WorldWideScience

Sample records for calcium signalling pathways

  1. Modularized study of human calcium signalling pathway

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Losiana Nayak; Rajat K De

    2007-08-01

    Signalling pathways are complex biochemical networks responsible for reg ulation of numerous cellular functions. These networks function by serial and successive interactions among a large number of vital biomolecules and chemical compounds. For deciphering and analysing the underlying mechanism of such networks, a modularized study is quite helpful. Here we propose an algorithm for modularization of calcium signalling pathway of H. sapiens. The idea that ``a node whose function is dependant on maximum number of other nodes tends to be the center of a sub network” is used to divide a large signalling network into smaller sub networks. Inclusion of node(s) into sub networks(s) is dependant on the outdegree of the node(s). Here outdegree of a node refers to the number of re lations of the considered node lying outside the constructed sub network. Node(s) having more than c relations lying outside the expanding subnetwork have to be excluded from it. Here is a specified variable based on user preference, which is finally fixed during adjustments of created subnetworks, so that certain biological significance can be conferred on them.

  2. Angiotensin II activates different calcium signaling pathways in adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgacheva, Lyudmila P; Turovskaya, Maria V; Dynnik, Vladimir V; Zinchenko, Valery P; Goncharov, Nikolay V; Davletov, Bazbek; Turovsky, Egor A

    2016-03-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is an important mammalian neurohormone involved in reninangiotensin system. Ang II is produced both constitutively and locally by RAS systems, including white fat adipocytes. The influence of Ang II on adipocytes is complex, affecting different systems of signal transduction from early Са(2+) responses to cell proliferation and differentiation, triglyceride accumulation, expression of adipokine-encoding genes and adipokine secretion. It is known that white fat adipocytes express all RAS components and Ang II receptors (АТ1 and АТ2). The current work was carried out with the primary white adipocytes culture, and Са(2+) signaling pathways activated by Ang II were investigated using fluorescent microscopy. Са(2+)-oscillations and transient responses of differentiated adipocytes to Ang II were registered in cells with both small and multiple lipid inclusions. Using inhibitory analysis and selective antagonists, we now show that Ang II initiates periodic Са(2+)-oscillations and transient responses by activating АТ1 and АТ2 receptors and involving branched signaling cascades:In these cascades, AT1 receptors play the leading role. The results of the present work open a perspective of using Ang II for correction of signal resistance of adipocytes often observed during obesity and type 2diabetes. PMID:26850364

  3. Plasma membrane calcium ATPase proteins as novel regulators of signal transduction pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mary; Louisa; Holton; Michael; Emerson; Ludwig; Neyses; Angel; L; Armesilla

    2010-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that plasma membrane calcium ATPases (PMCAs) play a key role as regulators of calcium-triggered signal transduction pathways via interaction with partner proteins. PMCAs regulate these pathways by targeting specific proteins to cellular sub-domains where the levels of intracellular freecalcium are kept low by the calcium ejection properties of PMCAs. According to this model, PMCAs have been shown to interact functionally with the calcium-sensitive proteins neuronal nitric oxide synthase, calmodulindependent serine protein kinase, calcineurin and endothelial nitric oxidase synthase. Transgenic animals with altered expression of PMCAs are being used to evaluate the physiological significance of these interactions. To date, PMCA interactions with calcium-dependent partner proteins have been demonstrated to play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system via regulation of the nitric oxide and calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells pathways. This new evidence suggests that PMCAs play a more sophisticated role than the mere ejection of calcium from the cells, by acting as modulators of signaling transduction pathways.

  4. Genome-wide association study knowledge-driven pathway analysis of alcohol dependence implicates the calcium signaling pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Danni; Li Jinming; Guo Yanfang

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcohol dependence (AD) is a serious and common public health problem.The identification of genes that contribute to the AD variation will improve our understanding of the genetic mechanism underlying this complex disease.Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and candidate gene genetic association studies identified individual genes as candidates for alcohol phenotypes,but efforts to generate an integrated view of accumulative genetic variants and pathways under alcohol drinking are lacking.Methods We applied enrichment gene set analysis to existing genetic association results to identify pertinent pathways to AD in this study.A total of 1 438 SNPs (P <1.0×10-3) associated to alcohol drinking related traits have been collected from 31 studies (10 candidate gene association studies,19 GWAS of SNPs,and 2 GWAS of copy number variants).Results Among all of the KEGG pathways,the calcium signaling pathway (hsa04020) showed the most significant enrichment of associations (21 genes) to alcohol consumption phenotypes (P=5.4×10-5).Furthermore,the calcium signaling pathway is the only pathway that turned out to be significant after multiple test adjustments,achieving Bonferroni P value of 0.8×10-3 and FDR value of 0.6×10-2,respectively.Interestingly,the calcium signaling pathway was previously found to be essential to regulate brain function,and genes in this pathway link to a depressive effect of alcohol consumption on the body.Conclusions Our findings,together with previous biological evidence,suggest the importance of gene polymorphisms of calcium signaling pathway to AD susceptibility.Still,further investigations are warranted to uncover the role of this pathway in AD and related traits.

  5. The Inositol Trisphosphate/Calcium Signaling Pathway in Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berridge, Michael J

    2016-10-01

    Many cellular functions are regulated by calcium (Ca(2+)) signals that are generated by different signaling pathways. One of these is the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate/calcium (InsP3/Ca(2+)) signaling pathway that operates through either primary or modulatory mechanisms. In its primary role, it generates the Ca(2+) that acts directly to control processes such as metabolism, secretion, fertilization, proliferation, and smooth muscle contraction. Its modulatory role occurs in excitable cells where it modulates the primary Ca(2+) signal generated by the entry of Ca(2+) through voltage-operated channels that releases Ca(2+) from ryanodine receptors (RYRs) on the internal stores. In carrying out this modulatory role, the InsP3/Ca(2+) signaling pathway induces subtle changes in the generation and function of the voltage-dependent primary Ca(2+) signal. Changes in the nature of both the primary and modulatory roles of InsP3/Ca(2+) signaling are a contributory factor responsible for the onset of a large number human diseases. PMID:27512009

  6. Multiple signaling pathways mediated by dopamine and calcium ionophore A23187 in human platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to investigate the mechanism(s) of platelet aggregation induced by the synergistic action of dopamine (DA) and a Ca/sup +2/-ionophore, A23187. DA showed non significant effect on platelet aggregation over a wide range of concentrations (up to 500 micro M), but did potentiate the aggregation response of A23187. Aggregation induced by A23187 was inhibited by calcium channel blockers (diltiazem and verpamil), receptor blockers (chlorpromazine and haloperidol) and a cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor (indomethacin). However, the inhibitory effect of these blockers was more pronounced (with a selectivity ratio of 1.5-28) in the aggregation induced by synergistic effect of A23187 and DA. A phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (P1 3-Kinase) inhibitor, wortmanin (1C/sub 50/. 25-30 nM), inhibited aggregation induced by either A23187 or DA and act synergistically. This synergistic effect on platelet aggregation is mediated through multiple signaling pathways. (author)

  7. Differential regulation of calcium signalling pathways by components of Piper methysticum (‘Awa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoda, L.M.N; Showman, A.; Baker, J.D.; Lange, I.; Koomoa, D.L.; Stokes, A.J.; Borris, R.P.; Turner, H.

    2015-01-01

    Kava is a soporific, anxiolytic and relaxant in widespread ritual and recreational use throughout the Pacific. Traditional uses of kava by indigenous Pacific Island peoples reflect a complex pharmacopeia, centered on GABA-ergic effects of the well-characterized kavalactones. However, peripheral effects of kava suggest active components other than the CNS-targeted kavalactones. We have previously shown that immunocytes exhibit calcium mobilization in response to traditionally-prepared kava extracts, and that the kavalactones do not induce these calcium responses. Here, we characterize the complex calcium-mobilizing activity of traditionally-prepared and partially HPLC-purified kava extracts, noting induction of both calcium entry and store release pathways. Kava components activate intracellular store depletion of thapsigargin-sensitive and –insensitive stores that are coupled to the calcium release activated (CRAC) current, and cause calcium entry through non-store-operated pathways. Together with the pepper-like potency reported by kava users, these studies lead us to hypothesize that kava extracts contain one or more ligands for the transient receptor potential (TRP) family of ion channels. Indeed, TRP-like conductances are observed in kava-treated cells under patch clamp. Thus TRP-mediated cellular effects may be responsible for some of the reported pharmacology of kava. PMID:25640812

  8. Oxethazaine inhibits hepatitis B virus capsid assembly by blocking the cytosolic calcium-signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Liu, Chunlan; Xiao, Yu; Chen, Xulin

    2016-05-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a serious public health problem and may progress to liver fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. It is currently treated with PEGylated IFN-α2a and nucleoside/nucleotide analogues (NAs). However, PEGylated IFN treatment has problems of high cost, low efficiency and side effects. Long-term administration of NAs is necessary to avoid virus relapse, which can cause drug resistance and side effects. New efforts are now being directed to develop novel anti-HBV drugs targeting either additional viral targets other than viral DNA polymerase or host targets to improve the treatment of chronic hepatitis B. In this study, we discovered that oxethazaine, approved for clinic use in a few countries such as Japan, India, South Africa and Brazil, can dose-dependently reduce the levels of HBV envelope antigen, extracellular HBV DNA in supernatants and intracellular HBV total DNA. However, the levels of HBV cccDNA and HBV RNAs were not affected by oxethazaine treatment. Further study confirmed that oxethazaine acts on the virus assembly stage of the HBV life cycle. A study of the mechanisms of oxethazaine suggested that this drug inhibits HBV replication and capsid assembly by blocking the cytosolic calcium-signalling pathway. Moreover, oxethazaine could inhibit the replication of lamivudine/entecavir-dual-resistant and adefovir-resistant HBV mutants. In conclusion, our study suggests that oxethazaine may serve as a promising drug, or could be used as a starting point for anti-HBV drug discovery. PMID:26838678

  9. Cross-Talk between Signaling Pathways Can Generate Robust Oscillations in Calcium and cAMP

    OpenAIRE

    Siso-Nadal, Fernando; Fox, Jeffrey J.; Laporte, Stéphane A.; Hébert, Terence E.; Swain, Peter S

    2009-01-01

    Background To control and manipulate cellular signaling, we need to understand cellular strategies for information transfer, integration, and decision-making. A key feature of signal transduction is the generation of only a few intracellular messengers by many extracellular stimuli. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we model molecular cross-talk between two classic second messengers, cyclic AMP (cAMP) and calcium, and show that the dynamical complexity of the response of both messengers inc...

  10. Cross-talk between signaling pathways can generate robust oscillations in calcium and cAMP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Siso-Nadal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To control and manipulate cellular signaling, we need to understand cellular strategies for information transfer, integration, and decision-making. A key feature of signal transduction is the generation of only a few intracellular messengers by many extracellular stimuli. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we model molecular cross-talk between two classic second messengers, cyclic AMP (cAMP and calcium, and show that the dynamical complexity of the response of both messengers increases substantially through their interaction. In our model of a non-excitable cell, both cAMP and calcium concentrations can oscillate. If mutually inhibitory, cross-talk between the two second messengers can increase the range of agonist concentrations for which oscillations occur. If mutually activating, cross-talk decreases the oscillation range, but can generate 'bursting' oscillations of calcium and may enable better filtering of noise. CONCLUSION: We postulate that this increased dynamical complexity allows the cell to encode more information, particularly if both second messengers encode signals. In their native environments, it is unlikely that cells are exposed to one stimulus at a time, and cross-talk may help generate sufficiently complex responses to allow the cell to discriminate between different combinations and concentrations of extracellular agonists.

  11. Identification of a Calcium Signalling Pathway of S-[6]-Gingerol in HuH-7 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Hong Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium signals in hepatocytes control cell growth, proliferation, and death. Members of the transient receptor potential (TRP cation channel superfamily are candidate calcium influx channels. NFκB activation strictly depends on calcium influx and often induces antiapoptotic genes favouring cell survival. Previously, we reported that S-[6]-gingerol is an efficacious agonist of the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1 in neurones. In this study, we tested the effect of S-[6]-gingerol on HuH-7 cells using the Fluo-4 calcium assay, RT-qPCR, transient cell transfection, and luciferase measurements. We found that S-[6]-gingerol induced a transient rise in [Ca2+]i in HuH-7 cells. The increase in [Ca2+]i induced by S-[6]-gingerol was abolished by preincubation with EGTA and was also inhibited by the TRPV1 channel antagonist capsazepine. Expression of TRPV1 in HuH-7 cells was confirmed by mRNA analysis as well as a test for increase of [Ca2+]i by TRPV1 agonist capsaicin and its inhibition by capsazepine. We found that S-[6]-gingerol induced rapid NFκB activation through TRPV1 in HuH-7 cells. Furthermore, S-[6]-gingerol-induced NFκB activation was dependent on the calcium gradient and TRPV1. The rapid NFκB activation by S-[6]-gingerol was associated with an increase in mRNA levels of NFκB-target genes: cIAP-2, XIAP, and Bcl-2 that encode antiapoptotic proteins.

  12. Conditions and constraints for astrocyte calcium signaling in the hippocampal mossy fiber pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Haustein, Martin D.; Kracun, Sebastian; Lu, Xiao-Hong; Shih, Tiffany; Jackson-Weaver, Olan; Tong, Xiaoping; Xu, Ji; Yang, X William; O'Dell, Thomas J.; Marvin, Jonathan S.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Bushong, Eric A.; Looger, Loren L.; Khakh, Baljit S.

    2014-01-01

    The spatiotemporal activities of astrocyte Ca2+ signaling in mature neuronal circuits remain unclear. We used genetically encoded Ca2+ and glutamate indicators as well as pharmacogenetic and electrical control of neurotransmitter release to explore astrocyte activity in the hippocampal mossy fiber pathway. Our data revealed numerous localised spontaneous Ca2+ signals in astrocyte branches and territories, but these were not driven by neuronal activity or glutamate. Moreover, evoked astrocyte ...

  13. A history of stress alters drought calcium signalling pathways in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, H; Brandt, S; Knight, M R

    1998-12-01

    Environmental stresses commonly encountered by plants lead to rapid transient elevations in cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]cyt) (Bush, 1995; Knight et al., 1991). These cellular calcium (Ca2+) signals lead ultimately to the increased expression of stress-responsive genes, including those encoding proteins of protective function (Knight et al., 1996; Knight et al., 1997). The kinetics and magnitude of the Ca2+ signal, or 'calcium signature', differ between different stimuli and are thought to contribute to the specificity of the end response (Dolmetsch et al., 1997; McAinsh and Hetherington, 1998). We measured [Ca2+]cyt changes during treatment with mannitol (to mimic drought stress) in whole intact seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana. The responses of plants which were previously exposed to osmotic and oxidative stresses were compared to those of control plants. We show here that osmotic stress-induced Ca2+ responses can be markedly altered by previous encounters with either osmotic or oxidative stress. The nature of the alterations in Ca2+ response depends on the identity and severity of the previous stress: oxidative stress pre-treatment reduced the mannitol-induced [Ca2+]cyt response whereas osmotic stress pretreatment increased the [Ca2+]cyt response. Therefore, our data show that different combinations of environmental stress can produce novel Ca2+ signal outputs. These alterations are accompanied by corresponding changes in the patterns of osmotic stress-induced gene expression and, in the case of osmotic stress pre-treatment, the acquisition of stress-tolerance. This suggests that altered Ca2+ responses encode a 'memory' of previous stress encounters and thus may perhaps be involved in acclimation to environmental stresses. PMID:10069075

  14. Calcium Signaling Pathway Genes RUNX2 and CACNA1C Are Associated With Calcific Aortic Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guauque-Olarte, Sandra; Messika-Zeitoun, David; Droit, Arnaud; Lamontagne, Maxime; Tremblay-Marchand, Joël; Lavoie-Charland, Emilie; Gaudreault, Nathalie; Arsenault, Benoit J.; Dubé, Marie-Pierre; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Body, Simon C.; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Boileau, Catherine; Mathieu, Patrick; Pibarot, Philippe; Bossé, Yohan

    2016-01-01

    Background Calcific aortic valve stenosis (AS) is a life-threatening disease with no medical therapy. The genetic architecture of AS remains elusive. This study combines genome-wide association studies, gene expression, and expression quantitative trait loci mapping in human valve tissues to identify susceptibility genes of AS. Methods and Results A meta-analysis was performed combining the results of 2 genome-wide association studies in 474 and 486 cases from Quebec City (Canada) and Paris (France), respectively. Corresponding controls consisted of 2988 and 1864 individuals with European ancestry from the database of genotypes and phenotypes. mRNA expression levels were evaluated in 9 calcified and 8 normal aortic valves by RNA sequencing. The results were integrated with valve expression quantitative trait loci data obtained from 22 AS patients. Twenty-five single-nucleotide polymorphisms had Pmeta-analysis. The calcium signaling pathway was the top gene set enriched for genes mapped to moderately AS-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Genes in this pathway were found differentially expressed in valves with and without AS. Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms located in RUNX2 (runt-related transcription factor 2), encoding an osteogenic transcription factor, demonstrated some association with AS (genome-wide association studies P=5.33×10−5). The mRNA expression levels of RUNX2 were upregulated in calcified valves and associated with eQTL-SNPs. CACNA1C encoding a subunit of a voltage-dependent calcium channel was upregulated in calcified valves. The eQTL-SNP with the most significant association with AS located in CACNA1C was associated with higher expression of the gene. Conclusions This integrative genomic study confirmed the role of RUNX2 as a potential driver of AS and identified a new AS susceptibility gene, CACNA1C, belonging to the calcium signaling pathway. PMID:26553695

  15. Calcium sensing receptor suppresses human pancreatic tumorigenesis through a novel NCX1/Ca(2+)/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bo; Chow, Jimmy Y C; Dong, Tobias Xiao; Yang, Shi-Ming; Lu, De-Sheng; Carethers, John M; Dong, Hui

    2016-07-10

    The calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) is functionally expressed in normal human pancreases, but its pathological role in pancreatic tumorigenesis is currently unknown. We sought to investigate the role of CaSR in pancreatic cancer (PC) and the underlying molecular mechanisms. We revealed that the expression of CaSR was consistently downregulated in the primary cancer tissues from PC patients, which was correlated with tumor size, differentiation and poor survival of the patients. CaSR activation markedly suppressed pancreatic tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo likely through the Ca(2+) entry mode of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger 1 (NCX1) to induce Ca(2+) entry into PC cells. Moreover, NCX1-mediated Ca(2+) entry resulted in Ca(2+)-dependent inhibition of β-catenin signaling in PC cells, eventually leading to the inhibition of pancreatic tumorigenesis. Collectively, we demonstrate for the first time that CaSR exerts a suppressive function in pancreatic tumorigenesis through a novel NCX1/Ca(2+)/β-catenin signaling pathway. Targeting this specific signaling pathway could be a potential therapeutic strategy for PC. PMID:27108064

  16. Odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells by calcium silicate materials stimulating via FGFR/ERK signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chao-Hsin [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Hung, Chi-Jr; Huang, Tsui-Hsien [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chi-Chang [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Kao, Chia-Tze [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Shie, Ming-You, E-mail: eviltacasi@gmail.com [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-01

    Bone healing needs a complex interaction of growth factors that establishes an environment for efficient bone formation. We examine how calcium silicate (CS) and tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) cements influence the behavior of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) through fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) and active MAPK pathways, in particular ERK. The hDPCs are cultured with β-TCP and CS, after which the cells' viability and odontogenic differentiation markers are determined by using PrestoBlue® assay and western blot, respectively. The effect of small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection targeting FGFR was also evaluated. The results showed that CS promoted cell proliferation and enhances FGFR expression. It was also found that CS increases ERK and p38 activity in hDPCs, and furthermore, raises the expression and secretion of DSP, and DMP-1. Additionally, statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) have been found in the calcium deposition in si-FGFR transfection and ERK inhibitor between CS and β-TCP; these variations indicated that ERK/MAPK signaling is involved in the silicon-induced odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs. The current study shows that CS substrates play a key role in odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs through FGFR and modulate ERK/MAPK activation. - Highlights: • CS influences the behavior of hDPCs through fibroblast growth factor receptor. • CS increases ERK and p38 activity in hDPCs. • ERK/MAPK signaling is involved in the Si-induced odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs. • Ca staining shows that FGFR regulates hDPC differentiation on CS, but not on β-TCP.

  17. Odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells by calcium silicate materials stimulating via FGFR/ERK signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone healing needs a complex interaction of growth factors that establishes an environment for efficient bone formation. We examine how calcium silicate (CS) and tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) cements influence the behavior of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) through fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) and active MAPK pathways, in particular ERK. The hDPCs are cultured with β-TCP and CS, after which the cells' viability and odontogenic differentiation markers are determined by using PrestoBlue® assay and western blot, respectively. The effect of small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection targeting FGFR was also evaluated. The results showed that CS promoted cell proliferation and enhances FGFR expression. It was also found that CS increases ERK and p38 activity in hDPCs, and furthermore, raises the expression and secretion of DSP, and DMP-1. Additionally, statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) have been found in the calcium deposition in si-FGFR transfection and ERK inhibitor between CS and β-TCP; these variations indicated that ERK/MAPK signaling is involved in the silicon-induced odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs. The current study shows that CS substrates play a key role in odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs through FGFR and modulate ERK/MAPK activation. - Highlights: • CS influences the behavior of hDPCs through fibroblast growth factor receptor. • CS increases ERK and p38 activity in hDPCs. • ERK/MAPK signaling is involved in the Si-induced odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs. • Ca staining shows that FGFR regulates hDPC differentiation on CS, but not on β-TCP

  18. VSNL1 Co-expression networks in aging include calcium signaling, synaptic plasticity, and Alzheimer’s disease pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C W Lin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Visinin-like 1 (VSNL1 gene encodes Visinin-like protein 1, a peripheral biomarker for Alzheimer disease (AD. Little is known, however, about normal VSNL1 expression in brain and the biologic networks in which it participates. Frontal cortex gray matter from 209 subjects without neurodegenerative or psychiatric illness, ranging in age from 16–91, were processed on Affymetrix GeneChip 1.1 ST and Human SNP Array 6.0. VSNL1 expression was unaffected by age and sex, and not significantly associated with SNPs in cis or trans. VSNL1 was significantly co-expressed with genes in pathways for Calcium Signaling, AD, Long Term Potentiation, Long Term Depression, and Trafficking of AMPA Receptors. The association with AD was driven, in part, by correlation with amyloid precursor protein (APP expression. These findings provide an unbiased link between VSNL1 and molecular mechanisms of AD, including pathways implicated in synaptic pathology in AD. Whether APP may drive increased VSNL1 expression, VSNL1 drives increased APP expression, or both are downstream of common pathogenic regulators will need to be evaluated in model systems.

  19. Stimulation of Odontogenesis and Angiogenesis via Bioactive Nanocomposite Calcium Phosphate Cements Through Integrin and VEGF Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Im; Lee, Eui-Suk; El-Fiqi, Ahmed; Lee, So-Youn; Eun-Cheol Kim; Kim, Hae-Won

    2016-05-01

    Formulating self-setting calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) with secondary phases particularly in the nanoscale order holds great promise to improve biological properties. Here, we focus on the effect that bioactive glass nanoparticles (BGN) incorporated in CPC compositions can have on the proliferation, odontogenic differentiation, and angiogenic stimulation of stem cells derived from human dental pulp (HDPSCs). These odontogenic and angiogenic events are of special importance in the dentin-pulp regeneration processes. In comparison to pure CPCs, nanocomposite cements exhibit a significantly improved proliferation of HDPSCs, and the improvement is more significant as the BGN content increases. The nanocomposite cements substantially enhance the adhesion of cells, and significantly up-regulate odontogenic differentiation, including alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the expressions of odontogenic genes (sialophosphoprotein, dentin matrix protein I, ALP, osteopontin and osteocalcin). Furthermore, the use of nanocomposite cements result in stimulation of angiogenic gene expression (VEGF, FGF-2, VEGFRs, PECAM-1, and VE-cadherin) and protein production (VEGF, VEGFR-1). The angiogenic stimulation by the HDPSCs significantly affects the endothelial cell behaviors, that is, the endothelial cell migration and the tubular network formation are substantially improved when treated with HDPSC-conditioned medium, particularly with the help of nanocomposite cements. The integrin and VEGF signaling pathways are reasoned for the stimulation of the odontogenesis and angiogenesis of cells, where the nanocomposite cements up-regulate the integrin subsets α1, α2, α3, and β1, and activate the integrin downstream signal pathways, such as p-FAK, p-Akt, p-paxillin, JNK, EK, and NF-κB, as well as other nuclear transcriptional factors, including CREB, STAT-3, and ELK-1. The current results indicate that the new formulation of the nanocomposite self-setting cements might provide some

  20. Genetic association study of QT interval highlights role for calcium signaling pathways in myocardial repolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arking, Dan E; Pulit, Sara L; Crotti, Lia; van der Harst, Pim; Munroe, Patricia B; Koopmann, Tamara T; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Rossin, Elizabeth J; Morley, Michael; Wang, Xinchen; Johnson, Andrew D; Lundby, Alicia; Gudbjartsson, Daníel F; Noseworthy, Peter A; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Bradford, Yuki; Tarasov, Kirill V; Dörr, Marcus; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Lahtinen, Annukka M; Nolte, Ilja M; Smith, Albert Vernon; Bis, Joshua C; Isaacs, Aaron; Newhouse, Stephen J; Evans, Daniel S; Post, Wendy S; Waggott, Daryl; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Hicks, Andrew A; Eisele, Lewin; Ellinghaus, David; Hayward, Caroline; Navarro, Pau; Ulivi, Sheila; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tester, David J; Chatel, Stéphanie; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kumari, Meena; Morris, Richard W; Naluai, Åsa T; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Kluttig, Alexander; Strohmer, Bernhard; Panayiotou, Andrie G; Torres, Maria; Knoflach, Michael; Hubacek, Jaroslav A; Slowikowski, Kamil; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Kumar, Runjun D; Harris, Tamara B; Launer, Lenore J; Shuldiner, Alan R; Alonso, Alvaro; Bader, Joel S; Ehret, Georg; Huang, Hailiang; Kao, W H Linda; Strait, James B; Macfarlane, Peter W; Brown, Morris; Caulfield, Mark J; Samani, Nilesh J; Kronenberg, Florian; Willeit, Johann; Smith, J Gustav; Greiser, Karin H; Meyer Zu Schwabedissen, Henriette; Werdan, Karl; Carella, Massimo; Zelante, Leopoldo; Heckbert, Susan R; Psaty, Bruce M; Rotter, Jerome I; Kolcic, Ivana; Polašek, Ozren; Wright, Alan F; Griffin, Maura; Daly, Mark J; Arnar, David O; Hólm, Hilma; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Denny, Joshua C; Roden, Dan M; Zuvich, Rebecca L; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew S; Larson, Martin G; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Yin, Xiaoyan; Bobbo, Marco; D'Adamo, Adamo P; Iorio, Annamaria; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Carracedo, Angel; Cummings, Steven R; Nalls, Michael A; Jula, Antti; Kontula, Kimmo K; Marjamaa, Annukka; Oikarinen, Lasse; Perola, Markus; Porthan, Kimmo; Erbel, Raimund; Hoffmann, Per; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kälsch, Hagen; Nöthen, Markus M; den Hoed, Marcel; Loos, Ruth J F; Thelle, Dag S; Gieger, Christian; Meitinger, Thomas; Perz, Siegfried; Peters, Annette; Prucha, Hanna; Sinner, Moritz F; Waldenberger, Melanie; de Boer, Rudolf A; Franke, Lude; van der Vleuten, Pieter A; Beckmann, Britt Maria; Martens, Eimo; Bardai, Abdennasser; Hofman, Nynke; Wilde, Arthur A M; Behr, Elijah R; Dalageorgou, Chrysoula; Giudicessi, John R; Medeiros-Domingo, Argelia; Barc, Julien; Kyndt, Florence; Probst, Vincent; Ghidoni, Alice; Insolia, Roberto; Hamilton, Robert M; Scherer, Stephen W; Brandimarto, Jeffrey; Margulies, Kenneth; Moravec, Christine E; del Greco M, Fabiola; Fuchsberger, Christian; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Lee, Wai K; Watt, Graham C M; Campbell, Harry; Wild, Sarah H; El Mokhtari, Nour E; Frey, Norbert; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Mateo Leach, Irene; Navis, Gerjan; van den Berg, Maarten P; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Kellis, Manolis; Krijthe, Bouwe P; Franco, Oscar H; Hofman, Albert; Kors, Jan A; Uitterlinden, André G; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Lamina, Claudia; Oostra, Ben A; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Lakatta, Edward G; Mulas, Antonella; Orrú, Marco; Schlessinger, David; Uda, Manuela; Markus, Marcello R P; Völker, Uwe; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Timothy D; Ärnlöv, Johan; Lind, Lars; Sundström, Johan; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Kivimaki, Mika; Kähönen, Mika; Mononen, Nina; Raitakari, Olli T; Viikari, Jorma S; Adamkova, Vera; Kiechl, Stefan; Brion, Maria; Nicolaides, Andrew N; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haerting, Johannes; Dominiczak, Anna F; Nyberg, Fredrik; Whincup, Peter H; Hingorani, Aroon D; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Bezzina, Connie R; Ingelsson, Erik; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gasparini, Paolo; Wilson, James F; Rudan, Igor; Franke, Andre; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Pramstaller, Peter P; Lehtimäki, Terho J; Paterson, Andrew D; Parsa, Afshin; Liu, Yongmei; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Siscovick, David S; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Jamshidi, Yalda; Salomaa, Veikko; Felix, Stephan B; Sanna, Serena; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Stricker, Bruno H; Stefansson, Kari; Boyer, Laurie A; Cappola, Thomas P; Olsen, Jesper V; Lage, Kasper; Schwartz, Peter J; Kääb, Stefan; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Ackerman, Michael J; Pfeufer, Arne; de Bakker, Paul I W; Newton-Cheh, Christopher

    2014-08-01

    The QT interval, an electrocardiographic measure reflecting myocardial repolarization, is a heritable trait. QT prolongation is a risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) and could indicate the presence of the potentially lethal mendelian long-QT syndrome (LQTS). Using a genome-wide association and replication study in up to 100,000 individuals, we identified 35 common variant loci associated with QT interval that collectively explain ∼8-10% of QT-interval variation and highlight the importance of calcium regulation in myocardial repolarization. Rare variant analysis of 6 new QT interval-associated loci in 298 unrelated probands with LQTS identified coding variants not found in controls but of uncertain causality and therefore requiring validation. Several newly identified loci encode proteins that physically interact with other recognized repolarization proteins. Our integration of common variant association, expression and orthogonal protein-protein interaction screens provides new insights into cardiac electrophysiology and identifies new candidate genes for ventricular arrhythmias, LQTS and SCD. PMID:24952745

  1. CCN3 and calcium signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chang Long

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The CCN family of genes consists presently of six members in human (CCN1-6 also known as Cyr61 (Cystein rich 61, CTGF (Connective Tissue Growth Factor, NOV (Nephroblastoma Overexpressed gene, WISP-1, 2 and 3 (Wnt-1 Induced Secreted Proteins. Results obtained over the past decade have indicated that CCN proteins are matricellular proteins, which are involved in the regulation of various cellular functions, such as proliferation, differentiation, survival, adhesion and migration. The CCN proteins have recently emerged as regulatory factors involved in both internal and external cell signaling. CCN3 was reported to physically interact with fibulin-1C, integrins, Notch and S100A4. Considering that, the conformation and biological activity of these proteins are dependent upon calcium binding, we hypothesized that CCN3 might be involved in signaling pathways mediated by calcium ions. In this article, we review the data showing that CCN3 regulates the levels of intracellular calcium and discuss potential models that may account for the biological effects of CCN3.

  2. Calcium signals and calcium channels in osteoblastic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, R. L.; Akanbi, K. A.; Farach-Carson, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) channels are present in non-excitable as well as in excitable cells. In bone cells of the osteoblast lineage, Ca2+ channels play fundamental roles in cellular responses to external stimuli including both mechanical forces and hormonal signals. They are also proposed to modulate paracrine signaling between bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts at local sites of bone remodeling. Calcium signals are characterized by transient increases in intracellular Ca2+ levels that are associated with activation of intracellular signaling pathways that control cell behavior and phenotype, including patterns of gene expression. Development of Ca2+ signals is a tightly regulated cellular process that involves the concerted actions of plasma membrane and intracellular Ca2+ channels, along with Ca2+ pumps and exchangers. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge concerning the structure, function, and role of Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ signals in bone cells, focusing on the osteoblast.

  3. Models of calcium signalling

    CERN Document Server

    Dupont, Geneviève; Kirk, Vivien; Sneyd, James

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses the ways in which mathematical, computational, and modelling methods can be used to help understand the dynamics of intracellular calcium. The concentration of free intracellular calcium is vital for controlling a wide range of cellular processes, and is thus of great physiological importance. However, because of the complex ways in which the calcium concentration varies, it is also of great mathematical interest.This book presents the general modelling theory as well as a large number of specific case examples, to show how mathematical modelling can interact with experimental approaches, in an interdisciplinary and multifaceted approach to the study of an important physiological control mechanism. Geneviève Dupont is FNRS Research Director at the Unit of Theoretical Chronobiology of the Université Libre de Bruxelles;Martin Falcke is head of the Mathematical Cell Physiology group at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin;Vivien Kirk is an Associate Professor in the Depar...

  4. Calcium Dysregulation Induces Apoptosis-inducing Factor Release: Cross-talk Between PARP-1- and Calpain- Signaling Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Vosler, Peter S.; Sun, Dandan; Wang, Suping; Gao, Yanqin; Kintner, Douglas B.; Signore, Armando P.; Cao, Guodong; Chen, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Recent discoveries show that caspase-independent cell death pathways are a pervasive mechanism in neurodegenerative diseases, and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) is an important effector of this mode of neuronal death. There are currently two known mechanisms underlying AIF release following excitotoxic stress, PARP-1 and calpain. To test whether there is an interaction between PARP-1 and calpain in triggering AIF release, we used the NMDA toxicity model in rat primary cortical neurons. Expos...

  5. Presynaptic calcium signalling in cerebellar mossy fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Jörntell, Henrik; Midtgaard, Jens

    2010-01-01

    appeared to be isolated from one another in terms of calcium signalling. CGP55845 application showed that GABA B receptors mediated presynaptic inhibition of the calcium signal over the entire firing frequency range of mossy fibres. A paired-pulse depression of the calcium signal lasting more than 1 s...... affected burst firing in mossy fibres; this paired-pulse depression was reduced by GABA B antagonists. While our results indicated that a presynaptic rosette electrophysiologically functioned as a unit, topical GABA application showed that calcium signals in the branches of complex rosettes could be...

  6. Multimodal encoding in a simplified model of intracellular calcium signaling

    OpenAIRE

    De Pitta`, Maurizio; Volman, Vladislav; Levine, Herbert; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2009-01-01

    Many cells use calcium signalling to carry information from the extracellular side of the plasma membrane to targets in their interior. Since virtually all cells employ a network of biochemical reactions for Ca2+ signalling, much effort has been devoted to understand the functional role of Ca2+ responses and to decipher how their complex dynamics is regulated by the biochemical network of Ca2+-related signal transduction pathways. Experimental observations show that Ca2+ signals in response t...

  7. Dissection of the insulin signaling pathway via quantitative phosphoproteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Marcus; Kratchmarova, Irina; Blagoev, Blagoy;

    2008-01-01

    spectrum of the tyrosine phosphorylation cascade, we have defined the tyrosine-phosphoproteome of the insulin signaling pathway, using high resolution mass spectrometry in combination with phosphotyrosine immunoprecipitation and stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) in...... calcium transporting ATPase SERCA2, supporting a connection to calcium signaling. The combination of quantitative phosphoproteomics with cell culture models provides a powerful strategy to dissect the insulin signaling pathways in intact cells....

  8. Extracellular calcium sensing and extracellular calcium signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, E. M.; MacLeod, R. J.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    , localized changes in Ca(o)(2+) within the ECF can originate from several mechanisms, including fluxes of calcium ions into or out of cellular or extracellular stores or across epithelium that absorb or secrete Ca(2+). In any event, the CaR and other receptors/sensors for Ca(o)(2+) and probably for other extracellular ions represent versatile regulators of numerous cellular functions and may serve as important therapeutic targets.

  9. Lipid body accumulation alters calcium signaling dynamics in immune cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greineisen, William E.; Speck, Mark; Shimoda, Lori M.N.; Sung, Carl; Phan, Nolwenn; Maaetoft-Udsen, Kristina; Stokes, Alexander J.; Turner, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Summary There is well-established variability in the numbers of lipid bodies (LB) in macrophages, eosinophils, and neutrophils. Similarly to the steatosis observed in adipocytes and hepatocytes during hyperinsulinemia and nutrient overload, immune cell LB hyper-accumulate in response to bacterial and parasitic infection and inflammatory presentations. Recently we described that hyperinsulinemia, both in vitro and in vivo, drives steatosis and phenotypic changes in primary and transformed mast cells and basophils. LB reach high numbers in these steatotic cytosols, and here we propose that they could dramatically impact the transcytoplasmic signaling pathways. We compared calcium release and influx responses at the population and single cell level in normal and steatotic model mast cells. At the population level, all aspects of FcεRI-dependent calcium mobilization, as well as activation of calcium-dependent downstream signalling targets such as NFATC1 phosphorylation are suppressed. At the single cell level, we demonstrate that LB are both sources and sinks of calcium following FcεRI cross-linking. Unbiased analysis of the impact of the presence of LB on the rate of trans-cytoplasmic calcium signals suggest that LB enrichment accelerates calcium propagation, which may reflect a Bernoulli effect. LB abundance thus impacts this fundamental signalling pathway and its downstream targets. PMID:25016314

  10. Calcium signaling in physiology and pathophysiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He-ping CHENG; Sheng WEI; Li-ping WEI; Alexei VERKHRATSKY

    2006-01-01

    Calcium ions are the most ubiquitous and pluripotent cellular signaling molecules that control a wide variety of cellular processes.The calcium signaling system is represented by a relatively limited number of highly conserved transporters and channels,which execute Ca2+ movements across biological membranes and by many thousands of Ca2+-sensitive effectors.Molecular cascades,responsible for the generation of calcium signals,are tightly controlled by Ca2+ ions themselves and by genetic factors,which tune the expression of different Ca2+-handling molecules according to adaptational requirements.Ca2+ ions determine normal physiological reactions and the development of many pathological processes.

  11. Do calcium-mediated cellular signalling pathways, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), estrogen or progesterone receptor antagonists, or bacterial endotoxins affect bovine placental function in vitro?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weems, Y S; Randel, R D; Carstens, G E; Welsh, T H; Weems, C W

    2004-04-01

    .05). Concentrations of PGE2 in media at 4 and 8 h were lower (P or = 0.05). PGF2alpha was increased (P < or = 0.05) by RU-486 at 8h and no other treatment affected PGF2alpha at 4 or 8 h (P < or = 0.05). In conclusion, modulators of cellular calcium signalling pathways given alone do not affect bovine placental progesterone secretion at the days studied and progesterone receptor-mediated events appear to suppress placental progesterone, PGF2alpha, and PGE2 secretion in cattle. In addition, PGE2 does not appear to regulate bovine placental progesterone secretion when the corpus luteum is functional and bacterial endotoxin does not appear to affect bovine placental secretion of PGF2alpha or PGE2. PMID:15287156

  12. Stochastic models of intracellular calcium signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellular signaling operates in a noisy environment shaped by low molecular concentrations and cellular heterogeneity. For calcium release through intracellular channels–one of the most important cellular signaling mechanisms–feedback by liberated calcium endows fluctuations with critical functions in signal generation and formation. In this review it is first described, under which general conditions the environment makes stochasticity relevant, and which conditions allow approximating or deterministic equations. This analysis provides a framework, in which one can deduce an efficient hybrid description combining stochastic and deterministic evolution laws. Within the hybrid approach, Markov chains model gating of channels, while the concentrations of calcium and calcium binding molecules (buffers) are described by reaction–diffusion equations. The article further focuses on the spatial representation of subcellular calcium domains related to intracellular calcium channels. It presents analysis for single channels and clusters of channels and reviews the effects of buffers on the calcium release. For clustered channels, we discuss the application and validity of coarse-graining as well as approaches based on continuous gating variables (Fokker–Planck and chemical Langevin equations). Comparison with recent experiments substantiates the stochastic and spatial approach, identifies minimal requirements for a realistic modeling, and facilitates an understanding of collective channel behavior. At the end of the review, implications of stochastic and local modeling for the generation and properties of cell-wide release and the integration of calcium dynamics into cellular signaling models are discussed

  13. Stochastic models of intracellular calcium signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rüdiger, Sten, E-mail: sten.ruediger@physik.hu-berlin.de

    2014-01-10

    Cellular signaling operates in a noisy environment shaped by low molecular concentrations and cellular heterogeneity. For calcium release through intracellular channels–one of the most important cellular signaling mechanisms–feedback by liberated calcium endows fluctuations with critical functions in signal generation and formation. In this review it is first described, under which general conditions the environment makes stochasticity relevant, and which conditions allow approximating or deterministic equations. This analysis provides a framework, in which one can deduce an efficient hybrid description combining stochastic and deterministic evolution laws. Within the hybrid approach, Markov chains model gating of channels, while the concentrations of calcium and calcium binding molecules (buffers) are described by reaction–diffusion equations. The article further focuses on the spatial representation of subcellular calcium domains related to intracellular calcium channels. It presents analysis for single channels and clusters of channels and reviews the effects of buffers on the calcium release. For clustered channels, we discuss the application and validity of coarse-graining as well as approaches based on continuous gating variables (Fokker–Planck and chemical Langevin equations). Comparison with recent experiments substantiates the stochastic and spatial approach, identifies minimal requirements for a realistic modeling, and facilitates an understanding of collective channel behavior. At the end of the review, implications of stochastic and local modeling for the generation and properties of cell-wide release and the integration of calcium dynamics into cellular signaling models are discussed.

  14. The calcium-signaling toolkit: Updates needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Charlotte; Prevarskaya, Natalia; Vanden Abeele, Fabien

    2016-06-01

    Here, we review the role of Ca(2+) in apoptosis, namely that ER Ca(2+) depletion or a sustained elevation of cytosolic or mitochondrial Ca(2+) concentration are sufficient to trigger apoptosis. These concepts have emerged by the use of ER stressor agents that decrease the ER Ca(2+) pool by inhibiting SERCA pumps. However, aside from their well-known actions on Ca(2+) homeostasis disruption leading to apoptosis, new evidence show that some ER Ca(2+) modulators have significant implications in other Ca(2+)-mediated or Ca(2+)-independent pathways determining cell fate suggesting a more complex regulation of apoptosis by intracellular Ca(2+). Here, we discuss the crucial interplay between Ca(2+) mediated apoptosis, the Unfold Protein Response and autophagy determining cell fate, and the molecular compounds that have been used to depict these pathways. This review of the literature clearly shows the need for new inhibitors that do not interfere concomitantly with autophagy and Ca(2+) signaling. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium and Cell Fate. Guest Editors: Jacques Haiech, Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, Thierry Capiod and Olivier Mignen. PMID:26658643

  15. Glial calcium signaling in physiology and pathophysioilogy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexei VERKHRASKY

    2006-01-01

    Neuronal-glial circuits underlie integrative processes in the nervous system.Function of glial syncytium is,to a very large extent,regulated by the intracellular calcium signaling system.Glial calcium signals are triggered by activation of multiple receptors,expressed in glial membrane,which regulate both Ca2+ entry and Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum.The endoplasmic reticulum also endows glial cells with intracellular excitable media,which is able to produce and maintain long-ranging signaling in a form of propagating Ca2+ waves.In pathological conditions,calcium signals regulate glial response to injury,which might have both protective and detrimental effects on the nervous tissue.

  16. Critical nodes in signalling pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taniguchi, Cullen M; Emanuelli, Brice; Kahn, C Ronald

    2006-01-01

    Physiologically important cell-signalling networks are complex, and contain several points of regulation, signal divergence and crosstalk with other signalling cascades. Here, we use the concept of 'critical nodes' to define the important junctions in these pathways and illustrate their unique ro...

  17. STIM1 is a Calcium Sensor Specialized for Digital Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Bird, Gary S.; Hwang, Sung-Yong; Smyth, Jeremy T.; Fukushima, Miwako; Boyles, Rebecca R.; Putney, James W.

    2009-01-01

    When cells are activated by calcium-mobilizing agonists at low, physiological concentrations, the resulting calcium signals generally take the form of repetitive regenerative discharges of stored calcium, termed calcium oscillations [1]. These intracellular calcium oscillations have long fascinated biologists as representing a mode of digitized intracellular signaling. Recent work has highlighted the role of calcium influx as an essential component of calcium oscillations [2]. This influx occ...

  18. Calcium-Sensing Receptor in Human Peripheral Blood T Lymphocytes Is Involved in the AMI Onset and Progression through the NF-κB Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jing-Ya; Du, Jing-Jing; Pan, Ying; Wu, Jian; Bi, Hai-Liang; Cui, Bao-Hong; Zhai, Tai-Yu; Sun, Yong; Sun, Yi-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a condition triggered by an inflammatory process that seriously affects human health. Calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) in T lymphocytes is involved during the inflammation reaction. However, the relationship between them is not very clear. In this study, we collected human peripheral blood T lymphocytes from patients with AMI and in different stages of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) (at the onset of AMI, the first day after PCI (PCI-1), PCI-3, and PCI-5) to study the CaSR and NF-κB pathway protein expression, cytokine release and T cell apoptosis. The results showed that the expressions of CaSR, P-p65, Caspase-12, and the secretions of Th-1 and Th-2 type cytokines were increased at the onset of AMI, especially on the PCI-1. Meanwhile, the apoptosis rate of CD(3+), CD(4+) and CD(8+) T lymphocytes also increased. However, from PCI-3, all the indicators began to decline. In addition, we also found that positive CaSR small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection in T lymphocytes and NF-κB pathway blocker Bay-11-7082 reversed the increased expressions of CaSR, P-p65, Caspase-12, reduced the secretions of Th-1 and Th-2 type cytokines, and decreased T lymphocytes apoptosis rate not only in the AMI patients but also in the normal controls. All of these results indicated that CaSR in the human peripheral blood T lymphocytes were involved in the AMI onset and progression, which probably was related to the NF-κB pathway. Our study demonstrated the relationship between AMI and CaSR, and will provide new effective prevention theory and new targets for drug treatment. PMID:27563892

  19. Aberrant Signaling Pathways in Glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakada, Mitsutoshi, E-mail: nakada@ns.m.kanazawa-u.ac.jp; Kita, Daisuke; Watanabe, Takuya; Hayashi, Yutaka [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-8641 (Japan); Teng, Lei [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-8641 (Japan); Department of Neurosurgery, The First Clinical College of Harbin Medical University, Nangang, Harbin 150001 (China); Pyko, Ilya V.; Hamada, Jun-Ichiro [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-8641 (Japan)

    2011-08-10

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a WHO grade IV malignant glioma, is the most common and lethal primary brain tumor in adults; few treatments are available. Median survival rates range from 12–15 months. The biological characteristics of this tumor are exemplified by prominent proliferation, active invasiveness, and rich angiogenesis. This is mainly due to highly deregulated signaling pathways in the tumor. Studies of these signaling pathways have greatly increased our understanding of the biology and clinical behavior of GBM. An integrated view of signal transduction will provide a more useful approach in designing novel therapies for this devastating disease. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of GBM signaling pathways with a focus on potential molecular targets for anti-signaling molecular therapies.

  20. Aberrant Signaling Pathways in Glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a WHO grade IV malignant glioma, is the most common and lethal primary brain tumor in adults; few treatments are available. Median survival rates range from 12–15 months. The biological characteristics of this tumor are exemplified by prominent proliferation, active invasiveness, and rich angiogenesis. This is mainly due to highly deregulated signaling pathways in the tumor. Studies of these signaling pathways have greatly increased our understanding of the biology and clinical behavior of GBM. An integrated view of signal transduction will provide a more useful approach in designing novel therapies for this devastating disease. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of GBM signaling pathways with a focus on potential molecular targets for anti-signaling molecular therapies

  1. Astrocyte calcium signaling: the third wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazargani, Narges; Attwell, David

    2016-01-27

    The discovery that transient elevations of calcium concentration occur in astrocytes, and release 'gliotransmitters' which act on neurons and vascular smooth muscle, led to the idea that astrocytes are powerful regulators of neuronal spiking, synaptic plasticity and brain blood flow. These findings were challenged by a second wave of reports that astrocyte calcium transients did not mediate functions attributed to gliotransmitters and were too slow to generate blood flow increases. Remarkably, the tide has now turned again: the most important calcium transients occur in fine astrocyte processes not resolved in earlier studies, and new mechanisms have been discovered by which astrocyte [Ca(2+)]i is raised and exerts its effects. Here we review how this third wave of discoveries has changed our understanding of astrocyte calcium signaling and its consequences for neuronal function. PMID:26814587

  2. Calcium Signaling Pathway Is Associated with the Long-Term Clinical Response to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI) and SSRI with Antipsychotics in Patients with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umehara, Hidehiro; Numata, Shusuke; Tajima, Atsushi; Nishi, Akira; Nakataki, Masahito; Imoto, Issei; Sumitani, Satsuki; Ohmori, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    Background Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) are established first-line pharmacological treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), while antipsychotics are used as an augmentation strategy for SSRI in OCD patients who have either no response or a partial response to SSRI treatment. The goal of the present study was to identify genetic variants and pathways that are associated with the long-term clinical response of OCD patients to SSRI or SSRI with antipsychotics. Methods We first performed a genome-wide association study of 96 OCD patients to examine genetic variants contributing to the response to SSRI or SSRI with antipsychotics. Subsequently, we conducted pathway-based analyses by using Improved Gene Set Enrichment Analysis for Genome-wide Association Study (i-GSEA4GWAS) to examine the combined effects of genetic variants on the clinical response in OCD. Results While we failed to detect specific genetic variants associated with clinical responses to SSRI or to SSRI with an atypical antipsychotic at genome-wide levels of significance, we identified 8 enriched pathways for the SSRI treatment response and 5 enriched pathways for the treatment response to SSRI with an antipsychotic medication. Notably, the calcium signaling pathway was identified in both treatment responses. Conclusions Our results provide novel insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the variability in clinical response to SSRI and SSRI with antipsychotics in OCD patients. PMID:27281126

  3. Signaling Pathways in Melanogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey A. N. D’Mello

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Melanocytes are melanin-producing cells found in skin, hair follicles, eyes, inner ear, bones, heart and brain of humans. They arise from pluripotent neural crest cells and differentiate in response to a complex network of interacting regulatory pathways. Melanins are pigment molecules that are endogenously synthesized by melanocytes. The light absorption of melanin in skin and hair leads to photoreceptor shielding, thermoregulation, photoprotection, camouflage and display coloring. Melanins are also powerful cation chelators and may act as free radical sinks. Melanin formation is a product of complex biochemical events that starts from amino acid tyrosine and its metabolite, dopa. The types and amounts of melanin produced by melanocytes are determined genetically and are influenced by a variety of extrinsic and intrinsic factors such as hormonal changes, inflammation, age and exposure to UV light. These stimuli affect the different pathways in melanogenesis. In this review we will discuss the regulatory mechanisms involved in melanogenesis and explain how intrinsic and extrinsic factors regulate melanin production. We will also explain the regulatory roles of different proteins involved in melanogenesis.

  4. Signaling Pathways in Melanogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Mello, Stacey A N; Finlay, Graeme J; Baguley, Bruce C; Askarian-Amiri, Marjan E

    2016-01-01

    Melanocytes are melanin-producing cells found in skin, hair follicles, eyes, inner ear, bones, heart and brain of humans. They arise from pluripotent neural crest cells and differentiate in response to a complex network of interacting regulatory pathways. Melanins are pigment molecules that are endogenously synthesized by melanocytes. The light absorption of melanin in skin and hair leads to photoreceptor shielding, thermoregulation, photoprotection, camouflage and display coloring. Melanins are also powerful cation chelators and may act as free radical sinks. Melanin formation is a product of complex biochemical events that starts from amino acid tyrosine and its metabolite, dopa. The types and amounts of melanin produced by melanocytes are determined genetically and are influenced by a variety of extrinsic and intrinsic factors such as hormonal changes, inflammation, age and exposure to UV light. These stimuli affect the different pathways in melanogenesis. In this review we will discuss the regulatory mechanisms involved in melanogenesis and explain how intrinsic and extrinsic factors regulate melanin production. We will also explain the regulatory roles of different proteins involved in melanogenesis. PMID:27428965

  5. Calcium Signals from the Vacuole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Schönknecht

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The vacuole is by far the largest intracellular Ca2+ store in most plant cells. Here, the current knowledge about the molecular mechanisms of vacuolar Ca2+ release and Ca2+ uptake is summarized, and how different vacuolar Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ pumps may contribute to Ca2+ signaling in plant cells is discussed. To provide a phylogenetic perspective, the distribution of potential vacuolar Ca2+ transporters is compared for different clades of photosynthetic eukaryotes. There are several candidates for vacuolar Ca2+ channels that could elicit cytosolic [Ca2+] transients. Typical second messengers, such as InsP3 and cADPR, seem to trigger vacuolar Ca2+ release, but the molecular mechanism of this Ca2+ release still awaits elucidation. Some vacuolar Ca2+ channels have been identified on a molecular level, the voltage-dependent SV/TPC1 channel, and recently two cyclic-nucleotide-gated cation channels. However, their function in Ca2+ signaling still has to be demonstrated. Ca2+ pumps in addition to establishing long-term Ca2+ homeostasis can shape cytosolic [Ca2+] transients by limiting their amplitude and duration, and may thus affect Ca2+ signaling.

  6. Signalling pathways in endometrial cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Markowska, Anna; Pawałowska, Monika; Lubin, Jolanta; Markowska, Janina

    2014-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is a multistage process, during which the activity of signalling pathways responsible for cell cycle regulation and division is disrupted which leads to inhibition of apoptosis and enhanced proliferation. Improper activation of Wnt/β-catenin and PI3K. Akt pathways play essential role in endometrial cancers (EC), mainly type I. Mutations in APC, axin or CTNBB1 may lead to β-catenin overactivation leading to excessive gene expression. PTEN inactivation, mutations in the PIK3CA or...

  7. Sodium/Calcium Exchangers Selectively Regulate Calcium Signaling in Mouse Taste Receptor Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Szebenyi, Steven A.; Laskowski, Agnieszka I.; Medler, Kathryn F.

    2010-01-01

    Taste cells use multiple signaling mechanisms to generate appropriate cellular responses to discrete taste stimuli. Some taste stimuli activate G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that cause calcium release from intracellular stores while other stimuli depolarize taste cells to cause calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). While the signaling mechanisms that initiate calcium signals have been described in taste cells, the calcium clearance mechanisms (CCMs) that contrib...

  8. Calcium-mediated increased expression of fibroblast growth factor-2 acts through NF-κB and PGE2/EP4 receptor signaling pathways in cementoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaya, Sousuke; Nemoto, Eiji; Sakisaka, Yukihiko; Shimauchi, Hidetoshi

    2013-10-01

    We reported previously that cementoblasts are provided with sensing mechanisms for extracellular Ca2+ and that elevated extracellular Ca2+ increases fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) gene and protein expression levels via a cyclic AMP/protein kinase A (PKA) dependent pathway. In the present study, we found that stimulation of murine cementoblasts with 10 mM CaCl2 induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) gene expression and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) biosynthesis. NS-398, a COX-2 inhibitor, significantly reduced CaCl2-induced increase in Fgf-2 gene expression, indicating that PGE2 synthesized by COX-2 may be involved in FGF-2 induction. The inhibitory effect of NS-398 was restored completely by the addition of PGE2 receptor 4 (E-prostanoid receptor 4, called EP4) agonist, but not agonists for EP1, EP2, and EP3. Furthermore, EP4 antagonist significantly reduced CaCl2-induced Fgf-2 induction, suggesting that it is mediated by EP4 activation. However, stimulation with EP4 agonist alone in the absence of CaCl2 had no effect on the Fgf-2 induction, indicating that EP4 signaling alone is not sufficient. CaCl2 also upregulated gene expression levels of Ep4 and Cox-2, as well as Fgf-2 and induction of these genes was abolished by pretreatment with BMS-345541, a nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) inhibitor, indicating that NF-κB signaling triggered by CaCl2 is indispensable for FGF-2 induction. Furthermore, CaCl2-induced Fgf-2 induction was synergistically enhanced by the addition of EP4 agonist. This indicates that the signaling triggered via CaCl2 and its combination with EP4 agonist may be useful as a novel strategy for periodontal regeneration. PMID:23851295

  9. Signaling pathways in diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanami, Daiji; Matoba, Keiichiro; Utsunomiya, Kazunori

    2016-10-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a major cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), however, specific treatment for DN has not yet been elucidated. Therefore, it is critically important to understand the molecular mechanism underlying DN to develop cause-related therapeutic strategy. To date, various factors such as hemodynamic changes and metabolic pathways have been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of DN. Excessive glucose influx activates cellular signaling pathways, including the diacylglycerol (DAG)-protein kinase C (PKC) pathway, advanced glycation end-products (AGE), polyol pathway, hexosamine pathway and oxidative stress. These factors interact with one another, thereby facilitating inflammatory processes, leading to the development of glomerulosclerosis under diabetic conditions. In addition to metabolic pathways, Rho-kinase, an effector of small-GTPase binding protein Rho, has been implicated as an important factor in the pathogenesis of DN. A number of studies have demonstrated that Rho-kinase plays key roles in the development of DN by inducing endothelial dysfunction, mesangial excessive extracellular matrix (ECM) production, podocyte abnormality, and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. In this review article, we describe our current understanding of the signaling pathways in DN. PMID:27094540

  10. Calcium signaling and T-type calcium channels in cancer cell cycling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James T Taylor; Xiang-Bin Zeng; Jonathan E Pottle; Kevin Lee; Alun R Wang; Stephenie G Yi; Jennifer A S Scruggs; Suresh S Sikka; Ming Li

    2008-01-01

    Regulation of intracellular calcium is an important signaling mechanism for cell proliferation in both normal and cancerous cells. In normal epithelial cells,free calcium concentration is essential for cells to enter and accomplish the S phase and the M phase of the cell cycle. In contrast, cancerous cells can pass these phases of the cell cycle with much lower cytoplasmic free calcium concentrations, indicating an alternative mechanism has developed for fulfilling the intracellular calcium requirement for an increased rate of DNA synthesis and mitosis of fast replicating cancerous cells. The detailed mechanism underlying the altered calcium loading pathway remains unclear;however, there is a growing body of evidence that suggests the T-type Ca2+ channel is abnormally expressed in cancerous cells and that blockade of these channels may reduce cell proliferation in addition to inducing apoptosis. Recent studies also show that the expression of T-type Ca2+ channels in breast cancer cells is proliferation state dependent, i.e. the channels are expressed at higher levels during the fast-replication period, and once the cells are in a non-proliferation state, expression of this channel isminimal. Therefore, selectively blocking calcium entry into cancerous cells may be a valuable approach for preventing tumor growth. Since T-type Ca2+ channels are not expressed in epithelial cells, selective T-type Ca2+ channel blockers may be useful in the treatment of certain types of cancers.

  11. Role of Calcium Signaling in B Cell Activation and Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Yoshihiro; Kurosaki, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    Increase in intracellular levels of calcium ions (Ca2+) is one of the key triggering signals for the development of B cell response to the antigen. The diverse Ca2+ signals finely controlled by multiple factors participate in the regulation of gene expression, B cell development, and effector functions. B cell receptor (BCR)-initiated Ca2+ mobilization is sourced from two pathways: one is the release of Ca2+ from the intracellular stores, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and other is the prolonged influx of extracellular Ca2+ induced by depleting the stores via store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) and calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels. The identification of stromal interaction molecule 1(STIM1), the ER Ca2+ sensor, and Orai1, a key subunit of the CRAC channel pore, has now provided the tools to understand the mode of Ca2+ influx regulation and physiological relevance. Herein, we discuss our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying BCR-triggered Ca2+ signaling as well as its contribution to the B cell biological processes and diseases. PMID:26369772

  12. Calcium signaling: A tale for all seasons

    OpenAIRE

    Carafoli, Ernesto

    2002-01-01

    An experiment performed in London nearly 120 years ago, which by today's standards would be considered unacceptably sloppy, marked the beginning of the calcium (Ca2+) signaling saga. Sidney Ringer [Ringer, S. (1883) J. Physiol. 4, 29–43] was studying the contraction of isolated rat hearts. In earlier experiments, Ringer had suspended them in a saline medium for which he admitted to having used London tap water, which is hard: The hearts contracted beautifully. When he proceeded to replace the...

  13. Signaling Pathways Involved in Cardiac Hypertrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Zewei; Li Longgui

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is the heart's response to a variety of extrinsic and intrinsic stimuli that impose increased biomechanical stress.Traditionally, it has been considered a beneficial mechanism; however, sustained hypertrophy has been associated with a significant increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Delineating intracellular signaling pathways involved in the different aspects of cardiac hypertrophy will permit future improvements in potential targets for therapeutic intervention. Generally, there are two types of cardiac hypertrophies, adaptive hypertrophy, including eutrophy (normal growth) and physiological hypertrophy (growth induced by physical conditioning), and maladaptive hypertrophy, including pathologic or reactive hypertrophy (growth induced by pathologic stimuli) and hypertrophic growth caused by genetic mutations affecting sarcomeric or cytoskeletal proteins. Accumulating observations from animal models and human patients have identified a number of intracellular signaling pathways that characterized as important transducers of the hypertrophic response,including calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated Tcells, phosphoinositide 3-kinases/Akt (PI3Ks/Akt),G protein-coupled receptors, small G proteins,MAPK, PKCs, Gp130/STAT'3, Na+/H+ exchanger,peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, myocyte enhancer factor 2/histone deacetylases, and many others. Furthermore, recent evidence suggests that adaptive cardiac hypertrophy is regulated in large part by the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factors axis via signaling through the PI3K/Akt pathway. In contrast, pathological or reactive hypertrophy is triggered by autocrine and paracrine neurohormonal factors released during biomechanical stress that signal through the Gq/phosphorlipase C pathway, leading to an increase in cytosolic calcium and activation of PKC.

  14. Signalling pathways in endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowska, Anna; Pawałowska, Monika; Lubin, Jolanta; Markowska, Janina

    2014-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is a multistage process, during which the activity of signalling pathways responsible for cell cycle regulation and division is disrupted which leads to inhibition of apoptosis and enhanced proliferation. Improper activation of Wnt/β-catenin and PI3K. Akt pathways play essential role in endometrial cancers (EC), mainly type I. Mutations in APC, axin or CTNBB1 may lead to β-catenin overactivation leading to excessive gene expression. PTEN inactivation, mutations in the PIK3CA or Akt result in increased transmission in the PI3K/Akt pathway, apoptosis inhibition, intensive cell division, mTOR excitation. In non-endometrioid cancers, key mutations include suppressor gene TP53 responsible for repairing damaged DNA or apoptosis initiation. Irregularities in gene P16, encoding a protein forming the p16-cyclinD/CDK-pRb have also been described. Understanding the complex relations between specific proteins taking part in signal transduction of the abovementioned pathways is key to research on drugs used in targeted therapy. PMID:25520571

  15. Signaling pathways in ascidian oocyte maturation: the roles of cAMP/Epac, intracellular calcium levels, and calmodulin kinase in regulating GVBD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Charles C

    2011-01-01

    Most mature ascidian oocytes undergo germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) when released by the ovary into sea water (SW). Acidic SW blocks this but they can be stimulated by raising the pH, increasing intracellular cAMP levels by cell permeant forms, inhibiting its breakdown or causing synthesis. Boltenia villosa oocytes undergo GVBD in response to these drugs. However, the cAMP receptor protein kinase A (PKA) does not appear to be involved, as oocytes are not affected by the kinase inhibitor H-89. Also, the PKA independent Epac agonist 8CPT-2Me-cAMP stimulates GVBD in acidic SW. GVBD is inhibited in calcium free sea water (CaFSW). The intracellular calcium chelator BAPTA-AM blocks GVBD at 10 µM. GVBD is also inhibited when the ryanodine receptors (RYR) are blocked by tetracaine or ruthenium red but not by the IP(3) inhibitor D-609. However, dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA), a protein kinase activator, stimulates GVBD in BAPTA, tetracaine or ruthenium red blocked oocytes. The calmodulin kinase inhibitor KN-93 blocks GVBD at 10 µM. This and preceding papers support the hypothesis that the maturation inducing substance (MIS) produced by the follicle cells in response to increased pH causes activation of a G protein which triggers cAMP synthesis. The cAMP then activates an Epac molecule, which causes an increase in intracellular calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum ryanodine receptor. The increased intracellular calcium subsequently activates calmodulin kinase, which causes an increase in cdc25 phosphatase activity, activating MPF and the progression of the oocyte into meiosis. PMID:21774024

  16. Signaling pathways in a Citrus EST database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Mehta

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Citrus spp. are economically important crops, which in Brazil are grown mainly in the State of São Paulo. Citrus cultures are attacked by several pathogens, causing severe yield losses. In order to better understand this culture, the Millenium Project (IAC Cordeirópolis was launched in order to sequence Citrus ESTs (expressed sequence tags from different tissues, including leaf, bark, fruit, root and flower. Plants were submitted to biotic and abiotic stresses and investigated under different development stages (adult vs. juvenile. Several cDNA libraries were constructed and the sequences obtained formed the Citrus ESTs database with almost 200,000 sequences. Searches were performed in the Citrus database to investigate the presence of different signaling pathway components. Several of the genes involved in the signaling of sugar, calcium, cytokinin, plant hormones, inositol phosphate, MAPKinase and COP9 were found in the citrus genome and are discussed in this paper. The results obtained may indicate that similar mechanisms described in other plants, such as Arabidopsis, occur in citrus. Further experimental studies must be conducted in order to understand the different signaling pathways present.

  17. Store-operated calcium channels and pro-inflammatory signals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-chiao CHANG

    2006-01-01

    In non-excitable cells such as T lymphocytes,hepatocytes,mast cells,endothelia and epithelia,the major pathway for calcium(Ca2+)entry is through store-operated Ca2+ channels in the plasma membrane.These channels are activated by the emptying of intracellular Ca2+ stores,however,neither the gating mechanism nor the downstream targets of these channels has been clear established.Here,I review some of the proposed gating mechanisms of store-operated Ca2+ channels and the functional implications in regulating pro-inflammatory signals.

  18. The spatial pattern of atrial cardiomyocyte calcium signalling modulates contraction

    OpenAIRE

    Mackenzie, L; Roderick, H Llewelyn; Berridge, MJ; Conway, SJ; Bootman, MD

    2004-01-01

    We examined the regulation of calcium signalling in atrial cardiomyocytes during excitation-contraction coupling, and how changes in the distribution of calcium impacts on contractility. Under control conditions, calcium transients originated in subsarcolemmal locations and showed local regeneration through activation of calcium-induced calcium release from ryanodine receptors. Despite functional ryanodine receptors being expressed at regular (~2 μm) intervals throughout atrial myocytes, the ...

  19. Coupling Effect of Ion Channel Clusters on Calcium Signalling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on a modified intracellular Ca2+ model involving diffusive coupling of two calcium ion channel clusters, the effects of coupling on calcium signalling are numerically investigated. The simulation results indicate that the diffusive coupling of clusters together with internal noise determine the calcium dynamics of single cluster, and for either homogeneous or heterogeneous coupled clusters, the synchronization of clusters, which is important to calcium signalling, is enhanced by the coupling effect

  20. Coupling Effect of Ion Channel Clusters on Calcium Signalling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Jun; JIA Ya; YI Ming; MA Jun; YU Guang

    2008-01-01

    @@ Based on a modified intracellular Ca2+ model involving diffusive coupling of two calcium ion channel clusters,the effects of coupling on calcium signalling are numerically investigated.The simulation results indicate that the diffusive coupling of clusters together with internal noise determine the calcium dynamics of single cluster,and for either homogeneous or heterogeneous coupled clusters,the synchronization of clusters,which is important to calcium signalling,is enhanced by the coupling effect.

  1. Calcium-Mediated Abiotic Stress Signaling in Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Katie A; Matthus, Elsa; Swarbreck, Stéphanie M; Davies, Julia M

    2016-01-01

    Roots are subjected to a range of abiotic stresses as they forage for water and nutrients. Cytosolic free calcium is a common second messenger in the signaling of abiotic stress. In addition, roots take up calcium both as a nutrient and to stimulate exocytosis in growth. For calcium to fulfill its multiple roles must require strict spatio-temporal regulation of its uptake and efflux across the plasma membrane, its buffering in the cytosol and its sequestration or release from internal stores. This prompts the question of how specificity of signaling output can be achieved against the background of calcium's other uses. Threats to agriculture such as salinity, water availability and hypoxia are signaled through calcium. Nutrient deficiency is also emerging as a stress that is signaled through cytosolic free calcium, with progress in potassium, nitrate and boron deficiency signaling now being made. Heavy metals have the capacity to trigger or modulate root calcium signaling depending on their dose and their capacity to catalyze production of hydroxyl radicals. Mechanical stress and cold stress can both trigger an increase in root cytosolic free calcium, with the possibility of membrane deformation playing a part in initiating the calcium signal. This review addresses progress in identifying the calcium transporting proteins (particularly channels such as annexins and cyclic nucleotide-gated channels) that effect stress-induced calcium increases in roots and explores links to reactive oxygen species, lipid signaling, and the unfolded protein response. PMID:27621742

  2. Calcium signaling in cognition and aging-dependent cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ana M M; Bading, Hilmar

    2011-01-01

    Calcium-dependent signals are key triggers of the molecular mechanisms underlying learning and memory and dysregulation of calcium homeostasis in the aging brain has been proposed to underlie aging-dependent cognitive decline. Mechanisms triggered by calcium in neurons include activity-dependent activation of transcription responsible for the synthesis of molecules underlying the long-term changes of neuronal function. Effectors of calcium signaling with a primordial role in transcription regulation are calcium signal-regulated transcription factors. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the contribution of key calcium signal-regulated transcription factors, namely CREB, NFAT, and DREAM, to memory formation. We further describe evidence for dysregulation of the activity of these factors during aging. PMID:21698696

  3. Extracellular Ca2+ is a danger signal activating the NLRP3 inflammasome through G protein-coupled calcium sensing receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossol, Manuela; Pierer, Matthias; Raulien, Nora; Quandt, Dagmar; Meusch, Undine; Rothe, Kathrin; Schubert, Kristin; Schöneberg, Torsten; Schaefer, Michael; Krügel, Ute; Smajilovic, Sanela; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Baerwald, Christoph; Wagner, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    calcium activates the NLRP3 inflammasome via stimulation of G protein-coupled calcium sensing receptors. Activation is mediated by signalling through the calcium-sensing receptor and GPRC6A via the phosphatidyl inositol/Ca(2+) pathway. The resulting increase in the intracellular calcium concentration...... this effect was inhibited in GPRC6A(-/-) mice. Our results demonstrate that G-protein-coupled receptors can activate the inflammasome, and indicate that increased extracellular calcium has a role as a danger signal and amplifier of inflammation....

  4. Calcium influx pathways in rat pancreatic ducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hug, M J; Pahl, C; Novak, I

    1996-01-01

    A number of agonists increase intracellular Ca2+ activity, [Ca2+]i, in pancreatic ducts, but the influx/efflux pathways and intracellular Ca2+ stores in this epithelium are unknown. The aim of the present study was to characterise the Ca2+ influx pathways, especially their pH sensitivity, in nati...

  5. Mapping Complex Networks: Exploring Boolean Modeling of Signal Transduction Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Bhardwaj, Gaurav; Wells, Christine P.; Albert, Reka; van Rossum, Damian B.; Patterson, Randen L

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we explored the utility of a descriptive and predictive bionetwork model for phospholipase C-coupled calcium signaling pathways, built with non-kinetic experimental information. Boolean models generated from these data yield oscillatory activity patterns for both the endoplasmic reticulum resident inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) and the plasma-membrane resident canonical transient receptor potential channel 3 (TRPC3). These results are specific as randomization of ...

  6. DMPD: Signal integration between IFNgamma and TLR signalling pathways in macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16920490 Signal integration between IFNgamma and TLR signalling pathways in macroph...ages. Schroder K, Sweet MJ, Hume DA. Immunobiology. 2006;211(6-8):511-24. Epub 2006 Jul 5. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Signal... integration between IFNgamma and TLR signalling pathways in macrophages. PubmedID 16920490 Title Signal

  7. MicroRNA-30 family members regulate calcium/calcineurin signaling in podocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junnan; Zheng, Chunxia; Wang, Xiao; Yun, Shifeng; Zhao, Yue; Liu, Lin; Lu, Yuqiu; Ye, Yuting; Zhu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Changming; Shi, Shaolin; Liu, Zhihong

    2015-01-01

    Calcium/calcineurin signaling is critical for normal cellular physiology. Abnormalities in this pathway cause many diseases, including podocytopathy; therefore, understanding the mechanisms that underlie the regulation of calcium/calcineurin signaling is essential. Here, we showed that critical components of calcium/calcineurin signaling, including TRPC6, PPP3CA, PPP3CB, PPP3R1, and NFATC3, are the targets of the microRNA-30 family (miR-30s). We found that these 5 genes are highly expressed as mRNA, but the level of the proteins is low in normal podocytes. Conversely, protein levels were markedly elevated in podocytes from rats treated with puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN) and from patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). In both FSGS patients and PAN-treated rats, miR-30s were downregulated in podocytes. In cultured podocytes, PAN or a miR-30 sponge increased TRPC6, PPP3CA, PPP3CB, PPP3R1, and NFATC3 expression; calcium influx; intracellular Ca2+ concentration; and calcineurin activity. Moreover, NFATC3 nuclear translocation, synaptopodin degradation, integrin β3 (ITGB3) activation, and actin fiber loss, which are downstream of calcium/calcineurin signaling, were induced by miR-30 reduction but blocked by the calcineurin inhibitor FK506. Podocyte-specific expression of the miR-30 sponge in mice increased calcium/calcineurin pathway component protein expression and calcineurin activity. The mice developed podocyte foot process effacement and proteinuria, which were prevented by FK506. miR-30s also regulated calcium/calcineurin signaling in cardiomyocytes. Together, our results identify miR-30s as essential regulators of calcium/calcineurin signaling. PMID:26436650

  8. Leptin signalling pathways in hypothalamic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Obin; Kim, Ki Woo; Kim, Min-Seon

    2016-04-01

    Leptin is the most critical hormone in the homeostatic regulation of energy balance among those so far discovered. Leptin primarily acts on the neurons of the mediobasal part of hypothalamus to regulate food intake, thermogenesis, and the blood glucose level. In the hypothalamic neurons, leptin binding to the long form leptin receptors on the plasma membrane initiates multiple signaling cascades. The signaling pathways known to mediate the actions of leptin include JAK-STAT signaling, PI3K-Akt-FoxO1 signaling, SHP2-ERK signaling, AMPK signaling, and mTOR-S6K signaling. Recent evidence suggests that leptin signaling in hypothalamic neurons is also linked to primary cilia function. On the other hand, signaling molecules/pathways mitigating leptin actions in hypothalamic neurons have been extensively investigated in an effort to treat leptin resistance observed in obesity. These include SOCS3, tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B, and inflammatory signaling pathways such as IKK-NFκB and JNK signaling, and ER stress-mitochondrial signaling. In this review, we discuss leptin signaling pathways in the hypothalamus, with a particular focus on the most recently discovered pathways. PMID:26786898

  9. Notch Signaling Pathway and Human Placenta

    OpenAIRE

    Wei-Xiu Zhao, Jian-Hua Lin

    2012-01-01

    Notch signaling was evolutionarily conserved and critical for cell-fate determination, differentiation and many other biological processes. Growing evidences suggested that Notch signaling pathway played an important role in the mammalian placental development. All of the mammalian Notch family proteins had been identified in human placenta except Delta-like 3, which appeared to affect the axial skeletal system. However the molecular mechanisms that regulated the Notch signaling pathway remai...

  10. Clinical implications of hedgehog signaling pathway inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hailan Liu; Dongsheng Gu; Jingwu Xie

    2011-01-01

    Hedgehog was first described in Drosophila melanogaster by the Nobel laureates Eric Wieschaus and Christiane Nusslein-Volhard. The hedgehog (Hh) pathway is a major regulator of cell differentiation,proliferation, tissue polarity, stem cell maintenance, and carcinogenesis. The first link of Hh signaling to cancer was established through studies of a rare familial disease, Gorlin syndrome, in 1996. Follow-up studies revealed activation of this pathway in basal cell carcinoma, medulloblastoma and, leukemia as well as in gastrointestinal, lung, ovarian, breast, and prostate cancer. Targeted inhibition of Hh signaling is now believed to be effective in the treatment and prevention of human cancer. The discovery and synthesis of specific inhibitors for this pathway are even more exciting. In this review, we summarize major advances in the understanding of Hh signaling pathway activation in human cancer, mouse models for studying Hhmediated carcinogenesis, the roles of Hh signaling in tumor development and metastasis, antagonists for Hh signaling and their clinical implications.

  11. Short-range intercellular calcium signaling in bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas Rye

    2005-01-01

    biological effects in bone. Intercellular calcium waves are increases in intracellular calcium concentration in single cells, subsequently propagating to adjacent cells, and can be a possible mechanism for the coupling of bone formation to bone resorption. The aim of the present studies was to investigate...... whether bone cells are capable of communicating via intercellular calcium signals, and determine by which mechanisms the cells propagate the signals. First, we found that osteoblastic cells can propagate intercellular calcium transients upon mechanical stimulation, and that there are two principally...... different mechanisms for this propagation. One mechanism involves the secretion of a nucleotide, possibly ATP, acting in an autocrine action to purinergic P2Y2 receptors on the neighboring cells, leading to intracellular IP3 generation and subsequent release of calcium from intracellular stores. The other...

  12. Relating a calcium indicator signal to the unperturbed calcium concentration time-course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abarbanel Henry DI

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optical indicators of cytosolic calcium levels have become important experimental tools in systems and cellular neuroscience. Indicators are known to interfere with intracellular calcium levels by acting as additional buffers, and this may strongly alter the time-course of various dynamical variables to be measured. Results By investigating the underlying reaction kinetics, we show that in some ranges of kinetic parameters one can explicitly link the time dependent indicator signal to the time-course of the calcium influx, and thus, to the unperturbed calcium level had there been no indicator in the cell.

  13. Enhanced Synchronization of Intercellular Calcium Oscillations by Noise Contaminated Signals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ji-Qian; CHEN Han-Shuang; WANG Mao-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    We consider the dynamics of locally coupled calcium oscillation systems, each cell is subjected to extracel-lular contaminated signal, which contains common sub-threshold signal and independent Gaussian noise. It is found that intermediate noise can enhance synchronized oscillations of calcium ions, where the frequency of noise-induced oscilla-tions is matched with the one of sub-threshold external signal. We show that synchronization is enhanced as a result of the entrainment of external signal Furthermore, the effect of coupling strength is considered. We find above-mentioned phenomenon exists only when coupling strength is very small Our findings may exhibit that noise can enhance the detection of feeble external signal through the mechanism of synchronization of intercellular calcium ions.

  14. Multilevel complexity of calcium signaling:Modeling angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luca; Munaron; Marco; Scianna

    2012-01-01

    Intracellular calcium signaling is a universal,evolutionary conserved and versatile regulator of cell biochemistry.The complexity of calcium signaling and related cell machinery can be investigated by the use of experimental strategies,as well as by computational approaches.Vascular endothelium is a fascinating model to study the specific properties and roles of calcium signals at multiple biological levels.During the past 20 years,live cell imaging,patch clamp and other techniques have allowed us to detect and interfere with calcium signaling in endothelial cells(ECs),providing a huge amount of information on the regulation of vascularization(angiogenesis) in normal and tumoral tissues.These data range from the spatiotemporal dynamics of calcium within different cell microcompartments to those in entire multicellular and organized EC networks.Beside experimental strategies,in silico endothelial models,specifically designed for simulating calcium signaling,are contributing to our knowledge of vascular physiol-ogy and pathology.They help to investigate and predict the quantitative features of proangiogenic events moving through subcellular,cellular and supracellular levels.This review focuses on some recent developments of computational approaches for proangiogenic endothelial calcium signaling.In particular,we discuss the creation of hybrid simulation environments,which combine and integrate discrete Cellular Potts Models.They are able to capture the phenomenological mechanisms of cell morphological reorganization,migration,and intercellular adhesion,with single-cell spatiotemporal models,based on reaction-diffusion equations that describe the agonist-induced intracellular calcium events.

  15. Signaling pathways regulating murine pancreatic development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup, Palle

    2012-01-01

    The recent decades have seen a huge expansion in our knowledge about pancreatic development. Numerous lineage-restricted transcription factor genes have been identified and much has been learned about their function. Similarly, numerous signaling pathways important for pancreas development have...... been identified and the specific roles have been investigated by genetic and cell biological methods. The present review presents an overview of the principal signaling pathways involved in regulating murine pancreatic growth, morphogenesis, and cell differentiation....

  16. Effect of dendroaspis natriuretic peptide (DNP) on L-type calcium channel current and its pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu-Ying; Cai, Zheng-Xu; Li, Ping; Cai, Chun-Yu; Qu, Cheng-Long; Guo, Hui-Shu

    2010-09-24

    Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide (DNP), a newly-described natriuretic peptide, relaxes gastrointestinal smooth muscle. L-type calcium channel currents play an important role in regulating smooth muscle contraction. The effect of DNP on L-type calcium channel currents in gastrointestinal tract is still unclear. This study was designed to investigate the effect of DNP on barium current (I(Ba)) through the L-type calcium channel in gastric antral myocytes of guinea pigs and cGMP-pathway mechanism. The whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to record L-type calcium channel currents. The content of cGMP in guinea pig gastric antral smooth muscle and perfusion solution was measured using radioimmunoassay. DNP markedly enhanced cGMP levels in gastric antral smooth muscle tissue and in perfusion medium. DNP concentration-dependently inhibited I(Ba) in freshly isolated guinea pig gastric antral circular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of guinea pigs. DNP-induced inhibition of I(Ba) was partially blocked by LY83583, an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase. KT5823, a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) inhibitor, almost completely blocked DNP-induced inhibition of I(Ba). However, DNP-induced inhibition of I(Ba) was potentiated by zaprinast, an inhibitor of cGMP-sensitive phosphodiesterase. Taken together, DNP inhibits L-type calcium channel currents via pGC-cGMP-PKG-dependent signal pathway in gastric antral myocytes of guinea pigs. PMID:20594955

  17. Interleukin 4 signals through two related pathways.

    OpenAIRE

    Pernis, A; Witthuhn, B.; Keegan, A D; Nelms, K; Garfein, E; Ihle, J N; Paul, W. E.; Pierce, J H; Rothman, P.

    1995-01-01

    The interleukin 4 (IL-4) signaling pathway involves activation, by tyrosine phosphorylation, of two distinct substrates, a signal-transducing factor (STF-IL4) and the IL-4-induced phosphotyrosine substrate (4PS). It is not known whether the IL-4-mediated activation of these substrates occurs via related or distinct signaling pathways. We report that 32D cells, an IL-3-dependent myeloid progenitor cell line in which no phosphorylated 4PS is found, activate high levels of STF-IL4 in response to...

  18. Calcium signaling in UV-induced damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dan; Zhang, Su-juan; Li, Yuan-yuan; Qu, Ying; Ren, Zhao-Yu

    2007-05-01

    Hepa1-6 cells were irradiated with UV and incubated for varying periods of time. [Ca 2+] i (intracellular calcium concentration) of UV-irradiated cell was measured by ratio fluorescence imaging system. The comet assay was used to determine DNA damage. During the UVB-irradiation, [Ca 2+] i had an ascending tendency from 0.88 J/m2 to 92.4J/m2. Comet assay instant test indicated that when the irradiation dosage was above 0.88J/m2, DNA damage was observed. Even after approximate 2 h of incubation, DNA damage was still not detected by 0.88J/m2 of UVB irradiation. During UVA-irradiation, the elevation of [Ca 2+] i was not dose-dependent in a range of 1200 J/m2-6000J/m2 and DNA damage was not observed by comet assay. These results suggested that several intracellular UV receptors might induce [Ca 2+] i rising by absorption of the UV energy. Just [Ca 2+] i rising can't induce DNA damage certainly, it is very likely that the breakdown of calcium steady state induces DNA damage.u

  19. The Hedgehog signalling pathway in bone formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Yang; Philipp Andre; Ling Ye; Ying-Zi Yang

    2015-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathway plays many important roles in development, homeostasis and tumorigenesis. The critical function of Hh signalling in bone formation has been identified in the past two decades. Here, we review the evolutionarily conserved Hh signalling mechanisms with an emphasis on the functions of the Hh signalling pathway in bone development, homeostasis and diseases. In the early stages of embryonic limb development, Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) acts as a major morphogen in patterning the limb buds. Indian Hedgehog (Ihh) has an essential function in endochondral ossification and induces osteoblast differentiation in the perichondrium. Hh signalling is also involved intramembrane ossification. Interactions between Hh and Wnt signalling regulate cartilage development, endochondral bone formation and synovial joint formation. Hh also plays an important role in bone homeostasis, and reducing Hh signalling protects against age-related bone loss. Disruption of Hh signalling regulation leads to multiple bone diseases, such as progressive osseous heteroplasia. Therefore, understanding the signalling mechanisms and functions of Hh signalling in bone development, homeostasis and diseases will provide important insights into bone disease prevention, diagnoses and therapeutics.

  20. Advances in Targeting Signal Transduction Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    McCubrey, James A.; Steelman, Linda S.; Chappell, William H.; Sun, Lin; Davis, Nicole M.; Abrams, Stephen L.; Franklin, Richard A.; Cocco, Lucio; Evangelisti, Camilla; Chiarini, Francesca; Martelli, Alberto M.; Libra, Massimo; Candido, Saverio; Ligresti, Giovanni; Malaponte, Grazia

    2012-01-01

    Over the past few years, significant advances have occurred in both our understanding of the complexity of signal transduction pathways as well as the isolation of specific inhibitors which target key components in those pathways. Furthermore critical information is being accrued regarding how genetic mutations can affect the sensitivity of various types of patients to targeted therapy. Finally, genetic mechanisms responsible for the development of resistance after targeted therapy are being ...

  1. Role of calcium signaling in down-regulation of aggrecan induced by cyclic tensile strain in annulus fibrosus cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Zhi-liang; ZHOU Yue; LI Hua-zhuang; CAO Guo-yong; TENG Hai-jun

    2006-01-01

    Objective:To study the role of intracellular calcium signal pathway in the down-regulation of aggrecan induced by cyclic tensile strain in the annulus fibrosus cells. Methods :The expression of aggrecan mRNA and core protein were respectively detected with RT-PCR and western blot after the channels transmitting calcium ions were blocked with EGTA, gadolinium and verapamil. Results:EGTA, gadolinium and verapamil partially prevented the effects of cyclic tensile strain on the expression of aggrecan in annulus fibrosus cells. Conclusion:The calcium signaling is involved in the down-regulation of proteoglycan resulting from cyclic tensile strain in the annulus fibrosus cells.

  2. Cellular Signaling Pathways and Their Clinical Reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ceren Sumer-Turanligil

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cellular signaling pathways have important roles in cellular growth, differentiation, inflammatory response and apoptosis and in regulation of cellular responses under various chemical stimulators. Different proteins which belong to these pathways may be exposed to loss-of-function or gain-of-function mutations; this may lead to many clinical phenotypes including primarily cancer. In this review information about basic working principles of these pathways and diseases related to them are included. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2010; 19(3.000: 180-191

  3. Disruption of Vitamin D and Calcium Signaling in Keratinocytes Predisposes to Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikle, Daniel D.; Jiang, Yan; Nguyen, Thai; Oda, Yuko; Tu, Chia-ling

    2016-01-01

    1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D), the active metabolite of vitamin D, and calcium regulate epidermal differentiation. 1,25(OH)2D exerts its effects through the vitamin D receptor (VDR), a transcription factor in the nuclear hormone receptor family, whereas calcium acts through the calcium sensing receptor (Casr), a membrane bound member of the G protein coupled receptor family. We have developed mouse models in which the Vdr and Casr have been deleted in the epidermis (epidVdr−∕− and epidCasr−∕−). Both genotypes show abnormalities in calcium induced epidermal differentiation in vivo and in vitro, associated with altered hedgehog (HH) and β–catenin signaling that when abnormally expressed lead to basal cell carcinomas (BCC) and trichofolliculomas, respectively. The Vdr−∕− mice are susceptible to tumor formation following UVB or chemical carcinogen exposure. More recently we found that the keratinocytes from these mice over express long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) oncogenes such as H19 and under express lncRNA tumor suppressors such as lincRNA-21. Spontaneous tumors have not been observed in either the epidVdr−∕− or epidCasr−∕−. But in mice with epidermal specific deletion of both Vdr and Casr (epidVdr−∕−/epidCasr−∕− [DKO]) tumor formation occurs spontaneously when the DKO mice are placed on a low calcium diet. These results demonstrate important interactions between vitamin D and calcium signaling through their respective receptors that lead to cancer when these signals are disrupted. The roles of the β–catenin, hedgehog, and lncRNA pathways in predisposing the epidermis to tumor formation when vitamin D and calcium signaling are disrupted will be discussed. PMID:27462278

  4. Calcium signaling orchestrates glioblastoma development: Facts and conjunctures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Catherine; Haeich, Jacques; Aulestia, Francisco J; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude; Miller, Andrew L; Néant, Isabelle; Webb, Sarah E; Schaeffer, Etienne; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Moreau, Marc

    2016-06-01

    While it is a relatively rare disease, glioblastoma multiform (GBM) is one of the more deadly adult cancers. Following current interventions, the tumor is never eliminated whatever the treatment performed; whether it is radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or surgery. One hypothesis to explain this poor outcome is the "cancer stem cell" hypothesis. This concept proposes that a minority of cells within the tumor mass share many of the properties of adult neural stem cells and it is these that are responsible for the growth of the tumor and its resistance to existing therapies. Accumulating evidence suggests that Ca(2+) might also be an important positive regulator of tumorigenesis in GBM, in processes involving quiescence, maintenance, proliferation, or migration. Glioblastoma tumors are generally thought to develop by co-opting pathways that are involved in the formation of an organ. We propose that the cells initiating the tumor, and subsequently the cells of the tumor mass, must hijack the different checkpoints that evolution has selected in order to prevent the pathological development of an organ. In this article, two main points are discussed. (i) The first is the establishment of a so-called "cellular society," which is required to create a favorable microenvironment. (ii) The second is that GBM can be considered to be an organism, which fights to survive and develop. Since GBM evolves in a limited space, its only chance of development is to overcome the evolutionary checkpoints. For example, the deregulation of the normal Ca(2+) signaling elements contributes to the progression of the disease. Thus, by manipulating the Ca(2+) signaling, the GBM cells might not be killed, but might be reprogrammed toward a new fate that is either easy to cure or that has no aberrant functioning. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium and Cell Fate. Guest Editors: Jacques Haiech, Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, Thierry Capiod and Olivier Mignen. PMID:26826650

  5. Wnt Signalling Pathway Parameters for Mammalian Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Chin Wee; Gardiner, Bruce S.; Hirokawa, Yumiko; Layton, Meredith J.; Smith, David W.; Burgess, Antony W.

    2012-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signalling regulates cell fate, survival, proliferation and differentiation at many stages of mammalian development and pathology. Mutations of two key proteins in the pathway, APC and β-catenin, have been implicated in a range of cancers, including colorectal cancer. Activation of Wnt signalling has been associated with the stabilization and nuclear accumulation of β-catenin and consequential up-regulation of β-catenin/TCF gene transcription. In 2003, Lee et al. constructed a c...

  6. Reciprocal regulation of metabolic and signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barth Andreas S

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background By studying genome-wide expression patterns in healthy and diseased tissues across a wide range of pathophysiological conditions, DNA microarrays have revealed unique insights into complex diseases. However, the high-dimensionality of microarray data makes interpretation of heterogeneous gene expression studies inherently difficult. Results Using a large-scale analysis of more than 40 microarray studies encompassing ~2400 mammalian tissue samples, we identified a common theme across heterogeneous microarray studies evident by a robust genome-wide inverse regulation of metabolic and cell signaling pathways: We found that upregulation of cell signaling pathways was invariably accompanied by downregulation of cell metabolic transcriptional activity (and vice versa. Several findings suggest that this characteristic gene expression pattern represents a new principle of mammalian transcriptional regulation. First, this coordinated transcriptional pattern occurred in a wide variety of physiological and pathophysiological conditions and was identified across all 20 human and animal tissue types examined. Second, the differences in metabolic gene expression predicted the magnitude of differences for signaling and all other pathways, i.e. tissue samples with similar expression levels of metabolic transcripts did not show any differences in gene expression for all other pathways. Third, this transcriptional pattern predicted a profound effect on the proteome, evident by differences in structure, stability and post-translational modifications of proteins belonging to signaling and metabolic pathways, respectively. Conclusions Our data suggest that in a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological conditions, gene expression changes exhibit a recurring pattern along a transcriptional axis, characterized by an inverse regulation of major metabolic and cell signaling pathways. Given its widespread occurrence and its predicted effects

  7. Enhanced airway smooth muscle cell thromboxane receptor signaling via activation of JNK MAPK and extracellular calcium influx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lei, Ying; Cao, Yongxiao; Zhang, Yaping;

    2011-01-01

    airway smooth muscle cells by using an organ culture model and a set of selective pharmacological inhibitors for mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and calcium signal pathways. Western-blot, immunohistochemistry, myograph and a selective TP receptor agonist U46619 were used for examining TP receptor...... signal proteins and function. Organ culture of rat bronchial segments for up to 48 h induces a time-dependently increased airway contractile response to U46619. This indicates that organ culture increases TP receptor signaling in the airway smooth muscle cells. The enhanced bronchial contraction was...... attenuated by the inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) MAPK activity, chelation of extracellular calcium and calcium channel blocker nifedipine, suggesting that JNK MAPK activity and elevated intracellular calcium level are required for the TP receptor signaling. In conclusion, airway smooth muscle...

  8. Limonin, a Component of Dictamni Radicis Cortex, Inhibits Eugenol-Induced Calcium and cAMP Levels and PKA/CREB Signaling Pathway in Non-Neuronal 3T3-L1 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeo Cho Yoon

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Limonin, one of the major components in dictamni radicis cortex (DRC, has been shown to play various biological roles in cancer, inflammation, and obesity in many different cell types and tissues. Recently, the odorant-induced signal transduction pathway (OST has gained attention not only because of its function in the perception of smell but also because of its numerous physiological functions in non-neuronal cells. However, little is known about the effects of limonin and DRC on the OST pathway in non-neuronal cells. We investigated odorant-stimulated increases in Ca2+ and cAMP, major second messengers in the OST pathway, in non-neuronal 3T3-L1 cells pretreated with limonin and ethanol extracts of DRC. Limonin and the extracts significantly decreased eugenol-induced Ca2+ and cAMP levels and upregulated phosphorylation of CREB and PKA. Our results demonstrated that limonin and DRC extract inhibit the OST pathway in non-neuronal cells by modulating Ca2+ and cAMP levels and phosphorylation of CREB.

  9. Apoptosis signaling pathways and lymphocyte homeostasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangwu Xu; Yufang Shi

    2007-01-01

    It has been almost three decades since the term "apoptosis" was first coined to describe a unique form of cell death that involves orderly, gene-dependent cell disintegration. It is now well accepted that apoptosis is an essential life process for metazoan animals and is critical for the formation and function of tissues and organs. In the adult mammalian body, apoptosis is especially important for proper functioning of the immune system. In recent years, along with the rapid advancement of molecular and cellular biology, great progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms leading to apoptosis. It is generally accepted that there are two major pathways of apoptotic cell death induction: extrinsic signaling through death receptors that leads to the formation of the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC), and intrinsic signaling mainly through mitochondria which leads to the formation of the apoptosome. Formation of the DISC or apoptosome, respectively, activates initiator and common effector caspases that execute the apoptosis process. In the immune system, both pathways operate; however, it is not known whether they are sufficient to maintain lymphocyte homeostasis. Recently, new apoptotic mechanisms including caspase-independent pathways and granzyme-initiated pathways have been shown to exist in lymphocytes. This review will summarize our understanding of the mechanisms that control the homeostasis of various lymphocyte populations.

  10. Wnt signalling pathway parameters for mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chin Wee; Gardiner, Bruce S; Hirokawa, Yumiko; Layton, Meredith J; Smith, David W; Burgess, Antony W

    2012-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signalling regulates cell fate, survival, proliferation and differentiation at many stages of mammalian development and pathology. Mutations of two key proteins in the pathway, APC and β-catenin, have been implicated in a range of cancers, including colorectal cancer. Activation of Wnt signalling has been associated with the stabilization and nuclear accumulation of β-catenin and consequential up-regulation of β-catenin/TCF gene transcription. In 2003, Lee et al. constructed a computational model of Wnt signalling supported by experimental data from analysis of time-dependent concentration of Wnt signalling proteins in Xenopus egg extracts. Subsequent studies have used the Xenopus quantitative data to infer Wnt pathway dynamics in other systems. As a basis for understanding Wnt signalling in mammalian cells, a confocal live cell imaging measurement technique is developed to measure the cell and nuclear volumes of MDCK, HEK293T cells and 3 human colorectal cancer cell lines and the concentrations of Wnt signalling proteins β-catenin, Axin, APC, GSK3β and E-cadherin. These parameters provide the basis for formulating Wnt signalling models for kidney/intestinal epithelial mammalian cells. There are significant differences in concentrations of key proteins between Xenopus extracts and mammalian whole cell lysates. Higher concentrations of Axin and lower concentrations of APC are present in mammalian cells. Axin concentrations are greater than APC in kidney epithelial cells, whereas in intestinal epithelial cells the APC concentration is higher than Axin. Computational simulations based on Lee's model, with this new data, suggest a need for a recalibration of the model.A quantitative understanding of Wnt signalling in mammalian cells, in particular human colorectal cancers requires a detailed understanding of the concentrations of key protein complexes over time. Simulations of Wnt signalling in mammalian cells can be initiated with the parameters

  11. Wnt signalling pathway parameters for mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin Wee Tan

    Full Text Available Wnt/β-catenin signalling regulates cell fate, survival, proliferation and differentiation at many stages of mammalian development and pathology. Mutations of two key proteins in the pathway, APC and β-catenin, have been implicated in a range of cancers, including colorectal cancer. Activation of Wnt signalling has been associated with the stabilization and nuclear accumulation of β-catenin and consequential up-regulation of β-catenin/TCF gene transcription. In 2003, Lee et al. constructed a computational model of Wnt signalling supported by experimental data from analysis of time-dependent concentration of Wnt signalling proteins in Xenopus egg extracts. Subsequent studies have used the Xenopus quantitative data to infer Wnt pathway dynamics in other systems. As a basis for understanding Wnt signalling in mammalian cells, a confocal live cell imaging measurement technique is developed to measure the cell and nuclear volumes of MDCK, HEK293T cells and 3 human colorectal cancer cell lines and the concentrations of Wnt signalling proteins β-catenin, Axin, APC, GSK3β and E-cadherin. These parameters provide the basis for formulating Wnt signalling models for kidney/intestinal epithelial mammalian cells. There are significant differences in concentrations of key proteins between Xenopus extracts and mammalian whole cell lysates. Higher concentrations of Axin and lower concentrations of APC are present in mammalian cells. Axin concentrations are greater than APC in kidney epithelial cells, whereas in intestinal epithelial cells the APC concentration is higher than Axin. Computational simulations based on Lee's model, with this new data, suggest a need for a recalibration of the model.A quantitative understanding of Wnt signalling in mammalian cells, in particular human colorectal cancers requires a detailed understanding of the concentrations of key protein complexes over time. Simulations of Wnt signalling in mammalian cells can be initiated

  12. Regulation of PKC mediated signaling by calcium during visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Nivedita; Chakraborty, Supriya; Paul Chowdhury, Bidisha; Banerjee, Sayantan; Halder, Kuntal; Majumder, Saikat; Majumdar, Subrata; Sen, Parimal C

    2014-01-01

    Calcium is an ubiquitous cellular signaling molecule that controls a variety of cellular processes and is strictly maintained in the cellular compartments by the coordination of various Ca2+ pumps and channels. Two such fundamental calcium pumps are plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) and Sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) which play a pivotal role in maintaining intracellular calcium homeostasis. This intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis is often disturbed by the protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani, the causative organism of visceral leishmaniasis. In the present study we have dileneated the involvement of PMCA4 and SERCA3 during leishmaniasis. We have observed that during leishmaniasis, intracellular Ca2+ concentration was up-regulated and was further controlled by both PMCA4 and SERCA3. Inhibition of these two Ca2+-ATPases resulted in decreased parasite burden within the host macrophages due to enhanced intracellular Ca2+. Contrastingly, on the other hand, activation of PMCA4 was found to enhance the parasite burden. Our findings also highlighted the importance of Ca2+ in the modulation of cytokine balance during leishmaniasis. These results thus cumulatively suggests that these two Ca2+-ATPases play prominent roles during visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:25329062

  13. Regulation of PKC mediated signaling by calcium during visceral leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nivedita Roy

    Full Text Available Calcium is an ubiquitous cellular signaling molecule that controls a variety of cellular processes and is strictly maintained in the cellular compartments by the coordination of various Ca2+ pumps and channels. Two such fundamental calcium pumps are plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA and Sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA which play a pivotal role in maintaining intracellular calcium homeostasis. This intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis is often disturbed by the protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani, the causative organism of visceral leishmaniasis. In the present study we have dileneated the involvement of PMCA4 and SERCA3 during leishmaniasis. We have observed that during leishmaniasis, intracellular Ca2+ concentration was up-regulated and was further controlled by both PMCA4 and SERCA3. Inhibition of these two Ca2+-ATPases resulted in decreased parasite burden within the host macrophages due to enhanced intracellular Ca2+. Contrastingly, on the other hand, activation of PMCA4 was found to enhance the parasite burden. Our findings also highlighted the importance of Ca2+ in the modulation of cytokine balance during leishmaniasis. These results thus cumulatively suggests that these two Ca2+-ATPases play prominent roles during visceral leishmaniasis.

  14. The role of calcium in hypoxia-induced signal transduction and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seta, Karen A; Yuan, Yong; Spicer, Zachary; Lu, Gang; Bedard, James; Ferguson, Tsuneo K; Pathrose, Peterson; Cole-Strauss, Allyson; Kaufhold, Alexa; Millhorn, David E

    2004-01-01

    Mammalian cells require a constant supply of oxygen in order to maintain adequate energy production, which is essential for maintaining normal function and for ensuring cell survival. Sustained hypoxia can result in cell death. Sophisticated mechanisms have therefore evolved which allow cells to respond and adapt to hypoxia. Specialized oxygen-sensing cells have the ability to detect changes in oxygen tension and transduce this signal into organ system functions that enhance the delivery of oxygen to tissue in a wide variety of different organisms. An increase in intracellular calcium levels is a primary response of many cell types to hypoxia/ischemia. The response to hypoxia is complex and involves the regulation of multiple signaling pathways and coordinated expression of perhaps hundreds of genes. This review discusses the role of calcium in hypoxia-induced regulation of signal transduction pathways and gene expression. An understanding of the molecular events initiated by changes in intracellular calcium will lead to the development of therapeutic approaches toward the treatment of hypoxic/ischemic diseases and tumors. PMID:15261489

  15. Lung carcinoma signaling pathways activated by smoking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Wen; Jian-Hua Fu; Wei Zhang; Ming Guo

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men and women worldwide, with over a million deaths annually. Tobacco smoke is the major etiologic risk factor for lung cancer in current or previous smokers and has been strongly related to certain types of lung cancer, such as small cell lung carcinoma and squamous cell lung carcinoma. In recent years, there has been an increased incidence of lung adenocarcinoma. This change is strongly associated with changes in smoking behavior and cigarette design. Carcinogens present in tobacco products and their intermediate metabolites can activate multiple signaling pathways that contribute to lung cancer carcinogenesis. In this review, we summarize the smoking-activated signaling pathways involved in lung cancer.

  16. Obesity-Induced Hypertension: Brain Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Carmo, Jussara M; da Silva, Alexandre A; Wang, Zhen; Fang, Taolin; Aberdein, Nicola; de Lara Rodriguez, Cecilia E P; Hall, John E

    2016-07-01

    Obesity greatly increases the risk for cardiovascular, metabolic, and renal diseases and is one of the most significant and preventable causes of increased blood pressure (BP) in patients with essential hypertension. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of central nervous system (CNS) signaling pathways that contribute to the etiology and pathogenesis of obesity-induced hypertension. We discuss the role of excess adiposity and activation of the brain leptin-melanocortin system in causing increased sympathetic activity in obesity. In addition, we highlight other potential brain mechanisms by which increased weight gain modulates metabolic and cardiovascular functions. Unraveling the CNS mechanisms responsible for increased sympathetic activation and hypertension and how circulating hormones activate brain signaling pathways to control BP offer potentially important therapeutic targets for obesity and hypertension. PMID:27262997

  17. Mathematics of the NFAT signalling pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Rendall, A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a mathematical study of some aspects of the signalling pathway leading to the activation of the transcription factor NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T cells). Activation takes place by dephosphorylation at multiple sites. This has been modelled by Salazar and H\\"ofer using a large system of ordinary differential equations depending on many parameters. With the help of chemical reaction network theory we show that for any choice of the parameters this system has a unique statio...

  18. Resveratrol and Calcium Signaling: Molecular Mechanisms and Clinical Relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey E. McCalley

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol is a naturally occurring compound contributing to cellular defense mechanisms in plants. Its use as a nutritional component and/or supplement in a number of diseases, disorders, and syndromes such as chronic diseases of the central nervous system, cancer, inflammatory diseases, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases has prompted great interest in the underlying molecular mechanisms of action. The present review focuses on resveratrol, specifically its isomer trans-resveratrol, and its effects on intracellular calcium signaling mechanisms. As resveratrol’s mechanisms of action are likely pleiotropic, its effects and interactions with key signaling proteins controlling cellular calcium homeostasis are reviewed and discussed. The clinical relevance of resveratrol’s actions on excitable cells, transformed or cancer cells, immune cells and retinal pigment epithelial cells are contrasted with a review of the molecular mechanisms affecting calcium signaling proteins on the plasma membrane, cytoplasm, endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria. The present review emphasizes the correlation between molecular mechanisms of action that have recently been identified for resveratrol and their clinical implications.

  19. Insulin signaling pathways in lepidopteran steroidogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WendySmith

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Molting and metamorphosis are stimulated by the secretion of ecdysteroid hormones from the prothoracic glands. Insulin-like hormones have been found to enhance prothoracic gland activity, providing a mechanism to link molting to nutritional state. In silk moths (Bombyx mori, the prothoracic glands are directly stimulated by insulin and the insulin-like hormone bombyxin. Further, in Bombyx , the neuropeptide prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH appears to act at least in part through the insulin-signaling pathway. In the prothoracic glands of Manduca sexta, while insulin stimulates the phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and Akt, neither insulin nor bombyxin II stimulate ecdysone secretion. Involvement of the insulin-signaling pathway in Manduca prothoracic glands was explored using two inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K, LY294002 and wortmannin. PI3K inhibitors block the phosphorylation of Akt and 4EBP but have no effect on ecdysone secretion, or on the phosphorylation of the MAPkinase, ERK. Inhibitors that block phosphorylation of ERK, including the MEK inhibitor U0126, and high doses of the RSK inhibitor SL0101, effectively inhibit ecdysone secretion. The results highlight differences between the two lepidopteran insects most commonly used to directly study ecdysteroid secretion. In Bombyx, the PTTH and insulin-signaling pathways intersect; both insulin and PTTH enhance the phosphorylation of Akt and stimulate ecdysteroid secretion, and inhibition of PI3K reduces ecdysteroid secretion. By contrast, in Manduca, the action of PTTH is distinct from insulin. The results highlight species differences in the roles of translational regulators such as 4EBP, and members of the MAPkinase pathway such as ERK and RSK, in the effects of nutritionally-sensitive hormones such as insulin on ecdysone secretion and molting.

  20. Comparative genomics of MAP kinase and calcium-calcineurin signalling components in plant and human pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rispail, Nicolas; Soanes, Darren M; Ant, Cemile; Czajkowski, Robert; Grünler, Anke; Huguet, Romain; Perez-Nadales, Elena; Poli, Anna; Sartorel, Elodie; Valiante, Vito; Yang, Meng; Beffa, Roland; Brakhage, Axel A; Gow, Neil A R; Kahmann, Regine; Lebrun, Marc-Henri; Lenasi, Helena; Perez-Martin, José; Talbot, Nicholas J; Wendland, Jürgen; Di Pietro, Antonio

    2009-04-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades and the calcium-calcineurin pathway control fundamental aspects of fungal growth, development and reproduction. Core elements of these signalling pathways are required for virulence in a wide array of fungal pathogens of plants and mammals. In this review, we have used the available genome databases to explore the structural conservation of three MAPK cascades and the calcium-calcineurin pathway in ten different fungal species, including model organisms, plant pathogens and human pathogens. While most known pathway components from the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae appear to be widely conserved among taxonomically and biologically diverse fungi, some of them were found to be restricted to the Saccharomycotina. The presence of multiple paralogues in certain species such as the zygomycete Rhizopus oryzae and the incorporation of new functional domains that are lacking in S. cerevisiae signalling proteins, most likely reflect functional diversification or adaptation as filamentous fungi have evolved to occupy distinct ecological niches. PMID:19570501

  1. Emanuel Strehler’s work on calcium pumps and calcium signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emanuel; E; Strehler

    2011-01-01

    Cells are equipped with mechanisms to control tightly the influx, efflux and resting level of free calcium (Ca 2+ ). Inappropriate Ca 2+ signaling and abnormal Ca 2+ levels are involved in many clinical disorders including heart disease, Alzheimer’s disease and stroke. Ca 2+ also plays a major role in cell growth, differentiation and motility; disturbances in these processes underlie cell transformation and the progression of cancer. Accordingly, research in the Strehler laboratory is focused on a better understanding of the molecular "toolkit" needed to ensure proper Ca 2+ homeostasis in the cell, as well as on the mechanisms of localized Ca 2+ signaling. A longterm focus has been on the plasma membrane calcium pumps (PMCAs), which are linked to multiple disorders including hearing loss, neurodegeneration, and heart disease. Our work over the past 20 years or more has revealed a surprising complexity of PMCA isoforms with different functional characteristics, regulation, and cellular localization. Emerging evidence shows how specific PMCAs contribute not only to setting basal intracellular Ca 2+ levels, but also to local Ca 2+ signaling and vectorial Ca 2+ transport. A second major research arearevolves around the calcium sensor protein calmodulin and an enigmatic calmodulin-like protein (CALML3) that is linked to epithelial differentiation. One of the cellular targets of CALML3 is the unconventional motor protein myosin-10, which raises new questions about the role of CALML3 and myosin-10 in cell adhesion and migration in normal cell differentiation and cancer.

  2. Molecular Signaling Pathways Mediating Osteoclastogenesis Induced by Prostate Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced prostate cancer commonly metastasizes to bone leading to osteoblastic and osteolytic lesions. Although an osteolytic component governed by activation of bone resorbing osteoclasts is prominent in prostate cancer metastasis, the molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer-induced osteoclastogenesis are not well-understood. We studied the effect of soluble mediators released from human prostate carcinoma cells on osteoclast formation from mouse bone marrow and RAW 264.7 monocytes. Soluble factors released from human prostate carcinoma cells significantly increased viability of naïve bone marrow monocytes, as well as osteoclastogenesis from precursors primed with receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand (RANKL). The prostate cancer-induced osteoclastogenesis was not mediated by RANKL as it was not inhibited by osteoprotegerin (OPG). However inhibition of TGFβ receptor I (TβRI), or macrophage-colony stimulating factor (MCSF) resulted in attenuation of prostate cancer-induced osteoclastogenesis. We characterized the signaling pathways induced in osteoclast precursors by soluble mediators released from human prostate carcinoma cells. Prostate cancer factors increased basal calcium levels and calcium fluctuations, induced nuclear localization of nuclear factor of activated t-cells (NFAT)c1, and activated prolonged phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in RANKL-primed osteoclast precursors. Inhibition of calcium signaling, NFATc1 activation, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation significantly reduced the ability of prostate cancer mediators to stimulate osteoclastogenesis. This study reveals the molecular mechanisms underlying the direct osteoclastogenic effect of prostate cancer derived factors, which may be beneficial in developing novel osteoclast-targeting therapeutic approaches

  3. The immune signaling pathways of Manduca sexta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaolong; He, Yan; Hu, Yingxia; Wang, Yang; Chen, Yun-Ru; Bryant, Bart; Clem, Rollie J; Schwartz, Lawrence M; Blissard, Gary; Jiang, Haobo

    2015-07-01

    Signal transduction pathways and their coordination are critically important for proper functioning of animal immune systems. Our knowledge of the constituents of the intracellular signaling network in insects mainly comes from genetic analyses in Drosophila melanogaster. To facilitate future studies of similar systems in the tobacco hornworm and other lepidopteran insects, we have identified and examined the homologous genes in the genome of Manduca sexta. Based on 1:1 orthologous relationships in most cases, we hypothesize that the Toll, Imd, MAPK-JNK-p38 and JAK-STAT pathways are intact and operative in this species, as are most of the regulatory mechanisms. Similarly, cellular processes such as autophagy, apoptosis and RNA interference probably function in similar ways, because their mediators and modulators are mostly conserved in this lepidopteran species. We have annotated a total of 186 genes encoding 199 proteins, studied their domain structures and evolution, and examined their mRNA levels in tissues at different life stages. Such information provides a genomic perspective of the intricate signaling system in a non-drosophiline insect. PMID:25858029

  4. DMPD: When signaling pathways collide: positive and negative regulation of toll-likereceptor signal transduction. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18631453 When signaling pathways collide: positive and negative regulation of toll-likereceptor signal tran...l) Show When signaling pathways collide: positive and negative regulation of toll-likereceptor signal transd...ative regulation of toll-likereceptor signal transduction. Authors O'Neill LA. Publication Immunity. 2008 Ju

  5. Human osteoblastic cells propagate intercellular calcium signals by two different mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Henriksen, Z; Brot, C;

    2000-01-01

    . After the fast intercellular calcium waves were blocked, we observed slower calcium waves that were dependent on gap junctional communication and influx of extracellular calcium. These results show that human osteoblastic cells can propagate calcium signals from cell to cell by two markedly different...... cells: autocrine activation of P2 (purinergic) receptors leading to release of intracellular calcium stores, and gap junction-mediated communication resulting in influx of extracellular calcium. In the current work we asked whether human osteoblastic cells (HOB) were capable of mechanically induced...... intercellular calcium signaling, and if so, by which mechanisms. Upon mechanical stimulation, human osteoblasts propagated fast intercellular calcium waves, which required activation of P2 receptors and release of intracellular calcium stores but did not require calcium influx or gap junctional communication...

  6. Cross-talk between calcium and reactive oxygen species signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan YAN; Chao-liang WEI; Wan-rui ZHANG; He-ping CHENG; Jie LIU

    2006-01-01

    Calcium(Ca2+) and reactive oxygen species(ROS)constitute the most important intracellular signaling molecules participating in the regulation and integration of diverse cellular functions.Here we briefly review cross-talk between the two prominent signaling systems that finely tune the homeostasis and integrate functionality of Ca2+ and ROS in different types of cells.Ca2+ modulates ROS homeostasis by regulating ROS generation and annihilation mechanisms in both the mitochondria and the cytosol.Reciprocal redox regulation of Ca2+ homeostasis occurs in different physiological and pathological processes,by modulating components of the Ca2+ signaling toolkit and altering characteristics of local and global Ca2+ signals.Functionally,interactions between Ca2+ and ROS signaling systems can be both stimulatory and inhibitory,depending on the type of target proteins,the ROS species,the dose,duration of exposure,and the cell contexts.Such extensive and complex cross-talk might enhance signaling coordination and integration,whereas abnormalities in either system might propagate into the other system and undermine the stability of both systems.

  7. Hedgehog signaling pathway and ovarian cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Chen; Guolan Gao; Shiwen Luo

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) is the most common form of ovarian malignancies and the most lethal gynecologic malignancy in the United States.To date,in spite of treatment to it with the extensive surgical debulking and chemotherapy,the prognosis of EOC remains dismal.Recently,it has become increasingly clear that in many instances,the signaling and molecular players that control development are the same,and when inappropriately regulated,drive tumorigenesis and cancer development.Here,we discuss the possible involvement of Hedgehog (Hh) pathway in the cellular regulation and development of cancer in the ovaries.Using the in vitro and in vivo assays developed has facilitated the dissection of the mechanisms behind Hh-driven ovarian cancers formation and growth.Based on recent studies,we propose that the inhibition of Hh signaling may interfere with spheroid-like structures in ovarian cancers.The components of the Hh signaling may provide novel drug targets,which could be explored as crucial combinatorial strategies for the treatment of ovarian cancers.

  8. Effects of microgravity environment on intracellular signal transduction pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De CHANG

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Microgravity environment is a stress and extracellular signal that affects cellular morphology and function through signal transduction system, thus leading to certain biological effect. At present, many signaling pathways have been reported to be involved in the regulation of cell function under microgravity environment, such as NF-κB signaling pathway, Notch signaling pathway, MAPK signaling pathway, HSP signaling pathway and so on, and these reports have laid a foundation for the molecular studies of cytolergy under outer space environment. The recent progress in the researches on intracellular signaling pathways affected by microgravity is herewith reviewed in present paper in the hope of providing references for understanding the cell activity in space environment, and to find the ways to alleviate the harmful effects caused by the microgravity environment.

  9. Involvement of aberrant calcium signalling in herpetic neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, Rebekah A; Hanani, Menachem

    2016-03-01

    Alpha-herpesviruses, herpes simplex viruses (HSV) and varicella zoster virus (VZV), are pathogens of the peripheral nervous system. After primary infection, these viruses establish latency within sensory ganglia, while retaining the ability to reactivate. Reactivation of VZV results in herpes zoster, a condition characterized by skin lesions that leads to post-herpetic neuralgia. Recurrent reactivations of HSV, which cause mucocutaneous lesions, may also result in neuralgia. During reactivation of alpha-herpesviruses, satellite glial cells (SGCs), which surround neurons in sensory ganglia, become infected with the replicating virus. SGCs are known to contribute to neuropathic pain in a variety of animal pain models. Here we investigated how infection of short-term cultures of mouse trigeminal ganglia with HSV-1 affects communication between SGCs and neurons, and how this altered communication may increase neuronal excitability, thus contributing to herpetic neuralgia. Mechanical stimulation of single neurons or SGCs resulted in intercellular calcium waves, which were larger in cultures infected with HSV-1. Two differences were observed between control and HSV-1 infected cultures that could account for this augmentation. Firstly, HSV-1 infection induced cell fusion among SGCs and neurons, which would facilitate the spread of calcium signals over farther distances. Secondly, using calcium imaging and intracellular electrical recordings, we found that neurons in the HSV-1 infected cultures exhibited augmented influx of calcium upon depolarization. These virally induced changes may not only cause more neurons in the sensory ganglia to fire action potentials, but may also increase neurotransmitter release at the presynaptic terminals in the spinal cord. They are therefore likely to be contributing factors to herpetic neuralgia. PMID:26684187

  10. DMPD: LPS/TLR4 signal transduction pathway. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18304834 LPS/TLR4 signal transduction pathway. Lu YC, Yeh WC, Ohashi PS. Cytokine. ...2008 May;42(2):145-51. Epub 2008 Mar 4. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show LPS/TLR4 signal transduction path...way. PubmedID 18304834 Title LPS/TLR4 signal transduction pathway. Authors Lu YC, Yeh WC, Ohashi PS. Publica

  11. DMPD: Regulation of mitochondrial antiviral signaling pathways. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18549796 Regulation of mitochondrial antiviral signaling pathways. Moore CB, Ting J...P. Immunity. 2008 Jun;28(6):735-9. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Regulation of mitochondrial antiviral ...signaling pathways. PubmedID 18549796 Title Regulation of mitochondrial antiviral signaling pathways. Author

  12. DMPD: Signaling pathways activated by microorganisms. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17303405 Signaling pathways activated by microorganisms. Takeuchi O, Akira S. Curr ...Opin Cell Biol. 2007 Apr;19(2):185-91. Epub 2007 Feb 15. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Signaling pathwa...ys activated by microorganisms. PubmedID 17303405 Title Signaling pathways activated by microorganisms. Auth

  13. A Study of the PDGF Signaling Pathway with PRISM

    OpenAIRE

    Qixia Yuan; Jun Pang; Sjouke Mauw; Panuwat Trairatphisan; Monique Wiesinger; Thomas Sauter

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we apply the probabilistic model checker PRISM to the analysis of a biological system -- the Platelet-Derived Growth Factor (PDGF) signaling pathway, demonstrating in detail how this pathway can be analyzed in PRISM. We show that quantitative verification can yield a better understanding of the PDGF signaling pathway.

  14. Shuffling the cards in signal transduction: Calcium, arachidonic acid and mechanosensitivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luca; Munaron

    2011-01-01

    Cell signaling is a very complex network of biochemical reactions triggered by a huge number of stimuli coming from the external medium. The function of any single signaling component depends not only on its own structure but also on its connections with other biomolecules. During prokaryotic-eukaryotic transition, the rearrangement of cell organization in terms of diffusional compartmentalization exerts a deep change in cell signaling functional potentiality. In this review I briefly introduce an intriguing ancient relationship between pathways involved in cell responses to chemical agonists (growth factors, nutrients, hormones) as well as to mechanical forces (stretch, osmotic changes). Some biomolecules (ion channels and enzymes) act as "hubs", thanks to their ability to be directly or indirectly chemically/mechanically co-regulated. In particular calcium signaling machinery and arachidonic acid metabolism are very ancient networks, already present before eukaryotic appearance. A number of molecular "hubs", including phospholipase A2 and some calcium channels, appear tightly interconnected in a cross regulation leading to the cellular response to chemical and mechanical stimulations.

  15. The Role of nAChR and Calcium Signaling in Pancreatic Cancer Initiation and Progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaal, Courtney [Department of Tumor Biology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, FL 33612 (United States); Padmanabhan, Jaya [Department of Molecular Medicine and USF Health Byrd Alzheimer’s Institute, University of South Florida, 4001 E. Fletcher Ave., Tampa, FL 33612 (United States); Chellappan, Srikumar, E-mail: Srikumar.Chellappan@moffitt.org [Department of Tumor Biology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, FL 33612 (United States)

    2015-07-31

    Pancreatic cancer shows a strong correlation with smoking and the current therapeutic strategies have been relatively ineffective in improving the survival of patients. Efforts have been made over the past many years to understand the molecular events that drive the initiation and progression of pancreatic cancer, especially in the context of smoking. It has become clear that components of tobacco smoke not only initiate these cancers, especially pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) through their mutagenic properties, but can also promote the growth and metastasis of these tumors by stimulating cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Studies in cell culture systems, animal models and human samples have shown that nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) activation enhances these tumor-promoting events by channeling signaling through multiple pathways. In this context, signaling through calcium channels appear to facilitate pancreatic cancer growth by itself or downstream of nAChRs. This review article highlights the role of nAChR downstream signaling events and calcium signaling in the growth, metastasis as well as drug resistance of pancreatic cancer.

  16. [Sphingolipid-mediated apoptotic signaling pathways].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuvillier, Olivier; Andrieu-Abadie, Nathalie; Ségui, Bruno; Malagarie-Cazenave, Sophie; Tardy, Claudine; Bonhoure, Elisabeth; Levade, Thierry

    2003-01-01

    Various sphingolipids are being viewed as bioactive molecules and/or second messengers. Among them, ceramide (or N-acylsphingosine) and sphingosine generally behave as pro-apoptotic mediators. Indeed, ceramide mediates the death signal initiated by numerous stress agents which either stimulate its de novo synthesis or activate sphingomyelinases that release ceramide from sphingomyelin. For instance, the early generation of ceramide promoted by TNF is mediated by a neutral sphingomyelinase the activity of which is regulated by the FAN adaptor protein, thereby controlling caspase activation and the cell death programme. In addition, the activity of this neutral sphingomyelinase is negatively modulated by caveolin, a major constituent of some membrane microdomains. The enzyme sphingosine kinase also plays a crucial role in apoptosis signalling by regulating the intracellular levels of two sphingolipids having opposite effects, namely the pro-apoptotic sphingosine and the anti-apoptotic sphingosine 1-phosphate molecule. Ceramide and sphingosine metabolism therefore appears as a pivotal regulatory pathway in the determination of cell fate. PMID:14708343

  17. DMPD: Signalling pathways mediating type I interferon gene expression. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17904888 Signalling pathways mediating type I interferon gene expression. Edwards M...R, Slater L, Johnston SL. Microbes Infect. 2007 Sep;9(11):1245-51. Epub 2007 Jul 1. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Signal...ling pathways mediating type I interferon gene expression. PubmedID 17904888 Title Signalli

  18. BowTieBuilder: modeling signal transduction pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schröder Adrian

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sensory proteins react to changing environmental conditions by transducing signals into the cell. These signals are integrated into core proteins that activate downstream target proteins such as transcription factors (TFs. This structure is referred to as a bow tie, and allows cells to respond appropriately to complex environmental conditions. Understanding this cellular processing of information, from sensory proteins (e.g., cell-surface proteins to target proteins (e.g., TFs is important, yet for many processes the signaling pathways remain unknown. Results Here, we present BowTieBuilder for inferring signal transduction pathways from multiple source and target proteins. Given protein-protein interaction (PPI data signaling pathways are assembled without knowledge of the intermediate signaling proteins while maximizing the overall probability of the pathway. To assess the inference quality, BowTieBuilder and three alternative heuristics are applied to several pathways, and the resulting pathways are compared to reference pathways taken from KEGG. In addition, BowTieBuilder is used to infer a signaling pathway of the innate immune response in humans and a signaling pathway that potentially regulates an underlying gene regulatory network. Conclusion We show that BowTieBuilder, given multiple source and/or target proteins, infers pathways with satisfactory recall and precision rates and detects the core proteins of each pathway.

  19. Canonical WNT signaling pathway and human AREG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Yuriko; Katoh, Masaru

    2006-06-01

    AREG (Amphiregulin), BTC (beta-cellulin), EGF, EPGN (Epigen), EREG (Epiregulin), HBEGF, NRG1, NRG2, NRG3, NRG4 and TGFA (TGFalpha) constitute EGF family ligands for ERBB family receptors. Cetuximab (Erbitux), Pertuzumab (Omnitarg) and Trastuzumab (Herceptin) are anti-cancer drugs targeted to EGF family ligands, while Gefitinib (Iressa), Erlotinib (Tarceva) and Lapatinib (GW572016) are anti-cancer drugs targeted to ERBB family receptors. AREG and TGFA are biomarkers for Gefitinib non-responders. The TCF/LEF binding sites within the promoter region of human EGF family members were searched for by using bioinformatics and human intelligence (Humint). Because three TCF/LEF-binding sites were identified within the 5'-promoter region of human AREG gene, comparative genomics analyses on AREG orthologs were further performed. The EPGN-EREG-AREG-BTC cluster at human chromosome 4q13.3 was linked to the PPBP-CXCL segmental duplicons. AREG was the paralog of HBEGF at human chromosome 5q31.2. Chimpanzee AREG gene, consisting of six exons, was located within NW_105918.1 genome sequence. Chimpanzee AREG was a type I transmembrane protein showing 98.0% and 71.4% total amino-acid identity with human AREG and mouse Areg, respectively. Three TCF/LEF-binding sites within human AREG promoter were conserved in chimpanzee AREG promoter, but not in rodent Areg promoters. Primate AREG promoters were significantly divergent from rodent Areg promoters. AREG mRNA was expressed in a variety of human tumors, such as colorectal cancer, liver cancer, gastric cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, esophageal cancer and myeloma. Because human AREG was characterized as potent target gene of WNT/beta-catenin signaling pathway, WNT signaling activation could lead to Gefitinib resistance through AREG upregulation. AREG is a target of systems medicine in the field of oncology. PMID:16685431

  20. Neuronal calcium signaling, mitochondrial dysfunction and Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supnet, Charlene; Bezprozvanny, Ilya

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder that affects millions of ageing people worldwide. AD is characterized by extensive synaptic and neuronal loss which lead to impaired memory and cognitive decline. The cause of pathology in AD is not completely understood and no effective therapy so far has been developed. The accumulation of toxic amyloid-beta 42 (Aβ42) peptide oligomers and aggregates in AD brain has been proposed to be primarily responsible for the pathology of the disease, an idea dubbed ‘amyloid hypothesis’ of AD etiology. In addition to increase in Aβ42 levels, disturbances in neuronal calcium (Ca2+) signaling and alterations in expression levels of Ca2+ signaling proteins have been observed in animal models of familial AD and in studies of postmortem brain samples from sporadic AD patients. Based on these evidence ‘Ca2+ hypothesis of AD’ has been proposed. In particular, familal AD has been linked with enhanced Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and elevated cytosolic Ca2+ levels. The augmented cytosolic Ca2+ levels can trigger signaling cascades that affect synaptic stability and function and can be detrimental to neuronal health, such as Ca2+-dependent phosphatase calcineurin and Ca2+-dependent proteases calpains. Here we review the latest results supporting ‘Ca2+ hypothesis’ of AD pathogenesis. We further argue that over long period of time supranormal cytosolic Ca2+ signaling can impaire mitochondrial function in AD neurons. We conclude that inhibitors and stablizers of neuronal Ca2+ signaling and mitochondrial function may have a therapeutic potential for treatment of AD. We discuss latest and planned AD therapeutic trials of agents targeting Ca2+ channels and mitochodria. PMID:20413848

  1. M3R介导的cAMP-PKA信号途径对L-型钙通道的调控作用研究%Effects of M3 Receptor on L-type Calcium Channels by cAMP-PKA Signal Pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    栾海蓉; 董琦; 王得利; 李海林; 吴红

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of M3 receptor agonist choline on L-type calcium channels by cAMP-PKA signal pathway. Methods Whole cell patch clamp technique was used to record L-type calcium current. Laser scanning confocal microscope( LSCM )was employed to measure the concentration of intracellular free calcium. Results The application of choline reduced the density of peak Ica-L from( 9.07 ±0. 68)pA/pf to(5.58 ±0.62 )pA/pP( n =4,vs control,P <0.01 ),H89 with choline reduced the density of peak Ica-L to( 7.68 ±0.75 )pA/pF,whose amplitude was higher than that of choline group( n =4,vs choline, P< 0.01 ). LSCM recorded that KC1 induced determined by used[ Ca2 + ]I increasing could be depressed by choline, and also depressed by H89 with choline, whose amplitude is higher than that of choline group( n=30,vs choline,P<0.05 ). Conclusion Choline reduces[ Ca2 + ]I via inhibition of cAMP-PKA signal pathway of L-type calcium channel, which is possibly involved in the mechanism of its protective effects on myocardial injury.%目的 研究M3受体激动剂通过cAMP-PKA信号途径对L-型钙通道的影响.方法 应用全细胞膜片钳技术记录M3受体激动剂胆碱对大鼠单个心室肌细胞L-型钙通道电流(ICa-L)的影响;采用激光扫描共聚焦技术观察细胞内钙离子的变化.结果 胆碱使大鼠心室肌细胞ICa-L密度从(9.07±0.68)pA/pF减少至(5.58 ±0.62)pA/pF(n=4,与对照组相比,P<0.01),H89加胆碱组使ICa-L电流密度减少至(7.68±0.75),幅度明显高于胆碱组(n=4,与胆碱组相比,P<0.01).胆碱抑制KCl除极诱导的心肌细胞[Ca2+]i的升高,从(2.83±0.08)降至(1.17±0.09)FI/FI0(n=30,与KCl组相比,P<0.01),胆碱与H89组可使[Ca2+]i降至(1.65±0.17)FI/FI0,幅度高于胆碱组(n=30,与胆碱组相比,P<0.05).结论 M3受体激动剂胆碱通过抑制PKA活性调控L-型钙通道,使外钙内流减少,降低细胞[Ca2+]i,从而发挥抗心肌保护作用.

  2. Calcium and protein phosphorylation in the transduction of gravity signal in corn roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, M.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1991-01-01

    The involvement of calcium and protein phosphorylation in the transduction of gravity signal was studied using corn roots of a light-insensitive variety (Zea mays L., cv. Patriot). The gravitropic response was calcium-dependent. Horizontal placement of roots preloaded with 32P for three minutes resulted in changes in protein phosphorylation of polypeptides of 32 and 35 kD. Calcium depletion resulted in decreased phosphorylation of these phosphoproteins and replenishment of calcium restored the phosphorylation.

  3. Notch -- a goldilocks signaling pathway in disease and cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braune, Eike-Benjamin; Lendahl, Urban

    2016-03-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is a fundamental signaling mechanism operating in most, if not all, multicellular organisms and in most cell types in the body. Like other "ivy league" pathways such as Wnt, PI3K, Sonic Hedgehog, Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTKs), and JAK/STAT signaling, the Notch pathway is a linear signaling mechanism, i.e., an extracellular ligand activates a receptor, which ultimately leads to transcriptional alterations in the cell nucleus, but Notch signaling is a strict cell-cell communication mechanism and lacks built-in amplification steps in the signaling pathway. Dysregulated Notch signaling, either by direct mutations in the pathway or by altered signaling output, is increasingly linked to disease, and Notch can act as an oncogene or tumor suppressor depending on the cellular context. This underscores that appropriate level of Notch signaling is important for differentiation and tissue homeostasis, a notion supported also by genetic data indicating that Notch signaling is very gene dosage-sensitive. Thus, too much or too little signaling can lead to disease and Notch can therefore be considered a Goldilocks signaling pathway. Given the emerging role of dysregulated Notch signaling in disease, there is increasing interest in developing therapeutic approaches to modulate Notch signaling. In this review we discuss recent findings on how signal transduction is tuned in the Notch pathway and how Notch signaling is dysregulated in disease. We also discuss different strategies to modulate Notch signaling for clinical use, for example by novel antibody-based tools and by taking advantage of the cross-talk between Notch and other signaling mechanisms. PMID:27115169

  4. Unravelling the molecular mechanisms of the canonical Wnt signalling pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, S. S.

    2010-01-01

    The Canonical Wnt signaling pathway (Wnt/beta-catenin pathway) is required during embryonic development and maintenance of adult-renewing tissue homeostasis. Deregulation of this pathway is found associated with cancer and other diseases. The main goal of this thesis is to discern the regulation mechanisms of canonical Wnt signaling and thereby identify potential drug targets. We found that, neither the dissembled of Axin1, APC or GSK3 from the destruction complex nor inactivation of GSK3 and...

  5. Characterization of calcium signals provoked by lysophosphatidylinositol in human microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Suleimani, Y M; Hiley, C R

    2016-01-01

    The lipid molecule, lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), is hypothesised to form part of a novel lipid signalling system that involves the G protein-coupled receptor GPR55 and distinct intracellular signalling cascades in endothelial cells. This work aimed to study the possible mechanisms involved in LPI-evoked cytosolic Ca(2+) mobilization in human brain microvascular endothelial cells. Changes in intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations were measured using cell population Ca(2+) assay. LPI evoked biphasic elevation of intracellular calcium concentration, a rapid phase and a sustained phase. The rapid phase was attenuated by the inhibitor of PLC (U 73122), inhibitor of IP(3) receptors, 2-APB and the depletor of endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) store, thapsigargin. The sustained phase, on the other hand, was enhanced by U 73122 and abolished by the RhoA kinase inhibitor, Y-27632. In conclusion, the Ca(2+) signal evoked by LPI is characterised by a rapid phase of Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum, and requires activation of the PLC-IP(3) signalling pathway. The sustained phase mainly depends on RhoA kinase activation. LPI acts as novel lipid signalling molecule in endothelial cells, and elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) triggered by it may present an important intracellular message required in gene expression and controlling of vascular tone. PMID:26596318

  6. Singapore signalling: the 2012 hedgehog pathway cocktail

    OpenAIRE

    Briscoe, James; Rohatgi, Rajat

    2012-01-01

    The ‘Hedgehog Signalling in Development Evolution and Disease' conference took place in Singapore in March 2012. It brought leading researchers together to discuss the latest findings, and exchange ideas, on every aspect of Hedgehog signalling.

  7. Temporal and Evolutionary Dynamics of Two-Component Signaling Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Salazar, Michael E.; Laub, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria sense and respond to numerous environmental signals through two-component signaling pathways. Typically, a given stimulus will activate a sensor histidine kinase to autophosphorylate and then phosphotransfer to a cognate response regulator, which can mount an appropriate response. Although these signaling pathways often appear to be simple switches, they can also orchestrate surprisingly sophisticated and complex responses. These temporal dynamics arise from several key regulatory fe...

  8. Death and dessert: Nutrient signalling pathways and ageing

    OpenAIRE

    Alic, Nazif; Partridge, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Reduction in nutrient intake without malnutrition can delay ageing and extend healthy life in diverse organisms from yeast to primates. This effect can be recapitulated by genetic or pharmacological dampening of the signal through nutrient signalling pathways, making them a promising target for intervention into human ageing and age-related diseases. Here we review the current knowledge of the interactions between nutrient signalling pathways and ageing, focusing on the findings emerged in th...

  9. Tributyltin induces apoptotic signaling in hepatocytes through pathways involving the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tri-n-butyltin is a widespread environmental toxicant, which accumulates in the liver. This study investigates whether tri-n-butyltin induces pro-apoptotic signaling in rat liver hepatocytes through pathways involving the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Tri-n-butyltin activated the endoplasmic reticulum pathway of apoptosis, which was demonstrated by the activation of the protease calpain, its translocation to the plasma membrane, followed by cleavage of the calpain substrates, cytoskeletal protein vinculin, and caspase-12. Caspase-12 is localized to the cytoplasmic side of the endoplasmic reticulum and is involved in apoptosis mediated by the endoplasmic reticulum. Tri-n-butyltin also caused translocation of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and Bad from the cytosol to mitochondria, as well as changes in mitochondrial membrane permeability, events which can activate the mitochondrial death pathway. Tri-n-butyltin induced downstream apoptotic events in rat hepatocytes at the nuclear level, detected by chromatin condensation and by confocal microscopy using acridine orange. We investigated whether the tri-n-butyltin-induced pro-apoptotic events in hepatocytes could be linked to perturbation of intracellular calcium homeostasis, using confocal microscopy. Tri-n-butyltin caused changes in intracellular calcium distribution, which were similar to those induced by thapsigargin. Calcium was released from a subcellular compartment, which is likely to be the endoplasmic reticulum, into the cytosol. Cytosolic acidification, which is known to trigger apoptosis, also occurred and involved the Cl-/HCO3- exchanger. Pro-apoptotic events in hepatocytes were inhibited by the calcium chelator, Bapta-AM, and by a calpain inhibitor, which suggests that changes in intracellular calcium homeostasis are involved in tri-n-butyltin-induced apoptotic signaling in rat hepatocytes

  10. Endogenous Sulfur Dioxide Inhibits Vascular Calcification in Association with the TGF-β/Smad Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenzhen; Huang, Yaqian; Du, Junbao; Liu, Angie Dong; Tang, Chaoshu; Qi, Yongfen; Jin, Hongfang

    2016-01-01

    The study was designed to investigate whether endogenous sulfur dioxide (SO₂) plays a role in vascular calcification (VC) in rats and its possible mechanisms. In vivo medial vascular calcification was induced in rats by vitamin D3 and nicotine for four weeks. In vitro calcification of cultured A7r5 vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) was induced by calcifying media containing 5 mmol/L CaCl₂. Aortic smooth muscle (SM) α-actin, runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and Smad expression was measured. VC rats showed dispersed calcified nodules among the elastic fibers in calcified aorta with increased aortic calcium content and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. SM α-actin was markedly decreased, but the osteochondrogenic marker Runx2 concomitantly increased and TGF-β/Smad signaling was activated, in association with the downregulated SO₂/aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) pathway. However, SO₂ supplementation successfully ameliorated vascular calcification, and increased SM α-actin expression, but inhibited Runx2 and TGF-β/Smad expression. In calcified A7r5 VSMCs, the endogenous SO₂/AAT pathway was significantly downregulated. SO₂ treatment reduced the calcium deposits, calcium content, ALP activity and Runx2 expression and downregulated the TGF-β/Smad pathway in A7r5 cells but increased SM α-actin expression. In brief, SO₂ significantly ameliorated vascular calcification in association with downregulation of the TGF-β/Smad pathway. PMID:26907267

  11. Radioresistance-related signaling pathways in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the difference of gene expression profile between the radioresistant human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line CNE-2R and CNE-2, and to screen the signaling pathway associated with radioresistance of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods: The radioresistant nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line CNE-2R was constructed from the original cell line CNE-2. CNE-2R and CNE-2 cells were cultured and administered with 60Co γ-ray irradiation at the dose of 400 cGy for 15 times. Human-6v 3.0 whole genome expression profile was used to screen the differentially expressed genes. Bioinformatic analysis was used to identify the pathways related to radioresistance. Results: The number of the differentially expressed genes that were found in these 2 experiments was 374. The Kegg pathway and Biocarta pathway analysis of the differentially expressed genes showed the biological importance of Toll-like receptor signaling pathway and IL-1 R-mediated signal transduction pathway to the radioresistance of the CNE-2R cells and the significant differences of 13 genes in these 2 pathways,including JUN, MYD88, CCL5, CXCL10, STAT1, LY96, FOS, CCL3, IL-6, IL-8, IL-1α, IL-1β, and IRAK2 (t=13.47-66.57, P<0.05). Conclusions: Toll-like receptor signaling pathway and IL-1R-mediated signal transduction pathway might be related to the occurrence of radioresistance. (authors)

  12. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated calcium signaling in the nervous system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-xin SHEN; Jerrel L YAKEL

    2009-01-01

    Based on the composition of the five subunits forming functional neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), they are grouped into either heteromeric (comprising both α and β subunits) or homomeric (comprising only α subunits) recep-tors. The nAChRs are known to be differentially permeable to calcium ions, with the α7 nAChR subtype having one of the highest permeabilities to calcium. Calcium influx through nAChRs, particularly through the α-bungarotoxin-sensitive α7-containing nAChRs, is a very efficient way to raise cytoplasmic calcium levels. The activation of nAChRs can mediate three types of cytoplasmic calcium signals: (1) direct calcium influx through the nAChRs, (2) indirect calcium influx through voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) which are activated by the nAChR-mediated depolarization, and (3) calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) (triggered by the first two sources) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) through the ryanodine receptors and inositol (1,4,5)-triphosphate receptors (IP3Rs). Downstream signaling events mediated by nAChR-mediated calcium responses can be grouped into instantaneous effects (such as neurotransmitter release, which can occur in milliseconds after nAChR activation), short-term effects (such as the recovery of nAChR desensitization through cellular signaling cascades), and long-term effects (such as neuroprotection via gene expression). In addition, nAChR activity can be regulated by cytoplasmic calcium levels, suggesting a complex reciprocal relationship. Further advances in imaging techniques, animal models, and more potent and subtype-selective ligands for neuronal nAChRs would help in understand-ing the neuronal nAChR-mediated calcium signaling, and lead to the development of improved therapeutic treatments.

  13. Elevating calcium in Th2 cells activates multiple pathways to induce IL-4 transcription and mRNA stabilization

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Liying; Joseph F. Urban; Zhu, Jinfang; Paul, William E.

    2008-01-01

    PMA and ionomycin cause T cell cytokine production. We report that ionomycin alone induces IL-4 and IFNγ, but not IL-2, from in vivo and in vitro generated murine Th2 and Th1 cells. Ionomycin-induced cytokine production requires nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), p38; and calmodulin-dependent kinase IV (CaMKIV). Ionomycin induces p38 phosphorylation through a calcium-dependent, cyclosporine A-inhibitable pathway. “Knocking-down” apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) inhibits io...

  14. The Fibroblast Growth Factor signaling pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Ornitz, David M.; Itoh, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The signaling component of the mammalian Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) family is comprised of eighteen secreted proteins that interact with four signaling tyrosine kinase FGF receptors (FGFRs). Interaction of FGF ligands with their signaling receptors is regulated by protein or proteoglycan cofactors and by extracellular binding proteins. Activated FGFRs phosphorylate specific tyrosine residues that mediate interaction with cytosolic adaptor proteins and the RAS-MAPK, PI3K-AKT, PLCγ, and STA...

  15. Calcium and cell death signaling in neurodegeneration and aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya Smaili

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Transient increase in cytosolic (Cac2+ and mitochondrial Ca2+ (Ca m2+ are essential elements in the control of many physiological processes. However, sustained increases in Ca c2+ and Ca m2+ may contribute to oxidative stress and cell death. Several events are related to the increase in Ca m2+, including regulation and activation of a number of Ca2+ dependent enzymes, such as phospholipases, proteases and nucleases. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER play pivotal roles in the maintenance of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and regulation of cell death. Several lines of evidence have shown that, in the presence of some apoptotic stimuli, the activation of mitochondrial processes maylead to the release of cytochrome c followed by the activation of caspases, nuclear fragmentation and apoptotic cell death. The aim of this review was to show how changes in calcium signaling can be related to the apoptotic cell death induction. Calcium homeostasis was also shown to be an important mechanism involved in neurodegenerative and aging processes.Aumentos transientes no cálcio citosólico (Ca c2+ e mitocondrial (Ca m2+ são elementos essenciais no controle de muitos processos fisiológicos. No entanto, aumentos sustentados do Ca c2+ e do Ca m2+ podem contribuir para o estresse oxidativo ea morte celular. Muitos eventos estão relacionados ao aumentono Ca c2+, incluindo a regulação e ativação de várias enzimas dependentes de Ca2+ como as fosfolipases, proteases e nucleases. A mitocôndria e o retículo endoplasmático têm um papel central na manutenção da homeostase intracellular de Ca c2+ e na regulação da morte celular. Várias evidências mostraram que, na presença de certos estímulos apoptóticos, a ativação dos processos mitocondriais pode promover a liberação de citocromo c, seguida da ativação de caspases, fragmentação nuclear e morte celular por apoptose. O objetivo desta revisão é mostrar como aumentos na sinalização de

  16. Intricacies of hedgehog signaling pathways: A perspective in tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway is a crucial negotiator of developmental proceedings in the embryo governing a diverse array of processes including cell proliferation, differentiation, and tissue patterning. The overall activity of the pathway is significantly curtailed after embryogenesis as well as in adults, yet it retains many of its functional capacities. However, aberration in HH signaling mediates the initiation, proliferation and continued sustenance of malignancy in different tissues to varying degrees through different mechanisms. In this review, we provide an overview of the role of constitutively active aberrant HH signaling pathway in different types of human cancer and the underlying molecular and genetic mechanisms that drive tumorigenesis in that particular tissue. An insight into the various modes of anomalous HH signaling in different organs will provide a comprehensive knowledge of the pathway in these tissues and open a window for individually tailored, tissue-specific therapeutic interventions. The synergistic cross talking of HH pathway with many other regulatory molecules and developmentally inclined signaling pathways may offer many avenues for pharmacological advances. Understanding the molecular basis of abnormal HH signaling in cancer will provide an opportunity to inhibit the deregulated pathway in many aggressive and therapeutically challenging cancers where promising options are not available.

  17. Intricacies of hedgehog signaling pathways: A perspective in tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kar, Swayamsiddha; Deb, Moonmoon; Sengupta, Dipta; Shilpi, Arunima; Bhutia, Sujit Kumar [Epigenetics and Cancer Research Laboratory, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Group, Department of Life Science, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela, Odisha 769008 (India); Patra, Samir Kumar, E-mail: samirp@nitrkl.ac.in [Epigenetics and Cancer Research Laboratory, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Group, Department of Life Science, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela, Odisha 769008 (India)

    2012-10-01

    The hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway is a crucial negotiator of developmental proceedings in the embryo governing a diverse array of processes including cell proliferation, differentiation, and tissue patterning. The overall activity of the pathway is significantly curtailed after embryogenesis as well as in adults, yet it retains many of its functional capacities. However, aberration in HH signaling mediates the initiation, proliferation and continued sustenance of malignancy in different tissues to varying degrees through different mechanisms. In this review, we provide an overview of the role of constitutively active aberrant HH signaling pathway in different types of human cancer and the underlying molecular and genetic mechanisms that drive tumorigenesis in that particular tissue. An insight into the various modes of anomalous HH signaling in different organs will provide a comprehensive knowledge of the pathway in these tissues and open a window for individually tailored, tissue-specific therapeutic interventions. The synergistic cross talking of HH pathway with many other regulatory molecules and developmentally inclined signaling pathways may offer many avenues for pharmacological advances. Understanding the molecular basis of abnormal HH signaling in cancer will provide an opportunity to inhibit the deregulated pathway in many aggressive and therapeutically challenging cancers where promising options are not available.

  18. Coupling calcium/calmodulin-mediated signaling and herbivore-induced plant response calmodulin-binding transcription factor AtSR1/CAMTA3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium/calmodulin (Ca2+/CaM) has long been considered a crucial component in wound signaling pathway. However, no functional significance of Ca2+/CaM-binding proteins has been identified in plant responses to herbivore attack/wounding stress. We have reported earlier that a family of Ca2+/CaM-bindi...

  19. The signal transduction pathway in the proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells induced by urotensin Ⅱ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈亚红; 赵鸣武; 姚婉贞; 庞永政; 唐朝枢

    2004-01-01

    Background Human urotensin Ⅱ (UⅡ) is the most potent mammalian vasoconstrictor identified so far. Our previous study showed that UⅡ is a potent mitogen of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC) inducing ASMC proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. The signal transduction pathway of UⅡ mitogenic effect remains to be clarified. This study was conducted to investigate the signal transduction pathway in the proliferation of ASMC induced by UⅡ.Methods In primary cultures of rat ASMCs, activities of protein kinase C (PKC), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and calcineurin (CaN) induced by UⅡ were measured. The effect of CaN on PKC and MAPK was studied by adding cyclosporin A (CsA), a specific inhibitor of CaN. Using H7 and PD98059, inhibitors of PKC and MAPK, respectively, to study the effect of PKC and MAPK on CaN. The cytosolic free calcium concentration induced by UⅡ was measured using Fura-2/AM. Results UⅡ 10-7 mol/L stimulated ASMC PKC and MAPK activities by 44% and 24% (P0.05). CsA 10-6 mol/L inhibited UⅡ-stimulated PKC activity by 14% (P0.05).Conclusions UⅡ increases cytosolic free calcium concentration and activates PKC, MAPK and CaN. The signal transduction pathway between PKC and CaN has cross-talk.

  20. Activation of L-type calcium channels is required for gap junction-mediated intercellular calcium signaling in osteoblastic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Niklas Rye; Teilmann, Stefan Cuoni; Henriksen, Zanne; Civitelli, Roberto; Sorensen, Ole Helmer; Steinberg, Thomas H.

    2003-01-01

    The propagation of mechanically induced intercellular calcium waves (ICW) among osteoblastic cells occurs both by activation of P2Y (purinergic) receptors by extracellular nucleotides, resulting in "fast" ICW, and by gap junctional communication in cells that express connexin43 (Cx43), resulting in "slow" ICW. Human osteoblastic cells transmit intercellular calcium signals by both of these mechanisms. In the current studies we have examined the mechanism of slow gap junction-dependent ICW in osteoblastic cells. In ROS rat osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW were inhibited by removal of extracellular calcium, plasma membrane depolarization by high extracellular potassium, and the L-type voltage-operated calcium channel inhibitor, nifedipine. In contrast, all these treatments enhanced the spread of P2 receptor-mediated ICW in UMR rat osteoblastic cells. Using UMR cells transfected to express Cx43 (UMR/Cx43) we confirmed that nifedipine sensitivity of ICW required Cx43 expression. In human osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW also required activation of L-type calcium channels and influx of extracellular calcium.

  1. Structure of Signaling Enzyme Reveals How Calcium Turns It On

    OpenAIRE

    Rellos, Peter; Pike, Ashley C. W.; Niesen, Frank H.; Salah, Eidarus; Lee, Wen Hwa; von Delft, Frank; Knapp, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP), a long-lasting enhancement in communication between neurons, is considered to be the major cellular mechanism underlying learning and memory. LTP triggers high-frequency calcium pulses that result in the activation of Calcium/Calmodulin (CaM)-dependent kinase II (CaMKII). CaMKII acts as a molecular switch because it remains active for a long time after the return to basal calcium levels, which is a unique property required for CaMKII function. Here we describe th...

  2. Signaling transduction pathways involved in basophil adhesion and histamine release

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Background Little is known about basophil with respect to the different signaling transduction pathways involved in spontaneous, cytokine or anti-IgE induced adhesion and how this compares to IgE-dependent and IgE-independent mediator secretion. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the roles of β1 andβ2 integrins in basophil adhesion as well as hosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), src-kinases and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 in basophil adhesion and histamine release (HR). Methods Basophils (purity of 10%-50%) were preincubated with anti-CD29 or anti-CD18 blocking antibodies before used for adhesion study. Basophils were preincubated with the pharmacological inhibitors wortmannin, PP1, PD98059 before used for adhesion and HR study. Cell adherence to bovine serum albumin (BSA) or fibronectin (Fn) was monitored using cell associated histamine as a basophil marker and the histamine was measured by the glass fiber assay.Results Basophil spontaneous adhesion to Fn was inhibited by anti-CD29. Interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) induced adhesion to BSA was inhibited by anti-CD18. Wortmannin at 1 μmol/L and PP1 at 20 μmol/L strongly interfered with, whereas PD98059 at 50 μmol/L weakly inhibited basophil spontaneous adhesion to Fn. One μmol/L wortmannin strongly inhibited IL-3, IL-5, GM-CSF and anti-IgE induced adhesion to BSA. PP1 at 20 μmol/L partly inhibited anti-IgE induced adhesion. Fifty μmol/L PD98059 marginally inhibited IL-5, weakly inhibited anti-IgE, partly inhibited GM-CSF induced adhesion. Wortmannin, PP1 and PD98059 inhibited anti-IgE (1:100 or 1:1000) induced basophil HR in a dose dependent manner. They inhibited calcium ionophore A23187 (10 μmol/L, 5 μmol/L) induced basophil HR in a dose dependent manner, but to different extend with PP1 being the most efficient.Conclusions Basophil spontaneous adhesion to Fn is mediated by β1-integrins whereas cytokine induced adhesion

  3. Understanding disease mechanisms with models of signaling pathway activities

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastian-Leon, Patricia; Vidal, Enrique; Minguez, Pablo; Conesa, Ana; Tarazona, Sonia; Amadoz, Alicia; Armero, Carmen; Salavert, Francisco; VIDAL-PUIG, Antonio; Montaner, David; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2014-01-01

    Background Understanding the aspects of the cell functionality that account for disease or drug action mechanisms is one of the main challenges in the analysis of genomic data and is on the basis of the future implementation of precision medicine. Results Here we propose a simple probabilistic model in which signaling pathways are separated into elementary sub-pathways or signal transmission circuits (which ultimately trigger cell functions) and then transforms gene expression measurements in...

  4. Modelling and Analysis of Biochemical Signalling Pathway Cross-talk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Donaldson

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Signalling pathways are abstractions that help life scientists structure the coordination of cellular activity. Cross-talk between pathways accounts for many of the complex behaviours exhibited by signalling pathways and is often critical in producing the correct signal-response relationship. Formal models of signalling pathways and cross-talk in particular can aid understanding and drive experimentation. We define an approach to modelling based on the concept that a pathway is the (synchronising parallel composition of instances of generic modules (with internal and external labels. Pathways are then composed by (synchronising parallel composition and renaming; different types of cross-talk result from different combinations of synchronisation and renaming. We define a number of generic modules in PRISM and five types of cross-talk: signal flow, substrate availability, receptor function, gene expression and intracellular communication. We show that Continuous Stochastic Logic properties can both detect and distinguish the types of cross-talk. The approach is illustrated with small examples and an analysis of the cross-talk between the TGF-b/BMP, WNT and MAPK pathways.

  5. Actin filaments as the fast pathways for calcium ions involved in auditory processes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Miljko V Sataric; Dalibor L Sekulic; Bogdan M Sataric

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the polyelectrolyte properties of actin filaments which are in interaction with myosin motors, basic participants in mechano-electrical transduction in the stereocilia of the inner ear. Here, we elaborated a model in which actin filaments play the role of guides or pathways for localized flow of calcium ions. It is well recognized that calcium ions are implicated in tuning of actin-myosin cross-bridge interaction, which controls the mechanical property of hair bundle. Actin filaments enable much more efficient delivery of calcium ions and faster mechanism for their distribution within the stereocilia. With this model we were able to semiquantitatively explain experimental evidences regarding the way of how calcium ions tune the mechanosensitivity of hair cells.

  6. Temporal and evolutionary dynamics of two-component signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Michael E; Laub, Michael T

    2015-04-01

    Bacteria sense and respond to numerous environmental signals through two-component signaling pathways. Typically, a given stimulus will activate a sensor histidine kinase to autophosphorylate and then phosphotransfer to a cognate response regulator, which can mount an appropriate response. Although these signaling pathways often appear to be simple switches, they can also orchestrate surprisingly sophisticated and complex responses. These temporal dynamics arise from several key regulatory features, including the bifunctionality of histidine kinases as well as positive and negative feedback loops. Two-component signaling pathways are also dynamic on evolutionary time-scales, expanding dramatically in many species through gene duplication and divergence. Here, we review recent work probing the temporal and evolutionary dynamics of two-component signaling systems. PMID:25589045

  7. Role of Hedgehog Signaling Pathway in NASH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Verdelho Machado

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the number one cause of chronic liver disease in the Western world. Although only a minority of patients will ultimately develop end-stage liver disease, it is not yet possible to efficiently predict who will progress and, most importantly, effective treatments are still unavailable. Better understanding of the pathophysiology of this disease is necessary to improve the clinical management of NAFLD patients. Epidemiological data indicate that NAFLD prognosis is determined by an individual’s response to lipotoxic injury, rather than either the severity of exposure to lipotoxins, or the intensity of liver injury. The liver responds to injury with a synchronized wound-healing response. When this response is abnormal, it leads to pathological scarring, resulting in progressive fibrosis and cirrhosis, rather than repair. The hedgehog pathway is a crucial player in the wound-healing response. In this review, we summarize the pre-clinical and clinical evidence, which demonstrate the role of hedgehog pathway dysregulation in NAFLD pathogenesis, and the preliminary data that place the hedgehog pathway as a potential target for the treatment of this disease.

  8. Role of Hedgehog Signaling Pathway in NASH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdelho Machado, Mariana; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the number one cause of chronic liver disease in the Western world. Although only a minority of patients will ultimately develop end-stage liver disease, it is not yet possible to efficiently predict who will progress and, most importantly, effective treatments are still unavailable. Better understanding of the pathophysiology of this disease is necessary to improve the clinical management of NAFLD patients. Epidemiological data indicate that NAFLD prognosis is determined by an individual's response to lipotoxic injury, rather than either the severity of exposure to lipotoxins, or the intensity of liver injury. The liver responds to injury with a synchronized wound-healing response. When this response is abnormal, it leads to pathological scarring, resulting in progressive fibrosis and cirrhosis, rather than repair. The hedgehog pathway is a crucial player in the wound-healing response. In this review, we summarize the pre-clinical and clinical evidence, which demonstrate the role of hedgehog pathway dysregulation in NAFLD pathogenesis, and the preliminary data that place the hedgehog pathway as a potential target for the treatment of this disease. PMID:27258259

  9. DMPD: Calcium signaling in lymphocytes. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available csml) Open .csml file with CIOPlayer Open .csml file with CIOPlayer - ※CIO Playerのご利用上の注意 Open .csml file with CIO Open .csml file with CIO - ※CIOのご利用上の注意 ...

  10. New concepts in calcium-sensing receptor pharmacology and signalling

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, Donald T.; Riccardi, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is the key controller of extracellular calcium (Ca2+o) homeostasis via its regulation of parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion and renal Ca2+ reabsorption. The CaR-selective calcimimetic drug Cinacalcet stimulates the CaR to suppress PTH secretion in chronic kidney disease and represents the world's first clinically available receptor positive allosteric modulator (PAM). Negative CaR allosteric modulators (NAMs), known as calcilytics, can increase PTH secretio...

  11. Connexins regulate calcium signaling by controlling ATP release

    OpenAIRE

    Cotrina, Maria Luisa; Lin, Jane H.-C.; Alves-Rodrigues, Alexandra; Liu, Shujun; Li, Jiang; Azmi-Ghadimi, Hooman; Kang, Jian; Naus, Christian C.G.; Nedergaard, Maiken

    1998-01-01

    Forced expression of gap junction proteins, connexins, enables gap junction-deficient cell lines to propagate intercellular calcium waves. Here, we show that ATP secretion from the poorly coupled cell lines, C6 glioma, HeLa, and U373 glioblastoma, is potentiated 5- to 15-fold by connexin expression. ATP release required purinergic receptor-activated intracellular Ca2+ mobilization and was inhibited by Cl− channel blockers. Calcium wave propagation also was reduced by purinergic receptor antag...

  12. Sensory-Driven Enhancement of Calcium Signals in Individual Purkinje Cell Dendrites of Awake Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Najafi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Climbing fibers (CFs are thought to contribute to cerebellar plasticity and learning by triggering a large influx of dendritic calcium in the postsynaptic Purkinje cell (PC to signal the occurrence of an unexpected sensory event. However, CFs fire about once per second whether or not an event occurs, raising the question of how sensory-driven signals might be distinguished from a background of ongoing spontaneous activity. Here, we report that in PC dendrites of awake mice, CF-triggered calcium signals are enhanced when the trigger is a sensory event. In addition, we show that a large fraction of the total enhancement in each PC dendrite can be accounted for by an additional boost of calcium provided by sensory activation of a non-CF input. We suggest that sensory stimulation may modulate dendritic voltage and calcium concentration in PCs to increase the strength of plasticity signals during cerebellar learning.

  13. Signaling pathway networks mined from human pituitary adenoma proteomics data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Xianquan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We obtained a series of pituitary adenoma proteomic expression data, including protein-mapping data (111 proteins, comparative proteomic data (56 differentially expressed proteins, and nitroproteomic data (17 nitroproteins. There is a pressing need to clarify the significant signaling pathway networks that derive from those proteins in order to clarify and to better understand the molecular basis of pituitary adenoma pathogenesis and to discover biomarkers. Here, we describe the significant signaling pathway networks that were mined from human pituitary adenoma proteomic data with the Ingenuity pathway analysis system. Methods The Ingenuity pathway analysis system was used to analyze signal pathway networks and canonical pathways from protein-mapping data, comparative proteomic data, adenoma nitroproteomic data, and control nitroproteomic data. A Fisher's exact test was used to test the statistical significance with a significance level of 0.05. Statistical significant results were rationalized within the pituitary adenoma biological system with literature-based bioinformatics analyses. Results For the protein-mapping data, the top pathway networks were related to cancer, cell death, and lipid metabolism; the top canonical toxicity pathways included acute-phase response, oxidative-stress response, oxidative stress, and cell-cycle G2/M transition regulation. For the comparative proteomic data, top pathway networks were related to cancer, endocrine system development and function, and lipid metabolism; the top canonical toxicity pathways included mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative phosphorylation, oxidative-stress response, and ERK/MAPK signaling. The nitroproteomic data from a pituitary adenoma were related to cancer, cell death, lipid metabolism, and reproductive system disease, and the top canonical toxicity pathways mainly related to p38 MAPK signaling and cell-cycle G2/M transition regulation. Nitroproteins from a

  14. AlzPathway: a comprehensive map of signaling pathways of Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizuno Satoshi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most common cause of dementia among the elderly. To clarify pathogenesis of AD, thousands of reports have been accumulating. However, knowledge of signaling pathways in the field of AD has not been compiled as a database before. Description Here, we have constructed a publicly available pathway map called “AlzPathway” that comprehensively catalogs signaling pathways in the field of AD. We have collected and manually curated over 100 review articles related to AD, and have built an AD pathway map using CellDesigner. AlzPathway is currently composed of 1347 molecules and 1070 reactions in neuron, brain blood barrier, presynaptic, postsynaptic, astrocyte, and microglial cells and their cellular localizations. AlzPathway is available as both the SBML (Systems Biology Markup Language map for CellDesigner and the high resolution image map. AlzPathway is also available as a web service (online map based on Payao system, a community-based, collaborative web service platform for pathway model curation, enabling continuous updates by AD researchers. Conclusions AlzPathway is the first comprehensive map of intra, inter and extra cellular AD signaling pathways which can enable mechanistic deciphering of AD pathogenesis. The AlzPathway map is accessible at http://alzpathway.org/.

  15. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chory, Joanne

    2006-01-16

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  16. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chory, Joanne

    2004-12-31

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  17. Role of Calcium Signaling in the Transcriptional Regulation of the Apicoplast Genome of Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabna Cheemadan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium is a universal second messenger that plays an important role in regulatory processes in eukaryotic cells. To understand calcium-dependent signaling in malaria parasites, we analyzed transcriptional responses of Plasmodium falciparum to two calcium ionophores (A23187 and ionomycin that cause redistribution of intracellular calcium within the cytoplasm. While ionomycin induced a specific transcriptional response defined by up- or downregulation of a narrow set of genes, A23187 caused a developmental arrest in the schizont stage. In addition, we observed a dramatic decrease of mRNA levels of the transcripts encoded by the apicoplast genome during the exposure of P. falciparum to both calcium ionophores. Neither of the ionophores caused any disruptions to the DNA replication or the overall apicoplast morphology. This suggests that the mRNA downregulation reflects direct inhibition of the apicoplast gene transcription. Next, we identify a nuclear encoded protein with a calcium binding domain (EF-hand that is localized to the apicoplast. Overexpression of this protein (termed PfACBP1 in P. falciparum cells mediates an increased resistance to the ionophores which suggests its role in calcium-dependent signaling within the apicoplast. Our data indicate that the P. falciparum apicoplast requires calcium-dependent signaling that involves a novel protein PfACBP1.

  18. Targeting Signaling Pathways in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Haybaeck

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian carcinoma (OC is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Response to platinum-based chemotherapy is poor in some patients and, thus, current research is focusing on new therapy options. The various histological types of OC are characterized by distinctive molecular genetic alterations that are relevant for ovarian tumorigenesis. The understanding of these molecular pathways is essential for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. Purpose: We want to give an overview on the molecular genetic changes of the histopathological types of OC and their role as putative therapeutic targets. In Depth Review of Existing Data: In 2012, the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF inhibitor, bevacizumab, was approved for OC treatment. Bevacizumab has shown promising results as single agent and in combination with conventional chemotherapy, but its target is not distinctive when analyzed before treatment. At present, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitors, poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors and components of the EGFR pathway are in the focus of clinical research. Interestingly, some phytochemical substances show good synergistic effects when used in combination with chemotherapy. Conclusion: Ongoing studies of targeted agents in conjunction with chemotherapy will show whether there are alternative options to bevacizumab available for OC patients. Novel targets which can be assessed before therapy to predict efficacy are needed. The assessment of therapeutic targets is continuously improved by molecular pathological analyses on tumor tissue. A careful selection of patients for personalized treatment will help to reduce putative side effects and toxicity.

  19. TSLP signaling pathway map: a platform for analysis of TSLP-mediated signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jun; Sharma, Jyoti; Raju, Rajesh; Palapetta, Shyam Mohan; Prasad, T S Keshava; Huang, Tai-Chung; Yoda, Akinori; Tyner, Jeffrey W; van Bodegom, Diederik; Weinstock, David M; Ziegler, Steven F; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2014-01-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is a four-helix bundle cytokine that plays a critical role in the regulation of immune responses and in the differentiation of hematopoietic cells. TSLP signals through a heterodimeric receptor complex consisting of an interleukin-7 receptor α chain and a unique TSLP receptor (TSLPR) [also known as cytokine receptor-like factor 2 (CRLF2)]. Cellular targets of TSLP include dendritic cells, B cells, mast cells, regulatory T (Treg) cells and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. The TSLP/TSLPR axis can activate multiple signaling transduction pathways including the JAK/STAT pathway and the PI-3 kinase pathway. Aberrant TSLP/TSLPR signaling has been associated with a variety of human diseases including asthma, atopic dermatitis, nasal polyposis, inflammatory bowel disease, eosinophilic eosophagitis and, most recently, acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A centralized resource of the TSLP signaling pathway cataloging signaling events is not yet available. In this study, we present a literature-annotated resource of reactions in the TSLP signaling pathway. This pathway map is publicly available through NetPath (http://www.netpath.org/), an open access signal transduction pathway resource developed previously by our group. This map includes 236 molecules and 252 reactions that are involved in TSLP/TSLPR signaling pathway. We expect that the TSLP signaling pathway map will provide a rich resource to study the biology of this important cytokine as well as to identify novel therapeutic targets for diseases associated with dysregulated TSLP/TSLPR signaling. Database URL: http://www.netpath.org/pathways?path_id=NetPath_24. PMID:24573880

  20. A Bioinformatics Resource for TWEAK-Fn14 Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitali Bhattacharjee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available TNF-related weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK is a new member of the TNF superfamily. It signals through TNFRSF12A, commonly known as Fn14. The TWEAK-Fn14 interaction regulates cellular activities including proliferation, migration, differentiation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, tissue remodeling and inflammation. Although TWEAK has been reported to be associated with autoimmune diseases, cancers, stroke, and kidney-related disorders, the downstream molecular events of TWEAK-Fn14 signaling are yet not available in any signaling pathway repository. In this paper, we manually compiled from the literature, in particular those reported in human systems, the downstream reactions stimulated by TWEAK-Fn14 interactions. Our manual amassment of the TWEAK-Fn14 pathway has resulted in cataloging of 46 proteins involved in various biochemical reactions and TWEAK-Fn14 induced expression of 28 genes. We have enabled the availability of data in various standard exchange formats from NetPath, a repository for signaling pathways. We believe that this composite molecular interaction pathway will enable identification of new signaling components in TWEAK signaling pathway. This in turn may lead to the identification of potential therapeutic targets in TWEAK-associated disorders.

  1. Signal transduction pathway profiling of individual tumor samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterson Carsten

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signal transduction pathways convey information from the outside of the cell to transcription factors, which in turn regulate gene expression. Our objective is to analyze tumor gene expression data from microarrays in the context of such pathways. Results We use pathways compiled from the TRANSPATH/TRANSFAC databases and the literature, and three publicly available cancer microarray data sets. Variation in pathway activity, across the samples, is gauged by the degree of correlation between downstream targets of a pathway. Two correlation scores are applied; one considers all pairs of downstream targets, and the other considers only pairs without common transcription factors. Several pathways are found to be differentially active in the data sets using these scores. Moreover, we devise a score for pathway activity in individual samples, based on the average expression value of the downstream targets. Statistical significance is assigned to the scores using permutation of genes as null model. Hence, for individual samples, the status of a pathway is given as a sign, + or -, and a p-value. This approach defines a projection of high-dimensional gene expression data onto low-dimensional pathway activity scores. For each dataset and many pathways we find a much larger number of significant samples than expected by chance. Finally, we find that several sample-wise pathway activities are significantly associated with clinical classifications of the samples. Conclusion This study shows that it is feasible to infer signal transduction pathway activity, in individual samples, from gene expression data. Furthermore, these pathway activities are biologically relevant in the three cancer data sets.

  2. ERβ induces the differentiation of cultured osteoblasts by both Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and estrogen signaling pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Xinhua [Department of Spine Surgery, Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha (China); Wang, Xiaoyuan [Department of Nephrology, Xi An Honghui Hospital, Xi an (China); Hu, Xiongke; Chen, Yong; Zeng, Kefeng [Department of Spine Surgery, Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha (China); Zhang, Hongqi, E-mail: zhq9699@126.com [Department of Spine Surgery, Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha (China)

    2015-07-01

    Although 17β-estradial (E2) is known to stimulate bone formation, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Recent studies have implicated the Wnt/β-catenin pathway as a major signaling cascade in bone biology. The interactions between Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and estrogen signaling pathways have been reported in many tissues. In this study, E2 significantly increased the expression of β-catenin by inducing phosphorylations of GSK3β at serine 9. ERβ siRNAs were transfected into MC3T3-E1 cells and revealed that ERβ involved E2-induced osteoblasts proliferation and differentiation via Wnt/β-catenin signaling. The osteoblast differentiation genes (BGP, ALP and OPN) and proliferation related gene (cyclin D1) expression were significantly induced by E2-mediated ERβ. Furthermore immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that E2 induced the accumulation of β-catenin protein in the nucleus which leads to interaction with T-cell-specific transcription factor/lymphoid enhancer binding factor (TCF/LEF) transcription factors. Taken together, these findings suggest that E2 promotes osteoblastic proliferation and differentiation by inducing proliferation-related and differentiation-related gene expression via ERβ/GSK-3β-dependent Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Our findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms of action of E2 in osteoblastogenesis. - Highlights: • 17β-estradial (E2) promotes GSK3-β phosphorylation. • E2 activates the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. • The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway interacts with estrogen signaling pathways. • E2-mediated ER induced osteoblast differentiation and proliferation related genes expression.

  3. ERβ induces the differentiation of cultured osteoblasts by both Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and estrogen signaling pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although 17β-estradial (E2) is known to stimulate bone formation, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Recent studies have implicated the Wnt/β-catenin pathway as a major signaling cascade in bone biology. The interactions between Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and estrogen signaling pathways have been reported in many tissues. In this study, E2 significantly increased the expression of β-catenin by inducing phosphorylations of GSK3β at serine 9. ERβ siRNAs were transfected into MC3T3-E1 cells and revealed that ERβ involved E2-induced osteoblasts proliferation and differentiation via Wnt/β-catenin signaling. The osteoblast differentiation genes (BGP, ALP and OPN) and proliferation related gene (cyclin D1) expression were significantly induced by E2-mediated ERβ. Furthermore immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that E2 induced the accumulation of β-catenin protein in the nucleus which leads to interaction with T-cell-specific transcription factor/lymphoid enhancer binding factor (TCF/LEF) transcription factors. Taken together, these findings suggest that E2 promotes osteoblastic proliferation and differentiation by inducing proliferation-related and differentiation-related gene expression via ERβ/GSK-3β-dependent Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Our findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms of action of E2 in osteoblastogenesis. - Highlights: • 17β-estradial (E2) promotes GSK3-β phosphorylation. • E2 activates the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. • The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway interacts with estrogen signaling pathways. • E2-mediated ER induced osteoblast differentiation and proliferation related genes expression

  4. Ca2+ signals induced from calcium stores in pancreatic islet β cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In single rat pancreatic β cells,using fura-2 microfluorometry to measure [Ca2+]i response upon different stimuli,the ways of calcium regulation have been studied.When the extracellular calcium concentration was 2.5 mmol/L,either 60 mmol/L KCl,20 mmol/L D-glucose or 0.1 mmol/L tolbutamide induced increase in [Ca2+]i.Such increase in [Ca2+]i was absent when the same stimuli were applied under zero extracellular calcium.These results indicate that the increase of [Ca2+]i is induced by the activation of voltage-dependent calcium channels in β cells.The manifold forms of [Ca2+]i change induced by glucose imply that the effects of glucose are complex.5 mmol/L caffeine or 5 mmol/L MCh increase the [Ca2+]i ,which is independent of the external calcium,suggesting that [Ca2+]i can be regulated by Ca2+ release from not only the IP3-sensitive but also the ryanodine sensitive calcium stores in β cells.The latency of Ca responses for IP3 pathway (5 s) is faster than that for ryanodine pathway (30 s).It is concluded that there are multiple calcium stores in rat pancreatic β cells.

  5. The Medicago truncatula DMI1 protein modulates cytosolic calcium signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peiter, Edgar; Sun, Jongho; Heckmann, Anne Birgitte Lau;

    2007-01-01

    Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum potassium channel (MthK). The cytosolic C terminus of DMI1 contains a RCK (regulator of the conductance of K+) domain that in MthK acts as a calcium-regulated gating ring controlling the activity of the channel. Here we show that a dmi1 mutant lacking the entire C terminus acts...

  6. Diffusion Modeling of ATP Signaling Suggests a Partially Regenerative Mechanism Underlies Astrocyte Intercellular Calcium Waves

    OpenAIRE

    MacDonald, Christopher L.; Yu, Diana; Buibas, Marius; Silva, Gabriel A.

    2008-01-01

    Network signaling through astrocyte syncytiums putatively contribute to the regulation of a number of both physiological and pathophysiological processes in the mammalian central nervous system. As such, an understanding of the underlying mechanisms is critical to determining any roles played by signaling through astrocyte networks. Astrocyte signaling is primarily mediated by the propagation of intercellular calcium waves (ICW) in the sense that paracrine signaling results in measurable intr...

  7. Using Proteomics To Elucidate Critical Signaling Pathways

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Heba

    2012-11-01

    Despite important advances in the therapy of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) the majority of patients will die from their disease (Appelbaum, Rowe, Radich, & Dick, 2001). Characterization of the aberrant molecular pathways responsible for this malignancy provides a platform to discover alternative treatments to help alter the fate of patients. AML is characterized by a blockage in the differentiation of myeloid cells resulting in the accumulation of highly proliferating immature hematopoietic cells. Since treatments such as chemotherapy rarely destroy the leukemic cells entirely, differentiation induction therapy has become a very attractive treatment option. Interestingly, previous experiments have shown that ligation of CD44, a cell surface glycoprotein strongly expressed on all AML cells, with anti-CD44 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) could reverse this block in differentiation of leukemic blasts regardless of the AML subtype. To expand the understanding of the cellular regulation and circuitry involved, we aim to apply quantitative phosphoproteomics to monitor dynamic changes in phosphorylation state in response to anti-CD44 treatment. Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation is a highly controlled biochemical process that responds to various intracellular and extracellular stimuli. As phosphorylation is a dynamic process, quantification of these phosphorylation events would be vastly insightful. The main objective of this project is to determine the differentiation-dependent phosphoproteome of AML cells upon treatment of cells with the anti-CD44 mAb.In these experiments, optimization of protein extraction, phosphopeptide enrichment and data processing and analysis has been achieved. The primary results show successful phosphoproteome extraction complemented with efficient phosphopeptide enrichment and informative data processing. Further quantification with stable isotope labeling techniques is anticipated to provide candidates for targeted therapy.

  8. Hypertensive stretch regulates endothelial exocytosis of Weibel-Palade bodies through VEGF receptor 2 signaling pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Xiong; Zhenqian Hu; Xiaofan Han; Beibei Jiang; Rongli Zhang; Xiaoyu Zhang; Yao Lu

    2013-01-01

    Regulated endothelial exocytosis of Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs),the first stage in leukocyte trafficking,plays a pivotal role in inflammation and injury.Acute mechanical stretch has been closely associated with vascular inflammation,although the precise mechanism is unknown.Here,we show that hypertensive stretch regulates the exocytosis of WPBs of endothelial ceils (ECs) through VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) signaling pathways.Stretch triggers a rapid release (within minutes) of von Willebrand factor and interleukin-8 from WPBs in cultured human ECs,promoting the interaction between leukocytes and ECs through the translocation of P-selectin to the cell membrane.We further show that hypertensive stretch significantly induces P-selectin translocation of intact ECs and enhances leukocyte adhesion both ex vivo and in vivo.Stretch-induced endothelial exocytosis is mediated via a VEGFR2/PLCy1/calcium pathway.Interestingly,stretch also induces a negative feedback via a VEGFR2/Akt/nitric oxide pathway.Such dual effects are confirmed using pharmacological and genetic approaches in carotid artery segments,as well as in acute hypertensive mouse models.These studies reveal mechanical stretch as a potent agonist for endothelial exocytosis,which is modulated by VEGFR2 signaling.Thus,VEGFR2 signaling pathways may represent novel therapeutic targets in limiting hypertensive stretch-related inflammation.

  9. Spontaneous and CRH-Induced Excitability and Calcium Signaling in Mice Corticotrophs Involves Sodium, Calcium, and Cation-Conducting Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemkova, Hana; Tomić, Melanija; Kucka, Marek; Aguilera, Greti; Stojilkovic, Stanko S

    2016-04-01

    Transgenic mice expressing the tdimer2(12) form of Discosoma red fluorescent protein under control of the proopiomelanocortin gene's regulatory elements are a useful model for studying corticotrophs. Using these mice, we studied the ion channels and mechanisms controlling corticotroph excitability. Corticotrophs were either quiescent or electrically active, with a 22-mV difference in the resting membrane potential (RMP) between the 2 groups. In quiescent cells, CRH depolarized the membrane, leading to initial single spiking and sustained bursting; in active cells, CRH further facilitated or inhibited electrical activity and calcium spiking, depending on the initial activity pattern and CRH concentration. The stimulatory but not inhibitory action of CRH on electrical activity was mimicked by cAMP independently of the presence or absence of arachidonic acid. Removal of bath sodium silenced spiking and hyperpolarized the majority of cells; in contrast, the removal of bath calcium did not affect RMP but reduced CRH-induced depolarization, which abolished bursting electrical activity and decreased the spiking frequency but not the amplitude of single spikes. Corticotrophs with inhibited voltage-gated sodium channels fired calcium-dependent action potentials, whereas cells with inhibited L-type calcium channels fired sodium-dependent spikes; blockade of both channels abolished spiking without affecting the RMP. These results indicate that the background voltage-insensitive sodium conductance influences RMP, the CRH-depolarization current is driven by a cationic conductance, and the interplay between voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels plays a critical role in determining the status and pattern of electrical activity and calcium signaling. PMID:26901094

  10. New microRNAS regulating the P53 signaling pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Bisso, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    A vast body of evidence from clinical and basic research studies has demonstrated that the p53 pathway acts as an essential barrier in preventing cancer onset and development. ------------------------ A vast body of evidence from clinical and basic research studies has demonstrated that the p53 pathway acts as an essential barrier in preventing cancer onset and development. p53 receives and integrates a wide variety of cytotoxic and genotoxic stress signals from upstream sensors transla...

  11. Bone biology, signaling pathways, and therapeutic targets for osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iñiguez-Ariza, Nicole M; Clarke, Bart L

    2015-10-01

    Major advances have occurred recently in the treatment of osteoporosis in recent years. Most patients are currently treated with bisphosphonates, denosumab, raloxifene, or teriparatide, and in some countries, strontium ranelate. Strontium ranelate and calcitonin have recently had their use restricted due to cardiovascular concerns and malignancy, respectively. The available agents have generally provided excellent options that effectively reduce fracture risk. New targets are being sought based on appreciation of the bone biology and signaling pathways involved in bone formation and resorption. These agents will directly target these signaling pathways, and further expand the options available for treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:26255682

  12. POSTRANSLATIONAL MODIFICATIONS OF P53: UPSTREAM SIGNALING PATHWAYS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ANDERSON,C.W.APPELLA,E.

    2003-10-23

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a tetrameric transcription factor that is posttranslational modified at >20 different sites by phosphorylation, acetylation, or sumoylation in response to various cellular stress conditions. Specific posttranslational modifications, or groups of modifications, that result from the activation of different stress-induced signaling pathways are thought to modulate p53 activity to regulate cell fate by inducing cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or cellular senescence. Here we review recent progress in characterizing the upstream signaling pathways whose activation in response to various genotoxic and non-genotoxic stresses result in p53 posttranslational modifications.

  13. Visualization of Plasticity in Fear-Evoked Calcium Signals in Midbrain Dopamine Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Bryan B.; Soden, Marta E.; Zweifel, Larry S.

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine is broadly implicated in fear-related processes, yet we know very little about signaling dynamics in these neurons during active fear conditioning. We describe the direct imaging of calcium signals of dopamine neurons during Pavlovian fear conditioning using fiber-optic confocal microscopy coupled with the genetically encoded calcium…

  14. Dynamic visualization of calcium-dependent signaling in cellular microdomains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sohum; Zhang, Jin

    2015-10-01

    Cells rely on the coordinated action of diverse signaling molecules to sense, interpret, and respond to their highly dynamic external environment. To ensure the specific and robust flow of information, signaling molecules are often spatially organized to form distinct signaling compartments, and our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that guide intracellular signaling hinges on the ability to directly probe signaling events within these cellular microdomains. Ca(2+) signaling in particular owes much of its functional versatility to this type of exquisite spatial regulation. As discussed below, a number of methods have been developed to investigate the mechanistic and functional implications of microdomains of Ca(2+) signaling, ranging from the application of Ca(2+) buffers to the direct and targeted visualization of Ca(2+) signaling microdomains using genetically encoded fluorescent reporters. PMID:25703691

  15. IgE receptor-activated calcium permeability pathway in rat basophilic leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When antigen-stimulated 45Ca uptake is measured in RBL cells loaded with > 3 mM quin2, re-extrusion of 45Ca is minimized and the initial rate of 45Ca uptake reflects the true unidirectional influx of Ca. This influx correlates more closely with secretion than with the number of IgE receptors aggregated by antigen. The antigen-induced permeability pathway is saturable, having a Km of about 0.7 mM and a Vmax of 0.9 nmol Ca/106 cells/min and it persists for at least an hour provided that receptor aggregation is maintained. The negatively charged fluorescent probe bis-oxonol is insensitive to changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential and is, therefore, a useful plasma membrane potential indicator. Antigen-stimulation of RBL cells equilibrated with bis-oxonol causes a rapid depolarization that peaks within 2-3 minutes and persists until receptor aggregates are disrupted. Antigen-induced depolarization is seen in the absence of extracellular calcium, but is almost completely abolished when both sodium and calcium are replaced by glucose. Addition of calcium restores this response even when sodium is absent. This suggests that the IgE receptor-activated permeability pathway has a similar conductance for sodium and calcium ions

  16. A network map of Interleukin-10 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Renu; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Sharma, Kusum; Khan, Aafaque Ahmad; Advani, Jayshree; Gowda, Harsha; Tripathy, Srikanth Prasad; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Pandey, Akhilesh; Gandotra, Sheetal; Prasad, T S Keshava; Shankar, Subramanian

    2016-03-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is an anti-inflammatory cytokine with important immunoregulatory functions. It is primarily secreted by antigen-presenting cells such as activated T-cells, monocytes, B-cells and macrophages. In biologically functional form, it exists as a homodimer that binds to tetrameric heterodimer IL-10 receptor and induces downstream signaling. IL-10 is associated with survival, proliferation and anti-apoptotic activities of various cancers such as Burkitt lymphoma, non-Hodgkins lymphoma and non-small scell lung cancer. In addition, it plays a central role in survival and persistence of intracellular pathogens such as Leishmania donovani, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Trypanosoma cruzi inside the host. The signaling mechanisms of IL-10 cytokine are not well explored and a well annotated pathway map has been lacking. To this end, we developed a pathway resource by manually annotating the IL-10 induced signaling molecules derived from literature. The reactions were categorized under molecular associations, activation/inhibition, catalysis, transport and gene regulation. In all, 37 molecules and 76 reactions were annotated. The IL-10 signaling pathway can be freely accessed through NetPath, a resource of signal transduction pathways previously developed by our group. PMID:26253919

  17. Calcium as a branching signal in Neurospora crassa.

    OpenAIRE

    Reissig, J L; Kinney, S G

    1983-01-01

    The divalent cation ionophore A23187 was found to induce apical branching in Neurospora crassa. Optimal effects were obtained by treatment with 0.1 mM ionophore for 30 min. Branching first became manifest during or shortly after treatment; successive rounds of branching could be observed at later times. Calcium starvation of the mycelium markedly reduced its subsequent response to the ionophore, whereas starvation for other divalent cations had no detectable effect. The branching response was...

  18. Clinical Implications of Hedgehog Pathway Signaling in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L. Suzman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Activity in the Hedgehog pathway, which regulates GLI-mediated transcription, is important in organogenesis and stem cell regulation in self-renewing organs, but is pathologically elevated in many human malignancies. Mutations leading to constitutive activation of the pathway have been implicated in medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma, and inhibition of the pathway has demonstrated clinical responses leading to the approval of the Smoothened inhibitor, vismodegib, for the treatment of advanced basal cell carcinoma. Aberrant Hedgehog pathway signaling has also been noted in prostate cancer with evidence suggesting that it may render prostate epithelial cells tumorigenic, drive the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and contribute towards the development of castration-resistance through autocrine and paracrine signaling within the tumor microenvironment and cross-talk with the androgen pathway. In addition, there are emerging clinical data suggesting that inhibition of the Hedgehog pathway may be effective in the treatment of recurrent and metastatic prostate cancer. Here we will review these data and highlight areas of active clinical research as they relate to Hedgehog pathway inhibition in prostate cancer.

  19. Diffusion modeling of ATP signaling suggests a partially regenerative mechanism underlies astrocyte intercellular calcium waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Network signaling through astrocyte syncytiums putatively contribute to the regulation of a number of both physiological and pathophysiological processes in the mammalian central nervous system. As such, an understanding of the underlying mechanisms is critical to determining any roles played by signaling through astrocyte networks. Astrocyte signaling is primarily mediated by the propagation of intercellular calcium waves in the sense that paracrine signaling results in measurable intracellular calcium transients. Although the molecular mechanisms are relatively well known, there is conflicting data regarding the mechanism by which the signal propagates through the network. Experimentally there is evidence for both a point source signaling model in which adenosine triphosphate (ATP is released by an initially activated astrocyte only, and a regenerative signaling model in which downstream astrocytes release ATP. We modeled both conditions as a simple lumped parameter phenomenological diffusion model and show that the only possible mechanism that can accurately reproduce experimentally measured results is a dual signaling mechanism that incorporates elements of both proposed signaling models. Specifically, we were able to accurately simulate experimentally measured in vitro intercellular calcium wave dynamics by assuming a point source signaling model with a downstream regenerative component. These results suggest that seemingly conflicting data in the literature are actually complimentary, and represents a highly efficient and robustly engineered signaling mechanism.

  20. Band-pass processing in a GPCR signaling pathway selects for NFAT transcription factor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumit, M; Neubig, R R; Takayama, S; Linderman, J J

    2015-11-01

    Many biological processes are rhythmic and proper timing is increasingly appreciated as being critical for development and maintenance of physiological functions. To understand how temporal modulation of an input signal influences downstream responses, we employ microfluidic pulsatile stimulation of a G-protein coupled receptor, the muscarinic M3 receptor, in single cells with simultaneous real-time imaging of both intracellular calcium and NFAT nuclear localization. Interestingly, we find that reduced stimulation with pulses of ligand can give more efficient transcription factor activation, if stimuli are timed appropriately. Our experiments and computational analyses show that M3 receptor-induced calcium oscillations form a low pass filter while calcium-induced NFAT translocation forms a high pass filter. The combination acts as a band-pass filter optimized for intermediate frequencies of stimulation. We demonstrate that receptor desensitization and NFAT translocation rates determine critical features of the band-pass filter and that the band-pass may be shifted for different receptors or NFAT dynamics. As an example, we show that the two NFAT isoforms (NFAT4 and NFAT1) have shifted band-pass windows for the same receptor. While we focus specifically on the M3 muscarinic receptor and NFAT translocation, band-pass processing is expected to be a general theme that applies to multiple signaling pathways. PMID:26374065

  1. Filamin and phospholipase C-ε are required for calcium signaling in the Caenorhabditis elegans spermatheca.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismar Kovacevic

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Caenorhabditis elegans spermatheca is a myoepithelial tube that stores sperm and undergoes cycles of stretching and constriction as oocytes enter, are fertilized, and exit into the uterus. FLN-1/filamin, a stretch-sensitive structural and signaling scaffold, and PLC-1/phospholipase C-ε, an enzyme that generates the second messenger IP3, are required for embryos to exit normally after fertilization. Using GCaMP, a genetically encoded calcium indicator, we show that entry of an oocyte into the spermatheca initiates a distinctive series of IP3-dependent calcium oscillations that propagate across the tissue via gap junctions and lead to constriction of the spermatheca. PLC-1 is required for the calcium release mechanism triggered by oocyte entry, and FLN-1 is required for timely initiation of the calcium oscillations. INX-12, a gap junction subunit, coordinates propagation of the calcium transients across the spermatheca. Gain-of-function mutations in ITR-1/IP3R, an IP3-dependent calcium channel, and loss-of-function mutations in LFE-2, a negative regulator of IP3 signaling, increase calcium release and suppress the exit defect in filamin-deficient animals. We further demonstrate that a regulatory cassette consisting of MEL-11/myosin phosphatase and NMY-1/non-muscle myosin is required for coordinated contraction of the spermatheca. In summary, this study answers long-standing questions concerning calcium signaling dynamics in the C. elegans spermatheca and suggests FLN-1 is needed in response to oocyte entry to trigger calcium release and coordinated contraction of the spermathecal tissue.

  2. Phylogenetic diversity of stress signalling pathways in fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stansfield Ian

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbes must sense environmental stresses, transduce these signals and mount protective responses to survive in hostile environments. In this study we have tested the hypothesis that fungal stress signalling pathways have evolved rapidly in a niche-specific fashion that is independent of phylogeny. To test this hypothesis we have compared the conservation of stress signalling molecules in diverse fungal species with their stress resistance. These fungi, which include ascomycetes, basidiomycetes and microsporidia, occupy highly divergent niches from saline environments to plant or mammalian hosts. Results The fungi displayed significant variation in their resistance to osmotic (NaCl and sorbitol, oxidative (H2O2 and menadione and cell wall stresses (Calcofluor White and Congo Red. There was no strict correlation between fungal phylogeny and stress resistance. Rather, the human pathogens tended to be more resistant to all three types of stress, an exception being the sensitivity of Candida albicans to the cell wall stress, Calcofluor White. In contrast, the plant pathogens were relatively sensitive to oxidative stress. The degree of conservation of osmotic, oxidative and cell wall stress signalling pathways amongst the eighteen fungal species was examined. Putative orthologues of functionally defined signalling components in Saccharomyces cerevisiae were identified by performing reciprocal BLASTP searches, and the percent amino acid identities of these orthologues recorded. This revealed that in general, central components of the osmotic, oxidative and cell wall stress signalling pathways are relatively well conserved, whereas the sensors lying upstream and transcriptional regulators lying downstream of these modules have diverged significantly. There was no obvious correlation between the degree of conservation of stress signalling pathways and the resistance of a particular fungus to the corresponding stress. Conclusion Our

  3. Metabolic pathway engineering using the central signal processor PII

    OpenAIRE

    Watzer, Björn; Engelbrecht, Alicia; Hauf, Waldemar; Stahl, Mark; Maldener, Iris; Forchhammer, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Background PII signal processor proteins are wide spread in prokaryotes and plants where they control a multitude of anabolic reactions. Efficient overproduction of metabolites requires relaxing the tight cellular control circuits. Here we demonstrate that a single point mutation in the PII signaling protein from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is sufficient to unlock the arginine pathway causing over accumulation of the biopolymer cyanophycin (multi-l-arginyl-poly-l-aspartate)....

  4. PACAP signaling to DREAM: a cAMP-dependent pathway that regulates cortical astrogliogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, Mario

    2009-04-01

    Astrocytes constitute a very abundant cell type in the mammalian central nervous system and play critical roles in brain function. During development, astrocytes are generated from neural progenitor cells only after these cells have generated neurons. This so called gliogenic switch is tightly regulated by intrinsic factors that inhibit the generation of astrocytes during the neurogenic period. Once neural progenitors acquire gliogenic competence, they differentiate into astrocytes in response to specific extracellular signals. Some of these signals are delivered by neurotrophic cytokines via activation of the gp130-JAK-signal transducer and activator of transcription system, whereas others depend on the activity of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) on specific PAC1 receptors that stimulate the production of cAMP. This results in the activation of the small GTPases Rap1 and Ras, and in the cAMP-dependent entry of extracellular calcium into the cell. Calcium, in turn, stimulates the transcription factor downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM), which is bound to specific sites of the promoter of the glial fibrillary acidic protein gene, stimulating its expression during astrocyte differentiation. Lack of DREAM in vivo results in alterations in the number of neurons and astrocytes generated during development. Thus, the PACAP-cAMP-Ca(2+)-DREAM signaling cascade constitutes an important pathway to activate glial-specific gene expression during astrocyte differentiation. PMID:19238593

  5. Modulation of the Ca(2+) signaling pathway by celangulin I in the central neurons of Spodoptera exigua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuxin; Lian, Xihong; Wan, Yinging; Wang, Duoyi; Chen, Wei; Di, Fengjuan; Wu, Wenjun; Li, Zhengming

    2016-02-01

    Celangulin I is an insecticidal component isolated from Chinese bittersweet Celastrus angulatus. The present study explored the possible effects of celangulin I on the calcium signaling pathway, especially on the L-type Ca(2+) channel and the calcium channels in the endoplasmic reticulum in the central neurons isolated from the third instar larvae of Spodoptera exigua using whole-cell patch-clamp and calcium imaging technique. The results showed that celangulin I could activate the high voltage-gated calcium channel at the concentration of 150μM. The peak currents were increased by 17% of the initial value at the end of the 10-min recording after treated with celangulin I. The rises of intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in neurons treated by celangulin I showed that the effects of celangulin I were concentration-dependent. Activation of the RyRs by ryanodine decreased the calcium release induced by celangulin I, indicating that celangulin I exerts effect on insect RyRs. Furthermore, we also provided evidence for the first time that celangulin I activates inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) sensitive intracellular calcium release channels in the endoplasmic reticulum third instar larvae neurons of S. exigua. Plausibly, these experimental results can explain the characteristic symptoms of anesthesia and paralysis in celangulin I treated insects. PMID:26821661

  6. YAP regulates neuronal differentiation through Sonic hedgehog signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yi-Ting; Ding, Jing-Ya [Department of Life Sciences and Institute of Genome Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Li, Ming-Yang [Department of Life Science, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Tien-Shun [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Wang, Tsu-Wei, E-mail: twwang@ntnu.edu.tw [Department of Life Science, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China); Yu, Jenn-Yah, E-mail: jyyu@ym.edu.tw [Department of Life Sciences and Institute of Genome Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Brain Research Center, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China)

    2012-09-10

    Tight regulation of cell numbers by controlling cell proliferation and apoptosis is important during development. Recently, the Hippo pathway has been shown to regulate tissue growth and organ size in Drosophila. In mammalian cells, it also affects cell proliferation and differentiation in various tissues, including the nervous system. Interplay of several signaling cascades, such as Notch, Wnt, and Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) pathways, control cell proliferation during neuronal differentiation. However, it remains unclear whether the Hippo pathway coordinates with other signaling cascades in regulating neuronal differentiation. Here, we used P19 cells, a mouse embryonic carcinoma cell line, as a model to study roles of YAP, a core component of the Hippo pathway, in neuronal differentiation. P19 cells can be induced to differentiate into neurons by expressing a neural bHLH transcription factor gene Ascl1. Our results showed that YAP promoted cell proliferation and inhibited neuronal differentiation. Expression of Yap activated Shh but not Wnt or Notch signaling activity during neuronal differentiation. Furthermore, expression of Yap increased the expression of Patched homolog 1 (Ptch1), a downstream target of the Shh signaling. Knockdown of Gli2, a transcription factor of the Shh pathway, promoted neuronal differentiation even when Yap was over-expressed. We further demonstrated that over-expression of Yap inhibited neuronal differentiation in primary mouse cortical progenitors and Gli2 knockdown rescued the differentiation defect in Yap over-expressing cells. In conclusion, our study reveals that Shh signaling acts downstream of YAP in regulating neuronal differentiation. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer YAP promotes cell proliferation and inhibits neuronal differentiation in P19 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer YAP promotes Sonic hedgehog signaling activity during neuronal differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of Gli2 rescues the Yap

  7. Molecular pathway profiling of T lymphocyte signal transduction pathways; Th1 and Th2 genomic fingerprints are defined by TCR and CD28-mediated signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smeets Ruben L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background T lymphocytes are orchestrators of adaptive immunity. Naïve T cells may differentiate into Th1, Th2, Th17 or iTreg phenotypes, depending on environmental co-stimulatory signals. To identify genes and pathways involved in differentiation of Jurkat T cells towards Th1 and Th2 subtypes we performed comprehensive transcriptome analyses of Jurkat T cells stimulated with various stimuli and pathway inhibitors. Results from these experiments were validated in a human experimental setting using whole blood and purified CD4+ Tcells. Results Calcium-dependent activation of T cells using CD3/CD28 and PMA/CD3 stimulation induced a Th1 expression profile reflected by increased expression of T-bet, RUNX3, IL-2, and IFNγ, whereas calcium-independent activation via PMA/CD28 induced a Th2 expression profile which included GATA3, RXRA, CCL1 and Itk. Knock down with siRNA and gene expression profiling in the presence of selective kinase inhibitors showed that proximal kinases Lck and PKCθ are crucial signaling hubs during T helper cell activation, revealing a clear role for Lck in Th1 development and for PKCθ in both Th1 and Th2 development. Medial signaling via MAPkinases appeared to be less important in these pathways, since specific inhibitors of these kinases displayed a minor effect on gene expression. Translation towards a primary, whole blood setting and purified human CD4+ T cells revealed that PMA/CD3 stimulation induced a more pronounced Th1 specific, Lck and PKCθ dependent IFNγ production, whereas PMA/CD28 induced Th2 specific IL-5 and IL-13 production, independent of Lck activation. PMA/CD3-mediated skewing towards a Th1 phenotype was also reflected in mRNA expression of the master transcription factor Tbet, whereas PMA/CD28-mediated stimulation enhanced GATA3 mRNA expression in primary human CD4+ Tcells. Conclusions This study identifies stimulatory pathways and gene expression profiles for in vitro skewing of T helper cell

  8. DMPD: Multiple signaling pathways leading to the activation of interferon regulatoryfactor 3. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12213596 Multiple signaling pathways leading to the activation of interferon regulatoryfactor...(.html) (.csml) Show Multiple signaling pathways leading to the activation of interferon regulatoryfactor 3.... PubmedID 12213596 Title Multiple signaling pathways leading to the activation of... interferon regulatoryfactor 3. Authors Servant MJ, Grandvaux N, Hiscott J. Publication Biochem Pharmacol. 2

  9. Testin, a novel binding partner of the calcium-sensing receptor, enhances receptor-mediated Rho-kinase signalling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → A yeast two-hybrid screen revealed testin bound to the calcium-sensing receptor. → The second zinc finger of LIM domain 1 of testin is critical for interaction. → Testin bound to a region of the receptor tail important for cell signalling. → Testin and receptor interaction was confirmed in mammalian (HEK293) cells. → Overexpression of testin enhanced receptor-mediated Rho signalling in HEK293 cells. -- Abstract: The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) plays an integral role in calcium homeostasis and the regulation of other cellular functions including cell proliferation and cytoskeletal organisation. The multifunctional nature of the CaR is manifested through ligand-dependent stimulation of different signalling pathways that are also regulated by partner binding proteins. Following a yeast two-hybrid library screen using the intracellular tail of the CaR as bait, we identified several novel binding partners including the focal adhesion protein, testin. Testin has not previously been shown to interact with cell surface receptors. The sites of interaction between the CaR and testin were mapped to the membrane proximal region of the receptor tail and the second zinc-finger of LIM domain 1 of testin, the integrity of which was found to be critical for the CaR-testin interaction. The CaR-testin association was confirmed in HEK293 cells by coimmunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy studies. Ectopic expression of testin in HEK293 cells stably expressing the CaR enhanced CaR-stimulated Rho activity but had no effect on CaR-stimulated ERK signalling. These results suggest an interplay between the CaR and testin in the regulation of CaR-mediated Rho signalling with possible effects on the cytoskeleton.

  10. DPP in the matrix activates AKT and mTOR signaling pathway to promote preodontoblast survival and differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANNE GEORGE

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Dentin phosphophoryn (DPP is an extracellular matrix protein synthesized by odontoblasts. It is highly acidic and the phosphorylated protein possesses a strong affinity for calcium ions. Therefore, DPP in the extracellular matrix can promote hydroxyapatite nucleation and can regulate the size of the growing crystal. Besides its calcium binding property, DPP can initiate signaling functions from the ECM (Extracellular matrix. The signals that promote the cytodifferentiation of preodontoblasts to fully functional odontoblasts are not known. In this study, we demonstrate that preodontoblasts on a DPP matrix, generates mechanical and biochemical signals. This is initiated by the ligation of the integrins with the RGD containing DPP. The downstream biochemical response observed is the activation of the AKT( protein kinase B and mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathways leading to the activation of the transcription factor NF- κB (Nuclear factor κB . Terminal differentiation of the preodontoblasts was assessed by identifying phosphate and calcium deposits in the matrix using von Kossa and Alizarin red staining respectively. Identifying the signaling pathways initiated by DPP in the dentin matrix would help in devising strategies for dentin tissue engineering.

  11. Signaling transduction pathways involved in basophil adhesion and histamine release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sha, Quan; Poulsen, Lars K.; Gerwien, Jens; Ødum, Niels; Skov, Per Stahl

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about basophil with respect to the different signaling transduction pathways involved in spontaneous, cytokine or anti-IgE induced adhesion and how this compares to IgE-dependent and IgE-independent mediator secretion. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the roles ...

  12. Hedgehog signaling pathway in small bovine ovarian follicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    The hedgehog signaling pathway is involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, and turnover in a variety of mammalian embryonic and adult tissues including bovine ovarian granulosa and theca cells. Binding of hedgehog to the patch receptor derepresses smoothened resulting in t...

  13. Beyond microarrays: Finding key transcription factors controlling signal transduction pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kel, Alexdander; Voss, Nico; Jauregui, Ruy; Kel-Margoulis, Olga; Wingender, Edgar

    2006-01-01

    Background Massive gene expression changes in different cellular states measured by microarrays, in fact, reflect just an "echo" of real molecular processes in the cells. Transcription factors constitute a class of the regulatory molecules that typically require posttranscriptional modifications or ligand binding in order to exert their function. Therefore, such important functional changes of transcription factors are not directly visible in the microarray experiments. Results We developed a novel approach to find key transcription factors that may explain concerted expression changes of specific components of the signal transduction network. The approach aims at revealing evidence of positive feedback loops in the signal transduction circuits through activation of pathway-specific transcription factors. We demonstrate that promoters of genes encoding components of many known signal transduction pathways are enriched by binding sites of those transcription factors that are endpoints of the considered pathways. Application of the approach to the microarray gene expression data on TNF-alpha stimulated primary human endothelial cells helped to reveal novel key transcription factors potentially involved in the regulation of the signal transduction pathways of the cells. Conclusion We developed a novel computational approach for revealing key transcription factors by knowledge-based analysis of gene expression data with the help of databases on gene regulatory networks (TRANSFAC® and TRANSPATH®). The corresponding software and databases are available at . PMID:17118134

  14. Quantitative phosphoproteomics applied to the yeast pheromone signaling pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gruhler, Albrecht; Olsen, Jesper Velgaard; Mohammed, Shabaz;

    2005-01-01

    /MS/MS) for identification. This integrated phosphoproteomic technology identified and quantified phosphorylation in key regulator and effector proteins of a prototypical G-protein-coupled receptor signaling pathway, the yeast pheromone response. SILAC encoding of yeast proteomes was achieved by incorporation...

  15. Targeting glioma stem cells via the Hedgehog signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Gliomas are among the most devastating tumor types, and current clinical therapies are unsatisfactory. Recent reports revealed the importance of glioma-propagating cells in the malignancy of gliomas. These cells, also referred to as glioma stem cells (GSCs, share similarities with neural stem cells (NSCs. The Hedgehog (Hh signaling pathway controls tissue polarity, patterning maintenance, and maintenance of NSCs during embryonic development. Aberrant activation of the Hh pathway resulting from mutation and deregulation has recently been recognized to cause tumorigenesis in a wide variety of tissues, including gliomas and GSCs. In this review, we explore the role of the Hh signaling pathway in GSCs and its potential as a therapeutic strategy.

  16. Mapping the spatiotemporal dynamics of calcium signaling in cellular neural networks using optical flow

    CERN Document Server

    Buibas, Marius; Nizar, Krystal; Silva, Gabriel A

    2009-01-01

    An optical flow gradient algorithm was applied to spontaneously forming networks of neurons and glia in culture imaged by fluorescence optical microscopy in order to map functional calcium signaling with single pixel resolution. Optical flow estimates the direction and speed of motion of objects in an image between subsequent frames in a recorded digital sequence of images (i.e. a movie). Computed vector field outputs by the algorithm were able to track the spatiotemporal dynamics of calcium signaling patterns. We begin by briefly reviewing the mathematics of the optical flow algorithm, describe how to solve for the displacement vectors, and how to measure their reliability. We then compare computed flow vectors with manually estimated vectors for the progression of a calcium signal recorded from representative astrocyte cultures. Finally, we applied the algorithm to preparations of primary astrocytes and hippocampal neurons and to the rMC-1 Muller glial cell line in order to illustrate the capability of the ...

  17. Integration of Shh and Wnt Signaling Pathways Regulating Hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhigang; Wan, Liping; Wang, Chun; Zhou, Kun

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the spatial and temporal programmed expression of Shh and Wnt members during key stages of definitive hematopoiesis and the possible mechanism of Shh and Wnt signaling pathways regulating the proliferation of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). Spatial and temporal programmed gene expression of Shh and Wnt signaling during hematopoiesis corresponded with c-kit(+)lin(-) HPCs proliferation. C-kit(+)Lin(-) populations derived from aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) of Balb/c mice at E10.5 with increased expression of Shh and Wnt3a demonstrated a greater potential for proliferation. Additionally, supplementation with soluble Shh N-terminal peptide promoted the proliferation of c-kit(+)Lin(-) populations by activating the Wnt signaling pathway, an effect which was inhibited by blocking Shh signaling. A specific inhibitor of wnt signaling was capable of inhibiting Shh-induced proliferation in a similar manner to shh inhibitor. Our results provide valuable information on Shh and Wnt signaling involved in hematopoiesis and highlight the importance of interaction of Shh and Wnt signaling in regulating HPCs proliferation. PMID:26378473

  18. Current perspectives of the signaling pathways directing neural crest induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhlmiller, Timothy J; García-Castro, Martín I

    2012-11-01

    The neural crest is a migratory population of embryonic cells with a tremendous potential to differentiate and contribute to nearly every organ system in the adult body. Over the past two decades, an incredible amount of research has given us a reasonable understanding of how these cells are generated. Neural crest induction involves the combinatorial input of multiple signaling pathways and transcription factors, and is thought to occur in two phases from gastrulation to neurulation. In the first phase, FGF and Wnt signaling induce NC progenitors at the border of the neural plate, activating the expression of members of the Msx, Pax, and Zic families, among others. In the second phase, BMP, Wnt, and Notch signaling maintain these progenitors and bring about the expression of definitive NC markers including Snail2, FoxD3, and Sox9/10. In recent years, additional signaling molecules and modulators of these pathways have been uncovered, creating an increasingly complex regulatory network. In this work, we provide a comprehensive review of the major signaling pathways that participate in neural crest induction, with a focus on recent developments and current perspectives. We provide a simplified model of early neural crest development and stress similarities and differences between four major model organisms: Xenopus, chick, zebrafish, and mouse. PMID:22547091

  19. Asymptotic Analysis of the Wnt/β Signaling Pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Wnt/β-catenin pathway is a signal transduction pathway made of proteins, which plays an important role in oncogenesis. Ethan Lee and and co-workers introduced in 2003 a detailed mathematical model of this pathway, incorporating the kinetics of protein-protein interactions, protein synthesis/degradation and phosphorylation/dephosphorylation. The fast/slow dynamics of Lee's system are examined here, by employing the Computational Singular Perturbation (CSP) algorithm. CSP reproduces the results of the classical singular perturbation analysis in an algorithmic fashion, producing an approximation of (i) the low dimensional Slow Invariant Manifold (SIM), where the solution evolves and (ii) the reduced model that governs the flow there. The temporal variation of the dimensions of the SIM will be presented and the components of the pathway that are responsible (i) for the generation of the SIM and (ii) for driving the system on it will be identified

  20. DELLA proteins are common components of symbiotic rhizobial and mycorrhizal signalling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yue; Liu, Huan; Luo, Dexian; Yu, Nan; Dong, Wentao; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Xiaowei; Dai, Huiling; Yang, Jun; Wang, Ertao

    2016-01-01

    Legumes form symbiotic associations with either nitrogen-fixing bacteria or arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Formation of these two symbioses is regulated by a common set of signalling components that act downstream of recognition of rhizobia or mycorrhizae by host plants. Central to these pathways is the calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK)-IPD3 complex which initiates nodule organogenesis following calcium oscillations in the host nucleus. However, downstream signalling events are not fully understood. Here we show that Medicago truncatula DELLA proteins, which are the central regulators of gibberellic acid signalling, positively regulate rhizobial symbiosis. Rhizobia colonization is impaired in della mutants and we provide evidence that DELLAs can promote CCaMK-IPD3 complex formation and increase the phosphorylation state of IPD3. DELLAs can also interact with NSP2-NSP1 and enhance the expression of Nod-factor-inducible genes in protoplasts. We show that DELLA is able to bridge a protein complex containing IPD3 and NSP2. Our results suggest a transcriptional framework for regulation of root nodule symbiosis. PMID:27514472

  1. Cellular-signaling pathways unveil the carcinogenic potential of chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Giel; van de Water, Bob; Schoonen, Willem; Vrieling, Harry

    2013-06-01

    Most of the current in vitro carcinogenicity assays assess the potential carcinogenic properties of chemicals through the detection of inflicted DNA damage or subsequent chromosome damage and gene mutations. Unfortunately, these assays generally do not provide mechanistic insight into the reactive properties of a chemical. Upon chemical-induced damage of biomolecules, molecular sensors will activate general and damage-specific cellular response pathways that provide protection against the (geno)toxic and potential carcinogenic properties of chemicals. These cellular defense mechanisms include activation of cell-cycle checkpoints, DNA repair systems and induction of apoptosis or necrosis. Visualization of activated cellular-signaling pathways forms a powerful means to readily detect the genotoxic potential of chemical compounds and simultaneously gain insight into their reactive properties. Over the past years, various in vitro reporter assays have been developed that monitor activation of general and more specific cellular-signaling pathways, including the GreenScreen HC and ToxTracker assays. In this review we provide a perspective on how we can exploit activation of cellular signaling pathways to shed light on the mode of action of the chemical exposure and to develop sophisticated mechanism-based in vitro assays for cancer risk assessment. PMID:23339022

  2. Inflammation-and stress-related signaling pathways in hepatocarcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hayato Nakagawa; Shin Maeda

    2012-01-01

    It has been established that cancer can be promoted and exacerbated by inflammation.Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer worldwide,and its long-term prognosis remains poor.Although HCC is a complex and heterogeneous tumor with several genomic mutations,it usually develops in the context of chronic liver damage and inflammation,suggesting that understanding the mechanism(s) of inflammation-mediated hepatocarcinogenesis is essential for the treatment and prevention of HCC.Chronic liver damage induces a persistent cycle of necroinflammation and hepatocyte regeneration,resulting in genetic mutations in hepatocytes and expansion of initiated cells,eventually leading to HCC development.Recently,several inflammation-and stress-related signaling pathways have been identified as key players in these processes,which include the nuclear factorκB,signal transducer and activator of transcription,and stress-activated mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways.Although these pathways may suggest potential therapeutic targets,they have a wide range of functions and complex crosstalk occurs among them.This review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of the roles of these signaling pathways in hepatocarcinogenesis.

  3. Cytosolic organelles shape calcium signals and exo-endocytotic responses of chromaffin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Antonio G; Padín, Fernando; Fernández-Morales, José C; Maroto, Marcos; García-Sancho, Javier

    2012-01-01

    The concept of stimulus-secretion coupling was born from experiments performed in chromaffin cells 50 years ago. Stimulation of these cells with acetylcholine enhances calcium (Ca(2+)) entry and this generates a transient elevation of the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)) that triggers the exocytotic release of catecholamines. The control of the [Ca(2+)](c) signal is complex and depends on various classes of plasmalemmal calcium channels, cytosolic calcium buffers, the uptake and release of Ca(2+) from cytoplasmic organelles, such as the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, chromaffin vesicles and the nucleus, and Ca(2+) extrusion mechanisms, such as the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-stimulated ATPase, and the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger. Computation of the rates of Ca(2+) fluxes between the different cell compartments support the proposal that the chromaffin cell has developed functional calcium tetrads formed by calcium channels, cytosolic calcium buffers, the endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria nearby the exocytotic plasmalemmal sites. These tetrads shape the Ca(2+) transients occurring during cell activation to regulate early and late steps of exocytosis, and the ensuing endocytotic responses. The different patterns of catecholamine secretion in response to stress may thus depend on such local [Ca(2+)](c) transients occurring at different cell compartments, and generated by redistribution and release of Ca(2+) by cytoplasmic organelles. In this manner, the calcium tetrads serve to couple the variable energy demands due to exo-endocytotic activities with energy production and protein synthesis. PMID:22209033

  4. Activation of the Canonical Wnt Signaling Pathway Induces Cementum Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Pingping; Ivanovski, Saso; Crawford, Ross; Xiao, Yin

    2015-07-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling is important in tooth development but it is unclear whether it can induce cementogenesis and promote the regeneration of periodontal tissues lost because of disease. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the influence of canonical Wnt signaling enhancers on human periodontal ligament cell (hPDLCs) cementogenic differentiation in vitro and cementum repair in a rat periodontal defect model. Canonical Wnt signaling was induced by (1) local injection of lithium chloride; (2) local injection of sclerostin antibody; and (3) local injection of a lentiviral construct overexpressing β-catenin. The results showed that the local activation of canonical Wnt signaling resulted in significant new cellular cementum deposition and the formation of well-organized periodontal ligament fibers, which was absent in the control group. In vitro experiments using hPDLCs showed that the Wnt signaling pathway activators significantly increased mineralization, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and gene and protein expression of the bone and cementum markers osteocalcin (OCN), osteopontin (OPN), cementum protein 1 (CEMP1), and cementum attachment protein (CAP). Our results show that the activation of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway can induce in vivo cementum regeneration and in vitro cementogenic differentiation of hPDLCs. PMID:25556853

  5. The mTOR Signalling Pathway in Human Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Soares

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The conserved serine/threonine kinase mTOR (the mammalian target of rapamycin, a downstream effector of the PI3K/AKT pathway, forms two distinct multiprotein complexes: mTORC1 and mTORC2. mTORC1 is sensitive to rapamycin, activates S6K1 and 4EBP1, which are involved in mRNA translation. It is activated by diverse stimuli, such as growth factors, nutrients, energy and stress signals, and essential signalling pathways, such as PI3K, MAPK and AMPK, in order to control cell growth, proliferation and survival. mTORC2 is considered resistant to rapamycin and is generally insensitive to nutrients and energy signals. It activates PKC-α and AKT and regulates the actin cytoskeleton. Deregulation of multiple elements of the mTOR pathway (PI3K amplification/mutation, PTEN loss of function, AKT overexpression, and S6K1, 4EBP1 and eIF4E overexpression has been reported in many types of cancers, particularly in melanoma, where alterations in major components of the mTOR pathway were reported to have significant effects on tumour progression. Therefore, mTOR is an appealing therapeutic target and mTOR inhibitors, including the rapamycin analogues deforolimus, everolimus and temsirolimus, are submitted to clinical trials for treating multiple cancers, alone or in combination with inhibitors of other pathways. Importantly, temsirolimus and everolimus were recently approved by the FDA for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma, PNET and giant cell astrocytoma. Small molecules that inhibit mTOR kinase activity and dual PI3K-mTOR inhibitors are also being developed. In this review, we aim to survey relevant research, the molecular mechanisms of signalling, including upstream activation and downstream effectors, and the role of mTOR in cancer, mainly in melanoma.

  6. Honey bee dopamine and octopamine receptors linked to intracellular calcium signaling have a close phylogenetic and pharmacological relationship.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle T Beggs

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Three dopamine receptor genes have been identified that are highly conserved among arthropod species. One of these genes, referred to in honey bees as Amdop2, shows a close phylogenetic relationship to the a-adrenergic-like octopamine receptor family. In this study we examined in parallel the functional and pharmacological properties of AmDOP2 and the honey bee octopamine receptor, AmOA1. For comparison, pharmacological properties of the honey bee dopamine receptors AmDOP1 and AmDOP3, and the tyramine receptor AmTYR1, were also examined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using HEK293 cells heterologously expressing honey bee biogenic amine receptors, we found that activation of AmDOP2 receptors, like AmOA1 receptors, initiates a rapid increase in intracellular calcium levels. We found no evidence of calcium signaling via AmDOP1, AmDOP3 or AmTYR1 receptors. AmDOP2- and AmOA1-mediated increases in intracellular calcium were inhibited by 10 µM edelfosine indicating a requirement for phospholipase C-β activity in this signaling pathway. Edelfosine treatment had no effect on AmDOP2- or AmOA1-mediated increases in intracellular cAMP. The synthetic compounds mianserin and epinastine, like cis-(Z-flupentixol and spiperone, were found to have significant antagonist activity on AmDOP2 receptors. All 4 compounds were effective antagonists also on AmOA1 receptors. Analysis of putative ligand binding sites offers a possible explanation for why epinastine acts as an antagonist at AmDOP2 receptors, but fails to block responses mediated via AmDOP1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that AmDOP2, like AmOA1, is coupled not only to cAMP, but also to calcium-signalling and moreover, that the two signalling pathways are independent upstream of phospholipase C-β activity. The striking similarity between the pharmacological properties of these 2 receptors suggests an underlying conservation of structural properties related to receptor

  7. Interaction between Calcium and Actin in Guard Cell and Pollen Signaling Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hua Chen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Calcium (Ca2+ plays important roles in plant growth, development, and signal transduction. It is a vital nutrient for plant physical design, such as cell wall and membrane, and also serves as a counter-cation for biochemical, inorganic, and organic anions, and more particularly, its concentration change in cytosol is a ubiquitous second messenger in plant physiological signaling in responses to developmental and environmental stimuli. Actin cytoskeleton is well known for its importance in cellular architecture maintenance and its significance in cytoplasmic streaming and cell division. In plant cell system, the actin dynamics is a process of polymerization and de-polymerization of globular actin and filamentous actin and that acts as an active regulator for calcium signaling by controlling calcium evoked physiological responses. The elucidation of the interaction between calcium and actin dynamics will be helpful for further investigation of plant cell signaling networks at molecular level. This review mainly focuses on the recent advances in understanding the interaction between the two aforementioned signaling components in two well-established model systems of plant, guard cell, and pollen.

  8. Targeting of proangiogenic signalling pathways in chronic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas, Sander W; Maracle, Chrissta X; Balogh, Emese; Szekanecz, Zoltán

    2016-02-01

    Angiogenesis is de novo capillary outgrowth from pre-existing blood vessels. This process not only is crucial for normal development, but also has an important role in supplying oxygen and nutrients to inflamed tissues, as well as in facilitating the migration of inflammatory cells to the synovium in rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis and other systemic autoimmune diseases. Neovascularization is dependent on the balance of proangiogenic and antiangiogenic mediators, including growth factors, cytokines, chemokines, cell adhesion molecules and matrix metalloproteinases. This Review describes the various intracellular signalling pathways that govern these angiogenic processes and discusses potential approaches to interfere with pathological angiogenesis, and thereby ameliorate inflammatory disease, by targeting these pathways. PMID:26633288

  9. Expression pattern of the Hedgehog signaling pathway in pituitary adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavropoulou, Maria P; Maladaki, Anna; Topouridou, Konstantina; Kotoula, Vasiliki; Poulios, Chris; Daskalaki, Emily; Foroglou, Nikolaos; Karkavelas, George; Yovos, John G

    2016-01-12

    Several studies have demonstrated the role of Wnt and Notch signaling in the pathogenesis of pituitary adenomas, but data are scarce regarding the role of Hedgehog signaling. In this study we investigated the differential expression of gene targets of the Hedgehog signaling pathway. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens from adult patients who underwent transphenoidal resection and normal human pituitary tissues that were obtained from autopsies were used. Clinical information and data from pre-operative MRI scan (extracellular tumor extension, tumor size, displacement of the optic chiasm) were retrieved from the Hospital's database. We used a customized RT(2) Profiler PCR Array, to investigate the expression of genes related to Notch and Hedgehog signaling pathways (PTCH1, PTCH2, GLI1, GLI3, NOTCH3, JAG1, HES1, and HIP). A total of 52 pituitary adenomas (32 non-functioning adenomas, 15 somatotropinomas and 5 prolactinomas) were used in the final analysis. In non-functioning pituitary adenomas there was a significant decrease (approximately 75%) in expression of all Hedgehog related genes that were tested, while Notch3 and Jagged-1 expression was found significantly increased, compared with normal pituitary tissue controls. In contrast, somatotropinomas demonstrated a significant increase in expression of all Hedgehog related genes and a decrease in the expression of Notch3 and Jagged-1. There was no significant difference in the expression of Hedgehog and Notch related genes between prolactinomas and healthy pituitary tissues. Hedgehog signalling appears to be activated in somatotropinomas but not in non-functioning pituitary adenomas in contrast to the expression pattern of Notch signalling pathway. PMID:26620835

  10. Parameter sensitivity analysis of IL-6 signalling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Y; Jayaraman, A; Hahn, J

    2007-11-01

    Signal transduction pathways generally consist of a large number of individual components and have an even greater number of parameters describing their reaction kinetics. Although the structure of some signalling pathways can be found in the literature, many of the parameters are not well known and they would need to be re-estimated from experimental data for each specific case. However it is not feasible to estimate hundreds of parameters because of the cost of the experiments associated with generating data. Parameter sensitivity analysis can address this situation as it investigates how the system behaviour is changed by variations of parameters and the analysis identifies which parameters play a key role in signal transduction. Only these important parameters need then be re-estimated using data from further experiments. This article presents a detailed parameter sensitivity analysis of the JAK/STAT and MAPK signal transduction pathway that is used for signalling by the cytokine IL-6. As no parameter sensitivity analysis technique is known to work best for all situations, a comparison of the results returned by four techniques is presented: differential analysis, the Morris method, a sampling-based approach and the Fourier amplitude sensitivity test. The recruitment of the transcription factor STAT3 to the dimer of the phosphorylated receptor complex is determined as the most important step by the sensitivity analysis. Additionally, the desphosphorylation of the nuclear STAT3 dimer by PP2 as well as feedback inhibition by SOCS3 are found to play an important role for signal transduction. PMID:18203580

  11. Cell viability modulation through changes of Ca(2+)-dependent signalling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcik-Piotrowicz, Karolina; Kaszuba-Zwoińska, Jolanta; Rokita, Eugeniusz; Thor, Piotr

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the correlations between intracellular calcium ion level and a cell's ability to survive. The intracellular concentration of Ca(2+) ions, maintained through different mechanisms, plays an important role in signalling in cells. The deregulation of these mechanisms by various cell stressors (e.g. cytotoxic agents) can disturb Ca(2+) homeostasis and influence Ca(2+)-dependent signalling pathways in the cell. Perturbations of intracellular electrochemical equilibrium may lead to changes in cell function or even to cell death. According to some experimental results, one of the cell stressors may be exposure to magnetic fields (MF). Because of the wide distribution of MF sources in our environment, magnetic fields have recently been intensively examined in relation to the occurrence of cancer. Nevertheless, two questions still remain unanswered: Is the influence of MF on cells positive or negative, and what mechanism(s) underlie the effects of MF action on cells? Most studies focus on the influence of MF on Ca(2+) ion fluxes as calcium ions play the role of intracellular second messengers, triggering many signalling cascades. Physical models assuming the mechanisms generating the disturbance of ionic transport and/or the dysfunction of ion-protein complexes in cells due to MF action have been widely discussed in the literature, but a detailed explanation of experimental results is still awaited. The dynamics of the concentration of intracellular calcium ions can be detected by various methods, including optical and non-optical techniques. This review combines an insight into basic intracellular Ca(2+) regulative mechanisms and common techniques used to detect changes in Ca(2+) concentration inside the cell. The emphasis here is on the determination of Ca(2+) regulative mechanisms developed in non-excitable cells (e.g. U937 cells, HeLa, etc.), which are probably mainly involved in cell responses to external stress (e.g. MF stimuli

  12. Shared signaling pathways in normal and breast cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautam K Malhotra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in our understanding of breast cancer biology have led to the identification of a subpopulation of cells within tumors that appear to be responsible for initiating and propagating the cancer. These tumor initiating cells are not only unique in their ability to generate tumors, but also share many similarities with elements of normal adult tissue stem cells, and have therefore been termed cancer stem cells (CSCs. These CSCs often inappropriately use many of the same signaling pathways utilized by their normal stem cell counterparts which may present a challenge to the development of CSC specific therapies. Here, we discuss three major stem cell signaling pathways (Notch, Wnt, and Hedgehog; with a focus on their function in normal mammary gland development and their misuse in breast cancer stem cell fate determination.

  13. IGF-1 induces IP3 -dependent calcium signal involved in the regulation of myostatin gene expression mediated by NFAT during myoblast differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés, Juan A; Flores, Sylvia; Fuentes, Eduardo N; Osorio-Fuentealba, Cesar; Jaimovich, Enrique; Molina, Alfredo

    2013-07-01

    Skeletal muscle differentiation is a complex and highly regulated process characterized by cell cycle arrest, which is associated with morphological changes including myoblast alignment, elongation, and fusion into multinucleated myotubes. This is a balanced process dynamically coordinated by positive and negative signals such as the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1) and myostatin (MSTN), respectively. In this study, we report that the stimulation of skeletal myoblasts during differentiation with IGF-1 induces a rapid and transient calcium increase from intracellular stores, which are principally mediated through the phospholipase C gamma (PLC γ)/inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3 )-dependent signaling pathways. This response was completely blocked when myoblasts were incubated with LY294002 or transfected with the dominant-negative p110 gamma, suggesting a fundamental role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) in PLCγ activation. Additionally, we show that calcium released via IP3 and induced by IGF-1 stimulates NFAT-dependent gene transcription and nuclear translocation of the GFP-labeled NFATc3 isoform. This activation was independent of extracellular calcium influx and calcium release mediated by ryanodine receptor (RyR). Finally, we examined mstn mRNA levels and mstn promoter activity in myoblasts stimulated with IGF-1. We found a significant increase in mRNA contents and in reporter activity, which was inhibited by cyclosporin A, 11R-VIVIT, and by inhibitors of the PI3Kγ, PLCγ, and IP3 receptor. Our results strongly suggest that IGF-1 regulates myostatin transcription through the activation of the NFAT transcription factor in an IP3 /calcium-dependent manner. This is the first study to demonstrate a role of calcium-dependent signaling pathways in the mRNA expression of myostatin. PMID:23255067

  14. Dynamical patterns of calcium signaling in a functional model of neuron-astrocyte networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, D.E.; Koreshkov, R.N.; Brazhe, N.A.;

    2009-01-01

    We propose a functional mathematical model for neuron-astrocyte networks. The model incorporates elements of the tripartite synapse and the spatial branching structure of coupled astrocytes. We consider glutamate-induced calcium signaling as a specific mode of excitability and transmission in...... astrocytic-neuronal networks. We reproduce local and global dynamical patterns observed experimentally....

  15. Dynamical patterns of calcium signaling in a functional model of neuron–astrocyte networks

    OpenAIRE

    Postnov, D. E.; Koreshkov, R. N.; Brazhe, N. A.; Brazhe, A. R.; Sosnovtseva, O. V.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a functional mathematical model for neuron-astrocyte networks. The model incorporates elements of the tripartite synapse and the spatial branching structure of coupled astrocytes. We consider glutamate-induced calcium signaling as a specific mode of excitability and transmission in astrocytic–neuronal networks. We reproduce local and global dynamical patterns observed experimentally.

  16. Calcium signaling in the cochlea – Molecular mechanisms and physiopathological implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceriani Federico

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Calcium ions (Ca2+ regulate numerous and diverse aspects of cochlear and vestibular physiology. This review focuses on the Ca2+ control of mechanotransduction and synaptic transmission in sensory hair cells, as well as on Ca2+ signalling in non-sensory cells of the developing cochlea.

  17. Effects of tetracaine on charge movements and calcium signals in frog skeletal muscle fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Vergara, Julio; Caputo, Carlo

    1983-01-01

    Intramembrane charge movements in skeletal muscle fibers contain a tetracaine-sensitive component that can be isolated by the use of this drug. The time course and voltage dependence of this component, studied in relation to antipyrylazo III absorbance signals, suggest its direct involvement in the calcium release process in muscle.

  18. Leptin signaling: A key pathway in immune responses

    OpenAIRE

    Procaccini, Claudio; Lourenco, Elaine V.; Matarese, Giuseppe; La Cava, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Leptin is a hormone whose central role is to regulate endocrine functions and to control energy expenditure. After the discovery that leptin can also have pro-inflammatory effects, several studies have tried to address - at the molecular level - the pathways involved in leptin-induced modulation of the immune functions in normal and pathologic conditions. The signaling events influenced by leptin after its binding to the leptin receptor have been under scrutiny in the past few years, and cons...

  19. Therapeutic Targeting of Signaling Pathways in Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatnagar, Shephali; Kumar, Ashok

    2009-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy refers to a group of genetic diseases that cause severe muscle weakness and loss of skeletal muscle mass. Although research has helped understanding the molecular basis of muscular dystrophy, there is still no cure for this devastating disorder. Numerous lines of investigation suggest that the primary deficiency of specific proteins causes aberrant activation of several cell signaling pathways in skeletal and cardiac muscle leading to the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophy....

  20. Current perspectives of the signaling pathways directing neural crest induction

    OpenAIRE

    Stuhlmiller, Timothy J.; García-Castro, Martín I.

    2012-01-01

    The neural crest is a migratory population of embryonic cells with a tremendous potential to differentiate and contribute to nearly every organ system in the adult body. Over the past two decades, an incredible amount of research has given us a reasonable understanding of how these cells are generated. Neural crest induction involves the combinatorial input of multiple signaling pathways and transcription factors, and is thought to occur in two phases from gastrulation to neurulation. In the ...

  1. Parameter inference and model selection in signaling pathway models

    OpenAIRE

    Toni, Tina; Stumpf, Michael P. H.

    2009-01-01

    To support and guide an extensive experimental research into systems biology of signaling pathways, increasingly more mechanistic models are being developed with hopes of gaining further insight into biological processes. In order to analyse these models, computational and statistical techniques are needed to estimate the unknown kinetic parameters. This chapter reviews methods from frequentist and Bayesian statistics for estimation of parameters and for choosing which model is best for model...

  2. Intrinsic and extrinsic pathway signaling during neuronal apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Putcha, Girish V.; Harris, Charles A; Moulder, Krista L.; Easton, Rachael M.; Thompson, Craig B.; Johnson, Eugene M.

    2002-01-01

    Trophic factor deprivation (TFD)-induced apoptosis in sympathetic neurons requires macromolecular synthesis–dependent BAX translocation, cytochrome c (cyt c) release, and caspase activation. Here, we report the contributions of other intrinsic and extrinsic pathway signals to these processes. Sympathetic neurons expressed all antiapoptotic BCL-2 proteins examined, yet expressed only certain BH3-only and multidomain proapoptotic BCL-2 family members. All coexpressed proapoptotic proteins did n...

  3. Regulation of mRNA Translation by Signaling Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Roux, Philippe P.; Topisirovic, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    mRNA translation is the most energy consuming process in the cell. In addition, it plays a pivotal role in the control of gene expression and is therefore tightly regulated. In response to various extracellular stimuli and intracellular cues, signaling pathways induce quantitative and qualitative changes in mRNA translation by modulating the phosphorylation status and thus the activity of components of the translational machinery. In this work we focus on the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/...

  4. Spatiotemporal Properties of Intracellular Calcium Signaling in Osteocytic and Osteoblastic Cell Networks under Fluid Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Jing, Da; Lu, X. Lucas; Luo, Erping; Sajda, Paul; Leong, Pui L.; Guo, X. Edward

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical stimuli can trigger intracellular calcium (Ca2+) responses in osteocytes and osteoblasts. Successful construction of bone cell networks necessitates more elaborate and systematic analysis for the spatiotemporal properties of Ca2+ signaling in the networks. In the present study, an unsupervised algorithm based on independent component analysis (ICA) was employed to extract the Ca2+ signals of bone cells in the network. We demonstrated that the ICA-based technology could yield higher...

  5. UTP-induced ATP release is a fine-tuned signalling pathway in osteocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kringelbach, Tina M; Aslan, Derya; Novak, Ivana; Schwarz, Peter; Jørgensen, Niklas R

    2014-01-01

    Osteocytes reside as a cellular network throughout the mineralised matrix of bone and are considered the primary mechanosensors of this tissue. They sense mechanical stimulation such as fluid flow and are able to regulate osteoblast and osteoclast functions on the bone surface. Previously, we found that ATP is released load-dependently from osteocytes from the onset of mechanical stimulation. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether and how ATP release can be evoked in osteocytes via purinergic receptor activation. ATP release was quantified by real-time determination using the luciferin-luciferase assay and the release pathway was investigated using pharmacological inhibition. The P2Y receptor profile was analysed using gene expression analysis by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, while functional testing was performed using measurements of intracellular calcium responses to P2 receptor agonists. These investigations demonstrated that MLO-Y4 osteocytes express functional P2Y(2), P2Y(4), P2Y(12) and P2Y(13) receptors in addition to the previously reported P2X receptors. Further, we found that osteocytes respond to nucleotides such as ATP, UTP and ADP by increasing the intracellular calcium concentration and that they release ATP dose-dependently upon stimulation with 1-10 μM UTP. In addition to this, osteocytes release large amounts of ATP upon cell rupture, which might also be a source for other nucleotides, such as UTP. These findings indicate that mechanically induced ATP signals may be propagated by P2 receptor activation and further ATP release in the osteocyte network and implicate purinergic signalling as a central signalling pathway in osteocyte mechanotransduction. PMID:24374572

  6. Muscle mitochondrial metabolism and calcium signaling impairment in patients treated with statins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirvent, P., E-mail: pascal.sirvent@univ-bpclermont.fr [U1046, INSERM, Université Montpellier 1 and Université Montpellier 2, 34295 Montpellier (France); CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier (France); Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, EA 3533, Laboratoire des Adaptations Métaboliques à l' Exercice en conditions Physiologiques et Pathologiques (AME2P), BP 80026, F-63171 Aubière cedex (France); Fabre, O.; Bordenave, S. [U1046, INSERM, Université Montpellier 1 and Université Montpellier 2, 34295 Montpellier (France); CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier (France); Hillaire-Buys, D. [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier (France); Raynaud De Mauverger, E.; Lacampagne, A.; Mercier, J. [U1046, INSERM, Université Montpellier 1 and Université Montpellier 2, 34295 Montpellier (France); CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier (France)

    2012-03-01

    The most common and problematic side effect of statins is myopathy. To date, the patho-physiological mechanisms of statin myotoxicity are still not clearly understood. In previous studies, we showed that acute application in vitro of simvastatin caused impairment of mitochondrial function and dysfunction of calcium homeostasis in human and rat healthy muscle samples. We thus evaluated in the present study, mitochondrial function and calcium signaling in muscles of patients treated with statins, who present or not muscle symptoms, by oxygraphy and recording of calcium sparks, respectively. Patients treated with statins showed impairment of mitochondrial respiration that involved mainly the complex I of the respiratory chain and altered frequency and amplitude of calcium sparks. The muscle problems observed in statin-treated patients appear thus to be related to impairment of mitochondrial function and muscle calcium homeostasis, confirming the results we previously reported in vitro. -- Highlights: ► The most common and problematic side effect of statins is myopathy. ► Patients treated with statins showed impairment of mitochondrial respiration. ► Statins-treated patients showed altered frequency and amplitude of calcium sparks.

  7. Naringin Stimulates Osteogenic Differentiation of Rat Bone Marrow Stromal Cells via Activation of the Notch Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-yong Yu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Naringin is a major flavonoid found in grapefruit and is an active compound extracted from the Chinese herbal medicine Rhizoma Drynariae. Naringin is a potent stimulator of osteogenic differentiation and has potential application in preventing bone loss. However, the signaling pathway underlying its osteogenic effect remains unclear. We hypothesized that the osteogenic activity of naringin involves the Notch signaling pathway. Rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs were cultured in osteogenic medium containing-naringin, with or without DAPT (an inhibitor of Notch signaling, the effects on ALP activity, calcium deposits, osteogenic genes (ALP, BSP, and cbfa1, adipogenic maker gene PPARγ2 levels, and Notch expression were examined. We found that naringin dose-dependently increased ALP activity and Alizarin red S staining, and treatment at the optimal concentration (50 μg/mL increased mRNA levels of osteogenic genes and Notch1 expression, while decreasing PPARγ2 mRNA levels. Furthermore, treatment with DAPT partly reversed effects of naringin on BMSCs, as judged by decreases in naringin-induced ALP activity, calcium deposits, and osteogenic genes expression, as well as upregulation of PPARγ2 mRNA levels. These results suggest that the osteogenic effect of naringin partly involves the Notch signaling pathway.

  8. Naringin Stimulates Osteogenic Differentiation of Rat Bone Marrow Stromal Cells via Activation of the Notch Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guo-Yong; Zheng, Gui-Zhou; Chang, Bo; Hu, Qin-Xiao; Lin, Fei-Xiang; Liu, De-Zhong; Wu, Chu-Cheng; Du, Shi-Xin; Li, Xue-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Naringin is a major flavonoid found in grapefruit and is an active compound extracted from the Chinese herbal medicine Rhizoma Drynariae. Naringin is a potent stimulator of osteogenic differentiation and has potential application in preventing bone loss. However, the signaling pathway underlying its osteogenic effect remains unclear. We hypothesized that the osteogenic activity of naringin involves the Notch signaling pathway. Rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were cultured in osteogenic medium containing-naringin, with or without DAPT (an inhibitor of Notch signaling), the effects on ALP activity, calcium deposits, osteogenic genes (ALP, BSP, and cbfa1), adipogenic maker gene PPARγ2 levels, and Notch expression were examined. We found that naringin dose-dependently increased ALP activity and Alizarin red S staining, and treatment at the optimal concentration (50 μg/mL) increased mRNA levels of osteogenic genes and Notch1 expression, while decreasing PPARγ2 mRNA levels. Furthermore, treatment with DAPT partly reversed effects of naringin on BMSCs, as judged by decreases in naringin-induced ALP activity, calcium deposits, and osteogenic genes expression, as well as upregulation of PPARγ2 mRNA levels. These results suggest that the osteogenic effect of naringin partly involves the Notch signaling pathway. PMID:27069482

  9. SLOB, a SLOWPOKE channel binding protein, regulates insulin pathway signaling and metabolism in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L Sheldon

    Full Text Available There is ample evidence that ion channel modulation by accessory proteins within a macromolecular complex can regulate channel activity and thereby impact neuronal excitability. However, the downstream consequences of ion channel modulation remain largely undetermined. The Drosophila melanogaster large conductance calcium-activated potassium channel SLOWPOKE (SLO undergoes modulation via its binding partner SLO-binding protein (SLOB. Regulation of SLO by SLOB influences the voltage dependence of SLO activation and modulates synaptic transmission. SLO and SLOB are expressed especially prominently in median neurosecretory cells (mNSCs in the pars intercerebralis (PI region of the brain; these cells also express and secrete Drosophila insulin like peptides (dILPs. Previously, we found that flies lacking SLOB exhibit increased resistance to starvation, and we reasoned that SLOB may regulate aspects of insulin signaling and metabolism. Here we investigate the role of SLOB in metabolism and find that slob null flies exhibit changes in energy storage and insulin pathway signaling. In addition, slob null flies have decreased levels of dilp3 and increased levels of takeout, a gene known to be involved in feeding and metabolism. Targeted expression of SLOB to mNSCs rescues these alterations in gene expression, as well as the metabolic phenotypes. Analysis of fly lines mutant for both slob and slo indicate that the effect of SLOB on metabolism and gene expression is via SLO. We propose that modulation of SLO by SLOB regulates neurotransmission in mNSCs, influencing downstream insulin pathway signaling and metabolism.

  10. A sophisticated network of signaling pathways regulates stomatal defenses to bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Dominique; Hwang, Ildoo

    2015-04-01

    Guard cells are specialized cells forming stomatal pores at the leaf surface for gas exchanges between the plant and the atmosphere. Stomata have been shown to play an important role in plant defense as a part of the innate immune response. Plants actively close their stomata upon contact with microbes, thereby preventing pathogen entry into the leaves and the subsequent colonization of host tissues. In this review, we present current knowledge of molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways implicated in stomatal defenses, with particular emphasis on plant-bacteria interactions. Stomatal defense responses begin from the perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and activate a signaling cascade involving the production of secondary messengers such as reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, and calcium for the regulation of plasma membrane ion channels. The analyses on downstream molecular mechanisms implicated in PAMP-triggered stomatal closure have revealed extensive interplays among the components regulating hormonal signaling pathways. We also discuss the strategies deployed by pathogenic bacteria to counteract stomatal immunity through the example of the phytotoxin coronatine. PMID:25661059

  11. Microsecond Molecular Simulations Reveal a Transient Proton Pathway in the Calcium Pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza-Fonseca, L Michel; Ramírez-Salinas, G Lizbeth

    2015-06-10

    The calcium pump sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) counter-transports Ca(2+) and H(+) at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. SERCA uses separate proton and metal ion pathways during active transport to neutralize the highly charged transport site, thus preserving SERCA's structural stability during active Ca(2+) transport. Although separate metal ion and proton pathways have been identified during slow (millisecond) structural transitions of SERCA, the existence of simultaneous metal and proton pathways during fast (microsecond) structural transitions remains unknown. We have analyzed microsecond-long trajectories of E1·H(+)771, a protonated intermediate of the pump populated during SERCA regulation. We found a transiently established hydrophobic pore in the luminal side of the transmembrane helices 6, 8, and 9. This narrow (0.5-0.6 nm) pore connects the transport sites to the sarcoplasmic reticulum lumen through a chain of water molecules. Protein pKa calculations of the transport site residues and structural analysis of the water molecules showed that this pore is suitable for proton transport. This transient proton pathway ensures neutralization of the transport sites during the rapid structural transitions associated with regulation of the pump. We conclude that this transient proton pathway plays a central role in optimizing active Ca(2+) transport by SERCA. Our discovery provides insight into ion-exchange mechanisms through transient hydrophobic pores in P-type ATPases. PMID:26028459

  12. [Sonic Hedgehog signaling pathway and regulation of inner ear development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Qiang; Han, Xin-Huan; Cao, Xin

    2013-09-01

    During inner ear development, Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway is involved in the ventral otic identity, cell fate determination of statoacoustic ganglion neurons and hair cell development. Shh protein, secreted from floor plate, antagonizes Wnt protein from roof plate, which refines and maintains dorsoventral axial patterning in the ear. Shh, served as a mitogen during neurogenesis, directly promotes the development of spiral ganglion neuron. After Shh signaling pathway is activated, Ngn1 is freed from Tbx1 repression. As a result, Shh indirectly upregulates the expression of Ngn1, thus regulating neurogenic patterning of inner ear. In addition, Shh regulates the differentiation of hair cells by influencing cell cycle of the progenitor cells located in the cochlea. The basal-to-apical wave of Shh decline ensures the normal devel- opment pattern of hair cells. It is confirmed by a quantity of researches conducted in both animals and patients with hereditary hearing impairment that abnormal Shh signaling results in aberrant transcription of target genes, disturbance of the proper development of inner ear, and human hearing impairment. In humans, diseases accompanied by hearing disorders caused by abnormal Shh signaling include Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS), Pallister-Hall syndrome (PHS), Waardenburg syndrome (WS) and medulloblastoma, etc. This review would provide a theoretical basis for further study of molecular mechanisms and clinical use of inner ear development. PMID:24400478

  13. Nuclear proton dynamics and interactions with calcium signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulikova, Alzbeta; Swietach, Pawel

    2016-07-01

    Biochemical signals acting on the nucleus can regulate gene expression. Despite the inherent affinity of nucleic acids and nuclear proteins (e.g. transcription factors) for protons, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate nuclear pH (pHnuc), and how these could be exploited to control gene expression. Here, we show that pHnuc dynamics can be imaged using the DNA-binding dye Hoechst 33342. Nuclear pores allow the passage of medium-sized molecules (calcein), but protons must first bind to mobile buffers in order to gain access to the nucleoplasm. Fixed buffering residing in the nucleus of permeabilized cells was estimated to be very weak on the basis of the large amplitude of pHnuc transients evoked by photolytic H(+)-uncaging or exposure to weak acids/bases. Consequently, the majority of nuclear pH buffering is sourced from the cytoplasm in the form of mobile buffers. Effective proton diffusion was faster in nucleoplasm than in cytoplasm, in agreement with the higher mobile-to-fixed buffering ratio in the nucleus. Cardiac myocyte pHnuc changed in response to maneuvers that alter nuclear Ca(2+) signals. Blocking Ca(2+) release from inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors stably alkalinized the nucleus. This Ca(2+)-pH interaction may arise from competitive binding to common chemical moieties. Competitive binding to mobile buffers may couple the efflux of Ca(2+)via nuclear pores with a counterflux of protons. This would generate a stable pH gradient between cytoplasm and nucleus that is sensitive to the state of nuclear Ca(2+) signaling. The unusual behavior of protons in the nucleus provides new mechanisms for regulating cardiac nuclear biology. PMID:26183898

  14. Calcium effect on the metabolic pathway of phosphorus accumulating organisms in enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Ling; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Fang, Wei; Wang, Yong-Peng; Fang, Cai-Yun; Shao, Li-Min; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-11-01

    Phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAOs) have been found to act as glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAOs) under certain conditions, thus, the deterioration in the performance of enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems is not always attributed to the proliferation of GAOs. In this work, the effects of calcium on the metabolic pathway of PAOs were explored. It was found that when the influent Ca(2+) concentration was elevated, the tendency and extent of extracellular calcium phosphate precipitation increased, and the intracellular inert Ca-bound polyphosphate was synthesized, while the microbial population remained almost unchanged. The changes in the ratios of phosphorus released/acetate uptaken, the glycogen degraded/acetate uptaken and the poly-β-hydroxyalkanoates synthesized/acetate uptaken during the anaerobic period confirm that, as the influent Ca(2+) concentration was increased, the polyphosphate-accumulating metabolism was partially shifted to the glycogen-accumulating metabolism. At an influent Ca(2+) around 50 mg/L, in addition to the extracellular calcium phosphate precipitation, the intracellular inert Ca-bound polyphosphate synthesis might also be involved in the metabolic change of PAOs. The results of the present work would be beneficial to better understand the biochemical metabolism of PAOs in enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems. PMID:26233656

  15. RNA-induced silencing attenuates G protein-mediated calcium signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Finly; Sahu, Shriya; Golebiewska, Urszula; Scarlata, Suzanne

    2016-05-01

    Phospholipase Cβ (PLCβ) is activated by G protein subunits in response to environmental stimuli to increase intracellular calcium. In cells, a significant portion of PLCβ is cytosolic, where it binds a protein complex required for efficient RNA-induced silencing called C3PO (component 3 promoter of RISC). Binding between C3PO and PLCβ raises the possibility that RNA silencing activity can affect the ability of PLCβ to mediate calcium signals. By use of human and rat neuronal cell lines (SK-N-SH and PC12), we show that overexpression of one of the main components of C3PO diminishes Ca(2+) release in response to Gαq/PLCβ stimulation by 30 to 40%. In untransfected SK-N-SH or PC12 cells, the introduction of siRNA(GAPDH) [small interfering RNA(glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase)] reduces PLCβ-mediated calcium signals by ∼30%, but addition of siRNA(Hsp90) (heat shock protein 90) had little effect. Fluorescence imaging studies suggest an increase in PLCβ-C3PO association in cells treated with siRNA(GAPDH) but not siRNA(Hsp90). Taken together, our studies raise the possibility that Ca(2+) responses to extracellular stimuli can be modulated by components of the RNA silencing machinery.-Philip, F., Sahu, S., Golebiewska, U., Scarlata, S. RNA-induced silencing attenuates G protein-mediated calcium signals. PMID:26862135

  16. Characterization of NAADP-mediated calcium signaling in human spermatozoa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Human sperm cells synthesize NAADP. •NAADP-AM mediates [Ca2+]i increases in human sperm in the absence of [Ca2+]o. •Human sperm have two acidic compartments located in the head and midpiece. -- Abstract: Ca2+ signaling in spermatozoa plays a crucial role during processes such as capacitation and release of the acrosome, but the underlying molecular mechanisms still remain unclear. Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) is a potent Ca2+-releasing second messenger in a variety of cellular processes. The presence of a NAADP synthesizing enzyme in sea urchin sperm has been previously reported, suggesting a possible role of NAADP in sperm Ca2+ signaling. In this work we used in vitro enzyme assays to show the presence of a novel NAADP synthesizing enzyme in human sperm, and to characterize its sensitivity to Ca2+ and pH. Ca2+ fluorescence imaging studies demonstrated that the permeable form of NAADP (NAADP-AM) induces intracellular [Ca2+] increases in human sperm even in the absence of extracellular Ca2+. Using LysoTracker®, a fluorescent probe that selectively accumulates in acidic compartments, we identified two such stores in human sperm cells. Their acidic nature was further confirmed by the reduction in staining intensity observed upon inhibition of the endo-lysosomal proton pump with Bafilomycin, or after lysosomal bursting with glycyl-L-phenylalanine-2-naphthylamide. The selective fluorescent NAADP analog, Ned-19, stained the same subcellular regions as LysoTracker®, suggesting that these stores are the targets of NAADP action

  17. Characterization of NAADP-mediated calcium signaling in human spermatozoa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez-Tusie, A.A. [Departamento de Genética del Desarrollo y Fisiología Molecular, Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Vasudevan, S.R.; Churchill, G.C. [Department of Pharmacology, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3QT, England (United Kingdom); Nishigaki, T. [Departamento de Genética del Desarrollo y Fisiología Molecular, Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Treviño, C.L., E-mail: ctrevino@ibt.unam.mx [Departamento de Genética del Desarrollo y Fisiología Molecular, Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •Human sperm cells synthesize NAADP. •NAADP-AM mediates [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increases in human sperm in the absence of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}. •Human sperm have two acidic compartments located in the head and midpiece. -- Abstract: Ca{sup 2+} signaling in spermatozoa plays a crucial role during processes such as capacitation and release of the acrosome, but the underlying molecular mechanisms still remain unclear. Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) is a potent Ca{sup 2+}-releasing second messenger in a variety of cellular processes. The presence of a NAADP synthesizing enzyme in sea urchin sperm has been previously reported, suggesting a possible role of NAADP in sperm Ca{sup 2+} signaling. In this work we used in vitro enzyme assays to show the presence of a novel NAADP synthesizing enzyme in human sperm, and to characterize its sensitivity to Ca{sup 2+} and pH. Ca{sup 2+} fluorescence imaging studies demonstrated that the permeable form of NAADP (NAADP-AM) induces intracellular [Ca{sup 2+}] increases in human sperm even in the absence of extracellular Ca{sup 2+}. Using LysoTracker®, a fluorescent probe that selectively accumulates in acidic compartments, we identified two such stores in human sperm cells. Their acidic nature was further confirmed by the reduction in staining intensity observed upon inhibition of the endo-lysosomal proton pump with Bafilomycin, or after lysosomal bursting with glycyl-L-phenylalanine-2-naphthylamide. The selective fluorescent NAADP analog, Ned-19, stained the same subcellular regions as LysoTracker®, suggesting that these stores are the targets of NAADP action.

  18. Calcium Oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    Dupont, Geneviève; Combettes, Laurent; Bird, Gary S.; Putney, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Calcium signaling results from a complex interplay between activation and inactivation of intracellular and extracellular calcium permeable channels. This complexity is obvious from the pattern of calcium signals observed with modest, physiological concentrations of calcium-mobilizing agonists, which typically present as sequential regenerative discharges of stored calcium, a process referred to as calcium oscillations. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the underlyin...

  19. Muscle redox signalling pathways in exercise. Role of antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Shaun A; Morrison, Dale; McConell, Glenn K; Wadley, Glenn D

    2016-09-01

    Recent research highlights the importance of redox signalling pathway activation by contraction-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) in normal exercise-related cellular and molecular adaptations in skeletal muscle. In this review, we discuss some potentially important redox signalling pathways in skeletal muscle that are involved in acute and chronic responses to contraction and exercise. Specifically, we discuss redox signalling implicated in skeletal muscle contraction force, mitochondrial biogenesis and antioxidant enzyme induction, glucose uptake and muscle hypertrophy. Furthermore, we review evidence investigating the impact of major exogenous antioxidants on these acute and chronic responses to exercise. Redox signalling pathways involved in adaptive responses in skeletal muscle to exercise are not clearly elucidated at present, and further research is required to better define important signalling pathways involved. Evidence of beneficial or detrimental effects of specific antioxidant compounds on exercise adaptations in muscle is similarly limited, particularly in human subjects. Future research is required to not only investigate effects of specific antioxidant compounds on skeletal muscle exercise adaptations, but also to better establish mechanisms of action of specific antioxidants in vivo. Although we feel it remains somewhat premature to make clear recommendations in relation to application of specific antioxidant compounds in different exercise settings, a bulk of evidence suggests that N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is ergogenic through its effects on maintenance of muscle force production during sustained fatiguing events. Nevertheless, a current lack of evidence from studies using performance tests representative of athletic competition and a potential for adverse effects with high doses (>70mg/kg body mass) warrants caution in its use for performance enhancement. In addition, evidence implicates high dose vitamin C (1g/day) and E

  20. Effect of TGFβ on calcium signaling in megakaryocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Jing [Department of Physiology I, University of Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany); Schmid, Evi [Department of Physiology I, University of Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany); Department of Pediatric Surgery and Pediatric Urology, University Children' s Hospital Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany); Almilaji, Ahmad; Shumilina, Ekaterina [Department of Physiology I, University of Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany); Borst, Oliver [Department of Physiology I, University of Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany); Department of Cardiology & Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany); Laufer, Stefan [Department of Pharmacy, University of Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany); Gawaz, Meinrad [Department of Cardiology & Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany); Lang, Florian, E-mail: florian.lang@uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Physiology I, University of Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany)

    2015-05-22

    TGFβ is a powerful regulator of megakaryocyte maturation and platelet formation. As previously shown for other cell types, TGFβ may up-regulate the expression of the serum & glucocorticoid inducible kinase SGK1, an effect requiring p38 kinase. SGK1 has in turn recently been shown to participate in the regulation of cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} activity ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) in megakaryocytes and platelets. SGK1 phosphorylates the IκB kinase (IKKα/β), which in turn phosphorylates the inhibitor protein IκBα resulting in nuclear translocation of nuclear factor NFκB. Genes up-regulated by NFκB include Orai1, the pore forming ion channel subunit accomplishing store operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE). The present study explored whether TGFβ influences Ca{sup 2+} signaling in megakaryocytes. [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was determined by Fura-2 fluorescence and SOCE from the increase of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} following re-addition of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} after store depletion by removal of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} and inhibition of the sarcoendoplasmatic Ca{sup 2+} ATPase (SERCA) with thapsigargin (1 μM). As a result, TGFβ (60 ng, 24 h) increased SOCE, an effect significantly blunted by p38 kinase inhibitor Skepinone-L (1 μM), SGK1 inhibitor EMD638683 (50 μM) and NFκB inhibitor wogonin (100 μM). In conclusion, TGFβ is a powerful regulator of store operated Ca{sup 2+} entry into megakaryocytes, an effect mediated by a signaling cascade involving p38 kinase, SGK1 and NFκB. - Highlights: • TGFβ up-regulates store operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE) in megakaryocytes. • The effect of TGFβ on SOCE is blunted by p38 kinase inhibitor Skepinone-L. • The effect of TGFβ on SOCE is virtually abrogated by SGK1 inhibitor EMD638683. • The effect of TGFβ on SOCE is almost abolished by NFκB inhibitor wogonin. • The effect of TGFβ is expected to enhance sensitivity of platelets to activation.

  1. Effect of TGFβ on calcium signaling in megakaryocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TGFβ is a powerful regulator of megakaryocyte maturation and platelet formation. As previously shown for other cell types, TGFβ may up-regulate the expression of the serum & glucocorticoid inducible kinase SGK1, an effect requiring p38 kinase. SGK1 has in turn recently been shown to participate in the regulation of cytosolic Ca2+ activity ([Ca2+]i) in megakaryocytes and platelets. SGK1 phosphorylates the IκB kinase (IKKα/β), which in turn phosphorylates the inhibitor protein IκBα resulting in nuclear translocation of nuclear factor NFκB. Genes up-regulated by NFκB include Orai1, the pore forming ion channel subunit accomplishing store operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE). The present study explored whether TGFβ influences Ca2+ signaling in megakaryocytes. [Ca2+]i was determined by Fura-2 fluorescence and SOCE from the increase of [Ca2+]i following re-addition of extracellular Ca2+ after store depletion by removal of extracellular Ca2+ and inhibition of the sarcoendoplasmatic Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA) with thapsigargin (1 μM). As a result, TGFβ (60 ng, 24 h) increased SOCE, an effect significantly blunted by p38 kinase inhibitor Skepinone-L (1 μM), SGK1 inhibitor EMD638683 (50 μM) and NFκB inhibitor wogonin (100 μM). In conclusion, TGFβ is a powerful regulator of store operated Ca2+ entry into megakaryocytes, an effect mediated by a signaling cascade involving p38 kinase, SGK1 and NFκB. - Highlights: • TGFβ up-regulates store operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) in megakaryocytes. • The effect of TGFβ on SOCE is blunted by p38 kinase inhibitor Skepinone-L. • The effect of TGFβ on SOCE is virtually abrogated by SGK1 inhibitor EMD638683. • The effect of TGFβ on SOCE is almost abolished by NFκB inhibitor wogonin. • The effect of TGFβ is expected to enhance sensitivity of platelets to activation

  2. Intercellular calcium signaling occurs between human osteoblasts and osteoclasts and requires activation of osteoclast P2X7 receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas R; Henriksen, Zanne; Sørensen, Ole;

    2002-01-01

    Signaling between osteoblasts and osteoclasts is important in bone homeostasis. We previously showed that human osteoblasts propagate intercellular calcium signals via two mechanisms: autocrine activation of P2Y receptors, and gap junctional communication. In the current work we identified...... mechanically induced intercellular calcium signaling between osteoblasts and osteoclasts and among osteoclasts. Intercellular calcium responses in osteoclasts required P2 receptor activation but not gap junctional communication. Pharmacological studies and reverse transcriptase-PCR amplification demonstrated...... that human osteoclasts expressed functional P2Y1 receptors, but, unexpectedly, desensitization of P2Y1 did not block calcium signaling to osteoclasts. We also found that osteoclasts expressed functional P2X7 receptors and showed that pharmacological inhibition of these receptors blocked calcium...

  3. Integrative analyses reveal signaling pathways underlying familial breast cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccolo, Stephen R; Hoffman, Laura M; Conner, Thomas; Shrestha, Gajendra; Cohen, Adam L; Marks, Jeffrey R; Neumayer, Leigh A; Agarwal, Cori A; Beckerle, Mary C; Andrulis, Irene L; Spira, Avrum E; Moos, Philip J; Buys, Saundra S; Johnson, William Evan; Bild, Andrea H

    2016-03-01

    The signaling events that drive familial breast cancer (FBC) risk remain poorly understood. While the majority of genomic studies have focused on genetic risk variants, known risk variants account for at most 30% of FBC cases. Considering that multiple genes may influence FBC risk, we hypothesized that a pathway-based strategy examining different data types from multiple tissues could elucidate the biological basis for FBC. In this study, we performed integrated analyses of gene expression and exome-sequencing data from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and showed that cell adhesion pathways are significantly and consistently dysregulated in women who develop FBC. The dysregulation of cell adhesion pathways in high-risk women was also identified by pathway-based profiling applied to normal breast tissue data from two independent cohorts. The results of our genomic analyses were validated in normal primary mammary epithelial cells from high-risk and control women, using cell-based functional assays, drug-response assays, fluorescence microscopy, and Western blotting assays. Both genomic and cell-based experiments indicate that cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix adhesion processes seem to be disrupted in non-malignant cells of women at high risk for FBC and suggest a potential role for these processes in FBC development. PMID:26969729

  4. Wnt signaling pathway in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David J

    2014-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin alterations are prominent in human malignancies. In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), β-catenin and APC mutations are uncommon, but Wnt signaling is important in NSCLC cell lines, and Wnt inhibition reduces proliferation. Overexpression of Wnt-1, -2, -3, and -5a and of Wnt-pathway components Frizzled-8, Dishevelled, Porcupine, and TCF-4 is common in resected NSCLC and is associated with poor prognosis. Conversely, noncanonical Wnt-7a suppresses NSCLC development and is often downregulated. Although β-catenin is often expressed in NSCLCs, it was paradoxically associated with improved prognosis in some series, possibly because of E-cadherin interactions. Downregulation of Wnt inhibitors (eg, by hypermethylation) is common in NSCLC tumor cell lines and resected samples; may be associated with high stage, dedifferentiation, and poor prognosis; and has been reported for AXIN, sFRPs 1-5, WIF-1, Dkk-1, Dkk-3, HDPR1, RUNX3, APC, CDX2, DACT2, TMEM88, Chibby, NKD1, EMX2, ING4, and miR-487b. AXIN is also destabilized by tankyrases, and GSK3β may be inactivated through phosphorylation by EGFR. Preclinically, restoration of Wnt inhibitor function is associated with reduced Wnt signaling, decreased cell proliferation, and increased apoptosis. Wnt signaling may also augment resistance to cisplatin, docetaxel, and radiotherapy, and Wnt inhibitors may restore sensitivity. Overall, available data indicate that Wnt signaling substantially impacts NSCLC tumorigenesis, prognosis, and resistance to therapy, with loss of Wnt signaling inhibitors by promoter hypermethylation or other mechanisms appearing to be particularly important. Wnt pathway antagonists warrant exploration clinically in NSCLC. Agents blocking selected specific β-catenin interactions and approaches to increase expression of downregulated Wnt inhibitors may be of particular interest. PMID:24309006

  5. Oxidative stress and signal transduction pathways in alcoholic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zima, Tomás; Kalousová, Marta

    2005-11-01

    Ethanol is linked to several pathologies like alcohol liver injury, neurotoxicity, cardiomyopathy, fetal alcoholic syndrome or cancer. It is generally accepted that oxidative stress plays a central role in their pathogenesis. After chronic and excessive consumption, alcohol may accelerate oxidative mechanisms both directly via increased production of reactive oxygen species and indirectly by impairing protective mechanisms against them. Ethanol, its metabolites arising during its metabolic degradation as well as novel compounds formed via ethanol induced oxidative stress, especially during the action of the ethanol inducible microsomal cytochrome CYP2E1, may apart from direct damage to biological structures affect signal transduction pathways thus modulating and potentiating damage. Alteration of the redox status of cells following chronic ethanol misuse may have profound effects on cellular function and viability and lead to cell death and tissue damage. These changes linked to pathologic processes in the organism, are related to alteration of intracellular signaling pathways associated with protein kinases and transcription factor activation. Mainly mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, transcription factors-nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) and activating protein 1 (AP-1) are involved in the deterioration of cells and organs. The response is cell-type specific and depends on the dose of ethanol. Oxido-reduction balance, regulatory disturbances and signal transduction cascades responsible for alcoholic damage have been partially described, nevertheless, further studies are required to allow future novel diagnostic and therapeutical strategies. We are only at the beginning ... PMID:16344594

  6. Parallel quorum sensing signaling pathways in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sarah A; Hawver, Lisa A; Ng, Wai-Leung

    2016-05-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a microbial signaling process for monitoring population density and complexity. Communication among bacterial cells via QS relies on the production, secretion, and detection of small molecules called autoinducers. Many bacteria have evolved their QS systems with different network architectures to incorporate information from multiple signals. In the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae, at least four parallel signaling pathways converge to control the activity of a single regulator to modulate its QS response. By integrating multiple signal inputs, it is believed that Vibrio species can survey intra-species, intra-genus, and inter-species populations and program their gene expression accordingly. Our recent studies suggest that this "many-to-one" circuitry is also important for maintaining the integrity of the input-output relationship of the system and minimizes premature commitment to QS due to signal perturbation. Here we discuss the implications of this specific parallel network setup for V. cholerae intercellular communication and how this system arrangement affects our approach to manipulate the QS response of this clinically important pathogen. PMID:26545759

  7. The Lophotrochozoan TGF-β signalling cassette - diversification and conservation in a key signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Nathan J; Namigai, Erica K O; Dearden, Peter K; Hui, Jerome H L; Grande, Cristina; Shimeld, Sebastian M

    2014-01-01

    TGF-β signalling plays a key role in the patterning of metazoan body plans and growth. It is widely regarded as a 'module' capable of co-option into novel functions. The TGF-β pathway arose in the Metazoan lineage, and while it is generally regarded as well conserved across evolutionary time, its components have been largely studied in the Ecdysozoa and Deuterostomia. The recent discovery of the Nodal molecule in molluscs has underlined the necessity of untangling this signalling network in lophotrochozoans in order to truly comprehend the evolution, conservation and diversification of this key pathway. Three novel genome resources, the mollusc Patella vulgata, annelid Pomatoceros lamarcki and rotifer Brachionus plicatilis, along with other publicly available data, were searched for the presence of TGF-β pathway genes. Bayesian and Maximum Likelihood analyses, along with some consideration of conserved domain structure, was used to confirm gene identity. Analysis revealed conservation of key components within the canonical pathway, allied with extensive diversification of TGF-β ligands and partial loss of genes encoding pathway inhibitors in some lophotrochozoan lineages. We fully describe the TGF-β signalling cassette of a range of lophotrochozoans, allowing firm inference to be drawn as to the ancestral state of this pathway in this Superphylum. The TGF-β signalling cascade's reputation as being highly conserved across the Metazoa is reinforced. Diversification within the activin-like complement, as well as potential wide loss of regulatory steps in some Phyla, hint at specific evolutionary implications for aspects of this cascade's functionality in this Superphylum. PMID:25690968

  8. Cell volume homeostatic mechanisms: effectors and signalling pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, E K; Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig

    2011-01-01

    the historical context of studies of cell volume regulation, focusing on the lineage started by Krogh, Bodil Schmidt-Nielsen, Hans-Henrik Ussing, and their students. The early work was focused on understanding the functional behaviour, kinetics and thermodynamics of the volume-regulatory ion transport......Cell volume homeostasis and its fine-tuning to the specific physiological context at any given moment are processes fundamental to normal cell function. The understanding of cell volume regulation owes much to August Krogh, yet has advanced greatly over the last decades. In this review, we outline...... mechanisms. Later work addressed the mechanisms through which cellular signalling pathways regulate the volume regulatory effectors or flux pathways. These studies were facilitated by the molecular identification of most of the relevant channels and transporters, and more recently also by the increased...

  9. Crosstalk between pathways enhances the controllability of signalling networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dingjie; Jin, Suoqin; Zou, Xiufen

    2016-02-01

    The control of complex networks is one of the most challenging problems in the fields of biology and engineering. In this study, the authors explored the controllability and control energy of several signalling networks, which consisted of many interconnected pathways, including networks with a bow-tie architecture. On the basis of the theory of structure controllability, they revealed that biological mechanisms, such as cross-pathway interactions, compartmentalisation and so on make the networks easier to fully control. Furthermore, using numerical simulations for two realistic examples, they demonstrated that the control energy of normal networks with crosstalk is lower than in networks without crosstalk. These results indicate that the biological networks are optimally designed to achieve their normal functions from the viewpoint of the control theory. The authors' work provides a comprehensive understanding of the impact of network structures and properties on controllability. PMID:26816393

  10. Effect of nicotine on exocytotic pancreatic secretory response: role of calcium signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chowdhury Parimal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nicotine is a risk factor for pancreatitis resulting in loss of pancreatic enzyme secretion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanisms of nicotine-induced secretory response measured in primary pancreatic acinar cells isolated from Male Sprague Dawley rats. The study examines the role of calcium signaling in the mechanism of the enhanced secretory response observed with nicotine exposure. Methods Isolated and purified pancreatic acinar cells were subjected to a nicotine exposure at a dose of 100 μM for 6 minutes and then stimulated with cholecystokinin (CCK for 30 min. The cell’s secretory response was measured by the percent of amylase released from the cells in the incubation medium Calcium receptor antagonists, inositol trisphosphate (IP3 receptor blockers, mitogen activated protein kinase inhibitors and specific nicotinic receptor antagonists were used to confirm the involvement of calcium in this process. Results Nicotine exposure induced enhanced secretory response in primary cells. These responses remained unaffected by mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK’s inhibitors. The effects, however, have been completely abolished by nicotinic receptor antagonist, calcium channel receptor antagonists and inositol trisphosphate (IP3 receptor blockers. Conclusions The data suggest that calcium activated events regulating the exocytotic secretion are affected by nicotine as shown by enhanced functional response which is inhibited by specific antagonists… The results implicate the role of nicotine in the mobilization of both intra- and extracellular calcium in the regulation of stimulus-secretory response of enzyme secretion in this cell system. We conclude that nicotine plays an important role in promoting enhanced calcium levels inside the acinar cell.

  11. A model of calcium signaling and degranulation dynamics induced by laser irradiation in mast cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI XiaoMin; ZHENG YuFan; LIU ZengRong; YANG WenZhong

    2008-01-01

    Recent experiments show that calcium signaling and degranulation dynamics induced by low power laser irradiation in mast cells must rely on extracellular Ca2+ influx. An analytical expression of Ca2+ flux through TRPV4 cation channel in response to interaction of laser photon energy and extracellular Ca2+ is deduced, and a model characterizing dynamics of calcium signaling and degranulation activated by laser irradiation in mast cells is established. The model indicates that the characteristics of calcium signaling and degranulation dynamics are determined by interaction between laser photon energy and Ca2+ influx. Extracellular Ca2+ concentration is so high that even small photon energy can activate mast cells, thus avoiding the possible injury caused by laser irradiation with shorter wavelengths. The model predicts that there exists a narrow parameter domain of photon energy and extracellular Ca2+ concentration of which results in cytosolic Ca2+ limit cycle oscillations, and shows that PKC activity is in direct proportion to the frequency of Ca2+ oscillations. With the model it is found that sustained and stable maximum plateau of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration can get optimal degranulation rate. Furthermore, the idea of introducing the realistic physical energy into model is applicable to modeling other physical signal transduction systems.

  12. Understanding Resolvin Signaling Pathways to Improve Oral Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura De Oleo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of resolvins has been a major breakthrough for understanding the processes involved in resolution of inflammation. Resolvins belong to a family of novel lipid mediators that possess dual anti-inflammatory and pro-resolution actions. Specifically, they protect healthy tissue during immune-inflammatory responses to infection or injury, thereby aiding inflammation resolution and promoting tissue healing. One of the major concerns in modern medicine is the management and treatment of oral diseases, as they are related to systemic outcomes impacting the quality of life of many patients. This review summarizes known signaling pathways utilized by resolvins to regulate inflammatory responses associated with the oral cavity.

  13. The new sideway of CNTF signal transduction pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The action of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) on intercellular free Ca2+ concentrations [Ca2+]I induced by glutamate (Glu) in primary cultured hippocampal neurons were detected with Fura2/AM,a Ca2+-sensitive fluorophore,and the morphological influence of G-protein on it was ob- jected. Glu could induce rapid increase of [Ca2+]I in hippo- campal neurons. CNTF had no significant action on [Ca2+]I in resting hippocampal neurons. However,after incubation of CNTF for 5 min,the increase of [Ca2+]I in hippocampal neurons rapidly induced by Glu was inhibited. Pretussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive G protein could block the action. These results indicate that a new non-genomic rapid sideway might exist in the upper stream of CNTF signal transduction pathway,which was related to Ca2+ signal transduction.

  14. Roles of MAP kinase signaling pathway in oocyte meiosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is a family of Ser/Thr protein kinases expressed widely in eukaryotic cells. MAPK is activated by a cascade of protein kinase phosphorylation and plays pivotal roles in regulating meiosis process in oocytes. As an important physical substrate of MAPK, p90rsk mediates numerous MAPK functions. MAPK was activated at G2/M transition during meiosis. Its activity reached the peak at MⅠ stage and maintained at this level until the time before the pronuclear formation after fertilization. There is complex interplay between MAPK and MPF in the meiosis regulation. Furthermore, other intracellular signal transducers, such as cAMP, protein kinase C and protein phosphotase, ect., also regulated the activity of MAPK at different stages during meiosis in oocytes. In the present article, the roles of MAPK signaling pathway in oocyte meiosis are reviewed and discussed.

  15. Activation and signaling of the p38 MAP kinase pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tyler ZARUBIN; Jiahuai HAN

    2005-01-01

    The family members of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases mediate a wide variety of cellular behaviors in response to extracellular stimuli. One of the four main sub-groups, the p38 group of MAP kinases, serve as a nexus for signal transduction and play a vital role in numerous biological processes. In this review, we highlight the known characteristics and components of the p38 pathway along with the mechanism and consequences of p38 activation. We focus on the role of p38 as a signal transduction mediator and examine the evidence linking p38 to inflammation, cell cycle, cell death, development, cell differentiation, senescence and tumorigenesis in specific cell types. Upstream and downstream components of p38 are described and questions remaining to be answered are posed. Finally, we propose several directions for future research on p38.

  16. ATP releasing connexin 30 hemichannels mediate flow-induced calcium signaling in the collecting duct

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Per; Burford, James L; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2013-01-01

    ATP in the renal tubular fluid is an important regulator of salt and water reabsorption via purinergic calcium signaling that involves the P2Y2 receptor, ENaC, and AQP2. Recently, we have shown that connexin (Cx) 30 hemichannels are localized to the non-junctional apical membrane of cells in the...... distal nephron-collecting duct (CD) and release ATP into the tubular fluid upon mechanical stimuli, leading to reduced salt and water reabsorption. Cx30(-/-) mice show salt-dependent elevations in BP and impaired pressure-natriuresis. Thus, we hypothesized that increased tubular flow rate leads to Cx30...... suramin. Taken together, these data confirm that mechanosensitive Cx30 hemichannels mediate tubular ATP release and purinergic calcium signaling in the CD which mechanism plays an important role in the regulation of CD salt and water reabsorption....

  17. Spontaneous calcium signals induced by gap junctions in a network model of astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazantsev, V. B.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of a network model of astrocytes coupled by gap junctions is investigated. Calcium dynamics of the single cell is described by the biophysical model comprising the set of three nonlinear differential equations. Intercellular dynamics is provided by the diffusion of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) through gap junctions between neighboring astrocytes. It is found that the diffusion induces the appearance of spontaneous activity patterns in the network. Stability of the network steady state is analyzed. It is proved that the increase of the diffusion coefficient above a certain critical value yields the generation of low-amplitude subthreshold oscillatory signals in a certain frequency range. It is shown that such spontaneous oscillations can facilitate calcium pulse generation and provide a certain time scale in astrocyte signaling.

  18. From uncertainty to reward: BOLD characteristics differentiate signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grön Georg

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reward value and uncertainty are represented by dopamine neurons in monkeys by distinct phasic and tonic firing rates. Knowledge about the underlying differential dopaminergic pathways is crucial for a better understanding of dopamine-related processes. Using functional magnetic resonance blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD imaging we analyzed brain activation in 15 healthy, male subjects performing a gambling task, upon expectation of potential monetary rewards at different reward values and levels of uncertainty. Results Consistent with previous studies, ventral striatal activation was related to both reward magnitudes and values. Activation in medial and lateral orbitofrontal brain areas was best predicted by reward uncertainty. Moreover, late BOLD responses relative to trial onset were due to expectation of different reward values and likely to represent phasic dopaminergic signaling. Early BOLD responses were due to different levels of reward uncertainty and likely to represent tonic dopaminergic signals. Conclusions We conclude that differential dopaminergic signaling as revealed in animal studies is not only represented locally by involvement of distinct brain regions but also by distinct BOLD signal characteristics.

  19. 14-3-3 Proteins Buffer Intracellular Calcium Sensing Receptors to Constrain Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Grant

    Full Text Available Calcium sensing receptors (CaSR interact with 14-3-3 binding proteins at a carboxyl terminal arginine-rich motif. Mutations identified in patients with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia, autosomal dominant hypocalcemia, pancreatitis or idiopathic epilepsy support the functional importance of this motif. We combined total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and biochemical approaches to determine the mechanism of 14-3-3 protein regulation of CaSR signaling. Loss of 14-3-3 binding caused increased basal CaSR signaling and plasma membrane levels, and a significantly larger signaling-evoked increase in plasma membrane receptors. Block of core glycosylation with tunicamycin demonstrated that changes in plasma membrane CaSR levels were due to differences in exocytic rate. Western blotting to quantify time-dependent changes in maturation of expressed wt CaSR and a 14-3-3 protein binding-defective mutant demonstrated that signaling increases synthesis to maintain constant levels of the immaturely and maturely glycosylated forms. CaSR thus operates by a feed-forward mechanism, whereby signaling not only induces anterograde trafficking of nascent receptors but also increases biosynthesis to maintain steady state levels of net cellular CaSR. Overall, these studies suggest that 14-3-3 binding at the carboxyl terminus provides an important buffering mechanism to increase the intracellular pool of CaSR available for signaling-evoked trafficking, but attenuates trafficking to control the dynamic range of responses to extracellular calcium.

  20. Mechanism of store-operated calcium entry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Devkanya Dutta

    2000-12-01

    Activation of receptors coupled to the phospholipase C/IP3 signalling pathway results in a rapid release of calcium from its intracellular stores, eventually leading to depletion of these stores. Calcium store depletion triggers an influx of extracellular calcium across the plasma membrane, a mechanism known as the store-operated calcium entry or capacitative calcium entry. Capacitative calcium current plays a key role in replenishing calcium stores and activating various physiological processes. Despite considerable efforts, very little is known about the molecular nature of the capacitative channel and the signalling pathway that activates it. This review summarizes our current knowledge about store operated calcium entry and suggests possible hypotheses for its mode of activation.

  1. Aspirin Promotes Oligodendroglial Differentiation Through Inhibition of Wnt Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Nanxin; Chen, Dong; Wu, Xiyan; Chen, Xianjun; Zhang, Xuesi; Niu, Jianqin; Shen, Hai-Ying; Xiao, Lan

    2016-07-01

    Aspirin, one of the most commonly used anti-inflammatory drugs, has been recently reported to display multiple effects in the central nervous system (CNS), including neuroprotection and upregulation of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) expression in astrocytes. Although it was most recently reported that aspirin could promote the proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) after white matter lesion, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. To dissect the effects of aspirin on oligodendroglial development and explore possible mechanisms, we here demonstrated the following: (i) in vitro treatment of aspirin on OPC cultures significantly increased the number of differentiated oligodendrocytes (OLs) but had no effect on the number of proliferative OPCs, indicating that aspirin can promote OPC differentiation but not proliferation; (ii) in vivo treatment of aspirin on neonatal (P3) rats for 4 days led to a nearly twofold increase in the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP), devoid of change in OPC proliferaion, in the corpus callosum (CC); (iii) finally, aspirin treatment increased the phosphorylation level of β-catenin and counteracted Wnt signaling pathway synergist QS11-induced suppression on OPC differentiation. Together, our data show that aspirin can directly target oligodendroglial lineage cells and promote their differentiation through inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. These findings suggest that aspirin may be a novel candidate for the treatment of demyelinating diseases. PMID:26059811

  2. Puerarin Suppress Apoptosis of Human Osteoblasts via ERK Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-juan Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Puerarin, the main isoflavone glycoside extracted from Radix Puerariae, is an isoflavone traditional Chinese herb. Previous studies have demonstrated that puerarin could regulate osteoblast proliferation and differentiation to promote bone formation. However, the effect of puerarin on the process of human osteoblasts (hOBs apoptosis is still unclear. In this study, we detected the function of puerarin on serum-free-induced cell apoptosis using ELISA and TUNEL arrays and then found that the mortality of hOBs was significantly decreased after exposure to 10−10–10−6 M puerarin and reached the maximal antiapoptotic effect at the concentration of 10−8 M. In addition, compared with the control group, puerarin notably increased the Bcl-2 protein levels while it decreased the Bax protein levels in the hOBs in a dose-dependent way. 10−7 M puerarin decreased the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio with a maximal decrease to 0.08. Moreover, puerarin activated ERK signaling pathways in hOBs, and the antiapoptotic effect induced by puerarin was abolished by incubation of ERK inhibitor PD98059. Similarly, the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI182780 also suppressed the inhibitory effect of puerarin on hOBs apoptosis. In conclusion, puerarin could prevent hOBs apoptosis via ERK signaling pathway, which might be effective in providing protection against bone loss and bone remolding associated with osteoporosis.

  3. The chromatin remodeler SPLAYED regulates specific stress signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin W Walley

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Organisms are continuously exposed to a myriad of environmental stresses. Central to an organism's survival is the ability to mount a robust transcriptional response to the imposed stress. An emerging mechanism of transcriptional control involves dynamic changes in chromatin structure. Alterations in chromatin structure are brought about by a number of different mechanisms, including chromatin modifications, which covalently modify histone proteins; incorporation of histone variants; and chromatin remodeling, which utilizes ATP hydrolysis to alter histone-DNA contacts. While considerable insight into the mechanisms of chromatin remodeling has been gained, the biological role of chromatin remodeling complexes beyond their function as regulators of cellular differentiation and development has remained poorly understood. Here, we provide genetic, biochemical, and biological evidence for the critical role of chromatin remodeling in mediating plant defense against specific biotic stresses. We found that the Arabidopsis SWI/SNF class chromatin remodeling ATPase SPLAYED (SYD is required for the expression of selected genes downstream of the jasmonate (JA and ethylene (ET signaling pathways. SYD is also directly recruited to the promoters of several of these genes. Furthermore, we show that SYD is required for resistance against the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea but not the biotrophic pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. These findings demonstrate not only that chromatin remodeling is required for selective pathogen resistance, but also that chromatin remodelers such as SYD can regulate specific pathways within biotic stress signaling networks.

  4. Aberrant signaling pathways in medulloblastomas: a stem cell connection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Oliveira Rodini

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is a highly malignant primary tumor of the central nervous system. It represents the most frequent type of solid tumor and the leading cause of death related to cancer in early childhood. Current treatment includes surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy which may lead to severe cognitive impairment and secondary brain tumors. New perspectives for therapeutic development have emerged with the identification of stem-like cells displaying high tumorigenic potential and increased radio- and chemo-resistance in gliomas. Under the cancer stem cell hypothesis, transformation of neural stem cells and/or granular neuron progenitors of the cerebellum are though to be involved in medulloblastoma development. Dissecting the genetic and molecular alterations associated with this process should significantly impact both basic and applied cancer research. Based on cumulative evidences in the fields of genetics and molecular biology of medulloblastomas, we discuss the possible involvement of developmental signaling pathways as critical biochemical switches determining normal neurogenesis or tumorigenesis. From the clinical viewpoint, modulation of signaling pathways such as TGFβ, regulating neural stem cell proliferation and tumor development, might be attempted as an alternative strategy for future drug development aiming at more efficient therapies and improved clinical outcome of patients with pediatric brain cancers.

  5. MicroRNA-gene signaling pathways in pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Drakaki

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most frequent cause of cancer-related deaths and is characterized by early metastasis and pronounced resistance to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Despite extensive esearch efforts, there is not any substantial progress regarding the identification of novel drugs against pancreatic cancer. Although the introduction of the chemotherapeutic agent gemcitabine improved clinical response, the prognosis of these patients remained extremely poor with a 5-year survival rate of 3-5%. Thus, the identification of the novel molecular pathways involved in pancreatic oncogenesis and the development of new and potent therapeutic options are highly desirable. Here, we describe how microRNAs control signaling pathways that are frequently deregulated during pancreatic oncogenesis. In addition, we provide evidence that microRNAs could be potentially used as novel pancreatic cancer therapeutics through reversal of chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistance or regulation of essential molecular pathways. Further studies should integrate the deregulated genes and microRNAs into molecular networks in order to identify the central regulators of pancreatic oncogenesis. Targeting these central regulators could lead to the development of novel targeted therapeutic approaches for pancreatic cancer patients.

  6. Signaling Pathways and Molecular Mechanisms of Oxidative Stress in Skeletal Muscle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haibing HU; Wenjing LI; Zhi FANG; Bo XUE; Longzhou LIU; Ye YANG

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a major factor affecting animal health and production performance. This paper briefly introduced the signaling pathways(i.e. NF-κB signal-ing pathway, MAPK, AP-1 and PGC-1α) of oxidative stress and the main genes regulating the signals of oxidative stress in skeletal muscle, providing a theoretical basis for reducing oxidative stress damage.

  7. The APP670/671 mutation alters calcium signaling and response to hyperosmotic stress in rat primary hippocampal neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kloskowska, Ewa; Bruton, Joseph D; Winblad, Bengt; Benedikz, Eirikur

    2008-01-01

    Altered calcium homeostasis is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and much effort has been put into understanding the association between the autosomal dominant gene mutations causative of this devastating disease and perturbed calcium signaling. We have focused our attention o...

  8. Localized Calcium Signals along the Cleavage Furrow of the Xenopus Egg Are Not Involved in Cytokinesis

    OpenAIRE

    Noguchi, Tatsuhiko; Mabuchi, Issei

    2002-01-01

    It has been proposed that a localized calcium (Ca) signal at the growing end of the cleavage furrow triggers cleavage furrow formation in large eggs. We have examined the possible role of a Ca signal in cleavage furrow formation in the Xenopus laevis egg during the first cleavage. We were able to detect two kinds of Ca waves along the cleavage furrow. However, the Ca waves appeared after cleavage furrow formation in late stages of the first cleavage. In addition, cleavage was not affected by ...

  9. Peroxiredoxins in Regulation of MAPK Signalling Pathways; Sensors and Barriers to Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, Heather R; Veal, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Peroxiredoxins are highly conserved and abundant peroxidases. Although the thioredoxin peroxidase activity of peroxiredoxin (Prx) is important to maintain low levels of endogenous hydrogen peroxide, Prx have also been shown to promote hydrogen peroxide-mediated signalling. Mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathways mediate cellular responses to a variety of stimuli, including reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we review the evidence that Prx can act as both sensors and barriers to the activation of MAPK and discuss the underlying mechanisms involved, focusing in particular on the relationship with thioredoxin. PMID:26813660

  10. Mitochondrial function in ageing: coordination with signalling and transcriptional pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Fei; Sancheti, Harsh; Liu, Zhigang; Cadenas, Enrique

    2016-04-15

    Mitochondrial dysfunction entailing decreased energy-transducing capacity and perturbed redox homeostasis is an early and sometimes initiating event in ageing and age-related disorders involving tissues with high metabolic rate such as brain, liver and heart. In the central nervous system (CNS), recent findings from our and other groups suggest that the mitochondrion-centred hypometabolism is a key feature of ageing brains and Alzheimer's disease. This hypometabolic state is manifested by lowered neuronal glucose uptake, metabolic shift in the astrocytes, and alternations in mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle function. Similarly, in liver and adipose tissue, mitochondrial capacity around glucose and fatty acid metabolism and thermogenesis is found to decline with age and is implicated in age-related metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. These mitochondrion-related disorders in peripheral tissues can impact on brain functions through metabolic, hormonal and inflammatory signals. At the cellular level, studies in CNS and non-CNS tissues support the notion that instead of being viewed as autonomous organelles, mitochondria are part of a dynamic network with close interactions with other cellular components through energy- or redox-sensitive cytosolic kinase signalling and transcriptional pathways. Hence, it would be critical to further understand the molecular mechanisms involved in the communication between mitochondria and the rest of the cell. Therapeutic strategies that effectively preserves or improve mitochondrial function by targeting key component of these signalling cascades could represent a novel direction for numerous mitochondrion-implicated, age-related disorders. PMID:26293414

  11. Hormone Signaling Pathways in Plants: The Role of Jasmonic Acid in Plant Cell Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    TİRYAKİ, İskender

    2004-01-01

    Plant growth and metabolism are affected by various biotic and abiotic stimuli including microorganisms and insects attack as well as light and environmental stresses. Such a diverse plant response requires a communication system that uses a group of chemical messengers called hormones. Hormones promote, inhibit, or qualitatively modify plant growth and development. This complex process requires a signal transduction that defines a specific information pathway within a cell that translat...

  12. Potassium conductances mediate bidirectional state-dependent modulation of action potential evoked dendritic calcium signals in dentate gyrus granule cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    János Brunner

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Backpropagating action potentials (bAPs and local calcium signals that they trigger are fundamental for dendritic functions. Here we addressed the question what extent the changes of local dendritic membrane properties can contribute to the shaping of the coupling between dendritic action potentials and the local calcium responses. Using a combination of in vitro electrophysiological and confocal imaging techniques we found that activation of dendritic GIRK channels via mGlu2 or GABAB receptors enhanced the bAP¬-triggered calcium signals in the dendrites of dentate gyrus granule cells (GCs. The enhancement of calcium signals was significant only in those dendritic regions, where these receptors are predominantly expressed. Similarly to GIRK channel activation, somatic hyperpolarization by DC current injection (from -64 mV to -77 mV, significantly increased bAP-associated calcium signals in the proximal dendrites. The hyperpolarization was associated with a decrease in the input resistance due to the rectification of the membrane potential of GCs. The effect of hyperpolarization on the calcium signals was maintained when T-type calcium currents were blocked but it decreased when GIRK channels were inhibited. Simultaneous dual somato-dendritic recordings from GCs showed that somatic hyperpolarization accelerated the repolarization phase of dendritic bAP in the proximal region whereas the rising phase and peak amplitude was not affected. We hypothesize that the larger driving force for calcium ions during the faster repolarization can contribute to the increasing in calcium signals. Employment of previously recorded dendritic bAP waveforms from hyperpolarized membrane potential as voltage command evoked larger calcium currents in nucleated patches compared to bAP waveform from the same recording at depolarized membrane potential. Furthermore, addition of native, high-voltage activated, inactivating potassium conductance by somatic dynamic clamp

  13. Membrane wounding triggers ATP release and dysferlin-mediated intercellular calcium signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Covian-Nares, J. Fernando; Koushik, Srinagesh V.; Puhl, Henry L.; Vogel, Steven S.

    2010-01-01

    Dysferlin is a Ca2+-binding protein found in many different cell types. It is required for membrane wound repair in muscle, but it is not known whether it has the same function in other cells. Here we report the activation of an intercellular signaling pathway in sea urchin embryos by membrane wounding that evokes Ca2+ spikes in neighboring cells. This pathway was mimicked by ATP application, and inhibited by apyrase, cadmium, and ω-agatoxin-IVA. Microinjection of dysferlin antisense phosphor...

  14. In vitro reconstitution of an abscisic acid signalling pathway

    KAUST Repository

    Fujii, Hiroaki

    2009-11-18

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates the expression of many genes in plants; it has critical functions in stress resistance and in growth and development. Several proteins have been reported to function as ABA receptors, and many more are known to be involved in ABA signalling. However, the identities of ABA receptors remain controversial and the mechanism of signalling from perception to downstream gene expression is unclear. Here we show that by combining the recently identified ABA receptor PYR1 with the type 2C protein phosphatase (PP2C) ABI1, the serine/threonine protein kinase SnRK2.6/OST1 and the transcription factor ABF2/AREB1, we can reconstitute ABA-triggered phosphorylation of the transcription factor in vitro. Introduction of these four components into plant protoplasts results in ABA-responsive gene expression. Protoplast and test-tube reconstitution assays were used to test the function of various members of the receptor, protein phosphatase and kinase families. Our results suggest that the default state of the SnRK2 kinases is an autophosphorylated, active state and that the SnRK2 kinases are kept inactive by the PP2Cs through physical interaction and dephosphorylation. We found that in the presence of ABA, the PYR/PYL (pyrabactin resistance 1/PYR1-like) receptor proteins can disrupt the interaction between the SnRK2s and PP2Cs, thus preventing the PP2C-mediated dephosphorylation of the SnRK2s and resulting in the activation of the SnRK2 kinases. Our results reveal new insights into ABA signalling mechanisms and define a minimal set of core components of a complete major ABA signalling pathway. © 2009 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  15. Hedgehog signaling pathway mediates invasion and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma via ERK pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-tao LU; Wen-di ZHAO; Wei HE; Wei WEI

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the role of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway in the invasion and metastasis of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).Methods:Eighty six HCC tissues samples and HCC cell line Bel-7402 were examined.The protein expression of sonic hedgehog (Shh),nuclear glioma-associated oncogene-1 (Gli1),MMP-9 and p-ERK1/2 in HCC was analyzed using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis.Boyden chamber assay and wound-healing assay were used to quantify the invasion and metastasis of Bel-7402 cells.Results:In 86 HCC tissue samples,the positive ratio of Shh and nucleus Gli1 was 67.44% (58/86) and 60.47% (52/86),respectively;the expression of nucleus Gli1 was correlated with the tumor pathological grade (P=0.034),and with the ability of the tumor to invade and metastasize (P=0.001); the expression of nucleus Gli1 was also correlated with p-ERK1/2 (P=0.031) and with MMP-9 (P=0.034).Neither Shh,nor nucleus Gli1 was observed in normal liver tissue.KAAD-cyclopamine (KAAD-cyc),a specific inhibitor of the Hh pathway,at the concentrations of 1 and 4 μmol/L inhibited the invasion and migration of Bel-7402 cells and decreased the expression of Gli1 in nucleus and MMP-9,p-ERK1/2 proteins in Bel-7402 cells,On the other hand,Shh,a ligand of the Hh pathway,at the concentration of 0.5 μg/mL produced opposite effects.The MAPK pathway inhibitors U0126 and PD98059 at the concentrations of 5 and 10μmol/L inhibited invasion and metastasis of Bel-7402 cells induced by Shh,and decreased the expression of p-ERK1/2 and MMP-9.However,U0126 and PD98059 had no effect on the expression of Gii1.Conclusion:Hh signaling pathway mediates invasion and metastasis of human HCC by up-regulating the protein expression of MMP-9via ERK pathway.

  16. From Phosphoproteome to Modeling of Plant Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhartsev, Maksim; Pertl-Obermeyer, Heidi; Schulze, Waltraud X

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative proteomic experiments in recent years became almost routine in many aspects of biology. Particularly the quantification of peptides and corresponding phosphorylated counterparts from a single experiment is highly important for understanding of dynamics of signaling pathways. We developed an analytical method to quantify phosphopeptides (pP) in relation to the quantity of the corresponding non-phosphorylated parent peptides (P). We used mixed-mode solid-phase extraction to purify total peptides from tryptic digest and separated them from most of the phosphorous-containing compounds (e.g., phospholipids, nucleotides) which enhances pP enrichment on TiO2 beads. Phosphoproteomic data derived with this designed method allows quantifying pP/P stoichiometry, and qualifying experimental data for mathematical modeling. PMID:26700054

  17. Signaling pathways in the epithelial origins of pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardie, William D; Hagood, James S; Dave, Vrushank; Perl, Anne-Karina T; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Korfhagen, Thomas R; Glasser, Stephan

    2010-07-15

    Pulmonary fibrosis complicates a number of disease processes and leads to substantial morbidity and mortality. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is perhaps the most pernicious and enigmatic form of the greater problem of lung fibrogenesis with a median survival of three years from diagnosis in affected patients. In this review, we will focus on the pathology of IPF as a model of pulmonary fibrotic processes, review possible cellular mechanisms, review current treatment approaches and review two transgenic mouse models of lung fibrosis to provide insight into processes that cause lung fibrosis. We will also summarize the potential utility of signaling pathway inhibitors as a future treatment in pulmonary fibrosis. Finally, we will present data demonstrating a minimal contribution of epithelial-mesenchymal transition in the development of fibrotic lesions in the transforming growth factor-alpha transgenic model of lung fibrosis. PMID:20676040

  18. Pathogenesis of cholangiocarcinoma: From genetics to signalling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongpetch, Sarinya; Jusakul, Apinya; Ong, Choon Kiat; Lim, Weng Khong; Rozen, Steven G; Tan, Patrick; Teh, Bin Tean

    2015-04-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a malignant tumour of bile duct epithelial cells with dismal prognosis and rising incidence. Chronic inflammation resulting from liver fluke infection, hepatitis and other inflammatory bowel diseases is a major contributing factor to cholangiocarcinogenesis, likely through accumulation of serial genetic and epigenetic alterations resulting in aberration of oncogenes and tumour suppressors. Recent studies making use of advances in high-throughput genomics have revealed the genetic landscape of CCA, greatly increasing our understanding of its underlying biology. A series of highly recurrent mutations in genes such as TP53, KRAS, SMAD4, BRAF, MLL3, ARID1A, PBRM1 and BAP1, which are known to be involved in cell cycle control, cell signalling pathways and chromatin dynamics, have led to investigations of their roles, through molecular to mouse modelling studies, in cholangiocarcinogenesis. This review focuses on the landscape genetic alterations in CCA and its functional relevance to the formation and progression of CCA. PMID:25966424

  19. Current Views of Toll-Like Receptor Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Yamamoto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available On microbial invasion, the host immediately evokes innate immune responses. Recent studies have demonstrated that Toll-like receptors (TLRs play crucial roles in innate responses that lead not only to the clearance of pathogens but also to the efficient establishment of acquired immunity by directly detecting molecules from microbes. In terms of intracellular TLR-mediated signaling pathways, cytoplasmic adaptor molecules containing Toll/IL-1R (TIR domains play important roles in inflammatory immune responses through the production of proinflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide, and type I interferon, and upregulation of costimulatory molecules. In this paper, we will describe our current understanding of the relationship between TLRs and their ligands derived from pathogens such as viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. Moreover, we will review the historical and current literature to describe the mechanisms behind TLR-mediated activation of innate immune responses.

  20. Advanced age decreases local calcium signaling in endothelium of mouse mesenteric arteries in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerman, Erika M; Everhart, Jesse E; Segal, Steven S

    2016-05-01

    Aging is associated with vascular dysfunction that impairs tissue perfusion, physical activity, and the quality of life. Calcium signaling in endothelial cells (ECs) is integral to vasomotor control, exemplified by localized Ca(2+) signals within EC projections through holes in the internal elastic lamina (IEL). Within these microdomains, endothelium-derived hyperpolarization is integral to smooth muscle cell (SMC) relaxation via coupling through myoendothelial gap junctions. However, the effects of aging on local EC Ca(2+) signals (and thereby signaling between ECs and SMCs) remain unclear, and these events have not been investigated in vivo. Furthermore, it is unknown whether aging affects either the number or the size of IEL holes. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that local EC Ca(2+) signaling is impaired with advanced age along with a reduction in IEL holes. In anesthetized mice expressing a Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescent protein (GCaMP2) selectively in ECs, our findings illustrate that for mesenteric arteries controlling splanchnic blood flow the frequency of spontaneous local Ca(2+) signals in ECs was reduced by ∼85% in old (24-26 mo) vs. young (3-6 mo) animals. At the same time, the number (and total area) of holes per square millimeter of IEL was reduced by ∼40%. We suggest that diminished signaling between ECs and SMCs contributes to dysfunction of resistance arteries with advanced age.Listen to this article's corresponding podcast at http://ajpheart.podbean.com/e/aging-impairs-endothelial-ca2-signaling/. PMID:26945073

  1. Involvement of neutral sphingomyelinase in the angiotensin II signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista-Pérez, Rocio; del Valle-Mondragón, Leonardo; Cano-Martínez, Agustina; Pérez-Méndez, Oscar; Escalante, Bruno; Franco, Martha

    2015-05-15

    The possibility that angiotensin II (ANG II) exerts its effects through the activation of neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase) has not been tested in kidneys. The results of the present study provide evidence for the activity and expression of nSMase in rat kidneys. In isolated perfused rat kidney, ANG II-induced renal vasoconstriction was inhibited by GW4869, an inhibitor of nSMase. We used nSMase for investigating the signal transduction downstream of ceramide. nSMase constricted the renal vasculature. An inhibitor of ceramidase (CDase), N-oleoylethanolamine (OEA), enhanced either ANG II- or nSMase-induced renal vasoconstriction. To demonstrate the interaction between the nSMase and cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) signal transduction pathways, we evaluated the response to nSMase in the presence and absence of inhibitors of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism: arachidonyl trifluoromethyl ketone (AACOCF3), an inhibitor of cPLA2; 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA), an inhibitor of all AA pathways; indomethacin, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase (COX); furegrelate, a thromboxane A2 (TxA2)-synthase inhibitor; and SQ29548, a TxA2-receptor antagonist. In these experiments, the nSMase-induced renal vasoconstriction decreased. ANG II or nSMase was associated with an increase in the release of thromboxane B2 (TxB2) in the renal perfusate of isolated perfused rat kidney. In addition, the coexpression of the ceramide with cPLA2, was found in the smooth muscle layer of intrarenal vessels. Our results suggest that ANG II stimulates ceramide formation via the activation of nSMase; thus ceramide may indirectly regulate vasoactive processes that modulate the activity of cPLA2 and the release of TxA2. PMID:25354938

  2. Kavain Involvement in LPS-Induced Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaoren; Amar, Salomon

    2016-10-01

    Kavain, a compound extracted from the Kava plant, Piper methysticum, is found to be involved in TNF-α expression in human and mouse cells via regulation of transcriptional factors such as NF-kB and LITAF. LITAF is known to activate the transcription of more than 20 cytokines that are involved in a variety of cellular processes and is associated with many inflammatory diseases, including angiogenesis, cancer, arthritis, and more. The modulation of LITAF is expected to positively affect cytokine-mediated diseases. Thus, intensive efforts have been deployed in search of LITAF inhibitors. In this work, we found that, in vitro, Kavain reduced LPS- induced TNF-α secretion in mouse macrophages, mouse bone marrow macrophages (BMM), and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (HPBMC). We also found that Kavain treatment in RAW264.7 cells deactivated MyD88 and Akt, inhibited LITAF, and reduced the production of TNF-α, IL-27, and MIG in response to LPS. Similarly, it had a significant in vivo anti-inflammatory effect on wild-type (WT) mice that developed Collagen Antibody Induced Arthritis (CAIA). Overall, MyD88 was found to be an important mediator of the LPS-induced inflammatory response that can be distinguished from the NF-κB pathway. We also found that MyD88 is involved in the pathway linking LPS/LITAF to TNF-α. Therefore, given that Kavain modulates LPS-induced signaling pathways leading to cytokine expression, therapeutic interventions involving Kavain in inflammatory diseases are warranted. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2272-2280, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26917453

  3. mTOR signaling pathway genes in focal epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baulac, S

    2016-01-01

    Focal epilepsies, where seizures initiate in spatially limited networks, are the most frequent epilepsy type, accounting for two-thirds of patients. Focal epilepsies have long been thought to be acquired disorders; several focal epilepsy syndromes are now proven to be (genetically heterogeneous) monogenic disorders. While earlier genetic studies have demonstrated a strong contribution of ion channel and neurotransmitter receptor genes, or synaptic secreted protein genes, later work has revealed a new class of genes encoding components of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signal transduction pathway. The mTOR pathway controls a myriad of biological processes among which cell growth and protein synthesis in response to several extracellular and intracellular. Recently, germline mutations have been found in genes encoding the components of the GATOR1 complex (DEPDC5, NPRL2, NPRL3), a repressor of mTORC1. These mutations are increasingly recognized as causing a wide and yet evolving spectrum of focal epilepsy syndromes, with and without cortical structural abnormalities (usually focal cortical dysplasia). Brain somatic mutations in the gene encoding mTOR (MTOR) have recently been linked to focal cortical dysplasia and other associated brain pathologies including hemimegalencephaly. This chapter reviews the genetics and neurobiology of DEPDC5, NPRL2, and NPRL3, and summarizes the clinical and molecular spectrum of GATOR1-related epilepsies. PMID:27323939

  4. Generation of a Homozygous Transgenic Rat Strain Stably Expressing a Calcium Sensor Protein for Direct Examination of Calcium Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Kornélia Szebényi; András Füredi; Orsolya Kolacsek; Enikő Pergel; Zsuzsanna Bősze; Balázs Bender; Péter Vajdovich; József Tóvári; László Homolya; Gergely Szakács; László Héja; Ágnes Enyedi; Balázs Sarkadi; Ágota Apáti; Orbán, Tamás I.

    2015-01-01

    In drug discovery, prediction of selectivity and toxicity require the evaluation of cellular calcium homeostasis. The rat is a preferred laboratory animal for pharmacology and toxicology studies, while currently no calcium indicator protein expressing rat model is available. We established a transgenic rat strain stably expressing the GCaMP2 fluorescent calcium sensor by a transposon-based methodology. Zygotes were co-injected with mRNA of transposase and a CAG-GCaMP2 expressing construct, an...

  5. Signal processing by T-type calcium channel interactions in the cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engbers, Jordan D. T.; Anderson, Dustin; Zamponi, Gerald W.; Turner, Ray W.

    2013-01-01

    T-type calcium channels of the Cav3 family are unique among voltage-gated calcium channels due to their low activation voltage, rapid inactivation, and small single channel conductance. These special properties allow Cav3 calcium channels to regulate neuronal processing in the subthreshold voltage range. Here, we review two different subthreshold ion channel interactions involving Cav3 channels and explore the ability of these interactions to expand the functional roles of Cav3 channels. In cerebellar Purkinje cells, Cav3 and intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium (IKCa) channels form a novel complex which creates a low voltage-activated, transient outward current capable of suppressing temporal summation of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs). In large diameter neurons of the deep cerebellar nuclei, Cav3-mediated calcium current (IT) and hyperpolarization-activated cation current (IH) are activated during trains of inhibitory postsynaptic potentials. These currents have distinct, and yet synergistic, roles in the subthreshold domain with IT generating a rebound burst and IH controlling first spike latency and rebound spike precision. However, by shortening the membrane time constant the membrane returns towards resting value at a faster rate, allowing IH to increase the efficacy of IT and increase the range of burst frequencies that can be generated. The net effect of Cav3 channels thus depends on the channels with which they are paired. When expressed in a complex with a KCa channel, Cav3 channels reduce excitability when processing excitatory inputs. If functionally coupled with an HCN channel, the depolarizing effect of Cav3 channels is accentuated, allowing for efficient inversion of inhibitory inputs to generate a rebound burst output. Therefore, signal processing relies not only on the activity of individual subtypes of channels but also on complex interactions between ion channels whether based on a physical complex or by indirect

  6. Macroscopic consequences of calcium signaling in microdomains: A first passage time approach

    CERN Document Server

    Rovetti, Robert; Garfinkel, Alan; Shiferaw, Yohannes

    2007-01-01

    Calcium (Ca) plays an important role in regulating various cellular processes. In a variety of cell types, Ca signaling occurs within microdomains where channels deliver localized pulses of Ca which activate a nearby collection of Ca-sensitive receptors. The small number of channels involved ensures that the signaling process is stochastic. The aggregate response of several thousand of these microdomains yields a whole-cell response which dictates the cell behavior. Here, we study analytically the statistical properties of a population of these microdomains in response to a trigger signal. We apply these results to understand the relationship between Ca influx and Ca release in cardiac cells. In this context, we use a first passage time approach to show analytically how Ca release in the whole cell depends on the single channel kinetics of Ca channels and the properties of microdomains. Using these results, we explain the underlying mechanism for the graded relationship between Ca influx and Ca release in car...

  7. Use of multiple singular value decompositions to analyze complex intracellular calcium ion signals

    KAUST Repository

    Martinez, Josue G.

    2009-12-01

    We compare calcium ion signaling (Ca(2+)) between two exposures; the data are present as movies, or, more prosaically, time series of images. This paper describes novel uses of singular value decompositions (SVD) and weighted versions of them (WSVD) to extract the signals from such movies, in a way that is semi-automatic and tuned closely to the actual data and their many complexities. These complexities include the following. First, the images themselves are of no interest: all interest focuses on the behavior of individual cells across time, and thus, the cells need to be segmented in an automated manner. Second, the cells themselves have 100+ pixels, so that they form 100+ curves measured over time, so that data compression is required to extract the features of these curves. Third, some of the pixels in some of the cells are subject to image saturation due to bit depth limits, and this saturation needs to be accounted for if one is to normalize the images in a reasonably un-biased manner. Finally, the Ca(2+) signals have oscillations or waves that vary with time and these signals need to be extracted. Thus, our aim is to show how to use multiple weighted and standard singular value decompositions to detect, extract and clarify the Ca(2+) signals. Our signal extraction methods then lead to simple although finely focused statistical methods to compare Ca(2+) signals across experimental conditions.

  8. Signaling pathways regulating production of hyaluronic acid in pig oocyte-cumulus cell-complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Procházka, Radek; Nagyová, Eva

    Luxembourg: Recherches Scientifiques Luxembourg, 2006. s. 647. [Cell Signaling World 2006, Signal Transduction Pathways therapeutic targets. 25.01.2006-28.01.2006, Luxembourg] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA523/04/0574 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : signaling pathways Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  9. Effect of calcium on strawberry fruit flavonoid pathway gene expression and anthocyanin accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenping; Peng, Hui; Yang, Tianbao; Whitaker, Bruce; Huang, Luhong; Sun, Jianghao; Chen, Pei

    2014-09-01

    Two diploid woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca) inbred lines, Ruegen F7-4 (red fruit-bearing) and YW5AF7 (yellow fruit-bearing) were used to study the regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis in fruit. Ruegen F7-4 fruit had similar total phenolics and anthocyanin contents to commercial octoploid (F. × ananassa) cultivar Seascape, while YW5AF7 exhibited relatively low total phenolics content and no anthocyanin accumulation. Foliar spray of CaCl2 boosted fruit total phenolics content, especially anthocyanins, by more than 20% in both Seascape and RF7-4. Expression levels of almost all the flavonoid pathway genes were comparable in Ruegen F7-4 and YW5AF7 green-stage fruit. However, at the turning and ripe stages, key anthocyanin structural genes, including flavanone 3-hydroxylase (F3H1), dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR2), anthocyanidin synthase (ANS1), and UDP-glucosyltransferase (UGT1), were highly expressed in Ruegen F7-4 compared with YW5AF7 fruit. Calcium treatment further stimulated the expression of those genes in Ruegen F7-4 fruit. Anthocyanins isolated from petioles of YW5AF7 and Ruegen F-7 had the same HPLC-DAD profile, which differed from that of Ruegen F-7 fruit anthocyanins. All the anthocyanin structural genes except FvUGT1 were detected in petioles of YW5AF7 and Ruegen F-7. Taken together, these results indicate that the "yellow" gene in YW5AF7 is a fruit specific regulatory gene(s) for anthocyanin biosynthesis. Calcium can enhance accumulation of anthocyanins and total phenolics in fruit possibly via upregulation of anthocyanin structural genes. Our results also suggest that the anthocyanin biosynthesis machinery in petioles is different from that in fruit. PMID:25036468

  10. Roles and mechanisms of the CD38/cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose/Ca2+ signaling pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenjie; Wei; Richard; Graeff; Jianbo; Yue

    2014-01-01

    Mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ stores is involved inmany diverse cell functions, including: cell proliferation;differentiation; fertilization; muscle contraction; secre-tion of neurotransmitters, hormones and enzymes;and lymphocyte activation and proliferation. Cyclic ad-enosine diphosphate ribose(cADPR) is an endogenousCa2+ mobilizing nucleotide present in many cell typesand species, from plants to animals. cADPR is formedby ADP-ribosyl cyclases from nicotinamide adenine di-nucleotide. The main ADP-ribosyl cyclase in mammalsis CD38, a multi-functional enzyme and a type Ⅱ mem-brane protein. It has been shown that many extracel-lular stimuli can induce cADPR production that leadsto calcium release or influx, establishing cADPR as asecond messenger. cADPR has been linked to a widevariety of cellular processes, but the molecular mecha-nisms regarding cADPR signaling remain elusive. Theaim of this review is to summarize the CD38/cADPR/Ca2+ signaling pathway, focusing on the recent advanc-es involving the mechanism and physiological functionsof cADPR-mediated Ca2+ mobilization.

  11. Modulation of bovine sperm signalling pathways: correlation between intracellular parameters and sperm capacitation and acrosome exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons-Rejraji, Hanae; Bailey, Janice L; Leclerc, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, the viability, intracellular pH (pHi), cAMP ([cAMP]i), calcium concentration and protein phosphotyrosine content were evaluated in relation to the acrosomal and capacitation status of freshly ejaculated bull spermatozoa. These parameters were evaluated before and after incubation with the capacitation inducer heparin, the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), the phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatase inhibitors phenylarsine oxide (PAO) and sodium orthovanadate, and hydrogen peroxide. The results obtained were integrated to address the physiological interactions between the different signalling events affecting sperm capacitation and acrosome reaction. As expected, heparin promoted the expression of the 'B' pattern of chlortetracycline binding, increased pHi, [cAMP]i and the phosphotyrosine content of sperm proteins. The effects of heparin were enhanced by IBMX. Both PAO and sodium orthovanadate stimulated protein phosphotyrosine content and acrosomal exocytosis, although only PAO affected pH, Ca2+ and cAMP levels. Intracellular pH was increased while both Ca2+ and [cAMP]i were decreased. Physiological concentrations of H2O2 increased [cAMP]i and promoted acrosomal exocytosis. A significant positive correlation was found between sperm capacitation, protein phosphotyrosine content and stored Ca2+ concentration, whereas the acrosome reaction was correlated with pHi and Ca2+ concentration. This study presents the first global analysis of the major elements individually described during sperm capacitation and acrosome reaction signalling pathways, supported by statistical correlations. PMID:19383258

  12. Signalling pathway impact analysis based on the strength of interaction between genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Zhenshen; Li, Xianbin; Zan, Xiangzhen; Shen, Liangzhong; Ma, Runnian; Liu, Wenbin

    2016-08-01

    Signalling pathway analysis is a popular approach that is used to identify significant cancer-related pathways based on differentially expressed genes (DEGs) from biological experiments. The main advantage of signalling pathway analysis lies in the fact that it assesses both the number of DEGs and the propagation of signal perturbation in signalling pathways. However, this method simplifies the interactions between genes by categorising them only as activation (+1) and suppression (-1), which does not encompass the range of interactions in real pathways, where interaction strength between genes may vary. In this study, the authors used newly developed signalling pathway impact analysis (SPIA) methods, SPIA based on Pearson correlation coefficient (PSPIA), and mutual information (MSPIA), to measure the interaction strength between pairs of genes. In analyses of a colorectal cancer dataset, a lung cancer dataset, and a pancreatic cancer dataset, PSPIA and MSPIA identified more candidate cancer-related pathways than were identified by SPIA. Generally, MSPIA performed better than PSPIA. PMID:27444024

  13. FGF signaling inhibitor, SPRY4, is evolutionarily conserved target of WNT signaling pathway in progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Yuriko; Katoh, Masaru

    2006-03-01

    WNT, FGF and Hedgehog signaling pathways network together during embryogenesis, tissue regeneration, and carcinogenesis. FGF16, FGF18, and FGF20 genes are targets of WNT-mediated TCF/LEF-beta-catenin-BCL9/BCL9L-PYGO transcriptional complex. SPROUTY (SPRY) and SPRED family genes encode inhibitors for receptor tyrosine kinase signaling cascades, such as those of FGF receptor family members and EGF receptor family members. Here, transcriptional regulation of SPRY1, SPRY2, SPRY3, SPRY4, SPRED1, SPRED2, and SPRED3 genes by WNT/beta-catenin signaling cascade was investigated by using bioinformatics and human intelligence (humint). Because double TCF/LEF-binding sites were identified within the 5'-promoter region of human SPRY4 gene, comparative genomics analyses on SPRY4 orthologs were further performed. SPRY4-FGF1 locus at human chromosome 5q31.3 and FGF2-NUDT6-SPATA5-SPRY1 locus at human chromosome 4q27-q28.1 were paralogous regions within the human genome. Chimpanzee SPRY4 gene was identified within NW_107083.1 genome sequence. Human, chimpanzee, rat and mouse SPRY4 orthologs, consisting of three exons, were well conserved. SPRY4 gene was identified as the evolutionarily conserved target of WNT/beta-catenin signaling pathway based on the conservation of double TCF/LEF-binding sites within 5'-promoter region of mammalian SPRY4 orthologs. Human SPRY4 mRNA was expressed in embryonic stem (ES) cells, brain, pancreatic islet, colon cancer, head and neck tumor, melanoma, and pancreatic cancer. WNT signaling activation in progenitor cells leads to the growth regulation of progenitor cells themselves through SPRY4 induction, and also to the growth stimulation of proliferating cells through FGF secretion. Epigenetic silencing and loss-of-function mutations of SPRY4 gene in progenitor cells could lead to carcinogenesis. SPRY4 is the pharmacogenomics target in the fields of oncology and regenerative medicine. PMID:16465403

  14. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Bradleigh; Tyerman, Stephen D.; Burton, Rachel A.; Gilliham, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    -regulated signaling pathways that control ripening would assist in addressing calcium deficiency disorders and improving fruit pathogen resistance. PMID:27200042

  15. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Bradleigh; Tyerman, Stephen D; Burton, Rachel A; Gilliham, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    -regulated signaling pathways that control ripening would assist in addressing calcium deficiency disorders and improving fruit pathogen resistance. PMID:27200042

  16. Role of endoplasmic reticulum calcium signaling in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena ePopugaeva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer disease (AD is a major threat of XXI century that is responsible for the majority of dementia in the elderly. Development of effective AD-preventing therapies are the top priority tasks for neuroscience research. Amyloid hypothesis of AD is a dominant idea in the field, but so far all amyloid-targeting therapies have failed in clinical trials. In addition to amyloid accumulation, there are consistent reports of abnormal calcium signaling in AD neurons. AD neurons exhibit enhanced intracellular calcium (Ca2+ liberation from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and reduced store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOC. These changes occur primarily as a result of ER Ca2+ overload. We argue that normalization of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis could be a strategy for development of effective disease-modifying therapies. The current review summarizes recent data about changes in ER Ca2+ signaling in AD. Ca2+ channels that are discussed in the current review include: inositol trisphosphate receptors (InsP3R, ryanodine receptors (RyanR, presenilins as ER Ca2+ leak channels and neuronal SOC channels. We discuss how function of these channels is altered in AD and how important are resulting Ca2+ signaling changes for AD pathogenesis.

  17. Activation of L-type calcium channels is required for gap junction-mediated intercellular calcium signaling in osteoblastic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Teilmann, Stefan Cuoni; Henriksen, Zanne;

    2003-01-01

    The propagation of mechanically induced intercellular calcium waves (ICW) among osteoblastic cells occurs both by activation of P2Y (purinergic) receptors by extracellular nucleotides, resulting in "fast" ICW, and by gap junctional communication in cells that express connexin43 (Cx43), resulting in...... extracellular calcium, plasma membrane depolarization by high extracellular potassium, and the L-type voltage-operated calcium channel inhibitor, nifedipine. In contrast, all these treatments enhanced the spread of P2 receptor-mediated ICW in UMR rat osteoblastic cells. Using UMR cells transfected to express Cx......43 (UMR/Cx43) we confirmed that nifedipine sensitivity of ICW required Cx43 expression. In human osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW also required activation of L-type calcium channels and influx of extracellular calcium....

  18. Regulation of Arabidopsis defense responses against Spodoptera littoralis by CPK-mediated calcium signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishihama Nobuaki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant Ca2+ signals are involved in a wide array of intracellular signaling pathways after pest invasion. Ca2+-binding sensory proteins such as Ca2+-dependent protein kinases (CPKs have been predicted to mediate the signaling following Ca2+ influx after insect herbivory. However, until now this prediction was not testable. Results To investigate the roles CPKs play in a herbivore response-signaling pathway, we screened the characteristics of Arabidopsis CPK mutants damaged by a feeding generalist herbivore, Spodoptera littoralis. Following insect attack, the cpk3 and cpk13 mutants showed lower transcript levels of plant defensin gene PDF1.2 compared to wild-type plants. The CPK cascade was not directly linked to the herbivory-induced signaling pathways that were mediated by defense-related phytohormones such as jasmonic acid and ethylene. CPK3 was also suggested to be involved in a negative feedback regulation of the cytosolic Ca2+ levels after herbivory and wounding damage. In vitro kinase assays of CPK3 protein with a suite of substrates demonstrated that the protein phosphorylates transcription factors (including ERF1, HsfB2a and CZF1/ZFAR1 in the presence of Ca2+. CPK13 strongly phosphorylated only HsfB2a, irrespective of the presence of Ca2+. Furthermore, in vivo agroinfiltration assays showed that CPK3-or CPK13-derived phosphorylation of a heat shock factor (HsfB2a promotes PDF1.2 transcriptional activation in the defense response. Conclusions These results reveal the involvement of two Arabidopsis CPKs (CPK3 and CPK13 in the herbivory-induced signaling network via HsfB2a-mediated regulation of the defense-related transcriptional machinery. This cascade is not involved in the phytohormone-related signaling pathways, but rather directly impacts transcription factors for defense responses.

  19. Sunlight UV-induced skin cancer relies upon activation of the p38α signaling pathway

    OpenAIRE

    LIU, KANGDONG; Yu, Donghoon; Cho, Yong-Yeon; Ann M Bode; Ma, Weiya; Yao, Ke; Li, Shengqing; Li, Jixia; Bowden, G. Tim; Dong, Ziming; Dong, Zigang

    2013-01-01

    The activation of cellular signal transduction pathways by solar ultraviolet (SUV) irradiation plays a vital role in skin tumorigenesis. Although many pathways have been studied using pure ultraviolet A (UVA) or ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation, the signaling pathways induced by SUV (i.e., sunlight) are not understood well enough to permit improvements for prevention, prognosis and treatment. Here we report parallel protein kinase array studies aimed at determining the dominant signaling pathw...

  20. Micro-RNA Feedback Loops Modulating the Calcineurin/NFAT Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shichina Kannambath

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT is a family of transcription factors important for innate and adaptive immune responses. NFAT activation is tightly regulated through the calcineurin/NFAT signaling pathway. There is increasing evidence on non-coding RNAs such as miRNAs playing a crucial role in regulating transcription factors and signaling pathways. However, not much is known about microRNAs (miRNAs targeting the calcineurin/NFAT signaling pathway involved in immune response in human. In this study, a comprehensive pathway level analysis has been carried out to identify miRNAs regulating the calcineurin/NFAT signaling pathway. Firstly, by incorporating experimental data and computational predictions, 191 unique miRNAs were identified to be targeting the calcineurin/NFAT signaling pathway in humans. Secondly, combining miRNA expression data from activated T cells and computational predictions, 32 miRNAs were observed to be induced by NFAT transcription factors. Finally, 11 miRNAs were identified to be involved in a feedback loop to modulate the calcineurin/NFAT signaling pathway activity. This data demonstrate the potential role of miRNAs as regulators of the calcineurin/NFAT signaling pathway. The present study thus emphasizes the importance of pathway level analysis to identify miRNAs and understands their role in modulating signaling pathways and transcription factor activity.

  1. Constant change: dynamic regulation of membrane transport by calcium signalling networks keeps plants in tune with their environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleist, Thomas J; Luan, Sheng

    2016-03-01

    Despite substantial variation and irregularities in their environment, plants must conform to spatiotemporal demands on the molecular composition of their cytosol. Cell membranes are the major interface between organisms and their environment and the basis for controlling the contents and intracellular organization of the cell. Membrane transport proteins (MTPs) govern the flow of molecules across membranes, and their activities are closely monitored and regulated by cell signalling networks. By continuously adjusting MTP activities, plants can mitigate the effects of environmental perturbations, but effective implementation of this strategy is reliant on precise coordination among transport systems that reside in distinct cell types and membranes. Here, we examine the role of calcium signalling in the coordination of membrane transport, with an emphasis on potassium transport. Potassium is an exceptionally abundant and mobile ion in plants, and plant potassium transport has been intensively studied for decades. Classic and recent studies have underscored the importance of calcium in plant environmental responses and membrane transport regulation. In reviewing recent advances in our understanding of the coding and decoding of calcium signals, we highlight established and emerging roles of calcium signalling in coordinating membrane transport among multiple subcellular locations and distinct transport systems in plants, drawing examples from the CBL-CIPK signalling network. By synthesizing classical studies and recent findings, we aim to provide timely insights on the role of calcium signalling networks in the modulation of membrane transport and its importance in plant environmental responses. PMID:26139029

  2. Modelling and simulation of signal transductions in an apoptosis pathway by using timed Petri nets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chen Li; Qi-Wei Ge; Mitsuru Nakata; Hiroshi Matsuno; Satoru Miyano

    2007-01-01

    This paper first presents basic Petri net components representing molecular interactions and mechanisms of signalling pathways, and introduces a method to construct a Petri net model of a signalling pathway with these components. Then a simulation method of determining the delay time of transitions, by using timed Petri nets – i.e. the time taken in firing of each transition – is proposed based on some simple principles that the number of tokens flowed into a place is equivalent to the number of tokens flowed out. Finally, the availability of proposed method is confirmed by observing signalling transductions in biological pathways through simulation experiments of the apoptosis signalling pathways as an example.

  3. Intracellular calcium signals display an avalanche-like behavior over multiple lengthscales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Lucía; Piegari, Estefanía; Sigaut, Lorena; Ponce Dawson, Silvina

    2012-01-01

    Many natural phenomena display "self-organized criticality" (SOC), (Bak et al., 1987). This refers to spatially extended systems for which patterns of activity characterized by different lengthscales can occur with a probability density that follows a power law with pattern size. Differently from power laws at phase transitions, systems displaying SOC do not need the tuning of an external parameter. Here we analyze intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) signals, a key component of the signaling toolkit of almost any cell type. Ca(2+) signals can either be spatially restricted (local) or propagate throughout the cell (global). Different models have suggested that the transition from local to global signals is similar to that of directed percolation. Directed percolation has been associated, in turn, to the appearance of SOC. In this paper we discuss these issues within the framework of simple models of Ca(2+) signal propagation. We also analyze the size distribution of local signals ("puffs") observed in immature Xenopus Laevis oocytes. The puff amplitude distribution obtained from observed local signals is not Gaussian with a noticeable fraction of large size events. The experimental distribution of puff areas in the spatio-temporal record of the image has a long tail that is approximately log-normal. The distribution can also be fitted with a power law relationship albeit with a smaller goodness of fit. The power law behavior is encountered within a simple model that includes some coupling among individual signals for a wide range of parameter values. An analysis of the model shows that a global elevation of the Ca(2+) concentration plays a major role in determining whether the puff size distribution is long-tailed or not. This suggests that Ca(2+)-clearing from the cytosol is key to determine whether IP(3)-mediated Ca(2+) signals can display a SOC-like behavior or not. PMID:22969730

  4. Intracellular calcium signals display an avalanche-like behavior over multiple lengthscales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LucíaLopez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Many natural phenomena display "self-organized criticality'' (SOC. This refers to spatially extended systems for which patterns of activity characterized by different lengthscales can occur with a probability density that follows a power law with pattern size. Differently from power laws at phase transitions, systems displaying SOC do not need the tuning of an external parameter. Here we analyze intracellular calcium Ca2+ signals, a key component of the signaling toolkit of almost any cell type. Ca2+ signals can either be spatially restricted (local or propagate throughout the cell (global. Different models have suggested that the transition from local to global signals is similar to that of directed percolation. Directed percolation has been associated, in turn, to the appearance of self-organized criticality. In this paper we discuss these issues within the framework of simple models of Ca2+ signal propagation. We also analyze the size distribution of local signals ("puffs'' observed in immature Xenopus Laevis oocytes. The puff amplitude distribution obtained from observed local signals is not Gaussian with a noticeable fraction of large size events. The experimental distribution of puff areas in the spatio-temporal record of the image has a long tail that is approximately log-normal. The distribution can also be fitted with a power law relationship albeit with a smaller goodness of fit. The power law behavior is encountered within a simple model that includes some coupling among individual signals for a wide range of parameter values. An analysis of the model shows that a global elevation of the Ca2+ concentration plays a major role in determining whether the puff size distribution is long-tailed or not. This suggests that Ca2+-clearing from the cytosol is key to determine whether IP3-mediated Ca2+ signals can display a SOC-like behavior or not.

  5. Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas: Opening Access to the Biology of Nuclear Receptor Signaling Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren B Becnel

    Full Text Available Signaling pathways involving nuclear receptors (NRs, their ligands and coregulators, regulate tissue-specific transcriptomes in diverse processes, including development, metabolism, reproduction, the immune response and neuronal function, as well as in their associated pathologies. The Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA is a Consortium focused around a Hub website (www.nursa.org that annotates and integrates diverse 'omics datasets originating from the published literature and NURSA-funded Data Source Projects (NDSPs. These datasets are then exposed to the scientific community on an Open Access basis through user-friendly data browsing and search interfaces. Here, we describe the redesign of the Hub, version 3.0, to deploy "Web 2.0" technologies and add richer, more diverse content. The Molecule Pages, which aggregate information relevant to NR signaling pathways from myriad external databases, have been enhanced to include resources for basic scientists, such as post-translational modification sites and targeting miRNAs, and for clinicians, such as clinical trials. A portal to NURSA's Open Access, PubMed-indexed journal Nuclear Receptor Signaling has been added to facilitate manuscript submissions. Datasets and information on reagents generated by NDSPs are available, as is information concerning periodic new NDSP funding solicitations. Finally, the new website integrates the Transcriptomine analysis tool, which allows for mining of millions of richly annotated public transcriptomic data points in the field, providing an environment for dataset re-use and citation, bench data validation and hypothesis generation. We anticipate that this new release of the NURSA database will have tangible, long term benefits for both basic and clinical research in this field.

  6. Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas: Opening Access to the Biology of Nuclear Receptor Signaling Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becnel, Lauren B.; Darlington, Yolanda F.; Ochsner, Scott A.; Easton-Marks, Jeremy R.; Watkins, Christopher M.; McOwiti, Apollo; Kankanamge, Wasula H.; Wise, Michael W.; DeHart, Michael; Margolis, Ronald N.; McKenna, Neil J.

    2015-01-01

    Signaling pathways involving nuclear receptors (NRs), their ligands and coregulators, regulate tissue-specific transcriptomes in diverse processes, including development, metabolism, reproduction, the immune response and neuronal function, as well as in their associated pathologies. The Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA) is a Consortium focused around a Hub website (www.nursa.org) that annotates and integrates diverse ‘omics datasets originating from the published literature and NURSA-funded Data Source Projects (NDSPs). These datasets are then exposed to the scientific community on an Open Access basis through user-friendly data browsing and search interfaces. Here, we describe the redesign of the Hub, version 3.0, to deploy “Web 2.0” technologies and add richer, more diverse content. The Molecule Pages, which aggregate information relevant to NR signaling pathways from myriad external databases, have been enhanced to include resources for basic scientists, such as post-translational modification sites and targeting miRNAs, and for clinicians, such as clinical trials. A portal to NURSA’s Open Access, PubMed-indexed journal Nuclear Receptor Signaling has been added to facilitate manuscript submissions. Datasets and information on reagents generated by NDSPs are available, as is information concerning periodic new NDSP funding solicitations. Finally, the new website integrates the Transcriptomine analysis tool, which allows for mining of millions of richly annotated public transcriptomic data points in the field, providing an environment for dataset re-use and citation, bench data validation and hypothesis generation. We anticipate that this new release of the NURSA database will have tangible, long term benefits for both basic and clinical research in this field. PMID:26325041

  7. Preparing nano-calcium phosphate particles via a biologically friendly pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Qinghong; Xu Xurong; Tang Ruikang [Department of Chemistry and Centre of Biopathways and Biomaterials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejang 310027 (China); Ji Huijiao; Liu Yukan; Zhang Ming, E-mail: rtang@zju.edu.c [Department of Biology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China)

    2010-08-01

    It is widely agreed that nano-calcium phosphates (CaP) play an important role in tissue engineering and medical application due to their unique biological characteristics. However, the properties of nano-CaP, including bioactivity, biocompatibility and mechanical properties, are tailored over wide ranges by controlling the size and morphology of particles. Therefore, it is important to develop synthesis methods which can control the particle size distribution and shape uniformly. In this study, we report that polyacrylic acid (PAA) can act as an efficient agent to modulate nano-CaP formation. The dimension of the resultant sphere-like nanoparticles (5-60 nm) can readily be regulated by changing PAA concentrations (75-200 {mu}g ml{sup -1}). In contrast to other additives, PAA is a water-soluble polymer that has already been used as an excellent biocompatible implant material in vivo. Our in vitro proliferation experiments of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) demonstrate that the involvement of PAA does not change the bioactivity of the resultant nano-CaP. In contrast, the nano-CaP fabricated by using another typical control agent, hexadecyl (cetyl) trimethyl ammonium bromide, suppressed the cell proliferation of BMSCs. Thus, we suggest that the biopolymer, PAA, can provide a more biologically friendly pathway to prepare biological nano-CaP for biomedical application. (communication)

  8. Preparing nano-calcium phosphate particles via a biologically friendly pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is widely agreed that nano-calcium phosphates (CaP) play an important role in tissue engineering and medical application due to their unique biological characteristics. However, the properties of nano-CaP, including bioactivity, biocompatibility and mechanical properties, are tailored over wide ranges by controlling the size and morphology of particles. Therefore, it is important to develop synthesis methods which can control the particle size distribution and shape uniformly. In this study, we report that polyacrylic acid (PAA) can act as an efficient agent to modulate nano-CaP formation. The dimension of the resultant sphere-like nanoparticles (5-60 nm) can readily be regulated by changing PAA concentrations (75-200 μg ml-1). In contrast to other additives, PAA is a water-soluble polymer that has already been used as an excellent biocompatible implant material in vivo. Our in vitro proliferation experiments of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) demonstrate that the involvement of PAA does not change the bioactivity of the resultant nano-CaP. In contrast, the nano-CaP fabricated by using another typical control agent, hexadecyl (cetyl) trimethyl ammonium bromide, suppressed the cell proliferation of BMSCs. Thus, we suggest that the biopolymer, PAA, can provide a more biologically friendly pathway to prepare biological nano-CaP for biomedical application. (communication)

  9. Progesterone in pregnancy; receptor-ligand interaction and signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekeres-Bartho, Julia; Halasz, Melinda; Palkovics, Tamas

    2009-12-01

    Progesterone is indispensable in creating a suitable endometrial environment for implantation, and also for the maintenance of pregnancy. Successful pregnancy depends on an appropriate maternal immune response to the fetus. Along with its endocrine effects, progesterone also acts as an "immunosteroid", by contributing to the establishment of a pregnancy protective immune milieu. Progesterone plays a role in uterine homing of NK cells and upregulates HLA-G gene expression, the ligand for NK inhibitory and activating receptors. At high concentrations, progesterone is a potent inducer of Th2-type cytokines as well as of LIF and M-CSF production by T cells. A protein called progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF), by inducing a Th2-dominant cytokine production mediates the immunological effects of progesterone. PIBF binds to a novel type of the IL-4 receptor and signals via the Jak/STAT pathway, to induce a number of genes, that not only affect the immune response, but might also play a role in trophoblast invasiveness. PMID:19880194

  10. The VEGF signaling pathway in cancer: the road ahead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven A. Stacker

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF family of soluble protein growth factors consists of key mediators of angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in the context of tumor biology. The members of the family, VEGF-A (also known as VEGF, VEGF-B, VEGF-C, VEGF-D, and placenta growth factor (PlGF, play important roles in vascular biology in both normal physiology and pathology. The generation of a humanized neutralizing antibody to VEGF-A (bevacizumab, also known as Avastin and the demonstration of its benefit in numerous human cancers have confirmed the merit of an anti-angiogenesis approach to cancer treatment and have validated the VEGF-A signaling pathway as a therapeutic target. Other members of the VEGF family are now being targeted, and their relevance to human cancer and the development of resistance to anti-VEGF-A treatment are being evaluated in the clinic. Here, we discuss the potential of targeting VEGF family members in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

  11. Functional comparison of innate immune signaling pathways in primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis B Barreiro

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Humans respond differently than other primates to a large number of infections. Differences in susceptibility to infectious agents between humans and other primates are probably due to inter-species differences in immune response to infection. Consistent with that notion, genes involved in immunity-related processes are strongly enriched among recent targets of positive selection in primates, suggesting that immune responses evolve rapidly, yet providing only indirect evidence for possible inter-species functional differences. To directly compare immune responses among primates, we stimulated primary monocytes from humans, chimpanzees, and rhesus macaques with lipopolysaccharide (LPS and studied the ensuing time-course regulatory responses. We find that, while the universal Toll-like receptor response is mostly conserved across primates, the regulatory response associated with viral infections is often lineage-specific, probably reflecting rapid host-virus mutual adaptation cycles. Additionally, human-specific immune responses are enriched for genes involved in apoptosis, as well as for genes associated with cancer and with susceptibility to infectious diseases or immune-related disorders. Finally, we find that chimpanzee-specific immune signaling pathways are enriched for HIV-interacting genes. Put together, our observations lend strong support to the notion that lineage-specific immune responses may help explain known inter-species differences in susceptibility to infectious diseases.

  12. Urotensin II inhibits skeletal muscle glucose transport signaling pathways via the NADPH oxidase pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Xia Wang

    Full Text Available Our previous studies have demonstrated that the urotensin (UII and its receptor are up-regulated in the skeletal muscle of mice with type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM, but the significance of UII in skeletal muscle insulin resistance remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of UII on NADPH oxidase and glucose transport signaling pathways in the skeletal muscle of mice with T2DM and in C2C12 mouse myotube cells. KK/upj-AY/J mice (KK mice were divided into the following groups: KK group, with saline treatment for 2 weeks; KK+ urantide group, with daily 30 µg/kg body weight injections over the same time period of urantide, a potent urotensin II antagonist peptide; Non-diabetic C57BL/6J mice were used as normal controls. After urantide treatment, mice were subjected to an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test, in addition to measurements of the levels of ROS, NADPH oxidase and the phosphorylated AKT, PKC and ERK. C2C12 cells were incubated with serum-free DMEM for 24 hours before conducting the experiments, and then administrated with 100 nM UII for 2 hours or 24 hours. Urantide treatment improved glucose tolerance, decreased the translocation of the NADPH subunits p40-phox and p47-phox, and increased levels of the phosphorylated PKC, AKT and ERK. In contrast, UII treatment increased ROS production and p47-phox and p67-phox translocation, and decreased the phosphorylated AKT, ERK1/2 and p38MAPK; Apocynin abrogated this effect. In conclusion, UII increased ROS production by NADPH oxidase, leading to the inhibition of signaling pathways involving glucose transport, such as AKT/PKC/ERK. Our data imply a role for UII at the molecular level in glucose homeostasis, and possibly in skeletal muscle insulin resistance in T2DM.

  13. Testosterone induces molecular changes in dopamine signaling pathway molecules in the adolescent male rat nigrostriatal pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tertia D Purves-Tyson

    Full Text Available Adolescent males have an increased risk of developing schizophrenia, implicating testosterone in the precipitation of dopamine-related psychopathology. Evidence from adult rodent brain indicates that testosterone can modulate nigrostriatal dopamine. However, studies are required to understand the role testosterone plays in maturation of dopamine pathways during adolescence and to elucidate the molecular mechanism(s by which testosterone exerts its effects. We hypothesized that molecular indices of dopamine neurotransmission [synthesis (tyrosine hydroxylase, breakdown (catechol-O-methyl transferase; monoamine oxygenase, transport [vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT, dopamine transporter (DAT] and receptors (DRD1-D5] would be changed by testosterone or its metabolites, dihydrotestosterone and 17β-estradiol, in the nigrostriatal pathway of adolescent male rats. We found that testosterone and dihydrotestosterone increased DAT and VMAT mRNAs in the substantia nigra and that testosterone increased DAT protein at the region of the cell bodies, but not in target regions in the striatum. Dopamine receptor D2 mRNA was increased and D3 mRNA was decreased in substantia nigra and/or striatum by androgens. These data suggest that increased testosterone at adolescence may change dopamine responsivity of the nigrostriatal pathway by modulating, at a molecular level, the capacity of neurons to transport and respond to dopamine. Further, dopamine turnover was increased in the dorsal striatum following gonadectomy and this was prevented by testosterone replacement. Gene expression changes in the dopaminergic cell body region may serve to modulate both dendritic dopamine feedback inhibition and reuptake in the dopaminergic somatodendritic field as well as dopamine release and re-uptake dynamics at the presynaptic terminals in the striatum. These testosterone-induced changes of molecular indices of dopamine neurotransmission in males are primarily androgen

  14. The role of Ca(2+) mediated signaling pathways on the effect of taurine against Streptococcus uberis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Bin; Zhang, Jinqiu; Liu, Ming; Lu, Jinye; Zhang, Yuanshu; Xu, Yuanyuan; Miao, Jinfeng; Yin, Yulong

    2016-08-30

    To provide insight into the mechanisms of taurine attenuation of pro-inflammatory response in mouse mammary epithelial cell line (EpH4-Ev, purchased by ATCC, USA) after Streptococcus uberis (S. uberis, 0140J) challenge, we infected MECs with S. uberis (2.5×10(7)cfumL(-1), MOI=10) for 3h and quantified changes in TLR-2 and calcium (Ca(2+)) mediated signaling pathways. The results indicate that S. uberis infection significantly increases the expression of TLR-2, intracellular Ca(2+) levels, PLC-γ1 and PKC-α, the activities of transcription factors NF-κB and NFAT, and related cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, G-CSF, IL-2, KC, IL-15, FasL, MCP-1, and LIX) in culture supernatants. Taurine administration downregulated all these indices, the activities of NF-κB and NFAT. Cytokine secretions were similar using special PKC inhibitor Go 6983 and NFAT inhibitor VIVIT. Our data indicate that S. uberis infection induces pro-inflammatory response of MECs through a TLR-2 mediated signaling pathway. In addition, taurine can prevent MEC damage by affecting both PLC-γ1-Ca(2+)-PKC-α-NF-κB and PLC-γ1-Ca(2+)-NFATs signaling pathways. This is the first report to demonstrate the mechanisms of taurine attenuated pro-inflammatory response in MECs after S. uberis challenge. PMID:27527761

  15. Chronic exposure to paclitaxel diminishes phosphoinositide signaling by calpain-mediated neuronal calcium sensor-1 degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehmerle, Wolfgang; Zhang, Kun; Sivula, Michael; Heidrich, Felix M; Lee, Yashang; Jordt, Sven-Eric; Ehrlich, Barbara E

    2007-06-26

    Paclitaxel (Taxol) is a well established chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of solid tumors, but it is limited in its usefulness by the frequent induction of peripheral neuropathy. We found that prolonged exposure of a neuroblastoma cell line and primary rat dorsal root ganglia with therapeutic concentrations of Taxol leads to a reduction in inositol trisphosphate (InsP(3))-mediated Ca(2+) signaling. We also observed a Taxol-specific reduction in neuronal calcium sensor 1 (NCS-1) protein levels, a known modulator of InsP(3) receptor (InsP(3)R) activity. This reduction was also found in peripheral neuronal tissue from Taxol treated animals. We further observed that short hairpin RNA-mediated NCS-1 knockdown had a similar effect on phosphoinositide-mediated Ca(2+) signaling. When NCS-1 protein levels recovered, so did InsP(3)-mediated Ca(2+) signaling. Inhibition of the Ca(2+)-activated protease mu-calpain prevented alterations in phosphoinositide-mediated Ca(2+) signaling and NCS-1 protein levels. We also found that NCS-1 is readily degraded by mu-calpain in vitro and that mu-calpain activity is increased in Taxol but not vehicle-treated cells. From these results, we conclude that prolonged exposure to Taxol activates mu-calpain, which leads to the degradation of NCS-1, which, in turn, attenuates InsP(3)mediated Ca(2+) signaling. These findings provide a previously undescribed approach to understanding and treating Taxol-induced peripheral neuropathy. PMID:17581879

  16. Stroma cell-derived factor-1α signaling enhances calcium transients and beating frequency in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ielham Hadad

    Full Text Available Stroma cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α is a cardioprotective chemokine, acting through its G-protein coupled receptor CXCR4. In experimental acute myocardial infarction, administration of SDF-1α induces an early improvement of systolic function which is difficult to explain solely by an anti-apoptotic and angiogenic effect. We wondered whether SDF-1α signaling might have direct effects on calcium transients and beating frequency.Primary rat neonatal cardiomyocytes were culture-expanded and characterized by immunofluorescence staining. Calcium sparks were studied by fluorescence microscopy after calcium loading with the Fluo-4 acetoxymethyl ester sensor. The cardiomyocyte enriched cellular suspension expressed troponin I and CXCR4 but was vimentin negative. Addition of SDF-1α in the medium increased cytoplasmic calcium release. The calcium response was completely abolished by using a neutralizing anti-CXCR4 antibody and partially suppressed and delayed by preincubation with an inositol triphosphate receptor (IP3R blocker, but not with a ryanodine receptor (RyR antagonist. Calcium fluxes induced by caffeine, a RyR agonist, were decreased by an IP3R blocker. Treatment with forskolin or SDF-1α increased cardiomyocyte beating frequency and their effects were additive. In vivo, treatment with SDF-1α increased left ventricular dP/dtmax.These results suggest that in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes, the SDF-1α/CXCR4 signaling increases calcium transients in an IP3-gated fashion leading to a positive chronotropic and inotropic effect.

  17. Rapid and Localized Mechanical Stimulation and Adhesion Assay: TRPM7 Involvement in Calcium Signaling and Cell Adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner Shin Nishitani; Adriano Mesquita Alencar; Yingxiao Wang

    2015-01-01

    A cell mechanical stimulation equipment, based on cell substrate deformation, and a more sensitive method for measuring adhesion of cells were developed. A probe, precisely positioned close to the cell, was capable of a vertical localized mechanical stimulation with a temporal frequency of 207 Hz, and strain magnitude of 50%. This setup was characterized and used to probe the response of Human Umbilical Endothelial Vein Cells (HUVECs) in terms of calcium signaling. The intracellular calcium i...

  18. Scotopic Visual Signaling in the Mouse Retina Is Modulated by High-Affinity Plasma Membrane Calcium Extrusion

    OpenAIRE

    Duncan, Jacque L.; Yang, Haidong; Doan, Thuy; Silverstein, Robert S.; Murphy, Gabe J.; Nune, George; Liu, Xiaorong; Copenhagen, David; Tempel, Bruce L; Rieke, Fred; KRIŽAJ, DAVID

    2006-01-01

    Transmission of visual signals at the first retinal synapse is associated with changes in calcium concentration in photoreceptors and bipolar cells. We investigated how loss of plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase isoform 2 (PMCA2), the calcium transporter isoform with the highest affinity for Ca2+/calmodulin, affects transmission of rod- and cone-mediated responses. PMCA2 expression in the neuroblast layer was observed soon after birth; in the adult, PMCA2 was expressed in inner segments and synaptic...

  19. Calcium-sensing receptors regulate cardiomyocyte Ca2+ signaling via the sarcoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrion interface during hypoxia/reoxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Fang-hao

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Communication between the SR (sarcoplasmic reticulum, SR and mitochondria is important for cell survival and apoptosis. The SR supplies Ca2+ directly to mitochondria via inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs at close contacts between the two organelles referred to as mitochondrion-associated ER membrane (MAM. Although it has been demonstrated that CaR (calcium sensing receptor activation is involved in intracellular calcium overload during hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/Re, the role of CaR activation in the cardiomyocyte apoptotic pathway remains unclear. We postulated that CaR activation plays a role in the regulation of SR-mitochondrial inter-organelle Ca2+ signaling, causing apoptosis during H/Re. To investigate the above hypothesis, cultured cardiomyocytes were subjected to H/Re. We examined the distribution of IP3Rs in cardiomyocytes via immunofluorescence and Western blotting and found that type 3 IP3Rs were located in the SR. [Ca2+]i, [Ca2+]m and [Ca2+]SR were determined using Fluo-4, x-rhod-1 and Fluo 5N, respectively, and the mitochondrial membrane potential was detected with JC-1 during reoxygenation using laser confocal microscopy. We found that activation of CaR reduced [Ca2+]SR, increased [Ca2+]i and [Ca2+]m and decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential during reoxygenation. We found that the activation of CaR caused the cleavage of BAP31, thus generating the pro-apoptotic p20 fragment, which induced the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria and the translocation of bak/bax to mitochondria. Taken together, these results reveal that CaR activation causes Ca2+ release from the SR into the mitochondria through IP3Rs and induces cardiomyocyte apoptosis during hypoxia/reoxygenation.

  20. The role of the sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling pathway in osteocyte mechanotransduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia-Ning; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Chao; Han, Elizabeth S; Yu, Xue; Lidington, Darcy; Bolz, Steffen-Sebastian; You, Lidan

    2015-10-01

    Osteocytes are proposed to be the mechanosensory cells that translate mechanical loading into biochemical signals during the process of bone adaptation. The lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) has been reported to play a role in the mechanotransduction process of blood vessels and also in the dynamic control of bone mineral homeostasis. Nevertheless, the potential role of S1P in bone mechanotransduction has yet to be elucidated. In this study, we hypothesized that a S1P cascade is involved in the activation of osteocytes in response to loading-induced oscillatory fluid flow (OFF) in bone. MLO-Y4 osteocyte-like cells express the necessary components of a functional S1P cascade. To examine the involvement of S1P signaling in osteocyte mechanotransduction, we applied OFF (1 Pa, 1 Hz) to osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 cells under conditions where the S1P signaling pathway was modulated. We found that decreased endogenous S1P levels significantly suppressed the OFF-induced intracellular calcium response. Addition of extracellular S1P to MLO-Y4 cells enhanced the synthesis and release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) under static cells and amplified OFF-induced PGE2 release. The stimulatory effect of OFF on the gene expression levels of osteoprotegerin (OPG) and receptor activator for nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) was S1P dependent. Furthermore, the S1P2 receptor subtype was shown to be involved in OFF-induced PGE2 synthesis and release, as well as down-regulation of RANKL/OPG gene expression ratio. In summary, our data suggest that S1P cascade is involved in OFF-induced mechanotransduction in MLO-Y4 cells and that extracellular S1P exerts its effect partly through S1P2 receptors. PMID:25988659

  1. An interplay between 2 signaling pathways: Melatonin-cAMP and IP{sub 3}–Ca{sup 2+} signaling pathways control intraerythrocytic development of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuyama, Wakako [National Research Center for Protozoan Diseases, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro, Hokkaido 080-8555 (Japan); Enomoto, Masahiro [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, M5G1L7 Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Mossaad, Ehab [National Research Center for Protozoan Diseases, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro, Hokkaido 080-8555 (Japan); Kawai, Satoru [Laboratory of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology, Dokkyo Medical University, Mibu, Tochigi 321-0293 (Japan); Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko [Laboratory for Developmental Neurobiology, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kawazu, Shin-ichiro, E-mail: skawazu@obihiro.ac.jp [National Research Center for Protozoan Diseases, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro, Hokkaido 080-8555 (Japan)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • A melatonin receptor antagonist blocked Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in P. falciparum and inhibited parasite growth. • P. falciparum development is controlled by Ca{sup 2+}- and cAMP-signaling pathways. • The cAMP-signaling pathway at ring form and late trophozoite stages governs parasite growth of P. falciparum. - Abstract: Plasmodium falciparum spends most of its asexual life cycle within human erythrocytes, where proliferation and maturation occur. Development into the mature forms of P. falciparum causes severe symptoms due to its distinctive sequestration capability. However, the physiological roles and the molecular mechanisms of signaling pathways that govern development are poorly understood. Our previous study showed that P. falciparum exhibits stage-specific spontaneous Calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) oscillations in ring and early trophozoites, and the latter was essential for parasite development. In this study, we show that luzindole (LZ), a selective melatonin receptor antagonist, inhibits parasite growth. Analyses of development and morphology of LZ-treated P. falciparum revealed that LZ severely disrupted intraerythrocytic maturation, resulting in parasite death. When LZ was added at ring stage, the parasite could not undergo further development, whereas LZ added at the trophozoite stage inhibited development from early into late schizonts. Live-cell Ca{sup 2+} imaging showed that LZ treatment completely abolished Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in the ring forms while having little effect on early trophozoites. Further, the melatonin-induced cAMP increase observed at ring and late trophozoite stage was attenuated by LZ treatment. These suggest that a complex interplay between IP{sub 3}–Ca{sup 2+} and cAMP signaling pathways is involved in intraerythrocytic development of P. falciparum.

  2. Comparative Detection of Calcium Fluctuations in Single Female Sex Cells of Tobacco to Distinguish Calcium Signals Triggered by in vitro Fertilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiong-Bo Peng; Meng-Xiang Sun; Hong-Yuan Yang

    2009-01-01

    Double fertilization is a key process of sexual reproduction in higher plants. The role of calcium In the activation of female sex cells through fertilization has recently received a great deal of attention. The establishment of a Ca-imaging technique for living, single, female sex cells is a difficult but necessary prerequisite for evaluating the role of Ca in the transduction of external stimuli, including the fusion with the sperm cell, to internal cellular processes. The present study describes the use of Fluo-3 for reporting the Ca signal in isolated, single, female sex cells, egg cells and central cells, of tobacco plants. A suitable loading protocol was optimized by loading the cells at pH 5.6 with 2 μM Fluo-3 for 30 min at 30℃. Under theseconditions, several key factors related to in vitro fertilization were also investigated in order to test their possible effects onthe [Ca] of the female sex cells. The results indicated that the bovine serum albumin-fusion system was superior to the polyethlene glycol.fusion system for detecting calcium fluctuations in female sex cells during fertilization. The central cell was fertilized with the sperm cell in bovine serum albumin; however, no evident calcium dynamic was detected, implying that a transient calcium rise might be a specific signal for egg cell fertilization.

  3. Interplay between phosphoinositide lipids and calcium signals at the leading edge of chemotaxing ameboid cells☆

    OpenAIRE

    Falke, Joseph J.; Ziemba, Brian P

    2014-01-01

    The chemotactic migration of eukaryotic ameboid cells up concentration gradients is among the most advanced forms of cellular behavior. Chemotaxis is controlled by a complex network of signaling proteins bound to specific lipids on the cytoplasmic surface of the plasma membrane at the front of the cell, or the leading edge. The central lipid players in this leading edge signaling pathway include the phosphoinositides PI(4,5)P2 (PIP2) and PI(3,4,5)P3 (PIP3), both of which play multiple roles. ...

  4. Preventive effects of imperatorin on perfluorohexanesulfonate-induced neuronal apoptosis via inhibition of intracellular calcium-mediated ERK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunkyung; Choi, So-Young; Yang, Jae-Ho; Lee, Youn Ju

    2016-07-01

    Early life neuronal exposure to environmental toxicants has been suggested to be an important etiology of neurodegenerative disease development. Perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS), one of the major perfluoroalkyl compounds, is widely distributed environmental contaminants. We have reported that PFHxS induces neuronal apoptosis via ERK-mediated pathway. Imperatorin is a furanocoumarin found in various edible plants and has a wide range of pharmacological effects including neuroprotection. In this study, the effects of imperatorin on PFHxS-induced neuronal apoptosis and the underlying mechanisms are examined using cerebellar granule cells (CGC). CGC were isolated from seven-day old rats and were grown in culture for seven days. Caspase-3 activity and TUNEL staining were used to determine neuronal apoptosis. PFHxS-induced apoptosis of CGC was significantly reduced by imperatorin and PD98059, an ERK pathway inhibitor. PFHxS induced a persistent increase in intracellular calcium, which was significantly blocked by imperatorin, NMDA receptor antagonist, MK801 and the L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel blockers, diltiazem and nifedipine. The activation of caspase-3 by PFHxS was also inhibited by MK801, diltiazem and nifedipine. PFHxS-increased ERK activation was inhibited by imperatorin, MK801, diltiazem and nifedipine. Taken together, imperatorin protects CGC against PFHxS-induced apoptosis via inhibition of NMDA receptor/intracellular calcium-mediated ERK pathway. PMID:27382356

  5. Possible Molecular Targets of Cinnamon in the Insulin Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana Eijaz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cinnamon (CN is known for its anti-diabetic activities in traditional medicine. CN extracts are reported to have beneficial effects on normal and impaired glucose tolerance, insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes. However, molecular characterization of cinnamon effects is limited. The aim of this study is to observe the effect of CN extract on certain diabetogenes involved in insulin signaling. Streptozotocin (STZ induced type-2 diabetic rats were given CN extract for one month and its effect was observed on blood glucose levels, body weights and gene expression levels of protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP-1B, insulin receptor (INSR, insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K, protein kinase B (PKB, protein kinase C-theta (PKCθ and phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1 in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Statistically significant difference was found in the glucose levels and body weights (p = <0.001; 0.002 respectively of test and diabetic control groups. In muscle, statistically significant difference was observed in gene expression levels of PTP-1B, IRS-1, PKB, PDK1, PI3K and PKCθ (p = 0.03; <0.001; 0.02; 0.001; 0.01; <0.001 respectively between test and diabetic control groups and PTP-1B, IRS-1, PKB, PDK1 and PKCθ (p = 0.01; 0.01; 0.03; 0.01; <0.001 respectively between normal and diabetic control groups. In adipose tissue, statistically significant difference was found in gene expression levels of PTP-1B, PKCθ, IRS-1 (p = <0.001; 0.04; 0.01 respectively between test and diabetic control groups and PTP-1B, PDK1, PI3K, PKCθ and IRS-1 (p = 0.002; 0.02; 0.02; 0.002; <0.001 respectively between normal and diabetic control groups. These results suggest that cinnamon normalizes blood glucose level and body weight and affect certain molecular targets in the insulin signaling pathway and therefore, possess strong anti-diabetogenic and hypoglycemic action in HFD and STZ-induced type-2 diabetic rat model

  6. Detection of differentially regulated subsarcolemmal calcium signals activated by vasoactive agonists in rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells

    OpenAIRE

    Subedi, Krishna P; Paudel, Omkar; Sham, James S.K.

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular calcium (Ca2+) plays pivotal roles in distinct cellular functions through global and local signaling in various subcellular compartments, and subcellular Ca2+ signal is the key factor for independent regulation of different cellular functions. In vascular smooth muscle cells, subsarcolemmal Ca2+ is an important regulator of excitation-contraction coupling, and nucleoplasmic Ca2+ is crucial for excitation-transcription coupling. However, information on Ca2+ signals in these subce...

  7. Characteristics of calcium signaling in astrocytes induced by photostimulation with femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuan; Zhang, Yuan; Zhou, Wei; Liu, Xiuli; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2010-05-01

    Astrocytes have been identified to actively contribute to brain functions through Ca2+ signaling, serving as a bridge to communicate with neurons and other brain cells. However, conventional stimulation techniques are hard to apply to delicate investigations on astrocytes. Our group previously reported photostimulation with a femtosecond laser to evoke astrocytic calcium (Ca2+) waves, providing a noninvasive and efficient approach with highly precise targeting. In this work, detailed characteristics of astrocytic Ca2+ signaling induced by photostimulation are presented. In a purified astrocytic culture, after the illumination of a femtosecond laser onto one cell, a Ca2+ wave throughout the network with reduced speed is induced, and intracellular Ca2+ oscillations are observed. The intercellular propagation is pharmacologically confirmed to be mainly mediated by ATP through P2Y receptors. Different patterns of Ca2+ elevations with increased amplitude in the stimulated astrocyte are discovered by varying the femtosecond laser power, which is correspondingly followed by broader intercellular waves. These indicate that the strength of photogenerated Ca2+ signaling in astrocytes has a positive relationship with the stimulating laser power. Therefore, distinct Ca2+ signaling is feasibly available for specific studies on astrocytes by employing precisely controlled photostimulation.

  8. From tyrosine to melanin: Signaling pathways and factors regulating melanogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzepka, Zuzanna; Buszman, Ewa; Beberok, Artur; Wrześniok, Dorota

    2016-01-01

    Melanins are natural pigments of skin, hair and eyes and can be classified into two main types: brown to black eumelanin and yellow to reddish-brown pheomelanin. Biosynthesis of melanins takes place in melanosomes, which are specialized cytoplasmic organelles of melanocytes - dendritic cells located in the basal layer of the epidermis, uveal tract of the eye, hair follicles, as well as in the inner ear, central nervous system and heart. Melanogenesis is a multistep process and begins with the conversion of amino acid L-tyrosine to DOPAquinone. The addition of cysteine or glutathione to DOPAquinone leads to the intermediates formation, followed by subsequent transformations and polymerization to the final product, pheomelanin. In the absence of thiol compounds DOPAquinone undergoes an intramolecular cyclization and oxidation to form DOPAchrome, which is then converted to 5,6-dihydroksyindole (DHI) or 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA). Eumelanin is formed by polymerization of DHI and DHICA and their quinones. Regulation of melanogenesis is achieved by physical and biochemical factors. The article presents the intracellular signaling pathways: cAMP/PKA/CREB/MITF cascade, MAP kinases cascade, PLC/DAG/PKCβ cascade and NO/cGMP/PKG cascade, which are involved in the regulation of expression and activity of the melanogenesis-related proteins by ultraviolet radiation and endogenous agents (cytokines, hormones). Activity of the key melanogenic enzyme, tyrosinase, is also affected by pH and temperature. Many pharmacologically active substances are able to inhibit or stimulate melanin biosynthesis, as evidenced by in vitro studies on cultured pigment cells. PMID:27356601

  9. Segregation of Axial Motor and Sensory Pathways via Heterotypic Trans-Axonal Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Gallarda, Benjamin W.; Bonanomi, Dario; Müller, Daniel; Brown, Arthur; Alaynick, William A; Andrews, Shane E.; Lemke, Greg; Pfaff, Samuel L.; Marquardt, Till

    2008-01-01

    Execution of motor behaviors relies on circuitries effectively integrating immediate sensory feedback to efferent pathways controlling muscle activity. It remains unclear how, during neuromuscular circuit assembly, sensory and motor projections become incorporated into tightly coordinated, yet functionally separate pathways. We report that, within axial nerves, establishment of discrete afferent and efferent pathways depends on coordinate signaling between coextending sensory and motor projec...

  10. Quantitative Single-Cell Analysis of Signaling Pathways Activated Immediately Downstream of Histamine Receptor Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Unen, Jakobus; Rashidfarrokhi, Ali; Hoogendoorn, Eelco; Postma, Marten; Gadella, Theodorus W J; Goedhart, Joachim

    2016-09-01

    Genetically encoded biosensors based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) can visualize responses of individual cells in real time. Here, we evaluated whether FRET-based biosensors provide sufficient contrast and specificity to measure activity of G-protein-coupled receptors. The four histamine receptor subtypes (H1R, H2R, H3R, and H4R) respond to the ligand histamine by activating three canonical heterotrimeric G-protein-mediated signaling pathways with a reported high degree of specificity. Using FRET-based biosensors, we demonstrate that H1R activates Gαq. We also observed that H1R activates Gαi, albeit at a 10-fold lower potency. In addition to increasing cAMP levels, most likely via Gαs, we found that the H2R induces Gαq-mediated calcium release. The H3R and H4R activated Gαi with high specificity and a high potency. We demonstrate that a number of FRET sensors provide sufficient contrast to: 1) analyze the specificity of the histamine receptor subtypes for different heterotrimeric G-protein families with single-cell resolution, 2) probe for antagonist specificity, and 3) allow the measurement of single-cell concentration-response curves. PMID:27358232

  11. Resistance to hemi-biotrophic F. graminearum infection is associated with coordinated and ordered expression of diverse defense signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Ding

    Full Text Available Fusarium species cause serious diseases in cereal staple food crops such as wheat and maize. Currently, the mechanisms underlying resistance to Fusarium-caused diseases are still largely unknown. In the present study, we employed a combined proteomic and transcriptomic approach to investigate wheat genes responding to F. graminearum infection that causes Fusarium head blight (FHB. We found a total of 163 genes and 37 proteins that were induced by infection. These genes and proteins were associated with signaling pathways mediated by salicylic acid (SA, jasmonic acid (JA, ethylene (ET, calcium ions, phosphatidic acid (PA, as well as with reactive oxygen species (ROS production and scavenging, antimicrobial compound synthesis, detoxification, and cell wall fortification. We compared the time-course expression profiles between FHB-resistant Wangshuibai plants and susceptible Meh0106 mutant plants of a selected set of genes that are critical to the plants' resistance and defense reactions. A biphasic phenomenon was observed during the first 24 h after inoculation (hai in the resistant plants. The SA and Ca(2+ signaling pathways were activated within 6 hai followed by the JA mediated defense signaling activated around 12 hai. ET signaling was activated between these two phases. Genes for PA and ROS synthesis were induced during the SA and JA phases, respectively. The delayed activation of the SA defense pathway in the mutant was associated with its susceptibility. After F. graminearum infection, the endogenous contents of SA and JA in Wangshuibai and the mutant changed in a manner similar to the investigated genes corresponding to the individual pathways. A few genes for resistance-related cell modification and phytoalexin production were also identified. This study provided important clues for designing strategies to curb diseases caused by Fusarium.

  12. Conserved features and evolutionary shifts of the EDA signaling pathway involved in vertebrate skin appendage development.

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    It is widely accepted that evolutionary changes in conserved developmental signaling pathways play an important role in morphological evolution. However, few in silico studies were interested in tracking such changes in a signaling pathway. The Ectodysplasin (EDA) pathway provides an opportunity to fill this gap because it is involved in vertebrate skin appendage development such as scales, teeth, hair, and feathers that take an obvious part in the adaptation of species to their environment. ...

  13. Cross-regulation of signaling pathways: An example of nuclear hormone receptors and the canonical Wnt pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beildeck, Marcy E. [Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, 3970 Reservoir Road, NW, Washington, DC 20057 (United States); Gelmann, Edward P. [Columbia University, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Byers, Stephen W., E-mail: byerss@georgetown.edu [Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, 3970 Reservoir Road, NW, Washington, DC 20057 (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Predicting the potential physiological outcome(s) of any given molecular pathway is complex because of cross-talk with other pathways. This is particularly evident in the case of the nuclear hormone receptor and canonical Wnt pathways, which regulate cell growth and proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and metastatic potential in numerous tissues. These pathways are known to intersect at many levels: in the intracellular space, at the membrane, in the cytoplasm, and within the nucleus. The outcomes of these interactions are important in the control of stem cell differentiation and maintenance, feedback loops, and regulating oncogenic potential. The aim of this review is to demonstrate the importance of considering pathway cross-talk when predicting functional outcomes of signaling, using nuclear hormone receptor/canonical Wnt pathway cross-talk as an example.

  14. The secretory pathway calcium ATPase PMR-1/SPCA1 has essential roles in cell migration during Caenorhabditis elegans embryonic development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vida Praitis

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining levels of calcium in the cytosol is important for many cellular events, including cell migration, where localized regions of high calcium are required to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics, contractility, and adhesion. Studies show inositol-trisphosphate receptors (IP3R and ryanodine receptors (RyR, which release calcium into the cytosol, are important regulators of cell migration. Similarly, proteins that return calcium to secretory stores are likely to be important for cell migration. The secretory protein calcium ATPase (SPCA is a Golgi-localized protein that transports calcium from the cytosol into secretory stores. SPCA has established roles in protein processing, metal homeostasis, and inositol-trisphosphate signaling. Defects in the human SPCA1/ATP2C1 gene cause Hailey-Hailey disease (MIM# 169600, a genodermatosis characterized by cutaneous blisters and fissures as well as keratinocyte cell adhesion defects. We have determined that PMR-1, the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog of SPCA1, plays an essential role in embryogenesis. Pmr-1 strains isolated from genetic screens show terminal phenotypes, such as ventral and anterior enclosure failures, body morphogenesis defects, and an unattached pharynx, which are caused by earlier defects during gastrulation. In Pmr-1 embryos, migration rates are significantly reduced for cells moving along the embryo surface, such as ventral neuroblasts, C-derived, and anterior-most blastomeres. Gene interaction experiments show changing the activity of itr-1/IP3R and unc-68/RyR modulates levels of embryonic lethality in Pmr-1 strains, indicating pmr-1 acts with these calcium channels to regulate cell migration. This analysis reveals novel genes involved in C. elegans cell migration, as well as a new role in cell migration for the highly conserved SPCA gene family.

  15. Facilitation of plateau potentials in turtle motoneurones by a pathway dependent on calcium and calmodulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrier, J F; Mejia-Gervacio, S; Hounsgaard, J

    2000-01-01

    1. The involvement of intracellular calcium and calmodulin in the modulation of plateau potentials in motoneurones was investigated using intracellular recordings from a spinal cord slice preparation. 2. Chelation of intracellular calcium with BAPTA-AM or inactivation of calmodulin with W-7 or tr...

  16. Adenosine A{sub 2A} receptor-dependent proliferation of pulmonary endothelial cells is mediated through calcium mobilization, PI3-kinase and ERK1/2 pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Aftab, E-mail: Aftab.Ahmad@UCDenver.edu [Pediatric Airway Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Aurora, CO (United States); Schaack, Jerome B. [Department of Microbiology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); White, Carl W.; Ahmad, Shama [Pediatric Airway Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •A{sub 2A} receptor-induced pulmonary endothelial growth is mediated by PI3K and ERK1/2. •Cytosolic calcium mobilization is also critical for pulmonary endothelial growth. •Effectors of A{sub 2A} receptor, like tyrosine kinases and cAMP increase PI3K/Akt signaling. •Activation of A{sub 2A} receptor can contribute to vascular remodeling. -- Abstract: Hypoxia and HIF-2α-dependent A{sub 2A} receptor expression and activation increase proliferation of human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVECs). This study was undertaken to investigate the signaling mechanisms that mediate the proliferative effects of A{sub 2A} receptor. A{sub 2A} receptor-mediated proliferation of HLMVECs was inhibited by intracellular calcium chelation, and by specific inhibitors of ERK1/2 and PI3-kinase (PI3K). The adenosine A{sub 2A} receptor agonist CGS21680 caused intracellular calcium mobilization in controls and, to a greater extent, in A{sub 2A} receptor-overexpressing HLMVECs. Adenoviral-mediated A{sub 2A} receptor overexpression as well as receptor activation by CGS21680 caused increased PI3K activity and Akt phosphorylation. Cells overexpressing A{sub 2A} receptor also manifested enhanced ERK1/2 phosphorylation upon CGS21680 treatment. A{sub 2A} receptor activation also caused enhanced cAMP production. Likewise, treatment with 8Br-cAMP increased PI3K activity. Hence A{sub 2A} receptor-mediated cAMP production and PI3K and Akt phosphorylation are potential mediators of the A{sub 2A}-mediated proliferative response of HLMVECs. Cytosolic calcium mobilization and ERK1/2 phosphorylation are other critical effectors of HLMVEC proliferation and growth. These studies underscore the importance of adenosine A{sub 2A} receptor in activation of survival and proliferative pathways in pulmonary endothelial cells that are mediated through PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 pathways.

  17. Calcium signaling triggered by ouabain protects the embryonic kidney from adverse developmental programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodus, Georgiy R; Kruusmägi, Markus; Li, Juan; Liu, Xiao-Li; Aperia, Anita

    2011-09-01

    The kidney is extraordinarily sensitive to adverse fetal programming. Malnutrition, the most common form of developmental challenge, retards formation of the kidney's functional units, the nephrons. The resulting low nephron endowment increases susceptibility to renal injury and disease. Using explanted rat embryonic kidneys, we found that the sodium-potassium-adenosine triphosphatase (Na, K-ATPase) ligand ouabain triggers, via the Na, K-ATPase/ inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor signalosome, a calcium-nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signal that protects kidney development from adverse effects of malnutrition. Serum deprivation resulted in severe retardation of nephron formation and robust increase in apoptotic rate, but in ouabain-exposed kidneys, no adverse effects of serum deprivation were observed. Depletion of intracellular calcium stores and inhibition of NF-κB activity abolished the rescuing effect of ouabain. Proof of principle that ouabain rescues development of embryonic kidneys exposed to malnutrition was obtained from studies on pregnant rats given low-protein diets and treated with ouabain or vehicle throughout pregnancy. PMID:21424905

  18. INOH: ontology-based highly structured database of signal transduction pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Satoko; Sakai, Noriko; Nakamura, Hiromi; Fukagawa, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Ken; Takagi, Toshihisa

    2011-01-01

    The Integrating Network Objects with Hierarchies (INOH) database is a highly structured, manually curated database of signal transduction pathways including Mammalia, Xenopus laevis, Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans and canonical. Since most pathway knowledge resides in scientific articles, the database focuses on curating and encoding textual knowledge into a machine-processable form. We use a hierarchical pathway representation model with a compound graph, and every pathway c...

  19. An alternative pathway for signal flow from rod photoreceptors to ganglion cells in mammalian retina.

    OpenAIRE

    DeVries, S H; Baylor, D A

    1995-01-01

    Rod signals in the mammalian retina are thought to reach ganglion cells over the circuit rod-->rod depolarizing bipolar cell-->AII amacrine cell-->cone bipolar cells-->ganglion cells. A possible alternative pathway involves gap junctions linking the rods and cones, the circuit being rod-->cone-->cone bipolar cells-->ganglion cells. It is not clear whether this second pathway indeed relays rod signals to ganglion cells. We studied signal flow in the isolated rabbit retina with a multielectrode...

  20. Interactions among oscillatory pathways in NF-kappa B signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White Michael RH

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sustained stimulation with tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha induces substantial oscillations—observed at both the single cell and population levels—in the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B system. Although the mechanism has not yet been elucidated fully, a core system has been identified consisting of a negative feedback loop involving NF-kappa B (RelA:p50 hetero-dimer and its inhibitor I-kappa B-alpha. Many authors have suggested that this core oscillator should couple to other oscillatory pathways. Results First we analyse single-cell data from experiments in which the NF-kappa B system is forced by short trains of strong pulses of TNF-alpha. Power spectra of the ratio of nuclear-to-cytoplasmic concentration of NF-kappa B suggest that the cells' responses are entrained by the pulsing frequency. Using a recent model of the NF-kappa B system due to Caroline Horton, we carried out extensive numerical simulations to analyze the response frequencies induced by trains of pulses of TNF-alpha stimulation having a wide range of frequencies and amplitudes. These studies suggest that for sufficiently weak stimulation, various nonlinear resonances should be observable. To explore further the possibility of probing alternative feedback mechanisms, we also coupled the model to sinusoidal signals with a wide range of strengths and frequencies. Our results show that, at least in simulation, frequencies other than those of the forcing and the main NF-kappa B oscillator can be excited via sub- and superharmonic resonance, producing quasiperiodic and even chaotic dynamics. Conclusions Our numerical results suggest that the entrainment phenomena observed in pulse-stimulated experiments is a consequence of the high intensity of the stimulation. Computational studies based on current models suggest that resonant interactions between periodic pulsatile forcing and the system's natural frequencies may become evident for sufficiently

  1. Aromatic amino acid activation of signaling pathways in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells depends on oxygen tension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona El Refaey

    Full Text Available The physiologic oxygen pressures inside the bone marrow environment are much lower than what is present in the peripheral circulation, ranging from 1-7%, compared to values as high as 10-13% in the arteries, lungs and liver. Thus, experiments done with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs using standard culture conditions may not accurately reflect the true hypoxic bone marrow microenvironment. However, since aging is associated with an increased generation of reactive oxygen species, experiments done under 21%O2 conditions may actually more closely resemble that of the aging bone marrow environment. Aromatic amino acids are known to be natural anti-oxidants. We have previously reported that aromatic amino acids are potent agonists for stimulating increases in intracellular calcium and phospho-c-Raf and in promoting BMMSC differentiation down the osteogenic pathway. Our previous experiments were performed under normoxic conditions. Thus, we next decided to compare a normoxic (21% O2 vs. a hypoxic environment (3% O2 alone or after treatment with aromatic amino acids. Reverse-phase protein arrays showed that 3% O2 itself up-regulated proliferative pathways. Aromatic amino acids had no additional effect on signaling pathways under these conditions. However, under 21%O2 conditions, aromatic amino acids could now significantly increase these proliferative pathways over this "normoxic" baseline. Pharmacologic studies are consistent with the aromatic amino acids activating the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor. The effects of aromatic amino acids on BMMSC function in the 21% O2 environment is consistent with a potential role for these amino acids in an aging environment as functional anti oxidants.

  2. Lung cancer, intracellular signaling pathways, and preclinical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Activation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT and Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homologue (KRAS) can induce cellular immortalization, proliferation, and resistance to anticancer therapeutics such as epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors or chemotherapy. This study assessed the consequences of inhibiting these two pathways in tumor cells with activation of KRAS, PI3K-AKT, or both. We investigated whether the combination of a novel RAF/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitor, RAF265, with a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, RAD001 (everolimus), could lead to enhanced anti-tumoral effects in vitro and in vivo. To address this question, we used cell lines with different status regarding KRAS, PIK3CA, and BRAF mutations, using immunoblotting to evaluate the inhibitors, and MTT and clonogenic assays for effects on cell viability and proliferation. Subcutaneous xenografts were used to assess the activity of the combination in vivo. RAD001 inhibited mTOR downstream signaling in all cell lines, whereas RAF265 inhibited RAF downstream signaling only in BRAF mutant cells. In vitro, addition of RAF265 to RAD001 led to decreased AKT, S6, and Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 phosphorylation in HCT116 cells. In vitro and in vivo, RAD001 addition enhanced the anti-tumoral effect of RAF265 in HCT116 and H460 cells (both KRAS mut, PIK3CA mut); in contrast, the combination of RAF265 and RAD001 yielded no additional activity in A549 and MDAMB231 cells. The combination of RAF and mTOR inhibitors is effective for enhancing anti-tumoral effects in cells with deregulation of both RAS-RAF and PI3K, possibly through the cross-inhibition of 4E binding protein 1 and S6 protein. We then focus on animal models. Preclinical models of NSCLC require better clinical relevance to study disease mechanisms and innovative

  3. Defense-Related Calcium Signaling Mutants Uncovered via a Quantitative High-Throughput Screen in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stefanie Ranf; Julia Grimmer; Yvonne P(o)schl; Pascal Pecher; Delphine Chinchilla; Dierk Scheel; Justin Lee

    2012-01-01

    Calcium acts as a second messenger for signaling to a variety of stimuli including MAMPs (Microbe-Associated Molecular Patterns),such as flg22 and elf18 that are derived from bacterial flagellin and elongation factor Tu,respectively.Here,Arabidopsis thaliana mutants with changed calcium elevation (cce) in response to fig22 treatment were isolated and characterized.Besides novel mutant alleles of the flg22 receptor,FLS2 (Flagellin-Sensitive 2),and the receptor-associated kinase,BAK1 (Brassinosteroid receptor 1-Associated Kinase 1),the new cce mutants can be categorized into two main groups—those with a reduced or an enhanced calcium elevation.Moreover,cce mutants from both groups show differential phenotypes to different sets of MAMPs.Thus,these mutants will facilitate the discovery of novel components in early MAMP signaling and bridge the gaps in current knowledge of calcium signaling during plant-microbe interactions.Last but not least,the screening method is optimized for speed (covering 384 plants in 3 or 10 h) and can be adapted to genetically dissect any other stimuli that induce a change in calcium levels.

  4. Spatiotemporal properties of intracellular calcium signaling in osteocytic and osteoblastic cell networks under fluid flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Da; Lu, X Lucas; Luo, Erping; Sajda, Paul; Leong, Pui L; Guo, X Edward

    2013-04-01

    Mechanical stimuli can trigger intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) responses in osteocytes and osteoblasts. Successful construction of bone cell networks necessitates more elaborate and systematic analysis for the spatiotemporal properties of Ca(2+) signaling in the networks. In the present study, an unsupervised algorithm based on independent component analysis (ICA) was employed to extract the Ca(2+) signals of bone cells in the network. We demonstrated that the ICA-based technology could yield higher signal fidelity than the manual region of interest (ROI) method. Second, the spatiotemporal properties of Ca(2+) signaling in osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 and osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cell networks under laminar and steady fluid flow stimulation were systematically analyzed and compared. MLO-Y4 cells exhibited much more active Ca(2+) transients than MC3T3-E1 cells, evidenced by more Ca(2+) peaks, less time to the 1st peak and less time between the 1st and 2nd peaks. With respect to temporal properties, MLO-Y4 cells demonstrated higher spike rate and Ca(2+) oscillating frequency. The spatial intercellular synchronous activities of Ca(2+) signaling in MLO-Y4 cell networks were higher than those in MC3T3-E1 cell networks and also negatively correlated with the intercellular distance, revealing faster Ca(2+) wave propagation in MLO-Y4 cell networks. Our findings show that the unsupervised ICA-based technique results in more sensitive and quantitative signal extraction than traditional ROI analysis, with the potential to be widely employed in Ca(2+) signaling extraction in the cell networks. The present study also revealed a dramatic spatiotemporal difference in Ca(2+) signaling for osteocytic and osteoblastic cell networks in processing the mechanical stimulus. The higher intracellular Ca(2+) oscillatory behaviors and intercellular coordination of MLO-Y4 cells provided further evidences that osteocytes may behave as the major mechanical sensor in bone modeling and remodeling

  5. Comparison of growth factor signalling pathway utilisation in cultured normal melanocytes and melanoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K-PKB), mitogen activated protein kinase (MEK-ERK) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR- p70S6K), are thought to regulate many aspects of tumour cell proliferation and survival. We have examined the utilisation of these three signalling pathways in a number of cell lines derived from patients with metastatic malignant melanoma of known PIK3CA, PTEN, NRAS and BRAF mutational status. Western blotting was used to compare the phosphorylation status of components of the PI3K-PKB, MEK-ERK and mTOR-p70S6K signalling pathways, as indices of pathway utilisation. Normal melanocytes could not be distinguished from melanoma cells on the basis of pathway utilisation when grown in the presence of serum, but could be distinguished upon serum starvation, where signalling protein phosphorylation was generally abrogated. Surprisingly, the differential utilisation of individual pathways was not consistently associated with the presence of an oncogenic or tumour suppressor mutation of genes in these pathways. Utilisation of the PI3K-PKB, MEK-ERK and mTOR-p70S6K signalling pathways in melanoma, as determined by phosphorylation of signalling components, varies widely across a series of cell lines, and does not directly reflect mutation of genes coding these components. The main difference between cultured normal melanocytes and melanoma cells is not the pathway utilisation itself, but rather in the serum dependence of pathway utilisation

  6. Hypertrophy signaling pathways in experimental chronic aortic regurgitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Niels Thue; Dimaano, Veronica L; Fritz-Hansen, Thomas;

    2013-01-01

    The development of left ventricular hypertrophy and dysfunction in aortic regurgitation (AR) has only been sparsely studied experimentally. In a new model of chronic AR in rats, we examined activation of molecular pathways involved in myocardial hypertrophy. Chronic AR was produced by damaging on...... of activation of intracellular pathways different from that seen with pathological hypertrophy in pressure overload, and more similar to that associated with benign physiological hypertrophy....

  7. Signaling pathways and stem cells in uterus and fallopian tubes

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yongqian

    2012-01-01

    textabstractDuring her fertile years, the endometrium of fertile women undergoes regular cycles of regeneration, differentiation and shedding, driven by changing concentrations of the steroid hormones estradiol and progesterone. In the present study, the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in relation to steroid hormone signaling and the balance between proliferation and differentiation was investigated. Furthermore, since the consequence of hormone signaling in the endometrium is tissue degradat...

  8. Noise in cellular signaling pathways: causes and effects

    OpenAIRE

    Ladbury, John E.; Arold, Stefan T.

    2012-01-01

    Noise caused by stochastic fluctuations in genetic circuits (transcription and translation) is now appreciated as a central aspect of cell function and phenotypic behavior. Noise has also been detected in signaling networks, but the origin of this noise and how it shapes cellular outcomes remain poorly understood. Here, we argue that noise in signaling networks results from the intrinsic promiscuity of protein-protein interactions, and that this noise has shaped cellular signal transduction. ...

  9. Liposomal Lipopolysaccharide Initiates TRIF-Dependent Signaling Pathway Independent of CD14

    OpenAIRE

    Sachiko Watanabe; Yoshio Kumazawa; Joe Inoue

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is recognized by CD14 with Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), and initiates 2 major pathways of TLR4 signaling, the MyD88-dependent and TRIF-dependent signaling pathways. The MyD88-dependent pathway induces inflammatory responses such as the production of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-12 via the activation of NFκB and MAPK. The TRIF-dependent pathway induces the production of type-I IFN, and RANTES via the activation of IRF-3 and NFκB, and is also important for the induction of adapt...

  10. Melatonin sensitivity of type II GnRH-induced calcium signaling and secretion in neonatal rat gonadotrophs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jindřichová, Marie; Balík, Aleš; Mazna, Petr; Zemková, Hana

    British Pharmacological Society, 2005. [Focused Meeting on Cell Signalling /4./. 11.04.2005-12.04.2005, Leicester] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5011408 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : GnRH type II * melatonin * calcium Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition

  11. Differential modulation of ATP-induced calcium signalling by A1 and A2 adenosine receptors in cultured cortical astrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Alloisio, Susanna; Cugnoli, Carlo; Ferroni, Stefano; Nobile, Mario

    2004-01-01

    Despite the accumulating evidence that under various pathological conditions the extracellular elevation of adenine-based nucleotides and nucleosides plays a key role in the control of astroglial reactivity, how these signalling molecules interact in the regulation of astrocyte function is still largely elusive.The action of the nucleoside adenosine in the modulation of the intracellular calcium signalling ([Ca2+]i) elicited by adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP)-induced activation of P2 purinoce...

  12. Neuro-protective effects of CNTF on hippocampal neurons via an unknown signal transduction pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In our previous study, we proposed that there may be an unknown pathway in the upper stream of the known signal transduction pathway of Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) that mediates the neuro-protective function of CNTF. In the present experiment, we observed that the neuro-protective function of the non-classic signal transduction pathway in a L-NMDA (a glutamic acid ion type receptor atagonist) induced hippocampal neuron injury model, using primary culture rat hippocampal neurons, continuous photography and gp130 immunohistochemical assay. The results showed that L-NMDA induced injurious reaction of hippocampal neurons, and CNTF was able to inhibit the toxic action of L-NMDA on hippocampal neurons. Additionally, when JAK/STATs in the known classic signal transduction pathway of CNTF were blocked by PTPi-2, the protective effect of CNTF against L-NMDA injury still existed. L-NMDA caused a rapid increase in the concentration of hippocampal intracellular free [Ca2+]i. CNTF was able to attenuate L-NMDA-induced elevation of [Ca2+]i, and blocking JAK/STATs in the known classic signal trans- duction pathway of CNTF did not affect L-NMDA- induced elevation of [Ca2+]i, indicating that, apart from the known classic signal transduction pathway, there may be some other transduction pathways for CNTF to exert the protective effect on hippocampal neurons, and this pathway is related to [Ca2+].

  13. P12 - PTHC1: A Continuing Cell Line Expressing PTH and Genes Involved in Calcium Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Fabbri, S.; Mazzotta, C.; Ciuffi, S.; Mavilia, C.; Galli, G.; Zonefrati, R; Strigoli, D.; Cavalli, L.; Cavalli, T.; Brandi, M.L.

    2010-01-01

    The main organs regulating serum levels of ionised calcium (Ca2+) are the parathyroids, which are composed of two different cell types: chief cells and oxyphil cells. Chief cells, through the calcium sensing receptor (CaSR), are affected by changes in calcium concentration, modifying PTH secretion in proportion to calcium levels. Current understanding of calcium regulation mechanisms connected to PTH and of the signalling pathways involved derive from in vitro studies carried out on primary c...

  14. A conditional form of Bruton's tyrosine kinase is sufficient to activate multiple downstream signaling pathways via PLC Gamma 2 in B cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witte Owen N

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk is essential for B cell development and function. Mutations of Btk elicit X-linked agammaglobulinemia in humans and X-linked immunodeficiency in the mouse. Btk has been proposed to participate in B cell antigen receptor-induced signaling events leading to activation of phospholipase C-γ2 (PLCγ2 and calcium mobilization. However it is unclear whether Btk activation is alone sufficient for these signaling events, and whether Btk can activate additional pathways that do not involve PLCγ2. To address such issues we have generated Btk:ER, a conditionally active form of the kinase, and expressed it in the PLCγ2-deficient DT40 B cell line. Results Activation of Btk:ER was sufficient to induce multiple B cell signaling pathways in PLCγ2-sufficient DT40 cells. These included tyrosine phosphorylation of PLCγ2, mobilization of intracellular calcium, activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways, and apoptosis. In DT40 B cells deficient for PLCγ2, Btk:ER activation failed to induce the signaling events described above with the consequence that the cells failed to undergo apoptosis. Conclusions These data suggest that Btk:ER regulates downstream signaling pathways primarily via PLCγ2 in B cells. While it is not known whether activated Btk:ER precisely mimics activated Btk, this conditional system will likely facilitate the dissection of the role of Btk and its family members in a variety of biological processes in many different cell types.

  15. Structures of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases reveal mechanism of activation by calcium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wernimont, Amy K; Artz, Jennifer D.; Jr, Patrick Finerty; Lin, Yu-Hui; Amani, Mehrnaz; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Senisterra, Guillermo; Vedadi, Masoud; Tempel, Wolfram; Mackenzie, Farrell; Chau, Irene; Lourido, Sebastian; Sibley, L. David; Hui, Raymond (Toronto); (WU-MED)

    2010-09-21

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) have pivotal roles in the calcium-signaling pathway in plants, ciliates and apicomplexan parasites and comprise a calmodulin-dependent kinase (CaMK)-like kinase domain regulated by a calcium-binding domain in the C terminus. To understand this intramolecular mechanism of activation, we solved the structures of the autoinhibited (apo) and activated (calcium-bound) conformations of CDPKs from the apicomplexan parasites Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. In the apo form, the C-terminal CDPK activation domain (CAD) resembles a calmodulin protein with an unexpected long helix in the N terminus that inhibits the kinase domain in the same manner as CaMKII. Calcium binding triggers the reorganization of the CAD into a highly intricate fold, leading to its relocation around the base of the kinase domain to a site remote from the substrate binding site. This large conformational change constitutes a distinct mechanism in calcium signal-transduction pathways.

  16. N-glycosylation at Asn residues 554 and 566 of E-cadherin affects cell cycle progression through extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase signaling pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongbo Zhao; Xiliang Zha; Lidong Sun; Liying Wang; Zhibin Xu; Feng Zhou; Jianmin Su; Jiawei Jin; Yong Yang; Yali Hu

    2008-01-01

    E-cadherin, which has a widely acknowledged role in mediating calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion between epithelial cells, also functions as a tumor suppressor. The ectodomain of human E-cadherin contains four potential N-glycosylation sites at Asn residues 554, 566, 618, and 633.We investigated the role of E-cadherin N-glycosylation in cell cycle progression by site-directed mutagenesis. We showed previously that all four potential N-glycosylation sites of E-cadherin were N-glycosylated in human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-435 cells. Removal of N-glycan at Asn633 dramatically affected E-cadherin stability. In this study we showed that E-cadherin mutant missing N-glycans at Asn554, Asn566 and Asn618 failed to induce cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and to suppress cell proliferation in comparison with wild-type E-cadherin. Moreover, N-glycans at Asn554 and Asn566, but not at Asn618, seemed to be indispensable for E-cadherin-mediated suppression of cell cycle progression.Removal of N-glycans at either Asn554 or Asn566 of E-cadherin was accompanied with the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase signaling pathway. After treatment with PD98059, an inhibitor of the extraceilular signal-regulated protein kinase signaling pathway, wild-type E-cadherin transfected MDA-MB-435 and E-cadherin N-glycosylation-deficient mutant transfected MDA-MB-435 cells had equivalent numbers of cells in G1 phase. These findings implied that N-glycosylation might be crucial for E-cadherin-mediated suppression of cell cycle progression.

  17. ATP- and gap junction-dependent intercellular calcium signaling in osteoblastic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, N R; Geist, S T; Civitelli, R;

    1997-01-01

    stores. In one model, IP3 traverses gap junctions and initiates the release of intracellular calcium stores in neighboring cells. Alternatively, calcium waves may be mediated not by gap junctional communication, but rather by autocrine activity of secreted ATP on P2 purinergic receptors. We studied...... connexin43 (Cx43), are well dye coupled, and lack P2U receptors, transmitted slow gap junction-dependent calcium waves that did not require release of intracellular calcium stores. UMR 106-01 cells predominantly express the gap junction protein connexin 45 (Cx45), are poorly dye coupled, and express P2U...... receptors; they propagated fast calcium waves that required release of intracellular calcium stores and activation of P2U purinergic receptors, but not gap junctional communication. ROS/P2U transfectants and UMR/Cx43 transfectants expressed both types of calcium waves. Gap junction-independent, ATP...

  18. CLE peptides and their signaling pathways in plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Yasuka L; Ishida, Takashi; Sawa, Shinichiro

    2016-08-01

    Cell-to-cell communication is crucial for the coherent functioning of multicellular organisms, and they have evolved intricate molecular mechanisms to achieve such communication. Small, secreted peptide hormones participate in cell-to-cell communication to regulate various physiological processes. One such family of plant peptide hormones is the CLAVATA3 (CLV3)/EMBRYO SURROUNDING REGION-related (CLE) family, whose members play crucial roles in the differentiation of shoot and root meristems. Recent biochemical and genetic studies have characterized various CLE signaling modules, which include CLE peptides, transmembrane receptors, and downstream intracellular signaling components. CLE signaling systems are conserved across the plant kingdom but have divergent modes of action in various developmental processes in different species. Moreover, several CLE peptides play roles in symbiosis, parasitism, and responses to abiotic cues. Here we review recent studies that have provided new insights into the mechanisms of CLE signaling. PMID:27229733

  19. Spontaneous and CRH-Induced Excitability and Calcium Signaling in Mice Corticotrophs Involves Sodium, Calcium, and Cation-Conducting Channels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zemková, Hana; Tomič, M.; Kučka, M.; Aguilera, G.; Stojilkovic, S. S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 157, č. 4 (2016), s. 1576-1589. ISSN 0013-7227 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : action potential * background sodium conductance * bursting activity * cation-conducting channels * cytosolic calcium concentration * resting membrane potential Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 4.503, year: 2014

  20. FM dyes enter via a store-operated calcium channel and modify calcium signaling of cultured astrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Dongdong; Hérault, Karine; Oheim, Martin; Ropert, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    The amphiphilic fluorescent styryl pyridinium dyes FM1-43 and FM4-64 are used to probe activity-dependent synaptic vesicle cycling in neurons. Cultured astrocytes can internalize FM1-43 and FM4-64 inside vesicles but their uptake is insensitive to the elevation of cytosolic calcium (Ca2+) concentration and the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we used total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and pharmacological tools to study the mechanisms of FM4-64 uptake into cultured ast...

  1. No-dependent signaling pathways in unloaded skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Shenkman, Boris S.; Nemirovskaya, Tatiana L.; Lomonosova, Yulia N.

    2015-01-01

    The main focus of the current review is the nitric oxide (NO)-mediated signaling mechanism in unloaded skeletal. Review of the published data describing muscles during physical activity and inactivity demonstrates that NO is an essential trigger of signaling processes, which leads to structural and metabolic changes of the muscle fibers. The experiments with modulation of NO-synthase (NOS) activity during muscle unloading demonstrate the ability of an activated enzyme to stabilize degradation...

  2. BowTieBuilder: modeling signal transduction pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Schröder Adrian; Dräger Andreas; Planatscher Hannes; Spangenberg Lucía; Supper Jochen; Zell Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Sensory proteins react to changing environmental conditions by transducing signals into the cell. These signals are integrated into core proteins that activate downstream target proteins such as transcription factors (TFs). This structure is referred to as a bow tie, and allows cells to respond appropriately to complex environmental conditions. Understanding this cellular processing of information, from sensory proteins (e.g., cell-surface proteins) to target proteins (e.g...

  3. MicroRNAs Regulating Signaling Pathways: Potential Biomarkers in Systemic Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yisha Li

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis (SSc is a multisystem fibrotic and autoimmune disease. Both genetic and epigenetic elements mediate SSc pathophysiology. This review summarizes the role of one epigenetic element, known as microRNAs (miRNAs, involved in different signaling pathways of SSc pathogenesis. The expression of key components in transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β signaling pathway has been found to be regulated by miRNAs both upstream and downstream of TGF-β. We are specifically interested in the pathway components upstream of TGF-β, while miRNAs in other signaling pathways have not been extensively studied. The emerging role of miRNAs in vasculopathy of SSc suggests a promising new direction for future investigation. Elucidation of the regulatory role of miRNAs in the expression of signaling factors may facilitate the discovery of novel biomarkers in SSc and improve the understanding and treatment of this disease.

  4. MicroRNAs Regulating Signaling Pathways:Potential Biomarkers in Systemic Sclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yisha Li; Jing Huang; Muyao Guo; Xiaoxia Zuo

    2015-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multisystem fibrotic and autoimmune disease. Both genetic and epigenetic elements mediate SSc pathophysiology. This review summarizes the role of one epigenetic element, known as microRNAs (miRNAs), involved in different signaling pathways of SSc pathogenesis. The expression of key components in transforming growth factor-b (TGF-b) signaling pathway has been found to be regulated by miRNAs both upstream and downstream of TGF-b. We are specifically interested in the pathway components upstream of TGF-b, while miRNAs in other signaling pathways have not been extensively studied. The emerging role of miRNAs in vasculopathy of SSc suggests a promising new direction for future investigation. Elu-cidation of the regulatory role of miRNAs in the expression of signaling factors may facilitate the discovery of novel biomarkers in SSc and improve the understanding and treatment of this disease.

  5. Differential Modulation of Nods Signaling Pathways by Fatty Acids in Human Colonic Epithelial HCT116 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing proteins (Nods) are intracellular pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) recognizing conserved moieties of bacterial peptidoglycan through their leucine-rich repeats (LRR) domain. The agonists for Nods activate proinflammtory signaling pathways incl...

  6. Redox and zinc signalling pathways converging on protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellomo, Elisa; Hogstrand, Christer; Maret, Wolfgang

    2014-10-01

    Zinc ions, though redox-inert, have either pro-antioxidant or pro-oxidant functions at critical junctures in redox metabolism and redox signalling. They are released from cells and in cells, e.g. from metallothionein, a protein that transduces redox signals into zinc signals (1). The released zinc ions inhibit enzymes such as protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), key regulatory enzymes of cellular phosphorylation signalling. The Ki(Zn) value for inhibition of receptor PTPB is 21pM (2). The binding is about as tight as the binding of zinc to zinc metalloenzymes and suggests tonic zinc inhibition. PTP1-B (PTPN1), an enzyme regulating the insulin and leptin receptors and involved in cancer and diabetes pathobiochemistry, has a Ki(Zn) value of about 5nM (3). Zinc ions bind to the enzyme in the closed conformation when additional metal-binding ligands are brought into the vicinity of the active site. In contrast, redox reactions target cysteines in the active sites of PTPs in the open conformation. This work provides a molecular basis how hydrogen peroxide and free zinc ions generated by growth factor signalling stimulate phosphorylation signalling differentially. (Supported by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council UK, grant BB/K001442/1.). PMID:26461422

  7. 17β-estradiol rapidly activates calcium release from intracellular stores via the GPR30 pathway and MAPK phosphorylation in osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, Jian

    2012-03-06

    Estrogen regulates critical cellular functions, and its deficiency initiates bone turnover and the development of bone mass loss in menopausal females. Recent studies have demonstrated that 17β-estradiol (E 2) induces rapid non-genomic responses that activate downstream signaling molecules, thus providing a new perspective to understand the relationship between estrogen and bone metabolism. In this study, we investigated rapid estrogen responses, including calcium release and MAPK phosphorylation, in osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 cells. E 2 elevated [Ca 2+] i and increased Ca 2+ oscillation frequency in a dose-dependent manner. Immunolabeling confirmed the expression of three estrogen receptors (ERα, ERβ, and G protein-coupled receptor 30 [GPR30]) in MLO-Y4 cells and localized GPR30 predominantly to the plasma membrane. E 2 mobilized calcium from intracellular stores, and the use of selective agonist(s) for each ER showed that this was mediated mainly through the GPR30 pathway. MAPK phosphorylation increased in a biphasic manner, with peaks occurring after 7 and 60 min. GPR30 and classical ERs showed different temporal effects on MAPK phosphorylation and contributed to MAPK phosphorylation sequentially. ICI182,780 inhibited E 2 activation of MAPK at 7 min, while the GPR30 agonist G-1 and antagonist G-15 failed to affect MAPK phosphorylation levels. G-1-mediated MAPK phosphorylation at 60 min was prevented by prior depletion of calcium stores. Our data suggest that E 2 induces the non-genomic responses Ca 2+ release and MAPK phosphorylation to regulate osteocyte function and indicate that multiple receptors mediate rapid E 2 responses. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  8. 17β-estradiol rapidly activates calcium release from intracellular stores via the GPR30 pathway and MAPK phosphorylation in osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jian; Wu, Jun Hua

    2012-05-01

    Estrogen regulates critical cellular functions, and its deficiency initiates bone turnover and the development of bone mass loss in menopausal females. Recent studies have demonstrated that 17β-estradiol (E(2)) induces rapid non-genomic responses that activate downstream signaling molecules, thus providing a new perspective to understand the relationship between estrogen and bone metabolism. In this study, we investigated rapid estrogen responses, including calcium release and MAPK phosphorylation, in osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 cells. E(2) elevated [Ca(2+)]( i ) and increased Ca(2+) oscillation frequency in a dose-dependent manner. Immunolabeling confirmed the expression of three estrogen receptors (ERα, ERβ, and G protein-coupled receptor 30 [GPR30]) in MLO-Y4 cells and localized GPR30 predominantly to the plasma membrane. E(2) mobilized calcium from intracellular stores, and the use of selective agonist(s) for each ER showed that this was mediated mainly through the GPR30 pathway. MAPK phosphorylation increased in a biphasic manner, with peaks occurring after 7 and 60 min. GPR30 and classical ERs showed different temporal effects on MAPK phosphorylation and contributed to MAPK phosphorylation sequentially. ICI182,780 inhibited E(2) activation of MAPK at 7 min, while the GPR30 agonist G-1 and antagonist G-15 failed to affect MAPK phosphorylation levels. G-1-mediated MAPK phosphorylation at 60 min was prevented by prior depletion of calcium stores. Our data suggest that E(2) induces the non-genomic responses Ca(2+) release and MAPK phosphorylation to regulate osteocyte function and indicate that multiple receptors mediate rapid E(2) responses. PMID:22392527

  9. Relationships between Signaling Pathway Usage and Sensitivity to a Pathway Inhibitor: Examination of Trametinib Responses in Cultured Breast Cancer Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Euphemia Y.; Kim, Ji Eun; Askarian-Amiri, Marjan; Rewcastle, Gordon W.; Finlay, Graeme J.; Baguley, Bruce C.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular signaling pathways involving mTOR, PI3K and ERK have dominated recent studies of breast cancer biology, and inhibitors of these pathways have formed a focus of numerous clinical trials. We have chosen trametinib, a drug targeting MEK in the ERK pathway, to address two questions. Firstly, does inhibition of a signaling pathway, as measured by protein phosphorylation, predict the antiproliferative activity of trametinib? Secondly, do inhibitors of the mTOR and PI3K pathways synergize with trametinib in their effects on cell proliferation? A panel of 30 human breast cancer cell lines was chosen to include lines that could be classified according to whether they were ER and PR positive, HER2 over-expressing, and “triple negative”. Everolimus (targeting mTOR), NVP-BEZ235 and GSK2126458 (both targeting PI3K/mTOR) were chosen for combination experiments. Inhibition of cell proliferation was measured by IC50 values and pathway utilization was measured by phosphorylation of signaling kinases. Overall, no correlation was found between trametinib IC50 values and inhibition of ERK signaling. Inhibition of ERK phosphorylation was observed at trametinib concentrations not affecting proliferation, and sensitivity of cell proliferation to trametinib was found in cell lines with low ERK phosphorylation. Evidence was found for synergy between trametinib and either everolimus, NVP-BEZ235 or GSK2126458, but this was cell line specific. The results have implications for the clinical application of PI3K/mTOR and MEK inhibitors. PMID:25170609

  10. Regulation of drug-induced liver injury by signal transduction pathways: critical role of mitochondria

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Derick; Dara, Lily; Win, Sanda; Than, Tin Aung; Yuan, Liyun; Abbasi, Sadeea Q; Liu, Zhang-Xu; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Drugs that cause liver injury often “stress” mitochondria and activate signal transduction pathways important in determining cell survival or death. In most cases, hepatocytes adapt to the drug-induced stress by activating adaptive signaling pathways, such as mitochondrial adaptive responses and erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf-2), a transcription factor that upregulates antioxidant defenses. Due to adaptation, drugs alone rarely cause liver injury, with acetaminophen being the notable excep...

  11. Sox17 regulates the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chew, Li-Jin; Shen, Weiping; Ming, Xiaotian; Senatorov, Vladimir V.; Chen, Hui-Ling; Ying CHENG; Hong, Elim; Knoblach, Susan; Gallo, Vittorio

    2011-01-01

    The SRY-box (Sox) transcription factors regulate oligodendrocyte differentiation, but their signaling targets are largely unknown. We have identified a major signal transduction pathway regulated by Sox17 in the oligodendrocyte lineage. Microarray analysis in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) after Sox17 attenuation revealed upregulated genes associated with cell cycle control and activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin-pathway. Sox17 knockdown also increases the levels of cyclinD1, Axin2 an...

  12. Regulation of Cell Wall Biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: The Cell Wall Integrity Signaling Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Levin, David E.

    2011-01-01

    The yeast cell wall is a strong, but elastic, structure that is essential not only for the maintenance of cell shape and integrity, but also for progression through the cell cycle. During growth and morphogenesis, and in response to environmental challenges, the cell wall is remodeled in a highly regulated and polarized manner, a process that is principally under the control of the cell wall integrity (CWI) signaling pathway. This pathway transmits wall stress signals from the cell surface to...

  13. Teaching the Toolkit: A Laboratory Series to Demonstrate the Evolutionary Conservation of Metazoan Cell Signaling Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeClair, Elizabeth E.

    2008-01-01

    A major finding of comparative genomics and developmental genetics is that metazoans share certain conserved, embryonically deployed signaling pathways that instruct cells as to their ultimate fate. Because the DNA encoding these pathways predates the evolutionary split of most animal groups, it should in principle be possible to clone…

  14. A SNARE-protein has opposing functions in penetration resistance and defence signalling pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Ziguo; Feechan, Angela; Pedersen, Carsten;

    2007-01-01

    Penetration resistance is often the first line of defence against fungal pathogens. Subsequently induced defences are mediated by the programmed cell death (PCD) reaction pathway and the salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) signalling pathways. We previously demonstrated...

  15. Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma: Molecular Signaling Pathways and Emerging Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Gómez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC over the last 55 years has led to a good understanding of the genetic defects and altered molecular pathways associated with its development. Currently, with the use of genetic testing, patients at high risk for MTC can be identified before the disease develops and offered prophylactic treatment. In cases of localized neck disease, surgery can be curative. However, once MTC has spread beyond the neck, systemic therapy may be necessary. Conventional chemotherapy has been shown to be ineffective; however, multikinase inhibitors have shown promise in stabilizing disease, and this year will probably see the approval of a drug (Vandetanib for advanced unresectable or metastatic disease, which represents a new chapter in the history of MTC. In this paper, we explore newly understood molecular pathways and the most promising emerging therapies that may change the management of MTC.

  16. DMPD: Signal transduction pathways mediated by the interaction of CpG DNA withToll-like receptor 9. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14751759 Signal transduction pathways mediated by the interaction of CpG DNA withTo...;16(1):17-22. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Signal transduction pathways mediated by the interaction of... CpG DNA withToll-like receptor 9. PubmedID 14751759 Title Signal transduction pa

  17. NO-DEPENDENT SIGNALING PATHWAYS IN UNLOADED SKELETAL MUSCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Stivovich Shenkman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The main focus of the current review is the nitric oxide (NO-mediated signaling mechanism in unloaded skeletal. Review of the published data describing muscles during physical activity and inactivity demonstrates that NO is an essential trigger of signaling processes, which leads to structural and metabolic changes of the muscle fibers. The experiments with modulation of NO-synthase (NOS activity during muscle unloading demonstrate the ability of an activated enzyme to stabilize degradation processes and prevent development of muscle atrophy. Various forms of muscle mechanical activity, i.e plantar afferent stimulation, resistive exercise and passive chronic stretch increase the content of neural NOS (nNOS and thus may facilitate an increase in NO production. Recent studies demonstrate that NO-synthase participates in the regulation of protein and energy metabolism in skeletal muscle by fine-tuning and stabilizing complex signaling systems which regulate protein synthesis and degradation in the fibers of inactive muscle.

  18. The crosstalk between EGF, IGF, and Insulin cell signaling pathways - computational and experimental analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przytycka Teresa M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular response to external stimuli requires propagation of corresponding signals through molecular signaling pathways. However, signaling pathways are not isolated information highways, but rather interact in a number of ways forming sophisticated signaling networks. Since defects in signaling pathways are associated with many serious diseases, understanding of the crosstalk between them is fundamental for designing molecularly targeted therapy. Unfortunately, we still lack technology that would allow high throughput detailed measurement of activity of individual signaling molecules and their interactions. This necessitates developing methods to prioritize selection of the molecules such that measuring their activity would be most informative for understanding the crosstalk. Furthermore, absence of the reaction coefficients necessary for detailed modeling of signal propagation raises the question whether simple parameter-free models could provide useful information about such pathways. Results We study the combined signaling network of three major pro-survival signaling pathways: Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR, Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 Receptor (IGF-1R, and Insulin Receptor (IR. Our study involves static analysis and dynamic modeling of this network, as well as an experimental verification of the model by measuring the response of selected signaling molecules to differential stimulation of EGF, IGF and insulin receptors. We introduced two novel measures of the importance of a node in the context of such crosstalk. Based on these measures several molecules, namely Erk1/2, Akt1, Jnk, p70S6K, were selected for monitoring in the network simulation and for experimental studies. Our simulation method relies on the Boolean network model combined with stochastic propagation of the signal. Most (although not all trends suggested by the simulations have been confirmed by experiments. Conclusion The simple model

  19. Cross-talk between calcium-calmodulin and nitric oxide in abscisic acid signaling in leaves of maize plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianrong Sang; Aying Zhang; Fan Lin; Mingpu Tan; Mingyi Jiang

    2008-01-01

    Using pharmacological and biochemical approaches,the signaling pathways between hydrogen peroxide (H2O2),calcium (Ca2+)-calmodulin (CAM),and nitric oxide (NO) in abscisic acid (ABA)-induced antioxidant defense were investigated in leaves of maize (Zea mays L.) plants.Treatments with ABA,H2O2,and CaCI2 induced increases in the generation of NO in maize mesophyll cells and the activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the cytosolic and microsomal fractions of maize leaves.However,such increases were blocked by the pretreatments with Ca2+ inhibitors and CaM antagonists.Meanwhile,pretreatments with two NOS inhibitors also suppressed the Ca2+-induced increase in the production of NO.On the other hand,treatments with ABA and the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) also led to increases in the concentration of cytosolic Ca2+ in protoplasts of mesophyll cells and in the expression of calmodulin 1 (CaMI) gene and the contents of CaM in leaves of maize plants,and the increases induced by ABA were reduced by the pretreatments with a NO scavenger and a NOS inhibitor.Moreover,SNP-induced increases in the expression of the antioxidant genes superoxide dismutase 4 (SOD4),cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase (cAPX),and glutathione reductase 1 (GRI) and the activities of the chloroplastic and cytosolic antioxidant enzymes were arrested by the pretreatments with Ca2+ inhibitors and CaM antagonists.Our results suggest that Ca2+-CaM functions both upstream and downstream of NO production,which is mainly from NOS,in ABA- and H2O2-induced antioxidant defense in leaves of maize plants.

  20. Activation of intracellular calcium by multiple Wnt ligands and translocation of β-catenin into the nucleus: a convergent model of Wnt/Ca2+ and Wnt/β-catenin pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrasivoulou, Christopher; Millar, Michael; Ahmed, Aamir

    2013-12-13

    Ca(2+) and β-catenin, a 92-kDa negatively charged transcription factor, transduce Wnt signaling via the non-canonical, Wnt/Ca(2+) and canonical, Wnt/β-catenin pathways independently. The nuclear envelope is a barrier to large protein entry, and this process is regulated by intracellular calcium [Ca(2+)]i and trans-nuclear potential. How β-catenin traverses the nuclear envelope is not well known. We hypothesized that Wnt/Ca(2+) and Wnt/β-catenin pathways act in a coordinated manner and that [Ca(2+)]i release facilitates β-catenin entry into the nucleus in mammalian cells. In a live assay using calcium dyes in PC3 prostate cancer cells, six Wnt peptides (3A, 4, 5A, 7A, 9B, and 10B) mobilized [Ca(2+)]i but Wnt11 did not. Based upon dwell time (range = 15-30 s) of the calcium waveform, these Wnts could be classified into three classes: short, 3A and 5A; long, 7A and 10B; and very long, 4 and 9B. Wnt-activated [Ca(2+)]i release was followed by an increase in intranuclear calcium and the depolarization of both the cell and nuclear membranes, determined by using FM4-64. In cells treated with Wnts 5A, 9B, and 10B, paradigm substrates for each Wnt class, increased [Ca(2+)]i was followed by β-catenin translocation into the nucleus in PC3, MCF7, and 253J, prostate, breast, and bladder cancer cell lines; both the increase in Wnt 5A, 9B, and 10B induced [Ca(2+)]i release and β-catenin translocation are suppressed by thapsigargin in PC3 cell line. We propose a convergent model of Wnt signaling network where Ca(2+) and β-catenin pathways may act in a coordinated, interdependent, rather than independent, manner. PMID:24158438

  1. Modulation of Intercellular Calcium Signaling by Melatonin, in Avian and Mammalian Astrocytes, is Brain Region Specific

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Jennifer L.; Earnest, Barbara J.; Tjalkens, Ronald B.; Cassone, Vincent M.; Zoran, Mark J.

    2005-01-01

    Calcium waves among glial cells impact many central nervous system functions, including neural integration and brain metabolism. Here, we have characterized the modulatory effects of melatonin, a pineal neurohormone that mediates circadian and seasonal processes, on glial calcium waves derived from different brain regions and species. Diencephalic and telencephalic astrocytes, from both chick and mouse brains, expressed melatonin receptor proteins. Further, using the calcium-sensitive dye Flu...

  2. Signaling pathways and stem cells in uterus and fallopian tubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Wang (Yongqian)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractDuring her fertile years, the endometrium of fertile women undergoes regular cycles of regeneration, differentiation and shedding, driven by changing concentrations of the steroid hormones estradiol and progesterone. In the present study, the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in relation t

  3. Identification of photoperception and light signal transduction pathways in citrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Quecini

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies employing model species have elucidated several aspects of photoperception and light signal transduction that control plant development. However, the information available for economically important crops is scarce. Citrus genome databases of expressed sequence tags (EST were investigated in order to identify genes coding for functionally characterized proteins responsible for light-regulated developmental control in model plants. Approximately 176,200 EST sequences from 53 libraries were queried and all bona fide and putative photoreceptor gene families were found in citrus species. We have identified 53 orthologs for several families of transcriptional regulators and cytoplasmic proteins mediating photoreceptor-induced responses although some important Arabidopsis phytochrome- and cryptochrome-signaling components are absent from citrus sequence databases. The main gene families responsible for phototropin-mediated signal transduction were present in citrus transcriptome, including general regulatory factors (14-3-3 proteins, scaffolding elements and auxin-responsive transcription factors and transporters. A working model of light perception, signal transduction and response-eliciting in citrus is proposed based on the identified key components. These results demonstrate the power of comparative genomics between model systems and economically important crop species to elucidate several aspects of plant physiology and metabolism.

  4. Mitochondria, calcium and pro-apoptotic proteins as mediators in cell death signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.S. Smaili

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Cellular Ca2+ signals are crucial in the control of most physiological processes, cell injury and programmed cell death through the regulation of a number of Ca2+-dependent enzymes such as phospholipases, proteases, and nucleases. Mitochondria along with the endoplasmic reticulum play pivotal roles in regulating intracellular Ca2+ content. Mitochondria are endowed with multiple Ca2+ transport mechanisms by which they take up and release Ca2+ across their inner membrane. During cellular Ca2+ overload, mitochondria take up cytosolic Ca2+, which in turn induces opening of permeability transition pores and disrupts the mitochondrial membrane potential (Dym. The collapse of Dym along with the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria is followed by the activation of caspases, nuclear fragmentation and cell death. Members of the Bcl-2 family are a group of proteins that play important roles in apoptosis regulation. Members of this family appear to differentially regulate intracellular Ca2+ level. Translocation of Bax, an apoptotic signaling protein, from the cytosol to the mitochondrial membrane is another step in this apoptosis signaling pathway.

  5. Calcium-dependent oligomerization of CAR proteins at cell membrane modulates ABA signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Maira; Sanchez-Barrena, Maria Jose; Gonzalez-Rubio, Juana Maria; Rodriguez, Lesia; Fernandez, Daniel; Antoni, Regina; Yunta, Cristina; Belda-Palazon, Borja; Gonzalez-Guzman, Miguel; Peirats-Llobet, Marta; Menendez, Margarita; Boskovic, Jasminka; Marquez, Jose A; Rodriguez, Pedro L; Albert, Armando

    2016-01-19

    Regulation of ion transport in plants is essential for cell function. Abiotic stress unbalances cell ion homeostasis, and plants tend to readjust it, regulating membrane transporters and channels. The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) and the second messenger Ca(2+) are central in such processes, as they are involved in the regulation of protein kinases and phosphatases that control ion transport activity in response to environmental stimuli. The identification and characterization of the molecular mechanisms underlying the effect of ABA and Ca(2+) signaling pathways on membrane function are central and could provide opportunities for crop improvement. The C2-domain ABA-related (CAR) family of small proteins is involved in the Ca(2+)-dependent recruitment of the pyrabactin resistance 1/PYR1-like (PYR/PYL) ABA receptors to the membrane. However, to fully understand CAR function, it is necessary to define a molecular mechanism that integrates Ca(2+) sensing, membrane interaction, and the recognition of the PYR/PYL interacting partners. We present structural and biochemical data showing that CARs are peripheral membrane proteins that functionally cluster on the membrane and generate strong positive membrane curvature in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. These features represent a mechanism for the generation, stabilization, and/or specific recognition of membrane discontinuities. Such structures may act as signaling platforms involved in the recruitment of PYR/PYL receptors and other signaling components involved in cell responses to stress. PMID:26719420

  6. Unique responsiveness of angiosperm stomata to elevated CO2 explained by calcium signalling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J Brodribb

    Full Text Available Angiosperm and conifer tree species respond differently when exposed to elevated CO2, with angiosperms found to dynamically reduce water loss while conifers appear insensitive. Such distinct responses are likely to affect competition between these tree groups as atmospheric CO2 concentration rises. Seeking the mechanism behind this globally important phenomenon we targeted the Ca(2+-dependent signalling pathway, a mediator of stomatal closure in response to elevated CO2, as a possible explanation for the differentiation of stomatal behaviours. Sampling across the diversity of vascular plants including lycophytes, ferns, gymnosperms and angiosperms we show that only angiosperms possess the stomatal behaviour and prerequisite genetic coding, linked to Ca(2+-dependent stomatal signalling. We conclude that the evolution of Ca(2+-dependent stomatal signalling gives angiosperms adaptive benefits in terms of highly efficient water use, but that stomatal sensitivity to high CO2 may penalise angiosperm productivity relative to other plant groups in the current era of soaring atmospheric CO2.

  7. Novel function of perforin in negatively regulating CD4+T cell activation by affecting calcium signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Enguang Bi; Kairui Mao; Jia Zou; Yuhan Zheng; Bing Sun; Chunjian Huang; Yu Hu; Xiaodong Wu; Weiwen Deng; Guomei Lin; Zhiduo Liu; Lin Tian; Shuhui Sun

    2009-01-01

    Perforin is a pore-forming protein engaged mainly in mediating target T cell death and is employed by cytotoxic Tlymphocytes (CTLs) and natural killer cells. However, whether it also plays a role in conventional CD4+ T cell func-tion remains unclear. Here we report that in perforin-deficient (PKO) mice, CD4+ T cells are hyperproliferative in response to T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation. This feature of hyperproliferation is accompanied by the enhancement both in cell division and in IL-2 secretion. It seems that the perforin deficiency does not influence T cell development in thymus spleen and lymph node. In vivo, perforin deficiency results in increased antigen-specific T cell prolifera-tion and antibody production. Furthermore, PKO mice are more susceptible to experimental autoimmune uveitis. To address the molecular mechanism, we found that after TCR stimulation, CD44 T cells from PKO mice display an increased intracellular calcium flux and subsequently enhance activation of transcription factor NFATI. Our results indicate that perforin plays a negative role in regulating CD4+ T cell activation and immune response by affecting TCR-dependent Ca2+ signaling.

  8. Analysing calcium signalling of cells under high shear flows using discontinuous dielectrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffe, Rebecca; Baratchi, Sara; Tang, Shi-Yang; Nasabi, Mahyar; McIntyre, Peter; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar

    2015-07-01

    Immobilisation of cells is an important feature of many cellular assays, as it enables the physical/chemical stimulation of cells; whilst, monitoring cellular processes using microscopic techniques. Current approaches for immobilising cells, however, are hampered by time-consuming processes, the need for specific antibodies or coatings, and adverse effects on cell integrity. Here, we present a dielectrophoresis-based approach for the robust immobilisation of cells, and analysis of their responses under high shear flows. This approach is quick and label-free, and more importantly, minimises the adverse effects of electric field on the cell integrity, by activating the field for a short duration of 120 s, just long enough to immobilise the cells, after which cell culture media (such as HEPES) is flushed through the platform. In optimal conditions, at least 90% of the cells remained stably immobilised, when exposed to a shear stress of 63 dyn/cm2. This approach was used to examine the shear-induced calcium signalling of HEK-293 cells expressing a mechanosensitive ion channel, transient receptor potential vaniloid type 4 (TRPV4), when exposed to the full physiological range of shear stress.

  9. Understanding and Targeting the Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway in Chronic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Thanendrarajan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been revealed that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays an important role in the development of solid tumors and hematological malignancies, particularly in B-cell neoplasia and leukemia. In the last decade there have been made experimental approaches targeting the Wnt pathway in chronic leukemia. In this paper we provide an overview about the current state of knowledge regarding the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in chronic leukemia with special focus on therapeutic options and strategies.

  10. Curcumin and emodin down-regulate TGF-β signaling pathway in human cervical cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Chandrakant Thacker

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is the major cause of cancer related deaths in women, especially in developing countries and Human Papilloma Virus infection in conjunction with multiple deregulated signaling pathways leads to cervical carcinogenesis. TGF-β signaling in later stages of cancer is known to induce epithelial to mesenchymal transition promoting tumor growth. Phytochemicals, curcumin and emodin, are effective as chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic compounds against several cancers including cervical cancer. The main objective of this work was to study the effect of curcumin and emodin on TGF-β signaling pathway and its functional relevance to growth, migration and invasion in two cervical cancer cell lines, SiHa and HeLa. Since TGF-β and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways are known to cross talk having common downstream targets, we analyzed the effect of TGF-β on β-catenin (an important player in Wnt/β-catenin signaling and also studied whether curcumin and emodin modulate them. We observed that curcumin and emodin effectively down regulate TGF-β signaling pathway by decreasing the expression of TGF-β Receptor II, P-Smad3 and Smad4, and also counterbalance the tumorigenic effects of TGF-β by inhibiting the TGF-β-induced migration and invasion. Expression of downstream effectors of TGF-β signaling pathway, cyclinD1, p21 and Pin1, was inhibited along with the down regulation of key mesenchymal markers (Snail and Slug upon curcumin and emodin treatment. Curcumin and emodin were also found to synergistically inhibit cell population and migration in SiHa and HeLa cells. Moreover, we found that TGF-β activates Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in HeLa cells, and curcumin and emodin down regulate the pathway by inhibiting β-catenin. Taken together our data provide a mechanistic basis for the use of curcumin and emodin in the treatment of cervical cancer.

  11. Maturation of calcium-dependent GABA, glycine, and glutamate release in the glycinergic MNTB-LSO pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Alamilla

    Full Text Available The medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB is a key nucleus in high-fidelity temporal processing that underlies sound localization in the auditory brainstem. While the glycinergic principal cells of the MNTB project to all primary nuclei of the superior olive, during development the projection from MNTB to the lateral superior olive (LSO is of interest because this immature inhibitory projection is known to undergo tonotopic refinement during an early postnatal period, and because during this period individual MNTB terminals in the LSO transiently release glycine GABA and glutamate. Developmental changes in calcium-dependent release are understood to be required to allow various auditory nuclei to follow high frequency activity; however, little is known about maturation of calcium-dependent release in the MNTB-LSO pathway, which has been presumed to have less stringent requirements for high-fidelity temporal following. In acute brainstem slices of rats age postnatal day 1 to 15 we recorded whole-cell responses in LSO principal neurons to electrical stimulation in the MNTB in order to measure sensitivity to external calcium, the contribution of different voltage-gated calcium channel subtypes to vesicular release, and the maturation of these measures for both GABA/glycine and glutamate transmission. Our results establish that release of glutamate at MNTB-LSO synapses is calcium-dependent. Whereas no significant developmental changes were evident for glutamate release, GABA/glycine release underwent substantial changes over the first two postnatal weeks: soon after birth L-type, N-type, and P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs together mediated release, but after hearing onset P/Q-type VGCCs predominated. Blockade of P/Q-type VGCCs reduced the estimated quantal number for GABA/gly and glutamate transmission at P5-8 and the frequency of evoked miniature glycinergic events at P12-15, without apparent effects on spontaneous release of

  12. Pentamidine blocks the interaction between mutant S100A5 and RAGE V domain and inhibits the RAGE signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Ching Chang; Chou, Ruey Hwang; Yu, Chin

    2016-08-19

    The human S100 protein family contains small, dimeric and acidic proteins that contain two EF-hand motifs and bind calcium. When S100A5 binds calcium, its conformation changes and promotes interaction with the target protein. The extracellular domain of RAGE (Receptor of Advanced Glycation End products) contain three domains: C1, C2 and V. The RAGE V domain is the target protein of S100A5 that promotes cell survival, growth and differentiation by activating several signaling pathways. Pentamidine is an apoptotic and antiparasitic drug that is used to treat or prevent pneumonia. Here, we found that pentamidine interacts with S100A5 using HSQC titration. We elucidated the interactions of S100A5 with RAGE V domain and pentamidine using fluorescence and NMR spectroscopy. We generated two binary models-the S100A5-RAGE V domain and S100A5-Pentamidine complex-and then observed that the pentamidine and RAGE V domain share a similar binding region in mS100A5. We also used the WST-1 assay to investigate the bioactivity of S100A5, RAGE V domain and pentamidine. These results indicated that pentamidine blocks the binding between S100A5 and RAGE V domain. This finding is useful for the development of new anti-proliferation drugs. PMID:27297108

  13. Damnacanthal inhibits the NF-κB/RIP-2/caspase-1 signal pathway by inhibiting p56lck tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Ho; Jeong, Hyun-Ja

    2014-10-01

    Damnacanthal is a major constituent of Morinda citrifolia L. (noni) and exhibits anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the effects of damnacanthal on allergic diseases have not been determined. In this study, we investigated the effect of damnacanthal on mast cell-mediated allergic inflammatory responses. Damnacanthal significantly and dose-dependently inhibited compound 48/80-induced systemic anaphylactic shock, histamine release and intracellular calcium levels. In particular, IgE-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis was significantly inhibited by the oral administration of damnacanthal. In addition, we report for the first time that p56lck tyrosine kinase was expressed in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and calcium ionophore A23187 (PMACI)-stimulated mast cells. Furthermore, damnacanthal inhibited the up-regulation of p56lck tyrosine kinase activity by PMACI and repressed PMACI-induced histidine decarboxylase expression and activity. Damnacanthal also inhibited PMACI-induced interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α expressions by suppressing nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation and suppressed the activation of caspase-1 and the expression of receptor interacting protein-2. This study shows damnacanthal inhibits the NF-κB/receptor-interacting protein-2/caspase-1 signal pathway by inhibiting p56lck tyrosine kinase and suggests that damnacanthal has potential for the treatment of mast cell-mediated allergic disorders. PMID:25139491

  14. Conservation of early odontogenic signaling pathways in Aves

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yiping; Zhang, Yanding; Jiang, Ting-Xing; Barlow, Amanda J.; St Amand, Tara R; Hu, Yueping; Heaney, Shaun; Francis-West, Philippa; Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Maas, Richard

    2000-01-01

    Teeth have been missing from birds (Aves) for at least 60 million years. However, in the chick oral cavity a rudiment forms that resembles the lamina stage of the mammalian molar tooth germ. We have addressed the molecular basis for this secondary loss of tooth formation in Aves by analyzing in chick embryos the status of molecular pathways known to regulate mouse tooth development. Similar to the mouse dental lamina, expression of Fgf8, Pitx2, Barx1, and Pax9 defines a potential chick odonto...

  15. Interleukin-2 signaling pathway analysis by quantitative phosphoproteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osinalde, Nerea; Moss, Helle; Arrizabalaga, Onetsine;

    2011-01-01

    by IL-2, we aimed to define the global tyrosine-phosphoproteome of IL-2 pathway in human T cell line Kit225 using high resolution mass spectrometry combined with phosphotyrosine immunoprecipitation and SILAC. The molecular snapshot at 5min of IL-2 stimulation resulted in identification of 172...... proteins among which 79 were found with increased abundance in the tyrosine-phosphorylated complexes, including several previously not reported IL-2 downstream effectors. Combinatorial site-specific phosphoproteomic analysis resulted in identification of 99 phosphorylated sites mapping to the identified...

  16. Integrative transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of osteocytic cells exposed to fluid flow reveals novel mechano-sensitive signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govey, Peter M; Jacobs, Jon M; Tilton, Susan C; Loiselle, Alayna E; Zhang, Yue; Freeman, Willard M; Waters, Katrina M; Karin, Norman J; Donahue, Henry J

    2014-06-01

    Osteocytes, positioned within bone׳s porous structure, are subject to interstitial fluid flow upon whole bone loading. Such fluid flow is widely theorized to be a mechanical signal transduced by osteocytes, initiating a poorly understood cascade of signaling events mediating bone adaptation to mechanical load. The objective of this study was to examine the time course of flow-induced changes in osteocyte gene transcript and protein levels using high-throughput approaches. Osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 cells were subjected to 2h of oscillating fluid flow (1Pa peak shear stress) and analyzed following 0, 2, 8, and 24h post-flow incubation. Transcriptomic microarray analysis, followed by gene ontology pathway analysis, demonstrated fluid flow regulation of genes consistent with both known and unknown metabolic and inflammatory responses in bone. Additionally, two of the more highly up-regulated gene products - chemokines Cxcl1 and Cxcl2, supported by qPCR - have not previously been reported as responsive to fluid flow. Proteomic analysis demonstrated greatest up-regulation of the ATP-producing enzyme NDK, calcium-binding Calcyclin, and G protein-coupled receptor kinase 6. Finally, an integrative pathway analysis merging fold changes in transcript and protein levels predicted signaling nodes not directly detected at the sampled time points, including transcription factors c-Myc, c-Jun, and RelA/NF-κB. These results extend our knowledge of the osteocytic response to fluid flow, most notably up-regulation of Cxcl1 and Cxcl2 as possible paracrine agents for osteoblastic and osteoclastic recruitment. Moreover, these results demonstrate the utility of integrative, high-throughput approaches in place of a traditional candidate approach for identifying novel mechano-sensitive signaling molecules. PMID:24720889

  17. Pulsating fluid flow modulates gene expression of proteins involved in Wnt signaling pathways in osteocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Santos; A.D. Bakker; B. Zandieh-Doulabi; C.M. Semeins; J. Klein-Nulend

    2009-01-01

    Strain-derived flow of interstitial fluid activates signal transduction pathways in osteocytes that regulate bone mechanical adaptation. Wnts are involved in this process, but whether mechanical loading modulates Wnt signaling in osteocytes is unclear. We assessed whether mechanical stimulation by p

  18. Involvement of Jasmonate- signaling pathway in the herbivore-induced rice plant defense

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Tao; ZHOU Qiang; CHEN Wei; ZHANG Guren; HE Guofeng; GU Dexiang; ZHANG Wenqing

    2003-01-01

    The expression patterns of eight defense- related genes in the herbivore-infested and jasmonate- treated (jasmonic acid, JA and its derivative MeJA) rice leaves were analyzed using RT-PCR. The results showed that Spodoptera litura Fabricius (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) herbivory induced the expression of lipoxygenase (LOX) and allene oxide synthase (AOS) genes that are involved in the jasmonate-signaling pathway. Moreover, S. Litura damage resulted in the expression of farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (FPS), Bowman-birk proteinase inhibitor (BBPI), phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and other rice defense- related genes that were also induced by aqueous JA treatment or gaseous MeJA treatment. These indicated that in rice leaves, the JA-related signaling pathway was involved in the S. Litura-induced chemical defense. Mechanical damage and brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens (Stal) (Homoptera: Delphacidae) damage induced the expression of LOX gene, but both treatments did not induce the expression of AOS gene. However, BPH damage induced the expression of acidic pathogen-related protein 1 (PR-1a), Chitinase (PR-3), and PAL genes, which is involved in the salicylate- signaling pathway. It was suggested that salicylate-related signaling pathway or other pathways, rather than jasmonate-signaling pathway was involved in the BPH-induced rice plant defense.

  19. Identification of photoperception and light signal transduction pathways in citrus

    OpenAIRE

    Vera Quecini

    2007-01-01

    Studies employing model species have elucidated several aspects of photoperception and light signal transduction that control plant development. However, the information available for economically important crops is scarce. Citrus genome databases of expressed sequence tags (EST) were investigated in order to identify genes coding for functionally characterized proteins responsible for light-regulated developmental control in model plants. Approximately 176,200 EST sequences from 53 libraries...

  20. Phytohormones Signaling Pathways and ROS Involvement in Seed Germination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oracz, Krystyna; Karpiński, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    Phytohormones and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are major determinants of the regulation of development and stress responses in plants. During life cycle of these organisms, signaling networks of plant growth regulators and ROS interact in order to render an appropriate developmental and environmental response. In plant’s photosynthetic (e.g., leaves) and non-photosynthetic (e.g., seeds) tissues, enhanced and suboptimal ROS production is usually associated with stress, which in extreme cases can be lethal to cells, a whole organ or even an organism. However, controlled production of ROS is appreciated for cellular signaling. Despite the current progress that has been made in plant biology and increasing number of findings that have revealed roles of ROS and hormonal signaling in germination, some questions still arise, e.g., what are the downstream protein targets modified by ROS enabling stimulus-specific cellular responses of the seed? Or which molecular regulators allow ROS/phytohormones interactions and what is their function in seed life? In this particular review the role of some transcription factors, kinases and phosphatases is discussed, especially those which usually known to be involved in ROS and hormonal signal transduction under stress in plants, may also play a role in the regulation of processes occurring in seeds. The summarized recent findings regarding particular ROS- and phytohormones-related regulatory proteins, as well as their integration, allowed to propose a novel, possible model of action of LESION SIMULATING DISEASE 1, ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY 1, and PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT 4 functioning during seeds life. PMID:27379144

  1. β1 Integrins Mediate Mechanosensitive Signaling Pathways in Osteocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Litzenberger, Julie B.; Tummala, Padmaja; Kim, Jae-Beom; Jacobs, Christopher R.

    2010-01-01

    Integrins are cell-substrate adhesion proteins that initiate intracellular signaling and may serve as mechanosensors in bone. MLO-Y4 cells were stably transfected with a dominant negative form of the β1 integrin subunit (β1DN) containing the transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail of β1 integrin. Cells expressing β1DN had reduced vinculin localization to focal contacts but no change in intracellular actin organization. When exposed to oscillatory fluid flow, β1DN cells exhibited a significa...

  2. WDR26 is a new partner of Axin1 in the canonical Wnt signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Toshiyasu; Matsuzawa, Junhei; Iemura, Shun-Ichiro; Natsume, Tohru; Shibuya, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    The stability of β-catenin is very important for canonical Wnt signaling. A protein complex including Axin/APC/GSK3β phosphorylates β-catenin to be degraded by ubiquitination with β-TrCP. In the recent study, we isolated WDR26, a protein that binds to Axin. Here, we found that WDR26 is a negative regulator of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, and that WDR26 affected β-catenin levels. In addition, WDR26/Axin binding is involved in the ubiquitination of β-catenin. These results suggest that WDR26 plays a negative role in β-catenin degradation in the Wnt signaling pathway. PMID:27098453

  3. Regulation of drug-induced liver injury by signal transduction pathways: critical role of mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Derick; Dara, Lily; Win, Sanda; Than, Tin Aung; Yuan, Liyun; Abbasi, Sadeea Q; Liu, Zhang-Xu; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2013-04-01

    Drugs that cause liver injury often 'stress' mitochondria and activate signal transduction pathways important in determining cell survival or death. In most cases, hepatocytes adapt to the drug-induced stress by activating adaptive signaling pathways, such as mitochondrial adaptive responses and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf-2), a transcription factor that upregulates antioxidant defenses. Owing to adaptation, drugs alone rarely cause liver injury, with acetaminophen (APAP) being the notable exception. Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) usually involves other extrinsic factors, such as the adaptive immune system, that cause 'stressed' hepatocytes to become injured, leading to idiosyncratic DILI, the rare and unpredictable adverse drug reaction in the liver. Hepatocyte injury, due to drug and extrinsic insult, causes a second wave of signaling changes associated with adaptation, cell death, and repair. If the stress and injury reach a critical threshold, then death signaling pathways such as c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) become dominant and hepatocytes enter a failsafe mode to undergo self-destruction. DILI can be seen as an active process involving recruitment of death signaling pathways that mediate cell death rather than a passive process due to overwhelming biochemical injury. In this review, we highlight the role of signal transduction pathways, which frequently involve mitochondria, in the development of DILI. PMID:23453390

  4. From fruitflies to mammals: mechanisms of signalling via the Sonic hedgehog pathway in lung development

    OpenAIRE

    Tuyl, Minke; Post, Martin

    2000-01-01

    The hedgehog signalling pathway has been implicated in many different processes in fly and vertebrate development. It is now known that the hedgehog cascade is crucial for the patterning of the early respiratory system. Hedgehog signalling in the lung involves Gli transcription proteins, but their potential downstream target genes have yet to be identified. Bmp4 and Fgf10 have been shown to regulate lung branching morphogenesis but seem not to be targets of hedgehog signalling.

  5. Novel Modeling of Cancer Cell Signaling Pathways Enables Systematic Drug Repositioning for Distinct Breast Cancer Metastases

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Hong; Jin, Guangxu; Cui, Kemi; Ren, Ding; Liu, Timothy; Chen, Peikai; Wong, Solomon; Li, Fuhai; Fan, Yubo; Rodriguez, Angel; Chang, Jenny; Wong, Stephen TC.

    2013-01-01

    A new type of signaling network element, called cancer signaling bridges (CSB), has been shown to have the potential for systematic and fast-tracked drug repositioning. On the basis of CSBs, we developed a computational model to derive specific downstream signaling pathways that reveal previously unknown target-disease connections and new mechanisms for specific cancer subtypes. The model enables us to reposition drugs based on available patient gene expression data. We applied this model to ...

  6. Applications Of Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM)-Mass Spectrometry (MS) For Quantitative Measurement Of Signaling Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yingxin; Allan R. Brasier

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative measurement of the major regulatory proteins in signaling networks poses several technical challenges, including low abundance, the presence of post-translational modifications (PTMs), and the lack of suitable affinity detection reagents. Using the innate immune response (IIR) as a model signaling pathway, we illustrate the approach of stable isotopic dilution (SID)-selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-mass spectrometry (MS) assays for quantification of low abundance signaling prot...

  7. Development of Drugs Targeting the PI3K Signalling Pathway in Leukaemias and Lymphomas

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandre Arcaro

    2015-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) family of signalling enzymes play a key role in the transduction of signals from activated cell surface receptors controlling cell growth and proliferation, survival, metabolism, and migration. The intracellular signalling pathway from activated receptors to PI3K and its downstream targets v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog (Akt) and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is very frequently deregulated by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms in human...

  8. Inhibition of cytokines and JAK-STAT activation by distinct signaling pathways.

    OpenAIRE

    Sengupta, T K; Schmitt, E M; Ivashkiv, L B

    1996-01-01

    An important component of cytokine regulation of cell growth and differentiation is rapid transcriptional activation of genes by the JAK-STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription) signaling pathway. Ligation of cytokine receptors results in tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of receptor-associated Jak protein tyrosine kinases and cytoplasmic STAT transcription factors, which then translocate to the nucleus. We describe the interruption of cytokine triggered JAK-STAT signals ...

  9. The ubiquitin–proteasome system and signal transduction pathways regulating Epithelial Mesenchymal transition of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voutsadakis Ioannis A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Epithelial to Mesenchymal transition (EMT in cancer, a process permitting cancer cells to become mobile and metastatic, has a signaling hardwire forged from development. Multiple signaling pathways that regulate carcinogenesis enabling characteristics in neoplastic cells such as proliferation, resistance to apoptosis and angiogenesis are also the main players in EMT. These pathways, as almost all cellular processes, are in their turn regulated by ubiquitination and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System (UPS. Ubiquitination is the covalent link of target proteins with the small protein ubiquitin and serves as a signal to target protein degradation by the proteasome or to other outcomes such as endocytosis, degradation by the lysosome or specification of cellular localization. This paper reviews signal transduction pathways regulating EMT and being regulated by ubiquitination.

  10. NSAIDs, Mitochondria and Calcium Signaling: Special Focus on Aspirin/Salicylates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Suzuki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid is a well-known nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID that has long been used as an anti-pyretic and analgesic drug. Recently, much attention has been paid to the chemopreventive and apoptosis-inducing effects of NSAIDs in cancer cells. These effects have been thought to be primarily attributed to the inhibition of cyclooxygenase activity and prostaglandin synthesis. However, recent studies have demonstrated unequivocally that certain NSAIDs, including aspirin and its metabolite salicylic acid, exert their anti-inflammatory and chemopreventive effects independently of cyclooxygenase activity and prostaglandin synthesis inhibition. It is becoming increasingly evident that two potential common targets of NSAIDs are mitochondria and the Ca2+ signaling pathway. In this review, we provide an overview of the current knowledge regarding the roles of mitochondria and Ca2+ in the apoptosis-inducing effects as well as some side effects of aspirin, salicylates and other NSAIDs, and introducing the emerging role of L-type Ca2+ channels, a new Ca2+ entry pathway in non-excitable cells that is up-regulated in human cancer cells.

  11. Enlightenment on the aequorin-based platform for screening Arabidopsis stress sensory channels related to calcium signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiming; Taylor, Jemma L; He, Yue; Ni, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Free calcium ions (Ca(2+)) are an important signal molecule in response to a large array of external stimuli encountered by plants. Using the aequorin-based Ca(2+) recording system, tremendous progress has been made in understanding the Ca(2+) responses to biotic or abiotic stresses in dicotyledonous Arabidopsis. However, due to the lack of a similar detection system, little information has been obtained from the monocotyledonous rice (Oryza sativa). Recombinant aequorin has been introduced into rice, and the Ca(2+) responses to NaCl and H2O2 in rice roots were characterized. Although rice calcium signal sensor research has just started, the transgenic rice expressing aequorin provides a good platform to study rice adapted to different environmental conditions. PMID:26336841

  12. Pharmacologic study of calcium influx pathways in rabbit aortic smooth muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Functional characteristics and pharmacologic domains of receptor-operated and potential-sensitive calcium (Ca2+) channels (ROCs and PSCs, respectively) were derived via measurements of 45Ca2+ influx (M/sup Ca/) during activation by the neurotransmitters norepinephrine (NE), histamine (HS), and serotonin (5-HT) and by elevated extracellular potassium (K+) in the individual or combined presence of organic Ca2+ channel antagonists (CAts), calmodulin antagonists (Calm-ants), lanthanum (La3+), and agents that increase intracellular levels of cyclic AMP

  13. Calcium-containing phosphopeptides pave the secretory pathway for efficient protein traffic and secretion in fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Martín, Juan F.

    2014-01-01

    Casein phosphopeptides (CPPs) containing chelated calcium drastically increase the secretion of extracellular homologous and heterologous proteins in filamentous fungi. Casein phosphopeptides released by digestion of alpha − and beta-casein are rich in phosphoserine residues (SerP). They stimulate enzyme secretion in the gastrointestinal tract and enhance the immune response in mammals, and are used as food supplements. It is well known that casein phosphopeptides transport Ca2+ across the me...

  14. Dentin phosphophoryn in the matrix activates AKT and mTOR signaling pathway to promote preodontoblast survival and differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Eapen, Asha; George, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Dentin phosphophoryn (DPP) is an extracellular matrix protein synthesized by odontoblasts. It is highly acidic and the phosphorylated protein possesses a strong affinity for calcium ions. Therefore, DPP in the extracellular matrix can promote hydroxyapatite nucleation and can regulate the size of the growing crystal. Besides its calcium binding property, DPP can initiate signaling functions from the ECM (Extracellular matrix). The signals that promote the cytodifferentiation of preodontoblast...

  15. Calcium signaling in epithelium:special focus on Hailey-Hailey and Darier diseases, neurofibromatosis 1 and transitional cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Leinonen, P

    2008-01-01

    Abstract This study utilized normal and defective epithelial cell cultures and epidermal skin samples to examine intra- and intercellular calcium signaling. The main interests of this thesis were Hailey-Hailey disease (HHD), Darier disease (DD), neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) and transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). HHD and DD diseases are rare autosomal dominant skin disorders characterized by dissociation of epidermal keratinocytes (acantholysis) at the suprabasal layer of the epidermis. HH...

  16. Modular and Stochastic Approaches to Molecular Pathway Models of ATM, TGF beta, and WNT Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; O'Neill, Peter; Ponomarev, Artem; Carra, Claudio; Whalen, Mary; Pluth, Janice M.

    2009-01-01

    Deterministic pathway models that describe the biochemical interactions of a group of related proteins, their complexes, activation through kinase, etc. are often the basis for many systems biology models. Low dose radiation effects present a unique set of challenges to these models including the importance of stochastic effects due to the nature of radiation tracks and small number of molecules activated, and the search for infrequent events that contribute to cancer risks. We have been studying models of the ATM, TGF -Smad and WNT signaling pathways with the goal of applying pathway models to the investigation of low dose radiation cancer risks. Modeling challenges include introduction of stochastic models of radiation tracks, their relationships to more than one substrate species that perturb pathways, and the identification of a representative set of enzymes that act on the dominant substrates. Because several pathways are activated concurrently by radiation the development of modular pathway approach is of interest.

  17. Vitamin D, reactive oxygen species and calcium signalling in ageing and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berridge, Michael J

    2016-08-01

    Vitamin D is a hormone that maintains healthy cells. It functions by regulating the low resting levels of cell signalling components such as Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Its role in maintaining phenotypic stability of these signalling pathways depends on the ability of vitamin D to control the expression of those components that act to reduce the levels of both Ca(2+) and ROS. This regulatory role of vitamin D is supported by both Klotho and Nrf2. A decline in the vitamin D/Klotho/Nrf2 regulatory network may enhance the ageing process, and this is well illustrated by the age-related decline in cognition in rats that can be reversed by administering vitamin D. A deficiency in vitamin D has also been linked to two of the major diseases in man: heart disease and Alzheimer's disease (AD). In cardiac cells, this deficiency alters the Ca(2+) transients to activate the gene transcriptional events leading to cardiac hypertrophy and the failing heart. In the case of AD, it is argued that vitamin D deficiency results in the Ca(2+) landscape that initiates amyloid formation, which then elevates the resting level of Ca(2+) to drive the memory loss that progresses to neuronal cell death and dementia.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. PMID:27377727

  18. Neuron class-specific requirements for Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein in critical period development of calcium signaling in learning and memory circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Caleb A; Broadie, Kendal

    2016-05-01

    Neural circuit optimization occurs through sensory activity-dependent mechanisms that refine synaptic connectivity and information processing during early-use developmental critical periods. Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP), the gene product lost in Fragile X syndrome (FXS), acts as an activity sensor during critical period development, both as an RNA-binding translation regulator and channel-binding excitability regulator. Here, we employ a Drosophila FXS disease model to assay calcium signaling dynamics with a targeted transgenic GCaMP reporter during critical period development of the mushroom body (MB) learning/memory circuit. We find FMRP regulates depolarization-induced calcium signaling in a neuron-specific manner within this circuit, suppressing activity-dependent calcium transients in excitatory cholinergic MB input projection neurons and enhancing calcium signals in inhibitory GABAergic MB output neurons. Both changes are restricted to the developmental critical period and rectified at maturity. Importantly, conditional genetic (dfmr1) rescue of null mutants during the critical period corrects calcium signaling defects in both neuron classes, indicating a temporally restricted FMRP requirement. Likewise, conditional dfmr1 knockdown (RNAi) during the critical period replicates constitutive null mutant defects in both neuron classes, confirming cell-autonomous requirements for FMRP in developmental regulation of calcium signaling dynamics. Optogenetic stimulation during the critical period enhances depolarization-induced calcium signaling in both neuron classes, but this developmental change is eliminated in dfmr1 null mutants, indicating the activity-dependent regulation requires FMRP. These results show FMRP shapes neuron class-specific calcium signaling in excitatory vs. inhibitory neurons in developing learning/memory circuitry, and that FMRP mediates activity-dependent regulation of calcium signaling specifically during the early

  19. In vivo photoacoustic neuronal imaging of odor-evoked calcium signals in the drosophila brain (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiying; Rao, Bin; Rong, Haoyang; Raman, Baranidharan; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    Neural scientists can benefit greatly from imaging tools that can penetrate thick brain tissue. Compared with traditional optical microscopy methods, photoacoustic imaging can beat the optical diffusion limit and achieve such deep tissue imaging with high spatial resolution. In this study, we used an optical-resolution photoacoustic microscope to image the odor-evoked neuronal activities in a drosophila model. Drosophila brain neurons stably express GCaMP5G, a calcium-sensitive fluorescent protein whose optical absorption coefficient changes with calcium influx during action potentials. We recorded an ~20% odor-evoked fractional photoacoustic signal increase at all depths of the drosophila brain in vivo, with and without removal of the brain cuticle, at a recording rate of 1 kHz. Our results were confirmed by concurrent fluorescent recordings. Furthermore, by performing fast 2D scanning, we imaged the antenna lobe region, which is of particular interest in neuroscience, at a volumetric rate of ~1 Hz with a sub-neuron resolution of 3 μm. Unlike optical imaging, which requires surgical removal of the scattering brain cuticle, our photoacoustic system can image through the cuticle and measure neuronal signals of the whole drosophila brain without invasive surgery, enabling minimal disturbance to the animal's behaviors. In conclusion, we have demonstrated photoacoustic imaging of calcium signals in drosophila brains for the first time. Utilizing the deep imaging capability of photoacoustic tomography, our methods could potentially be extended to in vivo imaging of neuronal activities from deep brains in other animal models.

  20. Plasmonic activation of gold nanorods for remote stimulation of calcium signaling and protein expression in HEK 293T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Rodriguez, Sandra P; Sauer, Jeremy P; Stanley, Sarah A; Qian, Xi; Gottesdiener, Andrew; Friedman, Jeffrey M; Dordick, Jonathan S

    2016-10-01

    Remote activation of specific cells of a heterogeneous population can provide a useful research tool for clinical and therapeutic applications. Here, we demonstrate that photostimulation of gold nanorods (AuNRs) using a tunable near-infrared (NIR) laser at specific longitudinal surface plasmon resonance wavelengths can induce the selective and temporal internalization of calcium in HEK 293T cells. Biotin-PEG-Au nanorods coated with streptavidin Alexa Fluor-633 and biotinylated anti-His antibodies were used to decorate cells genetically modified with His-tagged TRPV1 temperature-sensitive ion channel and AuNRs conjugated to biotinylated RGD peptide were used to decorate integrins in unmodified cells. Plasmonic activation can be stimulated at weak laser power (0.7-4.0 W/cm(2) ) without causing cell damage. Selective activation of TRPV1 channels could be controlled by laser power between 1.0 and 1.5 W/cm(2) . Integrin targeting robustly stimulated calcium signaling due to a dense cellular distribution of nanoparticles. Such an approach represents a functional tool for combinatorial activation of cell signaling in heterogeneous cell populations. Our results suggest that it is possible to induce cell activation via NIR-induced gold nanorod heating through the selective targeting of membrane proteins in unmodified cells to produce calcium signaling and downstream expression of specific genes with significant relevance for both in vitro and therapeutic applications. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2228-2240. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27563853

  1. Targeting the Hippo Signaling Pathway for Tissue Regeneration and Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, Wen Chun; Hong, Wanjin

    2016-01-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway is a highly-conserved developmental pathway that plays an essential role in organ size control, tumor suppression, tissue regeneration and stem cell self-renewal. The YES-associated protein (YAP) and the transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) are two important transcriptional co-activators that are negatively regulated by the Hippo signaling pathway. By binding to transcription factors, especially the TEA domain transcription factors (TEADs), YAP and TAZ induce the expression of growth-promoting genes, which can promote organ regeneration after injury. Therefore, controlled activation of YAP and TAZ can be useful for regenerative medicine. However, aberrant activation of YAP and TAZ due to deregulation of the Hippo pathway or overexpression of YAP/TAZ and TEADs can promote cancer development. Hence, pharmacological inhibition of YAP and TAZ may be a useful approach to treat tumors with high YAP and/or TAZ activity. In this review, we present the mechanisms regulating the Hippo pathway, the role of the Hippo pathway in tissue repair and cancer, as well as a detailed analysis of the different strategies to target the Hippo signaling pathway and the genes regulated by YAP and TAZ for regenerative medicine and cancer therapy. PMID:27589805

  2. Insulin-like growth factor-1 suppresses the Myostatin signaling pathway during myogenic differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myogenic differentiation is a complex and well-coordinated process for generating mature skeletal muscle fibers. This event is autocrine/paracrine regulated by growth factors, principally Myostatin (MSTN) and Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1). Myostatin, a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth in vertebrates that exerts its inhibitory function by activating Smad transcription factors. In contrast, IGF-1 promotes the differentiation of skeletal myoblasts by activating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. This study reports on a novel functional crosstalk between the IGF-1 and MSTN signaling pathways, as mediated through interaction between PI3K/Akt and Smad3. Stimulation of skeletal myoblasts with MSTN resulted in a transient increase in the pSmad3:Smad3 ratio and Smad-dependent transcription. Moreover, MSTN inhibited myod gene expression and myoblast fusion in an Activin receptor-like kinase/Smad3-dependent manner. Preincubation of skeletal myoblasts with IGF-1 blocked MSTN-induced Smad3 activation, promoting myod expression and myoblast differentiation. This inhibitory effect of IGF-1 on the MSTN signaling pathway was dependent on IGF-1 receptor, PI3K, and Akt activities. Finally, immunoprecipitation assay analysis determined that IGF-1 pretreatment increased Akt and Smad3 interaction. These results demonstrate that the IGF-1/PI3K/Akt pathway may inhibit MSTN signaling during myoblast differentiation, providing new insight to existing knowledge on the complex crosstalk between both growth factors. - Highlights: • IGF-1 inhibits Myostatin canonical signaling pathway through IGF-1R/PI3K/Akt pathway. • IGF-1 promotes myoblast differentiation through a direct blocking of Myostatin signaling pathway. • IGF-1 induces the interaction of Akt with Smad3 in skeletal myoblast

  3. Insulin-like growth factor-1 suppresses the Myostatin signaling pathway during myogenic differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Retamales, A.; Zuloaga, R.; Valenzuela, C.A. [Laboratorio de Biotecnología Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Andrés Bello, Santiago (Chile); Gallardo-Escarate, C. [Laboratory of Biotechnology and Aquatic Genomics, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción (Chile); Interdisciplinary Center for Aquaculture Research (INCAR), P.O. Box 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Molina, A. [Laboratorio de Biotecnología Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Andrés Bello, Santiago (Chile); Interdisciplinary Center for Aquaculture Research (INCAR), P.O. Box 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Valdés, J.A., E-mail: jvaldes@unab.cl [Laboratorio de Biotecnología Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Andrés Bello, Santiago (Chile); Interdisciplinary Center for Aquaculture Research (INCAR), P.O. Box 160-C, Concepción (Chile)

    2015-08-21

    Myogenic differentiation is a complex and well-coordinated process for generating mature skeletal muscle fibers. This event is autocrine/paracrine regulated by growth factors, principally Myostatin (MSTN) and Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1). Myostatin, a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth in vertebrates that exerts its inhibitory function by activating Smad transcription factors. In contrast, IGF-1 promotes the differentiation of skeletal myoblasts by activating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. This study reports on a novel functional crosstalk between the IGF-1 and MSTN signaling pathways, as mediated through interaction between PI3K/Akt and Smad3. Stimulation of skeletal myoblasts with MSTN resulted in a transient increase in the pSmad3:Smad3 ratio and Smad-dependent transcription. Moreover, MSTN inhibited myod gene expression and myoblast fusion in an Activin receptor-like kinase/Smad3-dependent manner. Preincubation of skeletal myoblasts with IGF-1 blocked MSTN-induced Smad3 activation, promoting myod expression and myoblast differentiation. This inhibitory effect of IGF-1 on the MSTN signaling pathway was dependent on IGF-1 receptor, PI3K, and Akt activities. Finally, immunoprecipitation assay analysis determined that IGF-1 pretreatment increased Akt and Smad3 interaction. These results demonstrate that the IGF-1/PI3K/Akt pathway may inhibit MSTN signaling during myoblast differentiation, providing new insight to existing knowledge on the complex crosstalk between both growth factors. - Highlights: • IGF-1 inhibits Myostatin canonical signaling pathway through IGF-1R/PI3K/Akt pathway. • IGF-1 promotes myoblast differentiation through a direct blocking of Myostatin signaling pathway. • IGF-1 induces the interaction of Akt with Smad3 in skeletal myoblast.

  4. Liposomal lipopolysaccharide initiates TRIF-dependent signaling pathway independent of CD14.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachiko Watanabe

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide (LPS is recognized by CD14 with Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4, and initiates 2 major pathways of TLR4 signaling, the MyD88-dependent and TRIF-dependent signaling pathways. The MyD88-dependent pathway induces inflammatory responses such as the production of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-12 via the activation of NFκB and MAPK. The TRIF-dependent pathway induces the production of type-I IFN, and RANTES via the activation of IRF-3 and NFκB, and is also important for the induction of adaptive immune responses. CD14 plays a critical role in initiating the TRIF-dependent signaling pathway response to LPS, to support the internalization of LPS via endocytosis. Here, we clearly demonstrate that intracellular delivery of LPS by LPS-formulated liposomes (LPS-liposomes initiate only TRIF-dependent signaling via clathrin-mediated endocytosis, independent of CD14. In fact, LPS-liposomes do not induce the production of TNF-α and IL-6 but induce RANTES production in peritoneal macrophages. Additionally, LPS-liposomes could induce adaptive immune responses effectively in CD14-deficient mice. Collectively, our results strongly suggest that LPS-liposomes are useful as a TRIF-dependent signaling-based immune adjuvant without inducing unnecessary inflammation.

  5. Regulation of hematopoiesis and the hematopoietic stem cell niche by Wnt signaling pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael J Nemeth; David M Bodine

    2007-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are a rare population of cells that are responsible for life-long generation of blood cells of all lineages. In order to maintain their numbers, HSCs must establish a balance between the opposing cell fates of self-renewal (in which the ability to function as HSCs is retained) and initiation of hematopoietic differentiation. Multiple signaling pathways have been implicated in the regulation of HSC cell fate. One such set of pathways are those activated by the Wnt family of ligands. Wnt signaling pathways play a crucial role during embryogenesis and deregulation of these pathways has been implicated in the formation of solid tumors. Wnt signaling also plays a role in the regulation of stem cells from multiple tissues, such as embryonic, epidermal, and intestinal stem cells. However, the function of Wnt signaling in HSC biology is still controversial. In this review, we will discuss the basic characteristics of the adult HSC and its regulatory microenvironment, the "niche", focusing on the regulation of the HSC and its niche by the Wnt signaling pathways.

  6. Constraint-based modeling and kinetic analysis of the Smad dependent TGF-beta signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhike Zi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Investigation of dynamics and regulation of the TGF-beta signaling pathway is central to the understanding of complex cellular processes such as growth, apoptosis, and differentiation. In this study, we aim at using systems biology approach to provide dynamic analysis on this pathway. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We proposed a constraint-based modeling method to build a comprehensive mathematical model for the Smad dependent TGF-beta signaling pathway by fitting the experimental data and incorporating the qualitative constraints from the experimental analysis. The performance of the model generated by constraint-based modeling method is significantly improved compared to the model obtained by only fitting the quantitative data. The model agrees well with the experimental analysis of TGF-beta pathway, such as the time course of nuclear phosphorylated Smad, the subcellular location of Smad and signal response of Smad phosphorylation to different doses of TGF-beta. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The simulation results indicate that the signal response to TGF-beta is regulated by the balance between clathrin dependent endocytosis and non-clathrin mediated endocytosis. This model is useful to be built upon as new precise experimental data are emerging. The constraint-based modeling method can also be applied to quantitative modeling of other signaling pathways.

  7. Interactions between Trypanosoma cruzi Secreted Proteins and Host Cell Signaling Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe Costa, Renata; da Silveira, Jose F.; Bahia, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is one of the prevalent neglected tropical diseases, affecting at least 6–7 million individuals in Latin America. It is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to vertebrate hosts by blood-sucking insects. After infection, the parasite invades and multiplies in the myocardium, leading to acute myocarditis that kills around 5% of untreated individuals. T. cruzi secretes proteins that manipulate multiple host cell signaling pathways to promote host cell invasion. The primary secreted lysosomal peptidase in T. cruzi is cruzipain, which has been shown to modulate the host immune response. Cruzipain hinders macrophage activation during the early stages of infection by interrupting the NF-kB P65 mediated signaling pathway. This allows the parasite to survive and replicate, and may contribute to the spread of infection in acute Chagas disease. Another secreted protein P21, which is expressed in all of the developmental stages of T. cruzi, has been shown to modulate host phagocytosis signaling pathways. The parasite also secretes soluble factors that exert effects on host extracellular matrix, such as proteolytic degradation of collagens. Finally, secreted phospholipase A from T. cruzi contributes to lipid modifications on host cells and concomitantly activates the PKC signaling pathway. Here, we present a brief review of the interaction between secreted proteins from T. cruzi and the host cells, emphasizing the manipulation of host signaling pathways during invasion. PMID:27065960

  8. Proinflammatory Cytokines Regulate Cementogenic Differentiation of Periodontal Ligament Cells by Wnt/Ca(2+) Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Pingping; Lloyd, Tain; Chen, Zetao; Xiao, Yin

    2016-05-01

    Periodontal inflammation can inhibit cell differentiation of periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs), resulting in decreased bone/cementum regeneration ability. The Wnt signaling pathway, including canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling and noncanonical Wnt/Ca(2+) signaling, plays essential roles in cell proliferation and differentiation during tooth development. However, little is still known whether noncanonical Wnt/Ca(2+) signaling cascade could regulate cementogenic/osteogenic differentiation capability of PDLCs within an inflammatory environment. Therefore, in this study, human PDLCs (hPDLCs) and their cementogenic differentiation potential were investigated in the presence of cytokines. The data demonstrated that both cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) inhibited cell proliferation, relative alkaline phosphatase activity, bone/cementum-related gene/protein expression, and canonical Wnt pathway-related gene/protein expression in hPDLCs. Interestingly, both cytokines upregulated the noncanonical Wnt/Ca(2+) signaling-related gene and protein expression in hPDLCs. When the Wnt/Ca(2+) pathway was blocked by Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitor KN93, even in the presence of IL-6 and TNF-α, cementogenesis could be stimulated in hPDLCs. Our data indicate that the Wnt/Ca(2+) pathway plays an inhibitory role on PDLC cementogenic differentiation in inflammatory microenvironments. Therefore, targeting the Wnt/Ca(2+) pathway may provide a novel therapeutic approach to improve periodontal regeneration for periodontal diseases. PMID:27074616

  9. Crosstalk between signaling pathways of adrenoreceptors and signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) in heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai-zheng GONG; Hui ZHANG; Jian-hai DU; You-yi ZHANG

    2007-01-01

    Recently, there have been important advancements in our understanding of the signaling mechanisms of adrenoreceptors (AR) and signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3). While their crucial roles in the pathological processes of the heart are well established, accumulating evidence suggests there is a complex pattern of crosstalk between these 2 signaling pathways. Moreover, the potential for crosstalk occurs at multiple levels in each signaling cascade and involves receptor transactivation, G proteins, small GTPases, cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate/protein kinase A, protein kinase C, scaffold/adaptor proteins, protein tyrosine kinases, and mitogen-activated protein kinases. In addition, post-translational modification (eg acetylation) of STAT3 may provide a link betweenSTAT3 and AR signaling. In particular, crosstalk between these 2 systems in the heart would appear to be dependent upon the species/tissue studied, develop-mental stage, and eliciting stimulus. This at least partly accounts for the epigenetic effects on biological function that is mediated by the 2 signaling pathways. Elucidation of these mechanisms will provide new targets in the development of novel clinical strategies for heart disorders.

  10. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 6 signaling enhances TRPM1 calcium channel function and increases melanin content in human melanocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Devi, Sulochana; Markandeya, Yogananda; Maddodi, Nityanand; Dhingra, Anuradha; Vardi, Noga; Ravi C Balijepalli; Setaluri, Vijayasaradhi

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in TRPM1, a calcium channel expressed in retinal bipolar cells and epidermal melanocytes, cause complete congenital stationary night blindness with no discernible skin phenotype. In the retina, TRPM1 activity is negatively coupled to metabotropic glutamate receptor 6 (mGluR6) signaling through Gαo and TRPM1 mutations result in the loss of responsiveness of TRPM1 to mGluR6 signaling. Here, we show that human melanocytes express mGluR6 and treatment of melanocytes with L-AP4, a type I...

  11. Down-regulation of HIV-1 Infection by Inhibition of the MAPK Signaling Pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Gong; Xi-hui Shen; Chao Chen; Hui Qiu; Rong-ge Yang

    2011-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1(HIV-1)can interact with and exploit the host cellular machinery to replicate and propagate itself.Numerous studies have shown that the Mitogen-activated protein kinase(MAPK)signal pathway can positively regulate the replication of HIV-1,but exactly how each MAPK pathway affects HIV-1 infection and replication is not understood.In this study,we used the Extracellular signal-regulated kinase(ERK)pathway inhibitor,PD98059,the Jun N-terminal kinase(JNK)pathway inhibitor,SP600125,and the p38 pathway inhibitor,SB203580,to investigate the roles of these pathways in HIV-1replication.We found that application of PD98059 results in a strong VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1NL4-3 luciferase reporter virus and HIV-1NL4-3 virus inhibition activity.In addition,SB203580 and SP600125 also elicited marked VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1NL4-3 luciferase reporter virus inhibition activity but no HIV-1NL4-3 virus inhibition activity.We also found that SB203580 and SP600125 can enhance the HIV-1 inhibition activity of PD98059when cells were treated with all three MAPK pathway inhibitors in combination.Finally,we show that HIV-1virus inhibition activity of the MAPK pathway inhibitors was the result of the negative regulation of HIV-1 LTR promoter activity.

  12. Remote activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway using functionalised magnetic particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Rotherham

    Full Text Available Wnt signalling pathways play crucial roles in developmental biology, stem cell fate and tissue patterning and have become an attractive therapeutic target in the fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Wnt signalling has also been shown to play a role in human Mesenchymal Stem Cell (hMSC fate, which have shown potential as a cell therapy in bone and cartilage tissue engineering. Previous work has shown that biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles (MNP can be used to stimulate specific mechanosensitive membrane receptors and ion channels in vitro and in vivo. Using this strategy, we determined the effects of mechano-stimulation of the Wnt Frizzled receptor on Wnt pathway activation in hMSC. Frizzled receptors were tagged using anti-Frizzled functionalised MNP (Fz-MNP. A commercially available oscillating magnetic bioreactor (MICA Biosystems was used to mechanically stimulate Frizzled receptors remotely. Our results demonstrate that Fz-MNP can activate Wnt/β-catenin signalling at key checkpoints in the signalling pathway. Immunocytochemistry indicated nuclear localisation of the Wnt intracellular messenger β-catenin after treatment with Fz-MNP. A Wnt signalling TCF/LEF responsive luciferase reporter transfected into hMSC was used to assess terminal signal activation at the nucleus. We observed an increase in reporter activity after treatment with Fz-MNP and this effect was enhanced after mechano-stimulation using the magnetic array. Western blot analysis was used to probe the mechanism of signalling activation and indicated that Fz-MNP signal through an LRP independent mechanism. Finally, the gene expression profiles of stress response genes were found to be similar when cells were treated with recombinant Wnt-3A or Fz-MNP. This study provides proof of principle that Wnt signalling and Frizzled receptors are mechanosensitive and can be remotely activated in vitro. Using magnetic nanoparticle technology it may be possible to modulate

  13. Role of Notch signalling pathway in cancer and its association with DNA methylation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhuri G. S. Aithal; Narayanappa Rajeswari

    2013-12-01

    The Notch signalling pathway is an evolutionarily conserved cell signalling pathway involved in the development of organisms as diverse as humans and fruit flies. It plays a pivotal role in cell fate determination. Dysregulated Notch signalling is oncogenic, inhibits apoptosis and promotes cell survival. Abnormal Notch signalling is seen in many cancers like T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, acute myeloid leukaemia and cancers of the breast, cervix, colon, pancreas, skin and brain. Inhibition of Notch signalling leads to growth arrest and differentiation in those cells in which Notch pathway is activated and this represents a new target for cancer therapy. Cancer develops from genome defects, including both genetic and epigenetic alterations. Epigenetics deals with heritable changes in gene function that occur without a change in the DNA sequence. Among various epigenetic alterations such as acetylation, phosphorylation, ubiquitylation and sumoylation, promoter region methylation is considered as an important component in cancer development. Epigenetic alterations can be used as biomarkers in screening, detection, diagnosis, staging and risk stratification of various cancers. DNA methylation can be therapeutically reversed and demethylating drugs have proven to be promising in cancer treatment. This review focusses on the methylation status of genes in Notch signalling pathway from various cancers and how this epigenetic alteration can be used as a biomarker for cancer diagnosis and subsequent treatment.

  14. The PI3K signaling pathway as a pharmacological target in Autism related disorders and Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enriquez-Barreto, Lilian; Morales, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    This review is focused in PI3K's involvement in two widespread mental disorders: Autism and Schizophrenia. A large body of evidence points to synaptic dysfunction as a cause of these diseases, either during the initial phases of brain synaptic circuit's development or later modulating synaptic function and plasticity. Autism related disorders and Schizophrenia are complex genetic conditions in which the identification of gene markers has proved difficult, although the existence of single-gene mutations with a high prevalence in both diseases offers insight into the role of the PI3K signaling pathway. In the brain, components of the PI3K pathway regulate synaptic formation and plasticity; thus, disruption of this pathway leads to synapse dysfunction and pathological behaviors. Here, we recapitulate recent evidences that demonstrate the imbalance of several PI3K elements as leading causes of Autism and Schizophrenia, together with the plausible new pharmacological paths targeting this signaling pathway. PMID:26877878

  15. Signaling Pathways in Exosomes Biogenesis, Secretion and Fate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Emiliani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are small extracellular vesicles (30–100 nm derived from the endosomal system, which have raised considerable interest in the last decade. Several studies have shown that they mediate cell-to-cell communication in a variety of biological processes. Thus, in addition to cell-to-cell direct interaction or secretion of active molecules, they are now considered another class of signal mediators. Exosomes can be secreted by several cell types and retrieved in many body fluids, such as blood, urine, saliva and cerebrospinal fluid. In addition to proteins and lipids, they also contain nucleic acids, namely mRNA and miRNA. These features have prompted extensive research to exploit them as a source of biomarkers for several pathologies, such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. In this context, exosomes also appear attractive as gene delivery vehicles. Furthermore, exosome immunomodulatory and regenerative properties are also encouraging their application for further therapeutic purposes. Nevertheless, several issues remain to be addressed: exosome biogenesis and secretion mechanisms have not been clearly understood, and physiological functions, as well as pathological roles, are far from being satisfactorily elucidated.

  16. PKC and MAPK signalling pathways regulate vascular endothelin receptor expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, David; Wackenfors, Angelica; Gustafsson, Lotta; Ugander, Martin; Ingemansson, Richard; Edvinsson, Lars; Malmsjö, Malin

    immunofluorescence techniques. Sarafotoxin 6c and endothelin ET-1 were used to examine the endothelin ET(A) and ET(B) receptor effects. The involvement of PKC and MAPK in the receptor regulation was examined by culture in the presence of antagonists. Organ culture resulted in increased sarafotoxin 6c and endothelin......-1 contractions, endothelin ET(A) and ET(B) receptor immunofluorescence staining intensities and endothelin ET(B), but not ET(A), receptor mRNA levels. The general PKC inhibitors, bisindolylmaleimide I (10 microM) or Ro-32-0432 (10 microM), inhibited these effects. Also, the increase in sarafotoxin 6......c contraction, endothelin ET(B) receptor and mRNA levels and endothelin ET(A) and ET(B) immunofluorescence staining intensities were inhibited by MAPK inhibitors for extracellular signal related kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), PD98059 (10 microM), C-jun terminal kinase (JNK), SP600125 (10 microM), but not...

  17. Targeting key signalling pathways in oesophageal adenocarcinoma: A reality for personalised medicine?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard R Keld; Yeng S Ang

    2011-01-01

    Cancer treatments are rapidly changing. Curative treatment for oesophageal adenocarcinoma currently involves surgery and cytotoxic chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy.Outcomes for both regimes are generally poor as a result of tumor recurrence. We have reviewed the key signalling pathways associated with oesophageal adenocarcinomas and discussed the recent trials of novel agents that attempt to target these pathways. There are many trials underway with the aim of improving survival in oesophageal cancer. Currently,phase 2 and 3 trials are focused on MAP kinase inhibition, either through inhibition of growth factor receptors or signal transducer proteins. In order to avoid tumor resistance, it appears to be clear that targeted therapy will be needed to combat the multiple signalling pathways that are in operation in oesophageal adenocarcinomas. This may be achievable in the future with the advent of gene signatures and a combinatorial approach.

  18. The role of MAPK signalling pathways in acetic acid-induced cell death of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Azevedo, Flávio Humberto Torres Dias Feio de

    2011-01-01

    Dissertação de mestrado em Genética Molecular Mitogenic Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) cascades are important signalling pathways that allow yeast cells to swiftly adapt to changing environmental conditions. Previous studies suggested that the High Osmolarity Glycerol (HOG) MAPK pathway and ceramide production are involved in acetic-acid induced apoptosis in yeast. Evidence that changes in the levels of endogenous ceramides can affect yeast cell fate has also been put forth...

  19. Advances of Targeted Therapy Based on Estrogen Receptor Signaling Pathway 
in Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Liqiang; Liao, Yongde; Hexiao TANG; Zhang, Chao; Liu, Zhaoguo

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that estrogen promotes tumor growth in both estrogen target organs and non-target organs. Estrogen regulates cell proliferation and differentiation via two different receptors, estrogen receptors α and β (ERα and ERβ). In recent decades, with the clarification of the ERα-mediated signaling pathways in breast cancer, targeted therapy through these pathways have successfully been used in clinical application. Tamoxifen, the classic representative, is a selective es...

  20. Cellular regulation of dinoflagellate bioluminescence : characterizing mechanosensitive ion channels in the signaling pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Dinoflagellate bioluminescence represents a dramatic response to mechanical stress found in nature. The cellular mechanisms that govern this pathway, however, are not completely understood. The objective of this thesis is to build and expand from previous studies to explore the mechanosensitive properties of dinoflagellate bioluminescence. Chapter I tests the hypothesis that the signaling pathway involves a stretch-activated component. Chapter I uses two separate, measurable types of biolumin...

  1. Homocysteine enhances MMP-9 production in murine macrophages via ERK and Akt signaling pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Jin; Lee, Yi Sle; Seo, Kyo Won; Bae, Jin Ung; Kim, Gyu Hee; Park, So Youn; Kim, Chi Dae, E-mail: chidkim@pusan.ac.kr

    2012-04-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) at elevated levels is an independent risk factor of cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of Hcy on the production of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) in murine macrophages. Among the MMP known to regulate the activities of collagenase and gelatinase, Hcy exclusively increased the gelatinolytic activity of MMP-9 in J774A.1 cells as well as in mouse peritoneal macrophages. Furthermore, this activity was found to be correlated with Western blot findings in J774A.1 cells, which showed that MMP-9 expression was concentration- and time-dependently increased by Hcy. Inhibition of the ERK and Akt pathways led to a significant decrease in Hcy-induced MMP-9 expression, and combined treatment with inhibitors of the ERK and Akt pathways showed an additive effects. Activity assays for ERK and Akt showed that Hcy increased the phosphorylation of both, but these phosphorylation were not affected by inhibitors of the Akt and ERK pathways. In line with these findings, the molecular inhibition of ERK and Akt using siRNA did not affect the Hcy-induced phosphorylation of Akt and ERK, respectively. Taken together, these findings suggest that Hcy enhances MMP-9 production in murine macrophages by separately activating the ERK and Akt signaling pathways. -- Highlights: ► Homocysteine (Hcy) induced MMP-9 production in murine macrophages. ► Hcy induced MMP-9 production through ERK and Akt signaling pathways. ► ERK and Akt signaling pathways were activated by Hcy in murine macrophages. ► ERK and Akt pathways were additively act on Hcy-induced MMP-9 production. ► Hcy enhances MMP-9 production in macrophages via activation of ERK and Akt signaling pathways in an independent manner.

  2. Homocysteine enhances MMP-9 production in murine macrophages via ERK and Akt signaling pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homocysteine (Hcy) at elevated levels is an independent risk factor of cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of Hcy on the production of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) in murine macrophages. Among the MMP known to regulate the activities of collagenase and gelatinase, Hcy exclusively increased the gelatinolytic activity of MMP-9 in J774A.1 cells as well as in mouse peritoneal macrophages. Furthermore, this activity was found to be correlated with Western blot findings in J774A.1 cells, which showed that MMP-9 expression was concentration- and time-dependently increased by Hcy. Inhibition of the ERK and Akt pathways led to a significant decrease in Hcy-induced MMP-9 expression, and combined treatment with inhibitors of the ERK and Akt pathways showed an additive effects. Activity assays for ERK and Akt showed that Hcy increased the phosphorylation of both, but these phosphorylation were not affected by inhibitors of the Akt and ERK pathways. In line with these findings, the molecular inhibition of ERK and Akt using siRNA did not affect the Hcy-induced phosphorylation of Akt and ERK, respectively. Taken together, these findings suggest that Hcy enhances MMP-9 production in murine macrophages by separately activating the ERK and Akt signaling pathways. -- Highlights: ► Homocysteine (Hcy) induced MMP-9 production in murine macrophages. ► Hcy induced MMP-9 production through ERK and Akt signaling pathways. ► ERK and Akt signaling pathways were activated by Hcy in murine macrophages. ► ERK and Akt pathways were additively act on Hcy-induced MMP-9 production. ► Hcy enhances MMP-9 production in macrophages via activation of ERK and Akt signaling pathways in an independent manner.

  3. Identification of Major Signaling Pathways in Prion Disease Progression Using Network Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newaz, Khalique; Sriram, K; Bera, Debajyoti

    2015-01-01

    Prion diseases are transmissible neurodegenerative diseases that arise due to conformational change of normal, cellular prion protein (PrPC) to protease-resistant isofrom (rPrPSc). Deposition of misfolded PrpSc proteins leads to an alteration of many signaling pathways that includes immunological and apoptotic pathways. As a result, this culminates in the dysfunction and death of neuronal cells. Earlier works on transcriptomic studies have revealed some affected pathways, but it is not clear which is (are) the prime network pathway(s) that change during the disease progression and how these pathways are involved in crosstalks with each other from the time of incubation to clinical death. We perform network analysis on large-scale transcriptomic data of differentially expressed genes obtained from whole brain in six different mouse strain-prion strain combination models to determine the pathways involved in prion diseases, and to understand the role of crosstalks in disease propagation. We employ a notion of differential network centrality measures on protein interaction networks to identify the potential biological pathways involved. We also propose a crosstalk ranking method based on dynamic protein interaction networks to identify the core network elements involved in crosstalk with different pathways. We identify 148 DEGs (differentially expressed genes) potentially related to the prion disease progression. Functional association of the identified genes implicates a strong involvement of immunological pathways. We extract a bow-tie structure that is potentially dysregulated in prion disease. We also propose an ODE model for the bow-tie network. Predictions related to diseased condition suggests the downregulation of the core signaling elements (PI3Ks and AKTs) of the bow-tie network. In this work, we show using transcriptomic data that the neuronal dysfunction in prion disease is strongly related to the immunological pathways. We conclude that these

  4. Identification of Major Signaling Pathways in Prion Disease Progression Using Network Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalique Newaz

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are transmissible neurodegenerative diseases that arise due to conformational change of normal, cellular prion protein (PrPC to protease-resistant isofrom (rPrPSc. Deposition of misfolded PrpSc proteins leads to an alteration of many signaling pathways that includes immunological and apoptotic pathways. As a result, this culminates in the dysfunction and death of neuronal cells. Earlier works on transcriptomic studies have revealed some affected pathways, but it is not clear which is (are the prime network pathway(s that change during the disease progression and how these pathways are involved in crosstalks with each other from the time of incubation to clinical death. We perform network analysis on large-scale transcriptomic data of differentially expressed genes obtained from whole brain in six different mouse strain-prion strain combination models to determine the pathways involved in prion diseases, and to understand the role of crosstalks in disease propagation. We employ a notion of differential network centrality measures on protein interaction networks to identify the potential biological pathways involved. We also propose a crosstalk ranking method based on dynamic protein interaction networks to identify the core network elements involved in crosstalk with different pathways. We identify 148 DEGs (differentially expressed genes potentially related to the prion disease progression. Functional association of the identified genes implicates a strong involvement of immunological pathways. We extract a bow-tie structure that is potentially dysregulated in prion disease. We also propose an ODE model for the bow-tie network. Predictions related to diseased condition suggests the downregulation of the core signaling elements (PI3Ks and AKTs of the bow-tie network. In this work, we show using transcriptomic data that the neuronal dysfunction in prion disease is strongly related to the immunological pathways. We conclude that

  5. Natural Genetic Variation Influences Protein Abundances in C. elegans Developmental Signalling Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil Dev Singh

    Full Text Available Complex traits, including common disease-related traits, are affected by many different genes that function in multiple pathways and networks. The apoptosis, MAPK, Notch, and Wnt signalling pathways play important roles in development and disease progression. At the moment we have a poor understanding of how allelic variation affects gene expression in these pathways at the level of translation. Here we report the effect of natural genetic variation on transcript and protein abundance involved in developmental signalling pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans. We used selected reaction monitoring to analyse proteins from the abovementioned four pathways in a set of recombinant inbred lines (RILs generated from the wild-type strains N2 (Bristol and CB4856 (Hawaii to enable quantitative trait locus (QTL mapping. About half of the cases from the 44 genes tested showed a statistically significant change in protein abundance between various strains, most of these were however very weak (below 1.3-fold change. We detected a distant QTL on the left arm of chromosome II that affected protein abundance of the phosphatidylserine receptor protein PSR-1, and two separate QTLs that influenced embryonic and ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis on chromosome IV. Our results demonstrate that natural variation in C. elegans is sufficient to cause significant changes in signalling pathways both at the gene expression (transcript and protein abundance and phenotypic levels.

  6. Epigenetic regulator Lid maintains germline stem cells through regulating JAK-STAT signaling pathway activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lama Tarayrah

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Signaling pathways and epigenetic mechanisms have both been shown to play essential roles in regulating stem cell activity. While the role of either mechanism in this regulation is well established in multiple stem cell lineages, how the two mechanisms interact to regulate stem cell activity is not as well understood. Here we report that in the Drosophila testis, an H3K4me3-specific histone demethylase encoded by little imaginal discs (lid maintains germline stem cell (GSC mitotic index and prevents GSC premature differentiation. Lid is required in germ cells for proper expression of the Stat92E transcription factor, the downstream effector of the Janus kinase signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT signaling pathway. Our findings support a germ cell autonomous role for the JAK-STAT pathway in maintaining GSCs and place Lid as an upstream regulator of this pathway. Our study provides new insights into the biological functions of a histone demethylase in vivo and sheds light on the interaction between epigenetic mechanisms and signaling pathways in regulating stem cell activities.

  7. Role of insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 signaling pathway in longevity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Lei Cheng; Tian-Qin Gao; Zhen Wang; Dian-Dong Li

    2005-01-01

    The insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling pathway is evolutionary conserved in diverse species including C.elegans, saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, rodents and humans, which is involved in many interrelated functions that are necessary for metabolism, growth and reproduction. Interestingly,more and more research has revealed that insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in the regulation of longevity. Generally, disruption of the power of this pathway will extend longevity in species ranging from C.elegansto humans. The role of insulin/IGF-1 in longevity is probably related to stress resistance. Although the underlying mechanisms of longevity are not fully understood,the Insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway has attracted substantial attention and it will be a novel target to prevent or postpone age-related diseases and extend life span.In this review, we mainly focus on the similar constitution and role of insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway in C.elegans,saccharomyces cerevisiae, rodents and humans.

  8. Dopamine D1-D2 receptor heteromer signaling pathway in the brain: emerging physiological relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasbi Ahmed

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dopamine is an important catecholamine neurotransmitter modulating many physiological functions, and is linked to psychopathology of many diseases such as schizophrenia and drug addiction. Dopamine D1 and D2 receptors are the most abundant dopaminergic receptors in the striatum, and although a clear segregation between the pathways expressing these two receptors has been reported in certain subregions, the presence of D1-D2 receptor heteromers within a unique subset of neurons, forming a novel signaling transducing functional entity has been shown. Recently, significant progress has been made in elucidating the signaling pathways activated by the D1-D2 receptor heteromer and their potential physiological relevance.

  9. Aberrant Wnt signaling pathway in medial temporal lobe structures of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riise, Jesper; Plath, Niels; Pakkenberg, Bente;

    2015-01-01

    hippocampus exhibiting most pronounced changes. Furthermore, the Wnt pathway constituents Wnt7b and Tcf7l1/Tcf3 showed overlapping gene expression alterations across both medial temporal lobe structures, while β-catenin was inversely expressed between brain regions. We also identified total protein......-targeted hyperphosphorylation at specific tau epitope in soluble pretangles and prominent tau aggregation exclusively in insoluble neurofibrillary tangles of AD subjects. The Wnt pathway-focused approach confirms altered Wnt signaling in the neurodegenerative AD brain and highlights the potential role of the pathway as a...

  10. Induction of Cancer Cell Death by Isoflavone: The Role of Multiple Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazlul H. Sarkar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Soy isoflavones have been documented as dietary nutrients broadly classified as “natural agents” which plays important roles in reducing the incidence of hormone-related cancers in Asian countries, and have shown inhibitory effects on cancer development and progression in vitro and in vivo, suggesting the cancer preventive or therapeutic activity of soy isoflavones against cancers. Emerging experimental evidence shows that isoflavones could induce cancer cell death by regulating multiple cellular signaling pathways including Akt, NF-κB, MAPK, Wnt, androgen receptor (AR, p53 and Notch signaling, all of which have been found to be deregulated in cancer cells. Therefore, homeostatic regulation of these important cellular signaling pathways by isoflavones could be useful for the activation of cell death signaling, which could result in the induction of apoptosis of both pre-cancerous and/or cancerous cells without affecting normal cells. In this article, we have attempted to summarize the current state-of-our-knowledge regarding the induction of cancer cell death pathways by isoflavones, which is believed to be mediated through the regulation of multiple cellular signaling pathways. The knowledge gained from this article will provide a comprehensive view on the molecular mechanism(s by which soy isoflavones may exert their effects on the prevention of tumor progression and/or treatment of human malignancies, which would also aid in stimulating further in-depth mechanistic research and foster the initiation of novel clinical trials.

  11. Investigations on Inhibitors of Hedgehog Signal Pathway: A Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwei Cao

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The hedgehog signal pathway is an essential agent in developmental patterning, wherein the local concentration of the Hedgehog morphogens directs cellular differentiation and expansion. Furthermore, the Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor/stromal interaction and cancer stem cell. Nowadays searching novel inhibitors for Hedgehog Signal Pathway is drawing much more attention by biological, chemical and pharmological scientists. In our study, a solid computational model is proposed which incorporates various statistical analysis methods to perform a Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR study on the inhibitors of Hedgehog signaling. The whole QSAR data contain 93 cyclopamine derivatives as well as their activities against four different cell lines (NCI-H446, BxPC-3, SW1990 and NCI-H157. Our extensive testing indicated that the binary classification model is a better choice for building the QSAR model of inhibitors of Hedgehog signaling compared with other statistical methods and the corresponding in silico analysis provides three possible ways to improve the activity of inhibitors by demethylation, methylation and hydroxylation at specific positions of the compound scaffold respectively. From these, demethylation is the best choice for inhibitor structure modifications. Our investigation also revealed that NCI-H466 served as the best cell line for testing the activities of inhibitors of Hedgehog signal pathway among others.

  12. Molecular pathways: novel approaches for improved therapeutic targeting of Hedgehog signaling in cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justilien, Verline; Fields, Alan P

    2015-02-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is critical for embryonic development. In adult tissues, Hh signaling is relatively quiescent with the exception of roles in tissue maintenance and repair. Aberrant activation of Hh signaling is implicated in multiple aspects of transformation, including the maintenance of the cancer stem cell (CSC) phenotype. Preclinical studies indicate that CSCs from many tumor types are sensitive to Hh pathway inhibition and that Hh-targeted therapeutics block many aspects of transformation attributed to CSCs, including drug resistance, relapse, and metastasis. However, to date, Hh inhibitors, specifically those targeting Smoothened [such as vismodegib, BMS-833923, saridegib (IPI-926), sonidegib/erismodegib (LDE225), PF-04449913, LY2940680, LEQ 506, and TAK-441], have demonstrated good efficacy as monotherapy in patients with basal cell carcinoma and medulloblastoma, but have shown limited activity in other tumor types. This lack of success is likely due to many factors, including a lack of patient stratification in early trials, cross-talk between Hh and other oncogenic signaling pathways that can modulate therapeutic response, and a limited knowledge of Hh pathway activation mechanisms in CSCs from most tumor types. Here, we discuss Hh signaling mechanisms in the context of human cancer, particularly in the maintenance of the CSC phenotype, and consider new therapeutic strategies that hold the potential to expand considerably the scope and therapeutic efficacy of Hh-directed anticancer therapy. PMID:25646180

  13. Deoxycholic acid mediates non-canonical EGFR-MAPK activation through the induction of calcium signaling in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centuori, Sara M; Gomes, Cecil J; Trujillo, Jesse; Borg, Jamie; Brownlee, Joshua; Putnam, Charles W; Martinez, Jesse D

    2016-07-01

    Obesity and a western diet have been linked to high levels of bile acids and the development of colon cancer. Specifically, increased levels of the bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA), an established tumor promoter, has been shown to correlate with increased development of colorectal adenomas and progression to carcinoma. Herein we investigate the mechanism by which DCA leads to EGFR-MAPK activation, a candidate mechanism by which DCA may promote colorectal tumorigenesis. DCA treated colon cancer cells exhibited strong and prolonged activation of ERK1/2 when compared to EGF treatment alone. We also showed that DCA treatment prevents EGFR degradation as opposed to the canonical EGFR recycling observed with EGF treatment. Moreover, the combination of DCA and EGF treatment displayed synergistic activity, suggesting DCA activates MAPK signaling in a non-canonical manner. Further evaluation showed that DCA treatment increased intracellular calcium levels and CAMKII phosphorylation, and that blocking calcium with BAPTA-AM abrogated MAPK activation induced by DCA, but not by EGF. Finally we showed that DCA-induced CAMKII leads to MAPK activation through the recruitment of c-Src. Taken together, we demonstrated that DCA regulates MAPK activation through calcium signaling, an alternative mechanism not previously recognized in human colon cancer cells. Importantly, this mechanism allows for EGFR to escape degradation and thus achieve a constitutively active state, which may explain its tumor promoting effects. PMID:27086143

  14. Virulent Diuraphis noxia Aphids Over-Express Calcium Signaling Proteins to Overcome Defenses of Aphid-Resistant Wheat Plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak K Sinha

    Full Text Available The Russian wheat aphid, Diuraphis noxia, an invasive phytotoxic pest of wheat, Triticum aestivum, and barley, Hordeum vulgare, causes huge economic losses in Africa, South America, and North America. Most acceptable and ecologically beneficial aphid management strategies include selection and breeding of D. noxia-resistant varieties, and numerous D. noxia resistance genes have been identified in T. aestivum and H. vulgare. North American D. noxia biotype 1 is avirulent to T. aestivum varieties possessing Dn4 or Dn7 genes, while biotype 2 is virulent to Dn4 and avirulent to Dn7. The current investigation utilized next-generation RNAseq technology to reveal that biotype 2 over expresses proteins involved in calcium signaling, which activates phosphoinositide (PI metabolism. Calcium signaling proteins comprised 36% of all transcripts identified in the two D. noxia biotypes. Depending on plant resistance gene-aphid biotype interaction, additional transcript groups included those involved in tissue growth; defense and stress response; zinc ion and related cofactor binding; and apoptosis. Activation of enzymes involved in PI metabolism by D. noxia biotype 2 aphids allows depletion of plant calcium that normally blocks aphid feeding sites in phloem sieve elements and enables successful, continuous feeding on plants resistant to avirulent biotype 1. Inhibition of the key enzyme phospholipase C significantly reduced biotype 2 salivation into phloem and phloem sap ingestion.

  15. Cartography of Pathway Signal Perturbations Identifies Distinct Molecular Pathomechanisms in Malignant and Chronic Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakelyan, Arsen; Nersisyan, Lilit; Petrek, Martin; Löffler-Wirth, Henry; Binder, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Lung diseases are described by a wide variety of developmental mechanisms and clinical manifestations. Accurate classification and diagnosis of lung diseases are the bases for development of effective treatments. While extensive studies are conducted toward characterization of various lung diseases at molecular level, no systematic approach has been developed so far. Here we have applied a methodology for pathway-centered mining of high throughput gene expression data to describe a wide range of lung diseases in the light of shared and specific pathway activity profiles. We have applied an algorithm combining a Pathway Signal Flow (PSF) algorithm for estimation of pathway activity deregulation states in lung diseases and malignancies, and a Self Organizing Maps algorithm for classification and clustering of the pathway activity profiles. The analysis results allowed clearly distinguish between cancer and non-cancer lung diseases. Lung cancers were characterized by pathways implicated in cell proliferation, metabolism, while non-malignant lung diseases were characterized by deregulations in pathways involved in immune/inflammatory response and fibrotic tissue remodeling. In contrast to lung malignancies, chronic lung diseases had relatively heterogeneous pathway deregulation profiles. We identified three groups of interstitial lung diseases and showed that the development of characteristic pathological processes, such as fibrosis, can be initiated by deregulations in different signaling pathways. In conclusion, this paper describes the pathobiology of lung diseases from systems viewpoint using pathway centered high-dimensional data mining approach. Our results contribute largely to current understanding of pathological events in lung cancers and non-malignant lung diseases. Moreover, this paper provides new insight into molecular mechanisms of a number of interstitial lung diseases that have been studied to a lesser extent. PMID:27200087

  16. Analysis of corkscrew signaling in the Drosophila epidermal growth factor receptor pathway during myogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson Hamlet, M R; Perkins, L A

    2001-01-01

    The Drosophila nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase, Corkscrew (Csw), functions positively in multiple receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) pathways, including signaling by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Detailed phenotypic analyses of csw mutations have revealed that Csw activity is required in many of the same developmental processes that require EGFR function. However, it is still unclear where in the signaling hierarchy Csw functions relative to other proteins whose activities...

  17. The BMP signaling pathway at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction and its links to neurodegenerative diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Bayat, Vafa; Jaiswal, Manish; Bellen, Hugo J

    2010-01-01

    The Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ) has recently provided new insights into the roles of various proteins in neurodegenerative diseases including Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA), Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP), and Huntington’s Disease (HD). Several developmental signaling pathways including WNT, MAPK and BMP/TGF-β signaling play important roles in the formation and growth of the Drosophila NMJ. Studies of the fly homolog...

  18. Cell death and signal transduction pathways in Alzheimer's disease : The role of presenilin 1

    OpenAIRE

    Popescu, Bogdan O

    2004-01-01

    Mutated presenilins (PSs) may cause familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) by altering neuronal signal transduction pathways, by increasing AP production or by triggering a number of proapoptotic mechanisms. The present thesis explores mechanisms by which PSs regulate signal transduction and cell death with relevance to AD. Paper I explored the complex proteolytic processing of wild-type (WT) and FAD presenilin 1 (PS1) exon 9 deleted mutant (deltaE9 PS1) during apoptosis. PS...

  19. Targeting Notch signaling pathway in cancer: Clinical development advances and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Takebe, Naoko; Nguyen, Dat; Yang, Sherry X

    2013-01-01

    Notch signaling plays an important role in development and cell fate determination, and it is deregulated in human hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. This review includes a brief introduction of the relevant pathophysiology of Notch signaling pathway and primarily focuses on the clinical development of promising agents that either obstruct Notch receptor cleavages such as γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs) or interfere with the Notch ligand–receptor interaction by monoclonal antibodies (mA...

  20. Signaling pathway-based identification of extensive prognostic gene signatures for lung adenocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, Ying-Wooi; Beer, David G.; Guo, Nancy Lan

    2011-01-01

    Tumor recurrence is the major cause of death in lung cancer treatment. To date, there is no clinically applied gene expression-based model to predict the risk for tumor recurrence in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We sought to embed crosstalk with major signaling pathways into biomarker identification. Three approaches were used to identify prognostic gene signatures from 442 lung adenocarcinoma samples. Candidate genes co-expressed with 6 or 7 major NSCLC signaling hallmarks were identi...

  1. MAPK signal pathways in the regulation of cell proliferation in mammalian cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    MAPK families play an important role in complex cellular programs like proliferation, differentiation,development, transformation, and apoptosis. At least three MAPK families have been characterized: extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), Jun kinase (JNK/SAPK) and p38 MAPK. The above effects are fulfilled by regulation of cell cycle engine and other cell proliferation related proteins. In this paper we discussed their functions and cooperation with other signal pathways in regulation of cell proliferation.

  2. Two distinct signaling pathways participate in auxin-induced swelling of pea epidermal protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagami, Mutsumi; Haga, Ken; Napier, Richard M; Iino, Moritoshi

    2004-02-01

    Protoplast swelling was used to investigate auxin signaling in the growth-limiting stem epidermis. The protoplasts of epidermal cells were isolated from elongating internodes of pea (Pisum sativum). These protoplasts swelled in response to auxin, providing the clearest evidence that the epidermis can directly perceive auxin. The swelling response to the natural auxin IAA showed a biphasic dose response curve but that to the synthetic auxin 1-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) showed a simple bell-shaped dose response curve. The responses to IAA and NAA were further analyzed using antibodies raised against ABP1 (auxin-binding protein 1), and their dependency on extracellular ions was investigated. Two signaling pathways were resolved for IAA, an ABP1-dependent pathway and an ABP1-independent pathway that is much more sensitive to IAA than the former. The response by the ABP1 pathway was eliminated by anti-ABP1 antibodies, had a higher sensitivity to NAA, and did not depend on extracellular Ca(2+). In contrast, the response by the non-ABP1 pathway was not affected by anti-ABP1 antibodies, had no sensitivity to NAA, and depended on extracellular Ca(2+). The swelling by either pathway required extracellular K(+) and Cl(-). The auxin-induced growth of pea internode segments showed similar response patterns, including the occurrence of two peaks in the dose response curve for IAA and the difference in Ca(2+) requirements. It is suggested that two signaling pathways participate in auxin-induced internode growth and that the non-ABP1 pathway is more likely to be involved in the control of growth by constitutive concentrations of endogenous auxin. PMID:14764902

  3. Ca2+ signal is generated only once in the mating pheromone response pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima-Shimada, J; Sakaguchi, S; Tsuji, F I; Anraku, Y; Iida, H

    2000-04-01

    The mating pheromone, alpha-factor, of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae binds to the heterotrimeric G protein-coupled cell surface receptor of MATa cells and induces cellular responses necessary for mating. In higher eukaryotic cells, many hormones and growth factors rapidly mobilize a second messenger, Ca2+, by means of receptor-G protein signaling. Although striking similarities between the mechanisms of the receptor-G protein signaling in yeast and higher eukaryotes have long been known, it is still uncertain whether the pheromone rapidly mobilizes Ca2+ necessary for early events of the pheromone response. Here we reexamine this problem using sensitive methods for detecting Ca2+ fluxes and mobilization, and find no evidence that there is rapid Ca2+ influx leading to a rapid increase in the cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration. In addition, the yeast PLC1 deletion mutant lacking phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C, a key enzyme for generating Ca2+ signals in higher eukaryotic cells, responds normally to the pheromone. These findings suggest that the receptor-G protein signaling does not utilize Ca2+ as a second messenger in the early stage of the pheromone response pathway. Since the receptor-G protein signaling does stimulate Ca2+ influx after early events have finished and this stimulation is essential for late events in the pheromone response pathway [Iida et al., (1990) J. Biol. Chem., 265: 13391-13399] Ca2+ may be used only once in the signal transduction pathway in unicellular eukaryotes such as yeast. PMID:10885582

  4. Stimulatory effects of the degradation products from Mg-Ca-Sr alloy on the osteogenesis through regulating ERK signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mei; He, Peng; Wu, Yuanhao; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Hong; Zheng, Yufeng; Han, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The influence of Mg-1Ca-xwt.% Sr (x = 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0) alloys on the osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of pre-osteoblast MC3T3-E1 were studied through typical differentiation markers, such as intracellular alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, extracellular collagen secretion and calcium nodule formation. It was shown that Mg-1Ca alloys with different content of Sr promoted cell viability and enhanced the differentiation and mineralization levels of osteoblasts, and Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy had the most remarkable and significant effect among all. To further investigate the underlying mechanisms, RT-PCR and Western Blotting assays were taken to analyze the mRNA expression level of osteogenesis-related genes and intracellular signaling pathways involved in osteogenesis, respectively. RT-PCR results showed that Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy significantly up-regulated the expressions of the transcription factors of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and Osterix (OSX), Integrin subunits, as well as alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Bone sialoprotein (BSP), Collagen I (COL I), Osteocalcin (OCN) and Osteopontin (OPN). Western Blotting results suggested that Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy rapidly induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation but showed no obvious effects on c-Jun N terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase of MAPK. Taken together, our results demonstrated that Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy had excellent biocompatibility and osteogenesis via the ERK pathway and is expected to be promising as orthopedic implants and bone repair materials. PMID:27580744

  5. A model invalidation-based approach for elucidating biological signalling pathways, applied to the chemotaxis pathway in R. sphaeroides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamadeh Abdullah

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Developing methods for understanding the connectivity of signalling pathways is a major challenge in biological research. For this purpose, mathematical models are routinely developed based on experimental observations, which also allow the prediction of the system behaviour under different experimental conditions. Often, however, the same experimental data can be represented by several competing network models. Results In this paper, we developed a novel mathematical model/experiment design cycle to help determine the probable network connectivity by iteratively invalidating models corresponding to competing signalling pathways. To do this, we systematically design experiments in silico that discriminate best between models of the competing signalling pathways. The method determines the inputs and parameter perturbations that will differentiate best between model outputs, corresponding to what can be measured/observed experimentally. We applied our method to the unknown connectivities in the chemotaxis pathway of the bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. We first developed several models of R. sphaeroides chemotaxis corresponding to different signalling networks, all of which are biologically plausible. Parameters in these models were fitted so that they all represented wild type data equally well. The models were then compared to current mutant data and some were invalidated. To discriminate between the remaining models we used ideas from control systems theory to determine efficiently in silico an input profile that would result in the biggest difference in model outputs. However, when we applied this input to the models, we found it to be insufficient for discrimination in silico. Thus, to achieve better discrimination, we determined the best change in initial conditions (total protein concentrations as well as the best change in the input profile. The designed experiments were then performed on live cells and the resulting

  6. Intercellular calcium signaling and nitric oxide feedback during constriction of rabbit renal afferent arterioles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhrenholt, Torben Rene; Schjerning, J; Vanhoutte, Paul M. G.;

    2007-01-01

    Vasoconstriction and increase in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) of vascular smooth muscle cells may cause an increase of endothelial cell [Ca(2+)](i), which, in turn, augments nitric oxide (NO) production and inhibits smooth muscle cell contraction. This hypothesis was tested...... in microperfused rabbit renal afferent arterioles, using fluorescence imaging microscopy with the calcium-sensitive dye fura-2 and the NO-sensitive dye 4-amino-5-methylamino-2',7'-difluorescein. Both dyes were loaded into smooth muscle and endothelium. Depolarization with 100 mmol/l KCl led to a...... transient vasoconstriction which was converted into a sustained response by N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME). Depolarization increased smooth muscle cell [Ca(2+)](i) from 162 +/- 15 nmol/l to a peak of 555 +/- 70 nmol/l (n = 7), and this response was inhibited by 80% by the l-type calcium channel...

  7. Calcium-sensing receptor regulates stomatal closure through hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide in response to extracellular calcium in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wen-Hua; Yi, Xiao-Qian; Han, Ai-Dong; Liu, Ting-Wu; Chen, Juan; Wu, Fei-Hua; Dong, Xue-Jun; He, Jun-Xian; Pei, Zhen-Ming; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2011-01-01

    The Arabidopsis calcium-sensing receptor CAS is a crucial regulator of extracellular calcium-induced stomatal closure. Free cytosolic Ca2+ (Ca2+ i) increases in response to a high extracellular calcium (Ca2+ o) level through a CAS signalling pathway and finally leads to stomatal closure. Multidisciplinary approaches including histochemical, pharmacological, fluorescent, electrochemical, and molecular biological methods were used to discuss the relationship of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitr...

  8. Narrative-based computational modelling of the Gp130/JAK/STAT signalling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heath John K

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Appropriately formulated quantitative computational models can support researchers in understanding the dynamic behaviour of biological pathways and support hypothesis formulation and selection by "in silico" experimentation. An obstacle to widespread adoption of this approach is the requirement to formulate a biological pathway as machine executable computer code. We have recently proposed a novel, biologically intuitive, narrative-style modelling language for biologists to formulate the pathway which is then automatically translated into an executable format and is, thus, usable for analysis via existing simulation techniques. Results Here we use a high-level narrative language in designing a computational model of the gp130/JAK/STAT signalling pathway and show that the model reproduces the dynamic behaviour of the pathway derived by biological observation. We then "experiment" on the model by simulation and sensitivity analysis to define those parameters which dominate the dynamic behaviour of the pathway. The model predicts that nuclear compartmentalisation and phosphorylation status of STAT are key determinants of the pathway and that alternative mechanisms of signal attenuation exert their influence on different timescales. Conclusion The described narrative model of the gp130/JAK/STAT pathway represents an interesting case study showing how, by using this approach, researchers can model biological systems without explicitly dealing with formal notations and mathematical expressions (typically used for biochemical modelling, nevertheless being able to obtain simulation and analysis results. We present the model and the sensitivity analysis results we have obtained, that allow us to identify the parameters which are most sensitive to perturbations. The results, which are shown to be in agreement with existing mathematical models of the gp130/JAK/STAT pathway, serve us as a form of validation of the model and of the

  9. Sorting and targeting of melanosomal membrane proteins: signals, pathways, and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setaluri, V

    2000-06-01

    Newly synthesized melanosomal proteins, like many other cellular proteins, traverse through a series of intracellular compartments en route to melanosomes. Entry and exit of proteins through these compartments is orchestrated by cellular sorting machinery that recognize specific sorting signals. Melanosomal membrane proteins begin their intracellular journey upon co-translational importation into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The biosynthetic output of tyrosinase, the key melanogenic enzyme, appears to be regulated by quality-control events at the ER, the 'port of entry' to the secretory pathway. Following maturation in the ER and through the Golgi, the sorting of these proteins in the trans-Golgi network for intracellular retention and transport along endosome/lysosome pathway requires cytoplasmically exposed signals. A di-leucine motif, present in the cytoplasmic tails of most melanosomal proteins, and its interaction with adaptor protein (AP) complexes, specifically AP-3, are critical for these events. Defects in sorting signals and the cytosolic components that interact with these signals result in a number of murine coat color phenotypes and cause human pigmentary disorders. Thus, missense or frame-shift mutations that produce truncated tyrosinase lacking the melanosomal sorting signal(s) appear to be responsible for murine platinum coat color phenotypes and a proportion of human oculocutaneous albinism-1; mutations in AP-3 appear to be responsible for the mocha phenotype in mice and Hermansky-Pudlak-like syndrome in man. Additional signals and sorting steps downstream of AP-3 appear to be required for endosomal sorting and targeting proteins to melanosomes. Signals and mechanisms that sequester melanosomal proteins from endosomes/lysosomes are not understood. Potential candidates that mediate such processes include proteins encoded by lyst and pallid genes. The common occurrence of abnormalities in melanosomes in many storage-pool disorders suggests that

  10. A calcium sensor – protein kinase signaling module diversified in plants and is retained in all lineages of Bikonta species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Linda; Edel, Kai H.; Batistič, Oliver; Kudla, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) signaling is a universal mechanism of signal transduction and involves Ca2+ signal formation and decoding of information by Ca2+ binding proteins. Calcineurin B-like proteins (CBLs), which upon Ca2+ binding activate CBL-interacting protein kinases (CIPKs) regulate a multitude of physiological processes in plants. Here, we combine phylogenomics and functional analyses to investigate the occurrence and structural conservation of CBL and CIPK proteins in 26 species representing all major clades of eukaryotes. We demonstrate the presence of at least singular CBL-CIPK pairs in representatives of Archaeplastida, Chromalveolates and Excavates and their general absence in Opisthokonta and Amoebozoa. This denotes CBL-CIPK complexes as evolutionary ancient Ca2+ signaling modules that likely evolved in the ancestor of all Bikonta. Furthermore, we functionally characterize the CBLs and CIPK from the parabasalid human pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis. Our results reveal strict evolutionary conservation of functionally important structural features, preservation of biochemical properties and a remarkable cross-kingdom protein-protein interaction potential between CBLs and CIPKs from Arabidopsis thaliana and T. vaginalis. Together our findings suggest an ancient evolutionary origin of a functional CBL-CIPK signaling module close to the root of eukaryotic evolution and provide insights into the initial evolution of signaling networks and Ca2+ signaling specificity. PMID:27538881

  11. A calcium sensor - protein kinase signaling module diversified in plants and is retained in all lineages of Bikonta species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Linda; Edel, Kai H; Batistič, Oliver; Kudla, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling is a universal mechanism of signal transduction and involves Ca(2+) signal formation and decoding of information by Ca(2+) binding proteins. Calcineurin B-like proteins (CBLs), which upon Ca(2+) binding activate CBL-interacting protein kinases (CIPKs) regulate a multitude of physiological processes in plants. Here, we combine phylogenomics and functional analyses to investigate the occurrence and structural conservation of CBL and CIPK proteins in 26 species representing all major clades of eukaryotes. We demonstrate the presence of at least singular CBL-CIPK pairs in representatives of Archaeplastida, Chromalveolates and Excavates and their general absence in Opisthokonta and Amoebozoa. This denotes CBL-CIPK complexes as evolutionary ancient Ca(2+) signaling modules that likely evolved in the ancestor of all Bikonta. Furthermore, we functionally characterize the CBLs and CIPK from the parabasalid human pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis. Our results reveal strict evolutionary conservation of functionally important structural features, preservation of biochemical properties and a remarkable cross-kingdom protein-protein interaction potential between CBLs and CIPKs from Arabidopsis thaliana and T. vaginalis. Together our findings suggest an ancient evolutionary origin of a functional CBL-CIPK signaling module close to the root of eukaryotic evolution and provide insights into the initial evolution of signaling networks and Ca(2+) signaling specificity. PMID:27538881

  12. Human aging mechanisms and radiation exposure related to the mTOR signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The search for human aging mechanisms has been guided by a paradigm: Aging and age-related diseases are mainly attributable to the accumulation of damage at the molecular level. Exposure to ionizing radiation is observed to increase risks of age-related diseases, including cancer and cardiovascular disease. Such radiation effects are also viewed and investigated from the perspective of molecular damage. Recently, another aging mechanism theory has been proposed from an entirely different perspective. The 'hyperfunction' theory (Blagosklonny, 2006) views aging where anabolic processes, such as protein synthesis, which contribute to cell proliferation and tissue formation in developmental phases, continue in later life at too high a level, leading to hypertrophy and hyperplasia. In these activities, nutrient and growth factor-sensing pathways, typically the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), are known to play pivotal roles. In fact, inhibition of the mTOR signaling pathway expands lifespan in model animals, and the mTOR signaling is activated in human cancer cells. Interestingly enough, recent studies revealed that activity of the mTOR signaling pathway is altered by irradiation and that mTOR activity is involved in cellular responses to radiation exposure. In this paper, I discuss human aging mechanisms and radiation exposure in terms of the mTOR signaling pathway. (author)

  13. Primary cilia and signaling pathways in mammalian development, health and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veland, Iben R; Awan, Aashir; Pedersen, Lotte B;

    2009-01-01

    surface of most growth-arrested or differentiated mammalian cells, and defects in their assembly or function are tightly coupled to many developmental defects, diseases and disorders. In normal tissues, the primary cilium coordinates a series of signal transduction pathways, including Hedgehog, Wnt...

  14. Involvement of wnt signaling pathways in the metamorphosis of the bryozoan bugula neritina

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Yue Him

    2012-03-20

    In this study, we analyzed the metamorphosis of the marine bryozoan Bugula neritina. We observed the morphogenesis of the ancestrula. We defined three distinct pre-ancestrula stages based on the anatomy of the developing polypide and the overall morphology of pre-ancestrula. We then used an annotation based enrichment analysis tool to analyze the B. neritina transcriptome and identified over-representation of genes related to Wnt signaling pathways, suggesting its involvement in metamorphosis. Finally, we studied the temporal-spatial gene expression studies of several Wnt pathway genes. We found that one of the Wnt ligand, BnWnt10, was expressed spatially opposite to the Wnt antagonist BnsFRP within the blastemas, which is the presumptive polypide. Down-stream components of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway were exclusively expressed in the blastemas. Bn?catenin and BnFz5/8 were exclusively expressed in the blastemas throughout the metamorphosis. Based on the genes expression patterns, we propose that BnWnt10 and BnsFRP may relate to the patterning of the polypide, in which the two genes served as positional signals and contributed to the polarization of the blastemas. Another Wnt ligand, BnWnt6, was expressed in the apical part of the pre-ancestrula epidermis. Overall, our findings suggest that the Wnt signaling pathway may be important to the pattern formation of polypide and the development of epidermis. © 2012 Wong et al.

  15. Signaling pathways involved in PDGF-evoked cellular responses in human RPE cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined whether PDGF may directly stimulate the expression of VEGF by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in vitro, and the involvement of three signal transduction pathways in the regulation of PDGF-evoked cell proliferation, migration, and production of VEGF-A was investigated. PDGF stimulated the gene and protein expression of VEGF-A by RPE cells, and increased cell proliferation and chemotaxis. PDGF activated all signaling pathways investigated, as determined by increased phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2, p38, and Akt proteins. The three signaling pathways were involved in the mediation of PDGF-evoked cell proliferation, while p38 and PI3K mediated cell migration, and PI3K mediated secretion of VEGF-A. In addition to VEGF-A, the cells expressed mRNAs for various members of the VEGF family and for their receptors, including VEGF-B, -C, -D, flt-1, and KDR. The data indicate that PDGF selectively stimulates the expression of VEGF-A in RPE cells. PDGF evokes at least three signal transduction pathways which are differentially involved in various cellular responses

  16. Signaling Pathways Used by Ergot Alkaloids to Inhibit Bovine Sperm Motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergot alkaloids exert their toxic or pharmaceutical effects through membrane receptor-mediated activities. This study investigated the signaling pathways involved in the in vitro inhibitory effects of both ergotamine (ET) and dihydroergotamine (DEHT) on bovine sperm motility using specific inhibitor...

  17. Protein conservation and variation suggest mechanisms of cell type-specific modulation of signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin H Schaefer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins and signaling pathways are present in most cell types and tissues and yet perform specialized functions. To elucidate mechanisms by which these ubiquitous pathways are modulated, we overlaid information about cross-cell line protein abundance and variability, and evolutionary conservation onto functional pathway components and topological layers in the pathway hierarchy. We found that the input (receptors and the output (transcription factors layers evolve more rapidly than proteins in the intermediary transmission layer. In contrast, protein expression variability decreases from the input to the output layer. We observed that the differences in protein variability between the input and transmission layer can be attributed to both the network position and the tendency of variable proteins to physically interact with constitutively expressed proteins. Differences in protein expression variability and conservation are also accompanied by the tendency of conserved and constitutively expressed proteins to acquire somatic mutations, while germline mutations tend to occur in cell type-specific proteins. Thus, conserved core proteins in the transmission layer could perform a fundamental role in most cell types and are therefore less tolerant to germline mutations. In summary, we propose that the core signal transmission machinery is largely modulated by a variable input layer through physical protein interactions. We hypothesize that the bow-tie organization of cellular signaling on the level of protein abundance variability contributes to the specificity of the signal response in different cell types.

  18. Tyrosinase kinetics in epidermal melanocytes: analysis of DAG-PKC-dependent signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolnitz, Mikhail M.; Peshkova, Anna Y.

    2001-05-01

    Tyrosinase is the key enzyme of melanogenesis with unusual enzyme kinetics. Protein kinase C plays an important role in regulating of tyrosinase activity. In the paper the mathematical model of PKC-DAG-dependent signal transduction pathway for UV-radiation is presented.

  19. Protein conservation and variation suggest mechanisms of cell type-specific modulation of signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Martin H; Yang, Jae-Seong; Serrano, Luis; Kiel, Christina

    2014-06-01

    Many proteins and signaling pathways are present in most cell types and tissues and yet perform specialized functions. To elucidate mechanisms by which these ubiquitous pathways are modulated, we overlaid information about cross-cell line protein abundance and variability, and evolutionary conservation onto functional pathway components and topological layers in the pathway hierarchy. We found that the input (receptors) and the output (transcription factors) layers evolve more rapidly than proteins in the intermediary transmission layer. In contrast, protein expression variability decreases from the input to the output layer. We observed that the differences in protein variability between the input and transmission layer can be attributed to both the network position and the tendency of variable proteins to physically interact with constitutively expressed proteins. Differences in protein expression variability and conservation are also accompanied by the tendency of conserved and constitutively expressed proteins to acquire somatic mutations, while germline mutations tend to occur in cell type-specific proteins. Thus, conserved core proteins in the transmission layer could perform a fundamental role in most cell types and are therefore less tolerant to germline mutations. In summary, we propose that the core signal transmission machinery is largely modulated by a variable input layer through physical protein interactions. We hypothesize that the bow-tie organization of cellular signaling on the level of protein abundance variability contributes to the specificity of the signal response in different cell types. PMID:24922536

  20. The role of CXCL12-CXCR4 signaling pathway in pancreatic development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katsumoto, Keiichi; Kume, Shoen

    2013-01-01

    , cell chemotaxis and apoptosis [1, 2]. The expression of CXCR4 is observed in embryonic stem cells, blood cells, haematopoietic stem cells, endothelial cells, angioblasts and smooth muscle cells [3-9]. The CXCL12-CXCR4 signaling pathway has very important roles in the embryonic development. Mutant mice...

  1. Potent and Selective CK2 Kinase Inhibitors with Effects on Wnt Pathway Signaling in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, James E; Alimzhanov, Marat; Bao, Larry; Chuaqui, Claudio; Denz, Christopher R; Jenkins, Emma; Larsen, Nicholas A; Lyne, Paul D; Pontz, Timothy; Ye, Qing; Holdgate, Geoff A; Snow, Lindsay; O'Connell, Nichole; Ferguson, Andrew D

    2016-03-10

    The Wnt pathway is an evolutionarily conserved and tightly regulated signaling network with important roles in embryonic development and adult tissue regeneration. Impaired Wnt pathway regulation, arising from mutations in Wnt signaling components, such as Axin, APC, and β-catenin, results in uncontrolled cell growth and triggers oncogenesis. To explore the reported link between CK2 kinase activity and Wnt pathway signaling, we sought to identify a potent, selective inhibitor of CK2 suitable for proof of concept studies in vivo. Starting from a pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine lead (2), we identified compound 7h, a potent CK2 inhibitor with picomolar affinity that is highly selectivity against other kinase family enzymes and inhibits Wnt pathway signaling (IC50 = 50 nM) in DLD-1 cells. In addition, compound 7h has physicochemical properties that are suitable for formulation as an intravenous solution, has demonstrated good pharmacokinetics in preclinical species, and exhibits a high level of activity as a monotherapy in HCT-116 and SW-620 xenografts. PMID:26985319

  2. Targeting the Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Pathway: Review of Smoothened and GLI Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadas K. Rimkus

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling pathway is a major regulator of cell differentiation, cell proliferation, and tissue polarity. Aberrant activation of the Shh pathway has been shown in a variety of human cancers, including, basal cell carcinoma, malignant gliomas, medulloblastoma, leukemias, and cancers of the breast, lung, pancreas, and prostate. Tumorigenesis, tumor progression and therapeutic response have all been shown to be impacted by the Shh signaling pathway. Downstream effectors of the Shh pathway include smoothened (SMO and glioma-associated oncogene homolog (GLI family of zinc finger transcription factors. Both are regarded as important targets for cancer therapeutics. While most efforts have been devoted towards pharmacologically targeting SMO, developing GLI-targeted approach has its merit because of the fact that GLI proteins can be activated by both Shh ligand-dependent and -independent mechanisms. To date, two SMO inhibitors (LDE225/Sonidegib and GDC-0449/Vismodegib have received FDA approval for treating basal cell carcinoma while many clinical trials are being conducted to evaluate the efficacy of this exciting class of targeted therapy in a variety of cancers. In this review, we provide an overview of the biology of the Shh pathway and then detail the current landscape of the Shh-SMO-GLI pathway inhibitors including those in preclinical studies and clinical trials.

  3. Dicer-2-dependent activation of Culex Vago occurs via the TRAF-Rel2 signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad N Paradkar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite their importance as vectors of human and livestock diseases, relatively little is known about innate antiviral immune pathways in mosquitoes and other insects. Previous work has shown that Culex Vago (CxVago, which is induced and secreted from West Nile virus (WNV-infected mosquito cells, acts as a functional homolog of interferon, by activating Jak-STAT pathway and limiting virus replication in neighbouring cells. Here we describe the Dicer-2-dependent pathway leading to WNV-induced CxVago activation. Using a luciferase reporter assay, we show that a NF-κB-like binding site in CxVago promoter region is conserved in mosquito species and is responsible for induction of CxVago expression following WNV infection. Using dsRNA-based gene knockdown, we show that the NF-κB ortholog, Rel2, plays significant role in the signaling pathway that activates CxVago in mosquito cells in vitro and in vivo. Using similar approaches, we also show that TRAF, but not TRAF-3, is involved in activation of Rel2 after viral infection. Overall the study shows that a conserved signaling pathway, which is similar to mammalian interferon activation pathway, is responsible for the induction and antiviral activity of CxVago.

  4. Make Yourself at Home: Viral Hijacking of the PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Diehl

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available As viruses do not possess genes encoding for proteins required for translation, energy metabolism or membrane biosynthesis, they are classified as obligatory intracellular parasites that depend on a host cell to replicate. This genome limitation forces them to gain control over cellular processes to ensure their successful propagation. A diverse spectrum of virally encoded proteins tackling a broad spectrum of cellular pathways during most steps of the viral life cycle ranging from the host cell entry to viral protein translation has evolved. Since the host cell PI3K/Akt signaling pathway plays a critical regulatory role in many cellular processes including RNA processing, translation, autophagy and apoptosis, many viruses, in widely varying ways, target it. This review focuses on a number of remarkable examples of viral strategies, which exploit the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway for effective viral replication.

  5. Advances of Targeted Therapy Based on Estrogen Receptor Signaling Pathway 
in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqiang XU

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence indicates that estrogen promotes tumor growth in both estrogen target organs and non-target organs. Estrogen regulates cell proliferation and differentiation via two different receptors, estrogen receptors α and β (ERα and ERβ. In recent decades, with the clarification of the ERα-mediated signaling pathways in breast cancer, targeted therapy through these pathways have successfully been used in clinical application. Tamoxifen, the classic representative, is a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM. Along with the elucidation of the role of estrogen in the pathophysiology of lung cancer, targeted lung cancer treatment based on the ER signaling pathways is also gradually being applied and it could become an important part of the comprehensive treatment for lung cancer.

  6. Functional genomic analyses identify pathways dysregulated by progranulin deficiency, implicating Wnt signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Ezra Y; Wexler, Eric M; Versano, Revital; Coppola, Giovanni; Gao, Fuying; Winden, Kellen D; Oldham, Michael C; Martens, Lauren Herl; Zhou, Ping; Farese, Robert V; Geschwind, Daniel H

    2011-09-22

    Progranulin (GRN) mutations cause frontotemporal dementia (FTD), but GRN's function in the CNS remains largely unknown. To identify the pathways downstream of GRN, we used weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA) to develop a systems-level view of transcriptional alterations in a human neural progenitor model of GRN-deficiency. This highlighted key pathways such as apoptosis and ubiquitination in GRN deficient human neurons, while revealing an unexpected major role for the Wnt signaling pathway, which was confirmed by analysis of gene expression data from postmortem FTD brain. Furthermore, we observed that the Wnt receptor Fzd2 was one of only a few genes upregulated at 6 weeks in a GRN knockout mouse, and that FZD2 reduction caused increased apoptosis, while its upregulation promoted neuronal survival in vitro. Together, these in vitro and in vivo data point to an adaptive role for altered Wnt signaling in GRN deficiency-mediated FTD, representing a potential therapeutic target. PMID:21943601

  7. Arrestin development: emerging roles for beta-arrestins in developmental signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Jeffrey J; Hara, Makoto R; Davenport, Chandra L; Kim, Jihee; Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2009-10-01

    Arrestins were identified as mediators of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) desensitization and endocytosis. However, it is now clear that they scaffold many intracellular signaling networks to modulate the strength and duration of signaling by diverse types of receptors--including those relevant to the Hedgehog, Wnt, Notch, and TGFbeta pathways--and downstream kinases such as the MAPK and Akt/PI3K cascades. The involvement of arrestins in many discrete developmental signaling events suggests an indispensable role for these multifaceted molecular scaffolds. PMID:19853559

  8. A cGMP-signaling pathway in a subset of olfactory sensory neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, M.R.; Angele, A.; Kremmer, E; Kaupp, U B; F. Müller

    2000-01-01

    It is well established that signal transduction in sensory neurons of the rat olfactory epithelium involves a cAMP-signaling pathway. However, a small number of olfactory neurons specifically express cGMP-signaling components, namely a guanylyl cyclase (GC-D) and a cGMP-stimulated phosphodiesterase (PDE2). Here, we show that this subset of olfactory neurons expressing GC-D and PDE2 does also express the subunit of a cGMP-selective cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel that has been previously...

  9. Metformin exerts anticancer effects through the inhibition of the Sonic hedgehog signaling pathway in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Cong; Wang, Yunshan; Liu, Ziming; Sun, Ying; Wang, Xiuwen; Wei, Guangwei; Wei, Junmin

    2015-07-01

    Metformin, a widely prescribed antidiabetic drug, has previously been shown to lower the risk of certain types of cancer, including that of breast cancer, and to improve prognosis. Its anticancer effects, which are mediated by the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), have become notable. The Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway is involved in changes in mammary ducts and malignant transformation. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the role of the Shh pathway in mediating the anticancer effects of metformin and the correlation between AMPK and the Shh pathway. We investigated the effectiveness of metformin in inhibiting the proliferation, migration, invasion and stemness of breast cancer cells in vitro using RNA extraction and reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), western blot analysis, cell proliferation assay, scratch-wound assay (cell migration assay), cell invasion assay, mammosphere culture and flow cytometry. In in vivo experiments, a tumor xenograft model was used to detect the effects of metformin on cancer cell proliferation. The results revealed that the treatment of breast cancer cells with metformin led to the inhibition of the Shh signaling pathway. Importantly, metformin inhibited recombinant human Shh (rhShh)‑induced cell migration, invasion, and stemness, and impaired cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the small interfering RNA (siRNA)‑mediated downregulation of AMPK reversed the inhibitory effects of metformin on rhShh‑induced Gli-1 expression and stemness. Our findings identified a role of the Shh signaling pathway in the anticancer effects of metformin in breast cancer. Furthermore, we revealed that the metformin-mediated inhibition of the Shh signaling pathway may be dependent on AMPK. PMID:25999130

  10. Directed random walks and constraint programming reveal active pathways in hepatocyte growth factor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittas, Aristotelis; Delobelle, Aurélien; Schmitt, Sabrina; Breuhahn, Kai; Guziolowski, Carito; Grabe, Niels

    2016-01-01

    An effective means to analyze mRNA expression data is to take advantage of established knowledge from pathway databases, using methods such as pathway-enrichment analyses. However, pathway databases are not case-specific and expression data could be used to infer gene-regulation patterns in the context of specific pathways. In addition, canonical pathways may not always describe the signaling mechanisms properly, because interactions can frequently occur between genes in different pathways. Relatively few methods have been proposed to date for generating and analyzing such networks, preserving the causality between gene interactions and reasoning over the qualitative logic of regulatory effects. We present an algorithm (MCWalk) integrated with a logic programming approach, to discover subgraphs in large-scale signaling networks by random walks in a fully automated pipeline. As an exemplary application, we uncover the signal transduction mechanisms in a gene interaction network describing hepatocyte growth factor-stimulated cell migration and proliferation from gene-expression measured with microarray and RT-qPCR using in-house perturbation experiments in a keratinocyte-fibroblast co-culture. The resulting subgraphs illustrate possible associations of hepatocyte growth factor receptor c-Met nodes, differentially expressed genes and cellular states. Using perturbation experiments and Answer Set programming, we are able to select those which are more consistent with the experimental data. We discover key regulator nodes by measuring the frequency with which they are traversed when connecting signaling between receptors and significantly regulated genes and predict their expression-shift consistently with the measured data. The Java implementation of MCWalk is publicly available under the MIT license at: https://bitbucket.org/akittas/biosubg. PMID:26518250

  11. Association of single nucleotide polymorphisms in Wnt signaling pathway genes with breast cancer in Saudi patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Saud Alanazi

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a complex heterogeneous disease involving genetic and epigenetic alterations in genes encoding proteins that are components of various signaling pathways. Candidate gene approach have identified association of genetic variants in the Wnt signaling pathway genes and increased susceptibility to several diseases including breast cancer. Due to the rarity of somatic mutations in key genes of Wnt pathway, we investigated the association of genetic variants in these genes with predisposition to breast cancers. We performed a case-control study to identify risk variants by examining 15 SNPs located in 8 genes associated with Wnt signaling. Genotypic analysis of individual locus showed statistically significant association of five SNPs located in β-catenin, AXIN2, DKK3, SFRP3 and TCF7L2 with breast cancers. Increased risk was observed only with the SNP in β-catenin while the other four SNPs conferred protection against breast cancers. Majority of these associations persisted after stratification of the cases based on estrogen receptor status and age of on-set of breast cancer. The rs7775 SNP in exon 6 of SFRP3 gene that codes for either arginine or glycine exhibited very strong association with breast cancer, even after Bonferroni's correction. Apart from these five variants, rs3923086 in AXIN2 and rs3763511 in DKK4 that did not show any association in the overall population were significantly associated with early on-set and estrogen receptor negative breast cancers, respectively. This is the first study to utilize pathway based approach to identify association of risk variants in the Wnt signaling pathway genes with breast cancers. Confirmation of our findings in larger populations of different ethnicities would provide evidence for the role of Wnt pathway as well as screening markers for early detection of breast carcinomas.

  12. Calcium-calmodulin signalling is involved in light-induced acidification by epidermal leaf cells of pea, Pisum sativum L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzenga, JTM; Staal, M; Prins, HBA

    1997-01-01

    Pathways of signal transduction of red and blue light-dependent acidification by leaf epidermal cells were studied using epidermal strips of the Argenteum mutant of Pisum sativum. In these preparations the contribution of guard cells to the acidification is minimal. The hydroxypyridine nifedipine, a

  13. Wnt-signalling pathways and microRNAs network in carcinogenesis: experimental and bioinformatics approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyido, Emenike K; Sweeney, Eloise; Nateri, Abdolrahman Shams

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few years, microRNAs (miRNAs) have not only emerged as integral regulators of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level but also respond to signalling molecules to affect cell function(s). miRNAs crosstalk with a variety of the key cellular signalling networks such as Wnt, transforming growth factor-β and Notch, control stem cell activity in maintaining tissue homeostasis, while if dysregulated contributes to the initiation and progression of cancer. Herein, we overview the molecular mechanism(s) underlying the crosstalk between Wnt-signalling components (canonical and non-canonical) and miRNAs, as well as changes in the miRNA/Wnt-signalling components observed in the different forms of cancer. Furthermore, the fundamental understanding of miRNA-mediated regulation of Wnt-signalling pathway and vice versa has been significantly improved by high-throughput genomics and bioinformatics technologies. Whilst, these approaches have identified a number of specific miRNA(s) that function as oncogenes or tumour suppressors, additional analyses will be necessary to fully unravel the links among conserved cellular signalling pathways and miRNAs and their potential associated components in cancer, thereby creating therapeutic avenues against tumours. Hence, we also discuss the current challenges associated with Wnt-signalling/miRNAs complex and the analysis using the biomedical experimental and bioinformatics approaches. PMID:27590724

  14. Long-distance plant signaling pathways in response to multiple stressors: the gap in knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Annika E; Bauerle, Taryn L

    2016-03-01

    Plants require the capacity for quick and precise recognition of external stimuli within their environment for survival. Upon exposure to biotic (herbivores and pathogens) or abiotic stressors (environmental conditions), plants can activate hydraulic, chemical, or electrical long-distance signals to initiate systemic stress responses. A plant's stress reactions can be highly precise and orchestrated in response to different stressors or stress combinations. To date, an array of information is available on plant responses to single stressors. However, information on simultaneously occurring stresses that represent either multiple, within, or across abiotic and biotic stress types is nascent. Likewise, the crosstalk between hydraulic, chemical, and electrical signaling pathways and the importance of each individual signaling type requires further investigation in order to be fully understood. The overlapping presence and speed of the signals upon plant exposure to various stressors makes it challenging to identify the signal initiating plant systemic stress/defense responses. Furthermore, it is thought that systemic plant responses are not transmitted by a single pathway, but rather by a combination of signals enabling the transmission of information on the prevailing stressor(s) and its intensity. In this review, we summarize the mode of action of hydraulic, chemical, and electrical long-distance signals, discuss their importance in information transmission to biotic and abiotic stressors, and suggest future research directions. PMID:26944636

  15. Genetic association study of QT interval highlights role for calcium signaling pathways in myocardial repolarization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arking, Dan E.; Pulit, Sara L.; Crotti, Lia; Van der Harst, Pim; Munroe, Patricia B.; Koopmann, Tamara T.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Morley, Michael; Wang, Xinchen; Johnson, Andrew D.; Lundby, Alicia; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Noseworthy, Peter A.; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Bradford, Yuki; Tarasov, Kirill V.; Dorr, Marcus; Miiller-Nurasyid, Martina; Lahtinen, Annukka M.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Bis, Joshua C.; Isaacs, Aaron; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Evans, Daniel S.; Post, Wendy S.; Waggott, Daryl; Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka; Hicks, Andrew A.; Eisele, Lewin; Ellinghaus, David; Hayward, Caroline; Navarro, Pau; Ulivi, Sheila; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tester, David J.; Chatel, Stephanie; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kumari, Meena; Morris, Richard W.; Naluai, Asa T.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Kluttig, Alexander; Strohmer, Bernhard; Panayiotou, Andrie G.; Torres, Maria; Knoflach, Michael; Hubacek, Jaroslav A.; Slowikowski, Kamil; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Kumar, Runjun D.; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Alonso, Alvaro; Bader, Joel S.; EhreT, Georg; Huang, Hailiang; Kao, W. H. Linda; Strait, James B.; Macfarlane, Peter W.; Brown, Morris; Caulfield, Mark J.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Kronenberg, Florian; Willeit, Johann; Smith, J. Gustav; Greiser, Karin H.; Schwabedissen, Henriette Meyer Zu; Werdan, Karl; Carella, Massimo; Zelante, Leopoldo; Heckbert, Susan R.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Kolcic, Ivana; Poagek, Ozren; Wright, Alan F.; Griffin, Maura; Daly, Mark J.; Arnar, David O.; Holm, Hilma; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Denny, Joshua C.; Roden, Dan M.; Zuvich, Rebecca L.; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew S.; Larson, Martin G.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Yin, Xiaoyan; Bobboll, Marco; D'Adamo, Adamo P.; Iorio, Annamaria; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Carracedo, Angel; Cummings, Steven R.; Nalls, Michael A.; Jula, Antti; Kontula, Kimmo K.; Marjamaa, Annukka; Oikarinen, Lasse; Perola, Markus; Porthan, Kimmo; Erbe, Raimund; Hoffmann, Per; Jockel, Karl-Heinz; Kalsch, Hagen; Nothen, Markus M.; Den Hoed, Marcel; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Thelle, Dag S.; Gieger, Christian; Meitinger, Thomas; Perz, Siegfried; Peters, Annette; Pruchal, Hanna; Sinner, Moritz F.; Waldenberger, Melanie; De Boer, Rudolf A.; Franke, Lude; Van der Vleuten, Pieter A.; Beckmann, Britt Maria; Martens, Eimo; Bardail, Abdennasser; Hofman, Nynke; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Behr, Elijah R.; Dalageorgou, Chrysoula; Giudicessi, John R.; Medeiros-Domingo, Argelia; Barc, Julien; Kyndt, Florence; Probst, Vincent; Ghidoni, Alice; Insolia, Roberto; Hamilton, Robert M.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Brandimarto, Jeffrey; Margulies, Kenneth; Moravec, Christine E.; Del Greco, Fabiola; Fuchsberger, Christian; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Lee, Wai K.; Watt, Graham C. M.; Campbell, Harry; Wild, Sarah H.; El Mokhtari, Nour E.; Frey, Norbert; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Mateo Leach, Irene; Navis, Gerjan; Van den Berg, Maarten P.; Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Kellis, Manolis; Krijthe, Bouwe P.; Franco, Oscar H.; Hofman, Albert; Kors, Jan A.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Lamina, Claudia; Oostra, Ben A.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Lakatta, Edward G.; Mulas, Antonella; Orru, Marco; Schlessinger, David; Uda, Manuela; Markus, Marcello R. P.; Volker, Uwe; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Timothy D.; Arnlov, Johan; Lind, Lars; Sundstrom, Johan; Syvanen, Ann-Christine; Kivimaki, Mika; Kahonen, Mika; Mononen, Nina; Raitakari, I. T.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Adamkova, Vera; Kiech, Stefan; Brion, Maria; Nicolaides, Andrew N.; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haerting, Johannes; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Whincup, Peter H.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Bezzina, Connie R.; Ingelsson, Erik; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gaspariniin, Paolo; Wilson, James F.; Rudan, Igor; Franke, Andre; Miihleisen, Thomas W.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Lehtimaki, Terho J.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Parsa, Afshin; Liu, Yongmei; Van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Siscovick, David S.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Jamshidi, Yalda; Salomaa, Veikko; Felix, Stephan B.; Sanna, Serena; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Stefansson, Karl; Boyer, Laurie A.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Olsen, Jesper V.; Lage, Kasper; Schwartz, Peter J.; Kaab, Stefan; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Ackerman, Michael J.; Pfeufer, Arne; De Bakker, Paul I. W.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The QT interval, an electrocardiographic measure reflecting myocardial repolarization, is a heritable trait. QT prolongation is a risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) and could indicate the presence of the potentially lethal mendelian long-QT syndrome (LQTS). Using

  16. Genetic association study of QT interval highlights role for calcium signaling pathways in myocardial repolarization

    OpenAIRE

    Arking, Dan E; Sara L. Pulit; Crotti, Lia; van der Harst, Pim; Munroe, Patricia B; Koopmann, Tamara T.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Morley, Michael; Wang, Xinchen; Johnson, Andrew D.; Lundby, Alicia; Gudbjartsson, Daníel F.; Noseworthy, Peter A.; Eijgelsheim, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The QT interval, an electrocardiographic measure reflecting myocardial repolarization, is a heritable trait. QT prolongation is a risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) and could indicate the presence of the potentially lethal Mendelian Long QT Syndrome (LQTS). Using a genome-wide association and replication study in up to 100,000 individuals we identified 35 common variant QT interval loci, that collectively explain ∼8-10% of QT variation and highlight the imp...

  17. Genetic association study of QT interval highlights role for calcium signaling pathways in myocardial repolarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arking, Dan E; Pulit, Sara L; Crotti, Lia;

    2014-01-01

    The QT interval, an electrocardiographic measure reflecting myocardial repolarization, is a heritable trait. QT prolongation is a risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) and could indicate the presence of the potentially lethal mendelian long-QT syndrome (LQTS). Usi...

  18. Genetic association study of QT interval highlights role for calcium signaling pathways in myocardial repolarization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Arking (Dan); S.L. Pulit (Sara); L. Crotti (Lia); P. van der Harst (Pim); P. Munroe (Patricia); T.T. Koopmann (Tamara); N. Sotoodehnia (Nona); E. Rossin (Elizabeth); M. Morley (Michael); X. Wang (Xinchen); A.D. Johnson (Andrew); A. Lundby (Alicia); D.F. Gudbjartsson (Daniel); P.A. Noseworthy (Peter); M. Eijgelsheim (Mark); Y. Bradford (Yuki); K.V. Tarasov (Kirill); M. Dörr (Marcus); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); A.M. Lahtinen (Annukka); I.M. Nolte (Ilja); G.D. Smith; J.C. Bis (Joshua); A.J. Isaacs (Aaron); S.J. Newhouse (Stephen); D.S. Evans (Daniel); W.S. Post (Wendy S.); D. Waggott (Daryl); L.-P. Lyytikäinen (Leo-Pekka); A.A. Hicks (Andrew); L. Eisele (Lewin); D. Ellinghaus (David); C. Hayward (Caroline); P. Navarro (Pau); S. Ulivi (Shelia); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); D.J. Tester (David); S. Chatel (Stéphanie); S. Gustafsson (Stefan); M. Kumari (Meena); R. Morris (Richard); A.T. Naluai (Asa); S. Padmanabhan (Sandosh); A. Kluttig (Alexander); B. Strohmer (Bernhard); A.G. Panayiotou (Andrie); M. Torres (Maria); M. Knoflach (Michael); J.A. Hubacek (Jaroslav A.); K. Slowikowski (Kamil); S. Raychaudhuri (Soumya); R.D. Kumar (Runjun); T.B. Harris (Tamara); L.J. Launer (Lenore); A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); A. Alonso (Alvaro); J.S. Bader (Joel); G.B. Ehret (Georg); H. Huang (Hailiang); W.H.L. Kao (Wen); J.B. Strait (James); P.W. Macfarlane (Peter); M.J. Brown (Morris); M. Caulfield (Mark); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); F. Kronenberg (Florian); J. Willeit (Johann); J.G. Smith (J. Gustav); K.H. Greiser (Karin Halina); H.M. Zu Schwabedissen (Henriette Meyer); K. Werdan (Karl); C. Carella (Cintia); L. Zelante (Leopoldo); S.R. Heckbert (Susan); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); I. Kolcic (Ivana); O. Polasek (Ozren); A.F. Wright (Alan); M. Griffin (Maura); M.J. Daly (Mark); D.O. Arnar (David); H. Hólm (Hilma); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); J.C. Denny (Joshua); D.M. Roden (Dan); R.L. Zuvich (Rebecca); V. Emilsson (Valur); A.S. Plump (Andrew); M.G. Larson (Martin); C.J. O'Donnell (Christopher); X. Yin (Xiaoyan); M. Bobbo (Marco); P. D'Adamo (Pio); A. Iorio (Annamaria); G. Sinagra (Gianfranco); A. Carracedo (Angel); S.R. Cummings (Steven); M.A. Nalls (Michael); A. Jula (Antti); K.K. Kontula (Kimmo); A. Marjamaa (Annukka); L. Oikarinen (Lasse); M. Perola (Markus); K. Porthan (Kimmo); R. Erbel (Raimund); P. Hoffmann (Per); K.-H. Jöckel (Karl-Heinz); H. Kälsch (Hagen); M.M. Nöthen (Markus); M. den Hoed (Marcel); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); D.S. Thelle (Dag); C. Gieger (Christian); T. Meitinger (Thomas); S. Perz (Siegfried); A. Peters (Annette); H. Prucha (Hanna); M.F. Sinner (Moritz); M. Waldenberger (Melanie); R.A. de Boer (Rudolf); L. Franke (Lude); P.A. van der Vleuten (Pieter); B.M. Beckmann (Britt); E. Martens (Eimo); A. Bardai (Abdennasser); N. Hofman (Nynke); A.A.M. Wilde (Arthur); E.R. Behr (Elijah ); C. Dalageorgou (Chrysoula); J.R. Giudicessi (John); A. Medeiros-Domingo (Argelia); J. Barc (Julien); F. Kyndt (Florence); V. Probst (Vincent); A. Ghidoni (Alice); R. Insolia (Roberto); R.M. Hamilton (Robert); S.W. Scherer (Stephen); J. Brandimarto (Jeffrey); K. Margulies (Kenneth); C.E. Moravec (Christine); F. Del Greco M (Fabiola); C. Fuchsberger (Christian); J.R. O'Connell (Jeffery); W.K. Lee (Wai); G.C.M. Watt (Graham); H. Campbell (Harry); S.H. Wild (Sarah); N.E. El Mokhtari (Nour); N. Frey (Norbert); F.W. Asselbergs (Folkert); I.M. Leach (Irene Mateo); G. Navis (Gerjan); M.P. van den Berg (Maarten); D.J. van Veldhuisen (Dirk); M. Kellis (Manolis); B.P. Krijthe (Bouwe); O.H. Franco (Oscar); A. Hofman (Albert); J.A. Kors (Jan); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); L. Kedenko (Lyudmyla); C. Lamina (Claudia); B.A. Oostra (Ben); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); E. Lakatta (Edward); A. Mulas (Antonella); M. Orrù (Marco); D. Schlessinger (David); M. Uda (Manuela); M.R.P. Markus (Marcello R. P.); U. Völker (Uwe); H. Snieder (Harold); T.D. Spector (Timothy); J. Ärnlöv (Johan); L. Lind (Lars); J. Sundstrom (Johan); A.C. Syvanen; M. Kivimaki (Mika); M. Kähönen (Mika); K. Mononen (Kari); O. Raitakari (Olli); J. Viikari (Jorma); V. Adamkova (Vera); S. Kiechl (Stefan); M.-J. Brion (Maria); A.N. Nicolaides (Andrew); B. Paulweber (Bernhard); J. Haerting (Johannes); A. Dominiczak (Anna); F. Nyberg (Fredrik); P.H. Whincup (Peter); A. Hingorani (Aroon); J.-J. Schott (Jean-Jacques); C.R. Bezzina (Connie); E. Ingelsson (Erik); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); P. Gasparini (Paolo); J.F. Wilson (James); I. Rudan (Igor); A. Franke (Andre); T.W. Mühleisen (Thomas); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); A.D. Paterson (Andrew); A. Parsa (Afshin); Y. Liu (Yongmei); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); D.S. Siscovick (David); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); Y. Jamshidi (Yalda); V. Salomaa (Veikko); S.B. Felix (Stephan); S. Sanna (Serena); M.D. Ritchie (Marylyn); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); L.A. Boyer (Laurie); T.P. Cappola (Thomas); J.V. Olsen (Jesper); P. Lage (Pedro); P.J. Schwartz (Peter); S. Kääb (Stefan); A. Chakravarti (Aravinda); M. Ackerman (Margaret); A. Pfeufer (Arne); P.I.W. de Bakker (Paul); C. Newton-Cheh (Christopher)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe QT interval, an electrocardiographic measure reflecting myocardial repolarization, is a heritable trait. QT prolongation is a risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) and could indicate the presence of the potentially lethal mendelian long-QT syndrome (L

  19. Single-cell mechanics and calcium signalling in organotypic slices of human myometrium ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Loftus, Fiona C.; Richardson, Magnus J. E.; Shmygol, Anatoly

    2015-01-01

    Elucidation of cellular mechanisms regulating myometrial contractility is crucial for improvement in management of many obstetric abnormalities, such as premature delivery, uterine dystocia and post-partum haemorrhage. Myometrial contractions are triggered by periodic synchronous rises in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) elicited by spontaneously generated action potentials propagating throughout the entire myometrium. During labour, hormones like oxytocin and prostaglandins pote...

  20. Signaling pathways regulating Homer1a expression: implications for antidepressant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serchov, Tsvetan; Heumann, Rolf; van Calker, Dietrich; Biber, Knut

    2016-03-01

    Homer1a is upregulated by several different antidepressant measures, including non-pharmacological treatments, like sleep deprivation (SD) and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and antidepressant drugs, such as imipramine, fluoxetine and ketamine. Homer1a induction might thus be a crucial joint mechanism for antidepressant therapy in general. However, the upstream signaling pathways that regulate or induce Homer1a expression are still not well understood. The main focus of the present review is to offer an overview of the current knowledge about the potential role of Homer1a in depression and the signaling pathways responsible for Homer1a regulation. It is suggested here that a detailed characterization of the signaling mechanisms leading to Homer1a expression might provide novel therapeutic targets for antidepressant drug development. PMID:26641965