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Sample records for calcium phosphate ceramics

  1. Dimension of surface microstructure as an osteogenic factor in calcium phosphate ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Jingwei; Luo, Xiaoman; Barbieri, D.; Barradas, A.M.C.; de Bruijn, Joost Dick; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Yuan, Huipin

    2014-01-01

    Microporosity of calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramics has shown its essential role in osteoinduction by CaP ceramics after ectopic implantation. Here we show that not the microporosity but the dimension of surface microstructural features is likely the osteogenic factor. Two tricalcium phosphate

  2. Optimization of calcium phosphate fine ceramic powders preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezanova, K.; Tepavitcharova, S.; Rabadjieva, D.; Gergulova, R.; Ilieva, R.

    2013-12-01

    The effect of biomimetic synthesis method, reaction medium and further precursor treatments on the chemical and phase composition, crystal size and morphology of calcium phosphates was examined. Nanosized calcium phosphate precursors were biomimetically precipitated by the method of continuous precipitation in three types of reaction media at pH 8: (i) SBF as an inorganic electrolyte system; (ii) organic (glycerine) modified SBF (volume ratio of 1:1); (iii) polymer (10 g/l xanthan gum or 10 g/l guar gum) modified SBF (volume ratio of 1:1). After maturation (24 h) the samples were lyophilized, calcinated at 300°C for 3 hours, and washed with water, followed by new gelation, lyophilization and step-wise (200, 400, 600, 800, and 1000°C, each for 3 hours) sintering. The reaction medium influenced the chemical composition and particle size but not the morphology of the calcium phosphate powders. In all studied cases bi-phase calcium phosphate fine powders with well-shaped spherical grains, consisting of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and hydroxyapatite (HA) with a Ca/P ratio of 1.3 - 1.6 were obtained. The SBF modifiers decreased the particle size of the product in the sequence guar gum ˜ xanthan gum < glycerin < SBF medium.

  3. Effect of nanostructure on osteoinduction of porous biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Liao, Xiaoling; Zheng, Li; Zhu, Xiangdong; Wang, Zhe; Fan, Hongsong; Zhang, Xingdong

    2012-10-01

    In order to evaluate the effect of the nanostructure of calcium phosphate ceramics on osteoinductive potential, porous biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) ceramics with a nano- or submicron structure were prepared via microwave sintering and compared to conventional BCP ceramics. The selective protein adsorption of bovine serum albumin and lysozyme (LSZ) and the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells in vitro was investigated. Porous BCP nanoceramics showed higher ability to adsorb proteins, especially low molecular weight protein of LSZ, than conventional BCP ceramics, and the BCP nanoceramics promoted bone sialoprotein expression more than conventional BCP did. Further in vivo study to investigate ectopic bone formation and bone repair efficiency proved the highly osteoinductive potential of nanostructured BCP ceramics. The results suggest that nanostructured BCP ceramics have the potential to become a new generation of bioceramics for bone tissue engineering grafts. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative study on in vivo response of porous calcium carbonate composite ceramic and biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Fupo, E-mail: fphebm@126.com [School of Electromechanical Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Ren, Weiwei [School of Electromechanical Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Tian, Xiumei [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Basic Sciences, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510182 (China); Liu, Wei; Wu, Shanghua [School of Electromechanical Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Chen, Xiaoming, E-mail: xmchenw@126.com [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Basic Sciences, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510182 (China)

    2016-07-01

    In a previous study, robust calcium carbonate composite ceramics (CC/PG) were prepared by using phosphate-based glass (PG) as an additive, which showed good cell response. In the present study the in vivo response of porous CC/PG was compared to that of porous biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics (BCP), using a rabbit femoral critical-size grafting model. The materials degradation and bone formation processes were evaluated by general observation, X-ray radiography, micro-computed tomography, and histological examination. The results demonstrated excellent biocompatibility and osteoconductivity, and progressive degradation of CC/PG and BCP. Although the in vitro degradation rate of CC/PG was distinctly faster than that of BCP, at 4 week post-implantation, the bone generation and material degradation of CC/PG were less than those of BCP. Nevertheless, at postoperative week 8, the increment of bone formation and material degradation of CC/PG was pronouncedly larger than that of BCP. These results show that CC/PG is a potential resorbable bone graft aside from the traditional synthetic ones. - Highlights: • A calcium carbonate composite ceramic (CC/PG) was acquired. • The in vivo response of CC/PG and biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) was compared. • CC/PG showed faster in vitro degradation rate compared to BCP. • CC/PG showed less in vivo degradation and bone formation than BCP at week 4. • CC/PG had larger increment of degradation and bone formation than BCP at week 8.

  5. Scaffolds with a standardized macro-architecture fabricated from several calcium phosphate ceramics using an indirect rapid prototyping technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilson, C.E.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Verbout, A.J.; Dhert, W.J.A.; de Bruijn, Joost Dick

    2011-01-01

    Calcium phosphate ceramics, commonly applied as bone graft substitutes, are a natural choice of scaffolding material for bone tissue engineering. Evidence shows that the chemical composition, macroporosity and microporosity of these ceramics influences their behavior as bone graft substitutes and

  6. Comparative study on in vivo response of porous calcium carbonate composite ceramic and biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fupo; Ren, Weiwei; Tian, Xiumei; Liu, Wei; Wu, Shanghua; Chen, Xiaoming

    2016-07-01

    In a previous study, robust calcium carbonate composite ceramics (CC/PG) were prepared by using phosphate-based glass (PG) as an additive, which showed good cell response. In the present study the in vivo response of porous CC/PG was compared to that of porous biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics (BCP), using a rabbit femoral critical-size grafting model. The materials degradation and bone formation processes were evaluated by general observation, X-ray radiography, micro-computed tomography, and histological examination. The results demonstrated excellent biocompatibility and osteoconductivity, and progressive degradation of CC/PG and BCP. Although the in vitro degradation rate of CC/PG was distinctly faster than that of BCP, at 4week post-implantation, the bone generation and material degradation of CC/PG were less than those of BCP. Nevertheless, at postoperative week 8, the increment of bone formation and material degradation of CC/PG was pronouncedly larger than that of BCP. These results show that CC/PG is a potential resorbable bone graft aside from the traditional synthetic ones. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Controlling surface microstructure of calcium phosphate ceramic from random to custom-design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Liao; Luo, Xiaoman; Barbieri, D.; Bao, Chongyun; Yuan, Huipin

    2014-01-01

    Calcium phosphate ceramics have long been studied as bone graft substitutes due to their similarity with the mineral constitute of bone and teeth, excellent biocompatibility and bioactivity. Chemical composition, macrostructure and surface microstructure are believed to be important for the bone

  8. Long-term cell-mediated protein release from calcium phosphate ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wernike, E.; Hofstetter, W.; Liu, Y.; Wu, G.; Sebald, H.J.; Wismeijer, D.; Hunziker, E.B.; Siebenrock, K.A.; Klenke, F.M.

    2010-01-01

    Efficient delivery of growth factors from carrier biomaterials depends critically on the release kinetics of the proteins that constitute the carrier. Immobilizing growth factors to calcium phosphate ceramics has been attempted by direct adsorption and usually resulted in a rapid and passive release

  9. Effect of phase composition on protein adsorption and osteoinduction of porous calcium phosphate ceramics in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Chen, Ying; Zhu, Xiangdong; Yuan, Tun; Tan, Yanfei; Fan, Yujiang; Zhang, Xingdong

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of phase compositions of porous calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramics on their protein adsorption behaviors in vitro and osteoinductive potentials in vivo in mice. Under competitive conditions, a high adsorption of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) was observed at a high initial concentration of BMP-2 in the multi-protein solution on all the four types of ceramics, indicating their strong affinity for BMP-2. No significant difference in BMP-2 adsorption between the ceramics was noted, indicating that phase composition could have little influence on BMP-2 adsorption. After implantation into the thigh muscles of mice for 45 and 90 days, the histological and histomorphometric analyses showed that porous biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) ceramic consisting of 30% hydroxyapatite HA and 70% tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), i.e. BCP-2 had stronger osteoinductive ability than the other three groups of ceramics. The immunohistochemical staining showed the highest expression of BMP-2 and osteocalcin (OCN) in BCP-2 group. Osteoinduction of porous CaP ceramics might be influenced by the amount of BMP-2 present in the local microenvironment in the implant, which was regulated by the phase composition of the ceramics. BCP-2 promoted the highest expression of BMP-2 and then showed the strongest osteoinduction in mice. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Effect of particle size on osteoinductive potential of microstructured biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liao; Barbieri, Davide; Zhou, Hongyu; de Bruijn, Joost D; Bao, Chongyun; Yuan, Huipin

    2015-06-01

    Material factors such as chemistry, surface microstructure and geometry have shown their influence on osteoinduction of calcium phosphate ceramics. Hereby we report that osteoinduction of a micro-structured biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic (BCP) has a relation with the particle sizes. BCP particles with the size of 212-300 µm, 106-212 µm, 45-106 µm, and smaller than 45 µm were prepared and implanted in paraspinal muscle of dogs for 12 weeks. Histological evaluation of the explants showed abundant bone in all samples with particle size of 212-300 µm, 106-212 µm, and 45-106 µm, while no bone was seen in any sample having particle size smaller than 45 µm. Bone was formed as early as 3 weeks after implantation in implants having BCP particles bigger than 45 µm and the volume of the formed bone was similar among the implants with particles larger than 45 µm after 12 weeks implantation. The results herein show that a size limitation of microstructured calcium phosphate ceramic particles for osteoinduction. It is most likely that the particle size affect inductive bone formation via macroporous structures for body fluid infiltration, cell/tissue ingrowth and angiogenesis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Bone morphogenetic protein Smads signaling in mesenchymal stem cells affected by osteoinductive calcium phosphate ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhurong; Wang, Zhe; Qing, Fangzhu; Ni, Yilu; Fan, Yujiang; Tan, Yanfei; Zhang, Xingdong

    2015-03-01

    Porous calcium phosphate ceramics (CaP ceramics) could induce ectopic bone formation which was regulated by various signal molecules. In this work, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were cultured on the surface of osteoinductive hydroxyapatite (HA) and biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) ceramics in comparison with control (culture plate) for up to 14 days to detect the signal molecules which might be affected by the CaP ceramics. Without adding osteogenic factors, MSCs cultured on HA and BCP both expressed higher Runx2, Osterix, collagen type I, osteopontin, bone sialoprotein, and osteocalcin at various stages compared with control, thus confirmed the osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs. Later study demonstrated the messenger RNA level of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and BMP4 were also significantly enhanced by HA and BCP. Furthermore, Smad1, 4, 5, and Dlx5, the main molecules in the BMP/Smads signaling pathway, were upregulated by HA and BCP. Moreover, the higher expression of Smads and BMP2, 4 in BCP over HA, corresponded to the better performance of BCP in stimulating in vitro osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs. This was in accordance with the better osteoinductivity of BCP over HA in vivo. Altogether, these results implied that the CaP ceramics may initiate the osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs by influencing the expression of molecules in BMP/Smads pathway. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Grafting cyclodextrins to calcium phosphate ceramics for biomedical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, P.A.L.; Nielsen, J.L.; Juhl, M.V.

    2012-01-01

    The grafting of hydroxyapatite/beta-tricalcium phosphate with β-cyclodextrin was achieved using a two step reaction with (3-glycidyloxypropyl)trimethoxysilane as a linker. Firstly, the silane group was brought to react with the hydroxyl groups at the surface of the hydroxyapatite/beta-tricalcium ...

  13. Cell response of calcium phosphate based ceramics, a bone substitute material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Marchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize calcium phosphate ceramics with different Ca/P ratios and evaluate cell response of these materials for use as a bone substitute. Bioceramics consisting of mixtures of hydroxyapatite (HAp and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP powders in different proportions were pressed and sintered. The physical and chemical properties of these bioceramics were then characterized. Characterization of the biological properties of these materials was based on analysis of cell response using cultured fibroblasts. The number of cells attached to the samples was counted from SEM images of samples exposed to cell culture solution for different periods. These data were compared by analysis of variance (ANOVA complemented by the Tukey's test. The TCP sample had higher surface roughness and lower density. The adherence and growth of FMM1 cells on samples from all groups was studied. Even though the different calcium based ceramics exhibited properties which made them suitable as bone substitutes, those with higher levels of β-TCP revealed improved cell growth on their surfaces. These observations indicated two-phase calcium phosphate based materials with a β-TCP surface layer to be a promising bone substitute.

  14. Preparation and characterization of calcium phosphate ceramics and composites as bone substitutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing

    Marine CaCO3 skeletons have tailored architectures created by nature, which give them structural support and other functions. For example, seashells have dense lamellar structures, while coral, cuttlebone and sea urchin spines have interconnected porous structures. In our experiments, seashells, coral and cuttlebone were hydrothermally converted to hydroxyapatite (HAP), and sea urchin spines were converted to Mg-substituted tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCMP), while maintaining their original structures. Partially converted shell samples have mechanical strength, which is close to that of compact human bone. After implantation of converted shell and spine samples in rat femoral defects for 6 weeks, there was newly formed bone growth up to and around the implants. Some new bone was found to migrate through the pores of converted spine samples and grow inward. These results show good bioactivity and osteoconductivity of the implants, indicating the converted shell and spine samples can be used as bone defect fillers. Calcium phosphate powders were prepared through different synthesis methods. Micro-size HAP rods were synthesized by hydrothermal method through a nucleation-growth mechanism. On the other hand, HAP particles, which have good crystallinity, were prepared by wet precipitation with further hydrothermal treatment. beta-TCP or beta-TCMP powders were prepared by a two-step process: wet precipitation of apatitic tricalcium phosphate ('precursor') and calcination of the precursor at 800°C for 3 hours. beta-TCMP or beta-TCP powders were also prepared by solid-state reactions from CaHPO4 and CaCO 3 with/without MgO. Biphasic calcium phosphate, which is mixture of HAP and beta-TCP, can be prepared though mechanical mixing of HAP and beta-TCP powders synthesized as above. Dense beta-TCP and beta-TCMP ceramics can be produced by pressing green bodies at 100MPa and further sintering above 1100°C for 2 hours. beta-TCMP ceramics ˜99.4% relative dense were prepared by

  15. Calcium phosphate ceramics as bone graft substitutes in filling bone tumor defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saikia K

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Synthetic bio-inert materials are currently used as an alternative to autogenous bone graft. Calcium hydroxyapatite (HA and Beta tri-calcium phosphate (β-TCP, which belong to the calcium phosphate ceramics group, are biocompatible and osteo-conductive. The purpose of this study is to analyse the use of HA and β-TCP in their ceramic forms as a bone graft substitute in filling bone voids after curettage of benign bone tumors. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four patients in the age range of 3.5-55 years (mean 14.3 years having benign bone tumors with bone defects were filled with bone graft substitute following curettage. In 20 patients bone defects were filled with block/granules of HA ceramic and in four with β-TCP. Fibular strut graft was packed with HA in four patients. The patients were followed up for an average of 18 months (range 12-36 months. Results: The functional status of the patients at follow-up was evaluated and compared with preoperative functional status. Early incorporation of graft substitutes became evident radiologically between 6 and 10 weeks (Stage I. Complete incorporation (Stage III was observed in an average of nine months (6-18 months. Clinical healing was observed before radiological healing. The average time taken to return to preoperative function was 14 weeks. There was no recurrence of lesion or growth retardation. Conclusion: Calcium hydroxyapatite and β-TCP are excellent bone graft substitutes for autogenous bone graft in filling voids after curettage of benign bone tumors.

  16. A Novel Polymer-Synthesized Ceramic Composite Based System for Bone Repair: Osteoblast Growth on Scaffolds with Varied Calcium Phosphate Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    demongtrated the synthesis of degradable scaffolds from PLAGA /calcium phosphate composite microspheres in which an amorphous calcium phosphate is...EXPERIMENTAL DETAILS Scaffold Preparation Scaffolds were prepared as described in detail previously [3]. Briefly, PLAGA /calcium phosphate composite...culture polystyrene (TCPS) 2- pure PLAGA microspheres 64 3- composite microsphere matrices with a low polymer/ceramic ratio 4- composite microsphere

  17. Preparation of calcium phosphate glass-ceramics and their coating on titanium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasuga, T.; Nogami, M. [Nagoya Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Niinomi, M. [Toyohashi Univ. of Technology (Japan). Dept. of Production Systems Engineering

    2001-07-01

    Novel silica-free calcium phosphate glass-ceramics was prepared by heating a compact of 60CaO . 30P{sub 2}O{sub 5} . 3TiO{sub 2} . 7Na{sub 2}O glass powders. When powder-compacts of the glasses were heated at 850 C, they crystallized and subsequently sintered, resulting in glass-ceramics containing {beta}Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} and {beta}-Ca{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} crystalline phases. The glass-ceramics show relatively high mechanical strength of 100 {proportional_to} 120 MPa in bending and fracture toughness of K{sub IC} {approx} 1.9 MPa.m{sup 0.5}. Hydroxyapatite was formed newly on the surface of the glass-ceramic in simulated body fluid at 37 C. By heating a new type of titanium alloy (Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr), on which the glass powders were placed, at 800 C in air, a glass-ceramic layer containing {beta}-Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} crystal was found to be joined easily with the metal. The joining between the coating layer and the metal substrate is very strong in tensile bonding strength. (orig.)

  18. Scaffolds with a standardized macro-architecture fabricated from several calcium phosphate ceramics using an indirect rapid prototyping technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C. E.; van Blitterswijk, C. A.; Verbout, A. J.; de Bruijn, J. D.

    2010-01-01

    Calcium phosphate ceramics, commonly applied as bone graft substitutes, are a natural choice of scaffolding material for bone tissue engineering. Evidence shows that the chemical composition, macroporosity and microporosity of these ceramics influences their behavior as bone graft substitutes and bone tissue engineering scaffolds but little has been done to optimize these parameters. One method of optimization is to place focus on a particular parameter by normalizing the influence, as much as possible, of confounding parameters. This is difficult to accomplish with traditional fabrication techniques. In this study we describe a design based rapid prototyping method of manufacturing scaffolds with virtually identical macroporous architectures from different calcium phosphate ceramic compositions. Beta-tricalcium phosphate, hydroxyapatite (at two sintering temperatures) and biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds were manufactured. The macro- and micro-architectures of the scaffolds were characterized as well as the influence of the manufacturing method on the chemistries of the calcium phosphate compositions. The structural characteristics of the resulting scaffolds were remarkably similar. The manufacturing process had little influence on the composition of the materials except for the consistent but small addition of, or increase in, a beta-tricalcium phosphate phase. Among other applications, scaffolds produced by the method described provide a means of examining the influence of different calcium phosphate compositions while confidently excluding the influence of the macroporous structure of the scaffolds. PMID:21069558

  19. Macroporous calcium phosphate glass-ceramic prepared by two-step pressing technique and using sucrose as a pore former.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Kasuga, Toshihiro; Nogami, Masayuki

    2005-08-01

    Macroporous calcium phosphate glass-ceramic with an initial glass composition of 60CaO.30P2O5.3TiO2.7Na2O in mol% was successfully prepared by sintering the mixture compact consisting of calcium phosphate glass and sucrose powders, which was formed using a two-step pressing technique. After burning off the sucrose phase, a 3D interconnected macroporous structure was formed in the sintered body, in which the skeleton consisting of the calcium phosphate glass-ceramic (including beta-calcium pyrophosphate and beta-tricalcium phosphate as the crystalline phases) was transformed from the initial glass during the sintering. The macropores with several hundred microns in diameter and the large interconnection size (approximately 100 microm), which result from the controllably large-sized sucrose particles and the hot-pressing at a little higher temperature than the sucrose's melting point, are believed to meet the requirements for cell adhesion and bone tissue regeneration well. Moreover, in vitro dissolution behavior study indicates that the calcium phosphate glass-ceramic is soluble to an acetic acid solution of pH 5-7. These, together with the simplicity and feasibility of the innovative fabrication method itself, show that the formed porous glass-ceramic has a promising potential for application to a scaffold for bone tissue engineering.

  20. Calcium phosphate/microgel composites for 3D powderbed printing of ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkholz, Mandy-Nicole; Agrawal, Garima; Bergmann, Christian; Schröder, Ricarda; Lechner, Sebastian J; Pich, Andrij; Fischer, Horst

    2016-06-01

    Composites of microgels and calcium phosphates are promising as drug delivery systems and basic components for bone substitute implants. In this study, we synthesized novel composite materials consisting of pure β-tricalcium phosphate and stimuli-responsive poly(N-vinylcaprolactam-co-acetoacetoxyethyl methacrylate-co-vinylimidazole) microgels. The chemical composition, thermal properties and morphology for obtained composites were extensively characterized by Fourier transform infrared, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, IGAsorp moisture sorption analyzer, thermogravimetric analysis, granulometric analysis, ESEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and TEM. Mechanical properties of the composites were evaluated by ball-on-three-balls test to determine the biaxial strength. Furthermore, initial 3D powderbed-based printing tests were conducted with spray-dried composites and diluted 2-propanol as a binder to evaluate a new binding concept for β-tricalcium phosphate-based granulates. The printed ceramic bodies were characterized before and after a sintering step by ESEM. The hypothesis that the microgels act as polymer adhesive agents by efficient chemical interactions with the β-tricalcium phosphate particles was confirmed. The obtained composites can be used for the development of new scaffolds.

  1. Physico chemical characterization of two processes of macropores elaboration for biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daculsi, G. [INSERM, Nantes (France). Research Center on Materials of Biological Interest; Schmitt, M. [INSERM, Nantes (France). Research Center on Materials of Biological Interest; Biomatlante, Bretagne (France)

    2001-07-01

    The use of micro and macroporous biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics in orthopedic surgery and more generally in bone filling are more and more used in replacement of allograft. The bybrid bone or STEM cell tissue engineering are also in place to supply of the autograft. This specific material must be macroporous. The technology generally used is polymer sponge impregnated with a green of calcium phosphate followed by a pyrolysis process. The technology we have developed until today for the macropores elaboration in our material from 15 years are based on the sublimation of naphtalin balls. The inconvenient is the smelling, and the auto ignition over 500 C. The purpose of this study was to developed a macropores processing using other porogen. We have selected from various porogen of sugar origin like saccharose. We have determined the physical characteristic of such biphasic macroporous implant comparing to classical material obtain with naphtalin porogen and demonstrated that fundamental structural and chemical properties are preserved using sugar porogens, before to perform in vivo biofunctionality to achieve the demonstration and to use in human clinical situation such materials. (orig.)

  2. Understanding of dopant-induced osteogenesis and angiogenesis in calcium phosphate ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Susmita; Fielding, Gary; Tarafder, Solaiman; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2013-10-01

    General trends in synthetic bone grafting materials are shifting towards approaches that can illicit osteoinductive properties. Pharmacologics and biologics have been used in combination with calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramics, however, they have recently become the target of scrutiny over safety. The importance of trace elements in natural bone health is well documented. Ions, for example, lithium, zinc, magnesium, manganese, silicon, strontium, etc., have been shown to increase osteogenesis and neovascularization. Incorporation of dopants (trace metal ions) into CaPs can provide a platform for safe and efficient delivery in clinical applications where increased bone healing is favorable. This review highlights the use of trace elements in CaP biomaterials, and offers an insight into the mechanisms of how metal ions can enhance both osteogenesis and angiogenesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Osteoinduction of Calcium Phosphate Ceramics in Four Kinds of Animals for 1 Year: Dog, Rabbit, Rat, and Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, L; Wang, T; Zhu, J; Cai, P

    2016-05-01

    Bone grafts are in great demand. Synthetic materials have been extensively studied as substitutes for autografts. Calcium phosphate ceramics are promising synthetic bone replacement materials. Because they share chemical similarities with human bone mineral, they show excellent biocompatibility and osteoinductivity. Calcium phosphate ceramics have been used to fill bone defects in preclinical study in a variety of animals. This study aimed to investigate the osteogenesis ability of calcium phosphate ceramics in 4 kinds of animals. Φ3 × 5 mm hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate (HA/β-TCP) cylinders were implanted into the dorsal muscle of rats and mice, whereas Φ5 × 10 mm cylinders were implanted into the dorsal muscle of dogs and rabbits. One year after implantation, the ceramics were harvested to perform hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining and Masson-trichrome staining. The new bone tissues were observed and the area percentage of new bone was compared in the 4 kinds of animals. A large number of new bone and bone marrow tissues were observed in dogs, rabbits, and mice, but not in rats; and the area percentage of new bone in mice was significantly higher than that in dogs and rabbits (P  dog > rabbit > rat. To achieve better effects for bone transplantation, mouse should be chosen as the preferred experimental model based on these advantages: economic, convenience, and osteogenesis ability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cells responding to surface structure of calcium phosphate ceramics for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingwei; Sun, Lanying; Luo, Xiaoman; Barbieri, Davide; de Bruijn, Joost D; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Moroni, Lorenzo; Yuan, Huipin

    2017-11-01

    Surface structure largely affects the inductive bone-forming potential of calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramics in ectopic sites and bone regeneration in critical-sized bone defects. Surface-dependent osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) partially explained the improved bone-forming ability of submicron surface structured CaP ceramics. In this study, we investigated the possible influence of surface structure on different bone-related cells, which may potentially participate in the process of improved bone formation in CaP ceramics. Besides BMSCs, the response of human brain vascular pericytes (HBVP), C2C12 (osteogenic inducible cells), MC3T3-E1 (osteogenic precursors), SV-HFO (pre-osteoblasts), MG63 (osteoblasts) and SAOS-2 (mature osteoblasts) to the surface structure was evaluated in terms of cell proliferation, osteogenic differentiation and gene expression. The cells were cultured on tricalcium phosphate (TCP) ceramics with either micron-scaled surface structure (TCP-B) or submicron-scaled surface structure (TCP-S) for up to 14 days, followed by DNA, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction gene assays. HBVP were not sensitive to surface structure with respect to cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation, but had downregulated angiogenesis-related gene expression (i.e. vascular endothelial growth factor) on TCP-S. Without additional osteogenic inducing factors, submicron-scaled surface structure enhanced ALP activity and osteocalcin gene expression of human (h)BMSCs and C2C12 cells, favoured the proliferation of MC3T3-E1, MG63 and SAOS-2, and increased ALP activity of MC3T3-E1 and SV-HFO. The results herein indicate that cells with osteogenic potency (either osteogenic inducible cells or osteogenic cells) could be sensitive to surface structure and responded to osteoinductive submicron-structured CaP ceramics in cell proliferation, ALP production or osteogenic gene expression, which favour bone

  5. Synthesis, characterization and bioactivity of a calcium-phosphate glass-ceramics obtained by the sol-gel processing method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jmal, Nouha; Bouaziz, Jamel

    2017-02-01

    In this work, a calcium-phosphate glass-ceramics was successfully obtained by heat treatment of a mixture of 26.52 in wt.% of fluorapatite (Fap) and 73.48 in wt.% of 77S (77 SiO214 CaO9 P2O5 in wt.%) gel. The calcium phosphate-glass-ceramics was prepared by sol-gel process with tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS), triethyl phosphate (TEP), calcium nitrate and fluorapatite. The synthesized powders were characterized by some commonly used tools such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), 31P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and thin-film X-ray diffraction (TF-XRD). The obtained results seemed to confirm the nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite (Hap) nano-phase in the glass. Moreover, an in-vitro evaluation of the glass-ceramic was performed. In addition, to assess its bioactive capacity, it was soaked in simulated body fluid (SBF) at different time intervals. The SEM, EDS and TF-XRD analyses showed the deposition of hydroxyapatite on the surface of the specimens after three days of immersion in SBF solution. The mechanical properties of the obtained material such as rupture strength, Vickers hardness and elastic modulus were measured. In addition, the friction coefficient of calcium phosphate-glass-ceramics was tested. The values of the composite of rupture strength (24MPa), Vickers hardness (214Hv), Young's modulus (52.3GPa), shear modulus (19GPa) and friction coefficient (0.327) were obtained. This glass-ceramics can have useful applications in dental prostheses. Indeed, this material may have promising applications for implants because of its content of fluorine, the effective protector against dental caries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. 3D Printing of Calcium Phosphate Ceramics for Bone Tissue Engineering and Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombetta, Ryan; Inzana, Jason A; Schwarz, Edward M; Kates, Stephen L; Awad, Hani A

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing, also known as 3D printing, has emerged over the past 3 decades as a disruptive technology for rapid prototyping and manufacturing. Vat polymerization, powder bed fusion, material extrusion, and binder jetting are distinct technologies of additive manufacturing, which have been used in a wide variety of fields, including biomedical research and tissue engineering. The ability to print biocompatible, patient-specific geometries with controlled macro- and micro-pores, and to incorporate cells, drugs and proteins has made 3D-printing ideal for orthopaedic applications, such as bone grafting. Herein, we performed a systematic review examining the fabrication of calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramics by 3D printing, their biocompatibility in vitro, and their bone regenerative potential in vivo, as well as their use in localized delivery of bioactive molecules or cells. Understanding the advantages and limitations of the different 3D printing approaches, CaP materials, and bioactive additives through critical evaluation of in vitro and in vivo evidence of efficacy is essential for developing new classes of bone graft substitutes that can perform as well as autografts and allografts or even surpass the performance of these clinical standards.

  7. Synthesis, characterization, and in-vitro cytocompatibility of amorphous β-tri-calcium magnesium phosphate ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Satish S., E-mail: sss42@pitt.edu [Department of Chemical & Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Roy, Abhijit, E-mail: abr20@pitt.edu [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Lee, Boeun, E-mail: bol11@pitt.edu [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Banerjee, Ipsita [Department of Chemical & Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Kumta, Prashant N., E-mail: pkumta@pitt.edu [Department of Chemical & Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Center for Craniofacial Regeneration, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Biphasic mixtures of crystalline β-tricalcium magnesium phosphate (β-TCMP) and an amorphous calcium magnesium phosphate have been synthesized and reported to support enhanced hMSC differentiation in comparison to β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) due to the release of increased amounts of bioactive ions. In the current study, completely amorphous β-TCMP has been synthesized which is capable of releasing increased amounts of Mg{sup 2+} and PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} ions, rather than a biphasic mixture as earlier reported. The amorphous phase formed was observed to crystallize between temperatures of 400–600 °C. The scaffolds prepared with amorphous β-TCMP were capable of supporting enhanced hMSC proliferation and differentiation in comparison to commercially available β-TCP. However, a similar gene expression of mature osteoblast markers, OCN and COL-1, in comparison to biphasic β-TCMP was observed. To further study the role of Mg{sup 2+} and PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} ions in regulating hMSC osteogenic differentiation, the capability of hMSCs to mineralize in growth media supplemented with Mg{sup 2+} and PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} ions was studied. Interestingly, 5 mM PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} supported mineralization while the addition of 5 mM Mg{sup 2+} to 5 mM PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} inhibited mineralization. It was therefore concluded that the release of Ca{sup 2+} ions from β-TCMP scaffolds also plays a role in regulating osteogenic differentiation on these scaffolds and it is noted that further work is required to more accurately determine the exact role of Mg{sup 2+} in regulating hMSC osteogenic differentiation. - Highlights: • Synthesis of amorphous Mg containing beta tricalcium phosphate ceramics • Amorphous beta TCMP supports enhanced hMSC proliferation and differentiation. • Amorphous beta TCMP shows comparable OCN and COL-1 expression to biphasic TCMP. • Presence of 5 mM Mg{sup 2+} and PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} ions in growth media inhibits hMSC mineralization.

  8. [Histologic and biomechanic evaluation of posterolateral arthrodesis using a biphasic ceramic of calcium phosphate as bone substitute. Experimental study with sheep].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guigui, P; Hardouin, P

    2000-01-01

    The effectiveness of a macroporous biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic was studied after laterovertebral arthrodesis in sheep. A ceramic with a TCP/HAP ratio of 35/65 was compared with autologous bone graft in an histomorphometric and biomechanical point of view. Quantitative analysis of the results indicated that the biphasic ceramic allows an arthrodesis after 12 months, although control graft is effective after six months. A large decrease of flexibility in all directions was obtained with the ceramic, similarly to autologous graft. No nonfusion case was observed. In conditions very close to the human surgery, a posterolateral fusion can be obtained using biphasic phosphate ceramic as bone substitute.

  9. In vitro study of matrix surface properties of porous granulated calcium phosphate ceramic materials made in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chissov, V I; Sviridova, I K; Sergeeva, N S; Kirsanova, V A; Achmedova, S A; Filiushin, M M; Barinov, S M; Fadeeva, I V; Komlev, V S; Smirnov, V V

    2008-04-01

    We performed in vitro screening of monophasic (hydroxyapatite, beta-tricalcium phosphate, carbonate-substituted hydroxyapatite with 0.59 and 5.9 wt% substitution with CO(3)(2-)) and biphasic (hydroxyapatite-tricalcium phosphate with various percentage of the components 80/20, 60/40, 20/80, silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite with 0.79 wt% SiO(2)) porous granulated ceramics composed of calcium phosphate powders synthesized by methods of heterophasic interaction of reagents and precipitation from aqueous solutions using MTT test and cultured human fibroblasts. Acute toxicity of materials (24-h incubation with cell culture) and matrix properties (3, 5, 7, 14, 18, 21, 28 days in culture) were evaluated. We selected a batch of materials obtained by precipitation from aqueous solutions, which were non-toxic and were characterized by good matrix properties (for cells). Biphasic ceramics with hydroxyapatite-tricalcium phosphate ratio of 80/20 exhibited best characteristics, and ceramics on the basis of silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite showed moderate characteristics.

  10. Dynamic competitive adsorption of bone-related proteins on calcium phosphate ceramic particles with different phase composition and microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Huijie; Zhu, Xiangdong; Fan, Hongsong; Fan, Yujiang; Zhang, Xingdong

    2013-08-01

    The biocompatibility and bioactivity of biomaterials used for hard tissue repair are closely related to their adsorption capacities for bone-related proteins. In the present study, three types of calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramic particles with different phase composition or microstructure were fabricated, and their protein adsorption abilities were investigated by a self-made device under the simulated dynamic physiological circumstance. The results of X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, mercury penetration test, and nitrogen sorption test showed that the irregular hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramic particles obtained by conventional drying and sintering (named as HA-C) had fewer micropores and lower specific surface area (SSA) than did the spherical HA or biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) ceramic particles made by spray drying and sintering (named as HA-S and BCP-S, respectively). The dynamic protein adsorption study proved that both the phase composition and microstructure of CaP ceramic particles affected their adsorption capacities for those bone-related proteins. The spherical HA-S and BCP-S particles with abundant micropores and high SSA showed higher adsorption of serum proteins, including fibronectin and vitronectin, than the irregular HA-C did. On the other hand, in spite of the relatively high concentration of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in the binary bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2)/BSA solution, BMP-2 adsorption on the three CaP ceramic particles increased with the increase in its initial concentration. Similarly, HA-S and BCP-S particles had a larger amount of the adsorbed BMP-2 per gram solid than HA-C did. Therefore, it could be believed that the difference of various CaP ceramics in the phase composition and microporous structure would affect their binding capacity for those bone-related proteins and thus lead to their difference in osteoinduction. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Calcium phosphate holmium-166 ceramic to addition in bone cement: synthesis and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donanzam, Blanda A.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R., E-mail: campos@nuclear.ufmg.b [Universidade do Federal de Minas Gerais (DEN/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Dalmazio, Ilza; Valente, Eduardo S., E-mail: id@cdtn.b, E-mail: valente@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Spine metastases are a common and painful complication of cancer. The treatment often consists of bone cement injection (vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty) within vertebral body for vertebrae stabilization, followed by external beam radiation therapy. Recently, researchers introduced the concept of radioactive bone cement for spine tumors therapy. Then, investigations about bioactive and radioactive materials became interesting. In this study, we present the synthesis of calcium phosphate incorporated holmium (CaP-Ho) via sol-gel technique, and its characterization by XRD, FT-IR, NA and SEM. Results showed a multiphasic bioceramic composed mainly of hydroxyapatite, {beta}-tricalcium phosphate, holmium phosphate and traces of calcium pyrophosphate. Furthermore, the nuclide Ho-166 was the major radioisotope produced. Despite that, the radioactive bioceramic CaP-{sup 166}Ho must be investigated in clinical trials to assure its efficacy and safety on spine tumors treatment (author)

  12. Study of hMSC proliferation and differentiation on Mg and Mg–Sr containing biphasic β-tricalcium phosphate and amorphous calcium phosphate ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Satish S., E-mail: sss42@pitt.edu [Department of Chemical & Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Roy, Abhijit, E-mail: abr20@pitt.edu [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Lee, Boeun [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Kumta, Prashant N., E-mail: pkumta@pitt.edu [Department of Chemical & Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Center for Craniofacial Regeneration, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Biphasic mixtures of either Mg{sup 2+} or combined Mg{sup 2+} and Sr{sup 2+} cation substituted β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) were prepared using a low temperature chemical phosphatizing and hydrolysis reaction approach. Scaffolds prepared using the cation substituted calcium phosphates were capable of supporting similar levels of human mesenchymal stem cell proliferation in comparison to commercially available β-TCP. The concentrations of Mg{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+}, and PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} released from these scaffolds were also within the ranges desired from previous reports to support both hMSC proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. Interestingly, hMSCs cultured directly on scaffolds prepared with only Mg{sup 2+} substituted β-TCP were capable of supporting statistically significantly increased alkaline phosphatase activity, osteopontin, and osteoprotegerin expression in comparison to all compositions containing both Mg{sup 2+} and Sr{sup 2+}, and commercially available β-TCP. hMSCs cultured in the presence of scaffold extracts also exhibited similar trends in the expression of osteogenic markers as was observed during direct culture. Therefore, it was concluded that the enhanced differentiation observed was due to the release of bioactive ions rather than the surface microstructure. The role of these ions on transforming growth factor-β and bone morphogenic protein signaling was also evaluated using a PCR array. It was concluded that the release of these ions may support enhanced differentiation through SMAD dependent TGF-β and BMP signaling. - Highlights: • Synthesis of Mg and Mg-Sr containing biphasic beta tricalcium phosphate ceramics • Magnesium substitution influences ALP activity compared to strontium content. • Solution extract plays a more dominant role on hMSC differentiation. • Direct and indirect Mg and Mg-Sr TCP culture show similar OPG and OPN expression.

  13. Processing highly porous calcium phosphate ceramics for use in bioreactor cores for culturing human liver cells in-vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finoli, Anthony

    Chronic liver disease is the 11th highest cause of death in the United States claiming over 30,000 lives in 2009. The current treatment for chronic liver failure is liver transplantation but the availability of tissue is far less than the number of patients in need. To develop human liver tissue in the lab a 3D culturing environment must be created to support the growth of a complex tissue. Hydroxyapatite (HAp) has been chosen as a scaffold material because of its biocompatibility in the body and the ability to create a bioresorbable scaffold. By using a ceramic material, it is possible to create a three dimensional, protective environment in which tissue can grow. The first part of this study is to examine the behavior of adult human liver cells grown on composites of HAp and different biocompatible hydrogels. Porous HAp has been created using an emulsion foaming technique and cells are injected into the structure after being suspended in a hydrogel and are kept in culture for up to 28 days. Functional assays, gene expression and fluorescent microscopy will be used to examine these cultures. The second part of this study will be to develop a processing technique to create a resorbable scaffold that incorporates a vascular system template. Previous experiments have shown the high temperature decomposition of HAp into resorbable calcium phosphates will be used to create a multiphase material. By controlling the amount of transformation product formed, it is proposed that the resorption of the scaffold can be tailored. To introduce a pore network to guide the growth of a vascular system, a positive-negative casting technique has also been developed. A positive polymer copy can be made of a natural vascular system and ceramic is foamed around the copy. During sintering, the polymer is pyrolyzed leaving a multiscale pore network in the ceramic. By combining these techniques, it is proposed that a calcium phosphate bioreactor core can be processed that is suitable for

  14. Microstructure and spectroscopic investigations of calcium zinc bismuth phosphate glass ceramics doped with manganese ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suneel Kumar, A.; Sambasiva Rao, M. V.; Chinna Ram, G.; Krishna Rao, D.

    2017-07-01

    Multi-component 10CaF2-20ZnO-(15 - x)Bi2O3-55P2O5:xMnO (0 ≤ x ≤ 2.5) glass ceramics were synthesised by melt quenching technique and heat treatment. The prepared glass ceramics were characterised by XRD, DTA, EDS and SEM. Spectroscopic studies such as optical absorption, EPR, FTIR and Raman were also carried out on these glass ceramics. The XRD and SEM studies have indicated that ceramic samples contain well defined and randomly distributed grains of different crystalline phases. The observed increase of enthalpy from DTA patterns up to 1 mol% of MnO indicates that the crystallisation starts initially from the surface of the material then gradually it is extended to the volume of the material and this influence is meagre at higher concentrations of MnO. The absorption spectra of manganese doped glass ceramics have exhibited two types of conventional bands; one due to Mn2+ ions and other due to Mn3+ ions. The EPR spectra of MnO doped glass ceramics showed a resonance signal around g2 = 2.023 with a six line hyperfine structure and another signal at about g1 = 4.314. The relative intensity and half-width of these two signals are observed to increase with the increase in the concentration of manganese ions up to 1 mol% beyond this concentration it is found to decrease. Such observation indicates the conversion of part of Mn2+ ions into Mn3+ ions in the glass ceramic matrix. The observed increase in the intensity of symmetrical structural units at the expense of asymmetrical structural units from the FTIR and Raman spectra at higher concentration of MnO indicating that Mn2+ ions occupy the network forming positions in the glass ceramic structure.

  15. Preparation and Characterization of a Calcium Phosphate Ceramic for the Immobilization of Chloride-containing Intermediate Level Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metcalfe, Brian; Donald, Ian W.; Scheele, Randall D.; Strachan, Denis M.

    2003-12-01

    Attention has recently been given to the immobilization of special categories of radioactive wastes, some of which contain high concentrations of actinide chlorides. Although vitrification in phosphate glass has been proposed, this was rejected because of the high losses of chloride. On the basis of non-radioactive and, more recently, radioactive studies, we have shown that calcium phosphate is an effective host for immobilizing the chloride constituents [1]. In this instance, the chlorine is retained as chloride, rather than evolved as a chlorine-bearing gas. The immobilized product is in the form of a free-flowing, non-hygroscopic powder, in which the chlorides are chemically combined within the mineral phases chlorapatite [Ca5(PO4)3Cl] and spodiosite [Ca2(PO4)Cl]. Data from studies on non-radioactive simulated waste consisting of a mixture of CaCl2 and SmCl3, and radioactive simulated waste composed of CaCl2 with PuCl3 or PuCl3 and AmCl3, are presented and compared. The XRD data confirm the presence of chlorapatite and spodiosite in the non-radioactive and radioactive materials. The durability of all specimens was measured with a modified MCC-1 test. Releases of Cl after 28 days were 1.6 x 10-3 g m-2 for the non-radioactive specimens and 7 x 10-3 g m-2 for the Pu-bearing specimens. Releases of Ca after 28 days were 0.3 x 10-3 and 2.0 x 10-3 g m-2 for the non-radioactive composition and the Pu composition, respectively, whilst release of Pu from the radioactive specimens was lower for the mixed Pu/Am specimen at 1.2 x 10-5g m-2. The release of Am from the mixed Pu/Am composition was exceptionally low at 2.4 x 10-7 g m-2. Overall, the release rate data suggest that the ceramics dissolve congruently, followed by precipitation of Sm, Pu and Am as less soluble phases, possibly oxides or phosphates. The differences in behaviour noted between non-radioactive and radioactive specimens are interpreted in terms of the crystal chemistry of the individual systems.

  16. Role of biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic-mediated secretion of signaling molecules by macrophages in migration and osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Dan; Guo, Bo; Yang, Xiao; Chen, Xuening; Zhu, Xiangdong; Fan, Yujiang; Zhang, Xingdong

    2017-03-15

    The inflammatory reaction initiates fracture healing and could play a role in the osteoinductive effect of calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramics, which has been widely confirmed; however, the underlying mechanism has not been fully elucidated. In this study, various signaling molecules from macrophages under the stimulation of osteoinductive biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) ceramic and its degradation products were examined and evaluated for their influence on the migration and osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The results of cellular experiments confirmed that the gene expression of most inflammatory factors (IL-1, IL-6 and MCP-1) and growth factors (VEGF, PDGF and EGF) by macrophages were up-regulated to varying degrees by BCP ceramic and its degradation products. Cell migration tests demonstrated that the conditioned media (CMs), which contained abundant signaling molecules secreted by macrophages cultured on BCP ceramic and its degradation products, promoted the migration of MSCs. qRT-PCR analysis indicated that CMs promoted the gene expression of osteogenic markers (ALP, COL-I, OSX, BSP and OPN) in MSCs. ALP activity and mineralization staining further confirmed that CMs promoted the osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs. The present study confirmed the correlation between the inflammatory reaction and osteoinductive capacity of BCP ceramic. The ceramic itself and its degradation products can induce macrophages to express and secrete various signaling molecules, which then recruit and promote the MSCs to differentiate into osteoblasts. Compared with BCP conditioned media, degradation particles played a more substantial role in this process. Thus, inflammation initiated by BCP ceramic and its degradation products could be necessary for osteoinduction by the ceramic. It is known that the inflammatory reaction initiates fracture healing. The aim of this study was to examine whether osteoinductive BCP ceramics could cause macrophages to

  17. Laser Sintered Calcium Phosphate Bone

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vail, Neil

    1999-01-01

    ...) technology selective laser sintering (SLS). BME has successfully implemented a pilot facility to fabricate calcium phosphate implants using anatomical data coupled with the selective laser sintering process...

  18. Combined numerical and experimental mechanical characterization of a calcium phosphate ceramic using modified Brazilian disc and SCB specimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elghazel, A., E-mail: elgazelachwak@live.fr [Laboratory of Industrial Chemistry, National School of Engineering, Box 1173, 3038 Sfax (Tunisia); Taktak, R. [Materials Engineering and Environment Laboratory (LGME), National School of Engineering, 3038 Sfax (Tunisia); Bouaziz, J. [Laboratory of Industrial Chemistry, National School of Engineering, Box 1173, 3038 Sfax (Tunisia)

    2016-07-18

    Ceramics and bioceramic composites are materials characterized with strong but quite low crack-resistance properties. Indeed, their application is hindered by their brittleness and low ability to deform. This paper presents an examination of the mechanical behavior of a commercial tricalcium phosphate (TCP) mixed with synthesized fluorapatite (Fap) powder. A new method called the semi-circular bending “SCB” method is developed for mode I fracture toughness determination. The samples were characterized by scanning electronic microscopy measurements and examined for mechanical properties, such as compressive strength, flexural strength, tensile strength, elastic modulus, Vickers hardness and fracture toughness under tensile and shear mode. The evolution of these mechanical properties and microstructure of TCP-Fap was studied. The performances of the composites increase with the addition of the Fap. The highest values of the composites of compressive strength (95 MPa), flexural strength (15 MPa), tensile strength (7 MPa) and fracture toughness (2.9 MPa m{sup 1/2}) were obtained after the sintering process with 33.16 wt% Fap at 1300° C. The increase of these performances is due to the formation of the liquid phase, which helps to fill the pores in the microstructure. Above 33.16 wt% Fap, the mechanical properties of the composites are hindered by the exaggerated grain growth formation.

  19. Calcium phosphates for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canillas, M.; Pena, P.; Aza, A.H. de; Rodriguez, M.A.

    2017-07-01

    The history of calcium phosphates in the medicine field starts in 1769 when the first evidence of its existence in the bone tissue is discovered. Since then, the interest for calcium phosphates has increased among the scientific community. Their study has been developed in parallel with new advances in materials sciences, medicine or tissue engineering areas. Bone tissue engineering is the field where calcium phosphates have had a great importance. While the first bioceramics are selected according to bioinert, biocompatibility and mechanical properties with the aim to replace bone tissue damaged, calcium phosphates open the way to the bone tissue regeneration challenge. Nowadays, they are present in the majority of commercial products directed to repair or regenerate damaged bone tissue. Finally, in the last few decades, they have been suggested and studied as drug delivering devices and as vehicles of DNA and RNA for the future generation therapies. (Author)

  20. Injectable and biodegradable composite bone filler composed of poly(propylene fumarate) and calcium phosphate ceramic for vertebral augmentation procedure: An in vivo porcine study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chang-Chin; Hsu, Li-Ho; Sumi, Shoichiro; Yang, Kai-Chiang; Yang, Shu-Hua

    2017-11-01

    Despite its common usage in vertebral augmentation procedures (VAPs), shortcomings of commercial polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) still remain. Accordingly, injectable and biodegradable composite cements, which are composed of poly(propylene fumarate)/α-tricalcium/hydroxyapatite (PPF/α-TCP/HAP) and PPF/tetracalcium phosphate/dicalcium phosphate (PPF/TtCP/DCP), were developed. A porcine model was used and cylindrical holes in critical size were created at the center of the lateral cortex of vertebral bodies of the lumbar spine. A fixed volume of testing materials and PMMA were randomly injected into the defects. Results showed that both composite groups had a comparable radiolucency as PMMA but a significantly lower setting temperature. Histological inspections revealed new bone formation and remodeling along the border of the two composite cements. New bone substitution and irregular sclerotic bone mantles were found along the composite cements but not in the PMMA group. Radiological and histological changes were observed in the two composite groups and these modifications were diminished along the block boundaries. These findings imply gradual substitution of decomposed composite by new bone formation, which could not be found around the PMMA block. Comparing PPF/α-TCP/HAP with the PPF/TtCP/DCP cement block, smaller particles that were spreading out were observed in the TtCP/DCP group, which represents rapid degradability. In conclusion, the composite cements have advantages such as a low setting temperature, radio-opacity, biodegradability, and osteoconductivity. The injectable PPF/calcium phosphate ceramic composite has the potential to be used in VAPs. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 2232-2243, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Design and Production of Continuously Gradient Macro/Microporous Calcium Phosphate (CaP) Scaffolds Using Ceramic/Camphene-Based 3D Extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Min-Kyung; Moon, Young-Wook; Maeng, Woo-Youl; Koh, Young-Hag; Kim, Hyoun-Ee

    2017-01-01

    This study proposes a new type of calcium phosphate (CaP) scaffolds with a continuously gradient macro/microporous structure using the ceramic/camphene-based 3D extrusion process. Green filaments with a continuously gradient core/shell structure were successfully produced by extruding a bilayered feedrod comprised of a CaP/camphene mixture lower part and a pure camphene upper part. The extruded filaments were then deposited in a controlled manner to construct triangular prisms, followed by the assembly process for the production of CaP scaffolds with a gradient core/shell structure. In addition, a gradient microporous structure was created by heat-treating the green body at 43 °C to induce the overgrowth of camphene dendrites in the CaP/camphene walls. The produced CaP scaffold showed a highly macroporous structure within its inner core, where the size of macrochannels increased gradually with an increase in the distance from the outer shell, while relatively larger micropores were created in the outer shell. PMID:28773077

  2. Influence of saline solution on hydration behavior of β-dicalcium silicate in comparison with biphasic calcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite bio-ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radwan, M.M., E-mail: mmahmoudradwan@yahoo.com [Ceramics Dept, National Research Centre, Cairo (Egypt); Abd El-Hamid, H.K. [Ceramics Dept, National Research Centre, Cairo (Egypt); Mohamed, A.F. [The Holding Company for Production of Vaccines, Sera and Drugs (EGYVAC) (Egypt)

    2015-12-01

    The influence of using saline solution as mixing and curing liquid on some characteristics of β-dicalcium silicate (β-C{sub 2}S) and biphasic compound tri-calcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite (TCP/HAp) bio-ceramics was investigated. β-C{sub 2}S (27–30 nm) was prepared by solid state reaction at 1450 °C, while biphasic compound TCP/HAp (7–15 nm) was synthesized from an aqueous solution of Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4}·12H{sub 2}O by chemical precipitation method. Setting times, compressive strength, pH values, X-ray diffraction analysis, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were investigated. The evaluation of cytotoxicity of both calcium silicate and biphasic compounds to human gingival fibroblasts was carried out. The use of saline solution as mixing and immersing liquid shortened the setting time for the two bio-cements. TCP/HAp did not show any mechanical strength but β-C{sub 2}S showed good strength values. Both synthesized compounds showed a moderate cytotoxicity and both materials were effective in a no significant way. - Highlights: • The dissolution and hydration of β-C{sub 2}S and TCP/HAp in distilled water and saline solution were studied. • TCP/HAp did not show mechanical strength, while β-C{sub 2}S showed good mechanical strength. • The use of saline solution did enhances the dissolution & hydration rate. • An increase in pH values was detected when using saline solution. • Both materials showed a moderate cytotoxicity in no significant way.

  3. Mineralisation of two phosphate ceramics in HBSS: role of albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, P A A P; Serro, A P; Saramago, B J; Fernandes, A C; Magalhães, M C F; Correia, R N

    2003-02-01

    The role of albumin in the mineralisation process of commercial hydroxyapatite (HAp) and synthesised biphasic (HAp-tricalcium phosphate) ceramics in a bufferless simulated inorganic plasma (HBSS) was investigated by conventional in vitro tests and static and dynamic wettability measurements. Albumin was either pre-adsorbed or solubilised in HBSS. It was found that calcium complexation by albumin plays a key role in early mineralisation kinetics, so that mineralisation is favoured when albumin is pre-adsorbed and hindered when it is dissolved in HBSS. In the biphasic ceramic this picture is complicated by the fact that albumin, in solution, seems to promote the dissolution of tricalcium phosphate, and simultaneously compete for calcium with the ceramic. It also appears that albumin has a stabilising effect of octacalcium phosphate present in deposits on commercial HAp. The same effect may be present in the case of the biphasic ceramic, at earlier mineralisation times, when octacalcium phosphate appears as a precursor of HAp. Octacalcium phosphate formation on commercial apatite is accompanied by carbonate substitution in phosphate positions.

  4. Electrochemical Induced Calcium Phosphate Precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lei, Yang; Song, Bingnan; Weijden, van der Renata D.; Saakes, M.; Buisman, Cees J.N.

    2017-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient for living organisms and cannot be replaced or substituted. In this paper, we present a simple yet efficient membrane free electrochemical system for P removal and recovery as calcium phosphate (CaP). This method relies on in situ formation of hydroxide

  5. 21 CFR 182.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium phosphate. 182.1217 Section 182.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b...

  6. 21 CFR 582.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.1217 Section 582.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b...

  7. Effect of calcium carbonate on hardening, physicochemical properties, and in vitro degradation of injectable calcium phosphate cements.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sariibrahimoglu, K.; Leeuwenburgh, S.C.G.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Yubao, L.; Jansen, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    The main disadvantage of apatitic calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) is their slow degradation rate, which limits complete bone regeneration. Carbonate (CO(3)(2)(-)) is the common constituent of bone and it can be used to improve the degradability of the apatitic calcium phosphate ceramics. This study

  8. Application of Calcium Phosphate Materials in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jabr S. Al-Sanabani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate materials are similar to bone in composition and in having bioactive and osteoconductive properties. Calcium phosphate materials in different forms, as cements, composites, and coatings, are used in many medical and dental applications. This paper reviews the applications of these materials in dentistry. It presents a brief history, dental applications, and methods for improving their mechanical properties. Notable research is highlighted regarding (1 application of calcium phosphate into various fields in dentistry; (2 improving mechanical properties of calcium phosphate; (3 biomimetic process and functionally graded materials. This paper deals with most common types of the calcium phosphate materials such as hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate which are currently used in dental and medical fields.

  9. Calcium phosphate: a substitute for aluminum adjuvants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Jean-Daniel; Thibaudon, Michel; Bélec, Laurent; Crépeaux, Guillemette

    2017-03-01

    Calcium phosphate was used as an adjuvant in France in diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and poliomyelitis vaccines. It was later completely substituted by alum salts in the late 80's, but it still remains as an approved adjuvant for the World Health Organization for human vaccination. Area covered: Thus, calcium phosphate is now considered as one of the substances that could replace alum salts in vaccines. The aim of this paper is to draw a review of existing data on calcium phosphate as an adjuvant in order to bring out the strengths and weaknesses for its use on a large scale. Expert commentary: Calcium phosphate is a compound naturally present in the organism, safe and already used in human vaccination. Beyond comparisons with the other adjuvants, calcium phosphate represents a good candidate to replace or to complete alum salts as a vaccine adjuvant.

  10. Osteoinduction of calcium phosphate biomaterials in small animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Lijia; Shi, Yujun [Key Laboratory of Transplant Engineering and Immunology, Ministry of Health, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Ye, Feng [Department of Pathology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610041 (China); Bu, Hong, E-mail: hongbu@scu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Transplant Engineering and Immunology, Ministry of Health, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Department of Pathology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610041 (China)

    2013-04-01

    Although osteoinduction mechanism of calcium phosphate (CP) ceramics is still unclear, several essential properties have been reported, such as chemical composition, pore size and porosity, etc. In this study, calcium phosphate powder (Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}, CaP, group 1), biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic powder (BCP, group 2), and intact BCP rods (group 3) were implanted into leg muscles of mice and dorsal muscles of rabbits. One month and three months after implantation, samples were harvested for biological and histological analysis. New bone tissues were observed in 10/10 samples in group 1, 3/10 samples in group 2, and 9/10 samples in group 3 at 3rd month in mice, but not in rabbits. In vitro, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were cultured with trace CaP and BCP powder, and osteogenic differentiation was observed at day 7. Our results suggested that chemical composition is the prerequisite in osteoinduction, and pore structure would contribute to more bone formation. - Highlights: ► Intrinsic osteoinduction of calcium phosphate biomaterials was observed implanted in muscles of mice. ► Biomaterials powder also has osteoinduction property. ► Osteogenic genes and protein could be detected by RT-PCR and Western blot in implanted biomaterials. ► Osteogenic phenomenon could be observed by electron microscopy. ► The chemical composition is the prerequisite in osteoinduction, and pore structure would contribute to more bone formation.

  11. In vivo performance of microstructured calcium phosphate formulated in novel water-free carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davison, N.L.; Yuan, Huipin; de Bruijn, Joost Dick; Barrere-de Groot, F.YF.

    2012-01-01

    Osteoinductive calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramics can be combined with polymeric carriers to make shapeable bone substitutes as an alternative to autologous bone; however, carriers containing water may degrade the ceramic surface microstructure, which is crucial to bone formation. In this study five

  12. Effects of calcium phosphate composition in sputter coatings on in vitro and in vivo performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urquia Edreira, E.R.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Aldosari, A.A.; Al-Johany, S.S.; Anil, S.; Jansen, J.A.; Beucken, J.J.J.P van den

    2015-01-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramic coatings have been used to enhance the biocompatibility and osteoconductive properties of metallic implants. The chemical composition of these ceramic coatings is an important parameter, which can influence the final bone performance of the implant. In this study, the

  13. Apatite Formation from Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Mixed Amorphous Calcium Phosphate/Amorphous Calcium Carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibsen, Casper J S; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Birkedal, Henrik

    2016-08-22

    Crystallization from amorphous phases is an emerging pathway for making advanced materials. Biology has made use of amorphous precursor phases for eons and used them to produce structures with remarkable properties. Herein, we show how the design of the amorphous phase greatly influences the nanocrystals formed therefrom. We investigate the transformation of mixed amorphous calcium phosphate/amorphous calcium carbonate phases into bone-like nanocrystalline apatite using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy. The speciation of phosphate was controlled by pH to favor HPO4 (2-) . In a carbonate free system, the reaction produces anisotropic apatite crystallites with large aspect ratios. The first formed crystallites are highly calcium deficient and hydrogen phosphate rich, consistent with thin octacalcium phosphate (OCP)-like needles. During growth, the crystallites become increasingly stoichiometric, which indicates that the crystallites grow through addition of near-stoichiometric apatite to the OCP-like initial crystals through a process that involves either crystallite fusion/aggregation or Ostwald ripening. The mixed amorphous phases were found to be more stable against phase transformations, hence, the crystallization was inhibited. The resulting crystallites were smaller and less anisotropic. This is rationalized by the idea that a local phosphate-depletion zone formed around the growing crystal until it was surrounded by amorphous calcium carbonate, which stopped the crystallization. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Biomimetic calcium phosphate coatings on recombinant spider silk fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Liang; Habibovic, Pamela; Van Blitterswijk, Clemens A [Department of Tissue Regeneration, University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Hedhammar, My; Johansson, Jan [Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Biochemistry, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, the Biomedical Centre, Box 575, 751 23 Uppsala (Sweden); Blom, Tobias; Leifer, Klaus [Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Box 534, S-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-08-01

    Calcium phosphate ceramic coatings, applied on surfaces of metallic and polymeric biomaterials, can improve their performance in bone repair and regeneration. Spider silk is biocompatible, strong and elastic, and hence an attractive biomaterial for applications in connective tissue repair. Recently, artificial spider silk, with mechanical and structural characteristics similar to those of native spider silk, has been produced from recombinant minispidroins. In the present study, supersaturated simulated body fluid was used to deposit calcium phosphate coatings on recombinant spider silk fibres. The mineralization process was followed in time using scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) detector and Raman spectroscope. Focused ion beam technology was used to produce a cross section of a coated fibre, which was further analysed by EDX. Preliminary in vitro experiments using a culture of bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) on coated fibres were also performed. This study showed that recombinant spider silk fibres were successfully coated with a homogeneous and thick crystalline calcium phosphate layer. In the course of the mineralization process from modified simulated body fluid, sodium chloride crystals were first deposited on the silk surface, followed by the deposition of a calcium phosphate layer. The coated silk fibres supported the attachment and growth of hMSCs.

  15. 21 CFR 182.8217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium phosphate. 182.8217 Section 182.8217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8217 Calcium...

  16. Osteoinduction of calcium phosphate biomaterials in small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lijia; Shi, Yujun; Ye, Feng; Bu, Hong

    2013-04-01

    Although osteoinduction mechanism of calcium phosphate (CP) ceramics is still unclear, several essential properties have been reported, such as chemical composition, pore size and porosity, etc. In this study, calcium phosphate powder (Ca3(PO4)2, CaP, group 1), biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic powder (BCP, group 2), and intact BCP rods (group 3) were implanted into leg muscles of mice and dorsal muscles of rabbits. One month and three months after implantation, samples were harvested for biological and histological analysis. New bone tissues were observed in 10/10 samples in group 1, 3/10 samples in group 2, and 9/10 samples in group 3 at 3rd month in mice, but not in rabbits. In vitro, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were cultured with trace CaP and BCP powder, and osteogenic differentiation was observed at day 7. Our results suggested that chemical composition is the prerequisite in osteoinduction, and pore structure would contribute to more bone formation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Mechanism of calcium phosphates precipitation in liquid crystals; Mecanisme de precipitation de phosphates de calcium dans des cristaux liquides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prelot, B.; Zemb, T

    2004-04-01

    The possibility of using as a precursor an easily wet meso-porous powder would be a breakthrough in the preparation of nuclear waste storage ceramics. A concentrated solution containing ions to be stored would wet a dry powder and then, subjected to mild compression, lead to a micro-crystalline matrix of calcium phosphate at acceptable temperatures. Since no porous calcium phosphate different from calcined bone (patented) is described as porous precursor, we have compared the different synthesis routes towards meso-porous ceramics. First, we considered homogeneous precipitation of slats in water: using initially off-stoichiometry in reaction, micron-sized hydroxyapatite particles are produced with a specific surface up to 100 m{sup 2}/g. Then, we consider the classical route of precipitation of an hybrid material in the miscibility gap of a phase diagram, when an hexagonal liquid crystal is used a matrix for precipitation. The surfactant family consists in single chain surfactants containing phosphates as head-group to poison the growing surface of calcium phosphate nano-domains. Since the reaction is still too brutal, we considered using a cat-anionic precursor material of controllable surface charge. For certain concentrations and molar ratios, a new structure not yet described in surfactant precipitation literature is observed: since the periodicity is lower than twice the chain length, a disordered constant curvature monolayer (instead of the classical cylinder of twice chain length diameter) of surfactant is implied. Finally, we have investigated synthesis routes implying slow dissolution of pre-formed calcium phosphate in an already existing hexagonal matrix. For all these routes of synthesis, micro-structural determinations using SAXS, WARS and BET are performed, with a special attention to comparison of the precipitation material, the matrix obtained with all elements present, and also the material obtained after calcinations. (authors)

  18. Serum Calcium, Inorganic Phosphates and some Haematological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Sickle cell disease has long been associated with bone deformities and pain. Mineral salts such as calcium and inorganic phosphate are critical in bone formation and metabolism. This investigation was designed to study the serum concentration of these minerals as well as some haematological parameters in ...

  19. 21 CFR 582.5217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.5217 Section 582.5217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary...

  20. 21 CFR 582.6215 - Monobasic calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monobasic calcium phosphate. 582.6215 Section 582.6215 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....6215 Monobasic calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Monobasic calcium phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  1. 21 CFR 182.6215 - Monobasic calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Monobasic calcium phosphate. 182.6215 Section 182.6215 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....6215 Monobasic calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Monobasic calcium phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  2. The thermophysical properties of calcium and barium zirconium phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Daniel J.; Karatchevtseva, Inna; Triani, Gerry; Lumpkin, Gregory R.; Vance, Eric R.

    2013-10-01

    The thermophysical and structural properties of calcium and barium zirconium phosphate ceramics (CZP and BZP) have been investigated for their potential candidacy as actinide hosts for inert matrix fuels (IMF) in nuclear reactors. These phosphate ceramics, which can accommodate minor actinides as well as the resulting fission products, are found to be thermally stable to 1600 °C in air, however they begin to decompose in an inert atmosphere above approximately 1400 °C. The heat capacity, thermal conductivity and bulk thermal-expansion were measured from room temperature up to 1200 °C. Structural changes in this temperature region as well as the anisotropic thermal-expansion behaviour were studied using high-temperature X-ray diffraction. A phase change from R-3 to R-3c was identified for Ba0.5Zr2(PO4)3 near 880 °C. The thermal conductivity for these ceramics at 1000 °C was found to be 1.0 W m-1 K-1, a relatively low thermal conductivity that was increased to 5.0 W m-1 K-1 at 1000 °C for BZP:Ni (25:75 mass ratio) cermet composites.

  3. Tailoring the structure of biphasic calcium phosphate via synthesis procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, S. F.; El-dek, S. I.; Ahmed, M. K.

    2017-12-01

    Nano calcium phosphate ceramics (CaPC) were synthesized using simple co-precipitation method at different preparation conditions. The selected Ca/P ratio with a variation of pH value lead to formation of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) at pH 5 and 6 while, hydroxyapatite (HAP) nano particles were formed at pH 9 and 12 at room temperature. The crystallite size was in the range of 15–55 nm depending on the obtained crystalline phase. The study displayed variation of decomposition depending on the annealing temperature. The significant note is the different transformation trend of each phase depending on the starting pH value. The HRTEM illustrated that the DCPD phase was formed as fibers with diameter around 4–6 nm, while HAP was formed in rod shape. The aspect ratio decreased from 6.6 at pH 9 to 4 at pH 12 which refer to the great influence of pH value on the morphology of calcium phosphates.

  4. Formation of chemically bonded ceramics with magnesium dihydrogen phosphate binder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagh, Arun S.; Jeong, Seung-Young

    2004-08-17

    A new method for combining magnesium oxide, MgO, and magnesium dihydrogen phosphate to form an inexpensive compactible ceramic to stabilize very low solubility metal oxides, ashes, swarfs, and other iron or metal-based additives, to create products and waste forms which can be poured or dye cast, and to reinforce and strengthen the ceramics formed by the addition of fibers to the initial ceramic mixture.

  5. Calcium phosphate saturation in the western Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.; Reddy, C.V.G.

    Temperature, inorganic phosphate concentration and pH seem to be the major factors influencing the degree of saturation of calcium phosphate in sea water. Two water regions can be demarcated in the study area based on the saturation patterns...

  6. Hybrid calcium phosphate coatings for implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malchikhina, Alena I.; Shesterikov, Evgeny V.; Bolbasov, Evgeny N.; Ignatov, Viktor P.; Tverdokhlebov, Sergei I.

    2016-08-01

    Monophasic biomaterials cannot provide all the necessary functions of bones or other calcined tissues. It is necessary to create for cancer patients the multiphase materials with the structure and composition simulating the natural bone. Such materials are classified as hybrid, obtained by a combination of chemically different components. The paper presents the physical, chemical and biological studies of coatings produced by hybrid technologies (HT), which combine primer layer and calcium phosphate (CaP) coating. The first HT type combines the method of vacuum arc titanium primer layer deposition on a stainless steel substrate with the following micro-arc oxidation (MAO) in phosphoric acid solution with addition of calcium compounds to achieve high supersaturated state. MAO CaP coatings feature high porosity (2-8%, pore size 5-7 µm) and surface morphology with the thickness greater than 5 µm. The thickness of Ti primer layer is 5-40 µm. Amorphous MAO CaP coating micro-hardness was measured at maximum normal load Fmax = 300 mN. It was 3.1 ± 0.8 GPa, surface layer elasticity modulus E = 110 ± 20 GPa, roughness Ra = 0.9 ± 0.1 µm, Rz = 7.5 ± 0.2 µm, which is less than the titanium primer layer roughness. Hybrid MAO CaP coating is biocompatible, able to form calcium phosphates from supersaturated body fluid (SBF) solution and also stimulates osteoinduction processes. The second HT type includes the oxide layer formation by thermal oxidation and then CaP target radio frequency magnetron sputtering (RFMS). Oxide-RFMS CaP coating is a thin dense coating with good adhesion to the substrate material, which can be used for metal implants. The RFMS CaP coating has thickness 1.6 ± 0.1 µm and consists of main target elements calcium and phosphorus and Ca/P ratio 2.4. The second HT type can form calcium phosphates from SBF solution. In vivo study shows that hybrid RFMS CaP coating is biocompatible and produces fibrointegration processes.

  7. Fabrications of zinc-releasing biocement combining zinc calcium phosphate to calcium phosphate cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Shinya; Hiasa, Masahiro; Yasue, Akihiro; Sekine, Kazumitsu; Hamada, Kenichi; Asaoka, Kenzo; Tanaka, Eiji

    2014-01-01

    Recently, zinc-releasing bioceramics have been the focus of much attention owing to their bone-forming ability. Thus, some types of zinc-containing calcium phosphate (e.g., zinc-doped tricalcium phosphate and zinc-substituted hydroxyapatite) are examined and their osteoblastic cell responses determined. In this investigation, we studied the effects of zinc calcium phosphate (ZCP) derived from zinc phosphate incorporated into calcium phosphate cement (CPC) in terms of its setting reaction and MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cell responses. Compositional analysis by powder X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that HAP crystals were precipitated in the CPC containing 10 or 30wt% ZCP after successfully hardening. However, the crystal growth observed by scanning electron microscopy was delayed in the presence of additional ZCP. These findings indicate that the additional zinc inhibits crystal growth and the conversion of CPC to the HAP crystals. The proliferation of the cells and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were enhanced when 10wt% ZCP was added to CPC. Taken together, ZCP added CPC at an appropriate fraction has a potent promotional effect on bone substitute biomaterials. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Total Serum Calcium and Inorganic Phosphate levels in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) is still a very common cause of morbidity and mortality around the globe and the disorder of calcium and inorganic phosphate metabolism has been poorly associated with the infection. This study was aimed at assessing the total serum calcium and inorganic phosphate levels in PTB patients in ...

  9. Development of a fully injectable calcium phosphate cement for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A study on the development of a fully injectable calcium phosphate cement for orthopedic and dental applications is presented. The paper describes its characteristic properties including results of bio- compatibility studies. A conventional two-component calcium phosphate cement formulation (having a powder part ...

  10. Do Ca2+-adsorbing ceramics reduce the release of calcium ions from gypsum-based biomaterials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcarz, Anna; Zalewska, Justyna; Pałka, Krzysztof; Hajnos, Mieczysław; Ginalska, Grazyna

    2015-02-01

    Bone implantable materials based on calcium sulfate dihydrate dissolve quickly in tissue liquids and release calcium ions at very high levels. This phenomenon induces temporary toxicity for osteoblasts, may cause local inflammation and delay the healing process. Reduction in the calcium ion release rate by gypsum could be therefore beneficial for the healing of gypsum-filled bone defects. The aim of this study concerned the potential use of calcium phosphate ceramics of various porosities for the reduction of high Ca(2+) ion release from gypsum-based materials. Highly porous ceramics failed to reduce the level of Ca(2+) ions released to the medium in a continuous flow system. However, it succeeded to shorten the period of high calcium level. It was not the phase composition but the high porosity of ceramics that was found crucial for both the shortening of the Ca(2+) release-related toxicity period and intensification of apatite deposition on the composite. Nonporous ceramics was completely ineffective for this purpose and did not show any ability to absorb calcium ions at a significant level. Moreover, according to our observations, complex studies imitating in vivo systems, rather than standard tests, are essential for the proper evaluation of implantable biomaterials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Bioactive calcium phosphate coatings on metallic implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedelnikova, M. B.; Komarova, E. G.; Sharkeev, Yu. P.; Tolkacheva, T. V.; Khlusov, I. A.; Sheikin, V. V.

    2017-09-01

    Biocomposites based on bioinert metals or alloys and bioactive calcium phosphate coatings are a promising tendency of the new-generation implants development. In recent years, the approach of regenerative medicine based on the use of biodegradable biomaterials has been priority direction. Such materials are capable of initiating the bone tissue regeneration and replaced by the newly formed bone. The microarc oxidation (MAO) method allows obtaining the bioactive coatings with a porous structure, special functional properties, and modified by the essential elements. During the last decade, the investigations in the field of the nanostructured biocomposites based on bioinert Ti, Zr, Nb and their alloys with a calcium phosphate coatings deposited by the MAO method have been studied in the Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk. In this article the possibility to produce the bioactive coatings with high antibacterial and osseoconductive properties due to the introduction in the coatings of Zn, Cu, Ag, La, Si elements and wollastonite CaSiO3 was shown. The high hydrophilic and bioresorbed coatings stimulate the processes of osseointegration of the implant into the bone tissue. A promising direction in the field of the medical material science is a development of the metallic implants with good biomechanical compatibility to the bone, such as Ti-Nb alloys with a low elastic modulus that can be classified as biomaterials of the second generation. Zr and its alloys are promising materials for the dentistry and orthopedic surgery due to their high strength and corrosion resistance. Biodegradable Mg alloys are biomaterials of third generation. Such materials can dissolve with a certain speed in human body and excreted from the body thereby excluding the need for reoperation. This article presents the analysis of the study results of bioactive MAO coatings on Ti, Ti-Nb, Zr-Nb and Mg alloys and their promising medical application.

  12. Solubility of Calcium Phosphate in Concentrated Dairy Effluent Brines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kezia, K; Lee, J; Zisu, B; Chen, G Q; Gras, S L; Kentish, S E

    2017-05-24

    The solubility of calcium phosphate in concentrated dairy brine streams is important in understanding mineral scaling on equipment, such as membrane modules, evaporators, and heat exchangers, and in brine pond operation. In this study, the solubility of calcium phosphate has been assessed in the presence of up to 300 g/L sodium chloride as well as lactose, organic acids, and anions at 10, 30, and 50 °C. As a neutral molecule, lactose has a marginal but still detectable effect upon calcium solubility. However, additions of sodium chloride up to 100 g/L result in a much greater increase in calcium solubility. Beyond this point, the concentrations of ions in the solution decrease significantly. These changes in calcium solubility can readily be explained through changes in the activity coefficients. There is little difference in calcium phosphate speciation between 10 and 30 °C. However, at 50 °C, the ratio of calcium to phosphate in the solution is lower than at the other temperatures and varies less with ionic strength. While the addition of sodium lactate has less effect upon calcium solubility than sodium citrate, it still has a greater effect than sodium chloride at an equivalent ionic strength. Conversely, when these organic anions are present in the solution in the acid form, the effect of pH dominates and results in much higher solubility and a calcium/phosphate ratio close to one, indicative of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate as the dominant solid phase.

  13. Immobilization of fission products in phosphate ceramic waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The goal of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a novel low-temperature solidification/stabilization (S/S) technology for immobilizing waste streams containing fission products such as cesium, strontium, and technetium in a chemically bonded phosphate ceramic. This technology can immobilize partitioned tank wastes and decontaminate waste streams containing volatile fission products.

  14. Associations between calcium-phosphate metabolism and coronary artery calcification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønhøj, Mette H; Gerke, Oke; Mickley, Hans

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: High serum calcium-phosphate levels are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with chronic kidney disease. Recent studies have demonstrated this relationship also in subjects with normal kidney function. Our aim was to examine whether......, were analysed for total calcium, phosphate, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D). CAC was measured by a non-contrast cardiac CT scan and categorised into four groups: 0, 1-99, 100-399, ≥400 Agatston units. The association of calcium-phosphate metabolism with CAC was evaluated...

  15. A hybrid composite system of biphasic calcium phosphate granules loaded with hyaluronic acid-gelatin hydrogel for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruq, Omar; Kim, Boram; Padalhin, Andrew R; Lee, Gun Hee; Lee, Byong-Taek

    2017-10-01

    An ideal bone substitute should be made of biocompatible materials that mimic the structure, characteristics, and functions of natural bone. Many researchers have worked on the fabrication of different bone scaffold systems including ceramic-polymer hybrid system. In the present study, we incorporated hyaluronic acid-gelatin hydrogel to micro-channeled biphasic calcium phosphate granules as a carrier to improve cell attachment and proliferation through highly interconnected porous structure. This hybrid system is composed of ceramic biphasic calcium phosphate granules measuring 1 mm in diameter with seven holes and hyaluronic acid-gelatin hydrogel. This combination of biphasic calcium phosphate and hyaluronic acid-gelatin retained suitable characteristics for bone regeneration. The resulting scaffold had a porosity of 56% with a suitable pore sizes. The mechanical strength of biphasic calcium phosphate granule increased after loading hyaluronic acid-gelatin from 4.26 ± 0.43 to 6.57 ± 0.25 MPa, which is highly recommended for cancellous bone substitution. Swelling and degradation rates decreased in the hybrid scaffold compared to hydrogel due to the presence of granules in hybrid scaffold. In vitro cytocompatibility studies were observed by preosteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) cell line and the result revealed that biphasic calcium phosphate/hyaluronic acid-gelatin significantly increased cell growth and proliferation compared to biphasic calcium phosphate granules. Analysis of micro-computed tomography data and stained tissue sections from the implanted samples showed that the hybrid scaffold had good osseointegration and better bone formation in the scaffold one and two months postimplantation. Histological section confirmed the formation of dense collagenous tissue and new bone in biphasic calcium phosphate/hyaluronic acid-gelatin scaffolds at two months. Our study demonstrated that such hybrid biphasic calcium phosphate/hyaluronic acid-gelatin scaffold is a

  16. Porous poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid)/calcium phosphate cement composite for reconstruction of bone defects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruhe, P.Q.; Hedberg, E.L.; Padron, N.T.; Spauwen, P.H.M.; Jansen, J.A.; Mikos, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    Calcium phosphate (Ca-P) cements are injectable, self-setting ceramic pastes generally known for their favorable bone response. Ingrowth of bone and subsequent degradation rates can be enhanced by the inclusion of macropores. Initial porosity can be induced by CO(2) foaming during setting of the

  17. Long-term survival of calcium phosphate-coated dental implants: a meta-analytical approach to the clinical literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oirschot, B.A. van; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Beucken, J.J.J.P van den; Meijer, G.J.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.; Junker, R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calcium phosphate ceramic coatings have the potential to compensate for challenging bone conditions such as delayed or impaired bone healing and low bone quantity or density. Thus, the increasing universal prevalence of subjects with such challenging bone conditions might be paralleled

  18. Calcium phosphate scaffold from biogenic calcium carbonate by fast ambient condition reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Abhishek; Fermani, Simona; Arjun Tekalur, Srinivasan; Vanderberg, Abigail; Falini, Giuseppe

    2011-12-01

    Calcium phosphate biogenic materials are biocompatible and promote bioactivity and osteoconductivity, which implies their natural affinity and tendency to bond directly to bones subsequently replacing the host bone after implantation owing to its biodegradability. Calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate, CaHPO 4·2H 2O, is known to be a nucleation precursor, in aqueous solutions, for apatitic calcium phosphates and, hence, a potential starting material for bone substitutes. Numerous approaches, via hydrothermal and ambient synthetic routes, have been used to produce calcium phosphate from biogenic calcium carbonate, taking advantage of the peculiar architecture and composition of the latter. In this article, the lamellar region of the cuttlefish bone ( Sepia officinalis) was used as a framework for the organized deposition of calcium phosphate crystals, at ambient conditions via a fast procedure involving an amorphous calcium carbonate intermediate, and ending with a conversion to calcium phosphate and a fixation procedure, thereby resulting in direct conversion of biogenic calcium carbonate into calcium phosphates at ambient conditions from the scale of months to hours.

  19. Calcium phosphate mineralization is widely applied in crustacean mandibles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentov, Shmuel; Aflalo, Eliahu D; Tynyakov, Jenny; Glazer, Lilah; Sagi, Amir

    2016-02-24

    Crustaceans, like most mineralized invertebrates, adopted calcium carbonate mineralization for bulk skeleton reinforcement. Here, we show that a major part of the crustacean class Malacostraca (which includes lobsters, crayfishes, prawns and shrimps) shifted toward the formation of calcium phosphate as the main mineral at specified locations of the mandibular teeth. In these structures, calcium phosphate is not merely co-precipitated with the bulk calcium carbonate but rather creates specialized structures in which a layer of calcium phosphate, frequently in the form of crystalline fluorapatite, is mounted over a calcareous "jaw". From a functional perspective, the co-existence of carbonate and phosphate mineralization demonstrates a biomineralization system that provides a versatile route to control the physico-chemical properties of skeletal elements. This system enables the deposition of amorphous calcium carbonate, amorphous calcium phosphate, calcite and apatite at various skeletal locations, as well as combinations of these minerals, to form graded composites materials. This study demonstrates the widespread occurrence of the dual mineralization strategy in the Malacostraca, suggesting that in terms of evolution, this feature of phosphatic teeth did not evolve independently in the different groups but rather represents an early common trait.

  20. Multimodal pore formation in calcium phosphate cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodoso-Torrecilla, Irene; van Gestel, Nicole A P; Diaz-Gomez, Luis; Grosfeld, Eline-Claire; Laperre, Kjell; Wolke, Joop G C; Smith, Brandon T; Arts, Jacobus J; Mikos, Antonios G; Jansen, John A; Hofmann, Sandra; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P

    2017-09-23

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) are commonly used as bone substitute materials. However, their slow degradation rate and lack of macroporosity hinders new bone formation. Poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) incorporation is of great interest as, upon degradation, produces acidic by-products that enhance CPC degradation. Yet, new bone formation is delayed until PLGA degradation occurs a few weeks after implantation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to accelerate the early stage pore formation within CPCs in vitro. With that purpose, we incorporated the water-soluble porogen sucrose at different weight percentages (10 or 20 wt %) to CPC and CPC/PLGA composites. The results revealed that incorporation of sucrose porogens increased mass loss within the first week of in vitro degradation in groups containing sucrose compared to control groups. After week 1, a further mass loss was observed related to PLGA and CPC degradation. Macroporosity analysis confirmed that macroporosity formation is influenced by the dissolution of sucrose at an early stage and by the degradation of PLGA and CPC at a later stage. We concluded that the combination of sucrose and PLGA porogens in CPC is a promising approach to promote early stage bone tissue ingrowth and complete replacement of CPC through multimodal pore formation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Compression and rupture cycles as tools for compressibility characterization application to apatitic calcium phosphates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontier, C. [S.P.C.T.S., Faculte des Sciences, Limoges (France); G.E.F., Faculte de Pharmacie, Limoges (France); Viana, M.; Chulia, D. [G.E.F., Faculte de Pharmacie, Limoges (France); Champion, E.; Bernache-Assollant, D. [S.P.C.T.S., Faculte des Sciences, Limoges (France)

    2002-07-01

    Measurement of the cycles of compression and rupture helps to understand the phenomena occurring during compaction. Different parameters are deduced from the cycles, such as the packing of the material and energies used during compression. The ratio between the energy of rupture and the energy of compaction defines the efficacy of compaction of the materials. This technique is applied to ceramic materials using apatitic calcium phosphates with a Ca/P molar ratio of 1.5 (apatitic tricalcium phosphate and {beta}-tricalcium phosphate) and 1.667 (stoichiometric hydroxyapatite). The methodology uses a uniaxial instrumented press to plot the cycles of compaction and rupture. The results point out the good compaction and cohesion properties of apatitic tricalcium phosphate, compared to the other apatitic materials. (orig.)

  2. Obtain ceramic porous alumina-zirconia by replica method calcium phosphate coated; Oobtencao de ceramicas porosas de alumina-zirconia pelo metodo da replica recobertas com fosfato de calcio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, A.D.R.; Rigoli, W.R.; Osiro, Denise; Pallone, E.M.J.A., E-mail: adinizrs@yahoo.com.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FZEA/USP), Pirassununga, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Zootecnia e Engenharia de Alimentos; Lobo, A.O. [Universidade do Vale do Paraiba (UNIVAP), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Biomaterials used in bone replacement, including porous bioceramics, are often used as support structure for bone formation and repair. The porous bioceramics are used because present features as biocompatibility, high porosity and pore morphology that confer adequate mechanical strength and induce bone growth. In this work were obtained porous specimens of alumina containing 5% by inclusion of volume of zirconia produced by the replica method. The porous specimens had its surface chemically treated with phosphoric acid and were coated with calcium phosphate. The coating was performed using the biomimetic method during 14 days and an initial pH of 6.1. The porous specimens were characterized using the follow techniques: porosity, axial compression tests, microtomography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and pH measurements SBF solution. The results showed specimens with suitable pore morphology for application as biomaterial, and even a reduced time of incubation favored the calcium phosphate phases formation on the material surfaces. (author)

  3. Chemistry Misconceptions Associated with Understanding Calcium and Phosphate Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Successful learning of many aspects in physiology depends on a meaningful understanding of fundamental chemistry concepts. Two conceptual diagnostic questions measured student understanding of the chemical equilibrium underlying calcium and phosphate homeostasis. One question assessed the ability to predict the change in phosphate concentration…

  4. Aluminum phosphate ceramics for waste storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagh, Arun; Maloney, Martin D

    2014-06-03

    The present disclosure describes solid waste forms and methods of processing waste. In one particular implementation, the invention provides a method of processing waste that may be particularly suitable for processing hazardous waste. In this method, a waste component is combined with an aluminum oxide and an acidic phosphate component in a slurry. A molar ratio of aluminum to phosphorus in the slurry is greater than one. Water in the slurry may be evaporated while mixing the slurry at a temperature of about 140-200.degree. C. The mixed slurry may be allowed to cure into a solid waste form. This solid waste form includes an anhydrous aluminum phosphate with at least a residual portion of the waste component bound therein.

  5. Vitrified chemically bonded phosphate ceramics for immobilization of radioisotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagh, Arun S.

    2016-04-05

    A method of immobilizing a radioisotope and vitrified chemically bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC) articles formed by the method are described. The method comprises combining a radioisotope-containing material, MgO, a source of phosphate, and optionally, a reducing agent, in water at a temperature of less than 100.degree. C. to form a slurry; curing the slurry to form a solid intermediate CBPC article comprising the radioisotope therefrom; comminuting the intermediate CBPC article, mixing the comminuted material with glass frits, and heating the mixture at a temperature in the range of about 900 to about 1500.degree. C. to form a vitrified CBPC article comprising the radioisotope immobilized therein.

  6. Evaluation of Serum Calcium and Inorganic Phosphate Levels in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Serum samples were analysed for calcium and inorganic phosphate using titrimetric and colorimetric methods respectively. Our result revealed a steady decrease in calcium from first trimester to lactating period with statistically significant values in second and third trimesters, and lactation (P<0.05) when compared with ...

  7. Osteoinduction by Foamed and 3D-Printed Calcium Phosphate Scaffolds: Effect of Nanostructure and Pore Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, Albert; Diez-Escudero, Anna; Maazouz, Yassine; Rappe, Katrin; Espanol, Montserrat; Montufar, Edgar B; Bonany, Mar; Sadowska, Joanna M; Guillem-Marti, Jordi; Öhman-Mägi, Caroline; Persson, Cecilia; Manzanares, Maria-Cristina; Franch, Jordi; Ginebra, Maria-Pau

    2017-12-06

    Some biomaterials are osteoinductive, that is, they are able to trigger the osteogenic process by inducing the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells to the osteogenic lineage. Although the underlying mechanism is still unclear, microporosity and specific surface area (SSA) have been identified as critical factors in material-associated osteoinduction. However, only sintered ceramics, which have a limited range of porosities and SSA, have been analyzed so far. In this work, we were able to extend these ranges to the nanoscale, through the foaming and 3D-printing of biomimetic calcium phosphates, thereby obtaining scaffolds with controlled micro- and nanoporosity and with tailored macropore architectures. Calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) scaffolds were evaluated after 6 and 12 weeks in an ectopic-implantation canine model and compared with two sintered ceramics, biphasic calcium phosphate and β-tricalcium phosphate. Only foams with spherical, concave macropores and not 3D-printed scaffolds with convex, prismatic macropores induced significant ectopic bone formation. Among them, biomimetic nanostructured CDHA produced the highest incidence of ectopic bone and accelerated bone formation when compared with conventional microstructured sintered calcium phosphates with the same macropore architecture. Moreover, they exhibited different bone formation patterns; in CDHA foams, the new ectopic bone progressively replaced the scaffold, whereas in sintered biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds, bone was deposited on the surface of the material, progressively filling the pore space. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the high reactivity of nanostructured biomimetic CDHA combined with a spherical, concave macroporosity allows the pushing of the osteoinduction potential beyond the limits of microstructured calcium phosphate ceramics.

  8. Calcium phosphate in plant trichomes: the overlooked biomineral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigend, Maximilian; Mustafa, Adeel; Ensikat, Hans-Jürgen

    2017-12-12

    Calcium phosphate was unknown as a plant biomineral until recently reported in Neotropical Loasaceae. Here, we demonstrate its widespread occurrence in the trichomes of several plant families, including Brassicaceae. Calcium phosphate is the primary biomineral in, e.g., the bones and teeth of higher animals; in plants, it was only recently discovered in the stinging hairs and scabrid-glochidiate trichomes of South American Loasaceae (Ensikat et al. in Sci Rep UK 6:26073, 2016), where it appears to be deposited highly specifically, often replacing the common plant biomineral silica. We initiated a broader survey in a range of different plant orders to investigate a possibly wider distribution of calcium phosphate biomineralization in plants. Scanning electron microscopy with EDX element analysis and mapping was used for the detection of the biominerals: calcium phosphate, calcium carbonate, and silica in the trichomes of several common plant species of different orders. Results were authenticated with Raman spectroscopy. Calcium phosphate was found in the trichomes of several species in the orders Malpighiales, Rosales, Boraginales, and Brassicales. It occurred in trichome tips, replacing the more common silica, or together with silica and calcium carbonate at specific locations in the trichome cell walls. Most surprisingly, it was found in the trichomes of Arabidopsis thaliana, one of the most studied plant species-where it had been overlooked so far. The wide distribution of calcium phosphate as plant biomineral here demonstrated and the striking mineralization patterns with three different biominerals in the walls of single-celled trichomes underscore an unexpected complexity in plant biomineralization.

  9. Immobilization of fission products in phosphate ceramic waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, D.; Wagh, A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Chemically bonded phosphate ceramics (CBPCs) have several advantages that make them ideal candidates for containing radioactive and hazardous wastes. In general, phosphates have high solid-solution capacities for incorporating radionuclides, as evidenced by several phosphates (e.g., monazites and apatites) that are natural analogs of radioactive and rare-earth elements. The phosphates have high radiation stability, are refractory, and will not degrade in the presence of internal heating by fission products. Dense and hard CBPCs can be fabricated inexpensively and at low temperature by acid-base reactions between an inorganic oxide/hydroxide powder and either phosphoric acid or an acid-phosphate solution. The resulting phosphates are extremely insoluble in aqueous media and have excellent long-term durability. CBPCs offer the dual stabilization mechanisms of chemical fixation and physical encapsulation, resulting in superior waste forms. The goal of this task is develop and demonstrate the feasibility of CBPCs for S/S of wastes containing fission products. The focus of this work is to develop a low-temperature CBPC immobilization system for eluted {sup 99}Tc wastes from sorption processes.

  10. Long-term survival of calcium phosphate-coated dental implants: a meta-analytical approach to the clinical literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oirschot, Bart A J A; Bronkhorst, Ewald M; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Meijer, Gert J; Jansen, John A; Junker, Rüdiger

    2013-04-01

    Calcium phosphate ceramic coatings have the potential to compensate for challenging bone conditions such as delayed or impaired bone healing and low bone quantity or density. Thus, the increasing universal prevalence of subjects with such challenging bone conditions might be paralleled by an enhanced global use of calcium phosphate ceramic-coated dental implants. However, it is speculated that the long-term clinical survival of calcium phosphate-coated dental implants might be adversely affected by coating delamination. The aims of the current review were (1) to systematically appraise and (2) to meta-analyse long-term survival data of calcium phosphate-coated dental implants in clinical trials. An extensive search in the electronic databases of the National Library of Medicine (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov), The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and the ISI Web of Knowledge, was carried out for articles published between January 2000 and November 2011 to identify randomized controlled clinical trials, prospective clinical trials as well as retrospective analysis of cases (RA) presenting survival data on the topic of calcium phosphate-coated dental implants. Only publications in English were considered, and the search was narrowed to studies in humans with a follow-up of at least 5 years only. Furthermore, the reference lists of related review articles and publications selected for inclusion in this review were systematically screened. The primary outcome variable was percentage annual failure rate (AFR), and the secondary outcome variable was percentage cumulative survival rate (CSR). The electronic search in the database of the National Library of Medicine, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and the ISI Web of Knowledge, resulted in the identification of 385 titles. These titles were initially screened by the two independent reviewers for possible inclusion, resulting in 29 publications suitable for further consideration. Screening

  11. Calcium phosphate bioceramics prepared from wet chemically precipitated powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine Salma

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work calcium phosphates were synthesized by modified wet chemical precipitation route. Contrary to the conventional chemical precipitation route calcium hydroxide was homogenized with planetary mill. Milling calcium oxide and water in planetary ball mill as a first step of synthesis provides a highly dispersed calcium hydroxide suspension. The aim of this work was to study the influence of main processing parameters of wet chemical precipitation synthesis product and to control the morphology, phase and functional group composition and, consequently, thermal stability and microstructure of calcium phosphate bioceramics after thermal treatment. The results showed that it is possible to obtain calcium phosphates with different and reproducible phase compositions after thermal processing (hydroxyapatite [HAp], β-tricalcium phosphate [β-TCP] and HAp/β-TCP by modified wet-chemical precipitation route. The β-TCP phase content in sintered bioceramics samples is found to be highly dependent on the changes in technological parameters and it can be controlled with ending pH, synthesis temperature and thermal treatment. Pure, crystalline and highly thermally stable (up to 1300°C HAp bioceramics with homogenous grainy microstructure, grain size up to 200–250 nm and high open porosity can be successfully obtained by powder synthesized at elevated synthesis temperature of 70°C and stabilizing ending pH at 9.

  12. Biological Reactions to Calcium Phosphate-coated Calcium Carbonate Particles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tetsunari NISHIKAWA; Kazuya MASUNO; Tomoharu OKAMURA; Kazuya TOMINAGA; Masahiro WATO; Mayu KOKUBU; Koichi IMAI; Shoji TAKEDA; Yoichro TAGUCHI; Masatoshi UEDA; Akio TANAKA

    2010-01-01

    [SYNOPSIS][Objectives]: In order to histopathologically investigate biological reactions to materials used for scaffolds, we examined the cytotoxicity to calcium particles in vitro and bioabsorption in vivo...

  13. Renal control of calcium, phosphate, and magnesium homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaine, Judith; Chonchol, Michel; Levi, Moshe

    2015-07-07

    Calcium, phosphate, and magnesium are multivalent cations that are important for many biologic and cellular functions. The kidneys play a central role in the homeostasis of these ions. Gastrointestinal absorption is balanced by renal excretion. When body stores of these ions decline significantly, gastrointestinal absorption, bone resorption, and renal tubular reabsorption increase to normalize their levels. Renal regulation of these ions occurs through glomerular filtration and tubular reabsorption and/or secretion and is therefore an important determinant of plasma ion concentration. Under physiologic conditions, the whole body balance of calcium, phosphate, and magnesium is maintained by fine adjustments of urinary excretion to equal the net intake. This review discusses how calcium, phosphate, and magnesium are handled by the kidneys. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  14. Development of calcium phosphate based bioceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Ritter 1997; Suchanek and. Yoshimura 1998). Bioglasses are an important ..... Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, National. Institute of Health, NIH Pub. No. 80-275) 2nd ed. p. 32. Engin N Ö and Tas, A C 2000 J. Am. Ceram. Soc.

  15. Development of calcium phosphate based bioceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Histological studies showed that A–W glass ceramic implanted in the tibia of rat formed an intimate contact with newly grown bone and provided enough strength to the bone to bear the animal weight. Implants made of Ca–P–O glass was almost fully resorbed and was replaced by new bone. The implants made of both the ...

  16. Light transmittance and polymerization kinetics of amorphous calcium phosphate composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Par, Matej; Marovic, Danijela; Skenderovic, Hrvoje; Gamulin, Ozren; Klaric, Eva; Tarle, Zrinka

    2017-05-01

    This study investigated light transmittance and polymerization kinetics of experimental remineralizing composite materials based on amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), reinforced with inert fillers. Light-curable composites were composed of Bis-EMA-TEGDMA-HEMA resin and ACP, barium glass, and silica fillers. Additionally, a commercial composite Tetric EvoCeram was used as a reference. Light transmittance was recorded in real-time during curing, and transmittance curves were used to assess polymerization kinetics. To obtain additional information on polymerization kinetics, temperature rise was monitored in real-time during curing and degree of conversion was measured immediately and 24 h post-cure. Light transmittance values of 2-mm thick samples of uncured ACP composites (2.3-2.9 %) were significantly lower than those of the commercial composite (3.8 %). The ACP composites presented a considerable transmittance rise during curing, resulting in post-cure transmittance values similar to or higher than those of the commercial composite (5.5-7.9 vs. 5.4 %). The initial part of light transmittance curves of experimental composites showed a linear rise that lasted for 7-20 s. Linear fitting was performed to obtain a function whose slope was assessed as a measure of polymerization rate. Comparison of transmittance and temperature curves showed that the linear transmittance rise lasted throughout the most part of the pre-vitrification period. The linear rise of light transmittance during curing has not been reported in previous studies and may indicate a unique kinetic behavior, characterized by a long period of nearly constant polymerization rate. The observed kinetic behavior may result in slower development of polymerization shrinkage stress but also inferior mechanical properties.

  17. Combined delivery of bone morphogenetic protein-2 and insulin-like growth factor-1 from nano-poly (γ-glutamic acid)/β-tricalcium phosphate-based calcium phosphate cement and its effect on bone regeneration in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xiulin; Feng, Jin; Feng, Jing; Huang, Xiaomo; Li, Liangqiu; Shi, Qingshan

    2017-11-01

    In this study, nano-doped calcium phosphate cement delivery systems (poly (γ-glutamic acid)/β-tricalcium phosphate/calcium phosphate ceramics and nano (γ-glutamic acid)/β-tricalcium phosphate/calcium phosphate ceramic) were fabricated, and low doses (10 µg/g) of two growth factors, insulin-like growth factor-1 and bone morphogenetic protein-2, were encapsulated then sequentially released. We characterized the delivery systems using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction and measured washout resistance and compressive strength, and thus optimized the most appropriate proportioning of delivery systems for the two growth factors. One of the growth factors was absorbed by the nano-poly (γ-glutamic acid)/β-tricalcium phosphate, which was then mixed into the calcium phosphate ceramic solid phase to create a new solid phase calcium phosphate ceramic. Nano-poly (γ-glutamic acid)/β-tricalcium phosphate/calcium phosphate ceramic carriers were then prepared by blending the new calcium phosphate ceramic solid phase powder with a solution of the remaining growth factor. The effects of different release patterns (studying sequential behavior) of insulin-like growth factor-1 and bone morphogenetic protein-2 on osteogenic proliferation and differentiation of the MC3t3-E1 mouse osteoblast cell were investigated. This combinational delivery system provided a controlled release of the two growth factors, in which nano-doping significantly affected their release kinetics. The incorporation of dual growth factors could potentially stimulate bone healing and promoting bone ingrowth processes at a low dose.

  18. Phase stability of silver particles embedded calcium phosphate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Phase stability of silver particles embedded calcium phosphate bioceramics. BRAJENDRA SINGH1,2,∗ ... cal absorption spectroscopy analysis reveals the presence of Ag+ ions at low doping levels. As the doping increases, abundance of ... temperature, ability to generate shape and size controlled nanosized particles.9,10.

  19. In vitro study on biomineralization of biphasic calcium phosphate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this study, we report the preparation of a bone graft material, having cylindrical shape, containing biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP), gelatin (G), chitosan (C) and Terminalia chebula (TC) extract. TC extract was used as a crosslinker that gives stability to bone graft when it is placed in SBF. The graft was stable in ...

  20. lectrolytic deposition of lithium into calcium phosphate coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; de Groot, K.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Lithium ions stimulate the Wnt signaling pathway and the authors previously demonstrated that lithium enhances the proliferation of tissue cultured human mesenchymal stem cells. The aim of this study was to prepare and characterize a calcium phosphate/lithium coating by means of

  1. Calcium-phosphate-coated Oral Implants Promote Osseointegration in Osteoporosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alghamdi, H.S.A.; Cuijpers, V.M.J.I.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Beucken, J.J.J.P van den; Jansen, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Osteoporotic conditions are anticipated to affect the osseointegration of dental implants. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of a radiofrequent magnetron-sputtered calcium phosphate (CaP) coating on dental implant integration upon installment in the femoral condyles of both healthy and

  2. Calcium and phosphate homeostasis: concerted interplay of new regulators.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renkema, K.Y.R.; Alexander, R.T.; Bindels, R.J.M.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.

    2008-01-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) and phosphate (P(i)) are essential to many vital physiological processes. Consequently the maintenance of Ca(2+) and P(i) homeostasis is essential to a healthy existence. This occurs through the concerted action of intestinal, renal, and skeletal regulatory mechanisms. Ca(2+) and

  3. Optimizing conditions for calcium phosphate mediated transient transfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Guo

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: Calcium phosphate mediated transfection is the most low-cost approach to introduce recombinant DNA into culture cells. However, the utility of this procedure is limited in highly-differentiated cells. Here we describe the specific HBS-buffered saline, PH, glycerol shock, vortex strength, transfection medium, and particle concentrations conditions necessary to optimize this transfection method in highly differentiated cells.

  4. Light scattering studies on solutions containing calcium phosphates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feenstra, T.P.; Bruyn, P.L. de

    A number of light scattering experiments was performed on calcium and phosphate containing solutions at pH 8.33 and 26°C. Supplementary information was obtained by means of dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The measurements prove that

  5. The effect of calcium phosphate-containing desensitizing agent on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of calcium phosphate containing desensitizing pretreatments on the microtensile bond strength (MTBS) and microleakage of the multimode adhesive agent to dentin. Materials and Methods: In this study, twelve noncarious, freshly extracted human third molar teeth ...

  6. In vitro study on biomineralization of biphasic calcium phosphate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, we report the preparation of a bone graft material, having cylindrical shape, containing biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP), gelatin (G), chitosan (C) and Terminalia chebula (TC) extract. TC extract was used as a crosslinker that gives stability to bone graft when it is placed in SBF. The graft was stable in the SBF ...

  7. Calcium phosphate biomaterials from marine algae. Hydrothermal synthesis and characterisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Felício-Fernandes

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate compounds such as Hydroxyapatite (HAp were prepared by hydrothermal synthesis with phycogenic CaCO3 as starting material. Material obtained was characterised by usual methods (XRD, FTIR, TG, N2-adsorption, SEM and EDX in order to study its physical-chemical characteristics. The prepared HAp showed that it may be suitable for use as a biomaterial.

  8. Calcium phosphate saturation in seawater around the Andaman Island

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.; Reddy, C.V.G.

    apparent solubility product of 4 x 10/20 C given by Kester and Pytocowicz. The maximum percentage saturation works out to be 67, 65, 95, and 97 respectively towards west, east, north and south. The inorganic mineral phosphate and calcium content...

  9. Atomic structure of intracellular amorphous calcium phosphate deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, F; Blumenthal, N C; Posner, A S; Becker, G L; Lehninger, A L

    1975-01-01

    The radial distribution function calculated from x-ray diffraction of mineralized cytoplasmic structures isolated from the hepatopancreas of the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) is very similar to that previously found for synthetic amorphous calcium phosphate. Both types of mineral apparently have only short-range atomic order, represented as a neutral ion cluster of about 10 A in longest dimension, whose probable composition is expressed by the formula Ca9(PO4)6. The minor differences observed are attributed to the presence in the biological mineral of significant amounts of Mg-2+ and ATP. Synthetic amorphous calcium phosphate in contact with a solution containing an amount of ATP equivalent to that of the biological mineral failed to undergo conversion to the thermodynamically more stable hydroxyapatite. The amorphous calcium phosphate of the cytoplasmic mineral granules is similarly stable, and does not undergo conversion to hydroxyapatite, presumably owing to the presence of ATP and Mg-2+, known in inhibitors of the conversion process. The physiological implications of mineral deposits consisting of stabilized calcium phosphate ion clusters are discussed. PMID:1056015

  10. Adsorption studies of phosphate ions on alginate-calcium carbonate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alginate-calcium carbonate composite beads was prepared by the sol-gel method and characterized by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) instruments. Adsorption potential of phosphate ions have been studied on laboratory scale. The effects of contact time, adsorbent ...

  11. Development of a Calcium Phosphate Nanocomposite for Fast Fluorogenic Detection of Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio R. Martínez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Current procedures for the detection and identification of bacterial infections are laborious, time-consuming, and require a high workload and well-equipped laboratories. Therefore the work presented herein developed a simple, fast, and low cost method for bacterial detection based on hydroxyapatite nanoparticles with a nutritive mixture and the fluorogenic substrate. Calcium phosphate ceramic nanoparticles were characterized and integrated with a nutritive mixture for the early detection of bacteria by visual as well as fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. The composite was obtained by combining calcium phosphate nanoparticles (Ca:P ratio, 1.33:1 with a nutritive mixture of protein hydrolysates and carbon sources, which promote fast bacterial multiplication, and the fluorogenic substrate 4-methylumbellipheryl-β-d-glucuronide (MUG. The composite had an average particle size of 173.2 nm and did not show antibacterial activity against Gram-negative or Gram-positive bacteria. After an Escherichia coli suspension was in contact with the composite for 60–90 min, fluorescence detected under UV light or by fluorescence spectrophotometer indicated the presence of bacteria. Intense fluorescence was observed after incubation for a maximum of 90 min. Thus, this calcium phosphate nanocomposite system may be useful as a model for the development of other nanoparticle composites for detection of early bacterial adhesion.

  12. Amorphous calcium phosphate and its application in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Wei-bin

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Amorphous Calcium Phosphate (ACP is an essential mineral phase formed in mineralized tissues and the first commercial product as artificial hydroxyapatite. ACP is unique among all forms of calcium phosphates in that it lacks long-range, periodic atomic scale order of crystalline calcium phosphates. The X-ray diffraction pattern is broad and diffuse with a maximum at 25 degree 2 theta, and no other different features compared with well-crystallized hydroxyapatite. Under electron microscopy, its morphological form is shown as small spheroidal particles in the scale of tenths nanometer. In aqueous media, ACP is easily transformed into crystalline phases such as octacalcium phosphate and apatite due to the growing of microcrystalline. It has been demonstrated that ACP has better osteoconductivity and biodegradability than tricalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite in vivo. Moreover, it can increase alkaline phosphatase activities of mesoblasts, enhance cell proliferation and promote cell adhesion. The unique role of ACP during the formation of mineralized tissues makes it a promising candidate material for tissue repair and regeneration. ACP may also be a potential remineralizing agent in dental applications. Recently developed ACP-filled bioactive composites are believed to be effective anti-demineralizing/remineralizing agents for the preservation and repair of tooth structures. This review provides an overview of the development, structure, chemical composition, morphological characterization, phase transformation and biomedical application of ACP in dentistry.

  13. Variation of crystal structure of hydroxyapatite in calcium phosphate cement by the substitution of strontium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiupeng; Ye, Jiandong

    2008-03-01

    New routes were used to introduce strontium into calcium phosphate cement in the present article. The study showed that by mixing 50 wt% amorphous calcium phosphate + amorphous strontium phosphate and 50 wt% dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, hydroxyapatite and Sr-hydroxyapatite precipitated separately in the hydrated cement; whereas, by mixing 50 wt% Sr- amorphous calcium phosphate and 50 wt% dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, strontium can be doped into hydroxyapatite lattice and increase the lattice dimensions and lattice volume. The strontium substituted calcium phosphate cement has potential for use in orthopedic surgeries.

  14. Method of waste stabilization with dewatered chemically bonded phosphate ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagh, Arun; Maloney, Martin D.

    2010-06-29

    A method of stabilizing a waste in a chemically bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC). The method consists of preparing a slurry including the waste, water, an oxide binder, and a phosphate binder. The slurry is then allowed to cure to a solid, hydrated CBPC matrix. Next, bound water within the solid, hydrated CBPC matrix is removed. Typically, the bound water is removed by applying heat to the cured CBPC matrix. Preferably, the quantity of heat applied to the cured CBPC matrix is sufficient to drive off water bound within the hydrated CBPC matrix, but not to volatalize other non-water components of the matrix, such as metals and radioactive components. Typically, a temperature range of between 100.degree. C.-200.degree. C. will be sufficient. In another embodiment of the invention wherein the waste and water have been mixed prior to the preparation of the slurry, a select amount of water may be evaporated from the waste and water mixture prior to preparation of the slurry. Another aspect of the invention is a direct anyhydrous CBPC fabrication method wherein water is removed from the slurry by heating and mixing the slurry while allowing the slurry to cure. Additional aspects of the invention are ceramic matrix waste forms prepared by the methods disclosed above.

  15. Calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles for caries control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Birkedal, Henrik; Olsen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Caries is caused by acid production in biofilms on dental surfaces. Preventing caries therefore involves control of microorganisms and/or the acid produced. Here, calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles are presented as a new approach to caries control. The particles are made by co......-precipitation and designed to bind to bacteria in biofilms, impede biofilm build-up without killing the microflora, and release phosphate ions to buffer bacterial acid production if the pH decreases below 6. Analysis of biofilm formation and pH in a five-species biofilm model for dental caries showed that treatment......H always remained above 5.5. Hence, calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles show potential for applications in caries control....

  16. Calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles for caries control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian

    -phosphate-osteopontin particles are a new promising therapeutic approach to caries control. They are designed to bind to dental biofilms and interfere with biofilm build-up, lowering the bacterial burden on the tooth surface without affecting bacterial viability in the oral cavity. Moreover, they dissolve when pH in the biofilm......Oftentimes caries lesions develop in protected sites that are difficult to access by self-performed mechanical tooth cleaning. At present, there is a growing interest in chemical adjuncts to mechanical procedures of oral hygiene that aim at biofilm control rather than biofilm eradication. Calcium...... drops to 6 or below and release buffering phosphate ions that stabilize biofilm pH above the critical level for enamel dissolution. With that twofold approach, calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles may make a relevant contribution to clinical caries control....

  17. Magnetic properties study on Fe-doped calcium phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, C C; Valente, M A [Physics Department (I3N), Aveiro University (Portugal); Vasconcelos, I F [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Federal University of Ceara, Campus do Pici, 714 Block, 60455-760, Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil); Sombra, A S B [Telecommunications and Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory (LOCEM), Department of Physics, Federal University of Ceara, Campus do Pici, Postal Code 6030, 60455-760, Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil)], E-mail: ccsilva@ua.pt, E-mail: ccsilva@fisica.ufc.br

    2009-11-15

    Calcium phosphates are very important for applications in medicine due to their properties such as biocompatibility and bioactivity. In order to enhance these properties, substitution of calcium with other ions has been proposed. Partial substitution of calcium by different ions has been made in order to improve the properties of the calcium phosphates and also to allow new applications of apatite in medicine. In this work, hydroxyapatite [Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}-HAP] was prepared by high-energy dry milling (20 h) and mixed with iron oxide (5 wt.%). The mixture was calcinated at 900 deg. C for 5 h with a heating rate of 3 deg. C min{sup -1} in an attempt to introduce iron oxide into the HAP structure. The sintered sample was characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and magnetization. The {sup 57}Fe-Moessbauer spectra of the calcium phosphate oxides were also measured, revealing the presence of iron in three different phases: Ca{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 5}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and hydroxyapatite.

  18. Polyester fibers can be rendered calcium phosphate-binding by surface functionalization with bisphosphonate groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polini, Alessandro; Petre, Daniela Geta; Iafisco, Michele; de Lacerda Schickert, Sonia; Tampieri, Anna; van den Beucken, Jeroen; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C G

    2017-08-01

    Fibers are often used as structural elements to improve the mechanical properties of materials such as brittle ceramic matrices by facilitating the dissipation of energy. However, this energy dissipation is mainly controlled by the interface between the two components, and a poorly designed fiber-matrix interface strongly reduces the efficacy of fiber reinforcement. Here, we present a versatile approach to control the affinity of biocompatible fibers to calcium-containing matrices to maximize the efficacy of reinforcement of calcium phosphates-based bioceramics by means of polymeric fibers. To this end, polyester fibers of tunable length were produced by electrospinning and aminolysis, followed by covalent attachment of alendronate, a bisphosphonate molecule with strong calcium-binding affinity, to the surface of the fibers. The proposed method allowed for selective control over the amount of alendronate conjugation, thereby improving the affinity of polyester fibers toward calcium phosphate bioceramics. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 2335-2342, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Bone regeneration: molecular and cellular interactions with calcium phospate ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrère, F.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Groot, K.

    2006-01-01

    Calcium phosphate bioceramics are widely used in orthopedic and dental applications and porous scaffolds made of them are serious candidates in the field of bone tissue engineering. They have superior properties for the stimulation of bone formation and bone bonding, both related to the specific

  20. Hybrid Calcium Phosphate Coatings for Titanium Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharapudchenko, E.; Ignatov, V.; Ivanov, V.; Tverdokhlebov, S.

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid multilayer coatings were obtained on titanium substrates by the combination of two methods: the micro-arc oxidation in phosphoric acid solution with the addition of calcium compounds to high supersaturated state and RF magnetron sputtering of the target made of synthetic hydroxyapatite. 16 different groups of coatings were formed on titanium substrates and in vitro studies were conducted in accordance with ISO 23317 in the solution simulating body fluid. The studies using SEM, XRD of the coatings of the samples before and after exposure to SBF were performed. The features of morphology, chemical and phase composition of the studied coatings are shown.

  1. Bone reaction adjacent to microplasma-sprayed calcium phosphate-coated oral implants subjected to an occlusal load, an experimental study in the dog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junker, R.; Manders, P.J.D.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Borisov, Y.; Braceras, I.; Jansen, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A new microplasma spraying equipment (MSE) to deposit calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramic coatings onto titanium substrates has been developed. With this system, it is possible to spray fine particles and to apply textured hydroxylapatite coatings onto titanium surfaces. Moreover, due to the

  2. Short-fibre reinforcement of calcium phosphate bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, F; Gallagher, L; Jack, V; Dunne, N

    2007-02-01

    Calcium phosphate cement (CPC) sets to form hydroxyapatite, a major component of mineral bone, and is gaining increasing interest in bone repair applications. However, concerns regarding its brittleness and tendency to fragment have limited its widespread use. In the present study, short-fibre reinforcement of an apatitic calcium phosphate has been investigated to improve the fracture behaviour. The fibres used were polypropylene (PP) fibres, 50 microm in diameter and reduced in length by cryogenic grinding. The compressive strength and fracture behaviour were examined. Fibre addition of up to 10 wt % had a significant effect on composite properties, with the energy absorbed during failure being significantly increased, although this tended to be accompanied with a slight drop in compressive strength. The fibre reinforcement mechanisms appeared to be crack bridging and fibre pull-out. The setting time of the CPC with fibre reinforcement was also investigated and was found to increase with fibre volume fraction.

  3. Sintering behavior in zirconium phosphate bonded silicon nitride porous ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Fei [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Shen Qiang [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)], E-mail: sqqf@263.net; Schoenung, Julie M. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Zhang Lianmeng [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2008-12-15

    A new method for preparing high bending strength porous silicon nitride ceramics with controlled porosity has been developed by using a pressureless sintering technique with zirconium phosphate (ZrP{sub 2}O{sub 7}) as a binder phase. The sintering behavior in these porous ceramics is investigated in this study by using XRD, SEM, and HRTEM analysis. The results show that the sintering process can be divided into two stages: one is at temperatures below 250 deg. C, during which ZrO{sub 2} can react completely with H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} to form ZrP{sub 2}O{sub 7}, and a ZrP{sub 2}O{sub 7} bonded Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} porous structure is formed; the other is at temperatures above 250 deg. C, at which solid state sintering of the ZrP{sub 2}O{sub 7} dominates and a continuous open porosity network is obtained. The effect of the ZrP{sub 2}O{sub 7} binder content on sintering behavior, porosity and mechanical properties is also investigated.

  4. Effects of calcium phosphate composition in sputter coatings on in vitro and in vivo performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquia Edreira, Eva R; Wolke, Joop G C; Aldosari, Abdullah AlFarraj; Al-Johany, Sulieman S; Anil, Sukumaran; Jansen, John A; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P

    2015-01-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramic coatings have been used to enhance the biocompatibility and osteoconductive properties of metallic implants. The chemical composition of these ceramic coatings is an important parameter, which can influence the final bone performance of the implant. In this study, the effect of phase composition of CaP-sputtered coatings was investigated on in vitro dissolution behavior and in vivo bone response. Coatings were prepared by a radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering technique; three types of CaP target materials were used to obtain coatings with different stoichiometry and calcium to phosphate ratios (hydroxyapatite (HA), α-tricalciumphosphate (α-TCP), and tetracalciumphosphate (TTCP)) were compared with non-coated titanium controls. The applied ceramic coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The in vitro dissolution/precipitation of the CaP coatings was evaluated using immersion tests in simulated body fluid (SBF). To mimic the in vivo situation, identical CaP coatings were also evaluated in a femoral condyle rabbit model. TCPH and TTCPH showed morphological changes during 4-week immersion in SBF. The results of bone implant contact (BIC) and peri-implant bone volume (BV) showed a similar response for all experimental coatings. An apparent increase in tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) positive staining was observed in the peri-implant region with decreasing coating stability. In conclusion, the experimental groups showed different coating properties when tested in vitro and an apparent increase in bone remodeling with increasing coating dissolution in vivo. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Single Step Sintered Calcium Phosphate Fibers from Avian EGG Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadhich, Prabhash; Das, Bodhisatwa; Dhara, Santanu

    2013-11-01

    Different forms of calcium-phosphate (Hydoxyapatite, α-TCP, β-TCP, CDHA) minerals are found to be major component of bone tissue. Development of calcium-phosphate (CaP) based fibrous microstructures is of significant research interest worldwide owing to its improved mechanical properties and higher interconnectivity. Here we represent a method for single step sintered wet-spun Fibers of calcium phosphate from avian egg shells for biomedical applications. Raw egg shell powder was mixed with chitosan solution and Phosphoric acid. The mixture is milled in a ball mill overnight and then filtered. The slurry was de-aired using 100 microliter 1-octanol per 100 ml of slurry as antifoaming and wet spun in coagulation bath. Fiber was dried overnight and sintered at different temperatures for microstructure and phase analysis. Both green and sintered Fibers were physico-chemical characterized by SEM, EDX, XRD, TGA, DSC, FTIR, and stereo-zoom microscopy. The fibers obtained in this procedure are found to have highly porous interconnected structures which can provide good cell adhesion and therefore can be used for bioactive scaffold making.

  6. Biomimetic coprecipitation of calcium phosphate and bovine serum albumin on titanium alloy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Yuelian; Layrolle, Pierre; de Bruijn, Joost Dick; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Groot, K.

    2001-01-01

    Titanium alloy implants were precoated biomimetically with a thin and dense layer of calcium phosphate and then incubated either in a supersaturated solution of calcium phosphate or in phosphate-buffered saline, each containing bovine serum albumin (BSA) at various concentrations, under

  7. Effect of processing parameters on the microstructure and mechanical behavior of silica-calcium phosphate nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xueran; Ei-Ghannam, Ahmed

    2010-07-01

    Silica-calcium phosphate nanocomposite (SCPC) is a bioactive ceramic characterized by superior bone regenerative capacity and resorbability when compared to traditional bioactive ceramics. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effect of processing parameters on the microstructure and mechanical properties of SCPC. Cylinders were prepared by pressing the ceramic powder at 200, 300 or 400 MPa and sintering at 900, 1000 or 1100 degrees C for 3 h, respectively. XRD results indicate that the crystalline structure of the material is made of beta-NaCaPO(4) and alpha-cristobalite solid solutions. The increase in sintering temperature results in an increase in the grain size and the formation of a melting phase that coats the grains. TEM analyses reveal that the melting phase is amorphous and rich in silicon. The mechanical properties of SCPC cylinders are dependent on the content of the melting phase and the microstructure of the material. The ranges of compressive strength and modulus of elasticity of the SCPC are 62-204 MPa and 6-14 GPa, respectively, which are comparable to those of cortical bone. The results suggest that the interaction between crystalline and amorphous phases modulated the mechanical behavior of SCPC. It is possible to engineer the mechanical properties of SCPC by controlling the processing parameters to synthesize various fixation devices for orthopedic and cranio-maxillofacial applications.

  8. Characterization of wet powder-sprayed zirconia/calcium phosphate coating for dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardun, Karoline; Treccani, Laura; Volkmann, Eike; Li Destri, Giovanni; Marletta, Giovanni; Streckbein, Philipp; Heiss, Christian; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2015-02-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (TZ) is used for dental applications because of its low toxicity and beneficial mechanical properties, but it does not stimulate bone regeneration around the implant due to its bioinertness. Therefore, hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings are often utilized to increase the surface bioactivity and to achieve a better osseointegration. These coatings, however, are chemically nonstable and provide a weak bonding to the substrate surface. In this study, zirconia substrates were coated with a calcium phosphate/zirconia mixture to achieve ceramic coatings with a high bioactivity potential and a good mechanical stability. The coatings were obtained by wet powder spraying (WPS). Pure HA and TZ coatings were employed as reference materials. The coatings were characterized with regard to microstructure, surface roughness, and phase composition. Scratch tests were carried out to investigate the coating adhesion. The influence of the coating on the mechanical strength was evaluated with the ball on three balls test (B3B). In addition, zirconia dental implant screws were also coated and inserted in a biomechanical test block and bovine rip bone. After sintering, the mixed coating exhibited a porous morphology with a surface roughness of about 4 μm and a total porosity of 17%. Phase analysis showed a transformation from TZ and HA to calcium zirconium oxide and tricalcium phosphate. Investigations of the bond strength confirmed a strong adhesion of the mixed coating to the substrate, while the biaxial fracture strength was only slightly affected. Insertion experiments confirmed the scratch test results and evidenced an intact mixed coating on the zirconia screw. The present study revealed a higher stability and firm adhesion of the mixed coating compared with a pure calcium phosphate coating. We also successfully demonstrate the particular versatility of the WPS technique for dental implants by coating a complex curved surface. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. PROPERTIES AND SHAPING OF LIGHTWEIGHT CERAMICS BASED ON PHOSPHATE-BONDED HOLLOW SILICA MICROSPHERES

    OpenAIRE

    With, de, PHN Peter; Verweij, H.

    1986-01-01

    The values for the Young's modulus, strength, fracture toughness and thermal conductivity of lightweight ceramics based on phosphate-bonded hollow silica microspheres are reported as a function of the processing conditions. They are compared with the relevant data for other lightweight ceramic composites. The shaping by either pressing or lathe machining is briefly discussed.

  10. Selective laser sintering of calcium phosphate materials for orthopedic implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Goonhee

    Two technologies, Solid Freeform Fabrication (SFF) and bioceramics are combined in this work to prepare bone replacement implants with complex geometry. SFF has emerged as a crucial technique for rapid prototyping in the last decade. Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) is one of the established SFF manufacturing processes that can build three-dimensional objects directly from computer models without part-specific tooling or human intervention. Meanwhile, there have been great efforts to develop implantable materials that can assist in regeneration of bone defects and injuries. However, little attention has been focused in shaping bones from these materials. The main thrust of this research was to develop a process that can combine those two separate efforts. The specific objective of this research is to develop a process that can construct bone replacement material of complex geometry from synthetic calcium phosphate materials by using the SLS process. The achievement of this goal can have a significant impact on the quality of health care in the sense that complete custom-fit bone and tooth structures suitable for implantation can be prepared within 24--48 hours of receipt of geometric information obtained either from patient Computed Tomographic (CT) data, from Computer Aided Design (CAD) software or from other imaging systems such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Holographic Laser Range Imaging (HLRI). In this research, two different processes have been developed. First is the SLS fabrication of porous bone implants. In this effort, systematic procedures have been established and calcium phosphate implants were successfully fabricated from various sources of geometric information. These efforts include material selection and preparation, SLS process parameter optimization, and development of post-processing techniques within the 48-hour time frame. Post-processing allows accurate control of geometry and of the chemistry of calcium phosphate, as well as

  11. Zirconia / Alumina Composite Foams with Calcium Phosphate Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Novotná

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, mechanical properties of calcium phosphate foams were enhanced by zirconia/alumina porous cores prepared by polymer replica technique. This technique was chosen to ensure interconnected pores of optimal size for cell migration and attachment. The porosity of ZA cores (50 – 99% was controlled by multistep impregnation process, the size of pore windows was 300 – 500 μm. Sintered ZA cores were impregnated by hydroxyapatite or β-tricalcium phosphate slurry to improve bioactivity. The bone like apatite layer was formed on coatings when immersed in a simulated body fluid. Neither of tested materials was cytotoxic. Thus, the composite foam can be potentially used as a permanent substitute of cancellous bone.

  12. Phosphate decreases urine calcium and increases calcium balance: A meta-analysis of the osteoporosis acid-ash diet hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliasziw Michael

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The acid-ash hypothesis posits that increased excretion of "acidic" ions derived from the diet, such as phosphate, contributes to net acidic ion excretion, urine calcium excretion, demineralization of bone, and osteoporosis. The public is advised by various media to follow an alkaline diet to lower their acidic ion intakes. The objectives of this meta-analysis were to quantify the contribution of phosphate to bone loss in healthy adult subjects; specifically, a to assess the effect of supplemental dietary phosphate on urine calcium, calcium balance, and markers of bone metabolism; and to assess whether these affects are altered by the b level of calcium intake, c the degree of protonation of the phosphate. Methods Literature was identified through computerized searches regarding phosphate with surrogate and/or direct markers of bone health, and was assessed for methodological quality. Multiple linear regression analyses, weighted for sample size, were used to combine the study results. Tests of interaction included stratification by calcium intake and degree of protonation of the phosphate supplement. Results Twelve studies including 30 intervention arms manipulated 269 subjects' phosphate intakes. Three studies reported net acid excretion. All of the meta-analyses demonstrated significant decreases in urine calcium excretion in response to phosphate supplements whether the calcium intake was high or low, regardless of the degree of protonation of the phosphate supplement. None of the meta-analyses revealed lower calcium balance in response to increased phosphate intakes, whether the calcium intake was high or low, or the composition of the phosphate supplement. Conclusion All of the findings from this meta-analysis were contrary to the acid ash hypothesis. Higher phosphate intakes were associated with decreased urine calcium and increased calcium retention. This meta-analysis did not find evidence that phosphate intake

  13. Effect of Potassium Citrate on Calcium Phosphate Stones in a Model of Hypercalciuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asplin, John R.; Frick, Kevin K.; Granja, Ignacio; Culbertson, Christopher D.; Ng, Adeline; Grynpas, Marc D.; Bushinsky, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Potassium citrate is prescribed to decrease stone recurrence in patients with calcium nephrolithiasis. Citrate binds intestinal and urine calcium and increases urine pH. Citrate, metabolized to bicarbonate, should decrease calcium excretion by reducing bone resorption and increasing renal calcium reabsorption. However, citrate binding to intestinal calcium may increase absorption and renal excretion of both phosphate and oxalate. Thus, the effect of potassium citrate on urine calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate supersaturation and stone formation is complex and difficult to predict. To study the effects of potassium citrate on urine supersaturation and stone formation, we utilized 95th-generation inbred genetic hypercalciuric stone-forming rats. Rats were fed a fixed amount of a normal calcium (1.2%) diet supplemented with potassium citrate or potassium chloride (each 4 mmol/d) for 18 weeks. Urine was collected at 6, 12, and 18 weeks. At 18 weeks, stone formation was visualized by radiography. Urine citrate, phosphate, oxalate, and pH levels were higher and urine calcium level was lower in rats fed potassium citrate. Furthermore, calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate supersaturation were higher with potassium citrate; however, uric acid supersaturation was lower. Both groups had similar numbers of exclusively calcium phosphate stones. Thus, potassium citrate effectively raises urine citrate levels and lowers urine calcium levels; however, the increases in urine pH, oxalate, and phosphate levels lead to increased calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate supersaturation. Potassium citrate induces complex changes in urine chemistries and resultant supersaturation, which may not be beneficial in preventing calcium phosphate stone formation. PMID:25855777

  14. Reinforcement Strategies for Load-Bearing Calcium Phosphate Biocements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Geffers

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate biocements based on calcium phosphate chemistry are well-established biomaterials for the repair of non-load bearing bone defects due to the brittle nature and low flexural strength of such cements. This article features reinforcement strategies of biocements based on various intrinsic or extrinsic material modifications to improve their strength and toughness. Altering particle size distribution in conjunction with using liquefiers reduces the amount of cement liquid necessary for cement paste preparation. This in turn decreases cement porosity and increases the mechanical performance, but does not change the brittle nature of the cements. The use of fibers may lead to a reinforcement of the matrix with a toughness increase of up to two orders of magnitude, but restricts at the same time cement injection for minimal invasive application techniques. A novel promising approach is the concept of dual-setting cements, in which a second hydrogel phase is simultaneously formed during setting, leading to more ductile cement–hydrogel composites with largely unaffected application properties.

  15. Biomimetic Calcium Phosphate Crystallization: Synchrotron X-ray Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Ahmet; Stripe, Benjamin; Dutta, Pulak; Lin, Binhua; Meron, Mati

    2012-02-01

    The nucleation and growth of calcium phosphate by organic templates attract great attention due to its relevance to bone biomineralization. In spite of the vast studies in the field, the role of the organic templates in the process is still not well understood. One reason for this drawback is the lack of experimental tools to probe the organic template structure during the process. We studied the nucleation and growth of calcium phosphate under floating Langmuir monolayers, at the air/water interface, using two complementary X-ray scattering methods. We show that Grazing Incidence X-ray Diffraction (GID) and Grazing Incidence X-ray off-Specular Scattering (GIXOS) can reveal the organic-inorganic interface properties in situ. By using GID and GIXOS together, we can simultaneously determine the lateral interface structure and the electron density profile normal to the interface. Combined with ex situ methods, these techniques can improve our understanding of the role of the organic template during biomineralization.

  16. Phosphate-bonded ceramics as candidate final-waste-form materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, D.; Wagh, A.S.; Cunnane, J.; Sutaria, M.; Kurokawa, S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Mayberry, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Room-temperature-setting phosphate-bonded ceramics were studied as candidate materials for stabilizing DOE low-level problem mixed wastes, which cannot be treated by other established stabilization techniques. Phosphates of Mg, Mg-Na, Al, and Zr were studied to stabilize ash-surrogate waste that contained RCRA metals as nitrates and RCRA organics. We show that for a typical loading of 35 wt.% of ash waste, the phosphate ceramics pass the Toxic Chemicals Leaching Procedure test (TCLP). The waste forms have high compression strength that exceeds ASTM recommendations for final waste forms. Detailed X-ray diffraction studies and differential thermal analyses of the waste forms show evidence of chemical reaction of the waste with phosphoric acid and the host matrix. SEM studies show evidence of physical bonding. Excellent performance in the leaching test is attributed to chemical solidification and to both physical and chemical bonding of the ash wastes with the phosphate ceramics.

  17. Enhanced Luminescent Properties in Tm3+/Dy3+ Co-doped Transparent Phosphate Glass Ceramic

    OpenAIRE

    Yao L. Q.; Chen G. H.; Zhong H. J.; Cui S. C.; Li F; Gan J.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Novel Tm3+/Dy3+ co-doped phosphate glass and glass ceramic samples for white light emitting diodes were prepared by melt quenching method. Under 353 nm excitation, the colors of the luminescence of the glass and glass ceramic samples are white. The CIE chromaticity coordinates (0.338, 0.328) of the emission from the glass ceramic is close to the standard white-light illumination (0.333, 0.333). Compared to the glass, the fluorescence intensity in the glass ceramic is greatly enhanced.

  18. Effective solidification/stabilisation of mercury-contaminated wastes using zeolites and chemically bonded phosphate ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaoqing; Zhang, Xinyan; Xiong, Ya; Wang, Guoping; Zheng, Na

    2015-02-01

    In this study, two kinds of zeolites materials (natural zeolite and thiol-functionalised zeolite) were added to the chemically bonded phosphate ceramic processes to treat mercury-contaminated wastes. Strong promotion effects of zeolites (natural zeolite and thiol-functionalised zeolite) on the stability of mercury in the wastes were obtained and these technologies showed promising advantages toward the traditional Portland cement process, i.e. using Portland cement as a solidification agent and natural or thiol-functionalised zeolite as a stabilisation agent. Not only is a high stabilisation efficiency (lowered the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure Hg by above 10%) obtained, but also a lower dosage of solidification (for thiol-functionalised zeolite as stabilisation agent, 0.5 g g(-1) and 0.7 g g(-1) for chemically bonded phosphate ceramic and Portland cement, respectively) and stabilisation agents (for natural zeolite as stabilisation agent, 0.35 g g(-1) and 0.4 g g(-1) for chemically bonded phosphate ceramic and Portland cement, respectively) were used compared with the Portland cement process. Treated by thiol-functionalised zeolite and chemically bonded phosphate ceramic under optimum parameters, the waste containing 1500 mg Hg kg(-1) passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure test. Moreover, stabilisation/solidification technology using natural zeolite and chemically bonded phosphate ceramic also passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure test (the mercury waste containing 625 mg Hg kg(-1)). Moreover, the presence of chloride and phosphate did not have a negative effect on the chemically bonded phosphate ceramic/thiol-functionalised zeolite treatment process; thus, showing potential for future application in treatment of 'difficult-to-manage' mercury-contaminated wastes or landfill disposal with high phosphate and chloride content. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Ionic Substitutions in Non-Apatitic Calcium Phosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskus, Aleksandra; Kolmas, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Calcium phosphate materials (CaPs) are similar to inorganic part of human mineralized tissues (i.e., bone, enamel, and dentin). Owing to their high biocompatibility, CaPs, mainly hydroxyapatite (HA), have been investigated for their use in various medical applications. One of the most widely used ways to improve the biological and physicochemical properties of HA is ionic substitution with trace ions. Recent developments in bioceramics have already demonstrated that introducing foreign ions is also possible in other CaPs, such as tricalcium phosphates (amorphous as well as α and β crystalline forms) and brushite. The purpose of this paper is to review recent achievements in the field of non-apatitic CaPs substituted with various ions. Particular attention will be focused on tricalcium phosphates (TCP) and “additives” such as magnesium, zinc, strontium, and silicate ions, all of which have been widely investigated thanks to their important biological role. This review also highlights some of the potential biomedical applications of non-apatitic substituted CaPs. PMID:29186932

  20. Ionic Substitutions in Non-Apatitic Calcium Phosphates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Laskus

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate materials (CaPs are similar to inorganic part of human mineralized tissues (i.e., bone, enamel, and dentin. Owing to their high biocompatibility, CaPs, mainly hydroxyapatite (HA, have been investigated for their use in various medical applications. One of the most widely used ways to improve the biological and physicochemical properties of HA is ionic substitution with trace ions. Recent developments in bioceramics have already demonstrated that introducing foreign ions is also possible in other CaPs, such as tricalcium phosphates (amorphous as well as α and β crystalline forms and brushite. The purpose of this paper is to review recent achievements in the field of non-apatitic CaPs substituted with various ions. Particular attention will be focused on tricalcium phosphates (TCP and “additives” such as magnesium, zinc, strontium, and silicate ions, all of which have been widely investigated thanks to their important biological role. This review also highlights some of the potential biomedical applications of non-apatitic substituted CaPs.

  1. The increasing of enamel calcium level after casein phosphopeptideamorphous calcium phosphate covering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widyasri Prananingrum

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Caries process is characterized by the presence of demineralization. Demineralization is caused by organic acids as a result of carbohydrate substrate fermentation. Remineralization is a natural repair process for non-cavitated lesions. Remineralization occurs if there are Ca2+ and PO43- ions in sufficient quantities. Casein-amorphous calcium phosphate phosphopeptide (CPP-ACP is a paste material containing milk protein (casein, that actually contains minerals, such as calcium and phosphate. The casein ability to stabilize calcium phosphate and enhance mineral solubility and bioavailability confers upon CPP potential to be biological delivery vehicles for calcium and phosphate. Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the calcium levels in tooth enamel after being covered with CPP-ACP 2 times a day for 3, 14 and 28 days. Methods: Sample were bovine incisors of 3 year old cows divided into 4 groups, namely group I as control group, group II, III and IV as treatment groups covered with CPP-ACP 2 times a day. All of those teeth were then immersed in artificial saliva. Group II was immersed for 3 days, while group III was immersed for 14 days, and group IV was immersed for 28 days. One drop of CPP-ACP was used to cover the entire labial surface of teeth. The measurement of the calcium levels was then conducted by using titration method. All data were analyzed by One- Way ANOVA test with 5% degree of confidence. Results: The results showed significant difference of the calcium levels in tooth enamel of those groups after covered with CPP-ACP 2 times a day for 3, 14 and 28 days (p = 0.001. There is also significant difference of the calcium levels in tooth enamel of those treatment groups and the control group (p = 0.001. Conclusion: The calcium levels of tooth enamel are increased after covered with CPP-ACP 2 times a day for 3, 14 and 28 days.Latar belakang: Proses terjadinya karies gigi ditandai oleh adanya demineralisasi

  2. Injectable calcium phosphate cement with PLGA, gelatin and PTMC microspheres in a rabbit femoral defect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liao, Hongbing; Walboomers, X. Frank; Habraken, Wouter J.E.M.; Zhang Zheng, Z.Z.; Li, Yubao; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Mikos, Antonios G.; Wolke, Joop G.C.; Jansen, John A.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the in vivo degradation properties and tissue response towards injectable calcium phosphate cement (CPC) with no further addition, or calcium phosphate composite cement containing approximately 50 vol.% of microspheres. Three types of spheres were assessed, i.e.

  3. Gentamycin-impregnated calcium phosphate cement for calcaneal osteomyelitis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakura, Takashi; Lee, Sang Yang; Niikura, Takahiro; Miwa, Masahiko; Sakai, Yoshitada; Nishida, Kotaro; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    We report a case of chronic calcaneal osteomyelitis in a diabetic patient who was successfully treated with radical debridement and gentamycin-impregnated calcium phosphate cement. At 1.5-year follow-up, the patient could walk without any assistance. Calcium phosphate cement is an effective local antibiotic delivery system and a biocompatible material for filling the debrided space to facilitate bone formation.

  4. Calcium phosphate cement as a "barrier-graft" for the treatment of human periodontal intraosseous defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh J

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Calcium phosphate cements (CPC are apparently good candidates for periodontal treatment by virtue of their biocompatibility, mouldability and osteoconductivity. However, the clinical efficacy in this regard has not been established. This study is aimed at the evaluation of the efficacy of a formulation of CPC in healing human periodontal intraosseous defects in comparison with hydroxyapatite ceramic granules. Materials and Methods : In this clinical study, 60 patients with periodontal defects were divided into 2 test groups and 1 control group. The defect sites in the test groups were repaired with CPC and hydroxyapatite ceramic granules (HAG. Debridement alone was given in the control group. The progress was assessed at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months observation intervals through soft tissue parameters (probing depth, attachment level and gingival recession. Results: CPC showed significantly better outcome. Probing depth reduction values of CPC, HAG and Control at 6 months were 5.40 ± 1.43, 3.75 ± 1.71 and 2.90 ± 1.48, and those at 12 months were 6.20 ± 1.80, 4.5 ± 1.91 and 2.95 ± 1.73. Clinical attachment gain values of CPC, HAG and Control at 6 months were 5.15 ± 1.50, 3.45 ± 1.96 and 2.25 ± 1.52, and those at 12 months were 5.80 ± 2.02, 3.55 ± 2.06 and 2.30 ± 1.78, In both cases the P value was < 0.001 showing high significance. The gingival recession over 12 months, for the CPC group is lesser than that in the HAG group and the value for the control group is marginally higher than both. Soft-tissue measurements were appended by postoperative radiographs and surgical re-entry in selected cases. Conclusions: Calcium phosphate cement is found to be significantly better than hydroxyapatite ceramic granules. The material could be considered as a "barrier-graft".

  5. In vivo Dentin Microhardness beneath a Calcium-Phosphate Cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresciani, E.; Wagner, W.C.; Navarro, M.F.L.; Dickens, S.H.; Peters, M.C.

    2010-01-01

    A minimally invasive caries-removal technique preserves potentially repairable, caries-affected dentin. Mineral-releasing cements may promote remineralization of soft residual dentin. This study evaluated the in vivo remineralization capacity of resin-based calcium-phosphate cement (Ca-PO4) used for indirect pulp-capping. Permanent carious and sound teeth indicated for extraction were excavated and restored either with or without the Ca-PO4 base (control), followed by adhesive restoration. Study teeth were extracted after 3 months, followed by sectioning and in vitro microhardness analysis of the cavity floor to 115-µm depth. Caries-affected dentin that received acid conditioning prior to Ca-PO4 basing showed significantly increased Knoop hardness near the cavity floor. The non-etched group presented results similar to those of the non-treated group. Acid etching prior to cement application increased microhardness of residual dentin near the interface after 3 months in situ. PMID:20511564

  6. The effects of excess calcium on the handling and mechanical properties of hydrothermal derived calcium phosphate bone cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razali, N. N.; Sukardi, M. A.; Sopyan, I.; Mel, M.; Salleh, H. M.; Rahman, M. M.

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the effects of excess calcium on the handling and mechanical properties of hydrothermal derived calcium phosphate cement (CPC) for bone filling applications. Hydroxyapatite powder was synthesized via hydrothermal method using calcium oxide, CaO and ammonium dihydrogen phosphate, NH4H2PO4 as the calcium and phosphorus precursors respectively. The effects of calcium excess were evaluated by varying the CaO content at 0, 5 and 15 mole %. The precursors were then refluxed in distilled water at 90-100°C and dried overnight until the calcium phosphate powder was formed. CPC was then produced by mixing the synthesized powder with distilled water at the powder-to-liquid (P/L) ratio of 1.5. The result from the morphological properties of CPC shows the increase in agglomeration and particles size with 5 mole % of calcium excess but decreased with 15 mole % of calcium excess in CPC. This result was in agreement with the compressive strength result where the CPC increased its strength with 5 mole % of calcium excess but reduced with 15 mole % of calcium excess. The excess in calcium precursor also significantly improved the setting time but reduced the injectability of CPC.

  7. Deposition of calcium phosphate coatings using condensed phosphates (P2O7(4-) and P3O10(5-)) as phosphate source through induction heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huan; Hou, Saisai; Zhang, Mingjie; Yang, Mengmeng; Deng, Linhong; Xiong, Xinbo; Ni, Xinye

    2016-12-01

    In present work condensed phosphates (P2O7(4-) and P3O10(5-)) were used as phosphate source in induction heating to deposit calcium phosphate coatings. The phase, morphology, and composition of different phosphate-related coatings were characterized and compared using XRD, FTIR, and SEM analyses. Results showed that P2O7(4-)formed calcium pyrophosphate hydrate coatings with interconnected cuboid-like particles. The as-deposited calcium tripolyphosphate hydrate coating with P3O10(5-) was mainly composed of flower-like particles assembled by plate-like crystals. The bioactivity and cytocompatibility of the coatings were also studied. Moreover, the feasibility of using hybrid phosphate sources for preparing and depositing coatings onto magnesium alloy was investigated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Crystal phase of fibrous calcium phosphates prepared with sodium alginate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashizaki, J; Ban, S; Arimoto, N; Kato, N; Kimura, Y; Hasegawa, J

    1995-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of preparation conditions on the crystal phase of the fired fiber prepared with sodium alginate. Hydroxyapatite, Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, hereafter referred to as HA, was only formed in fiber fired at 900 degrees C under proper conditions. There was no significant difference in the crystal phase of the fired fibers prepared using different sodium alginate concentrations and syringe nozzle diameter, although fiber diameters were enlarged with increasing in either. No effects of phosphate type on the crystal phase of the fired fiber were found, but the aging time and the rinsing time had great effects. Sodium calcium phosphate, NaCaPO4, and HA were formed when the aging time was shorter than 5 min. Chlorapatite, Ca5Cl(PO4)3, and HA were formed when the rinsing time was shorter than 3 sec, and HA was formed when the rinsing time was 5 min to 1 hour, beta-TCP, beta-Ca3 (PO4)2, and HA were formed when the rinsing time exceeded 2 weeks.

  9. Investigation of the setting reaction in magnesium phosphate ceramics with quasielastic neutron scattering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Viani, Alberto; Zbiri, M.; Bordallo, H. N.; Gualtieri, A. F.; Mácová, Petra

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 121, č. 21 (2017), s. 11355-11367 ISSN 1932-7447 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : magnesium potassium phosphate ceramics * amorphous materials * NMR-spectroscopy Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 4.536, year: 2016 http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.jpcc.7b01396

  10. Penggunaan batuan fosfat NDCP (natural defluorinated calcium phosphate sebagai pengganti dicalcium phosphate dalam ransom ayam broiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold P. Sinurat

    1995-08-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to study the utilization of local rock phosphate or natural defluorinated calcium phosphate (NDCP as phosphorus source for broilers by using the imported dicalcium phosphate (DCP as a reference. The study was designed by formulating 6 experimental diets which consist of 2 phosphorus sources (DCP dan NDCP and 3 dietary total P levels (0 .55 ; 0.65 and 0 .75%. Each diet was fed to 60 chickens (10 replicates with 6 birds each from three day old to 6 weeks of age. Parameters observed were feed consumption, body weight gain, mortality, Ca and P retention, and ash content of tibia bones. Results showed that dietary phosphorus levels (0.55 to 0.75% did not significantly affect body weight gain, feed consumption, and mortalities. However, better feed conversion ratio was obtained when dietary phosphorus level was 0.55%. The NDCP treated birds could significantly gain heavier weight compared with those received DCP, although this improvement was also followed by an increase in the feed consumption. The relative biological value of phosphorus in NDCP was 101 `7n. It is concluded that NDCP can he used in broilers diet to replace DCP as phosphorus source.

  11. Investigating calcium polyphosphate addition to a conventional calcium phosphate cement for bone-interfacing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krausher, Jennifer Lynn

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) are of great interest in bone regeneration applications because of their biocompatibility and osteoconductivity, and as delivery vehicles for therapeutics; however, delivery applications have been limited by adverse interactions between therapeutics and the cement setting reaction. Amorphous calcium polyphosphate (CPP) yields a biodegradable material with a demonstrated drug delivery capacity following appropriate processing. The incorporation of drug-loaded CPP into a CPC is under consideration as a method of minimizing adverse interactions and extending drug release. This thesis represents the first investigation into the effects of CPP addition on the properties, setting and antibiotic release profile of a conventional apatitic calcium phosphate cement. As-made, gelled and vancomycin-loaded CPP particulate were added to the powder component of a conventional dicalcium phosphate/tetracalcium phosphate CPC. The setting behaviour, set properties and microstructure of the resulting CPP-CPCs were evaluated with setting time testing (Gilmore needle method), pH testing, mechanical testing, SEM imaging, XRD and FTIR analysis. In vitro degradation and elution behaviour were evaluated by monitoring calcium release (atomic absorbance spectroscopy), mechanical strength and vancomycin release (UV-visual spectrophotometry). CPP addition was found to increase the setting time, reduce the mechanical strength and inhibit the conversion of the CPC starting powders to the set apatitic phase. The most likely mechanism for the observed effect of CPP addition was the adsorption of polyphosphate chains on the particle surfaces, which would inhibit the dissolution of the starting powders and the conversion of apatite precursor phases to apatite, leading to reduced mechanical properties. The detrimental effects of CPP were reduced by limiting the CPP fraction to less than a few weight per cent and increasing the size of the CPP particulate. CPP

  12. Structural studies of calcium phosphate doped with titanium and zirconium obtained by high-energy mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, C C; Sombra, A S B [Telecommunications and Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory (LOCEM), Physics Department, Federal University of Ceara, Campus do Pii, Postal Code 6030, 60455-760, Fortaleza-Ceara (Brazil)], E-mail: sombra@fisica.ufc.br

    2009-12-15

    In this paper, we present a new variation of the solid-state procedure on the synthesis of bioceramics with titanium (CapTi) and zirconium (CapZr), considering that zirconium (ZrO{sub 2}) and titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) are strengthening agents, due to their superb force and fracture toughness. The high efficiency of the calcination process opens a new way of producing commercial amounts of nanocrystalline bioceramics. In this work, a new variation of the solid-state procedure method was used to produce nanocrystalline powders of titanium and zirconium, using two different experimental chemical routes: CapTi: Ca(H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}){sub 2}+TiO{sub 2} and CapZr: Ca(H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}){sub 2}+ZrO{sub 2}. The powders were submitted to calcination processes (CapTic and CapZrc) at 800, 900 and 1000 deg. C. The calcium titanium phosphate phase, CaTi{sub 4}P{sub 6}O{sub 24}, was obtained in the CapTic reaction and the calcium zirconium phosphate, CaZr{sub 4}P{sub 6}O{sub 24}, was obtained in the CapZrc reaction. The obtained ceramics were characterized by x-ray powder diffraction (XRD), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, Raman scattering spectroscopy (RSS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. This method was compared with the milling process (CapTim and CapZrm), where in the last process the melting is not necessary and the powder obtained is nanocrystalline. The calcium titanium phosphate phase, CaTi{sub 4}P{sub 6}O{sub 24}, was obtained in the reaction CapTim, but in CapZrm the formation of any calcium phosphate phase even after 15 h of dry mechanical alloying was not observed.

  13. Production of citric and oxalic acids and solubilization of calcium phosphate by Penicillium bilaii.

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, J. E.; Kuiack, C

    1992-01-01

    An isolate of Penicillium bilaii previously reported to solubilize mineral phosphates and enhance plant uptake of phosphate was studied. Using agar media with calcium phosphate and the pH indicator alizarin red S, the influence of the medium composition on phosphate solubility and medium acidification was recorded. The major acidic metabolites produced by P. bilaii in a sucrose nitrate liquid medium were found to be oxalic acid and citric acid. Citric acid production was promoted under nitrog...

  14. Osteogenic activity of cyclodextrin-encapsulated doxycycline in a calcium phosphate PCL and PLGA composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trajano, V.C.C.; Costa, K.J.R. [Restorative Dentistry Department, Faculty of Dentistry, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antônio Carlos, 6627, CEP: 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Lanza, C.R.M. [Department of Oral Clinical, Surgery and Pathology, Faculty of Dentistry, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antônio Carlos, 6627, CEP: 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Sinisterra, R.D. [Chemistry Department, ICEX, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antônio Carlos, 6627, CEP: 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Cortés, M.E., E-mail: mecortes@ufmg.br [Restorative Dentistry Department, Faculty of Dentistry, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antônio Carlos, 6627, CEP: 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Composites of biodegradable polymers and calcium phosphate are bioactive and flexible, and have been proposed for use in tissue engineering and bone regeneration. When associated with the broad-spectrum antibiotic doxycycline (DOX), they could favor antimicrobial action and enhance the action of osteogenic composites. Composites of polycaprolactone (PCL), poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), and a bioceramic of biphasic calcium phosphate Osteosynt® (BCP) were loaded with DOX encapsulated in β-cyclodextrin (βCD) and were evaluated for effects on osteoblastic cell cultures. The DOX/βCD composite was prepared with a double mixing method. Osteoblast viability was assessed with methyl tetrazolium (MTT) assays after 1 day, 7 day, and 14 days of composite exposure; alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity and collagen production were evaluated after 7 days and 14 days, and mineral nodule formation after 14 days. Composite structures were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Osteoblasts exposed to the composite containing 25 μg/mL DOX/βCD had increased cell proliferation (p < 0.05) compared to control osteoblast cultures at all experimental time points, reaching a maximum in the second week. AP activity and collagen secretion levels were also elevated in osteoblasts exposed to the DOX/βCD composite (p < 0.05 vs. controls) and reached a maximum after 14 days. These results were corroborated by Von Kossa test results, which showed strong formation of mineralization nodules during the same time period. SEM of the composite material revealed a surface topography with pore sizes suitable for growing osteoblasts. Together, these results suggest that osteoblasts are viable, proliferative, and osteogenic in the presence of a DOX/βCD-containing BCP ceramic composite. - Highlights: • Doxycycline encapsulated in β-cyclodextrin was incorpored into a polycaprolactone - poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) - calcium phosphate • Composite’s scaffold carrying doxycycline

  15. Rapid biomimetic deposition of octacalcium phosphate coatings on zirconia ceramics (Y-TZP) for dental implant applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanic, Martin; Krnel, Kristoffer; Pribosic, Irena; Kosmac, Tomaz

    2012-03-01

    Octacalcium phosphate (OCP) coatings on zirconia oral implants have a great potential to improve the osseointegration of already existing ceramic implants, owing to high osteoconductive characteristics of OCP and its possibility of use as a drug delivery system. Such OCP coatings can be prepared with a simple two-step biomimetic procedure investigated in our study. In the first step, zirconia discs were immersed into the solution with a pH 7.4 and after 1 h of soaking a thin nanostructured calcium phosphate (Ca-P) layer was precipitated on the ceramic substrate via three stages: (i) precipitation of an amorphous Ca-P; (ii) precipitation of the OCP; and (iii) the transformation of the OCP to apatite. This Ca-P layer later served as a template for the rapid deposition of a thicker OCP coating in the second step of the synthesis where the substrate was immersed into the solution with pH 7.0. The main benefits of the method are a relatively quick synthesis, simplicity and a good reproducibility. Moreover, the coatings show good tensile adhesion strength according to the tape tests (ASTM D-3359). In addition, mild physiological conditions of the synthesis may allow incorporation of biologically active molecules in the coating.

  16. In vitro degradation and cell response of calcium carbonate composite ceramic in comparison with other synthetic bone substitute materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fupo; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Fanwen; Zhu, Jixiang; Tian, Xiumei; Chen, Xiaoming

    2015-05-01

    The robust calcium carbonate composite ceramics (CC/PG) can be acquired by fast sintering calcium carbonate at a low temperature (650 °C) using a biocompatible, degradable phosphate-based glass (PG) as sintering agent. In the present study, the in vitro degradation and cell response of CC/PG were assessed and compared with 4 synthetic bone substitute materials, calcium carbonate ceramic (CC), PG, hydroxyapatite (HA) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) ceramics. The degradation rates in decreasing order were as follows: PG, CC, CC/PG, β-TCP, and HA. The proliferation of rat bone mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) cultured on the CC/PG was comparable with that on CC and PG, but inferior to HA and β-TCP. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of rMSCs on CC/PG was lower than PG, comparable with β-TCP, but higher than HA. The rMSCs on CC/PG and PG had enhanced gene expression in specific osteogenic markers, respectively. Compared to HA and β-TCP, the rMSCs on the CC/PG expressed relatively lower level of collagen I and runt-related transcription factor 2, but showed more considerable expression of osteopontin. Although CC, PG, HA, and β-TCP possessed impressive performances in some specific aspects, they faced extant intrinsic drawbacks in either degradation rate or mechanical strength. Based on considerable compressive strength, moderate degradation rate, good cell response, and being free of obvious shortcoming, the CC/PG is promising as another choice for bone substitute materials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A glass-encapsulated calcium phosphate wasteform for the immobilization of actinide-, fluoride-, and chloride-containing radioactive wastes from the pyrochemical reprocessing of plutonium metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, I. W.; Metcalfe, B. L.; Fong, S. K.; Gerrard, L. A.; Strachan, D. M.; Scheele, R. D.

    2007-03-01

    Chloride-containing radioactive wastes are generated during the pyrochemical reprocessing of Pu metal. Immobilization of these wastes in borosilicate glass or Synroc-type ceramics is not feasible due to the very low solubility of chlorides in these hosts. Alternative candidates have therefore been sought including phosphate-based glasses, crystalline ceramics and hybrid glass/ceramic systems. These studies have shown that high losses of chloride or evolution of chlorine gas from the melt make vitrification an unacceptable solution unless suitable off-gas treatment facilities capable of dealing with these corrosive by-products are available. On the other hand, both sodium aluminosilicate and calcium phosphate ceramics are capable of retaining chloride in stable mineral phases, which include sodalite, Na 8(AlSiO 4) 6Cl 2, chlorapatite, Ca 5(PO 4) 3Cl, and spodiosite, Ca 2(PO 4)Cl. The immobilization process developed in this study involves a solid state process in which waste and precursor powders are mixed and reacted in air at temperatures in the range 700-800 °C. The ceramic products are non-hygroscopic free-flowing powders that only require encapsulation in a relatively low melting temperature phosphate-based glass to produce a monolithic wasteform suitable for storage and ultimate disposal.

  18. Development of a glass-encapsulated calcium phosphate wasteform for the immobilization of actinide and halide containing radioactive wastes from the pyrochemical reprocessing of plutonium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fong, S.K. [AWE, Aldermaston, Berkshire (United Kingdom)], E-mail: shirley.fong@awe.co.uk; Donald, I.W.; Metcalfe, B.L. [AWE, Aldermaston, Berkshire (United Kingdom)

    2007-10-11

    Chloride-containing radioactive wastes are generated during the pyrochemical reprocessing of Pu metal. Immobilization of these wastes in borosilicate glass or Synroc-type ceramics is not viable due to the very low solubility of chlorides in these hosts. Alternative wasteforms, including zeolites and direct vitrification in phosphate glasses, were therefore studied. However, the preferred option was to immobilize the waste in calcium phosphate ceramics, forming a number of stable mineral phases including chlorapatite, chloride-substituted fluorapatite and spodiosite. The immobilization process developed in this study involves a solid state process in which waste and host powders are reacted in air at temperatures in the range of 700-800 deg. C. The ceramic products obtained by this process are non-hygroscopic free-flowing powders that require encapsulation in glass to produce a monolithic wasteform suitable for storage and ultimate disposal. A suitable relatively low melting temperature phosphate-based glass was identified. Durability trials of both the ceramic powder and sintered glass-ceramic hybrid wasteform indicate that both the halides and actinide surrogate ions are satisfactorily immobilized.

  19. Calcium Phosphate Bone Cements Including Sugar Surfactants: Part One—Porosity, Setting Times and Compressive Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliette Fitremann

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Addition of sugar surfactants, sucrose fatty acid esters and alkylpolyglucosides, to calcium phosphate cement designed for bone reconstruction is described. Thanks to their surface activity and through their adsorption at the surface of the calcium phosphate particles, they both induced a strong increase in the porosity (quantified by Image Analysis and brought a very good workability. Other properties typically studied for these cements are reported, including setting times, compressive strength, cohesion in water, and effect of sterilization on these properties. The whole study brought good insight in the interest of adding these mild surfactants to improve several properties of the calcium phosphate cement, without impairing their function.

  20. Calcium Phosphate Bone Cements Including Sugar Surfactants: Part One-Porosity, Setting Times and Compressive Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercier, Ariane; Gonçalves, Stéphane; Lignon, Olivier; Fitremann, Juliette

    2010-09-30

    Addition of sugar surfactants, sucrose fatty acid esters and alkylpolyglucosides, to calcium phosphate cement designed for bone reconstruction is described. Thanks to their surface activity and through their adsorption at the surface of the calcium phosphate particles, they both induced a strong increase in the porosity (quantified by Image Analysis) and brought a very good workability. Other properties typically studied for these cements are reported, including setting times, compressive strength, cohesion in water, and effect of sterilization on these properties. The whole study brought good insight in the interest of adding these mild surfactants to improve several properties of the calcium phosphate cement, without impairing their function.

  1. Incorporation of Collagen in Calcium Phosphate Cements for Controlling Osseointegration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hsien Hu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the effect of supplementing a non-dispersive dicalcium phosphate-rich calcium phosphate bone cement (DCP-rich CPC with type I collagen on in vitro cellular activities and its performance as a bone graft material. Varying amounts of type I collagen were added during the preparation of the DCP-rich CPC. In vitro cell adhesion, morphology, viability, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity were evaluated using progenitor bone cells. Bone graft performance was evaluated via a rat posterolateral lumbar fusion model and osteointegration of the implant. New bone formations in the restorative sites were assessed by micro-computed tomography (micro-CT and histological analysis. We found that the incorporation of collagen into the DCP-rich CPC was associated with increased cell adhesion, cell viability, and ALP activity in vitro. The spinal fusion model revealed a significant increase in bone regeneration. Additionally, better osseointegration was observed between the host bone and graft with the DCP-rich CPC supplemented with collagen than with the collagen-free DCP-rich CPC control graft. Furthermore, compared to the control graft, the results of micro-CT showed that a smaller amount of residual material was observed with the collagen-containing DCP-rich CPC graft compared with the control graft, which suggests the collagen supplement enhanced new bone formation. Of the different mixtures evaluated in this study (0.8 g DCP-rich CPC supplemented with 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 mL type I collagen, respectively, DCP-rich CPC supplemented with 0.4 mL collagen led to the highest level of osteogenesis. Our results suggest that the DCP-rich CPC supplemented with collagen has potential to be used as an effective bone graft material in spinal surgery.

  2. First-Row Transition Metal Doping in Calcium Phosphate Bioceramics: A Detailed Crystallographic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Renaudin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Doped calcium phosphate bioceramics are promising materials for bone repair surgery because of their chemical resemblance to the mineral constituent of bone. Among these materials, BCP samples composed of hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO46(OH2 and β-TCP (Ca3(PO42 present a mineral analogy with the nano-multi-substituted hydroxyapatite bio-mineral part of bones. At the same time, doping can be used to tune the biological properties of these ceramics. This paper presents a general overview of the doping mechanisms of BCP samples using cations from the first-row transition metals (from manganese to zinc, with respect to the applied sintering temperature. The results enable the preparation of doped synthetic BCP that can be used to tailor biological properties, in particular by tuning the release amounts upon interaction with biological fluids. Intermediate sintering temperatures stabilize the doping elements in the more soluble β-TCP phase, which favors quick and easy release upon integration in the biological environment, whereas higher sintering temperatures locate the doping elements in the weakly soluble HAp phase, enabling a slow and continuous supply of the bio-inspired properties. An interstitial doping mechanism in the HAp hexagonal channel is observed for the six investigated cations (Mn2+, Fe3+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+ with specific characteristics involving a shift away from the center of the hexagonal channel (Fe3+, Co2+, cationic oxidation (Mn3+, Co3+, and also cationic reduction (Cu+. The complete crystallochemical study highlights a complex HAp doping mechanism, mainly realized by an interstitial process combined with calcium substitution for the larger cations of the series leading to potentially calcium deficient HAp.

  3. First-Row Transition Metal Doping in Calcium Phosphate Bioceramics: A Detailed Crystallographic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaudin, Guillaume; Gomes, Sandrine; Nedelec, Jean-Marie

    2017-01-23

    Doped calcium phosphate bioceramics are promising materials for bone repair surgery because of their chemical resemblance to the mineral constituent of bone. Among these materials, BCP samples composed of hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO₄)₆(OH)₂) and β-TCP (Ca₃(PO₄)₂) present a mineral analogy with the nano-multi-substituted hydroxyapatite bio-mineral part of bones. At the same time, doping can be used to tune the biological properties of these ceramics. This paper presents a general overview of the doping mechanisms of BCP samples using cations from the first-row transition metals (from manganese to zinc), with respect to the applied sintering temperature. The results enable the preparation of doped synthetic BCP that can be used to tailor biological properties, in particular by tuning the release amounts upon interaction with biological fluids. Intermediate sintering temperatures stabilize the doping elements in the more soluble β-TCP phase, which favors quick and easy release upon integration in the biological environment, whereas higher sintering temperatures locate the doping elements in the weakly soluble HAp phase, enabling a slow and continuous supply of the bio-inspired properties. An interstitial doping mechanism in the HAp hexagonal channel is observed for the six investigated cations (Mn2+, Fe3+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+) with specific characteristics involving a shift away from the center of the hexagonal channel (Fe3+, Co2+), cationic oxidation (Mn3+, Co3+), and also cationic reduction (Cu⁺). The complete crystallochemical study highlights a complex HAp doping mechanism, mainly realized by an interstitial process combined with calcium substitution for the larger cations of the series leading to potentially calcium deficient HAp.

  4. Bond strength of plasma sprayed ceramic coatings on the phosphated steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pokorny

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the presented work, results of adhesion measurements for different systems of steel sheet-phosphate interlayer-ceramiccoating are described. The interlayers were produced by zinc phosphating; alumina, olivine and zirconiasilica-alumina (e.g. eucor coatings were deposited by water stabilized plasma torch WSP®. However, successful application of the WSP technique depends on the choice of correct deposition parameters preserving the hydrated phosphates from thermal destruction by the molten ceramic particles. For the adhesion measurement ISO 4624standardized test was used. Corrosion resistivity was measured by polarisation resistance and free corrosion potential in 3 % NaCl solution.

  5. Thermal stability of hydroxyapatite in biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nilen, RWN

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available , so the HA/b-TCP phase content ratio is a critical parameter to control during synthesis. Most BCP products have a b-TCP content of 40 wt% (balance HA), although Livingstone-Arinzeh et al. [6] recently reported that BCP with 80 wt% b-TCP content....424 10.429 10.439 c (A˚ ) 6.884 6.879 37.38 37.375 RIR None 1.06 None 1.25 J Mater Sci: Mater Med 123 (see Table 1), and XRD and FTIR were used to confirm its phase purity. Although under-reported, this HA synthesis technique is relatively simple...

  6. Investigation of setting reaction in magnesium potassium phosphate ceramics with time resolved infrared spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mácová, Petra; Viani, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 205, October (2017), s. 62-66 ISSN 0167-577X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : amorphous materials * magnesium potassium phosphate cements * FTIR Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics , Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 2.572, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167577X17309552

  7. Oral phosphate binders: phosphate binding capacity of iron (III) hydroxide complexes containing saccharides and their effect on the urinary excretion of calcium and phosphate in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, T; Baxter, J G; Maebashi, N; Asano, T

    1999-09-01

    Phosphate binders that contain aluminum or calcium are frequently prescribed to treat hyperphosphatemia in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), but an accumulation of aluminum can lead to encephalopathy, aluminum-related bone disease (ARBD) such as osteomalacia, anaemia, and resistance to erythropoietin, and calcium accumulation can lead to hypercalcaemia. High phosphate concentrations are reduced in vitro and in vivo by a phosphate adsorption pill, which is synthesized by hydrolyzing ferrous sulfate in the presence of saccharides, to form an iron (III)-saccharide complex that is acid resistant and binds phosphate greater than iron (III) hydroxide alone. Under in vitro conditions, containing 3.26 mg P/dL, the iron (III)-sucrose complex showed the highest phosphate adsorption capacity at pH 2 with artificial gastric juice, 58.9 mg P/g binder. For the 7 day in vivo study, 0% (Group 1), 1% (Group 2), 4% (Group 3), and 8% (Group 4) iron (III)-sucrose complex was admixed into the rodent chow by weight and fed to 15 male Wistar rats. The weight and volume of the feces and urine, and the calcium, iron, and phosphorus excretions in the feces and urine samples were monitored for any signs of irregularity. Total urine outflow was collected during a 24-h period to determine the amount of phosphate recovered, which indicates the ability of the phosphate binder to reduce gastrointestinal phosphate absorption. The fecal iron excretion was significantly effected by the amount of binder ingested throughout the study for Group 2 (p calcium excretion (mg/rat/24-h) significantly increased by the 7th day for Group 2 (p calcium containing phosphate-binding agents for combating hyperphosphataemia.

  8. Requests of laboratory tests for the diagnosis and management of calcium-phosphate disorders in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, María; López-Garrigós, Maite; Flores, Emilio; Uris, Joaquín; Leiva-Salinas, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Knowledge about the variability in the request of calcium-phosphate metabolism laboratory tests in primary care is important to design strategies to improve health system efficiency. To compare the inter-practice variability in calcium-phosphate metabolism laboratory tests requested by general practitioners from diverse regions across Spain. One hundred and forty one clinical laboratories were invited to participate in an observational cross-sectional study. They informed the number of serum calcium, phosphate, parathyroid hormone and 25-hydroxyvitamin D requested by general practitioners. Appropriateness indicators were calculated as number of test requests per 1,000 inhabitants and ratio of related tests requests. The differences according to hospital setting, region and type of management were analyzed. We recruited 76 laboratories (17,679,195 inhabitants). General practitioners requested 3,260,894 calcium-phosphate metabolism tests. The rate of request ranged from 2.97 per 1,000 inhabitants for 25-hydroxyvitamin D to 98.89 per 1,000 inhabitants for calcium. The rates of request for calcium, phosphate, parathyroid hormone in some areas were 30, 100 and 340 times higher than in other areas. Parathyroid hormone and 25-hydroxyvitamin D were highly requested in private management areas. There were also differences in phosphate, parathyroid hormone and 25-hydroxyvitamin D requesting between regions across Spain. The high variability observed is difficult to explain by differences in patient case mix between regions. Depending on the area, calcium could be under requested to detect primary hyperparathyroidism.

  9. Mg-doped biphasic calcium phosphate by a solid state reaction route: Characterization and evaluation of cytotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webler, Geovana D. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, Maceió-AL 57072970 (Brazil); Correia, Ana C.C.; Barreto, Emiliano [Laboratório de Biologia Celular, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, Maceió-AL 57072970 (Brazil); Fonseca, Eduardo J.S., E-mail: eduardo@fis.ufal.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, Maceió-AL 57072970 (Brazil)

    2015-07-15

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) are widely used in tissue engineering because of their chemical similarity to the inorganic bone phase. In this work, we prepare biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP, a mixture of HAP and β-TCP) doped with different concentrations of magnesium to investigate the influence of magnesium on the BCP crystal structure. Magnesium is known to be an important element in the composition of bones and teeth. Recent research has shown that the doping of magnesium into BCP improves its bone metabolism and mechanical properties without affecting its biocompatibility. The samples were prepared by solid-state reaction from calcium carbonate, monobasic ammonium phosphate, and magnesium nitrate hexahydrate. Varying concentrations of magnesium were used and its modifications were examined by different characterization techniques. The phase composition and morphology of the ceramic powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The functional groups were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Cell viability experiments, using macrophage-like cell lines J774, showed that the synthesized Mg-doped BCP did not exhibit cytotoxicity regardless of the doses assayed or the different concentrations of magnesium used, suggesting it as a good material for potential biological applications. - Highlights: • Simple and fast method for the preparation of the Mg-BCP. • Study of the influence of the incorporation of Mg in the BCP. • Cell viability showed that the synthesized Mg-BCP did not exhibit cytotoxicity.

  10. Hardness and microplasticity of nanocrystalline and amorphous calcium phosphate coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ievlev, V. M.; Kostyuchenko, A. V.; Darinskii, B. M.; Barinov, S. M.

    2014-02-01

    The hardness of thin (1.0-4.0 μm) hydroxyapatite coatings with different structures (nanocrystalline, amorphous-crystalline, and amorphous) grown by rf magnetron sputtering on Ti and Si plates has been studied using the nanoindentation method. All the grown structures are characterized by the strain which has reversible and irreversible components. The hardness of nanocrystalline coatings (about 10 GPa) corresponds to the average hardness of hydroxyapatite single crystals. The structure of nanocrystalline coatings in the indentation zone and outside it has been investigated and changes in the structure under the indenter have been revealed using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. From a comparison of the hardnesses of coatings with different structures and based on an analysis of the intragranular structure, it has been assumed that the plastic deformation occurs according to a dislocation-free mechanism. The plastic deformation is interpreted in terms of the cluster representation of the hydroxyapatite structure and amorphous calcium phosphates of the same elemental composition and cluster-boundary sliding during the deformation.

  11. Degree of vinyl conversion in experimental amorphous calcium phosphate composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarle, Z.; Knežević, A.; Matošević, D.; Škrtić, D.; Ristić, M.; Prskalo, K.; Musić, S.

    2009-04-01

    An experimental dental composite, based on amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) with the potential to arrest caries development and regenerate mineral-deficient tooth structures has recently been developed. The aim of this study was to assess the degree of vinyl conversion (DVC) attained in experimental composites based on zirconia-modified ACP. Photo-activated resins were based on ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate (EBPADMA) [ETHM series with varying EBPADMA/triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) molar ratios assigned 0.5-ETHM I, 0.85-ETHM II and 1.35-ETHM III], or 2,2-bis[p-(2'-hydroxy-3'-methacryloxypropoxy)phenyl]-propane (Bis-GMA) [BTHZ series]. To asses a possible effect of filler particle size on DVC, composites containing 60 mass % resin and 40 mass % of either milled ACP (mACP; median diameter d m = 0.9 μm) or coarse ACP (cACP; d m = 6.0 μm) were prepared, and irradiated with LED curing unit for 40 s. The DVC was calculated as the % change in the ratio of the integrated peak areas between the aliphatic and aromatic absorption bands determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The highest DVCs values were attained in mACP-BTHZ, cACP-BTHZ and mACP-ETHM III formulations. DVC of tested ACP composites (on average (76.76 ± 4.43)%) compares well with or exceeds DVCs values reported for the majority of commercial materials.

  12. Calcium Phosphate: A potential host for halide contaminated plutonium wastes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metcalfe, Brian L.; Donald, Ian W.; Fong, Shirley K.; Gerrard, Lee A.; Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.

    2009-07-06

    The presence of significant quantities of fluoride and chloride in four types of legacy wastes from plutonium pyrochemical reprocessing required the development of a new wasteform which could adequately immobilize the halides in addition to the Pu and Am. Using a simulant chloride-based waste (Type I waste) and Sm as the surrogate for the Pu3+ and Am3+ present in the waste, AWE developed a process which utilised Ca3(PO4)2 as the host material. The waste was successfully incorporated into two crystalline phases, chlorapatite, [Ca5(PO4)3Cl], and spodiosite, [Ca2(PO4)Cl]. Radioactive studies performed at PNNL with 239Pu and 241Am confirmed the process. A slightly modified version of the process in which CaHPO4 was used as the host was successful in immobilizing a more complex multi-cation oxide–based waste (Type II) which contained significant concentrations of Cl and F in addition to 239Pu and 241Am. This waste resulted in the formation of cation-doped whitlockite, Ca3-xMgx(PO4)2, β-calcium phosphate, β-Ca2P2O7 and chlor-fluorapatite rather than the chlorapatite and spodiosite formed with Type I waste.

  13. Characterization of a silver-incorporated calcium phosphate film by RBS and its antimicrobial effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, I-H [Institute of Physics and Applied Physics, and Atomic-Scale Surface Science Research Center, Yonsei University, Seou1 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, I-S [Institute of Physics and Applied Physics, and Atomic-Scale Surface Science Research Center, Yonsei University, Seou1 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Song, J-H [Advanced Analysis Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, M-H [Department of Medical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Park, J-C [Department of Medical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, G-H [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Chang-Won 641-010 (Korea, Republic of); Sun, X-D [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Chung, S-M [Implantium Research Center, Seoul 135-879 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    A thin calcium phosphate film was synthesized on both commercially pure Ti and Si wafers by electron beam evaporation of hydroxyapatite as an evaporant with simultaneous Ar ion beam bombardments. Silver was introduced into an ion-beam-assisted deposition of a calcium phosphate thin film for antimicrobial effect. The amount of incorporated silver ions was controlled by immersing calcium-phosphate-coated samples in different AgNO{sub 3} concentrations, and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) was employed to measure the amounts of substituted silver. The higher concentration of silver in the calcium phosphate film was more effective in reducing the bacteria of Escherichia coli ATCC 8739 and Streptococcus mutans OMZ 65 on contact with respect to controls.

  14. In vitro growth factor release from injectable calcium phosphate cements containing gelatin microspheres.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habraken, W.J.E.M.; Boerman, O.C.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Mikos, A.G.; Jansen, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    To improve the in vivo resorption of an injectable calcium phosphate cement (CPC) for bone tissue engineering purposes, in previous experiments macroporosity was introduced by the in situ degradation of incorporated gelatin microspheres. Gelatin microspheres are also suitable carriers for

  15. Release Rates of Timolol Maleate from Carbopol and Carboxymethylcellulose Polymer Gels with Incorporated Calcium Phosphate Nanoparticles.

    OpenAIRE

    KENNETH REED; MAGGIE MONTGOMERY; NILAMBEN MAHESH PATEL

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. It is of interest to determine whether the release rate of Timolol maleate from Carbopol® 980 and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose gels is modified when varying concentrations of calcium phosphate nanoparticles are incorporated into the gels. Methods. Timolol solution, Carbopol® 980 and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose gels with and without varying concentrations of calcium phosphate nanoparticles were manufactured and their Timolol trans dialysis membrane diffusion rates measured. The t...

  16. Calcium Phosphate Bone Cements Including Sugar Surfactants: Part Two—Injectability, Adhesive Properties and Biocompatibility

    OpenAIRE

    Fabienne Briand-Mesange; Stéphane Gonçalves; Helène Autefage; Ariane Bercier; Olivier Lignon; Juliette Fitremann

    2010-01-01

    Addition of sugar surfactants, sucrose fatty acid esters and alkylpolyglucosides to a calcium phosphate cement, designed for bone reconstruction, is described. Thanks to their adsorption at the surface of the calcium phosphate particles, the sugar surfactants allowed a full injectability and brought a very good workability. Injectability was measured by monitoring force-distance curves. With some of the selected sugar surfactants adhesive properties of the cement pastes were also observed, wh...

  17. Calcium Phosphate Bone Cements Including Sugar Surfactants: Part One?Porosity, Setting Times and Compressive Strength

    OpenAIRE

    Juliette Fitremann; Ariane Bercier; Olivier Lignon; Stéphane Gonçalves

    2010-01-01

    Addition of sugar surfactants, sucrose fatty acid esters and alkylpolyglucosides, to calcium phosphate cement designed for bone reconstruction is described. Thanks to their surface activity and through their adsorption at the surface of the calcium phosphate particles, they both induced a strong increase in the porosity (quantified by Image Analysis) and brought a very good workability. Other properties typically studied for these cements are reported, including setting times, compressive str...

  18. In vitro elution of vancomycin from biodegradable osteoconductive calcium phosphate-polycaprolactone composite beads for treatment of osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, C; Cohen, V; Raz-Pasteur, A; Gotman, I

    2014-10-01

    In this work, osteoconductive composite materials comprising a large volume fraction of a bioresorbable calcium phosphate ceramic (CaP) and a smaller amount of a polycaprolactone polymer (PCL) were studied as a degradable antibiotic carrier material for treatment of osteomyelitis. Beads loaded with 1 and 4wt.% vancomycin were prepared by admixing dissolved drug to an in situ synthesized dicalcium phosphate (DCP)-PCL or solution-mixed beta-tricalcium phosphate (βTCP)-PCL composite powder followed by high pressure consolidation of the blend at room temperature. Vancomycin release was measured in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at 37°C. All the beads gradually released the drug over the period of 4-11weeks, depending on the composite matrix homogeneity and porosity. Mathematical modeling using the Peppas equation showed that vancomycin elution was diffusion controlled. The stability of the antibiotic after high pressure application at room temperature was demonstrated by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) studies and MIC testing. The preservation of the structure and activity of vancomycin during the processing of composite beads and its sustained in vitro release profile suggest that high pressure consolidated CaP-PCL beads may be useful in the treatment of chronic bone infections as resorbable delivery vehicles of vancomycin and even of thermally unstable drug substances. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of calcium phosphate addition on sintering of El-Oued sand quartz raw materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Foughali

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This work addresses the development of an eventual low cost ceramic insulating or microfiltration membrane supports from inexpensive raw materials such Eloued quartz sand (EQS and calcium phosphate (CP using uniaxially dry compaction method. The prepared samples were sintered at different temperatures ranging between 1200 and 1550 ºC. Subsequently, the effects of sintering temperature and amount of CP on samples proprieties were investigated. It is observed that X-ray diffracion measurements confirmed that EQS was transformed into cristobalite and tridymite phases when both sintering temperature and holding time were increased. This transformation is favored with increasing amount of CP, it is observed also formation of CaSiO3 and Ca(Fe(AlPO4. The SEM images of the samples sintered at different temperatures illustrate that silica grains, CP grains, intergranular phase contents (Si, Ca, P, and O and an important open porosity depend on the sintering temperature. The porosity ratio changes in the range between 37% and 34% according to sintering temperature and to CP content; these values are in good agreement with SEM images. The thermal expansion behavior shows a weak expansion in the range of temperature between 600 and 1000 ºC which is situated between 1.27% and 1.33% (variation of 0.05% at 400 ºC.

  20. Growth of calcium phosphate thin films by in situ assisted ultraviolet pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelea, V.; Craciun, V.; Iliescu, M.; Mihailescu, I.N.; Pelletier, H.; Mille, P.; Werckmann, J

    2003-03-15

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) thin films including hydroxyapatite were intensively studied in order to optimize the technology of the bone prostheses manufacturing. A drawback in the CaP films processing is the poor mechanical characteristics, especially hardness, tensile strength and adherence to the metallic substrate. We report a new method for the growth of high quality CaP films with substantial improvement of the mechanical properties: pulsed laser deposition (PLD) assisted by in situ ultraviolet (UV) radiation emitted by a low pressure Hg lamp. The depositions were made on Si and Ti-5Al-2.5Fe alloys in very low ambient oxygen at pressures of 10{sup -2} to 10{sup -1} Pa with the substrates maintained at 500-600 deg. C temperature. The films were analyzed by electron microscopy, white light confocal microscopy (WLCM), grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and Berkovich nanoindentation. The films were crystalline and exhibited remarkable mechanical characteristics with values of hardness and Young modulus of 6-8 and 150-170 GPa, respectively, which are uncommonly high for the CaP ceramics. The UV lamp radiation enhanced the gas reactivity and atoms mobility during processing, while the tensile strength between the film's grains and the bonding strength at the CaP film-substrate interface were increased.

  1. Gallium enhances reconstructive properties of a calcium phosphate bone biomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strazic Geljic, Ivana; Melis, Nicolas; Boukhechba, Florian; Schaub, Sébastien; Mellier, Charlotte; Janvier, Pascal; Laugier, Jean-Pierre; Bouler, Jean-Michel; Verron, Elise; Scimeca, Jean-Claude

    2018-02-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP)-based biomaterials are commonly used in bone reconstructive surgery to replace the damaged tissue, and can also serve as vectors for local drug delivery. Due to its inhibitory action on osteoclasts, the semi-metallic element gallium (Ga) is used for the systemic treatment of disorders associated with accelerated bone resorption. As it was demonstrated that Ga could be incorporated in the structure of CaP biomaterials, we investigated the biological properties of Ga-loaded CaP biomaterials. Culturing bone cells on Ga-CaP, we observed a decrease in osteoclast number and a downregulation of late osteoclastic markers expression, while Ga-CaP upregulated the expression of osteoblastic marker genes involved in the maturation of bone matrix. We next investigated in vivo bone reconstructive properties of different Ga-loaded biomaterials using a murine bone defect healing model. All implanted biomaterials showed a good osseointegration into the surrounding host tissue, accompanied by a successful bone ingrowth and bone marrow reconstruction, as evidenced by histological analysis. Moreover, quantitative micro-computed tomography analysis of implants revealed that Ga enhanced total defect filling. Lastly, we took advantage for the first time of a particular mode of non-linear microscopy (second harmonic generation) to quantify in vivo bone tissue reconstruction within a CaP bone substitute. By doing so, we showed that Ga exerted a positive impact on mature organized collagen synthesis. As a whole, our data support the hypothesis that Ga represents an attractive additive to CaP biomaterials for bone reconstructive surgery. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Low temperature method for the production of calcium phosphate fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastro Alfonso

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calcium phosphate manufactured samples, prepared with hydroxyapatite, are used as either spacers or fillers in orthopedic surgery, but these implants have never been used under conditions of mechanical stress. Similar conditions also apply with cements. Many authors have postulated that cements are a useful substitute material when implanted in vivo. The aim of this research is to develop a low cristalline material similar to bone in porosity and cristallinity. Methods Commercial hydroxyapatite (HAp and monetite (M powders are mixed with water and compacted to produce cylindrical samples. The material is processed at a temperature of 37–120 degrees C in saturated steam to obtain samples that are osteoconductive. The samples are studied by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, Vickers hardness test (HV, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and porosity evaluation. Results The X-ray diffractions of powders from the samples show patterns typical of HAp and M powders. After thermal treatment, no new crystal phase is formed and no increase of the relative intensity of the peaks is obtained. Vicker hardness data do not show any relationship with treatment temperature. The total porosity decreases by 50–60% according to the specific thermal treatment. Scanning electron microscopy of the surfaces of the samples with either HAp 80%-M 20% (c or Hap 50%-M 50% (f, show cohesion of the powder grains. Conclusions The dissolution-reprecipitation process is more intesive in manufactured samples (c and (f, according to Vickers hardness data. The process occurs in a steam saturated environment between 37 degrees and 120 degrees C. (c (f manufactured samples show pore dimension distributions useful to cellular repopulation in living tissues.

  3. Calcium phosphate cements with strontium halides as radiopacifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Alejandro; Montazerolghaem, Maryam; Engqvist, Håkan; Ott, Marjam Karlsson; Persson, Cecilia

    2014-02-01

    High radiopacity is required to monitor the delivery and positioning of injectable implants. Inorganic nonsoluble radiopacifiers are typically used in nondegradable bone cements; however, their usefulness in resorbable cements is limited due to their low solubility. Strontium halides, except strontium fluoride, are ionic water-soluble compounds that possess potential as radiopacifiers. In this study, we compare the radiopacity, mechanical properties, composition, and cytotoxicity of radiopaque brushite cements prepared with strontium fluoride (SrF2 ), strontium chloride (SrCl2 ·6H2 O), strontium bromide (SrBr2 ), or strontium iodide (SrI2 ). Brushite cements containing 10 wt % SrCl2 ·6H2 O, SrBr2 , or SrI2 exhibited equal to or higher radiopacity than commercial radiopaque cements. Furthermore, the brushite crystal lattice in cements that contained the ionic radiopacifiers was larger than in unmodified cements and in cements that contained SrF2 , indicating strontium substitution. Despite the fact that the strontium halides increased the solubility of the cements and affected their mechanical properties, calcium phosphate cements containing SrCl2 ·6H2 O, SrBr2 , and SrI2 showed no significant differences in Saos-2 cell viability and proliferation with respect to the control. Strontium halides: SrCl2 ·6H2 O, SrBr2 , and SrI2 may be potential candidates as radiopacifiers in resorbable biomaterials although their in vivo biocompatibility, when incorporated into injectable implants, is yet to be assessed. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. In vitro evaluation of different heat-treated radio frequency magnetron sputtered calcium phosphate coatings.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yonggang, Y.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Yubao, L.; Jansen, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Surface chemical compositions, such as calcium/phosphorus ratio and phase content, have a strong influence on the bioactivity and biocompatibility of calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings as applied on orthopedic and dental implants. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Hydroxylapatite (HA) and dicalcium

  5. Osteoclast-like cells on deproteinized bovine bone mineral and biphasic calcium phosphate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Simon S; Gruber, Reinhard; Buser, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    commercially available calcium phosphate bone substitute materials retrieved from bone defects. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Six defects were prepared bilaterally in the mandibular body of three mini pigs. The defects were randomly grafted with either deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM) or biphasic calcium...

  6. Randomized crossover study comparing the phosphate-binding efficacy of calcium ketoglutarate versus calcium carbonate in patients on chronic hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro, S; Rasmussen, R A; Handberg, J

    1998-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the phosphate-binding efficacy, side effects, and cost of therapy of calcium ketoglutarate granulate as compared with calcium carbonate tablets in patients on chronic hemodialysis. The study design used was a randomized, crossover open trial, and the main...... outcome measurements were plasma ionized calcium levels, plasma phosphate levels, plasma intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels, requirements for supplemental aluminum-aminoacetate therapy, patient tolerance, and cost of therapy. Nineteen patients on chronic hemodialysis were treated with a dialysate......, diarrhea, general uneasiness), whereas the remaining 12 patients did not experience any side effects at all. The five patients with calcium ketoglutarate intolerance all had pre-existing gastrointestinal symptoms; four of them had received treatment with cimetidine or omeprazol before inclusion...

  7. Synthesis and characterization of nanocomposite powders of calcium phosphate/silica-gel; Sintese e caracterizacao de pos nanoestruturados de fosfato de calcio/silica-gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, D.T.; Delima, S.A. [Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina (UDESC), Joinville, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica; Santos, R.B.M.; Camargo, N.H.A., E-mail: dem2nhac@joinville.udesc.b [Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina (UDESC), Joinville, SC (Brazil). Programa de Pos Graduacao em Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais

    2009-07-01

    In the recent years ceramics of calcium phosphate are pointed out as an outstanding material in substitution and regeneration in defects from osseous tissue, in reason of their similar mineralogical characteristics of apatite of bone structure. However, the challenge with phosphate calcium ceramics find out about the mechanical properties and the development of biomaterials similar of the bone structure, what sometimes is not so easy, about fragile materials. The aim of this work focused in synthesis and characterization nanocomposites powders of calcium phosphate/silica-gel with percentages 1, 2, 3 e 5% of nanometric silica. The method synthesis used for the compositions elaboration was dissolution-precipitation. The presented results are related with the optimization to method elaboration of nanostructured powders, the mineralogical characterization with X-ray diffraction, thermal behavior with thermal differential analysis, differential scanning calorimetry here is ADT and dilatometer. The scanning electronic microscopy was used to help of morphological characterization the nanostructured powders and the surfaces from body test recovered from the mechanical test. (author)

  8. Calcium Overload Accelerates Phosphate-Induced Vascular Calcification Via Pit-1, but not the Calcium-Sensing Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masumoto, Asuka; Sonou, Tomohiro; Ohya, Masaki; Yashiro, Mitsuru; Nakashima, Yuri; Okuda, Kouji; Iwashita, Yuko; Mima, Toru; Negi, Shigeo; Shigematsu, Takashi

    2017-07-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is a risk factor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). CKD-mineral and bone metabolism disorder is an important problem in patients with renal failure. Abnormal levels of serum phosphate and calcium affect CKD-mineral and bone metabolism disorder and contribute to bone disease, VC, and cardiovascular disease. Hypercalcemia is a contributing factor in progression of VC in patients with CKD. However, the mechanisms of how calcium promotes intracellular calcification are still unclear. This study aimed to examine the mechanisms underlying calcium-induced calcification in a rat aortic tissue culture model. Aortic segments from 7-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were cultured in serum-supplemented medium for 10 days. We added high calcium (HiCa; calcium 3.0 mM) to high phosphate (HPi; phosphate 3.8 mM) medium to accelerate phosphate and calcium-induced VC. We used phosphonoformic acid and the calcimimetic R-568 to determine whether the mechanism of calcification involves Pit-1 or the calcium-sensing receptor. Medial VC was significantly augmented by HPi+HiCa medium compared with HPi alone (300%, p<0.05), and was associated with upregulation of Pit-1 protein. Pit-1 protein concentrations in HPi+HiCa medium were greater than those in HPi medium. Phosphonoformic acid completely negated the augmentation of medial VC induced by HPi+HiCa. R-568 had no additive direct effect on medial VC. These results indicated that exposure to HPi+HiCa accelerates medial VC, and this is mediated through Pit-1, not the calcium-sensing receptor.

  9. Demonstration of phosphates in calcium deposits: a modification of von Kossa's reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchtler, H; Meloan, S N

    1978-07-12

    It has been suggested that in von Kóss'as technic silver cations replace calcium bound to phosphate or carbonate groups and are then reduced to black metallic silver during exposure to light. However, in test tube experiments silver phosphate retains its yellow color for days. These differences between reactions of pure calcium phosphates and calcium deposits in tissues were emphasized already by von Kóssa; he regarded only the initial yellow coloration of calcium diagnostic for calcium phosphates and deplored the subsequent blackening caused by organic compounds. Von Kóssa's experiments were easily reproducible. A review of the literature showed that reduction of silver nitrate by organic compounds was well known in the 19th century. For histochemical studies of phosphates it was deemed desirable to avoid the formation of black by-products. Sections of paraffin-embedded human tissues were exposed to solutions of silver nitrate in subdued light or darkness then treated with sodium thiosulfate. Silver phosphate was yellow to yellowish brown; other tissue structures remained colorless. No darkening was observed in sections stored for eight years. Other compounds which form yellow silver salts, e.g. iodides and periodates, are unlikely to occur in paraffin sections of human tissues.

  10. Enhanced sintering ability of biphasic calcium phosphate by polymers used for bone scaffold fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chengde; Yang, Bo; Hu, Huanlong; Liu, Jinglin; Shuai, Cijun; Peng, Shuping

    2013-10-01

    Biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP), which is composed of hydroxyapatite [HAP, Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2] and β-tricalcium phosphate [β-TCP, β-Ca3(PO4)2], is usually difficult to densify into a solid state with selective laser sintering (SLS) due to the short sintering time. In this study, the sintering ability of BCP ceramics was significantly improved by adding a small amount of polymers, by which a liquid phase was introduced during the sintering process. The effects of the polymer content, laser power and HAP/β-TCP ratios on the microstructure, chemical composition and mechanical properties of the BCP scaffolds were investigated. The results showed that the BCP scaffolds became increasingly more compact with the increase of the poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) content (0-1 wt.%) and laser power (6-10 W). The fracture toughness and micro-hardness of the sintered scaffolds were also improved. Moreover, PLLA could be gradually decomposed in the late sintering stages and eliminated from the final BCP scaffolds if the PLLA content was below a certain value (approximately 1 wt.% in this case). The added PLLA could not be completely eliminated when its content was further increased to 1.5 wt.% or higher because an unexpected carbon phase was detected in the sintered scaffolds. Furthermore, many pores were observed due to the removal of PLLA. Micro-cracks and micro-pores occurred when the laser power was too high (12 W). These defects resulted in a deterioration of the mechanical properties. The hardness and fracture toughness reached maximum values of 490.3±10 HV and 1.72±0.10 MPa m(1/2), respectively, with a PLLA content of approximately 1 wt.% and laser power of approximately 10 W. Poly(l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) showed similar effects on the sintering process of BCP ceramics. Rectangular, porous BCP scaffolds were fabricated based on the optimum values of the polymer content and laser power. This work may provide an experimental basis for improving the mechanical

  11. A systematic review on the long-term success of calcium phosphate plasma-spray-coated dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oirschot, B A J A; Bronkhorst, E M; van den Beucken, J J J P; Meijer, G J; Jansen, J A; Junker, R

    2016-09-01

    The objectives of the current review were (1) to systematically appraise, and (2) to evaluate long-term success data of calcium phosphate (CaP) plasma-spray-coated dental implants in clinical trials with at least 5 years of follow-up. To describe the long-term efficacy of functional implants, the outcome variables were (a) percentage annual complication rate (ACR) and (b) cumulative success rate (CSR), as presented in the selected articles. The electronic search yielded 645 titles. On the basis of the inclusion criteria, 8 studies were finally included. The percentage of implants in function after the first year was estimated to be 98.4 % in the maxilla and 99.2 % in the mandible. The estimates of the weighted mean ACR-percentage increased over the years up to 2.6 (SE 0.7) during the fifth year of function for the maxilla and to 9.4 (SE 8.4) for the mandible in the tenth year of function. After 10 years, the mean percentage of successful implants was estimated to be 71.1 % in the maxilla and 72.2 % in the mandible. The estimates seem to confirm the proposed, long-term progressive bone loss pattern of CaP-ceramic-coated dental implants. Within the limits of this meta-analytic approach to the literature, we conclude that: (1) published long-term success data for calcium phosphate plasma-spray-coated dental implants are limited, (2) comparison of the data is difficult due to differences in success criteria among the studies, and (3) long-term CSRs demonstrate very weak evidence for progressive complications around calcium phosphate plasma-spray-coated dental implants.

  12. Immobilization of calcium and phosphate ions improves the osteoconductivity of titanium implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunarso; Toita, Riki; Tsuru, Kanji; Ishikawa, Kunio

    2016-11-01

    In this work, to elevate weak osteoconductivity of titanium (Ti) implant, we prepared a Ti implant having both calcium and phosphate ions on its surface. To modify calcium and phosphate ions onto Ti, phosphate ions were first immobilized by treating the Ti with a NaH2PO4 solution, followed by CaCl2 treatment to immobilize calcium ions, which created the calcium and phosphate ions-modified Ti (Ca-P-Ti). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thin-layer X-ray diffraction measurement confirmed that both phosphate and calcium ions were co-immobilized onto the Ti surface on the molecular level. Three-hour after seeding MC3T3-E1 murine pre-osteoblast cells on substrates, cell number on Ca-P-Ti was much larger than that of Ti and phosphate-modified Ti (P-Ti), but was similar to that of calcium-modified Ti (Ca-Ti). Also, MC3T3-E1 cells on Ca-P-Ti expressed larger amount of vinculin, a focal adhesion protein, than those on other substrates, probably resulting in larger cell size as well as greater cell proliferation on Ca-P-Ti than those on other substrates. Alkaline phosphatase activity of cells on Ca-P-Ti was greater than those on Ti and P-Ti, but was almost comparable to that of Ca-Ti. Moreover, the largest amount of bone-like nodule formation was observed on Ca-P-Ti. These results provide evidence that calcium and phosphate ions-co-immobilization onto Ti increased the osteoconductivity of Ti by stimulating the responses of pre-osteoblast cells. This simple modification would be promising technique for bone tissue implant including dental and orthopedic implants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Controlled adsorption and release onto calcium phosphates materials and drug delivery applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barroug A.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The adsorptive properties of synthetic calcium phosphates analogous to bone mineral were examined with respect to cisplatin and risedronate, two biological active drugs; the uptake and release experiments were carried out under various conditions in order to understand the basic mechanism of interaction. The effect of temperature and solution composition were highlighted and discussed. The adsorption results obtained for the therapeutic agents demonstrated that, depending on the conditions investigated (nature of the sorbent, concentration range, ionic composition, temperature…, the shape of the isotherms is of Freundlich or Langmuir type. The adsorption is described as an ion-exchange process in dilute solutions, while the interaction appears to be reactive for concentrated solutions (dissolution of mineral ions from the apatite substrate and formation of soluble calcium complex and/or precipitation of calcium salts involving sorbate molecules. The information gained on the surface reactivity of calcium phosphate were exploited to associate an antibiotic to calcium phosphate cements for drug delivery applications. The specimens were obtained by combination of calcium phosphate and calcium carbonate powders upon mixing with water. The physicochemical properties of the paste were altered by the drug loading method (in the liquid or solid phase. Thus, a dose-dependent effect was noticed for the paste setting time, hardening and the release process.

  14. Pathogenic Role of Basic Calcium Phosphate Crystals in Destructive Arthropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ea, Hang-Korng; Chobaz, Véronique; Nguyen, Christelle; Nasi, Sonia; van Lent, Peter; Daudon, Michel; Dessombz, Arnaud; Bazin, Dominique; McCarthy, Geraldine; Jolles-Haeberli, Brigitte; Ives, Annette; Van Linthoudt, Daniel; So, Alexander; Lioté, Frédéric; Busso, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    Background basic calcium phosphate (BCP) crystals are commonly found in osteoarthritis (OA) and are associated with cartilage destruction. BCP crystals induce in vitro catabolic responses with the production of metalloproteases and inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 (IL-1). In vivo, IL-1 production induced by BCP crystals is both dependant and independent of NLRP3 inflammasome. We aimed to clarify 1/ the role of BCP crystals in cartilage destruction and 2/ the role of IL-1 and NLRP3 inflammasome in cartilage degradation related to BCP crystals. Methodology/ Principal Findings synovial membranes isolated from OA knees were analysed by alizarin Red and FTIR. Pyrogen free BCP crystals were injected into right knees of WT, NLRP3 -/-, ASC -/-, IL-1α -/- and IL-1β-/- mice and PBS was injected into left knees. To assess the role of IL-1, WT mice were treated by intra-peritoneal injections of anakinra, the IL-1Ra recombinant protein, or PBS. Articular destruction was studied at d4, d17 and d30 assessing synovial inflammation, proteoglycan loss and chondrocyte apoptosis. BCP crystals were frequently found in OA synovial membranes including low grade OA. BCP crystals injected into murine knee joints provoked synovial inflammation characterized by synovial macrophage infiltration that persisted at day 30, cartilage degradation as evidenced by loss of proteoglycan staining by Safranin-O and concomitant expression of VDIPEN epitopes, and increased chondrocyte apoptosis. BCP crystal-induced synovitis was totally independent of IL-1α and IL-1β signalling and no alterations of inflammation were observed in mice deficient for components of the NLRP3-inflammasome, IL-1α or IL-1β. Similarly, treatment with anakinra did not prevent BCP crystal effects. In vitro, BCP crystals elicited enhanced transcription of matrix degrading and pro-inflammatory genes in macrophages. Conclusions/ Significance intra-articular BCP crystals can elicit synovial inflammation and cartilage

  15. Calcium phosphate scaling during wastewater desalination on oligoamide surfaces mimicking reverse osmosis and nanofiltration membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathinam, Karthik; Oren, Yoram; Petry, Winfried; Schwahn, Dietmar; Kasher, Roni

    2018-01-01

    Desalinated domestic wastewater is an indispensable water resource in arid regions; however, its recovery can be limited by calcium phosphate scaling and fouling of the membrane. Here we investigated calcium phosphate mineralization on oligoamide surfaces that mimics reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane surfaces. We used a solution that simulates desalination of secondary treated domestic wastewater effluents for calcium phosphate mineralization experiments with oligoamide-coated gold surfaces. Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and energy dispersive spectrometry showed that calcium phosphate and carbonate precipitated on RO mimetic surfaces. The rate of precipitation on oligoamide sensors was monitored by a quartz crystal microbalance, showing that scaling was more intense on the RO than the NF mimetic surface and that excessive carboxyl functional groups on both surfaces promoted scaling. Filtration experiments of similar solutions with commercial membranes showed that scaling was more intense on the RO membranes than on the NF membranes, which supported the results obtained with the oligoamide model surfaces. The results of this study can be implemented in developing RO and NF membranes to prevent calcium phosphate scaling and consequently lower water-treatment costs of domestic wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of strontium ions substitution on gene delivery related properties of calcium phosphate nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanifi, A; Fathi, M H; Mir Mohammad Sadeghi, H

    2010-09-01

    Gene therapy has been considered a strategy for delivery of therapeutic nucleic acids to a specific site. Calcium phosphates are one gene delivery vector group of interest. However, low transfection efficiency has limited the use of calcium phosphate in gene delivery applications. Present work aims at studying the fabrication of strontium substituted calcium phosphate nanoparticles with improved gene delivery related properties. Strontium substituted calcium phosphate was prepared using a simple sol gel method. X-ray diffraction analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, specific surface area analysis, zeta potential measurement and ion release evaluation were used to characterize the samples. This characterization showed strontium and carbonate co-substituted calcium phosphate which resulted in nano size particles with low crystallinity, high specific surface area, positive surface charge, and a high dissolution rate. These improved properties could increase the DNA concentration on the vector as well as the endosomal escape of the complex that leads to higher transfection efficiency of this novel gene delivery vector.

  17. Surface physical chemistry properties in coated bacterial cellulose membranes with calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Olyveira, Gabriel Molina; Basmaji, Pierre; Costa, Ligia Maria Manzine; Dos Santos, Márcio Luiz; Dos Santos Riccardi, Carla; Guastaldi, Fernando Pozzi Semeghini; Scarel-Caminaga, Raquel Mantuaneli; de Oliveira Capote, Ticiana Sidorenko; Pizoni, Elisabeth; Guastaldi, Antônio Carlos

    2017-06-01

    Bacterial cellulose has become established as a new biomaterial, and it can be used for medical applications. In addition, it has called attention due to the increasing interest in tissue engineering materials for wound care. In this work, the bacterial cellulose fermentation process was modified by the addition of chondroitin sulfate to the culture medium before the inoculation of the bacteria. The biomimetic process with heterogeneous calcium phosphate precipitation of biological interest was studied for the guided regeneration purposes on bacterial cellulose. FTIR results showed the incorporation of the chondroitin sulfate in the bacterial cellulose, SEM images confirmed the deposition of the calcium phosphate on the bacterial cellulose surface, XPS analysis showed a selective chemical group influences which change calcium phosphate deposition, besides, the calcium phosphate phase with different Ca/P ratios on bacterial cellulose surface influences wettability. XTT results concluded that these materials did not affect significantly in the cell viability, being non-cytotoxic. Thus, it was produced one biomaterial with the surface charge changes for calcium phosphate deposition, besides different wettability which builds new membranes for Guided Tissue Regeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Calcium phosphate coatings on magnesium alloys for biomedical applications: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadanbaz, Shaylin; Dias, George J

    2012-01-01

    Magnesium has been suggested as a revolutionary biodegradable metal for use as an orthopaedic material. As a biocompatible and degradable metal, it has several advantages over the permanent metallic materials currently in use, including eliminating the effects of stress shielding, improving biocompatibility concerns in vivo and improving degradation properties, removing the requirement of a second surgery for implant removal. The rapid degradation of magnesium, however, is a double-edged sword as it is necessary to control the corrosion rates of the materials to match the rates of bone healing. In response, calcium phosphate coatings have been suggested as a means to control these corrosion rates. The potential calcium phosphate phases and their coating techniques on substrates are numerous and can provide several different properties for different applications. The reactivity and low melting point of magnesium, however, require specific parameters for calcium phosphate coatings to be successful. Within this review, an overview of the different calcium phosphate phases, their properties and their behaviour in vitro and in vivo has been provided, followed by the current coating techniques used for calcium phosphates that may be or may have been adapted for magnesium substrates. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A microstructural study of the degradation and calcium release from hydroxyapatite-calcium oxide ceramics made by infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qinghao; Schmelzer, Eva; Gerlach, Jörg C; Nettleship, Ian

    2017-04-01

    Hydroxyapatite pellets, partially densified in a low-temperature heat treatment, were infiltrated with calcium nitrate solution followed by in-situ precipitation of Ca(OH)2 and CaCO3. The infiltrated bodies were then densified to high relative density and the calcium carbonate transformed to calcium oxide during sintering and resulted in biphasic hydroxyapatite-CaO ceramics. This work investigated the influence of the infiltration on surface morphology, weight change, and microstructural-level degradation caused by exposure to saline at pH=7.4 and a temperature of 20°C. The CaO rendered the materials more susceptible to degradation, and released calcium into the saline faster than single phase, calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (HA) that were used as a control. In consequence, these ceramics could be used to release calcium into the culture microenvironments of bone tissue or bone marrow cells next to a scaffold surface. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Setting time and formability of calcium phosphate cements prepared using modified dicalcium phosphate anhydrous powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawamura, Takenori; Mizutani, Yoichiro; Okuyama, Masahiko; Kasuga, Toshihiro

    2014-07-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) were prepared using Ca4(PO4)2O (TeCP) and modified CaHPO4 (DCPA) to evaluate the effects of the powder properties for DCPA particles on the setting time and formability of the resulting CPCs. Two types of modified DCPA were prepared by milling commercially available DCPA with ethanol (to produce E-DCPA) or distilled water (to produce W-DCPA). The E-DCPA samples consisted of well-dispersed, fine primary particles, while the W-DCPA samples contained agglomerated particles, and had a smaller specific surface area. The mean particle size decreased with increased milling time in both cases. The raw CPC powders prepared using W-DCPA had a higher packing density than those prepared using E-DCPA, regardless of the mean particle size. The setting time of the CPC paste after mixing with distilled water decreased with decreases in the mean particle size and specific surface area, for both types of DCPA. The CPCs prepared using W-DCPA showed larger plasticity values compared with those prepared using E-DCPA, which contributed to the superior formability of the W-DCPA samples. The CPCs prepared using W-DCPA showed a short setting time and large plasticity values, despite the fact that only a small amount of liquid was used for the mixing of the raw CPC powders (a liquid-to-powder ratio of 0.25 g g(-1) was used). It is likely that the higher packing density of the raw CPC powders prepared using W-DCPA was responsible for the higher performance of the resulting CPCs.

  1. Long-term conversion of 45S5 bioactive glass-ceramic microspheres in aqueous phosphate solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hailuo; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Day, Delbert E; Huang, Wenhai

    2012-05-01

    The conversion of 45S5 glass and glass-ceramics to a hydroxyapatite (HA)-like material in vitro has been studied extensively, but only for short reaction times (typically glass-ceramic microspheres (designated 45S5c) in an aqueous phosphate solution. Microspheres of 45S5c (75-150 μm) were immersed for 10 years at room temperature (~25 °C) in K(2)HPO(4) solution with a concentration of 0.01 M or 1.0 M, and with a starting pH of 7.0 or 9.5. The reacted 45S5c microspheres and solutions were analyzed using structural and analytical techniques. Only 25-45 vol% of the 45S5c microspheres were converted to an HA-like material after the 10 year reaction. In solutions with a starting pH of 9.5, an increase in the K(2)HPO(4) concentration from 0.01 to 1.0 M resulted in a doubling of the volume of the microspheres converted to an HA-like material but had little effect on the composition of the HA-like product. In comparison, reaction of the 45S5c microspheres in the solution with a starting pH of 7.0 resulted in an HA-like product in the 0.01 M K(2)HPO(4) solution but a calcium pyrophosphate product, Ca(10)K(4)(P(2)O(7))(6).9H(2)O, in the 1.0 M solution. The consequences of these results for the long-term use of 45S5 glass-ceramics in biomedical applications are discussed.

  2. Serum magnesium, phosphate and calcium in Nigerian children with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of sickle cell disease. This study was set out to determine the serum levels of magnesium, phosphorus and calcium in Nigerian children with sickle cell disease. Study design.' A case-control study carried out on children with HbSS genotype (cases) and age—matched controls with HbAA. Serum magnesium, calcium,.

  3. Development of calcium phosphate based apatite from hen's eggshell

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Stoichiometric hydroxyapatite with Ca/P molar ratio, 1⋅67, was synthesized using hen's eggshell as calcium source and phosphoric acid by precipitation method. Conventional EDTA titration and gravimetric methods were adopted to estimate the amount of calcium and phosphorous, respectively. Fourier-transform.

  4. Molecular mechanism of crystallization impacting calcium phosphate cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giocondi, J L; El-Dasher, B S; Nancollas, G H; Orme, C A

    2009-05-31

    theoretical modeling. The question changes from 'What types of molecules will inhibit brushite growth' to 'What type of molecule will interact with the [10-1]{sub Cc} step?' Similarly, to increase resorption rate, it would be most efficacious to target the slow moving [-100] step, perhaps by targeting the hydroxyl group which seem to stabilize this step compared to its otherwise similar mirror, [100]. In short, there are a number of opportunities where molecular scale imaging can provide new information that has the prospect to aid in optimizing calcium phosphate cements.

  5. Chemically bonded phosphate ceramics for low-level mixed waste stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, D.; Wagh, A.S.; Cunnane, J.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Mayberry, J.L. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Novel chemically bonded phosphate ceramics (CBPCs) are being developed and fabricated for low-temperature stabilization and solidification of mixed waste streams which are amenable to conventional high-temperature stabilization processes due to presence of volatiles such as heavy metal chloride and fluorides and/or pyrophorics in the wastes. Phosphates of Mg, Mg-Na and Zr are being developed as candidate matrix materials. In this paper, we present the fabrication procedures of phosphate waste forms using surrogates compositions of three typical mixed wastes streams -- ash, cement sludges, and salts. The performance of the final waste forms such as compression strength, leachability of the contaminants, durability in aqueous environment were conducted. In addition, parameteric studies have been conducted to establish the optimal waste loading in a particular binder system. Based on the results, we present potential applications in the treatment of various mixed waste streams.

  6. Computational modelling of local calcium ions release from calcium phosphate-based scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manhas, Varun; Guyot, Yann; Kerckhofs, Greet; Chai, Yoke Chin; Geris, Liesbet

    2017-04-01

    A variety of natural or synthetic calcium phosphate (CaP)-based scaffolds are currently produced for dental and orthopaedic applications. These scaffolds have been shown to stimulate bone formation due to their biocompatibility, osteoconductivity and osteoinductivity. The release of the [Formula: see text] ions from these scaffolds is of great interest in light of the aforementioned properties. It can depend on a number of biophysicochemical phenomena such as dissolution, diffusion and degradation, which in turn depend on specific scaffold characteristics such as composition and morphology. Achieving an optimal release profile can be challenging when relying on traditional experimental work alone. Mathematical modelling can complement experimentation. In this study, the in vitro dissolution behaviour of four CaP-based scaffold types was investigated experimentally. Subsequently, a mechanistic finite element method model based on biophysicochemical phenomena and specific scaffold characteristics was developed to predict the experimentally observed behaviour. Before the model could be used for local [Formula: see text] ions release predictions, certain parameters such as dissolution constant ([Formula: see text]) and degradation constant ([Formula: see text]) for each type of scaffold were determined by calibrating the model to the in vitro dissolution data. The resulting model showed to yield release characteristics in satisfactory agreement with those observed experimentally. This suggests that the mathematical model can be used to investigate the local [Formula: see text] ions release from CaP-based scaffolds.

  7. Dental Composites with Calcium / Strontium Phosphates and Polylysine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyaphong Panpisut

    Full Text Available This study developed light cured dental composites with added monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM, tristrontium phosphate (TSrP and antimicrobial polylysine (PLS. The aim was to produce composites that have enhanced water sorption induced expansion, can promote apatite precipitation and release polylysine.Experimental composite formulations consisted of light activated dimethacrylate monomers combined with 80 wt% powder. The powder phase contained a dental glass with and without PLS (2.5 wt% and/or reactive phosphate fillers (15 wt% TSrP and 10 wt% MCPM. The commercial composite, Z250, was used as a control. Monomer conversion and calculated polymerization shrinkage were assessed using FTIR. Subsequent mass or volume changes in water versus simulated body fluid (SBF were quantified using gravimetric studies. These were used, along with Raman and SEM, to assess apatite precipitation on the composite surface. PLS release was determined using UV spectroscopy. Furthermore, biaxial flexural strengths after 24 hours of SBF immersion were obtained.Monomer conversion of the composites decreased upon the addition of phosphate fillers (from 76 to 64% but was always higher than that of Z250 (54%. Phosphate addition increased water sorption induced expansion from 2 to 4% helping to balance the calculated polymerization shrinkage of ~ 3.4%. Phosphate addition promoted apatite precipitation from SBF. Polylysine increased the apatite layer thickness from ~ 10 to 20 μm after 4 weeks. The novel composites showed a burst release of PLS (3.7% followed by diffusion-controlled release irrespective of phosphate addition. PLS and phosphates decreased strength from 154 MPa on average by 17% and 18%, respectively. All formulations, however, had greater strength than the ISO 4049 requirement of > 80 MPa.The addition of MCPM with TSrP promoted hygroscopic expansion, and apatite formation. These properties are expected to help compensate polymerization shrinkage and

  8. Phosphate recovery using calcium zeolite in ultrafiltration pilot plant

    OpenAIRE

    La Rotonda Ferrer, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important ecological problems is the eutrophication, this process consist in the uncontrolled growing of algae and phytoplankton, which can destroy entire aquatic ecosystems. The reason of this process is the excess of nutrients, as for example, phosphate coming from human activities. This project focus on the study of synthetic zeolites capacity to absorb phosphate from wastewater. Zeolites are porous minerals of the alumina-silicates family with high capacity ...

  9. Signal molecules-calcium phosphate coprecipitation and its biomedical application as a functional coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiupeng; Ito, Atsuo; Li, Xia; Sogo, Yu; Oyane, Ayako

    2011-06-01

    In this review, the current knowledge of signal molecules-calcium phosphate coprecipitation and its biomedical application as a functional coating are described. Although signal molecules regulate a variety of cellular processes, it is difficult to sustain the regulation activity for a long term when the signal molecules are only injected in a free form. The signal molecules-calcium phosphate coprecipitation on a substrate surface is a very promising process to achieve sustained regulation activity of the signal molecules by controlled and localized delivery of the signal molecules to specific body sites (implantation sites). However, the significance of immobilizing signal molecules with calcium phosphate coatings and their biomedical application are not systematically illustrated. For this purpose, the presently existing coprecipitation methods and strategies on biomedical application are summarized and discussed.

  10. Calcium Phosphate Bone Cements Including Sugar Surfactants: Part Two—Injectability, Adhesive Properties and Biocompatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabienne Briand-Mesange

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Addition of sugar surfactants, sucrose fatty acid esters and alkylpolyglucosides to a calcium phosphate cement, designed for bone reconstruction, is described. Thanks to their adsorption at the surface of the calcium phosphate particles, the sugar surfactants allowed a full injectability and brought a very good workability. Injectability was measured by monitoring force-distance curves. With some of the selected sugar surfactants adhesive properties of the cement pastes were also observed, which were measured by tack tests. Finally, some properties related to biological applications are described, including gentamicine release and osteoblast viability experiments. The whole study demonstrates that addition of these mild surfactants improved several properties of the calcium phosphate cement, without impairing function.

  11. Calcium Phosphate Bone Cements Including Sugar Surfactants: Part Two-Injectability, Adhesive Properties and Biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercier, Ariane; Gonçalves, Stéphane; Autefage, Helène; Briand-Mesange, Fabienne; Lignon, Olivier; Fitremann, Juliette

    2010-12-02

    Addition of sugar surfactants, sucrose fatty acid esters and alkylpolyglucosides to a calcium phosphate cement, designed for bone reconstruction, is described. Thanks to their adsorption at the surface of the calcium phosphate particles, the sugar surfactants allowed a full injectability and brought a very good workability. Injectability was measured by monitoring force-distance curves. With some of the selected sugar surfactants adhesive properties of the cement pastes were also observed, which were measured by tack tests. Finally, some properties related to biological applications are described, including gentamicine release and osteoblast viability experiments. The whole study demonstrates that addition of these mild surfactants improved several properties of the calcium phosphate cement, without impairing function.

  12. Calcium phosphate formation from sea urchin - (brissus latecarinatus via modified mechano-chemical (ultrasonic conversion method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Samur

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to produce apatite structures, such as hydroxyapatite (HA and fluorapatite (FA, from precursor calcium phosphates of biological origin, namely from sea urchin, with mechano-chemical stirring and hot-plating conversion method. The produced materials were heat treated at 800 °C for 4 hours. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM studies were conducted. Calcium phosphate phases were developed. The SEM images showed the formation of micro to nano-powders. The experimental results suggest that sea urchin, Brissus latecarinatus skeleton could be an alternative source for the production of various mono or biphasic calcium phosphates with simple and economic mechano-chemical (ultrasonic conversion method.

  13. Chitosan based hydrogel assisted spongelike calcium phosphate mineralization for in-vitro BSA release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Ahmed

    2017-12-07

    New chitosan-g- poly (3-sulfopropyl methacrylate), CHI-g-P(SPMA), hydrogel was prepared by free radical polymerization process and investigated as a template for biomimetic spongelike calcium phosphate mineralization in a solution mimicking physiological condition. Infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the predominant formation of rod-like hydroxyapatite. The swelling behavior of the nanocomposite was evaluated at different pHs and different saline concentrations. Bovine serum albumin (BSA), as a model protein drug, was loaded in the CHI-g-P(SPMA)/calcium phosphate hybrid. The BSA release behavior was investigated and the results suggested CHI-g-P(SPMA)/calcium phosphate hybrid as controlled release carrier. These results suggest that next generation of polysaccharides based hybrid materials could be interesting for biomedical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Ossification Vesicles with Calcium Phosphate in the Eyes of the Insect Copium teucrii (Hemiptera: Tingidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Garcia-Guinea

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Arthropod eyes are built of repeating units named ommatidia. Each single ommatidium unit contains a cluster of photoreceptor cells surrounded by support cells and pigment cells. The insect Copium eye ommatidia include additional calcium-phosphate deposits, not described in insects to date, which can be examined today using a combined set of modern microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. Teucrium gnaphalodes L'Her plants, growing in central Spain, develop galls induced by Copium insects. A survey of C. teucrii adult specimens resulted in surprising environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM images, showing that their bright red eyes contain a calcium-phosphate mineralization. A complete survey of Copium eye specimens was performed by ESEM using energy-dispersive spectroscopy, backscattered electron detector and cathodoluminescence (CL probes, field emission scanning electron microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy in order to learn ommatidia features, such as chemical composition, molecular structure, cell membrane, and internal ommatidium eye fluids and calcium-phosphate distribution deposits. The CL panchromatic images distinguish between the calcium-phosphate ommatidium and calcium-phosphate setae, which are more apatite rich. They show Raman bands attributable to bone tissue apatite biomaterials, such as bone, collagen, lipids, and blood, i.e., peptides, amide-S, amide-II, amide-III, and cytochrome P-450scc. The chemical composition of both galls and leaves of T. gnaphalodes was determined by gas chromatography – mass spectrometry (GC-MS of their extracts. The spectrometric and microscopic images reveal that the calcium-phosphate mineralization is formed and constrained to Copium ommatidia, which are both matrix vesicles generating mixtures of apatite collagen and operational compound eyes of the insect.

  15. Randomized crossover study comparing the phosphate-binding efficacy of calcium ketoglutarate versus calcium carbonate in patients on chronic hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro, S; Rasmussen, R A; Handberg, J

    1998-01-01

    outcome measurements were plasma ionized calcium levels, plasma phosphate levels, plasma intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels, requirements for supplemental aluminum-aminoacetate therapy, patient tolerance, and cost of therapy. Nineteen patients on chronic hemodialysis were treated with a dialysate......The objective of the study was to evaluate the phosphate-binding efficacy, side effects, and cost of therapy of calcium ketoglutarate granulate as compared with calcium carbonate tablets in patients on chronic hemodialysis. The study design used was a randomized, crossover open trial, and the main...... lower in the ketoglutarate arm compared with the calcium carbonate arm (4.8+/-0.1 mg/dL v 5.2+/-0.1 mg/dL; P = 0.004), whereas the mean plasma phosphate (4.5+/-0.3 mg/dL v 5.1+/-0.1 mg/dL) and PTH levels (266+/-125 pg/mL v 301+/-148 pg/mL) did not differ significantly between the two treatment arms...

  16. Biomimetic Nanocomposites of Calcium Phosphate and Self-Assembling Triblock and Pentablock Copolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enlow, Drew Lenzen [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    In an effort to mimic the growth of natural bone, self-assembling, micelle and gel-forming copolymers were used as a template for calcium phosphate precipitation. Because of the cationic characteristics imparted by PDEAEM end group additions to commercially available Pluronic{reg_sign} Fl27, a direct ionic attraction mechanism was utilized and a polymer-brushite nanocomposite spheres were produced. Brushite coated spherical micelles with diameters of ~40 nm, and agglomerates of these particles (on the order of 0.5 μm) were obtained. Thickness and durability of the calcium phosphate coating, and the extent of agglomeration were studied. The coating has been shown to be robust enough to retain its integrity even below polymer critical micelle concentration and/or temperature. Calcium phosphate-polymer gel nanocomposites were also prepared. Gel samples appeared as a single phase network of agglomerated spherical micelles, and had a final calcium phosphate concentration of up to 15 wt%. Analysis with x-ray diffraction and NMR indicated a disordered brushite phase with the phosphate groups linking inorganic phase to the polymer.

  17. Magnesium substitution in the structure of orthopedic nanoparticles: A comparison between amorphous magnesium phosphates, calcium magnesium phosphates, and hydroxyapatites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabiyouni, Maryam; Ren, Yufu; Bhaduri, Sarit B

    2015-01-01

    As biocompatible materials, magnesium phosphates have received a lot of attention for orthopedic applications. During the last decade multiple studies have shown advantages for magnesium phosphate such as lack of cytotoxicity, biocompatibility, strong mechanical properties, and high biodegradability. The present study investigates the role of Mg(+2) and Ca(+2) ions in the structure of magnesium phosphate and calcium phosphate nanoparticles. To directly compare the effect of Mg(+2) and Ca(+2) ions on structure of nanoparticles and their biological behavior, three groups of nanoparticles including amorphous magnesium phosphates (AMPs) which release Mg(+2), calcium magnesium phosphates (CMPs) which release Mg(+2) and Ca(+2), and hydroxyapatites (HAs) which release Ca(+2) were studied. SEM, TEM, XRD, and FTIR were used to evaluate the morphology, crystallinity, and chemical properties of the particles. AMP particles were homogeneous nanospheres, whereas CMPs were combinations of heterogeneous nanorods and nanospheres, and HAs which contained heterogeneous nanosphere particles. Cell compatibility was monitored in all groups to determine the cytotoxicity effect of particles on studied MC3T3-E1 preosteoblasts. AMPs showed significantly higher attachment rate than the HAs after 1 day and both AMPs and CMPs showed significantly higher proliferation rate when compared to HAs after 7days. Gene expression level of osteoblastic markers ALP, COL I, OCN, OPN, RUNX2 were monitored and they were normalized to GAPDH housekeeping gene. Beta actin expression level was monitored as the second housekeeping gene to confirm the accuracy of results. In general, AMPs and CMPs showed higher expression level of osteoblastic genes after 7 days which can further confirm the stimulating role of Mg(+2) and Ca(+2) ions in increasing the proliferation rate, differentiation, and mineralization of MC3T3-E1 preosteoblasts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Studies on calcium phosphate precipitation: effects of metal ions used in dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Y; Hidaka, S

    1994-12-01

    The effects of 26 metal ions, of which 23 are used in dental materials, on the conversion of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) to hydroxyapatite (HAP) in vitro were studied. From the effects on both the rate of HAP transformation and induction time, effects of metal ions were classified into three types; inhibitory (in the order: nickel, tin, cobalt, manganese, copper, zinc, gallium, thallium, molybdenum, cadmium, antimony, magnesium, and mercury); ineffective (cesium, titanium, chromium, iron [ferrous], iridium, palladium, platinum, silver, gold, aluminum, and lead); and stimulatory (iron [ferric] and indium). These results suggest that metal ions used in dental materials may modify the precipitation of oral calcium phosphate.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of porous calcium phosphate; Sintesis y caracterizacion del fosfato de calcio poroso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granados C, F.; Serrano G, J.; Bonifacio M, J. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: fgc@nuclear.inin.mx

    2007-07-01

    The porous calcium phosphate was prepared by the continuous precipitation method using Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.4H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} salts. The synthesized material was structurally and superficially characterized using the XRD, BET, IR TGA and SEM techniques. The obtained inorganic material was identified as calcium phosphate that presents a great specific area for what can be efficiently used as adsorbent material for adsorption studies in the radioactive wastes treatment present in aqueous solution. (Author)

  20. Bioactivity evaluation of commercial calcium phosphate-based bioceramics for bone regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrós, S.; Mas, A.

    2016-11-01

    Calcium phosphate-based bioceramics constitute a great promise for bone tissue engineering as they chemically resemble to mammalian bone and teeth. Their use is a viable alternative for bone regeneration as it avoids the use of autografts and allografts, which usually involves immunogenic reactions and patient’s discomfort. This work evolves around the study of the bioactivity potential of different commercially available bone substitutes based in calcium phosphate through the characterization of their ionic exchangeability when immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF). (Author)

  1. Calcium phosphate/porous silicon biocomposites prepared by cyclic deposition methods: Spin coating vs electrochemical activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Montelongo, J., E-mail: jacobo.hernandez@uam.es [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Gallach, D.; Naveas, N.; Torres-Costa, V. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Climent-Font, A. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Centro de Microanálisis de Materiales (CMAM), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049 (Spain); García-Ruiz, J.P. [Departamento de Biología Molecular, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Manso-Silvan, M. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-01-01

    Porous silicon (PSi) provides an excellent platform for bioengineering applications due to its biocompatibility, biodegradability, and bioresorbability. However, to promote its application as bone engineering scaffold, deposition of calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramics in its hydroxyapatite (HAP) phase is in progress. In that sense, this work focuses on the synthesis of CaP/PSi composites by means of two different techniques for CaP deposition on PSi: Cyclic Spin Coating (CSC) and Cyclic Electrochemical Activation (CEA). Both techniques CSC and CEA consisted on alternate Ca and P deposition steps on PSi. Each technique produced specific morphologies and CaP phases using the same independent Ca and P stem-solutions at neutral pH and at room temperature. The brushite (BRU) phase was favored with the CSC technique and the hydroxyapatite (HAP) phase was better synthesized using the CEA technique. Analyses by elastic backscattering spectroscopy (EBS) on CaP/PSi structures synthesized by CEA supported that, by controlling the CEA parameters, an HAP coating with the required Ca/P atomic ratio of 1.67 can be promoted. Biocompatibility was evaluated by bone-derived progenitor cells, which grew onto CaP/PSi prepared by CSC technique with a long-shaped actin cytoskeleton. The density of adhered cells was higher on CaP/PSi prepared by CEA, where cells presented a normal morphological appearance and active mitosis. These results can be used for the design and optimization of CaP/PSi composites with enhanced biocompatibility for bone-tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Proposed cyclic methods produce specific morphologies and CaP phases in biocomposites. • The brushite phase is favored in the biocomposite produced by Cyclic Spin Coating. • The hydroxyapatite phase is favored in the biocomposite produced by Cyclic Electrochemical Activation. • The Ca/P atomic ratio of hydroxyapatite was validated by elastic backscattering spectroscopy. • Cells grown showed morphological and

  2. HAp granules encapsulated oxidized alginate-gelatin-biphasic calcium phosphate hydrogel for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, Avik; Amirian, Jhaleh; Min, Young Ki; Lee, Byong Taek

    2015-11-01

    Bone repair in the critical size defect zone using 3D hydrogel scaffold is still a challenge in tissue engineering field. A novel type of hydrogel scaffold combining ceramic and polymer materials, therefore, was fabricated to meet this challenge. In this study, oxidized alginate-gelatin-biphasic calcium phosphate (OxAlg-Gel-BCP) and spherical hydroxyapatite (HAp) granules encapsulated OxAlg-Gel-BCP hydrogel complex were fabricated using freeze-drying method. Detailed morphological and material characterizations of OxAlg-Gel-BCP hydrogel (OGB00), 25wt% and 35wt% granules encapsulated hydrogel (OGB25 and OGB35) were carried out for micro-structure, porosity, chemical constituents, and compressive stress analysis. Cell viability, cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation behavior of rat bone marrow-derived stem cell (BMSC) on OGB00, OGB25 and OGB35 scaffolds were confirmed by MTT assay, Live-Dead assay, and confocal imaging in vitro experiments. Finally, OGB00 and OGB25 hydrogel scaffolds were implanted in the critical size defect of rabbit femoral chondyle for 4 and 8 weeks. The micro-CT analysis and histological studies conducted by H&E and Masson's trichrome demonstrated that a significantly higher (***p<0.001) and earlier bone formation happened in case of 25% HAp granules encapsulated OxAlg-Gel-BCP hydrogel than in OxAlg-Gel-BCP complex alone. All results taken together, HAp granules encapsulated OxAlg-Gel-BCP system can be a promising 3D hydrogel scaffold for the healing of a critical bone defect. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Correlation between calcium and phosphate levels to calculus accumulation on coronary heart disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahaya, Cindy; Masulili, Sri Lelyati C.; Lessang, Robert; Radi, Basuni

    2017-02-01

    Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) or Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is a disease that happened because of blood flow being blocked by atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is a process of hardening of the arteries which characterized by thickening and loss of elasticity of the intimal layer of vascular wall, by lipid deposit. Periodontitis is a chronic multifactorial inflammatory disease caused by microorganism and characterized by progressive destruction of the tooth supporting apparatus leading to tooth loss. Many studies use saliva as a valuable source for clinically information, as an asset for early diagnosis, prognostic and reviewer for pascatherapy status. Dental calculus had happened as a consequence of saliva supersaturation by calcium and phosphate. Salivary flow rate and its composition influence the formation of calculus. Increasing salivary calcium levels is characteristic of periodontitis patients. An important hipotesis in Cardiology is chronic infections contribute in atherosclerosis. Objective: To analyse the correlation between calcium and phosphate levels in saliva to calculus accumulation on CHD patients. Result: Correlation analysis between salivary calcium levels with calculus accumulation in patients with CHD and non-CHD showed no significant p value, p=0.59 and p=0.518. Correlation analysis between salivary phosphate levels and calculus accumulation showed no significant p value, p=0.836 for CHD patients and p=0.484 for non-CHD patients. Conclusion: There are no correlation between calcium levels and phosphate levels with calculus accumulation in CHD patients. Further research need to be done.

  4. Chemical immobilization of Pb, Cu, and Cd by phosphate materials and calcium carbonate in contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guoyong; Su, Xiaojuan; Rizwan, Muhammad Shahid; Zhu, Yifei; Hu, Hongqing

    2016-08-01

    Soil contamination with toxic metals has increasingly become a global concern over the past few decades. Phosphate and carbonate compounds are good passivation materials for Pb immobilization, while the effect of phosphate and carbonate on the immobilization of multiple heavy metals (Pb, Cu, and Cd) in contaminated soils was seldom investigated. In this study, bone meal (BM), phosphate rock (PR), oxalic acid-activated phosphate rock (APR), super phosphate (SP), and calcium carbonate (CC) were added to the contaminated soils to evaluate the effect of phosphate materials and calcium carbonate on the immobilization of Pb, Cu, and Cd. The results showed that the pH of the treated soils increased 1.3-2.7, except SP which decreased 0.5 at most. Compared to the control treatment, all phosphates and calcium carbonate added to the polluted soils increased the fraction of residual metals, and the application of APR, PR, BM, and CC significantly reduced exchangeable and carbonate-bound fraction metals. PR and APR were the most effective for the immobilization of Pb, Cu, and Cd in the soils among these materials. Moreover, the concentrations of all metals in the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) leachate decreased with increasing amounts of amendments, and the concentrations of Pb in the TCLP leachate for soils treated with PR and APR were below the nonhazardous regulatory limit of 5 mg L(-1) (US Environmental Protection Agency). Based on our results, phosphate rock and oxalic acid-activated phosphate rock are effective in the immobilization of multiple metals by reducing their mobility in the co-contaminated soils.

  5. Vascular calcification and secondary hyperparathyroidism of severe chronic kidney disease and its relation to serum phosphate and calcium levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terai, K; Nara, H; Takakura, K; Mizukami, K; Sanagi, M; Fukushima, S; Fujimori, A; Itoh, H; Okada, M

    2009-04-01

    Various complications consequent on disordered calcium and phosphate homeostasis occur frequently in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Particularly, vascular calcification has high morbidity and mortality rates. There is a clear need for a better CKD model to examine various aspects of this disordered homeostasis. Oral dosing with adenine induced CKD in rats in only 10 days. Serum calcium, phosphate and parathyroid hormone were measured and calcification in aorta was assessed histologically. The effects of varying phosphorus content of diet or treatment with phosphate binders or active vitamin D(3) on these parameters were examined. After adenine dosing, significant hyperphosphatemia, hypocalcemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism (2HPT) were observed during the experimental period of 15 weeks. Aortic calcification was detected in only some of the animals even at 15 weeks (approximately 40%). Treatment with vitamin D(3) for 18 days, even at a low dose (100 ng x kg(-1), 3-4 times week(-1), p.o), caused aortic calcification in all animals and increases in serum calcium levels up to the normal range. The vitamin D(3)-induced calcification was significantly inhibited by phosphate binders which lowered serum phosphate levels and the calcium x phosphate product, although serum calcium levels were elevated. These data suggest that rats dosed orally with adenine provide a more useful model for analysing calcium/phosphate homeostasis in severe CKD. Controlling serum calcium/phosphate levels with phosphate binders may be better than vitamin D(3) treatment in hyperphosphatemia and 2HPT, to avoid vascular calcification.

  6. The effect of injectable calcium phosphate cement on bone anchorage of titanium implants: an experimental feasibility study in dogs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arisan, V.; Anil, A.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Ozer, K.

    2010-01-01

    Calcium phosphate has high osteotransductive potential. The injectable form of calcium phosphate cement (ICAP) can be used as an adjunctive supportive agent for dental implants. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of an ICAP on the reverse torque resistance of titanium implants. Two

  7. Non-viral bone morphogenetic protein 2 transfection of rat dental pulp stem cells using calcium phosphate nanoparticles as carriers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, X.; Walboomers, X.F.; Dolder, J. van den; Yang, F.; Bian, Z.; Fan, M.; Jansen, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Calcium phosphate nanoparticles have shown potential as non-viral vectors for gene delivery. The aim of this study was to induce bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp)2 transfection in rat dental pulp stem cells using calcium phosphate nanoparticles as a gene vector and then to evaluate the efficiency and

  8. Effect of phase composition of calcium silicate phosphate component on properties of brushite based composite cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopcak, T., E-mail: tsopcak@imr.saske.sk [Institute of Materials Research of SAS, Watsonova 47, 04001 Kosice (Slovakia); Medvecky, L.; Giretova, M.; Stulajterova, R.; Durisin, J. [Institute of Materials Research of SAS, Watsonova 47, 04001 Kosice (Slovakia); Girman, V. [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science, P. J. Šafárik University, Park Angelinum 9, 04001 Kosice (Slovakia); Faberova, M. [Institute of Materials Research of SAS, Watsonova 47, 04001 Kosice (Slovakia)

    2016-07-15

    The composite cement mixtures were prepared by mixing brushite (B) with, the amorphous hydrated calcium silicate phosphate (CSPH) or annealed calcium silicate phosphate (CSP composed of Si-saturated hydroxyapatite, wollastonite and silica) phases and water as liquid component. The contents of the silicate-phosphate phase in composites were 10.30 and 50 wt%. The significant effect of both the Ca/P ratio and different solubility of calcium silicate phosphate component in starting cement systems on setting time and phase composition of the final composite cements was demonstrated. The compressive strength of the set cements increased with the filler addition and the highest value (~ 48 MPa) exhibited the 50CSP/B cement composite. The final setting times of the composite cements decreased with the CSPH addition from about 25 to 17 min in 50CSHP/B and setting time of CSP/B composites was around 30 min. The higher content of silica in cements caused the precipitation of fine hydroxyapatite particles in the form of nanoneedles or thin plates perpendicularly oriented to sample surface. The analysis of in vitro cement cytotoxicity demonstrated the strong reduction in cytotoxicity of 10CSPH/B composite with time of cultivation (a low cytotoxicity after 9 days of culture) contrary to cements with higher calcium silicate-phosphate content. These results were attributed to the different surface topography of composite substrates and possible stimulation of cell proliferation by the slow continuously release of ions from 10CSPH/B cement. - Highlights: • Ca/P ratio and solubility of calcium silicate-phosphate components affect the self-setting properties of cements. • Strong relationship between the composite in vitro cytotoxicity and surface microtopography was demonstrated. • Plate-like morphology of coarser particles allowed cells to better adhere and proliferate as compared with nanoneedles.

  9. Characterization of calcium phosphate powders originating from Phyllacanthus imperialis and Trochidae Infundibulum concavus marine shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tămăşan, M., E-mail: monica.tamasan@phys.ubbcluj.ro [Babeş-Bolyai University, Faculty of Physics and Interdisciplinary Research Institute on Bio-Nano-Sciences, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Ozyegin, L.S. [Marmara University, Istanbul (Turkey); Oktar, F.N. [Marmara University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Bioengineering, Göztepe Campus, Kadıköy 34722, Istanbul (Turkey); Marmara University, School of Health Related Professions, Department of Medical Imaging Technics, Haydarpaşa Campus, Tıbbiye Street, 49, Üsküdar 34668, Istanbul (Turkey); Marmara University, Nanotechnology and Biomaterials Application and Research Centre, Göztepe Campus, Kadıköy 34722, Istanbul (Turkey); Simon, V. [Babeş-Bolyai University, Faculty of Physics and Interdisciplinary Research Institute on Bio-Nano-Sciences, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-07-01

    The study reports the preparation and characterization of powders consisting of the different phases of calcium phosphates that were obtained from the naturally derived raw materials of sea-shell origins reacted with H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. Species of sea origin, such as corals and nacres, attracted a special interest in bone tissue engineering area. Nacre shells are built up of calcium carbonate in aragonite form crystallized in an organic matrix. In this work two natural marine origin materials (shells of echinoderm Sputnik sea urchin — Phyllacanthus imperialis and Trochidae Infundibulum concavus mollusk) were involved in the developing powders of calcium phosphate based biomaterials (as raw materials for bone-scaffolds) by hotplate and ultrasound methods. Thermal analyses of the as-prepared materials were made for an assessment of the thermal behavior and heat treatment temperatures. Samples from both sea shells each of them prepared by the above mentioned methods were subjected to thermal treatments at 450 °C and 850 °C in order to evaluate the crystalline transformations of the calcium phosphate structures in the heating process. By X-ray diffraction analyses various calcium phosphate phases were identified. In Sputnik sea urchins originated samples were found predominantly brushite and calcite as a small secondary phase, while in Trochidae I. concavus samples mainly monetite and HA phases were identified. Thermal treatment at 850 °C resulted flat-plate whitlockite crystals — β-MgTCP [(Ca, Mg){sub 3} (PO{sub 4}){sub 2}] for both samples regardless the preparation method (ultrasound or hotplate) or the targeted Ca/P molar ratio according with XRD patterns. Scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy were involved more in the characterization of these materials and the good correlations of the results of these methods were made. - Highlights: ► Calcium phosphate powders are obtained from the crushed shells of 2

  10. Mapping calcium phosphate activated gene networks as a strategy for targeted osteoinduction of human progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyckmans, Jeroen; Roberts, Scott J; Bolander, Johanna; Schrooten, Jan; Chen, Christopher S; Luyten, Frank P

    2013-06-01

    Although calcium phosphate-containing biomaterials are promising scaffolds for bone regenerative strategies, the osteoinductive capacity of such materials is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated whether endogenous mechanisms of in vivo calcium phosphate-driven, ectopic bone formation could be identified and used to induce enhanced differentiation in vitro of the same progenitor population. To accomplish this, human periosteum derived cells (hPDCs) were seeded on hydroxyapatite/collagen scaffolds (calcium phosphate rich matrix or CPRM), or on decalcified scaffolds (calcium phosphate depleted matrix or CPDM), followed by subcutaneous implantation in nude mice to trigger ectopic bone formation. In this system, osteoblast differentiation occurred in CPRM scaffolds, but not in CPDM scaffolds. Gene expression was assessed by human full-genome microarray at 20 h after seeding, and 2, 8 and 18 days after implantation. In both matrices, implantation of the cell constructs triggered a similar gene expression cascade, however, gene expression dynamics progressed faster in CPRM scaffolds than in CPDM scaffolds. The difference in gene expression dynamics was associated with differential activation of hub genes and molecular signaling pathways related to calcium signaling (CREB), inflammation (TNFα, NFkB, and IL6) and bone development (TGFβ, β-catenin, BMP, EGF, and ERK signaling). Starting from this set of pathways, a growth factor cocktail was developed that robustly enhanced osteogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our data demonstrate that through the identification and subsequent stimulation of genes, proteins and signaling pathways associated with calcium phosphate mediated osteoinduction, a focused approach to develop targeted differentiation protocols in adult progenitor cells can be achieved. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A combination of biphasic calcium phosphate scaffold with hyaluronic acid-gelatin hydrogel as a new tool for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thuy Ba Linh; Lee, Byong-Taek

    2014-07-01

    A novel bone substitute was fabricated to enhance bone healing by combining ceramic and polymer materials. In this study, Hyaluronic acid (HyA)-Gelatin (Gel) hydrogel was loaded into a biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) ceramic, and the resulting scaffold, with unique micro- and macroporous orientation, was evaluated for bone regeneration applications. The fabricated scaffold showed high interconnected porosity, with an average compressive strength of 2.8±0.15 MPa, which is usually recommended for cancellous bone substitution. In vitro cytocompatibility studies were conducted using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. The HyA-Gel-loaded BCP scaffold resulted in a significant increase in cell proliferation at 3 (p<0.05) and 7 days (p<0.001) and high alkaline phosphatase activities at 14 and 21 days. Furthermore, the in vivo studies showed that the implanted HyA-Gel-loaded BCP scaffold begins to degrade within 3 months after implantation. Histological sections also confirmed a rapid new bone formation and a high rate of collagen mineralization. A bone matrix formation was confirmed by positive immunohistochemistry staining of osteopontin, osteocalcin, and collagen type I. In vivo expression of extracellular matrix proteins demonstrated that this novel bone substitute holds great promise for use in stimulating new bone regeneration.

  12. Phase stability of silver particles embedded calcium phosphate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The transformation of hydroxyapatite to (/) tricalcium phosphate phases during sintering has been explored using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. The optical absorption spectroscopy analysis reveals the presence of Ag+ ions at low doping levels. As the doping increases, abundance of Ag particles ...

  13. Effects of Silicate, Phosphate, and Calcium on the Stability of Aldopentoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Sakiko; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    Ribose is an important constituent of RNA: ribose connects RNA bases and forms a strand of sugar phosphates. Accumulation of ribose on prebiotic Earth was difficult because of its low stability. Improvement in the yield of ribose by the introduction of borate or silicate in a formose-like reaction has been proposed. The effects of borates have been further analyzed and confirmed in subsequent studies. Nonetheless, the effects of silicates and phosphates remain unclear. In the present study, we incubated aldopentoses in a highly alkaline aqueous solution at a moderate temperature to determine the effects of silicate or phosphate on the degradation rates of ribose and its isomeric aldopentoses. The formation of a complex of silicate (or phosphate) with ribose was also analyzed in experiments with 29Si and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We found that silicate or phosphate complexes of ribose were not detectable under our experimental conditions. The stability of ribose and lyxose improved after addition of 40-fold molar excess (relative to a pentose) of sodium silicate or sodium phosphate to the alkaline solution. The stability was not improved further when an 80-fold molar excess of sodium silicate or sodium phosphate was added. Calcium was removed from these solutions by precipitation of calcium salts. The drop in Ca2+ concentration might have improved the stability of ribose and lyxose, which are susceptible to aldol addition. The improvement of ribose stability by the removal of Ca2+ and by addition of silicate or phosphate was far smaller than the improvement by borate. Furthermore, all aldopentoses showed similar stability in silicate- and phosphate-containing solutions. These results clearly show that selective stabilization of ribose by borate cannot be replaced by the effects of silicate or phosphate; this finding points to the importance of borate in prebiotic RNA formation.

  14. In situ hydroxyapatite nanofiber growth on calcium borate silicate ceramics in SBF and its structural characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pu, Yinfu; Huang, Yanlin; Qi, Shuyun [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Chen, Cuili [Department of Physics and Interdisciplinary Program of Biomedical, Mechanical & Electrical Engineering, Pukyong National University, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Hyo Jin, E-mail: hjseo@pknu.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Interdisciplinary Program of Biomedical, Mechanical & Electrical Engineering, Pukyong National University, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-01

    A novel calcium silicate borate Ca{sub 11}Si{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 22} ceramic was firstly prepared by the conventional solid-state reaction. In vitro hydroxyapatite mineralization was investigated by soaking the ceramics in simulated body fluid (SBF) solutions at body temperature (37 °C) for various time periods. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) measurements were applied to investigate the samples before and after the immersion of ceramics in SBF solution. The elemental compositions of a hydroxyapatite layer on the ceramics during the mineralization were confirmed by X-ray energy-dispersive spectra (EDS). Meanwhile, the bending strength and elastic modulus of Ca{sub 11}Si{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 22} ceramics were also measured, which indicate that the biomaterials based on Ca{sub 11}Si{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 22} ceramics possess bioactivity and might be a potential candidate as biomaterials for hard tissue repair. The bioactive mineralization ability was evaluated on the base of its crystal structural characteristics, i.e., silanol (Si–OH) and B–OH groups can be easily induced on the surface of Ca{sub 11}Si{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 22} ceramics soaked in SBF solutions. - Highlights: • Calcium silicate borate Ca{sub 11}Si{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 22} ceramics were developed as a new biomaterial. • Ca{sub 11}Si{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 22} shows a superior in vitro bioactivity by inducing bone-like apatite. • Ca{sub 11}Si{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 22} has good mechanical properties as potential candidate biomaterials. • The structure with SiO{sub 4} and BO{sub 3} groups is favorable for hydroxyapatite formation.

  15. Effect of modified compound calcium phosphate cement on the differentiation and osteogenesis of bone mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jican; Lin, Jiazhong; Yao, Guanfeng; Kong, Kangmei; Wang, Xinjia

    2017-06-29

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of self-invented compound calcium phosphate cement upon the proliferation and osteogenesis of bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). Four groups including traditional calcium phosphate cement, modified calcium phosphate cement, modified calcium phosphate cement plus bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), and control groups were established. The cell proliferation curve was delineated by MTT. The activity of BMSCs to synthesize alkaline phosphatase (AKP) was evaluated. The growth and invasion of BMSCs were observed. The expression levels of aggrecan, collagen I, collagen II, AKP, and OSX messenger RNA (mRNA) were measured by using RT-PCR. Compared with other groups, the BMSCs in the modified calcium phosphate cement group presented with loose microstructure and the BMSCs closely attached to the vector margin. At 7 days after co-culture, the expression of AKP in the modified calcium phosphate cement plus BMP group was significantly upregulated compared with those in other groups. In the modified calcium phosphate cement group, the BMSCs properly proliferated on the surface of bone cement and invaded into the cement space. At 10 days, the expression levels of aggrecan, collagen I, collagen II, AKP, and OSX mRNA in the modified calcium phosphate cement and modified calcium phosphate cement plus BMP groups were significantly upregulated than those in other groups. Modified compound calcium phosphate cement possesses excellent biocompatibility and osteogenic induction ability. Loose microstructure and large pore size create a favorable environment for BMSCs proliferation and vascular invasion, as an ideal vector for releasing BMP cytokines to mediate the differentiation and osteogenesis of BMSCs.

  16. Surface degradation of glass ceramics after exposure to acidulated phosphate fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    CCAHUANA, Vanessa Zulema S.; ÖZCAN, Mutlu; MESQUITA, Alfredo Mikail Melo; NISHIOKA, Renato Sussumo; KIMPARA, Estevão Tomomitsu; BOTTINO, Marco Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the surface degradation effect of acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) gel exposure on the glassy matrix ceramics as a function of time. Material and methods Disc-shaped ceramic specimens (N = 120, 10/per ceramic material) were prepared in stainless steel molds (inner diameter: 5 mm, height: 2 mm) using 6 dental ceramics: 3 indicated for ceramic-fused-to-metal (Vita Omega 900, Carmen and Vita Titankeramik), 2 for all-ceramic (Vitadur Alpha and Finesse® Low Fusing) and 1 for both types of restorations (IPS d.SIGN). The specimens were wet ground finished, ultrasonically cleaned and auto-glazed. All specimens were subjected to calculation of percentage of mass loss, surface roughness analysis and topographical description by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) before (0 min) and after exposure to 1.23 % APF gel for 4 min and 60 min representing short- and long-term etching effect, respectively. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA with repeated measures and Tukey`s test (α=0.05). Results Significant effect of the type of the ceramics (p=0.0000, p=0.0031) and exposure time (p=0.0000) was observed in both surface roughness and percentage of mass loss values, respectively. The interaction factor between both parameters was also significant for both parameters (p=0.0904, p=0.0258). Both 4 min (0.44±0.1 - 0.81±0.2 µm) and 60 min (0.66±0.1 - 1.04±0.3 µm) APF gel exposure created significantly more surface roughness for all groups when compared to the control groups (0.33±0.2 - 0.68±0.2 µm) (p0.05) but at 60 min exposure, IPS d.SIGN showed the highest percentage of mass loss (0.1151±0.11). The mean surface roughness for Vita Titankeramik (0.84±0.2 µm) and Finesse® Low Fusing (0.74.±0.2 µm) was significantly higher than those of the other ceramics (0.59±0.1 µm - 0.49±0.1 µm) and Vita Titankeramik (p<0.05) regardless of the exposure time. A positive correlation was found between surface roughness and percentage of mass

  17. Effects of calcium and phosphate on catecholamines, ATP and dopamine beta-hydroxylase of chromaffin medullary granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schümann, H J; Althoff, B

    1976-01-01

    Isolated bovine chromaffin granules lost their catecholamines to a significantly higher degree when incubated in isotonic sucrose-buffer of pH 7.4 containing 10 and 25 mM sodium phosphate, respectively, than during incubatation in sucrose with 4 mM sodium phosphate. 2. In 4mM sodium phosphate-sucrose, CaCl(2) in a final concentration of 1 and 2 mM, respectively, produced only traces of an amorphous precipitate of calcium phosphate which increased the efflux of catecholamines only to a small degree. The same concentrations of CaCl(2) in 10 and 25 mM sodium phosphate containing sucrose solutions caused larger amounts of calcium phosphate precipitate and simultaneously a very high efflux of catecholamines. Small amounts of exogenous ATP (1 mM) and MgCl(2) (0.3 mM) effectively antagonized the efflux of catecholamines from the granules evolked by calcium phosphate...

  18. FORMATION OF PHOSPHATE-CONTAINING CALCIUM-FLUORIDE AT THE EXPENSE OF ENAMEL, HYDROXYAPATITE AND FLUORAPATITE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CHRISTOFFERSEN, J; CHRISTOFFERSEN, MR; ARENDS, J; LEONARDSEN, ES

    1995-01-01

    During the caries process complex reactions involving calcium, phosphate, hydrogen and fluoride ions as main species take place. In this study the precipitation and dissolution reactions occurring in suspensions of enamel, hydroxyapatite (HAP) and fluorapatite (FAP) on addition of fluoride were

  19. Long-term biological performance of injectable and degradable calcium phosphate cement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grosfeld, E.C.; Hoekstra, J.W.M.; Herber, R.P.; Ulrich, D.J.O.; Jansen, J.A.; Beucken, J.J.J.P van den

    2016-01-01

    Enhancing degradation of poorly degrading injectable calcium phosphate (CaP) cements (CPCs) can be achieved by adding poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles, generating porosity after polymer degradation. CPC-PLGA has proven to be biodegradable, although its long-term biological

  20. Effect of different calcium phosphate scaffold ratios on odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbdulQader, Sarah Talib; Kannan, Thirumulu Ponnuraj; Rahman, Ismail Ab; Ismail, Hanafi; Mahmood, Zuliani

    2015-04-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) scaffolds have been widely and successfully used with osteoblast cells for bone tissue regeneration. However, it is necessary to investigate the effects of these scaffolds on odontoblast cells' proliferation and differentiation for dentin tissue regeneration. In this study, three different hydroxyapatite (HA) to beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) ratios of biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) scaffolds, BCP20, BCP50, and BCP80, with a mean pore size of 300μm and 65% porosity were prepared from phosphoric acid (H2PO4) and calcium carbonate (CaCO3) sintered at 1000°C for 2h. The extracts of these scaffolds were assessed with regard to cell viability and differentiation of odontoblasts. The high alkalinity, more calcium, and phosphate ions released that were exhibited by BCP20 decreased the viability of human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) as compared to BCP50 and BCP80. However, the cells cultured with BCP20 extract expressed high alkaline phosphatase activity and high expression level of bone sialoprotein (BSP), dental matrix protein-1 (DMP-1), and dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) genes as compared to that cultured with BCP50 and BCP80 extracts. The results highlighted the effect of different scaffold ratios on the cell microenvironment and demonstrated that BCP20 scaffold can support HDPC differentiation for dentin tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of surface microstructure and chemistry on osteoinduction and osteoclastogenesis by biphasic calcium phosphate discs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davison, N.L.; Su, J.; Yuan, H.; Beucken, J.J.J.P van den; Bruijn, J.D. de; rrere-de Groot, F. Ba

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that surface microstructural dimensions can influence the osteoinductivity of calcium phosphates (CaPs), and osteoclasts may play a role in this process. We hypothesised that surface structural dimensions of

  2. Transformation of Amorphous Calcium Phosphate to Crystalline Dahllite in the Radular Teeth of Chitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstam, H. A.; Weiner, S.

    1985-01-01

    A comparison of infrared spectra from individual teeth along the radula of a chiton (Polyplacophora, Mollusca) shows that the first-formed calcium phosphate mineral is amorphous. Over a period of weeks the mineral transforms to dahllite. The c axes of the dahllite crystals are aligned approximately perpendicular to the tooth surface.

  3. Evaluation of the biocompatibility of calcium phosphate cement/PLGA microparticle composites.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Link, D.P.; Dolder, J. van den; Beucken, J.J.J.P van den; Cuijpers, V.M.J.I.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Mikos, A.G.; Jansen, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the biocompatibility of a calcium phosphate (CaP) cement incorporating poly (D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles was evaluated in a subcutaneous implantation model in rats. Short-term biocompatibility was assessed using pure CaP discs and CaP discs incorporating PLGA

  4. PLGA microsphere/calcium phosphate cement composites for tissue engineering: in vitro release and degradation characteristics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habraken, W.J.E.M.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Mikos, A.G.; Jansen, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Bone cements with biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres have already been proven to provide a macroporous calcium phosphate cement (CPC) during in situ microsphere degradation. Furthermore, in vitro/in vivo release studies with these PLGA microsphere/CPC composites

  5. Incorporation of bioactive glass in calcium phosphate cement: Material characterization and in vitro degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renno, A.C.; Nejadnik, M.R.; Watering, F.C.J. van de; Crovace, M.C.; Zanotto, E.D.; Hoefnagels, J.P.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Jansen, Jan; Beucken, J.J.J.P van den

    2013-01-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) have been widely used as an alternative to biological grafts due to their excellent osteoconductive properties. Although degradation has been improved by using poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) microspheres as porogens, the biological performance of CPC/PLGA

  6. In vitro degradation rate of apatitic calcium phosphate cement with incorporated PLGA microspheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felix Lanao, R.P.; Leeuwenburgh, S.C.G.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Jansen, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) are frequently used as bone substitute material. Despite their superior clinical handling and excellent biocompatibility, they exhibit poor degradability, which limits bone ingrowth into the implant. Microspheres were prepared from poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid)

  7. Injectable PLGA microsphere/calcium phosphate cements: physical properties and degradation characteristics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habraken, W.J.E.M.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Mikos, A.G.; Jansen, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) cements show an excellent biocompatibility and often have a high mechanical strength, but in general degrade relatively slow. To increase degradation rates, macropores can be introduced into the cement, e.g., by the inclusion of biodegradable microspheres into the cement. The

  8. Bone response to fast-degrading, injectable calcium phosphate cements containing PLGA microparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanao, R.P.; Leeuwenburgh, S.C.G.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Jansen, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Apatitic calcium phosphate cements (CPC) are frequently used to fill bone defects due to their favourable clinical handling and excellent bone response, but their lack of degradability inhibits complete bone regeneration. In order to render these injectable CaP cements biodegradable, hollow

  9. Maxillary sinus floor augmentation with injectable calcium phosphate cements: a pre-clinical study in sheep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, J.W.M.; Klijn, R.J.; Meijer, G.J.; Beucken, J.J.J.P van den; Jansen, J.B.M.J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this pre-clinical study was to evaluate the biological performance of two injectable calcium phosphate cement (CPC) composite materials containing poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic)acid (PLGA) microspheres with different properties in a maxillary sinus floor elevation model in

  10. Mechanical evaluation of implanted calcium phosphate cement incorporated with PLGA microparticles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Link, D.P.; Dolder, J. van den; Jurgens, W.J.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Jansen, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the mechanical properties of an implanted calcium phosphate (CaP) cement incorporated with 20wt% poly (dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles were investigated in a rat cranial defect. After 2, 4 and 8 weeks of implantation, implants were evaluated mechanically (push-out

  11. Biocompatibility and degradation of poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid)/calcium phosphate cement composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruhe, P.Q.; Hedberg, E.L.; Padron, N.T.; Spauwen, P.H.M.; Jansen, J.A.; Mikos, A.G.

    2005-01-01

    Injectable calcium phosphate (Ca-P) cement materials exhibit favorable osteocompatible behavior but are resorbed slowly because of a lack of a bone ingrowth-enabling macroporosity. In this study, poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles (average size 66 +/- 25 microm) were incorporated

  12. Calcium addition to increase the production of phosphate granules in anaerobic treatment of black water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cunha, Jorge Ricardo; Schott, Chris; Weijden, van der Renata D.; Leal, Lucía Hernández; Zeeman, Grietje; Buisman, Cees

    2018-01-01

    Simultaneous recovery of calcium phosphate granules (CaP granules) and methane from vacuum collected black water (BW), using an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor was previously investigated. It was calculated that only 2% of the total phosphorus (P) fed was present as CaP granules

  13. Trabecular bone response to injectable calcium phosphate (Ca-P) cement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooms, E.M.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Waerden, J.P.C.M. van der; Jansen, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the physicochemical, biological, and handling properties of a new developed calcium phosphate (Ca-P) cement when implanted in trabecular bone. Ca-P cement consisting of a powder and a liquid phase was implanted as a paste into femoral trabecular bone of goats

  14. Influence of polymeric additives on the cohesion and mechanical properties of calcium phosphate cements.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    An, J.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Jansen, J.A.; Leeuwenburgh, S.C.G.

    2016-01-01

    To expand the clinical applicability of calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) to load-bearing anatomical sites, the mechanical and setting properties of CPCs need to be improved. Specifically, organic additives need to be developed that can overcome the disintegration and brittleness of CPCs. Hence, we

  15. Zero echo time MR imaging of contrast-agent-enhanced calcium phosphate bone defect fillers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Y.; Ventura, M.; Oosterwijk, E.; Walboomers, X.F.; Jansen, P.D., John; Heerschap, A.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium Phosphate Cements (CPCs) are widely used bone substitutes. However, CPCs have similar radiopacity as natural bone, rendering them difficult to be differentiated in classical X-ray and CT imaging. As conventional MRI of bone is cumbersome, due to a low water content and very short

  16. Novel tea polyphenol-modified calcium phosphate nanoparticle and its remineralization potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, L.; Deng, D.; Zhou, X.; Cheng, L.; ten Cate, J.M.; Li, J.; Li, X.; Crielaard, W.

    2015-01-01

    Tea polyphenols (TP) are not only potent antimicrobial and antioxidant agents but also effective modifiers in the formation of nanosized crystals. Since nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HA) is known to enhance remineralization of dental hard tissue, our aims were to synthesize nanosized calcium phosphate

  17. Introduction of enzymatically degradable poly(trimethylene carbonate) microspheres into an injectable calcium phosphate cement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habraken, Wouter J. E. M.; Zhang, Zheng; Wolke, Joop G. C.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Mikos, Antonios G.; Feijen, Jan; Jansen, John A.

    Poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) is an enzymatically degradable polyester with rubber-like properties. Introduction of this polymer into an injectable calcium phosphate bone cement can therefore be used to introduce macroporosity into the cement for tissue engineering purposes as well as to

  18. Fabrication of gelatin-strontium substituted calcium phosphate scaffolds with unidirectional pores for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Chun; Lin, Wei-Yu; Yang, Chyun-Yu; Lee, Tzer-Min

    2015-03-01

    This study fabricated homogeneous gelatin-strontium substituted calcium phosphate composites via coprecipitation in a gelatin solution. Unidirectional porous scaffolds with an oriented microtubular structure were then manufactured using freeze-drying technology. The resulting structure and pore alignment were determined using scanning electron microscopy. The pore size were in the range of 200-400 μm, which is considered ideal for the engineering of bone tissue. The scaffolds were further characterized using energy dispersive spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Hydroxyapatite was the main calcium phosphate compound in the scaffolds, with strontium incorporated into the crystal structure. The porosity of the scaffolds decreased with increasing concentration of calcium-phosphate. The compressive strength in the longitudinal direction was two to threefold higher than that observed in the transverse direction. Our results demonstrate that the composite scaffolds degraded by approximately 20 % after 5 weeks. Additionally, in vitro results reveal that the addition of strontium significantly increased human osteoblastic cells proliferation. Scaffolds containing strontium with a Sr-CaP/(gelatin + Sr-CaP) ratio of 50 % provided the most suitable environment for cell proliferation, particularly under dynamic culture conditions. This study demonstrates the considerable potential of composite scaffolds composed of gelatin-strontium-substituted calcium phosphate for applications in bone tissue engineering.

  19. Strontium enhances osseointegration of calcium phosphate cement: a histomorphometric pilot study in ovariectomized rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Calcium phosphate cements are used frequently in orthopedic and dental surgeries. Strontium-containing drugs serve as systemic osteoblast-activating medication in various clinical settings promoting mechanical stability of the osteoporotic bone. Methods Strontium-containing calcium phosphate cement (SPC) and calcium phosphate cement (CPC) were compared regarding their local and systemic effects on bone tissue in a standard animal model for osteoporotic bone. A bone defect was created in the distal femoral metaphysis of 60 ovariectomized Sprague-Dawley rats. CPC and SPC were used to fill the defects in 30 rats in each group. Local effects were assessed by histomorphometry at the implant site. Systemic effects were assessed by bone mineral density (BMD) measurements at the contralateral femur and the spine. Results Faster osseointegration and more new bone formation were found for SPC as compared to CPC implant sites. SPC implants exhibited more cracks than CPC implants, allowing more bone formation within the implant. Contralateral femur BMD and spine BMD did not differ significantly between the groups. Conclusions The addition of strontium to calcium phosphate stimulates bone formation in and around the implant. Systemic release of strontium from the SPC implants did not lead to sufficiently high serum strontium levels to induce significant systemic effects on bone mass in this rat model. PMID:23758869

  20. Bone response adjacent to calcium phosphate electrostatic spray deposition coated implants: an experimental study in goats.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manders, P.J.D.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Jansen, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A new technique to deposit calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings onto titanium substrates has been developed recently. This electrostatic spray deposition (ESD) technique seems to be very promising. It appears to have clinical advantages such as an inexpensive and simple set-up, high

  1. The effect of inorganic additives to calcium phosphate on in vitro behavior of osteoblasts and osteoclasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Liang; Perez-Amodio, Soledad; Barrère, F.; Everts, Vincent; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Habibovic, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    This study describes a medium-throughput system based on deposition of calcium phosphate films in multi-well tissue culture plates that can be used to study the effect of inorganic additives on the behavior of osteoblasts and osteoclasts in a standardized manner. All tested elements, copper, zinc,

  2. The effects of inorganic additives to calcium phosphate on in vitro behavior of osteoblasts and osteoclasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, L.; Perez-Amodio, S.; Barrere-de Groot, F.Y.F.; Everts, V.; van Blitterswijk, C.A.; Habibovic, P.

    2010-01-01

    This study describes a medium-throughput system based on deposition of calcium phosphate films in multi-well tissue culture plates that can be used to study the effect of inorganic additives on the behavior of osteoblasts and osteoclasts in a standardized manner. All tested elements, copper, zinc,

  3. Crystal growth mechanism of calcium phosphate coatings on titanium by electrochemical deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mokabber, Taraneh; Lu, Liqiang; van Rijn, Patrick; Vakis, Antonis I.; Pei, Yutao T.

    2018-01-01

    The pulsed current electrochemical deposition of calcium phosphate (Ca-P) coatings on a titanium substrate was investigated in this study. The effects of applied voltage and H2O2 concentration in the electrolyte solution on the phase composition and coating morphology were studied using X-ray

  4. Incorporation of fast dissolving glucose porogens into an injectable calcium phosphate cement for bone tissue engineering.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, B.T.; Santoro, M.; Grosfeld, E.C.; Shah, S.R.; Beucken, J.J.J.P van den; Jansen, J.A.; Mikos, A.G.

    2017-01-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) have been extensively investigated as scaffolds in bone tissue engineering in light of their chemical composition closely resembling the mineral component of bone extracellular matrix. Yet, the degradation kinetics of many CPCs is slow compared to de novo bone

  5. Nano-scale study of the nucleation and growth of calcium phosphate coating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrère, F.; Snel, M.M.E.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Groot, K.; Layrolle, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    The nucleation and growth of a calcium phosphate (Ca-P) coating deposited on titanium implants from simulated body fluid was investigated by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Forty titanium alloy plates were assigned into two groups. One group

  6. Microbial phytase-induced calcium-phosphate precipitation : A potential soil stabilization method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeselers, G.; Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    Two hypotheses were tested: (1) microbial dephosphorylation of phytate in the presence of Ca2+ ions will result in the precipitation of hydroxyapatite-like crystals and (2) precipitation of calcium-phosphate crystals on and between sand-like particles can cause cementation. A growing culture of the

  7. Application of poly(trimethylene carbonate) and calcium phosphate composite biomaterials in oral and maxillofacial surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, Ni

    2017-01-01

    This thesis has been dedicated to explore the feasibilities of applying composite biomaterials to bone reconstruction in jawbones and skulls. The composite biomaterials used in our studies are composed of a polymer matrix and various calcium phosphate particles. The polymer matrix is made of a

  8. Calcium phosphates produced by physical methods in the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolci, G; Mongiorgi, R; Prati, C; Valdrè, G

    1999-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the properties of innovative materials based on defective calcium phosphates produced by physical methods in the therapy of dentin hypersensitivity. In particular, the effects of gels, aqueous solutions and toothpastes containing the above mentioned materials on dentinal permeability measured as dentin hydraulic conductance have been studied. The calcium phosphates have been characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (Rietveld analysis) and Fourier transform infra-red analysis. In addition, scanning electron microscopy has been performed to study the surface of dentin and enamel after treatment with the phosphates. In particular sound occlusal dentin, sound cervical dentin, carious occlusal dentin, sound buccal enamel and carious buccal enamel have been observed. The results have shown that these biocompatible materials can be produced with chemical and physical characteristics very similar to dentin and/or enamel. By forming a protective layer inside and outside the dentin tubuli, the calcium phosphates significantly reduce the dentinal hypersensitivity. These phosphates seem to be a promising material for clinical application.

  9. Processing and properties of calcium phosphates bioceramics by hot isostatic pressing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boilet Laurent

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Stoichiometric β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP, hydroxyapatite (HA and biphasic calcium phosphate (TCP/HA 60/40 %wt, BCP40 powders were synthesized by chemical precipitation of aqueous solutions of diammonium phosphate and calcium nitrate. After a calcination treatment and a milling step, powders were shaped by slip-casting. The sintering temperature effect on the density and the average grain size was investigated. By natural sintering, densities between 98 and 99.8% were obtained. Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP treatment was carried out after a pre-sintering of these materials. Transparent or translucent samples were obtained, indicating a relative density very close to the theoretical value (>99.9%. Mechanical properties (three-point bending strength, fracture toughness, Young's modulus and Vickers hardness were measured on hipped materials with similar grain size (∼0.7μm.

  10. Encapsulation of plasmid DNA in calcium phosphate nanoparticles: stem cell uptake and gene transfer efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xia; Deng, Wenwen; Wei, Yuan; Su, Weiyan; Yang, Yan; Wei, Yawei; Yu, Jiangnan; Xu, Ximing

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop calcium phosphate nanocomposite particles encapsulating plasmid DNA (CP-pDNA) nanoparticles as a nonviral vector for gene delivery. CP-pDNA nanoparticles employing plasmid transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) were prepared and characterized. The transfection efficiency and cell viability of the CP-pDNA nanoparticles were evaluated in mesenchymal stem cells, which were identified by immunofluorescence staining. Cytotoxicity of plasmid TGF-β1 and calcium phosphate to mesenchymal stem cells were evaluated by MTT assay. The integrity of TGF-β1 encapsulated in the CP-pDNA nanoparticles was maintained. The well dispersed CP-pDNA nanoparticles exhibited an ultralow particle size (20-50 nm) and significantly lower cytotoxicity than Lipofectamine™ 2000. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that the cultured cells in this study were probably mesenchymal stem cells. The cellular uptake and transfection efficiency of the CP-pDNA nanoparticles into the mesenchymal stem cells were higher than that of needle-like calcium phosphate nanoparticles and a standard calcium phosphate transfection kit. Furthermore, live cell imaging and confocal laser microscopy vividly showed the transportation process of the CP-pDNA nanoparticles in mesenchymal stem cells. The results of a cytotoxicity assay found that both plasmid TGF-β1 and calcium phosphate were not toxic to mesenchymal stem cells. CP-pDNA nanoparticles can be developed into an effective alternative as a nonviral gene delivery system that is highly efficient and has low cytotoxicity.

  11. A novel biodegradable nicotinic acid/calcium phosphate composite coating on Mg-3Zn alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yingwei, E-mail: ywsong@imr.ac.cn; Shan, Dayong; Han, En-Hou

    2013-01-01

    A novel biodegradable composite coating is prepared to reduce the biodegradation rate of Mg-3Zn alloy. The Mg-3Zn substrate is first immersed into 0.02 mol L{sup -1} nicotinic acid (NA) solution, named as vitamin B{sub 3}, to obtain a pretreatment film, and then the electrodeposition of calcium phosphate coating with ultrasonic agitation is carried out on the NA pretreatment film to obtain a NA/calcium phosphate composite coating. Surface morphology is observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chemical composition is determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and EDX. Protection property of the coatings is evaluated by electrochemical tests. The biodegradable behavior is investigated by immersion tests. The results indicate that a thin but compact bottom layer can be obtained by NA pretreatment. The electrodeposition calcium phosphate coating consists of many flake particles and ultrasonic agitation can greatly improve the compactness of the coating. The composite coating is biodegradable and can reduce the biodegradation rate of Mg alloys in stimulated body fluid (SBF) for twenty times. The biodegradation process of the composite coating can be attributed to the gradual dissolution of the flake particles into chippings. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NA/calcium phosphate composite coating is prepared to protect Mg-3Zn alloy implant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotinic acid (vitamin B{sub 3}) is available to obtain a protective bottom film. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ultrasonic agitation greatly improves the compactness of calcium phosphate coating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The composite coating can reduce the biodegradation rate of Mg-3Zn twenty times. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The composite coating is biodegraded by the dissolution of flakes into chippings.

  12. Effect of Fluoride, Casein Phosphopeptide–Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Casein Phosphopeptide–Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Fluoride on Enamel Surface Microhardness After Microabrasion: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazaleh Ahmadi Zenouz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to assess the effect of applying casein phosphopeptide–amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP paste, casein phosphopeptide–amorphous calcium phosphate fluoride (CPP-ACPF paste and sodium fluoride gel on surface microhardness of enamel after microabrasion.Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted human premolars were selected. All samples were subjected to hardness indentations made with the Vickers hardness machine and the average value was recorded as the initial surface microhardness. The specimens were then randomly divided into three groups (n=10 of CPP-ACPF, fluoride and CPP-ACP. The teeth were micro-abraded with Opalustre. Microhardness test was performed to assess the post-abrasion hardness. Three remineralization modalities were performed on samples of each group. The enamel surface microhardness measurements were performed. To compare the difference between groups, the rehardening and softening values were defined. One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc test at a significance level of 5% were used for statistical analysis.Results: The mean microhardness value (MMV had a significant decrease after microabrasion from baseline. The MMV had a significant increase after remineralization in all groups. The MMV of CPP-ACPF group was significantly more than that of fluoride group (P=0.027. The rehardening value of fluoride group was significantly more than that of other groups (P<0.001.Conclusion: All the remineralizing agents were effective for rehardening the enamel after microabrasion. The CPP-ACP and CPP-ACPF pastes are effective, but to a lesser extent than neutral sodium fluoride gel in remineralizing enamel surface. Incorporation of fluoride to CPP-ACP formulation does not provide any additional remineralizing potential.Keywords: Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate nanocomplex; Enamel Microabrasion; Hardness; Sodium Fluoride

  13. Magnesium substitution in the structure of orthopedic nanoparticles: A comparison between amorphous magnesium phosphates, calcium magnesium phosphates, and hydroxyapatites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabiyouni, Maryam, E-mail: maryam.nabiyouni@rockets.utoledo.edu [Department of Bioengineering, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Ren, Yufu [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Bhaduri, Sarit B. [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Department of Surgery (Dentistry), University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2015-07-01

    As biocompatible materials, magnesium phosphates have received a lot of attention for orthopedic applications. During the last decade multiple studies have shown advantages for magnesium phosphate such as lack of cytotoxicity, biocompatibility, strong mechanical properties, and high biodegradability. The present study investigates the role of Mg{sup +2} and Ca{sup +2} ions in the structure of magnesium phosphate and calcium phosphate nanoparticles. To directly compare the effect of Mg{sup +2} and Ca{sup +2} ions on structure of nanoparticles and their biological behavior, three groups of nanoparticles including amorphous magnesium phosphates (AMPs) which release Mg{sup +2}, calcium magnesium phosphates (CMPs) which release Mg{sup +2} and Ca{sup +2}, and hydroxyapatites (HAs) which release Ca{sup +2} were studied. SEM, TEM, XRD, and FTIR were used to evaluate the morphology, crystallinity, and chemical properties of the particles. AMP particles were homogeneous nanospheres, whereas CMPs were combinations of heterogeneous nanorods and nanospheres, and HAs which contained heterogeneous nanosphere particles. Cell compatibility was monitored in all groups to determine the cytotoxicity effect of particles on studied MC3T3-E1 preosteoblasts. AMPs showed significantly higher attachment rate than the HAs after 1 day and both AMPs and CMPs showed significantly higher proliferation rate when compared to HAs after 7 days. Gene expression level of osteoblastic markers ALP, COL I, OCN, OPN, RUNX2 were monitored and they were normalized to GAPDH housekeeping gene. Beta actin expression level was monitored as the second housekeeping gene to confirm the accuracy of results. In general, AMPs and CMPs showed higher expression level of osteoblastic genes after 7 days which can further confirm the stimulating role of Mg{sup +}2 and Ca{sup +2} ions in increasing the proliferation rate, differentiation, and mineralization of MC3T3-E1 preosteoblasts. - Highlights: • Role of Mg{sup 2

  14. Phase composition, mechanical performance and in vitro biocompatibility of hydraulic setting calcium magnesium phosphate cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klammert, Uwe; Reuther, Tobias; Blank, Melanie; Reske, Isabelle; Barralet, Jake E; Grover, Liam M; Kübler, Alexander C; Gbureck, Uwe

    2010-04-01

    Brushite (CaHPO(4) x 2H(2)O)-forming calcium phosphate cements are of great interest as bone replacement materials because they are resorbable in physiological conditions. However, their short setting times and low mechanical strengths limit broad clinical application. In this study, we showed that a significant improvement of these properties of brushite cement could be achieved by the use of magnesium-substituted beta-tricalcium phosphate with the general formula Mg(x)Ca((3-x))((PO(4))(2) with 0 forming newberyite (MgHPO(4) x 3H(2)O) as a second setting product. The biocompatibility of the material was investigated in vitro using the osteoblast-like cell line MC3T3-E1. A considerable increase of cell proliferation and expression of alkaline phosphatase, indicating an osteoblastic differentiation, could be noticed. Scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed an obvious cell growth on the surface of the scaffolds. Analysis of the culture medium showed minor alterations of pH value within the physiological range. The concentrations of free calcium, magnesium and phosphate ions were altered markedly due to the chemical solubility of the scaffolds. We conclude that the calcium magnesium phosphate (newberyite) cements have a promising potential for their use as bone replacement material since they provide a suitable biocompatibility, an extended workability and improved mechanical performance compared with brushite cements. Copyright 2009 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Physicochemical Properties of Calcium Phosphate Based Coating on Gutta-Percha Root Canal Filling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afaf Al-Haddad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental Gutta-percha (GP is a polymer based standard root canal filling material that has been widely used in dentistry. However, it has an inadequate sealing ability and adhesion to root dentin. The aim of this study is to coat GP with a bioactive material to enhance its sealing ability and adhesion to the root sealer and subsequently to the root dentin. The choice of coating method is limited by the nature of GP as it requires a technique that is not governed by high temperatures or uses organic solvents. In this study, biomimetic coating technique using 1.5 Tas-simulated body fluids (SBF was employed to coat the treated GP cones. The coated samples were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray Diffraction (XRD, and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM. The presence of hydroxyl, carbonate, and phosphate groups was detected by FTIR while the formation of hydroxyapatite (HA/calcium phosphate was confirmed with XRD. FESEM revealed uniform, thin, and crystalline HA calcium phosphate coating. The adhesion of the coating to the GP substrate was assessed with microscratch technique. It was viable with cohesive failure mode. In conclusion, Tas-SBF is able to coat pretreated GP cones with a crystalline apatitic calcium phosphate layer.

  16. Synthesis, characterization and cation adsorption of p-aminobenzoic acid intercalated on calcium phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Camila F.N. [Departamento de Química, Universidade Estadual de Maringá, Av. Colombo, 5790, 87020-900 Maringá, PR (Brazil); Lazarin, Angélica M., E-mail: amlazarin2@uem.br [Departamento de Química, Universidade Estadual de Maringá, Av. Colombo, 5790, 87020-900 Maringá, PR (Brazil); Sernaglia, Rosana L.; Andreotti, Elza I.S. [Departamento de Química, Universidade Estadual de Maringá, Av. Colombo, 5790, 87020-900 Maringá, PR (Brazil)

    2012-06-15

    Graphical abstract: Scanning electron microscopy photographs of calcium phosphate (a) and intercalated with p-aminobenzoic acid (b). Highlights: ► Calcium phosphate was intercalated with p-aminobenzoic acid. ► Guest molecule contains nitrogen and oxygen atoms from amine and carboxylic groups. ► These basic centers are potentially useful for cation coordination in ethanol solution. ► Crystal morphology of compounds is lamellar, it agrees with expected structural characteristics. -- Abstract: Crystalline lamellar calcium phosphate retained 4-aminobenzoic acid inside its cavity without leaching. The intense infrared bands in the 1033 and 1010 cm{sup −1} interval confirmed the presence of the phosphonate groups attached to the inorganic layer, with sharp and intense peaks in X-ray diffraction patterns, which gave basal distances of 712 and 1578 pm for the original and the intercalated compounds, respectively. Solid-state {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance spectra presented only one peak for the phosphate groups attached to the main inorganic polymeric structure near −2.4 ppm. The adsorption isotherms from ethanol gave the maximum adsorption capacities of 6.44 and 3.34 mmol g{sup −1} for nickel and cobalt, respectively, which stability constant and distribution coefficient followed Co > Ni.

  17. Macroporous Calcium Phosphate/Chitosan Composites Prepared via Unidirectional Ice Segregation and Subsequent Freeze-Drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Aranaz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate chitosan-based composites have gained much interest in recent years for biomedical purposes. In this paper, three-dimensional calcium phosphate chitosan-based composites with different mineral contents were produced using a green method called ice segregation induced self-assembly (ISISA. In this methodology, ice crystals were used as a template to produce porous structures from an aqueous solution of chitosan (CS and hydroxyapatite (Hap also containing acetic acid (pH = 4.5. For better characterization of the nature of the inorganic matter entrapped within the resulting composite, we performed either oxygen plasma or calcination processes to remove the organic matter. The nature of the phosphate salts was studied by XRD and NMR studies. Amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP was identified as the mineral phase in the composites submitted to oxygen plasma, whereas crystalline Hap was obtained after calcination. SEM microscopy revealed the formation of porous structures (porosity around 80–85% in the original composites, as well as in the inorganic matrices obtained after calcination, with porous channels of up to 50 µm in diameter in the former case and of up to 20 µm in the latter. The biocompatibility of the composites was assessed using two different cell lines: C2C12GFP premyoblastic cells and MC3T3 preosteoblastic cells.

  18. Surface Modification of Zirconia Substrate by Calcium Phosphate Particles Using Sol-Gel Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, So Dam; Um, Sang Cheol; Lee, Jong Kook

    2015-08-01

    Surface modification with a biphasic composition of hydroxyapatite (HA) and tricalcium phosphate (TCP) was performed on a zirconia substrate using a sol-gel method. An initial calcium phosphate sol was prepared by mixing a solution of Ca(NO3)2 · 4H20 and (C2H5O)3P(O), while both porous and dense zirconia were used as substrates. The sol-gel coating was performed using a spin coater. The coated porous zirconia substrate was re-sintered at 1350 °C 2 h, while coated dense zirconia substrate was heat-treated at 750 °C 1 h. The microstructure of the resultant HA/TCP coatings was found to be dependent on the type of zirconia substrate used. With porous zirconia as a starting substrate, numerous isolated calcium phosphate particles (TCP and HA) were uniformly dispersed on the surface, and the particle size and covered area were dependent on the viscosity of the calcium phosphate sol. Conversely, when dense zirconia was used as a starting substrate, a thick film of nano-sized HA particles was obtained after heat treatment, however, substantial agglomeration and cracking was also observed.

  19. Calcium Carbonate versus Sevelamer Hydrochloride as Phosphate Binders after Long-Term Disease Progression in 5/6 Nephrectomized Rats

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    Suvi Törmänen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to compare the effects of calcium carbonate and sevelamer-HCl treatments on calcium-phosphate metabolism and renal function in 5/6 nephrectomized (NX rats so that long-term disease progression preceded the treatment. After 15-week progression, calcium carbonate (3.0%, sevelamer-HCl (3.0%, or control diets (0.3% calcium were given for 9 weeks. Subtotal nephrectomy reduced creatinine clearance (−40%, plasma calcidiol (−25%, and calcitriol (−70% and increased phosphate (+37%, parathyroid hormone (PTH (11-fold, and fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23 (4-fold. In NX rats, calcium carbonate diet increased plasma (+20% and urinary calcium (6-fold, reduced plasma phosphate (−50% and calcidiol (−30%, decreased creatinine clearance (−35% and FGF 23 (−85%, and suppressed PTH without influencing blood pH. In NX rats, sevelamer-HCl increased urinary calcium (4-fold and decreased creatinine clearance (−45%, PTH (−75%, blood pH (by 0.20 units, plasma calcidiol (−40%, and calcitriol (−65%. Plasma phosphate and FGF-23 were unchanged. In conclusion, when initiated after long-term progression of experimental renal insufficiency, calcium carbonate diet reduced plasma phosphate and FGF-23 while sevelamer-HCl did not. The former induced hypercalcemia, the latter induced acidosis, while both treatments reduced vitamin D metabolites and deteriorated renal function. Thus, delayed initiation influences the effects of these phosphate binders in remnant kidney rats.

  20. Structures and infrared spectra of calcium phosphate clusters by ab initio methods with implicit solvation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Jen; Chiu, Cheng-Chau

    2017-12-20

    Since the first detection of pre-nucleation clusters during the formation of calcium phosphate minerals, determining such clusters' compositions and structures has become crucial for understanding the early-stage nucleation of these minerals in solutions. In previous experimental studies, the composition and sizes of pre-nucleation clusters have been calculated, but their structural information has been difficult to determine because they are very small (clusters using ab initio calculations combined with implicit solvation models. Adding solvent effects increased the possibility of the existence of alternative configurations of calcium phosphate clusters other than their compact configurations. The calcium atoms had a tendency to be located outside of the clusters to coordinate with water molecules in the aqueous environment. The computed infrared spectra of extended small calcium phosphate clusters captured some of the features measured in the in situ infrared spectra, which supports the network structures proposed by large-scale molecular dynamics studies and X-ray adsorption near-edge spectra. The relative stabilities of medium-sized Ca9(PO4)6 clusters with respect to the stability of Posner's cluster in water were also reviewed. We found that in water, alternative structures with low symmetry or large dipole moments had lower energies than Posner's cluster.

  1. Synthesis of some calcium phosphate crystals using the useful biomass for immobilization of microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohiruimaki, T, E-mail: kohi@hi-tech.ac.jp [Department of Technology, Hachinohe Institute of Technology, 88-1 Myo-oobiraki, Hachinohe-shi 031-8501 (Japan)

    2011-10-29

    Three sources of biomass generated by primary industry were used as the raw material for the synthesis of calcium phosphate crystals. Phosphoric acid was extracted from burned rice chaff using a 30% nitric acid solution, while scallop shells and gypsum of plasterboard were used as calcium sources. The calcium phosphate crystals were synthesized by a method involving homogeneous precipitation, and the relationship between the composition and shape of the crystals and the pH at the time of the precipitation was investigated. Monetite crystals in a petal form with a diameter ranging from 0.1 to 2 {mu}m were precipitated at pH 2.0, while granular apatite crystals with a mean diameter of 1 {mu}m were precipitated at pH 6.0. We also investigated the ability of the synthesized calcium phosphate crystals to immobilize lactic acid bacteria for practical use in industrial bioreactor. It was determined that monetite crystals with a diameter of 2 {mu}m had the highest ability to fix lactic acid bacteria. The population of lactic acid bacteria was estimated to exceed 1,300 bacteria per crystal surface of 50 {mu}m{sup 2} suggesting that these crystals may be of practical use in industrial fermenters.

  2. Complexation/encapsulation of green tea polyphenols in mixed calcium carbonate and phosphate micro-particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elabbadi, Amal; Jeckelmann, Nicolas; Haefliger, Olivier P; Ouali, Lahoussine

    2011-01-01

    We used a double-jet mixer to encapsulate water-soluble polyphenols, green tea extract (GTE), with calcium-based inorganic materials. The device mixed calcium chloride solutions with a solution of carbonate and phosphate in the presence of a GTE solution, and formed micro-particles which capture the GTE molecules. The micro-particles were analysed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectroscopy to determine the encapsulation yield and loading of the different GTE components. We established correlations between (1) the efficiency of the GTE encapsulation and the composition of the mixed anion solutions and (2) the protonation degree of the ions and the molar ratio of calcium cations and carbonate/phosphate anions. An optimal and reproducible GTE loading of about 40% with an encapsulation yield of 65% was observed for a carbonate/phosphate molar composition of 4 : 1. In addition, our experimental results showed that the process is selective and favours the encapsulation of gallated species which form stronger complexes with calcium cations.

  3. Calcium intercalation into layered fluorinated sodium iron phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipson, Albert L.; Kim, Soojeong; Pan, Baofei; Liao, Chen; Fister, Timothy T.; Ingram, Brian J.

    2017-11-01

    The energy density and cost of battery systems, relative to the current state-of-the art, can be improved by developing alternative chemistries utilizing multivalent working ions such as calcium. Many challenges must be overcome, such as the identification of cathode materials with high energy density and an electrolyte with a wide electrochemical stability window that can plate and strip calcium metal, before market implementation. Herein, the feasibility and cycling performance of Ca2+ intercalation into a desodiated layered Na2FePO4F host is described. This is the first demonstration of Ca2+ intercalation into a polyanionic framework, which implies that other polyanionic framework materials may be active for Ca2+ intercalation. Although substantial effort is expected in order to develop a high energy density cathode material, this study demonstrates the feasibility of Ca2+ intercalation into multiple host structures types, thereby extending opportunities for development of Ca insertion host structures, suggesting such a cathode material can be identified and developed.

  4. An experimental approach to the study of the rheology behaviour of synthetic bone calcium phosphate cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friberg, J.; Fernandez, E.; Sarda, S.; Nilsson, M.; Ginebra, M.P.; Planell, J.A. [Universidad Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering; Martinez, S. [Barcelona Univ. (Spain). Mineralogia i Recursos Minerals

    2001-07-01

    Calcium phosphate cements were developed to fit surgical needs in biomedical fields such as odontology or traumatology. Nowadays, a broad field of new applications have been found for this kind of materials. Drug delivery systems, tissue-engineering scaffolds and osteoporotic bone filling applications are some of the new fields that are being benefited with these materials. Looking at both, commercial and new experimental calcium phosphate cements it is found that {alpha}-tricalcium phosphate is the main reactive powder responsible for the setting and the hardening of the cement. Thus, it is important to know how {alpha}-tricalcium phosphate affects injectability of these cements. The aim of this study was to investigate the rheological behaviour of {alpha}-tricalcium phosphate slurries in order to know how the cement injectability should be modified. Factors such as liquid to powder ratio, particle size of the main reactive powder and the addition of dispersants have been considered. The results showed that viscosity decreased when particle size of reactant was increased and when liquid to powder ratio was increased. It was also found that a minimum of viscosity exists at an optimum value of the weight percentage of dispersant. (orig.)

  5. Investigation into the role of NaOH and calcium ions in the synthesis of calcium phosphate nanoshells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. Yeo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate (CaP nanoshells were prepared using negatively charged liposomes (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate sodium salt (DOPA as a template by base titration synthesis at various concentrations of NaOH and calcium ions. The elemental composition, morphology, particle size, particle size distribution and zeta potential of the products were determined via various characterisation techniques, such as energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, dynamic light scattering (DLS, laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. The best results showed that stable spherical CaP nanoshells with a mean particle size of 197.5 ± 5.8 nm and a zeta potential of -34.5 ± 0.6 mV were successfully formed when 0.100 M sodium hydroxide (NaOH and 0.100 M calcium ions were used. Moreover, an optimal pH of 10.52 and a final Ca/P molar ratio of 0.97 were achieved under these conditions.

  6. Study of calcium phosphate (DCPD electrodeposition process on a Mg-3Al-1Zn magnesium alloy surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Pastorek

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of calcium phosphating process realized on Mg-3Al-1Zn alloy surface after grinding was investigated by electrochemical tests supported by photodocumentation. The electrodeposition treatment was performed by electrochemical method in water solution of Ca(NO32.4H2O, (NH42HPO4 and H2O2. The formation of calcium phosphate was divided into several stages and described using light microscopy. The progress in corrosion protection of created calcium phosphate layer in 0.9% NaCl after particular electrodeposition steps was evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results in the form of Nyquist plots were analyzed using equivalent circuits.

  7. STUDY OF CALCIUM PHOSPHATE (DCPD ELECTRODEPOSITION PROCESS ON THE Mg-3Al-1Zn MAGNESIUM ALLOY SURFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Pastorek

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of calcium phosphating process realized on the Mg-3Al-1Zn alloy surface after grinding was investigated by electrochemical tests supported by photodocumentation. The electrodeposition treatment was performed by electrochemical method in water solution of Ca(NO32.4H2O, (NH42HPO4 and H2O2. The formation of calcium phosphate was divided into several stages and described using light microscopy. The progress in corrosion protection of created calcium phosphate layer in 0.9% NaCl after particular electrodeposition steps was evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results in the form of Nyquist plots were analyzed using equivalent circuits.

  8. The progress of early phase bone healing using porous granules produced from calcium phosphate cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungbluth P

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Bone grafting is a vital component in many surgical procedures to facilitate the repair of bone defects or fusions. Autologous bone has been the gold standard to date in spite of associated donor-site morbidity and the limited amount of available donor bone. The aim of this study was to investigate the progress of bone regeneration and material degradation of calcium phosphate granules (CPG produced from a calcium phosphate self-setting cement powder compared to the use of autologous bone grafting in the treatment of "critical size defects" on load-bearing long bones of minipigs. Methods A critical size defect in the tibial metaphysis of 16 mini-pigs was filled either with autologous cancellous graft or with micro- and macroporous carbonated, apatic calcium phosphate granules (CPG produced from a calcium phosphate self-setting cement powder. After 6 weeks, the specimens were assessed by X-ray and histological evaluation. The amount of new bone formation was analysed histomorphometrically. Results The semi-quantitative analysis of the radiological results showed a complete osseous bridging of the defect in three cases for the autograft group. In the same group five animals showed a beginning, but still incomplete bridging of the defect, whereas in the CPG group just two animals developed this. All other animals of the CPG group showed only a still discontinuous new bone formation. Altogether, radiologically a better osseous bridging was observed in the autograft group compared to the CPG group. Histomorphometrical analysis after six weeks of healing revealed that the area of new bone was significantly greater in the autograft group concerning the central area of the defect zone (p Conclusions Within the limits of the present study it could be demonstrated that autologous cancellous grafts lead to a significantly better bone regeneration compared to the application of calcium phosphate granules (CPG produced from a calcium

  9. Calcium phosphate phase transformation produced by the interaction of the portland cement component of white mineral trioxide aggregate with a phosphate-containing fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Franklin R; Pashley, David H; Rueggeberg, Frederick A; Loushine, Robert J; Weller, R Norman

    2007-11-01

    The bioactivity of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has been attributed to its ability to produce hydroxyapatite in the presence of phosphate-containing fluids. It is known that stoichiometric hydroxyapatites do not exist in biological systems and do not contribute to the osteogenic potential of calcium phosphate-based biomaterials. Because Portland cement is the active ingredient in white MTA, we have characterized the calcium phosphate phases produced when set white Portland cement was immersed in phosphate-buffered saline using pH and turbidity measurements, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, x-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy. An amorphous calcium phosphate phase was initially formed that transformed to an apatite phase, with the latter consisting of calcium-deficient, poorly crystalline, B-type carbonated apatite crystallites. Amorphous calcium phosphate is a key intermediate that precedes biological apatite formation in skeletal calcification. Thus, the clinical manifestations of bioactivity with the use of MTA may at least be partially attributed to the mineralization induction capacity of its Portland cement component.

  10. Identification and quantitive analysis of calcium phosphate microparticles in intestinal tissue by nuclear microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Morilla, Inmaculada [Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: i.gomez-morilla@surrey.ac.uk; Thoree, Vinay [Gastrointestinal Laboratory, Rayne Institute, St. Thomas' Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Powell, Jonathan J. [MRC Human Nutrition Research, Elsie Widdowson Laboratory, Fulbourn Road, Cambridge CB1 9NL (United Kingdom); Kirkby, Karen J. [Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Grime, Geoffrey W. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-15

    Microscopic particles (0.5-2 {mu}m diameter), rich in calcium and phosphorus, are found in the lumen of the mid-distal gut of all mammals investigated, including humans, and these may play a role in immuno-surveillance and immune regulation of antigens from food and symbiotic bacteria that are contained in the gut. Whether these particles can cross in to tissue of the intestinal mucosa is unclear. If so, characterising their morphology and chemical composition is an important task in elucidating their function. The analysis of calcium phosphate in biological tissues has been approached in several ways including optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and, most recently in this work, with nuclear microscopy. In this paper, we describe the use of microPIXE and microRBS to locate these particles and to determine, accurately, the ratio of phosphorus to calcium using the information on sample thickness obtained from RBS to allow the PIXE ratios to be corrected. A commercial sample of hydroxy apatite was used to demonstrate accuracy and precision of the technique. Then, in a pilot study on intestinal tissue of mice, we demonstrated the presence of calcium phosphate microparticles, consistent with confocal microscopy observations, and we identified the average molar P:Ca molar ratio as 1.0. Further work will confirm the exact chemical speciation of these particles and will examine the influence of differing calcium containing diets on the formation of these microparticles.

  11. Morphological evolution of precipitates during transformation of amorphous calcium phosphate into octacalcium phosphate in relation to role of intermediate phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Yuki; Onuma, Kazuo; Kimura, Yuki; Miura, Hitoshi; Tsukamoto, Katsuo

    2011-10-01

    Nucleation of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) and its phase transformation with a decrease in solution pH were investigated at a constant temperature of 32 °C. A solution containing a mixture of CaCl 2 and KH 2PO 4 was prepared (initial pH=7.7), and a drop was sampled at a constant interval to observe the morphological evolution of the precipitates that formed in the solution. A gel-like solution structure formed immediately after mixing and contained a small amount of sea-urchin-like ACP spherulites (3-20 μm in size). These spherulites consisted of 1.5-10-μm-long flexible needles that formed simultaneously with numerous ACP spherical particles. They first transformed into β-tri calcium phosphate-like material (called "pseudo β-TCP") and then into single crystals of octacalcium phosphate (OCP) without dissolution. The flexible needles in the spherulites changed into blade springs, then into flexible plates, and finally into rigid plates during the transformation. The OCP structure appeared in the pseudo β-TCP plates and gradually substituted for the β-TCP structure over time. The macroscopic spherulite morphology of the initial ACP remained unchanged during the phase transformation, suggesting that OCP is a pseudomorph of ACP. This feature was observed only when the ACP spherulites formed in the initial solution. Fiber-like aggregates consisting of β-TCP single crystals nucleated around the ACP spherical particles and grew over time. They survived until the final stage of the reaction, and OCP polycrystals formed in the mixture of β-TCP and ACP spheres. The OCP polycrystals gradually substituted for the ACP spheres without phase transformation of β-TCP into OCP.

  12. Effect of Fluoride, Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Fluoride on Enamel Surface Microhardness After Microabrasion: An in Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi Zenouz, Ghazaleh; Ezoji, Fariba; Enderami, Seyede Anese; Khafri, Soraya

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of applying casein phosphopeptide- amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) paste, casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate fluoride (CPP-ACPF) paste and sodium fluoride gel on surface microhardness of enamel after microabrasion. Thirty freshly extracted human premolars were selected. All samples were subjected to hardness indentations made with the Vickers hardness machine and the average value was recorded as the initial surface microhardness. The specimens were then randomly divided into three groups (n=10) of CPP-ACPF, fluoride and CPPACP. The teeth were micro-abraded with Opalustre. Microhardness test was performed to assess the post-abrasion hardness. Three remineralization modalities were performed on samples of each group. The enamel surface microhardness measurements were performed. To compare the difference between groups, the rehardening and softening values were defined. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test at a significance level of 5% were used for statistical analysis. The mean microhardness value (MMV) had a significant decrease after microabrasion from baseline. The MMV had a significant increase after remineralization in all groups. The MMV of CPP-ACPF group was significantly more than that of fluoride group (P=0.027). The rehardening value of fluoride group was significantly more than that of other groups (Pmicroabrasion. The CPP-ACP and CPP-ACPF pastes are effective, but to a lesser extent than neutral sodium fluoride gel in remineralizing enamel surface. Incorporation of fluoride to CPP-ACP formulation does not provide any additional remineralizing potential.

  13. Manufacturing of calcium phosphate scaffolds by pseudomorphic transformation of gypsum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo Batista, H. de.; Batista Cardoso, M.; Sales Vasconcelos, A.; Vinicius Lia Fook, M.; Rodriguez Barbero, M. A.; Garcia Carrodeguas, R.

    2016-08-01

    Carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHAp) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) have been employed for decades as constituents of scaffolds for bone regeneration because they chemically resemble bone mineral. In this study, the feasibility to manufacture CHAp/β-TCP scaffolds by pseudomorphic transformation of casted blocks of gypsum was investigated. The transformation was carried out by immersing the precursor gypsum block in 1 M (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4}/1.33 M NH{sub 4}OH solution with liquid/solid ratio of 10 mL/g and autoclaving at 120 degree centigrade and 203 kPa (2 atm) for 3 h at least. Neither shape nor dimensions significantly changed during transformation. The composition of scaffolds treated for 3 h was 70 wt.% CHAp and 30 wt.% β-TCP, and their compressive and diametral compressive strengths were 6.5 ± 0.7 and 5.3 ±0.7 MPa, respectively. By increasing the time of treatment to 6 h, the composition of the scaffold enriched in β-TCP (60 wt.% CHAp and 40 wt.% β-TCP) but its compressive and diametral compressive strengths were not significantly affected (6.7 ± 0.9 and 5.4 ± 0.6 MPa, respectively). On the basis of the results obtained, it was concluded that this route is a good approach to the manufacturing of biphasic (CHAp/β-TCP) scaffolds from previously shaped pieces of gypsum. (Author)

  14. Multiple prismatic calcium phosphate layers in the jaws of present-day sharks (Chondrichthyes; Selachii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingerkus, G; Séret, B; Guilbert, E

    1991-01-15

    Jaws of large individuals, over 2 m in total length, of the shark species Carcharodon carcharias (great white shark) and Isurus oxyrinchus (mako shark) of the family Lamnidae, and Galeocerdo cuvieri (tiger shark) and Carcharhinus leucas (bull shark) of the family Carcharhinidae were found to have multiple, up to five, layers of prismatic calcium phosphate surrounding the cartilages. Smaller individuals of these species and other known species of living chondrichthyans have only one layer of prismatic calcium phosphate surrounding the cartilages, as also do most species of fossil chondrichthyans. Two exceptions are the fossil shark genera Xenacanthus and Tamiobatis. Where it is found in living forms, this multiple layered calcification does not appear to be phylogenetic, as it appears to be lacking in other lamnid and carcharhinid genera and species. Rather it appears to be functional, only appearing in larger individuals and species of these two groups, and hence may be necessary to strengthen the jaw cartilages of such individuals for biting.

  15. Investigation on the biomimetic influence of biopolymers on calcium phosphate precipitation-Part 1: Alginate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira de Lima, Daniel; Gomes Aimoli, Cassiano [Faculdade de Engenharia Quimica, Unicamp, CP6066 CEP13083-970, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Beppu, Marisa Masumi, E-mail: beppu@feq.unicamp.br [Faculdade de Engenharia Quimica, Unicamp, CP6066 CEP13083-970, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2009-05-05

    The understanding of how macromocules act in precipitation of inorganic phases is the key knowledge that is needed to establish the foundation to mimic nature and produce materials with high mechanical modulus besides outstanding optical and thermal properties. This study investigated how addition of small amounts of alginate (7-70 ppm), that presents many carboxylic groups, affects phase distribution and morphology of calcium phosphates, obtained through precipitation and further submitted to calcination and sintering. The results lead to the conclusion that alginate action is dynamic, where alginate molecules act as templates to nucleation, and most of the biopolymer remains in solution even when all calcium phosphate has precipitated. However, despite the effect on phase composition being mainly related to the system's kinetics, alginate does present thermodynamic interaction with the precipitates. It is probable that it acts by reducing the free energy of nucleation, as in heterogeneous nucleation processes.

  16. Strong and Biostable Hyaluronic Acid-Calcium Phosphate Nanocomposite Hydrogel via in Situ Precipitation Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seol-Ha; Koh, Young-Hag; Kim, Suk-Wha; Park, Ji-Ung; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Song, Juha

    2016-03-14

    Hyaluronic acid (HAc) hydrogel exhibits excellent biocompatibility, but it has limited biomedical application due to its poor biomechanical properties as well as too-fast enzymatic degradation. In this study, we have developed an in situ precipitation process for the fabrication of a HAc-calcium phosphate nanocomposite hydrogel, after the formation of the glycidyl methacrylate-conjugated HAc (GMHA) hydrogels via photo-cross-linking, to improve the mechanical and biological properties under physiological conditions. In particular, our process facilitates the rapid incorporation of calcium phosphate (CaP) nanoparticles of uniform size and with minimal agglomeration into a polymer matrix, homogeneously. Compared with pure HAc, the nanocomposite hydrogels exhibit improved mechanical behavior. Specifically, the shear modulus is improved by a factor of 4. The biostability of the nanocomposite hydrogel was also significantly improved compared with that of pure HAc hydrogels under both in vitro and in vivo conditions.

  17. Early resorption of an artificial bone graft made of calcium phosphate for cranioplasty: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monaco BA

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Bernardo Assumpção de Monaco, Erich Talamoni Fonoff, Manoel Jacobsen TeixeiraDivision of Functional Neurosurgery, Department of Neurology, Hospital das Clinicas, University of São Paulo Medical School, São Paulo, BrazilAbstract: The treatment of uncomplicated osteoma consists of an en bloc resection, or curettage, of the tumor, followed by cranioplasty. Here, we present a case report of a patient treated for a parietal osteoma, followed by a calcium phosphate cranioplasty, with early resorption after 3 months, which was presented by a sinking flap above the resection area. This case suggests that synthetic cranioplasty should be preferred, even in small skull-gap areas.Keywords: cranioplasty, bone cement, osteoma, calcium phosphate, resorption

  18. Kinetics of phosphate absorption in lactating dairy cows after enteral administration of sodium phosphate or calcium phosphate salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünberg, Walter; Dobbelaar, Paul; Breves, Gerhard

    2013-09-28

    Hypophosphataemia is frequently encountered in dairy cows during early lactation. Although supplementation of P is generally recommended, controversy exists over the suitability of oral P supplementation in animals with decreased or absent rumen motility. Since the effects of transruminal P absorption and the reticular groove reflex on the absorption kinetics of P are not well understood, it is unclear in how far treatment efficacy of oral P supplementation is affected by decreased rumen motility. Phosphate absorption was studied in six phosphate-depleted dairy cows fitted with rumen cannulas and treated with test solutions containing either NaH2PO4 or CaHPO4 with acetaminophen. Each animal was treated orally, intraruminally and intra-abomasally in randomised order. Absorption kinetics of P were studied and compared with the absorption kinetics of acetaminophen, a marker substance only absorbed from the small intestine. Intra-abomasal treatment with NaH2PO4 resulted in the most rapid and highest peaks in plasma inorganic P (Pi) concentration. Oral and intraruminal administration of NaH2PO4 resulted in similar increases in plasma Pi concentration from 4 to 7 h in both groups. Treatment with NaH2PO4 caused more pronounced peaks in plasma Pi concentration compared with CaHPO4. Neither transruminal P absorption nor the reticular groove reflex affected P absorption kinetics as determined by comparing plasma concentration–time curves of P and acetaminophen after administration of 1M-phosphate salt solutions. It is concluded that oral treatment with NaH2PO4 but not CaHPO4 is effective in supplementing P in hypophosphataemic cows with adequate rumen motility. Decreased rumen motility is likely to hamper the efficacy of oral phosphate treatment.

  19. Studies on the mechanisms underlying the transfer of calcium and phosphate from bone to blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brommage, Jr., Robert J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1978-01-01

    The skeleton is recognized as a crucial organ in the minute-to-minute regulation of the blood levels of calcium and phosphate. The fluxes of calcium and phosphate to and from bone greatly exceed the entry and exit of these ions occurring in the intestine and kidneys. Parathyroid hormone, calcitonin, and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-(OH)2D3 are known to influence the transfer of calcium and phosphate from bone to blood. Three mechanisms have been proposed to explain the hormonal control of the calcium and phosphate effluxes from bone. The concept of a bone membrane maintaining a distinct bone extracellular fluid composition has led to the pump and pH gradient theories. An alternate solubilizer theory proposes that bone cells secrete a substance which increases the solubility of the bone mineral. The bone membrane concept was originally proposed to explain the presence of the apparent anomalously high concentrations of potassium in the bone extracellular fluid. However, the available evidence does not allow an unambiguous decision concerning the presence of a bone membrane. Calvarial lactate production was unaltered by 1,25-(OH)2D3 treatment and consequently 1,25-(OH)2D3 does not appear to promote the mobilization of bone mineral through a lactate-mediated pH gradient mechanism. 1,25-(OH)2D3 did increase the solubility of non-vital bone, clearly demonstrating that the solubilizer mechanism is at least partially responsible for the mobilization of bone mineral and the regulation of blood levels of calcium and phosphate. Vitamin D-deficient female rats fed a 0.2% calcium, 0.4% phosphorous diet and supplemented with daily injections of 0.75 pmole of 1,25-(OH)2D3 were shown to be capable of bearing young. When the injections of 1,25-(OH)2D3 were terminated at delivery, the dams and pups showed signs of vitamin D deficiency

  20. Short term tolvaptan increases water intake and effectively decreases urinary calcium oxalate, calcium phosphate, and uric acid supersaturations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Erickson, Stephen B.; Rule, Andrew D.; Enders, Felicity; Lieske, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Many patients cannot effectively increase water intake and urine volume to prevent urinary stones. Tolvaptan, a V2 receptor antagonist, blocks water reabsorption in the collecting duct and should reduce urinary supersaturation (SS) of stone forming solutes, but this has never been proven. Materials and Methods We conducted a double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study in 21 adult calcium urinary stone formers stratified as majority calcium oxalate(CaOx, n=10) or calcium phosphate(CaP, n=11). Patients received tolvaptan 45 mg/day or placebo for 1 week, followed by a washout week and crossover to tolvaptan or placebo for week 3. A 24h urines was collected at the end of weeks 1 and 3. Results Tolvaptan vs. placebo decreased urinary osmolality (204±96 vs 529±213 mOsm/kg, P0.05 for all interactions). Conclusions Tolvaptan increases urine volume and decreases urinary SS in calcium stone formers. Further study is needed to determine if long term use of V2 receptor antagonists results in fewer stone events. PMID:26598423

  1. Effect of different calcium phosphate scaffold ratios on odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AbdulQader, Sarah Talib [School of Dental Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan (Malaysia); Department of Pedodontic and Preventive Dentistry, College of Dentistry, University of Baghdad, Baghdad (Iraq); Kannan, Thirumulu Ponnuraj, E-mail: kannan@usm.my [School of Dental Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan (Malaysia); Human Genome Centre, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan (Malaysia); Rahman, Ismail Ab [School of Dental Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan (Malaysia); Ismail, Hanafi [School of Materials and Minerals Resource Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Penang (Malaysia); Mahmood, Zuliani [School of Dental Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan (Malaysia)

    2015-04-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) scaffolds have been widely and successfully used with osteoblast cells for bone tissue regeneration. However, it is necessary to investigate the effects of these scaffolds on odontoblast cells' proliferation and differentiation for dentin tissue regeneration. In this study, three different hydroxyapatite (HA) to beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) ratios of biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) scaffolds, BCP20, BCP50, and BCP80, with a mean pore size of 300 μm and 65% porosity were prepared from phosphoric acid (H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}) and calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) sintered at 1000 °C for 2 h. The extracts of these scaffolds were assessed with regard to cell viability and differentiation of odontoblasts. The high alkalinity, more calcium, and phosphate ions released that were exhibited by BCP20 decreased the viability of human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) as compared to BCP50 and BCP80. However, the cells cultured with BCP20 extract expressed high alkaline phosphatase activity and high expression level of bone sialoprotein (BSP), dental matrix protein-1 (DMP-1), and dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) genes as compared to that cultured with BCP50 and BCP80 extracts. The results highlighted the effect of different scaffold ratios on the cell microenvironment and demonstrated that BCP20 scaffold can support HDPC differentiation for dentin tissue regeneration. - Highlights: • BCPs of different HA/β-TCP ratios influence cell microenvironment. • BCP20 decreases cell viability of HDPCs as compared to BCP50 and BCP80. • HDPCs cultured with BCP20 express highest ALP activity. • HDPCs cultured with BCP20 up-regulate BSP, DMP-1 and DSPP gene expressions. • BCP20 can support HDPC differentiation for dentin tissue regeneration.

  2. Evaluation of implant calcium-phosphate materials depending on their mineral content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Talashova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biocompatibility of original implant calcium-phosphate materials was evaluated in the experiment on animals. The methods of radiological electron-probe microanalysis (REMA and light and scan electron microscopy (SEM were used. Studied materials had the properties of biodegradation, osteoinduction and osteoconduction at different extent. The materials with the composite maximally close to the the bone tissue had the greatest grade of biocompatibility.

  3. Antiwashout behavior of calcium phosphate cement incorporated with Poly(ethylene glycol)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hablee, S.; Sopyan, I.; Mel, M.; Salleh, H. M.; Rahman, M. M.

    2018-01-01

    The effect of powder-to-liquid ratio and addition of poly(ethylene glycol) on the antiwashout behavior of calcium phosphate cement has been investigated. Calcium hydroxide, Ca(OH)2, and diammonium hydrogen phosphate, (NH4)2HPO4, were used as precursors with distilled water as the solvent in the wet chemical precipitation synthesis of hydroxyapatite powder. Cement paste was prepared by mixing the as-synthesized powder with distilled water at certain ratios, varied at 1.0, 1.3, 1.5 and 1.6. Poly(ethylene glycol) was added into distilled water, varied at 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 wt% using the powder-to-liquid ratio of 1.3. The antiwashout properties of the cement has been investigated by soaking in Ringer’s solution for 3 and 7 days. The evolution of compressive strength of calcium phosphate cement before and after soaking have been determined. After 7 days soaking, the strength of the cement increased by 94.4%, 2.98%, 11.39% and 111.29% for powder-to-liquid ratios 1.0, 1.3, 1.5 and 1.6 respectively. The addition of poly(ethylene glycol) up to 3% shows an increase in strength after 7 days soaking, with 57.75%, 16.4% and 19.97% increase for 1, 2 and 3% poly(ethylene glycol) contents respectively. The calcium phosphate cement produced in this current study shows excellent antiwashout behavior since no cement dissolution happened and the compressive strength of the cement increased with soaking time throughout 7 days soaking in Ringer’s solution.

  4. In Vitro Properties of Orthodontic Adhesives with Fluoride or Amorphous Calcium Phosphate

    OpenAIRE

    Clara Ka Wai Chow; Christine D Wu; Evans, Carla A.

    2011-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the efficacy of orthodontic adhesives with fluoride or amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) in reducing bacterial adhesion and enamel demineralization. Forty human premolars each sectioned buccolingually into three parts were bracketed with control resin (Transbond XT) or adhesives containing ACP (Aegis Ortho) or fluoride (QuickCure). Artificial lesions induced by pH cycling were examined by X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometry (XPS) and polarized light microscopy ...

  5. The decreased of Streptococcus Mutans growth after topical application of phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate paste

    OpenAIRE

    Tika Faradina Araf; Meirina Gartika; Warta Dewi

    2011-01-01

    Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate (CPP-ACP) paste is a topical application substance that consisted of a series of milk derivative peptide as a result of phosphorylation and has an antibacterial activity. The objective of this research was to find out the difference of Streptococcus mutans growth before and after CPP-ACP paste given topically to child's teeth. The method of the research was a quasi-experiment. Research samples were 10 students of MI Al Falah Islamic Boarding S...

  6. Functionalized Calcium Phosphates with Anti-Resorptive, Anti-Angiogenetic and Anti-Bacteric Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Forte, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    This PhD thesis was addressed to study the interaction between calcium phosphates and several functionalizing agents, in order to develop new materials with enhanced biological performance, suitable for biomedical applications in the orthopedic field. The functionalizing molecules taken into consideration include several bisphosphonates, namely risedronate, zoledronate, and alendronate, and a molecule from the large group of flavonoids, quercetin (3, 3’, 4’, 5, 7-pentahydroxy-flavone). Functi...

  7. Biomechanical evaluation of vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty with polymethyl methacrylate or calcium phosphate cement under cyclic loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Mehnert, Ulrich; Claes, Lutz E; Bierschneider, Michael M; Jaksche, Hans; Boszczyk, Bronek M

    2006-12-01

    We developed a new method to simulating in vivo dynamic loading as closely as possible, which allows comparison of kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty, as well as augmentation materials. Special interest was given to calcium phosphate cement, which might fail due to its brittleness. Vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty are, with limitations, 2 promising alternative techniques to augment osteoporotic vertebrae with polymethyl methacrylate or calcium phosphate cements. However, little is known about the fatigue characteristics of the treated vertebrae under cyclic loading. Twenty-four intact, osteoporotic bi-segmental human specimens were divided into 4 groups: (1) vertebroplasty with polymethyl methacrylate, (2) kyphoplasty with polymethyl methacrylate, (3) kyphoplasty with calcium phosphate cement, and (4) untreated control group. After augmentation of the middle vertebrae, all specimens underwent 100,000 cycles of eccentric loading during which the specimen revolved around its longitudinal axis. Pre-loading and post-loading radiographs, and subsidence measurements at different sites of the vertebrae were taken. The overall height was additionally determined every 20,000 cycles in the material testing machine. Finally, the specimens were cryosectioned to examine the cements. Loss of height progressed with strong individual differences in all groups, with an increasing number of load cycles up to median values of 2.8 mm for both augmented groups and 4.2 mm for the nonaugmented group. At the center of the upper endplate, subsidence in kyphoplasty was greater than in vertebroplasty, with little differences with respect to the kind of cement. The cryosections did not show any signs of fatigue in the polymethyl methacrylate, but small cracks were in the calcium phosphate. Vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty seem to be equivalent methods in strengthening osteoporotic vertebrae. However, these results cannot be transferred to the treatment of fractures with these methods. A "physiologic

  8. The Surface Properties of Teeth Treated with Resin Infiltration or Amorphous Calcium Phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-04

    carious teeth . The tenets of this philosophy are to preserve intact tooth structure reducing trauma to the pulp tissue, and to decrease risk for future...non-cavitated lesion and on eliminating the bacterial risk factors through counseling on dietary practices, tooth brushing , and topical application...The Surface Properties of Teeth Treated with Resin Infiltration or Amorphous Calcium Phosphate A THESIS Presented to the Faculty of The

  9. Calcium gluconate in phosphate buffered saline increases gene delivery with adenovirus type 5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko T Ahonen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adenoviruses are attractive vectors for gene therapy because of their stability in vivo and the possibility of production at high titers. Despite exciting preclinical data with various approaches, there are only a few examples of clear efficacy in clinical trials. Effective gene delivery to target cells remains the key variable determining efficacy and thus enhanced transduction methods are important. METHODS/RESULTS: We found that heated serum could enhance adenovirus 5 mediated gene delivery up to twentyfold. A new protein-level interaction was found between fiber knob and serum transthyretin, but this was not responsible for the observed effect. Instead, we found that heating caused the calcium and phosphate present in the serum mix to precipitate, and this was responsible for enhanced gene delivery. This finding could have relevance for designing preclinical experiments with adenoviruses, since calcium and phosphate are present in many solutions. To translate this into an approach potentially testable in patients, we used calcium gluconate in phosphate buffered saline, both of which are clinically approved, to increase adenoviral gene transfer up to 300-fold in vitro. Gene transfer was increased with or without heating and in a manner independent from the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor. In vivo, in mouse studies, gene delivery was increased 2-, 110-, 12- and 13-fold to tumors, lungs, heart and liver and did not result in increased pro-inflammatory cytokine induction. Antitumor efficacy of a replication competent virus was also increased significantly. CONCLUSION: In summary, adenoviral gene transfer and antitumor efficacy can be enhanced by calcium gluconate in phosphate buffered saline.

  10. Efficacy of polyphasic calcium phosphates as a direct pulp capping material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiba, Wakako; Imazato, Satoshi; Takahashi, Yusuke; Yoshioka, Seisuke; Ebisu, Sigeyuki; Nakano, Takayoshi

    2010-10-01

    Polyphasic calcium phosphates (Poly-CaP), a complex of hydroxyapatite (HAp) and soluble calcium phosphates including alpha-tricalcium phosphate and tetracalcium phosphate, demonstrate promoting effects on hard tissue formation by osteoblasts. We hypothesized that a Poly-CaP block with a soluble calcium phosphates phase on one side and an insoluble HAp phase on the other side is useful for vital pulp therapy as it may promote dentin regeneration and provide the surface effective to achieve sealing. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of Poly-CaP as a direct pulp capping material by examining the Ca-release profile, the in vivo ability to induce reparative dentinogenesis, and the bonding of HAp surface with adhesive systems. Poly-CaP prepared by annealing crude HAp disc was immersed in buffer solution at pH 7.4 or 4.0, and the concentration of Ca released was measured until 15 days. The pulp of 9-week-old Wister rat molar was exposed and capped with Poly-CaP or HAp block, and dentin bridge formation and pulpal inflammation was evaluated histopathologically after 2 or 4 weeks. Etch & rinse or self-etching adhesive was bonded to HAp surface, and the interface was observed using SEM. Poly-CaP exhibited continuous release of Ca with significantly greater amount than HAp at both pH conditions (PSteel-Dwass test). Impregnation of resin into etched HAp surface, with production of intimate contact at the bonding interface, was seen for all adhesives. Poly-CaP is a potentially useful material for direct pulp capping with the advantages to promote dentin bridge formation and to provide tight sealing by adhesives. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Formation of calcium phosphates by vapour diffusion in highly concentrated ionic micro-droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iafisco, M. [Alma Mater Studiorum Universita di Bologna, Dipartimento di Chimica ' ' G. Ciamician' ' , Via Selmi 2, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Universita del Piemonte Orientale, Dipartimento di Scienze Mediche, Via Solaroli 4, 28100 Novara (Italy); Delgado-Lopez, J.M.; Gomez-Morales, J.; Hernandez-Hernandez, M.A.; Rodriguez-Ruiz, I. [Laboratorio de Estudios Cristalograficos, IACT CSIC-UGR, Edificio Lopez Neyra, Avenida del Conocimiento, s/n 18100 Armilla (Spain); Roveri, N. [Alma Mater Studiorum Universita di Bologna, Dipartimento di Chimica ' ' G. Ciamician' ' , Via Selmi 2, 40126 Bologna (Italy)

    2011-08-15

    In this work we have used the sitting drop vapour diffusion technique, employing the ''crystallization mushroom '' to analyze the evolution of calcium phosphate crystallization in micro-droplets containing high initial concentrations of Ca{sup 2+} and HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-}. The decomposition of NH{sub 4}HCO{sub 3} solution produces vapours of NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} which diffuse through the droplets containing an aqueous solution of Ca(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2} and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4}. The result is the increase of pH by means of the diffusion of NH{sub 3} gas and the doping of the calcium phosphate with CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} ions by means of the diffusion of CO{sub 2} gas. The pH of the crystallization process is monitored and the precipitates at different times are characterized by XRD, FTIR, TGA, SEM and TEM techniques. The slow increase of pH and the high concentration of Ca{sup 2+} and HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-} in the droplets induce the crystallization of three calcium phosphate phases: dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD, brushite), octacalcium phosphate (OCP) and carbonate-hydroxyapatite (HA). The amount of HA nanocrystals with needle-like morphology and dimensions of about 100 nm, closely resembling the inorganic phase of bones, gradually increases, with the precipitation time up to 7 days, whereas the amount of DCPD, growing along the b axis, increases up to 3 days. Then, DCDP crystals start to hydrolyze yielding OCP nanoribbons and HA nanocrystals. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. An in vitro comparison of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate paste, casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate paste with fluoride and casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate varnish on the inhibition of demineralization and promotion of remineralization of enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prachi Jayesh Thakkar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aims to determine and compare the extent of inhibition of demineralization and promotion of remineralization of permanent molar enamel with and without application of three remineralizing agents. Materials and Methods: Forty extracted permanent molars were randomly divided into two groups 1 and 2, longitudinally sectioned into four and divided into subgroups A, B, C, and D. The sections were coated with nail varnish leaving a window of 3 mm × 3 mm. All sections of Group 1 were treated with their respective subgroup-specific agent: Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP paste for subgroup A, CPP-amorphous calcium phosphate fluoride (ACPF paste for subgroup B, CPP-ACPF varnish for subgroup C and subgroup D served as a control. The sections were then subjected to demineralization for 12 days following which lesional depth was measured under the stereomicroscope. All the sections of Group 2 were subjected to demineralization for 12 days, examined for lesional depth, then treated with their respective subgroup specific agents and immersed in artificial saliva for 7 days. The sections were then examined again under the stereomicroscope to measure the lesional depth. Results: CPP-ACPF varnish caused significant inhibition of demineralization. All three agents showed significant remineralization of previously demineralized lesions. However, CPP-ACPF varnish showed the greatest remineralization, followed by CPP-ACPF paste and then CPP-ACP paste. Conclusion: This study shows that CPP-ACPF varnish is effective in preventing demineralization as well as promoting remineralization of enamel. Thus, it can be used as an effective preventive measure for pediatric patients where compliance with the use of tooth mousse may be questionable.

  13. An in vitro comparison of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate paste, casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate paste with fluoride and casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate varnish on the inhibition of demineralization and promotion of remineralization of enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Prachi Jayesh; Badakar, Chandrashekhar M; Hugar, Shivayogi M; Hallikerimath, Seema; Patel, Punit M; Shah, Parin

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to determine and compare the extent of inhibition of demineralization and promotion of remineralization of permanent molar enamel with and without application of three remineralizing agents. Forty extracted permanent molars were randomly divided into two groups 1 and 2, longitudinally sectioned into four and divided into subgroups A, B, C, and D. The sections were coated with nail varnish leaving a window of 3 mm × 3 mm. All sections of Group 1 were treated with their respective subgroup-specific agent: Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) paste for subgroup A, CPP-amorphous calcium phosphate fluoride (ACPF) paste for subgroup B, CPP-ACPF varnish for subgroup C and subgroup D served as a control. The sections were then subjected to demineralization for 12 days following which lesional depth was measured under the stereomicroscope. All the sections of Group 2 were subjected to demineralization for 12 days, examined for lesional depth, then treated with their respective subgroup specific agents and immersed in artificial saliva for 7 days. The sections were then examined again under the stereomicroscope to measure the lesional depth. CPP-ACPF varnish caused significant inhibition of demineralization. All three agents showed significant remineralization of previously demineralized lesions. However, CPP-ACPF varnish showed the greatest remineralization, followed by CPP-ACPF paste and then CPP-ACP paste. This study shows that CPP-ACPF varnish is effective in preventing demineralization as well as promoting remineralization of enamel. Thus, it can be used as an effective preventive measure for pediatric patients where compliance with the use of tooth mousse may be questionable.

  14. Effect of polymer molecular weight on the bone biological activity of biodegradable polymer/calcium phosphate cement composites.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodde, E.W.H.; Habraken, W.J.E.M.; Mikos, A.G.; Spauwen, P.H.M.; Jansen, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that the addition of biodegradable polymer microparticles to calcium phosphate (CaP) cement improves the cement's degradative behavior without affecting its handling characteristics, especially its injectability and moldability. We investigated the influence of

  15. Adding casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate to sports drinks to eliminate in vitro erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, L; Messer, L B; Reynolds, E C

    2005-01-01

    Enamel erosion can occur with frequent consumption of sports drinks. The purpose of this study was to determine a minimal concentration of casein phosphopeptide-stabilized amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) which when added to a sports drink would eliminate such erosion in vitro. Human enamel specimens were immersed in: (1) the sports drink Powerade; (2) Poweradeplus 4 concentrations of CPP-ACP (0.063%, 0.09%, 0.125%, 0.25%); or (3) double deionized water. Windows of test and control enamel were profiled, and the enamel surface characteristics were examined under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The pH of test solutions increased and the titratable acidity decreased with increasing CPP-ACP concentrations. Erosive step lesions occurred in specimens immersed in Powerade (mean depth=38.70kA +/- 5.60), which were eliminated by the addition of CPP-ACP to Powerade at all test concentrations except 0.063% CPP-ACP. Microscopic surface irregularities on test enamel were observed, apparent as adherent granules or globules. These may represent redeposited mineral phases following mobilization of calcium and phosphate from CPP-ACP. Tasters in a taste panel could not distinguish Powerade from Powerade plus 0.125% CPP-ACP. Adding casein phosphopeptide-stabilized amorphous calcium phosphate to the sports drink Powerade significantly reduced the beverage's erosivity without affecting the product's taste.

  16. 3D printing of composite calcium phosphate and collagen scaffolds for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inzana, Jason A; Olvera, Diana; Fuller, Seth M; Kelly, James P; Graeve, Olivia A; Schwarz, Edward M; Kates, Stephen L; Awad, Hani A

    2014-04-01

    Low temperature 3D printing of calcium phosphate scaffolds holds great promise for fabricating synthetic bone graft substitutes with enhanced performance over traditional techniques. Many design parameters, such as the binder solution properties, have yet to be optimized to ensure maximal biocompatibility and osteoconductivity with sufficient mechanical properties. This study tailored the phosphoric acid-based binder solution concentration to 8.75 wt% to maximize cytocompatibility and mechanical strength, with a supplementation of Tween 80 to improve printing. To further enhance the formulation, collagen was dissolved into the binder solution to fabricate collagen-calcium phosphate composites. Reducing the viscosity and surface tension through a physiologic heat treatment and Tween 80, respectively, enabled reliable thermal inkjet printing of the collagen solutions. Supplementing the binder solution with 1-2 wt% collagen significantly improved maximum flexural strength and cell viability. To assess the bone healing performance, we implanted 3D printed scaffolds into a critically sized murine femoral defect for 9 weeks. The implants were confirmed to be osteoconductive, with new bone growth incorporating the degrading scaffold materials. In conclusion, this study demonstrates optimization of material parameters for 3D printed calcium phosphate scaffolds and enhancement of material properties by volumetric collagen incorporation via inkjet printing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Aptamer-Conjugated Calcium Phosphate Nanoparticles for Reducing Diabetes Risk via Retinol Binding Protein 4 Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabi, Raheleh; Ghourchian, Hedayatollah; Amanlou, Massoud; Pasalar, Parvin

    2017-06-01

    Inhibition of the binding of retinol to its carrier, retinol binding protein 4, is a new strategy for treating type 2 diabetes; for this purpose, we have provided an aptamer-functionalized multishell calcium phosphate nanoparticle. First, calcium phosphate nanoparticles were synthesized and conjugated to the aptamer. The cytotoxicity of nanoparticles releases the process of aptamer from nanoparticles and their inhibition function of binding retinol to retinol binding protein 4. After synthesizing and characterizing the multishell calcium phosphate nanoparticles and observing the noncytotoxicity of conjugate, the optimum time (48 hours) and the pH (7.4) for releasing the aptamer from the nanoparticles was determined. The half-maximum inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) value for inhibition of retinol binding to retinol binding protein 4 was 210 femtomolar (fmol). The results revealed that the aptamer could prevent connection between retinol and retinol binding protein 4 at a very low IC 50 value (210 fmol) compared to other reported inhibitors. It seems that this aptamer could be used as an efficient candidate not only for decreasing the insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes, but also for inhibiting the other retinol binding protein 4-related diseases. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Quantitative solid-state NMR imaging of synthetic calcium phosphate implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, C; Ackerman, J L

    1999-06-01

    It is shown that solid-state phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance imaging can be used to measure quantitatively the mass of hydroxyapatite (HA), a synthetic calcium phosphate used as an orthopedic implant material, in the presence of bone. A three-dimensional projection reconstruction technique was used to produce solid-state images from 998 free induction decays sampled in the presence of a fixed amplitude field gradient whose direction was varied uniformly over the unit sphere. Chemical selection is achieved using T1 contrast, as the synthetic calcium phosphate has a shorter T1 (1.8 sec at 4.7 T) compared with the bone (approximately 15 sec at 4.7 T in vivo, 42 sec ex vivo). Experimental results demonstrating the linear relationship between image intensity and HA density in phantoms containing HA and silicon (IV) oxide, and HA and bone are shown. Chemically pure images of bone mineral and synthetic HA have been computed from images of New Zealand White rabbits acquired in vivo at two different recycle times. The technique can be used to follow noninvasively the resorption and remodeling of calcium phosphate implants in vivo.

  19. Silver-doped calcium phosphate nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and toxic effects toward mammalian and prokaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peetsch, Alexander; Greulich, Christina; Braun, Dieter; Stroetges, Christian; Rehage, Heinz; Siebers, Bettina; Köller, Manfred; Epple, Matthias

    2013-02-01

    Spherical silver-doped calcium phosphate nanoparticles were synthesized in a co-precipitation route from calcium nitrate/silver nitrate and ammonium phosphate in a continuous process and colloidally stabilized by carboxymethyl cellulose. Nanoparticles with 0.39 wt% silver content and a diameter of about 50-60 nm were obtained. The toxic effects toward mammalian and prokaryotic cells were determined by viability tests and determination of the minimal inhibitory and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MIC and MBC). Three mammalian cells lines, i.e. human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) and blood peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMC, monocytes and T-lymphocytes), and two prokaryotic strains, i.e. Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) were used. Silver-doped calcium phosphate nanoparticles and silver acetate showed similar effect toward mammalian and prokaryotic cells with toxic silver concentrations in the range of 1-3 μg mL(-1). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Fabrication of Superhydrophobic Calcium Phosphate Coating on Mg-Zn-Ca alloy and Its Corrosion Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lashuang; Jiang, Yue; Zai, Wei; Li, Guangyu; Liu, Shaocheng; Lian, Jianshe; Jiang, Zhonghao

    2017-11-01

    A novel superhydrophobic calcium phosphate coating was prepared on a magnesium alloy substrate by a highly effective chemical conversion process and subsequent chemical modification. Different methods were employed to characterize the surface morphology and chemical composition as well as measure the wettability of the coating. It was demonstrated that the as-prepared superhydrophobic calcium phosphate coating has a typical three-level hierarchical structure consisted of micro-protrusions, submicro-lumps and nano-grains, conferring excellent superhydrophobicity with a water contact angle of 159°. The electrochemical measurements and appropriate equivalent circuit revealed that the corrosion-resistant performance of the superhydrophobic calcium phosphate coating was significantly improved as compared with that of the substrate, the corrosion potential of the superhydrophobic coating increases from -1.56 to -1.36 V, and its corrosion current density decreases from 1.29 × 10-4 to 1.3 × 10-6 A/cm2. The anti-corrosion mechanism of the superhydrophobic coating was also discussed. It can be indicated that the corrosion inhibitive properties of the coating are in accordance with its hydrophobicity, which is owing to the presence of a protective layer of air trapped in the grooves of the coating surface to isolate the underlying materials from the external environment.

  1. Europium-doped amorphous calcium phosphate porous nanospheres: preparation and application as luminescent drug carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Kui-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Calcium phosphate is the most important inorganic constituent of biological tissues, and synthetic calcium phosphate has been widely used as biomaterials. In this study, a facile method has been developed for the fabrication of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP/polylactide-block-monomethoxy(polyethyleneglycol hybrid nanoparticles and ACP porous nanospheres. Europium-doping is performed to enable photoluminescence (PL function of ACP porous nanospheres. A high specific surface area of the europium-doped ACP (Eu3+:ACP porous nanospheres is achieved (126.7 m2/g. PL properties of Eu3+:ACP porous nanospheres are investigated, and the most intense peak at 612 nm is observed at 5 mol% Eu3+ doping. In vitro cytotoxicity experiments indicate that the as-prepared Eu3+:ACP porous nanospheres are biocompatible. In vitro drug release experiments indicate that the ibuprofen-loaded Eu3+:ACP porous nanospheres show a slow and sustained drug release in simulated body fluid. We have found that the cumulative amount of released drug has a linear relationship with the natural logarithm of release time (ln(t. The Eu3+:ACP porous nanospheres are bioactive, and can transform to hydroxyapatite during drug release. The PL properties of drug-loaded nanocarriers before and after drug release are also investigated.

  2. Physicochemical and Microstructural Characterization of Injectable Load-Bearing Calcium Phosphate Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazen Alshaaer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Injectable load-bearing calcium phosphate scaffolds are synthesized using rod-like mannitol grains as porogen. These degradable injectable strong porous scaffolds, prepared by calcium phosphate cement, could represent a valid solution to achieve adequate porosity requirements while providing adequate support in load-bearing applications. The proposed process for preparing porous injectable scaffolds is as quick and versatile as conventional technologies. Using this method, porous CDHA-based calcium phosphate scaffolds with macropores sizes ranging from 70 to 300 μm, micropores ranging from 5 to 30 μm, and 30% open macroporosity were prepared. The setting time of the prepared scaffolds was 15 minutes. Also their compressive strength and e-modulus, 4.9 MPa and 400 MPa, respectively, were comparable with those of the cancellous bone. Finally, the bioactivity of the scaffolds was confirmed by cell growth with cytoplasmic extensions in the scaffolds in culture, demonstrating that the scaffold has a potential for MSC seeding and growth architecture. This combination of an interconnected macroporous structure with pore size suitable for the promotion of cell seeding and proliferation, plus adequate mechanical features, represents a porous scaffold which is a promising candidate for bone tissue engineering.

  3. The formation of calcium phosphate coatings by pulse laser deposition on the surface of polymeric ferroelectric

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolbasov, E.N. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Avenue, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Lapin, I.N.; Svetlichnyi, V.A. [Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Avenue, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Lenivtseva, Y.D. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Avenue, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Malashicheva, A. [Federal Almazov Medical Research Centre, 2 Akkuratova St., St. Petersburg 197341 (Russian Federation); St. Petersburg State University, 7/9 Universitetskaya nab., St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); ITMO University, Institute of translational Medicine, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Malashichev, Y. [St. Petersburg State University, 7/9 Universitetskaya nab., St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Golovkin, A.S. [Federal Almazov Medical Research Centre, 2 Akkuratova St., St. Petersburg 197341 (Russian Federation); Anissimov, Y.G. [Griffith University, School of Natural Sciences, Engineering Dr., Southport, QLD 4222 (Australia); Tverdokhlebov, S.I., E-mail: tverd@tpu.ru [Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Avenue, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Calcium phosphate coatings were obtained on ferroelectric polymer materials surface by using PLD method. • Obtained coatings have well-developed surface. • Depending on sputtering target composition it is possible to obtain crystalline or amorphous coating. • Formation of coating does not change the crystal structure of the ferroelectric polymer material. - Abstract: This work analyses the properties of calcium phosphate coatings obtained by pulsed laser deposition on the surface of the ferroelectric polymer material. Atomic force and scanning electron microscopy studies demonstrate that, regardless of the type of sputtering target, the calcium phosphate coatings have a multiscale rough surface that is potentially capable of promoting the attachment and proliferation of osteoblasts. This developed surface of the coatings is due to its formation mainly from a liquid phase. The chemical and crystalline composition of the coatings depends on the type of sputtering target used. It was shown that, regardless of the type of sputtering target, the crystalline structure of the ferroelectric polymer material does not change. Cell viability and adhesion studies of mesenchymal stromal cells on the coatings were conducted using flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy. These studies indicated that the produced coatings are non-toxic.

  4. Designing calcium phosphate-based bifunctional nanocapsules with bone-targeting properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khung, Yit-Lung; Bastari, Kelsen; Cho, Xing Ling; Yee, Wu Aik; Loo, Say Chye Joachim, E-mail: joachimloo@ntu.edu.sg [Nanyang Technological University, School of Materials Science and Engineering (Singapore)

    2012-06-15

    Using sodium dodecyl sulphate micelles as template, hollow-cored calcium phosphate nanocapsules were produced. The surfaces of the nanocapsule were subsequently silanised by a polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based silane with an N-hydroxysuccinimide ester end groups which permits for further attachment with bisphosphonates (BP). Characterisations of these nanocapsules were investigated using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy, Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Dynamic Light Scattering. To further validate the bone-targeting potential, dentine discs were incubated with these functionalised nanocapsules. FESEM analysis showed that these surface-modified nanocapsules would bind strongly to dentine surfaces compared to non-functionalised nanocapsules. We envisage that respective components would give this construct a bifunctional attribute, whereby (1) the shell of the calcium phosphate nanocapsule would serve as biocompatible coating aiding in gradual osteoconduction, while (2) surface BP moieties, acting as targeting ligands, would provide the bone-targeting potential of these calcium phosphate nanocapsules.

  5. Biomimetic synthesis of modified calcium phosphate fine powders and their in vitro studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gergulova, R., E-mail: rumigg@yahoo.com; Tepavitcharova, S., E-mail: rumigg@yahoo.com; Rabadjieva, D., E-mail: rumigg@yahoo.com; Sezanova, K., E-mail: rumigg@yahoo.com; Ilieva, R., E-mail: rumigg@yahoo.com [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl. 11, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Alexandrova, R.; Andonova-Lilova, B. [Institute of Experimental Morphology, Pathology and Anthropology with Museum, BAS, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl. 25, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2013-12-16

    Biomimetic approach and subsequent high-temperature treatment were used to synthesize ion modified calcium phosphate fine powders. Thus, using Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) as an ion modifier, a bi-phase mixture of ion modified β-tricalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite (β-TCP + HA) was prepared. The use of SBF electrolyte solution enriched with Mg{sup 2+} or Zn{sup 2+} yielded monophase β-tricalcium phosphate additionally modified with Mg{sup 2+} or Zn{sup 2+} (Mg-β-TCP or Zn-β-TCP). The in vitro behavior of the prepared powders on cell viability and proliferation of murine BALB/c 3T3 fibroblasts and of human Lep 3 cells was studied by MTT test assays and Mosmann method after 72 h incubation. The relative cell viability was calculated.

  6. Free DNA precipitates calcium phosphate apatite crystals in the arterial wall in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coscas, Raphaël; Bensussan, Marie; Jacob, Marie-Paule; Louedec, Liliane; Massy, Ziad; Sadoine, Jeremy; Daudon, Michel; Chaussain, Catherine; Bazin, Dominique; Michel, Jean-Baptiste

    2017-04-01

    The arterial wall calcium score and circulating free DNA levels are now used in clinical practice as biomarkers of cardiovascular risk. Calcium phosphate apatite retention in the arterial wall necessitates precipitation on an anionic platform. Here, we explore the role of tissue-free DNA as such a platform. The first step consisted of histological observation of samples from human and rat calcified arteries. Various stains were used to evaluate colocalization of free DNA with calcified tissue (alizarin red, fluorescent Hoechst, DNA immunostaining and TUNEL assay). Sections were treated by EDTA to reveal calcification background. Secondly, a rat model of vascular calcifications induced by intra-aortic infusions of free DNA and elastase + free DNA was developed. Rat aortas underwent a micro-CT for calcium score calculation at 3 weeks. Rat and human calcifications were qualitatively characterized using μFourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (μFTIR) and Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM). Our histological study shows colocalization of calcified arterial plaques with free DNA. In the intra-aortic infusion model, free DNA was able to penetrate into the arterial wall and induce calcifications whereas no microscopic calcification was seen in control aortas. The calcification score in the elastase + free DNA group was significantly higher than in the control groups. Qualitative evaluation with μFTIR and FE-SEM demonstrated typical calcium phosphate retention in human and rat arterial specimens. This translational study demonstrates that free DNA could be involved in arterial calcification formation by precipitating calcium phosphate apatite crystals in the vessel wall. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. In vitro and in vivo study of commercial calcium phosphate cement HydroSet™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Niall W; Blunn, Gordon; Karpukhina, Natalia; Davis, Graham; de Godoy, Roberta Ferro; Wilson, Rory M; Coathup, Melanie; Onwordi, Lyris; Quak, Wen Yu; Hill, Robert

    2018-01-01

    The commercial calcium phosphate cement, HydroSet™, was investigated in vitro, studying phase formation, compressive strength and setting time, followed by an ovine in vivo study to measure osseointegration, bone apposition and bone-to-graft contact. The X-ray diffraction and 31 P Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS NMR) results showed the initial formation of octacalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite at one hour. Over 7 days the octacalcium phosphate transformed to apatite, which was the only crystalline phase of the cement at 28 days. This apatite phase is thought to be a calcium deficient apatite. In the scanning electron microscopy, histological images of 12-week ovine in vivo results showed a high degree of osseointegration, 92.5%. Compressive strength comparisons between in vitro and in vivo measurements showed a dramatic difference between the in vitro measurements (highest 25.4 MPa) and in vivo (95 MPa), attributed to bone ingrowth into the cement in vivo. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time phase evolution of HydroSet™ and the properties studied in vitro complement the in vivo evaluation of the cement in a publication. The significance of the new finding of initial formation of octacalcium phosphate in this cement is discussed. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 106B: 21-30, 2018. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Novel Chemically-Bonded Phosphate Ceramic Borehole Sealants (Ceramicretes) for Arctic Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirish Patil; Godwin A. Chukwu; Gang Chen; Santanu Khataniar

    2008-12-31

    Novel chemically bonded phosphate ceramic borehole sealant, i.e. Ceramicrete, has many advantages over conventionally used permafrost cement at Alaska North Slope (ANS). However, in normal field practices when Ceramicrete is mixed with water in blenders, it has a chance of being contaminated with leftover Portland cement. In order to identify the effect of Portland cement contamination, recent tests have been conducted at BJ services in Tomball, TX as well as at the University of Alaska Fairbanks with Ceramicrete formulations proposed by the Argonne National Laboratory. The tests conducted at BJ Services with proposed Ceramicrete formulations and Portland cement contamination have shown significant drawbacks which has caused these formulations to be rejected. However, the newly developed Ceramicrete formulation at the University of Alaska Fairbanks has shown positive results with Portland cement contamination as well as without Portland cement contamination for its effective use in oil well cementing operations at ANS.

  9. Elaboration of phosphate ceramics as a safe form for halide salt waste immobilization of `dry` fuel reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlova, A.I.; Petkov, V.I.; Egorkova, O.V.; Kurazhkovskaya, V.S.; Kemenov, D.V. [Nizhny Novgorod State Univ. Chemical Dept., Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Skiba, O.V.

    1997-12-31

    The conception of high level radwaste immobilization from M{sup 1}-containing molten salts and their solid forms into NZP-like structure phosphate ceramics are considered. The crystal-chemical principle on radionuclide incorporation into this structure is described. The prepared NZP ceramics was tested and it was shown that they had stability to action of such factors as temperature (up to 1200-1600degC), pressure (up to 500 MPa), radiation ({gamma}, up to 5{center_dot}10{sup 8} Gy), water solutions (up to 400degC, 60 MPa). Their structure is able to contain alkali elements up to 30-40%. Such monophase phosphate compositions may be formed at process of alkali chloride wastes solidification. The reactions of alkali chlorides, radionuclides, with phosphates are taken up here. (author)

  10. Pulsed electrodeposition for the synthesis of strontium-substituted calcium phosphate coatings with improved dissolution properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drevet, Richard; Benhayoune, Hicham

    2013-10-01

    Strontium-substituted calcium phosphate coatings are synthesized by pulsed electrodeposition on titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) substrates. Experimental conditions of the process are optimized in order to obtain a coating with a 5% atomic substitution of calcium by strontium which corresponds to the best observations on the osteoblast cells activity and on the osteoclast cells proliferation. The physical and chemical characterizations of the obtained coating are carried out by scanning electron microscopy associated to energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) for X-ray microanalysis and the structural characterization of the coating is carried out by X-ray diffraction. The in vitro dissolution/precipitation properties of the coated substrates are investigated by immersion into Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM) from 1h to 14 days. The calcium, phosphorus and strontium concentrations variations in the biological liquid are assessed by Induced Coupled Plasma - Atomic Emission Spectroscopy for each immersion time. The results show that under specific experimental conditions, the electrodeposition process is suitable to synthesize strontium-substituted calcium phosphate coatings. Moreover, the addition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) into the electrolytic solution used in the process allows us to observe a control of the strontium release during the immersion of the prosthetic materials into DMEM. © 2013.

  11. Identification of the hydrate gel phases present in phosphate-modified calcium aluminate binders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavda, Mehul A.; Bernal, Susan A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Apperley, David C. [Solid-State NMR Group, Department of Chemistry, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Kinoshita, Hajime [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Provis, John L., E-mail: j.provis@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-15

    The conversion of hexagonal calcium aluminate hydrates to cubic phases in hydrated calcium aluminate cements (CAC) can involve undesirable porosity changes and loss of strength. Modification of CAC by phosphate addition avoids conversion, by altering the nature of the reaction products, yielding a stable amorphous gel instead of the usual crystalline hydrate products. Here, details of the environments of aluminium and phosphorus in this gel were elucidated using solid-state NMR and complementary techniques. Aluminium is identified in both octahedral and tetrahedral coordination states, and phosphorus is present in hydrous environments with varying, but mostly low, degrees of crosslinking. A {sup 31}P/{sup 27}Al rotational echo adiabatic passage double resonance (REAPDOR) experiment showed the existence of aluminium–phosphorus interactions, confirming the formation of a hydrated calcium aluminophosphate gel as a key component of the binding phase. This resolves previous disagreements in the literature regarding the nature of the disordered products forming in this system.

  12. Incorporation of fast dissolving glucose porogens into an injectable calcium phosphate cement for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brandon T; Santoro, Marco; Grosfeld, Eline C; Shah, Sarita R; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Jansen, John A; Mikos, Antonios G

    2017-03-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) have been extensively investigated as scaffolds in bone tissue engineering in light of their chemical composition closely resembling the mineral component of bone extracellular matrix. Yet, the degradation kinetics of many CPCs is slow compared to de novo bone formation. In order to overcome this shortcoming, the use of porogens within CPCs has been suggested as a potential strategy to increase scaffold porosity and promote surface degradation. This study explored the usage of glucose microparticles (GMPs) as porogens for the introduction of macroporosity within CPCs, and characterized the handling properties and physicochemical characteristics of CPCs containing GMPs. Samples were fabricated with four different weight fractions of GMPs (10, 20, 30, and 40%) and two different size ranges (100-150μm and 150-300μm), and were assayed for porosity, pore size distribution, morphology, and compressive mechanical properties. Samples were further tested for their handling properties - specifically, setting time and cohesiveness. Additionally, these same analyses were conducted on samples exposed to a physiological solution in order to estimate the dissolution kinetics of GMPs and its effect on the properties of the composite. GMPs were efficiently encapsulated and homogeneously dispersed in the resulting composite. Although setting times increased for GMP/CPC formulations compared to control CPC material, increasing the Na 2 HPO 4 concentration in the liquid phase decreased the initial setting time to clinically acceptable values (i.e. introduction of GMPs into CPC resulted in macroporous scaffolds with good handling properties, as well as designer porosity and pore size distribution via selection of the appropriate size/weight fraction of GMPs. The data demonstrate that GMPs are promising porogens for the production of highly tunable porous CPC scaffolds. Calcium phosphate cements have shown great promise for the regeneration of bone

  13. Comparison and preparation of multilayered polylactic acid fabric strengthen calcium phosphate-based bone substitutes for orthopedic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Ko, Chia-Ling; Yang, Jia-Kai; Wu, Hui-Yu; Lin, Jia-Horng

    2016-03-01

    An attempt to maintain the three-dimensional space into restorative sites through the conveniently pack porous fillers are general used strategy. Advancement in the manufacturing protective shells in the scaffolds, which would be filled with brittle ceramic grafts for the development of highly connective pores provides the approach to solve crack problem for generating the tissues. Therefore, multilayered braided and alkalized poly(lactic acid) (PLA) composites with calcium phosphate bone cement (CPC) were synthesized and compared. The PLA/CPC composites were divided into various groups according to a series of heat-treatment temperatures (100-190 °C) and periods (1-3 h) and then characterized. The effects of 24-h immersion on the strength decay resistance of the samples were compared. Results showed that the residual oil capped on the surfaces of alkalized PLA braid was removed, and the structure was unaltered. However, the reduced tensile stress of alkalized PLA braids was due to ester-group formation by hydrolysis. Mechanical test results of PLA/CPC composites showed that the strength significantly increased after heat treatment, except when the heating temperature was higher than the PLA melting point at approximately 160-170 °C. The degree of PLA after recrystallization became higher than that of unheated composites, thereby leading to reduced strength and toughness of the specimen. Braiding fibers of biodegradable PLA reinforced and toughened the structure particularly of the extra-brittle material of thin-sheet CPC after implantation.

  14. Comparison of fluoride uptake into tooth enamel from two fluoride varnishes containing different calcium phosphate sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schemehorn, B R; Wood, G D; McHale, W; Winston, A E

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this in vitro study was to compare two 5% sodium fluoride varnishes, each containing different sources of calcium and phosphate, for their ability to deliver fluoride into treated sound tooth enamel and adjacent, but untreated demineralized enamel. Six sets of 12 bovine enamel cores were mounted in plexiglass rods and the exposed surfaces were polished. Synthetic lesions were formed in the surface of three sets by soaking in thickened, pH 5.0, 1M lactic acid, 50% saturated with calcium hydroxyapatite. A fluoride varnish containing tri-calcium phosphate (TCP) was applied to one set of sound enamel cores, and a second, delivering amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), was applied to another. A third set of sound enamel cores was water-treated. Each treated sound core was paired with an untreated lesioned core, and the pairs were soaked in artificial saliva for 24 hours at 37 degrees C. The treated cores, but not their lesioned counterparts, were initially soaked in 1.0 N KOH saturated with calcium phosphate for 18 hours. Each core was separately etched with 1.0 N perchloric acid for exactly 15 seconds, and fluoride measured by an ion-sensitive electrode after neutralizing with NaOH and buffering in TISAB II. The amount of calcium extracted was also determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry as a measure of etch depth. Fluoride uptake average was 1677 +/- 193 ppm, 455 + 38 ppm, and 44 +/- 5 ppm for the sound enamel cores treated with ACP varnish, TCP varnish, and water treatment, respectively. Fluoride uptake into the demineralized enamel averaged 5567 +/- 460 ppm, 2126 +/-126 ppm, and 49 -/+ 4 ppm for demineralized enamel paired with the sound cores treated with ACP varnish, TCP varnish, and water, respectively. The differences between the ACP varnish, the TCP varnish, and the water treatments were statistically significant (p < 0.05). The ACP varnish formulation delivers statistically significantly more fluoride to both intact and demineralized

  15. Dissolution and storage stability of nanostructured calcium carbonates and phosphates for nutrition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posavec, Lidija; Knijnenburg, Jesper T. N., E-mail: jesper.knijnenburg@alumni.ethz.ch; Hilty, Florentine M. [ETH Zurich, Human Nutrition Laboratory, Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, Department of Health Sciences and Technology (Switzerland); Krumeich, Frank; Pratsinis, Sotiris E. [ETH Zurich, Particle Technology Laboratory, Institute of Process Engineering, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering (Switzerland); Zimmermann, Michael B. [ETH Zurich, Human Nutrition Laboratory, Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, Department of Health Sciences and Technology (Switzerland)

    2016-10-15

    Rapid calcium (Ca) dissolution from nanostructured Ca phosphate and carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) powders may allow them to be absorbed in much higher fraction in humans. Nanosized Ca phosphate and CaCO{sub 3} made by flame-assisted spray pyrolysis were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. As-prepared nanopowders contained both CaCO{sub 3} and CaO, but storing them under ambient conditions over 130 days resulted in a complete transformation into CaCO{sub 3}, with an increase in both crystal and particle sizes. The small particle size could be stabilized against such aging by cation (Mg, Zn, Sr) and anion (P) doping, with P and Mg being most effective. Calcium phosphate nanopowders made at Ca:P ≤ 1.5 were XRD amorphous and contained γ-Ca{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} with increasing hydroxyapatite content at higher Ca:P. Aging of powders with Ca:P = 1.0 and 1.5 for over 500 days gradually increased particle size (but less than for CaCO{sub 3}) without a change in phase composition or crystallinity. In 0.01 M H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} calcium phosphate nanopowders dissolved ≈4 times more Ca than micronsized compounds and about twice more Ca than CaCO{sub 3} nanopowders, confirming that nanosizing and/or amorphous structuring sharply increases Ca powder dissolution. Because higher Ca solubility in vitro generally leads to greater absorption in vivo, these novel FASP-made Ca nanostructured compounds may prove useful for nutrition applications, including supplementation and/or food fortification.

  16. Dissolution and storage stability of nanostructured calcium carbonates and phosphates for nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posavec, Lidija; Knijnenburg, Jesper T. N.; Hilty, Florentine M.; Krumeich, Frank; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.; Zimmermann, Michael B.

    2016-10-01

    Rapid calcium (Ca) dissolution from nanostructured Ca phosphate and carbonate (CaCO3) powders may allow them to be absorbed in much higher fraction in humans. Nanosized Ca phosphate and CaCO3 made by flame-assisted spray pyrolysis were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. As-prepared nanopowders contained both CaCO3 and CaO, but storing them under ambient conditions over 130 days resulted in a complete transformation into CaCO3, with an increase in both crystal and particle sizes. The small particle size could be stabilized against such aging by cation (Mg, Zn, Sr) and anion (P) doping, with P and Mg being most effective. Calcium phosphate nanopowders made at Ca:P ≤ 1.5 were XRD amorphous and contained γ-Ca2P2O7 with increasing hydroxyapatite content at higher Ca:P. Aging of powders with Ca:P = 1.0 and 1.5 for over 500 days gradually increased particle size (but less than for CaCO3) without a change in phase composition or crystallinity. In 0.01 M H3PO4 calcium phosphate nanopowders dissolved ≈4 times more Ca than micronsized compounds and about twice more Ca than CaCO3 nanopowders, confirming that nanosizing and/or amorphous structuring sharply increases Ca powder dissolution. Because higher Ca solubility in vitro generally leads to greater absorption in vivo, these novel FASP-made Ca nanostructured compounds may prove useful for nutrition applications, including supplementation and/or food fortification.

  17. Calcium phosphate flocs and the clarification of sugar cane juice from whole of crop harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, Caroline C D; Moghaddam, Lalehvash; Doherty, William O S

    2015-02-11

    Sugar cane biomass is one of the most viable feedstocks for the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. Therefore, processing the whole of crop (WC) (i.e., stalk and trash, instead of stalk only) will increase the amount of available biomass for this purpose. However, effective clarification of juice expressed from WC for raw sugar manufacture is a major challenge because of the amounts and types of non-sucrose impurities (e.g., polysaccharides, inorganics, proteins, etc.) present. Calcium phosphate flocs are important during sugar cane juice clarification because they are responsible for the removal of impurities. Therefore, to gain a better understanding of the role of calcium phosphate flocs during the juice clarification process, the effects of impurities on the physicochemical properties of calcium phosphate flocs were examined using small-angle laser light scattering technique, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray powder diffraction. Results on synthetic sugar juice solutions showed that the presence of SiO2 and Na(+) ions affected floc size and floc structure. Starch and phosphate ions did not affect the floc structure; however, the former reduced the floc size, whereas the latter increased the floc size. The study revealed that high levels of Na(+) ions would negatively affect the clarification process the most, as they would reduce the amount of suspended particles trapped by the flocs. A complementary study on prepared WC juice using cold and cold/intermediate liming techniques was conducted. The study demonstrated that, in comparison to the one-stage (i.e., conventional) clarification process, a two-stage clarification process using cold liming removed more polysaccharides (≤19%), proteins (≤82%), phosphorus (≤53%), and SiO2 (≤23%) in WC juice but increased Ca(2+) (≤136%) and sulfur (≤200%).

  18. In vitro evaluation of Ag-containing calcium phosphates: Effectiveness of Ag-incorporated β-tricalcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokcekaya, Ozkan; Ueda, Kyosuke; Ogasawara, Kouetsu; Kanetaka, Hiroyasu; Narushima, Takayuki

    2017-06-01

    Development of bioceramics with antibacterial activity and without cytotoxicity would be beneficial for preventing infection associated with implants. This study aimed to capitalize on the antibacterial properties of silver (Ag) incorporated in or coexisting in metallic form with calcium phosphates (CaPs). The in vitro dissolution behavior, antibacterial activity, and cytotoxicity of Ag-containing CaPs with different phase fractions of hydroxyapatite (HA) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) were evaluated. The antibacterial activity of Ag-containing CaPs depended on the main phase of CaP, the chemical state of Ag, and the amount of incorporated Ag. Superior antibacterial activity was obtained from sustained release of Ag ions through continuous dissolution of Ag-incorporated β-TCP compared to that obtained for HA coexisting with metallic Ag particles. Ag-containing CaPs did not exhibit any toxic effect on V79 fibroblasts. Thus, these results demonstrated the effectiveness of Ag-incorporated β-TCP in preventing infection, with respect to long-term applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Electrodialytic removal of fluoride and calcium ions to recover phosphate from fertilizer industry wastewater

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    Arseto Yekti Bagastyo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The fertilizer industry generates wastewater rich in phosphate and fluoride content, with concentration as high as 4540 and 9720 mg L−1, respectively. The untreated wastewater may enhance the growth of algae, promote eutrophication, and create serious effects on environmental health and aquatic life. Therefore, this wastewater has to be treated before releasing into the environment. This study evaluates the performance of a three-compartment electrodialysis reactor to remove fluoride and calcium ions, and recover phosphate present in the wastewater, for possible further use in the fertilizer industry. The experiments were conducted in a batch system at room temperature. A 4 L of wastewater was electrodialysed using three different electrical current (i.e., 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 A and two different membrane surface areas (i.e., 100 and 200 cm2. The highest removal of fluoride ions was up to 260 mg L−1 (2.7% by applying 1 A of current and 100 cm2 membrane area. No substantial increase of fluoride and calcium removal was observed for 200 cm2 membrane area. Interestingly, the amount of the remaining phosphate was high (i.e., only 1% removal, implying a very efficient recovery in the feed. The energy required for fluoride ion transfer was much lower than for phosphate ion, i.e., up to 6 vs. 0.12 mol kWh−1, suggesting that a higher removal of fluoride can possibly be achieved by limiting migration of phosphate ion through the membrane.

  20. Glucose-6-phosphate reduces calcium accumulation in rat brain endoplasmic reticulum

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    Jeffrey Thomas Cole

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain cells expend large amounts of energy sequestering calcium (Ca2+, while loss of Ca2+ compartmentalization leads to cell damage or death. Upon cell entry, glucose is converted to glucose-6-phosphate (G6P, a parent substrate to several metabolic major pathways, including glycolysis. In several tissues, G6P alters the ability of the endoplasmic reticulum to sequester Ca2+. This led to the hypothesis that G6P regulates Ca2+ accumulation by acting as an endogenous ligand for sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA. Whole brain ER microsomes were pooled from adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Using radio-isotopic assays, 45Ca2+ accumulation was quantified following incubation with increasing amounts of G6P, in the presence or absence of thapsigargin, a potent SERCA inhibitor. To qualitatively assess SERCA activity, the simultaneous release of inorganic phosphate (Pi coupled with Ca2+ accumulation was quantified. Addition of G6P significantly and decreased Ca2+ accumulation in a dose-dependent fashion (1-10 mM. The reduction in Ca2+ accumulation was not significantly different that seen with addition of thapsigargin. Addition of glucose-1-phosphate or fructose-6-phosphate, or other glucose metabolic pathway intermediates, had no effect on Ca2+ accumulation. Further, the release of Pi was markedly decreased, indicating G6P-mediated SERCA inhibition as the responsible mechanism for reduced Ca2+ uptake. Simultaneous addition of thapsigargin and G6P did decrease inorganic phosphate in comparison to either treatment alone, which suggests that the two treatments have different mechanisms of action. Therefore, G6P may be a novel, endogenous regulator of SERCA activity. Additionally, pathological conditions observed during disease states that disrupt glucose homeostasis, may be attributable to Ca2+ dystasis caused by altered G6P regulation of SERCA activity

  1. Effect of Fluoride, Casein Phosphopeptide–Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Casein Phosphopeptide–Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Fluoride on Enamel Surface Microhardness After Microabrasion: An in Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi Zenouz, Ghazaleh; Ezoji, Fariba; Khafri, Soraya

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to assess the effect of applying casein phosphopeptide– amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) paste, casein phosphopeptide–amorphous calcium phosphate fluoride (CPP-ACPF) paste and sodium fluoride gel on surface microhardness of enamel after microabrasion. Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted human premolars were selected. All samples were subjected to hardness indentations made with the Vickers hardness machine and the average value was recorded as the initial surface microhardness. The specimens were then randomly divided into three groups (n=10) of CPP-ACPF, fluoride and CPPACP. The teeth were micro-abraded with Opalustre. Microhardness test was performed to assess the post-abrasion hardness. Three remineralization modalities were performed on samples of each group. The enamel surface microhardness measurements were performed. To compare the difference between groups, the rehardening and softening values were defined. One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc test at a significance level of 5% were used for statistical analysis. Results: The mean microhardness value (MMV) had a significant decrease after microabrasion from baseline. The MMV had a significant increase after remineralization in all groups. The MMV of CPP-ACPF group was significantly more than that of fluoride group (P=0.027). The rehardening value of fluoride group was significantly more than that of other groups (Pmicroabrasion. The CPP-ACP and CPP-ACPF pastes are effective, but to a lesser extent than neutral sodium fluoride gel in remineralizing enamel surface. Incorporation of fluoride to CPP-ACP formulation does not provide any additional remineralizing potential. PMID:27252753

  2. Plasma Calcium, Inorganic Phosphate and Magnesium During Hypocalcaemia Induced by a Standardized EDTA Infusion in Cows

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    Enemark JMD

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The intravenous Na2EDTA infusion technique allows effective specific chelation of circulating Ca2+ leading to a progressive hypocalcaemia. Methods previously used were not described in detail and results obtained by monitoring total and free ionic calcium were not comparable due to differences in sampling and analysis. This paper describes a standardized EDTA infusion technique that allowed comparison of the response of calcium, phosphorus and magnesium between 2 groups of experimental cows. The concentration of the Na2EDTA solution was 0.134 mol/l and the flow rate was standardized at 1.2 ml/kg per hour. Involuntary recumbency occurred when ionised calcium dropped to 0.39 – 0.52 mmol/l due to chelation. An initial fast drop of ionized calcium was observed during the first 20 min of infusion followed by a fluctuation leading to a further drop until recumbency. Pre-infusion [Ca2+] between tests does not correlate with the amount of EDTA required to induce involuntary recumbence. Total calcium concentration measured by atomic absorption remained almost constant during the first 100 min of infusion but declined gradually when the infusion was prolonged. The concentration of inorganic phosphate declined gradually in a fluctuating manner until recumbency. Magnesium concentration remained constant during infusion. Such electrolyte responses during infusion were comparable to those in spontaneous milk fever. The standardized infusion technique might be useful in future experimental studies.

  3. Influences of the steam sterilization on the properties of calcium phosphate porous bioceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangfeng; Guo, Bo; Xiao, Yumei; Yuan, Tun; Fan, Yujiang; Zhang, Xingdong

    2016-01-01

    The influences of steam sterilization on the physicochemical properties of calcium phosphate (Ca-P) porous bioceramics, including β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) and hydroxyapatite (HA) are investigated. After being steam sterilized in an autoclave (121 °C for 40 min), the porous bioceramics are dried and characterized. The steam sterilization has no obvious effects on the phase composition, thermal stability, pH value and dissolubility of β-TCP porous bioceramic, but changes its morphology and mechanical strength. Meanwhile, the steam sterilization leads to the significant changes of the morphology, phase composition, pH value and dissolubility of BCP porous bioceramic. The increase of dissolubility and mechanical strength, the decrease of pH value of the immersed solution and partial oriented growth of crystals are also observed in HA porous bioceramic after steam sterilization. These results indicate that the steam sterilization can result in different influences on the physicochemical properties of β-TCP, BCP and HA porous bioceramics, thus the application of the steam sterilization on the three kinds of Ca-P porous bioceramics should be considered carefully based on the above changed properties.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of the aluminium phosphates modified with ammonium, calcium and molybdenum by hydrothermal method

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    Łuczka Kinga

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis and characterization of the aluminum phosphates modified with ammonium, calcium and molybdenum were conducted. The influence of process parameters (reactive pressure and molar ratios in the reaction mixture were studied. The contents of the individual components in the products were in the range of: 10.97–17.31 wt% Al, 2.65–13.32 wt% Ca, 0.70–3.11 wt% Mo, 4.36–8.38 wt% NH3, and 35.12–50.54 wt% P2O5. The materials obtained in the experiments were characterized by various physicochemical parameters. The absorption oil number was in the range from 67 to 89 of oil/100 g of product, the surface area was within the range of 4–76 m2/g, whereas the average particle size of products reached 282–370 nm. The Tafel tests revealed comparable anticorrosive properties of aluminum phosphates modified with ammonium, calcium, molybdenum in comparison with commercial phosphate.

  5. The effect of phosphate binders, calcium and lanthanum carbonate on FGF23 levels in chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, Sagrario; Ojeda, Raquel; Rodríguez, Mencarnación; Almadén, Yolanda; Rodríguez, Mariano; Martín-Malo, Alejandro; Aljama, Pedro

    2013-07-01

    Recent publications show that elevation of FGF23 is independently associated with progression or renal disease, left ventricular hypertrophy and cardiovascular mortality. Dietary restriction of phosphate and phosphate binders are used for control phosphate balance and elevation of serum FGF23 levels. The aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of calcium carbonate vs. lanthanum carbonate in reducing serum FGF23 levels in Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) patients. 32 patients from the Nephrology outpatient clinic with CKD 4 - 5 non-dialysis were included. Patients receive a 4-month treatment period of calcium carbonate or lanthanum carbonate. Patients had normal serum calcium concentration, 25 (OH) levels >30 ng/ml and they were not on VDR activators or cinacalcet. As compared with calcium carbonate, patients on lanthanum carbonate had lower serum levels of FGF23 (226 ± 11 vs. 158 ± 9 pg/ml) and less urinary excretion of phosphate. No significant changes in serum calcium and PTH levels were observed in both groups. In conclusion, in CKD 4 - 5 patients lanthanum carbonate is effective in reducing phosphate load and FGF23 levels; this effect was not observed with calcium carbonate.

  6. Feasibility of a tetracycline-binding method for detecting synovial fluid basic calcium phosphate crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Ann K; Fahey, Mark; Gohr, Claudia; Burner, Todd; Konon, Irina; Daft, Laureen; Mattson, Eric; Hirschmugl, Carol; Ryan, Lawrence M; Simkin, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Basic calcium phosphate (BCP) crystals are common components of osteoarthritis (OA) synovial fluid. Progress in understanding the role of these bioactive particles in clinical OA has been hampered by difficulties in their identification. Tetracyclines stain calcium phosphate mineral in bone. The aim of this study was to investigate whether tetracycline staining might be an additional or alternative method for identifying BCP crystals in synovial fluid. A drop of oxytetracycline was mixed with a drop of fluid containing synthetic or native BCP, calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD), or monosodium urate (MSU) crystals and placed on a microscope slide. Stained and unstained crystals were examined by light microscopy, with and without a portable broad-spectrum ultraviolet (UV) pen light. A small set of characterized synovial fluid samples were compared by staining with alizarin red S and oxytetracycline. Synthetic BCP crystals in synovial fluid were quantified fluorimetrically using oxytetracycline. After oxytetracycline staining, synthetic and native BCP crystals appeared as fluorescent amorphous aggregates under UV light. Oxytetracycline did not stain CPPD or MSU crystals or other particulates. Oxytetracycline staining had fewer false-positive test results than did alizarin red S staining and could provide estimates of the quantities of synthetic BCP crystals in synovial fluid. With further validation, oxytetracycline staining may prove to be a useful adjunct or alternative to currently available methods for identifying BCP crystals in synovial fluid.

  7. Porous bioceramic bead prepared by calcium phosphate with sodium alginate gel and PE powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Y.C. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Ho, M.L.; Wu, S.C. [Department of Physiology, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100, Shih-Chuan 1st Rd, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, H.S. [Faculty of Medicinal and Applied Chemistry, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100, Shih-Chuan 1st Rd, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Wang, C.K. [Faculty of Medicinal and Applied Chemistry, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100, Shih-Chuan 1st Rd, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: ckwang@kmu.edu.tw

    2008-08-01

    The porous calcium phosphate beads were made by an alginate-interacting Ca ions mechanism on addition of a pore-forming polyethylene (PE) powder at 1250 deg. C sintering. The nature of the powders and porous beads were analyzed through X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and heavy metal analysis by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The porous beads size and the pore microstructure characteristics were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Beside, the porosity analysis was evaluated out using an Archimedes' principle and mercury porosimetry. Then, the sodium ampicillin was penetrated/adsorbed onto calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite porous beads, and was subsequently released in PBS. No matter whether the raw material was HAp, TCP or biphase, the Ca{sub 9}(HPO{sub 4})(PO{sub 4}){sub 5}OH phase (CDHA) was formed only after sintering. Porous beads of various calcium phosphates with different sizes (0.9-1.1 mm) and pore size groups (60-120 {mu}m and lower than 10 {mu}m) were appeared. The release kinetics of sodium ampicillin from these porous beads have indicated the possibility of using these materials as possible carriers for drug delivery.

  8. Understanding the Biocompatibility of Sintered Calcium Phosphate with Ratio of [Ca]/[P] = 1.50

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    Feng-Lin Yen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biocompatibility of sintered calcium phosphate pellets with [Ca]/[P] = 1.50 was determined in this study. Calcium pyrophosphate (CPP phase formed on the sintered pellets immersed in a normal saline solution for 14 d at 37∘C. The intensities of hydroxyapatite (HA reflections in the X-ray diffraction (XRD patterns of the pellets were retrieved to as-sintered state. The pellet surface morphology shows that CPP crystallites were clearly present and make an amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP to discriminate against become to the area of slice join together. In addition, the intensities of the CPP reflections in the XRD patterns were the highest when the pellets were immersed for 28 d. When the CPP powders were extracted from the pellets after immersion in the solution for 14 d, the viability of 3T3 cells remained above 90% for culture times from 1 to 4 d. The pellet surface morphology observed using optical microscopy showed that the cells did not adhere to the bottom of the sintered pellets when cultured for 4 d; however, some CPP phase precipitates were formed, as confirmed by XRD. In consequence, the results suggest that the sintered HA powders are good materials for use in biomedical applications because of their good biocompatibility.

  9. Alkali corrosion resistant coatings and ceramic foams having superfine open cell structure and method of processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jr., Jesse J.; Hirschfeld, Deidre A.; Li, Tingkai

    1993-12-07

    Alkali corrosion resistant coatings and ceramic foams having superfine open cell structure are created using sol-gel processes. The processes have particular application in creating calcium magnesium zirconium phosphate, CMZP, coatings and foams.

  10. Sequential Healing at Calcium- versus Calcium Phosphate-Modified Titanium Implant Surfaces: An Experimental Study in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favero, Riccardo; Botticelli, Daniele; Antunes, Antonio A; Martinez Sanchez, Roxanna; Caroprese, Marino; Salata, Luiz A

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to study the sequential healing of bone tissues at implants with different configuration and different modified surfaces. Twelve Beagle dogs were used. Extractions of all teeth from the second premolar to the first molar were performed in both sides of the mandible. After 3 months, full-thickness flaps were elevated and two implants of different systems and with different surfaces were randomly installed in the premolar region in one side of the mandible. One surface was acid etched and further modified with calcium ions (BTI unicCa®), the other was sandblasted and acid etched plus a nanometer calcium phosphate deposition (3i T3®). The flaps were sutured to allow a fully submerged healing. The surgery on the other side of the mandible and the sacrifices were planned in such a way to obtain biopsies representing the healing after 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks (n = 6 per period). After 1 and 2 weeks of healing, the mean values of new bone apposition on the implant surfaces were 5.9 ± 3.3% and 29.8 ± 16.0% at BTI unicCa and 4.6 ± 3.3% and 12.4 ± 5.6% at 3i T3, respectively. After 4 and 8 weeks, the percentage increased, being 49.4 ± 8.1% and 63.6 ± 7.3% at BTI unicCa and 40.3 ± 10.0% and 47.3 ± 20.2 at 3i T3, respectively. Differences statistically significant between the two surfaces were found only at the 2- and 4-week observation periods. Concomitantly, the old bone was resorbed at both surfaces from about 15-17% after 1 week to about 4-6% after 8 weeks of healing. Moderately rough surfaces modified with calcium ions or discrete calcium phosphate nanocrystalline deposition showed similar patterns of sequential healing. Higher new bone percentages were found at BTI unicCa compared with the 3i T3 implants, the difference being statistically significant at 2 and 4 weeks observation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Bioactivity studies and adhesion of human osteoblast (hFOB) on silicon-biphasic calcium phosphate material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, S; Sabudin, S; Sahid, S; Marzuke, M A; Hussin, Z H; Kader Bashah, N S; Jamuna-Thevi, K

    2016-01-01

    Surface reactivity of bioactive ceramics contributes in accelerating bone healing by anchoring osteoblast cells and the connection of the surrounding bone tissues. The presence of silicon (Si) in many biocompatible and bioactive materials has been shown to improve osteoblast cell adhesion, proliferation and bone regeneration due to its role in the mineralisation process around implants. In this study, the effects of Si-biphasic calcium phosphate (Si-BCP) on bioactivity and adhesion of human osteoblast (hFOB) as an in vitro model have been investigated. Si-BCP was synthesised using calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) and phosphoric acid (H3PO4) via wet synthesis technique at Ca/P ratio 1.60 of material precursors. SiO2 at 3 wt% based on total precursors was added into apatite slurry before proceeding with the spray drying process. Apatite powder derived from the spray drying process was pressed into discs with Ø 10 mm. Finally, the discs were sintered at atmospheric condition to obtain biphasic hydroxyapatite (HA) and tricalcium phosphate (TCP) peaks simultaneously and examined by XRD, AFM and SEM for its bioactivity evaluation. In vitro cell viability of L929 fibroblast and adhesion of hFOB cell were investigated via AlamarBlue® (AB) assay and SEM respectively. All results were compared with BCP without Si substitution. Results showed that the presence of Si affected the material's surface and morphology, cell proliferation and cell adhesion. AFM and SEM of Si-BCP revealed a rougher surface compared to BCP. Bioactivity in simulated body fluid (SBF) was characterised by pH, weight gain and apatite mineralisation on the sample surface whereby the changes in surface morphology were evaluated using SEM. Immersion in SBF up to 21 days indicated significant changes in pH, weight gain and apatite formation. Cell viability has demonstrated no cytotoxic effect and denoted that Si-BCP promoted good initial cell adhesion and proliferation. These results suggest that Si

  12. Osteoinduction of biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds in a nude mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miramond, T; Corre, P; Borget, P; Moreau, F; Guicheux, J; Daculsi, G; Weiss, P

    2014-10-01

    Bioceramics combined with isolated stem cells, or with total bone marrow, constitute the main strategies under consideration in the field of bone tissue engineering. In the present preclinical study, two biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds currently on the market, MBCP® and MBCP+®, with different hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate ratio, were implanted ectopically in a nude mouse model. These scaffolds were supplemented either with human mesenchymal stromal cells, or with human total bone marrow, or rat total bone marrow. Biomaterials alone were found to have potentially low, but non-zero, osteoinductive properties, while biomaterials associated with total bone marrow consistently improved osteoinduction in comparison with high concentrations of isolated human stromal cells. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  13. Effect of Mg2+ on acidic calcium phosphate phases grown by electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Matheus Bento; Júnior, José Pedro Gualberto; Macedo, Michelle Cardinale S. S.; Resende, Cristiane Xavier; dos Santos, Euler Araujo

    2017-10-01

    In this work, the effect of Mg2+ ions on the electrodeposition of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), octacalcium phosphate (OCP) and calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) crystals on a commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti) substrate was evaluated. We demonstrated that Mg2+ ions could change the morphology of the coatings by inhibiting the growth rate of the OCP and CDHA crystals and diminishing the crystallite size of DCPD. The inhibition effect on OCP and CDHA was most likely due to a surface adsorption mechanism since no evidence of a doping process was observed using Rietveld refinement and electron diffraction analyses. Conversely, the presence of Mg2+ ions generated a favorable condition for the nucleation of a new Mg2+-rich DCPD crystal population, presenting smaller crystallite sizes.

  14. An in vivo study on bone formation behavior of microporous granular calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmônico, G M L; Franczak, P F; Levandowski, N; Camargo, N H A; Dallabrida, A L; da Costa, B D; Gil, O García; Cambra-Moo, O; Rodríguez, M A; Canillas, M

    2017-06-27

    This study was developed based on in vivo investigation of microporous granular biomaterials based on calcium phosphates, involving matrices of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), hydroxyapatite (HA), biphasic compositions of both phases and a control group. The physicochemical characterization of materials was carried out by X-Ray diffraction (DRX) and mercury porosimetry. Biodegradability, bioactivity and neoformation processes were investigated by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and polarized light conducted on biopsies obtained from in vivo tests for periods of 90 and 180 days. These were performed to evaluate the behavior of granular microporous compositions in relation to bone neoformation. Through the performance obtained from in vivo assays, excellent osseointegration and bone tissue neoformation were observed. The results are encouraging and show that the microporous granular biomaterials of HA, β-TCP and biphasic compositions show similar results with perfect osseointegration. Architectures simulating a bone structure can make the difference between biomaterials for bone tissue replacement and repair.

  15. Injectable Hydrogel Composite Based Gelatin-PEG and Biphasic Calcium Phosphate Nanoparticles for Bone Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van, Thuy Duong; Tran, Ngoc Quyen; Nguyen, Dai Hai; Nguyen, Cuu Khoa; Tran, Dai Lam; Nguyen, Phuong Thi

    2016-05-01

    Gelatin hydrogels have recently attracted much attention for tissue regeneration because of their biocompatibility. In this study, we introduce poly-ethylene glycol (PEG)—grafted gelatin containing tyramine moieties which have been utilized for in situ enzyme-mediated hydrogel preparation. The hydrogel can be used to load nanoparticles of biphasic calcium phosphate, a mixture of hydroxyapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate, and forming injectable bio-composites. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectra indicated that tyramine-functionalized polyethylene glycol-nitrophenyl carbonate ester was conjugated to the gelatin. The hydrogel composite was rapidly formed in situ (within a few seconds) in the presence of horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide. In vitro experiments with bio-mineralization on the hydrogel composite surfaces was well-observed after 2 weeks soaking in simulated body fluid solution. The obtained results indicated that the hydrogel composite could be a potential injectable material for bone regeneration.

  16. Effect of Sr2+AND Mg2+ IONS on electrochemical deposition of calcium phosphates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correia, M.B.; Gualberto Junior, J.P.; Macedo, M.C.S.S.; Resende, C.X.; Santos, E.A. [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), SE (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The incorporation of Sr2+ and Mg2+ ions into apatite favors the mineralization process of the bone, besides it to prevent the osteoporosis. In this work, it was evaluated the individual effect of Sr2+ and Mg2+ ions in the electrochemical deposition process of calcium phosphate on metallic substrate. The electrodeposition was performed using a conventional three- electrode cell. The titanium sheets were immersed in the electrolyte containing Ca(NO3)2 and NH4H2PO4 and a potential of -0. 8 V was applied. The coatings were characterized by SEM and XRD. By XRD analysis was possible to identify octacalcium phosphate in the control sample. However, after the addition of Mg2+ ions the OCP becomes the secondary phase while the brushite showed as majoritary phase. On the other hand, the incorporation of Sr2+ ions stabilized the OCP phase. (author)

  17. Proliferation and differentiation of osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells ons biomimetically and electrolytically deposited calcium phosphate coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; de Boer, Jan; de Groot, K.

    2009-01-01

    Biomimetic and electrolytic deposition are versatile methods to prepare calcium phosphate coatings. In this article, we compared the effects of biomimetically deposited octacalcium phosphate and carbonate apatite coatings as well as electrolytically deposited carbonate apatite coating on the

  18. Ammonium hexafluorosilicate elicits calcium phosphate precipitation and shows continuous dentin tubule occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suge, Toshiyuki; Kawasaki, Akiko; Ishikawa, Kunio; Matsuo, Takashi; Ebisu, Shigeyuki

    2008-02-01

    Diamine silver fluoride [AgF: (NH(3))(2)AgF] has been used clinically in Japan, as it reduces dental caries and dentin hypersensitivity. However, AgF stains the teeth black due to silver precipitation. To overcome this drawback, the authors prepared ammonium hexafluorosilicate [SiF: (NH(4))(2)SiF(6)], which does not stain the teeth, and SiF occluded open dentin tubules completely with silica-calcium phosphate precipitate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the duration of dentin tubule occlusion after SiF treatment in a simulated oral environment. To simulate dentin tubules subject to dentin hypersensitivity, dentin disks were treated with EDTA for 2 min. The disks were treated with 0.476 mol/L SiF for 3 min, and then the disks were immersed in synthetic saliva, which was regularly replenished to maintain its ionic concentration, for up to 7 days. The occluding ability of the dentin tubules was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the hydraulic conductance was measured following Pashley's method at regular intervals. SEM photographs demonstrated that dentin tubules were occluded homogeneously and completely with the precipitate at 7 days after treatment with SiF. In addition, newly formed calcium phosphate precipitate was present at the dentin surface. The dentin permeability showed a consistently low value throughout the experimental period. The values immediately after SiF treatment and 7 days after immersion were 11.9+/-3.7% and 7.9+/-2.9%, respectively. Ammonium hexafluorosilicate is useful for the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity, since ammonium hexafluorosilicate induced calcium phosphate precipitation from the saliva; therefore, it has a continuous effect on dentin tubules occlusion under a simulated oral environment.

  19. CALCIUM, CREATININE AND URINARY PHOSPHATE/CREATININE RATIO CONCENTRATIONS IN NEONATES OF VARIOUS GESTATIONAL AGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Fomina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: specify peculiarities of calcium and phosphates excretion in neonates of various gestational ages and types of feeding in neonatal period. Patients and methods. Calcium-creatinine (Ca/Cr and phosphate-creatinine (P/Cr ratio concentrations were determined in 96 healthy neonates of 38-40 weeks of gestational age and 146 premature infants of 28-37 weeks of gestational age of various types of feeding. Results. The Ca/Cr ratio concentration in healthy term infants in the early neonatal period amounted to 0.9-2.2 (median – 1.8, the P/Cr ratio concentration – 0.8-2.1 (median – 1.6. The Ca/Cr ratio concentration in premature infants (28-37 weeks of gestational age amounted to 0.9-2.4 (median – 1.9, which is comparable to this parameter’s value in term infants. The P/Cr ratio concentration amounted to 0.7-3.1 (median – 2.4, which exceeds this parameter’s value in term infants. The lesser the gestational age and birth weight, the higher the Ca/Cr and P/Cr ratio concentrations. The authors revealed hypercalciuria and hyperphosphaturia in premature infants with a very low body weight fed with specialized formulas. Conclusions. Use of specialized formulas in small premature infants (gestational age < 33 weeks with VLBW results in excessive calcium and phosphates excretion. It is reasonable to monitor their concentrations using a non-invasive and informative method of determining Ca/Cr and P/Cr ratios. Feeding of premature infants with BW > 1,500 g with breast milk only (in case of the mother’s adequate lactation allows avoiding hypercalciuria and hyperphosphaturia and preventing risk of a renal pathology. 

  20. Dental plaque microcosm biofilm behavior on calcium phosphate nanocomposite with quaternary ammonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lei; Weir, Michael D; Zhang, Ke; Wu, Eric J; Xu, Sarah M; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Hockin H K

    2012-08-01

    Half of dental restorations fail in 10 years, with secondary caries as the main reason. Calcium phosphate composites could remineralize tooth lesions. The objectives of this study were to: (1) impart antibacterial activity to a composite with nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP); and (2) investigate the effect of quaternary ammonium dimethacrylate (QADM) on mechanical and dental plaque microcosm biofilm properties for the first time. The NACP and glass particles were filled into a dental resin that contained bis(2-methacryloyloxy-ethyl) dimethyl-ammonium bromide, the QADM. NACP nanocomposites containing 0%, 7%, 14%, and 17.5% of QADM by mass, respectively, were photo-cured. A commercial composite with no antibacterial activity was used as control. Mechanical properties were measured in three-point flexure. A human saliva microcosm model was used to grow biofilms on composites. Live/dead assay, metabolic activity, colony-forming unit (CFU) counts, and lactic acid production of biofilms on the composites were measured. Increasing QADM mass fraction monotonically reduced the biofilm viability, CFU and lactic acid. Biofilms on NACP nanocomposite with 17.5% QADM had metabolic activity that was 30% that on a commercial composite control (p0.1) those of a commercial composite without Ca-PO(4) or antibacterial activity. A dental plaque microcosm model was used to evaluate the novel NACP-QADM nanocomposite. The nanocomposite greatly reduced the biofilm viability, metabolic activity and lactic acid, while its mechanical properties matched those of a commercial composite. NACP-QADM nanocomposite with calcium phosphate fillers, good mechanical properties and a strong antibacterial activity may have potential for anti-biofilm and anti-caries restorations. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of amorphous calcium phosphate and silver nanocomposites on dental plaque microcosm biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lei; Weir, Michael D.; Xu, Hockin H. K.; Antonucci, Joseph M.; Lin, Nancy J.; Lin-Gibson, Sheng; Xu, Sarah M.; Zhou, Xuedong

    2012-01-01

    A dental composite containing amorphous calcium phosphate nanoparticles (NACP) was developed that released calcium (Ca) and phosphate (PO4) ions and possessed acid-neutralization capability. There has been little study on incorporation of antibacterial agents into calcium phosphate composites. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of silver nanoparticle (NAg) mass fraction in NACP nanocomposite on mechanical properties and dental plaque microcosm biofilm for the first time. NACP nanoparticles of 116 nm were synthesized via a spray-drying technique. NAg nanoparticles were synthesized using Ag 2-ethylhexanoate and 2-(tert-butylamino)ethyl methacrylate, yielding NAg of particle size of 2.7 nm that were well-dispersed in the resin. Five NACP nanocomposites were fabricated with NAg mass fractions of 0, 0.028, 0.042, 0.088, and 0.175%, respectively. Mechanical properties of NACP nanocomposites containing 0–0.042% of NAg matched those of a commercial composite without antibacterial activity. Live/dead assay of dental plaque microcosm biofilms showed complete coverage with live bacteria on commercial composite. However, there were increasingly more dead bacteria with higher NAg content in the NACP nanocomposite. Colony-forming unit (CFU) counts for total microorganisms, total Streptococci, and mutans Streptococci for NACP nanocomposite with 0.042% NAg were about 1/4 those of commercial composite. Lactic acid production on NACP nanocomposite with 0.042% NAg was 1/3 that on commercial composite. In conclusion, novel NACP–NAg nanocomposites were developed which possessed good mechanical properties and potent antibacterial properties, with substantially reduced biofilm viability and lactic acid production. Hence, the NACP–NAg nanocomposites are promising for dental restorations with remineralizing and antibacterial capabilities. PMID:22566464

  2. Dental plaque microcosm biofilm behavior on calcium phosphate nanocomposite with quaternary ammonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lei; Weir, Michael D.; Zhang, Ke; Wu, Eric; Xu, Sarah M.; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Half of dental restorations fail in 10 years, with secondary caries as the main reason. Calcium phosphate composites could remineralize tooth lesions. The objectives of this study were to: (1) Impart antibacterial activity to a composite with nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP); and (2) investigate the effect of quaternary ammonium dimethacrylate (QADM) on mechanical and dental plaque microcosm biofilm properties for the first time. Methods The NACP and glass particles were filled into a dental resin that contained bis(2-methacryloyloxy-ethyl) dimethyl-ammonium bromide, the QADM. NACP nanocomposites containing 0%, 7%, 14%, and 17.5% of QADM by mass, respectively, were photo-cured. A commercial composite with no antibacterial activity was used as control. Mechanical properties were measured in three-point flexure. A human saliva microcosm model was used to grow biofilms on composites. Live/dead assay, metabolic activity, colony-forming unit (CFU) counts, and lactic acid production of biofilms on the composites were measured. Results Increasing QADM mass fraction monotonically reduced the biofilm viability, CFU and lactic acid. Biofilms on NACP nanocomposite with 17.5% QADM had metabolic activity that was 30% that on a commercial composite control (p0.1) those of a commercial composite without Ca-PO4 or antibacterial activity. Significance A dental plaque microcosm model was used to evaluate the novel NACP-QADM nanocomposite. The nanocomposite greatly reduced the biofilm viability, metabolic activity and lactic acid, while its mechanical properties matched those of a commercial composite. NACP-QADM nanocomposite with calcium phosphate fillers, good mechanical properties and a strong antibacterial activity may have potential for anti-biofilm and anti-caries restorations. PMID:22578992

  3. Synthesis and characterization of Ag-containing calcium phosphates with various Ca/P ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokcekaya, Ozkan; Ueda, Kyosuke; Narushima, Takayuki; Ergun, Celaletdin

    2015-08-01

    Ag-containing calcium phosphate (CaP) powders were synthesized by a precipitation method using aqueous solutions of calcium nitrate, silver nitrate, and ammonium phosphate. The powders were sintered at temperatures ranging from 1173 to 1473 K. The charged atomic ratios of (Ca+Ag)/P and Ag/(Ca+Ag) in solution were varied from 1.33 to 1.67 and from 0 to 0.30, respectively. The Ag content in the as-precipitated CaP powders increased with the charged Ag/(Ca+Ag) atomic ratio in solution and was lower than the charged Ag/(Ca+Ag) value. The as-precipitated CaP powders consisted of hydroxyapatite (HA) as the main phase. Ag nanoparticles were observed on the as-precipitated HA particles under all conditions of Ag addition. After the sintering, HA, β-TCP (tricalcium phosphate), α-TCP, and β-CPP (calcium pyrophosphate) were mainly detected as CaPs on the basis of the Ca/P atomic ratio of the as-precipitated powders. The addition of Ag stabilized the β-TCP phase, and the distribution of Ag in β-TCP was homogeneous. A metallic Ag phase coexisted with HA. The solubility of Ag in HA was estimated to be 0.0019-0.0061 (Ag/(Ca+Ag)) atomic ratio, which was lower than that in β-TCP (higher than 0.0536) and higher than that of β-CPP (below the detection limit of analyses). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of Ag-containing calcium phosphates with various Ca/P ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokcekaya, Ozkan, E-mail: gokcekaya@dc.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Materials Processing, Tohoku University, 6-6-02 Aza Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan); Ueda, Kyosuke; Narushima, Takayuki [Department of Materials Processing, Tohoku University, 6-6-02 Aza Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan); Ergun, Celaletdin [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Istanbul Technical University, 65 Inonu Street, Gumussuyu, Istanbul 34437 (Turkey)

    2015-08-01

    Ag-containing calcium phosphate (CaP) powders were synthesized by a precipitation method using aqueous solutions of calcium nitrate, silver nitrate, and ammonium phosphate. The powders were sintered at temperatures ranging from 1173 to 1473 K. The charged atomic ratios of (Ca + Ag)/P and Ag/(Ca + Ag) in solution were varied from 1.33 to 1.67 and from 0 to 0.30, respectively. The Ag content in the as-precipitated CaP powders increased with the charged Ag/(Ca + Ag) atomic ratio in solution and was lower than the charged Ag/(Ca + Ag) value. The as-precipitated CaP powders consisted of hydroxyapatite (HA) as the main phase. Ag nanoparticles were observed on the as-precipitated HA particles under all conditions of Ag addition. After the sintering, HA, β-TCP (tricalcium phosphate), α-TCP, and β-CPP (calcium pyrophosphate) were mainly detected as CaPs on the basis of the Ca/P atomic ratio of the as-precipitated powders. The addition of Ag stabilized the β-TCP phase, and the distribution of Ag in β-TCP was homogeneous. A metallic Ag phase coexisted with HA. The solubility of Ag in HA was estimated to be 0.0019–0.0061 (Ag/(Ca + Ag)) atomic ratio, which was lower than that in β-TCP (higher than 0.0536) and higher than that of β-CPP (below the detection limit of analyses). - Highlights: • The HA powders with Ag nanoparticles were synthesized by a precipitation method. • Metallic Ag particles were detected with the HA phase after sintering. • The distribution of Ag in β-TCP was homogeneous after sintering. • The addition of Ag stabilized the β-ΤCP phase. • β-TCP exhibited higher solubility of Ag than HA and β-CPP.

  5. Effect of polydopamine on the biomimetic mineralization of mussel-inspired calcium phosphate cement in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zongguang [Key Lab of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Qu, Shuxin, E-mail: qushuxin@swjtu.edu.cn [Key Lab of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Zheng, Xiaotong; Xiong, Xiong [Key Lab of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Fu, Rong; Tang, Kuangyun; Zhong, Zhendong [Department of Plastic Surgery, Academy of Medical Sciences and Sichuan Provincial People' s Hospital, Chengdu 610041 (China); Weng, Jie [Key Lab of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2014-11-01

    Inspired by the excellent adhesive property of mussel adhesive protein, we added polydopamine (PDA) to calcium phosphate cement (PDA–CPC) to enhance its compressive strength previously. The mineralization and mechanism on PDA–CPC were investigated by soaking it in simulated body fluid in this study. The results indicated that PDA promoted the conversion of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate and α-tricalcium phosphate to hydroxyapatite (HA) in the early stage but inhibited this conversion subsequently. PDA promoted the rapid mineralization on PDA–CPC to form a layer of nanoscale calcium phosphate (CaP) whereas there was no CaP formation on the control-CPC after 1 d of soaking. This layer of nanoscale CaP was similar to that of natural bone, which was always observed during soaking. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that the peak of C=O of PDA existed in the newly formed CaP on PDA–CPC, indicating the co-precipitation of CaP with PDA. Furthermore, the newly formed CaP on PDA–CPC was HA confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, which the newly formed HA was in association with PDA. Therefore, PDA increased the capacity of mineralization of CPC and induced the formation of nanoscale bone-like apatite on PDA–CPC. Thus, this provides the feasible route for surface modification on CPC. - Highlights: • Effect of polydopamine (PDA) on the in vitro mineralization of PDA-CPC was studied. • PDA promoted the rapid mineralization on PDA-CPC to form a nanoscale HA layer. • The precipitation of the nanoscale HA layer on PDA-CPC accompanied with PDA. • Polydopamine induced mineralization is feasible for surface modification of CaP.

  6. Studies on the toxicities of aluminium hydroxide and calcium phosphate as immunological adjuvants for vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, N; Kato, H; Maeyama, J; Eto, K; Yoshihara, S

    1993-01-01

    Aluminium hydroxide (Al) and calcium phosphate (Ca) have been used for many years as immunological adjuvants for biologicals. We investigated the toxic effects of both adjuvants with different physical properties. Al-gel elicited vascular permeability-increasing and toxic effects to macrophages (M phi), while its haemolytic effect was weak. Ca-gel elicited a significantly stronger haemolytic effect, but no other toxic effect. Incubation of M phi or polymorphonuclear leucocytes with Al-suspension resulted in the largest release of lactate dehydrogenase. Ca-suspension caused haemolysis of about 50% of that caused by Ca-gel.

  7. Postextraction socket grafting using calcium phosphate cement and platelet rich fibrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihal Devkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This clinical case report describes and demonstrates the successful use of calcium phosphate cement (CPC in conjunction with platelet-rich fibrin (PRF for postextraction socket grafting in maxillary right first premolar area. CPC can be molded to form a scaffold. It has been used previously for regeneration in intrabony defects, but very few clinical studies in humans have reported its use for socket grafting. In this report, we have presented a novel use of CPC in conjunction with PRF for ridge preservation after tooth extraction.

  8. Ionic liquid-assisted formation of cellulose/calcium phosphate hybrid materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Salama

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose/calcium phosphate hybrid materials were synthesized via an ionic liquid-assisted route. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis show that, depending on the reaction conditions, cellulose/hydroxyapatite, cellulose/chlorapatite, or cellulose/monetite composites form. Preliminary studies with MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts show that the cells proliferate on the hybrid materials suggesting that the ionic liquid-based process yields materials that are potentially useful as scaffolds for regenerative therapies.

  9. Ionic liquid-assisted formation of cellulose/calcium phosphate hybrid materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Ahmed; Neumann, Mike; Günter, Christina; Taubert, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Cellulose/calcium phosphate hybrid materials were synthesized via an ionic liquid-assisted route. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis show that, depending on the reaction conditions, cellulose/hydroxyapatite, cellulose/chlorapatite, or cellulose/monetite composites form. Preliminary studies with MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts show that the cells proliferate on the hybrid materials suggesting that the ionic liquid-based process yields materials that are potentially useful as scaffolds for regenerative therapies.

  10. Influence of the use of phosphate binders on serum levels of calcium phosphate in patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing hemodialysis: A retrospective and prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiani Agus, Lusi; Effendi, Imam; Abdillah, Syamsudin

    2014-09-01

    Hypercalcemia-hyperphosphatemia is an unavoidable consequence of end-stage chronic kidney disease and common in hemodialytic patients. Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) is one type of phosphate binder used widely and prescribed in patients undergoing hemodialysis, aiming to control the levels of calcium and phosphate. These drugs are most effective if taken with meals. This study aimed to evaluate the use of phosphate binders in hemodialysis patients and the factors that influence the success of phosphate binder therapy by experimental studies with retrospective data collection through the medical records and prospectively through the questionnaire and interviews with patients. The research was conducted in the Unit Hemodialysis building floor 8 of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta. The data were collected in a retrospective way for two months (January-February 2013) and a prospective study in March-April 2013. Patients included were stage 5 chronic kidney disease patients who underwent hemodialysis in hemodialysis ward of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital. Patients who had data of serum levels at the beginning of the use of calcium phosphate and the final data in 2013 got the phosphate binder therapy. Ninety six patients with stage 5 chronic kidney disease who underwent hemodialysis had been using phosphate binder for 3 years in average. Patient evaluation showed that hypocalcemia was obtained in 23%; normokalemia in 42.7% and hypercalcemia in 34.3%. While the percentage of patients with hipofosfatemia14, 6%, normofosfatemia 32.3% and 53.1% hyperphosphatemia. Results obtained by the prospective analysis of factors that affect the success of the use of phosphate binder therapy are related to how the routine use of phosphate binders is made by the patient. Chi square test showed a significance of 0.000 (p binders. Monitoring of serum levels of calcium phosphate in patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing hemodialysis should be performed every month. Education and the

  11. Alendronate-Eluting Biphasic Calcium Phosphate (BCP) Scaffolds Stimulate Osteogenic Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Eun; Lee, Deok-Won; Kang, Eun Young; Jeong, Won Jae; Lee, Boram; Jeong, Myeong Seon; Kim, Hak Jun; Park, Kyeongsoon; Song, Hae-Ryong

    2015-01-01

    Biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) scaffolds have been widely used in orthopedic and dental fields as osteoconductive bone substitutes. However, BCP scaffolds are not satisfactory for the stimulation of osteogenic differentiation and maturation. To enhance osteogenic differentiation, we prepared alendronate- (ALN-) eluting BCP scaffolds. The coating of ALN on BCP scaffolds was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). An in vitro release study showed that release of ALN from ALN-eluting BCP scaffolds was sustained for up to 28 days. In vitro results revealed that MG-63 cells grown on ALN-eluting BCP scaffolds exhibited increased ALP activity and calcium deposition and upregulated gene expression of Runx2, ALP, OCN, and OPN compared with the BCP scaffold alone. Therefore, this study suggests that ALN-eluting BCP scaffolds have the potential to effectively stimulate osteogenic differentiation. PMID:26221587

  12. Alendronate-Eluting Biphasic Calcium Phosphate (BCP Scaffolds Stimulate Osteogenic Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Eun Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP scaffolds have been widely used in orthopedic and dental fields as osteoconductive bone substitutes. However, BCP scaffolds are not satisfactory for the stimulation of osteogenic differentiation and maturation. To enhance osteogenic differentiation, we prepared alendronate- (ALN- eluting BCP scaffolds. The coating of ALN on BCP scaffolds was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS, and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR. An in vitro release study showed that release of ALN from ALN-eluting BCP scaffolds was sustained for up to 28 days. In vitro results revealed that MG-63 cells grown on ALN-eluting BCP scaffolds exhibited increased ALP activity and calcium deposition and upregulated gene expression of Runx2, ALP, OCN, and OPN compared with the BCP scaffold alone. Therefore, this study suggests that ALN-eluting BCP scaffolds have the potential to effectively stimulate osteogenic differentiation.

  13. In vitro properties of orthodontic adhesives with fluoride or amorphous calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Clara Ka Wai; Wu, Christine D; Evans, Carla A

    2011-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the efficacy of orthodontic adhesives with fluoride or amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) in reducing bacterial adhesion and enamel demineralization. Forty human premolars each sectioned buccolingually into three parts were bracketed with control resin (Transbond XT) or adhesives containing ACP (Aegis Ortho) or fluoride (QuickCure). Artificial lesions induced by pH cycling were examined by X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometry (XPS) and polarized light microscopy (PLM). After 28 days, Aegis Ortho demonstrated the lowest calcium and phosphorous content by XPS analysis. After 42 days, reductions in lesion depth areas were 23.6% for Quick Cure and 20.3% for Aegis Ortho (P sucrose, adhesion of Streptococcus mutans to Aegis Ortho and Quick Cure was reduced by 41.8% and 37.7% (P < 0.05) as compared to Transbond XT. Composites containing ACP or fluoride reduced bacterial adherence and lesion formation as compared to a composite without ACP or fluoride.

  14. Biomimetic calcium phosphate coatings on Ti6Al4V: a crystal growth study of octacalcium phosphate and inhibition by Mg2+ and HCO3−

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrère, F.; Layrolle, P.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Groot, K.

    1999-01-01

    The biomimetic approach for coating metal implants allows the deposition of new calcium phosphate (Ca-P) phases. Films elaborated at physiological conditions might have structures closer to bone mineral than hydroxyl-apatite (HA) plasma-sprayed coatings. In this study, different Ca-P coatings have

  15. Simple additive manufacturing of an osteoconductive ceramic using suspension melt extrusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slots, Casper; Bonde Jensen, Martin; Ditzel, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    /calcium phosphate suspension melt for simple additive manufacturing of ceramic tricalcium phosphate implants. METHODS: A wide variety of non-aqueous liquids were tested to determine the formulation of a storable 3D printable tricalcium phosphate suspension ink, and only fatty acid-based inks were found to work...

  16. Structural, morphological and surface characteristics of two types of octacalcium phosphate-derived fluoride-containing apatitic calcium phosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiwaku, Y; Anada, T; Yamazaki, H; Honda, Y; Morimoto, S; Sasaki, K; Suzuki, O

    2012-12-01

    Octacalcium phosphate (OCP) has been reported to stimulate bone regeneration during hydrolysis into hydroxyapatite (HA). The present study was designed to characterize structural, morphological and surface properties of fluoride-containing apatitic calcium phosphates (CaP) obtained through OCP hydrolysis or direct precipitation of OCP in the presence of 12-230ppm of fluoride (F). The products were characterized by chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) as well as measurements of surface area, solubility, osteoblastic activities and bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption. XRD analysis re-confirmed that both preparations yielded more apatitic CaP with a higher concentration of F. However, the co-precipitated products (CF-CaP) maintained the properties of OCP, in particular the solubility, whereas the hydrolysis products (HF-CaP) had the characteristics of fluoridated apatite. The crystals of plate-like OCP were changed to the crystals of rod-like CF-CaP and small irregular HF-CaP with the advance of the hydrolysis. The SAED analysis detected both OCP and apatite crystals even in the most hydrolyzed CF-CaP. Mouse bone marrow stromal ST-2 cells grew better on CF-CaP compared with HF-CaP. BSA adsorption was inhibited on HF-CaP more than on CF-CaP. These results show that OCP produces physicochemically distinct apatitic fluoridated CaP during hydrolysis, regarding the structure, the crystal morphology and the protein adsorption, depending on the fluoride introduction route, which provides biologically interesting material. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Processing of an apatite-mullite glass-ceramic and an hydroxyapatite/phosphate glass composite by selective laser sintering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorrison, J C; Dalgarno, K W; Wood, D J

    2005-08-01

    The work presented details the results of an investigation into the feasibility of using Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) to directly produce customised bioceramic implants. The materials used were bioactive in nature and included a glass-ceramic and a combination of hydroxyapatite and phosphate glass. The glass-ceramic was selected from the range of apatite-mullite materials in the SiO2.Al2O3.CaO.CaF2.P2O5 series, due to their potentially suitable biological and mechanical properties. The hydroxyapatite and phosphate glass combination was chosen to allow an alternative production approach to be investigated. The viability of using both these materials with the SLS process was assessed and the process route and resulting material properties characterised using a variety of techniques including Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The results obtained indicate that it was possible to produce multiple layer components from both materials using the SLS process. The glass-ceramic materials could only be processed at very low scan speeds and powers, yielding relatively brittle components. It was though possible to produce parts from the hydroxyapatite and phosphate glass combination across a much wider range of parameters, producing parts which had a greater potential for possible implant production.

  18. Elucidating the individual effects of calcium and phosphate ions on hMSCs by using composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danoux, Charlène B S S; Bassett, David C; Othman, Ziryan; Rodrigues, Ana I; Reis, Rui L; Barralet, Jake E; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Habibovic, Pamela

    2015-04-01

    The biological performance of bone graft substitutes based on calcium phosphate bioceramics is dependent on a number of properties including chemical composition, porosity and surface micro- and nanoscale structure. However, in contemporary bioceramics these properties are interlinked, therefore making it difficult to investigate the individual effects of each property on cell behavior. In this study we have attempted to investigate the effects of calcium and inorganic phosphate ions independent from one another by preparing composite materials with polylactic acid (PLA) as a polymeric matrix and calcium carbonate or sodium phosphate salts as fillers. Clinically relevant bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) were cultured on these composites and proliferation, osteogenic differentiation and ECM mineralization were investigated with time and were compared to plain PLA control particles. In parallel, cells were also cultured on conventional cell culture plates in media supplemented with calcium or inorganic phosphate to study the effect of these ions independent of the 3D environment created by the particles. Calcium was shown to increase proliferation of cells, whereas both calcium and phosphate positively affected alkaline phosphatase enzyme production. QPCR analysis revealed positive effects of calcium and of inorganic phosphate on the expression of osteogenic markers, in particular bone morphogenetic protein-2 and osteopontin. Higher levels of mineralization were also observed upon exposure to either ion. Effects were similar for cells cultured on composite materials and those cultured in supplemented media, although ion concentrations in the composite cultures were lower. The approach presented here may be a valuable tool for studying the individual effects of a variety of soluble compounds, including bioinorganics, without interference from other material properties. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  19. A biomimetic strategy to form calcium phosphate crystals on type I collagen substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Zhang [Department of Restorative Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, National University of Singapore, 5 Lower Kent Ridge Road 119074, Singapore (Singapore); Neoh, Koon Gee [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, Kent Ridge 119260, Singapore (Singapore); Kishen, Anil, E-mail: anil.kishen@utoronto.ca [Discipline of Endodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, 124 Edward Street, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2010-07-20

    Objective: The aim of this study is to induce mineralization of collagen by introducing phosphate groups onto type I collagen from eggshell membrane (ESM) by treating with sodium trimetaphosphate (STMP). This strategy is based on the hypothesis that phosphate groups introduced on collagen can mimic the nucleating role of phosphorylated non-collagenous proteins bound to collagen for inducing mineralization in natural hard tissue. Method: The collagen membrane was phosphorylated by treating it with a solution of STMP and saturated calcium hydroxide. The phosphorylated collagen was subsequently exposed to a mineralization solution and the pattern of mineralization on the surface of phosphorylated collagen substrate was analyzed. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field emission electron microscopy (FESEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and microhardness test were used to characterize the collagen substrate and the pattern of minerals formed on the collagen surface. Results: The FTIR and EDX results indicated that the phosphate groups were incorporated onto the collagen surface by treatment with STMP. During the mineralization process, the plate-like mineral, octacalcium phosphate (OCP), which was initially formed on the surface of ESM, was later transformed into needle-like hydroxyapatite (HAP) as indicated by the SEM, FESEM, EDX and XRD findings. The microhardness test displayed significant increase in the Knoop hardness number of the mineralized collagen. Conclusions: Phosphate groups can be introduced onto type I collagen surface by treating it with STMP and such phosphorylated collagen can induce the mineralization of type I collagen.

  20. Ageing of a phosphate ceramic used to immobilize chloride contaminated actinide waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metcalfe, B.L. [Materials Science Research Division, AWE plc, Aldermaston, Reading (United Kingdom)], E-mail: brian.metcalfe@awe.co.uk; Donald, I.W.; Fong, S.K.; Gerrard, L.A. [Materials Science Research Division, AWE plc, Aldermaston, Reading (United Kingdom); Strachan, D.M.; Scheele, R.D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratories, Richland, WA (United States)

    2009-03-31

    A process for the immobilization of intermediate level waste containing a significant quantity of chloride using Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} as the host material has been developed. Waste ions are incorporated into two phosphate-based phases, chlorapatite [Ca{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}Cl] and spodiosite [Ca{sub 2}(PO{sub 4})Cl]. Non-active trials performed using Sm as the actinide surrogate demonstrated the durability of these phases in aqueous solution. Trials of the process, in which actinide-doped materials were used, were performed at PNNL which confirmed the wasteform resistant to aqueous leaching. Initial leach trials conducted on {sup 239}Pu/{sup 241}Am loaded ceramic at 313 K/28 days gave normalized mass losses of 1.2 x 10{sup -5} g m{sup -2} and 2.7 x 10{sup -3} g m{sup -2} for Pu and Cl, respectively. In order to assess the response of the phases to radiation-induced damage, accelerated ageing trials were performed on samples in which the {sup 239}Pu was replaced with {sup 238}Pu. No changes to the crystalline structure of the waste were detected in the XRD spectra after the samples had experienced an {alpha} radiation fluence of 4 x 10{sup 18} g{sup -1}. Leach trials showed that there was an increase in the P and Ca release rates but no change in the Pu release rate.

  1. Ageing of a phosphate ceramic used to immobilize chloride contaminated actinide waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, B. L.; Donald, I. W.; Fong, S. K.; Gerrard, L. A.; Strachan, D. M.; Scheele, R. D.

    2009-03-01

    A process for the immobilization of intermediate level waste containing a significant quantity of chloride using Ca3(PO4)2 as the host material has been developed. Waste ions are incorporated into two phosphate-based phases, chlorapatite [Ca5(PO4)3Cl] and spodiosite [Ca2(PO4)Cl]. Non-active trials performed using Sm as the actinide surrogate demonstrated the durability of these phases in aqueous solution. Trials of the process, in which actinide-doped materials were used, were performed at PNNL which confirmed the wasteform resistant to aqueous leaching. Initial leach trials conducted on 239Pu/241Am loaded ceramic at 313 K/28 days gave normalized mass losses of 1.2 × 10-5 g m-2 and 2.7 × 10-3 g m-2 for Pu and Cl, respectively. In order to assess the response of the phases to radiation-induced damage, accelerated ageing trials were performed on samples in which the 239Pu was replaced with 238Pu. No changes to the crystalline structure of the waste were detected in the XRD spectra after the samples had experienced an α radiation fluence of 4 × 1018 g-1. Leach trials showed that there was an increase in the P and Ca release rates but no change in the Pu release rate.

  2. Ageing of a phosphate ceramic used to immobilize chloride contaminated actinide waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metcalfe, Brian L.; Donald, Ian W.; Fong, Shirley K.; Gerrard, Lee A.; Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.

    2009-03-31

    AWE has developed a process for the immobilization of ILW waste containing a significant quantity of chloride using Ca3(PO4)2 as the host material. Waste ions are incorporated into two phosphate based phases, chlorapatite, Ca5(PO4)3Cl, and spodiosite, Ca2(PO4)Cl. Non-active trials performed at AWE using samarium as the actinide surrogate demonstrated the durability of these phases in aqueous solution. Trials of the process using actinide-doped material were performed at PNNL which confirmed the immobilized wasteform resistant to aqueous leaching. Initial leach trials conducted on 239Pu /241Am loaded ceramic at 40°C/28 days gave normalized mass losses of 1.2 x 10-5 g.m-2 and 2.7 x 10-3 g.m-2 for Pu and Cl respectively. In order to assess the response of the phases to radiation-induced damage, accelerated ageing trials were performed on samples in which the 239Pu was replaced by 238Pu. No changes to the crystalline structure of the waste were detected using XRD after the samples had experienced a radiation dose of 4 x 1018 α.g-1. Leach trials showed that there had been an increase in the P and Ca release rates but no change in the Pu release rate.

  3. Electrochemically deposited gentamicin-loaded calcium phosphate coatings for bone tissue integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altomare, Lina; Visai, Livia; Bloise, Nora; Arciola, Carla Renata; Ulivi, Lorenzo; Candiani, Gabriele; Cigada, Alberto; Chiesa, Roberto; De Nardo, Luigi

    2012-10-01

    Despite improvements in operative environment and surgical techniques, post-operative infections remain one of the most devastating complications in total joint replacement prostheses. Several efforts have been made to modify the surface of materials in order to prevent bacterial adhesion and colonization. Here, we show a one-pot electrochemical surface modification process for co-deposition of calcium phosphate and gentamicin, with the aim of triggering specific biological responses and imparting antibacterial properties on titanium alloy prostheses. Gentamicin-loaded calcium phosphate coatings were deposited on Ti specimens via cathodic polarization in an electrochemical bath containing different amounts of the antibiotic salt (1-10 mg mL-1). Coatings were evaluated in terms of chemico-physical properties, via SEM/EDX, XRD, and ICP analysis, and antibacterial activity, via agar disc diffusion test on Staphylococcus aureus 8325-4 and Staphylococcus aureus SA113. An effective incorporation of gentamicin was achieved without any major effect on the morphology and structure. Morphology resulted in a typical plate-like brushite structure, confirmed by chemical composition and crystallographic structure. Gentamicin-loaded coatings showed an antibacterial efficacy on both staphlococcal strains, with a dose-dependent activity. Electrochemical technology can be advantageously exploited in order to obtain coatings for bone-contact prostheses with tailored antibacterial properties.

  4. The use of calcium phosphate cement paste for the correction of the depressed nose deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatoko, Mitsuo; Tada, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Aya; Yurugi, Satoshi; Niitsuma, Katsunori; Iioka, Hiroshi

    2005-03-01

    The authors report the use of calcium phosphate cement paste as a material for correction of depression after nasal bone fracture, and evaluate its usefulness. Biopex R (Mitsubishi Material Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) was used in this study as calcium phosphate cement (CPC), which was developed in Japan. CPC injection was used in six patients (four women and two men) with depressed nose deformity after nasal bone fracture. The patients' ages ranged from 29 to 67 years (mean, 49 years), and the follow-up period ranged from 12 to 27 months. The amount of injected cement varied from 0.5 to 2.5 mL, approximately. There was no postoperative infection or allergic reaction in any patient. Clinical and X-ray photography findings showed that a reduction in volume of the injected cement occurred gradually as long as 7 to 8 months after surgery. After that period, the volume was mostly maintained. It seemed that the degree of reduction was approximately 10% to 15% of the original volume. Satisfactory results were obtained in all cases. The authors conclude that the use of CPC is an option for the correction of depressed nose deformity and that its application must be determined in each case, considering its advantages and disadvantages.

  5. Bioactive calcium sulfate/magnesium phosphate cement for bone substitute applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guangyong; Liu, Jianli; Li, Fan; Pan, Zongyou; Ni, Xiao; Shen, Yue; Xu, Huazi; Huang, Qing

    2014-02-01

    A novel calcium sulfate/magnesium phosphate cement (CSMPC) composite was prepared and studied in the present work. The physical properties including the phases, the microstructures, the setting properties and the compressive strengths of the CSMPCs were studied. The bio-performances of the CSMPCs were comprehensively evaluated using in vitro simulated body fluid (SBF) method and in vitro cell culture. The dependence of the physical and chemical properties of the CSMPC on its composition and microstructure was studied in detail. It is found that the CSMPC composites exhibited mediate setting times (6-12 min) compared to the calcium sulfate (CS) and the magnesium phosphate cement (MPC). They showed an encapsulation structure in which the unconverted hexagonal prism CSH particles were embedded in the xerogel-like MPC matrix. The phase compositions and the mechanical properties of the CSMPCs were closely related to the content of MPC and the hardening process. The CSMPCs exhibited excellent bioactivity and good biocompatibility to support the cells to attach and proliferate on the surface. The CSMPC composite has the potential to serve as bone grafts for the bone regeneration. © 2013.

  6. Polyaspartic Acid Concentration Controls the Rate of Calcium Phosphate Nanorod Formation in High Concentration Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krogstad, Daniel V. [Biosystems and; Wang, Dongbo [Biosystems and; Lin-Gibson, Sheng [Biosystems and

    2017-08-31

    Polyelectrolytes are known to greatly affect calcium phosphate (CaP) mineralization. The reaction kinetics as well as the CaP phase, morphology and aggregation state depend on the relative concentrations of the polyelectrolyte and the inorganic ions in a complex, nonlinear manner. This study examines the structural evolution and kinetics of polyaspartic acid (pAsp) directed CaP mineralization at high concentrations of polyelectrolytes, calcium, and total phosphate (19–30 mg/mL pAsp, 50–100 mM Ca2+, Ca/P = 2). Using a novel combination of characterization techniques including cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), spectrophotometry, X-ray total scattering pair distribution function analysis, and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), it was determined that the CaP mineralization occurred over four transition steps. The steps include the formation of aggregates of pAsp stabilized CaP spherical nanoparticles (sNP), crystallization of sNP, oriented attachment of the sNP into nanorods, and further crystallization of the nanorods. The intermediate aggregate sizes and the reaction kinetics were found to be highly polymer concentration dependent while the sizes of the particles were not concentration dependent. This study demonstrates the complex role of pAsp in controlling the mechanism as well as the kinetics of CaP mineralization.

  7. Preparation, Physical-Chemical Characterization, and Cytocompatibility of Polymeric Calcium Phosphate Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania M. Khashaba

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Physicochemical mechanical and in vitro biological properties of novel formulations of polymeric calcium phosphate cements (CPCs were investigated. Methods. Monocalcium phosphate, calcium oxide, and synthetic hydroxyapatite were combined with either modified polyacrylic acid, light activated polyalkenoic acid, or polymethyl vinyl ether maleic acid to obtain Types I, II, and III CPCs. Setting time, compressive and diametral strength of CPCs was compared with zinc polycarboxylate cement (control. Specimens were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. In vitro cytotoxicity of CPCs and control was assessed. Results. X-ray diffraction analysis showed hydroxyapatite, monetite, and brushite. Acid-base reaction was confirmed by the appearance of stretching peaks in IR spectra of set cements. SEM revealed rod-like crystals and platy crystals. Setting time of cements was 5–12 min. Type III showed significantly higher strength values compared to control. Type III yielded high biocompatibility. Conclusions. Type III CPCs show promise for dental applications.

  8. Effect of increased strut porosity of calcium phosphate bone graft substitute biomaterials on osteoinduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coathup, Melanie J; Hing, Karin A; Samizadeh, Sorousheh; Chan, Oliver; Fang, Yvette S; Campion, Charlie; Buckland, Thomas; Blunn, Gordon W

    2012-06-01

    The effect of increasing strut porosity on the osteoinductivity of porous calcium phosphate (CaP) and silicate-substituted calcium phosphate (SiCaP) bone substitute materials was investigated in an ovine ectopic model. One to two millimeter-sized granules or block implants with strut porosities of 10, 20, or 30% were inserted into the left and right paraspinalis muscle. At 12 weeks, histological sections were prepared through the center of each implant and bone contact, bone area and implant area quantified. Backscattered scanning electron microscopy (bSEM) was used to visualize bone within small pores in the struts of the scaffolds. Increased bone formation was measured in the SiCaP with 30% strut porosity (5.482% ± 1.546%) when compared with the nonsilicate CaP with the same morphology (1.160% ± 0.502%, p = 0.02), indicating that silicate substitution may increase osteoinduction. Greater bone formation was seen in scaffolds with increased strut porosity. No bone growth was found in any of the SiCaP scaffold with 10% porosity. There was no significant difference between block and granule specimens. Scanning electron microscopy and EDX in combination with histology demonstrated bone formation within pores <5 μm in size. The use of silicate-substituted CaP material with increased strut porosity may further augment repair and regeneration in bony sites. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Treatment of fluorosed and white-spot human enamel with calcium sucrose phosphate in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Den Besten, P; Giambro, N

    1995-01-01

    A number of treatments have been devised to improve the appearance of fluorosed enamel. However, many of these have been empirically based, and the success of the various treatment regimens have not been quantitated. In this study, the relative whiteness of normal, mildly fluorosed, moderately fluorosed, and carious white-spot lesions on extracted teeth was quantitated by light reflectance using a Minolta Chroma Meter. The color was again determined following a number of treatment regimens to assess the potential use of various agents in treating the enamel lesions. Treatment of the enamel with a 35% hydrogen peroxide gel resulted in a significantly increased whitening, which was not reduced by subsequent treatment (P calcium sucrose phosphate paste and placement in artificial saliva was most successful in returning both white-spot and fluorosed lesions to a normal color. SEM imaging of the calcium sucrose phosphate treated enamel suggests that this treatment filled the porous enamel, resulting in a normal light reflectance from the enamel.

  10. Chapter 9: Model Systems for Formation and Dissolution of Calcium Phosphate Minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orme, C A; Giocondi, J L

    2006-07-29

    Calcium phosphates are the mineral component of bones and teeth. As such there is great interest in understanding the physical mechanisms that underlie their growth, dissolution, and phase stability. Control is often achieved at the cellular level by the manipulation of solution states and the use of crystal growth modulators such as peptides or other organic molecules. This chapter begins with a discussion of solution speciation in body fluids and relates this to important crystal growth parameters such as the supersaturation, pH, ionic strength and the ratio of calcium to phosphate activities. We then discuss the use of scanning probe microscopy as a tool to measure surface kinetics of mineral surfaces evolving in simplified solutions. The two primary themes that we will touch on are the use of microenvironments that temporally evolve the solution state to control growth and dissolution; and the use of various growth modifiers that interact with the solution species or with mineral surfaces to shift growth away from the lowest energy facetted forms. The study of synthetic minerals in simplified solution lays the foundation for understand mineralization process in more complex environments found in the body.

  11. Bioactive calcium sulfate/magnesium phosphate cement for bone substitute applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Guangyong [Department of Orthopaedics, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province, Linhai Zhejiang, 317000 (China); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, 325000 (China); Liu, Jianli [Trauma Center, Affiliated Hospital of Hainan Medical University, Haikou, Hainan, 570206 (China); Division of Functional Materials and Nanodevices, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering (NIMTE), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Ningbo, Zhejiang, 315201 (China); Li, Fan; Pan, Zongyou; Ni, Xiao; Shen, Yue [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, 325000 (China); Xu, Huazi, E-mail: spinexu@163.com [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, 325000 (China); Huang, Qing, E-mail: huangqing@nimte.ac.cn [Division of Functional Materials and Nanodevices, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering (NIMTE), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Ningbo, Zhejiang, 315201 (China)

    2014-02-01

    A novel calcium sulfate/magnesium phosphate cement (CSMPC) composite was prepared and studied in the present work. The physical properties including the phases, the microstructures, the setting properties and the compressive strengths of the CSMPCs were studied. The bio-performances of the CSMPCs were comprehensively evaluated using in vitro simulated body fluid (SBF) method and in vitro cell culture. The dependence of the physical and chemical properties of the CSMPC on its composition and microstructure was studied in detail. It is found that the CSMPC composites exhibited mediate setting times (6–12 min) compared to the calcium sulfate (CS) and the magnesium phosphate cement (MPC). They showed an encapsulation structure in which the unconverted hexagonal prism CSH particles were embedded in the xerogel-like MPC matrix. The phase compositions and the mechanical properties of the CSMPCs were closely related to the content of MPC and the hardening process. The CSMPCs exhibited excellent bioactivity and good biocompatibility to support the cells to attach and proliferate on the surface. The CSMPC composite has the potential to serve as bone grafts for the bone regeneration. - Highlights: • The mechanical strength and degradation rate of CSMPC composites are discussed. • The CSMPC composites exhibited good bioactivity to form bone-like apatite. • The CSMPC composites also show good biocompatibility.

  12. Uptake of the proteins HTRA1 and HTRA2 by cells mediated by calcium phosphate nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Rotan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The efficient intracellular delivery of (biomolecules into living cells remains a challenge in biomedicine. Many biomolecules and synthetic drugs are not able to cross the cell membrane, which is a problem if an intracellular mode of action is desired, for example, with a nuclear receptor. Calcium phosphate nanoparticles can serve as carriers for small and large biomolecules as well as for synthetic compounds. The nanoparticles were prepared and colloidally stabilized with either polyethyleneimine (PEI; cationic nanoparticles or carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC; anionic nanoparticles and loaded with defined amounts of the fluorescently labelled proteins HTRA1, HTRA2, and BSA. The nanoparticles were purified by ultracentrifugation and characterized by dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy. Various cell types (HeLa, MG-63, THP-1, and hMSC were incubated with fluorescently labelled proteins alone or with protein-loaded cationic and anionic nanoparticles. The cellular uptake was followed by light and fluorescence microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM, and flow cytometry. All proteins were readily transported into the cells by cationic calcium phosphate nanoparticles. Notably, only HTRA1 was able to penetrate the cell membrane of MG-63 cells in dissolved form. However, the application of endocytosis inhibitors revealed that the uptake pathway was different for dissolved HTRA1 and HTRA1-loaded nanoparticles.

  13. Phase evolution during heat treatment of amorphous calcium phosphate derived from fast nitrate synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltan Z. Zyman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The phase evolution in amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP, with a Ca/P ratio of 1 : 1, derived from the fast nitrate synthesis using different conditions, was studied in temperature range 20-980°C. ACP crystallized within 600-700°C and the phase composition depended on the synthesis duration. It was firstly revealed that for an extremely short synthesis (1min two metastable phases α′-CPP and α′-TCP of the high-temperature calcium pyrophosphate α-CPP and tricalcium phosphate α-TCP were crystallized. For a longer synthesis (5min, α′- CPP and minor β-CPP crystallized. The metastable phases gradually transformed to stable polymorphs β-CPP and β-TCP above 800°C, and a biphasic mixture β-CPP/β-TCP or β-CPP formed at 980°C. The crystallization of the metastable phases was attributed to the Ostwald step rule. A mechanism for the formation of TCP (Ca/P = 1.5 from ACP (Ca/P = 1 was proposed. The prepared powders of β-CPP/β-TCP, β-CPP or initial ACP were fine-grained and would have enhanced sinterability. Contribution to the densification was demonstrated due to the thermal transformation of the metastable polymorphs into stable phases having higher densities.

  14. Chlorhexidine-calcium phosphate nanoparticles - Polymer mixer based wound healing cream and their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Kaliyaperumal; Monisha, P; Srinivasan, M; Swathi, D; Raman, M; Dhinakar Raj, G

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we developed a wound healing cream composed of two different polymers, namely chitosan and gelatin with chlorhexidine along with calcium phosphate nanoparticles. The physicochemical properties of the prepared cream were investigated based on SEM, EDX, Raman, FTIR and the results indicated that the cream contained gelatin, chitosan, calcium phosphate nanoparticles and chlorhexidine. The maximum swelling ratio studies indicated that the ratio was around of 52±2.2 at pH7.4 and the value was increased in acidic and alkaline pH. The antimicrobial activity was tested against bacteria and the results indicated that, both chlorhexidine and the hybrid cream devoid of chlorhexidine exhibited antimicrobial activity but the chlorhexidine impregnated cream showed three fold higher antimicrobial activity than without chlorhexidine. In vivo wound healing promoting activities of hybrid cream containing 0.4mg/L chlorhexidine were evaluated on surgically induced dermal wounds in mice. The results indicated that the cream with incorporated chlorhexidine significantly enhanced healing compared with the control samples. For the field validations, the veterinary clinical animals were treated with the cream and showed enhanced healing capacity. In conclusion, a simple and efficient method for design of a novel wound healing cream has been developed for veterinary applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Crustacean derived calcium phosphate systems: Application in defluoridation of drinking water in East African rift valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagutu, Agatha W; Machunda, Revocatus; Jande, Yusufu Abeid Chande

    2018-04-05

    Calcium phosphate adsorbents, derived from prawns and crabs shell biomass wastes have been developed using wet chemistry and low temperature treatment. The adsorbents were characterized by X-ray diffractometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Batch adsorption test were carried out to investigate their effectiveness in adsorption of fluoride from ground and surface waters. Adsorption capacities were compared with bone char and synthetic hydroxyapatite (CCHA). Results indicate that prawns derived adsorbent (PHA) formed hexagonal structure with phases identifiable with hydroxyapatite while crabs based adsorbent (CHA) formed predominantly monoclinic structure with crystalline phase characteristic of brushite. Vibrational analysis and kinetic studies predicted defluoridation occurred mainly by ion exchange and ion adsorption mechanisms. Defluoridation capacity of the adsorbents was found to be superior compared to bone char and CCHA. CHA was the most effective with efficiencies above 92% and highest capacity of 13.6 mg/g in field water with fluoride concentration of 5-70 mg/L. PHA had highest capacity of 8.5 mg/g which was still better than 2.6 mg/g recorded by CCHA and bone char. Adsorption was best described by pseudo 2nd order kinetics. The findings indicate that crustacean derived calcium phosphate systems have better potential for defluoridation than traditional bone char and synthetic systems. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Remineralization of early enamel lesions using casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium Phosphate: An ex-vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Vashisht

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed at qualitatively evaluating the remineralization potential of casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate on artificial early enamel lesions in an ex-vivo scenario by observing the treated tooth surface using a scanning electron microscope (SEM. Materials and Methods: This randomized study was conducted on 10 subjects undergoing orthodontic treatment with premolar extraction as part of their treatment. Artificial white lesions were created with the application of 37% phosphoric acid for 20 mins. Teeth were then divided into two groups: one experimental and the other control. Customised orthodontic band with a window was luted with intermediate restorative material in the experimental group whereas in the control group, band without a window was luted. The casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate (GC TOOTH MOUSSE paste was then applied on the window region of the experimental group for 3 mins thrice daily after meals for 14 days, whereas no paste was applied in the control group. After 14 days, teeth were extracted and viewed under an SEM. Results: The study groups showed remineralization of the lesions as compared with the control group in most of the samples. Conclusion: Casein phophopeptide could significantly remineralize the artificial enamel lesions in vivo.

  17. Mixed zirconia calcium phosphate coatings for dental implants: Tailoring coating stability and bioactivity potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardun, Karoline [University of Bremen, Advanced Ceramics, Am Biologischen Garten 2, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Treccani, Laura, E-mail: treccani@uni-bremen.de [University of Bremen, Advanced Ceramics, Am Biologischen Garten 2, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Volkmann, Eike [University of Bremen, Advanced Ceramics, Am Biologischen Garten 2, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Streckbein, Philipp [University Hospital, Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Department of Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery, Klinikstrasse 33, 35385 Giessen (Germany); Heiss, Christian [University Hospital of Giessen-Marburg, Department of Trauma Surgery, Rudolf-Buchheim-Strasse 7, 35385 Giessen, Germany, (Germany); Laboratory of Experimental Surgery, Kerkraderstrasse 9, 35392 Giessen (Germany); Destri, Giovanni Li; Marletta, Giovanni [Laboratory for Molecular Surfaces and Nanotechnology (LAMSUN), Department of Chemistry, University of Catania and CSGI, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Rezwan, Kurosch [University of Bremen, Advanced Ceramics, Am Biologischen Garten 2, 28359 Bremen (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    Enhanced coating stability and adhesion are essential for long-term success of orthopedic and dental implants. In this study, the effect of coating composition on mechanical, physico-chemical and biological properties of coated zirconia specimens is investigated. Zirconia discs and dental screw implants are coated using the wet powder spraying (WPS) technique. The coatings are obtained by mixing yttria-stabilized zirconia (TZ) and hydroxyapatite (HA) in various ratios while a pure HA coating served as reference material. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical profilometer analysis confirm a similar coating morphology and roughness for all studied coatings, whereas the coating stability can be tailored with composition and is probed by insertion and dissections experiments in bovine bone with coated zirconia screw implants. An increasing content of calcium phosphate (CP) resulted in a decrease of mechanical and chemical stability, while the bioactivity increased in simulated body fluid (SBF). In vitro experiments with human osteoblast cells (HOB) revealed that the cells grew well on all samples but are affected by dissolution behavior of the studied coatings. This work demonstrates the overall good mechanical strength, the excellent interfacial bonding and the bioactivity potential of coatings with higher TZ contents, which provide a highly interesting coating for dental implants. - Highlights: • Different ratios of zirconia (TZ) and calcium phosphate (CP) were deposited on zirconia substrates. • Enhancement of TZ content in mixed coatings increased coating stability. • Enhancement of CP content in mixed coatings increased bioactivity. • All tested coating compositions were non-toxic.

  18. A Study for Tooth Bleaching via Carbamide Peroxide-Loaded Hollow Calcium Phosphate Spheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Qin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate if a prolonged bleaching effect of carbamide peroxide-loaded hollow calcium phosphate spheres (HCPS can be achieved. HCPS was synthesized via a hydrothermal reaction method. Carbamide peroxide (CP was-loaded into HCPS by mixing with distilled water as solvent. We developed two bleaching gels containing CP-loaded HCPS: one gel with low HP concentration as at-home bleaching gel, and one with high HP concentration as in-office gel. Their bleaching effects on stained human permanent posterior teeth were investigated by measuring the color difference before and after bleaching. The effect of gels on rhodamine B degradation was also studied. To investigate the potential effect of remineralization of using HCPS, bleached teeth were soaked in phosphate buffer solution (PBS containing calcium and magnesium ions. Both bleaching gels had a prolonged whitening effect, and showed a strong ability to degrade rhodamine B. After soaking in PBS for 3 days, remineralization was observed at the sites where HCPS attached to the teeth surface. CP-loaded HCPS could prolong the HP release behavior and improve the bleaching effect. HCPS was effective in increasing the whitening effect of carbamide peroxide and improving remineralization after bleaching process.

  19. Dentin bond strength of a new adhesive system containing calcium phosphate experimentally developed for direct pulp capping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkai, Koichi; Taira, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Masaya; Kato, Chikage; Ebihara, Takashi; Wakaki, Suguru; Seki, Hideaki; Shirono, Manabu; Ogisu, Takahito; Yamauchi, Junichi; Suzuki, Shiro; Katoh, Yoshiroh

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (microTBS) to human dentin of an experimental bonding agent containing calcium phosphates experimentally developed for direct pulp capping. Different concentrations of four types of calcium phosphates were added to an experimental bonding monomer, and six experimental bonding agents were thus prepared. Clearfil SE Bond/Bond was used as the control. Flat dentin surfaces of human molars were assigned to the experimental adhesive systems and the control. After Clearfil SE Bond/Primer was applied to the dentin surface, each experimental bonding agent was applied and photopolymerized, and then a resin composite paste was placed and photopolymerized. The specimens were subjected to microTBS testing. Results revealed that there were no significant differences among the microTBS values of the experimental bonding agents and the control. In other words, the calcium phosphate-containing experimental adhesives did not adversely affect the microTBS to dentin.

  20. Short-term in vivo evaluation of zinc-containing calcium phosphate using a normalized procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calasans-Maia, Monica, E-mail: monicacalasansmaia@gmail.com [Dental Clinical Research Center, Dentistry School, Fluminense Federal University, Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Calasans-Maia, José, E-mail: josecalasans@gmail.com [Dental Clinical Research Center, Dentistry School, Fluminense Federal University, Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Santos, Silvia, E-mail: silviaquimica@gmail.com [LABIOMAT, Brazilian Center for Physics Research, CBPF, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Mavropoulos, Elena, E-mail: elena@cbpf.br [LABIOMAT, Brazilian Center for Physics Research, CBPF, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Farina, Marcos, E-mail: mfarina@anato.ufrj.br [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Lima, Inayá, E-mail: inayacorrea@gmail.com [Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory, Nuclear Engineering Program, COPPE, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu [Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory, Nuclear Engineering Program, COPPE, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Rossi, Alexandre, E-mail: rossi@cbpf.br [LABIOMAT, Brazilian Center for Physics Research, CBPF, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Granjeiro, José Mauro, E-mail: jmgranjeiro@gmail.com [Dental Clinical Research Center, Dentistry School, Fluminense Federal University, Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Bioengineering Division, National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology, Duque de Caxias, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2014-08-01

    The effect of zinc-substituted calcium phosphate (CaP) on bone osteogenesis was evaluated using an in vivo normalized ISO 10993-6 protocol. Zinc-containing hydroxyapatite (ZnHA) powder with 0.3% by wt zinc (experimental group) and stoichiometric hydroxyapatite (control group) were shaped into cylindrical implants (2 × 6 mm) and were sintered at 1000 °C. Thermal treatment transformed the ZnHA cylinder into a biphasic implant that was composed of Zn-substituted HA and Zn-substituted β-tricalcium phosphate (ZnHA/βZnTCP); the hydroxyapatite cylinder was a highly crystalline and poorly soluble HA implant. In vivo tests were performed in New Zealand White rabbits by implanting two cylinders of ZnHA/βZnTCP in the left tibia and two cylinders of HA in the right tibia for 7, 14 and 28 days. Incorporation of 0.3% by wt zinc into CaP increased the rate of Zn release to the biological medium. Microfluorescence analyses (μXRF-SR) using synchrotron radiation suggested that some of the Zn released from the biomaterial was incorporated into new bone near the implanted region. In contrast with previous studies, histomorphometric analysis did not show significant differences between the newly formed bone around ZnHA/βZnTCP and HA due to the dissolution profile of Zn-doped CaP. Despite the great potential of Zn-containing CaP matrices for future use in bone regeneration, additional in vivo studies must be conducted to explain the mobility of zinc at the CaP surface and its interactions with a biological medium. - Highlights: • We produced a hydroxyapatite containing a low concentration (0.3 wt.%) of zinc. • The biomaterial underwent characterization before and after in vivo implant. • In vivo tests were performed according to ISO 10993-6. • Zinc-containing calcium phosphate promotes osteoconduction and bone regeneration. • Zinc-containing calcium phosphate may be useful for clinical applications.

  1. Direct-Write Assembly of Calcium Phosphate Scaffolds Using a Water-Based Hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, J.; Hunger, P.; Launey, M.E.; Tomsia, A.P.; Saiz, E.

    2009-01-01

    The development of materials to support bone regeneration requires flexible fabrication technologies able to tailor chemistry and architecture for specific applications. In this work, we describe the preparation of ceramic-based inks for robotic-assisted deposition (robocasting) using Pluronic® F-127 solutions. This approach allows the preparation of pseudoplastic inks with solid contents ranging between 30–50 vol% enabling them to flow through a narrow printing nozzle while supporting the weight of the printed structure. Ink formulation does not require the manipulation of the pH or the use of highly volatile organic components. Therefore, the approach can be used to prepare materials with a wide range of compositions, and here we use it to build hydroxyapatite (HA), β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), and biphasic (HA/β-TCP) structures. The flow of the inks is controlled by the Pluronic® content and the particle-size distribution of the ceramic powders. The use of wide size distributions favors flow through the narrow printing nozzles, and we have been able to use printing nozzles as narrow as 100 μm in diameter, applying relatively low printing pressures. The microporosity of the printed lines increases with increasing Pluronic® contents and lower sintering temperatures. Microporosity can play a key role in determining the biological response to the materials, but it also affects the strength of the structure. PMID:19563923

  2. Calcium-phosphate levels and cardiovascular disease in community-dwelling adults: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Robert N; Collins, Allan J; Ishani, Areef; Kalra, Philip A

    2008-09-01

    Calcium-phosphate levels, linked to vascular dysfunction in chronic kidney disease, may represent novel risk factors for coronary heart disease, stroke, and death in community-dwelling adults. We tested this hypothesis over 12.6 years of follow-up in the prospective, community-based Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (n = 15,732). At baseline, mean (SD) values were 9.8 (0.4) mg/dL for serum calcium, 3.4 (0.5) mg/dL for serum phosphate, 33.6 (5.3) mg(2)/dL(2) for calcium-phosphate product, 54.2 (5.7) years for age, and 93.1 (21.5) mL/min per 1.73 m(2) for glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Shared associations of calcium, phosphate, and calcium-phosphate product included older age, female sex, African American race, cigarette-years, current cigarette smoking, low body mass index, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, low serum albumin, low GFR, low caloric intake, and phosphorus intake. With adjustment for age, demographic characteristics, comorbid conditions, albumin, and GFR, calcium-associated hazards ratios for coronary heart disease, stroke, and death were, respectively, 1.01 (95% confidence interval 0.96-1.06), 1.16 (1.07-1.26, P = .0005), and 1.03 (0.98-1.08); phosphate-associated hazards ratios were 1.03 (0.98-1.08), 1.11 (1.02-1.21, P = .0219), and 1.14 (1.09-1.20, P adults.

  3. Local tissue irritating effects and adjuvant activities of calcium phosphate and aluminium hydroxide with different physical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, N; Kato, H; Maeyama, J; Shibano, M; Saito, T; Yamaguchi, J; Yoshihara, S

    1997-01-01

    Effects of calcium phosphate and aluminium hydroxide adjuvants with different physical properties were examined in guinea pigs for local histopathological reactions, electron-microscopical changes of macrophages and adjuvanticity on total IgG antibody response to subcutaneously administered ovalbumin (OVA) and tetanus toxoid (TT). Calcium phosphate gel (Ca-gel) induced active inflammatory reactions consisting of neutrophils (pseudoeosinophils) and foamy macrophages associated with many multinuclear giant cells for at least 4 weeks. Aluminium hydroxide gel (Al-gel) also elicited granulomatous inflammatory reactions consisting mainly of macrophages with foamy cytoplasm, small lymphocytes and giant cells at the injection sites for up to 8 weeks or longer. Severity of local tissue irritation due to calcium phosphate gel (Ca-gel) was similar to that due to Al-gel except for the duration of the inflammatory reactions. Calcium phosphate suspension (Ca-sus)-induced local reactions completely ceased by the 4th week, while aluminium hydroxide suspension (Al-sus)-induced reactions were seen up to the 8th week. Electron-microscopical observations showed that both Al-gel and Al-sus caused damage of macrophages. The adjuvant activity of Al-gel for OVA or TT was significantly stronger than that of any other adjuvant material, whereas those of Ca-gel and Ca-sus were not seen at a dose of 3 mg calcium phosphate per millilitre. Al-sus-TT at a dose of 3 mg aluminium hydroxide per millilitre induced very low levels of antibody. These results suggest that calcium phosphate adjuvant may not be an useful alternative to Al adjuvant.

  4. Influence of surface microstructure and chemistry on osteoinduction and osteoclastogenesis by biphasic calcium phosphate discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, N L; Su, J; Yuan, H; van den Beucken, J J J P; de Bruijn, J D; Barrère-de Groot, F

    2015-06-20

    It has been reported that surface microstructural dimensions can influence the osteoinductivity of calcium phosphates (CaPs), and osteoclasts may play a role in this process. We hypothesised that surface structural dimensions of ≤ 1 μm trigger osteoinduction and osteoclast formation irrespective of macrostructure (e.g., concavities, interconnected macropores, interparticle space) or surface chemistry. To test this, planar discs made of biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP: 80% hydroxyapatite, 20% tricalcium phosphate) were prepared with different surface structural dimensions - either ~ 1 μm (BCP1150) or ~ 2-4 μm (BCP1300) - and no macropores or concavities. A third material was made by sputter coating BCP1150 with titanium (BCP1150Ti), thereby changing its surface chemistry but preserving its surface structure and chemical reactivity. After intramuscular implantation in 5 dogs for 12 weeks, BCP1150 formed ectopic bone in 4 out of 5 samples, BCP1150Ti formed ectopic bone in 3 out of 5 samples, and BCP1300 formed no ectopic bone in any of the 5 samples. In vivo, large multinucleated osteoclast-like cells densely colonised BCP1150, smaller osteoclast-like cells formed on BCP1150Ti, and osteoclast-like cells scarcely formed on BCP1300. In vitro, RAW264.7 cells cultured on the surface of BCP1150 and BCP1150Ti in the presence of osteoclast differentiation factor RANKL (receptor activator for NF-κB ligand) proliferated then differentiated into multinucleated osteoclast-like cells with positive tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity. However, cell proliferation, fusion, and TRAP activity were all significantly inhibited on BCP1300. These results indicate that of the material parameters tested - namely, surface microstructure, macrostructure, and surface chemistry - microstructural dimensions are critical in promoting osteoclastogenesis and triggering ectopic bone formation.

  5. Improved sugar cane juice clarification by understanding calcium oxide-phosphate-sucrose systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, William O S

    2011-03-09

    It is accepted that the efficiency of sugar cane clarification is closely linked with sugar juice composition (including suspended or insoluble impurities), the inorganic phosphate content, the liming condition and type, and the interactions between the juice components. These interactions are not well understood, particularly those between calcium, phosphate, and sucrose in sugar cane juice. Studies have been conducted on calcium oxide (CaO)/phosphate/sucrose systems in both synthetic and factory juices to provide further information on the defecation process (i.e., simple liming to effect impurity removal) and to identify an effective clarification process that would result in reduced scaling of sugar factory evaporators, pans, and centrifugals. Results have shown that a two-stage process involving the addition of lime saccharate to a set juice pH followed by the addition of sodium hydroxide to a final juice pH or a similar two-stage process where the order of addition of the alkalis is reversed prior to clarification reduces the impurity loading of the clarified juice compared to that of the clarified juice obtained by the conventional defecation process. The treatment process showed reductions in CaO (27% to 50%) and MgO (up to 20%) in clarified juices with no apparent loss in juice clarity or increase in residence time of the mud particles compared to those in the conventional process. There was also a reduction in the SiO2 content. However, the disadvantage of this process is the significant increase in the Na2O content.

  6. Continuous cellularization of calcium phosphate hybrid scaffolds induced by plasma polymer activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergemann, Claudia [University Medical Center Rostock, Cell Biology, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Cornelsen, Matthias [University of Rostock, Fluid Technology and Microfluidics, Justus-von-Liebig Weg 6, D-18059 Rostock (Germany); Quade, Antje [Leibniz-Institute for Plasma Science and Technology (INP), Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany); Laube, Thorsten; Schnabelrauch, Matthias [INNOVENT e.V., Biomaterials Department, Pruessingstrasse 27B, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Rebl, Henrike [University Medical Center Rostock, Cell Biology, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Weißmann, Volker [Institute for Polymer Technologies (IPT) e.V., Alter Holzhafen 19, D-23966 Wismar (Germany); Seitz, Hermann [University of Rostock, Fluid Technology and Microfluidics, Justus-von-Liebig Weg 6, D-18059 Rostock (Germany); Nebe, Barbara, E-mail: barbara.nebe@med.uni-rostock.de [University Medical Center Rostock, Cell Biology, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany)

    2016-02-01

    The generation of hybrid materials based on β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) and various biodegradable polymers like poly(L-lactide-co-D,L-lactide) (PLA) represents a common approach to overcoming the disadvantages of pure TCP devices. These disadvantages lie in TCP's mechanical properties, such as brittleness. The positive characteristic of PLA — improvement of compressive strength of calcium phosphate scaffolds – is diametrically opposed to its cell attractiveness. Therefore, the objective of this work was to optimize osteoblast migration and cellularization inside a three-dimensionally (3D) printed, PLA polymer stabilized TCP hybrid scaffold by a plasma polymer process depositing amino groups via allylamine. MG-63 osteoblastic cells inside the 10 mm hybrid scaffold were dynamically cultivated for 14 days in a 3D model system integrated in a perfusion reactor. The whole TCP/PLA hybrid scaffold was continuously colonized due to plasma polymerized allylamine activation inducing the migration potential of osteoblasts. - Highlights: • Mechanical stabilization of β-tricalcium phosphate scaffolds by PLA infiltration • Hybrid scaffolds with higher cell attraction due to plasma polymerized allylamine • 3D perfusion in vitro model for observation of cell migration inside scaffolds • Enhanced cell migration within plasma polymer coated TCP hybrid scaffolds.

  7. A New Type of Biphasic Calcium Phosphate Cement as a Gentamicin Carrier for Osteomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Yu Su

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteomyelitis therapy is a long-term and inconvenient procedure for a patient. Antibiotic-loaded bone cements are both a complementary and alternative treatment option to intravenous antibiotic therapy for the treatment of osteomyelitis. In the current study, the biphasic calcium phosphate cement (CPC, called α-TCP/HAP (α-tricalcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite biphasic cement, was prepared as an antibiotics carrier for osteomyelitis. The developed biphasic cement with a microstructure of α-TCP surrounding the HAP has a fast setting time which will fulfill the clinical demand. The X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry analyses showed the final phase to be HAP, the basic bone mineral, after setting for a period of time. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a porous structure with particle sizes of a few micrometers. The addition of gentamicin in α-TCP/HAP would delay the transition of α-TCP but would not change the final-phase HAP. The gentamicin-loaded α-TCP/HAP supplies high doses of the antibiotic during the initial 24 hours when they are soaked in phosphate buffer solution (PBS. Thereafter, a slower drug release is produced, supplying minimum inhibitory concentration until the end of the experiment (30 days. Studies of growth inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in culture indicated that gentamicin released after 30 days from α-TCP/HAP biphasic cement retained antibacterial activity.

  8. In situ synthesis of magnesium-substituted biphasic calcium phosphate and in vitro biodegradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae-Wan; Lee, Hyeong-Shin; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Jin, Hyeong-Ho [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Kyu-Hong [School of Nano and Advanced Materials, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, Kyungnam 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Kook [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hong-Chae [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Seog-Young, E-mail: syy3@pusan.ac.kr [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: ► Mg–BCP were successfully prepared through in situ aqueous co-precipitation method. ► The amount of β-TCP phase was changed with the magnesium substitution level. ► The substitution of magnesium led to a decrease in the unit cell volume. ► Mg–BCP could be able to develop a new apatite phase on the surface faster than BCP. -- Abstract: In situ preparation of magnesium (Mg) substituted biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) of hydroxyapatite (HAp)/β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) were carried out through aqueous co-precipitation method. The concentrations of added magnesium were varied with the calcium in order to obtain constant (Ca + Mg)/P ratios of 1.602. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to characterize the structure of synthesized magnesium substituted BCP powders. The results have shown that substitution of magnesium in the calcium deficient apatites revealed the formation of biphasic mixtures of different HAp/β-TCP ratios after heating at 1000 °C. The ratios of the formation of phase mixtures were dependent on the content of magnesium. After immersing in Hanks’ balanced salt solution (HBSS) for 1 week, 1 wt% magnesium substituted BCP powders were degraded and precipitation started to be formed with small granules consisting of number of flake-like crystal onto the surface of synthesized powders. On the other hand, in the case of pure BCP powders, the formation of new precipitates was detected after immersion in HBSS for 2 weeks. On the basis of these results, magnesium substituted BCP could be able to develop a new apatite phase on the surface in contact with physiological fluids faster than BCP does. In addition, the retention time to produce the new apatite phase in implantation operation for the BCP powder could be controlled by the amount of magnesium substitution.

  9. Calcium phosphate formation and ion dissolution rates in silica gel-PDLLA composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korventausta, Joni; Jokinen, Mika; Rosling, Ari; Peltola, Timo; Yli-Urpo, Antti

    2003-12-01

    Sol-gel derived silicas are potential biomaterials both for tissue regeneration and drug delivery applications. In this study, both SiO(2) and calcium and phosphate-containing SiO(2) (CaPSiO(2)) are combined with poly-(DL-lactide) to form a composite. The main properties studied are the ion release rates of biologically important ions (soluble SiO(2) and Ca(2+)) and the formation of bone mineral-like calcium phosphate (CaP) on the composite surface. These properties are studied by varying the quality, content and granule size of silica gel in the composite, and porosity of the polymer. The results indicate that release rates of SiO(2) and Ca(2+) depend mostly on the formed CaP layer, but in some extent also on the granule size of silicas and polymer porosity. The formation of the bone mineral-like CaP is suggested to be induced by a thin SiO(-) layer on the composite surface. However, due to absence of active SiO(2) or CaPSiO(2) granules on the outermost surface, the suitable nanoscale dimensions do not contribute the nucleation and growth and an extra source for calcium is needed instead. The result show also that all composites with varying amount of CaPSiO(2) (10-60 wt%) formed bone mineral-like CaP on their surfaces, which provides possibilities to optimise the mechanical properties of composites.

  10. Low-cost processing technology for the synthesis of calcium phosphates/collagen biocomposites for potential bone tissue engineering applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Helena Santos

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study two novel composites of Calcium phosphates (CaP and Collagen (COL were synthesized, hydroxyapatite/Collagen (HA/COL and hydroxyapatite-btricalcium phosphate/COL (HAbTCP/COL. Collagen was extracted from bovine pericardium submitted to enzymatic digestion and purification by ion-exchange chromatography yielding high purity grade type I collagen. Biocomposites of HAP/COL and HAbTCP/COL were produced with a calcium phosphate/COL ratio of 80/20 (wt. (% and were characterized by chemical analysis, light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, X ray diffraction and FT-infrared spectroscopy. SEM results of the CaP powders showed agglomerates of particles at the nanometric size range with predominantly columnar shape and average chemical composition of [Ca/P] = 1.67. FTIR analysis of collagen has confirmed the major vibrational bands associated with chemical groups like amides and hydroxyls usually found in proteins. SEM micrographs have indicated that both morphological and structural features and chemical composition of the composites were very similar to their precursors, collagen and calcium phosphate components. SDS-PAGE characterization results of protein extracted and purified has showed that bovine type I collagen was successfully obtained. Finally, the biocomposites presented a homogeneous aspect with the calcium phosphate particles aggregated to the collagen fibers. Hence, the novel developed biocomposites have high potential to be used for rebuilding small lesions in bone tissue engineering.

  11. Advanced Zinc Phosphate Conversion and Pre-Ceramic Polymetallosiloxane Coatings for Corrosion Protection of Steel and Aluminum, and Characteristics of Polyphenyletheretherketone-Based Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-24

    JÜ>AM*O 9WP BNL-48106 INFORMAL REPORT Advanced Zinc Phosphate Conversion and Pre-Ceramic ■ Polymetallosiloxane Coatings For Corrosion Protection...ment or any agency, contractor, or subcontractor thereof. Advanced Zinc Phosphate Conversion and Pre-Geraraic Poiymetallosiloxane Coatings For...L,„..„ r • n Advanced Zinc Phosphate Conversion ana Pre- Ceraraic Polymetallosiloxane Coatings for Corrosion Protec- tion of Steel and

  12. Assessment of salivary calcium, phosphate, magnesium, pH, and flow rate in healthy subjects, periodontitis, and dental caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K S Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was conducted to estimate and compare inorganic salivary calcium, phosphate, magnesium, salivary flow rate, and pH of unstimulated saliva and oral hygiene status of healthy subjects, subjects with periodontitis and dental caries, and to correlate salivary calcium level with number of intact teeth. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of 48 systemically healthy subjects in the age group of 18-55 years, which was further divided into three groups: healthy, periodontitis, and dental caries. Oral hygiene index-simplified, probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level, the number of intact teeth, and active carious lesions were recorded. Estimation of inorganic salivary calcium, phosphate, and magnesium was performed spectrophotometrically using Vitros 5.1 FS. Statistical analysis was performed using the one-way analysis of variance test at 5% significance level. Results: There was a statistically significant increase in inorganic salivary calcium, phosphate, pH, flow rate, and poor oral hygiene status in periodontitis group compared to dental caries and healthy group. Conclusion: Subjects with increased inorganic salivary calcium, phosphate, pH, flow rate, and poor oral hygiene are at a higher risk of developing periodontitis. Since there is increased remineralization potential, these subjects have more number of intact teeth compared to the dental caries group.

  13. Sinus Floor Augmentation Comparing an In Situ Hardening Biphasic Calcium Phosphate (Hydroxyapatite/β-Tricalcium Phosphate) Bone Graft Substitute with a Particulate Biphasic Calcium Phosphate (Hydroxyapatite/β-Tricalcium Phosphate) Bone Graft Substitute: An Experimental Study in Sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildburger, Angelika; Bubalo, Vladimir; Magyar, Marton; Nagursky, Heiner; Jakse, Norbert; Schmelzeisen, Rainer; Sauerbier, Sebastian

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the present split-mouth study in sheep was to assess the influence of in situ hardening properties of a biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) bone graft substitute (BGS) (ratio hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate = 60/40) compared with a particulate BGS with the same biphasic core-granule composition without in situ hardening properties on sinus floor augmentation. Therefore, bilateral sinus floor augmentation was performed in eight sheep. Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)-coated, in situ hardening biphasic BGS (PLGA-NMP [N-Methyl-2-pyrrolidone]-BCP) was placed at the test site, and a particulate biphasic BGS without PLGA coating (BCP) was used for the contralateral site as a control. Animals were sacrificed after 21 weeks. Sinus augmentation sites were analyzed histologically. The volume was analyzed by computed tomography. Histomorphometric parameters were assessed for the 12 and 21 weeks' time points. Slopes of new bone formation over time were compared with a linear growth regression model. Bone formation after 12 and 21 weeks of healing was 8.94% (±3.74) and 19.82% (±6.29) for PLGA-NMP-BCP and 7.00% (±2.58) and 14.38% (±4.51) for BCP, respectively. The bone growth rate for PLGA-NMP-BCP was higher than the growth rate for BCP (probability 97.5%). The total fraction of calcified hard tissue (% bone fraction + % biomaterial) was around 46% for both tested biomaterials, 21 weeks after sinus floor augmentation. The in situ hardening BGS (PLGA-NMP-BCP) performed better than the particulate material (BCP) in terms of bone formation rate. The in situ hardening properties of the PLGA-NMP-BCP material mediated by the PLGA coating and NMP solution as plasticizer had no negative influence on the bone formation.

  14. Calcium phosphate deposition in human dental plaque microcosm biofilms induced by a ureolytic pH-rise procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, L; Sissons, C H; Pearce, E I F; Cutress, T W

    2002-11-01

    The objectives were to develop and characterize a procedure based on a ureolytic pH rise to deposit calcium phosphate into microcosm dental plaque biofilms and to test the importance of the plaque pH range. Plaque biofilms were cultured in a multiplaque culture system ('artificial mouth') with a continuous supply of a simulated oral fluid (basal medium mucin; BMM) with 146 mmol/l (5% w/v) sucrose periodically applied over 6 min every 8h. After initial plaque growth, the biofilms were periodically exposed for up to 16 days to 6-min applications of calcium phosphate monofluorophosphate urea (CPMU) solution containing 20 mmol/l CaCl(2), 12 mmol/l NaH(2)PO(4), 5 mmol/l monofluorophosphate and 500 mmol/l urea (pH 5.0). Three application regimes were examined, one included a sucrose-induced acidic pH fluctuation. Plaque hydrolysis of the urea in CPMU caused the pH to rise to between 8.2 and 8.8, depositing fluoridated and carbonated calcium phosphates, and possibly some calcium carbonate, into the plaque. Calcium, phosphate and fluoride deposition was rapid for about 4 days and then slowed. After 10 days' treatment under standard conditions (BMM containing 1 mmol/l urea and 1 mmol/l arginine), plaque calcium and phosphate concentrations had increased up to 50-fold and 10-fold to approximately 2-4 and 1-2 mmol/g plaque protein, respectively. The calcium, phosphate and fluoride content increased steadily. Calcium phosphate deposition was proportional to the plaque resting pH, increasing over four-fold when the BMM urea concentration was increased from 0 to 20 mmol/l, which raised the resting pH from 6.4 to 7.2 and yielded a mean plaque calcium concentration of 14.3 mmol/g protein, one subsample reaching 20.8 mmol/g protein. Supplementation of BMM with 20% human serum inhibited deposition. These results support the hypothesis that an alkaline pH in plaque is critical in promoting plaque mineralization and that mineral deposition is modulated by serum. These factors are

  15. Rapid hydrothermal flow synthesis and characterisation of carbonate- and silicate-substituted calcium phosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Aqif A; Knowles, Jonathan C; Rehman, Ihtesham; Darr, Jawwad A

    2013-09-01

    A range of crystalline and nano-sized carbonate- and silicate-substituted hydroxyapatite has been successfully produced by using continuous hydrothermal flow synthesis technology. Ion-substituted calcium phosphates are better candidates for bone replacement applications (due to improved bioactivity) as compared to phase-pure hydroxyapatite. Urea was used as a carbonate source for synthesising phase pure carbonated hydroxyapatite (CO₃-HA) with ≈5 wt% substituted carbonate content (sample 7.5CO₃-HA) and it was found that a further increase in urea concentration in solution resulted in biphasic mixtures of carbonate-substituted hydroxyapatite and calcium carbonate. Transmission electron microscopy images revealed that the particle size of hydroxyapatite decreased with increasing urea concentration. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy result revealed a calcium deficient apatite with Ca:P molar ratio of 1.45 (±0.04) in sample 7.5CO₃-HA. For silicate-substituted hydroxyapatite (SiO₄-HA) silicon acetate was used as a silicate ion source. It was observed that a substitution threshold of ∼1.1 wt% exists for synthesis of SiO₄-HA in the continuous hydrothermal flow synthesis system, which could be due to the decreasing yields with progressive increase in silicon acetate concentration. All the as-precipitated powders (without any additional heat treatments) were analysed using techniques including Transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, Differential scanning calorimetry, Thermogravimetric analysis, Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  16. Effects of lactic acid and glycolic acid on human osteoblasts: a way to understand PLGA involvement in PLGA/calcium phosphate composite failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Florent; Wardale, John; Best, Serena; Cameron, Ruth; Rushton, Neil; Brooks, Roger

    2012-06-01

    The use of degradable composite materials in orthopedics remains a field of intense research due to their ability to support new bone formation and degrade in a controlled manner, broadening their use for orthopedic applications. Poly (lactide-co-glycolide) acid (PLGA), a degradable biopolymer, is now a popular material for different orthopedic applications and is proposed for use in tissue engineering scaffolds either alone or combined with bioactive ceramics. Interference screws composed of calcium phosphates and PLGA are readily available in the market. However, some reports highlight problems of screw migration or aseptic cyst formation following screw degradation. In order to understand these phenomena and to help to improve implant formulation, we have evaluated the effects of PLGA degradation products: lactic acid and glycolic acid on human osteoblasts in vitro. Cell proliferation, differentiation, and matrix mineralization, important for bone healing were studied. It was found that the toxicity of polymer degradation products under buffering conditions was limited to high concentrations. However, non-toxic concentrations led to a decrease in cell proliferation, rapid cell differentiation, and mineralization failure. Calcium, whilst stimulating cell proliferation was not able to overcome the negative effects of high concentrations of lactic and glycolic acids on osteoblasts. These effects help to explain recently reported clinical failures of calcium phosphate/PLGA composites, but further in vitro analyses are needed to mimic the dynamic situation which occurs in the body by, for example, culture of osteoblasts with materials that have been pre-degraded to different extents and thus be able to relate these findings to the degradation studies that have been performed previously. Copyright © 2011 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  17. Augmentation of pedicle screw fixation strength using an injectable calcium phosphate cement as a function of injection timing and method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Susan M; Lim, Tae-Hong; Kim, Whoan-Jeang; Katolik, Leonid; An, Howard S; Andersson, Gunnar B J

    2004-06-01

    Axial pullout tests using fresh cadaveric thoracolumbar vertebral bodies. To evaluate the effect of a new injectable calcium phosphate cement on the axial pullout strength of both revised and augmented pedicle screws in comparison with polymethyl methacrylate and in terms of injection method. Failure of pedicle screws by loosening and back out remains a significant clinical problem and is of particular concern for patients with low bone quality. Polymethyl methacrylate was shown to significantly improve the screw pullout strength. However, polymethyl methacrylate is known to have a high polymerization temperature, which may damage surrounding tissues, and a short handling time, and it lacks long-term biocompatibility. Bone mineral cements such as calcium phosphate have a longer working time, very low thermal effect, and are biodegradable as well as having good mechanical strength. Recently, new calcium phosphate cement with improved infiltration properties for better injectability has been introduced, but its performance in augmenting the pedicle screw fixation has not been tested yet. The bone mineral densities of 52 vertebral bodies (T11-L5) were measured using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. In each vertebral body, a 6.5-mm-diameter and 45 +/- 5-mm-long pedicle screw was inserted into either the right or left pedicle, representing an initial intact implantation. These intact screws were pulled axially until failure at 10 mm/min. Following failure of the intact pedicle, 3.0 cc of cement was injected into the failed screw hole, representing a revision case, and the prepared screw hole in the contralateral intact pedicle representing an augmentation case. The cement was injected either to the distal tip of the screw hole (calcium phosphate-1 group, n = 19) or along the entire length of the screw hole (calcium phosphate-2 group, n = 20), and the screws were inserted. The cement was then allowed to cure for 24 hours at room temperature before both screws were

  18. 3D plotting of growth factor loaded calcium phosphate cement scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkineni, Ashwini Rahul; Luo, Yongxiang; Schumacher, Matthias; Nies, Berthold; Lode, Anja; Gelinsky, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Additive manufacturing allows to widely control the geometrical features of implants. Recently, we described the fabrication of calcium phosphate cement (CPC) scaffolds by 3D plotting of a storable CPC paste based on water-immiscible carrier liquid. Plotting and hardening is conducted under mild conditions allowing the (precise and local) integration of biological components. In this study, we have developed a procedure for efficient loading of growth factors in the CPC scaffolds during plotting and demonstrated the feasibility of this approach. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), used as model proteins, were encapsulated in chitosan/dextran sulphate microparticles which could be easily mixed into the CPC paste in freeze-dried state. In order to prevent leaching of the proteins during cement setting, usually carried out by immersion in aqueous solutions, the plotted scaffolds were aged in water-saturated atmosphere (humidity). Setting in humidity avoided early loss of loaded proteins but provided sufficient amount of water to allow cement setting, as indicated by XRD analysis and mechanical testing in comparison to scaffolds set in water. Moreover, humidity-set scaffolds were characterised by altered, even improved properties: no swelling or crack formation was observed and accordingly, surface topography, total porosity and compressive modulus of the humidity-set scaffolds differed from those of the water-set counterparts. Direct cultivation of mesenchymal stem cells on the humidity-set scaffolds over 21days revealed their cytocompatibility. Maintenance of the bioactivity of VEGF during the fabrication procedure was proven in indirect and direct culture experiments with endothelial cells. Additive manufacturing techniques allow the fabrication of implants with defined architecture (inner pore structure and outer shape). Especially printing technologies conducted under mild conditions allow additionally the (spatially controlled

  19. Rechargeable dental adhesive with calcium phosphate nanoparticles for long-term ion release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Weir, Michael D; Hack, Gary; Fouad, Ashraf F; Xu, Hockin H K

    2015-12-01

    The tooth-resin bond is the weak link of restoration, with secondary caries as a main reason for failure. Calcium phosphate-containing resins are promising for remineralization; however, calcium (Ca) and phosphate (P) ion releases last only a couple of months. The objectives of this study were to develop the first rechargeable CaP bonding agent and investigate the key factors that determine CaP ion recharge and re-release. Nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) were synthesized. Pyromellitic glycerol dimethacrylate (PMGDM), ethoxylated bisphenol-A dimethacrylate (EBPADMA), 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), and bisphenol-A glycidyl dimethacrylate (BisGMA) were used to synthesize three adhesives (denoted PE, PEH and PEHB). NACP were mixed into adhesive at 0-30% by mass. Dentin shear bond strengths were measured. Adhesive specimens were tested for Ca and P initial ion release. Then the ion-exhausted specimens were immersed in Ca and P solution to recharge the specimens, and the recharged specimens were then used to measure ion re-release for 7 days as one cycle. Then these specimens were again recharged and the re-release was measured for 7 days as the second cycle. Three recharge/re-release cycles were tested. PEHB had the highest dentin bond strength (p0.1), but increased CaP release and re-release (p0.1). After the third cycle, specimens without further recharge had continuous CaP ion release for 2-3 weeks. Rechargeable CaP bonding agents were developed for the first time to provide long-term Ca and P ions to promote remineralization and reduce caries. Incorporation of NACP into adhesive had no negative effect on dentin bond strength. Increasing NACP filler level increased the ion recharge and re-release capability. The new CaP recharge method and PMGDM-EBPADMA-NACP composition may have wide application in adhesives, composites and cements, to combat caries and remineralize lesions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Rechargeable dental adhesive with calcium phosphate nanoparticles for long-term ion release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Weir, Michael D.; Hack, Gary; Fouad, Ashraf F.; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The tooth-resin bond is the weak link of restoration, with secondary caries as a main reason for failure. Calcium phosphate-containing resins are promising for remineralization; however, calcium (Ca) and phosphate (P) ion releases last only a couple of months. The objectives of this study were to develop the first rechargeable CaP bonding agent and investigate the key factors that determine CaP ion recharge and re-release. Methods Nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) were synthesized. Pyromellitic glycerol dimethacrylate (PMGDM), ethoxylated bisphenol-A dimethacrylate (EBPADMA), 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), and bisphenol-A glycidyl dimethacrylate (BisGMA) were used to synthesize three adhesives (denoted PE, PEH and PEHB). NACP were mixed into adhesive at 0–30% by mass. Dentin shear bond strengths were measured. Adhesive specimens were tested for Ca and P initial ion release. Then the ion-exhausted specimens were immersed in Ca and P solution to recharge the specimens, and the recharged specimens were then used to measure ion re-release for 7 days as one cycle. Then these specimens were again recharged and the re-release was measured for 7 days as the second cycle. Three recharge/re-release cycles were tested. Results PEHB had the highest dentin bond strength (p0.1), but increased CaP release and re-release (p0.1). After the third cycle, specimens without further recharge had continuous CaP ion release for 2–3 weeks. Significance Rechargeable CaP bonding agents were developed for the first time to provide long-term Ca and P ions to promote remineralization and reduce caries. Incorporation of NACP into adhesive had no negative effect on dentin bond strength. Increasing NACP filler level increased the ion recharge and re-release capability. The new CaP recharge method and PMGDM-EBPAGMA-NACP composition may have wide application in adhesives, composites and cements, to combat caries and remineralize lesions. PMID:26144190

  1. Calcium Phosphate as a Key Material for Socially Responsible Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuk Uskoković

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Socially responsible technologies are designed while taking into consideration the socioeconomic, geopolitical and environmental limitations of regions in which they will be implemented. In the medical context, this involves making therapeutic platforms more accessible and affordable to patients in poor regions of the world wherein a given disease is endemic. This often necessitates going against the reigning trend of making therapeutic nanoparticles ever more structurally complex and expensive. However, studies aimed at simplifying materials and formulations while maintaining the functionality and therapeutic response of their more complex counterparts seldom provoke a significant interest in the scientific community. In this review we demonstrate that such compositional simplifications are meaningful when it comes to the design of a solution for osteomyelitis, a disease that is in its natural, non-postoperative form particularly prevalent in the underdeveloped parts of the world wherein poverty, poor sanitary conditions, and chronically compromised defense lines of the immune system are the norm. We show that calcium phosphate nanoparticles, which are inexpensive to make, could be chemically designed to possess the same functionality as a hypothetic mixture additionally composed of: (a a bone growth factor; (b an antibiotic for prophylactic or anti-infective purposes; (c a bisphosphonate as an antiresorptive compound; (d a viral vector to enable the intracellular delivery of therapeutics; (e a luminescent dye; (f a radiographic component; (g an imaging contrast agent; (h a magnetic domain; and (i polymers as viscous components enabling the injectability of the material and acting as carriers for the sustained release of a drug. In particular, calcium phosphates could: (a produce tunable drug release profiles; (b take the form of viscous and injectable, self-setting pastes; (c be naturally osteo-inductive and inhibitory for osteoclastogenesis

  2. High phosphate reduces host ability to develop arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis without affecting root calcium spiking responses to the fungus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coline eBalzergue

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis associates soil fungi with the roots of the majority of plants species and represents a major source of soil phosphorus acquisition. Mycorrhizal interactions begin with an exchange of molecular signals between the two partners. A root signaling pathway is recruited, for which the perception of fungal signals triggers oscillations of intracellular calcium concentration. High phosphate availability is known to inhibit the establishment and/or persistence of this symbiosis, thereby favoring the direct, non symbiotic uptake of phosphorus by the root system. In this study, Medicago truncatula plants were used to investigate the effects of phosphate supply on the early stages of the interaction. When plants were supplied with high phosphate fungal attachment to the roots was drastically reduced. An experimental system was designed to individually study the effects of phosphate supply on the fungus, on the roots and on root exudates. These experiments revealed that the most important effects of high phosphate supply were on the roots themselves, which became unable to host mycorrhizal fungi even when these had been appropriately stimulated. The ability of the roots to perceive their fungal partner was then investigated by monitoring nuclear calcium spiking in response to fungal signals. This response did not appear to be affected by high phosphate supply. In conclusion, high levels of phosphate predominantly impact the plant host, but apparently not in its ability to perceive the fungal partner.

  3. The calcium phosphate coating of soy lecithin nanoemulsion with performance in stability and as an oxygen carrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyu B.

    This work studied the relationship between surfactant, oil, and water, by building ternary phase diagrams, the goal of which was to identify the oil-in-water phase composition. The resulting nano-sized emulsion was coated with dicalcium phosphate by utilizing the ionic affinity between calcium ions and the emulsion surface. Since the desired function of the particle is as an oxygen carrier, the particle stability, oxygen capacity, and oxygen release rate were investigated. The first step in the process was to construct ternary phase diagrams with 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate (DOPA) and soy derived lecithin. The results showed that the lecithin surfactant formed an oil-in-water phase region that was 36 times greater than that of DOPA. With the desired phase composition set, the lecithin emulsion was extruded, resulting in a well-dispersed nanosized particle. A pH titration study of the emulsion found an optimized calcium phosphate coating condition at pH 8.8, at which, the calcium ion had a greater affinity for the emulsion surface than phosphate. A Hill plot was used to show calcium cooperativeness on the emulsion surface which suggested one calcium ion binds to one lecithin molecule. The lecithin emulsion particles were then coated with calcium phosphate using a layering technique that allowed for careful control of the coating thickness. The overall particle hydrodynamic radius was consistent with the growth of the calcium phosphate coating, from 8 nm to 28 nm. This observation was further supported with cryo-TEM measurements. The stability of the coated emulsion was tested in conditions that simulate practical thermal, physical, and time-dependent conditions. Throughout the tests, the coated emulsion exhibited a constant mono-dispersed particle size, while the uncoated emulsion size fluctuated greatly and exhibited increased polydispersion. The fast mixing method with the stopped-flow apparatus was employed to test the product as an oxygen carrier, and it

  4. Development of iron phosphate ceramic waste form to immobilize radioactive waste solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jongkwon; Um, Wooyong; Choung, Sungwook

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this research was to develop an iron phosphate ceramic (IPC) waste form using converter slag obtained as a by-product of the steel industry as a source of iron instead of conventional iron oxide. Both synthetic off-gas scrubber solution containing technetium-99 (or Re as a surrogate) and LiCl-KCl eutectic salt, a final waste solution from pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuel, were used as radioactive waste streams. The IPC waste form was characterized for compressive strength, reduction capacity, chemical durability, and contaminant leachability. Compressive strengths of the IPC waste form prepared with different types of waste solutions were 16 MPa and 19 MPa for LiCl-KCl eutectic salt and the off-gas scrubber simulant, respectively, which meet the minimum compressive strength of 3.45 MPa (500 psi) for waste forms to be accepted into the radioactive waste repository. The reduction capacity of converter slag, a main dry ingredient used to prepare the IPC waste form, was 4136 meq/kg by the Ce(IV) method, which is much higher than those of the conventional Fe oxides used for the IPC waste form and the blast furnace slag materials. Average leachability indexes of Tc, Li, and K for the IPC waste form were higher than 6.0, and the IPC waste form demonstrated stable durability even after 63-day leaching. In addition, the Toxicity Characteristic Leach Procedure measurements of converter slag and the IPC waste form with LiCl-KCl eutectic salt met the universal treatment standard of the leachability limit for metals regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This study confirms the possibility of development of the IPC waste form using converter slag, showing its immobilization capability for radionuclides in both LiCl-KCl eutectic salt and off-gas scrubber solutions with significant cost savings.

  5. Study of structural, electrical, and dielectric properties of phosphate-borate glasses and glass-ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, B. M. G.; Graça, M. P. F., E-mail: mpfg@ua.pt; Prezas, P. R.; Valente, M. A. [Physics Department (I3N), Aveiro University, Campus Universitário de Santiago, Aveiro (Portugal); Almeida, A. F.; Freire, F. N. A. [Mechanics Engineering Department, Ceará Federal University, Fortaleza (Brazil); Bih, L. [Equipe Physico-Chimie la Matière Condensée, Faculté des Sciences de Meknès, Meknès (Morocco)

    2016-08-07

    In this work, phosphate-borate based glasses with molar composition 20.7P{sub 2}O{sub 5}–17.2Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}–13.8WO{sub 3}–34.5A{sub 2}O–13.8B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, where A = Li, Na, and K, were prepared by the melt quenching technique. The as-prepared glasses were heat-treated in air at 800 °C for 4 h, which led to the formation of glass-ceramics. These high chemical and thermal stability glasses are good candidates for several applications such as fast ionic conductors, semiconductors, photonic materials, electrolytes, hermetic seals, rare-earth ion host solid lasers, and biomedical materials. The present work endorses the analysis of the electrical conductivity of the as-grown samples, and also the electrical, dielectric, and structural changes established by the heat-treatment process. The structure of the samples was analyzed using X-Ray powder Diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and density measurements. Both XRD and Raman analysis confirmed crystals formation through the heat-treatment process. The electrical ac and dc conductivities, σ{sub ac} and σ{sub dc}, respectively, and impedance spectroscopy measurements as function of the temperature, varying from 200 to 380 K, were investigated for the as-grown and heat-treated samples. The impedance spectroscopy was measured in the frequency range of 100 Hz–1 MHz.

  6. Ageing of a phosphate ceramic used to immobilize chloride-contaminated actinide waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metcalfe, Brian [AWE plc, Reading (United Kingdom); Donald, Ian W. [AWE plc, Reading (United Kingdom); Fong, Shirley K. [AWE plc, Reading (United Kingdom); Gerrard, Lee A. [AWE plc, Reading (United Kingdom); Strachan, Denis M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Scheele, Randall D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2009-03-31

    At AWE, we have developed a process for the immobilization of ILW waste containing a significant quantity of chloride with Ca3(PO4)2 as the host material. Waste ions are incorporated into two phosphate-based phases, chlorapatite [Ca5(PO4)3Cl] and spodiosite [Ca2(PO4)Cl]. Non-active trials performed at AWE with Sm as the actinide surrogate demonstrated the durability of these phases in aqueous solution. Trials of the process, in which actinide-doped materials were used, wer performed at PNNL where the waste form was found to be resistant to aqueous leaching. Initial leach trials conducted on 239Pu /241Am loaded ceramic at 40°C/28 days gave normalized mass losses of 1.2 x 10-5 g.m-2 and 2.7 x 10-3 g.m-2 for Pu and Cl respectively. In order to assess the response of the phases to radiation-induced damage, accelerated ageing trials were performed on samples in which the 239Pu was replaced with 238Pu. No changes to the crystalline structure of the waste were detected in the XRD patterns after the samples had experienced an α radiation dose of 4 x 1018 g-1. Leach trials showed that there was an increase in the P and Ca release rates but no change in the Pu release rate.

  7. Mapping calcium phosphate activated gene networks as a strategy for targeted osteoinduction of human progenitors in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyckmans, J.; Roberts, S.J.; Bolander, J.; Schrooten, J.; Chen, C.S.; Luyten, F.P.

    2014-01-01

    Although calcium phosphate-containing biomaterials are promising scaffolds for bone regenerative strategies, the osteoinductive capacity of such materials is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated whether endogenous mechanisms of in vivo calcium phosphate-driven, ectopic bone formation could be identified and used to induce enhanced differentiation in vitro of the same progenitor population. To accomplish this, human periosteum derived cells (hPDCs) were seeded on hydroxyapatite/collagen scaffolds (calcium phosphate rich matrix or CPRM), or on decalcified scaffolds (calcium phosphate depleted matrix or CPDM), followed by subcutaneous implantation in nude mice to trigger ectopic bone formation. In this system, osteoblast differentiation occurred in CPRM scaffolds, but not in CPDM scaffolds. Gene expression was assessed by human full-genome microarray at 20 hours after seeding, and 2, 8 and 18 days after implantation. In both matrices, implantation of the cell constructs triggered a similar gene expression cascade, however, gene expression dynamics progressed faster in CPRM scaffolds than in CPDM scaffolds. The difference in gene expression dynamics was associated with differential activation of hub genes and molecular signaling pathways related to calcium signaling (CREB), inflammation (TNFα, NFkB, and IL6) and bone development (TGFβ, β-catenin, BMP, EGF, and ERK signaling). Starting from this set of pathways, a growth factor cocktail was developed that robustly enhanced osteogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our data demonstrate that through the identification and subsequent stimulation of genes, proteins and signaling pathways associated with calcium phosphate mediated osteoinduction, a focused approach to develop targeted differentiation protocols in adult progenitor cells can be achieved. PMID:23537666

  8. Synthesis and characterization of nanosized calcium phosphates by flame spray pyrolysis, and their effect on osteogenic differentiation of stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ataol, Sibel; Tezcaner, Ayşen [Middle East Technical University, Department of Biomedical Engineering (Turkey); Duygulu, Ozgur [TUBITAK Marmara Research Center, Materials Institute (Turkey); Keskin, Dilek [Middle East Technical University, Department of Biomedical Engineering (Turkey); Machin, Nesrin E., E-mail: nesrinmachin@gmail.com [Kocaeli University, Department of Chemical Engineering (Turkey)

    2015-02-15

    The present study evaluates the synthesis of biocompatible osteoconductive and osteoinductive nano calcium phosphate (CaP) particles by industrially applied, aerosol-derived flame spray pyrolysis method for biomedical field. Calcium phosphate nanoparticles were produced in a range of calcium-to-phosphorus ratio, (1.20–2.19) in order to analyze the morphology and crystallinity changes, and to test the bioactivity of particles. The characterization results confirmed that nanometer-sized, spherical calcium phosphate particles were produced. The average primary particle size was determined as 23 nm by counting more than 500 particles in TEM pictures. XRD patterns, HRTEM, SAED, and SEM analyses revealed the amorphous nature of the as-prepared nano calcium phosphate particles at low Ca/P ratios. Increases in the specific surface area and crystallinity were observed with the increasing Ca/P ratio. TGA–DTA analysis showed that the thermally stable crystal phases formed after 700 °C. Cell culture studies were conducted with urine-derived stem cells that possess the characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells. Synthesized amorphous nanoparticles did not have cytotoxic effect at 5–50 μg/ml concentration range. Cells treated with the as-prepared nanoparticles had higher alkaline phosphatase (ALP) enzyme activity than control cells, indicating osteogenic differentiation of cells. A slight decrease in ALP activity of cells treated with two highest Ca:P ratios at 50 μg/ml concentration was observed at day 7. The findings suggest that calcium phosphate nanoparticles produced in this work have a potential to be used as biomaterials in biomedical applications.

  9. Stabilization Using Phosphate Bonded Ceramics. Salt Containing Mixed Waste Treatment. Mixed Waste Focus Area. OST Reference No. 117

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1999-09-01

    Throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex there are large inventories of homogeneous mixed waste solids, such as wastewater treatment residues, fly ashes, and sludges that contain relatively high concentrations (greater than 15% by weight) of salts. The inherent solubility of salts (e.g., nitrates, chlorides, and sulfates) makes traditional treatment of these waste streams difficult, expensive, and challenging. One alternative is low-temperature stabilization by chemically bonded phosphate ceramics (CBPCs). The process involves reacting magnesium oxide with monopotassium phosphate with the salt waste to produce a dense monolith. The ceramic makes a strong environmental barrier, and the metals are converted to insoluble, low-leaching phosphate salts. The process has been tested on a variety of surrogates and actual mixed waste streams, including soils, wastewater, flyashes, and crushed debris. It has also been demonstrated at scales ranging from 5 to 55 gallons. In some applications, the CBPC technology provides higher waste loadings and a more durable salt waste form than the baseline method of cementitious grouting. Waste form test specimens were subjected to a variety of performance tests. Results of waste form performance testing concluded that CBPC forms made with salt wastes meet or exceed both RCRA and recommended Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) low-level waste (LLW) disposal criteria. Application of a polymer coating to the CBPC may decrease the leaching of salt anions, but continued waste form evaluations are needed to fully assess the deteriorating effects of this leaching, if any, over time.

  10. Influence of colloidal calcium phosphate level on the microstructure and rheological properties of rennet-induced skim milk gels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koutina, Glykeria; Knudsen, Jes Christian; Andersen, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal calcium phosphate is an essential part of casein micelles and being responsible for their stability. Different mineralization of casein micelles was obtained by acidification of skim milk to pH 6.5, 6.0 or 5.5, followed by a dialysis method, using simulated milk ultrafiltrate without...... lactose, to obtain varying levels of micellar calcium and phosphorus but constant value of pH, serum and free calcium, and serum phosphorus. Bovine chymosin was added to the skim milk samples after dialysis and microstructural and rheological properties during gel formation were recorded at 30°C. Samples...

  11. 3D printing of mineral-polymer bone substitutes based on sodium alginate and calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, Aleksey A; Fedotov, Alexander Yu; Mironov, Anton V; Komlev, Vladimir S; Popov, Vladimir K; Zobkov, Yury V

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a relatively simple route for three-dimensional (3D) printing of complex-shaped biocompatible structures based on sodium alginate and calcium phosphate (CP) for bone tissue engineering. The fabrication of 3D composite structures was performed through the synthesis of inorganic particles within a biopolymer macromolecular network during 3D printing process. The formation of a new CP phase was studied through X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Both the phase composition and the diameter of the CP particles depend on the concentration of a liquid component (i.e., the "ink"). The 3D printed structures were fabricated and found to have large interconnected porous systems (mean diameter ≈800 μm) and were found to possess compressive strengths from 0.45 to 1.0 MPa. This new approach can be effectively applied for fabrication of biocompatible scaffolds for bone tissue engineering constructions.

  12. Current and Future Theranostic Applications of the Lipid-Calcium-Phosphate Nanoparticle Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterlee, Andrew B; Huang, Leaf

    2016-01-01

    Over the last four years, the Lipid-Calcium-Phosphate (LCP) nanoparticle platform has shown success in a wide range of treatment strategies, recently including theranostics. The high specific drug loading of radiometals into LCP, coupled with its ability to efficiently encapsulate many types of cytotoxic agents, allows a broad range of theranostic applications, many of which are yet unexplored. In addition to providing an overview of current medical imaging modalities, this review highlights the current theranostic applications for LCP using SPECT and PET, and discusses potential future uses of the platform by comparing it with both systemically and locally delivered clinical radiotherapy options as well as introducing its applications as an MRI contrast agent. Strengths and weaknesses of LCP and of nanoparticles in general are discussed, as well as caveats regarding the use of fluorescence to determine the accumulation or biodistribution of a probe.

  13. Cantilever-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy applied in the research of natural and synthetic calcium phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brangule, A.; Gross, K. A.; Stepanova, V.

    2017-04-01

    This study demonstrates the significant potential of cantilever-enhanced Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy (FTIR PAS) principles. The improved sensitivity and reproducibility of this method presents a potent tool in the study of biomaterials. The article discusses aspects of the application of cantilever-enhanced FTIR PAS in the research of natural and biological calcium phosphate and the statistical evaluation of the FTIR PAS sampling method. The improved constructions of the FTIR PAS accessory reduce limitations of the conventional capacitive microphone and provide a sensitive tool for samples or processes unreachable by more traditional transmittance methods, or ATR sampling technique. The most common and important applications have been discussed in-depth to show the wide range of problems solved by FTIR PAS.

  14. Monitoring of hardening and hygroscopic induced strains in a calcium phosphate bone cement using FBG sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimis, A; Karalekas, D; Bouropoulos, N; Mouzakis, D; Zaoutsos, S

    2016-07-01

    This study initially deals with the investigation of the induced strains during hardening stage of a self-setting calcium phosphate bone cement using fiber-Bragg grating (FBG) optical sensors. A complementary Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) investigation was also conducted at different time intervals of the hardening period and its findings were related to the FBG recordings. From the obtained results, it is demonstrated that the FBG response is affected by the microstructural changes taking place when the bone cement is immersed into the hardening liquid media. Subsequently, the FBG sensor was used to monitor the absorption process and hygroscopic response of the hardened and dried biocement when exposed to a liquid/humid environment. From the FBG-based calculated hygric strains as a function of moisture concentration, the coefficient of moisture expansion (CME) of the examined bone cement was obtained, exhibiting two distinct linear regions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of calcium phosphate nanoparticles, Piriformospora indica and Glomus mosseae on growth of Zea mays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rane, Mansi; Bawskar, Manisha; Rathod, Dnyaneshwar; Nagaonkar, Dipali; Rai, Mahendra

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (G. mosseae) and endosymbiont (P. indica) colonized Zea mays were treated with calcium phosphate nanoparticles (CaPNPs) and evaluated for their plant growth promotion efficiency. It was observed that CaPNPs in combination with both G. mosseae and P. indica are more potent plant growth promoter than independent combinations of CaPNPs + G. mosseae, CaPNPs + P. indica or CaPNPs alone. The fluorimetric studies of treated plants revealed that CaPNPs alone and in combination with P. indica can enhance vitality of Zea mays by improving chlorophyll a content and performance index of treated plants. Hence, we conclude that CaPNPs exhibit synergistic growth promotion, root proliferation and vitality improvement properties along with endosymbiotic and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, which after further field trials can be developed as a cost-effective nanofertilizer with pronounced efficiency.

  16. Thermally stimulated luminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance studies on uranium doped calcium phosphate

    CERN Document Server

    Natarajan, V; Veeraraghavan, R; Sastry, M D

    2003-01-01

    Thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies on uranium doped calcium phosphate yielded mechanistic information on the observed glow peaks at 365, 410 and 450 K. TSL spectral studies of the glow peaks showed that UO sub 2 sup 2 sup + acts as the luminescent center. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies on gamma-irradiated samples revealed that the predominant radiation induced centers are H sup 0 , PO sub 4 sup 2 sup - , PO sub 3 sup 2 sup - and O sup - ion. Studies on the temperature dependence studies of the EPR spectra of samples annealed to different temperatures indicate the role of H sup 0 and PO sub 4 sup 2 sup - ions in the main glow peak at 410 K.

  17. Light scattering study on the size and structure of calcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite flocs formed in sugar solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Judy; Rainey, Tom; Doherty, William O S

    2007-02-01

    The formation, flocculation and sedimentation of calcium phosphate particles are among the main physico-chemical reactions that occur during the clarification of cane sugar juice. The mechanisms through which processes occur in juice clarification are still poorly understood. This study (being part of a comprehensive investigation to unravel these mechanisms) reports on the size and structure of calcium phosphate particles and aggregates in water and sugar solutions at 20 degrees C using the small angle laser light scattering technique. The average size of the primary calcium phosphate particles was in the range 10.4+/-1.1 microm to 17.5+/-1.2 microm and the scattering exponents, which describe the structure of the calcium phosphate flocs, varied from 1.97 to 2.76. The flocs formed without flocculant are more compact in water than those formed in sugar solution. The compactness of the flocs was also affected by pH of the solution. This effect has been explained by considering the electrical double layer phenomenon.

  18. Antiresorption implant coatings based on calcium alendronate and octacalcium phosphate deposited by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boanini, Elisa; Torricelli, Paola; Forte, Lucia; Pagani, Stefania; Mihailescu, Natalia; Ristoscu, Carmen; Mihailescu, Ion N; Bigi, Adriana

    2015-12-01

    The integration of an implant material with bone tissue depends on the chemistry and physics of the implant surface. In this study we applied matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) in order to synthesize calcium alendronate monohydrate (a bisphosphonate obtained by calcium sequestration from octacalcium phosphate by alendronate) and calcium alendronate monohydrate/octacalcium phosphate composite thin films on titanium substrates. Octacalcium phosphate coatings were prepared as reference material. The powders, which were synthesized in aqueous medium, were suspended in deionised water, frozen at liquid nitrogen temperature and used as targets for MAPLE experiments. The transfer was conducted with a KrF* excimer laser source (λ = 248 nm, τFWHM ≤ 25 ns) in mild conditions of temperature and pressure. XRD, FTIR and SEM analyses confirmed that the coatings contain the same crystalline phases as the as-prepared powder samples. Osteoblast derived from stem cells and osteoclast derived from monocytes of osteoporotic subjects were co-cultured on the coatings up to 14 days. Osteoclast displayed significantly reduced proliferation and differentiation in the presence of calcium alendronate monohydrate, pointing to a clear role of the coatings containing this bisphosphonate on inhibiting excessive bone resorption. At variance, osteoblast production of alkaline phosphatase and type I pro-collagen were promoted by the presence of bisphosphonate, which also decreased the production of interleukin 6. The positive influence towards osteoblast differentiation was even more enhanced in the composite coatings, thanks to the presence of octacalcium phosphate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of pH and phosphate on calcium carbonate polymorphs precipitated at near-freezing temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Yu-Bin; Wolthers, Mariëtte; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter A.; Nehrke, Gernot

    2015-01-01

    The effects of pH and phosphate on the precipitation of calcium carbonate polymorphs from aqueous solution were investigated. Experiments were carried out at near-freezing temperature and two different pH conditions (pH 13.4 and 9.0). At each pH condition, solutions having different concentrations

  20. rhBMP-2 release from injectable poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid)/calcium-phosphate cement composites.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruhe, P.Q.; Hedberg, E.L.; Padron, N.T.; Spauwen, P.H.M.; Jansen, J.A.; Mikos, A.G.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In bone tissue engineering, poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles are frequently used as a delivery vehicle for bioactive molecules. Calcium phosphate cement is an injectable, osteoconductive, and degradable bone cement that sets in situ. The objective of this study was

  1. Bone healing around nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite, deproteinized bovine bone mineral, biphasic calcium phosphate, and autogenous bone in mandibular bone defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broggini, Nina; Bosshardt, Dieter D; Jensen, Simon S

    2015-01-01

    with nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (HA-SiO), deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM), biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) with a 60/40% HA/β-TCP (BCP 60/40) ratio, or particulate autogenous bone (A) for histological and histomorphometric analysis. At 2 weeks, percent filler amongst the test groups (DBBM (35.65%), HA...

  2. A systematic review on the long-term success of calcium phosphate plasma-spray-coated dental implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oirschot, B.A.J.A. van; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Beucken, J.J.J.P van den; Meijer, G.J.; Jansen, J.A.; Junker, R.

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the current review were (1) to systematically appraise, and (2) to evaluate long-term success data of calcium phosphate (CaP) plasma-spray-coated dental implants in clinical trials with at least 5 years of follow-up. To describe the long-term efficacy of functional implants, the

  3. Calcium-Phosphate-Osteopontin Particles Reduce Biofilm Formation and pH Drops in in situ Grown Dental Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Ibsen, Casper J S; Birkedal, Henrik; Nyvad, Bente

    2017-01-01

    This 2-period crossover study investigated the effect of calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles on biofilm formation and pH in 48-h biofilms grown in situ. Bovine milk osteopontin is a highly phosphorylated glycoprotein that has been shown to interfere with bacterial adhesion to salivary-coated surfaces. Calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles have been shown to reduce biofilm formation and pH drops in a 5-species laboratory model of dental biofilm without affecting bacterial viability. Here, smooth surface biofilms from 10 individuals were treated ex vivo 6 times/day for 30 min with either calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles or sterile saline. After growth, the amount of biofilm formed was determined by confocal microscopy, and pH drops upon exposure to glucose were monitored using confocal-microscopy-based pH ratiometry. A total of 160 biofilms were analysed. No adverse effects of repeated ex vivo treatment with calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles were observed. Particle treatment resulted in a 32% lower amount of biofilm formed (p Biofilm pH was significantly higher upon particle treatment, both shortly after the addition of glucose and after 30 min of incubation with glucose (p biofilms as well as the remineralizing potential of the particles. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Calcium-Phosphate-Osteopontin Particles Reduce Biofilm Formation and pH Drops in in situ-Grown Dental Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Ibsen, Casper Jon Steenberg; Birkedal, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    -coated surfaces. Calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles have been shown to reduce biofilm formation and pH drops in a 5-species laboratory model of dental biofilm without affecting bacterial viability. Here, smooth surface biofilms from 10 individuals were treated ex vivo 6 times/day for 30 min with either...

  5. Comparison of the adjuvant activity of aluminum hydroxide and calcium phosphate on the antibody response towards Bothrops asper snake venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedo, Hidekel; Herrera, María; Rojas, Leonardo; Villalta, Mauren; Vargas, Mariángela; Leiguez, Elbio; Teixeira, Catarina; Estrada, Ricardo; Gutiérrez, José María; León, Guillermo; Montero, Mavis L

    2014-01-01

    The adjuvanticity of aluminum hydroxide and calcium phosphate on the antibody response in mice towards the venom of the snake Bothrops asper was studied. It was found that, in vitro, most of the venom proteins are similarly adsorbed by both mineral salts, with the exception of some basic phospholipases A2, which are better adsorbed by calcium phosphate. After injection, the adjuvants promoted a slow release of the venom, as judged by the lack of acute toxicity when lethal doses of venom were administered to mice. Leukocyte recruitment induced by the venom was enhanced when it was adsorbed on both mineral salts; however, venom adsorbed on calcium phosphate induced a higher antibody response towards all tested HPLC fractions of the venom. On the other hand, co-precipitation of venom with calcium phosphate was the best strategy for increasing: (1) the capacity of the salt to couple venom proteins in vitro; (2) the venom ability to induce leukocyte recruitment; (3) phagocytosis by macrophages; and (4) a host antibody response. These findings suggest that the chemical nature is not the only one determining factor of the adjuvant activity of mineral salts.

  6. Antibacterial properties of Ag (or Pt)-containing calcium phosphate coatings formed by micro-arc oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Won-Hoon; Ryu, Hyun Sam; Hong, Seong-Hyeon

    2009-01-01

    Silver (or platinum)-containing calcium phosphate (hydroxyapatite (HA) and tricalcium phosphate (alpha-TCP)) coatings on titanium substrates were formed by micro-arc oxidation (MAO) and their in vitro antibacterial activity and in vitro cytotoxicity were evaluated. MAO was performed in an electrolytic solution containing beta-glycerophosphate disodium salt pentahydrate (beta-GP) and calcium acetate monohydrate (CA), and Ag and Pt were introduced in the form of AgNO(3) (or CH(3)COOAg) and H(2)PtCl(6), respectively. The MG63 and human osteosarcoma (HOS) cell lines were used to investigate the proliferation and differentiation behavior of the cells, respectively, whereas two strains of bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, were used to evaluate the antibacterial activity of the coatings. The phase, morphology, and Ag content of the coatings were strongly dependent on the applied voltage and Ag precursor concentration. HA and alpha-TCP phases were detected in the coatings oxidized above 400 V and the presence of Ag was confirmed by EDS. While the coatings with a high content of Ag were cytotoxic and those obtained in the Pt-containing electrolyte had no apparent antibacterial activity, the calcium phosphate coatings obtained in the low Ag concentration electrolyte exhibited in vitro antibacterial activity but no cytotoxicity. Thus, biocompatible calcium phosphate coatings on Ti implants with antibacterial activity can be achieved by one-step MAO. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Definition of silver concentration in calcium phosphate coatings on titanium implants ensuring balancing of bactericidity and cytotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlov, A.V.; Shakhov, V.P. [RAMS, Tomsk (Russian Federation). Centre of Orthopaedy and Medical Material Sciences; Kolobov, Ju.R. [RAS, Tomsk (Russian Federation). Inst. of Strength Physics and Material Sciences

    2001-07-01

    Complexity of the problem of creation of effective silver coating is that the boundary between necessary level of expression of antibacterial activity and undesirable cytotoxic properties lays in sufficiently narrow range. In this work one made attempt to define the optimal correlation between cytotoxicity and bacteriocidity of silver on calcium phosphate coating, applied with the help of the ion implantation. (orig.)

  8. Influence of precursor solution parameters on chemical properties of calcium phosphate coatings prepared using Electrostatic Spray Deposition (ESD).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwenburgh, S.C.G.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Schoonman, J.; Jansen, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    A novel coating technique, referred to as Electrostatic Spray Deposition (ESD), was used to deposit calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings with a variety of chemical properties. The relationship between the composition of the precursor solutions and the crystal and molecular structure of the deposited

  9. Development of macroporous calcium phosphate scaffold processed via microwave rapid drying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamuna-Thevi, K., E-mail: jamuna@sirim.my [Advanced Materials Research Centre (AMREC), SIRIM Berhad, Lot 34, Jalan Hi-Tech 2/3, Kulim Hi-Tech Park, 09000 Kulim, Kedah (Malaysia); Zakaria, F.A. [Advanced Materials Research Centre (AMREC), SIRIM Berhad, Lot 34, Jalan Hi-Tech 2/3, Kulim Hi-Tech Park, 09000 Kulim, Kedah (Malaysia); Othman, R. [Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Seri Ampangan, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Muhamad, S. [Bioassay Unit, Herbal Medicine Research Centre (HMRC), Institute for Medical Research (IMR), Jalan Pahang, 50588 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2009-06-01

    Porous hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffold has great potential in bone tissue engineering applications. A new method to fabricate macroporous calcium phosphate (CP) scaffold via microwave irradiation, followed by conventional sintering to form HA scaffold was developed. Incorporation of trisodium citrate dihydrate and citric acid in the CP mixture gave macroporous scaffolds upon microwave rapid drying. In this work, a mixture of {beta}-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP), calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}), trisodium citrate dihydrate, citric acid and double distilled de-ionised water (DDI) was exposed to microwave radiation to form a macroporous structure. Based on gross eye examinations, addition of trisodium citrate at 30 and 40 wt.% in the CP mixture ({beta}-TCP and CaCO{sub 3}) without citric acid indicates increasing order of pore volume where the highest porosity yield was observed at 40 wt.% of trisodium citrate addition and the pore size was detected at several millimeters. Therefore, optimization of pore size was performed by adding 3-7 wt.% of citric acid in the CP mixture which was separately mixed with 30 and 40 wt.% of trisodium citrate for comparison purposes. Fabricated scaffolds were calcined at 600 deg. C and washed with DDI water to remove the sodium hydroxycarbonate and sintered at 1250 deg. C to form HA phase as confirmed in the X-ray diffraction (XRD) results. Based on Archimedes method, HA scaffolds prepared from 40 wt.% of trisodium citrate with 3-7 wt.% of citric acid added CP mixture have an open and interconnected porous structure ranging from 51 to 53 vol.% and observation using Scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed the pore size distribution between 100 and 500 {mu}m. The cytotoxicity tests revealed that the porous HA scaffolds have no cytotoxic potential on MG63 osteoblast-like cells which might allow for their use as biomaterials.

  10. Novel bioactive root canal sealer to inhibit endodontic multispecies biofilms with remineralizing calcium phosphate ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Xie, Xianju; Li, Chunyan; Liu, Huaibing; Zhang, Ke; Zhou, Yanmin; Chang, Xiaofeng; Xu, Hockin H K

    2017-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop a bioactive endodontic sealer via dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM), 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) and nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) for the first time; and (2) evaluate inhibition of early-stage and mature multispecies endodontic biofilm, bond strength to root canal dentine, and calcium (Ca) and phosphate (P) ion release. A series of bioactive endodontic sealers were formulated with DMAHDM, MPC, and NACP. Root dentine bond strength was measured via a push-out test. Three endodontic strains, Enterococcus faecalis, Actinomyces naeslundii, and Fusobacterium nucleatum, were grown on endodontic sealer disks to form multispecies biofilms. Biofilms were grown for 3 days (early) and 14 days (mature). Colony-forming units (CFU), live/dead assay, metabolic activity and polysaccharide were determined. Ca and P ion release from endodontic sealer was measured. Incorporating DMAHDM, MPC and NACP did not decrease the push-out bond strength (p>0.1). Adding DMAHDM and MPC reduced endodontic biofilm CFU by 3 log. DMAHDM or MPC each greatly decreased the biofilm CFU (pEndodontic sealer with DMAHDM+MPC had much greater killing efficacy than DMAHDM or MPC alone (pEndodontic sealer with DMAHDM+MPC had slightly lower, but not significantly lower, Ca and P ion release compared to that without DMAHDM+MPC (p>0.1). A novel bioactive endodontic sealer was developed with potent inhibition of multispecies endodontic biofilms, reducing biofilm CFU by 3 log, while containing NACP for remineralization and possessing good bond strength to root canal dentine walls. The new bioactive endodontic sealer is promising for endodontic applications to eradicate endodontic biofilms and strengthen root structures. The combination of DMAHDM, MPC and NACP may be applicable to other preventive and restoration resins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Structure-Composition-Property Relationships in Polymeric Amorphous Calcium Phosphate-Based Dental Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drago Skrtic

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Our studies of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP-based materials over the last decade have yielded bioactive polymeric composites capable of protecting teeth from demineralization or even regenerating lost tooth mineral. The anti-cariogenic/remineralizing potential of these ACP composites originates from their propensity, when exposed to the oral environment, to release in a sustained manner sufficient levels of mineral-forming calcium and phosphate ions to promote formation of stable apatitic tooth mineral. However, the less than optimal ACP filler/resin matrix cohesion, excessive polymerization shrinkage and water sorption of these experimental materials can adversely affect their physicochemical and mechanical properties, and, ultimately, limit their lifespan. This study demonstrates the effects of chemical structure and composition of the methacrylate monomers used to form the matrix phase of composites on degree of vinyl conversion (DVC and water sorption of both copolymers and composites and the release of mineral ions from the composites. Modification of ACP surface via introducing cations and/or polymers ab initio during filler synthesis failed to yield mechanically improved composites. However, moderate improvement in composite’s mechanical stability without compromising its remineralization potential was achieved by silanization and/or milling of ACP filler. Using ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate or urethane dimethacrylate as base monomers and adding moderate amounts of hydrophilic 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate or its isomer ethyl-α-hydroxymethacrylate appears to be a promising route to maximize the remineralizing ability of the filler while maintaining high DVC. Exploration of the structure/composition/property relationships of ACP fillers and polymer matrices is complex but essential for achieving a better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that govern dissolution/re-precipitation of bioactive ACP fillers, and

  12. Characterization of nickel-doped biphasic calcium phosphate/graphene nanoplatelet composites for biomedical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baradaran, S., E-mail: saeid_baradaran@yahoo.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Moghaddam, E. [Tropical Infectious Diseases Research and Education Centre, Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Nasiri-Tabrizi, Bahman, E-mail: bahman_nasiri@hotmail.com [Advanced Materials Research Center, Materials Engineering Department, Najafabad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Basirun, W.J. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Institute of Nanotechnology& Catalysis Research (NanoCat), University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Mehrali, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Sookhakian, M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Hamdi, M. [Center of Advanced Manufacturing and Material Processing, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Alias, Y. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia)

    2015-04-01

    The effect of the addition of an ionic dopant to calcium phosphates for biomedical applications requires specific research due to the essential roles played in such processes. In the present study, the mechanical and biological properties of Ni-doped hydroxyapatite (HA) and Ni-doped HA mixed with graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) were evaluated. Ni (3 wt.% and 6 wt.%)-doped HA was synthesized using a continuous precipitation method and calcined at 900 °C for 1 h. The GNP (0.5–2 wt.%)-reinforced 6% Ni-doped HA (Ni6) composite was prepared using rotary ball milling for 15 h. The sintering process was performed using hot isostatic pressing at processing conditions of 1150 °C and 160 MPa with a 1-h holding time. The results indicated that the phase compositions and structural features of the products were noticeably affected by the Ni and GNPs. The mechanical properties of Ni6 and 1.5Ni6 were increased by 55% and 75% in hardness, 59% and 163% in fracture toughness and 120% and 85% in elastic modulus compared with monolithic HA, respectively. The in-vitro biological behavior was investigated using h-FOB osteoblast cells in 1, 3 and 5 days of culture. Based on the osteoblast results, the cytotoxicity of the products was indeed affected by the Ni doping. In addition, the effect of GNPs on the growth and proliferation of osteoblast cells was investigated in Ni6 composites containing different ratios of GNPs, where 1.5 wt.% was the optimum value. - Highlights: • Ni doped biphasic calcium phosphate/graphene nanoplatelets composite was investigated. • Mechanical and biological properties were evaluated. • Phase compositions and structural features were influenced noticeably by the Ni and GNPs. • The cytotoxicity of the Ni was improved with the addition of GNPs.

  13. EFFECT OF FLUORIDE VARNISHES CONTAINING DIFFERENT CALCIUM PHOSPHATE SOURCES ON MINERALIZATION OF INITIAL PRIMARY ENAMEL LESIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rirattanapong, Praphasri; Vongsavan, Kadkao; Saengsirinavin, Chavengkiat; Pornmahala, Tuenjai

    2014-11-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of fluoride varnishes containing different calcium phosphate sources on demineralization of initial primary enamel lesions. Forty-eight sound primary incisors were completely coated with nail varnish except for two 1 x 1 mm windows before being placed in demineralizing solution for 4 days. After demineralization, one of the windows in each tooth was coated with nail varnish. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups (A to D; n = 12), and then the other (exposed) window was treated with: Group A: deionized water, Group B: Duraphat® fluoride varnish, Group C: Clinpro™ White varnish and Group D: Enamel Pro® varnish. The pH-cycling regimen was carried out consisting of demineralization (6 hours) and remineralization (18 hours) for 7 days. Polarized light microscopy was used to evaluate the lesion depth initially and then after a seven-day pH cycle. Lesion depth was measured using a computerized method with the Image-Pro® Plus Program. The pair t-test was used to compare lesion depths before and after treatment. Differences in mean lesion depths among the groups were compared with the one-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparison tests with 95% confidence intervals. The lesion depths had a significant difference between before and after treatment of the all groups. There was a significant increase in lesion depth in Group A compared to the other groups. No significant differences were seen among Groups B, C and D, containing fluoride and the different calcium phosphate sources in inhibiting progression of initial primary enamel lesions.

  14. Novel dental adhesives containing nanoparticles of silver and amorphous calcium phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Mary Anne S.; Cheng, Lei; Zhang, Ke; Weir, Michael D.; Rodrigues, Lidiany K. A.; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Secondary caries is the main reason for restoration failure, and replacement of the failed restorations accounts for 50–70% of all restorations. Antibacterial adhesives could inhibit residual bacteria in tooth cavity and invading bacteria along the margins. Calcium (Ca) and phosphate (P) ion release could remineralize the lesions. The objectives of this study were to incorporate nanoparticles of silver (NAg) and nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) into adhesive for the first time, and to investigate the effects on dentin bond strength and plaque microcosm biofilms. Methods Scotchbond Multi-Purpose adhesive was used as control. NAg were added into primer and adhesive at 0.1% by mass. NACP were mixed into adhesive at 10%, 20%, 30% and 40%. Microcosm biofilms were grown on disks with primer covering the adhesive on a composite. Biofilm metabolic activity, colony-forming units (CFU) and lactic acid were measured. Results Human dentin shear bond strengths (n=10) ranged from 26 to 34 MPa; adding NAg and NACP into adhesive did not decrease the bond strength (p > 0.1). SEM examination revealed resin tags from well-filled dentinal tubules. Numerous NACP infiltrated into the dentinal tubules. While NACP had little antibacterial effect, NAg in bonding agents greatly reduced the biofilm viability and metabolic activity, compared to the control (p Dental plaque microcosm biofilm viability and acid production were greatly reduced on bonding agents containing NAg and NACP, without compromising dentin bond strength. The novel method of incorporating dual agents (remineralizing agent NACP and antibacterial agent NAg) may have wide applicability to other dental bonding systems. PMID:23138046

  15. Electrochemical characteristics of calcium-phosphatized AZ31 magnesium alloy in 0.9 % NaCl solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadzima, Branislav; Mhaede, Mansour; Pastorek, Filip

    2014-05-01

    Magnesium alloys suffer from their high reactivity in common environments. Protective layers are widely created on the surface of magnesium alloys to improve their corrosion resistance. This article evaluates the influence of a calcium-phosphate layer on the electrochemical characteristics of AZ31 magnesium alloy in 0.9 % NaCl solution. The calcium phosphate (CaP) layer was electrochemically deposited in a solution containing 0.1 M Ca(NO3)2, 0.06 M NH4H2PO4 and 10 ml l(-1) of H2O2. The formed surface layer was composed mainly of brushite [(dicalcium phosphate dihidrate (DCPD)] as proved by energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. The surface morphology was observed by scanning electron microscopy. Immersion test was performed in order to observe degradation of the calcium phosphatized surfaces. The influence of the phosphate layer on the electrochemical characteristics of AZ31, in 0.9 % NaCl solution, was evaluated by potentiodynamic measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The obtained results were analysed by the Tafel-extrapolation method and equivalent circuits method. The results showed that the polarization resistance of the DCPD-coated surface is about 25 times higher than that of non-coated surface. The CaP electro-deposition process increased the activation energy of corrosion process.

  16. Next-generation resorbable polymer scaffolds with surface-precipitated calcium phosphate coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinku; Magno, Maria Hanshella R; Ortiz, Ophir; McBride, Sean; Darr, Aniq; Kohn, Joachim; Hollinger, Jeffrey O

    2015-03-01

    Next-generation synthetic bone graft therapies will most likely be composed of resorbable polymers in combination with bioactive components. In this article, we continue our exploration of E1001(1k), a tyrosine-derived polycarbonate, as an orthopedic implant material. Specifically, we use E1001(1k), which is degradable, nontoxic, and osteoconductive, to fabricate porous bone regeneration scaffolds that were enhanced by two different types of calcium phosphate (CP) coatings: in one case, pure dicalcium phosphate dihydrate was precipitated on the scaffold surface and throughout its porous structure (E1001(1k) + CP). In the other case, bone matrix minerals (BMM) such as zinc, manganese and fluoride were co-precipitated within the dicalcium phosphate dihydrate coating (E1001(1k) + BMM). These scaffold compositions were compared against each other and against ChronOS (Synthes USA, West Chester, PA, USA), a clinically used bone graft substitute (BGS), which served as the positive control in our experimental design. This BGS is composed of poly(lactide co-ε-caprolactone) and beta-tricalcium phosphate. We used the established rabbit calvaria critical-sized defect model to determine bone regeneration within the defect for each of the three scaffold compositions. New bone formation was determined after 2, 4, 6, 8 and 12 weeks by micro-computerized tomography (μCT) and histology. The experimental tyrosine-derived polycarbonate, enhanced with dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, E1001(1k) + CP, supported significant bone formation within the defects and was superior to the same scaffold containing a mix of BMM, E1001(1k) + BMM. The comparison with the commercially available BGS was complicated by the large variability in bone formation observed for the laboratory preparations of E1001(1k) scaffolds. At all time points, there was a trend for E1001(1k) + CP to be superior to the commercial BGS. However, only at the 6-week time point did this trend reach statistical significance

  17. Corrosion Behavior of PEO Coatings Formed on AZ31 Alloy in Phosphate-Based Electrolytes with Calcium Acetate Additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziyaei, E.; Atapour, M.; Edris, H.; Hakimizad, A.

    2017-07-01

    The PEO coating started on magnesium AZ31 using a unipolar DC power source. The coating was generated in the electrolyte based on Na3PO4·12H2O and KOH with calcium acetate as additive. The x-ray diffraction method showed some phases containing calcium and phosphate, which was created in the presence of additive. Also, the EDS tests of the sample's surfaces proved the existence of calcium on the surface. Based on the electrochemical tests results, the most corrosion resistance belongs to the sample with calcium acetate additive. In fact, the results of the EIS tests showed the coating with calcium acetate has the highest resistance but the lowest capacitance. However, this state belongs to the surface morphology, the lower porosity, and surface chemical composition.

  18. Modifications of a calcium phosphate cement with biomolecules--influence on nanostructure, material, and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vater, Corina; Lode, Anja; Bernhardt, Anne; Reinstorf, Antje; Nies, Berthold; Gelinsky, Michael

    2010-12-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPC), forming hydroxyapatite during the setting reaction, are characterized by good biocompatibility and osteoconductivity, however, their remodeling into native bone tissue is slow. One strategy to improve remodeling and bone regeneration is the directed modification of their nanostructure. In this study, a CPC was set in the presence of cocarboxylase, glucuronic acid, tartaric acid, α-glucose-1-phosphate, L-arginine, L-aspartic acid, and L-lysine, respectively, with the aim to influence formation and growth of hydroxyapatite crystals through the functional groups of these biomolecules. Except for glucuronic acid, all these modifications resulted in the formation of smaller and more agglomerated hydroxyapatite particles which had a positive impact on the biological performance indicated by first experiments with the human osteoblast cell line hFOB 1.19. Moreover, adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSC) as well as binding of the growth factors BMP-2 and VEGF was investigated on CPC modified with cocarboxylase, arginine, and aspartic acid. Initial adhesion of hBMSC was improved on these three modifications and proliferation was enhanced on CPC modified with cocarboxylase and arginine whereas osteogenic differentiation remained unaffected. Modification of the CPC with arginine and aspartic acid, but not with cocarboxylase, led to a higher BMP-2 binding. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A, 2010.

  19. A study of strontium doped calcium phosphate coatings on AZ31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Satish S., E-mail: sss42@pitt.edu [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Roy, Abhijit, E-mail: abr20@pitt.edu [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Lee, Boeun E.; Ohodnicki, John; Loghmanian, Autrine [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Banerjee, Ipsita [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Kumta, Prashant N., E-mail: pkumta@pitt.edu [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Center for Craniofacial Regeneration, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings have been studied to tailor the uncontrolled non-uniform corrosion of Mg based alloys while simultaneously enhancing bioactivity. The use of immersion techniques to deposit CaP coatings is attractive due to the ability of the approach to coat complex structures. In the current study, AZ31 substrates were subjected to various pretreatment conditions prior to depositing Sr{sup 2+} doped and undoped CaP coatings. It was hypothesized that the bioactivity and corrosion protection of CaP coatings could be improved by doping with Sr{sup 2+}. Heat treatment to elevated temperatures resulted in the diffusion of alloying elements, Mg and Zn, into the pretreated layer. Sr{sup 2+} doped and undoped CaP coatings formed on the pretreated substrates consisted of biphasic mixtures of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and hydroxyapatite (HA). Electrochemical corrosion experiments indicated that the extent of Sr{sup 2+} doping and pretreatment both influenced the corrosion protection. Cytotoxicity was evaluated with MC3T3-E1 mouse preosteoblasts and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). For both cell types, proliferation decreased upon increasing the Sr{sup 2+} concentration. However, both osteogenic gene and protein expression significantly increased upon increasing Sr{sup 2+} concentration. These results suggest that Sr{sup 2+} doped coatings are capable of promoting osteogenic differentiation on degradable Mg alloys, while also enhancing corrosion protection, in comparison to undoped CaP coatings.

  20. In vitro comparison of elution characteristics of vancomycin from calcium phosphate cement and polymethylmethacrylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urabe, Ken; Naruse, Kouji; Hattori, Hideki; Hirano, Masahiro; Uchida, Kentaroo; Onuma, Kenji; Park, Hwang Jung; Itoman, Moritoshi

    2009-11-01

    Calcium phosphate cement [CPC (Biopex)] has been used as the drug delivery system of choice for treatment of infected joint replacement because of its good elution efficiency. The influence of CPC polymerization on the bactericidal activity of vancomycin (VCM) impregnated into CPC has not been investigated. We compared VCM concentration, bactericidal activity, and profile of eluates between CPC and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA; Cemex RX). Test specimens consisted of a powder composite of CPC or PMMA, VCM and solvent (10:0.25:3.3 g). Each test specimen was immersed in sterile phosphate-buffered saline. Eluates obtained on days 1, 3, 7, and 14 and weeks 4, 8, and 12 were evaluated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and by microbiological assay (MBA). The elution level of VCM from CPC/VCM on day 1 was 8.1 fold greater than that from PMMA/VCM. The detection periods of VCM from CPC/VCM and PMMA/VCM were 8 weeks and 14 days, respectively. The values of eluates from CPC/VCM and PMMA/VCM obtained by HPLC were comparable to those obtained by MBA. HPLC chromatogram showed that the elution profiles of VCM from CPC/VCM and PMMA/VCM on day 1 were very close to those of standard solutions. CPC could release more VCM over a longer period than PMMA. The polymerization of CPC and PMMA did not alter the inhibitory activity of VCM and did not denature VCM.

  1. Effects of polymer concentration on the morphology of calcium phosphate crystals formed in polyacrylamide hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, Taishi; Kawashita, Masakazu; Ohtsuki, Chikara

    2013-11-01

    Growing crystals in hydrogels is an attractive method to form inorganic solids with designed morphology under ambient conditions. Precipitation of the inorganic solids in a hydrogel matrix can be regarded as mimicking the process of biomineralization. In the construction of biominerals, an organic template composed of insoluble macromolecules is used to control the crystal growth of the inorganic compounds. The morphological control in biomineralization can be applied to artificial reaction systems. In this study, the morphology of calcium phosphate crystals formed in polymeric hydrogels of various polymer concentrations was investigated. Spherical octacalcium phosphate (OCP) precipitated in the polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogels. Fibrous crystals gradually covered the surface of the spherical crystals as the polymer concentration of the gel increased. The morphology of the OCP crystals changed from sea urchin shapes to wool-ball shapes with increasing PAAm concentration. The morphological change is generated by the template effect of the polymer wall, which is made up of stacked PAAm sheets, surrounding the spherical OCP crystals.

  2. Continuous cellularization of calcium phosphate hybrid scaffolds induced by plasma polymer activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergemann, Claudia; Cornelsen, Matthias; Quade, Antje; Laube, Thorsten; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Rebl, Henrike; Weißmann, Volker; Seitz, Hermann; Nebe, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    The generation of hybrid materials based on β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) and various biodegradable polymers like poly(l-lactide-co-d,l-lactide) (PLA) represents a common approach to overcoming the disadvantages of pure TCP devices. These disadvantages lie in TCP's mechanical properties, such as brittleness. The positive characteristic of PLA - improvement of compressive strength of calcium phosphate scaffolds - is diametrically opposed to its cell attractiveness. Therefore, the objective of this work was to optimize osteoblast migration and cellularization inside a three-dimensionally (3D) printed, PLA polymer stabilized TCP hybrid scaffold by a plasma polymer process depositing amino groups via allylamine. MG-63 osteoblastic cells inside the 10mm hybrid scaffold were dynamically cultivated for 14days in a 3D model system integrated in a perfusion reactor. The whole TCP/PLA hybrid scaffold was continuously colonized due to plasma polymerized allylamine activation inducing the migration potential of osteoblasts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Nanocrystalline biphasic resorbable calcium phosphate (HAp/β-TCP) thin film prepared by electron beam evaporation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elayaraja, K.; Chandra, V. Sarath; Joshy, M.I. Ahymah; Suganthi, R.V. [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai 600025, Tamil Nadu (India); Asokan, K. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Kalkura, S. Narayana, E-mail: kalkura@yahoo.com [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai 600025, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2013-06-01

    Biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) thin film having resorbable β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and non-resorbable hydroxyapatite (HAp) phases having enhanced bioactivity was synthesized by electron beam evaporation technique. Nanosized BCP was deposited as a layer (500 nm) on (0 0 1) silicon substrate by electron beam evaporation and crystalline phase of samples were found to improve on annealing at 700 °C. Uniform deposition of calcium phosphate on silicon substrate was verified from elemental mapping using scanning electron microscope (SEM-EDX). Annealing of the samples led to a decrease in surface roughness, hydrophobicity and dissolution of the coating layer. Amoxicillin loaded thin films exhibited significant bacterial resistance. In addition, BCP thin films did not exhibit any cytotoxicity. Antibiotics incorporated BCP coated implants might prevent the post-surgical infections and could promote bone-bonding of orthopedic devices.

  4. In Vitro Properties of Orthodontic Adhesives with Fluoride or Amorphous Calcium Phosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Ka Wai Chow

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This in vitro study evaluated the efficacy of orthodontic adhesives with fluoride or amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP in reducing bacterial adhesion and enamel demineralization. Forty human premolars each sectioned buccolingually into three parts were bracketed with control resin (Transbond XT or adhesives containing ACP (Aegis Ortho or fluoride (QuickCure. Artificial lesions induced by pH cycling were examined by X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometry (XPS and polarized light microscopy (PLM. After 28 days, Aegis Ortho demonstrated the lowest calcium and phosphorous content by XPS analysis. After 42 days, reductions in lesion depth areas were 23.6% for Quick Cure and 20.3% for Aegis Ortho (P<0.05. In the presence of 1% sucrose, adhesion of Streptococcus mutans to Aegis Ortho and Quick Cure was reduced by 41.8% and 37.7% (P<0.05 as compared to Transbond XT. Composites containing ACP or fluoride reduced bacterial adherence and lesion formation as compared to a composite without ACP or fluoride.

  5. The porosity and roughness of electrodeposited calcium phosphate coatings in simulated body fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đošić Marija S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate coatings were electrochemically deposited on titanium from the aqueous solution of Ca(NO32 and NH4H2PO4 with the current density of 10 mA cm-2 for deposition time of 15 min. The obtained brushite coatings, (CaHPO4·2H2O, were converted to hydroxyapatite (HA by soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF for 2, 7 and 14 days. The brushite and hydroxyapatite coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM. It was shown that the increase in soaking time increases the porosity, roughness and crystallite domain size of HA coatings and decreases the unit cell parameters and unit cell volume, while does not affect the HA mean pore area. The calcium and phosphorus ions concentrations in SBF were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS and UV-Vis spectroscopy, respectively and the mechanism of HA growth based on dissolution-precipitation was proposed. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 45019, br. III 45015 i br. OI 72004

  6. A silicon cell cycle in a bacterial model of calcium phosphate mineralogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, Kathryn M; Tapping, Charles R; Adams, David G; CarterR, D Howard; Shore, Roger C; Aaron, Jean E

    2013-01-01

    The prokaryote Corynebacterium matruchotii produces calcium phosphate (bone salt) and may serve as a convenient model for examining individual factors relevant to vertebrate calcification. A factor of current clinical uncertainty is silicon. To investigate its possible role in biomineralisation advanced optical (digital deconvolution and 3D fluorescent image rendering) and electron microscopy (EDX microanalysis and elemental mapping) were applied to calcifying microbial colonies grown in graded Si concentrations (0-60mM). Cell viability was confirmed throughout by TO-PRO-3-iodide and SYTO-9 nucleic acid staining. It was observed that calcium accumulated in dense intracellular microspherical objects (types i-iii) as nanoparticles (5 nm, type i), nanospheres (30-50 nm, type ii) and filamentous clusters (0.1-0.5 μm, type iii), with a regular transitory Si content evident. With bacterial colony development (7-28 days) the P content increased from 5 to 60%, while Si was displaced from 60 to 5%, distinguishing the phenomenon from random contamination, and with a significant relationship (pcalcium phosphorylation in biological systems, thereby recapitulating an ancient and conserved bacterial cycle of calcification via silicification. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Osseoconductive and Corrosion-Inhibiting Plasma-Sprayed Calcium Phosphate Coatings for Metallic Medical Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert B. Heimann

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available During the last several decades, research into bioceramic coatings for medical implants has emerged as a hot topic among materials scientists and clinical practitioners alike. In particular, today, calcium phosphate-based bioceramic materials are ubiquitously used in clinical applications to coat the stems of metallic endoprosthetic hips as well as the surfaces of dental root implants. Such implants frequently consist of titanium alloys, CoCrMo alloy, or austenitic surgical stainless steels, and aim at replacing lost body parts or restoring functions to diseased or damaged tissues of the human body. In addition, besides such inherently corrosion-resistant metals, increasingly, biodegradable metals such as magnesium alloys are being researched for osseosynthetic devices and coronary stents both of which are intended to remain in the human body for only a short time. Biocompatible coatings provide not only vital biological functions by supporting osseoconductivity but may serve also to protect the metallic parts of implants from corrosion in the aggressive metabolic environment. Moreover, the essential properties of hydroxylapatite-based bioceramic coatings including their in vitro alteration in contact with simulated body fluids will be addressed in this current review paper. In addition, a paradigmatic shift is suggested towards the development of transition metal-substituted calcium hexa-orthophosphates with the NaSiCON (Na superionic conductor structure to be used for implant coatings with superior degradation resistance in the corrosive body environment and with pronounced ionic conductivity that might be utilized in novel devices for electrical bone growth stimulation.

  8. Calcium Carbonate Phosphate Binding Ion Exchange Filtration and Accelerated Denitrification Improve Public Health Standards and Combat Eutrophication in Aquatic Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanamadala, Vijay

    2010-01-01

    Cultural eutrophication, the process by which a lake becomes rich in dissolved nutrients as a result of point and nonpoint pollutant sources, is a major cause of the loss of natural lake ecosystems throughout the world. The process occurs naturally in all lakes, but phosphate-rich nutrient runoff from sources such as storm drains and agricultural runoff is a major cause of excess phosphate-induced eutrophication. Especially in Madrona Marsh, one of the last remaining vernal marshes in the greater Los Angeles area, California, cultural eutrophication has become a major problem. In this study, calcium carbonate was found to be an excellent phosphate binder, reducing up to 70% of the phosphates in a given sample of water, and it posed relatively negligent ecological repercussions. This study involved the testing of this principle in both the laboratory and the real ecosystem. A calcium carbonate lacing procedure was first carried out to determine its efficacy in Madrona Marsh. Through this, ammonia was found to interfere with the solubility of calcium carbonate and therefore to be a hindrance to the reduction of phosphate. Therefore, various approaches for reduction of ammonia were tested, including aeration, use of fiber growth media, and plants, mainly Caulerpa verticellata, chosen for it hardiness, primarily in an attempt to increase population of Nitrobacter and Nitrosomonas. All were successful in moderately reducing ammonia levels. In addition, soil sampling, sediment analysis, microscopic plant analysis, microorganism and macroinvertebrate identification, and rate law formulations were conducted. The effect of phosphate and ammonia reduction on the populations of enterobacteria was also an important focus of this experiment. Varying concentrations of phosphate, ammonia, and calcium carbonate in conjunction with phosphate were tested in Madrona Marsh to determine their effects on the populations of enteropathogens on nonspecific blood agar, MacConkey agar, and

  9. Rapid hydrothermal flow synthesis and characterisation of carbonate- and silicate-substituted calcium phosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Jonathan C; Rehman, Ihtesham; Darr, Jawwad A

    2013-01-01

    A range of crystalline and nano-sized carbonate- and silicate-substituted hydroxyapatite has been successfully produced by using continuous hydrothermal flow synthesis technology. Ion-substituted calcium phosphates are better candidates for bone replacement applications (due to improved bioactivity) as compared to phase-pure hydroxyapatite. Urea was used as a carbonate source for synthesising phase pure carbonated hydroxyapatite (CO3-HA) with ≈5 wt% substituted carbonate content (sample 7.5CO3-HA) and it was found that a further increase in urea concentration in solution resulted in biphasic mixtures of carbonate-substituted hydroxyapatite and calcium carbonate. Transmission electron microscopy images revealed that the particle size of hydroxyapatite decreased with increasing urea concentration. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy result revealed a calcium deficient apatite with Ca:P molar ratio of 1.45 (±0.04) in sample 7.5CO3-HA. For silicate-substituted hydroxyapatite (SiO4-HA) silicon acetate was used as a silicate ion source. It was observed that a substitution threshold of ∼1.1 wt% exists for synthesis of SiO4-HA in the continuous hydrothermal flow synthesis system, which could be due to the decreasing yields with progressive increase in silicon acetate concentration. All the as-precipitated powders (without any additional heat treatments) were analysed using techniques including Transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, Differential scanning calorimetry, Thermogravimetric analysis, Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. PMID:22983020

  10. Nano clay-enhanced calcium phosphate cements and hydrogels for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jammalamadaka, Udayabhanu

    Biomaterials are used as templates for drug delivery, scaffolds in tissue engineering, grafts in surgeries, and support for tissue regeneration. Novel biomaterial composites are needed to meet multifaceted requirements of compatibility, ease of fabrication and controlled drug delivery. Currently used biomaterials in orthopedics surgeries suffer limitations in toxicity and preventing infections. Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) used as bone cement suffers from limitations of thermal necrosis and monomer toxicity calls for development of better cementing biomaterials. A biodegradable/bioresorbable cement with good mechanical properties is needed to address this short coming. Metal implants used in fixing fractures or total joint replacement needs improvements in preventing biofilm formation and better tissue integration. This research addressed the above mentioned research gaps by formulating novel biomaterial composites. Calcium phosphate cements are the alternative bone cements that are bioresorbable and promote tissue integration. These cements lack sufficient mechanical strengths to be used in load bearing sites. The addition of nanoparticles is hypothesized to improve the mechanical properties without inducing toxicity to the tissue. This hypothesis was tested by evaluating compression and flexural strengths in addition to cytocompatibility tests. Results indicate that addition of nano-clay particles (halloysites nanotubes) improved the compressive strength and osteoinductive properties of calcium phosphate cements. To address the research need of preventing implant failure due to infection and aseptic loosening, novel coatings are needed. Hydrogels are well establish for their ability to mimic in vivo environment, promote cell viability and as drug delivery vehicles. Use of composites of hydrogels and drug-loaded nanoparticles to prevent infection was evaluated. Cytocompatibility results indicate good cell viability. Antibacterial results show sustained release

  11. CALCIUM PHOSPHATE GRANULES IN THE HEPATOPANCREAS OF THE BLUE CRAB CALLINECTES SAPIDUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Gerald L.; Chen, Chung-Ho; Greenawalt, John W.; Lehninger, Albert L.

    1974-01-01

    The hepatopancreas of the adult male blue crab Callinectes sapidus in intermolt was found to contain substantial amounts of calcium, magnesium, and inorganic phosphorus, averaging about 260, 20, and 250 µg-atoms per g wet tissue, respectively, accounting for over 10% of the tissue dry weight. Electron microscopy of the intact tissue showed three qualitatively different granular structures having electron densities suggestive of high mineral content. After fractionation of the tissue using centrifugal techniques, almost 95% of the total mineral was found to reside in a heavy, nonmitochondrial particulate fraction(s). The bulk of the low-speed pellet consisted of relatively dense, roughly spherical granules 1–5 µm in diameter, which could be considerably purified by repeated suspension in water and low-speed sedimentation. In the electron microscope the isolated granules appeared basically similar to one of the three characteristic types of electron-dense granules seen in the intact tissue. Although the freshly isolated granules lost approximately 50% of their wet weight when dried at 105°C, only 10% more was lost upon dry ashing at 450°C, suggesting a fairly low content of organic material. Chemical analysis revealed calcium, magnesium, and inorganic phosphate at 5.7, 2.1, and 4.4 µg-atoms per mg dried granules, respectively, accounting for 69% of the dry weight of the fraction. By specific enzymatic assays, the freshly isolated granules were found to contain ATP, ADP, and AMP at levels of 0.13, 0.03, and 0.01 µmol/mg, or 8% of their total dry weight. The remainder of the total phosphorus contributed an additional 3%, whereas carbonate, citrate, oxalate, and protein each constituted no more than 1%. The mineral granules of the crab hepatopancreas appear to function as storage forms of calcium and phosphate during the intermolt period. This tissue appears promising as a model for study of the cellular events associated with biological calcification, since

  12. Effects of silica and calcium levels in nanobioglass ceramic particles on osteoblast proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorthi, A; Parihar, P R; Saravanan, S; Vairamani, M; Selvamurugan, N

    2014-10-01

    At nanoscale, bioglass ceramic (nBGC) particles containing calcium oxide (lime), silica and phosphorus pentoxide promote osteoblast proliferation. However, the role of varied amounts of calcium and silica present in nBGC particles on osteoblast proliferation is not yet completely known. Hence, the current work was aimed at synthesizing two different nBGC particles with varied amounts of calcium oxide and silica, nBGC-1: SiO2:CaO:P2O5; mol%~70:25:5 and nBGC-2: SiO2:CaO:P2O5; mol%~64:31:5, and investigating their role on osteoblast proliferation. The synthesized nBGC particles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. They exhibited their size at nanoscale and were non-toxic to human osteoblastic cells (MG-63). The nBGC-2 particles were found to have more effect on stimulation of osteoblast proliferation and promoted entering of more cells into G2/M cell cycle phase compared to nBGC-1 particles. There was a differential expression of cyclin proteins in MG-63 cells by nBGC-1 and nBGC-2 treatments, and the expression of cyclin B1 and E proteins was found to be more by nBGC-2 treatment. Thus, these results provide us a new insight in understanding the design of various nBGC particles by altering their ionic constituents with desirable biological properties thereby supporting bone augmentation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The influence of some transition metal ions in lead- and calcium-phosphate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedeanu, N.S. [Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Department of Physics-Biophysics, RO-400023 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Magdas, D.A., E-mail: amagdas@itim-cj.ro [National Institute for Research and Development for Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, RO-400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2012-09-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Preparation of phosphate glasses dopped with: CuO, V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MoO{sub 3.} Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPR investigation on x(CuO{center_dot}V{sub 2}O{sub 5})(100-x)[P{sub 2}O{sub 5}{center_dot}CaO] glass system, x Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 50 mol%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPR investigation on x(Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}MoO{sub 3}) (1-x)[2P{sub 2}O{sub 5}PbO] glass system, x Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 50 mol%. - Abstract: Phosphate glasses, despite of their poor chemical durability have many biomedical and technological applications. Phosphate materials containing calcium oxide are intensely studied because they may have bioactive potential. Such materials with calcium oxide can be produced to have similar bone structure or to be used as microstructures for active implant. On the other hand phosphate materials containing lead oxide are used in the nuclear technique as nuclear waste encapsulation. The present work is a structural study on some phosphate glasses containing vanadium, copper, molybdenum and iron ions. The following two glass systems were investigated by EPR method: x(CuO{center_dot}V{sub 2}O{sub 5})(100-x)[P{sub 2}O{sub 5}{center_dot}CaO] and x(Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}MoO{sub 3}) (1-x)[2P{sub 2}O{sub 5}PbO] with 0.5 Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To x Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 50 mol%. In both systems, EPR spectra evidenced the hyperfine structure of vanadium and molybdenum ions. EPR parameters indicate the presence of V{sup 4+} ions in C{sub 4V} symmetry until 7 mol%. After this concentration the hyperfine structure of vanadium disappears due to the clusters formation. Hyperfine structure of copper was not evidenced in x(CuO{center_dot}V{sub 2}O{sub 5})(100-x)[P{sub 2}O{sub 5}{center_dot}CaO] system. EPR spectra for xFe{sub 2}O{sub 3}MoO{sub 3} (1-x)[2P{sub 2}O{sub 5}PbO] evidence the presence of molybdenum ions in a C{sub 4v} symmetry, but for iron ions weak signals at g Almost

  14. In-situ observation of the transformation of amorphous calcium phosphate to crystalline hydroxyapatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stammeier, Jessica; Hippler, Dorothee; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Sacher, Stephan; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Amorphous calcium phosphate (Ca3(PO4)2*nH2O; ACP) is often a precursor phase of the mineral (hydroxy-) apatite (Ca5(PO4)3(OH)) that can be formed in natural settings during both authigenic and biogenic mineral formation. Particularly, in the biomineralization process of fish tissue, ACP has shown to be an important transient phase. In solution ACP rapidly transforms into the crystalline phase. The transformation rate highly depends on the physico-chemical conditions of the solution: Ca & P availability, pH and temperature. In natural settings Ca can be provided by different sources: from (1) seawater, (2) porewater, or (3) diagenetically-altered carbonates, whereas local supersaturation of P can be induced by microbial activity. In this study, we performed phosphate precipitation experiments in order to monitor the transformation process of the ACP to crystalline hydroxyapatite (HAP) using in-situ Raman spectroscopy. During the experiments the temperature was kept constant at 20.0 ± 0.01 ° C and pH at 9 ± 0.1. 50 ml of 0.3 CaCl 2H2O was titrated at a rate of 5 ml/min to an equal volume of 0.2 M Na2HPO4. The pH was kept constant by titration of 1 M NaOH. During the experiment samples were taken from the solution and instantly filtered. The obtained solid samples were lyophilized and analyzed with XRD, ATR and SEM. The respective solution samples were analyzed using ion chromatography and ICP OES, coupling the spectroscopic data with detailed solution chemistry data. We observed transformation of ACP to HAP to occur within 14 hours, illustrated in a clear peak shift in Raman spectra from 950 cm-1 to 960 cm-1. The obtained results are discussed in the aspects of distribution of major elements during the formation of phosphates and/or the diagenetic alteration of carbonates to phosphates in geologic settings. Financial support by DFG-FG 736 and NAWI Graz is kindly acknowledged.

  15. The effect of short chain fatty acid administration on hepatic glucose, phosphate, magnesium and calcium metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veech, R L; Gitomer, W L; King, M T; Balaban, R S; Costa, J L; Eanes, E D

    1986-01-01

    Intra peritoneal administration of the short chain fatty acids, acetate, propionate and butyrate, in amounts calculated to reach 20 mM in total body water were given to fed and 48 hour starved male Wistar rats. One half hour after administration, the livers were freeze-clamped and the hepatic contents of various intermediary metabolites were measured. The liver content of total glycolytic intermediates was elevated by short chain fatty acids. In fed animals, the portion of glycolysis from fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) to PEP was elevated 2 to 4 fold. In 48 hour starved animals, where gluconeogenesis is active, the portion of the gluconeogenetic pathway from FBP to glucose was elevated 1.5 to 3.5 fold with the exception of the butyrate treated animals where blood glucose was not elevated. The metabolites of the hexose-monophosphate pathway that were measured, namely 6-phosphogluconate, ribulose 5-phosphate and xylose 5-phosphate were increased in both fed and starved animals. The free cytoplasmic [NAD+]/[NADH], [NADP+]/[NADPH], and [epsilon ATP]/[epsilon ADP] X [epsilon Pi] ratios were all decreased in both fed and starved animals after short chain fatty acid administration. The liver content of calcium increased 1.2 to 2 fold in fed animals and 2 to 3 fold in starved animals while total liver magnesium was either unchanged or increased only 1.2 times. The liver pyrophosphate (PPi) content increased a minimum of 10 fold in fed animals and over 100 fold in starved animals. In all cases no PPi could be detected in vivo by 31P NMR even though in the starved rats the PPi levels approached those of ATP. The liver content of inorganic Pi increased 1.3 to 1.5 fold in fed animals and 1.5 to 2 fold in starved animals. The total "rapidly metabolizing" Pi pool, that includes adenine and guanine nucleotides, glycolytic and shunt intermediates, Pi and PPi increased 1.3 times in fed animals (from 13.8 mumole/g fresh weight) and 1.5 to 1.7 fold in starved animals (from 15

  16. Effect of hydroxyapatite, octacalcium phosphate and calcium phosphate on the auto-flocculation of the microalgae in a high-rate algal pond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baya, D T; Effebi, K R; Tangou, T T; Keffala, C; Vasel, J L

    2013-01-01

    Recovering microalgae is one of the main technological and economic concerns in a high-rate algal pond (HRAP) because of their small size and their low density. This paper emphasizes the characterization (identification and assessment of potential flocculation) of chemical compounds involved in microalgae auto-flocculation in a HRAP. First, thermodynamic simulations were performed, using two models (i.e. Visual Minteq and a simplified thermodynamic model) in order to determine the chemical compounds of interest. Experimental tests were then carried out with these compounds for assessing their flocculation ability. Both models revealed that precipitates of calcium