested that depletion of calcium stores can evoke an increased calcium entry into the cell through some pathway. PMID:1665265

  10. Effect of Calcium on the Vanadium Extraction from High Calcium Type Stone Coal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO Shenxu; LIANG Liang; ZHANG Yimin; HAN Shihua; HU Yangjia

    2015-01-01

    The high calcium type stone coal from Hubei province was leached by water and dilute acid separately after being roasted with different dosage of NaCl. The water leaching rate of vanadium (WLRV) was low and only 26.8%of vanadium can be leached by water when 4%NaCl was added, but the acid leaching rate of vanadium (ALRV) was relatively high. Calcium in the high calcium type stone coal is greatly superfluous relative to vanadium, hence, the calcium reacts with vanadium to form Ca(VO3)2, Ca2V2O7 and Ca3(VO4)2 orderly during the stone coal roasting process and high temperature is beneficial to the reactions between calcium and vanadium, which was validated by simulated reactions between pure calcium carbonate and vanadium pentoxide. These calcium vanadates are all water insoluble but acid soluble and this causes the low WLRV and relatively high ALRV. After calcium removal by HCl, the WLRV is highly enhanced and reaches about 50%when only 2%NaCl was added. If the HCl content is too high, the stone coal is easily sintered and the formed glass structure can enwrap vanadium, which leads the WLRV to decline. Single water leaching process is not appropriate to extract vanadium from high calcium type stone coal.

  11. Effect of albumin and free calcium concentrations on calcium binding in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Besarab, A; DeGuzman, A; Swanson, J W

    1981-01-01

    In vivo equilibrium dialysis studies were performed to define further the characteristics of calcium binding to bovine albumin. The concentration range for albumin (1 to 9 g/dl) as well as ultrafilterable calcium (0.5 to 2.5 mM) studied encompassed those that might be ordinarily encountered in most clinical situations. Major differences in the regressions of total calcium on ultrafilterable calcium occurred at albumin concentrations of 1, 2, and 9 g/dl but only small differences at albumin co...

  12. Study of calcium chloride and calcium nitrate purification on inorganic sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purification of calcium chloride and calcium nitrate from iron, chromium, manganese and cobalt impurities by sorption on some inorganic collectors are considered in this article. Study was conducted by means of radioactive-tracer technique at concurrent use of several γ-radioactive isotopes. As a collectors were used hydrated aluminium and zirconium oxides. Dependence of effectiveness of precipitation by collectors on ph-value of medium, quantity of collector, nature and concentration of components is studied. Optimal parameters of purification of calcium chloride and calcium nitrate are defined.

  13. 21 CFR 201.70 - Calcium labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... product is more than 3.2 grams: “Ask a doctor before use if you have 1 kidney stones a calcium-restricted diet”. The warnings in §§ 201.64(c), 201.70(c), 201.71(c), and 201.72(c) may be combined, if applicable, provided the ingredients are listed in alphabetical order, e.g., a calcium or sodium restricted diet. 1...

  14. Modulation of intestinal absorption of calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absorption of ingested calcium (2ml of a 10mM CaCl2 solution + 45Ca) by the adult rat was shown to be facilitated by the simultaneous ingestion of an active carbohydrate, L-arabinose. As the carbohydrate concentration is increased from 10 to 200mM, the absorption of calcium is maximised at a level corresponding to about twice the control absorption level. A similar doubling of calcium absorption is obtained when a 100mM concentration of any one of a number of other carbohydrates is ingested simultaneously with a 10mM CaCl2 solution. Conversely, the simultaneous ingestion of increasing doses (10 to 100mM) of phosphate (NaH2PO4) with a 10mM CaCl2 solution results in decreased 45Ca absorption and retention by the adult rat. The maximum inhibition of calcium absorption by phosphate is independent of the concentration of the ingested calcium solution (from 5 to 50mM CaCl2). The simultaneous ingestion of CaCl2 (10mM) with lactose and sodium phosphate (50 and 10mM respectively) shows that the activation effect of lactose upon 45Ca absorption may be partly dissimulated by the presence of phosphate. These various observations indicate that, within a large concentration range (2 to 50mM CaCl2) calcium absorption appears to be a precisely modulated diffusion process. Calcium absorption varies (between minimum and maximum levels) as a function of the state of saturation by the activators (carbohydrates) and inhibitors (phosphate) of the calcium transport system

  15. Oral calcium supplementation in peripartum dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oetzel, Garrett R

    2013-07-01

    Hypocalcemia in dairy cattle around parturition can be manifest as clinical milk fever or subclinical hypocalcemia. Subclinical hypocalcemia has the greatest economic effect because it affects a much higher proportion of cows. Oral calcium supplements are used to mitigate the effects of both forms of hypocalcemia. Oral calcium supplements are appropriate for cows displaying early clinical signs of hypocalcemia and prophylactically to lessen the negative impacts of hypocalcemia. PMID:23809900

  16. DETERMINATION OF CALCIUM CONTENT IN DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Marjanović-Balaban, Željka R.; Antunović, Vesna R.; Jelić, Dijana R.; Živković, Tanja M.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium is a macro element that is very important for the human body: its content and circulation in the body is large, it serves as the electrolyte, it has a building role and participates in the process of metabolism. The European Union, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Ministry of Food and Drug (Food and Drug Administration, FDA) gave the RDA (Recommended Dietary Allowances,) for this macro element. The absorption and bioavailability of the calcium may vary depending on a number...

  17. Rickets induced by calcium or phosphate depletion.

    OpenAIRE

    Abugassa, S.; Svensson, O.

    1990-01-01

    We studied the effects of calciopenia and phosphopenia on longitudinal growth, skeletal mineralization, and development of rickets in young Sprague-Dawley rats. At an age of 21 days, two experimental groups were given diets containing 0.02% calcium or 0.02% phosphorus; otherwise the diets were nutritionally adequate. After 7, 14, and 21 days, five animals from each group were randomly chosen. The animals were anaesthetized and blood samples were drawn for analysis of calcium, phosphorus, and ...

  18. Gel time of calcium acrylate grouting material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tong-Chun

    2004-08-01

    Calcium acrylate is a polymerized grout, and can polymerize in an aqueous solution. The polymerization reaction utilizes ammonium persulfate as a catalyst and sodium thiosulfate as the activator. Based on the theory of reaction kinetics, this study on the relation between gel time and concentration of activator and catalyst showed that gel time of calcium acrylate is inversely proportional to activator and catalyst concentration. A formula of gel time is proposed, and an example is provided to verify the proposed formula. PMID:15236477

  19. Understanding calcium dynamics experiments and theory

    CERN Document Server

    Malchow, Dieter

    2003-01-01

    Intracellular Calcium is an important messenger in living cells. Calcium dynamics display complex temporal and spatial structures created by the concentration patterns which are characteristic for a nonlinear system operating far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Written as a set of tutorial reviews on both experimental facts and theoretical modelling, this volume is intended as an introduction and modern reference in the field for graduate students and researchers in biophysics, biochemistry and applied mathematics.

  20. The Dy–Ni–Si system as a representative of the rare earth–Ni–Si family: Its isothermal section and new rare-earth nickel silicides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Fang; Mozharivskyj, Y. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4M1 (Canada); Morozkin, A.V., E-mail: morozkin@general.chem.msu.ru [Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, House 1, Building 3, Moscow GSP-2, 119992 (Russian Federation); Knotko, A.V. [Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, House 1, Building 3, Moscow GSP-2, 119992 (Russian Federation); Yapaskurt, V.O. [Department of Petrology, Geological Faculty, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Pani, M.; Provino, A.; Manfrinetti, P. [Institute SPIN-CNR and Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Università di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 31, 16146 Genova (Italy)

    2014-11-15

    }Si{sub 24}, ∼Dy{sub 16}Ni{sub 62}Si{sub 22}, DyNi{sub 7}Si{sub 6}, Dy{sub 3}Ni{sub 8}Si, DyNi{sub 2}Si, ∼Dy{sub 40}Ni{sub 47}Si{sub 13} and ∼Dy{sub 5}Ni{sub 2}Si{sub 3}. Quasi–binary solid solutions were detected for Dy{sub 2}Ni{sub 17}, DyNi{sub 5}, DyNi{sub 7}, DyNi{sub 3}, DyNi{sub 2}, DyNi, DySi{sub 2} and DySi{sub 1.67}. The crystal structures and magnetic properties of new phases RNi{sub 7}Si{sub 6} (GdNi{sub 7}Si{sub 6}-type), R{sub 3}Ni{sub 8}Si (Ce{sub 3}Co{sub 8}Si-type), RNi{sub 2}Si (YPd{sub 2}Si-type) and R{sub 3}Ni{sub 12}Si{sub 4} (Gd{sub 3}Ru{sub 4}Al{sub 12}-type), with R=Y, Gd–Tm, are also reported. - Highlights: • Dy–Ni–Si isothermal section was obtained at 870 K/1070 K. • Twelve known ternary dysprosium nickel silicides were confirmed in Dy–Ni–Si. • Nine new dysprosium nickel silicides were detected in Dy–Ni–Si. • Seventeen new rare earth nickel silicides were detected in (Y, Gd–Tm)–Ni–Si. • Tb{sub 3}Ni{sub 8}Si, Dy{sub 3}Ni{sub 8}Si, Ho{sub 3}Ni{sub 12}Si{sub 4} and DyNi{sub 2}Si show ferromagnetic-like ordering.

  1. The Dy–Ni–Si system as a representative of the rare earth–Ni–Si family: Its isothermal section and new rare-earth nickel silicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Dy–Ni–Si system has been investigated at 1070 K by X-ray and microprobe analysis. The system contains the 12 known compounds DyNi10Si2, DyNi5Si3, DyNi6Si6, DyNi4Si, DyNi2Si2, Dy2Ni3Si5, DyNiSi3, Dy3Ni6Si2, DyNiSi2, DyNiSi, Dy3NiSi3, Dy3NiSi2, and the new compounds Dy34Ni16−27Si50−39 (AlB2-type), Dy2Ni15.2−14.1Si1.8−2.9 (Th2Zn17-type), ∼Dy11Ni65Si24, ∼Dy16Ni62Si22 (unknown structures), DyNi7Si6 (GdNi7Si6-type), Dy3Ni8Si (Ce3Co8Si-type), DyNi2Si (YPd2Si-type), ∼Dy40Ni47Si13 and ∼Dy5Ni2Si3 (unknown structures). Quasi–binary solid solutions were detected at 1070 (870 K) for Dy2Ni17, DyNi5, DyNi7, DyNi3, DyNi2, DyNi, DySi2 and DySi1.67. No detectable solubility is observed for the other binary compounds of the Dy–Ni–Si system. The crystal structures of new phases RNi7Si6 (GdNi7Si6-type), R3Ni8Si (Ce3Co8Si-type), RNi2Si (YPd2Si-type) and R3Ni12Si4 (Gd3Ru4Al12-type), with R=Y, Gd–Tm, has been studied. Magnetic properties of few representative compounds are also reported. - Graphical abstract: The Dy–Ni–Si system has been investigated at 1070 K by X-ray and microprobe analysis. The system contains the 12 known compounds DyNi10Si2, DyNi5Si3, DyNi6Si6, DyNi4Si, DyNi2Si2, Dy2Ni3Si5, DyNiSi3, Dy3Ni6Si2, DyNiSi2, DyNiSi, Dy3NiSi3, Dy3NiSi2, and the new compounds Dy34Ni16−27Si50−39, Dy2Ni15.2−14.1Si1.8−2.9, ∼Dy11Ni65Si24, ∼Dy16Ni62Si22, DyNi7Si6, Dy3Ni8Si, DyNi2Si, ∼Dy40Ni47Si13 and ∼Dy5Ni2Si3. Quasi–binary solid solutions were detected for Dy2Ni17, DyNi5, DyNi7, DyNi3, DyNi2, DyNi, DySi2 and DySi1.67. The crystal structures and magnetic properties of new phases RNi7Si6 (GdNi7Si6-type), R3Ni8Si (Ce3Co8Si-type), RNi2Si (YPd2Si-type) and R3Ni12Si4 (Gd3Ru4Al12-type), with R=Y, Gd–Tm, are also reported. - Highlights: • Dy–Ni–Si isothermal section was obtained at 870 K/1070 K. • Twelve known ternary dysprosium nickel silicides were confirmed in Dy–Ni–Si. • Nine new dysprosium nickel silicides were detected in Dy

  2. A theory of Plasma Membrane Calcium Pump stimulation and activity

    CERN Document Server

    Graupner, M; Meyer-Hermann, M; Erler, Frido; Graupner, Michael; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The ATP-driven Plasma Membrane Calcium (PMCA) pump is characterized by a high affinity to calcium and a low transport rate compared to other transmembrane calcium transport proteins. It plays a crucial role for calcium extrusion from cells. Calmodulin is an intracellular calcium buffering protein which is capable in its Calcium-liganded form to stimulate the PMCA pump by increasing both, the affinity to calcium and the maximum calcium transport rate. We introduce a new model of this stimulation process and deduce analytical expressions for experimental observables in order to determine the model parameter on the basis of specific experiments. Furthermore a model for the pumping activity is developed. In contrast to the biological process we have to describe the pumping rate behavior by assuming a ATP:Calcium stoichiometry of 2 in order to reproduce experimental data. The conjunction of the description of calcium pumping and the stimulation model fully and correctly simulates PMCA pump function. Therewith the ...

  3. A calcium-induced calcium release mechanism mediated by calsequestrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Seon; Keener, James P

    2008-08-21

    Calcium (Ca(2+))-induced Ca(2+) release (CICR) is widely accepted as the principal mechanism linking electrical excitation and mechanical contraction in cardiac cells. The CICR mechanism has been understood mainly based on binding of cytosolic Ca(2+) with ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and inducing Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). However, recent experiments suggest that SR lumenal Ca(2+) may also participate in regulating RyR gating through calsequestrin (CSQ), the SR lumenal Ca(2+) buffer. We investigate how SR Ca(2+) release via RyR is regulated by Ca(2+) and calsequestrin (CSQ). First, a mathematical model of RyR kinetics is derived based on experimental evidence. We assume that the RyR has three binding sites, two cytosolic sites for Ca(2+) activation and inactivation, and one SR lumenal site for CSQ binding. The open probability (P(o)) of the RyR is found by simulation under controlled cytosolic and SR lumenal Ca(2+). Both peak and steady-state P(o) effectively increase as SR lumenal Ca(2+) increases. Second, we incorporate the RyR model into a CICR model that has both a diadic space and the junctional SR (jSR). At low jSR Ca(2+) loads, CSQs are more likely to bind with the RyR and act to inhibit jSR Ca(2+) release, while at high SR loads CSQs are more likely to detach from the RyR, thereby increasing jSR Ca(2+) release. Furthermore, this CICR model produces a nonlinear relationship between fractional jSR Ca(2+) release and jSR load. These findings agree with experimental observations in lipid bilayers and cardiac myocytes. PMID:18538346

  4. Analytical models of calcium binding in a calcium channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anomalous mole fraction effect of L-type calcium channels is analyzed using a Fermi like distribution with the experimental data of Almers and McCleskey [J. Physiol. 353, 585 (1984)] and the atomic resolution model of Lipkind and Fozzard [Biochemistry 40, 6786 (2001)] of the selectivity filter of the channel. Much of the analysis is algebraic, independent of differential equations. The Fermi distribution is derived from the configuration entropy of ions and water molecules with different sizes, different valences, and interstitial voids between particles. It allows us to calculate potentials and distances (between the binding ion and the oxygen ions of the glutamate side chains) directly from the experimental data using algebraic formulas. The spatial resolution of these results is comparable with those of molecular models, but of course the accuracy is no better than that implied by the experimental data. The glutamate side chains in our model are flexible enough to accommodate different types of binding ions in different bath conditions. The binding curves of Na+ and Ca2+ for [CaCl2] ranging from 10−8 to 10−2 M with a fixed 32 mM background [NaCl] are shown to agree with published Monte Carlo simulations. The Poisson-Fermi differential equation—that includes both steric and correlation effects—is then used to obtain the spatial profiles of energy, concentration, and dielectric coefficient from the solvent region to the filter. The energy profiles of ions are shown to depend sensitively on the steric energy that is not taken into account in the classical rate theory. We improve the rate theory by introducing a steric energy that lumps the effects of excluded volumes of all ions and water molecules and empty spaces between particles created by Lennard-Jones type and electrostatic forces. We show that the energy landscape varies significantly with bath concentrations. The energy landscape is not constant

  5. Contribution of calcium oxalate to soil-exchangeable calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauer, Jenny M.; Perakis, Steven S.

    2013-01-01

    Acid deposition and repeated biomass harvest have decreased soil calcium (Ca) availability in many temperate forests worldwide, yet existing methods for assessing available soil Ca do not fully characterize soil Ca forms. To account for discrepancies in ecosystem Ca budgets, it has been hypothesized that the highly insoluble biomineral Ca oxalate might represent an additional soil Ca pool that is not detected in standard measures of soil-exchangeable Ca. We asked whether several standard method extractants for soil-exchangeable Ca could also access Ca held in Ca oxalate crystals using spike recovery tests in both pure solutions and soil extractions. In solutions of the extractants ammonium chloride, ammonium acetate, and barium chloride, we observed 2% to 104% dissolution of Ca oxalate crystals, with dissolution increasing with both solution molarity and ionic potential of cation extractant. In spike recovery tests using a low-Ca soil, we estimate that 1 M ammonium acetate extraction dissolved sufficient Ca oxalate to contribute an additional 52% to standard measurements of soil-exchangeable Ca. However, in a high-Ca soil, the amount of Ca oxalate spike that would dissolve in 1 M ammonium acetate extraction was difficult to detect against the large pool of exchangeable Ca. We conclude that Ca oxalate can contribute substantially to standard estimates of soil-exchangeable Ca in acid forest soils with low soil-exchangeable Ca. Consequently, measures of exchangeable Ca are unlikely to fully resolve discrepancies in ecosystem Ca mass balance unless the contribution of Ca oxalate to exchangeable Ca is also assessed.

  6. Membrane associated complexes in calcium dynamics modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitochondria not only govern energy production, but are also involved in crucial cellular signalling processes. They are one of the most important organelles determining the Ca2+ regulatory pathway in the cell. Several mathematical models explaining these mechanisms were constructed, but only few of them describe interplay between calcium concentrations in endoplasmic reticulum (ER), cytoplasm and mitochondria. Experiments measuring calcium concentrations in mitochondria and ER suggested the existence of cytosolic microdomains with locally elevated calcium concentration in the nearest vicinity of the outer mitochondrial membrane. These intermediate physical connections between ER and mitochondria are called MAM (mitochondria-associated ER membrane) complexes. We propose a model with a direct calcium flow from ER to mitochondria, which may be justified by the existence of MAMs, and perform detailed numerical analysis of the effect of this flow on the type and shape of calcium oscillations. The model is partially based on the Marhl et al model. We have numerically found that the stable oscillations exist for a considerable set of parameter values. However, for some parameter sets the oscillations disappear and the trajectories of the model tend to a steady state with very high calcium level in mitochondria. This can be interpreted as an early step in an apoptotic pathway. (paper)

  7. The effect of dimethylsulfoxide on the calcium paradox.

    OpenAIRE

    Ruigrok, T. J.; Moes, D.; Slade, A.M.; Nayler, W. G.

    1981-01-01

    Reperfusion of isolated rat hearts with calcium-containing solution after a short period of calcium-free perfusion results in irreversible cell damage (calcium paradox). Experiments were undertaken to study the effect of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) on the occurrence of the calcium paradox in rat heart muscle. DMSO (1.4 mol/l) was added to the calcium-free or the reperfusion medium. Cell damage was quantitated in terms of creatine kinase (CK) release, cardiac electrogram (CEG) changes, and ultras...

  8. Factors to consider in the selection of a calcium supplement.

    OpenAIRE

    Shangraw, R F

    1989-01-01

    Calcium supplements are widely used, yet many questions remain as to the absorption of various calcium salts. Because the solubility of many calcium salts is dependent upon pH, the type of salt used, the condition of the patient, and the time of administration should be considered. Studies show that many calcium supplements on the market today do not meet standards of quality established in the "U.S. Pharmacopeia" (USP). Consumers must be discerning about the products they purchase. Calcium s...

  9. The spatial pattern of atrial cardiomyocyte calcium signalling modulates contraction

    OpenAIRE

    Mackenzie, L; Roderick, H Llewelyn; Berridge, MJ; Conway, SJ; Bootman, MD

    2004-01-01

    We examined the regulation of calcium signalling in atrial cardiomyocytes during excitation-contraction coupling, and how changes in the distribution of calcium impacts on contractility. Under control conditions, calcium transients originated in subsarcolemmal locations and showed local regeneration through activation of calcium-induced calcium release from ryanodine receptors. Despite functional ryanodine receptors being expressed at regular (~2 μm) intervals throughout atrial myocytes, the ...

  10. Increased absolute calcium binding to albumin in hypoalbuminaemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Besarab, A; Caro, J F

    1981-01-01

    The amount of calcium bound to protein was measured in 30 patients with differing diseases and varying degrees of hypoalbuminaemia. Total serum calcium increased directly with both serum albumin and ultrafilterable calcium concentrations. The estimated amount of calcium bound per gram of albumin varied inversely with the albumin concentration, decreasing from 2.1 to 1.0 mg calcium/g albumin as albumin concentration increased from 1.7 to 3.1 g/dl. Circulating parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentr...

  11. Effect of combining different calcium concentration dialysate on calcium balance in peritoneal dialysis patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hui-ping; WU Bei; LU Li-xia; QIAO Jie; WU Xiang-lan; WANG Mei

    2012-01-01

    Background Calcium and phosphorus metabolic disturbance are common in dialysis patients and associated with increased morbidity and mortality.Therefore,maintaining the balance of calcium and phosphate metabolism and suitable intact parathyroid hormone(iPTH)level has become the focus of attention.We investigated the effects of different peritoneal dialysate calcium concentrations on calcium phosphate metabolism and iPTH in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis(CAPD)patients.Methods Forty stable CAPD patients with normal serum calcium were followed for six months of treatment with 1.25 mmol/L calcium dialysate(DCa1.25,PD4,22 patients)or a combination of 1.75 mmol/L calcium dialysate(DCa1.75,PD2)and PD4(18 patients)twice a day respectively.Total serum calcium(after albumin correction),serum phosphorus,iPTH,alkaline phosphatase(ALP)and blood pressure were recorded before and 1,3 and 6 months after treatment commenced.Results No significant difference was found in baseline serum calcium,phosphorus between the two patient groups,but the levels of iPTH were significantly different.No significant changes were found in the dosage of calcium carbonate and active vitamin D during 6 months.In the PD4 group,serum calcium level at the 1st,3rd,6th months were significantly lower than the baseline(P<0.05).There was no significant difference in serum phosphorus after 6 months treatment.iPTH was significantly higher(P<0.001)at the 1st,3rd,and 6th months compared with the baseline.No differences were seen in ALP and blood pressure.In the PD4+PD2 group,no significant changes in serum calcium,phosphorus,iPTH,ALP and BP during the 6-month follow-up period.Conclusions Treatment with 1.25 mmol/L calcium dialysate for six months can decrease serum calcium,increase iPTH,without change in serum phosphorus,ALP,and BP.The combining of PD4 and PD2 can stabilize the serum calcium and avoid fluctuations in iPTH levels.

  12. Increased calcium absorption from synthetic stable amorphous calcium carbonate: Double-blind randomized crossover clinical trial in post-menopausal women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium supplementation is a widely recognized strategy for achieving adequate calcium intake. We designed this blinded, randomized, crossover interventional trial to compare the bioavailability of a new stable synthetic amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) with that of crystalline calcium carbonate (C...

  13. Anodic Behavior of Alloy 22 in Calcium Chloride and in Calcium Chloride Plus Calcium Nitrate Brines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, K J; Day, S D; Ilevbare, G O; Whalen, M T; King, K J; Hust, G A; Wong, L L; Estill, J C; Rebak, R B

    2003-05-13

    Alloy 22 (UNS N60622) is a nickel-based alloy, which is extensively used in aggressive industrial applications, especially due to its resistance to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in high chloride environments. The purpose of this work was to characterize the anodic behavior of Alloy 22 in concentrated calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}) brines and to evaluate the inhibitive effect of nitrate, especially to localized corrosion. Standard electrochemical tests such as polarization resistance and cyclic polarization were used. Results show that the corrosion potential of Alloy 22 was approximately -360 mV in the silver-silver chloride (SSC) scale and independent of the tested temperature. Cyclic polarization tests showed that Alloy 22 was mainly susceptible to localized attack in 5 M CaCl{sub 2} at 75 C and higher temperatures. The addition of nitrate in a molar ratio of chloride to nitrate equal to 10 increased the onset of localized corrosion to approximately 105 C. The addition of nitrate to the solution also decreased the uniform corrosion rate and the passive current of the alloy.

  14. Update on calcium pyrophosphate deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhishek, Abhishek; Doherty, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition (CPPD) associates with ageing, osteoarthritis (OA), uncommon metabolic diseases, mutations and polymorphisms in the ankylosis human gene (ANKH). CPPD is frequently polyarticular, occurs due to a generalised articular predisposition, and the association between CPPD and OA is joint specific, for example CPPD associates with knee OA, but not with hip OA. Other recently identified associations include knee malalignment (knee CC), low cortical BMD and soft-tissue calcification. CPPD is generally asymptomatic. A recent study reported that knees with OA plus CC at the index joint, or at distant joints (in absence of index joint CC), were more likely to have attrition. CPPD can cause acute CPP crystal arthritis, chronic CPP crystal inflammatory arthritis, and is frequently present in joints with OA. Joint aspiration remains the gold standard for diagnosing CPPD, although other promising techniques are emerging. Patients with polyarticular or young onset CPPD should be screened for underlying metabolic abnormalities, however, such testing can be unrewarding. The treatment of CPPD is symptomatic. Acute CPP crystal arthritis is treated with rest, local application of ice-packs, joint aspiration, colchicine and/or intra-articular corticosteroid injection (once infection is excluded). Colchicine, low-dose corticosteroids, hydroxychloroquine and radiosynovectomy are recommended for the treatment of chronic or recurrent acute CPP crystal arthritis. Recent RCTs did not confirm any benefit from methotrexate, and although there is increasing interest in the use of anti-IL1 agents for acute or chronic CPP crystal arthritis, their efficacy has not been formally examined. Unlike gout, currently there are no treatments to eliminate CPP crystal deposits. PMID:27586801

  15. Eggshell powder, a comparable or better source of calcium than purified calcium carbonate: Piglet studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, A.; Beelen, G.M.

    1999-01-01

    Powdered chicken eggshells might be an interesting and widely available source of calcium. In two studies using piglets we determined the digestibility of calcium from different diets. The first study compared casein-based diets with CaCO3 (CasCC) or eggshell powder (CasES). The second study compare

  16. Calcium spikes and calcium plateaux evoked by differential polarization in dendrites of turtle motoneurones in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounsgaard, J; Kiehn, O

    1993-01-01

    The ability of dendrites in turtle motoneurones to support calcium spikes and calcium plateaux was investigated using differential polarization by applied electric fields. 2. Electric fields were generated by passing current through transverse slices of the turtle spinal cord between two plate...

  17. Characterization of dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structural and regulatory properties of the dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channel were studied by isolating protein components of the channel complex from both cardiac and skeletal muscle. Hydrodynamic characterization of the (+)-(3H)PN200-110-labeled cardiac calcium channel revealed that the protein components of the complex had a total molecular mass of 370,000 daltons, a Stokes radius of 86 angstrom, and a frictional ratio of 1.3. A technique is described for the rapid incorporation of the CHAPS solubilized skeletal muscle calcium channel complex into phospholipid vesicles. 45Ca2+ uptake into phospholipid vesicles containing calcium channels was inhibited by phenylalkalamine calcium antagonists. Wheat germ lectin followed by DEAE chromatography of the CHAPS solubilized complex resulted in the dissociation of regulatory components of the complex from channel components. The DEAE preparation gave rise to 45Ca2+ uptake that was not inhibited by verapamil but was inhibited by GTPgS activated G0. The inhibition of 45Ca2+ uptake by verapamil was restored by co-reconstitution of wash fractions from wheat germ lectin chromatography. Phosphorylation of polypeptides in this fraction by polypeptide-dependent protein kinase prevented the restoration of verapamil sensitivity. The partial purification of an endogenous skeletal muscle ADP-ribosyltransferase is also described. ADP-ribosylation of the α2 subunit of the calcium channel complex is enhanced by polylysine and inhibited by GTPγS, suggesting that regulation of this enzyme is under the control of GTP binding proteins. These results suggest a complex model, involving a number of different protein components, for calcium channel regulation in skeletal muscle

  18. Accelerations of {epsilon}+{alpha}{yields}{beta} transformation and sintering of iron silicide by addition of Pd; Pd tenka ni yoru keikatetsu no {epsilon}+{alpha}{yields}{beta} hentai to shoketsu no sokushin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, M.; Yamamoto, N.; Takeda, T. [Isuzu Advanced Engineering Center Ltd., Kanagawa (Japan); Hayashi, K. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Institute of Industrial Science

    1996-12-15

    FeSi2 ({beta} phase) semiconducting iron silicide, which is expected to be widely used as a thermoelectric material in high temperature environment, is formed below 1259K by the peritectoid reaction of FeSi ({epsilon}) and Fe2Si5 ({alpha}) two metallic phases. Because the transformation of {epsilon} + {alpha} {yields} {beta} caused by this peritectoid reaction occurs considerably slowly, the iron silicide material which is produced by sintering of the powder at temperatures above 1259K has to be isothermally heat-treated for at least 180ks at about 1120K after the sintering so that the transformation occurs completely. We have found that the transformation was drastically accelerated by the addition of a small amount of Pd in the same way as Cu; the isothermal heat-treatment time necessary for the completion of the transformation was reduced to about 1/60. The sintering time needed for the almost full densification of the powder by pressure DCL sintering (DCL; direct current loading) was also reduced. A hypothesis for the mechanisms was proposed. 15 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Analysis of bonding and d-electron count in the transition-metal carbides and transition-metal-silicide carbides with discrete linear M-C-M units (M = Cr, Fe, Re) by electronic structure calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electronic structures of the silicide carbides Tm2Fe2Si2C, Th2Re2Si2C, and ThFe2SiC and the carbide Ho2Cr2C3 were calculated, using the extended Hueckel tight binding method, to probe the d-electron counts of their transition metal atoms M (Cr, Fe, Re) the bonding of their linear M-C-M (M = Cr, Fe, Re) units. The nature of the short interlayer X hor-ellipsis X (X = C, Si) bonds in Tm2Fe2Si2C, Th2Re2Si2C, and Ho2Cr2C3 was also examined. The study shows that the M-C bonds of the M-C-M units exist as double bonds. There is significant bonding in the interlayer Si hor-ellipsis Si contacts of the silicide carbides R2M2Si2C (M = Fe, Re). The transition-metal atoms exist as d10 ions in Tm2Fe2Si2C and Th2Re2Si2C. The d-electron count is slightly lower than d10 in ThFe2SiC and close to d5 in Ho2Cr2C3

  20. Calcium ferrite formation from the thermolysis of calcium tris (maleato) ferrate(III)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B S Randhawa; Kamaljeet Sweety

    2000-08-01

    For preparing calcium ferrite, calcium tris (maleato) ferrate(III) precursor was prepared by mixing aqueous solutions of iron(III) maleate, calcium maleate and maleic acid. Various physico-chemical techniques i.e. TG, DTG, DTA, Mössbauer, XRD, IR etc have been used to study the decomposition behaviour from ambient to 900°C and ferrite formation. Three consecutive decomposition steps leading to the formation of -Fe2O3 and calcium carbonate have been observed at various stages of thermolysis. In the final stage the ferrite, Ca2Fe2O5, is obtained as a result of solid state reaction between -Fe2O3 and calcium carbonate at 788°C, a temperature much lower than for ceramic method. The results have been compared with those of the oxalate precursor.