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Sample records for calcium silicate hydrates

  1. Nanostructure of Calcium Silicate Hydrates in Cements

    KAUST Repository

    Skinner, L. B.

    2010-05-11

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is the major volume phase in the matrix of Portland cement concrete. Total x-ray scattering measurements with synchrotron x rays on synthetic CSH(I) shows nanocrystalline ordering with a particle diameter of 3.5(5) nm, similar to a size-broadened 1.1 nm tobermorite crystal structure. The CSH component in hydrated tricalcium silicate is found to be similar to CSH(I). Only a slight bend and additional disorder within the CaO sheets is required to explain its nanocrystalline structure. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  2. Aggregation of Calcium Silicate Hydrate Nanoplatelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delhorme, Maxime; Labbez, Christophe; Turesson, Martin; Lesniewska, Eric; Woodward, Cliff E; Jönsson, Bo

    2016-03-01

    We study the aggregation of calcium silicate hydrate nanoplatelets on a surface by means of Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations at thermodynamic equilibrium. Calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is the main component formed in cement and is responsible for the strength of the material. The hydrate is formed in early cement paste and grows to form platelets on the nanoscale, which aggregate either on dissolving cement particles or on auxiliary particles. The general result is that the experimentally observed variations in these dynamic processes generically called growth can be rationalized from interaction free energies, that is, from pure thermodynamic arguments. We further show that the surface charge density of the particles determines the aggregate structures formed by C-S-H and thus their growth modes. PMID:26859614

  3. Behavior of calcium silicate hydrate in aluminate solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-bin; ZHAO Zhuo; LIU Gui-hua; ZHOU Qiu-sheng; PENG Zhi-hong

    2005-01-01

    Using calcium hydroxide and sodium silicate as starting materials, two kinds of calcium silicate hydrates, CaO · SiO2 · H2O and 2CaO · SiO2 · 1.17H2O, were hydro-thermally synthesized at 120 ℃. The reaction rule of calcium silicate hydrate in aluminate solution was investigated. The result shows that CaO · SiO2 · H2O is more stable than 2CaO · SiO2 · 1.17H2 O in aluminate solution and its stability increases with the increase of reaction temperature but decreases with the increase of caustic concentration. The reaction between calcium silicate hydrate and aluminate solution is mainly through two routes. In the first case, Al replaces partial Si in calcium silicate hydrate, meanwhile 3CaO · Al2 O3 · xSiO2 · (6-2x) H2 O (hydro-garnet) is formed and some SiO2 enters the solution. In the second case, calcium silicate hydrate can react directly with aluminate solution, forming hydro-garnet and Na2O · Al2O3 · 2SiO2 · nH2O (DSP). The desilication reaction of aluminate solution containing silicate could contribute partially to forming DSP.

  4. NMR study of hydrated calcium silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive wastes storage methods are developed by the CEA. As cements are important materials as well for hours living radioisotopes than for years living radioisotopes, a better knowledge of this material will allow to anticipate its behaviour and to obtain safer storage methods. The structure of calcium silicates (C-S-H) (main constituent of cements) have then been determined in this thesis by nuclear magnetic resonance. This method has allow to explain in structural terms, the different calcium rates that can be measured in the C-S-H too. (O.M.)

  5. Hardening of calcium hydroxide and calcium silicate binders due to carbonation and hydration

    OpenAIRE

    Cizer, Özlem; Campforts, J; Balen, Koenraad Van; Elsen, Jan; Gemert, Dionys van

    2006-01-01

    Hardening of calcium hydroxide and calcium silicate binders composed of cement, rice husk ash (RHA) and lime in different compositions were studied with mechanical strength, mercury intrusion porosimetry, thermal analysis and SEM. When cement is partially replaced with RHA and lime, hardening occurs as a result of combined hydration, pozzolanic reaction and carbonation reaction. While hydration of cement contributes to the early strength development of the mortars, carbonation is much more pr...

  6. Synthesis and reaction behavior of calcium silicate hydrate in basic system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘桂华; 贺强; 李小斌; 彭志宏; 周秋生

    2004-01-01

    At the molar ratio of CaO to SiO2 of 1, with calcium hydroxide and sodium silicate, calcium silicate hydrate was synthesized at 50, 100, 170 ℃, respectively. The results show that temperature favors the formation of calcium silicate hydrate with perfect structure. When calcium silicate hydrate reacts with caustic solution, the decomposition rate of calcium silicate hydrate increases with the increasing caustic concentration and decreases with the raising synthesis temperature and the prolongation of reaction time. The decomposition rate is all less than 1.2 % in caustic solution, and XRD pattern of the residue after reaction with caustic solution is found as the same as that of original calcium silicate hydrate, which indicates the stable existence of calcium silicate hydrate in caustic solution.When reacted with soda solution, the decomposition rate increases with the increasing soda concentration and reaction time, while decreases with the synthesis temperature. The decomposition rate is more than 2% because CaO · SiO2 · H2O(CSH( Ⅰ )), except Ca5 (OH)2Si6O16 · 4H2O and Ca6Si6O17 (OH)2, is decomposed. So the synthesis temperature and soda concentration should be controlled in the process of transformation of sodium aluminosilicate hydrate into calcium silicate hydrate.

  7. Synthesis and Characterization of Different Crystalline Calcium Silicate Hydrate: Application for the Removal of Aflatoxin B1 from Aqueous Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Lu Zeng; Ligang Yang; Shuping Wang; Kai Yang

    2014-01-01

    Different crystalline calcium silicate hydrates (CSH) were synthesized under specific hydrothermal conditions and several methods were used to analyze samples. Amorphous calcium silicate hydrates (ACSH) mainly consists of disordered calcium silicate hydrate gel (C-S-H gel) and crystalline calcium silicate hydrates (CCSH) consists of crystallized tobermorite. The adsorption of carcinogenic aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) onto ACSH and CCSH was investigated. The adsorption kinetics was studied using pseudo...

  8. Calcium silicate hydrates: Solid and liquid phase composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a review on the relationship between the composition, the structure and the solution in which calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H) is equilibrated. The silica chain length in C–S–H increases with the silicon concentration and the calcium content in the interlayer space with the calcium concentrations. Sodium and potassium are taken up in the interlayer space, preferentially at low calcium concentrations and thus by low Ca/Si C–S–H. Aluminium uptake in C–S–H increases strongly at higher aluminium concentrations in the solution. At low Ca/Si, aluminium substitutes silica in the bridging position, at Ca/Si > 1 aluminium is bound in TAH. Recently developed thermodynamic models are closely related to the structure of C–S–H and tobermorite, and able to model not only the solubility and the chemical composition of the C–S–H, but also to predict the mean silica chain length and the uptake of aluminium

  9. Calcium silicate hydrates: Solid and liquid phase composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lothenbach, Barbara, E-mail: Barbara.lothenbach@empa.ch [Laboratory Concrete & Construction Chemistry, Empa (Switzerland); Nonat, André [ICB, UMR CNRS 6303 CNRS-Université de Bourgogne, Faculté des Sciences et Techniques, BP47870, 21078 Dijon Cedex (France)

    2015-12-15

    This paper presents a review on the relationship between the composition, the structure and the solution in which calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H) is equilibrated. The silica chain length in C–S–H increases with the silicon concentration and the calcium content in the interlayer space with the calcium concentrations. Sodium and potassium are taken up in the interlayer space, preferentially at low calcium concentrations and thus by low Ca/Si C–S–H. Aluminium uptake in C–S–H increases strongly at higher aluminium concentrations in the solution. At low Ca/Si, aluminium substitutes silica in the bridging position, at Ca/Si > 1 aluminium is bound in TAH. Recently developed thermodynamic models are closely related to the structure of C–S–H and tobermorite, and able to model not only the solubility and the chemical composition of the C–S–H, but also to predict the mean silica chain length and the uptake of aluminium.

  10. Discrete element modeling of calcium-silicate-hydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discrete element method (DEM) was used to model calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) at the nanoscale. The C-S-H nanoparticles were modeled as spherical particles with diameters of approximately 5 nm. Interparticle forces included traditional mechanical contact forces, van der Waals forces and ionic correlation forces due to negatively charged C-S-H nanoparticles and ion species in the nanopores. Previous work by the authors demonstrated the DEM method was feasible in studying the properties of the C-S-H nanostructures. In this work, the simulations were performed to look into the effects of nanoparticle packing, nanoparticle morphology, interparticle forces and nanoparticle properties on the deformation mechanisms and mechanical properties of the C-S-H matrix. This work will provide insights into possible ways to improve the properties of the C-S-H matrix. (paper)

  11. Mechanical behavior of a composite interface: Calcium-silicate-hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palkovic, Steven D.; Moeini, Sina; Büyüköztürk, Oral, E-mail: obuyuk@mit.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Yip, Sidney [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-07-21

    The generalized stacking fault (GSF) is a conceptual procedure historically used to assess shear behavior of defect-free crystalline structures through molecular dynamics or density functional theory simulations. We apply the GSF technique to the spatially and chemically complex quasi-layered structure of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H), the fundamental nanoscale binder within cementitious materials. A failure plane is enforced to calculate the shear traction-displacement response along a composite interface containing highly confined water molecules, hydroxyl groups, and calcium ions. GSF simulations are compared with affine (homogeneous) shear simulations, which allow strain to localize naturally in response to the local atomic environment. Comparison of strength and deformation behavior for the two loading methods shows the composite interface controls bulk shear deformation. Both models indicate the maximum shear strength of C-S-H exhibits a normal-stress dependency typical of cohesive-frictional materials. These findings suggest the applicability of GSF techniques to inhomogeneous structures and bonding environments, including other layered systems such as biological materials containing organic and inorganic interfaces.

  12. Mechanical behavior of a composite interface: Calcium-silicate-hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The generalized stacking fault (GSF) is a conceptual procedure historically used to assess shear behavior of defect-free crystalline structures through molecular dynamics or density functional theory simulations. We apply the GSF technique to the spatially and chemically complex quasi-layered structure of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H), the fundamental nanoscale binder within cementitious materials. A failure plane is enforced to calculate the shear traction-displacement response along a composite interface containing highly confined water molecules, hydroxyl groups, and calcium ions. GSF simulations are compared with affine (homogeneous) shear simulations, which allow strain to localize naturally in response to the local atomic environment. Comparison of strength and deformation behavior for the two loading methods shows the composite interface controls bulk shear deformation. Both models indicate the maximum shear strength of C-S-H exhibits a normal-stress dependency typical of cohesive-frictional materials. These findings suggest the applicability of GSF techniques to inhomogeneous structures and bonding environments, including other layered systems such as biological materials containing organic and inorganic interfaces

  13. Silicate anion structural change in calcium silicate hydrate gel on dissolution of hydrated cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High pH conditions of aqueous solutions in a radioactive waste repository can be brought about by dissolution of cementitious materials. In order to clarify the mechanisms involved in maintaining this high pH for long time, we investigated the dissolution phenomena of OPC hydrate. In the present research, leaching tests on powdered cement hydrates were conducted by changing the ratio of mass of leaching water to mass of OPC hydrate (liquid/solid ratio) from 10 - 2,000 (wt/wt). Ordinary Portland Cement hydrate was contacted with deionized water and placed in a sealed bottle. After a predetermined period, the solid was separated from the solution. From the results of XRD analysis on the solid phase and the Ca concentration in the aqueous phase, it was confirmed that Ca(OH)2 was preferentially dissolved when the liquid/solid ratio was 10 or 100 (wt/wt), and that C-S-H gel as well as Ca(OH)2 were dissolved when the liquid/solid ratio was 500 (wt/wt) or larger. 29Si-NMR results showed that the silicate anion chain of the C-S-H gel became longer when the liquid/solid ratio was 500 (wt/wt) or greater. This indicates that leaching of OPC hydrate results in a structural change of C-S-H gel. (author)

  14. Synthesis of pure zeolite P2 from calcium silicate hydrate; tobermorite

    OpenAIRE

    Nasser Y. Mostafa; Rasha A. Garib; Z. K. Heiba; Abd-Elkader, Omar H.; M. M. Al-Majthoub

    2015-01-01

    Calcium silicate hydrate phases offer the possibility to become potential zeolites precursors due to its high silica contents. Pure calcium silicate hydrate phase; tobermorite (Ca5Si6O16(OH)2·4H2O), was prepared by hydrothermal method at 175°C. Tobermorite was sucssefully converted to Zeolite P2 for the first time via refluxing in 3 M NaOH solution and in the presence of Al source. Sodium hydroxide removed calcium ions from the interlayers of calcium silicate phase and form mesoporous zeolite...

  15. Distribution of Water in Synthetic Calcium Silicate Hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosz, C; Gaboreau, S; Grangeon, S; Prêt, D; Montouillout, V; Maubec, N; Ory, S; Blanc, P; Vieillard, P; Henocq, P

    2016-07-12

    Understanding calcium silicate hydrates (CSHs) is of paramount importance for understanding the behavior of cement materials because they control most of the properties of these man-made materials. The atomic scale water content and structure have a major influence on their properties, as is analogous with clay minerals, and we should assess these. Here, we used a multiple analytical approach to quantify water distribution in CSH samples and to determine the relative proportions of water sorbed on external and internal (interlayer) surfaces. Water vapor isotherms were used to explain the water distribution in the CSH microstructure. As with many layered compounds, CSHs have external and internal (interlayer) surfaces displaying multilayer adsorption of water molecules on external surfaces owing to the hydrophilic surfaces. Interlayer water was also quantified from water vapor isotherm, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermal gravimetric analyses (TGA) data, displaying nonreversible swelling/shrinkage behavior in response to drying/rewetting cycles. From this quantification and balance of water distribution, we were able to explain most of the widely dispersed data already published according to the various relative humidity (RH) conditions and measurement techniques. Stoichiometric formulas were proposed for the different CSH samples analyzed (0.6 < Ca/Si < 1.6), considering the interlayer water contribution. PMID:27281114

  16. Hydration characteristics and environmental friendly performance of a cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Na; Li, Hongxu; Zhao, Yazhao; Liu, Xiaoming

    2016-04-01

    Calcium silicate slag is an alkali leaching waste generated during the process of extracting Al2O3 from high-alumina fly ash. In this research, a cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag was developed, and its mechanical and physical properties, hydration characteristics and environmental friendly performance were investigated. The results show that an optimal design for the cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag was determined by the specimen CFSC7 containing 30% calcium silicate slag, 5% high-alumina fly ash, 24% blast furnace slag, 35% clinker and 6% FGD gypsum. This blended system yields excellent physical and mechanical properties, confirming the usefulness of CFSC7. The hydration products of CFSC7 are mostly amorphous C-A-S-H gel, rod-like ettringite and hexagonal-sheet Ca(OH)2 with small amount of zeolite-like minerals such as CaAl2Si2O8·4H2O and Na2Al2Si2O8·H2O. As the predominant hydration products, rod-like ettringite and amorphous C-A-S-H gel play a positive role in promoting densification of the paste structure, resulting in strength development of CFSC7 in the early hydration process. The leaching toxicity and radioactivity tests results indicate that the developed cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag is environmentally acceptable. This study points out a promising direction for the proper utilization of calcium silicate slag in large quantities. PMID:26691955

  17. Hydration characteristics and environmental friendly performance of a cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Na; Li, Hongxu; Zhao, Yazhao; Liu, Xiaoming

    2016-04-01

    Calcium silicate slag is an alkali leaching waste generated during the process of extracting Al2O3 from high-alumina fly ash. In this research, a cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag was developed, and its mechanical and physical properties, hydration characteristics and environmental friendly performance were investigated. The results show that an optimal design for the cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag was determined by the specimen CFSC7 containing 30% calcium silicate slag, 5% high-alumina fly ash, 24% blast furnace slag, 35% clinker and 6% FGD gypsum. This blended system yields excellent physical and mechanical properties, confirming the usefulness of CFSC7. The hydration products of CFSC7 are mostly amorphous C-A-S-H gel, rod-like ettringite and hexagonal-sheet Ca(OH)2 with small amount of zeolite-like minerals such as CaAl2Si2O8·4H2O and Na2Al2Si2O8·H2O. As the predominant hydration products, rod-like ettringite and amorphous C-A-S-H gel play a positive role in promoting densification of the paste structure, resulting in strength development of CFSC7 in the early hydration process. The leaching toxicity and radioactivity tests results indicate that the developed cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag is environmentally acceptable. This study points out a promising direction for the proper utilization of calcium silicate slag in large quantities.

  18. Santaclaraite, a new calcium-manganese silicate hydrate from California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erd, Richard C.; Ohashi, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Santaclaraite, ideally CaMn4(Si5O14(OH))(OH).H2O, occurs as pink and tan veins and masses in Franciscan chert in the Diablo Range, Santa Clara and Stanislaus counties, California. It is associated with four unidentified Mn silicates, Mn-howieite, quartz, braunite, calcite, rhodochrosite, kutnahorite, baryte, harmotome, chalcopyrite and native copper. Santaclaraite is triclinic, space group B1, a 15.633(1), b 7.603(1) , c 12.003(1) A, alpha 109.71(1)o, beta 88.61(1)o, gamma 99.95(1) o, V 1322.0(3) A3; Z = 4. The strongest lines of the X-ray pattern are 7.04(100), 3.003(84), 3.152(80), 7.69(63), 3.847(57) A. Crystals are lamellar to prismatic (flattened on (100)), with good cleavage on (100) and (010); H. 61/2 Dcalc. 3.398 g/cm3, Dmeas. 3.31 (+ or -0.01); optically biaxial negative, alpha 1.681, beta 1.696, gamma 1.708 (all + or - 0.002), 2Valpha 83 (+ or -1)o. Although chemically a hydrated rhodonite, santaclaraite dehydrates to Mn-bustamite at approx 550oC (in air) . Santaclaraite is a five-tetrahedral-repeat single-chain silicate and has structural affinities with rhodonite, nambulite, marsturite, babingtonite and inesite.-J.A.Z.

  19. Nanoscale Charge Balancing Mechanism in Alkali Substituted Calcium-Silicate-Hydrate Gels

    CERN Document Server

    Özçelik, V Ongun

    2016-01-01

    Alkali-activated materials and related alternative cementitious systems are sustainable material technologies that have the potential to substantially lower CO$_2$ emissions associated with the construction industry. However, the impact of augmenting the chemical composition of the material on the main binder phase, calcium-silicate-hydrate gel, is far from understood, particularly since this binder phase is disordered at the nanoscale. Here, we reveal the presence of a charge balancing mechanism at the molecular level, which leads to stable structures when alkalis (i.e., Na or K) are incorporated into a calcium-silicate-hydrate gel, as modeled using crystalline 14{\\AA} tobermorite. These alkali containing charge balanced structures possess superior mechanical properties compared to their charge unbalanced counterparts. Our results, which are based on first-principles simulations using density functional theory, include the impact of charge balancing on the optimized geometries of the new model phases, format...

  20. Synthetic crystalline calcium silicate hydrate (I): cation exchange and caesium selectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid crystalline calcium silicate hydrate (I) synthesized from equimolar amounts of Ca and Si under hydrothermal conditions at 120 oC shows cation exchange properties towards divalent metal cations such as Ni, Cu, Cd, or Hg. It also exhibits caesium selectivity in the presence of Na+. The exchange capacity and selectivity of the solid can be increased by 10 and 28 %, respectively, upon substitution of 0.01 mol of the Ca2+ in its structure by Na+. The ability of metal cation uptake by the solid was found to obey the order Ni2+ > Hg2+ > Cu2+ > Cd2+. The different affinities of calcium silicate hydrate (I) towards these ions can be used for their separation from solutions and also in nuclear waste treatment. The mechanism of the exchange reaction is discussed. (author)

  1. Influence of Hydrothermal Temperature on Phosphorus Recovery Efficiency of Porous Calcium Silicate Hydrate

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Guan; Fangying Ji; Qingkong Chen; Peng Yan; Weiwei Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Porous calcium silicate hydrate (PCSH) was synthesized by carbide residue and white carbon black. The influence of hydrothermal temperature on phosphorus recovery efficiency was investigated by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Hydrothermal temperature exerted significant influence on phosphorus recovery performance of PCSH. Hydrothermal temperature 170°C for PCSH was more proper to recover phosphorus. PCSH could re...

  2. Study on selective sorption of 137Cs on Al-substituted calcium silicate hydroxy hydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorption properties have been investigated by radiometric (tracer) technique at room temperature for aluminium substituted calcium silicate hydroxy hydrate, known as tobermorite. The 137Cs selectivity has been examined in presence of 1000 times concentrated solution of Na+, Ca2+, and Ba2+. The results suggest that the title phase could be used for immobilization of radioactive cesium. Cation exchange reaction takes place mainly from edge and planar surface sites along with interlayer Ca2+ sites. (author)

  3. Accelerated growth of calcium silicate hydrates: Experiments and simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the usefulness of isothermal calorimetry in cement analytics, without any further computations this brings only little information on the nucleation and growth of hydrates. A model originally developed by Garrault et al. is used in this study in order to simulate hydration curves of cement obtained by calorimetry with different known hardening accelerators. The limited basis set of parameters used in this model, having a physical or chemical significance, is valuable for a better understanding of mechanisms underlying in the acceleration of C-S-H precipitation. Alite hydration in presence of four different types of hardening accelerators was investigated. It is evidenced that each accelerator type plays a specific role on one or several growth parameters and that the model may support the development of new accelerators. Those simulations supported by experimental observations enable us to follow the formation of the C-S-H layer around grains and to extract interesting information on its apparent permeability.

  4. Synthesis of pure zeolite P2 from calcium silicate hydrate; tobermorite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Y. Mostafa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Calcium silicate hydrate phases offer the possibility to become potential zeolites precursors due to its high silica contents. Pure calcium silicate hydrate phase; tobermorite (Ca5Si6O16(OH2·4H2O, was prepared by hydrothermal method at 175°C. Tobermorite was sucssefully converted to Zeolite P2 for the first time via refluxing in 3 M NaOH solution and in the presence of Al source. Sodium hydroxide removed calcium ions from the interlayers of calcium silicate phase and form mesoporous zeolite. The pure zeolite was obtained after extraction of Ca(OH2 with sugar solution. The zeolite products were characterized by using X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM with microanalysis (EDX. The Si/Al molar ratio of zeolite P can be controlled by vering the initinal Si/Al molar ratio. The cation-exchange capacity (CEC of the produced zeolite P was higher than those produced from fly ash.

  5. A Novel Synthesis Method of Porous Calcium Silicate Hydrate Based on the Calcium Oxide/Polyethylene Glycol Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Guan; Fangying Ji; Yong Cheng; Zhuoyao Fang; Dexin Fang; Peng Yan; Qingkong Chen

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposed a novel method to prepare porous calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) based on the calcium oxide/polyethylene glycol (CaO/PEG2000) composites as the calcium materials. The porosity formation mechanism was revealed via X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The reactivity of silica materials (SiO2) enhanced by increasing pH value. Ca2+ could not sustain rele...

  6. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    OpenAIRE

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Robert J. Flatt; D'Espinose De Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measuremen...

  7. Caesium immobilization in hydrated calcium-silicate-aluminate systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A special field of application of cementitious materials in using cements for immobilization of low and medium level radioactive wastes. Clarification of mechanisms of binding is complicated by the multicomponent nature of the solidifying matrix. In the present work, interest is turned to one of the most difficult to confine, long half-life isotopes, the caesium isotope. The cement matrix for solidification of the radioactive waste can be considered, with simplification, as a CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-H2O system. The various compositions of hydrated cementitious assemblages were investigated with respect to their Cs sorption by measuring the Cs distribution ratios (Rd) therein. Trends in sorption properties were detected, and the section of the ternary phase diagram with the best performance was identified

  8. Synthesis and characterization of calcium-alumino-silicate hydrates from oil shale ash - Towards industrial applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janek Reinik; Ivo Heinmaa; Jyri-Pekka Mikkola; Uuve Kirso [National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Tallinn (Estonia)

    2008-08-15

    The influence of the alkaline medium on the hydrothermal activation of the oil shale fly ash with NaOH and KOH was studied using SEM/EDX, XRD, {sup 29}Si and {sup 27}Al high-resolution MAS-NMR spectra. In the presence of NaOH the silicon in the original fly ash was completely converted into calcium-aluminum-silicate-hydrates, mainly into 1.1 nm tobermorite structure during 24-h treatment at 160{sup o}C. At similar reaction conditions, the activation with KOH resulted only to the formation of amorphous calcium-silica-hydrate gel on the surface of ash particles at temperature. The results obtained in this study indicate that the oil shale fly ash can be used for production of Al-substituted tobermorites when strongly alkaline media (NaOH) is applied. The synthesized product was used in a catalytic d-lactose isomerization reaction. 29 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Structure alteration of C-S-H (calcium silicate hydrated phases) caused by sorption of caesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sorption behavior of Cs onto C-S-H (calcium silicate hydrated phases) was investigated by evaluating the effect of sorption on the C-S-H structure. The C-S-H have a tobermorite-type layer structure. Each layer consists of central calcium and oxygen atoms sandwiched by silicate tetrahedral chains. Additional calcium and water are located in interlayer zones. The XRD spectra showed that the tobermorite-type layer degraded and that the sorption of Cs made the fragments of layer intergrowths much smaller. The fragmentation of the tobermorite-type layer was observed for C-S-H in contact with CsCl solution or with CsOH solution, but not for the C-S-H in contact with Na solution. Furthermore, 29Si NMR spectroscopy revealed that the sorption of Cs onto C-S-H induced cleavages of silicate chains in C-S-H. It was also suggested that the OH- ion contributed to breaking the silicate chains. (orig.)

  10. On the nature of structural disorder in calcium silicate hydrates with a calcium/silicon ratio similar to tobermorite

    OpenAIRE

    Grangeon, Sylvain; Claret, Francis; Lerouge, Catherine; Warmont, Fabienne; SATO, Tsutomo; ANRAKU, Sohtoru; Numako, Chiya; LINARD, Yannick; Lanson, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Four calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H) with structural calcium/silicon (Ca/Si) ratios ranging from 0.82 +/- 0.02 to 0.87 +/- 0.02 were synthesized at room temperature, 50, 80, and 110 degrees C. Their structure was elucidated by collating information from electron probe micro-analysis, transmission electron microscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). A modeling approach specific to defective minerals was used because sample turbostrat...

  11. Specific interaction of cesium with the surface of calcium silicate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sorption of cesium at the calcium silicate hydrates (CSH) surface was investigated, both through sorption isotherm data and by solid-state NMR experiments. The sorption ability of CSH towards cesium is favored for low solid Ca/Si molar ratios, in agreement with the negative surface charge they develop then. A significant proportion of these sorbed cesium cations remains tightly bound to the surface sites forming, in dehydrated CSH, inner-sphere complexes, which can not be removed by alcohol washing. Chloride seems to present a lower affinity for CSH, even for high Ca/Si molar ratios, where the surface charge becomes positive. (orig.)

  12. Sorption study of 137Cs on Al-substituted calcium silicate hydroxy hydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium silicate hydroxy hydrate is also known as tobermorite and it is similar to Ca5AlxSi6-xO18H24.nH2O (where x = 0.025) in composition. Sorption studies have been investigated by radiometric technique at room temperature. The 137Cs selectivity has been examined in presence of 1000 times concentrated solution of Na+, Ca2+ and Ba2+. The data suggests that tobermorite could be used for immobilisation of radioactive caesium. (author)

  13. Immobilisation and solidification of cesium on 11 A calcium silicate hydroxy hydrate column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium silicate hydrate closely resembling silicate mineral 11 A tobermorite has been synthesised by hydrothermal treatment of lime and silica at 175 degC. The synthetic mineral exhibits selectivity for Cs+ in the presence of strong solutions of alkali and alkaline earth cations, viz, Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Sr2+, etc. The Al-substituted form of this mineral effectively separates cesium ion when used as an exchanger in column of size 35x5 mm (hxr). It is possible to remove 98.65±0.5%Cs+ from a mixed solution of cesium and sodium (0.0001N Cs+ + 0.5N Na+). Column separation of cesium from simulated intermediate level waste solution shows that from the first run ∼ 76% Cs+ can be immobilised on a small column, 18x10mm (hxr), having 2.0 g of exchanger. (author)

  14. Novel technique for phosphorus recovery from aqueous solutions using amorphous calcium silicate hydrates (A-CSHs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Kenji; Uemoto, Masahide; Kagami, Jumpei; Miura, Keiichi; Aketo, Tsuyoshi; Toda, Masaya; Honda, Kohsuke; Ohtake, Hisao

    2013-05-01

    A novel technique for phosphorus (P) recovery from aqueous solutions was developed using amorphous calcium silicate hydrates (A-CSHs). A-CSHs, which have a high Ca/Si molar ratio of 2.0 or greater, could be synthesized using unlimitedly available, inexpensive materials such as siliceous shale and calcium hydroxide. A-CSHs showed high performance for P recovery from an anaerobic sludge digestion liquor (ASDL) and the synthetic model liquor (s-ASDL) containing 89 mg PO4-P/L. After 20 min mixing, 1.5 g/L A-CSHs could remove approximately 69 and 73% PO4-P from ASDL and s-ASDL, respectively. By contrast, autoclaved lightweight concrete particles, which contained crystalline calcium silicate hydrates as a principal component, removed only 10 and 6% PO4-P from ASDL and s-ASDL, respectively, under the same experimental conditions. When A-CSHs were washed with deionized water to remove free Ca(OH)2, P removability was significantly improved (up to 82%) despite the reduction in the amount of Ca(2+) released. Unlike in the case of Ca(OH)2, no significant carbonate inhibition was observed with P removal by A-CSHs. Moreover, P removed by A-CSHs showed better settleability, filterability, and dewaterability than P precipitated with conventional CaCl2 and Ca(OH)2. The present study demonstrated that A-CSHs have great potential as a novel, beneficial material for P recovery and recycling. PMID:23497975

  15. A Novel Synthesis Method of Porous Calcium Silicate Hydrate Based on the Calcium Oxide/Polyethylene Glycol Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Guan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposed a novel method to prepare porous calcium silicate hydrate (CSH based on the calcium oxide/polyethylene glycol (CaO/PEG2000 composites as the calcium materials. The porosity formation mechanism was revealed via X-ray diffraction (XRD, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET, and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR. The reactivity of silica materials (SiO2 enhanced by increasing pH value. Ca2+ could not sustain release from CaO/PEG2000 and reacted with caused by silica to form CSH until the hydrothermal temperature reached to 170°C, avoiding the hardly dissolved intermediates formation efficiently. The as-prepared CSH, due to the large specific surface areas, exhibited excellent release capability of Ca2+ and OH−. This porous CSH has potential application in reducing the negative environmental effects of continual natural phosphate resource depletion.

  16. Simple preparation and initial characterization of semi-amorphous hollow calcium silicate hydrate nanoparticles by ammonia-hydrothermal-template techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semi-amorphous hollow calcium silicate hydrate nanoparticles (CS10d120Hac) were successfully synthesized via simple ammonia-hydrothermal-template approach (AHT) followed by acid treatment. Results revealed that the newly synthesized samples had homogenous hollow nano-interior wherein the shell wall contained semi-amorphous calcium silicate hydrate. The AHT intensified the formation of a stronger electrostatic interaction (Si–O–Ca) from the weaker electrostatic contact composed of silicate wall-calcium hydroxide interaction (Si–OH–Ca) forming a thin semi-amorphous calcium silicate hydrate shell wall. This is also a convenient way for structural stability of the hollow CS10d120Hac. The CS10d120Hac showed a relatively higher surface area, which is uniquely rare especially if compared with bulk calcium silicate particles. This CS10d120Hac can be selectively functionalized with multiple organic and inorganic groups. Hence, this work may open a new route for the formation of hybrid hollow bio-active particles.

  17. Effect of temperature and aluminium on calcium (alumino)silicate hydrate chemistry under equilibrium conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There exists limited information regarding the effect of temperature on the structure and solubility of calcium aluminosilicate hydrate (C–A–S–H). Here, calcium (alumino)silicate hydrate (C–(A–)S–H) is synthesised at Ca/Si = 1, Al/Si ≤ 0.15 and equilibrated at 7–80 °C. These systems increase in phase-purity, long-range order, and degree of polymerisation of C–(A–)S–H chains at higher temperatures; the most highly polymerised, crystalline and cross-linked C–(A–)S–H product is formed at Al/Si = 0.1 and 80 °C. Solubility products for C–(A–)S–H were calculated via determination of the solid-phase compositions and measurements of the concentrations of dissolved species in contact with the solid products, and show that the solubilities of C–(A–)S–H change slightly, within the experimental uncertainty, as a function of Al/Si ratio and temperature between 7 °C and 80 °C. These results are important in the development of thermodynamic models for C–(A–)S–H to enable accurate thermodynamic modelling of cement-based materials

  18. Effect of temperature and aluminium on calcium (alumino)silicate hydrate chemistry under equilibrium conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Rupert J., E-mail: rjmyers@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, S1 3JD Sheffield (United Kingdom); Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, EMPA, Dübendorf 8600 (Switzerland); L' Hôpital, Emilie, E-mail: Emilie.Lhopital@empa.ch [Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, EMPA, Dübendorf 8600 (Switzerland); Provis, John L., E-mail: j.provis@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, S1 3JD Sheffield (United Kingdom); Lothenbach, Barbara, E-mail: Barbara.Lothenbach@empa.ch [Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, EMPA, Dübendorf 8600 (Switzerland)

    2015-02-15

    There exists limited information regarding the effect of temperature on the structure and solubility of calcium aluminosilicate hydrate (C–A–S–H). Here, calcium (alumino)silicate hydrate (C–(A–)S–H) is synthesised at Ca/Si = 1, Al/Si ≤ 0.15 and equilibrated at 7–80 °C. These systems increase in phase-purity, long-range order, and degree of polymerisation of C–(A–)S–H chains at higher temperatures; the most highly polymerised, crystalline and cross-linked C–(A–)S–H product is formed at Al/Si = 0.1 and 80 °C. Solubility products for C–(A–)S–H were calculated via determination of the solid-phase compositions and measurements of the concentrations of dissolved species in contact with the solid products, and show that the solubilities of C–(A–)S–H change slightly, within the experimental uncertainty, as a function of Al/Si ratio and temperature between 7 °C and 80 °C. These results are important in the development of thermodynamic models for C–(A–)S–H to enable accurate thermodynamic modelling of cement-based materials.

  19. Mechanistic study and modeling of radionuclides retention by the hydrated calcium silicates (HCS) of cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work attempts to investigate the modelling of radioisotopes (Cs+, Pb2+, Eu3+) immobilization in cement matrix, in the frame of the design of engineered barrier of a deep radwaste repository. The model development concept consists of three major steps: - surface chemistry modelling of the calcium silicate hydrate CSH, used to simulate hydrated cement behaviour; - solid analysis of the batch sorption experiments: identification of the uptake mechanism; - both previous steps are used, with isotherm data, in the modelling of the radioisotopes immobilization in the CSH matrix. Final results: (all modelling are available for all the range of studied Ca/Si ratios and have been validated with predictive calculations). - A thermodynamic modelling of the CSH surface chemistry has been developed. The labile calcium and proton sorption constants on silanol sites (>SiOH) have been extracted. - Cs+ is sorbed on two sites. The silanol site (weak site) has a high site density (10 sites.nm-2), which accounts for the CSH unsaturation in high [CS+]. A strong site is also identified. - Pb2+ immobilization in CSH matrix is modelled with surface equilibria and solubility equilibrium. - Eu3+ fixation has been investigated with solid analysis: Site-Selective anti Time-Resolved Luminescence Spectroscopy, XPS and SEM-EDS. Eu3+ thus does not precipitate in CSH water but is sorbed on the CSH surface (high hydroxylated environment). Europium is also (minority site) inserted in the CSH framework. (author)

  20. Influence of Hydrothermal Temperature on Phosphorus Recovery Efficiency of Porous Calcium Silicate Hydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porous calcium silicate hydrate (PCSH) was synthesized by carbide residue and white carbon black. The influence of hydrothermal temperature on phosphorus recovery efficiency was investigated by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Hydrothermal temperature exerted significant influence on phosphorus recovery performance of PCSH. Hydrothermal temperature 170°C for PCSH was more proper to recover phosphorus. PCSH could recover phosphorus with content of 18.51%. The law of Ca2+ and OH− release was the key of phosphorus recovery efficiency, and this law depended upon the microstructure of PCSH. When the temperature of synthesis reached to 170°C, the reactions between CaO and amorphous SiO2 were more efficient. Solubility of SiO2 was a limiting factor.

  1. Influence of Hydrothermal Temperature on Phosphorus Recovery Efficiency of Porous Calcium Silicate Hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Guan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Porous calcium silicate hydrate (PCSH was synthesized by carbide residue and white carbon black. The influence of hydrothermal temperature on phosphorus recovery efficiency was investigated by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET, and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD. Hydrothermal temperature exerted significant influence on phosphorus recovery performance of PCSH. Hydrothermal temperature 170°C for PCSH was more proper to recover phosphorus. PCSH could recover phosphorus with content of 18.51%. The law of Ca2+ and OH− release was the key of phosphorus recovery efficiency, and this law depended upon the microstructure of PCSH. When the temperature of synthesis reached to 170°C, the reactions between CaO and amorphous SiO2 were more efficient. Solubility of SiO2 was a limiting factor.

  2. Fractionation and solubility of cadmium in paddy soils amended with porous hydrated calcium silicate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xiu-lan; Saigusa Masaihiko

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that porous hydrated calcium silicate(PS)is very effective in decreasing cadmium(Cd)content in brown rice.However,it is unclear whether me PS influences cadmium transformation in soil.The present study examined the effect of PS on pH,cadmium transformation and cadmium solubility in Andosol and Alluvial soil,and also compared its effects with CaCO3,acidic porous hydrated calcium silicate(APS)and silica gel.Soil cadmium was operationally fractionationed into exchangeable(Exch),bound to carbonates(Carb).bound to iron and manganese oxides(FeMnOx),bound to organic matters(OM)and residual(Res)fraction.ApplicatiOn of PS and CaCO3 at hig rates enhanced soil pH,while APS and silica gel did not obviously change soil pH.PS and CaCO3 also increased the FeMnOx-Cd in Andosol and Carb-Cd in Alluvial soil,thus reducing the Exch-Cd in me tested soils.However,PS was less effecfive than CaCO3 at the same application rate.Cadmium fractions in the two soils were not changed by the treatments of APS and silica gel.There were no obvious differences in the solubility of cadmium in soils treated with PS,APS,silica gel and CaCO3 except Andosol treated 2.0%CaCO3 at the same pH of soil-CaCl2 suspensions.These findings suggested that the decrease of cadmium availability in soil was mainly attributed to the increase of soil pH caused by PS.

  3. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P; Andreev, Andrey S; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F; Flatt, Robert J; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of (29)Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured. PMID:27009966

  4. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Flatt, Robert J.; D'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-03-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of 29Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured.

  5. On the nature of structural disorder in calcium silicate hydrates with a calcium/silicon ratio similar to tobermorite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H) with structural calcium/silicon (Ca/Si) ratios ranging from 0.82 ± 0.02 to 0.87 ± 0.02 were synthesized at room temperature, 50, 80, and 110 °C. Their structure was elucidated by collating information from electron probe micro-analysis, transmission electron microscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). A modeling approach specific to defective minerals was used because sample turbostratism prevented analysis using usual XRD refinement techniques (e.g. Rietveld analysis). It is shown that C-S-H with Ca/Si ratio of ∼ 0.8 are structurally similar to nano-crystalline turbostratic tobermorite, a naturally occurring mineral. Their structure thus consists of sheets of calcium atoms in 7-fold coordination, covered by ribbons of silicon tetrahedra with a dreierketten (wollastonite-like) organization. In these silicate ribbons, 0.42 Si per bridging tetrahedron are missing. Random stacking faults occur systematically between successive layers (turbostratic stacking). Layer-to-layer distance is equal to 11.34 Å. Crystallites have a mean size of 10 nm in the a–b plane, and a mean number of 2.6–2.9 layers stacked coherently along the c* axis

  6. Interaction grand potential between calcium-silicate-hydrate nanoparticles at the molecular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnaud, Patrick A; Labbez, Christophe; Miura, Ryuji; Suzuki, Ai; Miyamoto, Naoto; Hatakeyama, Nozomu; Miyamoto, Akira; Van Vliet, Krystyn J

    2016-02-21

    Calcium-silicate-hydrate (or C-S-H), an inosilicate, is the major binding phase in cement pastes and concretes and a porous hydrated material made up of a percolated and dense network of crystalline nanoparticles of a mean apparent spherical diameter of ∼5 nm that are each stacks of multiple C-S-H layers. Interaction forces between these nanoparticles are at the origin of C-S-H chemical, physical, and mechanical properties at the meso- and macroscales. These particle interactions and the resulting properties may be affected significantly by nanoparticle density and environmental conditions such as the temperature, relative humidity, or concentration of chemical species in the bulk solution. In this study, we combined grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations and an extension of the mean force integration method to derive the pair potentials. This approach enables realistic simulation of the physical environment surrounding the C-S-H particles. We thus constructed the pair potentials for C-S-H nanoparticles of defined chemical stoichiometry at 10% relative humidity (RH), varying the relative crystallographic orientations at a constant particle density of ρpart ∼ 2.21 mmol L(-1). We found that cohesion between nanoparticles is affected strongly by both the aspect ratio and the crystallographic misorientation of interacting particles. This method and the findings underscore the importance of accounting for relative dimensions and orientation among C-S-H nanoparticles in descriptions of physical and simulated multiparticle aggregates or mesoscale systems. PMID:26866999

  7. Nanostructural Deformation Analysis of Calcium Silicate Hydrate in Portland Cement Paste by Atomic Pair Distribution Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Suzuki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The deformation of nanostructure of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H in Portland cement (PC paste under compression was characterized by the atomic pair distribution function (PDF, measured using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The PDF of the PC paste exhibited a unique deformation behavior for a short-range order below 2.0 nm, close to the size of the C-S-H globule, while the deformation for a long-range order was similar to that of a calcium hydroxide phase measured by Bragg peak shift. The compressive deformation of the C-S-H nanostructure was comprised of three stages with different interactions between globules. This behavior would originate from the granular nature of C-S-H, which deforms with increasing packing density by slipping the interfaces between globules, rearranging the overall C-S-H nanostructure. This new approach will lead to increasing applications of the PDF technique to understand the deformation mechanism of C-S-H in PC-based materials.

  8. Preparation, characterization and cytocompatibility of bioactive coatings on porous calcium-silicate-hydrate scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major goal of this research was to investigate and characterize the deposition of a biomimetic apatite-like coating onto the surface of 3D porous calcium-silicate-hydrate scaffolds with suitable bioactivity for potential application in bone tissue engineering. Basically, Portland cement, water, sand and lime were mixed for preparing the slurry which was poured into molds, and fine aluminum powder was added as foaming agent resulting on the formation of porous 3D structures. After aging for 28 days, these porous inorganic scaffolds were immersed in calcium chloride supersaturated solution in PBS for 7 days at 37 deg. C for the biomimetic layer deposition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques were used in order to characterize the porous scaffolds and the apatite-like biomimetic coating. The results have showed that 3D constructs were successfully produced with interconnected porosity, compressive strength and cytocompatibility appropriate for potential use as an alternative in trabecular bone repair.

  9. Interaction of Nanostructured Calcium Silicate Hydrate with Ibuprofen Drug Molecules: X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) Study at the Ca, Si and O K-edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesoporous calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) nanostructure has been proven to be bioactive and biocompatible, and has a bright future in the application of bone treatment among other applications. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) is a powerful tool for the study of the interactions of calcium silicate hydrates with drug molecules because it is element specific and it probes the unoccupied electronic states. Herein, we report the use of the calcium, silicon and oxygen K-edge XANES spectroscopy to identify how drug molecules interact with different groups in calcium silicate hydrate mesoporous nano-carriers with different morphologies. Significant changes are observed in XANES spectra after drug loading into the calcium silicate hydrate system, especially at the Si and O K-edge. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  10. Interaction of Nanostructured Calcium Silicate Hydrate with Ibuprofen Drug Molecules: X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) Study at the Ca, Si and O K-edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, X. X.; Sham, T. K.; Zhu, Y. J.; Hu, Y. F.

    2013-04-01

    Mesoporous calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) nanostructure has been proven to be bioactive and biocompatible, and has a bright future in the application of bone treatment among other applications. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) is a powerful tool for the study of the interactions of calcium silicate hydrates with drug molecules because it is element specific and it probes the unoccupied electronic states. Herein, we report the use of the calcium, silicon and oxygen K-edge XANES spectroscopy to identify how drug molecules interact with different groups in calcium silicate hydrate mesoporous nano-carriers with different morphologies. Significant changes are observed in XANES spectra after drug loading into the calcium silicate hydrate system, especially at the Si and O K-edge. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  11. Imaging of drug loading distributions in individual microspheres of calcium silicate hydrate - an X-ray spectromicroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoxuan; Wang, Zhiqiang; Wu, Jin; Wang, Jian; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Sham, Tsun-Kong

    2015-04-01

    Imaging is one of the most direct and ideal ways to track drug loading distributions in drug carriers on the molecular level, which will facilitate the optimization of drug carriers and drug loading capacities. Herein, we report the mapping of an individual mesoporous calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) microsphere before and after the loading of ibuprofen (IBU) and the interactions between drug carriers and drug molecules simultaneously by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Nanoscaled X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy clearly indicates that IBU is bonded to calcium and silicate sites via carboxylic acid groups. More importantly, STXM has been successfully used to determine the absolute thickness of IBU, revealing its distribution in the CSH microsphere.Imaging is one of the most direct and ideal ways to track drug loading distributions in drug carriers on the molecular level, which will facilitate the optimization of drug carriers and drug loading capacities. Herein, we report the mapping of an individual mesoporous calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) microsphere before and after the loading of ibuprofen (IBU) and the interactions between drug carriers and drug molecules simultaneously by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Nanoscaled X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy clearly indicates that IBU is bonded to calcium and silicate sites via carboxylic acid groups. More importantly, STXM has been successfully used to determine the absolute thickness of IBU, revealing its distribution in the CSH microsphere. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07471h

  12. Structural models of random packing of spheres extended to bricks. Simulation of the nanoporous Calcium-Silicate-Hydrates.

    OpenAIRE

    Morales-Florez, Victor; BRUNET, Fabrice

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Structure simulation algorithms of random packing of spheres and bricks have been developed. These algorithms were used to reproduce the nanostructure of the cementitius calcium-silicate-hydrates. The textural parameters (specific surface area, porosity, pore size, etc.) of a C-S-H sample, the main binding phase of cements, have been derived from N2-physisorption experiments. In the same time, these parameters have been simulated by using a sphere-based structural model wh...

  13. Nanostructured calcium silicate hydrate seeds accelerate concrete hardening: a combined assessment of benefits and risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bräu, Michael; Ma-Hock, Lan; Hesse, Christoph; Nicoleau, Luc; Strauss, Volker; Treumann, Silke; Wiench, Karin; Landsiedel, Robert; Wohlleben, Wendel

    2012-07-01

    Nanotechnology creates new possibilities to control and improve material properties for civil infrastructure. Special focus in this area is put on Portland cement and gypsum. Together their annual production is by far larger than for any other material worldwide. Nanomodification of these materials can be done during the few hours between dissolution and hardening, especially by nucleation of the re-crystallization with suitable colloids. Here we report first results in homogeneous seeding of the precipitation of calcium silicate hydrates within a real Portland cement composition. The occupational safety during the production phase and during mixing of concrete paste is addressed in detail by in vivo testing. We perform 5-day inhalation with 21-day recovery in rats and analyze organ-specific toxicity and 71 endpoints from bronchoalveolar lavage (BALF) and blood. In BALF parameters, no test-related changes were observed, indicating the generally low toxicity of the test material. Some mild lesions were observed in larynx level. In the lungs, all animals of the 50 mg/m³ concentration group revealed a minimal to mild increase in alveolar macrophages, which recovered back to control level.

  14. Low-to-Medium-Frequency AC Impedance Spectroscopy Investigations of Nanocrystalline Calcium Silicate Hydrate Dried Powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-to-medium-frequency range impedance spectroscopy was used to investigate two series of dried calcium silicate hydrates with or without aluminum atoms, C-S-H and C-A-S-H. Over four decades in frequency, sample Nyquist plots were fitted by adopting an equivalent circuit using constant phase elements (CPE). Conductivity values of the order of 10-9-10-10 S/cm were obtained at 316 K. The presence of CPE characteristic of the depleted semicircle at high frequency was related to a fractal dimension ranging from 2.4 up to 2.7. Above 316 K, the impedance spectra behaved unpredictably due to the dehydration process, while below 316 K the behavior was followed by adopting the modulus loss factor. The associated peak maximum variation is of the Arrhenius-type. The entire behavior may be interpreted by ionic motion and charge accumulation in addition to dielectric polarization at the grain boundaries associated to low fractal surface. (authors)

  15. Calcium-aluminum-silicate-hydrate "cement" phases and rare Ca-zeolite association at Colle Fabbri, Central Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoppa, F.; Scordari, F.; Mesto, E.; Sharygin, V.; Bortolozzi, G.

    2010-06-01

    Very high temperature, Ca-rich alkaline magma intruded an argillite formation at Colle Fabbri, Central Italy, producing cordierite-tridymite metamorphism in the country rocks. An intense Ba-rich sulphate-carbonate-alkaline hydrothermal plume produced a zone of mineralization several meters thick around the igneous body. Reaction of hydrothermal fluids with country rocks formed calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH), i.e., tobermorite-afwillite-jennite; calcium-aluminum-silicate-hydrate (CASH) — "cement" phases - i.e., thaumasite, strätlingite and an ettringite-like phase and several different species of zeolites: chabazite-Ca, willhendersonite, gismon-dine, three phases bearing Ca with the same or perhaps lower symmetry of phillipsite-Ca, levyne-Ca and the Ca-rich analogue of merlinoite. In addition, apophyllite-(KF) and/or apophyllite-(KOH), Ca-Ba-carbonates, portlandite and sulphates were present. A new polymorph from the pyrrhotite group, containing three layers of sphalerite-type structure in the unit cell, is reported for the first time. Such a complex association is unique. Most of these minerals are specifically related to hydration processes of: (1) pyrometamorphic metacarbonate/metapelitic rocks (natural analogues of cement clinkers); (2) mineralization between intrusive stocks and slates; and (3) high-calcium, alkaline igneous rocks such as melilitites and foidites as well as carbonatites. The Colle Fabbri outcrop offers an opportunity to study in situ complex crystalline overgrowth and specific crystal chemistry in mineral phases formed in igneous to hydrothermal conditions.

  16. Imaging of drug loading distributions in individual microspheres of calcium silicate hydrate--an X-ray spectromicroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoxuan; Wang, Zhiqiang; Wu, Jin; Wang, Jian; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Sham, Tsun-Kong

    2015-04-21

    Imaging is one of the most direct and ideal ways to track drug loading distributions in drug carriers on the molecular level, which will facilitate the optimization of drug carriers and drug loading capacities. Herein, we report the mapping of an individual mesoporous calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) microsphere before and after the loading of ibuprofen (IBU) and the interactions between drug carriers and drug molecules simultaneously by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Nanoscaled X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy clearly indicates that IBU is bonded to calcium and silicate sites via carboxylic acid groups. More importantly, STXM has been successfully used to determine the absolute thickness of IBU, revealing its distribution in the CSH microsphere.

  17. Sorption of caesium and strontium onto calcium silicate hydrate in saline groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: In the concept for radioactive waste disposal in Japan, cement is a potential waste packaging and backfilling material and is expected to provide chemical containment. The sorption of radionuclides onto cement materials, which controls the aqueous concentrations of elements in the pore-water, is a very important parameter when considering the release of radionuclides from the near field of a cementitious radioactive waste repository. Many safety assessment calculations currently assume radionuclide retardation as linear sorption equilibrium and describe it with a distribution ratio (Rd value). In this study, the sorption mechanism is discussed by measuring the sorption isotherm of caesium, strontium (10-5 ∼ 10-2 mol dm-3) and sodium (10-4 ∼ 10-1 mol dm-3) onto Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H gel, Ca/Si 0.65 ∼ 1.2) at a liquid:solid ratio of 100:1, to support the assumption. In addition, the competitive sorption between caesium or strontium, and sodium is studied by sorption measurements using a range of sodium chloride concentration to simulate different ionic strengths in saline groundwater. The initial and equilibrated aqueous compositions were measured in the sorption experiments and it was found that caesium, strontium and sodium were sorbed by substitution for Ca in C-S-H phases by examining the mass balance. Based on the experimental results, we propose a modelling approach in which the ion-exchange model is employed and the presence of some calcium sites with different ion-exchange log K values in C-S-H is assumed by considering the composition and the structure of C-S-H. The modelling calculation results predict the measured Rd values well and also describe the competition of sorption of caesium or strontium, and sodium in the experiments. The log K values for sorption of each cation element decreased as Ca/Si ratio of C-S-H gel increased. This agrees with the trend that C-S-H gel is negatively charged at low Ca

  18. Intrinsic differences in atomic ordering of calcium (alumino)silicate hydrates in conventional and alkali-activated cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomic structures of calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H) and calcium (–sodium) aluminosilicate hydrate (C–(N)–A–S–H) gels, and their presence in conventional and blended cement systems, have been the topic of significant debate over recent decades. Previous investigations have revealed that synthetic C–S–H gel is nanocrystalline and due to the chemical similarities between ordinary Portland cement (OPC)-based systems and low-CO2 alkali-activated slags, researchers have inferred that the atomic ordering in alkali-activated slag is the same as in OPC–slag cements. Here, X-ray total scattering is used to determine the local bonding environment and nanostructure of C(–A)–S–H gels present in hydrated tricalcium silicate (C3S), blended C3S–slag and alkali-activated slag, revealing the large intrinsic differences in the extent of nanoscale ordering between C–S–H derived from C3S and alkali-activated slag systems, which may have a significant influence on thermodynamic stability, and material properties at higher length scales, including long term durability of alkali-activated cements

  19. Structural and nano-mechanical properties of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) formed from alite hydration in the presence of sodium and potassium hydroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza, Oscar, E-mail: oamendoz@unal.edu.co [Grupo del Cemento y Materiales de Construcción (CEMATCO). Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Facultad de Minas, Medellín (Colombia); Giraldo, Carolina [Cementos Argos S.A., Medellín (Colombia); Camargo, Sergio S. [Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro/COPPE, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Tobón, Jorge I. [Grupo del Cemento y Materiales de Construcción (CEMATCO). Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Facultad de Minas, Medellín (Colombia)

    2015-08-15

    This research evaluates the effect of sodium and potassium hydroxide on the structure and nano-mechanical properties of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) formed from the hydration of pure alite. Monoclinic (MIII) alite was synthesized and hydrated, using water-to-alite ratios of 0.5 and 0.6 and additions of 10% NaOH and KOH by weight of alite. Based on results of X-ray diffraction, isothermal calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and nanoindentation, two different effects of the alkaline hydroxides on the hydration reaction of alite, both at early and later ages, can be identified: (i) a differentiated hydration process, attributed to an enhancement in calcium hydroxide (CH) precipitation and a stimulation of the C-S-H nuclei; and (ii) an increase in the elastic modulus of the C-S-H aggregations, attributed to an electrostatic attraction between positive charges from the alkaline cations and negative charges from the C-S-H structure.

  20. Structural and nano-mechanical properties of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) formed from alite hydration in the presence of sodium and potassium hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research evaluates the effect of sodium and potassium hydroxide on the structure and nano-mechanical properties of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) formed from the hydration of pure alite. Monoclinic (MIII) alite was synthesized and hydrated, using water-to-alite ratios of 0.5 and 0.6 and additions of 10% NaOH and KOH by weight of alite. Based on results of X-ray diffraction, isothermal calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and nanoindentation, two different effects of the alkaline hydroxides on the hydration reaction of alite, both at early and later ages, can be identified: (i) a differentiated hydration process, attributed to an enhancement in calcium hydroxide (CH) precipitation and a stimulation of the C-S-H nuclei; and (ii) an increase in the elastic modulus of the C-S-H aggregations, attributed to an electrostatic attraction between positive charges from the alkaline cations and negative charges from the C-S-H structure

  1. Preparation of MnO2and calcium silicate hydrate from electrolytic manganese residue and evaluation of adsorption properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李昌新; 钟宏; 王帅; 薛建荣; 武芳芳; 张振宇

    2015-01-01

    Electrolytic manganese residue (EMR), a high volume byproduct resulting from the electrolytic manganese industry, was used as a cheap and abundant chemical source for preparing MnO2 and EMR-made calcium silicate hydrate (EMR-CSH). The MnO2 is successfully synthesized from the metal cations extracted from EMR, which can effectively recycle the manganese in the EMR. By the combination of XRD, SEM and EDX analysis, the as-prepared MnO2 is found to exhibit a single-phase with the purity of 90.3%. Furthermore, EMR-CSH is synthesized from EMR via hydrothermal method. Based on the detailed analyses using XRD, FT-IR, FE-SEM, EDX and BET surface area measurement, the product synthesized under the optimum conditions (pH 12.0 and 100 °C) is identified to be a calcium silicate hydrate with a specific surface area of 205 m2/g incorporating the slag-derived metals (Al and Mg) in its structure. The as-synthesized material shows good adsorption properties for removal of Mn2+ and phosphate ions diluted in water, making it a promising candidate for efficient bulk wastewater treatment. This conversion process, which enables us to fabricate two different kinds of valuable materials from EMR at low cost and through convenient preparation steps, is surely beneficial from the viewpoint of the chemical and economical use of EMR.

  2. Preparation and Characterization of Ni-Doped Calcium Silicate Hydrate Based on Steel Slag: Adsorption Capacity for Rhodamine B from Aqueous Solution

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Calcium silicate hydrate based on steel slag (SCSH) and Ni-doped SCSH (NSCSH) were synthesized under specific hydrothermal conditions at saturated vapor pressure and 185°C for 7 hours. The structure and morphology of SCSH and NSCSH were characterized by XRD, SEM, and N2 adsorption/desorption. SCSH mainly consisted of amorphous calcium silicate hydrate gel (C-S-H gel) together with some flake-like tobermorite and NSCSH consisted of crystalline tobermorite and xonotlite. The addition of Ni(NO3)...

  3. Study of caesium adsorption on hydrated calcium-silicate-aluminate systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immobilization of caesium in cementitious matrixes was studied in the present paper which is a key issue of handling radioactive caesium containig wastes for caesium does not form stabile compounds therefor it can not be readily immobilized. Model matrices were prepared to map up the calcium-silicate-aluminate system considering caesium immobilization, which were of different starting compositions. To caracterize Cs sorption, distribution ratios were determined. Based on the results obtained the model matrix compositions were prepared using industrial grade materials and their caesium retardation and trapping were examined by means of leaching and sorption experiments. In the light of the results obtained, it can be established that immobilization of caesium significantly depend on the starting composition of the used matrix. (orig.)

  4. Effect of temperature on the microstructure of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temperature affects the properties of concrete through its effect on the hydration of cement and its associated microstructural development. This paper focuses on the modifications to C-S-H induced by isothermal curing between 5 and 60 °C. The results show that as the temperature increases (within the range studied) the C/S ratio of C-S-H changes only slightly, with a higher degree of polymerisation of silicate chains, but there is a significant decrease in its bound water content and an increase of apparent density of 25%. This increase seems to come from a different packing of C-S-H at the nanoscale. As a consequence of these changes, the microstructure of the cement paste is much coarser and porous, which explains the lower final strengths obtained by curing at elevated temperatures. -- Highlights: •C-S-H structure studied at the atomic level •Multiple analytical techniques used •Studies conducted at temperatures above and below normal temperatures

  5. Interaction of calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H), the main components of cement, with alkaline chlorides, analogy with clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work, belonging to a more general study on the structure and reactivity of cement, deals with the experimental and theoretical analysis of the interaction of alkaline chlorides with calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H), the main components of cement paste. The interaction of alkaline cations with C-S-H is interfacial, involving both electrostatic and surface complexation mechanisms. The C-S-H surface is constituted of silanol sites, partially dissociated due to the high pH of the interstitial solution. The calcium ions, present in large amounts in the equilibrium solution of C-S-H, constitute potential determining ions for the C-S-H surface. The alkaline ions seem to compete with calcium for the same surface sites. The adsorption isotherms show that caesium presents a better affinity than sodium and lithium for the C-S-H surface. Moreover, solid-state NMR suggests that caesium forms with the surface sites inner-sphere complexes, whereas sodium seems to keep its hydration sphere. These results are in agreement with zeta potential measurements, which let suppose a specific adsorption of caesium ions, and an indifferent behaviour of both other alkaline ions. A model for the C-S-H surface was proposed, from the electric double layer model, and mass action laws expressing the complexation of the different ionic species with the silanol sites. The whole study relies on a structural analogy with smectites, some clays presenting well-known cationic adsorption properties. The structural similarity between both minerals is enhanced by some similarities of reactivity, though significant behaviour differences could also be noted. (author)

  6. Mechanistic study and modeling of radionuclides retention by the hydrated calcium silicates (HCS) of cements; Etude mecanistique et modelisation de la retention de radionucleides par les silicates de calcium hydrates (CSH) des ciments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pointeau, I

    2000-09-01

    This work attempts to investigate the modelling of radioisotopes (Cs{sup +}, Pb{sup 2+}, Eu{sup 3+}) immobilization in cement matrix, in the frame of the design of engineered barrier of a deep radwaste repository. The model development concept consists of three major steps: - surface chemistry modelling of the calcium silicate hydrate CSH, used to simulate hydrated cement behaviour; - solid analysis of the batch sorption experiments: identification of the uptake mechanism; - both previous steps are used, with isotherm data, in the modelling of the radioisotopes immobilization in the CSH matrix. Final results: (all modelling are available for all the range of studied Ca/Si ratios and have been validated with predictive calculations). - A thermodynamic modelling of the CSH surface chemistry has been developed. The labile calcium and proton sorption constants on silanol sites (>SiOH) have been extracted. - Cs{sup +} is sorbed on two sites. The silanol site (weak site) has a high site density (10 sites.nm{sup -2}), which accounts for the CSH unsaturation in high [CS{sup +}]. A strong site is also identified. - Pb{sup 2+} immobilization in CSH matrix is modelled with surface equilibria and solubility equilibrium. - Eu{sup 3+} fixation has been investigated with solid analysis: Site-Selective anti Time-Resolved Luminescence Spectroscopy, XPS and SEM-EDS. Eu{sup 3+} thus does not precipitate in CSH water but is sorbed on the CSH surface (high hydroxylated environment). Europium is also (minority site) inserted in the CSH framework. (author)

  7. X-ray diffraction: a powerful tool to probe and understand the structure of nanocrystalline calcium silicate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure of nanocrystalline calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H) was studied using X-ray diffraction and literature data. It is proposed that C-S-H of Ca/Si ratio ranging between ∼ 0.6 and ∼ 1.7 can be described as nanocrystalline tobermorite affected by turbostratic disorder. The broadening and shift of the basal reflection positioned between ∼ 13.5 and ∼ 11.2 Å (depending on the Ca/Si ratio) arises from nanocrystallinity and possibly from an interstratification phenomenon. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns were calculated and compared to literature data with the aim of investigating the crystal structure of nanocrystalline calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H), the main binding phase in hydrated Portland cement pastes. Published XRD patterns from C-S-H of Ca/Si ratios ranging from ∼ 0.6 to ∼ 1.7 are fully compatible with nanocrystalline and turbostratic tobermorite. Even at a ratio close or slightly higher than that of jennite (Ca/Si = 1.5) this latter mineral, which is required in some models to describe the structure of C-S-H, is not detected in the experimental XRD patterns. The 001 basal reflection from C-S-H, positioned at ∼ 13.5 Å when the C-S-H structural Ca/Si ratio is low (< 0.9), shifts towards smaller d values and sharpens with increasing Ca/Si ratio, to reach ∼ 11.2 Å when the Ca/Si ratio is higher than 1.5. Calculations indicate that the sharpening of the 001 reflection may be related to a crystallite size along c* (i.e. a mean number of stacked layers) increasing with the C-S-H Ca/Si ratio. Such an increase would contribute to the observed shift of the 001 reflection, but fails to quantitatively explain it. It is proposed that the observed shift could result from interstratification of at least two tobermorite-like layers, one having a high and the other a low Ca/Si ratio with a basal spacing of 11.3 and 14 Å, respectively

  8. Reproducibility of the uptake of U(VI) onto degraded cement pastes and calcium silicate hydrate phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U(VI) uptake in degraded cement pastes was undertaken in the laboratories of CEA/L3MR and SUBATECH in order to check the reproducibility of the study. Two well hydrated cement pastes, CEM I (ordinary portland cement, OPC) and CEM V (blast furnace slag (BFS) and fly ash added to OPC) were degraded using similar protocols. Equilibrium solutions and solid materials were characterised for three degradation states for each paste. All samples are free of portlandite and the pH of the equilibrated cement solutions vary in the range 9.8-12.2. Three calcium silicate hydrate phases (C-S-H) were synthesised in order to compare the sorption properties of degraded cement pastes and of hydrate phases in similar pH conditions. In order to avoid precipitation processes, the operational solubility limit was evaluated before batch experiments. These solubility values vary significantly in the pH range [9-13] with a 2.4 x 10-7 mol L-1 minimum at pH close to 10.5. In batch sorption experiments, the distribution ratio Rd values are high: 3 x 104 - 1.5 x 105 mL g-1. The uptake of U(VI) increases when comparing the least and the most degraded cement pastes whereas the initial composition of cement has relatively insensitive effect. Sorption isotherms, expressed as a log [U(VI)solid]/log[U(VI)solution] plots are linear. A slope of 1 is calculated indicating the predominance of sorption processes. As sorption and desorption values are close, the uptake mechanism seems reversible. The Rd values measured in C-S-H suspensions are in good agreement with Rd values of degraded cement pastes, and C-S-H materials could be one of the cementitious phases which control U(VI) uptake in cement pastes. (orig.)

  9. Synthesis and Enhanced Phosphate Recovery Property of Porous Calcium Silicate Hydrate Using Polyethyleneglycol as Pore-Generation Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Pei

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this paper was to synthesize a porous calcium silicate hydrate (CSH with enhanced phosphate recovery property using polyethyleneglycol (PEG as pore-generation agent. The formation mechanism of porous CSH was proposed. PEG molecules were inserted into the void region of oxygen–silicon tetrahedron chains and the layers of CSH. A steric hindrance layer was generated to prevent the aggregation of solid particles. A porous structure was formed due to the residual space caused by the removal of PEG through incineration. This porous CSH exhibited highly enhanced solubility of Ca2+ and OH− due to the decreased particle size, declined crystalline, and increased specific surface area (SBET and pore volume. Supersaturation was increased in the wastewater with the enhanced solubility, which was beneficial to the formation of hydroxyapatite (HAP crystallization. Thus, phosphate can be recovered from wastewater by producing HAP using porous CSH as crystal seed. In addition, the regenerated phosphate-containing products (HAP can be reused to achieve sustainable utilization of phosphate. The present research could provide an effective approach for the synthesis of porous CSH and the enhancement of phosphate recovery properties for environmental applications.

  10. Transformation of meta-stable calcium silicate hydrates to tobermorite: reaction kinetics and molecular structure from XRD and NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Jacqueline R; Maxwell, Robert S; Carroll, Susan A

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the integrity of well-bore systems that are lined with Portland-based cements is critical to the successful storage of sequestered CO2 in gas and oil reservoirs. As a first step, we investigate reaction rates and mechanistic pathways for cement mineral growth in the absence of CO2 by coupling water chemistry with XRD and NMR spectroscopic data. We find that semi-crystalline calcium (alumino-)silicate hydrate (Al-CSH) forms as a precursor solid to the cement mineral tobermorite. Rate constants for tobermorite growth were found to be k = 0.6 (+/- 0.1) x 10(-5) s(-1) for a solution:solid of 10:1 and 1.6 (+/- 0.8) x 10(-4) s(-1) for a solution:solid of 5:1 (batch mode; T = 150 degrees C). This data indicates that reaction rates for tobermorite growth are faster when the solution volume is reduced by half, suggesting that rates are dependent on solution saturation and that the Gibbs free energy is the reaction driver. However, calculated solution saturation indexes for Al-CSH and tobermorite differ by less than one log unit, which is within the measured uncertainty. Based on this data, we consider both heterogeneous nucleation as the thermodynamic driver and internal restructuring as possible mechanistic pathways for growth. We also use NMR spectroscopy to characterize the site symmetry and bonding environment of Al and Si in a reacted tobermorite sample. We find two [4]Al coordination structures at delta iso = 59.9 ppm and 66.3 ppm with quadrupolar product parameters (PQ) of 0.21 MHz and 0.10 MHz (+/- 0.08) from 27Al 3Q-MAS NMR and speculate on the Al occupancy of framework sites by probing the protonation environment of Al metal centers using 27Al{1H}CP-MAS NMR. PMID:19144195

  11. 水化硅酸钙的制备及磷回收性能表征%Preparation and phosphorus recovery performance of calcium silicate hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    关伟; 吉芳英; 陈晴空; 晏鹏; 张千

    2012-01-01

    Calcium silicate hydrate with phosphorus recovery efficiency was synthesized by carbide residue and silica. Effect of prepared method on phosphorus recovery efficiency of calcium silicate hydrate was studied. Mechanism of phosphorus recovery was revealed by XRD. Microstructure of calcium silicate hydrate was characterized by BET and SEM. Capacity of Ca^2+ and OH release was investigated. The considerable preparation conditions are obtained on the condition of Ca/Si molar ratio 1.6 - 1, reaction temperature 170℃, reaction time 4.5h, stirring intensity 90r/min. Phosphorus content of product of phosphorus recovery reached 18.64. The prepared calcium silicate hydrate has a high BET surface area 113. 3572m^2/g with porous structure. Concentration of Ca^2+ release reached 3.52mg/g. This material could recover phosphorus from wastewater in the form of hydroxyl calcium phosphate on the condition of pH=9.%以电石渣和白碳黑分别作为钙质和硅质原料,采用水热法制备具有磷回收特性的水化硅酸钙。研究了制备条件对水化硅酸钙磷回收性能的影响,采用XRD揭示了水化硅酸钙的磷回收机制。通过BET、SEM表征了水化硅酸钙的微观结构,考察了水化硅酸钙的溶钙供碱能力。钙硅摩尔比为1.6∶1,水热反应温度为170℃,水热反应时间为4.5h,搅拌强度为90r/min的条件下所制备的水化硅酸钙,其磷回收产品中的磷含量达到18.64%。该材料具有多孔结构,比表面积达到113.3572m2/g,能够溶出的Ca2+浓度为3.52mg/g,这些溶钙供碱特性使得该材料能够在pH值=9.0的环境下以羟基磷酸钙的形式从污水中回收磷。

  12. In situ X-ray pair distribution function analysis of accelerated carbonation of a synthetic calcium-silicate-hydrate gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morandeau, Antoine E.; White, Claire E. [Princeton

    2015-04-21

    Calcium–silicate–hydrate (C–S–H) gel is the main binder component in hydrated ordinary Portland cement (OPC) paste, and is known to play a crucial role in the carbonation of cementitious materials, especially for more sustainable alternatives containing supplementary cementitious materials. However, the exact atomic structural changes that occur during carbonation of C–S–H gel remain unknown. Here, we investigate the local atomic structural changes that occur during carbonation of a synthetic calcium–silicate–hydrate gel exposed to pure CO₂ vapour, using in situ X-ray total scattering measurements and subsequent pair distribution function (PDF) analysis. By analysing both the reciprocal and real-space scattering data as the C–S–H carbonation reaction progresses, all phases present during the reaction (crystalline and non-crystalline) have been identified and quantified, with the results revealing the emergence of several polymorphs of crystalline calcium carbonate (vaterite and calcite) in addition to the decalcified C–S–H gel. Furthermore, the results point toward residual calcium being present in the amorphous decalcified gel, potentially in the form of an amorphous calcium carbonate phase. As a result of the quantification process, the reaction kinetics for the evolution of the individual phases have been obtained, revealing new information on the rate of growth/dissolution for each phase associated with C–S–H gel carbonation. Moreover, the investigation reveals that the use of real space diffraction data in the form of PDFs enables more accurate determination of the phases that develop during complex reaction processes such as C–S–H gel carbonation in comparison to the conventional reciprocal space Rietveld analysis approach.

  13. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and... Listing § 573.260 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely used as an anticaking agent in animal feed, provided that the amount of calcium silicate does...

  14. Recovery of phosphorus from wastewater by calcium silicate hydrate%水化硅酸钙回收污水中磷的试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王鑫永; 陈雪初; 何圣兵; 李春杰; 孔海南; 李思劫

    2011-01-01

    Taking simulation wastewater as the research object, a test on phosphorus removal from waste-water by synthesized calcium silicate hydrate was carried out, and the influences of contact time, Ca2+ concentration, initial pH value, interfering ion and some other factors on phosphorus removal were investigated. The results of the test on phosphorus recovery from actual wastewater by calcium silicate hydrate showed that, after 8 hours of reaction, the amount of phosphorus recovery reached 101 mg/g; the phosphorus content of the wastewater, converted into P2O5, was larger then that of the common water-soluble phosphate fertilizer: calcium superphosphate; furthermore, phosphorus was released rapidly after the product had been treated by acid, and the release rate was nearly 100% within 1 hour, which indicated that, the said material could enrich and reclaim phosphorus from actual wastewater, and would have good application prospect.%采用合成水化硅酸钙进行污水除磷试验,以模拟污水为研究对象,考察了接触时间、Ca2+浓度、初始pH值、干扰离子等因素对除磷效果的影响,在利用水化硅酸钙回收实际污水中磷的试验发现,在处理8h后除磷量达到101 mg/g,折合P2O5含量超过常用的水溶性磷肥过磷酸钙,且产物经酸处理后将快速释磷,在1h后磷释放率接近100%,显示该材料能富集回收实际污水中的磷,具有较好的应用前景.

  15. Synthesis and nano-mechanical characterization of calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) made with 1.5 CaO/SiO2 mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is synthesized and characterized. C-S-H slurry was made with calcium oxide (CaO) to micro-silica (SiO2) mixture ratio of 1.5 and enough deionized water. The slurry was continuously mixed for 7 days, then the excess water was removed. Two methods of drying were implemented: one method used the standard d-dry technique and the other was equilibrated to 11% relative humidity (RH). The dried powders were characterized using thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRDA), and 29Si magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The stoichiometric formulas of synthetic C-S-H powders dried to d-dry and 11% RH in this study were approximated as C1.2SH0.7 and C1.2SH2.4 respectively. The powders were then compacted to create specimens with porosities similar to C-S-H in hydrated cement. The specimens underwent nanoindentation to mechanically characterize C-S-H. The experiments provide insight on the nanoscale mechanical characteristics of C-S-H.

  16. Influence of saline solution on hydration behavior of β-dicalcium silicate in comparison with biphasic calcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite bio-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of using saline solution as mixing and curing liquid on some characteristics of β-dicalcium silicate (β-C2S) and biphasic compound tri-calcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite (TCP/HAp) bio-ceramics was investigated. β-C2S (27–30 nm) was prepared by solid state reaction at 1450 °C, while biphasic compound TCP/HAp (7–15 nm) was synthesized from an aqueous solution of Ca(NO3)2·4H2O and (NH4)2HPO4·12H2O by chemical precipitation method. Setting times, compressive strength, pH values, X-ray diffraction analysis, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were investigated. The evaluation of cytotoxicity of both calcium silicate and biphasic compounds to human gingival fibroblasts was carried out. The use of saline solution as mixing and immersing liquid shortened the setting time for the two bio-cements. TCP/HAp did not show any mechanical strength but β-C2S showed good strength values. Both synthesized compounds showed a moderate cytotoxicity and both materials were effective in a no significant way. - Highlights: • The dissolution and hydration of β-C2S and TCP/HAp in distilled water and saline solution were studied. • TCP/HAp did not show mechanical strength, while β-C2S showed good mechanical strength. • The use of saline solution did enhances the dissolution & hydration rate. • An increase in pH values was detected when using saline solution. • Both materials showed a moderate cytotoxicity in no significant way

  17. Influence of saline solution on hydration behavior of β-dicalcium silicate in comparison with biphasic calcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite bio-ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radwan, M.M., E-mail: mmahmoudradwan@yahoo.com [Ceramics Dept, National Research Centre, Cairo (Egypt); Abd El-Hamid, H.K. [Ceramics Dept, National Research Centre, Cairo (Egypt); Mohamed, A.F. [The Holding Company for Production of Vaccines, Sera and Drugs (EGYVAC) (Egypt)

    2015-12-01

    The influence of using saline solution as mixing and curing liquid on some characteristics of β-dicalcium silicate (β-C{sub 2}S) and biphasic compound tri-calcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite (TCP/HAp) bio-ceramics was investigated. β-C{sub 2}S (27–30 nm) was prepared by solid state reaction at 1450 °C, while biphasic compound TCP/HAp (7–15 nm) was synthesized from an aqueous solution of Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4}·12H{sub 2}O by chemical precipitation method. Setting times, compressive strength, pH values, X-ray diffraction analysis, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were investigated. The evaluation of cytotoxicity of both calcium silicate and biphasic compounds to human gingival fibroblasts was carried out. The use of saline solution as mixing and immersing liquid shortened the setting time for the two bio-cements. TCP/HAp did not show any mechanical strength but β-C{sub 2}S showed good strength values. Both synthesized compounds showed a moderate cytotoxicity and both materials were effective in a no significant way. - Highlights: • The dissolution and hydration of β-C{sub 2}S and TCP/HAp in distilled water and saline solution were studied. • TCP/HAp did not show mechanical strength, while β-C{sub 2}S showed good mechanical strength. • The use of saline solution did enhances the dissolution & hydration rate. • An increase in pH values was detected when using saline solution. • Both materials showed a moderate cytotoxicity in no significant way.

  18. In-situ tracing of calcium silicate hydrate precipitation from high pH leachates by micro FT-IR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Cementitious grout materials will be used to seal conductive fractures in the construction of a repository for the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Expected reactions between groundwater and cementitious grouts will result in the formation and release of a chemically aggressive high pH plume. Such a high pH plume will likely cause the dissolution of primary and precipitation of secondary mineral phases in other barrier components. On the spatial and temporal scales of laboratory experiments, however, these mineral changes tend to be only slight and so their detection is problematic. The current study presents a new methodology of analyzing these mineral changes in-situ by micro Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Under the experimental conditions tested, primary quartz dissolution and secondary calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) precipitation was observed and described in context of their reaction kinetics. An in-situ hydrothermal cell was constructed from titanium alloy with a diamond window to allow the transmission of an IR beam. The cell can be operated over a temperature range of 25-200 deg. C, a pressure range of 0.1-30 MPa, and can either be left sealed or connected to a fluid circulator. In the present study, a 0.0015-0.0038 g mixture of Ca(OH)2 and quartz (SiO2) powders were placed in the in-situ hydrothermal cell at a molar ratio = 1:1, with the remaining space filled with a Ca(OH)2 saturated solution (pH ≅ 12.5 at 25 deg. C, Ca ≅ 22 mM) to give a powder (g):solution (ml) ratio ∼ 1:1. The in-situ hydrothermal cell was then sealed and heated at 100, 120, 130, or 140 deg. C at a pressure of 3 MPa with IR spectra collected in the mid region every 5 minutes for 3.8-91 hours using a Jasco MFT 2000. An IR absorption band at 790 cm-1 was assigned to stretching vibration of Si-O in primary quartz and at 970 cm-1 to the stretching vibration of silanol (Si-OH) groups in

  19. Effect of polymers on the nanostructure and on the carbonation of calcium silicate hydrates: a scanning transmission X-ray microscopy study

    KAUST Repository

    Ha, J.

    2011-09-07

    This study investigated the effects of organic polymers (polyethylene glycol and hexadecyltrimethylammonium) on structures of calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H) which is the major product of Portland cement hydration. Increased surface areas and expansion of layers were observed for all organic polymer modified C-S-H. The results from attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopic measurements also suggest lowered water contents in the layered structures for the C-S-H samples that are modified by organic polymers. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) results further supports this observation. We also observed difference in the extent of C-S-H carbonation due to the presence of organic polymers. No calcite formed in the presence of HDTMA whereas formation of calcite was observed with C-S-H sample modified with PEG. We suggest that the difference in the carbonation reaction is possibly due to the ease of penetration and diffusion of the CO 2. This observation suggests that CO 2 reaction strongly depends on the presence of organic polymers and the types of organic polymers incorporated within the C-S-H structure. This is the first comprehensive study using STXM to quantitatively characterize the level of heterogeneity in cementitious materials at high spatial and spectral resolutions. The results from BET, XRD, ATR-FTIR, and STXM measurements are consistent and suggest that C-S-H layer structures are significantly modified due to the presence of organic polymers, and that the chemical composition and structural differences among the organic polymers determine the extent of the changes in the C-S-H nanostructures as well as the extent of carbonation reaction. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  20. Low-temperature fabrication of macroporous scaffolds through foaming and hydration of tricalcium silicate paste and their bioactivity

    OpenAIRE

    Huan, Z.; Chang, J.; Zhou, J.

    2009-01-01

    A low-temperature fabrication method for highly porous bioactive scaffolds was developed. The two-step method involved the foaming of tricalcium silicate cement paste and hydration to form calcium silicate hydrate and calcium hydroxide. Scaffolds with a combination of interconnected macro- and micro-sized pores were fabricated by making use of the decomposition of a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solution that acted as a foaming agent and through the hydration of tricalcium silicate cement. It was ...

  1. Chemical alteration of cement materials in a radioactive waste repository environment. 1. Thermodynamic modelling for the dissolution and precipitation of calcium silicate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cementitious material, a potential waste packaging and backfilling material for the disposal of radioactive waste, is expected to provide both physical and chemical containment. In particular the ability to provide high-pH conditions, which depends on the solubility of the constituent hydrated minerals in cement matrices, is a very important parameter when considering the release of radionuclides from radio active wastes. For long-term safety assessment, it is necessary to develop a series of predictive calculation models. Several models have been proposed for the incongruent dissolution of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) gel, which is the principal product of hydrated cement phases. In the repository, the re-precipitation of minerals would follow their dissolution when an equilibrated solution moves to the other regions and equilibrates with the constituent minerals there. However, previous models have not yet adequately quantitatively evaluated the re-precipitation or interaction of other minerals with the dissolution of C-S-H gel. In this study, therefore, a thermodynamic dissolution and precipitation model of C-S-H gel is proposed assuming a binary non-ideal solid solution of Ca(OH)2 and Si02. Dissolution and precipitation experiments on C-S-H gel were performed. C-S-H precipitates were prepared using two techniques. One was based on hydrolysis in a mixture of Ca and Si solutions and produced homogeneous gels. With the other technique, precipitates were prepared by contacting Ca(OH)2 solution with C-S-H gel with low Ca/Si ratios (0.47, 0.65, 0.9). The results were well predicted by the proposed model. Dissolution experiments on C-S-H gel coexisting with ettringite were also carried out. At Ca/Si>l.2 in C-S-H gel, the equilibrated pH and Ca and Si concentrations are nearly the same as those for C-S-H gel alone. At lower Ca/Si, interaction between ettringite and C-S-H dissolution was observed more clearly. The measured pH and Ca and Si concentrations were

  2. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2227 Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate....

  3. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  4. Interaction of calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H), the main components of cement, with alkaline chlorides, analogy with clays; Interaction des silicates de calcium hydrates, principaux constituants du ciment, avec les chlorures d'alcalins. Analogie avec les argiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viallis-Terrisse, H

    2000-10-06

    This work, belonging to a more general study on the structure and reactivity of cement, deals with the experimental and theoretical analysis of the interaction of alkaline chlorides with calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H), the main components of cement paste. The interaction of alkaline cations with C-S-H is interfacial, involving both electrostatic and surface complexation mechanisms. The C-S-H surface is constituted of silanol sites, partially dissociated due to the high pH of the interstitial solution. The calcium ions, present in large amounts in the equilibrium solution of C-S-H, constitute potential determining ions for the C-S-H surface. The alkaline ions seem to compete with calcium for the same surface sites. The adsorption isotherms show that caesium presents a better affinity than sodium and lithium for the C-S-H surface. Moreover, solid-state NMR suggests that caesium forms with the surface sites inner-sphere complexes, whereas sodium seems to keep its hydration sphere. These results are in agreement with zeta potential measurements, which let suppose a specific adsorption of caesium ions, and an indifferent behaviour of both other alkaline ions. A model for the C-S-H surface was proposed, from the electric double layer model, and mass action laws expressing the complexation of the different ionic species with the silanol sites. The whole study relies on a structural analogy with smectites, some clays presenting well-known cationic adsorption properties. The structural similarity between both minerals is enhanced by some similarities of reactivity, though significant behaviour differences could also be noted. (author)

  5. Preparation and fluorescence property of red-emitting Eu3+-activated amorphous calcium silicate phosphor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the energy efficient synthesis of a red-emitting Eu3+-activated amorphous calcium silicate phosphor produced by heating a Eu3+-activated calcium silicate hydrate phosphor. Concentration quenching of the Eu3+-activated calcium silicate hydrate phosphor was not observed and the emission intensity did not decrease up to a Eu/(Ca+Eu) atomic ratio of 0.46. Heating of the Eu3+-activated calcium silicate hydrate (Eu/(Ca+Eu) atomic ratio = 0.32) phosphor produced an amorphous Eu3+-activated calcium silicate phosphor, which had a maximum emission intensity at 870 oC and emitted in the red under near-ultraviolet irradiation (395 nm). The emission intensity of the Eu3+-activated amorphous calcium silicate phosphor was about half that of a commercial BaMgAl10O17:Eu2+ phosphor, and shows great potential for application in white light-emitting diodes.

  6. Compositional Evolution of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) Structures by Total X-Ray Scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Soyer-Uzun, Sezen

    2011-12-09

    High-energy X-ray diffraction was employed to study the structural characteristics of a set of C-S-H samples with 0.6 ≤ C/S a;circ 1.75. It has been observed that Si is tetrahedrally coordinated to O for all samples irrespective of chemical composition and the Ca-O coordination number gradually decreases from ∼7 to ∼6 with increasing C/S ratio. This suggests that the C-S-H structure evolves from a tobermorite-like structure into a jennite-like structure as a function of increasing C/S ratio as the interlayer space decreases from ∼1.3 to ∼1 nm. Evolution of these short- and medium-range order structural characteristics in the C-S-H system is associated with the alteration of the Ca-O layers and silicate depolymerization with increasing C/S. © 2011 The American Ceramic Society.

  7. Insight into elastic behavior of calcium silicate hydrated oxide (C–S–H) under pressure and composition effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work relates to the study of structural and elastic properties of Tobermorite 11 Å as a function of external pressure and composition in terms of calcium to silicon ratio. Basing on the lattice dynamics method, the main aim of this work is precisely to shed light, for the first time, on the high pressure structural phase transition in Tobermorite 11 Å and the possible correlation with some elastic quantities. In order to check the transferability of the potentials used we have, additionally, performed a single calculation based on the density functional theory (DFT) for a pressure of 15 GPa in the case of Ca/Si = 1. The variation of the unit cell parameters with pressure indicates that Tobermorite 11 Å undergoes a structural instability around 15 GPa along b-axis and around 20 GPa along a-axis which is confirmed from our calculations of X-Rays diffraction patterns at various pressure values. We have also observed the anisotropic character of the Tobermorite structure for both cases (Ca/Si = 1 and Ca/Si = 0.83). Our results show that around 20 GPa an important change appears in the elastic behaviour of Tobermorite. As pressure increases the calculated elastic quantities for Ca/Si = 1 became closer to those evaluated for Ca/Si = 0.83, which may stimulate further experimental and theoretical research on the matter.

  8. Influence of the redox state on the neptunium sorption under alkaline conditions. Batch sorption studies on titanium dioxide and calcium silicate hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tits, Jan; Laube, Andreas; Wieland, Erich [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland). Lab. for Waste Management; Gaona, Xavier [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Nuclear Waste Disposal

    2014-07-01

    Wet chemistry experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of the redox state and aqueous speciation on the uptake of neptunium by titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) and by calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H) under alkaline conditions. TiO{sub 2} was chosen as a reference sorbent to determine the surface complexation behaviour of neptunium under alkaline conditions. C-S-H phases are important constituents of cement and concrete. They may contribute significantly to radionuclide retention due to their high recrystallization rates making incorporation the dominating sorption mechanism for many radionuclides (e.g. the actinides) on these materials. The sorption of neptunium on both solids was found to depend strongly on the degree of hydrolysis. On TiO{sub 2}R{sub d} values for Np(IV), Np(V) and Np(VI) are identical at pH = 10 and decrease with progressing hydrolysis in case of Np(V) and Np(VI). On C-S-H phases, R{sub d} values for the three redox states are also identical at pH = 10. While the R{sub d} values for Np(VI) sorption on C-S-H phases decrease with progressing hydrolysis, the R{sub d} values for Np(IV) and Np(V) sorption are not affected by the pH. In addition to the effect of hydrolysis, the presence of Ca is found to promote Np(V) and Np(VI) sorption on TiO{sub 2} whereas on C-S-H phases, the present wet chemistry data do not give unambiguous evidence. Thus, the aqueous speciation appears to have a similar influence on the sorption of the actinides on both types of solids despite the different sorption mechanism. The similar R{sub d} values for Np(IV,V,VI) sorption at pH = 10 can be explained qualitatively by invoking inter-ligand electrostatic repulsion between OH groups in the coordination sphere of Np(V) and Np(VI). This mechanism was proposed earlier in the literature for the prediction of actinide complexation constants with inorganic ligands. A limiting coordination number for each Np redox state, resulting from the inter-ligand electrostatic

  9. Influence of the redox state on the neptunium sorption under alkaline conditions. Batch sorption studies on titanium dioxide and calcium silicate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wet chemistry experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of the redox state and aqueous speciation on the uptake of neptunium by titanium dioxide (TiO2) and by calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H) under alkaline conditions. TiO2 was chosen as a reference sorbent to determine the surface complexation behaviour of neptunium under alkaline conditions. C-S-H phases are important constituents of cement and concrete. They may contribute significantly to radionuclide retention due to their high recrystallization rates making incorporation the dominating sorption mechanism for many radionuclides (e.g. the actinides) on these materials. The sorption of neptunium on both solids was found to depend strongly on the degree of hydrolysis. On TiO2Rd values for Np(IV), Np(V) and Np(VI) are identical at pH = 10 and decrease with progressing hydrolysis in case of Np(V) and Np(VI). On C-S-H phases, Rd values for the three redox states are also identical at pH = 10. While the Rd values for Np(VI) sorption on C-S-H phases decrease with progressing hydrolysis, the Rd values for Np(IV) and Np(V) sorption are not affected by the pH. In addition to the effect of hydrolysis, the presence of Ca is found to promote Np(V) and Np(VI) sorption on TiO2 whereas on C-S-H phases, the present wet chemistry data do not give unambiguous evidence. Thus, the aqueous speciation appears to have a similar influence on the sorption of the actinides on both types of solids despite the different sorption mechanism. The similar Rd values for Np(IV,V,VI) sorption at pH = 10 can be explained qualitatively by invoking inter-ligand electrostatic repulsion between OH groups in the coordination sphere of Np(V) and Np(VI). This mechanism was proposed earlier in the literature for the prediction of actinide complexation constants with inorganic ligands. A limiting coordination number for each Np redox state, resulting from the inter-ligand electrostatic repulsion, allows the weaker sorption of the highest

  10. Preparation and Phosphorus Recovery Properties of Porous Calcium Silicate Hydrate%多孔水化硅酸钙的制备及其磷回收特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吉芳英; 关伟; 周卫威; 姜宁; 陈晴空; 晏鹏

    2013-01-01

    In order to sustainably utilize phosphorus,Carbide residue (as calcium material) and white carbon black (as silica material) was used to synthesize calcium silicate hydrate (CSH).As a crystal seed,CSH was used to recover phosphorus from wastewater by producing hydroxyapatite (HAP).The effect of Ca/Si molar ratio on the phosphorus recovery properties of CSH was studied.It was found that there were effects of Ca/Si molar ratio on the structure of CSH.When the Ca/Si molar ratio was 1.8∶ 1,the surface of prepared CSH presented porous structure.A good solubility of Ca2+ was obtained when the large area was used.The best operating condition to recover phosphorus by CSH were CSH dosage of 4 g/L,reaction time of 60 minutes,stirring intensity of 40 r/min.Under the optimum condition,the phosphorus content of regenerated products reached 17.56% after 15 times of circulation of phosphorus removal.This result indicated that the CSH material possessed good phosphorus recovery properties.According to X-ray diffraction and FTIR analysis,HAP has been formed on the surface of CSH during the phosphorus recovery process.In order to recover phosphorus,the CSH can be used to deal with the high phosphorus-contenting wastewater,including industrial wastewater and anaerobic rich phosphate supernatant.In addition,the regenerated phosphorus-containing products (HAP),instead of precious and depleting phosphorus resource,can be reused as phosphorus rock and phosphorus fertilizer.%为实现磷资源的可持续利用,以环境废弃物电石渣为钙质材料,以白碳黑为硅质材料合成CSH(水化硅酸钙),以该材料为晶种,以结晶形成羟基磷灰石的形式从含磷废水中回收磷,重点研究了不同钙硅比[c(CaO) /c(SiO2)]条件下制备的CSH对含磷废水中磷的回收特性.结果表明,钙硅比为1.8∶1时所得的CSH结构更疏松、表面分布有较多的孔隙,较大的比表面积使其具有较好的溶钙能力.钙硅比为1.8∶1的CSH最佳磷回

  11. Influence of saline solution on hydration behavior of β-dicalcium silicate in comparison with biphasic calcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite bio-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, M M; Abd El-Hamid, H K; Mohamed, A F

    2015-12-01

    The influence of using saline solution as mixing and curing liquid on some characteristics of β-dicalcium silicate (β-C2S) and biphasic compound tri-calcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite (TCP/HAp) bio-ceramics was investigated. β-C2S (27-30 nm) was prepared by solid state reaction at 1450°C, while biphasic compound TCP/HAp (7-15 nm) was synthesized from an aqueous solution of Ca(NO3)2·4H2O and (NH4)2HPO4·12H2O by chemical precipitation method. Setting times, compressive strength, pH values, X-ray diffraction analysis, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were investigated. The evaluation of cytotoxicity of both calcium silicate and biphasic compounds to human gingival fibroblasts was carried out. The use of saline solution as mixing and immersing liquid shortened the setting time for the two bio-cements. TCP/HAp did not show any mechanical strength but β-C2S showed good strength values. Both synthesized compounds showed a moderate cytotoxicity and both materials were effective in a no significant way.

  12. Influence of PC superplasticizers on tricalcium silicate hydration.

    OpenAIRE

    Pourchet, S.; Comparet, C.; Nicoleau, L.; Nonat, A.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of polycarboxylate superplasticizers with variations of content of anionic groups was studied on pure tricalcium silicate hydration. The hydration in diluted suspension has been investigated by conductimetry, calorimetry, and ionic and total organic carbon analysis of the liquid phase. The tricalcium silicate hydration is always delayed in presence of polycarboxylate superplasticizer. Moreover, the delay can be correlated with the number of carboxylate groups which are on the ad...

  13. Small angle X-ray scattering from hydrating tricalcium silicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The small-angle X-ray scattering technique was used to study the structural evolution of hydrated tricalcium silicate at room temperature. The changes in specific area of the associated porosity and the evolution of density fluctuations in the solid hydrated phase were deduced from the scattering data. A correlation of these variations with the hydration mechanism is tried. (Author)

  14. CaCl2-Accelerated Hydration of Tricalcium Silicate: A STXM Study Combined with 29Si MAS NMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinfei Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of calcium chloride (CaCl2 on tricalcium silicate (C3S hydration was investigated by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM with Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS spectra and 29Si MAS NMR. STXM is demonstrated to be a powerful tool for studying the chemical composition of a cement-based hydration system. The Ca L3,2-edge NEXAFS spectra obtained by examining C3S hydration in the presence of CaCl2 showed that this accelerator does not change the coordination of calcium in the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H, which is the primary hydration product. O K-edge NEXAFS is also very useful in distinguishing the chemical components in hydrated C3S. Based on the Ca L3,2-edge spectra and chemical component mapping, we concluded that CaCl2 prefers to coexist with unhydrated C3S instead of C-S-H. In Si K-edge NEXAFS analysis, CaCl2 increases the degree of silicate polymerization of C-S-H in agreement with the 29Si CP/MAS NMR results, which show that the presence of CaCl2 in hydrated C3S considerably accelerates the formation of middle groups (Q2 and branch sites (Q3 in the silicate chains of C-S-H gel at 1-day hydration.

  15. Stability of calcium silicate in basic solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘桂华; 李小斌; 彭志宏; 周秋生

    2003-01-01

    Mixture of CaO and SiO2 was sintered at 1 200 or 1 400 ℃ according to the mole ratio of CaO/SiO2 of 1 or 2, and then calcium silicate was leached in pure caustic or soda solution. The results indicated that calcium silicate exists much more stably in caustic solution than that in soda solution, and CaO*SiO2 is more stable than β-2CaO*SiO2 whether in caustic solution or in soda solution. The increase of sintering temperature favored the stability of calcium silicate in the leaching process. When β-2CaO*SiO2 was leached in soda solution, the increase of leaching temperature and time resulted in decomposing of more calcium silicate. And when β-2CaO*SiO2 was leached in caustic solution at high temperature, much 2CaO*SiO2*H2O but little CaO*SiO2*H2O appeared in slag.

  16. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Anticaking... agent in food in an amount not in excess of that reasonably required to produce its intended effect. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food...

  17. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  18. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  19. Observation directe de la croissance d'hydrosilicate de calcium sur des surfaces d'alité et de silice par microscopie à force atomique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauffinet, Sandrine; Finot, Éric; Lesniewska, Eric; Nonat, André

    1998-08-01

    Direct observation of the growth of calcium silicate hydrates, the tricalcium silicate hydration products, at the solid-solution interface were performed by atomic force microscopy. The covering of the surface of alite or silica by a three-dimensional oriented aggregation of nano particles of calcium silicate hydrate is always observed whatever the sample. All observations and quantifications made on calcium silicate growth at the submicronic level are in agreement with the data deduced from the study of the system evolution at the macroscopic level.

  20. Premixed calcium silicate cement for endodontic applications

    OpenAIRE

    Persson, Cecilia; Engqvist, Håkan

    2011-01-01

    Calcium silicate-based materials (also called MTA) are increasingly being used in endodontic applications. However, the handling properties of MTA are not optimal when it comes to injectability and cohesion. Premixing the cements using glycerol avoids these issues. However, there is a lack of data on the effect of common cement variables on important properties of premixed cements for endodontic applications. In this study, the effects of liquid-to-powder ratio, amount of radiopacifier and am...

  1. Creating of highly active calcium-silicate phases for application in endodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Čolović B.; Jokanović V.; Jović N.

    2013-01-01

    The synthesis of active silicate phases by combined sol gel and high-temperature selfpropagating wave method, is described in this paper. They show a significant decrease of setting time and good mechanical properties, which are very important for its potential application in endodontic practice. Particularly, process of hydration of calcium silicate phases is carefully analyzed, from the aspect of phase changes during their soaking in water for 1, 3, 7 and...

  2. Thermodynamics of calcium silicate hydrates, development of a database to model concrete dissolution at 25°C using the EQ3/6 geochemical modeling code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clodic, L; Meike, A

    1997-08-18

    Examination of the ability to model aqueous systems of interest to the repository proposed by the Yucca Mountain Project has revealed an historical deficit in the ability to model complex waterÐmaterial systems that contain ordinary Portland cement (OPC) at elevated temperature (e.g., Bruton et al., 1994; Meike et al., 1994). One of the reasons is that cement chemistry typically concentrates on two issues of importance to the concrete industry: the hydration of cement powder, which contains reactive phases that do not persist in the cured concrete, and the causes of mechanical degradation at earth surface temperatures such as delayed ettringite formation and alkali silica reaction. Such modeling capability is not available in the open literature, even from applications that might have developed high temperature approaches, such as deep drilling for oil and geothermal resource recovery. The ability to simulate the interaction between concrete, as it evolves over time, and water has become more critical as repository designers begin to consider the incorporation of OPC materials in the emplacement drifts. The Yucca Mountain Project is unique among the high-level radioactive waste repository projects in the world in terms of the need to understand and predict processes in excess of 100°C (see, e.g., Meike, 1997). Our aim has been to develop this capability in the area of aqueous chemistry.

  3. Preparation of calcium silicate absorbent from iron blast furnace slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodnax, L F; Rochelle, G T

    2000-09-01

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) solids were prepared from hydrated lime and iron blast furnace slag in an aqueous agitated slurry at 92 degrees C. While it was hoped a minimal lime/slag ratio could be used to create near-amorphous CSH, the surface area of the product improved by increasing the lime/slag weight ratio to 2. The addition of gypsum to the lime/slag system dramatically improved the formation of surface area, creating solids with 139 m2/g after 30 hr of reaction when only a minimal amount of lime was present. The SO2 reactivity of solids prepared with gypsum greatly exceeded that of hydrated lime, achieving greater than 70-80% conversion of the alkalinity after 1 hr of reaction with SO2. The use of CaCl2 as an additive to the lime/slag system, in lieu of gypsum, also produced high-surface-area solids, 115 m2/g after 21 hr of reaction. However, the SO2 reactivity of these sorbents was relatively low given the high surface area. This emphasized that the correlation between surface area and SO2 reactivity was highly dependent on the solid phase, which was subsequently dependent on slurry composition. PMID:11055162

  4. Calcium silicate hydrate: Crystallisation and alkali sorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homogeneous single C-S-H gels has been prepared for the investigation of alkali binding potential and crystallisation. A distribution coefficient, Rd, was introduced to express the partition of alkali between solid and aqueous phases at 25 deg. C. Rd is independent of alkali hydroxide concentration and depends only on Ca:Si ratio over wide ranges of alkali concentration. The trend of numerical values of Rd indicates that alkali bonding into the solid improves as its Ca:Si ratio decreases. Reversibility is demonstrated, indicating a possibility of constant Rd value of the material. Al has been introduced to form C-A-S-H gels and their alkali sorption properties also determined. Al substituted into C-S-H markedly increases Rd, indicating enhancement of alkali binding. However, the dependence of Rd on alkali concentration is non-ideal with composition. A two-site model for bonding is presented. Crystallisation both under saturated steam and 1 bar vapour pressure has been investigated. It has been shown that heat treatment by saturated steam causes crystallisation of gels. The principal minerals obtained were (i) C-S-H gel and Ca(OH)2 at -55 deg. C, (ii) 1.1 nm tobermorite, jennite and afwillite at 85 -130 deg. C, and (iii) xonotlite, foshagite and hillebrandite at 150-180 deg. C. Properties of crystalline C-S-H were also reported for reversible phase transformation, pH conditioning ability, seeding effect and solubility. At 1 bar pressure, crystallisation is slower than in saturated steam due to lower water activity. Tobermorite-like nanodomains develop during reaction at low Ca/Si ratios. In some Ca-rich compositions, Ca(OH)2 is exsolved and occurs as nano-sized crystallites. (author)

  5. Kinetics and Mechanism of Adsorption of Phosphate on Fluorine-containing Calcium Silicate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Xinhua; ZHANG Zhao; SHEN Jun

    2016-01-01

    The nanowires-reticulated calcium silicate with a speciifc surface area more than 100 m2/g was prepared by a hydrothermal process using hydrated lime (Ca(OH)2, HL) and silica containing soluble lfuoride, which was a by-product of lfuorine industry, and the soluble lfuoride in raw silica was ifxed as CaSiF6 at the same time. The kinetic characteristics and mechanism of adsorbing phosphate by lfuorine-containing calcium silicate were investigated in the experiments of phosphorus (P) removal from aqueous solution. The results show that the prepared lfuorine-containing calcium silicate has excellent performance for adsorbing phosphate, the adsorption process appears to follow pseudo-second-order reaction kinetics and the process is mainly controlled by chemisorption. The product resulted from P adsorption is mainly composed of hydroxyapatite (HAP) and lfuorapatite (FAP), which are further used as adsorbents of heavy metal ion Cd2+ in aqueous solution and display excellent performance.

  6. CaCl2-Accelerated Hydration of Tricalcium Silicate: A STXM Study Combined with 29Si MAS NMR

    OpenAIRE

    Qinfei Li; Yong Ge; Guoqing Geng; Sungchul Bae; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of calcium chloride (CaCl2) on tricalcium silicate (C3S) hydration was investigated by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) with Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectra and 29Si MAS NMR. STXM is demonstrated to be a powerful tool for studying the chemical composition of a cement-based hydration system. The Ca L3,2-edge NEXAFS spectra obtained by examining C3S hydration in the presence of CaCl2 showed that this accelerator does not change the coordination...

  7. Hydration of Blended Portland Cements Containing Calcium-Aluminosilicate Glass Powder and Limestone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard, Mette; Poulsen, S.L.; Herfort, D.;

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates the hydration of blended Portland cement containing 30 wt.% Na2O-CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 (NCAS) glass particles either as the only supplementary cementitious material (SCM) or in combination with limestone, using 29Si MAS NMR, powder XRD, and thermal analyses. The NCAS glass...... of hydration. The hydrated glass contributes to the formation of the calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) phase, consuming a part of the Portlandite (Ca(OH)2) formed during hydration of the Portland cement. Furthermore, the presence of the glass and limestone particles, alone or in combination, results...... in an accelerated hydration for alite (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement. A higher degree of limestone reaction has been observed in the blend containing both limestone and NCAS glass as compared to the limestone – Portland mixture. This reflects that limestone reacts with a part of the alumina...

  8. Fluorescent properties of a blue-to green-emitting Ce3+, Tb3+ codoped amorphous calcium silicate phosphors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ce3+, Tb3+ codoped amorphous calcium silicate phosphor was prepared by heating (830 °C for 30 min) Ce3+, Tb3+ codoped calcium silicate hydrate phosphor formed by liquid-phase reaction. The excitation peak wavelength of the resulting phosphor was 330 nm and the emission peak wavelengths were at 544 nm, attributed to the 5D4→7F5 transition of Tb3+, and at 430–470 mm, attributed to Ce3+. The intensity ratio of the two peaks could be freely controlled by varying the Tb/Ca atomic ratio of the Ce3+, Tb3+ codoped amorphous calcium silicate phosphor, allowing light to be emitted over a wide range from blue to green. It was clarified that energy transfer exists from Ce3+ to Tb3+. - Graphical abstract: Ce3+, Tb3+ codoped calcium silicate hydrate phosphor was synthesized by liquid-phase reaction. This was heated at 830 °C to obtain a Ce3+, Tb3+ codoped amorphous calcium silicate phosphor. Under 330 nm excitation, this phosphor showed emission peaks at 430–470 nm and 542 nm. The luminescent color could be continuously changed blue to green with increasing Tb/Ca atomic ratio. It was clarified that electron transfer from Ce3+ to Tb3+ is occurring.

  9. Vibrational investigation of calcium-silicate cements for endodontics in simulated body fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddei, Paola; Modena, Enrico; Tinti, Anna; Siboni, Francesco; Prati, Carlo; Gandolfi, Maria Giovanna

    2011-05-01

    Calcium-silicate MTA (Mineral Trioxide Aggregate) cements have been recently developed for oral and endodontic surgery. This study was aimed at investigating commercial (White ProRoot MTA, White and Grey MTA-Angelus) and experimental (wTC-Bi) accelerated calcium-silicate cements with regards to composition, hydration products and bioactivity upon incubation for 1-28 days at 37 °C, in Dulbecco's Phosphate Buffered Saline (DPBS). Deposits on the surface of the cements and the composition changes during incubation were investigated by micro-Raman and ATR/FT-IR spectroscopy, and pH measurements. Vibrational techniques disclosed significant differences in composition among the unhydrated cements, which significantly affected the bioactivity as well as pH, and hydration products of the cements. After one day in DPBS, all the cements were covered by a more or less homogeneous layer of B-type carbonated apatite. The experimental cement maintained a high bioactivity, only slightly lower than the other cements and appears a valid alternative to commercial cements, in view of its adequate setting time properties. The bioactivity represents an essential property to favour bone healing and makes the calcium-silicate cements the gold standard materials for root-apical endodontic surgery.

  10. LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS OF SILICATE MUD CONTAMINATION WITH CALCIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The silicate-based drilling fluid is a low solids KCl/polymer system with the addition of soluble sodium or potassium silicate to enhance inhibition and wellbore stability. Silicate-based drilling fluids exhibit remarkable shale and chalk stabilizing properties, resulting in gauge hole and the formation of firm cuttings when drilling reactive shales and soft chalks. Silicates protect shales by in-situ gellation when exposed to the neutral pore fluid and precipitation, which occurs on contact with divalent ions present at the surface of the shale. Also, silicates prevent the dispersion and washouts when drilling soft chalk by reacting with the Ca2+ ions present on chalk surfaces of cutting and wellbore to form a protective film. The silicate-based drilling fluid can be used during drilling hole section through shale interbeded anhydrite formations because of its superior shale stabilizing characteristics. However, drilling through the anhydrite can decrease the silicate concentration and change rheological and filtration fluid properties. So, the critical concentration of calcium ions should be investigated by lab tests. This paper details the mechanism of shale inhibition using silicate-based drilling fluid, and presents results of lab tests conducted to ascertain the effect of Ca2+ ions on silicate level in the fluid and the fluid properties.

  11. Fluorescence Properties and Synthesis of Green-Emitting Tb3+-Activated Amorphous Calcium Silicate Phosphor by Ultraviolet Irradiation of 378 nm

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshiyuki Kojima; Masaaki Numazawa; Shinnosuke Kamei; Nobuyuki Nishimiya

    2012-01-01

    The excitation wavelength of conventional Tb3+-activated phosphor is near 270 nm. This study describes novel green-emitting Tb3+-activated amorphous calcium silicate by ultraviolet excitation at 378 nm. The Tb3+-activated amorphous calcium silicate was prepared by heating a sample of Tb3+-activated calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) at 900°C for 30 minutes. The emission wavelength of the resulting phosphor was 544 nm. The optimum excitation wavelength within the range 300–400 nm was 378 nm. The T...

  12. A Comprehensive Study of Osteogenic Calcium Phosphate Silicate Cement: Material Characterization and In Vitro/In Vivo Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Tianxing; Wang, Zhiqin; Zhang, Yixi; Zhang, Yubiao; Hou, Mingxiao; Liu, Xinwei; Wang, Yu; Zhao, Lejun; Ruse, N Dorin; Troczynski, Tom; Häfeli, Urs O

    2016-02-18

    Vertebral compression fractures can be successfully restored by injectable bone cements. Here the as-yet unexplored in vitro cytotoxicity, in vivo biodegradation, and osteoconductivity of a new calcium phosphate silicate cements (CPSC) are studied, where monocalcium phosphate (MCP; 5, 10, and 15 wt%) is added to calcium silicate cement (CSC). Setting rate and compressive strength of CPSC decrease with the addition of MCP. The crystallinity, microstructure, and porosity of hardened CPSC are evaluated by X-ray diffractometer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and microcomputed tomography (CT). It is found that MCP reacts with calcium hydroxide, one of CSC hydration products, to precipitate apatite. While the reaction accelerates the hydration of CSC, the formation of calcium silicate hydrate gel is disturbed and highly porous microstructures form, resulting in weaker compressive strength. In vitro studies demonstrate that CPSC is noncytotoxic to osteoblast cells and promotes their proliferation. In the rabbit tibia implantation model, clinical X-ray and CT scans demonstrate that CPSC biodegrades slower and osseointegrates better than clinically used calcium phosphate cement (CPC). Histological studies demonstrate that CPSC is osteoconductive and induces higher bone formation than CPC, a finding that might warrant future clinical studies. PMID:26677175

  13. Study of cements silicate phases hydrated under high pressure and high temperature; Etude des phases silicatees du ciment hydrate sous haute pression et haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meducin, F.

    2001-10-01

    This study concerns the durability of oil-well cementing. Indeed, in oil well cementing a cement slurry is pumped down the steel casing of the well up the annular space between it and the surrounding rock to support and protect the casing. The setting conditions of pressure and temperature may be very high (up to 1000 bar and 250 deg C at the bottom of the oil-well). In this research, the hydration of the main constituent of cement, synthetic tri-calcium silicate Ca{sub 3}SiO{sub 2}, often called C{sub 3}S (C = CaO; S = SiO{sub 2} and H H{sub 2}O), is studied. Calcium Silicate hydrates are prepared in high-pressure cells to complete their phase diagram (P,T) and obtain the stability conditions for each species. Indeed, the phases formed in these conditions are unknown and the study consists in the hydration of C{sub 3}S at different temperatures, pressures, and during different times to simulate the oil-well conditions. In a first step (until 120 deg C at ambient pressure) the C-S-H, a not well crystallized and non-stoichiometric phase, is synthesized: it brings adhesion and mechanical properties., Then, when pressure and temperature increase, crystallized phases appear such as jaffeite (Ca{sub 6}(Si{sub 2}O{sub 7})(OH){sub 6}) and hillebrandite (Ca{sub 2}(SiO{sub 3})(OH){sub 2}). Silicon {sup 29}Si Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (using standard sequences MAS, CPMAS) allow us to identify all the silicates hydrates formed. Indeed, {sup 29}Si NMR is a valuable tool to determine the structure of crystallized or not-well crystallized phases of cement. The characterization of the hydrated samples is completed by other techniques: X- Ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The following results are found: jaffeite is the most stable phase at C/S=3. To simulate the hydration of real cement, hydration of C{sub 3}S with ground quartz and with or without super-plasticizers is done. In those cases, new phases appear: kilchoanite mainly, and xonotlite. A large amount of

  14. Preparation and characterization of high-strength calcium silicate boards from coal-fired industrial solid wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhao; Cao, Yong-dan; Zhang, Jin-shan; Sun, Chun-bao; Li, Xian-long

    2015-08-01

    To realize the comprehensive utilization of coal-fired industrial solid wastes, a novel high-strength board was prepared from calcium silicate slag, fly ash, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum. The changes in mineral phases, chemical structure, and morphology during hydration were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A traditional board made from quartz and lime was prepared as a reference. The novel board not only consumes a lot of solid wastes, but also meets the strength requirement of the class-five calcium silicate board according to the Chinese Standard JC/T 564.2—2008. Microanalysis showed that hydrated calcium silicate gel (C-S-H(I)), ettringite, tobermorite, and xonotlite were successively generated in the novel board by synergistic hydration of the mixed solid wastes. The board strength was improved by the formation of tobermorite and xonotlite but decreased by unhydrated quartz. It was demonstrated that quartz was not completely hydrated in the traditional board. As a result, the flexural strength of the traditional board was much lower than that of the novel board.

  15. Preparation and characterization of high-strength calcium silicate boards from coal-fired industrial solid wastes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Cao; Yong-dan Cao; Jin-shan Zhang; Chun-bao Sun; Xian-long Li

    2015-01-01

    To realize the comprehensive utilization of coal-fired industrial solid wastes, a novel high-strength board was prepared from cal-cium silicate slag, fly ash, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum. The changes in mineral phases, chemical structure, and morphology during hydration were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and scanning electron mi-croscopy (SEM). A traditional board made from quartz and lime was prepared as a reference. The novel board not only consumes a lot of solid wastes, but also meets the strength requirement of the class-five calcium silicate board according to the Chinese Standard JC/T 564.2—2008. Microanalysis showed that hydrated calcium silicate gel (C−S−H(I)), ettringite, tobermorite, and xonotlite were successivelygenerated in the novel board by synergistic hydration of the mixed solid wastes. The board strength was improved by the formation of tobermorite and xonotlite but decreased by unhydrated quartz. It was demonstrated that quartz was not completely hydrated in the traditional board. As a re-sult, the flexural strength of the traditional board was much lower than that of the novel board.

  16. In vitro macrophage cytotoxicity of five calcium silicates.

    OpenAIRE

    Skaug, V; Davies, R.; Gylseth, B

    1984-01-01

    Five calcium silicate minerals (two naturally occurring and three synthetic compounds) with defined morphology and chemical composition were compared for their cytotoxic and lysosomal enzyme releasing effects on unstimulated mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro. One synthetic material, a fibrous tobermorite, was cytotoxic towards the cells, and two naturally occurring wollastonites induced selective release of beta-glucuronidase from the cells.

  17. SINTERING AND SULFATION OF CALCIUM SILICATE-ALUMINATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of sintering on the reactivity of solids at high temperature was studied. The nature of the interaction was studied with calcium silicate-aluminate reacting with SO2 between 665 and 800 C. The kinetics of the sintering and sulfation processes were measured independentl...

  18. Hydration of Portland cement with additions of calcium sulfoaluminates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Saout, Gwenn, E-mail: gwenn.le-saout@mines-ales.fr [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Concrete and Construction Chemistry Laboratory, Ueberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Lothenbach, Barbara [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Concrete and Construction Chemistry Laboratory, Ueberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Hori, Akihiro [DENKA Chemicals GmbH, Wehrhahn-Center, Cantadorstr. 3, D-40211 Duesseldorf (Germany); Higuchi, Takayuki [Denki Kagaku Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha (DENKA), Omi, Itoigawa, Niigata, 949-0393 (Japan); Winnefeld, Frank [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Concrete and Construction Chemistry Laboratory, Ueberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    2013-01-15

    The effect of mineral additions based on calcium aluminates on the hydration mechanism of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) was investigated using isothermal calorimetry, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, solid state nuclear magnetic resonance and pore solution analysis. Results show that the addition of a calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSA) to the OPC does not affect the hydration mechanism of alite but controls the aluminate dissolution. In the second blend investigated, a rapid setting cement, the amorphous calcium aluminate reacts very fast to ettringite. The release of aluminum ions strongly retards the hydration of alite but the C-S-H has a similar composition as in OPC with no additional Al to Si substitution. As in CSA-OPC, the aluminate hydration is controlled by the availability of sulfates. The coupling of thermodynamic modeling with the kinetic equations predicts the amount of hydrates and pore solution compositions as a function of time and validates the model in these systems.

  19. Hydration of Portland cement with additions of calcium sulfoaluminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of mineral additions based on calcium aluminates on the hydration mechanism of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) was investigated using isothermal calorimetry, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, solid state nuclear magnetic resonance and pore solution analysis. Results show that the addition of a calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSA) to the OPC does not affect the hydration mechanism of alite but controls the aluminate dissolution. In the second blend investigated, a rapid setting cement, the amorphous calcium aluminate reacts very fast to ettringite. The release of aluminum ions strongly retards the hydration of alite but the C–S–H has a similar composition as in OPC with no additional Al to Si substitution. As in CSA–OPC, the aluminate hydration is controlled by the availability of sulfates. The coupling of thermodynamic modeling with the kinetic equations predicts the amount of hydrates and pore solution compositions as a function of time and validates the model in these systems.

  20. Phase transformations, microstructure formation and in vitro osteoblast response in calcium silicate/brushite cement composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopcak, T; Medvecky, L; Giretova, M; Kovalcikova, A; Stulajterova, R; Durisin, J

    2016-01-01

    Self-setting simple calcium silicate/brushite (B) biocements with various Ca/P ratios were prepared by mutual mixing of both monocalcium silicate hydrate (CSH) or β-wollastonite (woll) powders with B and the addition of 2 wt% NaH2PO4 solution as a hardening liquid. The phase composition of the final composites and the texture of the surface calcium phosphate/silica layer were controlled by the starting Ca/P ratio in composites and the pH during setting. It was verified that the presence of continuous bone-like calcium phosphate coating on the surface of the samples was not essential for in vitro osteoblast proliferation. The nanocrystalline calcium deficient hydroxyapatite and amorphous silica were found as the main setting products in composite mixtures with a Ca/P ratio close to the region of the formation of deficient hydroxyapatite-like calcium phosphates. No CSH phase with a lower Ca/Si ratio was identified after transformation. The results confirmed a small effect of the monocalcium silicate addition on the compressive strength (CS) of cements up to 30 wt% (around 20-25 MPa) and a significant rise of the value in 50 woll/B cement (65 MPa). The final setting times of the cement composites varied between 5 and 43 min depending on the P/L ratio and the type of monocalcium silicate phase in the cement mixture. 10CSH/B and 50 woll/B cements with different textures but free of both the needle-like and perpendicularly-oriented hydroxyapatite particles on the surface of the samples had low cytotoxicity. PMID:27509265

  1. Potassium silicate and calcium silicate on the resistance of soybean to Phakopsora pachyrhizi infection

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Fernanda Cruz; Fabrício Ávila Rodrigues; Ana Paula Cardoso Diniz; Maurilio Alves Moreira; Everaldo Gonçalves de Barros

    2013-01-01

    The control of Asian Soybean Rust (ASR), caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi, has been difficult due to the aggressiveness of the pathogen and the lack of resistant cultivars. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of spray of potassium silicate (PS) and soil amendment with calcium silicate (CS) on soybean resistance to ASR. The PS solution was sprayed to leaves 24 hours prior to fungal inoculation while CS was amended to the soil at thirty-five days before sowing. The infection ...

  2. Dentin-cement Interfacial Interaction: Calcium Silicates and Polyalkenoates

    OpenAIRE

    Atmeh, A.R.; Chong, E. Z.; Richard, G; Festy, F.; Watson, T.F.

    2012-01-01

    The interfacial properties of a new calcium-silicate-based coronal restorative material (Biodentine™) and a glass-ionomer cement (GIC) with dentin have been studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-Raman spectroscopy, and two-photon auto-fluorescence and second-harmonic-generation (SHG) imaging. Results indicate the formation of tag-like structures alongside an interfacial layer called the “mineral infiltration zone”, where the alkaline c...

  3. Hydration of calcium sulfoaluminate cements - Experimental findings and thermodynamic modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium sulfoaluminate cements (CSA) are a promising low-CO2 alternative to ordinary Portland cements and are as well of interest concerning their use as binder for waste encapsulation. In this study, the hydration of two CSA cements has been investigated experimentally and by thermodynamic modelling between 1 h and 28 days at w/c ratios of 0.72 and 0.80, respectively. The main hydration product of CSA is ettringite, which precipitates together with amorphous Al(OH)3 until the calcium sulfate is consumed after around 1-2 days of hydration. Afterwards, monosulfate is formed. In the presence of belite, straetlingite occurs as an additional hydration product. The pore solution analysis reveals that straetlingite can bind a part of the potassium ions, which are released by the clinker minerals. The microstructure of both cements is quite dense even after 16 h of hydration, with not much pore space available at a sample age of 28 days. The pore solution of both cements is dominated during the first hours of hydration by potassium, sodium, calcium, aluminium and sulfate; the pH is around 10-11. When the calcium sulfate is depleted, the sulfate concentration drops by a factor of 10. This increases pH to around 12.5-12.8. Based on the experimental data, a thermodynamic hydration model for CSA cements based on cement composition, hydration kinetics of clinker phases and calculations of thermodynamic equilibria by geochemical speciation has been established. The modelled phase development with ongoing hydration agrees well with the experimental findings.

  4. Rheological and hydration characterization of calcium sulfoaluminate cement pastes

    OpenAIRE

    García-Maté, Marta; Santacruz, Isabel; de la Torre, Ángeles G.; León-Reina, Laura; Aranda, Miguel A. G.

    2012-01-01

    Calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cements are currently receiving a lot of attention because their manufacture produces less CO2 than ordinary Portland cement (OPC). However, it is essential to understand all parameters which may affect the hydration processes. This work deals with the study of the effect of several parameters, such as superplasticizer (SP), gypsum contents (10, 20 and 30 wt%) and w/c ratio (0.4 and 0.5), on the properties of CSA pastes during early hydration. This characteriza...

  5. Chemical characteristics of mineral trioxide aggregate and its hydration reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Seok-Woo

    2012-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was developed in early 1990s and has been successfully used for root perforation repair, root end filling, and one-visit apexification. MTA is composed mainly of tricalcium silicate and dicalcium silicate. When MTA is hydrated, calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) and calcium hydroxide is formed. Formed calcium hydroxide interacts with the phosphate ion in body fluid and form amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) which finally transforms into calcium deficient hydroxyap...

  6. Fluorescent properties of a green- to red-emitting Eu3+, Tb3+ codoped amorphous calcium silicate phosphor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Eu3+, Tb3+ codoped amorphous calcium silicate phosphor was prepared by heating a Eu3+, Tb3+ codoped calcium silicate hydrate phosphor formed by liquid-phase reaction for 30 min at 900 °C. The excitation peak wavelength of the resulting phosphor was 379 nm and the emission peak wavelengths were at 542 nm, attributed to the 5D4→7F5 transition of Tb3+, and at 613 mm, attributed to the 5D0→7F1 transition of Eu3+. The intensity ratio of the two peaks could be freely controlled by varying the Eu/Tb atomic ratio of the Eu3+, Tb3+ codoped amorphous calcium silicate phosphor, allowing light to be emitted over a wide range from green to red. It was clarified that electron transfer from Tb3+ to Eu3+ is occurring. - Highlights: ► A Eu3+, Tb3+ codoped CSH phosphor was synthesized by liquid-phase reaction. ► CSH phosphor was heated at 900 °C to obtain Eu3+, Tb3+ codoped amorphous calcium silicate phosphor. ► Under 379 nm excitation, this phosphor showed emission peaks at 542 nm and 613 nm. ► The luminescent color could be continuously changed from green to red with increasing Eu/Tb atomic ratio. ► It was clarified that electron transfer from Tb3+ to Eu3+ is occurring.

  7. Structure and Kinetics of formation of the gel phase in hydrated tricalcium silicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydration of tricalcium silicate has been studied by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) at different temperatures. The degree of hydration was determined by quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis (QXDA). The Kinetics of setting of the pastes is well described by the Johnson-Mehl equation with n=2, suggesting that the scattering objects (hydrated regions) grow by a diffusion controlled mechanism and have a shape of plates of constant thickness. Features of the SAXS curves from samples, in saturated conditions, are consistent with the lamellar model for the structure of the C-S-H gel. (author)

  8. Study of belite calcium sulfo-aluminate cement potential for zinc conditioning: From hydration to durability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium silicate cements are widely used for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste conditioning. However, wastes produced by nuclear activities are very diverse and some of their components may chemically react with cement phases. For instance, ashes resulting from the incineration of technological wastes including neoprene and polyvinylchloride may contain substantial amounts of soluble zinc chloride. This compound is known to strongly delay or inhibit Portland cement setting. One approach to limit adverse cement-waste interactions is to select a binder showing a better compatibility with the waste while keeping cement matrix advantages (low cost, simple process, hydration with water provided by the waste...). This work thus investigates the potential of calcium sulfo-aluminate cement for zinc Zn(II) immobilization. Four aspects were considered: hydration (kinetics and products formed), properties of hydrated binders, mechanisms of zinc retention and durability of the cement pastes (based on leaching experiments and modelling). The influence of three main parameters was assessed: the gypsum content of the cement, the concentration of ZnCl2 and the thermal evolution at early age. It follows that materials based on a calcium sulfo-aluminate cement containing 20% gypsum are interesting candidates for zinc Zn(II) stabilization/solidification: there is no delay in hydration, mineralogy of the hydrated phases is slightly dependent on thermal history, mechanical strength is high, dimensional changes are limited and zinc Zn(II) is well immobilized, even if the cement paste is leached by pure water during a long period (90 d). (author)

  9. Synthesis of Calcium Silicate (Casio3 Using Calcium Fluoride, Quartz and Microbes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gopal Krishna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbes like bacteria, algae, fungi and virus play an important role to catalyst chemical reactions. In Nature, ores or minerals of different compounds are formed due to microbial environment and other factors like weathering. Microbial environment is also instrumental in forming calcium containing silicate minerals. Chemical reactions occur under microbial environment because microbes have the ability to control or modify different factors like pH, chemical potential and temperature during reactions. In this paper, synthesis of calcium silicate (CaSiO3 using calcium fluoride (CaF2 and quartz (SiO2 under microbial environment in a laboratory is being adopted to produce the required material. XRD technique is used to confirm the formation of CaSiO3.

  10. Enhanced bioactivity of glass ionomer cement by incorporating calcium silicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Song; Cai, Yixiao; Engqvist, Håkan; Xia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are known as a non-bioactive dental cement. During setting the GIC have an acidic pH, driven by the acrylic acid component. It is a challenge to make GIC alkaline without disturbing its mechanical properties. One strategy was to add slowly reacting systems with an alkaline pH. The aim of the present study is to investigate the possibility of forming a bioactive dental material based on the combination of glass ionomer cement and calcium silicates. Two types of GIC were used as control. Wollastonite (CS also denoted β-CaSiO3) or Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) was incorporated into the 2 types of GIC. The material formulations' setting time, compressive strength, pH and bioactivity were compared between modified GIC and GIC control. Apatite crystals were found on the surfaces of the modified cements but not on the control GIC. The compressive strength of the cement remained with the addition of 20% calcium silicate or 20% MTA after one day immersion. In addition, the compressive strength of GIC modified with 20% MTA had been increased during the 14 d immersion (p < 0 .05). PMID:26787304

  11. Bioactivity studies of calcium magnesium silicate prepared from eggshell waste by sol–gel combustion synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Rajan Choudhary; Sivasankar Koppala; Sasikumar Swamiappan

    2015-01-01

    The present study focused on the synthesis of calcium magnesium silicate (akermanite, Ca2MgSi2O7) using eggshell biowaste (as calcium source), magnesium nitrate and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as starting materials. Sol–gel combustion method was adopted to obtain calcium magnesium silicate. Citric acid was used as a fuel (reducing agent) and nitrate ions present in the metal nitrates acts as an oxidizing agent during combustion process. The characterization of synthesized calcium magnesiu...

  12. A low-temperature sol-gel route for the synthesis of bioactive calcium silicates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Sen Sun; Ai-Ling Li; Fu-Jian Xu; Dong Qiu

    2013-01-01

    Sol-gel-derived bioactive calcium silicates,synthesized from calcium nitrate tetrahydrate and calcium 2-methoxyethoxide as calcium precursor respectively,were calcified under different temperatures.A series of techniques including SEM,TGA,solid 29Si NMR,nitrogen adsorption,and simulated body fluids (SBF) soaking were employed to study their textural features and in vitro bioactivity.It was confirmed that calcium 2-methoxyethoxide is a promising candidate of calcium precursor for bioactive calcium silicates stabilized under low temperatures.This has implications in fabrication of organic-inorganic hybrid composites.

  13. Calcium bromide hydration for heat storage systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ai Niwa; Noriyuki Kobayashi

    2015-01-01

    A chemical reaction is a common and simple way to produce heat for a heat storage system. The reaction produces heat energy without the use of electricity or fuel. The goal of this study was to develop a heat storage system for use in automobiles, which is able to provide heat rapidly via a hydration reaction. A heat storage system without an evaporator stores high-density heat and has a high heat output rate since the solid–liquid product that is formed is transferred as a heat medium to the...

  14. Calcium bromide hydration for heat storage systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai Niwa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A chemical reaction is a common and simple way to produce heat for a heat storage system. The reaction produces heat energy without the use of electricity or fuel. The goal of this study was to develop a heat storage system for use in automobiles, which is able to provide heat rapidly via a hydration reaction. A heat storage system without an evaporator stores high-density heat and has a high heat output rate since the solid–liquid product that is formed is transferred as a heat medium to the object that requires heat. The exothermic heat produced from the solid–liquid reaction was measured, and the relationship between the equivalence ratio and the reaction heat was evaluated. The heat output and heat recovered by the heat storage system, which comprised a reaction vessel and a heat exchanger, were measured. We selected solid CaBr2 because it was the best metal halide for a hydration reaction and had a high heat yield from the dissolution reaction. With this system, we were able to achieve a heat recovery rate of 582 kJ/L-H2O. We found no degradation in the chemical composition of CaBr2 after it being recycled 100 times.

  15. CO2 sequestration using calcium-silicate concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examined the feasibility of sequestering carbon dioxide (CO2) using calcium silicate while developing a strong and durable concrete building product. In addition to offering a solution for a safe, environmentally sound manner to sequester carbon dioxide, the carbonation curing of concrete has the potential to provide a permanent storage for exhaust CO2. The calcium compounds in cement react with CO2 through the early-age carbonation curing, forming geologically stable calcium carbonates. In this study, both type 10 and type 30 Portland cements were used as CO2 binders in concretes with 0, 25, 50, and 75 per cent quartz aggregates and lightweight aggregates. The sequestration took place in a chamber under 0.5 MPa pressure at ambient temperature for a duration of 2 hours. The recovered CO2 from flue gas was simulated using a 100 per cent concentration of CO2. The CO2 uptake was quantified by direct mass gain and by an infrared-based carbon analyzer. The performance of the carbonated concrete was evaluated by its strength. In 2 hours, a CO2 uptake of 9 to 16 per cent by binder mass was achieved. The carbonation curing of concrete was found to provide better strength, stability, permeability and abrasion resistance in concrete products without steel reinforcement. 10 refs., 4 tabs., 10 figs

  16. Productivity and nutritive value of bluestem grass fertilized with calcium and magnesium silicate

    OpenAIRE

    Cinthya Souza Santana; Laura Souza Santos; Greiciele de Morais; Luiz Arnaldo Fernandes; Luciana Castro Geraseev

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of application of calcium and magnesium silicate on the productivity, chemical composition and in situ ruminal degradation of bluestem grass (Andropogon gayanus Kunth, cv. Baeti; Embrapa 23) during the rainy and dry seasons. The design consisted of completely randomized blocks in a 6x2 factorial scheme (six silicate doses and two cutting seasons), arranged in plots subdivided over time. The plots were the calcium and magnesium silicate doses (0, 200, 400, 600, ...

  17. Preparation of TiO2 nanotubes/mesoporous calcium silicate composites with controllable drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chunling; Li, Ping; Liu, Yan; Luo, Fei; Xiao, Xiufeng

    2016-10-01

    Nanotube structures such as TiO2 nanotube (TNT) arrays produced by self-ordering electrochemical anodization have been extensively explored for drug delivery applications. In this study, we presented a new implantable drug delivery system that combined mesoporous calcium silicate coating with nanotube structures to achieve a controllable drug release of water soluble and antiphlogistic drug loxoprofen sodium. The results showed that the TiO2 nanotubes/mesoporous calcium silicate composites were successfully fabricated by a simple template method and the deposition of mesoporous calcium silicate increased with the soaking time. Moreover, the rate of deposition of biological mesoporous calcium silicate on amorphous TNTs was better than that on anatase TNTs. Further, zinc-incorporated mesoporous calcium silicate coating, produced by adding a certain concentration of zinc nitrate into the soaking system, displayed improved chemical stability. A significant improvement in the drug release characteristics with reduced burst release and sustained release was demonstrated. PMID:27287140

  18. Synthesis of Calcium Silicate (Casio3) Using Calcium Fluoride, Quartz and Microbes

    OpenAIRE

    B. Gopal Krishna; M. Jagannadha Rao

    2015-01-01

    Microbes like bacteria, algae, fungi and virus play an important role to catalyst chemical reactions. In Nature, ores or minerals of different compounds are formed due to microbial environment and other factors like weathering. Microbial environment is also instrumental in forming calcium containing silicate minerals. Chemical reactions occur under microbial environment because microbes have the ability to control or modify different factors like pH, chemical potential and tempera...

  19. A multinuclear solid state NMR spectroscopic study of the structural evolution of disordered calcium silicate sol-gel biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhongjie; Jones, Julian R; Hanna, John V; Smith, Mark E

    2015-01-28

    Disordered sol-gel prepared calcium silicate biomaterials show significant, composition dependent ability to bond with bone. Bone bonding is attributed to rapid hydroxycarbonate apatite (HCA) formation on the glass surface after immersion in body fluid (or implantation). Atomic scale details of the development of the structure of (CaO)x(SiO2)1-x (x = 0.2, 0.3 and 0.5) under heat treatment and subsequent dissolution in simulated body fluid (SBF) are revealed through a multinuclear solid state NMR approach using one-dimensional (17)O, (29)Si, (31)P and (1)H. Central to this study is the combination of conventional static and magic angle spinning (MAS) and two-dimensional (2D) triple quantum (3Q) (17)O NMR experiments that can readily distinguish and quantify the bridging (BOs) and non-bridging (NBOs) oxygens in the silicate network. Although soluble calcium is present in the sol, the (17)O NMR results reveal that the sol-gel produced network structure is initially dominated by BOs after gelation, aging and drying (e.g. at 120 °C), indicating a nanoscale mixture of the calcium salt and a predominantly silicate network. Only once the calcium salt is decomposed at elevated temperatures do the Ca(2+) ions become available to break BO. Apatite forming ability in SBF depends strongly on the surface OH and calcium content. The presence of calcium aids HCA formation via promotion of surface hydration and the ready availability of Ca(2+) ions. (17)O NMR shows the rapid loss of NBOs charge balanced by calcium as it is leached into the SBF. The formation of nanocrystalline, partially ordered HCA can be detected via(31)P NMR. This data indicates the importance of achieving the right balance of BO/NBO for optimal biochemical response and network properties. PMID:25494341

  20. Photostable Solid Dispersion of Nifedipine by Porous Calcium Silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Yumi; Hirai, Nobuaki; Takatani-Nakase, Tomoka; Takahashi, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Nifedipine (NIF) is a typical light-sensitive drug requiring protection from light during manufacture, storage, and handling of its dosage forms. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of porous calcium silicate (PCS) for maintaining the photostability of NIF in a solid dispersion formulation. Adsorption solid dispersion (ASD) prepared using NIF and PCS as an amorphous formulation was more stable to light irradiation than a physical mixture of NIF and microcrystalline cellulose (a control physical mixture) as a crystalline formulation. In addition, PCS in physical mixtures with NIF adequately protected NIF from photodegradation, suggesting that this protective effect could be because of some screening effect by the porous structure of PCS blocking the passage of light reaching NIF in pores of PCS. These findings suggest that PCS is useful for improving the solubility and photostability of NIF in solid dispersion formulation.

  1. Thermodynamics and kinetics of the sulfation of porous calcium silicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. A.; Kohl, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    The sulfation of plasma sprayed calcium silicate in flowing SO2/air mixtures at 900 and 1000 C was investigated thermogravimetrically. Reaction products were analyzed using electron microprobe and X-ray diffraction analysis techniques, and results were compared with thermodynamic predictions. The percentage, by volume, of SO2 in air was varied between 0.036 and 10 percent. At 10 percent SO2 the weight gain curve displays a concave downward shoulder early in the sulfation process. An analytical model was developed which treats the initial process as one which decays exponentially with increasing time and the subsequent process as one which decays exponentially with increasing weight gain. At lower SO2 levels the initial rate is controlled by the reactant flow rate. At 1100 C and 0.036 percent SO2 there is no reaction, in agreement with thermodynamic predictions.

  2. Potassium silicate and calcium silicate on the resistance of soybean to Phakopsora pachyrhizi infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernanda Cruz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The control of Asian Soybean Rust (ASR, caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi, has been difficult due to the aggressiveness of the pathogen and the lack of resistant cultivars. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of spray of potassium silicate (PS and soil amendment with calcium silicate (CS on soybean resistance to ASR. The PS solution was sprayed to leaves 24 hours prior to fungal inoculation while CS was amended to the soil at thirty-five days before sowing. The infection process of P. pachyrhizi was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The uredia on leaves of plants sprayed with PS were smaller and more compact than those observed on the leaves of plants grown in soil amended with CS or in soil non-amended with CS (control treatment. On leaves of plants from the control treatment, uredia produced many urediniospores at 9 days after inoculation, and the ASR severity was 15, 8 and 9%, respectively, for plants from control, PS and CS treatments. In conclusion, the spray of PS contributed to reduce the number of uredia per cm² of leaf area and both PS spray and CS resulted in lower ASR symptoms.

  3. Effect of temperature on the hydration of Portland cement blended with siliceous fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of temperature on the hydration of Portland cement pastes blended with 50 wt.% of siliceous fly ash is investigated within a temperature range of 7 to 80 °C. The elevation of temperature accelerates both the hydration of OPC and fly ash. Due to the enhanced pozzolanic reaction of the fly ash, the change of the composition of the C–S–H and the pore solution towards lower Ca and higher Al and Si concentrations is shifted towards earlier hydration times. Above 50 °C, the reaction of fly ash also contributes to the formation of siliceous hydrogarnet. At 80 °C, ettringite and AFm are destabilised and the released sulphate is partially incorporated into the C–S–H. The observed changes of the phase assemblage in dependence of the temperature are confirmed by thermodynamic modelling. The increasingly heterogeneous microstructure at elevated temperatures shows an increased density of the C–S–H and a higher coarse porosity. -- Highlights: •The reaction of quartz powder at 80 °C strongly enhances the compressive strength. •Almost no strength increase of fly ash blended OPC at 80 °C was found after 2 days. •Siliceous hydrogarnet is formed upon the reaction of fly ash at high temperatures. •Temperature dependent change of the system was simulated by thermodynamic modelling. •Destabilisation of ettringite above 50 °C correlates with sulphate content of C–S–H

  4. Internal friction of hydrated soda-lime-silicate glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinsch, S; Müller, R; Deubener, J; Behrens, H

    2013-11-01

    The internal friction of hydrated soda-lime-silica glasses with total water content (C(W)) up to 1.9 wt. % was studied by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) using temperature-frequency sweeps from 723 K to 273 K and from 1 s(-1) to 50 s(-1). Total water content and concentrations of H2O molecules (C(H2O)) and OH groups (C(OH)) in the DMA specimens were determined by infrared spectroscopy. For low water contents (C(W) ≈ C(OH) 1 wt. %), where significant amounts of molecular water are evident (C(H2O) > 0.15 wt. %), however, internal friction spectra change unexpectedly: the β(OH) peak heights saturate and a low temperature shoulder appears on the β-relaxation peak. This emerging relaxation mode (β(H2O) relaxation) was assigned to the motions of H2O molecules. β(H2O) relaxation was found to be faster than β(OH) but slower than γ relaxation. Activation energy of the different relaxation modes increased in the order γ < β(H2O) < β(OH) < α. PMID:24206315

  5. Biocompatibility and bioactivity of calcium silicate-based endodontic sealers in human dental pulp cells

    OpenAIRE

    Leticia Boldrin MESTIERI; GOMES-CORNÉLIO, Ana Lívia; RODRIGUES, Elisandra Márcia; SALLES, Loise Pedrosa; BOSSO-MARTELO, Roberta; Juliane Maria GUERREIRO-TANOMARU; TANOMARU-FILHO, Mário

    2015-01-01

    Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) is a calcium silicate-based material. New sealers have been developed based on calcium silicate as MTA Fillapex and MTA Plus. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate biocompatibility and bioactivity of these two calcium silicate-based sealers in culture of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs). Material and Methods The cells were isolated from third molars extracted from a 16-year-old patient. Pulp tissue was sectioned into fragments with approximately 1 mm3...

  6. Uranium(VI) uptake by synthetic calcium silicate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The immobilization of U(VI) by C-S-H phases under conditions relevant for the cementitious near field of a repository for radioactive waste has been investigated. C-S-H phases have been synthesized using two different procedures: the 'direct reaction' method and the 'solution reaction' method. The stabilities of alkaline solutions of U(VI) (presence of precipitates or colloidal material) were studied prior to sorption and co-precipitation tests in order to determine the experimental U(VI) solubility limits. These U(VI) solubility limits were compared with the U(VI) solubilities obtained from thermodynamic speciation calculations assuming the presence of combinations of different solid U(VI) phases. The solid phase controlling U(VI) solubility in the present experiments was found to be CaUO4s). The U(VI) uptake kinetics and sorption isotherms on C-S-H phases with different C:S ratios were determined under various chemical conditions; e.g., sorption and co-precipitation experiments and different pH's. U(VI) was found to sorb fast and very strongly on C-S-H phases with distribution ratios (Rd values) ranging in value between 103 L kg-1 and 106 L kg-1. Both sorption and co-precipitation experiments resulted in Rd values which were very similar, thus indicating that no additional sorption sites for U(VI) were generated in the co-precipitation process. Furthermore, C-S-H synthesis procedures did not have a significant influence on U(VI) uptake. The U(VI) sorption isotherms were found to be non-linear, and further, increasing Ca concentrations resulted in increasing U(VI) uptake. The latter observation suggests that U(VI) uptake is controlled by a solubility-limiting process, while the former observation further indicates that pure Ca-uranate is not the solubility-limiting phase. It is proposed that a solid solution containing Ca and UO22+ could control U(VI) uptake by C-S-H phases. (authors)

  7. Retention capacity of the calcium silicates hydrates (CSH) for caesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkalis are poorly trapped by cement and this constitutes one of the problem for the use of cement as nuclear waste matrix. Therefore we have studied the sorption of 137Cs on the CSH which are the major components of a Portland cement. CSH of different Ca/Si has been synthetised in suspension. Caesium chloride, which is highly soluble, was placed in a reactor with the CSH. To have a high precision for the caesium quantity fixed by the CSH, radioactive caesium was used as tracer. We observed that the maximum exchange capacity occurs at low Ca/Si ratio, when the structure is close to that of tobermorite. A Cs/Ca molar ratio around one could be obtained in this structure. (orig.)

  8. Developments in TEM Nanotomography of Calcium Silicate Hydrate

    KAUST Repository

    Taylor, Rae

    2015-04-01

    This investigation was designed to explore the possibility of using transmission electron microscope (TEM) tomography on cement-based systems gain a greater understanding of their nanostructure and pore network. The preliminary results show a clearly a well-defined pore network at the nanoscale, with pore size approximately 1.7-2.4 nm in diameter and spaced around 5-8 nm apart. A comparison of small angle X-ray scattering data with 2-D TEM images analyzed with the Fourier slice theorem documents an excellent structural correlation. © 2015 The American Ceramic Society.

  9. Present and future of glass-ionomers and calcium-silicate cements as bioactive materials in dentistry: Biophotonics-based interfacial analyses in health and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, Timothy F; Atmeh, Amre R.; Sajini, Shara; Cook, Richard J.; Festy, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Objective Since their introduction, calcium silicate cements have primarily found use as endodontic sealers, due to long setting times. While similar in chemistry, recent variations such as constituent proportions, purities and manufacturing processes mandate a critical understanding of service behavior differences of the new coronal restorative material variants. Of particular relevance to minimally invasive philosophies is the potential for ion supply, from initial hydration to mature set i...

  10. LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS OF SILICATE MUD CONTAMINATION WITH CALCIUM

    OpenAIRE

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec; Katarina Simon; Davorin Matanović

    2004-01-01

    The silicate-based drilling fluid is a low solids KCl/polymer system with the addition of soluble sodium or potassium silicate to enhance inhibition and wellbore stability. Silicate-based drilling fluids exhibit remarkable shale and chalk stabilizing properties, resulting in gauge hole and the formation of firm cuttings when drilling reactive shales and soft chalks. Silicates protect shales by in-situ gellation when exposed to the neutral pore fluid and precipitation, which occurs on contact ...

  11. Biocompatibility of a new nanomaterial based on calcium silicate implanted in subcutaneous connective tissue of rats

    OpenAIRE

    Petrović Violeta; Opačić-Galić Vanja; Jokanović V.; Jovanović M.; Basta-Jovanović Gordana; Živković S.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate rat connective tissue response to a new calcium silicate system 7, 15, 30 and 60 days after implantation. Twenty Wistar albino male rats received two tubes half-filled with a new calcium silicate system (NCSS) or MTA in subcutaneous tissue. The empty half of the tubes served as controls. Five animals were sacrificed after 7, 15, 30 and 60 days and samples of the subcutaneous tissue around implanted material were submi...

  12. Determine the Compressive Strength of Calcium Silicate Bricks by Combined Nondestructive Method

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with the application of combined nondestructive method for assessment of compressive strength of calcium silicate bricks. In this case, it is a combination of the rebound hammer method and ultrasonic pulse method. Calibration relationships for determining compressive strength of calcium silicate bricks obtained from nondestructive parameter testing for the combined method as well as for the L-type Schmidt rebound hammer and ultrasonic pulse method are quoted here. Calibration ...

  13. Aqueous deposition of calcium phosphates and silicate substituted calcium phosphates on magnesium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attempts were made to deposit homogeneous films of calcium phosphates (CaPs) on two magnesium alloy systems, AZ31 and Mg–4Y, through an aqueous phosphating bath method. The deposition of silicate substituted CaPs by this aqueous method was also explored as silicate substitution is believed to increase the bioactivity of CaPs. The effect of doped and undoped coatings on the in vitro degradation and bioactivity of both alloy systems was studied. FTIR and EDX confirmed the deposition of Ca, P, and Si on both alloys and the coatings appeared to consist primarily biphasic mixtures of hydroxyapatite and β-TCP. These largely inhomogeneous coatings, as observed by SEM, were not shown to have any significant effect on maintaining the physiological pH of the culture medium in comparison to the uncoated samples, as the pH remained approximately in the 8.4–8.7 range. Interestingly, despite similar pH profiles between the coated and uncoated samples, CaP coatings affected the degradation of both alloys. These doped and undoped calcium phosphate coatings were observed to decrease the degradation of AZ31 whereas they increased the degradation of Mg–4Y. In vitro studies on cell attachment using MC3T3-E1 mouse osteoblasts showed that between the uncoated alloys, Mg–4Y appeared to be the more biocompatible of the two. Silicate substituted CaP coatings were observed to increase the cell attachment on AZ31 compared to bare and undoped CaPs coated samples, but did not have as great of an effect on increasing cell attachment on Mg–4Y.

  14. The flame photometric determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, H.

    1957-01-01

    A flame photometric method of determining calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate locks has been developed Aluminum and phosphate interference was overcome by the addition of a large excess of magnesium. The method is rapid and suitable for routine analysis Results obtained are within ?? 2% of the calcium oxide content. ?? 1957.

  15. Structural characterization of magnesium silicate hydrate: towards the design of eco-sustainable cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonelli, M; Martini, F; Calucci, L; Fratini, E; Geppi, M; Ridi, F; Borsacchi, S; Baglioni, P

    2016-02-28

    Magnesium-based cement is one of the most interesting eco-sustainable alternatives to standard cementitious binders. The reasons for the interest towards this material are twofold: (i) its production process, using magnesium silicates, brine or seawater, dramatically reduces CO2 emissions with respect to Portland cement production, and (ii) it is very well suited to applications in radioactive waste encapsulation. In spite of its potential, assessment of the structural properties of its binder phase (magnesium silicate hydrate or M-S-H) is far from complete, especially because of its amorphous character. In this work, a comprehensive structural characterization of M-S-H was obtained using a multi-technique approach, including a detailed solid-state NMR investigation and, in particular, for the first time, quantitative (29)Si solid-state NMR data. M-S-H was prepared through room-temperature hydration of highly reactive MgO and silica fume and was monitored for 28 days. The results clearly evidenced the presence in M-S-H of "chrysotile-like" and "talc-like" sub-nanometric domains, which are approximately in a 1 : 1 molar ratio after long-time hydration. Both these kinds of domains have a high degree of condensation, corresponding to the presence of a small amount of silanols in the tetrahedral sheets. The decisive improvement obtained in the knowledge of M-S-H structure paves the way for tailoring the macroscopic properties of eco-sustainable cements by means of a bottom-up approach. PMID:26781557

  16. Hydration studies of calcium sulfoaluminate cements blended with fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Maté, M.; De la Torre, A.G. [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Cristalografía y Mineralogía, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain); León-Reina, L. [Servicios Centrales de Apoyo a la Investigación, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain); Aranda, M.A.G. [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Cristalografía y Mineralogía, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain); CELLS-Alba synchrotron, Carretera BP 1413, Km. 3.3, E-08290 Cerdanyola, Barcelona (Spain); Santacruz, I., E-mail: isantacruz@uma.es [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Cristalografía y Mineralogía, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain)

    2013-12-15

    The main objective of this work is to study the hydration and properties of calcium sulfoaluminate cement pastes blended with fly ash (FA) and the corresponding mortars at different hydration ages. Laboratory X-ray powder diffraction, rheological studies, thermal analysis, porosimetry and compressive strength measurements were performed. The analysis of the diffraction data by Rietveld method allowed quantifying crystalline phases and overall amorphous contents. The studied parameters were: i) FA content, 0, 15 and 30 wt.%; and ii) water addition, water-to-CSA mass ratio (w/CSA = 0.50 and 0.65), and water-to-binder mass ratio (w/b = 0.50). Finally, compressive strengths after 6 months of 0 and 15 wt.% FA [w/CSA = 0.50] mortars were similar: 73 ± 2 and 72 ± 3 MPa, respectively. This is justified by the filler effect of the FA as no strong evidences of reactivity of FA with CSA were observed. These results support the partial substitution of CSA cements with FA with the economic and environmental benefits.

  17. Hydration studies of calcium sulfoaluminate cements blended with fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this work is to study the hydration and properties of calcium sulfoaluminate cement pastes blended with fly ash (FA) and the corresponding mortars at different hydration ages. Laboratory X-ray powder diffraction, rheological studies, thermal analysis, porosimetry and compressive strength measurements were performed. The analysis of the diffraction data by Rietveld method allowed quantifying crystalline phases and overall amorphous contents. The studied parameters were: i) FA content, 0, 15 and 30 wt.%; and ii) water addition, water-to-CSA mass ratio (w/CSA = 0.50 and 0.65), and water-to-binder mass ratio (w/b = 0.50). Finally, compressive strengths after 6 months of 0 and 15 wt.% FA [w/CSA = 0.50] mortars were similar: 73 ± 2 and 72 ± 3 MPa, respectively. This is justified by the filler effect of the FA as no strong evidences of reactivity of FA with CSA were observed. These results support the partial substitution of CSA cements with FA with the economic and environmental benefits

  18. Total allowable concentrations of monomeric inorganic aluminum and hydrated aluminum silicates in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willhite, Calvin C; Ball, Gwendolyn L; McLellan, Clifton J

    2012-05-01

    Maximum contaminant levels are used to control potential health hazards posed by chemicals in drinking water, but no primary national or international limits for aluminum (Al) have been adopted. Given the differences in toxicological profiles, the present evaluation derives total allowable concentrations for certain water-soluble inorganic Al compounds (including chloride, hydroxide, oxide, phosphate and sulfate) and for the hydrated Al silicates (including attapulgite, bentonite/montmorillonite, illite, kaolinite) in drinking water. The chemistry, toxicology and clinical experience with Al materials are extensive and depend upon the particular physical and chemical form. In general, the water solubility of the monomeric Al materials depends on pH and their water solubility and gastrointestinal bioavailability are much greater than that of the hydrated Al silicates. Other than Al-containing antacids and buffered aspirin, food is the primary source of Al exposure for most healthy people. Systemic uptake of Al after ingestion of the monomeric salts is somewhat greater from drinking water (0.28%) than from food (0.1%). Once absorbed, Al accumulates in bone, brain, liver and kidney, with bone as the major site for Al deposition in humans. Oral Al hydroxide is used routinely to bind phosphate salts in the gut to control hyperphosphatemia in people with compromised renal function. Signs of chronic Al toxicity in the musculoskeletal system include a vitamin D-resistant osteomalacia (deranged membranous bone formation characterized by accumulation of the osteoid matrix and reduced mineralization, reduced numbers of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, decreased lamellar and osteoid bands with elevated Al concentrations) presenting as bone pain and proximal myopathy. Aluminum-induced bone disease can progress to stress fractures of the ribs, femur, vertebrae, humerus and metatarsals. Serum Al ≥100 µg/L has a 75-88% positive predictive value for Al bone disease. Chronic Al

  19. 煅烧磷石膏对蒸压硅酸盐制品水化过程的影响%Effect of calcined phosphogypsum on hydration process of autoclaved silicate products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆金驰; 李东南; 陈凯; 黄金林

    2012-01-01

    磷石膏经高温煅烧改性后与粉煤灰、砂粉、石灰及水泥熟料等制备蒸压硅酸盐制品,研究了不同温度煅烧的磷石膏对蒸压硅酸盐制品水化过程的影响,用蒸压制品中未反应的Ca(OH)2量及结合水量分析它们的反应速率,用XRD测定蒸压硅酸盐制品的水化产物,并结合SEM分析,结果表明,经煅烧的磷石膏对蒸压硅酸盐制品的水化有明显的促进作用,托勃莫来石与C-S-H (1)等水化产物的迅速生长而形成密实的水化产物结构是其增强蒸压硅酸盐制品的根本原因.%The effects of calcined phosphogypsum on the hydration process of the autoclaved silicate products were investigated in this paper. The influence of adding phosphogypsum calcined at different temperatures on the hydration rate of autoclaved silicate products was analyzed for un-reacted Ca(OH)2 content and combined water. The hydrates were determined with XRD and SEM. It was found that the hydration of autoclaved silicate products with added phosphogypsum calcined over 500℃ was greatly improved. The hydrates of the autoclaved silicate products with added phosphogypsum calcined over 500℃ had more un-reacted Ca(OH)2 content and combined water in the same curing time, and the research indicated that adding phosphogypsum calcined over 500℃ could also reinforce the compressive strength of autoclaved silicate products. It was pointed out that the aluminate phase present in the raw materials cannot hydrate to form more ettringite during autoclaved curing, and rapid formation of such hydrates as calcium silicate hydrate (1) and tobermorite with a more compact structure is the main reason for strengthening autoclaved silicate products.

  20. Effects of Silicate, Phosphate, and Calcium on the Stability of Aldopentoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Sakiko; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    Ribose is an important constituent of RNA: ribose connects RNA bases and forms a strand of sugar phosphates. Accumulation of ribose on prebiotic Earth was difficult because of its low stability. Improvement in the yield of ribose by the introduction of borate or silicate in a formose-like reaction has been proposed. The effects of borates have been further analyzed and confirmed in subsequent studies. Nonetheless, the effects of silicates and phosphates remain unclear. In the present study, we incubated aldopentoses in a highly alkaline aqueous solution at a moderate temperature to determine the effects of silicate or phosphate on the degradation rates of ribose and its isomeric aldopentoses. The formation of a complex of silicate (or phosphate) with ribose was also analyzed in experiments with 29Si and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We found that silicate or phosphate complexes of ribose were not detectable under our experimental conditions. The stability of ribose and lyxose improved after addition of 40-fold molar excess (relative to a pentose) of sodium silicate or sodium phosphate to the alkaline solution. The stability was not improved further when an 80-fold molar excess of sodium silicate or sodium phosphate was added. Calcium was removed from these solutions by precipitation of calcium salts. The drop in Ca2+ concentration might have improved the stability of ribose and lyxose, which are susceptible to aldol addition. The improvement of ribose stability by the removal of Ca2+ and by addition of silicate or phosphate was far smaller than the improvement by borate. Furthermore, all aldopentoses showed similar stability in silicate- and phosphate-containing solutions. These results clearly show that selective stabilization of ribose by borate cannot be replaced by the effects of silicate or phosphate; this finding points to the importance of borate in prebiotic RNA formation.

  1. Electrophoretic deposition of calcium silicate-reduced graphene oxide composites on titanium substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehrali, Mehdi; Akhiani, Amir Reza; Talebian, Sepehr;

    2016-01-01

    silicate-reduced graphene oxide (CS-rGO) composites were synthesized, using an in situ hydrothermal method. CS nanowires were uniformly decorated on the rGO, with an appropriate interfacial bonding. The CS-rGO composites behaved like hybrid composites when deposited on a titanium substrate by cathodic......Calcium silicate (CS)/graphene coatings have been used to improve the biological and mechanical fixation of metallic prosthesis. Among the extraordinary features of graphene is its very high mechanical strength, which makes it an attractive nanoreinforcement material for composites. Calcium...

  2. Effects of calcium hydroxide addition on the physical and chemical properties of a calcium silicate-based sealer

    OpenAIRE

    KUGA, Milton Carlos; DUARTE Marco Antonio Hungaro; SANT'ANNA-JÚNIOR, Arnaldo; KEINE, Kátia Cristina; FARIA, Gisele; Andrea Abi Rached DANTAS; GUIOTTI, Flávia Angélica

    2014-01-01

    Recently, various calcium silicate-based sealers have been introduced for use in root canal filling. The MTA Fillapex is one of these sealers, but some of its physicochemical properties are not in accordance with the ISO requirements. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the flowability, pH level and calcium release of pure MTA Fillapex (MTAF) or containing 5% (MTAF5) or 10% (MTAF10) calcium hydroxide (CH), in weight, in comparison with AH Plus sealer. Material and Methods: The...

  3. Calcium silicates synthesised from industrial residues with the ability for CO2 sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Flórez, Victor; Santos, Alberto; López, Antonio; Moriña, Isabel; Esquivias, Luis

    2014-12-01

    This work explored several synthesis routes to obtain calcium silicates from different calcium-rich and silica-rich industrial residues. Larnite, wollastonite and calcium silicate chloride were successfully synthesised with moderate heat treatments below standard temperatures. These procedures help to not only conserve natural resources, but also to reduce the energy requirements and CO2 emissions. In addition, these silicates have been successfully tested as carbon dioxide sequesters, to enhance the viability of CO2 mineral sequestration technologies using calcium-rich industrial by-products as sequestration agents. Two different carbon sequestration experiments were performed under ambient conditions. Static experiments revealed carbonation efficiencies close to 100% and real-time resolved experiments characterised the dynamic behaviour and ability of these samples to reduce the CO2 concentration within a mixture of gases. The CO2 concentration was reduced up to 70%, with a carbon fixation dynamic ratio of 3.2 mg CO2 per g of sequestration agent and minute. Our results confirm the suitability of the proposed synthesis routes to synthesise different calcium silicates recycling industrial residues, being therefore energetically more efficient and environmentally friendly procedures for the cement industry. PMID:25012303

  4. In Vitro Cytotoxicity of Calcium Silicate-Based Endodontic Cement as Root-End Filling Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Selen Küçükkaya; Mehmet Ömer Görduysus; Naciye Dilara Zeybek; Sevda Fatma Müftüoğlu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of three types of calcium silicate-based endodontic cement after different incubation periods with human periodontal ligament fibroblasts. Human periodontal ligament fibroblasts were cultured from extracted third molars and seeded in 96-well plates. MTA, calcium enriched mixture (CEM) cement, and Biodentine were prepared and added to culture insert plates which were immediately placed into 96-well plates containing cultured cells. After i...

  5. Growth of a bonelike apatite on chitosan microparticles after a calcium silicate treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Leonor, I. B.; Baran, E. T.; Kawashita, M.; Reis, R. L.; T Kokubo; Nakamura, T

    2008-01-01

    Bioactive chitosan microparticles can be prepared successfully by treating them with a calcium silicate solution and then subsequently soaking them in simulated body fluid (SBF). Such a combination enables the development of bioactive microparticles that can be used for several applications in the medical field, including injectable biomaterial systems and tissue engineering carrier systems. Chitosan microparticles, 0.6 lm in average size, were soaked either for 12 h in fresh calcium...

  6. Calcium Silicate-Based Cements Associated with Micro- and Nanoparticle Radiopacifiers: Physicochemical Properties and Bioactivity

    OpenAIRE

    BOSSO-MARTELO, Roberta; Juliane Maria GUERREIRO-TANOMARU; Viapiana, Raqueli; Berbert, Fábio Luis Camargo Vilella; Basso Bernardi, Maria Inês; Tanomaru-Filho, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the physicochemical properties and bioactivity of two formulations of calcium silicate-based cements containing additives (CSCM) or resin (CSCR), associated with radiopacifying agents zirconium oxide (ZrO2) and niobium oxide (Nb2O5) as micro- and nanoparticles; calcium tungstate (CaWO4); and bismuth oxide (Bi2O3). MTA Angelus was used as control. Methods. Surface features and bioactivity were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and the ch...

  7. Pressure induced reactions amongst calcium aluminate hydrate phases

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, Ju-hyuk

    2011-06-01

    The compressibilities of two AFm phases (strätlingite and calcium hemicarboaluminate hydrate) and hydrogarnet were obtained up to 5 GPa by using synchrotron high-pressure X-ray powder diffraction with a diamond anvil cell. The AFm phases show abrupt volume contraction regardless of the molecular size of the pressure-transmitting media. This volume discontinuity could be associated to a structural transition or to the movement of the weakly bound interlayer water molecules in the AFm structure. The experimental results seem to indicate that the pressure-induced dehydration is the dominant mechanism especially with hygroscopic pressure medium. The Birch-Murnaghan equation of state was used to compute the bulk modulus of the minerals. Due to the discontinuity in the pressure-volume diagram, a two stage bulk modulus of each AFm phase was calculated. The abnormal volume compressibility for the AFm phases caused a significant change to their bulk modulus. The reliability of this experiment is verified by comparing the bulk modulus of hydrogarnet with previous studies. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Thermal conductivity measurements on xonotlite-type calcium silicate by the transient hot-strip method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The experimental results of the thermal conductivities of xonotlite-type calcium silicate insulation materials were presented at different temperatures and pressures.Two appropriative surroundings,i.e.an elevated temperature surrounding from ambient temperature to 1450 K and a vacuum surrounding from atmosphere pressure to 10-3 Pa,were designed for the transient hot-strip (THS) method.The thermal conduetivities of xonotlite-type calcium silicate with four densities from ambient temperature to 1000 K and 0.045 Pa to atmospheric pressure were measured.The results show that the thermal conductivity of xunotlite-type calcium silicate decreases apparently with the fall of density,and decreases apparently with the drop of pressure,and reaches the least value at about 100 Pa.The thermal conductivity of xonotlite-type calcium silicate increases almost linearly with T3,and increases more abundantly with low density than with high density.The thermal conductivity measurement uncertainty is estimated to be approximately 3% at ambient temperature,and 6% at 800 K.

  9. Porosity distribution in root canals filled with gutta percha and calcium silicate cement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.T. Moinzadeh; W. Zerbst; C. Boutsioukis; H. Shemesh; P. Zaslansky

    2015-01-01

    Objective Gutta percha is commonly used in conjunction with a sealer to produce a fluid-tight seal within the root canal fillings. One of the most commonly used filling methods is lateral compaction of gutta percha coupled with a sealer such as calcium silicate cement. However, this technique may re

  10. The lithification of ultramafic dominated till with magnesium silicate hydrate: a new green concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruiter, Lisa; Olav Austrheim, Håkon; Hu, Depan; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Ulven, Ole Ivar

    2016-04-01

    The Feragen Ultramafic Body located near the town of Røros in Eastern Norway gives rise to a unique phenomenon: A lithification process involving natural cement of magnesium silicate hydrate (M-S-H). The ultramafic body is covered with moraine deposits that form tills throughout the area. The tills consist mainly of variably serpentinized ultramafic rock fragments, with additional quartz and feldspar grains transported to the area with the glaciers that formed the till. This provides the exceptional combination of ultramafic and Si-rich rocks. Throughout the area, multiple spots can be found where natural cement has resulted in the lithification of the till, forming tillite. This mainly occurs close to mine tailings of ancient chromium mines, as the mine tunnels provide air flow that increases the evaporation and thus the precipitation of the cement. The Weichselian glaciation constrains the age of the moraines to less than 10 ka and the formation of the concrete related to mine tailings suggests that the lithification took place after the termination of the mining activity in 1927. Thus, the cement is formed in-situ at its current location, indicating that it forms in a subarctic climate. EMP and SEM analysis indicate that the cement is a hydrated magnesium silicate phase, cementing together quartz, feldspar and serpentine grains to form a natural concrete. The cement consist of 31 wt% of MgO and 49 wt% of SiO2. Quartz and feldspar grains are partly dissolved in the concrete while the resulting pore space is filled with cement, indicating that the Si in the cement originated from the quartz and feldspar phases. Weathering of the ultramafic body involves the dissolution of brucite to create a high pH, Mg-rich fluid, which subsequently can dissolve the quartz and be the source for the M-S-H cement. A dissolution-precipitation process involving the dissolution of both brucite and quartz thus results in the formation of the cement. Future TEM analysis should give

  11. Hydrated silicate minerals on Mars observed by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter CRISM instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustard, John F; Murchie, S L; Pelkey, S M; Ehlmann, B L; Milliken, R E; Grant, J A; Bibring, J-P; Poulet, F; Bishop, J; Dobrea, E Noe; Roach, L; Seelos, F; Arvidson, R E; Wiseman, S; Green, R; Hash, C; Humm, D; Malaret, E; McGovern, J A; Seelos, K; Clancy, T; Clark, R; Marais, D D; Izenberg, N; Knudson, A; Langevin, Y; Martin, T; McGuire, P; Morris, R; Robinson, M; Roush, T; Smith, M; Swayze, G; Taylor, H; Titus, T; Wolff, M

    2008-07-17

    Phyllosilicates, a class of hydrous mineral first definitively identified on Mars by the OMEGA (Observatoire pour la Mineralogie, L'Eau, les Glaces et l'Activitié) instrument, preserve a record of the interaction of water with rocks on Mars. Global mapping showed that phyllosilicates are widespread but are apparently restricted to ancient terrains and a relatively narrow range of mineralogy (Fe/Mg and Al smectite clays). This was interpreted to indicate that phyllosilicate formation occurred during the Noachian (the earliest geological era of Mars), and that the conditions necessary for phyllosilicate formation (moderate to high pH and high water activity) were specific to surface environments during the earliest era of Mars's history. Here we report results from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) of phyllosilicate-rich regions. We expand the diversity of phyllosilicate mineralogy with the identification of kaolinite, chlorite and illite or muscovite, and a new class of hydrated silicate (hydrated silica). We observe diverse Fe/Mg-OH phyllosilicates and find that smectites such as nontronite and saponite are the most common, but chlorites are also present in some locations. Stratigraphic relationships in the Nili Fossae region show olivine-rich materials overlying phyllosilicate-bearing units, indicating the cessation of aqueous alteration before emplacement of the olivine-bearing unit. Hundreds of detections of Fe/Mg phyllosilicate in rims, ejecta and central peaks of craters in the southern highland Noachian cratered terrain indicate excavation of altered crust from depth. We also find phyllosilicate in sedimentary deposits clearly laid by water. These results point to a rich diversity of Noachian environments conducive to habitability. PMID:18633411

  12. Attributes of the soil fertilized with sewage sludge and calcium and magnesium silicate

    OpenAIRE

    Geraldo R. Zuba Junio; Regynaldo A. Sampaio; Altina L. Nascimento; Luiz A. Fernandes; Natália N. de Lima; João P. Carneiro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTThis study aimed to evaluate the chemical attributes of an Inceptisol cultivated with castor bean (Ricinus communis L.), variety ‘BRS Energia’, fertilized with sewage sludge compost and calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) silicate. The experiment was conducted at the ICA/UFMG, in a randomized block design, using a 2 x 4 factorial scheme with three replicates, and the treatments consisted of two doses of Ca-Mg silicate (0 and 1 t ha-1) and four doses of sewage sludge compost (0, 23.81, 47....

  13. Mechanical Properties and Durability of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings in Calcium-Magnesium-Alumino-Silicate Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miladinovich, Daniel S.; Zhu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings are being developed and tested for use with SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) gas turbine engine components. Several oxide and silicate based compositons are being studied for use as top-coat and intermediate layers in a three or more layer environmental barrier coating system. Specifically, the room temperature Vickers-indentation-fracture-toughness testing and high-temperature stability reaction studies with Calcium Magnesium Alumino-Silicate (CMAS or "sand") are being conducted using advanced testing techniques such as high pressure burner rig tests as well as high heat flux laser tests.

  14. Sustainable Nanopozzolan Modified Cement: Characterizations and Morphology of Calcium Silicate Hydrate during Hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Mohamed Sutan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There are environmental and sustainable benefits of partially replacing cement with industrial by-products or synthetic materials in cement based products. Since microstructural behaviours of cement based products are the crucial parameters that govern their sustainability and durability, this study investigates the microstructural comparison between two different types of cement replacements as nanopozzolan modified cement (NPMC in cement based product by focusing on the evidence of pozzolanic reactivity in corroboration with physical and mechanical properties. Characterization and morphology techniques using X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM were carried out to assess the pozzolanic reactivity of cement paste modified with the combination of nano- and micro silica as NPMC in comparison to unmodified cement paste (UCP of 0.5 water to cement ratio (w/c. Results were then substantiated with compressive strength (CS results as mechanical property. Results of this study showed clear evidence of pozzolanicity for all samples with varying reactivity with NPMC being the most reactive.

  15. Combination of simvastatin, calcium silicate/gypsum, and gelatin and bone regeneration in rabbit calvarial defects

    OpenAIRE

    Jing Zhang; Huiming Wang; Jue Shi; Ying Wang; Kaichen Lai; Xianyan Yang; Xiaoyi Chen; Guoli Yang

    2016-01-01

    The present study was performed to determine whether simvastatin improves bone regeneration when combined with calcium silicate/gypsum and gelatin (CS-GEL). The surface morphology was determined using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FSEM). Degradation in vitro was evaluated by monitoring the weight change of the composites soaked in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Drug release was evaluated using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Cytotoxicity testing was performed t...

  16. Effects of Calcium Lignosulfonate and Silicic Acid on Ammonium Nitrate Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Ozan Gezerman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium nitrate salts are the most commonly used nitrogenous fertilizers in industry. However, storage of ammonium nitrate is problematic, since its initial properties can decline because of environmental factors, leading to large economic losses. In this study, in order to prevent the caking and degradation of ammonium nitrate, an alternative composition with additional calcium lignosulfonate and silicic acid was studied. The resulting fertilizer was analyzed by screening analysis, ion chromatography, and electron microscopy methods.

  17. Biomimetic apatite deposition on polymeric microspheres treated with a calcium silicate solution

    OpenAIRE

    Leonor, I. B.; Balas, F.; Kawashita, M.; Reis, R. L.; T Kokubo; Nakamura, T

    2009-01-01

    Bioactive polymeric microspheres can be prepared by means of coating them with a calcium silicate solution and subsequently soaking in a simulated body fluid (SBF). Such combination should allow for the development of bioactive microspheres for several applications in the medical field including tissue engineering carriers. Four types of polymeric microspheres, with different sizes, were used in this work: (i) ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer (20–30 µm), (ii) polyamide 12 with 10% magnetite (...

  18. Solubility of a new calcium silicate-based root-end filling material

    OpenAIRE

    Shishir Singh; Rajesh Podar; Shifali Dadu; Gaurav Kulkarni; Rucheet Purba

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to compare solubility of a new calcium silicate-based cement, Biodentine with three commonly used root-end filling materials viz. glass-ionomer cement (GIC), intermediate restorative material (IRM), and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Materials and Methods: Twenty stainless steel ring molds were filled with cements corresponding to four groups (n = 5). The weight of 20 dried glass bottles was recorded. Samples were transferred to bottles conta...

  19. Biomimetic apatite formation on different polymeric microspheres modified with calcium silicate solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Leonor, I. B.; Balas, F.; Kawashita, M.; Reis, R. L.; T Kokubo; Nakamura, T

    2006-01-01

    Bioactive polymeric microspheres can be produced by pre-coating them with a calcium silicate solution and the subsequent soaking in a simulated body fluid (SBF). Such combination should allow for the development of bioactive microspheres for several applications in the medical field including tissue engineering. In this work, three types of polymeric microspheres with different sizes were used: (i) ethylene-vinyl alcohol co-polymer (20-30 'm), (ii) polyamide 12 (10-30 'm) and (...

  20. Alleviating aluminum toxicity in an acid sulfate soil from Peninsular Malaysia by calcium silicate application

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Elisa; Ninomiya, S.; J. Shamshuddin; Roslan, I.

    2016-01-01

    In response to human population increase, the utilization of acid sulfate soils for rice cultivation is one option for increasing production. The main problems associated with such soils are their low pH values and their associated high content of exchangeable Al, which could be detrimental to crop growth. The application of soil amendments is one approach for mitigating this problem, and calcium silicate is an alternative soil amendment that could be used. Therefore, the ma...

  1. Raman thresholds and rigid to floppy transitions in calcium silicate glasses

    OpenAIRE

    Micoulaut, M.; Malki, M.; Simon, P.; Canizares, A.

    2004-01-01

    Alkaline earth silicate glasses $xCaO-(1-x)SiO_2$ exhibit a well marked threshold in Raman lineshapes which can be related to the onset of network rigidity as the concentration of calcium oxide $x$ is decreased. The present results are analyzed by constraint counting algorithms and more deeply characterized by a size increasing cluster approximation that allows to perform Maxwell mechanical constraint counting beyond the usual mean-field treatment. This permits to discuss under which structur...

  2. Alleviating aluminium toxicity on an acid sulphate soils in Peninsular Malaysia with application of calcium silicate

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Elisa; Ninomiya, S.; J. Shamshuddin; Roslan, I.

    2015-01-01

    A study was conducted to alleviate Al toxicity of an acid sulphate soils collected from paddy cultivation area in Kedah, Peninsular Malaysia. For this purpose, the collected acid sulphate soils were treated with calcium silicate. The treated soils were incubated for 120 days in submerged condition in a glasshouse. Subsamples were collected every 30 days throughout the incubation period. Soil pH and exchangeable Al showed positive effect; soil pH increased from ...

  3. Analysis of the color alteration and radiopacity promoted by bismuth oxide in calcium silicate cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Angelica Marciano

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine if the increase in radiopacity provided by bismuth oxide is related to the color alteration of calcium silicate-based cement. Calcium silicate cement (CSC was mixed with 0%, 15%, 20%, 30% and 50% of bismuth oxide (BO, determined by weight. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA was the control group. The radiopacity test was performed according to ISO 6876/2001. The color was evaluated using the CIE system. The assessments were performed after 24 hours, 7 and 30 days of setting time, using a spectrophotometer to obtain the ΔE, Δa, Δb and ΔL values. The statistical analyses were performed using the Kruskal-Wallis/Dunn and ANOVA/Tukey tests (p 3 mm equivalent of Al. The MTA group was statistically similar to the CSC / 30% BO group (p > 0.05. In regard to color, the increase of bismuth oxide resulted in a decrease in the ΔE value of the calcium silicate cement. The CSC group presented statistically higher ΔE values than the CSC / 50% BO group (p < 0.05. The comparison between 24 hours and 7 days showed higher ΔE for the MTA group, with statistical differences for the CSC / 15% BO and CSC / 50% BO groups (p < 0.05. After 30 days, CSC showed statistically higher ΔE values than CSC / 30% BO and CSC / 50% BO (p < 0.05. In conclusion, the increase in radiopacity provided by bismuth oxide has no relation to the color alteration of calcium silicate-based cements.

  4. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of calcium silicate-based cements on an osteoblast lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lívia GOMES-CORNÉLIO

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several calcium silicate-based biomaterials have been developed in recent years, in addition to Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and apoptosis/necrosis in human osteoblast cells (SAOS-2 of pure calcium silicate-based cements (CSC and modified formulations: modified calcium silicate-based cements (CSCM and three resin-based calcium silicate cements (CSCR1 (CSCR 2 (CSCR3. The following tests were performed after 24 hours of cement extract exposure: methyl-thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT, apoptosis/necrosis assay and comet assay. The negative control (CT- was performed with untreated cells, and the positive control (CT+ used hydrogen peroxide. The data for MTT and apoptosis were submitted to analysis of variance and Bonferroni’s posttest (p < 0.05, and the data for the comet assay analysis, to the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests (p < 0.05. The MTT test showed no significant difference among the materials in 2 mg/mL and 10 mg/mL concentrations. CSCR3 showed lower cell viability at 10 mg/mL. Only CSC showed lower cell viability at 50 mg/mL. CSCR1, CSCR2 and CSCR3 showed a higher percentage of initial apoptosis than the control in the apoptosis test, after 24 hours exposure. The same cements showed no genotoxicity in the concentration of 2 mg/mL, with the comet assay. CSC and CSCR2 were also not genotoxic at 10 mg/mL. All experimental materials showed viability with MTT. CSC and CSCR2 presented a better response to apoptosis and genotoxicity evaluation in the 10 mg/mL concentration, and demonstrated a considerable potential for use as reparative materials.

  5. The Mechanical Properties and Hydration Characteristics of Cement Pastes Containing Added-calcium Coal Gangue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Dongxu; SONG Xuyan

    2008-01-01

    The mechanical properties of several kinds of coal gangue calcined with limestone were Researched so as to find the optimum way of calcinations with limestone. Mierostructure and property of hydration process of cement pastes containing added-calcium coal gangue were analyzed by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM) and method of mercury in trusion poremeasurement (MIP), etc. The experiment can approve those results: when proper amounst of gypsum and fluorite were taken as mineralizers in the course of calcinations of added-calcium coal gangue, activity of coal gangue can be effectively improved. The results of mechanical property and structural characteristic such as hydration process, hydration product and microstructure etc. of cement pastes containing added-calcium coal gangue are consistent.

  6. Characterization of modified calcium-silicate cements exposed to acidic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camilleri, Josette, E-mail: josette.camilleri@um.edu.mt

    2011-01-15

    Portland cement which is used as a binder in concrete in the construction industry has been developed into a biomaterial. It is marketed as mineral trioxide aggregate and is used in dentistry. This material has been reported to be very biocompatible and thus its use has diversified. The extended use of this material has led to developments of newer versions with improved physical properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of acidic environments found in the oral cavity on fast setting calcium silicate cements with improved physical properties using a combination of techniques. Two fast setting calcium silicate cements (CSA and CFA) and two cement composites (CSAG and CFAG) were assessed by subjecting the materials to lactic acid/sodium lactate buffer gel for a period of 28 days. At weekly intervals the materials were viewed under the tandem scanning confocal microscope (TSM), and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The two prototype cements exhibited changes in their internal chemistry with no changes in surface characteristics. Since the changes observed were mostly sub-surface evaluation of surface characteristics of cement may not be sufficient in the determination of chemical changes occurring. - Research Highlights: {yields} An acidic environment affects modified fast setting calcium silicate-based cements. {yields} No surface changes are observed in acidic environment. {yields} An acidic environment causes sub-surface changes in the material chemistry which are only visible in fractured specimens. {yields} A combination of techniques is necessary in order to evaluate the chemical changes occurring.

  7. Characterization of modified calcium-silicate cements exposed to acidic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portland cement which is used as a binder in concrete in the construction industry has been developed into a biomaterial. It is marketed as mineral trioxide aggregate and is used in dentistry. This material has been reported to be very biocompatible and thus its use has diversified. The extended use of this material has led to developments of newer versions with improved physical properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of acidic environments found in the oral cavity on fast setting calcium silicate cements with improved physical properties using a combination of techniques. Two fast setting calcium silicate cements (CSA and CFA) and two cement composites (CSAG and CFAG) were assessed by subjecting the materials to lactic acid/sodium lactate buffer gel for a period of 28 days. At weekly intervals the materials were viewed under the tandem scanning confocal microscope (TSM), and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The two prototype cements exhibited changes in their internal chemistry with no changes in surface characteristics. Since the changes observed were mostly sub-surface evaluation of surface characteristics of cement may not be sufficient in the determination of chemical changes occurring. - Research Highlights: → An acidic environment affects modified fast setting calcium silicate-based cements. → No surface changes are observed in acidic environment. → An acidic environment causes sub-surface changes in the material chemistry which are only visible in fractured specimens. → A combination of techniques is necessary in order to evaluate the chemical changes occurring.

  8. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Xonotlite-type Calcium Silicate Insulation Material Using Industrial Zirconium Waste Residue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Jinguo; CUI Chong; LIU Jinqiang; LIAO Wenli

    2011-01-01

    Xonotlite-type insulation material was prepared by hydrothermal synthesis technology using industrial zirconium waste residue in this paper, and the phase analysis together with the observation of micro-morphology were also carried out by XRD, SEM and TEM. The density and thermal conductivity were measured finally. The results indicate, chlorine ion impurity contained in zirconium waste residue can be removed effectively via water washed process, and the reactive activity of silicon dioxide is almost not affected,which make it be a good substitution of silicon material for the preparation of calcium silicate insulation material by hydrothermal synthesis technique. The density and thermal conductivity of xonotlite-type calcium silicate insulation material obtained by hydrothermal synthesis technique can reach 159 kg/m3, 0.049 W/(m·°C), respectively, meeting with National Standard well, when synthesis conditions are selected as follows: Ca/Si molar ratio equal to 1, synthesis temperature at 210 ℃ and kept for 8 hrs. It provides a new approach to realize lightweight and low thermal conductivity of calcium silicate insulation material.

  9. Hydration studies of calcium sulfoaluminate cements blended with fly ash

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Maté, Marta; De la Torre, Angeles G; León-Reina, Laura; Aranda, Miguel A. G.; Santacruz, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to study the hydration and properties of calciumsulfoaluminate cement pastes blended with fly ash (FA) and the corresponding mortars at different hydration ages. Laboratory X-ray powder diffraction, rheological studies, thermal analysis, porosimetry and compressive strength measurements were performed. The analysis of the diffraction data by Rietveld method allowed quantifying crystalline phases and overall amorphous contents. The studied paramet...

  10. Quantitative Evaluation by Glucose Diffusion of Microleakage in Aged Calcium Silicate-Based Open-Sandwich Restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Camps, J.; Tassery, H.; Koubi, G.; Elmerini, H.; Koubi, S.

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the in vitro marginal integrity of open-sandwich restorations based on aged calcium silicate cement versus resin-modified glass ionomer cement. Class II cavities were prepared on 30 extracted human third molars. These teeth were randomly assigned to two groups ( = 1 0 ) to compare a new hydraulic calcium silicate cement designed for restorative dentistry (Biodentine, Septodont, Saint Maur des Fossés, France) with a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Ionolux, Voco, Cuxh...

  11. Hydration of Blended Portland Cements Containing Calcium-Aluminosilicate Glass Powder and Limestone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard, M; Poulsen, Søren Lundsted; Herfort, D;

    2012-01-01

    M. MOESGAARD, S.L. POULSEN, D. HERFORT, M. STEENBERG, L.F. KIRKEGAARD, J. SKIBSTED, Y. YUE, Hydration of Blended Portland Cements Containing Calcium-Aluminosilicate Glass Powder and Limestone, Journal of the American Ceramic Society 95, 403 – 409 (2012).......M. MOESGAARD, S.L. POULSEN, D. HERFORT, M. STEENBERG, L.F. KIRKEGAARD, J. SKIBSTED, Y. YUE, Hydration of Blended Portland Cements Containing Calcium-Aluminosilicate Glass Powder and Limestone, Journal of the American Ceramic Society 95, 403 – 409 (2012)....

  12. The determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks by flame photometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Henry

    1956-01-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks using the Beckman flame photometer, with photomultiplier attachement. The sample is dissolved in hydrofluoric, nitric, and perchloric acids, the hydrofluoric and nitric acids are expelled, a radiation buffer consisting of aluminum, magnesium, iron, sodium, potassium, phosphoric acid, and nitric acid is added, and the solution is atomized in an oxy-hydrogen flame with an instrument setting of 554 mµ. Measurements are made by comparison against calcium standards, prepared in the same manner, in the 0 to 50 ppm range. The suppression of calcium emission by aluminum and phosphate was overcome by the addition of a large excess of magnesium. This addition almost completely restores the standard curve obtained from a solution of calcium nitrate. Interference was noted when the iron concentration in the aspirated solution (including the iron from the buffer) exceeded 100 ppm iron. Other common rock-forming elements did not interfere. The results obtained by this procedure are within ± 2 percent of the calcium oxide values obtained by other methods in the range 1 to 95 percent calcium oxide. In the 0 to 1 percent calcium oxide range the method compares favorably with standard methods.

  13. Formation of low-T hydrated silicates in modern microbialites from Mexico and implications for microbial fossilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina eZeyen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Microbialites are organo-sedimentary rocks found in abundance throughout the geological record back to ~3.5 Ga. Interpretations of the biological and environmental conditions under which they formed rely on comparisons with modern microbialites. Therefore, a better characterization of diverse modern microbialites is crucial to improve such interpretations. Here, we studied modern microbialites from three Mexican alkaline crater lakes: Quechulac, La Preciosa and Atexcac. The geochemical analyses of water solutions showed that they were supersaturated to varying extents with several mineral phases, including aragonite, calcite, hydromagnesite, as well as hydrated Mg-silicates. Consistently, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses revealed that microbialites are composed of a diversity of mineral phases including aragonite and sometimes calcite, hydromagnesite, and more interestingly, a poorly-crystalline hydrated silicate phase. Coupling of scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry microanalyses on polished sections showed that this latter phase is abundant, authigenic, magnesium-rich and sometimes associated with iron and manganese. This mineral phase is similar to kerolite, a hydrated poorly crystalline talc-like phase (Mg3Si4O10(OH2·nH2O. Diverse microfossils were permineralized by this silicate phase. Some of them were imaged in 3D by FIB-tomography showing that their morphologically was exquisitely preserved down to the few nm-scale. The structural and chemical features of these fossils were further studied using a combination of transmission electron microscopy and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy at the carbon and magnesium K-edges and iron L2,3-edges. These results showed that organic carbon is pervasively associated with kerolite. Overall, it is suggested that the poorly-crystalline hydrated magnesium-rich silicate forms in many alkaline lakes and has a strong potential

  14. Terahertz spectroscopy of concrete for evaluating the critical hydration level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Jyotirmayee; Ray, Shaumik; Nallappan, Kathirvel; Sasmal, Saptarshi; Pesala, Bala

    2014-03-01

    Concrete, a mixture of cement, coarse aggregate, sand and filler material (if any), is widely used in the construction industry. Cement, mainly composed of Tricalcium Silicate (C3S) and Dicalcium Silicate (C2S) reacts readily with water, a process known as hydration. The hydration process forms a solid material known as hardened cement paste which is mainly composed of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H), Calcium Hydroxide and Calcium Carbonate. To quantify the critical hydration level, an accurate and fast technique is highly desired. However, in conventional XRD technique, the peaks of the constituents of anhydrated and hydrated cement cannot be resolved properly, where as Mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy has low penetration depth and hence cannot be used to determine the hydration level of thicker concrete samples easily. Further, MIR spectroscopy cannot be used to effectively track the formation of Calcium Hydroxide, a key by-product during the hydration process. This paper describes a promising approach to quantify the hydration dynamics of cement using Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy. This technique has been employed to track the time dependent reaction mechanism of the key constituents of cement that react with water and form the products in the hydrated cement, viz., C-S-H, Calcium Hydroxide and Calcium Carbonate. This study helps in providing an improved understanding on the hydration kinetics of cement and also to optimise the physio-mechanical characteristics of concrete.

  15. Widespread oxidized and hydrated amorphous silicates in CR chondrites matrices: Implications for alteration conditions and H2 degassing of asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guillou, Corentin; Changela, Hitesh G.; Brearley, Adrian J.

    2015-06-01

    The CR chondrites carry one of the most pristine records of the solar nebula materials that accreted to form planetesimals. They have experienced very variable degrees of aqueous alteration, ranging from incipient alteration in their matrices to the complete hydration of all of their components. In order to constrain their chemical alteration pathways and the conditions of alteration, we have investigated the mineralogy and Fe oxidation state of silicates in the matrices of 8 CR chondrites, from type 3 to type 1. Fe-L edge X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) was performed on matrix FIB sections using synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). The Fe3+ / ∑ Fe ratio of submicron silicate particles was obtained and coordinated with TEM observations. In all the least altered CR chondrites (QUE 99177, EET 87770, EET 92042, LAP 02342, GRA 95229 and Renazzo), we find that the matrices consist of abundant submicron Fe-rich hydrated amorphous silicate grains, mixed with nanometer-sized phyllosilicates. The Fe3+ / ∑ Fe ratios of both amorphous and nanocrystalline regions are very high with values ranging from 68 to 78%. In the most altered samples (Al Rais and GRO 95577), fine-grained phyllosilicates also have a high Fe3+ / ∑ Fe ratio (around 70%), whereas the coarse, micrometer-sized phyllosilicates are less oxidized (down to 55%) and have a lower iron content. These observations suggest the following sequence: submicron Fe2+-amorphous silicate particles were the building blocks of CR matrices; after accretion they were quickly hydrated and oxidized, leading to a metastable, amorphous gel-like phase. Nucleation and growth of crystalline phyllosilicates was kinetically-limited in most type 3 and 2 CRs, but increased as alteration became more extensive in Al Rais and GRO 95577. The decreasing Fe3+ / ∑ Fe ratio is interpreted as a result of the transfer of Fe3+ from silicates to oxides during growth, while aqueous alteration progressed

  16. NON-AUTOCLAVE SILICATE BRICK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Yaglov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a technology for obtaining bricks on the basis of lime-silica mixtures where chemical interactions are practically completely realized in dispersive state at the stage of preparation of binding contact maturing and raw mixture as a whole. The role of forming operation (moulding is changed in principle because in this case conversion of dispersive system into a rock-like solid occurs and due to this the solid obtains complete water-resistance in contact with water immediately after forming operation. Theoretical basis for the developed technology is capability of silicate dispersive substances (hydrated calcium silicate to transit in non-stable state, to form a rock-like water-resistant solid in the moment of mechanical load application during forming process. Specific feature of the proposed method is an exclusion of additional operations for autoclaving of products from the process of obtaining a silicate brick.Synthetic hydrated calcium silicate in contrast to natural ones are more uniform in composition and structure, they contain less impurities and they are characterized by dispersive composition and due to the mentioned advantages they find wider practical application. Contact-condensation binders permit to manipulate product properties on their basis and ensure maximum correspondence to the requirements of the concrete application. Raw material sources for obtaining synthetic hydrated calcium silicates are practically un-limited because calcium-silicon containing substances are found as in various technogenic wastes so in natural compounds as well. So the problem for obtaining hydrated calcium silicates having contact-condensation ability for structure formation becomes more and more actual one. This transition is considered as dependent principally on arrangement rate of substance particles which determined the level of its instability.

  17. A cubic calcium oxynitrido-silicate, Ca2.89Si2N1.76O4.24

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Sharafat; Pedro Berastegui; Saeid Esmaeilzadeh; Lars Eriksson; Jekabs Grins

    2011-01-01

    The title compound, tricalcium oxynitride silicate, with composition Ca3-xSi2N2-2xO4+2x (x ≃ 0.12), is a perovskite-related calcium oxynitrido silicate containing isolated oxynitrido silicate 12-rings. The N atoms are statistically disordered with O atoms (occupancy ratio N:O = 0.88:0.12) and occupy the bridging positions in the 12 ring oxynitrido silicate anion, while the remaining O atoms are located at the terminal positions of the Si(O,N)4 tetrahedra. The majority of the Ca2+ ca...

  18. Effects of calcium hydroxide addition on the physical and chemical properties of a calcium silicate-based sealer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Carlos KUGA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, various calcium silicate-based sealers have been introduced for use in root canal filling. The MTA Fillapex is one of these sealers, but some of its physicochemical properties are not in accordance with the ISO requirements. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the flowability, pH level and calcium release of pure MTA Fillapex (MTAF or containing 5% (MTAF5 or 10% (MTAF10 calcium hydroxide (CH, in weight, in comparison with AH Plus sealer. Material and Methods: The flowability test was performed according to the ISO 6876:2001 requirements. For the pH level and calcium ion release analyses, the sealers were placed individually (n=10 in plastic tubes and immersed in deionized water. After 24 hours, 7 and 14 days, the water in which each specimen had been immersed was evaluated to determine the pH level changes and calcium released. Flowability, pH level and calcium release data were analyzed statistically by the ANOVA test (α=5%. Results: In relation to flowability: MTAF>AH Plus>MTAF5>MTAF10. In relation to the pH level, for 24 h: MTAF5=MTAF10=MTAF>AH Plus; for 7 and 14 days: MTAF5=MTAF10>MTAF>AH Plus. For the calcium release, for all periods: MTAF>MTAF5=MTAF10>AH Plus. Conclusions: The addition of 5% CH to the MTA Fillapex (in weight is an alternative to reduce the high flowability presented by the sealer, without interfering in its alkalization potential.

  19. PART II. HYDRATED CEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Drabik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential focus of the study has been to acquire thermoanalytical events, incl. enthalpies of decompositions - ΔH, of technological materials based on two types of Portland cements. The values of thermoanalytical events and also ΔH of probes of technological compositions, if related with the data of a choice of minerals of calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates, served as a valued input for the assessment of phases present and phase changes due to the topical hydraulic processes. The results indicate mainly the effects of "standard humidity" or "wet storage" of the entire hydration/hydraulic treatment, but also the presence of cement residues alongside calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates (during the tested period of treatment. "A diluting" effect of unhydrated cement residues upon the values of decomposition enthalpies in the studied multiphase system is postulated and discussed

  20. Hydration Characteristics of Tetracalcium Alumino-Ferrite Phase in the presence Calcium Carbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Radwan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Tetracalcium alumino-ferrite phase (C4AF prepared from pure starting materials was employed for composing various mixes prepared of C4AF phase, CaSO4·2H2O, Ca(OH2 and CaCO3. The effect of replacing calcium sulphate (gypsum by calcium carbonate as a set retarder on the hydration behaviour of ferrite phase was studied. The mixes were hydrated for various periods and the hydration products were investigated using the appropriate techniques. The kinetics of hydration was studied by measuring the chemically-combined water as well as the combined lime contents. The mineralogical constitution was studied by using XRD, and DTA. The microstructure of some represented hydrated samples was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. Some interesting conclusions have been drawn. It was found that calcium carbonate reacts with tetracalcium alumino-ferrite phase (C4AF in the presence of hydrolime [Ca(OH2] to form carboferrite compounds which may coat the aluminate grains as ettringite does and this may probably regulate the setting time.

  1. CALCIUM ORTHOPHOSPHATES HYDRATES: FORMATION, STABILITY AND INFLUENCE ON STANDARD PROPERTIES OF PORTLAND CEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaziliunas A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Preparation of phosphogypsum to produce the binders requires a much higher input than preparation of natural gypsum stone. This makes it uncompetitive material. The investigations presented therein are meant to reduce this input by looking for the ways of rendering impurities harmless. Soluble acid orthophosphates are the main harmful impurity of phosphogypsum. The studies show that dry insoluble calcium orthophosphates hydrates (1.09 % and 2.18 % P2O5 in gypsum have little effect on W/C, setting times and soundness of Portland cement pastes. Insoluble calcium orthophosphates hydrates {CaHPO4∙2H2O, Ca8(HPO42(PO44∙5H2O and Ca9(HPO4(PO45(OH∙4H2O} formed in acidic medium (pH = 4.2 - 5.9 have been destroyed in alkaline medium and reduce standard compressive strength of cement up to 28 %. Calcium orthophosphates hydrates of hydroxyapatite group are stable in alcaline medium, while in dry state they reduce the standard compressive strength of cement until 10 %, but their suspensions prolong setting times of Portland cement as soluble orthophosphates – 2 - 3 times. Alkalis in cement increase pH of paste, but do not change the process of formation of calcium orthophosphates hydrates of hydroxyapatite group: it takes place through an intermediate phase - CaHPO4·2H2O, whose transformation into apatite lasts for 2 - 3 months.

  2. Mechanical and physical properties of calcium silicate/alumina composite for biomedical engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, F S; Mehrali, M; Oshkour, A A; Metselaar, H S C; Kadri, N A; Abu Osman, N A

    2014-02-01

    The focus of this study is to investigate the effect of Al2O3 on α-calcium silicate (α-CaSiO3) ceramic. α-CaSiO3 was synthesized from CaO and SiO2 using mechanochemical method followed by calcinations at 1000°C. α-CaSiO3 and alumina were grinded using ball mill to create mixtures, containing 0-50w% of Al2O3 loadings. The powders were uniaxially pressed and followed by cold isostatic pressing (CIP) in order to achieve greater uniformity of compaction and to increase the shape capability. Afterward, the compaction was sintered in a resistive element furnace at both 1150°C and 1250°C with a 5h holding time. It was found that alumina reacted with α-CaSiO3 and formed alumina-rich calcium aluminates after sintering. An addition of 15wt% of Al2O3 powder at 1250°C were found to improve the hardness and fracture toughness of the calcium silicate. It was also observed that the average grain sizes of α-CaSiO3 /Al2O3 composite were maintained 500-700nm after sintering process.

  3. Influence of sodium borate on the early age hydration of calcium sulfoaluminate cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champenois, Jean-Baptiste; Dhoury, Mélanie [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SPDE, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France); Cau Dit Coumes, Céline, E-mail: celine.cau-dit-coumes@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SPDE, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France); Mercier, Cyrille [LMCPA, Université de Valenciennes et du Hainaut Cambrésis, 59600 Maubeuge (France); Revel, Bertrand [Centre Commun de Mesure RMN, Université Lille1 Sciences Technologies, Cité Scientifique, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Le Bescop, Patrick [CEA, DEN, DPC, SECR, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Damidot, Denis [Ecole des Mines de Douai, LGCgE-GCE, 59508 Douai (France)

    2015-04-15

    Calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cements are potential candidates for the conditioning of radioactive wastes with high sodium borate concentrations. This work thus investigates early age hydration of two CSA cements with different gypsum contents (0 to 20%) as a function of the mixing solution composition (borate and NaOH concentrations). Gypsum plays a key role in controlling the reactivity of cement. When the mixing solution is pure water, increasing the gypsum concentration accelerates cement hydration. However, the reverse is observed when the mixing solution contains sodium borate. Until gypsum exhaustion, the pore solution pH remains constant at ~ 10.8, and a poorly crystallized borate compound (ulexite) precipitates. A correlation is established between this transient precipitation and the hydration delay. Decreasing the gypsum content in the binder, or increasing the sodium content in the mixing solution, are two ways of reducing the stability of ulexite, thus decreasing the hydration delay.

  4. Influence of sodium borate on the early age hydration of calcium sulfoaluminate cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cements are potential candidates for the conditioning of radioactive wastes with high sodium borate concentrations. This work thus investigates early age hydration of two CSA cements with different gypsum contents (0 to 20%) as a function of the mixing solution composition (borate and NaOH concentrations). Gypsum plays a key role in controlling the reactivity of cement. When the mixing solution is pure water, increasing the gypsum concentration accelerates cement hydration. However, the reverse is observed when the mixing solution contains sodium borate. Until gypsum exhaustion, the pore solution pH remains constant at ~ 10.8, and a poorly crystallized borate compound (ulexite) precipitates. A correlation is established between this transient precipitation and the hydration delay. Decreasing the gypsum content in the binder, or increasing the sodium content in the mixing solution, are two ways of reducing the stability of ulexite, thus decreasing the hydration delay

  5. 40 CFR 721.10018 - Calcium hydroxide oxide silicate (Ca6(OH)2O2(Si2O5)3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Calcium hydroxide oxide silicate (Ca6... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10018 Calcium hydroxide oxide silicate (Ca6(OH)2O2... substance identified as calcium hydroxide oxide silicate (Ca6(OH)2O2(Si2O5)3) (PMN P-01-442; CAS No....

  6. Hydration and strength development of binder based on high-calcium oil shale fly ash. Part 2: Influence of curing conditions on long-term stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freidin, C.

    1999-11-01

    The distinguishing feature of high-calcium oil shale fly ash (HCOSFA) used in experiments is the high amount of free CaO and SO{sub 3} in form of lime and anhydrite. Strength development as well as the microstructure and composition of the new formations of fly ash binder (FAB) based on HCOSFA and low-calcium coal fly ash after curing in different conditions and long-term exposure in various environments were studied. It was determined that moist air and water are the most favorable conditions for aging processes of FAB. In atmospheric air three stages in strength change of cured FAB are observed: increase of compressive strength over 1 month; sharp drop after 1 month up to the 3 to months; stabilization or slowdown of loss in strength after 3 to 6 months of exposure. The duration of the second and third stages depends on HCOSFA content and does not depend on curing conditions. One of the hydration products of FAB is ettringite. Its instability in air could be a reason for the decrease in strength of FAB and some disintegration of the hardened system. In the presence of low-calcium coal fly ash, additional amounts of stable calcium silicate hydrates are formed during FAB curing especially during steam curing. This has a positive effect on compressive strength and stability of FAB in atmospheric air.

  7. Calcium silicate ceramic scaffolds toughened with hydroxyapatite whiskers for bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Pei [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Complex Manufacturing, Central South University, Changsha 410083, PR China, (China); Wei, Pingpin [Cancer Research Institute, Central South University, Changsha 410078 (China); Li, Pengjian; Gao, Chengde [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Complex Manufacturing, Central South University, Changsha 410083, PR China, (China); Shuai, Cijun, E-mail: shuai@csu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Complex Manufacturing, Central South University, Changsha 410083, PR China, (China); Department of Regenerative Medicine and Cell Biology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Peng, Shuping, E-mail: shuping@csu.edu.cn [Cancer Research Institute, Central South University, Changsha 410078 (China)

    2014-11-15

    Calcium silicate possessed excellent biocompatibility, bioactivity and degradability, while the high brittleness limited its application in load-bearing sites. Hydroxyapatite whiskers ranging from 0 to 30 wt.% were incorporated into the calcium silicate matrix to improve the strength and fracture resistance. Porous scaffolds were fabricated by selective laser sintering. The effects of hydroxyapatite whiskers on the mechanical properties and toughening mechanisms were investigated. The results showed that the scaffolds had a uniform and continuous inner network with the pore size ranging between 0.5 mm and 0.8 mm. The mechanical properties were enhanced with increasing hydroxyapatite whiskers, reached a maximum at 20 wt.% (compressive strength: 27.28 MPa, compressive Young's modulus: 156.2 MPa, flexural strength: 15.64 MPa and fracture toughness: 1.43 MPa·m{sup 1/2}) and then decreased by addition of more hydroxyapatite whiskers. The improvement of mechanical properties was due to whisker pull-out, crack deflection and crack bridging. Moreover, the degradation rate decreased with the increase of hydroxyapatite whisker content. A layer of bone-like apatite was formed on the scaffold surfaces after being soaked in simulated body fluid. Human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells spread well on the scaffolds and proliferated with increasing culture time. These findings suggested that the calcium silicate scaffolds reinforced with hydroxyapatite whiskers showed great potential for bone regeneration and tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: • HA whiskers were incorporated into CS to improve the properties. • The scaffolds were successfully fabricated by SLS. • Toughening mechanisms was whisker pull-out, crack deflection and bridging. • The scaffolds showed excellent apatite forming ability.

  8. Calcium silicate ceramic scaffolds toughened with hydroxyapatite whiskers for bone tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium silicate possessed excellent biocompatibility, bioactivity and degradability, while the high brittleness limited its application in load-bearing sites. Hydroxyapatite whiskers ranging from 0 to 30 wt.% were incorporated into the calcium silicate matrix to improve the strength and fracture resistance. Porous scaffolds were fabricated by selective laser sintering. The effects of hydroxyapatite whiskers on the mechanical properties and toughening mechanisms were investigated. The results showed that the scaffolds had a uniform and continuous inner network with the pore size ranging between 0.5 mm and 0.8 mm. The mechanical properties were enhanced with increasing hydroxyapatite whiskers, reached a maximum at 20 wt.% (compressive strength: 27.28 MPa, compressive Young's modulus: 156.2 MPa, flexural strength: 15.64 MPa and fracture toughness: 1.43 MPa·m1/2) and then decreased by addition of more hydroxyapatite whiskers. The improvement of mechanical properties was due to whisker pull-out, crack deflection and crack bridging. Moreover, the degradation rate decreased with the increase of hydroxyapatite whisker content. A layer of bone-like apatite was formed on the scaffold surfaces after being soaked in simulated body fluid. Human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells spread well on the scaffolds and proliferated with increasing culture time. These findings suggested that the calcium silicate scaffolds reinforced with hydroxyapatite whiskers showed great potential for bone regeneration and tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: • HA whiskers were incorporated into CS to improve the properties. • The scaffolds were successfully fabricated by SLS. • Toughening mechanisms was whisker pull-out, crack deflection and bridging. • The scaffolds showed excellent apatite forming ability

  9. Biocompatibility and bioactivity of calcium silicate-based endodontic sealers in human dental pulp cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Boldrin MESTIERI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA is a calcium silicate-based material. New sealers have been developed based on calcium silicate as MTA Fillapex and MTA Plus.Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate biocompatibility and bioactivity of these two calcium silicate-based sealers in culture of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs.Material and Methods The cells were isolated from third molars extracted from a 16-year-old patient. Pulp tissue was sectioned into fragments with approximately 1 mm3 and kept in supplemented medium to obtain hDPCs adherent cultures. Cell characterization assays were performed to prove the osteogenic potential. The evaluated materials were: MTA Plus (MTAP; MTA Fillapex (MTAF and FillCanal (FC. Biocompatibility was evaluated with MTT and Neutral Red (NR assays, after hDPCs exposure for 24 h to different dilutions of each sealer extract (1:2, 1:3 and 1:4. Unexposed cells were the positive control (CT. Bioactivity was assessed by alkaline phosphatase (ALP enzymatic assay in cells exposed for one and three days to sealer extracts (1:4 dilution. All data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey post-test (p≤0.05%.Results MTT and NR results showed suitable cell viability rates for MTAP at all dilutions (90-135%. Cells exposed to MTAF and FC (1:2 and 1:4 dilutions showed significant low viability rate when compared to CT in MTT. The NR results demonstrated cell viability for all materials tested. In MTAP group, the cells ALP activity was similar to CT in one and three days of exposure to the material. MTAF and FC groups demonstrated a decrease in ALP activity when compared to CT at both periods of cell exposure.Conclusions The hDPCs were suitable for the evaluation of new endodontic materialsin vitro. MTAP may be considered a promising material for endodontic treatments.

  10. Biocompatibility of a new nanomaterial based on calcium silicate implanted in subcutaneous connective tissue of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Violeta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate rat connective tissue response to a new calcium silicate system 7, 15, 30 and 60 days after implantation. Twenty Wistar albino male rats received two tubes half-filled with a new calcium silicate system (NCSS or MTA in subcutaneous tissue. The empty half of the tubes served as controls. Five animals were sacrificed after 7, 15, 30 and 60 days and samples of the subcutaneous tissue around implanted material were submitted to histological analysis. The intensity of inflammation was evaluated based on the number of inflammatory cells present. Statistical analysis was performed using one way ANOVA and Holm Sidak's multiple comparison tests. Mild to moderate inflammatory reaction was observed after 7, 15 and 30 days around a NCSS while mild inflammatory reaction was detected after 60 days of implantation. In the MTA group, mild to moderate inflammatory reaction was found after 7 and 15 days while mild inflammatory reaction was present after 30 and 60 days. There was no statistically significant difference in the intensity of inflammatory reactions between the tested materials and control groups in any experimental period (ANOVA p>0.05. Regarding the intensity of inflammatory reactions at different experimental periods, a statistically significant difference was observed between 7 and 30 days, 7 and 60 days and 15 to 60 days for both materials. For the controls, a statistically significant difference was found between 7 and 60 days and 15 and 60 days of the experiment (Holm Sidak < p 0.001. Subcutaneous tissue of rats showed good tolerance to a new calcium silicate system. Inflammatory reaction was similar to that caused by MTA. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172026

  11. The Performance of Calcium Silicate Board Partition Fireproof Drywall Assembly with Junction Box under Fire

    OpenAIRE

    Yinuo Wang; Ying-Ji Chuang; Ching-Yuan Lin

    2015-01-01

    This study uses a metal stud partition fireproof drywall measuring 83 mm in thickness as a test specimen to explore the impact of an embedded junction box on the firefighting performance of the wall through one time of standard fire test on a 300 cm × 300 cm area and five times of standard fire test on a 120 cm × 120 cm area. The results show that the quality of calcium silicate board plays a big role in the fireproof effectiveness. The embedded junction box located on the backside of the f...

  12. Crystal chemistry and structure refinement of five hydrated calcium borates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J.R.; Appleman, D.E.; Christ, C.L.

    1964-01-01

    The crystal structures of the five known members of the series Ca2B6O11??xH2O (x = 1, 5, 5, 7, 9, and 13) have been refined by full-matrix least-squares techniques, yielding bond distances and angles with standard errors of less than 0??01 A?? and 0??5??, respectively. The results illustrate the crystal chemical principles that govern the structures of hydrated borate compounds. The importance of hydrogen bonding in the ferroelectric transition of colemanite is confirmed by more accurate proton assignments. ?? 1964.

  13. Apatite precipitation on a novel fast-setting calcium silicate cement containing fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjkesh, Bahram; Chevallier, Jacques; Salehi, Hamideh; Cuisinier, Frédéric; Isidor, Flemming; Løvschall, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Calcium silicate cements are widely used in endodontics. Novel fast-setting calcium silicate cement with fluoride (Protooth) has been developed for potential applications in teeth crowns including cavity lining and cementation. Objective: To evaluate the surface apatite-forming ability of Protooth compositions as a function of fluoride content and immersion time in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Material and methods: Three cement compositions were tested: Protooth (3.5% fluoride and 10% radiocontrast), ultrafast Protooth (3.5% fluoride and 20% radiocontrast), and high fluoride Protooth (15% fluoride and 25% radiocontrast). Powders were cap-mixed with liquid, filled to the molds and immersed in PBS. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the precipitations morphology and composition after 1, 7, 28, and 56 days. Apatite/belite Raman peak height indicated the apatite thickness. Results: Spherical calcium phosphate precipitations with acicular crystallites were formed after 1-day immersion in PBS and Raman spectra disclosed the phosphate band at 965 cm−1, supporting the apatite formation over Protooth compositions. The apatite deposition continued and more voluminous precipitations were observed after 56 days over the surface of all cements. Raman bands suggested the formation of β-type carbonated apatite over Protooth compositions. High fluoride Protooth showed the most compact deposition with significantly higher apatite/belite ratio compared to Protooth and ultrafast Protooth after 28 and 56 days. Conclusions: Calcium phosphate precipitations (apatite) were formed over Protooth compositions after immersion in PBS with increasing apatite formation as a function of time. High fluoride Protooth exhibited thicker apatite deposition. PMID:27335901

  14. Bond strength of a calcium silicate-based sealer tested in bulk or with different main core materials

    OpenAIRE

    Nagas, Emre; Cehreli, Zafer; Mehmet Ozgur UYANIK; Veli DURMAZ

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of a calcium silicate-based sealer (iRoot SP), with or without a core material, on bond strength to radicular dentin, in comparison with various contemporary root filling systems. Root canals of freshly extracted single-rooted teeth (n = 60) were instrumented using rotary instruments. The roots were randomly assigned to one of the following experimental groups: (1) a calcium silicate-based sealer without a core material (bulk-fill); (2) a ca...

  15. Interactions in Calcium Oxalate Hydrate/Surfactant Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikiric; Filipovic-Vincekovic; Babic-Ivancić Vdović Füredi-Milhofer

    1999-04-15

    Phase transformation of calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) into the thermodynamically stable monohydrate (COM) in anionic (sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)) and cationic (dodecylammonium chloride) surfactant solutions has been studied. Both surfactants inhibit, but do not stop transformation from COD to COM due to their preferential adsorption at different crystal faces. SDS acts as a stronger transformation inhibitor. The general shape of adsorption isotherms of both surfactants at the solid/liquid interface is of two-plateau-type, but differences in the adsorption behavior exist. They originate from different ionic and molecular structures of crystal surfaces and interactions between surfactant headgroups and solid surface. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  16. Effect of silica fume additions on the hydration behaviour of calcium aluminates

    OpenAIRE

    Fumo, Daniel A.; Segadães, Ana M.

    1997-01-01

    In the recent refractory castables technology, the calcium aluminate cement is being replaced in increasing proportion by very fine matrix components, such as silica fume and colloidal alumina. More efficient particle packing and the resulting lower water requirements have been the proposed explanation for the improved green density and strength, without sacrificing the castable workability. However, the aluminates are still responsible for the hydraulic setting of the castable. The hydration...

  17. Functionalized calcium silicate nanofibers with hierarchical structure derived from oyster shells and their application in heavy metal ions removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Weijie; Hong, Mingzhu; Zhang, HaiFeng; Wu, Qiuping; Zhuang, Zanyong; Yu, Yan

    2016-06-21

    Inorganic hierarchical nanostructures have remarkable potential applications in environmental metal remediation; however, their applications usually suffer from low capacity, high cost, and difficulties in the recycling of adsorbents. We previously reported a facile strategy to synthesize acid-insoluble calcium silicate hydrates (CSH) from oyster shells, a representative kind of biowaste. However, little is known of the structure, size, and morphology of the as-prepared CSH, which hampers the improvement of their adsorption capacities. In this work, systematic investigation of the structures of as-generated CSH demonstrate that they have a hierarchically porous structure composed of thin nano-sheets, where each nano-sheet is assembled by nano-fibers with width of around ten nanometers. The hierarchical nanostructures with pore size of ∼12 nm provide a significant amount of active sites to graft polyethyleneimine (PEI), which enables the efficient extraction of both Cu(ii) cations and Cr(vi) anions from the aqueous solution. Batch experiments further indicate that the PEI-modified PCSH exhibit a maximum adsorption capacity of 203 and 256 mg g(-1) for Cu(ii) and Cr(vi), respectively, much higher than that of CSH, OS and many other adsorbents in literature. The adsorption of Cu(ii) and Cr(vi) proved to be spontaneous and exothermic. Combining the pH-dependent experiments with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, the underlying mechanism is discussed. PCSH derived from OS biowaste maintains an efficient extraction ability toward Cu(ii) and Cr(vi) after five adsorption-desorption cycles. It is also applicable for treating various kinds of heavy metal ions and organic pollutants, showing potentially wide applications in water treatment. PMID:27221228

  18. Optical properties and Judd–Ofelt analysis of Eu3+ activated calcium silicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eu3+ activated calcium silicate was synthesized in stoichiometric ratio using the co-precipitation technique. The phosphors were characterized using X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence technique. Based on Judd–Ofelt (J–O) analysis, the intensity parameters Ω2 and Ω4 were calculated from the emission spectra for various Europium concentrations. The determined values indicate higher hypersensitive behavior of the 5D0→7F2 transition of Eu3+ ions in the host matrix and a stronger covalency. Different radiative properties have been discussed as the function of Eu3+ concentration. The lifetime decay pattern recorded for these samples indicated single exponential behavior. The quantum efficiency has been calculated to be 62% from the emission spectrum and the fluorescence lifetime was found to be 2.9 ms

  19. Thermal conductivity of the gadolinium calcium silicate apatites: Effect of different point defect types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The apatite crystal structure of the gadolinium calcium silicates can accommodate a wide range of point defects, including oxygen and cation vacancies, as well as anti-site defects, depending on the Gd/Ca ratio. Compositions having only cation or oxygen vacancies were identified and the thermal diffusivity and conductivity were measured up to 1000 deg. C. All the compositions, including the stoichiometric composition, exhibit low thermal conductivities from room temperature to high temperature with the defect-containing compositions having even lower thermal conductivities. The high-temperature thermal conductivity, at temperatures below the onset of significant radiative heat transport, decreases with the inverse square root of the cation and anion vacancy concentration, consistent with simple defect scattering models. Based on the data, it is concluded that the oxygen vacancies are slightly more effective in reducing thermal conductivity.

  20. Characterization of a calcium phospho-silicated apatite with iron oxide inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desport, Barthélémy; Carpena, Joëlle; Lacout, Jean-Louis; Borschneck, Daniel; Gattacceca, Jérôme

    2011-02-01

    An iron oxide containing calcium phosphate-silicate hydroxyapatite was synthesized by calcination at 900 °C of a sample obtained by precipitation in basic aqueous solution of Ca, P, Si, Fe and Mg containing acidic solution made from dissolution of natural minerals. XRD and FTIR were used for crystallographic characterization of the main apatitic phase. Its composition was determined using ICP-AES. EDX coupled with SEM and TEM evidenced the heterogeneity of this compound and the existence of iron-magnesium oxide. Magnetic analyses highlighted that this phase was non-stoichiometric magnesioferrite (Mg 1.2Fe 1.8O 3.9) spherical nanoparticles. Those analyses also put into evidence the role of calcination in synthesis. Carbonates detected by FTIR and estimated by SEM-EDX in non-calcinated sample were removed from apatitic structure, and crystallization of apatite was enhanced during heating. Moreover, there was phase segregation that led to magnesioferrite formation.

  1. A chemical activity evaluation of two dental calcium silicate-based materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalas Renata

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Calcium silicate-based materials are interesting products widely used in dentistry. The study was designed to compare the chemical reaction between analyzed two preparates and dentin during cavity lining. In our work, dentinal discs were prepared from human extracted teeth filled with Biodentine and MTA+. The samples were then analyzed by way of SEM, EDS and Raman spectroscopy. The obtained results revealed differences in elemental composition between both materials. Biodentine showed higher activity in contact with dentine. Moreover, the interfacial layer in the tooth filled by Biodentine was wider than that in the tooth filled with MTA+. The applied methods of analysis confirmed that both materials have a bioactive potential which is a promising ability.

  2. Luminescent, mesoporous, and bioactive europium-doped calcium silicate (MCS: Eu3+) as a drug carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yong; Huang, Shanshan; Jiang, Jinhua; Li, Guogang; Yang, Piaoping; Lian, Hongzhou; Cheng, Ziyong; Lin, Jun

    2011-05-15

    Luminescent, mesoporous, and bioactive europium-doped calcium silicate (MCS: Eu) was successfully synthesized. The obtained MCS: Eu(3+) was performed as a drug delivery carrier to investigate the drug storage/release properties using ibuprofen (IBU) as the model drug. The structural, morphological, textural, and optical properties were well characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), N(2) adsorption/desorption, and photoluminescence (PL) spectra, respectively. The results reveal that the MCS: Eu exhibits the typical ordered characteristics of the mesostructure. This composite shows a sustained release profile with IBU as the model drug. The IBU-loaded samples still present red luminescence of Eu(3+) ((5)D(0)-(7)F(1,2)) under UV irradiation. The emission intensities of Eu(3+) in the drug carrier system vary with the amount of released IBU, making the drug release easily tracked and monitored. The system demonstrates a great potential for drug delivery and disease therapy. PMID:21376337

  3. Optical properties and Judd–Ofelt analysis of Eu{sup 3+} activated calcium silicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barve, R.A., E-mail: rujuta_barve2003@yahoo.com; Suriyamurthy, N.; Panigrahi, B.S.; Venkatraman, B.

    2015-10-15

    Eu{sup 3+} activated calcium silicate was synthesized in stoichiometric ratio using the co-precipitation technique. The phosphors were characterized using X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence technique. Based on Judd–Ofelt (J–O) analysis, the intensity parameters Ω{sub 2} and Ω{sub 4} were calculated from the emission spectra for various Europium concentrations. The determined values indicate higher hypersensitive behavior of the {sup 5}D{sub 0}→{sup 7}F{sub 2} transition of Eu{sup 3+} ions in the host matrix and a stronger covalency. Different radiative properties have been discussed as the function of Eu{sup 3+} concentration. The lifetime decay pattern recorded for these samples indicated single exponential behavior. The quantum efficiency has been calculated to be 62% from the emission spectrum and the fluorescence lifetime was found to be 2.9 ms.

  4. In situ hydroxyapatite nanofiber growth on calcium borate silicate ceramics in SBF and its structural characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pu, Yinfu; Huang, Yanlin; Qi, Shuyun [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Chen, Cuili [Department of Physics and Interdisciplinary Program of Biomedical, Mechanical & Electrical Engineering, Pukyong National University, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Hyo Jin, E-mail: hjseo@pknu.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Interdisciplinary Program of Biomedical, Mechanical & Electrical Engineering, Pukyong National University, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-01

    A novel calcium silicate borate Ca{sub 11}Si{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 22} ceramic was firstly prepared by the conventional solid-state reaction. In vitro hydroxyapatite mineralization was investigated by soaking the ceramics in simulated body fluid (SBF) solutions at body temperature (37 °C) for various time periods. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) measurements were applied to investigate the samples before and after the immersion of ceramics in SBF solution. The elemental compositions of a hydroxyapatite layer on the ceramics during the mineralization were confirmed by X-ray energy-dispersive spectra (EDS). Meanwhile, the bending strength and elastic modulus of Ca{sub 11}Si{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 22} ceramics were also measured, which indicate that the biomaterials based on Ca{sub 11}Si{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 22} ceramics possess bioactivity and might be a potential candidate as biomaterials for hard tissue repair. The bioactive mineralization ability was evaluated on the base of its crystal structural characteristics, i.e., silanol (Si–OH) and B–OH groups can be easily induced on the surface of Ca{sub 11}Si{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 22} ceramics soaked in SBF solutions. - Highlights: • Calcium silicate borate Ca{sub 11}Si{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 22} ceramics were developed as a new biomaterial. • Ca{sub 11}Si{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 22} shows a superior in vitro bioactivity by inducing bone-like apatite. • Ca{sub 11}Si{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 22} has good mechanical properties as potential candidate biomaterials. • The structure with SiO{sub 4} and BO{sub 3} groups is favorable for hydroxyapatite formation.

  5. In situ hydroxyapatite nanofiber growth on calcium borate silicate ceramics in SBF and its structural characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel calcium silicate borate Ca11Si4B2O22 ceramic was firstly prepared by the conventional solid-state reaction. In vitro hydroxyapatite mineralization was investigated by soaking the ceramics in simulated body fluid (SBF) solutions at body temperature (37 °C) for various time periods. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) measurements were applied to investigate the samples before and after the immersion of ceramics in SBF solution. The elemental compositions of a hydroxyapatite layer on the ceramics during the mineralization were confirmed by X-ray energy-dispersive spectra (EDS). Meanwhile, the bending strength and elastic modulus of Ca11Si4B2O22 ceramics were also measured, which indicate that the biomaterials based on Ca11Si4B2O22 ceramics possess bioactivity and might be a potential candidate as biomaterials for hard tissue repair. The bioactive mineralization ability was evaluated on the base of its crystal structural characteristics, i.e., silanol (Si–OH) and B–OH groups can be easily induced on the surface of Ca11Si4B2O22 ceramics soaked in SBF solutions. - Highlights: • Calcium silicate borate Ca11Si4B2O22 ceramics were developed as a new biomaterial. • Ca11Si4B2O22 shows a superior in vitro bioactivity by inducing bone-like apatite. • Ca11Si4B2O22 has good mechanical properties as potential candidate biomaterials. • The structure with SiO4 and BO3 groups is favorable for hydroxyapatite formation

  6. Effect of calcium sulfates on the early hydration of calcium sulfoaluminate cement and the stability of embedded aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional Portland cement-based systems have been considered unsuitable for immobilising nuclear wastes containing reactive metals, such as aluminium, due to the high pH of the pore solution (usually around 12.5) and free moisture. On the contrary, calcium sulfo-aluminate cement (CSA) produces a lower pH (10.5-12) environment and has an excellent water binding capability as a result of the formation of its main hydration product, ettringite. Therefore, it offers a good potential to immobilise aluminium. However, the pore solution pH and ettringite formation depend largely on the raw materials used to formulate the CSA, which is usually a blend of 75%-85% of CSA clinker and 15-25% of calcium sulfate (in the form of gypsum or anhydrite). In this paper, it was found that, compared to anhydrite, gypsum (15% wt of the blend) demonstrated the highest reduction in the corrosion of embedded Al, possibly due to its lower initial pH (around 10.5) and self-desiccating nature at the early stage of hydration. Whilst the CSA/anhydrite had a higher Al corrosion rate, the initial set was more acceptable than CSA/gypsum. Nonetheless, overall, it was concluded that CSA with gypsum (15% wt) should be considered as a base formulation for the encapsulation of Al waste. The unfavorable rapid set and high heat generation, however, demonstrated that modifications are required, potentially by using mineral additions. (authors)

  7. In Vitro Cytotoxicity of Calcium Silicate-Based Endodontic Cement as Root-End Filling Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selen Küçükkaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of three types of calcium silicate-based endodontic cement after different incubation periods with human periodontal ligament fibroblasts. Human periodontal ligament fibroblasts were cultured from extracted third molars and seeded in 96-well plates. MTA, calcium enriched mixture (CEM cement, and Biodentine were prepared and added to culture insert plates which were immediately placed into 96-well plates containing cultured cells. After incubation periods of 24, 48, and 72 hours, cell viability was determined with WST-1 assay. Data were analysed statistically by ANOVA with repeated measures and Bonferroni tests. There was no significant difference in cell viability amongst the test materials after each incubation period (P>0.05. MTA and CEM presented more than 90% cell viability after 24 and 48 hours of incubation and showed statistically significant decrease in cell viability after 72 hours of incubation (P<0.05. Biodentine showed significantly less cell viability (73% after 24 hours of incubation, whereas more than 90% cell viability was seen after 48 and 72 hours of incubation (P<0.05. Despite the significant changes in cell viability over time, materials presented similar cytotoxicity profile. Biodentine and CEM can be considered as alternative materials for root-end surgery procedures.

  8. In Vitro Cytotoxicity of Calcium Silicate-Based Endodontic Cement as Root-End Filling Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küçükkaya, Selen; Görduysus, Mehmet Ömer; Zeybek, Naciye Dilara; Müftüoğlu, Sevda Fatma

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of three types of calcium silicate-based endodontic cement after different incubation periods with human periodontal ligament fibroblasts. Human periodontal ligament fibroblasts were cultured from extracted third molars and seeded in 96-well plates. MTA, calcium enriched mixture (CEM) cement, and Biodentine were prepared and added to culture insert plates which were immediately placed into 96-well plates containing cultured cells. After incubation periods of 24, 48, and 72 hours, cell viability was determined with WST-1 assay. Data were analysed statistically by ANOVA with repeated measures and Bonferroni tests. There was no significant difference in cell viability amongst the test materials after each incubation period (P > 0.05). MTA and CEM presented more than 90% cell viability after 24 and 48 hours of incubation and showed statistically significant decrease in cell viability after 72 hours of incubation (P Biodentine showed significantly less cell viability (73%) after 24 hours of incubation, whereas more than 90% cell viability was seen after 48 and 72 hours of incubation (P Biodentine and CEM can be considered as alternative materials for root-end surgery procedures.

  9. Physical characteristics, antimicrobial and odontogenesis potentials of calcium silicate cement containing hinokitiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming-Hsien; Shen, Yu-Fang; Hsu, Tuan-Ti; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Shie, Ming-You

    2016-08-01

    Hinokitiol is a natural material and it has antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the material characterization, cell viability, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory abilities of the hinokitiol-modified calcium silicate (CS) cement as a root end filling material. The setting times, diametral tensile strength (DTS) values and XRD patterns of CS cements with 0-10mM hinokitiol were examined. Then, the antibacterial effect and the expression levels of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) of the hinokitiol-modified CS cements were evaluated. Furthermore, the cytocompatibility, the expression levels of the markers of odontoblastic differentiation, mineralized nodule formation and calcium deposition of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured on hinokitiol-modified CS cements were determined. The hinokitiol-modified CS cements had better antibacterial and anti-inflammatory abilities and cytocompatibility than non-modified CS cements. Otherwise, the hinokitiol-modified CS cements had suitable setting times and better odontoblastic potential of hDPCs. Previous report pointed out that the root-end filling materials may induce inflammatory cytokines reaction. In our study, hinokitiol-modified CS cements not only inhibited the expression level of inflammatory cytokines, but also had better cytocompatibility, antimicrobial properties and active ability of odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs. Therefore, the hinokitiol-modified CS cement may be a potential root end filling material for clinic. PMID:27157721

  10. Graphene-reinforced calcium silicate coatings for load-bearing implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owing to the superior mechanical properties and low coefficient of thermal expansion, graphene has been widely used in the reinforcement of ceramics. In the present study, various ratios of graphene (0.5 wt%, 1.5 wt% and 4 wt%) were reinforced into calcium silicate (CS) coatings for load-bearing implant surface modification. Surface characteristics of the graphene/calcium silicate (GC) composite coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Results show that the graphene plates (less than 4 wt% in the coatings) were embedded in the CS matrix homogeneously. The surfaces of the coatings showed a hierarchical hybrid nano-/microstructure, which is believed to be beneficial to the behaviors of the cell and early bone fixation of the implants. Wear resistance measured by a pin-on-disc model exhibited an obvious enhancement with the adoption of graphene plates. The weight losses of the GC coatings decreased with the increase of graphene content. However, too high graphene content (4 wt% or more) made the composite coatings porous and the wear resistance decreased dramatically. The weight loss was only 1.3 ± 0.2 mg for the GC coating containing 1.5 wt% graphene (denoted as GC1.5) with a load of 10 N and sliding distance of 500 m, while that of the pure CS coating reached up to 28.6 ± 0.5 mg. In vitro cytocompatibility of the GC1.5 coating was evaluated using a human marrow stem cell (hMSC) culture system. The proliferation and alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin and osteocalcin (OC) osteogenesis-related gene expression of the cells on the GC1.5 coating did not deteriorate with the adoption of graphene. Conversely, even better adhesion of the hMSCs was observed on the GC1.5 coating than on the pure CS coating. All of the results indicate that the GC1.5 coating is a good candidate for load-bearing implants. (paper)

  11. Preparation and in vitro evaluation of strontium-doped calcium silicate/gypsum bioactive bone cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combination of two or more bioactive components with different biodegradability could cooperatively improve the physicochemical and biological performances of the biomaterials. Here we explore the use of α-calcium sulfate hemihydrate (α-CSH) and calcium silicate with and without strontium doping (Sr-CSi, CSi) to fabricate new bioactive cements with appropriate biodegradability as bone implants. The cements were fabricated by adding different amounts (0–35 wt%) of Sr-CSi (or CSi) into the α-CSH-based pastes at a liquid-to-solid ratio of 0.4. The addition of Sr-CSi into α-CSH cements not only led to a pH rise in the immersion medium, but also changed the surface reactivity of cements, making them more bioactive and therefore promoting apatite mineralization in simulated body fluid (SBF). The impact of additives on long-term in vitro degradation was evaluated by soaking the cements in Tris buffer, SBF, and α-minimal essential medium (α-MEM) for a period of five weeks. An addition of 20% Sr-CSi to α-CSH cement retarded the weight loss of the samples to 36% (in Tris buffer), 43% (in SBF) and 54% (in α-MEM) as compared with the pure α-CSH cement. However, the addition of CSi resulted in a slightly faster degradation in comparison with Sr-CSi in these media. Finally, the in vitro cell-ion dissolution products interaction study using human fetal osteoblast cells demonstrated that the addition of Sr-CSi improved cell viability and proliferation. These results indicate that tailorable bioactivity and biodegradation behavior can be achieved in gypsum cement by adding Sr-CSi, and such biocements will be of benefit for enhancing bone defect repair. (paper)

  12. Photo-luminescent properties of a green or red emitting Tb3+ or Eu3+ doped calcium magnesium silicate phosphors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study describes green-emitting Tb3+ or red-emitting Eu3+ doped calcium magnesium silicate phosphors by ultraviolet excitation at 335 nm. The rare earth activated amorphous calcium silicate was prepared by a solution–combustion process at 600 °C for 5–10 min. The Ca2MgSi2O7 prepared using urea and ammonium nitrate has a tetragonal crystal structure. The resulting Tb3+-doped phosphor emitted green light centered at 544 nm. The optimum excitation wavelength within the range 300–400 nm was 335 nm. The intensity and emitting wavelength of the Eu3+ doped samples can be controlled by annealing in a reducing or oxidizing environment, allowing light to be emitted as green or red. When the reducing environment is optimized, the emission spectrum of Ca2MgSi2O7:Eu2+ is a broad band at 497 nm.

  13. Combination of simvastatin, calcium silicate/gypsum, and gelatin and bone regeneration in rabbit calvarial defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Huiming; Shi, Jue; Wang, Ying; Lai, Kaichen; Yang, Xianyan; Chen, Xiaoyi; Yang, Guoli

    2016-01-01

    The present study was performed to determine whether simvastatin improves bone regeneration when combined with calcium silicate/gypsum and gelatin (CS-GEL). The surface morphology was determined using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FSEM). Degradation in vitro was evaluated by monitoring the weight change of the composites soaked in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Drug release was evaluated using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Cytotoxicity testing was performed to assess the biocompatibility of composites. Four 5 mm-diameter bone defects were created in rabbit calvaria. Three sites were filled with CS-GEL, 0.5 mg simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL (SIM-0.5) and 1.0 mg simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL (SIM-1.0), respectively, and the fourth was left empty as the control group. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and histological analysis were carried out at 4 and 12 weeks postoperatively. The composites all exhibited three-dimensional structures and showed the residue with nearly 80% after 4 weeks of immersion. Drug release was explosive on the first day and then the release rate remained stable. The composites did not induce any cytotoxicity. The results in vivo demonstrated that the new bone formation and the expressions of BMP-2, OC and type I collagen were improved in the simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL group. It was concluded that the simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL may improve bone regeneration. PMID:26996657

  14. Mechanical and microstructure of reinforced hydroxyapatite/calcium silicate nano-composites materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Nano sized of HA and CS powders were prepared. ► Mechanical of HACS composites enhanced with content of CS. ► The apatite formation onto the composites is proved. -- Abstract: In this study, the nano sized hydroxyapatite (HA) and calcium silicate (CS) powders prepared by both chemical precipitation and sol–gel methods respectively. Biphasic nano-composites materials containing different ratios of HA and CS were fabricated and assessed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transmission infrared reflectance (FT-IR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The effect of variation of ratios between HA and CS on mechanical properties, microstructure and in vitro study was studied. The results proved that the mechanical properties were enhanced with increasing the CS ratio in the composite. In vitro study proved the formation and nucleation of apatite onto composites surfaces which contain low content of CS after one week of immersion. Finally, it is concluded that the HACS composites containing high HA content at the expense of CS content will be promising for bone substitute’s applications, especially in load bearing sites.

  15. Electrodeposition of porous hydroxyapatite/calcium silicate composite coating on titanium for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel method of electrolytic porous hydroxyapatite/calcium silicate (HA/CaSiO3) composite coating was conducted on pure titanium in a mixed solution of nano-SiO2, Ca(NO3)2 and NH4H2PO4. SEM observation showed that the composite layer was porous, thereby providing abundant sites for the osteoblast adhesion. XRD results showed that the composite coating was mainly composed of HA and CaSiO3. Bond strength testing exhibited that HA-CaSiO3/Ti had higher bond strength than HA/Ti. The HA/CaSiO3 coating was more corrosion resistant than the HA coating based on the polarization tests. In vitro cell experiments demonstrated that both the HA and HA/CaSiO3 coatings showed better cell response than the bared titanium. In addition, the proliferation of MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells grown on the HA/CaSiO3 coating were remarkably higher than those on the bared Ti and pure HA coating.

  16. The Performance of Calcium Silicate Board Partition Fireproof Drywall Assembly with Junction Box under Fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinuo Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study uses a metal stud partition fireproof drywall measuring 83 mm in thickness as a test specimen to explore the impact of an embedded junction box on the firefighting performance of the wall through one time of standard fire test on a 300 cm × 300 cm area and five times of standard fire test on a 120 cm × 120 cm area. The results show that the quality of calcium silicate board plays a big role in the fireproof effectiveness. The embedded junction box located on the backside of the fire can reduce the effectiveness of the wall, especially the area above the socket. The thickness of rock wool may increase the performance, but in a limited rate. External junction box may not impact the fireproofing performance of the wall but it still possesses some safety risks. An embedded junction box measuring 101 × 55 mm could already damage the fire compartment, and in reality there may be more complicated situations that should be noted and improved.

  17. Combination of simvastatin, calcium silicate/gypsum, and gelatin and bone regeneration in rabbit calvarial defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Huiming; Shi, Jue; Wang, Ying; Lai, Kaichen; Yang, Xianyan; Chen, Xiaoyi; Yang, Guoli

    2016-03-01

    The present study was performed to determine whether simvastatin improves bone regeneration when combined with calcium silicate/gypsum and gelatin (CS-GEL). The surface morphology was determined using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FSEM). Degradation in vitro was evaluated by monitoring the weight change of the composites soaked in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Drug release was evaluated using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Cytotoxicity testing was performed to assess the biocompatibility of composites. Four 5 mm-diameter bone defects were created in rabbit calvaria. Three sites were filled with CS-GEL, 0.5 mg simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL (SIM-0.5) and 1.0 mg simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL (SIM-1.0), respectively, and the fourth was left empty as the control group. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and histological analysis were carried out at 4 and 12 weeks postoperatively. The composites all exhibited three-dimensional structures and showed the residue with nearly 80% after 4 weeks of immersion. Drug release was explosive on the first day and then the release rate remained stable. The composites did not induce any cytotoxicity. The results in vivo demonstrated that the new bone formation and the expressions of BMP-2, OC and type I collagen were improved in the simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL group. It was concluded that the simvastatin-loaded CS-GEL may improve bone regeneration.

  18. Biological Assessment of a Calcium Silicate Incorporated Hydroxyapatite-Gelatin Nanocomposite: A Comparison to Decellularized Bone Matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Dong Joon Lee; Ricardo Padilla; He Zhang; Wei-Shou Hu; Ching-Chang Ko

    2014-01-01

    Our laboratory utilized biomimicry to develop a synthetic bone scaffold based on hydroxyapatite-gelatin-calcium silicate (HGCS). Here, we evaluated the potential of HGCS scaffold in bone formation in vivo using the rat calvarial critical-sized defect (CSD). Twelve Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to four groups: control (defect only), decellularized bone matrix (DECBM), and HGCS with and without multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs). DECBM was prepared by removing all the cells using ...

  19. Effects of graphene plates’ adoption on the microstructure, mechanical properties, and in vivo biocompatibility of calcium silicate coating

    OpenAIRE

    Xie YT; Li HQ; Ding CX; Zheng XB; Li K

    2015-01-01

    Youtao Xie, Hongqin Li, Chuanxian Ding, Xuebin Zheng, Kai Li Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Key Laboratory of Inorganic Coating Materials, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Calcium silicate (CS) ceramic is a good coating candidate for biomedical implants to improve biocompatibility and accelerate early osseo-integration. However, the poor fracture toughness and wear resistance of this ceramic material restricts the long-term performance of impl...

  20. Preliminary study of raw material for calcium silicate/PVA coating on Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium silicate bioceramic was prepared from the rice husk and limestone resources using the sol gel method. The preparations of CaSiO3 formulation were differ from the previous study due CaO/SiO2 amount with 45:55 ratio. X-Ray Fluorescence analysis was carried out to clarify the amount of SiO2 and CaO content in the limestone and rice husk ash. The high amount of CaO was found in the limestone with the percentages of 97.22%, whereby 89% of SiO2 content of the rice husk ash. Several milling time were studied to obtain the optimized milling ti me and speed in progress to obtain nano size particle. The particle size analysis result confirms that increase in milling time does not certainly reduce the size of particle. The addition of 0.05% polyvinyl alcohol as a binder did not change the phases or composition of calcium silicates after examined by X-Ray diffraction analysis which make it suitable to be used as a binder for calcium silicate coating without changing the chemical structure

  1. Preliminary study of raw material for calcium silicate/PVA coating on Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azam, Farah ' Atiqah bt Abdul; Shamsudin, Roslinda, E-mail: linda@ukm.edu.my [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    Calcium silicate bioceramic was prepared from the rice husk and limestone resources using the sol gel method. The preparations of CaSiO{sub 3} formulation were differ from the previous study due CaO/SiO{sub 2} amount with 45:55 ratio. X-Ray Fluorescence analysis was carried out to clarify the amount of SiO{sub 2} and CaO content in the limestone and rice husk ash. The high amount of CaO was found in the limestone with the percentages of 97.22%, whereby 89% of SiO{sub 2} content of the rice husk ash. Several milling time were studied to obtain the optimized milling ti me and speed in progress to obtain nano size particle. The particle size analysis result confirms that increase in milling time does not certainly reduce the size of particle. The addition of 0.05% polyvinyl alcohol as a binder did not change the phases or composition of calcium silicates after examined by X-Ray diffraction analysis which make it suitable to be used as a binder for calcium silicate coating without changing the chemical structure.

  2. Dealkalization of calcium silicate slag and study of using it as cement admixture%硅钙渣脱碱处理及作水泥混合材的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘江; 张建波; 孙俊民; 王宏霞; 叶家元; 史迪

    2012-01-01

    Orthogonal experiment method is applied to research on dealkalization of calcium silicate slag, and properties of non-dealkalizated and dealkalizated calcium slag cement have been analyzed. Effects of temperature, holding time, content of lime milk and washing times were discussed, the results show that the optimum dealkalization combination of the four factors is as follows:content of lime milk is 10%,temperature 85 X. and holding time 3 hours,washing twice,then an alkali content of 0.83% will be acquired; compressive strength of non梔ealkalizated calcium slag cement is higher than dealkalizated calcium slag cement during the early hydration, the advantages of dealkalizated calcium slag cement will gradually appear as time goes and will be more significantly as calcium slag content increase; Microscopic analysis shows that non-dealkalizated calcium slag cement generates large amount of C-S-H gel during early hydration and its hydration products are more compact than dealkalizated calcium slag cement, little difference of the compactness has been found between them when the hydration time is 28 days.%采用正交试验法对硅钙渣进行脱碱处理,对脱碱前后的硅钙渣水泥性能进行了研究.通过调整温度、保温时间、石灰乳掺量和水洗次数,得出最佳脱碱组合为:石灰乳掺量10%,温度85℃,保温时间3h,水洗2次,处理后碱含量为0.83%:强度试验结果表明,水化早期未脱碱硅钙渣水泥抗压强度要高于脱碱硅钙渣水泥,但随着龄期逐渐增长,脱碱硅钙渣水泥优势逐渐显现,掺量越大优势越明显;微观形貌分析表明,未脱碱硅钙渣水泥水化早期生成大量C-S-H凝胶,水化产物较脱碱硅钙渣水泥更致密,水化28d时两者水化产物的致密性相当.

  3. Fluoride-containing nanoporous calcium-silicate MTA cements for endodontics and oral surgery: Early fluorapatite formation in a phosphate-containing solution

    OpenAIRE

    Gandolfi, M.G.; Taddei, P.; Siboni, F.; Modena, E.; Ginebra Molins, Maria Pau; Prati, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    Gandolfi MG, Taddei P, Siboni F, Modena E, Ginebra MP, Prati C. Fluoride-containing nanoporous calcium-silicate MTA cements for endodontics and oral surgery: early fluorapatite formation in a phosphate-containing solution. International Endodontic Journal, 44, 938–949, 2011. Aim To test the chemical–physical properties and apatite-forming ability of experimental fluoride-doped calcium silicate cements designed to create novel bioactive materials for use in endodontics ...

  4. Luminescence properties of dysprosium doped di-calcium di-aluminium silicate phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Geetanjali; Brahme, Nameeta; Sharma, Ravi; Bisen, D. P.; Sao, Sanjay K.; Tigga, Shalinta

    2016-08-01

    A Dysprosium doped di-calcium di-aluminium silicate phosphor emitting long-lasting white light was prepared and investigated. Phosphors were synthesized by combustion-assisted method. The effect of doping concentration on the crystal structure and luminescence properties of Ca2Al2SiO7:Dy3+ phosphors were investigated. The phase structure, surface morphology, particle size, elemental analysis was analyzed by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) techniques. X-ray diffraction (XRD) profiles showed that all peaks could be attributed to the tetragonal Ca2Al2SiO7 phase when the sample was annealed at 1100 °C. The increase in TL intensity indicates that the concentration of traps increases with UV irradiation. Under the UV-excitation, the Thermoluminescence (TL) emission spectra of Ca2Al2SiO7:Dy3+ phosphor shows the characteristic emission of Dy3+ peaking at 484 nm (blue), 583 nm (yellow) and 680 nm (red), originating from the transitions of 4F9/2 → 6H15/2, 4F9/2 → 6H13/2 and 4F9/2 → 6H11/2. Photoluminescence (PL) decay has also reported and it indicates that Ca2Al2SiO7:Dy3+ phosphor contains fast decay and slow decay process. The peak of Mechanoluminescence (ML) intensity increases linearly with increasing impact velocity of the moving piston. The possible mechanism of Thermoluminescence (TL), Photoluminescence (PL) and Mechanoluminescence (ML) of this white light emitting long lasting phosphor is also investigated.

  5. Luminescence properties of dysprosium doped calcium magnesium silicate phosphor by solid state reaction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dysprosium doped calcium magnesium silicate (CaMgSi2O6:Dy3+) white light emitting phosphor was synthesized by solid state reaction process. The crystal structure of sintered phosphor was monoclinic structure with space group C2/c. Chemical composition of the sintered CaMgSi2O6:Dy3+ phosphor was confirmed by EDX. The prepared CaMgSi2O6:Dy3+ phosphor was excited from 352 nm and their corresponding emission spectra were recorded at blue (470 nm), yellow (570 nm) and red (675 nm) line due to the 4F9/2 → 6H15/2, 4F9/2 → 6H13/2, 4F9/2 → 6H11/2 transitions of Dy3+ ions. The combination of these three emissions constituted as white light confirmed by the Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE) chromatic coordinate diagram. The possible mechanism of the white light emitting long lasting CaMgSi2O6:Dy3+ phosphor was also investigated. Investigation on afterglow property show that phosphor held fast and slow decay process. The peak of mechanoluminescence (ML) intensity increases linearly with increasing impact velocity of the moving piston. Thus the present investigation indicates that the local piezoelectricity-induced electron bombardment model is responsible to produce ML in prepared CaMgSi2O6:Dy3+ phosphor. - Highlights: • The crystal structure of CaMgSi2O6:Dy3+ phosphor is consistent with standard monoclinic structure. • CIE coordinates of CaMgSi2O6:Dy3+ phosphor is suitable as white light emitting phosphor. • The local piezoelectricity-induced electron bombardment model is responsible to produce ML in CaMgSi2O6:Dy3+ phosphor

  6. Directed osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem/precursor cells on silicate substituted calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Kate; Travers, Paul; Chander, Chaman; Buckland, Tom; Campion, Charlie; Noble, Brendon

    2013-01-01

    Insufficient, underactive, or inappropriate osteoblast function results in serious clinical conditions such as osteoporosis, osteogenesis imperfecta and fracture nonunion and therefore the control of osteogenesis is a medical priority. In vitro mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be directed to form osteoblasts through the addition of soluble factors such as β-glycerophosphate, ascorbic acid, and dexamethasone; however this is unlikely to be practical in the clinical setting. An alternative approach would be to use a scaffold or matrix engineered to provide cues for differentiation without the need for soluble factors. Here we describe studies using Silicate-substituted calcium phosphate (Si-CaP) and unmodified hydroxyapatite (HA) to test whether these materials are capable of promoting osteogenic differentiation of MSCs in the absence of soluble factors. Si-CaP supported attachment and proliferation of MSCs and induced osteogenesis to a greater extent than HA, as evidenced through upregulation of the osteoblast-related genes: Runx2 (1.2 fold), Col1a1 (2 fold), Pth1r (1.5 fold), and Bglap (1.7 fold) Dmp1 (1.1 fold), respectively. Osteogenic-associated proteins, alkaline phosphatase (1.4 fold), RUNX2, COL1A1, and BGLAP, were also upregulated and there was an increased production of mineralized bone matrix (1.75 fold), as detected by the Von Kossa Assay. These data indicate that inorganic substrates are capable of directing the differentiation programme of stem cells in the absence of known chemical drivers and therefore may provide the basis for bone repair in the clinical setting.

  7. Solidification/stabilization and leaching behavior of PbCl₂ in fly-ash hydrated silicate matrix and fly-ash geopolymer matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Gao, Xingbao; Wang, Qi; He, Jie; Yan, Dahai

    2015-05-01

    Fly ash (FA) for reuse as a construction material is activated using two methods, to produce hydrated silicate and geopolymer gels. We investigated the solidification/stabilization and leaching behavior of PbCl2 in a geopolymer matrix (GM) and hydrated silicate matrix (HSM), based on FA as the source material, to evaluate the environmental and health risks. The GM and HSM synthetic conditions were 60 °C, 20 % relative humidity (RH), and 12 wt% (6 mol/L) NaOH, and 20 ± 2 °C, ≥ 90 % RH, and 30 wt.%, respectively, based on their compressive strength performances. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that Pb participated in hydration and geopolymerization, and was incorporated in the structural components of the hydrated silicate and geopolymer. In leaching experiments, the solidification/stabilization effects of Pb and Cl in the HSM and GM improved with increasing curing time. After long-term curing (28 days), the immobility of Pb in the GM was better than that in the HSM. Sodalite improved the Cl-stabilizing ability of the GM compared with that of the HSM. In static monolithic leaching experiments, HSM and GM had the same Pb-leaching behaviors. Based on the changes in the location of the neutral sphere layer with decreasing acid-neutralizing capacity, Pb release was divided into alkaline-release, stagnation, and acid-release stages. The neutral sphere layer contained the highest Pb concentration during permeation toward the block center from the block edge. This behavior regulation could also apply to other amphoteric metals immobilized by GMs and HSMs.

  8. Sorption behavior of iodine on calcium silicate hydrates formed as a secondary mineral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examined the sorption behaviors of iodine into CSH gel without dried processes, considering the repository system saturated with groundwater after the backfilling. In glove, box saturated with N2 gas, each sample of CSH gel was synthesized with CaO, SiO2, and distilled water with liquid/solid ratio 20. Then, 1 mM iodine solution is added into the aqueous solution including the CSH gel with various Ca/Si molar ratios under the isothermal condition (298 K). In the results, even if the Ca/Si ratio is relatively small (d) of iodine on CSH gel without dried processes were two-order of magnitude larger than those with dried processes. For example, the value of Kd (ml/g) was about 380 in the case of 0.5 in Ca/Si molar ratio. Furthermore, it was confirmed the sorption behavior attain equilibrium in 24 hours. These suggest secondary mineral of CSH gel would retard the migration of anionic nuclides under the conditions saturated with groundwater. In comparison, this study prepared also the co-precipitated samples of CSH gel and iodine, where the 1 mM iodine solution is added before curing the CSH gel. These distribution coefficients and the kinetics almost agreed with those mentioned above. (author)

  9. Phosphorus Removal and Methylene Blue Adsorption by Porous Calcium Silicate Hydrate.

    OpenAIRE

    Welagedara, Asanka

    2013-01-01

    Nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) should be removed and recycled from wastewater in order to reduce the nutrient load to recipient waters, avoiding contamination of groundwater and conserve resources. There is a need to pay more attention to phosphorus (P) removal and recycling from wastewater due to limited availability of phosphorus recourses. For such purpose reactive filter media can be used to remove nutrient from wastewater as a sustainable technology. The present study was aimed to e...

  10. Improvement of in vitro physicochemical properties and osteogenic activity of calcium sulfate cement for bone repair by dicalcium silicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Dicalcium silicate can improve osteogenic activity of calcium sulfate cement. • The higher the calcium sulfate content, the shorter the setting time in the composite cement. • The results were useful for designing calcium-based cement with optimal properties. -- Abstract: An ideal bone graft substitute should have the same speed of degradation as formation of new bone tissue. To improve the properties of calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) featured for its rapid resorption, a low degradation material of dicalcium silicate (DCS) was added to the CSH cement. This study examined the effect of DCS (20, 40, 60 and 80 wt%) on the in vitro physicochemical properties and osteogenic activities of the calcium-based composite cements. The diametral tensile strength, porosity and weight loss of the composite cements were evaluated before and after soaking in a simulated body fluid (SBF). The osteogenic activities, such as proliferation, differentiation and mineralization, of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) seeded on cement surfaces were also examined. As a result, the greater the DCS amount, the higher the setting time was in the cement. Before soaking in SBF, the diametral tensile strength of the composite cements was decreased due to the introduction of DCS. On 180-day soaking, the composite cements containing 20, 40, 60 and 80 wt% DCS lost 80%, 69%, 61% and 44% in strength, respectively. Regarding in vitro bioactivity, the DCS-rich cements were covered with clusters of apatite spherulites after soaking for 7 days, while there was no formation of apatite spherulites on the CSH-rich cement surfaces. The presence of DCS could reduce the degradation of the CSH cements, as evidenced in the results of weight loss and porosity. More importantly, DCS may promote effectively the cell proliferation, proliferation and mineralization. The combination of osteogenesis of DCS and degradation of CSH made the calcium-based composite cements an attractive choice for

  11. Hydration state of calcium sulfates in Gale crater, Mars: Identification of bassanite veins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapin, W.; Meslin, P.-Y.; Maurice, S.; Vaniman, D.; Nachon, M.; Mangold, N.; Schröder, S.; Gasnault, O.; Forni, O.; Wiens, R. C.; Martínez, G. M.; Cousin, A.; Sautter, V.; Lasue, J.; Rampe, E. B.; Archer, D.

    2016-10-01

    In-situ analyses reveal the presence of hydrogen within calcium sulfate veins crosscutting the sediments found in Gale crater. Laboratory experiments were performed to calibrate the hydrogen signal measured by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in a range applicable to martian data. The analyses indicate that all veins targeted so far at Gale consist predominantly of bassanite which most likely formed by dehydration of gypsum. This scenario suggests that the percolating water produced gypsum, possibly by hydration of anhydrite in aqueous solution, and remained at temperatures below ∼60 °C at that time. Desiccating conditions followed, consistent with a hyperarid climate and favored by burial or impacts. Additionally, anhydrite with lesser bassanite has been found by XRD in samples of sediments hosting the veins. Our result suggests bassanite is likely found in the veins and anhydrite may be more common as a fine-grained component within the sediments.

  12. Hydrothermal Formation Of Hemi-hydrate Calcium Sulfate Whiskers In The Presence Of Additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of addictives on the hydrothermal formation of hemi-hydrate calcium sulfate (CaSO4·0.5H2O) whiskers were discussed in this paper, using CaCl2 and Na2SO4 as the reactants. The presence of NaCl, CaCl2 or Na2SO4 increased the concentrations of Ca2+ and SO42-, leading to the formation of CaSO4·0.5H2O whiskers with aspect ratio lower than 50. The one dimensional growth of CaSO4·0.5H2O whiskers was enhanced in water with no additives owing to the low super-saturation, leading to the formation of uniform whiskers with a length of 200-2000 μm and an aspect ratio higher than 100.

  13. Capture and sequestration of CO2 in the interlayer space of hydrated calcium Montmorillonite clay under various geological burial depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, W.; Zaoui, A.

    2016-05-01

    We perform, at nanoscale level, the structure and dynamics of carbon dioxide molecules in hydrated Ca-montmorillonite clays. The swelling behaviour of hydrated Wyoming-type Montmorillonite including CO2 molecules and counterions is presented and analysed. In addition, the atom density profile, diffusion behaviours and radial distribution functions of CO2, interlayer water molecules and Calcium ions have been investigated at different geological burial depth of 0 km, 3 km and 6 km, which correspond to various temperature and pressure of simulation conditions. Furthermore, the influence of different hydration state on the dynamical behaviours of carbon dioxide is also explained. The calculated self-diffusion coefficient shows that the carbon dioxide species diffuse more freely with the increase of depth and water content. We also found that the presence of interlayer CO2 inhibits the diffusion of all the mobile species. These results mainly show that the hydrated clay system is an appropriate space capable of absorbing CO2 molecules.

  14. Corrosion resistance of enamel coating modified by calcium silicate and sand particle for steel reinforcement in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fujian

    Porcelain enamel has stable chemical property in harsh environments such as high temperature, acid and alkaline, and it can also chemically react with substrate reinforcing steel resulting in improved adherence strength. In this study, the corrosion resistances of enamel coating modified by calcium silicate and sand particles, which are designed for improved bond strength with surrounding concrete, were investigated in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution. It consists of two papers that describe the results of the study. The first paper investigates the corrosion behavior of enamel coating modified by calcium silicate applied to reinforcing steel bar in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution by OCP, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization. The coatings include a pure enamel, a mixed enamel that consists of 50% pure enamel and 50% calcium silicate by weight, and a double enamel that has an inner pure enamel layer and an outer mixed enamel layer. Electrochemical tests demonstrates that both pure and double enamel coatings can significantly improve corrosion resistance, while the mixed enamel coating offers very little protection due to connected channels. The second paper is focused on the electrochemical characteristics of enamel coating modified by sand particle applied to reinforcing steel bar in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution by EIS. Six percentages by weight are considered including 5%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 50%, and 70%. Results reveal that addition of sand particle does not affect its corrosion resistance significantly. Most of the sand particles can wet very well with enamel body, while some have a weak zone which is induced during the cooling stage due to different coefficient of thermal expansion. Therefore, quality control of sand particle is the key factor to improve its corrosion resistance.

  15. Luminescence properties of dysprosium doped calcium magnesium silicate phosphor by solid state reaction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, Ishwar Prasad, E-mail: ishwarprasad1986@gmail.com [School of Studies in Physics & Astrophysics, Pt. Ravishankar Shukla University, Raipur, C.G. 492010 (India); Chandrakar, Priya; Baghel, R.N.; Bisen, D.P.; Brahme, Nameeta [School of Studies in Physics & Astrophysics, Pt. Ravishankar Shukla University, Raipur, C.G. 492010 (India); Tamrakar, Raunak Kumar [Department of Applied Physics, Bhilai Institute of Technology, Durg, C.G. 491001 (India)

    2015-11-15

    Dysprosium doped calcium magnesium silicate (CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Dy{sup 3+}) white light emitting phosphor was synthesized by solid state reaction process. The crystal structure of sintered phosphor was monoclinic structure with space group C2/c. Chemical composition of the sintered CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphor was confirmed by EDX. The prepared CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphor was excited from 352 nm and their corresponding emission spectra were recorded at blue (470 nm), yellow (570 nm) and red (675 nm) line due to the {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} → {sup 6}H{sub 15/2}, {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} → {sup 6}H{sub 13/2}, {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} → {sup 6}H{sub 11/2} transitions of Dy{sup 3+} ions. The combination of these three emissions constituted as white light confirmed by the Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE) chromatic coordinate diagram. The possible mechanism of the white light emitting long lasting CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphor was also investigated. Investigation on afterglow property show that phosphor held fast and slow decay process. The peak of mechanoluminescence (ML) intensity increases linearly with increasing impact velocity of the moving piston. Thus the present investigation indicates that the local piezoelectricity-induced electron bombardment model is responsible to produce ML in prepared CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphor. - Highlights: • The crystal structure of CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphor is consistent with standard monoclinic structure. • CIE coordinates of CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphor is suitable as white light emitting phosphor. • The local piezoelectricity-induced electron bombardment model is responsible to produce ML in CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphor.

  16. Clinical and Radiographic Assessment of the Efficacy of Calcium Silicate Indirect Pulp Capping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, D.; Mannocci, F.; Patel, S.; Manoharan, A.; Brown, J.E.; Watson, T.F.

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the effectiveness of calcium silicate cement (Biodentine) versus glass ionomer cement (GIC; control group) as indirect pulp capping materials in patients with reversible pulpitis and to compare the effectiveness of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) versus periapical (PA) radiographs in detecting PA changes at baseline (T0) and at 12 mo (T12) postoperatively. Seventy-two restorations (36 Biodentine, 36 Fuji IX) were placed randomly in 53 patients. CBCT/PA radiographs were taken at T0 and T12. Two calibrated examiners assessed the presence/absence and increase/decrease in the size of existing PA radiolucencies under standardized conditions. The Kappa coefficient evaluated statistically the effectiveness of CBCT versus PA radiographs in detecting PA changes. Chi-square/Mann-Whitney tests were used to evaluate the association between PA changes in CBCT with various clinical measures. Significance was predetermined at α = 0.05. Clinical success rates for Biodentine and Fuji IX GIC were 83.3%. CBCT was significantly more effective in detecting PA radiolucencies compared with radiographs (P = 0.0069). Of the teeth, 65.4% and 90.4% were deemed healthy using CBCT and PA radiographs, respectively, at T12. Healing/healed rates were 17.3%/0%, while new/progressed radiolucency were 30.8%/9.6% with CBCT/PA radiographs, respectively. Seventy-one percent of healed lesions had received Biodentine; 88% of new/progressed lesions received Fuji IX GIC. Teeth presenting with an initial CBCT PA lesion had a failure rate of 63%, whereas teeth with no initial lesion had a failure rate of 16%. Although no statistically significant difference was detected in the clinical efficacy of Biodentine/Fuji IX when used as indirect pulp capping materials in patients with reversible pulpitis, CBCT showed a significant difference in that most healed CBCT lesions had received Biodentine while most that did not heal received Fuji IX. Longer-term follow-up is

  17. Hydration process in Portland cement blended with activated coal gangue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-ping LIU; Pei-ming WANG; Min-ju DING

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the hydration of a blend of Portland cement and activated coal gangue in order to determine the relationship between the degree of hydration and compressive strength development.The hydration process was investigated by various means:isothermal calorimetry,thermal analysis,non-cvaporable water measurement,and X-ray diffraction analysis.The results show that the activated coal gangue is a pozzolanic material that contributes to the hydration of the cement blend.The pozzolanic reaction occurs over a period of between 7 and 90 d,consuming portlandite and forming both crystal hydrates and ill-crystallized calcium silicate hydrates.These hydrates are similar to those found in pure Portland cement.The results show that if activated coal gangue is substituted for cement at up to 30% (w/w),it does not significantly affect the final compressive strength of the blend.A long-term compressive strength improvement can in fact be achieved by using activated coal gangue as a supplementary cementing material.The relationship between compressive strength and degree of hydration for both pure Portland cement and blended cement can be described with the same equation.However,the parameters are different since blended cement produces fewer calcium silicate hydrates than pure Portland cement at the same degree of hydration.

  18. The application of thermal analysis, XRD and SEM to study the hydration behavior of tricalcium silicate in the presence of a polycarboxylate superplasticizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ming [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Lei, Jiaheng, E-mail: lm3706370@163.com [School of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Life Sciences, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Guo, Liping; Du, Xiaodi; Li, Junsheng [School of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Life Sciences, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2015-08-10

    Highlights: • The initial hydration process of C{sub 3}S is markedly retarded by PC. • The decomposition temperature of Ca(OH){sub 2} is slightly lower after PC modification. • The adsorption amount of PC on C{sub 3}S increases progressively with the hydration time. • The size of Ca(OH){sub 2} crystals are changed due to the adsorption of PC. - Abstract: Hydration behavior of tricalcium silicate (C{sub 3}S) in the presence of a polycarboxylate (PC) superplasticizer was investigated by means of isothermal calorimetry, differential thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction. In addition, the adsorption characteristics of PC and morphology change of Ca(OH){sub 2} crystals were also examined, respectively. The results showed that initial hydration process of C{sub 3}S was markedly retarded by PC and the retardation effect depended on the dosage of PC. The decomposition temperature of the Ca(OH){sub 2} was slightly lower after PC modification. Moreover, the size of Ca(OH){sub 2} crystals were found to be changed due to the adsorption of PC. The results obtained in this research allowed us to gain insights into the interactions between PC and cement.

  19. Effect of Compounding of Sodium Tripolyphosphate and Super Plasticizers on the Hydration of α-calcium Sulfate Hemihydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Wei; WANG Peiming

    2011-01-01

    The inhibition and its mechanism of sodium tripolyphosphate(STP)composited with super plasticizers(SPs)on hydration of α-calcium sulfate hemihydrate were studied by setting time,strength,hydration heat,X-ray diffraction(XRD),X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS),electronic probe micro analysis (EPMA),scanning electron microscopy(SEM)and differential scanning calorimeter(DSC)measurements.The experimental results show that compared with STP addition,compositing STP with polycarboxylate(PC)plasticizer,the final setting time is prolonged from 0.5h to 2hs.While formulating STP with naphthalene-based plasticizer(NAP)or sulfonate melamine formaldehyde plasticizer(SMF),the final setting time is reduced to quarter of an hour Similar changes can also be found in the rate of exothermic hydration and hydration degree.Formulating STP with suitable addition of PC can enhance the strength,while compositing STP and NAP or SMF weakens the strength.Besides,adding STP or STP and SMF,obvious movement(more than lev)of binding energy of Ca2p1/2 and Ca2p3/2 is detected.Compared with STP addition,content of the characteristic element(P)of STP is cut down form 1.1% to 0.49% by compositing STP with SMF.Furthermore,as hydration age increases,hydration inhibition in the presence of admixtures weakens and even disappears within 56 h.

  20. Structural study and crystallography of the major compound of anhydrous cement: tri-calcium silicate; Etude structurale et cristallographie du compose majoritaire du ciment anhydre: le silicate tricalcique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noirfontaine, M.N. de

    2000-01-01

    Anhydrous (Portland) cement is mainly composed of a synthetic material, the clinker, whose major compound is tri-calcium silicate (Ca{sub 3}SiO{sub 5}), often referred as C{sub 3}S with the compact oxides notations, C = CaO et S = SiO{sub 2}. The polymorphism of C{sub 3}S, still not well known, is the main subject of the thesis. Various crystal structures (rhombohedral R, monoclinic M1, M2, M3 and triclinic T1, T2, T3) can be found, depending on temperature and impurities. The only known structures are T1, M1 and M3, involving large unit cells with an orientational disorder of silicate tetrahedra. The single crystal studies exhibit no clear relation between the various polymorphs. Starting from known results from literature single crystal experiments, we establish the metric and structural relations between the different structures. Averaged structures for the T1, M1 and M3 polymorphs are proposed, together with all the matrices of transformation between the unit cells. We also introduce new 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D structural units, which make easier the understanding of the structures of C{sub 3}S, with the result of a better description of the orientational disorder. The effects of impurities on the structure are discussed. In industrial clinkers, impurities stabilize mainly M1 and M3 monoclinic forms. We propose a space group (Pc) and two structural models (a superstructure and an approximate averaged structure) for the M1 form. All the models are validated on synthetic compounds (M3, M2, M1 et T1) and industrial clinkers analysed by X-Ray powder diffraction with Rietveld analysis. (author)

  1. Preparation and rebinding properties of protein-imprinted polysiloxane using mesoporous calcium silicate grafted non-woven polypropylene as matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Bohong; Feng, Lingzhi; Zhao, Kongyin; Wei, Junfu; Zhu, Dunwan; Zhang, Linhua; Ren, Qian

    2016-03-01

    Calcium silicate particle containing mesoporous SiO2 (CaSiO3@SiO2) was grafted on the surface of non-woven polypropylene. The PP non-woven grafted calcium silicate containing mesoporous SiO2 (PP-g-CaSiO3@SiO2) was used as the matrix to prepare bovine serum albumin (BSA) molecularly imprinted polysiloxane (MIP) by using silanes as the functional monomers and BSA as the template. PP non-woven grafted BSA-imprinted polysiloxane (PP-g-CaSiO3@SiO2 MIP) was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectometry (FTIR) and drilling string compensator (DSC). Influence factors on the rebinding capacity of the MIP were investigated, such as grafting degree, the pH in treating CaSiO3 and the type and proportion of silanes. The rebinding properties of BSA on PP-g-CaSiO3@SiO2 and MIP were investigated under different conditions. The results indicated that the rebinding capacity of MIP for BSA reached 56.32 mg/g, which was 2.65 times of NIP. The non-woven polypropylene grafted BSA-imprinted polysiloxane could recognize the template protein and the selectivity factor (β) was above 2.4 when using ovalbumin, hemoglobin and γ-globulin as control proteins. The PP-g-CaSiO3@SiO2 MIP has favorable reusability. PMID:25726930

  2. Notes on hydrated cement fractals investigated by SANS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ficker, T [Faculty of Civil Engineering, Physics Department, Technical University, Zizkova 17, CZ-602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Len, A [Budapest Neutron Centre, Konkoly Thege 29-33, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Nemec, P [Faculty of Civil Engineering, Physics Department, Technical University, Zizkova 17, CZ-602 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2007-07-07

    Hydrated cement pastes with different water-to-cement ratios have been investigated by the small-angle scattering neutron technique. Special attention has been paid to the fractal nanostructure of the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H solid gel) and its basic building particles, i.e. nanometric globules. The inner stability of these particles has been tested and shown to be sufficiently persistent to withstand all spatial regroupings of the overall nanostructure caused by variations of w/c ratios.

  3. Stabilization of ZnCl2-containing wastes using calcium sulfoaluminate cement: cement hydration, strength development and volume stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Stéphane; Cau Dit Coumes, Céline; Le Bescop, Patrick; Damidot, Denis

    2011-10-30

    The potential of calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cement was investigated to solidify and stabilize wastes containing large amounts of soluble zinc chloride (a strong inhibitor of Portland cement hydration). Hydration of pastes and mortars prepared with a 0.5 mol/L ZnCl(2) mixing solution was characterized over one year as a function of the gypsum content of the binder and the thermal history of the material. Blending the CSA clinker with 20% gypsum enabled its rapid hydration, with only very small delay compared with a reference prepared with pure water. It also improved the compressive strength of the hardened material and significantly reduced its expansion under wet curing. Moreover, the hydrates assemblage was less affected by a thermal treatment at early age simulating the temperature rise and fall occurring in a large-volume drum of cemented waste. Fully hydrated materials contained ettringite, amorphous aluminum hydroxide, strätlingite, together with AFm phases (Kuzel's salt associated with monosulfoaluminate or Friedel's salt depending on the gypsum content of the binder), and possibly C-(A)-S-H. Zinc was readily insolubilized and could not be detected in the pore solution extracted from cement pastes. PMID:21889260

  4. Preparation and characterization of bioactive and degradable composites containing ordered mesoporous calcium-magnesium silicate and poly(L-lactide)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Jiajin [Key Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced Polymeric Materials, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Dong, Xieping, E-mail: jxzhyxh@163.com [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Jiangxi People' s Hospital, Nanchang 330006 (China); Ma, Xuhui [Polymer Science (Shenzhen) New Materials Co., Ltd., Shenzhen 518101 (China); Tang, Songchao, E-mail: schtang@ecust.edu.cn [Key Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced Polymeric Materials, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Wu, Zhaoying; Xia, Ji; Wang, Quanxiang; Wang, Yutao; Wei, Jie [Key Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced Polymeric Materials, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • Mesoporous calcium-magnesium silicate and poly(L-lactide) composite was fabricated. • The composite has good hydrophilicity, in vitro degradation and bioactivity. • The composite could support cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation. - Abstract: Polylactide (PLA) and its copolymers have been widely used for bone tissue regeneration. In this study, a bioactive composite of ordered mesoporous calcium–magnesium silicate (m-CMS) and poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) was fabricated by melt blending method. The results indicated that the m-CMS particles were entrapped by polymer phase, and crystallinity of PLLA significantly decreased while the thermal stability of the m-CMS/PLLA composites was not obviously affected by addition of the m-CMS into PLLA. In addition, compared to PLLA, incorporation of the m-CMS into PLLA significantly improved the hydrophilicity, in vitro degradability and bioactivity (apatite-formation ability) of the m-CMS/PLLA composite, which were m-CMS content dependent. Moreover, it was found that incorporation of the m-CMS into PLLA could neutralize the acidic degradation by-products and thus compensated for the decrease of pH value. In cell culture experiments, the results showed that the composite enhanced attachment, proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) of MC3T3-E1 cells, which were m-CMS content dependent. The results indicated that the addition of bioactive materials to PLLA could result in a composite with improved properties of hydrophilicity, degradability, bioactivity and cytocompatibility.

  5. Preparation and characterization of bioactive and degradable composites containing ordered mesoporous calcium-magnesium silicate and poly(L-lactide)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Mesoporous calcium-magnesium silicate and poly(L-lactide) composite was fabricated. • The composite has good hydrophilicity, in vitro degradation and bioactivity. • The composite could support cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation. - Abstract: Polylactide (PLA) and its copolymers have been widely used for bone tissue regeneration. In this study, a bioactive composite of ordered mesoporous calcium–magnesium silicate (m-CMS) and poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) was fabricated by melt blending method. The results indicated that the m-CMS particles were entrapped by polymer phase, and crystallinity of PLLA significantly decreased while the thermal stability of the m-CMS/PLLA composites was not obviously affected by addition of the m-CMS into PLLA. In addition, compared to PLLA, incorporation of the m-CMS into PLLA significantly improved the hydrophilicity, in vitro degradability and bioactivity (apatite-formation ability) of the m-CMS/PLLA composite, which were m-CMS content dependent. Moreover, it was found that incorporation of the m-CMS into PLLA could neutralize the acidic degradation by-products and thus compensated for the decrease of pH value. In cell culture experiments, the results showed that the composite enhanced attachment, proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) of MC3T3-E1 cells, which were m-CMS content dependent. The results indicated that the addition of bioactive materials to PLLA could result in a composite with improved properties of hydrophilicity, degradability, bioactivity and cytocompatibility

  6. Improved model of hydrated calcium ion for molecular dynamics simulations using classical biomolecular force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jejoong; Wilson, James; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2016-10-01

    Calcium ions (Ca(2+) ) play key roles in various fundamental biological processes such as cell signaling and brain function. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been used to study such interactions, however, the accuracy of the Ca(2+) models provided by the standard MD force fields has not been rigorously tested. Here, we assess the performance of the Ca(2+) models from the most popular classical force fields AMBER and CHARMM by computing the osmotic pressure of model compounds and the free energy of DNA-DNA interactions. In the simulations performed using the two standard models, Ca(2+) ions are seen to form artificial clusters with chloride, acetate, and phosphate species; the osmotic pressure of CaAc2 and CaCl2 solutions is a small fraction of the experimental values for both force fields. Using the standard parameterization of Ca(2+) ions in the simulations of Ca(2+) -mediated DNA-DNA interactions leads to qualitatively wrong outcomes: both AMBER and CHARMM simulations suggest strong inter-DNA attraction whereas, in experiment, DNA molecules repel one another. The artificial attraction of Ca(2+) to DNA phosphate is strong enough to affect the direction of the electric field-driven translocation of DNA through a solid-state nanopore. To address these shortcomings of the standard Ca(2+) model, we introduce a custom model of a hydrated Ca(2+) ion and show that using our model brings the results of the above MD simulations in quantitative agreement with experiment. Our improved model of Ca(2+) can be readily applied to MD simulations of various biomolecular systems, including nucleic acids, proteins and lipid bilayer membranes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 752-763, 2016. PMID:27144470

  7. Effect of different concentrations of potassium silicate, nano-silicon and calcium chloride on concentration of potassium, calcium and magnesium, chlorophyll content and number of florets of Asiatic lily cv. ‘Brunello’

    OpenAIRE

    N. Mirabbasi; A. Nikbakht; N. Etemadi; M.R. Sabzalian

    2013-01-01

    Production of many cut flowers, such as lilium, is very common in Iran. Flower quality has special importance in lilium flower production process, and proper nutrition is one of the major effective factors. This research was conducted to investigate the effect of different concentrations of potassium silicate, nano-silicon and calcium chloride on concentration of potassium, calcium and magnesium, chlorophyll index and number of florets of Asiatic lily 'Brunello'. The experiment was carried ou...

  8. Effects of surface application of calcium-magnesium silicate and gypsum on soil fertility and sugarcane yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alexandre Costa Crusciol

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lime application recommendations for amendment of soil acidity in sugarcane were developed with a burnt cane harvesting system in mind. Sugarcane is now harvested in most areas without burning, and lime application for amendment of soil acidity in this system in which the sugarcane crop residue remains on the ground has been carried out without a scientific basis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in soil acidity and stalk and sugar yield with different rates of surface application of calcium, magnesium silicate, and gypsum in ratoon cane. The experiment was performed after the 3rd harvest of the variety SP 81-3250 in a commercial green sugarcane plantation of the São Luiz Sugar Mill (47º 25' 33" W; 21º 59' 46" S, located in Pirassununga, São Paulo, in southeast Brazil. A factorial arrangement of four Ca-Mg silicate rates (0, 850, 1700, and 3400 kg ha-1 and two gypsum rates (0 and 1700 kg ha-1 was used in the experiment. After 12 months, the experiment was harvested and technological measurements of stalk and sugar yield were made. After harvest, soil samples were taken at the depths of 0.00-0.05, 0.05-0.10, 0.10-0.20, 0.20-0.40, and 0.40-0.60 m in all plots, and the following determinations were made: soil pH in CaCl2, organic matter, P, S, K, Ca, Mg, H+Al, Al, Si, and base saturation. The results show that the application of gypsum reduced the exchangeable Al3+ content and Al saturation below 0.05 m, and increased the Ca2+ concentration in the whole profile, the Mg2+ content below 0.10 m, K+ below 0.4 m, and base saturation below 0.20 m. This contributed to the effect of surface application of silicate on amendment of soil acidity reaching deeper layers. From the results of this study, it may be concluded that the silicate rate recommended may be too low, since the greater rates used in this experiment showed greater reduction in soil acidity, higher levels of nutrients at greater depths and an increase in stalk and sugar

  9. Copper Silicate Hydrate Hollow Spheres Constructed by Nanotubes Encapsulated in Reduced Graphene Oxide as Long-Life Lithium-Ion Battery Anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiujuan; Tang, Chunjuan; Wang, Xuanpeng; Zhou, Liang; Wei, Qiulong; Yan, Mengyu; Sheng, Jinzhi; Hu, Ping; Wang, Bolun; Mai, Liqiang

    2015-12-01

    Hierarchical copper silicate hydrate hollow spheres-reduced graphene oxide (RGO) composite is successfully fabricated by a facile hydrothermal method using silica as in situ sacrificing template. The electrochemical performance of the composite as lithium-ion battery anode was studied for the first time. Benefiting from the synergistic effect of the hierarchical hollow structure and conductive RGO matrix, the composite exhibits excellent long-life performance and rate capability. A capacity of 890 mAh/g is achieved after 200 cycles at 200 mA/g and a capacity of 429 mAh/g is retained after 800 cycles at 1000 mA/g. The results indicate that the strategy of combining hierarchical hollow structures with conductive RGO holds the potential in addressing the volume expansion issue of high capacity anode materials.

  10. Influence of silicate anions structure on desilication in silicate-bearing sodium aluminate solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘桂华; 张闻; 齐天贵; 彭志宏; 周秋生; 李小斌

    2016-01-01

    The structural changes of silicate anions in the desilication process with the addition of calcium hydrate alumino-carbonate were studied by measuring Raman spectra, infrared spectra and corresponding second derivative spectra. The results show that the desilication ratio in the solution prepared by the addition of sodium silicate (solution-SS) is much greater than that in the solution by the addition of green liquor (solution-GL), and low alumina concentration in the sodium aluminate solutions facilitates the desilication process. It is also shown that alumino-silicate anions in the solution-GL, and Q3 polymeric silicate anions in solution-SS are predominant, respectively. In addition, increasing the concentration of silica favors respectively the formation of the alumino-silicate or the Q3 silicate anions in the solution-GL or the solution-SS. Therefore, it can be inferred that the low desilication ratio in the silicate-bearing aluminate solution is mainly attributed to the existence of alumino-silicate anions.

  11. Silicato de cálcio como amenizante da toxidez de metais pesados em mudas de eucalipto Calcium silicate to reduce heavy metal toxicity in eucalyptus seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Maria de Aguiar Accioly

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito do silicato de cálcio na redução da toxidez de metais pesados no solo para Eucalyptus camaldulensis. Foram utilizadas cinco doses de silicato de cálcio (0, 1,6, 3,2, 4,8 e 6,4 g kg-1, em solos com diferentes graus de contaminação. O experimento foi conduzido em vasos com 1,5 kg de solo, com uma muda por vaso, em esquema fatorial 4x5 (quatro graus de contaminação x cinco doses de silicato. O silicato de cálcio reduziu a toxidez de metais pesados em E.camaldulensis, retardou o aparecimento dos sintomas de toxidez e diminuiu os teores de zinco e cádmio na parte aérea das plantas. Entretanto, não evitou totalmente a depressão no crescimento, nos solos com contaminação elevada. O efeito amenizante do silicato foi crescente com o aumento das doses e mais evidente nos solos com contaminação elevada. O efeito benéfico do silicato de cálcio está relacionado à redução da transferência do zinco para a parte aérea do eucalipto.The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of calcium silicate to reduce heavy metal toxicity in Eucalyptus camaldulensis seedlings. Five doses of calcium silicate (0, 1.6, 3.2, 4.8, and 6.4 g kg-1 were used in soils with increasing levels of contamination. The experiment was carried out in pots with 1.5 kg of soil, with one plant each, in a 4x5 factorial array (four levels of contamination x five silicate doses. Calcium silicate minimized heavy metal toxicity to E.camaldulensis, delayed the onset of toxicity symptoms, and decreased zinc and cadmium shoot concentrations. However, calcium silicate did not completely overcome the depressive effect upon plant growth in soils with high metal concentrations. Calcium silicate effects increased with increasing doses and were more evident in highly contaminated soils. The beneficial effects of calcium silicate on metal toxicity were highly related to the decrease in zinc translocation to the eucalyptus shoots.

  12. Application of reference point indentation for micro-mechanical surface characterization of calcium silicate based dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonijević, Djordje; Milovanović, Petar; Riedel, Christoph; Hahn, Michael; Amling, Michael; Busse, Björn; Djurić, Marija

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to elucidate micromechanical properties of Biodentine and two experimental calcium silicate cements (CSCs) using Reference Point Indentation (RPI). Biomechanical characteristics of the cement type and the effects of a radiopacifier, liquid components, acid etching treatment and bioactivation in simulated body fluid (SBF) were investigated by measuring the microhardness, average unloading slope (Avg US) and indentation distance increase (IDI). Biodentine had a greater microhardness than the experimental CSCs, while the Avg US and IDI values were not significantly different among investigated materials. There was a statistically significant difference in microhardness and IDI values between pure CSCs and radiopacified cements (p < 0.05). Micromechanical properties were not affected by different liquid components used. Acid-etching treatment reduced Biodentine's microhardness while cements' immersion in SBF resulted in greater microhardness and higher IDI values compared to the control group. Clearly, the physiological environment and the cements' composition affect their surface micromechanical properties. The addition of calcium chloride and CSCs' immersion in SBF are beneficial for CSCs' micromechanical performance, while the addition of radiopacifiers and acid etching treatment weaken the CSCs' surface. Application of RPI aids with the characterization of micromechanical properties of synthetic materials' surfaces. PMID:26888441

  13. XANES analysis of calcium and sodium phosphates and silicates and hydroxyapatite-Bioglass (registered) 45S5 co-sintered bioceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioglass (registered) 45S5 was co-sintered with hydroxyapatite at 1200 deg. C. When small amounts (5(PO4)2SiO4 and Na3Ca6(PO4)5 in an amorphous silicate matrix respectively. These chemistries show improved bioactivity compared to hydroxyapatite and are the subject of this study. The structure of several crystalline calcium and sodium phosphates and silicates as well as the co-sintered hydroxyapatite-Bioglass (registered) 45S5 bioceramics were examined using XANES spectroscopy. The nature of the crystalline and amorphous phases were studied using silicon (Si) and phosphorus (P) K- and L2,3-edge and calcium (Ca) K-edge XANES. Si L2,3-edge spectra of sintered bioceramic compositions indicates that the primary silicates present in these compositions are sodium silicates in the amorphous state. From Si K-edge spectra, it is shown that the silicates are in a similar structural environment in all the sintered bioceramic compositions with 4-fold coordination. Using P L2,3-edge it is clearly shown that there is no evidence of sodium phosphate present in the sintered bioceramic compositions. In the P K-edge spectra, the post-edge shoulder peak at around 2155 eV indicates that this shoulder to be more defined for calcium phosphate compounds with decreasing solubility and increasing thermodynamic stability. This shoulder peak is more noticeable in hydroxyapatite and β-TCP indicating greater stability of the phosphate phase. The only spectra that does not show a noticeable peak is the composition with Na3Ca6(PO4)5 in a silicate matrix indicating that it is more soluble compared to the other compositions.

  14. Characterization of silicates and calcium carbonates applied to high-dose dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The predominant isomorphous form in the biominerals studied in this work (oyster shell, coral, mother of pearl and shell) was aragonite. The appearance of the calcite phase occurred at 500 deg C at a heating rate of 10 deg C/s for all samples except for the coral sample, which was 400 deg C, independent of the heating rate. The most abundant element in the biominerals samples was Ca in the CaO form, and in the silicates (tremolite, diopside and rhodonite) Si in the SiO form. The most common trace element observed in the biominerals samples was Fe. The analyses of electron paramagnetic resonance showed lines of Mn2+ in the coral and mother-of-pearl samples before irradiation. In the case of the irradiated samples, the defects found were CO2-, CO33-, CO3- and SO2-, in the g range between 2.0010 and 2.0062. In the analyses by optical absorption of biominerals, transitions due to the presence of Mn in the samples were found. A thermoluminescent (TL) peak at approximately 140 deg C was found for the biominerals and at 180 deg C for silicates, which intensity depends directly on the dose. For samples exposed to different types of radiation, the TL peak occurred at lower temperatures. From the dose-response curves obtained for these materials, it was possible to determine a linear range for which their application in high dose dosimetry becomes possible. Taking into account the radiation type, among biominerals and silicates, the lowest detectable dose (40mGy) to gamma radiation was achieved for oyster shell samples using the measuring technique of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). Using beta radiation, for diopside and tremolite samples the lowest detectable dose of 60mGy was obtained. For all samples, using the TL, OSL and thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE) techniques in alpha, beta and gamma radiation beans a good response reproducibility was obtained. Therefore, the samples characterized in this work are suitable to be used as high dose detectors

  15. Early-age hydration and volume change of calcium sulfoaluminate cement-based binders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaunsali, Piyush

    Shrinkage cracking is a predominant deterioration mechanism in structures with high surface-to-volume ratio. One way to allay shrinkage-induced stresses is to use calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cement whose early-age expansion in restrained condition induces compressive stress that can be utilized to counter the tensile stresses due to shrinkage. In addition to enhancing the resistance against shrinkage cracking, CSA cement also has lower carbon footprint than that of Portland cement. This dissertation aims at improving the understanding of early-age volume change of CSA cement-based binders. For the first time, interaction between mineral admixtures (Class F fly ash, Class C fly ash, and silica fume) and OPC-CSA binder was studied. Various physico-chemical factors such as the hydration of ye'elimite (main component in CSA cement), amount of ettringite (the main phase responsible for expansion in CSA cement), supersaturation with respect to ettringite in cement pore solution, total pore volume, and material stiffness were monitored to examine early-age expansion characteristics. This research validated the crystallization stress theory by showing the presence of higher supersaturation level of ettringite, and therefore, higher crystallization stress in CSA cement-based binders. Supersaturation with respect to ettringite was found to increase with CSA dosage and external supply of gypsum. Mineral admixtures (MA) altered the expansion characteristics in OPC-CSA-MA binders with fixed CSA cement. This study reports that fly ash (FA) behaves differently depending on its phase composition. The Class C FA-based binder (OPC-CSA-CFA) ceased expanding beyond two days unlike other OPC-CSA-MA binders. Three factors were found to govern expansion of CSA cement-based binders: 1) volume fraction of ettringite in given pore volume, 2) saturation level of ettringite, and 3) dynamic modulus. Various models were utilized to estimate the macroscopic tensile stress in CSA cement

  16. Influence of Calcium Sulfate State and Fineness of Cement on Hydration of Portland Cements Using Electrical Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Xiaosheng; LI Zongjin; XIAO Lianzhen; THONG Wangfai

    2006-01-01

    The influence of calcium sulfate state and fineness of cement on hydration of Portland cement was studied using electrical resistivity measurement. The bulk resistivity curve of the paste from the abnormal cement mainly with hemihydrate had a characteristic abnormal peak and rapid increase in early period. The resistivity measurement technique can be used to discriminate abnormal setting. For normal cement with gypsum, the increase in fineness of the Portland cement decreases the minimum resistivity due to a higher ionic concentration and increases the 24 hour resistivity due to a reduction in macroscopic pore size. Thesetting time, compressive strength, pore structure of pastes made from different cements were carried out to compare the influence of water to cement ratio, calcium sulfate state and fineness. It is found that the electrical and mechanical properties are strongly affected by the initial porosity, the presence of hemihydrate or gypsum, and the fineness of cement.

  17. Effects of surface application of dolomitic limestone and calcium-magnesium silicate on soybean and maize in rotation with green manure in a tropical region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Spadotti Amaral Castro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although lime is currently the material most frequently used to ameliorate soil acidity in Brazil, silicate could efficiently replace this source because of its greater solubility and its greater silicon content, which are beneficial for plant development. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of superficial lime and silicate application on soil chemical attributes as well as on soybean and maize nutrition and grain yields when these crops are grown in rotation with green manure. The experimental design was a complete randomized block with sixteen replicates. Plots were treated with one of two materials for acidity correction (dolomitic lime and calcium/magnesium silicate or with no soil correction, as a control. Silicate corrected soil acidity and increased exchangeable base levels in soil at greater depths faster than does liming. The application of both acidity-correcting materials increased N, Ca and Mg leaf concentrations, and all yield components and grain yield in soybean; but in maize, just silicate also increased N and Si when compared with lime, whereas both acidity-correcting increased just two yield components: grains per ear and mass of 100 grains, resulting in highest grain yield. The application of both acidity-correcting materials increased dry matter production of green manures, but for pigeon pea the silicate provided the best result in this dry-winter region.

  18. The Early Strength of Slag Cements with Addition of Hydrate Microcrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The effect of hydrate microcrystals such as calcium silicate hydrates (CSH) and ettringite on the early strength of slag cements was studied.The authors explored the possibility of improving the early strength of the slag cement by applying crystal seed technology.It is shown that slag crystal seeds make the early strength of the cement increased due to the action of hydrate crystal seeds,which speed up the hydration of clinker minerals in the nucleation of ettringite.Therefore,the early strength of the slag cement is obviously improved.

  19. Asymmetric hydration structure around calcium ion restricted in micropores fabricated in activated carbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkubo, Takahiro; Kusudo, Tomoko; Kuroda, Yasushige

    2016-11-01

    The adsorbed phase and hydration structure of an aqueous solution of Ca(NO3)2 restricted in micropores fabricated in activated carbons (ACs) having different average pore widths (0.63 and 1.1 nm) were investigated with the analysis of adsorption isotherms and x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra on Ca K-edge. The adsorbed density of Ca2+ per unit micropore volume in the narrower pore was higher than in the wider pore, while the adsorbed amount per unit mass of carbon with the narrower pore was half of the amount of ACs with the larger pore. On the other hand, variations in the bands assigned to double-electron (KM I) and 1s  →  3d excitations in XAFS spectra demonstrate the formation of a distorted hydration cluster around Ca2+ in the micropore, although the structural parameters of hydrated Ca2+ in the micropores were almost consistent with the bulk aqueous solution, as revealed by the analysis of extended XAFS (EXAFS) spectra. In contrast to the hydration structure of monovalent ions such as Rb+, which generally presents a dehydrated structure in smaller than 1 nm micropores in ACs, the present study clearly explains that the non-spherically-symmetric structure of hydrated Ca2+ restricted in carbon micropores whose sizes are around 1 nm is experimentally revealed where any dehydration phenomena from the first hydration shell around Ca2+ could not be observed.

  20. Effect of Additives on the Morphology of the Hydrated Product and Physical Properties of a Calcium Phosphate Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiupeng WANG; Jiandong YE; Yingjun WANG

    2008-01-01

    The morphology of a hydrated calcium phosphate cement (CPC) doped with several normally used additives was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the compressive strength of the cement was determined in this study. The hydrated products of CPC without additives was rod-like hydroxyapatite (HA) grains with around 2-5 μm in length and 100 nm in width. The addition of Sr obviously decreased the crystal size of the rod-like grains. CPCs containing carbonate, collagen and gelatin showed flake-like crystal morphology. Crylic acid-containing CPC presented flocculus-like structure. And malic acid-containing CPC exhibited oriented flake-like structure. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis showed that the additives used in this study did not alter the hydration products of the cement. The compressive strength tests indicated that the compressive strength of the cement with rod-like morphology HA crystals was much higher than that of the cement with flake-like morphology HA crystals, and the cement with oriented flake-like morphology HA crystals .exhibited the poorest compressive strength.

  1. Odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells by calcium silicate materials stimulating via FGFR/ERK signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone healing needs a complex interaction of growth factors that establishes an environment for efficient bone formation. We examine how calcium silicate (CS) and tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) cements influence the behavior of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) through fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) and active MAPK pathways, in particular ERK. The hDPCs are cultured with β-TCP and CS, after which the cells' viability and odontogenic differentiation markers are determined by using PrestoBlue® assay and western blot, respectively. The effect of small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection targeting FGFR was also evaluated. The results showed that CS promoted cell proliferation and enhances FGFR expression. It was also found that CS increases ERK and p38 activity in hDPCs, and furthermore, raises the expression and secretion of DSP, and DMP-1. Additionally, statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) have been found in the calcium deposition in si-FGFR transfection and ERK inhibitor between CS and β-TCP; these variations indicated that ERK/MAPK signaling is involved in the silicon-induced odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs. The current study shows that CS substrates play a key role in odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs through FGFR and modulate ERK/MAPK activation. - Highlights: • CS influences the behavior of hDPCs through fibroblast growth factor receptor. • CS increases ERK and p38 activity in hDPCs. • ERK/MAPK signaling is involved in the Si-induced odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs. • Ca staining shows that FGFR regulates hDPC differentiation on CS, but not on β-TCP

  2. Odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells by calcium silicate materials stimulating via FGFR/ERK signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chao-Hsin [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Hung, Chi-Jr; Huang, Tsui-Hsien [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chi-Chang [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Kao, Chia-Tze [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Shie, Ming-You, E-mail: eviltacasi@gmail.com [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-01

    Bone healing needs a complex interaction of growth factors that establishes an environment for efficient bone formation. We examine how calcium silicate (CS) and tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) cements influence the behavior of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) through fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) and active MAPK pathways, in particular ERK. The hDPCs are cultured with β-TCP and CS, after which the cells' viability and odontogenic differentiation markers are determined by using PrestoBlue® assay and western blot, respectively. The effect of small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection targeting FGFR was also evaluated. The results showed that CS promoted cell proliferation and enhances FGFR expression. It was also found that CS increases ERK and p38 activity in hDPCs, and furthermore, raises the expression and secretion of DSP, and DMP-1. Additionally, statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) have been found in the calcium deposition in si-FGFR transfection and ERK inhibitor between CS and β-TCP; these variations indicated that ERK/MAPK signaling is involved in the silicon-induced odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs. The current study shows that CS substrates play a key role in odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs through FGFR and modulate ERK/MAPK activation. - Highlights: • CS influences the behavior of hDPCs through fibroblast growth factor receptor. • CS increases ERK and p38 activity in hDPCs. • ERK/MAPK signaling is involved in the Si-induced odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs. • Ca staining shows that FGFR regulates hDPC differentiation on CS, but not on β-TCP.

  3. A nanoscale study of dissolution and growth processes in cement hydrates

    OpenAIRE

    Rheinheimer, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    This thesis aims at providing new knowledge on the, otherwise poorly known, molecular-scale mechanisms that operate during hydration of cement phases and dissolution of their hydrates. In order to pursue this objective, a novel approach has been followed, including the development of a new procedure to synthesize thin films of calcium silicates, real time characterization of grain growth and dissolution with liquid-cell atomic force microscopy, and monitoring of their chemical evolution by X-...

  4. Push-out bond strength of MTA HP, a new high-plasticity calcium silicate-based cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Emmanuel Jnl; Carvalho, Nancy Kudsi; Zanon, Mayara; Senna, Plínio Mendes; DE-Deus, Gustavo; Zuolo, Mário Luis; Zaia, Alexandre Augusto

    2016-06-14

    This study was designed to investigate the resistance to dislodgment provided by MTA HP, a new high-plasticity calcium silicate-based cement. Biodentine and White MTA Angelus were used as reference materials for comparison. Three discs 1 ± 0.1 mm thick were obtained from the middle third of the roots of 5 maxillary canines. Three 0.8-mm-wide holes were drilled on the axial surface of each root disc. Standardized irrigation was performed. Then the holes were dried with paper points and filled with one of the three tested cements. The filled dental slices were immersed in a phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution (pH 7.2) for 7 days before the push-out assessment. The Kruskal-Wallis test was applied to assess the effect of each endodontic cement on the push-out bond strength. Mann-Whitney with Bonferroni correction was used to isolate the differences. The alpha-type error was set at 0.05. All specimens had measurable push-out values and no premature failure occurred. There were significant differences among the materials (p <0.05). The Biodentine specimens had the highest push-out bond strength values (p < 0.05). MTA HP had significantly higher bond strength than White MTA (p < 0.05). MTA HP showed better push-out bond strength than its predecessor, White MTA; however, Biodentine had higher dislodgment resistance than both MTA formulations. PMID:27305515

  5. In vivo evaluation of the effects of hydraulic calcium silicate dental cements on plasma and liver aluminium levels in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirkaya, Kadriye; Can Demirdöğen, Birsen; Öncel Torun, Zeynep; Erdem, Onur; Çetinkaya, Serdar; Akay, Cemal

    2016-02-01

    Our aim was to test whether the presence of three hydraulic calcium silicate dental cements--MTA Angelus, MTA Fillapex, and Theracal LC--in the dental extraction socket of an in vivo model, would affect the levels of aluminium (Al) in the plasma and liver. Following anesthesia, the right upper incisor of each male Wistar albino rat was extracted and polyethylene tubes filled with MTA Angelus, MTA Fillapex, or Theracal LC were inserted into the depth of the extraction socket and gingival tissue was sutured. The rats were killed 7, 30, or 60 d after the operation. Blood and liver samples were obtained from the rats before they were killed, and the levels of Al were measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. Plasma Al levels were higher in the rats in which the mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) cements were implanted, especially MTA Angelus and MTA Fillapex, compared with control rats. In liver samples, however, the differences in Al level were not statistically significant. Our results show that Al might have been released into the circulation from the three dental cements tested, especially MTA Angelus and MTA Fillapex. Further research should be carried out on the possible biological effects of Al liberated from dental cements. PMID:26706154

  6. Anticorrosive effects and in vitro cytocompatibility of calcium silicate/zinc-doped hydroxyapatite composite coatings on titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong; Zhang, Honglei; Qiao, Haixia; Nian, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Xuejiao; Wang, Wendong; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Chang, Xiaotong; Han, Shuguang; Pang, Xiaofeng

    2015-12-01

    This work elucidated the corrosion resistance and cytocompatibility of electroplated Zn- and Si-containing bioactive calcium silicate/zinc-doped hydroxyapatite (ZnHA/CS) ceramic coatings on commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti). The formation of ZnHA/CS coating was investigated through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray and inductively coupled plasma analyses. The XRD image showed that the reaction layer was mainly composed of HA and CaSiO3. The fabricated ZnHA/CS coatings presented a porous structure and appropriate thickness for possible applications in orthopaedic surgery. Potentiodynamic polarization tests showed that ZnHA/CS coatings exhibited higher corrosion resistance than CP-Ti. Dissolution tests on the coating also revealed that Si4+ and Zn2+ were leached at low levels. Moreover, MC3T3-E1 cells cultured on ZnHA/CS featured improved cell morphology, adhesion, spreading, proliferation and expression of alkaline phosphatase than those cultured on HA. The high cytocompatibility of ZnHA/CS could be mainly attributed to the combination of micro-porous surface effects and ion release (Zn2+ and Si4+). All these results indicate that ZnHA/CS composite-coated CP-Ti may be a potential material for orthopaedic applications.

  7. Push-out bond strength of MTA HP, a new high-plasticity calcium silicate-based cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Emmanuel Jnl; Carvalho, Nancy Kudsi; Zanon, Mayara; Senna, Plínio Mendes; DE-Deus, Gustavo; Zuolo, Mário Luis; Zaia, Alexandre Augusto

    2016-06-14

    This study was designed to investigate the resistance to dislodgment provided by MTA HP, a new high-plasticity calcium silicate-based cement. Biodentine and White MTA Angelus were used as reference materials for comparison. Three discs 1 ± 0.1 mm thick were obtained from the middle third of the roots of 5 maxillary canines. Three 0.8-mm-wide holes were drilled on the axial surface of each root disc. Standardized irrigation was performed. Then the holes were dried with paper points and filled with one of the three tested cements. The filled dental slices were immersed in a phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution (pH 7.2) for 7 days before the push-out assessment. The Kruskal-Wallis test was applied to assess the effect of each endodontic cement on the push-out bond strength. Mann-Whitney with Bonferroni correction was used to isolate the differences. The alpha-type error was set at 0.05. All specimens had measurable push-out values and no premature failure occurred. There were significant differences among the materials (p Biodentine specimens had the highest push-out bond strength values (p Biodentine had higher dislodgment resistance than both MTA formulations.

  8. Biological Assessment of a Calcium Silicate Incorporated Hydroxyapatite-Gelatin Nanocomposite: A Comparison to Decellularized Bone Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Joon Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Our laboratory utilized biomimicry to develop a synthetic bone scaffold based on hydroxyapatite-gelatin-calcium silicate (HGCS. Here, we evaluated the potential of HGCS scaffold in bone formation in vivo using the rat calvarial critical-sized defect (CSD. Twelve Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to four groups: control (defect only, decellularized bone matrix (DECBM, and HGCS with and without multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs. DECBM was prepared by removing all the cells using SDS and NH4OH. After 12 weeks, the CSD specimens were harvested to evaluate radiographical, histological, and histomorphometrical outcomes. The in vitro osteogenic effects of the materials were studied by focal adhesion, MTS, and alizarin red. Micro-CT analysis indicated that the DECBM and the HGCS scaffold groups developed greater radiopaque areas than the other groups. Bone regeneration, assessed using histological analysis and fluorochrome labeling, was the highest in the HGCS scaffold seeded with MAPCs. The DECBM group showed limited osteoinductivity, causing a gap between the implant and host tissue. The group grafted with HGCS+MAPCs resulting in twice as much new bone formation seems to indicate a role for effective bone regeneration. In conclusion, the novel HGCS scaffold could improve bone regeneration and is a promising carrier for stem cell-mediated bone regeneration.

  9. Biological assessment of a calcium silicate incorporated hydroxyapatite-gelatin nanocomposite: a comparison to decellularized bone matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Joon; Padilla, Ricardo; Zhang, He; Hu, Wei-Shou; Ko, Ching-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Our laboratory utilized biomimicry to develop a synthetic bone scaffold based on hydroxyapatite-gelatin-calcium silicate (HGCS). Here, we evaluated the potential of HGCS scaffold in bone formation in vivo using the rat calvarial critical-sized defect (CSD). Twelve Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to four groups: control (defect only), decellularized bone matrix (DECBM), and HGCS with and without multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs). DECBM was prepared by removing all the cells using SDS and NH4OH. After 12 weeks, the CSD specimens were harvested to evaluate radiographical, histological, and histomorphometrical outcomes. The in vitro osteogenic effects of the materials were studied by focal adhesion, MTS, and alizarin red. Micro-CT analysis indicated that the DECBM and the HGCS scaffold groups developed greater radiopaque areas than the other groups. Bone regeneration, assessed using histological analysis and fluorochrome labeling, was the highest in the HGCS scaffold seeded with MAPCs. The DECBM group showed limited osteoinductivity, causing a gap between the implant and host tissue. The group grafted with HGCS+MAPCs resulting in twice as much new bone formation seems to indicate a role for effective bone regeneration. In conclusion, the novel HGCS scaffold could improve bone regeneration and is a promising carrier for stem cell-mediated bone regeneration. PMID:25054149

  10. Beneficial use of a cell coupling rheometry, conductimetry, and calorimetry to investigate the early age hydration of calcium sulfo-aluminate cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A specific cell was designed to monitor simultaneously the evolution of the viscoelastic properties, electrical conductivity, and temperature of a cement paste with ongoing hydration. Hydration of calcium sulfo-aluminate cement by demineralized water or by a borated solution was then investigated as an example. Borate anions acted as set retarders but to a smaller extent than with ordinary Portland cement. The delay in cement hydration resulted from the precipitation of an amorphous or poorly crystallized calcium borate, which also caused a rapid stiffening (and thus a loss of workability) of the paste after mixing. The gypsum content of the CSA cement was shown to play a key role in the control of the cement reactivity. (authors)

  11. Using calcium silicate to regulate the physicochemical and biological properties when using β-tricalcium phosphate as bone cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Chia-Tze; Huang, Tsui-Hsien [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yi-Jyun [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Dental Department, Taichung Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Hung, Chi-Jr [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chi-Chang, E-mail: chichang31@gmail.com [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Shie, Ming-You, E-mail: eviltacasi@gmail.com [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-01

    β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is an osteoconductive material. For this research we have combined it with a low degradation calcium silicate (CS) to enhance its bioactive and osteostimulative properties. To check its effectiveness, a series of β-TCP/CS composites with different ratios were prepared to make new bioactive and biodegradable biocomposites for bone repair. Regarding the formation of bone-like apatite, the diametral tensile strength as well as the ion release and weight loss of composites were compared both before and after immersions in simulated body fluid (SBF). In addition, we also examined the behavior of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured on β-TCP/CS composites. The results show that the apatite deposition ability of the β-TCP/CS composites improves as the CS content is increased. For composites with more than a 60% CS content, the samples become completely covered by a dense bone-like apatite layer. At the end of the immersion period, weight losses of 24%, 32%, 34%, 38%, 41%, and 45% were observed for the composites containing 0%, 20%, 40%, 80%, 80% and 100% β-TCP cements, respectively. In addition, the antibacterial activity of CS/β-TCP composite improves as the CS-content is increased. In vitro cell experiments show that the CS-rich composites promote human dental pulp cell (hDPC) proliferation and differentiation. However, when the CS quantity in the composite is less than 60%, the quantity of cells and osteogenesis protein of hDPCs is stimulated by Si released from the β-TCP/CS composites. The degradation of β-TCP and the osteogenesis of CS give strong reason to believe that these calcium-based composite cements will prove to be effective bone repair materials. - Highlights: • CS improved the physicochemical properties and osteogenic activity of β-TCP. • Higher CS in the composite, the shorter setting time and the higher DTS was found. • With a CS more than 40%, the osteogenesis and angiogenesis proteins were promoted by

  12. Using calcium silicate to regulate the physicochemical and biological properties when using β-tricalcium phosphate as bone cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is an osteoconductive material. For this research we have combined it with a low degradation calcium silicate (CS) to enhance its bioactive and osteostimulative properties. To check its effectiveness, a series of β-TCP/CS composites with different ratios were prepared to make new bioactive and biodegradable biocomposites for bone repair. Regarding the formation of bone-like apatite, the diametral tensile strength as well as the ion release and weight loss of composites were compared both before and after immersions in simulated body fluid (SBF). In addition, we also examined the behavior of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured on β-TCP/CS composites. The results show that the apatite deposition ability of the β-TCP/CS composites improves as the CS content is increased. For composites with more than a 60% CS content, the samples become completely covered by a dense bone-like apatite layer. At the end of the immersion period, weight losses of 24%, 32%, 34%, 38%, 41%, and 45% were observed for the composites containing 0%, 20%, 40%, 80%, 80% and 100% β-TCP cements, respectively. In addition, the antibacterial activity of CS/β-TCP composite improves as the CS-content is increased. In vitro cell experiments show that the CS-rich composites promote human dental pulp cell (hDPC) proliferation and differentiation. However, when the CS quantity in the composite is less than 60%, the quantity of cells and osteogenesis protein of hDPCs is stimulated by Si released from the β-TCP/CS composites. The degradation of β-TCP and the osteogenesis of CS give strong reason to believe that these calcium-based composite cements will prove to be effective bone repair materials. - Highlights: • CS improved the physicochemical properties and osteogenic activity of β-TCP. • Higher CS in the composite, the shorter setting time and the higher DTS was found. • With a CS more than 40%, the osteogenesis and angiogenesis proteins were promoted by

  13. Preparation and Evaluation of Solid Dispersion Tablets by a Simple and Manufacturable Wet Granulation Method Using Porous Calcium Silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Yumi; Hirai, Nobuaki; Takatani-Nakase, Tomoka; Takahashi, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare and evaluate solid dispersion tablets containing a poorly water-soluble drug using porous calcium silicate (PCS) by a wet granulation method. Nifedipine (NIF) was used as the model poorly water-soluble drug. Solid dispersion tablets were prepared with the wet granulation method using ethanol and water by a high-speed mixer granulator. The binder and disintegrant were selected from 7 and 4 candidates, respectively. The dissolution test was conducted using the JP 16 paddle method. The oral absorption of NIF was studied in fasted rats. Xylitol and crospovidone were selected as the binder and disintegrant, respectively. The dissolution rates of NIF from solid dispersion formulations were markedly enhanced compared with NIF powder and physical mixtures. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) confirmed the reduced crystallinity of NIF in the solid dispersion formulations. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) showed the physical interaction between NIF and PCS in the solid dispersion formulations. NIF is present in an amorphous state in granules prepared by the wet granulation method using water. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) and peak concentration (C(max)) values of NIF after dosing rats with the solid dispersion granules were significantly greater than those after dosing with NIF powder. The solid dispersion formulations of NIF prepared with PCS using the wet granulation method exhibited accelerated dissolution rates and superior oral bioavailability. This method is very simple, and may be applicable to the development of other poorly water-soluble drugs.

  14. Hydrothermal synthesis and characterization of Si and Sr co-substituted hydroxyapatite nanowires using strontium containing calcium silicate as precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the absence of any organic surfactants and solvents, the silicon (Si) and strontium (Sr) co-substituted hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, Si/Sr-HAp] nanowires were synthesized via hydrothermal treatment of the Sr-containing calcium silicate (Sr-CS) powders as the precursors in trisodium phosphate (Na3PO4) aqueous solution. The morphology, phase, chemical compositions, lattice constants and the degradability of the products were characterized. The Si/Sr-HAp nanowires with diameter of about 60 nm and up to 2 μm in length were obtained after hydrothermal treatment of the Sr-CS precursors. The Sr and Si substitution amount of the HAp nanowires could be well regulated by facile tailoring the Sr substitution level of the precursors and the reaction ratio of the precursor/solution, respectively. The SiO4 tetrahedra and Sr2+ ions occupied the crystal sites of the HAp, and the lattice constants increased apparently with the increase of the substitution amount. EDS mapping also suggested the uniform distribution of Si and Sr in the synthetic nanowires. Moreover, the Si/Sr-substitution apparently improved the degradability of the HAp materials. Our study suggested that the precursor transformation method provided a facile approach to synthesize the Si/Sr co-substituted HAp nanowires with controllable substitution amount, and the synthetic Si/Sr-HAp nanowires might be used as bioactive materials for hard tissue regeneration applications. - Highlights: • Si/Sr-HAp nanowires were hydrothermally transformed from Srx-CaSiO3 precursors. • The Si/Sr-substitution level could be facilely regulated. • The nanowire-like morphology and composition could be simultaneously regulated

  15. Preparation and luminescence characteristics of Eu-doped calcium chloride silicate Ca7Si2O8Cl6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Ca7Si2O8Cl6: Eu prepared in a reducing atmosphere contains Eu2+ and Eu3+ centers. • With increasing Eu-doping Eu2+ emission decrease and Eu3+ f–f transitions increase. • Luminescence color can be tunable Upon an excitation with near UV-light. • QE of Ca7Si2O8Cl6: 0.04Eu is 47.5% under excitation of 390 nm. -- Abstract: Eu-activated (0.1–5.0 mol%) calcium chloride silicate Ca7Si2O8Cl6 phosphors were prepared by means of ceramic method, which were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction and SEM measurements. The luminescence properties were investigated by the photoluminescence excitation and emission spectra, the luminescence decay lifetimes, the color coordinates and the internal quantum efficiency. Ca7Si2O8Cl6:Eu contains two kinds of Eu-emission centers, i.e., Eu2+ and Eu3+ ions, even it was prepared in a reducing atmosphere. Eu2+ and Eu3+ ions which present the characteristic broad band (5d → 4f) and narrow 4f → 4f luminescent features, respectively. The luminescence mechanism was discussed by analyzing the spectra, concentration-dependent emission intensity and lifetimes. With increasing Eu-doping, the energy transfer happens from Eu2+ to Eu3+ centers. Upon an excitation with near UV light, the luminescence color can be tunable from green to orange with increasing the Eu-doping because of the changes of the luminescence components from Eu3+ and Eu2+ ions in Ca7Si2O8Cl6 host. This is a potential phosphor combining both luminescence effects of Eu2+ and Eu3+ ions

  16. Different response of osteoblastic cells to Mg(2+), Zn(2+) and Sr(2+) doped calcium silicate coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dandan; Li, Kai; Xie, Youtao; Pan, Houhua; Zhao, Jun; Huang, Liping; Zheng, Xuebin

    2016-03-01

    Mg(2+), Zn(2+) and Sr(2+) substitution for Ca(2+) in plasma sprayed calcium silicate (Ca-Si) coatings have been reported to impede their degradation in physiological environment and, more importantly, to improve their biological performance. The reason for the improved biological performance is still elusive and, especially, the contribution of the dopant ions is lack of obvious and direct evidence. In this study, we aim to identify the effect of Mg(2+), Zn(2+) and Sr(2+) incorporation on the osteogenic ability of Ca-Si based coatings (Ca2MgSi2O7, Ca2ZnSi2O7 and Sr-CaSiO3) by minimizing the influence of Ca and Si ions release and surface physical properties. Similar surface morphology, crystallinity and roughness were achieved for all samples by optimizing the spray parameters. As expected, Ca and Si ions release from all the coatings showed the comparable concentration with immersing time. The response of MC3T3-E1 cells onto Mg(2+), Zn(2+) and Sr(2+) doped Ca-Si coatings were studied in terms of osteoblastic adhesion, proliferation, differentiation and mineralization. The results showed that the level of cell adhesion and proliferation increased the most on the surface of Mg-modified coating. Gene expressions of early markers of osteoblast differentiation (COL-I and ALP mRNA) were obviously improved on Zn-modified coating. Gene expressions of later markers for osteoblast differentiation (OPN and OC mRNA) and mineralized nodules formation were obviously accelerated on the surface of Sr-modified coating. Since Mg(2+), Zn(2+) and Sr(2+) play a regulatory role in different stages of osteogenesis, it may be possible to utilize this in the development of new coating materials for orthopedic application. PMID:26787488

  17. Preparation and Evaluation of Solid Dispersion Tablets by a Simple and Manufacturable Wet Granulation Method Using Porous Calcium Silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Yumi; Hirai, Nobuaki; Takatani-Nakase, Tomoka; Takahashi, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare and evaluate solid dispersion tablets containing a poorly water-soluble drug using porous calcium silicate (PCS) by a wet granulation method. Nifedipine (NIF) was used as the model poorly water-soluble drug. Solid dispersion tablets were prepared with the wet granulation method using ethanol and water by a high-speed mixer granulator. The binder and disintegrant were selected from 7 and 4 candidates, respectively. The dissolution test was conducted using the JP 16 paddle method. The oral absorption of NIF was studied in fasted rats. Xylitol and crospovidone were selected as the binder and disintegrant, respectively. The dissolution rates of NIF from solid dispersion formulations were markedly enhanced compared with NIF powder and physical mixtures. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) confirmed the reduced crystallinity of NIF in the solid dispersion formulations. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) showed the physical interaction between NIF and PCS in the solid dispersion formulations. NIF is present in an amorphous state in granules prepared by the wet granulation method using water. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) and peak concentration (C(max)) values of NIF after dosing rats with the solid dispersion granules were significantly greater than those after dosing with NIF powder. The solid dispersion formulations of NIF prepared with PCS using the wet granulation method exhibited accelerated dissolution rates and superior oral bioavailability. This method is very simple, and may be applicable to the development of other poorly water-soluble drugs. PMID:27039831

  18. The synergistic effects of CO2 laser treatment with calcium silicate cement of antibacterial, osteogenesis and cementogenesis efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, T.-T.; Kao, C.-T.; Chen, Y.-W.; Huang, T.-H.; Yang, J.-J.; Shie, M.-Y.

    2015-05-01

    Calcium silicate-based material (CS) has been successfully used in dental clinical applications. Some researches show that the antibacterial effects of CO2 laser irradiation are highly efficient when bacteria are embedded in biofilm, due to a photo-thermal mechanism. The purpose of this study was to confirm the effects of CO2 laser irradiation on CS, with regard to both material characterization and human periodontal ligament cell (hPDLs) viability. CS was irradiated with a dental CO2 laser using directly mounted fiber optics in wound healing mode with a spot area of 0.25 cm2, and then stored in an incubator at 100% relative humidity and 37 °C for 1 d to set. The hPDLs cultured on CS were analyzed, along with their proliferation and odontogenic differentiation behaviors. The results indicate that the CO2 laser irradiation increased the amount of Ca and Si ions released from the CS, and regulated cell behavior. CO2 laser-irradiated CS promoted cementogenic differentiation of hPDLs, with the increased formation of mineralized nodules on the substrate’s surface. It also up-regulated the protein expression of multiple markers of cementogenic and the expression of cementum attachment protein. The current study provides new and important data about the effects of CO2 laser irradiation on CS. Taking cell functions into account, the Si concentration released from CS with laser irradiated may be lower than a critical value, and this information could lead to the development of new regenerative therapies for dentin and periodontal tissue.

  19. Effects of graphene plates’ adoption on the microstructure, mechanical properties, and in vivo biocompatibility of calcium silicate coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie YT

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Youtao Xie, Hongqin Li, Chuanxian Ding, Xuebin Zheng, Kai Li Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Key Laboratory of Inorganic Coating Materials, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Calcium silicate (CS ceramic is a good coating candidate for biomedical implants to improve biocompatibility and accelerate early osseo-integration. However, the poor fracture toughness and wear resistance of this ceramic material restricts the long-term performance of implants. In this study, graphene plates (GPs were used as reinforcement to improve the mechanical properties of CS coating. Composite coating containing 1.5 weight % GPs was prepared by vacuum plasma spraying technology. The good survival of the GPs in the composite coating was demonstrated by Raman analysis, although the defects of the GPs were increased after plasma spraying. Effects of the GPs’ adoption on the microstructure of the coating were studied by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Results showed that the GPs were homogenously distributed in the CS grains interface or enwrapped on the particles, and exhibited good wetting behavior with the CS matrix. The wear properties of the composite coating were obviously enhanced by the reinforcement of GPs. The reinforcement mechanism was attributed to the enhanced micro-hardness and interfacial bonding of the particles in the coating. In vivo experiments demonstrated that the composite coating possessed similarly good biocompatibility compared to pure CS coating. The bone-implant contact ratio reached 84.3%±7.4% for GPs/CS coating and 79.6%±9.4% for CS coating after 3 months’ implantation.Keywords: graphene plates, coating, microstructure, wear resistance, biocompatibility

  20. XANES analysis of calcium and sodium phosphates and silicates and hydroxyapatite-Bioglass (registered) 45S5 co-sintered bioceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirkiran, Hande [Graduate Student, Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX (United States); Hu Yongfeng; Zuin, Lucia [Beamline Scientist, Canadian Light Source, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Appathurai, Narayana [Beamline Scientist, Synchrotron Radiation Center, Madison, WI (United States); Aswath, Pranesh B., E-mail: aswath@uta.edu [Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX (United States)

    2011-03-12

    Bioglass (registered) 45S5 was co-sintered with hydroxyapatite at 1200 deg. C. When small amounts (< 5 wt.%) of Bioglass (registered) 45S5 was added it behaved as a sintering aid and also enhanced the decomposition of hydroxyapatite to {beta}-tricalcium phosphate. However when 10 wt.% and 25 wt.% Bioglass (registered) 45S5 was used it resulted in the formation of Ca{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Na{sub 3}Ca{sub 6}(PO{sub 4}){sub 5} in an amorphous silicate matrix respectively. These chemistries show improved bioactivity compared to hydroxyapatite and are the subject of this study. The structure of several crystalline calcium and sodium phosphates and silicates as well as the co-sintered hydroxyapatite-Bioglass (registered) 45S5 bioceramics were examined using XANES spectroscopy. The nature of the crystalline and amorphous phases were studied using silicon (Si) and phosphorus (P) K- and L{sub 2,3}-edge and calcium (Ca) K-edge XANES. Si L{sub 2,3}-edge spectra of sintered bioceramic compositions indicates that the primary silicates present in these compositions are sodium silicates in the amorphous state. From Si K-edge spectra, it is shown that the silicates are in a similar structural environment in all the sintered bioceramic compositions with 4-fold coordination. Using P L{sub 2,3}-edge it is clearly shown that there is no evidence of sodium phosphate present in the sintered bioceramic compositions. In the P K-edge spectra, the post-edge shoulder peak at around 2155 eV indicates that this shoulder to be more defined for calcium phosphate compounds with decreasing solubility and increasing thermodynamic stability. This shoulder peak is more noticeable in hydroxyapatite and {beta}-TCP indicating greater stability of the phosphate phase. The only spectra that does not show a noticeable peak is the composition with Na{sub 3}Ca{sub 6}(PO{sub 4}){sub 5} in a silicate matrix indicating that it is more soluble compared to the other compositions.

  1. The effects of citric acid on the hydration of calcium phosphate cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Hong-lian; YAN Yu-hua; WANG You-fa; LI Shi-pu

    2001-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION Calcium phosphate cements (CPC) overcome the practical disadvantages of blocks or granulesl can be handled as a paste and sit in situ. Their structure and composition close to that of HAP make them biocompatible materials. 2 The conventional calcium phosphate cement had some problems such as long setting time (30~60 min) and low compressive strength, etc. In our system, an α-TCP/TTCP powder mixture was mixed with water containing citric acid to control the setting time and compressive strength. In this paper, the effects of various concentration citric acid solutions on the properties of the cement are reported.

  2. Effect of different retarders on the hydration of calcium sulfoaluminate eco-cement pastes

    OpenAIRE

    García-Maté, Marta; De la Torre, Ángeles G.; Aranda, Miguel A. G.; Santacruz, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    The manufacture of Calcium SulfoAluminate (CSA) cements is more environmentally friendly than that of OPC [1] as their production releases up to 40% less CO2 than the latter. The main performances of CSA cements are fast setting time, good-chemical resistance properties and high early strengths. CSA cements are prepared by mixing CSA clinker with different amounts of a calcium sulfate set regulator such as gypsum (CaSO4•2H2O), bassanite (CaSO4•½H2O), or anhydrite (CaSO4), or mixtures of th...

  3. MODIFICATION OF PRECIPITATED CALCIUM CARBONATE FILLER USING SODIUM SILICATE/ZINC CHLORIDE BASED MODIFIERS TO IMPROVE ACID-RESISTANCE AND USE OF THE MODIFIED FILLER IN PAPERMAKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Shen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the acid-resistant property of papermaking grade precipitated calcium carbonate filler and to obtain modified filler in powder form, sodium silicate/zinc chloride based modifiers were used in filler modification, and the use of modified filler in papermaking of deinked pulp derived from recycled newspaper was also preliminarily investigated. Under the preliminarily optimized experimental conditions, when sodium silicate, zinc chloride, sodium hexametaphosphate, and phosphoric acid with dosages of 10 wt%, 3 wt%, 1 wt% and 0.2 wt%, respectively, were used as modifiers, and when the temperature, aging time, and PCC concentration during the filler modification process was 70 oC, 7 h and 9.1 wt%, respectively, the acid-resistant property of filler was significantly improved after modification, as evaluated using alum consumption and pH methods. The use of modified precipitated calcium carbonate filler prepared under the optimized conditions provided considerably more brightness and light scattering improvement in comparison to unmodified filler, and filler modification was found to have only negligible influence on tensile and burst strength of the paper, air permeability of the paper, and retention performance of the filler. Surface analysis of the modified filler using XPS and SEM confirmed the occurring of surface encapsulation and modification of precipitated calcium carbonate filler when the relevant modifiers were used in filler modification. The encapsulating effect of modifiers on filler was thought to be favorable to improvement in acid-resistant property, and optical properties of the filled paper.

  4. In situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction study of the early hydration of α-tricalcium phosphate/tricalcium silicate composite bone cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morejon-Alonso, Loreley; Correa, Jose Raul, E-mail: lmorejon@fq.uh.cu [Departamento de Quimica General, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de La Habana, UH (Cuba); Motisuke, Mariana [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Carrodeguas, Raul Garcia [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Laboratorio de Avaliacao e Desenvolvimento de Biomateriais do Nordeste; Santos, Luis Alberto dos [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Departamento de Materiais

    2015-01-15

    Bioactivity, osteogenicity and mechanical properties of α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) based phosphates cements can be improved by adding tricalcium silicate (C{sub 3}S); however, the addition of C{sub 3}S delays the precipitation and growth of calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA). Thus, the aim of this work was the study of in situ setting reaction of α-TCP/C{sub 3}S composite bone cement under high energy X-ray generated by a synchrotron source within the first 72h. The results showed that the addition of C{sub 3}S induces the precipitation of nanosized CDHA at early times depending on the added content. Calculated crystallite sizes showed that the higher the content of C{sub 3}S, the smaller the crystal size at the beginning of the precipitation. These results are different from those obtained by conventional XRD method, suggesting that the proposed technique is a powerful tool in determining the composition and extent of reaction of CPCs surfaces in real time. (author)

  5. Calcium sulfoaluminate (Ye'elimite) hydration in the presence of gypsum, calcite, and vaterite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargis, Craig W. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Telesca, Antonio [School of Engineering, University of Basilicata, Potenza (Italy); Monteiro, Paulo J.M., E-mail: monteiro@ce.berkeley.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Six calcium sulfoaluminate-based cementitious systems composed of calcium sulfoaluminate, calcite, vaterite, and gypsum were cured as pastes and mortars for 1, 7, 28 and 84 days. Pastes were analyzed with X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses. Mortars were tested for compressive strength, dimensional stability and setting time. Furthermore, pastes with a water/cementitious material mass ratio of 0.80 were tested for heat evolution during the first 48 h by means of isothermal conduction calorimetry. It has been found that: (1) both calcite and vaterite reacted with monosulfoaluminate to give monocarboaluminate and ettringite, with vaterite being more reactive; (2) gypsum lowered the reactivity of both carbonates; (3) expansion was reduced by calcite and vaterite, irrespective of the presence of gypsum; and (4) both carbonates increased compressive strength in the absence of gypsum and decreased compressive strength less in the presence of gypsum, with vaterite's action more effective than that of calcite.

  6. Effect of addition of nano-hydroxyapatite on physico-chemical and antibiofilm properties of calcium silicate cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    GUERREIRO-TANOMARU, Juliane Maria; VÁZQUEZ-GARCÍA, Fernando Antonio; BOSSO-MARTELO, Roberta; BERNARDI, Maria Inês Basso; FARIA, Gisele; TANOMARU, Mario

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) is a calcium silicate cement composed of Portland cement (PC) and bismuth oxide. Hydroxyapatite has been incorporated to enhance mechanical and biological properties of dental materials. This study evaluated physicochemical and mechanical properties and antibiofilm activity of MTA and PC associated with zirconium oxide (ZrO2) and hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (HAn). Material and Methods White MTA (Angelus, Brazil); PC (70%)+ZrO2 (30%); PC (60%)+ZrO2 (30%)+HAn (10%); PC (50%)+ZrO2 (30%)+HAn (20%) were evaluated. The pH was assessed by a digital pH-meter and solubility by mass loss. Setting time was evaluated by using Gilmore needles. Compressive strength was analyzed by mechanical test. Samples were radiographed alongside an aluminum step wedge to evaluate radiopacity. For the antibiofilm evaluation, materials were placed in direct contact with E. faecalis biofilm induced on dentine blocks. The number of colony-forming units (CFU mL-1) in the remaining biolfilm was evaluated. The results were submitted to ANOVA and the Tukey test, with 5% significance. Results There was no difference in pH levels of PC+ZrO2, PC+ZrO2+HAn (10%) and PC+ZrO2+HAn (20%) (p>0.05) and these cements presented higher pH levels than MTA (p<0.05). The highest solubility was observed in PC+ZrO2+HAn (10%) and PC+ZrO2+HAn (20%) (p<0.05). MTA had the shortest initial setting time (p<0.05). All the materials showed radiopacity higher than 3 mmAl. PC+ZrO2 and MTA had the highest compressive strength (p<0.05). Materials did not completely neutralize the bacterial biofilm, but the association with HAn provided greater bacterial reduction than MTA and PC+ZrO2 (p<0.05) after the post-manipulation period of 2 days. Conclusions The addition of HAn to PC associated with ZrO2 harmed the compressive strength and solubility. On the other hand, HAn did not change the pH and the initial setting time, but improved the radiopacity (HAn 10%), the final setting time

  7. Early age hydration of calcium sulfoaluminate (synthetic ye'elimite, ) in the presence of gypsum and varying amounts of calcium hydroxide

    KAUST Repository

    Hargis, Craig W.

    2013-06-01

    Suspensions of synthetic ye\\'elimite (C4A3S̄) in a saturated gypsum (CS̄H2) and calcium hydroxide (CH) solution were examined in-situ in a wet cell by soft X-ray transmission microscopy and ex-situ by scanning electron microscopy. The most voluminous hydration product observed was ettringite. Ettringite commonly displayed acicular, filiform, reticulated, and stellate crystal habits. Additionally, pastes with C 4A3S̄, 15% CS̄H2, and varying amounts of CH were prepared and examined with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and isothermal calorimetry. The XRD experiments showed that increasing CH content caused more solid solution (SO4 2 -/OH-) AFm phases to form at early ages (< 1 d) and more monosulfate to form at later ages (> 1 d). Calorimetry indicated that the increased production of solid solution AFm was accompanied with an increase in the initial (< 30 min) rate of heat evolution, and increasing CH generally reduced the time till the second maximum rate of heat evolution due to the formation of ettringite and monosulfate. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Study on activity evaluation of activated coal-gangue and the hydration process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Chemical compositions, mineral compositions and the activated mechanism of the coal-gangue were analyzed. And pozzolana activities of the coal-gangue were evaluated after activated. Moreover, hydration heat and hydration compositions of activated coal-gangue-calcium oxide system, as well as hydration degree and hardened paste microstructures of activated coal-gangue-cement system were studied. Results show that pozzolana activities of the activated coal-gangue root in amorphous SiO2 and activated Al2 O3. With the exciting of gypsum, the reaction of activated coal-gangue and Ca(OH)2 would produce hydration products as ettringite, calcium silicate hydrate, and calcium aluminate. The relationship between the curing age and the content of Ca(OH)2 in coal-gangue-cement system was ascertained. Unhydrated particles in the coal-gangue-cement paste were more than that in the neat cement paste at the same hydration periods, and even existed at the later stage of hydration. Furthermore, the activated coal-gangue could inhibit growth and gathering of the calcium oxide crystal, and improve the structure of hardened cement paste.

  9. SIMULTANEOUS CONTROL OF HGO, SO2, AND NOX BY NOVEL OXIDIZED CALCIUM-BASED SORBENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper gives results of an investigation of two classes of calcium (Ca)-based sorbents (hydrated limes and silicate compounds). (NOTE: Efforts to develop multipollutant control strategies have demonstrated that adding certain oxidants to different classes of Ca-based sorbents...

  10. SIMULTANEOUS CONTROL OF HG(0), SO2, AND NOX BY NOVEL OXIDIZED CALCIUM-BASED SORBENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper gives results of an investigation of two classes of calcium (Ca)-based sorbents (hydrated limes and silicate compounds). {NOTE: Efforts to develop multipollutant control strategies have demonstrated that adding certain oxidants to different classes of Ca-based sorbents ...

  11. Tunable luminescence and white light emission of novel multiphase sodium calcium silicate nanophosphors doped with Ce3+, Tb3+, and Mn2+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reports the sol–gel synthesis of sodium calcium multiphase silicate (SCMS) nanophosphors. X-ray powder diffraction indicated the crystallization of devitrite (Na2Ca3Si6O16), wollastonite-2M (CaSiO3), and cristobalite (SiO2) phases that consistently occurred together upon repeated syntheses. The multiphase silicate system was used as a host matrix for varied concentrations of Ce3+, Tb3+, and Mn2+ dopant ions which resulted in tunable photoluminescence. A broad violet/UV emission band of Ce3+ (350–425 nm) combined with blue-green emissions of Tb3+ (488 and 545 nm) and a yellow-orange emission of Mn2+ (560 nm) resulted in the observance of white light (x=0.31, y=0.32, TC=6624 K) under midwave UV excitation (300–340 nm). Energy transfer from Ce3+→Tb3+ and Ce3+→Mn2+ was confirmed by steady state and time-resolved emission spectra, lifetime, and quantum yield measurements. The structural properties, morphology, and elemental composition of the nanophosphors were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). -- Highlights: • White light-emitting multiphase silicate nanophosphors were prepared for the first time. • Multiple crystalline silicate phases were reproduced consistently by repeated syntheses. • Energy transfer from Ce3+→Tb3+ and Ce3+→Mn2+ was confirmed by PL, lifetime, and QY measurements

  12. 次氯酸钙对水合物中甲烷储气量的影响%Methane Storage via Hydrate Formation Using Calcium Hypochlorite as Additive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭彦坤; 樊栓狮; 郭开华; 石磊; 陈勇

    2002-01-01

    @@ 1 INTRODUCTION At present,natural gas accounts for 3% of the total energy consumption in China.It will go up to 5% in 2005 and 8% in 2010. Natural gas storage is a subject of great interest to many industries and particularly to transportation.Compressed natural gas,liquefied natural gas and adsorbed natural gas are techniques widely used.The possibility of developing a convenient storage system based on hydrate has been explored for about ten years around the world[1-5].Gudmundsson[1] has focused on the storage and transportation of gas as hydrate at atmospheric pressure since 1990.Khokhar[2] used 1,3-dimethylcyclohexane and polyvinyl-pyrrolidone as additives to lower hydrate formation pressure. Saito[3] surveyed the effects of tetrahydrofuran and acetone.Rogers[3] used sodium dodecyl sulfate as accelerator to natural gas hydrate formation. In this work,the effects of calcium hypochlorite on hydrate formation are investigated.The data show that it can lower the degree of supercooling and enhance the relative cage occupancy.

  13. Effects of two fast-setting calcium-silicate cements on cell viability and angiogenic factor release in human pulp-derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chooryung J; Kim, Euiseong; Song, Minju; Park, Jeong-Won; Shin, Su-Jung

    2016-05-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is considered a pulp-capping agent of choice, but has the drawback of a long setting time. This study aimed to assess two different types of calcium-silicate cements as pulp-capping agents, by investigating their in vitro cytotoxicity and angiogenic effects in human pulp cells. ProRoot MTA, Endocem Zr, and Retro MTA were prepared as set or freshly mixed pellets. Human pulp-derived cells were grown in direct contact with these three cements, Dycal, or no cement, for 7 days. Initial cell attachment, viability, calcium release, and the levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), angiogenin, and basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) were evaluated statistically using a linear mixed model (P calcium concentration compared with the control group (P  0.05). We demonstrate that Retro MTA, which has a short setting time, has similar biocompatibility and angiogenic effects on human pulp cells, and can therefore potentially be as effective in pulp capping as ProRoot MTA. Endocem Zr showed intermittent cytotoxicity and elicited lower levels of VEGF and angiogenin expression. PMID:25596932

  14. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Boron Removal from Metallurgical Grade Silicon by Addition of High Basic Potassium Carbonate to Calcium Silicate Slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jijun; Wang, Fanmao; Ma, Wenhui; Lei, Yun; Yang, Bin

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the thermodynamics and kinetics of boron removal from metallurgical grade silicon (MG-Si) using a calcium silicate slag containing a high basic potassium carbonate. The distribution of boron between slag and silicon was theoretically derived and the distribution coefficients ( L B) of boron with different compositions of CaO, SiO2, and K2CO3 in slag reagents were determined. The maximal value of L B reached 2.08 with a high basicity slag of 40 pctCaO-40 pctSiO2-20 pctK2CO3 (Λ = 0.73). The boron removal rates from MG-Si using CaO-SiO2 and CaO-SiO2-K2CO3 slags at 1823 K (1550 °C) were investigated in an electromagnetic induction furnace. The results showed that the boron concentration in MG-Si can be reduced from 22 to 1.8 ppmw at 1823 K (1550 °C) with 20 pct K2CO3 addition to calcium silicate slag, where the removal efficiency of boron reached 91.8 pct. The mass transfer coefficient ( β S) of boron in binary 50 pctCaO-50 pctSiO2 slag was 3.16 × 10-6 m s-1 at 1823 K (1550 °C) and was 2.43 × 10-5 m s-1 in ternary 40 pctCaO-40 pctSiO2-20 pctK2CO3 slag.

  15. Analysis on Calcium Based Sulphur- fixation Reagent hydration Active%钙基固硫剂水合活性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于德亭; 于荣华; 侯栋岐; 侯清濯; 陈昌和

    2000-01-01

    基于Ca0水合放热,设计专用试验装置对生石灰水合活性进行测试比较,其结果对炉内喷钙增湿水合烟气脱硫和以生石灰为吸着剂的简易湿法脱硫技术吸着剂选择有指导意义。%Based on CaO dydration exothennity, the special test unit is designed to measure and compare the quick lime hydration actives, the conclusion which is useful for the adsorbent selection of interior furnace Calcium spary moisture increase hydration gas desulphuring technique and the quick lime adsorbent simple wet desulphuring techwique is achieved.

  16. Carbonation Behavior of Pure Cement Hydrates under Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Conditions - 12199

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonation of cement-based waste forms using a supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2) is a developing technology for the waste immobilization of radioactive and non-radioactive wastes. However, the detail carbonation behaviors of cement matrices under the SCCO2 condition are unknown, since cement matrices forms very complex phases. In this study, in order to clarify the crystal phases, we synthesized pure cement hydrate phases as each single phases; portlandite (Ca(OH)2), ettringite (Ca6Al2(SO4)3(OH)12.26H2O), and calcium silicate hydrate (n CaO---m SiO2 ---x H2O), using suspensions containing a stoichiometric mixture of chemical regents, and performed carbonation experiments using an autoclave under supercritical condition for carbon dioxide. The XRD results revealed both the carbonate phases and co-product phases depending on the initial hydrate phases; gypsum for Ettringite, amorphous or crystalline silica for calcium silicate hydroxide. Thermogravimetric analysis was also performed to understand carbonation behaviors quantitatively. According to the experimental results, it was found that the major reaction was formation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in all cases. However, the behaviors of H2O and CO2 content were quietly different: Portlandite was most reactive for carbonation under SCCO2 conditions, and the CO2 content per one molar CaO was ranged from 0.96 ∼ 0.98. In the case of Ettringite, the experiment indicates partial decomposition of ettringite phase during carbonation. Ettringite was comparatively stable even under the SCCO2 conditions. Therefore, a part of ettringite remained and formed similar phases after the ettringite carbonation. The CO2 content for ettringite showed almost constant values around 0.86 ∼ 0.87. In the case of calcium silicate hydrate, the carbonation behavior was significantly influenced by the condition of SCCO2. The CO2 content for the calcium silicate hydrate had values that ranged from 0.51 ∼ 1.01. The co-products of the

  17. Mesoscale texture of cement hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Krakowiak, Konrad J; Bauchy, Mathieu; Hoover, Christian G; Masoero, Enrico; Yip, Sidney; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Levitz, Pierre; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Del Gado, Emanuela

    2016-02-23

    Strength and other mechanical properties of cement and concrete rely upon the formation of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) during cement hydration. Controlling structure and properties of the C-S-H phase is a challenge, due to the complexity of this hydration product and of the mechanisms that drive its precipitation from the ionic solution upon dissolution of cement grains in water. Departing from traditional models mostly focused on length scales above the micrometer, recent research addressed the molecular structure of C-S-H. However, small-angle neutron scattering, electron-microscopy imaging, and nanoindentation experiments suggest that its mesoscale organization, extending over hundreds of nanometers, may be more important. Here we unveil the C-S-H mesoscale texture, a crucial step to connect the fundamental scales to the macroscale of engineering properties. We use simulations that combine information of the nanoscale building units of C-S-H and their effective interactions, obtained from atomistic simulations and experiments, into a statistical physics framework for aggregating nanoparticles. We compute small-angle scattering intensities, pore size distributions, specific surface area, local densities, indentation modulus, and hardness of the material, providing quantitative understanding of different experimental investigations. Our results provide insight into how the heterogeneities developed during the early stages of hydration persist in the structure of C-S-H and impact the mechanical performance of the hardened cement paste. Unraveling such links in cement hydrates can be groundbreaking and controlling them can be the key to smarter mix designs of cementitious materials. PMID:26858450

  18. Atributos químicos de solos influenciados pela substituição do carbonato por silicato de cálcio Soil chemical properties influenced by the substitution of calcium carbonate by calcium silicate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Ferreira de Souza

    2008-08-01

    ácia do silicato de Ca foi inferior à de carbonato de Ca na melhoria das condições químicas do solo.The application of silicates to soils can result in increased soil cation exchange capacity (CEC, displace anions, especially H2PO4- (diacid phosphate, neutralize the pH and Al toxicity and, in general, increase the nutrient availability to plants. However, calcium silicates may be less efficient than calcium carbonates. To evaluate the effect of calcium carbonate substitution by calcium silicate on the soil chemical properties, especially on phosphorus availability, four experiments were conducted in an entirely randomized design with four replications, in a greenhouse. The treatments consisted of five levels (0, 25, 50, 75, and 100 % of calcium carbonate substitution by calcium silicate, with a 4:1 Ca:Mg stoichiometric and the same amount of CaO, enough to reach a 60 % base saturation. The treatments were applied to 4 dm³ samples of a sandy orthic Quartzarenic Neosol (Quartzpsament, a sandy loam dystrophic Red-Yellow Latosol (Oxisol, sandy clay loam dystrophic Red-Yellow Latosol (Oxisol and a clayey dystrophic Red Latosol (Oxisol; each soil represented one experiment. The pH values in H2O, P, phosphorus in the equilibrium solution (P-rem, K, Ca, Mg, Si, Al, H + Al, organic matter (OM, Cu, Mn, Zn and B, sum of bases (S, effective (t ant total (T CEC, base saturation (V and Al saturation (m were submitted to analysis of variance and simple regression models fitted as a function of CaCO3 substitution by CaSiO3 levels. It was observed that carbonate substitution by silicate promoted significant increases in the values of Si, Al, H + Al and m and reduction in the values of P-rem, pH, S, t and V. The values of Mehlich 1 P, K, Mg, OM, T, Mn, Cu, and B were not influenced significantly. A reduction in Zn availability was verified in the dystrophic orthic Quartzarenic Neosol only. Calcium silicate was less efficient than calcium carbonate in the improvement of soil chemical

  19. Calcium hydroxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrate - calcium; Lime milk; Slaked lime ... Calcium hydroxide ... These products contain calcium hydroxide: Cement Limewater Many industrial solvents and cleaners (hundreds to thousands of construction products, flooring strippers, brick cleaners, cement ...

  20. Trichloroethylene decomposition and in-situ dry sorption of Cl-products by calcium oxides prepared from hydrated limes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Yoshimi; Iwata, Goichi; Choh, Kyaw; Kubota, Mitsuhiro; Matsuda, Hitoki

    2011-10-01

    A comparison of CaOs produced by calcining two types of hydrated lime and calcium carbonate was made for decomposition of trichloroethylene and in-situ dry sorption of the decomposed Cl-products using a lab-scale gas flow type tubular packed bed reactor. About 20 mg of CaO sample was mixed with about 2 g of Al2O3 particles and packed in the reactor and allowed to react with a flowing standard gas containing 500 ppm of C2HCl3 (N2 balance) at 673 and 873 K, under the condition that the reaction of CaO with C2HCl3 might be completed within a few hours. It was found that no thermal decomposition of C2HCl3 at or below 673 K was observed in a reactor packed only with Al2O3 particles. However, a considerable amount of decomposition of C2HCl3 was obtained in a reactor packed with CaO and Al2O3, even at 673 K. For 1 mol of CaO prepared by calcining highly reactive Ca(OH)2 at 673 K, decomposition of 0.42 mol of C2HCl3 and in-situ absorption product of 0.53 mol of CaCl2 were obtained. At 873 K, about 46% of C2HCl3 was thermally decomposed. The total amount of C2HCl3 decomposed in CaO-Al2O3 particle bed at 873 K became nearly twice larger than that at 673 K. For 1 mol of CaO prepared by calcining highly reactive Ca(OH)2 at 873 K, decomposition of 0.59 mol of C2HCl3 and in-situ absorption product of 0.67 mol of CaCl2 were obtained. Small amounts of C2Cl2, C2Cl4, CCl4, etc. were detected during decomposition of C2HCl3 at 673 and 873 K. It was recognized that the data on decomposition of C2HCl3 as well as in-situ dry sorption of Cl-products in CaO particle bed were correlated with specific surface area of the CaO employed. PMID:21821273

  1. NASA's Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings Development for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Understanding Calcium Magnesium Alumino-Silicate (CMAS) Degradations and Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) and SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) systems will play a crucial role in next generation turbine engines for hot-section component applications because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures with improved efficiency, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. The development of prime-reliant environmental barrier coatings is essential to the viability and reliability of the envisioned CMC engine component applications, ensuring integrated EBC-CMC system durability and designs are achievable for successful applications of the game-changing component technologies and lifing methodologies.This paper will emphasize recent NASA environmental barrier coating developments for SiCSiC turbine airfoil components, utilizing advanced coating compositions, state-of-the-art processing methods, and combined mechanical and environment testing and durability evaluations. The coating-CMC degradations in the engine fatigue-creep and operating environments are particularly complex; one of the important coating development aspects is to better understand engine environmental interactions and coating life debits, and we have particularly addressed the effect of Calcium-Magnesium-Alumino-Silicate (CMAS) from road sand or volcano-ash deposits on the durability of the environmental barrier coating systems, and how the temperature capability, stability and cyclic life of the candidate rare earth oxide and silicate coating systems will be impacted in the presence of the CMAS at high temperatures and under simulated heat flux conditions. Advanced environmental barrier coating systems, including HfO2-Si with rare earth dopant based bond coat systems, will be discussed for the performance improvements to achieve better temperature capability and CMAS resistance for future engine operating conditions.

  2. A combined QXRD/TG method to quantify the phase composition of hydrated Portland cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soin, Alexander V.; Catalan, Lionel J.J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Lakehead University, 955 Oliver Road, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 5E1 (Canada); Kinrade, Stephen D., E-mail: stephen.kinrade@lakeheadu.ca [Department of Chemistry, Lakehead University, 955 Oliver Road, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 5E1 (Canada)

    2013-06-15

    A new method is reported for quantifying the mineral phases in hydrated cement pastes that is based on a combination of quantitative X-ray diffractometry (QXRD) and thermogravimetry (TG). It differs from previous methods in that it gives a precise measure of the amorphous phase content without relying on an assumed stoichiometric relationship between the principal hydration products, calcium hydroxide (CH) and calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H). The method was successfully applied to gray and white ordinary Portland cements (GOPC and WOPC, respectively) that were cured for up to 56 days. Phase distributions determined by QXRD/TG closely matched those from gray-level analysis of backscattered scanning electron microscope (BSEM) images, whereas elemental compositions obtained for the amorphous phase by QXRD/TG agreed well with those measured by quantitative energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS)

  3. Hydration products of lime-metakaolin pastes at ambient temperature with ageing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gameiro, A., E-mail: agameiro@lnec.pt [National Laboratory of Civil Engineering, Materials Department, Av. do Brasil, 101, 1700 Lisbon (Portugal); Santos Silva, A., E-mail: ssilva@lnec.pt [National Laboratory of Civil Engineering, Materials Department, Av. do Brasil, 101, 1700 Lisbon (Portugal); Veiga, R., E-mail: rveiga@lnec.pt [National Laboratory of Civil Engineering, Buildings Department, Av. do Brasil, 101, 1700 Lisbon (Portugal); Velosa, A., E-mail: avelosa@ua.pt [Department of Civil Engineering, Geobiotec, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2012-05-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study the compounds formed in lime/MK blended pastes and their stability over time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different mixes of lime/MK pastes show different reaction kinetics during curing time, being the pozzolanic compounds formed directly proportional to the lime by MK replacement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some pozzolanic products are found to be unstable during the hydration reaction employed in our study. - Abstract: Mortars constituted of lime mixtures with pozzolanic additions have been extensively used in the past for the construction of historic and traditional buildings. This paper presents the results of blended pastes of lime and metakaolin (MK), namely compounds formed and their stability over time. This research is part of an extensive study aiming at the formulation of lime based mortars for restoration purposes. It has been shown for several years that MK has been applied in inorganic binders due to its capacity to react vigorously with calcium hydroxide (CH). In the presence of water originating a series of major hydrated phases, namely tetra calcium aluminate hydrate (C{sub 4}AH{sub 13}), calcium silicates hydrates (CSH) and calcium aluminium silicate hydrates (stratlingite - C{sub 2}ASH{sub 8}). Several blended pastes of lime and MK, with different substitution rates of lime by MK (wt%) were prepared and cured at a temperature of 20 Degree-Sign C and relative humidity RH > 95%. The phase composition of the formed hydrated phases was determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and simultaneous thermal analysis (TG-DTA). The obtained results showed that lime/MK pastes compositions displayed different reaction kinetics during curing time, being the pozzolanic products content directly proportional to the substitution rate of lime by MK. Also, a relationship between the increase stratlingite content and the MK substitution rate of lime by MK was found.

  4. Individual and combined effects of chloride, sulfate, and magnesium ions on hydrated Portland-cement paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ground water with a high concentration of magnesium ion is known to cause deterioration to portland cement concretes. A proposed mechanism for this deterioration process published previously involves an approximate 1:1 replacement of Ca ions by Mg ions in the crystalline phases of hydrated cement. The current study was undertaken to determine which ions, among magnesium, chloride, and sulfate, cause deterioration; whether their deleterious action is individual or interdependent; and to relate this mechanism of deterioration to the outlook for a 100-yr service life of concretes used in mass placements at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Loss of Ca ion by cement pastes was found to be strongly related to the concentration of Mg ion in simulated ground-water solutions in which the paste samples were aged. This was true of both salt- containing and conventional cement pastes. No other ion in the solutions exerted a strong effect on Ca loss. Ca ion left first from calcium hydroxide in the pastes, depleting all calcium hydroxide by 60 days. Some calcium silicate hydrate remained even after 90 days in the solutions with the highest concentration of Mg ion, while the paste samples deteriorated noticeably. The results indicated a mechanism that involves dissolution of Ca phases and transport of Ca ions to the surface of the sample, followed by formation of Mg-bearing phases at this reaction surface rather than directly by substitution within the microstructure of hydrated cement. Given that calcium hydroxide and calcium silicate hydrate are the principal strength-giving phases of hydrated cement, this mechanism indicates the likelihood of significant loss of integrity of a concrete exposed to Mg-bearing ground water at the WIPP. The rate of deterioration ultimately will depend on Mg-ion concentration, the microstructure materials of the concrete exposed to that groundwater, and the availability of brine

  5. Hinokitiol-Loaded Mesoporous Calcium Silicate Nanoparticles Induce Apoptotic Cell Death through Regulation of the Function of MDR1 in Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Fang Shen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hinokitiol is a tropolone-related compound found in heartwood cupressaceous plants. Hinokitiol slows the growth of a variety of cancers through inhibition of cell proliferation. The low water solubility of hinokitiol leads to less bioavailability. This has been highlighted as a major limiting factor. In this study, mesoporous calcium silicate (MCS nanoparticles, both pure and hinokitiol-loaded, were synthesized and their effects on A549 cells were analyzed. The results indicate that Hino-MCS nanoparticles induce apoptosis in higher concentration loads (>12.5 μg/mL for A549 cells. Hino-MCS nanoparticles suppress gene and protein expression levels of multiple drug resistance protein 1 (MDR1. In addition, both the activity and the expression levels of caspase-3/-9 were measured in Hino-MCS nanoparticle-treated A549 cells. The Hino-MCS nanoparticles-triggered apoptosis was blocked by inhibitors of pan-caspase, caspase-3/-9, and antioxidant agents (N-acetylcysteine; NAC. The Hino-MCS nanoparticles enhance reactive oxygen species production and the protein expression levels of caspase-3/-9. Our data suggest that Hino-MCS nanoparticles trigger an intrinsic apoptotic pathway through regulating the function of MDR1 and the production of reactive oxygen species in A549 cells. Therefore, we believe that Hino-MCS nanoparticles may be efficacious in the treatment of drug-resistant human lung cancer in the future.

  6. The effect of calcium silicate on in vitro physiochemical properties and in vivo osteogenesis, degradability and bioactivity of porous β-tricalcium phosphate bioceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porous β-tricalcium phosphate(TCP)/calcium silicate(CS) composite bioceramics with different weight proportions were prepared to investigate the in vitro effects of CS on the physiochemical properties of TCP and the in vivo effects of CS on the degradability, osteogenesis and bioactivity of TCP. The physiochemical results showed that the addition of CS to porous TCP resulted in a looser and rougher surface and a lower solid density, compressive strength and Young's modulus and a lower pH value as compared to pure CS without any chemical interaction between the TCP and the CS. The in vivo study showed that the material degradation of porous TCP/CS composite bioceramics was slower than that of pure CS, although the osteogenesis, degradability and bioactivity were significantly increased in the long term. Thereafter, the introduction of CS into porous TCP bioceramics is an effective way to prepare bioactive bone grafting scaffolds for clinical use and to control properties such as in vivo degradability and osteoinduction of TCP. (paper)

  7. Cinética de hidratação de ligantes à base de alumina hidratável ou aluminato de cálcio Kinetics of hydration of binders based on hydratable alumina or calcium aluminate cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. R. Oliveira

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available O estado de dispersão da matriz de um concreto refratário apresenta uma grande influência no comportamento reológico desse material, determinando as técnicas utilizadas para a sua aplicação. Tais métodos normalmente exigem a preparação de concretos com elevada fluidez, que possam ser bombeados com facilidade e sejam capazes de preencher moldes de formato complexo sem a necessidade de aplicação de vibração. Entretanto, embora tais requisitos favoreçam uma boa trabalhabilidade do concreto, tendem a aumentar o tempo requerido para efetuar a desmoldagem do corpo conformado. Uma vez que o desenvolvimento da resistência mecânica do concreto está intimamente relacionado ao processo de hidratação do ligante hidráulico, este necessita ser controlado quando se busca a redução do tempo para a desmoldagem. Tal controle depende de um profundo conhecimento das variáveis que determinam a cinética das reações. Neste contexto, o objetivo deste trabalho foi o de avaliar a influência do tipo de ligante hidráulico, da temperatura e da presença de finos (matriz ou de aditivos inorgânicos adicionados ao concreto sobre o processo de hidratação por meio de medidas de temperatura e ensaios reológicos oscilatórios em função do tempo.The dispersion of refractory castables matrix presents a great influence on their rheological behavior, which defines the most appropriate methods for placing these materials. The growing demand for automatically transported refractory castables has promoted the use of pumpable castables, usually specified as self flow compositions. Nevertheless, castables with higher fluidity present longer workability, leading to extended demoulding times. Because the strength development is intimately linked to the hydration process of calcium aluminate cement or hydratable alumina, it needs to be controlled in order to reach the minimum time for demoulding, contributing to reducing overall costs. The control of cement

  8. Measurement on Hydrate Products Crystallinity Degrees of Autoclaved Silicate Products%蒸压硅酸盐制品水化产物的结晶度分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柯昌君; 王淑英; 王浩; 袁兵

    2012-01-01

    利用烧失量和酸溶法测定不同固体废物蒸压样品的结合水量和溶出差,研究固体废物蒸压样品中水化产物量、结晶度与其强度的关系.结果表明,粉煤灰、废玻璃、废混凝土蒸压样品的结晶度较低,钢渣蒸压样品的结晶度较高.蒸压样品的溶出差、结合水量和结晶度与水化产物种类有关.蒸压样品的结晶度可间接表达结晶良好的水化产物占总水化产物量的多少,并可用来确定不同蒸压制品的合理养护制度,指导蒸压制品的工艺优化.蒸压样品的结晶度存在合理范围.%The relationships of solid waste autoclaved samples compressive strength and their crystal-Unity degrees, hydrate amounts were studied with dissolved amount difference and bound water a-mount measured with loss on ignition and acid digestion method. The results showed that the crystal-linity degrees of autoclaved samples, such as fly ash, waste glass and waste concrete are in a low level except that the crystallinity degree of autoclaved steel slag sample is higher. The dissolved amount difference, bound water amount and crystallinity degree of the autoclaved samples were related to their hydrate types. The crystallinity degrees of autoclaved samples could be indirectly represented as the ratios of well-crystallized hydrate amounts to total hydrate amounts in the autoclaved samples, and used to determine the autoclaved schedule and guide the technology optimization for autoclaved products. There is a reasonable crystallinity degree range for the compressive strength of autoclaved samples.

  9. Regulation of physicochemical properties, osteogenesis activity, and fibroblast growth factor-2 release ability of β-tricalcium phosphate for bone cement by calcium silicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Ching-Chuan [Antai Medical Care Cooperation Antai Tian-Sheng Memorial Hospital, Pingtung, Taiwan (China); Kao, Chia-Tze; Hung, Chi-Jr [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yi-Jyun [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Dental Department, Taichung Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Huang, Tsui-Hsien, E-mail: thh@csmu.edu.tw [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Shie, Ming-You, E-mail: eviltacasi@gmail.com [Institute of Oral Science, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2014-04-01

    β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is an osteoconductive material. For this research we have combined it with a low degradation calcium silicate (CS) to enhance its bioactive and osteostimulative properties. To check its effectiveness, a series of β-TCP/CS composites with different ratios were prepared to make new bioactive and biodegradable biocomposites for bone repair. Formation of bone-like apatite, the diametral tensile strength, and weight loss of composites were considered before and after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). In addition, we also examined the effects of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) released from β-TCP/CS composites and in vitro human dental pulp cell (hDPC) and studied its behavior. The results showed that the apatite deposition ability of the β-TCP/CS composites was enhanced as the CS content was increased. For composites with more than 50% CS contents, the samples were completely covered by a dense bone-like apatite layer. At the end of the immersion point, weight losses of 19%, 24%, 33%, 42%, and 51% were observed for the composites containing 0%, 30%, 50%, 70% and 100% β-TCP cements, respectively. In vitro cell experiments show that the CS-rich composites promote human dental pulp cell (hDPC) proliferation and differentiation. However, when the CS quantity in the composite is less than 70%, the amount of cells and osteogenesis protein of hDPCs was stimulated by FGF-2 released from β-TCP/CS composites. The combination of FGF-2 in degradation of β-TCP and osteogenesis of CS gives a strong reason to believe that these calcium-based composite cements may prove to be promising bone repair materials. - Highlights: • CS improved physicochemical properties and osteogenic activity of β-TCP. • The higher the CS in the cement, the shorter the setting time and the higher the DTS. • The cell behavior was stimulated by FGF-2 released from composite containing 50% CS. • β-TCP/CS composite with FGF-2 has optimal properties for

  10. Regulation of physicochemical properties, osteogenesis activity, and fibroblast growth factor-2 release ability of β-tricalcium phosphate for bone cement by calcium silicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is an osteoconductive material. For this research we have combined it with a low degradation calcium silicate (CS) to enhance its bioactive and osteostimulative properties. To check its effectiveness, a series of β-TCP/CS composites with different ratios were prepared to make new bioactive and biodegradable biocomposites for bone repair. Formation of bone-like apatite, the diametral tensile strength, and weight loss of composites were considered before and after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). In addition, we also examined the effects of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) released from β-TCP/CS composites and in vitro human dental pulp cell (hDPC) and studied its behavior. The results showed that the apatite deposition ability of the β-TCP/CS composites was enhanced as the CS content was increased. For composites with more than 50% CS contents, the samples were completely covered by a dense bone-like apatite layer. At the end of the immersion point, weight losses of 19%, 24%, 33%, 42%, and 51% were observed for the composites containing 0%, 30%, 50%, 70% and 100% β-TCP cements, respectively. In vitro cell experiments show that the CS-rich composites promote human dental pulp cell (hDPC) proliferation and differentiation. However, when the CS quantity in the composite is less than 70%, the amount of cells and osteogenesis protein of hDPCs was stimulated by FGF-2 released from β-TCP/CS composites. The combination of FGF-2 in degradation of β-TCP and osteogenesis of CS gives a strong reason to believe that these calcium-based composite cements may prove to be promising bone repair materials. - Highlights: • CS improved physicochemical properties and osteogenic activity of β-TCP. • The higher the CS in the cement, the shorter the setting time and the higher the DTS. • The cell behavior was stimulated by FGF-2 released from composite containing 50% CS. • β-TCP/CS composite with FGF-2 has optimal properties for

  11. Interfacial Kinetics of High-Al-Containing Ultra-Lightweight Steels with Calcium Silicate-Based Molten Oxides at High Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gi Hyun; Sohn, Il

    2016-06-01

    The kinetics of the high-temperature reaction between high-Al- and -Mn-containing steels and synthesized molten calcium silicate-based fluxes from 1623 K to 1643 K (1350 °C to 1370 °C) was studied. Cylindrical steel rods were rotated in the molten fluxes for 300 to 1200 seconds at various temperatures below the melting point of the steels. The rods were connected to a rheometer, and the initial reaction rates were estimated from the torque variations. The dissolution of the steel into the molten slag was correlated to the variation in torque. The kinetics of the reaction between the rods and the slag estimated from the torque and subsequently from the viscosity were confirmed from the mass balance and from the variation in the chemical compositions of the rods and the molten slags, respectively. The liquid-phase mass transfer coefficient of Al2O3 was calculated to be 1.14 × 10-2 cm/s at 1623 K (1350 °C) and 1.52 × 10-2 cm/s at 1633 K (1360 °C). The kinetics calculated assuming liquid-phase mass transfer control was observed to be similar to the aforementioned kinetics determined from the dynamic viscosity variations. On the basis of dimensionless analysis of the Sherwood number (Sh = 0.05·Re0.65Sc0.31), liquid-phase mass transfer from the metal/flux interface was observed to be the rate-controlling step.

  12. Effects of adsorbed and templated nanosilver in mesoporous calcium-silicate nanoparticles on inhibition of bacteria colonization of dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan W

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Wei Fan,1,* Daming Wu,1,* Franklin R Tay,2 Tengjiao Ma,1 Yujie Wu,1 Bing Fan1 1The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST and Key Laboratory of Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Endodontics, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, Georgia, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Mesoporous calcium-silicate nanoparticles (MCSNs are advanced biomaterials for controlled drug delivery and mineralization induction. Nanosilver-incorporated MCSNs (Ag-MCSNs were prepared in the present study using both the adsorption and template methods. Both versions of Ag-MCSNs showed characteristic morphology of mesoporous materials and exhibited sustained release of ions over time. In antibacterial testing against planktonic Enterococcus faecalis, Ag-MCSNs showed significantly better antibacterial effects when compared with MCSNs (P<0.05. The Ag-MCSNs aggregated on the dentin surface of root canal walls and infiltrated into dentinal tubules after ultrasound activation, significantly inhibiting the adherence and colonization of E. faecalis on dentin (P<0.05. Despite this, Ag-MCSNs with templated nanosilver showed much lower cytotoxicity than Ag-MCSNs with adsorbed nanosilver (P<0.05. The results of the present study indicated that nanosilver could be incorporated into MCSNs using the template method. The templated nanosilver could release silver ions and inhibit the growth and colonization of E. faecalis both in the planktonic form and as biofilms on dentin surfaces as absorbed nanosilver. Templated Ag-MCSNs may be developed into a new intracanal disinfectant for root canal disinfection due to their antibacterial ability and low cytotoxicity, and as controlled release devices for other bioactive molecules to produce multifunctional biomaterials. Keywords: antibacterial effect, mesoporosity

  13. Acid-resistant calcium silicate-based composite implants with high-strength as load-bearing bone graft substitutes and fracture fixation devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chung-Kai; Ding, Shinn-Jyh

    2016-09-01

    To achieve the excellent mechanical properties of biodegradable materials used for cortical bone graft substitutes and fracture fixation devices remains a challenge. To this end, the biomimetic calcium silicate/gelatin/chitosan oligosaccharide composite implants were developed, with an aim of achieving high strength, controlled degradation, and superior osteogenic activity. The work focused on the effect of gelatin on mechanical properties of the composites under four different kinds of mechanical stresses including compression, tensile, bending, and impact. The evaluation of in vitro degradability and fatigue at two simulated body fluid (SBF) of pH 7.4 and 5.0 was also performed, in which the pH 5.0 condition simulated clinical conditions caused by bacterial induced local metabolic acidosis or tissue inflammation. In addition, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were sued to examine osteogenic activity. Experimental results showed that the appropriate amount of gelatin positively contributed to failure enhancement in compressive and impact modes. The 10wt% gelatin-containing composite exhibits the maximum value of the compressive strength (166.1MPa), which is within the reported compressive strength for cortical bone. The stability of the bone implants was apparently affected by the in vitro fatigue, but not by the initial pH environments (7.4 or 5.0). The gelatin not only greatly enhanced the degradation of the composite when soaked in the dynamic SBF solution, but effectively promoted attachment, proliferation, differentiation, and formation of mineralization of hMSCs. The 10wt%-gelatin composite with high initial strength may be a potential implant candidate for cortical bone repair and fracture fixation applications. PMID:27254281

  14. Sealing of cracks in cement using microencapsulated sodium silicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannaros, P.; Kanellopoulos, A.; Al-Tabbaa, A.

    2016-08-01

    Cement-based materials possess an inherent autogenous self-healing capability allowing them to seal, and potentially heal, microcracks. This can be improved through the addition of microencapsulated healing agents for autonomic self-healing. The fundamental principle of this self-healing mechanism is that when cracks propagate in the cementitious matrix, they rupture the dispersed capsules and their content (cargo material) is released into the crack volume. Various healing agents have been explored in the literature for their efficacy to recover mechanical and durability properties in cementitious materials. In these materials, the healing agents are most commonly encapsulated in macrocontainers (e.g. glass tubes or capsules) and placed into the material. In this work, microencapsulated sodium silicate in both liquid and solid form was added to cement specimens. Sodium silicate reacts with the calcium hydroxide in hydrated cement paste to form calcium-silicate-hydrate gel that fills cracks. The effect of microcapsule addition on rheological and mechanical properties of cement is reported. It is observed that the microcapsule addition inhibits compressive strength development in cement and this is observed through a plateau in strength between 28 and 56 days. The improvement in crack-sealing for microcapsule-containing specimens is quantified through sorptivity measurements over a 28 day healing period. After just seven days, the addition of 4% microcapsules resulted in a reduction in sorptivity of up to 45% when compared to specimens without any microcapsule addition. A qualitative description of the reaction between the cargo material and the cementitious matrix is also provided using x-ray diffraction analysis.

  15. Properties of Chemically Combusted Calcium Carbide Residue and Its Influence on Cement Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Hongfang Sun; Zishanshan Li; Jing Bai; Shazim Ali Memon; Biqin Dong; Yuan Fang; Weiting Xu; Feng Xing

    2015-01-01

    Calcium carbide residue (CCR) is a waste by-product from acetylene gas production. The main component of CCR is Ca(OH)2, which can react with siliceous materials through pozzolanic reactions, resulting in a product similar to those obtained from the cement hydration process. Thus, it is possible to use CCR as a substitute for Portland cement in concrete. In this research, we synthesized CCR and silica fume through a chemical combustion technique to produce a new reactive cementitious powder (...

  16. Sulphur dioxide removal using South African limestone/siliceous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.O. Ogenga; M.M. Mbarawa; K.T. Lee; A.R. Mohamed; I. Dahlan [Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria (South Africa)

    2010-09-15

    This study presents an investigation into the desulfurization effect of sorbent derived from South African calcined limestone conditioned with fly ash. The main aim was to examine the effect of chemical composition and structural properties of the sorbent with regard to SO{sub 2} removal in dry-type flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process. South African fly ash and CaO obtained from calcination of limestone in a laboratory kiln at a temperature of 900{sup o}C were used to synthesize CaO/ash sorbent by atmospheric hydration process. The sorbent was prepared under different hydration conditions: CaO/fly ash weight ratio, hydration temperature (55-75{sup o}C) and hydration period (4-10 h). Desulfurization experiments were done in the fixed bed reactor at 87{sup o}C and relative humidity of 50%. The chemical composition of both the fly ash and calcined limestone had relatively high Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and oxides of other transitional elements which provided catalytic ability during the sorbent sorption process. Generally the sorbents had higher SO{sub 2} absorption capacity in terms of mol of SO{sub 2} per mol of sorbent (0.1403-0.3336) compared to hydrated lime alone (maximum 0.1823). The sorbents were also found to consist of mesoporous structure with larger pore volume and BET specific surface area than both CaO and fly ash. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis showed the presence of complex compounds containing calcium silicate hydrate in the sorbents. 19 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Obtaining calcium silicates by using solid residues as precursors. Influence of water in the process of mixing reagents; Obtencin de silicatos de calcio empleando como precursores residuos solidos. Influencia del mezclado de reactivos en fase seca o fase humeda

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felipe-Sese, M.; Eliche-Quesada, D.; Corpas-Iglesias, F. A.

    2011-07-01

    The suitability of re-using residues marble, remaining from cutting marble, as a source of calcium-oxide, as well as the resultant ashes from the combustion of the wastes generated in the process of manufacturing boards from derivates of wood, as a source of silica, as raw material for the production of calcium silicate products has been determined. First of all, the influence of water has been studied in the initial phase of mixing residues. Marble and ashes have been mixed in molar relation CaO:SiO{sub 2} of 1:1 using two different ways: using a planetary ball mill (while in solid state) or agitating at 90 degree centigrade (2 h) using a 60 wt% of water (while in humid state). Later, both mixtures were sintered at 1100 degree centigrade (24 h). In order to use the obtained calcium-silicates as ceramic insulating thermal materials, the samples were compressed at 15 Tm obtaining bricks from which the technological properties have been studied. The ceramic materials obtained from mixing the residues in dry phase, as well as those obtained in the wet phase, can be used as thermal insulators, showing values of conductivity of 0.18 and 0.12 w/m{sup 2}K, with an elevated resistance to compressive strength. (Author) 14 refs.

  18. INFLUENCE OF POZZOLANA ON THE HYDRATION OF C4AF RICH CEMENT IN CHLORIDE ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IRMANTAS BARAUSKAS

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the influence of natural pozzolana - opoka additive on the hydration of C4AF rich cement and the effects of chloride ions on the hydrates formed. In the samples, 25 % (by weight of the sintered C4AF rich cement and OPC was replaced with pozzolana. The mixtures were hardened for 28 days in water, soaked in a saturated NaCl solution for 3 months at 20°C. It was estimated that under normal conditions, pozzolana additive accelerates the hydration of calcium silicates and initiates the formation of CO32- - AFm in the Brownmillerite rich cement. However, the hydration of Brownmillerite cement with opoka additive is still slower to compare with hydration of Portland cement. Also, opoka decreases total porosity and threshold pore diameter of Brownmillerite cement paste after two days of hydration. After 28 days of hydration threshold pore diameter became smaller even to compare with threshold pore diameter of Portland cement. Opoka additive promotes the formation of Friedel’s salt in Brownmillerite samples treated in saturated NaCl solution, because CO32-–AFm affected by saturated NaCl solution become unstable and takes part in reactions producing Friedel’s salt.

  19. The crucial effect of early-stage gelation on the mechanical properties of cement hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Kanduč, Matej; Li, Lunna; Frenkel, Daan; Dobnikar, Jure; Del Gado, Emanuela

    2016-07-01

    Gelation and densification of calcium-silicate-hydrate take place during cement hydration. Both processes are crucial for the development of cement strength, and for the long-term evolution of concrete structures. However, the physicochemical environment evolves during cement formation, making it difficult to disentangle what factors are crucial for the mechanical properties. Here we use Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics simulations to study a coarse-grained model of cement formation, and investigate the equilibrium and arrested states. We can correlate the various structures with the time evolution of the interactions between the nano-hydrates during the preparation of cement. The novel emerging picture is that the changes of the physicochemical environment, which dictate the evolution of the effective interactions, specifically favour the early gel formation and its continuous densification. Our observations help us understand how cement attains its unique strength and may help in the rational design of the properties of cement and related materials.

  20. The effect of fluoride and silicate ions on the coprecipitation of gadolinium with calcium in phosphoric and sulpho-phosphoric media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouhlassa, S.; Salhamen, F. [Univ. Mohammed V - Agdal, Rabat (Morocco). Lab. de Radiochimie

    2013-05-01

    This work was carried out with the aim to establish the effect of some impurities on the coprecipitation of gadolinium with calcium phosphate and gypsum. The tests were performed using the radioactive tracer technique to monitor the fate of gadolinium in various phosphoric and sulpho-phosphoric media containing fluoride and silicate ions as impurities. In 10{sup -2} to 10{sup -1} M NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} solution, the Gd(III) at a concentration of 10{sup -4} M is almost entirely precipitated as amorphous phosphate. However, the presence of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} at C{sub H{sub 3SO{sub 4}}} {>=} 0.1 M, reduces the coprecipitation to less than 8 at. %, on average. The fluoride ions in solution, even at C{sub HF} {<=} 0.1 M, induce a reduction of coprecipitation of 10 to 30% according to HF concentration. In the media containing 10{sup -2} to 10{sup -1} M NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} and 10{sup -1} M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, the effect of HF is almost negligible in the absence of Si(IV); nevertheless, the presence of fluorosilicate in solution may contribute to the enhancement of the coprecipitation of the REE. The sulphuric acid (0.1 M) in phosphoric media (0.74 {<=} C{sub H{sub 3PO{sub 4}}} {<=} 4.44 M), leads to a significant coprecipitation of the REE (1.3 {+-} 0.2 {<=}D{sub Gd}{<=} 3.1 {+-} 0.5), whilst the addition of HF (0.1 M) to these media enhances the solubility of the REE (left angle D{sub Gd} right angle = 0.06 {+-} 0.01). XRD, IR spectroscopy and elemental analyses of the solid phases in conjunction with the variation of the distribution coefficient D indicate that the coprecipitation of the REE is likely controlled by heterovalent substitution of REE in gypsum and its precipitation as phosphate or fluorosilicate. (orig.)

  1. Effects of surface application of dolomitic limestone and calcium-magnesium silicate on soybean and maize in rotation with green manure in a tropical region

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Although lime is currently the material most frequently used to ameliorate soil acidity in Brazil, silicate could efficiently replace this source because of its greater solubility and its greater silicon content, which are beneficial for plant development. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of superficial lime and silicate application on soil chemical attributes as well as on soybean and maize nutrition and grain yields when these crops are grown in rotation with green manure. The exper...

  2. Hydration of calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CaSO 4· {1}/{2}H 2O) into gypsum (CaSO 4·2H 2O). The influence of the sodium poly(acrylate)/surface interaction and molecular weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisvert, Jean-Philippe; Domenech, Marc; Foissy, Alain; Persello, Jacques; Mutin, Jean-Claude

    2000-12-01

    The retarding influence of sodium poly(acrylate) (PANa) on the hydration of calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CaSO 4· {1}/{2}H 2O) was investigated. This study reports the influence of sodium poly(acrylate) on hemihydrate dissolution, on homogenous and heterogeneous gypsum (CaSO 4·2H 2O) nucleation as well as on gypsum growth. It is shown that adsorption of PANa does not hinder the dissolution of hemihydrate in the present experimental conditions. The specific interaction of PANa with gypsum can explain the oriented growth of gypsum crystal. The gypsum growth is slowed down but cannot be blocked by the adsorption of PANa. On the other hand, PANa can block the heterogeneous and homogenous gypsum nucleation. As soon as a critical surface density of PANa onto the hemihydrate surface is reached, the heterogeneous gypsum nucleation is prevented and hemihydrate hydration is indefinitely blocked. The interaction between PANa and the hemihydrate surface is of prime importance to control hydration. Also, the influence of the molecular weight of PANa on homogenous nucleation has been investigated. The precipitation of calcium polyacrylate can explain the differences between the two molecular weights used (2100 and 20 000). This work leads to the conclusion that heterogeneous nucleation is the key process that controls hydration of a system in which hemihydrate dissolution, gypsum nucleation and growth are all occurring at the same time in a continuous manner.

  3. Effect of Tartaric Acid on Hydration of a Sodium-Metasilicate-Activated Blend of Calcium Aluminate Cement and Fly Ash F

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Pyatina

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available An alkali-activated blend of aluminum cement and class F fly ash is an attractive solution for geothermal wells where cement is exposed to significant thermal shocks and aggressive environments. Set-control additives enable the safe cement placement in a well but may compromise its mechanical properties. This work evaluates the effect of a tartaric-acid set retarder on phase composition, microstructure, and strength development of a sodium-metasilicate-activated calcium aluminate/fly ash class F blend after curing at 85 °C, 200 °C or 300 °C. The hardened materials were characterized with X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray computed tomography, and combined scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and tested for mechanical strength. With increasing temperature, a higher number of phase transitions in non-retarded specimens was found as a result of fast cement hydration. The differences in the phase compositions were also attributed to tartaric acid interactions with metal ions released by the blend in retarded samples. The retarded samples showed higher total porosity but reduced percentage of large pores (above 500 µm and greater compressive strength after 300 °C curing. Mechanical properties of the set cements were not compromised by the retarder.

  4. Comparison of the sequestering properties of yeast cell wall extract and hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate in three in vitro models accounting for the animal physiological bioavailability of zearalenone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiannikouris, A; Kettunen, H; Apajalahti, J; Pennala, E; Moran, C A

    2013-01-01

    The sequestration/inactivation of the oestrogenic mycotoxin zearalenone (ZEA) by two adsorbents--yeast cell wall extract (YCW) and hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (HSCAS)--was studied in three laboratory models: (1) an in vitro model was adapted from referenced methods to test for the sequestrant sorption capabilities under buffer conditions at two pH values using liquid chromatography coupled to a fluorescence detector for toxin quantification; (2) a second in vitro model was used to evaluate the sequestrant sorption stability according to pH variations and using ³H-labelled ZEA at low toxin concentration; and (3) an original, ex vivo Ussing chamber model was developed to further understand the transfer of ZEA through intestinal tissue and the impact of each sequestrant on the mycotoxin bioavailability of ³H-labelled ZEA. YCW was a more efficient ZEA adsorbent than HSCAS in all three models, except under very acidic conditions (pH 2.5 or 3.0). The Ussing chamber model offered a novel, ex vivo, alternative method for understanding the effect of sequestrant on the bioavailability of ZEA. The results showed that compared with HSCAS, YCW was more efficient in sequestering ZEA and that it reduced the accumulation of ZEA in the intestinal tissue by 40% (p < 0.001).

  5. Evaluation of long-term interaction between cement and bentonite for geological disposal (2) XAFS analysis of calcium silicate hydrate precipitates at cementitious and bentonite material interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Numerical analyses of the long-term alteration of the engineered barriers used for the disposal of TRU waste predicted precipitation of C-S-H minerals at the interface between the cementitious materials and the bentonite-based buffer. When the C-S-H precipitates at this interface, the diffusion coefficient in the engineered barriers will decrease, resulting in reduced mass transport, which feeds back to reduce the rate of subsequent alteration. The C-S-H predicted to form at the cement-bentonite interface could not be identified directly using conventional analytical tools, including XRD, due to its low crystallinity. The authors propose that XAFS analysis, which provides spectra sensitive to the valency and coordination of the element of interest regardless of its crystallinity, would be capable of characterizing the C-S-H. The presence of the C-S-H precipitated as a secondary mineral has already been confirmed by applying chemical and XAFS analyses to bentonite specimens collected from the compacted bentonite-cement interface. However, because of the limitations on the width of specimens that can be collected by cutting from block samples, i.e. approximately 1 mm, detailed concentration profiles could not be obtained for this secondary C-S-H. In this study, XAFS spectra of thin specimens were measured using an X-ray detector in order to obtain detailed concentration profiles for the C-S-H formed at the interface between the cementitious material and the bentonite-based buffer. The X-ray detector used in the XAFS analysis consists of 1024 photodiodes arranged in line with a 0.025 mm pitch (photodiode array; PDA). Ca-K-edge XAFS measurements were conducted at the Photon Factory of the KEK. The synchrotron was operated in top-up mode with 450 mA during the measurements. Specimens were taken from a contact sample of compacted bentonite (Kunigel V1; dry density of 1.6 g/cm3) and hardened OPC (w/c = 0.6) immersed in fresh reducing high-pH (FRHP) water for six years. The thickness of the thin specimens was approximately 100 μm, selected considering the concentration of Ca present in the bentonite and penetration depth of the X-rays. The XAFS spectra were analyzed using the REX2000 XAFS analysis software of the Rigaku Corporation. The amount of secondary C-S-H formed in the bentonite was quantified based on a pattern fitting method using a XANES data analysis tool. It was concluded that XAFS analysis of in-situ thin specimens PDAs allowed data to be obtained on the concentration of Ca in the bentonite at 25μm intervals. A high Ca absorption peak was observed around the interface between the cement and the bentonite, which decreased with distance from the interface. This result is very similar to the distribution of Ca concentration measured separately using electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA).Quantitative analyses based on pattern fitting methods for summation of ten consecutive data points (0.25 mm) indicated similar trends to those obtained for XAFS analysis of the bentonite specimens collected by cutting from the block samples. This suggests not only that detailed profiles for secondary C-S-H concentrations can be obtained, but also that detailed profiles of the composition of minerals including secondary minerals can be measured. (authors)

  6. Early age hydration of calcium sulfoaluminate (synthetic ye'elimite, C{sub 4}A{sub 3}S{sup ¯}) in the presence of gypsum and varying amounts of calcium hydroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargis, Craig W. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Kirchheim, Ana Paula [Department of Civil Engineering, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Monteiro, Paulo J.M., E-mail: monteiro@ce.berkeley.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Gartner, Ellis M. [Lafarge Centre de Recherche, St. Quentin Fallavier, Isere (France)

    2013-06-15

    Suspensions of synthetic ye'elimite (C{sub 4}A{sub 3}S{sup ¯}) in a saturated gypsum (CS{sup ¯}H{sub 2}) and calcium hydroxide (CH) solution were examined in-situ in a wet cell by soft X-ray transmission microscopy and ex-situ by scanning electron microscopy. The most voluminous hydration product observed was ettringite. Ettringite commonly displayed acicular, filiform, reticulated, and stellate crystal habits. Additionally, pastes with C{sub 4}A{sub 3}S{sup ¯}, 15% CS{sup ¯}H{sub 2}, and varying amounts of CH were prepared and examined with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and isothermal calorimetry. The XRD experiments showed that increasing CH content caused more solid solution (SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}/OH{sup −}) AFm phases to form at early ages (< 1 d) and more monosulfate to form at later ages (> 1 d). Calorimetry indicated that the increased production of solid solution AFm was accompanied with an increase in the initial (< 30 min) rate of heat evolution, and increasing CH generally reduced the time till the second maximum rate of heat evolution due to the formation of ettringite and monosulfate.

  7. Heated fly ash/hydrated lime slurries for SO[sub 2] removal in spray dryer absorbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, J.F.; Keener, T.C.; Wang, J. (Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering)

    1995-01-01

    Coal fly ashes have been slurried with quicklime at elevated temperatures to determine their reactivity with SO[sub 2] in a minipilot spray dryer. Bench-scale experimental results indicate that this hydration process greatly increases the total surface area of the solids. Minipilot-scale spray dryer tests reveal that the slurry reaction step can significantly increase calcium utilization and SO[sub 2] removal of these fly ash/quicklime sorbents, depending on the type of fly ash used. One type of fly ash showed considerably better reactivity in the spray dryer tests. This enhancement is considered due to the presence of calcium silica hydrate material formed from the reaction between calcium and the alumina silicate found in the fly ashes and the difference in reactivity due to the type of calcium silica hydrate material formed. The benefit, however, decreases with the calcium feed rate. Pozzolanic strength tests were performed on the fly ashes used, and the measured unconfined compressive strengths followed the reactivity results in the spray dryer; the most reactive fly ash possessed the highest pozzolanic activity.

  8. Removal of Co (Ⅱ)and Radioactive Transition Metal Ions by Adsorption on Fly Ash-Derived Mesoporous Calcium-Silicate Material%粉煤灰衍生介孔硅钙材料吸附去除Co(Ⅱ)及放射性过渡金属离子性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷雪飞; 祁光霞; 孙应龙; 李磊; 袁超; 王毅; 孙俊民

    2014-01-01

    To meet the needs of treatment of waste water containing low-level radioactive transition metal ions,using Co (Ⅱ)as a representative,the sorption ability of Co (Ⅱ)on calcium-silicate material,which is produced at the pre-desilication stage during the alumina extraction from the high-alumina fly ash by pre-desilication-soda-lime sintering technique,was studied.The results indicate that the calcium-silicate material,with hydration calcium silicate (C—S—H(Ⅰ))as the main mineral,is one of those mesoporous materials with high specific surface area(733 m2/g)and developed void space structure.The material also has good acid and alkali buffer performance(pH=2-10)and cation exchange capacity(Ca2+/H+).The adsorption capacity can reach 209-296 mg/g in the temperature range of 35-60 ℃for Co(Ⅱ).The adsorption process is endothermic and consistent with Langmuir monolayer chemical adsorption.The adsorption equilibrium can be reached quickly within 3 h.Our results show that the main adsorption mechanism is most ion exchange(84.5%).Moreover, the adsorption results for nuclear power plant overhaul wastewater show that more than 98.6% of the radioactive cobalt as well as other radioactive transition metal ions are removed.Speaking from the perspective of practical application,the mesoporous calcium-silicate material not only has high compatibility with cement which is good to the radionu-clide stabilization,but also can replace part of cement to achieve the reduction of the radioac-tive solidification blocks.Because of the above mentioned environmental and economic bene-fits,the mesoporous calcium-silicate material evidently has potential application in radioac-tive transition nuclide removal of wastewater.%针对含低水平放射性过渡金属离子废水的处理需求,本工作以 Co(Ⅱ)为代表,研究了粉煤灰衍生介孔硅钙材料对Co(Ⅱ)的吸附去除性能。研究结果表明,高铝粉煤灰“预脱硅-碱石灰烧结提铝”工艺在预脱硅阶

  9. Structural Investigations of Portland Cement Components, Hydration, and Effects of Admixtures by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, Jørgen Bengaard; Andersen, Morten D.; Jakobsen, Hans Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    for the C-S-H phase formed during hydration. It will be demonstrated that Al3+ and flouride guest-ions in the anhydrous and hydrated calcium silicates can be studied in detail by 27Al and 19F MAS NMR, thereby providing information on the local structure and the mechanisms for incorporation of these ions...... in the cement phases. The role of flouride ions is of special interest for mineralized Portland cements and it demonstrated that the location of these anions in anhydrous and hydrated Portland cements can be clarified using 19F MAS or 29Si{19F} CP/MAS NMR despite these cements contain only about 0.2 wt...

  10. Calcium and potassium silicates and the growth of Eucalyptus grandis seedlings Aplicação de silicatos de cálcio e de potássio e o crescimento de mudas de Eucalyptus grandis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itamar Antonio Bognola

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available

    The use of silicate is a practice that has been frequently adopted in annual crops, although few studies have been conducted in order to verify its efficiency in forest tree species. The main objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of calcium and potassium silicates in the growth of seedlings of Eucalyptus grandis. The experiment was conducted in a greenhouse, in Alambari county, State of São Paulo. A completely randomized experimental design was adopted, with eight treatments, three replications and 25 plants per plot, maintained at the field capacity moisture level. Seedlings were planted in plastic tubes using local substrate, basic fertilization and silicates. Diameter, height and fresh and dry biomass of the seedlings were determined 150 days after silicates treatments were applied. The use of silicates either in the substrate or through foliar application, in the production of eucalypt seedlings has proven to be inadequate when the substrate presents a balanced basic composition in terms of nutrients and pH.

    doi: 10.4336/2011.pfb.31.66.83

    O uso de silicato é uma prática que vem sendo adotada com frequência em culturas anuais, muito embora poucos trabalhos tenham sido realizados com intuito de verificar sua eficiência em espécies florestais arbóreas. O objetivo principal desta pesquisa foi avaliar o efeito da aplicação de silicatos de cálcio e de potássio no crescimento de mudas de Eucalyptus grandis. O experimento foi conduzido em casa de vegetação, no Município de Alambari, SP. O delineamento usado foi inteiramente ao acaso, com oito tratamentos, três repetições e 25 plantas por parcela, sendo mantidas na umidade de capacidade de campo. As mudas foram plantadas em tubetes de plástico, utilizando substrato local, com adubação básica e silicatos. Diâmetro de colo, altura e biomassa verde e seca das mudas foram determinados 150 dias após a

  11. Confined Water Dissociation in Disordered Silicate Nanometer-Channels at Elevated Temperatures: Mechanism, Dynamics and Impact on Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Dongshuai; Li, Dengke; Zhao, Tiejun; Li, Zongjin

    2016-05-01

    The effects of elevated temperature on the physical and chemical properties of water molecules filled in the nanometer-channels of calcium silicate hydrate have been investigated by performing reactive molecular dynamics simulation on C-S-H gel subjected to high temperature from 500 to 1500 K. The mobility of interlayer water molecules is temperature-dependent: with the elevation of temperature, the self-diffusivity of water molecules increases, and the glassy dynamic nature of interlayer water at low temperature transforms to bulk water characteristic at high temperature. In addition, the high temperature contributes to the water dissociation and hydroxyl group formation, and proton exchange between neighboring water molecules and calcium silicate substrate frequently happens. The hydrolytic reaction of water molecules results in breakage of the silicate chains and weakens the connectivity of the ionic-covalent bonds in the C-S-H skeleton. However, the broken silicate chains can repolymerize together to form branch structures to resist thermal attacking. PMID:27077726

  12. Interaction of dispersed polyvynil acetate with silicate in finishing materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runova, R. F.

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the processes of interaction between calcium silicate hydrates and dispersed polyvinyl acetate in tight films with the aim of developing compounds meant for restoration and finishing works. The basis of this development relies on the concept concerning the determining role of the crystal-chemical factor of the silicate phase in the formation of organic-mineral compounds of increased durability. The characteristics of dispersed calcium silicate hydrates are portrayed. The preparation conditions, accounting for the synthesis of the product of submicrocrystalline structure, conforming with the stoichiometry CaO∙SiO2 =0.8-2.0 have been determined. The interaction has been studied for compounds achieved by mixing ingredients in a rapid whirling mixer, and subjected to hardening at T=20+2 T. With the aid of XRD, DTA and Infra-Red Spectrometry methods the formation process of the sophisticated polymer silicate phase in the material was observed for a period of 90 days. The properties of the film were investigated and its high resistance against the influence of external factors was established. On this basis a conclusion concerning the quite high effectiveness of substituting portland cement with dispersed calcium silicate hydrate in polymer cement compounds has been made. White colour and other various special properties determine the suitability for repair and finishing works on facades of buildings.

    Este artículo está orientado a estudiar los procesos de interacción entre los silicatos cálcicos hidratados y el acetato de polivinilo disperso en capas impermeables, con el objeto de desarrollar compuestos destinados para la restauración. El fundamento de estos estudios es determinar el papel que los factores cristaloquímicos de las fases silicato tienen en la formación de compuestos órganominerales de elevada durabilidad. Se han descrito las características de los silicatos cálcicos hidratados

  13. The di- and tricalcium silicate dissolutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a specially designed reactor connected to an ICP spectrometer enabled the careful determination of the dissolution rates of C3S, C2S and CaO, respectively, over a broad range of concentration of calcium and silicates under conditions devoid of C–S–H. The kinetic laws, bridging the dissolution rates and the undersaturations, were obtained after extrapolation of rate zero allowing the estimation of the true experimental solubility products of C3S (Ksp = 9.6 · 10−23), C2S (Ksp = 4.3 · 10−18) and CaO (Ksp = 9.17 · 10−6). The latter are then compared to the solubilities calculated from the enthalpies of formation. We propose that the observed deviations result from the protonation of the unsaturated oxygen atoms present at the surface of these minerals. Hydration rates measured in cement pastes or in C3S pastes are in excellent agreement with the kinetic law found in this study for C3S under conditions undersaturated with respect to C–S–H

  14. Activity diagrams for calcium/hydrogen, sodium/hydrogen, and potassium/hydrogen, and H4SiO4 and their relation to reactions in systems containing radioactive waste forms, cement, and rock in the presence of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to identify reactions which can occur in systems containing nuclear waste forms, cement, and repository rock in the presence of water, activity diagrams were calculated from free energies for aluminosilicates and calcium silicates. Groundwater compositions from candidate repository sites in the Palo Duro Basin of Texas, the Delaware Basin of New Mexico, and the Nevada Test Site were plotted on these diagrams. Essentially all of these are shown to be in the calcium zeolite field as shown on the diagram for calcium in the absence of other cations. Chlorite is shown to be stable in this region at the Mg and pH level of the Ogallala if the chlorite is high in iron, and at the Mg and pH level of the Wolfcamp low- or high-Fe chlorites are stable. Potassium and sodium mineral relationships fall in two categories, dilute waters and saline waters. Boreholes at Yucca Flat and Mercury Valley at the Nevada Test Site, and shallow ground water from the Rolling Plains north and east of the Palo Duro Basin are in equilibrium with kaolinite. The brines from the Salado and Rustler formations are in equilibrium with kaolinite and possibly also with sodium-potassium zeolite and illite. Leachates of cement and water, and cement, waste, and water were plotted on the calcium silicate activity diagram. These solutions are in equilibrium with calcium silicate hydrate hydrolysis reactions, with grossular and possibly with Ca-zeolites. Among the calcium silicates, calcium-silicate-hydrate gel (C-S-H gel) and tobermorite are the most likely candidates, but the thermodynamic data are not adequate to distinguish all the possibilities. 37 references, 4 figures, 3 tables

  15. A contribution of research by chlorination from nickel silicate and nickel ferrite in the presence of calcium chloride and coke with possibilities of their intensification

    OpenAIRE

    Krstev, Boris

    1988-01-01

    The previous investigations in the field of the metal compounds chlorination of the refractory nickel minerals: garnierite and nontronite, by the chlorine, Cl2, HCl, NaCl or CaCl2, were determined directions, confirming the perspective of the mentioned process for the treatment of the low grade and complex minerals-laterites. The existing combined methods for enriching of the oxide-silicate nickel ores are these through which by heating the ore with coke and CaCl2 at high temperature reduced...

  16. Silicate fertilizer and irrigation depth in corn production

    OpenAIRE

    Edvaldo Eloy Dantas Júnior; Lucia Helena Garófala Chaves; Fernando Antônio Melo da Costa; Hans Raj Gheyi

    2013-01-01

    Calcium-magnesium silicates improve the soil physicochemical properties and provide benefits to plant nutrition, since they are sources of silica, calcium and magnesium. The objective of this study was to evaluate the grain yield of irrigated corn fertilized with calcium-magnesium silicate. The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse in Campina Grande - PB, Brazil, using plastic pots containing 80 kg of soil. The treatments consisted of the combination of four irrigation depths, related to...

  17. Avaliação de cultivares de alface adubadas com silicato de cálcio em casa-de-vegetação Evaluation of lettuce cultivars fertilized with calcium silicate in greenhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Lúcia Félix Ferreira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available O experimento foi conduzido no Departamento de Ciência do Solo da Universidade Federal de Lavras - UFLA, no período de junho a agosto de 2002. Objetivou-se avaliar a produtividade, o estado nutricional e a qualidade (classe de tamanho de cultivares de alface cultivadas com doses de silicato de cálcio em vasos sob casa-de-vegetação. O delineamento experimental foi em blocos casualizados, com quatro repetições, com 1 planta/vaso, em esquema fatorial 3 x 4 + 3, sendo três cultivares de alface (Raider, Regina e Vera e quatro doses de silicato de cálcio (0, 410, 1,000 e 2,000 mg dm-3; os tratamentos adicionais foram compostos pela aplicação de 820 mg dm-3 de carbonato de cálcio, para as três cultivares. O estado nutricional das plantas de alface foi avaliado pelo Sistema Integrado de Diagnose e Recomendação (DRIS. A aplicação da fonte silicato de cálcio não aumentou o crescimento das plantas e não aumentou o teor dos nutrientes nas plantas de alface, mas melhorou a nutrição das plantas para Si e aumentou a porcentagem de plantas sadias. A aplicação também aumentou a concentração de Mn, devido ao alto conteúdo de Mn no fertilizante aplicado (Silifértil®. As três variedades de alface comportaram-se como plantas não acumuladoras de Si.The experiment was carried out at the Department of Soil Sciences of the Universidade Federal de Lavras - UFLA, from June to August 2002, with the objective to evaluate the productivity, the nutritional state and the quality (size class of lettuce cultivars grown with calcium silicate in greenhouse. The experimental design was disposed in blocks with four replicates, in factorial arrangement with additional treatments: 3 x 4 +3, composed by three lettuce cultivars: Raider (group crisphead lettuce; Regina (group butterhead lettuce and Vera (group looseleaf lettuce and four calcium silicate rates (0, 410, 1.000 and 2.000 mg dm-3, additional treatments were composed of the application of

  18. Characterization of silicates and calcium carbonates applied to high-dose dosimetry; Caracterizacao de silicatos e carbonatos de calcio aplicados a dosimetria de doses altas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vila, Gustavo Barreto

    2012-07-01

    The predominant isomorphous form in the biominerals studied in this work (oyster shell, coral, mother of pearl and shell) was aragonite. The appearance of the calcite phase occurred at 500 deg C at a heating rate of 10 deg {sup C}/s for all samples except for the coral sample, which was 400 deg C, independent of the heating rate. The most abundant element in the biominerals samples was Ca in the CaO form, and in the silicates (tremolite, diopside and rhodonite) Si in the SiO form. The most common trace element observed in the biominerals samples was Fe. The analyses of electron paramagnetic resonance showed lines of Mn{sup 2+} in the coral and mother-of-pearl samples before irradiation. In the case of the irradiated samples, the defects found were CO{sub 2}{sup -}, CO{sub 3}{sup 3-}, CO{sub 3}{sup -} and SO{sub 2}{sup -}, in the g range between 2.0010 and 2.0062. In the analyses by optical absorption of biominerals, transitions due to the presence of Mn in the samples were found. A thermoluminescent (TL) peak at approximately 140 deg C was found for the biominerals and at 180 deg C for silicates, which intensity depends directly on the dose. For samples exposed to different types of radiation, the TL peak occurred at lower temperatures. From the dose-response curves obtained for these materials, it was possible to determine a linear range for which their application in high dose dosimetry becomes possible. Taking into account the radiation type, among biominerals and silicates, the lowest detectable dose (40mGy) to gamma radiation was achieved for oyster shell samples using the measuring technique of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). Using beta radiation, for diopside and tremolite samples the lowest detectable dose of 60mGy was obtained. For all samples, using the TL, OSL and thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE) techniques in alpha, beta and gamma radiation beans a good response reproducibility was obtained. Therefore, the samples characterized

  19. Alleviating negative effects of irrigation-water salinity on growth and vase life of gerbera by foliar spray of calcium chloride and potassium silicate

    OpenAIRE

    A. Mohammadi Torkashvand

    2015-01-01

    The required water for greenhouses in Kishestan, Soume-e-Sara town, Guilan province, Iran, is mainly provided by underground resources that have inappropriate quality. One way to reduce the impact of salinity an plant growth is proper nutrition. This greenhouse research was conducted to evaluate the effect of water salinity and foliar spray of calcium (Ca) and silicon (Si) on growth and vase life of gerbera in a factorial experiment based on compeletly randomized design with two factors. The ...

  20. 活性硅酸钙在高填料文化用纸中的应用研究%Application research of activated calcium silicate in high ifller ifne paper

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔樵夫; 刘廷志; 杨波

    2015-01-01

    研究了活性硅酸钙作为填料在高填料文化用纸中的应用。所用硅酸钙填料来源于电厂粉煤灰,平均粒径为31.90µm,是一种偏碱性、带有较强负电荷、高分散新型硅酸盐产品。以针叶木浆和阔叶木浆为纤维原料,在打浆度45°S R情况下,以40/60的比例进行混合,采用阳离子玉米淀粉和两性聚丙烯酰胺的双元增强助留体系,抄造出来的纸样在活性硅酸钙填料的添加量为35%时,各项指标均达到了国家静电复印纸标准(GB/T 24988-2010)规定要求。在针叶木浆与废纸浆的混合比例达到50/50时,采用同样的抄造方法也可以达到以上标准要求。在此基础上,在小长网试验纸机上,以针叶木浆/阔叶木浆(40/60)为原料进行抄纸试验,按照CS (1.5%)、AmCPAM(0.8%)、CPAM(0.03%)、AKD(0.5%)、填料(74%)的顺序加入各种助剂,抄造出的纸样在活性硅酸钙填料的添加量达到35%时,其白度、紧度、施胶度、不透明度、撕裂度、耐折度、抗张强度、弯曲挺度等各项指标均能够满足国家标准要求。%Application of activated calcium silicate as papermaking ifller for high ifller ifne papers was studied in this article. The activated calcium silicate was extracted from fine coal ash which is produced from thermal power plant. Calcium silicate ifller is a kind of negatively charged, alkaline, high dispersion product with mean particle diameter of 31.90µm. The performances of the handsheet could meet the requirements of the national standards for copy paper(GB/T 24988-2010), while the bleached soft wood KP pulp and hard wood pulp (40/60) was used as ifber stock and the ash content of the handsheet was 35%. The same results were obtained when the bleached softwood kraft pulp and deinked pulp (ratio 50/50) was used. Cationic starch and AmCPAM, comprising a binary retention system, were employed in handsheet making. The pilot

  1. Phase transformation during the decomposition of hydrated calcium zirconium aluminate (Ca{sub 7}ZrAl{sub 6}O{sub 18}) paste subjected to various dehydration temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madej, Dominika, E-mail: dmadej@agh.edu.pl; Szczerba, Jacek; Dul, Krzysztof

    2014-12-10

    Highlights: • The phase transformation during heating of hydrated Ca{sub 7}ZrAl{sub 6}O{sub 18} paste was investigated. • DTA-TG-EGA, LT-XRD, HT-XRD, FT-IR, and SEM-EDS techniques were used for phases identification. • Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6}, Ca{sub 12}Al{sub 14}O{sub 33}, Ca{sub 5}Al{sub 6}O{sub 14}, and Ca–Zr–Al–O oxide phase were formed upon dehydration. • Ca{sub 5}Al{sub 6}O{sub 14} appeared as a preliminary amorphous calcium aluminate phase. • The unknown ternary phase CaO–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–ZrO{sub 2} was identified. - Abstract: In this paper, the results of experimental study concerning the characterization of dehydration behavior of the hydrated Ca{sub 7}ZrAl{sub 6}O{sub 18} phase are presented. The hydrated and dehydrated Ca{sub 7}ZrAl{sub 6}O{sub 18} pastes were investigated by DTA-TG-EGA, LT-XRD, HT-XRD, FT-IR, and SEM/EDS techniques. The original Ca{sub 7}ZrAl{sub 6}O{sub 18} changed to the calcium–aluminate–hydrates (C–A–H; C ≡CaO, A ≡Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, H ≡H{sub 2}O) and CaZrO{sub 3} due to the hydration reaction after mixing with water. C{sub 3}AH{sub 6} was formed in the conversion reaction of metastable hexagonal hydrated phases, i.e., CAH{sub 10} and C{sub 2}AH{sub 8} due to higher temperature. Calcium aluminates, Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6}, Ca{sub 12}Al{sub 14}O{sub 33}, and Ca{sub 5}Al{sub 6}O{sub 14} were formed as dehydration products of C–A–H phases. The results of IR spectroscopic measurements revealed that pentacalcium trialuminate, Ca{sub 5}Al{sub 6}O{sub 14} has appeared as a preliminary amorphous calcium aluminate phase. The unknown ternary compound in the system CaO–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–ZrO{sub 2} forming the dehydrated ring on the surface of the internal core of the unhydrated Ca{sub 7}ZrAl{sub 6}O{sub 18} grains has been identified by SEM-EDS.

  2. A new quantification method based on SEM-EDS to assess fly ash composition and study the reaction of its individual components in hydrating cement paste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durdziński, Paweł T., E-mail: pawel.durdzinski@gmail.com [Laboratory of Construction Materials, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Station 12, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Dunant, Cyrille F. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Station 12, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Haha, Mohsen Ben [HeidelbergCement Technology Center GmbH (HeidelbergCement AG), Rohrbacher Str. 95, 69181 Leimen (Germany); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Station 12, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2015-07-15

    Calcareous fly ashes are high-potential reactive residues for blended cements, but their qualification and use in concrete are hindered by heterogeneity and variability. Current characterization often fails to identify the dominant, most reactive, amorphous fraction of the ashes. We developed an approach to characterize ashes using electron microscopy. EDS element composition of millions of points is plotted in a ternary frequency plot. A visual analysis reveals number and ranges of chemical composition of populations: silicate, calcium-silicate, aluminosilicate, and calcium-rich aluminosilicate. We quantified these populations in four ashes and followed their hydration in two Portland-ash systems. One ash reacted at a moderate rate: it was composed of 70 vol.% of aluminosilicates and calcium-silicates and reached 60% reaction at 90 days. The other reacted faster, reaching 60% at 28 days due to 55 vol.% of calcium-rich aluminosilicates, but further reaction was slower and 15 vol.% of phases, the silica-rich ones, did not react.

  3. The influence of different parameters on the hydration process of binders based on alkali activated slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DARKO KRIZAN

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The influence of certain types of activators (water glass Na2O·nSiO2 and sodium-metasilicate Na2SiO3·5H2O on the hydration process of alkali activated slag was investigated in this study. The influence of activator concentration, specific surface area of the slag and the modulus n of the water glass (mass ratio between SiO2 and Na2O on the kinetics of the hydration process i.e., the change of compressive strength were also investigated. Poorly crystallized low base calcium silicate hydrate C–S–H (I is the main hydration product of alkali activated slag regardless of the activator used. This is the reason for the rapid increase in the strength of alkali activated slag and also of the very high strength values. The strength growth rate and strength values were significantly higher when sodium–metasilicate was used as the activator than when water glass was used. The specific surface area of the slag and the activator concentration are parameters which have a closely connected influence on strength and their action is cumulative. The modulus n of water glass does not have an explicit influence on the strength of alkali activated slag.

  4. Hydrothermal and mechanochemical reactions of rice husk ash with calcium hydroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugita, S.; Isojima, Y. [Hachinohe Institute of Technology, Aomori (Japan); Yu, Q. [Wuhan University of Technology, (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1998-05-01

    It is well known that a calcium silicate hydrate, commonly referred to as C-S-H gel, is important for cement to exhibit strength. Silica is present in rice husk ash to around 90%. When sufficiently sintered and crushed, rice husk ash mostly comprises amorphous silica having a large surface area. It is reactive, and is considered to contribute to improvement of concrete strength and durability. In this study, rice husk ash is reacted with calcium hydroxide under hydrothermal conditions or mechanochemical conditions at normal temperature, to synthesize Ca(1.5)SiO(3.5){center_dot}xH2O as one of the calcium silicate hydrates. It has an average particle size of 10{mu}m or smaller, which varies depending on synthesis method and condition. The compound synthesized at 40degC is composed of flocs having a porous structure and large specific surface area, as is the case with a C-S-H gel present in Portland cement paste. It loses the above structure and moisture in the fine pores gradually, when heated, but remains amorphous at up to 750degC. It is transformed into wollastonite, when heated to 780degC. 7 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Alleviating negative effects of irrigation-water salinity on growth and vase life of gerbera by foliar spray of calcium chloride and potassium silicate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mohammadi Torkashvand

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The required water for greenhouses in Kishestan, Soume-e-Sara town, Guilan province, Iran, is mainly provided by underground resources that have inappropriate quality. One way to reduce the impact of salinity an plant growth is proper nutrition. This greenhouse research was conducted to evaluate the effect of water salinity and foliar spray of calcium (Ca and silicon (Si on growth and vase life of gerbera in a factorial experiment based on compeletly randomized design with two factors. The first factor was salinity of irrigation water at two levels (0 and 1.5 dS/m and the second factor was foliar spray at seven levels (without spray, twice Ca spray, four times Ca spray, two times Ca spray + once Si spray, twice Ca spray + twice Si spray, four times Ca spray + once Si spray, and four times Ca spray + twice Si spray, each with three replications. Results showed that four times Ca foliar spray led to an increase in stem hight, stem and neck diameter, postharvest life and Ca concentration of shoots. In all spray treatments, number of flowers in zero salinity was more than 1.5 dS/m treatments. In general, in case of using low-quality water (electrical conductivity of 1.5 dS/m, the effects of salinity on dry and fresh weights of gerbera plant and vase life of its flowers can be reduced by foliar application of Ca and Si. Since inappropriate water quality in Rasht Greenhouse Complex, Soume-e-Sara town, is one of the main problems of the farmers, especially in growing the ornamental plants, effects of salinity on plant growth could be alleviated with foliar spray of nutrients, especially Ca and Si. In this respect, four times spray of Ca and also twice spray of Ca + twice spray of Si are recommended.

  6. Evolution of trees and mycorrhizal fungi intensifies silicate mineral weathering

    OpenAIRE

    Quirk, J; D. J. Beerling; S. A. Banwart; Kakonyi, G.; Romero-Gonzalez, M. E.; Leake, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    Forested ecosystems diversified more than 350 Ma to become major engines of continental silicate weathering, regulating the Earth's atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration by driving calcium export into ocean carbonates. Our field experiments with mature trees demonstrate intensification of this weathering engine as tree lineages diversified in concert with their symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi. Preferential hyphal colonization of the calcium silicate-bearing rock, basalt, progressively increase...

  7. Gas hydrates

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.

    Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 43 Gas Hydrates T. Ramprasad National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa-403 004 rprasad@nio.org A gas hydrate is a crystalline solid; its building blocks consist of a gas molecule... surrounded by a cage of water molecules. Thus it is similar to ice, except that the crystalline structure is stabilized by the guest gas molecule within the cage of water molecules. Many gases have molecular sizes suitable to form hydrate, including...

  8. Effect of Some Admixtures on the Hydration of Silica Fume and Hydrated Lime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The effects of sodium salt of naphthalene formaldehyde sulfonic acid and stearic acid on the hydration of silica fume and Ca(0H)2 have been investigated. The hydration was carried out at 60℃ and W/S ratio of 4 for various time intervals namely, 1, 3, 7 and 28 days and in the presence of 0.2% and 5% superplasticizer and stearic acid. The results of the hydration kinetics show that both admixtures accelerate the hydration reaction of silica fume and calcium hydroxide during the first 7 days. Whereas, after 28 days hydration there is no significant effect. Generally, most of free calcium hydroxide seems to be consumed after 28 days. In addition, the phase composition as well as the microstructure of the formed hydrates was examined by using X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) respectively.

  9. Antibacterial Activity of Silicate Bioceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Sheng; NING Congqin; ZHOU Yue; CHEN Lei; LIN Kaili; CHANG Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Four kinds of pure silicate ceramic particles, CaSiO3, Ca3SiO5, bredigite and akermanite were prepared and their bactericidal effects were systematically investigated. The phase compositions of these silicate ceramics were characterized by XRD. The ionic concentration meas urement revealed that the Calcium (Ca) ion concentration were relatively higher in Ca3SiO5 and bredigite, and much lower in CaSiO3 and akermanite. Accordingly, the pH values of the four silicate ceramics extracts showed a positive correlation with the particle concentrations. Meanwhile, by decreasing the particle size, higher Ca ion concentrations can be achieved, leading to the increase of aqueous pH value as well. In summary, all of the four silicate ceramics tested in our study showed antibacterial effect in a dose-dependent manner. Generally, the order of their antibacterial activity against E.coli from strong to weak is Ca3SiO5, bredigite, CaSiO3 and akermanite.

  10. Effect of silicate solutions on metakaolinite based cementitious material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Xue-jun; LI Hua-jian; SUN Heng-hu

    2006-01-01

    High performance metakaolinite based cementitious materials were prepared with metakaolinite as main component, and the different modules of Na and Na-K silicate solutions as diagenetic agent. The results show that the mechanical properties are affected by different silicate solutions, compressive strengths of pastes hydrated for 3 d and 28 d with Na-K silicate solution (The modulus is 1) are about 43.68 and 78.52 MPa respectively. By analyzing the mechanical properties of Metakaolinite based cementitious materials, the diagenetic effect of lower module is better than higher module, and Na-K silicate solution is better than Na silicate solution. The structure of the Na and Na-K silicate solutions is studied with IR and 29Si NMR, the reason of the lower module and Na-K silicate solution improving the mechanical properties is that the low module silicate solution has lower polymeric degree of silicon dioxide, and the higher polymeric degree of silicon oxide tetrahedron(Q4) in Na-K silicate solution is less than Na silicate solution.

  11. Hydration Characteristic of Cementitious Material of Steel Slag Concrete Used for Artificial Reefs%人工鱼礁用钢渣混凝土胶凝材料的水化特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王中杰; 倪文; 高术杰; 祝丽萍; 乔春雨

    2012-01-01

    以鞍钢-0.088 mm热闷法钢渣和鞍钢高炉矿渣为胶凝材料的主要组分,以鞍钢0.088~19 mm热闷法钢渣为骨料,制备出了具有较高强度的人工鱼礁用钢渣混凝土.通过X射线衍射分析、场发射扫描电镜分析、差热分析和红外吸收光谱分析对胶凝材料的水化特性进行研究,结果表明:该胶凝材料在水化初期生成大量低碱度水化硅酸钙凝胶和少量钙矾石,水化硅酸钙凝胶是混凝土早期强度的主要来源;而随着水化进程的延续,水化硅酸钙凝胶的继续发展和不断增多、长大的钙矾石对体系空隙的充填则共同使混凝土的后期强度得到进一步的提高.%An Artificial reef characterized by its high strength was prepared Its cementitious material is composed of - 0. 088 mm steel slag stabilized by a hot-simmering method and blast furnace slag from Ansteel company; its fine and coarse aggregates are also steel slag stabilized by a hot-simmering method with sizes from 0.088 ram to 19 mm. By analyses of X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscope, differential thermal and infrared absorption spectrum for the hydration characteristic of the cementitious material, it can be found that a large amount of calcium silicate hydrate which mainly contributes to the early strength characterized by its low-alkalinity and a small amount of ettringte are both formed at early hydration stage. With the development of the hydration process, the calcium silicate hydrate and ettringite which is filling in the gaps of the hydration system are increasing continually. Therefore, the long-term strength can be improved by calcium silicate hydrate and ettringite.

  12. Study on silicate-calcium phosphate composite bone cement modified by sodium carbonate solution%碳酸钠液相改性硅-磷酸钙复合骨水泥研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李青林; 杨帮成

    2014-01-01

    以质量分数70%的硅酸三钙(Ca3 SiO5,C3 S)和30%磷酸氢钙(CaHPO4·2H2 O,DCPD)复合得到的 DCP30粉体材料为固相,以不同浓度碳酸钠溶液为液相,得到碳酸钠改性骨水泥材料。使用 X 射线衍射(XRD)、扫描电镜(SEM)、万能材料试验机等手段对不同浓度改性材料进行表征。结果显示:添加碳酸钠液相,骨水泥初、终凝时间分别缩短至16和55 min;调控碳酸钠液相浓度,可以实现短期抗压强度优化;使用碳酸钠后,固化自发生成羟基磷灰石(HA)。浸泡模拟体液(SBF)7天,材料表面覆盖 HA 沉积层,生物活性优越。碳酸钠液相改性硅-磷酸钙复合骨水泥体系的水化性能、短期力学性能以及生物活性均优于Ca3 SiO5水泥和未改性硅-磷酸钙复合骨水泥,是一种良好的生物活性骨修复材料。%Sodium carbonate solution modified bone cement materials have been prepared using sodium carbonate solution with dif-ferent concentration as liquid phase and DCP30 powder material obtained by 70% mass fraction tricalcium silicate (Ca3 SiO5 ,C3 S) and 30% dicalcium phosphate (CaHPO4 ·2H2 O,DCPD)as the solid phase.The materials were characterized by the means of X-ray diffraction (XRD),scanning electron microscope (SEM)and mechanical test.The results show that the initial and final set-ting time of bone cement is reduced to 16 and 55 min by the addition of sodium carbonate solution.The short-term mechanical strength can be optimized by controlling the concentration of sodium carbonate solution.Hydroxyapatite (HA)can spontaneously form after the use of sodium carbonate solution.HA forms on the surface of bone-cement after immersion in SBF for 7 days,indi-cating its good bioactivity.The modified system shows better hydraulic property,bioactivity and mechanical strength than Ca3 SiO5 cement and unmodifiled silicate-calcium phosphate composite bone cement,suggesting the new system is a

  13. Hydration of blended cement pastes containing waste ceramic powder as a function of age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheinherrová, Lenka; Trník, Anton; Kulovaná, Tereza; Pavlík, Zbyšek; Rahhal, Viviana; Irassar, Edgardo F.; Černý, Robert

    2016-07-01

    The production of a cement binder generates a high amount of CO2 and has high energy consumption, resulting in a very adverse impact on the environment. Therefore, use of pozzolana active materials in the concrete production leads to a decrease of the consumption of cement binder and costs, especially when some type of industrial waste is used. In this paper, the hydration of blended cement pastes containing waste ceramic powder from the Czech Republic and Portland cement produced in Argentina is studied. A cement binder is partially replaced by 8 and 40 mass% of a ceramic powder. These materials are compared with an ordinary cement paste. All mixtures are prepared with a water/cement ratio of 0.5. Thermal characterization of the hydrated blended pastes is carried out in the time period from 2 to 360 days. Simultaneous DSC/TG analysis is performed in the temperature range from 25 °C to 1000 °C in an argon atmosphere. Using this thermal analysis, we identify the temperature, enthalpy and mass changes related to the liberation of physically bound water, calcium-silicate-hydrates gels dehydration, portlandite, vaterite and calcite decomposition and their changes during the curing time. Based on thermogravimetry results, we found out that the portlandite content slightly decreases with time for all blended cement pastes.

  14. Preparation and characterization of TiO2/silicate hierarchical coating on titanium surface for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qianli; Liu, Xujie; Elkhooly, Tarek A; Zhang, Ranran; Yang, Xing; Shen, Zhijian; Feng, Qingling

    2016-03-01

    In the current work, TiO2/silicate hierarchical coatings with various nanostructure morphologies were successfully prepared on titanium substrates through micro-arc oxidation (MAO) and subsequent hydrothermal treatment (HT). Moreover, the nucleation mechanism and growth behavior of the nanostructures, hydrophilicity, protein adsorption and apatite-inducing ability of various coatings were also explored. The novel TiO2/silicate hierarchical coatings comprised calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) as an outer-layer and TiO2 matrix as an inner-layer. According to the morphological features, the nanostructures were classified as nanorod, nanoplate and nanoleaf. The morphology, degree of crystallinity and crystalline phases of CSH nanostructures could be controlled by optimizing the HT conditions. The nucleation of CSH nanostructures is caused by release and re-precipitation mechanism. The TiO2/CSH hierarchical coatings exhibited some enhanced physical and biological performances compared to MAO-fabricated coating. The improvement of the hydrophilicity, fibronectin adsorption and apatite-inducing ability was found to be morphological dependent according to the following trend: nanoleaf coating>nanoplate coating>nanorod coating>MAO coating. The results indicate that the tuning of physical and morphological properties of nanostructures coated on biomaterial surface could significantly influence the hydrophilicity, protein adsorption and in vitro bioactivity of biomaterial. PMID:26706535

  15. Preparation and characterization of TiO2/silicate hierarchical coating on titanium surface for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qianli; Liu, Xujie; Elkhooly, Tarek A; Zhang, Ranran; Yang, Xing; Shen, Zhijian; Feng, Qingling

    2016-03-01

    In the current work, TiO2/silicate hierarchical coatings with various nanostructure morphologies were successfully prepared on titanium substrates through micro-arc oxidation (MAO) and subsequent hydrothermal treatment (HT). Moreover, the nucleation mechanism and growth behavior of the nanostructures, hydrophilicity, protein adsorption and apatite-inducing ability of various coatings were also explored. The novel TiO2/silicate hierarchical coatings comprised calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) as an outer-layer and TiO2 matrix as an inner-layer. According to the morphological features, the nanostructures were classified as nanorod, nanoplate and nanoleaf. The morphology, degree of crystallinity and crystalline phases of CSH nanostructures could be controlled by optimizing the HT conditions. The nucleation of CSH nanostructures is caused by release and re-precipitation mechanism. The TiO2/CSH hierarchical coatings exhibited some enhanced physical and biological performances compared to MAO-fabricated coating. The improvement of the hydrophilicity, fibronectin adsorption and apatite-inducing ability was found to be morphological dependent according to the following trend: nanoleaf coating>nanoplate coating>nanorod coating>MAO coating. The results indicate that the tuning of physical and morphological properties of nanostructures coated on biomaterial surface could significantly influence the hydrophilicity, protein adsorption and in vitro bioactivity of biomaterial.

  16. Measurement and modeling of the surface potential evolution of hydrated cement pastes as a function of degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrated cement pastes (HCP) have a high affinity with a lot of (radio)toxic products and can be used as waste confining materials. In cementitious media. elements are removed from solution via (co)precipitation reactions or via sorption/diffusion mechanisms as surface complexation equilibria. In this study, to improve the knowledge of the surface charge evolution vs the degradation of the HCP particles, two cements have been studied: CEM-I (ordinary Portland cement, OPC) and CEM-V (blast furnace slag and fly ash added to OPC). Zeta potential measurements showed that two isoelectric points exist vs HCP leaching, i.e., pH. Zeta potential increases from -17 to +20 mV for pH 13.3 to pH 12.65 (fresh HCP states) and decreases from 20 to -8 mV for pH 12.65 to I I (degraded HCP states). The use of a simple surface complexation model of C-S-H, limited in comparison with the structural modeling of C-S-H in literature, allows a good pr?diction of the surface potential evolution of both HCP. Using this operational modeling, the surface charge is controlled by the deprotonation of surface sites (> SO-) and by the sorption of calcium (> SOCa+), which brings in addition a positive charge. The calcium concentration is controlled by portlandite or calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) solubilities. (authors)

  17. Behavior of calcium silicate in leaching process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘桂华; 李小斌; 彭志宏; 周秋生

    2003-01-01

    Based on the thermodynamic calculation, the mole ratio of CaO to SiO2, temperature and A/S of bauxitehave a profound influence on the mole ratio of 2CaO @ SiO2 to CaO @ SiO2 in sinter. CaO @ SiO2 and β-2CaO @ SiO2appear stable in caustic solution but unstable in soda solution, and CaO @ SiO2 is more stable than β-2CaO @ SiO2 un-der the same leaching condition. Compared with the conventional sinter, the rate of alumina extraction of the newsinter is large and the secondary reaction is restricted in the leaching, which might be mainly due to the more contentof CaO @ SiO2 in sinter and better stability of CaO @ SiO2 in leaching.

  18. Characterization of the Aqueous Uranyl-Silicate Complex Using X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Ab Initio Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, M.; Massey, M.; Huang, P.

    2015-12-01

    The speciation of aqueous uranium ions is an important factor in predicting its mobility and fate in the environment. Two major controls on speciation are pH and the presence of complexing ligands. For the case of aqueous uranyl, UO22+(aq), some common complexes include uranyl-hydroxy, uranyl-carbonato, and uranyl-calcium-carbonato complexes, all of which differ in chemical reactivity and mobility. Uranyl-silicate complexes are also known but remain poorly characterized. In this work, we studied uranyl speciation in a series of aqueous solutions of 0.1 mM uranyl and 2 mM silicate with pH ranging from 4 to 7. Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectra of these samples were recorded at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory). Of particular note are the uranyl and silicate concentrations employed in our experiments, which are lower than conditions in previously reported EXAFS studies and approach conditions in natural groundwater systems. Preliminary analyses of EXAFS data indicate that uranyl speciation changes across the pH range, consistent with published thermodynamic data that suggest uranyl-silicate complexes may be important for pH ~ 5 and below, while uranyl-carbonato complexes become dominant at circumneutral pH. To guide the interpretation of the EXAFS data, molecular-scale simulations were carried out using density functional theory. We considered two classes of models: (i) hydrated clusters, and (ii) ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of 3D-periodic models involving uranyl and silicate in water. These calculations reveal that at pH ~ 5, the uranyl speciation is the [UO2(H2O)4H3SiO4]+ complex formed by the substitution of an equatorial uranyl water with a monodentate silicate ligand. The evidence from experiments and simulations provide a consistent picture for the uranyl-silicate complex, which may be important in the transport of uranyl in acidic, silicate-rich waters.

  19. Silicate fertilizer and irrigation depth in corn production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edvaldo Eloy Dantas Júnior

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Calcium-magnesium silicates improve the soil physicochemical properties and provide benefits to plant nutrition, since they are sources of silica, calcium and magnesium. The objective of this study was to evaluate the grain yield of irrigated corn fertilized with calcium-magnesium silicate. The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse in Campina Grande - PB, Brazil, using plastic pots containing 80 kg of soil. The treatments consisted of the combination of four irrigation depths, related to water replacement of 50, 75, 100 and 125% of the crop evapotranspiration, with fertilizer levels of 0, 82, 164 and 246 g of calcium-magnesium silicate, with three replications. The experimental design was in randomized blocks, with the irrigation depths distributed in bands while the silicon levels constituted the subplots. Corn yield was influenced by calcium-magnesium silicate and by irrigation depth, obtaining the greatest grain yield with the dose of 164 g pot-1 irrigated at the highest water level. The water-use efficiency of in corn production tended to decrease when the irrigation depth was increased. The best water-use efficiency was observed when the irrigation level was between 87 and 174 mm, and the dose of silicate was 164 g pot-1.

  20. EFFECT OF QUARTZ/MULLITE BLEND CERAMIC ADDITIVE ON IMPROVING RESISTANCE TO ACID OF SODIUM SILICATE-ACTIVATED SLAG CEMENT. CELCIUS BRINE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUGAMA, T.; BROTHERS, L.E.; VAN DE PUTTE, T.R.

    2006-06-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of manufactured quartz/mullite blend (MQMB) ceramic powder in increasing the resistance to acid of sodium silicate-activated slag (SSAS) cementitious material for geothermal wells. A 15-day exposure to 90{sup o} CO{sub 2}-laden H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} revealed that the MQMB had high potential as an acid-resistant additive for SSAS cement. Two factors, the appropriate ratio of slag/MQMB and the autoclave temperature, contributed to better performance of MQMB-modified SSAS cement in abating its acid erosion. The most effective slag/MQMB ratio in minimizing the loss in weight by acid erosion was 70/30 by weight. For autoclave temperature, the loss in weight of 100 C autoclaved cement was a less than 2%, but at 300 C it was even lower. Before exposure to acid, the cement autoclaved at 100 C was essentially amorphous; increasing the temperature to 200 C led to the formation of crystalline analcime in the zeolitic mineral family during reactions between the mullite in MQMB and the Na from sodium silicate. In addition, at 300 C, crystal of calcium silicate hydrate (1) (CSH) was generated in reactions between the quartz in MQMB and the activated slag. These two crystalline phases (CSH and analcime) were responsible for densifying the autoclaved cement, conveying improved compressive strength and minimizing water permeability. The CSH was susceptible to reactions with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, forming two corrosion products, bassanite and ionized monosilicic acid. However, the uptake of ionized monosilicic acid by Mg dissociated from the activated slag resulted in the formation of lizardite as magnesium silicate hydrate. On the other hand, the analcime was barely susceptible to acid if at all. Thus, the excellent acid resistance of MQMB-modified SSAS cement was due to the combined phases of lizardite and analcime.

  1. Rice-husk ash paste and concrete: Some aspects of hydration and the microstructure of the interfacial zone between the aggregate and paste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, M.H.; Lastra, R.; Malhotra, V.M. [CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Natural Resources Canada

    1996-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental study on the effects of the incorporation of rice-husk ash (RHA) in cement paste and concrete on the hydration and the microstructure of the interfacial zone between the aggregate and paste. The influence on the compressive strength of concrete is discussed, and the results are compared with those obtained with the control portland cement concrete and concrete incorporating silica fume. As for ordinary portland cement paste, it was found that calcium hydroxide and calcium silicate hydrates [C-S-H] were the major hydration and reaction products for the HA paste. Because of the pozzolanic reaction, the paste incorporating RHA had lower Ca(OH){sub 2} content than the control portland cement paste. The incorporation of the RHA in concrete reduced its porosity and the Ca(OH){sub 2} amount in the interfacial zone; the width of the interfacial zone between the aggregate and the cement paste was also reduced compared with the control portland cement composite. However, the porosity in the interfacial zone of the rice-husk ash composite was higher than that of the silica fume composite. The incorporation of the RHA in the cement paste did not increase its compressive strength compared with that of the control. The higher compressive strength of the RHA concrete compared with that of the control is due probably to the reduced porosity, reduced Ca(OH){sub 2}, and reduced width of the interfacial zone between the paste and the aggregate.

  2. Suprimento do silicato de cálcio e a eficiência nutricional de variedades de cafeeiro Effect of calcium silicate suplly and the nutritional efficiency of coffee cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adélia Aziz Alexandre Pozza

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Embora não seja considerado nutriente essencial às plantas, o Si é classificado como elemento benéfico ou útil, mas pode alterar a dinâmica nutricional das plantas. Objetivando comparar a eficiência nutricional de variedades de cafeeiro (Catuaí, Mundo Novo e Icatu em resposta à adubação silicatada, realizou-se um experimento em blocos casualizados, com as três variedades de mudas em tubetes combinadas com seis doses de CaSiO3 (T0 = 0, T1 = 0,063, T2 = 0,125, T3 = 0,25, T4 = 0,5 e T5 = 1,0 g dm-3 de substrato. A variedade Icatu teve a maior eficiência de absorção (EA de Cu, Zn, Fe e Si, maior eficiência de uso (EU de N, K, Ca, B e Mn, não diferindo da Mundo Novo com relação aos nutrientes N, Ca e Mn, e maior eficiência de translocação (ET de N, S, Zn e de Fe. A Catuaí teve maior EA de P, K, B e Mn, não diferindo da Mundo Novo com relação aos nutrientes P, K e Mn, maior EU para Mg, S, Cu, Zn, Fe e Si, provavelmente devido à melhor ET desses nutrientes, exceto para Fe e Si. A Mundo Novo foi mais eficiente na absorção de N, K, Ca, Mg, Mn e Si, teve maior EU de P e Mn e maior ET de K, Ca, B, Mn e Si.Silicon is classified as a beneficial nutrient and can improve the nutritional dynamics of plants, although it is not considered an essential nutrient for plants. In an experiment in a randomized block design, three coffee cultivars (Catuaí, Mundo Novo and Icatu were planted in plastic tubes, combined with six doses of calcium silicate (T0=0, T1=0.063, T2=0.125, T3=0.25, T4=0.5 and T5=1.0 g dm-3 substrate, to compare the nutritional efficiency of the cultivars in response to silicon fertilization. Cultivar Icatu showed the higher uptake efficiency (UE of Cu, Zn, Fe, and Si, and efficiency of use (EU of N, K, Ca, B, and Mn, but the later did not differ from Mundo Novo cultivar (N, Ca, and Mn. The efficiency of translocation (ET was higher for N, S, Zn, and Fe. For Catuaí the uptake efficiency of P, K, B, and Mn was higher

  3. Characterization of iron-phosphate-silicate chemical garden structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barge, Laura M; Doloboff, Ivria J; White, Lauren M; Stucky, Galen D; Russell, Michael J; Kanik, Isik

    2012-02-28

    Chemical gardens form when ferrous chloride hydrate seed crystals are added or concentrated solutions are injected into solutions of sodium silicate and potassium phosphate. Various precipitation morphologies are observed depending on silicate and phosphate concentrations, including hollow plumes, bulbs, and tubes. The growth of precipitates is controlled by the internal osmotic pressure, fluid buoyancy, and membrane strength. Additionally, rapid bubble-led growth is observed when silicate concentrations are high. ESEM/EDX analysis confirms compositional gradients within the membranes, and voltage measurements across the membranes during growth show a final potential of around 150-200 mV, indicating that electrochemical gradients are maintained across the membranes as growth proceeds. The characterization of chemical gardens formed with iron, silicate, and phosphate, three important components of an early earth prebiotic hydrothermal system, can help us understand the properties of analogous structures that likely formed at submarine alkaline hydrothermal vents in the Hadean-structures offering themselves as the hatchery of life.

  4. Natural Gas Hydrates

    OpenAIRE

    Ersland, Geir

    2010-01-01

    The experimental set-up with the MRI monitoring apparatus was capable of forming large quantities of methane hydrates in sandstone pores and monitor hydrate growth patterns for various initial conditions. Spontaneous conversion of methane hydrate to carbon dioxide hydrate occurred when methane hydrate, in porous media, was exposed to liquid carbon dioxide. The MRI images did not detect any significant increase in signal in the hydrate saturated cores that would indicate the presence of free w...

  5. Statistical Analyses of Optimum Partial Replacement of Cement by Fly Ash Based on Complete Consumption of Calcium Hydroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouypornprasert Winai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this technical paper were to propose the optimum partial replacement of cement by fly ash based on the complete consumption of calcium hydroxide from hydration reactions of cement and the long-term strength activity index based on equivalent calcium silicate hydrate as well as the propagation of uncertainty due to randomness inherent in main chemical compositions in cement and fly ash. Firstly the hydration- and pozzolanic reactions as well as stoichiometry were reviewed. Then the optimum partial replacement of cement by fly ash was formulated. After that the propagation of uncertainty due to main chemical compositions in cement and fly ash was discussed and the reliability analyses for applying the suitable replacement were reviewed. Finally an applicability of the concepts mentioned above based on statistical data of materials available was demonstrated. The results from analyses were consistent with the testing results by other researchers. The results of this study provided guidelines of suitable utilization of fly ash for partial replacement of cement. It was interesting to note that these concepts could be extended to optimize partial replacement of cement by other types of pozzolan which were described in the other papers of the authors.

  6. Artrodese na coluna cervical utilizando SICAP como substituto de enxerto ósseo Artrodesis en la columna cervical utilizando SICAP como sustituto de injerto óseo Cervical spine fusion utilizing silicated calcium phosphate bone graft substitute (SICAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Fratezi

    2011-01-01

    Tech EE.UU, Reino Unido es un injerto óseo compuesto de calcio-fosfato con una sustitución de silicato en la estructura química, con una estructura tridimensional que parece hueso natural. MÉTODOS: 19 pacientes fueron sometidos a fusión ósea cervical y analizados retrospectivamente. La evaluación radiográfica y la evaluación clínica fueron realizadas utilizandose el cuestionario Neck Disability Index y la escala análoga del dolor (VAS pre y postoperación. RESULTADOS: El período promedio de seguimiento postoperatorio fue de 14 meses ± 5 meses (7-30 meses. Once pacientes fueron sometidos a fusión vía anterior; 5 pacientes vía posterior y 3 pacientes vía anterior y posterior. La revisión radiográfica mostró 19/19 (100% de fusión ósea, ningún caso presentó subsidencia, rotura o soltura de material de implante o movimiento en los niveles fusionados. Ningún ejemplo de osificación heterotópica o de crecimiento óseo intracanal fue observado. Clínicamente, el promedio de las puntuaciones del Neck Disability disminuyeron 13,3 puntos (promedio preop. de 34,5, postop. de 21,2, mejora de 39%, el promedio de VAS para dolor cervical disminuyó 2 puntos (2,7 preop. para 0,7 postop.; mejora de 74,1%. No fueron observadas complicaciones como infección, osteólisis o edema excesivo de las partes blandas. CONCLUSIÓN: Los resultados preliminares obtenidos en esta serie feuron estimulantes con el uso de SICaP como injerto óseo, con sólida fusión ósea obtenida en todos los casos y sin formación de osificación heterotópica o crecimiento de hueso intracanal. SIcaP demuestra ser un sustituto confiable para el injerto óseo autólogo en la columna cervical.OBJECTIVE: Bone graft substitutes have been developed to obviate the need for autograft from the iliac crest and its resultant complications. SiCaP (Actifuse, ApaTech US, UK is a calcium phosphate bone graft substitute with selective controlled silicate substitution in a patented 3-dimensional structure

  7. Effect of silicate fertilization on soil and on palisade grass plants under grazing intensities

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro Henrique de Cerqueira Luz; Letícia de Abreu Faria; Felipe Barros Macedo; Valdo Rodrigues Herling; Antonio Batista Sanches; Rosane Cláudia Rodrigues

    2011-01-01

    Application of calcium silicate (SiCa) as soil acidity corrective was evaluated in a Rhodic Hapludox soil with palisade grass conducted under pasture rotation system with different grazing intensities. Experimental design was complete randomized blocks with four grazing intensities - grazing intensities were imposed by forage supply (50, 100, 150 and 200 kg t-1 of DM per LW) - in experimental plots with four replicates and, in the subplots, with seven doses of calcium silicate combined with l...

  8. Investigating the Hydration of CM2 meteorites by IR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Góbi, S; Beck, P; Quirico, E; Schmidt, B

    2014-01-01

    Chondritic meteorites are of great interest since they are one of the most ancient remnants of the early solar system. Some of them, like the carbonaceous CM meteorites experienced aqueous alteration thus their olivine content transformed more or less into hydrated silicates such as phyllosilicates. These hydrated CM2 meteorites have been investigated in KBr pellets by means of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. In our focus of interest was to study the 3 and 10 $\\mu$m (3000 and 1000 cm$^{-1}$, the O$-$H and silicate streching) bands of several CM2 chondrites. By investigating these signals the water content and the extent of hydration can be determined. In order to achieve this, development of a new pellet production method was essential. This technique facilitates the elimination of adsorbed water coming from the surrounding environment, which would complicate correct interpretation of the results.

  9. Effect of calcium and magnesium silicate on the growth of the castor oil plant subjected to salinity levels Efeito de silicato de cálcio e magnésio sobre o crescimento de plantas de mamoneira submetidas a níveis de salinidade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Félix Brito Neto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Salt stress decreases the osmotic potential of soil solution causing water stress, causing toxic effects in the plants resulting in injuries on the metabolism and nutritional disorders, thus compromising the plant growth, resulting in lower production. The calcium silicate and magnesium can perform the same function as limestone, besides providing silicon to plants, may also contribute to the resistance of plants to salt stress. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of calcium and magnesium silicate on the growth of the castor oil plant BRS Energia cultivated under saline conditions. This study evaluated plant height, stem diameter, number of leaves, leaf area, dry weight of shoot and root, and soil chemical characteristics. There was no interaction between factors of salinity level and of silicate level regarding the evaluated variables. There was a direct relationship between salinity levels and plant growth in height and stem diameter. The K concentration in soil were affected by salinity levels. O estresse salino diminui o potencial osmótico da solução do solo causando estresse hídrico, provocando efeitos tóxicos nas plantas que resultam em injúrias no metabolismo e desordens nutricionais, comprometendo assim o crescimento das plantas, resultando em menor produção. O silicato de cálcio e magnésio pode desempenhar a mesma função do calcário, além de fornecer silício para as plantas, podendo ainda, contribuir para a resistência de plantas ao estresse salino. Nesse sentido, objetivou-se com esse trabalho avaliar o efeito do silicato de cálcio e magnésio no crescimento da mamoneira BRS Energia cultivada sob condições salinas. Avaliou-se a altura da planta, diâmetro do caule, número de folhas, área foliar, massa seca da parte aérea e da raiz e as características químicas do solo. Não houve interação entre os fatores níveis de salinidade e silicato sobre as variáveis analisadas. Houve rela

  10. First-principles elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, J.

    2014-07-01

    The elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates, 3CaO·Al2O3·CaCO3·xH2O (x = 11 or 8), has been investigated by first-principles calculations. Previous experimental study revealed that the fully hydrated monocarboaluminate (x = 11) exhibits exceptionally low compressibility compared to other reported calcium aluminate hydrates. This stiff hydration product can contribute to the strength of concrete made with Portland cements containing calcium carbonates. In this study, full elastic tensors and mechanical properties of the crystal structures with different water contents (x = 11 or 8) are computed by first-principles methods based on density functional theory. The results indicate that the compressibility of monocarboaluminate is highly dependent on the water content in the interlayer region. The structure also becomes more isotropic with the addition of water molecules in this region. Since the monocarboaluminate is a key hydration product of limestone added cement, elasticity of the crystal is important to understand its mechanical impact on concrete. Besides, it is put forth that this theoretical calculation will be useful in predicting the elastic properties of other complex cementitous materials and the influence of ion exchange on compressibility.

  11. Silicate Urolithiasis during Long-Term Treatment with Zonisamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Taguchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicate urinary calculi are rare in humans, with an incidence of 0.2% of all urinary calculi. Most cases were related to excess ingestion of silicate, typically by taking magnesium trisilicate as an antacid for peptic ulcers over a long period of time; however, there also existed unrelated cases, whose mechanism of development remains unclear. On the other hand, zonisamide, a newer antiepileptic drug, is one of the important causing agents of iatrogenic urinary stones in patients with epilepsy. The supposed mechanism is that zonisamide induces urine alkalinization and then promotes crystallization of urine components such as calcium phosphate by inhibition of carbonate dehydratase in renal tubular epithelial cells. Here, we report a case of silicate urolithiasis during long-term treatment with zonisamide without magnesium trisilicate intake and discuss the etiology of the disease by examining the silicate concentration in his urine.

  12. Properties of Chemically Combusted Calcium Carbide Residue and Its Influence on Cement Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongfang Sun

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Calcium carbide residue (CCR is a waste by-product from acetylene gas production. The main component of CCR is Ca(OH2, which can react with siliceous materials through pozzolanic reactions, resulting in a product similar to those obtained from the cement hydration process. Thus, it is possible to use CCR as a substitute for Portland cement in concrete. In this research, we synthesized CCR and silica fume through a chemical combustion technique to produce a new reactive cementitious powder (RCP. The properties of paste and mortar in fresh and hardened states (setting time, shrinkage, and compressive strength with 5% cement replacement by RCP were evaluated. The hydration of RCP and OPC (Ordinary Portland Cement pastes was also examined through SEM (scanning electron microscope. Test results showed that in comparison to control OPC mix, the hydration products for the RCP mix took longer to formulate. The initial and final setting times were prolonged, while the drying shrinkage was significantly reduced. The compressive strength at the age of 45 days for RCP mortar mix was found to be higher than that of OPC mortar and OPC mortar with silica fume mix by 10% and 8%, respectively. Therefore, the synthesized RCP was proved to be a sustainable active cementitious powder for the strength enhanced of building materials, which will result in the diversion of significant quantities of this by-product from landfills.

  13. Glass powder blended cement hydration modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Huda

    The use of waste materials in construction is among the most attractive options to consume these materials without affecting the environment. Glass is among these types of potential waste materials. In this research, waste glass in powder form, i.e. glass powder (GP) is examined for potential use in enhancing the characteristics of concrete on the basis that it is a pozzolanic material. The experimental and the theoretical components of the work are carried out primarily to prove that glass powder belongs to the "family" of the pozzolanic materials. The chemical and physical properties of the hydrated activated glass powder and the hydrated glass powder cement on the microstructure level have been studied experimentally and theoretically. The work presented in this thesis consists of two main phases. The first phase contains experimental investigations of the reaction of glass powder with calcium hydroxide (CH) and water. In addition, it includes experiments that are aimed at determining the consumption of water and CH with time. The reactivity, degree of hydration, and nature of the pore solution of the glass powder-blended cement pastes and the effect of adding different ratios of glass powder on cement hydration is also investigated. The experiments proved that glass powder has a pozzolanic effect on cement hydration; hence it enhances the chemical and physical properties of cement paste. Based on the experimental test results, it is recommended to use a glass powder-to-cement ratio (GP/C) of 10% as an optimum ratio to achieve the best hydration and best properties of the paste. Two different chemical formulas for the produced GP C-S-H gel due to the pure GP and GP-CH pozzolanic reaction hydration are proposed. For the pure GP hydration, the produced GP C-S-H gel has a calcium-to-silica ratio (C/S) of 0.164, water-to-silica ratio (H/S) of 1.3 and sodium/silica ratio (N/S) of 0.18. However, for the GP-CH hydration, the produced GP C-S-H gel has a C/S ratio of 1

  14. Silicic Large Igneous Provinces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Scott Bryan

    2007-01-01

    @@ Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) are the end-product of huge additions of magma to the continental crust both at the surface and at depth. Since the first categorisation of LIPs by Coffin & Eldholm (1994), it has been recognised that LIPs are more varied inform, age and character, and this includes the recognition of Silicic LIPs. Silicic LIPs are the largest accumulations of primary volcaniclastic rocks at the Earth's surface with areal extents >0.1 Mkm2 and extrusive and subvolcanic intrusive volumes >0.25 Mkm3. The Late Palaeozoic to Cenozoic Silicic LIP events are the best recognised and are similar in terms of their dimension, crustal setting, volcanic architecture and geochemistry.

  15. The Hydration and Carbonation of Tricalcium Aluminate (C3A) in the Presence of Heavy Metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Quanyuan; C. D. Hills; M. Tyrer; I. Slipper

    2005-01-01

    The hydration of tricalcium aluminate (C3A) has a significant effect on the effectiveness of cement-based systems. In addition, the carbonation of hydration products of C3A is particularly important in respect of durability performance. The present work investigates the hydration and carbonation reactions of C3A and the changes induced by the presence of the heavy metal ions such as Zn2+, Pb2+, Cu2+ and Cr3+ by X-ray diffractometry (XRD). During hydration of C3A, gehlenite hydrate, hydrogarnet, calcium monoaluminate (C4AHx) and calcium carboaluminate were detected in C3A pastes except the Zn2+doped paste, where hydrogarnet did not form. The examinations revealed that heavy metals coexisted with gehlenite hydrate, calcium monoaluminate (C4AHx) and calcium carboaluminate, inhibiting the formation of hydrogarnet. Hydrating C3A was liable to be carbonated on exposure to air and carbon dioxide, especially in the presence of heavy metals, resulting in the formation of carboaluminate and/or calcium carbonate. The presence of heavy metals in-fluenced the polymorphism of calcium carbonate,ndicating that heavy metals could co-precipitate with calcium to form a carbonate solid solution.

  16. Authigenic gypsum found in gas hydrate-associated sediments from Hydrate Ridge, the eastern North Pacific

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jiasheng; Erwin Suess; Dirk Rickert

    2004-01-01

    Characteristic gypsum micro-sphere and granular mass were discovered by binocular microscope in the gas hydrate-associated sediments at cores SO143-221 and SO143/TVG40-2A respectively on Hydrate Ridge of Cascadia margin, the eastern North Pacific. XRD patterns and EPA analyses show both micro-sphere and granular mass of the crystals have the typical peaks and the typical main chemical compositions of gypsum, although their weight percents are slightly less than the others in the non-gas hydrate-associated marine regions. SEM pictures show that the gypsum crystals have clear crystal boundaries, planes, edges and cleavages of gypsum in form either of single crystal or of twin crystals. In view of the fact that there are meanwhile gas hydrate-associated authigenic carbonates and SO42(-rich pore water in the same sediment cores, it could be inferred reasonably that the gypsums formed also authigenically in the gas hydrate-associated environment too, most probably at the interface between the downward advecting sulfate-rich seawater and the below gas hydrate, which spilled calcium during its formation on Hydrate Ridge. The two distinct forms of crystal intergrowth, which are the granular mass of series single gypsum crystals at core SO143/TVG40-2A and the microsphere of gypsum crystals accompanied with detrital components at core SO143-221 respectively, indicate that they precipitated most likely in different interstitial water dynamic environments. So, the distinct authigenic gypsums found in gas hydrate-associated sediments on Hydrate Ridge could also be believed as one of the parameters which could be used to indicate the presence of gas hydrate in an unknown marine sediment cores.

  17. Biological and therapeutic effects of ortho-silicic acid and some ortho-silicic acid-releasing compounds: New perspectives for therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurkić Lela Munjas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Silicon (Si is the most abundant element present in the Earth's crust besides oxygen. However, the exact biological roles of silicon remain unknown. Moreover, the ortho-silicic acid (H4SiO4, as a major form of bioavailable silicon for both humans and animals, has not been given adequate attention so far. Silicon has already been associated with bone mineralization, collagen synthesis, skin, hair and nails health atherosclerosis, Alzheimer disease, immune system enhancement, and with some other disorders or pharmacological effects. Beside the ortho-silicic acid and its stabilized formulations such as choline chloride-stabilized ortho-silicic acid and sodium or potassium silicates (e.g. M2SiO3; M= Na,K, the most important sources that release ortho-silicic acid as a bioavailable form of silicon are: colloidal silicic acid (hydrated silica gel, silica gel (amorphous silicon dioxide, and zeolites. Although all these compounds are characterized by substantial water insolubility, they release small, but significant, equilibrium concentration of ortho-silicic acid (H4SiO4 in contact with water and physiological fluids. Even though certain pharmacological effects of these compounds might be attributed to specific structural characteristics that result in profound adsorption and absorption properties, they all exhibit similar pharmacological profiles readily comparable to ortho-silicic acid effects. The most unusual ortho-silicic acid-releasing agents are certain types of zeolites, a class of aluminosilicates with well described ion(cation-exchange properties. Numerous biological activities of some types of zeolites documented so far might probably be attributable to the ortho-silicic acid-releasing property. In this review, we therefore discuss biological and potential therapeutic effects of ortho-silicic acid and ortho-silicic acid -releasing silicon compounds as its major natural sources.

  18. THE ALUMINA-SILICATES IN STABILIZATION PROCESSES IN FLUIDIZED-BED ASH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IVANA PERNA

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Presented study of coal fluidized-bed ash solidification was accompanied with specific studies of alumino-silicates residues in ashes. The specific technology of fluid coal burning and its relatively low temperature combustion combines coal burning and decomposition of calcium carbonate added to the fluid layer in the main endeavor to capture all sulfur oxides. The burning temperature seems be decisive to the behavior of clayed residues and calcium carbonate decomposition in connection for the future solidification of fluidized bed ash. The calcareous substances in combination with alumino-silicate residues form solid bodies where silicates play decisive role of long-term stability and insolubility of obtained solids. The position of aluminum ions in clayed residues of burned coal were studied by MAS-NMR with attention on aluminum ion coordination to oxygen and formation of roentgen amorphous phase of poly-condensed calcium alumina-silicate.

  19. HYDRATION AND ENZYME ACTIVITY

    OpenAIRE

    Poole, P.

    1984-01-01

    Hydration induced conformation and dynamic changes are followed using a variety of experimental techniques applied to hen egg white lysozyme. These changes are completed just before the onset of enzyme activity, which occurs before all polar groups are hydrated, and before monolayer coverage is attained. We suggest that these hydration induced changes are necessary for the return of enzyme activity.

  20. SON68 glass dissolution driven by magnesium silicate precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Benjamin; Godon, Nicole; Ayral, André; Gin, Stéphane

    2013-11-01

    layer at the interface with the pristine glass, the gel and the secondary phases. B is not fixed in the gel layer but retention of both B and Li retention is evidenced in one part of the hydrated layer corresponding to a narrow interdiffusion layer [40]. The (H/Li) interdiffusion coefficient decreases by several orders of magnitude when the alteration solution is silica-saturated [41]. This interdiffusion coefficient is a relevant parameter for evaluating the passivation phenomenon. It has also been shown that the nanoporosity of the hydrated glass layer plays an important role [40]. It can be deduced that the precipitation of a silicate secondary phase associated with the consumption of silica strongly affects the hydration rate of the glass and as a consequence its alteration. So the precipitation of secondary phase is a motive force which modifies the physico-chemical properties of the reactive interface situated in the gel or probably in the hydrated glass which has a role of passivation. Currently, the notion of reactive interface and its physico-chemical conditions are under investigations. In our study, solid characterizations are difficult so we use only the general notion of a protective gel. The increased calcium concentrations correspond to congruent dissolution of the gel formed before the addition of magnesium. The Ca/Si molar ratio of the gel was estimated from each experiment based on the data for day 29; in each case the ratio was near 0.1. This hypothesis was not taken into account for the experiment with regular Mg additions because no gel alteration occurred between 45 and 63 days. Glass alteration released boron and silicon in the same proportions as in the glass. No gel formation occurred within the balance period except in the experiment with 100 mg L-1 of Mg at t = 0, for which the cases of 10%, 30% and 50% gel formation (percentage of silicon from glass alteration incorporated in the gel) are indicated as examples. Based on the calcium

  1. Limestone reaction in calcium aluminate cement–calcium sulfate systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizzozero, Julien, E-mail: julien.bizzozero@gmail.com; Scrivener, Karen L.

    2015-10-15

    This paper reports a study of ternary blends composed of calcium aluminate cement, calcium sulfate hemihydrate and limestone. Compressive strength tests and hydration kinetics were studied as a function of limestone and calcium sulfate content. The phase evolution and the total porosity were followed and compared to thermodynamic simulation to understand the reactions involved and the effect of limestone on these binders. The reaction of limestone leads to the formation of hemicarboaluminate and monocarboaluminate. Increasing the ratio between sulfate and aluminate decreases the extent of limestone reaction.

  2. Mortar and concrete based on calcium sulphate binders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, J.J.F.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2006-01-01

    In this study both hemi-hydrate and anhydrite are tested as calcium sulphate binders for structural mortar and concrete. The advantage of using calcium sulphates instead of cement as a binder is the fact that the production of calcium sulphate is more environmental friendly than that of cement. For

  3. Efeito do silicato de cálcio e da autoclavagem na supressividade e na conducividade de dois solos à Rhizoctonia solani Influence of calcium silicate and sterilization on the natural suppressiveness and on the conduciveness of two soils to Rhizoctonia solani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício de Ávila Rodrigues

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se verificar o efeito da aplicação de silicato de cálcio e da esterilização na supressividade natural de um Latossolo Vermelho-Escuro (LEa álico textura muito argilosa e na conducividade natural de uma Terra Roxa Estruturada eutrófica (TRe ao fungo Rhizoctonia solani, em condições de casa de vegetação. Utilizou-se o delineamento inteiramente casualizado em esquema fatorial 2 x 3 x 2. Os fatores foram: duas classes de solo (LEa e TRe - 0-20 cm; três tratamentos (esterilização ou não por autoclavagem, aplicação de silicato e testemunha e infestação ou não com R. solani, com três repetições e 16 plântulas de feijoeiro por parcela. A aplicação de silicato foi feita incorporando 0,63 g do produto em 1 kg de cada material de solo, seguido de incubação por 30 dias. Para promover a infestação artificial, foram colocados 800 mg de inóculo em 1 kg de cada material de solo. O silicato de cálcio aumentou os teores de Ca trocável e a soma de bases nos dois solos. Um decréscimo na saturação por Al de 70 para 19% e um aumento na saturação por bases de 9 para 21% alteraram significativamente a supressividade natural do LEa à R. solani. Com relação à TRe, a aplicação de silicato não teve nenhum efeito na sua conducividade, dado ao seu natural caráter eutrófico, o qual já é favorável ao desenvolvimento deste fungo. A esterilização não influiu no desenvolvimento de R. solani, o que sugere que os fatores abióticos foram os responsáveis pela supressividade ou conducividade desses solos.The effect of calcium silicate slag and soil sterilization on the natural suppressiveness of a Typic Acrustox (clay Dark Red Latosol -- LEa and the natural conduciveness of an Oxic Haplustoll (TRe to Rhizoctonia solani were studied under greenhouse conditions. The experimental design was a three-replicate completely randomized one, with 2 x 3 x 2 factorial combination of the following treatments: two soil kinds (LEa and

  4. Silicates in Alien Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    This plot of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescopes shows that asteroid dust around a dead 'white dwarf' star contains silicates a common mineral on Earth. The data were taken primarily by Spitzer's infrared spectrograph, an instrument that breaks light apart into its basic constituents. The yellow dots show averaged data from the spectrograph, while the orange triangles show older data from Spitzer's infrared array camera. The white dwarf is called GD 40.

  5. Effects of silica addition on the chemical, mechanical and biological properties of a new α-Tricalcium Phosphate/Tricalcium Silicate Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loreley Morejón-Alonso

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The addition of tricalcium silicate (C3S to apatite cements results in an increase of bioactivity and improvement in the mechanical properties. However, adding large amounts raises the local pH at early stages, which retards the precipitation of hydroxyapatite and produces a loss of mechanical strength. The introduction of Pozzolanic materials in cement pastes could be an effective way to reduces basicity and enhance their mechanical resistance; thus, the effect of adding silica on the chemical, mechanical and biological properties of α-tricalcium phosphate/C3S cement was studied. Adding silica produces a reduction in the early pH and a decrease in setting times; nevertheless, the presence of more calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H delays the growth of hydroxyapatite crystals and consequently, reduces early compressive strength. The new formulations show a good bioactivity, but higher cytotoxicity than traditional cements and additions higher than 2.5% of SiO2 cause a lack of mechanical strength and an elevated degradability.

  6. Carbonate-silicate ratio for soil correction and influence on nutrition, biomass production and quality of palisade grass

    OpenAIRE

    Renato Ferreira de Souza; Fabrício William Ávila; Valdemar Faquin; Adélia Aziz Alexandre Pozza; Janice Guedes de Carvalho; Antônio Ricardo Evangelista

    2011-01-01

    Silicates can be used as soil correctives, with the advantage of being a source of silicon, a beneficial element to the grasses. However, high concentrations of silicon in the plant would affect the digestibility of the forage. To evaluate the influence of the substitution of the calcium carbonate by calcium silicate on the nutrition, biomass production and the feed quality of the palisade grass [Urochloa brizantha (C. Hochstetter ex A. Rich.) R. Webster], three greenhouse experiments were co...

  7. Gas hydrate nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The overall aim of the project was to gain more knowledge about the kinetics of gas hydrate formation especially the early growth phase. Knowledge of kinetics of gas hydrate formation is important and measurements of gas hydrate particle size and concentration can contribute to improve this knowledge. An experimental setup for carrying out experimental studies of the nucleation and growth of gas hydrates has been constructed and tested. Multi wavelength extinction (MWE) was the experimental technique selected for obtaining particle diameter and concentration. The principle behind MWE is described as well as turbidity spectrum analysis that in an initial stage of the project was considered as an alternative experimental technique. Details of the experimental setup and its operation are outlined. The measuring cell consists of a 1 litre horizontal tube sustaining pressures up to 200 bar. Laser light for particle size determination can be applied through sapphire windows. A description of the various auxiliary equipment and of another gas hydrate cell used in the study are given. A computer program for simulation and analysis of gas hydrate experiments is based on the gas hydrate kinetics model proposed by Skovborg and Rasmussen (1993). Initial measurements showed that knowledge of the refractive index of gas hydrates was important in order to use MWE. An experimental determination of the refractive index of methane and natural gas hydrate is described. The test experiments performed with MWE on collectives of gas hydrate particles and experiments with ethane, methane and natural gas hydrate are discussed. Gas hydrate particles initially seem to grow mainly in size and at latter stages in number. (EG) EFP-94; 41 refs.

  8. Calcium - urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003603.htm Calcium - urine To use the sharing features on this ... enable JavaScript. This test measures the amount of calcium in urine. All cells need calcium in order ...

  9. Calcium supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007477.htm Calcium supplements To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. WHO SHOULD TAKE CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS? Calcium is an important mineral for the ...

  10. Cement with silica fume and granulated blast-furnace slag: strength behavior and hydration

    OpenAIRE

    Bonavetti, V. L.; Castellano, C.; Donza, H.; Rahhal, V. F.; Irassar, E. F.

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses the influence of portland cement replacement by silica fume (up to 10%) and/or granulated blast furnace slag (up to 70%) on the hydration cement (XRD, heat of hydration, non evaporable water content and calcium hydroxide content) curing under sealed conditions and their effect on the mechanical strength. The obtained results indicate that binary cements containing silica fume and ternary cements there was a significant increase of hydration rate at early age. At later a...

  11. Uranium-thorium silicates, with specific reference to the species in the Witwatersrand reefs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    (U,Th)-silicates form two complete series of anhydrous and hydrated species with general formulae (U,Th)SiO4 and (U,Th)SiO4.nH2O respectively. The end-members of the anhydrous series are anhydrous coffinite and thorite, and those of the hydrated series, coffinite and thorogummite. Although the silicates are relatively rare in nature, coffinite is a common ore mineral in uranium deposits of the sandstone type. In the Witwatersrand reefs, (U,Th)-silicates are extremely rare in most reefs, except for the Elsburg Reefs on the West Rand Goldfield and the Dominion Reef. In these reefs detrital uraninite has been partly or entirely transformed to (U,Th)-silicates of coffinite composition, but thorite and thorogummite of detrital origin are also found in the Dominion Reef. In leaching tests on polished sections of rock samples containing (U,Th)-silicates, a dilute sulphuric acid solution, to which ferric iron had been added, was used as the lixiviant. It appeared that the dissolution of coffinite is less rapid than that of uraninite and uraniferous leucoxene. However, the reaction of silicates of high thorium content is much slower, and was not completed during the tests

  12. Effect of silicate pretreatment, post-sealing and additives on corrosion resistance of phosphated galvanized steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Sodium silicate (water glass) pretreatment before phosphating, silicate post-sealing after phosphating and adding silicate to a traditional phosphating solution were respectively carried out to obtain the improved phosphate coatings with high corrosion resistance and coverage on hot-dip galvanized(HDG) steel. The corrosion resistance, morphology and chemical composition of the coatings were investigated using neutral salt spray(NSS) tests, scanning electron microscopy(SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy(EDS). The results show that pretreatment HDG steel with silicate solutions, phosphate coatings with finer crystals and higher coverage are formed and the corrosion resistance is enhanced. Adding silicate to a traditional phosphating solution, the surface morphology of the coatings is nearly unchanged. The corrosion resistance of the coatings is mainly dependent on phosphating time.Phosphating for a longer time (such as 5 min), the corrosion resistance, increasing with concentration of silicate, is improved significantly. Post-sealing the phosphated HDG steel with silicate solutions, the pores among the zinc phosphate crystals are sealed with the films containing Si, P, O and Zn and the continuous composite coatings are formed. The corrosion resistance of the composite coatings, related to the pH value, contents of hydrated gel of silica and Si2O52- and post-sealing time, is increased markedly. The improved coatings with optimal corrosion resistance are obtained for phosphating 5 min and post-sealing with 5 g/L silicate solution for 10 min.

  13. In vitro bioactivity of a tricalcium silicate cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tricalcium silicate is the major constituent of Portland cement and the responsible for their mechanical strength at early stages. In order to be used as and additive of conventional calcium phosphate cement (CPC), in vitro bioactivity of a calcium silicate cement (CSC) after soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 14 days was study. The cement was obtained by mixing Ca3SiO5, obtained by sol-gel process, and a Na2HPO4 solution. The morphological and structural changes of the material before and after soaking were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed the formation of a layer of a Hydroxyapatite (HA) onto the CSC cement after soaking for 1h in SBF that became denser with the increase of soaking time. The study suggests that Ca3SiO5 would be an effective additive to improve the bioactivity and long term strength of conventional CPC. (author)

  14. Determination of reactivity rates of silicate particle-size fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Cristina Fernandes Deus

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of sources used for soil acidity correction depends on reactivity rate (RR and neutralization power (NP, indicated by effective calcium carbonate (ECC. Few studies establish relative efficiency of reactivity (RER for silicate particle-size fractions, therefore, the RER applied for lime are used. This study aimed to evaluate the reactivity of silicate materials affected by particle size throughout incubation periods in comparison to lime, and to calculate the RER for silicate particle-size fractions. Six correction sources were evaluated: three slags from distinct origins, dolomitic and calcitic lime separated into four particle-size fractions (2, 0.84, 0.30 and <0.30-mm sieves, and wollastonite, as an additional treatment. The treatments were applied to three soils with different texture classes. The dose of neutralizing material (calcium and magnesium oxides was applied at equal quantities, and the only variation was the particle-size material. After a 90-day incubation period, the RER was calculated for each particle-size fraction, as well as the RR and ECC of each source. The neutralization of soil acidity of the same particle-size fraction for different sources showed distinct solubility and a distinct reaction between silicates and lime. The RER for slag were higher than the limits established by Brazilian legislation, indicating that the method used for limes should not be used for the slags studied here.

  15. Carbon Mineralization Using Phosphate and Silicate Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokturk, H.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction from combustion of fossil fuels has become an urgent concern for the society due to marked increase in weather related natural disasters and other negative consequences of global warming. CO2 is a highly stable molecule which does not readily interact with other neutral molecules. However it is more responsive to ions due to charge versus quadrupole interaction [1-2]. Ions can be created by dissolving a salt in water and then aerosolizing the solution. This approach gives CO2 molecules a chance to interact with the hydrated salt ions over the large surface area of the aerosol. Ion containing aerosols exist in nature, an example being sea spray particles generated by breaking waves. Such particles contain singly and doubly charged salt ions including Na+, Cl-, Mg++ and SO4--. Depending on the proximity of CO2 to the ion, interaction energy can be significantly higher than the thermal energy of the aerosol. For example, an interaction energy of 0.6 eV is obtained with the sulfate (SO4--) ion when CO2 is the nearest neighbor [2]. In this research interaction between CO2 and ions which carry higher charges are investigated. The molecules selected for the study are triply charged phosphate (PO4---) ions and quadruply charged silicate (SiO4----) ions. Examples of salts which contain such molecules are potassium phosphate (K3PO4) and sodium orthosilicate (Na4SiO4). The research has been carried out with first principle quantum mechanical calculations using the Density Functional Theory method with B3LYP functional and Pople type basis sets augmented with polarization and diffuse functions. Atomic models consist of the selected ions surrounded by water and CO2 molecules. Similar to the results obtained with singly and doubly charged ions [1-2], phosphate and silicate ions attract CO2 molecules. Energy of interaction between the ion and CO2 is 1.6 eV for the phosphate ion and 3.3 eV for the silicate ion. Hence one can expect that the selected

  16. Hydration Assessment of Athletes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ KEY POINTS · Although there is no scientific consensus for 1 ) howbest to assess the hydration status of athletes, 2)what criteria to use as acceptable outcome measurements, or 3) the best time to apply practical assessment methods, there are methods that can be used toprovide athletes with useful feedback about their hydration status

  17. Characterization of iron-phosphate-silicate chemical garden structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barge, Laura M; Doloboff, Ivria J; White, Lauren M; Stucky, Galen D; Russell, Michael J; Kanik, Isik

    2012-02-28

    Chemical gardens form when ferrous chloride hydrate seed crystals are added or concentrated solutions are injected into solutions of sodium silicate and potassium phosphate. Various precipitation morphologies are observed depending on silicate and phosphate concentrations, including hollow plumes, bulbs, and tubes. The growth of precipitates is controlled by the internal osmotic pressure, fluid buoyancy, and membrane strength. Additionally, rapid bubble-led growth is observed when silicate concentrations are high. ESEM/EDX analysis confirms compositional gradients within the membranes, and voltage measurements across the membranes during growth show a final potential of around 150-200 mV, indicating that electrochemical gradients are maintained across the membranes as growth proceeds. The characterization of chemical gardens formed with iron, silicate, and phosphate, three important components of an early earth prebiotic hydrothermal system, can help us understand the properties of analogous structures that likely formed at submarine alkaline hydrothermal vents in the Hadean-structures offering themselves as the hatchery of life. PMID:22035594

  18. Calcium Forms,Subcelluar Distribution and Ultrastructure of Pulp Cells as Influenced by Calcium Deficiency in Apple (Malus pumila) Fruits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian-hui; ZHOU Wei

    2004-01-01

    Calcium in Red Fuji and Starkrimson apples during storage were fractionated by sequent extracting. Localization and distribution of calcium and influence of calcium nutrition on cell ultrastructure were observed by transmission electron microscopy combined with in situ precipitation of calcium with an improved method of potassium pyroantimonate technique. Results indicated that spraying calcium solution on surface of young fruits increased contents of calcium in all forms. During storage, contents of soluble calcium and pectic calcium declined and thosein calcium phosphate, calcium oxalate and calcium silicate increased. Calcium contents of Red Fuji in all forms were higher than those of Starkrimson, indicating that calcium accumulating capability of Red Fuji fruits preceded that of Starkrimson. Under transmission electron microscopy, calcium antimonite precipitates (CaAP) was mainly distributed in cell wall, tonoplast, nuclear membrane and nucleoplasm,much more CaAP deposited in vacuole. Calcium deficiency during storage leads to decrease of CaAP in locations mentioned above, disappearance of compartmentation, and entrance of CaAP to cytoplasm. Transformation from soluble calcium and pectic calcium to calcium phosphate,oxalate and damages of biomembranes structuraly and functionally resulted from calcium deficiency during storage were the crucial causation of physiological disorder.

  19. High-pressure transformations in sulfuric acid hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Galilean moons of Jupiter; Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto, have surfaces that are composed of very different materials to the silicates that make up our Earth. For Europa and Ganymede, two moons under intense investigation from past and future space missions, their surfaces are made up of ice and hydrates. Despite the apparent ‘simplicity’ of these materials, we still observe very complex geological formations on these moons – including subduction. This means we need to understand the transformations of candidate surface materials under a range of pressure/temperature conditions in order to accurately explain the formations on these icy surfaces. One hydrate candidate material for the surfaces of these moons are sulfuric acid hydrates, formed from radolytic sulfur (from Io) reacting with the surface ice. Sulfuric acid hydrates have already been established to have a complex phase diagram with composition. We have now used the Mito cell at the PLANET instrument to undertake the first investigation of the high-pressure behavior of the water rich sulfuric acid hydrates. Compressing at 100 K and 180 K we see that the hemitriskaidekahydrate becomes the stable water-rich hydrate and observe some interesting relaxation behaviour in this material at pressure, which could have significant consequences for the interiors of Ganymede.

  20. COMPARISON OF SOL-GEL SILICATE COATINGS ON Ti SUBSTRATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIANA HORKAVCOVÁ

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the submitted work was to prepare and to characterize two types of silicate coatings prepared by the sol-gel method using the dip-coating technique on a titanium substrate. Efforts have been made to use mechanical properties of bio-inert titanium and bioactive properties of a silicate layer enriched with an admixture of compounds identified below. The first group consisted of silicate coatings containing silver, brushite and monetite. The other group of silicate coatings contained calcium nitrate and triethyl phosphate. Mechanically and chemically treated titanium substrates were dipped into sols and dried and fired. Silicate coatings from the first group were also chemically treated in 10 mol.l-1 solution of sodium hydroxide. All coatings were measured to determine their adhesive and bioactive properties and furthermore the antibacterial properties were tested in the case of first group. Surfaces of the coated substrates were investigated after the firing and after the individual tests with optical and electron microscopy and X-ray microdiffraction. A tape test demonstrated excellent adhesive property of all coatings to the substrate, classified with degree 5. A static in vitro test demonstrated bioactivity of nearly all the coatings. The basic silicate coating from the first group and one type of coating from the second group were identified as inert. Antibacterial properties of silicate coatings containing silver showed to be different when tested against Escherichia coli bacteria. A complete inhibition of the growth of bacteria under our experimental conditions was observed for the coating containing silver and monetite and a partial inhibition of the growth of bacteria for coatings containing silver and silver in combination with brushite.

  1. Cementing properties of steel slag activated by sodium silicates and sodium hydroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Ni; En Wang; Jianping Li; Han Sun

    2005-01-01

    Steel slag which is mainly composed of γ-CasSiO4 and other silicates or alumino-silicates is activated by sodium silicates and sodium hydroxide. The powders of such steel slag are usually inert to hydrate and subsequently have very low ability of cementing. But when sodium silicates and sodium hydroxide are used as activators the steel slag shows very good properties of cementing. When activated with NaOH solution the hardened slurry of the steel slag has a compressive strength of 11.13 MPa after being cured for 28 days. When activated with Na2SiO3 solution the samples after being cured for 28 days have an average compressive strength of 40.23 MPa. While the steel slag slurry which is only mixed with water has a compressive of 0.88 MPa after being cured for 28 days.

  2. Cation Hydration Constants by Proton NMR: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Studies the polarization effect on water by cations and anions. Describes an experiment to illustrate the polarization effect of sodium, lithium, calcium, and strontium ions on the water molecule in the hydration spheres of the ions. Analysis is performed by proton NMR. (MVL)

  3. Influence of Cellulose Ethers on Hydration Products of Portland Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Baoguo; OU Zhihua; JIAN Shouwei; XU Rulin

    2011-01-01

    Cellulose ethers are widely used to mortar formulations, and it is significant to understand the interaction between cellulose ethers and cement pastes. FT-IR spectra, thermal analysis and SEM are used to investigate hydration products in the cement pastes modified by HEMC and HPMC in this article. The results show that the hydration products in modified cement pastes were finally identical with those in the unmodified cement paste, but the major hydration products, such as CH (calcium hydroxide), ettringite and C-S-H, appeared later in the modified cement pastes than in the unmodified cement paste. The cellulose ethers decrease the outer products and increase inner products of C-S-H gels. Compared to unmodified cement pastes, no new products are found in the modified cement pastes in the present experiment. The HEMC and HPMC investigation shows almost the same influence on the hydration products of Portland cement.

  4. Withdrawing Nutrition, Hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Module eleven of the EPEC-O Self-Study Original Version discusses the general aspects of withholding or withdrawing of life-sustaining therapies, and presents a specific application to artificial nutrition and hydration.

  5. Hydrate morphology: Physical properties of sands with patchy hydrate saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S.; Santamarina, J.C.; Waite, William F.; Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    The physical properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments depend on the volume fraction and spatial distribution of the hydrate phase. The host sediment grain size and the state of effective stress determine the hydrate morphology in sediments; this information can be used to significantly constrain estimates of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments, including the coarse-grained sands subjected to high effective stress that are of interest as potential energy resources. Reported data and physical analyses suggest hydrate-bearing sands contain a heterogeneous, patchy hydrate distribution, whereby zones with 100% pore-space hydrate saturation are embedded in hydrate-free sand. Accounting for patchy rather than homogeneous hydrate distribution yields more tightly constrained estimates of physical properties in hydrate-bearing sands and captures observed physical-property dependencies on hydrate saturation. For example, numerical modeling results of sands with patchy saturation agree with experimental observation, showing a transition in stiffness starting near the series bound at low hydrate saturations but moving toward the parallel bound at high hydrate saturations. The hydrate-patch size itself impacts the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments; for example, at constant hydrate saturation, we find that conductivity (electrical, hydraulic and thermal) increases as the number of hydrate-saturated patches increases. This increase reflects the larger number of conductive flow paths that exist in specimens with many small hydrate-saturated patches in comparison to specimens in which a few large hydrate saturated patches can block flow over a significant cross-section of the specimen.

  6. Study of calcium chloride and calcium nitrate purification on inorganic sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purification of calcium chloride and calcium nitrate from iron, chromium, manganese and cobalt impurities by sorption on some inorganic collectors are considered in this article. Study was conducted by means of radioactive-tracer technique at concurrent use of several γ-radioactive isotopes. As a collectors were used hydrated aluminium and zirconium oxides. Dependence of effectiveness of precipitation by collectors on ph-value of medium, quantity of collector, nature and concentration of components is studied. Optimal parameters of purification of calcium chloride and calcium nitrate are defined.

  7. Environmental silicate nano-biocomposites

    CERN Document Server

    Pollet, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Environmental Silicate Nano-Biocomposites focuses on nano-biocomposites, which are obtained by the association of silicates such as bioclays with biopolymers. By highlighting recent developments and findings, green and biodegradable nano-composites from both renewable and biodegradable polymers are explored. This includes coverage of potential markets such as packaging, agricultures, leisure and the fast food industry. The knowledge and experience of more than twenty international experts in diverse fields, from chemical and biochemical engineering to applications, is brought together in four different sections covering: Biodegradable polymers and Silicates, Clay/Polyesters Nano-biocomposites, Clay/Agropolymers Nano-biocomposites, and Applications and biodegradation of Nano-biocomposites. By exploring the relationships between the biopolymer structures, the processes, and the final properties Environmental Silicate Nano-Biocomposites explains how to design nano-materials to develop new, valuable, environmenta...

  8. Mortar and concrete based on calcium sulphate binders

    OpenAIRE

    Bakker, J.J.F.; Brouwers, H. J. H.

    2006-01-01

    In this study both hemi-hydrate and anhydrite are tested as calcium sulphate binders for structural mortar and concrete. The advantage of using calcium sulphates instead of cement as a binder is the fact that the production of calcium sulphate is more environmental friendly than that of cement. For the calcinations of Portland cement, temperatures up to 1480 oC are needed, while the calcination of for instance hemihydrate requires a temperature of 170 oC

  9. Chemical Composition and Microstructure of Hydration Products of Hardened White Portland Cement Pastes Containing Admixtures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qiu

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the nature of hydration products of white portland cement (WPC) containing 20 mM malic acid or 1 M calcium chloride hydrated for 11 years. The study identiifed the hydration products and characterized the chemical composition, morphology, micro/nano structure of C-S-H and the main binding phase in cementitious materials. Calcium hydroxide (CH), ettringite and C-S-H were identiifed in WPC with 20 mM malic acid paste hydrated for 11 years. WPC with 1 M calcium chloride paste hydrated for 11 years contained the same phases, but with less CH, and the presence of Friedel’s salt (Ca2Al(OH)6Cl·2H2O). There were still small amount of anhydrous cement particles remaining in both pastes after 11 years hydration according to the SEM and29Si MAS NMR results. The hydration products of paste containing malic acid had a lower porosity than those prepared with calcium chloride upon visual inspection under SEM. The morphology of the outer product (Op) C-S-H was coarse ifbrillar and the inner product (Ip) C-S-H had a very ifne microstructure in both pastes under TEM. Both Ip and Op C-S-H formed in paste containing malic acid had lower Ca/Si and higher Al/Si than those in paste containing calcium chloride. C-S-H in paste containing calcium chloride had longer MCL and less percentage of bridging tetrahedra occupied by aluminum in silicon/aluminum chains due to relatively lessQ1 and moreQ2. A new type of silicon tetrahedra,Q2B, was introduced during deconvolution of29Si MAS NMR results. Ip and Op C-S-H in both pastes had aluminum substituted tobermorite-type and jennite-type structure, and all the charges caused by aluminum substituting silicon bridging tetrahedra were balanced by Ca2+.

  10. Low-δD hydration rinds in Yellowstone perlites record rapid syneruptive hydration during glacial and interglacial conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindeman, Ilya N.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    2016-01-01

    Hydration of silicic volcanic glass forms perlite, a dusky, porous form of altered glass characterized by abundant “onion-skin” fractures. The timing and temperature of perlite formation are enigmatic and could plausibly occur during eruption, during post-eruptive cooling, or much later at ambient temperatures. To learn more about the origin of natural perlite, and to fingerprint the hydration waters, we investigated perlitic glass from several synglacial and interglacial rhyolitic lavas and tuffs from the Yellowstone volcanic system. Perlitic cores are surrounded by a series of conchoidal cracks that separate 30- to 100-µm-thick slivers, likely formed in response to hydration-induced stress. H2O and D/H profiles confirm that most D/H exchange happens together with rapid H2O addition but some smoother D/H variations may suggest separate minor exchange by deuterium atom interdiffusion following hydration. The hydrated rinds (2–3 wt% H2O) transition rapidly (within 30 µm, or by 1 wt% H2O per 10 µm) to unhydrated glass cores. This is consistent with quenched “hydration fronts” where H2O diffusion coefficients are strongly dependent on H2O concentrations. The chemical, δ18O, and δD systematics of bulk glass records last equilibrium between ~110 and 60 °C without chemical exchange but with some δ18O exchange. Similarly, the δ18O of water extracted from glass by rapid heating suggests that water was added to the glass during cooling at C. Our observations support fast hydration at temperatures as low as 60 °C; prolonged exposure to high temperature of 175°–225° during water addition is less likely as the glass would lose alkalies and should alter to clays within days. A compilation of low-temperature hydration diffusion coefficients suggests ~2 orders of magnitude higher rates of diffusion at 60–110 °C temperatures, compared with values expected from extrapolation of high-temperature (>400 °C) experimental data. The thick hydration

  11. Preparation and characterization of multifunctional magnetic mesoporous calcium silicate materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have prepared multifunctional magnetic mesoporous Fe–CaSiO3 materials using triblock copolymer (P123) as a structure-directing agent. The effects of Fe substitution on the mesoporous structure, in vitro bioactivity, magnetic heating ability and drug delivery property of mesoporous CaSiO3 materials were investigated. Mesoporous Fe–CaSiO3 materials had similar mesoporous channels (5–6 nm) with different Fe substitution. When 5 and 10% Fe were substituted for Ca in mesoporous CaSiO3 materials, mesoporous Fe–CaSiO3 materials still showed good apatite-formation ability and had no cytotoxic effect on osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells evaluated by the elution cell culture assay. On the other hand, mesoporous Fe–CaSiO3 materials could generate heat to raise the temperature of the surrounding environment in an alternating magnetic field due to their superparamagnetic property. When we use gentamicin (GS) as a model drug, mesoporous Fe–CaSiO3 materials release GS in a sustained manner. Therefore, magnetic mesoporous Fe–CaSiO3 materials would be a promising multifunctional platform with bone regeneration, local drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia. (paper)

  12. Protein hydration and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inelastic neutron scattering can measure the protein thermal fluctuations under the physiological aqueous environment, especially it is powerful to observe the low-energy protein dynamics in THz region, which are revealed theoretically to be coupled with solvations. Neutron enables the selective observation of protein and hydration water by deuteration. The complementary analysis with molecular dynamics simulation is also effective for the study of protein hydration. Some examples of the application toward the understanding of molecular basis of protein functions will be introduced. (author)

  13. Formation of porous gas hydrates

    CERN Document Server

    Salamatin, Andrey N

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrates grown at gas-ice interfaces are examined by electron microscopy and found to have a submicron porous texture. Permeability of the intervening hydrate layers provides the connection between the two counterparts (gas and water molecules) of the clathration reaction and makes further hydrate formation possible. The study is focused on phenomenological description of principal stages and rate-limiting processes that control the kinetics of the porous gas hydrate crystal growth from ice powders. Although the detailed physical mechanisms involved in the porous hydrate formation still are not fully understood, the initial stage of hydrate film spreading over the ice surface should be distinguished from the subsequent stage which is presumably limited by the clathration reaction at the ice-hydrate interface and develops after the ice grain coating is finished. The model reveals a time dependence of the reaction degree essentially different from that when the rate-limiting step of the hydrate formation at...

  14. Stardust silicates from primitive meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2004-04-29

    Primitive chondritic meteorites contain material (presolar grains), at the level of a few parts per million, that predates the formation of our Solar System. Astronomical observations and the chemical composition of the Sun both suggest that silicates must have been the dominant solids in the protoplanetary disk from which the planets of the Solar System formed, but no presolar silicates have been identified in chondrites. Here we report the in situ discovery of presolar silicate grains 0.1-1 microm in size in the matrices of two primitive carbonaceous chondrites. These grains are highly enriched in 17O (delta17O(SMOW) > 100-400 per thousand ), but have solar silicon isotopic compositions within analytical uncertainties, suggesting an origin in an oxygen-rich red giant or an asymptotic giant branch star. The estimated abundance of these presolar silicates (3-30 parts per million) is higher than reported for other types of presolar grains in meteorites, consistent with their ubiquity in the early Solar System, but is about two orders of magnitude lower than their abundance in anhydrous interplanetary dust particles. This result is best explained by the destruction of silicates during high-temperature processing in the solar nebula.

  15. Effect of silicate incorporation on in vivo responses of α-tricalcium phosphate ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamitakahara, Masanobu; Tatsukawa, Eri; Shibata, Yasuaki; Umemoto, Shota; Yokoi, Taishi; Ioku, Koji; Ikeda, Tohru

    2016-05-01

    In addition to calcium phosphate-based ceramics, glass-based materials have been utilized as bone substitutes, and silicate in these materials has been suggested to contribute to their ability to stimulate bone repair. In this study, a silicate-containing α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) ceramic was prepared using a wet chemical process. Porous granules composed of silicate-containing α-TCP, for which the starting composition had a molar ratio of 0.05 for Si/(P + Si), and silicate-free α-TCP were prepared and evaluated in vivo. When implanted into bone defects that were created in rat femurs, α-TCP ceramics either with or without silicate were biodegraded, generating a hybrid tissue composed of residual ceramic granules and newly formed bone, which had a tissue architecture similar to physiological trabecular structures, and aided regeneration of the bone defects. Supplementation with silicate significantly promoted osteogenesis and delayed biodegradation of α-TCP. These results suggest that silicate-containing α-TCP is advantageous for initial skeletal fixation and wound regeneration in bone repair. PMID:27003839

  16. On the Anomalous Silicate Absorption Feature of the Prototypical Seyfert 2 Galaxy NGC 1068

    CERN Document Server

    Koehler, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    The first detection of the silicate absorption feature in AGNs was made at 9.7 micrometer for the prototypical Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 over 30 years ago, indicating the presence of a large column of silicate dust in the line-of-sight to the nucleus. It is now well recognized that type 2 AGNs exhibit prominent silicate absorption bands, while the silicate bands of type 1 AGNs appear in emission. More recently, using the Mid-Infrared Interferometric Instrument on the Very Large Telescope Interferometer, Jaffe et al. (2004) by the first time spatially resolved the parsec-sized dust torus around NGC 1068 and found that the 10 micrometer silicate absorption feature of the innermost hot component exhibits an anomalous profile differing from that of the interstellar medium and that of common olivine-type silicate dust. While they ascribed the anomalous absorption profile to gehlenite (Ca_2Al_2SiO_7, a calcium aluminum silicate species), we propose a physical dust model and argue that, although the presence of gehl...

  17. ACTION OF SILICATO OF CALCIUM AND MAGNESIUM IN THE REDUCTION Cercospora

    OpenAIRE

    Franciane Diniz Cogo; Gabriel Sergio Graciano; Katia Alves Campos

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the response of coffee plants (Coffea arabica) Catuaí IAC-44 with different doses of calcium silicate and magnesium in relation to incidence of Cercospora spot coffeicola and plant growth. The experiment was conducted in nursery seedling production of coffee from the Federal Institute of Southern Minas Gerais, Campus Machado, MG randomized blocks with five replications and the treatment used a source of silicon, calcium silicate and magnesium in doses - 0...

  18. Microbeam recoil detection for hydration of minerals studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sie, S.H.; Suter, G.F. [CSIRO, North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Exploration and Mining Div.; Chekhmir, A.; Green, T.H. [Macquarie Univ., North Ryde, NSW (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    The glancing angle geometry is chosen to enable application of the elastic recoil detection microanalysis on thick geological samples, for hydrogen content determination. Simultaneous PIXE measurements can be used to eliminate the problem of uncertainties in beam charge collection. The method is applied to determine the hydration characteristics of silicates, produced experimentally at high pressure and temperature simulating the lower crust and upper mantle conditions. Preliminary results show that the technique can be applied readily on a microscopic (<100 {mu}m) scale for determination of H at fraction of atomic percent level. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Formation of alteration products during dissolution of vitrified ILW in a high-pH calcium-rich solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To simulate the possible disposition of a vitrified intermediate-level waste (ILW) in a cementitious environment within a geological disposal facility (GDF), the durability of a laboratory simulant ILW vitrified in a borosilicate glass in a saturated Ca(OH)2 solution (pH ∼12.5) was measured. Both a low surface area to volume (SA/V) ratio (∼10 m−1) Materials Characterisation Center test 1 (MCC-1) and a high SA/V ratio (∼10,000 m−1) product consistency test type B (PCT-B) were used at 50 °C for up to 170 days. The formation of alteration layers and products was followed. The surfaces of the monoliths were analysed using SEM/EDX and showed the formation of magnesium-rich precipitates and distinct calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) precipitates. Cross sections showed the development of a calcium-rich alteration layer, which was observed from 14 days. The altered layer was up to 5 μm thick after 170 days and showed accumulation of zirconium, iron and magnesium and to a lesser extent aluminium, along with calcium and silicon. Based on comparison of the rate data, it is suggested that the presence of this layer may offer some protection to the underlying glass. However, the high SA/V ratio experiments showed resumed alteration after 56 days, indicating that the altered layer may not be protective in the long term (under accelerated conditions). The formation of a magnesium-containing smectite clay (likely saponite) in addition to CSH(II), a jennite-like CSH phase, were identified in the high SA/V experiment by X-ray diffraction after 170 days. These results suggest that calcium and magnesium have important roles in both the long and shorter-term durability of vitrified wastes exposed to high pH

  20. Amended Silicated for Mercury Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Butz; Thomas Broderick; Craig Turchi

    2006-12-31

    Amended Silicates{trademark}, a powdered, noncarbon mercury-control sorbent, was tested at Duke Energy's Miami Fort Station, Unit 6 during the first quarter of 2006. Unit 6 is a 175-MW boiler with a cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The plant burns run-of-the-river eastern bituminous coal with typical ash contents ranging from 8-15% and sulfur contents from 1.6-2.6% on an as-received basis. The performance of the Amended Silicates sorbent was compared with that for powdered activated carbon (PAC). The trial began with a period of baseline monitoring during which no sorbent was injected. Sampling during this and subsequent periods indicated mercury capture by the native fly ash was less than 10%. After the baseline period, Amended Silicates sorbent was injected at several different ratios, followed by a 30-day trial at a fixed injection ratio of 5-6 lb/MMACF. After this period, PAC was injected to provide a comparison. Approximately 40% mercury control was achieved for both the Amended Silicates sorbent and PAC at injection ratios of 5-6 lbs/MMACF. Higher injection ratios did not achieve significantly increased removal. Similar removal efficiencies have been reported for PAC injection trials at other plants with cold-side ESPs, most notably for plants using medium to high sulfur coal. Sorbent injection did not detrimentally impact plant operations and testing confirmed that the use of Amended Silicates sorbent does not degrade fly ash quality (unlike PAC). The cost for mercury control using either PAC or Amended Silicates sorbent was estimated to be equivalent if fly ash sales are not a consideration. However, if the plant did sell fly ash, the effective cost for mercury control could more than double if those sales were no longer possible, due to lost by-product sales and additional cost for waste disposal. Accordingly, the use of Amended Silicates sorbent could reduce the overall cost of mercury control by 50% or more versus PAC for locations where

  1. Characterization of radiative properties of Nd2O3 doped phosphate and silicate glasses for solid state laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nd2O3 doped calcium aluminium phosphate and calcium aluminium silicate glasses prepared to compare their absorption and emission properties. Radiative lifetime of the excited state 4F3/2 derived by Judd-Ofelt theory applied to the absorption spectra. Using the photoluminescence spectrometer the steady state emission and relaxation time from excited energy level recorded under green light excitation. Phosphate glass has higher emission cross-section, higher radiative lifetime but less quantum efficiency due to non-radiative quenching through hydroxyl ions compared to silicate glass for Nd3+:4F3/2→4I9/2 emission

  2. Étude des modifications structurales de l'eau confinée dans le gel de silice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouzri, A.; Dorbez-Sridi, R.; Oumezzine, M.

    2004-11-01

    Les modifications structurales de l'eau confinée dans le gel de silice en poudre en fonction du taux d'hydratation sont étudiées par calorimétrie différentielle à balayage et par diffusion des rayons X. L'analyse thermique par DSC a permis de montrer que pour les faibles taux d'hydratation (≤ 50%) l'eau est complètement confinée dans les pores alors que pour les forts taux d'hydratation (>50%) l'eau se trouve aussi bien dans les pores qu'autour des grains de la silice. L'apparition de la glace cubique lors du refroidissement de l'eau confinée dans le gel de silice prouve que l'interaction eau-silice ne peut être négligée lors de la détermination du signal de l'eau. L'extraction du signal, diffusé uniquement par l'eau confinée, à partir des intensités diffusées par le gel de silice à deux taux d'hydratation distincts, révèle dans les fonctions de corrélation de paire un pic à 3.7Å qui ne peut être attribué qu'à une corrélation oxygène-oxygène inexistante dans l'eau massique et résultant de la déformation du réseau tétraédrique des molécules d'eau sous l'effet du confinement et de la proximité d'une surface.

  3. Influence of dispersing agent in formation of B-dicalcium silicate from rice husk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present experimental work describes the synthesis of beta-dicalcium silicate from rice husk by using dispersing agent during formation of calcium hydro silicate (CSH) gel. The growth of CSH gel retards the impeller mixing phenomenon. This type of problem can be resolved by using dispersing agent. Amorphous silica was obtained from HCl treated rice husk. Calcination temperature of rice husk was maintained at 600 degree C for 90 minutes. In the presence of water, amorphous silica was treated with calcium oxide by using 0.2 % dispersing agent to develop CSH gel. The CSH gel was developed in oven for 12 hours at 90 degree C followed by drying at 105 degree C for 12 hours in an oven. Dried gels were heated up to 900 degree C to obtain beta form of dicalcium silicate. The CSH gel and beta-dicalcium silicate were examined by XRD, FTIR, SEM and TGA. It was observed that by using pretreated rice husk truly amorphous silica can be obtained. It was also observed that dispersing agent facilitated the formation of CSH gel. Observations further revealed that such amorphous CSH gel started converting into beta form of dicalcium silicate at 600 degree C. (author)

  4. The In-situ Reinforcement of Calcium Phosphate Cement and Its Micro-structural Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes ( CNTs ) and polyacrylic acid were employed to modify the setting process and hydration products of β- TCP/ TTCP calcium phosphate cement. The micro-structure of hydration product and the fashion of how additives and hydration particles interconnected were investigated. With the modification effect of CNTs, the setting particles and CNTs got winded and interconnected and thus made the composite more compact and denser.

  5. Modeling Hydrates and the Gas Hydrate Markup Language

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Weihua; Moridis, George; Wang, Runqiang; Xiao, Yun; Li, Jianhui

    2007-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates, as an important potential fuels, flow assurance hazards, and possible factors initiating the submarine geo-hazard and global climate change, have attracted the interest of scientists all over the world. After two centuries of hydrate research, a great amount of scientific data on gas hydrates has been accumulated. Therefore the means to manage, share, and exchange these data have become an urgent task. At present, metadata (Markup Language) is recognized as one of the mo...

  6. Effects of ionization on silicate glasses. [Silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primak, W.

    1982-02-01

    This evaluation of radiation effects in silicate glasses caused by ionization is based on our own investigations, on material collected in our files (reports, articles, and notes), and on a computer literature search through recent issues of Physics Abstracts and Chemical Abstracts (and the apparently pertinent references which appeared). Some of our recent results, available heretofore only in internal correspondence, are presented in some detail. It is concluded that research into the behavior of silicate glasses generally will be required before the specific effects in the radioactive waste storage glasses can be properly understood and evaluated. Two particular neglected areas of investigation are targeted for immediate concern: a kinetic analysis of annealing data and the acquisition of data on effects of irradiation at controlled elevated temperatures.

  7. Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... before being swallowed; do not swallow them whole. Drink a full glass of water after taking either the regular or chewable tablets or capsules. Some liquid forms of calcium carbonate must be shaken well before use.Do not ...

  8. Calcium Calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Latvia - Lebanon - Libya - Lithuania - Luxembourg - Macedonia, Republic of - Malaysia - Malta - Mexico - Moldova - Morocco - Netherlands - New Zealand - Nigeria - ... and Statistics Popular content Calcium content of common foods What is Osteoporosis? The Board Introduction to Bone ...

  9. Calcium Electroporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gibot, Laure; Madi, Moinecha;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calcium electroporation describes the use of high voltage electric pulses to introduce supraphysiological calcium concentrations into cells. This promising method is currently in clinical trial as an anti-cancer treatment. One very important issue is the relation between tumor cell kill...... efficacy-and normal cell sensitivity. METHODS: Using a 3D spheroid cell culture model we have tested the effect of calcium electroporation and electrochemotherapy using bleomycin on three different human cancer cell lines: a colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT29), a bladder transitional cell carcinoma (SW780......), and a breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB231), as well as on primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDF-n). RESULTS: The results showed a clear reduction in spheroid size in all three cancer cell spheroids three days after treatment with respectively calcium electroporation (p

  10. Silicate Composition of the Interstellar Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Fogerty, Shane; Watson, Dan M; Sargent, Benjamin A; Koch, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    The composition of silicate dust in the diffuse interstellar medium and in protoplanetary disks around young stars informs our understanding of the processing and evolution of the dust grains leading up to planet formation. Analysis of the well-known 9.7{\\mu}m feature indicates that small amorphous silicate grains represent a significant fraction of interstellar dust and are also major components of protoplanetary disks. However, this feature is typically modelled assuming amorphous silicate dust of olivine and pyroxene stoichiometries. Here, we analyze interstellar dust with models of silicate dust that include non-stoichiometric amorphous silicate grains. Modelling the optical depth along lines of sight toward the extinguished objects Cyg OB2 No. 12 and {\\zeta} Ophiuchi, we find evidence for interstellar amorphous silicate dust with stoichiometry intermediate between olivine and pyroxene, which we simply refer to as "polivene." Finally, we compare these results to models of silicate emission from the Trapez...

  11. Polymer-Layer Silicate Nanocomposites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Potarniche, Catalina-Gabriela

    with a spectacular improvement up to 300 % in impact strength were obtained. In the second part of this study, layered silicate bio-nanomaterials were obtained starting from natural compounds and taking into consideration their biocompatibility properties. These new materials may be used for drug delivery systems......Nowadays, some of the material challenges arise from a performance point of view as well as from recycling and biodegradability. Concerning these aspects, the development of polymer layered silicate nanocomposites can provide possible solutions. This study investigates how to obtain polymer layered...... toughness-stiffness requirements. The new compatibilizer system used to obtain nanocomposites, presented an improvement of 8-20 % in tensile strength, 15-34 % in Young’s modulus, 23-34 % in fatigue tests and 20-58% in degree of crystalline phase. By introducing a rubbery phase as modifier, nanocomposites...

  12. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Metal Silicates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lii Kwang-Hwa

    2004-01-01

    Organically templated metal phosphates have been extensively studied because of interesting structural chemistry and potential applications in catalysis. However, in most cases the organic templates cannot be removed without collapse of the frameworks. This is in contrast to the high thermal stability and extensive applications of zeolites in refinery and petrochemical processes.Therefore, studies have been directed to the synthesis of transition metal silicates to produce more stable frameworks. Our synthetic methods are twofold, namely mild hydrothermal reactions in Teflon-lined autoclaves at 100-200 ℃ using organic amines as templates and high-temperature,high-pressure hydrothermal reactions in gold ampoules contained in a high-pressure reaction vessel at ca. 550 ℃ and 150 Mpa using alkali metal cations as templates. In this presentation I will report the high-temperature, high-pressure hydrothermal synthesis, crystal structures, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy of a number of new silicates of indium, uranium, and transition metals.

  13. Biogenic silicate accumulation in sediments, Jiaozhou Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xuegang; SONG Jinming; DAI Jicui; YUAN Huamao; LI Ning; LI Fengye; SUN Song

    2006-01-01

    It has been widely recognized that low silicate content in seawater is a major limiting factor to phytoplankton primary production in Jiaozhou Bay. However the reason of Si-limitation remains poorly understood. In the present study we measured the biogenic silicate content and discussed the accumulation of silicate in Jiaozhou Bay sediment. The results show that the biogenic silica content in the sediment of the Jiaozhou Bay is obviously much higher than those in the Yellow Sea and the Bohai Sea. The BSi:TN ratios and BSi:16P ratios in the sediment are > 1 and the OC:BSi ratio in sediment is lower than these of Redfield ratio (106:16), indicating that the decomposition rate of OC is much higher than that for BSi in similar conditions. Therefore, the majority of the biogenic silicate was buried and thus did not participate in silicate recycling. Silicate accumulation in sediment may explain why Si limits the phytoplankton growth in the Jiaozhou Bay. Comparing the flux of biogenic silicate from sediments with primary production rate, it can be concluded that only 15.5% of biogenic silicate is hydrolyzed during the journey from surface to bottom in seawater, thus approximate 84.5% of biogenic silicate could reach the bottom. The silicate releasing rate from the sediment to seawater is considerably lower than that of sedimentation of biogenic silicate, indicating silicate accumulation in sediment too. In a word, the silicate accumulation in sediment is the key reason of silicate limiting to phytoplankton growth in Jiaozhou Bay.

  14. Modifying Silicates for Better Dispersion in Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Sandi

    2005-01-01

    An improved chemical modification has been developed to enhance the dispersion of layered silicate particles in the formulation of a polymer/silicate nanocomposite material. The modification involves, among other things, the co-exchange of an alkyl ammonium ion and a monoprotonated diamine with interlayer cations of the silicate. The net overall effects of the improved chemical modification are to improve processability of the nanocomposite and maximize the benefits of dispersing the silicate particles into the polymer. Some background discussion is necessary to give meaning to a description of this development. Polymer/silicate nanocomposites are also denoted polymer/clay composites because the silicate particles in them are typically derived from clay particles. Particles of clay comprise layers of silicate platelets separated by gaps called "galleries." The platelet thickness is 1 nm. The length varies from 30 nm to 1 m, depending on the silicate. In order to fully realize the benefits of polymer/silicate nanocomposites, it is necessary to ensure that the platelets become dispersed in the polymer matrices. Proper dispersion can impart physical and chemical properties that make nanocomposites attractive for a variety of applications. In order to achieve nanometer-level dispersion of a layered silicate into a polymer matrix, it is typically necessary to modify the interlayer silicate surfaces by attaching organic functional groups. This modification can be achieved easily by ion exchange between the interlayer metal cations found naturally in the silicate and protonated organic cations - typically protonated amines. Long-chain alkyl ammonium ions are commonly chosen as the ion-exchange materials because they effectively lower the surface energies of the silicates and ease the incorporation of organic monomers or polymers into the silicate galleries. This completes the background discussion. In the present improved modification of the interlayer silicate surfaces

  15. Gas hydrates of Lake Baikal

    OpenAIRE

    Khlystov, O.; De Batist, M.; Shoji, H; Nishio, S.; L. Naudts; J. Poort

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews some of the results of recent gas-hydrate studies in Lake Baikal, the only fresh-water lake in the world containing gas hydrates in its sedimentary infill. We give a historical overview of the different investigations and discoveries and highlight some recent breakthroughs in our understanding of the Baikal hydrate system. The importance of mapping mud volcanoes and gas seeps is stressed, as these are currently the only locations where gas hydrates at or very close to the f...

  16. Hydration and physical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Bob

    2007-10-01

    There is a rich scientific literature regarding hydration status and physical function that began in the late 1800s, although the relationship was likely apparent centuries before that. A decrease in body water from normal levels (often referred to as dehydration or hypohydration) provokes changes in cardiovascular, thermoregulatory, metabolic, and central nervous function that become increasingly greater as dehydration worsens. Similarly, performance impairment often reported with modest dehydration (e.g., -2% body mass) is also exacerbated by greater fluid loss. Dehydration during physical activity in the heat provokes greater performance decrements than similar activity in cooler conditions, a difference thought to be due, at least in part, to greater cardiovascular and thermoregulatory strain associated with heat exposure. There is little doubt that performance during prolonged, continuous exercise in the heat is impaired by levels of dehydration >or= -2% body mass, and there is some evidence that lower levels of dehydration can also impair performance even during relatively short-duration, intermittent exercise. Although additional research is needed to more fully understand low-level dehydration's effects on physical performance, one can generalize that when performance is at stake, it is better to be well-hydrated than dehydrated. This generalization holds true in the occupational, military, and sports settings.

  17. Some thermodynamical aspects of protein hydration water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallamace, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.mallamace@unime.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Corsaro, Carmelo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); CNR-IPCF, Viale F. Stagno D’Alcontres 37, I-98158 Messina (Italy); Mallamace, Domenico [Dipartimento SASTAS, Università di Messina, I-98166 Messina (Italy); Vasi, Sebastiano [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); Vasi, Cirino [CNR-IPCF, Viale F. Stagno D’Alcontres 37, I-98158 Messina (Italy); Stanley, H. Eugene [Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Chen, Sow-Hsin [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-06-07

    We study by means of nuclear magnetic resonance the self-diffusion of protein hydration water at different hydration levels across a large temperature range that includes the deeply supercooled regime. Starting with a single hydration shell (h = 0.3), we consider different hydrations up to h = 0.65. Our experimental evidence indicates that two phenomena play a significant role in the dynamics of protein hydration water: (i) the measured fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover temperature is unaffected by the hydration level and (ii) the first hydration shell remains liquid at all hydrations, even at the lowest temperature.

  18. Electrophoretic deposition of magnesium silicates on titanium implants: Ion migration and silicide interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afshar-Mohajer, M. [Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Material Processing, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Yaghoubi, A., E-mail: yaghoubi@siswa.um.edu.my [Center for High Impact Research, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Ramesh, S., E-mail: ramesh79@um.edu.my [Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Material Processing, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Bushroa, A.R.; Chin, K.M.C.; Tin, C.C. [Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Material Processing, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Chiu, W.S. [Low Dimensional Materials Research Center, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia)

    2014-07-01

    Magnesium silicates (Mg{sub x}SiO{sub y}) and in particular forsterite (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) owing to their low thermal expansion mismatch with metals are promising materials for bioactive coating of implants. Here, we report the electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of forsterite onto titanium substrates using different precursors. Unlike bulk samples which achieve full stoichiometry only beyond 1400 °C, non-stoichiometric magnesium silicate rapidly decomposes into magnesium oxide nanowires during sintering. Elemental mapping and X-ray diffraction suggest that oxygen diffusion followed by ion exchange near the substrate leads to formation of an interfacial Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} layer. Pre-annealed forsterite powder on the other hand shows a comparatively lower diffusion rate. Overall, magnesium silicate coatings do not exhibit thermally induced microcracks upon sintering as opposed to calcium phosphate bioceramics which are currently in use.

  19. Electrophoretic deposition of magnesium silicates on titanium implants: Ion migration and silicide interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnesium silicates (MgxSiOy) and in particular forsterite (Mg2SiO4) owing to their low thermal expansion mismatch with metals are promising materials for bioactive coating of implants. Here, we report the electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of forsterite onto titanium substrates using different precursors. Unlike bulk samples which achieve full stoichiometry only beyond 1400 °C, non-stoichiometric magnesium silicate rapidly decomposes into magnesium oxide nanowires during sintering. Elemental mapping and X-ray diffraction suggest that oxygen diffusion followed by ion exchange near the substrate leads to formation of an interfacial Ti5Si3 layer. Pre-annealed forsterite powder on the other hand shows a comparatively lower diffusion rate. Overall, magnesium silicate coatings do not exhibit thermally induced microcracks upon sintering as opposed to calcium phosphate bioceramics which are currently in use.

  20. Flow assurance intervention, hydrates remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, Christopher S. [Oceaneering International Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This paper addresses the issues of removing hydrates in sub sea flow lines and associated equipment with an Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) of opportunity and a multi-service-vessel (MSV). The paper is split into three topics: the equipment used with the ROV, assessing the interface points and handling fluids produced from drawing down the pressure. Each section is explained thoroughly and backed up with real world experience. The equipment section details information from actual jobs performed and why the particular components were utilized. The system is generally contained in an ROV mounted skid. Pumps are utilized to draw down the pressure inside the hydrated section of equipment, removing one of the three necessary components for hydrates formation. Once the section is pumped down, several options exist for handling the fluids pumped out of the system: pumping to surface, re-injection into the well, or injection into an operating flow line. This method of hydrates remediation is both economical and timely. Hydrate blockages form in low temperatures and high pressures. Reducing the pressure or increasing the temperature so the conditions lie to the right of the hydrate dissociation curve will slowly decompose the blockage. Depressurization and the use of MEG or methanol will give favorable conditions to remove the hydrate plug. Oceaneering has the capabilities to remove hydrates using the FRS in conjunction with an installation vessel to dispose of the gas and fluid removed from the flow line. Hydrate remediation techniques should be implemented into the initial design to reduce costs later. The cost of stopped production combined with the day rate for equipment needed for hydrate removal outweighs the costs if no technique is utilized. (author)

  1. Ion-Doped Silicate Bioceramic Coating of Ti-Based Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Hossein; Sepantafar, Mohammadmajid

    2016-01-01

    Titanium and its alloy are known as important load-bearing biomaterials. The major drawbacks of these metals are fibrous formation and low corrosion rate after implantation. The surface modification of biomedical implants through various methods such as plasma spray improves their osseointegration and clinical lifetime. Different materials have been already used as coatings on biomedical implant, including calcium phosphates and bioglass. However, these materials have been reported to have limited clinical success. The excellent bioactivity of calcium silicate (Ca-Si) has been also regarded as coating material. However, their high degradation rate and low mechanical strength limit their further coating application. Trace element modification of (Ca-Si) bioceramics is a promising method, which improves their mechanical strength and chemical stability. In this review, the potential of trace element-modified silicate coatings on better bone formation of titanium implant is investigated. PMID:26979401

  2. Ion-Doped Silicate Bioceramic Coating of Ti-Based Implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Hossein; Sepantafar, Mohammadmajid

    2016-09-01

    Titanium and its alloy are known as important load-bearing biomaterials. The major drawbacks of these metals are fibrous formation and low corrosion rate after implantation. The surface modification of biomedical implants through various methods such as plasma spray improves their osseointegration and clinical lifetime. Different materials have been already used as coatings on biomedical implant, including calcium phosphates and bioglass. However, these materials have been reported to have limited clinical success. The excellent bioactivity of calcium silicate (Ca-Si) has been also regarded as coating material. However, their high degradation rate and low mechanical strength limit their further coating application. Trace element modification of (Ca-Si) bioceramics is a promising method, which improves their mechanical strength and chemical stability. In this review, the potential of trace element-modified silicate coatings on better bone formation of titanium implant is investigated. PMID:26979401

  3. Cumulate Fragments in Silicic Ignimbrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, O.; Ellis, B. S.; Wolff, J.

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly, studies are concluding that silicic ignimbrites are the result of the amalgamation of multiple discrete magma batches. Yet the existence of discrete batches presents a conundrum for magma generation and storage; if silicic magma batches are not generated nearly in situ in the upper crust, they must traverse, and reside within, a thermally hostile environment with large temperature gradients, resulting in low survivability in their shallow magmatic hearths. The Snake River Plain (Idaho, USA) is a type example of this 'multi-batch' assembly with ignimbrites containing multiple populations of pyroxene crystals, glass shards, and crystal aggregates. The ubiquitous crystal aggregates hint at a mechanism to facilitate the existence of multiple, relatively small batches of rhyolite in the upper crust. These aggregates contain the same plagioclase, pyroxene, and oxide mineral compositions as single phenocrysts of the same minerals in their host rocks, but they have significantly less silicic bulk compositions and lack quartz and sanidine, which occur as single phenocrysts in the deposits. This implies significant crystallization followed by melt extraction from mushy reservoir margins. The extracted melt then continues to evolve (crystallizing sanidine and quartz) while the melt-depleted margins provide an increasingly rigid and refractory network segregating the crystal-poor batches of magma. The hot, refractory, margins insulate the crystal-poor lenses, allowing (1) extended residence in the upper crust, and (2) preservation of chemical heterogeneities among batches. In contrast, systems that produce cumulates richer in low-temperature phases (quartz, K-feldspars, and/or biotite) favour remelting upon recharge, leading to less segregation of eruptible melt pockets and the formation of gradationally zoned ignimbrites. The occurrence of similar crystal aggregates from a variety of magmatic lineages suggests the generality of this process.

  4. Removal of phosphate from greenhouse wastewater using hydrated lime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunets, C Siobhan; Zheng, Youbin

    2014-01-01

    Phosphate (P) contamination in nutrient-laden wastewater is currently a major topic of discussion in the North American greenhouse industry. Precipitation of P as calcium phosphate minerals using hydrated lime could provide a simple, inexpensive method for retrieval. A combination of batch experiments and chemical equilibrium modelling was used to confirm the viability of this P removal method and determine lime addition rates and pH requirements for greenhouse wastewater of varying nutrient compositions. Lime: P ratio (molar ratio of CaMg(OH)₄: PO₄‒P) provided a consistent parameter for estimating lime addition requirements regardless of initial P concentration, with a ratio of 1.5 providing around 99% removal of dissolved P. Optimal P removal occurred when lime addition increased the pH from 8.6 to 9.0, suggesting that pH monitoring during the P removal process could provide a simple method for ensuring consistent adherence to P removal standards. A Visual MINTEQ model, validated using experimental data, provided a means of predicting lime addition and pH requirements as influenced by changes in other parameters of the lime-wastewater system (e.g. calcium concentration, temperature, and initial wastewater pH). Hydrated lime addition did not contribute to the removal of macronutrient elements such as nitrate and ammonium, but did decrease the concentration of some micronutrients. This study provides basic guidance for greenhouse operators to use hydrated lime for phosphate removal from greenhouse wastewater. PMID:25176490

  5. Investigation on Gas Storage in Methane Hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigao Sun; Rongsheng Ma; Shuanshi Fan; Kaihua Guo; Ruzhu Wang

    2004-01-01

    The effect of additives (anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), nonionic surfactant alkyl polysaccharide glycoside (APG), and liquid hydrocarbon cyclopentane (CP)) on hydrate induction time and formation rate, and storage capacity was studied in this work. Micelle surfactant solutions were found to reduce hydrate induction time, increase methane hydrate formation rate and improve methane storage capacity in hydrates. In the presence of surfactant, hydrate could form quickly in a quiescent system and the energy costs of hydrate formation were reduced. The critical micelle concentrations of SDS and APG water solutions were found to be 300× 10-6 and 500× 10-6 for methane hydrate formation system respectively. The effect of anionic surfactant (SDS) on methane storage in hydrates is more pronounced compared to a nonionic surfactant (APG). CP also reduced hydrate induction time and improved hydrate formation rate, but could not improve methane storage in hydrates.

  6. Calcium and bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone strength and calcium ... calcium (as well as phosphorus) to make healthy bones. Bones are the main storage site of calcium in ... your body does not absorb enough calcium, your bones can get weak or will not grow properly. ...

  7. Calcium carbonate overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tums overdose; Calcium overdose ... Calcium carbonate can be dangerous in large amounts. ... Some products that contain calcium carbonate are certain: ... and mineral supplements Other products may also contain calcium ...

  8. Get Enough Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Calcium Print This Topic En español Get Enough Calcium Browse Sections The Basics Overview Foods and Vitamins ... 2 of 4 sections Take Action! Take Action: Calcium Sources Protect your bones – get plenty of calcium ...

  9. Silicate condensation in Mira variables

    CERN Document Server

    Gail, Hans-Peter; Pucci, Annemarie

    2016-01-01

    We study whether the condensation of silicate dust in Mira envelopes could be caused by cluster formation by the abundant SiO molecules. For a simplified model of the pulsational motions of matter in the the outer layers of a Mira variable which is guided by a numerical model for Mira pulsations, the equations of dust nucleation and growth are solved in the co-moving frame of a fixed mass element. It is assumed that seed particles form by clustering of SiO molecules. The calculation of the nucleation rate is based on the experimental data of Nuth and Donn (1982). The quantity of dust formed is calculated by a moment method and the calculation of radiation pressure on the dusty gas is based on a dirty silicate model. Dust nucleation occurs in the model at the upper culmination of the trajectory of a gas parcel where it stays for a considerable time at low temperatures while subsequent dust growth occurs during the descending part of the motion and continues after the next shock reversed motion. It is found tha...

  10. In Vitro Screening of the Apatite-Forming Ability, Biointeractivity and Physical Properties of a Tricalcium Silicate Material for Endodontics and Restorative Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Giovanna Gandolfi; Francesco Siboni; Antonella Polimeni; Maurizio Bossù; Francesco Riccitiello; Sandro Rengo; Carlo Prati

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Calcium silicate-based materials are hydraulic self-setting materials with physico-chemical properties suitable for endodontic surgery and good biological/clinical outcomes. The study aim was to evaluate the bio-properties (biointeractivity and apatite-forming ability) and selected physical properties (porosity, water sorption, solubility, and setting time) of Biodentine, a tricalcium silicate material for endodontics and restorative dentistry, compared to that of ProRoot MTA (Mineral ...

  11. Compositional dependence of in vitro response to commercial silicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedlicka, Amy B.

    Materials are often incorporated into the human body, interacting with surrounding fluids, cells and tissues. The reactions that occur between a material and this surrounding biological system are not fundamentally understood. Basic knowledge of material biocompatibility and the controlling processes is lacking. This thesis examines material biocompatibility of a series of silicate-based glasses on a primary level determining cell response to material composition and durability. The silicate glass system studied included two BioglassRTM compositions with known biologically favorable response, two fiberglass compositions, with demonstrated 'not-unfavorable' in vitro response, a ternary soda-lime-silicate glass, a binary alkali silicate glass, and pure silica. Chemical durability was analyzed in three different fluids through solution analysis and material characterization. In vitro response to the substrates was observed. Cell behavior was then directly correlated to the material behavior in cell culture medium under the same conditions as the in vitro test, yet in the absence of cells. The effect of several physical and chemical surface treatments on substrates with predetermined biocompatible behavior was subsequently determined. The chemically durable glasses with no added B2O3 elicited similar cell response as the control polystyrene substrate. The addition of B2O3 resulted in polygonal cell shape and restricted cell proliferation. The non-durable glasses presented a dynamic surface to the cells, which did not adversely affect in vitro response. Extreme dissolution of the binary alkali silicate glass in conjunction with increased pH resulted in unfavorable cell response. Reaction of the Bioglass RTM compositions, producing a biologically favorable calcium-phosphate surface film, caused enhanced cell attachment and spreading. Surface energy increase due to sterilization procedures did not alter cellular response. Surface treatment procedures influencing substrate

  12. Influence of pozzolana on C4AF hydratio n and the effects of chloride and sulfate io ns on the hydrates formed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RIMVYDAS KAMINSKAS

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the influence of natural pozzolana additive on the hydration of C4AF (aluminoferrite and the effects of chloride and sulfate ions on the hydrates formed. In the samples, 25% (by weight of the C4AF was replaced with pozzolana. The mixture was then hardened for 28 days in water, soaked in a saturated NaCl solution for 3 months, and then soaked in a 5% Na2SO4 solution for 3 months at 20°C. It is estimated that under normal conditions, pozzolana additive accelerates the formation of CO32-–AFm (monocarboaluminate and gibbsite, however, impede the formation of cubic aluminum hydrates. Also, part of the amorphous SiO2 penetrates into the structure of hydrates of C4AF and initiates the formation of hydrated alumino-silicate (gismondine. Monocarboaluminate affected by NaCl becomes unstable and takes part in reactions producing Ca2Al(OH6Cl·2H2O (hydrocalumite-M. After samples were transferred from a saturated NaCl solution to a 5% Na2SO4 solution, hydrocalumite-M was the source of aluminates for the formation of ettringite. In samples with pozzolana additive, the hydrated alumino-silicate and gibbsite compounds that were formed remained stable in an environment containing chloride and sulfate ions and retarded the corrosion reaction of C4AF hydrates.

  13. Silicates materials of high vacuum technology

    CERN Document Server

    Espe, Werner

    2013-01-01

    Materials of High Vacuum Technology, Volume 2: Silicates covers silicate insulators of special importance to vacuum technology. The book discusses the manufacture, composition, and physical and chemical properties of technical glasses, quartz glass, quartzware, vycor glass, ceramic materials, mica, and asbestos.

  14. Degree of Hydration of OPC and OPC/Fly ash Paste Samples Conditioned at Different Relative Humidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasir Shafiq

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Degree of hydration of cement paste controls many properties of hardened concrete and/or mortar such as compressive strength. During the drying process, the degree and the rate of hydration of cement paste in concrete/mortar samples are significantly affected by the ambient relative humidity of the exposure conditions. There are various parameters such as the amount of calcium hydroxide, Ca(OH2 in the paste, quantity of the chemically bound water, specific gravity of the paste, fraction of un-hydrated cement, liberated heat of hydration and strength of the hydrated cement may be used to determine the degree of hydration of the cement paste. This paper presents the results of the experimental investigation for the determination of the degree of hydration of 100% cement paste and fly ash blended cement pastes. After 28 days moist curing, the samples were conditioned in 100%, 75%, 65%, 40% and 12% relative humidity. Conditioning of samples in different relative humidity had significant effects on the compressive strength of the mortar samples and the degree of hydration of the paste samples. Conditioning of samples in 100% RH resulted in higher compressive strength and the degree of hydration. Because of the 28 days moist curing and 12 weeks moisture conditioning in different RH, fly ash based samples showed better compressive strength than the OPC samples.

  15. Calcium paradox and calcium entry blockers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Slade, A.M.; Nayler, W.G.; Meijler, F.L.

    1984-01-01

    Reperfusion of isolated hearts with calcium-containing solution after a short period of calcium-free perfusion results in irreversible cell damage (calcium paradox). This phenomenon is characterized by an excessive influx of calcium into the cells, the rapid onset of myocardial contracture, exhausti

  16. Hydration in soccer: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro Cristiano Ralo; Guerra Isabela; Barros Turíbio Leite de

    2003-01-01

    Hydration should be considered before, during and after the exercise. This review intends to approach the main points of hydration process in soccer. The replacement of fluids during exercise is proportional to some factors, such as: exercise intensity; climatic conditions; the athlete's acclimatization; the athlete's physical conditioning; physiologic individual characteristics and the player's biomechanics. Performance is improved when players ingest not only water but also carbohydrate. Th...

  17. Mesoporous Silicate Materials in Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul T. Charles

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Mesoporous silicas, especially those exhibiting ordered pore systems and uniform pore diameters, have shown great potential for sensing applications in recent years. Morphological control grants them versatility in the method of deployment whether as bulk powders, monoliths, thin films, or embedded in coatings. High surface areas and pore sizes greater than 2 nm make them effective as adsorbent coatings for humidity sensors. The pore networks also provide the potential for immobilization of enzymes within the materials. Functionalization of materials by silane grafting or through cocondensation of silicate precursors can be used to provide mesoporous materials with a variety of fluorescent probes as well as surface properties that aid in selective detection of specific analytes. This review will illustrate how mesoporous silicas have been applied to sensing changes in relative humidity, changes in pH, metal cations, toxic industrial compounds, volatile organic compounds, small molecules and ions, nitroenergetic compounds, and biologically relevant molecules.

  18. Mechanism of gypsum hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacheco, G.

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an hypothesis that the mechanism o f gypsum hydration and dehydration is performed through two simultaneous phenomena. In this study we try to clear up this phenomenon using chlorides as accelerators or a mixture of ethanol-methanol as retarders to carry out the gypsum setting. Natural Mexican gypsum samples and a hemihydrate prepared in the laboratory are used. The following analytical techniques are used: MO, DRX, DTA, TG and DTG. In agreement with the obtained results, it can be concluded: that colloid formation depends on the action of accelerators or retarders and the crystals are a consequence of the quantity of hemihydrate formed.

    En el mecanismo de hidratación y deshidratación del yeso existe la hipótesis de que éste se efectúa por dos fenómenos simultáneos. Este estudio intenta esclarecer estos fenómenos, empleando: cloruros como aceleradores o mezcla etanol-metanol como retardadores para efectuar el fraguado del yeso. Se emplean muestras de yeso de origen natural mexicano y hemihydrate preparado en laboratorio; se utilizan técnicas analíticas: MO, DRX, DTA, TG y DTG. De acuerdo a los resultados obtenidos se puede deducir: que la formación del coloide depende de la acción de los agentes aceleradores o retardadores y que los cristales son consecuencia de la cantidad de hemihidrato formado.

  19. Characterization and nutrient release from silicate rocks and influence on chemical changes in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Ramos Guelfi Silva

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The expansion of Brazilian agriculture has led to a heavy dependence on imported fertilizers to ensure the supply of the growing food demand. This fact has contributed to a growing interest in alternative nutrient sources, such as ground silicate rocks. It is necessary, however, to know the potential of nutrient release and changes these materials can cause in soils. The purpose of this study was to characterize six silicate rocks and evaluate their effects on the chemical properties of treated soil, assessed by chemical extractants after greenhouse incubation. The experimental design consisted of completely randomized plots, in a 3 x 6 factorial scheme, with four replications. The factors were potassium levels (0-control: without silicate rock application; 200; 400; 600 kg ha-1 of K2O, supplied as six silicate rock types (breccia, biotite schist, ultramafic rock, phlogopite schist and two types of mining waste. The chemical, physical and mineralogical properties of the alternative rock fertilizers were characterized. Treatments were applied to a dystrophic Red-Yellow Oxisol (Ferralsol, which was incubated for 100 days, at 70 % (w/w moisture in 3.7 kg/pots. The soil was evaluated for pH; calcium and magnesium were extracted with KCl 1 mol L-1; potassium, phosphorus and sodium by Mehlich 1; nickel, copper and zinc with DTPA; and the saturation of the cation exchange capacity was calculated for aluminum, calcium, magnesium, potassium, and sodium, and overall base saturation. The alternative fertilizers affected soil chemical properties. Ultramafic rock and Chapada mining byproduct (CMB were the silicate rocks that most influenced soil pH, while the mining byproduct (MB led to high K levels. Zinc availability was highest in the treatments with mining byproduct and Cu in soil fertilized with Chapada and mining byproduct.

  20. Heavy ion bombardment of silicates and nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several silicates, including α-quartz, zirconium silicate, thorium silicate, LiAlSiO4, a silicate glass and several nitrides, α and β Si3N4, AlN, ZrN as well as Si2N2O and ThO2, have been irradiated by 1019 to 1021 Krypton (3 MeV) ions/m2. The damaged powders of original particle size less than 5 μm, have been examined by x-ray diffraction and electron microscope methods. The silicates and Si2N2O become non-crystalline by 10 x 1019 ions/m2. The particles change shape, extending and bloating under prolonged irradiations of the order of 100 x 1019 ions/m2. Silicate glass also undergoes this irradiation creep process. The nitrides and ThO2 behave quite differently and even at fluences of 200 x 1019 x ions/m-2 the powders remain crystalline, retaining relatively sharp edges to the particles without exhibiting irradiation creep. This difference in behavior can be related to the nature of the framework crystal structures, flexible for the silicates with variable bond angles, rigid for the nitrides with fixed bond angles. This may explain the behavior of radioactive minerals not found in a metamict condition. (author)

  1. ACTION OF SILICATO OF CALCIUM AND MAGNESIUM IN THE REDUCTION Cercospora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franciane Diniz Cogo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the response of coffee plants (Coffea arabica Catuaí IAC-44 with different doses of calcium silicate and magnesium in relation to incidence of Cercospora spot coffeicola and plant growth. The experiment was conducted in nursery seedling production of coffee from the Federal Institute of Southern Minas Gerais, Campus Machado, MG randomized blocks with five replications and the treatment used a source of silicon, calcium silicate and magnesium in doses - 0 (control, 75, 150, 225 300 g/m2. The application of silicon in the soil causes the reduction to Cercospora coffeicola. The application of calcium silicate and magnesium affect the growth characteristics and was effective in inducing gray leaf spot, via ground coffee seedlings in nurseries.

  2. Progress of Gas Hydrate Studies in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊栓狮; 汪集旸

    2006-01-01

    A brief overview is given on the gas hydrate-related research activities carried out by Chinese researchers in the past 15 years. The content involves: (1) Historical review. Introducing the gas hydrate research history in China; (2) Gas hydrate research groups in China. There are nearly 20 groups engaged in gas hydrate research now; (3) Present studies.Including fundamental studies, status of the exploration of natural gas hydrate resources in the South China Sea region, and development of hydrate-based new techniques; (4) Future development.

  3. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Lachowski, Eric E.;

    1999-01-01

    Vapour phase hydration of purl cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities is described. This is relevant to modern high performance concrete that may self-desiccate during hydration and is also relevant to the quality of the cement during storage. Both the oretical considerations and...... experimental data are presented showing that C(3)A can hydrate at lower humidities than either C3S or C2S. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during exposure to water vapour is nucleation controlled. When C(3)A hydrates at low humidity, the characteristic hydration product is C(3)AH(6...

  4. Hydration of swelling clays: multi-scale sequence of hydration and determination of macroscopic energies from microscopic properties; Hydratation des argiles gonflantes: sequence d'hydratation multi-echelle determination des energies macroscopiques a partir des proprietes microscopiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salles, F

    2006-10-15

    Smectites have interesting properties which make them potential candidates for engineered barriers in deep geological nuclear waste repository: low permeability, swelling and cations retention. The subject of this thesis consists in the determination of the relationship between hydration properties, swelling properties and cations mobility in relation with confinement properties of clayey materials. The aim is to understand and to predict the behaviour of water in smectites, following two research orientations: the mechanistic aspects and the energetic aspects of the hydration of smectites. We worked on the Na-Ca montmorillonite contained in the MX80 bentonite, with the exchanged homo ionic structure (saturated with alkaline cations and calcium cations). The approach crosses the various scales (microscopic, mesoscopic and macroscopic) and implied the study of the various components of the system (layer-cation-water), by using original experimental methods (thermo-poro-metry and electric conductivity for various relative humidities (RH) and electrostatic calculations. Initially, the dry state is defined by SCTA (scanning calorimetry thermal analysis). Then a classical characterization of the smectite porosity for the dry state is carried out using mercury intrusion and nitrogen adsorption. We evidenced the existence of a meso-porosity which radius varies from 2 to 10 nm depending on the compensating cation. The thermo-poro-metry and conductivity experiments performed at various hydration states made it possible to follow the increase in the pore sizes and the cations mobility as a function of the hydration state. We highlight in particular the existence of an osmotic mesoscopic swelling for low RH (approximately 50-60%RH for Li and Na). By combining the results of thermo-poro-metry, X-ray diffraction and electric conductivity, we are able to propose a complete hydration sequence for each cation, showing the crucial role of the compensating cation in the hydration of

  5. Hydration water in dynamics of a hydrated beta-lactoglobulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, K.; Yamaguchi, T.; Bellissent-Funel, M.-C.; Longeville, S.

    2007-02-01

    Incoherent spin-echo signals of a hydrated β-lactoglobulin protein were investigated, at 275 and 293 K. The intermediate scattering functions I(Q,t) were divided in two contributions from surface water and protein, respectively. On one hand, the dynamics of the surface water follows a KWW stretched exponential function (the exponent is ~0.5), on the other hand, that of the protein follows a single exponential. The present results are consistent with our previous results of hydrated C-phycocyanin combining elastic and quasielastic neutron scattering and by molecular dynamics simulation.

  6. Hydration studies of ye’elimite by using Ptychographic X-ray nano-tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Cuesta, Ana; da Silva, Julio C; Diaz, Ana; Holler, Mirko; De la Torre, Ángeles G.; García Aranda, Miguel Ángel

    2015-01-01

    CSA (Calcium SulfoAluminate) cements may have variable compositions but all of them contain ye’elimite(Ca4Al6O12SO4). The manufacture of CSA cements is more environmentally friendly than that of ordinary Portland cements as their production releases up to 40% less CO2. The hydration of ye’elimite leads to crystalline ettringite (AFt) and amorphous aluminum hydroxide (AH3•nH2O). Ptychographic X-ray computed nanotomography (PXCT) has been used here to study the hydration of ye’elimite-contai...

  7. Energetics of sodium-calcium exchanged zeolite A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, H; Wu, D; Guo, X; Shen, B; Navrotsky, A

    2015-05-01

    A series of calcium-exchanged zeolite A samples with different degrees of exchange were prepared. They were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). High temperature oxide melt drop solution calorimetry measured the formation enthalpies of hydrated zeolites CaNa-A from constituent oxides. The water content is a linear function of the degree of exchange, ranging from 20.54% for Na-A to 23.77% for 97.9% CaNa-A. The enthalpies of formation (from oxides) at 25 °C are -74.50 ± 1.21 kJ mol(-1) TO2 for hydrated zeolite Na-A and -30.79 ± 1.64 kJ mol(-1) TO2 for hydrated zeolite 97.9% CaNa-A. Dehydration enthalpies obtained from differential scanning calorimetry are 32.0 kJ mol(-1) H2O for hydrated zeolite Na-A and 20.5 kJ mol(-1) H2O for hydrated zeolite 97.9% CaNa-A. Enthalpies of formation of Ca-exchanged zeolites A are less exothermic than for zeolite Na-A. A linear relationship between the formation enthalpy and the extent of calcium substitution was observed. The energetic effect of Ca-exchange on zeolite A is discussed with an emphasis on the complex interactions between the zeolite framework, cations, and water.

  8. Magnetic properties of sheet silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susceptibility, magnetisation and Moessbauer measurements are reported for a representative selection of 2:1 layer phyllosilicates. Eight samples from the mica, vermiculite and smectite groups include examples diluted in iron which are paramagnetic at all temperatures, as well as iron-rich silicates which order magnetically below 10 K. Anisotropic susceptibility of crystals of muscovite, biotite and vermiculite is quantitatively explained with a model where the Fe2+ ions lie in sites of effective trigonal symmetry, the trigonal axis lying normal to the sheets. The ferrous ground state is an orbital singlet. Ferric iron gives an isotropic contribution to the susceptibility. Fe2+-Fe2+ exchange interactions are ferromagnetic with Gapprox. equal to2 K, whereas Fe3+-Fe3+ coupling is antiferromagnetic in the purely ferric minerals. A positive paramagnetic Curie temperature for glauconite may be attributable to Fe2+ → Fe3+ charge transfer. Magnetic order was found to set in inhomogeneously for glauconite at 1-7 K. One biotite sample showed an antiferromagnetic transition at Tsub(N) = 7 K marked by a well-defined susceptibility maximum. Its magnetic structure, consisting of ferromagnetic sheets with moments in their planes coupled antiferromagnetically by other, weak interactions, resembles that found earlier for the 1:1 mineral greenalite. (orig.)

  9. Calcium source (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getting enough calcium to keep bones from thinning throughout a person's life may be made more difficult if that person has ... as a tendency toward kidney stones, for avoiding calcium-rich food sources. Calcium deficiency also effects the ...

  10. Calcium and bones (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the growth, maintenance, and reproduction of the human ... body, are continually being re-formed and incorporate calcium into their structure. Calcium is essential for the ...

  11. Coronary Calcium Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Coronary Calcium Scan? A coronary calcium scan is a test ... you have calcifications in your coronary arteries. Coronary Calcium Scan Figure A shows the position of the ...

  12. Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD) Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD) Fast Facts The risk of ... young people, too. Proper diagnosis depends on detecting calcium pyrophosphate crystals in the fluid of an affected ...

  13. Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System (COSRS) is an innovative method that for the first time uses the strong reductant carbon monoxide to both reduce iron...

  14. Siliceous microfossil extraction from altered Monterey rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, C.O.; Casey, R.E.

    1986-04-01

    Samples of altered Monterey rocks of differing lithologies were processed by various methods to develop new techniques for extracting siliceous microfossils. The preliminary use of thin sections made from the same rocks reduced the number of probable samples (samples worth further processing) by about one-third. Most of the siliceous microfossils contained in altered Monterey rocks appear to be highly recrystallized and are extremely fragile; however, some contained silicified and silica-infilled radiolarians and planktonic and benthonic foraminifera, which are very tough. In general the most useful techniques were gently hydrochloric acid, hydrogen peroxide, formic acid, monosodium glutamate, and regular siliceous microfossil extraction techniques. Unsuccessful techniques and a new siliceous microfossil flotation technique are also documented.

  15. Geo-neutrinos and Silicate Earth Enrichment

    CERN Document Server

    Dye, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The terrestrial distribution of U, Th, and K abundances governs the thermal evolution, traces the differentiation, and reflects the bulk composition of the earth. Comparing the bulk earth composition to chondritic meteorites estimates the net amounts of these radiogenic heat-producing elements available for partitioning to the crust, mantle, and core. Core formation enriches the abundances of refractory lithophile elements, including U and Th, in the silicate earth by ~1.5. Global removal of volatile elements potentially increases this enrichment to ~2.8. The K content of the silicate earth follows from the ratio of K to U. Variable enrichment produces a range of possible heat-producing element abundances in the silicate earth. A model assesses the essentially fixed amounts of U, Th, and K in the approximately closed crust reservoir. Subtracting these sequestered crustal amounts from the variable amounts in the silicate earth results in a range of possible mantle allocations, leaving global dynamics and therm...

  16. Silicate production and availability for mineral carbonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renforth, P; Washbourne, C-L; Taylder, J; Manning, D A C

    2011-03-15

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide sequestered as carbonates through the accelerated weathering of silicate minerals is proposed as a climate change mitigation technology with the potential to capture billions of tonnes of carbon per year. Although these materials can be mined expressly for carbonation, they are also produced by human activities (cement, iron and steel making, coal combustion, etc.). Despite their potential, there is poor global accounting of silicates produced in this way. This paper presents production estimates (by proxy) of various silicate materials including aggregate and mine waste, cement kiln dust, construction and demolition waste, iron and steel slag, and fuel ash. Approximately 7-17 billion tonnes are produced globally each year with an approximate annual sequestration potential of 190-332 million tonnes C. These estimates provide justification for additional research to accurately quantify the contemporary production of silicate minerals and to determine the location and carbon capture potential of historic material accumulations. PMID:21332128

  17. Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System (COSRS) is a novel technology for producing large quantities of oxygen on the Moon. Oxygen yields of 15 kilograms per...

  18. Hydration of swelling clays: multi-scale sequence of hydration and determination of macroscopic energies from microscopic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smectites have interesting properties which make them potential candidates for engineered barriers in deep geological nuclear waste repository: low permeability, swelling and cations retention. The subject of this thesis consists in the determination of the relationship between hydration properties, swelling properties and cations mobility in relation with confinement properties of clayey materials. The aim is to understand and to predict the behaviour of water in smectites, following two research orientations: the mechanistic aspects and the energetic aspects of the hydration of smectites. We worked on the Na-Ca montmorillonite contained in the MX80 bentonite, with the exchanged homo ionic structure (saturated with alkaline cations and calcium cations). The approach crosses the various scales (microscopic, mesoscopic and macroscopic) and implied the study of the various components of the system (layer-cation-water), by using original experimental methods (thermo-poro-metry and electric conductivity for various relative humidities (RH) and electrostatic calculations. Initially, the dry state is defined by SCTA (scanning calorimetry thermal analysis). Then a classical characterization of the smectite porosity for the dry state is carried out using mercury intrusion and nitrogen adsorption. We evidenced the existence of a meso-porosity which radius varies from 2 to 10 nm depending on the compensating cation. The thermo-poro-metry and conductivity experiments performed at various hydration states made it possible to follow the increase in the pore sizes and the cations mobility as a function of the hydration state. We highlight in particular the existence of an osmotic mesoscopic swelling for low RH (approximately 50-60%RH for Li and Na). By combining the results of thermo-poro-metry, X-ray diffraction and electric conductivity, we are able to propose a complete hydration sequence for each cation, showing the crucial role of the compensating cation in the hydration of

  19. Conditioning highly concentrated borate solutions with calcium sulfo-aluminate cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The early age hydration by borate solution of 3 calcium sulfo-aluminate cements (CSA), containing respectively 0%, 10% and 20% of gypsum by weight of cement was studied using isothermal calorimetry and dynamic mode rheo-metry. XRD and TGA analysis were carried out on pastes with increasing hydration degrees (up to 90 days) to specify the mineralogy and to figure out the mechanisms of borate immobilisation. It has been shown that the retarding effect of borate anions is due to the precipitation of the amorphous calcium borate C2B3H8; borate anions were then incorporated in Aft-type phases. The macroscopic properties of hydrated binders (compressive strength, length change) were also followed during 180 days. It appears that the mechanical strength continuously increases with the hydration degree. Length changes under wet-curing and sealed bag remain moderate and seem to be stabilized after 180 days

  20. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Silicate Vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Costa, Gustavo C. C.

    2015-01-01

    Silicates are a common class of materials that are often exposed to high temperatures. The behavior of these materials needs to be understood for applications as high temperature coatings in material science as well as the constituents of lava for geological considerations. The vaporization behavior of these materials is an important aspect of their high temperature behavior and it also provides fundamental thermodynamic data. The application of Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry (KEMS) to silicates is discussed. There are several special considerations for silicates. The first is selection of an appropriate cell material, which is either nearly inert or has well-understood interactions with the silicate. The second consideration is proper measurement of the low vapor pressures. This can be circumvented by using a reducing agent to boost the vapor pressure without changing the solid composition or by working at very high temperatures. The third consideration deals with kinetic barriers to vaporization. The measurement of these barriers, as encompassed in a vaporization coefficient, is discussed. Current measured data of rare earth silicates for high temperature coating applications are discussed. In addition, data on magnesium-iron-silicates (olivine) are presented and discussed.