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Sample records for calcium signaling involves

  1. Involvement of calcium and calmodulin signaling in adaptation to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heat stress is a common form of stress suffered by plants. Therefore, plants have evolved mechanisms to cope with the problems caused by high temperatures. In this study, the involvement of calcium ion and calmodulin (Ca2+-CaM) in the protection against heat stress-induced oxidative damage in tomato (Solanum ...

  2. Spontaneous and CRH-Induced Excitability and Calcium Signaling in Mice Corticotrophs Involves Sodium, Calcium, and Cation-Conducting Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemkova, Hana; Tomić, Melanija; Kucka, Marek; Aguilera, Greti; Stojilkovic, Stanko S

    2016-04-01

    Transgenic mice expressing the tdimer2(12) form of Discosoma red fluorescent protein under control of the proopiomelanocortin gene's regulatory elements are a useful model for studying corticotrophs. Using these mice, we studied the ion channels and mechanisms controlling corticotroph excitability. Corticotrophs were either quiescent or electrically active, with a 22-mV difference in the resting membrane potential (RMP) between the 2 groups. In quiescent cells, CRH depolarized the membrane, leading to initial single spiking and sustained bursting; in active cells, CRH further facilitated or inhibited electrical activity and calcium spiking, depending on the initial activity pattern and CRH concentration. The stimulatory but not inhibitory action of CRH on electrical activity was mimicked by cAMP independently of the presence or absence of arachidonic acid. Removal of bath sodium silenced spiking and hyperpolarized the majority of cells; in contrast, the removal of bath calcium did not affect RMP but reduced CRH-induced depolarization, which abolished bursting electrical activity and decreased the spiking frequency but not the amplitude of single spikes. Corticotrophs with inhibited voltage-gated sodium channels fired calcium-dependent action potentials, whereas cells with inhibited L-type calcium channels fired sodium-dependent spikes; blockade of both channels abolished spiking without affecting the RMP. These results indicate that the background voltage-insensitive sodium conductance influences RMP, the CRH-depolarization current is driven by a cationic conductance, and the interplay between voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels plays a critical role in determining the status and pattern of electrical activity and calcium signaling.

  3. The involvement of calcium and MAP kinase signaling pathways in the production of radiation-induced bystander effects.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lyng, F M

    2006-04-01

    Much evidence now exists regarding radiation-induced bystander effects, but the mechanisms involved in the transduction of the signal are still unclear. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways have been linked to growth factor-mediated regulation of cellular events such as proliferation, senescence, differentiation and apoptosis. Activation of multiple MAPK pathways such as the ERK, JNK and p38 pathways have been shown to occur after exposure of cells to radiation and a variety of other toxic stresses. Previous studies have shown oxidative stress and calcium signaling to be important in radiation-induced bystander effects. The aim of the present study was to investigate MAPK signaling pathways in bystander cells exposed to irradiated cell conditioned medium (ICCM) and the role of oxidative metabolism and calcium signaling in the induction of bystander responses. Human keratinocytes (HPV-G cell line) were irradiated (0.005-5 Gy) using a cobalt-60 teletherapy unit. The medium was harvested 1 h postirradiation and transferred to recipient HPV-G cells. Phosphorylated forms of p38, JNK and ERK were studied by immunofluorescence 30 min-24 h after exposure to ICCM. Inhibitors of the ERK pathway (PD98059 and U0126), the JNK pathway (SP600125), and the p38 pathway (SB203580) were used to investigate whether bystander-induced cell death could be blocked. Cells were also incubated with ICCM in the presence of superoxide dismutase, catalase, EGTA, verapamil, nifedipine and thapsigargin to investigate whether bystander effects could be inhibited because of the known effects on calcium homeostasis. Activated forms of JNK and ERK proteins were observed after exposure to ICCM. Inhibition of the ERK pathway appeared to increase bystander-induced apoptosis, while inhibition of the JNK pathway appeared to decrease apoptosis. In addition, reactive oxygen species, such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, and calcium signaling were found to be important modulators of

  4. Calcium signaling in lymphocytes and ELF fields. Evidence for an electric field metric and a site of interaction involving the calcium ion channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liburdy, R P

    1992-04-13

    Calcium influx increased during mitogen-activated signal transduction in thymic lymphocytes exposed to a 22 mT, 60 Hz magnetic field (E induced = 1.7 mV/cm, 37 degrees C, 60 min). To distinguish between an electric or a magnetic field dependence a special multi-ring annular cell culture plate based on Faraday's Law of Induction was employed. Studies show a dependence on the strength of the induced electric field at constant magnetic flux density. Moreover, exposure to a pure 60 Hz electric field or to a magnetically-induced electric field of identical strength resulted in similar changes in calcium transport. The first real-time monitoring of [Ca2+]i during application of a 60 Hz electric field revealed an increase in [Ca2+]i observed 100 s after mitogen stimulation; this suggests that the plateau phase rather than the early phase of calcium signaling was influenced. The hypothesis was tested by separating, in time, the early release of calcium from intracellular stores from the influx of extracellular calcium. In calcium-free buffer, 60 Hz field exerted little influence on the early release of calcium from intracellular stores. In contrast, addition of extracellular calcium during exposure enhanced calcium influx through the plasma membrane. Alteration of the plateau phase of calcium signaling implicates the calcium channel as a site of field interaction. In addition, an electric field exposure metric is mechanistically consistent with a cell-surface interaction site.

  5. Hypotonic stress-induced calcium signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves TRP-like transporters on the endoplasmic reticulum membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigamonti, M; Groppi, S; Belotti, F; Ambrosini, R; Filippi, G; Martegani, E; Tisi, R

    2015-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells respond to hypotonic stress (HTS) by a cytosolic calcium rise, either generated by an influx of calcium from extracellular medium, when calcium is available, or by a release from intracellular stores in scarcity of extracellular calcium. Calcium release from intracellular compartments is peculiarly inhibited by external calcium in a calcineurin-independent and Cch1-, but not Mid1-, driven manner. HTS-induced calcium release is also negatively regulated by the ER protein Cls2 and involves a poorly characterized protein, FLC2/YAL053W gene product, previously proposed to be required for FAD transport in the ER, albeit, due to its molecular features, it was also previously classified as an ion transporter. A computational analysis revealed that this gene and its three homologs in S. cerevisiae, together with previously identified Schizosaccharomyces pombe pkd2 and Neurospora crassa calcium-related spray protein, belong to a fungal branch of TRP-like ion transporters related to human mucolipin and polycystin 2 calcium transporters. Moreover, disruption of FLC2 gene confers severe sensitivity to Calcofluor white and hyper-activation of the cell wall integrity MAPK cascade, suggesting a role in cell wall maintenance as previously suggested for the fission yeast homolog. Perturbation in cytosolic resting calcium concentration and hyper-activation of calcineurin in exponentially growing cells suggest a role for this transporter in calcium homeostasis in yeast. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Reactive oxygen species and calcium signals in skeletal muscle: A crosstalk involved in both normal signaling and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Alejandra; Henríquez-Olguín, Carlos; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2016-09-01

    Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) have been profusely studied as agents of potential damage to living cells and they have been related to a number of pathological processes. Increasing evidence points to a more positive role of ROS in cell signaling and the detailed mechanism that regulates the precise amount of ROS needed for cell functioning without the deleterious effects of excess ROS still needs to be resolved in detail. In skeletal muscle the main source of ROS during normal functioning appears to be NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2), which is activated by electrical stimuli (or exercise) through a cascade of events that include ATP release through pannexin1 channels. NOX2 is a protein complex that assembles in the T-tubule membrane before activation and ROS production by NOX2 appears to be important for muscle adaptation through gene expression and mitochondrial biogenesis as well as for improving glucose transport after insulin action. Excess ROS production (or diminished antioxidant defenses) plays a role in a number of pathological processes in skeletal muscle. Together with increased reactive nitrogen species, an increase in ROS appears to have a deleterious role in a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy as well as muscle wasting in other diseases such as aging sarcopenia and cancer cachexia. In addition, ROS is involved in obesity and muscle insulin resistance, both of which are causally related to type 2 diabetes. A detailed description of the fine-tuning of ROS (including all sources of ROS) in skeletal muscle in health and disease will significantly contribute to our knowledge of both muscle adaptation and muscle related pathologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. CCN3 and calcium signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chang Long

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The CCN family of genes consists presently of six members in human (CCN1-6 also known as Cyr61 (Cystein rich 61, CTGF (Connective Tissue Growth Factor, NOV (Nephroblastoma Overexpressed gene, WISP-1, 2 and 3 (Wnt-1 Induced Secreted Proteins. Results obtained over the past decade have indicated that CCN proteins are matricellular proteins, which are involved in the regulation of various cellular functions, such as proliferation, differentiation, survival, adhesion and migration. The CCN proteins have recently emerged as regulatory factors involved in both internal and external cell signaling. CCN3 was reported to physically interact with fibulin-1C, integrins, Notch and S100A4. Considering that, the conformation and biological activity of these proteins are dependent upon calcium binding, we hypothesized that CCN3 might be involved in signaling pathways mediated by calcium ions. In this article, we review the data showing that CCN3 regulates the levels of intracellular calcium and discuss potential models that may account for the biological effects of CCN3.

  8. Calcium signaling in taste cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medler, Kathryn F

    2015-09-01

    The sense of taste is a common ability shared by all organisms and is used to detect nutrients as well as potentially harmful compounds. Thus taste is critical to survival. Despite its importance, surprisingly little is known about the mechanisms generating and regulating responses to taste stimuli. All taste responses depend on calcium signals to generate appropriate responses which are relayed to the brain. Some taste cells have conventional synapses and rely on calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels. Other taste cells lack these synapses and depend on calcium release to formulate an output signal through a hemichannel. Beyond establishing these characteristics, few studies have focused on understanding how these calcium signals are formed. We identified multiple calcium clearance mechanisms that regulate calcium levels in taste cells as well as a calcium influx that contributes to maintaining appropriate calcium homeostasis in these cells. Multiple factors regulate the evoked taste signals with varying roles in different cell populations. Clearly, calcium signaling is a dynamic process in taste cells and is more complex than has previously been appreciated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Rapid and Localized Mechanical Stimulation and Adhesion Assay: TRPM7 Involvement in Calcium Signaling and Cell Adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Shin Nishitani

    Full Text Available A cell mechanical stimulation equipment, based on cell substrate deformation, and a more sensitive method for measuring adhesion of cells were developed. A probe, precisely positioned close to the cell, was capable of a vertical localized mechanical stimulation with a temporal frequency of 207 Hz, and strain magnitude of 50%. This setup was characterized and used to probe the response of Human Umbilical Endothelial Vein Cells (HUVECs in terms of calcium signaling. The intracellular calcium ion concentration was measured by the genetically encoded Cameleon biosensor, with the Transient Receptor Potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 7 (TRPM7 expression inhibited. As TRPM7 expression also regulates adhesion, a relatively simple method for measuring adhesion of cells was also developed, tested and used to study the effect of adhesion alone. Three adhesion conditions of HUVECs on polyacrylamide gel dishes were compared. In the first condition, the substrate is fully treated with Sulfo-SANPAH crosslinking and fibronectin. The other two conditions had increasingly reduced adhesion: partially treated (only coated with fibronectin, with no use of Sulfo-SANPAH, at 5% of the normal amount and non-treated polyacrylamide gels. The cells showed adhesion and calcium response to the mechanical stimulation correlated to the degree of gel treatment: highest for fully treated gels and lowest for non-treated ones. TRPM7 inhibition by siRNA on HUVECs caused an increase in adhesion relative to control (no siRNA treatment and non-targeting siRNA, but a decrease to 80% of calcium response relative to non-targeting siRNA which confirms the important role of TRPM7 in mechanotransduction despite the increase in adhesion.

  10. Models of calcium signalling

    CERN Document Server

    Dupont, Geneviève; Kirk, Vivien; Sneyd, James

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses the ways in which mathematical, computational, and modelling methods can be used to help understand the dynamics of intracellular calcium. The concentration of free intracellular calcium is vital for controlling a wide range of cellular processes, and is thus of great physiological importance. However, because of the complex ways in which the calcium concentration varies, it is also of great mathematical interest.This book presents the general modelling theory as well as a large number of specific case examples, to show how mathematical modelling can interact with experimental approaches, in an interdisciplinary and multifaceted approach to the study of an important physiological control mechanism. Geneviève Dupont is FNRS Research Director at the Unit of Theoretical Chronobiology of the Université Libre de Bruxelles;Martin Falcke is head of the Mathematical Cell Physiology group at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin;Vivien Kirk is an Associate Professor in the Depar...

  11. ROS and calcium signaling mediated pathways involved in stress responses of the marine microalgae Dunaliella salina to enhanced UV-B radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinxin; Tang, Xuexi; Wang, Ming; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Bin; Wang, You

    2017-08-01

    UV-B ray has been addressed to trigger common metabolic responses on marine microalgae, however, the upstream events responsible for these changes in marine microalgae are poorly understood. In the present study, a species of marine green microalgae Dunaliella salina was exposed to a series of enhanced UV-B radiation ranging from 0.25 to 1.00 KJ·m -2 per day. The role of ROS and calcium signaling in the D. salina responses to UV-B was discussed. Results showed that enhanced UV-B radiation markedly decreased the cell density in a dose-dependent manner, but the contents of protein and glycerol that were essential for cell growth increased. It suggested that it was cell division instead of cell growth that UV-B exerted negative effects on. The subcellular damages on nuclei and plasmalemma further evidenced the hypothesis. The nutrient absorption was affected with UV-B exposure, and the inhibition on PO 4 3- uptake was more serious compared to NO 3 - uptake. UV-B radiation promoted reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) contents, decreased the redox status and altered the antioxidant enzyme activities. The addition of the ROS scavenger and the glutathione biosynthesis precursor N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) alleviated the stress degree, implying ROS-mediated pathway was involved in the stress response to UV-B radiation. Transient increase in Ca 2+ -ATPase was triggered simultaneously with UV-B exposure. Meanwhile, the addition of an intracellular free calcium chelator aggravated the damage of cell division, but exogenous calcium and ion channel blocker applications did not, inferring that endogenously initiated calcium signaling played roles in response to UV-B. Cross-talk analysis showed a relatively clear relationship between ROS inhibition and Ca 2+ -ATPase suppression, and a relation between Ca 2+ inhibition and GPx activity change was also observed. It was thus presumed that ROS-coupled calcium signaling via the

  12. Involvement of calcium signaling and the actin cytoskeleton in the membrane block to polyspermy in mouse eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAvey, Beth A; Wortzman, Genevieve B; Williams, Carmen J; Evans, Janice P

    2002-10-01

    This study examines the effects of actin microfilament-disrupting drugs on events of fertilization, with emphasis on gamete membrane interactions. Mouse eggs, freed of their zonae pellucidae, were treated with drugs that perturb the actin cytoskeleton by different mechanisms (cytochalasin B, cytochalasin D, jasplakinolide, latrunculin B) and then inseminated. Cytochalasin B, jasplakinolide, and latrunculin B treatments resulted in a decrease in the percentage of eggs fertilized and the average number of sperm fused per egg. However, cytochalasin D treatment resulted in an increase in the average number of sperm fused per egg and the percentage of polyspermic eggs. This increase in polyspermy occurred despite the observation that cytochalasin D treatment caused a decrease in sperm-egg binding and did not affect spontaneous acrosome reactions or sperm motility. This suggested that cytochalasin D-treated eggs had an impaired ability to establish a block to polyspermy at the level of the plasma membrane. The effect of cytochalasin D on the block to polyspermy was not due to a general disruption of egg activation because sperm-induced calcium oscillations and cortical granule exocytosis were similar in cytochalasin D-treated and control eggs. However, buffering of intracellular calcium levels with the calcium chelator BAPTA-AM resulted in an increase in polyspermy. Together, these data suggest that a postfertilization decrease in egg membrane receptivity to sperm requires functions of the egg actin cytoskeleton that are disrupted by cytochalasin D. Furthermore, egg activation-associated increased intracellular calcium levels are necessary but not sufficient to affect postfertilization membrane dynamics that contribute to a membrane block to polyspermy.

  13. Calcium signaling and cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Mauro Cunha Xavier; Kihara, Alexandre Hiroaki; Goulart, Vânia A M; Tonelli, Fernanda M P; Gomes, Katia N; Ulrich, Henning; Resende, Rodrigo R

    2015-11-01

    Cell proliferation is orchestrated through diverse proteins related to calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling inside the cell. Cellular Ca(2+) influx that occurs first by various mechanisms at the plasma membrane, is then followed by absorption of Ca(2+) ions by mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, and, finally, there is a connection of calcium stores to the nucleus. Experimental evidence indicates that the fluctuation of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum provides a pivotal and physiological role for cell proliferation. Ca(2+) depletion in the endoplasmatic reticulum triggers Ca(2+) influx across the plasma membrane in an phenomenon called store-operated calcium entries (SOCEs). SOCE is activated through a complex interplay between a Ca(2+) sensor, denominated STIM, localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and a Ca(2+) channel at the cell membrane, denominated Orai. The interplay between STIM and Orai proteins with cell membrane receptors and their role in cell proliferation is discussed in this review. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Calcium Signalling: Fishing Out Molecules of Mitochondrial Calcium Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Hajnóczky, György; Csordás, György

    2010-01-01

    Cellular energy metabolism, survival and death are controlled by mitochondrial calcium signals originating in the cytoplasm. Now, RNAi studies link three proteins — MICU1, NCLX and LETM1 — to the previously unknown molecular mechanism of mitochondrial calcium transport.

  15. Presynaptic calcium signalling in cerebellar mossy fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Jörntell, Henrik; Midtgaard, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Whole-cell recordings were obtained from mossy fibre terminals in adult turtles in order to characterize the basic membrane properties. Calcium imaging of presynaptic calcium signals was carried out in order to analyse calcium dynamics and presynaptic GABA B inhibition. A tetrodotoxin (TTX....... Calcium imaging using Calcium-Green dextran revealed a stimulus-evoked all-or-none TTX-sensitive calcium signal in simple and complex rosettes. All compartments of a complex rosette were activated during electrical activation of the mossy fibre, while individual simple and complex rosettes along an axon...... appeared to be isolated from one another in terms of calcium signalling. CGP55845 application showed that GABA B receptors mediated presynaptic inhibition of the calcium signal over the entire firing frequency range of mossy fibres. A paired-pulse depression of the calcium signal lasting more than 1 s...

  16. Calcium-calmodulin signalling is involved in light-induced acidification by epidermal leaf cells of pea, Pisum sativum L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzenga, JTM; Staal, M; Prins, HBA

    1997-01-01

    Pathways of signal transduction of red and blue light-dependent acidification by leaf epidermal cells were studied using epidermal strips of the Argenteum mutant of Pisum sativum. In these preparations the contribution of guard cells to the acidification is minimal. The hydroxypyridine nifedipine, a

  17. Calcium signaling in human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apáti, Ágota; Berecz, Tünde; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2016-03-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells provide new tools for developmental and pharmacological studies as well as for regenerative medicine applications. Calcium homeostasis and ligand-dependent calcium signaling are key components of major cellular responses, including cell proliferation, differentiation or apoptosis. Interestingly, these phenomena have not been characterized in detail as yet in pluripotent human cell sates. Here we review the methods applicable for studying both short- and long-term calcium responses, focusing on the expression of fluorescent calcium indicator proteins and imaging methods as applied in pluripotent human stem cells. We discuss the potential regulatory pathways involving calcium responses in hPS cells and compare these to the implicated pathways in mouse PS cells. A recent development in the stem cell field is the recognition of so called "naïve" states, resembling the earliest potential forms of stem cells during development, as well as the "fuzzy" stem cells, which may be alternative forms of pluripotent cell types, therefore we also discuss the potential role of calcium homeostasis in these PS cell types. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Polyamine regulates tolerance to water stress in leaves of white clover associated with antioxidant defense and dehydrin genes via involvement in calcium messenger system and hydrogen peroxide signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou eLi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous polyamine (PA may play a critical role in tolerance to water stress in plants acting as a signaling molecule activator. Water stress caused increases in endogenous PA content in leaves, including putrescine (Put, spermidine (Spd, and spermine (Spm. Exogenous application of Spd could induce the instantaneous H2O2 burst and accumulation of cytosolic free Ca2+, and activate NADPH oxidase and CDPK gene expression in cells. To a great extent, PA biosynthetic inhibitor reduced the water stress-induced H2O2 accumulation, free cytosolic Ca2+ release, antioxidant enzyme activities and genes expression leading to aggravate water stress-induced oxidative damage, while these suppressing effects were alleviated by the addition of exogenous Spd, indicating PA was involved in water stress-induced H2O2 and cytosolic free Ca2+ production as well as stress tolerance. Dehydrin genes (Y2SK, Y2K, and SK2 were showed to be highly responsive to exogenous Spd. PA-induced antioxidant defense and dehydrin genes expression could be blocked by the scavenger of H2O2 and the inhibitors of H2O2 generation or Ca2+ channels blockers, a calmodulin antagonist, as well as the inhibitor of CDPK. These findings suggested that PA regulated tolerance to water stress in white clover associated with antioxidant defenses and dehydrins via involvement in the calcium messenger system and H2O2 signaling pathways. PA-induced H2O2 production required Ca2+ release, while PA-induced Ca2+ release was also essential for H2O2 production, suggesting an interaction between PA-induced H2O2 and Ca2+ signaling.

  19. Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase is Involved in the Release of High Mobility Group Box 1 Via the Interferon-β Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lijuan; Kim, Seon-Ju

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we have reported that high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a proinflammatory mediator in sepsis, is released via the IFN-β-mediated JAK/STAT pathway. However, detailed mechanisms are still unclear. In this study, we dissected upstream signaling pathways of HMGB1 release using various molecular biology methods. Here, we found that calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaM kinase, CaMK) is involved in HMGB1 release by regulating IFN-β production. CaMK inhibitor, STO609, treatment inhibits LPS-induced IFN-β production, which is correlated with the phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). Additionally, we show that CaMK-I plays a major role in IFN-β production although other CaMK members also seem to contribute to this event. Furthermore, the CaMK inhibitor treatment reduced IFN-β production in a murine endotoxemia. Our results suggest CaMKs contribute to HMGB1 release by enhancing IFN-β production in sepsis. PMID:23091438

  20. Altered calcium signaling in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Teneale A; Yapa, Kunsala T D S; Monteith, Gregory R

    2015-10-01

    It is the nature of the calcium signal, as determined by the coordinated activity of a suite of calcium channels, pumps, exchangers and binding proteins that ultimately guides a cell's fate. Deregulation of the calcium signal is often deleterious and has been linked to each of the 'cancer hallmarks'. Despite this, we do not yet have a full understanding of the remodeling of the calcium signal associated with cancer. Such an understanding could aid in guiding the development of therapies specifically targeting altered calcium signaling in cancer cells during tumorigenic progression. Findings from some of the studies that have assessed the remodeling of the calcium signal associated with tumorigenesis and/or processes important in invasion and metastasis are presented in this review. The potential of new methodologies is also discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Calcium signalling: fishing out molecules of mitochondrial calcium transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajnóczky, György; Csordás, György

    2010-10-26

    Cellular energy metabolism, survival and death are controlled by mitochondrial calcium signals originating in the cytoplasm. Now, RNAi studies link three proteins - MICU1, NCLX and LETM1 - to the previously unknown molecular mechanism of mitochondrial calcium transport. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Extracellular ATP Induces Calcium Signaling in Odontoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B M; Jo, H; Park, G; Kim, Y H; Park, C K; Jung, S J; Chung, G; Oh, S B

    2017-02-01

    Odontoblasts form dentin at the outermost surface of tooth pulp. An increasing level of evidence in recent years, along with their locational advantage, implicates odontoblasts as a secondary role as sensory or immune cells. Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a well-characterized signaling molecule in the neuronal and immune systems, and its potential involvement in interodontoblast communications was recently demonstrated. In an effort to elaborate the ATP-mediated signaling pathway in odontoblasts, the current study performed single-cell reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunofluorescent detection to investigate the expression of ATP receptors related to calcium signal in odontoblasts from incisal teeth of 8- to 10-wk-old rats, and demonstrated an in vitro response to ATP application via calcium imaging experiments. While whole tissue RT-PCR analysis detected P2Y2, P2Y4, and all 7 subtypes (P2X1 to P2X7) in tooth pulp, single-cell RT-PCR analysis of acutely isolated rat odontoblasts revealed P2Y2, P2Y4, P2X2, P2X4, P2X6, and P2X7 expression in only a subset (23% to 47%) of cells tested, with no evidence for P2X1, P2X3, and P2X5 expression. An increase of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in response to 100μM ATP, which was repeated after pretreatment of thapsigargin or under the Ca(2+)-free condition, suggested function of both ionotropic and metabotropic ATP receptors in odontoblasts. The enhancement of ATP-induced calcium response by ivermectin and inhibition by 5-(3-bromophenyl)-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzofuro[3,2-e]-1,4-diazepin-2-one (5-BDBD) confirmed a functional P2X4 subtype in odontoblasts. Positive calcium response to 2',3'-O-(benzoyl-4-benzoyl)-ATP (BzATP) and negative response to α,β-methylene ATP suggested P2X2, P2X4, and P2X7 as functional subunits in rat odontoblasts. Single-cell RT-PCR analysis of the cells with confirmed calcium response and immunofluorescent detection further corroborated the expression of P2X

  3. Calcium Signaling Is Required for Erythroid Enucleation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina B Wölwer

    Full Text Available Although erythroid enucleation, the property of erythroblasts to expel their nucleus, has been known for 7ore than a century, surprisingly little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms governing this unique developmental process. Here we show that similar to cytokinesis, nuclear extrusion requires intracellular calcium signaling and signal transduction through the calmodulin (CaM pathway. However, in contrast to cytokinesis we found that orthochromatic erythroblasts require uptake of extracellular calcium to enucleate. Together these functional studies highlight a critical role for calcium signaling in the regulation of erythroid enucleation.

  4. Calcium Signaling and Cardiac Arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landstrom, Andrew P; Dobrev, Dobromir; Wehrens, Xander H T

    2017-06-09

    There has been a significant progress in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which calcium (Ca2+) ions mediate various types of cardiac arrhythmias. A growing list of inherited gene defects can cause potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmia syndromes, including catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, congenital long QT syndrome, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. In addition, acquired deficits of multiple Ca2+-handling proteins can contribute to the pathogenesis of arrhythmias in patients with various types of heart disease. In this review article, we will first review the key role of Ca2+ in normal cardiac function-in particular, excitation-contraction coupling and normal electric rhythms. The functional involvement of Ca2+ in distinct arrhythmia mechanisms will be discussed, followed by various inherited arrhythmia syndromes caused by mutations in Ca2+-handling proteins. Finally, we will discuss how changes in the expression of regulation of Ca2+ channels and transporters can cause acquired arrhythmias, and how these mechanisms might be targeted for therapeutic purposes. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. P12 - PTHC1: A Continuing Cell Line Expressing PTH and Genes Involved in Calcium Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Fabbri, S.; Mazzotta, C.; Ciuffi, S; Mavilia, C.; Galli, G.; Zonefrati, R.; Strigoli, D.; Cavalli, L.; Cavalli, T; Brandi, M.L.

    2010-01-01

    The main organs regulating serum levels of ionised calcium (Ca2+) are the parathyroids, which are composed of two different cell types: chief cells and oxyphil cells. Chief cells, through the calcium sensing receptor (CaSR), are affected by changes in calcium concentration, modifying PTH secretion in proportion to calcium levels. Current understanding of calcium regulation mechanisms connected to PTH and of the signalling pathways involved derive from in vitro studies carried out on primary c...

  6. Calcium Signaling and Meiotic Exit at Fertilization in Xenopus Egg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokmakov, Alexander A.; Stefanov, Vasily E.; Iwasaki, Tetsushi; Sato, Ken-Ichi; Fukami, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    Calcium is a universal messenger that mediates egg activation at fertilization in all sexually reproducing species studied. However, signaling pathways leading to calcium generation and the mechanisms of calcium-induced exit from meiotic arrest vary substantially among species. Here, we review the pathways of calcium signaling and the mechanisms of meiotic exit at fertilization in the eggs of the established developmental model, African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis. We also discuss calcium involvement in the early fertilization-induced events in Xenopus egg, such as membrane depolarization, the increase in intracellular pH, cortical granule exocytosis, cortical contraction, contraction wave, cortical rotation, reformation of the nuclear envelope, sperm chromatin decondensation and sister chromatid segregation. PMID:25322156

  7. Short-range intercellular calcium signaling in bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas Rye

    2005-01-01

    into biological effects in bone. Intercellular calcium waves are increases in intracellular calcium concentration in single cells, subsequently propagating to adjacent cells, and can be a possible mechanism for the coupling of bone formation to bone resorption. The aim of the present studies was to investigate...... whether bone cells are capable of communicating via intercellular calcium signals, and determine by which mechanisms the cells propagate the signals. First, we found that osteoblastic cells can propagate intercellular calcium transients upon mechanical stimulation, and that there are two principally...... different mechanisms for this propagation. One mechanism involves the secretion of a nucleotide, possibly ATP, acting in an autocrine action to purinergic P2Y2 receptors on the neighboring cells, leading to intracellular IP3 generation and subsequent release of calcium from intracellular stores. The other...

  8. Calcium signalling silencing in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiser, Maura

    2017-06-15

    Subcellular calcium signalling silencing is a novel and distinct cellular and molecular adaptive response to rapid cardiac activation. Calcium signalling silencing develops during short-term sustained rapid atrial activation as seen clinically during paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). It is the first 'anti-arrhythmic' adaptive response in the setting of AF and appears to counteract the maladaptive changes that lead to intracellular Ca(2+) signalling instability and Ca(2+) -based arrhythmogenicity. Calcium signalling silencing results in a failed propagation of the [Ca(2+) ]i signal to the myocyte centre both in patients with AF and in a rabbit model. This adaptive mechanism leads to a substantial reduction in the expression levels of calcium release channels (ryanodine receptors, RyR2) in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and the frequency of Ca(2+) sparks and arrhythmogenic Ca(2+) waves remains low. Less Ca(2+) release per [Ca(2+) ]i transient, increased fast Ca(2+) buffering strength, shortened action potentials and reduced L-type Ca(2+) current contribute to a substantial reduction of intracellular [Na(+) ]. These features of Ca(2+) signalling silencing are distinct and in contrast to the changes attributed to Ca(2+) -based arrhythmogenicity. Some features of Ca(2+) signalling silencing prevail in human AF suggesting that the Ca(2+) signalling 'phenotype' in AF is a sum of Ca(2+) stabilizing (Ca(2+) signalling silencing) and Ca(2+) destabilizing (arrhythmogenic unstable Ca(2+) signalling) factors. Calcium signalling silencing is a part of the mechanisms that contribute to the natural progression of AF and may limit the role of Ca(2+) -based arrhythmogenicity after the onset of AF. © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  9. Calcium wave signaling in cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    PARKASH, JAI; ASOTRA, KAMLESH

    2010-01-01

    Ca2+ functions as an important signaling messenger right from beginning of the life to final moment of the end of the life. Ca2+ is needed at several steps of the cell cycle such as early G1, at the G1/S, and G2/M transitions. The Ca2+ signals in the form of time-dependent changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations, [Ca2+]i, are presented as brief spikes organized into regenerative Ca2+ waves. Ca2+-mediated signaling pathways have also been shown to play important roles in carcinogenesis such as transformation of normal cells to cancerous cells, tumor formation and growth, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis. Since the global Ca2+ oscillations arise from Ca2+ waves initiated locally, it results in stochastic oscillations because although each cell has many IP3Rs and Ca2+ ions, the law of large numbers does not apply to the initiating event which is restricted to very few IP3Rs due to steep Ca2+ concentration gradients. The specific Ca2+ signaling information is likely to be encoded in a calcium code as the amplitude, duration, frequency, waveform or timing of Ca2+ oscillations and decoded again at a later stage. Since Ca2+ channels or pumps involved in regulating Ca2+ signaling pathways show altered expression in cancer, one can target these Ca2+ channels and pumps as therapeutic options to decrease proliferation of cancer cells and to promote their apoptosis. These studies can provide novel insights into alterations in Ca2+ wave patterns in carcinogenesis and lead to development of newer technologies based on Ca2+ waves for the diagnosis and therapy of cancer. PMID:20875431

  10. Short-range intercellular calcium signaling in bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas Rye

    2005-01-01

    mechanism involves the passage of a small messenger through gap junctions to the cytoplasm of the neighboring cells, inducing depolarization of the plasma membrane with subsequent opening of membrane bound voltage-operated calcium channels. Next, we found that osteoblasts can propagate these signals...

  11. Calcium signaling in plant cells in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordyum, E.

    Changes in the intracellular Ca 2 + concentration in altered gravity (microgravity and clinostating) evidence that Ca2 + signaling can play a fundamental role in biological effects of microgravity. Calcium as a second messenger is known to play a crucial role in stimulus - response coupling for many plant cellular signaling pathways. Its messenger functions are realized by transient changes in the cytosolic ion concentration induced by a variety of internal and external stimuli such as light, hormones, temperature, anoxia, salinity, and gravity. Although the first data on the changes in the calcium balance in plant cells under the influence of altered gravity have appeared in eighties, a review highlighting the performed research and the possible significance of such Ca 2 + changes in the structural and metabolic rearrangements of plant cells in altered gravity is still lacking. In this paper, an attempt was made to summarize the available experimental results and to consider some hypotheses in this field of research. It is proposed to distinguish between cell gravisensing and cell graviperception; the former is related to cell structure and metabolism stability in the gravitational field and their changes in microgravity (cells not specialized to gravity perception), the latter is related to active use of a gravitational stimulus by cells presumably specialized to gravity perception for realization of normal space orientation, growth, and vital activity (gravitropism, gravitaxis) in plants. The main experimental data concerning both redistribution of free Ca 2 + ions in plant cell organelles and the cell wall, and an increase in the intracellular Ca 2+ concentration under the influence of altered gravity are presented. Based on the gravitational decompensation hypothesis, the consequence of events occurring in gravis ensing cells not specialized to gravity perception under altered gravity are considered in the following order: changes in the cytoplasmic membrane

  12. Calcium Signals from the Vacuole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Schönknecht

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The vacuole is by far the largest intracellular Ca2+ store in most plant cells. Here, the current knowledge about the molecular mechanisms of vacuolar Ca2+ release and Ca2+ uptake is summarized, and how different vacuolar Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ pumps may contribute to Ca2+ signaling in plant cells is discussed. To provide a phylogenetic perspective, the distribution of potential vacuolar Ca2+ transporters is compared for different clades of photosynthetic eukaryotes. There are several candidates for vacuolar Ca2+ channels that could elicit cytosolic [Ca2+] transients. Typical second messengers, such as InsP3 and cADPR, seem to trigger vacuolar Ca2+ release, but the molecular mechanism of this Ca2+ release still awaits elucidation. Some vacuolar Ca2+ channels have been identified on a molecular level, the voltage-dependent SV/TPC1 channel, and recently two cyclic-nucleotide-gated cation channels. However, their function in Ca2+ signaling still has to be demonstrated. Ca2+ pumps in addition to establishing long-term Ca2+ homeostasis can shape cytosolic [Ca2+] transients by limiting their amplitude and duration, and may thus affect Ca2+ signaling.

  13. CBL-CIPK network for calcium signaling in higher plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Sheng

    Plants sense their environment by signaling mechanisms involving calcium. Calcium signals are encoded by a complex set of parameters and decoded by a large number of proteins including the more recently discovered CBL-CIPK network. The calcium-binding CBL proteins specifi-cally interact with a family of protein kinases CIPKs and regulate the activity and subcellular localization of these kinases, leading to the modification of kinase substrates. This represents a paradigm shift as compared to a calcium signaling mechanism from yeast and animals. One example of CBL-CIPK signaling pathways is the low-potassium response of Arabidopsis roots. When grown in low-K medium, plants develop stronger K-uptake capacity adapting to the low-K condition. Recent studies show that the increased K-uptake is caused by activation of a specific K-channel by the CBL-CIPK network. A working model for this regulatory pathway will be discussed in the context of calcium coding and decoding processes.

  14. Decoding calcium signaling across the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, André G; Guimarães, Erika S; Andrade, Lídia M; Menezes, Gustavo B; Fatima Leite, M

    2014-09-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) is an important multifaceted second messenger that regulates a wide range of cellular events. A Ca(2+)-signaling toolkit has been shown to exist in the nucleus and to be capable of generating and modulating nucleoplasmic Ca(2+) transients. Within the nucleus, Ca(2+) controls cellular events that are different from those modulated by cytosolic Ca(2+). This review focuses on nuclear Ca(2+) signals and their role in regulating physiological and pathological processes. ©2014 Int. Union Physiol. Sci./Am. Physiol. Soc.

  15. Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinases in Phytohormone Signaling Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Wuwu Xu; Wenchao Huang

    2017-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CPKs/CDPKs) are Ca2+-sensors that decode Ca2+ signals into specific physiological responses. Research has reported that CDPKs constitute a large multigene family in various plant species, and play diverse roles in plant growth, development, and stress responses. Although numerous CDPKs have been exhaustively studied, and many of them have been found to be involved in plant hormone biosynthesis and response mechanisms, a comprehensive overview of the manner i...

  16. Localization of calcium signals by a mobile calcium buffer in frog saccular hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, W M

    1994-05-01

    A recent study (Roberts, 1993) of saccular hair cells from grass frogs (Rana pipiens) has suggested a mechanism by which the unusually high concentrations of calcium-binding proteins found in certain sensory receptors and neurons, particularly in the auditory system, can influence short-range intracellular calcium signaling. In frog saccular hair cells, the mechanism operates within arrays of calcium channels and calcium-activated potassium channels that are involved in the cells' electrical resonance and synaptic transmission. The present study tests the hypothesis that calbindin-D28k, one of the most abundant proteins in these cells, can serve as a mobile calcium buffer that reduces and localizes changes in the intracellular free-calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) by shuttling calcium away from the channel arrays. Based upon theoretical analysis and computer modeling, it is shown that [Ca2+]i near one or more open channels quickly reaches a steady-state level determined primarily by two properties of the buffer, the mean time (tau c) before it captures a free-calcium ion and a replenishment factor (R), which are related to the buffer's diffusional mobility (DBu), association rate constant (kon), and concentration (Bo) by tau c = (konB0)-1 and R = B0DBu. Simulation of calcium entry through a channel array showed that approximately 1.5 mM of a molecule with the diffusional and binding properties expected for calbindin-D28k (Bo approximately 8 mM calcium-binding sites) is needed to reproduce the previous experimental results. A lower concentration (B0 = 2 mM) was almost completely depleted within the channel array by a modest calcium current (8 pA = 12% of calcium channels open), but still had two important effects: it caused [Ca2+]i to fall steeply with distance outside the array (space constant < 50 nm), and returned [Ca2+]i quickly to the resting level after the channels closed. A high concentration of calbindin-D28k can thus influence the cell's electrical

  17. Calcium signaling in synapse-to-nucleus communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenston, Anna M; Bading, Hilmar

    2011-11-01

    Changes in the intracellular concentration of calcium ions in neurons are involved in neurite growth, development, and remodeling, regulation of neuronal excitability, increases and decreases in the strength of synaptic connections, and the activation of survival and programmed cell death pathways. An important aspect of the signals that trigger these processes is that they are frequently initiated in the form of glutamatergic neurotransmission within dendritic trees, while their completion involves specific changes in the patterns of genes expressed within neuronal nuclei. Accordingly, two prominent aims of research concerned with calcium signaling in neurons are determination of the mechanisms governing information conveyance between synapse and nucleus, and discovery of the rules dictating translation of specific patterns of inputs into appropriate and specific transcriptional responses. In this article, we present an overview of the avenues by which glutamatergic excitation of dendrites may be communicated to the neuronal nucleus and the primary calcium-dependent signaling pathways by which synaptic activity can invoke changes in neuronal gene expression programs.

  18. The spatial pattern of atrial cardiomyocyte calcium signalling modulates contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Lauren; Roderick, H Llewelyn; Berridge, Michael J; Conway, Stuart J; Bootman, Martin D

    2004-12-15

    We examined the regulation of calcium signalling in atrial cardiomyocytes during excitation-contraction coupling, and how changes in the distribution of calcium impacts on contractility. Under control conditions, calcium transients originated in subsarcolemmal locations and showed local regeneration through activation of calcium-induced calcium release from ryanodine receptors. Despite functional ryanodine receptors being expressed at regular (approximately 2 microm) intervals throughout atrial myocytes, the subsarcolemmal calcium signal did not spread in a fully regenerative manner through the interior of a cell. Rather, there was a diminishing centripetal propagation of calcium. The lack of regeneration was due to mitochondria and SERCA pumps preventing the inward movement of calcium. Inhibiting these calcium buffering mechanisms allowed the globalisation of action potential-evoked responses. In addition, physiological positive inotropic agents, such as endothelin-1 and beta-adrenergic agonists, as well as enhanced calcium current, calcium store loading and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate infusion also led to regenerative global responses. The consequence of globalising calcium signals was a significant increase in cellular contraction. These data indicate how calcium signals and their consequences are determined by the interplay of multiple subcellular calcium management systems.

  19. Calcium sensing receptor signalling in physiology and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Sarah C; Thiem, Ursula; Roth, Susanne; Aggarwal, Abhishek; Fetahu, Irfete Sh; Tennakoon, Samawansha; Gomes, Ana Rita; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Bruggeman, Frank; Mentaverri, Romuald; Riccardi, Daniela; Kallay, Enikö

    2013-07-01

    The calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) is a class C G-protein-coupled receptor that is crucial for the feedback regulation of extracellular free ionised calcium homeostasis. While extracellular calcium (Ca(2+)o) is considered the primary physiological ligand, the CaSR is activated physiologically by a plethora of molecules including polyamines and l-amino acids. Activation of the CaSR by different ligands has the ability to stabilise unique conformations of the receptor, which may lead to preferential coupling of different G proteins; a phenomenon termed 'ligand-biased signalling'. While mutations of the CaSR are currently not linked with any malignancies, altered CaSR expression and function are associated with cancer progression. Interestingly, the CaSR appears to act both as a tumour suppressor and an oncogene, depending on the pathophysiology involved. Reduced expression of the CaSR occurs in both parathyroid and colon cancers, leading to loss of the growth suppressing effect of high Ca(2+)o. On the other hand, activation of the CaSR might facilitate metastasis to bone in breast and prostate cancer. A deeper understanding of the mechanisms driving CaSR signalling in different tissues, aided by a systems biology approach, will be instrumental in developing novel drugs that target the CaSR or its ligands in cancer. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 12th European Symposium on Calcium. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The effect of pulsed electric fields on the electrotactic migration of human neural progenitor cells through the involvement of intracellular calcium signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Hisamitsu; Edin, Fredrik; Li, Hao; Liu, Wei; Rask-Andersen, Helge

    2016-12-01

    Endogenous electric fields (EFs) are required for the physiological control of the central nervous system development. Application of the direct current EFs to neural stem cells has been studied for the possibility of stem cell transplantation as one of the therapies for brain injury. EFs generated within the nervous system are often associated with action potentials and synaptic activity, apparently resulting in a pulsed current in nature. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of pulsed EF, which can reduce the cytotoxicity, on the migration of human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs). We applied the mono-directional pulsed EF with a strength of 250mV/mm to hNPCs for 6h. The migration distance of the hNPCs exposed to pulsed EF was significantly greater compared with the control not exposed to the EF. Pulsed EFs, however, had less of an effect on the migration of the differentiated hNPCs. There was no significant change in the survival of hNPCs after exposure to the pulsed EF. To investigate the role of Ca 2+ signaling in electrotactic migration of hNPCs, pharmacological inhibition of Ca 2+ channels in the EF-exposed cells revealed that the electrotactic migration of hNPCs exposed to Ca 2+ channel blockers was significantly lower compared to the control group. The findings suggest that the pulsed EF induced migration of hNPCs is partly influenced by intracellular Ca 2+ signaling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Can calcium signaling be harnessed for cancer immunotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooke, Ronald

    2014-10-01

    Experimental evidence shows the importance of the immune system in controlling tumor appearance and growth. Immunotherapy is defined as the treatment of a disease by inducing, enhancing or suppressing an immune response. In the context of cancer treatment, it involves breaking tolerance to a cancer-specific self-antigen and/or enhancing the existing anti-tumor immune response, be it specific or not. Part of the complexity in developing such treatment is that cancers are selected to escape adaptive or innate immune responses. These escape mechanisms are numerous and they may cumulate in one cancer. Moreover, different cancers of a same type may present different combinations of escape mechanisms. The limited success of immunotherapeutics in the clinic as stand-alone products may in part be explained by the fact that most of them only activate one facet of the immune response. It is important to identify novel methods to broaden the efficacy of immunotherapeutics. Calcium signaling is central to numerous cellular processes, leading to immune responses, cancer growth and apoptosis induced by cancer treatments. Calcium signaling in cancer therapy and control will be integrated to current cancer immunotherapy approaches. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium Signaling in Health and Disease. Guest Editors: Geert Bultynck, Jacques Haiech, Claus W. Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, and Marc Moreau. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Astrocyte calcium signalling orchestrates neuronal synchronization in organotypic hippocampal slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Takuya; Ishikawa, Tomoe; Abe, Reimi; Nakayama, Ryota; Asada, Akiko; Matsuki, Norio; Ikegaya, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes are thought to detect neuronal activity in the form of intracellular calcium elevations; thereby, astrocytes can regulate neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission. Little is known, however, about how the astrocyte calcium signal regulates the activity of neuronal populations. In this study, we addressed this issue using functional multineuron calcium imaging in hippocampal slice cultures. Under normal conditions, CA3 neuronal networks exhibited temporally correlated activity patterns, occasionally generating large synchronization among a subset of cells. The synchronized neuronal activity was correlated with astrocyte calcium events. Calcium buffering by an intracellular injection of a calcium chelator into multiple astrocytes reduced the synaptic strength of unitary transmission between pairs of surrounding pyramidal cells and caused desynchronization of the neuronal networks. Uncaging the calcium in the astrocytes increased the frequency of neuronal synchronization. These data suggest an essential role of the astrocyte calcium signal in the maintenance of basal neuronal function at the circuit level. PMID:24710057

  3. Calcium signals and oocyte maturation in marine invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguchi, Ryusaku; Takeda, Noriyo; Stricker, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    In various oocytes and eggs of animals, transient elevations in cytoplasmic calcium ion concentrations are known to regulate key processes during fertilization and the completion of meiosis. However, whether or not calcium transients also help to reinitiate meiotic progression at the onset of oocyte maturation remains controversial. This article summarizes reports of calcium signals playing essential roles during maturation onset (=germinal vesicle breakdown, GVBD) in several kinds of marine invertebrate oocytes. Conversely, other data from the literature, as well as previously unpublished findings for jellyfish oocytes, fail to support the view that calcium signals are required for GVBD. In addition to assessing the effects of calcium transients on GVBD in marine invertebrate oocytes, the ability of maturing oocytes to enhance their calcium-releasing capabilities after GVBD is also reviewed. Furthermore, possible explanations are proposed for the contradictory results that have been obtained regarding calcium signals during oocyte maturation in marine invertebrates.

  4. Store-operated calcium entry is essential for glial calcium signalling in CNS white matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, M; Lewis, A; Butt, A M

    2017-02-28

    'Calcium signalling' is the ubiquitous response of glial cells to multiple extracellular stimuli. The primary mechanism of glial calcium signalling is by release of calcium from intracellular stores of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Replenishment of ER Ca(2+) stores relies on store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). However, despite the importance of calcium signalling in glial cells, little is known about their mechanisms of SOCE. Here, we investigated SOCE in glia of the mouse optic nerve, a typical CNS white matter tract that comprises bundles of myelinated axons and the oligodendrocytes and astrocytes that support them. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we identified Orai1 channels, both Stim1 and Stim2, and the transient receptor potential M3 channel (TRPM3) as the primary channels for SOCE in the optic nerve, and their expression in both astrocytes and oligodendrocytes was demonstrated by immunolabelling of optic nerve sections and cultures. The functional importance of SOCE was demonstrated by fluo-4 calcium imaging on isolated intact optic nerves and optic nerve cultures. Removal of extracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]o) resulted in a marked depletion of glial cytosolic calcium ([Ca(2+)]i), which recovered rapidly on restoration of [Ca(2+)]o via SOCE. 2-aminoethoxydiphenylborane (2APB) significantly decreased SOCE and severely attenuated ATP-mediated calcium signalling. The results provide evidence that Orai/Stim and TRPM3 are important components of the 'calcium toolkit' that underpins SOCE and the sustainability of calcium signalling in white matter glia.

  5. Induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in breast cancer cells is calcium signal dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, F M; Azimi, I; Faville, R A; Peters, A A; Jalink, K; Putney, J W; Goodhill, G J; Thompson, E W; Roberts-Thomson, S J; Monteith, G R

    2014-05-01

    Signals from the tumor microenvironment trigger cancer cells to adopt an invasive phenotype through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Relatively little is known regarding key signal transduction pathways that serve as cytosolic bridges between cell surface receptors and nuclear transcription factors to induce EMT. A better understanding of these early EMT events may identify potential targets for the control of metastasis. One rapid intracellular signaling pathway that has not yet been explored during EMT induction is calcium. Here we show that stimuli used to induce EMT produce a transient increase in cytosolic calcium levels in human breast cancer cells. Attenuation of the calcium signal by intracellular calcium chelation significantly reduced epidermal growth factor (EGF)- and hypoxia-induced EMT. Intracellular calcium chelation also inhibited EGF-induced activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), while preserving other signal transduction pathways such as Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation. To identify calcium-permeable channels that may regulate EMT induction in breast cancer cells, we performed a targeted siRNA-based screen. We found that transient receptor potential-melastatin-like 7 (TRPM7) channel expression regulated EGF-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and expression of the EMT marker vimentin. Although intracellular calcium chelation almost completely blocked the induction of many EMT markers, including vimentin, Twist and N-cadherin, the effect of TRPM7 silencing was specific for vimentin protein expression and STAT3 phosphorylation. These results indicate that TRPM7 is a partial regulator of EMT in breast cancer cells, and that other calcium-permeable ion channels are also involved in calcium-dependent EMT induction. In summary, this work establishes an important role for the intracellular calcium signal in the induction of EMT in human breast cancer cells. Manipulation of

  6. Calcium signatures and signaling events orchestrate plant-microbe interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Peiguo; Jauregui, Edgard; Du, Liqun; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Poovaiah, B W

    2017-08-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) acts as an essential second messenger connecting the perception of microbe signals to the establishment of appropriate immune and symbiotic responses in plants. Accumulating evidence suggests that plants distinguish different microorganisms through plasma membrane-localized pattern recognition receptors. The particular recognition events are encoded into Ca2+ signatures, which are sensed by diverse intracellular Ca2+ binding proteins. The Ca2+ signatures are eventually decoded to distinct downstream responses through transcriptional reprogramming of the defense or symbiosis-related genes. Recent observations further reveal that Ca2+-mediated signaling is also involved in negative regulation of plant immunity. This review is intended as an overview of Ca2+ signaling during immunity and symbiosis, including Ca2+ responses in the nucleus and cytosol. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Calcium signals can freely cross the nuclear envelope in hippocampal neurons: somatic calcium increases generate nuclear calcium transients

    OpenAIRE

    Eder, Anja; Bading, Hilmar

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background In hippocampal neurons, nuclear calcium signaling is important for learning- and neuronal survival-associated gene expression. However, it is unknown whether calcium signals generated by neuronal activity at the cell membrane and propagated to the soma can unrestrictedly cross the nuclear envelope to invade the nucleus. The nuclear envelope, which allows ion transit via the nuclear pore complex, may represent a barrier for calcium and has been suggested to insulate the nuc...

  8. Modularized study of human calcium signalling pathway

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    When there is an extracellular change, cells get the message either by introduction of calcium ions into ... as it precipitates phosphate, the established energy currency of cells. Prolonged high intracellular calcium ... trigger proteins upon binding with free calcium ion(s) change their confirmation to modulate enzymes and ion ...

  9. Insulin induces calcium signals in the nucleus of rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Michele A; Gomes, Dawidson A; Andrade, Viviane A; Leite, M Fatima; Nathanson, Michael H

    2008-11-01

    Insulin is an hepatic mitogen that promotes liver regeneration. Actions of insulin are mediated by the insulin receptor, which is a receptor tyrosine kinase. It is currently thought that signaling via the insulin receptor occurs at the plasma membrane, where it binds to insulin. Here we report that insulin induces calcium oscillations in isolated rat hepatocytes, and that these calcium signals depend upon activation of phospholipase C and the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, but not upon extracellular calcium. Furthermore, insulin-induced calcium signals occur in the nucleus, and are temporally associated with selective depletion of nuclear phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate and translocation of the insulin receptor to the nucleus. These findings suggest that the insulin receptor translocates to the nucleus to initiate nuclear, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-mediated calcium signals in rat hepatocytes. This novel signaling mechanism may be responsible for insulin's effects on liver growth and regeneration.

  10. When Neurons Encounter Nanoobjects: Spotlight on Calcium Signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Lovisolo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nanosized objects are increasingly present in everyday life and in specialized technological applications. In recent years, as a consequence of concern about their potential adverse effects, intense research effort has led to a better understanding of the physicochemical properties that underlie their biocompatibility or potential toxicity, setting the basis for a rational approach to their use in the different fields of application. Among the functional parameters that can be perturbed by interaction between nanoparticles (NPs and living structures, calcium homeostasis is one of the key players and has been actively investigated. One of the most relevant biological targets is represented by the nervous system (NS, since it has been shown that these objects can access the NS through several pathways; moreover, engineered nanoparticles are increasingly developed to be used for imaging and drug delivery in the NS. In neurons, calcium homeostasis is tightly regulated through a complex set of mechanisms controlling both calcium increases and recovery to the basal levels, and even minor perturbations can have severe consequences on neuronal viability and function, such as excitability and synaptic transmission. In this review, we will focus on the available knowledge about the effects of NPs on the mechanisms controlling calcium signalling and homeostasis in neurons. We have taken into account the data related to environmental NPs, and, in more detail, studies employing engineered NPs, since their more strictly controlled chemical and physical properties allow a better understanding of the relevant parameters that determine the biological responses they elicit. The literature on this specific subject is all quite recent, and we have based the review on the data present in papers dealing strictly with nanoparticles and calcium signals in neuronal cells; while they presently amount to about 20 papers, and no related review is available, the field is

  11. Calcium signals can freely cross the nuclear envelope in hippocampal neurons: somatic calcium increases generate nuclear calcium transients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bading Hilmar

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In hippocampal neurons, nuclear calcium signaling is important for learning- and neuronal survival-associated gene expression. However, it is unknown whether calcium signals generated by neuronal activity at the cell membrane and propagated to the soma can unrestrictedly cross the nuclear envelope to invade the nucleus. The nuclear envelope, which allows ion transit via the nuclear pore complex, may represent a barrier for calcium and has been suggested to insulate the nucleus from activity-induced cytoplasmic calcium transients in some cell types. Results Using laser-assisted uncaging of caged calcium compounds in defined sub-cellular domains, we show here that the nuclear compartment border does not represent a barrier for calcium signals in hippocampal neurons. Although passive diffusion of molecules between the cytosol and the nucleoplasm may be modulated through changes in conformational state of the nuclear pore complex, we found no evidence for a gating mechanism for calcium movement across the nuclear border. Conclusion Thus, the nuclear envelope does not spatially restrict calcium transients to the somatic cytosol but allows calcium signals to freely enter the cell nucleus to trigger genomic events.

  12. Calcium signals can freely cross the nuclear envelope in hippocampal neurons: somatic calcium increases generate nuclear calcium transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Anja; Bading, Hilmar

    2007-01-01

    Background In hippocampal neurons, nuclear calcium signaling is important for learning- and neuronal survival-associated gene expression. However, it is unknown whether calcium signals generated by neuronal activity at the cell membrane and propagated to the soma can unrestrictedly cross the nuclear envelope to invade the nucleus. The nuclear envelope, which allows ion transit via the nuclear pore complex, may represent a barrier for calcium and has been suggested to insulate the nucleus from activity-induced cytoplasmic calcium transients in some cell types. Results Using laser-assisted uncaging of caged calcium compounds in defined sub-cellular domains, we show here that the nuclear compartment border does not represent a barrier for calcium signals in hippocampal neurons. Although passive diffusion of molecules between the cytosol and the nucleoplasm may be modulated through changes in conformational state of the nuclear pore complex, we found no evidence for a gating mechanism for calcium movement across the nuclear border. Conclusion Thus, the nuclear envelope does not spatially restrict calcium transients to the somatic cytosol but allows calcium signals to freely enter the cell nucleus to trigger genomic events. PMID:17663775

  13. Calcium Signaling in Interstitial Cells: Focus on Telocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Mihaela Radu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we describe the current knowledge on calcium signaling pathways in interstitial cells with a special focus on interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs, interstitial Cajal-like cells (ICLCs, and telocytes. In detail, we present the generation of Ca2+ oscillations, the inositol triphosphate (IP3/Ca2+ signaling pathway and modulation exerted by cytokines and vasoactive agents on calcium signaling in interstitial cells. We discuss the physiology and alterations of calcium signaling in interstitial cells, and in particular in telocytes. We describe the physiological contribution of calcium signaling in interstitial cells to the pacemaking activity (e.g., intestinal, urinary, uterine or vascular pacemaking activity and to the reproductive function. We also present the pathological contribution of calcium signaling in interstitial cells to the aortic valve calcification or intestinal inflammation. Moreover, we summarize the current knowledge of the role played by calcium signaling in telocytes in the uterine, cardiac and urinary physiology, and also in various pathologies, including immune response, uterine and cardiac pathologies.

  14. DMPD: Calcium signaling in lymphocytes. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 8 Jun;20(3):250-8. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Calcium signaling in lymphocytes. PubmedID 18515054 Ti...):250-8. Pathway - PNG File (.png) SVG File (.svg) HTML File (.html) CSML File (.

  15. Role of Calcium Signaling in the Transcriptional Regulation of the Apicoplast Genome of Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabna Cheemadan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium is a universal second messenger that plays an important role in regulatory processes in eukaryotic cells. To understand calcium-dependent signaling in malaria parasites, we analyzed transcriptional responses of Plasmodium falciparum to two calcium ionophores (A23187 and ionomycin that cause redistribution of intracellular calcium within the cytoplasm. While ionomycin induced a specific transcriptional response defined by up- or downregulation of a narrow set of genes, A23187 caused a developmental arrest in the schizont stage. In addition, we observed a dramatic decrease of mRNA levels of the transcripts encoded by the apicoplast genome during the exposure of P. falciparum to both calcium ionophores. Neither of the ionophores caused any disruptions to the DNA replication or the overall apicoplast morphology. This suggests that the mRNA downregulation reflects direct inhibition of the apicoplast gene transcription. Next, we identify a nuclear encoded protein with a calcium binding domain (EF-hand that is localized to the apicoplast. Overexpression of this protein (termed PfACBP1 in P. falciparum cells mediates an increased resistance to the ionophores which suggests its role in calcium-dependent signaling within the apicoplast. Our data indicate that the P. falciparum apicoplast requires calcium-dependent signaling that involves a novel protein PfACBP1.

  16. Homer regulates calcium signalling in growth cone turning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Michael JW

    2009-08-01

    component of the calcium signalling repertoire within motile growth cones, regulating guidance-cue-induced calcium release and maintaining basal cytosolic calcium.

  17. Nuclear Calcium Signaling Induces Expression of the Synaptic Organizers Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayer, Stefanie N.; Bading, Hilmar

    2015-01-01

    Calcium transients in the cell nucleus evoked by synaptic activity in hippocampal neurons function as a signaling end point in synapse-to-nucleus communication. As an important regulator of neuronal gene expression, nuclear calcium is involved in the conversion of synaptic stimuli into functional and structural changes of neurons. Here we identify two synaptic organizers, Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2, as targets of nuclear calcium signaling. Expression of both Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2 increased in a synaptic NMDA receptor- and nuclear calcium-dependent manner in hippocampal neurons within 2–4 h after the induction of action potential bursting. Induction of Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2 occurred independently of the need for new protein synthesis and required calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases and the nuclear calcium signaling target CREB-binding protein. Analysis of reporter gene constructs revealed a functional cAMP response element in the proximal promoter of Lrrtm2, indicating that at least Lrrtm2 is regulated by the classical nuclear Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV-CREB/CREB-binding protein pathway. These results suggest that one mechanism by which nuclear calcium signaling controls neuronal network function is by regulating the expression of Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2. PMID:25527504

  18. Nuclear calcium signaling induces expression of the synaptic organizers Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayer, Stefanie N; Bading, Hilmar

    2015-02-27

    Calcium transients in the cell nucleus evoked by synaptic activity in hippocampal neurons function as a signaling end point in synapse-to-nucleus communication. As an important regulator of neuronal gene expression, nuclear calcium is involved in the conversion of synaptic stimuli into functional and structural changes of neurons. Here we identify two synaptic organizers, Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2, as targets of nuclear calcium signaling. Expression of both Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2 increased in a synaptic NMDA receptor- and nuclear calcium-dependent manner in hippocampal neurons within 2-4 h after the induction of action potential bursting. Induction of Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2 occurred independently of the need for new protein synthesis and required calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases and the nuclear calcium signaling target CREB-binding protein. Analysis of reporter gene constructs revealed a functional cAMP response element in the proximal promoter of Lrrtm2, indicating that at least Lrrtm2 is regulated by the classical nuclear Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV-CREB/CREB-binding protein pathway. These results suggest that one mechanism by which nuclear calcium signaling controls neuronal network function is by regulating the expression of Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria calcium signaling in hepatic metabolic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieusset, Jennifer

    2017-06-01

    The liver plays a central role in glucose homeostasis, and both metabolic inflexibility and insulin resistance predispose to the development of hepatic metabolic diseases. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which play a key role in the control of hepatic metabolism, also interact at contact points defined as mitochondria-associated membranes (MAM), in order to exchange metabolites and calcium (Ca 2+ ) and regulate cellular homeostasis and signaling. Here, we overview the role of the liver in the control of glucose homeostasis, mainly focusing on the independent involvement of mitochondria, ER and Ca 2+ signaling in both healthy and pathological contexts. Then we focus on recent data highlighting MAM as important hubs for hormone and nutrient signaling in the liver, thus adapting mitochondria physiology and cellular metabolism to energy availability. Lastly, we discuss how chronic ER-mitochondria miscommunication could participate to hepatic metabolic diseases, pointing MAM interface as a potential therapeutic target for metabolic disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: ECS Meeting edited by Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs and Jacques Haiech. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Nuclear calcium signalling in the regulation of brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bading, Hilmar

    2013-09-01

    Synaptic activity initiates biochemical processes that have various outcomes, including the formation of memories, increases in neuronal survival and the development of chronic pain and addiction. Virtually all activity-induced, long-lasting adaptations of brain functions require a dialogue between synapses and the nucleus that results in changes in gene expression. Calcium signals that are induced by synaptic activity and propagate into the nucleus are a major route for synapse-to-nucleus communication. Recent findings indicate that diverse forms of neuroadaptation require calcium transients in the nucleus to switch on the necessary genomic programme. Deficits in nuclear calcium signalling as a result of a reduction in synaptic activity or increased extrasynaptic NMDA receptor signalling may underlie the aetiologies of various diseases, including neurodegeneration and cognitive dysfunction.

  1. Microdamage induced calcium efflux from bone matrix activates intracellular calcium signaling in osteoblasts via L-type and T-type voltage-gated calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyungjin; Best, Makenzie; Akkus, Ozan

    2015-07-01

    Mechanisms by which bone microdamage triggers repair response are not completely understood. It has been shown that calcium efflux ([Ca(2+)]E) occurs from regions of bone undergoing microdamage. Such efflux has also been shown to trigger intracellular calcium signaling ([Ca(2+)]I) in MC3T3-E1 cells local to damaged regions. Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are implicated in the entry of [Ca(2+)]E to the cytoplasm. We investigated the involvement of VGCC in the extracellular calcium induced intracellular calcium response (ECIICR). MC3T3-E1 cells were subjected to one dimensional calcium efflux from their basal aspect which results in an increase in [Ca(2+)]I. This increase was concomitant with membrane depolarization and it was significantly reduced in the presence of Bepridil, a non-selective VGCC inhibitor. To identify specific type(s) of VGCC in ECIICR, the cells were treated with selective inhibitors for different types of VGCC. Significant changes in the peak intensity and the number of [Ca(2+)]I oscillations were observed when L-type and T-type specific VGCC inhibitors (Verapamil and NNC55-0396, respectively) were used. So as to confirm the involvement of L- and T-type VGCC in the context of microdamage, cells were seeded on devitalized notched bone specimen, which were loaded to induce microdamage in the presence and absence of Verapamil and NNC55-0396. The results showed significant decrease in [Ca(2+)]I activity of cells in the microdamaged regions of bone when L- and T-type blockers were applied. This study demonstrated that extracellular calcium increase in association with damage depolarizes the cell membrane and the calcium ions enter the cell cytoplasm by L- and T-type VGCCs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Selenium potentiates the anticancer effect of cisplatin against oxidative stress and calcium ion signaling-induced intracellular toxicity in MCF-7 breast cancer cells: involvement of the TRPV1 channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakallı Çetin, Esin; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Çiğ, Bilal; Övey, İshak Suat; Aslan Koşar, Pınar

    2017-02-01

    In breast cancers, calcium signaling is a main cause of proliferation and apoptosis of breast cancer cells. Although previous studies have implicated the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) cation channel, the synergistic inhibition effects of selenium (Se) and cisplatin in cancer and the suppression of ongoing apoptosis have not yet been investigated in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. This study investigates the anticancer properties of Se through TRPV1 channel activity in MCF-7 breast cancer cell line cultures when given alone or in combination with cisplatin. The MCF-7 cells were divided into four groups: the control group, the Se-treated group (200 nM), the cisplatin-treated group (40 μM) and the Se + cisplatin-treated group. The intracellular free calcium ion concentration and current densities increased with TRPV1 channel activator capsaicin (0.01 mM), but they decreased with the TRPV1 blocker capsazepine (0.1 mM), Se, cisplatin, and Se + cisplatin incubations. However, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, apoptosis, and the caspase 3, and caspase 9 values increased in the Se-treated group and the cisplatin-treated group, although Western blot (procaspase 3 and 9) results and the cell viability levels decreased with the Se and Se + cisplatin treatments. Apoptosis and caspase-3 were further increased with the Se + cisplatin treatment. Intracellular reactive oxygen species production increased with the cisplatin treatment, but not with the Se treatment. This study's results report, for the first time, that at a cellular level, Se and cisplatin interact on the same intracellular toxic cascade, and the combination of these two drugs can result in a remarkable anticancer effect through modulation of the TRPV1.

  3. Modularized study of human calcium signalling pathway

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-08-06

    Aug 6, 2007 ... The idea that ``a node whose function is dependant on maximum number of other nodes tends to be the center of a sub network” is used to divide a large signalling network into smaller sub networks. Inclusion of node(s) into sub networks(s) is dependant on the outdegree of the node(s). Here outdegree of ...

  4. Calcium homeostasis and signaling in fungi and their relevance for pathogenicity of yeasts and filamentous fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Tisi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Though fungi show peculiarities in the purposes and specific traits of calcium signaling pathways, the general scheme and the most important players are well conserved if compared to higher eukaryotes. This provides a powerful opportunity either to investigate shared features using yeast as a model or to exploit fungal specificities as potential targets for antifungal therapies. The sequenced genomes from yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa were already published more than ten years ago. More recently the genome sequences of filamentous fungi of Aspergillus genus, some of which threatening pathogens, and dimorphic fungi Ustilago maydis were published, giving the chance to identify several proteins involved in calcium signaling based on their homology to yeast or mammalian counterparts. Nonetheless, unidentified calcium transporters are still present in these organisms which await to be molecularly characterized. Despite the relative simplicity in yeast calcium machinery and the availability of sophisticated molecular tools, in the last years, a number of new actors have been identified, albeit not yet fully characterized. This review will try to describe the state of the art in calcium channels and calcium signaling knowledge in yeast, with particular attention to the relevance of this knowledge with respect to pathological fungi.

  5. Calcium signaling in plant cells in altered gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordyum, E. L.

    2003-10-01

    Changes in the intracellular Ca 2+ concentration in altered gravity (microgravity and clinostating) evidence that Ca 2+ signaling can play a fundamental role in biological effects of microgravity. Calcium as a second messenger is known to play a crucial role in stimulus - response coupling for many plant cellular signaling pathways. Its messenger functions are realized by transient changes in the cytosolic ion concentration induced by a variety of internal and external stimuli such as light, hormones, temperature, anoxia, salinity, and gravity. Although the first data on the changes in the calcium balance in plant cells under the influence of altered gravity have appeared in 80 th, a review highlighting the performed research and the possible significance of such Ca 2+ changes in the structural and metabolic rearrangements of plant cells in altered gravity is still lacking. In this paper, an attempt was made to summarize the available experimental results and to consider some hypotheses in this field of research. It is proposed to distinguish between cell gravisensing and cell graviperception; the former is related to cell structure and metabolism stability in the gravitational field and their changes in microgravity (cells not specialized to gravity perception), the latter is related to active use of a gravitational stimulus by cells presumebly specialized to gravity perception for realization of normal space orientation, growth, and vital activity (gravitropism, gravitaxis) in plants. The main experimental data concerning both redistribution of free Ca 2+ ions in plant cell organelles and the cell wall, and an increase in the intracellular Ca 2+ concentration under the influence of altered gravity are presented. Based on the gravitational decompensation hypothesis, the consequence of events occurring in gravisensing cells not specialized to gravity perception under altered gravity are considered in the following order: changes in the cytoplasmic membrane surface

  6. Role of calcium signaling in epithelial bicarbonate secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jinsei; Lee, Min Goo

    2014-06-01

    Transepithelial bicarbonate secretion plays a key role in the maintenance of fluid and protein secretion from epithelial cells and the protection of the epithelial cell surface from various pathogens. Epithelial bicarbonate secretion is mainly under the control of cAMP and calcium signaling. While the physiological roles and molecular mechanisms of cAMP-induced bicarbonate secretion are relatively well defined, those induced by calcium signaling remain poorly understood in most epithelia. The present review summarizes the current status of knowledge on the role of calcium signaling in epithelial bicarbonate secretion. Specifically, this review introduces how cytosolic calcium signaling can increase bicarbonate secretion by regulating membrane transport proteins and how it synergizes with cAMP-induced mechanisms in epithelial cells. In addition, tissue-specific variations in the pancreas, salivary glands, intestines, bile ducts, and airways are discussed. We hope that the present report will stimulate further research into this important topic. These studies will provide the basis for future medicines for a wide spectrum of epithelial disorders including cystic fibrosis, Sjögren's syndrome, and chronic pancreatitis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cutaneous Penetration-Enhancing Effect of Menthol: Calcium Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Amit; Joshi, Abhay; Patel, Hiren; Ponnoth, Dovenia; Stagni, Grazia

    2017-07-01

    Menthol is a naturally occurring terpene used as a penetration enhancer in topical and transdermal formulations. Literature shows a growing interest in menthol's interactions with the transient receptor potential melastatin 8. A decrease in extracellular Ca 2+ due to the activation of the transient receptor potential melastatin 8 receptor produces inhibition of E-cadherin expression that is responsible for cell-cell adhesion. Because calcium is present in the entire epidermis, the purpose of this study is to evaluate whether the aforementioned properties of menthol are also related to its penetration-enhancing effects. We formulated 16 gels: (i) drug-alone (diphenhydramine or lidocaine), (ii) drug with menthol, (iii) drug, menthol, and calcium channel blocker (CCB; verapamil or diltiazem), and (iv) drug and CCB. In vitro studies showed no effect of the CCB on the release of the drugs either with or without menthol. In vivo experiments were performed for each drug/menthol/CCB combination gel by applying 4 formulations on a shaved rabbit's dorsum on the same day. Dermis concentration profiles were assessed with microdialysis. The gels containing menthol showed higher penetration of drugs than those without whereas the addition of the CCB consistently inhibited the penetration-enhancing effects of menthol. In summary, these findings strongly support the involvement of calcium in the penetration-enhancing effect of menthol. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Thromboxane-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction: involvement of calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrukh, I S; Michael, J R; Summer, W R; Adkinson, N F; Gurtner, G H

    1985-01-01

    Infusion of tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-bu-OOH) or arachidonic acid into rabbit pulmonary arteries stimulated thromboxane B2 (TxB2) production and caused pulmonary vasoconstriction. Both phenomena were blocked by cyclooxygenase inhibitors or a thromboxane synthase inhibitor. The increase in pulmonary arterial pressure caused by either t-bu-OOH or arachidonic acid infusion correlated with the concentration of TxB2 in the effluent perfusate. The concentration of TxB2 in the effluent perfusate, however, was always 10-fold greater after arachidonic acid infusion. In the rabbit pulmonary vascular bed lipoxygenase products did not appear involved in the vasoactive response to t-bu-OOH or exogenous arachidonic acid infusion. Calcium entry blockers or a calcium-free perfusate prevented the thromboxane-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction. Calmodulin inhibitors also blocked the pulmonary vasoconstriction induced by t-bu-OOH without affecting the production of TxB2 or prostacyclin. These results suggest that thromboxane causes pulmonary vasoconstriction by increasing cytosol calcium concentration.

  9. Regulation of calcium signals in the nucleus by a nucleoplasmic reticulum

    OpenAIRE

    Echevarría, Wihelma; Leite, M. Fatima; Guerra, Mateus T.; Zipfel, Warren R.; Nathanson, Michael H.

    2003-01-01

    Calcium is a second messenger in virtually all cells and tissues1. Calcium signals in the nucleus have effects on gene transcription and cell growth that are distinct from those of cytosolic calcium signals; however, it is unknown how nuclear calcium signals are regulated. Here we identify a reticular network of nuclear calcium stores that is continuous with the endoplasmic reticulum and the nuclear envelope. This network expresses inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors, and the nucle...

  10. The Medicago truncatula DMI1 protein modulates cytosolic calcium signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peiter, Edgar; Sun, Jongho; Heckmann, Anne Birgitte Lau

    2007-01-01

    nodulation have been cloned in model legumes. Among them, Medicago truncatula DMI1 (DOESN'T MAKE INFECTIONS1) is required for the generation of nucleus-associated calcium spikes in response to the rhizobial signaling molecule Nod factor. DMI1 encodes a membrane protein with striking similarities...... to the Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum potassium channel (MthK). The cytosolic C terminus of DMI1 contains a RCK (regulator of the conductance of K+) domain that in MthK acts as a calcium-regulated gating ring controlling the activity of the channel. Here we show that a dmi1 mutant lacking the entire C terminus acts...... as a dominant-negative allele interfering with the formation of nitrogen-fixing nodules and abolishing the induction of calcium spikes by the G-protein agonist Mastoparan. Using both the full-length DMI1 and this dominant-negative mutant protein we show that DMI1 increases the sensitivity of a sodium...

  11. The calcium: An early signal that initiate the formation of the nervous system during embryogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine eLeclerc

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The calcium (Ca2+ signalling pathways have crucial roles in development from fertilization through differentiation to organogenesis. In the nervous system, Ca2+ signals are important regulators for various neuronal functions, including formation and maturation of neuronal circuits and long-term memory. However, Ca2+ signals are also involved in the earliest steps of nervous system development including neural induction, differentiation of neural progenitors into neurons, and the neuro-glial switch. This review examines when and how Ca2+ signals are generated during each of these steps with examples taken from in vivo studies in vertebrate embryos and from in vitro assays using embryonic and neural stem cells. Also discussed is the highly specific nature of the Ca2+ signalling pathway and its interaction with the other signalling pathways involved in early neural development.

  12. Resveratrol and Calcium Signaling: Molecular Mechanisms and Clinical Relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey E. McCalley

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol is a naturally occurring compound contributing to cellular defense mechanisms in plants. Its use as a nutritional component and/or supplement in a number of diseases, disorders, and syndromes such as chronic diseases of the central nervous system, cancer, inflammatory diseases, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases has prompted great interest in the underlying molecular mechanisms of action. The present review focuses on resveratrol, specifically its isomer trans-resveratrol, and its effects on intracellular calcium signaling mechanisms. As resveratrol’s mechanisms of action are likely pleiotropic, its effects and interactions with key signaling proteins controlling cellular calcium homeostasis are reviewed and discussed. The clinical relevance of resveratrol’s actions on excitable cells, transformed or cancer cells, immune cells and retinal pigment epithelial cells are contrasted with a review of the molecular mechanisms affecting calcium signaling proteins on the plasma membrane, cytoplasm, endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria. The present review emphasizes the correlation between molecular mechanisms of action that have recently been identified for resveratrol and their clinical implications.

  13. Calcium and cell death signaling in neurodegeneration and aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya Smaili

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Transient increase in cytosolic (Cac2+ and mitochondrial Ca2+ (Ca m2+ are essential elements in the control of many physiological processes. However, sustained increases in Ca c2+ and Ca m2+ may contribute to oxidative stress and cell death. Several events are related to the increase in Ca m2+, including regulation and activation of a number of Ca2+ dependent enzymes, such as phospholipases, proteases and nucleases. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER play pivotal roles in the maintenance of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and regulation of cell death. Several lines of evidence have shown that, in the presence of some apoptotic stimuli, the activation of mitochondrial processes maylead to the release of cytochrome c followed by the activation of caspases, nuclear fragmentation and apoptotic cell death. The aim of this review was to show how changes in calcium signaling can be related to the apoptotic cell death induction. Calcium homeostasis was also shown to be an important mechanism involved in neurodegenerative and aging processes.Aumentos transientes no cálcio citosólico (Ca c2+ e mitocondrial (Ca m2+ são elementos essenciais no controle de muitos processos fisiológicos. No entanto, aumentos sustentados do Ca c2+ e do Ca m2+ podem contribuir para o estresse oxidativo ea morte celular. Muitos eventos estão relacionados ao aumentono Ca c2+, incluindo a regulação e ativação de várias enzimas dependentes de Ca2+ como as fosfolipases, proteases e nucleases. A mitocôndria e o retículo endoplasmático têm um papel central na manutenção da homeostase intracellular de Ca c2+ e na regulação da morte celular. Várias evidências mostraram que, na presença de certos estímulos apoptóticos, a ativação dos processos mitocondriais pode promover a liberação de citocromo c, seguida da ativação de caspases, fragmentação nuclear e morte celular por apoptose. O objetivo desta revisão é mostrar como aumentos na sinalização de

  14. Neuronal calcium sensor synaptotagmin-9 is not involved in the regulation of glucose homeostasis or insulin secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Gustavsson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin secretion is a complex and highly regulated process. It is well established that cytoplasmic calcium is a key regulator of insulin secretion, but how elevated intracellular calcium triggers insulin granule exocytosis remains unclear, and we have only begun to define the identities of proteins that are responsible for sensing calcium changes and for transmitting the calcium signal to release machineries. Synaptotagmins are primarily expressed in brain and endocrine cells and exhibit diverse calcium binding properties. Synaptotagmin-1, -2 and -9 are calcium sensors for fast neurotransmitter release in respective brain regions, while synaptotagmin-7 is a positive regulator of calcium-dependent insulin release. Unlike the three neuronal calcium sensors, whose deletion abolished fast neurotransmitter release, synaptotagmin-7 deletion resulted in only partial loss of calcium-dependent insulin secretion, thus suggesting that other calcium-sensors must participate in the regulation of insulin secretion. Of the other synaptotagmin isoforms that are present in pancreatic islets, the neuronal calcium sensor synaptotagmin-9 is expressed at the highest level after synaptotagmin-7. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we tested whether synaptotagmin-9 participates in the regulation of glucose-stimulated insulin release by using pancreas-specific synaptotagmin-9 knockout (p-S9X mice. Deletion of synaptotagmin-9 in the pancreas resulted in no changes in glucose homeostasis or body weight. Glucose tolerance, and insulin secretion in vivo and from isolated islets were not affected in the p-S9X mice. Single-cell capacitance measurements showed no difference in insulin granule exocytosis between p-S9X and control mice. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, synaptotagmin-9, although a major calcium sensor in the brain, is not involved in the regulation of glucose-stimulated insulin release from pancreatic β-cells.

  15. A Protein Involved in the Assembly of an Extracellular Calcium Storage Matrix*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, Lilah; Shechter, Assaf; Tom, Moshe; Yudkovski, Yana; Weil, Simy; Aflalo, Eliahu David; Pamuru, Ramachandra Reddy; Khalaila, Isam; Bentov, Shmuel; Berman, Amir; Sagi, Amir

    2010-01-01

    Gastroliths, the calcium storage organs of crustaceans, consist of chitin-protein-mineral complexes in which the mineral component is stabilized amorphous calcium carbonate. To date, only three proteins, GAP 65, gastrolith matrix protein (GAMP), and orchestin, have been identified in gastroliths. Here, we report a novel protein, GAP 10, isolated from the gastrolith of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus and specifically expressed in its gastrolith disc. The encoding gene was cloned by partial sequencing of the protein extracted from the gastrolith matrix. Based on an assembled microarray cDNA chip, GAP 10 transcripts were found to be highly (12-fold) up-regulated in premolt gastrolith disc and significantly down-regulated in the hypodermis at the same molt stage. The deduced protein sequence of GAP 10 lacks chitin-binding domains and does not show homology to known proteins in the GenBankTM data base. It does, however, have an amino acid composition that has similarity to proteins extracted from invertebrate and ascidian-calcified extracellular matrices. The GAP 10 sequence contains a predicted signal peptide and predicted phosphorylation sites. In addition, the protein is phosphorylated and exhibits calcium-binding ability. Repeated daily injections of GAP 10 double strand RNA to premolt C. quadricarinatus resulted in a prolonged premolt stage and in the development of gastroliths with irregularly rough surfaces. These findings suggest that GAP 10 may be involved in the assembly of the gastrolith chitin-protein-mineral complex, particularly in the deposition of amorphous calcium carbonate. PMID:20150428

  16. Muscle mitochondrial metabolism and calcium signaling impairment in patients treated with statins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirvent, P., E-mail: pascal.sirvent@univ-bpclermont.fr [U1046, INSERM, Université Montpellier 1 and Université Montpellier 2, 34295 Montpellier (France); CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier (France); Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, EA 3533, Laboratoire des Adaptations Métaboliques à l' Exercice en conditions Physiologiques et Pathologiques (AME2P), BP 80026, F-63171 Aubière cedex (France); Fabre, O.; Bordenave, S. [U1046, INSERM, Université Montpellier 1 and Université Montpellier 2, 34295 Montpellier (France); CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier (France); Hillaire-Buys, D. [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier (France); Raynaud De Mauverger, E.; Lacampagne, A.; Mercier, J. [U1046, INSERM, Université Montpellier 1 and Université Montpellier 2, 34295 Montpellier (France); CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier (France)

    2012-03-01

    The most common and problematic side effect of statins is myopathy. To date, the patho-physiological mechanisms of statin myotoxicity are still not clearly understood. In previous studies, we showed that acute application in vitro of simvastatin caused impairment of mitochondrial function and dysfunction of calcium homeostasis in human and rat healthy muscle samples. We thus evaluated in the present study, mitochondrial function and calcium signaling in muscles of patients treated with statins, who present or not muscle symptoms, by oxygraphy and recording of calcium sparks, respectively. Patients treated with statins showed impairment of mitochondrial respiration that involved mainly the complex I of the respiratory chain and altered frequency and amplitude of calcium sparks. The muscle problems observed in statin-treated patients appear thus to be related to impairment of mitochondrial function and muscle calcium homeostasis, confirming the results we previously reported in vitro. -- Highlights: ► The most common and problematic side effect of statins is myopathy. ► Patients treated with statins showed impairment of mitochondrial respiration. ► Statins-treated patients showed altered frequency and amplitude of calcium sparks.

  17. Local perinuclear calcium signals associated with mitosis-entry in early sea urchin embryos

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Using calcium-sensitive dyes together with their dextran conjugates and confocal microscopy, we have looked for evidence of localized calcium signaling in the region of the nucleus before entry into mitosis, using the sea urchin egg first mitotic cell cycle as a model. Global calcium transients that appear to originate from the nuclear area are often observed just before nuclear envelope breakdown (NEB). In the absence of global increases in calcium, confocal microscopy using Calcium Green- 1...

  18. Cellular signaling events involved in thrombin activation of vascular endothelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brock, T.A.; Capasso, E.L.; Gimbrone, M.A. Jr.

    1986-03-05

    Although cytosolic calcium ((Ca))/sub I/), inositol trisphosphate (IP/sub 3/) and diacylglycerol (DAG) are important second messengers involved in stimulus-response coupling to certain hormones, little information is available regarding their role in the activation of vascular endothelial cells (EC) during coagulation. The authors have used cultured human umbilical vein EC to examine thrombin effects on (Ca)/sub I/ and on IP/sub 3/ and DAG formation. Thrombin (1 U/ml) induces a rapid (peak < 15 sec) increase in (Ca)/sub I/ (300% basal levels) in suspensions of fura-2 (fluorescent Ca/sup 2 +/ indicator)-loaded EC. In addition thrombin stimulates concentration-dependent (.001-1 U/ml) increases in calcium efflux and IP/sub 3/ formation in EC prelabeled with /sup 45/Ca or /sup 3/H-myoinositol. Peak IP/sub 3/ (182+/-14% control) is rapid (<15 sec) and temporally similar to the rise in (Ca)/sub I/. In /sup 3/H-arachidonic acid-labeled EC, thrombin increases DAG (protein kinase C activator) at 15 sec (133+/-8% control), as well as 5 min (148+/-12% control). EC preincubation with 4..beta..-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (10/sup -7/M, 5 min), a potent activator of protein kinase C, blocks thrombin (1 U/ml)-induced increases in (Ca)/sub I/ and IP/sub 3/. Thus, thrombin may trigger at least two distinct signaling pathways (IP/sub 3//calcium; DAG/protein kinase C) in EC. In addition, DAG stimulation of protein kinase C may influence this mediator's action in vascular EC.

  19. Retinoic acid affects calcium signaling in adult molluscan neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesprini, Nicholas D.; Dawson, Taylor F.; Yuan, Ye; Bruce, Doug

    2014-01-01

    Retinoic acid, the active metabolite of vitamin A, is important for nervous system development, regeneration, as well as cognitive functions of the adult central nervous system. These central nervous system functions are all highly dependent on neuronal activity. Retinoic acid has previously been shown to induce changes in the firing properties and action potential waveforms of adult molluscan neurons in a dose- and isomer-dependent manner. In this study, we aimed to determine the cellular pathways by which retinoic acid might exert such effects, by testing the involvement of pathways previously shown to be affected by retinoic acid. We demonstrated that the ability of all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) to induce electrophysiological changes in cultured molluscan neurons was not prevented by inhibitors of protein synthesis, protein kinase A or phospholipase C. However, we showed that atRA was capable of rapidly reducing intracellular calcium levels in the same dose- and isomer-dependent manner as shown previously for changes in neuronal firing. Moreover, we also demonstrated that the transmembrane ion flux through voltage-gated calcium channels was rapidly modulated by retinoic acid. In particular, the peak current density was reduced and the inactivation rate was increased in the presence of atRA, over a similar time course as the changes in cell firing and reductions in intracellular calcium. These studies provide further evidence for the ability of atRA to induce rapid effects in mature neurons. PMID:25343782

  20. Effect of nicotine on exocytotic pancreatic secretory response: role of calcium signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chowdhury Parimal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nicotine is a risk factor for pancreatitis resulting in loss of pancreatic enzyme secretion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanisms of nicotine-induced secretory response measured in primary pancreatic acinar cells isolated from Male Sprague Dawley rats. The study examines the role of calcium signaling in the mechanism of the enhanced secretory response observed with nicotine exposure. Methods Isolated and purified pancreatic acinar cells were subjected to a nicotine exposure at a dose of 100 μM for 6 minutes and then stimulated with cholecystokinin (CCK for 30 min. The cell’s secretory response was measured by the percent of amylase released from the cells in the incubation medium Calcium receptor antagonists, inositol trisphosphate (IP3 receptor blockers, mitogen activated protein kinase inhibitors and specific nicotinic receptor antagonists were used to confirm the involvement of calcium in this process. Results Nicotine exposure induced enhanced secretory response in primary cells. These responses remained unaffected by mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK’s inhibitors. The effects, however, have been completely abolished by nicotinic receptor antagonist, calcium channel receptor antagonists and inositol trisphosphate (IP3 receptor blockers. Conclusions The data suggest that calcium activated events regulating the exocytotic secretion are affected by nicotine as shown by enhanced functional response which is inhibited by specific antagonists… The results implicate the role of nicotine in the mobilization of both intra- and extracellular calcium in the regulation of stimulus-secretory response of enzyme secretion in this cell system. We conclude that nicotine plays an important role in promoting enhanced calcium levels inside the acinar cell.

  1. Regulation of calcium signals in the nucleus by a nucleoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echevarría, Wihelma; Leite, M Fatima; Guerra, Mateus T; Zipfel, Warren R; Nathanson, Michael H

    2003-05-01

    Calcium is a second messenger in virtually all cells and tissues. Calcium signals in the nucleus have effects on gene transcription and cell growth that are distinct from those of cytosolic calcium signals; however, it is unknown how nuclear calcium signals are regulated. Here we identify a reticular network of nuclear calcium stores that is continuous with the endoplasmic reticulum and the nuclear envelope. This network expresses inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors, and the nuclear component of InsP3-mediated calcium signals begins in its locality. Stimulation of these receptors with a little InsP3 results in small calcium signals that are initiated in this region of the nucleus. Localized release of calcium in the nucleus causes nuclear protein kinase C (PKC) to translocate to the region of the nuclear envelope, whereas release of calcium in the cytosol induces translocation of cytosolic PKC to the plasma membrane. Our findings show that the nucleus contains a nucleoplasmic reticulum with the capacity to regulate calcium signals in localized subnuclear regions. The presence of such machinery provides a potential mechanism by which calcium can simultaneously regulate many independent processes in the nucleus.

  2. Calcium channel TRPV6 is involved in murine maternal-fetal calcium transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshiro; Kovacs, Christopher S; Takanaga, Hitomi; Peng, Ji-Bin; Landowski, Christopher P; Hediger, Matthias A

    2008-08-01

    Maternal-fetal calcium (Ca(2+)) transport is crucial for fetal Ca(2+) homeostasis and bone mineralization. In this study, the physiological significance of the transient receptor potential, vanilloid 6 (TRPV6) Ca(2+) channel in maternal-fetal Ca(2+) transport was investigated using Trpv6 knockout mice. The Ca(2+) concentration in fetal blood and amniotic fluid was significantly lower in Trpv6 knockout fetuses than in wildtypes. The transport activity of radioactive Ca(2+) ((45)Ca) from mother to fetuses was 40% lower in Trpv6 knockout fetuses than in wildtypes. The ash weight was also lower in Trpv6 knockout fetuses compared with wildtype fetuses. TRPV6 mRNA and protein were mainly localized in intraplacental yolk sac and the visceral layer of extraplacental yolk sac, which are thought to be the places for maternal-fetal Ca(2+) transport in mice. These expression sites were co-localized with calbindin D(9K) in the yolk sac. In wildtype mice, placental TRPV6 mRNA increased 14-fold during the last 4 days of gestation, which coincides with fetal bone mineralization. These results provide the first in vivo evidence that TRPV6 is involved in maternal-fetal Ca(2+) transport. We propose that TRPV6 functions as a Ca(2+) entry pathway, which is critical for fetal Ca(2+) homeostasis.

  3. The control of calcium signaling in the heart | Eisner | Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Work on the role of calcium in the heart began in the nineteenth century with Ringer's demonstration that calcium is essential for cardiac contraction. This article provides a brief overview of the regulation of cardiac calcium signalling. Contraction results from the systolic rise of Ca concentration (the Ca transient). This occurs ...

  4. Orai and TRPC channel characterization in FcεRI-mediated calcium signaling and mediator secretion in human mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajdner, Hannah E; Farrington, Jasmine; Barnard, Claire; Peachell, Peter T; Schnackenberg, Christine G; Marino, Joseph P; Xu, Xiaoping; Affleck, Karen; Begg, Malcolm; Seward, Elizabeth P

    2017-03-01

    Inappropriate activation of mast cells via the FcεRI receptor leads to the release of inflammatory mediators and symptoms of allergic disease. Calcium influx is a critical regulator of mast cell signaling and is required for exocytosis of preformed mediators and for synthesis of eicosanoids, cytokines and chemokines. Studies in rodent and human mast cells have identified Orai calcium channels as key contributors to FcεRI-initiated mediator release. However, until now the role of TRPC calcium channels in FcεRI-mediated human mast cell signaling has not been published. Here, we show evidence for the expression of Orai 1,2, and 3 and TRPC1 and 6 in primary human lung mast cells and the LAD2 human mast cell line but, we only find evidence of functional contribution of Orai and not TRPC channels to FcεRI-mediated calcium entry. Calcium imaging experiments, utilizing an Orai selective antagonist (Synta66) showed the contribution of Orai to FcεRI-mediated signaling in human mast cells. Although, the use of a TRPC3/6 selective antagonist and agonist (GSK-3503A and GSK-2934A, respectively) did not reveal evidence for TRPC6 contribution to FcεRI-mediated calcium signaling in human mast cells. Similarly, inactivation of STIM1-regulated TRPC1 in human mast cells (as tested by transfecting cells with STIM1-KK684-685EE - TRPC1 gating mutant) failed to alter FcεRI-mediated calcium signaling in LAD2 human mast cells. Mediator release assays confirm that FcεRI-mediated calcium influx through Orai is necessary for histamine and TNFα release but is differentially involved in the generation of cytokines and eicosanoids. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  5. Thapsigargin-induced nuclear calcium signals in rat basophilic leukaemia cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Horikoshi, Y; Furuno, T; Teshima, R; Sawada, J; Nakanishi, M

    1994-01-01

    By a confocal fluorescence microscope with an argon-ion laser (488 nm) and a He-Cd laser (325 nm) we have studied thapsigargin-induced calcium signals in individual rat basophilic leukaemia (RBL-2H3) cells. In the presence or absence of external calcium ions, thapsigargin-induced calcium signals were transferred to the nucleus as well as to the cytoplasm of RBL-2H3 cells. The calcium signals were generally much stronger in the nucleus than in the cytoplasm. However, some of the RBL-2H3 cells ...

  6. Calcium-dependent freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis involves membrane resealing via synaptotagmin SYT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Tomokazu; Kawamura, Yukio; Minami, Anzu; Uemura, Matsuo

    2008-12-01

    Plant freezing tolerance involves the prevention of lethal freeze-induced damage to the plasma membrane. We hypothesized that plant freezing tolerance involves membrane resealing, which, in animal cells, is accomplished by calcium-dependent exocytosis following mechanical disruption of the plasma membrane. In Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts, extracellular calcium enhanced not only freezing tolerance but also tolerance to electroporation, which typically punctures the plasma membrane. However, calcium did not enhance survival when protoplasts were exposed to osmotic stress that mimicked freeze-induced dehydration. Calcium-dependent freezing tolerance was also detected with leaf sections in which ice crystals intruded into tissues. Interestingly, calcium-dependent freezing tolerance was inhibited by extracellular addition of an antibody against the cytosolic region of SYT1, a homolog of synaptotagmin known to be a calcium sensor that initiates exocytosis. This inhibition indicates that the puncture allowing the antibody to flow into the cytoplasm occurs during freeze/thawing. Thus, we propose that calcium-dependent freezing tolerance results from resealing of the punctured site. Protoplasts or leaf sections isolated from Arabidopsis SYT1-RNA interference (RNAi) plants lost calcium-dependent freezing tolerance, and intact SYT1-RNAi plants had lower freezing tolerance than control plants. Taken together, these findings suggest that calcium-dependent freezing tolerance results from membrane resealing and that this mechanism involves SYT1 function.

  7. Calcium signals and caspase-12 participated in paraoxon-induced apoptosis in EL4 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lan; Cao, Zhiheng; Jia, Pengfei; Wang, Ziren

    2010-04-01

    In order to investigate whether calcium signals participate in paraoxon (POX)-induced apoptosis in EL4 cells, real-time laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) was used to detect Ca(2+) changes during the POX application. Apoptotic rates of EL4 cells and caspase-12 expression were also evaluated. POX (1-10nM) increased intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in EL4 cells in a dose-dependent manner at early stage (0-2h) of POX application, and apoptotic rates of EL4 cells after treatment with POX for 16h were also increased in a dose-dependent manner. Pre-treatment with EGTA, heparin or procaine attenuated POX-induced [Ca(2+)]i elevation and apoptosis. Additionally, POX up-regulated caspase-12 expression in a dose-dependent manner, and pre-treatment with EGTA, heparin or procaine significantly inhibited POX-induced increase of caspase-12 expression. Our results suggested that POX induced [Ca(2+)]i elevation in EL4 cells at the early stage of POX-induced apoptosis, which might involve Ca(2+) efflux from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Ca(2+) influx from extracellular medium. Calcium signals and caspase-12 were important upstream messengers in POX-induced apoptosis in EL4 cells. The ER-associated pathway possibly operated in this apoptosis. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. ATP Releasing Connexin 30 Hemichannels Mediate Flow-Induced Calcium Signaling in the Collecting Duct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per eSvenningsen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available ATP in the renal tubular fluid is an important regulator of salt and water reabsorption via purinergic calcium signaling that involves the P2Y2 receptor, ENaC and AQP2. Recently, we have shown that connexin (Cx 30 hemichannels are localized to the non-junctional apical membrane of cells in the distal nephron-collecting duct (CD and release ATP into the tubular fluid upon mechanical stimuli, leading to reduced salt and water reabsorption. Cx30-/- mice show salt-dependent elevations in BP and impaired pressure-natriuresis. Thus, we hypothesized that increased tubular flow rate leads to Cx30-dependent purinergic intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i signaling in the CD. Cortical CDs (CCDs from wild type and Cx30-/- mice were freshly dissected and microperfused in vitro. Using confocal fluorescence imaging and the calcium-sensitive fluorophore pair Fluo-4 and Fura Red, we found that increasing tubular flow rate from 2 to 20 nl/min caused a significant 2.1-fold elevation in [Ca2+]i in wild type CCDs. This response was blunted in Cx30-/- CCDs ([Ca2+]i increased only 1.2-fold, p

  9. Calcium signaling through CaMKII regulates hepatic glucose production in fasting and obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Lale; Wong, Catherine C.L.; Li, Gang; Xu, Tao; Pajvani, Utpal; Park, Sung Kyu Robin; Wronska, Anetta; Chen, Bi-Xing; Marks, Andrew R.; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Backs, Johannes; Singer, Harold A.; Yates, John R.; Accili, Domenico; Tabas, Ira

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Hepatic glucose production (HGP) is crucial for glucose homeostasis, but the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Here we show that a calcium-sensing enzyme, CaMKII, is activated in a calcium- and IP3R-dependent manner by cAMP and glucagon in primary HCs and by glucagon and fasting in vivo. Genetic deficiency or inhibition of CaMKII blocks nuclear translocation of FoxO1 by affecting its phosphorylation, impairs fasting- and glucagon/cAMP-induced glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis, and lowers blood glucose levels, while constitutively active CaMKII has the opposite effects. Importantly, the suppressive effect of CaMKII deficiency on glucose metabolism is abrogated by transduction with constitutively nuclear FoxO1, indicating that the effect of CaMKII deficiency requires nuclear exclusion of FoxO1. This same pathway is also involved in excessive HGP in the setting of obesity. These results reveal a calcium-mediated signaling pathway involved in FoxO1 nuclear localization and hepatic glucose homeostasis. PMID:22503562

  10. Signal processing by T-type calcium channel interactions in the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engbers, Jordan D T; Anderson, Dustin; Zamponi, Gerald W; Turner, Ray W

    2013-11-27

    T-type calcium channels of the Cav3 family are unique among voltage-gated calcium channels due to their low activation voltage, rapid inactivation, and small single channel conductance. These special properties allow Cav3 calcium channels to regulate neuronal processing in the subthreshold voltage range. Here, we review two different subthreshold ion channel interactions involving Cav3 channels and explore the ability of these interactions to expand the functional roles of Cav3 channels. In cerebellar Purkinje cells, Cav3 and intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium (IKCa) channels form a novel complex which creates a low voltage-activated, transient outward current capable of suppressing temporal summation of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs). In large diameter neurons of the deep cerebellar nuclei, Cav3-mediated calcium current (I T) and hyperpolarization-activated cation current (I H) are activated during trains of inhibitory postsynaptic potentials. These currents have distinct, and yet synergistic, roles in the subthreshold domain with I T generating a rebound burst and I H controlling first spike latency and rebound spike precision. However, by shortening the membrane time constant the membrane returns towards resting value at a faster rate, allowing I H to increase the efficacy of I T and increase the range of burst frequencies that can be generated. The net effect of Cav3 channels thus depends on the channels with which they are paired. When expressed in a complex with a KCa channel, Cav3 channels reduce excitability when processing excitatory inputs. If functionally coupled with an HCN channel, the depolarizing effect of Cav3 channels is accentuated, allowing for efficient inversion of inhibitory inputs to generate a rebound burst output. Therefore, signal processing relies not only on the activity of individual subtypes of channels but also on complex interactions between ion channels whether based on a physical complex or by indirect

  11. Signal processing by T-type calcium channel interactions in the cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan D.T. Engbers

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available T-type calcium channels of the Cav3 family are unique among voltage-gated calcium channels due to their low activation voltage, rapid inactivation, and small single channel conductance. These special properties allow Cav3 calcium channels to regulate neuronal processing in the subthreshold voltage range. Here, we review two different subthreshold ion channel interactions involving Cav3 channels and explore the ability of these interactions to expand the functional roles of Cav3 channels. In cerebellar Purkinje cells, Cav3 and intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium (IKCa channels form a novel complex which creates a low voltage-activated, transient outward current capable of suppressing temporal summation of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs. In large diameter neurons of the deep cerebellar nuclei, Cav3-mediated calcium current (IT and hyperpolarization-activated cation current (IH are activated during trains of IPSPs. These currents have distinct, and yet synergistic, roles in the subthreshold domain with IT generating a rebound burst and IH controlling first spike latency and rebound spike precision. However, by shortening the membrane time constant the membrane returns towards resting value at a faster rate, allowing IH to increase the efficacy of IT, and increase the range of burst frequencies that can be generated. The net effect of Cav3 channels thus depends on the channels with which they are paired. When expressed in a complex with a KCa channel, Cav3 channels reduce excitability when processing excitatory inputs. If functionally coupled with an HCN channel, the depolarizing effect of Cav3 channels is accentuated, allowing for efficient inversion of inhibitory inputs to generate a rebound burst output. Therefore, signal processing relies not only on the activity of individual subtypes of channels but also on complex interactions between ion channels whether based on a physical complex or by indirect effects on

  12. Activation of L-type calcium channels is required for gap junction-mediated intercellular calcium signaling in osteoblastic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Teilmann, Stefan Cuoni; Henriksen, Zanne

    2003-01-01

    The propagation of mechanically induced intercellular calcium waves (ICW) among osteoblastic cells occurs both by activation of P2Y (purinergic) receptors by extracellular nucleotides, resulting in "fast" ICW, and by gap junctional communication in cells that express connexin43 (Cx43), resulting...... in "slow" ICW. Human osteoblastic cells transmit intercellular calcium signals by both of these mechanisms. In the current studies we have examined the mechanism of slow gap junction-dependent ICW in osteoblastic cells. In ROS rat osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW were inhibited by removal......43 (UMR/Cx43) we confirmed that nifedipine sensitivity of ICW required Cx43 expression. In human osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW also required activation of L-type calcium channels and influx of extracellular calcium....

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum generates calcium signalling microdomains around the nucleus and spindle in syncytial Drosophila embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, H; McDougall, A; Whitaker, M

    2006-06-01

    Cell cycle calcium signals are generated by inositol trisphosphate-mediated release of calcium from internal stores [Ciapa, Pesando, Wilding and Whitaker (1994) Nature (London) 368, 875-878; Groigno and Whitaker (1998) Cell 92, 193-204]. The major internal calcium store is the ER (endoplasmic reticulum): the spatial organization of the ER during mitosis is important in defining a microdomain around the nucleus and mitotic spindle in early Drosophila embryos [Parry, McDougall and Whitaker (2005) J. Cell Biol. 171, 47-59]. Nuclear divisions in syncytial Drosophila embryos are accompanied by both cortical and nuclear localized calcium transients. Mitosis is prevented by the InsP(3) antagonists Xestospongin C and heparin. Nuclear-localized transients and cortical transients rely on extraembryonic calcium, suggesting that ER calcium levels are maintained by calcium influx.

  14. [Intracellular signals involved in glucose control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, M; Velasco, E; Kumate, J

    2001-01-01

    Many proteins are involved in glucose control. The first step for glucose uptake is insulin receptor-binding. Stimulation of the insulin receptor results in rapid autophosphorylation and conformational changes in the beta chain and the subsequent phosphorylation of the insulin receptor substrate. This results in the docking of several SH2 domain proteins, including PI 3-kinase and other adapters. The final event is glucose transporter (GLUT) translocation to the cell surface. GLUT is in the cytosol but after insulin stimulation, several proteins are activated either in the GLUT vesicles or in the inner membrane. The role of the cytoskeleton is not well known, but it apparently participates in membrane fusion and vesicle mobilization. After glucose uptake, several hexokines metabolize the glucose to generate energy, convert the glucose in glycogen and store it. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by high glucose levels and insulin resistance. The insulin receptor is diminished on the cell surface membrane, tyrosine phosphorylation is decreased, serine and threonine phosphorylation is augmented. Apparently, the main problem with GLUT protein is in its translocation to the cell surface. At present, we know the role of many proteins involved in glucose control. However, we do not understand the significance of insulin resistance at the molecular level with type 2 diabetes.

  15. Dexamethasone-induced cardiac deterioration is associated with both calcium handling abnormalities and calcineurin signaling pathway activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Salvi Guimarães, Fabiana; de Moraes, Wilson Max Almeida Monteiro; Bozi, Luis Henrique Marchesi; Souza, Pâmela R; Antonio, Ednei Luiz; Bocalini, Danilo Sales; Tucci, Paulo José Ferreira; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki; Brum, Patricia Chakur; Medeiros, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    Dexamethasone is a potent and widely used anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive drug. However, recent evidences suggest that dexamethasone cause pathologic cardiac remodeling, which later impairs cardiac function. The mechanism behind the cardiotoxic effect of dexamethasone is elusive. The present study aimed to verify if dexamethasone-induced cardiotoxicity would be associated with changes in the cardiac net balance of calcium handling protein and calcineurin signaling pathway activation. Wistar rats (~400 g) were treated with dexamethasone (35 µg/g) in drinking water for 15 days. After dexamethasone treatment, we analyzed cardiac function, cardiomyocyte diameter, cardiac fibrosis, and the expression of proteins involved in calcium handling and calcineurin signaling pathway. Dexamethasone-treated rats showed several cardiovascular abnormalities, including elevated blood pressure, diastolic dysfunction, cardiac fibrosis, and cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Regarding the expression of proteins involved in calcium handling, dexamethasone increased phosphorylation of phospholamban at threonine 17, reduced protein levels of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, and had no effect on protein expression of Serca2a. Protein levels of NFAT and GATA-4 were increased in both cytoplasmic and nuclear faction. In addition, dexamethasone increased nuclear protein levels of calcineurin. Altogether our findings suggest that dexamethasone causes pathologic cardiac remodeling and diastolic dysfunction, which is associated with impaired calcium handling and calcineurin signaling pathway activation.

  16. Signal molecules-calcium phosphate coprecipitation and its biomedical application as a functional coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiupeng; Ito, Atsuo; Li, Xia; Sogo, Yu; Oyane, Ayako

    2011-06-01

    In this review, the current knowledge of signal molecules-calcium phosphate coprecipitation and its biomedical application as a functional coating are described. Although signal molecules regulate a variety of cellular processes, it is difficult to sustain the regulation activity for a long term when the signal molecules are only injected in a free form. The signal molecules-calcium phosphate coprecipitation on a substrate surface is a very promising process to achieve sustained regulation activity of the signal molecules by controlled and localized delivery of the signal molecules to specific body sites (implantation sites). However, the significance of immobilizing signal molecules with calcium phosphate coatings and their biomedical application are not systematically illustrated. For this purpose, the presently existing coprecipitation methods and strategies on biomedical application are summarized and discussed.

  17. [SIGNAL MEDIATORS IN PLANTS RESPONSES AGAINST ABIOTIC STRESSORS: CALCIUM, REACTIVE OXYGEN AND NITROGEN SPECIES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolupaev, Yu E; Karpets, Yu V; Dmitriev, O P

    2015-01-01

    The perception of signals of abiotic stressors by plant cells is accompanied by the increase of cytosolic calcium concentration, content of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen monoxide (NO) which execute the role of signal mediators at the activation of gene expression, supervising protective reactions. Calcium ions, ROS, and NO are in the multiple functional interactions which provides the intensifying and transduction of signals into genetic apparatus as well as their attenuation. The increase of content, at least, of one of these signal mediators in cells can cause activation of some signal cascades and formation of plant adaptive reactions.

  18. Effects of Staphylococcus aureus-hemolysin A on calcium signalling in immortalized human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichstaedt, Stefanie; Gäbler, Karoline; Below, Sabine; Müller, Christian; Kohler, Christian; Engelmann, Susanne; Hildebrandt, Petra; Völker, Uwe; Hecker, Michael; Hildebrandt, Jan-Peter

    2009-02-01

    Part of the innate defence of bronchial epithelia against bacterial colonization is secretion of salt and water which generally depends on coordinated actions of receptor-mediated cAMP- and calcium signalling. The hypothesis that Staphylococcus aureus-virulence factors interfere with endogenous signals in host cells was tested by measuring agonist-mediated changes in [Ca(2+)](i) in S9 cells upon pre-incubation with bacterial secretory products. S9 cells responded to mAChR-activation with calcium release from intracellular stores and capacitative calcium influx. Treatment of cells with culture supernatants of S. aureus (COL) or with recombinant alpha-hemolysin (Hla) resulted in time- and concentration-dependent changes in [Ca(2+)](i). High concentrations of Hla (2000 ng/ml) resulted in elevations in [Ca(2+)](i) elicited by accelerated calcium influx. A general Hla-mediated permeabilization of S9 cell membranes to small molecules, however, did not occur. Lower concentrations of Hla (200 ng/ml) induced a reduction in [Ca(2+)](i)-levels during the sustained plateau phase of receptor-mediated calcium signalling which was abolished by pre-incubation of cells with carboxyeosin, an inhibitor of the plasma membrane calcium-ATPase. This indicates that low concentrations of Hla change calcium signalling by accelerating pump-driven extrusion of Ca(2+) ions. In vivo, such a mechanism may result in attenuation of calcium-mediated cellular defence functions and facilitation of bacterial adherence to the bronchial epithelium.

  19. Mitochondrial dysfunction in oxidative stress : On the impact of neuronal KCa channels & calcium signaling in neurodegeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honrath, Birgit

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondriale dysfunctie in oxidatieve stress – over de impact van neuronale KCa kanalen en calcium signalering in neurodegeneratie (246 words) Neurodegeneratieve ziektes, zoals de ziekte van Alzheimer of Parkinson, worden gekarakteriseerd door een verlies van neuronen in verschillende

  20. Cadmium Induces Apoptosis in Freshwater Crab Sinopotamon henanense through Activating Calcium Signal Transduction Pathway: e0144392

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jinxiang Wang; Pingping Zhang; Na Liu; Qian Wang; Jixian Luo; Lan Wang

    2015-01-01

      Calcium ion (Ca2+) is one of the key intracellular signals, which is implicated in the regulation of cell functions such as impregnation, cell proliferation, differentiation and death. Cadmium (Cd...

  1. Human osteoblastic cells propagate intercellular calcium signals by two different mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Henriksen, Z; Brot, C

    2000-01-01

    Effective bone remodeling requires the coordination of bone matrix deposition by osteoblastic cells, which may occur via soluble mediators or via direct intercellular communication. We have previously identified two mechanisms by which rat osteoblastic cell lines coordinate calcium signaling amon...

  2. Impact of calcium signaling during infection of Neisseria meningitidis to human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmat, Tauseef M; Tenenbaum, Tobias; Jonsson, Ann-Beth; Schwerk, Christian; Schroten, Horst

    2014-01-01

    The pili and outer membrane proteins of Neisseria meningitidis (meningococci) facilitate bacterial adhesion and invasion into host cells. In this context expression of meningococcal PilC1 protein has been reported to play a crucial role. Intracellular calcium mobilization has been implicated as an important signaling event during internalization of several bacterial pathogens. Here we employed time lapse calcium-imaging and demonstrated that PilC1 of meningococci triggered a significant increase in cytoplasmic calcium in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, whereas PilC1-deficient meningococci could not initiate this signaling process. The increase in cytosolic calcium in response to PilC1-expressing meningococci was due to efflux of calcium from host intracellular stores as demonstrated by using 2-APB, which inhibits the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, pre-treatment of host cells with U73122 (phospholipase C inhibitor) abolished the cytosolic calcium increase caused by PilC1-expressing meningococci demonstrating that active phospholipase C (PLC) is required to induce calcium transients in host cells. Furthermore, the role of cytosolic calcium on meningococcal adherence and internalization was documented by gentamicin protection assay and double immunofluorescence (DIF) staining. Results indicated that chelation of intracellular calcium by using BAPTA-AM significantly impaired PilC1-mediated meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host endothelial cells. However, buffering of extracellular calcium by BAPTA or EGTA demonstrated no significant effect on meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host cells. Taken together, these results indicate that meningococci induce calcium release from intracellular stores of host endothelial cells via PilC1 and cytoplasmic calcium concentrations play a critical role during PilC1 mediated meningococcal adherence to and subsequent invasion into host endothelial cells.

  3. Impact of calcium signaling during infection of Neisseria meningitidis to human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tauseef M Asmat

    Full Text Available The pili and outer membrane proteins of Neisseria meningitidis (meningococci facilitate bacterial adhesion and invasion into host cells. In this context expression of meningococcal PilC1 protein has been reported to play a crucial role. Intracellular calcium mobilization has been implicated as an important signaling event during internalization of several bacterial pathogens. Here we employed time lapse calcium-imaging and demonstrated that PilC1 of meningococci triggered a significant increase in cytoplasmic calcium in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, whereas PilC1-deficient meningococci could not initiate this signaling process. The increase in cytosolic calcium in response to PilC1-expressing meningococci was due to efflux of calcium from host intracellular stores as demonstrated by using 2-APB, which inhibits the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, pre-treatment of host cells with U73122 (phospholipase C inhibitor abolished the cytosolic calcium increase caused by PilC1-expressing meningococci demonstrating that active phospholipase C (PLC is required to induce calcium transients in host cells. Furthermore, the role of cytosolic calcium on meningococcal adherence and internalization was documented by gentamicin protection assay and double immunofluorescence (DIF staining. Results indicated that chelation of intracellular calcium by using BAPTA-AM significantly impaired PilC1-mediated meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host endothelial cells. However, buffering of extracellular calcium by BAPTA or EGTA demonstrated no significant effect on meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host cells. Taken together, these results indicate that meningococci induce calcium release from intracellular stores of host endothelial cells via PilC1 and cytoplasmic calcium concentrations play a critical role during PilC1 mediated meningococcal adherence to and subsequent invasion into host endothelial cells.

  4. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Turn to calcium-fortified (or "calcium-set") tofu, soy milk, tempeh, soy yogurt, and cooked soybeans (edamame). Calcium-fortified foods. Look for calcium-fortified orange juice, soy or rice milk, breads, and cereal. Beans. You can get decent ...

  5. Postreceptor signal transduction mechanisms involved in octreotide-induced inhibition of angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, P C; Barrie, R; Hill, N; Landeck, S; Kurozawa, D; Woltering, E A

    1994-12-01

    Somatostatin analogues inhibit peptide release and cell growth through multiple postreceptor signal transduction mechanisms (PRSTM), including G proteins (GP), cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), calcium, protein kinase C (PKC), and tyrosine phosphatase (TP). Octreotide acetate (OA), a somatostatin analogue, has been shown to inhibit angiogenesis; however, the PRSTM involved are unknown. Fertilized chicken eggs were obtained and incubated. On day 3, embryos were removed and placed in plastic wrap hammocks. On day 7, disks containing OA, test substances that interfere with PRSTM, or combinations of OA plus a test substance were placed on the developing chorioallantoic membrane. Blood vessel growth under each disk was assessed at 24 hours. Data were evaluated by chi-squared analysis. OA's ability to inhibit angiogenesis is significantly diminished when combined with calcium, bradykinin (increases calcium), pertussis toxin (inhibits GP), or 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (increases cAMP). In contrast, no significant decrease is noted in OA's ability to inhibit angiogenesis when combined with phorbol ester (activates PKC) or vanadate (inhibits TP). OA-induced inhibition of angiogenesis is GP, calcium, and cAMP dependent and is PKC and TP independent. Better understanding of the PRSTM involved with OA-induced inhibition of angiogenesis may lead to enhancement of OA's effect on angiogenesis.

  6. Activity-dependent calcium signaling and ERK-MAP kinases in neurons: a link to structural plasticity of the nucleus and gene transcription regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegert, J Simon; Bading, Hilmar

    2011-05-01

    Activity-dependent gene expression is important for the formation and maturation of neuronal networks, neuronal survival and for plastic modifications within mature networks. At the level of individual neurons, expression of new protein is required for dendritic branching, synapse formation and elimination. Experience-driven synaptic activity induces membrane depolarization, which in turn evokes intracellular calcium transients that are decoded according to their source and strength by intracellular calcium sensing proteins. In order to activate the gene transcription machinery of the cell, calcium signals have to be conveyed from the site of their generation in the cytoplasm to the cell nucleus. This can occur via a variety of mechanisms and with different kinetics depending on the source and amplitude of calcium influx. One mechanism involves the propagation of calcium itself, leading to nuclear calcium transients that subsequently activate transcription. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade represents a second central signaling module that transduces information from the site of calcium signal generation at the plasma membrane to the nucleus. Nuclear signaling of the MAPK cascades catalyzes the phosphorylation of transcription factors but also regulates gene transcription more globally at the level of chromatin remodeling as well as through its recently identified role in the modulation of nuclear shape. Here we discuss the possible mechanisms by which the MAPKs ERK1 and ERK2, activated by synaptically evoked calcium influx, can signal to the nucleus and regulate gene transcription. Moreover, we describe how MAPK-dependent structural plasticity of the nuclear envelope enhances nuclear calcium signaling and suggest possible implications for the regulation of gene transcription in the context of nuclear geometry. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Calcium signaling induced by angiotensin II in the pancreatic acinar cell line AR42J.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, D C; Sarosi, G A; Romanchuk, G; Mulholland, M W

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the nature and mechanisms of angiotensin II-evoked calcium signaling in AR42J cells. Cytosolic calcium concentrations were determined using fura-2-based microfluorimetry. Angiotensin II causes elevations in free cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]i) in the rat pancreatic acinar cell line AR42J. The mechanisms of angiotensin II-evoked calcium signaling were examined using fura-2-based fluorescent digital microscopy. Angiotensin II caused dose-dependent increments in [Ca2+]i over a concentration range of 0.1-1,000 nM, with an average increment of 243 +/- 16 nM at an angiotensin II concentration of 1,000 nM. Dup753, an AT1-specific antagonist, inhibited angiotensin II-evoked signaling, whereas the AT2 antagonist PD123,319 had no effect. Preincubation with the phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 reduced the response in [Ca2+]i to 25% of that of the control. Thapsigargin abolished angiotensin II-evoked calcium signaling. The inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor antagonist heparin introduced by radiofrequency electroporation inhibited responses to 46 +/- 6% of controls. Angiotensin II-evoked signals were reduced in magnitude and duration by elimination of Ca2+ from the extracellular buffer. Preincubation with pertussis toxin (100 ng/ml) had no effect. Angiotensin II did not stimulate cyclic AMP or suppress vasoactive intestinal peptide stimulated cyclic AMP production over the concentration range that caused Ca2+ signaling.

  8. Are free radicals involved in thiol-based redox signaling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterbourn, Christine C

    2015-03-01

    Cells respond to many stimuli by transmitting signals through redox-regulated pathways. It is generally accepted that in many instances signal transduction is via reversible oxidation of thiol proteins, although there is uncertainty about the specific redox transformations involved. The prevailing view is that thiol oxidation occurs by a two electron mechanism, most commonly involving hydrogen peroxide. Free radicals, on the other hand, are considered as damaging species and not generally regarded as important in cell signaling. This paper examines whether it is justified to dismiss radicals or whether they could have a signaling role. Although there is no direct evidence that radicals are involved in transmitting thiol-based redox signals, evidence is presented that they are generated in cells when these signaling pathways are activated. Radicals produce the same thiol oxidation products as two electron oxidants, although by a different mechanism, and at this point radical-mediated pathways should not be dismissed. There are unresolved issues about how radical mechanisms could achieve sufficient selectivity, but this could be possible through colocalization of radical-generating and signal-transducing proteins. Colocalization is also likely to be important for nonradical signaling mechanisms and identification of such associations should be a priority for advancing the field. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Large-scale DNA methylation expression analysis across 12 solid cancers reveals hypermethylation in the calcium-signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Xiong; Xiao, Fu-Hui; Li, Qi-Gang; Liu, Jia; He, Yong-Han; Kong, Qing-Peng

    2017-02-14

    Tumorigenesis is linked to the role of DNA methylation in gene expression regulation. Yet, cancer is a highly heterogeneous disease in which the global pattern of DNA methylation and gene expression, especially across diverse cancers, is not well understood. We investigated DNA methylation status and its association with gene expressions across 12 solid cancer types obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Results showed that global hypermethylation was an important characteristic across all 12 cancer types. Moreover, there were more epigenetically silenced than epigenetically activated genes across the cancers. Further analysis identified epigenetically silenced genes shared in the calcium-signaling pathway across the different cancer types. Reversing the aberrant DNA methylation of genes involved in the calcium-signaling pathway could be an effective strategy for suppressing cancers and developing anti-cancer drugs.

  10. Rapid, Long-Distance Electrical and Calcium Signaling in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won-Gyu; Hilleary, Richard; Swanson, Sarah J; Kim, Su-Hwa; Gilroy, Simon

    2016-04-29

    Plants integrate activities throughout their bodies using long-range signaling systems in which stimuli sensed by just a few cells are translated into mobile signals that can influence the activities in distant tissues. Such signaling can travel at speeds well in excess of millimeters per second and can trigger responses as diverse as changes in transcription and translation levels, posttranslational regulation, alterations in metabolite levels, and even wholesale reprogramming of development. In addition to the use of mobile small molecules and hormones, electrical signals have long been known to propagate throughout the plant. This electrical signaling network has now been linked to waves of Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species that traverse the plant and trigger systemic responses. Analysis of cell type specificity in signal propagation has revealed the movement of systemic signals through specific cell types, suggesting that a rapid signaling network may be hardwired into the architecture of the plant.

  11. Involvement of Nitric Oxide in the Inhibition of Aortic Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation by Calcium Dobesilate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parés-Herbuté; Fliche; Monnier

    1999-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation is a key process in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Numerous factors are involved in the regulation of SMC growth. Nitric oxide (NO) induces the inhibition of SMC proliferation whereas oxidized low-density lipoproteins (LDL) have a mitogenic effect. Calcium dobesilate (Doxium) is an angioprotective agent for treating vascular diseases. It has been shown to increase NO production and to have antioxidant properties but its mechanism of action is not yet fully understood. This study investigated the effect of calcium dobesilate on proliferation of rat aortic SMC in culture. Proliferation was evaluated by cell number and DNA synthesis. Orally administered calcium dobesilate (30, 100, or 200 mg/kg/day for 7 days) induced a dose-dependent decrease of proliferation of SMC in primary culture compared with controls. In vitro treatment with calcium dobesilate (0.05-5 mM) inhibited both DNA synthesis and proliferation in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. In both ex vivo and in vitro models, the inhibition was reversible upon removal of the drug. Calcium dobesilate also stimulated NO production and NO synthase activity. Inhibitors of NO synthesis attenuated the inhibitory effect of calcium dobesilate (300 µM) on DNA synthesis. In addition, calcium dobesilate (2.5-40 µM) induced a dose-dependent protection of cooper-induced LDL oxidation. These results showed that calcium dobesilate inhibits SMC proliferation, partly by a NO-dependent mechanism, and suggest that it could be effective in the treatment of pathological disorders associated with vascular SMC proliferation.

  12. AtCNGC2 is involved in jasmonic acid-induced calcium mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Min; Zhang, Yanyan; Tang, Shikun; Pan, Jinbao; Yu, Yongkun; Han, Jun; Li, Yangyang; Du, Xihua; Nan, Zhangjie; Sun, Qingpeng

    2016-02-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) mobilization is a central theme in various plant signal transduction pathways. We demonstrate that Arabidopsis thaliana cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 2 (AtCNGC2) is involved in jasmonic acid (JA)-induced apoplastic Ca(2+) influx in Arabidopsis epidermal cells. Ca(2+) imaging results showed that JA can induce an elevation in the cytosolic cAMP concentration ([cAMP]cyt), reaching a maximum within 3 min. Dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP), a cell membrane-permeable analogue of cAMP, induced an increase in the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt), with a peak at 4 min. This [Ca(2+)]cyt increase was triggered by the JA-induced increase in [cAMP]cyt. W-7[N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide], an antagonist of calmodulin, positively modulated the JA-induced increase in [Ca(2+)]cyt, while W-5[N-(6-aminohexyl)-1-naphthalenesulfonamide], an inactive antagonist of calmodulin, had no apparent effect. db-cAMP and JA positively induced the expression of primary (i.e. JAZ1 and MYC2) and secondary (i.e. VSP1) response genes in the JA signalling pathway in wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana, whereas they had no significant effect in the AtCNGC2 mutant 'defense, no death (dnd1) plants. These data provide evidence that JA first induces the elevation of cAMP, and cAMP, as an activating ligand, activates the AtCNGC2 channel, resulting in apoplastic Ca(2+) influx through AtCNGC2. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy: involvement of multifaceted signalling mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakumar, Pitchai; Arora, Mandeep Kumar; Reddy, Jayarami; Anand-Srivastava, Madhu B

    2009-08-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a major cause of end-stage renal failure and the mortality rate due to this disease is continuously progressing worldwide. The multifaceted signalling mechanisms have been identified to be involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Despite the modern therapies like antidiabetics, antihypertensives, and antioxidants available to treat diabetic nephropathy; most of patients continue to show progressive renal damage. It suggests that the key pathogenic mechanism involved in the induction and progression of diabetic nephropathy is still remaining active and unmodified by the present therapies. The purpose of this review is to bring together the current information concerning the signalling systems involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy.

  14. [Involvement of the endosomal compartment in cellular insulin signaling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbuquois, Bernard; Authier, François

    2014-01-01

    The insulin receptor and insulin signaling proteins downstream the receptor reside in different subcellular compartments and undergo redistribution within the cell upon insulin activation. Endocytosis of the insulin-receptor complex, by mediating ligand degradation and receptor dephosphorylation, is generally viewed as a mechanism which attenuates or arrests insulin signal transduction. However, several observations suggest that insulin receptor endocytosis and/or recruitement of insulin signaling proteins to endosomes are also involved in a positive regulation of insulin signaling: (1) upon internalization, the insulin receptor remains transiently phosphorylated and activated; (2) in insulin-stimulated cells or tissues, signaling proteins of the PI3K/Akt and Ras/Raf/Mek/Erk pathways are recruited to endosomes or other intracellular compartments, in which they undergo phosphorylation and/or activation; and (3) depletion or overexpression of proteins involved in the regulation of membrane trafficking and endocytosis interfere with insulin signaling. These observations support a spatial and temporal regulation of insulin signal transduction and reinforce the concept that, as for other membrane signaling receptors, endocytosis and signaling are functionally linked. © Société de Biologie, 2014.

  15. Differential and chaotic calcium signatures in the symbiosis signaling pathway of legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosuta, Sonja; Hazledine, Saul; Sun, Jongho; Miwa, Hiroki; Morris, Richard J; Downie, J Allan; Oldroyd, Giles E D

    2008-07-15

    Understanding how the cell uses a limited set of proteins to transduce very different signals into specific cellular responses is a central goal of cell biology and signal transduction disciplines. Although multifunctionality in signal transduction is widespread, the mechanisms that allow differential modes of signaling in multifunctional signaling pathways are not well defined. In legume plants, a common symbiosis signaling pathway composed of at least seven proteins mediates infection by both mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobial bacteria. Here we show that the symbiosis signaling pathway in legumes differentially transduces both bacterial and fungal signals (inputs) to generate alternative calcium responses (outputs). We show that these differential calcium responses are dependent on the same proteins, DMI1 and DMI2, for their activation, indicating an inherent flexibility in this signaling pathway. By using Lyapunov and other mathematical analyses, we discovered that both bacterial-induced and fungal-induced calcium responses are chaotic in nature. Chaotic systems require minimal energy to produce a wide spectrum of outputs in response to marginally different inputs. The flexibility provided by chaotic systems is consistent with the need to transduce two different signals, one from rhizobial bacteria and one from mycorrhizal fungi, by using common components of a single signaling pathway.

  16. Mechanisms involved in calcium deficiency development in tomato fruit in response to gibberellins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although gibberellins (GAs) have been shown to induce the calcium deficiency disorder, blossom-end rot (BER), development in tomato fruit (Solanum lycopersicum), the mechanisms involved remain largely unexplored. Our objectives were to better understand how GAs and a GA biosynthesis inhibitor affect...

  17. Virulent Diuraphis noxia Aphids Over-Express Calcium Signaling Proteins to Overcome Defenses of Aphid-Resistant Wheat Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Deepak K; Chandran, Predeesh; Timm, Alicia E; Aguirre-Rojas, Lina; Smith, C Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Russian wheat aphid, Diuraphis noxia, an invasive phytotoxic pest of wheat, Triticum aestivum, and barley, Hordeum vulgare, causes huge economic losses in Africa, South America, and North America. Most acceptable and ecologically beneficial aphid management strategies include selection and breeding of D. noxia-resistant varieties, and numerous D. noxia resistance genes have been identified in T. aestivum and H. vulgare. North American D. noxia biotype 1 is avirulent to T. aestivum varieties possessing Dn4 or Dn7 genes, while biotype 2 is virulent to Dn4 and avirulent to Dn7. The current investigation utilized next-generation RNAseq technology to reveal that biotype 2 over expresses proteins involved in calcium signaling, which activates phosphoinositide (PI) metabolism. Calcium signaling proteins comprised 36% of all transcripts identified in the two D. noxia biotypes. Depending on plant resistance gene-aphid biotype interaction, additional transcript groups included those involved in tissue growth; defense and stress response; zinc ion and related cofactor binding; and apoptosis. Activation of enzymes involved in PI metabolism by D. noxia biotype 2 aphids allows depletion of plant calcium that normally blocks aphid feeding sites in phloem sieve elements and enables successful, continuous feeding on plants resistant to avirulent biotype 1. Inhibition of the key enzyme phospholipase C significantly reduced biotype 2 salivation into phloem and phloem sap ingestion.

  18. Filamin and phospholipase C-ε are required for calcium signaling in the Caenorhabditis elegans spermatheca.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismar Kovacevic

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Caenorhabditis elegans spermatheca is a myoepithelial tube that stores sperm and undergoes cycles of stretching and constriction as oocytes enter, are fertilized, and exit into the uterus. FLN-1/filamin, a stretch-sensitive structural and signaling scaffold, and PLC-1/phospholipase C-ε, an enzyme that generates the second messenger IP3, are required for embryos to exit normally after fertilization. Using GCaMP, a genetically encoded calcium indicator, we show that entry of an oocyte into the spermatheca initiates a distinctive series of IP3-dependent calcium oscillations that propagate across the tissue via gap junctions and lead to constriction of the spermatheca. PLC-1 is required for the calcium release mechanism triggered by oocyte entry, and FLN-1 is required for timely initiation of the calcium oscillations. INX-12, a gap junction subunit, coordinates propagation of the calcium transients across the spermatheca. Gain-of-function mutations in ITR-1/IP3R, an IP3-dependent calcium channel, and loss-of-function mutations in LFE-2, a negative regulator of IP3 signaling, increase calcium release and suppress the exit defect in filamin-deficient animals. We further demonstrate that a regulatory cassette consisting of MEL-11/myosin phosphatase and NMY-1/non-muscle myosin is required for coordinated contraction of the spermatheca. In summary, this study answers long-standing questions concerning calcium signaling dynamics in the C. elegans spermatheca and suggests FLN-1 is needed in response to oocyte entry to trigger calcium release and coordinated contraction of the spermathecal tissue.

  19. Effect of TGFβ on calcium signaling in megakaryocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Jing [Department of Physiology I, University of Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany); Schmid, Evi [Department of Physiology I, University of Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany); Department of Pediatric Surgery and Pediatric Urology, University Children' s Hospital Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany); Almilaji, Ahmad; Shumilina, Ekaterina [Department of Physiology I, University of Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany); Borst, Oliver [Department of Physiology I, University of Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany); Department of Cardiology & Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany); Laufer, Stefan [Department of Pharmacy, University of Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany); Gawaz, Meinrad [Department of Cardiology & Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany); Lang, Florian, E-mail: florian.lang@uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Physiology I, University of Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany)

    2015-05-22

    TGFβ is a powerful regulator of megakaryocyte maturation and platelet formation. As previously shown for other cell types, TGFβ may up-regulate the expression of the serum & glucocorticoid inducible kinase SGK1, an effect requiring p38 kinase. SGK1 has in turn recently been shown to participate in the regulation of cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} activity ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) in megakaryocytes and platelets. SGK1 phosphorylates the IκB kinase (IKKα/β), which in turn phosphorylates the inhibitor protein IκBα resulting in nuclear translocation of nuclear factor NFκB. Genes up-regulated by NFκB include Orai1, the pore forming ion channel subunit accomplishing store operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE). The present study explored whether TGFβ influences Ca{sup 2+} signaling in megakaryocytes. [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was determined by Fura-2 fluorescence and SOCE from the increase of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} following re-addition of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} after store depletion by removal of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} and inhibition of the sarcoendoplasmatic Ca{sup 2+} ATPase (SERCA) with thapsigargin (1 μM). As a result, TGFβ (60 ng, 24 h) increased SOCE, an effect significantly blunted by p38 kinase inhibitor Skepinone-L (1 μM), SGK1 inhibitor EMD638683 (50 μM) and NFκB inhibitor wogonin (100 μM). In conclusion, TGFβ is a powerful regulator of store operated Ca{sup 2+} entry into megakaryocytes, an effect mediated by a signaling cascade involving p38 kinase, SGK1 and NFκB. - Highlights: • TGFβ up-regulates store operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE) in megakaryocytes. • The effect of TGFβ on SOCE is blunted by p38 kinase inhibitor Skepinone-L. • The effect of TGFβ on SOCE is virtually abrogated by SGK1 inhibitor EMD638683. • The effect of TGFβ on SOCE is almost abolished by NFκB inhibitor wogonin. • The effect of TGFβ is expected to enhance sensitivity of platelets to activation.

  20. Prenatal nicotine is associated with reduced AMPA and NMDA receptor-mediated rises in calcium within the laterodorsal tegmentum: a pontine nucleus involved in addiction processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mc Nair, Laura Kristine Frendrup; Kohlmeier, Kristi Anne

    2015-01-01

    this nucleus. Accordingly, we used calcium imaging, to evaluate AMPA and NMDA receptor-mediated calcium responses in LDT brain slices from control and PNE mice. We also investigated whether the positive AMPA receptor modulator cyclothiazide (CYZ) had differential actions on calcium in the LDT following PNE...... in the LDT of PNE mice when compared with enhancements in responses in control LDT cells. Immunohistochemical processing confirmed that calcium imaging recordings were obtained from the LDT nucleus as determined by presence of cholinergic neurons. Our results contribute to the body of evidence suggesting...... excitatory neurotransmitter within the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT), which is a brainstem region importantly involved in responding to motivational stimuli and critical in development of drug addiction-associated behaviours, however, it is unknown whether PNE alters glutamate signalling within...

  1. The impact of mitochondrial endosymbiosis on the evolution of calcium signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstone, Neil W

    2015-03-01

    At high concentrations, calcium has detrimental effects on biological systems. Life likely arose in a low calcium environment, and the first cells evolved mechanisms to maintain this environment internally. Bursts of calcium influx followed by efflux or sequestration thus developed in a functional context. For example, in proto-cells with exterior energy-converting membranes, such bursts could be used to depolarize the membrane. In this way, proto-cells could maintain maximal phosphorylation (metabolic state 3) and moderate levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), while avoiding the resting state (metabolic state 4) and high levels of ROS. This trait is likely a shared primitive characteristic of prokaryotes. When eukaryotes evolved, the α-proteobacteria that gave rise to proto-mitochondria inhabited a novel environment, the interior of the proto-eukaryote that had a low calcium concentration. In this environment, metabolic homeostasis was difficult to maintain, and there were inherent risks from ROS, yet depolarizing the proto-mitochondrial membrane by calcium influx was challenging. To maintain metabolic state 3, proto-mitochondria were required to congregate near calcium influx points in the proto-eukaryotic membrane. This behavior, resulting in embryonic forms of calcium signaling, may have occurred immediately after the initiation of the endosymbiosis. Along with ROS, calcium may have served as one of the key forms of crosstalk among the community of prokaryotes that led to the eukaryotic cell. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Alix is involved in caspase 9 activation during calcium-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strappazzon, Flavie; Torch, Sakina; Chatellard-Causse, Christine; Petiot, Anne; Thibert, Chantal; Blot, Béatrice; Verna, Jean-Marc; Sadoul, Rémy

    2010-06-18

    The cytoplasmic protein Alix/AIP1 (ALG-2 interacting protein X) is involved in cell death through mechanisms which remain unclear but require its binding partner ALG-2 (apoptosis-linked gene-2). The latter was defined as a regulator of calcium-induced apoptosis following endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. We show here that Alix is also a critical component of caspase 9 activation and apoptosis triggered by calcium. Indeed, expression of Alix dominant-negative mutants or downregulation of Alix afford significant protection against cytosolic calcium elevation following thapsigargin (Tg) treatment. The function of Alix in this paradigm requires its interaction with ALG-2. In addition, we demonstrate that caspase 9 activation is necessary for apoptosis induced by Tg and that this activation is impaired by knocking down Alix. Altogether, our findings identify, for the first time, Alix as a crucial mediator of Ca(2+) induced caspase 9 activation. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Calcium carbonate mineralization: involvement of extracellular polymeric materials isolated from calcifying bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercole, Claudia; Bozzelli, Paola; Altieri, Fabio; Cacchio, Paola; Del Gallo, Maddalena

    2012-08-01

    This study highlights the role of specific outer bacterial structures, such as the glycocalix, in calcium carbonate crystallization in vitro. We describe the formation of calcite crystals by extracellular polymeric materials, such as exopolysaccharides (EPS) and capsular polysaccharides (CPS) isolated from Bacillus firmus and Nocardia calcarea. Organic matrices were isolated from calcifying bacteria grown on synthetic medium--in the presence or absence of calcium ions--and their effect on calcite precipitation was assessed. Scanning electron microscopy observations and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry analysis showed that CPS and EPS fractions were involved in calcium carbonate precipitation, not only serving as nucleation sites but also through a direct role in crystal formation. The utilization of different synthetic media, with and without addition of calcium ions, influenced the biofilm production and protein profile of extracellular polymeric materials. Proteins of CPS fractions with a molecular mass between 25 and 70 kDa were overexpressed when calcium ions were present in the medium. This higher level of protein synthesis could be related to the active process of bioprecipitation.

  4. Astrocytic Calcium Waves Signal Brain Injury to Neural Stem and Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kraft

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Brain injuries, such as stroke or trauma, induce neural stem cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ to a neurogenic response. Very little is known about the molecular cues that signal tissue damage, even over large distances, to the SVZ. Based on our analysis of gene expression patterns in the SVZ, 48 hr after an ischemic lesion caused by middle cerebral artery occlusion, we hypothesized that the presence of an injury might be transmitted by an astrocytic traveling calcium wave rather than by diffusible factors or hypoxia. Using a newly established in vitro system we show that calcium waves induced in an astrocytic monolayer spread to neural stem and progenitor cells and increase their self-renewal as well as migratory behavior. These changes are due to an upregulation of the Notch signaling pathway. This introduces the concept of propagating astrocytic calcium waves transmitting brain injury signals over long distances.

  5. Purinergic and Calcium Signaling in Macrophage Function and Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bimal N Desai

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In addition to a fundamental role in cellular bioenergetics, the purine nucleotide adenosine triphosphate (ATP plays a crucial role in the extracellular space as a signaling molecule. ATP and its metabolites serve as ligands for a family of receptors that are collectively referred to as purinergic receptors. These receptors were first described and characterized in the nervous system but it soon became evident that they are expressed ubiquitously. In the immune system, purinergic signals regulate the migration and activation of immune cells and they may also orchestrate the resolution of inflammation (1, 2. The intracellular signal transduction initiated by purinergic receptors is strongly coupled to Ca2+-signaling and coordination of these pathways plays a critical role in innate immunity. In this review, we provide an overview of purinergic and Ca2+-signaling in the context of macrophage phenotypic polarization and discuss the implications on macrophage function in physiological and pathological conditions.

  6. Fungal genes related to calcium homeostasis and signalling are upregulated in symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhiza interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Gianinazzi-Pearson, Vivienne; Arnould, Christine; Wipf, Daniel; Zhao, Bin; van Tuinen, Diederik

    2013-01-01

    Fluctuations in intracellular calcium levels generate signalling events and regulate different cellular processes. Whilst the implication of Ca(2+) in plant responses during arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) interactions is well documented, nothing is known about the regulation or role of this secondary messenger in the fungal symbiont. The spatio-temporal expression pattern of putatively Ca(2+)-related genes of Glomus intraradices BEG141 encoding five proteins involved in membrane transport and one nuclear protein kinase, was investigated during the AM symbiosis. Expression profiles related to successful colonization of host roots were observed in interactions of G. intraradices with roots of wild-type Medicago truncatula (line J5) compared to the mycorrhiza-defective mutant dmi3/Mtsym13. Symbiotic fungal activity was monitored using stearoyl-CoA desaturase and phosphate transporter genes. Laser microdissection based-mapping of fungal gene expression in mycorrhizal root tissues indicated that the Ca(2+)-related genes were differentially upregulated in arbuscules and/or in intercellular hyphae. The spatio-temporal variations in gene expression suggest that the encoded proteins may have different functions in fungal development or function during symbiosis development. Full-length cDNA obtained for two genes with interesting expression profiles confirmed a close similarity with an endoplasmic reticulum P-type ATPase and a Vcx1-like vacuolar Ca(2+) ion transporter functionally characterized in other fungi and involved in the regulation of cell calcium pools. Possible mechanisms are discussed in which Ca(2+)-related proteins G. intraradices BEG141 may play a role in mobilization and perception of the intracellular messenger by the AM fungus during symbiotic interactions with host roots. Copyright © 2012 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Calcium signalling through L-type calcium channels: role in pathophysiology of spinal nociceptive transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca-Lapirot, Olivier; Radwani, Houda; Aby, Franck; Nagy, Frédéric; Landry, Marc; Fossat, Pascal

    2017-02-18

    L-type voltage-gated calcium channels are ubiquitous channels in the CNS. L-type calcium channels (LTCs) are mostly post-synaptic channels regulating neuronal firing and gene expression. They play a role in important physio-pathological processes such as learning and memory, Parkinson's disease, autism and, as recognized more recently, in the pathophysiology of pain processes. Classically, the fundamental role of these channels in cardiovascular functions has limited the use of classical molecules to treat LTC-dependent disorders. However, when applied locally in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, the three families of LTC pharmacological blockers - dihydropyridines (nifedipine), phenylalkylamines (verapamil) and benzothiazepines (diltiazem) - proved effective in altering short-term sensitization to pain, inflammation-induced hyperexcitability and neuropathy-induced allodynia. Two subtypes of LTCs, Cav 1.2 and Cav 1.3, are expressed in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, where Cav 1.2 channels are localized mostly in the soma and proximal dendritic shafts, and Cav 1.3 channels are more distally located in the somato-dendritic compartment. Together with their different kinetics and pharmacological properties, this spatial distribution contributes to their separate roles in shaping short- and long-term sensitization to pain. Cav 1.3 channels sustain the expression of plateau potentials, an input/output amplification phenomenon that contributes to short-term sensitization to pain such as prolonged after-discharges, dynamic receptive fields and windup. The Cav 1.2 channels support calcium influx that is crucial for the excitation-transcription coupling underlying nerve injury-induced dorsal horn hyperexcitability. These subtype-specific cellular mechanisms may have different consequences in the development and/or the maintenance of pathological pain. Recent progress in developing more specific compounds for each subunit will offer new opportunities to modulate LTCs

  8. Signals and Cells Involved in Regulating Liver Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-I. Kang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Liver regeneration is a complex phenomenon aimed at maintaining a constant liver mass in the event of injury resulting in loss of hepatic parenchyma. Partial hepatectomy is followed by a series of events involving multiple signaling pathways controlled by mitogenic growth factors (HGF, EGF and their receptors (MET and EGFR. In addition multiple cytokines and other signaling molecules contribute to the orchestration of a signal which drives hepatocytes into DNA synthesis. The other cell types of the liver receive and transmit to hepatocytes complex signals so that, in the end of the regenerative process, complete hepatic tissue is assembled and regeneration is terminated at the proper time and at the right liver size. If hepatocytes fail to participate in this process, the biliary compartment is mobilized to generate populations of progenitor cells which transdifferentiate into hepatocytes and restore liver size.

  9. Ascorbic Acid Induces Necrosis in Human Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma via ROS, PKC, and Calcium Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Min-Woo; Cho, Heui-Seung; Kim, Sun-Hun; Kim, Won-Jae; Jung, Ji-Yeon

    2017-02-01

    Ascorbic acid induces apoptosis, autophagy, and necrotic cell death in cancer cells. We investigated the mechanisms by which ascorbic acid induces death in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma Hep2 cells. Ascorbic acid markedly reduced cell viability and induced death without caspase activation and an increase in cytochrome c. Hep2 cells exposed to ascorbic acid exhibited membrane rupture and swelling, the morphological characteristics of necrotic cell death. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was increased in Hep2 cells treated with ascorbic acid, and pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine blocked ascorbic acid-induced cell death. Ascorbic acid also stimulated protein kinase C (PKC) signaling, especially PKC α/β activation, and subsequently increased cytosolic calcium levels. However, ascorbic acid-induced necrotic cell death was inhibited by Ro-31-8425 (PKC inhibitor) and BAPTA-AM (cytosolic calcium-selective chelator). ROS scavenger NAC inhibited PKC activation induced by ascorbic acid and Ro-31-8425 suppressed the level of cytosolic calcium increased by ascorbic acid, indicating that ROS is represented as an upstream signal of PKC pathway and PKC activation leads to the release of calcium into the cytosol, which ultimately regulates the induction of necrosis in ascorbic acid-treated Hep2 cells. These data demonstrate that ascorbic acid induces necrotic cell death through ROS generation, PKC activation, and cytosolic calcium signaling in Hep2 cells. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 417-425, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Targeting Calcium Signaling Induces Epigenetic Reactivation of Tumor Suppressor Genes in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynal, Noël J-M; Lee, Justin T; Wang, Youjun; Beaudry, Annie; Madireddi, Priyanka; Garriga, Judith; Malouf, Gabriel G; Dumont, Sarah; Dettman, Elisha J; Gharibyan, Vazganush; Ahmed, Saira; Chung, Woonbok; Childers, Wayne E; Abou-Gharbia, Magid; Henry, Ryan A; Andrews, Andrew J; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Cui, Ying; Baylin, Stephen B; Gill, Donald L; Issa, Jean-Pierre J

    2016-03-15

    Targeting epigenetic pathways is a promising approach for cancer therapy. Here, we report on the unexpected finding that targeting calcium signaling can reverse epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes (TSG). In a screen for drugs that reactivate silenced gene expression in colon cancer cells, we found three classical epigenetic targeted drugs (DNA methylation and histone deacetylase inhibitors) and 11 other drugs that induced methylated and silenced CpG island promoters driving a reporter gene (GFP) as well as endogenous TSGs in multiple cancer cell lines. These newly identified drugs, most prominently cardiac glycosides, did not change DNA methylation locally or histone modifications globally. Instead, all 11 drugs altered calcium signaling and triggered calcium-calmodulin kinase (CamK) activity, leading to MeCP2 nuclear exclusion. Blocking CamK activity abolished gene reactivation and cancer cell killing by these drugs, showing that triggering calcium fluxes is an essential component of their epigenetic mechanism of action. Our data identify calcium signaling as a new pathway that can be targeted to reactivate TSGs in cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Reciprocal Interaction of Dendrite Geometry and Nuclear Calcium-VEGFD Signaling Gates Memory Consolidation and Extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemstedt, Thekla J; Bengtson, C Peter; Ramírez, Omar; Oliveira, Ana M M; Bading, Hilmar

    2017-07-19

    Nuclear calcium is an important signaling end point in synaptic excitation-transcription coupling that is critical for long-term neuroadaptations. Here, we show that nuclear calcium acting via a target gene, VEGFD, is required for hippocampus-dependent fear memory consolidation and extinction in mice. Nuclear calcium-VEGFD signaling upholds the structural integrity and complexity of the dendritic arbor of CA1 neurons that renders those cells permissive for the efficient generation of synaptic input-evoked nuclear calcium transients driving the expression of plasticity-related genes. Therefore, the gating of memory functions rests on the reciprocally reinforcing maintenance of an intact dendrite geometry and a functional synapse-to-nucleus communication axis. In psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders, therapeutic application of VEGFD may help to stabilize dendritic structures and network connectivity, which may prevent cognitive decline and could boost the efficacy of extinction-based exposure therapies. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study uncovers a reciprocal relationship between dendrite geometry, the ability to generate nuclear calcium transients in response to synaptic inputs, and the subsequent induction of expression of plasticity-related and dendritic structure-preserving genes. Insufficient nuclear calcium signaling in CA1 hippocampal neurons and, consequently, reduced expression of the nuclear calcium target gene VEGFD, a dendrite maintenance factor, leads to reduced-complexity basal dendrites of CA1 neurons, which severely compromises the animals' consolidation of both memory and extinction memory. The structure-protective function of VEGFD may prove beneficial in psychiatric disorders as well as neurodegenerative and aging-related conditions that are associated with loss of neuronal structures, dysfunctional excitation-transcription coupling, and cognitive decline. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/376946-10$15.00/0.

  12. The involvement of the Mid1/Cch1/Yvc1 calcium channels in Aspergillus fumigatus virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Alves de Castro

    Full Text Available Aspergillus fumigatus is a major opportunistic pathogen and allergen of mammals. Calcium homeostasis and signaling is essential for numerous biological processes and also influences A. fumigatus pathogenicity. The presented study characterized the function of the A. fumigatus homologues of three Saccharomyces cerevisiae calcium channels, voltage-gated Cch1, stretch-activated Mid1 and vacuolar Yvc1. The A. fumigatus calcium channels cchA, midA and yvcA were regulated at transcriptional level by increased calcium levels. The YvcA::GFP fusion protein localized to the vacuoles. Both ΔcchA and ΔmidA mutant strains showed reduced radial growth rate in nutrient-poor minimal media. Interestingly, this growth defect in the ΔcchA strain was rescued by the exogenous addition of CaCl2. The ΔcchA, ΔmidA, and ΔcchA ΔmidA strains were also sensitive to the oxidative stress inducer, paraquat. Restriction of external Ca(2+ through the addition of the Ca(2+-chelator EGTA impacted upon the growth of the ΔcchA and ΔmidA strains. All the A. fumigatus ΔcchA, ΔmidA, and ΔyvcA strains demonstrated attenuated virulence in a neutropenic murine model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Infection with the parental strain resulted in a 100% mortality rate at 15 days post-infection, while the mortality rate of the ΔcchA, ΔmidA, and ΔyvcA strains after 15 days post-infection was only 25%. Collectively, this investigation strongly indicates that CchA, MidA, and YvcA play a role in A. fumigatus calcium homeostasis and virulence.

  13. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and blood vessels contract and expand, to secrete hormones and enzymes and to send messages through the nervous system. It is important to get plenty of calcium in the foods you eat. Foods rich in calcium include Dairy products such as milk, cheese, and yogurt Leafy, green vegetables Fish with ...

  14. Osteogenic Differentiation of MSC through Calcium Signaling Activation: Transcriptomics and Functional Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Viti

    Full Text Available The culture of progenitor mesenchymal stem cells (MSC onto osteoconductive materials to induce a proper osteogenic differentiation and mineralized matrix regeneration represents a promising and widely diffused experimental approach for tissue-engineering (TE applications in orthopaedics. Among modern biomaterials, calcium phosphates represent the best bone substitutes, due to their chemical features emulating the mineral phase of bone tissue. Although many studies on stem cells differentiation mechanisms have been performed involving calcium-based scaffolds, results often focus on highlighting production of in vitro bone matrix markers and in vivo tissue ingrowth, while information related to the biomolecular mechanisms involved in the early cellular calcium-mediated differentiation is not well elucidated yet. Genetic programs for osteogenesis have been just partially deciphered, and the description of the different molecules and pathways operative in these differentiations is far from complete, as well as the activity of calcium in this process. The present work aims to shed light on the involvement of extracellular calcium in MSC differentiation: a better understanding of the early stage osteogenic differentiation program of MSC seeded on calcium-based biomaterials is required in order to develop optimal strategies to promote osteogenesis through the use of new generation osteoconductive scaffolds. A wide spectrum of analysis has been performed on time-dependent series: gene expression profiles are obtained from samples (MSC seeded on calcium-based scaffolds, together with related microRNAs expression and in vivo functional validation. On this basis, and relying on literature knowledge, hypotheses are made on the biomolecular players activated by the biomaterial calcium-phosphate component. Interestingly, a key role of miR-138 was highlighted, whose inhibition markedly increases osteogenic differentiation in vitro and enhance ectopic bone

  15. Signaling transduction pathways involved in basophil adhesion and histamine release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sha, Quan; Poulsen, Lars K.; Gerwien, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about basophil with respect to the different signaling transduction pathways involved in spontaneous, cytokine or anti-IgE induced adhesion and how this compares to IgE-dependent and IgE-independent mediator secretion. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the roles ...... of beta1 and beta2 integrins in basophil adhesion as well as hosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), src-kinases and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 in basophil adhesion and histamine release (HR)....

  16. Dynamical patterns of calcium signaling in a functional model of neuron-astrocyte networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, D.E.; Koreshkov, R.N.; Brazhe, N.A.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a functional mathematical model for neuron-astrocyte networks. The model incorporates elements of the tripartite synapse and the spatial branching structure of coupled astrocytes. We consider glutamate-induced calcium signaling as a specific mode of excitability and transmission...... in astrocytic-neuronal networks. We reproduce local and global dynamical patterns observed experimentally....

  17. Calcium signaling in the cochlea – Molecular mechanisms and physiopathological implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceriani Federico

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Calcium ions (Ca2+ regulate numerous and diverse aspects of cochlear and vestibular physiology. This review focuses on the Ca2+ control of mechanotransduction and synaptic transmission in sensory hair cells, as well as on Ca2+ signalling in non-sensory cells of the developing cochlea.

  18. Intercellular calcium signaling occurs between human osteoblasts and osteoclasts and requires activation of osteoclast P2X7 receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas R; Henriksen, Zanne; Sørensen, Ole

    2002-01-01

    that human osteoclasts expressed functional P2Y1 receptors, but, unexpectedly, desensitization of P2Y1 did not block calcium signaling to osteoclasts. We also found that osteoclasts expressed functional P2X7 receptors and showed that pharmacological inhibition of these receptors blocked calcium signaling...

  19. Fluoxetine suppresses calcium signaling in human T lymphocytes through depletion of intracellular calcium stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobin, V; De Bock, M; Broeckx, B J G; Kiselinova, M; De Spiegelaere, W; Vandekerckhove, L; Van Steendam, K; Leybaert, L; Deforce, D

    2015-09-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, such as fluoxetine, have recently been shown to exert anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects. Although the effects on cytokine secretion, proliferation and viability of T lymphocytes have been extensively characterized, little is known about the mechanism behind these effects. It is well known that Ca(2+) signaling is an important step in the signaling transduction pathway following T cell receptor activation. Therefore, we investigated if fluoxetine interferes with Ca(2+) signaling in Jurkat T lymphocytes. Fluoxetine was found to suppress Ca(2+) signaling in response to T cell receptor activation. Moreover, fluoxetine was found to deplete intracellular Ca(2+) stores, thereby leaving less Ca(2+) available for release upon IP3- and ryanodine-receptor activation. The Ca(2+)-modifying effects of fluoxetine are not related to its capability to block the serotonin transporter, as even a large excess of 5HT did not abolish the effects. In conclusion, these data show that fluoxetine decreases IP3- and ryanodine-receptor mediated Ca(2+) release in Jurkat T lymphocytes, an effect likely to be at the basis of the observed immunosuppression. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. L-type calcium channels regulate filopodia stability and cancer cell invasion downstream of integrin signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquemet, Guillaume; Baghirov, Habib; Georgiadou, Maria; Sihto, Harri; Peuhu, Emilia; Cettour-Janet, Pierre; He, Tao; Perälä, Merja; Kronqvist, Pauliina; Joensuu, Heikki; Ivaska, Johanna

    2016-12-02

    Mounting in vitro, in vivo and clinical evidence suggest an important role for filopodia in driving cancer cell invasion. Using a high-throughput microscopic-based drug screen, we identify FDA-approved calcium channel blockers (CCBs) as potent inhibitors of filopodia formation in cancer cells. Unexpectedly, we discover that L-type calcium channels are functional and frequently expressed in cancer cells suggesting a previously unappreciated role for these channels during tumorigenesis. We further demonstrate that, at filopodia, L-type calcium channels are activated by integrin inside-out signalling, integrin activation and Src. Moreover, L-type calcium channels promote filopodia stability and maturation into talin-rich adhesions through the spatially restricted regulation of calcium entry and subsequent activation of the protease calpain-1. Altogether we uncover a novel and clinically relevant signalling pathway that regulates filopodia formation in cancer cells and propose that cycles of filopodia stabilization, followed by maturation into focal adhesions, directs cancer cell migration and invasion.

  1. Scrophularia orientalis extract induces calcium signaling and apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    LANGE, INGO; MOSCHNY, JULIA; TAMANYAN, KAMILLA; KHUTSISHVILI, MANANA; ATHA, DANIEL; BORRIS, ROBERT P.; KOOMOA, DANA-LYNN

    2016-01-01

    Effective neuroblastoma (NB) treatments are still limited despite treatment options available today. Therefore, this study attempted to identify novel plant extracts that have anticancer effects. Cytotoxicity and increased intracellular calcium levels were determined using the Sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay and Fluo4-AM (acetoxymethyl) staining and fluorescence microscopy in NB cells in order to screen a library of plant extracts. The current study examined the anticancer effects of a dichloromethane extract from Scrophularia orientalis L. (Scrophulariaceae), a plant that has been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine. This extract contained highly potent agents that significantly reduced cell survival and increased calcium levels in NB cells. Further analysis revealed that cell death induced by this extract was associated with intracellular calcium release, opening of the MPTP, caspase 3- and PARP-cleavage suggesting that this extract induced aberrant calcium signaling that resulted in apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway. Therefore, agents from Scrophularia orientalis may have the potential to lead to new chemo therapeutic anticancer drugs. Furthermore, targeting intracellular calcium signaling may be a novel strategy to develop more effective treatments for NB. PMID:26848085

  2. Calcium signaling alterations, oxidative stress, and autophagy in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ureshino, Rodrigo Portes; Rocha, Katiucha Karolina; Lopes, Guiomar Silva; Bincoletto, Cláudia; Smaili, Soraya Soubhi

    2014-07-01

    Aging is a multi-factorial process that may be associated with several functional and structural deficits which can evolve into degenerative diseases. In this review, we present data that may depict an expanded view of molecular aging theories, beginning with the idea that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are the major effectors in this process. In addition, we have correlated the importance of autophagy as a neuroprotective mechanism and discussed a link between age-related molecules, Ca(2+) signaling, and oxidative stress. There is evidence suggesting that alterations in Ca(2+) homeostasis, including mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload and alterations in electron transport chain (ETC) complexes, which increase cell vulnerability, are linked to oxidative stress in aging. As much as Ca(2+) signaling is altered in aged cells, excess ROS can be produced due to an ineffective coupling of mitochondrial respiration. Damaged mitochondria might not be removed by the macroautophagic system, which is hampered in aging by lipofuscin accumulation, boosting ROS generation, damaging DNA, and, ultimately, leading to apoptosis. This process can lead to altered protein expression (such as p53, Sirt1, and IGF-1) and progress to cell death. This cycle can lead to increased cell vulnerability in aging and contribute to an increased susceptibility to degenerative processes. A better understanding of Ca(2+) signaling and molecular aging alterations is important for preventing apoptosis in age-related diseases. In addition, caloric restriction, resveratrol and autophagy modulation appear to be predominantly cytoprotective, and further studies of this process are promising in age-related disease therapeutics.

  3. Nuclear proton dynamics and interactions with calcium signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulikova, Alzbeta; Swietach, Pawel

    2016-07-01

    Biochemical signals acting on the nucleus can regulate gene expression. Despite the inherent affinity of nucleic acids and nuclear proteins (e.g. transcription factors) for protons, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate nuclear pH (pHnuc), and how these could be exploited to control gene expression. Here, we show that pHnuc dynamics can be imaged using the DNA-binding dye Hoechst 33342. Nuclear pores allow the passage of medium-sized molecules (calcein), but protons must first bind to mobile buffers in order to gain access to the nucleoplasm. Fixed buffering residing in the nucleus of permeabilized cells was estimated to be very weak on the basis of the large amplitude of pHnuc transients evoked by photolytic H(+)-uncaging or exposure to weak acids/bases. Consequently, the majority of nuclear pH buffering is sourced from the cytoplasm in the form of mobile buffers. Effective proton diffusion was faster in nucleoplasm than in cytoplasm, in agreement with the higher mobile-to-fixed buffering ratio in the nucleus. Cardiac myocyte pHnuc changed in response to maneuvers that alter nuclear Ca(2+) signals. Blocking Ca(2+) release from inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors stably alkalinized the nucleus. This Ca(2+)-pH interaction may arise from competitive binding to common chemical moieties. Competitive binding to mobile buffers may couple the efflux of Ca(2+)via nuclear pores with a counterflux of protons. This would generate a stable pH gradient between cytoplasm and nucleus that is sensitive to the state of nuclear Ca(2+) signaling. The unusual behavior of protons in the nucleus provides new mechanisms for regulating cardiac nuclear biology. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. FIBROBLAST CYTOSKELETAL REMODELING INDUCED BY TISSUE STRETCH INVOLVES ATP SIGNALING

    OpenAIRE

    Langevin, HM; Fujita, T.; Bouffard, NA; Takano, T; Koptiuch, C; Badger, GJ; Nedergaard, M

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblasts in whole areolar connective tissue respond to static stretching of the tissue by expanding and remodeling their cytoskeleton within minutes both ex vivo and in vivo. This study tested the hypothesis that the mechanism of fibroblast expansion in response to tissue stretch involves extracellular ATP signaling. In response to tissue stretch ex vivo, ATP levels in the bath solution increased significantly, and this increase was sustained for 20 minutes, returning to baseline at 60 min...

  5. Trichomoniasis immunity and the involvement of the purinergic signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Braz Menezes

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Innate and adaptive immunity play a significant role in trichomoniasis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. In the urogenital tract, innate immunity is accomplished by a defense physical barrier constituted by epithelial cells, mucus, and acidic pH. During infection, immune cells, antimicrobial peptides, cytokines, chemokines, and adaptive immunity evolve in the reproductive tract, and a proinflammatory response is generated to eliminate the invading extracellular pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis. However, the parasite has developed complex evolutionary mechanisms to evade the host immune response through cysteine proteases, phenotypic variation, and molecular mimicry. The purinergic system constitutes a signaling cellular net where nucleotides and nucleosides, enzymes, purinoceptors and transporters are involved in almost all cells and tissues signaling pathways, especially in central and autonomic nervous systems, endocrine, respiratory, cardiac, reproductive, and immune systems, during physiological as well as pathological processes. The involvement of the purinergic system in T. vaginalis biology and infection has been demonstrated and this review highlights the participation of this signaling pathway in the parasite immune evasion strategies. Keywords: Trichomoniasis, Innate immune response, Adaptive immune response, Evasion mechanisms, Purinergic signaling

  6. Structural dynamics of the cell nucleus: basis for morphology modulation of nuclear calcium signaling and gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queisser, Gillian; Wiegert, Simon; Bading, Hilmar

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal morphology plays an essential role in signal processing in the brain. Individual neurons can undergo use-dependent changes in their shape and connectivity, which affects how intracellular processes are regulated and how signals are transferred from one cell to another in a neuronal network. Calcium is one of the most important intracellular second messengers regulating cellular morphologies and functions. In neurons, intracellular calcium levels are controlled by ion channels in the plasma membrane such as NMDA receptors (NMDARs), voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and certain α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) as well as by calcium exchange pathways between the cytosol and internal calcium stores including the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Synaptic activity and the subsequent opening of ligand and/or voltage-gated calcium channels can initiate cytosolic calcium transients which propagate towards the cell soma and enter the nucleus via its nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) embedded in the nuclear envelope. We recently described the discovery that in hippocampal neurons the morphology of the nucleus affects the calcium dynamics within the nucleus. Here we propose that nuclear infoldings determine whether a nucleus functions as an integrator or detector of oscillating calcium signals. We outline possible ties between nuclear mophology and transcriptional activity and discuss the importance of extending the approach to whole cell calcium signal modeling in order to understand synapse-to-nucleus communication in healthy and dysfunctional neurons.

  7. Spinorphin inhibits membrane depolarization- and capsaicin-induced intracellular calcium signals in rat primary nociceptive dorsal root ganglion neurons in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayar, Ahmet; Ozcan, Mete; Kuzgun, Kemal Tuğrul; Kalkan, Omer Faruk

    2015-01-01

    Spinorphin is a potential endogenous antinociceptive agent although the mechanism(s) of its analgesic effect remain unknown. We conducted this study to investigate, by considering intracellular calcium concentrations as a key signal for nociceptive transmission, the effects of spinorphin on cytoplasmic Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) transients, evoked by high-K(+) (30 mM) depolariasation or capsaicin, and to determine whether there were any differences in the effects of spinorphin among subpopulation of cultured rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. DRG neurons were cultured on glass coverslips following enzymatic digestion and mechanical agitation, and loaded with the calcium sensitive dye fura-2 AM (1 µM). Intracellular calcium responses in individual DRG neurons were quantified using standard fura-2 based ratiometric calcium imaging technique. All data were analyzed by using unpaired t test, p nociceptive subtypes of this primary sensory neurons suggesting that peripheral site is involved in the pain modulating effect of this endogenous agent.

  8. Effect of sound on gap-junction-based intercellular signaling: Calcium waves under acoustic irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deymier, P A; Swinteck, N; Runge, K; Deymier-Black, A; Hoying, J B

    2015-01-01

    We present a previously unrecognized effect of sound waves on gap-junction-based intercellular signaling such as in biological tissues composed of endothelial cells. We suggest that sound irradiation may, through temporal and spatial modulation of cell-to-cell conductance, create intercellular calcium waves with unidirectional signal propagation associated with nonconventional topologies. Nonreciprocity in calcium wave propagation induced by sound wave irradiation is demonstrated in the case of a linear and a nonlinear reaction-diffusion model. This demonstration should be applicable to other types of gap-junction-based intercellular signals, and it is thought that it should be of help in interpreting a broad range of biological phenomena associated with the beneficial therapeutic effects of sound irradiation and possibly the harmful effects of sound waves on health.

  9. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from dietary supplements are linked to a greater risk of kidney stones, especially among older adults. But calcium from foods does not appear to cause kidney stones. For most people, other factors (such as not drinking enough fluids) probably have ...

  10. Plants, symbiosis and parasites: a calcium signalling connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Jeffrey F; Harmon, Alice

    2005-07-01

    A unique family of protein kinases has evolved with regulatory domains containing sequences that are related to Ca(2+)-binding EF-hands. In this family, the archetypal Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) have been found in plants and some protists, including the malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Recent genetic evidence has revealed isoform-specific functions for a CDPK that is essential for Plasmodium berghei gametogenesis, and for a related chimeric Ca(2+) and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) that is essential to the formation of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing nodules in plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the analysis of 42 isoforms of CDPK and related kinases is expected to delineate Ca(2+) signalling pathways in all aspects of plant biology.

  11. Characterization of NAADP-mediated calcium signaling in human spermatozoa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez-Tusie, A.A. [Departamento de Genética del Desarrollo y Fisiología Molecular, Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Vasudevan, S.R.; Churchill, G.C. [Department of Pharmacology, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3QT, England (United Kingdom); Nishigaki, T. [Departamento de Genética del Desarrollo y Fisiología Molecular, Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Treviño, C.L., E-mail: ctrevino@ibt.unam.mx [Departamento de Genética del Desarrollo y Fisiología Molecular, Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •Human sperm cells synthesize NAADP. •NAADP-AM mediates [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increases in human sperm in the absence of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}. •Human sperm have two acidic compartments located in the head and midpiece. -- Abstract: Ca{sup 2+} signaling in spermatozoa plays a crucial role during processes such as capacitation and release of the acrosome, but the underlying molecular mechanisms still remain unclear. Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) is a potent Ca{sup 2+}-releasing second messenger in a variety of cellular processes. The presence of a NAADP synthesizing enzyme in sea urchin sperm has been previously reported, suggesting a possible role of NAADP in sperm Ca{sup 2+} signaling. In this work we used in vitro enzyme assays to show the presence of a novel NAADP synthesizing enzyme in human sperm, and to characterize its sensitivity to Ca{sup 2+} and pH. Ca{sup 2+} fluorescence imaging studies demonstrated that the permeable form of NAADP (NAADP-AM) induces intracellular [Ca{sup 2+}] increases in human sperm even in the absence of extracellular Ca{sup 2+}. Using LysoTracker®, a fluorescent probe that selectively accumulates in acidic compartments, we identified two such stores in human sperm cells. Their acidic nature was further confirmed by the reduction in staining intensity observed upon inhibition of the endo-lysosomal proton pump with Bafilomycin, or after lysosomal bursting with glycyl-L-phenylalanine-2-naphthylamide. The selective fluorescent NAADP analog, Ned-19, stained the same subcellular regions as LysoTracker®, suggesting that these stores are the targets of NAADP action.

  12. Extracellular Ca2+ is a danger signal activating the NLRP3 inflammasome through G protein-coupled calcium sensing receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossol, Manuela; Pierer, Matthias; Raulien, Nora

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome enables monocytes and macrophages to release high levels of interleukin-1ß during inflammatory responses. Concentrations of extracellular calcium can increase at sites of infection, inflammation or cell activation. Here we show that increased extracellular...... calcium activates the NLRP3 inflammasome via stimulation of G protein-coupled calcium sensing receptors. Activation is mediated by signalling through the calcium-sensing receptor and GPRC6A via the phosphatidyl inositol/Ca(2+) pathway. The resulting increase in the intracellular calcium concentration...

  13. Calcium is involved in the R Mc1 (blb)-mediated hypersensitive response against Meloidogyne chitwoodi in potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Laura J; Brown, Charles R; Elling, Axel A

    2015-01-01

    Functional characterization of the Columbia root-knot nematode resistance gene R Mc1 ( blb ) in potato revealed the R gene-mediated resistance is dependent on a hypersensitive response and involves calcium. The resistance (R) gene R Mc1(blb) confers resistance against the plant-parasitic nematode, Meloidogyne chitwoodi. Avirulent and virulent nematodes were used to functionally characterize the R Mc1(blb)-mediated resistance mechanism in potato (Solanum tuberosum). Histological observations indicated a hypersensitive response (HR) occurred during avirulent nematode infection. This was confirmed by quantifying reactive oxygen species activity in response to avirulent and virulent M. chitwoodi. To gain an insight into the signal transduction pathways mediating the R Mc1(blb)-induced HR, chemical inhibitors were utilized. Inhibiting Ca(2+) channels caused a significant reduction in electrolyte leakage, an indicator of cell death. Labeling with a Ca(2+)-sensitive dye revealed high Ca(2+) levels in the root cells surrounding avirulent nematodes. Furthermore, the calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK), StCDPK4 had a higher transcript level in R Mc1(blb) potato roots infected with avirulent nematodes in comparison to roots infected with virulent M. chitwoodi. The results of this study indicate Ca(2+) plays a role in the R Mc1(blb)-mediated resistance against M. chitwoodi in potato.

  14. Excessive signal transduction of gain-of-function variants of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR are associated with increased ER to cytosol calcium gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Ranieri

    Full Text Available In humans, gain-of-function mutations of the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR gene are the cause of autosomal dominant hypocalcemia or type 5 Bartter syndrome characterized by an abnormality of calcium metabolism with low parathyroid hormone levels and excessive renal calcium excretion. Functional characterization of CaSR activating variants has been so far limited at demonstrating an increased sensitivity to external calcium leading to lower Ca-EC50. Here we combine high resolution fluorescence based techniques and provide evidence that for the efficiency of calcium signaling system, cells expressing gain-of-function variants of CaSR monitor cytosolic and ER calcium levels increasing the expression of the Sarco-Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium-ATPase (SERCA and reducing expression of Plasma Membrane Calcium-ATPase (PMCA. Wild-type CaSR (hCaSR-wt and its gain-of-function (hCaSR-R990G; hCaSR-N124K variants were transiently transfected in HEK-293 cells. Basal intracellular calcium concentration was significantly lower in cells expressing hCaSR-wt and its gain of function variants compared to mock. In line, FRET studies using the D1ER probe, which detects [Ca2+]ER directly, demonstrated significantly higher calcium accumulation in cells expressing the gain of function CaSR variants compared to hCaSR-wt. Consistently, cells expressing activating CaSR variants showed a significant increase in SERCA activity and expression and a reduced PMCA expression. This combined parallel regulation in protein expression increases the ER to cytosol calcium gradient explaining the higher sensitivity of CaSR gain-of-function variants to external calcium. This control principle provides a general explanation of how cells reliably connect (and exacerbate receptor inputs to cell function.

  15. Excessive Signal Transduction of Gain-of-Function Variants of the Calcium-Sensing Receptor (CaSR) Are Associated with Increased ER to Cytosol Calcium Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Mise, Annarita; Vezzoli, Giuseppe; Soldati, Laura; Svelto, Maria; Valenti, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    In humans, gain-of-function mutations of the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR) gene are the cause of autosomal dominant hypocalcemia or type 5 Bartter syndrome characterized by an abnormality of calcium metabolism with low parathyroid hormone levels and excessive renal calcium excretion. Functional characterization of CaSR activating variants has been so far limited at demonstrating an increased sensitivity to external calcium leading to lower Ca-EC50. Here we combine high resolution fluorescence based techniques and provide evidence that for the efficiency of calcium signaling system, cells expressing gain-of-function variants of CaSR monitor cytosolic and ER calcium levels increasing the expression of the Sarco-Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium-ATPase (SERCA) and reducing expression of Plasma Membrane Calcium-ATPase (PMCA). Wild-type CaSR (hCaSR-wt) and its gain-of-function (hCaSR-R990G; hCaSR-N124K) variants were transiently transfected in HEK-293 cells. Basal intracellular calcium concentration was significantly lower in cells expressing hCaSR-wt and its gain of function variants compared to mock. In line, FRET studies using the D1ER probe, which detects [Ca2+]ER directly, demonstrated significantly higher calcium accumulation in cells expressing the gain of function CaSR variants compared to hCaSR-wt. Consistently, cells expressing activating CaSR variants showed a significant increase in SERCA activity and expression and a reduced PMCA expression. This combined parallel regulation in protein expression increases the ER to cytosol calcium gradient explaining the higher sensitivity of CaSR gain-of-function variants to external calcium. This control principle provides a general explanation of how cells reliably connect (and exacerbate) receptor inputs to cell function. PMID:24244430

  16. Computational analysis of calcium signaling and membrane electrophysiology in cerebellar Purkinje neurons associated with ataxia

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    Brown Sherry-Ann

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the smooth endoplasmic reticulum (sER calcium channel Inositol Trisphosphate Receptor type 1 (IP3R1 in humans with the motor function coordination disorders Spinocerebellar Ataxia Types 15 and 16 (SCA15/16 and in a corresponding mouse model, the IP3R1delta18/delta18 mice, lead to reduced IP3R1 levels. We posit that increasing IP3R1 sensitivity to IP3 in ataxias with reduced IP3R1 could restore normal calcium response. On the other hand, in mouse models of the human polyglutamine (polyQ ataxias, SCA2, and SCA3, the primary finding appears to be hyperactive IP3R1-mediated calcium release. It has been suggested that the polyQ SCA1 mice may also show hyperactive IP3R1. Yet, SCA1 mice show downregulated gene expression of IP3R1, Homer, metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR, smooth endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATP-ase (SERCA, calbindin, parvalbumin, and other calcium signaling proteins. Results We create a computational model of pathological alterations in calcium signaling in cerebellar Purkinje neurons to investigate several forms of spinocerebellar ataxia associated with changes in the abundance, sensitivity, or activity of the calcium channel IP3R1. We find that increasing IP3R1 sensitivity to IP3 in computational models of SCA15/16 can restore normal calcium response if IP3R1 abundance is not too low. The studied range in IP3R1 levels reflects variability found in human and mouse ataxic models. Further, the required fold increases in sensitivity are within experimental ranges from experiments that use IP3R1 phosphorylation status to adjust its sensitivity to IP3. Results from our simulations of polyglutamine SCAs suggest that downregulation of some calcium signaling proteins may be partially compensatory. However, the downregulation of calcium buffer proteins observed in the SCA1 mice may contribute to pathology. Finally, our model suggests that the calcium-activated voltage-gated potassium channels may provide an

  17. The Calcium Sensor CBL-CIPK Is Involved in Plant’s Response to Abiotic Stresses

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    S. M. Nuruzzaman Manik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stress halts the physiological and developmental process of plant. During stress condition, CBL-CIPK complex is identified as a primary element of calcium sensor to perceive environmental signals. Recent studies established that this complex regulates downstream targets like ion channels and transporters in adverse stages conditions. Crosstalks between the CBL-CIPK complex and different abiotic stresses can extend our research area, which can improve and increase the production of genetically modified crops in response to abiotic stresses. How this complex links with environmental signals and creates adjustable circumstances under unfavorable conditions is now one of the burning issues. Diverse studies are already underway to delineate this signalling mechanism underlying different interactions. Therefore, up to date experimental results should be concisely published, thus paving the way for further research. The present review will concisely recapitulate the recent and ongoing research progress of positive ions (Mg2+, Na+, and K+, negative ions (NO3-, PO4-, and hormonal signalling, which are evolving from accumulating results of analyses of CBL and CIPK loss- or gain-of-function experiments in different species along with some progress and perspectives of our works. In a word, this review will give one step forward direction for more functional studies in this area.

  18. Mutual independence of alkaline- and calcium-mediated signalling in Aspergillus fumigatus refutes the existence of a conserved druggable signalling nexus.

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    Loss, Omar; Bertuzzi, Margherita; Yan, Yu; Fedorova, Natalie; McCann, Bethany L; Armstrong-James, Darius; Espeso, Eduardo A; Read, Nick D; Nierman, William C; Bignell, Elaine M

    2017-09-18

    Functional coupling of calcium- and alkaline responsive signalling occurs in multiple fungi to afford efficient cation homeostasis. Host microenvironments exert alkaline stress and potentially toxic concentrations of Ca(2+) , such that highly conserved regulators of both calcium- (Crz) and pH- (PacC/Rim) responsive signalling are crucial for fungal pathogenicity. Drugs targeting calcineurin are potent antifungal agents but also perturb human immunity thereby negating their use as anti-infectives, abrogation of alkaline signalling has therefore been postulated as an adjunctive antifungal strategy. We examined the interdependency of pH- and calcium-mediated signalling in Aspergillus fumigatus and found that calcium chelation severely impedes hyphal growth indicating a critical requirement for this ion independently of ambient pH. Transcriptomic responses to alkaline pH or calcium excess exhibited minimal similarity. Mutants lacking calcineurin, or its client CrzA, displayed normal alkaline tolerance, and nuclear translocation of CrzA was unaffected by ambient pH. Expression of a highly conserved, alkaline-regulated, sodium ATPase was tolerant of genetic or chemical perturbations of calcium-mediated signalling, but abolished in null mutants of the pH-responsive transcription factor PacC, and PacC proteolytic processing occurred normally during calcium excess. Taken together our data demonstrate that in A. fumigatus the regulatory hierarchy governing alkaline tolerance circumvents calcineurin signalling. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. 14-3-3 Proteins Buffer Intracellular Calcium Sensing Receptors to Constrain Signaling.

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    Michael P Grant

    Full Text Available Calcium sensing receptors (CaSR interact with 14-3-3 binding proteins at a carboxyl terminal arginine-rich motif. Mutations identified in patients with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia, autosomal dominant hypocalcemia, pancreatitis or idiopathic epilepsy support the functional importance of this motif. We combined total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and biochemical approaches to determine the mechanism of 14-3-3 protein regulation of CaSR signaling. Loss of 14-3-3 binding caused increased basal CaSR signaling and plasma membrane levels, and a significantly larger signaling-evoked increase in plasma membrane receptors. Block of core glycosylation with tunicamycin demonstrated that changes in plasma membrane CaSR levels were due to differences in exocytic rate. Western blotting to quantify time-dependent changes in maturation of expressed wt CaSR and a 14-3-3 protein binding-defective mutant demonstrated that signaling increases synthesis to maintain constant levels of the immaturely and maturely glycosylated forms. CaSR thus operates by a feed-forward mechanism, whereby signaling not only induces anterograde trafficking of nascent receptors but also increases biosynthesis to maintain steady state levels of net cellular CaSR. Overall, these studies suggest that 14-3-3 binding at the carboxyl terminus provides an important buffering mechanism to increase the intracellular pool of CaSR available for signaling-evoked trafficking, but attenuates trafficking to control the dynamic range of responses to extracellular calcium.

  20. CASK regulates CaMKII autophosphorylation in neuronal growth, calcium signalling and learning

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    John Michael Gillespie

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Calcium (Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM-dependent kinase II (CaMKII activity plays a fundamental role in learning and memory. A key feature of CaMKII in memory formation is its ability to be regulated by autophosphorylation, which switches its activity on and off during synaptic plasticity. The synaptic scaffolding protein CASK (calcium (Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM associated serine kinase is also important for learning and memory, as mutations in CASK result in intellectual disability and neurological defects in humans. We show that in Drosophila larvae, CASK interacts with CaMKII to control neuronal growth and calcium signalling. Furthermore, deletion of the CaMK-like and L27 domains of CASK (CASK β null or expression of overactive CaMKII (T287D produced similar effects on synaptic growth and Ca2+ signalling. CASK overexpression rescues the effects of CaMKII overactivity, consistent with the notion that CASK and CaMKII act in a common pathway that controls these neuronal processes. The reduction in Ca2+ signalling observed in the CASK β null mutant caused a decrease in vesicle trafficking at synapses. In addition, the decrease in Ca2+ signalling in CASK mutants was associated with an increase in Ether-à-go-go (EAG potassium (K+ channel localisation to synapses. Reducing EAG restored the decrease in Ca2+ signalling observed in CASK mutants to the level of wildtype, suggesting that CASK regulates Ca2+ signalling via EAG. CASK knockdown reduced both appetitive associative learning and odour evoked Ca2+ responses in Drosophila mushroom bodies, which are the learning centres of Drosophila. Expression of human CASK in Drosophila rescued the effect of CASK deletion on the activity state of CaMKII, suggesting that human CASK may also regulate CaMKII autophosphorylation.

  1. CASK regulates CaMKII autophosphorylation in neuronal growth, calcium signaling, and learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, John M.; Hodge, James J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+)/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) activity plays a fundamental role in learning and memory. A key feature of CaMKII in memory formation is its ability to be regulated by autophosphorylation, which switches its activity on and off during synaptic plasticity. The synaptic scaffolding protein CASK (calcium (Ca2+)/calmodulin (CaM) associated serine kinase) is also important for learning and memory, as mutations in CASK result in intellectual disability and neurological defects in humans. We show that in Drosophila larvae, CASK interacts with CaMKII to control neuronal growth and calcium signaling. Furthermore, deletion of the CaMK-like and L27 domains of CASK (CASK β null) or expression of overactive CaMKII (T287D) produced similar effects on synaptic growth and Ca2+ signaling. CASK overexpression rescues the effects of CaMKII overactivity, consistent with the notion that CASK and CaMKII act in a common pathway that controls these neuronal processes. The reduction in Ca2+ signaling observed in the CASK β null mutant caused a decrease in vesicle trafficking at synapses. In addition, the decrease in Ca2+ signaling in CASK mutants was associated with an increase in Ether-à-go-go (EAG) potassium (K+) channel localization to synapses. Reducing EAG restored the decrease in Ca2+ signaling observed in CASK mutants to the level of wildtype, suggesting that CASK regulates Ca2+ signaling via EAG. CASK knockdown reduced both appetitive associative learning and odor evoked Ca2+ responses in Drosophila mushroom bodies, which are the learning centers of Drosophila. Expression of human CASK in Drosophila rescued the effect of CASK deletion on the activity state of CaMKII, suggesting that human CASK may also regulate CaMKII autophosphorylation. PMID:24062638

  2. Cross-talk between signaling pathways can generate robust oscillations in calcium and cAMP.

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    Fernando Siso-Nadal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To control and manipulate cellular signaling, we need to understand cellular strategies for information transfer, integration, and decision-making. A key feature of signal transduction is the generation of only a few intracellular messengers by many extracellular stimuli. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we model molecular cross-talk between two classic second messengers, cyclic AMP (cAMP and calcium, and show that the dynamical complexity of the response of both messengers increases substantially through their interaction. In our model of a non-excitable cell, both cAMP and calcium concentrations can oscillate. If mutually inhibitory, cross-talk between the two second messengers can increase the range of agonist concentrations for which oscillations occur. If mutually activating, cross-talk decreases the oscillation range, but can generate 'bursting' oscillations of calcium and may enable better filtering of noise. CONCLUSION: We postulate that this increased dynamical complexity allows the cell to encode more information, particularly if both second messengers encode signals. In their native environments, it is unlikely that cells are exposed to one stimulus at a time, and cross-talk may help generate sufficiently complex responses to allow the cell to discriminate between different combinations and concentrations of extracellular agonists.

  3. Astrocytic Calcium Waves Signal Brain Injury to Neural Stem and Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Anna; Jubal, Eduardo Rosales; von Laer, Ruth; Döring, Claudia; Rocha, Adriana; Grebbin, Moyo; Zenke, Martin; Kettenmann, Helmut; Stroh, Albrecht; Momma, Stefan

    2017-03-14

    Brain injuries, such as stroke or trauma, induce neural stem cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) to a neurogenic response. Very little is known about the molecular cues that signal tissue damage, even over large distances, to the SVZ. Based on our analysis of gene expression patterns in the SVZ, 48 hr after an ischemic lesion caused by middle cerebral artery occlusion, we hypothesized that the presence of an injury might be transmitted by an astrocytic traveling calcium wave rather than by diffusible factors or hypoxia. Using a newly established in vitro system we show that calcium waves induced in an astrocytic monolayer spread to neural stem and progenitor cells and increase their self-renewal as well as migratory behavior. These changes are due to an upregulation of the Notch signaling pathway. This introduces the concept of propagating astrocytic calcium waves transmitting brain injury signals over long distances. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular Basis of the Extracellular Ligands Mediated Signaling by the Calcium Sensing Receptor

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    Chen Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ca2+-sensing receptors (CaSRs play a central role in regulating extracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]o homeostasis and many (pathophysiological processes in multiple organs. This regulation is orchestrated by a cooperative response to extracellular stimuli such as small changes in Ca2+, Mg2+, amino acids and other ligands. In addition, CaSR is a pleiotropic receptor regulating several intracellular signaling pathways, including calcium mobilization and intracellular calcium oscillation. Nearly 200 mutations and polymorphisms have been found in CaSR in relation to a variety of human disorders associated with abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis. In this review, we summarize efforts directed at identifying binding sites for calcium and amino acids. Both homotropic cooperativity among multiple calcium binding sites and heterotropic cooperativity between calcium and amino acid were revealed using computational modeling, predictions, and site-directed mutagenesis coupled with functional assays. The hinge region of the bilobed Venus flytrap (VFT domain of CaSR plays a pivotal role in coordinating multiple extracellular stimuli, leading to cooperative responses from the receptor. We further highlight the extensive number of disease-associated mutations that have also been shown to affect CaSR’s cooperative action via several types of mechanisms. These results provide insights into the molecular bases of the structure and functional cooperativity of this receptor and other members of family C of the G protein-coupled receptors (cGPCRs in health and disease states, and may assist in the prospective development of novel receptor-based therapeutics.

  5. Potassium conductances mediate bidirectional state-dependent modulation of action potential evoked dendritic calcium signals in dentate gyrus granule cells

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    János Brunner

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Backpropagating action potentials (bAPs and local calcium signals that they trigger are fundamental for dendritic functions. Here we addressed the question what extent the changes of local dendritic membrane properties can contribute to the shaping of the coupling between dendritic action potentials and the local calcium responses. Using a combination of in vitro electrophysiological and confocal imaging techniques we found that activation of dendritic GIRK channels via mGlu2 or GABAB receptors enhanced the bAP¬-triggered calcium signals in the dendrites of dentate gyrus granule cells (GCs. The enhancement of calcium signals was significant only in those dendritic regions, where these receptors are predominantly expressed. Similarly to GIRK channel activation, somatic hyperpolarization by DC current injection (from -64 mV to -77 mV, significantly increased bAP-associated calcium signals in the proximal dendrites. The hyperpolarization was associated with a decrease in the input resistance due to the rectification of the membrane potential of GCs. The effect of hyperpolarization on the calcium signals was maintained when T-type calcium currents were blocked but it decreased when GIRK channels were inhibited. Simultaneous dual somato-dendritic recordings from GCs showed that somatic hyperpolarization accelerated the repolarization phase of dendritic bAP in the proximal region whereas the rising phase and peak amplitude was not affected. We hypothesize that the larger driving force for calcium ions during the faster repolarization can contribute to the increasing in calcium signals. Employment of previously recorded dendritic bAP waveforms from hyperpolarized membrane potential as voltage command evoked larger calcium currents in nucleated patches compared to bAP waveform from the same recording at depolarized membrane potential. Furthermore, addition of native, high-voltage activated, inactivating potassium conductance by somatic dynamic clamp

  6. ZmCPK1, a calcium-independent kinase member of the Zea mays CDPK gene family, functions as a negative regulator in cold stress signalling.

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    Weckwerth, Philipp; Ehlert, Britta; Romeis, Tina

    2015-03-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) have been shown to play important roles in plant environmental stress signal transduction. We report on the identification of ZmCPK1 as a member of the maize (Zea mays) CDPK gene family involved in the regulation of the maize cold stress response. Based upon in silico analysis of the Z. mays cv. B73 genome, we identified that the maize CDPK gene family consists of 39 members. Two CDPK members were selected whose gene expression was either increased (Zmcpk1) or decreased (Zmcpk25) in response to cold exposure. Biochemical analysis demonstrated that ZmCPK1 displays calcium-independent protein kinase activity. The C-terminal calcium-binding domain of ZmCPK1 was sufficient to mediate calcium independency of a previously calcium-dependent enzyme in chimeric ZmCPK25-CPK1 proteins. Furthermore, co-transfection of maize mesophyll protoplasts with active full-length ZmCPK1 suppressed the expression of a cold-induced marker gene, Zmerf3 (ZmCOI6.21). In accordance, heterologous overexpression of ZmCPK1 in Arabidopsis thaliana yielded plants with altered acclimation-induced frost tolerance. Our results identify ZmCPK1 as a negative regulator of cold stress signalling in maize. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Fibroblast cytoskeletal remodeling induced by tissue stretch involves ATP signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, Helene M; Fujita, Takumi; Bouffard, Nicole A; Takano, Takahiro; Koptiuch, Cathryn; Badger, Gary J; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2013-09-01

    Fibroblasts in whole areolar connective tissue respond to static stretching of the tissue by expanding and remodeling their cytoskeleton within minutes both ex vivo and in vivo. This study tested the hypothesis that the mechanism of fibroblast expansion in response to tissue stretch involves extracellular ATP signaling. In response to tissue stretch ex vivo, ATP levels in the bath solution increased significantly, and this increase was sustained for 20 min, returning to baseline at 60 min. No increase in ATP was observed in tissue incubated without stretch or tissue stretched in the presence of the Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632. The increase in fibroblast cross sectional area in response to tissue stretch was blocked by both suramin (a purinergic receptor blocker) and apyrase (an enzyme that selectively degrades extracellular ATP). Furthermore, connexin channel blockers (octanol and carbenoxolone), but not VRAC (fluoxetine) or pannexin (probenecid) channel blockers, inhibited fibroblast expansion. Together, these results support a mechanism in which extracellular ATP signaling via connexin hemichannels mediate the active change in fibroblast shape that occurs in response to a static increase in tissue length. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Cadmium Induces Apoptosis in Freshwater Crab Sinopotamon henanense through Activating Calcium Signal Transduction Pathway.

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    Jinxiang Wang

    Full Text Available Calcium ion (Ca2+ is one of the key intracellular signals, which is implicated in the regulation of cell functions such as impregnation, cell proliferation, differentiation and death. Cadmium (Cd is a toxic environmental pollutant that can disturb cell functions and even lead to cell death. Recently, we have found that Cd induced apoptosis in gill cells of the freshwater crab Sinopotamon henanense via caspase activation. In the present study, we further investigated the role of calcium signaling in the Cd-induced apoptosis in the animals. Our data showed that Cd triggered gill cell apoptosis which is evidenced by apoptotic DNA fragmentation, activations of caspases-3, -8 and -9 and the presence of apoptotic morphological features. Moreover, Cd elevated the intracellular concentration of Ca2+, the protein concentration of calmodulin (CaM and the activity of Ca2+-ATPase in the gill cells of the crabs. Pretreatment of the animals with ethylene glycol-bis-(b-aminoethyl ether-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA, Ca2+ chelator, inhibited Cd-induced activation of caspases-3, -8 and -9 as well as blocked the Cd-triggered apoptotic DNA fragmentation. The apoptotic morphological features were no longer observed in gill cells pretreated with the Ca2+ signaling inhibitors before Cd treatment. Our results indicate that Cd evokes gill cell apoptosis through activating Ca2+-CaM signaling transduction pathway.

  9. The Role of nAChR and Calcium Signaling in Pancreatic Cancer Initiation and Progression

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    Courtney Schaal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer shows a strong correlation with smoking and the current therapeutic strategies have been relatively ineffective in improving the survival of patients. Efforts have been made over the past many years to understand the molecular events that drive the initiation and progression of pancreatic cancer, especially in the context of smoking. It has become clear that components of tobacco smoke not only initiate these cancers, especially pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs through their mutagenic properties, but can also promote the growth and metastasis of these tumors by stimulating cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Studies in cell culture systems, animal models and human samples have shown that nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR activation enhances these tumor-promoting events by channeling signaling through multiple pathways. In this context, signaling through calcium channels appear to facilitate pancreatic cancer growth by itself or downstream of nAChRs. This review article highlights the role of nAChR downstream signaling events and calcium signaling in the growth, metastasis as well as drug resistance of pancreatic cancer.

  10. The Role of nAChR and Calcium Signaling in Pancreatic Cancer Initiation and Progression

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    Schaal, Courtney [Department of Tumor Biology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, FL 33612 (United States); Padmanabhan, Jaya [Department of Molecular Medicine and USF Health Byrd Alzheimer’s Institute, University of South Florida, 4001 E. Fletcher Ave., Tampa, FL 33612 (United States); Chellappan, Srikumar, E-mail: Srikumar.Chellappan@moffitt.org [Department of Tumor Biology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, FL 33612 (United States)

    2015-07-31

    Pancreatic cancer shows a strong correlation with smoking and the current therapeutic strategies have been relatively ineffective in improving the survival of patients. Efforts have been made over the past many years to understand the molecular events that drive the initiation and progression of pancreatic cancer, especially in the context of smoking. It has become clear that components of tobacco smoke not only initiate these cancers, especially pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) through their mutagenic properties, but can also promote the growth and metastasis of these tumors by stimulating cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Studies in cell culture systems, animal models and human samples have shown that nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) activation enhances these tumor-promoting events by channeling signaling through multiple pathways. In this context, signaling through calcium channels appear to facilitate pancreatic cancer growth by itself or downstream of nAChRs. This review article highlights the role of nAChR downstream signaling events and calcium signaling in the growth, metastasis as well as drug resistance of pancreatic cancer.

  11. Identification of a Calcium Signalling Pathway of S-[6]-Gingerol in HuH-7 Cells

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    Xiao-Hong Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium signals in hepatocytes control cell growth, proliferation, and death. Members of the transient receptor potential (TRP cation channel superfamily are candidate calcium influx channels. NFκB activation strictly depends on calcium influx and often induces antiapoptotic genes favouring cell survival. Previously, we reported that S-[6]-gingerol is an efficacious agonist of the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1 in neurones. In this study, we tested the effect of S-[6]-gingerol on HuH-7 cells using the Fluo-4 calcium assay, RT-qPCR, transient cell transfection, and luciferase measurements. We found that S-[6]-gingerol induced a transient rise in [Ca2+]i in HuH-7 cells. The increase in [Ca2+]i induced by S-[6]-gingerol was abolished by preincubation with EGTA and was also inhibited by the TRPV1 channel antagonist capsazepine. Expression of TRPV1 in HuH-7 cells was confirmed by mRNA analysis as well as a test for increase of [Ca2+]i by TRPV1 agonist capsaicin and its inhibition by capsazepine. We found that S-[6]-gingerol induced rapid NFκB activation through TRPV1 in HuH-7 cells. Furthermore, S-[6]-gingerol-induced NFκB activation was dependent on the calcium gradient and TRPV1. The rapid NFκB activation by S-[6]-gingerol was associated with an increase in mRNA levels of NFκB-target genes: cIAP-2, XIAP, and Bcl-2 that encode antiapoptotic proteins.

  12. Mechanisms involved in calcium oxalate endocytosis by Madin-Darby canine kidney cells

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    A.H. Campos

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium oxalate (CaOx crystals adhere to and are internalized by tubular renal cells and it seems that this interaction is related (positively or negatively to the appearance of urinary calculi. The present study analyzes a series of mechanisms possibly involved in CaOx uptake by Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK cells. CaOx crystals were added to MDCK cell cultures and endocytosis was evaluated by polarized light microscopy. This process was inhibited by an increase in intracellular calcium by means of ionomycin (100 nM; N = 6; 43.9% inhibition; P<0.001 or thapsigargin (1 µM; N = 6; 33.3% inhibition; P<0.005 administration, and via blockade of cytoskeleton assembly by the addition of colchicine (10 µM; N = 8; 46.1% inhibition; P<0.001 or cytochalasin B (10 µM; N = 8; 34.2% inhibition; P<0.001. Furthermore, CaOx uptake was reduced when the activity of protein kinase C was inhibited by staurosporine (10 nM; N = 6; 44% inhibition; P<0.01, or that of cyclo-oxygenase by indomethacin (3 µM; N = 12; 17.2% inhibition; P<0.05; however, the uptake was unaffected by modulation of potassium channel activity with glibenclamide (3 µM; N = 6, tetraethylammonium (1 mM; N = 6 or cromakalim (1 µM; N = 6. Taken together, these data indicate that the process of CaOx internalization by renal tubular cells is similar to the endocytosis reported for other systems. These findings may be relevant to cellular phenomena involved in early stages of the formation of renal stones.

  13. Use of multiple singular value decompositions to analyze complex intracellular calcium ion signals

    KAUST Repository

    Martinez, Josue G.

    2009-12-01

    We compare calcium ion signaling (Ca(2+)) between two exposures; the data are present as movies, or, more prosaically, time series of images. This paper describes novel uses of singular value decompositions (SVD) and weighted versions of them (WSVD) to extract the signals from such movies, in a way that is semi-automatic and tuned closely to the actual data and their many complexities. These complexities include the following. First, the images themselves are of no interest: all interest focuses on the behavior of individual cells across time, and thus, the cells need to be segmented in an automated manner. Second, the cells themselves have 100+ pixels, so that they form 100+ curves measured over time, so that data compression is required to extract the features of these curves. Third, some of the pixels in some of the cells are subject to image saturation due to bit depth limits, and this saturation needs to be accounted for if one is to normalize the images in a reasonably un-biased manner. Finally, the Ca(2+) signals have oscillations or waves that vary with time and these signals need to be extracted. Thus, our aim is to show how to use multiple weighted and standard singular value decompositions to detect, extract and clarify the Ca(2+) signals. Our signal extraction methods then lead to simple although finely focused statistical methods to compare Ca(2+) signals across experimental conditions.

  14. Bone morphogenetic protein Smads signaling in mesenchymal stem cells affected by osteoinductive calcium phosphate ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhurong; Wang, Zhe; Qing, Fangzhu; Ni, Yilu; Fan, Yujiang; Tan, Yanfei; Zhang, Xingdong

    2015-03-01

    Porous calcium phosphate ceramics (CaP ceramics) could induce ectopic bone formation which was regulated by various signal molecules. In this work, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were cultured on the surface of osteoinductive hydroxyapatite (HA) and biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) ceramics in comparison with control (culture plate) for up to 14 days to detect the signal molecules which might be affected by the CaP ceramics. Without adding osteogenic factors, MSCs cultured on HA and BCP both expressed higher Runx2, Osterix, collagen type I, osteopontin, bone sialoprotein, and osteocalcin at various stages compared with control, thus confirmed the osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs. Later study demonstrated the messenger RNA level of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and BMP4 were also significantly enhanced by HA and BCP. Furthermore, Smad1, 4, 5, and Dlx5, the main molecules in the BMP/Smads signaling pathway, were upregulated by HA and BCP. Moreover, the higher expression of Smads and BMP2, 4 in BCP over HA, corresponded to the better performance of BCP in stimulating in vitro osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs. This was in accordance with the better osteoinductivity of BCP over HA in vivo. Altogether, these results implied that the CaP ceramics may initiate the osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs by influencing the expression of molecules in BMP/Smads pathway. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Methamphetamine addiction: involvement of CREB and neuroinflammatory signaling pathways

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    Krasnova, Irina N.; Justinova, Zuzana; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2017-01-01

    Rationale and objectives Addiction to psychostimulant methamphetamine (METH) remains a major public health problem in the world. Animal models that use METH self-administration incorporate many features of human drug-taking behavior and are very helpful in elucidating mechanisms underlying METH addiction. These models are also helping to decipher the neurobiological substrates of associated neuropsychiatric complications. This review summarizes our work on the influence of METH self-administration on dopamine systems, transcriptional and immune responses in the brain. Methods We used the rat model of METH self-administration with extended access (15 hours/day for 8 consecutive days) to investigate the effects of voluntary METH intake on the markers of dopamine system integrity and changes in gene expression observed in the brain at 2 hours – 1 month after cessation of drug exposure. Results Extended access to METH self-administration caused changes in the rat brain that are consistent with clinical findings reported in neuroimaging and post-mortem studies of human METH addicts. In addition, gene expression studies using striatal tissues from METH self-administering rats revealed increased expression of genes involved in CREB signaling pathway and in the activation of neuroinflammatory response in the brain. Conclusion These data show an association of METH exposure with activation of neuroplastic and neuroinflammatory cascades in the brain. The neuroplastic changes may be involved in promoting METH addiction. Neuroinflammatory processes in the striatum may underlie cognitive deficits, depression, and parkinsonism reported in METH addicts. Therapeutic approaches that include suppression of neuroinflammation may be beneficial to addicted patients. PMID:26873080

  16. Odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells by calcium silicate materials stimulating via FGFR/ERK signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chao-Hsin [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Hung, Chi-Jr; Huang, Tsui-Hsien [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chi-Chang [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Kao, Chia-Tze [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Shie, Ming-You, E-mail: eviltacasi@gmail.com [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-01

    Bone healing needs a complex interaction of growth factors that establishes an environment for efficient bone formation. We examine how calcium silicate (CS) and tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) cements influence the behavior of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) through fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) and active MAPK pathways, in particular ERK. The hDPCs are cultured with β-TCP and CS, after which the cells' viability and odontogenic differentiation markers are determined by using PrestoBlue® assay and western blot, respectively. The effect of small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection targeting FGFR was also evaluated. The results showed that CS promoted cell proliferation and enhances FGFR expression. It was also found that CS increases ERK and p38 activity in hDPCs, and furthermore, raises the expression and secretion of DSP, and DMP-1. Additionally, statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) have been found in the calcium deposition in si-FGFR transfection and ERK inhibitor between CS and β-TCP; these variations indicated that ERK/MAPK signaling is involved in the silicon-induced odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs. The current study shows that CS substrates play a key role in odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs through FGFR and modulate ERK/MAPK activation. - Highlights: • CS influences the behavior of hDPCs through fibroblast growth factor receptor. • CS increases ERK and p38 activity in hDPCs. • ERK/MAPK signaling is involved in the Si-induced odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs. • Ca staining shows that FGFR regulates hDPC differentiation on CS, but not on β-TCP.

  17. Transcriptional expression analysis of genes involved in regulation of calcium translocation and storage in finger millet (Eleusine coracana L. Gartn.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Neelofar; Taj, Gohar; Arora, Sandeep; Kumar, Anil

    2014-10-25

    Finger millet (Eleusine coracana) variably accumulates calcium in different tissues, due to differential expression of genes involved in uptake, translocation and accumulation of calcium. Ca(2+)/H(+) antiporter (CAX1), two pore channel (TPC1), CaM-stimulated type IIB Ca(2+) ATPase and two CaM dependent protein kinase (CaMK1 and 2) homologs were studied in finger millet. Two genotypes GP-45 and GP-1 (high and low calcium accumulating, respectively) were used to understand the role of these genes in differential calcium accumulation. For most of the genes higher expression was found in the high calcium accumulating genotype. CAX1 was strongly expressed in the late stages of spike development and could be responsible for accumulating high concentrations of calcium in seeds. TPC1 and Ca(2+) ATPase homologs recorded strong expression in the root, stem and developing spike and signify their role in calcium uptake and translocation, respectively. Calmodulin showed strong expression and a similar expression pattern to the type IIB ATPase in the developing spike only and indicating developing spike or even seed specific isoform of CaM affecting the activity of downstream target of calcium transportation. Interestingly, CaMK1 and CaMK2 had expression patterns similar to ATPase and TPC1 in various tissues raising a possibility of their respective regulation via CaM kinase. Expression pattern of 14-3-3 gene was observed to be similar to CAX1 gene in leaf and developing spike inferring a surprising possibility of CAX1 regulation through 14-3-3 protein. Our results provide a molecular insight for explaining the mechanism of calcium accumulation in finger millet. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Signaling domain of Sonic Hedgehog as cannibalistic calcium-regulated zinc-peptidase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Rebollido-Rios

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sonic Hedgehog (Shh is a representative of the evolutionary closely related class of Hedgehog proteins that have essential signaling functions in animal development. The N-terminal domain (ShhN is also assigned to the group of LAS proteins (LAS = Lysostaphin type enzymes, D-Ala-D-Ala metalloproteases, Sonic Hedgehog, of which all members harbor a structurally well-defined Zn2+ center; however, it is remarkable that ShhN so far is the only LAS member without proven peptidase activity. Another unique feature of ShhN in the LAS group is a double-Ca2+ center close to the zinc. We have studied the effect of these calcium ions on ShhN structure, dynamics, and interactions. We find that the presence of calcium has a marked impact on ShhN properties, with the two calcium ions having different effects. The more strongly bound calcium ion significantly stabilizes the overall structure. Surprisingly, the binding of the second calcium ion switches the putative catalytic center from a state similar to LAS enzymes to a state that probably is catalytically inactive. We describe in detail the mechanics of the switch, including the effect on substrate co-ordinating residues and on the putative catalytic water molecule. The properties of the putative substrate binding site suggest that ShhN could degrade other ShhN molecules, e.g. by cleavage at highly conserved glycines in ShhN. To test experimentally the stability of ShhN against autodegradation, we compare two ShhN mutants in vitro: (1 a ShhN mutant unable to bind calcium but with putative catalytic center intact, and thus, according to our hypothesis, a constitutively active peptidase, and (2 a mutant carrying additionally mutation E177A, i.e., with the putative catalytically active residue knocked out. The in vitro results are consistent with ShhN being a cannibalistic zinc-peptidase. These experiments also reveal that the peptidase activity depends on pH.

  19. Synaptic activity and nuclear calcium signaling protect hippocampal neurons from death signal-associated nuclear translocation of FoxO3a induced by extrasynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Oliver; Bading, Hilmar

    2010-06-18

    Synaptic activity and the generation of nuclear calcium signals promote neuronal survival through a transcription-dependent process that is not fully understood. Here we show that one mechanism of activity-induced acquired neuroprotection involves the Forkhead transcription factor, FoxO3a, which is known to induce genomic death responses upon translocation from the cytosol to the nucleus. Depletion of endogenous FoxO3a using RNA interference renders hippocampal neurons more resistant to excitotoxic cell death. Using a FoxO3a-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein to monitor in real time the localization of FoxO3a in hippocampal neurons, we found that several cell death inducing stimuli, including the stimulation of extrasynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, growth factor withdrawal, and oxygen-glucose deprivation, caused a swift translocation of FoxO3a-GFP from the cytosol to the cell nucleus. This translocation was inhibited in hippocampal neurons that had undergone prolonged periods of synaptic activity before exposure to cell death-inducing conditions. The activity-dependent protection from death signal-induced FoxO3a-GFP nuclear translocation required synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation and was dependent on nuclear calcium signaling and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV. The modulation of nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of FoxO3a may represent one mechanism through which nuclear calcium-induced genomic responses affect cell death processes.

  20. Synaptic Activity and Nuclear Calcium Signaling Protect Hippocampal Neurons from Death Signal-associated Nuclear Translocation of FoxO3a Induced by Extrasynaptic N-Methyl-d-aspartate Receptors*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Oliver; Bading, Hilmar

    2010-01-01

    Synaptic activity and the generation of nuclear calcium signals promote neuronal survival through a transcription-dependent process that is not fully understood. Here we show that one mechanism of activity-induced acquired neuroprotection involves the Forkhead transcription factor, FoxO3a, which is known to induce genomic death responses upon translocation from the cytosol to the nucleus. Depletion of endogenous FoxO3a using RNA interference renders hippocampal neurons more resistant to excitotoxic cell death. Using a FoxO3a-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein to monitor in real time the localization of FoxO3a in hippocampal neurons, we found that several cell death inducing stimuli, including the stimulation of extrasynaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors, growth factor withdrawal, and oxygen-glucose deprivation, caused a swift translocation of FoxO3a-GFP from the cytosol to the cell nucleus. This translocation was inhibited in hippocampal neurons that had undergone prolonged periods of synaptic activity before exposure to cell death-inducing conditions. The activity-dependent protection from death signal-induced FoxO3a-GFP nuclear translocation required synaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor activation and was dependent on nuclear calcium signaling and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV. The modulation of nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of FoxO3a may represent one mechanism through which nuclear calcium-induced genomic responses affect cell death processes. PMID:20404335

  1. Astrocytic calcium signals induced by neuromodulators via functional metabotropic receptors in the ventral respiratory group of neonatal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härtel, Kai; Schnell, Christian; Hülsmann, Swen

    2009-06-01

    A controlled, periodic exchange of air between lungs and atmosphere requires a neuronal rhythm generated by a network of neurons in the ventral respiratory group (VRG) of the brainstem. Glial cells, e.g. astrocytes, have been shown to be supportive in stabilizing this neuronal activity in the central nervous system during development. In addition, a variety of neuromodulators including serotonin (5-HT), Substance P (SP), and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) stimulate respiratory neurons directly. If astrocytes in the VRG, like their neuronal neighbors, are also directly stimulated by neuromodulators, they might indirectly affect the respiratory neurons and consequently the respiratory rhythm. In the present study, we provide support for this concept by demonstrating expression of NK1-R, TRH-R, and 5-HT(2)-R in astrocytes of the VRG with immunohistochemistry. Additionally, we showed that the external application of the neuromodulators 5-HT, SP, and TRH activate calcium transients in VRG astrocytes. Consequently, we postulate that in the VRG of the neonatal mouse, neuromodulation by SP, TRH, and serotonin also involves astrocytic calcium signaling. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. DMPD: Signals and receptors involved in recruitment of inflammatory cells. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 7744810 Signals and receptors involved in recruitment of inflammatory cells. Ben-Ba...ow Signals and receptors involved in recruitment of inflammatory cells. PubmedID 7744810 Title Signals and receptors involved in recr...uitment of inflammatory cells. Authors Ben-Baruch A, Mic

  3. Transient Oxygen/Glucose Deprivation Causes a Delayed Loss of Mitochondria and Increases Spontaneous Calcium Signaling in Astrocytic Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, John C; Jackson, Joshua G; Robinson, Michael B

    2016-07-06

    , are vital integrators of signaling and metabolism. Each astrocyte consists of many long, thin branches, called processes, which ensheathe vasculature and thousands of synapses. Mitochondria occupy the majority of each process. This occupancy is decreased by ∼50% 24 h after an in vitro model of ischemia/reperfusion injury, due to delayed fragmentation and mitophagy. The mechanism appears to be independent of neuropathology, instead involving an extended period of high glutamate uptake into astrocytes. Our data suggest that mitochondria serve as spatial buffers, and possibly even as a source of calcium signals in astrocytic processes. Loss of mitochondria resulted in drastically altered calcium signaling that could disrupt neurovascular coupling and gliotransmission. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/367110-19$15.00/0.

  4. A pulsing electric field (PEF) increases human chondrocyte proliferation through a transduction pathway involving nitric oxide signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons, Robert J; Gordon, Stephen L; Kronberg, James; Ganey, Timothy; Pilla, Arthur A

    2008-06-01

    A potential treatment modality for joint pain due to cartilage degradation is electromagnetic fields (EMF) that can be delivered, noninvasively, to chondrocytes buried within cartilage. A pulsed EMF in clinical use for recalcitrant bone fracture healing has been modified to be delivered as a pulsed electric field (PEF) through capacitive coupling. It was the objective of this study to determine whether the PEF signal could have a direct effect on chondrocytes in vitro. This study shows that a 30-min PEF treatment can increase DNA content of chondrocyte monolayer by approximately 150% at 72 h poststimulus. Studies intended to explore the biological mechanism showed this PEF signal increased nitric oxide measured in culture medium and cGMP measured in cell extract within the 30-min exposure period. Increasing calcium in the culture media or adding the calcium ionophore A23187, without PEF treatment, also significantly increased short-term nitric oxide production. The inhibitor W7, which blocks calcium/calmodulin, prevented the PEF-stimulated increase in both nitric oxide and cGMP. The inhibitor L-NAME, which blocks nitric oxide synthase, prevented the PEF-stimulated increase in nitric oxide, cGMP, and DNA content. An inhibitor of guanylate cyclase (LY83583) blocked the PEF-stimulated increase in cGMP and DNA content. A nitric oxide donor, when present for only 30 min, increased DNA content 72 h later. Taken together, these results suggest the transduction pathway for PEF-stimulated chondrocyte proliferation involves nitric oxide and the production of nitric oxide may be the result of a cascade that involves calcium, calmodulin, and cGMP production. (c) 2008 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  5. Novel strategies in drug discovery of the calcium-sensing receptor based on biased signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Alex Rojas Bie; Smajilovic, Sanela; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2012-01-01

    A hallmark of chronic kidney disease is hyperphosphatemia due to renal phosphate retention. Prolonged parathyroid gland exposure to hyperphosphatemia leads to secondary hyperparathyroidism characterized by hyperplasia of the glands and excessive secretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH), which cause...... by virtue of it not affecting calcitonin secretion. The present review will focus on recent advancements in understanding signaling and biased signaling of the CaSR, and how that may be utilized to discover new and smarter drugs targeting the CaSR....... targeting the CaSR and can be used to effectively control and reduce PTH secretion in PTH-related diseases. Cinacalcet is a positive allosteric modulator of the CaSR and affects PTH secretion from parathyroid glands by shifting the calcium-PTH concentration-response curve to the left. One major disadvantage...

  6. Intravital imaging reveals p53-dependent cancer cell death induced by phototherapy via calcium signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missiroli, Sonia; Poletti, Federica; Ramirez, Fabian Galindo; Morciano, Giampaolo; Morganti, Claudia; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Mammano, Fabio; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    One challenge in biology is signal transduction monitoring in a physiological context. Intravital imaging techniques are revolutionizing our understanding of tumor and host cell behaviors in the tumor environment. However, these deep tissue imaging techniques have not yet been adopted to investigate the second messenger calcium (Ca2+). In the present study, we established conditions that allow the in vivo detection of Ca2+ signaling in three-dimensional tumor masses in mouse models. By combining intravital imaging and a skinfold chamber technique, we determined the ability of photodynamic cancer therapy to induce an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and, consequently, an increase in cell death in a p53-dependent pathway. PMID:25544762

  7. L-type calcium channel targeting and local signalling in cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Robin M; Colecraft, Henry M

    2013-05-01

    In the heart, Ca(2+) influx via Ca(V)1.2 L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) is a multi-functional signal that triggers muscle contraction, controls action potential duration, and regulates gene expression. The use of LTCC Ca(2+) as a multi-dimensional signalling molecule in the heart is complicated by several aspects of cardiac physiology. Cytosolic Ca(2+) continuously cycles between ~100 nM and ~1 μM with each heartbeat due to Ca(2+) linked signalling from LTCCs to ryanodine receptors. This rapid cycling raises the question as to how cardiac myocytes distinguish the Ca(2+) fluxes originating through L-type channels that are dedicated to contraction from Ca(2+) fluxes originating from other L-type channels that are used for non-contraction-related signalling. In general, disparate Ca(2+) sources in cardiac myocytes such as current through differently localized LTCCs as well as from IP3 receptors can signal selectively to Ca(2+)-dependent effectors in local microdomains that can be impervious to the cytoplasmic Ca(2+) transients that drive contraction. A particular challenge for diversified signalling via cardiac LTCCs is that they are voltage-gated and, therefore, open and presumably flood their microdomains with Ca(2+) with each action potential. Thus spatial localization of Cav1.2 channels to different types of microdomains of the ventricular cardiomyocyte membrane as well as the existence of particular macromolecular complexes in each Cav1.2 microdomain are important to effect different types of Cav1.2 signalling. In this review we examine aspects of Cav1.2 structure, targeting and signalling in two specialized membrane microdomains--transverse tubules and caveolae.

  8. Calcium-activated chloride channel ANO1 promotes breast cancer progression by activating EGFR and CAMK signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britschgi, Adrian; Bill, Anke; Brinkhaus, Heike; Rothwell, Christopher; Clay, Ieuan; Duss, Stephan; Rebhan, Michael; Raman, Pichai; Guy, Chantale T; Wetzel, Kristie; George, Elizabeth; Popa, M Oana; Lilley, Sarah; Choudhury, Hedaythul; Gosling, Martin; Wang, Louis; Fitzgerald, Stephanie; Borawski, Jason; Baffoe, Jonathan; Labow, Mark; Gaither, L Alex; Bentires-Alj, Mohamed

    2013-03-12

    The calcium-activated chloride channel anoctamin 1 (ANO1) is located within the 11q13 amplicon, one of the most frequently amplified chromosomal regions in human cancer, but its functional role in tumorigenesis has remained unclear. The 11q13 region is amplified in ∼15% of breast cancers. Whether ANO1 is amplified in breast tumors, the extent to which gene amplification contributes to ANO1 overexpression, and whether overexpression of ANO1 is important for tumor maintenance have remained unknown. We have found that ANO1 is amplified and highly expressed in breast cancer cell lines and primary tumors. Amplification of ANO1 correlated with disease grade and poor prognosis. Knockdown of ANO1 in ANO1-amplified breast cancer cell lines and other cancers bearing 11q13 amplification inhibited proliferation, induced apoptosis, and reduced tumor growth in established cancer xenografts. Moreover, ANO1 chloride channel activity was important for cell viability. Mechanistically, ANO1 knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of its chloride-channel activity reduced EGF receptor (EGFR) and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CAMKII) signaling, which subsequently attenuated AKT, v-src sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (SRC), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation in vitro and in vivo. Our results highlight the involvement of the ANO1 chloride channel in tumor progression and provide insights into oncogenic signaling in human cancers with 11q13 amplification, thereby establishing ANO1 as a promising target for therapy in these highly prevalent tumor types.

  9. Spasmolytic activity of Rosmarinus officinalis L. involves calcium channels in the guinea pig ileum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura-Martínez, Rosa; Rivero-Osorno, Oscar; Gómez, Claudia; González-Trujano, María Eva

    2011-10-11

    Rosmarinus officinalis L. is a plant used around the world for its properties to cure pain in several conditions, such as arthritic and abdominal pain or as an antispasmodic; however, there are no scientific studies demonstrating its spasmolytic activity. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of an ethanol extract from Rosmarinus officinalis aerial parts and the possible mechanism involved by using rings from the isolated guinea pig ileum (IGPI). The IGPI rings were pre-contracted with potassium chloride (KCl; 60 mM), acetylcholine (ACh; 1 × 10(-9) to 1 × 10(-5)M) or electrical field stimulation (EFS; 0.3 Hz of frequency, 3.0 ms of duration and 14 V intensity) and tested in the presence of the Rosmarinus officinalis ethanol extract (150, 300, 600 and 1 200 μg/mL) or a referenced smooth muscle relaxant (papaverine, 30 μM). In addition, the possible mechanism of action was analyzed in the presence of hexametonium (a ganglionic blocker), indomethacine (an inhibitor of prostaglandins), l-NAME (a selective inhibitor of the nitric oxide synthase) and nifedipine (a calcium channel blocker). Rosmarinus officinalis ethanol extract exhibited a significant and concentration-dependent spasmolytic activity on the contractions induced by KCl (CI(50) = 661.06 ± 155.91 μg/mL); ACh (CI(50) = 464.05 ± 16.85 μg/mL) and EFS (CI(50) = 513.72 ± 34.13 μg/mL). Spasmolytic response of Rosmarinus officinalis (600 μg/mL) was reverted in the presence of nifedipine 1 μM, but not in the presence of hexamethonium 0.5mM, indomethacine 1 μM or L-NAME 100 μM. The present results reinforce the use of Rosmarinus officinalis as antispasmodic in folk medicine. Moreover, it is demonstrated the involvement of calcium channels in this activity, but not the participation of nicotinic receptors, prostaglandins or nitric oxide. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Biotic and abiotic stress responses through calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) signaling in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Aili; Wang, Xiang; Leseberg, Charles H; Jia, Jizeng; Mao, Long

    2008-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) sense the calcium concentration changes in plant cells and play important roles in signaling pathways for disease resistance and various stress responses as indicated by emerging evidences. Among the 20 wheat CDPK genes studied, 10 were found to respond to drought, salinity and ABA treatments. Consistent with previous observations, one CDPK gene was shown to respond to multiple abiotic stresses in wheat suggesting that CDPKs could be converging points...

  11. Stroma cell-derived factor-1α signaling enhances calcium transients and beating frequency in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ielham Hadad

    Full Text Available Stroma cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α is a cardioprotective chemokine, acting through its G-protein coupled receptor CXCR4. In experimental acute myocardial infarction, administration of SDF-1α induces an early improvement of systolic function which is difficult to explain solely by an anti-apoptotic and angiogenic effect. We wondered whether SDF-1α signaling might have direct effects on calcium transients and beating frequency.Primary rat neonatal cardiomyocytes were culture-expanded and characterized by immunofluorescence staining. Calcium sparks were studied by fluorescence microscopy after calcium loading with the Fluo-4 acetoxymethyl ester sensor. The cardiomyocyte enriched cellular suspension expressed troponin I and CXCR4 but was vimentin negative. Addition of SDF-1α in the medium increased cytoplasmic calcium release. The calcium response was completely abolished by using a neutralizing anti-CXCR4 antibody and partially suppressed and delayed by preincubation with an inositol triphosphate receptor (IP3R blocker, but not with a ryanodine receptor (RyR antagonist. Calcium fluxes induced by caffeine, a RyR agonist, were decreased by an IP3R blocker. Treatment with forskolin or SDF-1α increased cardiomyocyte beating frequency and their effects were additive. In vivo, treatment with SDF-1α increased left ventricular dP/dtmax.These results suggest that in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes, the SDF-1α/CXCR4 signaling increases calcium transients in an IP3-gated fashion leading to a positive chronotropic and inotropic effect.

  12. Inositol 1, 4, 5-trisphosphate-dependent nuclear calcium signals regulate angiogenesis and cell motility in triple negative breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Guimarães

    Full Text Available Increases in nuclear calcium concentration generate specific biological outcomes that differ from those resulting from increased cytoplasmic calcium. Nuclear calcium effects on tumor cell proliferation are widely appreciated; nevertheless, its involvement in other steps of tumor progression is not well understood. Therefore, we evaluated whether nuclear calcium is essential in other additional stages of tumor progression, including key steps associated with the formation of the primary tumor or with the metastatic cascade. We found that nuclear calcium buffering impaired 4T1 triple negative breast cancer growth not just by decreasing tumor cell proliferation, but also by enhancing tumor necrosis. Moreover, nuclear calcium regulates tumor angiogenesis through a mechanism that involves the upregulation of the anti-angiogenic C-X-C motif chemokine 10 (CXCL10-IP10. In addition, nuclear calcium buffering regulates breast tumor cell motility, culminating in less cell invasion, likely due to enhanced vinculin expression, a focal adhesion structural protein. Together, our results show that nuclear calcium is essential for triple breast cancer angiogenesis and cell migration and can be considered as a promising strategic target for triple negative breast cancer therapy.

  13. The effects of calcium on the expression of genes involved in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-14

    Jun 14, 2010 ... etiolated tomato seedlings (Zhang et al., 2002), delays fruit ripening (Ferguson, 1984), flower senescence and flower abscission (Glenn et al., 1988). Calcium, in the form of calcium pectate, binds adjacent cells and acts as a type of cementing agent within cell walls. Cementing is presumed to occur when ...

  14. Involvement of Potassium Channels and Calcium-Independent Mechanisms in Hydrogen Sulfide-Induced Relaxation of Rat Mesenteric Small Arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedegaard, Elise R; Gouliaev, Anja; Winther, Anna K; Arcanjo, Daniel D R; Aalling, Mathilde; Renaltan, Nirthika S; Wood, Mark E; Whiteman, Matthew; Skovgaard, Nini; Simonsen, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is involved in the regulation of vascular tone. We hypothesized that the lowering of calcium and opening of potassium (K) channels as well as calcium-independent mechanisms are involved in H2S-induced relaxation in rat mesenteric small arteries. Amperometric recordings revealed that free [H2S] after addition to closed tubes of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), Na2S, and GYY4137 [P-(4-methoxyphenyl)-P-4-morpholinyl-phosphinodithioic acid] were, respectively, 14%, 17%, and 1% of added amount. The compounds caused equipotent relaxations in isometric myographs, but based on the measured free [H2S], GYY4137 caused more relaxation in relation to released free H2S than NaHS and Na2S in rat mesenteric small arteries. Simultaneous measurements of [H2S] and tension showed that 15 µM of free H2S caused 61% relaxation in superior mesenteric arteries. Simultaneous measurements of smooth muscle calcium and tension revealed that NaHS lowered calcium and caused relaxation of NE-contracted arteries, while high extracellular potassium reduced NaHS relaxation without corresponding calcium changes. In NE-contracted arteries, NaHS (1 mM) lowered the phosphorylation of myosin light chain, while phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 remained unchanged. Protein kinase A and G, inhibitors of guanylate cyclase, failed to reduce NaHS relaxation, whereas blockers of voltage-gated KV7 channels inhibited NaHS relaxation, and blockers of mitochondrial complex I and III abolished NaHS relaxation. Our findings suggest that low micromolar concentrations of free H2S open K channels followed by lowering of smooth muscle calcium, and by another mechanism involving mitochondrial complex I and III leads to uncoupling of force, and hence vasodilation. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  15. Involvement of mouse and porcine PLCζ-induced calcium oscillations in preimplantation development of mouse embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoneda, Akihiro, E-mail: ayoneda@sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Animal Breeding and Reproduction, Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University (Japan); Division of Molecular Therapeutics, Center for Food & Medical Innovation, Hokkaido University (Japan); Watanabe, Tomomasa [Laboratory of Animal Breeding and Reproduction, Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    In mammals, phospholipase Cζ (PLCζ) has the ability to trigger calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) oscillations in oocytes, leading to oocyte activation. Although there is a species-specific difference in the PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern, whether PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillations affect preimplantation embryonic development remains unclear. Here, we show that Ca{sup 2+} oscillations in mouse PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes stopped just before pronuclear formation, while that in porcine PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes continued for several hours after pronuclei had been formed. This difference of Ca{sup 2+} oscillations in oocytes after pronuclear formation was dependent on the difference in the nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence of PLCζ between the mouse and pig. However, mouse and porcine PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes parthenogenetically developed to blastocysts regardless of the absence or presence of Ca{sup 2+} oscillations after pronuclear formation. Furthermore, the developmental rate of mouse or porcine PLCζ-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids to the blastocyst stage was not significantly different from that of strontium-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids. These results suggest that the PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern in mouse oocytes is dependent on the NLS sequence of PLCζ and injection of PLCζ may be a useful method for activation of round spermatid-injected and somatic nuclear transferred oocytes. - Highlights: • Porcine PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillations continued after pronuclear formation. • The Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern was dependent on the difference in the NLS sequence of PLCζ. • PLCζ-activated oocytes parthenogenetically developed to blastocysts. • PLCζ-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids developed to blastocysts.

  16. Involvement of T1R3 in calcium-magnesium taste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tordoff, Michael G; Shao, Hongguang; Alarcón, Laura K; Margolskee, Robert F; Mosinger, Bedrich; Bachmanov, Alexander A; Reed, Danielle R; McCaughey, Stuart

    2008-08-15

    Calcium and magnesium are essential for survival but it is unknown how animals detect and consume enough of these minerals to meet their needs. To investigate this, we exploited the PWK/PhJ (PWK) strain of mice, which, in contrast to the C57BL/6J (B6) and other inbred strains, displays strong preferences for calcium solutions. We found that the PWK strain also has strong preferences for MgCl2 and saccharin solutions but not representative salty, sour, bitter, or umami taste compounds. A genome scan of B6 x PWK F2 mice linked a component of the strain difference in calcium and magnesium preference to distal chromosome 4. The taste receptor gene, Tas1r3, was implicated by studies with 129.B6ByJ-Tas1r3 congenic and Tas1r3 knockout mice. Most notably, calcium and magnesium solutions that were avoided by wild-type B6 mice were preferred (relative to water) by B6 mice null for the Tas1r3 gene. Oral calcium elicited less electrophysiological activity in the chorda tympani nerve of Tas1r3 knockout than wild-type mice. Comparison of the sequence of Tas1r3 with calcium and saccharin preferences in inbred mouse strains found 1) an inverse correlation between calcium and saccharin preference scores across primarily domesticus strains, which was associated with an I60T substitution in T1R3, and 2) a V689A substitution in T1R3 that was unique to the PWK strain and thus may be responsible for its strong calcium and magnesium preference. Our results imply that, in addition to its established roles in the detection of sweet and umami compounds, T1R3 functions as a gustatory calcium-magnesium receptor.

  17. Reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide mediate plasticity of neuronal calcium signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yermolaieva, Olena; Brot, Nathan; Weissbach, Herbert; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2000-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) are important participants in signal transduction that could provide the cellular basis for activity-dependent regulation of neuronal excitability. In young rat cortical brain slices and undifferentiated PC12 cells, paired application of depolarization/agonist stimulation and oxidation induces long-lasting potentiation of subsequent Ca2+ signaling that is reversed by hypoxia. This potentiation critically depends on NO production and involves cellular ROS utilization. The ability to develop the Ca2+ signal potentiation is regulated by the developmental stage of nerve tissue, decreasing markedly in adult rat cortical neurons and differentiated PC12 cells.

  18. Moringa oleifera-rich diet and T cell calcium signaling in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attakpa, E S; Bertin, G A; Chabi, N W; Ategbo, J-M; Seri, B; Khan, N A

    2017-11-24

    Moringa oleifera is a plant whose fruits, roots and leaves have been advocated for traditional medicinal uses. The physicochemical analysis shows that Moringa oleifera contains more dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) than saturated fatty acids (SFA). The consumption of an experimental diet enriched with Moringa oleifera extracts lowered blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), but not in normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats as compared to rats fed an unsupplemented control diet. Anti-CD3-stimulated T cell proliferation was diminished in both strains of rats fed the Moringa oleifera. The experimental diet lowered secretion of interleukin-2 in SHR, but not in WKY rats compared with rats fed the control diet. Studies of platelets from patients with primary hypertension and from SHR support the notion that the concentration of intracellular free calcium [Ca(2+)](i) is modified in both clinical and experimental hypertension. We observed that the basal, [Ca(2+)](i) was lower in T cells of SHR than in those of WKY rats fed the control diet. Feeding the diet with Moringa oleifera extracts to WKY rats did not alter basal [Ca(2+)](i) in T cells but increased basal [Ca(2+)](i) in SHR. Our study clearly demonstrated that Moringa oleifera exerts antihypertensive effects by inhibiting the secretion of IL-2 and modulates T cell calcium signaling in hypertensive rats.

  19. Mitochondrial calcium signaling mediates rhythmic extracellular ATP accumulation in suprachiasmatic nucleus astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkeen, Jeff F; Womac, Alisa D; Earnest, David J; Zoran, Mark J

    2011-06-08

    The master circadian pacemaker located within the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) controls neural and neuroendocrine rhythms in the mammalian brain. Astrocytes are abundant in the SCN, and this cell type displays circadian rhythms in clock gene expression and extracellular accumulation of ATP. Still, the intracellular signaling pathways that link the SCN clockworks to circadian rhythms in extracellular ATP accumulation remain unclear. Because ATP release from astrocytes is a calcium-dependent process, we investigated the relationship between intracellular Ca(2+) and ATP accumulation and have demonstrated that intracellular Ca(2+) levels fluctuate in an antiphase relationship with rhythmic ATP accumulation in rat SCN2.2 cell cultures. Furthermore, mitochondrial Ca(2+) levels were rhythmic and maximal in precise antiphase with the peak in cytosolic Ca(2+). In contrast, our finding that peak mitochondrial Ca(2+) occurred during maximal extracellular ATP accumulation suggests a link between these cellular rhythms. Inhibition of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter disrupted the rhythmic production and extracellular accumulation of ATP. ATP, calcium, and the biological clock affect cell division and have been implicated in cell death processes. Nonetheless, rhythmic extracellular ATP accumulation was not disrupted by cell cycle arrest and was not correlated with caspase activity in SCN2.2 cell cultures. Together, these results demonstrate that mitochondrial Ca(2+) mediates SCN2.2 rhythms in extracellular ATP accumulation and suggest a role for circadian gliotransmission in SCN clock function.

  20. Extracellular calcium is involved in egg yolk-induced head-to-head agglutination of bull sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, D H; McMillan, A G; Standley, N T; Shannon, P; Xu, Z Z

    2012-10-15

    Head-to-head agglutination of bull sperm occurs when semen is highly diluted in an egg yolk-citrate diluent without streptomycin. The objectives were to investigate causes of sperm agglutination and the underlying mechanism. Aliquots of bull semen were diluted in a base diluent (BD) supplemented with various test components and the percentage of agglutinated sperm (% AggSp) was quantified at 1, 5, 24, 48, and 72 h of incubation. When sperm were incubated at 22 °C, no agglutination was observed in BD for up to 72 h, whereas the % AggSp was 5.0, 41.7, 72.2, 91.1, and 92.8% in BD + 5% egg yolk (BD + EY) at 1, 5, 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively. However, no sperm agglutination was observed in BD + EY if incubation temperature was 37 °C. Addition of 5 or 10 mM ethylenebis (oxyethyleneni-trilo) tetra-acetic acid to BD + EY reduced the % AggSp from 95% to agglutination in the absence of egg yolk, implicating calcium and other factors in egg yolk. Addition of the citrate-soluble fraction (CSF) of egg yolk to BD induced sperm agglutination similar to whole egg yolk, whereas water- and saline-soluble fractions of egg yolk were ineffective. The sperm-agglutinating efficacy of CSF (the % AggSp = 95% at 72 h) was reduced by dialysis (20%; P agglutinating diluent failed to inhibit sperm agglutination, whereas addition of 2 mM of a cAMP analogue, dbcAMP, to a nonagglutinating diluent failed to induce sperm agglutination. Agglutination status had no effect on sperm plasma membrane/acrosome status and mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, calcium and other component(s) in the CSF of egg yolk induced head-to-head agglutination of bull sperm in a time- and temperature-dependent manner. Although the mechanism of agglutination was not determined, the cAMP- protein kinase A signaling pathway was not involved. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Technical aspects involved in the removal of calcium hydroxide intracanal medication

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Luciana Jorge Moraes; BRAGA, Roberto Ruggiero; Pessoa, Oscar Faciola

    2014-01-01

    The search for an effective method of microbial control has been a constant concern in endodontics. The aim of this literature review was to discuss the technical aspects related to the removal of intracanal calcium hydroxide. As an adjunct to sanifi cation and microbial control, calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)2] intracanal medication is more suitable in cases of pulp necrosis and chronic periapical lesions. However, it is not easily removed from the root canal, and its residue can affect the inter...

  2. Neuronal MHC Class I Expression Is Regulated by Activity Driven Calcium Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Lv

    Full Text Available MHC class I (MHC-I molecules are important components of the immune system. Recently MHC-I have been reported to also play important roles in brain development and synaptic plasticity. In this study, we examine the molecular mechanism(s underlying activity-dependent MHC-I expression using hippocampal neurons. Here we report that neuronal expression level of MHC-I is dynamically regulated during hippocampal development after birth in vivo. Kainic acid (KA treatment significantly increases the expression of MHC-I in cultured hippocampal neurons in vitro, suggesting that MHC-I expression is regulated by neuronal activity. In addition, KA stimulation decreased the expression of pre- and post-synaptic proteins. This down-regulation is prevented by addition of an MHC-I antibody to KA treated neurons. Further studies demonstrate that calcium-dependent protein kinase C (PKC is important in relaying KA simulation activation signals to up-regulated MHC-I expression. This signaling cascade relies on activation of the MAPK pathway, which leads to increased phosphorylation of CREB and NF-κB p65 while also enhancing the expression of IRF-1. Together, these results suggest that expression of MHC-I in hippocampal neurons is driven by Ca2+ regulated activation of the MAPK signaling transduction cascade.

  3. Regulation of Arabidopsis defense responses against Spodoptera littoralis by CPK-mediated calcium signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishihama Nobuaki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant Ca2+ signals are involved in a wide array of intracellular signaling pathways after pest invasion. Ca2+-binding sensory proteins such as Ca2+-dependent protein kinases (CPKs have been predicted to mediate the signaling following Ca2+ influx after insect herbivory. However, until now this prediction was not testable. Results To investigate the roles CPKs play in a herbivore response-signaling pathway, we screened the characteristics of Arabidopsis CPK mutants damaged by a feeding generalist herbivore, Spodoptera littoralis. Following insect attack, the cpk3 and cpk13 mutants showed lower transcript levels of plant defensin gene PDF1.2 compared to wild-type plants. The CPK cascade was not directly linked to the herbivory-induced signaling pathways that were mediated by defense-related phytohormones such as jasmonic acid and ethylene. CPK3 was also suggested to be involved in a negative feedback regulation of the cytosolic Ca2+ levels after herbivory and wounding damage. In vitro kinase assays of CPK3 protein with a suite of substrates demonstrated that the protein phosphorylates transcription factors (including ERF1, HsfB2a and CZF1/ZFAR1 in the presence of Ca2+. CPK13 strongly phosphorylated only HsfB2a, irrespective of the presence of Ca2+. Furthermore, in vivo agroinfiltration assays showed that CPK3-or CPK13-derived phosphorylation of a heat shock factor (HsfB2a promotes PDF1.2 transcriptional activation in the defense response. Conclusions These results reveal the involvement of two Arabidopsis CPKs (CPK3 and CPK13 in the herbivory-induced signaling network via HsfB2a-mediated regulation of the defense-related transcriptional machinery. This cascade is not involved in the phytohormone-related signaling pathways, but rather directly impacts transcription factors for defense responses.

  4. Spatiotemporal patterns of voltage and calcium signaling in heart cells and tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karma, Alain

    2009-03-01

    This talk will describe recent progress made in understanding oscillatory patterns of voltage and calcium signals that precede the onset of electromechanical wave turbulence in the main chambers of the heart. Results will illustrate how both physiologically detailed and abstract models have proven useful to cope with the bewildering molecular complexity of cardiac biology and to bridge phenomena on cellular and tissue scales. A main conclusion is that those oscillatory patterns can be self-organized, resulting from symmetry-breaking linear instabilities, or/and a manifestation of underling tissue heterogeneities. Thus studying the evolution of those patterns provides a valuable indirect probe of complex physiological processes that render the heart susceptible to the sudden onset of lethal heart rhythm disorders.

  5. TRPV1-mediated calcium signal couples with cannabinoid receptors and sodium-calcium exchangers in rat odontoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsumura, Maki; Sobhan, Ubaidus; Muramatsu, Takashi; Sato, Masaki; Ichikawa, Hideki; Sahara, Yoshinori; Tazaki, Masakazu; Shibukawa, Yoshiyuki

    2012-08-01

    Odontoblasts are involved in the transduction of stimuli applied to exposed dentin. Although expression of thermo/mechano/osmo-sensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) channels has been demonstrated, the properties of TRP vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-mediated signaling remain to be clarified. We investigated physiological and pharmacological properties of TRPV1 and its functional coupling with cannabinoid (CB) receptors and Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchangers (NCXs) in odontoblasts. Anandamide (AEA), capsaicin (CAP), resiniferatoxin (RF) or low-pH evoked Ca(2+) influx. This influx was inhibited by capsazepine (CPZ). Delay in time-to-activation of TRPV1 channels was observed between application of AEA or CAP and increase in [Ca(2+)](i). In the absence of extracellular Ca(2+), however, an immediate increase in [Ca(2+)](i) was observed on administration of extracellular Ca(2+), followed by activation of TRPV1 channels. Intracellular application of CAP elicited inward current via opening of TRPV1 channels faster than extracellular application. With extracellular RF application, no time delay was observed in either increase in [Ca(2+)](i) or inward current, indicating that agonist binding sites are located on both extra- and intracellular domains. KB-R7943, an NCX inhibitor, yielded an increase in the decay time constant during TRPV1-mediated Ca(2+) entry. Increase in [Ca(2+)](i) by CB receptor agonist, 2-arachidonylglycerol, was inhibited by CB1 receptor antagonist or CPZ, as well as by adenylyl cyclase inhibitor. These results showed that TRPV1-mediated Ca(2+) entry functionally couples with CB1 receptor activation via cAMP signaling. Increased [Ca(2+)](i) by TRPV1 activation was extruded by NCXs. Taken together, this suggests that cAMP-mediated CB1-TRPV1 crosstalk and TRPV1-NCX coupling play an important role in driving cellular functions following transduction of external stimuli to odontoblasts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Entrainment to an auditory signal: Is attention involved?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunert, R.; Jongman, S.R.

    2017-01-01

    Many natural auditory signals, including music and language, change periodically. The effect of such auditory rhythms on the brain is unclear however. One widely held view, dynamic attending theory, proposes that the attentional system entrains to the rhythm and increases attention at moments of

  7. Fetal calcium regulates branching morphogenesis in the developing human and mouse lung: involvement of voltage-gated calcium channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah C Brennan

    Full Text Available Airway branching morphogenesis in utero is essential for optimal postnatal lung function. In the fetus, branching morphogenesis occurs during the pseudoglandular stage (weeks 9-17 of human gestation, embryonic days (E11.5-16.5 in mouse in a hypercalcaemic environment (~1.7 in the fetus vs. ~1.1-1.3 mM for an adult. Previously we have shown that fetal hypercalcemia exerts an inhibitory brake on branching morphogenesis via the calcium-sensing receptor. In addition, earlier studies have shown that nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+ channels (VGCC, inhibits fetal lung growth, suggesting a role for VGCC in lung development. The aim of this work was to investigate the expression of VGCC in the pseudoglandular human and mouse lung, and their role in branching morphogenesis. Expression of L-type (CaV1.2 and CaV1.3, P/Q type (CaV2.1, N-type (CaV2.2, R-type (CaV2.3, and T-type (CaV3.2 and CaV3.3 VGCC was investigated in paraffin sections from week 9 human fetal lungs and E12.5 mouse embryos. Here we show, for the first time, that Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 are expressed in both the smooth muscle and epithelium of the developing human and mouse lung. Additionally, Cav2.3 was expressed in the lung epithelium of both species. Incubating E12.5 mouse lung rudiments in the presence of nifedipine doubled the amount of branching, an effect which was partly mimicked by the Cav2.3 inhibitor, SNX-482. Direct measurements of changes in epithelial cell membrane potential, using the voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye DiSBAC2(3, demonstrated that cyclic depolarisations occur within the developing epithelium and coincide with rhythmic occlusions of the lumen, driven by the naturally occurring airway peristalsis. We conclude that VGCC are expressed and functional in the fetal human and mouse lung, where they play a role in branching morphogenesis. Furthermore, rhythmic epithelial depolarisations evoked by airway peristalsis would allow for branching to

  8. The Signaling Pathways Involved in Chondrocyte Differentiation and Hypertrophic Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmei Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chondrocytes communicate with each other mainly via diffusible signals rather than direct cell-to-cell contact. The chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs is well regulated by the interactions of varieties of growth factors, cytokines, and signaling molecules. A number of critical signaling molecules have been identified to regulate the differentiation of chondrocyte from mesenchymal progenitor cells to their terminal maturation of hypertrophic chondrocytes, including bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs, SRY-related high-mobility group-box gene 9 (Sox9, parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP, Indian hedgehog (Ihh, fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3, and β-catenin. Except for these molecules, other factors such as adenosine, O2 tension, and reactive oxygen species (ROS also have a vital role in cartilage formation and chondrocyte maturation. Here, we outlined the complex transcriptional network and the function of key factors in this network that determine and regulate the genetic program of chondrogenesis and chondrocyte differentiation.

  9. Role of local vitamin D signaling and cellular calcium transport system in bone homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuyama, Ritsuko

    2014-01-01

    Mouse genetic studies have demonstrated that the 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D] endocrine system is required for calcium (Ca(2+)) and bone homeostasis. These studies reported severe hypocalcemia and impaired bone mineralization associated with rickets in mutant mice. Specific phenotypes of these mice with an engineered deletion of 1,25(OH)2D cell signaling resemble the features observed in humans with the same congenital disease or severe 1,25(OH)2D deficiency. Decreased active intestinal Ca(2+) absorption because of reduced expression of epithelial Ca(2+) channels is a crucial mechanism that contributes to the major phenotypes observed in the mutant mice. The importance of intestinal Ca(2+) absorption supported by 1,25(OH)2D-mediated transport was further emphasized by the observation that Ca(2+) supplementation rescues hypocalcemia and restores bone mineralization in both patients and mice lacking 1,25(OH)2D signaling. This observation questions the direct role of 1,25(OH)2D signaling in bone tissue. Studies regarding tissue-specific manipulation of 1,25(OH)2D function have provided a consensus on this issue by demonstrating a direct action of 1,25(OH)2D on cells in bone tissue through bone metabolism and mineral homeostasis. In addition, movement of Ca(2+) from the bone as a result of osteoclastic bone resorption also provides a large Ca(2+) supply in Ca(2+) homeostasis; however, the system controlling Ca(2+) homeostasis in osteoclasts has not been fully identified. Transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) 4 mediates Ca(2+) influx during the late stage of osteoclast differentiation, thereby regulating the Ca(2+) signaling essential for cellular events during osteoclast differentiation; however, the system-modifying effect of TRPV4 activity should be determined. Furthermore, it remains unknown how local Ca(2+) metabolism participates in systemic Ca(2+) homeostasis through bone remodeling. New insights are therefore required to understand this issue.

  10. The Calcium Wave of Vegetable Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TD. Geydan

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Calcium is an essential nutrient for plants; it is involved in developmental processes and in responses to biotic and abiotic factors. Several signals that modify the calcium concentration in the cytoplasm, endoplasmic reticulum, nucleus and/or plastids have been observed. These changes in the calcium concentration in the cell interior are rapidly returned to basal levels, in the meantime, innumerable and complex signaling cascades. This note exposes the mechanisms of calcium transport through the cell membranes of the entrance of calcium in the plant cells.

  11. Gestational diabetes is characterized by reduced mitochondrial protein expression and altered calcium signaling proteins in skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen E Boyle

    Full Text Available The rising prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM affects up to 18% of pregnant women with immediate and long-term metabolic consequences for both mother and infant. Abnormal glucose uptake and lipid oxidation are hallmark features of GDM prompting us to use an exploratory proteomics approach to investigate the cellular mechanisms underlying differences in skeletal muscle metabolism between obese pregnant women with GDM (OGDM and obese pregnant women with normal glucose tolerance (ONGT. Functional validation was performed in a second cohort of obese OGDM and ONGT pregnant women. Quantitative proteomic analysis in rectus abdominus skeletal muscle tissue collected at delivery revealed reduced protein content of mitochondrial complex I (C-I subunits (NDUFS3, NDUFV2 and altered content of proteins involved in calcium homeostasis/signaling (calcineurin A, α1-syntrophin, annexin A4 in OGDM (n = 6 vs. ONGT (n = 6. Follow-up analyses showed reduced enzymatic activity of mitochondrial complexes C-I, C-III, and C-IV (-60-75% in the OGDM (n = 8 compared with ONGT (n = 10 subjects, though no differences were observed for mitochondrial complex protein content. Upstream regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation were not different between groups. However, AMPK phosphorylation was dramatically reduced by 75% in the OGDM women. These data suggest that GDM is associated with reduced skeletal muscle oxidative phosphorylation and disordered calcium homeostasis. These relationships deserve further attention as they may represent novel risk factors for development of GDM and may have implications on the effectiveness of physical activity interventions on both treatment strategies for GDM and for prevention of type 2 diabetes postpartum.

  12. Effects of differentiation on purinergic and neurotensin-mediated calcium signaling in human HT-29 colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Mohammad A; Peters, Amelia A; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J; Monteith, Gregory R

    2013-09-13

    Calcium signaling is a key regulator of processes important in differentiation. In colon cancer cells differentiation is associated with altered expression of specific isoforms of calcium pumps of the endoplasmic reticulum and the plasma membrane, suggesting that differentiation of colon cancer cells is associated with a major remodeling of calcium homeostasis. Purinergic and neurotensin receptor activation are known regulators of cytosolic free Ca(2+) levels in colon cancer cells. This study aimed to assess changes in cytosolic free Ca(2+) levels in response to ATP and neurotensin with differentiation induced by sodium butyrate or culturing post-confluence. Parameters assessed included peak cytosolic free Ca(2+) level after activation; time to reach peak cytosolic free Ca(2+) and the EC50 of dose response curves. Our results demonstrate that differentiation of HT-29 colon cancer cells is associated with a remodeling of both ATP and neurotensin mediated Ca(2+) signaling. Neurotensin-mediated calcium signaling appeared more sensitive to differentiation than ATP-mediated Ca(2+) signaling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The plasma membrane calcium ATPase 4 signalling in cardiac fibroblasts mediates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Tamer M. A.; Abou-Leisa, Riham; Stafford, Nicholas; Maqsood, Arfa; Zi, Min; Prehar, Sukhpal; Baudoin-Stanley, Florence; Wang, Xin; Neyses, Ludwig; Cartwright, Elizabeth J.; Oceandy, Delvac

    2016-01-01

    The heart responds to pathological overload through myocyte hypertrophy. Here we show that this response is regulated by cardiac fibroblasts via a paracrine mechanism involving plasma membrane calcium ATPase 4 (PMCA4). Pmca4 deletion in mice, both systemically and specifically in fibroblasts, reduces the hypertrophic response to pressure overload; however, knocking out Pmca4 specifically in cardiomyocytes does not produce this effect. Mechanistically, cardiac fibroblasts lacking PMCA4 produce higher levels of secreted frizzled related protein 2 (sFRP2), which inhibits the hypertrophic response in neighbouring cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, we show that treatment with the PMCA4 inhibitor aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA) inhibits and reverses cardiac hypertrophy induced by pressure overload in mice. Our results reveal that PMCA4 regulates the development of cardiac hypertrophy and provide proof of principle for a therapeutic approach to treat this condition. PMID:27020607

  14. CREB Signaling Is Involved in Rett Syndrome Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Qian; Wang, Anxin; Hamzah, Hamdi; Waldman, Alex; Jiang, Keer; Dong, Qiping; Li, Ronghui; Kim, Jason; Turner, Daniel; Chang, Qiang

    2017-03-29

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a debilitating neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the MECP2 gene. To facilitate the study of cellular mechanisms in human cells, we established several human stem cell lines: human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line carrying the common T158M mutation ( MECP2 T158M/T158M ), hESC line expressing no MECP2 ( MECP2-KO ), congenic pair of wild-type and mutant RTT patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) line carrying the V247fs mutation (V247fs-WT and V247fs-MT), and iPSC line in which the V247fs mutation was corrected by CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing (V247fs-MT-correction). Detailed analyses of forebrain neurons differentiated from these human stem cell lines revealed genotype-dependent quantitative phenotypes in neurite growth, dendritic complexity, and mitochondrial function. At the molecular level, we found a significant reduction in the level of CREB and phosphorylated CREB in forebrain neurons differentiated from MECP2 T158M/T158M , MECP2-KO , and V247fs-MT stem cell lines. Importantly, overexpression of CREB or pharmacological activation of CREB signaling in those forebrain neurons rescued the phenotypes in neurite growth, dendritic complexity, and mitochondrial function. Finally, pharmacological activation of CREB in the female Mecp2 heterozygous mice rescued several behavioral defects. Together, our study establishes a robust in vitro platform for consistent quantitative evaluation of genotype-dependent RTT phenotypes, reveals a previously unappreciated role of CREB signaling in RTT pathogenesis, and identifies a potential therapeutic target for RTT. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our study establishes a robust human stem cell-based platform for consistent quantitative evaluation of genotype-dependent Rett syndrome (RTT) phenotypes at the cellular level. By providing the first evidence that enhancing cAMP response element binding protein signaling can alleviate RTT phenotypes both in vitro and in vivo , we reveal a

  15. Computational modeling of calcium signaling from the nanoscale to multicellular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Ghanim

    Calcium signaling is one of the most important signaling mechanisms controlling e.g. the contraction of muscle cells, the release of neurotransmitter from neurons and astrocytes, transcription inside the nucleus and metabolic processes in liver and pancreas [8, 44, 36]. Due to the general importance in cell biology, Ca2+ signals of a variety of forms have been the subject of much recent experimental research. A recent and particularly powerful approach towards the understanding of Ca2+ signaling is the combination of highly resolved fluorescent imaging methods and detailed mathematical modeling. Models for Ca2+ signaling are probably the most advanced and realistic modes in all areas of biological physics. Hence theoretical predictions are quantitative in nature and allow direct comparison with experiments. Ca2+ signaling patterns exhibit a hierarchical structure varying from single-channel release events (10's of nanometers) to Ca2+ waves sweeping over entire organs like the liver to globally orchestrate the efficient release of enzymes [48]. This multi-scale organization renders it an ideal tool for studying basic concepts of pattern formation, especially since access to the most important experimental parameters is given. The aim of this dissertation is to develop mathematical models that quantitatively describe the characteristics of elementary Ca2+ elements (called Ca2+ -puffs) on the nano-scale as well as the organization of global waves and oscillations on the cell and organ scale. We used oocytes, eggs and astrocytes as model cells for our theoretical studies. Particularly on the microscopic scale we report significant progress in modeling Ca 2+ release events that are accurate in time course and spatial shape. Experimental investigations have revealed recently that Ca 2+ signaling differentiates during the development of oocytes into mature eggs. The fertilization specific Ca2+ signal in mature eggs is characterized by a fast rise of intracellular Ca2+ and

  16. The effects of calcium on the expression of genes involved in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-14

    carboxylic acid (ACC) is converted to ethylene was supported, but the study also revealed the regulation of expression in the ethylene receptors. The potential roles of LeACO1, LeETR 3, 4, 5 and calcium in AZs during tomato.

  17. Actin filaments as the fast pathways for calcium ions involved in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We investigated the polyelectrolyte properties of actin filaments which are in interaction with myosin motors, basic participants in mechano-electrical transduction in the stereocilia of the inner ear. Here, we elaborated a model in which actin filaments play the role of guides or pathways for localized flow of calcium ions.

  18. Calcium-sensing receptor (CASR) is involved in porcine in vitro fertilisation and early embryo development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C; Liu, Y; Larsen, K; Hou, Y P; Callesen, H

    2017-07-17

    It has been demonstrated that extracellular calcium is necessary in fertilisation and embryo development but the mechanism is still not well understood. The present study mainly focussed on the extracellular calcium effector called the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR) and examined its expression in porcine gametes and embryos and its function during fertilisation and early embryo development. By using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, CASR was found to be expressed in porcine oocytes, spermatozoa and embryos at different developmental stages. Functionally, medium supplementation with a CASR agonist or an antagonist during in vitro fertilisation (IVF) and in vitro culture (IVC) was tested. During fertilisation, the presence of a CASR agonist increased sperm penetration rate and decreased polyspermy rate leading to an increased normal fertilisation rate. During embryo development, for the IVF embryos, agonist treatment during IVC significantly increased cleavage rate and blastocyst formation rate compared with the control group. Furthermore, parthenogenetically activated embryos showed similar results with lower cleavage and blastocyst formation rates in the antagonist group than in the other groups. It was concluded that CASR, as the effector of extracellular calcium, modulates porcine fertilisation and early embryo development.

  19. Gravity persistent signal 1 reveals a novel cytochrome P450 involved in gravitropic signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Sarah

    is involved in gravitropic signal transduction. (Partially support by NSF: 0618506 to SEW)

  20. Integration of Kinase and Calcium Signaling at the Level of Chromatin Underlies Inducible Gene Activation in T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brignall, Ruth; Cauchy, Pierre; Bevington, Sarah L; Gorman, Bethany; Pisco, Angela O; Bagnall, James; Boddington, Christopher; Rowe, William; England, Hazel; Rich, Kevin; Schmidt, Lorraine; Dyer, Nigel P; Travis, Mark A; Ott, Sascha; Jackson, Dean A; Cockerill, Peter N; Paszek, Pawel

    2017-10-15

    TCR signaling pathways cooperate to activate the inducible transcription factors NF-κB, NFAT, and AP-1. In this study, using the calcium ionophore ionomycin and/or PMA on Jurkat T cells, we show that the gene expression program associated with activation of TCR signaling is closely related to specific chromatin landscapes. We find that calcium and kinase signaling cooperate to induce chromatin remodeling at ∼2100 chromatin regions, which demonstrate enriched binding motifs for inducible factors and correlate with target gene expression. We found that these regions typically function as inducible enhancers. Many of these elements contain composite NFAT/AP-1 sites, which typically support cooperative binding, thus further reinforcing the need for cooperation between calcium and kinase signaling in the activation of genes in T cells. In contrast, treatment with PMA or ionomycin alone induces chromatin remodeling at far fewer regions (∼600 and ∼350, respectively), which mostly represent a subset of those induced by costimulation. This suggests that the integration of TCR signaling largely occurs at the level of chromatin, which we propose plays a crucial role in regulating T cell activation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors.

  1. Negative interferences by calcium dobesilate in the detection of five serum analytes involving Trinder reaction-based assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiuzhi; Hou, Li'an; Yin, Yicong; Wu, Jie; Zhao, Fang; Xia, Liangyu; Cheng, Xinqi; Liu, Qian; Liu, Li; Xu, Ermu; Qiu, Ling

    2018-01-01

    Previously, we reported the strong negative interference of calcium dobesilate, a vasoprotective agent, in creatinine assays involving the Trinder reaction. It is hypothesized that a similar effect occurs in the detection of uric acid (UA), total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). The interferences of calcium dobesilate during the detection of the five serum analytes were investigated on automated systems/analysers, and the effects were compared among eight different assay systems for each analyte. A calcium dobesilate standard was added into two sets of the blank serum pools of each analyte at final concentrations of 0, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, and 64 μg/mL. The percentage deviation of each analyte value was calculated between each drug concentration and the drug-free samples. The clinically acceptable error levels for UA, TC, TG, HDL-C, and LDL-C were defined as ±4.87%, ±4.1%, ±9.57%, ±5.61%, and ±5.46%, respectively. The observed interference was concentration dependent for each analyte. In the presence of 16 μg/mL calcium dobesilate, which was within the therapeutic range, all seven Trinder reaction-based UA assay systems, two TG assay systems, two HDL-C assay systems and one TC assay system exhibited negative drug interferences. Calcium dobesilate negatively interferes with the detection of UA, TG, TC, and HDL-C in assay systems based on the Trinder reaction. The effect was most significant in UA and TG detection.

  2. Entrainment to an auditory signal: Is attention involved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunert, Richard; Jongman, Suzanne R

    2017-01-01

    Many natural auditory signals, including music and language, change periodically. The effect of such auditory rhythms on the brain is unclear however. One widely held view, dynamic attending theory, proposes that the attentional system entrains to the rhythm and increases attention at moments of rhythmic salience. In support, 2 experiments reported here show reduced response times to visual letter strings shown at auditory rhythm peaks, compared with rhythm troughs. However, we argue that an account invoking the entrainment of general attention should further predict rhythm entrainment to also influence memory for visual stimuli. In 2 pseudoword memory experiments we find evidence against this prediction. Whether a pseudoword is shown during an auditory rhythm peak or not is irrelevant for its later recognition memory in silence. Other attention manipulations, dividing attention and focusing attention, did result in a memory effect. This raises doubts about the suggested attentional nature of rhythm entrainment. We interpret our findings as support for auditory rhythm perception being based on auditory-motor entrainment, not general attention entrainment. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Possible Signaling Pathways Mediating Neuronal Calcium Sensor-1-Dependent Spatial Learning and Memory in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoe Y Nakamura

    Full Text Available Intracellular Ca2+ signaling regulates diverse functions of the nervous system. Many of these neuronal functions, including learning and memory, are regulated by neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS-1. However, the pathways by which NCS-1 regulates these functions remain poorly understood. Consistent with the findings of previous reports, we revealed that NCS-1 deficient (Ncs1-/- mice exhibit impaired spatial learning and memory function in the Morris water maze test, although there was little change in their exercise activity, as determined via treadmill-analysis. Expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF; a key regulator of memory function and dopamine was significantly reduced in the Ncs1-/- mouse brain, without changes in the levels of glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor or nerve growth factor. Although there were no gross structural abnormalities in the hippocampi of Ncs1-/- mice, electron microscopy analysis revealed that the density of large dense core vesicles in CA1 presynaptic neurons, which release BDNF and dopamine, was decreased. Phosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-α (CaMKII-α, which is known to trigger long-term potentiation and increase BDNF levels, was significantly reduced in the Ncs1-/- mouse brain. Furthermore, high voltage electric potential stimulation, which increases the levels of BDNF and promotes spatial learning, significantly increased the levels of NCS-1 concomitant with phosphorylated CaMKII-α in the hippocampus; suggesting a close relationship between NCS-1 and CaMKII-α. Our findings indicate that NCS-1 may regulate spatial learning and memory function at least in part through activation of CaMKII-α signaling, which may directly or indirectly increase BDNF production.

  4. A clinically relevant model of osteoinduction: a process requiring calcium phosphate and BMP/Wnt signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyckmans, J; Roberts, S J; Schrooten, J; Luyten, F P

    2010-06-01

    In this study, we investigated a clinically relevant model of in vivo ectopic bone formation utilizing human periosteum derived cells (HPDCs) seeded in a Collagraft carrier and explored the mechanisms by which this process is driven. Bone formation occurred after eight weeks when a minimum of one million HPDCs was loaded on Collagraft carriers and implanted subcutaneously in NMRI nu/nu mice. De novo bone matrix, mainly secreted by the HPDCs, was found juxta-proximal of the calcium phosphate (CaP) granules suggesting that CaP may have triggered the 'osteoinductive program'. Indeed, removal of the CaP granules by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid decalcification prior to cell seeding and implantation resulted in loss of bone formation. In addition, inhibition of endogenous bone morphogenetic protein and Wnt signalling by overexpression of the secreted antagonists Noggin and Frzb, respectively, also abrogated osteoinduction. Proliferation of the engrafted HPDCs was strongly reduced in the decalcified scaffolds or when seeded with adenovirus-Noggin/Frzb transduced HPDCs indicating that cell division of the engrafted HPDCs is required for the direct bone formation cascade. These data suggest that this model of bone formation is similar to that observed during physiological intramembranous bone development and may be of importance when investigating tissue engineering strategies.

  5. Calcium-sensing receptor activates the NLRP3 inflammasome in LS14 preadipocytes mediated by ERK1/2 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Espessailles, Amanda; Mora, Yuly A; Fuentes, Cecilia; Cifuentes, Mariana

    2018-01-18

    The study of the mechanisms that trigger inflammation in adipose tissue is key to understanding and preventing the cardiometabolic consequences of obesity. We have proposed a model where activation of the G protein-coupled calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) leads to inflammation and dysfunction in adipose cells. Upon activation, CaSR can mediate the expression and secretion of proinflammatory factors in human preadipocytes, adipocytes and adipose tissue explants. One possible pathway involved in CaSR-induced inflammation is the activation of the NLR family, pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, that promotes maturation and secretion of interleukin (IL)-1β. The present work aimed to study whether CaSR mediates the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in the human adipose cell model LS14. We assessed NLRP3 inflammasome priming and assembly after cinacalcet-induced CaSR activation and evaluated if this activation is mediated by downstream ERK1/2 signaling in LS14 preadipocytes. Exposure to 2µM cinacalcet elevated mRNA expression of NLRP3, CASP-1 and IL-1β, as well as an increase in pro-IL-1β protein. In addition, CaSR activation triggered NLRP3 inflammasome assembly, as evidenced by a 25% increase in caspase-1 activity and 63% IL-1β secretion. CaSR silencing (siRNA) abolished the effect. Upstream ERK pathway inhibition decreased cinacalcet-dependent activation of NLRP3 inflammasome. We propose CaSR-dependent NLRP3 inflammasome activation in preadipocytes through ERK signaling as a novel mechanism for the development of adipose dysfunction, that may favor the cardiovascular and metabolic consequences of obesity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report linking the inflammatory effect of CaSR to NLRP3 inflammasome induction in adipose cells. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Atorvastatin calcium inhibits phenotypic modulation of PDGF-BB-induced VSMCs via down-regulation the Akt signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuang; Liu, Baoqin; Kong, Dehui; Li, Si; Li, Chao; Wang, Huaqin; Sun, Yingxian

    2015-01-01

    Plasticity of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays a central role in the onset and progression of proliferative vascular diseases. In adult tissue, VSMCs exist in a physiological contractile-quiescent phenotype, which is defined by lack of the ability of proliferation and migration, while high expression of contractile marker proteins. After injury to the vessel, VSMC shifts from a contractile phenotype to a pathological synthetic phenotype, associated with increased proliferation, migration and matrix secretion. It has been demonstrated that PDGF-BB is a critical mediator of VSMCs phenotypic switch. Atorvastatin calcium, a selective inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl l coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, exhibits various protective effects against VSMCs. In this study, we investigated the effects of atorvastatin calcium on phenotype modulation of PDGF-BB-induced VSMCs and the related intracellular signal transduction pathways. Treatment of VSMCs with atorvastatin calcium showed dose-dependent inhibition of PDGF-BB-induced proliferation. Atorvastatin calcium co-treatment inhibited the phenotype modulation and cytoskeleton rearrangements and improved the expression of contractile phenotype marker proteins such as α-SM actin, SM22α and calponin in comparison with PDGF-BB alone stimulated VSMCs. Although Akt phosphorylation was strongly elicited by PDGF-BB, Akt activation was attenuated when PDGF-BB was co-administrated with atorvastatin calcium. In conclusion, atorvastatin calcium inhibits phenotype modulation of PDGF-BB-induced VSMCs and activation of the Akt signaling pathway, indicating that Akt might play a vital role in the modulation of phenotype.

  7. P2X7Rs are involved in cell death, growth and cellular signaling in primary human osteoblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrawal, Ankita; Henriksen, Zanne; Syberg, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    The ionotropic ATP-gated P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) is involved in the regulation of many physiological functions including bone metabolism. Several studies on osteoblasts from rodents and human osteoblast-like cell lines have addressed the expression and function of P2X7R on these bone-forming cells...... however; its role in human primary osteoblasts has not yet been reported. The aim of this study was to assess the expression of the P2X7R in bone marrow-derived stromal cells and in primary human trabecular osteoblasts and to determine the function in bone formation and cell signaling. We report...... that osteoblasts derived from human trabecular explants express a functional P2X7R capable of agonist-induced increase in intracellular calcium concentration and a positive permeability to fluorescent dyes. These osteoblasts are fully differentiated cells with alkaline phosphatase activity and the ability to form...

  8. Comparative genomics of MAP kinase and calcium-calcineurin signalling components in plant and human pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rispail, Nicolas; Soanes, Darren M; Ant, Cemile; Czajkowski, Robert; Grünler, Anke; Huguet, Romain; Perez-Nadales, Elena; Poli, Anna; Sartorel, Elodie; Valiante, Vito; Yang, Meng; Beffa, Roland; Brakhage, Axel A; Gow, Neil A R; Kahmann, Regine; Lebrun, Marc-Henri; Lenasi, Helena; Perez-Martin, José; Talbot, Nicholas J; Wendland, Jürgen; Di Pietro, Antonio

    2009-04-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades and the calcium-calcineurin pathway control fundamental aspects of fungal growth, development and reproduction. Core elements of these signalling pathways are required for virulence in a wide array of fungal pathogens of plants and mammals. In this review, we have used the available genome databases to explore the structural conservation of three MAPK cascades and the calcium-calcineurin pathway in ten different fungal species, including model organisms, plant pathogens and human pathogens. While most known pathway components from the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae appear to be widely conserved among taxonomically and biologically diverse fungi, some of them were found to be restricted to the Saccharomycotina. The presence of multiple paralogues in certain species such as the zygomycete Rhizopus oryzae and the incorporation of new functional domains that are lacking in S. cerevisiae signalling proteins, most likely reflect functional diversification or adaptation as filamentous fungi have evolved to occupy distinct ecological niches.

  9. ATP- and gap junction-dependent intercellular calcium signaling in osteoblastic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, N R; Geist, S T; Civitelli, R

    1997-01-01

    stores. In one model, IP3 traverses gap junctions and initiates the release of intracellular calcium stores in neighboring cells. Alternatively, calcium waves may be mediated not by gap junctional communication, but rather by autocrine activity of secreted ATP on P2 purinergic receptors. We studied...... mechanically induced calcium waves in two rat osteosarcoma cell lines that differ in the gap junction proteins they express, in their ability to pass microinjected dye from cell to cell, and in their expression of P2Y2 (P2U) purinergic receptors. ROS 17/2.8 cells, which express the gap junction protein...... connexin43 (Cx43), are well dye coupled, and lack P2U receptors, transmitted slow gap junction-dependent calcium waves that did not require release of intracellular calcium stores. UMR 106-01 cells predominantly express the gap junction protein connexin 45 (Cx45), are poorly dye coupled, and express P2U...

  10. Calcium channels are involved in EphB/ephrinB reverse signaling‑induced apoptosis in a rat chronic ocular hypertension model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lingdan; Cheng, Xianglin; Zhou, Long; Hu, Yanhong

    2018-02-01

    Erythropoietin-producing hepatocyte receptor B (EphB)/ephrinB reverse signaling has been revealed to be activated in chronic ocular hypertension (COH) by increasing the apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). However, the exact mechanism is not well understood. The present study investigated the involvement of Ca2+ channels in the apoptosis of RGCs induced by EphB/ephrinB reverse signaling in a rat CHO model, which was established by cauterizing 3 out of the 4 episcleral veins. The expression levels of four voltage‑gated Ca2+ channel subunits (Cav3.1‑3.3 and Cav1.2) were detected using immunofluorescence and western blot analysis. TUNEL staining was performed to assess RGC apoptosis following an injection with the T type Ca2+ channel blocker. Ca2+ channels, mainly the T type, were upregulated in COH rat retinas when compared with the sham group (P<0.01). Additionally, the Cav3.2 subunit of T type calcium channels was predominantly expressed in Müller cells and RGCs, such as ephrinB2. Furthermore, an intravitreal injection of the Ca2+ channel blocker Mibefradil (3 µM) reduced EphB2‑fragment crystallizable region‑induced RGC apoptosis in normal rats. Thus, the results suggest that Ca2+ channels in a COH model may be a pathway involved in ephrinB/EphB signaling‑induced RGC apoptosis.

  11. Multiple Mechanisms Drive Calcium Signal Dynamics around Laser-Induced Epithelial Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Erica K; Stevens, Aaron; Edrington, Westin; Zhao, Yunhua; Jayasinghe, Aroshan K; Page-McCaw, Andrea; Hutson, M Shane

    2017-10-03

    Epithelial wound healing is an evolutionarily conserved process that requires coordination across a field of cells. Studies in many organisms have shown that cytosolic calcium levels rise within a field of cells around the wound and spread to neighboring cells, within seconds of wounding. Although calcium is a known potent second messenger and master regulator of wound-healing programs, it is unknown what initiates the rise of cytosolic calcium across the wound field. Here we use laser ablation, a commonly used technique for the precision removal of cells or subcellular components, as a tool to investigate mechanisms of calcium entry upon wounding. Despite its precise ablation capabilities, we find that this technique damages cells outside the primary wound via a laser-induced cavitation bubble, which forms and collapses within microseconds of ablation. This cavitation bubble damages the plasma membranes of cells it contacts, tens of microns away from the wound, allowing direct calcium entry from extracellular fluid into damaged cells. Approximately 45 s after this rapid influx of calcium, we observe a second influx of calcium that spreads to neighboring cells beyond the footprint of cavitation. The occurrence of this second, delayed calcium expansion event is predicted by wound size, indicating that a separate mechanism of calcium entry exists, corresponding to cell loss at the primary wound. Our research demonstrates that the damage profile of laser ablation is more similar to a crush injury than the precision removal of individual cells. The generation of membrane microtears upon ablation is consistent with studies in the field of optoporation, which investigate ablation-induced cellular permeability. We conclude that multiple types of damage, including microtears and cell loss, result in multiple mechanisms of calcium influx around epithelial wounds. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Calcium signaling of in situ chondrocytes in articular cartilage under compressive loading: Roles of calcium sources and cell membrane ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Mengxi; Zhou, Yilu; Chen, Xingyu; Han, Lin; Wang, Liyun; Lu, X Lucas

    2017-10-05

    Mechanical loading on articular cartilage can induce many physical and chemical stimuli on chondrocytes residing in the extracellular matrix (ECM). Intracellular calcium ([Ca2+ ]i ) signaling is among the earliest responses of chondrocytes to physical stimuli, but the [Ca2+ ]i signaling of in situ chondrocytes in loaded cartilage is not fully understood due to the technical challenges in [Ca2+ ]i imaging of chondrocytes in a deforming ECM. This study developed a novel bi-directional microscopy loading device that enables the record of transient [Ca2+ ]i responses of in situ chondrocytes in loaded cartilage. It was found that compressive loading significantly promoted [Ca2+ ]i signaling in chondrocytes with faster [Ca2+ ]i oscillations in comparison to the non-loaded cartilage. Seven [Ca2+ ]i signaling pathways were further investigated by treating the cartilage with antagonists prior to and/or during the loading. Removal of extracellular Ca2+ ions completely abolished the [Ca2+ ]i responses of in situ chondrocytes, suggesting the indispensable role of extracellular Ca2+ sources in initiating the [Ca2+ ]i signaling in chondrocytes. Depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores, inhibition of PLC-IP3 pathway, and block of purinergic receptors on plasma membrane led to significant reduction in the responsive rate of cells. Three types of ion channels that are regulated by different physical signals, TRPV4 (osmotic and mechanical stress), T-type VGCCs (electrical potential), and mechanical sensitive ion channels (mechanical loading) all demonstrated critical roles in controlling the [Ca2+ ]i responses of in situ chondrocyte in the loaded cartilage. This study provided new knowledge about the [Ca2+ ]i signaling and mechanobiology of chondrocytes in its natural residing environment. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. FM dyes enter via a store-operated calcium channel and modify calcium signaling of cultured astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongdong; Hérault, Karine; Oheim, Martin; Ropert, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    The amphiphilic fluorescent styryl pyridinium dyes FM1-43 and FM4-64 are used to probe activity-dependent synaptic vesicle cycling in neurons. Cultured astrocytes can internalize FM1-43 and FM4-64 inside vesicles but their uptake is insensitive to the elevation of cytosolic calcium (Ca2+) concentration and the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we used total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and pharmacological tools to study the mechanisms of FM4-64 uptake into cultured astrocytes from mouse neocortex. Our data show that: (i) endocytosis is not a major route for FM4-64 uptake into astrocytes; (ii) FM4-64 enters astrocytes through an aqueous pore and strongly affects Ca2+ homeostasis; (iii) partitioning of FM4-64 into the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane results in a facilitation of store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) channel gating; (iv) FM4-64 permeates and competes with Ca2+ for entry through a SOCE channel; (v) intracellular FM4-64 mobilizes Ca2+ from the endoplasmic reticulum stores, conveying a positive feedback to activate SOCE and to sustain dye uptake into astrocytes. Our study demonstrates that FM dyes are not markers of cycling vesicles in astrocytes and calls for a careful interpretation of FM fluorescence. PMID:20007370

  14. Redox-Dependent Calcium-Mediated Signaling Networks that Control the Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Akshaya

    Cellular senescence has evolved as a protective mechanism to arrest growth of cells with oncogenic potential. While senescent cells have lost the ability to divide, they remain metabolically active and adapt a deleterious senescence associated secretory phenotype (SASP) central to the progression of several age-associated disease pathologies. The SASP is mechanistically regulated by the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1alpha) whose expression and activity is responsive to the senescence associated (SA) oxidant production and the accompanying disruption of calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis. Using primary IMR-90 human fetal lung fibroblasts as a model of replicative senescence, we explored the molecular underpinnings driving Ca2+ dysregulation in senescent cells. We establish that the redox-responsive Transient Receptor Potential TRPC6 channel is compromised due to desensitization owing to SA increases in steady state hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production. SA dysregulation of Ca2+ is also accompanied by loss of response to H2O2-induced Ca2+ influx that can be rescued with catalase pre-treatments. Senescent cells are also insensitive to Ca2+ entry induced by hyperforin, a specific activator of TRPC6, that can be restored by catalase pre-treatments, further suggesting redox regulation of TRPC6 in senescence. Inhibition of TRPC6 channel activity restores the ability of senescent cells to respond to peroxide-induced Ca2+ in addition to suppressing SASP gene expression. Furthermore, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling regulates SASP by means of modulating TRPC6 channel expression. Together, our findings provide compelling evidence that redox and mTOR-mediated regulation of TRPC6 channel modulate SASP gene expression. Further, the gain-of-function mutation of TRPC6 has pathological implications in several chronic pathologies and renders it a viable target in age-associated diseases.

  15. Wnt signaling is involved in human articular chondrocyte de-differentiation in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sassi, N.; Laadhar, L.; Allouche, M.; Zandieh-Doulabi, B.; Hamdoun, M.; Klein-Nulend, J.; Makni, S.; Sellami, S.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most prevalent form of arthritis in the world. Certain signaling pathways, such as the wnt pathway, are involved in cartilage pathology. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes undergo morphological and biochemical changes that lead to chondrocyte de-differentiation. We investigated

  16. Calcium signalling indicates bilateral power balancing in the Drosophila flight muscle during manoeuvring flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Fritz-Olaf; Skandalis, Dimitri A; Berthé, Ruben

    2013-05-06

    Manoeuvring flight in animals requires precise adjustments of mechanical power output produced by the flight musculature. In many insects such as fruit flies, power generation is most likely varied by altering stretch-activated tension, that is set by sarcoplasmic calcium levels. The muscles reside in a thoracic shell that simultaneously drives both wings during wing flapping. Using a genetically expressed muscle calcium indicator, we here demonstrate in vivo the ability of this animal to bilaterally adjust its calcium activation to the mechanical power output required to sustain aerodynamic costs during flight. Motoneuron-specific comparisons of calcium activation during lift modulation and yaw turning behaviour suggest slightly higher calcium activation for dorso-longitudinal than for dorsoventral muscle fibres, which corroborates the elevated need for muscle mechanical power during the wings' downstroke. During turning flight, calcium activation explains only up to 54 per cent of the required changes in mechanical power, suggesting substantial power transmission between both sides of the thoracic shell. The bilateral control of muscle calcium runs counter to the hypothesis that the thorax of flies acts as a single, equally proportional source for mechanical power production for both flapping wings. Collectively, power balancing highlights the precision with which insects adjust their flight motor to changing energetic requirements during aerial steering. This potentially enhances flight efficiency and is thus of interest for the development of technical vehicles that employ bioinspired strategies of power delivery to flapping wings.

  17. Calcium and cytoskeleton signaling during cell volume regulation in isolated nematocytes of Aiptasia mutabilis (Cnidaria: Anthozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, A; La Spada, G

    2007-05-01

    Cell volume regulation has not been completely clarified in Coelenterates. The present investigation focuses on cell volume regulation under anisosmotic conditions, both hyposmotic and hypertonic, and on the underlying signals in nematocytes isolated from the Coelenterate Aiptasia mutabilis living in sea water. Nematocytes, once isolated from acontia, that were submitted to either hyposmotic (35%) and hypertonic shock (45%) show RVD and RVI capabilities, respectively. In order to ascertain the role of Ca2+ in triggering such regulatory mechanisms and the possible involvement of cytoskeleton components, tests were performed by employing either Ca2+ free conditions, Gd3+ as Ca2+ channel blockers, TFP as calmodulin inhibitor, colchicine as microtubule inhibitor and cytochalasin B as microfilament polymerization inhibitor. Results show that isolated nematocytes of A. mutabilis can regulate their volume upon both hyposmotic and hypertonic challenge. Ca2+ both from external medium and from internal stores is needed to perform RVD mechanisms, whereas, intracellular Ca2+ seems to be mainly involved in RVI. Moreover cytoskeletal components may play an important role since a significant RVD and RVI inhibition was observed in treated cells. On the basis of our observations further studies are warranted to further verify the role of signals, including phosphatases and phosphorylases, in cell volume regulation of primitive eukaryotic cells.

  18. Calcium hydroxyapatite crystal deposition with intraosseous penetration involving the posterior aspect of the cervical spine: a previously unreported cause of neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, Julio; Contreras, Oscar

    2017-05-01

    Calcific tendinitis is a frequent disorder caused by hydroxyapatite crystal deposition; however, bone erosions from calcific tendinitis are unusual. The spinal manifestation of this disease is calcific tendinitis of the longus colli muscle; this disease has never been described in the posterior aspect of the spine. We report a case of calcium hydroxyapatite crystal deposition involving the posterior cervical spine eroding the bone cortex. A 57-year-old woman presented with a 5-month history of left-sided neck pain. Radiographs showed C4-C5 interspinous calcification with lytic compromise of the posterior arch of C4. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed a lytic lesion of the posterior arch of C4, with a soft tissue mass extending to the C4-C5 interspinous space; calcifications were observed as very low signal intensity areas on T1 and T2 sequences, surrounded by gadolinium-enhanced soft tissues. A computed tomography (CT) scan confirmed the bone erosions and the soft tissue calcifications. A CT-guided needle biopsy was performed; it showed vascularized connective tissue with inflammatory histiocytic infiltration and multinucleated giant cells; Alizarin Red stain confirmed the presence of hydroxyapatite crystals. The patient was treated with anti-inflammatories for 2 weeks. She has been asymptomatic in a 6-month follow-up; a CT scan at the last follow-up revealed reparative remodeling of bone erosions. This is the first report of calcium hydroxyapatite crystal deposition with intraosseous penetration involving the posterior aspect of the cervical spine. Considering that this unusual lesion can be misinterpreted as a tumor or infection, high suspicion is required to avoid unnecessary surgical procedures.

  19. Calcium-calmodulin kinase I cooperatively regulates nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of CCTα by accessing a nuclear export signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agassandian, Marianna; Chen, Bill B; Pulijala, Roopa; Kaercher, Leah; Glasser, Jennifer R; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2012-07-01

    We identified a new calmodulin kinase I (CaMKI) substrate, cytidyltransferase (CCTα), a crucial enzyme required for maintenance of cell membranes. CCTα becomes activated with translocation from the cytoplasm to the nuclear membrane, resulting in increased membrane phospholipids. Calcium-activated CCTα nuclear import is mediated by binding of its C-terminus to 14-3-3 ζ, a regulator of nuclear trafficking. Here CaMK1 phosphorylates residues within this C-terminus that signals association of CCTα with 14-3-3 ζ to initiate calcium-induced nuclear entry. CaMKI docks within the CCTα membrane-binding domain (residues 290-299), a sequence that displays similarities to a canonical nuclear export signal (NES) that also binds CRM1/exportin 1. Expression of a CFP-CCTα mutant lacking residues 290-299 in cells results in cytosolically retained enzyme. CRM1/exportin 1 was required for CCTα nuclear export, and its overexpression in cells was partially sufficient to trigger CCTα nuclear export despite calcium stimulation. An isolated CFP-290-299 peptide remained in the nucleus in the presence of leptomycin B but was able to target to the cytoplasm with farnesol. Thus CaMKI vies with CRM1/exportin 1 for access to a NES, and assembly of a CaMKI-14-3-3 ζ-CCTα complex is a key effector mechanism that drives nuclear CCTα translocation.

  20. Deoxycholic acid mediates non-canonical EGFR-MAPK activation through the induction of calcium signaling in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centuori, Sara M; Gomes, Cecil J; Trujillo, Jesse; Borg, Jamie; Brownlee, Joshua; Putnam, Charles W; Martinez, Jesse D

    2016-07-01

    Obesity and a western diet have been linked to high levels of bile acids and the development of colon cancer. Specifically, increased levels of the bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA), an established tumor promoter, has been shown to correlate with increased development of colorectal adenomas and progression to carcinoma. Herein we investigate the mechanism by which DCA leads to EGFR-MAPK activation, a candidate mechanism by which DCA may promote colorectal tumorigenesis. DCA treated colon cancer cells exhibited strong and prolonged activation of ERK1/2 when compared to EGF treatment alone. We also showed that DCA treatment prevents EGFR degradation as opposed to the canonical EGFR recycling observed with EGF treatment. Moreover, the combination of DCA and EGF treatment displayed synergistic activity, suggesting DCA activates MAPK signaling in a non-canonical manner. Further evaluation showed that DCA treatment increased intracellular calcium levels and CAMKII phosphorylation, and that blocking calcium with BAPTA-AM abrogated MAPK activation induced by DCA, but not by EGF. Finally we showed that DCA-induced CAMKII leads to MAPK activation through the recruitment of c-Src. Taken together, we demonstrated that DCA regulates MAPK activation through calcium signaling, an alternative mechanism not previously recognized in human colon cancer cells. Importantly, this mechanism allows for EGFR to escape degradation and thus achieve a constitutively active state, which may explain its tumor promoting effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Inhibition of hydrogen sulfide on the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells involved in the modulation of calcium sensing receptor in high homocysteine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuwen; Wang, Xiyao [Department of Clinical Laboratory, The second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150081 (China); Liang, Xiaohui [Department of Radiology, Central Hospital of the Red Cross, Harbin 150080 (China); Wu, Jichao; Dong, Shiyun; Li, Hongzhu [Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150081 (China); Jin, Meili [Department of Clinical Laboratory, The second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150081 (China); Sun, Dianjun [Center for Endemic Disease Control, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Zhang, Weihua [Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150081 (China); Zhong, Xin, E-mail: xzhong1111@163.com [Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150081 (China)

    2016-09-10

    Hyperhomocysteinemia induces the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) inhibits the phenotype switch of VSMCs and calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) regulated the production of endogenous H{sub 2}S. However, whether CaSR inhibits the proliferation of VSMCs by regulating the endogenous cystathionine-gamma-lyase (CSE, a major enzyme that produces H{sub 2}S) pathway in high homocysteine (HHcy) has not been previously investigated. The intracellular calcium concentration, the concentration of H{sub 2}S, the cell viability, the proliferation and the expression of proteins of cultured VSMCs from rat thoracic aortas were measured, respectively. The results showed that the [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and the expression of p-CaMK and CSE increased upon treatment with CaSR agonist. In HHcy, the H{sub 2}S concentration decrease, the proliferation and migration rate increased, the expression of Cyclin D1, PCNA, Osteopontin and p-Erk1/2 increased while the α-SM actin, P21{sup Cip/WAK−1} and Calponin decreased. The CaSR agonist or exogenous H{sub 2}S significantly reversed the changes of VSMCs caused by HHcy. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that CaSR regulate the endogenous CSE/H{sub 2}S is related to the PLC-IP{sub 3} receptor and CaM signal pathways which inhibit the proliferation of VSMCs, and the latter is involved in the Erk1/2 dependent signal pathway in high homocysteine. - Highlights: • CaSR activation increased the production of endogenous H{sub 2}S in high homocysteine VSMCs. • CaSR modulated the CSE/H{sub 2}S are related to the PLC-IP{sub 3}R and Ca{sup 2+}-CaM signal pathways. • Inhibition of H{sub 2}S on the proliferation of VSMCs is involved in the Erk1/2 pathway. • Explore the potential roles of CaSR in regulating VSMCs proliferation in high homocysteine.

  2. Biotic and abiotic stress responses through calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) signaling in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Aili; Wang, Xiang; Leseberg, Charles H; Jia, Jizeng; Mao, Long

    2008-09-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) sense the calcium concentration changes in plant cells and play important roles in signaling pathways for disease resistance and various stress responses as indicated by emerging evidences. Among the 20 wheat CDPK genes studied, 10 were found to respond to drought, salinity and ABA treatments. Consistent with previous observations, one CDPK gene was shown to respond to multiple abiotic stresses in wheat suggesting that CDPKs could be converging points for multiple signaling pathways. Among the 12 wheat CDPK genes that were responsive to Blumeria graminis tritici (Bgt) infection or the treatment of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), eight also responded to abiotic stresses, suggesting a cross-talk between biotic and abiotic stress signaling pathways. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that some of these genes were closely related to CDPKs from other species, whose functions have been partially studied, suggesting similar functions wheat CDPK genes. Combining the up-to-date knowledge of CDPK functions and our observations, a model was developed to project the possible roles of wheat CDPK genes in the signaling of biotic and abiotic stress responses.

  3. Signaling Network of Environmental Sensing and Adaptation in Plants:. Key Roles of Calcium Ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurusu, Takamitsu; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Considering the important issues concerning food, environment, and energy that humans are facing in the 21st century, humans mostly depend on plants. Unlike animals which move from an inappropriate environment, plants do not move, but rapidly sense diverse environmental changes or invasion by other organisms such as pathogens and insects in the place they root, and adapt themselves by changing their own bodies, through which they developed adaptability. Whole genetic information corresponding to the blueprints of many biological systems has recently been analyzed, and comparative genomic studies facilitated tracing strategies of each organism in their evolutional processes. Comparison of factors involved in intracellular signal transduction between animals and plants indicated diversification of different gene sets. Reversible binding of Ca2+ to sensor proteins play key roles as a molecular switch both in animals and plants. Molecular mechanisms for signaling network of environmental sensing and adaptation in plants will be discussed with special reference to Ca2+ as a key element in information processing.

  4. The signaling module cAMP/Epac/Rap1/PLCε/IP3 mobilizes acrosomal calcium during sperm exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchesi, Ornella; Ruete, María C; Bustos, Matías A; Quevedo, María F; Tomes, Claudia N

    2016-04-01

    Exocytosis of the sperm's single secretory granule, or acrosome, is a regulated exocytosis triggered by components of the egg's investments. In addition to external calcium, sperm exocytosis (termed the acrosome reaction) requires cAMP synthesized endogenously and calcium mobilized from the acrosome through IP3-sensitive channels. The relevant cAMP target is Epac. In the first part of this paper, we present a novel tool (the TAT-cAMP sponge) to investigate cAMP-related signaling pathways in response to progesterone as acrosome reaction trigger. The TAT-cAMP sponge consists of the cAMP-binding sites of protein kinase A regulatory subunit RIβ fused to the protein transduction domain TAT of the human immunodeficiency virus-1. The sponge permeated into sperm, sequestered endogenous cAMP, and blocked exocytosis. Progesterone increased the population of sperm with Rap1-GTP, Rab3-GTP, and Rab27-GTP in the acrosomal region; pretreatment with the TAT-cAMP sponge prevented the activation of all three GTPases. In the second part of this manuscript, we show that phospholipase Cε (PLCε) is required for the acrosome reaction downstream of Rap1 and upstream of intra-acrosomal calcium mobilization. Last, we present direct evidence that cAMP, Epac, Rap1, and PLCε are necessary for calcium mobilization from sperm's secretory granule. In summary, we describe here a pathway that connects cAMP to calcium mobilization from the acrosome during sperm exocytosis. Never before had direct evidence for each step of the cascade been put together in the same study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Cloning of a novel phosphotyrosine binding domain containing molecule, Odin, involved in signaling by receptor tyrosine kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, A.; Blagoev, B.; Kratchmarova, I.

    2002-01-01

    We have used a proteomic approach using mass spectrometry to identify signaling molecules involved in receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathways. Using affinity purification by anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies to enrich for tyrosine phosphorylated proteins, we have identified a novel signaling...

  6. Miro1 Regulates Activity-Driven Positioning of Mitochondria within Astrocytic Processes Apposed to Synapses to Regulate Intracellular Calcium Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Terri-Leigh; Higgs, Nathalie F.; Sheehan, David F.; Al Awabdh, Sana; López-Doménech, Guillermo; Arancibia-Carcamo, I. Lorena

    2015-01-01

    It is fast emerging that maintaining mitochondrial function is important for regulating astrocyte function, although the specific mechanisms that govern astrocyte mitochondrial trafficking and positioning remain poorly understood. The mitochondrial Rho-GTPase 1 protein (Miro1) regulates mitochondrial trafficking and detachment from the microtubule transport network to control activity-dependent mitochondrial positioning in neurons. However, whether Miro proteins are important for regulating signaling-dependent mitochondrial dynamics in astrocytic processes remains unclear. Using live-cell confocal microscopy of rat organotypic hippocampal slices, we find that enhancing neuronal activity induces transient mitochondrial remodeling in astrocytes, with a concomitant, transient reduction in mitochondrial trafficking, mediated by elevations in intracellular Ca2+. Stimulating neuronal activity also induced mitochondrial confinement within astrocytic processes in close proximity to synapses. Furthermore, we show that the Ca2+-sensing EF-hand domains of Miro1 are important for regulating mitochondrial trafficking in astrocytes and required for activity-driven mitochondrial confinement near synapses. Additionally, activity-dependent mitochondrial positioning by Miro1 reciprocally regulates the levels of intracellular Ca2+ in astrocytic processes. Thus, the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ signaling, dependent on Miro1-mediated mitochondrial positioning, could have important consequences for astrocyte Ca2+ wave propagation, gliotransmission, and ultimately neuronal function. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Mitochondria are key cellular organelles that play important roles in providing cellular energy and buffering intracellular calcium ions. The mechanisms that control mitochondrial distribution within the processes of glial cells called astrocytes and the impact this may have on calcium signaling remains unclear. We show that activation of glutamate receptors or increased neuronal

  7. Electromagnetic field effects on cells of the immune system: The role of calcium signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walleczek, J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1992-10-01

    During the past decade considerable evidence has accumulated demonstrating that nonthermal exposures of cells of the immune system to extremely low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields (< 300 Hz) can elicit cellular changes that might be relevant to in vivo immune activity. A similar responsiveness to nonionizing electromagnetic energy in this frequency range has also been documented for tissues of the neuroendocrine and musculoskeletal system. However, knowledge about the underlying biological mechanisms by which such fields can induce cellular changes is still very limited. It is generally believed that the cell membrane and Ca[sup 2+]-regulated activity is involved in bioactive ELF field coupling to living systems. This article begins with a short review of the current state of knowledge concerning the effects of nonthermal levels of ELF electromagnetic fields on the biochemistry and activity of immune cells and then closely examines new results that suggest a role for Ca[sup 2+] in the induction of these cellular field effects. Based on these findings it is proposed that membrane-mediated Ca[sup 2+] in the induction of these cellular field effects. Based on these findings it is proposed that membrane-mediated Ca[sup 2+] signaling processes are involved in the mediation of field effects on the immune system. 69 refs., 2 tabs.

  8. Electromagnetic field effects on cells of the immune system: The role of calcium signalling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walleczek, J.

    1991-07-01

    During the past decade considerable evidence has accumulated demonstrating the exposures of cells of the immune system to relatively weak extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields (< 300 Hz) can elicit cellular changes which might be relevant to in-vivo immune activity. However, knowledge about the underlying biological mechanisms by which weak fields induce cellular changes is still very limited. It is generally believed that the cell membrane and Ca{sup 2+} regulated activity is involved in bioactive ELF field-coupling to living systems. This article begins with a short review of the current state of knowledge concerning the effects of nonthermal levels of ELF electromagnetic fields on the biochemistry and activity of immune cells, and then closely examines new results which suggest a role for Ca{sup 2+} in the induction of these cellular field effects. Based on these findings it is proposed that membrane-mediated Ca{sup 2+} signalling processes are involved in the mediation of field effects on the immune system. 64 refs., 2 tabs.

  9. Lion's Mane Medicinal Mushroom, Hericium erinaceus (Agaricomycetes), Modulates Purinoceptor-Coupled Calcium Signaling and Murine Nociceptive Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei-Shan; Chueh, Sheau-Huei; Chen, Chin-Chu; Lee, Li-Ya; Shiu, Li-Yen

    2017-01-01

    Hericium erinaceus is well known for the neurotrophic effect it confers by promoting nerve growth factor biosynthesis. We discovered a novel bioactivity of H. erinaceus in its ability to suppress adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-induced calcium signaling in neuronal PC12 cells. ATP, known primarily as a neurotransmitter, also acts on purinoceptors (P2 purinergic receptor [P2R]) to generate the cellular calcium signaling and secretion that mediate P2R physiological manifestations, including pain. Chronic pain reduces quality of life. However, constant analgesic administration can cause liver and kidney injury, as well as loss of the analgesic effect because of desensitization. In this study we investigated the analgesic potential of H. erinaceus through measurements of ATP-induced Ca2+ signaling in cell lines and observation of pain behaviors in mice. In P2R-coupled Ca2+ signaling measurements, extracts of H. erinaceus mycelia (HEEs) blocked ATP-induced Ca2+ signaling in both rat PC12 cells and human HOS cells. HEEs completely blocked ATP-induced Ca2+ signaling in human HOS cells, suggesting that this effect of HEEs is exerted through the P2R subtypes present in HOS cells, which include the P2X4, P2X7, P2Y2, and P2Y4 subtypes. In observations of animal behavior during pain, HEEs significantly reduced heat-induced pain, including postponing both the tail-flick response to heat stimulation and the paw-lifting response to a hot plate. This study demonstrates novel characteristics of H. erinaceus in reducing nociceptive behavior and blocking the functional activity of P2R. Further studies are required to verify this linkage and its molecular mechanisms.

  10. Regulation of calcium signalling by docosahexaenoic acid in human T-cells. Implication of CRAC channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, A; Khan, N A

    2000-02-01

    We elucidated the role of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on the increases in free intracellular calcium concentrations, [Ca(2+)]i, in human (Jurkat) T-cell lines. DHA evoked an increase in [Ca(2+)]i in a dose-dependent manner in these cells. Anti-CD3 antibody, known to stimulate increases in Ca(2+) from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) via the production of inositol trisphosphate, also evoked increases in [Ca(2+)]i in Jurkat T-cells. We also used thapsigargin which inhibits Ca(2+)-ATPase of the ER and, therefore, increases Ca(2+) in the cytosol. Interestingly, addition of DHA during the thapsigargin-induced peak response exerted an additive effect on the increases in [Ca(2+)]i in human T-cells, indicating that the mechanisms of action of these two agents are different. However, the DHA-induced calcium response was not observed when this agent was added during the anti-CD3-induced calcium peak, though its addition resulted in a prolonged and sustained calcium response as a function of time, suggesting that DHA recruits calcium, in part, from the ER pool and the prolonged response may be due to Ca(2+) influx. In the medium containing 0% Ca(2+), the DHA-evoked response on the increases in [Ca(2+)]i was significantly curtailed as compared to that in 100% Ca(2+) medium, supporting the notion that the response of the DHA is also due, in part, to the opening of calcium channels. Furthermore, preincubation of cells with tyrphostin A9, an inhibitor of Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels also significantly curtailed the DHA-induced sustained response on the increases in [Ca(2+)]i in these cells. These results suggest that DHA induces an increase in [Ca(2+)]i via the ER pool and the opening of CRAC channels in human T-cells.

  11. Ethylene-mediated cross-talk between calcium-dependent protein kinase and MAPK signaling controls stress responses in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Andrea A; Saitoh, Hiromasa; Felix, Georg; Freymark, Gerald; Miersch, Otto; Wasternack, Claus; Boller, Thomas; Jones, Jonathan D G; Romeis, Tina

    2005-07-26

    Plants are constantly exposed to environmental changes and need to integrate multiple external stress cues. Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are implicated as major primary Ca2+ sensors in plants. CDPK activation, like activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), is triggered by biotic and abiotic stresses, although distinct stimulus-specific stress responses are induced. To investigate whether CDPKs are part of an underlying mechanism to guarantee response specificity, we identified CDPK-controlled signaling pathways. A truncated form of Nicotiana tabacum CDPK2 lacking its regulatory autoinhibitor and calcium-binding domains was ectopically expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana. Infiltrated leaves responded to an abiotic stress stimulus with the activation of biotic stress reactions. These responses included synthesis of reactive oxygen species, defense gene induction, and SGT1-dependent cell death. Furthermore, N-terminal CDPK2 signaling triggered enhanced levels of the phytohormones jasmonic acid, 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid, and ethylene but not salicylic acid. These responses, commonly only observed after challenge with a strong biotic stimulus, were prevented when the CDPK's intrinsic autoinhibitory peptide was coexpressed. Remarkably, elevated CDPK signaling compromised stress-induced MAPK activation, and this inhibition required ethylene synthesis and perception. These data indicate that CDPK and MAPK pathways do not function independently and that a concerted activation of both pathways controls response specificity to biotic and abiotic stress.

  12. Calcium imaging reveals glial involvement in transcranial direct current stimulation-induced plasticity in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monai, Hiromu; Ohkura, Masamichi; Tanaka, Mika; Oe, Yuki; Konno, Ayumu; Hirai, Hirokazu; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Nakai, Junichi; Iwai, Youichi; Hirase, Hajime

    2016-03-22

    Transcranical direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a treatment known to ameliorate various neurological conditions and enhance memory and cognition in humans. tDCS has gained traction for its potential therapeutic value; however, little is known about its mechanism of action. Using a transgenic mouse expressing G-CaMP7 in astrocytes and a subpopulation of excitatory neurons, we find that tDCS induces large-amplitude astrocytic Ca(2+) surges across the entire cortex with no obvious changes in the local field potential. Moreover, sensory evoked cortical responses are enhanced after tDCS. These enhancements are dependent on the alpha-1 adrenergic receptor and are not observed in IP3R2 (inositol trisphosphate receptor type 2) knockout mice, in which astrocytic Ca(2+) surges are absent. Together, we propose that tDCS changes the metaplasticity of the cortex through astrocytic Ca(2+)/IP3 signalling.

  13. Honey bee dopamine and octopamine receptors linked to intracellular calcium signaling have a close phylogenetic and pharmacological relationship.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle T Beggs

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Three dopamine receptor genes have been identified that are highly conserved among arthropod species. One of these genes, referred to in honey bees as Amdop2, shows a close phylogenetic relationship to the a-adrenergic-like octopamine receptor family. In this study we examined in parallel the functional and pharmacological properties of AmDOP2 and the honey bee octopamine receptor, AmOA1. For comparison, pharmacological properties of the honey bee dopamine receptors AmDOP1 and AmDOP3, and the tyramine receptor AmTYR1, were also examined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using HEK293 cells heterologously expressing honey bee biogenic amine receptors, we found that activation of AmDOP2 receptors, like AmOA1 receptors, initiates a rapid increase in intracellular calcium levels. We found no evidence of calcium signaling via AmDOP1, AmDOP3 or AmTYR1 receptors. AmDOP2- and AmOA1-mediated increases in intracellular calcium were inhibited by 10 µM edelfosine indicating a requirement for phospholipase C-β activity in this signaling pathway. Edelfosine treatment had no effect on AmDOP2- or AmOA1-mediated increases in intracellular cAMP. The synthetic compounds mianserin and epinastine, like cis-(Z-flupentixol and spiperone, were found to have significant antagonist activity on AmDOP2 receptors. All 4 compounds were effective antagonists also on AmOA1 receptors. Analysis of putative ligand binding sites offers a possible explanation for why epinastine acts as an antagonist at AmDOP2 receptors, but fails to block responses mediated via AmDOP1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that AmDOP2, like AmOA1, is coupled not only to cAMP, but also to calcium-signalling and moreover, that the two signalling pathways are independent upstream of phospholipase C-β activity. The striking similarity between the pharmacological properties of these 2 receptors suggests an underlying conservation of structural properties related to receptor

  14. Intercellular calcium signaling and nitric oxide feedback during constriction of rabbit renal afferent arterioles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhrenholt, Torben Rene; Schjerning, J; Vanhoutte, Paul M. G.

    2007-01-01

    calciseptine. After a delay of 10 s, [Ca(2+)](i) increased in endothelial cells immediately adjacent to reactive smooth muscle cells, and this calcium wave spread in a nonregenerative fashion laterally into the endothelial cell layer with a velocity of 1.2 microm/s. Depolarization with 100 mmol/l KCl led...

  15. Cytoskeleton rotation relocates mitochondria to the immunological synapse and increases calcium signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccari, Ilaria; Zhao, Renping; Peglow, Martin; Schwarz, Karsten; Hornak, Ivan; Pasche, Mathias; Quintana, Ariel; Hoth, Markus; Qu, Bin; Rieger, Heiko

    2016-11-01

    Ca2+ microdomains and spatially resolved Ca2+ signals are highly relevant for cell function. In T cells, local Ca2+ signaling at the immunological synapse (IS) is required for downstream effector functions. We present experimental evidence that the relocation of the MTOC towards the IS during polarization drags mitochondria along with the microtubule network. From time-lapse fluorescence microscopy we conclude that mitochondria rotate together with the cytoskeleton towards the IS. We hypothesize that this movement of mitochondria towards the IS together with their functionality of absorption and spatial redistribution of Ca2+ is sufficient to significantly increase the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration. To test this hypothesis we developed a whole cell model for Ca2+ homoeostasis involving specific geometries for mitochondria and use the model to calculate the spatial distribution of Ca2+ concentrations within the cell body as a function of the rotation angle and the distance from the IS. We find that an inhomogeneous distribution of PMCA pumps on the cell membrane, in particular an accumulation of PMCA at the IS, increases the global Ca2+ concentration and decreases the local Ca2+ concentration at the IS with decreasing distance of the MTOC from the IS. Unexpectedly, a change of CRAC/Orai activity is not required to explain the observed Ca2+ changes. We conclude that rotation-driven relocation of the MTOC towards the IS together with an accumulation of PMCA pumps at the IS are sufficient to control the observed Ca2+ dynamics in T-cells during polarization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 2 modulates local ATP-induced calcium signaling in human HaCaT keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Lin Ho

    Full Text Available Keratinocytes are the major building blocks of the human epidermis. In many physiological and pathophysiological conditions, keratinocytes release adenosine triphosphate (ATP as an autocrine/paracrine mediator that regulates cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration. ATP receptors have been identified in various epidermal cell types; therefore, extracellular ATP homeostasis likely determines its long-term, trophic effects on skin health. We investigated the possibility that human keratinocytes express surface-located enzymes that modulate ATP concentration, as well as the corresponding receptor activation, in the pericellular microenvironment. We observed that the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT released ATP and hydrolyzed extracellular ATP. Interestingly, ATP hydrolysis resulted in adenosine diphosphate (ADP accumulation in the extracellular space. Pharmacological inhibition by ARL 67156 or gene silencing of the endogenous ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase isoform 2 resulted in a 25% reduction in both ATP hydrolysis and ADP formation. Using intracellular calcium as a reporter, we found that although NTPDase2 hydrolyzed ATP and generated sustainable ADP levels, only ATP contributed to increased intracellular calcium via P2Y2 receptor activation. Furthermore, knocking down NTPDase2 potentiated the nanomolar ATP-induced intracellular calcium increase, suggesting that NTPDase2 globally attenuates nucleotide concentration in the pericellular microenvironment as well as locally shields receptors in the vicinity from being activated by extracellular ATP. Our findings reveal an important role of human keratinocyte NTPDase2 in modulating nucleotide signaling in the extracellular milieu of human epidermis.

  17. Calcium-sensing receptors signal constitutive macropinocytosis and facilitate the uptake of NOD2 ligands in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canton, Johnathan; Schlam, Daniel; Breuer, Christian; Gütschow, Michael; Glogauer, Michael; Grinstein, Sergio

    2016-04-06

    Macropinocytosis can be induced in several cell types by stimulation with growth factors. In selected cell types, notably macrophages and dendritic cells, macropinocytosis occurs constitutively, supporting the uptake of antigens for subsequent presentation. Despite their different mode of initiation and contrasting physiological roles, it is tacitly assumed that both types of macropinocytosis are mechanistically identical. We report that constitutive macropinocytosis is stringently calcium dependent, while stimulus-induced macropinocytosis is not. Extracellular calcium is sensed by G-protein-coupled calcium-sensing receptors (CaSR) that signal macropinocytosis through Gα-, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and phospholipase C. These pathways promote the recruitment of exchange factors that stimulate Rac and/or Cdc42, driving actin-dependent formation of ruffles and macropinosomes. In addition, the heterologous expression of CaSR in HEK293 cells confers on them the ability to perform constitutive macropinocytosis. Finally, we show that CaSR-induced constitutive macropinocytosis facilitates the sentinel function of macrophages, promoting the efficient delivery of ligands to cytosolic pattern-recognition receptors.

  18. Targeting Intracellular Calcium Signaling ([Ca2+]i to Overcome Acquired Multidrug Resistance of Cancer Cells: A Mini-Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietrich Büsselberg

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a main public health problem all over the world. It affects millions of humans no matter their age, gender, education, or social status. Although chemotherapy is the main strategy for the treatment of cancer, a major problem limiting its success is the intrinsic or acquired drug resistance. Therefore, cancer drug resistance is a major impediment in medical oncology resulting in a failure of a successful cancer treatment. This mini-overview focuses on the interdependent relationship between intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i signaling and multidrug resistance of cancer cells, acquired upon treatment of tumors with anticancer drugs. We propose that [Ca2+]i signaling modulates gene expression of multidrug resistant (MDR genes which in turn can be modulated by epigenetic factors which in turn leads to modified protein expression in drug resistant tumor cells. A precise knowledge of these mechanisms will help to develop new therapeutic strategies for drug resistant tumors and will improve current chemotherapy.

  19. Bruton's tyrosine kinase mediates the synergistic signalling between TLR9 and the B cell receptor by regulating calcium and calmodulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine F Kenny

    Full Text Available B cells signal through both the B cell receptor (BCR which binds antigens and Toll-like receptors (TLRs including TLR9 which recognises CpG DNA. Activation of TLR9 synergises with BCR signalling when the BCR and TLR9 co-localise within an auto-phagosome-like compartment. Here we report that Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK is required for synergistic IL6 production and up-regulation of surface expression of MHC-class-II, CD69 and CD86 in primary murine and human B cells. We show that BTK is essential for co-localisation of the BCR and TLR9 within a potential auto-phagosome-like compartment in the Namalwa human B cell line. Downstream of BTK we find that calcium acting via calmodulin is required for this process. These data provide new insights into the role of BTK, an important target for autoimmune diseases, in B cell activation.

  20. Nitric oxide and zinc-mediated protein assemblies involved in mu opioid receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Muñoz, María; Garzón, Javier

    2013-12-01

    Opioids are among the most effective analgesics in controlling the perception of intense pain, although their continuous use decreases their potency due to the development of tolerance. The glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor system is currently considered to be the most relevant functional antagonist of morphine analgesia. In the postsynapse of different brain regions the C terminus of the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) associates with NR1 subunits of NMDARs, as well as with a series of signaling proteins, such as neural nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)/nitric oxide (NO), protein kinase C (PKC), calcium and calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) and the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). NO is implicated in redox signaling and PKC falls under the regulation of zinc metabolism, suggesting that these signaling elements might participate in the regulation of MOR activity by the NMDAR. In this review, we discuss the influence of redox signaling in the mechanisms whose plasticity triggers opioid tolerance. Thus, the MOR C terminus assembles a series of signaling proteins around the homodimeric histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1 (HINT1). The NMDAR NR1 subunit and the regulator of G protein signaling RGSZ2 bind HINT1 in a zinc-independent manner, with RGSZ2 associating with nNOS and regulating MOR-induced production of NO. This NO acts on the RGSZ2 zinc finger, providing the zinc ions that are required for PKC/Raf-1 cysteine-rich domains to simultaneously bind to the histidines present in the HINT1 homodimer. The MOR-induced activation of phospholipase β (PLCβ) regulates PKC, which increases the reactive oxygen species (ROS) by acting on NOX/NADPH, consolidating the long-term PKC activation required to regulate the Raf-1/MAPK cascade and enhancing NMDAR function. Thus, RGSZ2 serves as a Redox Zinc Switch that converts NO signals into Zinc signals, thereby modulating Redox Sensor Proteins like PKCγ and Raf-1. Accordingly, redox-dependent and

  1. Effect of a high dose of simvastatin on muscle mitochondrial metabolism and calcium signaling in healthy volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galtier, F., E-mail: f-galtier@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, CIC 1001, 80 Avenue Augustin Fliche, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); CPID, Faculté de Pharmacie, 15 Av. Charles Flahault, BP 14491, 34093 Montpellier Cedex 5, Montpellier (France); Mura, T., E-mail: t-mura@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, CIC 1001, 80 Avenue Augustin Fliche, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Raynaud de Mauverger, E., E-mail: eric.raynaud-de-mauverger@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Université Montpellier 1, 5 bd Henri IV CS 19044, 34967 Montpellier Cedex 2 (France); Université Montpellier 2, Place Eugène Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, U1046, 371 Avenue du Doyen G. Giraud, CHU Arnaud de Villeneuve, Bâtiment INSERM Crastes de Paulet, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Chevassus, H., E-mail: h-chevassus@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, CIC 1001, 80 Avenue Augustin Fliche, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Farret, A., E-mail: a-farret@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, CIC 1001, 80 Avenue Augustin Fliche, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Gagnol, J.-P., E-mail: jp-gagnol@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, CIC 1001, 80 Avenue Augustin Fliche, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Costa, F., E-mail: francoisecosta@sfr.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, CIC 1001, 80 Avenue Augustin Fliche, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Dupuy, A., E-mail: am-dupuy@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); and others

    2012-09-15

    Statin use may be limited by muscle side effects. Although incompletely understood to date, their pathophysiology may involve oxidative stress and impairments of mitochondrial function and of muscle Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis. In order to simultaneously assess these mechanisms, 24 male healthy volunteers were randomized to receive either simvastatin for 80 mg daily or placebo for 8 weeks. Blood and urine samples and a stress test were performed at baseline and at follow-up, and mitochondrial respiration and Ca{sup 2+} spark properties were evaluated on a muscle biopsy 4 days before the second stress test. Simvastatin-treated subjects were separated according to their median creatine kinase (CK) increase. Simvastatin treatment induced a significant elevation of aspartate amino transferase (3.38 ± 5.68 vs − 1.15 ± 4.32 UI/L, P < 0.001) and CK (− 24.3 ± 99.1 ± 189.3vs 48.3 UI/L, P = 0.01) and a trend to an elevation of isoprostanes (193 ± 408 vs12 ± 53 pmol/mmol creatinine, P = 0.09) with no global change in mitochondrial respiration, lactate/pyruvate ratio or Ca{sup 2+} sparks. However, among statin-treated subjects, those with the highest CK increase displayed a significantly lower Vmax rotenone succinate and an increase in Ca{sup 2+} spark amplitude vs both subjects with the lowest CK increase and placebo-treated subjects. Moreover, Ca{sup 2+} spark amplitude was positively correlated with treatment-induced CK increase in the whole group (r = 0.71, P = 0.0045). In conclusion, this study further supports that statin induced muscular toxicity may be related to alterations in mitochondrial respiration and muscle calcium homeostasis independently of underlying disease or concomitant medication. -- Highlights: ► Statin use may be limited by side effects, particularly myopathy. ► Statins might impair mitochondrial function and muscle Ca2+ signaling in muscle. ► This was tested among healthy volunteers receiving simvastatin 80 mg daily for 8 weeks. ► CK

  2. Involvement of multiple calcium channels in neurotransmitter release from cultured sympathetic neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirning, L.D.; Perney, T.M.; Miller, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    The release of neurotransmitters has been defined to be a Ca/sup + +/ dependent process, however, the role of Ca/sup + +/ channels in the release process is unclear. Primary cultures of sympathetic nerves from superior cervical ganglia were used to examine the specific actions of dihydropyridine (DHP) drugs. In nerve cultures, /sup 3/H-norepinepharine (NE) was taken up in a desipramine blockable fashion and released on exposure to high external K/sup +/ concentrations. NE release was virtually abolished by Co/sup + +/ (3 mM) or in Ca/sup + +/ free media, demonstrating the Ca/sup + +/ dependence of the release. However, the antagonist DHP, nimodipine, was ineffective in blocking transmitter release in concentrations up to 10/sup -5/M. In contrast, the agonist DHP, Bay K8644 (10/sup -6/M), significantly enhanced transmitter release by 35-40% of control. This enhancement was blocked down to control levels by nimodipine (10/sup -6/M). The authors have also demonstrated high affinity /sup 3/H-nitrendipine binding sites (B/sub max/ = 179 fmoles/mg, Kd = 0.25 nM) on these sympathetic neuronal membranes. These data suggest that DHP sensitive Ca/sup + +/ channels, which have been shown to modulate SP release from DRG neurons in culture are not usually involved in NE release from sympathetic neurons. However, prolonged opening of these channels by the DHP agonist, Bay K8644, increases the overall Ca/sup + +/ influx into sympathetic nerves to enhance transmitter release.

  3. Interactions between salinity and boron toxicity in tomato plants involve apoplastic calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastías, Elizabeth; Alcaraz-López, Carlos; Bonilla, Ildefonso; Martínez-Ballesta, M Carmen; Bolaños, Luis; Carvajal, Micaela

    2010-01-01

    The lack of consensus about the mutual relations between salinity and boron (B) toxicity with respect to the physiological response of plants necessitates investigation of the interactions of soluble B with salinity. In this investigation, the effect of B was compared with Ca in order to elucidate whether the two nutrients have similar effects and/or to elucidate a relationship under salinity. Following addition of B or Ca, salinity was applied to tomato plants and the cell wall and plasma membrane permeability, measured as water permeability and electrolyte leakage, in relation to amino acid and ion cell wall composition, were determined. As the relationship between B and salinity was complex, several hypotheses are established. The increase of aquaporin functionality due to the presence of B and Ca compared with NaCl-treated plants could be the most feasible, whereas there is currently no satisfactory explanation for the results for the cell wall amino acid composition. In addition, the elemental composition results revealed that, in addition the known interactions between B and Ca with respect to cell wall stability, Mg and Mn were also increased in NaCl+B and NaCl+Ca treatments, suggesting their possible involvement in the cell wall function necessary for plant growth.

  4. p38 Mapk signal pathway involved in anti-inflammatory effect of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    6 were determined. The proteins of TLR4, phosphor-p38 MAPK and p38 MAPK involved in p38 MAPK signal pathway were assayed. Results: The statistical data indicated the NASH model rats reproduced typical histopathological features of ...

  5. Pitx2 impairs calcium handling in a dose-dependent manner by modulating Wnt signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Velasco, Estefanía; Hernández-Torres, Francisco; Daimi, Houria; Serra, Selma A; Herraiz, Adela; Hove-Madsen, Leif; Aránega, Amelia; Franco, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common type of arrhythmia in humans, yet the genetic cause of AF remains elusive. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have reported risk variants in four distinct genetic loci, and more recently, a meta-GWAS has further implicated six new loci in AF. However, the functional role of these AF GWAS-related genes in AF and their inter-relationship remain elusive. To get further insights into the molecular mechanisms driven by Pitx2, calcium handling and novel AF GWAS-associated gene expression were analysed in two distinct Pitx2 loss-of-function models with distinct basal electrophysiological defects; a novel Pitx2 conditional mouse line, Sox2CrePitx2, and our previously reported atrial-specific NppaCrePitx2 line. Molecular analyses of the left atrial appendage in NppaCrePitx2(+/-) and NppaCrePitx2(-/-) adult mice demonstrate that AF GWAS-associated genes such as Zfhx3, Kcnn3, and Wnt8a are severely impaired but not Cav1, Synpo2l, nor Prrx1. In addition, multiple calcium-handling genes such as Atp2a2, Casq2, and Plb are severely altered in atrial-specific NppaCrePitx2 mice in a dose-dependent manner. Functional assessment of calcium homeostasis further underscores these findings. In addition, multiple AF-related microRNAs are also impaired. In vitro over-expression of Wnt8, but not Zfhx3, impairs calcium handling and modulates microRNA expression signature identified in Pitx2 loss-of-function models. Our data demonstrate a dose-dependent relation between Pitx2 expression and the expression of AF susceptibility genes, calcium handling, and microRNAs and identify a complex regulatory network orchestrated by Pitx2 with large impact on atrial arrhythmogenesis susceptibility. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Mechanism of nuclear calcium signaling by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate produced in the nucleus, nuclear located protein kinase C and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Christian; Malviya, Anant N

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear phospholipase C-gamma 1 can be phosphorylated by nuclear membrane located epidermal growth factor receptor sequel to epidermal growth factor-mediated signaling to the nucleus. The function of mouse liver phospholipase C-gamma 1 is attributed to a 120 kDa protein fragment which has been found to be a proteolytic product of the 150 kDa native nuclear enzyme. The tyrosine-phosphorylated 120 kDa protein band interacts with activated EGFR, binds phosphatidyl-3-OH kinase enhancer, and activates nuclear phosphatidylinositol-3-OH-kinase, and is capable of generating diacylglycerol in response to the epidermal growth factor signal to the nucleus in vivo. Thus a mechanism for nuclear production of inositol-1,4,5-trisphophate is unraveled. Nuclear generated inositol-1,4,5-trisphophate interacts with the inner membrane located inositol-1,4,5-trisphophate receptor and sequesters calcium into the nucleoplasm. Nuclear inositol-1,4,5-trisphophate receptor is phosphorylated by native nuclear protein kinase C which enhances the receptor-ligand interaction. Nuclear calcium-ATPase and inositol-1,3,4,5-tetrakisphophate receptor are located on the outer nuclear membrane, thus facilitating calcium transport into the nuclear envelope lumen either by ATP or inositol-1,3,4,5-tetrakisphophate depending upon the external free calcium concentrations. Nuclear calcium ATPase is phosphorylated by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase with enhanced calcium pumping activity. A holistic picture emerges here where tyrosine phosphorylation compliments serine phosphorylation of key moieties regulating nuclear calcium signaling. Evidence are forwarded in favor of proteolysis having a profound implications in nuclear calcium homeostasis in particular and signal transduction in general.

  7. c-Met must translocate to the nucleus to initiate calcium signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Dawidson A; Rodrigues, Michele A; Leite, M Fatima; Gomez, Marcus V; Varnai, Peter; Balla, Tamas; Bennett, Anton M; Nathanson, Michael H

    2008-02-15

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is important for cell proliferation, differentiation, and related activities. HGF acts through its receptor c-Met, which activates downstream signaling pathways. HGF binds to c-Met at the plasma membrane, where it is generally believed that c-Met signaling is initiated. Here we report that c-Met rapidly translocates to the nucleus upon stimulation with HGF. Ca(2+) signals that are induced by HGF result from phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate hydrolysis and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate formation within the nucleus rather than within the cytoplasm. Translocation of c-Met to the nucleus depends upon the adaptor protein Gab1 and importin beta1, and formation of Ca(2+) signals in turn depends upon this translocation. HGF may exert its particular effects on cells because it bypasses signaling pathways in the cytoplasm to directly activate signaling pathways in the nucleus.

  8. Suggestive Evidence for the Involvement of the Second Calcium and Surface Loop in Interfacial Binding: Monoclinci and Trigonal Crystal Structures of a Quadruple Mutant of Phospholipase A2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekar,K.; Yogavel, M.; Kanaujia, S.; Sharma, A.; Velmurugan, D.; Poi, M.; Dauter, Z.; Tsai, M.

    2006-01-01

    The crystal structures of the monoclinic and trigonal forms of the quadruple mutant K53,56,120,121M of recombinant bovine pancreatic phospholipase A{sub 2} (PLA{sub 2}) have been solved and refined at 1.9 and 1.1 Angstroms resolution, respectively. Interestingly, the monoclinic form reveals the presence of the second calcium ion. Furthermore, the surface-loop residues are ordered and the conformation of residues 62-66 is similar to that observed in other structures containing the second calcium ion. On the other hand, in the trigonal form the surface loop is disordered and the second calcium is absent. Docking studies suggest that the second calcium and residues Lys62 and Asp66 from the surface loop could be involved in the interaction with the polar head group of the membrane phospholipid. It is hypothesized that the two structures of the quadruple mutant, monoclinic and trigonal, represent the conformations of PLA2 at the lipid interface and in solution, respectively. A docked structure with a phospholipid molecule and with a transition-state analogue bound, one at the active site coordinating to the catalytic calcium and the other at the second calcium site, but both at the i-face, is presented.

  9. Urotensin II-induced signaling involved in proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells

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    Myriam Iglewski

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Myriam Iglewski, Stephen R GrantDepartment of Integrative Physiology, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, Texas, USAAbstract: The urotensin II receptor, bound by the ligand urotensin II, generates second ­messengers, ie, inositol triphosphate and diacylglycerol, which stimulate the subsequent release of calcium (Ca2+ in vascular smooth muscle cells. Ca2+ influx leads to the activation of Ca2+-dependent kinases (CaMK via calmodulin binding, resulting in cellular proliferation. We hypothesize that urotensin II signaling in pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle cells (Pac1 and primary aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (PAVSMC results in phosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinases leading to cellular proliferation. Exposure of Pac1 cultures to urotensin II increased intracellular Ca2+, subsequently activating Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase (CaMKK, and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase Type I (CaMKI, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2, and protein kinase D. Treatment of Pac1 and PAVSMC with urotensin II increased proliferation as measured by 3H-thymidine uptake. The urotensin II-induced increase in 3H-thymidine incorporation was inhibited by a CaMKK inhibitor. Taken together, our results demonstrate that urotensin II stimulation of smooth muscle cells leads to a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase-mediated increase in cellular proliferation.Keywords: urotensin II receptor, CaMKI, hypertrophy, CaMKK, protein kinase D

  10. [Screening for cellular signal transduction pathway involved in C-reactive protein induced endothelial cell inflammation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xu-dong; Chen, Ai-hua; Zhou, Li-yao; Xiao, Hua; Fu, Qiang; Li, Zhi-liang

    2007-12-01

    To investigate the cellular signal transduction pathway involved in participation of C-reactive protein (CRP) in inflammation process in endothelial cell. Human umbilical vascular endothelial cells were cultured and characterized by anti-Factor VIII-related antigen. The cells were divided into CRP group and control group, and they were respectively treated with CRP (20 mg/L) or serum-free medium for 24 hours. RNAs of two groups were extracted and analyzed by human signal transduction pathway gene array. Expressions of 13 genes were increased, whereas expressions of 25 genes were decreased in CRP group compared with control group. Especially, WNT1 inducible signaling pathway protein 2 (WISP2) was increased by 37.63 folds, which was believed to involve in inflammation process as a growth factor, p53 was increased by 30.50 folds, which was a key factor to modulate apoptosis, whereas, Bcl-x and Bcl-2 were decreased by 9.61% and 49.95% which were characterized as an important factor to prevent apoptosis. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) was increased by 2.75 folds after treated with CRP, while intercellular adhesion molecular (ICAM) between two groups didn't show statistically significant difference. CRP may be involved in inflammatory process of endothelial cell, and the mechanism may be to induce apoptosis and activate cellular signal transduction pathway of cell adhesion proteins.

  11. Intracellular calcium promotes radioresistance of non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells through activating Akt signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiling; He, Jiantao; Zhang, Shenghui; Yang, Qingbo

    2017-03-01

    Radiotherapy is a major therapeutic approach in non-small cell lung cancer but is restricted by radioresistance. Although Akt signaling promotes radioresistance in non-small cell lung cancer, it is not well understood how Akt signaling is activated. Since intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) could activate Akt in A549 cells, we investigated the relationship between intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) and Akt signaling in radioresistant A549 cells by establishing radioresistant non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells. The radioresistant cell line A549 was generated by dose-gradient irradiation of the parental A549 cells. The cell viability, proliferation, and apoptosis were, respectively, assessed using the cell counting kit-8, EdU labeling, and flow cytometry analysis. The phosphorylation of Akt was evaluated by Western blotting, and the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration was assessed by Fluo 4-AM. The radioresistant A549 cells displayed mesenchymal morphology. After additional irradiation, the radioresistant A549 cells showed decreased cell viability and proliferation but increased apoptosis. Moreover, the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and the phosphorylation level on the Akt473 site in radioresistant A549 cells were higher than those in original cells, whereas the percentage of apoptosis in radioresistant A549 cells was less. All these results could be reversed by verapamil. In conclusion, our study found that intracellular Ca(2+) could promote radioresistance of non-small cell lung cancer cells through phosphorylating of Akt on the 473 site, which contributes to a better understanding on the non-small cell lung cancer radioresistance, and may provide a new target for radioresistance management.

  12. MATI, a Novel Protein Involved in the Regulation of Herbivore-Associated Signaling Pathways

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    M. Estrella Santamaría

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The defense response of the plants against herbivores relies on a complex network of interconnected signaling pathways. In this work, we characterized a new key player in the response of Arabidopsis against the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae, the MATI (Mite Attack Triggered Immunity gene. This gene was differentially induced in resistant Bla-2 strain relative to susceptible Kon Arabidopsis accessions after mite attack, suggesting a potential role in the control of spider mites. To study the MATI gene function, it has been performed a deep molecular characterization of the gene combined with feeding bioassays using modified Arabidopsis lines and phytophagous arthropods. The MATI gene belongs to a new gene family that had not been previously characterized. Biotic assays showed that it confers a high tolerance not only to T. urticae, but also to the chewing lepidopteran Spodoptera exigua. Biochemical analyses suggest that MATI encodes a protein involved in the accumulation of reducing agents upon herbivore attack to control plant redox homeostasis avoiding oxidative damage and cell death. Besides, molecular analyses demonstrated that MATI is involved in the modulation of different hormonal signaling pathways, affecting the expression of genes involved in biosynthesis and signaling of the jasmonic acid and salicylic acid hormones. The fact that MATI is also involved in defense through the modulation of the levels of photosynthetic pigments highlights the potential of MATI proteins to be exploited as biotechnological tools for pest control.

  13. Selective regulation of clathrin-mediated epidermal growth factor receptor signaling and endocytosis by phospholipase C and calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delos Santos, Ralph Christian; Bautista, Stephen; Lucarelli, Stefanie; Bone, Leslie N; Dayam, Roya M; Abousawan, John; Botelho, Roberto J; Antonescu, Costin N

    2017-10-15

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is a major regulator of cell-surface protein internalization. Clathrin and other proteins assemble into small invaginating structures at the plasma membrane termed clathrin-coated pits (CCPs) that mediate vesicle formation. In addition, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling is regulated by its accumulation within CCPs. Given the diversity of proteins regulated by clathrin-mediated endocytosis, how this process may distinctly regulate specific receptors is a key question. We examined the selective regulation of clathrin-dependent EGFR signaling and endocytosis. We find that perturbations of phospholipase Cγ1 (PLCγ1), Ca 2+ , or protein kinase C (PKC) impair clathrin-mediated endocytosis of EGFR, the formation of CCPs harboring EGFR, and EGFR signaling. Each of these manipulations was without effect on the clathrin-mediated endocytosis of transferrin receptor (TfR). EGFR and TfR were recruited to largely distinct clathrin structures. In addition to control of initiation and assembly of CCPs, EGF stimulation also elicited a Ca 2+ - and PKC-dependent reduction in synaptojanin1 recruitment to clathrin structures, indicating broad control of CCP assembly by Ca 2+ signals. Hence EGFR elicits PLCγ1-calcium signals to facilitate formation of a subset of CCPs, thus modulating its own signaling and endocytosis. This provides evidence for the versatility of CCPs to control diverse cellular processes. © 2017 Delos Santos et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  14. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases are involved in growth, thermotolerance, oxidative stress survival, and fertility in Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ravi; Tamuli, Ranjan

    2014-04-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases (Ca(2+)/CaMKs) are Ser/Thr protein kinases that respond to change in cytosolic free Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]c) and play multiple cellular roles in organisms ranging from fungi to humans. In the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, four Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent kinases, Ca(2+)/CaMK-1 to 4, are encoded by the genes NCU09123, NCU02283, NCU06177, and NCU09212, respectively. We found that camk-1 and camk-2 are essential for full fertility in N. crassa. The survival of ∆camk-2 mutant was increased in induced thermotolerance and oxidative stress conditions. In addition, the ∆camk-1 ∆camk-2, ∆camk-4 ∆camk-2, and ∆camk-3 ∆camk-2 double mutants display slow growth phenotype, reduced aerial hyphae, decreased thermotolerance, and increased sensitivity to oxidative stress, revealing the genetic interactions among these kinases. Therefore, Ca(2+)/CaMKs are involved in growth, thermotolerance, oxidative stress tolerance, and fertility in N. crassa.

  15. TRPM7 is involved in angiotensin II induced cardiac fibrosis development by mediating calcium and magnesium influx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Chen, Shaorui; Xiao, Chuyao; Jia, Yanyan; Guo, Jinlei; Jiang, Jianmin; Liu, Peiqing

    2014-05-01

    Cardiac fibrosis is involved in a lot of cardiovascular pathological processes. Cardiac fibrosis can block conduction, cause hypoxia, strengthen myocardial stiffness, create electrical heterogeneity, and hamper systolic ejection, which is associated with the development of arrhythmia, heart failure and sudden cardiac death. Besides the initial stimulating factors, the cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) are the principal responsible cells in the fibrogenesis cascade of events. TRPM7, a member of the TRPM (Melastatin) subfamily, is a non-selective cation channel, which permeates both Ca(2+) and Mg(2+). Here we demonstrated TRPM7 expression in CFs, and 2-APB (TRPM7 inhibitor), inhibited Ang II-induced CTGF, α-SMA expression and CFs proliferation. Besides, knocking down TRPM7 by shRNA, we proved that TRPM7 mediated both calcium and magnesium changes in cardiac fibroblasts which contribute to fibrosis progress. This study suggested that TRPM7 should play a pivotal role in cardiac fibroblast functions associated to cardiac fibrosis development. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Calcium and cAMP signaling induced by gamma-hydroxybutyrate receptor(s) stimulation in NCB-20 neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coune, P; Taleb, O; Mensah-Nyagan, A G; Maitre, M; Kemmel, V

    2010-04-28

    The NCB-20 neurohybridoma cells differentiated with dibutyryl-cyclic-AMP represent an interesting model to study several components of the gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) system in brain. In particular, an active Na(+)-dependent uptake and a depolarization-evoked release of GHB is expressed by these cells, together with high affinity specific binding sites for this substance. However, only little is known about cellular mechanisms following GHB receptor(s) stimulation in these neurons. Electrophysiological data indicate that GHB can differently affect Ca(2+) currents. L-type calcium channels were typically inhibited by GHB when NCB-20 cells were depolarized. In contrast, when NCB-20 cells were at resting potential, GHB induced a specific Ca(2+) entry through T-type calcium channels. In this study, we investigated the effect induced on cytosolic free Ca(2+) level and cAMP production by GHB receptor(s) stimulated with micromolar concentrations of GHB or structural analogues of GHB. Ca(2+) movements studied by cellular imaging were dose-dependently increased but disappeared for GHB concentrations >25 microM. In addition, nanomolar doses of GHB inhibited forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase. This effect was also rapidly desensitized at higher GHB concentrations. Acting as an antagonist, NCS-382 decreased GHB receptor(s) mediated cAMP and calcium signals. The agonist NCS-356 mimicked GHB effects which were not affected by the GABA(B) receptor antagonist CGP-55-845. Our results reveal the occurrence of Ca(2+)-dependent adenylate cyclase inhibition in NCB-20 neurons after GHB receptor(s) stimulation by GHB concentrations NCB-20 neurons of GHB receptors belonging to GPCR family that may recruit various G protein subtypes. Copyright 2010 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. STIM and Orai isoform expression in pregnant human myometrium: a potential role in calcium signaling during pregnancy.

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    Evonne eChin-Smith

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Store-operated calcium (Ca2+ entry (SOCE can be mediated by two novel proteins, STIM/Orai. We have previously demonstrated that members of the TRPC family, putative basal and store operated calcium entry channels, are present in human myometrium and regulated by labor associated stimuli IL-1β and mechanical stretch. Although STIM and Orai isoforms (1-3 have been reported in other smooth muscle cell types, there is little known about the expression or gestational regulation of STIM and Orai expression in human myometrium. Total RNA was isolated from lower segment human myometrial biopsies obtained at caesarean section from women at the time of preterm no labor (PTNL, preterm labor (PTL, term non-labor (TNL and term with labor (TL; primary cultured human uterine smooth muscle cells, and a human myometrial cell line (hTERT-HM. STIM1-2, and Orai1-3 mRNA expression was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR. All five genes were expressed in myometrial tissue and cultured cells. Orai2 was the most abundant Orai isoform in human myometrium. Expression of STIM1-2/Orai1-3 did not alter with the onset of labor. Orai1 mRNA expression in cultured cells was enhanced by IL-1β treatment. This novel report of STIM1-2 and Orai1-3 mRNA expression in pregnant human myometrium and Orai1 regulation by IL-1β indicates a potential role for these proteins in calcium signaling in human myometrium during pregnancy.

  18. Tumor-associated calcium signal transducer 2 regulates neovascularization of non-small-cell lung cancer via activating ERK1/2 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaobin; Zhu, Xiaoming; Zhao, Limin; Li, Xiao; Cheng, Dongjun; Feng, Keqing

    2017-03-01

    Lung cancer, especially the non-small-cell lung cancer, is a highly aggressive vascular cancer with excessively activated signaling pathways. Tumor-associated calcium signal transducer 2, also known as trop2, was identified to be correlated with tumor proliferation and invasion of non-small-cell lung cancer; however, the biological role of trop2 in neovascularization of non-small-cell lung cancer remained elusive. In this study, we first verified that trop2 was overexpressed in non-small-cell lung cancer tissues as well as cell lines and that the increased expression of trop2 promoted non-small-cell lung cancer cell proliferation and invasion. Then, we expanded the biological role of trop2 by in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis assay. The tubular formation analysis revealed that trop2 promoted non-small-cell lung cancer angiogenesis in vitro, and the immunohistochemistry staining of vascular markers (CD31 and CD34) provided evidences that trop2 promoted in vivo neovascularization. The results of polymerase chain reaction array revealed that trop2 promoted the expression level of two well-known angiogenesis factors MMP13 and PECAM1. By screening the trop2-related signaling pathways, we observed that excessive angiogenesis was correlated with activation of ERK1/2 signaling pathway, and ERK1/2 inhibitor (U0126) could suppress the tubular formation ability induced by trop2 expression. These results suggested that trop2 facilitated neovascularization of non-small-cell lung cancer via activating ERK1/2 signaling pathway. Targeting trop2 might provide novel anti-angiogenesis strategy for non-small-cell lung cancer treatment.

  19. Involvement of calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in endothelin receptor expression in rat cerebral arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldsee, Roya; Ahnstedt, Hilda; Eftekhari, Sajedeh; Edvinsson, Lars

    2010-03-01

    Experimental cerebral ischemia and organ culture of cerebral arteries result in the enhanced expression of endothelin ET(B) receptors in smooth muscle cells via increased transcription. The present study was designed to evaluate the involvement of calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CAMK) in the transcriptional expression of endothelin receptors after organ culture. Rat basilar arteries were incubated for 24 h with or without the CAMK inhibitor KN93 or ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126. The contractile responses to endothelin-1 (ET-1; ET(A) and ET(B) receptor agonist) and sarafotoxin 6c (S6c; ET(B) receptor agonist) were studied using a sensitive myograph. The mRNA levels of the ET(A) and ET(B) receptors and CAMKII were determined by real-time PCR, and their protein levels were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. The mRNA levels of CAMKII and the ET(B) receptor increased during organ culture, but there was no change in the expression of the ET(A) receptor. This effect was abolished by coincubation with KN93 or U0126. In functional studies, both inhibitors attenuated the S6c-induced contraction. Incubating the arteries with KN93, but not U0126, decreased the amount of phosphorylated CAMKII. The inhibitors had no effect on the levels of myosin light chain during organ culture, as measured by Western blot. CAMKII is involved in the upregulation of the endothelin ET(B) receptor and interacts with the ERK1/2 pathway to enhance receptor expression. CAMKII has no effect on the contractile apparatus in rat cerebral arteries.

  20. Mechanosensitive molecular networks involved in transducing resistance exercise-signals into muscle protein accretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Rindom

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Loss of skeletal muscle myofibrillar protein with disease and/or inactivity can severely deteriorate muscle strength and function. Strategies to counteract wasting of muscle myofibrillar protein are therefore desirable and invite for considerations on the potential superiority of specific modes of resistance exercise and/or the adequacy of low load resistance exercise regimens as well as underlying mechanisms. In this regard, delineation of the potentially mechanosensitive molecular mechanisms underlying muscle protein synthesis (MPS, may contribute to understanding on how differentiated resistance exercise can transduce a mechanical signal into stimulation of muscle accretion. Recent findings suggest specific upstream exercise-induced mechano-sensitive myocellular signaling pathways to converge on mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1, to influence MPS. This may e.g. implicate mechanical activation of signaling through a diacylglycerol kinase (DGKζ-phosphatidic acid (PA axis or implicate integrin deformation to signal through a Focal adhesion kinase (FAK-Tuberous Sclerosis Complex 2TSC2-Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb axis. Moreover, since initiation of translation is reliant on mRNA, it is also relevant to consider potentially mechanosensitive signaling pathways involved in muscle myofibrillar gene transcription and whether some of these pathways converge with those affecting mTORC1 activation for MPS. In this regard, recent findings suggest how mechanical stress may implicate integrin deformation and/or actin dynamics to signal through a Ras homolog gene family member A protein (RhoA-striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS axis or how it may implicate deformation of Notch to affect Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP signaling through a small mother of decapentaplegic (Smad axis.

  1. Mechanosensitive Molecular Networks Involved in Transducing Resistance Exercise-Signals into Muscle Protein Accretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindom, Emil; Vissing, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Loss of skeletal muscle myofibrillar protein with disease and/or inactivity can severely deteriorate muscle strength and function. Strategies to counteract wasting of muscle myofibrillar protein are therefore desirable and invite for considerations on the potential superiority of specific modes of resistance exercise and/or the adequacy of low load resistance exercise regimens as well as underlying mechanisms. In this regard, delineation of the potentially mechanosensitive molecular mechanisms underlying muscle protein synthesis (MPS), may contribute to an understanding on how differentiated resistance exercise can transduce a mechanical signal into stimulation of muscle accretion. Recent findings suggest specific upstream exercise-induced mechano-sensitive myocellular signaling pathways to converge on mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), to influence MPS. This may e.g. implicate mechanical activation of signaling through a diacylglycerol kinase (DGKζ)-phosphatidic acid (PA) axis or implicate integrin deformation to signal through a Focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-Tuberous Sclerosis Complex 2 (TSC2)-Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb) axis. Moreover, since initiation of translation is reliant on mRNA, it is also relevant to consider potentially mechanosensitive signaling pathways involved in muscle myofibrillar gene transcription and whether some of these pathways converge with those affecting mTORC1 activation for MPS. In this regard, recent findings suggest how mechanical stress may implicate integrin deformation and/or actin dynamics to signal through a Ras homolog gene family member A protein (RhoA)-striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) axis or implicate deformation of Notch to affect Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) signaling through a small mother of decapentaplegic (Smad) axis.

  2. Caffeine Modulates Vesicle Release and Recovery at Cerebellar Parallel Fibre Terminals, Independently of Calcium and Cyclic AMP Signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Katharine L; Jackson, Claire; Balakrishnan, Saju; Bellamy, Tomas C

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar parallel fibres release glutamate at both the synaptic active zone and at extrasynaptic sites-a process known as ectopic release. These sites exhibit different short-term and long-term plasticity, the basis of which is incompletely understood but depends on the efficiency of vesicle release and recycling. To investigate whether release of calcium from internal stores contributes to these differences in plasticity, we tested the effects of the ryanodine receptor agonist caffeine on both synaptic and ectopic transmission. Whole cell patch clamp recordings from Purkinje neurons and Bergmann glia were carried out in transverse cerebellar slices from juvenile (P16-20) Wistar rats. Caffeine caused complex changes in transmission at both synaptic and ectopic sites. The amplitude of postsynaptic currents in Purkinje neurons and extrasynaptic currents in Bergmann glia were increased 2-fold and 4-fold respectively, but paired pulse ratio was substantially reduced, reversing the short-term facilitation observed under control conditions. Caffeine treatment also caused synaptic sites to depress during 1 Hz stimulation, consistent with inhibition of the usual mechanisms for replenishing vesicles at the active zone. Unexpectedly, pharmacological intervention at known targets for caffeine--intracellular calcium release, and cAMP signalling--had no impact on these effects. We conclude that caffeine increases release probability and inhibits vesicle recovery at parallel fibre synapses, independently of known pharmacological targets. This complex effect would lead to potentiation of transmission at fibres firing at low frequencies, but depression of transmission at high frequency connections.

  3. A novel role of the L-type calcium channel α1D subunit as a gatekeeper for intracellular zinc signaling: zinc wave.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Yamasaki

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that zinc ion (Zn can behave as an intracellular signaling molecule. We previously demonstrated that mast cells stimulated through the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI rapidly release intracellular Zn from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, and we named this phenomenon the "Zn wave". However, the molecules responsible for releasing Zn and the roles of the Zn wave were elusive. Here we identified the pore-forming α(1 subunit of the Cav1.3 (α(1D L-type calcium channel (LTCC as the gatekeeper for the Zn wave. LTCC antagonists inhibited the Zn wave, and an agonist was sufficient to induce it. Notably, α(1D was mainly localized to the ER rather than the plasma membrane in mast cells, and the Zn wave was impaired by α(1D knockdown. We further found that the LTCC-mediated Zn wave positively controlled cytokine gene induction by enhancing the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB. Consistent with this finding, LTCC antagonists inhibited the cytokine-mediated delayed-type allergic reaction in mice without affecting the immediate-type allergic reaction. These findings indicated that the LTCC α(1D subunit located on the ER membrane has a novel function as a gatekeeper for the Zn wave, which is involved in regulating NF-κB signaling and the delayed-type allergic reaction.

  4. Involvement of CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling in spinal long term potentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Chao; Zhao, Zhi-Qi; Zhang, Yu-Qiu; Lü, Ning

    2015-01-01

    The long-term potentiation (LTP) of spinal C-fiber-evoked field potentials is considered as a fundamental mechanism of central sensitization in the spinal cord. Accumulating evidence has showed the contribution of spinal microglia to spinal LTP and pathological pain. As a key signaling of neurons-microglia interactions, the involvement of CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling in pathological pain has also been investigated extensively. The present study examined whether CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling plays a role in spinal LTP. The results showed that 10-trains tetanic stimulation (100 Hz, 2s) of the sciatic nerve (TSS) produced a significant LTP of C-fiber-evoked field potentials lasting for over 3 h in the rat spinal dorsal horn. Blockade of CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling with an anti-CX3CR1 neutralizing antibody (CX3CR1 AB) markedly suppressed TSS-induced LTP. Exogenous CX3CL1 significantly potentiated 3-trains TSS-induced LTP in rats. Consistently, spinal LTP of C-fiber-evoked field potentials was also induced by TSS (100 Hz, 1s, 4 trains) in all C57BL/6 wild type (WT) mice. However, in CX3CR1-/- mice, TSS failed to induce LTP and behavioral hypersensitivity, confirming an essential role of CX3CR1 in spinal LTP induction. Furthermore, blockade of IL-18 or IL-23, the potential downstream factors of CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling, with IL-18 BP or anti-IL-23 neutralizing antibody (IL-23 AB), obviously suppressed spinal LTP in rats. These results suggest that CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling is involved in LTP of C-fiber-evoked field potentials in the rodent spinal dorsal horn.

  5. Involvement of CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling in spinal long term potentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Bian

    Full Text Available The long-term potentiation (LTP of spinal C-fiber-evoked field potentials is considered as a fundamental mechanism of central sensitization in the spinal cord. Accumulating evidence has showed the contribution of spinal microglia to spinal LTP and pathological pain. As a key signaling of neurons-microglia interactions, the involvement of CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling in pathological pain has also been investigated extensively. The present study examined whether CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling plays a role in spinal LTP. The results showed that 10-trains tetanic stimulation (100 Hz, 2s of the sciatic nerve (TSS produced a significant LTP of C-fiber-evoked field potentials lasting for over 3 h in the rat spinal dorsal horn. Blockade of CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling with an anti-CX3CR1 neutralizing antibody (CX3CR1 AB markedly suppressed TSS-induced LTP. Exogenous CX3CL1 significantly potentiated 3-trains TSS-induced LTP in rats. Consistently, spinal LTP of C-fiber-evoked field potentials was also induced by TSS (100 Hz, 1s, 4 trains in all C57BL/6 wild type (WT mice. However, in CX3CR1-/- mice, TSS failed to induce LTP and behavioral hypersensitivity, confirming an essential role of CX3CR1 in spinal LTP induction. Furthermore, blockade of IL-18 or IL-23, the potential downstream factors of CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling, with IL-18 BP or anti-IL-23 neutralizing antibody (IL-23 AB, obviously suppressed spinal LTP in rats. These results suggest that CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling is involved in LTP of C-fiber-evoked field potentials in the rodent spinal dorsal horn.

  6. TEC protein tyrosine kinase is involved in the Erk signaling pathway induced by HGF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Feifei; Jiang, Yinan [Department of Pathophysiology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei 230032 (China); Zheng, Qiping [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Yang, Xiaoming [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Academy of Military Medical Sciences, Beijing 100850 (China); Wang, Siying, E-mail: sywang@ahmu.edu.cn [Department of Pathophysiology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei 230032 (China)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} TEC is rapidly tyrosine-phosphorylated and activated by HGF-stimulation in vivo or after partial hepatectomy in mice. {yields} TEC enhances the activity of Elk and serum response element (SRE) in HGF signaling pathway in hepatocyte. {yields} TEC promotes hepatocyte proliferation through the Erk-MAPK pathway. -- Abstract: Background/aims: TEC, a member of the TEC family of non-receptor type protein tyrosine kinases, has recently been suggested to play a role in hepatocyte proliferation and liver regeneration. This study aims to investigate the putative mechanisms of TEC kinase regulation of hepatocyte differentiation, i.e. to explore which signaling pathway TEC is involved in, and how TEC is activated in hepatocyte after hepatectomy and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) stimulation. Methods: We performed immunoprecipitation (IP) and immunoblotting (IB) to examine TEC tyrosine phosphorylation after partial hepatectomy in mice and HGF stimulation in WB F-344 hepatic cells. The TEC kinase activity was determined by in vitro kinase assay. Reporter gene assay, antisense oligonucleotide and TEC dominant negative mutant (TEC{sup KM}) were used to examine the possible signaling pathways in which TEC is involved. The cell proliferation rate was evaluated by {sup 3}H-TdR incorporation. Results: TEC phosphorylation and kinase activity were increased in 1 h after hepatectomy or HGF treatment. TEC enhanced the activity of Elk and serum response element (SRE). Inhibition of MEK1 suppressed TEC phosphorylation. Blocking TEC activity dramatically decreased the activation of Erk. Reduced TEC kinase activity also suppressed the proliferation of WB F-344 cells. These results suggest TEC is involved in the Ras-MAPK pathway and acts between MEK1 and Erk. Conclusions: TEC promotes hepatocyte proliferation and regeneration and is involved in HGF-induced Erk signaling pathway.

  7. NOX signaling in molecular cardiovascular mechanisms involved in the blood pressure homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Mariarosaria eSantillo; Antonio eColantuoni; Paolo eMondola; Bruna eGuida; Simona eDamiano

    2015-01-01

    Blood pressure homeostasis is maintained by several mechanisms regulating cardiac output, vascular resistances and blood volume. At cellular levels, reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling is involved in multiple molecular mechanisms controlling blood pressure. Among ROS producing systems, NADPH oxidases (NOXs), expressed in different cells of the cardiovascular system, are the most important enzymes clearly linked to the development of hypertension. NOXs exert a central role in cardiac me...

  8. Genetic association study of QT interval highlights role for calcium signaling pathways in myocardial repolarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arking, Dan E.; Pulit, Sara L.; Crotti, Lia; van der Harst, Pim; Munroe, Patricia B.; Koopmann, Tamara T.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Morley, Michael; Wang, Xinchen; Johnson, Andrew D.; Lundby, Alicia; Gudbjartsson, Daníel F.; Noseworthy, Peter A.; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Bradford, Yuki; Tarasov, Kirill V.; Dörr, Marcus; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Lahtinen, Annukka M.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Bis, Joshua C.; Isaacs, Aaron; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Evans, Daniel S.; Post, Wendy S.; Waggott, Daryl; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Hicks, Andrew A.; Eisele, Lewin; Ellinghaus, David; Hayward, Caroline; Navarro, Pau; Ulivi, Sheila; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tester, David J.; Chatel, Stéphanie; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kumari, Meena; Morris, Richard W.; Naluai, Åsa T.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Kluttig, Alexander; Strohmer, Bernhard; Panayiotou, Andrie G.; Torres, Maria; Knoflach, Michael; Hubacek, Jaroslav A.; Slowikowski, Kamil; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Kumar, Runjun D.; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Alonso, Alvaro; Bader, Joel S.; Ehret, Georg; Huang, Hailiang; Kao, W.H. Linda; Strait, James B.; Macfarlane, Peter W.; Brown, Morris; Caulfield, Mark J.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Kronenberg, Florian; Willeit, Johann; Smith, J. Gustav; Greiser, Karin H.; zu Schwabedissen, Henriette Meyer; Werdan, Karl; Carella, Massimo; Zelante, Leopoldo; Heckbert, Susan R.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Kolcic, Ivana; Polašek, Ozren; Wright, Alan F.; Griffin, Maura; Daly, Mark J.; Arnar, David O.; Hólm, Hilma; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Denny, Joshua C.; Roden, Dan M.; Zuvich, Rebecca L.; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew S.; Larson, Martin G.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Yin, Xiaoyan; Bobbo, Marco; D'Adamo, Adamo P.; Iorio, Annamaria; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Carracedo, Angel; Cummings, Steven R.; Nalls, Michael A.; Jula, Antti; Kontula, Kimmo K.; Marjamaa, Annukka; Oikarinen, Lasse; Perola, Markus; Porthan, Kimmo; Erbel, Raimund; Hoffmann, Per; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kälsch, Hagen; Nöthen, Markus M.; consortium, HRGEN; den Hoed, Marcel; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Thelle, Dag S.; Gieger, Christian; Meitinger, Thomas; Perz, Siegfried; Peters, Annette; Prucha, Hanna; Sinner, Moritz F.; Waldenberger, Melanie; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Franke, Lude; van der Vleuten, Pieter A.; Beckmann, Britt Maria; Martens, Eimo; Bardai, Abdennasser; Hofman, Nynke; Wilde, Arthur A.M.; Behr, Elijah R.; Dalageorgou, Chrysoula; Giudicessi, John R.; Medeiros-Domingo, Argelia; Barc, Julien; Kyndt, Florence; Probst, Vincent; Ghidoni, Alice; Insolia, Roberto; Hamilton, Robert M.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Brandimarto, Jeffrey; Margulies, Kenneth; Moravec, Christine E.; Fabiola Del, Greco M.; Fuchsberger, Christian; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Lee, Wai K.; Watt, Graham C.M.; Campbell, Harry; Wild, Sarah H.; El Mokhtari, Nour E.; Frey, Norbert; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Leach, Irene Mateo; Navis, Gerjan; van den Berg, Maarten P.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Kellis, Manolis; Krijthe, Bouwe P.; Franco, Oscar H.; Hofman, Albert; Kors, Jan A.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Lamina, Claudia; Oostra, Ben A.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Lakatta, Edward G.; Mulas, Antonella; Orrú, Marco; Schlessinger, David; Uda, Manuela; Markus, Marcello R.P.; Völker, Uwe; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Timothy D.; Ärnlöv, Johan; Lind, Lars; Sundström, Johan; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Kivimaki, Mika; Kähönen, Mika; Mononen, Nina; Raitakari, Olli T.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Adamkova, Vera; Kiechl, Stefan; Brion, Maria; Nicolaides, Andrew N.; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haerting, Johannes; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Whincup, Peter H.; Hingorani, Aroon; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Bezzina, Connie R.; Ingelsson, Erik; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gasparini, Paolo; Wilson, James F.; Rudan, Igor; Franke, Andre; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Lehtimäki, Terho J.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Parsa, Afshin; Liu, Yongmei; van Duijn, Cornelia; Siscovick, David S.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Jamshidi, Yalda; Salomaa, Veikko; Felix, Stephan B.; Sanna, Serena; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Stefansson, Kari; Boyer, Laurie A.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Olsen, Jesper V.; Lage, Kasper; Schwartz, Peter J.; Kääb, Stefan; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Ackerman, Michael J.; Pfeufer, Arne; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The QT interval, an electrocardiographic measure reflecting myocardial repolarization, is a heritable trait. QT prolongation is a risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) and could indicate the presence of the potentially lethal Mendelian Long QT Syndrome (LQTS). Using a genome-wide association and replication study in up to 100,000 individuals we identified 35 common variant QT interval loci, that collectively explain ∼8-10% of QT variation and highlight the importance of calcium regulation in myocardial repolarization. Rare variant analysis of 6 novel QT loci in 298 unrelated LQTS probands identified coding variants not found in controls but of uncertain causality and therefore requiring validation. Several newly identified loci encode for proteins that physically interact with other recognized repolarization proteins. Our integration of common variant association, expression and orthogonal protein-protein interaction screens provides new insights into cardiac electrophysiology and identifies novel candidate genes for ventricular arrhythmias, LQTS,and SCD. PMID:24952745

  9. Testis-specific isoform of Na/K-ATPase (ATP1A4) regulates sperm function and fertility in dairy bulls through potential mechanisms involving reactive oxygen species, calcium and actin polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajamanickam, G D; Kroetsch, T; Kastelic, J P; Thundathil, J C

    2017-07-01

    Traditional bull breeding soundness evaluation (BBSE) eliminates bulls that are grossly abnormal; however, bulls classified as satisfactory potential breeders still vary in field fertility, implying submicroscopic differences in sperm characteristics. The testis-specific isoform of Na/K-ATPase (ATP1A4) is involved in regulation of sperm motility and capacitation in bulls through well-established enzyme activity and signaling functions. The objective was to determine ATP1A4 content, activity and their relationship to post-thaw sperm function and field fertility, using semen samples from low-fertility (LF) and high-fertility (HF) Holstein bulls (n = 20 each) with known FERTSOL rates (measure of field fertility, based on non-return rate). Frozen-thawed sperm from HF bulls had increased ATP1A4 content and activity compared to LF bulls. Furthermore, post-thaw sperm from HF bulls had increased tyrosine phosphorylation, ROS, F-actin content, and low intracellular calcium compared to LF bulls. Subsequent incubation of HF bull sperm with ouabain (a specific ligand of Na/K-ATPase) further augmented the post-thaw increase in tyrosine phosphorylation, ROS production, and F-actin content, whereas the increase in intracellular calcium was still low compared to LF bull sperm. ATP1A4 content and activity, ROS, F-actin and calcium were significantly correlated with fertility. In conclusion, we inferred that ATP1A4 content and activity differed among dairy bulls with satisfactory semen characteristics and that ATP1A4 may regulate sperm function through mechanisms involving ROS, F-actin and calcium in frozen-thawed sperm of HF and LF dairy bulls. © 2017 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  10. Model-Free Reconstruction of Excitatory Neuronal Connectivity from Calcium Imaging Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetter, Olav; Battaglia, Demian; Soriano, Jordi; Geisel, Theo

    2012-01-01

    A systematic assessment of global neural network connectivity through direct electrophysiological assays has remained technically infeasible, even in simpler systems like dissociated neuronal cultures. We introduce an improved algorithmic approach based on Transfer Entropy to reconstruct structural connectivity from network activity monitored through calcium imaging. We focus in this study on the inference of excitatory synaptic links. Based on information theory, our method requires no prior assumptions on the statistics of neuronal firing and neuronal connections. The performance of our algorithm is benchmarked on surrogate time series of calcium fluorescence generated by the simulated dynamics of a network with known ground-truth topology. We find that the functional network topology revealed by Transfer Entropy depends qualitatively on the time-dependent dynamic state of the network (bursting or non-bursting). Thus by conditioning with respect to the global mean activity, we improve the performance of our method. This allows us to focus the analysis to specific dynamical regimes of the network in which the inferred functional connectivity is shaped by monosynaptic excitatory connections, rather than by collective synchrony. Our method can discriminate between actual causal influences between neurons and spurious non-causal correlations due to light scattering artifacts, which inherently affect the quality of fluorescence imaging. Compared to other reconstruction strategies such as cross-correlation or Granger Causality methods, our method based on improved Transfer Entropy is remarkably more accurate. In particular, it provides a good estimation of the excitatory network clustering coefficient, allowing for discrimination between weakly and strongly clustered topologies. Finally, we demonstrate the applicability of our method to analyses of real recordings of in vitro disinhibited cortical cultures where we suggest that excitatory connections are characterized

  11. Model-free reconstruction of excitatory neuronal connectivity from calcium imaging signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olav Stetter

    Full Text Available A systematic assessment of global neural network connectivity through direct electrophysiological assays has remained technically infeasible, even in simpler systems like dissociated neuronal cultures. We introduce an improved algorithmic approach based on Transfer Entropy to reconstruct structural connectivity from network activity monitored through calcium imaging. We focus in this study on the inference of excitatory synaptic links. Based on information theory, our method requires no prior assumptions on the statistics of neuronal firing and neuronal connections. The performance of our algorithm is benchmarked on surrogate time series of calcium fluorescence generated by the simulated dynamics of a network with known ground-truth topology. We find that the functional network topology revealed by Transfer Entropy depends qualitatively on the time-dependent dynamic state of the network (bursting or non-bursting. Thus by conditioning with respect to the global mean activity, we improve the performance of our method. This allows us to focus the analysis to specific dynamical regimes of the network in which the inferred functional connectivity is shaped by monosynaptic excitatory connections, rather than by collective synchrony. Our method can discriminate between actual causal influences between neurons and spurious non-causal correlations due to light scattering artifacts, which inherently affect the quality of fluorescence imaging. Compared to other reconstruction strategies such as cross-correlation or Granger Causality methods, our method based on improved Transfer Entropy is remarkably more accurate. In particular, it provides a good estimation of the excitatory network clustering coefficient, allowing for discrimination between weakly and strongly clustered topologies. Finally, we demonstrate the applicability of our method to analyses of real recordings of in vitro disinhibited cortical cultures where we suggest that excitatory connections

  12. Signaling Cascade Involved in Rapid Stimulation of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) by Dexamethasone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossmann, Miriam; Ackermann, Benjamin W; Thome, Ulrich H; Laube, Mandy

    2017-08-19

    Impairment of mucociliary clearance with reduced airway fluid secretion leads to chronically inflamed airways. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is crucially involved in airway fluid secretion and dexamethasone (dexa) has previously been shown to elevate CFTR activity in airway epithelial cells. However, the pathway by which dexa increases CFTR activity is largely unknown. We aimed to determine whether the increase of CFTR activity by dexa is achieved by non-genomic signaling and hypothesized that the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway is involved in CFTR stimulation. Primary rat airway epithelial cells and human bronchial submucosal gland-derived Calu-3 cells were analyzed in Ussing chambers and kinase activation was determined by Western blots. Results demonstrated a critical involvement of PI3K and protein kinase B (AKT) signaling in the dexa-induced increase of CFTR activity, while serum and glucocorticoid dependent kinase 1 (SGK1) activity was not essential. We further demonstrated a reduced neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally downregulated 4-like (NEDD4L) ubiquitin E3 ligase activity induced by dexa, possibly responsible for the elevated CFTR activity. Finally, increases of CFTR activity by dexa were demonstrated within 30 min accompanied by rapid activation of AKT. In conclusion, dexa induces a rapid stimulation of CFTR activity which depends on PI3K/AKT signaling in airway epithelial cells. Glucocorticoids might thus represent, in addition to their immunomodulatory actions, a therapeutic strategy to rapidly increase airway fluid secretion.

  13. Calcium in plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Schwartau

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the review on the role of calcium in many physiological processes of plant organisms, including growth and development, protection from pathogenic influences, response to changing environmental factors, and many other aspects of plant physiology. Initial intake of calcium ions is carried out by Ca2+-channels of plasma membrane and they are further transported by the xylem owing to auxins’ attractive ability. The level of intake and selectivity of calcium transport to ove-ground parts of the plant is controlled by a symplast. Ca2+enters to the cytoplasm of endoderm cells through calcium channels on the cortical side of Kaspary bands, and is redistributed inside the stele by the symplast, with the use of Ca2+-АТPases and Ca2+/Н+-antiports. Owing to regulated expression and activity of these calcium transporters, calclum can be selectively delivered to the xylem. Important role in supporting calcium homeostasis is given to the vacuole which is the largest depo of calcium. Regulated quantity of calcium movement through the tonoplast is provided by a number of potential-, ligand-gated active transporters and channels, like Ca2+-ATPase and Ca2+/H+ exchanger. They are actively involved in the inactivation of the calcium signal by pumping Ca2+ to the depo of cells. Calcium ATPases are high affinity pumps that efficiently transfer calcium ions against the concentration gradient in their presence in the solution in nanomolar concentrations. Calcium exchangers are low affinity, high capacity Ca2+ transporters that are effectively transporting calcium after raising its concentration in the cell cytosol through the use of protons gradients. Maintaining constant concentration and participation in the response to stimuli of different types also involves EPR, plastids, mitochondria, and cell wall. Calcium binding proteins contain several conserved sequences that provide sensitivity to changes in the concentration of Ca2+ and when you

  14. Genomics and evolutionary aspect of calcium signaling event in calmodulin and calmodulin-like proteins in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanta, Tapan Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep; Bae, Hanhong

    2017-02-03

    Ca2+ ion is a versatile second messenger that operate in a wide ranges of cellular processes that impact nearly every aspect of life. Ca2+ regulates gene expression and biotic and abiotic stress responses in organisms ranging from unicellular algae to multi-cellular higher plants through the cascades of calcium signaling processes. In this study, we deciphered the genomics and evolutionary aspects of calcium signaling event of calmodulin (CaM) and calmodulin like- (CML) proteins. We studied the CaM and CML gene family of 41 different species across the plant lineages. Genomic analysis showed that plant encodes more calmodulin like-protein than calmodulins. Further analyses showed, the majority of CMLs were intronless, while CaMs were intron rich. Multiple sequence alignment showed, the EF-hand domain of CaM contains four conserved D-x-D motifs, one in each EF-hand while CMLs contain only one D-x-D-x-D motif in the fourth EF-hand. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that, the CMLs were evolved earlier than CaM and later diversified. Gene expression analysis demonstrated that different CaM and CMLs genes were express differentially in different tissues in a spatio-temporal manner. In this study we provided in detailed genome-wide identifications and characterization of CaM and CML protein family, phylogenetic relationships, and domain structure. Expression study of CaM and CML genes were conducted in Glycine max and Phaseolus vulgaris. Our study provides a strong foundation for future functional research in CaM and CML gene family in plant kingdom.

  15. Involvement of mTOR signaling in sphingosylphosphorylcholine-induced hypopigmentation effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Hyo-Soon

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC acts as a potent lipid mediator and signaling molecule in various cell types. In the present study, we investigated the effects of SPC on melanogenesis and SPC-modulated signaling pathways related to melanin synthesis. Methods Melanin production was measured in Mel-Ab cells. A luciferase assay was used to detect transcriptional activity of the MITF promoter. Western blot analysis was performed to examine SPC-induced signaling pathways. Results SPC produced significant hypopigmentation effects in a dose-dependent manner. It was found that SPC induced not only activation of Akt but also stimulation of mTOR, a downstream mediator of the Akt signaling pathway. Moreover, SPC decreased the levels of LC3 II, which is known to be regulated by mTOR. Treatment with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin eliminated decreases in melanin and LC3 II levels by SPC. Furthermore, we found that the Akt inhibitor LY294002 restored SPC-mediated downregulation of LC3 II and inhibited the activation of mTOR by SPC. Conclusions Our data suggest that the mTOR signaling pathway is involved in SPC-modulated melanin synthesis.

  16. Autophagy is involved in mouse kidney development and podocyte differentiation regulated by Notch signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuyue; Li, Wen; Wen, Junkai; Yang, Zhuo

    2017-07-01

    Podocyte dysfunction results in glomerular diseases accounted for 90% of end-stage kidney disease. The evolutionarily conserved Notch signalling makes a crucial contribution in podocyte development and function. However, the underlying mechanism of Notch pathway modulating podocyte differentiation remains less obvious. Autophagy, reported to be related with Notch signalling pathways in different animal models, is regarded as a possible participant during podocyte differentiation. Here, we found the dynamic changes of Notch1 were coincided with autophagy: they both increased during kidney development and podocyte differentiation. Intriguingly, when Notch signalling was down-regulated by DAPT, autophagy was greatly diminished, and differentiation was also impaired. Further, to better understand the relationship between Notch signalling and autophagy in podocyte differentiation, rapamycin was added to enhance autophagy levels in DAPT-treated cells, and as a result, nephrin was recovered and DAPT-induced injury was ameliorated. Therefore, we put forward that autophagy is involved in kidney development and podocyte differentiation regulated by Notch signalling. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  17. Involvement of activin signaling in abnormalities of mouse vagina exposed neonatally to diethylstilbestrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Tadaaki; Iguchi, Taisen; Sato, Tomomi

    2011-06-01

    Perinatal exposure to a synthetic estrogen, diethylstilbestrol (DES), causes cervicovaginal adenosis and permanent hyperplastic cornified vaginal epithelium with keratinization in mice. To investigate the mechanisms of the induction of vaginal abnormalities by DES, we have focused on activin A signaling. We have found that the βA-subunit mRNA is mainly expressed in the neonatal vaginal stroma, whereas activin A receptor type IB is localized in the neonatal vaginal epithelium. SMAD2, the intracellular signaling protein, is phosphorylated in the neonatal vagina. Cell proliferation in the vaginal epithelium grown in vitro is reduced by DES treatment or by activin signaling suppression through inhibin treatment. Thus, activin A (a homodimer of the βA-subunit) in the stroma stimulates epithelial cell proliferation in the neonatal vagina. DES treatment decreases the expression of the βA-subunit and activin receptor IIB but increases the expression of the βB-subunit and inhibin receptor. Neonatal DES treatment inhibits the phosphorylation of SMAD2 in the vaginal epithelium, indicating the inhibition of activin A signaling in the vaginal epithelium by neonatal DES treatment. Treatment with DES or inhibin, a native antagonist of activin, induces adenosis-like structures and keratinization in the vagina grown in vitro. These data suggest that the suppression of activin A signaling by DES is involved in the induction of cervicovaginal adenosis and keratinization in the neonatal mouse vaginal epithelium.

  18. Interplay between phosphoinositide lipids and calcium signals at the leading edge of chemotaxing ameboid cells☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falke, Joseph J.; Ziemba, Brian P.

    2014-01-01

    The chemotactic migration of eukaryotic ameboid cells up concentration gradients is among the most advanced forms of cellular behavior. Chemotaxis is controlled by a complex network of signaling proteins bound to specific lipids on the cytoplasmic surface of the plasma membrane at the front of the cell, or the leading edge. The central lipid players in this leading edge signaling pathway include the phosphoinositides PI(4,5)P2 (PIP2) and PI(3,4,5)P3 (PIP3), both of which play multiple roles. The products of PI(4,5)P2 hydrolysis, diacylglycerol (DAG) and Ins(1,4,5)P3 (IP3), are also implicated as important players. Together, these leading edge phosphoinositides and their degradation products, in concert with a local Ca2+ signal, control the recruitment and activities of many peripheral membrane proteins that are crucial to the leading edge signaling network. The present critical review summarizes the current molecular understanding of chemotactic signaling at the leading edge, including newly discovered roles of phosphoinositide lipids and Ca2+, while highlighting key questions for future research. PMID:24451847

  19. Interplay between phosphoinositide lipids and calcium signals at the leading edge of chemotaxing ameboid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falke, Joseph J; Ziemba, Brian P

    2014-09-01

    The chemotactic migration of eukaryotic ameboid cells up concentration gradients is among the most advanced forms of cellular behavior. Chemotaxis is controlled by a complex network of signaling proteins bound to specific lipids on the cytoplasmic surface of the plasma membrane at the front of the cell, or the leading edge. The central lipid players in this leading edge signaling pathway include the phosphoinositides PI(4,5)P2 (PIP2) and PI(3,4,5)P3 (PIP3), both of which play multiple roles. The products of PI(4,5)P2 hydrolysis, diacylglycerol (DAG) and Ins(1,4,5)P3 (IP3), are also implicated as important players. Together, these leading edge phosphoinositides and their degradation products, in concert with a local Ca(2+) signal, control the recruitment and activities of many peripheral membrane proteins that are crucial to the leading edge signaling network. The present critical review summarizes the current molecular understanding of chemotactic signaling at the leading edge, including newly discovered roles of phosphoinositide lipids and Ca(2+), while highlighting key questions for future research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. High-throughput analysis of calcium signalling kinetics in astrocytes stimulated with different neurotransmitters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura R James

    Full Text Available Astrocytes express a wide range of receptors for neurotransmitters and hormones that are coupled to increases in intracellular Ca(2+ concentration, enabling them to detect activity in both neuronal and vascular networks. There is increasing evidence that astrocytes are able to discriminate between different Ca(2+-linked stimuli, as the efficiency of some Ca(2+ dependent processes--notably release of gliotransmitters--depends on the stimulus that initiates the Ca(2+ signal. The spatiotemporal complexity of Ca(2+ signals is substantial, and we here tested the hypothesis that variation in the kinetics of Ca(2+ responses could offer a means of selectively engaging downstream targets, if agonists exhibited a "signature shape" in evoked Ca(2+ response. To test this, astrocytes were exposed to three different receptor agonists (ATP, glutamate and histamine and the resultant Ca(2+ signals were analysed for systematic differences in kinetics that depended on the initiating stimulus. We found substantial heterogeneity between cells in the time course of Ca(2+ responses, but the variation did not correlate with the type or concentration of the stimulus. Using a simple metric to quantify the extent of difference between populations, it was found that the variation between agonists was insufficient to allow signal discrimination. We conclude that the time course of global intracellular Ca(2+ signals does not offer the cells a means for distinguishing between different neurotransmitters.

  1. Clusters of calcium release channels harness the Ising phase transition to confine their elementary intracellular signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Anna V; Maltsev, Victor A; Stern, Michael D

    2017-07-18

    Intracellular Ca signals represent a universal mechanism of cell function. Messages carried by Ca are local, rapid, and powerful enough to be delivered over the thermal noise. A higher signal-to-noise ratio is achieved by a cooperative action of Ca release channels such as IP3 receptors or ryanodine receptors arranged in clusters (release units) containing a few to several hundred release channels. The channels synchronize their openings via Ca-induced Ca release, generating high-amplitude local Ca signals known as puffs in neurons and sparks in muscle cells. Despite the positive feedback nature of the activation, Ca signals are strictly confined in time and space by an unexplained termination mechanism. Here we show that the collective transition of release channels from an open to a closed state is identical to the phase transition associated with the reversal of magnetic field in an Ising ferromagnet. Our simple quantitative criterion closely predicts the Ca store depletion level required for spark termination for each cluster size. We further formulate exact requirements that a cluster of release channels should satisfy in any cell type for our mapping to the Ising model and the associated formula to remain valid. Thus, we describe deterministically the behavior of a system on a coarser scale (release unit) that is random on a finer scale (release channels), bridging the gap between scales. Our results provide exact mapping of a nanoscale biological signaling model to an interacting particle system in statistical physics, making the extensive mathematical apparatus available to quantitative biology.

  2. Unique responsiveness of angiosperm stomata to elevated CO2 explained by calcium signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodribb, Timothy J; McAdam, Scott A M

    2013-01-01

    Angiosperm and conifer tree species respond differently when exposed to elevated CO2, with angiosperms found to dynamically reduce water loss while conifers appear insensitive. Such distinct responses are likely to affect competition between these tree groups as atmospheric CO2 concentration rises. Seeking the mechanism behind this globally important phenomenon we targeted the Ca(2+)-dependent signalling pathway, a mediator of stomatal closure in response to elevated CO2, as a possible explanation for the differentiation of stomatal behaviours. Sampling across the diversity of vascular plants including lycophytes, ferns, gymnosperms and angiosperms we show that only angiosperms possess the stomatal behaviour and prerequisite genetic coding, linked to Ca(2+)-dependent stomatal signalling. We conclude that the evolution of Ca(2+)-dependent stomatal signalling gives angiosperms adaptive benefits in terms of highly efficient water use, but that stomatal sensitivity to high CO2 may penalise angiosperm productivity relative to other plant groups in the current era of soaring atmospheric CO2.

  3. Alleviation of cadmium toxicity in Brassica juncea L. (Czern. & Coss. by calcium application involves various physiological and biochemical strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvaiz Ahmad

    Full Text Available Calcium (Ca plays important role in plant development and response to various environmental stresses. However, its involvement in mitigation of heavy metal stress in plants remains elusive. In this study, we examined the effect of Ca (50 mM in controlling cadmium (Cd uptake in mustard (Brassica juncea L. plants exposed to toxic levels of Cd (200 mg L(-1 and 300 mg L(-1. The Cd treatment showed substantial decrease in plant height, root length, dry weight, pigments and protein content. Application of Ca improved the growth and biomass yield of the Cd-stressed mustard seedlings. More importantly, the oil content of mustard seeds of Cd-stressed plants was also enhanced with Ca treatment. Proline was significantly increased in mustard plants under Cd stress, and exogenously sprayed Ca was found to have a positive impact on proline content in Cd-stressed plants. Different concentrations of Cd increased lipid peroxidation but the application of Ca minimized it to appreciable level in Cd-treated plants. Excessive Cd treatment enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase, which were further enhanced by the addition of Ca. Additionally, Cd stress caused reduced uptake of essential elements and increased Cd accumulation in roots and shoots. However, application of Ca enhanced the concentration of essential elements and decreased Cd accumulation in Cd-stressed plants. Our results indicated that application of Ca enables mustard plant to withstand the deleterious effect of Cd, resulting in improved growth and seed quality of mustard plants.

  4. PLC/CAMK IV-NF-kappaB involved in the receptor for advanced glycation end products mediated signaling pathway in human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jie; Peng, Wei; Lin, Xu; Huang, Qing-Ling; Lin, Jian-Yin

    2010-05-14

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their interaction with the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) play an important role in diabetic vascular complications. The current study demonstrated that AGEs significantly increased RAGE expression and the release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6) in human umbilical vein endothelial cell-derived line ECV304 cells. RAGE antisense RNA partially inhibited the expression of TNF-alpha and IL-6 induced by AGEs. Oligonucleotide microarray was used to identify the genes that respond to RAGE activation. Phospholipase C beta 1 (PLC beta 1), phospholipase C beta 4 (PLC beta 4) and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CAMK IV) which associated with Ca(2+) signaling were upregulated. The rise of intracellular calcium and the NF-kappaB promoter activity induced by AGEs were suppressed by RAGE antisense RNA, PLC inhibitor U73122 and dominant negative CAMK IV, respectively. These findings suggest that PLC/CAMK IV-NF-kappaB is involved in RAGE mediated signaling pathway in human endothelial cells. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Clusters of calcium release channels harness the Ising phase transition to confine their elementary intracellular signals

    CERN Document Server

    Maltsev, Anna; Stern, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular Ca signals represent a universal mechanism of cell function. Messages carried by Ca are local, rapid, and powerful enough to be delivered over the thermal noise. A higher signal to noise ratio is achieved by a cooperative action of Ca release channels such as IP3 receptors or ryanodine receptors arranged in clusters or release units containing a few to several hundred release channels. The release channels synchronize their openings via Ca-induced-Ca-release, generating high-amplitude local Ca signals known as puffs in neurons or sparks in muscle cells. Despite the high release amplitude and positive feedback nature of the activation, Ca signals are strictly confined in time and space by an unexplained termination mechanism. Here we show that the collective transition of release channels from an open to a closed state is identical to the phase transition associated with the reversal of magnetic field in an Ising ferromagnet. We demonstrate this mechanism using numerical model simulations of Ca s...

  6. Calcium signaling during the plant-plant interaction of parasitic Cuscuta reflexa with its hosts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albert, M.; Kaiser, B.; Krol, van der A.R.; Kaldenhoff, R.

    2010-01-01

    The plant parasite Cuscuta reflexa induces various responses in compatible and incompatible host plants. The visual reactions of both types of host plants including obvious morphological changes require the recognition of Cuscuta ssp. A consequently initiated signaling cascade is triggered which

  7. Calcium signals in the nucleus accumbens: Activation of astrocytes by ATP and succinate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emri Zsuzsa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accumulating evidence suggests that glial signalling is activated by different brain functions. However, knowledge regarding molecular mechanisms of activation or their relation to neuronal activity is limited. The purpose of the present study is to identify the characteristics of ATP-evoked glial signalling in the brain reward area, the nucleus accumbens (NAc, and thereby to explore the action of citric acid cycle intermediate succinate (SUC. Results We described the burst-like propagation of Ca2+ transients evoked by ATP in acute NAc slices from rat brain. Co-localization of the ATP-evoked Ca2+ signalling with immunoreactivities of the astroglia-specific gap junction forming channel protein connexin43 (Cx43 and the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP indicated that the responsive cells were a subpopulation of Cx43 and GFAP immunoreactive astrocytes. The ATP-evoked Ca2+ transients were present under the blockade of neuronal activity, but were inhibited by Ca2+ store depletion and antagonism of the G protein coupled purinergic P2Y1 receptor subtype-specific antagonist MRS2179. Similarly, Ca2+ transients evoked by the P2Y1 receptor subtype-specific agonist 2-(Methylthioadenosine 5'-diphosphate were also blocked by MRS2179. These characteristics implied that intercellular Ca2+ signalling originated from the release of Ca2+ from internal stores, triggered by the activation of P2Y1 receptors. Inhibition by the gap junction blockers carbenoxolone and flufenamic acid and by an antibody raised against the gating-associated segment of Cx43 suggested that intercellular Ca2+ signalling proceeded through gap junctions. We demonstrated for the first time that extracellular SUC also evoked Ca2+ transients (EC50 = 50-60 μM in about 15% of the ATP-responsive NAc astrocytes. By contrast to glial cells, electrophysiologically identified NAc neurons surrounded by ATP-responsive astrocytes were not activated simultaneously. Conclusions We

  8. Plasma membrane associated membranes (PAM) from Jurkat cells contain STIM1 protein is PAM involved in the capacitative calcium entry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozieł, Katarzyna; Lebiedzinska, Magdalena; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Onopiuk, Marta; Brutkowski, Wojciech; Wierzbicka, Katarzyna; Wilczyński, Grzegorz; Pinton, Paolo; Duszyński, Jerzy; Zabłocki, Krzysztof; Wieckowski, Mariusz R

    2009-12-01

    A proper cooperation between the plasma membrane, the endoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria seems to be essential for numerous cellular processes involved in Ca(2+) signalling and maintenance of Ca(2+) homeostasis. A presence of microsomal and mitochondrial proteins together with those characteristic for the plasma membrane in the fraction of the plasma membrane associated membranes (PAM) indicates a formation of stabile interactions between these three structures. We isolated the plasma membrane associated membranes from Jurkat cells and found its significant enrichment in the plasma membrane markers including plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase, Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and CD3 as well as sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase as a marker of the endoplasmic reticulum membranes. In addition, two proteins involved in the store-operated Ca(2+) entry, Orai1 located in the plasma membrane and an endoplasmic reticulum protein STIM1 were found in this fraction. Furthermore, we observed a rearrangement of STIM1-containing protein complexes isolated from Jurkat cells undergoing stimulation by thapsigargin. We suggest that the inter-membrane compartment composed of the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum, and isolated as a stabile plasma membrane associated membranes fraction, might be involved in the store-operated Ca(2+) entry, and their formation and rebuilding have an important regulatory role in cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis.

  9. The IQD Family of Calmodulin-Binding Proteins Links Calcium Signaling to Microtubules, Membrane Subdomains, and the Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürstenbinder, Katharina; Möller, Birgit; Plötner, Romina; Stamm, Gina; Hause, Gerd; Mitra, Dipannita; Abel, Steffen

    2017-03-01

    Calcium (Ca 2+ ) signaling and dynamic reorganization of the cytoskeleton are essential processes for the coordination and control of plant cell shape and cell growth. Calmodulin (CaM) and closely related calmodulin-like (CML) polypeptides are principal sensors of Ca 2+ signals. CaM/CMLs decode and relay information encrypted by the second messenger via differential interactions with a wide spectrum of targets to modulate their diverse biochemical activities. The plant-specific IQ67 DOMAIN (IQD) family emerged as possibly the largest class of CaM-interacting proteins with undefined molecular functions and biological roles. Here, we show that the 33 members of the IQD family in Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ) differentially localize, using green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged proteins, to multiple and distinct subcellular sites, including microtubule (MT) arrays, plasma membrane subdomains, and nuclear compartments. Intriguingly, the various IQD-specific localization patterns coincide with the subcellular patterns of IQD-dependent recruitment of CaM, suggesting that the diverse IQD members sequester Ca 2+ -CaM signaling modules to specific subcellular sites for precise regulation of Ca 2+ -dependent processes. Because MT localization is a hallmark of most IQD family members, we quantitatively analyzed GFP-labeled MT arrays in Nicotiana benthamiana cells transiently expressing GFP-IQD fusions and observed IQD-specific MT patterns, which point to a role of IQDs in MT organization and dynamics. Indeed, stable overexpression of select IQD proteins in Arabidopsis altered cellular MT orientation, cell shape, and organ morphology. Because IQDs share biochemical properties with scaffold proteins, we propose that IQD families provide an assortment of platform proteins for integrating CaM-dependent Ca 2+ signaling at multiple cellular sites to regulate cell function, shape, and growth. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  10. The IQD Family of Calmodulin-Binding Proteins Links Calcium Signaling to Microtubules, Membrane Subdomains, and the Nucleus1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plötner, Romina; Stamm, Gina; Hause, Gerd; Mitra, Dipannita; Abel, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) signaling and dynamic reorganization of the cytoskeleton are essential processes for the coordination and control of plant cell shape and cell growth. Calmodulin (CaM) and closely related calmodulin-like (CML) polypeptides are principal sensors of Ca2+ signals. CaM/CMLs decode and relay information encrypted by the second messenger via differential interactions with a wide spectrum of targets to modulate their diverse biochemical activities. The plant-specific IQ67 DOMAIN (IQD) family emerged as possibly the largest class of CaM-interacting proteins with undefined molecular functions and biological roles. Here, we show that the 33 members of the IQD family in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) differentially localize, using green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged proteins, to multiple and distinct subcellular sites, including microtubule (MT) arrays, plasma membrane subdomains, and nuclear compartments. Intriguingly, the various IQD-specific localization patterns coincide with the subcellular patterns of IQD-dependent recruitment of CaM, suggesting that the diverse IQD members sequester Ca2+-CaM signaling modules to specific subcellular sites for precise regulation of Ca2+-dependent processes. Because MT localization is a hallmark of most IQD family members, we quantitatively analyzed GFP-labeled MT arrays in Nicotiana benthamiana cells transiently expressing GFP-IQD fusions and observed IQD-specific MT patterns, which point to a role of IQDs in MT organization and dynamics. Indeed, stable overexpression of select IQD proteins in Arabidopsis altered cellular MT orientation, cell shape, and organ morphology. Because IQDs share biochemical properties with scaffold proteins, we propose that IQD families provide an assortment of platform proteins for integrating CaM-dependent Ca2+ signaling at multiple cellular sites to regulate cell function, shape, and growth. PMID:28115582

  11. Agonist-directed trafficking of signalling at serotonin 5-HT2A, 5-HT2B and 5-HT2C-VSV receptors mediated Gq/11 activation and calcium mobilisation in CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cussac, Didier; Boutet-Robinet, Elisa; Ailhaud, Marie-Christine; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian; Martel, Jean-Claude; Danty, Nathalie; Rauly-Lestienne, Isabelle

    2008-10-10

    Several examples of agonist-directed trafficking of receptor signalling at 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors have been reported that involve independent downstream transduction pathways. We now report the functional selectivity of a series of chemically diverse agonists at human (h)5-HT2A, h5-HT2B and h5-HT2C-VSV by examining two related responses, the upstream activation of Gq/11 proteins in comparison with its associated cascade of calcium mobilisation. At the h5-HT2A receptor, d-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and the antiparkinsonian agents lisuride, bromocriptine and pergolide exhibit a higher potency for Gq/11 activation than calcium release in contrast with all the other tested ligands such as 5-HT, mCPP and BW723C86, that show an opposite preference of signalling pathway. Comparable observations are made at h5-HT2B and h5-HT2C-VSV receptors, suggesting a similar mechanism of functional selectivity for the three serotonin receptors. Interestingly, the non-hallucinogenic compound lisuride behaves as a partial agonist for both Gq/11 activation and calcium release at the three 5-HT2 receptors, in contrast with DOI, LSD, pergolide and bromocriptine, which are known to provoke hallucinations, and behave as more efficacious agonists. Hence, a functional selectivity for Gq/11 activation together with a threshold of efficacy at h5-HT2A (and possibly h5-HT2B and/or h5-HT2C-VSV) may contribute to hallucinogenic liability. Thus, our results extend the notion of agonist-directed trafficking of receptor signalling to all the 5-HT2-receptor family and indicate that measures of Gq/11 activation versus calcium release may be useful to identify more effective therapeutic drugs with limited side effects.

  12. Signalling pathways involved in adult heart formation revealed by gene expression profiling in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Zeitouni

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila provides a powerful system for defining the complex genetic programs that drive organogenesis. Under control of the steroid hormone ecdysone, the adult heart in Drosophila forms during metamorphosis by a remodelling of the larval cardiac organ. Here, we evaluated the extent to which transcriptional signatures revealed by genomic approaches can provide new insights into the molecular pathways that underlie heart organogenesis. Whole-genome expression profiling at eight successive time-points covering adult heart formation revealed a highly dynamic temporal map of gene expression through 13 transcript clusters with distinct expression kinetics. A functional atlas of the transcriptome profile strikingly points to the genomic transcriptional response of the ecdysone cascade, and a sharp regulation of key components belonging to a few evolutionarily conserved signalling pathways. A reverse genetic analysis provided evidence that these specific signalling pathways are involved in discrete steps of adult heart formation. In particular, the Wnt signalling pathway is shown to participate in inflow tract and cardiomyocyte differentiation, while activation of the PDGF-VEGF pathway is required for cardiac valve formation. Thus, a detailed temporal map of gene expression can reveal signalling pathways responsible for specific developmental programs and provides here substantial grasp into heart formation.

  13. Involvement of wnt signaling pathways in the metamorphosis of the bryozoan bugula neritina

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Yue Him

    2012-03-20

    In this study, we analyzed the metamorphosis of the marine bryozoan Bugula neritina. We observed the morphogenesis of the ancestrula. We defined three distinct pre-ancestrula stages based on the anatomy of the developing polypide and the overall morphology of pre-ancestrula. We then used an annotation based enrichment analysis tool to analyze the B. neritina transcriptome and identified over-representation of genes related to Wnt signaling pathways, suggesting its involvement in metamorphosis. Finally, we studied the temporal-spatial gene expression studies of several Wnt pathway genes. We found that one of the Wnt ligand, BnWnt10, was expressed spatially opposite to the Wnt antagonist BnsFRP within the blastemas, which is the presumptive polypide. Down-stream components of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway were exclusively expressed in the blastemas. Bn?catenin and BnFz5/8 were exclusively expressed in the blastemas throughout the metamorphosis. Based on the genes expression patterns, we propose that BnWnt10 and BnsFRP may relate to the patterning of the polypide, in which the two genes served as positional signals and contributed to the polarization of the blastemas. Another Wnt ligand, BnWnt6, was expressed in the apical part of the pre-ancestrula epidermis. Overall, our findings suggest that the Wnt signaling pathway may be important to the pattern formation of polypide and the development of epidermis. © 2012 Wong et al.

  14. Spontaneous, pro-arrhythmic calcium signals disrupt electrical pacing in mouse pulmonary vein sleeve cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Rietdorf

    Full Text Available The pulmonary vein, which returns oxygenated blood to the left atrium, is ensheathed by a population of unique, myocyte-like cells called pulmonary vein sleeve cells (PVCs. These cells autonomously generate action potentials that propagate into the left atrial chamber and cause arrhythmias resulting in atrial fibrillation; the most common, often sustained, form of cardiac arrhythmia. In mice, PVCs extend along the pulmonary vein into the lungs, and are accessible in a lung slice preparation. We exploited this model to study how aberrant Ca(2+ signaling alters the ability of PVC networks to follow electrical pacing. Cellular responses were investigated using real-time 2-photon imaging of lung slices loaded with a Ca(2+-sensitive fluorescent indicator (Ca(2+ measurements and phase contrast microscopy (contraction measurements. PVCs displayed global Ca(2+ signals and coordinated contraction in response to electrical field stimulation (EFS. The effects of EFS relied on both Ca(2+ influx and Ca(2+ release, and could be inhibited by nifedipine, ryanodine or caffeine. Moreover, PVCs had a high propensity to show spontaneous Ca(2+ signals that arose via stochastic activation of ryanodine receptors (RyRs. The ability of electrical pacing to entrain Ca(2+ signals and contractile responses was dramatically influenced by inherent spontaneous Ca(2+ activity. In PVCs with relatively low spontaneous Ca(2+ activity (1.5 Hz, electrical pacing was less effective; PVCs became unpaced, only partially-paced or displayed alternans. Because spontaneous Ca(2+ activity varied between cells, neighboring PVCs often had different responses to electrical pacing. Our data indicate that the ability of PVCs to respond to electrical stimulation depends on their intrinsic Ca(2+ cycling properties. Heterogeneous spontaneous Ca(2+ activity arising from stochastic RyR opening can disengage them from sinus rhythm and lead to autonomous, pro-arrhythmic activity.

  15. Unique responsiveness of angiosperm stomata to elevated CO2 explained by calcium signalling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J Brodribb

    Full Text Available Angiosperm and conifer tree species respond differently when exposed to elevated CO2, with angiosperms found to dynamically reduce water loss while conifers appear insensitive. Such distinct responses are likely to affect competition between these tree groups as atmospheric CO2 concentration rises. Seeking the mechanism behind this globally important phenomenon we targeted the Ca(2+-dependent signalling pathway, a mediator of stomatal closure in response to elevated CO2, as a possible explanation for the differentiation of stomatal behaviours. Sampling across the diversity of vascular plants including lycophytes, ferns, gymnosperms and angiosperms we show that only angiosperms possess the stomatal behaviour and prerequisite genetic coding, linked to Ca(2+-dependent stomatal signalling. We conclude that the evolution of Ca(2+-dependent stomatal signalling gives angiosperms adaptive benefits in terms of highly efficient water use, but that stomatal sensitivity to high CO2 may penalise angiosperm productivity relative to other plant groups in the current era of soaring atmospheric CO2.

  16. Dysregulation of Mitochondrial Calcium Signaling and Superoxide Flashes Cause Mitochondrial Genomic DNA Damage in Huntington Disease*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiu-Qiang; Chen, Qian; Wang, Xianhua; Wang, Qiao-Chu; Wang, Yun; Cheng, He-Ping; Guo, Caixia; Sun, Qinmiao; Chen, Quan; Tang, Tie-Shan

    2013-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited, fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the progressive loss of striatal medium spiny neurons. Indications of oxidative stress are apparent in brain tissues from both HD patients and HD mouse models; however, the origin of this oxidant stress remains a mystery. Here, we used a yeast artificial chromosome transgenic mouse model of HD (YAC128) to investigate the potential connections between dysregulation of cytosolic Ca2+ signaling and mitochondrial oxidative damage in HD cells. We found that YAC128 mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibit a strikingly higher level of mitochondrial matrix Ca2+ loading and elevated superoxide generation compared with WT cells, indicating that both mitochondrial Ca2+ signaling and superoxide generation are dysregulated in HD cells. The excessive mitochondrial oxidant stress is critically dependent on mitochondrial Ca2+ loading in HD cells, because blocking mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake abolished elevated superoxide generation. Similar results were obtained using neurons from HD model mice and fibroblast cells from HD patients. More importantly, mitochondrial Ca2+ loading in HD cells caused a 2-fold higher level of mitochondrial genomic DNA (mtDNA) damage due to the excessive oxidant generation. This study provides strong evidence to support a new causal link between dysregulated mitochondrial Ca2+ signaling, elevated mitochondrial oxidant stress, and mtDNA damage in HD. Our results also indicate that reducing mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake could be a therapeutic strategy for HD. PMID:23250749

  17. Increase in anthraquinone content in Rubia cordifolia cells transformed by rol genes does not involve activation of the NADPH oxidase signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgakov, V P; Tchernoded, G K; Mischenko, N P; Shkryl, Yu N; Glazunov, V P; Fedoreyev, S A; Zhuravlev, Yu N

    2003-07-01

    It has been reported that rol plant oncogenes located in Ri-plasmids of Agrobacterium rhizogenes activated synthesis of secondary metabolites in the transformed plant cells. The activator mechanism is still unknown. In this work, we studied whether the NADPH oxidase-signaling pathway, which regulates the synthesis of defense metabolites in plants, is involved in the activator function of the rol genes. It was demonstrated that the transformation of Rubia cordifolia cells by the rolB and rolC genes caused an induction of biosynthesis of anthraquinone-type phytoalexins. Inhibition studies revealed a striking difference between the rolC and rolB transformed cultures in their sensitivity to Ca2+ channel blockers and calcium deficiency. The rolC culture displayed lowered resistance to the inhibitors compared to the non-transformed culture, while the rolB culture was more resistant to the treatment. The assumption was made that the oncogenic potential of rol genes is realized through the alteration of calcium balance in the plant cells. Anthraquinone production was not inhibited in the non-transformed and transformed cultures by Ca2+ channel blockers, as well as by diphenylene iodonium, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, and by the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine. These results indicate that the induction of anthraquinone production in transgenic cultures does not involve the activation of Ca2+-dependent NADPH oxidase pathway.

  18. Involvement of second messengers in the signaling pathway of vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormone and their effects on vitellogenin mRNA expression in the whiteleg shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sun-Hye; Okutsu, Tomoyuki; Tsutsui, Naoaki; Kang, Bong Jung; Chen, Hsiang-Yin; Wilder, Marcy N

    2017-05-15

    We incubated fragments of Litopenaeus vannamei ovary to investigate second messengers involved in the regulation of vitellogenin (vg) mRNA levels. The use of 100nM recombinant vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormone (VIH) (corresponding to recombinant L. vannamei sinus gland peptide-G: rLiv-SGP-G) significantly reduced vg mRNA expression in sub-adults after 8h incubation to less than 20% of the control. The concentration of intracellular cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) increased 3.2-fold relative to the control after 2h incubation with rLiv-SGP-G. However, it reached levels 18-fold relative to the control after 0.5h incubation with rLiv-SGP-G where 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (a phosphodiesterase inhibitor) was also added. Moreover, vg mRNA expression was significantly reduced to less than 50% of the control after 24h incubation with 1μM A23187 (a calcium ionophore). Thus, rLiv-SGP-G and calcium ionophore reduced vg mRNA expression in in vitro-cultured ovary, and cGMP may be involved in the signaling pathway of VIH. Overall, the above results suggest that vg mRNA expression might be inhibited in vitro by increasing intracellular cGMP and Ca2+ in L. vannamei ovary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Selective killing of cancer cells by Ashwagandha leaf extract and its component Withanone involves ROS signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nashi Widodo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Ashwagandha is a popular Ayurvedic herb used in Indian traditional home medicine. It has been assigned a variety of health-promoting effects of which the mechanisms remain unknown. We previously reported the selective killing of cancer cells by leaf extract of Ashwagandha (i-Extract and its purified component Withanone. In the present study, we investigated its mechanism by loss-of-function screening (abrogation of i-Extract induced cancer cell killing of the cellular targets and gene pathways. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Randomized ribozyme library was introduced into cancer cells prior to the treatment with i-Extract. Ribozymes were recovered from cells that survived the i-Extract treatment. Gene targets of the selected ribozymes (as predicted by database search were analyzed by bioinformatics and pathway analyses. The targets were validated for their role in i-Extract induced selective killing of cancer cells by biochemical and molecular assays. Fifteen gene-targets were identified and were investigated for their role in specific cancer cell killing activity of i-Extract and its two major components (Withaferin A and Withanone by undertaking the shRNA-mediated gene silencing approach. Bioinformatics on the selected gene-targets revealed the involvement of p53, apoptosis and insulin/IGF signaling pathways linked to the ROS signaling. We examined the involvement of ROS-signaling components (ROS levels, DNA damage, mitochondrial structure and membrane potential and demonstrate that the selective killing of cancer cells is mediated by induction of oxidative stress. CONCLUSION: Ashwagandha leaf extract and Withanone cause selective killing of cancer cells by induction of ROS-signaling and hence are potential reagents that could be recruited for ROS-mediated cancer chemotherapy.

  20. Selective killing of cancer cells by Ashwagandha leaf extract and its component Withanone involves ROS signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widodo, Nashi; Priyandoko, Didik; Shah, Navjot; Wadhwa, Renu; Kaul, Sunil C

    2010-10-21

    Ashwagandha is a popular Ayurvedic herb used in Indian traditional home medicine. It has been assigned a variety of health-promoting effects of which the mechanisms remain unknown. We previously reported the selective killing of cancer cells by leaf extract of Ashwagandha (i-Extract) and its purified component Withanone. In the present study, we investigated its mechanism by loss-of-function screening (abrogation of i-Extract induced cancer cell killing) of the cellular targets and gene pathways. Randomized ribozyme library was introduced into cancer cells prior to the treatment with i-Extract. Ribozymes were recovered from cells that survived the i-Extract treatment. Gene targets of the selected ribozymes (as predicted by database search) were analyzed by bioinformatics and pathway analyses. The targets were validated for their role in i-Extract induced selective killing of cancer cells by biochemical and molecular assays. Fifteen gene-targets were identified and were investigated for their role in specific cancer cell killing activity of i-Extract and its two major components (Withaferin A and Withanone) by undertaking the shRNA-mediated gene silencing approach. Bioinformatics on the selected gene-targets revealed the involvement of p53, apoptosis and insulin/IGF signaling pathways linked to the ROS signaling. We examined the involvement of ROS-signaling components (ROS levels, DNA damage, mitochondrial structure and membrane potential) and demonstrate that the selective killing of cancer cells is mediated by induction of oxidative stress. Ashwagandha leaf extract and Withanone cause selective killing of cancer cells by induction of ROS-signaling and hence are potential reagents that could be recruited for ROS-mediated cancer chemotherapy.

  1. Calcium signals regulated by NAADP and two-pore channels--their role in development, differentiation and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrington, John; Lear, Pamela; Hachem, Alaa

    2015-01-01

    Ca(2+) signals regulate a wide range of physiological processes. Intracellular Ca(2+) stores can be mobilized in response to extracellular stimuli via a range of signal transduction mechanisms, often involving recruitment of diffusible second messenger molecules. The Ca(2+) mobilizing messengers InsP 3 and cADPR release Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum via InsP 3 and ryanodine receptors, respectively, while a third messenger, NAADP, releases Ca(2+) from acidic endosomes and lysosomes. Bidirectional communication between the ER and acidic organelles has functional relevance for endolysosomal function as well as for the generation of Ca(2+) signals. The two-pore channels (TPCs) are currently strong candidates for being key components of NAADP-regulated Ca(2+) channels. Ca(2+) signals have been shown to play important roles in embryonic development and cell differentiation; however, much remains to be established about the exact signalling mechanisms involved. Investigation of the role of NAADP and TPCs in development and differentiation is still at an early stage, but recent studies have suggested that they play important roles at key developmental stages in vivo and are important mediators of differentiation of neurons, skeletal muscle cells and osteoclasts in vitro. NAADP signals and TPCs have also been implicated in autophagy, an important process in differentiation. Moreover, potential links between TPC2 and cancer have been recently identified. Further studies will be required to identify the precise mechanisms of action of TPCs and their link with NAADP signalling, and to relate these to their roles in differentiation and other key developmental processes in the cell and organism.

  2. Caffeine Modulates Vesicle Release and Recovery at Cerebellar Parallel Fibre Terminals, Independently of Calcium and Cyclic AMP Signalling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine L Dobson

    Full Text Available Cerebellar parallel fibres release glutamate at both the synaptic active zone and at extrasynaptic sites-a process known as ectopic release. These sites exhibit different short-term and long-term plasticity, the basis of which is incompletely understood but depends on the efficiency of vesicle release and recycling. To investigate whether release of calcium from internal stores contributes to these differences in plasticity, we tested the effects of the ryanodine receptor agonist caffeine on both synaptic and ectopic transmission.Whole cell patch clamp recordings from Purkinje neurons and Bergmann glia were carried out in transverse cerebellar slices from juvenile (P16-20 Wistar rats.Caffeine caused complex changes in transmission at both synaptic and ectopic sites. The amplitude of postsynaptic currents in Purkinje neurons and extrasynaptic currents in Bergmann glia were increased 2-fold and 4-fold respectively, but paired pulse ratio was substantially reduced, reversing the short-term facilitation observed under control conditions. Caffeine treatment also caused synaptic sites to depress during 1 Hz stimulation, consistent with inhibition of the usual mechanisms for replenishing vesicles at the active zone. Unexpectedly, pharmacological intervention at known targets for caffeine--intracellular calcium release, and cAMP signalling--had no impact on these effects.We conclude that caffeine increases release probability and inhibits vesicle recovery at parallel fibre synapses, independently of known pharmacological targets. This complex effect would lead to potentiation of transmission at fibres firing at low frequencies, but depression of transmission at high frequency connections.

  3. The involvement of lethal giant larvae and Wnt signaling in bottle cell formation in Xenopus embryos

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Sun-Cheol; Sokol, Sergei Y.

    2009-01-01

    Lethal giant larvae (Lgl) plays a critical role in establishment of cell polarity in epithelial cells. While Frizzled/Dsh signaling has been implicated in the regulation of the localization and activity of Lgl, it remains unclear whether specific Wnt ligands are involved. Here we show that Wnt5a triggers the release of Lgl from the cell cortex into the cytoplasm with the concomitant decrease in Lgl stability. The observed changes in Lgl localization were independent of atypical PKC (aPKC), wh...

  4. Synaptic activity induces dramatic changes in the geometry of the cell nucleus: interplay between nuclear structure, histone H3 phosphorylation, and nuclear calcium signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Malte; Queisser, Gillian; Eder, Anja; Wiegert, J Simon; Bengtson, C Peter; Hellwig, Andrea; Wittum, Gabriel; Bading, Hilmar

    2009-11-25

    Synaptic activity initiates many adaptive responses in neurons. Here we report a novel form of structural plasticity in dissociated hippocampal cultures and slice preparations. Using a recently developed algorithm for three-dimensional image reconstruction and quantitative measurements of cell organelles, we found that many nuclei from hippocampal neurons are highly infolded and form unequally sized nuclear compartments. Nuclear infoldings are dynamic structures, which can radically transform the geometry of the nucleus in response to neuronal activity. Action potential bursting causing synaptic NMDA receptor activation dramatically increases the number of infolded nuclei via a process that requires the ERK-MAP kinase pathway and new protein synthesis. In contrast, death-signaling pathways triggered by extrasynaptic NMDA receptors cause a rapid loss of nuclear infoldings. Compared with near-spherical nuclei, infolded nuclei have a larger surface and increased nuclear pore complex immunoreactivity. Nuclear calcium signals evoked by cytosolic calcium transients are larger in small nuclear compartments than in the large compartments of the same nucleus; moreover, small compartments are more efficient in temporally resolving calcium signals induced by trains of action potentials in the theta frequency range (5 Hz). Synaptic activity-induced phosphorylation of histone H3 on serine 10 was more robust in neurons with infolded nuclei compared with neurons with near-spherical nuclei, suggesting a functional link between nuclear geometry and transcriptional regulation. The translation of synaptic activity-induced signaling events into changes in nuclear geometry facilitates the relay of calcium signals to the nucleus, may lead to the formation of nuclear signaling microdomains, and could enhance signal-regulated transcription.

  5. Calcium Signaling Regulates Ventricular Hypertrophy During Development Independent of Contraction or Blood Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Nicholas D.; Ramachandran, Kapil V.; Bao, Michelle M.; Kirby, Margaret L.; Pitt, Geoffrey S.; Hutson, Mary R.

    2014-01-01

    In utero interventions aimed at restoring left ventricular hemodynamic forces in fetuses with prenatally diagnosed hypoplastic left heart syndrome failed to stimulate ventricular myocardial growth during gestation, suggesting chamber growth during development may not rely upon fluid forces. We therefore hypothesized that ventricular hypertrophy during development may depend upon fundamental Ca2+-dependent growth pathways that function independent of hemodynamic forces. To test this hypothesis, zebrafish embryos were treated with inhibitors or activators of Ca2+ signaling in the presence or absence of contraction during the period of chamber development. Abolishment of contractile function alone in the setting of preserved Ca2+ signaling did not impair ventricular hypertrophy. In contrast, inhibition of L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ influx abolished contraction and led to reduced ventricular hypertrophy, whereas increasing L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ influx led to enhanced ventricular hypertrophy in either the presence or absence of contraction. Similarly, inhibition of the downstream Ca2+-sensitive phosphatase calcineurin, a known regulator of adult cardiac hypertrophy, led to reduced ventricular hypertrophy in the presence or absence of contraction, whereas hypertrophy was rescued in the absence of L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ influx and contraction by expression of a constitutively active calcineurin. These data suggest ventricular cardiomyocyte hypertrophy during chamber formation is dependent upon Ca2+ signaling pathways that are unaffected by heart function or hemodynamic forces. Disruption of Ca2+-dependent hypertrophy during heart development may therefore represent one mechanism for impaired chamber formation that is not related to impaired blood flow. PMID:25536179

  6. ERK activation is involved in tooth development via FGF10 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyoung-Won; Cai, Jinglei; Kim, Hyun-Yi; Hosoya, Akihiro; Ohshima, Hayato; Choi, Kang-Yell; Jung, Han-Sung

    2009-12-15

    The tooth is one of the ectodermal organs that develop from epithelial-mesenchymal interactions during embryonic development. An understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms would improve our knowledge of the growth factors that regulate cell proliferation and differentiation. One of the related aspects is mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling in tooth differentiation. The extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK)/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) cascade plays a pivotal role in many of the essential cellular processes underlying embryonic development, including responses to major developmental changes. However, the role of the ERK pathway in molar development is unclear. This study investigated epithelial patterning and tooth growth in the mouse embryo by monitoring ERK and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling. ERK, MEK, and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) were activated at different levels and locations in the developing tooth at E13.5 to E16.5 and PN2. ERK was activated in the inner dental epithelium and cervical loop, while PTEN was activated in the outer dental epithelium. In addition, only ERK was activated in secretory ameloblast at PN2. To further define the pathways involving FGF and ERK, tooth germs were cultured in the presence of compounds to inhibit MAPK/ERK-mediated signaling. Western blot analysis indicated that pERK2 was strongly activated in the tooth germ. Moreover, the activation level of pERK1 was dramatically increased by exogenous FGF10 alone and by combined treatment with FGF10 and U0126. The reported results will improve our understanding of the unique developmental processes of the dental epithelium and tooth growth, and will help to elucidate the fundamental mechanisms of ERK signaling underlying tooth development. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Reciprocal Regulation of Mitochondrial Dynamics and Calcium Signaling in Astrocyte Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Joshua G.

    2015-01-01

    We recently showed that inhibition of neuronal activity, glutamate uptake, or reversed-Na+/Ca2+-exchange with TTX, TFB-TBOA, or YM-244769, respectively, increases mitochondrial mobility in astrocytic processes. In the present study, we examined the interrelationships between mitochondrial mobility and Ca2+ signaling in astrocyte processes in organotypic cultures of rat hippocampus. All of the treatments that increase mitochondrial mobility decreased basal Ca2+. As recently reported, we observed spontaneous Ca2+ spikes with half-lives of ∼1 s that spread ∼6 μm and are almost abolished by a TRPA1 channel antagonist. Virtually all of these Ca2+ spikes overlap mitochondria (98%), and 62% of mitochondria are overlapped by these spikes. Although tetrodotoxin, TFB-TBOA, or YM-244769 increased Ca2+ signaling, the specific effects on peak, decay time, and/or frequency were different. To more specifically manipulate mitochondrial mobility, we explored the effects of Miro motor adaptor proteins. We show that Miro1 and Miro2 are both expressed in astrocytes and that exogenous expression of Ca2+-insensitive Miro mutants (KK) nearly doubles the percentage of mobile mitochondria. Expression of Miro1KK had a modest effect on the frequency of these Ca2+ spikes but nearly doubled the decay half-life. The mitochondrial proton ionophore, FCCP, caused a large, prolonged increase in cytosolic Ca2+ followed by an increase in the decay time and the spread of the spontaneous Ca2+ spikes. Photo-ablation of mitochondria in individual astrocyte processes has similar effects on Ca2+. Together, these studies show that Ca2+ regulates mitochondrial mobility, and mitochondria in turn regulate Ca2+ signals in astrocyte processes. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In neurons, the movement and positioning of mitochondria at sites of elevated activity are important for matching local energy and Ca2+ buffering capacity. Previously, we demonstrated that mitochondria are immobilized in astrocytes in response

  8. Stimulation of fibroblast growth factor 23 by metabolic acidosis requires osteoblastic intracellular calcium signaling and prostaglandin synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Nancy S; Bushinsky, David A

    2017-10-01

    Serum fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) increases progressively in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is associated with increased mortality. FGF23 is synthesized in osteoblasts and osteocytes; however, the factors regulating its production are not clear. Patients with CKD have decreased renal acid excretion leading to metabolic acidosis (MET). During MET, acid is buffered by bone with release of mineral calcium (Ca) and phosphate (P). MET increases intracellular Ca signaling and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2)-induced prostaglandin production in the osteoblast, leading to decreased bone formation and increased bone resorption. We found that MET directly stimulates FGF23 in mouse bone organ cultures and primary osteoblasts. We hypothesized that MET increases FGF23 through similar pathways that lead to bone resorption. Neonatal mouse calvariae were incubated in neutral (NTL, pH = 7.44, Pco2 = 38 mmHg, [HCO3-] = 27 mM) or acid (MET, pH = 7.18, Pco2 = 37 mmHg, [HCO3-] = 13 mM) medium without or with 2-APB (50 μM), an inhibitor of intracellular Ca signaling or NS-398 (1 μM), an inhibitor of COX2. Each agent significantly inhibited MET stimulation of medium FGF23 protein and calvarial FGF23 RNA as well as bone resorption at 48 h. To exclude the potential contribution of MET-induced bone P release, we utilized primary calvarial osteoblasts. In these cells each agent inhibited MET stimulation of FGF23 RNA expression at 6 h. Thus stimulation of FGF23 by MET in mouse osteoblasts utilizes the same initial signaling pathways as MET-induced bone resorption. Therapeutic interventions directed toward correction of MET, especially in CKD, have the potential to not only prevent bone resorption but also lower FGF23 and perhaps decrease mortality. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Calcium-Induced calcium release during action potential firing in developing inner hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iosub, Radu; Avitabile, Daniele; Grant, Lisa; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Kennedy, Helen J

    2015-03-10

    In the mature auditory system, inner hair cells (IHCs) convert sound-induced vibrations into electrical signals that are relayed to the central nervous system via auditory afferents. Before the cochlea can respond to normal sound levels, developing IHCs fire calcium-based action potentials that disappear close to the onset of hearing. Action potential firing triggers transmitter release from the immature IHC that in turn generates experience-independent firing in auditory neurons. These early signaling events are thought to be essential for the organization and development of the auditory system and hair cells. A critical component of the action potential is the rise in intracellular calcium that activates both small conductance potassium channels essential during membrane repolarization, and triggers transmitter release from the cell. Whether this calcium signal is generated by calcium influx or requires calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is not yet known. IHCs can generate CICR, but to date its physiological role has remained unclear. Here, we used high and low concentrations of ryanodine to block or enhance CICR to determine whether calcium release from intracellular stores affected action potential waveform, interspike interval, or changes in membrane capacitance during development of mouse IHCs. Blocking CICR resulted in mixed action potential waveforms with both brief and prolonged oscillations in membrane potential and intracellular calcium. This mixed behavior is captured well by our mathematical model of IHC electrical activity. We perform two-parameter bifurcation analysis of the model that predicts the dependence of IHCs firing patterns on the level of activation of two parameters, the SK2 channels activation and CICR rate. Our data show that CICR forms an important component of the calcium signal that shapes action potentials and regulates firing patterns, but is not involved directly in triggering exocytosis. These data provide important insights

  10. Anabolic Androgenic Steroids and Intracellular Calcium Signaling: A Mini Review on Mechanisms and Physiological Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicencio, J.M.; Estrada, M.; Galvis, D.; Bravo, R.; Contreras, A.E.; Rotter, D.; Szabadkai, G.; Hill, J.A.; Rothermel, B.A.; Jaimovich, E.; Lavandero, S.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that nongenomic effects of testosterone and anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) operate concertedly with genomic effects. Classically, these responses have been viewed as separate and independent processes, primarily because nongenomic responses are faster and appear to be mediated by membrane androgen receptors, whereas long-term genomic effects are mediated through cytosolic androgen receptors regulating transcriptional activity. Numerous studies have demonstrated increases in intracellular Ca2+ in response to AAS. These Ca2+ mediated responses have been seen in a diversity of cell types, including osteoblasts, platelets, skeletal muscle cells, cardiac myocytes and neurons. The versatility of Ca2+ as a second messenger provides these responses with a vast number of pathophysiological implications. In cardiac cells, testosterone elicits voltage-dependent Ca2+ oscillations and IP3R-mediated Ca2+ release from internal stores, leading to activation of MAPK and mTOR signaling that promotes cardiac hypertrophy. In neurons, depending upon concentration, testosterone can provoke either physiological Ca2+ oscillations, essential for synaptic plasticity, or sustained, pathological Ca2+ transients that lead to neuronal apoptosis. We propose therefore, that Ca2+ acts as an important point of crosstalk between nongenomic and genomic AAS signaling, representing a central regulator that bridges these previously thought to be divergent responses. PMID:21443511

  11. Non-invasive in vivo imaging of calcium signaling in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly L Rogers

    Full Text Available Rapid and transient elevations of Ca(2+ within cellular microdomains play a critical role in the regulation of many signal transduction pathways. Described here is a genetic approach for non-invasive detection of localized Ca(2+ concentration ([Ca(2+] rises in live animals using bioluminescence imaging (BLI. Transgenic mice conditionally expressing the Ca(2+-sensitive bioluminescent reporter GFP-aequorin targeted to the mitochondrial matrix were studied in several experimental paradigms. Rapid [Ca(2+] rises inside the mitochondrial matrix could be readily detected during single-twitch muscle contractions. Whole body patterns of [Ca(2+] were monitored in freely moving mice and during epileptic seizures. Furthermore, variations in mitochondrial [Ca(2+] correlated to behavioral components of the sleep/wake cycle were observed during prolonged whole body recordings of newborn mice. This non-invasive imaging technique opens new avenues for the analysis of Ca(2+ signaling whenever whole body information in freely moving animals is desired, in particular during behavioral and developmental studies.

  12. L-selectin stimulation of canine neutrophil initiates calcium signal secondary to tyrosine kinase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett-Torabi, E; Fantone, J C

    1997-03-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. Neutrophil adhesion to the vascular endothelium is one of the important early mechanisms that lead to reperfusion injury. The leukocyte adhesion molecule, L-selectin, plays a major role in the initial interaction between neutrophils and endothelial cells. Intervention aimed at blocking selectins or their associated ligands can exert cardioprotective effects. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of L-selectin in the initiation of transmembrane signaling and regulation of canine neutrophil responses. Cross-linking of canine neutrophil L-selectin using anti-L-selectin antibody induced a rapid and transient increase in intracellular Ca2+ levels and superoxide anion generation that were dependent on the extent of L-selectin cross-linking. The responses were significantly inhibited by the protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein. The results demonstrate that ligation of canine neutrophil L-selectin is coupled to intracellular signal transduction pathways and the generation of second messengers, which may independently play important regulatory roles in modulating neutrophil-endothelial cell interactions.

  13. Strong Negative Interference by Calcium Dobesilate in Sarcosine Oxidase Assays for Serum Creatinine Involving the Trinder Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiuzhi; Hou, Li'an; Cheng, Xinqi; Zhang, Tianjiao; Yu, Songlin; Fang, Huiling; Xia, Liangyu; Qi, Zhihong; Qin, Xuzhen; Zhang, Lin; Liu, Qian; Liu, Li; Chi, Shuling; Hao, Yingying; Qiu, Ling

    2015-06-01

    The vasoprotective drug calcium dobesilate is known to interfere with creatinine (Cr) quantifications in sarcosine oxidase enzymatic (SOE) assays. The aim of this study was to investigate this interference in 8 different commercially available assays and to determine its clinical significance. In in vitro experiments, interference was evaluated at 3 Cr levels. For this, Cr was quantified by SOE assays in pooled serum supplemented with calcium dobesilate at final concentrations of 0, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, and 64 μg/mL. Percent bias was calculated relative to the drug-free specimen. For in vivo analyses, changes in serum concentrations of Cr, cystatin C (CysC; a renal function marker), and calcium dobesilate were monitored in healthy participants of group I before and after oral calcium dobesilate administration. In addition, variations in interference were also examined among different SOE assays using serum obtained from healthy participants of group II. Lastly, Cr levels from the 10 patients treated with calcium dobesilate were measured using 4 SOE assays and liquid chromatography-isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry (LC-IDMS/MS) for comparison. Our in vitro analyses indicated that the presence of 8 μg/mL calcium dobesilate resulted in a -4.4% to -36.3% reduction in Cr serum concentration compared to drug-free serum for 8 SOE assays examined. In vivo, Cr values decreased relative to the baseline level with increasing drug concentration, with the lowest Cr levels obtained at 2 or 3 hours after drug administration in participants of group I. The observed Cr concentrations for participants in group II were reduced by -28.5% to -3.1% and -60.5% to -11.6% at 0 and 2 hours after administration related to baseline levels. The Cr values of 10 patients measured by Roche, Beckman, Maker, and Merit Choice SOE assays showed an average deviation of -20.0%, -22.4%, -14.2%, and -29.6%, respectively, compared to values obtained by LC-IDMS/MS. These results revealed a

  14. Strong Negative Interference by Calcium Dobesilate in Sarcosine Oxidase Assays for Serum Creatinine Involving the Trinder Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiuzhi; Hou, Li’an; Cheng, Xinqi; Zhang, Tianjiao; Yu, Songlin; Fang, Huiling; Xia, Liangyu; Qi, Zhihong; Qin, Xuzhen; Zhang, Lin; Liu, Qian; Liu, Li; Chi, Shuling; Hao, Yingying; Qiu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The vasoprotective drug calcium dobesilate is known to interfere with creatinine (Cr) quantifications in sarcosine oxidase enzymatic (SOE) assays. The aim of this study was to investigate this interference in 8 different commercially available assays and to determine its clinical significance. In in vitro experiments, interference was evaluated at 3 Cr levels. For this, Cr was quantified by SOE assays in pooled serum supplemented with calcium dobesilate at final concentrations of 0, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, and 64 μg/mL. Percent bias was calculated relative to the drug-free specimen. For in vivo analyses, changes in serum concentrations of Cr, cystatin C (CysC; a renal function marker), and calcium dobesilate were monitored in healthy participants of group I before and after oral calcium dobesilate administration. In addition, variations in interference were also examined among different SOE assays using serum obtained from healthy participants of group II. Lastly, Cr levels from the 10 patients treated with calcium dobesilate were measured using 4 SOE assays and liquid chromatography-isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry (LC-IDMS/MS) for comparison. Our in vitro analyses indicated that the presence of 8 μg/mL calcium dobesilate resulted in a −4.4% to −36.3% reduction in Cr serum concentration compared to drug-free serum for 8 SOE assays examined. In vivo, Cr values decreased relative to the baseline level with increasing drug concentration, with the lowest Cr levels obtained at 2 or 3 hours after drug administration in participants of group I. The observed Cr concentrations for participants in group II were reduced by −28.5% to −3.1% and −60.5% to −11.6% at 0 and 2 hours after administration related to baseline levels. The Cr values of 10 patients measured by Roche, Beckman, Maker, and Merit Choice SOE assays showed an average deviation of −20.0%, −22.4%, −14.2%, and −29.6%, respectively, compared to values obtained by LC

  15. Depression of cardiac L-type calcium current by a scorpion venom fraction M1 following muscarinic receptors interaction involving adenylate cyclase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheikh, Amani; Benkhalifa, Rym; Bescond, Jocelyn; El Ayeb, Mohamed; Raymond, Guy; Cognard, Christian; Potreau, Daniel

    2006-09-15

    The effects of a non-toxic fraction, called M1, from Buthus occitanus tunetanus (Bot) scorpion were studied on rat cardiac contraction and calcium transient and current. A decrease in both rate and tension on isolated intact hearts as well as in calcium transient induced by depolarizing 100 K(+) solution on isolated ventricular cardiomyocytes was firstly observed. Studies with the whole cell patch clamp method showed that M1 decreased the L-type calcium current (ICa(L)) in a dose-dependent manner with an IC50 of 0.36 microg/mL and a Hill coefficient of 0.95. This effect was blocked and reversed by the specific muscarinic receptors antagonist atropine, 1 microM, and was completely prevented when cardiomyocytes were pretreated with Pertussis toxin, 1 microg/mL, to block the alpha subunit of the PTX-sensitive G proteins. These results show that M1 fraction of Bot inhibits basal calcium current by interacting with muscarinic receptors and suggest that this inhibition could be attributed to inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity by a mechanism involving PTX-sensitive G proteins.

  16. T-type calcium channels, but not Cav3.2, in the peripheral sensory afferents are involved in acute itch in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Si-Fang; Wang, Bing; Zhang, Feng-Ming; Fei, Yuan-Hui; Gu, Jia-Hui; Li, Jie; Bi, Ling-Bo; Liu, Xing-Jun

    2017-06-10

    T-type calcium channels are prominently expressed in primary nociceptive fibers and well characterized in pain processes. Although itch and pain share many similarities including primary sensory fibers, the function of T-type calcium channels on acute itch has not been explored. We investigated whether T-type calcium channels expressed within primary sensory fibers of mouse skin, especially Cav3.2 subtype, involve in chloroquine-, endothelin-1- and histamine-evoked acute itch using pharmacological, neuronal imaging and behavioral analyses. We found that pre-locally blocking three subtypes of T-type calcium channels in the peripheral afferents of skins, yielded an inhibition in acute itch or pain behaviors, while selectively blocking the Cav3.2 channel in the skin peripheral afferents only inhibited acute pain but not acute itch. These results suggest that T-type Cav3.1 or Cav3.3, but not Cav3.2 channel, have an important role in acute itch processing, and their distinctive roles in modulating acute itch are worthy of further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hormone-Mediated Intercellular Calcium Signalling in an Insect Salivary Gland Pathways and Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Bernhard; Walz, Bernd

    The salivary glands of the blowfly Calliphora vicina are a favourable preparation for investigations into spatio-temporal Ca 2+ dynamics in an intact miniorgan by using Ca 2+-sensitive indicator dyes and digital imaging techniques, including confocal microscopy, in combination with pharmacological approaches. The review summarizes the available data on the spatio-temporal patterns of the hormone-induced and IP 3-mediated Ca 2+ dynamics at both the intracellular and the intercellular level (intra- and intercellular Ca 2+ waves). The underlying signaling mechanisms are addressed, as well as the pathways of intercellular communication responsible for the complex spatio-temporal Ca 2+ dynamics. In addition, we review evidence for the exchange of Ca 2+ between IP 3 sensitive intracellular Ca 2+ stores and mitochondria including a modulatory effect of mitochondrial Ca 2+ uptake on the frequency of IP 3-induced Ca 2+ spiking.

  18. Autoinducer-2 signaling is involved in regulation of stress-related genes of Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Li, Tao; Dai, Shang; Yu, Jiangliu; Chen, Xiuqin; Wang, Liangyan; Wang, Yunguang; Hua, Yuejin; Tian, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Autoinducer-2 (AI-2) serves as a quorum-sensing signaling molecule that mediates both intraspecies and interspecies communication among bacteria, and plays critical roles in regulating various bacterial behaviors. In the present study, we investigated the functions of AI-2 signaling in the extremophilic bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans R1 by construction of the LuxS gene disruption mutant, survival phenotype assay and gene transcription assay. The gene mutant (DRΔLuxS), which was unable to produce AI-2, was significantly more sensitive to both gamma radiation and H2O2 compared with the wild-type strain. Addition of the wild-type-derived spent medium into the cell culture of DRΔLuxS fully restored the radioresistance of D. radiodurans. A higher level of reactive oxygen species accumulated in the mutant compared with the wild type under normal or oxidative stress. Quantitative real-time PCR assays showed that transcriptional levels of stress-related proteins, including catalase, extracellular nuclease, Dps-1 and ABC transporters, were decreased in DRΔLuxS, indicating that AI-2 is involved in regulation of stress-related genes of D. radiodurans. Hence, AI-2 signaling may contribute to the extreme resistance of D. radiodurans to radiation and oxidative stresses.

  19. The regulation of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis by phosphate in pea involves early and systemic signalling events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzergue, Coline; Puech-Pagès, Virginie; Bécard, Guillaume; Rochange, Soizic F.

    2011-01-01

    Most plants form root symbioses with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, which provide them with phosphate and other nutrients. High soil phosphate levels are known to affect AM symbiosis negatively, but the underlying mechanisms are not understood. This report describes experimental conditions which triggered a novel mycorrhizal phenotype under high phosphate supply: the interaction between pea and two different AM fungi was almost completely abolished at a very early stage, prior to the formation of hyphopodia. As demonstrated by split-root experiments, down-regulation of AM symbiosis occurred at least partly in response to plant-derived signals. Early signalling events were examined with a focus on strigolactones, compounds which stimulate pre-symbiotic fungal growth and metabolism. Strigolactones were also recently identified as novel plant hormones contributing to the control of shoot branching. Root exudates of plants grown under high phosphate lost their ability to stimulate AM fungi and lacked strigolactones. In addition, a systemic down-regulation of strigolactone release by high phosphate supply was demonstrated using split-root systems. Nevertheless, supplementation with exogenous strigolactones failed to restore root colonization under high phosphate. This observation does not exclude a contribution of strigolactones to the regulation of AM symbiosis by phosphate, but indicates that they are not the only factor involved. Together, the results suggest the existence of additional early signals that may control the differentiation of hyphopodia. PMID:21045005

  20. Disruption of action potential and calcium signaling properties in malformed myofibers from dystrophin-deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O; Pratt, Stephen J P; Garcia-Pelagio, Karla P; Schneider, Martin F; Lovering, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most common and severe muscular dystrophy, is caused by the absence of dystrophin. Muscle weakness and fragility (i.e., increased susceptibility to damage) are presumably due to structural instability of the myofiber cytoskeleton, but recent studies suggest that the increased presence of malformed/branched myofibers in dystrophic muscle may also play a role. We have previously studied myofiber morphology in healthy wild-type (WT) and dystrophic (MDX) skeletal muscle. Here, we examined myofiber excitability using high-speed confocal microscopy and the voltage-sensitive indicator di-8-butyl-amino-naphthyl-ethylene-pyridinium-propyl-sulfonate (di-8-ANEPPS) to assess the action potential (AP) properties. We also examined AP-induced Ca2+ transients using high-speed confocal microscopy with rhod-2, and assessed sarcolemma fragility using elastimetry. AP recordings showed an increased width and time to peak in malformed MDX myofibers compared to normal myofibers from both WT and MDX, but no significant change in AP amplitude. Malformed MDX myofibers also exhibited reduced AP-induced Ca2+ transients, with a further Ca2+ transient reduction in the branches of malformed MDX myofibers. Mechanical studies indicated an increased sarcolemma deformability and instability in malformed MDX myofibers. The data suggest that malformed myofibers are functionally different from myofibers with normal morphology. The differences seen in AP properties and Ca2+ signals suggest changes in excitability and remodeling of the global Ca2+ signal, both of which could underlie reported weakness in dystrophic muscle. The biomechanical changes in the sarcolemma support the notion that malformed myofibers are more susceptible to damage. The high prevalence of malformed myofibers in dystrophic muscle may contribute to the progressive strength loss and fragility seen in dystrophic muscles. PMID:25907787

  1. MST50 is involved in multiple MAP kinase signaling pathways in Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guotian; Zhang, Xue; Tian, Huan; Choi, Yoon-E; Tao, W Andy; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2017-05-01

    Appressorium formation plays a critical role in Magnaporthe oryzae. Mst50 is an adapter protein of the Mst11-Mst7-Pmk1 cascade that is essential for appressorium formation. To further characterize its functions, affinity purification was used to identify Mst50-interacting proteins (MIPs) in this study. Two of the MIPs are Mst11 and Mst7 that are known to interact with Mst50 for Pmk1 activation. Surprisingly, two other MIPs are Mck1 and Mkk2 that are the upstream kinases of the Mps1 pathway. Domain deletion analysis showed that the sterile alpha-motif of Mst50 but not the Ras-association domain was important for its interaction with Mck1 and responses to cell wall and oxidative stresses. The mst50 mutant was reduced in Mps1 activation under stress conditions. MIP11 encodes a RACK1 protein that also interacted with Mck1. Deletion of MIP11 resulted in defects in cell wall integrity, Mps1 phosphorylation and plant infection. Furthermore, Mst50 interacted with histidine kinase Hik1, and the mst50 mutant was reduced in Osm1 phosphorylation. These results indicated that Mst50 is involved in all three MAPK pathways in M. oryzae although its functions differ in each pathway. Several MIPs are conserved hypothetical proteins and may be involved in responses to various signals and crosstalk among signaling pathways. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Effect of Poly(γ-glutamic acid) on the Physiological Responses and Calcium Signaling of Rape Seedlings (Brassica napus L.) under Cold Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Peng; Xu, Zongqi; Ding, Yan; Tang, Bao; Zhang, Yunxia; Li, Huashan; Feng, Xiaohai; Xu, Hong

    2015-12-09

    Cold stress adversely affects plant growth and development. Poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) is a potential plant growth regulator that may be an effective cryoprotectant that prevents crops from damage during cold weather. In this study, the effects of γ-PGA on the physiological responses of rape seedlings subject to cold stress were investigated using hydroponic experiments. We determined that the malondialdehyde content was decreased by 33.4% and the proline content was increased by 62.5% by γ-PGA after 144 h under cold stress. Antioxidant enzymes activities were also evidently enhanced after treatment with γ-PGA. These responses counteracted increases in the fresh weight and chlorophyll content of rape seedlings, which increased by 24.5 and 50.9%, respectively, after 144 h, which meant that growth inhibition caused by cold was mitigated by γ-PGA. Our results also showed that γ-PGA also regulated Ca(2+) concentrations in the cytoplasm and calcium-dependent protein kinases, which are associated with cold resistance. In conclusion, we suggest that the Ca(2+)/CPKs signal pathway is involved in the γ-PGA-mediated enhancement of cold resistance in rape seedlings.

  3. Identification of the Components Involved in Cyclic Di-AMP Signaling in Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedric Blötz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria often use cyclic dinucleotides as second messengers for signal transduction. While the classical molecule c-di-GMP is involved in lifestyle selection, the functions of the more recently discovered signaling nucleotide cyclic di-AMP are less defined. For many Gram-positive bacteria, c-di-AMP is essential for growth suggesting its involvement in a key cellular function. We have analyzed c-di-AMP signaling in the genome-reduced pathogenic bacterium Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Our results demonstrate that these bacteria produce c-di-AMP, and we could identify the diadenylate cyclase CdaM (MPN244. This enzyme is the founding member of a novel family of diadenylate cyclases. Of two potential c-di-AMP degrading phosphodiesterases, only PdeM (MPN549 is active in c-di-AMP degradation, whereas NrnA (MPN140 was reported to degrade short oligoribonucleotides. As observed in other bacteria, both the c-di-AMP synthesizing and the degrading enzymes are essential for M. pneumoniae suggesting control of a major homeostatic process. To obtain more insights into the nature of this process, we have identified a c-di-AMP-binding protein from M. pneumoniae, KtrC. KtrC is the cytoplasmic regulatory subunit of the low affinity potassium transporter KtrCD. It is established that binding of c-di-AMP inhibits the KtrCD activity resulting in a limitation of potassium uptake. Our results suggest that the control of potassium homeostasis is the essential function of c-di-AMP in M. pneumoniae.

  4. Trichoderma Biocontrol: Signal Transduction Pathways Involved in Host Sensing and Mycoparasitism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Zeilinger

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungi of the genus Trichoderma are used as biocontrol agents against several plant pathogenic fungi like Rhizoctonia spp., Pythium spp., Botrytis cinerea and Fusarium spp. which cause both soil-borne and leaf- or flower-borne diseases of agricultural plants. Plant disease control by Trichoderma is based on complex interactions between Trichoderma, the plant pathogen and the plant. Until now, two main components of biocontrol have been identified: direct activity of Trichoderma against the plant pathogen by mycoparasitism and induced systemic resistance in plants. As the mycoparasitic interaction is host-specific and not merely a contact response, it is likely that signals from the host fungus are recognised by Trichoderma and provoke transcription of mycoparasitism-related genes.In the last few years examination of signalling pathways underlying Trichoderma biocontrol started and it was shown that heterotrimeric G-proteins and mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinases affected biocontrol-relevant processes such as the production of hydrolytic enzymes and antifungal metabolites and the formation of infection structures. MAPK signalling was also found to be involved in induction of plant systemic resistance in Trichoderma virens and in the hyperosmotic stress response in Trichoderma harzianum. Analyses of the function of components of the cAMP pathway during Trichoderma biocontrol revealed that mycoparasitism-associated coiling and chitinase production as well as secondary metabolism are affected by the internal cAMP level; in addition, a cross talk between regulation of light responses and the cAMP signalling pathway was found in Trichoderma atroviride.

  5. A Modified Glycosaminoglycan, GM-0111, Inhibits Molecular Signaling Involved in Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Justin R; Pulsipher, Abigail; Rao, Narayanam V; Kennedy, Thomas P; Prestwich, Glenn D; Ryan, Maria E; Lee, Won Yong

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is characterized by microbial infection, inflammation, tissue breakdown, and accelerated loss of alveolar bone matrix. Treatment targeting these multiple stages of the disease provides ways to treat or prevent periodontitis. Certain glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) block multiple inflammatory mediators as well as suppress bacterial growth, suggesting that these GAGs may be exploited as a therapeutic for periodontitis. We investigated the effects of a synthetic GAG, GM-0111, on various molecular events associated with periodontitis: growth of Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans) pathogenic bacteria associated with periodontitis; activation of pro-inflammatory signaling through TLR2 and TLR4 in mouse macrophage RAW 264.7 cells and heterologously expressed HEK 293 cells; osteoclast formation and bone matrix resorption in cultured mouse pre-osteoclasts. (1) GM-0111 suppressed the growth of P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans even at 1% (w/v) solution. The antibacterial effects of GM-0111 were stronger than hyaluronic acid (HA) or xylitol in P. gingivalis at all concentrations and comparable to xylitol in A. actinomycetemcomitans at ≥2% (w/v) solution. We also observed that GM-0111 suppressed biofilm formation of P. gingivalis and these effects were much stronger than HA. (2) GM-0111 inhibited TLR-mediated pro-inflammatory cellular signaling both in macrophage and HEK 293 cells with higher selectivity for TLR2 than TLR4 (IC50 of 1-10 ng/mL vs. > 100 μg/mL, respectively). (3) GM-0111 blocked RANKL-induced osteoclast formation (as low as 300 ng/mL) and bone matrix resorption. While GM-0111 showed high affinity binding to RANKL, it did not interfere with RANKL/RANK/NF-κB signaling, suggesting that GM-0111 inhibits osteoclast formation by a RANKL-RANK-independent mechanism. We report that GM-0111 inhibits multiple molecular events involved in periodontitis, spanning from the early pro

  6. Signal Integration at Elongation Factor 2 Kinase: THE ROLES OF CALCIUM, CALMODULIN, AND SER-500 PHOSPHORYLATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Clint D J; Giles, David H; Stancu, Gabriel; Chitjian, Catrina A; Ferguson, Scarlett B; Wellmann, Rebecca M; Kaoud, Tamer S; Ghose, Ranajeet; Dalby, Kevin N

    2017-02-03

    Eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (eEF-2K), the only calmodulin (CaM)-dependent member of the unique α-kinase family, impedes protein synthesis by phosphorylating eEF-2. We recently identified Thr-348 and Ser-500 as two key autophosphorylation sites within eEF-2K that regulate its activity. eEF-2K is regulated by Ca2+ ions and multiple upstream signaling pathways, but how it integrates these signals into a coherent output, i.e. phosphorylation of eEF-2, is unclear. This study focuses on understanding how the post-translational phosphorylation of Ser-500 integrates with Ca2+ and CaM to regulate eEF-2K. CaM is shown to be absolutely necessary for efficient activity of eEF-2K, and Ca2+ is shown to enhance the affinity of CaM toward eEF-2K. Ser-500 is found to undergo autophosphorylation in cells treated with ionomycin and is likely also targeted by PKA. In vitro, autophosphorylation of Ser-500 is found to require Ca2+ and CaM and is inhibited by mutations that compromise binding of phosphorylated Thr-348 to an allosteric binding pocket on the kinase domain. A phosphomimetic Ser-500 to aspartic acid mutation (eEF-2K S500D) enhances the rate of activation (Thr-348 autophosphorylation) by 6-fold and lowers the EC50 for Ca2+/CaM binding to activated eEF-2K (Thr-348 phosphorylated) by 20-fold. This is predicted to result in an elevation of the cellular fraction of active eEF-2K. In support of this mechanism, eEF-2K knock-out MCF10A cells reconstituted with eEF-2K S500D display relatively high levels of phospho-eEF-2 under basal conditions. This study reports how phosphorylation of a regulatory site (Ser-500) integrates with Ca2+ and CaM to influence eEF-2K activity. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Suppression of Cartilage Degradation by Zingerone Involving the p38 and JNK MAPK Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruangsuriya, Jetsada; Budprom, Piyaporn; Viriyakhasem, Nawarat; Kongdang, Patiwat; Chokchaitaweesuk, Chatchadawalai; Sirikaew, Nutnicha; Chomdej, Siriwadee; Nganvongpanit, Korakot; Ongchai, Siriwan

    2017-02-01

    Zingerone, an active compound that is present in cooked ginger, has been claimed to be a bioactive ingredient that holds the potential of preventing and/or treating diseases involving inflammation. In this study, zingerone was used to discover its properties against joint inflammation using interleukin-1β-induced osteoarthritis in cartilage explant and cell culture models. Zingerone was supplemented into the cartilage explant and cell culture media at different concentrations along with the presence of interleukin-1β, an inducer of osteoarthritis. Markers indicating cartilage degradation, inflammation, and the signaling molecules involved in the inflammatory induction were investigated. Diacerien, an anti-osteoarthritic drug, was used as a positive control. Zingerone at a concentration of 40 µM reduced the level of matrix metalloproteinase-13 to about 31.95 ± 4.33 % compared with the interleukin-1β-treated group and halted cartilage explant degradation as indicated by reducing the accumulative release of sulfated glycosaminoglycans by falling to the control concomitantly with an elevation of the remaining contents of uronic acid and collagen in the explant tissues when zingerone was added. In the SW1353 cell line model, zingerone efficiently suppressed the expression of TNF-α, interleukin-6, and interleukin-8 mRNA levels and tended to reduce the levels of both p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation. From the results of this study, it can be concluded that zingerone potentially reduced cartilage degradation, which is partially involved in p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinases of the mitogen activator protein kinase signaling pathway leading to the reduction of proinflammatory cytokine amplification effects and cartilage-degrading enzyme syntheses. This finding supports the contention that ginger holds positive pharmaceutical effects against osteoarthritis. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. StCDPK3 Phosphorylates In Vitro Two Transcription Factors Involved in GA and ABA Signaling in Potato: StRSG1 and StABF1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Grandellis

    Full Text Available Calcium-dependent protein kinases, CDPKs, decode calcium (Ca2+ transients and initiate downstream responses in plants. In order to understand how CDPKs affect plant physiology, their specific target proteins must be identified. In tobacco, the bZIP transcription factor Repression of Shoot Growth (NtRSG that modulates gibberellin (GA content is a specific target of NtCDPK1. StCDPK3 from potato is homologous (88% identical to NtCDPK1 even in its N-terminal variable domain. In this work, we observe that NtRSG is also phosphorylated by StCDPK3. The potato RSG family of transcription factors is composed of three members that share similar features. The closest homologue to NtRSG, which was named StRSG1, was amplified and sequenced. qRT-PCR data indicate that StRSG1 is mainly expressed in petioles, stems, lateral buds, and roots. In addition, GA treatment affected StRSG1 expression. StCDPK3 transcripts were detected in leaves, petioles, stolons, roots, and dormant tubers, and transcript levels were modified in response to GA. The recombinant StRSG1-GST protein was produced and tested as a substrate for StCDPK3 and StCDPK1. 6xHisStCDPK3 was able to phosphorylate the potato StRSG1 in a Ca2+-dependent way, while 6xHisStCDPK1 could not. StCDPK3 also interacts and phosphorylates the transcription factor StABF1 (ABRE binding factor 1 involved in ABA signaling, as shown by EMSA and phosphorylation assays. StABF1 transcripts were mainly detected in roots, stems, and stolons. Our data suggest that StCDPK3 could be involved in the cross-talk between ABA and GA signaling at the onset of tuber development.

  9. NSAIDs, Mitochondria and Calcium Signaling: Special Focus on Aspirin/Salicylates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Suzuki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid is a well-known nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID that has long been used as an anti-pyretic and analgesic drug. Recently, much attention has been paid to the chemopreventive and apoptosis-inducing effects of NSAIDs in cancer cells. These effects have been thought to be primarily attributed to the inhibition of cyclooxygenase activity and prostaglandin synthesis. However, recent studies have demonstrated unequivocally that certain NSAIDs, including aspirin and its metabolite salicylic acid, exert their anti-inflammatory and chemopreventive effects independently of cyclooxygenase activity and prostaglandin synthesis inhibition. It is becoming increasingly evident that two potential common targets of NSAIDs are mitochondria and the Ca2+ signaling pathway. In this review, we provide an overview of the current knowledge regarding the roles of mitochondria and Ca2+ in the apoptosis-inducing effects as well as some side effects of aspirin, salicylates and other NSAIDs, and introducing the emerging role of L-type Ca2+ channels, a new Ca2+ entry pathway in non-excitable cells that is up-regulated in human cancer cells.

  10. Purinergic receptors and calcium signalling in human pancreatic duct cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette R; Krabbe, Simon; Novak, Ivana

    2008-01-01

    pancreatic duct cell lines PANC-1 and CFPAC-1. Expression of P2 receptors was examined using RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. Both cell lines, and also Capan-1 cells, express RNA transcripts for the following receptors: P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y4, P2Y6, P2Y11-14 and P2X1, P2X2, P2X4, P2X5, P2X6 and P2X7. Using Fura-2......ATP, commonly used to stimulate P2X7 receptors, elicited non-oscillatory and transient Ca(2+) responses. Ivermectin, a potentiator of P2X4 receptors, increased Ca(2+) signals evoked by ATP. The single cell Ca(2+) measurements indicated functional expression of P2Y2 and other P2Y receptors, and notably...... expression of P2X4 and P2X7 receptors. Expression of P2Y2, P2X4 and P2X7 receptors was confirmed by immunocytochemistry. This fingerprint of P2 receptors in human pancreatic duct models forms the basis for studying effect of nucleotides on ion and fluid secretion, as well as on Ca(2+) and tissue homeostasis...

  11. mGluR-mediated calcium signalling in the thalamic reticular nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neyer, Christina; Herr, David; Kohmann, Denise; Budde, Thomas; Pape, Hans-Christian; Coulon, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    The thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) plays a major role in modulating the transfer of information from the thalamus to the cortex. GABAergic inhibition via the TRN is differentially regulated by metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and the effect of mGluRs on the membrane potential, on ion channels, and on the plasticity of electrical coupling of TRN neurons has been studied previously. Although mGluRs are generally known to trigger Ca(2+) transients, mGluR-mediated Ca(2+)-transients in TRN neurons have not yet been investigated. In this study, we show that mGluRs can trigger Ca(2+)-transients in TRN neurons, that these transients depend on intracellular Ca(2+)-stores, and are mediated by IP3 receptors. Ca(2+) transients caused by the group I mGluR agonist DHPG elicit a current that is sensitive to flufenamic acid and has a reversal potential around -40mV. Our results add mGluR-mediated Ca(2+)-signalling in the TRN to the state-dependent modulators of the thalamocortical system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Interorganellar Membrane Microdomains: Dynamic Platforms in the Control of Calcium Signaling and Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra d'Azzo

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic interplay among intracellular organelles occurs at specific membrane tethering sites, where two organellar membranes come in close apposition but do not fuse. Such membrane microdomains allow for rapid and efficient interorganelle communication that contributes to the maintenance of cell physiology. Pathological conditions that interfere with the proper composition, number, and physical vicinity of the apposing membranes initiate a cascade of events resulting in cell death. Membrane contact sites have now been identified that tether the extensive network of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER membranes with the mitochondria, the plasma membrane (PM, the Golgi and the endosomes/lysosomes. Thus far, the most extensively studied are the MAMs, or mitochondria associated ER membranes, and the ER-PM junctions that share functional properties and crosstalk to one another. Specific molecular components that define these microdomains have been shown to promote the interaction in trans between these intracellular compartments and the transfer or exchange of Ca2+ ions, lipids, and metabolic signaling molecules that determine the fate of the cell.

  13. Stimulation of Odontogenesis and Angiogenesis via Bioactive Nanocomposite Calcium Phosphate Cements Through Integrin and VEGF Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Im; Lee, Eui-Suk; El-Fiqi, Ahmed; Lee, So-Youn; Eun-Cheol Kim; Kim, Hae-Won

    2016-05-01

    Formulating self-setting calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) with secondary phases particularly in the nanoscale order holds great promise to improve biological properties. Here, we focus on the effect that bioactive glass nanoparticles (BGN) incorporated in CPC compositions can have on the proliferation, odontogenic differentiation, and angiogenic stimulation of stem cells derived from human dental pulp (HDPSCs). These odontogenic and angiogenic events are of special importance in the dentin-pulp regeneration processes. In comparison to pure CPCs, nanocomposite cements exhibit a significantly improved proliferation of HDPSCs, and the improvement is more significant as the BGN content increases. The nanocomposite cements substantially enhance the adhesion of cells, and significantly up-regulate odontogenic differentiation, including alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the expressions of odontogenic genes (sialophosphoprotein, dentin matrix protein I, ALP, osteopontin and osteocalcin). Furthermore, the use of nanocomposite cements result in stimulation of angiogenic gene expression (VEGF, FGF-2, VEGFRs, PECAM-1, and VE-cadherin) and protein production (VEGF, VEGFR-1). The angiogenic stimulation by the HDPSCs significantly affects the endothelial cell behaviors, that is, the endothelial cell migration and the tubular network formation are substantially improved when treated with HDPSC-conditioned medium, particularly with the help of nanocomposite cements. The integrin and VEGF signaling pathways are reasoned for the stimulation of the odontogenesis and angiogenesis of cells, where the nanocomposite cements up-regulate the integrin subsets α1, α2, α3, and β1, and activate the integrin downstream signal pathways, such as p-FAK, p-Akt, p-paxillin, JNK, EK, and NF-κB, as well as other nuclear transcriptional factors, including CREB, STAT-3, and ELK-1. The current results indicate that the new formulation of the nanocomposite self-setting cements might provide some

  14. Stimulus-dependent regulation of nuclear Ca2+ signaling in cardiomyocytes: a role of neuronal calcium sensor-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Shu; Wakabayashi, Shigeo; Nakamura, Tomoe Y

    2015-01-01

    In cardiomyocytes, intracellular calcium (Ca2+) transients are elicited by electrical and receptor stimulations, leading to muscle contraction and gene expression, respectively. Although such elevations of Ca2+levels ([Ca2+]) also occur in the nucleus, the precise mechanism of nuclear [Ca2+] regulation during different kinds of stimuli, and its relationship with cytoplasmic [Ca2+] regulation are not fully understood. To address these issues, we used a new region-specific fluorescent protein-based Ca2+ indicator, GECO, together with the conventional probe Fluo-4 AM. We confirmed that nuclear Ca2+ transients were elicited by both electrical and receptor stimulations in neonatal mouse ventricular myocytes. Kinetic analysis revealed that electrical stimulation-elicited nuclear Ca2+ transients are slower than cytoplasmic Ca2+ transients, and chelating cytoplasmic Ca2+ abolished nuclear Ca2+ transients, suggesting that nuclear Ca2+ are mainly derived from the cytoplasm during electrical stimulation. On the other hand, receptor stimulation such as with insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) preferentially increased nuclear [Ca2+] compared to cytoplasmic [Ca2+]. Experiments using inhibitors revealed that electrical and receptor stimulation-elicited Ca2+ transients were mainly mediated by ryanodine receptors and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs), respectively, suggesting different mechanisms for the two signals. Furthermore, IGF-1-elicited nuclear Ca2+ transient amplitude was significantly lower in myocytes lacking neuronal Ca2+ sensor-1 (NCS-1), a Ca2+ binding protein implicated in IP3R-mediated pathway in the heart. Moreover, IGF-1 strengthened the interaction between NCS-1 and IP3R. These results suggest a novel mechanism for receptor stimulation-induced nuclear [Ca2+] regulation mediated by IP3R and NCS-1 that may further fine-tune cardiac Ca2+ signal regulation.

  15. Neuroblast Migration and P2Y1 Receptor Mediated Calcium Signalling Depend on 9-O-Acetyl GD3 Ganglioside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo F Santiago

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies indicated that a ganglioside 9acGD3 (9-O-acetyl GD3 antibody [the J-Ab (Jones antibody] reduces GCP (granule cell progenitor migration in vitro and in vivo. We here investigated, using cerebellar explants of postnatal day (P 6 mice, the mechanism by which 9acGD3 reduces GCP migration. We found that immunoblockade of the ganglioside with the J-Ab or the lack of GD3 synthase reduced GCP in vitro migration and the frequency of Ca2+ oscillations. Immunocytochemistry and pharmacological assays indicated that GCPs expressed P2Y1Rs (P2Y1 receptors and that deletion or blockade of these receptors decreased the migration rate of GCPs and the frequency of Ca2+ oscillations. The reduction in P2Y1-mediated calcium signals seen in Jones-treated and GD3 synthase-null GCPs were paralleled by P2Y1R internalization. We conclude that 9acGD3 controls GCP migration by influencing P2Y1R cellular distribution and function.

  16. Activation and proliferation signals in mouse B cells. VII. Calcium ionophores are non-mitogenic polyclonal B-cell activators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, G G; Bijsterbosch, M K; Holman, M

    1985-01-01

    Calcium ionophores cause polyclonal proliferation of lymphocytes from man, rabbit and pig, but are not mitogenic for mouse T or B lymphocytes. We show here that two Ca2+ ionophores (A23187 and ionomycin) nonetheless activate a substantial proportion of mouse B lymphocytes at concentrations which effectively inhibit DNA synthesis induced by conventional mitogens, such as anti-immunoglobulin antibodies. Activation of B cells was detected by (i) increased expression of Ia antigen after 24 hr culture with ionophores, and (ii) the accelerated onset of DNA synthesis in B cells primed with ionophores for 24 hr, washed and then rechallenged with anti-Ig. Unlike anti-Ig, the ionophores did not induce either the breakdown of inositol phospholipids, or RNA synthesis in B cells. Finally, activation of B cells by ionophores is highly susceptible to inhibition by cyclosporine. These results therefore suggest that elevation of intracellular Ca2+ induced by these ionophores is sufficient to cause B cells to leave Go, but not to enter the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Clearly, additional signals are required for B cells to progress further into cycle and eventually become committed to DNA synthesis. PMID:2414214

  17. VSNL1 Co-expression networks in aging include calcium signaling, synaptic plasticity, and Alzheimer’s disease pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C W Lin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Visinin-like 1 (VSNL1 gene encodes Visinin-like protein 1, a peripheral biomarker for Alzheimer disease (AD. Little is known, however, about normal VSNL1 expression in brain and the biologic networks in which it participates. Frontal cortex gray matter from 209 subjects without neurodegenerative or psychiatric illness, ranging in age from 16–91, were processed on Affymetrix GeneChip 1.1 ST and Human SNP Array 6.0. VSNL1 expression was unaffected by age and sex, and not significantly associated with SNPs in cis or trans. VSNL1 was significantly co-expressed with genes in pathways for Calcium Signaling, AD, Long Term Potentiation, Long Term Depression, and Trafficking of AMPA Receptors. The association with AD was driven, in part, by correlation with amyloid precursor protein (APP expression. These findings provide an unbiased link between VSNL1 and molecular mechanisms of AD, including pathways implicated in synaptic pathology in AD. Whether APP may drive increased VSNL1 expression, VSNL1 drives increased APP expression, or both are downstream of common pathogenic regulators will need to be evaluated in model systems.

  18. Involvement of nuclear factor {kappa}B in platelet CD40 signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hachem, Ahmed [Laboratory of Thrombosis and Hemostasis, Montreal Heart Institute, 5000 Belanger, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H1T 1C8 (Canada); Yacoub, Daniel [Laboratory of Thrombosis and Hemostasis, Montreal Heart Institute, 5000 Belanger, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H1T 1C8 (Canada); Centre Hospitalier Universite de Montreal, 264 boul. Rene-Levesque est, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2X 1P1 (Canada); Zaid, Younes [Laboratory of Thrombosis and Hemostasis, Montreal Heart Institute, 5000 Belanger, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H1T 1C8 (Canada); Mourad, Walid [Universite de Montreal, Department of Medicine, 2900 boul. Edouard-Montpetit, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3T 1J4 (Canada); Centre Hospitalier Universite de Montreal, 264 boul. Rene-Levesque est, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2X 1P1 (Canada); Merhi, Yahye, E-mail: yahye.merhi@icm-mhi.org [Laboratory of Thrombosis and Hemostasis, Montreal Heart Institute, 5000 Belanger, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H1T 1C8 (Canada); Universite de Montreal, Department of Medicine, 2900 boul. Edouard-Montpetit, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3T 1J4 (Canada)

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer sCD40L induces TRAF2 association to CD40 and NF-{kappa}B activation in platelets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation downstream of CD40L/CD40 signaling is independent of p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer I{kappa}B{alpha} is required for sCD40L-induced platelet activation and potentiation of aggregation. -- Abstract: CD40 ligand (CD40L) is a thrombo-inflammatory molecule that predicts cardiovascular events. Platelets constitute the major source of soluble CD40L (sCD40L), which has been shown to potentiate platelet activation and aggregation, in a CD40-dependent manner, via p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Rac1 signaling. In many cells, the CD40L/CD40 dyad also induces activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B). Given that platelets contain NF-{kappa}B, we hypothesized that it may be involved in platelet CD40 signaling and function. In human platelets, sCD40L induces association of CD40 with its adaptor protein the tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 2 and triggers phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, which are abolished by CD40L blockade. Inhibition of I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation reverses sCD40L-induced I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation without affecting p38 MAPK phosphorylation. On the other hand, inhibition of p38 MAPK phosphorylation has no effect on I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation, indicating a divergence in the signaling pathway originating from CD40 upon its ligation. In functional studies, inhibition of I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation reverses sCD40L-induced platelet activation and potentiation of platelet aggregation in response to a sub-threshold concentration of collagen. This study demonstrates that the sCD40L/CD40 axis triggers NF-{kappa}B activation in platelets. This signaling pathway plays a critical role in platelet activation and aggregation upon sCD40L stimulation and may represent an important target against thrombo

  19. Stretch induced endothelin-1 secretion by adult rat astrocytes involves calcium influx via stretch-activated ion channels (SACs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostrow, Lyle W., E-mail: lostrow1@jhmi.edu [Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Suchyna, Thomas M.; Sachs, Frederick [Department of Physiology and Biophysical Sciences, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States)

    2011-06-24

    Highlights: {yields} Endothelin-1 expression by adult rat astrocytes correlates with cell proliferation. {yields} Stretch-induced ET-1 is inhibited by GsMtx-4, a specific inhibitor of Ca{sup 2+} permeant SACs. {yields} The less specific SAC inhibitor streptomycin also inhibits ET-1 secretion. {yields} Stretch-induced ET-1 production depends on a calcium influx. {yields} SAC pharmacology may provide a new class of therapeutic agents for CNS pathology. -- Abstract: The expression of endothelins (ETs) and ET-receptors is often upregulated in brain pathology. ET-1, a potent vasoconstrictor, also inhibits the expression of astrocyte glutamate transporters and is mitogenic for astrocytes, glioma cells, neurons, and brain capillary endothelia. We have previously shown that mechanical stress stimulates ET-1 production by adult rat astrocytes. We now show in adult astrocytes that ET-1 production is driven by calcium influx through stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) and the ET-1 production correlates with cell proliferation. Mechanical stimulation using biaxial stretch (<20%) of a rubber substrate increased ET-1 secretion, and 4 {mu}M GsMTx-4 (a specific inhibitor of SACs) inhibited secretion by 30%. GsMTx-4 did not alter basal ET-1 levels in the absence of stretch. Decreasing the calcium influx by lowering extracellular calcium also inhibited stretch-induced ET-1 secretion without effecting ET-1 secretion in unstretched controls. Furthermore, inhibiting SACs with the less specific inhibitor streptomycin also inhibited stretch-induced ET-1 secretion. The data can be explained with a simple model in which ET-1 secretion depends on an internal Ca{sup 2+} threshold. This coupling of mechanical stress to the astrocyte endothelin system through SACs has treatment implications, since all pathology deforms the surrounding parenchyma.

  20. Investigating nitric oxide signalling involvement in the antidepressant action of ketamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebenberg, Nico; Müller, Heidi Kaastrup; Elfving, Betina

    2012-01-01

    Stress-induced excessive glutamate transmission at N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDA-R’s) may underlie a primary mechanism in the physiology that leads to depression, and ketamine, an NMDA-R antagonist, has been shown to rapidly relieve depression in humans. A number of downstream mechanisms...... have been suggested to mediate the antidepressant action of ketamine, including the activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), protein kinase B (or Akt) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). However, the mechanism(s) that are affected immediately downstream of NMDA......-R’s remain unclear. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is directly coupled to and activated by NMDA-R’s, and the uncoupling of the nNOS-NMDA-R complex prevents NMDA-R-mediated excitotoxicity. Therefore, we investigated whether the antidepressant mechanism of ketamine involves the inhibition of nitric...

  1. Characterization of murine melanocortin receptors mediating adipocyte lipolysis and examination of signalling pathways involved

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Cathrine Laustrup; Raun, Kirsten; Jacobsen, Marianne Lambert

    2011-01-01

    The melanocortin receptors (MCRs) belong to the G-protein coupled receptors (family A). So far, 5 different subtypes have been described (MC1R-MC5R) and of these MC2R and MC5R have been proposed to act directly in adipocytes and regulate lipolysis in rodents. Using ACTH and a-melanocyte stimulating...... hormone (a-MSH) generated from proopiomelanocortin (POMC), as well as synthetic MSH analogues to stimulate lipolysis in murine 3T3-L1 adipocytes it is shown that MC2R and MC5R are lipolytic mediators in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Involvement of cAMP, phosphorylated extracellular signal...... is mediated through MC5R in a cAMP independent manner. Finally, we identify essential differences in MCR mediated lipolysis when using 3T3-L1 cells compared to primary adipocytes....

  2. The involvement of lethal giant larvae and Wnt signaling in bottle cell formation in Xenopus embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sun-Cheol; Sokol, Sergei Y

    2009-12-01

    Lethal giant larvae (Lgl) plays a critical role in establishment of cell polarity in epithelial cells. While Frizzled/Dsh signaling has been implicated in the regulation of the localization and activity of Lgl, it remains unclear whether specific Wnt ligands are involved. Here we show that Wnt5a triggers the release of Lgl from the cell cortex into the cytoplasm with the concomitant decrease in Lgl stability. The observed changes in Lgl localization were independent of atypical PKC (aPKC), which is known to influence Lgl distribution. In ectodermal cells, both Wnt5a and Lgl triggered morphological and molecular changes characteristic of apical constriction, whereas depletion of their functions prevented endogenous and ectopic bottle cell formation. Furthermore, Lgl RNA partially rescued bottle cell formation in embryos injected with a dominant negative Wnt5a construct. These results suggest a molecular link between Wnt5a and Lgl that is essential for apical constriction during vertebrate gastrulation.

  3. Profiling the metabolic signals involved in chemical communication between microbes using imaging mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasulli, Nikolas M; Shank, Elizabeth A

    2016-11-01

    The ability of microbes to secrete bioactive chemical signals into their environment has been known for over a century. However, it is only in the last decade that imaging mass spectrometry has provided us with the ability to directly visualize the spatial distributions of these microbial metabolites. This technology involves collecting mass spectra from multiple discrete locations across a biological sample, yielding chemical ‘maps’ that simultaneously reveal the distributions of hundreds of metabolites in two dimensions. Advances in microbial imaging mass spectrometry summarized here have included the identification of novel strain- or coculture-specific compounds, the visualization of biotransformation events (where one metabolite is converted into another by a neighboring microbe), and the implementation of a method to reconstruct the 3D subsurface distributions of metabolites, among others. Here we review the recent literature and discuss how imaging mass spectrometry has spurred novel insights regarding the chemical consequences of microbial interactions.

  4. B cell receptor signaling pathway involved in benign lymphoepithelial lesions of the lacrimal gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Na Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To detect the expression of B cell receptor signaling pathway (BCRSP in lacrimal gland benign lymphoepithelial lesions (LGBLEL. METHODS: Gene microarray was used to compare whole-genome expression in lacrimal gland tissues from LGBLEL patients to tissues from orbital cavernous hemangioma (control tissues. Expression of BCRSP was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: The expression of 22 genes of the BCRSP increased significantly in LGBLEL patients. PCR analysis showed that CD22, CR2, and BTK were all highly expressed in LGBLEL tissues. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that CR2 protein was present in LGBLEL, but CD22 and BTK proteins were negative. CR2, CD22, and BTK were not observed in the orbital cavernous hemangiomas with either PCR or immunohistochemistry. CONCLUSION: BCRSP might be involved in the pathogenesis of LGBLEL.

  5. Nitrogen modulation of legume root architecture signaling pathways involves phytohormones and small regulatory molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd-Radzman, Nadiatul A; Djordjevic, Michael A; Imin, Nijat

    2013-10-01

    Nitrogen, particularly nitrate is an important yield determinant for crops. However, current agricultural practice with excessive fertilizer usage has detrimental effects on the environment. Therefore, legumes have been suggested as a sustainable alternative for replenishing soil nitrogen. Legumes can uniquely form nitrogen-fixing nodules through symbiotic interaction with specialized soil bacteria. Legumes possess a highly plastic root system which modulates its architecture according to the nitrogen availability in the soil. Understanding how legumes regulate root development in response to nitrogen availability is an important step to improving root architecture. The nitrogen-mediated root development pathway starts with sensing soil nitrogen level followed by subsequent signal transduction pathways involving phytohormones, microRNAs and regulatory peptides that collectively modulate the growth and shape of the root system. This review focuses on the current understanding of nitrogen-mediated legume root architecture including local and systemic regulations by different N-sources and the modulations by phytohormones and small regulatory molecules.

  6. The endocannabinoid system: an ancient signaling involved in the control of male fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Silvia; Meccariello, Rosaria; Cobellis, Gilda; Chianese, Rosanna; Cacciola, Giovanna; Chioccarelli, Teresa; Pierantoni, Riccardo

    2009-04-01

    The effects of cannabinoids on human health have been known since the antiquities when the extract of the plant Cannabis sativa was used because of its psychoactivity. The scientific story of the cannabinoids started in the 1960s with the isolation and characterization of the active component of the plant. After the synthesis of cannabinoid analogues, the analysis of structure-effect relationships was implemented, and this had a similar effect to a positive "Pandora's box" opening. To date, numerous roles have been ascribed to the "endocannabinoid system." Here we describe its involvement in the control of male reproduction, taking into consideration possible evolutionary speculations. Indeed, the endocannabinoid system is a very ancient signaling system, being clearly present from the divergence of the protostomian/deuterostomian.

  7. Identification and analysis of signaling networks potentially involved in breast carcinoma metastasis to the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Li

    Full Text Available Brain is a common site of breast cancer metastasis associated with significant neurologic morbidity, decreased quality of life, and greatly shortened survival. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underpinning brain colonization by breast carcinoma cells are poorly understood. Here, we used 2D-DIGE (Difference in Gel Electrophoresis proteomic analysis followed by LC-tandem mass spectrometry to identify the proteins differentially expressed in brain-targeting breast carcinoma cells (MB231-Br compared with parental MDA-MB-231 cell line. Between the two cell lines, we identified 12 proteins consistently exhibiting greater than 2-fold (p<0.05 difference in expression, which were associated by the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA with two major signaling networks involving TNFα/TGFβ-, NFκB-, HSP-70-, TP53-, and IFNγ-associated pathways. Remarkably, highly related networks were revealed by the IPA analysis of a list of 19 brain-metastasis-associated proteins identified recently by the group of Dr. A. Sierra using MDA-MB-435-based experimental system (Martin et al., J Proteome Res 2008 7:908-20, or a 17-gene classifier associated with breast cancer brain relapse reported by the group of Dr. J. Massague based on a microarray analysis of clinically annotated breast tumors from 368 patients (Bos et al., Nature 2009 459: 1005-9. These findings, showing that different experimental systems and approaches (2D-DIGE proteomics used on brain targeting cell lines or gene expression analysis of patient samples with documented brain relapse yield highly related signaling networks, suggest strongly that these signaling networks could be essential for a successful colonization of the brain by metastatic breast carcinoma cells.

  8. The ghrelin signalling system is involved in the consumption of sweets.

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    Sara Landgren

    Full Text Available The gastric-derived orexigenic peptide ghrelin affects brain circuits involved in energy balance as well as in reward. Indeed, ghrelin activates an important reward circuit involved in natural- as well as drug-induced reward, the cholinergic-dopaminergic reward link. It has been hypothesized that there is a common reward mechanism for alcohol and sweet substances in both animals and humans. Alcohol dependent individuals have higher craving for sweets than do healthy controls and the hedonic response to sweet taste may, at least in part, depend on genetic factors. Rat selectively bred for high sucrose intake have higher alcohol consumption than non-sucrose preferring rats and vice versa. In the present study a group of alcohol-consuming individuals selected from a population cohort was investigated for genetic variants of the ghrelin signalling system in relation to both their alcohol and sucrose consumption. Moreover, the effects of GHS-R1A antagonism on voluntary sucrose-intake and operant self-administration, as well as saccharin intake were investigated in preclinical studies using rodents. The effects of peripheral grelin administration on sucrose intake were also examined. Here we found associations with the ghrelin gene haplotypes and increased sucrose consumption, and a trend for the same association was seen in the high alcohol consumers. The preclinical data show that a GHS-R1A antagonist reduces the intake and self-administration of sucrose in rats as well as saccharin intake in mice. Further, ghrelin increases the intake of sucrose in rats. Collectively, our data provide a clear indication that the GHS-R1A antagonists reduces and ghrelin increases the intake of rewarding substances and hence, the central ghrelin signalling system provides a novel target for the development of drug strategies to treat addictive behaviours.

  9. Jasmonate signalling in Arabidopsis involves SGT1b-HSP70-HSP90 chaperone complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Millet, Yves A; Cheng, Zhenyu; Bush, Jenifer; Ausubel, Frederick M

    Plant hormones play pivotal roles in growth, development and stress responses. Although it is essential to our understanding of hormone signalling, how plants maintain a steady state level of hormone receptors is poorly understood. We show that mutation of the Arabidopsis thaliana co-chaperone SGT1b impairs responses to the plant hormones jasmonate, auxin and gibberellic acid, but not brassinolide and abscisic acid, and that SGT1b and its homologue SGT1a are involved in maintaining the steady state levels of the F-box proteins COI1 and TIR1, receptors for jasmonate and auxin, respectively. The association of SGT1b with COI1 is direct and is independent of the Arabidopsis SKP1 protein, ASK1. We further show that COI1 is a client protein of SGT1b-HSP70-HSP90 chaperone complexes and that the complexes function in hormone signalling by stabilizing the COI1 protein. This study extends the SGT1b-HSP90 client protein list and broadens the functional scope of SGT1b-HSP70-HSP90 chaperone complexes.

  10. A critical appraisal of phloem-mobile signals involved in tuber induction

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    Paula eSuárez-López

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The identification of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT and several FT homologs as phloem-mobile proteins that regulate flowering has sparked the search for additional homologs involved in the long-distance regulation of other developmental processes. Given that flowering and tuber induction share regulatory pathways, the quest for long-distance tuberization signals has been further stimulated. Several tuberization regulators have been proposed as mobile molecules, including the FT family protein StSP6A, the plant growth regulators gibberellins and the microRNA miR172. Although some of these hypotheses are attractive and plausible, evidence that these molecules are transmissible in potato has yet to be obtained. Two mRNAs encoding transcription factors, StBEL5 and POTH1, are mobile and correlate with tuber induction. However, evidence that StBEL5 or POTH1 are required for tuberization is not available yet. Therefore, there are several good candidates for long-distance molecules in the tuberization process. Further research should test their role as systemic tuberization signals.

  11. A Novel RNA-Binding Protein Involves ABA Signaling by Post-transcriptionally Repressing ABI2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianwen; Chen, Yihan; Qian, Luofeng; Mu, Rong; Yuan, Xi; Fang, Huimin; Huang, Xi; Xu, Enshun; Zhang, Hongsheng; Huang, Ji

    2017-01-01

    The Stress Associated RNA-binding protein 1 (SRP1) repressed by ABA, salt and cold encodes a C2C2-type zinc finger protein in Arabidopsis. The knock-out mutation in srp1 reduced the sensitivity of seed to ABA and salt stress during germination and post-germinative growth stages. In contrast, SRP1-overexpressing seedlings were more sensitive to ABA and salt compared to wild type plants. In the presence of ABA, the transcript levels of ABA signaling and germination-related genes including ABI3. ABI5. EM1 and EM6 were less induced in srp1 compared to WT. Interestingly, expression of ABI2 encoding a protein phosphatase 2C protein were significantly up-regulated in srp1 mutants. By in vitro analysis, SRP1 was identified as a novel RNA-binding protein directly binding to 3'UTR of ABI2 mRNA. Moreover, transient expression assay proved the function of SRP1 in reducing the activity of luciferase whose coding sequence was fused with the ABI2 3'UTR. Together, it is suggested that SRP1 is involved in the ABA signaling by post-transcriptionally repressing ABI2 expression in Arabidopsis.

  12. Calcium: the molecular basis of calcium action in biology and medicine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pochet, Roland; Donato, Rosario

    2000-01-01

    ... of Calcium Calcium Signalling in Excitable Cells Ca2+ Release in Muscle Cells by N. Macrez and J. Mironneau Calcium Signalling in Neurons Exemplified by Rat Sympathetic Ganglion Cells by S.J. M...

  13. Bioinformatic identification of FGF, p38-MAKP, and calcium signalling pathways associated with carcinoma in situ in the urinary bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbsleb, Malene; Christensen, Ole F; Thykjaer, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    (FGF, p38 MAPK, and calcium signalling) or the expression of the twelve TFs together could be used to predict presence or absence of concomitant CIS. A cluster analysis based on expression of the twelve TFs separated the samples in two main clusters: one branch contained 11 of the 15 patients without...... approach to predict presence or absence of CIS in patients suffering from non muscle invasive bladder cancer. From Ingenuity Pathway Analysis we considered four canonical signalling pathways (p38 MAPK, FGF, Calcium, and cAMP pathways) with most coherent expression of transcription factors (TFs) across...... samples in a set of twenty-eight non muscle invasive bladder carcinomas. These pathways contained twelve TFs in total. We used the expression of the TFs to predict presence or absence of CIS in a Leave-One-Out Cross Validation classification. Results We showed that TF expression levels in three pathways...

  14. GSK-3β/NFAT Signaling Is Involved in Testosterone-Induced Cardiac Myocyte Hypertrophy.

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    Javier Duran

    Full Text Available Testosterone induces cardiac hypertrophy through a mechanism that involves a concerted crosstalk between cytosolic and nuclear signaling pathways. Nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT is associated with the promotion of cardiac hypertrophy, glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β is considered to function as a negative regulator, mainly by modulating NFAT activity. However, the role played by calcineurin-NFAT and GSK-3β signaling in testosterone-induced cardiac hypertrophy has remained unknown. Here, we determined that testosterone stimulates cardiac myocyte hypertrophy through NFAT activation and GSK-3β inhibition. Testosterone increased the activity of NFAT-luciferase (NFAT-Luc in a time- and dose-dependent manner, with the activity peaking after 24 h of stimulation with 100 nM testosterone. NFAT-Luc activity induced by testosterone was blocked by the calcineurin inhibitors FK506 and cyclosporine A and by 11R-VIVIT, a specific peptide inhibitor of NFAT. Conversely, testosterone inhibited GSK-3β activity as determined by increased GSK-3β phosphorylation at Ser9 and β-catenin protein accumulation, and also by reduction in β-catenin phosphorylation at residues Ser33, Ser37, and Thr41. GSK-3β inhibition with 1-azakenpaullone or a GSK-3β-targeting siRNA increased NFAT-Luc activity, whereas overexpression of a constitutively active GSK-3β mutant (GSK-3βS9A inhibited NFAT-Luc activation mediated by testosterone. Testosterone-induced cardiac myocyte hypertrophy was established by increased cardiac myocyte size and [3H]-leucine incorporation (as a measurement of cellular protein synthesis. Calcineurin-NFAT inhibition abolished and GSK-3β inhibition promoted the hypertrophy stimulated by testosterone. GSK-3β activation by GSK-3βS9A blocked the increase of hypertrophic markers induced by testosterone. Moreover, inhibition of intracellular androgen receptor prevented testosterone-induced NFAT-Luc activation. Collectively, these results

  15. Grouper (Epinephelus coioides) TCR signaling pathway was involved in response against Cryptocaryon irritans infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ze-Xiang; Li, Yan-Wei; Xu, Shun; Xu, Yang; Mo, Ze-Quan; Dan, Xue-Ming; Luo, Xiao-Chun

    2017-05-01

    T cell activation is a complicated process accompanying with the activation of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling pathway, which is not well described in teleost fish. The initiation of this pathway depends on the interaction of membrane TCR co-receptors (e.g. CD4/8, CD3 and CD45) and a series of cytoplasmic protein tyrosine kinases (e.g. Lck, Fyn and ZAP70). Cyptocaryon irritans is a ciliate pathogen of marine fish white spot disease causing huge economic lost in marine aquaculture. This parasite can infect fish gill and skin and is considered to be a good pathogen model for fish gill and skin mucosal immunity. Our previous studies showed the locally mucosal antibody response was important for fish defense against this parasite. While how TCR signaling pathway involved in T cell activation to help B cell activation in C. irritans infected fish is still not known. In the present study, we cloned a grouper TCR co-receptor gene EcCD3ε (537 bp) and its three kinase genes, including EcLck (1512 bp), EcFyn (1605 bp) and EcZAP70 (1893 bp). Homology analysis showed that they all shared the highest identity with corresponding genes from Takifugu rubripes (EcCD3ε 41%, EcLck 88%, EcFyn 98% and EcZAP70 93%), and their conserved motifs involved in the signaling transduction were analyzed. The tissue distribution analysis showed these four genes were high expressed in thymus, and it is interesting to find their comparative high expression in skin, gill and midgut mucosal immune tissues. In C. irritans infected grouper, the expression of three TCR co-receptors (EcCD4-1, EcCD3ε and EcCD45) and three kinases (EcLck, EcFyn and EcZAP70) was tested in skin, gill, head kidney and spleen at 0, 12 h, 24 h, 2 d, 3 d, 5 d and 7 d. All six genes were significantly up-regulated in skin at most tested time points, which indicate the possibility of skin local T cell activation to support the local antibody response. Compared to three TCR co-receptors, significantly up-regulation of three

  16. A Modified Glycosaminoglycan, GM-0111, Inhibits Molecular Signaling Involved in Periodontitis.

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    Justin R Savage

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is characterized by microbial infection, inflammation, tissue breakdown, and accelerated loss of alveolar bone matrix. Treatment targeting these multiple stages of the disease provides ways to treat or prevent periodontitis. Certain glycosaminoglycans (GAGs block multiple inflammatory mediators as well as suppress bacterial growth, suggesting that these GAGs may be exploited as a therapeutic for periodontitis.We investigated the effects of a synthetic GAG, GM-0111, on various molecular events associated with periodontitis: growth of Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans pathogenic bacteria associated with periodontitis; activation of pro-inflammatory signaling through TLR2 and TLR4 in mouse macrophage RAW 264.7 cells and heterologously expressed HEK 293 cells; osteoclast formation and bone matrix resorption in cultured mouse pre-osteoclasts.(1 GM-0111 suppressed the growth of P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans even at 1% (w/v solution. The antibacterial effects of GM-0111 were stronger than hyaluronic acid (HA or xylitol in P. gingivalis at all concentrations and comparable to xylitol in A. actinomycetemcomitans at ≥2% (w/v solution. We also observed that GM-0111 suppressed biofilm formation of P. gingivalis and these effects were much stronger than HA. (2 GM-0111 inhibited TLR-mediated pro-inflammatory cellular signaling both in macrophage and HEK 293 cells with higher selectivity for TLR2 than TLR4 (IC50 of 1-10 ng/mL vs. > 100 μg/mL, respectively. (3 GM-0111 blocked RANKL-induced osteoclast formation (as low as 300 ng/mL and bone matrix resorption. While GM-0111 showed high affinity binding to RANKL, it did not interfere with RANKL/RANK/NF-κB signaling, suggesting that GM-0111 inhibits osteoclast formation by a RANKL-RANK-independent mechanism.We report that GM-0111 inhibits multiple molecular events involved in periodontitis, spanning from the

  17. Inhibitors of arachidonate-regulated calcium channel signaling suppress triggered activity induced by the late sodium current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkowicz, Paul; Umeda, Patrick K; Sharifov, Oleg F; White, C Roger; Huang, Jian; Mahtani, Harry; Urthaler, Ferdinand

    2014-02-05

    Disturbances in myocyte calcium homeostasis are hypothesized to be one cause for cardiac arrhythmia. The full development of this hypothesis requires (i) the identification of all sources of arrhythmogenic calcium and (ii) an understanding of the mechanism(s) through which calcium initiates arrhythmia. To these ends we superfused rat left atria with the late sodium current activator type II Anemonia sulcata toxin (ATXII). This toxin prolonged atrial action potentials, induced early afterdepolarization, and provoked triggered activity. The calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitor KN-93 (N-[2-[[[3-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-propenyl]methylamino]methyl]phenyl]-N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-4-methoxybenzenesulphon-amide) suppressed ATXII triggered activity but its inactive congener KN-92 (2-[N-(4-methoxy benzenesulfonyl)]amino-N-(4-chlorocinnamyl)-N-methylbenzylamine) did not. Neither drug affected normal atrial contractility. Calcium entry via L-type channels or calcium leakage from sarcoplasmic reticulum stores are not critical for this type of ectopy as neither verapamil ((RS)-2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-5-{[2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)ethyl]-(methyl)amino}-2-prop-2-ylpentanenitrile) nor ryanodine affected ATXII triggered activity. By contrast, inhibitors of the voltage independent arachidonate-regulated calcium (ARC) channel and the store-operated calcium channel specifically suppressed ATXII triggered activity without normalizing action potentials or affecting atrial contractility. Inhibitors of cytosolic calcium-dependent phospholipase A2 also suppressed triggered activity suggesting that this lipase, which generates free arachidonate, plays a key role in ATXII ectopy. Thus, increased left atrial late sodium current appears to activate atrial Orai-linked ARC and store operated calcium channels, and these voltage-independent channels may be unexpected sources for the arrhythmogenic calcium that underlies triggered activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The NFP locus of Medicago truncatula controls an early step of Nod factor signal transduction upstream of a rapid calcium flux and root hair deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, Besma Ben; Shaw, Sidney L; Oldroyd, Giles E D; Maillet, Fabienne; Penmetsa, R Varma; Cook, Douglas; Long, Sharon R; Dénarié, Jean; Gough, Clare

    2003-05-01

    Establishment of the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis depends on a molecular dialogue, in which rhizobial nodulation (Nod) factors act as symbiotic signals, playing a key role in the control of specificity of infection and nodule formation. Using nodulation-defective (Nod-) mutants of Medicago truncatula to study the mechanisms controlling Nod factor perception and signalling, we have previously identified five genes that control components of a Nod factor-activated signal transduction pathway. Characterisation of a new M. truncatula Nod- mutant led to the identification of the Nod Factor Perception (NFP) locus. The nfp mutant has a novel phenotype among Nod- mutants of M. truncatula, as it does not respond to Nod factors by any of the responses tested. The nfp mutant thus shows no rapid calcium flux, the earliest detectable Nod factor response of wild-type plants, and no root hair deformation. The nfp mutant is also deficient in Nod factor-induced calcium spiking and early nodulin gene expression. While certain genes controlling Nod factor signal transduction also control the establishment of an arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, the nfp mutant shows a wild-type mycorrhizal phenotype. These data indicate that the NFP locus controls an early step of Nod factor signal transduction, upstream of previously identified genes and specific to nodulation.

  19. Proteins involved in platelet signaling are differentially regulated in acute coronary syndrome: a proteomic study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Fernández Parguiña

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Platelets play a fundamental role in pathological events underlying acute coronary syndrome (ACS. Because platelets do not have a nucleus, proteomics constitutes an optimal approach to follow platelet molecular events associated with the onset of the acute episode. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed the first high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis-based proteome analysis of circulating platelets from patients with non-ST segment elevation ACS (NSTE-ACS. Proteins were identified by mass spectrometry and validations were by western blotting. Forty protein features (corresponding to 22 unique genes were found to be differentially regulated between NSTE-ACS patients and matched controls with chronic ischemic cardiopathy. The number of differences decreased at day 5 (28 and 6 months after the acute event (5. Interestingly, a systems biology approach demonstrated that 16 of the 22 differentially regulated proteins identified are interconnected as part of a common network related to cell assembly and organization and cell morphology, processes very related to platelet activation. Indeed, 14 of those proteins are either signaling or cytoskeletal, and nine of them are known to participate in platelet activation by αIIbβ3 and/or GPVI receptors. Several of the proteins identified participate in platelet activation through post-translational modifications, as shown here for ILK, Src and Talin. Interestingly, the platelet-secreted glycoprotein SPARC was down-regulated in NSTE-ACS patients compared to stable controls, which is consistent with a secretion process from activated platelets. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study provides novel information on platelet proteome changes associated with platelet activation in NSTE-ACS, highlighting the presence of proteins involved in platelet signaling. This investigation paves the way for future studies in the search for novel platelet-related biomarkers and drug targets

  20. Urotensin II induction of adult cardiomyocytes hypertrophy involves the Akt/GSK-3beta signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruson, D; Ginion, A; Decroly, N; Lause, P; Vanoverschelde, J L; Ketelslegers, J M; Bertrand, L; Thissen, J P

    2010-07-01

    Urotensin II (UII) a potent vasoactive peptide is upregulated in the failing heart and promotes cardiomyocytes hypertrophy, in particular through mitogen-activated protein kinases. However, the regulation by UII of GSK-3beta, a recognized pivotal signaling element of cardiac hypertrophy has not yet been documented. We therefore investigated in adult cardiomyocytes, if UII phosphorylates GSK-3beta and Akt, one of its upstream regulators and stabilizes beta-catenin, a GSK-3beta dependent nuclear transcriptional co-activator. Primary cultures of adult rat cardiomyocytes were stimulated for 48h with UII. Cell size and protein/DNA contents were determined. Phosphorylated and total forms of Akt, GSK-3beta and the total amount of beta-catenin were quantified by western blot. The responses of cardiomyocytes to UII were also evaluated after pretreatment with the chemical phosphatidyl-inositol-3-kinase inhibitor, LY294002, and urantide, a competitive UII receptor antagonist. UII increased cell size and the protein/DNA ratio, consistent with a hypertrophic response. UII also increased phosphorylation of Akt and its downstream target GSK-3beta. beta-Catenin protein levels were increased. All of these effects of UII were prevented by LY294002, and urantide. The UII-induced adult cardiomyocytes hypertrophy involves the Akt/GSK-3beta signaling pathways and is accompanied by the stabilization of the beta-catenin. All these effects are abolished by competitive inhibition of the UII receptor, consistent with new therapeutic perspectives for heart failure treatment. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Pharmacological Characterization of the Mechanisms Involved in Delayed Calcium Deregulation in SH-SY5Y Cells Challenged with Methadone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Alvarez, Sergio; Solesio, Maria E.; Cuenca-Lopez, Maria D.; Melero-Fernández de Mera, Raquel M.; Villalobos, Carlos; Kmita, Hanna; Galindo, Maria F.; Jordán, Joaquin

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we have shown that SH-SY5Y cells exposed to high concentrations of methadone died due to a necrotic-like cell death mechanism related to delayed calcium deregulation (DCD). In this study, we show that, in terms of their Ca2+ responses to 0.5 mM methadone, SH-SY5Y cells can be pooled into four different groups. In a broad pharmacological survey, the relevance of different Ca2+-related mechanisms on methadone-induced DCD was investigated including extracellular calcium, L-type Ca2+ channels, μ-opioid receptor, mitochondrial inner membrane potential, mitochondrial ATP synthesis, mitochondrial Ca2+/2Na+-exchanger, reactive oxygen species, and mitochondrial permeability transition. Only those compounds targeting mitochondria such as oligomycin, FCCP, CGP 37157, and cyclosporine A were able to amend methadone-induced Ca2+ dyshomeostasis suggesting that methadone induces DCD by modulating the ability of mitochondria to handle Ca2+. Consistently, mitochondria became dramatically shorter and rounder in the presence of methadone. Furthermore, analysis of oxygen uptake by isolated rat liver mitochondria suggested that methadone affected mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in a respiratory substrate-dependent way. We conclude that methadone causes failure of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, and this effect is associated with morphological and functional changes of mitochondria. Likely, this mechanism contributes to degenerative side effects associated with methadone treatment. PMID:22778742

  2. cAMP-dependent protein kinase involves calcium tolerance through the regulation of Prz1 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Yasuhiro; Kawamukai, Makoto

    2017-02-01

    The cAMP-dependent protein kinase Pka1 is known as a regulator of glycogenesis, meiosis, and stress responses in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We demonstrated that Pka1 is responsible for calcium tolerance. Loss of functional components of the PKA pathway such as Git3, Gpa2, Cyr1, and Pka1 yields a CaCl2-sensitive phenotype, while loss of Cgs1, a regulatory subunit of PKA, results in CaCl2 tolerance. Cytoplasmic distribution of Cgs1 and Pka1 is increased by the addition of CaCl2, suggesting that CaCl2 induces dissociation of Cgs1 and Pka1. The expression of Prz1, a transcriptional regulator in calcium homeostasis, is elevated in a pka1∆ strain and in a wild type strain under glucose-limited conditions. Accordingly, higher expression of Prz1 in the wild type strain results in a CaCl2-sensitive phenotype. These findings suggest that Pka1 is essential for tolerance to exogenous CaCl2, probably because the expression level of Prz1 needs to be properly regulated by Pka1.

  3. Antagonizing amyloid-β/calcium-sensing receptor signaling in human astrocytes and neurons: a key to halt Alzheimer′s disease progression?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Dal Prà

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes′ roles in late-onset Alzheimer′s disease (LOAD promotion are important, since they survive soluble or fibrillar amyloid-β peptides (Aβs neurotoxic effects, undergo alterations of intracellular and intercellular Ca 2+ signaling and gliotransmitters release via the Aβ/α7-nAChR (α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor signaling, and overproduce/oversecrete newly synthesized Aβ42 oligomers, NO, and VEGF-A via the Aβ/CaSR (calcium-sensing receptor signaling. Recently, it was suggested that the NMDAR (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor inhibitor nitromemantine would block the synapse-destroying effects of Aβ/α7-nAChR signaling. Yet, this and the progressive extracellular accrual and spreading of Aβ42 oligomers would be stopped well upstream by NPS 2143, an allosteric CaSR antagonist (calcilytic.

  4. Peeping into human renal calcium oxalate stone matrix: characterization of novel proteins involved in the intricate mechanism of urolithiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanu Priya Aggarwal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The increasing number of patients suffering from urolithiasis represents one of the major challenges which nephrologists face worldwide today. For enhancing therapeutic outcomes of this disease, the pathogenic basis for the formation of renal stones is the need of hour. Proteins are found as major component in human renal stone matrix and are considered to have a potential role in crystal-membrane interaction, crystal growth and stone formation but their role in urolithiasis still remains obscure. METHODS: Proteins were isolated from the matrix of human CaOx containing kidney stones. Proteins having MW>3 kDa were subjected to anion exchange chromatography followed by molecular-sieve chromatography. The effect of these purified proteins was tested against CaOx nucleation and growth and on oxalate injured Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK renal epithelial cells for their activity. Proteins were identified by Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF MS followed by database search with MASCOT server. In silico molecular interaction studies with CaOx crystals were also investigated. RESULTS: Five proteins were identified from the matrix of calcium oxalate kidney stones by MALDI-TOF MS followed by database search with MASCOT server with the competence to control the stone formation process. Out of which two proteins were promoters, two were inhibitors and one protein had a dual activity of both inhibition and promotion towards CaOx nucleation and growth. Further molecular modelling calculations revealed the mode of interaction of these proteins with CaOx at the molecular level. CONCLUSIONS: We identified and characterized Ethanolamine-phosphate cytidylyltransferase, Ras GTPase-activating-like protein, UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase 2, RIMS-binding protein 3A, Macrophage-capping protein as novel proteins from the matrix of human calcium oxalate stone which play a critical role in kidney stone

  5. High extracellular magnesium inhibits mineralized matrix deposition and modulates intracellular calcium signaling in human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Yang, Chunxi; Li, Jiao; Zhu, Yuchang; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2014-08-08

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the potential to differentiate into several cell types and provide an attractive source of autologous cells for regenerative medicine. However, their cellular biology is not fully understood. Similar to Ca(2+), extracellular Mg(2+) plays an important role in the functions of the skeletal system. Here, we examined the effects of extracellular Mg(2+) on the deposition of calcium phosphate matrix and Ca(2+) signaling with or without ATP stimulation in human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). We found that high extracellular Mg(2+) concentration ([Mg(2+)]e) inhibited extracellular matrix mineralization in hBMSCs in vitro. hBMSCs also produced a dose-dependent decrease in the frequency of calcium oscillations during [Mg(2+)]e elevation with a slight suppression on oscillation amplitude. In addition, spontaneous ATP release was inhibited under high [Mg(2+)]e levels and exogenous ATP addition stimulated oscillation reappear. Taken together, our results indicate that high [Mg(2+)]e modulates calcium oscillations via suppression of spontaneous ATP release and inactivates purinergic receptors, resulting in decreased extracellular mineralized matrix deposition in hBMSCs. Therefore, the high magnesium environment created by the rapid corrosion of Mg alloys may result in the dysfunction of calcium-dependent physiology processes and be disadvantageous to hBMSCs physiology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Altered vasoreactivity in neonatal rats with pulmonary hypertension associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia: Implication of both eNOS phosphorylation and calcium signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Dumas de la Roque

    Full Text Available Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD consists of an arrest of pulmonary vascular and alveolar growth, with persistent hypoplasia of the pulmonary microvasculature and alveolar simplification. In 25 to 40% of the cases, BPD is complicated by pulmonary hypertension (BPD-PH that significantly increases the risk of morbidity. In vivo studies suggest that increased pulmonary vascular tone could contribute to late PH in BPD. Nevertheless, an alteration in vasoreactivity as well as the mechanisms involved remain to be confirmed. The purpose of this study was thus to assess changes in pulmonary vascular reactivity in a murine model of BPD-PH. Newborn Wistar rats were exposed to either room air (normoxia or 90% O2 (hyperoxia for 14 days. Exposure to hyperoxia induced the well-known features of BPD-PH such as elevated right ventricular systolic pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy, pulmonary vascular remodeling and decreased pulmonary vascular density. Intrapulmonary arteries from hyperoxic pups showed decreased endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine without any alteration of relaxation to the NO-donor sodium nitroprusside. This functional alteration was associated with a decrease of lung eNOS phosphorylation at the Ser1177 activating site. In pups exposed to hyperoxia, serotonin and phenylephrine induced exacerbated contractile responses of intrapulmonary arteries as well as intracellular calcium response in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC. Moreover, the amplitude of the store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE, induced by store depletion using a SERCA inhibitor, was significantly greater in PASMC from hyperoxic pups. Altogether, hyperoxia-induced BPD-PH alters the pulmonary arterial reactivity, with effects on both endothelial and smooth muscle functions. Reduced activating eNOS phosphorylation and enhanced Ca2+ signaling likely account for alterations of pulmonary arterial reactivity.

  7. Altered vasoreactivity in neonatal rats with pulmonary hypertension associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia: Implication of both eNOS phosphorylation and calcium signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas de la Roque, Eric; Smeralda, Gwladys; Quignard, Jean-François; Freund-Michel, Véronique; Courtois, Arnaud; Marthan, Roger; Muller, Bernard; Guibert, Christelle; Dubois, Mathilde

    2017-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) consists of an arrest of pulmonary vascular and alveolar growth, with persistent hypoplasia of the pulmonary microvasculature and alveolar simplification. In 25 to 40% of the cases, BPD is complicated by pulmonary hypertension (BPD-PH) that significantly increases the risk of morbidity. In vivo studies suggest that increased pulmonary vascular tone could contribute to late PH in BPD. Nevertheless, an alteration in vasoreactivity as well as the mechanisms involved remain to be confirmed. The purpose of this study was thus to assess changes in pulmonary vascular reactivity in a murine model of BPD-PH. Newborn Wistar rats were exposed to either room air (normoxia) or 90% O2 (hyperoxia) for 14 days. Exposure to hyperoxia induced the well-known features of BPD-PH such as elevated right ventricular systolic pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy, pulmonary vascular remodeling and decreased pulmonary vascular density. Intrapulmonary arteries from hyperoxic pups showed decreased endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine without any alteration of relaxation to the NO-donor sodium nitroprusside. This functional alteration was associated with a decrease of lung eNOS phosphorylation at the Ser1177 activating site. In pups exposed to hyperoxia, serotonin and phenylephrine induced exacerbated contractile responses of intrapulmonary arteries as well as intracellular calcium response in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC). Moreover, the amplitude of the store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE), induced by store depletion using a SERCA inhibitor, was significantly greater in PASMC from hyperoxic pups. Altogether, hyperoxia-induced BPD-PH alters the pulmonary arterial reactivity, with effects on both endothelial and smooth muscle functions. Reduced activating eNOS phosphorylation and enhanced Ca2+ signaling likely account for alterations of pulmonary arterial reactivity.

  8. The roles of calcium signaling and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in a Pax6+/- mouse model of epithelial wound-healing delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCaig Colin D

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital aniridia caused by heterozygousity at the PAX6 locus is associated with ocular surface disease including keratopathy. It is not clear whether the keratopathy is a direct result of reduced PAX6 gene dosage in the cornea itself, or due to recurrent corneal trauma secondary to defects such as dry eye caused by loss of PAX6 in other tissues. We investigated the hypothesis that reducing Pax6 gene dosage leads to corneal wound-healing defects. and assayed the immediate molecular responses to wounding in wild-type and mutant corneal epithelial cells. Results Pax6+/- mouse corneal epithelia exhibited a 2-hour delay in their response to wounding, but subsequently the cells migrated normally to repair the wound. Both Pax6+/+ and Pax6+/- epithelia activated immediate wound-induced waves of intracellular calcium signaling. However, the intensity and speed of propagation of the calcium wave, mediated by release from intracellular stores, was reduced in Pax6+/- cells. Initiation and propagation of the calcium wave could be largely decoupled, and both phases of the calcium wave responses were required for wound healing. Wounded cells phosphorylated the extracellular signal-related kinases 1/2 (phospho-ERK1/2. ERK1/2 activation was shown to be required for rapid initiation of wound healing, but had only a minor effect on the rate of cell migration in a healing epithelial sheet. Addition of exogenous epidermal growth factor (EGF to wounded Pax6+/- cells restored the calcium wave, increased ERK1/2 activation and restored the immediate healing response to wild-type levels. Conclusion The study links Pax6 deficiency to a previously overlooked wound-healing delay. It demonstrates that defective calcium signaling in Pax6+/- cells underlies this delay, and shows that it can be pharmacologically corrected. ERK1/2 phosphorylation is required for the rapid initiation of wound healing. A model is presented whereby minor abrasions, which are

  9. Nanometer Scale Titanium Surface Texturing Are Detected by Signaling Pathways Involving Transient FAK and Src Activations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Bonfante, Estevam A.; Jimbo, Ryo; Hayashi, Mariko; Andersson, Martin; Alves, Gutemberg; Takamori, Esther R.; Beltrão, Paulo J.; Coelho, Paulo G.; Granjeiro, José M.

    2014-01-01

    Background It is known that physico/chemical alterations on biomaterial surfaces have the capability to modulate cellular behavior, affecting early tissue repair. Such surface modifications are aimed to improve early healing response and, clinically, offer the possibility to shorten the time from implant placement to functional loading. Since FAK and Src are intracellular proteins able to predict the quality of osteoblast adhesion, this study evaluated the osteoblast behavior in response to nanometer scale titanium surface texturing by monitoring FAK and Src phosphorylations. Methodology Four engineered titanium surfaces were used for the study: machined (M), dual acid-etched (DAA), resorbable media microblasted and acid-etched (MBAA), and acid-etch microblasted (AAMB). Surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, interferometry, atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Thereafter, those 4 samples were used to evaluate their cytotoxicity and interference on FAK and Src phosphorylations. Both Src and FAK were investigated by using specific antibody against specific phosphorylation sites. Principal Findings The results showed that both FAK and Src activations were differently modulated as a function of titanium surfaces physico/chemical configuration and protein adsorption. Conclusions It can be suggested that signaling pathways involving both FAK and Src could provide biomarkers to predict osteoblast adhesion onto different surfaces. PMID:24999733

  10. Short- and long-term memory: differential involvement of neurotransmitter systems and signal transduction cascades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MÔNICA R.M. VIANNA

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Since William James (1890 first distinguished primary from secondary memory, equivalent to short- and long-term memory, respectively, it has been assumed that short-term memory processes are in charge of cognition while long-term memory is being consolidated. From those days a major question has been whether short-term memory is merely a initial phase of long-term memory, or a separate phenomena. Recent experiments have shown that many treatments with specific molecular actions given into the hippocampus and related brain areas after one-trial avoidance learning can effectively cancel short-term memory without affecting long-term memory formation. This shows that short-term memory and long-term memory involve separate mechanisms and are independently processed. Other treatments, however, influence both memory types similarly, suggesting links between both at the receptor and at the post-receptor level, which should not be surprising as they both deal with nearly the same sensorimotor representations. This review examines recent advances in short- and long-term memory mechanisms based on the effect of intra-hippocampal infusion of drugs acting upon neurotransmitter and signal transduction systems on both memory types.

  11. Akt-signal integration is involved in the differentiation of embryonal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Xue, Zheng; Yang, Guanghui; Shi, Bingyang; Yang, Ben; Yan, Yuemin; Wang, Xue; Han, Daishu; Huang, Yue; Dong, Wenji

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism by which Akt modulates stem cell homeostasis is still incompletely defined. Here we demonstrate that Akt phosphorylates special AT-rich sequences binding protein 1 (SATB1) at serine 47 and protects SATB1 from apoptotic cleavage. Meanwhile, Akt phosphorylates Oct4 at threonine 228 and Klf4 at threonine 399, and accelerates their degradation. Moreover, PI3K/Akt signaling enhances the binding of SATB1 to Sox2, thereby probably impairing the formation of Oct4/Sox2 regulatory complexes. During retinoic acid (RA)-induced differentiation of mouse F9 embryonal carcinoma cells (ECCs), the Akt activation profile as well as its substrate spectrum is strikingly correlated with the down-regulation of Oct4, Klf4 and Nanog, which suggests Akt activation is coupled to the onset of differentiation. Accordingly, Akt-mediated phosphorylation is crucial for the capability of SATB1 to repress Nanog expression and to activate transcription of Bcl2 and Nestin genes. Taken together, we conclude that Akt is involved in the differentiation of ECCs through coordinated phosphorylations of pluripotency/differentiation factors.

  12. Photoreception and signal transduction in corals: proteomic and behavioral evidence for cytoplasmic calcium as a mediator of light responsivity.

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    Hilton, J Daniel; Brady, Aisling K; Spaho, Skender A; Vize, Peter D

    2012-12-01

    Little is known about how corals sense and respond to light. In this report the proteome of coral is explored using 2D protein electrophoresis in two species, Montastraea cavernosa and Acropora millepora. Multiple protein species have major shifts in abundance in both species when sampled in daylight compared to corals sampled late in the night. These changes were observed both in larvae lacking zooxanthellae and in adult tissue containing zooxanthellae, including both Pacific and Caribbean corals. When larvae kept in the dark were treated with either thapsigargin or ionomycin, compounds that raise the level of cytoplasmic calcium, the night pattern of proteins shifted to the day pattern. This implies that photoreceptors responding to light elevate calcium levels and that calcium acts as the second messenger relaying light responses in corals. Corals spawn at night, and spawning can be delayed by exposure to light or pushed forward by early artificial sunsets. In a series of behavioral experiments, treatment of corals with ionomycin or thapsigargin was found to delay broadcast spawning in M. franksi, demonstrating that pharmacologically altering cytoplasmic calcium levels generates the same response as light exposure. Together these results show that the photo-responsive cells of corals detect and respond to light by altering cytoplasmic calcium levels, similarly to the transduction pathways in complex invertebrate eyes. The primacy of cytoplasmic calcium levels in light responsivity has broad implications for coral reproduction, including predicting how different species spawn at different times after sunset and how reproductive isolation is achieved during coral speciation.

  13. Intestinal glucose-induced calcium-calmodulin kinase signaling in the gut-brain axis in awake rats.

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    Vincent, K M; Sharp, J W; Raybould, H E

    2011-07-01

    Lumenal glucose initiates changes in gastrointestinal (GI) function, including inhibition of gastric emptying, stimulation of pancreatic exocrine and endocrine secretion, and intestinal fluid secretion. Glucose stimulates the release of GI hormones and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), and activates intrinsic and extrinsic neuronal pathways to initiate changes in GI function. The precise mechanisms involved in luminal glucose-sensing are not clear; studying gut endocrine cells is difficult due to their sparse and irregular localization within the epithelium. Here we show a technique to determine activation of gut epithelial cells and the gut-brain pathway in vivo in rats using immunohistochemical detection of the activated, phosphorylated, form of calcium-calmodulin kinase II (pCaMKII). Perfusion of the gut with glucose (60 mg) increased pCaMKII immunoreactivity in 5-HT-expressing enterochromaffin (EC) cells, cytokeratin-18 immunopositive brush cells, but not in enterocytes or cholecystokinin-expressing cells. Lumenal glucose increased pCaMKII in neurons in the myenteric plexus and nodose ganglion, nucleus of the solitary tract, dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus and the arcuate nucleus. pCaMKII expression in neurons, but not in EC cells, was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with the 5-HT(3) R antagonist ondansetron. Deoxynojirimycin, a selective agonist for the putative glucose sensor, sodium-glucose cotransporter-3 (SGLT-3), mimicked the effects of glucose with increased pCaMKII in ECs and neurons; galactose had no effect. The data suggest that native EC cells in situ respond to glucose, possibly via SGLT-3, to activate intrinsic and extrinsic neurons and thereby regulate GI function. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Rap2B promotes proliferation, migration, and invasion of human breast cancer through calcium-related ERK1/2 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Jiehui; Huang, Hui; Qu, Debao; Tang, Juangjuan; Cao, Wenjia; Lu, Zheng; Cheng, Qian; Yang, Jing; Bai, Jin; Zhang, Yanping; Zheng, Junnian

    2015-07-23

    Rap2B, a member of GTP-binding proteins, is widely upregulated in many types of tumors and promotes migration and invasion of human suprarenal epithelioma. However, the function of Rap2B in breast cancer is unknown. Expression of Rap2B was examined in breast cancer cell lines and human normal breast cell line using Western blot analysis. Using the CCK-8 cell proliferation assay, cell cycle analysis, and transwell migration assay, we also elucidated the role of Rap2B in breast cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Results showed that the expression of Rap2B is higher in tumor cells than in normal cells. Flow cytometry and Western blot analysis revealed that Rap2B elevates the intracellular calcium level and further promotes extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) 1/2 phosphorylation. By contrast, calcium chelator BAPTM/AM and MEK inhibitor (U0126) can reverse Rap2B-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Furthermore, Rap2B knockdown inhibits cell proliferation, migration, and invasion abilities via calcium related-ERK1/2 signaling. In addition, overexpression of Rap2B promotes cell proliferation, migration and invasion abilities, which could be neutralized by BAPTM/AM and U0126. Taken together, these findings shed light on Rap2B as a therapeutic target for breast cancer.

  15. Molecular analysis of the graviperception signal transduction in the flagellate Euglena gracilis: Involvement of a transient receptor potential-like channel and a calmodulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häder, Donat-Peter; Richter, Peter R.; Schuster, Martin; Daiker, Viktor; Lebert, Michael

    2009-04-01

    Euglena gracilis, a unicellular, photosynthetic flagellate is a model system for environmentally controlled behavior responses. The organism shows pronounced negative gravitaxis. This movement is based on physiological mechanisms, which in the past had been only indirectly assessed. It was shown that mechano-sensitive calcium channels are involved in the gravitaxis response. Recent studies have demonstrated that members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family function as mechano-sensitive channels in several different cell types. We have sequenced part of a TRP gene in Euglena and applied RNA interference (RNAi) to confirm that these channels are involved in graviperception. It was found that RNAi against the putative TRP channel abolished gravitaxis. The genes of three calmodulins were sequences in Euglena, one of which was previously known in its protein structure (cal 1). The other two were unknown (cal 2 and cal 3). Cal 2 has been analyzed in detail. The biosynthesis of the corresponding proteins of cal 1 and cal 2 was inhibited by means of RNA interference to see whether this blockage impairs gravitaxis. RNAi of cal 1 leads to a long-term loss of free swimming in the cells (while euglenoid movement persists). It induced pronounced cell form aberrations and the division of cells was hampered. After recovery from RNAi the cell showed precise negative gravitaxis again. Thus cal 1 does not seem to be involved in gravitaxis. In contrast, the blockage of cal 2 has no pronounced influence on motility and cell form but leads to a complete loss of gravitactic orientation for more than 30 days showing that this calmodulin is an element in the signal transduction chain. The data are discussed in the context of the current model of the gravitaxis signal transduction chain in Euglena gracilis.

  16. Calcium Input Potentiates the Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-β1-dependent Signaling to Promote the Export of Inorganic Pyrophosphate by Articular Chondrocyte*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cailotto, Frederic; Reboul, Pascal; Sebillaud, Sylvie; Netter, Patrick; Jouzeau, Jean-Yves; Bianchi, Arnaud

    2011-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 stimulates extracellular PPi (ePPi) generation and promotes chondrocalcinosis, which also occurs secondary to hyperparathyroidism-induced hypercalcemia. We previously demonstrated that ANK was up-regulated by TGF-β1 activation of ERK1/2 and Ca2+-dependent protein kinase C (PKCα). Thus, we investigated mechanisms by which calcium could affect ePPi metabolism, especially its main regulating proteins ANK and PC-1 (plasma cell membrane glycoprotein-1). We stimulated articular chondrocytes with TGF-β1 under extracellular (eCa2+) or cytosolic Ca2+ (cCa2+) modulations. We studied ANK, PC-1 expression (quantitative RT-PCR, Western blotting), ePPi levels (radiometric assay), and cCa2+ input (fluorescent probe). Voltage-operated Ca2+-channels (VOC) and signaling pathways involved were investigated with selective inhibitors. Finally, Ank promoter activity was evaluated (gene reporter). TGF-β1 elevated cCa2+ and ePPi levels (by up-regulating Ank and PC-1 mRNA/proteins) in an eCa2+ dose-dependent manner. TGF-β1 effects were suppressed by cCa2+ chelation or L- and T-VOC blockade while being mostly reproduced by ionomycin. In the same experimental conditions, the activation of Ras, the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and PKCα, and the stimulation of Ank promoter activity were affected similarly. Activation of SP1 (specific protein 1) and ELK-1 (Ets-like protein-1) transcription factors supported the regulatory role of Ca2+. SP1 or ELK-1 overexpression or blockade experiments demonstrated a major contribution of ELK-1, which acted synergistically with SP1 to activate Ank promoter in response to TGF-β1. TGF-β1 promotes input of eCa2+ through opening of L- and T-VOCs, to potentiate ERK1/2 and PKCα signaling cascades, resulting in an enhanced activation of Ank promoter and ePPi production in chondrocyte. PMID:21471198

  17. Calcium input potentiates the transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1-dependent signaling to promote the export of inorganic pyrophosphate by articular chondrocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cailotto, Frederic; Reboul, Pascal; Sebillaud, Sylvie; Netter, Patrick; Jouzeau, Jean-Yves; Bianchi, Arnaud

    2011-06-03

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 stimulates extracellular PP(i) (ePP(i)) generation and promotes chondrocalcinosis, which also occurs secondary to hyperparathyroidism-induced hypercalcemia. We previously demonstrated that ANK was up-regulated by TGF-β1 activation of ERK1/2 and Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase C (PKCα). Thus, we investigated mechanisms by which calcium could affect ePP(i) metabolism, especially its main regulating proteins ANK and PC-1 (plasma cell membrane glycoprotein-1). We stimulated articular chondrocytes with TGF-β1 under extracellular (eCa(2+)) or cytosolic Ca(2+) (cCa(2+)) modulations. We studied ANK, PC-1 expression (quantitative RT-PCR, Western blotting), ePP(i) levels (radiometric assay), and cCa(2+) input (fluorescent probe). Voltage-operated Ca(2+)-channels (VOC) and signaling pathways involved were investigated with selective inhibitors. Finally, Ank promoter activity was evaluated (gene reporter). TGF-β1 elevated cCa(2+) and ePP(i) levels (by up-regulating Ank and PC-1 mRNA/proteins) in an eCa(2+) dose-dependent manner. TGF-β1 effects were suppressed by cCa(2+) chelation or L- and T-VOC blockade while being mostly reproduced by ionomycin. In the same experimental conditions, the activation of Ras, the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and PKCα, and the stimulation of Ank promoter activity were affected similarly. Activation of SP1 (specific protein 1) and ELK-1 (Ets-like protein-1) transcription factors supported the regulatory role of Ca(2+). SP1 or ELK-1 overexpression or blockade experiments demonstrated a major contribution of ELK-1, which acted synergistically with SP1 to activate Ank promoter in response to TGF-β1. TGF-β1 promotes input of eCa(2+) through opening of L- and T-VOCs, to potentiate ERK1/2 and PKCα signaling cascades, resulting in an enhanced activation of Ank promoter and ePP(i) production in chondrocyte.

  18. Calcium-mediated repression of β-catenin and its transcriptional signaling mediates neural crest cell death in an avian model of fetal alcohol syndrome.

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    Flentke, George R; Garic, Ana; Amberger, Ed; Hernandez, Marcos; Smith, Susan M

    2011-07-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is a common birth defect in many societies. Affected individuals have neurodevelopmental disabilities and a distinctive craniofacial dysmorphology. These latter deficits originate during early development from the ethanol-mediated apoptotic depletion of cranial facial progenitors, a population known as the neural crest. We showed previously that this apoptosis is caused because acute ethanol exposure activates G-protein-dependent intracellular calcium within cranial neural crest progenitors, and this calcium transient initiates the cell death. The dysregulated signals that reside downstream of ethanol's calcium transient and effect neural crest death are unknown. Here we show that ethanol's repression of the transcriptional effector β-catenin causes the neural crest losses. Clinically relevant ethanol concentrations (22-78 mM) rapidly deplete nuclear β-catenin from neural crest progenitors, with accompanying losses of β-catenin transcriptional activity and downstream genes that govern neural crest induction, expansion, and survival. Using forced expression studies, we show that β-catenin loss of function (via dominant-negative T cell transcription factor [TCF]) recapitulates ethanol's effects on neural crest apoptosis, whereas β-catenin gain-of-function in ethanol's presence preserves neural crest survival. Blockade of ethanol's calcium transient using Bapta-AM normalizes β-catenin activity and prevents the neural crest losses, whereas ionomycin treatment is sufficient to destabilize β-catenin. We propose that ethanol's repression of β-catenin causes the neural crest losses in this model of FAS. β-Catenin is a novel target for ethanol's teratogenicity. β-Catenin/Wnt signals participate in many developmental events and its rapid and persistent dysregulation by ethanol may explain why the latter is such a potent teratogen. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. The Calcium-Mediated Repression of β-Catenin and Its Transcriptional Signaling Mediates Neural Crest Cell Death in an Avian Model of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flentke, George R.; Garic, Ana; Amberger, Ed; Hernandez, Marcos; Smith, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is a common birth defect in many societies. Affected individuals have neurodevelopmental disabilities and a distinctive craniofacial dysmorphology. These latter deficits originate during early development from the ethanol-mediated apoptotic depletion of cranial facial progenitors, a population known as the neural crest. We showed previously that this apoptosis is caused because acute ethanol exposure activates a G protein-dependent intracellular calcium within cranial neural crest progenitors, and this calcium transient initiates the cell death. The dysregulated signals that reside downstream of ethanol’s calcium transient and effect neural crest death are unknown. Here we show that ethanol’s repression of the transcriptional effector β-catenin causes the neural crest losses. Clinically-relevant ethanol concentrations (22–78 mM) rapidly deplete nuclear β-catenin from neural crest progenitors, with accompanying losses of β-catenin transcriptional activity and downstream genes that govern neural crest induction, expansion and survival. Using forced expression studies we show that β-catenin loss of function (via dominant-negative TCF) recapitulates ethanol’s effects on neural crest apoptosis, whereas β-catenin gain-of-function in ethanol’s presence preserves neural crest survival. Blockade of ethanol’s calcium transient using Bapta-AM normalizes β-catenin activity and prevents the neural crest losses, whereas ionomycin treatment is sufficient to destabilize β-catenin. We propose that ethanol’s repression of β-catenin causes the neural crest losses in this model of FAS. β-Catenin is a novel target for ethanol’s teratogenicity. β-Catenin/Wnt signals participate in many developmental events and its rapid and persistent dysregulation by ethanol may explain why the latter is such a potent teratogen. PMID:21630427

  20. Drosophila proteins involved in metabolism of uracil-DNA possess different types of nuclear localization signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merényi, Gábor; Kónya, Emese; Vértessy, Beáta G

    2010-05-01

    Adequate transport of large proteins that function in the nucleus is indispensable for cognate molecular events within this organelle. Selective protein import into the nucleus requires nuclear localization signals (NLS) that are recognized by importin receptors in the cytoplasm. Here we investigated the sequence requirements for nuclear targeting of Drosophila proteins involved in the metabolism of uracil-substituted DNA: the recently identified uracil-DNA degrading factor, dUTPase, and the two uracil-DNA glycosylases present in Drosophila. For the uracil-DNA degrading factor, NLS prediction identified two putative NLS sequences [PEKRKQE(320-326) and PKRKKKR(347-353)]. Truncation and site-directed mutagenesis using YFP reporter constructs showed that only one of these basic stretches is critically required for efficient nuclear localization in insect cells. This segment corresponds to the well-known prototypic NLS of SV40 T-antigen. An almost identical NLS segment is also present in the Drosophila thymine-DNA glycosylase, but no NLS elements were predicted in the single-strand-specific monofunctional uracil-DNA glycosylase homolog protein. This latter protein has a molecular mass of 31 kDa, which may allow NLS-independent transport. For Drosophila dUTPase, two isoforms with distinct features regarding molecular mass and subcellular distribution were recently described. In this study, we characterized the basic PAAKKMKID(10-18) segment of dUTPase, which has been predicted to be a putative NLS by in silico analysis. Deletion studies, using YFP reporter constructs expressed in insect cells, revealed the importance of the PAA(10-12) tripeptide and the ID(17-18) dipeptide, as well as the role of the PAAK(10-13) segment in nuclear localization of dUTPase. We constructed a structural model that shows the molecular basis of such recognition in three dimensions.

  1. Leptin-Notch signaling axis is involved in pancreatic cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbuzariu, Adriana; Rampoldi, Antonio; Daley-Brown, Danielle S; Candelaria, Pierre; Harmon, Tia L; Lipsey, Crystal C; Beech, Derrick J; Quarshie, Alexander; Ilies, Gabriela Oprea; Gonzalez-Perez, Ruben R

    2017-01-31

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) shows a high death rate. PC incidence and prognosis are affected by obesity, a pandemic characterized by high levels of leptin. Notch is upregulated by leptin in breast cancer. Thus, leptin and Notch crosstalk could influence PC progression. Here we investigated in PC cell lines (BxPC-3, MiaPaCa-2, Panc-1, AsPC-1), derived tumorspheres and xenografts whether a functional leptin-Notch axis affects PC progression and expansion of pancreatic cancer stem cells (PCSC). PC cells and tumorspheres were treated with leptin and inhibitors of Notch (gamma-secretase inhibitor, DAPT) and leptin (iron oxide nanoparticle-leptin peptide receptor antagonist 2, IONP-LPrA2). Leptin treatment increased cell cycle progression and proliferation, and the expression of Notch receptors, ligands and targeted molecules (Notch1-4, DLL4, JAG1, Survivin and Hey2), PCSC markers (CD24/CD44/ESA, ALDH, CD133, Oct-4), ABCB1 protein, as well as tumorsphere formation. Leptin-induced effects on PC and tumorspheres were decreased by IONP-LPrA2 and DAPT. PC cells secreted leptin and expressed the leptin receptor, OB-R, which indicates a leptin autocrine/paracrine signaling loop could also affect tumor progression. IONP-LPrA2 treatment delayed the onset of MiaPaCa-2 xenografts, and decreased tumor growth and the expression of proliferation and PCSC markers. Present data suggest that leptin-Notch axis is involved in PC. PC has no targeted therapy and is mainly treated with chemotherapy, whose efficiency could be decreased by leptin and Notch activities. Thus, the leptin-Notch axis could be a novel therapeutic target, particularly for obese PC patients.

  2. Involvement of Wnt signaling pathway in murine medulloblastoma induced by human neurotropic JC virus.

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    Gan, D D; Reiss, K; Carrill, T; Del Valle, L; Croul, S; Giordano, A; Fishman, P; Khalili, K

    2001-08-09

    By using the early genome of the human neurotropic polyomavirus, JCV, we have created transgenic animals that develop cerebellar primitive neuroectodermal tumors which model human medulloblastoma. Expression of T-antigen was found in some, but not all, tumor cells, and examination of the clonal cell lines derived from the tumor population showed enhanced tumorigenicity of cells expressing T-antigen in comparison to T-antigen negative cells. Considering the earlier notion on the potential involvement of beta-catenin with human medulloblastoma, we investigated various components of the Wnt signaling pathway including beta-catenin, its partner transcription factor, LEF-1, and their downstream target gene c-myc in these two cell populations. Immunohistochemical staining of the cells revealed enhanced nuclear appearance of beta-catenin in T-antigen positive cells. Results from Western blot showed higher levels of beta-catenin and LEF-1 in T-antigen positive cells in comparison to those in T-antigen negative cells. The enhanced level of LEF-1 expression correlated with the increase in DNA binding activity of this protein in nuclear extracts of T-antigen positive cells. Results from Northern and Western blot analyses revealed that the level of c-myc expression is augmented both at the RNA and protein levels in T-antigen positive cells. These observations corroborated results from transfection studies indicating the ability of JCV T-antigen to stimulate c-myc promoter activity. Further, co-transfection experiments revealed that the amount of c-myc and T-antigen protein in tumor cells may dictate the activity of JCV early promoter in these cells. These observations are interesting in light of recent discoveries on the association of JCV with human medulloblastoma and suggest that communication between JCV and the Wnt pathway may be an important event in the genesis of these tumors.

  3. MyD88 signaling is directly involved in the development of murine placental malaria.

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    Barboza, Renato; Reis, Aramys Silva; da Silva, Leandro Gustavo; Hasenkamp, Lutero; Pereira, Keitty Raquel Benevides; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Costa, Fabio Trindade Maranhão; Lima, Maria Regina D'Império; Alvarez, José Maria; Boscardin, Silvia Beatriz; Epiphanio, Sabrina; Marinho, Cláudio Romero Farias

    2014-02-01

    Malaria is a widespread infectious disease caused by the parasite Plasmodium. During pregnancy, malaria infection leads to a range of complications that can affect both the mother and fetus, including stillbirth, infant mortality, and low birth weight. In this study, we utilized a mouse model of placental malaria (PM) infection to determine the importance of the protein MyD88 in the host immune response to Plasmodium during pregnancy. Initially, we demonstrated that Plasmodium berghei NK65GFP adhered to placental tissue via chondroitin sulfate A and induced PM in mice with a C57BL/6 genetic background. To evaluate the involvement of MyD88 in the pathology of PM, we performed a histopathological analysis of placentas obtained from MyD88(-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice following infection on the 19th gestational day. Our data demonstrated that the detrimental placental alterations observed in the infected mice were correlated with the expression of MyD88. Moreover, in the absence of this protein, production of interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) was significantly reduced in the infected mice. More importantly, in contrast to fetuses from infected WT mice, which exhibited a reduction in body weight, the fetuses from infected MyD88(-/-) mice did not display significant weight loss compared to their noninfected littermates. In addition, we observed a decrement of maternal care associated with malaria infection, which was attenuated in the MyD88-deficient mice. Collectively, the results of this study illustrate the pivotal importance of the MyD88 signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of placental malaria, thus presenting new possibilities for targeting MyD88 in therapeutic interventions.

  4. Hepatoprotective effect of hesperidin in hepatocellular carcinoma: Involvement of Wnt signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghloul, Randa A; Elsherbiny, Nehal M; Kenawy, Hany I; El-Karef, Amr; Eissa, Laila A; El-Shishtawy, Mamdouh M

    2017-09-15

    Wnt3a and Wnt5a are ligands orchestrating the canonical and non-canonical pathways, respectively, with involvement in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Hesperidin (HP) is a natural product found in citrus fruits and reputed for its antitumor activity. The present study aims to investigate the potential hepatoprotective effect of HP against thioacetamide (TAA)-induced HCC focusing on its potential role on Wnt3a and Wnt5a signaling pathways. Forty rats were equally divided into groups; normal control, HP control (receiving HP, 150mg/kg/day), HCC (receiving TAA, 200mg/kg twice weekly for 14weeks) and HP-HCC (receiving HP and TAA). Gene expressions of Wnt3a, Wnt5a, β-catenin and Cyclin D1 were assessed by qPCR, while their protein levels, along with active caspase-3 level, were quantified by ELISA and immunohistochemistry. Liver functions, oxidative stress parameters and myeloperoxidase activity were measured. MTT assay of hepG2 cells treated with recombinant Wnt3a (10ng/ml) in presence or absence of HP (100μM) was performed. HCC group exhibited a significant increase in Wnt3a, β-catenin, Cyclin D1 and Wnt5a gene expressions, as well as, their protein levels. HP significantly prevented TAA-activated Wnt3a/β-catenin and Wnt5a pathways. Moreover, HP exerted hepatoprotective effect by significantly improving the oxidative imbalance, inflammation and liver function parameters, serum ALT, AST activities, and albumin level. Our study is the first to report the possible role of Wnt3a/β-catenin and Wnt5a pathways in TAA-induced early HCC model in rats. HP has a prophylactic effect against hepatocarcinogenesis via preventing the induction of both canonical and non-canonical Wnt pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Calcium-dependent and calcium-independent signals in the conglutinin-binding assay (KgBa) for immune complexes. Influence of anti-collagen-antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmskov, U; Haas, Henning de; Teisner, B

    1992-01-01

    G eluted on gel chromatography at the position of monomeric IgG suggesting binding via the antigen binding sites. Binding of this IgG was inhibited by both collagen type II and purified conglutinin. These observations suggest that the assay detects cross-reacting autoantibodies against collagen epitopes......G with serum at 37 degrees C abolished the binding to conglutinin, a finding consistent with the complete degradation of deposited C3b to C3c and C3d. The solubilized IgG that bound to solid phase conglutinin was found by gel chromatography to be of high molecular weight (greater than 600 kDa). Binding of Ig......G to solid phase bovine conglutinin was also observed to a variable degree in normal and pathological sera. However, in this situation the IgG binding was largely calcium-independent, was not inhibited by GlcNAc and did not decrease after prolonged incubation of the serum at 37 degrees C. The reactive Ig...

  6. Calcium-sensing receptors signal constitutive macropinocytosis and facilitate the uptake of NOD2 ligands in macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Canton, Johnathan; Schlam, Daniel; Breuer, Christian; G?tschow, Michael; Glogauer, Michael; Grinstein, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Macropinocytosis can be induced in several cell types by stimulation with growth factors. In selected cell types, notably macrophages and dendritic cells, macropinocytosis occurs constitutively, supporting the uptake of antigens for subsequent presentation. Despite their different mode of initiation and contrasting physiological roles, it is tacitly assumed that both types of macropinocytosis are mechanistically identical. We report that constitutive macropinocytosis is stringently calcium de...

  7. A protein kinase target of a PDK1 signalling pathway is involved in root hair growth in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anthony, R.G.; Henriques, R.; Helfer, A.; Mészáros, T.; Rios, G.; Testerink, C.; Munnik, T.; Deák, M.; Koncz, C.; Bögre, L.

    2004-01-01

    Here we report on a lipid-signalling pathway in plants that is downstream of phosphatidic acid and involves the Arabidopsis protein kinase, AGC2-1, regulated by the 3'-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (AtPDK1). AGC2-1 specifically interacts with AtPDK1 through a conserved C-terminal hydrophobic

  8. Characterisation of the liver progenitor cell niche in liver diseases: potential involvement of Wnt and Notch signalling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spee, B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304830925; Carpino, G.; Schotanus, B.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304836524; Katoonizadeh, A.; Vander Borght, S.; Gaudio, E.; Roskams, T.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatology Characterisation of the liver progenitor cell niche in liver diseases: potential involvement of Wnt and Notch signalling Bart Spee1, Guido Carpino2, Baukje A Schotanus3, Azeam Katoonizadeh1, Sara Vander Borght1, Eugenio Gaudio4, Tania Roskams1 + Author Affiliations 1Department of

  9. Calcium - urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urinary Ca+2; Kidney stones - calcium in urine; Renal calculi - calcium in your urine; Parathyroid - calcium in urine ... Urine calcium level can help your provider: Decide on the best treatment for the most common type of kidney ...

  10. Cloning and expression analysis of some genes involved in the phosphoinositide and phospholipid signaling pathways from maize (Zea mays L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Zhenhua; Niu, Linyuan; Yue, Guidong; Yang, Aifang; Zhang, Juren

    2008-12-15

    Previous studies have indicated the phosphoinositide and phospholipid signaling pathways play a key role in plant growth, development and responses to environmental stresses. However, little is known about the phosphoinositide and phospholipid signaling pathways in maize (Zea mays L.). To better understand the function of genes involved in the phosphoinositide and phospholipid signaling pathways in maize, the cDNA sequences of ZmPIS2, ZmPLC2, ZmDGK1, ZmDGK2 and ZmDGK3 were obtained by RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) or in silico cloning combined with PCR. RT-PCR analysis of cDNA from five tissues (roots, stems, leaves, tassels, and ears) indicated that the expression patterns of the five cDNAs we isolated as well as ZmPIS, ZmPLC, ZmPLD varied in different tissues. To determine the effects of different environmental conditions such as cold, drought and various phytohormones (abscisic acid, indole-3-acetic acid and gibberellic acid) on gene expression, we analyzed expression by Real-Time (RT-PCR), and found that the different isoforms of these gene families involved in the phosphoinositide and phospholipid signaling pathways have specific expression patterns. Our results suggested that these genes may be involved in the responses to environmental stresses, but have different functions. The isolation and analysis of expression patterns of genes involved in the phosphoinositide and phospholipid signaling pathways provides a good basis for further research of the phosphoinositide and phospholipid signaling pathways in maize and is a novel supplement to our comprehension of these pathways in plants.

  11. Building the Powerhouse: What are the Signals Involved in Plant Mitochondrial Biogenesis?

    OpenAIRE

    Howell, Katharine A; Millar, A. Harvey; Whelan, James

    2007-01-01

    With a central role in respiration and ATP production, regulation of mitochondrial form and function is essential for cell and organism survival. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms and signaling events underlying plant mitochondrial biogenesis is limited. In a recent paper published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry we have demonstrated aspects of mitochondrial biogenesis that are dependent on an oxygen signal in the monocot model, rice. Specifically, we identified (1) a set o...

  12. Ecm33 is a novel factor involved in efficient glucose uptake for nutrition-responsive TORC1 signaling in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umekawa, Midori; Ujihara, Masato; Nakai, Daiki; Takematsu, Hiromu; Wakayama, Mamoru

    2017-11-01

    Glucose uptake is crucial for providing both an energy source and a signal that regulates cell proliferation. Therefore, it is important to clarify the mechanisms underlying glucose uptake and its transmission to intracellular signaling pathways. In this study, we searched for a novel regulatory factor involved in glucose-induced signaling by using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a eukaryotic model. Requirement of the extracellular protein Ecm33 in efficient glucose uptake and full activation of the nutrient-responsive TOR kinase complex 1 (TORC1) signaling pathway is shown. Cells lacking Ecm33 elicit a series of starvation-induced pathways even in the presence of extracellular high glucose concentration. This results in delayed cell proliferation, reduced ATP, induction of autophagy, and dephosphorylation of the TORC1 substrates Atg13 and Sch9. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  13. Neuronal calcium sensor synaptotagmin-9 is not involved in the regulation of glucose homeostasis or insulin secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Wang, Xiaorui; Wang, Yue

    2010-01-01

    /PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we tested whether synaptotagmin-9 participates in the regulation of glucose-stimulated insulin release by using pancreas-specific synaptotagmin-9 knockout (p-S9X) mice. Deletion of synaptotagmin-9 in the pancreas resulted in no changes in glucose homeostasis or body weight. Glucose......, is not involved in the regulation of glucose-stimulated insulin release from pancreatic β-cells....

  14. Calcium dysregulation and Cdk5-ATM pathway involved in a mouse model of fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Gaëlle; López, José R; Espinal, Glenda M; Hulsizer, Susan; Hagerman, Paul J; Pessah, Isaac N

    2017-07-15

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a neurological disorder that affects premutation carriers with 55-200 CGG-expansion repeats (preCGG) in FMR1, presenting with early alterations in neuronal network formation and function that precede neurodegeneration. Whether intranuclear inclusions containing DNA damage response (DDR) proteins are causally linked to abnormal synaptic function, neuronal growth and survival are unknown. In a mouse that harbors a premutation CGG expansion (preCGG), cortical and hippocampal FMRP expression is moderately reduced from birth through adulthood, with greater FMRP reductions in the soma than in the neurite, despite several-fold elevation of Fmr1 mRNA levels. Resting cytoplasmic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in cultured preCGG hippocampal neurons is chronically elevated, 3-fold compared to Wt; elevated ROS and abnormal glutamatergic responses are detected at 14 DIV. Elevated µ-calpain activity and a higher p25/p35 ratio in the cortex of preCGG young adult mice indicate abnormal Cdk5 regulation. In support, the Cdk5 substrate, ATM, is upregulated by 1.5- to 2-fold at P0 and 6 months in preCGG brain, as is p-Ser1981-ATM. Bax:Bcl-2 is 30% higher in preCGG brain, indicating a greater vulnerability to apoptotic activation. Elevated [Ca2+]i, ROS, and DDR signals are normalized with dantrolene. Chronic [Ca2+]i dysregulation amplifies Cdk5-ATM signaling, possibly linking impaired glutamatergic signaling and DDR to neurodegeneration in preCGG brain. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. The involvement of survival signaling pathways in rubella-virus induced apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooray Samantha

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rubella virus (RV causes severe congenital defects when acquired during the first trimester of pregnancy. RV cytopathic effect has been shown to be due to caspase-dependent apoptosis in a number of susceptible cell lines, and it has been suggested that this apoptotic induction could be a causal factor in the development of such defects. Often the outcome of apoptotic stimuli is dependent on apoptotic, proliferative and survival signaling mechanisms in the cell. Therefore we investigated the role of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K-Akt survival signaling and Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK proliferative signaling during RV-induced apoptosis in RK13 cells. Increasing levels of phosphorylated ERK, Akt and GSK3β were detected from 24–96 hours post-infection, concomitant with RV-induced apoptotic signals. Inhibition of PI3K-Akt signaling reduced cell viability, and increased the speed and magnitude of RV-induced apoptosis, suggesting that this pathway contributes to cell survival during RV infection. In contrast, inhibition of the Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK pathway impaired RV replication and growth and reduced RV-induced apoptosis, suggesting that the normal cellular growth is required for efficient virus production.

  16. Involvement of JAK/STAT signaling in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coskun, Mehmet; Salem, Mohammad; Pedersen, Jannie

    2013-01-01

    The Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway constitute the fulcrum in many vital cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, proliferation, and regulatory immune functions. Various cytokines, growth factors, and protein tyrosine kinases...... communicate through the JAK/STAT pathway and regulate the transcription of numerous genes. In addition to their critical roles in a plethora of key cellular activities, the JAK/STAT signaling pathways also have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD......), especially since a JAK inhibitor recently has been shown to be effective in the treatment of ulcerative colitis. The aim of this review is to highlight the recent findings on the regulatory mechanism of JAK/STAT signaling pathways and to reveal the evolving comprehension of their interface which might...

  17. Analysis of a signal transduction pathway involved in leaf epidermis differentiation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip W. Becraft

    2005-05-23

    The major objective of this study was to identify and analyze signal transduction factors that function with the CR4 receptor kinase. We pursued this analysis in Arabidopsis. Analysis of other members of the ACR4 related receptor (CRR) family produced biochemical evidence consistent with some of them functioning in ACR4 signal transduction. Yeast 2-hybrid identified six proteins that interact with the cytoplasmic domain of ACR4, representing putative downstream signal transduction components. The interactions for all 6 proteins were verified by in vitro pull down assays. Five of the interacting proteins were phosphorylated by ACR4. We also identified candidate interactors with the extracellular TNFR domain. We hypothesize this may be the ligand binding domain for ACR4. In one approach, yeast 2-hybrid was again used and five candidate proteins identified. Nine additional candidates were identified in a genome wide scan of Arabidopsis amino acid sequences that threaded onto the TNF structure.

  18. PR3 and elastase alter PAR1 signaling and trigger vWF release via a calcium-independent mechanism from glomerular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tull, Samantha P; Bevins, Anne; Kuravi, Sahithi Jyothsna; Satchell, Simon C; Al-Ani, Bahjat; Young, Stephen P; Harper, Lorraine; Williams, Julie M; Rainger, George Ed; Savage, Caroline O S

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophil proteases, proteinase-3 (PR3) and elastase play key roles in glomerular endothelial cell (GEC) injury during glomerulonephritis. Endothelial protease-activated receptors (PARs) are potential serine protease targets in glomerulonephritis. We investigated whether PAR1/2 are required for alterations in GEC phenotype that are mediated by PR3 or elastase during active glomerulonephritis. Endothelial PARs were assessed by flow cytometry. Thrombin, trypsin and agonist peptides for PAR1 and PAR2, TFLLR-NH(2) and SLIGKV-NH(2,) respectively, were used to assess alterations in PAR activation induced by PR3 or elastase. Endothelial von Willebrand Factor (vWF)release and calcium signaling were used as PAR activation markers. Both PR3 and elastase induced endothelial vWF release, with elastase inducing the highest response. PAR1 peptide induced GEC vWF release to the same extent as PR3. However, knockdown of PARs by small interfering RNA showed that neither PAR1 nor PAR2 activation caused PR3 or elastase-mediated vWF release. Both proteases interacted with and disarmed surface GEC PAR1, but there was no detectable interaction with cellular PAR2. Neither protease induced a calcium response in GEC. Therefore, PAR signaling and serine protease-induced alterations in endothelial function modulate glomerular inflammation via parallel but independent pathways.

  19. PR3 and elastase alter PAR1 signaling and trigger vWF release via a calcium-independent mechanism from glomerular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha P Tull

    Full Text Available Neutrophil proteases, proteinase-3 (PR3 and elastase play key roles in glomerular endothelial cell (GEC injury during glomerulonephritis. Endothelial protease-activated receptors (PARs are potential serine protease targets in glomerulonephritis. We investigated whether PAR1/2 are required for alterations in GEC phenotype that are mediated by PR3 or elastase during active glomerulonephritis. Endothelial PARs were assessed by flow cytometry. Thrombin, trypsin and agonist peptides for PAR1 and PAR2, TFLLR-NH(2 and SLIGKV-NH(2, respectively, were used to assess alterations in PAR activation induced by PR3 or elastase. Endothelial von Willebrand Factor (vWFrelease and calcium signaling were used as PAR activation markers. Both PR3 and elastase induced endothelial vWF release, with elastase inducing the highest response. PAR1 peptide induced GEC vWF release to the same extent as PR3. However, knockdown of PARs by small interfering RNA showed that neither PAR1 nor PAR2 activation caused PR3 or elastase-mediated vWF release. Both proteases interacted with and disarmed surface GEC PAR1, but there was no detectable interaction with cellular PAR2. Neither protease induced a calcium response in GEC. Therefore, PAR signaling and serine protease-induced alterations in endothelial function modulate glomerular inflammation via parallel but independent pathways.

  20. Sorcin Links Calcium Signaling to Vesicle Trafficking, Regulates Polo-Like Kinase 1 and Is Necessary for Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalioti, Vasiliki S.; Ilari, Andrea; O'Connell, David J.; Poser, Elena; Sandoval, Ignacio V.; Colotti, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    Sorcin, a protein overexpressed in many multi-drug resistant cancers, dynamically localizes to distinct subcellular sites in 3T3-L1 fibroblasts during cell-cycle progression. During interphase sorcin is in the nucleus, in the plasma membrane, in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) cisternae, and in ER-derived vesicles localized along the microtubules. These vesicles are positive to RyR, SERCA, calreticulin and Rab10. At the beginning of mitosis, sorcin-containing vesicles associate with the mitotic spindle, and during telophase are concentrated in the cleavage furrow and, subsequently, in the midbody. Sorcin regulates dimensions and calcium load of the ER vesicles by inhibiting RYR and activating SERCA. Analysis of sorcin interactome reveals calcium-dependent interactions with many proteins, including Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1), Aurora A and Aurora B kinases. Sorcin interacts physically with PLK1, is phosphorylated by PLK1 and induces PLK1 autophosphorylation, thereby regulating kinase activity. Knockdown of sorcin results in major defects in mitosis and cytokinesis, increase in the number of rounded polynucleated cells, blockage of cell progression in G2/M, apoptosis and cell death. Sorcin regulates calcium homeostasis and is necessary for the activation of mitosis and cytokinesis. PMID:24427308

  1. Mitochondrial correlates of signaling processes involved with the cellular response to eimeria infection in broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Host cellular responses to coccidiosis infection are consistent with elements of apoptosis, autophagy, and necrosis. These processes are enhanced in the cell through cell-directed signaling or repressed through parasite-derived inhibitors of these processes favoring the survival of the parasite. Acr...

  2. Ligand-dependent Notch signaling is involved in tumor initiation and tumor maintenance in pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mullendore, Michael E.; Koorstra, Jan-Bart; Li, Yue-Ming; Offerhaus, G. Johan; Fan, Xing; Henderson, Clark M.; Matsui, William; Eberhart, Charles G.; Maitra, Anirban; Feldmann, Georg

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Aberrant activation of the Notch signaling pathway is commonly observed in human pancreatic cancer, although the mechanism(s) for this activation has not been elucidated. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: A panel of 20 human pancreatic cancer cell lines was profiled for the expression of Notch

  3. Activation of PKA/CREB Signaling is Involved in BMP9-Induced Osteogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Zhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: BMP9 is highly capable of promoting osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs although the molecular mechanism involved is largely unknown. Here, we explored the detail role of PKA/CREB signaling in BMP9-induced osteogenic differentiation. Methods: Activation status of PKA/CREB signaling is assessed by nonradioactive assay and Western blot. Using PKA inhibitors and a dominant negative protein of CREB (A-CREB, we investigated the effect of PKA/CREB signaling on BMP9-induced osteogenic differentiation. Results: We found that BMP9 promotes PKA activity and enhances CREB phosphorylation in MSCs. BMP9 is shown to down-regulate protein kinase A inhibitor γ (PKIγ expression. We demonstrated that PKA inhibitors suppress BMP9-induced early osteogenic marker alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity in MSCs as well as late osteogenic markers osteopontin (OPN, osteocalcin (OCN and matrix mineralization. We found that PKA inhibitor reduces BMP9-induced Runx2 activation and p38 phosphorylation in MSCs. Lastly, interference of CREB function by A-CREB decreased BMP9-induced osteogenic differentiation as well. Conclusion: Our results revealed that BMP9 may activate PKA/CREB signaling in MSCs through suppression of PKIγ expression. It is noteworthy that inhibition of PKA/CREB signaling may impair BMP9-induced osteogenic differentiation of MSCs, implying that activation of PKA/CREB signaling is required for BMP9 osteoinductive activity.

  4. Activation of the Notch-1 signaling pathway may be involved in intracerebral hemorrhage-induced reactive astrogliosis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jian-Hua; Zhou, Hua-Jun; Tang, Tao; Cui, Han-Jin; Yang, A-Li; Zhang, Qi-Mei; Zhou, Jing-Hua; Zhang, Qiang; Gong, Xun; Zhang, Zhao-Hui; Mei, Zhi-Gang

    2017-10-27

    OBJECTIVE Reactive astrogliosis, a key feature that is characterized by glial proliferation, has been observed in rat brains after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). However, the mechanisms that control reactive astrogliosis formation remain unknown. Notch-1 signaling plays a critical role in modulating reactive astrogliosis. The purpose of this paper was to establish whether Notch-1 signaling is involved in reactive astrogliosis after ICH. METHODS ICH was induced in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats via stereotactic injection of autologous blood into the right globus pallidus. N-[ N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-l-alanyl]- S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester (DAPT) was injected into the lateral ventricle to block Notch-1 signaling. The rats' brains were perfused to identify proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive/GFAP-positive nuclei. The expression of GFAP, Notch-1, and the activated form of Notch-1 (Notch intracellular domain [NICD]) and its ligand Jagged-1 was assessed using immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses, respectively. RESULTS Notch-1 signaling was upregulated and activated after ICH as confirmed by an increase in the expression of Notch-1 and NICD and its ligand Jagged-1. Remarkably, blockade of Notch-1 signaling with the specific inhibitor DAPT suppressed astrocytic proliferation and GFAP levels caused by ICH. In addition, DAPT improved neurological outcome after ICH. CONCLUSIONS Notch-1 signaling is a critical regulator of ICH-induced reactive astrogliosis, and its blockage may be a potential therapeutic strategy for hemorrhagic injury.

  5. PAPP5 is involved in the tetrapyrrole mediated plastid signalling during chloroplast development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan de Dios Barajas-López

    Full Text Available The initiation of chloroplast development in the light is dependent on nuclear encoded components. The nuclear genes encoding key components in the photosynthetic machinery are regulated by signals originating in the plastids. These plastid signals play an essential role in the regulation of photosynthesis associated nuclear genes (PhANGs when proplastids develop into chloroplasts. One of the plastid signals is linked to the tetrapyrrole biosynthesis and accumulation of the intermediates the Mg-ProtoIX and its methyl ester Mg-ProtoIX-ME. Phytochrome-Associated Protein Phosphatase 5 (PAPP5 was isolated in a previous study as a putative Mg-ProtoIX interacting protein. In order to elucidate if there is a biological link between PAPP5 and the tetrapyrrole mediated signal we generated double mutants between the Arabidopsis papp5 and the crd mutants. The crd mutant over-accumulates Mg-ProtoIX and Mg-ProtoIX-ME and the tetrapyrrole accumulation triggers retrograde signalling. The crd mutant exhibits repression of PhANG expression, altered chloroplast morphology and a pale phenotype. However, in the papp5crd double mutant, the crd phenotype is restored and papp5crd accumulated wild type levels of chlorophyll, developed proper chloroplasts and showed normal induction of PhANG expression in response to light. Tetrapyrrole feeding experiments showed that PAPP5 is required to respond correctly to accumulation of tetrapyrroles in the cell and that PAPP5 is most likely a component in the plastid signalling pathway down stream of the tetrapyrrole Mg-ProtoIX/Mg-ProtoIX-ME. Inhibition of phosphatase activity phenocopied the papp5crd phenotype in the crd single mutant demonstrating that PAPP5 phosphatase activity is essential to mediate the retrograde signal and to suppress PhANG expression in the crd mutant. Thus, our results suggest that PAPP5 receives an inbalance in the tetrapyrrole biosynthesis through the accumulation of Mg-ProtoIX and acts as a negative

  6. Calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3) increases L-type calcium current via protein kinase A signaling and modulates calcium cycling and contractility in isolated mouse ventricular myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, María; Manzanares, Esmeralda; Bas, Manuel; Martín-Nunes, Laura; Val-Blasco, Almudena; Jesús Larriba, María; Fernández-Velasco, María; Delgado, Carmen

    2017-03-01

    Calcitriol, the bioactive metabolite of vitamin D, exerts its effects through interaction with the nuclear vitamin D receptor (VDR) to induce genomic responses. Calcitriol may also induce rapid responses via plasma membrane-associated VDR, involving the activation of second messengers and modulation of voltage-dependent channels. VDR is expressed in cardiomyocytes, but the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the rapid responses of calcitriol in the heart are poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to analyze the rapid nongenomic effect of calcitriol on L-type calcium channels, intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) transients, and cell contractility in ventricular myocytes. We used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique to record L-type calcium current (ICaL) and confocal microscopy to study global [Ca(2+)]i transients evoked by electrical stimulation and cell shortening in adult mouse ventricular myocytes treated with vehicle or with calcitriol. In some experiments, ICaL was recorded using the perforated patch-clamp technique. Calcitriol treatment of cardiomyocytes induced a concentration-dependent increase in ICaL density (Half maximal effective concentration (EC50) = 0.23 nM) and a significant increase in peak [Ca(2+)]i transients and cell contraction. The effect of calcitriol on ICaL was prevented by pretreatment of cardiomyocytes with the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT-5720 but not with the β-adrenergic blocker propranolol. The effect of calcitriol on ICaL was absent in myocytes isolated from VDR knockout mice. Calcitriol induces a rapid response in mouse ventricular myocytes that involves a VDR-PKA-dependent increase in ICaL density, enhancing [Ca(2+)]i transients and contraction. Copyright © 2016 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Calcium's Role in Mechanotransduction during Muscle Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Benavides Damm

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanotransduction is a process where cells sense their surroundings and convert the physical forces in their environment into an appropriate response. Calcium plays a crucial role in the translation of such forces to biochemical signals that control various biological processes fundamental in muscle development. The mechanical stimulation of muscle cells may for example result from stretch, electric and magnetic stimulation, shear stress, and altered gravity exposure. The response, mainly involving changes in intracellular calcium concentration then leads to a cascade of events by the activation of downstream signaling pathways. The key calcium-dependent pathways described here include the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK activation. The subsequent effects in cellular homeostasis consist of cytoskeletal remodeling, cell cycle progression, growth, differentiation, and apoptosis, all necessary for healthy muscle development, repair, and regeneration. A deregulation from the normal process due to disuse, trauma, or disease can result in a clinical condition such as muscle atrophy, which entails a significant loss of muscle mass. In order to develop therapies against such diseased states, we need to better understand the relevance of calcium signaling and the downstream responses to mechanical forces in skeletal muscle. The purpose of this review is to discuss in detail how diverse mechanical stimuli cause changes in calcium homeostasis by affecting membrane channels and the intracellular stores, which in turn regulate multiple pathways that impart these effects and control the fate of muscle tissue.

  8. Plasma membrane calcium channels in cancer: Alterations and consequences for cell proliferation and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Déliot, Nadine; Constantin, Bruno

    2015-10-01

    The study of calcium channels in molecular mechanisms of cancer transformation is still a novel area of research. Several studies, mostly conducted on cancer cell lines, however support the idea that a diversity of plasma membrane channels participates in the remodeling of Ca2+ homeostasis, which regulates various cancer hallmarks such as uncontrolled multiplication and increase in migration and invasion abilities. However few is still understood concerning the intracellular signaling cascades mobilized by calcium influx participating to cancer cell behavior. This review intends to gather some of these pathways dependent on plasma membrane calcium channels and described in prostate, breast and lung cancer cell lines. In these cancer cell types, the calcium channels involved in calcium signaling pathways promoting cancer behaviors are mostly non-voltage activated calcium channels and belong to the TRP superfamily (TRPC, TPRPV and TRPM families) and the Orai family. TRP and Orai channels are part of many signaling cascades involving the activation of transmembrane receptors by extracellular ligand from the tumor environment. TRPV can sense changes in the physical and chemical environment of cancer cells and TRPM7 are stretch activated and sensitive to cholesterol. Changes in activation and or expression of plasma-membrane calcium channels affect calcium-dependent signaling processes relevant to tumorigenesis. The studies cited in this review suggest that an increase in plasma membrane calcium channel expression and/or activity sustain an elevated calcium entry (constitutive or under the control of extracellular signals) promoting higher cell proliferation and migration in most cases. A variety of non-voltage-operated calcium channels display change expression and/or activity in a same cancer type and cooperate to the same process relevant to cancer cell behavior, or can be involved in a different sequence of events during the tumorigenesis. This article is part of a

  9. Critical analysis of protein signaling networks involved in the regulation of plant secondary metabolism: focus on anthocyanins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgakov, Victor P; Avramenko, Tatiana V; Tsitsiashvili, Gurami Sh

    2017-09-01

    Anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis is a convenient and relatively simple model for investigating the basic principles of secondary metabolism regulation. In recent years, many publications have described links between anthocyanin biosynthesis and general defense reactions in plants as well as photomorphogenesis and hormonal signaling. These relationships are complex, and they cannot be understood intuitively. Upon observing the lacuna in the Arabidopsis interactome (an interaction map of the factors involved in the regulation of Arabidopsis secondary metabolism is not available), we attempted to connect various cellular processes that affect anthocyanin biosynthesis. In this review, we revealed the main signaling protein modules that regulate anthocyanin biosynthesis. To our knowledge, this is the first reconstruction of a network of proteins involved in plant secondary metabolism.

  10. Signaling Networks Involving Reactive Oxygen Species and Ca2+ in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Although plants never evolved central information processing organs such as brains, plants have evolved distributed information processing systems and are able to sense various environmental changes and reorganize their body plan coordinately without moving. Recent molecular biological studies revealed molecular bases for elementary processes of signal transduction in plants. Though reactive oxygen species (ROS) are highly toxic substances produced through aerobic respiration and photosynthesis, plants possess ROS-producing enzymes whose activity is highly regulated by binding of Ca2+. In turn, Ca2+- permeable channel proteins activated by ROS are shown to be localized to the cell membrane. These two components are proposed to constitute a positive feedback loop to amplify cellular signals. Such molecular physiological studies should be important steps to understand information processing systems in plants and future application for technology related to environmental, energy and food sciences.

  11. Involvement of salicylate and jasmonate signaling pathways in Arabidopsis interaction with Fusarium graminearum

    OpenAIRE

    Makandar, Ragiba; Nalam, Vamsi; Chaturvedi, Ratnesh; Jeannotte, Richard; Sparks, Alexis A.; Shah, Jyoti

    2010-01-01

    Fusarium graminearum is the principal causative agent of Fusarium head blight (FHB), a devastating disease of wheat and barley. This fungus can also colonize Arabidopsis thaliana. Disease resistance was enhanced in transgenic wheat and Arabidopsis plants that constitutively over-express the NONEXPRESSOR OF PR GENES 1 (NPR1) gene, which regulates salicylic acid (SA) signaling and modulates the activation of jasmonic acid (JA)-dependent defenses. Here, we provide several lines of evidence that ...

  12. Identification of intracellular domains in the growth hormone receptor involved in signal transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, N; Allevato, G; Norstedt, G

    1994-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH) receptor belongs to the GH/prolactin/cytokine super-family of receptors. The signal transduction mechanism utilized by this class of receptors remains largely unknown. In order to identify functional domains in the intracellular region of the GH receptor we generated......) for metabolic effects, a domain located in or near the proline-rich region is of importance; and (iii) for internalization, phenylalanine 346 is necessary....

  13. Cyclic GMP is involved in auxin signalling during Arabidopsis root growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Wenbin; Wang, Xiaomin; Yang, Lei; Hu, Yanfeng; Wei, Yuantao; Liang, Xiaolei; Mao, Lina; Bi, Yurong

    2014-04-01

    The second messenger cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP) plays an important role in plant development and responses to stress. Recent studies indicated that cGMP is a secondary signal generated in response to auxin stimulation. cGMP also mediates auxin-induced adventitious root formation in mung bean and gravitropic bending in soybean. Nonetheless, the mechanism of the participation of cGMP in auxin signalling to affect these growth and developmental processes is largely unknown. In this report we provide evidence that indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) induces cGMP accumulation in Arabidopsis roots through modulation of the guanylate cyclase activity. Application of 8-bromo-cGMP (a cell-permeable cGMP derivative) increases auxin-dependent lateral root formation, root hair development, primary root growth, and gene expression. In contrast, inhibitors of endogenous cGMP synthesis block these processes induced by auxin. Data also showed that 8-bromo-cGMP enhances auxin-induced degradation of Aux/IAA protein modulated by the SCF(TIR1) ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Furthermore, it was found that 8-bromo-cGMP is unable to directly influence the auxin-dependent TIR1-Aux/IAA interaction as evidenced by pull-down and yeast two-hybrid assays. In addition, we provide evidence for cGMP-mediated modulation of auxin signalling through cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG). Our results suggest that cGMP acts as a mediator to participate in auxin signalling and may govern this process by PKG activity via its influence on auxin-regulated gene expression and auxin/IAA degradation.

  14. B cell activation involves nanoscale receptor reorganizations and inside-out signaling by Syk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kläsener, Kathrin; Maity, Palash C; Hobeika, Elias; Yang, Jianying; Reth, Michael

    2014-06-24

    Binding of antigen to the B cell antigen receptor (BCR) initiates a multitude of events resulting in B cell activation. How the BCR becomes signaling-competent upon antigen binding is still a matter of controversy. Using a high-resolution proximity ligation assay (PLA) to monitor the conformation of the BCR and its interactions with co-receptors at a 10-20 nm resolution, we provide direct evidence for the opening of BCR dimers during B cell activation. We also show that upon binding Syk opens the receptor by an inside-out signaling mechanism that amplifies BCR signaling. Furthermore, we found that on resting B cells, the coreceptor CD19 is in close proximity with the IgD-BCR and on activated B cells with the IgM-BCR, indicating nanoscale reorganization of receptor clusters during B cell activation.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02069.001. Copyright © 2014, Kläsener et al.

  15. Heterotrimeric G Proteins Facilitate Arabidopsis Resistance to Necrotrophic Pathogens and Are Involved in Jasmonate Signaling1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusov, Yuri; Rookes, James Edward; Chakravorty, David; Armour, David; Schenk, Peer Martin; Botella, José Ramón

    2006-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteinshave been previously linked to plant defense; however a role for the Gβγ dimer in defense signaling has not been described to date. Using available Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants lacking functional Gα or Gβ subunits, we show that defense against the necrotrophic pathogens Alternaria brassicicola and Fusarium oxysporum is impaired in Gβ-deficient mutants while Gα-deficient mutants show slightly increased resistance compared to wild-type Columbia ecotype plants. In contrast, responses to virulent (DC3000) and avirulent (JL1065) strains of Pseudomonas syringae appear to be independent of heterotrimeric G proteins. The induction of a number of defense-related genes in Gβ-deficient mutants were severely reduced in response to A. brassicicola infection. In addition, Gβ-deficient mutants exhibit decreased sensitivity to a number of methyl jasmonate-induced responses such as induction of the plant defensin gene PDF1.2, inhibition of root elongation, seed germination, and growth of plants in sublethal concentrations of methyl jasmonate. In all cases, the behavior of the Gα-deficient mutants is coherent with the classic heterotrimeric mechanism of action, indicating that jasmonic acid signaling is influenced by the Gβγ functional subunit but not by Gα. We hypothesize that Gβγ acts as a direct or indirect enhancer of the jasmonate signaling pathway in plants. PMID:16339801

  16. Arabinosylated lipoarabinomannan (Ara-LAM) mediated intracellular mechanisms against tuberculosis infection: involvement of protein kinase C (PKC) mediated signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Shibali; Bhattacharjee, Oindrila; Goswami, Avranil; Pal, Nishith K; Majumdar, Subrata

    2015-03-01

    Tuberculosis causes severe immunosuppression thereby ensuring the loss of the host protective immune responses. During Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, the pathogen modulates TLR-2 receptor down-stream signaling, indicating the possible involvement of TLR-2 in the regulation of the host immune response. Moreover, different PKC isoforms are also involved in the course of infection. Arabinosylated lipoarabinomannan (Ara-LAM) possesses immuno-modulatory properties which induce the pro-inflammatory responses via induction of TLR-2-mediated signaling. Here, we found that pretreatment of M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages with Ara-LAM caused a significant increase in the conventional PKC expression along with their active association with TLR-2. This association activated the TLR-2 -mediated downstream signaling, facilitating the activation of MAP kinase P38. All these events culminated in the up-regulation of proinflammatory response, which was abrogated by treatment with PKC-α and P38 inhibitors. Moreover, pretreatment of macrophages with Ara-LAM abrogated the IL-10 production while restored MHC-II expression in the infected macrophages. This study demonstrates that Ara-LAM confers protection against tuberculosis via TLR-2/PKC signaling crosstalk which is responsible for the induction of host protective immune response against tuberculosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Structural and functional mapping of Rtg2p determinants involved in retrograde signaling and aging of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Maria Rios-Anjos

    Full Text Available In Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial dysfunction induces retrograde signaling, a pathway of communication from mitochondria to the nucleus that promotes a metabolic remodeling to ensure sufficient biosynthetic precursors for replication. Rtg2p is a positive modulator of this pathway that is also required for cellular longevity. This protein belongs to the ASKHA superfamily, and contains a putative N-terminal ATP-binding domain, but there is no detailed structural and functional map of the residues in this domain that accounts for their contribution to retrograde signaling and aging. Here we use Decomposition of Residue Correlation Networks and site-directed mutagenesis to identify Rtg2p structural determinants of retrograde signaling and longevity. We found that most of the residues involved in retrograde signaling surround the ATP-binding loops, and that Rtg2p N-terminus is divided in three regions whose mutants have different aging phenotypes. We also identified E137, D158 and S163 as possible residues involved in stabilization of ATP at the active site. The mutants shown here may be used to map other Rtg2p activities that crosstalk to other pathways of the cell related to genomic stability and aging.

  18. Conservative nature of oestradiol signalling pathways in the brain lobes of octopus vulgaris involved in reproduction, learning and motor coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lisa, E; Paolucci, M; Di Cosmo, A

    2012-02-01

    Oestradiol plays crucial roles in the mammalian brain by modulating reproductive behaviour, neural plasticity and pain perception. The cephalopod Octopus vulgaris is considered, along with its relatives, to be the most behaviourally advanced invertebrate, although the neurophysiological basis of its behaviours, including pain perception, remain largely unknown. In the present study, using a combination of molecular and imaging techniques, we found that oestradiol up-regulated O. vulgaris gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (Oct-GnRH) and O. vulgaris oestrogen receptor (Oct-ER) mRNA levels in the olfactory lobes; in turn, Oct-ER mRNA was regulated by NMDA in lobes involved in learning and motor coordination. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis revealed that oestradiol binds Oct-ER causing conformational modifications and nuclear translocation consistent with the classical genomic mechanism of the oestrogen receptor. Moreover, oestradiol triggered a calcium influx and cyclic AMP response element binding protein phosphorylation via membrane receptors, providing evidence for a rapid nongenomic action of oestradiol in O. vulgaris. In the present study, we demonstrate, for the first time, the physiological role of oestradiol in the brain lobes of O. vulgaris involved in reproduction, learning and motor coordination. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neuroendocrinology © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Exercise increases mTOR signaling in brain regions involved in cognition and emotional behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Brian A; Hake, Holly S; Ishiwata, Takayuki; Farmer, Caroline E; Loetz, Esteban C; Fleshner, Monika; Bland, Sondra T; Greenwood, Benjamin N

    2017-04-14

    Exercise can enhance learning and memory and produce resistance against stress-related psychiatric disorders such as depression and anxiety. In rats, these beneficial effects of exercise occur regardless of exercise controllability: both voluntary and forced wheel running produce stress-protective effects. The mechanisms underlying these beneficial effects of exercise remain unknown. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a translation regulator important for cell growth, proliferation, and survival. mTOR has been implicated in enhancing learning and memory as well as antidepressant effects. Moreover, mTOR is sensitive to exercise signals such as metabolic factors. The effects of exercise on mTOR signaling, however, remain unknown. The goal of the present study was to test the hypothesis that exercise, regardless of controllability, increases levels of phosphorylated mTOR (p-mTOR) in brain regions important for learning and emotional behavior. Rats were exposed to 6 weeks of either sedentary (locked wheel), voluntary, or forced wheel running conditions. At 6 weeks, rats were sacrificed during peak running and levels of p-mTOR were measured using immunohistochemistry. Overall, both voluntary and forced exercise increased p-mTOR-positive neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex, striatum, hippocampus, hypothalamus, and amygdala compared to locked wheel controls. Exercise, regardless of controllability, also increased numbers of p-mTOR-positive glia in the striatum, hippocampus, and amygdala. For both neurons and glia, the largest increase in p-mTOR positive cells was observed after voluntary running, with forced exercise causing a more modest increase. Interestingly, voluntary exercise preferentially increased p-mTOR in astrocytes (GFAP+), while forced running increased p-mTOR in microglia (CD11+) in the inferior dentate gyrus. Results suggest that mTOR signaling is sensitive to exercise, but subtle differences exist depending on exercise controllability

  20. Calcium sensing in exocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Wu, Bingbing; Han, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    Neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones are released through regulated exocytosis of synaptic vesicles and large dense core vesicles. This complex and highly regulated process is orchestrated by SNAREs and their associated proteins. The triggering signal for regulated exocytosis is usually...... an increase in intracellular calcium levels. Besides the triggering role, calcium signaling modulates the precise amount and kinetics of vesicle release. Thus, it is a central question to understand the molecular machineries responsible for calcium sensing in exocytosis. Here we provide an overview of our...

  1. Extra and intracellular calcium signaling pathway(s) differentially regulate histamine-induced myometrial contractions during early and mid-pregnancy stages in buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Abhishek; Nakade, Udayraj P; Choudhury, Soumen; Yadav, Rajkumar Singh; Garg, Satish Kumar

    2017-04-01

    This study examines the differential role of calcium signaling pathway(s) in histamine-induced uterotonic action during early and mid-pregnancy stages in buffaloes. Compared to mid pregnancy, tonic contraction, amplitude and mean-integral tension were significantly increased by histamine to produce myometrial contraction during early pregnancy with small effects on phasic contraction and frequency. Although uterotonic action of histamine during both stages of pregnancy is sensitive to nifedipine (a L-type Ca2+ channels blocker) and NNC55-0396 (T-type Ca2+ channels blocker), the role of extracellular calcium seems to be more significant during mid-pregnancy as in this stage histamine produced only 9.38±0.96% contraction in Ca2+ free-RLS compared to 21.60±1.45% in uteri of early pregnancy stage. Intracellular calcium plays major role in histamine-induced myometrial contraction during early pregnancy as compared to mid pregnancy, as in the presence of cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) Ca2+-free RLS, histamine produced significantly higher contraction in myometrial strips of early-pregancy in comparison to mid-pregnancy (10.59±1.58% and 3.13±0.46%, respectively). In the presence of U-73122, the DRC of histamine was significantly shifted towards right with decrease in maximal effect (Emax) only in early pregnancy suggesting the predominant role of phospholipase-C (PL-C) in this stage of pregnancy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Ultrasound Enhances the Expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Astrocyte Through Activation of TrkB-Akt and Calcium-CaMK Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shing-Hwa; Lai, Yi-Long; Chen, Bo-Lin; Yang, Feng-Yi

    2017-06-01

    Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulation has been shown to increase the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in astrocytes of an in vitro model and rat brains of an in vivo model; however, their molecular mechanisms are still not well clarified. Here, we investigated the underlying mechanisms of BDNF enhancement by LIPUS in rat cerebral cortex astrocytes. After LIPUS stimulation in astrocytes, the protein and mRNA expressions were measured by western blot and RT-PCR, respectively. The concentration of intracellular calcium was determined spectrophotometrically. The results showed that LIPUS enhanced the phosphorylation of tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) and Akt but had no effect on Erk1/2 phosphorylation. Additionally, LIPUS increased the intracellular concentration of calcium and enhanced the protein levels of calmodulin-dependent kinase (CaMK) II and CaMKIV. LIPUS also activated the phosphorylation of NF-κB-p65 but did not promote the activation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). Taken together, our results suggest that LIPUS stimulation upregulates BDNF production in astrocytes through the activation of NF-κB via the TrkB/PI3K/Akt and calcium/CaMK signaling pathways. BDNF has emerged as a major molecular player in the regulation of neural circuit development and function. Therefore, LIPUS stimulation may play a crucial and beneficial role in neurodegenerative diseases. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Molecular Signaling Involved in Entry and Exit of Malaria Parasites from Host Erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shailja; Chitnis, Chetan E

    2017-10-03

    During the blood stage, Plasmodium spp. merozoites invade host red blood cells (RBCs), multiply, exit, and reinvade uninfected RBCs in a continuing cycle that is responsible for all the clinical symptoms associated with malaria. Entry into (invasion) and exit from (egress) RBCs are highly regulated processes that are mediated by an array of parasite proteins with specific functional roles. Many of these parasite proteins are stored in specialized apical secretory vesicles, and their timely release is critical for successful invasion and egress. For example, the discharge of parasite protein ligands to the apical surface of merozoites is required for interaction with host receptors to mediate invasion, and the timely discharge of proteases and pore-forming proteins helps in permeabilization and dismantling of limiting membranes during egress. This review focuses on our understanding of the signaling mechanisms that regulate apical organelle secretion during host cell invasion and egress by malaria parasites. The review also explores how understanding key signaling mechanisms in the parasite can open opportunities to develop novel strategies to target Plasmodium parasites and eliminate malaria. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  4. Urotensin II induction of neonatal cardiomyocyte hypertrophy involves the CaMKII/PLN/SERCA 2a signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hongtao; Han, Qinghua; Xu, Jianrong; Liu, Wenyuan; Chu, Tingting; Zhao, Li

    2016-05-25

    Although studies have shown that Urotensin II (UII) can induce cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and UII-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy model has been widely used for hypertrophy research, but its precise mechanism remains unknown. Recent researches have demonstrated that UII-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy has a relationship with the changes of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by UII and to explore whether the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII)-mediated up-regulating of phospholamban (PLN) Thr17-phosphorylation signaling pathway contributed to UII-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Primary cultures of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were stimulated for 48h with UII. Cell size, protein/DNA contents and intracellular Ca(2+) were determined. Phosphorylated and total forms of CaMKII, PLN and the total amount of serco/endo-plasmic reticulum ATPases (SERCA 2a) were quantified by western blot. The responses of cardiomyocytes to UII were also evaluated after pretreatment with the CaMKII inhibitor, KN-93. These results showed that UII increased cell size, protein/DNA ratio and intracellular Ca(2+), consistent with a hypertrophic response. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of CaMKII and its downstream target PLN (Thr17), SERCA 2a levels were up-regulated by UII treatment. Conversely, treatment with KN-93 reversed all those effects of UII. Taken together, the results suggest that UII can induce cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through CaMKII-mediated up-regulating of PLN Thr17-phosphorylation signaling pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The neuroprotective effects of α-iso-cubebene on dopaminergic cell death: involvement of CREB/Nrf2 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun Young; Son, Beung Gu; Park, Young Hoon; Kim, Cheol-Min; Park, Geuntae; Choi, Young-Whan

    2014-09-01

    As a part of ongoing studies to elucidate pharmacologically active components of Schisandra chinensis, we isolated and studied α-iso-cubebene. The neuroprotective mechanisms of α-iso-cubebene in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells were investigated. α-Iso-cubebene significantly inhibited cytotoxicity and apoptosis due to 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity in dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells. Pretreatment of cells with α-iso-cubebene reduced intracellular accumulation of ROS and calcium in response to 6-OHDA. The neuroprotective effects of α-iso-cubebene were found to result from protecting the mitochondrial membrane potential. Notably, α-iso-cubebene inhibited the release of apoptosis-inducing factor from the mitochondria into the cytosol and nucleus after 6-OHDA treatment. α-Iso-cubebene also induced the activation of PKA/PKB/CREB/Nrf2 and suppressed 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity. α-Iso-cubebene was found to induce phosphorylation of PKA and PKB and activate Nrf2 and CREB signaling pathways in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, α-iso-cubebene stimulated the expression of the antioxidant response genes NQO1 and HO-1. Finally, α-iso-cubebene-mediated neuroprotective effects were found to be reversible after transfection with CREB and Nrf2 small interfering RNAs.

  6. Calcium-dependent protein kinase 21 phosphorylates 14-3-3 proteins in response to ABA signaling and salt stress in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yixing; Zhou, Xiaojin; Chang, Shu; Chu, Zhilin; Wang, Hanmeng; Han, Shengcheng; Wang, Yingdian

    2017-12-02

    The calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are a class of plant-specific kinase that directly bind Ca2+ and mediate the calcium-signaling pathways to play important physiological roles in growth and development. The rice genome contains 31 CDPK genes, one of which, OsCPK21, is known to modulate the abscisic acid (ABA) and salt stress responses in this crop; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation are largely unknown. In the present study, we performed yeast two-hybrid screening, glutathione S-transferase pull-down, co-immunoprecipitation, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays to confirm the interaction between OsCPK21 and one of its putative targets, Os14-3-3 (OsGF14e). We used an in vitro kinase assay and site-directed mutagenesis to verify that OsCPK21 phosphorylates OsGF14e at Tyr-138. We used real-time PCR to reveal that several ABA and salt inducible genes were more highly expressed in the OsCPK21-OE and OsGF14e WT-OE plants than in the mutant OsGF14e Y138A-OE and wild-type plants. These results suggest that OsCPK21 phosphorylates OsGF14e to facilitate the response to ABA and salt stress. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Mutational analyses of the signals involved in the subcellular location of DSCR1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique-Silva Flávio

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Down syndrome is the most frequent genetic disorder in humans. Rare cases involving partial trisomy of chromosome 21 allowed a small chromosomal region common to all carriers, called Down Syndrome Critical Region (DSCR, to be determined. The DSCR1 gene was identified in this region and is expressed preferentially in the brain, heart and skeletal muscle. Recent studies have shown that DSCR1 belongs to a family of proteins that binds and inhibits calcineurin, a serine-threonine phosphatase. The work reported on herein consisted of a study of the subcellular location of DSCR1 and DSCR1-mutated forms by fusion with a green fluorescent protein, using various cell lines, including human. Results The protein's location was preferentially nuclear, independently of the isoform, cell line and insertion in the GFP's N- or C-terminal. A segment in the C-terminal, which is important in the location of the protein, was identified by deletion. On the other hand, site-directed mutational analyses have indicated the involvement of some serine and threonine residues in this event. Conclusion In this paper, we discuss the identification of amino acids which can be important for subcellular location of DSCR1. The involvement of residues that are prone to phosphorylation suggests that the location and function of DSCR1 may be regulated by kinases and/or phosphatases.

  8. Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium carbonate is a dietary supplement used when the amount of calcium taken in the diet is not ... for healthy bones, muscles, nervous system, and heart. Calcium carbonate also is used as an antacid to relieve ...

  9. Calcium supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007477.htm Calcium supplements To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. WHO SHOULD TAKE CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS? Calcium is an important mineral for the ...

  10. Antiatherosclerotic Effect of Korean Red Ginseng Extract Involves Regulator of G-Protein Signaling 5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Ju Im

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulator of G-protein signaling 5 (RGS5, an inhibitor of Gα(q and Gα(i activation, has been reported to have antiatherosclerosis. Previous studies showed antiatherosclerotic effect of Korean red ginseng water extract (KRGE via multiple signaling pathways. However, potential protective effect of KRGE through RGS5 expression has not been elucidated. Here, we investigated the antiatherosclerotic effect of KRGE in vivo and in vitro and its role on RGS5 mRNA expression. Elevated levels of total cholesterol, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, and triglyceride (TG in western diet groups of low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient LDLr−/− mice were reversed by oral administration of KRGE. KRGE suppressed transcriptional activity of tumor necrotic factor alpha (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and leptin in adipose tissue. It also potently repressed western diet-induced atheroma formation in aortic sinus. While KRGE showed reduced mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, it enhanced mRNA expression of RGS5. Moreover, RGS5 siRNA transfection of microglia cells pretreated with KRGE reversed its inhibitory effect on the expression of iNOS, COX-2, and IL-1β mRNA. In conclusion, KRGE showed antiatherosclerotic and anti-inflammatory effects in western diet fed LDLr−/− mice and this effect could partly be mediated by RGS5 expression.

  11. Involvement of glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and signaling regulatory pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae biofilms during fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenjian; Chen, Yong; Liu, Dong; Zhao, Nan; Cheng, Hao; Ren, Hengfei; Guo, Ting; Niu, Huanqing; Zhuang, Wei; Wu, Jinglan; Ying, Hanjie

    2015-01-01

    Compared to free (free-living) cells, biofilm cells show increased resistance and stability to high-pressure fermentation conditions, although the reasons underlying these phenomena remain unclear. Here, we investigated biofilm formation with immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells grown on fiber surfaces during the process of ethanol fermentation. The development of biofilm colonies was visualized by fluorescent labeling and confocal microscopy. RNA from yeast cells at three different biofilm development periods was extracted and sequenced by high-throughput sequencing. We quantitated gene expression differences between biofilm cells and free cells and found that 2098, 1556, and 927 genes were significantly differentially expressed, respectively. We also validated the expression of previously reported genes and identified novel genes and pathways under the control of this system. Statistical analysis revealed that biofilm genes show significant gene expression changes principally in the initial period of biofilm formation compared to later periods. Carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid metabolism, signal transduction, and oxidoreductase activity were needed for biofilm formation. In contrast to previous findings, we observed some differential expression performances of FLO family genes, indicating that cell aggregation in our immobilized fermentation system was possibly independent of flocculation. Cyclic AMP-protein kinase A and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways regulated signal transduction pathways during yeast biofilm formation. We found that carbohydrate metabolism, especially glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, played a key role in the development of S. cerevisiae biofilms. This work provides an important dataset for future studies aimed at gaining insight into the regulatory mechanisms of immobilized cells in biofilms, as well as for optimizing bioprocessing applications with S. cerevisiae.

  12. Involvement of glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and signaling regulatory pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae biofilms during fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenjian eLi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Compared to free (free-living cells, biofilm cells show increased resistance and stability to high-pressure fermentation conditions, although the reasons underlying these phenomena remain unclear. Here, we investigated biofilm formation with immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells grown on fiber surfaces during the process of ethanol fermentation. The development of biofilm colonies was visualized by fluorescent labeling and confocal microscopy. RNA from yeast cells at 3 different biofilm development periods was extracted and sequenced by high-throughput sequencing. We quantitated gene expression differences between biofilm cells and free cells and found that 2098, 1556, and 927 genes were significantly differentially expressed respectively. We also validated the expression of previously reported genes and identified novel genes and pathways under the control of this system. Statistical analysis revealed that biofilm genes show significant gene expression changes principally in the initial period of biofilm formation compared to later periods. Carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid metabolism, signal transduction, and oxidoreductase activity were needed for biofilm formation. In contrast to previous findings, we observed some differential expression performances of FLO family genes, indicating that cell aggregation in our immobilized fermentation system was possibly independent of flocculation. Cyclic AMP-protein kinase A and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways regulated signal transduction pathways during yeast biofilm formation. We found that carbohydrate metabolism, especially glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, played a key role in the development of S. cerevisiae biofilms. This work provides an important dataset for future studies aimed at gaining insight into the regulatory mechanisms of immobilized cells in biofilms, as well as for optimizing bioprocessing applications with S. cerevisiae.

  13. Effects of Wenxin Keli on Cardiac Hypertrophy and Arrhythmia via Regula