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Sample records for calcium phosphate-based biomaterials

  1. Calcium Phosphate Biomaterials: An Update

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Current calcium phosphate (CaP) biomaterials for bone repair, substitution, augmentation and regeneration include hydroxyapatite ( HA ) from synthetic or biologic origin, beta-tricalcium phosphate ( β-TCP ) , biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP), and are available as granules, porous blocks, components of composites (CaP/polymer) cements, and as coatings on orthopedic and dental implants. Experimental calcium phosphate biomaterials include CO3- and F-substituted apatites, Mg-and Zn-substituted β-TCP, calcium phosphate glasses. This paper is a brief review of the different types of CaP biomaterials and their properties such as bioactivity, osteoconductivity, osteoinductivity.

  2. Calcium phosphate-based ceramic and composite materials for medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The topical problems in chemistry and technology of materials based on calcium phosphates aimed at both the replacement of damaged bone tissue and its regeneration are discussed. Specific features of the synthesis of nanocrystalline powders and the fabrication of ceramic implants are described. Advances in the development of porous scaffolds from resorbable and osteoconductive calcium phosphates and of hybrid composites that form the basis of bone tissue engineering are considered.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of zirconium-doped calcium phosphate biomaterial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new synthesis route for the production of calcium phosphate biomaterial was developed by using organic di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (DEHPA) mixed with calcium hydroxide slurry. Unlike the conventional involving chemical precipitation process this new method involves a sol-gel process. Another advantage of this method is the starting material DEHPA can form strong bonding with many elements including zirconium and rare earths. This makes it suitable to be used as drug delivery material especially those involving bone related disease. It also improves the biomaterial strength with the presence of zirconium oxide phase. From XRD analysis, the result shows the present of HA, α-TCP and β-TCP. The addition of different rare elements on to the calcium phosphate will varies the amount of these three phases. SEM analysis was also performed to study the morphology of the calcium phosphate material. The presence of the rare earths on to the calcium phosphate was established by using the EDS technique. (Author)

  4. Structural characterization of anion-calcium-humate complexes in phosphate-based fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baigorri, Roberto; Urrutia, Oscar; Erro, Javier; Mandado, Marcos; Pérez-Juste, Ignacio; Garcia-Mina, José María

    2013-07-01

    Fertilizers based on phosphate-metal-humate complexes are a new family of compounds that represents a more sustainable and bioavailable phosphorus source. The characterization of this type of complex by using solid (31)P NMR in several fertilizers, based on single superphosphate (SSP) and triple superphosphate (TSP) matrices, yielded surprising and unexpected trends in the intensity and fine structure of the (31)P NMR peaks. Computational chemistry methods allowed the characterization of phosphate-calcium-humate complexes in both SSP and TSP matrices, but also predicted the formation of a stable sulfate-calcium-humate complex in the SSP fertilizers, which has not been described previously. The stability of this complex has been confirmed by using ultrafiltration techniques. Preference towards the humic substance for the sulfate-metal phase in SSP allowed the explanation of the opposing trends that were observed in the experimental (31)P NMR spectra of SSP and TSP samples. Additionally, computational chemistry has provided an assignment of the (31)P NMR signals to different phosphate ligands as well as valuable information about the relative strength of the phosphate-calcium interactions within the crystals.

  5. Structural characterization of anion-calcium-humate complexes in phosphate-based fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baigorri, Roberto; Urrutia, Oscar; Erro, Javier; Mandado, Marcos; Pérez-Juste, Ignacio; Garcia-Mina, José María

    2013-07-01

    Fertilizers based on phosphate-metal-humate complexes are a new family of compounds that represents a more sustainable and bioavailable phosphorus source. The characterization of this type of complex by using solid (31)P NMR in several fertilizers, based on single superphosphate (SSP) and triple superphosphate (TSP) matrices, yielded surprising and unexpected trends in the intensity and fine structure of the (31)P NMR peaks. Computational chemistry methods allowed the characterization of phosphate-calcium-humate complexes in both SSP and TSP matrices, but also predicted the formation of a stable sulfate-calcium-humate complex in the SSP fertilizers, which has not been described previously. The stability of this complex has been confirmed by using ultrafiltration techniques. Preference towards the humic substance for the sulfate-metal phase in SSP allowed the explanation of the opposing trends that were observed in the experimental (31)P NMR spectra of SSP and TSP samples. Additionally, computational chemistry has provided an assignment of the (31)P NMR signals to different phosphate ligands as well as valuable information about the relative strength of the phosphate-calcium interactions within the crystals. PMID:23670945

  6. Designing calcium phosphate-based bifunctional nanocapsules with bone-targeting properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khung, Yit-Lung; Bastari, Kelsen; Cho, Xing Ling; Yee, Wu Aik; Loo, Say Chye Joachim, E-mail: joachimloo@ntu.edu.sg [Nanyang Technological University, School of Materials Science and Engineering (Singapore)

    2012-06-15

    Using sodium dodecyl sulphate micelles as template, hollow-cored calcium phosphate nanocapsules were produced. The surfaces of the nanocapsule were subsequently silanised by a polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based silane with an N-hydroxysuccinimide ester end groups which permits for further attachment with bisphosphonates (BP). Characterisations of these nanocapsules were investigated using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy, Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Dynamic Light Scattering. To further validate the bone-targeting potential, dentine discs were incubated with these functionalised nanocapsules. FESEM analysis showed that these surface-modified nanocapsules would bind strongly to dentine surfaces compared to non-functionalised nanocapsules. We envisage that respective components would give this construct a bifunctional attribute, whereby (1) the shell of the calcium phosphate nanocapsule would serve as biocompatible coating aiding in gradual osteoconduction, while (2) surface BP moieties, acting as targeting ligands, would provide the bone-targeting potential of these calcium phosphate nanocapsules.

  7. Biomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Mourik, P.; Van Dam, J.; Picken, S.J.; Ursem, B.

    2013-01-01

    The metabolic pathways of living organisms produce biomaterials. Hence, in principle biomaterials are fully sustainable. This does not mean that their processing and application have no impact on the environment, e.g. the recycling of natural rubber remains a problem. Biomaterials are applied in a w

  8. Development of calcium phosphate based apatite from hen’s eggshell

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Prabakaran; A Balamurugan; S Rajeswari

    2005-04-01

    Stoichiometric hydroxyapatite with Ca/P molar ratio, 1.67, was synthesized using hen’s eggshell as calcium source and phosphoric acid by precipitation method. Conventional EDTA titration and gravimetric methods were adopted to estimate the amount of calcium and phosphorous, respectively. Fourier-transform infrared (FT–IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques were employed to investigate the formation of the HAP phase. Thermal analysis (TG–DTA) was carried out to investigate the thermal stability of HAP powder. FT–IR spectra show the characteristic peaks for phosphate and hydroxyl groups. XRD results reveal that the major characteristic peaks of HAP appear in the region of approximately 26°, 28°, 29°, 30–35°, 39°, 46°, 49° and 50° (2) and also indicate that there are no occurrences of secondary phases during HAP formation. TG–DTA result depicts that the synthesized HAP was stable up to 1300°C.

  9. Structure-Composition-Property Relationships in Polymeric Amorphous Calcium Phosphate-Based Dental Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drago Skrtic

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Our studies of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP-based materials over the last decade have yielded bioactive polymeric composites capable of protecting teeth from demineralization or even regenerating lost tooth mineral. The anti-cariogenic/remineralizing potential of these ACP composites originates from their propensity, when exposed to the oral environment, to release in a sustained manner sufficient levels of mineral-forming calcium and phosphate ions to promote formation of stable apatitic tooth mineral. However, the less than optimal ACP filler/resin matrix cohesion, excessive polymerization shrinkage and water sorption of these experimental materials can adversely affect their physicochemical and mechanical properties, and, ultimately, limit their lifespan. This study demonstrates the effects of chemical structure and composition of the methacrylate monomers used to form the matrix phase of composites on degree of vinyl conversion (DVC and water sorption of both copolymers and composites and the release of mineral ions from the composites. Modification of ACP surface via introducing cations and/or polymers ab initio during filler synthesis failed to yield mechanically improved composites. However, moderate improvement in composite’s mechanical stability without compromising its remineralization potential was achieved by silanization and/or milling of ACP filler. Using ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate or urethane dimethacrylate as base monomers and adding moderate amounts of hydrophilic 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate or its isomer ethyl-α-hydroxymethacrylate appears to be a promising route to maximize the remineralizing ability of the filler while maintaining high DVC. Exploration of the structure/composition/property relationships of ACP fillers and polymer matrices is complex but essential for achieving a better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that govern dissolution/re-precipitation of bioactive ACP fillers, and

  10. Injectable nanoamorphous calcium phosphate based in situ gel systems for the treatment of periapical lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Amany A; Zaazou, Mohamed H; Chow, Laurence C; Mahmoud, Azza A; Zaki, Dalia Y; Basha, Mona; Abdel Hamid, Mohamed A; Khallaf, Maram E; Sharaf, Nehal F; Hamdy, Tamer M

    2015-12-01

    Nonsurgical local treatment of a periapical lesion arising from trauma or bacterial infection is a promising innovative approach. The present study investigated the feasibility of developing injectable amorphous calcium phosphate nanoparticles (ACP NPs) and ACP NPs loaded with an anti-inflammatory drug; ibuprofen (IBU-ACP NPs) in the form of thermoreversible in situ gels to treat periapical lesions with the stimulation of bone formation. NPs were produced by a spray-drying technique. Different formulations of Poloxamer 407 were incorporated with/without the produced NPs to form injectable gels. A drug release study was carried out. A 3 month in vivo test on a dog model also was assessed. Results showed successful incorporation of the drug into the NPs of CP during spray drying. The particles had mean diameters varying from 100 to 200 nm with a narrow distribution. A drug release study demonstrated controlled IBU release from IBU-ACP NPs at a pH of 7.4 over 24 h. The gelation temperature of the injectable in situ gels based on Poloxamer 407 was measured to be 30 °C. After 3 months of implantation in dogs, the results clearly demonstrated that the inclusion of ACP NPs loaded with IBU showed high degrees of periapical bone healing and cementum layer deposition around the apical root tip.

  11. Biomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Migonney , Véronique

    2014-01-01

    Discovered in the 20th century, biomaterials have contributed to many of the incredible scientific and technological advancements made in recent decades. This book introduces and details the tenets of biomaterials, their relevance in a various fields, practical applications of their products, and potential advancements of the years to come. A comprehensive resource, the text covers the reasons that certain properties of biomaterials contribute to specific applications, and students and researchers will appreciate this exhaustive textbook.

  12. Silicon, iron and titanium doped calcium phosphate-based glass reinforced biodegradable polyester composites as bone analogous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah Mohammadi, Maziar

    Bone defects resulting from disease or traumatic injury is a major health care problem worldwide. Tissue engineering offers an alternative approach to repair and regenerate bone through the use of a cell-scaffold construct. The scaffold should be biodegradable, biocompatible, porous with an open pore structure, and should be able to withstand the applied forces. Phosphate-based glasses (PGs) may be used as reinforcing agents in degradable composites since their degradation can be predicted and controlled through their chemistry. This doctoral dissertation describes the development and evaluation of PGs reinforced biodegradable polyesters for intended applications in bone augmentation and regeneration. This research was divided into three main objectives: 1) Investigating the composition dependent properties of novel PG formulations by doping a sodium-free calcium phosphate-based glass with SiO2, Fe2O3, and TiO2. Accordingly, (50P2 O5-40CaO- xSiO2-(10-x)Fe2O3, where x = 10, 5 and 0 mol.%) and (50P2O5-40CaO-xSiO 2-(10-x)TiO2 where x = 10, 7, 5, 3 and 0 mol.%) formulations were developed and characterised. SiO2 incorporation led to increased solubility, ion release, pH reduction, as well as hydrophilicity, surface energy, and surface polarity. In contrast, doping with Fe2O 3 or TiO2 resulted in more durable glasses, and improved cell attachment and viability. It was hypothesised that the presence of SiO 2 in the TiO2-doped formulations could up-regulate the ionic release from the PG leading to higher alkaline phosphatase activity of MC3T3-E1 cells. 2) Incorporating Si, Fe, and Ti doped PGs as fillers, either as particulates (PGPs) or fibres (PGFs), into biodegradable polyesters (polycaprolactone (PCL) and semi-crystalline and amorphous poly(lactic acid) (PLA and PDLLA)) with the aim of developing degradable bone analogous composites. It was found that PG composition and geometry dictated the weight loss, ionic release, and mechanical properties of the composites. It

  13. Surface characterization and corrosion behavior of calcium phosphate-base composite layer on titanium and its alloys via plasma electrolytic oxidation: A review paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafieerad, A R; Ashra, M R; Mahmoodian, R; Bushroa, A R

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, calcium phosphate-base composites, such as hydroxyapatite (HA) and carbonate apatite (CA) have been considered desirable and biocompatible coating layers in clinical and biomedical applications such as implants because of the high resistance of the composites. This review focuses on the effects of voltage, time and electrolytes on a calcium phosphate-base composite layer in case of pure titanium and other biomedical grade titanium alloys via the plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) method. Remarkably, these parameters changed the structure, morphology, pH, thickness and crystallinity of the obtained coating for various engineering and biomedical applications. Hence, the structured layer caused improvement of the biocompatibility, corrosion resistance and assignment of extra benefits for Osseo integration. The fabricated layer with a thickness range of 10 to 20 μm was evaluated for physical, chemical, mechanical and tribological characteristics via XRD, FESEM, EDS, EIS and corrosion analysis respectively, to determine the effects of the applied parameters and various electrolytes on morphology and phase transition. Moreover, it was observed that during PEO, the concentration of calcium, phosphor and titanium shifts upward, which leads to an enhanced bioactivity by altering the thickness. The results confirm that the crystallinity, thickness and contents of composite layer can be changed by applying thermal treatments. The corrosion behavior was investigated via the potentiodynamic polarization test in a body-simulated environment. Here, the optimum corrosion resistance was obtained for the coating process condition at 500 V for 15 min in Ringer solution. This review has been summarized, aiming at the further development of PEO by producing more adequate titanium-base implants along with desired mechanical and biomedical features.

  14. Do Ca2+-adsorbing ceramics reduce the release of calcium ions from gypsum-based biomaterials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcarz, Anna; Zalewska, Justyna; Pałka, Krzysztof; Hajnos, Mieczysław; Ginalska, Grazyna

    2015-02-01

    Bone implantable materials based on calcium sulfate dihydrate dissolve quickly in tissue liquids and release calcium ions at very high levels. This phenomenon induces temporary toxicity for osteoblasts, may cause local inflammation and delay the healing process. Reduction in the calcium ion release rate by gypsum could be therefore beneficial for the healing of gypsum-filled bone defects. The aim of this study concerned the potential use of calcium phosphate ceramics of various porosities for the reduction of high Ca(2+) ion release from gypsum-based materials. Highly porous ceramics failed to reduce the level of Ca(2+) ions released to the medium in a continuous flow system. However, it succeeded to shorten the period of high calcium level. It was not the phase composition but the high porosity of ceramics that was found crucial for both the shortening of the Ca(2+) release-related toxicity period and intensification of apatite deposition on the composite. Nonporous ceramics was completely ineffective for this purpose and did not show any ability to absorb calcium ions at a significant level. Moreover, according to our observations, complex studies imitating in vivo systems, rather than standard tests, are essential for the proper evaluation of implantable biomaterials. PMID:25492196

  15. In vivo biocompatibility of new nano-calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite/poly-amino acid complex biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai ZY

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Zhenyu Dai,1,2,* Yue Li,3,* Weizhong Lu,2,* Dianming Jiang,4 Hong Li,1 Yonggang Yan,1 Guoyu Lv,1 Aiping Yang1 1College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 2Department of Orthopedics, Chongqing Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 3Department of Clinical Laboratory, the Second Affiliated Hospital, 4Department of Orthopedics, the First Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: To evaluate the compatibility of novel nano-calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite/poly-amino acid (n-CDHA/PAA complex biomaterials with muscle and bone tissue in an in vivo model.Methods: Thirty-two New Zealand white rabbits were used in this study. Biomaterials were surgically implanted into each rabbit in the back erector spinae and in tibia with induced defect. Polyethylene was implanted into rabbits in the control group and n-CDHA/PAA into those of the experimental group. Animals were examined at four different points in time: 2 weeks, 4 weeks, 12 weeks, and 24 weeks after surgery. They were euthanized after embolization. Back erector spinae muscles with the surgical implants were examined after hematoxylin and eosin (HE staining at these points in time. Tibia bones with the surgical implants were examined by X-ray and scanning electron microscopy (SEM at these points in time to evaluate the interface of the bone with the implanted biomaterials. Bone tissues were sectioned and subjected to HE, Masson, and toluidine blue staining.Results: HE staining of back erector spinae muscles at 4 weeks, 12 weeks, and 24 weeks after implantation of either n-CDHA/PAA or polyethylene showed disappearance of inflammation and normal arrangement in the peripheral tissue of implant biomaterials; no abnormal staining was observed. At 2 weeks after implantation, X-ray imaging of bone tissue samples in both experimental and control groups showed that

  16. Development of a new antibacterial biomaterial by tetracycline immobilization on calcium-alginate beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozseker, Emine Erdogan; Akkaya, Alper

    2016-10-20

    In recent years, increasing risk of infection, caused by resistant microorganism to antibiotics, has become the limelight discovery of new and natural antibacterial materials. Heavy metals, such as silver, copper, mercury and titanium, have antibacterial activity. Products, which improved these metals, do not have stable antibacterial property. Therefore, use of these products is restricted. The aim of this study was to immobilize tetracycline to alginate and improve an antibacterial biomaterial. For this purpose, calcium-alginate beads were formed by dropping to calcium-chloride solution and tetracycline was immobilized to beads using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide at optimum conditions. After immobilization, actualization of immobilization was investigated by analyzing ATR-FTIR spectrum and SEM images. Also, antibacterial property of obtained product was tested. Improved product demonstrated antibacterial property. It has potential for open wound, surgical drapes, bed and pillow sheath in hospitals and it may also be used for increasing human comfort in daily life. PMID:27474587

  17. Comparison and preparation of multilayered polylactic acid fabric strengthen calcium phosphate-based bone substitutes for orthopedic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Ko, Chia-Ling; Yang, Jia-Kai; Wu, Hui-Yu; Lin, Jia-Horng

    2016-03-01

    An attempt to maintain the three-dimensional space into restorative sites through the conveniently pack porous fillers are general used strategy. Advancement in the manufacturing protective shells in the scaffolds, which would be filled with brittle ceramic grafts for the development of highly connective pores provides the approach to solve crack problem for generating the tissues. Therefore, multilayered braided and alkalized poly(lactic acid) (PLA) composites with calcium phosphate bone cement (CPC) were synthesized and compared. The PLA/CPC composites were divided into various groups according to a series of heat-treatment temperatures (100-190 °C) and periods (1-3 h) and then characterized. The effects of 24-h immersion on the strength decay resistance of the samples were compared. Results showed that the residual oil capped on the surfaces of alkalized PLA braid was removed, and the structure was unaltered. However, the reduced tensile stress of alkalized PLA braids was due to ester-group formation by hydrolysis. Mechanical test results of PLA/CPC composites showed that the strength significantly increased after heat treatment, except when the heating temperature was higher than the PLA melting point at approximately 160-170 °C. The degree of PLA after recrystallization became higher than that of unheated composites, thereby leading to reduced strength and toughness of the specimen. Braiding fibers of biodegradable PLA reinforced and toughened the structure particularly of the extra-brittle material of thin-sheet CPC after implantation.

  18. Effect of particle size of calcium phosphate based bioceramic drug delivery carrier on the release kinetics of ciprofloxacin hydrochloride: an in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasikumar, Swamiappan

    2013-09-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) is the constituent of calcium phosphate based bone cement and it is extensively used as a bone substitute and drug delivery vehicle in various biomedical applications. In the present study we investigated the release kinetics of ciprofloxacin loaded HAP and analyzed its ability to function as a targeted and sustained release drug carrier. Synthesis of HAP was carried out by combustion method using tartaric acid as a fuel and nitric acid as an oxidizer. Powder XRD and FTIR techniques were employed to characterize the phase purity of the drug carrier and to verify the chemical interaction between the drug and carrier. The synthesized powders were sieve separated to make two different drug carriers with different particle sizes and the surface topography of the pellets of the drug carrier was imaged by AFM. Surface area and porosity of the drug carrier was carried out using surface area analyzer. The in-vitro drug release kinetics was performed in simulated body fluid, at 37.3°C. The amount of ciprofloxacin released is measured using UV-visible spectroscopy following the characteristic λ max of 278 nm. The release saturates around 450 h which indicates that it can be used as a targeted and sustained release carrier for bone infections.

  19. Evaluation and comparison of the efficacy of low fluoridated and calcium phosphate-based dentifrice formulations when used with powered and manual toothbrush in children with autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prateek Awasthi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autism is a neurobiological disorder characterized by impaired social interaction, communication difficulties, and lacking manual dexterity. These limitations make the oral hygiene maintenance very difficult. Aim: The aim of this present study is to evaluate and compare the efficacy of low fluoridated and calcium phosphate-based dentifrice formulations when used with powered and manual toothbrush in children with autism. Setting and Design: Sample comprised 22 children with autism who daily visited a day care and education center named ARUSHI - a center for children with special health care needs in Bhopal. Methods: Children were divided into two groups (Group A and B according to toothbrush used and further divided into subgroups (A1 and B1 [low fluoridated − Pediflor toothpaste] and A2 and B2 [calcium sucrose phosphate − Enafix toothpaste]. Oral hygiene instructions and brushing technique demonstration were given every day for a period of 1-month. Oral health status was evaluated before and after the study using simplified oral hygiene index (OHI-S and its Miglani's modification for primary dentition, plaque index (PI, gingival index (GI, and decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT/deft index. The perception of parents regarding oral hygiene practices for their kids was also evaluated by an awareness and attitude questionnaire. Statistical Analysis: OHI-S, GI, PI, and DMFT/deft were statistically evaluated using Mann–Whitney U- test. Results and Conclusion: Mean value of OHI-S decreased significantly with powered toothbrush (0.035 [P < 0.05] in both groups. However, PI decreased significantly for Enafix when used with powered toothbrush (0.042 [P < 0.05]. Perception of parents was seen to improve significantly after 1-month study (0.000 [P < 0.05].

  20. [Raman spectrometry applied to calcified tissue and calcium-phosphorus biomaterials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penel, G; Leroy, G; Leroy, N; Behin, P; Langlois, J M; Libersa, J C; Dupas, P H

    2000-01-01

    The rigid part of the human body consists essentially of carbonated apatite (calcium phosphate). Biologists don't have any tools to study this "mineral" phase, though its origin is organic. A new approach of some compounds like enamel or bone is obtained with the Raman micro-characterisation by a very fine analysis of chemical bonds in a micrometric scale. This method allows the characterisation, the analysis and the dosage of ions, like carbonate, acid phosphates, proteins and fatty acids. The identification of other organic or mineral compounds (e.g. calcium carbonate, calcium oxide, substitutant ions...) is also possible. The Raman microspectrometry can also be used to study the chemical and physical properties of biomaterials and their evolution after implantation in a dental or bone site. On synthetical calcium phosphate, beta-TCP, brushite and hydroxyapatite can be distinguished and the impurities found in plasma spray deposits can be measured. The detection of alpha-, beta-, or gamma-pyrophosphates could be obtained in some commercial beta-TCP. The Raman microspectrometry is the only non-destructive method which allows the identification of the chemical bonds in a micrometric scale and gives the "fingerprint" of the studied component.

  1. Calcium citrate: a new biomaterial that can enhance bone formation in situ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li-ming; WANG Wei; LI Xiu-cui; PENG Lei; LIN Zhong-qin; X(ü) Hua-zi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of a new biomaterial combining calcium citrate and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) on bone regeneration in a bone defect rabbit model.Methods: Totally 30 male New Zealand white rabbits were randomly and equally divided into calcium citraterhBMP-2 (CC-rhBMP-2) group and rhBMP-2 only group.Two 10 mm-long and 5 mm-deep bone defects were respectively created in the left and right femoral condyles of the rabbits.Subsequently 5 pellets of calcium citrate (10 mg)combined with rhBMP-2 (2 mg) or rhBMP-2 alone were implanted into the bone defects and compressed with cotton swab.Bone granules were obtained at 2,4 and 6 weeks after procedure and received histological analysis.LSD t-test and a subsequent t-test were adopted for statistical analysis.Results: Histomorphometric analysis revealed newly formed bones,and calcium citrate has been absorbed in the treatment group.The percent of newly formed bone area in femoral condyle in control group and CC-rhBMP-2 group was respectively 31.73%±1.26% vs 48.21%±2.37% at 2 weeks; 43.40%±1.65% vs 57.32%±1.47% at 4 weeks,and 51.32%±7.80% vs 66.74%±4.05% at 6 weeks (P<0.05 for all).At 2 weeks,mature cancellous bone was observed to be already formed in the treatment group.Conclusion: From this study,it can be concluded that calcium citrate combined with rhBMP-2 signifcantly enhances bone regeneration in bone defects.This synthetic gelatin matrix stimulates formation of new bone and bone marrow in the defect areas by releasing calcium ions.

  2. In-situ high temperature XRD of calcium phosphate biomaterial using DEHPA as the starting material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process to produce calcium phosphate biomaterial was done using an organic based phosphoric acid (DEHPA) as its starting material. The gel obtained from this reaction was used to study calcium phosphate transformation using in-situ XRD with temperature ranges from room temperature to 1300 degree C. The results obtained from this analysis show the following phase transformation: Gel β-Ca2P2O7 β-TCP + HA α-TCP + HA, β-Ca2P2O7 forms at 400 degree C and as we heat the sample at 1000 degree C peaks belonging to β- TCP and HA appears showing the transformation of the β-Ca2P2O7 phase. When the sample is heated up further to 1200 degree C, β-TCP is transform into α-TCP. In the cold in-situ study, XRD analysis was performed on the sample from room temperature to -140 degree C. At room the XRD diffractogram shows the sample as an amorphous material and as the temperature was further lowered sharp peaks begins to form indicating that the material had becomes crystalline. The peaks were identified to be that calcium hydrogen phosphate (Ca(H2PO4)2) and this indicates that there is no hydroxyl group removal during the cooling process. The relative crystallinity values obtained for the different cooling temperatures show a slow exponential increase on the initial cooling of 0 to -100 degree C and at further cooling temperatures resulted fast and linear process. Also unlike the in-situ XRD analysis performs at high temperature no phase transformation occurred at this low temperature. (Author)

  3. Biocalcite, a multifunctional inorganic polymer: Building block for calcareous sponge spicules and bioseed for the synthesis of calcium phosphate-based bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Calcium carbonate is the material that builds up the spicules of the calcareous sponges. Recent results revealed that the calcium carbonate/biocalcite-based spicular skeleton of these animals is formed through an enzymatic mechanism, such as the skeleton of the siliceous sponges, evolutionarily the oldest animals that consist of biosilica. The enzyme that mediates the calcium carbonate deposition has been identified as a carbonic anhydrase (CA and has been cloned from the calcareous sponge species Sycon raphanus. Calcium carbonate deposits are also found in vertebrate bones besides the main constituent, calcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite (HA. Evidence has been presented that during the initial phase of HA synthesis poorly crystalline carbonated apatite is deposited. Recent data summarized here indicate that during early bone formation calcium carbonate deposits enzymatically formed by CA, act as potential bioseeds for the precipitation of calcium phosphate mineral onto bone-forming osteoblasts. Two different calcium carbonate phases have been found during CA-driven enzymatic calcium carbonate deposition in in vitro assays: calcite crystals and round-shaped vaterite deposits. The CA provides a new target of potential anabolic agents for treatment of bone diseases; a first CA activator stimulating the CA-driven calcium carbonate deposition has been identified. In addition, the CA-driven calcium carbonate crystal formation can be frozen at the vaterite state in the presence of silintaphin-2, an aspartic acid/glutamic acid-rich sponge-specific protein. The discovery that calcium carbonate crystals act as bioseeds in human bone formation may allow the development of novel biomimetic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Na-alginate hydrogels, enriched with biosilica, have recently been demonstrated as a suitable matrix to embed bone forming cells for rapid prototyping bioprinting/3D cell printing applications.

  4. A multinuclear solid state NMR spectroscopic study of the structural evolution of disordered calcium silicate sol-gel biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhongjie; Jones, Julian R; Hanna, John V; Smith, Mark E

    2015-01-28

    Disordered sol-gel prepared calcium silicate biomaterials show significant, composition dependent ability to bond with bone. Bone bonding is attributed to rapid hydroxycarbonate apatite (HCA) formation on the glass surface after immersion in body fluid (or implantation). Atomic scale details of the development of the structure of (CaO)x(SiO2)1-x (x = 0.2, 0.3 and 0.5) under heat treatment and subsequent dissolution in simulated body fluid (SBF) are revealed through a multinuclear solid state NMR approach using one-dimensional (17)O, (29)Si, (31)P and (1)H. Central to this study is the combination of conventional static and magic angle spinning (MAS) and two-dimensional (2D) triple quantum (3Q) (17)O NMR experiments that can readily distinguish and quantify the bridging (BOs) and non-bridging (NBOs) oxygens in the silicate network. Although soluble calcium is present in the sol, the (17)O NMR results reveal that the sol-gel produced network structure is initially dominated by BOs after gelation, aging and drying (e.g. at 120 °C), indicating a nanoscale mixture of the calcium salt and a predominantly silicate network. Only once the calcium salt is decomposed at elevated temperatures do the Ca(2+) ions become available to break BO. Apatite forming ability in SBF depends strongly on the surface OH and calcium content. The presence of calcium aids HCA formation via promotion of surface hydration and the ready availability of Ca(2+) ions. (17)O NMR shows the rapid loss of NBOs charge balanced by calcium as it is leached into the SBF. The formation of nanocrystalline, partially ordered HCA can be detected via(31)P NMR. This data indicates the importance of achieving the right balance of BO/NBO for optimal biochemical response and network properties. PMID:25494341

  5. Hybrid biomaterials based on calcium carbonate and polyaniline nanoparticles for application in photothermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neira-Carrillo, Andrónico; Yslas, Edith; Marini, Yazmin Amar; Vásquez-Quitral, Patricio; Sánchez, Marianela; Riveros, Ana; Yáñez, Diego; Cavallo, Pablo; Kogan, Marcelo J; Acevedo, Diego

    2016-09-01

    Inorganic materials contain remarkable properties for drug delivery, such as a large surface area and nanoporous structure. Among these materials, CaCO3 microparticles (CMPs) exhibit a high encapsulation efficiency and solubility in acidic media. The extracellular pH of tumor neoplastic tissue is significantly lower than the extracellular pH of normal tissue facilitating the release of drug-encapsulating CMPs in this area. Conducting polyaniline (PANI) absorbs light energy and transforms it into localized heat to produce cell death. This work aimed to generate hybrid CMPs loaded with PANI for photothermal therapy (PTT). The hybrid nanomaterial was synthesized with CaCO3 and carboxymethyl cellulose in a simple, reproducible manner. The CMP-PANI-Cys particles were developed for the first time and represent a novel type of hybrid biomaterial. Resultant nanoparticles were characterized utilizing scanning electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, zeta potential, UV-vis, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy. In vitro HeLa cells in dark and irradiated conditions showed that CMP-PANI-Cys and PANI-Cys are nontoxic at the assayed concentrations. Hybrid biomaterials displayed high efficiency for potential PTT compared with PANI-Cys. In summary, hierarchical hybrid biomaterials composed of CMPs and PANI-Cys combined with near infrared irradiation represents a useful alternative in PTT. PMID:27288818

  6. Hybrid biomaterials based on calcium carbonate and polyaniline nanoparticles for application in photothermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neira-Carrillo, Andrónico; Yslas, Edith; Marini, Yazmin Amar; Vásquez-Quitral, Patricio; Sánchez, Marianela; Riveros, Ana; Yáñez, Diego; Cavallo, Pablo; Kogan, Marcelo J; Acevedo, Diego

    2016-09-01

    Inorganic materials contain remarkable properties for drug delivery, such as a large surface area and nanoporous structure. Among these materials, CaCO3 microparticles (CMPs) exhibit a high encapsulation efficiency and solubility in acidic media. The extracellular pH of tumor neoplastic tissue is significantly lower than the extracellular pH of normal tissue facilitating the release of drug-encapsulating CMPs in this area. Conducting polyaniline (PANI) absorbs light energy and transforms it into localized heat to produce cell death. This work aimed to generate hybrid CMPs loaded with PANI for photothermal therapy (PTT). The hybrid nanomaterial was synthesized with CaCO3 and carboxymethyl cellulose in a simple, reproducible manner. The CMP-PANI-Cys particles were developed for the first time and represent a novel type of hybrid biomaterial. Resultant nanoparticles were characterized utilizing scanning electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, zeta potential, UV-vis, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy. In vitro HeLa cells in dark and irradiated conditions showed that CMP-PANI-Cys and PANI-Cys are nontoxic at the assayed concentrations. Hybrid biomaterials displayed high efficiency for potential PTT compared with PANI-Cys. In summary, hierarchical hybrid biomaterials composed of CMPs and PANI-Cys combined with near infrared irradiation represents a useful alternative in PTT.

  7. One-step synthesized calcium phosphate-based material for the removal of alizarin S dye from aqueous solutions: isothermal, kinetics, and thermodynamics studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeogun, Abideen Idowu; Babu, Ramesh Balakrishnan

    2015-07-01

    Calcium phosphate hydroxyapatite (Ca-Hap) synthesized from CaCO3 and H3PO5, it was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared, and X-ray diffraction. The Ca-Hap was used for the removal of Alizarin Red S dye from its aqueous solution. The kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamic of the adsorption of the dye onto the Ca-Hap were investigated. The effects of contact time, initial dye concentration, pH as well as temperature on adsorption capacity of Ca-Hap were studied. Experimental data were analyzed using six model equations: Langmuir, Freudlinch, Redlich-Peterson, Temkin, Dubinin-Radushkevich, and Sips isotherms and it was found that the data fitted well with Sips and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovic, and Avrami kinetic models were used to test the experimental data in order to elucidate the kinetic adsorption process and it was found that pseudo-second-order model best fit the data. The calculated thermodynamics parameters (∆G°, ∆H° and ∆S°) indicated that the process is spontaneous and endothermic in nature.

  8. Mass attenuation coefficient (μ/ρ), effective atomic number (Zeff) and measurement of x-ray energy spectra using based calcium phosphate biomaterials: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In dentistry, alveolar bone regeneration procedures using based calcium phosphate biomaterials have been shown effective. However,there are not reports in the literature of studies the interaction of low energy radiation in these biomaterials used as attenuator and not being then allowed a comparison between the theoretical values and experimental.The objective of this study was to determine the interaction of radiation parameters of four dental biomaterials - BioOss, Cerasorb M Dental, Straumann Boneceramic and Osteogen for diagnostic radiology qualities. As a material and methods, the composition of the biomaterials was determined by the analytical techniques. The samples with 0.181 cm to 0,297 cm thickness were experimentally used as attenuators for the measurement of the transmitted X-rays spectra in X-ray equipment with 50 to 90 kV range by spectrometric system comprising the Cd Te detector. After this procedure, the mass attenuation coefficient, the effective atomic number were determined and compared between all the specimens analyzed, using the program WinXCOM in the range of 10 to 200 keV. In all strains examined observed that the energy spectrum of x-rays transmitted through the BioOss has the mean energy slightly smaller than the others biomaterials for close thickness. The μ/ρ and Zeff of the biomaterials showed its dependence on photon energy and atomic number of the elements of the material analyzed. It is concluded according to the methodology employed in this study that the measurements of x-ray spectrum, μ/ρ and Zeff using biomaterials as attenuators confirmed that the thickness, density, composition of the samples, the incident photon energy are factors that determine the characteristics of radiation in a tissue or equivalent material. (Author)

  9. Editorial on the original article entitled "3D printing of composite calcium phosphate and collagen scaffolds for bone regeneration" published in the Biomaterials on February 14, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lan; Jiang, Qing

    2015-05-01

    The paper entitled "3D printing of composite calcium phosphate and collagen scaffolds for bone regeneration" published in the Biomaterials recently illuminated the way to make particular scaffolds with calcium phosphate (CaP) powder, phosphoric acid, type I collagen and Tween 80 in low temperature. After the optimal concentration of each component was determined, the scaffolds were evaluated in a critically sized murine femoral defect model and exhibited good material properties. We made some related introduction of materials applied in 3D printing for bone tissue engineering based on this article to demonstrate the current progress in this field of study.

  10. Development of calcium phosphate based bioceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amit Sinha; A Ingle; K R Munim; S N Vaidya; B P Sharma; A N Bhisey

    2001-12-01

    Two bioceramics (Ca–P–O glass and A–W glass ceramic) were produced using conventional methods of ceramic technology. X-ray powder diffraction patterns were used for identifying the phases and 3-point bend test was carried out for the determination of fracture strength of the bioceramics. Biocompatibility of both ceramics was evaluated using animal model experiments. Histological studies showed that A–W glass ceramic implanted in the tibia of rat formed an intimate contact with newly grown bone and provided enough strength to the bone to bear the animal weight. Implants made of Ca–P–O glass was almost fully resorbed and was replaced by new bone. The implants made of both the bioceramics were biocompatible and did not exhibit any kind of adverse effect to the surrounding tissues.

  11. Porous silicon biomaterials: PSi/Cyclodextrin drug delivery hybrids and PSi/Calcium phosphate bioceramic cell scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández Montelongo, Jesús Jacobo

    2013-01-01

    Tesis doctoral inédita, leída en Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Física Aplicada. Fecha de lectura: 14-11-2013 Porous silicon (PSi) is an excellent biomaterial given its biocompatibility, biodegradability and bioresorbability. Nevertheless, it is necessary to adapt its properties depending on the specific application. In that sense, two new PSi-based biomaterials were developed to work in the field of drug delivery and cell scaffolds. PSi-b...

  12. Degradation of zinc containing phosphate-based glass as a material for orthopedic tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaysi, Mustafa Al; Petrie, Aviva; Shah, Rishma; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2016-10-01

    Phosphate-based glasses have been examined in many studies as a potential biomaterial for bone repair because of its degradation properties, which can be controlled and allow the release of various elements to promote osteogenic tissue growth. However most of these experiments studied either tertiary or quaternary glass systems. This study investigated a qinternary system that included titanium dioxide for degradation rate control and zinc that is considered to have a role in bone formation. Zinc and titanium phosphate glass discs of different compositions were melt synthesized and samples of each composition was tested for different physical, chemical and biological characteristics via density measurement, X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, mass loss, ion release, scanning electron microscopy, biocompatibility studies via live/dead assays at three time points (day 1, 4, and 7). The results showed that the glass was amorphous and that the all thermal variables decreased as zinc oxide amount raised, mass loss as well as ion release increased as zinc oxide increased, and the maximum rise was with ZnO15. The cellular studies showed that all the formulation showed similar cytocompatibility properties with MG63 except ZnO15, which displayed cytotoxic properties and this was confirmed also by the scanning electron microscope images. In conclusion, replacing calcium oxide with zinc oxide in proportion less than 10 % can have a positive effect on bone forming cells. PMID:27620740

  13. A brief review of calcium phosphate conversion coating on magnesium and its alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaludin, Mohd Amin Farhan; Jamal, Zul Azhar Zahid; Jamaludin, Shamsul Baharin; Derman, Mohd Nazree

    2016-07-01

    Recent developments have shown that magnesium is a promising candidate to be used as a biomaterial. Owing to its light weight, biocompatibility and compressive strength comparable with natural bones makes magnesium as an excellent choice for biomaterial. However, high reactivity and low corrosion resistance properties have restricted the application of magnesium as biomaterials. At the moment, several strategies have been developed to solve this problem. Surface modification of magnesium is one of the popular solutions to solve the problem. Among many techniques developed in the surface modification, conversion coating method is one of the simple and effective techniques. From various types of conversion coating, calcium phosphate-based conversion coating is the most suitable for biomedical fields. This paper reviews some studies on calcium phosphate coating on Mg and its alloys via chemical conversion method and discusses some factors determining the coating performance.

  14. Calcium phosphate nanocoatings and nanocomposites, part 2: thin films for slow drug delivery and osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Nissan, Besim; Macha, Innocent; Cazalbou, Sophie; Choi, Andy H

    2016-01-01

    During the last two decades although many calcium phosphate based nanomaterials have been proposed for both drug delivery, and bone regeneration, their coating applications have been somehow slow due to the problems related to their complicated synthesis methods. In order to control the efficiency of local drug delivery of a biomaterial the critical pore sizes as well as good control of the chemical composition is pertinent. A variety of calcium phosphate based nanocoated composite drug delivery systems are currently being investigated. This review aims to give an update into the advancements of calcium phosphate nanocoatings and thin film nanolaminates. In particular recent research on PLA/hydroxyapatite composite thin films and coatings into the slow drug delivery for the possible treatment of osteomyelitis is covered. PMID:26891748

  15. Mass attenuation coefficient (μ/ρ), effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) and measurement of x-ray energy spectra using based calcium phosphate biomaterials: a comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes Z, M. A.; Da Silva, T. A.; Nogueira, M. S. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear / CNEN, Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, Belo Horizonte 31270-901, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Goncalves Z, E., E-mail: madelon@cdtn.br [Pontifice Catholic University of Minas Gerais, Av. Dom Jose Gaspar 500, Belo Horizonte 30535-901, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    In dentistry, alveolar bone regeneration procedures using based calcium phosphate biomaterials have been shown effective. However,there are not reports in the literature of studies the interaction of low energy radiation in these biomaterials used as attenuator and not being then allowed a comparison between the theoretical values and experimental.The objective of this study was to determine the interaction of radiation parameters of four dental biomaterials - BioOss, Cerasorb M Dental, Straumann Boneceramic and Osteogen for diagnostic radiology qualities. As a material and methods, the composition of the biomaterials was determined by the analytical techniques. The samples with 0.181 cm to 0,297 cm thickness were experimentally used as attenuators for the measurement of the transmitted X-rays spectra in X-ray equipment with 50 to 90 kV range by spectrometric system comprising the Cd Te detector. After this procedure, the mass attenuation coefficient, the effective atomic number were determined and compared between all the specimens analyzed, using the program WinXCOM in the range of 10 to 200 keV. In all strains examined observed that the energy spectrum of x-rays transmitted through the BioOss has the mean energy slightly smaller than the others biomaterials for close thickness. The μ/ρ and Z{sub eff} of the biomaterials showed its dependence on photon energy and atomic number of the elements of the material analyzed. It is concluded according to the methodology employed in this study that the measurements of x-ray spectrum, μ/ρ and Z{sub eff} using biomaterials as attenuators confirmed that the thickness, density, composition of the samples, the incident photon energy are factors that determine the characteristics of radiation in a tissue or equivalent material. (Author)

  16. [Cardiovascular biomaterials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loisance, D

    1995-03-01

    Hemocompatible biomaterials, i.e. materials to be used in a biological environment, are of various origins (biological, synthetic). The great variety of physical and chemical characteristics has allowed design of various prosthesis and artificial organs. Use of biomaterials and artificial organs has made possible the development of substitutive therapies, a growing component of medical care. None of the biomaterials presently used is ideal. Everyone of them is responsible for a local and general reaction: foreign body reaction, coagulation, whole body inflammatory response. For years, these reactions have been poorly understood and development was of a very empirical nature. Progress in cellular and molecular biology permits today a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in these reactions. Use of biomaterials is facing to day a difficult problem; liability concerns threaten further developments and leads to market withdrawal of major basic materials.

  17. Supramolecular biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Matthew J.; Appel, Eric A.; Meijer, E. W.; Langer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Polymers, ceramics and metals have historically dominated the application of materials in medicine. Yet rationally designed materials that exploit specific, directional, tunable and reversible non-covalent interactions offer unprecedented advantages: they enable modular and generalizable platforms with tunable mechanical, chemical and biological properties. Indeed, the reversible nature of supramolecular interactions gives rise to biomaterials that can sense and respond to physiological cues, or that mimic the structural and functional aspects of biological signalling. In this Review, we discuss the properties of several supramolecular biomaterials, as well as their applications in drug delivery, tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and immunology. We envision that supramolecular biomaterials will contribute to the development of new therapies that combine highly functional materials with unmatched patient- and application-specific tailoring of both material and biological properties.

  18. Biological biomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge-Herrero, E. [Servicio de Cirugia Experimental. Clinica Puerta de Hierro, Madrid (Spain)

    1997-05-01

    There are a number of situations in which substances of biological origin are employed as biomaterials. Most of them are macromolecules derived from isolated connective tissue or the connective tissue itself in membrane form, in both cases, the tissue can be used in its natural form or be chemically treated. In other cases, certain blood vessels can be chemically pretreated and used as vascular prostheses. Proteins such as albumin, collagen and fibrinogen are employed to coat vascular prostheses. Certain polysaccharides have also been tested for use in controlled drug release systems. Likewise, a number of tissues, such as dura mater, bovine pericardium, procine valves and human valves, are used in the preparation of cardiac prostheses. We also use veins from animals or humans in arterial replacement. In none of these cases are the tissues employed dissimilar to the native tissues as they have been chemically modified, becoming a new bio material with different physical and biochemical properties. In short, we find that natural products are being utilized as biomaterials and must be considered as such; thus, it is necessary to study both their chemicobiological and physicomechanical properties. In the present report, we review the current applications, problems and future prospects of some of these biological biomaterials. (Author) 84 refs.

  19. [Orthopedic biomaterials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedel, L; Nizard, R; Meunier, A

    1995-03-01

    It is very challenging to insure long term security and effectiveness for joint arthroplasties, artificial ligaments, extensive bone replacement and some other orthopaedic biomaterials. How can we predict the long term security and efficacy of such an implant? Only an interdisciplinary approach can provide a satisfactory answer. The surgeon must define the needs, he must find the appropriate surgical techniques and conduct the clinical trial. The material scientist must elaborate safe and secure materials with regards to their biotolerance and mechanical resistance. This has to be performed in close connection with the biomechanics lab. Biomechanic Science must predict the expected stresses. It has to design special simulator to quantify in vitro material toughness, wear characteristics, lubrication, behaviour and surface deformation. Biological and mechanical standardized tests have to be carried on. Then it is possible to conduct a clinical trial, prospectively in comparison to another already developed material. Clinical studies could serve to measure efficacy and radiological modification. After failure, it is possible to analyse retrieved specimen, to measure the material degradation in real environment, to perform biological studies on retrieved tissues i.e. : macrophagic activities, tissue response, bone ingrowth, inflammatory or immunological reaction. For more than twenty years we worked on alumina against alumina total hips. The idea was to develop a low debris system to enhance long term longevity of the prosthesis. The Charnley design has proven its effectiveness for more than fifteen years, but polyethylene wear is responsible for late failures. This is specially crucial for young patients, male sex and high activity level patients. At the beginning, biological studies and mechanical tests were performed, it appeared that the biological tolerance of alumina ceramic was excellent, the fracture toughness was adequate, but there were some problems related

  20. In vivo transformation of a calcium carbonate (aragonite based implant's biomaterial to bone. A histological, chemical and FT-IR study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón González

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió la respuesta del tejido óseo a implantes de carbonato de calcio aragonito (CCA. Se utilizaron implantes de Hidroxiapatita Coralina (HA en la misma forma y proceder quirúrgico como biomaterial de control comparativo. Se investigó el efecto de la composición química sobre la capacidad de curación y la velocidad de reabsorción de ambos biomateriales implantados en el fémur de ratas. Los animales fueron sacrificados a los 3, 7, 15, 21 y 60 d y los implantes fueron recuperados para los análisis posteriores. La evaluación se realiz ó mediante técnicas de microscopia óptica, estudios histológicos y radiográficos, análisis químico cuantitativo de calcio y fósforo y espectroscopia IR de Transformada de Fourier (FT-IR. Se encontró que ambos biomateriales fueron bien asimilados y se integraron al tejido óseo circundante. En el caso de la Hidroxiapatita se observó que a los 60 d el defecto óseo fue reparado, pero el biomaterial mantuvo la misma apariencia inicial. Por el contrario, en ese mismo período, el implante de coral (CCA disminuyó su tamaño y su apariencia resultó más parecida a la del tejido circundante. Los estudios histológicos mostraron la misma capacidad osteogénica en ambos biomateriales en los primeros 7 d de implantados, pero a los 15 d se aprecia una mayor velocidad de sustitución del tejido fibrovascular por hueso en el caso del CCA. La cinética de biodegradación calculada a partir de los análisis químicos (relación Ca/P y de los espectros IR coincide con las observaciones histológicas y muestra una mayor velocidad de reabsorción de los implantes de carbonato de calcio (CCA. Se encontró que la transformación del CCA produce una fase similar a la del hueso debido a la pérdida paulatina del anión carbonato y la incorporación del fosfato correspondiente. El CCA también presentó una mayor capacidad osteogénica en comparación con la HA. A los 60 d el (42,5 ± 3,2 % del CCA originalmente

  1. Structure and properties of strontium-doped phosphate-based glasses

    OpenAIRE

    Abou Neel, Ensanya A; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Pickup, David M.; O'Dell, Luke A.; Morden, Nicola J.; Newport, Robert J.; Smith, Mark E; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2009-01-01

    Owing to similarity in both ionic size and polarity, strontium (Sr2+) is known to behave in a comparable way to calcium (Ca2+), and its role in bone metabolism has been well documented as both anti-resorptive and bone forming. In this study, novel quaternary strontium-doped phosphate-based glasses, containing 1, 3 and 5 mol% SrO, were synthesized and characterized. P-31 magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance results showed that, as the Sr2+ content is increased in the glasses, ...

  2. Biomaterial-based regional chemotherapy: Local anticancer drug delivery to enhance chemotherapy and minimize its side-effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krukiewicz, Katarzyna; Zak, Jerzy K

    2016-05-01

    Since the majority of anticancer pharmacological agents affect not only cancer tissue but also normal cells, chemotherapy is usually accompanied with severe side effects. Regional chemotherapy, as the alternative version of conventional treatment, leads to the enhancement of the therapeutic efficiency of anticancer drugs and, simultaneously, reduction of toxic effects to healthy tissues. This paper provides an insight into different approaches of local delivery of chemotherapeutics, such as the injection of anticancer agents directly into tumor tissue, the use of injectable in situ forming drug carriers or injectable platforms in a form of implants. The wide range of biomaterials used as reservoirs of anticancer drugs is described, i.e. poly(ethylene glycol) and its copolymers, polyurethanes, poly(lactic acid) and its copolymers, poly(ɛ-caprolactone), polyanhydrides, chitosan, cellulose, cyclodextrins, silk, conducting polymers, modified titanium surfaces, calcium phosphate based biomaterials, silicone and silica implants, as well as carbon nanotubes and graphene. To emphasize the applicability of regional chemotherapy in cancer treatment, the commercially available products approved by the relevant health agencies are presented. PMID:26952500

  3. Biomaterials for cardiac regeneration

    CERN Document Server

    Ruel, Marc

    2015-01-01

    This book offers readers a comprehensive biomaterials-based approach to achieving clinically successful, functionally integrated vasculogenesis and myogenesis in the heart. Coverage is multidisciplinary, including the role of extracellular matrices in cardiac development, whole-heart tissue engineering, imaging the mechanisms and effects of biomaterial-based cardiac regeneration, and autologous bioengineered heart valves. Bringing current knowledge together into a single volume, this book provides a compendium to students and new researchers in the field and constitutes a platform to allow for future developments and collaborative approaches in biomaterials-based regenerative medicine, even beyond cardiac applications. This book also: Provides a valuable overview of the engineering of biomaterials for cardiac regeneration, including coverage of combined biomaterials and stem cells, as well as extracellular matrices Presents readers with multidisciplinary coverage of biomaterials for cardiac repair, including ...

  4. Voltammetry of Medical Biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Gulaboski, Rubin; Markovski, Velo

    2015-01-01

    The use of biomaterials in the medicine, dentistry and pharmacy represents probably a major breakthrough in tackling many diseases or disabilities in the last 50 years. We refer to varios techniques that are used for the characterization of the structure and the composition of the biomaterials. Voltammetry is an electrochemical technique that helps mainly in understanding the redox properties of various biomaterials containing some suitable redox centers in their structure. We give in this le...

  5. Biomaterials for MEMS

    CERN Document Server

    Chiao, Mu

    2011-01-01

    This book serves as a guide for practicing engineers, researchers, and students interested in MEMS devices that use biomaterials and biomedical applications. It is also suitable for engineers and researchers interested in MEMS and its applications but who do not have the necessary background in biomaterials.Biomaterials for MEMS highlights important features and issues of biomaterials that have been used in MEMS and biomedical areas. Hence this book is an essential guide for MEMS engineers or researchers who are trained in engineering institutes that do not provide the background or knowledge

  6. An introduction to biomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Hollinger, Jeffrey O

    2011-01-01

    Consensus Definitions, Fundamental Concepts, and a Standardized Approach to Applied Biomaterials Sciences, J.O. HollingerBiology, Biomechanics, Biomaterial Interactions: Wound Healing BiologyCutaneous Wound Pathobiology: Raison d'etre for Tissue Engineering, L.K. Macri and R.A.F. ClarkOsseous Wound Healing, A. Nawab, M. Wong, D. Kwak, L. Schutte, A. Sharma, and J.O. HollingerBiology, Biomechanics, Biomaterial Interactions: Cellular MechanicsCell and Tissue Mechanobiology, W. Guo, P. Alvarez, and Y. WangBiology, Biomechanics, Biomaterial Interactions: Materials-Host InteractionsCell-Material In

  7. Biomaterials in Artificial Organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambic, Helen E.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Biomaterials are substances or combinations of substances that can be used in a system that treats, augments, or replaces any tissue, organ, or body function. The nature and role of these substances, particularly in the cadiovascular system, are discussed. (JN)

  8. Biofilm and Dental Biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Øilo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available All treatment involving the use of biomaterials in the body can affect the host in positive or negative ways. The microbiological environment in the oral cavity is affected by the composition and shape of the biomaterials used for oral restorations. This may impair the patients’ oral health and sometimes their general health as well. Many factors determine the composition of the microbiota and the formation of biofilm in relation to biomaterials such as, surface roughness, surface energy and chemical composition, This paper aims to give an overview of the scientific literature regarding the association between the chemical, mechanical and physical properties of dental biomaterials and oral biofilm formation, with emphasis on current research and future perspectives.

  9. Regenerative biomaterials: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banyard, Derek A; Bourgeois, Jenna Martin; Widgerow, Alan D; Evans, Gregory R D

    2015-06-01

    The authors present a review of biomaterials, substances traditionally derived from human or animal tissue or, more recently, biodegradable synthetics modeled after naturally occurring resources. These constructs differ from purely synthetic materials in that they are degraded or incorporated into a host's tissue. These biomaterials include a diverse array of medical products, such as acellular dermal matrix, bone substitutes, and injectables. In this review, the authors examine various clinical applications, including burn reconstruction and wound healing, breast surgery, complex abdominal wall reconstruction, craniofacial repair, and cosmetic surgery. Biomaterials such as acellular dermal matrix have proven beneficial in difficult-to-treat applications; however, more prospective data are needed to determine their true efficacy and cost-effectiveness. PMID:26017603

  10. Advanced biomaterials and biodevices

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    Biomaterials are the fastest-growing emerging field of  biodevices. Design and development of biomaterials play a significant role in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases. Recently, a variety of scaffolds/carriers have been evaluated for tissue regeneration, drug delivery, sensing and imaging.  Liposomes and microspheres have been developed for sustained delivery. Several anti-cancer drugs have been successfully formulated using biomaterial. The targeting of drugs to certain physiological sites has emerged as a promising tool in the treatment with improved drug bioavailability and reduction of dosing frequency. Biodevices-based targeting of drugs may improve the therapeutic success by limiting the adverse drug effects and resulting in more patient compliance and attaining a higher adherence level. Advanced biodevices hold merit as a drug carrier with high carrier capacity, feasibility of incorporation of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic substances, high stability, as well as the feasibility...

  11. Biomaterials and therapeutic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Angelo

    2016-03-01

    A number of organic and inorganic, synthetic or natural derived materials have been classified as not harmful for the human body and are appropriate for medical applications. These materials are usually named biomaterials since they are suitable for introduction into living human tissues of prosthesis, as well as for drug delivery, diagnosis, therapies, tissue regeneration and many other clinical applications. Recently, nanomaterials and bioabsorbable polymers have greatly enlarged the fields of application of biomaterials attracting much more the attention of the biomedical community. In this review paper I am going to discuss the most recent advances in the use of magnetic nanoparticles and biodegradable materials as new biomedical tools.

  12. Characterizing biomaterial complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Clifton

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Biomaterials research will always require a range of techniques to examine structure and function on a range of length scales and in a range of settings. Neutron scattering provides a unique way of disentangling the molecular and structural complexity of biomaterials through study of the constituent components. We examine how the technique has been used to study surface immobilized proteins and lipid films, floating lipid bilayers as mimics of in vitro planar membranes, and formation of fibres from solution by insects and spiders.

  13. Biomaterials and magnetism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Bahadur; Jyotsnendu Giri

    2003-06-01

    Magnetism plays an important role in different applications of health care. Magnetite (Fe34) is biocompatible and therefore is one of the most extensively used biomaterials for different applications ranging from cell separation and drug delivery to hyperthermia. Other than this, a large number of magnetic materials in bulk as well as in the form of nano particles have been exploited for a variety of medical applications. In this review, we summarize the salient features of clinical applications, where magnetic biomaterials are used. Magnetic intracellular hyperthermia for cancer therapy is discussed in detail.

  14. Biomaterial Selection for Tooth Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Zhenglin; Nie, Hemin; Shuang WANG; Lee, Chang Hun; Li, Ang; Fu, Susan Y.; Zhou, Hong; Chen, Lili; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2011-01-01

    Biomaterials are native or synthetic polymers that act as carriers for drug delivery or scaffolds for tissue regeneration. When implanted in vivo, biomaterials should be nontoxic and exert intended functions. For tooth regeneration, biomaterials have primarily served as a scaffold for (1) transplanted stem cells and/or (2) recruitment of endogenous stem cells. This article critically synthesizes our knowledge of biomaterial use in tooth regeneration, including the selection of native and/or s...

  15. Biomaterials for tissue engineering: summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, L.; Mikos, A. G.; Gibbons, D. F.; Picciolo, G. L.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    This article summarizes presentations and discussion at the workshop "Enabling Biomaterial Technology for Tissue Engineering," which was held during the Fifth World Biomaterials Congress in May 1996. Presentations covered the areas of material substrate architecture, barrier effects, and cellular response, including analysis of biomaterials challenges involved in producing specific tissue-engineered products.

  16. Influence of octacalcium phosphate coating on osteoinductive properties of biomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habibovic, P.; Valk, van der C.M.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.; Groot, de K.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the influence of octacalcium phosphate (OCP) coating on osteoinductive behaviour of the biomaterials. Porous titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V), hydroxyapatite (HA), biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) and polyethylene glyco terephtalate/polybuthylene terephtalate (PEGT–PBT) copoly

  17. Optical approach in characterizing dental biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoli, Nazif; Vučić, Zlatko; Milat, Ognjen; Gladić, Jadranko; Lovrić, Davorin; Pandurić, Vlatko; Marović, Danijela; Moguš-Milanković, Andrea; Ristić, Mira; Čalogović, Marina; Tarle, Zrinka

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the current activities of a research collaborative program between three institutions from Zagreb (School of Dental Medicine, Institute of Physics, and Institute Ruđer Bo\\vsković). Within the scope of this program, it is planned to investigate and find guidelines for the refinement of the properties of dental biomaterials (DBs) and of procedures in restorative dental medicine. It is also planned to identify and model the dominant mechanisms which control polymerization of DBs. The materials to be investigated include methacrylate based composite resins, new composite materials with amorphous calcium phosphate, silorane based composite resins, glass-ionomer cements, and giomer.

  18. Biomaterials engineered for integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Moroni

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available As tissue engineering and regenerative medicine are staged to enter the medical care setting, the integration of these newly formed tissues with themselves and the surrounding natural environment of the treated patients is of paramount importance. Although cells alone have undoubtedly obtained a certain success as therapies for a number of different diseases, it is still unclear whether they form new tissues or they stimulate the local cells to restore tissue continuity. In both cases, the resulting outcome is often poorly connected with the surrounding environment and functionality is impaired after few months. True integration can be achieved by designing smart templates made of biomaterials that not only act as scaffolds for cells to adhere and form new tissue, but also provide cues and signals to promote functional tissue connections. Criteria to engineer biomaterials for integration and methodologies used to assess effective connection with host tissues are reviewed.

  19. Biomaterials surface science

    CERN Document Server

    Taubert, Andreas; Rodriguez-Cabello, José Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The book provides an overview of the highly interdisciplinary field of surface science in the context of biological and biomedical applications. The covered topics range from micro- and nanostructuring for imparting functionality in a top-down manner to the bottom-up fabrication of gradient surfaces by self-assembly, from interfaces between biomaterials and living matter to smart, stimuli-responsive surfaces, and from cell and surface mechanics to the elucidation of cell-chip interactions in biomedical devices.

  20. Biomaterials for periodontal regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Shue, Li; Yufeng, Zhang; Mony, Ullas

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal disease is characterized by the destruction of periodontal tissues. Various methods of regenerative periodontal therapy, including the use of barrier membranes, bone replacement grafts, growth factors and the combination of these procedures have been investigated. The development of biomaterials for tissue engineering has considerably improved the available treatment options above. They fall into two broad classes: ceramics and polymers. The available ceramic-based materials inclu...

  1. Biomaterials in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbell, J A

    1995-06-01

    Biomaterials play a pivotal role in field of tissue engineering. Biomimetic synthetic polymers have been created to elicit specific cellular functions and to direct cell-cell interactions both in implants that are initially cell-free, which may serve as matrices to conduct tissue regeneration, and in implants to support cell transplantation. Biomimetic approaches have been based on polymers endowed with bioadhesive receptor-binding peptides and mono- and oligosaccharides. These materials have been patterned in two- and three-dimensions to generate model multicellular tissue architectures, and this approach may be useful in future efforts to generate complex organizations of multiple cell types. Natural polymers have also played an important role in these efforts, and recombinant polymers that combine the beneficial aspects of natural polymers with many of the desirable features of synthetic polymers have been designed and produced. Biomaterials have been employed to conduct and accelerate otherwise naturally occurring phenomena, such as tissue regeneration in wound healing in the otherwise healthy subject; to induce cellular responses that might not be normally present, such as healing in a diseased subject or the generation of a new vascular bed to receive a subsequent cell transplant; and to block natural phenomena, such as the immune rejection of cell transplants from other species or the transmission of growth factor signals that stimulate scar formation. This review introduces the biomaterials and describes their application in the engineering of new tissues and the manipulation of tissue responses. PMID:9634795

  2. Biomaterials for craniofacial reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neumann, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomaterials for reconstruction of bony defects of the skull comprise of osteosynthetic materials applied after osteotomies or traumatic fractures and materials to fill bony defects which result from malformation, trauma or tumor resections. Other applications concern functional augmentations for dental implants or aesthetic augmentations in the facial region.For ostheosynthesis, mini- and microplates made from titanium alloys provide major advantages concerning biocompatibility, stability and individual fitting to the implant bed. The necessity of removing asymptomatic plates and screws after fracture healing is still a controversial issue. Risks and costs of secondary surgery for removal face a low rate of complications (due to corrosion products when the material remains in situ. Resorbable osteosynthesis systems have similar mechanical stability and are especially useful in the growing skull.The huge variety of biomaterials for the reconstruction of bony defects makes it difficult to decide which material is adequate for which indication and for which site. The optimal biomaterial that meets every requirement (e.g. biocompatibility, stability, intraoperative fitting, product safety, low costs etc. does not exist. The different material types are (autogenic bone and many alloplastics such as metals (mainly titanium, ceramics, plastics and composites. Future developments aim to improve physical and biological properties, especially regarding surface interactions. To date, tissue engineered bone is far from routine clinical application.

  3. Integrated Biomaterials in Tissue Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Ramalingam, Murugan; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Kobayashi, Hisatoshi; Haikel, Youssef

    2012-01-01

    "Integrated Biomaterials in Tissue Engineering" features all aspects from fundamental principles to current technological advances in biomaterials at the macro/micro/nano/molecular scales suitable for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The book is unique as it provides all important aspects dealing with the basic science involved in structure and properties, techniques and technological innovations in material processing and characterizations, and applications of biomaterials in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  4. Extraction and characterisation of apatite- and tricalcium phosphate-based materials from cod fish bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apatite- and tricalcium phosphate-based materials were produced from codfish bones, thus converting a waste by-product from the food industry into high added-valued compounds. The bones were annealed at temperatures between 900 and 1200 °C, giving a biphasic material of hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 and β-Ca(PO4)3) with a molar proportion of 75:25, a material widely used in biomedical implants. The treatment of the bones in solution prior to their annealing changed the composition of the material. Single phase hydroxyapatite, chlorapatite (Ca10(PO4)6Cl2) and fluorapatite (Ca10(PO4)6F2) were obtained using CaCl2 and NaF solutions, respectively. The samples were analysed by several techniques (X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and differential thermal/thermogravimetric analysis) and by elemental analyses, to have a more complete understanding of the conversion process. Such compositional modifications have never been performed before for these materials of natural origin to tailor the relative concentrations of elements. This paper shows the great potential for the conversion of this by-product into highly valuable compounds for biomedical applications, using a simple and effective valorisation process. - Highlights: ► Apatite and calcium phosphate compounds extraction from cod fish bones ► Bone calcination: biphasic material hydroxyapatite-calcium phosphate production ► Bone pre-treatments in solution change the material composition. ► Single phase materials (hydroxy-, chloro- or fluoroapatite) are obtained. ► Concentration of other elements (Na, F, Cl) suitable for biomedical applications

  5. Extraction and characterisation of apatite- and tricalcium phosphate-based materials from cod fish bones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piccirillo, C.; Silva, M.F. [CBQF/Escola Superior de Biotecnologia, Universidade Catolica Portuguesa, Porto (Portugal); Pullar, R.C. [Dept. Engenharia de Materiais e Ceramica/CICECO, Universidade de Aveiro, Aveiro (Portugal); Braga da Cruz, I. [CBQF/Escola Superior de Biotecnologia, Universidade Catolica Portuguesa, Porto (Portugal); WeDoTech, CiDEB/Escola Superior de Biotecnologia, Universidade Catolica Portuguesa, Porto (Portugal); Jorge, R. [WeDoTech, CiDEB/Escola Superior de Biotecnologia, Universidade Catolica Portuguesa, Porto (Portugal); Pintado, M.M.E. [CBQF/Escola Superior de Biotecnologia, Universidade Catolica Portuguesa, Porto (Portugal); Castro, P.M.L., E-mail: plcastro@porto.ucp.pt [CBQF/Escola Superior de Biotecnologia, Universidade Catolica Portuguesa, Porto (Portugal)

    2013-01-01

    Apatite- and tricalcium phosphate-based materials were produced from codfish bones, thus converting a waste by-product from the food industry into high added-valued compounds. The bones were annealed at temperatures between 900 and 1200 Degree-Sign C, giving a biphasic material of hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate (Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2} and {beta}-Ca(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}) with a molar proportion of 75:25, a material widely used in biomedical implants. The treatment of the bones in solution prior to their annealing changed the composition of the material. Single phase hydroxyapatite, chlorapatite (Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}Cl{sub 2}) and fluorapatite (Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}F{sub 2}) were obtained using CaCl{sub 2} and NaF solutions, respectively. The samples were analysed by several techniques (X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and differential thermal/thermogravimetric analysis) and by elemental analyses, to have a more complete understanding of the conversion process. Such compositional modifications have never been performed before for these materials of natural origin to tailor the relative concentrations of elements. This paper shows the great potential for the conversion of this by-product into highly valuable compounds for biomedical applications, using a simple and effective valorisation process. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Apatite and calcium phosphate compounds extraction from cod fish bones Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bone calcination: biphasic material hydroxyapatite-calcium phosphate production Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bone pre-treatments in solution change the material composition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single phase materials (hydroxy-, chloro- or fluoroapatite) are obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concentration of other elements (Na, F, Cl) suitable for biomedical applications.

  6. Phosphate-based glasses: Prediction of acoustical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Moneim, Amin Abd

    2016-04-01

    In this work, a comprehensive study has been carried out to predict the composition dependence of bulk modulus and ultrasonic attenuation coefficient in the phosphate-based glass systems PbO-P2O5, Li2O-TeO2-B2O3-P2O5, TiO2-Na2O-CaO-P2O5 and Cr2O3-doped Na2O-ZnO-P2O5 at room temperature. The prediction is based on (i) Makishima-Mackenzie theory, which correlates the bulk modulus with packing density and dissociation energy per unit volume, and (ii) Our recently presented semi-empirical formulas, which correlate the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient with the oxygen density, mean atomic ring size, first-order stretching force constant and experimental bulk modulus. Results revealed that our recently presented semi-empirical formulas can be applied successfully to predict changes of ultrasonic attenuation coefficient in binary PbO-P2O5 glasses at 10 MHz frequency and in quaternary Li2O-TeO2-B2O3-P2O5, TiO2-Na2O-CaO-P2O5 and Cr2O3-Na2O-ZnO-P2O5 glasses at 5 MHz frequency. Also, Makishima-Mackenzie theory appears to be valid for the studied glasses if the effect of the basic structural units that present in the glass network is taken into account.

  7. Special Issue "Biomaterials and Bioprinting".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Chee Kai; Yeong, Wai Yee; An, Jia

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of bioprinting in recent years represents a marvellous advancement in 3D printing technology. It expands the range of 3D printable materials from the world of non-living materials into the world of living materials. Biomaterials play an important role in this paradigm shift. This Special Issue focuses on biomaterials and bioprinting and contains eight articles covering a number of recent topics in this emerging area. PMID:27649121

  8. Self-healing biomaterials(3)

    OpenAIRE

    Brochu, Alice B. W.; Craig, Stephen L.; Reichert, William M.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this review is to introduce the biomaterials community to the emerging field of self-healing materials, and also to suggest how one could utilize and modify self-healing approaches to develop new classes of biomaterials. A brief discussion of the in vivo mechanical loading and resultant failures experienced by biomedical implants is followed by presentation of the self-healing methods for combating mechanical failure. If conventional composite materials that retard failure may be ...

  9. Host response to biomaterials the impact of host response on biomaterial selection

    CERN Document Server

    Badylak, Stephen F

    2015-01-01

    Host Response to Biomaterials: The Impact of Host Response on Biomaterial Selection explains the various categories of biomaterials and their significance for clinical applications, focusing on the host response to each biomaterial. It is one of the first books to connect immunology and biomaterials with regard to host response. The text also explores the role of the immune system in host response, and covers the regulatory environment for biomaterials, along with the benefits of synthetic versus natural biomaterials, and the transition from simple to complex biomaterial solutions. Fiel

  10. Biomaterial selection for tooth regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhenglin; Nie, Hemin; Wang, Shuang; Lee, Chang Hun; Li, Ang; Fu, Susan Y; Zhou, Hong; Chen, Lili; Mao, Jeremy J

    2011-10-01

    Biomaterials are native or synthetic polymers that act as carriers for drug delivery or scaffolds for tissue regeneration. When implanted in vivo, biomaterials should be nontoxic and exert intended functions. For tooth regeneration, biomaterials have primarily served as a scaffold for (1) transplanted stem cells and/or (2) recruitment of endogenous stem cells. This article critically synthesizes our knowledge of biomaterial use in tooth regeneration, including the selection of native and/or synthetic polymers, three-dimensional scaffold fabrication, stem cell transplantation, and stem cell homing. A tooth is a complex biological organ. Tooth loss represents the most common organ failure. Tooth regeneration encompasses not only regrowth of an entire tooth as an organ, but also biological restoration of individual components of the tooth including enamel, dentin, cementum, or dental pulp. Regeneration of tooth root represents perhaps more near-term opportunities than the regeneration of the whole tooth. In the adult, a tooth owes its biological vitality, arguably more, to the root than the crown. Biomaterials are indispensible for the regeneration of tooth root, tooth crown, dental pulp, or an entire tooth.

  11. Radiation produced biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medical advances that have prolonged the average life span have generated increased need for new materials that can be used as tissue and organ replacements, drug delivery systems and/or components of devices related to therapy and diagnosis. The first man-made plastic used as surgical implant was celluloid, applied for cranial defect repair. However, the first users applied commercial materials with no regard for their purity, biostability and post-operative interaction with the organism. Thus, these materials evoked a strong tissue reaction and were unacceptable. The first polymer which gained acceptance for man-made plastic was poly(methyl methacrylate). But the first polymer of choice, precursor of the broad class of materials known today as hydrogels, was poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) synthesized in the fifties by Wichterle and Lim. HEMA and its various combinations with other, both hydrophilic and hydrophobic, polymers are till now the most often used hydrogels for medical purposes. In the early fifties, the pioneers of the radiation chemistry of polymers began some experiments with radiation crosslinking, also with hydrophilic polymers. However, hydrogels were analyzed mainly from the point of view of phenomena associated with mechanism of reactions, topology of network, and relations between radiation parameters of the processes. Fundamental monographs on radiation polymer physics and chemistry written by Charlesby (1960) and Chapiro (1962) proceed from this time. The noticeable interest in application of radiation to obtain hydrogels for biomedical purposes began in the late sixties as a result of the papers and patents published by Japanese and American scientists. Among others, the team of the Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment headed by Kaetsu as well as Hoffman and his colleagues from the Center of Bioengineering, University of Washington have created the base for spreading interest in the field of biomaterials formed by means of

  12. Chitin fulfilling a biomaterials promise

    CERN Document Server

    Khor, Eugene

    2001-01-01

    The second edition of Chitin underscores the important factors for standardizing chitin processing and characterization. It captures the essential interplay between chitin's assets and limitations as a biomaterial, placing the past promises of chitin in perspective, addressing its present realities and offering insight into what is required to realize chitin's destiny (including its derivative, chitosan) as a biomaterial of the twenty-first century. This book is an ideal guide for both industrialists and researchers with a vested interest in commercializing chitin.An upd

  13. 3D Biomaterial Microarrays for Regenerative Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.; Arpanaei, Ayyoob; Andresen, Thomas Lars;

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) biomaterial microarrays hold enormous promise for regenerative medicine because of their ability to accelerate the design and fabrication of biomimetic materials. Such tissue-like biomaterials can provide an appropriate microenvironment for stimulating and controlling stem...

  14. Integrated Biomaterials for Biomedical Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Ramalingam, Murugan; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Kobayashi, Hisatoshi

    2012-01-01

    This cutting edge book provides all the important aspects dealing with the basic science involved in materials in biomedical technology, especially structure and properties, techniques and technological innovations in material processing and characterizations, as well as the applications. The volume consists of 12 chapters written by acknowledged experts of the biomaterials field and covers a wide range of topics and applications.

  15. Self-healing biomaterials(3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochu, Alice B. W.; Craig, Stephen L.; Reichert, William M.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this review is to introduce the biomaterials community to the emerging field of self-healing materials, and also to suggest how one could utilize and modify self-healing approaches to develop new classes of biomaterials. A brief discussion of the in vivo mechanical loading and resultant failures experienced by biomedical implants is followed by presentation of the self-healing methods for combating mechanical failure. If conventional composite materials that retard failure may be considered zeroth generation self-healing materials, then taxonomically-speaking, first generation self-healing materials describe approaches that “halt” and “fill” damage, whereas second generation self-healing materials strive to “fully restore” the pre-failed material structure. In spite of limited commercial use to date, primarily because the technical details have not been suitably optimized, it is likely from a practical standpoint that first generation approaches will be the first to be employed commercially, whereas second generation approaches may take longer to implement. For self-healing biomaterials the optimization of technical considerations is further compounded by the additional constraints of toxicity and biocompatibility, necessitating inclusion of separate discussions of design criteria for self-healing biomaterials. PMID:21171168

  16. Inorganic biomaterials structure, properties and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xiang C

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a practical guide to the use and applications of inorganic biomaterials. It begins by introducing the concept of inorganic biomaterials, which includes bioceramics and bioglass. This concept is further extended to hybrid biomaterials consisting of inorganic and organic materials to mimic natural biomaterials. The book goes on to provide the reader with information on biocompatibility, bioactivity and bioresorbability. The concept of the latter is important because of the increasing role resorbable biomaterials are playing in implant applications. The book also introduces a n

  17. Structure, solubility and bioactivity in TiO2-doped phosphate-based bioglasses and glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphate-based bioactive glasses in addition to TiO2 (x = 0-2.5 mol%) were prepared by melt quenching technique. Glass-ceramics were prepared by controlled two-step thermal treatment of the as-prepared phosphate bioglasses at their nucleation and crystallisation temperatures. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was used to explore the amorphous and crystalline nature of materials. The presence of calcium phosphate crystals like NaPO3, α, β-Ca2P2O7, α,β-Ca3(PO4)2 and Na5Ti(PO4)3 plays a dominant role in glass-ceramics. The structural changes were analyzed by density and Tg measurements. The degradation process in deionised water (DIW) was observed by pH and weight loss measurements. It was interesting to note that the highest solubility phosphate glasses become stiffer to degradation with increasing TiO2 content. Addition of TiO2 leads to densify the glass structure and interconnect the cross-linkages in the network. Chemical durability of glass-ceramics in DIW purely depends on the formed crystalline as well as the residual glassy phases. The formation of a biologically active layer on the surface of glasses and glass-ceramics were investigated by in vitro studies through XRD analysis.

  18. Physical approaches to biomaterial design

    OpenAIRE

    Mitragotri, Samir; Lahann, Joerg

    2009-01-01

    The development of biomaterials for drug delivery, tissue engineering and medical diagnostics has traditionally been based on new chemistries. However, there is growing recognition that the physical as well as the chemical properties of materials can regulate biological responses. Here, we review this transition with regard to selected physical properties including size, shape, mechanical properties, surface texture and compartmentalization. In each case, we present examples demonstrating the...

  19. Modulating macrophage response to biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaveri, Toral

    Macrophages recruited to the site of biomaterial implantation are the primary mediators of the chronic foreign body response to implanted materials. Since foreign body response limits performance and functional life of numerous implanted biomaterials/medical devices, various approaches have been investigated to modulate macrophage interactions with biomaterial surfaces to mitigate this response. In this work we have explored two independent approaches to modulate the macrophage inflammatory response to biomaterials. The first approach targets surface integrins, cell surface receptors that mediate cell adhesion to biomaterials through adhesive proteins spontaneously adsorbed on biomaterial surfaces. The second approach involves surface modification of biomaterials using nanotopographic features since nanotopography has been reported to modulate cell adhesion and viability in a cell type-dependent manner. More specifically, Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nanorod surface was investigated for its role in modulating macrophage adhesion and survival in vitro and foreign body response in vivo. For the first approach, we have investigated the role of integrin Mac-1 and RGD-binding integrins in the in-vivo osteolysis response and macrophage inflammatory processes of phagocytosis as well as inflammatory cytokine secretion in response to particulate biomaterials. We have also investigated the in vivo foreign body response (FBR) to subcutaneously implanted biomaterials by evaluating the thickness of fibrous capsule formed around the implants after 2 weeks of implantation. The role of Mac-1 integrin was isolated using a Mac-1 KO mouse and comparing it to a WT control. The role of RGD binding integrins in FBR was investigated by coating the implanted biomaterial with ELVAX(TM) polymer loaded with Echistatin which contains the RGD sequence. For the in-vivo osteolysis study and to study the in-vitro macrophage response to particulate biomaterials, we used the RGD peptide encapsulated in ELVAX

  20. Influence of octacalcium phosphate coating on osteoinductive properties of biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibovic, P; van der Valk, C M; van Blitterswijk, C A; De Groot, K; Meijer, G

    2004-04-01

    In this study, we investigated the influence of octacalcium phosphate (OCP) coating on osteoinductive behaviour of the biomaterials. Porous titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V), hydroxyapatite (HA), biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) and polyethylene glyco terephtalate/polybuthylene terephtalate (PEGT-PBT) copolymer, all uncoated and coated with biomimetically produced OCP, were implanted in back muscles of 10 goats for 6 and 12 weeks. Uncoated Ti6Al4Vand HA did not show any bone formation after intramuscular implantation. All OCP coated implants, except PEGT-PBT, did induce bone in the soft tissue. The reason for the non-inductive behaviour of the copolymer is probably its softness, that makes it impossible to maintain its porous shape after implantation. Both uncoated and OCP coated BCP induced bone. However, the amount of animals in which the bone was induced was higher in the coated BCP implants in comparison to the uncoated ones. Osteoinductive potential of biomaterials is influenced by various material characteristics, such as chemical composition, crystallinity, macro- and microstructure. OCP coating has a positive effect on osteoinductivity of the biomaterials. The combination of the advantages of biomimetic coating method above traditional methods, and a good osteoinductivity of OCP coating that is produced by using this method, opens new possibilities for designing more advanced orthopaedic implants. PMID:15332602

  1. Biomaterials for periodontal regeneration: a review of ceramics and polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shue, Li; Yufeng, Zhang; Mony, Ullas

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal disease is characterized by the destruction of periodontal tissues. Various methods of regenerative periodontal therapy, including the use of barrier membranes, bone replacement grafts, growth factors and the combination of these procedures have been investigated. The development of biomaterials for tissue engineering has considerably improved the available treatment options above. They fall into two broad classes: ceramics and polymers. The available ceramic-based materials include calcium phosphate (eg, tricalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite), calcium sulfate and bioactive glass. The bioactive glass bonds to the bone with the formation of a layer of carbonated hydroxyapatite in situ. The natural polymers include modified polysaccharides (eg, chitosan,) and polypeptides (collagen and gelatin). Synthetic polymers [eg, poly(glycolic acid), poly(L-lactic acid)] provide a platform for exhibiting the biomechanical properties of scaffolds in tissue engineering. The materials usually work as osteogenic, osteoconductive and osteoinductive scaffolds. Polymers are more widely used as a barrier material in guided tissue regeneration (GTR). They are shown to exclude epithelial downgrowth and allow periodontal ligament and alveolar bone cells to repopulate the defect. An attempt to overcome the problems related to a collapse of the barrier membrane in GTR or epithelial downgrowth is the use of a combination of barrier membranes and grafting materials. This article reviews various biomaterials including scaffolds and membranes used for periodontal treatment and their impacts on the experimental or clinical management of periodontal defect.

  2. Dynamic biomaterials: toward engineering autonomous feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Eliza; Chavez, Michael; Tan, Cheemeng

    2016-06-01

    Dynamic biomaterials are biocompatible engineered systems capable of sensing and actively responding to their surrounding environment. They are of growing interest, both as models in basic research to understand complex cellular systems and in medical applications. Here, we review recent advances in nano-scale and micro-scale biomaterials, specifically artificial cells consisting of compartmentalized biochemical reactions and biologically compatible hydrogels. These dynamic biomaterials respond to stimuli through triggered reactions, reaction cascades, logic gates, and autonomous feedback loops. We outline the advances and remaining challenges in implementing such 'smart' biomaterials capable of autonomously responding to environmental stimuli. PMID:26974245

  3. Biomaterials in Relation to Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Sanjukta; Chana, Simran

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries remains a challenge in the improvement of oral health. It is the most common and widespread biofilm-dependent oral disease, resulting in the destruction of tooth structure by the acidic attack from cariogenic bacteria. The tooth is a heavily mineralised tissue, and both enamel and dentine can undergo demineralisation due to trauma or dietary conditions. The adult population worldwide affected by dental caries is enormous and despite significant advances in caries prevention and tooth restoration, treatments continue to pose a substantial burden to healthcare. Biomaterials play a vital role in the restoration of the diseased or damaged tooth structure and, despite providing reasonable outcomes, there are some concerns with clinical performance. Amalgam, the silver grey biomaterial that has been widely used as a restorative material in dentistry, is currently in throes of being phased out, especially with the Minimata convention and treaty being signed by a number of countries (January 2013; http://mercuryconvention.org/Convention/) that aims to control the anthropogenic release of mercury in the environment, which naturally impacts the use of amalgam, where mercury is a component. Thus, the development of alternative restoratives and restoration methods that are inexpensive, can be used under different climatic conditions, withstand storage and allow easy handling, the main prerequisites of dental biomaterials, is important. The potential for using biologically engineered tissue and consequent research to replace damaged tissues has also seen a quantum leap in the last decade. Ongoing research in regenerative treatments in dentistry includes alveolar ridge augmentation, bone tissue engineering and periodontal ligament replacement, and a future aim is bioengineering of the whole tooth. Research towards developing bioengineered teeth is well underway and identification of adult stem cell sources to make this a viable treatment is advancing; however, this

  4. Biomaterials & scaffolds for tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fergal J. O'Brien

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Every day thousands of surgical procedures are performed to replace or repair tissue that has been damaged through disease or trauma. The developing field of tissue engineering (TE aims to regenerate damaged tissues by combining cells from the body with highly porous scaffold biomaterials, which act as templates for tissue regeneration, to guide the growth of new tissue. This article describes the functional requirements, and types, of materials used in developing state of the art of scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. Furthermore, it describes the challenges and where future research and direction is required in this rapidly advancing field.

  5. Biological performance of titania containing phosphate-based glasses for bone tissue engineering applications

    OpenAIRE

    Abou Neel, E. A.; W. Chrzanowski; Knowles, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    The interplay between glass chemistry, structure, degradation kinetics, and biological activity provides flexibility for the development of scaffolds with highly specific cellular response. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the role of titania inclusion into the phosphate-based glass on its ability to stimulate osteoblast-like human osteosarcoma (HOS) cells to adhere, proliferate and differentiate. In depth morphological and biochemical characterisation was performed on HOS c...

  6. Current requirements for polymeric biomaterials in otolaryngology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sternberg, Katrin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years otolaryngology was strongly influenced by newly developed implants which are based on both, innovative biomaterials and novel implant technologies. Since the biomaterials are integrated into biological systems they have to fulfill all technical requirements and accommodate biological interactions. Technical functionality relating to implant specific mechanical properties, a sufficiently high stability in terms of physiological conditions, and good biocompatibility are the demands with regard to suitability of biomaterials. The goal in applying biomaterials for implants is to maintain biofunctionality over extended periods of time. These general demands to biomaterials are equally valid for use in otolaryngology. Different classes of materials can be utilized as biomaterials. Metals belong to the oldest biomaterials. In addition, alloys, ceramics, inorganic glasses and composites have been tested successfully. Furthermore, natural and synthetic polymers are widely used materials, which will be in the focus of the current article with regard to their properties and usage as cochlear implants, osteosynthesis implants, stents, and matrices for tissue engineering. Due to their application as permanent or temporary implants materials are differentiated into biostable and biodegradable polymers. The here identified general and up to date requirements for biomaterials and the illustrated applications in otolaryngology emphasize ongoing research efforts in this area and at the same time demonstrate the high significance of interdisciplinary cooperation between natural sciences, engineering, and medical sciences.

  7. Biomaterial systems for orthopedic tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoerke, Erik David

    2003-06-01

    The World Health Organization has estimated that one out of seven Americans suffers from a musculoskeletal impairment, annually incurring 28.6 million musculoskeletal injuries---more than half of all injuries. Bone tissue engineering has evolved rapidly to address this continued health concern. In the last decade, the focus of orthopedic biomaterials design has shifted from the use of common engineering metals and plastics to smart materials designed to mimic nature and elicit favorable bioresponse. Working within this new paradigm, this thesis explores unique chemical and materials systems for orthopedic tissue engineering. Improving on current titanium implant technologies, porous titanium scaffolds were utilized to better approximate the mechanical and structural properties of natural bone. These foam scaffolds were enhanced with bioactive coatings, designed to enhance osteoblastic implant colonization. The biopolymer poly(L-lysine) was incorporated into both hydroxypatite and octacalcium phosphate mineral phases to create modified organoapatite and pLys-CP coatings respectively. These coatings were synthesized and characterized on titanium surfaces, including porous structures such as titanium mesh and titanium foam. In addition, in vitro osteoblastic cell culture experiments probed the biological influences of these coatings. Organoapatite (OA) accelerated preosteoblastic colonization of titanium mesh and improved cellular ingrowth into titanium foam. Alternatively, the thin, uniform pLys-CP coating demonstrated significant potential as a substrate for chemically binding biological molecules and supramolecular assemblies. Biologically, pLys-CP demonstrated enhanced cellular attachment over titanium and inorganic calcium phosphate controls. Supramolecular self-assembled nanofiber assemblies were also explored both as stand-alone tissue engineering gels and as titanium coatings. Self-supporting nanofiber gels induced accelerated, biomimetic mineralization

  8. Biomaterial science meets computational biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Little, J Paige; Pettet, Graeme J; Loessner, Daniela

    2015-05-01

    There is a pressing need for a predictive tool capable of revealing a holistic understanding of fundamental elements in the normal and pathological cell physiology of organoids in order to decipher the mechanoresponse of cells. Therefore, the integration of a systems bioengineering approach into a validated mathematical model is necessary to develop a new simulation tool. This tool can only be innovative by combining biomaterials science with computational biology. Systems-level and multi-scale experimental data are incorporated into a single framework, thus representing both single cells and collective cell behaviour. Such a computational platform needs to be validated in order to discover key mechano-biological factors associated with cell-cell and cell-niche interactions.

  9. Calcium - urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003603.htm Calcium - urine To use the sharing features on this ... enable JavaScript. This test measures the amount of calcium in urine. All cells need calcium in order ...

  10. Calcium supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007477.htm Calcium supplements To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. WHO SHOULD TAKE CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS? Calcium is an important mineral for the ...

  11. Tribological applications of biomaterials: an overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Tribological research is the study of lubrication, friction, and wear. Tribology of biomate-rials is to study how the materials work and fail. This will help us to produce better biomaterials.Tribology plays a very important role in improving the design and making successful biomaterialsfor medical purposes. Joints of human body, such as hip, knee, jaw, dental parts etc., all need toconsider the wear and lubrication problem. In this paper, we give a general introduction of bioma-terial research in tribological applications. Materials, the synthetic characterization, and their failureare introduced.

  12. Biomaterials and Stem Cells in Regenerative Medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Ramalingam, Murugan; Best, Serena

    2012-01-01

    Work in the area of biomaterials and stem cell therapy has revealed great potential for many applications, from the treatment of localized defects and diseases to the repair and replacement of whole organs. Researchers have also begun to develop a better understanding of the cellular environment needed for optimal tissue repair and regeneration. Biomaterials and Stem Cells in Regenerative Medicine explores a range of applications for biomaterials and stem cell therapy and describes recent research on suitable cell scaffolds and substrates for tissue repair and reconstruction. Featuring contrib

  13. Polymeric biomaterials structure and function, v.1

    CERN Document Server

    Dumitriu, Severian

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterials have had a major impact on the practice of contemporary medicine and patient care. Growing into a major interdisciplinary effort involving chemists, biologists, engineers, and physicians, biomaterials development has enabled the creation of high-quality devices, implants, and drug carriers with greater biocompatibility and biofunctionality. The fast-paced research and increasing interest in finding new and improved biocompatible or biodegradable polymers has provided a wealth of new information, transforming this edition of Polymeric Biomaterials into a two-volume set. This volume

  14. Applications of Biomaterials to Liquid Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kengo Sakaguchi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, chemically synthesized proteins and peptides are attractive building blocks and have potential in many important applications as biomaterials. In this review, applications of biomaterials to thermotropic liquid crystals are discussed. The review covers the improvement of the performance of liquid crystal displays using liquid crystal physical gels consisting of a liquid crystal and amino acid-based gelators, and also new functionalization of liquid crystals. Moreover, the influence of DNA, which is one of the more attractive biomaterials, dispersed in thermotropic liquid crystals and its potential use in the liquid crystal industry is described. In addition, we found interesting results during electrooptical measurements of liquid crystals doped with DNA, and explain them from the point of view of biological applications. These recent approaches suggest that these biomaterials may be applicable in the electronic device industry and should be considered as an interesting material with their physical properties having the potential to create or refine an industrial product.

  15. Ceramics as biomaterials for dental restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höland, Wolfram; Schweiger, Marcel; Watzke, Ronny; Peschke, Arnd; Kappert, Heinrich

    2008-11-01

    Sintered ceramics and glass-ceramics are widely used as biomaterials for dental restoration, especially as dental inlays, onlays, veneers, crowns or bridges. Biomaterials were developed either to veneer metal frameworks or to produce metal-free dental restorations. Different types of glass-ceramics and ceramics are available and necessary today to fulfill customers' needs (patients, dentists and dental technicians) regarding the properties of the biomaterials and the processing of the products. All of these different types of biomaterials already cover the entire range of indications of dental restorations. Today, patients are increasingly interested in metal-free restoration. Glass-ceramics are particularly suitable for fabricating inlays, crowns and small bridges, as these materials achieve very strong, esthetic results. High-strength ceramics are preferred in situations where the material is exposed to high masticatory forces.

  16. Biomaterials in the repair of sports injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducheyne, Paul; Mauck, Robert L.; Smith, Douglas H.

    2012-08-01

    The optimal stimulation of tissue regeneration in bone, cartilage and spinal cord injuries involves a judicious selection of biomaterials with tailored chemical compositions, micro- and nanostructures, porosities and kinetic release properties for the delivery of relevant biologically active molecules.

  17. Current Strategies in Cardiovascular Biomaterial Functionalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Lehle

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevention of the coagulation cascade and platelet activation is the foremost demand for biomaterials in contact with blood. In this review we describe the underlying mechanisms of these processes and offer the current state of antithrombotic strategies. We give an overview of methods to prevent protein and platelet adhesion, as well as techniques to immobilize biochemically active molecules on biomaterial surfaces. Finally, recent strategies in biofunctionalization by endothelial cell seeding as well as their possible clinical applications are discussed.

  18. Biomaterials innovation bundling technologies and life

    CERN Document Server

    Styhre, A

    2014-01-01

    Rapid advances in the life sciences means that there is now a far more detailed understanding of biological systems on the cellular, molecular and genetic levels. Sited at the intersection between the life sciences, the engineering sciences and the design sciences, innovations in the biomaterials industry are expected to garner increasing attention and play a key role in future development. This book examines the biomaterials innovations taking place in corporations and in academic research settings today.

  19. Medical applications for biomaterials in Bolivia

    CERN Document Server

    Arias, Susan

    2015-01-01

    This book investigates the potential medical benefits natural biomaterials can offer in developing countries by analyzing the case of Bolivia. The book explores the medical and health related applications of Bolivian commodities: quinoa, barley, sugarcane, corn, sorghum and sunflower seeds. This book helps readers better understand some of the key health concerns facing countries like Bolivia and how naturally derived biomaterials and therapeutics could help substantially alleviate many of their problems.

  20. Obtaining new composite biomaterials by means of mineralization of methacrylate hydrogels using the reaction–diffusion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper describes the synthesis and characterization of a new polymeric biomaterial mineralized with calcium phosphate using the reaction–diffusion method. The scaffold of this biomaterial was a hydrogel constituted by biocompatible polyethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMEM) and 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEM), which were cross-linked with N-N’-methylenebisacrylamide (BIS). The cross-linking content of the hydrogels was varied from 0.25% to 15% (w/w). The gels were used as matrix where two reactants (Na2HPO4 and CaCl2) diffused from both ends of the gel and upon encountering produced calcium phosphate crystals that precipitated within the polymer matrix forming bands. The shape of the crystals was tuned by modifying the matrix porosity in such a way that when the polymer matrix was slightly reticulated the diffusion reaction produced round calcium phosphate microcrystals, whilst when the polymer matrix was highly reticulated the reaction yielded flat calcium phosphate crystals. Selected area electron diffraction performed on the nanocrystals that constitute the microcrystals showed that they were formed by Brushite (CaHPO4.2H2O). This new composite material could be useful in medical and dentistry applications such as bone regeneration, bone repair or tissue engineering. - Highlights: • New polymeric biomaterial mineralized with calcium phosphate using the reaction-diffusion method.-Growing of brushite nanocrystals within a polymeric matrix. • Mineralization by reaction diffusion method controls the crystal growth within gels

  1. Electrospun Synthetic Polypeptide Nanofibrous Biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadka, Dhan; Haynie, Donald

    2011-03-01

    Water-insoluble nanofiber mats of synthetic polypeptides of defined composition have been prepared from fibers electrospun from aqueous solution in the absence of organic co-solvents. 20-50 kDa poly(L-glutamate, L-tyrosine) 4:1 (PLGY) but not 15-50 kDa or 50-100 kDa poly(L-glutamate) was spinnable at 20-55% (w/v) polymer in water. Applied voltage and needle-collector distance were crucial for spinnability. Attractive fibers were obtained at 50% polymer. Fiber diameter and mat morphology have been characterized by electron microscopy. Exposure of spun fiber mats to 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC), which reacts with carboxylate, decreased fiber solubility. Fluorescein-conjugated poly(L-lysine) (FITC-PLL) but not the fluorophore alone was able bind PLGY fiber mats electrostatically, judging by fluorescence microscopy. Key advances of this work are the avoidance of an animal source of peptides and of an inorganic co-solvent to achieve polypeptide spinnability. Polypeptide fiber mats are a promising type of nano-structured biomaterial for applications in biomedicine and biotechnology.

  2. Sorption of paracetamol onto biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferchichi, Maroua; Dhaouadi, Hatem

    2016-01-01

    Pharmaceutical residues released into the environment are posing more and more public health problems. It is worthwhile to study the retention of pharmaceuticals residues by adsorption on solid supports. Batch sorption experiments are intended to identify the adsorption isotherms of the pharmaceutically active ingredient on the biomaterials. The results obtained in this study have shown that the retention possibilities of these compounds by bio-adsorbents (clay and sand) are not significant. The negligible sorption for these media is explained by the low hydrophobicity of paracetamol (Log K(ow) = 0.46). The retention of paracetamol on the dehydrated sewage sludge and on Posidonia oceanica showed a relatively significant adsorption with a maximal quantity of 0.956 mg g(-1) and 1.638 mg g(-1) for the dehydrate sludge and P. oceanica, respectively. On the other hand, the study of paracetamol retention on the powdered activated carbon showed a high adsorption capacity of about 515.27 mg g(-1). Isotherm data show a good fit with Langmuir's model. An infrared analysis is carried out. It shows identical bands before and after adsorption, with some modifications. PMID:27387007

  3. Biomaterials in tooth tissue engineering: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sarang; Srivastava, Dhirendra; Grover, Shibani; Sharma, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    Biomaterials play a crucial role in the field of tissue engineering. They are utilized for fabricating frameworks known as scaffolds, matrices or constructs which are interconnected porous structures that establish a cellular microenvironment required for optimal tissue regeneration. Several natural and synthetic biomaterials have been utilized for fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds. Amongst different biomaterials, polymers are the most extensively experimented and employed materials. They can be tailored to provide good interconnected porosity, large surface area, adequate mechanical strengths, varying surface characterization and different geometries required for tissue regeneration. A single type of material may however not meet all the requirements. Selection of two or more biomaterials, optimization of their physical, chemical and mechanical properties and advanced fabrication techniques are required to obtain scaffold designs intended for their final application. Current focus is aimed at designing biomaterials such that they will replicate the local extra cellular environment of the native organ and enable cell-cell and cell-scaffold interactions at micro level required for functional tissue regeneration. This article provides an insight into the different biomaterials available and the emerging use of nano engineering principles for the construction of bioactive scaffolds in tooth regeneration.

  4. Adsorption behavior of heavy metals on biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamisawa, Mayumi; Minamisawa, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Shoichiro; Takai, Nobuharu

    2004-09-01

    We have investigated adsorption of Cd(II) and Pb(II) at pH 2-6.7 onto the biomaterials chitosan, coffee, green tea, tea, yuzu, aloe, and Japanese coarse tea, and onto the inorganic adsorbents, activated carbon and zeolite. High adsorptive capabilities were observed for all of the biomaterials at pH 4 and 6.7. In the adsorption of Cd(II), blend coffee, tea, green tea, and coarse tea have comparable loading capacities to activated carbon and zeolite. Although activated carbon, zeolite, and chitosan are utilized in a variety of fields such as wastewater treatment, chemical and metallurgical engineering, and analytical chemistry, these adsorbents are costly. On the other hand, processing of the test biomaterials was inexpensive, and all the biomaterials except for chitosan were able to adsorb large amounts of Pb(II) and Cd(II) ions after a convenient pretreatment of washing with water followed by drying. The high adsorption capability of the biomaterials prepared from plant materials is promising in the development of a novel, low-cost adsorbent. From these results, it is concluded that heavy metal removal using biomaterials would be an effective method for the economic treatment of wastewater. The proposed adsorption method was applied to the determination of amounts of Cd(II) and Pb(II) in water samples. PMID:15373400

  5. The effect of phosphate based glasses on the formation and viability of oral bacterial biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, April Miranda

    This study considered the antibacterial activity of a series of soluble phosphate-based glasses (based on the Na2O-CaO-P2O5 glass system) doped with increasing amounts of copper or silver against oral bacterial biofilms. Initially, a variety of phosphate-based glass compositions were produced. The dissolution rate of these glasses was determined, and the information obtained was used to decide which glass compositions would be investigated in future experiments for their antibacterial properties. Selected glass compositions were investigated for their antibacterial activity against Streptococcus sanguis biofilms and oral microcosm biofilms. These biofilms were produced on phosphate-based glass discs using a Constant Depth Film Fermenter (CDFF), which allows the conditions found in the oral cavity to be closely mimicked. Following disc removal from the CDFF, various analytical procedures were carried out. Under conditions designed to mimic the supragingival environment of the oral cavity, fewer viable cells of Streptococcus sanguis were detected on both copper and silver-containing glass discs than on control discs, during the initial stages of the experiments, the greatest reduction occurring on the silver-containing glasses. An increase in viable cell number was observed as the experiments continued. Under the same conditions, copper-containing glasses failed to reduce the viability of microcosm biofilms. Viable cell number was initially reduced on the silver-containing glasses, but by the end of the experiments the viability of microcosm biofilms was significantly similar to those observed on the controls. Attempts to determine the efficacy of silver-containing glasses at reducing the viability of microcosm biofilms, under conditions designed to mimic the subgingival environment of the oral cavity, were subsequently made. Viable cells were not detected on any type of disc, including the control discs. Various reasons for this were postulated. In conclusion, the

  6. Phosphate-based glass fiber vs. bulk glass: Change in fiber optical response to probe in vitro glass reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massera, J; Ahmed, I; Petit, L; Aallos, V; Hupa, L

    2014-04-01

    This paper investigates the effect of fiber drawing on the thermal and structural properties as well as on the glass reactivity of a phosphate glass in tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane-buffered (TRIS) solution and simulated body fluid (SBF). The changes induced in the thermal properties suggest that the fiber drawing process leads to a weakening and probable re-orientation of the POP bonds. Whereas the fiber drawing did not significantly impact the release of P and Ca, an increase in the release of Na into the solution was noticed. This was probably due to small structural reorientations occurring during the fiber drawing process and to a slight diffusion of Na to the fiber surface. Both the powders from the bulk and the glass fibers formed a Ca-P surface layer when immersed in SBF and TRIS. The layer thickness was higher in the calcium and phosphate supersaturated SBF than in TRIS. This paper for the first time presents the in vitro reactivity and optical response of a phosphate-based bioactive glass (PBG) fiber when immersed in SBF. The light intensity remained constant for the first 48h after which a decrease with three distinct slopes was observed: the first decrease between 48 and 200h of immersion could be correlated to the formation of the Ca-P layer at the fiber surface. After this a faster decrease in light transmission was observed from 200 to ~425h in SBF. SEM analysis suggested that after 200h, the surface of the fiber was fully covered by a thin Ca-P layer which is likely to scatter light. For immersion times longer than ~425h, the thickness of the Ca-P layer increased and thus acted as a barrier to the dissolution process limiting further reduction in light transmission. The tracking of light transmission through the PBG fiber allowed monitoring of the fiber dissolution in vitro. These results are essential in developing new bioactive fiber sensors that can be used to monitor bioresponse in situ.

  7. Marine Structural Biomaterials in Medical Biomimicry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David W; Lee, Jong-Min; Jung, Han-Sung

    2015-10-01

    Marine biomaterials display properties, behaviors, and functions that have not been artificially matched in relation to their hierarchical construction, crack-stopping properties, growth adaptation, and energy efficiency. The discovery and understanding of such features that are characteristic of natural biomaterials can be used to manufacture more energy-efficient and lightweight materials. However, a more detailed understanding of the design of natural biomaterials with good performance and the mechanism of their design is required. Far-reaching biomolecular characterization of biomaterials and biostructures from the ocean world is possible with sophisticated analytical methods, such as whole-genome RNA-seq, and de novo transcriptome sequencing and mass spectrophotometry-based sequencing. In combination with detailed material characterization, the elements in newly discovered biomaterials and their properties can be reconstituted into biomimetic or bio-inspired materials. A major aim of harnessing marine biomaterials is their translation into biomimetic counterparts. To achieve full translation, the genome, proteome, and hierarchical material characteristics, and their profiles in space and time, have to be associated to allow for smooth biomimetic translation. In this article, we highlight the novel science of marine biomimicry from a materials perspective. We focus on areas of material design and fabrication that have excelled in marine biological models, such as embedded interfaces, chiral organization, and the use of specialized composite material-on-material designs. Our emphasis is primarily on key materials with high value in healthcare in which we evaluate their future prospects. Marine biomaterials are among the most exquisite and powerful aspects in materials science today. PMID:25905922

  8. Biomaterials and medical devices a perspective from an emerging country

    CERN Document Server

    Hermawan, Hendra

    2016-01-01

    This book presents an introduction to biomaterials with the focus on the current development and future direction of biomaterials and medical devices research and development in Indonesia. It is the first biomaterials book written by selected academic and clinical experts experts on biomaterials and medical devices from various institutions and industries in Indonesia. It serves as a reference source for researchers starting new projects, for companies developing and marketing products and for governments setting new policies. Chapter one covers the fundamentals of biomaterials, types of biomaterials, their structures and properties and the relationship between them. Chapter two discusses unconventional processing of biomaterials including nano-hybrid organic-inorganic biomaterials. Chapter three addresses biocompatibility issues including in vitro cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, in vitro cell models, biocompatibility data and its related failure. Chapter four describes degradable biomaterial for medical implants...

  9. Formation and thermal studies of calcium phosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium Phosphate based glasses and glass ceramics are known for their bio- active nature. Thermal behaviour of three compositions of CaO-Na/sub 2/O-SiO/sub 2/-P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ glass system were studied. All glasses were clear and stable. Characteristic temperatures i.e. glass transition, glass softening temperature and liquids temperatures were determined by differential thermal analyzer and dilatometer. (author)

  10. Wear Characteristics of Metallic Biomaterials: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Hussein

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Metals are extensively used in a variety of applications in the medical field for internal support and biological tissue replacements, such as joint replacements, dental roots, orthopedic fixation, and stents. The metals and alloys that are primarily used in biomedical applications are stainless steels, Co alloys, and Ti alloys. The service period of a metallic biomaterial is determined by its abrasion and wear resistance. A reduction in the wear resistance of the implant results in the release of incompatible metal ions into the body that loosen the implant. In addition, several reactions may occur because of the deposition of wear debris in tissue. Therefore, developing biomaterials with high wear resistance is critical to ensuring a long life for the biomaterial. The aim of this work is to review the current state of knowledge of the wear of metallic biomaterials and how wear is affected by the material properties and conditions in terms of the type of alloys developed and fabrication processes. We also present a brief evaluation of various experimental test techniques and wear characterization techniques that are used to determine the tribological performance of metallic biomaterials.

  11. Heterogeneity of Scaffold Biomaterials in Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Edgar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering (TE offers a potential solution for the shortage of transplantable organs and the need for novel methods of tissue repair. Methods of TE have advanced significantly in recent years, but there are challenges to using engineered tissues and organs including but not limited to: biocompatibility, immunogenicity, biodegradation, and toxicity. Analysis of biomaterials used as scaffolds may, however, elucidate how TE can be enhanced. Ideally, biomaterials should closely mimic the characteristics of desired organ, their function and their in vivo environments. A review of biomaterials used in TE highlighted natural polymers, synthetic polymers, and decellularized organs as sources of scaffolding. Studies of discarded organs supported that decellularization offers a remedy to reducing waste of donor organs, but does not yet provide an effective solution to organ demand because it has shown varied success in vivo depending on organ complexity and physiological requirements. Review of polymer-based scaffolds revealed that a composite scaffold formed by copolymerization is more effective than single polymer scaffolds because it allows copolymers to offset disadvantages a single polymer may possess. Selection of biomaterials for use in TE is essential for transplant success. There is not, however, a singular biomaterial that is universally optimal.

  12. Microgel mechanics in biomaterial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Shalini; Hansen, Caroline E; Lyon, L Andrew

    2014-08-19

    The field of polymeric biomaterials has received much attention in recent years due to its potential for enhancing the biocompatibility of systems and devices applied to drug delivery and tissue engineering. Such applications continually push the definition of biocompatibility from relatively straightforward issues such as cytotoxicity to significantly more complex processes such as reducing foreign body responses or even promoting/recapitulating natural body functions. Hydrogels and their colloidal analogues, microgels, have been and continue to be heavily investigated as viable materials for biological applications because they offer numerous, facile avenues in tailoring chemical and physical properties to approach biologically harmonious integration. Mechanical properties in particular are recently coming into focus as an important manner in which biological responses can be altered. In this Account, we trace how mechanical properties of microgels have moved into the spotlight of research efforts with the realization of their potential impact in biologically integrative systems. We discuss early experiments in our lab and in others focused on synthetic modulation of particle structure at a rudimentary level for fundamental drug delivery studies. These experiments elucidated that microgel mechanics are a consequence of polymer network distribution, which can be controlled by chemical composition or particle architecture. The degree of deformability designed into the microgel allows for a defined response to an imposed external force. We have studied deformation in packed colloidal phases and in translocation events through confined pores; in all circumstances, microgels exhibit impressive deformability in response to their environmental constraints. Microgels further translate their mechanical properties when assembled in films to the properties of the bulk material. In particular, microgel films have been a large focus in our lab as building blocks for self

  13. Biomaterials-Based Organic Electronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettinger, Christopher J.; Bao, Zhenan

    2010-01-01

    Organic electronic devices have demonstrated tremendous versatility in a wide range of applications including consumer electronics, photovoltaics, and biotechnology. The traditional interface of organic electronics with biology, biotechnology, and medicine occurs in the general field of sensing biological phenomena. For example, the fabrication of hybrid electronic structures using both organic semiconductors and bioactive molecules has led to enhancements in sensitivity and specificity within biosensing platforms, which in turn has a potentially wide range of clinical applications. However, the interface of biomolecules and organic semiconductors has also recently explored the potential use of natural and synthetic biomaterials as structural components of electronic devices. The fabrication of electronically active systems using biomaterials-based components has the potential to realize a large set of unique devices including environmentally biodegradable systems and bioresorbable temporary medical devices. This article reviews recent advances in the implementation of biomaterials as structural components in organic electronic devices with a focus on potential applications in biotechnology and medicine. PMID:20607127

  14. Smart self-assembled hybrid hydrogel biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeček, Jindřich; Yang, Jiyuan

    2012-07-23

    Hybrid biomaterials are systems created from components of at least two distinct classes of molecules, for example, synthetic macromolecules and proteins or peptide domains. The synergistic combination of two types of structures may produce new materials that possess unprecedented levels of structural organization and novel properties. This Review focuses on biorecognition-driven self-assembly of hybrid macromolecules into functional hydrogel biomaterials. First, basic rules that govern the secondary structure of peptides are discussed, and then approaches to the specific design of hybrid systems with tailor-made properties are evaluated, followed by a discussion on the similarity of design principles of biomaterials and macromolecular therapeutics. Finally, the future of the field is briefly outlined.

  15. Novel hydroxyapatite biomaterial covalently linked to raloxifene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meme, L; Santarelli, A; Marzo, G; Emanuelli, M; Nocini, P F; Bertossi, D; Putignano, A; Dioguardi, M; Lo Muzio, L; Bambini, F

    2014-01-01

    Since raloxifene, a drug used in osteoporosis therapy, inhibits osteoclast, but not osteoblast functions, it has been suggested to improve recovery during implant surgery. The present paper describes an effective method to link raloxifene, through a covalent bond, to a nano-Hydroxyapatite-based biomaterial by interfacing with (3-aminopropyl)-Triethoxysilane as assessed by Infra Red-Fourier Transformed (IR-FT) spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). To evaluate the safety of this modified new material, the vitality of osteoblast-like cells cultured with the new biomaterial was then investigated. Raloxifene-conjugated HAbiomaterial has been shown to be a safe material easy to obtain which could be an interesting starting point for the use of a new functional biomaterial suitable in bone regeneration procedures. PMID:25280036

  16. Imaging challenges in biomaterials and tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, Alyssa A; Anastasio, Mark A; Larson, Jeffery C; Brey, Eric M

    2013-09-01

    Biomaterials are employed in the fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) in order to enhance the regeneration or replacement of tissue function and/or structure. The unique environments resulting from the presence of biomaterials, cells, and tissues result in distinct challenges in regards to monitoring and assessing the results of these interventions. Imaging technologies for three-dimensional (3D) analysis have been identified as a strategic priority in TERM research. Traditionally, histological and immunohistochemical techniques have been used to evaluate engineered tissues. However, these methods do not allow for an accurate volume assessment, are invasive, and do not provide information on functional status. Imaging techniques are needed that enable non-destructive, longitudinal, quantitative, and three-dimensional analysis of TERM strategies. This review focuses on evaluating the application of available imaging modalities for assessment of biomaterials and tissue in TERM applications. Included is a discussion of limitations of these techniques and identification of areas for further development.

  17. Electrospinning of calcium phosphate-poly (d,l-lactic acid) nanofibers for sustained release of water-soluble drug and fast mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qi-Wei; Zi, Yun-Peng; Xu, Wei; Zhou, Rong; Cai, Zhu-Yun; Zheng, Wei-Jie; Chen, Feng; Qian, Qi-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Calcium phosphate-based biomaterials have been well studied in biomedical fields due to their outstanding chemical and biological properties which are similar to the inorganic constituents in bone tissue. In this study, amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) nanoparticles were prepared by a precipitation method, and used for preparation of ACP-poly(d,l-lactic acid) (ACP-PLA) nanofibers and water-soluble drug-containing ACP-PLA nanofibers by electrospinning. Promoting the encapsulation efficiency of water-soluble drugs in electrospun hydrophobic polymer nanofibers is a common problem due to the incompatibility between the water-soluble drug molecules and hydrophobic polymers solution. Herein, we used a native biomolecule of lecithin as a biocompatible surfactant to overcome this problem, and successfully prepared water-soluble drug-containing ACP-PLA nanofibers. The lecithin and ACP nanoparticles played important roles in stabilizing water-soluble drug in the electrospinning composite solution. The electrospun drug-containing ACP-PLA nanofibers exhibited fast mineralization in simulated body fluid. The ACP nanoparticles played the key role of seeds in the process of mineralization. Furthermore, the drug-containing ACP-PLA nanofibers exhibited sustained drug release which simultaneously occurred with the in situ mineralization in simulated body fluid. The osteoblast-like (MG63) cells with spreading filopodia were well observed on the as-prepared nanofibrous mats after culturing for 24 hours, indicating a high cytocompatibility. Due to the high biocompatibility, sustained drug release, and fast mineralization, the as-prepared composite nanofibers may have potential applications in water-soluble drug loading and release for tissue engineering. PMID:27785016

  18. Sustainable Biomaterials: Current Trends, Challenges and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish Kumar Gupta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Biomaterials and sustainable resources are two complementary terms supporting the development of new sustainable emerging processes. In this context, many interdisciplinary approaches including biomass waste valorization and proper usage of green technologies, etc., were brought forward to tackle future challenges pertaining to declining fossil resources, energy conservation, and related environmental issues. The implementation of these approaches impels its potential effect on the economy of particular countries and also reduces unnecessary overburden on the environment. This contribution aims to provide an overview of some of the most recent trends, challenges, and applications in the field of biomaterials derived from sustainable resources.

  19. Regulatory affairs for biomaterials and medical devices

    CERN Document Server

    Amato, Stephen F; Amato, B

    2015-01-01

    All biomaterials and medical devices are subject to a long list of regulatory practises and policies which must be adhered to in order to receive clearance. This book provides readers with information on the systems in place in the USA and the rest of the world. Chapters focus on a series of procedures and policies including topics such as commercialization, clinical development, general good practise manufacturing and post market surveillance.Addresses global regulations and regulatory issues surrounding biomaterials and medical devicesEspecially useful for smaller co

  20. Biomaterials for tissue engineering of skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila MacNeil

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Tissue-engineered skin has been in clinical use for 25 years and has developed greatly during this time. This review looks at the role biomaterials need to play in providing for epidermal cover, dermal replacement, and epidermal/dermal replacement, and describes the major problems that remain. The majority of biomaterials in clinical use are based on natural or extracted collagen. The clinical challenges in using these materials are highlighted throughout – specifically safety issues, improving the take of cultured cells on wound beds, improving the rate of neovascularization of tissue-engineered skin, and developing scaffolds that resist contraction and fibrosis.

  1. Sustainable Biomaterials: Current Trends, Challenges and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Gupta, Girish; De, Sudipta; Franco, Ana; Balu, Alina Mariana; Luque, Rafael

    2015-12-30

    Biomaterials and sustainable resources are two complementary terms supporting the development of new sustainable emerging processes. In this context, many interdisciplinary approaches including biomass waste valorization and proper usage of green technologies, etc., were brought forward to tackle future challenges pertaining to declining fossil resources, energy conservation, and related environmental issues. The implementation of these approaches impels its potential effect on the economy of particular countries and also reduces unnecessary overburden on the environment. This contribution aims to provide an overview of some of the most recent trends, challenges, and applications in the field of biomaterials derived from sustainable resources.

  2. Biomaterials supported CdS nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balu, Alina M. [Institute of Physical Chemistry ' Ilie Murgulescu' , Spl. Independentei 202, 060021 Bucharest (Romania); Departamento de Quimica Organica, Campus de Rabanales, Edificio Marie Curie, Ctra Nnal IV, Km 396, Universidad de Cordoba, E-14014 Cordoba (Spain); Campelo, Juan M. [Departamento de Quimica Organica, Campus de Rabanales, Edificio Marie Curie, Ctra Nnal IV, Km 396, Universidad de Cordoba, E-14014 Cordoba (Spain); Luque, Rafael, E-mail: q62alsor@uco.es [Departamento de Quimica Organica, Campus de Rabanales, Edificio Marie Curie, Ctra Nnal IV, Km 396, Universidad de Cordoba, E-14014 Cordoba (Spain); Rajabi, Fatemeh [Department of Science, Payame Noor University, PO Box 878, Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Romero, Antonio A. [Departamento de Quimica Organica, Campus de Rabanales, Edificio Marie Curie, Ctra Nnal IV, Km 396, Universidad de Cordoba, E-14014 Cordoba (Spain)

    2010-11-01

    CdS quantum dot materials were prepared through a simple room temperature deposition of CdS nanocrystals on biomaterials including starch and chitosan. Materials obtained were found to contain differently distributed CdS nanocrystals on the surface of the biopolymers, making them potentially interesting for biomedical applications as contrast agents and/or in photocatalysis.

  3. Biomaterials for the Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadavi, Darya; Poot, André A

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) as a progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disease represents a huge unmet need for treatment. The low efficacy of current treatment methods is not only due to low drug potency but also due to the presence of various obstacles in the delivery routes. One of the main barriers is the blood-brain barrier. The increasing prevalence of AD and the low efficacy of current therapies have increased the amount of research on unraveling of disease pathways and development of treatment strategies. One of the interesting areas for the latter subject is biomaterials and their applications. This interest originates from the fact that biomaterials are very useful for the delivery of therapeutic agents, such as drugs, proteins, and/or cells, in order to treat diseases and regenerate tissues. Recently, manufacturing of nano-sized delivery systems has increased the efficacy and delivery potential of biomaterials. In this article, we review the latest developments with regard to the use of biomaterials for the treatment of AD, including nanoparticles and liposomes for delivery of therapeutic compounds and scaffolds for cell delivery strategies. PMID:27379232

  4. Properties of concretes and wood composites using a phosphate-based binder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Luong Thanh

    Magnesium potassium phosphate ceramics are from the family of phosphate-based cements which can be used as alternatives to Portland cements. In this study, concretes and wood composites were produced using magnesium potassium phosphate ceramic binders and supplementary materials including fly ash, sand, silica fume and sawdust. Bentonite, Delvo Stabilizer and baking soda were used as additives to increase the workability and the setting time of the fresh mixutres and decrease the density of the hardened products. The materials were then reinforced with chopped glass-fibers or textile glass-fabrics to increase their hardened properties. At 50% fly ash by total mass of the binder, the concretes had compressive strength and density of 33 MPa and 2170 kg/m3, respectively, after 90 days of simple curing. At 20% fly ash by total mass of the binder, the wood composites had compressive strength and density of 13 MPa and 1320 kg/m3, respectively, after 90 days. The flexural strengths were about 10% to 47% of the corresponding cylinder compressive strengths for these mixes. Increases in both compressive and flexural strengths for these mixes were observed with the addition of chopped glass-fibers or textile glass-fabrics.

  5. Biological performance of titania containing phosphate-based glasses for bone tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Neel, Ensanya Ali; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Knowles, Jonathan Campbell

    2014-02-01

    The interplay between glass chemistry, structure, degradation kinetics, and biological activity provides flexibility for the development of scaffolds with highly specific cellular response. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the role of titania inclusion into the phosphate-based glass on its ability to stimulate osteoblast-like human osteosarcoma (HOS) cells to adhere, proliferate and differentiate. In depth morphological and biochemical characterisation was performed on HOS cells cultured on the surface of glass discs. Cell proliferation was also studied in the presence of the glass extract. Cell differentiation, through osteoblast phenotype genes, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteocalcin production, was carried out using normal or osteogenic media. Both Thermanox® and titania free glass were used as controls. The data demonstrated that titania inclusion provides desired cytocompatible surface that supported initial cell attachment, sustained viability, and increased cell proliferation similar or significantly higher than Thermanox®. The modified glasses regulated osteoblastic cell differentiation as detected by osteoblast phenotype gene transcription and upregulated ALP and osteocalcin expression. Using osteogenic media had no significant effect on ALP activity and osteocalcin expression. Therefore, titania modified phosphate glasses may have future use as bone tissue engineering scaffolds. PMID:24411382

  6. Spectroscopic Investigation of Sm3+ doped phosphate based glasses for reddish-orange emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayab Rasool, Sk.; Rama Moorthy, L.; Jayasankar, C. K.

    2013-01-01

    Spectroscopic properties of Sm3+ ions in phosphate based glasses (P2O5+K2O+Al2O3+CaF2) were investigated through SEM with EDS, X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential thermal analysis (DTA), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Raman, absorption, emission and decay measurements. Judd-Ofelt (JO) intensity parameters were obtained from the absorption spectrum which are inturn used to calculate the emission properties such as radiative transition probabilities (AR), radiative lifetime (τR), branching ratios (βR) and stimulated emission cross-sections (σe(λP)) for the 4G5/2→→6HJ (J=5/2,7/2,9/2 and 11/2) transitions of Sm3+ ions. The effective fluorescence bandwidth (Δλeff) and the experimental branching ratios (βexp) were determined from the emission spectrum. The decay profiles of 4G5/2 level exhibited non- exponential nature with the increase of Sm3+ ions concentration. The non-exponential behavior of decay curves has been explained by using the Inokuti-Hirayama (IH) model for S=6, which indicates that the energy transfer mechanism is dipole-dipole between the Sm3+ ions.

  7. Effect of Boron Addition on the Thermal, Degradation, and Cytocompatibility Properties of Phosphate-Based Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nusrat Sharmin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study eight different phosphate-based glass compositions were prepared by melt-quenching: four in the (P2O545-(CaO16--(MgO24- system and four in the system (P2O550-(CaO16--(MgO24-, where and 10 mol%. The effect of B2O3 addition on the thermal properties, density, molar volume, dissolution rates, and cytocompatibility were studied for both glass systems. Addition of B2O3 increased the glass transition (, crystallisation (, melting (, Liquidus ( and dilatometric softening ( temperature and molar volume (. The thermal expansion coefficient (α and density ( were seen to decrease. An assessment of the thermal stability of the glasses was made in terms of their processing window (crystallisation onset, minus glass transition temperature, , and an increase in the processing window was observed with increasing B2O3 content. Degradation studies of the glasses revealed that the rates decreased with increasing B2O3 content and a decrease in degradation rates was also observed as the P2O5 content reduced from 50 to 45 mol%. MG63 osteoblast-like cells cultured in direct contact with the glass samples for 14 days revealed comparative data to the positive control for the cell metabolic activity, proliferation, ALP activity, and morphology for glasses containing up to 5 mol% of B2O3.

  8. Silk film biomaterials for ocular surface repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Brian David

    Current biomaterial approaches for repairing the cornea's ocular surface upon injury are partially effective due to inherent material limitations. As a result there is a need to expand the biomaterial options available for use in the eye, which in turn will help to expand new clinical innovations and technology development. The studies illustrated here are a collection of work to further characterize silk film biomaterials for use on the ocular surface. Silk films were produced from regenerated fibroin protein solution derived from the Bombyx mori silkworm cocoon. Methods of silk film processing and production were developed to produce consistent biomaterials for in vitro and in vivo evaluation. A wide range of experiments was undertaken that spanned from in vitro silk film material characterization to in vivo evaluation. It was found that a variety of silk film properties could be controlled through a water-annealing process. Silk films were then generated that could be use in vitro to produce stratified corneal epithelial cell sheets comparable to tissue grown on the clinical standard substrate of amniotic membrane. This understanding was translated to produce a silk film design that enhanced corneal healing in vivo on a rabbit injury model. Further work produced silk films with varying surface topographies that were used as a simplified analog to the corneal basement membrane surface in vitro. These studies demonstrated that silk film surface topography is capable of directing corneal epithelial cell attachment, growth, and migration response. Most notably epithelial tissue development was controllably directed by the presence of the silk surface topography through increasing cell sheet migration efficiency at the individual cellular level. Taken together, the presented findings represent a comprehensive characterization of silk film biomaterials for use in ocular surface reconstruction, and indicate their utility as a potential material choice in the

  9. Mechanistic investigation of a hemostatic keratin biomaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmany, Maria Bahawdory

    Traumatic injury leads to more productive years lost than heart disease, cancer and stroke combined. Trauma is often accompanied and complicated by uncontrolled bleeding. Human hair keratin biomaterials have demonstrated efficacy in controlling hemorrhage in both small and large animal models; however little is known about the mechanism by which these proteins aid in blood clotting. Inspection of the amino acid sequence of known keratins shows the presence of several cellular binding motifs, suggesting a possible mechanism and potentially eliminating the need to functionalize the material's surface for cellular interaction. In addition to small animal studies, the hemostatic activity of keratin hydrogels was explored through porcine hemorrhage models representing both a high flow and low flow bleed. In both studies, keratin hydrogels appeared to lead to a significant reduction in blood loss. The promising results from these in vivo studies provided the motivation for this project. The objective of this dissertation work was to assess the mechanism of action of a hemostatic keratin biomaterial, and more broadly assess the biomaterial-cellular interaction(s). It is our hypothesis that keratin biomaterials have the capacity to specifically interact with cells and lead to propagation of intracellular signaling pathway, specifically contributing to hemostasis. Through application of biochemical and molecular tools, we demonstrate here that keratin biomaterials contribute to hemostasis through two probable mechanisms; integrin mediated platelet adhesion and increased fibrin polymerization. Platelets are the major cell type involved in coagulation both by acting as a catalytic surface for the clotting cascade and adhering to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins providing a soft platelet plug. Because keratin biomaterials have structural and biochemical characteristics similar to ECM proteins, we utilized several adhesion assays to investigate platelet adhesion to keratin

  10. Glucocorticoid induced osteopenia in cancellous bone of sheep: validation of large animal model for spine fusion and biomaterial research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Cheng, Liming; Bollen, Peter;

    2010-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Glucocorticoid with low calcium and phosphorus intake induces osteopenia in cancellous bone of sheep. OBJECTIVE: To validate a large animal model for spine fusion and biomaterial research. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: A variety of ovariectomized animals has been used to study......-1) received prednisolone (GC) treatment (0.60 mg/kg/day, 5 times weekly) for 7 months. Group 2 (GC-2) received the same treatment as GC-1 for 7 months followed by 3 months without treatment. Group 3 was left untreated and served as the controls. All sheep received restricted diet with low calcium...

  11. Europium-doped amorphous calcium phosphate porous nanospheres: preparation and application as luminescent drug carriers

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Kui-Hua; Mo Xiu-Mei; Chen Feng; Zhu Ying-Jie; Wu Jin; Wang Ke-Wei; Tang Qi-Li

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Calcium phosphate is the most important inorganic constituent of biological tissues, and synthetic calcium phosphate has been widely used as biomaterials. In this study, a facile method has been developed for the fabrication of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP)/polylactide-block-monomethoxy(polyethyleneglycol) hybrid nanoparticles and ACP porous nanospheres. Europium-doping is performed to enable photoluminescence (PL) function of ACP porous nanospheres. A high specific surface area ...

  12. Biological performance of titania containing phosphate-based glasses for bone tissue engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou Neel, Ensanya Ali, E-mail: eabouneel@kau.edu.sa [Division of Biomaterials, Conservative Dental Sciences Department, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Biomaterials Department, Faculty of Dentistry, Tanta University, Tanta (Egypt); Division of Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, UCL Eastman Dental Institute, 256 Gray' s Inn Road, London WC1X 8LD (United Kingdom); Chrzanowski, Wojciech [The University of Sydney, Faculty of Pharmacy, Pharmacy and Bank Building, NSW2006 (Australia); Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 Plus NBM Global Reserch Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Knowles, Jonathan Campbell, E-mail: j.knowles@ucl.ac.uk [Division of Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, UCL Eastman Dental Institute, 256 Gray' s Inn Road, London WC1X 8LD (United Kingdom); Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 Plus NBM Global Reserch Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-01

    The interplay between glass chemistry, structure, degradation kinetics, and biological activity provides flexibility for the development of scaffolds with highly specific cellular response. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the role of titania inclusion into the phosphate-based glass on its ability to stimulate osteoblast-like human osteosarcoma (HOS) cells to adhere, proliferate and differentiate. In depth morphological and biochemical characterisation was performed on HOS cells cultured on the surface of glass discs. Cell proliferation was also studied in the presence of the glass extract. Cell differentiation, through osteoblast phenotype genes, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteocalcin production, was carried out using normal or osteogenic media. Both Thermanox® and titania free glass were used as controls. The data demonstrated that titania inclusion provides desired cytocompatible surface that supported initial cell attachment, sustained viability, and increased cell proliferation similar or significantly higher than Thermanox®. The modified glasses regulated osteoblastic cell differentiation as detected by osteoblast phenotype gene transcription and upregulated ALP and osteocalcin expression. Using osteogenic media had no significant effect on ALP activity and osteocalcin expression. Therefore, titania modified phosphate glasses may have future use as bone tissue engineering scaffolds. - Highlights: • This study investigated the role of titania on the biological response of phosphate glasses. • Incorporation of titania improved HOS cell attachment, viability and proliferation. • Titania modified glasses regulated osteoblastic cell differentiation. • Using osteogenic media had no significant effect on cell differentiation. • Titania modified glasses may have future use as bone tissue engineering scaffolds.

  13. Iron-phosphate-based chemically bonded phosphate ceramics for mixed waste stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an effort to develop chemically bonded phosphate ceramics for mixed waste stabilization, a collaborative project to develop iron-phosphate based ceramics has been initiated between Argonne National Laboratory and the V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia. The starter powders are oxides of iron that are generated as inexpensive byproduct materials in the iron and steel industry. They contain iron oxides as a mixture of magnetite (Fe3O4) and haematite (Fe2O3). In this initial phase of this project, both of these compounds were investigated independently. Each was reacted with phosphoric acid solution to form iron phosphate ceramics. In the case of magnetite, the reaction was rapid. Adding ash as the waste component containing hazardous contaminants resulted in a dense and hard ceramic rich in glassy phase. On the other hand, the reaction of phosphoric acid solution with a mixture of haematite and ash waste contaminated with cesium and americium was too slow. Samples had to be molded under pressure. They were cured for 2-3 weeks and then hardened by heating at 350 degrees C for 3 h. The resulting ceramics in both cases were subjected to physical tests for measurement of density, open porosity, compression strength, phase analyses using X-ray diffraction and differential thermal analysis, and leaching tests using toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and ANS 16.1 with 7 days of leaching. Using the preliminary information obtained from these tests, we evaluated these materials for stabilization of Department of Energy's mixed waste streams

  14. Stabilization and solidification of metal-laden wastes by compaction and magnesium phosphate-based binder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, A J; Pagilla, K R; Wagh, A S

    2000-09-01

    Bench-scale and full-scale investigations of waste stabilization and volume reduction were conducted using spiked soil and ash wastes containing heavy metals such as Cd, Cr, Pb, Ni, and Hg. The waste streams were stabilized and solidified using chemically bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC) binder, and then compacted by either uniaxial or harmonic press for volume reduction. The physical properties of the final waste forms were determined by measuring volume reduction, density, porosity, and compressive strength. The leachability of heavy metals in the final waste forms was determined by a toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) test and a 90-day immersion test (ANS 16.1). The structural composition and nature of waste forms were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. CBPC binder and compaction can achieve 80-wt% waste loading and 39-47% reduction in waste volume. Compressive strength of final waste forms ranged from 1500 to 2000 psi. TCLP testing of waste forms showed that all heavy metals except Hg passed the TCLP limits using the phosphate-based binder. When Na2S was added to the binder, the waste forms also passed TCLP limits for Hg. Long-term leachability resistance of the final waste forms was achieved for all metals in both soil and ash wastes, and the leachability index was approximately 14. XRD patterns of waste forms indicated vermiculite in the ash waste was chemically incorporated into the CBPC matrix. SEM showed that waste forms are layered when compacted by uniaxial press and are homogeneous when compacted by harmonic press. PMID:11055158

  15. Biological performance of titania containing phosphate-based glasses for bone tissue engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interplay between glass chemistry, structure, degradation kinetics, and biological activity provides flexibility for the development of scaffolds with highly specific cellular response. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the role of titania inclusion into the phosphate-based glass on its ability to stimulate osteoblast-like human osteosarcoma (HOS) cells to adhere, proliferate and differentiate. In depth morphological and biochemical characterisation was performed on HOS cells cultured on the surface of glass discs. Cell proliferation was also studied in the presence of the glass extract. Cell differentiation, through osteoblast phenotype genes, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteocalcin production, was carried out using normal or osteogenic media. Both Thermanox® and titania free glass were used as controls. The data demonstrated that titania inclusion provides desired cytocompatible surface that supported initial cell attachment, sustained viability, and increased cell proliferation similar or significantly higher than Thermanox®. The modified glasses regulated osteoblastic cell differentiation as detected by osteoblast phenotype gene transcription and upregulated ALP and osteocalcin expression. Using osteogenic media had no significant effect on ALP activity and osteocalcin expression. Therefore, titania modified phosphate glasses may have future use as bone tissue engineering scaffolds. - Highlights: • This study investigated the role of titania on the biological response of phosphate glasses. • Incorporation of titania improved HOS cell attachment, viability and proliferation. • Titania modified glasses regulated osteoblastic cell differentiation. • Using osteogenic media had no significant effect on cell differentiation. • Titania modified glasses may have future use as bone tissue engineering scaffolds

  16. Facile design of biomaterials by 'click' chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsted, Søren

    2012-01-01

    chemistry is elaborated. The present state of creating functional and biologically active surfaces by click chemistry is presented. Finally, conducting surfaces based on an azide‐functionalized polymer with prospective biological sensor potential are introduced. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry......The advent of the so‐called ‘click chemistry’ a decade ago has significantly improved the chemical toolbox for producing novel biomaterials. This review focuses primarily on the application of Cu(I)‐catalysed azide–alkyne 1,3‐cycloadditon in the preparation of numerous, diverse biomaterials...... and biomedical materials and concepts. In addition, the thiol–ene ‘click’ reaction is addressed in the same manner, and the possibility of using both click reactions orthogonally is highlighted. A strategy for the preparation of novel intriguing poly(ε‐caprolactone)‐based nanobiomaterials by orthogonal click...

  17. Grand challenge in Biomaterials-wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Salamone, Joseph C.; Salamone, Ann Beal; Swindle-Reilly, Katelyn; Leung, Kelly Xiaoyu-Chen; McMahon, Rebecca E.

    2016-01-01

    Providing improved health care for wound, burn and surgical patients is a major goal for enhancing patient well-being, in addition to reducing the high cost of current health care treatment. The introduction of new and novel biomaterials and biomedical devices is anticipated to have a profound effect on the future improvement of many deleterious health issues. This publication will discuss the development of novel non-stinging liquid adhesive bandages in healthcare applications developed by R...

  18. New nanostructured biomaterials for regenerative medicine

    OpenAIRE

    A. Sgambato

    2016-01-01

    Innovative approaches in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine based on decellularized extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffolds and tissues are quickly growing. ECM proteins are particularly adequate toward tissue regeneration applications, since they are natural biomaterials that can be bio-activated with signalling molecules able to influence cell fate, driving cell responses and tissue regeneration. Indeed, it is well recognized that cells perceive and respond to their microenvironment;...

  19. Sugared biomaterial binding lectins: achievements and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojarová, P; Křen, V

    2016-07-19

    Lectins, a distinct group of glycan-binding proteins, play a prominent role in the immune system ranging from pathogen recognition and tuning of inflammation to cell adhesion or cellular signalling. The possibilities of their detailed study expanded along with the rapid development of biomaterials in the last decade. The immense knowledge of all aspects of glycan-lectin interactions both in vitro and in vivo may be efficiently used in bioimaging, targeted drug delivery, diagnostic and analytic biological methods. Practically applicable examples comprise photoluminescence and optical biosensors, ingenious three-dimensional carbohydrate microarrays for high-throughput screening, matrices for magnetic resonance imaging, targeted hyperthermal treatment of cancer tissues, selective inhibitors of bacterial toxins and pathogen-recognising lectin receptors, and many others. This review aims to present an up-to-date systematic overview of glycan-decorated biomaterials promising for interactions with lectins, especially those applicable in biology, biotechnology or medicine. The lectins of interest include galectin-1, -3 and -7 participating in tumour progression, bacterial lectins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA-IL), E. coli (Fim-H) and Clostridium botulinum (HA33) or DC-SIGN, receptors of macrophages and dendritic cells. The spectrum of lectin-binding biomaterials covered herein ranges from glycosylated organic structures, calixarene and fullerene cores over glycopeptides and glycoproteins, functionalised carbohydrate scaffolds of cyclodextrin or chitin to self-assembling glycopolymer clusters, gels, micelles and liposomes. Glyconanoparticles, glycan arrays, and other biomaterials with a solid core are described in detail, including inorganic matrices like hydroxyapatite or stainless steel for bioimplants. PMID:27075026

  20. Reconstituted Keratin Biomaterial with Enhanced Ductility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halleh Atri

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the waste from protein fibres represents an important renewable source for a new generation of biomaterials and promising competitors for carbohydrate based biomaterials. Regenerated keratin biomaterials are biodegradable in vivo and in vitro, biocompatible, and support cell attachment and proliferation; however, their major drawback has been their weak mechanical properties such as ductility. The following study was conducted in an attempt to improve the ductility of reconstituted keratin films obtained from Australian merino wool fibres. Keratin was extracted from wool fibres according to an established protocol proposed by Yamauchi, and then dialyzed and desalted by multiple diafiltration wash cycles. The resulting keratin film was transparent, biodegradable, and, opposite to its predecessors, mechanically durable, possessing a Young modulus about 12.5 MPa with 35% extensibility. The polypeptide chains were found to rearrange themselves in the β-sheet state in this keratin film, which was shown to be semi-crystalline. This film, unlike its predecessors, did not support human cell proliferation. These properties of the diafiltered keratin film have led us to think that diafiltration resulted in producing a totally new keratin film, which is envisaged to find applications in various areas.

  1. The RAPIDOS project—European and Chinese collaborative research on biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Eglin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The research project entitled “rapid prototyping of custom-made bone-forming tissue engineering constructs” (RAPIDOS is one of the three unique projects that are the result of the first coordinated call for research proposals in biomaterials launched by the European Union Commission and the National Natural Science Foundation of China in 2013 for facilitating bilateral translational research. We formed the RAPIDOS European and Chinese consortium with the aim of applying technologies creating custom-made tissue engineered constructs made of resorbable polymer and calcium phosphate ceramic composites specifically designed by integrating the following: (1 imaging and information technologies, (2 biomaterials and process engineering, and (3 biological and biomedical engineering for novel and truly translational bone repair solutions. Advanced solid free form fabrication technologies, precise stereolithography, and low-temperature rapid prototyping provide the necessary control to create innovative high-resolution medical implants. The use of Chinese medicine extracts, such as the bone anabolic factor icaritin, which has been shown to promote osteogenic differentiation of stem cells and enhance bone healing in vivo, is a safe and technologically relevant alternative to the intensely debated growth factors delivery strategies. This unique initiative driven by a global consortium is expected to accelerate scientific progress in the important field of biomaterials and to foster strong scientific cooperation between China and Europe.

  2. Obtaining new composite biomaterials by means of mineralization of methacrylate hydrogels using the reaction–diffusion method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramadan, Yousof [Department of Physical Chemistry II, Faculty of Pharmacy, Complutense University of Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); González-Sánchez, M. Isabel [Department of Physical Chemistry, School of Industrial Engineering, Castilla-La Mancha University, 02071 Albacete (Spain); Hawkins, Karl [Centre of Nanohealth, Institute of Life Sciences, College of Medicine, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP, Wales (United Kingdom); Rubio-Retama, Jorge [Department of Physical Chemistry II, Faculty of Pharmacy, Complutense University of Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Valero, Edelmira [Department of Physical Chemistry, School of Industrial Engineering, Castilla-La Mancha University, 02071 Albacete (Spain); Perni, Stefano [School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF103NB (United Kingdom); Department of Biological Engineering, MA Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States); Prokopovich, Polina [School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF103NB (United Kingdom); Institute of Medical Engineering and Medical Physics, School of Engineering, Cardiff University, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Department of Biological Engineering, MA Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States); López-Cabarcos, Enrique, E-mail: cabarcos@farm.ucm.es [Department of Physical Chemistry II, Faculty of Pharmacy, Complutense University of Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-01

    The present paper describes the synthesis and characterization of a new polymeric biomaterial mineralized with calcium phosphate using the reaction–diffusion method. The scaffold of this biomaterial was a hydrogel constituted by biocompatible polyethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMEM) and 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEM), which were cross-linked with N-N’-methylenebisacrylamide (BIS). The cross-linking content of the hydrogels was varied from 0.25% to 15% (w/w). The gels were used as matrix where two reactants (Na{sub 2}HPO{sub 4} and CaCl{sub 2}) diffused from both ends of the gel and upon encountering produced calcium phosphate crystals that precipitated within the polymer matrix forming bands. The shape of the crystals was tuned by modifying the matrix porosity in such a way that when the polymer matrix was slightly reticulated the diffusion reaction produced round calcium phosphate microcrystals, whilst when the polymer matrix was highly reticulated the reaction yielded flat calcium phosphate crystals. Selected area electron diffraction performed on the nanocrystals that constitute the microcrystals showed that they were formed by Brushite (CaHPO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O). This new composite material could be useful in medical and dentistry applications such as bone regeneration, bone repair or tissue engineering. - Highlights: • New polymeric biomaterial mineralized with calcium phosphate using the reaction-diffusion method.-Growing of brushite nanocrystals within a polymeric matrix. • Mineralization by reaction diffusion method controls the crystal growth within gels.

  3. Analysis of the strengthening and toughening of a biomaterial interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG; Fan

    2001-01-01

    [1]Currey, J. D., Mechanical properties of mother of pearl in tension, Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B, 1977, 196: 443—463.[2]Jackson, A. P., Vincent, J. F. V., Turner, R. M., The mechanical design of nacre, Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B., 1988, 234: 415—440.[3]Wang, R. Z., Wen, H. B., Cui, F. Z. et al., Observations of damage morphologies in nacre during deformation and fracture, J. Mater. Sci., 1995, 30: 2299—2304.[4]Smith, B. L., Schaffer, T. E., Viani, M. et al., Molecular mechanistic origin of the toughness of natural adhesives, fibres and composites, Nature, 1999, 399: 761—763.[5]Addadi, L., Weiner, S., A pavement of pearl, Nature, 1997, 389: 912—915.[6]Schaffer,T. E., Ionescu-Zantti, C., Fritz, M. et al., Does abalone nacre form by heteroepiaxial nucleation or by growth through mineral bridges? Chem. Mater., 1997, 9: 1731—1740.[7]Vincent, J. F. V., Structural Biomaterials, New York; The Macmillan Press Ltd, 1982.[8]Song, F., Bai, Y. L., Effects of mineral bridges on the mechanical properties of nacre, Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica (in Chinese), 2000, 21(Special Issue): 171—176.[9]Szuromi, P., Microstructural engineering of materials, Science, 1997, 277: 1183—1183.[10]Heuer, A. H., Fink, D. J., Laraia, J. L. et al., Innovative materials processing strategies: a biomimetic approach, Science, 1992, 255: 1098—1105.[11]Stupp, S. I., Braun, P. V., Molecular manipulation of microstructure: biomaterials, ceramics, and semiconductors, Science, 1997, 277: 1242—1248.[12]Watabe, N., Crystal growth of calcium carbonate in the invertebrates, Prog. Crystal Growth Charact., 1981, 4: 99—147.[13]Clegg, W. J., Kendall, K., Alford, N. M. et al., A simple way to make tough ceramics, Nature, 1990, 347: 455—457.[14]Jackson, A. P., Vincent, J. F. V., Briggs, D. et al., Application of surface analytical techniques to the study fracture surface of mother-of pearl, J. Mater. Science Letters, 1986, 5: 975—980.[15

  4. Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... before being swallowed; do not swallow them whole. Drink a full glass of water after taking either the regular or chewable tablets or capsules. Some liquid forms of calcium carbonate must be shaken well before use.Do not ...

  5. Calcium Calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Latvia - Lebanon - Libya - Lithuania - Luxembourg - Macedonia, Republic of - Malaysia - Malta - Mexico - Moldova - Morocco - Netherlands - New Zealand - Nigeria - ... and Statistics Popular content Calcium content of common foods What is Osteoporosis? The Board Introduction to Bone ...

  6. Calcium Electroporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gibot, Laure; Madi, Moinecha;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calcium electroporation describes the use of high voltage electric pulses to introduce supraphysiological calcium concentrations into cells. This promising method is currently in clinical trial as an anti-cancer treatment. One very important issue is the relation between tumor cell kill...... efficacy-and normal cell sensitivity. METHODS: Using a 3D spheroid cell culture model we have tested the effect of calcium electroporation and electrochemotherapy using bleomycin on three different human cancer cell lines: a colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT29), a bladder transitional cell carcinoma (SW780......), and a breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB231), as well as on primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDF-n). RESULTS: The results showed a clear reduction in spheroid size in all three cancer cell spheroids three days after treatment with respectively calcium electroporation (p

  7. The case study of biomaterials and biominerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Hoyo Martínez, Carmen

    2013-04-01

    The teaching of biomaterials as case study by on-line platform , susceptible to develop both individually and in groups, got different objectives proposed by the European Higher Education System, among which include: participate actively in the teaching-learning process by students, interpreting situations, adapt processes and solutions. It also improves oral and written communication, analytical skills and synthesis and also the ability to think critically. Biomaterials have their origin in biominerals. These are solid inorganic compounds of defined structure, consisting of molecular control mechanisms that operate in biological systems. Its main functions are: structural support, a reservoir of essential elements, sensors, mechanical protection and storage of toxic elements. Following the demand of materials compatible with certain functional systems of our body, developed biomaterials. Always meet the condition of biocompatibility. Should be tolerated by the body and do not provoke rejection. This involves a comprehensive study of physiological conditions and the anatomy of the body where a biomaterial has to be implemented. The possibility of generating new materials from biominerals has a major impact in medicine and other fields could reach as geology, construction, crystallography, etc. While the study of these issues is in its infancy today, can be viewed as an impact on the art and future technology. Planning case study that students would prepare its report for discussion in subgroups. Occurs then the pooling of individual analysis, joint case discussion and adoption by the subgroup of a consensual solution to the problem. The teacher as facilitator and coordinator of the final case analysis, sharing leads to group-wide class and said the unanimous decision reached by the students and gives his opinion on the resolution of the case. REFERENCES D.P. Ausubel. Psicología Educativa. Un punto de vista cognoscitivo. Trillas. Ed. 1983. E.W. Eisner. Procesos

  8. Biomaterials and tissue engineering in reconstructive surgery

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D F Williams

    2003-06-01

    This paper provides an account of the rationale for the development of implantable medical devices over the last half-century and explains the criteria that have controlled the selection of biomaterials for these critical applications. In spite of some good successes and excellent materials, there are still serious limitations to the performance of implants today, and the paper explains these limitations and develops this theme in order to describe the recent innovations in tissue engineering, which involves a different approach to reconstruction of the body.

  9. Atomic layer deposition of nanoporous biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger J Narayan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials.

  10. Grand challenge in Biomaterials-wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, Joseph C; Salamone, Ann Beal; Swindle-Reilly, Katelyn; Leung, Kelly Xiaoyu-Chen; McMahon, Rebecca E

    2016-06-01

    Providing improved health care for wound, burn and surgical patients is a major goal for enhancing patient well-being, in addition to reducing the high cost of current health care treatment. The introduction of new and novel biomaterials and biomedical devices is anticipated to have a profound effect on the future improvement of many deleterious health issues. This publication will discuss the development of novel non-stinging liquid adhesive bandages in healthcare applications developed by Rochal Industries. The scientists/engineers at Rochal have participated in commercializing products in the field of ophthalmology, including rigid gas permeable contact lenses, soft hydrogel contact lenses, silicone hydrogel contact lenses, contact lens care solutions and cleaners, intraocular lens materials, intraocular controlled drug delivery, topical/intraocular anesthesia, and in the field of wound care, as non-stinging, spray-on liquid bandages to protect skin from moisture and body fluids and medical adhesive-related skin injuries. Current areas of entrepreneurial activity at Rochal Industries pertain to the development of new classes of biomaterials for wound healing, primarily in regard to microbial infection, chronic wound care, burn injuries and surgical procedures, with emphasis on innovation in product creation, which include cell-compatible substrates/scaffolds for wound healing, antimicrobial materials for opportunistic pathogens and biofilm reduction, necrotic wound debridement, scar remediation, treatment of diabetic ulcers, amelioration of pressure ulcers, amelioration of neuropathic pain and adjuvants for skin tissue substitutes. PMID:27047680

  11. Engineering biomolecular microenvironments for cell instructive biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custódio, Catarina A; Reis, Rui L; Mano, João F

    2014-06-01

    Engineered cell instructive microenvironments with the ability to stimulate specific cellular responses are a topic of high interest in the fabrication and development of biomaterials for application in tissue engineering. Cells are inherently sensitive to the in vivo microenvironment that is often designed as the cell "niche." The cell "niche" comprising the extracellular matrix and adjacent cells, influences not only cell architecture and mechanics, but also cell polarity and function. Extensive research has been performed to establish new tools to fabricate biomimetic advanced materials for tissue engineering that incorporate structural, mechanical, and biochemical signals that interact with cells in a controlled manner and to recapitulate the in vivo dynamic microenvironment. Bioactive tunable microenvironments using micro and nanofabrication have been successfully developed and proven to be extremely powerful to control intracellular signaling and cell function. This Review is focused in the assortment of biochemical signals that have been explored to fabricate bioactive cell microenvironments and the main technologies and chemical strategies to encode them in engineered biomaterials with biological information.

  12. Grand challenge in Biomaterials-wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, Joseph C.; Salamone, Ann Beal; Swindle-Reilly, Katelyn; Leung, Kelly Xiaoyu-Chen; McMahon, Rebecca E.

    2016-01-01

    Providing improved health care for wound, burn and surgical patients is a major goal for enhancing patient well-being, in addition to reducing the high cost of current health care treatment. The introduction of new and novel biomaterials and biomedical devices is anticipated to have a profound effect on the future improvement of many deleterious health issues. This publication will discuss the development of novel non-stinging liquid adhesive bandages in healthcare applications developed by Rochal Industries. The scientists/engineers at Rochal have participated in commercializing products in the field of ophthalmology, including rigid gas permeable contact lenses, soft hydrogel contact lenses, silicone hydrogel contact lenses, contact lens care solutions and cleaners, intraocular lens materials, intraocular controlled drug delivery, topical/intraocular anesthesia, and in the field of wound care, as non-stinging, spray-on liquid bandages to protect skin from moisture and body fluids and medical adhesive-related skin injuries. Current areas of entrepreneurial activity at Rochal Industries pertain to the development of new classes of biomaterials for wound healing, primarily in regard to microbial infection, chronic wound care, burn injuries and surgical procedures, with emphasis on innovation in product creation, which include cell-compatible substrates/scaffolds for wound healing, antimicrobial materials for opportunistic pathogens and biofilm reduction, necrotic wound debridement, scar remediation, treatment of diabetic ulcers, amelioration of pressure ulcers, amelioration of neuropathic pain and adjuvants for skin tissue substitutes. PMID:27047680

  13. Cell reactions with biomaterials: the microscopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis A. S.G.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The methods and results of optical microscopy that can be used to observe cell reactions to biomaterials are Interference Reflection Microscopy (IRM, Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy (TIRFM, Surface Plasmon Resonance Microscopy (SPRM and Forster Resonance Energy Transfer Microscopy (FRETM and Standing Wave Fluorescence Microscopy. The last three are new developments, which have not yet been fully perfected. TIRFM and SPRM are evanescent wave methods. The physics of these methods depend upon optical phenomena at interfaces. All these methods give information on the dimensions of the gap between cell and the substratum to which it is adhering and thus are especially suited to work with biomaterials. IRM and FRETM can be used on opaque surfaces though image interpretation is especially difficult for IRM on a reflecting opaque surface. These methods are compared with several electron microscopical methods for studying cell adhesion to substrata. These methods all yield fairly consistent results and show that the cell to substratum distance on many materials is in the range 5 to 30 nm. The area of contact relative to the total projected area of the cell may vary from a few per cent to close to 100% depending on the cell type and substratum. These methods show that those discrete contact areas well known as focal contacts are frequently present. The results of FRETM suggest that the separation from the substratum even in a focal contact is about 5 nm.

  14. Biomaterials for integration with 3-D bioprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skardal, Aleksander; Atala, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    Bioprinting has emerged in recent years as an attractive method for creating 3-D tissues and organs in the laboratory, and therefore is a promising technology in a number of regenerative medicine applications. It has the potential to (i) create fully functional replacements for damaged tissues in patients, and (ii) rapidly fabricate small-sized human-based tissue models, or organoids, for diagnostics, pathology modeling, and drug development. A number of bioprinting modalities have been explored, including cellular inkjet printing, extrusion-based technologies, soft lithography, and laser-induced forward transfer. Despite the innovation of each of these technologies, successful implementation of bioprinting relies heavily on integration with compatible biomaterials that are responsible for supporting the cellular components during and after biofabrication, and that are compatible with the bioprinting device requirements. In this review, we will evaluate a variety of biomaterials, such as curable synthetic polymers, synthetic gels, and naturally derived hydrogels. Specifically we will describe how they are integrated with the bioprinting technologies above to generate bioprinted constructs with practical application in medicine. PMID:25476164

  15. Graphite Oxide to Graphene. Biomaterials to Bionics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Brianna C; Murray, Eoin; Wallace, Gordon G

    2015-12-01

    The advent of implantable biomaterials has revolutionized medical treatment, allowing the development of the fields of tissue engineering and medical bionic devices (e.g., cochlea implants to restore hearing, vagus nerve stimulators to control Parkinson's disease, and cardiac pace makers). Similarly, future materials developments are likely to continue to drive development in treatment of disease and disability, or even enhancing human potential. The material requirements for implantable devices are stringent. In all cases they must be nontoxic and provide appropriate mechanical integrity for the application at hand. In the case of scaffolds for tissue regeneration, biodegradability in an appropriate time frame may be required, and for medical bionics electronic conductivity is essential. The emergence of graphene and graphene-family composites has resulted in materials and structures highly relevant to the expansion of the biomaterials inventory available for implantable medical devices. The rich chemistries available are able to ensure properties uncovered in the nanodomain are conveyed into the world of macroscopic devices. Here, the inherent properties of graphene, along with how graphene or structures containing it interface with living cells and the effect of electrical stimulation on nerves and cells, are reviewed.

  16. Innate Immunity and Biomaterials at the Nexus: Friends or Foes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan N. Christo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomaterial implants are an established part of medical practice, encompassing a broad range of devices that widely differ in function and structural composition. However, one common property amongst biomaterials is the induction of the foreign body response: an acute sterile inflammatory reaction which overlaps with tissue vascularisation and remodelling and ultimately fibrotic encapsulation of the biomaterial to prevent further interaction with host tissue. Severity and clinical manifestation of the biomaterial-induced foreign body response are different for each biomaterial, with cases of incompatibility often associated with loss of function. However, unravelling the mechanisms that progress to the formation of the fibrotic capsule highlights the tightly intertwined nature of immunological responses to a seemingly noncanonical “antigen.” In this review, we detail the pathways associated with the foreign body response and describe possible mechanisms of immune involvement that can be targeted. We also discuss methods of modulating the immune response by altering the physiochemical surface properties of the biomaterial prior to implantation. Developments in these areas are reliant on reproducible and effective animal models and may allow a “combined” immunomodulatory approach of adapting surface properties of biomaterials, as well as treating key immune pathways to ultimately reduce the negative consequences of biomaterial implantation.

  17. The influence of biomaterials on inflammatory responses to cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, J M; Matata, B M; Yin, H Q; Esposito, A; Mahiout, A; Taggart, D P; Lowe, G D

    1996-05-01

    The nature of cardiopulmonary bypass and the complexity of the inflammatory response make the detection and interpretation of a biomaterial influence difficult. However, if mediation of the inflammatory response is considered to be an appropriate clinical goal, alteration to the biomaterial influence merits further investigation.

  18. Repairing Femoral Fractures: A Model Lesson in Biomaterial Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakeeny, Jarred

    2006-01-01

    Biomaterial science is a rapidly growing field that has scientists and doctors searching for new ways to repair the body. A merger between medicine and engineering, biomaterials can be complex subject matter, and it can certainly capture the minds of middle school students. In the lesson described in this article, seventh graders generally learn…

  19. Synthesis and structural characterization of nano-hydroxyapatite biomaterials prepared by microwave processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramli, Rosmamuhamadani; Arawi, Ainaa Zafirah Omar; Talari, Mahesh Kumar; Mahat, Mohd Muzamir; Jais, Umi Sarah

    2012-07-01

    Synthetic hydroxyapatite, (HA, Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2), is an attractive and widely utilized bio-ceramic material for orthopedic and dental implants because of its close resemblance of native tooth and bone crystal structure. Synthetic HA exhibits excellent osteoconductive properties. Osteoconductivity means the ability to provide the appropriate scaffold or template for bone formation. Calcium phosphate biomaterials [(HA), tri-calcium phosphate (TCP) and biphasic calcium phosphate (HA/TCP)] with appropriate three-dimensional geometry are able to bind and concentrate endogenous bone morphogenetic proteins in circulation, and may become osteoinductive and can be effective carriers of bone cell seeds. This HA can be used in bio-implants as well as drug delivery application due to the unique properties of HA. Biomaterials synthesized from the natural species like mussel shells have additional benefits such as high purity, less expensive and high bio compatibility. In this project, HA-nanoparticles of different crystallite size were prepared by microwave synthesis of precursors. High purity CaO was extracted from the natural mussel shells for the synthesis of nano HA. Dried nano HA powders were analyzed using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) technique for the determination of crystal structure and impurity content. Scanning Electron Microscopic (SEM) investigation was employed for the morphological investigation of nano HA powders. From the results obtained, it was concluded that by altering the irradiation time, nano HA powders of different crystallite sizes and morphologies could be produced. Crystallite sizes calculated from the XRD patterns are found to be in the range of 10-55 nm depending on the irradiation time.

  20. Contribution of acoustic emission to monitor the effect of phosphate based inhibitor on the corrosion behavior of steel reinforcement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nahali, Haifa [Laboratoire MATEIS CNRS UMR5511 (Equipe CorrIS), INSA-Lyon, Villeurbanne (France); Univ. de Tunis El Manar, Belvedere (Tunisia). Unite de Recherche ' ' Mecanique-Energetique' ' ; Dhouibi, Leila [Univ. de Tunis El Manar, Belvedere (Tunisia). Unite de Recherche ' ' Mecanique-Energetique' ' ; Idrissi, Hassane [Laboratoire MATEIS CNRS UMR5511 (Equipe CorrIS), INSA-Lyon, Villeurbanne (France)

    2014-11-01

    One of the most important causes of reinforced concrete structures deterioration is the corrosion of the reinforcement steel. This corrosion depends on the presence of aggressive agents such as chlorides in the surrounding medium. Numerous protection techniques have been employed to mitigate this corrosion. Among them, the use of corrosion inhibitors has been considered as one of the most effective solutions. In the present work, the influence of phosphate based inhibitor on the corrosion of reinforcing steels embedded in mortar, and immersed in sodium chloride solution, was investigated by acoustic emission technique. The monitoring of specimens shows that the phosphate based inhibitor addition in the mortar increase the threshold of chloride concentrations, causing the breakdown of steel passivation layer. Thus, the acoustic signatures of concrete fracture and of structure degradation during the corrosion of these specimens have been highlighted. Similarly, the mechanism of phosphate action in terms of preventing steel from corrosion in mortar specimens was analysed by characterization methods (SEM, XRD) of the steel-mortar interface.

  1. Contribution of acoustic emission to monitor the effect of phosphate based inhibitor on the corrosion behavior of steel reinforcement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most important causes of reinforced concrete structures deterioration is the corrosion of the reinforcement steel. This corrosion depends on the presence of aggressive agents such as chlorides in the surrounding medium. Numerous protection techniques have been employed to mitigate this corrosion. Among them, the use of corrosion inhibitors has been considered as one of the most effective solutions. In the present work, the influence of phosphate based inhibitor on the corrosion of reinforcing steels embedded in mortar, and immersed in sodium chloride solution, was investigated by acoustic emission technique. The monitoring of specimens shows that the phosphate based inhibitor addition in the mortar increase the threshold of chloride concentrations, causing the breakdown of steel passivation layer. Thus, the acoustic signatures of concrete fracture and of structure degradation during the corrosion of these specimens have been highlighted. Similarly, the mechanism of phosphate action in terms of preventing steel from corrosion in mortar specimens was analysed by characterization methods (SEM, XRD) of the steel-mortar interface.

  2. Chitosan dan Aplikasi Klinisnya Sebagai Biomaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Irawan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of new materials with both organic and inorganic structures is of great interest to obtain special material properties. Chitosan [2-amino-2-deoxy-D-glucan] can be obtained by N-deacetylation of chitin. Chitin is the second most abundant biopolymer in nature and the supporting material of crustaceans, insects, fungi etc. Chitosan is unique polysaccharide and has been widely used in various biomedical application due to its biocompatibility, low toxicity, biodegradability, non-immunogenic and non-carcinogenic character. In the past few years, chitosan and some of its modifications have been reported for use in biomedical applications such as artificial skin, wound dressing, anticoagulant, suture, drug delivery, vaccine carrier and dietary fibers. Recently, the use of chitosan and its derivatives has received much attention as temporary scaffolding to promotie mineralization or stimulate endochodral ossification. This article aims to give a broad overview of chitosan and its clinical applications as biomaterial.

  3. What future for zirconia as a biomaterial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Jérôme

    2006-02-01

    The failure events of Prozyr femoral heads in 2001-2002 have opened a strong, controversial issue on the future of zirconia as a biomaterial. The aim of this paper is to review and analyze the current knowledge on ageing process and on its effect on the long term performance of implants in order to distinguish between scientific facts and speculation. Current state of the art shows the strong variability of zirconia to in vivo degradation, as a consequence of the strong influence of processing on ageing process. As different zirconia from different vendors have different process related microstructure, there is a need to assess their ageing sensitivity with advanced and accurate techniques, and ISO standards should be modified, especially to gain confidence from clinicians. There is a trend today to develop alumina-zirconia composites as an alternative to monolithic alumina and zirconia: the issue of ageing is also discussed for these composites. PMID:16143387

  4. Calcium and bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone strength and calcium ... calcium (as well as phosphorus) to make healthy bones. Bones are the main storage site of calcium in ... your body does not absorb enough calcium, your bones can get weak or will not grow properly. ...

  5. Calcium carbonate overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tums overdose; Calcium overdose ... Calcium carbonate can be dangerous in large amounts. ... Some products that contain calcium carbonate are certain: ... and mineral supplements Other products may also contain calcium ...

  6. Get Enough Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Calcium Print This Topic En español Get Enough Calcium Browse Sections The Basics Overview Foods and Vitamins ... 2 of 4 sections Take Action! Take Action: Calcium Sources Protect your bones – get plenty of calcium ...

  7. Calcium Phosphate Coating over Silk Fibroin Film by Biomimetic Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the biomineralization behavior of silk fibroin and to valuate the biodegradation and biocompatibility of the hybrid biomaterial, the calcium phosphate deposits were identified with SEM, EDX,XRD and FTIR. The results reveal that supersaturated calcification solution is an effective method for the mineralization of fibroin film. Enzymatic degradation experiment demonstrates the biodegradability of the composites. Osteoblasts incubation shows an excellent cytocompatibility on the mineralized fibroin films.

  8. Growth of a bonelike apatite on chitosan microparticles after a calcium silicate treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Leonor, I. B.; Baran, E. T.; Kawashita, M.; Reis, R. L.; T Kokubo; Nakamura, T

    2008-01-01

    Bioactive chitosan microparticles can be prepared successfully by treating them with a calcium silicate solution and then subsequently soaking them in simulated body fluid (SBF). Such a combination enables the development of bioactive microparticles that can be used for several applications in the medical field, including injectable biomaterial systems and tissue engineering carrier systems. Chitosan microparticles, 0.6 lm in average size, were soaked either for 12 h in fresh calcium...

  9. Light scattering experiments on aqueous solutions of selected cellulose ethers: contribution to the study of polymer-mineral interactions in a new injectable biomaterial.

    OpenAIRE

    Bohic, Sylvain; Weiss, Pierre; Roger, Philippe; Daculsi, Guy

    2001-01-01

    International audience Hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) is used as a ligand for a bioactive calcium phosphate ceramic (the filler) in a ready-to-use injectable sterilized biomaterial for bone and dental surgery. Light scattering experiments were usually used to study high water-soluble polymers and to determine the basic macromolecular parameters. In order to gain a deeper understanding of polymer/mineral interactions in this type of material, we have investigated the effect of divalent...

  10. New frontiers in biomaterials research for tissue repair and regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huiling Liu; Haoran Liu; Aaron Clasky; Huilin Yang; Lei Yang

    2016-01-01

    The field of biomaterials has recently emerged to augment or replace lost or damaged tissues and organs due to the human body’s limited ability to self-heal large defects. Historically, metallic components, polymers, ceramics, and composite materials were utilized as synthetic materials along with natural materials to assist in therapy. Various novel biomaterials were developed to respond to a significant amount of new medical challenges in the past decade. Therefore, there is a need to review these newly developed biomaterials and their potential to improve tissue repair and regeneration in a variety of applications. Here, we briefly review the different strategies and attempts to use novel biomaterials, including self-assembled and macromolecular biomaterials, hydrogels, metamaterials, decellularized tissues, and biomaterials obtained via synthetic biology, used either for tissue repair and regeneration or for therapeutic use by exploiting other mechanisms of healing. All these methods aim to create functional materials, devices, systems, and/or organisms with novel and useful functions on the basis of catalogued and standardized biological building blocks. This review details the various methods and introduces the applications of these biomaterials in tissue repair and regeneration, especially for bone, nerve, and skin applications.

  11. Protein-engineered biomaterials: highly tunable tissue engineering scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Debanti; Heilshorn, Sarah C

    2010-06-01

    A common goal in tissue engineering is to attain the ability to tailor specific cell-scaffold interactions and thereby gain control over cell behavior. The tunable nature of protein-engineered biomaterials enables independent tailoring of a range of biomaterial properties, creating an attractive alternative to synthetic polymeric scaffolds or harvested natural scaffolds. Protein-engineered biomaterials are comprised of modular peptide domains with various functionalities that are encoded into a DNA plasmid, transfected into an organism of choice, and expressed and purified to yield a biopolymer with exact molecular-level sequence specification. Because of the modular design strategy of protein-engineered biomaterials, these scaffolds can be easily modified to enable optimization for specific tissue engineering applications. By including multiple peptide domains with different functionalities in a single, modular biomaterial, the scaffolds can be designed to mimic the diverse properties of the natural extracellular matrix, including cell adhesion, cell signaling, elasticity, and biodegradability. Recently, the field of protein-engineered biomaterials has expanded to include functional modules that are not normally present in the extracellular matrix, thus expanding the scope and functionality of these materials. For example, these modules can include noncanonical amino acids, inorganic-binding domains, and DNA-binding sequences. The modularity, tunability, and sequence specificity of protein-engineered biomaterials make them attractive candidates for use as substrates for a variety of tissue engineering applications. PMID:20141386

  12. Adsorption of tranexamic acid on hydroxyapatite: Toward the development of biomaterials with local hemostatic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarda, Stéphanie; Errassifi, Farid; Marsan, Olivier; Geffre, Anne; Trumel, Catherine; Drouet, Christophe

    2016-09-01

    This work proposes to combine tranexamic acid (TAX), a clinically used antifibrinolytic agent, and hydroxyapatite (HA), widely used in bone replacement, to produce a novel bioactive apatitic biomaterial with intrinsic hemostatic properties. The aim of this study was to investigate adsorptive behavior of the TAX molecule onto HA and to point out its release in near physiological conditions. No other phase was observed by X-ray diffraction or transmission electron microscopy, and no apparent change in crystal size was detected. The presence of TAX on the powders was lightly detected on Raman spectra after adsorption. The adsorption data could be fitted with a Langmuir-Freundlich equation, suggesting a strong interaction between adsorbed molecules and the formation of multilayers. The concentration of calcium and phosphate ions in solution remained low and stable during the adsorption process, thus ion exchange during the adsorption process could be ruled out. The release of TAX was fast during the first hours and was governed by a complex process that likely involved both diffusion and dissolution of HA. Preliminary aPTT (activated partial thromboplastin time) hemostasis tests offered promising results for the development of osteoconductive apatitic biomaterials with intrinsic hemostatic properties, whether for dental or orthopedic applications. PMID:27207032

  13. KrF excimer laser precision machining of hard and brittle ceramic biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yao-Xiong; Lu, Jian-Yi; Huang, Jin-Xia

    2014-06-01

    KrF excimer laser precision machining of porous hard-brittle ceramic biomaterials was studied to find a suitable way of machining the materials into various desired shapes and sizes without distorting their intrinsic structure and porosity. Calcium phosphate glass ceramics (CPGs) and hydroxyapatite (HA) were chosen for the study. It was found that KrF excimer laser can cut both CPGs and HA with high efficiency and precision. The ablation rates of CPGs and HA are respectively 0.081 µm/(pulse J cm(-2)) and 0.048 µm/(pulse  J cm(-2)), while their threshold fluences are individually 0.72 and 1.5 J cm(-2). The cutting quality (smoothness of the cut surface) is a function of laser repetition rate and cutting speed. The higher the repetition rate and lower the cutting speed, the better the cutting quality. A comparison between the cross sections of CPGs and HA cut using the excimer laser and using a conventional diamond cutting blade indicates that those cut by the excimer laser could retain their intrinsic porosity and geometry without distortion. In contrast, those cut by conventional machining had distorted geometry and most of their surface porosities were lost. Therefore, when cutting hard-brittle ceramic biomaterials to prepare scaffold and implant or when sectioning them for porosity evaluation, it is better to choose KrF excimer laser machining.

  14. Calcium paradox and calcium entry blockers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Slade, A.M.; Nayler, W.G.; Meijler, F.L.

    1984-01-01

    Reperfusion of isolated hearts with calcium-containing solution after a short period of calcium-free perfusion results in irreversible cell damage (calcium paradox). This phenomenon is characterized by an excessive influx of calcium into the cells, the rapid onset of myocardial contracture, exhausti

  15. XPS - an essential tool in biomaterial research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Increased life expectancy has markedly enhanced the need for biomedical devices to combat life-threatening conditions (e.g., pacemakers, artificial blood vessels) or improve the quality of life (e.g., intraocular lenses, artificial ligaments, contact lenses). While the biomedical device industry has delivered remarkable benefits, many existing and emerging needs and applications are not adequately met with existing synthetic materials. Depending on the application, a biomaterial needs to meet a number of requirements to be 'biocompatible', such as appropriate mechanical properties, transparency, resistance to enzymatic degradation, and appropriate biological responses by the host environment. Surface science and surface analysis plays a key role in understanding and optimizing the molecular interfacial interactions between synthetic materials surfaces and biological media which lead to biological responses to implants. Many biological molecules such as proteins and lipids have surfactant activity and respond to interfaces on contact. Thus, an important part of achieving 'biocompatibility' is to produce an appropriate surface chemical composition that avoids undesirable biological consequences triggered by biological molecules recognizing a 'foreign' material interface. XPS surface analysis has proved uniquely suitable for studying several aspects of biomaterials. In order to interpret biological responses in terms of surface chemistry, it is essential that the surface be well characterized. However, for polymers this can be quite a challenge due to the inherent mobility of polymer chains. For instance, polyurethanes present a surface chemistry that differs from the 'bulk' chemistry. It is often desirable to utilize a bulk material with desirable bulk properties and improve its biocompatibility by the application of a surface modification or a thin coating. XPS has been used to verify the intended coating chemistry and the uniformity of thin coatings. On

  16. Brillouin microspectroscopy of nanostructured biomaterials: photonics assisted tailoring mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhaokai; Jaiswal, Manish K.; Chitrakar, Chandani; Thakur, Teena; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2016-03-01

    Developing new biomaterials is essential for the next-generation of materials for bioenergy, bioelectronics, basic biology, medical diagnostics, cancer research, and regenerative medicine. Specifically, recent progress in nanotechnology has stimulated the development of multifunctional biomaterials for tissue engineering applications. The physical properties of nanocomposite biomaterials, including elasticity and viscosity, play key roles in controlling cell fate, which underlines therapeutic success. Conventional mechanical tests, including uniaxial compression and tension, dynamic mechanical analysis and shear rheology, require mechanical forces to be directly exerted onto the sample and therefore may not be suitable for in situ measurements or continuous monitoring of mechanical stiffness. In this study, we employ spontaneous Brillouin spectroscopy as a viscoelasticity-specific probing technique. We utilized a Brillouin spectrometer to characterize biomaterial's microscopic elasticity and correlated those with conventional mechanical tests (e.g., rheology).

  17. A Multidisciplined Teaching Reform of Biomaterials Course for Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoming; Zhao, Feng; Pu, Fang; Liu, Haifeng; Niu, Xufeng; Zhou, Gang; Li, Deyu; Fan, Yubo; Feng, Qingling; Cui, Fu-zhai; Watari, Fumio

    2015-12-01

    The biomaterials science has advanced in a high speed with global science and technology development during the recent decades, which experts predict to be more obvious in the near future with a more significant position for medicine and health care. Although the three traditional subjects, such as medical science, materials science and biology that act as a scaffold to support the structure of biomaterials science, are still essential for the research and education of biomaterials, other subjects, such as mechanical engineering, mechanics, computer science, automatic science, nanotechnology, and Bio-MEMS, are playing more and more important roles in the modern biomaterials science development. Thus, the research and education of modern biomaterials science should require a logical integration of the interdisciplinary science and technology, which not only concerns medical science, materials science and biology, but also includes other subjects that have been stated above. This article focuses on multidisciplinary nature of biomaterials, the awareness of which is currently lacking in the education at undergraduate stage. In order to meet this educational challenge, we presented a multidisciplinary course that referred to not only traditional sciences, but also frontier sciences and lasted for a whole academic year for senior biomaterials undergraduate students with principles of a better understanding of the modern biomaterials science and meeting the requirements of the future development in this area. The course has been shown to gain the recognition of the participants by questionaries and specific "before and after" comments and has also gained high recognition and persistent supports from our university. The idea of this course might be also fit for the education and construction of some other disciplines.

  18. Characterization of Biomaterials by Soft X-Ray Spectromicroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hitchcock, Adam P.; Leung, Bonnie O.; Brash, John L.

    2010-01-01

    Synchrotron-based soft X-ray spectromicroscopy techniques are emerging as useful tools to characterize potentially biocompatible materials and to probe protein interactions with model biomaterial surfaces. Simultaneous quantitative chemical analysis of the near surface region of the candidate biomaterial, and adsorbed proteins, peptides or other biological species can be obtained at high spatial resolution via scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and X-ray photoemission electron micr...

  19. Numerical Simulation of thePorous Structure of Biomaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGHui-min; YANYu-hua; LIShi-pu

    2004-01-01

    Porous biomaterials are widely used as bone replacement materials because of thers high biocompatibility and osteoconductivity property. Understanding of their porous structure (i. e. geometrical and topological characteristic) and studying how to the body fluid flow through them are essential to investigate thed egradation behaviour at the surface-liquid interface. This research develops a numerical model to simulate the porous structure of biomaterials based on the stochastic approach in pore size distribution and interconnectivity.

  20. Formation of calcium phosphate mineral materialcontrolled by microemulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In order to prepare calcium phosphate-based material with nano-structure and bioactivity, natural lecithin and n-tetradecane were used as the amphipile and the oil phase respectively, along with the water phase, to form a microemulsion template. Phosphate mineralization was induced and controlled by the microemulsion. The products, characterized by scanning electronic microscopy, infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis, are composed of lecithin and hydroxyapatite, and possess the nano-structure of sticks, balls and three-dimensional nets connected by tubes. These results show that the microemulsion can be used to control calcium phosphate mineralization for the preparation of biomimetic mineral materials with various nano-structures.

  1. Atomic layer deposition of nanoporous biomaterials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, R. J.; Adiga, S. P.; Pellin, M. J.; Curtiss, L. A.; Stafslien, S.; Chisholm, B.; Monteiro-Riviere, N. A.; Brigmon, R. L.; Elam, J. W.; Univ. of North Carolina; North Carolina State Univ.; Eastman Kodak Co.; North Dakota State Univ.; SRL

    2010-03-01

    Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials. Nanoporous alumina, also known as anodic aluminum oxide (AAO), is a nanomaterial that exhibits several unusual properties, including high pore densities, straight pores, small pore sizes, and uniform pore sizes. In 1953, Keller et al. showed that anodizing aluminum in acid electrolytes results in a thick layer of nearly cylindrical pores, which are arranged in a close-packed hexagonal cell structure. More recently, Matsuda & Fukuda demonstrated preparation of highly ordered platinum and gold nanohole arrays using a replication process. In this study, a negative structure of nanoporous alumina was initially fabricated and a positive structure of a nanoporous metal was subsequently fabricated. Over the past fifteen years, nanoporous alumina membranes have been used as templates for growth of a variety of nanostructured materials, including nanotubes, nanowires, nanorods, and nanoporous membranes.

  2. Advancing the field of 3D biomaterial printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakus, Adam E; Rutz, Alexandra L; Shah, Ramille N

    2016-01-11

    3D biomaterial printing has emerged as a potentially revolutionary technology, promising to transform both research and medical therapeutics. Although there has been recent progress in the field, on-demand fabrication of functional and transplantable tissues and organs is still a distant reality. To advance to this point, there are two major technical challenges that must be overcome. The first is expanding upon the limited variety of available 3D printable biomaterials (biomaterial inks), which currently do not adequately represent the physical, chemical, and biological complexity and diversity of tissues and organs within the human body. Newly developed biomaterial inks and the resulting 3D printed constructs must meet numerous interdependent requirements, including those that lead to optimal printing, structural, and biological outcomes. The second challenge is developing and implementing comprehensive biomaterial ink and printed structure characterization combined with in vitro and in vivo tissue- and organ-specific evaluation. This perspective outlines considerations for addressing these technical hurdles that, once overcome, will facilitate rapid advancement of 3D biomaterial printing as an indispensable tool for both investigating complex tissue and organ morphogenesis and for developing functional devices for a variety of diagnostic and regenerative medicine applications.

  3. Polymer biomaterial constructs for regenerative medicine and functional biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Linghui

    The use of collagen as a biomaterial is currently undergoing a renaissance in the tissue engineering field. The excellent biocompatibility and safety due to its biological characteristics, such as biodegradability and weak antigenicity, make collagen a primary material resource in medical applications. Described herein is work towards the development of novel collagen-based matrices, with additional multi-functionality imparted through a novel in-situ crosslinking approach. The process of electrospinning has become a widely used technique for the creation of fibrous scaffolds for tissue engineering applications due to its ability to rapidly create structures composed of nano-scale polymer fibers closely resembling the architecture of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Collagen-PCL sheath-core bicomponent fibrous scaffolds were fabricated using a novel variation on traditional electrospinning, known as co-axial electrospinning. The results showed that the addition of a synthetic polymer core into collagen nanofibers remarkably increased the mechanical strength of collagen matrices spun from the benign solvent system. A novel single-step, in-situ collagen crosslink approach was developed in order to solve the problems dominating traditional collagen crosslinking methods, such as dimensional shrinking and loss of porous morphology, and to simplify the crosslinking procedure for electrospun collagen scaffolds. The excess amount of NHS present in the crosslinking mixture was found to delay the EDC/collagen coupling reaction in a controlled fashion. Fundamental investigations into the development and characterization of in-situ crosslinked collagen matrices such as fibrous scaffolds, gels and sponges, as well as their biomedical applications including cell culture substrates, wound dressings, drug delivery matrices and bone regeneration substitutes, were performed. The preliminary mice studies indicated that the in-situ crosslinked collagen matrices could be good candidates

  4. Development of biomaterial scaffold for nerve tissue engineering: Biomaterial mediated neural regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sethuraman Swaminathan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neural tissue repair and regeneration strategies have received a great deal of attention because it directly affects the quality of the patient's life. There are many scientific challenges to regenerate nerve while using conventional autologous nerve grafts and from the newly developed therapeutic strategies for the reconstruction of damaged nerves. Recent advancements in nerve regeneration have involved the application of tissue engineering principles and this has evolved a new perspective to neural therapy. The success of neural tissue engineering is mainly based on the regulation of cell behavior and tissue progression through the development of a synthetic scaffold that is analogous to the natural extracellular matrix and can support three-dimensional cell cultures. As the natural extracellular matrix provides an ideal environment for topographical, electrical and chemical cues to the adhesion and proliferation of neural cells, there exists a need to develop a synthetic scaffold that would be biocompatible, immunologically inert, conducting, biodegradable, and infection-resistant biomaterial to support neurite outgrowth. This review outlines the rationale for effective neural tissue engineering through the use of suitable biomaterials and scaffolding techniques for fabrication of a construct that would allow the neurons to adhere, proliferate and eventually form nerves.

  5. Preparing polymeric biomaterials using "click" chemistry techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fei

    Significant efforts have been focused on preparing degradable polymeric biomaterials with controllable properties, which have the potential to stimulate specific cellular responses at the molecular level. Click reactions provide a universal tool box to achieve that goal through molecular level design and modification. This dissertation demonstrates multiple methodologies and techniques to develop advanced biomaterials through combining degradable polymers and click chemistry. In my initial work, a novel class of amino acid-based poly(ester urea)s (PEU) materials was designed and prepared for potential applications in bone defect treatment. PEUs were synthesized via interfacial polycondensation, and showed degradability in vivo and possessed mechanical strength superior to conventionally used polyesters. Further mechanical enhancement was achieved after covalent crosslinking with a short peptide crosslinker derived from osteogenic growth peptide (OGP). The in vitro and in an in vivo subcutaneous rat model demonstrated that the OGP-based crosslinkers promoted proliferative activity of cells and accelerated degradation properties of PEUs. As a continuous study, extra efforts were focused on the development of PEUs with functional pendant groups, including alkyne, azide, alkene, tyrosine phenol, and ketone groups. PEUs with Mw exceeding to 100K Da were obtained via interfacial polycondensation, and the concentration of pendent groups was varied using a copolymerization strategy. Electrospinning was used to fabricate PEU nanofiber matrices with mechanical strengths suitable for tissue engineering. A series of biomolecules were conjugated to nanofiber surface following electrospinning using click reactions in aqueous media. The ability to derivatize PEUs with biological motifs using high efficient chemical reactions will significantly expand their use in vitro and in vivo. Based on similar principles, a series of mono- and multifunctionalized polycaprolactone (PCL

  6. Proteins at the Biomaterial Electrolyte Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tengvall, Pentti

    2005-03-01

    Proteins adsorb rapidly onto solid and polymeric surfaces because the association process is in the vast majority of cases energetically favourable, i.e. exothermic. The most common exceptions to this rule are hydrophilic interfaces with low net charge and high mobility, e.g. immobilized PEGs. Current research in the research area tries to understand and control unwanted and wanted adsorption by studying the adsorption kinetics, protein surface binding specificity, protein exchange at interfaces, and surface protein repulsion mechanisms. In blood plasma model systems humoral cascade reactions such as surface mediated coagulation and immune complement raise considerable interest due to the immediate association to blood compatibility, and in tissue applications the binding between surfaces and membrane receptors in cells and tissues. Thus, the understanding of interfacial events at the protein level is of large importance in applications such as blood and tissue contacting biomaterials, in vitro medical and biological diagnostics, food industry and in marine anti-fouling technology. Well described consequences of adsorption are a lowered system energy, increased system entropy, irreversible binding, conformational changes, specific surface/protein interactions, and in biomedical materials applications surface opsonization followed by cell-surface interactions and a host tissue response. This lecture will deal with some mechanisms known to be of importance for the adsorption processes, such as the influence of surface chemistry and surface energy, the composition of the protein solution, the Vroman effect, and residence time. Examples will be shown from ellipsometric experiments using different model surfaces in single/few protein solutions, and specific attention be given to blood serum and plasma experiments on coagulation and immune complement at interfaces.

  7. Calcium source (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getting enough calcium to keep bones from thinning throughout a person's life may be made more difficult if that person has ... as a tendency toward kidney stones, for avoiding calcium-rich food sources. Calcium deficiency also effects the ...

  8. Calcium hydroxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrate - calcium; Lime milk; Slaked lime ... Calcium hydroxide ... These products contain calcium hydroxide: Cement Limewater Many industrial solvents and cleaners (hundreds to thousands of construction products, flooring strippers, brick cleaners, cement ...

  9. Calcium and bones (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the growth, maintenance, and reproduction of the human ... body, are continually being re-formed and incorporate calcium into their structure. Calcium is essential for the ...

  10. Coronary Calcium Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Coronary Calcium Scan? A coronary calcium scan is a test ... you have calcifications in your coronary arteries. Coronary Calcium Scan Figure A shows the position of the ...

  11. Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD) Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD) Fast Facts The risk of ... young people, too. Proper diagnosis depends on detecting calcium pyrophosphate crystals in the fluid of an affected ...

  12. Biomimetic calcium phosphate coatings on recombinant spider silk fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Liang; Habibovic, Pamela; Van Blitterswijk, Clemens A [Department of Tissue Regeneration, University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Hedhammar, My; Johansson, Jan [Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Biochemistry, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, the Biomedical Centre, Box 575, 751 23 Uppsala (Sweden); Blom, Tobias; Leifer, Klaus [Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Box 534, S-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-08-01

    Calcium phosphate ceramic coatings, applied on surfaces of metallic and polymeric biomaterials, can improve their performance in bone repair and regeneration. Spider silk is biocompatible, strong and elastic, and hence an attractive biomaterial for applications in connective tissue repair. Recently, artificial spider silk, with mechanical and structural characteristics similar to those of native spider silk, has been produced from recombinant minispidroins. In the present study, supersaturated simulated body fluid was used to deposit calcium phosphate coatings on recombinant spider silk fibres. The mineralization process was followed in time using scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) detector and Raman spectroscope. Focused ion beam technology was used to produce a cross section of a coated fibre, which was further analysed by EDX. Preliminary in vitro experiments using a culture of bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) on coated fibres were also performed. This study showed that recombinant spider silk fibres were successfully coated with a homogeneous and thick crystalline calcium phosphate layer. In the course of the mineralization process from modified simulated body fluid, sodium chloride crystals were first deposited on the silk surface, followed by the deposition of a calcium phosphate layer. The coated silk fibres supported the attachment and growth of hMSCs.

  13. Methodology of citrate-based biomaterial development and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, M. Richard

    Biomaterials play central roles in modern strategies of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Attempts to find tissue-engineered solutions to cure various injuries or diseases have led to an enormous increase in the number of polymeric biomaterials over the past decade. The breadth of new materials arises from the multiplicity of anatomical locations, cell types, and mode of application, which all place application-specific requirements on the biomaterial. Unfortunately, many of the currently available biodegradable polymers are limited in their versatility to meet the wide range of requirements for tissue engineering. Therefore, a methodology of biomaterial development, which is able to address a broad spectrum of requirements, would be beneficial to the biomaterial field. This work presents a methodology of citrate-based biomaterial design and application to meet the multifaceted needs of tissue engineering. We hypothesize that (1) citric acid, a non-toxic metabolic product of the body (Krebs Cycle), can be exploited as a universal multifunctional monomer and reacted with various diols to produce a new class of soft biodegradable elastomers with the flexibility to tune the material properties of the resulting material to meet a wide range of requirements; (2) the newly developed citrate-based polymers can be used as platform biomaterials for the design of novel tissue engineering scaffolding; and (3) microengineering approaches in the form thin scaffold sheets, microchannels, and a new porogen design can be used to generate complex cell-cell and cell-microenvironment interactions to mimic tissue complexity and architecture. To test these hypotheses, we first developed a methodology of citrate-based biomaterial development through the synthesis and characterization of a family of in situ crosslinkable and urethane-doped elastomers, which are synthesized using simple, cost-effective strategies and offer a variety methods to tailor the material properties to

  14. Characterization of Biomaterials by Soft X-Ray Spectromicroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam P. Hitchcock

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Synchrotron-based soft X-ray spectromicroscopy techniques are emerging as useful tools to characterize potentially biocompatible materials and to probe protein interactions with model biomaterial surfaces. Simultaneous quantitative chemical analysis of the near surface region of the candidate biomaterial, and adsorbed proteins, peptides or other biological species can be obtained at high spatial resolution via scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM and X-ray photoemission electron microscopy (X-PEEM. Both techniques use near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS spectral contrast for chemical identification and quantitation. The capabilities of STXM and X-PEEM for the analysis of biomaterials are reviewed and illustrated by three recent studies: (1 characterization of hydrophobic surfaces, including adsorption of fibrinogen (Fg or human serum albumin (HSA to hydrophobic polymeric thin films, (2 studies of HSA adsorption to biodegradable or potentially biocompatible polymers, and (3 studies of biomaterials under fully hydrated conditions. Other recent applications of STXM and X-PEEM to biomaterials are also reviewed.

  15. A novel animal model for skin flap prelamination with biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xianyu; Luo, Xusong; Liu, Fei; Gu, Chuan; Wang, Xi; Yang, Qun; Qian, Yunliang; Yang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Several animal models of skin flap construction were reported using biomaterials in a way similar to prefabrication. However, there are few animal model using biomaterials similar to prelamination, another main way of clinical skin flap construction that has been proved to be reliable. Can biomaterials be added in skin flap prelamination to reduce the use of autogenous tissues? Beside individual clinical attempts, animal model is needed for randomized controlled trial to objectively evaluate the feasibility and further investigation. Combining human Acellular Dermal Matrix (hADM) and autologous skin graft, we prelaminated flaps based on inguinal fascia. One, two, three and four weeks later, hADM exhibited a sound revascularization and host cell infiltration. Prelaminated skin flaps were then raised and microsurgically transplanted back to groin region. Except for flaps after one week of prelamination, flaps from other subgroups successfully reconstructed defects. After six to sixteen weeks of transplantation, hADM was proved to being able to maintain its original structure, having a wealth of host tissue cells and achieving full revascularization.To our knowledge, this is the first animal model of prelaminating skin flap with biomaterials. Success of this animal model indicates that novel flap prelamination with biomaterials is feasible. PMID:27659066

  16. Hydroxyapatite-Bioglass-Titanium Biomaterials Used as Dense Bulk in Double-layer Biomimetic Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianpeng ZOU; Jianming RUAN; Baiyun HUANG; Jianben LIU; Zhigang ZHAO

    2004-01-01

    Sintering shrinkage, compressive strength, bending strength, chemical composition and their relationships with microstructure of HA-Ti and HA-BG-Ti biomaterials were studied. The results show that sintering shrinkage curve of HA-BG-Ti composite changes just like S shape (23.1%-16.2%-21.8%-17.1%) with increase of Ti content, and sintering shrinkage of HA-BG-Ti composite is always higher than that of HA-Ti composite. The approach also indicates that compressive strength and bending strength of HA-BG-Ti composite are always higher than that of HA-Ti composite. Basically, with its compressive strength and bending strength equaling to 211.5 MPa and 132.1 MPa respectively, HA-10 vol. pct BG-60 vol. pct Ti composite can meet the mechanical properties requirements of the outer dense bulk. Furthermore, microstructure analysis shows that interfacial integration of HA-BG-Ti composite is better than that of HA-Ti composite. From X-ray diffraction (XRD) and SEM-EDAX analysis, brittle new phases including calcium titanate and calcium carbonate are detected in HA-Ti composite. New phases in HA-Ti composite and complex strong binding force accompanied by elemental diffusion of Si, Ti in HA-BG-Ti composite can explain theoretically the great difference of mechanical properties of HA-Ti and HA-BG-Ti composites.

  17. Osteogenic Differentiation of MSC through Calcium Signaling Activation: Transcriptomics and Functional Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Viti

    Full Text Available The culture of progenitor mesenchymal stem cells (MSC onto osteoconductive materials to induce a proper osteogenic differentiation and mineralized matrix regeneration represents a promising and widely diffused experimental approach for tissue-engineering (TE applications in orthopaedics. Among modern biomaterials, calcium phosphates represent the best bone substitutes, due to their chemical features emulating the mineral phase of bone tissue. Although many studies on stem cells differentiation mechanisms have been performed involving calcium-based scaffolds, results often focus on highlighting production of in vitro bone matrix markers and in vivo tissue ingrowth, while information related to the biomolecular mechanisms involved in the early cellular calcium-mediated differentiation is not well elucidated yet. Genetic programs for osteogenesis have been just partially deciphered, and the description of the different molecules and pathways operative in these differentiations is far from complete, as well as the activity of calcium in this process. The present work aims to shed light on the involvement of extracellular calcium in MSC differentiation: a better understanding of the early stage osteogenic differentiation program of MSC seeded on calcium-based biomaterials is required in order to develop optimal strategies to promote osteogenesis through the use of new generation osteoconductive scaffolds. A wide spectrum of analysis has been performed on time-dependent series: gene expression profiles are obtained from samples (MSC seeded on calcium-based scaffolds, together with related microRNAs expression and in vivo functional validation. On this basis, and relying on literature knowledge, hypotheses are made on the biomolecular players activated by the biomaterial calcium-phosphate component. Interestingly, a key role of miR-138 was highlighted, whose inhibition markedly increases osteogenic differentiation in vitro and enhance ectopic bone

  18. Osteogenic Differentiation of MSC through Calcium Signaling Activation: Transcriptomics and Functional Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viti, Federica; Landini, Martina; Mezzelani, Alessandra; Petecchia, Loredana; Milanesi, Luciano; Scaglione, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The culture of progenitor mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) onto osteoconductive materials to induce a proper osteogenic differentiation and mineralized matrix regeneration represents a promising and widely diffused experimental approach for tissue-engineering (TE) applications in orthopaedics. Among modern biomaterials, calcium phosphates represent the best bone substitutes, due to their chemical features emulating the mineral phase of bone tissue. Although many studies on stem cells differentiation mechanisms have been performed involving calcium-based scaffolds, results often focus on highlighting production of in vitro bone matrix markers and in vivo tissue ingrowth, while information related to the biomolecular mechanisms involved in the early cellular calcium-mediated differentiation is not well elucidated yet. Genetic programs for osteogenesis have been just partially deciphered, and the description of the different molecules and pathways operative in these differentiations is far from complete, as well as the activity of calcium in this process. The present work aims to shed light on the involvement of extracellular calcium in MSC differentiation: a better understanding of the early stage osteogenic differentiation program of MSC seeded on calcium-based biomaterials is required in order to develop optimal strategies to promote osteogenesis through the use of new generation osteoconductive scaffolds. A wide spectrum of analysis has been performed on time-dependent series: gene expression profiles are obtained from samples (MSC seeded on calcium-based scaffolds), together with related microRNAs expression and in vivo functional validation. On this basis, and relying on literature knowledge, hypotheses are made on the biomolecular players activated by the biomaterial calcium-phosphate component. Interestingly, a key role of miR-138 was highlighted, whose inhibition markedly increases osteogenic differentiation in vitro and enhance ectopic bone formation in vivo

  19. Fundamental Characteristics of Bioprint on Calcium Alginate Gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezu, Shinjiro; Hatta, Tatsuru; Ohmori, Hitoshi

    2013-05-01

    The goal of this study is to fabricate precision three-dimensional (3D) biodevices those are micro fluidics and artificial organs utilizing digital fabrication. Digital fabrication is fabrication method utilizing inkjet technologies. Electrostatic inkjet is one of the inkjet technologies. The electrostatic inkjet method has following two merits; those are high resolution to print and ability to eject highly viscous liquid. These characteristics are suitable to print biomaterials precisely. We are now applying for bioprint. In this paper, the electrostatic inkjet method is applied for fabrication of 3D biodevices that has cave like blood vessel. When aqueous solution of sodium alginate is printed to aqueous solution of calcium chloride, calcium alginate is produced. 3D biodevices are fabricated in case that calcium alginate is piled.

  20. Lithotripter shock wave interaction with a bubble near various biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohl, S. W.; Klaseboer, E.; Szeri, A. J.; Khoo, B. C.

    2016-10-01

    Following previous work on the dynamics of an oscillating bubble near a bio-material (Ohl et al 2009 Phys. Med. Biol. 54 6313-36) and the interaction of a bubble with a shockwave (Klaseboer et al 2007 J. Fluid Mech. 593 33-56), the present work concerns the interaction of a gas bubble with a traveling shock wave (such as from a lithotripter) in the vicinity of bio-materials such as fat, skin, muscle, cornea, cartilage, and bone. The bubble is situated in water (to represent a water-like biofluid). The bubble collapses are not spherically symmetric, but tend to feature a high speed jet. A few simulations are performed and compared with available experimental observations from Sankin and Zhong (2006 Phys. Rev. E 74 046304). The collapses of cavitation bubbles (created by laser in the experiment) near an elastic membrane when hit by a lithotripter shock wave are correctly captured by the simulation. This is followed by a more systematic study of the effects involved concerning shockwave bubble biomaterial interactions. If a subsequent rarefaction wave hits the collapsed bubble, it will re-expand to a very large size straining the bio-materials nearby before collapsing once again. It is noted that, for hard bio-material like bone, reflection of the shock wave at the bone—water interface can affect the bubble dynamics. Also the initial size of the bubble has a significant effect. Large bubbles (˜1 mm) will split into smaller bubbles, while small bubbles collapse with a high speed jet in the travel direction of the shock wave. The numerical model offers a computationally efficient way of understanding the complex phenomena involving the interplay of a bubble, a shock wave, and a nearby bio-material.

  1. Nanoscale biomaterial interface modification for advanced tissue engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, various stem cells, including mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), have been found to have considerable potential for application in tissue engineering and future advanced therapies due to their biological capability to differentiate into specific lineages. Modified surface properties, such as composition, nano-roughness and wettability, affect the most important processes at the biomaterial interface. The aim of the present is work is to study the stem cells' (MSCs) adhesive potential, morphology, phenotypical characteristics in in vitro tests, and to distinguish betwen the different factors influencing the cell/biomaterial interaction, such as nano-topography, surface chemistry and surface free energy.

  2. BIOMATERIAL IMPLANTS IN BONE FRACTURES PRODUCED IN RATS FIBULAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirane, Henrique Yassuhiro; Oda, Diogo Yochizumi; Pinheiro, Thiago Cerizza; Cunha, Marcelo Rodrigues da

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the importance of collagen and hydroxyapatite in the regeneration of fractures experimentally induced in the fibulas of rats. Method: 15 rats were used. These were subjected to surgery to remove a fragment from the fibula. This site then received a graft consisting of a silicone tubes filled with hydroxyapatite and collagen. Results: Little bone neoformation occurred inside the tubes filled with the biomaterials. There was more neoformation in the tubes with collagen. Conclusion: The biomaterials used demonstrated biocompatibility and osteoconductive capacity that was capable of stimulating osteogenesis, even in bones with secondary mechanical and morphological functions such as the fibula of rats. PMID:27047813

  3. Development of Nano-biomaterials for Bone Repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    A new kind of nano-biomaterials of nano apatite ( NA ) and polyamide8063 ( PA ) composite was prepared by direct using NA slurry. The experimental results showed that the NA content in the composite was similar to that of natural bone. Interface chemical bonding was formed between NA and PA. The NA keeps the original morphological structure with a crystal size of 10- 30 nm in width by 50- 90 nm in length with a ratio of~ 2.5 and distributed uniformly in the polymer. The synthetic nano-biomaterials could be one of the best bioactive materials for load-bearing bone repair or substitution materials.

  4. Calcium and Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home › Patients › Treatment › Calcium/Vitamin D Calcium/Vitamin D Getting enough calcium and vitamin D is essential ... counter medications and calcium supplements. What is Vitamin D and What Does it Do? Vitamin D plays ...

  5. Degradation and Characterization of Resorbable Phosphate-Based Glass Thin-Film Coatings Applied by Radio-Frequency Magnetron Sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Bryan W; Gimeno-Fabra, Miquel; Segal, Joel; Ahmed, Ifty; Grant, David M

    2015-12-16

    Quinternary phosphate-based glasses of up to 2.67 μm, deposited by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering, were degraded in distilled water and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) to investigate their degradation characteristics. Magnetron-sputtered coatings have been structurally compared to their compositionally equivalent melt-quenched bulk glass counterparts. The coatings were found to have structurally variable surfaces to melt-quenched glass such that the respective bridging oxygen to nonbridging oxygen bonds were 34.2% to 65.8% versus 20.5% to 79.5%, forming metaphosphate (PO3)(-) (Q(2)) versus less soluble (P2O7)(4-) (Q(1)) and (PO4)(3-) (Q(0)), respectively. This factor led to highly soluble coatings, exhibiting a t(1/2) degradation dependence in the first 2 h in distilled water, followed by a more characteristic linear profile because the subsequent layers were less soluble. Degradation was observed to preferentially occur, forming voids characteristic of pitting corrosion, which was confirmed by the use of a focused ion beam. Coating degradation in PBS precipitated a (PO3)(-) metaphosphate, an X-ray amorphous layer, which remained adherent to the substrate and seemingly formed a protective diffusion barrier, which inhibited further coating degradation. The implications are that while compositionally similar, sputter-deposited coatings and melt-quenched glasses are structurally dissimilar, most notably, with regard to the surface layer. This factor has been attributed to surface etching of the as-deposited coating layer during deposition and variation in the thermal history between the processes of magnetron sputtering and melt quenching.

  6. Sustainable polysaccharide-based biomaterial recovered from waste aerobic granular sludge as a surface coating material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Y. M.; Nierop, K.G.J.; Girbal-Neuhauser, E.; Adriaanse, M.; van Loosdrecht, M. C M

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the possibility of utilizing polysaccharide-based biomaterial recovered from aerobic granular sludge as a coating material, the morphology, molecular weight distribution and chemical composition of the recovered biomaterial were investigated by atomic force microscopy, size exclusion chr

  7. Biomimetic mineralization of calcium phosphate on a functionalizaed porous silicon carbide biomaterial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dey, A.; Hoogen, van de C.J.; Rosso, M.; Lousberg, N.J.H.G.M.; Hendrix, M.M.R.M.; Friedrich, H.; Ramirez Rico, J.; Zuilhof, H.; With, de G.; Sommerdijk, N.A.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Porous biomorphic silicon carbide (bioSiC) is a structurally realistic, high-strength, and biocompatible material which is promising for application in load-bearing implants. The deposition of an osteoconductive coating is essential for further improvement of its integration with the surrounding tis

  8. Analysis of brominated and phosphate-based flame retardants in polymer samples by HPLC-UV/MS and online-GPC-HPLC-UV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlummer, M.; Brandl, F. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Verfahrenstechnik und Verpackung (IVV), Freising (Germany); Maeurer, A.

    2004-09-15

    Here we present two analytical approaches for the identification and quantification of brominated and phosphate-based flame retardants. The first is an HPLC-UV/MS approach, which allows the separation and unequivocal identification and quantification of at least 15 different technical flame retardants. The second approach was set-up as a screening tool, consisting of a GPC separation coupled to an HPLC-UV device.

  9. A comparison of seven methods to analyze heparin in biomaterials: quantification, location, and anticoagulant activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, G.; Westerlo, E.M.A. van de; Versteeg, E.M.M.; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van; Daamen, W.F.

    2011-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans, like heparin, are frequently incorporated in biomaterials because of their capacity to bind and store growth factors and because of their hydrating properties. Heparin is also often used in biomaterials for its anticoagulant activity. Analysis of biomaterial-bound heparin is chal

  10. Surface Engineered Polymeric Biomaterials with Improved Biocontact Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todorka G. Vladkova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present many examples of surface engineered polymeric biomaterials with nanosize modified layers, controlled protein adsorption, and cellular interactions potentially applicable for tissue and/or blood contacting devices, scaffolds for cell culture and tissue engineering, biosensors, biological microchips as well as approaches to their preparation.

  11. In vitro biocompatibility testing of biomaterials and medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, U

    2008-01-01

    Biomaterials used for medical devices must be thoroughly tested according to ISO 10993 before their introduction so that any negative effects on the body are known about and prevented. By using in vitro laboratory tests, dangers for patients and unnecessary animal experiments can be avoided. Here, in vitro tests for cell compatibility (cytotoxicity) and blood compatibility (haemocompatibility) are described. PMID:18605289

  12. Current and future biocompatibility aspects of biomaterials for hip prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Aherwar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The field of biomaterials has turn into an electrifying area because these materials improve the quality and longevity of human life. The first and foremost necessity for the selection of the biomaterial is the acceptability by human body. However, the materials used in hip implants are designed to sustain the load bearing function of human bones for the start of the patient’s life. The most common classes of biomaterials used are metals, polymers, ceramics, composites and apatite. These five classes are used individually or in combination with other materials to form most of the implantation devices in recent years. Numerous current and promising new biomaterials i.e. metallic, ceramic, polymeric and composite are discussed to highlight their merits and their frailties in terms of mechanical and metallurgical properties in this review. It is concluded that current materials have their confines and there is a need for more refined multi-functional materials to be developed in order to match the biocompatibility, metallurgical and mechanical complexity of the hip prosthesis.

  13. Fundamental monomeric biomaterial diagnostics by radio frequency signal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jae-Hoon; Shin, Kyeong-Sik; Kang, Shinill; Lee, Soo Hyun; Kang, Ji Yoon; Kim, Sinyoung; Jun, Seong Chan

    2016-08-15

    We present a new diagnostic technique of fundamental monomeric biomaterials that do not rely on any enzyme or chemical reaction. Instead, it only uses radio frequency (RF) signal analysis. The detection and classification of basic biomaterials, such as glucose and albumin, were demonstrated. The device was designed to generate a strong resonance response with glucose solution and fabricated by simple photolithography with PDMS (Polydimethylsiloxane) well. It even was used to detect the level of glucose in mixtures of glucose and albumin and in human serum, and it operated properly and identified the glucose concentration precisely. It has a detection limit about 100μM (1.8mg/dl), and a sensitivity about 58MHz per 1mM of glucose and exhibited a good linearity in human blood glucose level. In addition, the intrinsic electrical properties of biomaterials can be investigated by a de-embedding technique and an equivalent circuit analysis. The capacitance of glucose containing samples exhibited bell-shaped Gaussian dispersion spectra around 2.4GHz. The Albumin solution did not represent a clear dispersion spectra compared to glucose, and the magnitude of resistance and inductance of albumin was higher than that of other samples. Other parameters also represented distinguishable patterns to classify those biomaterials. It leads us to expect future usage of our technique as a pattern-recognizing biosensor. PMID:27111728

  14. Biomaterials for the Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadavi, Darya; Poot, André A.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) as a progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disease represents a huge unmet need for treatment. The low efficacy of current treatment methods is not only due to low drug potency but also due to the presence of various obstacles in the delivery routes. One of the main barriers is the blood–brain barrier. The increasing prevalence of AD and the low efficacy of current therapies have increased the amount of research on unraveling of disease pathways and development of treatment strategies. One of the interesting areas for the latter subject is biomaterials and their applications. This interest originates from the fact that biomaterials are very useful for the delivery of therapeutic agents, such as drugs, proteins, and/or cells, in order to treat diseases and regenerate tissues. Recently, manufacturing of nano-sized delivery systems has increased the efficacy and delivery potential of biomaterials. In this article, we review the latest developments with regard to the use of biomaterials for the treatment of AD, including nanoparticles and liposomes for delivery of therapeutic compounds and scaffolds for cell delivery strategies. PMID:27379232

  15. New phosphate-based binder for stabilization of soils contaminated with heavy metals: leaching, strength and microstructure characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yan-Jun; Wei, Ming-Li; Reddy, Krishna R; Jin, Fei; Wu, Hao-Liang; Liu, Zhi-Bin

    2014-12-15

    ), scholzite (CaZn2(PO4)2·2H2O), zinc hydroxide (Zn(OH)2), and fluoropyromorphite (Pb5(PO4)3F) in the soils are the main mechanisms for immobilization of Zn and Pb with the KMP binder. The change in the relative quantities of the formed phosphate-based products, with respect to the Zn concentration and presence of mixed Zn and Pb contaminants, can well explain the measured impact of the Zn concentration levels and presence of both Zn and Pb contaminants on the unconfined compressive strength of the KMP stabilized soils. PMID:25173726

  16. Preparation of novel functional Mg/O/PCL/ZnO composite biomaterials and their corrosion resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Zhongxian; Tan, Cui; Xu, Lan; Yang, Na; Li, Qing, E-mail: liqingdswu@163.com

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • Novel functional Mg/O/PCL/ZnO composite biomaterials were prepared. • The biomaterials were prepared by anodization treatment and dip-coating technique. • The composite biomaterials were smooth and with low porosity. • The prepared biomaterials have good corrosion resistance in SBF. • The composite biomaterials can release zinc ion to promote bone formation. - Abstract: In this study, novel and functional Mg/O/PCL/ZnO (magnesium/anodic film/poly(ε-caprolactone)/zinc oxide) composite biomaterials for enhancing the bioactivity and biocompatibility of the implant was prepared by using anodization treatment and dip-coating technique. The surface morphology, microstructure, adhesion strength and corrosion resistance of the composite biomaterials were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), adhesion measurements, electrochemical tests and immersion tests respectively. In addition, the biocompatible properties of Mg (magnesium), Mg/PCL (magnesium/poly(ε-caprolactone)) and Mg/O/PCL (magnesium/anodic film/poly(ε-caprolactone)) samples were also investigated. The results show that the Mg/O/PCL/ZnO composite biomaterials were with low porosity and with the ZnO powders dispersed in PCL uniformly. The adhesion tests suggested that Mg/O/PCL/ZnO composite biomaterials had better adhesion strength than that of Mg/PCL composite biomaterials obviously. Besides, an in vitro test for corrosion demonstrated that the Mg/O/PCL/ZnO composite biomaterials had good corrosion resistance and zinc ion was released obviously in SBF.

  17. Calcium channel blocker overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002580.htm Calcium channel blocker overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Calcium channel blockers are a type of medicine used ...

  18. Fenoprofen calcium overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002649.htm Fenoprofen calcium overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Fenoprofen calcium is a type of medicine called a nonsteroidal ...

  19. Calcium and Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  20. Calcium en cardioplegie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Meijler, F.L.

    1985-01-01

    Coronary perfusion with a calcium-free solution, followed by reperfusion with a calcium containing solution, may result in acute myocardial cell death and in irreversible loss of the e1ectrical and mechanical activity of the heart. This phenomenon is known as the calcium paradox. A number of cardiop

  1. Contributions of human paleohistology to the study of biomaterials; Aportaciones de la paleohistologia humana al estudio de biomateriales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nacarino Meneses, C.; Cambra-Moo, O.; Rodriguez Barbero, M. A.; Gonzalez Martin, A.

    2012-07-01

    The deep study of archaeological human bone could provide relevant information to biomaterials science, as it could tell how the implant process of bio glasses and bioresorbable ceramics is. In this paper, we propose to study, by means of different microscopic, spectroscopic, and X-ray diffraction techniques, the histological and mineral bone variability throughout ontogeny. Extrapolating this data, we could have a better knowledge of biodegradable materials implant. In different ages, we could notice different tissues in cortical bone: fibrolamellar bone is characteristic of early stages of life while secondary or harvesian bone is in adult individuals. Raman and infrared spectroscopy suggest an increase of critallinity in the inorganic matrix during live. Finally, the X-ray diffraction study of bone tissue shows {beta}-calcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite as the main mineral bone components. (Author) 31 refs.

  2. Global gene expression analysis for evaluation and design of biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobutaka Hanagata, Taro Takemura and Takashi Minowa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive gene expression analysis using DNA microarrays has become a widespread technique in molecular biological research. In the biomaterials field, it is used to evaluate the biocompatibility or cellular toxicity of metals, polymers and ceramics. Studies in this field have extracted differentially expressed genes in the context of differences in cellular responses among multiple materials. Based on these genes, the effects of materials on cells at the molecular level have been examined. Expression data ranging from several to tens of thousands of genes can be obtained from DNA microarrays. For this reason, several tens or hundreds of differentially expressed genes are often present in different materials. In this review, we outline the principles of DNA microarrays, and provide an introduction to methods of extracting information which is useful for evaluating and designing biomaterials from comprehensive gene expression data.

  3. CHARACTERISATION OF CASSAVA FIBRE FOR USE AS A BIOMATERIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lois Larbie

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigate the cytotoxicity of de-starched cassava fibre granules and fine powder using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC and examine changes in the composition of Simulated Body Fluid (SBF resulting from immersion of cassava fibre samples. The purpose of the study was to characterise cassavafibre for possible biomaterial applications. Preliminary results indicate insignificant cytotoxic effects on PBMCs with cassava sample concentrations of 0.1g/ml, 0.025g/ml and 0.00625g/ml. Additionally there was little or no significant change in Na, K, Mg, Cl, Ca, Mn, and Cu concentrations upon immersion in SBF as observed over a one week period at a temperature of 37°C. These initial results suggest cassava fibre may be considered for biomaterial applications following more extensive characterisation.

  4. In Vitro Endothelialization Test of Biomaterials Using Immortalized Endothelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Kono

    Full Text Available Functionalizing biomaterials with peptides or polymers that enhance recruitment of endothelial cells (ECs can reduce blood coagulation and thrombosis. To assess endothelialization of materials in vitro, primary ECs are generally used, although the characteristics of these cells vary among the donors and change with time in culture. Recently, primary cell lines immortalized by transduction of simian vacuolating virus 40 large T antigen or human telomerase reverse transcriptase have been developed. To determine whether immortalized ECs can substitute for primary ECs in material testing, we investigated endothelialization on biocompatible polymers using three lots of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC and immortalized microvascular ECs, TIME-GFP. Attachment to and growth on polymer surfaces were comparable between cell types, but results were more consistent with TIME-GFP. Our findings indicate that TIME-GFP is more suitable for in vitro endothelialization testing of biomaterials.

  5. APPLICATIONS OF BIOTECHNOLOGY IN DEVELOPMENT OF BIOMATERIALS: NANOTECHNOLOGY AND BIOFILMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.; Berry, T.; Narayan, R.

    2010-11-29

    Biotechnology is the application of biological techniques to develop new tools and products for medicine and industry. Due to various properties including chemical stability, biocompatibility, and specific activity, e.g. antimicrobial properties, many new and novel materials are being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. Many of these materials are less than 100 nanometers in size. Nanotechnology is the engineering discipline encompassing designing, producing, testing, and using structures and devices less than 100 nanometers. One of the challenges associated with biomaterials is microbial contamination that can lead to infections. In recent work we have examined the functionalization of nanoporous biomaterials and antimicrobial activities of nanocrystalline diamond materials. In vitro testing has revealed little antimicrobial activity against Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria and associated biofilm formation that enhances recalcitrance to antimicrobial agents including disinfectants and antibiotics. Laser scanning confocal microscopy studies further demonstrated properties and characteristics of the material with regard to biofilm formation.

  6. Collagen-Based Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Berthod

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Collagen is the most widely distributed class of proteins in the human body. The use of collagen-based biomaterials in the field of tissue engineering applications has been intensively growing over the past decades. Multiple cross-linking methods were investigated and different combinations with other biopolymers were explored in order to improve tissue function. Collagen possesses a major advantage in being biodegradable, biocompatible, easily available and highly versatile. However, since collagen is a protein, it remains difficult to sterilize without alterations to its structure. This review presents a comprehensive overview of the various applications of collagen-based biomaterials developed for tissue engineering, aimed at providing a functional material for use in regenerative medicine from the laboratory bench to the patient bedside.

  7. Modelling the regenerative niche: a major challenge in biomaterials research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, C James

    2015-12-01

    By definition, biomaterials are developed for clinical application. In the field of regenerative medicine their principal function is to play a significant, and, if possible, an instructive role in tissue healing. In the last analysis the latter involves targeting the 'regenerative niche'. The present paper will address the problem of simulating this niche in the laboratory and adopts a life science approach involving the harnessing of heterotypic cellular communication to achieve this, that is, the ability of cells of different types to mutually influence cellular functions. Thus, co-culture systems using human cells are the methodological focus and will concern four exemplary fields of regeneration, namely, bone, soft tissue, lower respiratory tract and airway regeneration. The working hypothesis underlying this approach is that in vitro models of higher complexity will be more clinically relevant than simple monolayer cultures of transformed cell lines in testing innovative strategies with biomaterials for regeneration. PMID:26816650

  8. Fabrication of PEGylated fibrinogen: a versatile injectable hydrogel biomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironi-Harpaz, Iris; Berdichevski, Alexandra; Seliktar, Dror

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogels are one of the most versatile biomaterials in use for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. They are assembled from either natural or synthetic polymers, and their high water content gives these materials practical advantages in numerous biomedical applications. Semisynthetic hydrogels, such as those that combine synthetic and biological building blocks, have the added advantage of controlled bioactivity and material properties. In myocardial regeneration, injectable hydrogels premised on a semisynthetic design are advantageous both as bioactive bulking agents and as a delivery vehicle for controlled release of bioactive factors and/or cardiomyocytes. A new semisynthetic hydrogel based on PEGylated fibrinogen has been developed to address the many requirements of an injectable biomaterial in cardiac restoration. This chapter highlights the fundamental aspects of making this biomimetic hydrogel matrix for cardiac applications. PMID:25070327

  9. Nanoindentation Studies of TNZ and Ti2448 Biomaterials After Magnetoelectropolishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hryniewicz T.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the nanoindentation results of two newly developed titanium alloy biomaterials, TNZ and Ti2448, after different surface treatments. The investigations were performed on the samples, AR – as received, MP – after abrasive polishing, EP – after a standard electropolshing, and MEP – after magnetoelectropolishing. The electropolishing processes, both EP and MEP, were conducted in the same proprietary electrolyte based on concentrated sulfuric acid. The mechanical properties of the titanium alloys biomaterials demonstrated an evident dependence on the surface treatment method, with MEP samples revealing extremely different behaviour and mechanical properties. Such a different mechanical behaviour may mean completely different composition and thickness of the surface film formed on the studied samples after MEP

  10. Towards practical soft X-ray spectromicroscopy of biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchcock, A P; Morin, C; Heng, Y M; Cornelius, R M; Brash, J L

    2002-01-01

    Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) is being developed as a new tool to study the surface chemical morphology and biointeractions of candidate biomaterials with emphasis on blood compatible polymers. STXM is a synchrotron based technique which provides quantitative chemical mapping at a spatial resolution of 50 nm. Chemical speciation is provided by the near edge X-ray absorption spectral (NEXAFS) signal. We show that STXM can detect proteins on soft X-ray transparent polymer thin films with monolayer sensitivity. Of great significance is the fact that measurements can be made in situ, i.e. in the presence of an overlayer of the protein solution. The strengths, limitations and future potential of STXM for studies of biomaterials are discussed.

  11. All-biomaterial supercapacitor derived from bacterial cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangjun; Kong, Debin; Zhang, Yunbo; Wang, Bin; Li, Xianglong; Qiu, Tengfei; Song, Qi; Ning, Jing; Song, Yan; Zhi, Linjie

    2016-04-01

    An all-biomaterial originated film supercapacitor has been successfully fabricated for the first time based on a unique three-dimensional bacterial cellulose (BC) derived electrode and a novel BC-based gel electrolyte. The obtained supercapacitor displays an excellent specific capacitance of 289 mF cm-2 and an improved solution resistance of 7 Ω.An all-biomaterial originated film supercapacitor has been successfully fabricated for the first time based on a unique three-dimensional bacterial cellulose (BC) derived electrode and a novel BC-based gel electrolyte. The obtained supercapacitor displays an excellent specific capacitance of 289 mF cm-2 and an improved solution resistance of 7 Ω. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01485b

  12. Scanning Probe Microscopy as a Tool for Investigation of Biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Veronika Novotna; Alexandr Knapek; Pavel Tomanek; Sarka Safarova

    2012-01-01

    Super-microscopic techniques like scanning tunnelling microscopy, atomic force microscopy or scanning near-field optical microscopy allows investigate micro- and/or nano-scale surfaces and structures. In this paper, both Environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) and Scanning near field optical microscope (SNOM) have been applied to more closely study of biomaterials. The results of visualization of human osteo-sarcoma cell line (U2OS) are compared. SNOM and ESEM yield different, howev...

  13. Advantages of RGD peptides for directing cell association with biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Bellis, Susan L.

    2011-01-01

    Despite many years of in vitro research confirming the effectiveness of RGD in promoting cell attachment to a wide variety of biomaterials, animal studies evaluating tissue responses to implanted RGD-functionalized substrates have yielded more variable results The goals of this report are to present some of the reasons why cell culture studies may not always reliably predict in vivo responses, and more importantly, to highlight potential applications that may benefit from the use of RGD pepti...

  14. All-biomaterial laser using vitamin and biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizamoglu, Sedat; Gather, Malte C; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2013-11-01

    Lasers based on biomaterials known as Generally-Recognized-As-Safe (GRAS) substances approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are demonstrated. Vitamin B2-doped microdroplet lasers are generated and trapped on a super-hydrophobic poly-L-lactic acid substrate. The spheres support whispering gallery mode lasing at optical pump energies as low as 15 nJ per pulse (≈1 kW/mm2).

  15. Musculoskeletal Regenerative Engineering: Biomaterials, Structures, and Small Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Roshan James; Laurencin, Cato T.

    2014-01-01

    Musculoskeletal tissues are critical to the normal functioning of an individual and following damage or degeneration they show extremely limited endogenous regenerative capacity. The future of regenerative medicine is the combination of advanced biomaterials, structures, and cues to re-engineer/guide stem cells to yield the desired organ cells and tissues. Tissue engineering strategies were ideally suited to repair damaged tissues; however, the substitution and regeneration of large tissue vo...

  16. Polysaccharide-based biomaterials with antimicrobial and antioxidant properties

    OpenAIRE

    Véronique Coma

    2013-01-01

    Active packaging is one of the responses to the recent food-borne microbial outbreaks and to the consumer’s demand for high quality food and for packaging that is more advanced and creative than what is currently offered. Moreover, with the recent increase in ecological awareness associated with the dramatic decrease in fossil resources, research has turned towards the elaboration of more natural materials. This paper provides a short review of biomaterials exhibiting antimicrobial and antiox...

  17. APPLICATION OF CHITOSAN-BASED BIOMATERIALS IN BIOARTIFICIAL LIVE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO Zhiming; PAN Jilun; LI Li; YU Yaoting

    2006-01-01

    Bioartificial liver support system (BALS) has the potential to provide temporary support for patients with fulminant hepatic failure and consist of viable hepatocytes and scaffolding materials for hepatocytes attachment. Various scaffolding materials are used in BALS, including chitosan,which is easily obtained by deacetylation of chitin and widely applied in biomedical applications. In this paper, we introduce and discuses chitosan-based biomaterials for BALS application.

  18. Bioactive Titania Layer Fabricated on Metallic Biomaterials by Electrodeposition

    OpenAIRE

    Miyazaki, T.; Otsuyama, T.; Ishida, E.

    2009-01-01

    Improvement of bone integration ability of metallic biomaterials is needed for long-term stable fIxation to bone tissues. Essential prerequisite for materials to show bone-integrating bioactivity is formation of apatite layer on their surfaces in body environments. Several functional groups have potential to trigger the apatite nucleation. In the present study, we attempted fabrication of bioactive titania layer which provides Ti-OH groups effective for the apatite formation on bioinert metal...

  19. Structural changes in sheep tibia bone undergoing biomaterial scaffold implant

    OpenAIRE

    Maxwell, Craig, 1984-

    2012-01-01

    Bone fracture is a common occurrence with most people having, or knowing someone who has experienced it. This thesis displays quantitative results on the growth and strength of new material formed in a fracture gap by analysing the density and volume of the implanted biomaterial scaffold and the new material formed alongside gait and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) of external factors which can have an effect on the remodeling process. The main goal of this thesis is to present methods to provi...

  20. The stability mechanisms of an injectable calcium phosphate ceramic suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatimi, Ahmed; Tassin, Jean-François; Axelos, Monique A V; Weiss, Pierre

    2010-06-01

    Calcium phosphate ceramics are widely used as bone substitutes in dentistry and orthopedic applications. For minimally invasive surgery an injectable calcium phosphate ceramic suspension (ICPCS) was developed. It consists in a biopolymer (hydroxypropylmethylcellulose: HPMC) as matrix and bioactive calcium phosphate ceramics (biphasic calcium phosphate: BCP) as fillers. The stability of the suspension is essential to this generation of "ready to use" injectable biomaterial. But, during storage, the particles settle down. The engineering sciences have long been interested in models describing the settling (or sedimentation) of particles in viscous fluids. Our work is dedicated to the comprehension of the effect of the formulation on the stability of calcium phosphate suspension before and after steam sterilization. The rheological characterization revealed the macromolecular behavior of the suspending medium. The investigations of settling kinetics showed the influence of the BCP particle size and the HPMC concentration on the settling velocity and sediment compactness before and after sterilization. To decrease the sedimentation process, the granule size has to be smaller and the polymer concentration has to increase. A much lower sedimentation velocity, as compared to Stokes law, is observed and interpreted in terms of interactions between the polymer network in solution and the particles. This experimentation highlights the granules spacer property of hydrophilic macromolecules that is a key issue for interconnection control, one of the better ways to improve osteoconduction and bioactivity. PMID:20229185

  1. Engineering Biomaterial Properties for Central Nervous System Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivet, Christopher John

    Biomaterials offer unique properties that are intrinsic to the chemistry of the material itself or occur as a result of the fabrication process; iron oxide nanoparticles are superparamagnetic, which enables controlled heating in the presence of an alternating magnetic field, and a hydrogel and electrospun fiber hybrid material provides minimally invasive placement of a fibrous, artificial extracellular matrix for tissue regeneration. Utilization of these unique properties towards central nervous system disease and dysfunction requires a thorough definition of the properties in concert with full biological assessment. This enables development of material-specific features to elicit unique cellular responses. Iron oxide nanoparticles are first investigated for material-dependent, cortical neuron cytotoxicity in vitro and subsequently evaluated for alternating magnetic field stimulation induced hyperthermia, emulating the clinical application for enhanced chemotherapy efficacy in glioblastoma treatment. A hydrogel and electrospun fiber hybrid material is first applied to a rat brain to evaluate biomaterial interface astrocyte accumulation as a function of hybrid material composition. The hybrid material is then utilized towards increasing functional engraftment of dopaminergic progenitor neural stem cells in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. Taken together, these two scenarios display the role of material property characterization in development of biomaterial strategies for central nervous system repair and regeneration.

  2. Biomaterials in Cardiovascular Research: Applications and Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravana Kumar Jaganathan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular biomaterials (CB dominate the category of biomaterials based on the demand and investments in this field. This review article classifies the CB into three major classes, namely, metals, polymers, and biological materials and collates the information about the CB. Blood compatibility is one of the major criteria which limit the use of biomaterials for cardiovascular application. Several key players are associated with blood compatibility and they are discussed in this paper. To enhance the compatibility of the CB, several surface modification strategies were in use currently. Some recent applications of surface modification technology on the materials for cardiovascular devices were also discussed for better understanding. Finally, the current trend of the CB, endothelization of the cardiac implants and utilization of induced human pluripotent stem cells (ihPSCs, is also presented in this review. The field of CB is growing constantly and many new investigators and researchers are developing interest in this domain. This review will serve as a one stop arrangement to quickly grasp the basic research in the field of CB.

  3. Complex Particulate Biomaterials as Immunostimulant-Delivery Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamat, Uwe; Wilke, Kathleen; Villaverde, Antonio; Roher, Nerea

    2016-01-01

    The control of infectious diseases is a major current challenge in intensive aquaculture. Most commercial vaccines are based on live attenuated or inactivated pathogens that are usually combined with adjuvants, oil emulsions being as the most widely used for vaccination in aquaculture. Although effective, the use of these oil emulsions is plagued with important side effects. Thus, the development of alternative safer and cost-effective immunostimulants and adjuvants is highly desirable. Here we have explored the capacity of inclusion bodies produced in bacteria to immunostimulate and protect fish against bacterial infections. Bacterial inclusion bodies are highly stable, non-toxic protein-based biomaterials produced through fully scalable and low-cost bio-production processes. The present study shows that the composition and structured organization of inclusion body components (protein, lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan, DNA and RNA) make these protein biomaterials excellent immunomodulators able to generically protect fish against otherwise lethal bacterial challenges. The results obtained in this work provide evidence that their inherent nature makes bacterial inclusion bodies exceptionally attractive as immunostimulants and this opens the door to the future exploration of this biomaterial as an alternative adjuvant for vaccination purposes in veterinary. PMID:27716780

  4. Deformation analysis in biomaterials using digital speckle interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, R.; González-Peña, R.; Cibrián, R.; Buend­ía, M.; Mínguez, F.; Micó, V.; Carrión, J. A.; Esteve-Taboada, J. J.; Molina-Jiménez, T.; Simón, S.; Pérez, E.

    2007-06-01

    One of the most interesting points when evaluating the response of an implanted prosthesis is the knowledge of how biomaterials behave under a certain deforming stress. Obviously, the greater the stress on a particular moment, the higher possibility of the failure implant. But in many cases, the most important fact regarding the implant failure is due to a lesser stress that is continuously applied. Therefore it is helpful to know how biomaterials respond to this lesser stress. Digital speckle interferometry (DSPI) is suitable for this type of determination because of it is a highly sensitive and non-invasive optical technique. The aim of the presented work is determining the elasticity of biomaterials such as osseous structures and implants used to replace bones and to fix fractures between them. In particular, preliminary results were obtained applied to macerated human radius and a titanium screw used to treat the fractures of this bone. The analysis shows high correlation ratios in determining Young's modulus via DSPI technique in comparison with than that obtained by creation of the bone computer aided design (CAD) model using finite element method (FEM) in ANSYS software. The high degree of concordance between the results of both methods makes it possible to continue studying osseous samples with a fixed implant, and also other implants made of different alloys.

  5. Scattering Anisotropy Measurements in Dental Tissues and Biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Oliveras, A.; Rubiño, M.; Perez, M. M.

    2012-05-01

    Understanding the behaviour of light propagation in biological materials is essential for biomedical engineering and applications, and even more so when dealing with incoming biomaterials. Many methods for determining optical parameters from biological media assume that scattered light is isotropically distributed over all angles. However, an angular dependence of light scattering may exist and affect the optical behaviour of biological media. The present work seeks to experimentally analyze the scattering anisotropy in different dental tissues (enamel and dentine) and their potential substitute biomaterials (hybrid dental-resin, nano-filled composite, and zirconia ceramic) and comparatively study them. Goniometric measurements were made for four wavelengths in the visible range, allowing a spectral characterization of the materials studied. Previously, for each material, measurements were made with two different sample thicknesses at the same wavelength, checking the behaviour of the angular scattering profile. The asymmetry of experimental phase functions was considered in the recovery of the scattering anisotropy factor. The results demonstrate that the thicker sample yielded a less forward-directed scattering profile than did the thinner sample. The biomaterials analysed show angular scattering comparable to those of the tissues that they may replace. Comparisons can be made by virtue of the low uncertainties found.

  6. Surface-MALDI mass spectrometry in biomaterials research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Griesser, H.J.; Kingshott, P.; McArthur, S.L.;

    2004-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) has been used for over a decade for the determination of purity and accurate molecular masses of macromolecular analytes, such as proteins, in solution. In the last few years the technique has been adapted to become a new su...... summarizes ways in which Surface-MALDI-MS methods have been applied to the study of a range of issues in biomaterials surfaces research. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....... surface analysis method with unique capabilities that complement established biomaterial surface analysis methods such as XPS and ToF-SSIMS. These new MALDI variant methods, which we shall collectively summarize as Surface-MALDI-MS, are capable of desorbing adsorbed macromolecules from biomaterial...... biochemical techniques such as SDS-PAGE, and can in some circumstances be used for the quantitative analysis of adsorbed protein amounts. At this early stage of development, however, limitations exist: in some cases proteins are not detectable, which appears to be related to tight surface binding. This review...

  7. Nanostructured Biomaterials for Tissue Engineered Bone Tissue Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bressan Eriberto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone tissue engineering strategies are emerging as attractive alternatives to autografts and allografts in bone tissue reconstruction, in particular thanks to their association with nanotechnologies. Nanostructured biomaterials, indeed, mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM of the natural bone, creating an artificial microenvironment that promotes cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. At the same time, the possibility to easily isolate mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from different adult tissues together with their multi-lineage differentiation potential makes them an interesting tool in the field of bone tissue engineering. This review gives an overview of the most promising nanostructured biomaterials, used alone or in combination with MSCs, which could in future be employed as bone substitutes. Recent works indicate that composite scaffolds made of ceramics/metals or ceramics/polymers are undoubtedly more effective than the single counterparts in terms of osteoconductivity, osteogenicity and osteoinductivity. A better understanding of the interactions between MSCs and nanostructured biomaterials will surely contribute to the progress of bone tissue engineering.

  8. Novel biomaterials: plasma-enabled nanostructures and functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levchenko, Igor; Keidar, Michael; Cvelbar, Uroš; Mariotti, Davide; Mai-Prochnow, Anne; Fang, Jinghua; (Ken Ostrikov, Kostya

    2016-07-01

    Material processing techniques utilizing low-temperature plasmas as the main process tool feature many unique capabilities for the fabrication of various nanostructured materials. As compared with the neutral-gas based techniques and methods, the plasma-based approaches offer higher levels of energy and flux controllability, often leading to higher quality of the fabricated nanomaterials and sometimes to the synthesis of the hierarchical materials with interesting properties. Among others, nanoscale biomaterials attract significant attention due to their special properties towards the biological materials (proteins, enzymes), living cells and tissues. This review briefly examines various approaches based on the use of low-temperature plasma environments to fabricate nanoscale biomaterials exhibiting high biological activity, biological inertness for drug delivery system, and other features of the biomaterials make them highly attractive. In particular, we briefly discuss the plasma-assisted fabrication of gold and silicon nanoparticles for bio-applications; carbon nanoparticles for bioimaging and cancer therapy; carbon nanotube-based platforms for enzyme production and bacteria growth control, and other applications of low-temperature plasmas in the production of biologically-active materials.

  9. Fabrications of zinc-releasing biocement combining zinc calcium phosphate to calcium phosphate cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Shinya; Hiasa, Masahiro; Yasue, Akihiro; Sekine, Kazumitsu; Hamada, Kenichi; Asaoka, Kenzo; Tanaka, Eiji

    2014-01-01

    Recently, zinc-releasing bioceramics have been the focus of much attention owing to their bone-forming ability. Thus, some types of zinc-containing calcium phosphate (e.g., zinc-doped tricalcium phosphate and zinc-substituted hydroxyapatite) are examined and their osteoblastic cell responses determined. In this investigation, we studied the effects of zinc calcium phosphate (ZCP) derived from zinc phosphate incorporated into calcium phosphate cement (CPC) in terms of its setting reaction and MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cell responses. Compositional analysis by powder X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that HAP crystals were precipitated in the CPC containing 10 or 30wt% ZCP after successfully hardening. However, the crystal growth observed by scanning electron microscopy was delayed in the presence of additional ZCP. These findings indicate that the additional zinc inhibits crystal growth and the conversion of CPC to the HAP crystals. The proliferation of the cells and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were enhanced when 10wt% ZCP was added to CPC. Taken together, ZCP added CPC at an appropriate fraction has a potent promotional effect on bone substitute biomaterials. PMID:24090874

  10. DMPD: The interrelated role of fibronectin and interleukin-1 in biomaterial-modulatedmacrophage function. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16978691 The interrelated role of fibronectin and interleukin-1 in biomaterial-modu...latedmacrophage function. Schmidt DR, Kao WJ. Biomaterials. 2007 Jan;28(3):371-82. Epub 2006 Sep 15. (.png) ...(.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show The interrelated role of fibronectin and interleukin-1 in biomaterial-modulatedm...and interleukin-1 in biomaterial-modulatedmacrophage function. Authors Schmidt DR, Kao WJ. Publication Biomaterial...acrophage function. PubmedID 16978691 Title The interrelated role of fibronectin

  11. Fabrication of a two-level tumor bone repair biomaterial based on a rapid prototyping technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kai He; Yan Yongnian; Zhang Renji; Wang Xiaohong [Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing Technology, Ministry of Education and Center of Organ Manufacturing, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang Xinluan; Madhukar, Kumta Shekhar; Qin Ling [Department of Orthoapedics and Traumatology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong. Shatin, NT (Hong Kong)], E-mail: wangxiaohong@tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: kumta@cuhk.edu.hk, E-mail: qin@ort.cuhk.edu.hk

    2009-06-01

    After the removal of the giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone, it is necessary to fill the defects with adequate biomaterials. A new functional bone repair material with both stimulating osteoblast growth and inhibiting osteoclast activity has been developed with phosphorylated chitosan (P-chitosan) and disodium (1 {yields} 4)-2-deoxy-2-sulfoamino-{beta}-D-glucopyranuronan (S-chitosan) as the additives of poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)/calcium phosphate (TCP) scaffolds based on a double-nozzle low-temperature deposition manufacturing technique. A computer-assisted design model was used and the optimal fabrication parameters were determined through the manipulation of a pure PLGA/TCP system. The microscopic structures, water absorbability and mechanical properties of the samples with different P-chitosan and S-chitosan concentrations were characterized correspondingly. The results suggested that this unique composite porous scaffold material is a potential candidate for the repair of large bone defects after a surgical removal of GCT.

  12. Current trends and future perspectives of bone substitute materials - from space holders to innovative biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolk, Andreas; Handschel, Jörg; Drescher, Wolf; Rothamel, Daniel; Kloss, Frank; Blessmann, Marco; Heiland, Max; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Smeets, Ralf

    2012-12-01

    An autologous bone graft is still the ideal material for the repair of craniofacial defects, but its availability is limited and harvesting can be associated with complications. Bone replacement materials as an alternative have a long history of success. With increasing technological advances the spectrum of grafting materials has broadened to allografts, xenografts, and synthetic materials, providing material specific advantages. A large number of bone-graft substitutes are available including allograft bone preparations such as demineralized bone matrix and calcium-based materials. More and more replacement materials consist of one or more components: an osteoconductive matrix, which supports the ingrowth of new bone; and osteoinductive proteins, which sustain mitogenesis of undifferentiated cells; and osteogenic cells (osteoblasts or osteoblast precursors), which are capable of forming bone in the proper environment. All substitutes can either replace autologous bone or expand an existing amount of autologous bone graft. Because an understanding of the properties of each material enables individual treatment concepts this review presents an overview of the principles of bone replacement, the types of graft materials available, and considers future perspectives. Bone substitutes are undergoing a change from a simple replacement material to an individually created composite biomaterial with osteoinductive properties to enable enhanced defect bridging.

  13. Effects of calcium phosphate/chitosan composite on bone healing in rats: calcium phosphate induces osteon formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Tulio; Olave, Gilberto; Valencia, Carlos H; Arce, Sandra; Quinn, Julian M W; Thouas, George A; Chen, Qi-Zhi

    2014-07-01

    Vascularization of an artificial graft represents one of the most significant challenges facing the field of bone tissue engineering. Over the past decade, strategies to vascularize artificial scaffolds have been intensively evaluated using osteoinductive calcium phosphate (CaP) biomaterials in animal models. In this work, we observed that CaP-based biomaterials implanted into rat calvarial defects showed remarkably accelerated formation and mineralization of new woven bone in defects in the initial stages, at a rate of ∼60 μm/day (0.8 mg/day), which was considerably higher than normal bone growth rates (several μm/day, 0.1 mg/day) in implant-free controls of the same age. Surprisingly, we also observed histological evidence of primary osteon formation, indicated by blood vessels in early-region fibrous tissue, which was encapsulated by lamellar osteocyte structures. These were later fully replaced by compact bone, indicating complete regeneration of calvarial bone. Thus, the CaP biomaterial used here is not only osteoinductive, but vasculogenic, and it may have contributed to the bone regeneration, despite an absence of osteons in normal rat calvaria. Further investigation will involve how this strategy can regulate formation of vascularized cortical bone such as by control of degradation rate, and use of models of long, dense bones, to more closely approximate repair of human cortical bone. PMID:24460696

  14. Biomaterial based modulation of macrophage polarization: a review and suggested design principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rukmani Sridharan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages have long been known for their phagocytic capabilities and immune defence; however, their role in healing is being increasingly recognized in recent years due to their ability to polarize into pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory phenotypes. Historically, biomaterials were designed to be inert to minimize the host response. More recently, the emergence of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine has led to the design of biomaterials that interact with the host through tailored mechanical, chemical and temporal characteristics. Due to such advances in biomaterial functionality and an improved understanding of macrophage responses to implanted materials, it is now possible to identify biomaterial design characteristics that dictate the host response and contribute to successful tissue integration. Herein, we begin by briefly reviewing macrophage cell origin and the key cytokine/chemokine markers of macrophage polarization and then describe which responses are favorable for both replacement and regenerative biomaterials. The body of the review focuses on macrophage polarization in response to inherent cues directly provided by biomaterials and the consequent cues that result from events related to biomaterial implantation. To conclude, a section on potential design principles for both replacement and regenerative biomaterials is presented. An in depth understanding of biomaterial cues to selectively polarize macrophages may prove beneficial in the design of a new generation of ‘immuno-informed’ biomaterials that can positively interact with the immune system to dictate a favorable macrophage response following implantation.

  15. Calcium signaling and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinlein, Ortrud K

    2014-08-01

    Calcium signaling is involved in a multitude of physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms. Over the last decade, it has been increasingly recognized as an important factor in epileptogenesis, and it is becoming obvious that the excess synchronization of neurons that is characteristic for seizures can be linked to various calcium signaling pathways. These include immediate effects on membrane excitability by calcium influx through ion channels as well as delayed mechanisms that act through G-protein coupled pathways. Calcium signaling is able to cause hyperexcitability either by direct modulation of neuronal activity or indirectly through calcium-dependent gliotransmission. Furthermore, feedback mechanisms between mitochondrial calcium signaling and reactive oxygen species are able to cause neuronal cell death and seizures. Unravelling the complexity of calcium signaling in epileptogenesis is a daunting task, but it includes the promise to uncover formerly unknown targets for the development of new antiepileptic drugs.

  16. Freezing-induced deformation of biomaterials in cryomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcelikkale, Altug

    Cryomedicine utilizes low temperature treatments of biological proteins, cells and tissues for cryopreservation, materials processing and cryotherapy. Lack of proper understanding of cryodamage that occurs during these applications remains to be the primary bottleneck for development of successful tissue cryopreservation and cryosurgery procedures. An engineering approach based on a view of biological systems as functional biomaterials can help identify, predict and control the primary cryodamage mechanisms by developing an understanding of underlying freezing-induced biophysical processes. In particular, freezing constitutes the main structural/mechanical origin of cryodamage and results in significant deformation of biomaterials at multiple length scales. Understanding of these freezing-induced deformation processes and their effects on post-thaw biomaterial functionality is currently lacking but will be critical to engineer improved cryomedicine procedures. This dissertation addresses this problem by presenting three separate but related studies of freezing-induced deformation at multiple length scales including nanometer-scale protein fibrils, single cells and whole tissues. A combination of rigorous experimentation and computational modeling is used to characterize post-thaw biomaterial structure and properties, predict biomaterial behavior and assess its post-thaw biological functionality. Firstly, freezing-induced damage on hierarchical extracellular matrix structure of collagen is investigated at molecular, fibril and matrix levels. Results indicate to a specific kind of fibril damage due to freezing-induced expansion of intrafibrillar fluid. This is followed by a study of freezing-induced cell and tissue deformation coupled to osmotically driven cellular water transport. Computational and semi empirical modeling of these processes indicate that intracellular deformation of the cell during freezing is heterogeneous and can interfere with cellular water

  17. Interactions between biomaterials and the sclera: Implications on myopia progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, James

    Myopia prevalence has steadily climbed worldwide in recent decades with the most dramatic impact in East Asian countries. Treatments such as eyeglasses, contact lenses, and laser surgery for the refractive error are widely available, but none cures the underlying cause. In progressive high myopia, invasive surgical procedures using a scleral buckle for mechanical support are performed since the patient is at risk of becoming blind. The treatment outcome is highly dependent on the surgeon's skills and the patient's myopia progression rate, with limited choices in buckling materials. This dissertation, in four main studies, represents efforts made to control high myopia progression through the exploration and development of biomaterials that influence scleral growth. First, mRNA expression levels of the chick scleral matrix metalloproteinases, tissue-inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases, and transforming growth factor-beta 2 were assessed for temporal and defocus power effects. The first study elucidated the roles that these factors play in scleral growth regulation and suggested potential motifs that can be incorporated in future biomaterials design. Second, poly(vinyl-pyrrolidone) as injectable gels and poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) as solid strips were implanted in chicks to demonstrate the concept of posterior pole scleral reinforcements. This second study found that placing appropriate biomaterials at the posterior pole of the eye could directly influence scleral remodeling by interacting with the host cells. Both studies advanced the idea that scleral tissue remodeling could be potentially controlled by well-designed biomaterials. These findings led to the exploration of biomimetic hydrogels comprising enzymatically-degradable semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (edsIPNs) to determine their biocompatibility and effects on the chick posterior eye wall. This third study demonstrated the feasibility of stimulating scleral growth by applying biomimetic

  18. Smoking, calcium, calcium antagonists, and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicita-Mauro, V

    1990-01-01

    Aging is characterized, besides other changes, by a progressive increase in calcium content in the arterial wall, which is enhanced by diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, arterial hypertension, and tabagism. As to tabagism, experiments in animals have shown that nicotine can increase calcium content of the arterial wall, and clinical studies have demonstrated that cigarette smoking induces peripheral vasoconstriction, with consequent increase in blood pressure levels. In order to study the role of calcium ions in the pathogenesis of the vasoconstrictive lesions caused by "acute" smoking, the author has studied the peripheral vascular effects of the calcium-channel antagonist nifedipine, a dihydropyridine derivative, and calcitonin, a hypocalcemizing hormone which possess vasoactive actions on 12 elderly regular smokers (mean age 65.8 years). The results demonstrated that both nifedipine (10 mg sublingually 20 min before smoking) and salmon calcitonin (100 MRC U/daily intramuscularly for three days) are able to prevent peripheral vasoconstriction evaluated by Doppler velocimetry, as well as the increase of blood pressure induced by smoking. On the basis of our results, the author proposes that cigarette smoking-induced vasoconstriction is a calcium-mediated process, which can be hindered by drugs with calcium antagonist action. PMID:2226675

  19. Calcium absorption and achlorhydria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defective absorption of calcium has been thought to exist in patients with achlorhydria. The author compared absorption of calcium in its carbonate form with that in a pH-adjusted citrate form in a group of 11 fasting patients with achlorhydria and in 9 fasting normal subjects. Fractional calcium absorption was measured by a modified double-isotope procedure with 0.25 g of calcium used as the carrier. Mean calcium absorption (+/- S.D.) in the patients with achlorhydria was 0.452 +/- 0.125 for citrate and 0.042 +/- 0.021 for carbonate (P less than 0.0001). Fractional calcium absorption in the normal subjects was 0.243 +/- 0.049 for citrate and 0.225 +/- 0.108 for carbonate (not significant). Absorption of calcium from carbonate in patients with achlorhydria was significantly lower than in the normal subjects and was lower than absorption from citrate in either group; absorption from citrate in those with achlorhydria was significantly higher than in the normal subjects, as well as higher than absorption from carbonate in either group. Administration of calcium carbonate as part of a normal breakfast resulted in completely normal absorption in the achlorhydric subjects. These results indicate that calcium absorption from carbonate is impaired in achlorhydria under fasting conditions. Since achlorhydria is common in older persons, calcium carbonate may not be the ideal dietary supplement

  20. Blood compatibility of zinc-calcium phosphate conversion coating on Mg-1.33Li-0.6Ca alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yu-Hong; Zeng, Rong-Chang; Wang, Qing-Zhao; Liu, Li-Jun; Xu, Qian-Qian; Wang, Chuang; Liu, Zhi-Wei

    2016-06-01

    Magnesium alloys as a new class of biomaterials possess biodegradability and biocompatibility in comparison with currently used metal implants. However, their rapid corrosion rates are necessary to be manipulated by appropriate coatings. In this paper, a new attempt was used to develop a zinc-calcium phosphate (Zn-Ca-P) conversion coating on Mg-1.33Li-0.6Ca alloys to increase the biocompatibility and improve the corrosion resistance. In vitro blood biocompatibility of the alloy with and without the Zn-Ca-P coating was investigated to determine its suitability as a degradable medical biomaterial. Blood biocompatibility was assessed from the hemolysis test, the dynamic cruor time test, blood cell count and SEM observation of the platelet adhesion to membrane surface. The results showed that the Zn-Ca-P coating on Mg-1.33Li-0.6Ca alloys had good blood compatibility, which is in accordance with the requirements for medical biomaterials.

  1. Blood compatibility of zinc-calcium phosphate conversion coating on Mg-1.33Li-0.6Ca alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yu-Hong; Zeng, Rong-Chang; Wang, Qing-Zhao; Liu, Li-Jun; Xu, Qian-Qian; Wang, Chuang; Liu, Zhi-Wei

    2016-09-01

    Magnesium alloys as a new class of biomaterials possess biodegradability and biocompatibility in comparison with currently used metal implants. However, their rapid corrosion rates are necessary to be manipulated by appropriate coatings. In this paper, a new attempt was used to develop a zinc-calcium phosphate (Zn-Ca-P) conversion coating on Mg-1.33Li-0.6Ca alloys to increase the biocompatibility and improve the corrosion resistance. In vitro blood biocompatibility of the alloy with and without the Zn-Ca-P coating was investigated to determine its suitability as a degradable medical biomaterial. Blood biocompatibility was assessed from the hemolysis test, the dynamic cruor time test, blood cell count and SEM observation of the platelet adhesion to membrane surface. The results showed that the Zn-Ca-P coating on Mg-1.33Li-0.6Ca alloys had good blood compatibility, which is in accordance with the requirements for medical biomaterials.

  2. Calcium phosphate nanocoatings and nanocomposites, part I: recent developments and advancements in tissue engineering and bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Andy H; Ben-Nissan, Besim

    2015-07-01

    A number of materials have been applied as implant coatings and as tissue regeneration materials. Calcium phosphate holds a special consideration, due to its chemical similarity to human bone and, most importantly, its dissolution characteristics, which allow for bone growth and regeneration. The applications of molecular and nanoscale-based biological materials have been and will continue to play an ever increasing role in enhancing and improving the osseointegration of dental and orthopedic implants. More recently, extensive research efforts have been focused on the development and applications of fluorescent nanoparticles and nanocoatings for in vivo imaging and diagnostics as well as devising methods of adding luminescent or fluorescent capabilities to enhance the in vivo functionality of calcium phosphate-based biomedical materials. PMID:26119630

  3. Characterization of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells on Biomaterials for Bone Tissue Engineering In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Dirk Henrich; René Verboket; Alexander Schaible; Kerstin Kontradowitz; Elsie Oppermann; Brune, Jan C; Christoph Nau; Simon Meier; Halvard Bonig; Ingo Marzi; Caroline Seebach

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMCs) are suitable for bone tissue engineering. Comparative data regarding the needs of BMC for the adhesion on biomaterials and biocompatibility to various biomaterials are lacking to a large extent. Therefore, we evaluated whether a surface coating would enhance BMC adhesion and analyze the biocompatibility of three different kinds of biomaterials. BMCs were purified from human bone marrow aspirate samples. Beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP, without coating or ...

  4. Frontiers in biomaterials the design, synthetic strategies and biocompatibility of polymer scaffolds for biomedical application

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Shunsheng

    2014-01-01

    Frontiers in Biomaterials: The Design, Synthetic Strategies and Biocompatibility of Polymer Scaffolds for Biomedical Application, Volume 1" highlights the importance of biomaterials and their interaction with biological system. The need for the development of biomaterials as scaffold for tissue regeneration is driven by the increasing demands for materials that mimic functions of extracellular matrices of body tissues.This ebook covers the latest challenges on the biocompatibility of scaffold overtime after implantation and discusses the requirement of innovative technologies and strategies f

  5. Can cells and biomaterials in therapeutic medicine be shielded off from innate immune recognition?

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Bo; Korsgren, Olle; Lambris, John D.; Ekdahl, Kristina Nilsson

    2010-01-01

    Biomaterials (e.g. polymers, metals, or ceramics), cell, and cell cluster (e.g. pancreatic islets) transplantation are beginning to offer novel treatment modalities for some otherwise intractable diseases. The innate immune system is involved in incompatibility reactions that occur when biomaterials or cells are introduced into the blood circulation. In particular the complement, coagulation, and contact systems are involved in the recognition of biomaterials and cells, eliciting activation o...

  6. The challenge to improve the response of biomaterials to the physiological environment

    OpenAIRE

    Peppas, Nicholas A.; Clegg, John R.

    2016-01-01

    New applications of biomaterials often require advanced structures containing synthetic and natural components that are tuned to provide properties unique to a specific application. We discuss how structural characteristics of biomaterials, especially hydrophilic ones, can be used in conjunction with non-ideal thermodynamics to develop advanced medical systems. We show a number of examples of biocompatible, intelligent biomaterials that can be used for organ replacement, biosensors, precise d...

  7. Measurements of intracellular calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) has been measured in cultured cells by using Fura-2 load cells and a computer-controlled Perkin Elmer LS-5B spectrofluorometer. Increased [Ca2+]i in cells exposed to extracellular bilirubin was observed both with and without extracellular calcium. However, the increase was considerable larger with extracellular calcium. The enhancement of [Ca2+]i became smaller with decreasing bilirubin/BSA (bovine serum albumine) ratio. 5 refs., 5 figs

  8. Novel biomaterials decontamination of toxic metals from wastewater

    CERN Document Server

    Srivastava, Shalini

    2010-01-01

    Current research revolves around trends to bring technology into harmony with the natural environment and in order to protect the ecosystem. Bioremediation involves processes which reduce the overall treatment costs by using agricultural residues. Regeneration of the biosorbent further increases the cost effectiveness of the process, thus warranting its future success in solving water quality problems. Special emphasis is paid to chemical modifications resulting in tailored novel biomaterials which improve its sorption efficiency and environmental stability. In this way it can be used commerci

  9. Fracture Toughness Properties of Three Different Biomaterials Measured by Nanoindentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-yu Sun; Jin Tong

    2007-01-01

    The fracture toughness of hard biomaterials,such as nacre,bovine hoof wall and beetle cuticle,is associated with fibrous or lamellar structures that deflect or stop growing cracks.Their hardness and reduced modulus were measured by using a nanoindenter in this paper.Micro/nanoscale cracks were generated by nanoindentation using a Berkovich tip.Nanoindentation of nacre and bovine hoof wall resulted in pile-up around the indent.It was found that the fracture toughness(Kc)of bovine hoof wall is the maximum,the second is nacre,and the elytra cuticle of dung beetle is the least one.

  10. USE OF ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF FUNCTIONALIZATION OF NANOPOROUS BIOMATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.; Narayan, R.; Adiga, S.; Pellin, M.; Curtiss, L.; Stafslien, S.; Chisholm, B.; Monteiro-Riviere, N.; Elam, J.

    2010-02-08

    Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials.

  11. Hybrid calcium phosphate coatings for implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malchikhina, Alena I.; Shesterikov, Evgeny V.; Bolbasov, Evgeny N.; Ignatov, Viktor P.; Tverdokhlebov, Sergei I.

    2016-08-01

    Monophasic biomaterials cannot provide all the necessary functions of bones or other calcined tissues. It is necessary to create for cancer patients the multiphase materials with the structure and composition simulating the natural bone. Such materials are classified as hybrid, obtained by a combination of chemically different components. The paper presents the physical, chemical and biological studies of coatings produced by hybrid technologies (HT), which combine primer layer and calcium phosphate (CaP) coating. The first HT type combines the method of vacuum arc titanium primer layer deposition on a stainless steel substrate with the following micro-arc oxidation (MAO) in phosphoric acid solution with addition of calcium compounds to achieve high supersaturated state. MAO CaP coatings feature high porosity (2-8%, pore size 5-7 µm) and surface morphology with the thickness greater than 5 µm. The thickness of Ti primer layer is 5-40 µm. Amorphous MAO CaP coating micro-hardness was measured at maximum normal load Fmax = 300 mN. It was 3.1 ± 0.8 GPa, surface layer elasticity modulus E = 110 ± 20 GPa, roughness Ra = 0.9 ± 0.1 µm, Rz = 7.5 ± 0.2 µm, which is less than the titanium primer layer roughness. Hybrid MAO CaP coating is biocompatible, able to form calcium phosphates from supersaturated body fluid (SBF) solution and also stimulates osteoinduction processes. The second HT type includes the oxide layer formation by thermal oxidation and then CaP target radio frequency magnetron sputtering (RFMS). Oxide-RFMS CaP coating is a thin dense coating with good adhesion to the substrate material, which can be used for metal implants. The RFMS CaP coating has thickness 1.6 ± 0.1 µm and consists of main target elements calcium and phosphorus and Ca/P ratio 2.4. The second HT type can form calcium phosphates from SBF solution. In vivo study shows that hybrid RFMS CaP coating is biocompatible and produces fibrointegration processes.

  12. Calcium in plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Schwartau

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the review on the role of calcium in many physiological processes of plant organisms, including growth and development, protection from pathogenic influences, response to changing environmental factors, and many other aspects of plant physiology. Initial intake of calcium ions is carried out by Ca2+-channels of plasma membrane and they are further transported by the xylem owing to auxins’ attractive ability. The level of intake and selectivity of calcium transport to ove-ground parts of the plant is controlled by a symplast. Ca2+enters to the cytoplasm of endoderm cells through calcium channels on the cortical side of Kaspary bands, and is redistributed inside the stele by the symplast, with the use of Ca2+-АТPases and Ca2+/Н+-antiports. Owing to regulated expression and activity of these calcium transporters, calclum can be selectively delivered to the xylem. Important role in supporting calcium homeostasis is given to the vacuole which is the largest depo of calcium. Regulated quantity of calcium movement through the tonoplast is provided by a number of potential-, ligand-gated active transporters and channels, like Ca2+-ATPase and Ca2+/H+ exchanger. They are actively involved in the inactivation of the calcium signal by pumping Ca2+ to the depo of cells. Calcium ATPases are high affinity pumps that efficiently transfer calcium ions against the concentration gradient in their presence in the solution in nanomolar concentrations. Calcium exchangers are low affinity, high capacity Ca2+ transporters that are effectively transporting calcium after raising its concentration in the cell cytosol through the use of protons gradients. Maintaining constant concentration and participation in the response to stimuli of different types also involves EPR, plastids, mitochondria, and cell wall. Calcium binding proteins contain several conserved sequences that provide sensitivity to changes in the concentration of Ca2+ and when you

  13. Calcium D-saccharate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, André Castilho; Hedegaard, Martina Vavrusova; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

    2016-01-01

    Molar conductivity of saturated aqueous solutions of calcium d-saccharate, used as a stabilizer of beverages fortified with calcium d-gluconate, increases strongly upon dilution, indicating complex formation between calcium and d-saccharate ions, for which, at 25 °C, Kassoc = 1032 ± 80, ΔHassoc......° = -34 ± 6 kJ mol-1, and ΔSassoc° = -55 ± 9 J mol-1 K-1, were determined electrochemically. Calcium d-saccharate is sparingly soluble, with a solubility product, Ksp, of (6.17 ± 0.32) × 10-7 at 25 °C, only moderately increasing with the temperature: ΔHsol° = 48 ± 2 kJ mol-1, and ΔSassoc° = 42 ± 7 J mol-1...... K-1. Equilibria in supersaturated solutions of calcium d-saccharate seem only to adjust slowly, as seen from calcium activity measurements in calcium d-saccharate solutions made supersaturated by cooling. Solutions formed by isothermal dissolution of calcium d-gluconate in aqueous potassium d...

  14. Arsenic removal using natural biomaterial-based sorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansone, Linda; Klavins, Maris; Viksna, Arturs

    2013-10-01

    Arsenic contamination of water is a major problem worldwide. A possible solution can be approached through developing new sorbents based on cost-effective and environmentally friendly natural biomaterials. We have developed new sorbents based on biomaterial impregnation with iron oxyhydroxide. In this study, raw peat material, iron-modified peat, iron-modified biomass (shingles, straw, sands, cane and moss) as well as iron humate were used for the removal of arsenate from contaminated water. The highest sorption capacity was observed in iron-modified peat, and kinetic studies indicated that the amount of arsenic sorbed on this material exceeds 90 % in 5 h. Arsenate sorption on iron-modified peat is characterised by the pseudo-second-order mechanism. The results of arsenic sorption in the presence of competing substances indicated that sulphate, nitrate, chloride and tartrate anions have practically no influence on As(V) sorption onto Fe-modified peat, whereas the presence of phosphate ions and humic acid significantly lowers the arsenic removal efficiency.

  15. Recombinant Exon-Encoded Resilins for Elastomeric Biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Guokui; Rivkin, Amit; Lapidot, Shaul; Hu, Xiao; Arinus, Shira B.; Dgany, Or; Shoseyov, Oded; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Resilin is an elastomeric protein found in specialized regions of the cuticle of most insects, providing outstanding material properties including high resilience and fatigue lifetime for insect flight and jumping needs. Two exons (1 and 3) from the resilin gene in Drosophila melanogaster were cloned and the encoded proteins expressed as soluble products in Escherichia coli. A heat and salt precipitation method was used for efficient purification of the recombinant proteins. The proteins were solution cast from water and formed into rubber-like biomaterials via horseradish peroxidase-mediated cross-linking. Comparative studies of the two proteins expressed from the two different exons were investigated by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Circular Dichrosim (CD) for structural features. Little structural organization was found, suggesting structural order was not induced by the enzyme-mediateed dityrosine cross-links. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to study the elastomeric properties of the uncross-linked and cross-linked proteins. The protein from exon 1 exhibited 90% resilience in comparison to 63% for the protein from exon 3, and therefore may be the more critical domain for functional materials to mimic native resilin. Further, the cross-linking of the recombinant exon 1 via the citrate-modified photo-Fenton reaction was explored as an alternative dityrosine mediated polymerization method and resulted in both highly elastic and adhesive materials. The citrate-modified photo-Fenton system may be suitable for in-vivo applications of resilin biomaterials. PMID:21963157

  16. Teaching technological innovation and entrepreneurship in polymeric biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Newell R

    2011-01-01

    A model for incorporating an entrepreneurship module has been developed in an upper-division and graduate-level engineering elective on Polymeric Biomaterials (27-311/42-311/27-711/42-711) at Carnegie Mellon University. A combination of lectures, assignments, and a team-based project were used to provide students with a framework for applying their technical skills in the development of new technologies and a basic understanding of the issues related to translational research and technology commercialization. The specific approach to the project established in the course, which represented 20% of the students' grades, and the grading rubric for each of the milestones are described along with suggestions for generalizing this approach to different applications of biomaterials or other engineering electives. Incorporating this model of entrepreneurship into electives teaches students course content within the framework of technological innovation and many of the concepts and tools need to practice it. For students with situational or individual interest in the project, it would also serve to deepen their understanding of the traditional course components as well as provide a foundation for integrating technological innovation and lifelong learning.

  17. Nanomechanics of Cells and Biomaterials Studied by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Jason I; Revenko, Irène; Rodriguez, Brian J

    2015-11-18

    The behavior and mechanical properties of cells are strongly dependent on the biochemical and biomechanical properties of their microenvironment. Thus, understanding the mechanical properties of cells, extracellular matrices, and biomaterials is key to understanding cell function and to develop new materials with tailored mechanical properties for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has emerged as an indispensable technique for measuring the mechanical properties of biomaterials and cells with high spatial resolution and force sensitivity within physiologically relevant environments and timescales in the kPa to GPa elastic modulus range. The growing interest in this field of bionanomechanics has been accompanied by an expanding array of models to describe the complexity of indentation of hierarchical biological samples. Furthermore, the integration of AFM with optical microscopy techniques has further opened the door to a wide range of mechanotransduction studies. In recent years, new multidimensional and multiharmonic AFM approaches for mapping mechanical properties have been developed, which allow the rapid determination of, for example, cell elasticity. This Progress Report provides an introduction and practical guide to making AFM-based nanomechanical measurements of cells and surfaces for tissue engineering applications.

  18. A Biodesigned Nanocomposite Biomaterial for Auricular Cartilage Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayyer, Leila; Jell, Gavin; Esmaeili, Ali; Birchall, Martin; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2016-05-01

    Current biomaterials for auricular replacement are associated with high rates of infection and extrusion. The development of new auricular biomaterials that mimic the mechanical properties of native tissue and promote desirable cellular interactions may prevent implant failure. A porous 3D nanocomposite scaffold (NS) based on POSS-PCU (polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane nanocage into polycarbonate based urea-urethane) is developed with an elastic modulus similar to native ear. In vitro biological interactions on this NS reveal greater protein adsorption, increased fibroblast adhesion, proliferation, and collagen production compared with Medpor (the current synthetic auricular implant). In vivo, the POSS-PCU with larger pores (NS2; 150-250 μm) have greater tissue ingrowth (≈5.8× and ≈1.4 × increase) than the POSS-PCU with smaller pores (NS1; 100-50 μm) and when compared to Medpor (>100 μm). The NS2 with the larger pores demonstrates a reduced fibrotic encapsulation compared with NS1 and Medpor (≈4.1× and ≈1.6×, respectively; P NS1 (12 weeks postimplantation). The lack of chronic inflammatory response for all materials may indicate that the elastic modulus and pore size of the implant scaffold could be important design considerations for influencing fibrotic responses to auricular and other soft tissue implants. PMID:26992039

  19. Scattering and Absorption Properties of Biomaterials for Dental Restorative Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Oliveras, A.; Rubiño, M.; Pérez, M. M.

    2013-08-01

    The physical understanding of the optical properties of dental biomaterials is mandatory for their final success in restorative applications.Light propagation in biological media is characterized by the absorption coefficient, the scattering coefficient, the scattering phase function,the refractive index, and the surface conditions (roughness). We have employed the inverse adding-doubling (IAD) method to combine transmittance and reflectance measurements performed using an integrating-sphere setup with the results of the previous scattering-anisotropygoniometric measurements. This has led to the determination of the absorption and the scattering coefficients. The aim was to optically characterize two different dental-resin composites (nanocomposite and hybrid) and one type of zirconia ceramic, and comparatively study them. The experimental procedure was conducted under repeatability conditions of measurement in order to determine the uncertainty associated to the optical properties of the biomaterials. Spectral variations of the refraction index and the scattering anisotropy factor were also considered. The whole experimental procedure fulfilled all the necessary requirements to provide optical-property values with lower associated uncertainties. The effective transport coefficient presented a similar spectral behavior for the two composites but completely different for the zirconia ceramic. The results demonstrated that the scattering anisotropy exerted a clearly distinct impact on the optical properties of the zirconia ceramic compared with those of the dental-resin composites.

  20. Complement inhibition in biomaterial- and biosurface-induced thromboinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekdahl, Kristina N; Huang, Shan; Nilsson, Bo; Teramura, Yuji

    2016-06-01

    Therapeutic medicine today includes a vast number of procedures involving the use of biomaterials, transplantation of therapeutic cells or cell clusters, as well as of solid organs. These treatment modalities are obviously of great benefit to the patient, but also present a great challenge to the innate immune system, since they involve direct exposure of non-biological materials, cells of non-hematological origin as well as endothelial cells, damaged by ischemia-perfusion in solid organs to proteins and cells in the blood. The result of such an exposure may be an inappropriate activation of the complement and contact/kallikrein systems, which produce mediators capable of triggering the platelets and PMNs and monocytes, which can ultimately result in thrombotic and inflammatory (i.e., a thrombo-inflammatory) response to the treatment modality. In this concept review, we give an overview of the mechanisms of recognition within the innate immunity system, with the aim to identify suitable points for intervention. Finally, we discuss emerging and promising techniques for surface modification of biomaterials and cells with specific inhibitors in order to diminish thromboinflammation and improve clinical outcome.

  1. Improving the clinical impact of biomaterials in cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammon, Joshua M; Dold, Neil M; Jewell, Christopher M

    2016-03-29

    Immunotherapies for cancer have progressed enormously over the past few decades, and hold great promise for the future. The successes of these therapies, with some patients showing durable and complete remission, demonstrate the power of harnessing the immune system to eradicate tumors. However, the effectiveness of current immunotherapies is limited by hurdles ranging from immunosuppressive strategies employed by tumors, to inadequate specificity of existing therapies, to heterogeneity of disease. Further, the vast majority of approved immunotherapies employ systemic delivery of immunomodulators or cells that make addressing some of these challenges more difficult. Natural and synthetic biomaterials - such as biocompatible polymers, self-assembled lipid particles, and implantable biodegradable devices - offer unique potential to address these hurdles by harnessing the benefits of therapeutic targeting, tissue engineering, co-delivery, controlled release, and sensing. However, despite the enormous investment in new materials and nanotechnology, translation of these ideas to the clinic is still an uncommon outcome. Here we review the major challenges facing immunotherapies and discuss how the newest biomaterials and nanotechnologies could help overcome these challenges to create new clinical options for patients.

  2. Generation of Viable Cell and Biomaterial Patterns by Laser Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringeisen, Bradley

    2001-03-01

    In order to fabricate and interface biological systems for next generation applications such as biosensors, protein recognition microarrays, and engineered tissues, it is imperative to have a method of accurately and rapidly depositing different active biomaterials in patterns or layered structures. Ideally, the biomaterial structures would also be compatible with many different substrates including technologically relevant platforms such as electronic circuits or various detection devices. We have developed a novel laser-based technique, termed matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation direct write (MAPLE DW), that is able to direct write patterns and three-dimensional structures of numerous biologically active species ranging from proteins and antibodies to living cells. Specifically, we have shown that MAPLE DW is capable of forming mesoscopic patterns of living prokaryotic cells (E. coli bacteria), living mammalian cells (Chinese hamster ovaries), active proteins (biotinylated bovine serum albumin, horse radish peroxidase), and antibodies specific to a variety of classes of cancer related proteins including intracellular and extracellular matrix proteins, signaling proteins, cell cycle proteins, growth factors, and growth factor receptors. In addition, patterns of viable cells and active biomolecules were deposited on different substrates including metals, semiconductors, nutrient agar, and functionalized glass slides. We will present an explanation of the laser-based transfer mechanism as well as results from our recent efforts to fabricate protein recognition microarrays and tissue-based microfluidic networks.

  3. Transfer of bacteria between biomaterials surfaces in the operating room - An experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knobben, Bas A. S.; van der Mei, Henny C.; van Horn, Jim R.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion to and transfer between surfaces is a complicated process. With regard to the success of biomaterials implants, studies on bacterial adhesion and transfer should not be confined to biomaterials surfaces in the human body, but also encompass surfaces in the operating room, where th

  4. Effect of biomaterial properties on bone healing in a rabbit tooth extraction socket model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fisher, J.P.; Lalani, Z.; Bossano, C.M.; Brey, E.M.; Demian, N.; Johnston, C.M.; Dean, D.; Jansen, J.A.; Wong, M.E.; Mikos, A.G.

    2004-01-01

    In this work we sought to understand the effect of biomaterial properties upon healing bone tissue. We hypothesized that a hydrophilic polymer gel implanted into a bone tissue defect would impede the healing process owing to the biomaterial's prevention of protein adsorption and thus cell adhesion.

  5. Preparation of biomaterials on the basis of a water-soluble cellulose acetate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akmalova, G. Yu.; Gulyamova, N. S.; Zainutdinov, U. N.; Rakhmanberdiev, G. R.; Negmatova, K. S.; Negmatova, M. I.

    2012-07-01

    Biomaterials were obtained on the basis of water-soluble cellulose acetate and diterpenoids group of plants Lagohulusa intoxicating having hemostatic properties. It is established that these biomaterials on the basis of water-soluble cellulose acetate and lagohilina (or lagohirzina) had increased hemostatic activity and reduce parenchymal hemorrhage 5-6 times compared to control.

  6. The foreign body reaction to a biodegradable biomaterial differs between rats and mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khouw, IMSL; van Wachem, PB; Molema, G; Plantinga, JA; de Leij, LFMH; van Luyn, MJA

    2000-01-01

    Before a biomaterial can be applied in the clinic, biocompatibility must be tested in in vivo models, by monitoring the foreign body reaction. In this study, we compared the foreign body reaction (EBR) to the biodegradable biomaterial hexamethylenediisocyanate crosslinked dermal sheep collagen (HDSC

  7. Tissue response to a new type of biomaterial implanted subcutaneously in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boennelycke, Marie; Christensen, Lise; Nielsen, Lene Feldskov;

    2011-01-01

    A new type of resorbable biomaterial intended for pelvic reconstruction was tested with respect to tissue regeneration and biocompatibility in rats. The biomaterial consisted of methoxypolyethyleneglycol-poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (MPEG-PLGA). Implants were pure, enriched with extra...

  8. HYPERTHERMIA, INTRACELLULAR FREE CALCIUM AND CALCIUM IONOPHORES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STEGE, GJJ; WIERENGA, PK; KAMPINGA, HH; KONINGS, AWT

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that heat-induced increase of intracellular calcium does not correlate with hyperthermic cell killing. Six different cell lines were investigated; in four (EAT, HeLa S3, L5178Y-R and L5178Y-S) heat treatments killing 90% of the cells did not affect the levels of intracellular free calciu

  9. In vitro evaluation of three different biomaterials as scaffolds for canine mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oduvaldo Câmara Marques Pereira-Junior

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate in vitro ability the of three different biomaterials - purified hydroxyapatite, demineralized bone matrix and castor oil-based polyurethane - as biocompatible 3D scaffolds for canine bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC intending bone tissue engineering. METHODS: MSCs were isolated from canine bone marrow, characterized and cultivated for seven days with the biomaterials. Cell proliferation and adhesion to the biomaterial surface were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy while differentiation into osteogenic lineage was evaluated by Alizarin Red staining and Sp7/Osterix surface antibody marker. RESULTS: The biomaterials allowed cellular growth, attachment and proliferation. Osteogenic differentiation occurred in the presence of hydroxyapatite, and matrix deposition commenced in the presence of the castor oil-based polyurethane. CONCLUSION: All the tested biomaterials may be used as mesenchymal stem cell scaffolds in cell-based orthopedic reconstructive therapy.

  10. Preparation and characterization of silk fibroin as a biomaterial with potential for drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Hao

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Degummed silk fibroin from Bombyx mori (silkworm has potential carrier capabilities for drug delivery in humans; however, the processing methods have yet to be comparatively analyzed to determine the differential effects on the silk protein properties, including crystalline structure and activity. Methods In this study, we treated degummed silk with four kinds of calcium-alcohol solutions, and performed secondary structure measurements and enzyme activity test to distinguish the differences between the regenerated fibroins and degummed silk fibroin. Results Gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that Ca(NO32-methanol, Ca(NO32-ethanol, or CaCl2-methanol treatments produced more lower molecular weights of silk fibroin than CaCl2-ethanol. X-ray diffraction and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy showed that CaCl2-ethanol produced a crystalline structure with more silk I (α-form, type II β-turn, while the other treatments produced more silk II (β-form, anti-parallel β-pleated sheet. Solid-State 13C cross polarization and magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance measurements suggested that regenerated fibroins from CaCl2-ethanol were nearly identical to degummed silk fibroin, while the other treatments produced fibroins with significantly different chemical shifts. Finally, enzyme activity test indicated that silk fibroins from CaCl2-ethanol had higher activity when linked to a known chemotherapeutic drug, L-asparaginase, than the fibroins from other treatments. Conclusions Collectively, these results suggest that the CaCl2-ethanol processing method produces silk fibroin with biomaterial properties that are appropriate for drug delivery.

  11. Osteoinduction by Ca-P biomaterials implanted into the muscles of mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui-na YANG; Feng YE; Li-jia CHENG; Jin-jing WANG; Xiao-feng LU; Yu-jun SHI; Hong-song FAN; Xing-dong ZHANG; Hong BU

    2011-01-01

    The osteoinduction of porous biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics (BCP) has been widely reported and documented,but little research has been performed on rodent animals,e.g.,mice.In this study,we report osteoinduction in a mouse model.Thirty mice were divided into two groups.BCP materials (Sample A) and control ceramics (Sample B) were implanted into the leg muscle,respectively.Five mice in each group were killed at 15,30,and 45 d after surgery.Sample A and Sample B were harvested and used for hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining,immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining,and Alizarin Red S staining to check bone formation in the biomaterials.Histological analysis showed that no bone tissue was formed 15 d after implantation (0/5) in either of the two groups.Newly-formed bone tissues were observed in Sample A at 30 d (5/5) and 45 d (5/5) after implantation; the average amounts of newly-formed bone tissues were approximately 5.2% and 8.6%,respectively.However,we did not see any bone tissue in Sample B until 45 d after implantation.Bone-related molecular makers such as bone morphogenesis protein-2 (BMP-2),collagen type Ⅰ,and osteopontin were detected by IHC staining in Sample A 30 d after implantation.In addition,the newly-formed bone was also confirmed by Alizarin Red S staining.Because this is the report of osteoinduction in the rodent animal on which all the biotechnologies were available,our results may contribute to further mechanism research.

  12. Macrophages, Foreign Body Giant Cells and Their Response to Implantable Biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeshan Sheikh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available All biomaterials, when implanted in vivo, elicit cellular and tissue responses. These responses include the inflammatory and wound healing responses, foreign body reactions, and fibrous encapsulation of the implanted materials. Macrophages are myeloid immune cells that are tactically situated throughout the tissues, where they ingest and degrade dead cells and foreign materials in addition to orchestrating inflammatory processes. Macrophages and their fused morphologic variants, the multinucleated giant cells, which include the foreign body giant cells (FBGCs are the dominant early responders to biomaterial implantation and remain at biomaterial-tissue interfaces for the lifetime of the device. An essential aspect of macrophage function in the body is to mediate degradation of bio-resorbable materials including bone through extracellular degradation and phagocytosis. Biomaterial surface properties play a crucial role in modulating the foreign body reaction in the first couple of weeks following implantation. The foreign body reaction may impact biocompatibility of implantation devices and may considerably impact short- and long-term success in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, necessitating a clear understanding of the foreign body reaction to different implantation materials. The focus of this review article is on the interactions of macrophages and foreign body giant cells with biomaterial surfaces, and the physical, chemical and morphological characteristics of biomaterial surfaces that play a role in regulating the foreign body response. Events in the foreign body response include protein adsorption, adhesion of monocytes/macrophages, fusion to form FBGCs, and the consequent modification of the biomaterial surface. The effect of physico-chemical cues on macrophages is not well known and there is a complex interplay between biomaterial properties and those that result from interactions with the local environment. By having a

  13. Soy Protein Scaffold Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Karen B.

    Developing functional biomaterials using highly processable materials with tailorable physical and bioactive properties is an ongoing challenge in tissue engineering. Soy protein is an abundant, natural resource with potential use for regenerative medicine applications. Preliminary studies show that soy protein can be physically modified and fabricated into various biocompatible constructs. However, optimized soy protein structures for tissue regeneration (i.e. 3D porous scaffolds) have not yet been designed. Furthermore, little work has established the in vivo biocompatibility of implanted soy protein and the benefit of using soy over other proteins including FDA-approved bovine collagen. In this work, freeze-drying and 3D printing fabrication processes were developed using commercially available soy protein to create porous scaffolds that improve cell growth and infiltration compared to other soy biomaterials previously reported. Characterization of scaffold structure, porosity, and mechanical/degradation properties was performed. In addition, the behavior of human mesenchymal stem cells seeded on various designed soy scaffolds was analyzed. Biological characterization of the cell-seeded scaffolds was performed to assess feasibility for use in liver tissue regeneration. The acute and humoral response of soy scaffolds implanted in an in vivo mouse subcutaneous model was also investigated. All fabricated soy scaffolds were modified using thermal, chemical, and enzymatic crosslinking to change properties and cell growth behavior. 3D printing allowed for control of scaffold pore size and geometry. Scaffold structure, porosity, and degradation rate significantly altered the in vivo response. Freeze-dried soy scaffolds had similar biocompatibility as freeze-dried collagen scaffolds of the same protein content. However, the soy scaffolds degraded at a much faster rate, minimizing immunogenicity. Interestingly, subcutaneously implanted soy scaffolds affected blood

  14. Antimicrobial Biomaterials based on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Seyma

    Biomaterials that inactivate bacteria are needed to eliminate medical device infections. We investigate the antimicrobial nature of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) incorporated within biomedical polymers. In the first part, we focus on SWNT dispersed in the common biomedical polymer poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) as a potential antimicrobial biomaterial. We find Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus epidermidis viability and metabolic activity to be significantly diminished in the presence of SWNT-PLGA, and to correlate with SWNT length and concentration. Up to 98 % of bacteria die within one hour of SWNT-PLGA versus 15-20% on pure PLGA. Shorter SWNT are found to be more toxic, possibly due to an increased density of open tube ends. In the second part, we investigate the antimicrobial activity of SWNT layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled with the polyelectrolytes poly(L-lysine) (PLL) and poly(L-glutamic acid) (PGA). The dispersibility of SWNT in aqueous solution is significantly improved via the biocompatible nonionic surfactant polyoxyethylene(20)sorbitan monolaurate (Tween 20) and the amphiphilic polymer phospholipid-poly(ethylene glycol) (PL-PEG). Absorbance spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) show SWNT with either Tween 20 or PL-PEG in aqueous solution to be well dispersed. Quartz crystal microgravimetry with dissipation (QCMD) measurements show both SWNT-Tween and SWNT-PL-PEG to LbL assemble with PLL and PGA into multilayer films, with the PL-PEG system yielding the greater final SWNT content. Bacterial inactivation rates are significantly higher (up to 90%) upon 24 hour incubation with SWNT containing films, compared to control films (ca. 20%). In the third part, we study the influence of bundling on the LbL assembly of SWNT with charged polymers, and on the antimicrobial properties of the assembled film. QCMD measurements show the bundled SWNT system to adsorb in an unusually strong fashion—to an extent three times greater than that

  15. Validation of the Osteopenia Sheep Model for Orthopaedic Biomaterial Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Danielsen, C.C.; Cheng, L.;

    2009-01-01

    patients do not have a normal bone quality that in many cases are due to osteoporosis (OP) even in osteoarthritic joints. Although a variety of ovariectomized (OVX) animals has been used to study osteoporosis, there is a great need for suitable large animal models with adequate bone size that closely...... for 7 months. The sheep were housed outdoors in paddocks, and received restricted diet with low calcium and phosphorus (0.55% calcium and 0.35% phosphorus) and hay. After sacrifice, cancellous bone specimens from the 5th lumbar vertebra, bilateral distal femur, and bilateral proximal tibia, and cortical...

  16. Bone Regeneration Using Bone Morphogenetic Proteins and Various Biomaterial Carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeshan Sheikh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Trauma and disease frequently result in fractures or critical sized bone defects and their management at times necessitates bone grafting. The process of bone healing or regeneration involves intricate network of molecules including bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs. BMPs belong to a larger superfamily of proteins and are very promising and intensively studied for in the enhancement of bone healing. More than 20 types of BMPs have been identified but only a subset of BMPs can induce de novo bone formation. Many research groups have shown that BMPs can induce differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells and stem cells into osteogenic cells which are capable of producing bone. This review introduces BMPs and discusses current advances in preclinical and clinical application of utilizing various biomaterial carriers for local delivery of BMPs to enhance bone regeneration.

  17. Gold nanoparticle-coated biomaterial as SERS micro-probes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G V Pavan Kumar

    2011-06-01

    We report for the first time, on the utility of plant-based biomaterial as enhanced-Raman scattering probes. The bio-substrate used in this study are commonly found in plant extracts, and are cost-effective, mechanically robust, flexible and easily transportable. The probe was fabricated by coating the plant extract with gold nanoparticles and characterized. By employing a ‘single-touch contact’ method, we reveal the ability of these probes to detect routinely used Raman markers such as 2-napthalenethiol and rhodamine B, at nano-molar concentrations, in dry and liquid forms, respectively. Reproducibility of the signals with variation <5%, and the ability to detect biomolecules are demonstrated herein. We envision these bio-probes as potential candidates for enhanced Raman sensing in chemical, environmental, and archaeological applications. By further engineering the shape, morphology, and surface chemistry of these micro-probes, we foresee their utility as miniaturized, natural SERS substrates.

  18. Polysaccharide-based biomaterials with antimicrobial and antioxidant properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Coma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Active packaging is one of the responses to the recent food-borne microbial outbreaks and to the consumer’s demand for high quality food and for packaging that is more advanced and creative than what is currently offered. Moreover, with the recent increase in ecological awareness associated with the dramatic decrease in fossil resources, research has turned towards the elaboration of more natural materials. This paper provides a short review of biomaterials exhibiting antimicrobial and antioxidant properties for applications in food preservation. The two main concepts of active biopackaging materials are briefly introduced. The different polysaccharides potentially used in packaging materials are then presented associated with a brief overview of research works related to biopackaging, exhibiting notably antimicrobial or antioxidant properties. Finally, future trends such as the release-on-demand of bioactive agents are discussed.

  19. Double site-bond percolation model for biomaterial implants

    CERN Document Server

    Mely, H

    2011-01-01

    We present a double site-bond percolation model to account, on the one hand, for the vascularization and/or resorption of biomaterial implant in bones and, on the other hand, for its mechanical continuity. The transformation of the implant into osseous material, and the dynamical formation/destruction of this osseous material is accounted for by creation and destruction of links and sites in two, entangled, networks. We identify the relevant parameters to describe the implant and its evolution, and separate their biological or chemical origin from their physical one. We classify the various phenomena in the two regimes, percolating or non-percolating, of the networks. We present first numerical results in two dimensions.

  20. Neural engineering from advanced biomaterials to 3D fabrication techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, David

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the principles of advanced 3D fabrication techniques, stem cells and biomaterials for neural engineering. Renowned contributors cover topics such as neural tissue regeneration, peripheral and central nervous system repair, brain-machine interfaces and in vitro nervous system modeling. Within these areas, focus remains on exciting and emerging technologies such as highly developed neuroprostheses and the communication channels between the brain and prostheses, enabling technologies that are beneficial for development of therapeutic interventions, advanced fabrication techniques such as 3D bioprinting, photolithography, microfluidics, and subtractive fabrication, and the engineering of implantable neural grafts. There is a strong focus on stem cells and 3D bioprinting technologies throughout the book, including working with embryonic, fetal, neonatal, and adult stem cells and a variety of sophisticated 3D bioprinting methods for neural engineering applications. There is also a strong focus on b...

  1. Soft X-ray emission studies of biomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurmaev, E.Z. E-mail: kurmaev@ifmlrs.uran.ru; Werner, J.P.; Moewes, A.; Chiuzbaian, S.; Bach, M.; Ching, W.-Y.; Motozaki, W.; Otsuka, T.; Matsuya, S.; Endo, K.; Neumann, M

    2004-07-01

    Soft X-ray fluorescence measurements are used to characterize three groups of biomaterials: Vitamin B{sub 12} and derivatives, antioxidants (aspirin and paracetamol), and human teeth. We show that the chemical bonding in Vitamin B{sub 12} is characterized by the strong Co-C bond and the relatively weak Co-N bond. The Co-C bond in cyanocobalamin is found to be stronger than that of methylcobalamin leading to their different biological activity. The chemical bonding of paracetamol and aspirin is characterized by the formation of oxygen lone-pair {pi}-orbitals, which can neutralize free radicals and therefore be related to antioxidant activity of these compounds. Carbon K{alpha} emission spectra of a caries lesion suggest that the CaCO{sub 3} like phase exists in sound enamel and that a selective loss of carbonate occurs during the early stages of a caries attack.

  2. Clinical study on orofacial photonic hydration using phototherapy and biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarelli, Rosane F. Z.; Grandi, Natália D. P.; Florez, Fernando L. E.; Grecco, Clovis; Lopes, Luciana A.

    2015-06-01

    Skin hydration is important to prevent aging and dysfunction of orofacial system. Nowadays, it is known that cutaneous system is linked to muscle system, then every dentist need to treat healthy facial skin, as lips, keeping orofacial functions healthy. Thirty-two patients were treated using laser and led therapy single or associated to biomaterials (dermo-cosmetics) searching for the best protocol to promote skin hydration. Using a peace of equipment to measure electric impedance, percentage of water and oil from skin, before and after different treatments were analyzed. Statistic tests using 5% and 0.1% of significance were applied and results showed that light could improve hydration of epidermis layer of facial skin. Considering just light effect, using infrared laser followed by blue led system is more effective to hydration than just blue led system application. Considering dermo-cosmetic and light, the association between both presented the best result.

  3. Biomaterials and Implants in Cardiac and Vascular Surgery - Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisławska A.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Currently, on prosthesis in cardiac blood vessels and heart valves are used materials of animal or synthetic origin. For animal materials include, among others pericardial sac in which is the heart. Materials such as this (natural are characterized by a remarkable biocompatibility within the human body, but their main disadvantage is the relatively low durability. In turn, synthetic materials, which include the austenitic chromium-nickel-molybdenum steels, alloys with a shape memory (nickel-titanium, or polymeric materials, such as lactic acid, are characterized by high stability in an environment of bodily fluids, wherein the insufficiently high biocompatibility with the organism human requires from patients using after implantation, anticoagulants which prevent anti-platelet deposition on the surface of the prosthesis. The present work is a review of biomaterials using in implantology and implants using in cardiac and vascular surgery.

  4. Patterning biomaterials for the spatiotemporal delivery of bioactive molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eMinardi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of tissue engineering is to promote the repair of functional tissues. For decades, the combined use of biomaterials, growth factors, and stem cells has been at the base of several regeneration strategies. Among these, biomimicry emerged as a robust strategy to efficiently address this clinical challenge. Biomimetic materials, able to recapitulate the composition and architecture of the extracellular matrix, are the materials of choice, for their biocompatibility and higher rate of efficacy. In addition, it has become increasingly clear that restoring the complex biochemical environment of the target tissue is crucial for its regeneration. Towards this aim, the combination of scaffolds and growth factors is required. The advent of nanotechnology significantly impacted the field of tissue engineering by providing new ways to reproduce the complex spatial and temporal biochemical patterns of tissues. This review will present the most recent approaches to finely control the spatiotemporal release of bioactive molecules for various tissue engineering applications.

  5. Patterning Biomaterials for the Spatiotemporal Delivery of Bioactive Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minardi, Silvia; Taraballi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Laura; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2016-01-01

    The aim of tissue engineering is to promote the repair of functional tissues. For decades, the combined use of biomaterials, growth factors (GFs), and stem cells has been the base of several regeneration strategies. Among these, biomimicry emerged as a robust strategy to efficiently address this clinical challenge. Biomimetic materials, able to recapitulate the composition and architecture of the extracellular matrix, are the materials of choice, for their biocompatibility and higher rate of efficacy. In addition, it has become increasingly clear that restoring the complex biochemical environment of the target tissue is crucial for its regeneration. Toward this aim, the combination of scaffolds and GFs is required. The advent of nanotechnology significantly impacted the field of tissue engineering by providing new ways to reproduce the complex spatial and temporal biochemical patterns of tissues. This review will present the most recent approaches to finely control the spatiotemporal release of bioactive molecules for various tissue engineering applications. PMID:27313997

  6. Fatigue behavior of porous biomaterials manufactured using selective laser melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavari, S Amin; Wauthle, R; van der Stok, J; Riemslag, A C; Janssen, M; Mulier, M; Kruth, J P; Schrooten, J; Weinans, H; Zadpoor, A A

    2013-12-01

    Porous titanium alloys are considered promising bone-mimicking biomaterials. Additive manufacturing techniques such as selective laser melting allow for manufacturing of porous titanium structures with a precise design of micro-architecture. The mechanical properties of selective laser melted porous titanium alloys with different designs of micro-architecture have been already studied and are shown to be in the range of mechanical properties of bone. However, the fatigue behavior of this biomaterial is not yet well understood. We studied the fatigue behavior of porous structures made of Ti6Al4V ELI powder using selective laser melting. Four different porous structures were manufactured with porosities between 68 and 84% and the fatigue S-N curves of these four porous structures were determined. The three-stage mechanism of fatigue failure of these porous structures is described and studied in detail. It was found that the absolute S-N curves of these four porous structures are very different. In general, given the same absolute stress level, the fatigue life is much shorter for more porous structures. However, the normalized fatigue S-N curves of these four structures were found to be very similar. A power law was fitted to all data points of the normalized S-N curves. It is shown that the measured data points conform to the fitted power law very well, R(2)=0.94. This power law may therefore help in estimating the fatigue life of porous structures for which no fatigue test data is available. It is also observed that the normalized endurance limit of all tested porous structures (<0.2) is lower than that of corresponding solid material (c.a. 0.4).

  7. Fiber from ramie plant (Boehmeria nivea): A novel suture biomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandimalla, Raghuram; Kalita, Sanjeeb; Choudhury, Bhaswati; Devi, Dipali; Kalita, Dhaneswar; Kalita, Kasturi; Dash, Suvakanta; Kotoky, Jibon

    2016-05-01

    The quest for developing an ideal suture material prompted our interest to develop a novel suture with advantageous characters to market available ones. From natural origin only silk, cotton and linen fibers are presently available in market as non-absorbable suture biomaterials. In this study, we have developed a novel, cost-effective, and biocompatible suture biomaterial from ramie plant, Boehmeria nivea fiber. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) results revealed the physicochemical properties of raw and degummed ramie fiber, where the former one showed desirable characteristics for suture preparation. The braided multifilament ramie suture prepared from degummed fiber exhibited excellent tensile strength. The suture found to be biocompatible towards human erythrocytes and nontoxic to mammalian cells. The fabricated ramie suture exhibited significant antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus; which can be attributed to the inherent bacteriostatic ability of ramie plant fiber. In vivo wound closure efficacy was evaluated in adult male wister rats by suturing the superficial wound incisions. Within seven days of surgery the wound got completely healed leaving no rash and scar. The role of the ramie suture in complete wound healing was supported by the reduced levels of serum inflammatory mediators. Histopathology studies confirmed the wound healing ability of ramie suture, as rapid synthesis of collagen, connective tissue and other skin adnexal structures were observed within seven days of surgery. Tensile properties, biocompatibility and wound closure efficacy of the ramie suture were comparable with market available BMSF suture. The outcome of this study can drive tremendous possibility for the utilization of ramie plant fiber for

  8. Gloss measurements and rugometric inspection in dental biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Oliveras, Alicia; Costa, Manuel F. M.; Yebra, Ana; Rubiño, Manuel; Pérez, María. M.

    2013-11-01

    In dental applications, optimizing appearance is desirable and increasingly demanded by patients. The specular gloss is among the major appearance properties of dental biomaterials, and its relationship with surface roughness has been reported. Roughness and gloss are key surface aspects that complement each other. We have experimentally analyzed the specular gloss and surface roughness of two different types of dental-resin composites and pre-sintered and sintered zirconia ceramics. We have studied two shades of both composite types and two sintered zirconia ceramics: colored and uncolored. Moreover, a surface treatment was applied to one specimen of each dental resin. Gloss measurements were performed with a standardized reflectometer and the corresponding gloss percentages were calculated. All the samples were submitted to rugometric non-invasive inspection with the MICROTOP.06.MFC laser microtopographer in order to determine meaningful statistical parameters such as the average roughness (Ra) and the root-mean-square deviation (Rq). For a comparison of the different biomaterials, the uncertainties associated to the measure of the surface gloss and roughness were also determined. The differences between the two shades of both kinds of composites proved significant in the case of the roughness parameters but not for the specular gloss. The surface treatment applied to the dental-resin composites increased the average roughness but the changes in the specular gloss were significant only for the A2 enamel nano-composite. For the zirconia ceramic the sintered process resulted in an increase in the surface roughness with a decrease of the specular gloss, corroborating that the relationship between the gloss and the roughness shows the expected behavior.

  9. In situ hydroxyapatite nanofiber growth on calcium borate silicate ceramics in SBF and its structural characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pu, Yinfu; Huang, Yanlin; Qi, Shuyun [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Chen, Cuili [Department of Physics and Interdisciplinary Program of Biomedical, Mechanical & Electrical Engineering, Pukyong National University, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Hyo Jin, E-mail: hjseo@pknu.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Interdisciplinary Program of Biomedical, Mechanical & Electrical Engineering, Pukyong National University, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-01

    A novel calcium silicate borate Ca{sub 11}Si{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 22} ceramic was firstly prepared by the conventional solid-state reaction. In vitro hydroxyapatite mineralization was investigated by soaking the ceramics in simulated body fluid (SBF) solutions at body temperature (37 °C) for various time periods. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) measurements were applied to investigate the samples before and after the immersion of ceramics in SBF solution. The elemental compositions of a hydroxyapatite layer on the ceramics during the mineralization were confirmed by X-ray energy-dispersive spectra (EDS). Meanwhile, the bending strength and elastic modulus of Ca{sub 11}Si{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 22} ceramics were also measured, which indicate that the biomaterials based on Ca{sub 11}Si{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 22} ceramics possess bioactivity and might be a potential candidate as biomaterials for hard tissue repair. The bioactive mineralization ability was evaluated on the base of its crystal structural characteristics, i.e., silanol (Si–OH) and B–OH groups can be easily induced on the surface of Ca{sub 11}Si{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 22} ceramics soaked in SBF solutions. - Highlights: • Calcium silicate borate Ca{sub 11}Si{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 22} ceramics were developed as a new biomaterial. • Ca{sub 11}Si{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 22} shows a superior in vitro bioactivity by inducing bone-like apatite. • Ca{sub 11}Si{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 22} has good mechanical properties as potential candidate biomaterials. • The structure with SiO{sub 4} and BO{sub 3} groups is favorable for hydroxyapatite formation.

  10. In situ hydroxyapatite nanofiber growth on calcium borate silicate ceramics in SBF and its structural characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel calcium silicate borate Ca11Si4B2O22 ceramic was firstly prepared by the conventional solid-state reaction. In vitro hydroxyapatite mineralization was investigated by soaking the ceramics in simulated body fluid (SBF) solutions at body temperature (37 °C) for various time periods. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) measurements were applied to investigate the samples before and after the immersion of ceramics in SBF solution. The elemental compositions of a hydroxyapatite layer on the ceramics during the mineralization were confirmed by X-ray energy-dispersive spectra (EDS). Meanwhile, the bending strength and elastic modulus of Ca11Si4B2O22 ceramics were also measured, which indicate that the biomaterials based on Ca11Si4B2O22 ceramics possess bioactivity and might be a potential candidate as biomaterials for hard tissue repair. The bioactive mineralization ability was evaluated on the base of its crystal structural characteristics, i.e., silanol (Si–OH) and B–OH groups can be easily induced on the surface of Ca11Si4B2O22 ceramics soaked in SBF solutions. - Highlights: • Calcium silicate borate Ca11Si4B2O22 ceramics were developed as a new biomaterial. • Ca11Si4B2O22 shows a superior in vitro bioactivity by inducing bone-like apatite. • Ca11Si4B2O22 has good mechanical properties as potential candidate biomaterials. • The structure with SiO4 and BO3 groups is favorable for hydroxyapatite formation

  11. VEGF incorporated into calcium phosphate ceramics promotes vascularisation and bone formation in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Wernike

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Bone formation and osseointegration of biomaterials are dependent on angiogenesis and vascularization. Angiogenic growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF were shown to promote biomaterial vascularization and enhance bone formation. However, high local concentrations of VEGF induce the formation of malformed, nonfunctional vessels. We hypothesized that a continuous delivery of low concentrations of VEGF from calcium phosphate ceramics may increase the efficacy of VEGF administration.VEGF was co-precipitated onto biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP ceramics to achieve a sustained release of the growth factor. The co-precipitation efficacy and the release kinetics of the protein were investigated in vitro. For in vivo investigations BCP ceramics were implanted into critical size cranial defects in Balb/c mice. Angiogenesis and microvascularization were investigated over 28 days by means of intravital microscopy. The formation of new bone was determined histomorphometrically. Co-precipitation reduced the burst release of VEGF. Furthermore, a sustained, cell-mediated release of low concentrations of VEGF from BCP ceramics was mediated by resorbing osteoclasts. In vivo, sustained delivery of VEGF achieved by protein co-precipitation promoted biomaterial vascularization, osseointegration, and bone formation. Short-term release of VEGF following superficial adsorption resulted in a temporally restricted promotion of angiogenesis and did not enhance bone formation. The release kinetics of VEGF appears to be an important factor in the promotion of biomaterial vascularization and bone formation. Sustained release of VEGF increased the efficacy of VEGF delivery demonstrating that a prolonged bioavailability of low concentrations of VEGF is beneficial for bone regeneration.

  12. Calcium binding by dietary fibre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietary fibre from plants low in phytate bound calcium in proportion to its uronic-acid content. This binding by the non-cellulosic fraction of fibre reduces the availability of calcium for small-intestinal absorption, but the colonic microbial digestion of uronic acids liberates the calcium. Thus the ability to maintain calcium balance on high-fibre diets may depend on the adaptive capacity on the colon for calcium. (author)

  13. Acidosis and Urinary Calcium Excretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, R Todd; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Chambrey, Régine;

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis is associated with increased urinary calcium excretion and related sequelae, including nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis. The increased urinary calcium excretion induced by metabolic acidosis predominantly results from increased mobilization of calcium out of bone...... and inhibition of calcium transport processes within the renal tubule. The mechanisms whereby acid alters the integrity and stability of bone have been examined extensively in the published literature. Here, after briefly reviewing this literature, we consider the effects of acid on calcium transport...

  14. [Calcium suppletion for patients who use gastric acid inhibitors: calcium citrate or calcium carbonate?].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, H.J. de; Gans, R.O.; Huls, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Various calcium supplements are available for patients who have an indication for calcium suppletion. American guidelines and UpToDate recommend prescribing calcium citrate to patients who use antacids The rationale for this advice is that water-insoluble calcium carbonate needs acid for adequate ab

  15. Calcium Deficient Hydroxyapatite for Medical Application Prepared by Hydrothermal Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioku, Koji; Kamitakahara, Masanobu; Ikeda, Tohru

    2010-11-01

    Hydrothermal processing plays a key role in the synthesis of biomaterials with excellent biocompatibility in the physiological environment. Especially, calcium phosphates are paid to much attention for the regenerative medicine. Two kinds of porous materials of hydroxyapatite with 70% porosity were prepared. One of them is a newly developed calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite composed of rod-shaped particles of about 20 μm in length synthesized hydrothermally (HHA) and the other one is the stoichiometric hydroxyapatite (SHA) prepared by the conventional sintering method. These materials were used for animal implantation tests to compare these biological responses. In the rabbit femur, implanted HHA was slowly resorbed and then most of the implanted HHA was resorbed after 72 weeks. The implanted SHA was unresorbed throughout the experimental period. The volume of newly formed bone and the number of osteoclasts in the implanted region were significantly larger in HHA than in SHA after 24 weeks. Results in the present research suggested that the activity of osteoclasts correlated to the bone forming activity of osteoblasts. The method to synthesize biodegradable pure calcium-deficient HA is expected to provide adequate biodegradability and bone replaceability.

  16. How smart do biomaterials need to be? A translational science and clinical point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzapfel, Boris Michael; Reichert, Johannes Christian; Schantz, Jan-Thorsten; Gbureck, Uwe; Rackwitz, Lars; Nöth, Ulrich; Jakob, Franz; Rudert, Maximilian; Groll, Jürgen; Hutmacher, Dietmar Werner

    2013-04-01

    Over the last 4 decades innovations in biomaterials and medical technology have had a sustainable impact on the development of biopolymers, titanium/stainless steel and ceramics utilized in medical devices and implants. This progress was primarily driven by issues of biocompatibility and demands for enhanced mechanical performance of permanent and non-permanent implants as well as medical devices and artificial organs. In the 21st century, the biomaterials community aims to develop advanced medical devices and implants, to establish techniques to meet these requirements, and to facilitate the treatment of older as well as younger patient cohorts. The major advances in the last 10 years from a cellular and molecular knowledge point of view provided the scientific foundation for the development of third-generation biomaterials. With the introduction of new concepts in molecular biology in the 2000s and specifically advances in genomics and proteomics, a differentiated understanding of biocompatibility slowly evolved. These cell biological discoveries significantly affected the way of biomaterials design and use. At the same time both clinical demands and patient expectations continued to grow. Therefore, the development of cutting-edge treatment strategies that alleviate or at least delay the need of implants could open up new vistas. This represents the main challenge for the biomaterials community in the 21st century. As a result, the present decade has seen the emergence of the fourth generation of biomaterials, the so-called smart or biomimetic materials. A key challenge in designing smart biomaterials is to capture the degree of complexity needed to mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) of natural tissue. We are still a long way from recreating the molecular architecture of the ECM one to one and the dynamic mechanisms by which information is revealed in the ECM proteins in response to challenges within the host environment. This special issue on smart

  17. Light scattering experiments on aqueous solutions of selected cellulose ethers: contribution to the study of polymer-mineral interactions in a new injectable biomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohic, S; Weiss, P; Roger, P; Daculsi, G

    2001-03-01

    Hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) is used as a ligand for a bioactive calcium phosphate ceramic (the filler) in a ready-to-use injectable sterilized biomaterial for bone and dental surgery. Light scattering experiments were usually used to study high water-soluble polymers and to determine the basic macromolecular parameters. In order to gain a deeper understanding of polymer/mineral interactions in this type of material, we have investigated the effect of divalent and trivalent ions (Ca(2+), PO(4)(3-)) and steam sterilization on dilute solutions of HPMC and hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC). The sterilization process may cause some degradation of HEC taking into account its high molecular weight and some rigidity of the polymer chain. Moreover, in the case of HPMC, the changes in the conformations rather than degradation process are supposed. These effects of degradation and flocculation are strengthened in alkaline medium. Experimental data suggested the formation of chelate complexes between Ca(2+) and HPMC which improve its affinity to the mineral blend and consolidate the injectable biomaterial even in the case of its hydration by biological fluid. PMID:15348303

  18. Light scattering experiments on aqueous solutions of selected cellulose ethers: contribution to the study of polymer-mineral interactions in a new injectable biomaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohic, Sylvain; Weiss, Pierre; Roger, Philippe; Daculsi, Guy

    2001-01-01

    Hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) is used as a ligand for a bioactive calcium phosphate ceramic (the filler) in a ready-to-use injectable sterilized biomaterial for bone and dental surgery. Light scattering experiments were usually used to study high water-soluble polymers and to determine the basic macromolecular parameters. In order to gain a deeper understanding of polymer/mineral interactions in this type of material, we have investigated the effect of divalent and trivalent ions (Ca2+, PO43−) and steam sterilization on dilute solutions of HPMC and HEC. The sterilization process may cause some degradation of HEC taking into account its high molecular weight and some rigidity of the polymer chain. Moreover, in the case of HPMC, the changes in the conformations rather than degradation process are supposed. These effects of degradation and flocculation are strengthened in alkaline medium. Experimental data suggested the formation of chelate complexes between Ca2+ and HPMC which improve its affinity to the mineral blend and consolidate the injectable biomaterial even in the case of its hydration by biological fluid. PMID:15348303

  19. Bioactivity of calcium phosphate bioceramic coating fabricated by laser cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yizhi; Liu, Qibin; Xu, Peng; Li, Long; Jiang, Haibing; Bai, Yang

    2016-05-01

    There were always strong expectations for suitable biomaterials used for bone regeneration. In this study, to improve the biocompatiblity of titanium alloy, calcium phosphate bioceramic coating was obtained by laser cladding technology. The microstructure, phases, bioactivity, cell differentiation, morphology and resorption lacunae were investigated by optical microscope (OM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining and scanning electronic microscope (SEM), respectively. The results show that bioceramic coating consists of three layers, which are a substrate, an alloyed layer and a ceramic layer. Bioactive phases of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and hydroxyapatite (HA) were found in ceramic coating. Osteoclast precursors have excellent proliferation on the bioceramic surface. The bioceramics coating could be digested by osteoclasts, which led to the resorption lacunae formed on its surface. It revealed that the gradient bioceramic coating has an excellent bioactivity.

  20. Recovery of phosphate from aqueous solution by magnesium oxide decorated magnetic biochar and its potential as phosphate-based fertilizer substitute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ronghua; Wang, Jim J; Zhou, Baoyue; Awasthi, Mukesh Kumar; Ali, Amjad; Zhang, Zengqiang; Lahori, Altaf Hussain; Mahar, Amanullah

    2016-09-01

    The present study deals with the preparation of a novel MgO-impregnated magnetic biochar (MMSB) for phosphate recovery from aqueous solution. The MMSB was evaluated against sugarcane harvest residue biochar (SB) and magnetic biochar without Mg (MSB). The results showed that increasing Mg content in MMSB greatly improved the phosphate adsorption compared to SB and MSB, with 20% Mg-impregnated MMSB (20MMSB) recovering more than 99.5% phosphate from aqueous solution. Phosphate adsorption capacity of 20MMSB was 121.25mgP/g at pH 4 and only 37.53% of recovered phosphate was desorbed by 0.01mol/L HCl solutions. XRD and FTIR analysis showed that phosphate sorption mechanisms involved predominately with surface electrostatic attraction and precipitation with impregnated MgO and surface inner-sphere complexation with Fe oxide. The 20MMSB exhibited both maximum phosphate sorption and strong magnetic separation ability. Overall, phosphate-loaded 20MMSB significantly enhanced plant growth and could be used as a potential substitute for phosphate-based fertilizer. PMID:26995322

  1. Biomimetic oligosaccharide and peptide surfactant polymers designed for cardiovascular biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruegsegger, Mark Andrew

    A common problem associated with cardiovascular devices is surface induced thrombosis initiated by the rapid, non-specific adsorption of plasma proteins onto the biomaterial surface. Control of the initial protein adsorption is crucial to achieve the desired longevity of the implanted biomaterial. The cell membrane glycocalyx acts as a non-thrombogenic interface through passive (dense oligosaccharide structures) and active (ligand/receptor interactions) mechanisms. This thesis is designed to investigate biomimicry of the cell glycocalyx to minimize non-specific protein adsorption and promote specific ligand/receptor interactions. Biomimetic macromolecules were designed through the molecular-scale engineering of polymer surfactants, utilizing a poly(vinyl amine) (PVAm) backbone to which hydrophilic (dextran, maltose, peptide) and hydrophobic alkyl (hexanoyl or hexanal) chains are simultaneously attached. The structure was controlled through the molar feed ratio of hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic groups, which also provided control of the solution and surface-active properties. To mimic passive properties, a series of oligomaltose surfactants were synthesized with increasing saccharide length (n = 2, 7, 15 where n is number of glucose units) to investigate the effect of coating height on protein adsorption. The surfactants were characterized by infra red (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies for structural properties and atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle goniometry for surface activity. Protein adsorption under dynamic flow (5 dyn/cm2) was reduced by 85%--95% over the bare hydrophobic substrate; platelet adhesion dropped by ˜80% compared to glass. Peptide ligands were incorporated into the oligosaccharide surfactant to promote functional activity of the passive coating. The surfactants were synthesized to contain 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% peptide ligand density and were stable on hydrophobic surfaces. The peptide surface density was

  2. The role of synthetic biomaterials in resorptive alveolar bone regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaličanin Biljana M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The alveolar bone tissue resorption defect has a significant role in dentistry. Because of the bone tissue deficit developed by alveolar resorption, the use of synthetic material CP/PLGA (calcium-phosphate/polylactide-co-gliycolide composite was introduced. Investigations were performed on rats with artificially produced resorption of the mandibular bone. The results show that the best effect on alveolar bone were attained by using nano-composite implants. The effect of the nanocomposite was ascertained by determining the calcium and phosphate content, as a basis of the hydroxyapatite structure. The results show that synthetic CP/PLGA nanocomposite alleviate the rehabilitation of weakened alveolar bone. Due to its osteoconductive effect, CP/PLGA can be the material of choice for bone substitution in the future.

  3. Bone grafting with granular biomaterial in segmental maxillary osteotomy: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orion Luiz Haas Junior

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: This is the first report of bone grafting with a granular biomaterial in segmental maxillary osteotomy. Successful formation of new bone with density greater than that of the surrounding tissue was achieved, preventing pseudarthrosis and postoperative instability.

  4. The Role of Biomaterials on Cancer Stem Cell Enrichment and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordikhani, Faride; Kim, Yonghyun; Zustiak, Silviya P.

    2015-11-01

    The theory of cancer stem cells (CSCs) and their role in cancer metastasis, tumorigenicity and resistance to therapy is slowly shifting the emphasis on the search for cancer cure: more evidence is surfacing that a successful therapy should be geared against this rare cancer cell population. Unfortunately, CSCs are difficult to culture in vitro which severely limits the progress of CSC research. This review gives a brief overview of CSCs and their microenvironment, with particular focus on studies that used in vitro biomaterial-based models and biomaterial/CSC interfaces for the enrichment of CSCs. Biomaterial properties relevant to CSC behaviors are also addressed. While the discussed research field is still in its infancy, it appears that in vitro cancer models that include a biomaterial can support CSC enrichment and this has proved indispensable to the study of their biology as well as the development of novel cancer therapies.

  5. The usage of three-dimensional nanostructurized biomaterials in experimental and clinical oncology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ The usage of biotransplants for substitution of tissue defects (in particular in reconstructive surgery in oncology) require both he suitable cell cultures and different biomaterials with definite and regulate properties.

  6. The usage of three-dimensional nanostructurized biomaterials in experimental and clinical oncology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sergeeva; N.; S.; Reshetov; I.; V.; Sviridova; I.; K.; Kirsanova; V.; A.; Achmedova; S.; A.; Barinov; S.; M.; Komlev; V.; S.; Samoylovich; M.; I.; Belyanin; A.; F.; Kleshcheva; S.; M.; Elinson; V.; M.

    2005-01-01

    The usage of biotransplants for substitution of tissue defects (in particular in reconstructive surgery in oncology) require both he suitable cell cultures and different biomaterials with definite and regulate properties.……

  7. Treatment and prevention of Staphylococcus epidermidis experimental biomaterial-associated infection by bactericidal peptide 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.H.S. Kwakman; A.A.T. Velde; C.M.J.E. Vandenbroucke-Grauls; S.J.H. van Deventer; S.A.J. Zaat

    2006-01-01

    Biomaterial-associated infections (BAI) are the major cause of failure of indwelling medical devices and are predominantly caused by staphylococci, especially Staphylococcus epidermidis. We investigated the in vitro microbicidal activity of the synthetic antimicrobial peptide bactericidal peptide 2

  8. Design, clinical translation and immunological response of biomaterials in regenerative medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadtler, Kaitlyn; Singh, Anirudha; Wolf, Matthew T.; Wang, Xiaokun; Pardoll, Drew M.; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.

    2016-07-01

    The field of regenerative medicine aims to replace tissues lost as a consequence of disease, trauma or congenital abnormalities. Biomaterials serve as scaffolds for regenerative medicine to deliver cells, provide biological signals and physical support, and mobilize endogenous cells to repair tissues. Sophisticated chemistries are used to synthesize materials that mimic and modulate native tissue microenvironments, to replace form and to elucidate structure-function relationships of cell-material interactions. The therapeutic relevance of these biomaterial properties can only be studied after clinical translation, whereby key parameters for efficacy can be defined and then used for future design. In this Review, we present the development and translation of biomaterials for two tissue engineering targets, cartilage and cornea, both of which lack the ability to self-repair. Finally, looking to the future, we discuss the role of the immune system in regeneration and the potential for biomaterial scaffolds to modulate immune signalling to create a pro-regenerative environment.

  9. Biomaterials for Pelvic Floor Reconstructive Surgery: How Can We Do Better?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Gigliobianco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress urinary incontinence (SUI and pelvic organ prolapse (POP are major health issues that detrimentally impact the quality of life of millions of women worldwide. Surgical repair is an effective and durable treatment for both conditions. Over the past two decades there has been a trend to enforce or reinforce repairs with synthetic and biological materials. The determinants of surgical outcome are many, encompassing the physical and mechanical properties of the material used, and individual immune responses, as well surgical and constitutional factors. Of the current biomaterials in use none represents an ideal. Biomaterials that induce limited inflammatory response followed by constructive remodelling appear to have more long term success than biomaterials that induce chronic inflammation, fibrosis and encapsulation. In this review we draw upon published animal and human studies to characterize the changes biomaterials undergo after implantation and the typical host responses, placing these in the context of clinical outcomes.

  10. Feasibility of bovine submaxillary mucin (BSM) films as biomimetic coating for polymeric biomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Seunghwan; Madsen, Jan Busk; Pakkanen, Kirsi I.

    2013-01-01

    Feasibility of bovine submaxillary mucin (BSM) films generated via spontaneous adsorption from aqueous solutions onto polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polystyrene (PS) surfaces have been investigated as biomimetic coatings for polymeric biomaterials. Two attributes as biomedical coatings, namely a...

  11. Design, clinical translation and immunological response of biomaterials in regenerative medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadtler, Kaitlyn; Singh, Anirudha; Wolf, Matthew T.; Wang, Xiaokun; Pardoll, Drew M.; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.

    2016-07-01

    The field of regenerative medicine aims to replace tissues lost as a consequence of disease, trauma or congenital abnormalities. Biomaterials serve as scaffolds for regenerative medicine to deliver cells, provide biological signals and physical support, and mobilize endogenous cells to repair tissues. Sophisticated chemistries are used to synthesize materials that mimic and modulate native tissue microenvironments, to replace form and to elucidate structure–function relationships of cell–material interactions. The therapeutic relevance of these biomaterial properties can only be studied after clinical translation, whereby key parameters for efficacy can be defined and then used for future design. In this Review, we present the development and translation of biomaterials for two tissue engineering targets, cartilage and cornea, both of which lack the ability to self-repair. Finally, looking to the future, we discuss the role of the immune system in regeneration and the potential for biomaterial scaffolds to modulate immune signalling to create a pro-regenerative environment.

  12. The influence of substrate topography and biomaterial substance on skin wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Ghanavati, Zeinab; Neisi, Niloofar; Bayati, Vahid; Makvandi, Manoochehr

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering is a new field of which the main purpose is to regenerate and repair the damaged tissues. Scaffolds serve as three dimensional matrices for neo-organogenesis and their substance can be biologic or synthetic. Natural polymers have good interactions with the cells and synthetic biomaterials are also highly useful in biomedical application because of their biocompatible properties. In addition to scaffold substance, surface properties of biomaterials have an important role in ...

  13. Structural and Cellular Characterization of Electrospun Recombinant Human Tropoelastin Biomaterials1

    OpenAIRE

    McKenna, Kathryn A.; Gregory, Kenton W.; Sarao, Rebecca C.; Maslen, Cheryl L.; Glanville, Robert W.; Hinds, Monica T.

    2011-01-01

    An off-the-shelf vascular graft biomaterial for vascular bypass surgeries is an unmet clinical need. The vascular biomaterial must support cell growth, be non-thrombogenic, minimize intimal hyperplasia, match the structural properties of native vessels, and allow for regeneration of arterial tissue. Electrospun recombinant human tropoelastin (rTE) as a medial component of a vascular graft scaffold was investigated in this study by evaluating its structural properties, as well as its ability t...

  14. Effect of Processing on Silk-Based Biomaterials: Reproducibility and Biocompatibility

    OpenAIRE

    Wray, Lindsay S.; Hu, Xiao; Gallego, Jabier; Georgakoudi, Irene; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.; Schmidt, Daniel; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Silk fibroin has been successfully used as a biomaterial for tissue regeneration. In order to prepare silk fibroin biomaterials for human implantation a series of processing steps are required to purify the protein. Degumming to remove inflammatory sericin is a crucial step related to biocompatibility and variability in the material. Detailed characterization of silk fibroin degumming is reported. The degumming conditions significantly affected cell viability on the silk fibroin material and ...

  15. Biomaterials as carrier, barrier and reactor for cell-based regenerative medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Chunxiao; Yan, Xiaojun; Huang, Chenyu; Melerzanov, Alexander; Du, Yanan

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapy has achieved tremendous success in regenerative medicine in the past several decades. However, challenges such as cell loss, death and immune-rejection after transplantation still persist. Biomaterials have been designed as carriers to deliver cells to desirable region for local tissue regeneration; as barriers to protect transplanted cells from host immune attack; or as reactors to stimulate host cell recruitment, homing and differentiation. With the assistance of biomaterials, ...

  16. Effects of sterilization treatments on bulk and surface properties of nanocomposite biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Maqsood; Punshon, Geoffrey; Darbyshire, Arnold; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2013-01-01

    With the continuous and expanding use of implantable biomaterials in a clinical setting, this study aims to elucidate the influence of sterilization techniques on the material surface and bulk properties of two polyurethane nanocomposite biomaterials. Both solid samples and porous membranes of nondegradable polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane poly(carbonate-urea) urethane (POSS-PCU) and a biodegradable poly(caprolactone-urea) urethane (POSS-PCL) were examined. Sterilization techniques includ...

  17. Bone defect animal models for testing efficacy of bone substitute biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Ye Li; Shu-Kui Chen; Long Li; Ling Qin; Xin-Luan Wang; Yu-Xiao Lai

    2015-01-01

    Large bone defects are serious complications that are most commonly caused by extensive trauma, tumour, infection, or congenital musculoskeletal disorders. If nonunion occurs, implantation for repairing bone defects with biomaterials developed as a defect filler, which can promote bone regeneration, is essential. In order to evaluate biomaterials to be developed as bone substitutes for bone defect repair, it is essential to establish clinically relevant in vitro and in vivo testing models for...

  18. Controlling fungal biofilms with functional drug delivery denture biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jianchuan; Jiang, Fuguang; Yeh, Chih-Ko; Sun, Yuyu

    2016-04-01

    Candida-associated denture stomatitis (CADS), caused by colonization and biofilm-formation of Candida species on denture surfaces, is a significant clinical concern. We show here that modification of conventional denture materials with functional groups can significantly increase drug binding capacity and control drug release rate of the resulting denture materials for potentially managing CADS. In our approach, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-based denture resins were surface grafted with three kinds of polymers, poly(1-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone) (PNVP), poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA), and poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA), through plasma-initiated grafting polymerization. With a grafting yield as low as 2 wt%, the three classes of new functionalized denture materials showed significantly higher drug binding capacities toward miconazole, a widely used antifungal drug, than the original PMMA denture resin control, leading to sustained drug release and potent biofilm-controlling effects against Candida. Among the three classes of functionalized denture materials, PNVP-grafted resin provided the highest miconazole binding capability and the most powerful antifungal and biofilm-controlling activities. Drug binding mechanisms were studied. These results demonstrated the importance of specific interactions between drug molecules and functional groups on biomaterials, shedding lights on future design of CADS-managing denture materials and other related devices for controlled drug delivery.

  19. Coaxial additive manufacture of biomaterial composite scaffolds for tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An inherent difficulty associated with the application of suitable bioscaffolds for tissue engineering is the incorporation of adequate mechanical characteristics into the materials which recapitulate that of the native tissue, whilst maintaining cell proliferation and nutrient transfer qualities. Biomaterial composites fabricated using rapid prototyping techniques can potentially improve the functionality and patient-specific processing of tissue engineering scaffolds. In this work, a technique for the coaxial melt extrusion printing of core-shell scaffold structures was designed, implemented and assessed with respect to the repeatability, cell efficacy and scaffold porosity obtainable. Encapsulated alginate hydrogel/thermoplastic polycaprolactone (Alg-PCL) cofibre scaffolds were fabricated. Selective laser melting was used to produce a high resolution stainless steel 316 L coaxial extrusion nozzle, exhibiting diameters of 300 μm/900 μm for the inner and outer nozzles respectively. We present coaxial melt extrusion printed scaffolds of Alg-PCL cofibres with ∼0.4 volume fraction alginate, with total fibre diameter as low as 600 μm and core material offset as low as 10% of the total diameter. Furthermore the tuneability of scaffold porosity, pore size and interconnectivity, as well as the preliminary inclusion, compatibility and survival of an L-929 mouse fibroblast cell-line within the scaffolds were explored. This preliminary cell work highlighted the need for optimal material selection and further design reiteration in future research. (paper)

  20. Stem cells in skin regeneration: biomaterials and computational models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele eTartarini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increased incidence of diabetes and tumors, associated with global demographic issues (aging and life styles, has pointed out the importance to develop new strategies for the effective management of skin wounds. Individuals affected by these diseases are in fact highly exposed to the risk of delayed healing of the injured tissue that typically leads to a pathological inflammatory state and consequently to chronic wounds. Therapies based on stem cells have been proposed for the treatment of these wounds, thanks to the ability of stem cells to self-renew and specifically differentiate in response to the target bimolecular environment. Here we discuss how advanced biomedical devices can be developed by combining stem cells with properly engineered biomaterials and computational models. Examples include composite skin substitutes and bioactive dressings with controlled porosity and surface topography for controlling the infiltration and differentiation of the cells. In this scenario, mathematical frameworks for the simulation of cell population growth can provide support for the design of bio-constructs, reducing the need of expensive, time-consuming and ethically controversial animal experimentation.

  1. Combustion synthesis and photoluminescence study of silicate biomaterials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V B Bhatkar; N V Bhatkar

    2011-10-01

    Silicate based bioceramics are promising candidates as biomaterials for tissue engineering. The combustion synthesis method provides control on the morphology and particle size of the synthesized material. This paper discusses the combustion synthesis of akermanite (Ca2MgSi2O7 and Sr2MgSi2O7), which has been shown to have good in vitro and in vivo bioactivities by earlier studies. Both Ca2MgSi2O7 and Sr2MgSi2O7 have akermanite structure. Ca2MgSi2O7 and Sr2MgSi2O7 were prepared using urea and ammonium nitrate. The combustion synthesis using urea and ammonium nitrate was found to be cost effective and efficient method of synthesis. The photoluminescence study of Ca2MgSi2O7 : Eu2+ and Sr2MgSi2O7 :Eu2+ shows host specific intense emission of Eu2+.

  2. A Novel Approach for Introducing Bio-Materials Into Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel approach was developed to introduce biological materials into cells for gene transfection and gene therapy applications. The method is based on the technique of electrospraying bio-materials into cells. A prototype apparatus was constructed for a feasibility study. The features of the gene transfector include: (1) A dual-capillary assembly to spray suspensions of biological materials. The outer capillary provided sheathing liquid that controlled the charge level on individual particles without altering the properties of suspensions. (2) An air-CO2 gas mixture was used for suppressing possible corona discharge and kept the same gas composition as those in incubators. (3) The designed chamber enabled the spray to operate at reduced pressure for increasing sprayed particle velocity. In the feasibility study, both suspensions of plasmid and plasmid-coated gold particles were used. The plasmid used was the commercially available Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein gene. COS-1 cells were used as the target and the liquid media was evacuated immediately prior to the spraying process. Electrospraying was conducted at ambient pressure and the duration was no more than 2 min. After the spray transfection, the media was immediately replaced and the cell samples were returned to the incubator for 36 h. Transgene expression was detected by cellular fluorescence. This technology promises to have great potential for gene transfection and therapy studies

  3. Review: photopolymerizable and degradable biomaterials for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifkovits, Jamie L; Burdick, Jason A

    2007-10-01

    Photopolymerizable and degradable biomaterials are finding widespread application in the field of tissue engineering for the engineering of tissues such as bone, cartilage, and liver. The spatial and temporal control afforded by photoinitiated polymerizations has allowed for the development of injectable materials that can deliver cells and growth factors, as well as for the fabrication of scaffolding with complex structures. The materials developed for these applications range from entirely synthetic polymers (e.g., poly(ethylene glycol)) to purely natural polymers (e.g., hyaluronic acid) that are modified with photoreactive groups, with degradation based on the hydrolytic or enzymatic degradation of bonds in the polymer backbone or crosslinks. The degradation behavior also ranges from purely bulk to entirely surface degrading, based on the nature of the backbone chemistry and type of degradable units. The mechanical properties of these polymers are primarily based on factors such as the network crosslinking density and polymer concentration. As we better understand biological features necessary to control cellular behavior, smarter materials are being developed that can incorporate and mimic many of these factors. PMID:17658993

  4. Adsorption of cadmium(II) on waste biomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baláž, M; Bujňáková, Z; Baláž, P; Zorkovská, A; Danková, Z; Briančin, J

    2015-09-15

    Significant increase of the adsorption ability of the eggshell biomaterial toward cadmium was observed upon milling, as is evidenced by the value of maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of 329mgg(-1), which is markedly higher than in the case of most "green" sorbents. The main driving force of the adsorption was proven to be the presence of aragonite phase as a consequence of phase transformation from calcite occurring during milling. Cadmium is adsorbed in a non-reversible way, as documented by different techniques (desorption tests, XRD and EDX measurements). The optimum pH for cadmium adsorption was 7. The adsorption process was accompanied by the increase of the value of specific surface area. The course of adsorption has been described by Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms. The adsorption kinetics was evaluated using three models, among which the best correlation coefficients and the best normalized standard deviation values were achieved for the pseudo-second order model and the intraparticle diffusion model, respectively.

  5. A Tubular Biomaterial Construct Exhibiting a Negative Poisson's Ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Woo; Soman, Pranav; Park, Jeong Hun; Chen, Shaochen; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Developing functional small-diameter vascular grafts is an important objective in tissue engineering research. In this study, we address the problem of compliance mismatch by designing and developing a 3D tubular construct that has a negative Poisson's ratio νxy (NPR). NPR constructs have the unique ability to expand transversely when pulled axially, thereby resulting in a highly-compliant tubular construct. In this work, we used projection stereolithography to 3D-print a planar NPR sheet composed of photosensitive poly(ethylene) glycol diacrylate biomaterial. We used a step-lithography exposure and a stitch process to scale up the projection printing process, and used the cut-missing rib unit design to develop a centimeter-scale NPR sheet, which was rolled up to form a tubular construct. The constructs had Poisson's ratios of -0.6 ≤ νxy ≤ -0.1. The NPR construct also supports higher cellular adhesion than does the construct that has positive νxy. Our NPR design offers a significant advance in the development of highly-compliant vascular grafts. PMID:27232181

  6. Binding Quantum Dots to Silk Biomaterials for Optical Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Disi Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dots (QDs, have great potential for fabricating optical sensing devices and imaging biomaterial degradation in vivo. In the present study, 2-mercaptoethylamine- (MEA- and mercaptopropionic acid- (MPA- capped CdTe-QDs were physically incorporated in silk films that contained a high content (>30% of crystalline beta-sheet structure. The beta-sheets were induced by the addition of glycerol, water annealing, glycerol/annealing, or treatment with methanol. Incorporation of QDs did not influence the formation of beta-sheets. When the films were extracted with water, most QDs remained associated with the silk, based on the retention of photoluminescence in the silk films and negligible photoluminescence in the extracts. Compared to the solution state, photoluminescence intensity significantly decreased for MEA-QDs but not for MPA-QDs in the silk films, while the emission maximum blue shifted (≈4 nm slightly for both. Further film digestion using protease XIV, alpha-chymotrypsin, and the combination of the two proteases suggested that QDs may be bound to the silk beta-sheet regions but not the amorphous regions. QDs photoluminescence in silk films was quenched when the concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 was above 0.2-0.3 mM, indicating the QDs-incorporated silk films can be used to report oxidation potential in solution.

  7. Investigation of Transport Properties of a New Biomaterials - GUM Mangosteen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Sourav S.; Sarkar, A.

    2006-06-01

    Biomaterial has occupied leading position in material science for various scientific and technological applications. This present work is carried out over a natural gum extracted from raw fruit of Mangosteen, an east Indian tree (Gercinia Mangostana) following extraction and purification process. Solid specimen of the said gum is developed following sol-gel like process. AC and DC electrical analysis on the dried solid specimen of the gum were carried out and showed high electrical conduction with σ ~ 1 E-03 S/cm, of which ionic and electronic contributions are 70% and 30% respectively. Analysis shows that origin of high electrical conductivity is due to presence of substantial amount of organic acid unit in its polysaccharide background. In fact the observed σ is about 1000 times of that observed in gum Arabica. Optical absorption of this new bio- materials are also studied using UV-VIS analysis. The results show its high absorption co-efficient in UV and blue part of analysed range. A complete electrical characterization of the material have been made. It has also been observed that the electronic conduction can be enhanced to 70% of the total electrical conductivity by forming complex with Iodine and organic (Citric) acid from Lemon fruit. This high potential material is being studied for development of electronic device application.

  8. Wear and/or corrosion study for biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lifetime extension of prosthetic device, dental materials and orthodontic devices is of major interest for medical international community. In the frame of an interdisciplinary national project, our institute has started to experiment some alternative procedures to evaluate wear/corrosion phenomena of biomaterials by using ion beam based techniques. In the case of metallic components from hip and knee prostheses and dental alloys we present the optimum nuclear reactions according with the main parameters of our U-120 Cyclotron (p, d, Emax = 13 MeV and α particle, Emax = 26 MeV). In the case of polymers, occurring in the joint parts of the prosthetic devices, direct activation causes severe changes in its surface morphology and its structure (formation of defects and free radicals). We have developed an indirect activation method using the principle of recoil ion implantation applied to 56 Co radioactive ions generated by proton particle beams on a Fe target (thickness ≅10μm). The radioactive ions are implanted into the near surface (a few hundred of nanometers). Wear/corrosion rate of the component is observed using tribological testers via the variation of the activity caused by the loss of material. In order to obtain supplementary data concerning radiation influence on polyethylene (PE) samples doses up to 100 kGy were used. Irradiation gamma facility was of an industrial type (SVST-IRASM) authorized for radiation sterilization. (authors)

  9. Atmospheric Microplasma Application for Surface Modification of Biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kazuo; Fukunaga, Hodaka; Tatematsu, Shigeki; Blajan, Marius

    2012-11-01

    Atmospheric microplasma has been intensively studied for applications in various fields, since in this technology the generated field is only 1 kV (approx) under atmospheric pressure and a dielectric barrier discharge gap of 10 to 100 µm. A low discharge voltage atmospheric plasma process is an economical and effective solution for various applications such as indoor air control including sterilization, odor removal, and surface treatment, and would be suitable for medical applications in the field of plasma life sciences. In this paper, we present the application of microplasma for the surface treatment of materials used in medical fields. Moreover, a biomaterial composed of L-lactic acid is used in experiments, which can be biodecomposed in the human body after medical operations. The surface modification process was carried out with active species generated between the microplasma electrodes, which were observed by emission spectrometry. Microplasma treatment of a polymer sheet using Ar as the process gas decreased the contact angle of a water droplet at the surface of the polymer from 78.3 to 45.6° in 10 s, indicating improved surface adhesive characteristics.

  10. Coaxial additive manufacture of biomaterial composite scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornock, R; Beirne, S; Thompson, B; Wallace, G G

    2014-06-01

    An inherent difficulty associated with the application of suitable bioscaffolds for tissue engineering is the incorporation of adequate mechanical characteristics into the materials which recapitulate that of the native tissue, whilst maintaining cell proliferation and nutrient transfer qualities. Biomaterial composites fabricated using rapid prototyping techniques can potentially improve the functionality and patient-specific processing of tissue engineering scaffolds. In this work, a technique for the coaxial melt extrusion printing of core-shell scaffold structures was designed, implemented and assessed with respect to the repeatability, cell efficacy and scaffold porosity obtainable. Encapsulated alginate hydrogel/thermoplastic polycaprolactone (Alg-PCL) cofibre scaffolds were fabricated. Selective laser melting was used to produce a high resolution stainless steel 316 L coaxial extrusion nozzle, exhibiting diameters of 300 μm/900 μm for the inner and outer nozzles respectively. We present coaxial melt extrusion printed scaffolds of Alg-PCL cofibres with ~0.4 volume fraction alginate, with total fibre diameter as low as 600 μm and core material offset as low as 10% of the total diameter. Furthermore the tuneability of scaffold porosity, pore size and interconnectivity, as well as the preliminary inclusion, compatibility and survival of an L-929 mouse fibroblast cell-line within the scaffolds were explored. This preliminary cell work highlighted the need for optimal material selection and further design reiteration in future research. PMID:24658021

  11. A Tubular Biomaterial Construct Exhibiting a Negative Poisson's Ratio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Woo Lee

    Full Text Available Developing functional small-diameter vascular grafts is an important objective in tissue engineering research. In this study, we address the problem of compliance mismatch by designing and developing a 3D tubular construct that has a negative Poisson's ratio νxy (NPR. NPR constructs have the unique ability to expand transversely when pulled axially, thereby resulting in a highly-compliant tubular construct. In this work, we used projection stereolithography to 3D-print a planar NPR sheet composed of photosensitive poly(ethylene glycol diacrylate biomaterial. We used a step-lithography exposure and a stitch process to scale up the projection printing process, and used the cut-missing rib unit design to develop a centimeter-scale NPR sheet, which was rolled up to form a tubular construct. The constructs had Poisson's ratios of -0.6 ≤ νxy ≤ -0.1. The NPR construct also supports higher cellular adhesion than does the construct that has positive νxy. Our NPR design offers a significant advance in the development of highly-compliant vascular grafts.

  12. Esthetic prevention with soft tissue and biomaterial grafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Margonar

    Full Text Available Gingival recessions are periodontal defects that may need the association of surgical techniques in order to be successfully treated. The absence of treatment of these defects may lead to local esthetics being compromised, patient dissatisfaction, and reduced time and duration of treatment. When dealing with dental implants, the esthetic condition is no different, with the aggravating factor that the lack of this protective tissue may accelerate vestibular bone loss and lead to loss of the implant. The clinical case presented report the performance of a conjunctive tissue grafting technique, associated with vestibular filling with biomaterial, to prevent a gingival recession in an immediate implant with immediate loading. The aim of the procedure was to prevent gingival recession, which would lead to a severe esthetic defect, and also to reinforce the vestibular bone wall. After three years of follow-up of the case, it was possible to conclude that the association of thetechniques had predictable and satisfactory results for preventing periimplant gingival recession.

  13. Opportunities and challenges for the development of polymer-based biomaterials and medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jinghua; Luan, Shifang

    2016-06-01

    Biomaterials and medical devices are broadly used in the diagnosis, treatment, repair, replacement or enhancing functions of human tissues or organs. Although the living conditions of human beings have been steadily improved in most parts of the world, the incidence of major human's diseases is still rapidly growing mainly because of the growth and aging of population. The compound annual growth rate of biomaterials and medical devices is projected to maintain around 10% in the next 10 years; and the global market sale of biomaterials and medical devices is estimated to reach $400 billion in 2020. In particular, the annual consumption of polymeric biomaterials is tremendous, more than 8000 kilotons. The compound annual growth rate of polymeric biomaterials and medical devices will be up to 15-30%. As a result, it is critical to address some widespread concerns that are associated with the biosafety of the polymer-based biomaterials and medical devices. Our group has been actively worked in this direction for the past two decades. In this review, some key research results will be highlighted.

  14. Opportunities and challenges for the development of polymer-based biomaterials and medical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jinghua

    2016-01-01

    Biomaterials and medical devices are broadly used in the diagnosis, treatment, repair, replacement or enhancing functions of human tissues or organs. Although the living conditions of human beings have been steadily improved in most parts of the world, the incidence of major human’s diseases is still rapidly growing mainly because of the growth and aging of population. The compound annual growth rate of biomaterials and medical devices is projected to maintain around 10% in the next 10 years; and the global market sale of biomaterials and medical devices is estimated to reach $400 billion in 2020. In particular, the annual consumption of polymeric biomaterials is tremendous, more than 8000 kilotons. The compound annual growth rate of polymeric biomaterials and medical devices will be up to 15–30%. As a result, it is critical to address some widespread concerns that are associated with the biosafety of the polymer-based biomaterials and medical devices. Our group has been actively worked in this direction for the past two decades. In this review, some key research results will be highlighted. PMID:27047681

  15. Biomaterials with Antibacterial and Osteoinductive Properties to Repair Infected Bone Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiping Lu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The repair of infected bone defects is still challenging in the fields of orthopedics, oral implantology and maxillofacial surgery. In these cases, the self-healing capacity of bone tissue can be significantly compromised by the large size of bone defects and the potential/active bacterial activity. Infected bone defects are conventionally treated by a systemic/local administration of antibiotics to control infection and a subsequent implantation of bone grafts, such as autografts and allografts. However, these treatment options are time-consuming and usually yield less optimal efficacy. To approach these problems, novel biomaterials with both antibacterial and osteoinductive properties have been developed. The antibacterial property can be conferred by antibiotics and other novel antibacterial biomaterials, such as silver nanoparticles. Bone morphogenetic proteins are used to functionalize the biomaterials with a potent osteoinductive property. By manipulating the carrying modes and release kinetics, these biomaterials are optimized to maximize their antibacterial and osteoinductive functions with minimized cytotoxicity. The findings, in the past decade, have shown a very promising application potential of the novel biomaterials with the dual functions in treating infected bone defects. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of novel biomaterials with both antibacterial and osteoinductive properties.

  16. CALCIUM-INDUCED SUPRAMOLECULAR STRUCTURES IN THE CALCIUM CASEINATE SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The molecular details deciphering the spontaneous calcium-induced protein aggregation process in the calcium caseinate system remain obscure. Understanding this complex process could lead to potential new applications of this important food ingredient. In this work, we studied calcium-induced supra...

  17. A sensor for calcium uptake

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Sean; Meyer, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria — the cell’s power plants — increase their energy production in response to calcium signals in the cytoplasm. A regulator of the elusive mitochondrial calcium channel has now been identified.

  18. Children's Bone Health and Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Trials Resources and Publications Children's Bone Health and Calcium: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links ... straight, walk, run, and lead an active life. Calcium is one of the key dietary building blocks ...

  19. Calcium ion channel and epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yudan Lü; Weihong Lin; Dihui Ma

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between calcium ion channel and epilepsy for well investigating the pathogenesis of epilepsy and probing into the new therapeutic pathway of epilepsy.DATA SOURCES: A computer-based online research Calcium ion channel and epilepsy related articles published between January 1994 and December 2006 in the CKNI and Wanfang database with the key words of "calcium influxion, epilepsy, calcium-channel blocker". The language was limited to Chinese. At the same time,related articles published between January 1993 and December 2006 in Pubmed were searched for on online with the key words of "calcium influxion, epilepsy" in English.STUDY SELECTION: The materials were selected firstly. Inclusive criteria: ① Studies related to calcium ion channel and the pat1hogenesis of epilepsy. ② Studies on the application of calcium ion channel blocker in the treatment of epilepsy. Exclusive criteria: repetitive or irrelated studies.DATA EXTRACTION: According to the criteria, 123 articles were retrieved and 93 were excluded due to repetitive or irrelated studies. Altogether 30 articles met the inclusive criteria, 11 of them were about the structure and characters of calcium ion channel, 10 about calcium ion channel and the pathogenesis of epilepsy and 9 about calcium blocker and the treatment of epilepsy.DATA SYNTHESIS: Calcium ion channels mainly consist of voltage dependent calcium channel and receptor operated calcium channel. Depolarization caused by voltage gating channel-induced influxion is the pathological basis of epileptic attack, and it is found in many studies that many anti-epileptic drugs have potential and direct effect to rivalizing voltage-dependent calcium ion channel.CONCLUSION: Calcium influxion plays an important role in the seizure of epilepsy. Some calcium antagonists seen commonly are being tried in the clinical therapy of epilepsy that is being explored, not applied in clinical practice. If there are enough evidences to

  20. Solar Imagery - Chromosphere - Calcium

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of full-disk images of the sun in Calcium (Ca) II K wavelength (393.4 nm). Ca II K imagery reveal magnetic structures of the sun from about...

  1. Calcium aluminate in alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altay, Arzu

    The properties of ceramic materials are determined not only by the composition and structure of the phases present, but also by the distribution of impurities, intergranular films and second phases. The phase distribution and microstructure both depend on the fabrication techniques, the raw materials used, the phase-equilibrium relations, grain growth and sintering processes. In this dissertation research, various approaches have been employed to understand fundamental phenomena such as grain growth, impurity segregation, second-phase formation and crystallization. The materials system chosen was alumina intentionally doped with calcium. Atomic-scale structural analyses of grain boundaries in alumina were carried on the processed samples. It was found that above certain calcium concentrations, CA6 precipitated as a second phase at all sintering temperatures. The results also showed that abnormal grain growth can occur after precipitation and it is not only related to the calcium level, but it is also temperature dependent. In order to understand the formation mechanism of CA6 precipitates in calcium doped alumina samples, several studies have been carried out using either bulk materials or thin films The crystallization of CA2 and CA6 powders has been studied. Chemical processing techniques were used to synthesize the powders. It was observed that CA2 powders crystallized directly, however CA6 powders crystallized through gamma-Al 2O3 solid solution. The results of energy-loss near-edge spectrometry confirmed that gamma-Al2O3 can dissolve calcium. Calcium aluminate/alumina reaction couples have also been investigated. All reaction couples were heat treated following deposition. It was found that gamma-Al2O3 was formed at the interface as a result of the interfacial reaction between the film and the substrate. gamma-Al 2O3 at the interface was stable at much higher temperatures compared to the bulk gamma-Al2O3 formed prior to the CA6 crystallization. In order to

  2. Resorbable glass-ceramic phosphate-based scaffolds for bone tissue engineering: synthesis, properties, and in vitro effects on human marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara; Ciapetti, Gabriela; Leonardi, Elisa; Baldini, Nicola; Bretcanu, Oana; Verné, Enrica; Baino, Francesco

    2011-11-01

    Highly porous bioresorbable glass-ceramic scaffolds were prepared via sponge replication method by using an open-cell polyurethane foam as a template and phosphate-based glass powders. The glass, belonging to the P2O5-SiO2-CaO-MgO-Na2O-K2O system, was synthesized by a melting-quenching route, ground, and sieved to obtain powders with a grain size of less than 30 μm. A slurry containing glass powders, polyvinyl alcohol, and water was prepared to coat the polymeric template. The removal of the polymer and the sintering of the glass powders were performed by a thermal treatment, in order to obtain an inorganic replica of the template structure. The structure and properties of the scaffold were investigated from structural, morphological, and mechanical viewpoints by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, density measurements, image analysis, and compressive tests. The scaffolds exhibited a trabecular architecture that closely mimics the structure of a natural spongy bone. The solubility of the porous structures was assessed by soaking the samples in acellular simulated body fluid (SBF) and Tris-HCl for different time frames and then by assessing the scaffold weight loss. As far as the test in SBF is concerned, the nucleation of hydroxyapatite on the scaffold trabeculae demonstrates the bioactivity of the material. Biological tests were carried out using human bone marrow stromal cells to test the osteoconductivity of the material. The cells adhered to the scaffold struts and were metabolically active; it was found that cell differentiation over proliferation occurred. Therefore, the produced scaffolds, being biocompatible, bioactive, resorbable, and structurally similar to a spongy bone, can be proposed as interesting candidates for bone grafting.

  3. Resorbable glass-ceramic phosphate-based scaffolds for bone tissue engineering: synthesis, properties, and in vitro effects on human marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara; Ciapetti, Gabriela; Leonardi, Elisa; Baldini, Nicola; Bretcanu, Oana; Verné, Enrica; Baino, Francesco

    2011-11-01

    Highly porous bioresorbable glass-ceramic scaffolds were prepared via sponge replication method by using an open-cell polyurethane foam as a template and phosphate-based glass powders. The glass, belonging to the P2O5-SiO2-CaO-MgO-Na2O-K2O system, was synthesized by a melting-quenching route, ground, and sieved to obtain powders with a grain size of less than 30 μm. A slurry containing glass powders, polyvinyl alcohol, and water was prepared to coat the polymeric template. The removal of the polymer and the sintering of the glass powders were performed by a thermal treatment, in order to obtain an inorganic replica of the template structure. The structure and properties of the scaffold were investigated from structural, morphological, and mechanical viewpoints by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, density measurements, image analysis, and compressive tests. The scaffolds exhibited a trabecular architecture that closely mimics the structure of a natural spongy bone. The solubility of the porous structures was assessed by soaking the samples in acellular simulated body fluid (SBF) and Tris-HCl for different time frames and then by assessing the scaffold weight loss. As far as the test in SBF is concerned, the nucleation of hydroxyapatite on the scaffold trabeculae demonstrates the bioactivity of the material. Biological tests were carried out using human bone marrow stromal cells to test the osteoconductivity of the material. The cells adhered to the scaffold struts and were metabolically active; it was found that cell differentiation over proliferation occurred. Therefore, the produced scaffolds, being biocompatible, bioactive, resorbable, and structurally similar to a spongy bone, can be proposed as interesting candidates for bone grafting. PMID:20566654

  4. Biomaterials for the Decorporation of Sr-85 in the Rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Curry, Terry L.; Luders, Teresa; Morris, James E.; Peterson, James M.; Thrall, Karla D.

    2010-09-01

    Although four stable isotopes of strontium occur naturally, strontium-90 is produced by nuclear fission and is present in surface soil around the world as a result of fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons tests. It can easily transfer to man in the event of a nuclear/radiological emergency or through the plant-animal-human food chain causing long-term exposures. Strontium is chemically and biologically similar to calcium, and is incorporated primarily into bone following internal deposition. Alginic acid (alginate) obtained from seaweed (kelp) extract selectively binds ingested strontium in the GI tract blocking its systemic uptake and reducing distribution to bone in rats, while other natural polysaccharides including chitosan and hyaluronic acid had little in vivo affinity for strontium. Alginate exhibits the unique ability to discriminate between strontium and calcium and has been previously shown to reduce intestinal absorption and skeletal retention of strontium without changing calcium metabolism. In our studies, the effect of commercially available alginate on strontium intestinal absorption was examined. One problem associated with alginate treatment is its limited solubility and gel formation in water. The aqueous solubility of sodium alginate was improved in a sodium chloride/sodium bicarbonate electrolyte solution containing low molecular weight polyethylene glycol (PEG). Furthermore, oral administration of the combined alginate/electrolyte//PEG solution synergistically accelerated removal of internal strontium in rats when compared to treatment with individual sodium alginate/electrolyte or electrolyte/PEG solutions. Importantly, both alginate and PEG are nontoxic, readily available materials that can be easily administered orally in case of a national emergency when potentially large numbers of the population may require medical treatment for internal depositions. Our results suggest further studies to optimize in vivo decorporation performance of

  5. Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion on hydrophobic and hydrophilic textured biomaterial surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li-Chong; Siedlecki, Christopher A

    2014-06-01

    It is of great interest to use nano- or micro-structured surfaces to inhibit microbial adhesion and biofilm formation and thereby to prevent biomaterial-associated infection, without modification of the surface chemistry or bulk properties of the materials and without use of the drugs. Our previous study showed that a submicron textured polyurethane surface can inhibit staphylococcal bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. To further understand the effect of the geometry of textures on bacterial adhesion as well as the underlying mechanism, in this study, submicron and micron textured polyurethane surfaces featuring ordered arrays of pillars were fabricated and modified to have different wettabilities. All the textured surfaces were originally hydrophobic and showed significant reductions in Staphylococcus epidermidis RP62A adhesion in phosphate buffered saline or 25% platelet poor plasma solutions under shear, as compared to smooth surfaces. After being subjected to an air glow discharge plasma treatment, all polyurethane surfaces were modified to hydrophilic, and reductions in bacterial adhesion on surfaces were subsequently found to be dependent on the size of the patterns. The submicron patterned surfaces reduced bacterial adhesion, while the micron patterned surfaces led to increased bacterial adhesion. The extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from the S. epidermidis cell surfaces were extracted and purified, and were coated on a glass colloidal surface so that the adhesion force and separation energy in interactions of the EPS and the surface could be measured by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy. These results were consistent with the bacterial adhesion observations. Overall, the data suggest that the increased surface hydrophobicity and the decreased availability of the contact area contributes to a reduction in bacterial adhesion to the hydrophobic textured surfaces, while the availability of the contact area is the primary determinant factor

  6. Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion on hydrophobic and hydrophilic textured biomaterial surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is of great interest to use nano- or micro-structured surfaces to inhibit microbial adhesion and biofilm formation and thereby to prevent biomaterial-associated infection, without modification of the surface chemistry or bulk properties of the materials and without use of the drugs. Our previous study showed that a submicron textured polyurethane surface can inhibit staphylococcal bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. To further understand the effect of the geometry of textures on bacterial adhesion as well as the underlying mechanism, in this study, submicron and micron textured polyurethane surfaces featuring ordered arrays of pillars were fabricated and modified to have different wettabilities. All the textured surfaces were originally hydrophobic and showed significant reductions in Staphylococcus epidermidis RP62A adhesion in phosphate buffered saline or 25% platelet poor plasma solutions under shear, as compared to smooth surfaces. After being subjected to an air glow discharge plasma treatment, all polyurethane surfaces were modified to hydrophilic, and reductions in bacterial adhesion on surfaces were subsequently found to be dependent on the size of the patterns. The submicron patterned surfaces reduced bacterial adhesion, while the micron patterned surfaces led to increased bacterial adhesion. The extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from the S. epidermidis cell surfaces were extracted and purified, and were coated on a glass colloidal surface so that the adhesion force and separation energy in interactions of the EPS and the surface could be measured by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy. These results were consistent with the bacterial adhesion observations. Overall, the data suggest that the increased surface hydrophobicity and the decreased availability of the contact area contributes to a reduction in bacterial adhesion to the hydrophobic textured surfaces, while the availability of the contact area is the primary determinant factor

  7. Biological and mechanical implications of PEGylating proteins into hydrogel biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonen-Wadmany, Maya; Goldshmid, Revital; Seliktar, Dror

    2011-09-01

    Protein PEGylation has been successfully applied in pharmaceuticals and more recently in biomaterials development for making bioactive and structurally versatile hydrogels. Despite many advantages in this regard, PEGylation of proteins is also known to alter biological activity and modify biophysical characteristics in ways that may be detrimental to cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relative loss of biological compatibility associated with PEGylating a fibrinogen precursor into a hydrogel scaffold, in comparison to thrombin cross-linked fibrin hydrogels. Specifically, we investigated the consequences of conjugating fibrinogen with linear polyethtylene glycol (PEG) polymer chains (10 kDa) on the ability to cultivate neonatal human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) in 3-D. For this purpose, thrombin cross-linked fibrin (TCL-Fib) and PEGylated fibrinogen (PEG-Fib) gels were prepared with HFFs and cultured for up to seven days. The benchmark biological compatibility test was based on a combined assessment of cellular morphology, proliferation, actin expression, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression in the 3-D culture systems. The results showed correlations between modulus and proteolytic biodegradation in both materials, but no correlation between the mechanical properties and the ability of HFFs to remodel the microenvironment. A slight reduction of actin, MMPs, and spindled morphology of the cells in the PEG-Fib hydrogels indicated that the PEGylation process altered the biological compatibility of the fibrin. Nevertheless, the overall benchmark performance of the two materials demonstrated that PEGylated fibrinogen hydrogels still retains much to the inherent biofunctionality of the fibrin precursor when used as a scaffold for 3-D cell cultivation. PMID:21669457

  8. Nano-thick calcium oxide armed titanium: boosts bone cells against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huiliang; Qin, Hui; Zhao, Yaochao; Jin, Guodong; Lu, Tao; Meng, Fanhao; Zhang, Xianlong; Liu, Xuanyong

    2016-02-01

    Since the use of systemic antibiotics for preventing acute biomaterial-associated infections (BAIs) may build up bacterial resistance and result in huge medical costs and unpredictable mortality, new precaution strategies are required. Here, it demonstrated that titanium armed with a nano-thick calcium oxide layer was effective on averting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections in rabbits. The calcium oxide layer was constructed by, firstly, injecting of metallic calcium into titanium via a plasma immersion ion implantation process, and then transforming the outer most surface into oxide by exposing to the atmosphere. Although the calcium oxide armed titanium had a relative low reduction rate (~74%) in growth of MRSA in vitro, it could markedly promote the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs), restore local bone integration against the challenge of MRSA, and decrease the incidence of MRSA infection with a rate of 100% (compared to the titanium control). This study demonstrated for the first time that calcium, as one of the major elements in a human body, could be engineered to avert MRSA infections, which is promising as a safe precaution of disinfection for implantable biomedical devices.

  9. Assessment of angiogenic properties of biomaterials using the chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The angiogenic potential of a biomaterial is a critical factor for successful graft intake in tissue engineering. We developed a modified, rapid and reproducible chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay to evaluate the ability of biomaterials in inducing blood vessel density. Five biomaterials including one-layer porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS), two-layer SIS, four-layer vacuum pressed (VP) SIS, polyglycolic acid (PGA) and PGA modified with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) were analyzed. A circular section (1.2 mm diameter) of each biomaterial was placed near a group of blood vessels in the CAM. Blood vessels around the biomaterials were captured with black and white images at 96 h post implantation; and the images were subjected to densitometry evaluation. One-layer SIS induced a significant increase in blood vessel density as compared to the cellulose nitrate negative control, and had the greatest increase in blood vessel density as compared to four-layer VP SIS, PGA, or PLGA modified PGA. Although two-layer SIS has enhanced physical structure for surgical manipulation, its induction in blood vessel density was significantly lower than the one-layer SIS. Stripping the SIS proteins or incubating one-layer SIS with neutralizing antibodies against basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) resulted in decreased angiogenesis. Consistent with results obtained from bladder augmentation animal models, these results confirmed that angiogenic growth factors were present in SIS and affected the angiogenic potential of biomaterials. These data also demonstrated that the CAM assay can be used to ascertain methodically the angiogenic potential of biomaterials

  10. Calcium signaling in taste cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medler, Kathryn F

    2015-09-01

    The sense of taste is a common ability shared by all organisms and is used to detect nutrients as well as potentially harmful compounds. Thus taste is critical to survival. Despite its importance, surprisingly little is known about the mechanisms generating and regulating responses to taste stimuli. All taste responses depend on calcium signals to generate appropriate responses which are relayed to the brain. Some taste cells have conventional synapses and rely on calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels. Other taste cells lack these synapses and depend on calcium release to formulate an output signal through a hemichannel. Beyond establishing these characteristics, few studies have focused on understanding how these calcium signals are formed. We identified multiple calcium clearance mechanisms that regulate calcium levels in taste cells as well as a calcium influx that contributes to maintaining appropriate calcium homeostasis in these cells. Multiple factors regulate the evoked taste signals with varying roles in different cell populations. Clearly, calcium signaling is a dynamic process in taste cells and is more complex than has previously been appreciated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium.

  11. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradleigh eHocking

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact fruit development, physical traits and disease susceptibility through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to ripening and the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g. blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples. This review works towards an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved

  12. Calcium enriched mixture cement for primary molars exhibiting root perforations and extensive root resorption: report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavassoli-Hojjati, Sara; Kameli, Somayeh; Rahimian-Emam, Sara; Ahmadyar, Maryam; Asgary, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    In primary molars with root perforations of endodontic origin, tooth extraction and space maintainer are recommended. Calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement is a new biomaterial demonstrating favorable sealability/biocompatibility. This report presents a novel treatment modality for cases of primary molar teeth with root perforations associated with a periodontal lesion due to extensive inflammatory root resorption, whereby CEM was used as a perforation repair/pulpotomy biomaterial. Three cases of primary molar root perforations due to inflammatory resorption were selected; all cases were associated with furcal lesions of endodontic origin. Pulp chambers were accessed/irrigated with NaOCl; the root canal orifices were filled with CEM and restored with stainless steel crowns. Clinical/radiographic examinations up to 17 months revealed that all teeth were functional and free of signs/symptoms of infection and all had complete bone healing. Further trials are suggested to confirm CEM use for management of root perforations in primary molars exhibiting root perforation.

  13. DISTILLATION OF CALCIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, J.

    1954-07-27

    This invention relates to an improvement in the process for the purification of caicium or magnesium containing an alkali metal as impurity, which comprises distiiling a batch of the mixture in two stages, the first stage distillation being carried out in the presence of an inert gas at an absolute pressure substantially greater than the vapor pressure of calcium or maguesium at the temperature of distillation, but less than the vaper pressure at that temperature of the alkali metal impurity so that only the alkali metal is vaporized and condensed on a condensing surface. A second stage distilso that substantially only the calcium or magnesium distills under its own vapor pressure only and condenses in solid form on a lower condensing surface.

  14. Characterization of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells on Biomaterials for Bone Tissue Engineering In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Henrich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMCs are suitable for bone tissue engineering. Comparative data regarding the needs of BMC for the adhesion on biomaterials and biocompatibility to various biomaterials are lacking to a large extent. Therefore, we evaluated whether a surface coating would enhance BMC adhesion and analyze the biocompatibility of three different kinds of biomaterials. BMCs were purified from human bone marrow aspirate samples. Beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP, without coating or coated with fibronectin or human plasma, demineralized bone matrix (DBM, and bovine cancellous bone (BS were assessed. Seeding efficacy on β-TCP was 95% regardless of the surface coating. BMC demonstrated a significantly increased initial adhesion on DBM and β-TCP compared to BS. On day 14, metabolic activity was significantly increased in BMC seeded on DBM in comparison to BMC seeded on BS. Likewise increased VEGF-synthesis was observed on day 2 in BMC seeded on DBM when compared to BMC seeded on BS. The seeding efficacy of BMC on uncoated biomaterials is generally high although there are differences between these biomaterials. Beta-TCP and DBM were similar and both superior to BS, suggesting either as suitable materials for spatial restriction of BMC used for regenerative medicine purposes in vivo.

  15. Biomaterials coated by dental pulp cells as substrate for neural stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Jose Miguel; Sancho-Tello, María; Esparza, M Angeles Garcia; Mirabet, Vicente; Bagan, Jose Vicente; Monleón, Manuel; Carda, Carmen

    2011-04-01

    This study is focused on the development of an in vitro hybrid system, consisting in a polymeric biomaterial covered by a dental pulp cellular stroma that acts as a scaffold offering a neurotrophic support for the subsequent survival and differentiation of neural stem cells. In the first place, the behavior of dental pulp stroma on the polymeric biomaterial based on ethyl acrylate and hydroxy ethyl acrylate copolymer was studied. For this purpose, cells from normal human third molars were grown onto 0.5-mm-diameter biomaterial discs. After cell culture, quantification of neurotrophic factors generated by the stromal cells was performed by means of an ELISA assay. In the second place, survival and differentiation of adult murine neural stem cells on the polymeric biomaterials covered by dental pulp stromal cells was studied. The results show the capacity of dental pulp cells to uniformly coat the majority of the material's surface and to secrete neurotrophic factors that become crucial for a subsequent differentiation of neural stem cells. The use of stromal cells cultured on scaffolding biomaterials provides neurotrophic pumps that may suggest new criteria for the design of cell therapy experiments in animal models to assist the repair of lesions in Central Nervous System.

  16. Adherence ability of Staphylococcus epidermidis on prosthetic biomaterials: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shida T

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Takayuki Shida,1 Hironobu Koseki,1 Itaru Yoda,1 Hidehiko Horiuchi,1 Hideyuki Sakoda,2 Makoto Osaki11Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, Japan; 2Division of Medical Devices, National Institute of Health Sciences, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Bacterial adhesion to the surface of biomaterials is an essential step in the pathogenesis of implant-related infections. In this in vitro research, we evaluated the ability of Staphylococcus epidermidis to adhere to the surface of solid biomaterials, including oxidized zirconium-niobium alloy (Oxinium, cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy, titanium alloy, commercially pure titanium, and stainless steel, and performed a biomaterial-to-biomaterial comparison. The test specimens were physically analyzed to quantitatively determine the viable adherent density of the S. epidermidis strain RP62A (American Type Culture Collection [ATCC] 35984. Field emission scanning electron microscope and laser microscope examination revealed a featureless, smooth surface in all specimens (average roughness <10 nm. The amounts of S. epidermidis that adhered to the biomaterial were significantly lower for Oxinium and the cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy than for commercially pure titanium. These results suggest that Oxinium and cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy are less susceptible to bacterial adherence and are less inclined to infection than other materials of a similar degree of smoothness.Keyword: bacterial adhesion, implant, infection, surface character

  17. Bone defect animal models for testing efficacy of bone substitute biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Large bone defects are serious complications that are most commonly caused by extensive trauma, tumour, infection, or congenital musculoskeletal disorders. If nonunion occurs, implantation for repairing bone defects with biomaterials developed as a defect filler, which can promote bone regeneration, is essential. In order to evaluate biomaterials to be developed as bone substitutes for bone defect repair, it is essential to establish clinically relevant in vitro and in vivo testing models for investigating their biocompatibility, mechanical properties, degradation, and interactional with culture medium or host tissues. The results of the in vitro experiment contribute significantly to the evaluation of direct cell response to the substitute biomaterial, and the in vivo tests constitute a step midway between in vitro tests and human clinical trials. Therefore, it is essential to develop or adopt a suitable in vivo bone defect animal model for testing bone substitutes for defect repair. This review aimed at introducing and discussing the most available and commonly used bone defect animal models for testing specific substitute biomaterials. Additionally, we reviewed surgical protocols for establishing relevant preclinical bone defect models with various animal species and the evaluation methodologies of the bone regeneration process after the implantation of bone substitute biomaterials. This review provides an important reference for preclinical studies in translational orthopaedics.

  18. Advanced biomaterials and their potential applications in the treatment of periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Wu, Guofeng; Feng, Zhihong; Dong, Yan; Zhou, Wei; Li, Bei; Bai, Shizhu; Zhao, Yimin

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal disease is considered as a widespread infectious disease and the most common cause of tooth loss in adults. Attempts for developing periodontal disease treatment strategies, including drug delivery and regeneration approaches, provide a useful experimental model for the evaluation of future periodontal therapies. Recently, emerging advanced biomaterials including hydrogels, films, micro/nanofibers and particles, hold great potential to be utilized as cell/drug carriers for local drug delivery and biomimetic scaffolds for future regeneration therapies. In this review, first, we describe the pathogenesis of periodontal disease, including plaque formation, immune response and inflammatory reactions caused by bacteria. Second, periodontal therapy and an overview of current biomaterials in periodontal regenerative medicine have been discussed. Third, the roles of state-of-the-art biomaterials, including hydrogels, films, micro/nanofibers and micro/nanoparticles, developed for periodontal disease treatment and periodontal tissue regeneration, and their fabrication methods, have been presented. Finally, biological properties, including biocompatibility, biodegradability and immunogenicity of the biomaterials, together with their current applications strategies are given. Conclusive remarks and future perspectives for such advanced biomaterials are discussed. PMID:26004052

  19. Engineered Biomaterials to Enhance Stem Cell-Based Cardiac Tissue Engineering and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Anwarul; Waters, Renae; Roula, Boustany; Dana, Rahbani; Yara, Seif; Alexandre, Toubia; Paul, Arghya

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death worldwide. Since adult cardiac cells are limited in their proliferation, cardiac tissue with dead or damaged cardiac cells downstream of the occluded vessel does not regenerate after myocardial infarction. The cardiac tissue is then replaced with nonfunctional fibrotic scar tissue rather than new cardiac cells, which leaves the heart weak. The limited proliferation ability of host cardiac cells has motivated investigators to research the potential cardiac regenerative ability of stem cells. Considerable progress has been made in this endeavor. However, the optimum type of stem cells along with the most suitable matrix-material and cellular microenvironmental cues are yet to be identified or agreed upon. This review presents an overview of various types of biofunctional materials and biomaterial matrices, which in combination with stem cells, have shown promises for cardiac tissue replacement and reinforcement. Engineered biomaterials also have applications in cardiac tissue engineering, in which tissue constructs are developed in vitro by combining stem cells and biomaterial scaffolds for drug screening or eventual implantation. This review highlights the benefits of using biomaterials in conjunction with stem cells to repair damaged myocardium and give a brief description of the properties of these biomaterials that make them such valuable tools to the field. PMID:26953627

  20. Reinforcement Strategies for Load-Bearing Calcium Phosphate Biocements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Geffers

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate biocements based on calcium phosphate chemistry are well-established biomaterials for the repair of non-load bearing bone defects due to the brittle nature and low flexural strength of such cements. This article features reinforcement strategies of biocements based on various intrinsic or extrinsic material modifications to improve their strength and toughness. Altering particle size distribution in conjunction with using liquefiers reduces the amount of cement liquid necessary for cement paste preparation. This in turn decreases cement porosity and increases the mechanical performance, but does not change the brittle nature of the cements. The use of fibers may lead to a reinforcement of the matrix with a toughness increase of up to two orders of magnitude, but restricts at the same time cement injection for minimal invasive application techniques. A novel promising approach is the concept of dual-setting cements, in which a second hydrogel phase is simultaneously formed during setting, leading to more ductile cement–hydrogel composites with largely unaffected application properties.

  1. Models of calcium signalling

    CERN Document Server

    Dupont, Geneviève; Kirk, Vivien; Sneyd, James

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses the ways in which mathematical, computational, and modelling methods can be used to help understand the dynamics of intracellular calcium. The concentration of free intracellular calcium is vital for controlling a wide range of cellular processes, and is thus of great physiological importance. However, because of the complex ways in which the calcium concentration varies, it is also of great mathematical interest.This book presents the general modelling theory as well as a large number of specific case examples, to show how mathematical modelling can interact with experimental approaches, in an interdisciplinary and multifaceted approach to the study of an important physiological control mechanism. Geneviève Dupont is FNRS Research Director at the Unit of Theoretical Chronobiology of the Université Libre de Bruxelles;Martin Falcke is head of the Mathematical Cell Physiology group at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin;Vivien Kirk is an Associate Professor in the Depar...

  2. Novel nanostructured biomaterials: implications for coronary stent thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karagkiozaki V

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Varvara Karagkiozaki,1,2 Panagiotis G Karagiannidis,1 Nikolaos Kalfagiannis,1 Paraskevi Kavatzikidou,1 Panagiotis Patsalas,3 Despoina Georgiou,1 Stergios Logothetidis11Lab for Thin Films – Nanosystems and Nanometrology (LTFN, Physics Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, 2AHEPA Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, 3Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Epirus, GreeceBackground: Nanomedicine has the potential to revolutionize medicine and help clinicians to treat cardiovascular disease through the improvement of stents. Advanced nanomaterials and tools for monitoring cell–material interactions will aid in inhibiting stent thrombosis. Although titanium boron nitride (TiBN, titanium diboride, and carbon nanotube (CNT thin films are emerging materials in the biomaterial field, the effect of their surface properties on platelet adhesion is relatively unexplored.Objective and methods: In this study, novel nanomaterials made of amorphous carbon, CNTs, titanium diboride, and TiBN were grown by vacuum deposition techniques to assess their role as potential stent coatings. Platelet response towards the nanostructured surfaces of the samples was analyzed in line with their physicochemical properties. As the stent skeleton is formed mainly of stainless steel, this material was used as reference material. Platelet adhesion studies were carried out by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy observations. A cell viability study was performed to assess the cytocompatibility of all thin film groups for 24 hours with a standard immortalized cell line.Results: The nanotopographic features of material surface, stoichiometry, and wetting properties were found to be significant factors in dictating platelet behavior and cell viability. The TiBN films with higher nitrogen contents were less thrombogenic compared with the biased carbon films and control

  3. Irradiation of bioresorbable biomaterials for controlled surface degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simpson, M.; Gilmore, B.F.; Miller, Arne;

    2014-01-01

    Bioresorbable polymers increasingly are the materials of choice for implantable orthopaedic fixation devices. Controlled degradation of these polymers is vital for preservation of mechanical properties during tissue repair and controlled release of incorporated agents such as osteoconductive...... or anti-microbial additives. The work outlined in this paper investigates the use of low energy electron beam irradiation to surface modify polyhydroxyacid samples incorporating beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP). This work uniquely demonstrates that surface modification of bioresorbable polymers through...... bioresorption, followed by characterisation. The results show that low energy e-beam irradiation enhances surface hydrolytic degradation in comparison to bulk and furthermore allows for earlier release of incorporated calcium via dissolution into the surrounding medium....

  4. Calcium Phosphates as Bone Substitute for Dental Implant Surgery%口腔种植中磷酸钙类骨替代材料的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈卓凡; 刘泉; Matinlinna JP

    2016-01-01

    在口腔种植手术中,磷酸钙类的骨替代材料已经被广泛应用于骨修复、骨增量和重建.了解此类材料的基础性能,对于一个种植医生来说是非常重要的,但初学者可能无法完全掌握.因此,本文对异种来源和人工合成的两类骨移植材料的特点,进行了全面总结评述.尽管部分材料显示了优良的生物效应,但目前磷酸钙类的骨替代材料仍有巨大的改进提升空间.%Calcium phosphate-based bone substitutes have been widely used for bone repair, augmentation and recon-struction in dental implant surgery. The basic properties of such materials are undoubtedly of importance, but may not be comprehensively understood by practitioners. Hence, the properties of two major groups, xenogenic and alloplastic grafting materials, have been reviewed and discussed in this article. It appears that more work is needed to improve the perfor-mance of the current calcium phosphate-based bone substitutes, although some of them have been showing outstanding bi-ological response.

  5. Second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon fluorescence (TPF) contrast imaging in biomaterial analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Xuye; Lyubovitsky, Julia

    2015-07-01

    Collagen hydrogels are natural biomaterials that comprise 3D networks of high water content and have viscoelastic properties and biocompatibility similar to native tissues. Consequently, these materials play an important role in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine for quite some time. Second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon fluorescence (TPF) contrasts transpire as valuable label-free spectroscopic probes for analysis of these biomaterials and this presentation will report the structural, mechanical and physicochemical parameters leading to the observed optical SHG and TPF effects in synthesized 3D collagen hydrogels. We will present results regarding understanding the dependency of collagen fiber formation on ion types, new results regarding strengthening of these biomaterials with a nontoxic chemical cross-linker genipin and polarization selection of collagen fibers' orientations.

  6. Preparation and characterization of Ti-15Mo alloy used as biomaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto Severino Martins Júnior

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available With the increase in life expectancy, biomaterials have become an increasingly important focus of research because they are used to replace parts and functions of the human body, thus contributing to improved quality of life. In the development of new biomaterials, the Ti-15Mo alloy is particularly significant. In this study, the Ti-15Mo alloy was produced using an arc-melting furnace and then characterized by density, X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, hardness and dynamic elasticity modulus measurements, and cytotoxicity tests. The microstructure was obtained with β predominance. Microhardness, elasticity modulus, and cytotoxicity testing results showed that this material has great potential for use as biomaterial, mainly in orthopedic applications.

  7. USING OF PROSTHETIC BIOMATERIALS IN LARGE ANIMALS: MODERN CONCEPTS ABOUT ABDOMINAL WALL DEFECTS APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciprian OBER

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of prosthetic biomaterials revolutionized surgery for the repair of abdominal wall hernias in humans. A tensionfree mesh technique has drastically reduced recurrence rates for all hernias compared to tissue repairs and has made it possible to reconstruct large ventral defects that were previously irreparable. Abdominal wall defects (hernias, eventrations, eviscerations in large animals (cattles, horses present also o high incidence, leading to morbidity, low productions, infertilities, poor performances. We used in our study polypropylene mesh which facilitated the reconstruction of large tissue defects in 6 animals (3 cows and 3 horses and was not associated with any serious complications. The results of this study allow us to say that the use of prosthetic biomaterials is superior to simple suture repair and represent a modern and safely procedure in large animals. The biocompatibility of these biomaterials for long periods warrants further investigations.

  8. Models for the histologic study of the skin interface with percutaneous biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percutaneous devices are critical for health care. Access to tissue, vessels and internal organs afforded by these devices provides the means to treat and monitor many diseases. Unfortunately, such access is not restricted, and infection may compromise the usefulness of the device and even the life of the patient. New biomaterials offer the possibility of maintaining internal access while limiting microbial access, but understanding of the cutaneous/biomaterial interface and models to study this area are limited. This paper focuses on models useful for studying the morphology and biology of the intersection of skin and percutaneous biomaterials. An organ culture and a mouse model are described that offer promising possibilities for improved understanding of this critical interface

  9. Integrated Circuit-Based Biofabrication with Common Biomaterials for Probing Cellular Biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Chun-Yen; Yang, Chung-Yao; Yeh, J Andrew; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2016-02-01

    Recent advances in bioengineering have enabled the development of biomedical tools with modifiable surface features (small-scale architecture) to mimic extracellular matrices and aid in the development of well-controlled platforms that allow for the application of mechanical stimulation for studying cellular biomechanics. An overview of recent developments in common biomaterials that can be manufactured using integrated circuit-based biofabrication is presented. Integrated circuit-based biofabrication possesses advantages including mass and diverse production capacities for fabricating in vitro biomedical devices. This review highlights the use of common biomaterials that have been most frequently used to study cellular biomechanics. In addition, the influence of various small-scale characteristics on common biomaterial surfaces for a range of different cell types is discussed.

  10. Innovative Biomaterials Based on Collagen-Hydroxyapatite and Doxycycline for Bone Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narcisa Mederle

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone regeneration is a serious challenge in orthopedic applications because of bone infections increase, tumor developing, and bone loss due to trauma. In this context, the aim of our study was to develop innovative biomaterials based on collagen and hydroxyapatite (25, 50, and 75% which mimic bone composition and prevent or treat infections due to doxycycline content. The biomaterials were obtained by freeze-drying in spongious forms and were characterized by water uptake capacity and microscopy. The in vitro release of doxycycline was also determined and established by non-Fickian drug transport mechanism. Among the studied biomaterials, the most suitable one to easily deliver the drug and mimic bone structure, having compact structure and lower capacity to uptake water, was the one with 75% hydroxyapatite and being cross-linked.

  11. The Quest for Anti-inflammatory and Anti-infective Biomaterials in Clinical Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, May; Islam, Mohammad M; Edin, Joel; Papapavlou, Georgia; Buznyk, Oleksiy; Patra, Hirak K

    2016-01-01

    Biomaterials are now being used or evaluated clinically as implants to supplement the severe shortage of available human donor organs. To date, however, such implants have mainly been developed as scaffolds to promote the regeneration of failing organs due to old age or congenital malformations. In the real world, however, infection or immunological issues often compromise patients. For example, bacterial and viral infections can result in uncontrolled immunopathological damage and lead to organ failure. Hence, there is a need for biomaterials and implants that not only promote regeneration but also address issues that are specific to compromised patients, such as infection and inflammation. Different strategies are needed to address the regeneration of organs that have been damaged by infection or inflammation for successful clinical translation. Therefore, the real quest is for multifunctional biomaterials with combined properties that can combat infections, modulate inflammation, and promote regeneration at the same time. These strategies will necessitate the inclusion of methodologies for management of the cellular and signaling components elicited within the local microenvironment. In the development of such biomaterials, strategies range from the inclusion of materials that have intrinsic anti-inflammatory properties, such as the synthetic lipid polymer, 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC), to silver nanoparticles that have antibacterial properties, to inclusion of nano- and micro-particles in biomaterials composites that deliver active drugs. In this present review, we present examples of both kinds of materials in each group along with their pros and cons. Thus, as a promising next generation strategy to aid or replace tissue/organ transplantation, an integrated smart programmable platform is needed for regenerative medicine applications to create and/or restore normal function at the cell and tissue levels. Therefore, now it is of utmost

  12. The Quest for Anti-inflammatory and Anti-infective Biomaterials in Clinical Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, May; Islam, Mohammad M.; Edin, Joel; Papapavlou, Georgia; Buznyk, Oleksiy; Patra, Hirak K.

    2016-01-01

    Biomaterials are now being used or evaluated clinically as implants to supplement the severe shortage of available human donor organs. To date, however, such implants have mainly been developed as scaffolds to promote the regeneration of failing organs due to old age or congenital malformations. In the real world, however, infection or immunological issues often compromise patients. For example, bacterial and viral infections can result in uncontrolled immunopathological damage and lead to organ failure. Hence, there is a need for biomaterials and implants that not only promote regeneration but also address issues that are specific to compromised patients, such as infection and inflammation. Different strategies are needed to address the regeneration of organs that have been damaged by infection or inflammation for successful clinical translation. Therefore, the real quest is for multifunctional biomaterials with combined properties that can combat infections, modulate inflammation, and promote regeneration at the same time. These strategies will necessitate the inclusion of methodologies for management of the cellular and signaling components elicited within the local microenvironment. In the development of such biomaterials, strategies range from the inclusion of materials that have intrinsic anti-inflammatory properties, such as the synthetic lipid polymer, 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC), to silver nanoparticles that have antibacterial properties, to inclusion of nano- and micro-particles in biomaterials composites that deliver active drugs. In this present review, we present examples of both kinds of materials in each group along with their pros and cons. Thus, as a promising next generation strategy to aid or replace tissue/organ transplantation, an integrated smart programmable platform is needed for regenerative medicine applications to create and/or restore normal function at the cell and tissue levels. Therefore, now it is of utmost

  13. Characterization of cell cultures in contact with different orthopedic implants biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouenzerfi, G.; Hannoun, A.; Hassler, M.; Brizuela, L.; Youjil, S.; Bougault, C.; Trunfio-Sfarghiu, A.-M.

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the role of biological and mechanical constraints (at the cellular level) surrounding living tissues (cartilage and bone) in the presence of different joint implant biomaterials. In this fact, cells cultures in the presence of different types of biomaterials (pyrolytic carbon, cobalt-Chromium, titanium) has been performed. These cell cultures were subjected to biological characterization tests and mechanical characterization. The obtained results correlate with the in vivo observations (a promotion of the creation of a neocartilagical tissue in contact with the Pyrolytic Carbon implants).

  14. Application of the INAA technique for elemental analysis of metallic biomaterials used in dentistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cincu, Em [' Horia Hulubei' National Institute for Research and Development in Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Bucharest-Magurele, 407 Atomistilor Street, P. O. Box MG-6, Bucharest 077125 (Romania)], E-mail: cincue@nipne.ro; Craciun, L.; Manea-Grigore, Ioana; Cazan, I.L.; Manu, V. [' Horia Hulubei' National Institute for Research and Development in Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Bucharest-Magurele, 407 Atomistilor Street, P. O. Box MG-6, Bucharest 077125 (Romania); Barbos, D. [Institute for Nuclear Research (INR) Mioveni, 1Campului Street, P. O. Box 78, Bucharest 115400 (Romania); Cocis, A. [Dental Surgery Clinic PANA-DANIELA, Bucharest, 6 Intrarea Buzesti Street (Romania)

    2009-12-15

    The sensitive nuclear analytical technique Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) has been applied on several types of metallic biomaterials (Heraenium CE, Ventura Nibon, Wiron 99 and Ducinox which are currently used for restoration in the dental clinics) to study its performance in elemental analysis and identify eventual limitations. The investigation has been performed by two NAA Laboratories and aimed at getting an answer to the question on how the biomaterials compositions influence the patients' health over the course of time, taking into account the EC Directive 94/27/EC recommendations concerning Ni toxicity.

  15. Preparation and Properties of Collagen-Chitosan/ Glycosaminoglycans as Candidate Tissue Engineering Biomaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIQin-Hua; HUANGYao-xiong; CHENGJian-su

    2004-01-01

    A novel biomaterial scaffold was created from collagen-chitosan/GAG. Its tensile strength was 8.6MPa(wet state)and degree of swelling water was 60%~75% with higer ultimate elongation 300%. Rabbit corneas of collagen-chitosan/GAG implantation samples in vivo for biodegradation showed that the inplantion samples was complets biodegrable and digested afere 120 day. There was enought time to maintain cell growth,immigrating and proliferation. This biomaterials scaffold can be used for cell culture and in various tissue engineering fields.

  16. Effects of calcium phosphate bioceramics on skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J S; Tsuang, Y H; Yao, C H; Liu, H C; Lin, F H; Hang, Y S

    1997-02-01

    With advances in ceramics technology, calcium phosphate bioceramics have been applied as bone substitutes. The effects of implants on bony tissue have been investigated. The effects upon adjacent skeletal muscles have not been determined. The focus of this work is to elucidate the biological effects of various calcium phosphate bioceramics on skeletal muscles. Four different kinds of powder of calcium phosphate biomaterials including beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP), hydroxyapatite (HA), beta-dicalcium pyrophosphate (beta-DCP) and sintered beta-dicalcium pyrophosphate (SDCP), were tested by myoblast cell cultures. The results were analyzed by cell count, cell morphology and concentration of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) in culture medium. The cell population and TGF-beta 1 concentration of the control sample increased persistently as the time of culture increased. The changes in cell population and TGF-beta 1 concentration in culture medium of the beta-TCP and HA were quite low in the first 3 days of culture, then increased gradually toward the seventh day. The changes in cell population and TGF-beta 1 concentration in culture medium of the silica, beta-DCP, and SDCP were quite similar. They were lower during the first day of culture but increased and reached that of the control medium after 7 days' culture. Most cells on B-TCP and HA diminished in size with radially spread, long pseudopods. We conclude that HA and beta-TCP are thought to have an inhibitory effect on growth of the myoblasts. The HA and beta-TCP may interfere with the repair and regeneration of injured skeletal muscle after orthopedic surgery.

  17. Microbial biofilm growth versus tissue integration on biomaterials with different wettabilities and a polymer-brush coating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Subbiahdoss, Guruprakash; Grijpma, Dirk W.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.; Kuijer, Roel

    2010-01-01

    Biomaterials-associated infections (BAI) constitute a major clinical problem and often necessitate implant replacement. In this study, the race for the surface between Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 35983 and U2OS osteosarcoma cells is studied on biomaterials with different wettabilities and on a p

  18. Injectable biomaterials for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence: their potential and pitfalls as urethral bulking agents.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davis, Niall F

    2013-06-01

    Injectable urethral bulking agents composed of synthetic and biological biomaterials are minimally invasive treatment options for stress urinary incontinence (SUI). The development of an ideal urethral bulking agent remains challenging because of clinical concerns over biocompatibility and durability. Herein, the mechanical and biological features of injectable urethral biomaterials are investigated, with particular emphasis on their future potential as primary and secondary treatment options for SUI. A literature search for English language publications using the two online databases was performed. Keywords included "stress urinary incontinence", "urethral bulking agent" and "injectable biomaterial". A total of 98 articles were analysed, of which 45 were suitable for review based on clinical relevance and importance of content. Injectable biomaterials are associated with a lower cure rate and fewer postoperative complications than open surgery for SUI. They are frequently reserved as secondary treatment options for patients unwilling or medically unfit to undergo surgery. Glutaraldehyde cross-linked bovine collagen remains the most commonly injected biomaterial and has a cure rate of up to 53 %. Important clinical features of an injectable biomaterial are durability, biocompatibility and ease of administration, but achieving these requirements is challenging. In carefully selected patients, injectable biomaterials are feasible alternatives to open surgical procedures as primary and secondary treatment options for SUI. In future, higher cure rates may be feasible as researchers investigate alternative biomaterials and more targeted injection techniques for treating SUI.

  19. The risk of biomaterial-associated infection after revision surgery due to an experimental primary implant infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelsman, Anton F.; Saldarriaga-Fernandez, Isabel C.; Nejadnik, M. Reza; van Dam, Gooitzen M.; Francis, Kevin P.; Ploeg, Rutger J.; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2010-01-01

    The fate of secondary biomaterial implants was determined by bio-optical imaging and plate counting, after antibiotic treatment of biomaterials-associated-infection (BAI) and surgical removal of an experimentally infected, primary implant. All primary implants and tissue samples from control mice sh

  20. Calcium – how and why?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J K Jaiswal

    2001-09-01

    Calcium is among the most commonly used ions, in a multitude of biological functions, so much so that it is impossible to imagine life without calcium. In this article I have attempted to address the question as to how calcium has achieved this status with a brief mention of the history of calcium research in biology. It appears that during the origin and early evolution of life the Ca2+ ion was given a unique opportunity to be used in several biological processes because of its unusual physical and chemical properties.

  1. Cardiovascular Effects of Calcium Supplements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian R. Reid

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Calcium supplements reduce bone turnover and slow the rate of bone loss. However, few studies have demonstrated reduced fracture incidence with calcium supplements, and meta-analyses show only a 10% decrease in fractures, which is of borderline statistical and clinical significance. Trials in normal older women and in patients with renal impairment suggest that calcium supplements increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. To further assess their safety, we recently conducted a meta-analysis of trials of calcium supplements, and found a 27%–31% increase in risk of myocardial infarction, and a 12%–20% increase in risk of stroke. These findings are robust because they are based on pre-specified analyses of randomized, placebo-controlled trials and are consistent across the trials. Co-administration of vitamin D with calcium does not lessen these adverse effects. The increased cardiovascular risk with calcium supplements is consistent with epidemiological data relating higher circulating calcium concentrations to cardiovascular disease in normal populations. There are several possible pathophysiological mechanisms for these effects, including effects on vascular calcification, vascular cells, blood coagulation and calcium-sensing receptors. Thus, the non-skeletal risks of calcium supplements appear to outweigh any skeletal benefits, and are they appear to be unnecessary for the efficacy of other osteoporosis treatments.

  2. Calcium measurement methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CarloAlberto Redi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Rightly stressed by prof. Wolfgang Walz in the Preface to the series Neuromethods series, the “careful application of methods is probably the most important step in the process of scientific inquiry”. Thus, I strongly suggest to all those interested in calcium signaling and especially to the new-comers in the hot topic of neuroscience (which has so much space even in science-society debate for its implications in legal issues and in the judge-decision process to take profit from this so well edited book. I am saying this since prof. Verkhratsky and prof. Petersen......

  3. 21 CFR 573.240 - Calcium periodate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... with calcium hydroxide or calcium oxide to form a substance consisting of not less than 60 percent by... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium periodate. 573.240 Section 573.240 Food... Additive Listing § 573.240 Calcium periodate. The food additive calcium periodate may be safely used...

  4. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and... Listing § 573.260 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely used as an anticaking agent in animal feed, provided that the amount of calcium silicate does...

  5. Extracellular calcium sensing and extracellular calcium signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, E. M.; MacLeod, R. J.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    , localized changes in Ca(o)(2+) within the ECF can originate from several mechanisms, including fluxes of calcium ions into or out of cellular or extracellular stores or across epithelium that absorb or secrete Ca(2+). In any event, the CaR and other receptors/sensors for Ca(o)(2+) and probably for other extracellular ions represent versatile regulators of numerous cellular functions and may serve as important therapeutic targets.

  6. Study of biomaterial-induced macrophage activation, cell-mediated immune response and molecular oxidative damage in patients with dermal bioimplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Olga; Rodríguez-Sureda, Víctor; Domínguez, Carmen; Fernández-Figueras, Teresa; Vilches, Angel; Llurba, Elisa; Alijotas-Reig, Jaume

    2012-01-01

    Several soft-tissue dermal fillers have been reported to provoke immunogenicity and may cause adverse reactions despite claims regarding their safety. This study aimed to assess biomaterial-induced macrophage activation, cell-mediated immune response and oxidative stress in 169 patients with dermal bioimplants. To this end, we analysed plasma concentrations of myeloperoxidase (MPO), the chitinase-like proteins chitotriosidase and YKL-40 and molecular oxidative damage. The present study shows, for the first time, that the components of innate immunity: chitotriosidase and YKL-40, are significantly higher in patients with certain bioimplants and these markers of monocyte/macrophage activation rose progressively as adverse reactions (AR) evolved. Plasma MPO levels increased 4-fold in filler users with AR and 3-fold in those without. Analysis by filler type showed subjects injected with calcium hydroxylapatite, methacrylate, acrylamides and silicone to have values significantly above those of non-filler subjects for at least two plasma biomarkers, probably because the afore-mentioned biomaterials are permanent and prone to trigger AR in the long term. By contrast, hyaluronic acid alone elicited little immune response. Plasma concentrations of markers of oxidative damage to lipids and proteins were found to be significantly higher in users of four of the nine dermal fillers studied. These diffusible products of molecular peroxidation would stem from the reaction catalysed by MPO that generates potent oxidants, leading to cell oxidative damage which, in turn, may exert deleterious effects on the organism. Overall, the results of this study on the effects of a range of dermal fillers point to chronic activation of the immune response mediated by macrophages and PMNs. The increases in plasma of MPO, chitotriosidase and YKL-40 proteins and products of macromolecular peroxidation suggests that these molecules could serve as blood-based biochemical markers and alert to the

  7. Enhanced biological performance of human adipose-derived stem cells cultured on titanium-based biomaterials and silicon carbide sheets for orthopaedic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopa, S; De Girolamo, L; Arrigoni, E; Stanco, D; Rimondini, L; Baruffaldi Preis, F W; Lanfranchi, L; Ghigo, M; Chiesa, R; Brini, A T

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that the surface properties of biomaterials may affect bone-healing processes by modulating both cell viability and osteogenic differentiation. In this study we evaluated proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) cultured on three prototypes of titanium disks and on thin layers of silicon carbide (SiC-PECVD), a material characterized by a high hardness and wear resistance. Our data indicated that all the tested surfaces supported cell growth, in particular, hASCs seeded on both titanium treated by a double-step etching process (TIT) and titanium modified by two Anodic Spark Deposition processes (TAA) grew better respect to the ones cultured on titanium obtained by KOH alkali etching process on TAA (TAAK). Furthermore, hASCs well colonized SiC-PECVD surface, showing a quite similar viability to cells cultured on plastic (PA). TIT and TAA better supported osteogenic differentiation of hASCs compared to PA, as shown by a marked increase of both alkaline phosphatase activity and calcified extracellular matrix deposition; in contrast TAAK did not positively affect hASCs differentiation. SiC-PECVD did not alter osteogenic differentiation of hASC cells: indeed, ALP and calcium deposition levels were comparable to those of cells cultured on plastic. Furthermore, we observed similar results testing hASCs either pre-differentiated for 14 days in osteogenic medium or directly differentiated on biomaterials. Our study suggests that modifications of titanium surface may improve osteo-integration of implant devices and that SiC-PECVD may represent a valid alternative for the coating of prosthetic devices to reduce wear and metallosis events.

  8. In vitro testing of surface-modified biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitão, E; Barbosa, M A; De Groot, K

    1998-09-01

    The influence of surface modification treatments such as ion implantation and sputter coating on an in vitro rat bone-marrow cell culture was studied by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis. 316 L stainless steel, Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-5Al-2.5Fe were nitrogen ion-implanted with three fluences: 10(15), 10(16) and 10(17) ion cm-2 with an energy beam of 40 keV. Both nitrogen and carbon sputter-coated 316 L stainless steel samples were also studied. Polished 316 L stainless steel, Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-5Al-2.5Fe and Thermanox were also studied, in order to give comparative information. The materials were inoculated with a droplet of cell suspension and were maintained for 3 wk. A mineralized extracellular matrix was formed on all materials except on nitrogen sputter-coated 316 L stainless steel. The morphology of the cell cultures obtained on nitrogen-ion implanted materials was similar to those obtained on the untreated materials and Thermanox. The observation of the interface between the cell layer and the substrata showed the presence of calcium- and phosphorus-rich globular deposits associated with collagen fibres. A higher density of these globular deposits was observed on the ion-implanted materials.

  9. Antibacterial Efficiency of Hydroxyapatite Biomaterials with Biodegradable Polylactic Acid and Polycaprolactone Polymers Saturated with Antibiotics / Bionoārdāmu Polimēru Saturošu Un Ar Antibiotiskajām Vielām Piesūcinātu Biomateriālu Antibakteriālās Efektivitātes Noteikšana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kroiča Juta

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Infections continue to spread in all fields of medicine, and especially in the field of implant biomaterial surgery, and not only during the surgery, but also after surgery. Reducing the adhesion of bacteria could decrease the possibility of biomaterial-associated infections. Bacterial adhesion could be reduced by local antibiotic release from the biomaterial. In this in vitro study, hydroxyapatite biomaterials with antibiotics and biodegradable polymers were tested for their ability to reduce bacteria adhesion and biofilm development. This study examined the antibacterial efficiency of hydroxyapatite biomaterials with antibiotics and biodegradable polymers against Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The study found that hydroxyapatite biomaterials with antibiotics and biodegradable polymers show longer antibacterial properties than hydroxyapatite biomaterials with antibiotics against both bacterial cultures. Therefore, the results of this study demonstrated that biomaterials that are coated with biodegradable polymers release antibiotics from biomaterial samples for a longer period of time and may be useful for reducing bacterial adhesion on orthopedic implants.

  10. Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000490.htm Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones To use the sharing ... and maintain strong bones. How Much Calcium and Vitamin D Do I Need? Amounts of calcium are ...

  11. Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Balance › Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health March 2012 Download PDFs ... helps keep your bones strong. Why are vitamin D and calcium important to bone health? Vitamin D ...

  12. Trends in surface engineering of biomaterials: atmospheric pressure plasma deposition of coatings for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Ponte, G.; Sardella, E.; Fanelli, F.; D'Agostino, R.; Favia, P.

    2011-11-01

    Cold plasma processes for surface engineering of biomaterials and biomedical devices are traditionally performed at low pressure; more and more, though, surface modification plasma processes at atmospheric pressure are also gaining popularity. This short review is aimed to list briefly atmospheric pressure plasma processes reported, in the last decade, for adapting the surface of materials to the best interactions with cells, bacteria and biomolecules.

  13. A chemometric method for correcting FTIR spectra of biomaterials for interference from water in KBr discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    FTIR analysis of solid biomaterials by the familiar KBr disc technique is very often frustrated by water interference in the important protein (amide I) and carbohydrate (hydroxyl) regions of their spectra. A method was therefore devised that overcomes the difficulty and measures FTIR spectra of so...

  14. Repair of injured spinal cord using biomaterial scaffolds and stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Bikesh; Coykendall, Katherine; Li, Yongchao; Moon, Alex; Priyadarshani, Priyanka; Yao, Li

    2014-08-01

    The loss of neurons and degeneration of axons after spinal cord injury result in the loss of sensory and motor functions. A bridging biomaterial construct that allows the axons to grow through has been investigated for the repair of injured spinal cord. Due to the hostility of the microenvironment in the lesion, multiple conditions need to be fulfilled to achieve improved functional recovery. A scaffold has been applied to bridge the gap of the lesion as contact guidance for axonal growth and to act as a vehicle to deliver stem cells in order to modify the microenvironment. Stem cells may improve functional recovery of the injured spinal cord by providing trophic support or directly replacing neurons and their support cells. Neural stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells have been seeded into biomaterial scaffolds and investigated for spinal cord regeneration. Both natural and synthetic biomaterials have increased stem cell survival in vivo by providing the cells with a controlled microenvironment in which cell growth and differentiation are facilitated. This optimal multi‒disciplinary approach of combining biomaterials, stem cells, and biomolecules offers a promising treatment for the injured spinal cord.

  15. Generation and Assessment of Functional Biomaterial Scaffolds for Applications in Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinderer, Svenja; Brauchle, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Current clinically applicable tissue and organ replacement therapies are limited in the field of cardiovascular regenerative medicine. The available options do not regenerate damaged tissues and organs, and, in the majority of the cases, show insufficient restoration of tissue function. To date, anticoagulant drug‐free heart valve replacements or growing valves for pediatric patients, hemocompatible and thrombus‐free vascular substitutes that are smaller than 6 mm, and stem cell‐recruiting delivery systems that induce myocardial regeneration are still only visions of researchers and medical professionals worldwide and far from being the standard of clinical treatment. The design of functional off‐the‐shelf biomaterials as well as automatable and up‐scalable biomaterial processing methods are the focus of current research endeavors and of great interest for fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Here, various approaches that aim to overcome the current limitations are reviewed, focusing on biomaterials design and generation methods for myocardium, heart valves, and blood vessels. Furthermore, novel contact‐ and marker‐free biomaterial and extracellular matrix assessment methods are highlighted. PMID:25778713

  16. Ica-expression and gentamicin susceptibility of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm on orthopedic implant biomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuryastuti, Titik; Krom, Bastiaan P.; Aman, Abu T.; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2011-01-01

    Ica-expression by Staphylococcus epidermidis and slime production depends on environmental conditions such as implant material and presence of antibiotics. Here, we evaluate biofilm formation and ica-expression of S. epidermidis strains on biomaterials involved in total hip-and knee arthroplasty [po

  17. Antimicrobial biomaterials based on carbon nanotubes dispersed in poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Seyma; Loebick, Codruta Zoican; Kang, Seoktae; Elimelech, Menachem; Pfefferle, Lisa D.; van Tassel, Paul R.

    2010-09-01

    Biomaterials that inactivate microbes are needed to eliminate medical device infections. We investigate here the antimicrobial nature of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) incorporated within the biomedical polymer poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). We find Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus epidermidis viability and metabolic activity to be significantly diminished in the presence of SWNT-PLGA, and to correlate with SWNT length and concentration (bacteria die within one hour on SWNT-PLGA versus 15-20% on pure PLGA. Shorter SWNTs are more toxic, possibly due to increased density of open tube ends. This study demonstrates the potential usefulness of SWNT-PLGA as an antimicrobial biomaterial.Biomaterials that inactivate microbes are needed to eliminate medical device infections. We investigate here the antimicrobial nature of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) incorporated within the biomedical polymer poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). We find Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus epidermidis viability and metabolic activity to be significantly diminished in the presence of SWNT-PLGA, and to correlate with SWNT length and concentration (bacteria die within one hour on SWNT-PLGA versus 15-20% on pure PLGA. Shorter SWNTs are more toxic, possibly due to increased density of open tube ends. This study demonstrates the potential usefulness of SWNT-PLGA as an antimicrobial biomaterial. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Raman spectra before and after SWNT cutting via cyclodextrins, and sample images from viability and metabolic activity assays are included. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00329h

  18. Micro/nano-scale strategies for engineering in vitro the celular microenvironment using biodegradable biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Coutinho, Daniela F.

    2011-01-01

    Programa doutoral em Bioengenharia Biological tissues result of a specific spatial organization of cells, extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, and soluble factors. These micro and nanoscaled biological entities organize into regional tissue architectures, creating highly complex and heterogeneous cellular microenvironments. To generate functional tissue equivalents in vitro, engineered biomaterials should mimic the structural, chemical and cellular complexity by recapitulating...

  19. Opportunities for biomaterials : economic, environmental and policy aspects along their life cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermann, B.G.

    2010-01-01

    Little was known at the start of these studies regarding the environmental impacts of bulk chemicals production from biomass and whether they could be produced economically. We have therefore analysed the entire life cycle of biomaterials: the production of bio-based chemicals, the application of bi

  20. Generation and Assessment of Functional Biomaterial Scaffolds for Applications in Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinderer, Svenja; Brauchle, Eva; Schenke-Layland, Katja

    2015-11-18

    Current clinically applicable tissue and organ replacement therapies are limited in the field of cardiovascular regenerative medicine. The available options do not regenerate damaged tissues and organs, and, in the majority of the cases, show insufficient restoration of tissue function. To date, anticoagulant drug-free heart valve replacements or growing valves for pediatric patients, hemocompatible and thrombus-free vascular substitutes that are smaller than 6 mm, and stem cell-recruiting delivery systems that induce myocardial regeneration are still only visions of researchers and medical professionals worldwide and far from being the standard of clinical treatment. The design of functional off-the-shelf biomaterials as well as automatable and up-scalable biomaterial processing methods are the focus of current research endeavors and of great interest for fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Here, various approaches that aim to overcome the current limitations are reviewed, focusing on biomaterials design and generation methods for myocardium, heart valves, and blood vessels. Furthermore, novel contact- and marker-free biomaterial and extracellular matrix assessment methods are highlighted. PMID:25778713

  1. p-BioSPRE-an information and communication technology framework for transnational biomaterial sharing and access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Gabriele; Schröder, Christina; Schera, Fatima; Dobkowicz, Matthias; Kiefer, Stephan; Heidtke, Karsten R; Hänold, Stefanie; Nwankwo, Iheanyi; Forgó, Nikolaus; Stanulla, Martin; Eckert, Cornelia; Graf, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Biobanks represent key resources for clinico-genomic research and are needed to pave the way to personalised medicine. To achieve this goal, it is crucial that scientists can securely access and share high-quality biomaterial and related data. Therefore, there is a growing interest in integrating biobanks into larger biomedical information and communication technology (ICT) infrastructures. The European project p-medicine is currently building an innovative ICT infrastructure to meet this need. This platform provides tools and services for conducting research and clinical trials in personalised medicine. In this paper, we describe one of its main components, the biobank access framework p-BioSPRE (p-medicine Biospecimen Search and Project Request Engine). This generic framework enables and simplifies access to existing biobanks, but also to offer own biomaterial collections to research communities, and to manage biobank specimens and related clinical data over the ObTiMA Trial Biomaterial Manager. p-BioSPRE takes into consideration all relevant ethical and legal standards, e.g., safeguarding donors' personal rights and enabling biobanks to keep control over the donated material and related data. The framework thus enables secure sharing of biomaterial within open and closed research communities, while flexibly integrating related clinical and omics data. Although the development of the framework is mainly driven by user scenarios from the cancer domain, in this case, acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and Wilms tumour, it can be extended to further disease entities. PMID:24567758

  2. Plasma-treated polystyrene surfaces : model surfaces for studying cell-biomaterial interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kooten, TG; Spijker, HT; Busscher, HJ

    2004-01-01

    Biocompatibility of biomaterials relates, amongst others, to the absence of adverse cellular reactions and modulation of cell adhesion and subsequent responses. With respect to tissue-engineering applications, most materials need to evoke cell adhesion and spreading, while potentially displaying dif

  3. Inhibition of the tissue reaction to a biodegradable biomaterial by monoclonal antibodies to IFN-gamma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khouw, IMSL; van Wachem, PB; de Leij, LFMH; van Luyn, MJA

    1998-01-01

    Biomaterials are increasingly used for clinical applications. However, loss of function may occur owing to tissue reactions, which are mainly caused by a variety of inflammatory reactions. Recently, we demonstrated that macrophages (MO) and T cells play key roles in these reactions. Since immunologi

  4. Responsive Biomaterials: Advances in Materials Based on Shape-Memory Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, John G; Palma, Matteo; Wind, Shalom J; Biggs, Manus J

    2016-07-01

    Shape-memory polymers (SMPs) are morphologically responsive materials with potential for a variety of biomedical applications, particularly as devices for minimally invasive surgery and the delivery of therapeutics and cells for tissue engineering. A brief introduction to SMPs is followed by a discussion of the current progress toward the development of SMP-based biomaterials for clinically relevant biomedical applications.

  5. Development of a hybrid scaffold with synthetic biomaterials and hydrogel using solid freeform fabrication technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Jin-Hyung; Park, Min; Park, Jaesung; Cho, Dong-Woo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, POSTECH (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Young, E-mail: dwcho@postech.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Andong National University (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Natural biomaterials such as hyaluronic acid, gelatin and collagen provide excellent environments for tissue regeneration. Furthermore, gel-state natural biomaterials are advantageous for encapsulating cells and growth factors. In cell printing technology, hydrogel which contains cells was printed directly to form three-dimensional (3D) structures for tissue or organ regeneration using various types of printers. However, maintaining the 3D shape of the printed structure, which is made only of the hydrogel, is very difficult due to its weak mechanical properties. In this study, we developed a hybrid scaffold consisting of synthetic biomaterials and natural hydrogel using a multi-head deposition system, which is useful in solid freeform fabrication technology. The hydrogel was intentionally infused into the space between the lines of a synthetic biomaterial-based scaffold. The cellular efficacy of the hybrid scaffold was validated using rat primary hepatocytes and a mouse pre-osteoblast MC3T3-E1 cell line. In addition, the collagen hydrogel, which encapsulates cells, was dispensed and the viability of the cells observed. We demonstrated superior effects of the hybrid scaffold on cell adhesion and proliferation and showed the high viability of dispensed cells.

  6. Biomaterial-associated infection of gentamicin-loaded PMMA beads in orthopaedic revision surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neut, D; van de Belt, H; Stokroos, [No Value; van Horn, [No Value; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    2001-01-01

    In two-stage orthopaedic revision surgery, high local levels of antibiotics are achieved after removal of an infected prosthesis through temporary implantation of gentamicin-loaded beads. However, despite their antibiotic release, these beads act as a biomaterial surface to which bacteria preferenti

  7. Characterization of Metalloproteins and Biomaterials by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankær, Christian Grundahl

    This thesis presents thework on combining complementary X-rays techniques for studying the structures of proteins and other biomaterials, and consists of three different projects: (i) Characterization of protein powders with X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). (ii) The combination of X-ray crystallo...

  8. Integrating dental anatomy and biomaterials: an innovative use of composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kenneth L; McAndrew, Maureen

    2004-01-01

    As part of the new integrated curriculum at the New York University College of Dentistry, a pilot program uses composite resins to teach dental anatomy. The Department of Biomaterials and Biomimetics, in conjunction with the Department of Cariology and Operative Dentistry, has created a teaching module to replicate the morphology of a central incisor through the manipulation and placement of a composite resin.

  9. METHYLCELLULOSE CELL-CULTURE AS A NEW CYTOTOXICITY TEST SYSTEM FOR BIOMATERIALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANLUYN, MJA; VANWACHEM, PB; NIEUWENHUIS, P; DAMINK, LO; TENHOOPEN, H; FEIJEN, J

    1991-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of biomaterials can be tested in vitro using various culture systems. Liquid culture systems may detect cytotoxicity of a material either by culture of cells with extracts or with the material itself. In the latter instance, renewing the medium will remove possible released cytotoxi

  10. Biomaterial porosity determined by fractal dimensions, succolarity and lacunarity on microcomputed tomographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N' Diaye, Mambaye [LUNAM Université, GEROM Groupe Etudes Remodelage Osseux et bioMatériaux-LHEA, IRIS-IBS Institut de Biologie en Santé, CHU d' Angers, 49933 ANGERS Cedex (France); Degeratu, Cristinel [LUNAM Université, GEROM Groupe Etudes Remodelage Osseux et bioMatériaux-LHEA, IRIS-IBS Institut de Biologie en Santé, CHU d' Angers, 49933 ANGERS Cedex (France); University Politehnica of Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Department of Bioresources and Polymer Science, Calea Victoriei 149, 010072, Sector 1, Bucharest (Romania); Bouler, Jean-Michel [Inserm UMR 791, LIOAD, University of Nantes, 44000 Nantes (France); Chappard, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.chappard@univ-angers.fr [LUNAM Université, GEROM Groupe Etudes Remodelage Osseux et bioMatériaux-LHEA, IRIS-IBS Institut de Biologie en Santé, CHU d' Angers, 49933 ANGERS Cedex (France)

    2013-05-01

    Porous structures are becoming more and more important in biology and material science because they help in reducing the density of the grafted material. For biomaterials, porosity also increases the accessibility of cells and vessels inside the grafted area. However, descriptors of porosity are scanty. We have used a series of biomaterials with different types of porosity (created by various porogens: fibers, beads …). Blocks were studied by microcomputed tomography for the measurement of 3D porosity. 2D sections were re-sliced to analyze the microarchitecture of the pores and were transferred to image analysis programs: star volumes, interconnectivity index, Minkowski–Bouligand and Kolmogorov fractal dimensions were determined. Lacunarity and succolarity, two recently described fractal dimensions, were also computed. These parameters provided a precise description of porosity and pores' characteristics. Non-linear relationships were found between several descriptors e.g. succolarity and star volume of the material. A linear correlation was found between lacunarity and succolarity. These techniques appear suitable in the study of biomaterials usable as bone substitutes. Highlights: ► Interconnected porosity is important in the development of bone substitutes. ► Porosity was evaluated by 2D and 3D morphometry on microCT images. ► Euclidean and fractal descriptors measure interconnectivity on 2D microCT images. ► Lacunarity and succolarity were evaluated on a series of porous biomaterials.

  11. Biomaterial-stem cell interactions and their impact on stem cell response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oziemlak-Schaap, Aneta M.; Kuhn, Philipp T.; van Kooten, Theo G.; van Rijn, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    In this review, current research in the field of biomaterial properties for directing stem cells are discussed and placed in a critical perspective. Regenerative medicine, in which stem cells play a crucial role, has become an interdisciplinary field between cell biology and materials science. New i

  12. CALCIUM ENHANCES ANTIINFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF ASPIRIN

    OpenAIRE

    Choksi Krishna; Shenoy Ashoka M; A. R. Shabharaya; Lala Minaxi

    2011-01-01

    The objective of present study is to evaluate the effects of calcium carbonate and calcium gluconate on acute and subacute inflammation and to study their possible interactions with Aspirin. Calcium carbonate (10 mg/kg) and calcium gluconate (5 mg/kg) were administered individually and also co-administered along with sub therapeutic dose Aspirin (50mg/kg) to study their interaction. The inflammation was induced by carrageenan or a foreign body. Both calcium carbonate and calcium gluconate cou...

  13. Calcium addition in straw gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risnes, H.; Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk;

    2003-01-01

    The present work focuses on the influence of calcium addition in gasification. The inorganic¿organic element interaction as well as the detailed inorganic¿inorganic elements interaction has been studied. The effect of calcium addition as calcium sugar/molasses solutions to straw significantly...... affected the ash chemistry and the ash sintering tendency but much less the char reactivity. Thermo balance test are made and high-temperature X-ray diffraction measurements are performed, the experimental results indicate that with calcium addition major inorganic¿inorganic reactions take place very late...... in the char conversion process. Comprehensive global equilibrium calculations predicted important characteristics of the inorganic ash residue. Equilibrium calculations predict the formation of liquid salt if sufficient amounts of Ca are added and according to experiments as well as calculations calcium binds...

  14. Mapping calcium phosphate activated gene networks as a strategy for targeted osteoinduction of human progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyckmans, Jeroen; Roberts, Scott J; Bolander, Johanna; Schrooten, Jan; Chen, Christopher S; Luyten, Frank P

    2013-06-01

    Although calcium phosphate-containing biomaterials are promising scaffolds for bone regenerative strategies, the osteoinductive capacity of such materials is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated whether endogenous mechanisms of in vivo calcium phosphate-driven, ectopic bone formation could be identified and used to induce enhanced differentiation in vitro of the same progenitor population. To accomplish this, human periosteum derived cells (hPDCs) were seeded on hydroxyapatite/collagen scaffolds (calcium phosphate rich matrix or CPRM), or on decalcified scaffolds (calcium phosphate depleted matrix or CPDM), followed by subcutaneous implantation in nude mice to trigger ectopic bone formation. In this system, osteoblast differentiation occurred in CPRM scaffolds, but not in CPDM scaffolds. Gene expression was assessed by human full-genome microarray at 20 h after seeding, and 2, 8 and 18 days after implantation. In both matrices, implantation of the cell constructs triggered a similar gene expression cascade, however, gene expression dynamics progressed faster in CPRM scaffolds than in CPDM scaffolds. The difference in gene expression dynamics was associated with differential activation of hub genes and molecular signaling pathways related to calcium signaling (CREB), inflammation (TNFα, NFkB, and IL6) and bone development (TGFβ, β-catenin, BMP, EGF, and ERK signaling). Starting from this set of pathways, a growth factor cocktail was developed that robustly enhanced osteogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our data demonstrate that through the identification and subsequent stimulation of genes, proteins and signaling pathways associated with calcium phosphate mediated osteoinduction, a focused approach to develop targeted differentiation protocols in adult progenitor cells can be achieved.

  15. Ossification Vesicles with Calcium Phosphate in the Eyes of the Insect Copium teucrii (Hemiptera: Tingidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Garcia-Guinea

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Arthropod eyes are built of repeating units named ommatidia. Each single ommatidium unit contains a cluster of photoreceptor cells surrounded by support cells and pigment cells. The insect Copium eye ommatidia include additional calcium-phosphate deposits, not described in insects to date, which can be examined today using a combined set of modern microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. Teucrium gnaphalodes L'Her plants, growing in central Spain, develop galls induced by Copium insects. A survey of C. teucrii adult specimens resulted in surprising environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM images, showing that their bright red eyes contain a calcium-phosphate mineralization. A complete survey of Copium eye specimens was performed by ESEM using energy-dispersive spectroscopy, backscattered electron detector and cathodoluminescence (CL probes, field emission scanning electron microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy in order to learn ommatidia features, such as chemical composition, molecular structure, cell membrane, and internal ommatidium eye fluids and calcium-phosphate distribution deposits. The CL panchromatic images distinguish between the calcium-phosphate ommatidium and calcium-phosphate setae, which are more apatite rich. They show Raman bands attributable to bone tissue apatite biomaterials, such as bone, collagen, lipids, and blood, i.e., peptides, amide-S, amide-II, amide-III, and cytochrome P-450scc. The chemical composition of both galls and leaves of T. gnaphalodes was determined by gas chromatography – mass spectrometry (GC-MS of their extracts. The spectrometric and microscopic images reveal that the calcium-phosphate mineralization is formed and constrained to Copium ommatidia, which are both matrix vesicles generating mixtures of apatite collagen and operational compound eyes of the insect.

  16. Evaluation of Reagent Emplacement Techniques for Phosphate-based Treatment of the Uranium Contamination Source in the 300 Area White Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimmons, Michael J.

    2010-06-04

    Persistent uranium contamination of groundwater under the 300 Area of the Hanford Site has been observed. The source of the uranium contamination resides in uranium deposits on sediments at the groundwater interface, and the contamination is mobilized when periodically wetted by fluctuations of Columbia River levels. Treatability work is ongoing to develop and apply phosphate-containing reagents to promote the formation of stable and insoluble uranium phosphate minerals (i.e., autunite) and other phosphate precipitates (di-calcium phosphate, apatite) to stabilize the uranium source. Technologies for applying phosphate-containing reagents by vertical percolation and lateral injection into sediments of the periodically wetted groundwater interface are being investigated. This report is a preliminary evaluation of technologies for lateral injection.

  17. Evolution of the Calcium Paradigm: The Relation between Vitamin D, Serum Calcium and Calcium Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borje E. Christopher Nordin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is the index disease for calcium deficiency, just as rickets/osteomalacia is the index disease for vitamin D deficiency, but there is considerable overlap between them. The common explanation for this overlap is that hypovitaminosis D causes malabsorption of calcium which then causes secondary hyperparathyroidism and is effectively the same thing as calcium deficiency. This paradigm is incorrect. Hypovitaminosis D causes secondary hyperparathyroidism at serum calcidiol levels lower than 60 nmol/L long before it causes malabsorption of calcium because serum calcitriol (which controls calcium absorption is maintained until serum calcidiol falls below 20 nmol/L. This secondary hyperparathyroidism, probably due to loss of a “calcaemic” action of vitamin D on bone first described in 1957, destroys bone and explains why vitamin D insufficiency is a risk factor for osteoporosis. Vitamin D thus plays a central role in the maintenance of the serum (ionised calcium, which is more important to the organism than the preservation of the skeleton. Bone is sacrificed when absorbed dietary calcium does not match excretion through the skin, kidneys and bowel which is why calcium deficiency causes osteoporosis in experimental animals and, by implication, in humans.

  18. Sensitivity to calcium intake in calcium stone forming patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilberg, I P; Martini, L A; Draibe, S A; Ajzen, H; Ramos, O L; Schor, N

    1996-01-01

    The absorptive or renal origin of hypercalciuria can be discriminated using an acute oral calcium load test (ACLT). Of 86 patients with calcium oxalate kidney stones, 28 (23%) were found to be hypercalciuric (HCa) and 58 (67%) normocalciuric (NCa) on their customary free diet, containing 542 +/- 29 mg/day (mean +/- SE) of calcium. Since the apparently normal 24-hour calcium excretion of many calcium stone formers (CSF) may be due to a combination of high calcium absorption with moderately low calcium intake, all patients were investigated by ACLT. Of 28 HCa patients, 13 (46%) were classified as absorptive (AH) and 15 (54%) as renal hypercalciuria (RH). Of the 58 NCa patients, 38 (65%) presented features of intestinal hyperabsorption and were therefore designated as AH-like, and 20 (35%) as RH-like. To further elucidate the role of dietary calcium in these CSF, a chronic calcium load test (CCLT), consisting of 1 g/day of oral Ca for 7 days, was designed. A positive response to the CCLT was considered to occur when urinary calcium (uCa) was > or = 4 mg/ kg/24 h on the 7th day. Among NCa patients, 29% of AH-like subjects responded to the CCLT and 71% did not; 50% of RH-like subjects also responded and 50% did not. In HCa patients, 85% of AH and 67% of RH subjects maintained uCa > or = 4 mg/kg/24 h after the CCLT and 15% of AH and 23% of RH subjects did not. However, a significant additional increase in mean uCa was not observed among HCa patients. All patients were submitted to a second evaluation of fasting calciuria (Ca/Cr). A modification of this parameter was noticed in 89% of RH-like and 78% of RH patients. In conclusion, these data suggest the presence of subpopulations of patients sensitive or not to calcium intake, regardless of whether the acute response to a calcium overload test suggested AH or RH. The CCLT disclosed dietary hypercalciuria in 21/58 (36%) of previously NCa patients. In these NCa patients, the ACLT may be replaced by the CCLT. The distinction

  19. Limestone reaction in calcium aluminate cement–calcium sulfate systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizzozero, Julien, E-mail: julien.bizzozero@gmail.com; Scrivener, Karen L.

    2015-10-15

    This paper reports a study of ternary blends composed of calcium aluminate cement, calcium sulfate hemihydrate and limestone. Compressive strength tests and hydration kinetics were studied as a function of limestone and calcium sulfate content. The phase evolution and the total porosity were followed and compared to thermodynamic simulation to understand the reactions involved and the effect of limestone on these binders. The reaction of limestone leads to the formation of hemicarboaluminate and monocarboaluminate. Increasing the ratio between sulfate and aluminate decreases the extent of limestone reaction.

  20. Calcium binding protein-mediated regulation of voltage-gated calcium channels linked to human diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nasrin NFJATBAKHSH; Zhong-ping FENG

    2011-01-01

    Calcium ion entry through voltage-gated calcium channels is essential for cellular signalling in a wide variety of cells and multiple physiological processes. Perturbations of voltage-gated calcium channel function can lead to pathophysiological consequences. Calcium binding proteins serve as calcium sensors and regulate the calcium channel properties via feedback mechanisms. This review highlights the current evidences of calcium binding protein-mediated channel regulation in human diseases.

  1. Studies by nuclear and physico-chemical methods of tissue's metallic contamination located around biomaterials. Toxicity measurements of several biomaterials residual radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Implants used as biomaterials fulfill conditions of functionality, compatibility and occasionally bio-activity. There are four main families of biomaterials: metals and metal alloys, polymers, bio-ceramics and natural materials. Because of corrosion and friction in the human body, implants generate debris. These debris develop different problems: toxicity, inflammatory reactions, prosthetic unsealing by osseous dissolution. Nature, size, morphology and amount of debris are the parameters which have an influence on tissue response. We characterize metallic contamination coming from knee prosthesis into surrounding capsular tissue by depth migration, in vivo behaviours, content, size and nature of debris. The PIXE-RBS and STEM-EDXS methods, that we used, are complementary, especially about characterization scale. Debris contamination distributed in the whole articulation is very heterogeneous. Debris migrate on several thousands μm in tissue. Solid metallic particles, μm, are found in the most polluted samples, for both kinds of alloys TA6V and CrCoMo. In the mean volume analysed by PIXE, the in vivo mass ratios [Ti]/[V] and [Co]/[Cr] confirm the chemical stability of TA6V debris and chemical evolution of CrCoMo debris. Complementary measures of TA6V grains, on a nano-metric scale by STEM-EDXS, show a dissolution of coarse grain (μm) in smaller grains (nm). Locally, TA6V grains of a phase are detected and could indicate a preferential dissolution of β phase (grain boundaries) with dropping of Al and V, both toxic and carcinogenic elements. A thin target protocol development correlates PIXE and histological analysis on the same zone. This protocol allows to locate other pathologies in relationship with weaker metal contamination, μg/g, thanks to the great sensitivity of PIXE method. Harmlessness with respect to the residual radioactivity of several natural or synthetic biomaterials is established, using ultra low background noise γ detection system. (author)

  2. Calcium signals in olfactory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tareilus, E; Noé, J; Breer, H

    1995-11-01

    Laser scanning confocal microscopy in combination with the fluorescent calcium indicators Fluo-3 and Fura-Red was employed to estimate the intracellular concentration of free calcium ions in individual olfactory receptor neurons and to monitor temporal and spatial changes in the Ca(2+)-level upon stimulation. The chemosensory cells responded to odorants with a significant increase in the calcium concentration, preferentially in the dendritic knob. Applying various stimulation paradigma, it was found that in a population of isolated cells, subsets of receptor neurons display distinct patterns of responsiveness. PMID:7488645

  3. Calcium signals in olfactory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tareilus, E; Noé, J; Breer, H

    1995-11-01

    Laser scanning confocal microscopy in combination with the fluorescent calcium indicators Fluo-3 and Fura-Red was employed to estimate the intracellular concentration of free calcium ions in individual olfactory receptor neurons and to monitor temporal and spatial changes in the Ca(2+)-level upon stimulation. The chemosensory cells responded to odorants with a significant increase in the calcium concentration, preferentially in the dendritic knob. Applying various stimulation paradigma, it was found that in a population of isolated cells, subsets of receptor neurons display distinct patterns of responsiveness.

  4. Novel microcalorimetric assay for antibacterial activity of implant coatings: The cases of silver-doped hydroxyapatite and calcium hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braissant, Olivier; Chavanne, Philippe; de Wild, Michael; Pieles, Uwe; Stevanovic, Sabrina; Schumacher, Ralf; Straumann, Lukas; Wirz, Dieter; Gruner, Philipp; Bachmann, Alexander; Bonkat, Gernot

    2015-08-01

    Biomaterials with antimicrobial properties are now commonly used in different clinical specialties including orthopedics, endodontic, and traumatology. As a result, assessing the antimicrobial effect of coatings applied on implants is of critical importance. In this study, we demonstrate that isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC) can be used for monitoring bacterial growth and biofilm formation at the surface of such coatings and for determining their antimicrobial effects. The antibacterial effects of silver doped hydroxyapatite (HA) and calcium hydroxide coatings on Staphylococcus epidermidis were determined with a minimal workload. Using the Gompertz growth model we determined biofilm growth rates close to those values reported in the literature. Furthermore, we were able to estimate the reduction in the bacterial inocula originally applied at the surface of the coatings. Therefore, in addition to monitoring the antimicrobial effect of silver doped HA and calcium hydroxide coatings, we also demonstrate that IMC might be a valuable tool for assessing such antimicrobial properties of implant coatings at a minimal workload.

  5. 自产氧型人发角蛋白/丝素蛋白复合材料体外制备及生化评估%In vitropreparation and biochemical evaluation of oxygen generative keratin/silk fibroin compound biomaterial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯超; 李喆; 吕向国; 徐月敏; 傅强

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Tissue engineering reconstruction materials have gradualy entered into so-caled inteligent stage, which means that the relevant biological materials wil be given more. If biomaterials are capable to release oxygenin vitro andin vivo, the successful rate of the biomaterials in repair of tissue defects can be significantly improved. However, only protein-derived biomaterials have been reported to produce oxygen successfuly. OBJECTIVE:To investigate the preparation of the oxygen generative keratin/silk fibroin scaffold and to evaluate its physicochemical and biological characters. METHODS:The keratin and silk fibroin solution were extracted from human hair and worm,respectively. Keratin and silk fibroin were blended at a constant rate (60/40) and mixed with various concentrations of calcium peroxide (5%-25%). The optimal concentration of calcium peroxide was confirmed by the oxygen releasing test. The infrared spectroscopy was used to check the structure of proteins in compound materials, and the mechanical test was also used for evaluating their biomechanical properties. The biomaterial was embedded beneath the rabbit back in order to exam its biocompatibility. The smooth muscle cels were seeded onto the oxygen generative scaffold in order to determine its function of supporting celular growth. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:Using extraction and purification technology, human hair keratin and silk fibroin concentration and purity were improved to meet the subsequent experimental requirements. The oxygen releasing test showed that when the optimal concentration of calcium peroxide was 20%, the final biomaterial could generate the oxygen for the longest time (P 0.05). The infrared spectroscopy examination showed that the structure of proteins kept intact within the final biomaterial. The final biomaterial also demonstrated the good biocompatibility and non-cytotoxcity. And the seeded cels grew better on the oxygen generative scaffold than on the traditional

  6. Variability of calcium absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Variability in calcium absorption was estimated in three groups of normal subjects in whom Ca absorption was measured by standard isotopic-tracer methods at interstudy intervals ranging from 1 to 4 mo. Fifty absorption tests were performed in 22 subjects. Each was done in the morning after an overnight fast with an identical standard breakfast containing a Ca load of approximately 250 mg. Individual fractional absorption values were normalized to permit pooling of the data. The coefficient of variation (CVs) for absorption for the three groups ranged from 10.57 to 12.79% with the size of the CV increasing with interstudy duration. One other published study presenting replicate absorption values was analyzed in a similar fashion and was found to have a CV of absorption of 9.78%. From these data we estimate that when the standard double-isotope method is used to measure Ca absorption there is approximately 10% variability around any given absorption value within an individual human subject and that roughly two-thirds of this represents real biological variability in absorption

  7. Biological Evaluation of ChuangYuLing Dressing-A Multifunctional Medicine Carrying Biomaterial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Rui; ZHENG Qixin; HAO Jie; ZOU Yang; CHENG Jie

    2005-01-01

    The safety of Chuangyuling (CYL) dressing-a multifunctional medicine carrying biomaterial was evaluated in order to provide foundation for the application of CYL as material used in the wound healing. The traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) extract solution was compounded with scaffolds (gelatin and Bletilla hyacinthine gum), and then frozen and dried to form spongy and porous material CYL. According to the standard of biological evaluation of medical devices that was instituted by the ministry of health of China[1] , the biological evaluation of CYL dressing was conducted. The results showed that all the contents of biological evaluation test consisting of acute toxicity, skin irritation, sensitization and cytotoxicity met the requirement of standards. It was concluded that the biomaterial carrying TCM (CYL dressing) is safe for application of wound healing.

  8. The potential contribution to climate change mitigation from temporary carbon storage in biomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Susanne Vedel; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Nielsen, Per H.

    2015-01-01

    contributes with negative CTP values, which means mitigation. The longer the duration of the storage, the larger the mitigation potential.Temporary carbon storage in biomaterials has a potential for contributing to avoid or postpone the crossing of a climatic target level of 450 ppm CO2e, depending on GHG...... concentration development scenario. The potential mitigation value depends on the timing of sequestration and re-emission of CO2. The suggested CTP approach enables inclusion of the potential benefit from temporary carbon storage in the environmental profile of biomaterials. This should be seen as supplement...... value of temporary carbon storage in terms of climate change mitigation has been widely discussed, this has not yet been directly coupled to avoiding climatic target levels representing predicted climatic tipping points. This paper provides recommendations on how to model temporary carbon storage...

  9. Recent contributions of polymers to the design of biomaterials for clinical and surgical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    San Roman, J. [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Polimeros, CSIC. Madrid (Spain)

    1997-05-01

    The present review addresses recent contributions of polymeric biomaterials to the design and development of new devices, implantation systems and supports for molecular recognition, molecular isolation, stability and bio degradability. Special interest is devoted to the analysis of the basis for the generalized application of polymeric systems, as well as the interfacial interactions of polymeric biomaterials with low and high molecular weight components of the living tissues. Advanced criteria for the modification of polymeric surface to obtain good bio compatibility and bio functionality, or to provide thrombogenic resistance are described. New concepts and methods for the preparation of controlled delivery systems and the design of polymeric drugs with targeting properties are commented, and the use of polymeric matrices as supports for the growth of cells in adequate culture media, as one of the most important objectives of the tissue engineering, are considered. (Author) 96 refs.

  10. Subchondral Bone Regenerative Effect of Two Different Biomaterials in the Same Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Cavallo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report aims at highlighting the different effects on subchondral bone regeneration of two different biomaterials in the same patient, in addition to bone marrow derived cell transplantation (BMDCT in ankle. A 15-year-old boy underwent a first BMDCT on a hyaluronate membrane to treat a deep osteochondral lesion (8 mm. The procedure failed: subchondral bone was still present at MRI. Two years after the first operation, the same procedure was performed on a collagen membrane with DBM filling the defect. After one year, AOFAS score was 100 points, and MRI showed a complete filling of the defect. The T2 mapping MRI after one year showed chondral tissue with values in the range of hyaline cartilage. In this case, DBM and the collagen membrane were demonstrated to be good biomaterials to restore subchondral bone: this is a critical step towards the regeneration of a healthy hyaline cartilage.

  11. Biomaterials approaches to modeling macrophage-extracellular matrix interactions in the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Nora L; Fischbach, Claudia

    2016-08-01

    Tumors are characterized by aberrant extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and chronic inflammation. While advances in biomaterials and tissue engineering strategies have led to important new insights regarding the role of ECM composition, structure, and mechanical properties in cancer in general, the functional link between these parameters and macrophage phenotype is poorly understood. Nevertheless, increasing experimental evidence suggests that macrophage behavior is similarly controlled by physicochemical properties of the ECM and consequential changes in mechanosignaling. Here, we will summarize the current knowledge of macrophage biology and ECM-mediated differences in mechanotransduction and discuss future opportunities of biomaterials and tissue engineering platforms to interrogate the functional relationship between these parameters and their relevance to cancer.

  12. In situ photoelectron spectroscopy study of water adsorption on model biomaterial surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmeron, Miquel; Ketteler, Guido; Ashby, Paul; Mun, B.S.; Ratera, I.; Bluhm, Hendrik; Kasemo, B.; Salmeron, Miquel

    2007-07-10

    Using in situ photoelectron spectroscopy at near ambient conditions, we compare the interaction of water with four different model biomaterial surfaces: self-assembled thiol monolayers on Au(111) that are functionalized with methyl, hydroxyl, and carboxyl groups, and phosphatidylcholine (POPC) lipid films on Silicon. We show that the interaction of water with biomaterial surfaces is mediated by polar functional groups that interact strongly with water molecules through hydrogen bonding, resulting in adsorption of 0.2-0.3 ML water on the polar thiol films in 700 mTorr water pressure and resulting in characteristic N1s and P2p shifts for the POPC films. Provided that beam damage is carefully controlled, in situ electron spectroscopy can give valuable information about water adsorption which is not accessible under ultra-high vacuum conditions.

  13. Carcinogenicity evaluation for the application of carbon nanotubes as biomaterials in rasH2 mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takanashi, Seiji; Hara, Kazuo; Aoki, Kaoru; Usui, Yuki; Shimizu, Masayuki; Haniu, Hisao; Ogihara, Nobuhide; Ishigaki, Norio; Nakamura, Koichi; Okamoto, Masanori; Kobayashi, Shinsuke; Kato, Hiroyuki; Sano, Kenji; Nishimura, Naoyuki; Tsutsumi, Hideki; Machida, Kazuhiko; Saito, Naoto

    2012-07-01

    The application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as biomaterials is of wide interest, and studies examining their application in medicine have had considerable significance. Biological safety is the most important factor when considering the clinical application of CNTs as biomaterials, and various toxicity evaluations are required. Among these evaluations, carcinogenicity should be examined with the highest priority; however, no report using transgenic mice to evaluate the carcinogenicity of CNTs has been published to date. Here, we performed a carcinogenicity test by implanting multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs) into the subcutaneous tissue of rasH2 mice, using the carbon black present in black tattoo ink as a reference material for safety. The rasH2 mice did not develop neoplasms after being injected with MWCNTs; instead, MWCNTs showed lower carcinogenicity than carbon black. Such evaluations should facilitate the clinical application and development of CNTs for use in important medical fields.

  14. Biological issues in materials science and engineering: Interdisciplinarity and the bio-materials paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murr, L. E.

    2006-07-01

    Biological systems and processes have had, and continue to have, important implications and applications in materials extraction, processing, and performance. This paper illustrates some interdisciplinary, biological issues in materials science and engineering. These include metal extraction involving bacterial catalysis, galvanic couples, bacterial-assisted corrosion and degradation of materials, biosorption and bioremediation of toxic and other heavy metals, metal and material implants and prostheses and related dental and medical biomaterials developments and applications, nanomaterials health benefits and toxicity issue, and biomimetics and biologically inspired materials developments. These and other examples provide compelling evidence and arguments for emphasizing biological sicences in materials science and engineering curricula and the implementation of a bio-materials paradigm to facilitate the emergence of innovative interdisciplinarity involving the biological sciences and materials sciences and engineering.

  15. Supracolloidal Assemblies as Sacrificial Templates for Porous Silk-Based Biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Hardy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Tissues in the body are hierarchically structured composite materials with tissue-specific properties. Urea self-assembles via hydrogen bonding interactions into crystalline supracolloidal assemblies that can be used to impart macroscopic pores to polymer-based tissue scaffolds. In this communication, we explain the solvent interactions governing the solubility of urea and thereby the scope of compatible polymers. We also highlight the role of solvent interactions on the morphology of the resulting supracolloidal crystals. We elucidate the role of polymer-urea interactions on the morphology of the pores in the resulting biomaterials. Finally, we demonstrate that it is possible to use our urea templating methodology to prepare Bombyx mori silk protein-based biomaterials with pores that human dermal fibroblasts respond to by aligning with the long axis of the pores. This methodology has potential for application in a variety of different tissue engineering niches in which cell alignment is observed, including skin, bone, muscle and nerve.

  16. Biomaterials-based electronics: polymers and interfaces for biology and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muskovich, Meredith; Bettinger, Christopher J

    2012-05-01

    Advanced polymeric biomaterials continue to serve as a cornerstone for new medical technologies and therapies. The vast majority of these materials, both natural and synthetic, interact with biological matter in the absence of direct electronic communication. However, biological systems have evolved to synthesize and utilize naturally-derived materials for the generation and modulation of electrical potentials, voltage gradients, and ion flows. Bioelectric phenomena can be translated into potent signaling cues for intra- and inter-cellular communication. These cues can serve as a gateway to link synthetic devices with biological systems. This progress report will provide an update on advances in the application of electronically active biomaterials for use in organic electronics and bio-interfaces. Specific focus will be granted to covering technologies where natural and synthetic biological materials serve as integral components such as thin film electronics, in vitro cell culture models, and implantable medical devices. Future perspectives and emerging challenges will also be highlighted.

  17. Biomaterials approaches to modeling macrophage-extracellular matrix interactions in the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Nora L; Fischbach, Claudia

    2016-08-01

    Tumors are characterized by aberrant extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and chronic inflammation. While advances in biomaterials and tissue engineering strategies have led to important new insights regarding the role of ECM composition, structure, and mechanical properties in cancer in general, the functional link between these parameters and macrophage phenotype is poorly understood. Nevertheless, increasing experimental evidence suggests that macrophage behavior is similarly controlled by physicochemical properties of the ECM and consequential changes in mechanosignaling. Here, we will summarize the current knowledge of macrophage biology and ECM-mediated differences in mechanotransduction and discuss future opportunities of biomaterials and tissue engineering platforms to interrogate the functional relationship between these parameters and their relevance to cancer. PMID:26921768

  18. Injectable biomaterials: a perspective on the next wave of injectable therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Myron; Lim, Teck Chuan

    2016-02-02

    We are experiencing a new wave of injectable therapeutics (namely/injectable biomaterials) to complement injectable drugs and injectable biologics, and to serve as the basis for injectable combinatorial therapeutics. Injectable biomaterials contribute to the treatment of the fluid-filled defects which often result from disease and injury, by providing the missing physical framework (i.e. the stroma). However, while injectable matrices may be necessary for the successful treatment of certain lesions, they will not likely be sufficient. Chemoattractants for select endogenous cells, or cells themselves, may need to be incorporated into the matrix prior to its injection to ensure the necessary cellular repopulation of the cavitary defect. These agents and others (drugs and biologics) delivered by the matrix represent the new category of injectable combinatorial therapeutics.

  19. Nano-hydroxyapatite composite biomaterials for bone tissue engineering--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Jayachandran; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, significant development has been achieved in the construction of artificial bone with ceramics, polymers and metals. Nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA) is widely used bioceramic material for bone graft substitute owing to its biocompatibility and osteoconductive properties. nHA with chitin, chitosan, collagen, gelatin, fibrin, polylactic acid, polycaprolactone, poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid, polyamide, polyvinyl alcohol, polyurethane and polyhydroxybutyrate based composite scaffolds have been explored in the present review for bone graft substitute. This article further reviews the preparative methods, chemical interaction, biocompatibiity, biodegradation, alkaline phosphatase activity, mineralization effect, mechanical properties and delivery of nHA-based nanocomposites for bone tissue regeneration. The nHA based composite biomaterials proved to be promising biomaterials for bone tissue engineering. PMID:25992432

  20. Opportunities for biomaterials : economic, environmental and policy aspects along their life cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Hermann, B.G.

    2010-01-01

    Little was known at the start of these studies regarding the environmental impacts of bulk chemicals production from biomass and whether they could be produced economically. We have therefore analysed the entire life cycle of biomaterials: the production of bio-based chemicals, the application of bio-based polymers in packaging and finally the waste treatment of biodegradable materials. Numerous bio-based chemicals offer economic opportunities, the extent of which depends on the prices of the...

  1. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of the marine sponge skeleton as a bone mimicking biomaterial

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nandi S.K.; Kundu, B.; Mahato, A.; Thakur, N.L.; Joardar, S.N.; Mandal, B.B.

    , marine sponges play an important role in the marine ecosystem. Recent reports show that marine sponges are potential source of therapeutic drugs including molecules for hormone replacement therapy, antibiotic substances, cosmetics etc.9... scanning electron microscope (FESEM, LEO, UK).  3. Results and discussion Marine sponges due to its availability and biocompatibility may be a potential biomaterial matrix for regenerative medicine. To prove its regenerative potential, we subjected...

  2. Titanium-Based Biomaterials for Preventing Stress Shielding between Implant Devices and Bone

    OpenAIRE

    Niinomi, M.; Nakai, M

    2011-01-01

    β-type titanium alloys with low Young's modulus are required to inhibit bone atrophy and enhance bone remodeling for implants used to substitute failed hard tissue. At the same time, these titanium alloys are required to have high static and dynamic strength. On the other hand, metallic biomaterials with variable Young's modulus are required to satisfy the needs of both patients and surgeons, namely, low and high Young's moduli, respectively. In this paper, we have discussed effective methods...

  3. Molecular interactions in biomineralized hydroxyapatite amino acid modified nanoclay: In silico design of bone biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simulations driven approach to design of a novel biomaterial nanocomposite system is described in this study. Nanoclays modified with amino acids (OMMT) were used to mineralize hydroxyapatite (HAP), mimicking biomineralization. Representative models of organically modified montmorillonite clay (OMMT) and OMMT-hydroxyapatite (OMMT-HAP) were constructed using molecular dynamics and validated using X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transforms Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Attractive interactions exist between Ca atoms of HAP and C=O group of aminovaleric acid, indicating chelate formation in OMMT-HAP. Interaction energy maps describe molecular interactions among different constituents and their quantitative contributions in the OMMT and OMMT-HAP systems at both parallel and perpendicular orientations. High attractive and high repulsive interactions were found between PO43− and MMT clay as well as aminovaleric molecules in OMMT-HAP perpendicular and parallel models. Large non-bonded interactions in OMMT-HAP indicate influence of neighboring environment on PO43− in in situ HAPclay. Extensive hydrogen bonds were observed between functional hydrogen atoms of modifier and MMT clay in OMMT-HAP as compared to OMMT. Thus, HAP interacts with clay through the aminovaleric acid. This computational study provides a framework for materials design and selection for biomaterials used in tissue engineering and other areas of regenerative medicine. - Highlights: • Representative models of a hybrid nanoclay-hydroxyapatite biomaterial are built. • Interaction energy maps are constructed using a molecular dynamics. • Quantitative interactions between the three components of the biomaterial are found. • The modeling and experimental approach provides insight into the complex nanomaterial

  4. Failure mechanisms of additively manufactured porous biomaterials: Effects of porosity and type of unit cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadkhodapour, J; Montazerian, H; Darabi, A Ch; Anaraki, A P; Ahmadi, S M; Zadpoor, A A; Schmauder, S

    2015-10-01

    Since the advent of additive manufacturing techniques, regular porous biomaterials have emerged as promising candidates for tissue engineering scaffolds owing to their controllable pore architecture and feasibility in producing scaffolds from a variety of biomaterials. The architecture of scaffolds could be designed to achieve similar mechanical properties as in the host bone tissue, thereby avoiding issues such as stress shielding in bone replacement procedure. In this paper, the deformation and failure mechanisms of porous titanium (Ti6Al4V) biomaterials manufactured by selective laser melting from two different types of repeating unit cells, namely cubic and diamond lattice structures, with four different porosities are studied. The mechanical behavior of the above-mentioned porous biomaterials was studied using finite element models. The computational results were compared with the experimental findings from a previous study of ours. The Johnson-Cook plasticity and damage model was implemented in the finite element models to simulate the failure of the additively manufactured scaffolds under compression. The computationally predicted stress-strain curves were compared with the experimental ones. The computational models incorporating the Johnson-Cook damage model could predict the plateau stress and maximum stress at the first peak with less than 18% error. Moreover, the computationally predicted deformation modes were in good agreement with the results of scaling law analysis. A layer-by-layer failure mechanism was found for the stretch-dominated structures, i.e. structures made from the cubic unit cell, while the failure of the bending-dominated structures, i.e. structures made from the diamond unit cells, was accompanied by the shearing bands of 45°. PMID:26143351

  5. Molecular interactions in biomineralized hydroxyapatite amino acid modified nanoclay: In silico design of bone biomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katti, Dinesh R., E-mail: Dinesh.Katti@ndsu.edu; Sharma, Anurag; Ambre, Avinash H.; Katti, Kalpana S.

    2015-01-01

    A simulations driven approach to design of a novel biomaterial nanocomposite system is described in this study. Nanoclays modified with amino acids (OMMT) were used to mineralize hydroxyapatite (HAP), mimicking biomineralization. Representative models of organically modified montmorillonite clay (OMMT) and OMMT-hydroxyapatite (OMMT-HAP) were constructed using molecular dynamics and validated using X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transforms Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Attractive interactions exist between Ca atoms of HAP and C=O group of aminovaleric acid, indicating chelate formation in OMMT-HAP. Interaction energy maps describe molecular interactions among different constituents and their quantitative contributions in the OMMT and OMMT-HAP systems at both parallel and perpendicular orientations. High attractive and high repulsive interactions were found between PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} and MMT clay as well as aminovaleric molecules in OMMT-HAP perpendicular and parallel models. Large non-bonded interactions in OMMT-HAP indicate influence of neighboring environment on PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} in in situ HAPclay. Extensive hydrogen bonds were observed between functional hydrogen atoms of modifier and MMT clay in OMMT-HAP as compared to OMMT. Thus, HAP interacts with clay through the aminovaleric acid. This computational study provides a framework for materials design and selection for biomaterials used in tissue engineering and other areas of regenerative medicine. - Highlights: • Representative models of a hybrid nanoclay-hydroxyapatite biomaterial are built. • Interaction energy maps are constructed using a molecular dynamics. • Quantitative interactions between the three components of the biomaterial are found. • The modeling and experimental approach provides insight into the complex nanomaterial.

  6. Radioactive biomaterial for treatment of bony metastases. Biomateriau radioactif utile pour le traitement de metastases osseuses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardouin, P.

    1992-04-03

    This patent is about a radioactive biomaterial perfected for the metastasis treatment. It is composed of Polymethylmethacrylate, of a radioisotope as {sup 32}P, {sup 33}P, {sup 89}Sr, {sup 197}Pt, {sup 125}I, {sup 131}I, {sup 90}Y, {sup 198}Au, {sup 186}Re or {sup 109}Pd, and of a contrast media. It can be injected, solidifies in situ and permits to give radiation doses that are locally important with low scattering.

  7. In vitro assessment of the enzymatic degradation of several starch based biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Azevedo, Helena S.; Gama, F. M.; Reis, R. L.

    2003-01-01

    The susceptibility of starch-based biomaterials to enzymatic degradation by amylolytic enzymes (glucoamylase and α-amylase) was investigated by means of incubating the materials with a buffer solution, containing enzymes at different concentrations and combinations, at 37 °C for 6 weeks. Two polymeric blends of corn starch with poly(ethylene-vinyl alcohol) copolymer and poly(Є-caprolactone), designated by SEVA-C and SPCL, respectively, were studied. The material degradation was ch...

  8. Laser-activated nano-biomaterials for tissue repair and controlled drug release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matteini, P; Ratto, F; Rossi, F; Pini, R [Institute of Applied Physics ' Nello Carrara' , National Research Council, via Madonna del Piano 10 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2014-07-31

    We present recent achievements of minimally invasive welding of biological tissue and controlled drug release based on laser-activated nano-biomaterials. In particular, we consider new advancements in the biomedical application of near-IR absorbing gold nano-chromophores as an original solution for the photothermal repair of surgical incisions and as nanotriggers of controlled drug release from hybrid biopolymer scaffolds. (laser biophotonics)

  9. ¬Mesenchymal Stem Cell Fate: Applying Biomaterials for Control of Stem Cell Behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Hilary Jane Anderson; Matthew John Dalby; Jugal eSahoo; Rein eUljin

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal Stem Cell Fate: Applying Biomaterials for Control of Stem Cell BehaviourHilary J Anderson1, Jugal Kishore Sahoo2, Rein V Ulijn2,3, Matthew J Dalby1*1 Centre for Cell Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.2 Technology and Innovation centre, Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK. 3 Advanced Science Research Centre (ASRC) and Hunter College, City University of New York, NY 10031, NY, USA. Correspondence:*Hilary Andersonh.anderson...

  10. Solvent Composition is Critical for Carbodiimide Cross-Linking of Hyaluronic Acid as an Ophthalmic Biomaterial

    OpenAIRE

    Jui-Yang Lai

    2012-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is one of the most important ophthalmic biomaterials, while also being used for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Although chemical cross-linking is an effective way to improve the material performance, it may as a consequence be detrimental to the living cells/tissues. Given that the cross-linking efficiency is mediated by the solvent composition during the chemical modification, this study aims to explore the stability and biocompatibility of carbodiimide cross-link...

  11. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of metallic biomaterials: reaction rate and ion release imaging modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, J L; Smith, S M; Lautenschlager, E P

    1993-11-01

    The Scanning Electrochemical Microscope (SECM) is a nonoptical scanning microscopic instrument capable of imaging highly localized electrical currents associated with charge transfer reactions on metallic biomaterials surfaces. The SECM operates as an aqueous electrochemical cell under bipotentiostatic control with a microelectrode and sample independently biased as working electrodes. Microelectrode current and position is recorded as it is scanned very near a metallurgically polished planar sample surface. To date, the SECM has imaged metallic biomaterials surfaces in oxygen reaction rate imaging (ORRI) and ion release and deposition imaging (IRDI) modes. In ORRI, sample and microelectrode are biased at sufficiently negative potentials to reduce absorbed oxygen. As the microelectrode scans areas of active oxygen reduction, localized diffusion fields with decreased oxygen solution concentrations are encountered and resultant decrements in microelectrode current are observed. In IRDI mode the sample is positively biased and the microelectrode is negatively biased. The microelectrode detects anodic dissolution products with highest currents being observed over the most active areas. Performance of the SECM has been evaluated on Ni minigrids, gamma-1 Hg-Ag dental amalgam crystals, and sintered beads of Co-Cr-Mo alloy which represent significantly different geometries and corrosion processes to help demonstrate the potential of this instrument. The SECM is a valuable tool for imaging microelectrochemical processes on the surfaces of metallurgically polished metallic biomaterials samples and a wide variety of other surfaces of biological interest where charge transfer reactions occur. The SECM allows selective biasing of metallic biomaterials surfaces and Faradaic reactions can be selectively imaged while the surface is in the active, passive, or transpassive state. PMID:8262998

  12. UV- Killed Staphylococcus aureus Enhances Adhesion and Differentiation of Osteoblasts on Bone-associated Biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Somayaji, Shankari N.; Huet, Yvette M.; Gruber, Helen E.; Hudson, Michael C

    2010-01-01

    Titanium alloys (Ti) are the preferred material for orthopaedic applications. However, very often, these metallic implants loosen over a long period and mandate revision surgery. For implant success, osteoblasts must adhere to the implant surface and deposit a mineralized extracellular matrix. Here, we utilized UV-killed Staphylococcus aureus as a novel osteoconductive coating for Ti surfaces. S. aureus expresses surface adhesins capable of binding to bone and biomaterials directly. Furthermo...

  13. Biomaterial design for specific cellular interactions: Role of surface functionalization and geometric features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolhar, Poornima

    The areas of drug delivery and tissue engineering have experienced extraordinary growth in recent years with the application of engineering principles and their potential to support and improve the field of medicine. The tremendous progress in nanotechnology and biotechnology has lead to this explosion of research and development in biomedical applications. Biomaterials can now be engineered at a nanoscale and their specific interactions with the biological tissues can be modulated. Various design parameters are being established and researched for design of drug-delivery carriers and scaffolds to be implanted into humans. Nanoparticles made from versatile biomaterial can deliver both small-molecule drugs and various classes of bio-macromolecules, such as proteins and oligonucleotides. Similarly in the field of tissue engineering, current approaches emphasize nanoscale control of cell behavior by mimicking the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) unlike, traditional scaffolds. Drug delivery and tissue engineering are closely connected fields and both of these applications require materials with exceptional physical, chemical, biological, and biomechanical properties to provide superior therapy. In the current study the surface functionalization and the geometric features of the biomaterials has been explored. In particular, a synthetic surface for culture of human embryonic stem cells has been developed, demonstrating the importance of surface functionalization in maintaining the pluripotency of hESCs. In the second study, the geometric features of the drug delivery carriers are investigated and the polymeric nanoneedles mediated cellular permeabilization and direct cytoplasmic delivery is reported. In the third study, the combined effect of surface functionalization and geometric modification of carriers for vascular targeting is enunciated. These studies illustrate how the biomaterials can be designed to achieve various cellular behaviors and control the

  14. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of metallic biomaterials: reaction rate and ion release imaging modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, J L; Smith, S M; Lautenschlager, E P

    1993-11-01

    The Scanning Electrochemical Microscope (SECM) is a nonoptical scanning microscopic instrument capable of imaging highly localized electrical currents associated with charge transfer reactions on metallic biomaterials surfaces. The SECM operates as an aqueous electrochemical cell under bipotentiostatic control with a microelectrode and sample independently biased as working electrodes. Microelectrode current and position is recorded as it is scanned very near a metallurgically polished planar sample surface. To date, the SECM has imaged metallic biomaterials surfaces in oxygen reaction rate imaging (ORRI) and ion release and deposition imaging (IRDI) modes. In ORRI, sample and microelectrode are biased at sufficiently negative potentials to reduce absorbed oxygen. As the microelectrode scans areas of active oxygen reduction, localized diffusion fields with decreased oxygen solution concentrations are encountered and resultant decrements in microelectrode current are observed. In IRDI mode the sample is positively biased and the microelectrode is negatively biased. The microelectrode detects anodic dissolution products with highest currents being observed over the most active areas. Performance of the SECM has been evaluated on Ni minigrids, gamma-1 Hg-Ag dental amalgam crystals, and sintered beads of Co-Cr-Mo alloy which represent significantly different geometries and corrosion processes to help demonstrate the potential of this instrument. The SECM is a valuable tool for imaging microelectrochemical processes on the surfaces of metallurgically polished metallic biomaterials samples and a wide variety of other surfaces of biological interest where charge transfer reactions occur. The SECM allows selective biasing of metallic biomaterials surfaces and Faradaic reactions can be selectively imaged while the surface is in the active, passive, or transpassive state.

  15. Biomaterial aspects: A key factor in the longevity of implant overdenture attachment systems

    OpenAIRE

    Daou, Elie E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: New attachment systems are released for mandibular two-implant overdentures often without evidence-based support. Biomaterial aspects are now the parameters considered when choosing the appropriate attachment. Studies regarding their properties remain scarce. Purpose: The purpose of this review was to help the clinician in selrcting the most adapted stud attachments according evidence-based dentistry. Materials and Methods: An electronic search was conducted using specific databas...

  16. Mechanical Properties and Biocompatibility of a Biomaterial Based on Deproteinized Hydroxyapatite and Endodentine Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupeks Lauris

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyapatite is used for bone reconstruction, in order to improve its mechanical properties different substances can be added. In our study new biomaterial is created from deproteinised hydroxyaptite and endodentic cement, its mechanical properties were tested. Material was implanted subcutaneous in rats, then histological and biocompatability tests were performed. Results indicate that stuff has good mechanical properties, short setting time and gradual resorption creating porosity and ability to integrate in bone.

  17. Self-assembled peptide based biomaterials for drug delivery and regenerative medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Çinar, Göksu

    2016-01-01

    Cataloged from PDF version of article. Thesis (M.S.): Bilkent University, Department of Materials Science and Nanotechnology Program , İhsan Doğramacı Bilkent University, 2016. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 181-219). Self-assembly is a nature inspired novel engineering tool to build functional new generation of adaptable and complex biomaterials with variety of chemical and physical properties based on recent discoveries at the interface of chemistry, biology a...

  18. Bone tissue regeneration indento-alveolar surgery : clinical and experimental studies on biomaterials and bone graft substitutes

    OpenAIRE

    Sahlin-Platt, Annika

    2011-01-01

    Pathological processes in the alveolar and facial bones can lead to bone loss that may not heal with complete regeneration. Biomaterials can be used to facilitate the healing process and/or as a bone substitute, but the mechanisms are not fully understood. Persistent leakage of bacteria/bacterial toxins, after root canal treatment, may lead to a residual bone defect. The healing is dependent on a placed dental biomaterial providing a tight seal. The composition of the filling material may als...

  19. In vitro evaluation of biomimetic chitosan-calcium phosphate scaffolds with potential application in bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanase, C E; Sartoris, A; Popa, M I; Verestiuc, L; Unger, R E; Kirkpatrick, C J

    2013-04-01

    This work reports on the physicochemical properties and in vitro cytotoxicity assessment of chitosan-calcium phosphate (Cs-CP) scaffolds for bone tissue engineering, which were synthesized by a novel biomimetic co-precipitation method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) along with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis confirmed the porous morphology of the scaffolds and the amorphous nature of the inorganic phase with different crystallite sizes and the formation of various forms of calcium phosphate. Compressive mechanical testing revealed that the Young's modulus of the biomaterials is in the range of human trabecular bone. In vitro tests were performed on the biomaterials for up to 14 days to study the behavior of the osteoblast-like human cell line (MG63), primary human osteoblasts (HOS) and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC). The cytotoxicity was evaluated by the MTS assay for cell metabolism and the detection of membrane integrity (lactate dehydrogenase-LDH release). An expression of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the cell supernatants was quantified by ELISA. Cell viability gave values close to untreated controls for MG63 and HOS, while in the case of HDMEC the viability after 2 weeks in the cell culture was between 80-90%. The cytotoxicity induced by the Cs-CP scaffolds on MG63, HOS and HDMEC in vitro was evaluated by the amount of LDH released, which is a sensitive and accurate marker for cellular toxicity. The increased levels of VEGF obtained in the osteoblast culture highlights its important role in the regulation of vascularization and bone remodeling. The biological responses of the Cs-CP scaffolds demonstrate a similar proliferation and differentiation characteristics of the cells comparable to the controls. These results reveal that biomimetic Cs-CP composite scaffolds are promising biomaterials for bone tissue engineering; their in vivo response remains to be tested. PMID:23343569

  20. In vitro evaluation of biomimetic chitosan–calcium phosphate scaffolds with potential application in bone tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work reports on the physicochemical properties and in vitro cytotoxicity assessment of chitosan–calcium phosphate (Cs–CP) scaffolds for bone tissue engineering, which were synthesized by a novel biomimetic co-precipitation method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) along with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis confirmed the porous morphology of the scaffolds and the amorphous nature of the inorganic phase with different crystallite sizes and the formation of various forms of calcium phosphate. Compressive mechanical testing revealed that the Young's modulus of the biomaterials is in the range of human trabecular bone. In vitro tests were performed on the biomaterials for up to 14 days to study the behavior of the osteoblast-like human cell line (MG63), primary human osteoblasts (HOS) and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC). The cytotoxicity was evaluated by the MTS assay for cell metabolism and the detection of membrane integrity (lactate dehydrogenase-LDH release). An expression of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the cell supernatants was quantified by ELISA. Cell viability gave values close to untreated controls for MG63 and HOS, while in the case of HDMEC the viability after 2 weeks in the cell culture was between 80–90%. The cytotoxicity induced by the Cs–CP scaffolds on MG63, HOS and HDMEC in vitro was evaluated by the amount of LDH released, which is a sensitive and accurate marker for cellular toxicity. The increased levels of VEGF obtained in the osteoblast culture highlights its important role in the regulation of vascularization and bone remodeling. The biological responses of the Cs–CP scaffolds demonstrate a similar proliferation and differentiation characteristics of the cells comparable to the controls. These results reveal that biomimetic Cs–CP composite scaffolds are promising biomaterials for bone tissue engineering; their in vivo response remains to be tested. (paper)

  1. Influence of cell surface characteristics on adhesion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to the biomaterial hydroxylapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jane S; Walker, Graeme M

    2011-02-01

    The influence of the physicochemical properties of biomaterials on microbial cell adhesion is well known, with the extent of adhesion depending on hydrophobicity, surface charge, specific functional groups and acid-base properties. Regarding yeasts, the effect of cell surfaces is often overlooked, despite the fact that generalisations may not be made between closely related strains. The current investigation compared adhesion of three industrially relevant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (M-type, NCYC 1681 and ALY, strains used in production of Scotch whisky, ale and lager, respectively) to the biomaterial hydroxylapatite (HAP). Adhesion of the whisky yeast was greatest, followed by the ale strain, while adhesion of the lager strain was approximately 10-times less. According to microbial adhesion to solvents (MATS) analysis, the ale strain was hydrophobic while the whisky and lager strains were moderately hydrophilic. This contrasted with analyses of water contact angles where all strains were characterised as hydrophilic. All yeast strains were electron donating, with low electron accepting potential, as indicated by both surface energy and MATS analysis. Overall, there was a linear correlation between adhesion to HAP and the overall surface free energy of the yeasts. This is the first time that the relationship between yeast cell surface energy and adherence to a biomaterial has been described.

  2. Effect of biomaterial properties on bone healing in a rabbit tooth extraction socket model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John P; Lalani, Zahid; Bossano, Carla M; Brey, Eric M; Demian, Nagi; Johnston, Carol M; Dean, David; Jansen, John A; Wong, Mark E K; Mikos, Antonios G

    2004-03-01

    In this work we sought to understand the effect of biomaterial properties upon healing bone tissue. We hypothesized that a hydrophilic polymer gel implanted into a bone tissue defect would impede the healing process owing to the biomaterial's prevention of protein adsorption and thus cell adhesion. To test this hypothesis, healing bone was investigated within a rabbit incisor extraction socket, a subcritical size bone defect that resists significant soft tissue invasion by virtue of its conformity. After removal of the incisor teeth, one tooth socket was left as an empty control, one was filled with crosslinked polymer networks formed from the hydrophobic polymer poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF), and one was filled with a hydrogel formed from the hydrophilic oligomer oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) (OPF). At five different times (4 days as well as 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks), jaw bone specimens containing the tooth sockets were removed. We analyzed bone healing by histomorphometrical analysis of hematoxylin and eosin stained sections as well as immunohistochemically stained sections. The proposed hypothesis, that a hydrophilic material would hinder bone healing, was supported by the histomorphometrical results. In addition, the immunohistochemical results reflect molecular signaling indicative of the early invasion of platelets, the vascularization of wound-healing tissue, the differentiation of migrating progenitor cells, and the formation and remodeling of bone tissue. Finally, the results emphasize the need to consider biomaterial properties and their differing effects upon endogenous growth factors, and thus bone healing, during the development of tissue engineering devices. PMID:14762922

  3. Mechanical properties of open-cell metallic biomaterials manufactured using additive manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Finite element (FE) models were used to predict the mechanical properties of porous biomaterials. ► Porous materials were produced using additive manufacturing techniques. ► Manufacturing irregularities need to be implemented in FE models. ► FE models are more accurate than analytical models in predicting mechanical properties. - Abstract: An important practical problem in application of open-cell porous biomaterials is the prediction of the mechanical properties of the material given its micro-architecture and the properties of its matrix material. Although analytical methods can be used for this purpose, these models are often based on several simplifying assumptions with respect to the complex architecture and cannot provide accurate prediction results. The aim of the current study is to present finite element (FE) models that can predict the mechanical properties of porous titanium produced using selective laser melting or selective electron beam melting. The irregularities caused by the manufacturing process including structural variations of the architecture are implemented in the FE models using statistical models. The predictions of FE models are compared with those of analytical models and are tested against experimental data. It is shown that, as opposed to analytical models, the predictions of FE models are in agreement with experimental observations. It is concluded that manufacturing irregularities significantly affect the mechanical properties of porous biomaterials

  4. Evolution of Antimicrobial Peptides to Self-Assembled Peptides for Biomaterial Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice P. McCloskey

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Biomaterial-related infections are a persistent burden on patient health, recovery, mortality and healthcare budgets. Self-assembled antimicrobial peptides have evolved from the area of antimicrobial peptides. Peptides serve as important weapons in nature, and increasingly medicine, for combating microbial infection and biofilms. Self-assembled peptides harness a “bottom-up” approach, whereby the primary peptide sequence may be modified with natural and unnatural amino acids to produce an inherently antimicrobial hydrogel. Gelation may be tailored to occur in the presence of physiological and infective indicators (e.g. pH, enzymes and therefore allow local, targeted antimicrobial therapy at the site of infection. Peptides demonstrate inherent biocompatibility, antimicrobial activity, biodegradability and numerous functional groups. They are therefore prime candidates for the production of polymeric molecules that have the potential to be conjugated to biomaterials with precision. Non-native chemistries and functional groups are easily incorporated into the peptide backbone allowing peptide hydrogels to be tailored to specific functional requirements. This article reviews an area of increasing interest, namely self-assembled peptides and their potential therapeutic applications as innovative hydrogels and biomaterials in the prevention of biofilm-related infection.

  5. Effect of biomaterial properties on bone healing in a rabbit tooth extraction socket model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John P; Lalani, Zahid; Bossano, Carla M; Brey, Eric M; Demian, Nagi; Johnston, Carol M; Dean, David; Jansen, John A; Wong, Mark E K; Mikos, Antonios G

    2004-03-01

    In this work we sought to understand the effect of biomaterial properties upon healing bone tissue. We hypothesized that a hydrophilic polymer gel implanted into a bone tissue defect would impede the healing process owing to the biomaterial's prevention of protein adsorption and thus cell adhesion. To test this hypothesis, healing bone was investigated within a rabbit incisor extraction socket, a subcritical size bone defect that resists significant soft tissue invasion by virtue of its conformity. After removal of the incisor teeth, one tooth socket was left as an empty control, one was filled with crosslinked polymer networks formed from the hydrophobic polymer poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF), and one was filled with a hydrogel formed from the hydrophilic oligomer oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) (OPF). At five different times (4 days as well as 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks), jaw bone specimens containing the tooth sockets were removed. We analyzed bone healing by histomorphometrical analysis of hematoxylin and eosin stained sections as well as immunohistochemically stained sections. The proposed hypothesis, that a hydrophilic material would hinder bone healing, was supported by the histomorphometrical results. In addition, the immunohistochemical results reflect molecular signaling indicative of the early invasion of platelets, the vascularization of wound-healing tissue, the differentiation of migrating progenitor cells, and the formation and remodeling of bone tissue. Finally, the results emphasize the need to consider biomaterial properties and their differing effects upon endogenous growth factors, and thus bone healing, during the development of tissue engineering devices.

  6. Development of an indirect stereolithography technology for scaffold fabrication with a wide range of biomaterial selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun-Wook; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2012-09-01

    Tissue engineering, which is the study of generating biological substitutes to restore or replace tissues or organs, has the potential to meet current needs for organ transplantation and medical interventions. Various approaches have been attempted to apply three-dimensional (3D) solid freeform fabrication technologies to tissue engineering for scaffold fabrication. Among these, the stereolithography (SL) technology not only has the highest resolution, but also offers quick fabrication. However, a lack of suitable biomaterials is a barrier to applying the SL technology to tissue engineering. In this study, an indirect SL method that combines the SL technology and a sacrificial molding process was developed to address this challenge. A sacrificial mold with an inverse porous shape was fabricated from an alkali-soluble photopolymer by the SL technology. A sacrificial molding process was then developed for scaffold construction using a variety of biomaterials. The results indicated a wide range of biomaterial selectivity and a high resolution. Achievable minimum pore and strut sizes were as large as 50 and 65 μm, respectively. This technology can also be used to fabricate three-dimensional organ shapes, and combined with traditional fabrication methods to construct a new type of scaffold with a dual-pore size. Cytotoxicity tests, as well as nuclear magnetic resonance and gel permeation chromatography analyses, showed that this technology has great potential for tissue engineering applications.

  7. Characterization of modified calcium-silicate cements exposed to acidic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camilleri, Josette, E-mail: josette.camilleri@um.edu.mt

    2011-01-15

    Portland cement which is used as a binder in concrete in the construction industry has been developed into a biomaterial. It is marketed as mineral trioxide aggregate and is used in dentistry. This material has been reported to be very biocompatible and thus its use has diversified. The extended use of this material has led to developments of newer versions with improved physical properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of acidic environments found in the oral cavity on fast setting calcium silicate cements with improved physical properties using a combination of techniques. Two fast setting calcium silicate cements (CSA and CFA) and two cement composites (CSAG and CFAG) were assessed by subjecting the materials to lactic acid/sodium lactate buffer gel for a period of 28 days. At weekly intervals the materials were viewed under the tandem scanning confocal microscope (TSM), and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The two prototype cements exhibited changes in their internal chemistry with no changes in surface characteristics. Since the changes observed were mostly sub-surface evaluation of surface characteristics of cement may not be sufficient in the determination of chemical changes occurring. - Research Highlights: {yields} An acidic environment affects modified fast setting calcium silicate-based cements. {yields} No surface changes are observed in acidic environment. {yields} An acidic environment causes sub-surface changes in the material chemistry which are only visible in fractured specimens. {yields} A combination of techniques is necessary in order to evaluate the chemical changes occurring.

  8. Characterization of modified calcium-silicate cements exposed to acidic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portland cement which is used as a binder in concrete in the construction industry has been developed into a biomaterial. It is marketed as mineral trioxide aggregate and is used in dentistry. This material has been reported to be very biocompatible and thus its use has diversified. The extended use of this material has led to developments of newer versions with improved physical properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of acidic environments found in the oral cavity on fast setting calcium silicate cements with improved physical properties using a combination of techniques. Two fast setting calcium silicate cements (CSA and CFA) and two cement composites (CSAG and CFAG) were assessed by subjecting the materials to lactic acid/sodium lactate buffer gel for a period of 28 days. At weekly intervals the materials were viewed under the tandem scanning confocal microscope (TSM), and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The two prototype cements exhibited changes in their internal chemistry with no changes in surface characteristics. Since the changes observed were mostly sub-surface evaluation of surface characteristics of cement may not be sufficient in the determination of chemical changes occurring. - Research Highlights: → An acidic environment affects modified fast setting calcium silicate-based cements. → No surface changes are observed in acidic environment. → An acidic environment causes sub-surface changes in the material chemistry which are only visible in fractured specimens. → A combination of techniques is necessary in order to evaluate the chemical changes occurring.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of nanocomposite powders of calcium phosphate/silica-gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the recent years ceramics of calcium phosphate are pointed out as an outstanding material in substitution and regeneration in defects from osseous tissue, in reason of their similar mineralogical characteristics of apatite of bone structure. However, the challenge with phosphate calcium ceramics find out about the mechanical properties and the development of biomaterials similar of the bone structure, what sometimes is not so easy, about fragile materials. The aim of this work focused in synthesis and characterization nanocomposites powders of calcium phosphate/silica-gel with percentages 1, 2, 3 e 5% of nanometric silica. The method synthesis used for the compositions elaboration was dissolution-precipitation. The presented results are related with the optimization to method elaboration of nanostructured powders, the mineralogical characterization with X-ray diffraction, thermal behavior with thermal differential analysis, differential scanning calorimetry here is ADT and dilatometer. The scanning electronic microscopy was used to help of morphological characterization the nanostructured powders and the surfaces from body test recovered from the mechanical test. (author)

  10. Europium-doped amorphous calcium phosphate porous nanospheres: preparation and application as luminescent drug carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Kui-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Calcium phosphate is the most important inorganic constituent of biological tissues, and synthetic calcium phosphate has been widely used as biomaterials. In this study, a facile method has been developed for the fabrication of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP/polylactide-block-monomethoxy(polyethyleneglycol hybrid nanoparticles and ACP porous nanospheres. Europium-doping is performed to enable photoluminescence (PL function of ACP porous nanospheres. A high specific surface area of the europium-doped ACP (Eu3+:ACP porous nanospheres is achieved (126.7 m2/g. PL properties of Eu3+:ACP porous nanospheres are investigated, and the most intense peak at 612 nm is observed at 5 mol% Eu3+ doping. In vitro cytotoxicity experiments indicate that the as-prepared Eu3+:ACP porous nanospheres are biocompatible. In vitro drug release experiments indicate that the ibuprofen-loaded Eu3+:ACP porous nanospheres show a slow and sustained drug release in simulated body fluid. We have found that the cumulative amount of released drug has a linear relationship with the natural logarithm of release time (ln(t. The Eu3+:ACP porous nanospheres are bioactive, and can transform to hydroxyapatite during drug release. The PL properties of drug-loaded nanocarriers before and after drug release are also investigated.

  11. Europium-doped amorphous calcium phosphate porous nanospheres: preparation and application as luminescent drug carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Zhang, Kui-Hua; Wu, Jin; Wang, Ke-Wei; Tang, Qi-Li; Mo, Xiu-Mei

    2011-01-01

    Calcium phosphate is the most important inorganic constituent of biological tissues, and synthetic calcium phosphate has been widely used as biomaterials. In this study, a facile method has been developed for the fabrication of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP)/polylactide-block-monomethoxy(polyethyleneglycol) hybrid nanoparticles and ACP porous nanospheres. Europium-doping is performed to enable photoluminescence (PL) function of ACP porous nanospheres. A high specific surface area of the europium-doped ACP (Eu3+:ACP) porous nanospheres is achieved (126.7 m2/g). PL properties of Eu3+:ACP porous nanospheres are investigated, and the most intense peak at 612 nm is observed at 5 mol% Eu3+ doping. In vitro cytotoxicity experiments indicate that the as-prepared Eu3+:ACP porous nanospheres are biocompatible. In vitro drug release experiments indicate that the ibuprofen-loaded Eu3+:ACP porous nanospheres show a slow and sustained drug release in simulated body fluid. We have found that the cumulative amount of released drug has a linear relationship with the natural logarithm of release time (ln(t)). The Eu3+:ACP porous nanospheres are bioactive, and can transform to hydroxyapatite during drug release. The PL properties of drug-loaded nanocarriers before and after drug release are also investigated. PMID:21711603

  12. A new titanium based alloy Ti-27Nb-13Zr produced by powder metallurgy with biomimetic coating for use as a biomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Marcio W D; Ágreda, Carola G; Bressiani, Ana H A; Bressiani, José C

    2016-06-01

    Titanium alloys are widely used in biomedical applications due to their excellent properties such as high strength, good corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. Titanium alloys with alloying elements such as Nb and Zr are biocompatible and have Young's modulus close to that of human bone. To increase the bioactivity of titanium alloy surfaces is used chemical treatment with NaOH followed by immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). The purpose of this study was to produce the alloy Ti-27Nb-13Zr with low Young's modulus by powder metallurgy using powders produced by the HDH process. The formation of biomimetic coatings on samples immersed in SBF for 3, 7, 11 and 15 days was evaluated. Characterization of the coating was performed by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and scanning electron microscope. The microstructure and composition of the alloy were determined using SEM and XRD, while the mechanical properties were evaluated by determining the elastic modulus and the Vickers microhardness. The sintered alloys were composed of α and β phases, equiaxed grains and with density around 97.8% of its theoretical density. The Vickers microhardness and elasticity modulus of the alloy were determined and their values indicate that this alloy can be used as a biomaterial. Analysis of the coating revealed the presence of calcium phosphate layers on samples immersed for >3 days in the SBF solution.

  13. Development of an osteoblast/osteoclast co-culture derived by human bone marrow stromal cells and human monocytes for biomaterials testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Worch

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The communication of bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts is a fundamental requirement for balanced bone remodelling. For biomaterial research, development of in vitro models is necessary to investigate this communication. In the present study human bone marrow stromal cells and human monocytes were cultivated in order to differentiate into osteoblasts and osteoclasts, respectively. Finally, a cultivation regime was identified which firstly induces the differentiation of the human bone marrow stromal cells followed by the induction of osteoclastogenesis through the osteoblasts formed – without the external addition of the factors RANKL and M-CSF. As a feedback on osteoblasts enhanced gene expression of BSP II was detected for modifications which facilitated the formation of large multinuclear osteoclasts. Phenotype characterization was performed by biochemical methods (DNA, LDH, ALP, TRAP 5b, gene expression analysis (ALP, BSP II, RANKL, IL-6, VTNR, CTSK, TRAP, OSCAR, CALCR as well as light microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. After establishing this model on polystyrene, similar positive results were obtained for cultivation on a relevant bone substitution material – a composite xerogel of silica, collagen, and calcium phosphate.

  14. Histological and Histomorphometric Human Results of HA-Beta-TCP 30/70 Compared to Three Different Biomaterials in Maxillary Sinus Augmentation at 6 Months: A Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Annibali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this investigation was to examine the bone regenerative potential of newly biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics (HA-β-TCP 30/70, by assessing histological and histomorphometric results of human specimens retrieved from sinuses augmented with HA-β-TCP 30/70, and comparing them to anorganic bovine bone (ABB, mineralized solvent-dehydrated bone allograft (MSDBA, and equine bone (EB, after a healing period of 6 months. Materials and Methods. Four consecutive patients with edentulous atrophic posterior maxilla were included in this report. A two-stage procedure was carried out for sinus augmentation with HA-β-TCP 30/70, ABB, MSDBA, and EB. After 6 months, specimens were retrieved at the time of implant placement and processed for histological and histomorphometric analyses. Results. At histological examination, all biomaterials were in close contact with the newly formed bone and showed the same pattern of bone formation; the grafted granules were surrounded by a bridge-like network of newly formed bone. A limited number of ABB particles were partially covered by connective tissue. The histomorphometric analysis revealed 30.2% newly formed bone for Ha-β-TCP 30/70, 20.1% for ABB, 16.4% for MSDBA, and 21.9% for EB. Conclusions. Within the limitations of the present investigation, these results support the successful use of HA-β-TCP 30/70 for sinus augmentation.

  15. A new titanium based alloy Ti-27Nb-13Zr produced by powder metallurgy with biomimetic coating for use as a biomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Marcio W D; Ágreda, Carola G; Bressiani, Ana H A; Bressiani, José C

    2016-06-01

    Titanium alloys are widely used in biomedical applications due to their excellent properties such as high strength, good corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. Titanium alloys with alloying elements such as Nb and Zr are biocompatible and have Young's modulus close to that of human bone. To increase the bioactivity of titanium alloy surfaces is used chemical treatment with NaOH followed by immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). The purpose of this study was to produce the alloy Ti-27Nb-13Zr with low Young's modulus by powder metallurgy using powders produced by the HDH process. The formation of biomimetic coatings on samples immersed in SBF for 3, 7, 11 and 15 days was evaluated. Characterization of the coating was performed by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and scanning electron microscope. The microstructure and composition of the alloy were determined using SEM and XRD, while the mechanical properties were evaluated by determining the elastic modulus and the Vickers microhardness. The sintered alloys were composed of α and β phases, equiaxed grains and with density around 97.8% of its theoretical density. The Vickers microhardness and elasticity modulus of the alloy were determined and their values indicate that this alloy can be used as a biomaterial. Analysis of the coating revealed the presence of calcium phosphate layers on samples immersed for >3 days in the SBF solution. PMID:27040264

  16. Mitochondrial calcium uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, George S B; Boyman, Liron; Chikando, Aristide C; Khairallah, Ramzi J; Lederer, W J

    2013-06-25

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) uptake into the mitochondrial matrix is critically important to cellular function. As a regulator of matrix Ca(2+) levels, this flux influences energy production and can initiate cell death. If large, this flux could potentially alter intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) signals. Despite years of study, fundamental disagreements on the extent and speed of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake still exist. Here, we review and quantitatively analyze mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake fluxes from different tissues and interpret the results with respect to the recently proposed mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) candidate. This quantitative analysis yields four clear results: (i) under physiological conditions, Ca(2+) influx into the mitochondria via the MCU is small relative to other cytosolic Ca(2+) extrusion pathways; (ii) single MCU conductance is ∼6-7 pS (105 mM [Ca(2+)]), and MCU flux appears to be modulated by [Ca(2+)]i, suggesting Ca(2+) regulation of MCU open probability (P(O)); (iii) in the heart, two features are clear: the number of MCU channels per mitochondrion can be calculated, and MCU probability is low under normal conditions; and (iv) in skeletal muscle and liver cells, uptake per mitochondrion varies in magnitude but total uptake per cell still appears to be modest. Based on our analysis of available quantitative data, we conclude that although Ca(2+) critically regulates mitochondrial function, the mitochondria do not act as a significant dynamic buffer of cytosolic Ca(2+) under physiological conditions. Nevertheless, with prolonged (superphysiological) elevations of [Ca(2+)]i, mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake can increase 10- to 1,000-fold and begin to shape [Ca(2+)]i dynamics.

  17. Summary of the National Conference on Challenges in Biomaterials Research jointly organized by VIT and CSIR-CECRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manivasagam G

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Geetha Manivasagam,1 Balasubramanian Subramanian,2 Thomas J Webster3,4 1Centre for Biomaterials Science and Technology, School of Mechanical and Building Sciences, Vellore Institute of Technology, Vellore, India; 2Electrochemical Materials Science Division, CSIR-Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi, Tamil Nadu, India; 3Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 4Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi ArabiaHealth care has become one of the highest priority research fields of this century owing to the dramatic increase in the number of people affected by various diseases. Health care costs and the high demand for biomaterials have placed tremendous pressure on government funding agencies and researchers to develop cost-effective, appropriate biomaterials to treat various diseases and to regenerate diseased and fractured organs. The field of biomaterials is projected to generate approximately $80 billion by the end of this decade. Thus, various funding organizations have allocated considerable funding for the development of the next generation of biomaterials. Despite the fact that certain global regions and countries (such as the US, Europe, Australia, Brazil, and the People’s Republic of China have considerable expertise in the manufacturing of various biomaterials, India has developed considerable expertise in specifically manufacturing cardiovascular and orthopedic implants over the past 3 decades.

  18. Synthesis of calcium hydrogen phosphate and hydroxyapatite coating on SS316 substrate through pulsed electrodeposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Rajib; Sengupta, Srijan; Saha, Partha; Das, Karabi; Das, Siddhartha

    2016-12-01

    The orthopaedic implants for human body are generally made of different biomaterials like stainless steels or Ti based alloys. However, it has been found that from surface properties point of view, none of these materials is attractive for fast tissue or cell growth on the surface of implant. This is one of the most important criteria to assure quick bonding between implant and body tissues vis-à-vis minimum recovery time for the patient. Keeping in view of the above facts, this work involves the pulsed electro-deposition coating of biocompatible hydroxyapatite and its group compounds from a diluted bath of calcium and phosphate salt at various current densities over the biomaterial sheet of SS316. SEM study confirms different morphologies of the coatings at different current densities. Characterization techniques like X-ray diffraction, SEM with EDX and FTIR have been used to confirm the phase and percentage quantity of hydroxyapatite compound in the depositions. This coating can serve as a medium for faster tissue growth over the metallic implants. PMID:27612782

  19. A glass-encapsulated calcium phosphate wasteform for the immobilization of actinide-, fluoride-, and chloride-containing radioactive wastes from the pyrochemical reprocessing of plutonium metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, I. W.; Metcalfe, B. L.; Fong, S. K.; Gerrard, L. A.; Strachan, D. M.; Scheele, R. D.

    2007-03-01

    Chloride-containing radioactive wastes are generated during the pyrochemical reprocessing of Pu metal. Immobilization of these wastes in borosilicate glass or Synroc-type ceramics is not feasible due to the very low solubility of chlorides in these hosts. Alternative candidates have therefore been sought including phosphate-based glasses, crystalline ceramics and hybrid glass/ceramic systems. These studies have shown that high losses of chloride or evolution of chlorine gas from the melt make vitrification an unacceptable solution unless suitable off-gas treatment facilities capable of dealing with these corrosive by-products are available. On the other hand, both sodium aluminosilicate and calcium phosphate ceramics are capable of retaining chloride in stable mineral phases, which include sodalite, Na 8(AlSiO 4) 6Cl 2, chlorapatite, Ca 5(PO 4) 3Cl, and spodiosite, Ca 2(PO 4)Cl. The immobilization process developed in this study involves a solid state process in which waste and precursor powders are mixed and reacted in air at temperatures in the range 700-800 °C. The ceramic products are non-hygroscopic free-flowing powders that only require encapsulation in a relatively low melting temperature phosphate-based glass to produce a monolithic wasteform suitable for storage and ultimate disposal.

  20. Aging and calcium as an environmental factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, T

    1985-12-01

    Calcium deficiency is a constant menace to land-abiding animals, including mammals. Humans enjoying exceptional longevity on earth are especially susceptible to calcium deficiency in old age. Low calcium and vitamin D intake, short solar exposure, decreased intestinal absorption, and falling renal function with insufficient 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D biosynthesis all contribute to calcium deficiency, secondary hyperparathyroidism, bone loss and possibly calcium shift from the bone to soft tissue, and from the extracellular to the intracellular compartment, blunting the sharp concentration gap between these compartments. The consequences of calcium deficiency might thus include not only osteoporosis, but also arteriosclerosis and hypertension due to the increase of calcium in the vascular wall, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and senile dementia due to calcium deposition in the central nervous system, and a decrease in cellular function, because of blunting of the difference in extracellular-intracellular calcium, leading to diabetes mellitus, immune deficiency and others (Fig. 6). PMID:2943880