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Sample records for calcium phosphate cements

  1. Development of a fully injectable calcium phosphate cement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/boms/026/04/0415-0422. Keywords. Calcium phosphate cements; hydroxyapatite; bioceramics; bone substitute; orthopedic; dental. Abstract. A study on the development of a fully injectable calcium phosphate cement for orthopedic and dental applications is presented.

  2. Calcium phosphate cement scaffolds with PLGA fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcellos, Letícia Araújo; dos Santos, Luís Alberto

    2013-04-01

    The use of calcium phosphate-based biomaterials has revolutionized current orthopedics and dentistry in repairing damaged parts of the skeletal system. Among those biomaterials, the cement made of hydraulic grip calcium phosphate has attracted great interest due to its biocompatibility and hardening "in situ". However, these cements have low mechanical strength compared with the bones of the human body. In the present work, we have studied the attainment of calcium phosphate cement powders and their addition to poly (co-glycolide) (PLGA) fibers to increase mechanical properties of those cements. We have used a new method that obtains fibers by dripping different reagents. PLGA fibers were frozen after lyophilized. With this new method, which was patented, it was possible to obtain fibers and reinforcing matrix which furthered the increase of mechanical properties, thus allowing the attainment of more resistant materials. The obtained materials were used in the construction of composites and scaffolds for tissue growth, keeping a higher mechanical integrity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of a calcium phosphate cement based on alpha-tricalcium phosphate obtained by wet precipitation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurmer, M.B.; Diehl, C.E.; Vieira, R.S.; Coelho, W.T.G.; Santos, L.A.

    2012-01-01

    There are several systems of calcium phosphate cements being studied. Those based on alpha-tricalcium phosphate are of particular interest. After setting they produce calcium deficient hydroxyapatite similar to bone like hydroxyapatite. This work aims to obtain alpha-tricalcium phosphate powders by the wet precipitation process, using calcium nitrate and phosphoric acid as reagents. This powder was characterized by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and particle size distribution. In order to prepare the calcium phosphate cement, the powder was mixed with an accelerator in an aqueous solution. The mechanical properties of the cement were assessed and it was evaluated by means of apparent density, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The described method produced crystalline alpha-tricalcium phosphate as the major phase. The calcium phosphate cement showed high values of compression strength (50 MPa). The soaking of the cement in a simulated body fluid (SBF) formed a layer of hydroxyapatite like crystals in the surface of the samples. (author)

  4. Preparation and characterization of bioceramics produced from calcium phosphate cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andriotis, O.; Katsamenis, O.L. [Department of Materials Science, University of Patras, 26504, Patras (Greece); Mouzakis, D.E. [Technological Educational Institute of Larisa, Department of Mechanical Engineering, T.E.I of Larissa, 411 10, Larissa (Greece); Bouropoulos, N. [Foundation for Research and Technology, Hellas, Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical Processes, FORTH/ICE-HT, P.O. Box 1414, 26504 Rio Patras (Greece)

    2010-03-15

    The present work reports a method for preparing calcium phosphate ceramics by calcination of calcium phosphate cements composed mainly of calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA). It was found that hardened cements calcinied at temperatures from to 600 to 1300 C were transformed to tricalcium phosphates. Moreover the compressive strength was determined and porosity was estimated as a function of the calcination temperature. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. Biocompatibility of calcium phosphate bone cement with optimised mechanical properties: an in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Iwan; Nelson, John; Schatton, Wolfgang; Dunne, Nicholas J; Buchanan, Fraser; Clarke, Susan A

    2016-12-01

    This work establishes the in vivo performance of modified calcium phosphate bone cements for vertebroplasty of spinal fractures using a lapine model. A non-modified calcium phosphate bone cement and collagen-calcium phosphate bone cements composites with enhanced mechanical properties, utilising either bovine collagen or collagen from a marine sponge, were compared to a commercial poly(methyl methacrylate) cement. Conical cement samples (8 mm height × 4 mm base diameter) were press-fit into distal femoral condyle defects in New Zealand White rabbits and assessed after 5 and 10 weeks. Bone apposition and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity around cements were assessed. All implants were well tolerated, but bone apposition was higher on calcium phosphate bone cements than on poly(methyl methacrylate) cement. Incorporation of collagen showed no evidence of inflammatory or immune reactions. Presence of positive tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining within cracks formed in calcium phosphate bone cements suggested active osteoclasts were present within the implants and were actively remodelling within the cements. Bone growth was also observed within these cracks. These findings confirm the biological advantages of calcium phosphate bone cements over poly(methyl methacrylate) and, coupled with previous work on enhancement of mechanical properties through collagen incorporation, suggest collagen-calcium phosphate bone cement composite may offer an alternative to calcium phosphate bone cements in applications where low setting times and higher mechanical stability are important.

  6. Brittle and ductile adjustable cement derived from calcium phosphate cement/polyacrylic acid composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Ju, Chien-Ping; Wang, Jen-Chyan; Hung, Chun-Cheng; Chern Lin, Jiin-Huey

    2008-12-01

    Bone filler has been used over the years in dental and biomedical applications. The present work is to characterize a non-dispersive, fast setting, modulus adjustable, high bioresorbable composite bone cement derived from calcium phosphate-based cement combined with polymer and binding agents. This cement, we hope, will not swell in simulated body fluid and keep the osteogenetic properties of the dry bone and avoid its disadvantages of being brittle. We developed a calcium phosphate cement (CPC) of tetracalcium phosphate/dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (TTCP/DCPA)-polyacrylic acid with tartaric acid, calcium fluoride additives and phosphate hardening solution. The results show that while composite, the hard-brittle properties of 25wt% polyacrylic acid are proportional to CPC and mixing with additives is the same as those of the CPC without polyacrylic acid added. With an increase of polyacrylic acid/CPC ratio, the 67wt% samples revealed ductile-tough properties and 100wt% samples kept ductile or elastic properties after 24h of immersion. The modulus range of this development was from 200 to 2600MPa after getting immersed in simulated body fluid for 24h. The TTCP/DCPA-polyacrylic acid based CPC demonstrates adjustable brittle/ductile strength during setting and after immersion, and the final reaction products consist of high bioresorbable monetite/brushite/calcium fluoride composite with polyacrylic acid.

  7. Prediction of the Setting Properties of Calcium Phosphate Bone Cement

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    Seyed Mahmud Rabiee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Setting properties of bone substitutes are improved using an injectable system. The injectable bone graft substitutes can be molded to the shape of the bone cavity and set in situ when injected. Such system is useful for surgical operation. The powder part of the injectable bone cement is included of β-tricalcium phosphate, calcium carbonate, and dicalcium phosphate and the liquid part contains poly ethylene glycol solution with different concentrations. In this way, prediction of the mechanical properties, setting times, and injectability helps to optimize the calcium phosphate bone cement properties. The objective of this study is development of three different adaptive neurofuzzy inference systems (ANFISs for estimation of compression strength, setting time, and injectability using the data generated based on experimental observations. The input parameters of models are polyethylene glycol percent and liquid/powder ratio. Comparison of the predicted values and measured data indicates that the ANFIS model has an acceptable performance to the estimation of calcium phosphate bone cement properties.

  8. Production and characterization of setting hydraulic cements based on calcium phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Luci C. de; Rigo, Eliana C.S.; Santos, Luis A dos; Boschi, Anselmo Ortega; Carrodeguas, Raul G.

    1997-01-01

    Setting hydraulic cements based on calcium phosphate has risen great interest in scientific literature during recent years due to their total bio compatibility and to the fact that they harden 'in situ', providing easy handling and adaptation to the shape and dimensions of the defect which requires correction, differently from the predecessors, the calcium phosphate ceramics (Hydroxy apatite, β-tri calcium phosphate, biphasic, etc) in the shape of dense or porous blocks and grains. In the work, three calcium-phosphate cement compositions were studied. The resulting compositions were characterized according to the following aspects: setting times, pH, mechanical resistance, crystalline phases, microstructure and solubility in SBF (Simulated Body Fluid). The results show a potential use for the compositions. (author)

  9. Effect of the calcium to phosphorus ratio on the setting properties of calcium phosphate bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlad, M D; Gómez, S; Barracó, M; López, J; Fernández, E

    2012-09-01

    α-Tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) has become the main reactant of most experimental and commercial ceramic bone cements. It has calcium-to-phosphorus (Ca/P) ratio of 1.50. The present study expands and reports on the microstructures and mechanical properties of calcium phosphate (CP) cements containing sintered monolithic reactants obtained in the interval 1.29 properties as well as on their microstructure and crystal phase evolution. The results showed that: (a) CP-cements made with reactants with Ca/P ratio other than 1.50 have longer setting and lower hardening properties; (b) CP-cements reactivity was clearly affected by the Ca/P ratio of the starting reactant; (c) reactants with Ca/P calcium pyrophosphate and α- and β-TCP. Similarly, reactants with Ca/P > 1.50 were composed of α-TCP, tetracalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite; (d) only the reactant with Ca/P = 1.50 was monophasic and was made of α-TCP, which transformed during the setting into calcium deficient hydroxyapatite; (e) CP-cements developed different crystal microstructures with specific features depending on the Ca/P ratio of the starting reactant.

  10. Calcium carbonate-calcium phosphate mixed cement compositions for bone reconstruction.

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    Combes, C; Bareille, R; Rey, C

    2006-11-01

    The feasibility of making calcium carbonate-calcium phosphate (CaCO(3)-CaP) mixed cements, comprising at least 40% (w/w) CaCO(3) in the dry powder ingredients, has been demonstrated. Several original cement compositions were obtained by mixing metastable crystalline CaCO(3) phases with metastable amorphous or crystalline CaP powders in aqueous medium. The cements set within at most 1 h at 37 degrees C in atmosphere saturated with water. The hardened cement is microporous and exhibits weak compressive strength. The setting reaction appeared to be essentially related to the formation of a highly carbonated nanocrystalline apatite phase by reaction of the metastable CaP phase with part or almost all of the metastable CaCO(3) phase. The recrystallization of metastable CaP varieties led to a final cement consisting of a highly carbonated poorly crystalline apatite analogous to bone mineral associated with various amounts of vaterite and/or aragonite. The presence of controlled amounts of CaCO(3) with a higher solubility than that of the apatite formed in the well-developed CaP cements might be of interest to increase resorption rates in biomedical cement and favors its replacement by bone tissue. Cytotoxicity testing revealed excellent cytocompatibility of CaCO(3)-CaP mixed cement compositions.

  11. Preparation of in situ hardening composite microcarriers: Calcium phosphate cement combined with alginate for bone regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Hui; Lee, Eun-Jung; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2014-01-01

    Novel microcarriers consisting of calcium phosphate cement and alginate were prepared for use as three-dimensional scaffolds for the culture and expansion of cells that are effective for bone tissue engineering. The calcium phosphate cement-alginate composite microcarriers were produced by an emulsification of the composite aqueous solutions mixed at varying ratios (calcium phosphate cement powder/alginate solution = 0.8–1.2) in an oil bath and the subsequent in situ hardening of the compositions during spherodization. Moreover, a porous structure could be easily created in the solid microcarriers by soaking the produced microcarriers in water and a subsequent freeze-drying process. Bone mineral-like apatite nanocrystallites were shown to rapidly develop on the calcium phosphate cement–alginate microcarriers under moist conditions due to the conversion of the α-tricalcium phosphate phase in the calcium phosphate cement into a carbonate–hydroxyapatite. Osteoblastic cells cultured on the microspherical scaffolds were proven to be viable, with an active proliferative potential during 14 days of culture, and their osteogenic differentiation was confirmed by the determination of alkaline phosphatase activity. The in situ hardening calcium phosphate cement–alginate microcarriers developed herein may be used as potential three-dimensional scaffolds for cell delivery and tissue engineering of bone. PMID:23836845

  12. Reduced CSF leak in complete calvarial reconstructions of microvascular decompression craniectomies using calcium phosphate cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eseonu, Chikezie I; Goodwin, C Rory; Zhou, Xin; Theodros, Debebe; Bender, Matthew T; Mathios, Dimitrios; Bettegowda, Chetan; Lim, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Calcium phosphate cement provides a biomaterial that can be used for calvarial reconstruction in a retrosigmoid craniectomy for microvascular decompression (MVD). This study evaluates the outcomes of postoperative CSF leak and wound infection for patients undergoing a complete cranioplasty using calcium phosphate cement versus incomplete cranioplasty using polyethylene titanium mesh following a retrosigmoid craniectomy for MVD. The authors evaluated 211 cases involving patients who underwent first-time retrosigmoid craniectomies performed by a single attending surgeon fortrigeminal neuralgia from October 2008 to June 2014. From this patient population, 111 patients underwent calvarial reconstruction after retrosigmoid craniectomy using polyethylene titanium mesh, and 100 patients had reconstructions using calcium phosphate cement. A Pearson's chi-square test was used to compare postoperative complications of CSF leak and wound infection in these 2 types of cranioplasties. The polyethylene titanium mesh group included 5 patients (4.5%) with postoperative CSF leak or pseudomeningocele and 3 patients (2.7%) with wound infections. In the calcium phosphate cement group, no patients had a CSF leak, and 2 patients (2%) had wound infections. This represented a statistically significant reduction of postoperative CSF leak in patients who underwent calcium phosphate reconstructions of their calvarial defect compared with those who underwent polyethylene titanium mesh reconstructions (p = 0.03). No significant difference was seen between the 2 groups in the number of patients with postoperative wound infections. Calcium phosphate cement provides a viable alternative biomaterial for calvarial reconstruction of retrosigmoid craniectomy defects in patients who have an MVD. The application of this material provides a biocompatible barrier that reduces the incidence of postoperative CSF leaks.

  13. Effect of calcium carbonate on hardening, physicochemical properties, and in vitro degradation of injectable calcium phosphate cements.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sariibrahimoglu, K.; Leeuwenburgh, S.C.G.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Yubao, L.; Jansen, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    The main disadvantage of apatitic calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) is their slow degradation rate, which limits complete bone regeneration. Carbonate (CO(3)(2)(-)) is the common constituent of bone and it can be used to improve the degradability of the apatitic calcium phosphate ceramics. This study

  14. Preparation, Physical-Chemical Characterization, and Cytocompatibility of Polymeric Calcium Phosphate Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania M. Khashaba

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Physicochemical mechanical and in vitro biological properties of novel formulations of polymeric calcium phosphate cements (CPCs were investigated. Methods. Monocalcium phosphate, calcium oxide, and synthetic hydroxyapatite were combined with either modified polyacrylic acid, light activated polyalkenoic acid, or polymethyl vinyl ether maleic acid to obtain Types I, II, and III CPCs. Setting time, compressive and diametral strength of CPCs was compared with zinc polycarboxylate cement (control. Specimens were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. In vitro cytotoxicity of CPCs and control was assessed. Results. X-ray diffraction analysis showed hydroxyapatite, monetite, and brushite. Acid-base reaction was confirmed by the appearance of stretching peaks in IR spectra of set cements. SEM revealed rod-like crystals and platy crystals. Setting time of cements was 5–12 min. Type III showed significantly higher strength values compared to control. Type III yielded high biocompatibility. Conclusions. Type III CPCs show promise for dental applications.

  15. Development of a degradable cement of calcium phosphate and calcium sulfate composite for bone reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, H; Wei, J; Liu, C S

    2006-01-01

    A new type of composite bone cement was prepared and investigated by adding calcium sulfate (CS) to calcium phosphate cement (CPC). This composite cement can be handled as a paste and easily shaped into any contour, which can set within 5-20 min, the setting time largely depending on the liquid-solid (L/S) ratio; adding CS to CPC had little effect on the setting time of the composite cements. No obvious temperature increase and pH change were observed during setting and immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). The compressive strength of the cement decreased with an increase in the content of CS. The degradation rate of the composite cements increased with time when the CS content was more than 20 wt%. Calcium deficient apatite could form on the surface of the composite cement because the release of calcium into SBF from the dissolution of CS and the apatite of the cement induced the new apatite formation; increasing the content of CS in the composite could improve the bioactivity of the composite cements. The results suggested that composite cement has a reasonable setting time, excellent degradability and suitable mechanical strength and bioactivity, which shows promising prospects for development as a clinical cement

  16. Silver-Doped Calcium Phosphate Bone Cements with Antibacterial Properties

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    J. V. Rau

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate bone cements (CPCs with antibacterial properties are demanded for clinical applications. In this study, we demonstrated the use of a relatively simple processing route based on preparation of silver-doped CPCs (CPCs-Ag through the preparation of solid dispersed active powder phase. Real-time monitoring of structural transformations and kinetics of several CPCs-Ag formulations (Ag = 0 wt %, 0.6 wt % and 1.0 wt % was performed by the Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffraction technique. The partial conversion of β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP phase into the dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD took place in all the investigated cement systems. In the pristine cement powders, Ag in its metallic form was found, whereas for CPC-Ag 0.6 wt % and CPC-Ag 1.0 wt % cements, CaAg(PO33 was detected and Ag (met. was no longer present. The CPC-Ag 0 wt % cement exhibited a compressive strength of 6.5 ± 1.0 MPa, whereas for the doped cements (CPC-Ag 0.6 wt % and CPC-Ag 1.0 wt % the reduced values of the compressive strength 4.0 ± 1.0 and 1.5 ± 1.0 MPa, respectively, were detected. Silver-ion release from CPC-Ag 0.6 wt % and CPC-Ag 1.0 wt % cements, measured by the Atomic Emission Spectroscopy, corresponds to the average values of 25 µg/L and 43 µg/L, respectively, rising a plateau after 15 days. The results of the antibacterial test proved the inhibitory effect towards pathogenic Escherichia coli for both CPC-Ag 0.6 wt % and CPC-Ag 1.0 wt % cements, better performances being observed for the cement with a higher Ag-content.

  17. Injectable biphasic calcium phosphate cements as a potential bone substitute

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sariibrahimoglu, K.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Leeuwenburgh, S.C.G.; Yubao, L.; Jansen, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Apatitic calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) have been widely used as bone grafts due to their excellent osteoconductive properties, but the degradation properties are insufficient to stimulate bone healing in large bone defects. A novel approach to overcome the lack of degradability of apatitic CPC

  18. In vitro and in vivo study of commercial calcium phosphate cement HydroSet™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Niall W; Blunn, Gordon; Karpukhina, Natalia; Davis, Graham; de Godoy, Roberta Ferro; Wilson, Rory M; Coathup, Melanie; Onwordi, Lyris; Quak, Wen Yu; Hill, Robert

    2018-01-01

    The commercial calcium phosphate cement, HydroSet™, was investigated in vitro, studying phase formation, compressive strength and setting time, followed by an ovine in vivo study to measure osseointegration, bone apposition and bone-to-graft contact. The X-ray diffraction and 31 P Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS NMR) results showed the initial formation of octacalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite at one hour. Over 7 days the octacalcium phosphate transformed to apatite, which was the only crystalline phase of the cement at 28 days. This apatite phase is thought to be a calcium deficient apatite. In the scanning electron microscopy, histological images of 12-week ovine in vivo results showed a high degree of osseointegration, 92.5%. Compressive strength comparisons between in vitro and in vivo measurements showed a dramatic difference between the in vitro measurements (highest 25.4 MPa) and in vivo (95 MPa), attributed to bone ingrowth into the cement in vivo. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time phase evolution of HydroSet™ and the properties studied in vitro complement the in vivo evaluation of the cement in a publication. The significance of the new finding of initial formation of octacalcium phosphate in this cement is discussed. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 106B: 21-30, 2018. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Ph-activated nano-amorphous calcium phosphate-based cement to reduce dental enamel demineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Mary A S; Weir, Michael D; Passos, Vanara F; Powers, Michael; Xu, Hockin H K

    2017-12-01

    Enamel demineralization is destructive, esthetically compromised, and costly complications for orthodontic patients. Nano-sized amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) has been explored to address this challenge. The 20% NACP-loaded ortho-cement notably exhibited favorable behavior on reducing demineralization of enamel around brackets in a caries model designed to simulate the carious attack. The 20% NACP-loaded ortho-cement markedly promotes higher calcium and phosphate release at a low pH, and the mineral loss was almost two fold lower and carious lesion depth decreased the by 1/3. This novel approach is promising co-adjuvant route for prevention of dental caries dissemination in millions of patients under orthodontic treatment.

  20. Calcium phosphate holmium-166 ceramic to addition in bone cement: synthesis and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donanzam, Blanda A.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R., E-mail: campos@nuclear.ufmg.b [Universidade do Federal de Minas Gerais (DEN/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Dalmazio, Ilza; Valente, Eduardo S., E-mail: id@cdtn.b, E-mail: valente@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Spine metastases are a common and painful complication of cancer. The treatment often consists of bone cement injection (vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty) within vertebral body for vertebrae stabilization, followed by external beam radiation therapy. Recently, researchers introduced the concept of radioactive bone cement for spine tumors therapy. Then, investigations about bioactive and radioactive materials became interesting. In this study, we present the synthesis of calcium phosphate incorporated holmium (CaP-Ho) via sol-gel technique, and its characterization by XRD, FT-IR, NA and SEM. Results showed a multiphasic bioceramic composed mainly of hydroxyapatite, {beta}-tricalcium phosphate, holmium phosphate and traces of calcium pyrophosphate. Furthermore, the nuclide Ho-166 was the major radioisotope produced. Despite that, the radioactive bioceramic CaP-{sup 166}Ho must be investigated in clinical trials to assure its efficacy and safety on spine tumors treatment (author)

  1. Calcium phosphate holmium-166 ceramic to addition in bone cement: synthesis and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donanzam, Blanda A.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R.

    2011-01-01

    Spine metastases are a common and painful complication of cancer. The treatment often consists of bone cement injection (vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty) within vertebral body for vertebrae stabilization, followed by external beam radiation therapy. Recently, researchers introduced the concept of radioactive bone cement for spine tumors therapy. Then, investigations about bioactive and radioactive materials became interesting. In this study, we present the synthesis of calcium phosphate incorporated holmium (CaP-Ho) via sol-gel technique, and its characterization by XRD, FT-IR, NA and SEM. Results showed a multiphasic bioceramic composed mainly of hydroxyapatite, β-tricalcium phosphate, holmium phosphate and traces of calcium pyrophosphate. Furthermore, the nuclide Ho-166 was the major radioisotope produced. Despite that, the radioactive bioceramic CaP- 166 Ho must be investigated in clinical trials to assure its efficacy and safety on spine tumors treatment (author)

  2. Reinforcement of calcium phosphate cement with multi-walled carbon nanotubes and bovine serum albumin for injectable bone substitute applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chew, K.K.; Low, K.L.; Zein, S.H.S.; McPhail, D.; Gerhardt, L.C.; Roether, J.A.; Boccaccini, A.R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the development of novel alternative injectable calcium phosphate cement (CPC) composites for orthopaedic applications. The new CPC composites comprise ß-tri-calcium phosphate (ß-TCP) and di-calcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA) mixed with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and incorporated

  3. Assessment of bone healing ability of calcium phosphate cements loaded with platelet lysate in rat calvarial defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babo, Pedro S; Carvalho, Pedro P; Santo, Vítor E; Faria, Susana; Gomes, Manuela E; Reis, Rui L

    2016-11-01

    Injectable calcium phosphate cements have been used as a valid alternative to autologous bone grafts for bone augmentation with the additional advantage of enabling minimally invasive implantation procedures and for perfectly fitting the tissue defect. Nevertheless, they have low biodegradability and lack adequate biochemical signaling to promote bone healing and remodeling. In previous in vitro studies, we observed that the incorporation of platelet lysate directly into the cement paste or loaded in hyaluronic acid microspheres allowed to modulate the cement degradation and the in vitro expression of osteogenic markers in seeded human adipose derived stem cells. The present study aimed at investigating the possible effect of this system in new bone formation when implanted in calvarial bilateral defects in rats. Different formulations were assessed, namely plain calcium phosphate cements, calcium phosphate cements loaded with human platelet lysate, hybrid injectable formulations composed of the calcium phosphate cement incorporating hyaluronin acid non-loaded microparticles (20% hyaluronin acid) or with particles loaded with platelet lysate. The degradability and new bone regrowth were evaluated in terms of mineral volume in the defect, measured by micro-computed tomography and histomorphometric analysis upon 4, 8 and 12 weeks of implantation. We observed that the incorporation of hyaluronin acid microspheres induced an overly rapid cement degradation, impairing the osteoconductive properties of the cement composites. Moreover, the incorporation of platelet lysate induced higher bone healing than the materials without platelet lysate, up to four weeks after surgery. Nevertheless, this effect was not found to be significant when compared to the one observed in the sham-treated group. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Preparation and characterization of a novel injectable strontium-containing calcium phosphate cement with collagen

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    Zhou Ziqiang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To develop a novel injectable strontium-containing calcium phosphate cement with collagen. Methods: A novel calcium phosphate bone cement (CPC was prepared with the addition of strontium element, collagenⅠ, and modified starch; the injectability, solidification time, microstructure, phase composition, compressive strength, anti-collapsibility and histological properties of material were evaluated. Results: The results showed that the material could be injected with an excellent performance; the modified starch significantly improved the anti-washout property of cement; with the liquid to solid ratio of 0.3, the largest compressive strength of cement was obtained (48.0 MPa ± 2.3 MPa; histological examination of repair tissue showed that the bone was repaired after 16 weeks; the degradation of cement was consistent with the new bone growth. Conclusion: A novel injectable collagen-strontium-containing CPC with excellent compressive strength and suitable setting time was prepared, with addition of modified starch. The CPC showed a good antiwashout property and the degradation time of the cement met with the new bone growing. This material is supposed to be used in orthopedic and maxillofacial surgery for bone defects.

  5. Nano clay-enhanced calcium phosphate cements and hydrogels for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jammalamadaka, Udayabhanu

    Biomaterials are used as templates for drug delivery, scaffolds in tissue engineering, grafts in surgeries, and support for tissue regeneration. Novel biomaterial composites are needed to meet multifaceted requirements of compatibility, ease of fabrication and controlled drug delivery. Currently used biomaterials in orthopedics surgeries suffer limitations in toxicity and preventing infections. Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) used as bone cement suffers from limitations of thermal necrosis and monomer toxicity calls for development of better cementing biomaterials. A biodegradable/bioresorbable cement with good mechanical properties is needed to address this short coming. Metal implants used in fixing fractures or total joint replacement needs improvements in preventing biofilm formation and better tissue integration. This research addressed the above mentioned research gaps by formulating novel biomaterial composites. Calcium phosphate cements are the alternative bone cements that are bioresorbable and promote tissue integration. These cements lack sufficient mechanical strengths to be used in load bearing sites. The addition of nanoparticles is hypothesized to improve the mechanical properties without inducing toxicity to the tissue. This hypothesis was tested by evaluating compression and flexural strengths in addition to cytocompatibility tests. Results indicate that addition of nano-clay particles (halloysites nanotubes) improved the compressive strength and osteoinductive properties of calcium phosphate cements. To address the research need of preventing implant failure due to infection and aseptic loosening, novel coatings are needed. Hydrogels are well establish for their ability to mimic in vivo environment, promote cell viability and as drug delivery vehicles. Use of composites of hydrogels and drug-loaded nanoparticles to prevent infection was evaluated. Cytocompatibility results indicate good cell viability. Antibacterial results show sustained release

  6. Mechanical properties of calcium phosphate cements obtained by solution combustion synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkmer, Tiago M.; Barreiro, Oscar; Souza, Vania Caldas; Santos, Luis Alberto dos, E-mail: tiagovolkmer@gmail.com, E-mail: oscarbafer@hotmail.com, E-mail: vania.souza@ufrgs.br, E-mail: luis.santos@ufrgs.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Laboratorio de Biomateriais

    2009-07-01

    Bioceramics based on calcium phosphates, especially hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphates (TCP) are the most used biomaterials as bone substitutes. The objective of this work is to evaluate the mechanical properties of α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) synthesized by the solution combustion method. The solution combustion synthesis (SCS) can be considered as faster and simpler as other methods, furthermore it allows the obtainment of high purity α-TCP. In the calcium phosphates (CPC), α-TCP reacts with water forming needle like HA, which restrain the movement of grains, increasing mechanical resistance. In the present paper the influence of particle size on mechanical properties of α-TCP cements were evaluated. The α-TCP powder were characterized by XRD, TEM, BET and laser diffraction to asses particle size while the CPC bodies by SEM, Arquimedes method and compression tests. Increasing the milling time, the particle size decreases, resulting in samples with less porosity and consequently with higher compression resistance. (author)

  7. Calcium phosphate cements with strontium halides as radiopacifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Alejandro; Montazerolghaem, Maryam; Engqvist, Håkan; Ott, Marjam Karlsson; Persson, Cecilia

    2014-02-01

    High radiopacity is required to monitor the delivery and positioning of injectable implants. Inorganic nonsoluble radiopacifiers are typically used in nondegradable bone cements; however, their usefulness in resorbable cements is limited due to their low solubility. Strontium halides, except strontium fluoride, are ionic water-soluble compounds that possess potential as radiopacifiers. In this study, we compare the radiopacity, mechanical properties, composition, and cytotoxicity of radiopaque brushite cements prepared with strontium fluoride (SrF2 ), strontium chloride (SrCl2 ·6H2 O), strontium bromide (SrBr2 ), or strontium iodide (SrI2 ). Brushite cements containing 10 wt % SrCl2 ·6H2 O, SrBr2 , or SrI2 exhibited equal to or higher radiopacity than commercial radiopaque cements. Furthermore, the brushite crystal lattice in cements that contained the ionic radiopacifiers was larger than in unmodified cements and in cements that contained SrF2 , indicating strontium substitution. Despite the fact that the strontium halides increased the solubility of the cements and affected their mechanical properties, calcium phosphate cements containing SrCl2 ·6H2 O, SrBr2 , and SrI2 showed no significant differences in Saos-2 cell viability and proliferation with respect to the control. Strontium halides: SrCl2 ·6H2 O, SrBr2 , and SrI2 may be potential candidates as radiopacifiers in resorbable biomaterials although their in vivo biocompatibility, when incorporated into injectable implants, is yet to be assessed. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Study of a hydraulic dicalcium phosphate dihydrate/calcium oxide-based cement for dental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Briak, Hasna; Durand, Denis; Nurit, Josiane; Munier, Sylvie; Pauvert, Bernard; Boudeville, Phillipe

    2002-01-01

    By mixing CaHPO(4) x 2H(2)O (DCPD) and CaO with water or sodium phosphate buffers as liquid phase, a calcium phosphate cement was obtained. Its physical and mechanical properties, such as compressive strength, initial and final setting times, cohesion time, dough time, swelling time, dimensional and thermal behavior, and injectability were investigated by varying different parameters such as liquid to powder (L/P) ratio (0.35-0.7 ml g(-1)), molar calcium to phosphate (Ca/P) ratio (1.67-2.5) and the pH (4, 7, and 9) and the concentration (0-1 M) of the sodium phosphate buffer. The best results were obtained with the pH 7 sodium phosphate buffer at the concentration of 0.75 M. With this liquid phase, physical and mechanical properties depended on the Ca/P and L/P ratios, varying from 3 to 11 MPa (compressive strength), 6 to 10 min (initial setting time), 11 to 15 min (final setting time), 15 to 30 min (swelling time), 7 to 20 min (time of 100% injectability). The dough or working time was over 16 min. This cement expanded during its setting (1.2-5 % according to Ca/P and L/P ratios); this would allow a tight filling. Given the mechanical and rheological properties of this new DCPD/CaO-based cement, its use as root canal sealing material can be considered as classical calcium hydroxide or ZnO/eugenol-based pastes, without or with a gutta-percha point. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res (Appl Biomater) 63: 447-453, 2002

  9. The effects of excess calcium on the handling and mechanical properties of hydrothermal derived calcium phosphate bone cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razali, N. N.; Sukardi, M. A.; Sopyan, I.; Mel, M.; Salleh, H. M.; Rahman, M. M.

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the effects of excess calcium on the handling and mechanical properties of hydrothermal derived calcium phosphate cement (CPC) for bone filling applications. Hydroxyapatite powder was synthesized via hydrothermal method using calcium oxide, CaO and ammonium dihydrogen phosphate, NH4H2PO4 as the calcium and phosphorus precursors respectively. The effects of calcium excess were evaluated by varying the CaO content at 0, 5 and 15 mole %. The precursors were then refluxed in distilled water at 90-100°C and dried overnight until the calcium phosphate powder was formed. CPC was then produced by mixing the synthesized powder with distilled water at the powder-to-liquid (P/L) ratio of 1.5. The result from the morphological properties of CPC shows the increase in agglomeration and particles size with 5 mole % of calcium excess but decreased with 15 mole % of calcium excess in CPC. This result was in agreement with the compressive strength result where the CPC increased its strength with 5 mole % of calcium excess but reduced with 15 mole % of calcium excess. The excess in calcium precursor also significantly improved the setting time but reduced the injectability of CPC.

  10. Polyelectrolyte addition effect on the properties of setting hydraulic cements based on calcium phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Luis A. dos; Oliveira, Luci C. de; Rigo, Eliana C.S.; Boschi, Anselmo Ortega; Carrodeguas, Raul Gracia

    1997-01-01

    In the present work the effects of the addition of some poly electrolytes (sodium alginate and poly acrylic acid) on the solubility, crystalline phases, pH and mechanical strength under compression of three calcium phosphate cements were studied. (author)

  11. Biphasic products of dicalcium phosphate-rich cement with injectability and nondispersibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Chia-Ling; Chen, Jian-Chih; Hung, Chun-Cheng; Wang, Jen-Chyan; Tien, Yin-Chun; Chen, Wen-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a calcium phosphate cement was developed using tetracalcium phosphate and surface-modified dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA). This developed injectable bone graft substitute can be molded to the shape of the bone cavity and set in situ through the piping system that has an adequate mechanical strength, non-dispersibility, and biocompatibility. The materials were based on the modified DCPA compositions of calcium phosphate cement (CPC), where the phase ratio of the surface-modified DCPA is higher than that of the conventional CPC for forming dicalcium phosphate (DCP)-rich cement. The composition and morphology of several calcium phosphate cement specimens during setting were analyzed via X-ray diffractometry and transmission electron microscopy coupled with an energy dispersive spectroscopy system. The compressive strength of DCP-rich CPCs was greater than 30 MPa after 24 h of immersion in vitro. The reaction of the CPCs produced steady final biphasic products of DCPs with apatite. The composites of calcium phosphate cements derived from tetracalcium phosphate mixed with surface-modified DCPA exhibited excellent mechanical properties, injectability, and interlocking forces between particles, and they also featured nondispersive behavior when immersed in a physiological solution. - Highlights: • Bone cement precursor with nanocrystals is characterized. • DCP-rich CPCs with nanocrystals exhibited biphasic product phases. • Nanocrystals in cement significantly affected the interlocking ability. • Nanocrystals in cement exhibited higher strength and anti-dispersion. • DCP-rich CPCs increase the potential of bioresorption after reaction

  12. Calcium phosphates: what is the evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Sune

    2010-03-01

    A number of different calcium phosphate compounds such as calcium phosphate cements and solid beta-tricalcium phosphate products have been introduced during the last decade. The chemical composition mimics the mineral phase of bone and as a result of this likeness, the materials seem to be remodeled as for normal bone through a cell-mediated process that involves osteoclastic activity. This is a major difference when compared with, for instance, calcium sulphate compounds that after implantation dissolve irrespective of the new bone formation rate. Calcium phosphates are highly biocompatible and in addition, they act as synthetic osteoconductive scaffolds after implantation in bone. When placed adjacent to bone, osteoid is formed directly on the surface of the calcium phosphate with no soft tissue interposed. Remodeling is slow and incomplete, but by adding more and larger pores, like in ultraporous beta-tricalcium phosphate, complete or nearly complete resorption can be achieved. The indications explored so far include filling of metaphyseal fracture voids or bone cysts, a volume expander in conjunction with inductive products, and as a carrier for various growth factors and antibiotics. Calcium phosphate compounds such as calcium phosphate cement and beta-tricalcium phosphate will most certainly be part of the future armamentarium when dealing with fracture treatment. It is reasonable to believe that we have so far only seen the beginning when it comes to clinical applications.

  13. Development of novel strontium containing bioactive glass based calcium phosphate cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Onofrio, A; Kent, N W; Shahdad, S A; Hill, R G

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect on properties of increasing strontium substitution for calcium in bioactive glasses used as precursors for novel calcium phosphate cements. Glasses were produced by progressively substituting strontium for calcium. Cements were prepared by mixing the glass powder with Ca(H2PO4)2 powder with a 2.5% solution of Na2HPO4. Setting times and compressive strength were measured after 1h, 1 day, 7 days and 28 days immersion in Tris buffer solution. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and radiopacity were measured and crystal morphology was assessed using scanning electron microscopy. A correlation between the phases formed, morphology of the crystallites, setting time and compressive strength were analyzed. Setting time increased proportionally with strontium substitution in the glass up to 25%, whereas for higher substitutions it decreased. Compressive strength showed a maximum value of 12.5MPa and was strongly influenced by the interlocking of the crystals and their morphology. XRD showed that the presence of strontium influenced the crystal phases formed. Octacalcium phosphate (Ca8H2(PO4)6·5H2O, OCP) was the main phase present after 1h and 1 day whereas after 28 days OCP was completely transformed to strontium-containing hydroxyapatite (SrxCa(10-x)(PO4)6(OH)2, SrHA). Radiopacity increased proportionally to strontium substitution in the glass. A novel method to develop a bone substitute forming in vitro SrHA as a final product by using a bioactive glass as a precursor was shown. These novel injectable bioactive glass cements are promising materials for dental and orthopedic applications. Further in vivo characterizations are being conducted. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Kinetics of apatite formation on a calcium-silicate cement for root-end filling during ageing in physiological-like phosphate solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolfi, Maria Giovanna; Taddei, Paola; Tinti, Anna; De Stefano Dorigo, Elettra; Rossi, Piermaria Luigi; Prati, Carlo

    2010-12-01

    The bioactivity of calcium silicate mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) cements has been attributed to their ability to produce apatite in presence of phosphate-containing fluids. This study evaluated surface morphology and chemical transformations of an experimental accelerated calcium-silicate cement as a function of soaking time in different phosphate-containing solutions. Cement discs were immersed in Dulbecco's phosphate-buffered saline (DPBS) or Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS) for different times (1-180 days) and analysed by scanning electron microscopy connected with an energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. SEM-EDX revealed Ca and P peaks after 14 days in DPBS. A thin Ca- and P-rich crystalline coating layer was detected after 60 days. A thicker multilayered coating was observed after 180 days. Micro-Raman disclosed the 965-cm(-1) phosphate band at 7 days only on samples stored in DPBS and later the 590- and 435-cm(-1) phosphate bands. After 60-180 days, a layer approximately 200-900 μm thick formed displaying the bands of carbonated apatite (at 1,077, 965, 590, 435 cm(-1)) and calcite (at 1,088, 713, 280 cm(-1)). On HBSS-soaked, only calcite bands were observed until 90 days, and just after 180 days, a thin apatite-calcite layer appeared. Micro-Raman and SEM-EDX demonstrated the mineralization induction capacity of calcium-silicate cements (MTAs and Portland cements) with the formation of apatite after 7 days in DPBS. Longer time is necessary to observe bioactivity when cements are immersed in HBSS.

  15. A novel and easy-to-prepare strontium(II) modified calcium phosphate bone cement with enhanced mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, M; Henß, A; Rohnke, M; Gelinsky, M

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate two different approaches to obtaining strontium-modified calcium phosphate bone cements (SrCPCs) without elaborate synthesis of Sr-containing calcium phosphate species as cement precursors that could release biologically effective doses of Sr(2+) and thus could improve the healing of osteoporotic bone defects. Using strontium carbonate as a strontium(II) source, it was introduced into a hydroxyapatite-forming cement either by the addition of SrCO3 to an α-tricalcium phosphate-based cement precursor mixture (A-type) or by substitution of CaCO3 by SrCO3 during precursor composition (S-type). The cements, obtained after setting in a water-saturated atmosphere, contained up to 2.2at.% strontium in different distribution patterns as determined by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The setting time of CPC and A-type cements was in the range of 6.5-7.5min and increased for substitution-type cements (12.5-13.0min). Set cements had an open porosity between 26 and 42%. Compressive strength was found to increase from 29MPa up to 90% in substituted S-type cements (58MPa). SrCPC samples released between 0.45 and 1.53mgg(-1) Sr(2+) within 21days and showed increased radiopacity. Based on these findings, the SrCPC developed in this study could be beneficial for the treatment of defects of systemically impaired (e.g. osteoporotic) bone. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Incorporation of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate into a glass-ionomer cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzaoui, S A; Burrow, M F; Tyas, M J; Dashper, S G; Eakins, D; Reynolds, E C

    2003-11-01

    Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) nanocomplexes have been shown to prevent demineralization and promote remineralization of enamel subsurface lesions in animal and in situ caries models. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of incorporating CPP-ACP into a self-cured glass-ionomer cement (GIC). Incorporation of 1.56% w/w CPP-ACP into the GIC significantly increased microtensile bond strength (33%) and compressive strength (23%) and significantly enhanced the release of calcium, phosphate, and fluoride ions at neutral and acidic pH. MALDI mass spectrometry also showed casein phosphopeptides from the CPP-ACP nanocomplexes to be released. The release of CPP-ACP and fluoride from the CPP-ACP-containing GIC was associated with enhanced protection of the adjacent dentin during acid challenge in vitro.

  17. Addition of Wollastonite Fibers to Calcium Phosphate Cement Increases Cell Viability and Stimulates Differentiation of Osteoblast-Like Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Almeida Domingues

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate cement (CPC that is based on α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP is considered desirable for bone tissue engineering because of its relatively rapid degradation properties. However, such cement is relatively weak, restricting its use to areas of low mechanical stress. Wollastonite fibers (WF have been used to improve the mechanical strength of biomaterials. However, the biological properties of WF remain poorly understood. Here, we tested the response of osteoblast-like cells to being cultured on CPC reinforced with 5% of WF (CPC-WF. We found that both types of cement studied achieved an ion balance for calcium and phosphate after 3 days of immersion in culture medium and this allowed subsequent long-term cell culture. CPC-WF increased cell viability and stimulated cell differentiation, compared to nonreinforced CPC. We hypothesize that late silicon release by CPC-WF induces increased cell proliferation and differentiation. Based on our findings, we propose that CPC-WF is a promising material for bone tissue engineering applications.

  18. Production and characterization of setting hydraulic cements based on calcium phosphate; Obtencao e caracterizacao de cimentos de fosfato de calcio de pega hidraulica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Luci C. de; Rigo, Eliana C.S.; Santos, Luis A dos; Boschi, Anselmo Ortega [Sao Carlos Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais; Carrodeguas, Raul G. [Universidad de La Habana, Habana (Cuba). Centro de Biomateriales

    1997-12-31

    Setting hydraulic cements based on calcium phosphate has risen great interest in scientific literature during recent years due to their total bio compatibility and to the fact that they harden `in situ`, providing easy handling and adaptation to the shape and dimensions of the defect which requires correction, differently from the predecessors, the calcium phosphate ceramics (Hydroxy apatite, {beta}-tri calcium phosphate, biphasic, etc) in the shape of dense or porous blocks and grains. In the work, three calcium-phosphate cement compositions were studied. The resulting compositions were characterized according to the following aspects: setting times, pH, mechanical resistance, crystalline phases, microstructure and solubility in SBF (Simulated Body Fluid). The results show a potential use for the compositions. (author) 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Physicochemical properties and biocompatibility of chitosan oligosaccharide/gelatin/calcium phosphate hybrid cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Ting-Yi [Department of Dental Laboratory Technology, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung 406, Taiwan (China); Ho, Chia-Che [Institute of Oral Biology and Biomaterials Science, Chung-Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Chen, David Chan-Hen [Institute of Veterinary Microbiology, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Lai, Meng-Heng [Institute of Oral Biology and Biomaterials Science, Chung-Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Ding, Shinn-Jyh, E-mail: sjding@csmu.edu.tw [Institute of Oral Biology and Biomaterials Science, Chung-Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung-Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China)

    2010-04-15

    A bone substitute material was developed consisting of a chitosan oligosaccharide (COS) solution in a liquid phase and gelatin (GLT) containing calcium phosphate powder in a solid phase. The physicochemical and biocompatible properties of the hybrid cements were evaluated. The addition of COS to cement did not affect the setting time or diametral tensile strength of the hybrid cements, whereas GLT significantly prolonged the setting time and decreased the strength slightly. The setting reaction was inhibited by the addition of GLT to the initial mixture, but not by COS. However, the presence of GLT appreciably improved the anti-washout properties of the hybrid cement compared with COS. COS may promote the cement's biocompatibility as an approximate twofold increase in cell proliferation for 10% COS-containing cements was observed on day 3 as compared with the controls. The combination of GLT and COS was chosen due to the benefits achieved from several synergistic effects and for their clinical applications. Cement with 5% GLT and 10% COS may be a better choice among cements in terms of anti-washout properties and biological activity.

  20. A theranostic agent to enhance osteogenic and magnetic resonance imaging properties of calcium phosphate cements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ventura, M.; Sun, Y.; Cremers, S.; Borm, P.; Tahmasebi Birgani, Zeinab; Habibovic, Pamela; Heerschap, A.; van der Kraan, P.M.; Jansen, J.A.; Walboomers, X.F.

    2014-01-01

    With biomimetic biomaterials, like calcium phosphate cements (CPCs), non-invasive assessment of tissue regeneration is challenging. This study describes a theranostic agent (TA) to simultaneously enhance both imaging and osteogenic properties of such a bone substitute material. For this purpose,

  1. Evaluation of the sealing ability of bone cement as furcation perforation repair material when compared with mineral trioxide aggregate and calcium phosphate cement: An in-vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Chordiya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was undertaken to compare the sealing ability of bone cement as furcation perforation repair material when compared with mineral trioxide aggregate and calcium phosphate cement. Materials and Methods: A total of 70 sound mandibular molars were selected for this study. The sample teeth were randomly divided into five groups: group I - n=20, perforation repair material used, mineral trioxide aggregate; group II - n=20, perforation repair material used, calcium phosphate cement; group III - n=20, perforation repair material used, bone cement; group IV - positive control, n=5, the furcation were not repaired with any material; group V - negative control, n=5, furcation area intact, no perforation done. The teeth were immersed in silver nitrate solution for 2 hours and then rinsed with photographic developer solution for 6 hours. They were then sectioned in a longitudinal direction and examined under a stereomicroscope. In each section the actual values of dye leakage were calculated from outer margins of perforation to the level of pulpal floor and were then subjected to statistical analysis. Results: An unpaired ′t′ test revealed that different groups exhibited significantly different dye penetrations (P<0.01. Conclusion: Furcation perforation repaired with MTA showed minimum microleakage (mean 54.5%, calcium phosphate cement showed maximum microleakage (100%, and bone cement showed moderate dye leakage (87.8%.

  2. A New Type of Biphasic Calcium Phosphate Cement as a Gentamicin Carrier for Osteomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Yu Su

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteomyelitis therapy is a long-term and inconvenient procedure for a patient. Antibiotic-loaded bone cements are both a complementary and alternative treatment option to intravenous antibiotic therapy for the treatment of osteomyelitis. In the current study, the biphasic calcium phosphate cement (CPC, called α-TCP/HAP (α-tricalcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite biphasic cement, was prepared as an antibiotics carrier for osteomyelitis. The developed biphasic cement with a microstructure of α-TCP surrounding the HAP has a fast setting time which will fulfill the clinical demand. The X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry analyses showed the final phase to be HAP, the basic bone mineral, after setting for a period of time. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a porous structure with particle sizes of a few micrometers. The addition of gentamicin in α-TCP/HAP would delay the transition of α-TCP but would not change the final-phase HAP. The gentamicin-loaded α-TCP/HAP supplies high doses of the antibiotic during the initial 24 hours when they are soaked in phosphate buffer solution (PBS. Thereafter, a slower drug release is produced, supplying minimum inhibitory concentration until the end of the experiment (30 days. Studies of growth inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in culture indicated that gentamicin released after 30 days from α-TCP/HAP biphasic cement retained antibacterial activity.

  3. Application of Calcium Phosphate Materials in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jabr S. Al-Sanabani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate materials are similar to bone in composition and in having bioactive and osteoconductive properties. Calcium phosphate materials in different forms, as cements, composites, and coatings, are used in many medical and dental applications. This paper reviews the applications of these materials in dentistry. It presents a brief history, dental applications, and methods for improving their mechanical properties. Notable research is highlighted regarding (1 application of calcium phosphate into various fields in dentistry; (2 improving mechanical properties of calcium phosphate; (3 biomimetic process and functionally graded materials. This paper deals with most common types of the calcium phosphate materials such as hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate which are currently used in dental and medical fields.

  4. Effect of a bonding agent on in vitro biochemical activities of remineralizing resin-based calcium phosphate cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickens, Sabine H; Flaim, Glenn M

    2008-09-01

    To test whether fluoride in a resin-based Ca-PO4 ion releasing cement or coating with an acidic bonding agent for improved adhesion compromised the cement remineralization potential. Cements were formulated without fluoride (Cement A) or with fluoride (Cement B). The treatment groups were A=Cement A; A2=Cement A+bonding agent; B=Cement B; B2=Cement B+bonding agent. The calcium, phosphate, and fluoride ion release in saliva-like solution (SLS) was determined from hardened cement disks without or with a coating of bonding agent. For the remineralization, two cavities were prepared in dentin of extracted human molars and demineralized. One cavity received composite resin (control); the other received treatment A, A2, B or B2. After 6 week incubation in SLS, 180 microm cross-sections were cut. The percentage remineralization was determined by transverse microradiography comparing the dentin mineral density under the cement to that under the control. The percentage of remineralization (mean+/-S.D.) was A (39+/-14)=B (37+/-18), A2 (23+/-13), B2 (14+/-7). Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Holm-Sidak test showed a significant effect from the presence of bonding agent (p0.05). The ion solution concentrations of all groups showed undersaturation with respect to dicalcium phosphate dihydrate and calcium fluoride and supersaturation for fluorapatite and hydroxyapatite suggesting a positive remineralization potential. Compared to the control all treatments resulted in mineral increase. The remineralization was negatively affected by the presence of the bonding agent.

  5. Fabrication and characterization of calcium phosphate cement scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa, E. de; Motisuke, M.; Bertran, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    In Tissue Engineering, the need for scaffolds which are capable of guiding the organization, differentiation and growth of cells leading to the formation of new tissues is highly relevant. For the development of new scaffolds focused on bone tissue therapy, calcium phosphate cements (CPC) have great potential, because besides their resorbability, they present morphology and chemical composition similar to the bone mineral phase. Moreover, there are several processing techniques to produce ceramic scaffolds: polymeric sponge replication, incorporation of organic material into the ceramic powder, gelcasting, emulsion, among others. The aim of this work was to obtain CPCs scaffolds by using two techniques, emulsion and gelcasting. The scaffolds were characterized by their physical and mechanical properties and the crystalline phases formed after the setting reaction of cement were determined by X-ray diffraction. The samples obtained by both methods presented porosity between 61-65% and the microstructure consists of nearly spherical pores (d5o = 50-100 μm). The mechanical strength of the samples ranged from 5.5 to 1.5 MPa. The crystalline phases found were monetite (CaHPO 4 ) and brushite (CaHPO 4 2H 2 O). (author)

  6. Effect of Poly(Vinyl Alcohol) Addition on the Properties of Hydrothermal Derived Calcium Phosphate Cement for Bone Filling Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razali, N. N.; Sopyan, I.; Mel, M.; Salleh, H. M.; Rahman, M. M.; Singh, R.

    2017-06-01

    The effect of addition of poly(vinyl alcohol) on hydrothermal derived calcium phosphate cement has been studied. The precursors used to prepare the cement were calcium oxide (CaO) and ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (NH4H2PO4); the reaction was conducted in water at 80-100°C. To improve properties of CPC, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) of 1wt% and 2wt% was added to the liquid phase of CPC and the results were compared to CPC without PVA addition. The addition of PVA was proved to bring remarkable effects on cohesion, setting time and mechanical strength of CPC which make it suitable physically for injectable bone filler applications.

  7. Preparation, physical-chemical characterisation and cytocompatibility of calcium carbonate cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, C; Miao, Baoji; Bareille, Reine; Rey, Christian

    2006-03-01

    The feasibility of calcium carbonate cements involving the recrystallisation of metastable calcium carbonate varieties has been demonstrated. Calcium carbonate cement compositions presented in this paper can be prepared straightforwardly by simply mixing water (liquid phase) with two calcium carbonate phases (solid phase) which can be easily obtained by precipitation. An original cement composition was obtained by mixing amorphous calcium carbonate and vaterite with an aqueous medium. The cement set and hardened within 2h at 37 degrees C in an atmosphere saturated with water and the final composition of the cement consisted mostly of aragonite. The hardened cement was microporous and showed poor mechanical properties. Cytotoxicity tests revealed excellent cytocompatibility of calcium carbonate cement compositions. Calcium carbonates with a higher solubility than the apatite formed for most of the marketed calcium phosphate cements might be of interest to increase biomedical cement resorption rates and to favour its replacement by bone tissue.

  8. Characterization of cement calcium phosphate for use dental

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros, C.M.B.; Oliveira, S.V.; Silva, M.C.; Marques, J.B.; Fook, M.V.L.

    2011-01-01

    Calcium phosphates are interesting biological and medical attention due to its occurrence in different animal species and humans. Ceramics based on calcium phosphate in the form of implants or porous particulate materials, have proven to be suitable replacements for bone tissue when they are only subjected to small mechanical stresses. Was obtained research laboratory DEMA/UFCG a calcium phosphate phase. The goal is to characterize the material by X-ray diffraction (XRD) in order to analyze what the phases and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to identify the absorption bands of the bonding characteristic. Was identified by XRD phase present in the sample is hydroxyapatite Ca/P 1.67. In infrared spectroscopy has absorption bands characteristic of the phosphate group at 1032 cm1 region. (author)

  9. Shear-peel strength comparison of orthodontic band cements including novel calcium silicate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leo, Mariantonietta; Løvschall, Henrik

    calcium silicate with fluoride and fast-setting, Glass ionomer, and Zinc phosphate cement, used for luting of orthodontic bands on molars kept one month in phosphate buffering solution (PBS). Materials and methods: The roots of 35 extracted human molars were embedded in acryl. Three groups were allocated....... An orthodontic band (AO) was fitted on the free crown. Each group of the teeth (n>10) was cemented with novel calcium silicate (Protooth), Glass ionomer (Orthocem), or Zinc phosphate (DeTrey Zinc). The cements were mixed according to the manufacturers instructions. Samples were stored at 37ºC in humid chamber...... Silicate (Protooth) and Zinc phosphate cement (DeTrey Zinc) were significantly higher than Glass ionomer cement (Orthocem) when looking for the force (N, p

  10. Orthodontic cement with protein-repellent and antibacterial properties and the release of calcium and phosphate ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Weir, Michael D; Chen, Chen; Melo, Mary A S; Bai, Yuxing; Xu, Hockin H K

    2016-07-01

    White spot lesions often occur in orthodontic treatments. The objective of this study was to develop a novel resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGI) as an orthodontic cement with protein-repellent, antibacterial and remineralization capabilities. Protein-repellent 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC), antibacterial dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM), nanoparticles of silver (NAg), and nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) were incorporated into a RMGI. Enamel shear bond strength (SBS) was determined. Calcium (Ca) and phosphate (P) ion releases were measured. Protein adsorption onto specimens was determined by a micro bicinchoninic acid method. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model was tested. Increasing the NACP filler level increased the Ca and P ion release. Decreasing the solution pH increased the ion release. Incorporating MPC into RMGI reduced protein adsorption, which was an order of magnitude less than that of commercial controls. Adding DMAHDM and NAg into RMGI yielded a strong antibacterial function, greatly reducing biofilm viability and acid production. Biofilm CFU counts on the multifunctional orthodontic cement were 3 orders of magnitude less than that of commercial control (p0.1). A novel multifunctional orthodontic cement was developed with strong antibacterial and protein-repellent capabilities for preventing enamel demineralization. The new cement is promising to prevent white spot lesions in orthodontic treatments. The method of incorporating four bioactive agents may have wide applicability to the development of other bioactive dental materials to inhibit caries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Bulk physicochemical, interconnectivity, and mechanical properties of calcium phosphate cements-fibrin glue composites for bone substitute applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopez-Heredia, M.A.; Pattipeilohy, J.; Hsu, S.; Grykien, M.; Weijden, B. van der; Leeuwenburgh, S.C.G.; Salmon, P.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Jansen, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) and fibrin glue (FG) are used for surgical applications. Their combination is promising to create bone substitutes able to promote cell attachment and bone remodeling. This study proposes a novel approach to create CPC-FG composites by simultaneous CPC setting and FG

  12. Influence of temperature on the synthesis of calcining cement α--tricalcium phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, R.S.; Thurmer, M.B.; Coelho, W.T.; Fernandes, J.M.; Santos, L.A.

    2011-01-01

    The calcium phosphate cement (CFCs) bone substitutes are of great potential use in medical and dental. However, one of the great difficulties of using this type of cement is its low mechanical strength due to the presence of undesirable phases, such as beta-tricalcium phosphate. The step of obtaining this compound is done at high temperature by solid state reaction. With the aim of obtaining calcium phosphate cements more resistant, we studied the conditions for obtaining an alpha-TCP at temperatures of 1300, 1400 and 1500 ° C with time 2h calcination. The samples were analyzed for crystalline phases, density, porosity and mechanical strength. The results show that the synthesis parameters studied strongly influence the obtained phases and the mechanical properties of cement. (author)

  13. In Vivo Evaluation of an Injectable Premixed Radiopaque Calcium Phosphate Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Åberg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work a radiopaque premixed calcium phosphate cement (pCPC has been developed and evaluated in vivo. Radiopacity was obtained by adding 0–40 % zirconia to the cement paste. The effects of zirconia on setting time, strength and radiopacity were evaluated. In the in vivo study a 2 by 3.5 mm cylindrical defect in a rat vertebrae was filled with either the pCPC, PMMA or bone chips. Nano-SPECT CT analysis was used to monitor osteoblast activity during bone regeneration. The study showed that by adding zirconia to the cement the setting time becomes longer and the compressive strength is reduced. All materials evaluated in the in vivo study filled the bone defect and there was a strong osteoblast activity at the injury site. In spite of the osteoblast activity, PMMA blocked bone healing and the bone chips group showed minimal new bone formation. At 12 weeks the pCPC was partially resorbed and replaced by new bone with good bone ingrowth. The radiopaque pCPC may be considered to be used for minimal invasive treatment of vertebral fractures since it has good handling, radiopacity and allows healing of cancellous bone in parallel with the resorption of the cement.

  14. A histological evaluation on osteogenesis and resorption of methotrexate-loaded calcium phosphate cement in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Dong; Yang Zhiping; Li Xin; Li Zhenfeng; Li Jianmin [Department of Orthopedics, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Shandong (China); Yang Jingyan, E-mail: yangzhiping@medmail.com.c [Department of Pathology, 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Shandong University, Shandong (China)

    2010-04-15

    In this study, we investigated the resorption of in vivo methotrexate-loaded calcium phosphate cement (MTX-CPC) implants and their effect on osteogenesis. MTX-CPC implants containing 1% methotrexate (MTX) (weight/weight) were preset and implanted into the femoral condyle of rabbits. Calcium phosphate cement (CPC) without MTX was used as the control. The femurs were harvested at day 1 and at 1, 3 and 6 months after implantation and radiological examination were performed. Decalcified sections were examined by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining, alkaline phosphatase (ALPase) immunohistochemistry and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAPase) enzyme histochemistry. Then, we performed histomorphometric analysis, including determination of the percentage of newly formed bone and osteoblast and osteoclast counts. The results indicated that MTX-CPC implants were biocompatible, biodegradable and osteoconducive. However, MTX release from the implantation site inhibited osteogenesis in the initial period; this inhibition weakened with time, and no difference was observed between CPC and MTX-CPC at 6 months after implantation. Hence, MTX-CPC is an excellent material for filling defects and can be used for preparing effective drug delivery systems to achieve local control of invasive bone tumors.

  15. Cu2+, Co2+ and Cr3+ doping of a calcium phosphate cement influences materials properties and response of human mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schamel, Martha; Bernhardt, Anne; Quade, Mandy; Würkner, Claudia; Gbureck, Uwe; Moseke, Claus; Gelinsky, Michael; Lode, Anja

    2017-04-01

    The application of biologically active metal ions to stimulate cellular reactions is a promising strategy to accelerate bone defect healing. Brushite-forming calcium phosphate cements were modified with low doses of Cu 2+ , Co 2+ and Cr 3+ . The modified cements released the metal ions in vitro in concentrations which were shown to be non-toxic for cells. The release kinetics correlated with the solubility of the respective metal phosphates: 17-45 wt.-% of Co 2+ and Cu 2+ , but calcium and phosphate ions with cell culture medium. In case of cements modified with 50mmol Cr 3+ /mol β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), XRD and SEM analyses revealed a significant amount of monetite and a changed morphology of the cement matrix. Cell culture experiments with human mesenchymal stromal cells indicated that the observed cell response is not only influenced by the released metal ions but also by changed cement properties. A positive effect of modifications with 50mmol Cr 3+ or 10mmol Cu 2+ per mol β-TCP on cell behaviour was observed in indirect and direct culture. Modification with Co 2+ resulted in a clear suppression of cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. In conclusion, metal ion doping of the cement influences cellular activities in addition to the effect of released metal ions by changing properties of the ceramic matrix. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. SEALING ABILITY OF MINERAL TRIOXIDE AGGREGATE, CALCIUM PHOSPHATE CEMENT, AND GLASS IONOMER CEMENT IN THE REPAIR OF FURCATION PERFORATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabath Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the in vitro sealing ability of three repair materials. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA; Group A, calcium phosphate cement (CPC; Group B, and light cured glass ionomer cement (GIC; Group C when used to repair the perforation created in the pulpal floor of fifty extracted human permanent molars. Materials and methods: Preparation of access openings and furcation perforations were done, and the teeth divided into five experimental groups (A, B, C including two controls (D, E with ten samples in each group randomly. Following the repair procedure, the pulp chambers and access openings were filled with composite resin and immersed in 2% methylene blue solution for 48 hours. The teeth were sectioned longitudinally and the linear dye penetration measured under a stereo­microscope. Results: The comparison of the linear length of micro-leakage (mm among the experimental groups revealed no significant difference (p = 0.332. On calculating the percentage of depth of leakage to the total length of the perforation, it was observed that the mean leakage was 35.5% in Group A, 53.6% in Group B and the highest, 87.5% in Group C. The mean of leakage percentage was statistically significant by Kruskal-Wallis test (p = 0.003. The results indicated that the dye penetration used as furcation perforation repair material was least with mineral trioxide aggregate. Comparing the depth of penetration of dye, 50% of the Group A samples showed less than 25% of depth penetration. While 40% of Group B cases had more than 50% dye penetration. In our study, all Group C teeth had ≥ 50% dye penetration. Conclusions: The present study indicated that GIC had the greatest dye penetration followed by CPC and MTA. Mineral trioxide aggregate and calcium phosphate cement had comparatively better sealing ability than glass ionomer cement.

  17. Calcium phosphate cements properties with polymers addition; Propriedades do cimento de fosfato de calcio com adicao de polimeros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, J.M.; Trajano, W.T.; Escobar, C.F.; Santos, L.A., E-mail: julianafernandes2@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), RS (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPC) have attracted great interest to use in orthopedics and dentistry as replacements for damaged parts of the skeletal system, showing good biocompatibility and osseointegration, allowing its use as bone graft. Several studies have shown that the addition of polymer additives have a strong influence on the cement properties. The low mechanical strength is the main obstacle to greater use of CPC as an implant material. The objective of this study was to evaluate properties of a cement based on α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP), added polymers. PVA (10%, 8%, 6%), sodium alginate (2%) and polyacrylate ammonia (3%), all in weight, were added to the synthesized α-TCP powder. The samples were molded and evaluated for density, porosity in vitro test (Simulated Body Fluid), crystalline phases and mechanical strength. The results show increased the mechanical properties of the cement when added these polymers.

  18. The Bone Building Blues: Self-hardening copper-doped calcium phosphate cement and its in vitro assessment against mammalian cells and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Julietta V; Wu, Victoria M; Graziani, Valerio; Fadeeva, Inna V; Fomin, Alexander S; Fosca, Marco; Uskoković, Vuk

    2017-10-01

    A blue calcium phosphate cement with optimal self-hardening properties was synthesized by doping whitlockite (β-TCP) with copper ions. The mechanism and the kinetics of the cement solidification process were studied using energy dispersive X-ray diffraction and it was found out that hardening was accompanied by the phase transition from TCP to brushite. Reduced lattice parameters in all crystallographic directions resulting from the rather low (1:180) substitution rate of copper for calcium was consistent with the higher ionic radius of the latter. The lower cationic hydration resulting from the partial Ca→Cu substitution facilitated the release of constitutive hydroxyls and lowered the energy of formation of TCP from the apatite precursor at elevated temperatures. Addition of copper thus effectively inhibited the formation of apatite as the secondary phase. The copper-doped cement exhibited an antibacterial effect, though exclusively against Gram-negative bacteria, including E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. enteritidis. This antibacterial effect was due to copper ions, as demonstrated by an almost negligible antibacterial effect of the pure, copper-free cement. Also, the antibacterial activity of the copper-containing cement was significantly higher than that of its precursor powder. Since there was no significant difference between the kinetics of the release of copper from the precursor TCP powder and from the final, brushite phase of the hardened cement, this has suggested that the antibacterial effect was not solely due to copper ions, but due to the synergy between cationic copper and a particular phase and aggregation state of calcium phosphate. Though inhibitory to bacteria, the copper-doped cement increased the viability of human glial E297 cells, murine osteoblastic K7M2 cells and especially human primary lung fibroblasts. That this effect was also due to copper ions was evidenced by the null effect on viability increase exhibited by the copper

  19. Setting time and sealing ability of alpha-tricalcium phosphate cement containing titanic oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, M; Terada, Y; Toda, T

    1998-10-01

    We developed a new type of calcium phosphate cement for clinical use in endodontics as a root canal sealer or pulp cupping agent. The solid phase of the sealer is composed of 70% of alpha-tricalcium phosphate (alpha-TCP) and 30% of titanic oxide (TiO2), and the liquid phase is 37% citric acid, 5% tannic acid and 58% distilled water. TiO2 was added to control setting time and handling of the cement. We used commercially available calcium phosphate root canal sealer as a control. ISO standards specify that new endodontic products should be examined thoroughly before clinical use. It is important to carry out in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo histocompatibility tests. We first did in vitro test of setting time and root canal sealing ability of the cement. We found that this developed calcium phosphate cement had an appropriate setting time and excellent sealing ability as a root canal sealer, and concluded that it was suitable for clinical use as a root canal sealer.

  20. Addition of 1, 2 and 3% in mass of sodium alginate in calcium phosphate cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelho, W.T.; Fernandes, J.M.; Vieira, R.S.; Thurmer, M.B.; Santos, L.A.

    2011-01-01

    The calcium phosphate cement (CFC) are bone substitutes with great potential for use in orthopedics, traumatology and dentistry because of their biocompatibility, bioactivity, osteoconductivity and osteotransdutivity, and a paste that can be easily molded and placed into the surgical site. However, CFCs have low mechanical strength, which equals the maximum mechanical strength of trabecular bone. Aiming to evaluate the strength and time to handle a CFC phase composed mainly of alpha were added to sodium alginate (1%, 2% and 3% wt) and an accelerator handle in an aqueous medium. The cement powder was mixed with liquid takes 2 minutes and resigned in specimens and assessed for apparent density and porosity by the Archimedes method, X-ray diffraction and mechanical strength. We noticed a significant increase in mechanical properties of cement added sodium alginate. (author)

  1. Cu{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+} and Cr{sup 3+} doping of a calcium phosphate cement influences materials properties and response of human mesenchymal stromal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schamel, Martha [Department for Functional Materials in Medicine and Dentistry, University of Würzburg, Pleicherwall 2, 97070 Würzburg (Germany); Bernhardt, Anne; Quade, Mandy; Würkner, Claudia [Centre for Translational Bone, Joint and Soft Tissue Research, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus and Faculty of Medicine of Technische Universität Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Gbureck, Uwe; Moseke, Claus [Department for Functional Materials in Medicine and Dentistry, University of Würzburg, Pleicherwall 2, 97070 Würzburg (Germany); Gelinsky, Michael [Centre for Translational Bone, Joint and Soft Tissue Research, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus and Faculty of Medicine of Technische Universität Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Lode, Anja, E-mail: anja.lode@tu-dresden.de [Centre for Translational Bone, Joint and Soft Tissue Research, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus and Faculty of Medicine of Technische Universität Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany)

    2017-04-01

    The application of biologically active metal ions to stimulate cellular reactions is a promising strategy to accelerate bone defect healing. Brushite-forming calcium phosphate cements were modified with low doses of Cu{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+} and Cr{sup 3+}. The modified cements released the metal ions in vitro in concentrations which were shown to be non-toxic for cells. The release kinetics correlated with the solubility of the respective metal phosphates: 17–45 wt.-% of Co{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+}, but < 1 wt.-% of Cr{sup 3+} were released within 28 days. Moreover, metal ion doping led to alterations in the exchange of calcium and phosphate ions with cell culture medium. In case of cements modified with 50 mmol Cr{sup 3+}/mol β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), XRD and SEM analyses revealed a significant amount of monetite and a changed morphology of the cement matrix. Cell culture experiments with human mesenchymal stromal cells indicated that the observed cell response is not only influenced by the released metal ions but also by changed cement properties. A positive effect of modifications with 50 mmol Cr{sup 3+} or 10 mmol Cu{sup 2+} per mol β-TCP on cell behaviour was observed in indirect and direct culture. Modification with Co{sup 2+} resulted in a clear suppression of cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. In conclusion, metal ion doping of the cement influences cellular activities in addition to the effect of released metal ions by changing properties of the ceramic matrix. - Highlights: • A brushite-forming calcium phosphate cement was modified by doping with bioactive Cu{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+} and Cr{sup 3+} ions. • The metal ions were integrated in the cement matrix, setting was not affected. • The modified cements released the metal ions in doses non-toxic for cells. • Modification with Cr{sup 3+} ions enhanced the biocompatibility of the cement.

  2. Modifications on the properties of a calcium phosphate cement by additions of sodium alginate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelho, W.T.; Fernandes, J.M.; Vieira, R.S.; Thurmer, M.B.; Santos, L.A.

    2012-01-01

    The Calcium Phosphate Cement (CPC) are bone substitutes with great potential for use in orthopedics, traumatology and dentistry due to its biocompatibility, bioactivity and osteoconductivity, and form a paste that can be easily shaped and placed into the surgical site. However, CPCs have low mechanical strength, which equals the maximum mechanical strength of trabecular bone. In order to assess the strength and time to handle a CPC composed primarily of alpha phase, were added sodium alginate (1%, 2% and 3% wt) and an accelerator in an aqueous solution. The cement powder was mixed with liquid of setting, shaped into specimens and evaluated for apparent density and porosity by Archimedes method, X-ray diffraction and compressive strength. A significant increase in compressive strength by adding sodium alginate was verified. (author)

  3. Calcium phosphate ceramics in drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Susmita; Tarafder, Solaiman; Edgington, Joe; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2011-04-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) particulates, cements and scaffolds have attracted significant interest as drug delivery vehicles. CaP systems, including both hydroxyapaptite and tricalcium phosphates, possess variable stoichiometry, functionality and dissolution properties which make them suitable for cellular delivery. Their chemical similarity to bone and thus biocompatibility, as well as variable surface charge density contribute to their controlled release properties. Among specific research areas, nanoparticle size, morphology, surface area due to porosity, and chemistry controlled release kinetics are the most active. This article discusses CaP systems in their particulate, cements, and scaffold forms for drug, protein, and growth factor delivery toward orthopedic and dental applications.

  4. Deterioration of the mechanical properties of calcium phosphate cements with Poly (γ-glutamic acid) and its strontium salt after in vitro degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ting; Gao, Chun-Xia; Yang, Lei; Saijilafu; Yang, Hui-Lin; Luo, Zong-Ping

    2017-11-01

    The mechanical reliability of calcium phosphate cements has restricted their clinical application in load-bearing locations. Although their mechanical strength can be improved using a variety of strategies, their fatigue properties are still unclear, especially after degradation. The evolutions of uniaxial compressive properties and the fatigue behavior of calcium phosphate cements incorporating poly (γ-glutamic acid) and its strontium salt after different in vitro degradation times were investigated in the present study. Compressive strength decreased from the 61.2±5.4MPa of the original specimen, to 51.1±4.4, 42.2±3.8, 36.8±2.4 and 28.9±3.2MPa following degradation for one, two, three and four weeks, respectively. Fatigue life under same loading condition also decreased with increasing degradation time. The original specimens remained intact for one million cycles (run-out) under a maximum stress of 30MPa. After degradation for one to four weeks, the specimens were able to withstand maximum stress of 20, 15, 10 and 10MPa, respectively until run-out. Defect volume fraction within the specimens increased from 0.19±0.021% of the original specimen to 0.60±0.19%, 1.09±0.04%, 2.68±0.64% and 7.18±0.34% at degradation time of one, two, three and four weeks, respectively. Therefore, we can infer that the primary cause of the deterioration of the mechanical properties was an increasing in micro defects induced by degradation, which promoted crack initiation and propagation, accelerating the final mechanical failure of the bone cement. This study provided the data required for enhancing the mechanical reliability of the calcium phosphate cements after different degradation times, which will be significant for the modification of load-bearing biodegradable bone cements to match clinical application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Wollastonite nanofiber–doped self-setting calcium phosphate bioactive cement for bone tissue regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo H

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Han Guo,1,2 Jie Wei,2 Wenhua Song,2 Shan Zhang,2 Yonggang Yan,3 Changsheng Liu,2 Tiqiao Xiao11Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 2Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 3School of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: The purpose of this study was to synthesize a self-setting bioactive cement by incorporation of wollastonite nanofibers (WNFs into calcium phosphate cement (CPC. The composition, morphology, setting time, compressive strength, hydrophilicity, and degradation of WNF-doped CPC (wnf-CPC were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy were utilized. Additionally, methyl-thiazolyl-tetrazolium bromide assay, scanning electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, and histological evaluation were used to study the cell and tissue responses to wnf-CPC, both in vitro and in vivo. The results confirmed that the addition of WNFs into CPC had no obvious effect on the setting time or the compressive strength of wnf-CPC, provided the WNF amount was not more than 10 wt%. However, the hydrophilicity and degradability of wnf-CPC were significantly improved by the addition of WNFs – this was because of the change of microstructure caused by the WNFs. The preferred dissolution of WNFs caused the formation of microporosity in wnf-CPC when soaked in tris hydrochloride solution. The microporosity enlarged the surface area of the wnf-CPC and so promoted degradation of the wnf-CPC when in contact with liquid. In addition, MG-63 cell attachment and proliferation on the wnf-CPC were superior to that on the CPC, indicating that

  6. [Experiment of porous calcium phosphate/bone matrix gelatin composite cement for repairing lumbar vertebral bone defect in rabbit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Song; Yang, Han; Yang, Jian; Kang, Jianping; Wang, Qing; Song, Yueming

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the effect of a porous calcium phosphate/bone matrix gelatin (BMG) composite cement (hereinafter referred to as the "porous composite cement") for repairing lumbar vertebral bone defect in a rabbit model. BMG was extracted from adult New Zealand rabbits according to the Urist's method. Poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) microsphere was prepared by W/O/W double emulsion method. The porous composite cement was developed by using calcium phosphate cement (CPC) composited with BMG and PLGA microsphere. The physicochemical characterizations of the porous composite cement were assessed by anti-washout property, porosity, and biomechanical experiment, also compared with the CPC. Thirty 2-month-old New Zealand rabbits were used to construct vertebral bone defect at L 3 in size of 4 mm×3 mm×3 mm. Then, the bone defect was repaired with porous composite cement (experimental group, n =15) or CPC (control group, n =15). At 4, 8, and 12 weeks after implantation, each bone specimen was assessed by X-ray films for bone fusion, micro-CT for bone mineral density (BMD), bone volume fraction (BVF), trabecular thickness (Tb. Th.), trabecular number (Tb.N.), and trabecular spacing (Tb. Sp.), and histological section with toluidine blue staining for new-born bone formation. The study demonstrated well anti-washout property in 2 groups. The porous composite cement has 55.06%±1.18% of porosity and (51.63±6.73) MPa of compressive strength. The CPC has 49.38%±1.75% of porosity and (63.34±3.27) MPa of compressive strength. There were significant differences in porosity and compressive strength between different cements ( t =4.254, P =0.006; t =2.476, P =0.034). X-ray films revealed that the zone between the cement and host bone gradually blurred with the time extending. At 12 weeks after implantation, the zone was disappeared in the experimental group, but clear in the control group. There were significant differences in BMD, BVF, Tb. Th., Tb. N., and Tb. Sp. between

  7. Preparation and Characterization of Apatitic Biphasic Calcium Phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin Thin Nwe; Kyaw Naing; Khin Mar Tun; Nyunt Wynn

    2005-09-01

    The apatitic biphasic calcium phosphate (ABcp) consisting of hydroxyapatite (HA) and -tricalcium phosphate ( -Tcp) has been prepared by precipitation technique using slaked lime and orthophosphoric acid. The X-ray diffraction analysis of the product I (hydroxyapatite) revealed that ABcp was partially crystalline state. However, on heating at 800 C for 8 hrs, XRD pattern indicated a perfectly crystalline form of ABcp. This observation was supported by FT-IR measurement. The change in morphology regarding in the functional nature was infered by the shift in the FT-IR frequency. The optimization of the apatitic biphasic calcium phosphate was done by the variation of disodium hydrogen phosphate concentration, setting time, hardening time as well as compressive strength. The perpared cement may be used as an artificial substitution bone

  8. Characterization and in vitro evaluation of biphasic α-tricalcium phosphate/β-tricalcium phosphate cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arahira, Takaaki; Maruta, Michito, E-mail: maruta@college.fdcnet.ac.jp; Matsuya, Shigeki

    2017-05-01

    Biphasic calcium phosphate consisting of hydroxyapatite (HA) and β-tricalcium phosphate(β-TCP) is an excellent bone substitute with controllable bioresorbability. Fabrication of biphasic calcium phosphate with self-setting ability is expected to enhance its potential application as bone substitute. In this study, mixtures of α-TCP and β-TCP with various compositions were prepared through α-β phase transition of α-TCP powder at 1000 °C for various periods. These powders were mixed with 0.25 M Na{sub 2}HPO{sub 4} at a P/L ratio of 2, and then hardened at 37 °C at 100% RH for up to 24 h. Material properties of biphasic HA/β-TCP cement with different α-TCP/β-TCP composition were characterized. These cements were also evaluated with respect to cell response in vitro using MC3T3-E1 cell lines. In conclusion, mechanical and biological properties of HA/β-TCP cement could be controlled by changing the heat treatment time of α-TCP powder at 1000 °C. In vitro results indicated that cell proliferation and ALP activity increased with increase β-TCP content. - Highlights: • We could fabricate biphasic HA/β-TCP cements using heat treated α-TCP powder. • It is easy to control the ratio of α-TCP to β-TCP changing the heat treatment time up to 48 h. • Both cell number and ALP activity increased with increase in β-TCP content. • In vitro results showed that β-TCP has superior cell affinity to HA.

  9. Molecular mechanism of crystallization impacting calcium phosphate cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giocondi, J L; El-Dasher, B S; Nancollas, G H; Orme, C A

    2009-05-31

    theoretical modeling. The question changes from 'What types of molecules will inhibit brushite growth' to 'What type of molecule will interact with the [10-1]{sub Cc} step?' Similarly, to increase resorption rate, it would be most efficacious to target the slow moving [-100] step, perhaps by targeting the hydroxyl group which seem to stabilize this step compared to its otherwise similar mirror, [100]. In short, there are a number of opportunities where molecular scale imaging can provide new information that has the prospect to aid in optimizing calcium phosphate cements.

  10. CT volumetry of intravertebral cement after kyphoplasty. Comparison of polymethylmethacrylate and calcium phosphate in a 12-month follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libicher, M.; Noeldge, G.; Kauffmann, G.W.; Vetter, M.; Wolf, I.; Meinzer, H.P.; Kasperk, C.; Grafe, I.; Fonseca, K.D.; Meeder, P.J.; Hillmeier, J.

    2005-01-01

    This study was intended to measure the volume of intravertebral cement after balloon kyphoplasty with high resolution computed tomography (CT) and dedicated software. Volume changes of biocompatible calcium phosphate cement (CPC) were detected during a follow-up of 12 months. Measurements were compared with a control group of patients treated with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Twenty-three vertebrae (14 CPC, 9 PMMA) of 12 patients were examined with CT using an identical imaging protocol. Dedicated software was used to quantify intravertebral cement volume in subvoxel resolution by analyzing each cement implant with a density-weighted algorithm. The mean volume reduction of CPC was 0.08 ml after 12 months, which corresponds to an absorption rate of 2 vol%. However, the difference did not reach significance level (P>0.05). The mean error estimate was 0.005 ml, indicating excellent precision of the method. CT volumetry appears a precise tool for measurement of intravertebral cement volume. CT volumetry offers the possibility of in vivo measurement of CPC resorption. (orig.)

  11. Preparation, characterization and investigation of in vitro and in vivo biological properties of strontium-modified calcium phosphate cement for bone defect repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Masaeli

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the invitro and invivo performance of a 3 wt% of strontium additive hydroxyapatite calcium phosphate cements (CPC. Materials and Methods: The prepared calcium phosphate cement was characterized with XRD, FTIR, setting time, STA and in vitro and in vivo biological analyses. The MTT assay ALP activities as in vitro study and radiological and histological examinations as in vivo study between the three groups of 3 wt% Sr-HA/CPC, CPC and control were performed and compared. Data were analyzed using T-test and One-way ANOVA. Results: XRD analysis demonstrated that by increasing the ratio of Powder/Liquid (P/L, the crystallinity of the prepared cement increased. The substitution of strontium instead of calcium in CPC could also alter the crystal structure, including some structural disorder. However, in the CPC with no strontium hydroxyapatite (Sr-HA, no significant increase in the crystallinity was observed. SEM observations revealed CPC with increasing P/L ratio, the formation of hydroxyapatite crystals arising from the interaction of solid and liquid phase of cement was decreased. Also, the addition of Sr within Ca site culminated in a dramatic increase in crystallinity of hydroxyapatite. In vitro biological properties ascertained that addition of 3 wt. % Sr-HA into CPC enhanced MTT assay and ALP activity, which could be due to the presence of strontium ions. The histological study showed that greater remodeling was seen at 4 weeks after implantation when the 3 wt% Sr-HA/CPC was used. Conclusion: The obtained results cleared that CPC can be a potential candidate as a carrier with strontium additives for bone remodeling and regeneration.

  12. [An experimental study on a slow-release complex with rifampicin-polylactic-co-glycolic acid-calciumphosphate cement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianhuang; Ding, Zhou; Lei, Qing; Li, Miao; Liang, Yan; Lu, Tao

    2016-09-28

    To prepare the slow-release complex with rifampicin (RFP)-polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA)-calcium phosphate cement (CPC) (RFP-PLGA-CPC complex), and to study its physical and chemical properties and drug release properties in vitro.
 The emulsification-solvent evaporation method was adopted to prepare rifampicin polylactic acid-glycolic acid (RFP-PLGA) slow-release microspheres, which were divided into 3 groups: a calcium phosphate bone cement group (CPC group), a CPC embedded with RFP group (RFP-CPC group), and a PLGA slow-release microspheres carrying RFP and the self-curing CPC group (RFP- PLGA-CPC complex group). The solidification time and porosity of materials were determined. The drug release experiments in vitro were carried out to observe the compressive strength, the change of section morphology before and after drug release. 
 The CPC group showed the shortest solidification time, while the RFP-PLGA-CPC complex group had the longest one. There was statistical difference in the porosity between the CPC group and the RFP-CPC group (Pbehavior of the complex, which was in accordance with zero order kinetics equation F=0.168×t.
 The porosity of RFP-PLGA-CPC complex is significantly higher than that of CPC, and it can keep slow release of the effective anti-tuberculosis drugs and maintain a certain mechanical strength for a long time.

  13. Development of a fully injectable calcium phosphate cement for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2003-01-27

    Jan 27, 2003 ... excellent alloplastic material for osseous augmentation because of the ... and basic calcium phosphate compounds on wetting with an aqueous ... ment of acute fracture of the radius through percutaneous administration of ...

  14. Vibrational investigation of calcium-silicate cements for endodontics in simulated body fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddei, Paola; Modena, Enrico; Tinti, Anna; Siboni, Francesco; Prati, Carlo; Gandolfi, Maria Giovanna

    2011-05-01

    Calcium-silicate MTA (Mineral Trioxide Aggregate) cements have been recently developed for oral and endodontic surgery. This study was aimed at investigating commercial (White ProRoot MTA, White and Grey MTA-Angelus) and experimental (wTC-Bi) accelerated calcium-silicate cements with regards to composition, hydration products and bioactivity upon incubation for 1-28 days at 37 °C, in Dulbecco's Phosphate Buffered Saline (DPBS). Deposits on the surface of the cements and the composition changes during incubation were investigated by micro-Raman and ATR/FT-IR spectroscopy, and pH measurements. Vibrational techniques disclosed significant differences in composition among the unhydrated cements, which significantly affected the bioactivity as well as pH, and hydration products of the cements. After one day in DPBS, all the cements were covered by a more or less homogeneous layer of B-type carbonated apatite. The experimental cement maintained a high bioactivity, only slightly lower than the other cements and appears a valid alternative to commercial cements, in view of its adequate setting time properties. The bioactivity represents an essential property to favour bone healing and makes the calcium-silicate cements the gold standard materials for root-apical endodontic surgery.

  15. Effect of polydopamine on the biomimetic mineralization of mussel-inspired calcium phosphate cement in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zongguang [Key Lab of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Qu, Shuxin, E-mail: qushuxin@swjtu.edu.cn [Key Lab of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Zheng, Xiaotong; Xiong, Xiong [Key Lab of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Fu, Rong; Tang, Kuangyun; Zhong, Zhendong [Department of Plastic Surgery, Academy of Medical Sciences and Sichuan Provincial People' s Hospital, Chengdu 610041 (China); Weng, Jie [Key Lab of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2014-11-01

    Inspired by the excellent adhesive property of mussel adhesive protein, we added polydopamine (PDA) to calcium phosphate cement (PDA–CPC) to enhance its compressive strength previously. The mineralization and mechanism on PDA–CPC were investigated by soaking it in simulated body fluid in this study. The results indicated that PDA promoted the conversion of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate and α-tricalcium phosphate to hydroxyapatite (HA) in the early stage but inhibited this conversion subsequently. PDA promoted the rapid mineralization on PDA–CPC to form a layer of nanoscale calcium phosphate (CaP) whereas there was no CaP formation on the control-CPC after 1 d of soaking. This layer of nanoscale CaP was similar to that of natural bone, which was always observed during soaking. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that the peak of C=O of PDA existed in the newly formed CaP on PDA–CPC, indicating the co-precipitation of CaP with PDA. Furthermore, the newly formed CaP on PDA–CPC was HA confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, which the newly formed HA was in association with PDA. Therefore, PDA increased the capacity of mineralization of CPC and induced the formation of nanoscale bone-like apatite on PDA–CPC. Thus, this provides the feasible route for surface modification on CPC. - Highlights: • Effect of polydopamine (PDA) on the in vitro mineralization of PDA-CPC was studied. • PDA promoted the rapid mineralization on PDA-CPC to form a nanoscale HA layer. • The precipitation of the nanoscale HA layer on PDA-CPC accompanied with PDA. • Polydopamine induced mineralization is feasible for surface modification of CaP.

  16. Biphasic calcium sulfate dihydrate/iron-modified alpha-tricalcium phosphate bone cement for spinal applications: in vitro study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlad, M D; Lopez, J; Torres, R; Barraco, M; Fernandez, E; Valle, L J; Poeata, I

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the cytocompatibility of new 'iron-modified/alpha-tricalcium phosphate (IM/α-TCP) and calcium sulfate dihydrate (CSD)' bone cement (IM/α-TCP/CSD-BC) intended for spinal applications has been approached. The objective was to investigate by direct-contact osteoblast-like cell cultures (from 1 to 14 days) the in vitro cell adhesion, proliferation, morphology and cytoskeleton organization of MG-63 cells seeded onto the new cements. The results were as follows: (a) quantitative MTT-assay and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that cell adhesion, proliferation and viability were not affected with time by the presence of iron in the cements; (b) double immunofluorescent labeling of F-actin and α-tubulin showed a dynamic interaction between the cell and its porous substrates sustaining the locomotion phenomenon on the cements' surface, which favored the colonization, and confirming the biocompatibility of the experimental cements; (c) SEM-cell morphology and cytoskeleton observations also evidenced that MG-63 cells were able to adhere, to spread and to attain normal morphology on the new IM/α-TCP/CSD-BC which offered favorable substratum properties for osteoblast-like cells proliferation and differentiation in vitro. The results showed that these new iron-modified cement-like biomaterials have cytocompatible features of interest not only as possible spinal cancellous bone replacement biomaterial but also as bone tissue engineering scaffolds.

  17. Tantalum oxide and barium sulfate as radiopacifiers in injectable calcium phosphate-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) cements for monitoring in vivo degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, Jan Willem M; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C G; Bronkhorst, Ewald M; Meijer, Gert J; Jansen, John A

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring the degradation of calcium phosphate-based bone substitute materials in vivo by means of noninvasive techniques (e.g., radiography) is often a problem due to the chemical resemblance of those substitutes with the mineral phase of bone. In the view of that, the present study aimed at enhancing the radiopacity of calcium phosphate cement enriched with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (CPC-PLGA) microspheres, by adding tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) or the more traditional radiopacifier barium sulfate (BaSO4). The radiopacifying capacity of these radiopacifiers was first evaluated in vitro by microcomputed tomography (μCT). Thereafter, both radiopacifiers were tested in vivo using a distal femoral condyle model in rabbits, with subsequent ex vivo μCT analysis in parallel with histomorphometry. Addition of either one of the radiopacifiers proved to enhance radiopacity of CPC-PLGA in vitro. The in vivo experiment showed that both radiopacifiers did not induce alterations in biological performance compared to plain CPC-PLGA, hence both radiopacifiers can be considered safe and biocompatible. The histomorphometrical assessment of cement degradation and bone formation showed similar values for the three experimental groups. Interestingly, μCT analysis showed that monitoring cement degradation becomes feasible upon incorporation of either type of radiopacifier, albeit that BaSO4 showed more accuracy compared to Ta2O5. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley Company.

  18. Biomineralization ability and interaction of mineral trioxide aggregate and white portland cement with dentin in a phosphate-containing fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Carmona, Jessie F; Felippe, Mara S; Felippe, Wilson T

    2009-05-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has been shown to be bioactive because of its ability to produce biologically compatible carbonated apatite. This study analyzed the interaction of MTA and white Portland cement with dentin after immersion in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Dentin disks with standardized cavities were filled with ProRoot MTA, MTA Branco, MTA BIO, white Portland cement + 20% bismuth oxide (PC1), or PC1 + 10% of calcium chloride (PC2) and immersed in 15 mL of PBS for 2 months. The precipitates were weighed and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray diffraction. The calcium ion release and pH of the solutions were monitored at 5, 15, 25, and 35 days. The samples were processed for SEM observations. Data were analyzed by using analysis of variance or Kruskall-Wallis tests. Our findings revealed the presence of amorphous calcium phosphate precipitates with different morphologies. The apatite formed by the cement-PBS system was deposited within collagen fibrils, promoting controlled mineral nucleation on dentin, observed as the formation of an interfacial layer with tag-like structures. All the cements tested were bioactive. The cements release some of their components in PBS, triggering the initial precipitation of amorphous calcium phosphates, which act as precursors during the formation of carbonated apatite. This spontaneous precipitation promotes a biomineralization process that leads to the formation of an interfacial layer with tag-like structures at the cement-dentin interface.

  19. Biocompatibility of calcium phosphate bone cement with optimized mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Iwan; Nelson, John; Schatton, Wolfgang; Dunne, Nicholas J; Buchanan, Fraser J; Clarke, Susan A

    2016-02-01

    The broad aim of this work was to investigate and optimize the properties of calcium phosphate bone cements (CPCs) for use in vertebroplasty to achieve effective primary fixation of spinal fractures. The incorporation of collagen, both bovine and from a marine sponge (Chondrosia reniformis), into a CPC was investigated. The biological properties of the CPC and collagen-CPC composites were assessed in vitro through the use of human bone marrow stromal cells. Cytotoxicity, proliferation, and osteoblastic differentiation were evaluated using lactate dehydrogenase, PicoGreen, and alkaline phosphatase activity assays, respectively. The addition of both types of collagen resulted in an increase in cytotoxicity, albeit not to a clinically relevant level. Cellular proliferation after 1, 7, and 14 days was unchanged. The osteogenic potential of the CPC was reduced through the addition of bovine collagen but remained unchanged in the case of the marine collagen. These findings, coupled with previous work showing that incorporation of marine collagen in this way can improve the physical properties of CPCs, suggest that such a composite may offer an alternative to CPCs in applications where low setting times and higher mechanical stability are important. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Calcium phosphate cement as a "barrier-graft" for the treatment of human periodontal intraosseous defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh J

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Calcium phosphate cements (CPC are apparently good candidates for periodontal treatment by virtue of their biocompatibility, mouldability and osteoconductivity. However, the clinical efficacy in this regard has not been established. This study is aimed at the evaluation of the efficacy of a formulation of CPC in healing human periodontal intraosseous defects in comparison with hydroxyapatite ceramic granules. Materials and Methods : In this clinical study, 60 patients with periodontal defects were divided into 2 test groups and 1 control group. The defect sites in the test groups were repaired with CPC and hydroxyapatite ceramic granules (HAG. Debridement alone was given in the control group. The progress was assessed at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months observation intervals through soft tissue parameters (probing depth, attachment level and gingival recession. Results: CPC showed significantly better outcome. Probing depth reduction values of CPC, HAG and Control at 6 months were 5.40 ± 1.43, 3.75 ± 1.71 and 2.90 ± 1.48, and those at 12 months were 6.20 ± 1.80, 4.5 ± 1.91 and 2.95 ± 1.73. Clinical attachment gain values of CPC, HAG and Control at 6 months were 5.15 ± 1.50, 3.45 ± 1.96 and 2.25 ± 1.52, and those at 12 months were 5.80 ± 2.02, 3.55 ± 2.06 and 2.30 ± 1.78, In both cases the P value was < 0.001 showing high significance. The gingival recession over 12 months, for the CPC group is lesser than that in the HAG group and the value for the control group is marginally higher than both. Soft-tissue measurements were appended by postoperative radiographs and surgical re-entry in selected cases. Conclusions: Calcium phosphate cement is found to be significantly better than hydroxyapatite ceramic granules. The material could be considered as a "barrier-graft".

  1. Influence of lead on stabilization/solidification by ordinary Portland cement and magnesium phosphate cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Shuai; Dai, Jian-Guo; Wang, Lei; Tsang, Daniel C W; Poon, Chi Sun

    2018-01-01

    Inorganic binder-based stabilization/solidification (S/S) of Pb-contaminated soil is a commonly used remediation approach. This paper investigates the influences of soluble Pb species on the hydration process of two types of inorganic binders: ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and magnesium potassium phosphate cement (MKPC). The environmental leachability, compressive strength, and setting time of the cement products are assessed as the primary performance indicators. The mechanisms of Pb involved in the hydration process are analyzed through X-ray diffraction (XRD), hydration heat evolution, and thermogravimetric analyses. Results show that the presence of Pb imposes adverse impact on the compressive strength (decreased by 30.4%) and the final setting time (prolonged by 334.7%) of OPC, but it exerts much less influence on those of MKPC. The reduced strength and delayed setting are attributed to the retarded hydration reaction rate of OPC during the induction period. These results suggest that the OPC-based S/S of soluble Pb mainly depends on physical encapsulation by calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH) gels. In contrast, in case of MKPC-based S/S process, chemical stabilization with residual phosphate (pyromorphite and lead phosphate precipitation) and physical fixation of cementitious struvite-K are the major mechanisms. Therefore, MKPC is a more efficient and chemically stable inorganic binder for the Pb S/S process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Calcium Orthophosphate Cements and Concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Dorozhkin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In early 1980s, researchers discovered self-setting calcium orthophosphate cements, which are a bioactive and biodegradable grafting material in the form of a powder and a liquid. Both phases form after mixing a viscous paste that after being implanted, sets and hardens within the body as either a non-stoichiometric calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA or brushite, sometimes blended with unreacted particles and other phases. As both CDHA and brushite are remarkably biocompartible and bioresorbable (therefore, in vivo they can be replaced with newly forming bone, calcium orthophosphate cements represent a good correction technique for non-weight-bearing bone fractures or defects and appear to be very promising materials for bone grafting applications. Besides, these cements possess an excellent osteoconductivity, molding capabilities and easy manipulation. Furthermore, reinforced cement formulations are available, which in a certain sense might be described as calcium orthophosphate concretes. The concepts established by calcium orthophosphate cement pioneers in the early 1980s were used as a platform to initiate a new generation of bone substitute materials for commercialization. Since then, advances have been made in the composition, performance and manufacturing; several beneficial formulations have already been introduced as a result. Many other compositions are in experimental stages. In this review, an insight into calcium orthophosphate cements and concretes, as excellent biomaterials suitable for both dental and bone grafting application, has been provided.

  3. Bone regeneration in experimental animals using calcium phosphate cement combined with platelet growth factors and human growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emilov-Velev, K; Clemente-de-Arriba, C; Alobera-García, M Á; Moreno-Sansalvador, E M; Campo-Loarte, J

    2015-01-01

    Many substances (growth factors and hormones) have osteoinduction properties and when added to some osteoconduction biomaterial they accelerate bone neoformation properties. The materials included 15 New Zealand rabbits, calcium phosphate cement (Calcibon(®)), human growth hormone (GH), and plasma rich in platelets (PRP). Each animal was operated on in both proximal tibias and a critical size bone defect of 6mm of diameter was made. The animals were separated into the following study groups: Control (regeneration only by Calcibon®), PRP (regeneration by Calcibon® and PRP), GH (regeneration by Calcibon® and GH). All the animals were sacrificed at 28 days. An evaluation was made of the appearance of the proximal extreme of rabbit tibiae in all the animals, and to check the filling of the critical size defect. A histological assessment was made of the tissue response, the presence of new bone formation, and the appearance of the biomaterial. Morphometry was performed using the MIP 45 image analyser. ANOVA statistical analysis was performed using the Statgraphics software application. The macroscopic appearance of the critical defect was better in the PRP and the GH group than in the control group. Histologically greater new bone formation was found in the PRP and GH groups. No statistically significant differences were detected in the morphometric study between bone formation observed in the PRP group and the control group. Significant differences in increased bone formation were found in the GH group (p=0.03) compared to the other two groups. GH facilitates bone regeneration in critical defects filled with calcium phosphate cement in the time period studied in New Zealand rabbits. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Apatite formation on bioactive calcium-silicate cements for dentistry affects surface topography and human marrow stromal cells proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolfi, Maria Giovanna; Ciapetti, Gabriela; Taddei, Paola; Perut, Francesca; Tinti, Anna; Cardoso, Marcio Vivan; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Prati, Carlo

    2010-10-01

    The effect of ageing in phosphate-containing solution of bioactive calcium-silicate cements on the chemistry, morphology and topography of the surface, as well as on in vitro human marrow stromal cells viability and proliferation was investigated. A calcium-silicate cement (wTC) mainly based on dicalcium-silicate and tricalcium-silicate was prepared. Alpha-TCP was added to wTC to obtain wTC-TCP. Bismuth oxide was inserted in wTC to prepare a radiopaque cement (wTC-Bi). A commercial calcium-silicate cement (ProRoot MTA) was tested as control. Cement disks were aged in DPBS for 5 h ('fresh samples'), 14 and 28 days, and analyzed by ESEM/EDX, SEM/EDX, ATR-FTIR, micro-Raman techniques and scanning white-light interferometry. Proliferation, LDH release, ALP activity and collagen production of human marrow stromal cells (MSC) seeded for 1-28 days on the cements were evaluated. Fresh samples exposed a surface mainly composed of calcium-silicate hydrates CSH (from the hydration of belite and alite), calcium hydroxide, calcium carbonate, and ettringite. Apatite nano-spherulites rapidly precipitated on cement surfaces within 5 h. On wTC-TCP the Ca-P deposits appeared thicker than on the other cements. Aged cements showed an irregular porous calcium-phosphate (Ca-P) coating, formed by aggregated apatite spherulites with interspersed calcite crystals. All the experimental cements exerted no acute toxicity in the cell assay system and allowed cell growth. Using biochemical results, the scores were: fresh cements>aged cements for cell proliferation and ALP activity (except for wTC-Bi), whereas fresh cementscements for collagen synthesis. Summarizing (1) non-aged cements showed higher cell proliferation than aged cements, probably favoured by the presence of Si-OH gel and the early formation of apatite nano-spherulites; (2) the alpha-TCP doped cement aged for 28 days displayed the highest bioactivity and cell proliferation; (3) the deleterious effect of bismuth on cell

  5. Controlled adsorption and release onto calcium phosphates materials and drug delivery applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barroug A.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The adsorptive properties of synthetic calcium phosphates analogous to bone mineral were examined with respect to cisplatin and risedronate, two biological active drugs; the uptake and release experiments were carried out under various conditions in order to understand the basic mechanism of interaction. The effect of temperature and solution composition were highlighted and discussed. The adsorption results obtained for the therapeutic agents demonstrated that, depending on the conditions investigated (nature of the sorbent, concentration range, ionic composition, temperature…, the shape of the isotherms is of Freundlich or Langmuir type. The adsorption is described as an ion-exchange process in dilute solutions, while the interaction appears to be reactive for concentrated solutions (dissolution of mineral ions from the apatite substrate and formation of soluble calcium complex and/or precipitation of calcium salts involving sorbate molecules. The information gained on the surface reactivity of calcium phosphate were exploited to associate an antibiotic to calcium phosphate cements for drug delivery applications. The specimens were obtained by combination of calcium phosphate and calcium carbonate powders upon mixing with water. The physicochemical properties of the paste were altered by the drug loading method (in the liquid or solid phase. Thus, a dose-dependent effect was noticed for the paste setting time, hardening and the release process.

  6. Microwave assisted preparation of magnesium phosphate cement (MPC) for orthopedic applications: A novel solution to the exothermicity problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Huan; Agarwal, Anand K.; Goel, Vijay K.; Bhaduri, Sarit B.

    2013-01-01

    There are two interesting features of this paper. First, we report herein a novel microwave assisted technique to prepare phosphate based orthopedic cements, which do not generate any exothermicity during setting. The exothermic reactions during the setting of phosphate cements can cause tissue damage during the administration of injectable compositions and hence a solution to the problem is sought via microwave processing. This solution through microwave exposure is based on a phenomenon that microwave irradiation can remove all water molecules from the alkaline earth phosphate cement paste to temporarily stop the setting reaction while preserving the active precursor phase in the formulation. The setting reaction can be initiated a second time by adding aqueous medium, but without any exothermicity. Second, a special emphasis is placed on using this technique to synthesize magnesium phosphate cements for orthopedic applications with their enhanced mechanical properties and possible uses as drug and protein delivery vehicles. The as-synthesized cements were evaluated for the occurrences of exothermic reactions, setting times, presence of Mg-phosphate phases, compressive strength levels, microstructural features before and after soaking in (simulated body fluid) SBF, and in vitro cytocompatibility responses. The major results show that exposure to microwaves solves the exothermicity problem, while simultaneously improving the mechanical performance of hardened cements and reducing the setting times. As expected, the cements are also found to be cytocompatible. Finally, it is observed that this process can be applied to calcium phosphate cements system (CPCs) as well. Based on the results, this microwave exposure provides a novel technique for the processing of injectable phosphate bone cement compositions. - Highlights: • A microwave assisted system for bone cement manufacturing • A solution to exothermicity problem of acid–base reaction based bone cement

  7. Microwave assisted preparation of magnesium phosphate cement (MPC) for orthopedic applications: A novel solution to the exothermicity problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Huan, E-mail: Huan.Zhou@rockets.utoledo.edu [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Agarwal, Anand K.; Goel, Vijay K. [Department of Bioengineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Bhaduri, Sarit B. [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Division of Dentistry, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    There are two interesting features of this paper. First, we report herein a novel microwave assisted technique to prepare phosphate based orthopedic cements, which do not generate any exothermicity during setting. The exothermic reactions during the setting of phosphate cements can cause tissue damage during the administration of injectable compositions and hence a solution to the problem is sought via microwave processing. This solution through microwave exposure is based on a phenomenon that microwave irradiation can remove all water molecules from the alkaline earth phosphate cement paste to temporarily stop the setting reaction while preserving the active precursor phase in the formulation. The setting reaction can be initiated a second time by adding aqueous medium, but without any exothermicity. Second, a special emphasis is placed on using this technique to synthesize magnesium phosphate cements for orthopedic applications with their enhanced mechanical properties and possible uses as drug and protein delivery vehicles. The as-synthesized cements were evaluated for the occurrences of exothermic reactions, setting times, presence of Mg-phosphate phases, compressive strength levels, microstructural features before and after soaking in (simulated body fluid) SBF, and in vitro cytocompatibility responses. The major results show that exposure to microwaves solves the exothermicity problem, while simultaneously improving the mechanical performance of hardened cements and reducing the setting times. As expected, the cements are also found to be cytocompatible. Finally, it is observed that this process can be applied to calcium phosphate cements system (CPCs) as well. Based on the results, this microwave exposure provides a novel technique for the processing of injectable phosphate bone cement compositions. - Highlights: • A microwave assisted system for bone cement manufacturing • A solution to exothermicity problem of acid–base reaction based bone cement

  8. Effects of Pore Size on the Osteoconductivity and Mechanical Properties of Calcium Phosphate Cement in a Rabbit Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yi-Nan; Fan, Jun-Jun; Li, Zhi-Quan; Liu, Yan-Wu; Wu, Yao-Ping; Liu, Jian

    2017-02-01

    Calcium phosphate cement (CPC) porous scaffold is widely used as a suitable bone substitute to repair bone defect, but the optimal pore size is unclear yet. The current study aimed to evaluate the effect of different pore sizes on the processing of bone formation in repairing segmental bone defect of rabbits using CPC porous scaffolds. Three kinds of CPC porous scaffolds with 5 mm diameters and 12 mm length were prepared with the same porosity but different pore sizes (Group A: 200-300 µm, Group B: 300-450 µm, Group C: 450-600 µm, respectively). Twelve millimeter segmental bone defects were created in the middle of the radius bone and filled with different kinds of CPC cylindrical scaffolds. After 4, 12, and 24 weeks, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), histological assessment, and mechanical properties evaluation were performed in all three groups. After 4 weeks, ALP activity increased in all groups but was highest in Group A with smallest pore size. The new bone formation within the scaffolds was not obvious in all groups. After 12 weeks, the new bone formation within the scaffolds was obvious in each group and highest in Group A. At 24 weeks, no significant difference in new bone formation was observed among different groups. Besides the osteoconductive effect, Group A with smallest pore size also had the best mechanical properties in vivo at 12 weeks. We demonstrate that pore size has a significant effect on the osteoconductivity and mechanical properties of calcium phosphate cement porous scaffold in vivo. Small pore size favors the bone formation in the early stage and may be more suitable for repairing segmental bone defect in vivo. © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Magnesium-phosphate-glass cements with ceramic-type properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.

    1982-09-23

    Rapid setting magnesium phosphate (Mg glass) cementitious materials consisting of magnesium phosphate cement paste, polyborax and water-saturated aggregate, exhibits rapid setting and high early strength characteristics. The magnesium glass cement is prepared from a cation-leachable powder and a bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid such as an aqueous solution of diammonium phosphate and ammonium polyphosphate. The cation-leachable powder includes a mixture of two different magnesium oxide powders processed and sized differently which when mixed with the bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid provides the magnesium glass cement consisting primarily of magnesium ortho phosphate tetrahydrate, with magnesium hydroxide and magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate also present. The polyborax serves as a set-retarder. The resulting magnesium mono- and polyphosphate cements are particularly suitable for use as a cementing matrix in rapid repair systems for deteriorated concrete structures as well as construction materials and surface coatings for fireproof structures.

  10. Magnesium phosphate glass cements with ceramic-type properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, Toshifumi; Kukacka, Lawrence E.

    1984-03-13

    Rapid setting magnesium phosphate (Mg glass) cementitious materials consisting of magnesium phosphate cement paste, polyborax and water-saturated aggregate exhibiting rapid setting and high early strength characteristics. The magnesium glass cement is prepared from a cation-leachable powder and a bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid such as an aqueous solution of diammonium phosphate and ammonium polyphosphate. The cation-leachable powder includes a mixture of two different magnesium oxide powders processed and sized differently which when mixed with the bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid provides the magnesium glass cement consisting primarily of magnesium ortho phosphate tetrahydrate, with magnesium hydroxide and magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate also present. The polyborax serves as a set-retarder. The resulting magnesium mono- and polyphosphate cements are particularly suitable for use as a cementing matrix in rapid repair systems for deteriorated concrete structures as well as construction materials and surface coatings for fireproof structures.

  11. Polyelectrolyte addition effect on the properties of setting hydraulic cements based on calcium phosphate; Efeito da adicao de polieletrolitos sobre as propriedades de cimentos de fosfato de calcio de pega hidraulica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Luis A. dos; Oliveira, Luci C. de; Rigo, Eliana C.S.; Boschi, Anselmo Ortega [Sao Carlos Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais; Carrodeguas, Raul Gracia [Universidad de La Habana, Habana, (Cuba). Centro de Biomateriales

    1997-12-31

    In the present work the effects of the addition of some poly electrolytes (sodium alginate and poly acrylic acid) on the solubility, crystalline phases, pH and mechanical strength under compression of three calcium phosphate cements were studied. (author) 10 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. The physical properties and ion release of CPP-ACP-modified calcium silicate-based cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawood, A E; Manton, D J; Parashos, P; Wong, Rhk; Palamara, Jea; Stanton, D P; Reynolds, E C

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the physical properties and ion release of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP)-modified calcium silicate-based cements (CSCs) and compared the properties of a trial mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) with two commercially available CSCs, Biodentine(™) and Angelus(®) MTA. The setting time, solubility, compressive strength and Vickers surface microhardness of the three CSCs incorporated with 0%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 2.0% and 3.0% (w/w) CPP-ACP were investigated. Release of calcium (Ca(2+) ), phosphate ions (Pi ) and pH of the test cements were measured after 24, 72, 168 and 336 h of storage. The addition of up to 1.0% CPP-ACP into Biodentine(™) and 0.5% into the other cements did not adversely affect their physical properties except for the setting time. The addition of 0.5% CPP-ACP increased Ca(2+) released from Biodentine(™) (after 168 and 336 h), Angelus(®) MTA (after 168 h) and the trial MTA (after 72 h). The addition of 1.0-3.0% CPP-ACP increased Ca(2+) and Pi released from all the cements. Biodentine(™) released more Ca(2+) particularly in the early stages and showed shorter setting time and higher mechanical properties than the other cements. The mechanical properties of Angelus(®) MTA and the trial MTA were similar. All the cements produced highly alkaline storage solutions. Up to 1.0% CPP-ACP in Biodentine(™) improves Ca(2+) and Pi release and 0.5% CPP-ACP in Angelus(®) MTA and the trial MTA improves Ca(2+) release without altering the mechanical properties and solubility. The addition of CPP-ACP into CSCs prolonged the setting time. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  13. Study of mechanical properties of calcium phosphate cement with addition of sodium alginate and dispersant; Estudo das propriedades mecanicas de cimento de fosfato de calcio com adicao de alginato de sodio e defloculante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, J.M.; Coelho, W.T.; Thurmer, M.B.; Vieira, P.S.; Santos, L.A., E-mail: julianafernandes2@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRS), RS (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Several studies in literature have shown that the addition of polymer additives and deflocculant has a strong influence on the mechanical properties of cements in general.The low mechanical strength is the main impediment to wider use of bone cement of calcium phosphate (CFCs) as the implant material, since they have mechanical strength which equals the maximum of trabecular bone.In order to evaluate the strength of a CFC compound alpha-tricalcium phosphate, sodium alginate were added (1%, 2% and 3% by weight) and dispersant ammonium polyacrylate (3%) in aqueous solution.Specimens were made and evaluated for density, porosity, crystalline phases and mechanical strength.The results show the increase of the mechanical properties of cement when added sodium alginate and dispersant. (author)

  14. The mechanical and biological studies of calcium phosphate cement-fibrin glue for bone reconstruction of rabbit femoral defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong J

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Jingjing Dong,1,* Geng Cui,2,* Long Bi,1,* Jie Li,3 Wei Lei11Institute of Orthopedics, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi, People’s Republic of China; 2Institute of Orthopedics, General Hospital of PLA, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 3Institute of Gynecology and Obstetrics, General Hospital of PLA, Beijing, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: In order to improve the mechanical and biological properties of calcium phosphate cement (CPC, nanometer-biomaterial for bone reconstruction in the rabbit femoral defect model, fibrin glue (FG, the natural product, purified from the blood was introduced at three different ratios. The CPC powder and the FG solution were mixed, respectively, at the powder/liquid (P/L ratios (g/mL of 1:1, 3:1, and 5:1 (g/mL, and pure CPC was used as a control. After being implanted into the femoral defect in rabbit, the healing process was evaluated by micro-computed tomography scan, biomechanical testing, and histological examination. By micro-computed tomography analysis, the P/L ratio of 1:1 (g/mL group indicated the largest quantity of new bone formation at 4 weeks, 8 weeks, and 12 weeks after implantation, respectively. Bone volume per trabecular volume of the 1:1 group was highest in the four groups, which was 1.45% ± 0.42%, 7.35% ± 1.45%, and 29.10% ± 1.67% at 4 weeks, 8 weeks, and 12 weeks after the operation, respectively. In the biomechanical tests, the compressive strength and the elastic modulus of the three CPC–FG groups were much higher than those of the pure CPC group at the determined time point (P < 0.05. The histological evaluation also showed the best osseointegration in the 1:1 group at 4 weeks, 8 weeks, and 12 weeks after the operation, respectively. In the 1:1 group, the bone grew into the pore of the cement in the laminar arrangement and connected with the cement tightly at the 12th week after the operation

  15. Synthesis of Portland cement and calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement for sustainable development and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Irvin Allen

    Portland cement concrete, the most widely used manufactured material in the world, is made primarily from water, mineral aggregates, and portland cement. The production of portland cement is energy intensive, accounting for 2% of primary energy consumption and 5% of industrial energy consumption globally. Moreover, portland cement manufacturing contributes significantly to greenhouse gases and accounts for 5% of the global CO2 emissions resulting from human activity. The primary objective of this research was to explore methods of reducing the environmental impact of cement production while maintaining or improving current performance standards. Two approaches were taken, (1) incorporation of waste materials in portland cement synthesis, and (2) optimization of an alternative environmental friendly binder, calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement. These approaches can lead to less energy consumption, less emission of CO2, and more reuse of industrial waste materials for cement manufacturing. In the portland cement part of the research, portland cement clinkers conforming to the compositional specifications in ASTM C 150 for Type I cement were successfully synthesized from reagent-grade chemicals with 0% to 40% fly ash and 0% to 60% slag incorporation (with 10% intervals), 72.5% limestone with 27.5% fly ash, and 65% limestone with 35% slag. The synthesized portland cements had similar early-age hydration behavior to commercial portland cement. However, waste materials significantly affected cement phase formation. The C3S--C2S ratio decreased with increasing amounts of waste materials incorporated. These differences could have implications on proportioning of raw materials for cement production when using waste materials. In the calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement part of the research, three calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement clinkers with a range of phase compositions were successfully synthesized from reagent-grade chemicals. The synthesized calcium sulfoaluminate

  16. Lithium doped calcium phosphate cement maintains physical mechanical properties and promotes osteoblast proliferation and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Wang, Renchong; Li, Baichuan; Liang, Wei; Pan, Haobo; Cui, Xu; Tang, Jingli; Li, Bing

    2017-07-01

    Calcium phosphate cement (CPC) has been widely used in bone tissue repairing due to its physical mechanical properties and biocompatibility. Addition of trace element to CPC has shown promising evidence to improve the physical properties and biological activities of CPC. Lithium (Li) has effect on osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we incorporated Li to CPC and examined the physical properties of Li/CPC and its effect on osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. We found that Li doped CPC maintained similar setting time, pore size distribution, compressive strength, composition, and morphology as CPC without Li. Additionally, Li doped CPC improved osteoblast proliferation and differentiation significantly compared to CPC without Li. To our knowledge, our results, for the first time, show that Li doped CPC has beneficial effect on osteoblast in cell culture while keeps the excellent physical-mechanical properties of CPC. This study will lead to potential application of Li doped CPC in bone tissue engineering. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 944-952, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Calcium phosphate stabilization of fly ash with chloride extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nzihou, Ange; Sharrock, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    Municipal solid waste incinerator by products include fly ash and air pollution control residues. In order to transform these incinerator wastes into reusable mineral species, soluble alkali chlorides must be separated and toxic trace elements must be stabilized in insoluble form. We show that alkali chlorides can be extracted efficiently in an aqueous extraction step combining a calcium phosphate gel precipitation. In such a process, sodium and potassium chlorides are obtained free from calcium salts, and the trace metal ions are immobilized in the calcium phosphate matrix. Moderate calcination of the chemically treated fly ash leads to the formation of cristalline hydroxylapatite. Fly ash spiked with copper ions and treated by this process shows improved stability of metal ions. Leaching tests with water or EDTA reveal a significant drop in metal ion dissolution. Hydroxylapatite may trap toxic metals and also prevent their evaporation during thermal treatments. Incinerator fly ash together with air pollution control residues, treated by the combined chloride extraction and hydroxylapatite formation process may be considered safe to use as a mineral filler in value added products such as road base or cement blocks.

  18. Development of hydroxyapatite bone cement for controlled drug ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The purpose of this work was to study the preparation and characterization of drug–hydroxyapatite cement. The hydroxyapatite (HA) cement has been synthesized by using tricalcium phosphate, calcium carbonate and dicalcium phosphate anhydrous with sodium hydrogen phosphate as liquid phase. The effect of added ...

  19. Effect of shelf life on compressive strength of zinc phosphate cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwiputri, D. R.; Damiyanti, M.; Eriwati, Y. K.

    2017-08-01

    Usage of zinc phosphate cements with no account of the shelf life left before the expiry date can affect its compressive strength. The aim of this study is to determine the different compressive strength values of zinc phosphate cement with different shelf lives before expiry. Three groups of zinc phosphate cement (GC Elite cement 100) with different expiry dates were tested for compressive strength using a universal testing machine (crosshead speed 1 mm/min: load cell of 250 kgF). The results showed that there was a significant difference (p<0.05) between the compressive strengths of zinc phosphate cement in group III (2 months before expiry date), group I (2 years and 5 months before expiry date), and group II (11 months before expiry date). It can be concluded that there is a significant decrease in compressive strength of zinc phosphate cement near its expiry date.

  20. Preparation, physical-chemical characterisation and cytocompatibility of calcium carbonate cements

    OpenAIRE

    Combes, Christèle; Miao, Baoji; Bareille, Reine; Rey, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The feasibility of calcium carbonate cements involving the recrystallisation of metastable calcium carbonate varieties has been demonstrated. Calcium carbonate cement compositions presented in this paper can be prepared straightforwardly by simply mixing water (liquid phase) with two calcium carbonate phases (solid phase) which can be easily obtained by precipitation. An original cement composition was obtained by mixing amorphous calcium carbonate and vaterite with an aqueous medium. The cem...

  1. Density and mechanical properties of calcium aluminate cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Syed Taqi Uddin; Ahmmad, Shaik Kareem

    2018-04-01

    Calcium aluminate cements are a special type of cements which have their composition mainly dominated by the presence of Monocalcium Aluminates. In the present paper for the first time we have shown theoretical density and elastic constants for various calcium aluminate cements. The density of the present CAS decrease with aluminates presents in the cement. Using the density data, the elastic moduli namely Young's modulus, bulk and shear modulus show strong linear dependence as a function of compositional parameter.

  2. Gold nanoparticles in injectable calcium phosphate cement enhance osteogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yang; Chen, Huimin; Zhang, Feimin; Bao, Chongyun; Weir, Michael D; Reynolds, Mark A; Ma, Junqing; Gu, Ning; Xu, Hockin H K

    2018-01-01

    In this study, a novel calcium phosphate cement containing gold nanoparticles (GNP-CPC) was developed. Its osteogenic induction ability on human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) was investigated for the first time. The incorporation of GNPs improved hDPSCs behavior on CPC, including better cell adhesion (about 2-fold increase in cell spreading) and proliferation, and enhanced osteogenic differentiation (about 2-3-fold increase at 14 days). GNPs endow CPC with micro-nano-structure, thus improving surface properties for cell adhesion and subsequent behaviors. In addition, GNPs released from GNP-CPC were internalized by hDPSCs, as verified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thus enhancing cell functions. The culture media containing GNPs enhanced the cellular activities of hDPSCs. This result was consistent with and supported the osteogenic induction results of GNP-CPC. In conclusion, GNP-CPC significantly enhanced the osteogenic functions of hDPSCs. GNPs are promising to modify CPC with nanotopography and work as bioactive additives thus enhance bone regeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of curing conditions on the dimensional and thermal stability of calcium phosphate cement for elevated temperature applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blom, Johan [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Department of Mechanics of Materials and Constructions, Pleinlaan 2, Brussels 1050 (Belgium); Rahier, Hubert [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Research Group of Physical Chemistry and Polymer Sciences, Pleinlaan 2, Brussels 1050 (Belgium); Wastiels, Jan, E-mail: Jan.Wastiels@vub.ac.be [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Department of Mechanics of Materials and Constructions, Pleinlaan 2, Brussels 1050 (Belgium)

    2014-12-15

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) are attractive materials for elevated temperature applications, like moulds to process thermoplastics up to 300 °C. The CPC resulting from the reaction of wollastonite with phosphoric acid cured at room temperature however contains hydrated phases like brushite, and is thus not stable when exposed to temperatures above 200 °C. A non-contact method based on digital image correlation demonstrated that isothermal curing at 60 °C reduces the thermal shrinkage up to 300 °C by 25%. This curing method results in the direct formation of the more stable monetite in a shorter curing time. The correlated results of TGA, pH of the filtration water, and DSC analysis on partially cured material indicate this. XRD diffractograms and SEM images in combination with EDX show the evolution of the transformation of wollastonite into monetite, and the structure and morphology of the formed material.

  4. Calcium phosphates for biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Canillas

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The history of calcium phosphates in the medicine field starts in 1769 when the first evidence of its existence in the bone tissue is discovered. Since then, the interest for calcium phosphates has increased among the scientific community. Their study has been developed in parallel with new advances in materials sciences, medicine or tissue engineering areas. Bone tissue engineering is the field where calcium phosphates have had a great importance. While the first bioceramics are selected according to bioinert, biocompatibility and mechanical properties with the aim to replace bone tissue damaged, calcium phosphates open the way to the bone tissue regeneration challenge. Nowadays, they are present in the majority of commercial products directed to repair or regenerate damaged bone tissue. Finally, in the last few decades, they have been suggested and studied as drug delivering devices and as vehicles of DNA and RNA for the future generation therapies.

  5. Calcium phosphates for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canillas, M.; Pena, P.; Aza, A.H. de; Rodriguez, M.A.

    2017-07-01

    The history of calcium phosphates in the medicine field starts in 1769 when the first evidence of its existence in the bone tissue is discovered. Since then, the interest for calcium phosphates has increased among the scientific community. Their study has been developed in parallel with new advances in materials sciences, medicine or tissue engineering areas. Bone tissue engineering is the field where calcium phosphates have had a great importance. While the first bioceramics are selected according to bioinert, biocompatibility and mechanical properties with the aim to replace bone tissue damaged, calcium phosphates open the way to the bone tissue regeneration challenge. Nowadays, they are present in the majority of commercial products directed to repair or regenerate damaged bone tissue. Finally, in the last few decades, they have been suggested and studied as drug delivering devices and as vehicles of DNA and RNA for the future generation therapies. (Author)

  6. A simple and effective approach to prepare injectable macroporous calcium phosphate cement for bone repair: Syringe-foaming using a viscous hydrophilic polymeric solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingtao; Liu, Weizhen; Gauthier, Olivier; Sourice, Sophie; Pilet, Paul; Rethore, Gildas; Khairoun, Khalid; Bouler, Jean-Michel; Tancret, Franck; Weiss, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we propose a simple and effective strategy to prepare injectable macroporous calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) by syringe-foaming via hydrophilic viscous polymeric solution, such as using silanized-hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (Si-HPMC) as a foaming agent. The Si-HPMC foamed CPCs demonstrate excellent handling properties such as injectability and cohesion. After hardening the foamed CPCs possess hierarchical macropores and their mechanical properties (Young's modulus and compressive strength) are comparable to those of cancellous bone. Moreover, a preliminary in vivo study in the distal femoral sites of rabbits was conducted to evaluate the biofunctionality of this injectable macroporous CPC. The evidence of newly formed bone in the central zone of implantation site indicates the feasibility and effectiveness of this foaming strategy that will have to be optimized by further extensive animal experiments. A major challenge in the design of biomaterial-based injectable bone substitutes is the development of cohesive, macroporous and self-setting calcium phosphate cement (CPC) that enables rapid cell invasion with adequate initial mechanical properties without the use of complex processing and additives. Thus, we propose a simple and effective strategy to prepare injectable macroporous CPCs through syringe-foaming using a hydrophilic viscous polymeric solution (silanized-hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, Si-HPMC) as a foaming agent, that simultaneously meets all the aforementioned aims. Evidence from our in vivo studies shows the existence of newly formed bone within the implantation site, indicating the feasibility and effectiveness of this foaming strategy, which could be used in various CPC systems using other hydrophilic viscous polymeric solutions. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Solidification of metallic aluminum on magnesium phosphate cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahalle, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    This work deals with the stabilization/solidification of radioactive waste using cement. More particularly, it aims at assessing the chemical compatibility between metallic aluminum and mortars based on magnesium phosphate cement. The physical and chemical processes leading to setting and hardening of the cement are first investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetry (TGA) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ("3"1P and "1"1B MAS-NMR) are first used to characterize the solid phases formed during hydration, while inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy analysis (ICP-AES), electrical conductometry and pH measurements provide information on the pore solution composition. Then, the corrosion of metallic aluminum in magnesium phosphate mortars is studied by monitoring the equilibrium potential and by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Magnesium phosphate cement is prepared from a mix of magnesium oxide (MgO) and potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate (KH_2PO_4). In the presence of water, hydration occurs according to a dissolution - precipitation process. The main hydrate is K-struvite (MgKPO_4.6H_2O). Its precipitation is preceded by that of two transient phases: phosphorrosslerite (MgHPO_4.7H_2O) and Mg_2KH(PO_4)_2.15H_2O. Boric acid retards cement hydration by delaying the formation of cement hydrates. Two processes may be involved in this retardation: the initial precipitation of amorphous or poorly crystallized minerals containing boron and phosphorus atoms, and/or the stabilization of cations (Mg"2"+, K"+) in solution. As compared with a Portland cement-based matrix, corrosion of aluminum is strongly limited in magnesium phosphate mortar. The pore solution pH is close to neutrality and falls within the passivation domain of aluminum. Corrosion depends on several parameters: it is promoted by a water-to-cement ratio (w/c) significantly higher than the chemical water demand of cement (w/c = 0.51), and by the addition of boric

  8. stabilization of ikpayongo laterite with cement and calcium carbide

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF EKWUEME

    Laterite obtained from Ikpayongo was stabilized with 2-10 % cement and 2-10 % Calcium Carbide waste, for use .... or open dumping which have effect on surface and ... Table 1: Chemical Composition of Calcium Carbide Waste and Cement.

  9. Preparation of calcium phosphate paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Reusmaazran Yusof; Norzita Yaacob; Idris Besar; Che Seman Mahmood; Rusnah Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    Calcium phosphate paste were prepared by mixing between calcium sodium potassium phosphate, Ca 2 NaK (PO 4 ) 2 (CSPP) and monocalcium phosphate monohydrate, Ca(H 2 PO 4 ) 2 .H 2 O (MCPM). CSPP were obtained by reaction between calcium hydrogen phosphate (CaHPO 4 ), potassium carbonate (K 2 CO 3 ) and sodium carbonate (Na 2 CO 3 ) in solid state sintering process followed by quenching in air at 1000 degree Celsius. The paste was aging in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 0.5, 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48 hrs, 3, 7 and 14 days. The morphological investigation indicated the formation of apatite crystal were first growth after 24 hours. The obvious growth of apatite crystal was shown at 3 days. The obvious growth of apatite crystal was shown in 7 and 14 days indicated the prediction of paste would have rapid reaction with bone after implantation. (author)

  10. BLENDED CALCIUM ALUMINATE-CALCIUM SULFATE CEMENT-BASED GROUT FOR P-REACTOR VESSEL IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.

    2011-03-10

    The objective of this report is to document laboratory testing of blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate grouts for P-Reactor vessel in-situ decommissioning. Blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement-based grout was identified as candidate material for filling (physically stabilizing) the 105-P Reactor vessel (RV) because it is less alkaline than portland cement-based grout which has a pH greater than 12.4. In addition, blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement compositions can be formulated such that the primary cementitious phase is a stable crystalline material. A less alkaline material (pH {<=} 10.5) was desired to address a potential materials compatibility issue caused by corrosion of aluminum metal in highly alkaline environments such as that encountered in portland cement grouts [Wiersma, 2009a and b, Wiersma, 2010, and Serrato and Langton, 2010]. Information concerning access points into the P-Reactor vessel and amount of aluminum metal in the vessel is provided elsewhere [Griffin, 2010, Stefanko, 2009 and Wiersma, 2009 and 2010, Bobbitt, 2010, respectively]. Radiolysis calculations are also provided in a separate document [Reyes-Jimenez, 2010].

  11. Umbilical cord stem cells released from alginate-fibrin microbeads inside macroporous and biofunctionalized calcium phosphate cement for bone regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenchuan; Zhou, Hongzhi; Weir, Michael D.; Bao, Chongyun; Xu, Hockin H.K.

    2012-01-01

    The need for bone repair has increased as the population ages. The objectives of this study were to (1) develop a novel biofunctionalized and macroporous calcium phosphate cement (CPC) containing alginate-fibrin microbeads encapsulating human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs); and (2) investigate hUCMSC proliferation and osteogenic differentiation inside CPC for the first time. Macroporous CPC was developed using calcium phosphate powders, chitosan, and gas-foaming porogen. Five types of CPCs were fabricated: CPC control, CPC + 0.05% fibronectin (Fn), CPC + 0.1% Fn, CPC + 0.1% Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), and CPC + 0.1% Fn + 0.1% RGD. Alginate-fibrin microbeads containing 106 hUCMSCs/mL were encapsulated in the CPC paste. After CPC had set, the degradable microbeads released hUCMSCs inside CPC. hUCMScs proliferated inside CPC, with cell density at 21 d being 4-fold that at 1 d. CPC + 0.1% RGD had the highest cell density, which was 4-fold that of CPC control. The released cells differentiated into the osteogenic lineage and synthesized bone minerals. hUCMSCs inside the CPC + 0.1% RGD construct had gene expressions of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin (OC) and collagen I, which were twice those of CPC control. Mineral synthesis by hUCMSCs inside the CPC + 0.1% RGD construct was 2-fold that in CPC control. RGD and Fn incorporation in CPC did not compromise the strength of CPC, which matched the reported strength of cancellous bone. In conclusion, degradable microbeads released the hUCMSCs which proliferated, differentiated and synthesized minerals inside the macroporous CPC for the first time. CPC with RGD greatly enhanced cell functions. The novel biofunctionalized and macroporous CPC-microbead-hUCMSC construct is promising for bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:22391411

  12. The biological performance of injectable calcium phosphate/PLGA cement in osteoporotic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van de Watering, Floor C J; Cuijpers, Vincent M; Jansen, John A; Van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Laverman, Peter; Gotthardt, Martin; Boerman, Otto C; Bronkhorst, Ewald M

    2013-01-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) including poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) microparticles are promising candidates for bone regenerative applications. Previous studies with CPC/PLGA demonstrated that the material is non-toxic, biocompatible and osteoconductive. However, the outcome of these studies was based on healthy individuals and consequently does not provide information on bone substitute material performance in a compromised situation, such as osteoporosis. Therefore, this study comparatively evaluated the performance of injectable CPC/PLGA in healthy (SHAM) and osteoporotic rats (OVX) using a rat femoral condyle defect with implantation periods of 4 and 12 weeks. It was hypothesized that in OVX rats the degradation of CPC/PLGA would increase due to a higher osteoclastic activity present in osteoporotic animals and that the obtained space would be rapidly filled with newly formed bone. The results revealed an accelerated degradation of the used CPC/PLGA in osteoporotic animals, but bone formation was less compared to that in healthy animals at 4 and 12 weeks after implantation. In addition, after 4 weeks, the amount of newly formed bone under osteoporotic conditions was less in the femoral condyle defect compared to that present in a non-defect, osteoporotic control femoral condyle, but equal after 12 weeks. On the other hand, in healthy animals, the amount of newly formed bone in the femoral condyle defect was equal to that present in a non-defect control femoral condyle at 4 weeks, while higher after 12 weeks. This indicates that bone regeneration at a defect site under osteoporotic conditions is slower, but can reach native amounts after longer time periods. Consequently, bone regenerative treatments under osteoporotic conditions seem to require additional empowerment of bone substitute materials. (paper)

  13. Removal of phosphate from solution by adsorption and precipitation of calcium phosphate onto monohydrocalcite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Shintaro; Fukushi, Keisuke

    2012-10-15

    The sorption behavior and mechanism of phosphate on monohydrocalcite (CaCO(3)·H(2)O: MHC) were examined using batch sorption experiments as a function of phosphate concentrations, ionic strengths, temperatures, and reaction times. The mode of PO(4) sorption is divisible into three processes depending on the phosphate loading. At low phosphate concentrations, phosphate is removed by coprecipitation of phosphate during the transformation of MHC to calcite. The sorption mode at the low-to-moderate phosphate concentrations is most likely an adsorption process because the sorption isotherm at the conditions can be fitted reasonably with the Langmuir equation. The rapid sorption kinetics at the conditions is also consistent with the adsorption reaction. The adsorption of phosphate on MHC depends strongly on ionic strength, but slightly on temperature. The maximum adsorption capacities of MHC obtained from the regression of the experimental data to the Langmuir equation are higher than those reported for stable calcium carbonate (calcite or aragonite) in any conditions. At high phosphate concentrations, the amount of sorption deviates from the Langmuir isotherm, which can fit the low-to-moderate phosphate concentrations. Speciation-saturation analyses of the reacted solutions at the conditions indicated that the solution compositions which deviate from the Langmuir equation are supersaturated with respect to a certain calcium phosphate. The obtained calcium phosphate is most likely amorphous calcium phosphate (Ca(3)(PO(4))(2)·xH(2)O). The formation of the calcium phosphate depends strongly on ionic strength, temperature, and reaction times. The solubility of MHC is higher than calcite and aragonite because of its metastability. Therefore, the higher solubility of MHC facilitates the formation of the calcium phosphates more than with calcite and aragonite. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of added antibiotics on the basic properties of anti-washout-type fast-setting calcium phosphate cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takechi, M; Miyamoto, Y; Ishikawa, K; Nagayama, M; Kon, M; Asaoka, K; Suzuki, K

    1998-02-01

    The effect of added antibiotics on the basic properties of anti-washout-type fast-setting calcium phosphate cement (aw-FSCPC) was investigated in a preliminary evaluation of aw-FSCPC containing drugs. Flomoxef sodium was employed as the antibiotic and was incorporated into the powder-phase aw-FSCPC at up to 10%. The setting time, consistency, wet diametral tensile strength (DTS) value, and porosity were measured for aw-FSCPC containing various amounts of flomoxef sodium. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was also conducted for the identification of products. To evaluate the drug-release profile, set aw-FSCPC was immersed in saline and the released flomoxef sodium was determined at regular intervals. The spread area of the cement paste as an index of consistency of the cement increased progressively with the addition of flomoxef sodium, and it doubled when the aw-FSCPC contained 8% flomoxef sodium. In contrast, the wet DTS value decreased with increase in flomoxef sodium content. Bulk density measurement and scanning electron microscopic observation revealed that the set mass was more porous with the amount of flomoxef sodium contained in the aw-FSCPC. The XRD analysis revealed that formation of hydroxyapatite (HAP) from aw-FSCPC was reduced even after 24 h, when the aw-FSCPC contained flomoxef sodium at > or = 6%. Therefore, the decrease of wet DTS value was thought to be partly the result of the increased porosity and inhibition of HAP formation in aw-FSCPC containing large amounts of flomoxef sodium. The flomoxef sodium release from aw-FSCPC showed the typical profile observed in a skeleton-type drug delivery system (DDS). The rate of drug release from aw-FSCPC can be controlled by changing the concentration of sodium alginate. Although flomoxef sodium addition has certain disadvantageous effects on the basic properties of aw-FSCPC, we conclude that aw-FSCPC is a good candidate for potential use as a DDS carrier that may be useful in surgical operations.

  15. A novel biphasic calcium phosphate derived from fish otoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montañez-Supelano, N. D.; Sandoval-Amador, A.; Estupiñan-Durán, H. A.; Y Peña-Ballesteros, D.

    2017-12-01

    Calcium phosphates are bioceramics that have been widely used as bone substitutes because they encourage the formation of bone on their surface and can improve the healing of the bone. Hydroxyapatite HA (calcium/phosphorus ratio of 1.67) and tricalcium phosphate TCP (calcium/phosphorus ratio of 1.50) are the most common calcium phosphates. Natural materials have begun to be tested to make HA or TCP such as shells of cardiidae (family of mollusks) and eggshells. The calcium phosphate obtained has a high ability to precipitate apatite. In this work, the mixed phase ceramic of beta-Tri-calcium phosphate / hydroxyapatite (β-TCP/HA) was synthesized by aqueous precipitation from fish otoliths, which are monomineralic species composed of aragonite. Otoliths of the specie Plagioscion squamosissimus, commonly called the river croaker, were used. Techniques such as DRX, Raman spectroscopy and SEM-EDS were used to characterize the raw material and the obtained material. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed the presence of two crystalline phases of calcium phosphates with 86.2% crystallinity. SEM micrographs showed agglomeration of particles with porous structure and submicron particle sizes.

  16. Elastic properties and strain-to-crack-initiation of calcium phosphate bone cements: Revelations of a high-resolution measurement technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajaxon, Ingrid; Acciaioli, Alice; Lionello, Giacomo; Ginebra, Maria-Pau; Öhman-Mägi, Caroline; Baleani, Massimiliano; Persson, Cecilia

    2017-10-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) should ideally have mechanical properties similar to those of the bone tissue the material is used to replace or repair. Usually, the compressive strength of the CPCs is reported and, more rarely, the elastic modulus. Conversely, scarce or no data are available on Poisson's ratio and strain-to-crack-initiation. This is unfortunate, as data on the elastic response is key to, e.g., numerical model accuracy. In this study, the compressive behaviour of brushite, monetite and apatite cements was fully characterised. Measurement of the surface strains was done using a digital image correlation (DIC) technique, and compared to results obtained with the commonly used built-in displacement measurement of the materials testers. The collected data showed that the use of fixed compression platens, as opposed to spherically seated ones, may in some cases underestimate the compressive strength by up to 40%. Also, the built-in measurements may underestimate the elastic modulus by up to 62% as compared to DIC measurements. Using DIC, the brushite cement was found to be much stiffer (24.3 ± 2.3GPa) than the apatite (13.5 ± 1.6GPa) and monetite (7.1 ± 1.0GPa) cements, and elastic moduli were inversely related to the porosity of the materials. Poisson's ratio was determined to be 0.26 ± 0.02 for brushite, 0.21 ± 0.02 for apatite and 0.20 ± 0.03 for monetite. All investigated CPCs showed low strain-to-crack-initiation (0.17-0.19%). In summary, the elastic modulus of CPCs is substantially higher than previously reported and it is concluded that an accurate procedure is a prerequisite in order to properly compare the mechanical properties of different CPC formulations. It is recommended to use spherically seated platens and measuring the strain at a relevant resolution and on the specimen surface. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Three Calcium Phosphate on Enamel Microhardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghgou, En Hr; Haghgoo, Roza; Roholahi, Mohamad R; Ghorbani, Zahra

    2017-07-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of casein phos-phopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate and three calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP and TCP) on increasing the microhardness of human enamel after induction of erosion. A total of 26 healthy human-impacted third molar teeth were chosen, and their hardness measured using a microhardness testing machine. The samples were immersed in Coca Cola (pH = 4.7) for 8 minutes. Then, micro-hardness was measured again, and these samples were randomly divided into four groups (two control groups and two experimental groups). (1) Negative control group: Artificial saliva was used for 10 minutes, (2) positive control group: Fluoride gel was used for 10 minutes, (3) β-TCP group: TCP was used for 10 minutes, (4) CCP-ACP group: CCP-ACP was used for 10 minutes. The final microhardness of those samples was measured, and the changes in microhardness of teeth within group and between groups were analyzed using the paired and analysis of variance tests respectively. Results were considered statistically significant at a level of p < 0.05. No significant difference was observed in microhard-ness between CPP-ACP group and TCP group (p = 0.368) during the time microhardness significantly dropped after soaking in soda. Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate and TCP increased the microhardness of teeth. The increase in hardness in the TCP group was higher than in the CPP-ACP group, but this difference was not significant (p = 0.36). Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate and TCP can affect the remineralization of erosive lesions.

  18. Influence of ferrite phase in alite-calcium sulfoaluminate cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvallet, Tristana Yvonne Francoise

    Since the energy crisis in 1970's, research on low energy cements with low CO2- emissions has been increasing. Numerous solutions have been investigated, and the goal of this original research is to create a viable hybrid cement with the components of both Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSAC), by forming a material that contains both alite and calcium sulfoaluminate clinker phases. Furthermore, this research focuses on keeping the cost of this material reasonable by reducing aluminum requirements through its substitution with iron. The aim of this work would produce a cement that can use large amounts of red mud, which is a plentiful waste material, in place of bauxite known as an expensive raw material. Modified Bogue equations were established and tested to formulate this novel cement with different amounts of ferrite, from 5% to 45% by weight. This was followed by the production of cement from reagent chemicals, and from industrial by-products as feedstocks (fly ash, red mud and slag). Hydration processes, as well as the mechanical properties, of these clinker compositions were studied, along with the addition of gypsum and the impact of a ferric iron complexing additive triisopropanolamine (TIPA). To summarize this research, the influence of the addition of 5-45% by weight of ferrite phase, was examined with the goal of introducing as much red mud as possible in the process without negatively attenuate the cement properties. Based on this PhD dissertation, the production of high-iron alite-calcium sulfoaluminateferrite cements was proven possible from the two sources of raw materials. The hydration processes and the mechanical properties seemed negatively affected by the addition of ferrite, as this phase was not hydrated entirely, even after 6 months of curing. The usage of TIPA counteracted this decline in strength by improving the ferrite hydration and increasing the optimum amount of gypsum required in each composition

  19. Characterization of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate cements prepared using a novel hydroxyapatite-based formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alge, Daniel L; Cruz, Grace Santa; Chu, Tien-Min Gabriel; Goebel, W Scott

    2009-01-01

    Dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) cements are typically prepared using β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) as the base component. However, hydroxyapatite (HA) is an interesting alternative because of its potential for reducing cement acidity, as well as modulating cement properties via ionic substitutions. In the present study, we have characterized DCPD cements prepared with a novel formulation based on monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM) and HA. Cements were prepared using a 4:1 MCPM:HA molar ratio. The reactivity of HA in this system was verified by showing DCPD formation using poorly crystalline HA, as well as highly crystalline HA. Evaluation of cements prepared with poorly crystalline HA revealed that setting occurs rapidly in the MCPM/HA system, and that the use of a setting regulator is necessary to maintain workability of the cement paste. Compressive testing showed that MCPM/HA cements have strengths comparable to what has previously been published for DCPD cements. However, preliminary in vitro analysis of cement degradation revealed that conversion of DCPD to HA may occur much more rapidly in the MCPM/HA system compared to cements prepared with β-TCP. Future studies should investigate this property further, as it could have important implications for the use of HA-based DCPD cement formulations.

  20. Effects of fibers on expansive shotcrete mixtures consisting of calcium sulfoaluminate cement, ordinary Portland cement, and calcium sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Yu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The mining industry often uses shotcrete for ground stabilization. However, cracking within shotcrete is commonly observed, which delays production schedules and increases maintenance costs. A possible crack reduction method is using expansive shotcrete mixture consisting of calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSA, ordinary Portland cement (OPC, and calcium sulfate (CS to reduce shrinkage. Furthermore, fibers can be added to the mixture to restrain expansion and impede cracking. The objective of this paper is to study the effects of nylon fiber, glass fiber, and steel fiber on an expansive shotcrete mixture that can better resist cracking. In this study, parameters such as density, water absorption, volume of permeable voids, unconfined compressive strength (UCS, splitting tensile strength (STS, and volume change of fiber-added expansive mixtures were determined at different time periods (i.e. the strengths on the 28th day, and the volume changes on the 1st, 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th days. The results show that addition of fibers can improve mixture durability, in the form of decreased water absorption and reduced permeable pore space content. Moreover, the expansion of the CSA-OPC-CS mixture was restrained up to 50% by glass fiber, up to 43% by nylon fiber, and up to 28% by steel fiber. The results show that the STS was improved by 57% with glass fiber addition, 43% with steel fiber addition, and 38% with nylon fiber addition. The UCS was also increased by 31% after steel fiber addition, 26% after nylon fiber addition, and 16% after glass fiber addition. These results suggest that fiber additions to the expansive shotcrete mixtures can improve durability and strengths while controlling expansion. Keywords: Shotcrete, Restrained expansion, Fibers, Calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSA, Ordinary Portland cement (OPC, Calcium sulfate (CS

  1. Using calcium silicate to regulate the physicochemical and biological properties when using β-tricalcium phosphate as bone cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Chia-Tze; Huang, Tsui-Hsien [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yi-Jyun [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Dental Department, Taichung Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Hung, Chi-Jr [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chi-Chang, E-mail: chichang31@gmail.com [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Shie, Ming-You, E-mail: eviltacasi@gmail.com [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-01

    β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is an osteoconductive material. For this research we have combined it with a low degradation calcium silicate (CS) to enhance its bioactive and osteostimulative properties. To check its effectiveness, a series of β-TCP/CS composites with different ratios were prepared to make new bioactive and biodegradable biocomposites for bone repair. Regarding the formation of bone-like apatite, the diametral tensile strength as well as the ion release and weight loss of composites were compared both before and after immersions in simulated body fluid (SBF). In addition, we also examined the behavior of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured on β-TCP/CS composites. The results show that the apatite deposition ability of the β-TCP/CS composites improves as the CS content is increased. For composites with more than a 60% CS content, the samples become completely covered by a dense bone-like apatite layer. At the end of the immersion period, weight losses of 24%, 32%, 34%, 38%, 41%, and 45% were observed for the composites containing 0%, 20%, 40%, 80%, 80% and 100% β-TCP cements, respectively. In addition, the antibacterial activity of CS/β-TCP composite improves as the CS-content is increased. In vitro cell experiments show that the CS-rich composites promote human dental pulp cell (hDPC) proliferation and differentiation. However, when the CS quantity in the composite is less than 60%, the quantity of cells and osteogenesis protein of hDPCs is stimulated by Si released from the β-TCP/CS composites. The degradation of β-TCP and the osteogenesis of CS give strong reason to believe that these calcium-based composite cements will prove to be effective bone repair materials. - Highlights: • CS improved the physicochemical properties and osteogenic activity of β-TCP. • Higher CS in the composite, the shorter setting time and the higher DTS was found. • With a CS more than 40%, the osteogenesis and angiogenesis proteins were promoted by

  2. Immobilization of lead in shooting range soils by means of cement, quicklime, and phosphate amendments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xinde; Dermatas, Dimitris; Xu, Xuanfeng; Shen, Gang

    2008-03-01

    Lead (Pb) contamination at shooting range sites is increasingly under environmental concern. Controlling Pb leachability from shooting range soil media is an important step to minimize Pb exposure to the surrounding environment. This study investigated stabilization of Pb in shooting range soils treated with cement, quicklime, and phosphate. Two soils were used and collected from two shooting ranges, referred to as SR1 and SR2. The treatment additives were applied to the soils at rates from 2.5% to 10% (w/w). The effectiveness of each treatment was evaluated by Pb (w/w). The effectiveness of each treatment was evaluated by Pb leachability, measured by the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). The possible mechanisms for Pb immobilization were elucidated using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). Cement and quicklime treatments were effective in immobilizing Pb in SR1 soil, with reduction of Pb concentration in TCLP leachate (TCLP-Pb) to be below the U.S. EPA non-hazardous regulatory limit of 5 mg L(-1) at application rates of > or =5% and 28-d incubation. By contrast, cement and quicklime amendments were less effective for Pb stabilization in SR2 soil because the TCLP-Pb levels in the treated soil were still higher than the limit of 5 mg L(-1) at all application rates, although they were significantly reduced in comparison with the untreated soil. Phosphate application was most effective in reducing Pb leach ing in both soils. Even at an application rate as low as 5% and 1-d incubation, phosphate could reduce TCLP-Pb to be below the limit of 5 mg L(-1) in both soils. Immobilization of Pb in the SR1 soil amended with cement and quicklime was attributed to the formation of pozzolanic minerals (e.g., calcium silicate hydrate C-S-H and ettringite) that could encapsulate soil Pb. The pozzolanic reaction was limited in the SR2 soil upon the application of cement and quicklime. Reduction of the TCLP-Pb might result from complexation of Pb on the surface of the

  3. Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy of synthetic and biological calcium phosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, G R; Zunic, W B; Durig, J R; Wuthier, R E

    1994-05-01

    Fourier-transform (FT) Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize the organic and mineral components of biological and synthetic calcium phosphate minerals. Raman spectroscopy provides information on biological minerals that is complimentary to more widely used infrared methodologies as some infrared-inactive vibrational modes are Raman-active. The application of FT-Raman technology has, for the first time, enabled the problems of high sample fluorescence and low signal-to-noise that are inherent in calcified tissues to be overcome. Raman spectra of calcium phosphates are dominated by a very strong band near 960 cm-1 that arises from the symmetric stretching mode (v1) of the phosphate group. Other Raman-active phosphate vibrational bands are seen at approximately 1075 (v3), 590 (v4), and 435 cm-1 (v2). Minerals containing acidic phosphate groups show additional vibrational modes. The different calcium phosphate mineral phases can be distinguished from one another by the relative positions and shapes of these bands in the Raman spectra. FT-Raman spectra of nascent, nonmineralized matrix vesicles (MV) show a distinct absence of the phosphate v1 band even though these structures are rich in calcium and phosphate. Similar results were seen with milk casein and synthetic Ca-phosphatidyl-serine-PO4 complexes. Hence, the phosphate and/or acidic phosphate ions in these noncrystalline biological calcium phosphates is in a molecular environment that differs from that in synthetic amorphous calcium phosphate. In MV, the first distinct mineral phase to form contained acidic phosphate bands similar to those seen in octacalcium phosphate. The mineral phase present in fully mineralized MV was much more apatitic, resembling that found in bones and teeth.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Regulation of physicochemical properties, osteogenesis activity, and fibroblast growth factor-2 release ability of β-tricalcium phosphate for bone cement by calcium silicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Ching-Chuan; Kao, Chia-Tze; Hung, Chi-Jr; Chen, Yi-Jyun; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Shie, Ming-You

    2014-01-01

    β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is an osteoconductive material. For this research we have combined it with a low degradation calcium silicate (CS) to enhance its bioactive and osteostimulative properties. To check its effectiveness, a series of β-TCP/CS composites with different ratios were prepared to make new bioactive and biodegradable biocomposites for bone repair. Formation of bone-like apatite, the diametral tensile strength, and weight loss of composites were considered before and after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). In addition, we also examined the effects of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) released from β-TCP/CS composites and in vitro human dental pulp cell (hDPC) and studied its behavior. The results showed that the apatite deposition ability of the β-TCP/CS composites was enhanced as the CS content was increased. For composites with more than 50% CS contents, the samples were completely covered by a dense bone-like apatite layer. At the end of the immersion point, weight losses of 19%, 24%, 33%, 42%, and 51% were observed for the composites containing 0%, 30%, 50%, 70% and 100% β-TCP cements, respectively. In vitro cell experiments show that the CS-rich composites promote human dental pulp cell (hDPC) proliferation and differentiation. However, when the CS quantity in the composite is less than 70%, the amount of cells and osteogenesis protein of hDPCs was stimulated by FGF-2 released from β-TCP/CS composites. The combination of FGF-2 in degradation of β-TCP and osteogenesis of CS gives a strong reason to believe that these calcium-based composite cements may prove to be promising bone repair materials. - Highlights: • CS improved physicochemical properties and osteogenic activity of β-TCP. • The higher the CS in the cement, the shorter the setting time and the higher the DTS. • The cell behavior was stimulated by FGF-2 released from composite containing 50% CS. • β-TCP/CS composite with FGF-2 has optimal properties for

  5. Improvement of disintegrable properties of bone prosthetic phosphate cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneda, Mitsumasa

    2007-01-01

    The author added a viscoelastic binder or bio-disintegrable polymer filler in αDT-cement (DTC) base, which consisting of α-tricalcium phosphate, tetracalcium phosphate and dicalcium phosphate anhydrous, in order to examine whether disintegrable properties of the bone prosthetic materials could be improved. The additive for the former binder was hydroxypropyl-cellulose and the latter filler, poly-(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) and they were mixed in various proportions with the base. At both sides of the cranial coronary suture of Japanese white rabbit, cavities (4 in total) were made at anteroposterior sites where those prosthetic cements were filled. At 1, 2 and 4 weeks later, the operated bone region was dissected out, its soft X-ray image was taken by the machine OMC603 (OHMICRON), and three-dimensional (3D) micro-focused XCT images, by Shimadzu SMX-130CT-SV. The trabecular thickness, bone volume and tissue volume ratio were calculated from the latter images by the trabecular structural measure software TRI/3Dbon (ROTAC). Disintegration rate of the cements was tested in water. Disintegrable properties were found to affect osteogenesis by giving the space for it, and thereby the choice of the ratio of the binder and disintegrable filler in the DTC makes it possible to design the most suitable cement needed. (R.T.)

  6. Investigation of calcium phosphate coatings for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusof Abdullah; Idris Besar; Muhammad Jamal Md Isa; Mohamad Abd Razak; Hyzan Mohd Yusof

    1999-01-01

    Calcium phosphate is the main constituent of our bone and tooth minerals. The use of this bioactive material for coating implant such as artificial joint prosthesis, therefore, can promote biological fixation and enhance biocompatibility. Our initial work has been focused on the evaluation of experimental conditions of coating preparation and the effects of post-deposition calcium phosphate coatings on stainless steel substrates. The coating layers were produced by the precipitation technique and coatings were carried out in sol-gel by the dipping method. For comparison purposes a wet method was used to obtain a fine calcium phosphate ceramic powder for fabrication of microcrystal suspension used as a coating material. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive microanalysis (EDS), energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterise the morphology, chemical composition and structure of the coatings. The results showed that the dip coating of stainless steel substrates using viscous solutions lead to the formation of porous calcium phosphate layers. These results suggested that fabrication of bioactive calcium phosphate coatings using this route offers significant advantages over the currently used methods due to considerably lower temperature process involved and may produce better result for substrates with complex shapes

  7. Calcium phosphate barrier for augmentation of bone in noncontained periodontal osseous defects: a novel approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Aditi; Sivaraman, Karthik; Awataramaney, Tarun K

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this technique is to augment bone in non-contained osseous deformities using a unique self-sustaining calcium phosphate barrier. Bone has the inherent ability to regenerate completely if it is provided with a fracture space or an undisturbed enclosed scaffold. A secluded environment is essential as it provides a secured, sterile and stable wound system that regenerates lost bone by a process of osteopromotion. Reconstructive techniques using bone grafts and barrier membranes utilize this principle for augmentation of deficient bony sites by providing a closed environment that promotes clot stability, graft retention, and facilitates correct cell repopulation. However, in noncontained bone defects like one walled infrabony periodontal defect or sites with horizontal bone loss, regeneration of bone still remains an unrealistic situation since osseous topography at such sites does not favor membrane stability or bone grafts retention. This case report presents a promising technique to augment bone in areas with horizontal loss. Augmentation of bone in the interdental area with horizontal bone loss was accomplished by building a contained defect using a unique self sustaining calcium phosphate cement formulation. The calcium phosphate barrier stimulates the lost cortical plates and promotes graft retention and clot stability. At 6 months, there was a significant bone fill and trabecular formation in the interdental area and reduction in tooth mobility. This promising technique could prove to be a good alternative to the conventional approaches for treating osseous deformities. Calcium phosphate is a promising barrier graft for repair of noncontained periodontal osseous defect. This technique cues both the clinicians and manufacturers to develop moldable tissue engineered constructs for osseous repair.

  8. Preparation and bioactivity of micro-arc oxidized calcium phosphate coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Y.K.; Chen, C.Z.; Wang, D.G.; Lin, Z.Q.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings were prepared on ZK60 magnesium alloy by micro-arc oxidation (MAO) in electrolyte containing calcium acetate monohydrate (CH 3 COO) 2 Ca·H 2 O) and disodium hydrogen phosphate dodecahydrate (Na 2 HPO 4 ·12H 2 O). Scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) were employed to characterize the microstructure, elemental distribution and phase composition of the CaP coatings respectively. Simulated body fluid (SBF) immersion test was used to evaluate the coating degradability and bioactivity. After 30 days of SBF immersion, the CaP coatings effectively reduce the degradation rate. The surfaces of CaP coatings are covered by a new layer formed of numerous needle-like, spherical and columned calcium phosphates. SEM, EDX and XRD results suggest that these calcium phosphates are bioactive calcium phosphate phases such as hydroxyapatite (Ca 10 (PO 4 ) 6 (OH) 2 , HA) and calcium pyrophosphates (Ca 2 P 2 O 7 , CPP). The formation of these calcium phosphates indicates that the CaP coatings have bioactivity. - Highlights: • Bioactive CaP coatings are successfully formed on ZK60 magnesium alloy. • CaP coatings consist of MgO, MgF 2 , CaO, CaF 2 and Ca 3 (PO 4 ) 2 . • Needle-like, spherical and columned calcium phosphates formed in SBF. • CaP coatings exhibit bioactivity and low corrosion rate

  9. Physical and chemical characterization of pastes of bone cements with ZrO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinto H, A.; Pina B, M.C.

    2003-01-01

    Setting times and temperature of sixteen calcium phosphate cements added with ZrO 2 were evaluated. Their behaviors were analysed to be used like injectable formulations in surgery of bone. Two cements of calcium phosphates enriched with ZrO 2 with the best characteristics in setting times and temperature, were mechanically tested after 1 and 7 days of prepared. Density was determined using a pycnometer, chemical composition was determined by X-ray diffraction and the molecular structure was determined by infrared spectroscopy. (Author)

  10. Optimization of calcium chloride content on bioactivity and mechanical properties of white Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torkittikul, Pincha; Chaipanich, Arnon

    2012-01-01

    This research investigates the optimization of calcium chloride content on the bioactivity and mechanical properties of white Portland cement. Calcium chloride was used as an addition of White Portland cement at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10% by weight. Calcium chloride was dissolved in sterile distilled water and blended with White Portland cement using a water to cement ratio of 0.5. Analysis of the bioactivity and pH of white Portland cement pastes with calcium chloride added at various amounts was carried out in simulated body fluid. Setting time, density, compressive strength and volume of permeable voids were also investigated. The characteristics of cement pastes were examined by X-ray diffractometer and scanning electron microscope linked to an energy-dispersive X-ray analyzer. The result indicated that the addition of calcium chloride could accelerate the hydration of white Portland cement, resulting in a decrease in setting time and an increase in early strength of the pastes. The compressive strength of all cement pastes with added calcium chloride was higher than that of the pure cement paste, and the addition of calcium chloride at 8 wt.% led to achieving the highest strength. Furthermore, white Portland cement pastes both with and without calcium chloride showed well-established bioactivity with respect to the formation of a hydroxyapatite layer on the material within 7 days following immersion in simulated body fluid; white Portland cement paste with added 3%CaCl 2 exhibited the best bioactivity. - Highlights: ► Optimization CaCl 2 content on the bioactivity and mechanical properties. ► CaCl 2 was used as an addition at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10% by weight. ► CaCl 2 resulted in a decrease in setting time and an increase in early strength. ► Addition of 3%CaCl 2 exhibited the optimum formation of hydroxyapatite.

  11. Preparation and Characterization of Porous Calcium Phosphate Bioceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Honglian Dai; Xinyu Wang; Yinchao Han; Xin Jiang; Shipu Li

    2011-01-01

    β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) powder and Na2O-CaO-MgO-P2O5 glass binder were synthesized and mixed, and then the biodegradable porous calcium phosphate ceramics were successfully prepared by foaming and sintering at 850℃. The as-prepared ceramics possess a high porosity with partial three-dimension interconnected macro- and micro-pores. As in vitro experiment testified, the calcium phosphate ceramics (CPCs) has good degradability.

  12. Role of magnesium on the biomimetic deposition of calcium phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Bimal K.; Sarma, Bikash

    2016-10-01

    Biomimetic depositions of calcium phosphate (CaP) are carried out using simulated body fluid (SBF), calcifying solution and newly developed magnesium containing calcifying solution. Calcium phosphate has a rich phase diagram and is well known for its excellent biocompatibility and bioactivity. The most common phase is hydroxyapatite (HAp), an integral component of human bone and tooth, widely used in orthopedic and dental applications. In addition, calcium phosphate nanoparticles show promise for the targeted drug delivery. The doping of calcium phosphate by magnesium, zinc, strontium etc. can change the protein uptake by CaP nanocrystals. This work describes the role of magnesium on the nucleation and growth of CaP on Ti and its oxide substrates. X-ray diffraction studies confirm formation of HAp nanocrystals which closely resemble the structure of bone apatite when grown using SBF and calcifying solution. It has been observed that magnesium plays crucial role in the nucleation and growth of calcium phosphate. A low magnesium level enhances the crystallinity of HAp while higher magnesium content leads to the formation of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) phase. Interestingly, the deposition of ACP phase is rapid when magnesium ion concentration in the solution is 40% of calcium plus magnesium ions concentration. Moreover, high magnesium content alters the morphology of CaP films.

  13. Hydration of Portland cement with additions of calcium sulfoaluminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Saoût, Gwenn; Lothenbach, Barbara; Hori, Akihiro; Higuchi, Takayuki; Winnefeld, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The effect of mineral additions based on calcium aluminates on the hydration mechanism of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) was investigated using isothermal calorimetry, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, solid state nuclear magnetic resonance and pore solution analysis. Results show that the addition of a calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSA) to the OPC does not affect the hydration mechanism of alite but controls the aluminate dissolution. In the second blend investigated, a rapid setting cement, the amorphous calcium aluminate reacts very fast to ettringite. The release of aluminum ions strongly retards the hydration of alite but the C–S–H has a similar composition as in OPC with no additional Al to Si substitution. As in CSA–OPC, the aluminate hydration is controlled by the availability of sulfates. The coupling of thermodynamic modeling with the kinetic equations predicts the amount of hydrates and pore solution compositions as a function of time and validates the model in these systems.

  14. Identification of the hydrate gel phases present in phosphate-modified calcium aluminate binders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavda, Mehul A.; Bernal, Susan A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Apperley, David C. [Solid-State NMR Group, Department of Chemistry, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Kinoshita, Hajime [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Provis, John L., E-mail: j.provis@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-15

    The conversion of hexagonal calcium aluminate hydrates to cubic phases in hydrated calcium aluminate cements (CAC) can involve undesirable porosity changes and loss of strength. Modification of CAC by phosphate addition avoids conversion, by altering the nature of the reaction products, yielding a stable amorphous gel instead of the usual crystalline hydrate products. Here, details of the environments of aluminium and phosphorus in this gel were elucidated using solid-state NMR and complementary techniques. Aluminium is identified in both octahedral and tetrahedral coordination states, and phosphorus is present in hydrous environments with varying, but mostly low, degrees of crosslinking. A {sup 31}P/{sup 27}Al rotational echo adiabatic passage double resonance (REAPDOR) experiment showed the existence of aluminium–phosphorus interactions, confirming the formation of a hydrated calcium aluminophosphate gel as a key component of the binding phase. This resolves previous disagreements in the literature regarding the nature of the disordered products forming in this system.

  15. Substitution of strontium for calcium in glass ionomer cements (Part ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Substitution of strontium for calcium in glass ionomer cements (Part 1): Glass synthesis and characterisation, and the effects on the cement handling variables and ... acid to form glass ionomer cements, whose properties were investigated at different time points: working and setting times were determined by rheometry; and, ...

  16. Preparation and bioactivity of micro-arc oxidized calcium phosphate coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Y.K. [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Ji' nan, Shandong 250061 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Ji' nan, Shandong 250061 (China); Chen, C.Z., E-mail: czchen@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Ji' nan, Shandong 250061 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Ji' nan, Shandong 250061 (China); Wang, D.G.; Lin, Z.Q. [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Ji' nan, Shandong 250061 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Ji' nan, Shandong 250061 (China)

    2013-09-16

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings were prepared on ZK60 magnesium alloy by micro-arc oxidation (MAO) in electrolyte containing calcium acetate monohydrate (CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2}Ca·H{sub 2}O) and disodium hydrogen phosphate dodecahydrate (Na{sub 2}HPO{sub 4}·12H{sub 2}O). Scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) were employed to characterize the microstructure, elemental distribution and phase composition of the CaP coatings respectively. Simulated body fluid (SBF) immersion test was used to evaluate the coating degradability and bioactivity. After 30 days of SBF immersion, the CaP coatings effectively reduce the degradation rate. The surfaces of CaP coatings are covered by a new layer formed of numerous needle-like, spherical and columned calcium phosphates. SEM, EDX and XRD results suggest that these calcium phosphates are bioactive calcium phosphate phases such as hydroxyapatite (Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}, HA) and calcium pyrophosphates (Ca{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}, CPP). The formation of these calcium phosphates indicates that the CaP coatings have bioactivity. - Highlights: • Bioactive CaP coatings are successfully formed on ZK60 magnesium alloy. • CaP coatings consist of MgO, MgF{sub 2}, CaO, CaF{sub 2} and Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}. • Needle-like, spherical and columned calcium phosphates formed in SBF. • CaP coatings exhibit bioactivity and low corrosion rate.

  17. Development of an Injectable Calcium Phosphate/Hyaluronic Acid Microparticles System for Platelet Lysate Sustained Delivery Aiming Bone Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babo, Pedro S; Santo, Vítor E; Gomes, Manuela E; Reis, Rui L

    2016-11-01

    Despite the biocompatibility and osteoinductive properties of calcium phosphate (CaP) cements their low biodegradability hampers full bone regeneration. Herein the incorporation of CaP cement with hyaluronic acid (HAc) microparticles loaded with platelet lysate (PL) to improve the degradability and biological performance of the cements is proposed. Cement formulations incorporating increasing weight ratios of either empty HAc microparticles or microparticles loaded with PL (10 and 20 wt%) are developed as well as cements directly incorporating PL. The direct incorporation of PL improves the mechanical properties of the plain cement, reaching values similar to native bone. Morphological analysis shows homogeneous particle distribution and high interconnectivity between the HAc microparticles. The cements incorporating PL (with or without the HAc microparticles) present a sustained release of PL proteins for up to 8 d. The sustained release of PL modulates the expression of osteogenic markers in seeded human adipose tissue derived stem cells, thus suggesting the stimulatory role of this hybrid system toward osteogenic commitment and bone regeneration applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Effects of Stirring and Fluid Perfusion on the In Vitro Degradation of Calcium Phosphate Cement/PLGA Composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    An, J.; Leeuwenburgh, S.C.G.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Jansen, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    In vitro degradation rates of calcium phosphate bioceramics are investigated using a large variation of soaking protocols that do not all match the dynamic conditions of the perfused physiological environment. Therefore, we studied the effect of stirring and fluid perfusion on the in vitro

  19. Atomic structure of intracellular amorphous calcium phosphate deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, F; Blumenthal, N C; Posner, A S; Becker, G L; Lehninger, A L

    1975-06-01

    The radial distribution function calculated from x-ray diffraction of mineralized cytoplasmic structures isolated from the hepatopancreas of the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) is very similar to that previously found for synthetic amorphous calcium phosphate. Both types of mineral apparently have only short-range atomic order, represented as a neutral ion cluster of about 10 A in longest dimension, whose probable composition is expressed by the formula Ca9(PO4)6. The minor differences observed are attributed to the presence in the biological mineral of significant amounts of Mg-2+ and ATP. Synthetic amorphous calcium phosphate in contact with a solution containing an amount of ATP equivalent to that of the biological mineral failed to undergo conversion to the thermodynamically more stable hydroxyapatite. The amorphous calcium phosphate of the cytoplasmic mineral granules is similarly stable, and does not undergo conversion to hydroxyapatite, presumably owing to the presence of ATP and Mg-2+, known in inhibitors of the conversion process. The physiological implications of mineral deposits consisting of stabilized calcium phosphate ion clusters are discussed.

  20. Calcium phosphate saturation in seawater around the Andaman Island

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.; Reddy, C.V.G.

    Ionic product (IP) of calcium phosphate is calculated at some stations around Andaman Island. The depthwise variations of the ionic product of calcium phosphate seem to follow a normal trend with maximum saturation value between 100 to 200 m. Using...

  1. Fabrication of Novel Biodegradable α-Tricalcium Phosphate Cement Set by Chelating Capability of Inositol Phosphate and Its Biocompatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiisa Konishi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradable α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP cement based on the chelate-setting mechanism of inositol phosphate (IP6 was developed. This paper examined the effect of the milling time of α-TCP powder on the material properties of the cement. In addition, biocompatibility of the result cement in vitro using osteoblasts and in vivo using rabbit models will be studied as well. The α-TCP powders were ballmilled using ZrO2 beads in pure water for various durations up to 270 minutes, with a single-phase α-TCP obtained at ballmilling for 120 minutes. The resulting cement was mostly composed of α-TCP phase, and the compressive strength of the cement was 8.5±1.1 MPa, which suggested that the cements set with keeping the crystallite phase of starting cement powder. The cell-culture test indicated that the resulting cements were biocompatible materials. In vivo studies showed that the newly formed bones increased with milling time at a slight distance from the cement specimens and grew mature at 24 weeks, and the surface of the cement was resorbed by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-(TRAP-positive osteoclast-like cells until 24 weeks of implantation. The present α-TCP cement is promising for application as a novel paste-like artificial bone with biodegradability and osteoconductivity.

  2. Optimization of calcium phosphate fine ceramic powders preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezanova, K.; Tepavitcharova, S.; Rabadjieva, D.; Gergulova, R.; Ilieva, R.

    2013-12-01

    The effect of biomimetic synthesis method, reaction medium and further precursor treatments on the chemical and phase composition, crystal size and morphology of calcium phosphates was examined. Nanosized calcium phosphate precursors were biomimetically precipitated by the method of continuous precipitation in three types of reaction media at pH 8: (i) SBF as an inorganic electrolyte system; (ii) organic (glycerine) modified SBF (volume ratio of 1:1); (iii) polymer (10 g/l xanthan gum or 10 g/l guar gum) modified SBF (volume ratio of 1:1). After maturation (24 h) the samples were lyophilized, calcinated at 300°C for 3 hours, and washed with water, followed by new gelation, lyophilization and step-wise (200, 400, 600, 800, and 1000°C, each for 3 hours) sintering. The reaction medium influenced the chemical composition and particle size but not the morphology of the calcium phosphate powders. In all studied cases bi-phase calcium phosphate fine powders with well-shaped spherical grains, consisting of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and hydroxyapatite (HA) with a Ca/P ratio of 1.3 - 1.6 were obtained. The SBF modifiers decreased the particle size of the product in the sequence guar gum ˜ xanthan gum < glycerin < SBF medium.

  3. Strontium doping promotes bioactivity of rhBMP-2 upon calcium phosphate cement via elevated recognition and expression of BMPR-IA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Baolin; Tian, Yu; Zhang, Wenjing; Ma, Yifan; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Changsheng

    2017-11-01

    Preserving and improving osteogenic activity of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) upon implants remains one of the key limitations in bone regeneration. With calcium phosphate cement (CPC) as model, we have developed a series of strontium (Sr)-doped CPC (SCPC) to address this issue. The effects of fixed Sr on the bioactivity of recombinant human BMP-2 (rhBMP-2) as well as the underlying mechanism were investigated. The results suggested that the rhBMP-2-induced osteogenic activity was significantly promoted upon SCPCs, especially with a low amount of fixed Sr (SrCO 3 content IA (BMPR-IA) to rhBMP-2 and an increased expression of BMPR-IA in C2C12 model cells. As a result, the activations of BMP-induced signaling pathways were different in C2C12 cells incubated upon CPC/rhBMP-2 and SCPCs/rhBMP-2. These findings explicitly decipher the mechanism of SCPCs promoting osteogenic bioactivity of rhBMP-2 and signify the promising application of the SCPCs/rhBMP-2 matrix in bone regeneration implants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Renal Control of Calcium, Phosphate, and Magnesium Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonchol, Michel; Levi, Moshe

    2015-01-01

    Calcium, phosphate, and magnesium are multivalent cations that are important for many biologic and cellular functions. The kidneys play a central role in the homeostasis of these ions. Gastrointestinal absorption is balanced by renal excretion. When body stores of these ions decline significantly, gastrointestinal absorption, bone resorption, and renal tubular reabsorption increase to normalize their levels. Renal regulation of these ions occurs through glomerular filtration and tubular reabsorption and/or secretion and is therefore an important determinant of plasma ion concentration. Under physiologic conditions, the whole body balance of calcium, phosphate, and magnesium is maintained by fine adjustments of urinary excretion to equal the net intake. This review discusses how calcium, phosphate, and magnesium are handled by the kidneys. PMID:25287933

  5. Effect of calcium chloride on physical properties of calcium-enriched mixture cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaszadegan, Abbas; Sedigh Shams, Mahdi; Jamshidi, Yasin; Parashos, Peter; Bagheri, Rafat

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of adding 10% calcium chloride (CaCl2) on the setting time, solubility and the pH of calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement. Setting time was assessed in accordance with American Dental Association specification N°57. Solubility was measured at 24 and 72 h, 7 and 14 days in hydrated and dehydrated conditions by calculating weight change. The pH of MiliQ water in which the CEM cement samples were immersed was measured immediately after each time interval with and without the addition of CaCl2. The data were analysed using the Mann-Whitney U-test and the Student's t-test. The initial setting time was significantly decreased after the addition of 10% CaCl2. The pH of water increased immediately when in contact with the cements in both groups. The weight loss of hydrated and dehydrated specimens was more than 3% and was significantly reduced by the addition of 10% CaCl2. © 2015 Australian Society of Endodontology.

  6. Development of the foremost light-curable calcium-silicate MTA cement as root-end in oral surgery. Chemical-physical properties, bioactivity and biological behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolfi, Maria Giovanna; Taddei, Paola; Siboni, Francesco; Modena, Enrico; Ciapetti, Gabriela; Prati, Carlo

    2011-07-01

    An innovative light-curable calcium-silicate cement containing a HEMA-TEGDMA-based resin (lc-MTA) was designed to obtain a bioactive fast setting root-end filling and root repair material. lc-MTA was tested for setting time, solubility, water absorption, calcium release, alkalinizing activity (pH of soaking water), bioactivity (apatite-forming ability) and cell growth-proliferation. The apatite-forming ability was investigated by micro-Raman, ATR-FTIR and ESEM/EDX after immersion at 37°C for 1-28 days in DPBS or DMEM+FBS. The marginal adaptation of cement in root-end cavities of extracted teeth was assessed by ESEM/EDX, and the viability of Saos-2 cell on cements was evaluated. lc-MTA demonstrated a rapid setting time (2min), low solubility, high calcium release (150-200ppm) and alkalinizing power (pH 10-12). lc-MTA proved the formation of bone-like apatite spherulites just after 1 day. Apatite precipitates completely filled the interface porosities and created a perfect marginal adaptation. lc-MTA allowed Saos-2 cell viability and growth and no compromising toxicity was exerted. HEMA-TEGDMA creates a polymeric network able to stabilize the outer surface of the cement and a hydrophilic matrix permeable enough to allow water absorption. SiO(-)/Si-OH groups from the mineral particles induce heterogeneous nucleation of apatite by sorption of calcium and phosphate ions. Oxygen-containing groups from poly-HEMA-TEGDMA provide additional apatite nucleating sites through the formation of calcium chelates. The strong novelty was that the combination of a hydraulic calcium-silicate powder and a poly-HEMA-TEGDMA hydrophilic resin creates the conditions (calcium release and functional groups able to chelate Ca ions) for a bioactive fast setting light-curable material for clinical applications in dental and maxillofacial surgery. The first and unique/exclusive light-curable calcium-silicate MTA cement for endodontics and root-end application was created, with a potential

  7. stabilization of ikpayongo laterite with cement and calcium carbide

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF EKWUEME

    the stabilization of soil will ensure economy in road construction, while providing an effective way of disposing calcium carbide waste. KEYWORDS: Cement, Calcium carbide waste, Stabilization, Ikpayongo laterite, Pavement material. INTRODUCTION. Road building in the developing nations has been a major challenge to ...

  8. Synthesis and characterization of porous calcium phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granados C, F.; Serrano G, J.; Bonifacio M, J.

    2007-01-01

    The porous calcium phosphate was prepared by the continuous precipitation method using Ca(NO 3 ) 2 .4H 2 O and NH 4 H 2 PO 4 salts. The synthesized material was structurally and superficially characterized using the XRD, BET, IR TGA and SEM techniques. The obtained inorganic material was identified as calcium phosphate that presents a great specific area for what can be efficiently used as adsorbent material for adsorption studies in the radioactive wastes treatment present in aqueous solution. (Author)

  9. Calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles for caries control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Birkedal, Henrik; Olsen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Caries is caused by acid production in biofilms on dental surfaces. Preventing caries therefore involves control of microorganisms and/or the acid produced. Here, calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles are presented as a new approach to caries control. The particles are made by co......-precipitation and designed to bind to bacteria in biofilms, impede biofilm build-up without killing the microflora, and release phosphate ions to buffer bacterial acid production if the pH decreases below 6. Analysis of biofilm formation and pH in a five-species biofilm model for dental caries showed that treatment......H always remained above 5.5. Hence, calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles show potential for applications in caries control....

  10. Degradation processes of reinforced concretes by combined sulfate–phosphate attack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Secco, Michele, E-mail: michele.secco@unipd.it [Inter-Departmental Research Center for the Study of Cement Materials and Hydraulic Binders (CIRCe), University of Padova, Via Gradenigo 6, 35131 Padova (Italy); Department of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering (ICEA), University of Padova, Via Marzolo 9, 35131 Padova (Italy); Lampronti, Giulio Isacco, E-mail: gil21@cam.ac.uk [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, CB2 3EQ Cambridge (United Kingdom); Schlegel, Moritz-Caspar, E-mail: moritz-caspar.schlegel@helmholtz-berlin.de [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fürMaterialien und Energie GmbH, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Maritan, Lara, E-mail: lara.maritan@unipd.it [Department of Geosciences, University of Padova, Via Gradenigo 6, 35131 Padova (Italy); Zorzi, Federico, E-mail: federico.zorzi@unipd.it [Department of Geosciences, University of Padova, Via Gradenigo 6, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2015-02-15

    A novel form of alteration due to the interaction between hydrated cement phases and sulfate and phosphate-based pollutants is described, through the characterization of concrete samples from an industrial reinforced concrete building. Decalcification of the cement matrices was observed, with secondary sulfate and phosphate-based mineral formation, according to a marked mineralogical and textural zoning. Five alteration layers may be detected: the two outermost layers are characterized by the presence of gypsum–brushite solid solution phases associated with anhydrous calcium sulfates and phosphates, respectively, while a progressive increase in apatite and ammonium magnesium phosphates is observable in the three innermost layers, associated with specific apatite precursors (brushite, octacalcium phosphate and amorphous calcium phosphate, respectively). The heterogeneous microstructural development of secondary phases is related to the chemical, pH and thermal gradients in the attacked cementitious systems, caused by different sources of pollutants and the exposure to the sun's radiation.

  11. Degradation processes of reinforced concretes by combined sulfate–phosphate attack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secco, Michele; Lampronti, Giulio Isacco; Schlegel, Moritz-Caspar; Maritan, Lara; Zorzi, Federico

    2015-01-01

    A novel form of alteration due to the interaction between hydrated cement phases and sulfate and phosphate-based pollutants is described, through the characterization of concrete samples from an industrial reinforced concrete building. Decalcification of the cement matrices was observed, with secondary sulfate and phosphate-based mineral formation, according to a marked mineralogical and textural zoning. Five alteration layers may be detected: the two outermost layers are characterized by the presence of gypsum–brushite solid solution phases associated with anhydrous calcium sulfates and phosphates, respectively, while a progressive increase in apatite and ammonium magnesium phosphates is observable in the three innermost layers, associated with specific apatite precursors (brushite, octacalcium phosphate and amorphous calcium phosphate, respectively). The heterogeneous microstructural development of secondary phases is related to the chemical, pH and thermal gradients in the attacked cementitious systems, caused by different sources of pollutants and the exposure to the sun's radiation

  12. Enhanced healing of rabbit segmental radius defects with surface-coated calcium phosphate cement/bone morphogenetic protein-2 scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yi; Hou, Juan; Yin, ManLi [Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Wang, Jing, E-mail: biomatwj@163.com [Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Liu, ChangSheng, E-mail: csliu@sh163.net [Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); The State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2014-11-01

    Large osseous defects remain a difficult clinical problem in orthopedic surgery owing to the limited effective therapeutic options, and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) is useful for its potent osteoinductive properties in bone regeneration. Here we build a strategy to achieve prolonged duration time and help inducting new bone formation by using water-soluble polymers as a protective film. In this study, calcium phosphate cement (CPC) scaffolds were prepared as the matrix and combined with sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC-Na), hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC), and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) respectively to protect from the digestion of rhBMP-2. After being implanted in the mouse thigh muscles, the surface-modified composite scaffolds evidently induced ectopic bone formation. In addition, we further evaluated the in vivo effects of surface-modified scaffolds in a rabbit radius critical defect by radiography, three dimensional micro-computed tomographic (μCT) imaging, synchrotron radiation-based micro-computed tomographic (SRμCT) imaging, histological analysis, and biomechanical measurement. The HPMC-modified CPC scaffold was regarded as the best combination for segmental bone regeneration in rabbit radius. - Highlights: • A simple surface-coating method was used to fabricate composite scaffolds. • Growth factor was protected from rapid depletion via superficial coating. • Significant promotion of bone regeneration was achieved. • HPMC-modification displayed optimal effect of bone regeneration.

  13. Human embryonic stem cell-encapsulation in alginate microbeads in macroporous calcium phosphate cement for bone tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Minghui; Chen, Wenchuan; Weir, Michael D.; Thein-Han, Wahwah; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2012-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are exciting for regenerative medicine applications because of their strong proliferative ability and multilineage differentiation capability. To date there has been no report on hESC seeding with calcium phosphate cement (CPC). The objective of this study was to investigate hESC-derived mesenchymal stem cell (hESCd-MSC) encapsulation in hydrogel microbeads in macroporous CPC for bone tissue engineering. hESCs were cultured to form embryoid bodies (EBs), and the MSCs were then migrated out of the EBs. hESCd-MSCs had surface markers characteristic of MSCs, with positive alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining when cultured in osteogenic medium. hESCd-MSCs were encapsulated in alginate at a density of 1 million cells/mL, with an average microbead size of 207 µm. CPC contained mannitol porogen to create a porosity of 64% and macropores with size of 218 µm, with 20% absorbable fibers for additional porosity when the fibers degrade. hESCd-MSCs encapsulated in microbeads in CPC had good viability from 1 to 21 d. ALP gene expression at 21 d was 25-fold that at 1 d. Osteocalcin (OC) at 21 d was two orders of magnitude of that at 1 d. ALP activity in colorimetric p-nitrophenyl phosphate assay at 21 d was 5-fold that at 1 d. Mineral synthesis by the encapsulated hESCd-MSCs at 21 d was 7-fold that at 1 d. Potential benefits of the CPC-stem cell paste include injectability, intimate adaptation to complex-shaped bone defects, ease in contouring to achieve esthetics in maxillofacial repairs, and in situ setting ability. In conclusion, hESCd-MSCs were encapsulated in alginate microbeads in macroporous CPC showing good cell viability, osteogenic differentiation and mineral synthesis for the first time. The hESCd-MSC-encapsulating macroporous CPC construct is promising for bone regeneration in a wide range of orthopedic and maxillofacial applications. PMID:22633970

  14. Antibiotic-impregnated calcium phosphate cement as part of a comprehensive treatment for patients with established orthopaedic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niikura, Takahiro; Lee, Sang Yang; Iwakura, Takashi; Sakai, Yoshitada; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2016-07-01

    The treatment of established orthopaedic infection is challenging. While the main focus of treatment is wide surgical debridement, systemic and local antibiotic administration are important adjuvant therapies. Several reports have described the clinical use of antibiotic-impregnated calcium phosphate cement (CPC) to provide local antibiotic therapy for bone infections. However, these were all individual case reports, and no case series have been reported. We report a case series treated by a single surgeon using antibiotic-impregnated CPC as part of a comprehensive treatment plan in patients with established orthopaedic infection. We enrolled 13 consecutive patients with osteomyelitis (n = 6) or infected non-union (n = 7). Implantation of antibiotic-impregnated CPC was performed to provide local antibiotic therapy as part of a comprehensive treatment plan that also included wide surgical debridement, systemic antibiotic therapy, and subsequent second-stage reconstruction surgery. We investigated the rate of successful infection eradication and systemic/local complications. The concentration of antibiotics in the surgical drainage fluids, blood, and recovered CPC (via elution into a phosphate-buffered saline bath) were measured. The mean follow-up period after surgery was 50.4 (range, 27-73) months. There were no cases of infection recurrence during follow-up. No systemic toxicity or local complications from the implantation of antibiotic-impregnated CPC were observed. The vancomycin concentration in the fluid from surgical drainage (n = 6) was 527.1 ± 363.9 μg/mL on postoperative day 1 and 224.5 ± 198.4 μg/mL on postoperative day 2. In patients who did not receive systemic vancomycin therapy (n = 3), the maximum serum vancomycin level was antibiotic-impregnated CPC is an option to provide local antibiotic therapy as part of a comprehensive treatment plan. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights

  15. Microstructural investigation into calcium phosphate biomaterials by spatially resolved cathodoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetze, J.; Heimann, R.B.; Hildebrandt, H. [Freiberg Univ. of Mining and Technology (Germany). Dept. of Mineralogy; Gburek, U. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Experimental Dentistry

    2001-02-01

    From cathodoluminescence (CL) investigations of synthetic and natural calcium phosphates it can be concluded that the CL of pure synthetic apatite is mainly characterized by intrinsic luminescence, whereas the luminescence of naturally occurring apatites is frequently activated by trace elements. CL revealed internal structures within plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings which were not discernible by SEM-BSE imaging. However, cathodoluminescence microscopy alone can presently not be used in every case to characterize synthetic calcium phosphate biomaterials because of the dominant intrinsic blue CL emission. In the future, optimum results will likely be achieved by using a combination of CL microscopy and spectroscopy with other spatially resolved analytical methods such as SEM-BSE, SEM-CL or micro-Raman spectroscopy. In the present study, different types of tetracalcium phosphate dental cements could be distinguished due to varying CL colours and CL spectra that are caused by a different content of impurity Mn. These results emphasize the advantages of spectral CL measurements for spatially resolved detection of trace elements in solids. (orig.) [German] Ergebnisse von Kathodolumineszenz- (KL-) Untersuchungen synthetischer und natuerlicher Apatite zeigen, dass die KL synthetischer Apatite vorrangig durch intrinsische Lumineszenz gekennzeichnet ist, waehrend die KL natuerlicher Apatite meist durch Spurenlemente aktiviert wird. Mittels KL koennen Internstrukturen in plasmagespritzten Hydroxylapatit-Schichten sichtbar gemacht werden, die im REM-BSE nicht nachweisbar sind. Allerdings kann die KL-Mikroskopie aufgrund der dominierenden blauen intrinsischen Lumineszenz gegenwaertig nicht als alleinige Untersuchungsmethode zur Charakterisierung von Calciumphosphat Biomaterialien eingesetzt werden. Optimale Resultate werden zukuenftig durch Kombination von KL-Mikrroskopie und -spektroskopie mit anderen ortsaufgeloesten analytischen Methoden wie REM-BSE, REM-KL oder Mikro

  16. Development of nanosilica bonded monetite cement from egg shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Huan, E-mail: huanzhou@cczu.edu.cn [Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Health Sciences, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu (China); Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Luchini, Timothy J.F.; Boroujeni, Nariman Mansouri [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Agarwal, Anand K.; Goel, Vijay K. [Department of Bioengineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Bhaduri, Sarit B. [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Division of Dentistry, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This work represents further effort from our group in developing monetite based calcium phosphate cements (CPC). These cements start with a calcium phosphate powder (MW-CPC) that is manufactured using microwave irradiation. Due to the robustness of the cement production process, we report that the starting materials can be derived from egg shells, a waste product from the poultry industry. The CPC were prepared with MW-CPC and aqueous setting solution. Results showed that the CPC hardened after mixing powdered cement with water for about 12.5 ± 1 min. The compressive strength after 24 h of incubation was approximately 8.45 ± 1.29 MPa. In addition, adding colloidal nanosilica to CPC can accelerate the cement hardening (10 ± 1 min) process by about 2.5 min and improve compressive strength (20.16 ± 4.39 MPa), which is more than double the original strength. The interaction between nanosilica and CPC was monitored using an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). While hardening, nanosilica can bond to the CPC crystal network for stabilization. The physical and biological studies performed on both cements suggest that they can potentially be used in orthopedics. - Highlights: • Cement raw powder is derived from egg shells. • A microwave assisted system is used for preparing monetite bone cement. • Colloidal silica is used to reinforce cement.

  17. Development of nanosilica bonded monetite cement from egg shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Huan; Luchini, Timothy J.F.; Boroujeni, Nariman Mansouri; Agarwal, Anand K.; Goel, Vijay K.; Bhaduri, Sarit B.

    2015-01-01

    This work represents further effort from our group in developing monetite based calcium phosphate cements (CPC). These cements start with a calcium phosphate powder (MW-CPC) that is manufactured using microwave irradiation. Due to the robustness of the cement production process, we report that the starting materials can be derived from egg shells, a waste product from the poultry industry. The CPC were prepared with MW-CPC and aqueous setting solution. Results showed that the CPC hardened after mixing powdered cement with water for about 12.5 ± 1 min. The compressive strength after 24 h of incubation was approximately 8.45 ± 1.29 MPa. In addition, adding colloidal nanosilica to CPC can accelerate the cement hardening (10 ± 1 min) process by about 2.5 min and improve compressive strength (20.16 ± 4.39 MPa), which is more than double the original strength. The interaction between nanosilica and CPC was monitored using an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). While hardening, nanosilica can bond to the CPC crystal network for stabilization. The physical and biological studies performed on both cements suggest that they can potentially be used in orthopedics. - Highlights: • Cement raw powder is derived from egg shells. • A microwave assisted system is used for preparing monetite bone cement. • Colloidal silica is used to reinforce cement

  18. Drug Release Profile from Calcium-Induced Alginate-Phosphate Composite Gel Beads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshifumi Murata

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium-induced alginate-phosphate composite gel beads were prepared, and model drug release profiles were investigated in vitro. The formation of calcium phosphate in the alginate gel matrix was observed and did not affect the rheological properties of the hydrogel beads. X-ray diffraction patterns showed that the calcium phosphate does not exist in crystalline form in the matrix. The initial release amount and release rate of a water-soluble drug, diclofenac, from the alginate gel beads could be controlled by modifying the composition of the matrix with calcium phosphate. In contrast, the release profile was not affected by the modification for hydrocortisone, a drug only slightly soluble in water.

  19. In situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction study of the early hydration of α-tricalcium phosphate/tricalcium silicate composite bone cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morejon-Alonso, Loreley; Correa, Jose Raul, E-mail: lmorejon@fq.uh.cu [Departamento de Quimica General, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de La Habana, UH (Cuba); Motisuke, Mariana [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Carrodeguas, Raul Garcia [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Laboratorio de Avaliacao e Desenvolvimento de Biomateriais do Nordeste; Santos, Luis Alberto dos [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Departamento de Materiais

    2015-01-15

    Bioactivity, osteogenicity and mechanical properties of α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) based phosphates cements can be improved by adding tricalcium silicate (C{sub 3}S); however, the addition of C{sub 3}S delays the precipitation and growth of calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA). Thus, the aim of this work was the study of in situ setting reaction of α-TCP/C{sub 3}S composite bone cement under high energy X-ray generated by a synchrotron source within the first 72h. The results showed that the addition of C{sub 3}S induces the precipitation of nanosized CDHA at early times depending on the added content. Calculated crystallite sizes showed that the higher the content of C{sub 3}S, the smaller the crystal size at the beginning of the precipitation. These results are different from those obtained by conventional XRD method, suggesting that the proposed technique is a powerful tool in determining the composition and extent of reaction of CPCs surfaces in real time. (author)

  20. Calcium phosphate bioceramics prepared from wet chemically precipitated powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine Salma

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work calcium phosphates were synthesized by modified wet chemical precipitation route. Contrary to the conventional chemical precipitation route calcium hydroxide was homogenized with planetary mill. Milling calcium oxide and water in planetary ball mill as a first step of synthesis provides a highly dispersed calcium hydroxide suspension. The aim of this work was to study the influence of main processing parameters of wet chemical precipitation synthesis product and to control the morphology, phase and functional group composition and, consequently, thermal stability and microstructure of calcium phosphate bioceramics after thermal treatment. The results showed that it is possible to obtain calcium phosphates with different and reproducible phase compositions after thermal processing (hydroxyapatite [HAp], β-tricalcium phosphate [β-TCP] and HAp/β-TCP by modified wet-chemical precipitation route. The β-TCP phase content in sintered bioceramics samples is found to be highly dependent on the changes in technological parameters and it can be controlled with ending pH, synthesis temperature and thermal treatment. Pure, crystalline and highly thermally stable (up to 1300°C HAp bioceramics with homogenous grainy microstructure, grain size up to 200–250 nm and high open porosity can be successfully obtained by powder synthesized at elevated synthesis temperature of 70°C and stabilizing ending pH at 9.

  1. Effect of humic substances on the precipitation of calcium phosphate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Yong-hui; Hermann H. HAHN; Erhard HOFFMANN; Peter G. WEIDLER

    2006-01-01

    For phosphorus (P) recovery from wastewater, the effect of humic substances (HS) on the precipitation of calcium phosphate was studied. Batch experiments of calcium phosphate precipitation were undertaken with synthetic water that contained 20 mg/L phosphate (as P) and 20 mg/L HS (as dissolved organic carbon, DOC) at a constant pH value in the range of 8.0-10.0. The concentration variations of phosphate, calcium (Ca) and HS were measured in the precipitation process; the crystalline state and compositions of the precipitates were analysed by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and chemical methods, respectively. It showed that at solution pH 8.0, the precipitation rate and removal efficiency of phosphate were greatly reduced by HS, but at solution pH ≥9.0,the effect of HS was very small. The Ca consumption for the precipitation of phosphate increased when HS was added; HS was also removed from solution with the precipitation of calcium phosphate. At solution pH 8.0 and HS concentrations ≤ 3.5 mg/L, and at pH ≥ 9.0 and HS concentrations ≤ 10 mg/L, the final precipitates were proved to be hydroxyapatite (HAP) by XRD. The increases of solution pH value and initial Ca/P ratio helped reduce the influence of HS on the precipitation of phosphate.

  2. Relative biological activity of amorphous calcium and calcium-magnesium phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silina, E.N.; Kunitsa, T.N.; Shuslikova, E.S.; Griggs, J.; Levchenko, L.V.; Karjaubaeva, R.A.; Sinyayev, V.A.

    2005-01-01

    Three amorphous calcium and calcium-magnesium phosphates that are close on composition to mineral basis of the bone tissues are compared on bioactivity in the given article. Properties of the hydrated substances produced from water solutions and their derivations, which are formed due to thermal treatment, are discussed here. As a detector of bioactivity was used microbial culture E-Coli. [author

  3. Calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles for caries control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian

    Oftentimes caries lesions develop in protected sites that are difficult to access by self-performed mechanical tooth cleaning. At present, there is a growing interest in chemical adjuncts to mechanical procedures of oral hygiene that aim at biofilm control rather than biofilm eradication. Calcium......-phosphate-osteopontin particles are a new promising therapeutic approach to caries control. They are designed to bind to dental biofilms and interfere with biofilm build-up, lowering the bacterial burden on the tooth surface without affecting bacterial viability in the oral cavity. Moreover, they dissolve when pH in the biofilm...... drops to 6 or below and release buffering phosphate ions that stabilize biofilm pH above the critical level for enamel dissolution. With that twofold approach, calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles may make a relevant contribution to clinical caries control....

  4. Production of a calcium silicate cement material from alginate impression material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washizawa, Norimasa; Narusawa, Hideaki; Tamaki, Yukimichi; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to synthesize biomaterials from daily dental waste. Since alginate impression material contains silica and calcium salts, we aimed to synthesize calcium silicate cement from alginate impression material. Gypsum-based investment material was also investigated as control. X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that although firing the set gypsum-based and modified investment materials at 1,200°C produced calcium silicates, firing the set alginate impression material did not. However, we succeeded when firing the set blend of pre-fired set alginate impression material and gypsum at 1,200°C. SEM observations of the powder revealed that the featured porous structures of diatomite as an alginate impression material component appeared useful for synthesizing calcium silicates. Experimentally fabricated calcium silicate powder was successfully mixed with phosphoric acid solution and set by depositing the brushite. Therefore, we conclude that the production of calcium silicate cement material is possible from waste alginate impression material.

  5. Mechanism of calcium phosphates precipitation in liquid crystals; Mecanisme de precipitation de phosphates de calcium dans des cristaux liquides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prelot, B.; Zemb, T

    2004-04-01

    The possibility of using as a precursor an easily wet meso-porous powder would be a breakthrough in the preparation of nuclear waste storage ceramics. A concentrated solution containing ions to be stored would wet a dry powder and then, subjected to mild compression, lead to a micro-crystalline matrix of calcium phosphate at acceptable temperatures. Since no porous calcium phosphate different from calcined bone (patented) is described as porous precursor, we have compared the different synthesis routes towards meso-porous ceramics. First, we considered homogeneous precipitation of slats in water: using initially off-stoichiometry in reaction, micron-sized hydroxyapatite particles are produced with a specific surface up to 100 m{sup 2}/g. Then, we consider the classical route of precipitation of an hybrid material in the miscibility gap of a phase diagram, when an hexagonal liquid crystal is used a matrix for precipitation. The surfactant family consists in single chain surfactants containing phosphates as head-group to poison the growing surface of calcium phosphate nano-domains. Since the reaction is still too brutal, we considered using a cat-anionic precursor material of controllable surface charge. For certain concentrations and molar ratios, a new structure not yet described in surfactant precipitation literature is observed: since the periodicity is lower than twice the chain length, a disordered constant curvature monolayer (instead of the classical cylinder of twice chain length diameter) of surfactant is implied. Finally, we have investigated synthesis routes implying slow dissolution of pre-formed calcium phosphate in an already existing hexagonal matrix. For all these routes of synthesis, micro-structural determinations using SAXS, WARS and BET are performed, with a special attention to comparison of the precipitation material, the matrix obtained with all elements present, and also the material obtained after calcinations. (authors)

  6. Calcium phosphate-based coatings on titanium and its alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, R; Seshadri, S K; Kwon, T Y; Kim, K H

    2008-04-01

    Use of titanium as biomaterial is possible because of its very favorable biocompatibility with living tissue. Titanium implants having calcium phosphate coatings on their surface show good fixation to the bone. This review covers briefly the requirements of typical biomaterials and narrowly focuses on the works on titanium. Calcium phosphate ceramics for use in implants are introduced and various methods of producing calcium phosphate coating on titanium substrates are elaborated. Advantages and disadvantages of each type of coating from the view point of process simplicity, cost-effectiveness, stability of the coatings, coating integration with the bone, cell behavior, and so forth are highlighted. Taking into account all these factors, the efficient method(s) of producing these coatings are indicated finally.

  7. Cytotoxicity Comparison of Harvard Zinc Phosphate Cement Versus Panavia F2 and Rely X Plus Resin Cements on Rat L929-fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahasti, Sahabi; Sattari, Mandana; Romoozi, Elham; Akbar-Zadeh Baghban, Alireza

    2011-01-01

    Resin cements, regardless of their biocompatibility, have been widely used in restorative dentistry during the recent years. These cements contain hydroxy ethyl methacrylate (HEMA) molecules which are claimed to penetrate into dentinal tubules and may affect dental pulp. Since tooth preparation for metal ceramic restorations involves a large surface of the tooth, cytotoxicity of these cements would be more important in fixed prosthodontic treatments. The purpose of this study was to compare the cytotoxicity of two resin cements (Panavia F2 and Rely X Plus) versus zinc phosphate cement (Harvard) using rat L929-fibroblasts in vitro. In this experimental study, ninety hollow glass cylinders (internal diameter 5-mm, height 2-mm) were made and divided into three groups. Each group was filled with one of three experimental cements; Harvard Zinc Phosphate cement, Panavia F2 resin cement and Rely X Plus resin cement. L929- Fibroblast were passaged and subsequently cultured in 6-well plates of 5×10(5) cells each. The culture medium was RPMI_ 1640. All samples were incubated in CO2. Using enzyme-linked immune-sorbent assay (ELISA) and (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) (MTT) assay, the cytotoxicity of the cements was investigated at 1 hour, 24 hours and one week post exposure. Statistical analyses were performed via two-way ANOVA and honestly significant difference (HSD) Tukey tests. This study revealed significant differences between the three cements at the different time intervals. Harvard cement displayed the greatest cytotoxicity at all three intervals. After 1 hour Panavia F2 showed the next greatest cytotoxicity, but after 24-hours and oneweek intervals Rely X Plus showed the next greatest cytotoxicity. The results further showed that cytotoxicity decreased significantly in the Panavia F2 group with time (pHarvard cement group failed to showed no noticeable change in cytotoxicity with time. Although this study has limitations, it provides

  8. Biomimetic coprecipitation of calcium phosphate and bovine serum albumin on titanium alloy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Yuelian; Layrolle, Pierre; de Bruijn, Joost Dick; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Groot, K.

    2001-01-01

    Titanium alloy implants were precoated biomimetically with a thin and dense layer of calcium phosphate and then incubated either in a supersaturated solution of calcium phosphate or in phosphate-buffered saline, each containing bovine serum albumin (BSA) at various concentrations, under

  9. Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Reduces Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Development on Glass Ionomer Cement and Disrupts Established Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashper, Stuart G; Catmull, Deanne V; Liu, Sze-Wei; Myroforidis, Helen; Zalizniak, Ilya; Palamara, Joseph E A; Huq, N Laila; Reynolds, Eric C

    2016-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are dental restorative materials that are suitable for modification to help prevent dental plaque (biofilm) formation. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of incorporating casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) into a GIC on the colonisation and establishment of Streptococcus mutans biofilms and the effects of aqueous CPP-ACP on established S mutans biofilms. S. mutans biofilms were either established in flow cells before a single ten min exposure to 1% w/v CPP-ACP treatment or cultured in static wells or flow cells with either GIC or GIC containing 3% w/w CPP-ACP as the substratum. The biofilms were then visualised using confocal laser scanning microscopy after BacLight LIVE/DEAD staining. A significant decrease in biovolume and average thickness of S. mutans biofilms was observed in both static and flow cell assays when 3% CPP-ACP was incorporated into the GIC substratum. A single ten min treatment with aqueous 1% CPP-ACP resulted in a 58% decrease in biofilm biomass and thickness of established S. mutans biofilms grown in a flow cell. The treatment also significantly altered the structure of these biofilms compared with controls. The incorporation of 3% CPP-ACP into GIC significantly reduced S. mutans biofilm development indicating another potential anticariogenic mechanism of this material. Additionally aqueous CPP-ACP disrupted established S. mutans biofilms. The use of CPP-ACP containing GIC combined with regular CPP-ACP treatment may lower S. mutans challenge.

  10. In Vivo Osteogenic Potential of Biomimetic Hydroxyapatite/Collagen Microspheres: Comparison with Injectable Cement Pastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzanares, Maria-Cristina; Ginebra, Maria-Pau; Franch, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    The osteogenic capacity of biomimetic calcium deficient hydroxyapatite microspheres with and without collagen obtained by emulsification of a calcium phosphate cement paste has been evaluated in an in vivo model, and compared with an injectable calcium phosphate cement with the same composition. The materials were implanted into a 5 mm defect in the femur condyle of rabbits, and bone formation was assessed after 1 and 3 months. The histological analysis revealed that the cements presented cellular activity only in the margins of the material, whereas each one of the individual microspheres was covered with osteogenic cells. Consequently, bone ingrowth was enhanced by the microspheres, with a tenfold increase compared to the cement, which was associated to the higher accessibility for the cells provided by the macroporous network between the microspheres, and the larger surface area available for osteoconduction. No significant differences were found in terms of bone formation associated with the presence of collagen in the materials, although a more extensive erosion of the collagen-containing microspheres was observed. PMID:26132468

  11. In Vivo Osteogenic Potential of Biomimetic Hydroxyapatite/Collagen Microspheres: Comparison with Injectable Cement Pastes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Cuzmar

    Full Text Available The osteogenic capacity of biomimetic calcium deficient hydroxyapatite microspheres with and without collagen obtained by emulsification of a calcium phosphate cement paste has been evaluated in an in vivo model, and compared with an injectable calcium phosphate cement with the same composition. The materials were implanted into a 5 mm defect in the femur condyle of rabbits, and bone formation was assessed after 1 and 3 months. The histological analysis revealed that the cements presented cellular activity only in the margins of the material, whereas each one of the individual microspheres was covered with osteogenic cells. Consequently, bone ingrowth was enhanced by the microspheres, with a tenfold increase compared to the cement, which was associated to the higher accessibility for the cells provided by the macroporous network between the microspheres, and the larger surface area available for osteoconduction. No significant differences were found in terms of bone formation associated with the presence of collagen in the materials, although a more extensive erosion of the collagen-containing microspheres was observed.

  12. Incorporation of bitumen and calcium silicate in cement and lime stabilized soil blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, W. H.; Cheah, C. B.; Ramli, M.; Al-Sakkaf, Y. K.

    2017-04-01

    Providing affordable housing is the most critical problem in many of the developing countries. Using earth materials in building construction is one of the feasible methods to address this issue and it can be a way towards sustainable construction as well. However, the published information on the stabilized soil blocks is limited. Therefore, the present study is conducted to examine the characterization of the soils and engineering properties of the stabilized soil blocks. Four types of stabilizer were used in the study, namely; cement, slaked lime, bitumen emulsion and calcium silicate. Cement and slaked lime were added at different percentages in the range of 5% to 15%, with interval of 2.5%. The percentage was determined based on weight of soil. Meanwhile, bitumen emulsion and calcium silicate were incorporated at various percentages together with 10% of cement. Dosage of bitumen emulsion is in the range of 2% to 10% at interval of 2% while calcium silicate was incorporated at 0.50%, 0.75%, 1.00%, 1.25%, 1.50% and 2.00%. Results show that cement is the most viable stabilizer for the soil block among all stabilizers in this study. The bulk density, optimum moisture content and compressive strengths were increased with the increasing cement content. The most suitable cement content was 10% added at moisture content of 12%. Lime, bitumen and calcium contents were recommended at 5.0%, 6.0% and 1.25%, respectively.

  13. RBS and XPS analyses of the composite calcium phosphate coatings for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ide-Ektessabi, Ari; Yamaguchi, Tetsuro; Tanaka, Yoshikazu

    2005-01-01

    The calcium phosphate coatings on metallic implants are widely used for biomedical applications. The calcium phosphate coatings require mechanical strength, strong adhesion to the metallic implants, chemical stability and low dissolution into the human body fluid for stable functioning in the corrosive environment of the human body. In this study, a novel approach for improving the calcium phosphate coatings is utilized by adding trace metallic element into the coatings. We focused on teeth enamel, which is the hardest calcium phosphate tissue in the human body. Zn concentration increases exponentially from the interior to the surface of the enamel. As the Zn concentration increases, so the local hardness increases. Our previous studies suggest that Zn has influence on the hardness and other properties of enamel, calcium phosphate tissue. Calcium phosphate coatings doped with Zn was fabricated and characterized. The atomic composition and chemical state were investigated by using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) and X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS), respectively. Scratch test was also carried out for measuring the adhesion of the coatings

  14. Amorphous calcium phosphate and its application in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Wei-bin

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Amorphous Calcium Phosphate (ACP is an essential mineral phase formed in mineralized tissues and the first commercial product as artificial hydroxyapatite. ACP is unique among all forms of calcium phosphates in that it lacks long-range, periodic atomic scale order of crystalline calcium phosphates. The X-ray diffraction pattern is broad and diffuse with a maximum at 25 degree 2 theta, and no other different features compared with well-crystallized hydroxyapatite. Under electron microscopy, its morphological form is shown as small spheroidal particles in the scale of tenths nanometer. In aqueous media, ACP is easily transformed into crystalline phases such as octacalcium phosphate and apatite due to the growing of microcrystalline. It has been demonstrated that ACP has better osteoconductivity and biodegradability than tricalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite in vivo. Moreover, it can increase alkaline phosphatase activities of mesoblasts, enhance cell proliferation and promote cell adhesion. The unique role of ACP during the formation of mineralized tissues makes it a promising candidate material for tissue repair and regeneration. ACP may also be a potential remineralizing agent in dental applications. Recently developed ACP-filled bioactive composites are believed to be effective anti-demineralizing/remineralizing agents for the preservation and repair of tooth structures. This review provides an overview of the development, structure, chemical composition, morphological characterization, phase transformation and biomedical application of ACP in dentistry.

  15. Effect of calcium/silicon ratio on retention of uranium (VI) in portland cement materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Hongbin; Li Yuxiang

    2005-01-01

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) materials of varied calcium to silicon (Ca/Si) ratios were prepared by hydrothermal synthesis at 80 degree C, with calcium oxide and micro-silicon employed. These products were determined to be of gel phase by XRD. Leaching tests with 1% hydrochloric acid indicated that more Uranium (VI) was detained by CSH with lower Ca/Si ratios. Alkali-activated slag cement (with a lower Ca/Si ratio) was found to have a stronger retention capacity than Portland cement (with a higher Ca/Si ratio), at 25 degree C in 102-days leaching tests with simulated solidified forms containing Uranium (VI). The accumulative leaching fraction of Uranium (VI) for Alkali-activated slag cement solidified forms is 17.6% lower than that for Portland cement. The corresponding difference of diffusion coefficients is 40.6%. This could be correlated with the difference of Ca/Si ratios between cements of two kinds. (authors)

  16. Direct 3D powder printing of biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds for substitution of complex bone defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castilho, Miguel; Pires, Inês; Moseke, Claus; Ewald, Andrea; Gbureck, Uwe; Groll, Jürgen; Teßmar, Jörg; Vorndran, Elke

    2014-01-01

    The 3D printing technique based on cement powders is an excellent method for the fabrication of individual and complex bone substitutes even in the case of large defects. The outstanding bone remodeling capacity of biphasic calcium phosphates (BCPs) containing hydroxyapatite (HA) as well as tricalcium phosphate (TCP) in varying ratios makes the adaption of powder systems resulting in BCP materials to this fabrication technique a desirable aim. This study presents the synthesis and characterization of a novel powder system for the 3D printing process, intended for the production of complexly shaped BCP scaffolds by a hydraulic setting reaction of calcium carbonate and TCP with phosphoric acid. The HA/TCP ratio in the specimens could be tailored by the calcium/phosphate ratio of the starting powder. The scaffolds could be fabricated with a dimensional accuracy of >96.5% and a minimal macro pore size of 300 µm. Independent of the phase composition the printed specimens showed a microporosity of approximately 68%, while the compressive strength strongly depended on the chemical composition and increased with rising TCP content in the scaffolds to a maximum of 1.81 MPa. Post-treatment of the scaffolds with a polylactic-co-glycolic acid-solution enhanced the mechanical properties by a factor of 8. In vitro studies showed that all BCP scaffolds were cytocompatible and enhanced the cell viability as well as the cell proliferation, as compared with pure TCP. Cell proliferation is even better on BCP when compared to HA and cell viability is in a similar range on these materials. (paper)

  17. Osteoinduction of calcium phosphate biomaterials in small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Lijia; Shi, Yujun; Ye, Feng; Bu, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Although osteoinduction mechanism of calcium phosphate (CP) ceramics is still unclear, several essential properties have been reported, such as chemical composition, pore size and porosity, etc. In this study, calcium phosphate powder (Ca 3 (PO 4 ) 2 , CaP, group 1), biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic powder (BCP, group 2), and intact BCP rods (group 3) were implanted into leg muscles of mice and dorsal muscles of rabbits. One month and three months after implantation, samples were harvested for biological and histological analysis. New bone tissues were observed in 10/10 samples in group 1, 3/10 samples in group 2, and 9/10 samples in group 3 at 3rd month in mice, but not in rabbits. In vitro, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were cultured with trace CaP and BCP powder, and osteogenic differentiation was observed at day 7. Our results suggested that chemical composition is the prerequisite in osteoinduction, and pore structure would contribute to more bone formation. - Highlights: ► Intrinsic osteoinduction of calcium phosphate biomaterials was observed implanted in muscles of mice. ► Biomaterials powder also has osteoinduction property. ► Osteogenic genes and protein could be detected by RT-PCR and Western blot in implanted biomaterials. ► Osteogenic phenomenon could be observed by electron microscopy. ► The chemical composition is the prerequisite in osteoinduction, and pore structure would contribute to more bone formation

  18. Osteoinduction of calcium phosphate biomaterials in small animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Lijia; Shi, Yujun [Key Laboratory of Transplant Engineering and Immunology, Ministry of Health, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Ye, Feng [Department of Pathology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610041 (China); Bu, Hong, E-mail: hongbu@scu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Transplant Engineering and Immunology, Ministry of Health, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Department of Pathology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610041 (China)

    2013-04-01

    Although osteoinduction mechanism of calcium phosphate (CP) ceramics is still unclear, several essential properties have been reported, such as chemical composition, pore size and porosity, etc. In this study, calcium phosphate powder (Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}, CaP, group 1), biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic powder (BCP, group 2), and intact BCP rods (group 3) were implanted into leg muscles of mice and dorsal muscles of rabbits. One month and three months after implantation, samples were harvested for biological and histological analysis. New bone tissues were observed in 10/10 samples in group 1, 3/10 samples in group 2, and 9/10 samples in group 3 at 3rd month in mice, but not in rabbits. In vitro, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were cultured with trace CaP and BCP powder, and osteogenic differentiation was observed at day 7. Our results suggested that chemical composition is the prerequisite in osteoinduction, and pore structure would contribute to more bone formation. - Highlights: ► Intrinsic osteoinduction of calcium phosphate biomaterials was observed implanted in muscles of mice. ► Biomaterials powder also has osteoinduction property. ► Osteogenic genes and protein could be detected by RT-PCR and Western blot in implanted biomaterials. ► Osteogenic phenomenon could be observed by electron microscopy. ► The chemical composition is the prerequisite in osteoinduction, and pore structure would contribute to more bone formation.

  19. Sorption behavior of Zn(II) ions on synthetic apatitic calcium phosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebei, Haroun; Pham Minh, Doan; Nzihou, Ange; Sharrock, Patrick

    2015-12-01

    The synthesis, characterization and the reactivity of apatitic calcium phosphates (Ca-HA, chemical formula Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) is reported. Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) and potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate (KH2PO4) were selected as economical starting materials for the synthesis of Ca-HA under atmospheric conditions. Monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM), dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), and octacalcium phosphate pentahydrate (OCP) were identified as the main intermediates of the synthesis reaction. The product obtained after 48 h of reaction contains mainly low-crystalline Ca-HA and small amounts of other calcium phosphates such as octacalcium phosphate (OCP), B-type carbonate apatite (CAP), as well as unreacted calcium carbonate. This Ca-HA was found to be active for the removal of Zn2+ from an aqueous solution. Its sorption capacity reached up to 120 mg of Zn2+ per g of Ca-HA powder after 24 h of reaction. The monitoring of soluble Zn, Ca and P during the sorption experiment allowed characterizing the mechanism of Zn uptake. Dissolution-precipitation, ionic exchange and surface complexation are the three main mechanisms involved in the sorption processes. The contribution of these mechanisms is discussed in detail.

  20. Calcium Aluminate Cement Hydration Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matusinović, T.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium aluminate cement (AC is a very versatile special cement used for specific applications. As the hydration of AC is highly temperature dependent, yielding structurally different hydration products that continuously alter material properties, a good knowledge of thermal properties at early stages of hydration is essential. The kinetics of AC hydration is a complex process and the use of single mechanisms models cannot describe the rate of hydration during the whole stage.This paper examines the influence of temperature (ϑ=5–20 °C and water-to-cement mass ratio (mH /mAC = 0.4; 0.5 and 1.0 on hydration of commercial iron-rich AC ISTRA 40 (producer: Istra Cement, Pula, Croatia, which is a part of CALUCEM group, Figs 1–3. The flow rate of heat generation of cement pastes as a result of the hydration reactions was measured with differential microcalorimeter. Chemically bonded water in the hydrated cement samples was determined by thermo-gravimetry.Far less heat is liberated when cement and water come in contact for the first time, Fig. 1, than in the case for portland cement (PC. Higher water-to-cement ratio increases the heat evolved at later ages (Fig. 3 due to higher quantity of water available for hydration. A significant effect of the water-to-cement ratio on the hydration rate and hydration degree showed the importance of water as being the limiting reactant that slows down the reaction early. A simplified stoichiometric model of early age AC hydration (eq. (8 based on reaction schemes of principal minerals, nominally CA, C12A7 and C4AF (Table 1, was employed. Hydration kinetics after the induction period (ϑ < 20 °C had been successfully described (Fig. 4 and Table 2 by a proposed model (eq. (23 which simultaneously comprised three main mechanisms: nucleation and growth, interaction at phase boundary, and mass transfer. In the proposed kinetic model the nucleation and growth is proportional to the amount of reacted minerals (eq

  1. Biomimetic calcium phosphate coatings on recombinant spider silk fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Liang; Habibovic, Pamela; Van Blitterswijk, Clemens A [Department of Tissue Regeneration, University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Hedhammar, My; Johansson, Jan [Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Biochemistry, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, the Biomedical Centre, Box 575, 751 23 Uppsala (Sweden); Blom, Tobias; Leifer, Klaus [Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Box 534, S-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-08-01

    Calcium phosphate ceramic coatings, applied on surfaces of metallic and polymeric biomaterials, can improve their performance in bone repair and regeneration. Spider silk is biocompatible, strong and elastic, and hence an attractive biomaterial for applications in connective tissue repair. Recently, artificial spider silk, with mechanical and structural characteristics similar to those of native spider silk, has been produced from recombinant minispidroins. In the present study, supersaturated simulated body fluid was used to deposit calcium phosphate coatings on recombinant spider silk fibres. The mineralization process was followed in time using scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) detector and Raman spectroscope. Focused ion beam technology was used to produce a cross section of a coated fibre, which was further analysed by EDX. Preliminary in vitro experiments using a culture of bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) on coated fibres were also performed. This study showed that recombinant spider silk fibres were successfully coated with a homogeneous and thick crystalline calcium phosphate layer. In the course of the mineralization process from modified simulated body fluid, sodium chloride crystals were first deposited on the silk surface, followed by the deposition of a calcium phosphate layer. The coated silk fibres supported the attachment and growth of hMSCs.

  2. Biomimetic calcium phosphate coatings on recombinant spider silk fibres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Liang; Habibovic, Pamela; Van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Hedhammar, My; Johansson, Jan; Blom, Tobias; Leifer, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Calcium phosphate ceramic coatings, applied on surfaces of metallic and polymeric biomaterials, can improve their performance in bone repair and regeneration. Spider silk is biocompatible, strong and elastic, and hence an attractive biomaterial for applications in connective tissue repair. Recently, artificial spider silk, with mechanical and structural characteristics similar to those of native spider silk, has been produced from recombinant minispidroins. In the present study, supersaturated simulated body fluid was used to deposit calcium phosphate coatings on recombinant spider silk fibres. The mineralization process was followed in time using scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) detector and Raman spectroscope. Focused ion beam technology was used to produce a cross section of a coated fibre, which was further analysed by EDX. Preliminary in vitro experiments using a culture of bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) on coated fibres were also performed. This study showed that recombinant spider silk fibres were successfully coated with a homogeneous and thick crystalline calcium phosphate layer. In the course of the mineralization process from modified simulated body fluid, sodium chloride crystals were first deposited on the silk surface, followed by the deposition of a calcium phosphate layer. The coated silk fibres supported the attachment and growth of hMSCs.

  3. Calcium Overload Accelerates Phosphate-Induced Vascular Calcification Via Pit-1, but not the Calcium-Sensing Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masumoto, Asuka; Sonou, Tomohiro; Ohya, Masaki; Yashiro, Mitsuru; Nakashima, Yuri; Okuda, Kouji; Iwashita, Yuko; Mima, Toru; Negi, Shigeo; Shigematsu, Takashi

    2017-07-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is a risk factor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). CKD-mineral and bone metabolism disorder is an important problem in patients with renal failure. Abnormal levels of serum phosphate and calcium affect CKD-mineral and bone metabolism disorder and contribute to bone disease, VC, and cardiovascular disease. Hypercalcemia is a contributing factor in progression of VC in patients with CKD. However, the mechanisms of how calcium promotes intracellular calcification are still unclear. This study aimed to examine the mechanisms underlying calcium-induced calcification in a rat aortic tissue culture model. Aortic segments from 7-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were cultured in serum-supplemented medium for 10 days. We added high calcium (HiCa; calcium 3.0 mM) to high phosphate (HPi; phosphate 3.8 mM) medium to accelerate phosphate and calcium-induced VC. We used phosphonoformic acid and the calcimimetic R-568 to determine whether the mechanism of calcification involves Pit-1 or the calcium-sensing receptor. Medial VC was significantly augmented by HPi+HiCa medium compared with HPi alone (300%, p<0.05), and was associated with upregulation of Pit-1 protein. Pit-1 protein concentrations in HPi+HiCa medium were greater than those in HPi medium. Phosphonoformic acid completely negated the augmentation of medial VC induced by HPi+HiCa. R-568 had no additive direct effect on medial VC. These results indicated that exposure to HPi+HiCa accelerates medial VC, and this is mediated through Pit-1, not the calcium-sensing receptor.

  4. Comparative study on in vitro biocompatibility of synthetic octacalcium phosphate and calcium phosphate ceramics used clinically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Shinji; Anada, Takahisa; Honda, Yoshitomo; Suzuki, Osamu

    2012-08-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the extent to which calcium phosphate bone substitute materials, including osteoconductive octacalcium phosphate (OCP), display cytotoxic and inflammatory responses based on their dissolution in vitro. Hydroxyapatite (HA) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) ceramics, which are clinically used, as well as dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) and synthesized OCP were compared. The materials were well characterized by chemical analysis, x-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Calcium and phosphate ion concentrations and the pH of culture media after immersion of the materials were determined. The colony forming rate of Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts was estimated with extraction of the materials. Proliferation of bone marrow stromal ST-2 cells and inflammatory cytokine TNF-α production by THP-1 cells grown on the material-coated plates were examined. The materials had characteristics that corresponded to those reported. DCPD was shown to dissolve the most in the culture media, with a marked increase in phosphate ion concentration and a reduction in pH. ST-2 cells proliferated well on the materials, with the exception of DCPD, which markedly inhibited cellular growth. The colony forming capacity was the lowest on DCPD, while that of the other calcium phosphates was not altered. In contrast, TNF-α was not detected even in cells grown on DCPD, suggesting that calcium phosphate materials are essentially non-inflammatory, while the solubility of the materials can affect osteoblastic and fibroblastic cellular attachment. These results indicate that OCP is biocompatible, which is similar to the materials used clinically, such as HA. Therefore, OCP could be clinically used as a biocompatible bone substitute material.

  5. Hydration of Blended Portland Cements Containing Calcium-Aluminosilicate Glass Powder and Limestone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard, M; Poulsen, Søren Lundsted; Herfort, D

    2012-01-01

    M. MOESGAARD, S.L. POULSEN, D. HERFORT, M. STEENBERG, L.F. KIRKEGAARD, J. SKIBSTED, Y. YUE, Hydration of Blended Portland Cements Containing Calcium-Aluminosilicate Glass Powder and Limestone, Journal of the American Ceramic Society 95, 403 – 409 (2012).......M. MOESGAARD, S.L. POULSEN, D. HERFORT, M. STEENBERG, L.F. KIRKEGAARD, J. SKIBSTED, Y. YUE, Hydration of Blended Portland Cements Containing Calcium-Aluminosilicate Glass Powder and Limestone, Journal of the American Ceramic Society 95, 403 – 409 (2012)....

  6. BoneSource hydroxyapatite cement: a novel biomaterial for craniofacial skeletal tissue engineering and reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, C D; Costantino, P D; Takagi, S; Chow, L C

    1998-01-01

    BoneSource-hydroxyapatite cement is a new self-setting calcium phosphate cement biomaterial. Its unique and innovative physical chemistry coupled with enhanced biocompatibility make it useful for craniofacial skeletal reconstruction. The general properties and clinical use guidelines are reviewed. The biomaterial and surgical applications offer insight into improved outcomes and potential new uses for hydroxyapatite cement systems.

  7. [Reconstruction of maxillary sinus superior wall fractures with calcium phosphate cement/recombinant human bonemorphogenetic protein 7 compound implanted material in rabbit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qunhui; Yu, Feng; Zhang, Haoliang; Gong, Huicheng; Lin, Ying

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the osteogenetic character and repairing maxillary sinus superior wall fractures capability of calcium phosphate cement (CPC) before and after combined with recombinant human bone morphogenetie protein-7(rhBMP-7). A 10 mmX5 mm bone defect in the maxillary sinus superior wall was induced by surgery in all 24 New Zealand white rabbits. These 24 rabbits were randomly divided into two groups. The defects were repaired with CPC group (n = 12) and CPC/rhBMP-7 group (n = 12). The osteogenesis of bone defect was monitored by gro'ss observation, histological examination, observation under scanning electron microscope and measurement of ALP activity at 6 and 12 weeks after the implantation. In group CPC,new bone was found to form slowly and little by little. In group CPC/rhBMP-7, however, new bone was observed to form early and massively. The ALP activity in group CPC showed significant statistical difference with that of group CPC/rhBMP-7 (P < 0.05). The CPC/rhBMP-7 composite has osteoconductibility and osteoinductibility, comparing the use of CPC/rhBMP-7 with CPC for the repair of orbital fracture, the former show obvious advantage repairing ability in maxillary sinus superior wall defect.

  8. A randomised study to compare salivary pH, calcium, phosphate and calculus formation after using anticavity dentifrices containing Recaldent(®) and functionalized tri-calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ena; Vishwanathamurthy, Ramesh Alampalli; Nadella, Manjari; Savitha, A N; Gundannavar, Gayatri; Hussain, M Ahad

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the pH of saliva, concentration of calcium and inorganic phosphate, and calculus formation before and after usage of Recaldent(®) (GC Tooth Mousse Plus™), Functionalized Tricalcium Phosphate (3M ESPE ClinPro™ Tooth Crème) and standard dentifrice (Colgate dental cream). Randomized double-blind study. A total of 50 subjects were recruited, the subjects were assessed at their first visit, on the 21(st) day and on the 42(nd) day. At the first visit, scaling was carried out and oral hygiene instructions were given. After 21 days, the subjects were given coded dentifrices where the operator and the subjects both were unaware of the type of dentifrice. Clinical parameters assessed were Plaque index, Gingival index, and Calculus index. Salivary samples were obtained to measure calcium, phosphate levels, and pH at 21(st) day and 42(nd) day. ANOVA test, t-test, Mann-Whitney test, Kruskal-Wallis test. The mean salivary calcium level and mean salivary phosphate level were higher in Group III (functionalized tricalcium phosphate (3M ESPE ClinPro™ Tooth Creme) as compared to Group II (Recaldent(®) GC Tooth Mousse Plus™) and Group I (Colgate dental cream) on the 42(nd) day after using dentifrices, which was statistically significant. This showed that the usage of remineralizing dentifrices led to an increase in the salivary calcium, phosphate, and pH but it did not reach the level of super saturation of the ions caused by elevated pH which could lead to calculus formation. Thought here was a statistically significant increase in salivary calcium and phosphate level in all three groups from baseline to 42(nd) day, there was no calculus formation.

  9. Hybrid calcium phosphate coatings for implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malchikhina, Alena I.; Shesterikov, Evgeny V.; Bolbasov, Evgeny N.; Ignatov, Viktor P.; Tverdokhlebov, Sergei I.

    2016-08-01

    Monophasic biomaterials cannot provide all the necessary functions of bones or other calcined tissues. It is necessary to create for cancer patients the multiphase materials with the structure and composition simulating the natural bone. Such materials are classified as hybrid, obtained by a combination of chemically different components. The paper presents the physical, chemical and biological studies of coatings produced by hybrid technologies (HT), which combine primer layer and calcium phosphate (CaP) coating. The first HT type combines the method of vacuum arc titanium primer layer deposition on a stainless steel substrate with the following micro-arc oxidation (MAO) in phosphoric acid solution with addition of calcium compounds to achieve high supersaturated state. MAO CaP coatings feature high porosity (2-8%, pore size 5-7 µm) and surface morphology with the thickness greater than 5 µm. The thickness of Ti primer layer is 5-40 µm. Amorphous MAO CaP coating micro-hardness was measured at maximum normal load Fmax = 300 mN. It was 3.1 ± 0.8 GPa, surface layer elasticity modulus E = 110 ± 20 GPa, roughness Ra = 0.9 ± 0.1 µm, Rz = 7.5 ± 0.2 µm, which is less than the titanium primer layer roughness. Hybrid MAO CaP coating is biocompatible, able to form calcium phosphates from supersaturated body fluid (SBF) solution and also stimulates osteoinduction processes. The second HT type includes the oxide layer formation by thermal oxidation and then CaP target radio frequency magnetron sputtering (RFMS). Oxide-RFMS CaP coating is a thin dense coating with good adhesion to the substrate material, which can be used for metal implants. The RFMS CaP coating has thickness 1.6 ± 0.1 µm and consists of main target elements calcium and phosphorus and Ca/P ratio 2.4. The second HT type can form calcium phosphates from SBF solution. In vivo study shows that hybrid RFMS CaP coating is biocompatible and produces fibrointegration processes.

  10. Effects of Montmorillonite on the Mineralization and Cementing Properties of Microbiologically Induced Calcium Carbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbonate mineralization microbe is a microorganism capable of decomposing the substrate in the metabolic process to produce the carbonate, which then forms calcium carbonate with calcium ions. By taking advantage of this process, contaminative uranium tailings can transform to solid cement, where calcium carbonate plays the role of a binder. In this paper, we have studied the morphology of mineralized crystals by controlling the mineralization time and adding different concentrations of montmorillonite (MMT. At the same time, we also studied the effect of carbonate mineralized cementation uranium tailings by controlling the amount of MMT. The results showed that MMT can regulate the crystal morphology of calcium carbonate. What is more, MMT can balance the acidity and ions in the uranium tailings; it also can reduce the toxicity of uranium ions on microorganisms. In addition, MMT filling in the gap between the uranium tailings made the cement body more stable. When the amount of MMT is 6%, the maximum strength of the cement body reached 2.18 MPa, which increased by 47.66% compared with that the sample without MMT. Therefore, it is reasonable and feasible to use the MMT to regulate the biocalcium carbonate cemented uranium tailings.

  11. Mechanism of calcium phosphates precipitation in liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prelot, B.; Zemb, T.

    2004-04-01

    The possibility of using as a precursor an easily wet meso-porous powder would be a breakthrough in the preparation of nuclear waste storage ceramics. A concentrated solution containing ions to be stored would wet a dry powder and then, subjected to mild compression, lead to a micro-crystalline matrix of calcium phosphate at acceptable temperatures. Since no porous calcium phosphate different from calcined bone (patented) is described as porous precursor, we have compared the different synthesis routes towards meso-porous ceramics. First, we considered homogeneous precipitation of slats in water: using initially off-stoichiometry in reaction, micron-sized hydroxyapatite particles are produced with a specific surface up to 100 m 2 /g. Then, we consider the classical route of precipitation of an hybrid material in the miscibility gap of a phase diagram, when an hexagonal liquid crystal is used a matrix for precipitation. The surfactant family consists in single chain surfactants containing phosphates as head-group to poison the growing surface of calcium phosphate nano-domains. Since the reaction is still too brutal, we considered using a cat-anionic precursor material of controllable surface charge. For certain concentrations and molar ratios, a new structure not yet described in surfactant precipitation literature is observed: since the periodicity is lower than twice the chain length, a disordered constant curvature monolayer (instead of the classical cylinder of twice chain length diameter) of surfactant is implied. Finally, we have investigated synthesis routes implying slow dissolution of pre-formed calcium phosphate in an already existing hexagonal matrix. For all these routes of synthesis, micro-structural determinations using SAXS, WARS and BET are performed, with a special attention to comparison of the precipitation material, the matrix obtained with all elements present, and also the material obtained after calcinations. (authors)

  12. Immobilization and leaching mechanisms of radwaste in cement-based matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.P.; Rahman, A.A.; Crawford, R.W.; McCullough, C.E.; Angus, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of potential sorbers including silicas, titania, calcined kaolin, zirconium phosphate and two crystalline calcium silicates, tobermorite and xonotlite, have been used to improve the Cs-retention capacity of cement-based systems. The analysis of the pore fluid compositions of equilibrated cement-radwaste composites provides evidence concerning the leach mechanisms whereby Cs is removed. The reactions occurring between cement and clinoptilolite are elucidated and results of kinetic studies presented. Simulate Magnox waste is shown to react with cement, leading to a carbonate exchange. (author)

  13. Extrusion-based, three-dimensional printing of calcium-phosphate scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witek, Lukasz

    Small or large bone defects, can occur due to a variety of reasons: congenital disorders, infections, tumors, or traumas which can lead to significant disabilities. There is an assortment of bone grafting procedures, each having their own respective advantages and disadvantages and exhibiting certain essential characteristics. Among the available grafts, autogenous (autograft), allograft, xenograft, and alloplasts, all exhibit a minimum of two-thirds of the essential characteristics and have been proven useful in fully or partially repairing skeletal defects. However, different host-to-grafting material responses have been reported and should be taken into consideration when determining treatment options. A large range of physical and chemical properties can be achieved with calcium phosphate based materials, which possess two of the ideal characteristics for grafting procedures: osteoconduction and osseointegration. Calcium phosphate based scaffolds composed of hydroxyapatite (HA), beta-tri-calcium phosphate (beta-TCP), or a combination of both (HA/beta-TCP) were investigated as materials for three-dimensional printing process to create layer-by-layer structures for use as bone regeneration scaffolds. Different calcium-phosphate phases will result in different degrees of in vivo dissolution and/or cell-mediated resorption. There has been a growing interest in BCP because it has been shown that this material improves the formation of new bone inside the implanted scaffold. The literature indicates that the faster dissolution rate of ?-TCP would be greatly responsible of this enhancement. However, in vitro tests indicate that fast dissolution can decrease the mechanical strength of BCP scaffolds. Furthermore, studies reported that HA has higher mechanical strength and lower degradation rate than beta-TCP. Therefore, the HA/beta-TCP ratio is a key parameter controlling the performance of the scaffold for bone repair applications, since it determines degradation rate

  14. In vitro bioactivity of a tricalcium silicate cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morejon-Alonso, L.; Bareiro, O.; Santos, L.A. dos, E-mail: loreley.morejon@ufrgs.b [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRG), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Dep. de Materiais; Carrodeguas R, Garcia [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Ceramica y Vidrio. Dept. de Ceramica

    2009-07-01

    Tricalcium silicate is the major constituent of Portland cement and the responsible for their mechanical strength at early stages. In order to be used as and additive of conventional calcium phosphate cement (CPC), in vitro bioactivity of a calcium silicate cement (CSC) after soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 14 days was study. The cement was obtained by mixing Ca{sub 3}SiO{sub 5}, obtained by sol-gel process, and a Na{sub 2}HPO{sub 4} solution. The morphological and structural changes of the material before and after soaking were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed the formation of a layer of a Hydroxyapatite (HA) onto the CSC cement after soaking for 1h in SBF that became denser with the increase of soaking time. The study suggests that Ca{sub 3}SiO{sub 5} would be an effective additive to improve the bioactivity and long term strength of conventional CPC. (author)

  15. Immobilization of calcium and phosphate ions improves the osteoconductivity of titanium implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunarso; Toita, Riki; Tsuru, Kanji; Ishikawa, Kunio

    2016-01-01

    In this work, to elevate weak osteoconductivity of titanium (Ti) implant, we prepared a Ti implant having both calcium and phosphate ions on its surface. To modify calcium and phosphate ions onto Ti, phosphate ions were first immobilized by treating the Ti with a NaH 2 PO 4 solution, followed by CaCl 2 treatment to immobilize calcium ions, which created the calcium and phosphate ions-modified Ti (Ca-P-Ti). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thin-layer X-ray diffraction measurement confirmed that both phosphate and calcium ions were co-immobilized onto the Ti surface on the molecular level. Three-hour after seeding MC3T3-E1 murine pre-osteoblast cells on substrates, cell number on Ca-P-Ti was much larger than that of Ti and phosphate-modified Ti (P-Ti), but was similar to that of calcium-modified Ti (Ca-Ti). Also, MC3T3-E1 cells on Ca-P-Ti expressed larger amount of vinculin, a focal adhesion protein, than those on other substrates, probably resulting in larger cell size as well as greater cell proliferation on Ca-P-Ti than those on other substrates. Alkaline phosphatase activity of cells on Ca-P-Ti was greater than those on Ti and P-Ti, but was almost comparable to that of Ca-Ti. Moreover, the largest amount of bone-like nodule formation was observed on Ca-P-Ti. These results provide evidence that calcium and phosphate ions-co-immobilization onto Ti increased the osteoconductivity of Ti by stimulating the responses of pre-osteoblast cells. This simple modification would be promising technique for bone tissue implant including dental and orthopedic implants. - Highlights: • Phosphate and calcium ions have been successfully co-immobilize on Ti surface. • Co-immobilization of Ca and phosphate ions (Ca-P-Ti) did not alter the original surface morphology. • Ca-P-Ti significantly improved initial MC3T3-E1 cell adhesion. • Ca-P-Ti demonstrated remarkable cell proliferation, differentiation and mineralization. • Overall, Ca-P-Ti would be a promising bone

  16. Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Reduces Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Development on Glass Ionomer Cement and Disrupts Established Biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart G Dashper

    Full Text Available Glass ionomer cements (GIC are dental restorative materials that are suitable for modification to help prevent dental plaque (biofilm formation. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of incorporating casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP into a GIC on the colonisation and establishment of Streptococcus mutans biofilms and the effects of aqueous CPP-ACP on established S mutans biofilms. S. mutans biofilms were either established in flow cells before a single ten min exposure to 1% w/v CPP-ACP treatment or cultured in static wells or flow cells with either GIC or GIC containing 3% w/w CPP-ACP as the substratum. The biofilms were then visualised using confocal laser scanning microscopy after BacLight LIVE/DEAD staining. A significant decrease in biovolume and average thickness of S. mutans biofilms was observed in both static and flow cell assays when 3% CPP-ACP was incorporated into the GIC substratum. A single ten min treatment with aqueous 1% CPP-ACP resulted in a 58% decrease in biofilm biomass and thickness of established S. mutans biofilms grown in a flow cell. The treatment also significantly altered the structure of these biofilms compared with controls. The incorporation of 3% CPP-ACP into GIC significantly reduced S. mutans biofilm development indicating another potential anticariogenic mechanism of this material. Additionally aqueous CPP-ACP disrupted established S. mutans biofilms. The use of CPP-ACP containing GIC combined with regular CPP-ACP treatment may lower S. mutans challenge.

  17. CALCIUM ORTHOPHOSPHATES HYDRATES: FORMATION, STABILITY AND INFLUENCE ON STANDARD PROPERTIES OF PORTLAND CEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaziliunas A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Preparation of phosphogypsum to produce the binders requires a much higher input than preparation of natural gypsum stone. This makes it uncompetitive material. The investigations presented therein are meant to reduce this input by looking for the ways of rendering impurities harmless. Soluble acid orthophosphates are the main harmful impurity of phosphogypsum. The studies show that dry insoluble calcium orthophosphates hydrates (1.09 % and 2.18 % P2O5 in gypsum have little effect on W/C, setting times and soundness of Portland cement pastes. Insoluble calcium orthophosphates hydrates {CaHPO4∙2H2O, Ca8(HPO42(PO44∙5H2O and Ca9(HPO4(PO45(OH∙4H2O} formed in acidic medium (pH = 4.2 - 5.9 have been destroyed in alkaline medium and reduce standard compressive strength of cement up to 28 %. Calcium orthophosphates hydrates of hydroxyapatite group are stable in alcaline medium, while in dry state they reduce the standard compressive strength of cement until 10 %, but their suspensions prolong setting times of Portland cement as soluble orthophosphates – 2 - 3 times. Alkalis in cement increase pH of paste, but do not change the process of formation of calcium orthophosphates hydrates of hydroxyapatite group: it takes place through an intermediate phase - CaHPO4·2H2O, whose transformation into apatite lasts for 2 - 3 months.

  18. Influence of calcium on ceramide-1-phosphate monolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana S. L. Oliveira

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P plays an important role in several biological processes, being identified as a key regulator of many protein functions. For instance, it acts as a mediator of inflammatory responses. The mediation of the inflammation process happens due to the interaction of C1P with the C2 domain of cPLA2α, an effector protein that needs the presence of submicromolar concentrations of calcium ions. The aim of this study was to determine the phase behaviour and structural properties of C1P in the presence and absence of millimolar quantities of calcium in a well-defined pH environment. For that purpose, we used monomolecular films of C1P at the soft air/liquid interface with calcium ions in the subphase. The pH was varied to change the protonation degree of the C1P head group. We used surface pressure versus molecular area isotherms coupled with other monolayer techniques as Brewster angle microscopy (BAM, infrared reflection–absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD. The isotherms indicate that C1P monolayers are in a condensed state in the presence of calcium ions, regardless of the pH. At higher pH without calcium ions, the monolayer is in a liquid-expanded state due to repulsion between the negatively charged phosphate groups of the C1P molecules. When divalent calcium ions are added, they are able to bridge the highly charged phosphate groups, enhancing the regular arrangement of the head groups. Similar solidification of the monolayer structure can be seen in the presence of a 150 times larger concentration of monovalent sodium ions. Therefore, calcium ions have clearly a strong affinity for the phosphomonoester of C1P.

  19. Effects of Leaching Behavior of Calcium Ions on Compression and Durability of Cement-Based Materials with Mineral Admixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, An; Chao, Sao-Jeng; Lin, Wei-Ting

    2013-01-01

    Leaching of calcium ions increases the porosity of cement-based materials, consequently resulting in a negative effect on durability since it provides an entry for aggressive harmful ions, causing reinforcing steel corrosion. This study investigates the effects of leaching behavior of calcium ions on the compression and durability of cement-based materials. Since the parameters influencing the leaching behavior of cement-based materials are unclear and diverse, this paper focuses on the influence of added mineral admixtures (fly ash, slag and silica fume) on the leaching behavior of calcium ions regarding compression and durability of cemented-based materials. Ammonium nitrate solution was used to accelerate the leaching process in this study. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis were employed to analyze and compare the cement-based material compositions prior to and after calcium ion leaching. The experimental results show that the mineral admixtures reduce calcium hydroxide quantity and refine pore structure through pozzolanic reaction, thus enhancing the compressive strength and durability of cement-based materials. PMID:28809247

  20. Fabrication of Phosphate Cement with High Integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jae Hwan; Lee, Chang Hwa; Heo, Cheol Min; Jeon, Min Ku; Kang, Kweon Ho

    2011-01-01

    As the development of industrial society has accelerated, hazardous wastes are generated as well. According to the 1986 statistics of U.S.A, each person made 40 tons of waste in America that year. Treatment of radioactive waste is one of the most important and serious problems related to waste treatments, because its radioactivity and decaying heat have harmful effects to human and environment for a long time. Nuclear developed countries have used conventional method of treatment such as vitrification or cementation in order to stabilize and solidify radioactive waste. Although the former guarantees the formation of high leaching resistant and durable waste form, it requires several hundred (or even more than one thousand) temperature to melt glass frit. This process generates secondary waste volatilized, as well as being non-economical. Cement technology played a role of immobilizing low and middle class wastes. It has advantages of low temperature setting, low cost, easy process, etc. The alkalinity of ordinary cement, however, constrains the utility of cement to the solidification of alkaline waste. In addition, leachability and mechanical strength of cements are not quite appropriate for the stabilization of high level waste. In this regard, chemically bonded phosphate cement(CBPC), which sets by an acid-base reaction, is a potentially expectable material for immobilization of radioactive waste. CBPC not only sets at room temperature, but also encapsulates various isotopes chemically. The performance of CBPC can be enhanced by the addition of fly ash, sand, wollastonite, etc. This study aims at fabricating the CBPC containing fly ash with high integrity. Morphology, microstructure, and compressive strength are evaluated using SEM, and digital compressing machine

  1. Surface physical chemistry properties in coated bacterial cellulose membranes with calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Olyveira, Gabriel Molina; Basmaji, Pierre; Costa, Ligia Maria Manzine; Dos Santos, Márcio Luiz; Dos Santos Riccardi, Carla; Guastaldi, Fernando Pozzi Semeghini; Scarel-Caminaga, Raquel Mantuaneli; de Oliveira Capote, Ticiana Sidorenko; Pizoni, Elisabeth; Guastaldi, Antônio Carlos

    2017-06-01

    Bacterial cellulose has become established as a new biomaterial, and it can be used for medical applications. In addition, it has called attention due to the increasing interest in tissue engineering materials for wound care. In this work, the bacterial cellulose fermentation process was modified by the addition of chondroitin sulfate to the culture medium before the inoculation of the bacteria. The biomimetic process with heterogeneous calcium phosphate precipitation of biological interest was studied for the guided regeneration purposes on bacterial cellulose. FTIR results showed the incorporation of the chondroitin sulfate in the bacterial cellulose, SEM images confirmed the deposition of the calcium phosphate on the bacterial cellulose surface, XPS analysis showed a selective chemical group influences which change calcium phosphate deposition, besides, the calcium phosphate phase with different Ca/P ratios on bacterial cellulose surface influences wettability. XTT results concluded that these materials did not affect significantly in the cell viability, being non-cytotoxic. Thus, it was produced one biomaterial with the surface charge changes for calcium phosphate deposition, besides different wettability which builds new membranes for Guided Tissue Regeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Halting of the calcium aluminate cement hydration process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luz, A.P.; Borba, N.Z; Pandolfelli, V.C.

    2011-01-01

    The calcium aluminate cement reactions with water lead to the anhydrous phases dissolution resulting a saturated solution, followed by nucleation and crystal growth of the hydrate compounds. This is a dynamic process, therefore, it is necessary to use suitable methods to halt the hydration in order to study the phase transformations kinetics of such materials. In this work two methods are evaluated: use of acetone and microwave drying, aiming to withdraw the free water and inhibit further reactions. X ray diffraction and thermogravimetric tests were used to quantify the phases generated in the cement samples which were kept at 37 deg C for 1 to 15 days. The advantages and disadvantages of those procedures are presented and discussed. The use of microwave to halt the hydration process seems to be effective to withdraw the cement free water, and it can further be used in researches of the refractory castables area, endodontic cements, etc. (author)

  3. Injection laryngoplasty using BIOPEX calcium phosphate cement. The Sanokousei General Hospital experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okubo, Keisuke; Shinnabe, Akihiro; Saito, Koichiro; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2008-01-01

    The calcium phosphate bone paste BIOPEX is an injectable material developed as a bone replacement that hardens into a hydroxylapatite block after injection. BIOPEX offers many advantages as a material for injection laryngoplasty: it induces little foreign-material reaction, is minimally absorbed, and is easy to prepare in the OR. Between 2004 and 2007, 14 patients, including 13 with vocal fold paralysis and 1 with severe atrophy of the vocal folds, were treated with BIOPEX-injection laryngoplasty at Sanokousei General Hospital. The injection of BIOPEX is usually performed through a direct laryngoscopy under general anesthesia, and no adverse effects were observed in any of the cases. A postoperative three-dimensional CT revealed successful injection of the BIOPEX into the paraglottic space in all cases. BIOPEX is minimally absorbed over long time periods, and this procedure results in a dramatic improvement of glottic function immediately after surgery. We consider this operative technique, which aims at medialization of the vocal fold by injection of a sclerotic agent into the lateral side of the vocal fold, as 'type I thyroplasty from inside the laryngeal framework.' (author)

  4. The increasing of enamel calcium level after casein phosphopeptideamorphous calcium phosphate covering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widyasri Prananingrum

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Caries process is characterized by the presence of demineralization. Demineralization is caused by organic acids as a result of carbohydrate substrate fermentation. Remineralization is a natural repair process for non-cavitated lesions. Remineralization occurs if there are Ca2+ and PO43- ions in sufficient quantities. Casein-amorphous calcium phosphate phosphopeptide (CPP-ACP is a paste material containing milk protein (casein, that actually contains minerals, such as calcium and phosphate. The casein ability to stabilize calcium phosphate and enhance mineral solubility and bioavailability confers upon CPP potential to be biological delivery vehicles for calcium and phosphate. Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the calcium levels in tooth enamel after being covered with CPP-ACP 2 times a day for 3, 14 and 28 days. Methods: Sample were bovine incisors of 3 year old cows divided into 4 groups, namely group I as control group, group II, III and IV as treatment groups covered with CPP-ACP 2 times a day. All of those teeth were then immersed in artificial saliva. Group II was immersed for 3 days, while group III was immersed for 14 days, and group IV was immersed for 28 days. One drop of CPP-ACP was used to cover the entire labial surface of teeth. The measurement of the calcium levels was then conducted by using titration method. All data were analyzed by One- Way ANOVA test with 5% degree of confidence. Results: The results showed significant difference of the calcium levels in tooth enamel of those groups after covered with CPP-ACP 2 times a day for 3, 14 and 28 days (p = 0.001. There is also significant difference of the calcium levels in tooth enamel of those treatment groups and the control group (p = 0.001. Conclusion: The calcium levels of tooth enamel are increased after covered with CPP-ACP 2 times a day for 3, 14 and 28 days.Latar belakang: Proses terjadinya karies gigi ditandai oleh adanya demineralisasi

  5. Calcium phosphate saturation in the western Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.; Reddy, C.V.G.

    Temperature, inorganic phosphate concentration and pH seem to be the major factors influencing the degree of saturation of calcium phosphate in sea water. Two water regions can be demarcated in the study area based on the saturation patterns...

  6. Synthesis of calcium phosphate hydrogel from waste incineration fly ash and bone powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Kunihiro; Arimitsu, Naoki; Kidoguchi, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Hideto

    2009-01-01

    Waste incineration fly ash and bone powder could be successfully recycled into calcium phosphate hydrogel, a type of fast proton conductor. Various properties of the intermediate and calcium phosphate hydrogel from them were characterized and compared with that from calcium carbonate reagent. It was found that the intermediate from the incineration fly ash and calcium phosphate glass was more brittle than that from bone powder and calcium carbonate reagent. The electric conductivity of crystallized hydrogel obtained from all raw materials increases exponentially with temperature. However, the crystallized hydrogel from incineration fly ash has lower electric conductivity and lower crystallinity than that from bone powder and the reagent. Moreover, the difference in electric conductivity between these crystallized hydrogels decreases with temperature. Compared with using the reagent as a raw material, bone powder provides a 25% reduction in the usage of H 3 PO 4 to acquire the crystallized hydrogel which has the highest conductivity. These experimental results suggest that the incineration fly ash and bone powder are useful calcium sources for the synthesis of calcium phosphate hydrogel

  7. Biomimetic fabrication of antibacterial calcium phosphates mediated by polydopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Lucia; Torricelli, Paola; Bonvicini, Francesca; Boanini, Elisa; Gentilomi, Giovanna Angela; Lusvardi, Gigliola; Della Bella, Elena; Fini, Milena; Vecchio Nepita, Edoardo; Bigi, Adriana

    2018-01-01

    In this work we developed new antibacterial composite materials using polydopamine (PDA) to trigger the deposition of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) onto calcium phosphates, namely octacalcium phosphate (OCP) and α-tricalcium phosphate (αTCP). Functionalization of OCP and αTCP with a self-polymerized polydopamine layer was obtained by soaking the calcium phosphates in dopamine solution. The PDA surface of functionalized calcium phosphates (OCPd and αTCPd) promoted the deposition of AgNPs by reducing silver ions when soaked in a silver nitrate solution. The amount of deposited AgNPs can be modulated by varying the concentration of silver nitrate solution and the type of substrate. The results of in vitro tests carried out with osteoblast-like MG63 cells indicate that the combination of AgNPs with OCP provides more biocompatible materials than those obtained using αTCP as substrate. In particular, the study of osteoblast activity and differentiation was focused on the samples OCPdAg5 (silver content=8.2wt%) and αTCPdAg5 (silver content=4.7wt%), which did not show any cytotoxicity, and compared with those obtained on pure OCP and αTCP. The results demonstrate that the AgNPs loaded materials support osteoblast viability and differentiation, whereas they significantly inhibit the growth of relevant antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of calcium silicate-based cements on an osteoblast lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lívia GOMES-CORNÉLIO

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several calcium silicate-based biomaterials have been developed in recent years, in addition to Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and apoptosis/necrosis in human osteoblast cells (SAOS-2 of pure calcium silicate-based cements (CSC and modified formulations: modified calcium silicate-based cements (CSCM and three resin-based calcium silicate cements (CSCR1 (CSCR 2 (CSCR3. The following tests were performed after 24 hours of cement extract exposure: methyl-thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT, apoptosis/necrosis assay and comet assay. The negative control (CT- was performed with untreated cells, and the positive control (CT+ used hydrogen peroxide. The data for MTT and apoptosis were submitted to analysis of variance and Bonferroni’s posttest (p < 0.05, and the data for the comet assay analysis, to the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests (p < 0.05. The MTT test showed no significant difference among the materials in 2 mg/mL and 10 mg/mL concentrations. CSCR3 showed lower cell viability at 10 mg/mL. Only CSC showed lower cell viability at 50 mg/mL. CSCR1, CSCR2 and CSCR3 showed a higher percentage of initial apoptosis than the control in the apoptosis test, after 24 hours exposure. The same cements showed no genotoxicity in the concentration of 2 mg/mL, with the comet assay. CSC and CSCR2 were also not genotoxic at 10 mg/mL. All experimental materials showed viability with MTT. CSC and CSCR2 presented a better response to apoptosis and genotoxicity evaluation in the 10 mg/mL concentration, and demonstrated a considerable potential for use as reparative materials.

  9. The effect of organic ligands on the crystallinity of calcium phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Houwen, Jacqueline A. M.; Cressey, Gordon; Cressey, Barbara A.; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia

    2003-03-01

    Calcium phosphate phases precipitated under critical supersaturation were identified and studied in detail using X-ray powder diffraction, electron probe microanalysis, infrared spectroscopy (IR) and transmission electron microscopy. These synthetic calcium phosphates formed by spontaneous precipitation at pH 7, 25°C and 0.1 M ionic strength (NaCl as the background electrolyte). The combination of several methods allowed detailed characterisation of the calcium phosphates. The purpose of the work was to assess the influence of carboxylate ligands, specifically acetate and citrate, on the quality of the calcium phosphate precipitate. All precipitates were identified as non-stoichiometric, calcium-deficient hydroxylapatites (HAPs), containing carbonate, HPO 42-, sodium and chloride impurities. No other phases were found to be present in any of the precipitates. The presence of citrate resulted in a decrease in crystal size and a higher degree of apatite lattice imperfection in the precipitated HAP. Furthermore, IR spectroscopy showed a higher amount of carbonate present in that HAP, compared with the ones formed in the control and acetate experiments. An additional absorption band, in the infrared spectrum of the HAP formed in the presence of citrate, was observed at 1570 cm -1; this is interpreted as carboxyl groups bound to HAP.

  10. Improvement of in vitro physicochemical properties and osteogenic activity of calcium sulfate cement for bone repair by dicalcium silicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chun-Cheng; Wang, Chien-Wen; Hsueh, Nai-Shuo; Ding, Shinn-Jyh

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Dicalcium silicate can improve osteogenic activity of calcium sulfate cement. • The higher the calcium sulfate content, the shorter the setting time in the composite cement. • The results were useful for designing calcium-based cement with optimal properties. -- Abstract: An ideal bone graft substitute should have the same speed of degradation as formation of new bone tissue. To improve the properties of calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) featured for its rapid resorption, a low degradation material of dicalcium silicate (DCS) was added to the CSH cement. This study examined the effect of DCS (20, 40, 60 and 80 wt%) on the in vitro physicochemical properties and osteogenic activities of the calcium-based composite cements. The diametral tensile strength, porosity and weight loss of the composite cements were evaluated before and after soaking in a simulated body fluid (SBF). The osteogenic activities, such as proliferation, differentiation and mineralization, of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) seeded on cement surfaces were also examined. As a result, the greater the DCS amount, the higher the setting time was in the cement. Before soaking in SBF, the diametral tensile strength of the composite cements was decreased due to the introduction of DCS. On 180-day soaking, the composite cements containing 20, 40, 60 and 80 wt% DCS lost 80%, 69%, 61% and 44% in strength, respectively. Regarding in vitro bioactivity, the DCS-rich cements were covered with clusters of apatite spherulites after soaking for 7 days, while there was no formation of apatite spherulites on the CSH-rich cement surfaces. The presence of DCS could reduce the degradation of the CSH cements, as evidenced in the results of weight loss and porosity. More importantly, DCS may promote effectively the cell proliferation, proliferation and mineralization. The combination of osteogenesis of DCS and degradation of CSH made the calcium-based composite cements an attractive choice for

  11. Preparation and Characterization of Injectable Brushite Filled-Poly (Methyl Methacrylate Bone Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas C. Rodriguez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Powder-liquid poly (methyl methacrylate (PMMA bone cements are widely utilized for augmentation of bone fractures and fixation of orthopedic implants. These cements typically have an abundance of beneficial qualities, however their lack of bioactivity allows for continued development. To enhance osseointegration and bioactivity, calcium phosphate cements prepared with hydroxyapatite, brushite or tricalcium phosphates have been introduced with rather unsuccessful results due to increased cement viscosity, poor handling and reduced mechanical performance. This has limited the use of such cements in applications requiring delivery through small cannulas and in load bearing. The goal of this study is to design an alternative cement system that can better accommodate calcium-phosphate additives while preserving cement rheological properties and performance. In the present work, a number of brushite-filled two-solution bone cements were prepared and characterized by studying their complex viscosity-versus-test frequency, extrusion stress, clumping tendency during injection through a syringe, extent of fill of a machined void in cortical bone analog specimens, and compressive strength. The addition of brushite into the two-solution cement formulations investigated did not affect the pseudoplastic behavior and handling properties of the materials as demonstrated by rheological experiments. Extrusion stress was observed to vary with brushite concentration with values lower or in the range of control PMMA-based cements. The materials were observed to completely fill pre-formed voids in bone analog specimens. Cement compressive strength was observed to decrease with increasing concentration of fillers; however, the materials exhibited high enough strength for consideration in load bearing applications. The results indicated that partially substituting the PMMA phase of the two-solution cement with brushite at a 40% by mass concentration provided the best

  12. Chemistry Misconceptions Associated with Understanding Calcium and Phosphate Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Successful learning of many aspects in physiology depends on a meaningful understanding of fundamental chemistry concepts. Two conceptual diagnostic questions measured student understanding of the chemical equilibrium underlying calcium and phosphate homeostasis. One question assessed the ability to predict the change in phosphate concentration…

  13. Study of belite calcium sulfo-aluminate cement potential for zinc conditioning: From hydration to durability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, St.

    2009-12-01

    Calcium silicate cements are widely used for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste conditioning. However, wastes produced by nuclear activities are very diverse and some of their components may chemically react with cement phases. For instance, ashes resulting from the incineration of technological wastes including neoprene and polyvinylchloride may contain substantial amounts of soluble zinc chloride. This compound is known to strongly delay or inhibit Portland cement setting. One approach to limit adverse cement-waste interactions is to select a binder showing a better compatibility with the waste while keeping cement matrix advantages (low cost, simple process, hydration with water provided by the waste...). This work thus investigates the potential of calcium sulfo-aluminate cement for zinc Zn(II) immobilization. Four aspects were considered: hydration (kinetics and products formed), properties of hydrated binders, mechanisms of zinc retention and durability of the cement pastes (based on leaching experiments and modelling). The influence of three main parameters was assessed: the gypsum content of the cement, the concentration of ZnCl 2 and the thermal evolution at early age. It follows that materials based on a calcium sulfo-aluminate cement containing 20% gypsum are interesting candidates for zinc Zn(II) stabilization/solidification: there is no delay in hydration, mineralogy of the hydrated phases is slightly dependent on thermal history, mechanical strength is high, dimensional changes are limited and zinc Zn(II) is well immobilized, even if the cement paste is leached by pure water during a long period (90 d). (author)

  14. Biomimetic fabrication of calcium phosphate/chitosan nanohybrid composite in modified simulated body fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. H. Park

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, nucleation and growth of bone-like hydroxyapatite (HAp mineral in modified simulated body fluids (m-SBF were induced on chitosan (CS substrates, which were prepared by spin coating of chitosan on Ti substrate. The m-SBF showed a two fold increase in the concentrations of calcium and phosphate ions compared to SBF, and the post-NaOH treatment provided stabilization of the coatings. The calcium phosphate/chitosan composite prepared in m-SBF showed homogeneous distribution of approximately 350 nm-sized spherical clusters composed of octacalcium phosphate (OCP; Ca8H2(PO46·5H2O crystalline structure. Chitosan provided a control over the size of calcium phosphate prepared by immersion in m-SBF, and post-NaOH treatment supported the binding of calcium phosphate compound on the Ti surface. Post-NaOH treatment increased hydrophilicity and crystallinity of carbonate apatite, which increased its potential for biomedical application.

  15. Comparison of three calcium phosphate bone graft substitutes from biomechanical, histological, and crystallographic perspectives using a rat posterolateral lumbar fusion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Ming-Hsien [Department of Biomedical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Department of Orthopedics, Show-Chwan Memorial Hospital, Changhua 50544, Taiwan (China); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Lee, Pei-Yuan [Department of Biomedical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Department of Orthopedics, Show-Chwan Memorial Hospital, Changhua 50544, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wen-Cheng, E-mail: wincheng0925@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Fiber and Composite Materials, College of Engineering, Feng Chia University, Taichung 40724, Taiwan (China); Hu, Jin-Jia, E-mail: jjhu@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Medical Device Innovation Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of three calcium phosphate bone graft substitutes with different chemical compositions on spinal fusion using a rat posterolateral lumbar fusion model. Specifically, two recently developed non-dispersive tetracalcium phosphate/dicalcium phosphate anhydrous-based calcium phosphate cements (CPCs), namely a CPC consisting of equimolar amounts of the two compounds (nd-CPC) and a CPC consisting of a two-fold greater amount of dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCP-rich CPC), were compared with a commercial calcium phosphate bone graft (c-CPG) consisting of hydroxyapatite (60%) and β-tricalcium phosphate (40%). Single-level posterolateral lumbar fusion was performed at the L4–L5 vertebrae in fifteen adult rats (n = 5 for each group). Spinal fusion was evaluated with radiographs, manual palpation, mechanical testing, micro-CT, and histology 8 weeks post-surgery. In particular, the crystallographic phases in the three substitutes were identified before and 8 weeks after their implantation. Manual palpation revealed stable constructs in nearly all of the spine specimens. The stiffness and bending load of fused spines in the two CPC groups were comparable to those in the c-CPG group. The radiographs specifically revealed implant resorption and bone remodeling in the DCP-rich CPC group. Analysis of 3D micro-CT images revealed that the bone volume ratio in the DCP-rich CPC group was significantly greater than those in the nd-CPC and c-CPG groups. Histology showed that the DCP-rich CPC group exhibited the highest degree of bone regeneration and osseointegration. Notably, DCP-rich CPC led to a pronounced phase transformation, generating the greatest amount of poorly crystalline apatite among the three groups, which together with adequate resorption may explain the aforementioned positive findings. We therefore conclude that of the bone graft substitutes considered, DCP-rich CPC has the greatest potential to be used in spinal fusion

  16. Thermal diffusion through amalgam and cement base: comparison of in vitro and in vivo measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbetts, V R; Schnell, R J; Swartz, M L; Phillips, R W

    1976-01-01

    Thermal diffusion was measured in vitro and in vivo through amalgam and amalgam underlaid with bases of zinc phosphate, zinc oxide-eugenol, and calcium hydroxide cements. Although the magnitudes differed, there generally was good agreement between in vitro and in vivo data with respect to the relative rates of thermal diffusivity through amalgam restorations underlaid with bases of each of the three materials. In all tests, both in vitro and in vivo, the zinc oxide-eugenol base proved to be the best thermal insulator. Calcium hydroxide was the next best thermal barrier and was followed by zinc phosphate cement. In vitro tests indicated dentin to be a better thermal insulator than zinc phosphate cement but inferior to the zinc oxide-eugenol and calcium hydroxide base materials used here. Although a method has been presented here for the in vivo assessment of the efficacy of thermal insulating bases and a number of in vivo experiments were conducted, much research remains to be done in this area. Additional investigation is needed to better define the parameters of thermal change beneath various types of restoratives and also to establish more exactly the role of base thickness in providing thermal protection beneath clinical metallic restorations.

  17. Characterization of a silver-incorporated calcium phosphate film by RBS and its antimicrobial effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, I-H; Lee, I-S; Song, J-H; Lee, M-H; Park, J-C; Lee, G-H; Sun, X-D; Chung, S-M

    2007-01-01

    A thin calcium phosphate film was synthesized on both commercially pure Ti and Si wafers by electron beam evaporation of hydroxyapatite as an evaporant with simultaneous Ar ion beam bombardments. Silver was introduced into an ion-beam-assisted deposition of a calcium phosphate thin film for antimicrobial effect. The amount of incorporated silver ions was controlled by immersing calcium-phosphate-coated samples in different AgNO 3 concentrations, and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) was employed to measure the amounts of substituted silver. The higher concentration of silver in the calcium phosphate film was more effective in reducing the bacteria of Escherichia coli ATCC 8739 and Streptococcus mutans OMZ 65 on contact with respect to controls

  18. Characterization of a silver-incorporated calcium phosphate film by RBS and its antimicrobial effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, I-H [Institute of Physics and Applied Physics, and Atomic-Scale Surface Science Research Center, Yonsei University, Seou1 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, I-S [Institute of Physics and Applied Physics, and Atomic-Scale Surface Science Research Center, Yonsei University, Seou1 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Song, J-H [Advanced Analysis Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, M-H [Department of Medical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Park, J-C [Department of Medical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, G-H [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Chang-Won 641-010 (Korea, Republic of); Sun, X-D [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Chung, S-M [Implantium Research Center, Seoul 135-879 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    A thin calcium phosphate film was synthesized on both commercially pure Ti and Si wafers by electron beam evaporation of hydroxyapatite as an evaporant with simultaneous Ar ion beam bombardments. Silver was introduced into an ion-beam-assisted deposition of a calcium phosphate thin film for antimicrobial effect. The amount of incorporated silver ions was controlled by immersing calcium-phosphate-coated samples in different AgNO{sub 3} concentrations, and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) was employed to measure the amounts of substituted silver. The higher concentration of silver in the calcium phosphate film was more effective in reducing the bacteria of Escherichia coli ATCC 8739 and Streptococcus mutans OMZ 65 on contact with respect to controls.

  19. The influence of Sr content in calcium phosphate coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindahl, Carl; Pujari-Palmer, Shiuli; Hoess, Andreas; Ott, Marjam; Engqvist, Håkan; Xia, Wei

    2015-01-01

    In this study calcium phosphate coatings with different amounts of strontium (Sr) were prepared using a biomineralization method. The incorporation of Sr changed the composition and morphology of coatings from plate-like to sphere-like morphology. Dissolution testing indicated that the solubility of the coatings increased with increased Sr concentration. Evaluation of extracts (with Sr concentrations ranging from 0 to 2.37 μg/mL) from the HA, 0.06Sr, 0.6Sr, and 1.2Sr coatings during in vitro cell cultures showed that Sr incorporation into coatings significantly enhanced the ALP activity in comparison to cells treated with control and HA eluted media. These findings show that calcium phosphate coatings could promote osteogenic differentiation even in a low amount of strontium. - Highlights: • Calcium phosphate coating doping with low Sr contents was prepared via a biomineralization process. • The solubility of the coatings increased with increased Sr concentration. • Present findings show the potential that Sr has on promoting osteogenic differentiation even in a low amount

  20. Synthesis and characterization of powders calcium phosphate for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, D.M.P. de; Prants, W.T.; Camargo, N.H.A.; Gemelli, E.

    2009-01-01

    Scientists of different areas research the bioceramics as new materials to substitute parts of the human body. The bioceramics of the calcium phosphate have the advantage present similar chemical composition to the structure of the bony apatite of the human skeleton. In this study, calcium phosphate powder was synthesized chemically using the solution of phosphorus pentoxide (P 2 O 5 ) and calcium oxide (CaO) necessary for molar Ca/P =1.67. These works aim the study of different thermal treatments, physics and of the microstructure properties. For characterization the bony matrix were used the techniques of: X-ray diffraction (DRX); Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). (author)

  1. The increasing of enamel calcium level after casein phosphopeptideamorphous calcium phosphate covering

    OpenAIRE

    Widyasri Prananingrum; Puguh Bayu Prabowo

    2012-01-01

    Background: Caries process is characterized by the presence of demineralization. Demineralization is caused by organic acids as a result of carbohydrate substrate fermentation. Remineralization is a natural repair process for non-cavitated lesions. Remineralization occurs if there are Ca2+ and PO43- ions in sufficient quantities. Casein-amorphous calcium phosphate phosphopeptide (CPP-ACP) is a paste material containing milk protein (casein), that actually contains minerals, such as calcium an...

  2. Kinetics of strontium sorption in calcium phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacic, S.; Komarov, V.F.; Vukovic, Z.

    1989-01-01

    Kinetics of strontium sorption by highly dispersed solids: tricalcium phosphate (Ca 3 (PO 4 ) 2 , TCP) and hydroxyapatite (Ca 5 (PO 4 ) 3 )H, HAP) were investigated. Analysis of sorption data was made taking into consideration composition and morphology of ultra micro particles. Conclusion is that the isomorphous strontium impurity is structurally sensitive element for calcium phosphate. It was determined that the beginning of strontium desorption corresponds to the beginning of transformation of the TCP - HAP (author)

  3. Development of fluorapatite cement for dental enamel defects repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jie; Wang, Jiecheng; Shan, Wenpeng; Liu, Xiaochen; Ma, Jian; Liu, Changsheng; Fang, Jing; Wei, Shicheng

    2011-06-01

    In order to restore the badly carious lesion of human dental enamel, a crystalline paste of fluoride substituted apatite cement was synthesized by using the mixture of tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP), dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA) and ammonium fluoride. The apatite cement paste could be directly filled into the enamel defects (cavities) to repair damaged dental enamel. The results indicated that the hardened cement was fluorapatite [Ca(10)(PO(4))(6)F(2), FA] with calcium to phosphorus atom molar ratio (Ca/P) of 1.67 and Ca/F ratio of 5. The solubility of FA cement in Tris-HCl solution (pH = 5) was slightly lower than the natural enamel, indicating the FA cement was much insensitive to the weakly acidic solutions. The FA cement was tightly combined with the enamel surface, and there was no obvious difference of the hardness between the FA cement and natural enamel. The extracts of FA cement caused no cytotoxicity on L929 cells, which satisfied the relevant criterion on dental biomaterials, revealing good cytocompatibility. In addition, the results showed that the FA cement had good mechanical strength, hydrophilicity, and anti-bacterial adhesion properties. The study suggested that using FA cement was simple and promising approach to effectively and conveniently restore enamel defects.

  4. Hydrolytic conversion of amorphous calcium phosphate into apatite accompanied by sustained calcium and orthophosphate ions release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Xufeng, E-mail: nxf@buaa.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Biomechanics and Mechanobiology of Ministry of Education, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); BUAA Research Institute, Guangzhou 510530 (China); Research Institute of Beihang University in Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518057 (China); Chen, Siqian; Tian, Feng; Wang, Lizhen [Key Laboratory for Biomechanics and Mechanobiology of Ministry of Education, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Feng, Qingling [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramic and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Fan, Yubo, E-mail: yubofan@buaa.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Biomechanics and Mechanobiology of Ministry of Education, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the calcium and orthophosphate ions release during the transformation of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) to hydroxyapatite (HA) in aqueous solution. The ACP is prepared by a wet chemical method and further immersed in the distilled water for various time points till 14 d. The release of calcium and orthophosphate ions is measured with calcium and phosphate colorimetric assay kits, respectively. The transition of ACP towards HA is detected by x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The results indicate that the morphological conversion of ACP to HA occurs within the first 9 h, whereas the calcium and orthophosphate ions releases last for over 7 d. Such sustained calcium and orthophosphate ions release is very useful for ACP as a candidate material for hard tissue regeneration. - Highlights: • ACP is prepared using a wet chemical method. • The conversion of crystal morphology and structure occurs mainly within the initial 9 h. • The calcium and orthophosphate ions release sustains over 14 d.

  5. Hydration process for calcium-aluminate cement within EVA emulsion by SPring-8 synchrotron radiation x-ray diffraction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotera, Masaru; Matsuda, Ikuyo; Miyashita, Keiko; Adachi, Nobuyuki; Tamura, Hisayuki

    2005-01-01

    Polymer-modified mortars which consist of a polymer emulsion and cement materials have been widely developed in the construction materials fields. Forming process of the polymer-modified cement membrane simultaneously involves evaporation of water within the polymer emulsion and hydration of cement. It is important for the polymer-modified cement paste that the hydrate crystal of cement is generating by the hydration during the setting process under existence of the polymer emulsion. In this study, hydration process for calcium-aluminate cement under existence of poly (ethylene-vinyl acetate) (EVA) emulsion (polymer-cement ratio=100%) was investigated by X-ray diffraction method using synchrotron radiation (SPring-8). The diffraction peaks of calcium aluminate (CA) disappeared after the hardening, on the other hand, the peaks of hydrate crystals of calcium-aluminate cement (C 2 AH 8 and C 3 AH 6 ) could be observed. This polymer-modified cement paste hydrated using the water within the polymer emulsion. The hydration of C 2 AH 8 from CA started at around 300 min, and then C 3 AH 6 hydrate crystal increased after 700 min at ambient temperature. This implies that the conversion from C 2 AH 8 to C 3 AH 6 occurred to be more stable phase. The setting temperature affected the reaction rate. In case of hydration at 35degC, the start time of the hydration for calcium-aluminate cement was quicker than that in the ambient temperature four or more times. (author)

  6. Analysis of the color alteration and radiopacity promoted by bismuth oxide in calcium silicate cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciano, Marina Angélica; Estrela, Carlos; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Ordinola-Zapata, Ronald; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine if the increase in radiopacity provided by bismuth oxide is related to the color alteration of calcium silicate-based cement. Calcium silicate cement (CSC) was mixed with 0%, 15%, 20%, 30% and 50% of bismuth oxide (BO), determined by weight. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was the control group. The radiopacity test was performed according to ISO 6876/2001. The color was evaluated using the CIE system. The assessments were performed after 24 hours, 7 and 30 days of setting time, using a spectrophotometer to obtain the ΔE, Δa, Δb and ΔL values. The statistical analyses were performed using the Kruskal-Wallis/Dunn and ANOVA/Tukey tests (poxide was added showed radiopacity corresponding to the ISO recommendations (>3 mm equivalent of Al). The MTA group was statistically similar to the CSC/30% BO group (p>0.05). In regard to color, the increase of bismuth oxide resulted in a decrease in the ΔE value of the calcium silicate cement. The CSC group presented statistically higher ΔE values than the CSC/50% BO group (poxide has no relation to the color alteration of calcium silicate-based cements.

  7. Predictive Mechanical Characterization of Macro-Molecular Material Chemistry Structures of Cement Paste at Nano Scale - Two-phase Macro-Molecular Structures of Calcium Silicate Hydrate, Tri-Calcium Silicate, Di-Calcium Silicate and Calcium Hydroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla Espinosa, Ingrid Marcela

    Concrete is a hierarchical composite material with a random structure over a wide range of length scales. At submicron length scale the main component of concrete is cement paste, formed by the reaction of Portland cement clinkers and water. Cement paste acts as a binding matrix for the other components and is responsible for the strength of concrete. Cement paste microstructure contains voids, hydrated and unhydrated cement phases. The main crystalline phases of unhydrated cement are tri-calcium silicate (C3S) and di-calcium silicate (C2S), and of hydrated cement are calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) and calcium hydroxide (CH). Although efforts have been made to comprehend the chemical and physical nature of cement paste, studies at molecular level have primarily been focused on individual components. Present research focuses on the development of a method to model, at molecular level, and analysis of the two-phase combination of hydrated and unhydrated phases of cement paste as macromolecular systems. Computational molecular modeling could help in understanding the influence of the phase interactions on the material properties, and mechanical performance of cement paste. Present work also strives to create a framework for molecular level models suitable for potential better comparisons with low length scale experimental methods, in which the sizes of the samples involve the mixture of different hydrated and unhydrated crystalline phases of cement paste. Two approaches based on two-phase cement paste macromolecular structures, one involving admixed molecular phases, and the second involving cluster of two molecular phases are investigated. The mechanical properties of two-phase macromolecular systems of cement paste consisting of key hydrated phase CSH and unhydrated phases C3S or C2S, as well as CSH with the second hydrated phase CH were calculated. It was found that these cement paste two-phase macromolecular systems predicted an isotropic material behavior. Also

  8. Preliminary characterization of calcium chemical environment in apatitic and non-apatitic calcium phosphates of biological interest by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichert, D.; Salome, M.; Banu, M.; Susini, J.; Rey, C.

    2005-01-01

    Several reports have mentioned the existence of non-apatitic environments of phosphate and carbonate ions in synthetic and biological poorly crystalline apatites. However there were no direct spectroscopic evidences for the existence of non-apatitic environment of calcium ions. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy, at the K-edge of calcium, allows the discrimination between different calcium phosphates of biological interest despite great spectral similarities. A primary analysis of the spectra reveals the existence, in synthetic poorly crystalline apatites, of variable features related to the maturation stage of the sample and corresponding to the existence of non-apatitic environments of calcium ions. Although these features can also be found in several other calcium phosphate salts, and do not allow a clear identification of the ionic environments of calcium ions, they give a possibility to directly determine the maturity of poorly crystalline apatite from calcium X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure spectra

  9. Designing calcium phosphate-based bifunctional nanocapsules with bone-targeting properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khung, Yit-Lung; Bastari, Kelsen; Cho, Xing Ling; Yee, Wu Aik; Loo, Say Chye Joachim, E-mail: joachimloo@ntu.edu.sg [Nanyang Technological University, School of Materials Science and Engineering (Singapore)

    2012-06-15

    Using sodium dodecyl sulphate micelles as template, hollow-cored calcium phosphate nanocapsules were produced. The surfaces of the nanocapsule were subsequently silanised by a polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based silane with an N-hydroxysuccinimide ester end groups which permits for further attachment with bisphosphonates (BP). Characterisations of these nanocapsules were investigated using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy, Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Dynamic Light Scattering. To further validate the bone-targeting potential, dentine discs were incubated with these functionalised nanocapsules. FESEM analysis showed that these surface-modified nanocapsules would bind strongly to dentine surfaces compared to non-functionalised nanocapsules. We envisage that respective components would give this construct a bifunctional attribute, whereby (1) the shell of the calcium phosphate nanocapsule would serve as biocompatible coating aiding in gradual osteoconduction, while (2) surface BP moieties, acting as targeting ligands, would provide the bone-targeting potential of these calcium phosphate nanocapsules.

  10. Designing calcium phosphate-based bifunctional nanocapsules with bone-targeting properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khung, Yit-Lung; Bastari, Kelsen; Cho, Xing Ling; Yee, Wu Aik; Loo, Say Chye Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Using sodium dodecyl sulphate micelles as template, hollow-cored calcium phosphate nanocapsules were produced. The surfaces of the nanocapsule were subsequently silanised by a polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based silane with an N-hydroxysuccinimide ester end groups which permits for further attachment with bisphosphonates (BP). Characterisations of these nanocapsules were investigated using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy, Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Dynamic Light Scattering. To further validate the bone-targeting potential, dentine discs were incubated with these functionalised nanocapsules. FESEM analysis showed that these surface-modified nanocapsules would bind strongly to dentine surfaces compared to non-functionalised nanocapsules. We envisage that respective components would give this construct a bifunctional attribute, whereby (1) the shell of the calcium phosphate nanocapsule would serve as biocompatible coating aiding in gradual osteoconduction, while (2) surface BP moieties, acting as targeting ligands, would provide the bone-targeting potential of these calcium phosphate nanocapsules.

  11. Effect of ultrasonic instrumentation on the bond strength of crowns cemented with zinc phosphate cement to natural teeth. An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Braulino de Melo Filho

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have reported the benefits of sonic and/or ultrasonic instrumentation for root debridement, with most of them focusing on changes in periodontal clinical parameters. The present study investigated possible alterations in the tensile bond strength of crowns cemented with zinc phosphate cement to natural teeth after ultrasonic instrumentation. Forty recently extracted intact human third molars were selected, cleaned and stored in physiologic serum at 4°C. They received standard preparations, at a 16º convergence angle, and AgPd alloy crowns. The crowns were cemented with zinc phosphate cement and then divided into four groups of 10 teeth each. Each group was then subdivided into two subgroups, with one of the subgroups being submitted to 5,000 thermal cycles ranging from 55 ± 2 to 5 ± 2°C, while the other was not. Each group was submitted to ultrasonic instrumentation for different periods of time: group 1 - 0 min (control, group 2 - 5 min, group 3 - 10 min, and group 4 - 15 min. Tensile bond strength tests were performed with an Instron testing machine (model 4310. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and Tukey's test at the 5% level of significance. A significant reduction in the tensile bond strength of crowns cemented with zinc phosphate and submitted to thermal cycles was observed at 15 min (196.75 N versus 0 min = 452.01 N, 5 min = 444.23 N and 10 min = 470.85 N. Thermal cycling and ultrasonic instrumentation for 15 min caused a significant reduction in tensile bond strength (p < .05.

  12. Yolk-Shell Porous Microspheres of Calcium Phosphate Prepared by Using Calcium L-Lactate and Adenosine 5'-Triphosphate Disodium Salt: Application in Protein/Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Guan-Jun; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Qi, Chao; Sun, Tuan-Wei; Wu, Jin; Chen, Feng

    2015-06-26

    A facile and environmentally friendly approach has been developed to prepare yolk-shell porous microspheres of calcium phosphate by using calcium L-lactate pentahydrate (CL) as the calcium source and adenosine 5'-triphosphate disodium salt (ATP) as the phosphate source through the microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. The effects of the concentration of CL, the microwave hydrothermal temperature, and the time on the morphology and crystal phase of the product are investigated. The possible formation mechanism of yolk-shell porous microspheres of calcium phosphate is proposed. Hemoglobin from bovine red cells (Hb) and ibuprofen (IBU) are used to explore the application potential of yolk-shell porous microspheres of calcium phosphate in protein/drug loading and delivery. The experimental results indicate that the as-prepared yolk-shell porous microspheres of calcium phosphate have relatively high protein/drug loading capacity, sustained protein/drug release, favorable pH-responsive release behavior, and a high biocompatibility in the cytotoxicity test. Therefore, the yolk-shell porous microspheres of calcium phosphate have promising applications in various biomedical fields such as protein/drug delivery. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Physical characteristics, antimicrobial and odontogenesis potentials of calcium silicate cement containing hinokitiol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Ming-Hsien [Institute of Oral Science, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Shen, Yu-Fang; Hsu, Tuan-Ti [3D Printing Medical Research Center, China Medical University Hospital, China Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Huang, Tsui-Hsien [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Department of Stomatology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Shie, Ming-You, E-mail: eviltacasi@gmail.com [3D Printing Medical Research Center, China Medical University Hospital, China Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China)

    2016-08-01

    Hinokitiol is a natural material and it has antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the material characterization, cell viability, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory abilities of the hinokitiol-modified calcium silicate (CS) cement as a root end filling material. The setting times, diametral tensile strength (DTS) values and XRD patterns of CS cements with 0–10 mM hinokitiol were examined. Then, the antibacterial effect and the expression levels of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) of the hinokitiol-modified CS cements were evaluated. Furthermore, the cytocompatibility, the expression levels of the markers of odontoblastic differentiation, mineralized nodule formation and calcium deposition of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured on hinokitiol-modified CS cements were determined. The hinokitiol-modified CS cements had better antibacterial and anti-inflammatory abilities and cytocompatibility than non-modified CS cements. Otherwise, the hinokitiol-modified CS cements had suitable setting times and better odontoblastic potential of hDPCs. Previous report pointed out that the root-end filling materials may induce inflammatory cytokines reaction. In our study, hinokitiol-modified CS cements not only inhibited the expression level of inflammatory cytokines, but also had better cytocompatibility, antimicrobial properties and active ability of odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs. Therefore, the hinokitiol-modified CS cement may be a potential root end filling material for clinic. - Highlights: • The hinokitiol-modified CS up-regulation of odontogenic of hDPCs. • Promoted proliferation of hDPCs on hinokitiol-modified CS. • The hinokitiol-modified CS cements not only inhibited the expression level of inflammatory cytokines, but also had better cytocompatibility. • The hinokitiol-modified CS up-regulation of odontogenic of hPDLs.

  14. Physical characteristics, antimicrobial and odontogenesis potentials of calcium silicate cement containing hinokitiol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Ming-Hsien; Shen, Yu-Fang; Hsu, Tuan-Ti; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Shie, Ming-You

    2016-01-01

    Hinokitiol is a natural material and it has antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the material characterization, cell viability, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory abilities of the hinokitiol-modified calcium silicate (CS) cement as a root end filling material. The setting times, diametral tensile strength (DTS) values and XRD patterns of CS cements with 0–10 mM hinokitiol were examined. Then, the antibacterial effect and the expression levels of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) of the hinokitiol-modified CS cements were evaluated. Furthermore, the cytocompatibility, the expression levels of the markers of odontoblastic differentiation, mineralized nodule formation and calcium deposition of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured on hinokitiol-modified CS cements were determined. The hinokitiol-modified CS cements had better antibacterial and anti-inflammatory abilities and cytocompatibility than non-modified CS cements. Otherwise, the hinokitiol-modified CS cements had suitable setting times and better odontoblastic potential of hDPCs. Previous report pointed out that the root-end filling materials may induce inflammatory cytokines reaction. In our study, hinokitiol-modified CS cements not only inhibited the expression level of inflammatory cytokines, but also had better cytocompatibility, antimicrobial properties and active ability of odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs. Therefore, the hinokitiol-modified CS cement may be a potential root end filling material for clinic. - Highlights: • The hinokitiol-modified CS up-regulation of odontogenic of hDPCs. • Promoted proliferation of hDPCs on hinokitiol-modified CS. • The hinokitiol-modified CS cements not only inhibited the expression level of inflammatory cytokines, but also had better cytocompatibility. • The hinokitiol-modified CS up-regulation of odontogenic of hPDLs.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of powders calcium phosphate for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, D.M.P. de; Prants, W.T.; Camargo, N.H.A.; Gemelli, E., E-mail: daniellapinheiro@gmail.com, E-mail: w_prants@hotmail.com, E-mail: dem2nhac@joinville.udesc.br, E-mail: dma2ec@joinville.udesc.br [Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina (UDESC), Joinville, SC (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Tecnologicas

    2009-07-01

    Scientists of different areas research the bioceramics as new materials to substitute parts of the human body. The bioceramics of the calcium phosphate have the advantage present similar chemical composition to the structure of the bony apatite of the human skeleton. In this study, calcium phosphate powder was synthesized chemically using the solution of phosphorus pentoxide (P{sub 2}O{sub 5}) and calcium oxide (CaO) necessary for molar Ca/P =1.67. These works aim the study of different thermal treatments, physics and of the microstructure properties. For characterization the bony matrix were used the techniques of: X-ray diffraction (DRX); Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). (author)

  16. Stabilization of Ikpayongo laterite with cement and calcium carbide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laterite obtained from Ikpayongo was stabilized with 2-10 % cement and 2-10 % Calcium Carbide waste, for use as pavement material. Atterberg's limits test, California bearing ratio (CBR) and unconfined compressive strength (UCS) tests were conducted on the natural laterite and the treated soil specimens. The plasticity ...

  17. Uptake of CrO42- ions by Fe-treated tri-calcium phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano G, J.; Ramirez S, J. L.; Bonifacio M, J.; Granados C, F.; Badillo A, V. E.

    2010-01-01

    CrO 4 2- ion adsorption of Fe-treated tri-calcium phosphate was studied by batch experiments as a function of contact time, initial concentration of metal ion and temperature. Adsorption results showed that at ph 5.5 and 1.0 x 10 -4 M chromium concentration the adsorption capacity of Fe-treated tri-calcium phosphate for CrO 4 2- ions was 7.10 x 10 -3 mmol/g. Chromium adsorption data on Fe-treated tri-calcium phosphate at various initial concentration fitted the Freundlich isotherm. By temperature studies the thermodynamic parameters ΔH 0 , ΔG 0 and ΔS 0 were estimated and the obtained results showed that the adsorption reaction was endothermic and spontaneous. (Author)

  18. α-TCP cements prepared by syringe-foaming: Influence of Na2HPO4 and surfactant concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez, A F; Domínguez, S; Loureiro Dos Santos, L A

    2017-12-01

    The lack of intrinsic open porosity in calcium phosphate cements slows down the resorption rate and bone ingrowth when implanted In Vivo. In this study, macroporous structures were obtained by mixing α-TCP cement with a foamed liquid phase containing different concentrations of sodium hydrogen phosphate and a nonionic surfactant. The cement paste was prepared by hand mixing in a novel system of two syringes connected by a tube. Two different liquid to powder (L/P) ratios were used to prepare the cement paste. The cement samples showed open macropores with diameters>100μm. The specimens prepared with lower L/P ratio showed smaller porosity, macroporosity and pore size distribution. The cohesion of the cement paste in liquid solutions was assessed by adding 2wt% sodium alginate to the liquid phase. This study suggests that the final macrostructure of the foamed cements can be controlled by varying the phosphate and surfactant concentrations in the liquid phase and the L/P ratio. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Calcium phosphate granulation in anaerobic treatment of black water: a new approach to phosphorus recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tervahauta, T.H.; Weijden, van der R.D.; Flemming, R.L.; Hernández, L.; Zeeman, G.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2014-01-01

    Recovery of phosphorus from wastewater as calcium phosphate could diminish the need for mining of scarce phosphate rock resources. This study introduces a novel approach to phosphorus recovery by precipitation of calcium phosphate granules in anaerobic treatment of black water. The granules formed

  20. Dense and porous titanium substrates with a biomimetic calcium phosphate coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, A.A., E-mail: aantunesr@yahoo.com.br [Powder Technology Laboratory, Materials Processing and Characterization Division, National Institute of Technology, No. 82 Venezuela Avenue, Room 602, 20081-312 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Balestra, R.M. [Powder Technology Laboratory, Materials Processing and Characterization Division, National Institute of Technology, No. 82 Venezuela Avenue, Room 602, 20081-312 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rocha, M.N. [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Program, COPPE, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, P.O. Box 68505, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Peripolli, S.B. [Materials Metrology Division, National Institute of Metrology, Normalization and Quality, No. 50 Nossa Senhora das Gracas Street, Building 3, 25250-020 Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); Andrade, M.C. [Polytechnic Institute of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro State University, s/n, Alberto Rangel Street, 28630-050 Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil); Pereira, L.C. [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Program, COPPE, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, P.O. Box 68505, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Oliveira, M.V. [Powder Technology Laboratory, Materials Processing and Characterization Division, National Institute of Technology, No. 82 Venezuela Avenue, Room 602, 20081-312 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A biomimetic coating method with simplified solution is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Titanium substrates are submitted to chemical and heat treatments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Titanium substrates are coated with biocompatible calcium phosphate phases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The simplified solution shows potential to be applied as a coating technique. - Abstract: The present work studied a biomimetic method using a simplified solution (SS) with calcium and phosphorus ions for coating titanium substrates, in order to improve their bioactivity. Commercially pure titanium dense sheet, microporous and macroporous titanium samples, both produced by powder metallurgy, were treated in NaOH solution followed by heat-treating and immersed in SS for 7, 14 or 21 days. The samples characterization was performed by quantitative metallographic analysis, confocal scanning optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and low angle X-ray diffraction. The results showed coatings with calcium phosphate precipitation in all samples, with globular or plate-like morphology, typical of hydroxyapatite and octacalcium phosphate, respectively, indicating that the solution (SS) has potential for coating titanium substrates. In addition, the different surfaces of substrates had an effect on the formed calcium phosphate phase and thickness of coatings, depending on the substrate type and imersion time in the simplified solution.

  1. Effects of the addition of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) on mechanical properties of luting and lining glass ionomer cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heravi, Farzin; Bagheri, Hossein; Rangrazi, Abdolrasoul; Mojtaba Zebarjad, Seyed

    2016-07-01

    Recently, the addition of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) into glass ionomer cements (GICs) has attracted interest due to its remineralization of teeth and its antibacterial effects. However, it should be investigated to ensure that the incorporation of CPP-ACP does not have significant adverse effects on its mechanical properties. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of the addition of CPP-ACP on the mechanical properties of luting and lining GIC. The first step was to synthesize the CPP-ACP. Then the CPP-ACP at concentrations of 1%, 1.56% and 2% of CPP-ACP was added into a luting and lining GIC. GIC without CPP-ACP was used as a control group. The results revealed that the incorporation of CPP-ACP up to 1.56%(w/w) increased the flexural strength (29%), diametral tensile strength (36%) and microhardness (18%), followed by a reduction in these mechanical properties at 2%(w/w) CPP-ACP. The wear rate was significantly decreased (23%) in 1.56%(w/w) concentration of CPP-ACP and it was increased in 2%(w/w). Accordingly, the addition of 1.56%(w/w) CPP-ACP into luting and lining GIC had no adverse effect on the mechanical properties of luting and lining GIC and could be used in clinical practice.

  2. Simultaneous in vivo determination of calcium and phosphate effective intestinal absorption in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladizesky, M.; Mautalen, C.A.; Cabrejas, M.; Degrossi, O.J.

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of a technique which allows a more precise assessment of the interrelation between calcium and phosphate transport systems. Rats were given an i.p. or oral dose of 47 Ca with 40 Ca as carrier and/or 32 P with 31 P as carrier. The animals were sacrificed and activities in body and excised gastrointestinal tract determined. The 1.28 MeV photopeak activity was measured for calcium 47, and phosphorus 32 activity was determined by measuring the Bremsstrahlung produced by this isotope in the rat's body in the 80 to 200 keV range. The rates of intestinal absorption of calcium and phosphate differed; there seemed to be no urinary excretion of the radioisotopes within 3 hours. The reciprocal influence of calcium and phosphate on the intestinal absorption was also studied. The technique is simple and allows the simultaneous in vivo measurement of the effective intestinal absorption of calcium and phosphate. (U.K.)

  3. Electrosprayed calcium phosphate coatings for biomedical purposes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwenburgh, S.C.G.

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, the suitability of the Electrostatic Spray Deposition (ESD) technique was studied for biomedical purposes, i.e., deposition of calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings onto titanium substrates. Using ESD, which is a simple and cheap deposition method for inorganic and organic coatings, it

  4. Substitution of strontium for calcium in glass ionomer cements (Part ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To investigate the effects of substituting strontium for calcium in fluoroaluminosilicate glass on the mechanical and ion-releasing properties of high-viscosity glass ionomer cements. Design: An exploratory, laboratory-based study. Setting: Dental biomaterials research laboratory, Dental Physical Sciences Unit, ...

  5. Continuous monitoring of the zinc-phosphate acid-base cement setting reaction by proton nuclear magnetic relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apih, T.; Lebar, A.; Pawlig, O.; Trettin, R.

    2001-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic relaxation is a well-established technique for continuous and non destructive monitoring of hydration of conventional Portland building cements. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) monitoring of the setting reaction of zinc-phosphate acid-base dental cements, which harden in minutes as compared to days, as in the case of Portland cements. We compare the setting of cement powder (mainly, zinc oxide) prepared with clinically used aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid solution with the setting of a model system where cement powder is mixed with pure orthophosphoric acid solution. In contrast to previously published NMR studies of setting Portland cements, where a decrease of spin-lattice relaxation time is attributed to enhanced relaxation at the growing internal surface, spin-lattice relaxation time T 1 increases during the set of clinically used zinc-phosphate cement. Comparison of these results with a detailed study of diffusion, viscosity, and magnetic-field dispersion of T 1 in pure and aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid demonstrates that the increase of T 1 in the setting cement is connected with the increase of molecular mobility in the residual phosphoric acid solution. Although not taken into account so far, such effects may also significantly influence the relaxation times in setting Portland cements, particularly when admixtures with an effect on water viscosity are used. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  6. Conditioning highly concentrated borate solutions with calcium sulfo-aluminate cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champenois, J.B.; Cau dit Coumes, C.; Poulesquen, A.; Le Bescop, P.; Damidot, D.

    2012-01-01

    The early age hydration by borate solution of 3 calcium sulfo-aluminate cements (CSA), containing respectively 0%, 10% and 20% of gypsum by weight of cement was studied using isothermal calorimetry and dynamic mode rheo-metry. XRD and TGA analysis were carried out on pastes with increasing hydration degrees (up to 90 days) to specify the mineralogy and to figure out the mechanisms of borate immobilisation. It has been shown that the retarding effect of borate anions is due to the precipitation of the amorphous calcium borate C 2 B 3 H 8 ; borate anions were then incorporated in Aft-type phases. The macroscopic properties of hydrated binders (compressive strength, length change) were also followed during 180 days. It appears that the mechanical strength continuously increases with the hydration degree. Length changes under wet-curing and sealed bag remain moderate and seem to be stabilized after 180 days

  7. The mechanical properties and hydration characteristics of cement pastes containing added-calcium coal gangue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongxu Li; Xuyan Song [Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing (China). College of Material Science and Engineering

    2008-04-15

    The mechanical properties of several kinds of coal gangue calcined with limestone were researched so as to find the optimum way of calcinations with limestone. The microstructure and property of hydration process of cement pastes containing added-calcium coal gangue were analyzed by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the method of mercury in trusion poremeasurement. When the proper amounst of gypsum and fluorite were taken as mineralizers in the course of calcinations of added-calcium coal gangue, the activity of coal gangue can be effectively improved. The results of mechanical property and structural characteristics such as hydration, hydration products and microstructure etc. of cement pastes containing added-calcium coal gangue are consistent.

  8. Physical and chemical characterization of pastes of bone cements with ZrO{sub 2}; Caracterizacion fisica y quimica de pastas de cementos oseos con ZrO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinto H, A. [Instituto Tecnologico de Zacatepec, A.P. 45, 62900 Zacatepec, Morelos (Mexico); Pina B, M.C. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-360, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    Setting times and temperature of sixteen calcium phosphate cements added with ZrO{sub 2} were evaluated. Their behaviors were analysed to be used like injectable formulations in surgery of bone. Two cements of calcium phosphates enriched with ZrO{sub 2} with the best characteristics in setting times and temperature, were mechanically tested after 1 and 7 days of prepared. Density was determined using a pycnometer, chemical composition was determined by X-ray diffraction and the molecular structure was determined by infrared spectroscopy. (Author)

  9. Cementing Material From Rice Husk-Broken Bricks-Spent Bleaching Earth-Dried Calcium Carbide Residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthengia Jackson Washira

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A cementious material, coded CSBR (Carbide residue Spent bleaching earth Broken bricks and Rice husks, was made from dried calcium carbide residue (DCCR and an incinerated mix of rice husks (RH, broken bricks (BB and spent bleaching earth (SBE. Another material, coded SBR (Spent bleaching earth Broken bricks and Rice husk ash, was made from mixing separately incinerated RH, SBE and ground BB in the same ash ratio as in CSBR. When CSBR was inter-ground with Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC, it showed a continued decrease in Ca(OH2 in the hydrating cement as a function of curing time and replacement levels of the cement. Up to 45 % replacement of the OPC by CSBR produced a Portland pozzolana cement (PPC material that passed the relevant Kenyan Standard. Incorporation of the CSBR in OPC reduces the resultant calcium hydroxide from hydrating Portland cement. The use of the waste materials in production of cementitious material would rid the environment of wastes and lead to production of low cost cementitious material.

  10. Serum Calcium, Inorganic Phosphates and some Haematological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Sickle cell disease has long been associated with bone deformities and pain. Mineral salts such as calcium and inorganic phosphate are critical in bone formation and metabolism. This investigation was designed to study the serum concentration of these minerals as well as some haematological parameters in ...

  11. Sulfoaluminate-belite cement from low-calcium fly ash and sulfur-rich and other industrial by-products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arjunan, P.; Silsbee, M.R.; Roy, D.M.

    1999-08-01

    The study describes the preparation and characterization of an environmentally friendly cement with performance characteristics similar to those of Portland cement, from a lime kiln bag house dust, a low-calcium fly ash, and a scrubber sludge. Promising preliminary results show the formation of relatively low-temperature phases calcium sulfoaluminate (4CaO{center{underscore}dot}3Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center{underscore}dot}SO{sub 3}) and dicalcium silicate (2CaO{center{underscore}dot}SiO{sub 2}) at {approximately} 1,250 C if nodulized raw means used for clinker preparation and at 1,175 C if powdered raw meal is used as compared to the {approximately} 1,500 C sintering temperature required for Portland cement. Phases of the developed cements were predicted using modified Bogue calculations. Isothermal calorimetric measurements indicate the hydration properties of the cements are comparable to ordinary Portland cement. Mechanical properties and microstructural evaluations also were carried out.

  12. Bioactivity evaluation of commercial calcium phosphate-based bioceramics for bone regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrós, S.; Mas, A.

    2016-11-01

    Calcium phosphate-based bioceramics constitute a great promise for bone tissue engineering as they chemically resemble to mammalian bone and teeth. Their use is a viable alternative for bone regeneration as it avoids the use of autografts and allografts, which usually involves immunogenic reactions and patient’s discomfort. This work evolves around the study of the bioactivity potential of different commercially available bone substitutes based in calcium phosphate through the characterization of their ionic exchangeability when immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF). (Author)

  13. Kinetics of dissolution of calcium phosphate (Ca-P bioceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Brazda

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyapatite (HAp and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP are widely used bioceramics for surgical or dental applications. This paper is dealing with dissolution kinetics of synthetically prepared β-TCP and four types of HAp granules. Two groups of HAp, treated at different temperatures, each of them with two different granule sizes, were tested. Three corrosive solutions with different pH and simulated body fluid (SBF were used for immersing of the samples. Changes in concentrations of calcium and phosphate ions, pH level and weight changes of the samples were observed. It was found that presence of TRIS buffer enhanced dissolution rate of the β-TCP approximately two times. When exposed to SBF solution, calcium phosphate (most probably hydroxyapatite precipitation predominates over β-TCP dissolution. Results from HAp samples dissolution showed some unexpected findings. Neither heat treatment nor HAp particle size made any major differences in dissolution rate of the same mass of each HAp sample.

  14. Hydrophobic Calcium Carbonate for Cement Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi B. Atla

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This report describes a novel way to generate a highly effective hydrophobic cement surface via a carbonation route using sodium stearate. Carbonation reaction was carried out at different temperatures to investigate the hydrophobicity and morphology of the calcium carbonate formed with this process. With increasing temperatures, the particles changed from irregular shapes to more uniform rod-like structures and then aggregated to form a plate-like formation. The contact angle against water was found to increase with increasing temperature; after 90 °C there was no further increase. The maximum contact angle of 129° was obtained at the temperature of 60 °C. It was also found that carbonation increased the micro hardness of the cement material. The micro hardness was found to be dependent on the morphology of the CaCO3 particles. The rod like structures which caused increased mineral filler produced a material with enhanced strength. The 13C cross polarization magic-angle spinning NMR spectra gave plausible explanation of the interaction of organic-inorganic moieties.

  15. Evaluation of growth of calcium phosphate ceramics on sintered Ti-Ca-P composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karanjai, Malobika [Centre for Nano Materials, International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials, Balapur P.O, Hyderabad - 500 005, Andhra Pradesh (India)], E-mail: malobika_k@rediffmail.com; Sundaresan, Ranganathan [Centre for Nano Materials, International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials, Balapur P.O, Hyderabad - 500 005, Andhra Pradesh (India); Mohan, Tallapragada Raja Rama; Kashyap, Bhagwati Prasad [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai - 400 076, Maharashtra (India)

    2008-12-01

    Sintered Ti-Ca-P composites having in situ formed calcium phosphate phases developed by powder metallurgy processing were soaked for 28 days in simulated body fluid (SBF) with a pH of 7.4 at 37 deg. C and evaluated for the growth of calcium phosphate ceramics onto its surface. The composites were taken out once every 7 days and characterised using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) for evaluating the Ca-P growth. Based on the change in chemistry of the SBF and phase contents, a model has been proposed for mechanism of growth of calcium phosphate compounds on sintered Ti-Ca-P composites immersed in SBF.

  16. Structure and properties of silver-doped calcium phosphate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Stable and antimicrobial silver-doped calcium phosphate nanopowders were synthesized using sol–gel .... ical morphology of HAP/Ag nanoparticles with particle size ..... [40] Buckley J J, Lee A F, Olivi L and Wilson K 2010 J. Mater.

  17. Calcium Phosphate Bioceramics: A Review of Their History, Structure, Properties, Coating Technologies and Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliaz, Noam; Metoki, Noah

    2017-01-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) bioceramics are widely used in the field of bone regeneration, both in orthopedics and in dentistry, due to their good biocompatibility, osseointegration and osteoconduction. The aim of this article is to review the history, structure, properties and clinical applications of these materials, whether they are in the form of bone cements, paste, scaffolds, or coatings. Major analytical techniques for characterization of CaPs, in vitro and in vivo tests, and the requirements of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and international standards from CaP coatings on orthopedic and dental endosseous implants, are also summarized, along with the possible effect of sterilization on these materials. CaP coating technologies are summarized, with a focus on electrochemical processes. Theories on the formation of transient precursor phases in biomineralization, the dissolution and reprecipitation as bone of CaPs are discussed. A wide variety of CaPs are presented, from the individual phases to nano-CaP, biphasic and triphasic CaP formulations, composite CaP coatings and cements, functionally graded materials (FGMs), and antibacterial CaPs. We conclude by foreseeing the future of CaPs. PMID:28772697

  18. Impact of fuel selection on the environmental performance of post-combustion calcium looping applied to a cement plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schakel, Wouter; Hung, Christine Roxanne; Tokheim, Lars Andre; Strømman, Anders Hammer; Worrell, Ernst; Ramírez, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    Calcium looping CO2 capture is a promising technology to reduce CO2 emissions from cement production. Coal has been seen as a logical choice of fuel to drive the calcium looping process as coal is already the primary fuel used to produce cement. This study assesses the impact of using different

  19. A review paper on biomimetic calcium phosphate coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, X.; de Groot, K.; Wang, D.; Hu, Q.; Wismeijer, D.; Liu, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Biomimetic calcium phosphate coatings have been developed for bone regeneration and repair because of their biocompatibility, osteoconductivity, and easy preparation. They can be rendered osteoinductive by incorporating an osteogenic agent, such as bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), into the

  20. Bone substitute material composition and morphology differentially modulate calcium and phosphate release through osteoclast-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konermann, A; Staubwasser, M; Dirk, C; Keilig, L; Bourauel, C; Götz, W; Jäger, A; Reichert, C

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the material composition and cell-mediated remodelling of different calcium phosphate-based bone substitutes. Osteoclasts were cultivated on bone substitutes (Cerabone, Maxresorb, and NanoBone) for up to 5 days. Bafilomycin A1 addition served as the control. To determine cellular activity, the supernatant content of calcium and phosphate was measured by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. Cells were visualized on the materials by scanning electron microscopy. Material composition and surface characteristics were assessed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Osteoclast-induced calcium and phosphate release was material-specific. Maxresorb exhibited the highest ion release to the medium (P = 0.034; calcium 40.25mg/l day 5, phosphate 102.08 mg/l day 5) and NanoBone the lowest (P = 0.021; calcium 8.43 mg/l day 5, phosphate 15.15 mg/l day 5); Cerabone was intermediate (P = 0.034; calcium 16.34 mg/l day 5, phosphate 30.6 mg/l day 5). All investigated materials showed unique resorption behaviours. The presented methodology provides a new perspective on the investigation of bone substitute biodegradation, maintaining the material-specific micro- and macrostructure. Copyright © 2013 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Microstructure of amorphous aluminum hydroxide in belite-calcium sulfoaluminate cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Fei; Yu, Zhenglei; Yang, Fengling; Lu, Yinong, E-mail: yinonglu@njtech.edu.cn; Liu, Yunfei, E-mail: yfliu@njtech.edu.cn

    2015-05-15

    Belite-calcium sulfoaluminate (BCSA) cement is a promising low-CO{sub 2} alternative to ordinary Portland cement. Herein, aluminum hydroxide (AH{sub 3}), the main amorphous hydration product of BCSA cement, was investigated in detail. The microstructure of AH{sub 3} with various quantities of gypsum was investigated via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The AH{sub 3} with various morphologies were observed and confirmed in the resulting pastes. Particular attention was paid to the fact that AH{sub 3} always contained a small amount of Ca according to the results of EDS analysis. The AH{sub 3} was then characterized via high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The results of HRTEM indicated that Ca arose from nanosized tricalcium aluminate hexahydrate which existed in the AH{sub 3}.

  2. Evaluation of four biodegradable, injectable bone cements in an experimental drill hole model in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Génot, Oliver R; Nuss, Katja; Galuppo, Larry; Fulmer, Mark; Jacobson, Evan; Kronen, Peter; Zlinszky, Kati; Auer, Jörg A

    2013-09-01

    Four cement applications were tested in this investigation. Two dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD-brushite) hydraulic cements, an apatite hydraulic fiber loaded cement, and a calcium sulfate cement (Plaster of Paris) were implanted in epiphyseal and metaphyseal cylindrical bone defects in sheep. The in vivo study was performed to assess the biocompatibility and bone remodeling of four cement formulations. After time periods of 2, 4, and 6 months, the cement samples were clinically and histologically evaluated. Histomorphometrically, the amount of new bone formation, fibrous tissue, and bone marrow and the area of remaining cement were measured. In all specimens, no signs of inflammation were detectable either macroscopically or microscopically. Cements differed mainly in their resorption time. Calcium sulfate was already completely resorbed at 2 months and showed a variable amount of new bone formation and/or fibrous tissue in the original drill hole over all time periods. The two DCPD cements in contrast were degraded to a large amount at 6 months, whereas the apatite was almost unchanged over all time periods. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. A comparative study of retentive strengths of zinc phosphate, polycarboxylate and glass ionomer cements with stainless steel crowns--an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, R; Basappa, N; Reddy, V V

    1998-03-01

    This study was conducted on 30 extracted human primary molars to assess the retentive strengths of zinc phosphate, polycarboxylate and glass ionomer cements. The teeth were embedded in resin blocks and were randomly divided into 3 groups of 10 each. The occlusal surfaces of all teeth were reduced uniformly by 1.0 to 1.5 mm. All mesial, distal undercuts were removed and sharp angles rounded. This was followed by cementing pretrimmed and precontoured stainless steel crowns on each tooth with hand pressure and storing in artificial saliva at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. Retentive strength was tested using Instron Universal Testing Machine. The load was applied starting from a zero reading and gradually increased until the cemented stainless steel crowns showed signs of movement and then the readings were recorded. It was found that retentive strengths of zinc phosphate and glass ionomer cements were statistically better (P cement. Negligible difference (0. 59 kg/cm2) was however observed between zinc phosphate and glass ionomer cements.

  4. Effect of bioglass 45S5 addition on properties, microstructure and cellular response of tetracalcium phosphate/monetite cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stulajterova, R., E-mail: rstulajterova@saske.sk; Medvecky, L.; Giretova, M.; Sopcak, T.; Kovalcikova, A.

    2017-04-15

    Tetracalcium phosphate/nanomonetite (TTCPMH) cement composites with 7.5 and 15 wt% addition of melt-derived 45S5 bioactive glass were prepared by mechanical homogenization of powder components and 2% NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} solution was used as a hardening liquid. The properties of composites with the acidic (Ca/P ratio equal 1.5) or basic (Ca/P ratio equal 1.67) TTCPMH component were compared. Addition of glass component caused rapid rise in pH of composites up to 10. In microstructure of basic cement composite, the large bioglass particles weakly bounded to surrounding cement matrix were found contrary to a more compact microstructure of acidic cement composites with the high number of spherical silica particles. Both the significant refinement of hydroxyapatite particles and the change to needle-like morphology with rise in the content of bioglass were identified in hydroxyapatite coatings created during soaking of composites in phosphate buffered saline. In acidic cement mixtures, the increase of compressive strength with an amount of bioglass was found whereas the opposite tendency was revealed in the case of basic cement mixtures. The higher concentrations of ions were verified in solutions after immersion of acidic cement composites. The severe cytotoxicity of extracts and composite cement substrates containing 15 wt% of bioglass demonstrated adverse effects of both the ionic concentrations and unappropriate surface texture on proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells. The enhanced ALP activities of cells cultured on composite cements confirmed the positive effect of bioactive glass addition on differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. - Highlights: • Novel B45S5 bioglass/tetracalcium phosphate/nanomonetite cement composites • Cement basicity negatively affected their microstructure. • Acid composite cements had higher compressive strengths than basic composites. • Fast differentiation of MSC to osteoblast line on composite with 7.5 wt% of bioglass

  5. Human bone marrow stem cell-encapsulating calcium phosphate scaffolds for bone repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Michael D.; Xu, Hockin H.K.

    2010-01-01

    Due to its injectability and excellent osteoconductivity, calcium phosphate cement (CPC) is highly promising for orthopedic applications. However, a literature search revealed no report on human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (hBMSC) encapsulation in CPC for bone tissue engineering. The aim of this study was to encapsulate hBMSCs in alginate hydrogel beads and then incorporate them into CPC, CPC–chitosan and CPC–chitosan–fiber scaffolds. Chitosan and degradable fibers were used to mechanically reinforce the scaffolds. After 21 days, that the percentage of live cells and the cell density of hBMSCs inside CPC-based constructs matched those in alginate without CPC, indicating that the CPC setting reaction did not harm the hBMSCs. Alkaline phosphate activity increased by 8-fold after 14 days. Mineral staining, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction confirmed that apatitic mineral was deposited by the cells. The amount of hBMSC-synthesized mineral in CPC–chitosan–fiber matched that in CPC without chitosan and fibers. Hence, adding chitosan and fibers, which reinforced the CPC, did not compromise hBMSC osteodifferentiation and mineral synthesis. In conclusion, hBMSCs were encapsulated in CPC and CPC–chitosan–fiber scaffolds for the first time. The encapsulated cells remained viable, osteodifferentiated and synthesized bone minerals. These self-setting, hBMSC-encapsulating CPC-based constructs may be promising for bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:20451676

  6. Reaction Mechanisms of Magnesium Potassium Phosphate Cement and its Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Fei

    Magnesium potassium phosphate cement (MKPC) is a kind of cementitious binder in which the chemical bond is formed via a heterogeneous acid-base reaction between dead burned magnesia powder and potassium phosphate solution at room temperature. Small amount of boron compounds can be incorporated in the cement as a setting retarder. The final reaction product of MgO-KH2PO4-H 2O ternary system is identified as magnesium potassium phosphate hexahydrate, MgKPO4·6H2O. However, the mechanisms and procedures through which this crystalline product is formed and the conditions under which the crystallization process would be influenced are not yet clear. Understanding of the reaction mechanism of the system is helpful for developing new methodologies to control the rapid reaction process and furthermore, to adjust the phase assemblage of the binder, and to enhance the macroscopic properties. This study is mainly focused on the examination of the reaction mechanism of MKPC. In addition, the formulation optimization, microstructure characterization and field application in rapid repair are also systematically studied. The chemical reactions between magnesia and potassium dihydrogen phosphate are essentially an acid-base reaction with strong heat release, the pH and temperature variation throughout the reaction process could provide useful information to disclose the different stages in the reaction. However, it would be very difficult to conduct such tests on the cement paste due to the limited water content and fast setting. In the current research, the reaction mechanism of MKPC is investigated on the diluted MKPC system through monitoring the pH and temperature development, identification of the solid phase formed, and measurement of the ionic concentration of the solution. The reaction process can be explained as follows: when magnesia and potassium phosphate powder are mixed with water, phosphate is readily dissolved, which is instantly followed by the dissociation of

  7. Anti-inflammation performance of curcumin-loaded mesoporous calcium silicate cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan-Chien; Shie, Ming-You; Wu, Yuan-Haw Andrew; Lee, Kai-Xing Alvin; Wei, Li-Ju; Shen, Yu-Fang

    2017-09-01

    Calcium silicate (CS) cements have excellent bioactivity and can induce the bone-like apatite formation. They are good biomaterials for bone tissue engineering and bone regenerative medicine. However, they have degradability and the dissolved CS can cause the inflammatory response at the early post-implantation stage. The purpose of this study was to design and prepare the curcumin-loaded mesoporous CS (MesoCS/curcumin) cements as a strategy to reduce the inflammatory reaction after implantation. The MesoCS/curcumin cements were designed and prepared. The characteristics of MesoCS/curcumin specimens were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Their physical properties, biocompatibility, and anti-inflammatory ability were also evaluated. The MesoCS/curcumin cements displayed excellent biocompatibility and physical properties. Their crystalline characterizations were very similar with MesoCS cements. After soaking in simulated body fluid, the bone-like apatite layer of the MesoCS/curcumin cements could be formed. In addition, it could inhibit the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) after inflammation reaction induced by lipopolysaccharides and had good anti-inflammatory ability. Adding curcumin in MesoCS cements can reduce the inflammatory reaction, but does not affect the original biological activity and properties of MesoCS cements. It can provide a good strategy to inhibit the inflammatory reaction after implantation for bone tissue engineering and bone regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Cytotoxicity and Bioactivity of Calcium Silicate Cements Combined with Niobium Oxide in Different Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestieri, Leticia Boldrin; Gomes-Cornélio, Ana Lívia; Rodrigues, Elisandra Márcia; Faria, Gisele; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Tanomaru-Filho, Mário

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity and bioactivity of calcium silicate-based cements combined with niobium oxide (Nb2O5) micro and nanoparticles, comparing the response in different cell lines. This evaluation used four cell lines: two primary cultures (human dental pulp cells - hDPCs and human dental follicle cells - hDFCs) and two immortalized cultures (human osteoblast-like cells - Saos-2 and mouse periodontal ligament cells - mPDL). The tested materials were: White Portland Cement (PC), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), white Portland cement combined with microparticles (PC/Nb2O5µ) or nanoparticles (PC/Nb2O5n) of niobium oxide (Nb2O5). Cytotoxicity was evaluated by the methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and trypan blue exclusion assays and bioactivity by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) enzyme activity. Results were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test (a=0.05). PC/Nb2O5n presented similar or higher cell viability than PC/Nb2O5µ in all cell lines. Moreover, the materials presented similar or higher cell viability than MTA. Saos-2 exhibited high ALP activity, highlighting PC/Nb2O5µ material at 7 days of exposure. In conclusion, calcium silicate cements combined with micro and nanoparticles of Nb2O5 presented cytocompatibility and bioactivity, demonstrating the potential of Nb2O5 as an alternative radiopacifier agent for these cements. The different cell lines had similar response to cytotoxicity evaluation of calcium silicate cements. However, bioactivity was more accurately detected in human osteoblast-like cell line, Saos-2.

  9. The influence of calcium nitrate on setting and hardening rate of Portland cement concrete at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kičaitė, A.; Pundienė, I.; Skripkiūnas, G.

    2017-10-01

    Calcium nitrate in mortars and concrete is used as a multifunctional additive: as set accelerator, plasticizer, long term strength enhancer and as antifreeze admixture. Used binding material and the amount of calcium nitrate, affect the characteristics of the concrete mixture and strength of hardened concrete. The setting time of the initial and the final binding at different temperatures of hardening (+ 20 °C and + 5 °C) of the pastes made of different cements (Portland cement CEM I 42.5 R and Portland limestone cement CEM II/A-LL 42.5 R) and various amounts of calcium nitrate from 1 % until 3 % were investigated. The effect of calcium nitrate on technological characteristics of concrete mixture (the consistency of the mixture, the density, and the amount of air in the mixture), on early concrete strength after 2 and 7 days, as well as on standard concrete strength after 28 days at different temperatures (at + 20 °C and + 5 °C) were analysed.

  10. Calculation of calcium diffusion coefficient of cement hardenings using minute pore data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hitomi, Takashi; Takeda, Nobufumi; Iriya, Keishiro

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the calculations of the diffusion coefficient of the Ca ion of cement hardenings using minute pore data. The observed hardenings were ordinary Portland cement (OPC), low-heat Portland cement with fly ash (LPC+FA) and highly fly ash containing silica fume cement (HFSC). The samples were cured in the standard and artificially leached by accelerated test. Minute pore datas of the cement hardenings were acquired with image processing of internal structural information obtained from high resolution X-ray computed tomography observations. Upon analysis, several voxels are combined into one bigger voxel, the diffusion coefficient of the voxels were determined in proportion to the number of voxels which were included in. The results reveal that the change in the calcium diffusion coefficient of OPC due to leaching was large, but the LPC+FA and HFSC cements exhibited even greater changes than OPC. It is suggested that the diffusion coefficients are proportional to the Ca/Si ratio of the samples. (author)

  11. Casein Aggregates Built Step-by-Step on Charged Polyelectrolyte Film Surfaces Are Calcium Phosphate-cemented*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Krisztina; Pilbat, Ana-Maria; Groma, Géza; Szalontai, Balázs; Cuisinier, Frédéric J. G.

    2010-01-01

    The possible mechanism of casein aggregation and micelle buildup was studied in a new approach by letting α-casein adsorb from low concentration (0.1 mg·ml−1) solutions onto the charged surfaces of polyelectrolyte films. It was found that α-casein could adsorb onto both positively and negatively charged surfaces. However, only when its negative phosphoseryl clusters remained free, i.e. when it adsorbed onto a negative surface, could calcium phosphate (CaP) nanoclusters bind to the casein molecules. Once the CaP clusters were in place, step-by-step building of multilayered casein architectures became possible. The presence of CaP was essential; neither Ca2+ nor phosphate could alone facilitate casein aggregation. Thus, it seems that CaP is the organizing motive in the casein micelle formation. Atomic force microscopy revealed that even a single adsorbed casein layer was composed of very small (in the range of tens of nanometers) spherical forms. The stiffness of the adsorbed casein layer largely increased in the presence of CaP. On this basis, we can imagine that casein micelles emerge according to the following scheme. The amphipathic casein monomers aggregate into oligomers via hydrophobic interactions even in the absence of CaP. Full scale, CaP-carrying micelles could materialize by interlocking these casein oligomers with CaP nanoclusters. Such a mechanism would not contradict former experimental results and could offer a synthesis between the submicelle and the block copolymer models of casein micelles. PMID:20921229

  12. Impact of Fuel Selection on Techno-environmental Performance of Post-combustion Calcium Looping Process Applied to a Cement Plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schakel, Wouter; Orregioni, Gabriel; Strømman, Anders; Ramirez, Andrea

    Calcium looping CO2 capture is a promising technology to reduce CO2 emissions from cement production. Coal is generally considered the fuel used to drive the calcium looping process as coal is already used as feedstock for cement production. This study assesses the impact of different fuels (coal,

  13. Nanostructure of Calcium Silicate Hydrates in Cements

    KAUST Repository

    Skinner, L. B.; Chae, S. R.; Benmore, C. J.; Wenk, H. R.; Monteiro, P. J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is the major volume phase in the matrix of Portland cement concrete. Total x-ray scattering measurements with synchrotron x rays on synthetic CSH(I) shows nanocrystalline ordering with a particle diameter of 3.5(5) nm, similar to a size-broadened 1.1 nm tobermorite crystal structure. The CSH component in hydrated tricalcium silicate is found to be similar to CSH(I). Only a slight bend and additional disorder within the CaO sheets is required to explain its nanocrystalline structure. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  14. Nanostructure of Calcium Silicate Hydrates in Cements

    KAUST Repository

    Skinner, L. B.

    2010-05-11

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is the major volume phase in the matrix of Portland cement concrete. Total x-ray scattering measurements with synchrotron x rays on synthetic CSH(I) shows nanocrystalline ordering with a particle diameter of 3.5(5) nm, similar to a size-broadened 1.1 nm tobermorite crystal structure. The CSH component in hydrated tricalcium silicate is found to be similar to CSH(I). Only a slight bend and additional disorder within the CaO sheets is required to explain its nanocrystalline structure. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  15. Bioactivity tests of calcium phosphates with variant molar ratios of main components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluta, Klaudia; Sobczak-Kupiec, Agnieszka; Półtorak, Olga; Malina, Dagmara; Tyliszczak, Bożena

    2018-03-09

    Calcium phosphates constitute attractive materials of biomedical applications. Among them particular attention is devoted to bioactive hydroxyapatite (HAp) and bioresorbable tricalcium phosphate (TCP) that possess ability to bind to living bones and can be used clinically as important bone substitutes. Notably, in vivo bone bioactivity can be predicted from apatite formation of bone immersed in SBF fluids. Thus, analyses of behavior of calcium phosphates immersed in various bio fluids are of great importance. Recently, stoichiometric HAp and TCP structures have been widely studied, whereas only limited number of publications have been devoted to analyses of nonstoichiometric calcium phosphates. Here, we report physicochemical analysis of natural and synthetic phosphates with variable Ca/P molar ratios. Subsequently attained structures were subjected to incubation in either artificial saliva or Ringer's fluids. Both pH and conductivity of such fluids were determined before and after incubation. Furthermore, the influence of the Ca/P values on such parameters was exemplified. Physicochemical analysis of received materials was performed by XRD and FT-IR characterization techniques. Their potential antibacterial activity and behavior in the presence of infectious microorganisms as Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus was also evaluated. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of nanostructured powders of hydroxyapatite and β-calcium phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prants, W.T.; Muller, D.T.; Orzechowski, L.G.; Feit, G.; Delima, S.A.; Camargo, N.H.A.; Gemelli, E., E-mail: w_prants@hotmail.com, E-mail: danielt_muller@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: sarahamindelima@hotmail.com, E-mail: dem2nhac@joinville.udesc.br, E-mail: gemelli@joinville.udesc.br [Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina (UDESC), Joinville, SC (Brazil). Campus Universitario Prof. Avelino Marcante

    2009-07-01

    Biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) bioceramics are composed in a general manner from a mixture between hydroxyapatite (HA), and β-calcium phosphate. In the recent years, the BCP bioceramics are pointed out in researches from regeneration and reconstitution in osseous tissue, in reason of their similar mineralogical characteristics of the human bone structure, as great biodegradation, absorption and formation of precocious osseous tissue. The biphasic materials (BCP) are detached for use in medical and dental application, as filling bone cavities, maxillofacial treatment, medicaments discharge for treatment cancerous osteomyelitis and antibiotics discharge related with orthopedic injuries reparation. The aim of this work focused in synthesis and characterization of hydroxyapatite and β-calcium phosphate. The presented results are related with the mineralogical characterization with X-ray diffraction, thermal behavior with Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Dilatometer. The Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM) was used to help in the morphological characterization of the nanostructured powders. (author)

  17. Synthesis and characterization of nanostructured powders of hydroxyapatite and β-calcium phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prants, W.T.; Muller, D.T.; Orzechowski, L.G.; Feit, G.; Delima, S.A.; Camargo, N.H.A.; Gemelli, E.

    2009-01-01

    Biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) bioceramics are composed in a general manner from a mixture between hydroxyapatite (HA), and β-calcium phosphate. In the recent years, the BCP bioceramics are pointed out in researches from regeneration and reconstitution in osseous tissue, in reason of their similar mineralogical characteristics of the human bone structure, as great biodegradation, absorption and formation of precocious osseous tissue. The biphasic materials (BCP) are detached for use in medical and dental application, as filling bone cavities, maxillofacial treatment, medicaments discharge for treatment cancerous osteomyelitis and antibiotics discharge related with orthopedic injuries reparation. The aim of this work focused in synthesis and characterization of hydroxyapatite and β-calcium phosphate. The presented results are related with the mineralogical characterization with X-ray diffraction, thermal behavior with Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Dilatometer. The Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM) was used to help in the morphological characterization of the nanostructured powders. (author)

  18. Removal of radioactive waste waters by calcium phosphate precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raicevic, S.; Vukovic, Z.; Mandic, M.

    1997-01-01

    The kinetics of removal of radioactive strontium by coprecipitation and sorption with amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) which transformed into stable crystalline hydroxyapatite (HA) were investigated. The advantage of phosphate precipitation is a possibility not only for removal of radioactive strontium but also for incorporation of a strontium ion into stable structure of HA. calcium phosphate was precipitated from highly saturated solution by fast reagent mixing. Kinetic experiments were performed using strontium nitrate solution labeled with 8 5 Sr. The amount of radionuclide uptake by the solid phase was determined radiometrically at different time intervals. It was found that ACP phase firmly retains coprecipitated impurities up to 150 min, of reaction time when partial rejection of strontium into the solution occurred. In sorption experiments after prolonged time of equilibrium the firm incorporation of 8 5 Sr stable crystalline structure of HA was detected. The incorporation of 8 5 Sr into crystalline HA was analysed in detail in the paper /S. Raicevic, et. al., J. Radioanal. Nucl. Chem., Articles, Vol. 204, No 2, 1996/ (author)

  19. Adsorption and release of amino acids mixture onto apatitic calcium phosphates analogous to bone mineral

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Rhilassi, A.; Mourabet, M.; El Boujaady, H.; Bennani-Ziatni, M.; Hamri, R. El; Taitai, A.

    2012-10-01

    Study focused on the interaction of adsorbate with poorly crystalline apatitic calcium phosphates analogous to bone mineral. Calcium phosphates prepared in water-ethanol medium at physiological temperature (37 °C) and neutral pH, their Ca/P ratio was between 1.33 and 1.67. Adsorbate used in this paper takes the mixture form of two essential amino acids L-lysine and DL-leucine which have respectively a character hydrophilic and hydrophobic. Adsorption and release are investigated experimentally; they are dependent on the phosphate type and on the nature of adsorbate L-lysine, DL-leucine and their mixture. Adsorption of mixture of amino acids on the apatitic calcium phosphates is influenced by the competition between the two amino acids: L-lysine and DL-leucine which exist in the medium reaction. The adsorption kinetics is very fast while the release kinetics is slow. The chemical composition of apatite has an influence on both adsorption and release. The interactions adsorbate-adsorbent are electrostatic type. Adsorption and release reactions of the amino acid mixture are explained by the existence of the hydrated surface layer of calcium phosphate apatite. The charged sbnd COOsbnd and sbnd NH3+ of adsorbates are the strongest groups that interact with the surface of apatites, the adsorption is mainly due to the electrostatic interaction between the groups sbnd COOsbnd of amino acids and calcium Ca2+ ions of the apatite. Comparative study of interactions between adsorbates (L-lysine, DL-leucine and their mixture) and apatitic calcium phosphates is carried out in vitro by using UV-vis and infrared spectroscopy IR techniques.

  20. Inorganic Corrosion-Inhibitive Pigments for High-Temperature Alkali-activated Well Casing Foam Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pyatina, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-11-14

    This study evaluates inorganic pigments for improving carbon steel (CS) brine-corrosion protection by the sodium metasilicate-activated calcium aluminate cement/Fly Ash blend at 300°C. Calcium borosilicate (CBS) and zinc phosphate, significantly improved CS corrosion-protection by decreasing cement’s permeability for corrosive ions and inhibiting anodic corrosion. An amorphous Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O phase tightly attached to CS surface formed at 300oC in CBS-modified cement pore solution. The corrosion rate of the CS covered with this phase was nearly 4-fold lower than in the case of nonmodified cement pore solution where the major phase formed on the surface of CS was crystalline analcime.

  1. Inorganic Corrosion-Inhibitive Pigments for High-Temperature Alkali-activated Well Casing Foam Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pyatina, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-11-01

    This study evaluates inorganic pigments for improving carbon steel (CS) brine-corrosion protection by the sodium metasilicate-activated calcium aluminate cement/Fly Ash blend at 300°C. Calcium borosilicate (CBS) and zinc phosphate, significantly improved CS corrosion-protection by decreasing cement’s permeability for corrosive ions and inhibiting anodic corrosion. An amorphous Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O phase tightly attached to CS surface formed at 300oC in CBS-modified cement pore solution. The corrosion rate of the CS covered with this phase was nearly 4-fold lower than in the case of nonmodified cement pore solution where the major phase formed on the surface of CS was crystalline analcime.

  2. Stabilisation of clayey soils with high calcium fly ash and cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Kolias; V. Kasselouri-Rigopoulou; A. Karahalios [National Technical University of Athens, Athens (Greece)

    2005-02-01

    The effectiveness of using high calcium fly ash and cement in stabilising fine-grained clayey soils (CL,CH) was investigated in the laboratory. Strength tests in uniaxial compression, in indirect (splitting) tension and flexure were carried out on samples to which various percentages of fly ash and cement had been added. Modulus of elasticity was determined at 90 days with different types of load application and 90-day soaked CBR values are also reported. Pavement structures incorporating subgrades improved by in situ stabilisation with fly ash and cement were analyzed for construction traffic and for operating traffic. These pavements are compared with conventional flexible pavements without improved subgrades and the results clearly show the technical benefits of stabilising clayey soils with fly ash and cement. In addition TG-SDTA and XRD tests were carried out on certain samples in order to study the hydraulic compounds, which were formed.

  3. Compressive strength and magnetic properties of calcium silicate-zirconia-iron (III) oxide composite cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridzwan, Hendrie Johann Muhamad; Shamsudin, Roslinda; Ismail, Hamisah; Yusof, Mohd Reusmaazran; Hamid, Muhammad Azmi Abdul; Awang, Rozidawati Binti

    2018-04-01

    In this study, ZrO2 microparticles and γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles have been added into calcium silicate based cements. The purpose of this experiment was to investigate the compressive strength and magnetic properties of the prepared composite cement. Calcium silicate (CAS) powder was prepared by hydrothermal method. SiO2 and CaO obtained from rice husk ash and limestone respectively were autoclaved at 135 °C for 8 h and sintered at 950°C to obtain CAS powder. SiO2:CaO ratio was set at 45:55. CAS/ZrO2 sample were prepared with varying ZrO2 microparticles concentrations by 0-40 wt. %. Compressive strength value of CAS/ZrO2 cements range from 1.44 to 2.44 MPa. CAS/ZrO2/γ-Fe2O3 sample with 40 wt. % ZrO2 were prepared with varying γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles concentrations (1-5 wt. %). The additions of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles showed up to twofold increase in the compressive strength of the cement. X-Ray diffraction (XRD) results confirm the formation of mixed phases in the produced composite cements. Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) analysis revealed that the ferromagnetic behaviour has been observed in CAS/ZrO2/γ-Fe2O3 composite cements.

  4. Murine osteoblastic and osteoclastic differentiation on strontium releasing hydroxyapatite forming cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Satish S., E-mail: sss42@pitt.edu [Department of Chemical & Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Roy, Abhijit, E-mail: abr20@pitt.edu [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Lee, Boeun, E-mail: bol11@pitt.edu [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Parekh, Shrey, E-mail: smp116@pitt.edu [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Kumta, Prashant N., E-mail: pkumta@pitt.edu [Department of Chemical & Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Center for Craniofacial Regeneration, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Center for Complex Engineered Multifunctional Materials, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Ionic substitutions in hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds and self-setting cements containing Sr{sup 2+} ions incorporated are particularly of interest in bone regeneration. To date, the approach widely used to incorporate Sr{sup 2+} ions into HA cements has been the addition of Sr{sup 2+} containing salts, such as SrCO{sub 3}, SrCl{sub 2} ∙ 6H{sub 2}O, or SrHPO{sub 4}. However, this approach is dependent upon the relative solubility of Sr{sup 2+} containing salts with respect to calcium phosphate (CaP) precursors. Therefore, in the current study Sr{sup 2+} substituted dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) was first synthesized and directly reacted with tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) to form Sr{sup 2+} substituted HA forming cements. Rietveld refinement indicated that after one week of aging in phosphate buffered saline, cements prepared with and without Sr{sup 2+} were composed of 75% HA and 25% unreacted TTCP by weight. Cements prepared with 10% Sr{sup 2+} DCPD exhibited increased compressive strengths in comparison to unsubstituted cements. Increased MC3T3-E1 proliferation and differentiation were also observed on the cements prepared with increasing Sr{sup 2+} content. It was concluded that both the scaffold microstructure and Sr{sup 2+} ion release supported osteogenic differentiation. With respect to osteoclastic differentiation, no statistically significant differences in TRAP activity or cell morphology were observed. This suggests that the amount of Sr{sup 2+} released may have been too low to influence osteoclast formation in comparison to unsubstituted cements. The results obtained herein demonstrate that the use of Sr{sup 2+} substituted DCPD precursors rather than individually separate Sr{sup 2+} containing salts may be a useful approach to prepare Sr{sup 2+} containing HA cements. - Highlights: • Sr{sup 2+} containing HA cement was prepared by reacting TTCP with Sr{sup 2+} substituted DCPD. • Cements with increased Sr{sup 2+} supported increased

  5. Phase stability of silver particles embedded calcium phosphate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper, we report the compositional variation-dependent phase stability of hydroxyapatite ... material along with other calcium phosphate bioceramics.3–5 ... Model U-3310). ... recorded using a Field Emissio scanning electron microscope .... the colour change of the silver-doped samples only after sin-.

  6. Incorporation of phosphorus guest ions in the calcium silicate phases of Portland cement from 31P MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Søren L; Jakobsen, Hans J; Skibsted, Jørgen

    2010-06-21

    Portland cements may contain small quantities of phosphorus (typically below 0.5 wt % P(2)O(5)), originating from either the raw materials or alternative sources of fuel used to heat the cement kilns. This work reports the first (31)P MAS NMR study of anhydrous and hydrated Portland cements that focuses on the phase and site preferences of the (PO(4))(3-) guest ions in the main clinker phases and hydration products. The observed (31)P chemical shifts (10 to -2 ppm), the (31)P chemical shift anisotropy, and the resemblance of the lineshapes in the (31)P and (29)Si MAS NMR spectra strongly suggest that (PO(4))(3-) units are incorporated in the calcium silicate phases, alite (Ca(3)SiO(5)) and belite (Ca(2)SiO(4)), by substitution for (SiO(4))(4-) tetrahedra. This assignment is further supported by a determination of the spin-lattice relaxation times for (31)P in alite and belite, which exhibit the same ratio as observed for the corresponding (29)Si relaxation times. From simulations of the intensities, observed in inversion-recovery spectra for a white Portland cement, it is deduced that 1.3% and 2.1% of the Si sites in alite and belite, respectively, are replaced by phosphorus. Charge balance may potentially be achieved to some extent by a coupled substitution mechanism where Ca(2+) is replaced by Fe(3+) ions, which may account for the interaction of the (31)P spins with paramagnetic Fe(3+) ions as observed for the ordinary Portland cements. A minor fraction of phosphorus may also be present in the separate phase Ca(3)(PO(4))(2), as indicated by the observation of a narrow resonance at delta((31)P) = 3.0 ppm for two of the studied cements. (31)P{(1)H} CP/MAS NMR spectra following the hydration of a white Portland cement show that the resonances from the hydrous phosphate species fall in the same spectral range as observed for (PO(4))(3-) incorporated in alite. This similarity and the absence of a large (31)P chemical shift ansitropy indicate that the hydrous (PO(4

  7. Zinc phosphate as a definitive cement for implant-supported crowns and fixed dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flanagan D

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Dennis Flanagan Private Practice, Willimantic, CT, USA Abstract: Implant-supported dental prostheses can be retained by a screw or cement. Implant-supported fixed partial dentures have a passive fit. A passive fit means there is an internal gap between the abutment surface and the intaglio of the retainer to insure that there is no lateral pressure on the supporting implants or friction upon seating of the prosthesis. This gap is filled with cement for retention of the prosthesis. Any lateral pressure may cause marginal bone loss or periimplantitis. Also, there is usually a microscopic gap at the margin of a crown retainer that exposes the cement to oral fluids. The solubility of zinc phosphate (ZOP cement is a definite liability due to the risk for cement dissolution. In fixed prostheses, the dissolution of the cement of one or more retainers would cause a transfer of the occlusal load to the retained unit(s. The resulting rotation and lifting of the cement-retained implants from occlusal and parafunctional loads could cause loss of osseointegration of the abutment-retained implant(s. ZOP cement may not be indicated for implant-supported fixed partial dentures or splints. Cement dissolution in single unit probably only involves re-cementation, if the patient does not swallow or aspirate the crown. Keywords: passive fit, retention, film thickness, fixed, marginal gap 

  8. Corrosion control of galvanized steel using a phosphate/calcium ion inhibitor mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zin, I.M.; Lyon, S.B.; Pokhmurskii, V.I.

    2003-01-01

    The corrosion inhibition of galvanized steel was studied in artificial acid rain solution using extracts of pigments normally used in organic coatings for corrosion control. It was established that a combination of zinc phosphate/molybdate and calcium ion exchange silica has a significant synergetic anticorrosion effect in the acid rain solution compared to the pigments used alone. Further, the charge transfer resistance of galvanized steel in acid rain solution saturated by the above pigment blend approaches that of strontium chromate in artificial acid rain solution. Use of the pigment blend was found to lead to development of a protective film, which is thought to be a complex mixture of calcium phosphates and zinc phosphate

  9. Biocompatible and colloidally stabilized mPEG-PE/calcium phosphate hybrid nanoparticles loaded with siRNAs targeting tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Pei; Zhang, Xiangyu; Wang, Hongzhi; Zhang, Qinghong; Li, He; Li, Yaogang; Duan, Yourong

    2015-01-01

    Calcium phosphate nanoparticles are safe and effective delivery vehicles for small interfering RNA (siRNA), as a result of their excellent biocompatibility. In this work, mPEG-PE (polyethylene glycol-L-?-phosphatidylethanolamine) was synthesized and used to prepare nanoparticles composed of mPEG-PE and calcium phosphate for siRNA delivery. Calcium phosphate and mPEG-PE formed the stable hybrid nanoparticles through self-assembly resulting from electrostatic interaction in water. The average s...

  10. Tailoring the structure of biphasic calcium phosphate via synthesis procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, S. F.; El-dek, S. I.; Ahmed, M. K.

    2017-12-01

    Nano calcium phosphate ceramics (CaPC) were synthesized using simple co-precipitation method at different preparation conditions. The selected Ca/P ratio with a variation of pH value lead to formation of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) at pH 5 and 6 while, hydroxyapatite (HAP) nano particles were formed at pH 9 and 12 at room temperature. The crystallite size was in the range of 15-55 nm depending on the obtained crystalline phase. The study displayed variation of decomposition depending on the annealing temperature. The significant note is the different transformation trend of each phase depending on the starting pH value. The HRTEM illustrated that the DCPD phase was formed as fibers with diameter around 4-6 nm, while HAP was formed in rod shape. The aspect ratio decreased from 6.6 at pH 9 to 4 at pH 12 which refer to the great influence of pH value on the morphology of calcium phosphates.

  11. Enzymatic pH control for biomimetic deposition of calcium phosphate coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, A.W.G.; Nejadnik, M.R.; Nudelman, F.; Walboomers, X.F.; Riet, J. te; Habibovic, P.; Tahmasebi Birgani, Z.; Li, Y.; Bomans, P.H.; Jansen, J.A.; Sommerdijk, N.A.; Leeuwenburgh, S.C.G.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examines the enzymatic decomposition of urea into carbon dioxide and ammonia as a means to increase the pH during biomimetic deposition of calcium phosphate (CaP) onto implant surfaces. The kinetics of the enzymatically induced pH increase were studied by monitoring pH, calcium

  12. A comparative study of retentive strengths of zinc phosphate, polycarboxylate and glass ionomer cements with stainless steel crowns - an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunath Reddy, M H; Subba Reddy, V V; Basappa, N

    2010-01-01

    An in vitro study was conducted to compare the retentive strengths of zinc phosphate, polycarboxylate and glass ionomer cements using Instron universal testing machine. Thirty preformed and pretrimmed stainless steel crowns were used for cementation on 30 extracted human primary molars which were divided into three groups of 10 teeth in each group. Then the teeth were stored in artificial saliva and incubated at 37°C for 24 h. A load was applied on to the crown and was gradually increased till the crown showed dislodgement, and then the readings were recorded using Instron recorder and analyzed for statistical significance. The surface area of crown was measured by graphical method. The retentive strength was expressed in terms of kg/cm 2 , which was calculated by the equation load divided by area. Retentive strengths of zinc phosphate (ranged from a minimum of 16.93 to amaximum of 28.13 kg/cm 2 with mean of 21.28 kg/cm 2 ) and glass ionomer cement (minimum of 13.69 - 28.15 kg/cm 2 with mean of 20.69 kg/cm 2 ) were greater than that of polycarboxylate cement (minimum of 13.26 - 22.69 kg/cm 2 with mean of 16.79 kg/cm 2 ). Negligible difference (0.59 kg/cm 2 ) of retentive strength was observed between zinc phosphate (21.28 kg/cm 2 ) and glass ionomer cements (20.69 kg/cm 2 ). Glass ionomer cements can be recommended for cementation of stainless steel crowns because of its advantages and the retentive strength was almost similar to that of zinc phosphate cement.

  13. Ossification Vesicles with Calcium Phosphate in the Eyes of the Insect Copium teucrii (Hemiptera: Tingidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Garcia-Guinea

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Arthropod eyes are built of repeating units named ommatidia. Each single ommatidium unit contains a cluster of photoreceptor cells surrounded by support cells and pigment cells. The insect Copium eye ommatidia include additional calcium-phosphate deposits, not described in insects to date, which can be examined today using a combined set of modern microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. Teucrium gnaphalodes L'Her plants, growing in central Spain, develop galls induced by Copium insects. A survey of C. teucrii adult specimens resulted in surprising environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM images, showing that their bright red eyes contain a calcium-phosphate mineralization. A complete survey of Copium eye specimens was performed by ESEM using energy-dispersive spectroscopy, backscattered electron detector and cathodoluminescence (CL probes, field emission scanning electron microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy in order to learn ommatidia features, such as chemical composition, molecular structure, cell membrane, and internal ommatidium eye fluids and calcium-phosphate distribution deposits. The CL panchromatic images distinguish between the calcium-phosphate ommatidium and calcium-phosphate setae, which are more apatite rich. They show Raman bands attributable to bone tissue apatite biomaterials, such as bone, collagen, lipids, and blood, i.e., peptides, amide-S, amide-II, amide-III, and cytochrome P-450scc. The chemical composition of both galls and leaves of T. gnaphalodes was determined by gas chromatography – mass spectrometry (GC-MS of their extracts. The spectrometric and microscopic images reveal that the calcium-phosphate mineralization is formed and constrained to Copium ommatidia, which are both matrix vesicles generating mixtures of apatite collagen and operational compound eyes of the insect.

  14. Nanostructured silicate substituted calcium phosphate (NanoSiCaPs) nanoparticles — Efficient calcium phosphate based non-viral gene delivery systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shekhar, Sudhanshu [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Center for Complex Engineered Multifunctional Materials, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); McGowan Institute of Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Roy, Abhijit; Hong, Daeho [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Kumta, Prashant N., E-mail: pkumta@pitt.edu [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Center for Complex Engineered Multifunctional Materials, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); McGowan Institute of Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Nanostructured ceramic particles, particularly, nanoparticles of calcium phosphate (CaP) remain an attractive option among the various types of non-viral gene delivery vectors studied because of their safety, biocompatibility, biodegradability, and ease of handling as well as their adsorptive capacity for DNA. We have accordingly developed an enhanced version of nanostructured calcium phosphates (NanoCaPs), by substituting known amounts of silicate for phosphate in the hydroxyapatite (HA) lattice (NanoSiCaPs). Results indicate that in addition to the excellent transfection levels exhibited by un-substituted NanoCaPs alone in vitro, an additional 20–50% increase in transfection is observed for NanoCaPs containing 8.3–50 mol% silicate aptly called NanoSiCaPs, owing to its rapid dissolution properties enabling nanoparticles escaping the lysosomal degradation. However, high silicate substitution (> 50 mol%) resulted in a drastic decline in transfection as the synthesized NanoCaPs deviated far from the characteristic hydroxyapatite phase formed as evidenced by the materials characterization results. - Highlights: • Successful demonstration of nanostructured NanoSiCaPs formation • Demonstration of superior transfection of NanoSiCaPs contrasted to NanoCaPs • Silicate substitution leads to smaller aggregates of nanoparticle complexes. • Enhanced dissolution of NanoSiCaPs demonstrated • Faster NanoSiCaPs dissolution leads to escape of pDNA from lysosomal degradation.

  15. Characterization of calcium phosphate powders originating from Phyllacanthus imperialis and Trochidae Infundibulum concavus marine shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tămăşan, M.; Ozyegin, L.S.; Oktar, F.N.; Simon, V.

    2013-01-01

    The study reports the preparation and characterization of powders consisting of the different phases of calcium phosphates that were obtained from the naturally derived raw materials of sea-shell origins reacted with H 3 PO 4 . Species of sea origin, such as corals and nacres, attracted a special interest in bone tissue engineering area. Nacre shells are built up of calcium carbonate in aragonite form crystallized in an organic matrix. In this work two natural marine origin materials (shells of echinoderm Sputnik sea urchin — Phyllacanthus imperialis and Trochidae Infundibulum concavus mollusk) were involved in the developing powders of calcium phosphate based biomaterials (as raw materials for bone-scaffolds) by hotplate and ultrasound methods. Thermal analyses of the as-prepared materials were made for an assessment of the thermal behavior and heat treatment temperatures. Samples from both sea shells each of them prepared by the above mentioned methods were subjected to thermal treatments at 450 °C and 850 °C in order to evaluate the crystalline transformations of the calcium phosphate structures in the heating process. By X-ray diffraction analyses various calcium phosphate phases were identified. In Sputnik sea urchins originated samples were found predominantly brushite and calcite as a small secondary phase, while in Trochidae I. concavus samples mainly monetite and HA phases were identified. Thermal treatment at 850 °C resulted flat-plate whitlockite crystals — β-MgTCP [(Ca, Mg) 3 (PO 4 ) 2 ] for both samples regardless the preparation method (ultrasound or hotplate) or the targeted Ca/P molar ratio according with XRD patterns. Scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy were involved more in the characterization of these materials and the good correlations of the results of these methods were made. - Highlights: ► Calcium phosphate powders are obtained from the crushed shells of 2 “marine” species and H 3 PO 4

  16. Characterization of calcium phosphate powders originating from Phyllacanthus imperialis and Trochidae Infundibulum concavus marine shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tămăşan, M., E-mail: monica.tamasan@phys.ubbcluj.ro [Babeş-Bolyai University, Faculty of Physics and Interdisciplinary Research Institute on Bio-Nano-Sciences, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Ozyegin, L.S. [Marmara University, Istanbul (Turkey); Oktar, F.N. [Marmara University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Bioengineering, Göztepe Campus, Kadıköy 34722, Istanbul (Turkey); Marmara University, School of Health Related Professions, Department of Medical Imaging Technics, Haydarpaşa Campus, Tıbbiye Street, 49, Üsküdar 34668, Istanbul (Turkey); Marmara University, Nanotechnology and Biomaterials Application and Research Centre, Göztepe Campus, Kadıköy 34722, Istanbul (Turkey); Simon, V. [Babeş-Bolyai University, Faculty of Physics and Interdisciplinary Research Institute on Bio-Nano-Sciences, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-07-01

    The study reports the preparation and characterization of powders consisting of the different phases of calcium phosphates that were obtained from the naturally derived raw materials of sea-shell origins reacted with H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. Species of sea origin, such as corals and nacres, attracted a special interest in bone tissue engineering area. Nacre shells are built up of calcium carbonate in aragonite form crystallized in an organic matrix. In this work two natural marine origin materials (shells of echinoderm Sputnik sea urchin — Phyllacanthus imperialis and Trochidae Infundibulum concavus mollusk) were involved in the developing powders of calcium phosphate based biomaterials (as raw materials for bone-scaffolds) by hotplate and ultrasound methods. Thermal analyses of the as-prepared materials were made for an assessment of the thermal behavior and heat treatment temperatures. Samples from both sea shells each of them prepared by the above mentioned methods were subjected to thermal treatments at 450 °C and 850 °C in order to evaluate the crystalline transformations of the calcium phosphate structures in the heating process. By X-ray diffraction analyses various calcium phosphate phases were identified. In Sputnik sea urchins originated samples were found predominantly brushite and calcite as a small secondary phase, while in Trochidae I. concavus samples mainly monetite and HA phases were identified. Thermal treatment at 850 °C resulted flat-plate whitlockite crystals — β-MgTCP [(Ca, Mg){sub 3} (PO{sub 4}){sub 2}] for both samples regardless the preparation method (ultrasound or hotplate) or the targeted Ca/P molar ratio according with XRD patterns. Scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy were involved more in the characterization of these materials and the good correlations of the results of these methods were made. - Highlights: ► Calcium phosphate powders are obtained from the crushed shells of 2

  17. Synthesis and characterization of nanocomposite powders of calcium phosphate/titanium oxide for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delima, S.A.; Camargo, N.H.A.; Souza, J.C.P.; Gemelli, E., E-mail: sarahamindelima@hotmail.com, E-mail: dem2nhac@joinville.udesc.br, E-mail: souzajulio@joinville.udesc.br, E-mail: gemelli@joinville.udesc.br [Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina (UDESC), Joinville, SC (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Tecnologicas

    2009-07-01

    The nanostructured bioceramics of calcium phosphate are current themes of research and they are becoming important as bone matrix in regeneration of tissues in orthopedic and dental applications. Nanocomposite powders of calcium phosphate, reinforced with nanometric particles of titanium oxide, silica oxide and alumina oxid ealpha, are being widely studied because they offer new microstructures, nanostructures and interconnected microporosity with high superficial area of micropores that contribute to osteointegration and osteoinduction processes. This study is about the synthesis of nanocomposites powders of calcium phosphate reinforced with 1%, 2%, 3% and 5% in volume of titanium oxide and its characterization through the techniques of X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA), Thermogravimetry (TG) and Dilatometry. (author)

  18. Synthesis and characterization of nanocomposite powders of calcium phosphate/titanium oxide for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delima, S.A.; Camargo, N.H.A.; Souza, J.C.P.; Gemelli, E.

    2009-01-01

    The nanostructured bioceramics of calcium phosphate are current themes of research and they are becoming important as bone matrix in regeneration of tissues in orthopedic and dental applications. Nanocomposite powders of calcium phosphate, reinforced with nanometric particles of titanium oxide, silica oxide and alumina oxid ealpha, are being widely studied because they offer new microstructures, nanostructures and interconnected microporosity with high superficial area of micropores that contribute to osteointegration and osteoinduction processes. This study is about the synthesis of nanocomposites powders of calcium phosphate reinforced with 1%, 2%, 3% and 5% in volume of titanium oxide and its characterization through the techniques of X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA), Thermogravimetry (TG) and Dilatometry. (author)

  19. Calcium phosphate formation from sea urchin - (brissus latecarinatus via modified mechano-chemical (ultrasonic conversion method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Samur

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to produce apatite structures, such as hydroxyapatite (HA and fluorapatite (FA, from precursor calcium phosphates of biological origin, namely from sea urchin, with mechano-chemical stirring and hot-plating conversion method. The produced materials were heat treated at 800 °C for 4 hours. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM studies were conducted. Calcium phosphate phases were developed. The SEM images showed the formation of micro to nano-powders. The experimental results suggest that sea urchin, Brissus latecarinatus skeleton could be an alternative source for the production of various mono or biphasic calcium phosphates with simple and economic mechano-chemical (ultrasonic conversion method.

  20. Processing and properties of calcium phosphates bioceramics by hot isostatic pressing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boilet Laurent

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Stoichiometric β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP, hydroxyapatite (HA and biphasic calcium phosphate (TCP/HA 60/40 %wt, BCP40 powders were synthesized by chemical precipitation of aqueous solutions of diammonium phosphate and calcium nitrate. After a calcination treatment and a milling step, powders were shaped by slip-casting. The sintering temperature effect on the density and the average grain size was investigated. By natural sintering, densities between 98 and 99.8% were obtained. Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP treatment was carried out after a pre-sintering of these materials. Transparent or translucent samples were obtained, indicating a relative density very close to the theoretical value (>99.9%. Mechanical properties (three-point bending strength, fracture toughness, Young's modulus and Vickers hardness were measured on hipped materials with similar grain size (∼0.7μm.

  1. Use of a strontium-enriched calcium phosphate cement in accelerating the healing of soft-tissue tendon graft within the bone tunnel in a rabbit model of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, G M; Yau, W P; Lu, W W; Chiu, K Y

    2013-07-01

    We investigated whether strontium-enriched calcium phosphate cement (Sr-CPC)-treated soft-tissue tendon graft results in accelerated healing within the bone tunnel in reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). A total of 30 single-bundle ACL reconstructions using tendo Achillis allograft were performed in 15 rabbits. The graft on the tested limb was treated with Sr-CPC, whereas that on the contralateral limb was untreated and served as a control. At timepoints three, six, nine, 12 and 24 weeks after surgery, three animals were killed for histological examination. At six weeks, the graft-bone interface in the control group was filled in with fibrovascular tissue. However, the gap in the Sr-CPC group had already been completely filled in with new bone, and there was evidence of the early formation of Sharpey fibres. At 24 weeks, remodelling into a normal ACL-bone-like insertion was found in the Sr-CPC group. Coating of Sr-CPC on soft tissue tendon allograft leads to accelerated graft healing within the bone tunnel in a rabbit model of ACL reconstruction using Achilles tendon allograft.

  2. Influence of core-finishing intervals on tensile strength of cast posts-and-cores luted with zinc phosphate cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Andrea Lopes Iglesias

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The core finishing of cast posts-and-cores after luting is routine in dental practice. However, the effects of the vibrations produced by the rotary cutting instruments over the luting cements are not well-documented. This study evaluated the influence of the time intervals that elapsed between the cementation and the core-finishing procedures on the tensile strength of cast posts-and-cores luted with zinc phosphate cement. Forty-eight bovine incisor roots were selected, endodontically treated, and divided into four groups (n = 12: GA, control (without finishing; GB, GC, and GD, subjected to finishing at 20 minutes, 60 minutes, and 24 hours after cementation, respectively. Root canals were molded, and the resin patterns were cast in copper-aluminum alloy. Cast posts-and-cores were luted with zinc phosphate cement, and the core-finishing procedures were applied according to the groups. The tensile tests were performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min for all groups, 24 hours after the core-finishing procedures. The data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05. No significant differences were observed in the tensile strengths between the control and experimental groups, regardless of the time interval that elapsed between the luting and finishing steps. Within the limitations of the present study, it was demonstrated that the core-finishing procedures and time intervals that elapsed after luting did not appear to affect the retention of cast posts-and-cores when zinc phosphate cement was used.

  3. Biomimetic calcium phosphate coatings on recombinant spider silk fibres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Liang; Hedhammar, My; Blom, Tobias; Leifer, Klaus; Johansson, Jan; Habibovic, Pamela; van Blitterswijk, Clemens

    2010-01-01

    Calcium phosphate ceramic coatings, applied on surfaces of metallic and polymeric biomaterials, can improve their performance in bone repair and regeneration. Spider silk is biocompatible, strong and elastic, and hence an attractive biomaterial for applications in connective tissue repair. Recently,

  4. Cell response of calcium phosphate based ceramics, a bone substitute material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Marchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize calcium phosphate ceramics with different Ca/P ratios and evaluate cell response of these materials for use as a bone substitute. Bioceramics consisting of mixtures of hydroxyapatite (HAp and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP powders in different proportions were pressed and sintered. The physical and chemical properties of these bioceramics were then characterized. Characterization of the biological properties of these materials was based on analysis of cell response using cultured fibroblasts. The number of cells attached to the samples was counted from SEM images of samples exposed to cell culture solution for different periods. These data were compared by analysis of variance (ANOVA complemented by the Tukey's test. The TCP sample had higher surface roughness and lower density. The adherence and growth of FMM1 cells on samples from all groups was studied. Even though the different calcium based ceramics exhibited properties which made them suitable as bone substitutes, those with higher levels of β-TCP revealed improved cell growth on their surfaces. These observations indicated two-phase calcium phosphate based materials with a β-TCP surface layer to be a promising bone substitute.

  5. Synthesis of amorphous calcium phosphate using various types of cyclodextrins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yanbao; Wiliana, Tjandra; Tam, Kam C.

    2007-01-01

    Amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) was synthesised in aqueous solution at room temperature using cyclodextrins. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and thermal analysis (DTA/TGA) were performed on the calcium phosphate precipitates obtained from solutions. We observed that only β-CD could stabilise the amorphous phase in the mother solution because of the lower solubility of β-CD in water and the ACP remained stable in aqueous solution for more than 24 h at room temperature. The ACP particle has an initial particle size of less than 40 nm, Ca/P molar ratio of 1.67 and β-CD absorbed on its surface. The mechanism for the stabilisation of ACP is proposed

  6. Modulating calcium phosphate formation using CO2 laser engineering of a polymeric material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waugh, D.G.; Lawrence, J.

    2012-01-01

    The use of simulated body fluid (SBF) is widely used as a screening technique to assess the ability of materials to promote calcium phosphate formation. This paper details the use of CO 2 laser surface treatment of nylon® 6,6 to modulate calcium phosphate formation following immersion in SBF for 14 days. Through white light interferometry (WLI) it was determined that the laser surface processing gave rise to maximum Ra and Sa parameters of 1.3 and 4.4 μm, respectively. The use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) enabled a maximum increase in surface oxygen content of 5.6%at. to be identified. The laser-induced surface modifications gave rise to a modulation in the wettability characteristics such that the contact angle, θ, decreased for the whole area processed samples, as expected, and increased for the patterned samples. The increase in θ can be attributed to a transition in wetting nature to a mixed-state wetting regime. It was seen for all samples that calcium phosphate formed on each surface following 14 days. The largest increase in mass, Δg, owed to calcium phosphate formation, was brought about by the whole area processed sample irradiated with a fluence of 51 J cm −2 . No correlation between the calcium phosphate formation and the laser patterned surface properties was determined due to the likely affect of the mixed-state wetting regime. Strong correlations between θ, the surface energy parameters and the calcium phosphate formation for the whole area processed samples allow one to realize the potential for this surface treatment technique in predicting the bone forming ability of laser processed materials. - Highlights: ► Surface modifications brought about a modulation in the wetting of nylon 6,6. ► An increase in θ can be attributed to a mixed-state wetting regime. ► Laser surface treatment modulated the ability to promote apatite formation. ► Mixed-state wetting regime affected the promotion of uniform apatite formation.

  7. A statistical investigation of the rheological properties of magnesium phosphate cement

    OpenAIRE

    Yue, Y.; Bai, Y.; Hu, W.; You, C.; Qian, J.; McCague, C.; Jin, F.; Al-Tabbaa, A.; Mo, L.; Deng, M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium phosphate cement (MPC) is a promising material applied for rapid patch repairing in civil engineering and waste immobilisation in nuclear industry. However, the rheological properties of this new binder material which highly affects its engineering application, is to be explored. The current work aims at investigating the rheological properties of MPC along 98 with determining the optimum conditions to obtain MPC materials with desirable rheological performances. ...

  8. Biocompatibility and setting time of CPM-MTA and white Portland cement clinker with or without calcium sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramante, Clovis Monteiro; Kato, Marcia Magro; Assis, Gerson Francisco de; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro; Bernardineli, Norberti; Moraes, Ivaldo Gomes de; Garcia, Roberto Brandão; Ordinola-Zapata, Ronald; Bramante, Alexandre Silva

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the biocompatibility and the setting time of Portland cement clinker with or without 2% or 5% calcium sulfate and MTA-CPM. Twenty-four mice (Rattus norvegicus) received subcutaneously polyethylene tubes filled with Portland cement clinker with or without 2% or 5% calcium sulfate and MTA. After 15, 30 and 60 days of implantation, the animals were killed and specimens were prepared for microscopic analysis. For evaluation of the setting time, each material was analyzed using Gilmore needles weighing 113.5 g and 456.5 g, according to the ASTM specification Number C266-08 guideline. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test for setting time and Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn test for biocompatibility at 5% significance level. Histologic observation showed no statistically significant difference of biocompatibility (p>0.05) among the materials in the subcutaneous tissues. For the setting time, clinker without calcium sulfate showed the shortest initial and final setting times (6.18 s/21.48 s), followed by clinker with 2% calcium sulfate (9.22 s/25.33 s), clinker with 5% calcium sulfate (10.06 s/42.46 s) and MTA (15.01 s/42.46 s). All the tested materials showed biocompatibility and the calcium sulfate absence shortened the initial and final setting times of the white Portland cement clinker.

  9. Complexation/encapsulation of green tea polyphenols in mixed calcium carbonate and phosphate micro-particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elabbadi, Amal; Jeckelmann, Nicolas; Haefliger, Olivier P; Ouali, Lahoussine

    2011-01-01

    We used a double-jet mixer to encapsulate water-soluble polyphenols, green tea extract (GTE), with calcium-based inorganic materials. The device mixed calcium chloride solutions with a solution of carbonate and phosphate in the presence of a GTE solution, and formed micro-particles which capture the GTE molecules. The micro-particles were analysed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectroscopy to determine the encapsulation yield and loading of the different GTE components. We established correlations between (1) the efficiency of the GTE encapsulation and the composition of the mixed anion solutions and (2) the protonation degree of the ions and the molar ratio of calcium cations and carbonate/phosphate anions. An optimal and reproducible GTE loading of about 40% with an encapsulation yield of 65% was observed for a carbonate/phosphate molar composition of 4 : 1. In addition, our experimental results showed that the process is selective and favours the encapsulation of gallated species which form stronger complexes with calcium cations.

  10. Characterization and chemical activity of Portland cement and two experimental cements with potential for use in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, J

    2008-09-01

    To evaluate the chemical activity of Portland cement and two other cement types with similar chemical composition to mineral trioxide aggregate with the aim of developing these cements for further applications in dentistry. The chemical composition of the three cement types namely Portland cement, calcium sulpho-aluminate cement and calcium fluoro-aluminate cement was evaluated by elemental analysis using energy dispersive analysis with X-ray under the scanning electron microscope and by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) to determine the phases. The constituents of the hydration reaction by-products were evaluated by XRD analysis of the set cements at 1, 7, 28 and 56 days and by analysis of the leachate by ion chromatography. The pH of both cements and leachate was determined at different time intervals. Cements admixed with micro-silica were also tested to determine the effect of micro-silica on the reaction by-products. All three cement types were composed of tricalcium silicate as the main constituent phase. The hydration reaction of Portland cement produced calcium hydroxide. However, this was not present in the other cements tested at all ages. Admixed micro-silica had little or no effect on the cements with regard to reaction by-products. The pH of all cements tested was alkaline. Both the experimental calcium sulpho-aluminate cement and calcium fluoro-aluminate cement had different hydration reactions to that of Portland cement even though calcium silicate was the major constituent element of both cement types. No calcium hydroxide was produced as a by-product to cement hydration. Micro-silica addition to the cement had no effect on the hydration reaction.

  11. A comparative study of retentive strengths of zinc phosphate, polycarboxylate and glass ionomer cements with stainless steel crowns - An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghunath Reddy M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available An in vitro study was conducted to compare the retentive strengths of zinc phosphate, polycarboxylate and glass ionomer cements using Instron universal testing machine. Thirty preformed and pretrimmed stainless steel crowns were used for cementation on 30 extracted human primary molars which were divided into three groups of 10 teeth in each group. Then the teeth were stored in artificial saliva and incubated at 37°C for 24 h. A load was applied on to the crown and was gradually increased till the crown showed dislodgement, and then the readings were recorded using Instron recorder and analyzed for statistical significance. The surface area of crown was measured by graphical method. The retentive strength was expressed in terms of kg/cm 2 , which was calculated by the equation load divided by area. Retentive strengths of zinc phosphate (ranged from a minimum of 16.93 to amaximum of 28.13 kg/cm 2 with mean of 21.28 kg/cm 2 and glass ionomer cement (minimum of 13.69 - 28.15 kg/cm 2 with mean of 20.69 kg/cm 2 were greater than that of polycarboxylate cement (minimum of 13.26 - 22.69 kg/cm 2 with mean of 16.79 kg/cm 2 . Negligible difference (0.59 kg/cm 2 of retentive strength was observed between zinc phosphate (21.28 kg/cm 2 and glass ionomer cements (20.69 kg/cm 2 . Glass ionomer cements can be recommended for cementation of stainless steel crowns because of its advantages and the retentive strength was almost similar to that of zinc phosphate cement.

  12. A new acoustic method to determine the setting time of calcium sulfate bone cement mixed with antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, J J; Brayford, M J; Laycock, P A

    2014-01-01

    A new method is described which can be used to determine the setting times of small amounts of high value bone cements. The test was developed to measure how the setting times of a commercially available synthetic calcium sulfate cement (Stimulan, Biocomposites, UK) in two forms (standard and Rapid Cure) varies with the addition of clinically relevant antibiotics. The importance of being able to accurately quantify these setting times is discussed. The results demonstrate that this new method, which is shown to correlate to the Vicat needle, gives reliable and repeatable data with additional benefits expressed in the article. The majority of antibiotics mixed were found to retard the setting reaction of the calcium sulfate cement. (paper)

  13. A new acoustic method to determine the setting time of calcium sulfate bone cement mixed with antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, J J; Brayford, M J; Laycock, P A

    2014-08-01

    A new method is described which can be used to determine the setting times of small amounts of high value bone cements. The test was developed to measure how the setting times of a commercially available synthetic calcium sulfate cement (Stimulan, Biocomposites, UK) in two forms (standard and Rapid Cure) varies with the addition of clinically relevant antibiotics. The importance of being able to accurately quantify these setting times is discussed. The results demonstrate that this new method, which is shown to correlate to the Vicat needle, gives reliable and repeatable data with additional benefits expressed in the article. The majority of antibiotics mixed were found to retard the setting reaction of the calcium sulfate cement.

  14. Comparative study on in vivo response of porous calcium carbonate composite ceramic and biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Fupo, E-mail: fphebm@126.com [School of Electromechanical Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Ren, Weiwei [School of Electromechanical Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Tian, Xiumei [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Basic Sciences, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510182 (China); Liu, Wei; Wu, Shanghua [School of Electromechanical Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Chen, Xiaoming, E-mail: xmchenw@126.com [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Basic Sciences, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510182 (China)

    2016-07-01

    In a previous study, robust calcium carbonate composite ceramics (CC/PG) were prepared by using phosphate-based glass (PG) as an additive, which showed good cell response. In the present study the in vivo response of porous CC/PG was compared to that of porous biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics (BCP), using a rabbit femoral critical-size grafting model. The materials degradation and bone formation processes were evaluated by general observation, X-ray radiography, micro-computed tomography, and histological examination. The results demonstrated excellent biocompatibility and osteoconductivity, and progressive degradation of CC/PG and BCP. Although the in vitro degradation rate of CC/PG was distinctly faster than that of BCP, at 4 week post-implantation, the bone generation and material degradation of CC/PG were less than those of BCP. Nevertheless, at postoperative week 8, the increment of bone formation and material degradation of CC/PG was pronouncedly larger than that of BCP. These results show that CC/PG is a potential resorbable bone graft aside from the traditional synthetic ones. - Highlights: • A calcium carbonate composite ceramic (CC/PG) was acquired. • The in vivo response of CC/PG and biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) was compared. • CC/PG showed faster in vitro degradation rate compared to BCP. • CC/PG showed less in vivo degradation and bone formation than BCP at week 4. • CC/PG had larger increment of degradation and bone formation than BCP at week 8.

  15. Comparative study on in vivo response of porous calcium carbonate composite ceramic and biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Fupo; Ren, Weiwei; Tian, Xiumei; Liu, Wei; Wu, Shanghua; Chen, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    In a previous study, robust calcium carbonate composite ceramics (CC/PG) were prepared by using phosphate-based glass (PG) as an additive, which showed good cell response. In the present study the in vivo response of porous CC/PG was compared to that of porous biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics (BCP), using a rabbit femoral critical-size grafting model. The materials degradation and bone formation processes were evaluated by general observation, X-ray radiography, micro-computed tomography, and histological examination. The results demonstrated excellent biocompatibility and osteoconductivity, and progressive degradation of CC/PG and BCP. Although the in vitro degradation rate of CC/PG was distinctly faster than that of BCP, at 4 week post-implantation, the bone generation and material degradation of CC/PG were less than those of BCP. Nevertheless, at postoperative week 8, the increment of bone formation and material degradation of CC/PG was pronouncedly larger than that of BCP. These results show that CC/PG is a potential resorbable bone graft aside from the traditional synthetic ones. - Highlights: • A calcium carbonate composite ceramic (CC/PG) was acquired. • The in vivo response of CC/PG and biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) was compared. • CC/PG showed faster in vitro degradation rate compared to BCP. • CC/PG showed less in vivo degradation and bone formation than BCP at week 4. • CC/PG had larger increment of degradation and bone formation than BCP at week 8.

  16. Retention of dental custom cast posts using zinc phosphate cement: A Systematic Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Alikhasi

    2018-03-01

    Conclusion: Our review showed that the retention of cast posts cemented with zinc phosphate in controlled condition is moderate and factors including post material and length could influence the retention of the post.

  17. Facial skeletal augmentation using hydroxyapatite cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindo, M L; Costantino, P D; Friedman, C D; Chow, L C

    1993-02-01

    This study investigates the use of a new calcium phosphate cement, which sets to solid, microporous hydroxyapatite, for facial bone augmentation. In six dogs, the supraorbital ridges were augmented bilaterally with this hydroxyapatite cement. On one side, the hydroxyapatite cement was placed directly onto the bone within a subperiosteal pocket. On the opposite side, the cement was contained within a collagen membrane tubule and then inserted into a subperiosteal pocket. The use of collagen tubules facilitated easy, precise placement of the cement. All implants maintained their original augmented height throughout the duration of the study. They were well tolerated without extrusion or migration, and there was no significant sustained inflammatory response. Histologic studies, performed at 3, 6, and 9 months revealed that when the cement was placed directly onto bone, progressive replacement of the implant by bone (osseointegration of the hydroxyapatite with the underlying bone) without a loss of volume was observed. In contrast, when the cement-collagen tubule combination was inserted, primarily a fibrous union was noted. Despite such fibrous union, the hydroxyapatite-collagen implant solidly bonded to the underlying bone, and no implant resorption was observed. Hydroxyapatite cement can be used successfully for the experimental augmentation of the craniofacial skeleton and may be applicable for such uses in humans.

  18. Preparation and Sustained-Release Property of Triblock Copolymer/Calcium Phosphate Nanocomposite as Nanocarrier for Hydrophobic Drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao Shao-Wen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The P123/ACP nanocomposite with sizes less than 100 nm consisting of triblock copolymer P123 and amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP has been prepared by using an aqueous solution containing CaCl2, (NH43PO4, and P123 at room temperature. The P123/ACP nanocomposite is used as the nanocarrier for hydrophobic drug ibuprofen, based on the combined advantages of both amphiphilic block copolymer and calcium phosphate delivery system. The P123/ACP nanocomposite has a much higher ibuprofen loading capacity (148 mg/g than the single-phase calcium phosphate nanostructures. The drug release percentage of the P123/ACP nanocomposite in simulated body fluid reaches about 100% in a period of 156 h, which is much slower than that of single-phase calcium phosphate nanostructures. It is expected that the P123/ACP nanocomposite is promising for the application in the controlled delivery of hydrophobic drugs.

  19. Oxalate Acid-Base Cements as a Means of Carbon Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, S. T.

    2017-12-01

    Emission of CO2 from industrial processes poses a myriad of environmental problems. One such polluter is the portland cement (PC) industry. PC is the main ingredient in concrete which is the ubiquitous binding material for construction works. Its production is responsible for 5-10 % of all anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Half of this emission arises from the calcination of calcareous raw materials and half from kiln fuel burning and cement clinker grinding. There have long been efforts to reduce the carbon footprint of concrete. Among the many ways, one is to bind CO2 to the phases in the cement-water paste, oxides, hydroxides, and silicates of calcium, during early hydration or while in service. The problem is that obtaining calcium oxide cheaply requires the decarbonation of limestone and the uptake of CO2 is slow and limited mainly to the surface of the concrete due to its low gas permeability. Hence, a faster method to bind more CO2 is needed. Acid-base (AB) cements are fast-setting, high-strength systems that have high durability in many environments in which PC concrete is vulnerable. They are made with a powder base such as MgO and an acid or acid salt, like phosphates. Despite certain advantages over PC cement systems, AB cements are not feasible, due to their high acid content. Also, the phosphoric acid used comes from non-renewable sources of phosphate. A potential way to reduce the drawbacks of using phosphates could be to use organic acids. Oxalic acid or its salts could react with the proper powder base to give concrete that could be used for infrastructure hence that would have very high demand. In addition, methods to produce oxalates from CO2, even atmospheric, are becoming widespread and more economical. The base can also be an industrial byproduct to further lower the environmental impact. This study describes the use of oxalic acid and industrial byproducts to obtain mortars with mechanical properties comparable to those of PC mortars. It is

  20. Efficacy of tooth whitening with different calcium phosphate-based formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jian; Xu, Xiaohui; Lai, Guangyun; Kunzelmann, Karl-Heinz

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this in-vitro study was to evaluate the efficacy of tooth whitening using different calcium phosphate-based formulations. Teeth were treated with three different hydroxyapatite preparations at different concentrations and with two control preparations; each tooth was treated a total of three times. After application of the last material, hydrodynamic shear force was applied to mimic mechanical loading. After each treatment, tooth color was measured using a dental spectrophotometer, and the mean changes in L*a*b* values between different measurements were expressed as ∆E. The results indicated significant differences between the materials, but neither dose- nor time-dependent associations were found. The suspension containing tricalcium phosphate (10 wt%) showed the most obvious color change (∆E = 2.20 ± 0.90), while the suspension containing zinc-carbonate-apatite (20 wt%) showed the least obvious color change (∆E = 0.91 ± 0.50). Calcium phosphate-based formulations that can adhere to the enamel surface and contribute to tooth whitening have promising tooth-whitening potential. © 2013 Eur J Oral Sci.

  1. Study of a hydraulic DCPA/CaO-based cement for dental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Briak, Hasna; Durand, Denis; Boudeville, Philippe

    2008-02-01

    A CPC was obtained by mixing calcium hydrogenphosphate (DCPA: CaHPO(4)) and calcium oxide with either water or sodium phosphate (NaP) buffers. Physical and mechanical properties such as compressive strength (CS), initial (I) and final (F) setting times, cohesion time (T(C)), dough time (T(D)), swelling time (T(S)), dimensional and thermal behavior, injectability (t(100%)), antimicrobial properties, setting reaction kinetics, and powder stability over time were investigated by varying different parameters such as liquid-to-powder (L/P) ratio (0.35 to 0.7 mL g(-1)), molar calcium-to-phosphate (Ca/P) ratio (1.67 to 3), the pH (4, 7 or 9) and the concentration (0 to 1 M) of the NaP buffer. The best results were obtained with the pH 7 NaP buffer at a concentration of 0.75 M. With this liquid phase, physical and mechanical properties depended on the Ca/P and L/P ratios, varying from 3 to 11 MPa (CS), 6 to 10 min (I), 11 to 15 min (F), 15 to 45 min (T(S)), 3 to 12 min (t(100%)), 16 min (T(D)). This cement expanded during its setting (2.5-7%), and is thus appropriate for tight filling. Finally the cement has antimicrobial activity from Ca/P = 2 and the whole properties were conserved after 8 months storage. Given the mechanical, rheological and antimicrobial properties of this new DCPA/CaO-based cement, its use as root canal sealing or pulp capping material may be considered as similar to calcium hydroxide or ZnO/eugenol-based pastes, without or with a gutta-percha point.

  2. Optimizing conditions for calcium phosphate mediated transient transfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Guo

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: Calcium phosphate mediated transfection is the most low-cost approach to introduce recombinant DNA into culture cells. However, the utility of this procedure is limited in highly-differentiated cells. Here we describe the specific HBS-buffered saline, PH, glycerol shock, vortex strength, transfection medium, and particle concentrations conditions necessary to optimize this transfection method in highly differentiated cells.

  3. Bone cements for percutaneous vertebroplasty and balloon kyphoplasty: Current status and future developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwei He

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVCFs have gradually evolved into a serious health care problem globally. In order to reduce the morbidity of OVCF patients and improve their life quality, two minimally invasive surgery procedures, vertebroplasty (VP and balloon kyphoplasty (BKP, have been developed. Both VP and BKP require the injection of bone cement into the vertebrae of patients to stabilize fractured vertebra. As such, bone cement as the filling material plays an essential role in the effectiveness of these treatments. In this review article, we summarize the bone cements that are currently available in the market and those still under development. Two major categories of bone cements, nondegradable acrylic bone cements (ABCs and degradable calcium phosphate cements (CPCs, are introduced in detail. We also provide our perspectives on the future development of bone cements for VP and BKP.

  4. A novel biodegradable nicotinic acid/calcium phosphate composite coating on Mg-3Zn alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yingwei, E-mail: ywsong@imr.ac.cn; Shan, Dayong; Han, En-Hou

    2013-01-01

    A novel biodegradable composite coating is prepared to reduce the biodegradation rate of Mg-3Zn alloy. The Mg-3Zn substrate is first immersed into 0.02 mol L{sup -1} nicotinic acid (NA) solution, named as vitamin B{sub 3}, to obtain a pretreatment film, and then the electrodeposition of calcium phosphate coating with ultrasonic agitation is carried out on the NA pretreatment film to obtain a NA/calcium phosphate composite coating. Surface morphology is observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chemical composition is determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and EDX. Protection property of the coatings is evaluated by electrochemical tests. The biodegradable behavior is investigated by immersion tests. The results indicate that a thin but compact bottom layer can be obtained by NA pretreatment. The electrodeposition calcium phosphate coating consists of many flake particles and ultrasonic agitation can greatly improve the compactness of the coating. The composite coating is biodegradable and can reduce the biodegradation rate of Mg alloys in stimulated body fluid (SBF) for twenty times. The biodegradation process of the composite coating can be attributed to the gradual dissolution of the flake particles into chippings. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NA/calcium phosphate composite coating is prepared to protect Mg-3Zn alloy implant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotinic acid (vitamin B{sub 3}) is available to obtain a protective bottom film. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ultrasonic agitation greatly improves the compactness of calcium phosphate coating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The composite coating can reduce the biodegradation rate of Mg-3Zn twenty times. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The composite coating is biodegraded by the dissolution of flakes into chippings.

  5. Physical-Mechanical Properties and Micromorphology of Calcium Cements Exposed to Polyacrylic and Phosphoric Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Gustavo Fernandes; Arrais, Ana Beatriz; Aragão, Cícero Flávio Soares; Ferreira, Isana Alvares; Borges, Boniek Castillo Dutra

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate if physical and mechanical properties of self-curing calcium hydroxide cements were affected by contact with polyacrylic and phosphoric acids. Resin-containing (Life (LF)) and resin-free (Hydro C (HyC)) materials were subjected to polyacrylic acid conditioning and rinsing (POL); phosphoric acid conditioning and rinsing (PHO); rinsing only; and no treatment ( n = 10). Water sorption/solubility, release of hydroxyl ions (pH), roughness (Ra), and impact resistance were evaluated. Additional samples ( n = 1) were prepared for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of the surface morphology. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test ( P < 0.05). Water sorption was significantly higher for LF when in contact with PHO and lower for POL ( P < 0.05). The mean solubility was higher with POL for both cements ( P < 0.05). PHO increased the mean surface roughness for HyC ( P < 0.01); a significant decrease was noted for LF after contact with both acids ( P < 0.01). PHO promoted lower release of hydroxyl ions on both cements ( P < 0.05). For LF, rinsing, PHO, and POL presented similar morphology, differing from the control group. For HyC, PHO and POL presented similar morphology, differing from the control group. PHO had a negative effect on the physical properties of the cements tested, except for the solubility test. POL affected roughness and solubility of HyC cement. Clinical procedures that require polyacrylic and phosphoric acid conditioning must be done carefully on self-curing calcium hydroxide cements in order to avoid negative impact on their properties.

  6. Investigation into the role of NaOH and calcium ions in the synthesis of calcium phosphate nanoshells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. Yeo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate (CaP nanoshells were prepared using negatively charged liposomes (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate sodium salt (DOPA as a template by base titration synthesis at various concentrations of NaOH and calcium ions. The elemental composition, morphology, particle size, particle size distribution and zeta potential of the products were determined via various characterisation techniques, such as energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, dynamic light scattering (DLS, laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. The best results showed that stable spherical CaP nanoshells with a mean particle size of 197.5 ± 5.8 nm and a zeta potential of -34.5 ± 0.6 mV were successfully formed when 0.100 M sodium hydroxide (NaOH and 0.100 M calcium ions were used. Moreover, an optimal pH of 10.52 and a final Ca/P molar ratio of 0.97 were achieved under these conditions.

  7. Effect of carbonate and phosphate ratios on the transformation of calcium orthophosphates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliassi, Mohammad Daoud, E-mail: eliassi2007@gmail.com [Key Laboratory of Arable Land Conservation (Middle and Lower Reaches of Yangtze River), Ministry of Agriculture, College of Resources and Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Zhao, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Soil Erosion and Dryland Farming on Loess Plateau, Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yangling 712100 (China); Tan, Wen Feng, E-mail: wenfeng.tan@hotmail.com [Key Laboratory of Arable Land Conservation (Middle and Lower Reaches of Yangtze River), Ministry of Agriculture, College of Resources and Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2014-07-01

    Graphical abstract: Complexes among phosphate, carbonate and calcium have been prepared via a facile hydrothermal route. The synthesized product at the low (0.15) and the high (1.8) molar ratio of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} is calcium phosphate hydrate and hydroxylapatite (HAp), respectively. Molar ratios of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} are effective on the reduction of carbonate activity during the crystallization of HAp. - Highlights: • Formation of different complexes from CO{sub 3}{sup 2−}, PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} and Ca{sup 2+} solutions at 60 °C. • Molar ratios of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2} cause changes in phase and size of synthesized products. • Addition of PO{sub 4}{sup 3} inhibited the activity of CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} during bound with Ca{sup 2+}. • The phase transformation was completed, when CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} peaks disappeared in FTIR. • PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} and Ca{sup 2+} distributed heterogeneously on the surface of precipitation. - Abstract: Complexes among phosphate, carbonate and calcium have been synthesized by a designed hydrothermal method. Effects of carbonate and phosphate ratios on the transformation of calcium-orthophosphates were investigated. With X-ray diffraction measurement the synthesized product at the low (0.15) and the high (1.8) molar ratio of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} is calcium phosphate hydrate at pH 9.0, and hydroxylapatite (HAp) at pH 8.0, respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of product at the high ratio (1.8) of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} shows that the CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} peaks disappear, and the strong peaks at 1412 and 1460 cm{sup −1} are assigned to the vibrations of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} in HAp. {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of products at the low (0.15–0.6) to the high (1.2–1.8) ratios of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} are obtained at 2.9 and 2.7 ppm, respectively. Molar ratios of PO

  8. The effect of calcium phosphate-containing desensitizing agent on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of calcium phosphate containing desensitizing pretreatments on the microtensile bond strength (MTBS) and microleakage of the multimode adhesive agent to dentin. Materials and Methods: In this study, twelve noncarious, freshly extracted human third molar teeth ...

  9. Evaluation of Serum Calcium and Inorganic Phosphate Levels in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The importance of calcium and inorganic phosphate in pregnancy cannot be overemphasized. Their adequacy or otherwise amongst pregnant and lactating women in Enugu metropolis receiving their routine antenatal supplements was the focus of this study. Two hundred subjects (forty in each trimester; forty lactating and ...

  10. Correlation between calcium and phosphate levels to calculus accumulation on coronary heart disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahaya, Cindy; Masulili, Sri Lelyati C.; Lessang, Robert; Radi, Basuni

    2017-02-01

    Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) or Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is a disease that happened because of blood flow being blocked by atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is a process of hardening of the arteries which characterized by thickening and loss of elasticity of the intimal layer of vascular wall, by lipid deposit. Periodontitis is a chronic multifactorial inflammatory disease caused by microorganism and characterized by progressive destruction of the tooth supporting apparatus leading to tooth loss. Many studies use saliva as a valuable source for clinically information, as an asset for early diagnosis, prognostic and reviewer for pascatherapy status. Dental calculus had happened as a consequence of saliva supersaturation by calcium and phosphate. Salivary flow rate and its composition influence the formation of calculus. Increasing salivary calcium levels is characteristic of periodontitis patients. An important hipotesis in Cardiology is chronic infections contribute in atherosclerosis. Objective: To analyse the correlation between calcium and phosphate levels in saliva to calculus accumulation on CHD patients. Result: Correlation analysis between salivary calcium levels with calculus accumulation in patients with CHD and non-CHD showed no significant p value, p=0.59 and p=0.518. Correlation analysis between salivary phosphate levels and calculus accumulation showed no significant p value, p=0.836 for CHD patients and p=0.484 for non-CHD patients. Conclusion: There are no correlation between calcium levels and phosphate levels with calculus accumulation in CHD patients. Further research need to be done.

  11. Experimental Calcium Silicate-Based Cement with and without Zirconium Oxide Modulates Fibroblasts Viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slompo, Camila; Peres-Buzalaf, Camila; Gasque, Kellen Cristina da Silva; Damante, Carla Andreotti; Ordinola-Zapata, Ronald; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro; de Oliveira, Rodrigo Cardoso

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify whether the use of zirconium oxide as a radiopacifier of an experimental calcium silicate-based cement (WPCZO) leads to cytotoxicity. Fibroblasts were treated with different concentrations (10 mg/mL, 1 mg/mL, and 0.1 mg/mL) of the cements diluted in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) for periods of 12, 24, and 48 h. Groups tested were white Portland cement (WPC), white Portland cement with zirconium oxide (WPCZO), and white mineral trioxide aggregate Angelus (MTA). Control group cells were not treated. The cytotoxicity was evaluated through mitochondrial-activity (MTT) and cell-density (crystal violet) assays. All cements showed low cytotoxicity. In general, at the concentration of 10 mg/mL there was an increase in viability of those groups treated with WPC and WPCZO when compared to the control group (pcement with 20% zirconium oxide as the radiopacifier showed low cytotoxicity as a promising material to be exploited for root-end filling.

  12. The Effect of Moderate Dietary Protein and Phosphate Restriction on Calcium-Phosphate Homeostasis in Healthy Older Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, R F; Biourge, V; Chang, Y; Syme, H M; Elliott, J

    2016-09-01

    Dietary phosphate and protein restriction decreases plasma PTH and FGF-23 concentrations and improves survival time in azotemic cats, but has not been examined in cats that are not azotemic. Feeding a moderately protein- and phosphate-restricted diet decreases PTH and FGF-23 in healthy older cats and thereby slows progression to azotemic CKD. A total of 54 healthy, client-owned cats (≥ 9 years). Prospective double-blinded randomized placebo-controlled trial. Cats were assigned to test diet (protein 76 g/Mcal and phosphate 1.6 g/Mcal) or control diet (protein 86 g/Mcal and phosphate 2.6 g/Mcal) and monitored for 18 months. Changes in variables over time and effect of diet were assessed by linear mixed models. A total of 26 cats ate test diet and 28 cats ate control diet. There was a significant effect of diet on urinary fractional excretion of phosphate (P = 0.045), plasma PTH (P = 0.005), and ionized calcium concentrations (P = 0.018), but not plasma phosphate, FGF-23, or creatinine concentrations. Plasma PTH concentrations did not significantly change in cats fed the test diet (P = 0.62) but increased over time in cats fed the control diet (P = 0.001). There was no significant treatment effect of the test diet on development of azotemic CKD (3 of 26 (12%) test versus 3 of 28 (11%) control, odds ratio 1.09 (95% CI 0.13-8.94), P = 0.92). Feeding a moderately protein- and phosphate-restricted diet has effects on calcium-phosphate homeostasis in healthy older cats and is well tolerated. This might have an impact on renal function and could be useful in early chronic kidney disease. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  13. Elaboration de biocéramiques phosphocalciques Processing of calcium phosphate bioceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Champion Eric

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Les céramiques phosphocalciques (hydroxyapatite, phosphate tricalcique sont couramment utilisées comme implants synthétiques en substitution osseuse. Le développement de nouveaux implants céramiques aux performances accrues nécessite la maîtrise de nombreux paramètres chimiques et physiques intervenant dans leurs procédés d'élaboration : synthèse de poudres spécifiques, mise en forme d'architectures complexes contrôlées, frittage et fonctionnalisation. Cette contribution illustre à travers quelques exemples les travaux menés dans le domaine des procédés d'élaboration de ces biocéramiques phosphocalciques pour des applications en ingénierie des tissus osseux. Calcium phosphate ceramics (hydroxyapatite, tricalcium phosphate are commonly used as synthetic bone graft substitutes. The development of new ceramic implants with improved performances requires the mastering of many chemical and physical parameters involved in their processing: synthesis of specific powders, shaping of complex architectures, sintering and functionalization. This paper illustrates a few examples of the work in the field of processes of these calcium phosphate bioceramics for applications in bone tissue engineering.

  14. Experimental study and field application of calcium sulfoaluminate cement for rapid repair of concrete pavements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanhua GUAN; Ying GAO; Renjuan SUN; Moon C.WON; Zhi GE

    2017-01-01

    The fast-track repair of deteriorated concrete pavement requires materials that can be placed,cured,and opened to the traffic in a short period.Type Ⅲ cement and Calcium Sulfoaluminate (CSA) cement are the most commonly used fast-setting hydraulic cement (FSHC).In this study,the properties of Type Ⅲ and CSA cement concrete,including compressive strength,coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and shrinkage were evaluated.The test results indicate that compressive strength of FSHC concrete increased rapidly at the early age.CSA cement concrete had higher early-age and long term strength.The shrinkage of CSA cement concrete was lower than that of Type Ⅲ cement concrete.Both CSA and Type Ⅲ cement concrete had similar CTE values.Based on the laboratory results,the CSA cement was selected as the partial-depth rapid repair material for a distressed continuously reinforced concrete pavement.The data collected during and after the repair show that the CSA cement concrete had good short-term and long-term performances and,therefore,was suitable for the rapid repair of concrete pavement.

  15. Calcium phosphate implants coatings as carriers for BMP-2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Y.; He, J.F.; Hunziker, E.B.

    2009-01-01

    The osteoconductivity of dental implants can be improved by coating them with a layer of calcium phosphate (CaP), which can be rendered osteoinductive by functionalizing it with an osteogenic agent, such as bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2). In the present study, we wished to compare the

  16. The role of calcium ions and lignosulphonate plasticiser in the hydration of cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grierson, L.H.; Knight, J.C.; Maharaj, R.

    2005-01-01

    Experiments involving equilibrium dialysis, conductivity, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), differential thermal analysis (DTA) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) have been carried out to investigate the role of calcium ions and polymeric plasticisers in cement/admixture hydration. Results from a study of lignosulphonic acid, sodium salt, acetate as a plasticiser shows that a plasticiser has dual role; one mainly as a kinetic inhibitor (poison) in cement hydration mechanism and the other as a dispersant. Evidence of a weak Ca 2+ binding to lignosulphonate sulphonic moieties was found at low ionic strengths of 0.1 M using ITC. No evidence of formal Ca 2+ binding to lignosulphonate sulphonic acid moieties was found using equilibrium dialysis at higher ionic strength of 1 M (ionic strengths of 0.4 M are typically found in Portland cement pore solution), as is often suggested in cement/admixture literature

  17. Modulating calcium phosphate formation using CO{sub 2} laser engineering of a polymeric material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waugh, D.G., E-mail: Dwaugh@lincoln.ac.uk; Lawrence, J.

    2012-02-01

    The use of simulated body fluid (SBF) is widely used as a screening technique to assess the ability of materials to promote calcium phosphate formation. This paper details the use of CO{sub 2} laser surface treatment of nylon Registered-Sign 6,6 to modulate calcium phosphate formation following immersion in SBF for 14 days. Through white light interferometry (WLI) it was determined that the laser surface processing gave rise to maximum Ra and Sa parameters of 1.3 and 4.4 {mu}m, respectively. The use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) enabled a maximum increase in surface oxygen content of 5.6%at. to be identified. The laser-induced surface modifications gave rise to a modulation in the wettability characteristics such that the contact angle, {theta}, decreased for the whole area processed samples, as expected, and increased for the patterned samples. The increase in {theta} can be attributed to a transition in wetting nature to a mixed-state wetting regime. It was seen for all samples that calcium phosphate formed on each surface following 14 days. The largest increase in mass, {Delta}g, owed to calcium phosphate formation, was brought about by the whole area processed sample irradiated with a fluence of 51 J cm{sup -2}. No correlation between the calcium phosphate formation and the laser patterned surface properties was determined due to the likely affect of the mixed-state wetting regime. Strong correlations between {theta}, the surface energy parameters and the calcium phosphate formation for the whole area processed samples allow one to realize the potential for this surface treatment technique in predicting the bone forming ability of laser processed materials. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface modifications brought about a modulation in the wetting of nylon 6,6. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An increase in {theta} can be attributed to a mixed-state wetting regime. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laser surface treatment modulated the

  18. Strontium doped injectable bone cement for potential drug delivery applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Ali; Akram, Muhammad; Jawad, Zaidoon; Alshemary, Ammar Z; Hussain, Rafaqat

    2017-11-01

    Microwave assisted wet precipitation method was used to synthesize calcium deficient strontium doped β-tricalcium phosphate (Sr-βTCP) with a chemical formula of Ca 2.96-x Sr x (PO 4 ) 2 . Sr-βTCP was reacted with monocalcium phosphate monohydrate [Ca(H 2 PO 4 ) 2 .H 2 O, MCPM] in presence of water to furnish corresponding Sr containing brushite cement (Sr-Brc). The samples were characterized by using X-ray diffractometry (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Strontium content in the prepared samples was determined by using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The effect of Sr 2+ ions on the structural, mechanical, setting properties and drug release of the cement is reported. Incorporation of Sr 2+ ions improved the injectability, setting time and mechanical properties of the Brc. The release profiles of antibiotics incorporated in Brc and Sr-Brc confirmed that the Sr incorporation into the Brc results in the efficient release of the antibiotics from the cement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Uptake of CrO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ions by Fe-treated tri-calcium phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano G, J.; Ramirez S, J. L.; Bonifacio M, J.; Granados C, F.; Badillo A, V. E., E-mail: juan.serrano@inin.gob.m [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    CrO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ion adsorption of Fe-treated tri-calcium phosphate was studied by batch experiments as a function of contact time, initial concentration of metal ion and temperature. Adsorption results showed that at ph 5.5 and 1.0 x 10{sup -4} M chromium concentration the adsorption capacity of Fe-treated tri-calcium phosphate for CrO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ions was 7.10 x 10{sup -3} mmol/g. Chromium adsorption data on Fe-treated tri-calcium phosphate at various initial concentration fitted the Freundlich isotherm. By temperature studies the thermodynamic parameters {Delta}H{sup 0}, {Delta}G{sup 0} and {Delta}S{sup 0} were estimated and the obtained results showed that the adsorption reaction was endothermic and spontaneous. (Author)

  20. Alkaline resistant phosphate glasses and method of preparation and use thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brow, Richard K.; Reis, Signo T.; Velez, Mariano; Day, Delbert E.

    2010-01-26

    A substantially alkaline resistant calcium-iron-phosphate (CFP) glass and methods of making and using thereof. In one application, the CFP glass is drawn into a fiber and dispersed in cement to produce glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC) articles having the high compressive strength of concrete with the high impact, flexural and tensile strength associated with glass fibers.

  1. Physicochemical Properties of Calcium Phosphate Based Coating on Gutta-Percha Root Canal Filling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afaf Al-Haddad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental Gutta-percha (GP is a polymer based standard root canal filling material that has been widely used in dentistry. However, it has an inadequate sealing ability and adhesion to root dentin. The aim of this study is to coat GP with a bioactive material to enhance its sealing ability and adhesion to the root sealer and subsequently to the root dentin. The choice of coating method is limited by the nature of GP as it requires a technique that is not governed by high temperatures or uses organic solvents. In this study, biomimetic coating technique using 1.5 Tas-simulated body fluids (SBF was employed to coat the treated GP cones. The coated samples were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray Diffraction (XRD, and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM. The presence of hydroxyl, carbonate, and phosphate groups was detected by FTIR while the formation of hydroxyapatite (HA/calcium phosphate was confirmed with XRD. FESEM revealed uniform, thin, and crystalline HA calcium phosphate coating. The adhesion of the coating to the GP substrate was assessed with microscratch technique. It was viable with cohesive failure mode. In conclusion, Tas-SBF is able to coat pretreated GP cones with a crystalline apatitic calcium phosphate layer.

  2. Selective laser sintering of calcium phosphate materials for orthopedic implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Goonhee

    Two technologies, Solid Freeform Fabrication (SFF) and bioceramics are combined in this work to prepare bone replacement implants with complex geometry. SFF has emerged as a crucial technique for rapid prototyping in the last decade. Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) is one of the established SFF manufacturing processes that can build three-dimensional objects directly from computer models without part-specific tooling or human intervention. Meanwhile, there have been great efforts to develop implantable materials that can assist in regeneration of bone defects and injuries. However, little attention has been focused in shaping bones from these materials. The main thrust of this research was to develop a process that can combine those two separate efforts. The specific objective of this research is to develop a process that can construct bone replacement material of complex geometry from synthetic calcium phosphate materials by using the SLS process. The achievement of this goal can have a significant impact on the quality of health care in the sense that complete custom-fit bone and tooth structures suitable for implantation can be prepared within 24--48 hours of receipt of geometric information obtained either from patient Computed Tomographic (CT) data, from Computer Aided Design (CAD) software or from other imaging systems such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Holographic Laser Range Imaging (HLRI). In this research, two different processes have been developed. First is the SLS fabrication of porous bone implants. In this effort, systematic procedures have been established and calcium phosphate implants were successfully fabricated from various sources of geometric information. These efforts include material selection and preparation, SLS process parameter optimization, and development of post-processing techniques within the 48-hour time frame. Post-processing allows accurate control of geometry and of the chemistry of calcium phosphate, as well as

  3. Electrosprayed calcium phosphate coatings for biomedical purposes.

    OpenAIRE

    Leeuwenburgh, S.C.G.

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, the suitability of the Electrostatic Spray Deposition (ESD) technique was studied for biomedical purposes, i.e., deposition of calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings onto titanium substrates. Using ESD, which is a simple and cheap deposition method for inorganic and organic coatings, it was possible to obtain thin CaP layers with an extremely wide range of chemical and morphological characteristics. Various CaP phases and phase mixtures were deposited and a broad diversity of coatin...

  4. Cementation of Radioactive Waste from a PWR with Calcium Sulfoaluminate Cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.

    2013-01-01

    Spent radioactive ion-exchange resin (SIER) and evaporation concentrates are radioactive wastes that are produced at by pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power stations. Borate, which is used as a retardent for cement, is also present as a moderator in a PWR, therefore, borate will be present in both ion-exchange resins and evaporation concentrates. In this study the use of Calcium sulfoaluminate cements (SAC) as encapsulation medium for these waste streams was investigated. The study involved the manufacturing of different cement test samples with different amounts of SAC cement, waste resins (50% water content) and admixtures. In order to reduce hydration heat during 200 L solidification experiments, different admixtures were investigated. Initial results based on compressive strength tests and hydration temperature studies, indicated that zeolite was the best admixture for the current waste form. Experiments indicated that the addition of resin material into the current cement matrix reduces the hydration heat during curing Experimental results indicated that a combination of SAC (35 wt. %), zeolite (7 wt. %) mix with 42 wt. % resins (50% water content) and 16 wt. % of water forms a optimum cured monolith with low hydration heat. The microstructures of hydrated OPC, SAC and SAC with zeolite addition were studied using a Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). SEM results indicated that the SAC matrices consist of a needle type structure that changed gradually into a flake type structure with the addition of zeolite. Additionally, the presence of zeolite material inside the SAC matrix reduced the leaching rates of radionuclides significantly. In a final 200 L grouting test, measured results indicated a hydration temperature below 90oC withno thermal cracks after solidified. The influence of radiation on the compressive strength and possible gas generation (due to radiolysis) on cement waste forms containing different concentrations ion exchange resin was

  5. Mg-phosphate ceramics produced from the product of thermal transformation of cement-asbestos

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pérez-Estébanez, Marta; Mácová, Petra; Šašek, Petr; Viani, Alberto; Gualtieri, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 2 (2014), s. 187-192 ISSN 1640-4920. [Conference on Environment and Mineral Processing /18./. Ostrava, 29.05.2014-31.05.2014] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : cement -asbestos * magnesium phosphate ceramics * amorphous Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage http://www.potopk.com.pl/archiwum.html

  6. Treatment of post-orthodontic white spot lesions with casein phosphopeptide-stabilised amorphous calcium phosphate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bröchner, Ann; Christensen, Carsten; Kristensen, Bjarne

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of topical applications of 10% casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) on white spot lesions (WSL) detected after treatment with fixed orthodontic appliances. Sixty healthy adolescents with >/=1 clinically visible WSL at debonding were...... findings were largely reflected by the clinical scores. No side effects were reported. Topical treatment of white spot lesions after debonding of orthodontic appliances with a casein phosphopeptide-stabilised amorphous calcium phosphate agent resulted in significantly reduced fluorescence and a reduced...

  7. The calcium phosphate coating of soy lecithin nanoemulsion with performance in stability and as an oxygen carrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyu B.

    This work studied the relationship between surfactant, oil, and water, by building ternary phase diagrams, the goal of which was to identify the oil-in-water phase composition. The resulting nano-sized emulsion was coated with dicalcium phosphate by utilizing the ionic affinity between calcium ions and the emulsion surface. Since the desired function of the particle is as an oxygen carrier, the particle stability, oxygen capacity, and oxygen release rate were investigated. The first step in the process was to construct ternary phase diagrams with 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate (DOPA) and soy derived lecithin. The results showed that the lecithin surfactant formed an oil-in-water phase region that was 36 times greater than that of DOPA. With the desired phase composition set, the lecithin emulsion was extruded, resulting in a well-dispersed nanosized particle. A pH titration study of the emulsion found an optimized calcium phosphate coating condition at pH 8.8, at which, the calcium ion had a greater affinity for the emulsion surface than phosphate. A Hill plot was used to show calcium cooperativeness on the emulsion surface which suggested one calcium ion binds to one lecithin molecule. The lecithin emulsion particles were then coated with calcium phosphate using a layering technique that allowed for careful control of the coating thickness. The overall particle hydrodynamic radius was consistent with the growth of the calcium phosphate coating, from 8 nm to 28 nm. This observation was further supported with cryo-TEM measurements. The stability of the coated emulsion was tested in conditions that simulate practical thermal, physical, and time-dependent conditions. Throughout the tests, the coated emulsion exhibited a constant mono-dispersed particle size, while the uncoated emulsion size fluctuated greatly and exhibited increased polydispersion. The fast mixing method with the stopped-flow apparatus was employed to test the product as an oxygen carrier, and it

  8. Synthesis of Calcium Phosphate Composite Organogels by Using Emulsion Method for Dentine Occlusion Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nopteeranupharp, C.; Akkarachaneeyakorn, K.; Songsasaen, A.

    2018-03-01

    Dentinal hypersensitivity (DH) is one of the most human’s problems caused by the erosion of enamel. There are many methods and materials to solve this problem. Calcium phosphate is an excellent alternative for curing this symptom because of its osteoconductivity, and biocompatibility properties. The low-cost and low-toxicity calcium phosphate nanogel was fabricated by using emulsion method and characterized by using TEM, EDX, and DLS techniques. The results showed that P123 (poly (ethylene oxide)19-block-Poly (propylene oxide)69-block-poly (ethylene oxide)19) has played a major role as template and gel formation, SDS was used as a surfactant to form water-in-oil emulsion nanodroplets with circle-like shape. Moreover, the ability of synthesised organogel to occlude the exposed dentine tubules was tested on the model of human’s dentine slices. The results showed that calcium phosphate composite organogel can be efficiently occluded on dentine slice, characterized by SEM technique, after 1 day.

  9. Influence of cement compressive strength and porosity on augmentation performance in a model of orthopedic screw pull-out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujari-Palmer, Michael; Robo, Celine; Persson, Cecilia; Procter, Philip; Engqvist, Håkan

    2018-01-01

    Disease and injuries that affect the skeletal system may require surgical intervention and internal fixation, i.e. orthopedic plate and screw insertion, to stabilize the injury and facilitate tissue repair. If the surrounding bone quality is poor the screws may migrate, or the bone may fail, resulting in fixation failure. While numerous studies have shown that cement augmentation of the interface between bone and implant can increase screw pull-out force, the physical properties of cement that influence pull-out force have not been investigated. The present study sought to determine how the physical properties of high strength calcium phosphate cements (hsCPCs, specifically dicalcium phosphate) affected the corresponding orthopedic screw pull-out force in urethane foam models of "healthy" and "osteoporotic" synthetic bone (Sawbones). In the simplest model, where only the bond strength between screw thread and cement (without Sawbone) was tested, the correlation between pull-out force and cement compressive strength (R 2 = 0.79) was weaker than correlation with total cement porosity (R 2 = 0.89). In open pore Sawbone that mimics "healthy" cancellous bone density the stronger cements produced higher pull-out force (50-60% increase). High strength, low porosity cements also produced higher pull-out forces (50-190% increase) in "healthy" Sawbones with cortical fixation if the failure strength of the cortical material was similar to, or greater than (a metal shell), actual cortical bone. This result is of particular clinical relevance where fixation with a metal plate implant is indicated, as the nearby metal can simulate a thicker cortical shell, thereby increasing the pull-out force of screws augmented with stronger cements. The improvement in pull-out force was apparent even at low augmentation volumes of 0.5mL (50% increase), which suggest that in clinical situations where augmentation volume is limited the stronger, lower porosity calcium phosphate cement (CPC) may

  10. Preparation of Porous Calcium Phosphate Bioceramic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Porous calcium phosphate ceramics were prepared by slip casting and molding method respectively. By these two different methods, different microstructures can be got. By slip casting method, the pore size was 100- 350μm and 20- 80μm; pores were opened, interconnected and ball-like; the grain size was 2- 4 μm.By molding method, the pore size was 100-500 μm and 1-10μm; the grain size was 2-8μm. By slip casting method regular and interconnected pores can be got. By molding method the porosity and strength can be adjusted easily.

  11. In vitro study on biomineralization of biphasic calcium phosphate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, we report the preparation of a bone graft material, having cylindrical shape, containing biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP), gelatin (G), chitosan (C) and Terminalia chebula (TC) extract. TC extract was used as a crosslinker that gives stability to bone graft when it is placed in SBF. The graft was stable in the SBF ...

  12. Calcium silicate-based cements: composition, properties, and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawood, Alaa E; Parashos, Peter; Wong, Rebecca H K; Reynolds, Eric C; Manton, David J

    2017-05-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is a calcium silicate-based cement (CSC) commonly used in endodontic procedures involving pulpal regeneration and hard tissue repair, such as pulp capping, pulpotomy, apexogenesis, apexification, perforation repair, and root-end filling. Despite the superior laboratory and clinical performance of MTA in comparison with previous endodontic repair cements, such as Ca(OH) 2 , MTA has poor handling properties and a long setting time. New CSC have been commercially launched and marketed to overcome the limitations of MTA. The aim of the present review was to explore the available literature on new CSC products, and to give evidence-based recommendations for the clinical use of these materials. Within the limitations of the available data in the literature regarding the properties and performance of the new CSC, the newer products could be promising alternatives to MTA; however, further research is required to support this assumption. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Leaching of both calcium hydroxide and C-S-H from cement paste: Modeling the mechanical behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carde, C.; Torrenti, J.M.; Francois, R.

    1996-01-01

    This paper deals with the effect of the leaching process of cement based materials on their mechanical properties. This process induces mainly a total leaching of Ca(OH) 2 and a progressive decalcification of C-S-H which leads to a gradient of C/S ratio in the leaching zone. In a previous work, the authors venture the hypothesis that the dissolution of calcium hydroxide was the essential parameter governing both decrease in strength and increase in porosity in the case of a paste sample made with an OPC cement which leads to a 20% content of calcium. In order to quantify the effect of the decrease of C/S ratio in C-S-H, the authors have performed experiments on paste samples with the admixture of silica fume to reduce the content of calcium hydroxide and thus emphasize the effect of C/S ratio decrease of the C-S-H. The leaching process was achieved by the use of a 50% concentrate solution of ammonium nitrate. Compression tests were conducted on micro-cylinder samples (10, 12, 14, 20 and 30 mm of diameter) because of the slow kinetics of degradation due to the leaching. The deterioration of the cement paste and the mortar exposed to the action of the ammonium nitrate was indicated by a peripheral zone of less resistance. The experimental results allow the modeling of the mechanical behavior of cement pastes in relation to the ratio of degraded area over total area of the sample A d /A t . The model thus defined allows separation of the effect of calcium hydroxide leaching and C-S-H leaching, and shows the importance of the first one. The current research program tries to characterize the deterioration of the mechanical properties of the concrete surrounding radioactive wastes, due to the water flow during storage

  14. Effect of surface modification of nanofibres with glutamic acid peptide on calcium phosphate nucleation and osteogenic differentiation of marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Ozan; Kumar, Ankur; Moeinzadeh, Seyedsina; He, Xuezhong; Cui, Tong; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2016-02-01

    Biomineralization is mediated by extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins with amino acid sequences rich in glutamic acid. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of calcium phosphate deposition on aligned nanofibres surface-modified with a glutamic acid peptide on osteogenic differentiation of rat marrow stromal cells. Blend of EEGGC peptide (GLU) conjugated low molecular weight polylactide (PLA) and high molecular weight poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) was electrospun to form aligned nanofibres (GLU-NF). The GLU-NF microsheets were incubated in a modified simulated body fluid for nucleation of calcium phosphate crystals on the fibre surface. To achieve a high calcium phosphate to fibre ratio, a layer-by-layer approach was used to improve diffusion of calcium and phosphate ions inside the microsheets. Based on dissipative particle dynamics simulation of PLGA/PLA-GLU fibres, > 80% of GLU peptide was localized to the fibre surface. Calcium phosphate to fibre ratios as high as 200%, between those of cancellous (160%) and cortical (310%) bone, was obtained with the layer-by-layer approach. The extent of osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of marrow stromal cells seeded on GLU-NF microsheets was directly related to the amount of calcium phosphate deposition on the fibres prior to cell seeding. Expression of osteogenic markers osteopontin, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin and type 1 collagen increased gradually with calcium phosphate deposition on GLU-NF microsheets. Results demonstrate that surface modification of aligned synthetic nanofibres with EEGGC peptide dramatically affects nucleation and growth of calcium phosphate crystals on the fibres leading to increased osteogenic differentiation of marrow stromal cells and mineralization. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Development of a Calcium Phosphate Nanocomposite for Fast Fluorogenic Detection of Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio R. Martínez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Current procedures for the detection and identification of bacterial infections are laborious, time-consuming, and require a high workload and well-equipped laboratories. Therefore the work presented herein developed a simple, fast, and low cost method for bacterial detection based on hydroxyapatite nanoparticles with a nutritive mixture and the fluorogenic substrate. Calcium phosphate ceramic nanoparticles were characterized and integrated with a nutritive mixture for the early detection of bacteria by visual as well as fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. The composite was obtained by combining calcium phosphate nanoparticles (Ca:P ratio, 1.33:1 with a nutritive mixture of protein hydrolysates and carbon sources, which promote fast bacterial multiplication, and the fluorogenic substrate 4-methylumbellipheryl-β-d-glucuronide (MUG. The composite had an average particle size of 173.2 nm and did not show antibacterial activity against Gram-negative or Gram-positive bacteria. After an Escherichia coli suspension was in contact with the composite for 60–90 min, fluorescence detected under UV light or by fluorescence spectrophotometer indicated the presence of bacteria. Intense fluorescence was observed after incubation for a maximum of 90 min. Thus, this calcium phosphate nanocomposite system may be useful as a model for the development of other nanoparticle composites for detection of early bacterial adhesion.

  16. Calcium hydroxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrate - calcium; Lime milk; Slaked lime ... Calcium hydroxide ... These products contain calcium hydroxide: Cement Limewater Many industrial solvents and cleaners (hundreds to thousands of construction products, flooring strippers, brick cleaners, cement ...

  17. Tooth Discoloration Induced by Different Calcium Silicate-based Cements: A Systematic Review of In Vitro Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Możyńska, Joanna; Metlerski, Marcin; Lipski, Mariusz; Nowicka, Alicja

    2017-10-01

    On the basis of many clinical observations, some calcium silicate-based cements have a high potential for staining tooth tissue. This feature greatly limits the use of those cements, particularly for anterior teeth. This review aimed to provide a systematic evaluation of published in vitro studies to determine the effect of different calcium silicate-based cements on dental tissue discoloration. This literature review was developed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. The literature search was based on all publications without a year limit. The last search was performed on October 22, 2016. An electronic search was performed on MEDLINE (PubMed), Cochrane, and Scopus. The articles were selected to address the following research question: Which materials based on calcium silicate-based cements have hard tissue staining potential? The necessary information was extracted by 2 authors independently using a standardized form. The search resulted in 390 titles from all databases. Twenty-three studies met the inclusion criteria. Most of the studies exhibited a moderate risk of bias. The results indicated that some materials showed a strong potential for staining, including gray and white MTA Angelus (Londrina, PR, Brazil), gray and white ProRoot MTA (Dentsply, Tulsa, OK), and Ortho MTA (BioMTA, Seoul, Korea). Individual study results showed that Biodentine (Septodont, Saint Maur des Fosses, France), Retro MTA (BioMTA), Portland cement, EndoSequence Root Repair Material (Brasseler USA, Savannah, GA), Odontocem (Australian Dental Manufacturing, Brisbane, Australia), MM-MTA (Micro Mega, Besancon Cedex, France), and MTA Ledermix (Riemser Pharma GmbH, Greiswald-Insel Riems, Germany) were materials with the smallest staining potential. This review clearly showed that some calcium silicate-based cements have a high potential for staining hard tissue. On the other hand, some showed only a small change in color, which was

  18. Experimental survey on percutaneous injection of calcium phosphate cement in preventing the articular surface collapsing secondary to avascular necrosis of femoral head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Changlong; Lv Weifu; Zhang Xuebin; Wang Weiyu; Zhang Xingming

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the technical way for animal model of ANFH with TAE (transcatheter arterial embolization)and to observe the image and pathologic changes of percutaneous injection with CPC (Calcium Phosphate Cement)in preventing the articular surface collapsing secondary to ANFH (avascular necrosis of femoral head)in pigs and its feasibility and safety. Methods: Branch arteries of the pig's left femoral head were embolized with woolly threads. Twenty pigs were randomly divided into A and B groups, and after about 1 month changes were assessed by imagings. Group A(n=8)was served as control of model contrast group, with only TAE and then surveyed the avascular necrosis features of femoral head by imaging together with pathologic and histologic examinations. Group B (n=12) was designated as percutaneous injection with CPC for interventional treatment group of ANFH at the stage Ficat II. Results: The animal models of ANFH in early stage were established by embolization of feeding arteries. In Group A, bone collapse occurred in 1.5 months after TAE, with imaging features of femoral head necrosis aggravated gradually. In group B, technical success of percutaneous injection with CPC was high and technical criteria included precise injection time, vigorous percutaneous fixing of bone, suitable proportion of CPC powder to liquid. CT scan of femoral head with injection CPC showed that it diffused well. Volume of bone trabecula (TBV)and percentage of bone lacuna (PBL)at unit area under microscopy were also inspected in two groups. TBV and PBL of two groups were compared in different special times and calculated especially for group B (P<0.05). Conclusion: The percutaneous injection of CPC to femoral head is a quite safe and effective palliative therapy for ANFH in early stage. (authors)

  19. Influence of whole-body irradiation on calcium and phosphate homeostasis in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pento, J.T.; Kenny, A.D.

    1975-01-01

    Previous irradiation studies have revealed marked alterations in calcium metabolism. Moreover, the maintenance of calcium homeostasis with parathyroid hormone or calcium salts has been reported to reduce radiation lethality. Therefore, the present study was designed to evaluate the influence of irradiation on calcium homeostasis in the rat. Nine hundred rad of whole-body irradiation produced a significant depression of both plasma calcium and phosphate at 4 days postirradiation. This effect of irradiation was observed to be dose-dependent over a range of 600 to 1200 rad, and possibly related to irradiation-induced anorexia. The physiological significance of these observations is discussed

  20. Dissolution and storage stability of nanostructured calcium carbonates and phosphates for nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posavec, Lidija; Knijnenburg, Jesper T. N.; Hilty, Florentine M.; Krumeich, Frank; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.; Zimmermann, Michael B.

    2016-10-01

    Rapid calcium (Ca) dissolution from nanostructured Ca phosphate and carbonate (CaCO3) powders may allow them to be absorbed in much higher fraction in humans. Nanosized Ca phosphate and CaCO3 made by flame-assisted spray pyrolysis were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. As-prepared nanopowders contained both CaCO3 and CaO, but storing them under ambient conditions over 130 days resulted in a complete transformation into CaCO3, with an increase in both crystal and particle sizes. The small particle size could be stabilized against such aging by cation (Mg, Zn, Sr) and anion (P) doping, with P and Mg being most effective. Calcium phosphate nanopowders made at Ca:P ≤ 1.5 were XRD amorphous and contained γ-Ca2P2O7 with increasing hydroxyapatite content at higher Ca:P. Aging of powders with Ca:P = 1.0 and 1.5 for over 500 days gradually increased particle size (but less than for CaCO3) without a change in phase composition or crystallinity. In 0.01 M H3PO4 calcium phosphate nanopowders dissolved ≈4 times more Ca than micronsized compounds and about twice more Ca than CaCO3 nanopowders, confirming that nanosizing and/or amorphous structuring sharply increases Ca powder dissolution. Because higher Ca solubility in vitro generally leads to greater absorption in vivo, these novel FASP-made Ca nanostructured compounds may prove useful for nutrition applications, including supplementation and/or food fortification.

  1. Dissolution and storage stability of nanostructured calcium carbonates and phosphates for nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posavec, Lidija; Knijnenburg, Jesper T. N.; Hilty, Florentine M.; Krumeich, Frank; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.; Zimmermann, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid calcium (Ca) dissolution from nanostructured Ca phosphate and carbonate (CaCO 3 ) powders may allow them to be absorbed in much higher fraction in humans. Nanosized Ca phosphate and CaCO 3 made by flame-assisted spray pyrolysis were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. As-prepared nanopowders contained both CaCO 3 and CaO, but storing them under ambient conditions over 130 days resulted in a complete transformation into CaCO 3 , with an increase in both crystal and particle sizes. The small particle size could be stabilized against such aging by cation (Mg, Zn, Sr) and anion (P) doping, with P and Mg being most effective. Calcium phosphate nanopowders made at Ca:P ≤ 1.5 were XRD amorphous and contained γ-Ca 2 P 2 O 7 with increasing hydroxyapatite content at higher Ca:P. Aging of powders with Ca:P = 1.0 and 1.5 for over 500 days gradually increased particle size (but less than for CaCO 3 ) without a change in phase composition or crystallinity. In 0.01 M H 3 PO 4 calcium phosphate nanopowders dissolved ≈4 times more Ca than micronsized compounds and about twice more Ca than CaCO 3 nanopowders, confirming that nanosizing and/or amorphous structuring sharply increases Ca powder dissolution. Because higher Ca solubility in vitro generally leads to greater absorption in vivo, these novel FASP-made Ca nanostructured compounds may prove useful for nutrition applications, including supplementation and/or food fortification.

  2. Physical–chemical and biological behavior of an amorphous calcium phosphate thin film produced by RF-magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Euler A. dos; Moldovan, Simona; Mateescu, Mihaela; Faerber, Jacques; Acosta, Manuel; Pelletier, Hervé; Anselme, Karine; Werckmann, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    This work evaluates the thermal reactivity and the biological reactivity of an amorphous calcium phosphate thin film produced by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering onto titanium substrates. The analyses showed that the sputtering conditions used in this work led to the deposition of an amorphous calcium phosphate. The thermal treatment of this amorphous coating in the presence of H 2 O and CO 2 promoted the formation of a carbonated HA crystalline coating with the entrance of CO 3 2− ions into the hydroxyl HA lattice. When immersed in culture medium, the amorphous and carbonated coatings exhibited a remarkable instability. The presence of proteins increased the dissolution process, which was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses. Moreover, the carbonated HA coating induced precipitation independently of the presence of proteins under dynamic conditions. Despite this surface instability, this reactive calcium phosphate significantly improved the cellular behavior. The cell proliferation was higher on the Ticp than on the calcium phosphate coatings, but the two coatings increased cellular spreading and stress fiber formation. In this sense, the presence of reactive calcium phosphate coatings can stimulate cellular behavior. - Highlights: ► Functionalization of Ti with reactive CaP thin film by RF-magnetron sputtering. ► De-hydroxylation facilitating the insertion of CO 3 2− into the HA lattice. ► High surface reactivity in the presence of culture medium. ► Cell behavior improved by the presence of reactive films.

  3. Synthesis of some calcium phosphate crystals using the useful biomass for immobilization of microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohiruimaki, T

    2011-01-01

    Three sources of biomass generated by primary industry were used as the raw material for the synthesis of calcium phosphate crystals. Phosphoric acid was extracted from burned rice chaff using a 30% nitric acid solution, while scallop shells and gypsum of plasterboard were used as calcium sources. The calcium phosphate crystals were synthesized by a method involving homogeneous precipitation, and the relationship between the composition and shape of the crystals and the pH at the time of the precipitation was investigated. Monetite crystals in a petal form with a diameter ranging from 0.1 to 2 μm were precipitated at pH 2.0, while granular apatite crystals with a mean diameter of 1 μm were precipitated at pH 6.0. We also investigated the ability of the synthesized calcium phosphate crystals to immobilize lactic acid bacteria for practical use in industrial bioreactor. It was determined that monetite crystals with a diameter of 2 μm had the highest ability to fix lactic acid bacteria. The population of lactic acid bacteria was estimated to exceed 1,300 bacteria per crystal surface of 50 μm 2 suggesting that these crystals may be of practical use in industrial fermenters.

  4. Carbonation of calcium aluminate cement pastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Carrasco, L.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available This work discusses the results from accelerated tests intended to investigate the ways the different curing methods affect the carbonation of calcium aluminate cements pastes (CAC. The research was focused on the mineralogical composition of hydrated and carbonated samples. The compressive strengths and the porosity of the samples have been determined. Results point out that vaterite and aragonite are formed as a result of carbonation of both cubic and hexagonal calcium aluminate hydrates. The polymorph of calcium carbonate formed does not depend on the curing process. Carbonation rates is higher in hexagonal than in cubic hydrates. Results obtained through this study evidence that, as a consequence of the carbonation process of CAC pastes, in test conditions, an increase of the mechanical strengths occurs.

    En el presente trabajo se discuten los resultados obtenidos en los ensayos acelerados llevados a cabo para investigar los efectos de diferentes métodos de curado sobre la carbonatacion de pastas del cemento de aluminato de calcio (CAC. Se estudió la composición mineralógica de las muestras hidratadas y carbonatadas. Además, se determinaron las resistencias mecánicas a compresión y la porosidad de las probetas. Los resultados indican que la vaterita y el aragonito son las polimorfías del CaCO3 que se forman al carbonatar los aluminatos cálcicos hidratos, tanto los de naturaleza hexagonal como cúbica. El polimorfo del carbonato cálcico formado no depende del proceso de curado. La velocidad de carbonatación de los hidratos hexagonales es mayor que la de los cúbicos. Los resultados obtenidos en el presente trabajo han evidenciado que como consecuencia del proceso de carbonatación sobre pastas de CAC, en las condiciones realizadas, se produce un incremento en las resistencias mecánicas.

  5. Association of salivary calcium, phosphate, pH and flow rate on oral health: A study on 90 subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiyaz, Mohamed; Ramesh, Amitha; Ramalingam, Karthikeyan; Thomas, Biju; Shetty, Sucheta; Prakash, Prashanth

    2013-07-01

    This study was designed to compare inorganic salivary calcium, phosphate, flow rate and pH of un-stimulated saliva and oral hygiene of healthy subjects, patients with periodontitis and dental caries and to correlate salivary calcium level with the number of intact teeth. The present study consisted of 90 patients aged between 18 and 55 years and were divided into three groups, periodontitis, dental caries and controls. Oral hygiene index-simplified, probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level and number of teeth present, teeth with active carious lesions were recorded. Salivary flow rate and pH was recorded and subjected to biochemical investigation. Estimation of inorganic calcium and phosphate was performed by colorimetric method. Results showed statistically significant increase in salivary inorganic calcium and phosphate levels, poor oral hygiene status, pH and salivary flow rate in patients with periodontitis when compared with dental caries group and controls. Individuals who have increased salivary inorganic calcium, phosphate, pH, flow rate and maintain poor oral hygiene could be at a higher risk for developing periodontitis and may have less dental caries and more number of intact teeth.

  6. Brain aluminium accumulation and oxidative stress in the presence of calcium silicate dental cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirkaya, K; Demirdöğen, B Can; Torun, Z Öncel; Erdem, O; Çırak, E; Tunca, Y M

    2017-10-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is a calcium silicate dental cement used for various applications in dentistry. This study was undertaken to test whether the presence of three commercial brands of calcium silicate dental cements in the dental extraction socket of rats would affect the brain aluminium (Al) levels and oxidative stress parameters. Right upper incisor was extracted and polyethylene tubes filled with MTA Angelus, MTA Fillapex or Theracal LC, or left empty for the control group, were inserted into the extraction socket. Rats were killed 7, 30 or 60 days after operation. Brain tissues were obtained before killing. Al levels were measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels, catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities were determined using spectrophotometry. A transient peak was observed in brain Al level of MTA Angelus group on day 7, while MTA Fillapex and Theracal LC groups reached highest brain Al level on day 60. Brain TBARS level, CAT, SOD and GPx activities transiently increased on day 7 and then returned to almost normal levels. This in vivo study for the first time indicated that initial washout may have occurred in MTA Angelus, while element leaching after the setting is complete may have taken place for MTA Fillapex and Theracal LC. Moreover, oxidative stress was induced and antioxidant enzymes were transiently upregulated. Further studies to search for oxidative neuronal damage should be done to completely understand the possible toxic effects of calcium silicate cements on the brain.

  7. Treatment of cows with parturient paresis using intravenous calcium and oral sodium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, U; Grob, D; Hässig, M

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate whether intravenous infusion of 1000 ml 40% calcium borogluconate combined with the oral adminstration of 500 g sodium phosphate leads to a better cure rate and longer-lasting normocalcaemia and normophosphataemia than standard intravenous treatment with 500 ml calcium borogluconate in cows with parturient paresis. Forty recumbent cows with hypocalcaemia and hypophosphataemia were alternately allocated to group A or B. Cows of both groups were treated intravenously with 500 ml 40% calcium borogluconate, and cows of group B additionally received another 500 ml calcium borogluconate via slow intravenous infusion and 500 g sodium phosphate administered via an orogastric tube. Thirty-two cows stood within 8 hours after the start of treatment and 8 did not; of the 32 cows that stood, 18 belonged to group A and 14 to group B (90% of group A vs. 70% of group B; P = 0.23). Seven cows relapsed; of these and the 8 that did not respond to initial treatment, 10 stood after two standard intravenous treatments. Downer cow syndrome occurred in 5 cows, 3 of which recovered after aggressive therapy. The overall cure rate did not differ significantly between groups A and B. Twelve (60%) cows of group A and 14 (70%) cows of group B were cured after a single treatment and of the remaining 14, 11 were cured after two or more treatments. Two downer cows were euthanized and one other died of heart failure during treatment. Serum calcium concentrations during the first eight hours after the start of treatment were significantly higher in group B than in group A, and oral sodium phosphate caused a significant and lasting increase in inorganic phosphate. More cows of group B than group A were cured after a single treatment (P > 0.05). These findings, although not statistically significant, are promising and should be verified using a larger number of cows.

  8. The Transformation of Calcium Phosphate Bioceramics in Vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Hong-lian; CAO Xian-ying; LI Xiao-xi; YAN Yu-hua; LI Shi-pu

    2003-01-01

    To study the transformation process of calcium phosphate bioceramic in vivo,biodegradable porous β-tricalcium phosphate ceramics (β-TCP) were used in this experiment. The materials (φ5×8mm) were implanted in the tibia of rabbits. The β-TCP ceramics with bone tissue were retrieved and treated for histology, and then observed by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an electron probe X-ray microanalyzer (EMPA) every month. The results show that β-TCP ceramics bond to bone directly,new bones are forming and maturing with materials continuous degrading,and the materials are nearly replaced by the formed bone finally.Parts of the materials were degraded,absorpted and recrystallized,the others dispersped on the cancellous bone and the Haversian lamella with an irregular arrangement incorporating in bone formation directly by remodeling structure.

  9. Evaluation of bioactivity in vitro of endodontic calcium aluminate cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, I.R.; Andrade, T.L.; Santos, G.L.; Pandolfelli, V.C.

    2011-01-01

    Bioactivity is referred to as the capacity of a material to develop a stable bond with living tissue via the deposition of hydroxyapatite. Materials which exhibit this property can be used to repair diseased or damaged bone tissue and can be designed to remain in situ indefinitely. An indication of bioactivity can be obtained by the formation of a hydroxyapatite layer on the surface of a substrate in simulated body fluids (SBF) in vitro. Therefore, set samples of calcium aluminate endodontic cement were maintained in contact with SBF solutions (Kokubo and Rigo) and their surfaces were later evaluated by means of SEM, EDX and DRX. Measurements of pH and ionic conductivity were also carried out for SBF solutions in contact with set samples of endodontic cement. The ideal conditions of precipitation were obtained in SBF Rigo been observed a surface layer with spherical morphology characteristic of stoichiometric hydroxyapatite.(author)

  10. Aluminum-free glass-ionomer bone cements with enhanced bioactivity and biodegradability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Filipa O.; Pires, Ricardo A., E-mail: rpires@dep.uminho.pt; Reis, Rui L.

    2013-04-01

    Al-free glasses of general composition 0.340SiO{sub 2}:0.300ZnO:(0.250-a-b)CaO:aSrO:bMgO:0.050Na{sub 2}O:0.060P{sub 2}O{sub 5} (a, b = 0.000 or 0.125) were synthesized by melt quenching and their ability to form glass-ionomer cements was evaluated using poly(acrylic acid) and water. We evaluated the influence of the poly(acrylic acid) molecular weight and glass particle size in the cement mechanical performance. Higher compressive strength (25 ± 5 MPa) and higher compressive elastic modulus (492 ± 17 MPa) were achieved with a poly(acrylic acid) of 50 kDa and glass particle sizes between 63 and 125 μm. Cements prepared with glass formulation a = 0.125 and b = 0.000 were analyzed after immersion in simulated body fluid; they presented a surface morphology consistent with a calcium phosphate coating and a Ca/P ratio of 1.55 (similar to calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite). Addition of starch to the cement formulation induced partial degradability after 8 weeks of immersion in phosphate buffer saline containing α-amylase. Micro-computed tomography analysis revealed that the inclusion of starch increased the cement porosity from 35% to 42%. We were able to produce partially degradable Al-free glass-ionomer bone cements with mechanical performance, bioactivity and biodegradability suitable to be applied on non-load bearing sites and with the appropriate physical characteristics for osteointegration upon partial degradation. Zn release studies (concentrations between 413 μM and 887 μM) evidenced the necessity to tune the cement formulations to reduce the Zn concentration in the surrounding environment. Highlights: ► We developed partially degradable, bioactive, Al-free glass-ionomer cements (GICs). ► Enhanced mechanical behavior was achieved using 63–125 μm glass particle size range. ► The highest mechanical resistance was obtained using poly(acrylic acid) of 50 kDa. ► Biodegradation was successfully tuned to start 8 weeks after GIC preparation. ► Zn

  11. Aluminum-free glass-ionomer bone cements with enhanced bioactivity and biodegradability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Filipa O.; Pires, Ricardo A.; Reis, Rui L.

    2013-01-01

    Al-free glasses of general composition 0.340SiO 2 :0.300ZnO:(0.250-a-b)CaO:aSrO:bMgO:0.050Na 2 O:0.060P 2 O 5 (a, b = 0.000 or 0.125) were synthesized by melt quenching and their ability to form glass-ionomer cements was evaluated using poly(acrylic acid) and water. We evaluated the influence of the poly(acrylic acid) molecular weight and glass particle size in the cement mechanical performance. Higher compressive strength (25 ± 5 MPa) and higher compressive elastic modulus (492 ± 17 MPa) were achieved with a poly(acrylic acid) of 50 kDa and glass particle sizes between 63 and 125 μm. Cements prepared with glass formulation a = 0.125 and b = 0.000 were analyzed after immersion in simulated body fluid; they presented a surface morphology consistent with a calcium phosphate coating and a Ca/P ratio of 1.55 (similar to calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite). Addition of starch to the cement formulation induced partial degradability after 8 weeks of immersion in phosphate buffer saline containing α-amylase. Micro-computed tomography analysis revealed that the inclusion of starch increased the cement porosity from 35% to 42%. We were able to produce partially degradable Al-free glass-ionomer bone cements with mechanical performance, bioactivity and biodegradability suitable to be applied on non-load bearing sites and with the appropriate physical characteristics for osteointegration upon partial degradation. Zn release studies (concentrations between 413 μM and 887 μM) evidenced the necessity to tune the cement formulations to reduce the Zn concentration in the surrounding environment. Highlights: ► We developed partially degradable, bioactive, Al-free glass-ionomer cements (GICs). ► Enhanced mechanical behavior was achieved using 63–125 μm glass particle size range. ► The highest mechanical resistance was obtained using poly(acrylic acid) of 50 kDa. ► Biodegradation was successfully tuned to start 8 weeks after GIC preparation. ► Zn release should be

  12. The Retentive Strength of Cemented Zirconium Oxide Crowns after Dentin Pretreatment with Desensitizing Paste Containing 8% Arginine and Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilo, Raphael; Harel, Noga; Nissan, Joseph; Levartovsky, Shifra

    2016-01-01

    The effect of dentin pretreatment with Desensitizing Paste containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate on the retention of zirconium oxide (Y-TZP) crowns was tested. Forty molar teeth were mounted and prepared using a standardized protocol. Y-TZP crowns were produced using computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology. The 40 prepared teeth were either pretreated with Desensitizing Paste or not pretreated. After two weeks, each group was subdivided into two groups, cemented with either Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (RMGIC) or Self Adhesive Resin Cement (SARC)). Prior to cementation, the surface areas of the prepared teeth were measured. After aging, the cemented crown-tooth assemblies were tested for retentive strength using a universal testing machine. The debonded surfaces of the teeth and crowns were examined microscopically at 10× magnification. Pretreating the dentin surfaces with Desensitizing Paste prior to cementation did not affect the retention of the Y-TZP crowns. The retentive values for RMGIC (3.04 ± 0.77 MPa) were significantly higher than those for SARC (2.28 ± 0.58 MPa). The predominant failure modes for the RMGIC and SARC were adhesive cement-dentin and adhesive cement-crown, respectively. An 8.0% arginine and calcium carbonate in-office desensitizing paste can be safely used to reduce post-cementation sensitivity without reducing the retentive strength of Y-TZP crowns. PMID:27023532

  13. The Retentive Strength of Cemented Zirconium Oxide Crowns after Dentin Pretreatment with Desensitizing Paste Containing 8% Arginine and Calcium Carbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Pilo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of dentin pretreatment with Desensitizing Paste containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate on the retention of zirconium oxide (Y-TZP crowns was tested. Forty molar teeth were mounted and prepared using a standardized protocol. Y-TZP crowns were produced using computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM technology. The 40 prepared teeth were either pretreated with Desensitizing Paste or not pretreated. After two weeks, each group was subdivided into two groups, cemented with either Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (RMGIC or Self Adhesive Resin Cement (SARC. Prior to cementation, the surface areas of the prepared teeth were measured. After aging, the cemented crown-tooth assemblies were tested for retentive strength using a universal testing machine. The debonded surfaces of the teeth and crowns were examined microscopically at 10× magnification. Pretreating the dentin surfaces with Desensitizing Paste prior to cementation did not affect the retention of the Y-TZP crowns. The retentive values for RMGIC (3.04 ± 0.77 MPa were significantly higher than those for SARC (2.28 ± 0.58 MPa. The predominant failure modes for the RMGIC and SARC were adhesive cement-dentin and adhesive cement-crown, respectively. An 8.0% arginine and calcium carbonate in-office desensitizing paste can be safely used to reduce post-cementation sensitivity without reducing the retentive strength of Y-TZP crowns.

  14. Formation of calcium phosphates by vapour diffusion in highly concentrated ionic micro-droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iafisco, M. [Alma Mater Studiorum Universita di Bologna, Dipartimento di Chimica ' ' G. Ciamician' ' , Via Selmi 2, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Universita del Piemonte Orientale, Dipartimento di Scienze Mediche, Via Solaroli 4, 28100 Novara (Italy); Delgado-Lopez, J.M.; Gomez-Morales, J.; Hernandez-Hernandez, M.A.; Rodriguez-Ruiz, I. [Laboratorio de Estudios Cristalograficos, IACT CSIC-UGR, Edificio Lopez Neyra, Avenida del Conocimiento, s/n 18100 Armilla (Spain); Roveri, N. [Alma Mater Studiorum Universita di Bologna, Dipartimento di Chimica ' ' G. Ciamician' ' , Via Selmi 2, 40126 Bologna (Italy)

    2011-08-15

    In this work we have used the sitting drop vapour diffusion technique, employing the ''crystallization mushroom '' to analyze the evolution of calcium phosphate crystallization in micro-droplets containing high initial concentrations of Ca{sup 2+} and HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-}. The decomposition of NH{sub 4}HCO{sub 3} solution produces vapours of NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} which diffuse through the droplets containing an aqueous solution of Ca(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2} and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4}. The result is the increase of pH by means of the diffusion of NH{sub 3} gas and the doping of the calcium phosphate with CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} ions by means of the diffusion of CO{sub 2} gas. The pH of the crystallization process is monitored and the precipitates at different times are characterized by XRD, FTIR, TGA, SEM and TEM techniques. The slow increase of pH and the high concentration of Ca{sup 2+} and HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-} in the droplets induce the crystallization of three calcium phosphate phases: dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD, brushite), octacalcium phosphate (OCP) and carbonate-hydroxyapatite (HA). The amount of HA nanocrystals with needle-like morphology and dimensions of about 100 nm, closely resembling the inorganic phase of bones, gradually increases, with the precipitation time up to 7 days, whereas the amount of DCPD, growing along the b axis, increases up to 3 days. Then, DCDP crystals start to hydrolyze yielding OCP nanoribbons and HA nanocrystals. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Properties of calcium silicate-monobasic calcium phosphate materials for endodontics containing tantalum pentoxide and zirconium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamparini, Fausto; Siboni, Francesco; Prati, Carlo; Taddei, Paola; Gandolfi, Maria Giovanna

    2018-05-08

    The aim of the study was to evaluate chemical-physical properties and apatite-forming ability of three premixed calcium silicate materials containing monobasic calcium phosphate (CaH 4 P 2 O 8 ) bioceramic, tantalum pentoxide and zirconium oxide, recently marketed for endodontics (TotalFill BC-Sealer, BC-RRM-Paste, BC-RRM-Putty). Microchemical and micromorphological analyses, radiopacity, initial and final setting times, calcium release and alkalising activity were tested. The nucleation of calcium phosphates (CaPs) and/or apatite after 28 days ageing was evaluated by ESEM-EDX and micro-Raman spectroscopy. BC-Sealer and BC-RRM-Paste showed similar initial (23 h), prolonged final (52 h) setting times and good radiopacity (> 7 mm Al); BC-RRM-Putty showed fast initial (2 h) and final setting times (27 h) and excellent radiopacity (> 9 mm Al). All materials induced a marked alkalisation (pH 11-12) up to 28 days and showed the release of calcium ions throughout the entire test period (cumulative calcium release 641-806 ppm). After 28 days ageing, a well-distributed mineral layer was present on all samples surface; EDX demonstrated relevant calcium and phosphorous peaks. B-type carbonated apatite and calcite deposits were identified by micro-Raman spectroscopy on all the 28-day-aged samples; the deposit thickness was higher on BC-RRM-Paste and BC-RRM-Putty, in agreement with calcium release data. These materials met the required chemical and physical standards and released biologically relevant ions. The CaSi-CaH 4 P 2 O 8 system present in the materials provided Ca and OH ions release with marked abilities to nucleate a layer of B-type carbonated apatite favoured/accelerated by the bioceramic presence. The ability to nucleate apatite may lead many clinical advantages: In orthograde endodontics, it may improve the sealing ability by the deposition of CaPs at the material-root dentine interface, and in endodontic surgery, it could promote bone and

  16. Nano-sized calcium phosphate (CaP) carriers for non-viral gene deilvery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Donghyun, E-mail: dhlee@cau.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Integrative Engineering, Chung-Ang University, 221 Heukseok-Dong, Dongjak-Gu, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Upadhye, Kalpesh [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Kumta, Prashant N., E-mail: pkumta@pitt.edu [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Sceince, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Center for Complex Engineered Multifunctional Materials, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States)

    2012-02-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanostructured calcium phosphates (NanoCaPs): comprehensive review. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non viral gene delivery mechanisms: detailed mechanisms are outlined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Barriers to non-viral gene delivery: detailed barriers are discussed. - Abstract: Gene therapy has garnered much interest due to the potential for curing multiple inherited and/or increases in the acquired diseases. As a result, there has been intense activity from multiple research groups for developing effective delivery methods and carriers, which is a critical step in advancing gene delivery technologies. In order for the carriers to effectively deliver the genetic payloads, multiple extracellular and intracellular barriers need to be overcome. Although overcoming these challenges to improve the effectiveness is critical, the development of safe gene delivery agents is even more vital to assure its use in clinical applications. The development of safe and effective strategies has therefore been a major challenge impeding gene therapy progress. In this regard, calcium phosphate (CaP) based nano-particles has been considered as one of the candidate non-viral gene delivery vehicles, but has been plagued by inconsistent and low transfection efficiencies limiting its progress. There has been major research effort to improve the consistency and effectiveness of CaP based vectors. Currently, it is therefore thought that by controlling the various synthesis factors such as Ca/P ratio, mode of mixing, and type of calcium phosphate phase, such variability and inefficiency could be modulated. This review attempts to provide a comprehensive analysis of the current research activity in the development of CaP based ceramic and polymer-ceramic hybrid systems for non-viral gene delivery. Preliminary transfection results of hydroxyapatite (HA or NanoCaPs), amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) and brushite phases are also compared to assess the

  17. Evaluation of an injectable bioactive borate glass cement to heal bone defects in a rabbit femoral condyle model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Xu [Institute of Bioengineering and Information Technology Materials, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Center for Human Tissues and Organs Degeneration, Shenzhen Institute of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Science, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Huang, Wenhai [Institute of Bioengineering and Information Technology Materials, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhang, Yadong, E-mail: zhangyadong6@126.com [Department of Spine Surgery, Shanghai East Hospital, School of Medicine, Tongji University, Shanghai 200120 (China); Huang, Chengcheng; Yu, Zunxiong; Wang, Lei; Liu, Wenlong; Wang, Ting [Center for Human Tissues and Organs Degeneration, Shenzhen Institute of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Science, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Zhou, Jie; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Nai; Wang, Deping [Institute of Bioengineering and Information Technology Materials, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Pan, Haobo, E-mail: hb.pan@siat.ac.cn [Center for Human Tissues and Organs Degeneration, Shenzhen Institute of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Science, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Rahaman, Mohamed N., E-mail: rahaman@mst.edu [Department of Spine Surgery, Shanghai East Hospital, School of Medicine, Tongji University, Shanghai 200120 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409-0340 (United States)

    2017-04-01

    There is a need for synthetic biomaterials to heal bone defects using minimal invasive surgery. In the present study, an injectable cement composed of bioactive borate glass particles and a chitosan bonding solution was developed and evaluated for its capacity to heal bone defects in a rabbit femoral condyle model. The injectability and setting time of the cement in vitro decreased but the compressive strength increased (8 ± 2 MPa to 31 ± 2 MPa) as the ratio of glass particles to chitosan solution increased (from 1.0 g ml{sup −1} to 2.5 g ml{sup −1}). Upon immersing the cement in phosphate-buffered saline, the glass particles reacted and converted to hydroxyapatite, imparting bioactivity to the cement. Osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells showed enhanced proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity when incubated in media containing the soluble ionic product of the cement. The bioactive glass cement showed a better capacity to stimulate bone formation in rabbit femoral condyle defects at 12 weeks postimplantation when compared to a commercial calcium sulfate cement. The injectable bioactive borate glass cement developed in this study could provide a promising biomaterial to heal bone defects by minimal invasive surgery. - Highlights: • New class of injectable bone cement composed of bioactive borate glass particles and chitosan bonding phase was created. • The cement is biocompatible and bioactive, and has a much lower temperature increase during setting than PMMA cement. • The cement has a more controllable degradation rate and higher strength over a longer time than calcium sulfate cement. • The cement showed a better ability to heal bone defects than calcium sulfate over a twelve-week implantation period.

  18. Injectable TEMPO-oxidized nanofibrillated cellulose/biphasic calcium phosphate hydrogel for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safwat, Engie; Hassan, Mohammad L; Saniour, Sayed; Zaki, Dalia Yehia; Eldeftar, Mervat; Saba, Dalia; Zazou, Mohamed

    2018-05-01

    Nanofibrillated cellulose, obtained from rice straw agricultural wastes was used as a substrate for the preparation of a new injectable and mineralized hydrogel for bone regeneration. Tetramethyl pyridine oxyl (TEMPO) oxidized nanofibrillated cellulose, was mineralized through the incorporation of a prepared and characterized biphasic calcium phosphate at a fixed ratio of 50 wt%. The TEMPO-oxidized rice straw nanofibrillated cellulose was characterized using transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared, and carboxylic content determination. The injectability and viscosity of the prepared hydrogel were evaluated using universal testing machine and rheometer testing, respectively. Cytotoxicity and alkaline phosphatase level tests on osteoblast like-cells for in vitro assessment of the biocompatibility were investigated. Results revealed that the isolated rice straw nanofibrillated cellulose is a nanocomposite of the cellulose nanofibers and silica nanoparticles. Rheological properties of the tested materials are suitable for use as injectable material and of nontoxic effect on osteoblast-like cells, as revealed by the positive alkaline phosphate assay. However, nanofibrillated cellulose/ biphasic calcium phosphate hydrogel showed higher cytotoxicity and lower bioactivity test results when compared to that of nanofibrillated cellulose.

  19. Dissolution and storage stability of nanostructured calcium carbonates and phosphates for nutrition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posavec, Lidija; Knijnenburg, Jesper T. N., E-mail: jesper.knijnenburg@alumni.ethz.ch; Hilty, Florentine M. [ETH Zurich, Human Nutrition Laboratory, Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, Department of Health Sciences and Technology (Switzerland); Krumeich, Frank; Pratsinis, Sotiris E. [ETH Zurich, Particle Technology Laboratory, Institute of Process Engineering, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering (Switzerland); Zimmermann, Michael B. [ETH Zurich, Human Nutrition Laboratory, Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, Department of Health Sciences and Technology (Switzerland)

    2016-10-15

    Rapid calcium (Ca) dissolution from nanostructured Ca phosphate and carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) powders may allow them to be absorbed in much higher fraction in humans. Nanosized Ca phosphate and CaCO{sub 3} made by flame-assisted spray pyrolysis were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. As-prepared nanopowders contained both CaCO{sub 3} and CaO, but storing them under ambient conditions over 130 days resulted in a complete transformation into CaCO{sub 3}, with an increase in both crystal and particle sizes. The small particle size could be stabilized against such aging by cation (Mg, Zn, Sr) and anion (P) doping, with P and Mg being most effective. Calcium phosphate nanopowders made at Ca:P ≤ 1.5 were XRD amorphous and contained γ-Ca{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} with increasing hydroxyapatite content at higher Ca:P. Aging of powders with Ca:P = 1.0 and 1.5 for over 500 days gradually increased particle size (but less than for CaCO{sub 3}) without a change in phase composition or crystallinity. In 0.01 M H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} calcium phosphate nanopowders dissolved ≈4 times more Ca than micronsized compounds and about twice more Ca than CaCO{sub 3} nanopowders, confirming that nanosizing and/or amorphous structuring sharply increases Ca powder dissolution. Because higher Ca solubility in vitro generally leads to greater absorption in vivo, these novel FASP-made Ca nanostructured compounds may prove useful for nutrition applications, including supplementation and/or food fortification.

  20. The effect of calcium phosphate nanoparticles on hormone production and apoptosis in human granulosa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Li

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives Although many nanomaterials are being used in academia, industry and daily life, there is little understanding about the effects of nanoparticles on the reproductive health of vertebral animals, including human beings. An experimental study was therefore performed here to explore the effect of calcium phosphate nanoparticles on both steroid hormone production and apoptosis in human ovarian granulosa cells. Methods Calcium phosphate nanoparticles uptaking was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The cell cycle was assessed with propidium iodide-stained cells (distribution of cells in G0/G1, S, and G2/M phases by flow cytometry. The pattern of cell death (necrosis and apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry with annexin V-FITC/PI staining. The expression of mRNAs encoding P450scc, P450arom and StAR were determined by RT-PCR. Progesterone and estradiol levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Results TEM results confirmed that calcium phosphate nanoparticles could enter into granulosa cells, and distributed in the membranate compartments, including lysosome and mitochondria and intracellular vesicles. The increased percentage of cells in S phase when cultured with nanoparticles indicated that there was an arrest at the checkpoint from phase S-to-G2/M (from 6.28 +/- 1.55% to 11.18 +/- 1.73%, p Conclusion Calcium phosphate nanoparticles interfered with cell cycle of cultured human ovarian granulosa cells thus increasing cell apoptosis. This pilot study suggested that effects of nanoparticles on ovarian function should be extensively investigated.

  1. Co-crystallization of cholesterol and calcium phosphate as related to atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Danielle; Azoury, Reuven; Sarig, Sara

    1990-09-01

    Calcification of atherosclerotic plaques occurs very frequently and aggravates the disease. In biological systems, epitaxial relationships between crystal structures may be important in nucleating the deposit of a solid phase. The biologically preferred calcium phosphate species, apatite, and cholesterol crystal have structurally compatible crystallographic faces which allow epitaxial growth of one crystal upon another. The present study describes a new approach to explore, in vitro, the crystallization processes of calcium phosphate (CaP) with cholesterol (CS) and cholestanol (CN) which are related to atherosclerosis. Aqueous solutions containing calcium and phosphate ions or CaP crystals as hydroxyapatite were added into saturated ethanolic solutions of CS or CS and 10% CN. After precipitation, crystals were collected and analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), infra-red (IR), X-ray, scanning electron microscope (SEM-LINK), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and atomic absorption. The principal result is the well-formed crystals precipitation when an aqueous solution and CaP seed crystals were added to saturated solutions of CS and 10% CN. Cholesterol-cholestanol dihydrate (CC2W) crystals precipitated in the presence of CaP seeds were compared to the CC2W crystals obtained without the mineral compound. The results of this comparison indicate a special link between crystals of CaP and CC2W, and support the epitaxial relationship between the two kinds of crystals. The potential of CC2W crystals to be precipitated by CaP seed crystals prove likewise the possible significant role of the cholestanol metabolite in the process of cholesterol crystallization and calcification in the arteries.

  2. Non-viral bone morphogenetic protein 2 transfection of rat dental pulp stem cells using calcium phosphate nanoparticles as carriers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, X.; Walboomers, X.F.; Dolder, J. van den; Yang, F.; Bian, Z.; Fan, M.; Jansen, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Calcium phosphate nanoparticles have shown potential as non-viral vectors for gene delivery. The aim of this study was to induce bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp)2 transfection in rat dental pulp stem cells using calcium phosphate nanoparticles as a gene vector and then to evaluate the efficiency and

  3. Synthesis and characterization of porous calcium phosphate; Sintesis y caracterizacion del fosfato de calcio poroso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granados C, F.; Serrano G, J.; Bonifacio M, J. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: fgc@nuclear.inin.mx

    2007-07-01

    The porous calcium phosphate was prepared by the continuous precipitation method using Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.4H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} salts. The synthesized material was structurally and superficially characterized using the XRD, BET, IR TGA and SEM techniques. The obtained inorganic material was identified as calcium phosphate that presents a great specific area for what can be efficiently used as adsorbent material for adsorption studies in the radioactive wastes treatment present in aqueous solution. (Author)

  4. The fabrication of nanocomposites via calcium phosphate formation on gelatin–chitosan network and the gelatin influence on the properties of biphasic composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babaei, Zahra; Jahanshahi, Mohsen; Rabiee, Sayed Mahmood

    2013-01-01

    A novel biodegradable polymer–ceramic nanocomposite which consisted of gelatin (Gel), chitosan (CS), and calcium phosphate (CaP) nanoparticles was prepared based on in situ preparation method. The fabricated biocomposites were characterized by FTIR, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as well as scanning electron microscope with X-ray elemental analysis (SEM-EDX). The characterization results confirmed that the crystalline calcium phosphate nanoparticles were mineralized in polymeric matrix and the interaction between Ca2+ in calcium phosphate and functional groups in polymers molecular chains was formed. XRD result showed that in addition to hydroxyapatite (HA), Brushite (BR) and tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) particles also were formed due to lack of complete penetration of the basic solution into the polymeric matrix. However, SEM image indicated that the polymeric matrix has the controlling role in the particle size of calcium phosphate. The size of particles in three component composites was about 100 nm while in two component composites proved to be more in μm size. TEM observation supported SEM results and showed that the three component composites have calcium phosphate nanoparticles. The elastic modulus and compressive strength of the composites were also improved by the employment of gelatin and chitosan together, which can make them more beneficial for surgical applications. - Highlights: ► A new type of calcium phosphate nanocomposites consisted chitosan and gelatin as polymeric matrix was obtained via in situ precipitation method. ► The formed particles into the polymeric matrix are hydroxyapatite, Brushite and β-tricalcium phosphate. ► The polymer concentration is a predominant factor for inhibiting nucleation and growth of calcium phosphate particles as the particles size was also decreased by increasing the amount of polymeric phase. ► The nano particles formed in three component composites and micro particles

  5. Another look at the deterioration of calcium aluminate cement concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jambor, Jaromir

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available Potential degradation of concrete structures made of calcium aluminate cement (CAC is well known and is caused by transformation (conversion of the thermodynamically metastable into stable calcium aluminate hydrate phases. This recrystallization is influenced by temperature and humidity; the structural degradation of the concrete itself thus its loss of strength, is strongly related to the pore structure of the hydrated cement paste, the critical parameters being the total volume of pores below 15-20 nm and the median micropore radius. This constitutes a novel procedure for evaluation of existing CAC concrete structure.

    La degradación potencial de estructuras de hormigón elaboradas con cemento aluminoso (CA es bien conocida. Este deterioro está causado por la recristalización (conversión de las fases del aluminato cálcico que son termodinámicamente metastables, en fases estables. En esta recristalización influye la temperatura y la humedad. Tanto la degradación del propio hormigón, como su pérdida de resistencias están relacionadas estrechamente con la estructura porosa de la pasta del cemento hidratado, siendo parámetros críticos el volumen total de los poros inferiores a 15-20 nm y el tamaño medio de los radios de los microporos. Esto constituye un nuevo procedimiento para evaluar las estructuras existentes de hormigón de cemento aluminoso (CA.

  6. Assessment of salivary calcium, phosphate, magnesium, pH, and flow rate in healthy subjects, periodontitis, and dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, K S; Zareena; Hegde, Shashikanth; Arun Kumar, M S

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to estimate and compare inorganic salivary calcium, phosphate, magnesium, salivary flow rate, and pH of unstimulated saliva and oral hygiene status of healthy subjects, subjects with periodontitis and dental caries, and to correlate salivary calcium level with number of intact teeth. The study population consisted of 48 systemically healthy subjects in the age group of 18-55 years, which was further divided into three groups: healthy, periodontitis, and dental caries. Oral hygiene index-simplified, probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level, the number of intact teeth, and active carious lesions were recorded. Estimation of inorganic salivary calcium, phosphate, and magnesium was performed spectrophotometrically using Vitros 5.1 FS. Statistical analysis was performed using the one-way analysis of variance test at 5% significance level. There was a statistically significant increase in inorganic salivary calcium, phosphate, pH, flow rate, and poor oral hygiene status in periodontitis group compared to dental caries and healthy group. Subjects with increased inorganic salivary calcium, phosphate, pH, flow rate, and poor oral hygiene are at a higher risk of developing periodontitis. Since there is increased remineralization potential, these subjects have more number of intact teeth compared to the dental caries group.

  7. Assessment of salivary calcium, phosphate, magnesium, pH, and flow rate in healthy subjects, periodontitis, and dental caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K S Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was conducted to estimate and compare inorganic salivary calcium, phosphate, magnesium, salivary flow rate, and pH of unstimulated saliva and oral hygiene status of healthy subjects, subjects with periodontitis and dental caries, and to correlate salivary calcium level with number of intact teeth. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of 48 systemically healthy subjects in the age group of 18-55 years, which was further divided into three groups: healthy, periodontitis, and dental caries. Oral hygiene index-simplified, probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level, the number of intact teeth, and active carious lesions were recorded. Estimation of inorganic salivary calcium, phosphate, and magnesium was performed spectrophotometrically using Vitros 5.1 FS. Statistical analysis was performed using the one-way analysis of variance test at 5% significance level. Results: There was a statistically significant increase in inorganic salivary calcium, phosphate, pH, flow rate, and poor oral hygiene status in periodontitis group compared to dental caries and healthy group. Conclusion: Subjects with increased inorganic salivary calcium, phosphate, pH, flow rate, and poor oral hygiene are at a higher risk of developing periodontitis. Since there is increased remineralization potential, these subjects have more number of intact teeth compared to the dental caries group.

  8. Nucleation, growth and evolution of calcium phosphate films on calcite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Sonia; Scherer, George W

    2014-12-01

    Marble, a stone composed of the mineral calcite, is subject to chemically induced weathering in nature due to its relatively high dissolution rate in acid rain. To protect monuments and sculpture from corrosion, we are investigating the application of thin layers of hydroxyapatite (HAP) onto marble. The motivation for using HAP is its low dissolution rate and crystal and lattice compatibility with calcite. A mild, wet chemical synthesis route, in which diammonium hydrogen phosphate salt was reacted with marble, alone and with cationic and anionic precursors under different reaction conditions, was used to produce inorganic HAP layers on marble. Nucleation and growth on the calcite substrate was studied, as well as metastable phase evolution, using scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy. Film nucleation was enhanced by surface roughness. The rate of nucleation and the growth rate of the film increased with cationic (calcium) and anionic (carbonate) precursor additions. Calcium additions also influenced phase formation, introducing a metastable phase (octacalcium phosphate) and a different phase evolution sequence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Studies on the mechanisms underlying the transfer of calcium and phosphate from bone to blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brommage, Jr., Robert J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1978-01-01

    The skeleton is recognized as a crucial organ in the minute-to-minute regulation of the blood levels of calcium and phosphate. The fluxes of calcium and phosphate to and from bone greatly exceed the entry and exit of these ions occurring in the intestine and kidneys. Parathyroid hormone, calcitonin, and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-(OH)2D3 are known to influence the transfer of calcium and phosphate from bone to blood. Three mechanisms have been proposed to explain the hormonal control of the calcium and phosphate effluxes from bone. The concept of a bone membrane maintaining a distinct bone extracellular fluid composition has led to the pump and pH gradient theories. An alternate solubilizer theory proposes that bone cells secrete a substance which increases the solubility of the bone mineral. The bone membrane concept was originally proposed to explain the presence of the apparent anomalously high concentrations of potassium in the bone extracellular fluid. However, the available evidence does not allow an unambiguous decision concerning the presence of a bone membrane. Calvarial lactate production was unaltered by 1,25-(OH)2D3 treatment and consequently 1,25-(OH)2D3 does not appear to promote the mobilization of bone mineral through a lactate-mediated pH gradient mechanism. 1,25-(OH)2D3 did increase the solubility of non-vital bone, clearly demonstrating that the solubilizer mechanism is at least partially responsible for the mobilization of bone mineral and the regulation of blood levels of calcium and phosphate. Vitamin D-deficient female rats fed a 0.2% calcium, 0.4% phosphorous diet and supplemented with daily injections of 0.75 pmole of 1,25-(OH)2D3 were shown to be capable of bearing young. When the injections of 1,25-(OH)2D3 were terminated at delivery, the dams and pups showed signs of vitamin D deficiency

  10. Preparation and Properties of Nanoparticles of Calcium Phosphates With Various Ca/P Ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Limin; Chow, Laurence C; Frukhtbeyn, Stanislav A; Bonevich, John E

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed at preparing and studying the properties of nanoparticles of calcium phosphate (nCaP) with Ca/P ratios ranging from 1.0 to 1.67 using a spray-drying technique. Micro-structural analyses suggested that the nCaPs with Ca/P ratios of 1.67 to 1.33 were nano-sized amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) containing varying amounts of acid phosphate and carbonate. The nCaP with Ca/P ratio of 1 contained only nano-sized low crystalline dicalcium phosphate (DCP). BET measurements of the nCaPs showed specific surface areas of (12 ± 2 to 50 ± 1) m(2)/g, corresponding to estimated equivalent spherical diameters of (38 to 172) nm. However, dynamic light scattering measurements revealed much larger particles of (380 ± 49 to 768 ± 111) nm, owing to agglomeration of the smaller primary nano particles as revealed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Thermodynamic solubility measurements showed that the nCaPs with Ca/P ratio of 1.33 - 1.67 all have similar solubility behavior. The materials were more soluble than the crystalline hydroxyapatite (HA) at pH greater than about 4.7, and more soluble than β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), octacalcium phosphate (OCP) and DCP at pH above 5.5. Their solubility approached that of α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) at about pH 7. These nCaPs, which cannot be readily prepared by other currently available methods for nanoparticle preparation, have potential biomedical applications.

  11. Effect of Fluoride, Casein Phosphopeptide–Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Casein Phosphopeptide–Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Fluoride on Enamel Surface Microhardness After Microabrasion: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazaleh Ahmadi Zenouz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to assess the effect of applying casein phosphopeptide–amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP paste, casein phosphopeptide–amorphous calcium phosphate fluoride (CPP-ACPF paste and sodium fluoride gel on surface microhardness of enamel after microabrasion.Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted human premolars were selected. All samples were subjected to hardness indentations made with the Vickers hardness machine and the average value was recorded as the initial surface microhardness. The specimens were then randomly divided into three groups (n=10 of CPP-ACPF, fluoride and CPP-ACP. The teeth were micro-abraded with Opalustre. Microhardness test was performed to assess the post-abrasion hardness. Three remineralization modalities were performed on samples of each group. The enamel surface microhardness measurements were performed. To compare the difference between groups, the rehardening and softening values were defined. One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc test at a significance level of 5% were used for statistical analysis.Results: The mean microhardness value (MMV had a significant decrease after microabrasion from baseline. The MMV had a significant increase after remineralization in all groups. The MMV of CPP-ACPF group was significantly more than that of fluoride group (P=0.027. The rehardening value of fluoride group was significantly more than that of other groups (P<0.001.Conclusion: All the remineralizing agents were effective for rehardening the enamel after microabrasion. The CPP-ACP and CPP-ACPF pastes are effective, but to a lesser extent than neutral sodium fluoride gel in remineralizing enamel surface. Incorporation of fluoride to CPP-ACP formulation does not provide any additional remineralizing potential.Keywords: Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate nanocomplex; Enamel Microabrasion; Hardness; Sodium Fluoride

  12. Difference in surface reactions between titanium and zirconium in Hanks' solution to elucidate mechanism of calcium phosphate formation on titanium using XPS and cathodic polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsumi, Y.; Nishimura, D.; Doi, H.; Nomura, N.; Hanawa, T.

    2009-01-01

    Titanium and zirconium were immersed in Hanks' solution with and without calcium and phosphate ions, and the surfaces were characterized with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to determine the mechanism of calcium phosphate formation on titanium in simulated body fluids and in a living body. In addition, they were cathodically polarized in the above solutions. XPS characterization and cathodic polarization revealed differences in the surface properties in the ability of calcium phosphate formation between titanium and zirconium. The surface oxide film on titanium is not completely oxidized and is relatively reactive; that on zirconium is more passive and protective than that on titanium. Neither calcium nor phosphate stably exists alone on titanium, and calcium phosphate is naturally formed on it; calcium phosphate formed on titanium is stable and protective. On the other hand, calcium is never incorporated on zirconium, while zirconium phosphate, which is easily formed on zirconium, is highly stable and protective. Our study presents new information regarding the surface property of titanium and demonstrates that the characteristics of titanium and zirconium may be applied to various medical devices and new surface modification techniques.

  13. Strontium hydroxyapatite and strontium carbonate as templates for the precipitation of calcium-phosphates in the absence and presence of fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternitzke, Vanessa; Janousch, Markus; Heeb, Michèle B.; Hering, Janet G.; Johnson, C. Annette

    2014-06-01

    The heterogeneous precipitation of calcium-phosphates on calcium hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 or HAP) in the presence and absence of fluoride is important in the formation of bone and teeth, protection against tooth decay, dental and skeletal fluorosis and defluoridation of drinking water. Strontium hydroxyapatite (Sr10(PO4)6(OH)2 or SrHAP) and strontium carbonate (SrCO3) were used as calcium-free seed templates in precipitation experiments conducted with varying initial calcium-to-phosphate (Ca/P) or calcium-to-phosphate-to-fluoride (Ca/P/F) ratios. Suspensions of SrHAP or SrCO3 seed templates (which were calcium-limited for both templates and phosphate-limited in the case of SrCO3) were reacted at pH 7.3 (25 °C) over 3 days. The resulting solids were examined with Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES), and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). Calcium apatite was the predominant phase identified by all techniques independent of the added Ca/P ratios and of the presence of fluoride. It was not possible to make an unambiguous distinction between HAP and fluorapatite (Ca10(PO4)6F2, FAP). The apatite was calcium-deficient and probably contained some strontium.

  14. Stabilization of ZnCl2-Containing Waste Using Calcium Sulfoaluminate Cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cau Dit Coumes, C.; Berger, S.; Le Bescop, P.; Damidot, D.

    2013-01-01

    The potential of calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cement was investigated to solidify and stabilize radwastes containing large amounts of soluble zinc chloride (a strong inhibitor of Portland cement hydration). Hydration of pastes and mortars prepared with a 0.5 mol/L ZnCl 2 mixing solution was characterized over one year as a function of the gypsum content of the binder and the thermal history of the material. Blending the CSA clinker with 20% gypsum enabled rapid hydration, with only very small delay compared with a reference prepared with pure water. It also improved the compressive strength of the hardened material and significantly reduced its expansion under wet curing. Moreover, the hydrate assemblage was less affected by a thermal treatment at early age simulating the temperature rise and fall occurring in a large-volume drum of cemented waste. Fully hydrated materials contained ettringite, amorphous aluminum hydroxide, straetlingite, together with AFm phases (Kuzel's salt associated with monosulfoaluminate or Friedel's salt depending on the gypsum content of the binder), and possibly C-(A)-S-H. Zinc was readily insolubilized and could not be detected in the pore solution extracted from cement pastes, or in their leachates after 3 months of leaching by pure water at pH 7. The good retention of zinc by the cement matrix was mainly attributed to the precipitation of a hydrated and well crystallized phase with platelet morphology (which may belong to the layered double hydroxides family) at early age ≤ 1 day), and to chemisorption onto aluminum hydroxide at later age. (author)

  15. Ectopic osteoid and bone formation by three calcium-phosphate ceramics in rats, rabbits and dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao Wang

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate ceramics with specific physicochemical properties have been shown to induce de novo bone formation upon ectopic implantation in a number of animal models. In this study we explored the influence of physicochemical properties as well as the animal species on material-induced ectopic bone formation. Three bioceramics were used for the study: phase-pure hydroxyapatite (HA sintered at 1200°C and two biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP ceramics, consisting of 60 wt.% HA and 40 wt.% TCP (β-Tricalcium phosphate, sintered at either 1100°C or 1200°C. 108 samples of each ceramic were intramuscularly implanted in dogs, rabbits, and rats for 6, 12, and 24 weeks respectively. Histological and histomorphometrical analyses illustrated that ectopic bone and/or osteoid tissue formation was most pronounced in BCP sintered at 1100°C and most limited in HA, independent of the animal model. Concerning the effect of animal species, ectopic bone formation reproducibly occurred in dogs, while in rabbits and rats, new tissue formation was mainly limited to osteoid. The results of this study confirmed that the incidence and the extent of material-induced bone formation are related to both the physicochemical properties of calcium phosphate ceramics and the animal model.

  16. Injectable calcium phosphate with hydrogel fibers encapsulating induced pluripotent, dental pulp and bone marrow stem cells for bone repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lin [VIP Integrated Department, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130011,China (China); Department of Endodontics, Periodontics and Prosthodontics, University of Maryland School of Dentistry, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Zhang, Chi [Department of Endodontics, Periodontics and Prosthodontics, University of Maryland School of Dentistry, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China School of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Li, Chunyan [VIP Integrated Department, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130011,China (China); Weir, Michael D. [Department of Endodontics, Periodontics and Prosthodontics, University of Maryland School of Dentistry, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Wang, Ping, E-mail: pwang@umaryland.edu [Department of Endodontics, Periodontics and Prosthodontics, University of Maryland School of Dentistry, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Reynolds, Mark A. [Department of Endodontics, Periodontics and Prosthodontics, University of Maryland School of Dentistry, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Zhao, Liang, E-mail: lzhaonf@126.com [Department of Endodontics, Periodontics and Prosthodontics, University of Maryland School of Dentistry, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510515 (China); Xu, Hockin H.K. [Department of Endodontics, Periodontics and Prosthodontics, University of Maryland School of Dentistry, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Center for Stem Cell Biology & Regenerative Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore County, MD 21250 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hiPSC-MSCs), dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) and bone marrow MSCs (hBMSCs) are exciting cell sources in regenerative medicine. However, there has been no report comparing hDPSCs, hBMSCs and hiPSC-MSCs for bone engineering in an injectable calcium phosphate cement (CPC) scaffold. The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop a novel injectable CPC containing hydrogel fibers encapsulating stem cells for bone engineering, and (2) compare cell viability, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hDPSCs, hiPSC-MSCs from bone marrow (BM-hiPSC-MSCs) and from foreskin (FS-hiPSC-MSCs), and hBMSCs in CPC for the first time. The results showed that the injection did not harm cell viability. The porosity of injectable CPC was 62%. All four types of cells proliferated and differentiated down the osteogenic lineage inside hydrogel fibers in CPC. hDPSCs, BM-hiPSC-MSCs, and hBMSCs exhibited high alkaline phosphatase, runt-related transcription factor, collagen I, and osteocalcin gene expressions. Cell-synthesized minerals increased with time (p < 0.05), with no significant difference among hDPSCs, BM-hiPSC-MSCs and hBMSCs (p > 0.1). Mineralization by hDPSCs, BM-hiPSC-MSCs, and hBMSCs inside CPC at 14 d was 14-fold that at 1 d. FS-hiPSC-MSCs were inferior in osteogenic differentiation compared to the other cells. In conclusion, hDPSCs, BM-hiPSC-MSCs and hBMSCs are similarly and highly promising for bone tissue engineering; however, FS-hiPSC-MSCs were relatively inferior in osteogenesis. The novel injectable CPC with cell-encapsulating hydrogel fibers may enhance bone regeneration in dental, craniofacial and orthopedic applications. - Highlights: • The osteogenic differentiation of hiPSC-MSCs from different origins, hDPSCs and hBMSCs were first investigated and compared in this study. • hDPSCs and hiPSC-MSCs from bone marrow represented viable alternatives to hBMSCs in bone tissue engineering. • hi

  17. Injectable calcium phosphate with hydrogel fibers encapsulating induced pluripotent, dental pulp and bone marrow stem cells for bone repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lin; Zhang, Chi; Li, Chunyan; Weir, Michael D.; Wang, Ping; Reynolds, Mark A.; Zhao, Liang; Xu, Hockin H.K.

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hiPSC-MSCs), dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) and bone marrow MSCs (hBMSCs) are exciting cell sources in regenerative medicine. However, there has been no report comparing hDPSCs, hBMSCs and hiPSC-MSCs for bone engineering in an injectable calcium phosphate cement (CPC) scaffold. The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop a novel injectable CPC containing hydrogel fibers encapsulating stem cells for bone engineering, and (2) compare cell viability, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hDPSCs, hiPSC-MSCs from bone marrow (BM-hiPSC-MSCs) and from foreskin (FS-hiPSC-MSCs), and hBMSCs in CPC for the first time. The results showed that the injection did not harm cell viability. The porosity of injectable CPC was 62%. All four types of cells proliferated and differentiated down the osteogenic lineage inside hydrogel fibers in CPC. hDPSCs, BM-hiPSC-MSCs, and hBMSCs exhibited high alkaline phosphatase, runt-related transcription factor, collagen I, and osteocalcin gene expressions. Cell-synthesized minerals increased with time (p < 0.05), with no significant difference among hDPSCs, BM-hiPSC-MSCs and hBMSCs (p > 0.1). Mineralization by hDPSCs, BM-hiPSC-MSCs, and hBMSCs inside CPC at 14 d was 14-fold that at 1 d. FS-hiPSC-MSCs were inferior in osteogenic differentiation compared to the other cells. In conclusion, hDPSCs, BM-hiPSC-MSCs and hBMSCs are similarly and highly promising for bone tissue engineering; however, FS-hiPSC-MSCs were relatively inferior in osteogenesis. The novel injectable CPC with cell-encapsulating hydrogel fibers may enhance bone regeneration in dental, craniofacial and orthopedic applications. - Highlights: • The osteogenic differentiation of hiPSC-MSCs from different origins, hDPSCs and hBMSCs were first investigated and compared in this study. • hDPSCs and hiPSC-MSCs from bone marrow represented viable alternatives to hBMSCs in bone tissue engineering. • hi

  18. Nitrite-cured color and phosphate-mediated water binding of pork muscle proteins as affected by calcium in the curing solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Xiong, Youling L

    2012-07-01

    Calcium is a mineral naturally present in water and may be included into meat products during processing thereby influencing meat quality. Phosphates improve myofibril swelling and meat water-holding capacity (WHC) but can be sensitive to calcium precipitation. In this study, pork shoulder meat was used to investigate the impact of calcium at 0, 250, and 500 ppm and phosphate type [sodium pyrophosphate (PP), tripolyphosphate (TPP), and hexametaphopshate (HMP)] at 10 mM on nitrite-cured protein extract color at various pH levels (5.5, 6.0, and 6.5) and crude myofibril WHC at pH 6.0. Neither calcium nor phosphates present in the curing brines significantly affected the cured color. Increasing the pH tended to promote the formation of metmyoglobin instead of nitrosylmyoglobin. The ability of PP to enhance myofibril WHC was hampered (P meat products. Although not affecting nitrite-cured color, calcium hampers the efficacy of phosphates to promote water binding by muscle proteins, underscoring the importance of water quality for brine-enhanced meat products. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  19. Device for continuous radiometric determination of the calcium and iron content in raw slurry for cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasilewska, M.; Ostachowicz, J.; Lankosz, M.; Molodynska, W.

    1975-01-01

    The characteristic iron and calcium-K series were excited using a Cd-109 isotope source. In order to determine the calcium and iron content in dry slurry, the Compton-effect scattered radiation of the Cd-109 source in the sample was used. A numerical process was worked out which allowed the elimination of the influence of changing contents of iron and water on the results of the calcium content determinations, and a device for continuous radiometric determination of calcium and iron in raw slurry was designed and constructed. The device was installed in the cement plant 'Przyjazn' under technical measuring conditions and its applicability was tested. (orig./LH) [de

  20. Obtain ceramic porous alumina-zirconia by replica method calcium phosphate coated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, A.D.R.; Rigoli, W.R.; Osiro, Denise; Pallone, E.M.J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Biomaterials used in bone replacement, including porous bioceramics, are often used as support structure for bone formation and repair. The porous bioceramics are used because present features as biocompatibility, high porosity and pore morphology that confer adequate mechanical strength and induce bone growth. In this work were obtained porous specimens of alumina containing 5% by inclusion of volume of zirconia produced by the replica method. The porous specimens had its surface chemically treated with phosphoric acid and were coated with calcium phosphate. The coating was performed using the biomimetic method during 14 days and an initial pH of 6.1. The porous specimens were characterized using the follow techniques: porosity, axial compression tests, microtomography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and pH measurements SBF solution. The results showed specimens with suitable pore morphology for application as biomaterial, and even a reduced time of incubation favored the calcium phosphate phases formation on the material surfaces. (author)

  1. Synthesis of calcium phosphates and porous hydroxyapatite beads prepared by emulsion method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, B.-H. [Faculty of Biotechnology, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100 Shih-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Chen, K.-I [Department of Electronics Engineering and Computer Science, Tung-Fang Institute of Technology, 100 Dungfang Road, Hunei, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Ho, M.-L. [Department of Physiology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Chen, H.-N. [Faculty of Medicinal and Applied Chemistry, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100 Shih-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Chen, W.-C. [Faculty of Dentistry, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Wang, C.-K. [Faculty of Medicinal and Applied Chemistry, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100 Shih-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: ckwang@kmu.edu.tw

    2009-01-15

    Raw calcium phosphates were synthesized via a chemical reaction between 0.5 M orthophosphoric acid and 0.5 M calcium hydroxide. Hydroxyapatite (HAp), {beta}-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP) or biphase calcium phosphate (BCP) comprising HAp and {beta}-TCP were obtained by changing pH value, Ca/P ratio, and the addition of glycerol. The as-synthesized and heat-treated powders were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transformation infrared spectrometry (FTIR). Thermal stability of the pure apatite phase was obtained to be 1300 deg. C, while synthesis was done at the pH value of 10.0 with a Ca/P ratio of 2.0 and a temperature of 37 deg. C. Besides, the {beta}-TCP phase (with higher purity) was achieved at 800 deg. C, whose synthesis was done at pH 6.4 with a Ca/P ratio of 1.5 and a temperature of 37 deg. C. Therefore, the biphase bioceramics comprising of HAp and {beta}-TCP could be obtained, since it was manipulated suitably. The HAp raw material was subjected to a simple emulsion method for the preparation of porous beads. They should have the advantage of exhibiting higher adsorptive ability and osteoconductivity in comparison with the sintered dense apatite. Additionally, the porous beads of apatite were demonstrated to be non-toxic to cells, and should be suitable for the use as a scaffold of cultured bone and bone graft material, as well as for drug delivery systems.

  2. Calcium-Phosphate-Osteopontin Particles Reduce Biofilm Formation and pH Drops in in situ Grown Dental Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Ibsen, Casper J S; Birkedal, Henrik; Nyvad, Bente

    2017-01-01

    This 2-period crossover study investigated the effect of calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles on biofilm formation and pH in 48-h biofilms grown in situ. Bovine milk osteopontin is a highly phosphorylated glycoprotein that has been shown to interfere with bacterial adhesion to salivary-coated surfaces. Calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles have been shown to reduce biofilm formation and pH drops in a 5-species laboratory model of dental biofilm without affecting bacterial viability. Here, smooth surface biofilms from 10 individuals were treated ex vivo 6 times/day for 30 min with either calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles or sterile saline. After growth, the amount of biofilm formed was determined by confocal microscopy, and pH drops upon exposure to glucose were monitored using confocal-microscopy-based pH ratiometry. A total of 160 biofilms were analysed. No adverse effects of repeated ex vivo treatment with calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles were observed. Particle treatment resulted in a 32% lower amount of biofilm formed (p Biofilm pH was significantly higher upon particle treatment, both shortly after the addition of glucose and after 30 min of incubation with glucose (p biofilms as well as the remineralizing potential of the particles. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Biological responses of brushite-forming Zn- and ZnSr- substituted beta-tricalcium phosphate bone cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Pina

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The core aim of this study was to investigate zinc (Zn- and zinc and strontium (ZnSr-containing brushite-forming beta-tricalcium phosphate (TCP cements for their effects on proliferation and differentiation of osteoblastic-like cells (MC3T3-E1 cell line as well as for their in vivo behaviour in trabecular bone cylindrical defects in a pilot study. In vitro proliferation and maturation responses of MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic-like cells to bone cements were studied at the cellular and molecular levels. The Zn- and Sr-containing brushite cements were found to stimulate pre-osteoblastic proliferation and osteoblastic maturation. Indeed, MC3T3-E1 cells exposed to the powdered cements had increased proliferative rates and higher adhesiveness capacity, in comparison to control cells. Furthermore, they exhibited higher alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity and increased Type-I collagen secretion and fibre deposition into the extracellular matrix. Proliferative and collagen deposition properties were more evident for cells grown in cements doped with Sr. The in vivo osteoconductive propertiesof the ZnCPC and ZnSrCPC cements were also pursued. Histological and histomorphometric analyses were performed at 1 and 2 months after implantation, using carbonated apatite cement (Norian SRS® as control. There was no evidence of cement-induced adverse foreign body reactions, and furthermore ZnCPC and ZnSrCPC cements revealed better in vivo performance in comparison to the control apatite cement. Additionally, the presence of both zinc and strontium resulted in the highest rate of new bone formation. These novel results indicate that the investigated ZnCPC and ZnSrCPC cements are both biocompatible and osteoconductive, being good candidate materials to use as bone substitutes.

  4. Calcium-Phosphate-Osteopontin Particles Reduce Biofilm Formation and pH Drops in in situ-Grown Dental Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Ibsen, Casper Jon Steenberg; Birkedal, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    This 2-period crossover study investigated the effect of calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles on biofilm formation and pH in 48-h biofilms grown in situ. Bovine milk osteopontin is a highly phosphorylated glycoprotein that has been shown to interfere with bacterial adhesion to salivary......-coated surfaces. Calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles have been shown to reduce biofilm formation and pH drops in a 5-species laboratory model of dental biofilm without affecting bacterial viability. Here, smooth surface biofilms from 10 individuals were treated ex vivo 6 times/day for 30 min with either...... calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles or sterile saline. After growth, the amount of biofilm formed was determined by confocal microscopy, and pH drops upon exposure to glucose were monitored using confocal-microscopy-based pH ratiometry. A total of 160 biofilms were analysed. No adverse effects...

  5. Alteration of a borosilicate glass in cemented water: antagonist effects of calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frizon, F.; Depierre, S.; Angeli, F.; Gin, S.

    2013-01-01

    In the framework of the storage of radioactive wastes in deep geological layers, vitrified waste may be in contact with an environment saturated with solutions stemming from various stages of cement degradation. A series of experiments has been performed to assess how a basic aqueous calcium-rich solution can impact the mechanisms and kinetics of glass alteration. This study shows that 2 main parameters have an impact on the kinetics of the dissolution of glass: the S/V ratio (the glass surface divided by the volume of solution) and the calcium concentration. The calcium concentration is a key parameter whatever the kinetics of glass degradation. In a diluted medium with a pH over 11, the kinetics of glass alteration slows down along with an increase in calcium concentration. What happens is that the silicon flux being too weak to allow the nucleation of C-S-H phases, calcium can penetrate the alteration layer which leads to a better retention of glass components through specific silicon-calcium reactivity and a slowing down of the glass alteration kinetics. On the contrary in a confined environment, a high concentration in calcium leads to the precipitation of C-S-H and to less C-S-H available to cover glass grains diminishing its passivating effect and consequently the dissolving of glass can keep on at more or less the same pace. (A.C.)

  6. In vitro degradation of calcium phosphates: Effect of multiscale porosity, textural properties and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez-Escudero, A; Espanol, M; Beats, S; Ginebra, M-P

    2017-09-15

    The capacity of calcium phosphates to be replaced by bone is tightly linked to their resorbability. However, the relative importance of some textural parameters on their degradation behavior is still unclear. The present study aims to quantify the effect of composition, specific surface area (SSA), and porosity at various length scales (nano-, micro- and macroporosity) on the in vitro degradation of different calcium phosphates. Degradation studies were performed in an acidic medium to mimic the osteoclastic environment. Small degradations were found in samples with interconnected nano- and micropores with sizes below 3µm although they were highly porous (35-65%), with maximum weight loss of 8wt%. Biomimetic calcium deficient hydroxyapatite, with high SSA and low crystallinity, presented the highest degradation rates exceeding even the more soluble β-TCP. A dependence of degradation on SSA was indisputable when porosity and pore sizes were increased. The introduction of additional macroporosity with pore interconnections above 20µm significantly impacted degradation, more markedly in the substrates with high SSA (>15m 2 /g), whereas in sintered substrates with low SSA (calcium deficient hydroxyapatite did not increase its degradation rate. Overall, the study highlights the importance of textural properties, which can modulate or even outweigh the effect of other features such as the solubility of the compounds. The physicochemical features of calcium phosphates are crucial to tune biological events like resorption during bone remodeling. Understanding in vitro resorption can help to predict the in vivo behavior. Besides chemical composition, other parameters such as porosity and specific surface area have a strong influence on resorption. The complexity of isolating the contribution of each parameter lies in the close interrelation between them. In this work, a multiscale study was proposed to discern the extent to which each parameter influences degradation in

  7. Fibronectin-calcium phosphate composite layer on hydroxyapatite to enhance adhesion, cell spread and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sogo, Yu; Ito, Atsuo; Matsuno, Tomonori; Oyane, Ayako; Tamazawa, Gaku; Satoh, Tazuko; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Uchimura, Eiji; Ohno, Tadao

    2007-01-01

    Fibronectin (Fn) and type I collagen (Col) were immobilized on a surface of a hydroxyapatite (HAP) ceramic by coprecipitation with calcium phosphate in a supersaturated calcium phosphate solution prepared by mixing clinically approved infusion fluids. These proteins and the calcium phosphate precipitate formed a composite surface layer. As a result, the proteins were immobilized firmly as not to be released completely for 3 d in a physiological salt solution. When human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were cultured on a HAP ceramic in a differentiation medium supplemented with dexamethasone, β-glycerophosphate and ascorbic acid, hMSCs spread well within 1 h. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of hMSCs cultured on the Fn-calcium phosphate composite layer significantly increased compared with that of hMSCs cultured on the untreated HAP ceramic. On the other hand, Col did not increase the ALP activity of hMSCs and no synergy between Fn and Col was observed. Therefore, the Fn-calcium phosphate composite layer formed on the HAP is useful for the enhancement of the spreading and osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs in vitro

  8. Chemical synthesis and characterization of magnesium substituted amorphous calcium phosphate (MG-ACP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Donghyun [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Chung-Ang University, 221 Heukseok-Dong, Dongjak-Gu, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kumta, Prashant N., E-mail: pkumta@pitt.edu [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Sceince, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States)

    2010-10-12

    Amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) was synthesized by a simple aqueous precipitation using CaCl{sub 2} and Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4} in the presence of MgCl{sub 2} to ensure the formation of the ACP phase at room temperature. Magnesium substituted ACP phases corresponding to two different compositions representing the two most prominent calcium phosphate phases (hydroxyapatite: Ca + Mg/P = 1.67 and tricalcium phosphate: Ca + Mg/P = 1.5) were synthesized by this simple approach. Both compositions of ACP phases resulted in their transformation into {beta}-tricalcium phosphate upon heat treatment in air at 600 deg. C. X-ray diffraction (XRD), heat treatment, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analyses were used to characterize the phase, thermal stability, surface area, and morphology of the synthesized ACP powders corresponding to the two different nominal Ca/P compositions. Although it is known that {alpha}-TCP is the phase that appears upon heat treatment at 600 deg. C unsubstituted ACP, substitution of magnesium ion in ACP (both TCP and HA composition) stabilized the structure of {beta}-TCMP phase at 600 deg. C. Moreover, FT-IR analysis revealed that the ACP phase regardless of the composition, exhibited characteristic bands corresponding to that of HA, with the exception of the ACP corresponding to HA composition which exhibited a prominent OH vibrational mode.

  9. Analysis of the influence of two different milling processes in the properties of precursor powder and [Beta]-TCP cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, H.A.I.; Pereira, C.H.R.; Zavaglia, C.A.C.; Motisuke, M.

    2011-01-01

    There are several characteristics that put calcium phosphate cements in evidence, like its bioactivity and in vivo resorption. The influence of two milling processes in the morphological properties of the [beta]-tricalcium phosphate powder, [beta]-TCP, and in the mechanical properties of the cement were analyzed. The powder was obtained by solid state reaction of CaCO_3 and CaHPO_4 at 1050 ° C. It showed high phase purity and absence of toxic elements. The powder was processed in ball mill (A) and high-energy vibratory mill (B), with posterior analyze by SEM and particle size distribution. The powders showed different average and distribution of grain size. Finally, the cement obtained by the process (B) showed values of axial tensile strength significantly greater than that obtained by the process (A). The milling process (B) is much more efficient than the process (A). (author)

  10. Controlling surface microstructure of calcium phosphate ceramic from random to custom-design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Liao; Luo, Xiaoman; Barbieri, D.; Bao, Chongyun; Yuan, Huipin

    2014-01-01

    Calcium phosphate ceramics have long been studied as bone graft substitutes due to their similarity with the mineral constitute of bone and teeth, excellent biocompatibility and bioactivity. Chemical composition, macrostructure and surface microstructure are believed to be important for the bone

  11. Calcium phosphate coated eletrospun fiber matrices as scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nandakumar, A.; Yang, Liang; Habibovic, Pamela; van Blitterswijk, Clemens

    2010-01-01

    Electrospun polymeric scaffolds are used for various tissue engineering applications. In this study, we applied a biomimetic coating method to provide electrospun scaffolds from a block copolymer-poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)−poly(buthylene terephthalate), with a calcium phosphate layer to

  12. The role of integrin αv in proliferation and differentiation of human dental pulp cell response to calcium silicate cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chi-Jr; Hsu, Hsin-I; Lin, Chi-Chang; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Wu, Buor-Chang; Kao, Chia-Tze; Shie, Ming-You

    2014-11-01

    It has been proved that integrin αv activity is related to cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, and organ development. However, the biological functions of integrin αv in human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured on silicate-based materials have not been explored. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of integrin αv in the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs cultured with the effect of calcium silicate (CS) cement and β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) cement. In this study, hDPCs were cultured on CS and TCP materials, and we evaluated fibronectin (FN) secretion and integrin αv expression during the cell attachment stage. After small interfering RNA transfection targeting integrin αv, the proliferation and odontogenesis differentiation behavior of hDPCs were analyzed. The results indicate that CS releases Si ion-increased FN secretion and adsorption, which promote cell attachment more effectively than TCP. The CS cement facilitates FN and αv subintegrin expression. However, the FN adsorption and integrin expression of TCP are similar to that observed in the control dish. Integrin αv small interfering RNA inhibited odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs with the decreased formation of mineralized nodules on CS. It also down-regulated the protein expression of multiple markers of odontogenesis and the expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein protein. These results establish composition-dependent differences in integrin binding and its effectiveness as a mechanism regulating cellular responses to biomaterial surface. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Osteogenic activity of porous calcium phosphate ceramics fabricated by rapid prototyping].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chenguang; Zhao, Li; Lin, Liulan; Gu, Huijie; Zhou, Heng; Cui, Lei

    2010-07-01

    Calcium phosphate bioceramics has a broad application prospect because of good biocompatibility, but porous scaffolds with complex shape can not be prepared by the traditional methods. To fabricate porous calcium phosphate ceramics by rapid prototyping and to investigate the in vitro osteogenic activities. The porous calcium phosphate ceramics was fabricated by rapid prototyping. The bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were isolated from bone marrow of Beagle canine, and the 3rd passage BMSCs were seeded onto the porous ceramics. The cell/ceramics composite cultured in osteogenic medium were taken as the experimental group (group A) and the cell/ceramics composite cultured in growth medium were taken as the control group (group B). Meanwhile, the cells seeded on the culture plate were cultured in osteogenic medium or growth medium respectively as positive control (group C) or negative control (group D). After 1, 3, and 7 days of culture, the cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation on the porous ceramics were evaluated by DNA quantitative analysis, histochemical staining and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. After DiO fluorescent dye, the cell adhesion, growth, and proliferation on the porous ceramics were also observed by confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). DNA quantitative analysis results showed that the number of BMSCs in all groups increased continuously with time. Plateau phase was not obvious in groups A and B, but it was clearly observed in groups C and D. The CLSM observation indicated that the activity of BMSCs was good and the cells spread extensively, showing good adhesion and proliferation on the porous calcium phosphate ceramics prepared by rapid prototyping. ALP quantitative analysis results showed that the stain of cells on the ceramics became deeper and deeper with time in groups A and B, the staining degree in group A were stronger than that in group B. There was no significant difference in the change of the ALP activity

  14. Cellular Performance Comparison of Biomimetic Calcium Phosphate Coating and Alkaline-Treated Titanium Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of biomimetic calcium phosphate coating on osteoblasts behavior in vitro is not well established yet. In this study, we investigated the behavior of osteoblastic rat osteosarcoma 17/2.8 cells (ROS17/2.8 on two groups of biomaterial surfaces: alkaline-treated titanium surface (ATT and biomimetic calcium phosphate coated ATT (CaP. The cell attachment, proliferation, differentiation, and morphology on these surfaces were extensively evaluated to reveal the impact of substrate surface on osteoblastic cell responses. It was found that the ROS17/2.8 cells cultured on the ATT surface had higher attachment and proliferation rates compared to those on the CaP surface. Our results also showed that the calcium phosphate coatings generated in this work have an inhibiting effect on osteoblast adhesion and further influenced the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblast compared to the ATT surface in vitro. Cells on the ATT surface also exhibited a higher alkaline phosphatase activity than on the CaP surface after two weeks of culture. Immunofluorescence staining and scanning electron microscopy results showed that the cells adhered and spread faster on the ATT surface than on the CaP surface. These results collectively suggested that substrate surface properties directly influence cell adhesion on different biomaterials, which would result in further influence on the cell proliferation and differentiation.

  15. Evaluation of mechanical strength and hydrate products evolution of calcium aluminate cement, for endodontic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luz, A.P.; Borba, N.Z.; Pandolfelli, V.C.

    2011-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is the most used retrograde filling cement in the endodontic area. Nevertheless, although its composition is similar to the conventional Portland cement, its high cost, long setting time and low mechanical strength have led to a continuous search for new alternative materials. Considering these aspects, the mechanical strength and crystalline phase evolution of a calcium aluminate cement (CAC), during its hydration process, have been evaluated in this work aiming to apply such material for endodontic treatments. Secar 71 cement samples were prepared and kept in contact with water or SBF (simulated body fluid) during 15 days at 37 deg C. Compressive strength, apparent porosity, X ray diffraction and thermogravimetric tests were carried out for the samples evaluation after 1, 3, 7 and 15 days. The main identified phases were CAH_1_0, C_2AH_8, C_3AH_6 and AH_3. Moreover, when in the presence of SBF, some changes in the amount of the hydrates in the CAC samples were observed, which affected the mechanical behavior of the cement. (author)

  16. Glucose-6-phosphate reduces calcium accumulation in rat brain endoplasmic reticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Thomas Cole

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain cells expend large amounts of energy sequestering calcium (Ca2+, while loss of Ca2+ compartmentalization leads to cell damage or death. Upon cell entry, glucose is converted to glucose-6-phosphate (G6P, a parent substrate to several metabolic major pathways, including glycolysis. In several tissues, G6P alters the ability of the endoplasmic reticulum to sequester Ca2+. This led to the hypothesis that G6P regulates Ca2+ accumulation by acting as an endogenous ligand for sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA. Whole brain ER microsomes were pooled from adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Using radio-isotopic assays, 45Ca2+ accumulation was quantified following incubation with increasing amounts of G6P, in the presence or absence of thapsigargin, a potent SERCA inhibitor. To qualitatively assess SERCA activity, the simultaneous release of inorganic phosphate (Pi coupled with Ca2+ accumulation was quantified. Addition of G6P significantly and decreased Ca2+ accumulation in a dose-dependent fashion (1-10 mM. The reduction in Ca2+ accumulation was not significantly different that seen with addition of thapsigargin. Addition of glucose-1-phosphate or fructose-6-phosphate, or other glucose metabolic pathway intermediates, had no effect on Ca2+ accumulation. Further, the release of Pi was markedly decreased, indicating G6P-mediated SERCA inhibition as the responsible mechanism for reduced Ca2+ uptake. Simultaneous addition of thapsigargin and G6P did decrease inorganic phosphate in comparison to either treatment alone, which suggests that the two treatments have different mechanisms of action. Therefore, G6P may be a novel, endogenous regulator of SERCA activity. Additionally, pathological conditions observed during disease states that disrupt glucose homeostasis, may be attributable to Ca2+ dystasis caused by altered G6P regulation of SERCA activity

  17. Surface Corrosion and Microstructure Degradation of Calcium Sulfoaluminate Cement Subjected to Wet-Dry Cycles in Sulfate Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuman Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydration products of calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA cement are different from those of Portland cement. The degradation of CSA cement subjected to wet-dry cycles in sulfate solution was studied in this paper. The surface corrosion was recorded and the microstructures were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results show that SO42-, Na+, Mg2+, and Cl− have an effect on the stability of ettringite. In the initial period of sulfate attack, salt crystallization is the main factor leading to the degradation of CSA cement specimens. The decomposition and the carbonation of ettringite will cause long-term degradation of CSA cement specimens under wet-dry cycles in sulfate solution. The surface spalling and microstructure degradation increase significantly with the increase of wet-dry cycles, sulfate concentration, and water to cement ratio. Magnesium sulfate and sodium chloride reduce the degradation when the concentration of sulfate ions is a constant value.

  18. Interactions of casein micelles with calcium phosphate particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tercinier, Lucile; Ye, Aiqian; Anema, Skelte G; Singh, Anne; Singh, Harjinder

    2014-06-25

    Insoluble calcium phosphate particles, such as hydroxyapatite (HA), are often used in calcium-fortified milks as they are considered to be chemically unreactive. However, this study showed that there was an interaction between the casein micelles in milk and HA particles. The caseins in milk were shown to bind to the HA particles, with the relative proportions of bound β-casein, αS-casein, and κ-casein different from the proportions of the individual caseins present in milk. Transmission electron microscopy showed no evidence of intact casein micelles on the surface of the HA particles, which suggested that the casein micelles dissociated either before or during binding. The HA particles behaved as ion chelators, with the ability to bind the ions contained in the milk serum phase. Consequently, the depletion of the serum minerals disrupted the milk mineral equilibrium, resulting in dissociation of the casein micelles in milk.

  19. Early-age hydration and volume change of calcium sulfoaluminate cement-based binders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaunsali, Piyush

    Shrinkage cracking is a predominant deterioration mechanism in structures with high surface-to-volume ratio. One way to allay shrinkage-induced stresses is to use calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cement whose early-age expansion in restrained condition induces compressive stress that can be utilized to counter the tensile stresses due to shrinkage. In addition to enhancing the resistance against shrinkage cracking, CSA cement also has lower carbon footprint than that of Portland cement. This dissertation aims at improving the understanding of early-age volume change of CSA cement-based binders. For the first time, interaction between mineral admixtures (Class F fly ash, Class C fly ash, and silica fume) and OPC-CSA binder was studied. Various physico-chemical factors such as the hydration of ye'elimite (main component in CSA cement), amount of ettringite (the main phase responsible for expansion in CSA cement), supersaturation with respect to ettringite in cement pore solution, total pore volume, and material stiffness were monitored to examine early-age expansion characteristics. This research validated the crystallization stress theory by showing the presence of higher supersaturation level of ettringite, and therefore, higher crystallization stress in CSA cement-based binders. Supersaturation with respect to ettringite was found to increase with CSA dosage and external supply of gypsum. Mineral admixtures (MA) altered the expansion characteristics in OPC-CSA-MA binders with fixed CSA cement. This study reports that fly ash (FA) behaves differently depending on its phase composition. The Class C FA-based binder (OPC-CSA-CFA) ceased expanding beyond two days unlike other OPC-CSA-MA binders. Three factors were found to govern expansion of CSA cement-based binders: 1) volume fraction of ettringite in given pore volume, 2) saturation level of ettringite, and 3) dynamic modulus. Various models were utilized to estimate the macroscopic tensile stress in CSA cement

  20. Photon absorption of calcium phosphate-based dental biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, V. P.; Badiger, N. M.; Tekin, H. O.; Kara, U.; Vega C, H. R.; Fernandes Z, M. A.

    2017-10-01

    Effective atomic number and mass energy absorption buildup factors for four calcium phosphate-based biomaterials used in dental treatments were calculated for 0.015 to 15 MeV photons. The mass energy absorption coefficients were calculated for 0.5 to 40 mean free paths of photons. In the energy region important for dental radiology the Zeff for all studied biomaterials are larger in comparison to larger energies. In x-rays for dental radiology and the energy absorption buildup factors are low, however CbMDI bio material shows a resonance at 80 keV. (Author)

  1. Europium-doped amorphous calcium phosphate porous nanospheres: preparation and application as luminescent drug carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Kui-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Calcium phosphate is the most important inorganic constituent of biological tissues, and synthetic calcium phosphate has been widely used as biomaterials. In this study, a facile method has been developed for the fabrication of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP/polylactide-block-monomethoxy(polyethyleneglycol hybrid nanoparticles and ACP porous nanospheres. Europium-doping is performed to enable photoluminescence (PL function of ACP porous nanospheres. A high specific surface area of the europium-doped ACP (Eu3+:ACP porous nanospheres is achieved (126.7 m2/g. PL properties of Eu3+:ACP porous nanospheres are investigated, and the most intense peak at 612 nm is observed at 5 mol% Eu3+ doping. In vitro cytotoxicity experiments indicate that the as-prepared Eu3+:ACP porous nanospheres are biocompatible. In vitro drug release experiments indicate that the ibuprofen-loaded Eu3+:ACP porous nanospheres show a slow and sustained drug release in simulated body fluid. We have found that the cumulative amount of released drug has a linear relationship with the natural logarithm of release time (ln(t. The Eu3+:ACP porous nanospheres are bioactive, and can transform to hydroxyapatite during drug release. The PL properties of drug-loaded nanocarriers before and after drug release are also investigated.

  2. Structure and properties of gadolinium loaded calcium phosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Cuiling; Liang, Xiaofeng; Li, Haijian; Yu, Huijun; Li, Zhen; Yang, Shiyuan

    2014-01-01

    The glass samples with composition xGd 2 O 3 –(50 − x)CaO–50P 2 O 5 (0 ⩽ x ⩽ 9 mol%) were prepared by the conventional melt quench method. The structure and properties of gadolinium loaded in calcium phosphate glasses were investigated using XRD, SEM, DTA, IR and Raman spectroscopy. The XRD and SEM analysis for the samples show that the majority of samples are amorphous, and crystallization occurs when the content of Gd 2 O 3 containing is up to 6 mol%. Two main crystalline phases, Ca 2 P 2 O 7 and Gd 3 (P 2 O 7 ) 3 , are embedded in an amorphous matrix. IR and Raman data indicate that glass structure consists of predominantly metaphosphate (Q 2 ) units and the depolymerization of phosphate network with the addition of Gd 2 O 3 . Both the chemical durability and the glass transition temperature (T g ) are improved with the increase of Gd 2 O 3 , which suggests that the Gd acts a role of strengthening the cross-links between the phosphate chains of the glass

  3. Bioactivity and Surface Reactivity of RF-sputtered Calcium Phosphate Thin Films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, Edwin van der

    2003-01-01

    Calcium phosphates (CaP) are known to be bioactive, i.e. able to bond to bone. This makes CaPs very suitable to be aplied as thin coatings on bone-implants. In this work we studied the physicochemical behaviour of CaP coatings applied with radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering, a deposition

  4. Interaction of bovine gallbladder mucin and calcium-binding protein: effects on calcium phosphate precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afdhal, N H; Ostrow, J D; Koehler, R; Niu, N; Groen, A K; Veis, A; Nunes, D P; Offner, G D

    1995-11-01

    Gallstones consist of calcium salts and cholesterol crystals, arrayed on a matrix of gallbladder mucin (GBM), and regulatory proteins like calcium-binding protein (CBP). To determine if interactions between CBP and GBM follow a biomineralization scheme, their mutual binding and effects on CaHPO4 precipitation were studied. Binding of CBP to GBM was assessed by inhibition of the fluorescence of the complex of GBM with bis-1,8-anilinonaphthalene sulfonic acid (bis-ANS). The effects of the proteins on precipitation of CaHPO4 were assessed by nephelometry and gravimetry. Precipitates were analyzed for calcium, phosphate, and protein. CBP and bis-ANS competitively displaced each other from 30 binding sites on mucin, with a 1:1 stoichiometry and similar affinity. The rate of precipitation of CaHPO4 was retarded by mucin and CBP. Precipitate mass was unaffected by GBM alone but decreased with the addition of CBP. Complexing CBP with GBM abolished or moderated this latter effect, altered precipitate morphology, and changed the stoichiometric ratios of Ca to PO4 in the precipitates from 1:1 to 3:2. Mucin and CBP were incorporated into the precipitates. These studies suggest that the formation of calcium-containing gallstones is a biomineralization process regulated by both GBM and CBP.

  5. Comparison of xenogenic bone bioimplant and calcium phosphate granules on experimental femoral bone defect healing in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GH Mousavi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Rebuilding and renovation of lost bone whether because of physiologic or pathologic factors was one of the surgeons’ motivations from the past. Osteogenesis of decalcified bone induced by growth factors contained in it. This study is to assay probability effect of decalcified bone and calcium phosphate granules on osteogenesis which is made in experimental flaw and it is as a laboratory pattern in rabbit femur.This experimental study is made on 15 male rabbits. Animals were divided randomly into 3 groups (control and treatments.After induction of general anesthesia, 2 holes in size of 2 mm in diameter was made using a dental bit in femur width to medullary channel. After surgery, the control group left untreated and decalcified bones was placed in group 2 and calcium phosphate granules were placed in group 3. Histopathological and histomorphometrical studies for evaluation of bone healing were carried out in experimental rats, which were euthanized after 45 days of the experiment using hematoxylin-eosin (H&E staining method.In control group, defect seemed to be filled with woven bone and bone marrow spaces and in spite of a poor osteogenic activity. In calcium phosphate group, young bone trabeculas increased in number and bone trabeculas more organized. Histomorphometric results, observed that calcium phosphate granules has significant effect on bone healing than decalcified and control groups.

  6. The influence of calcium lignosulphonate - sodium bicarbonate on the status of ettringite crystallization in fly ash cement paste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, K.; Zhang, C.; Liu, Z. [Hebei Institute of Technology, Tang Shan (China)

    2002-01-01

    Calcium lignosulphonate (CL) - sodium bicarbonate (SB) (a total of 0.7% by weight of cement and CL to SB ratio of 1:1.8) will cause the fluidity of fly ash cement paste to decrease rapidly. It is the variation of the status of ettringite crystallization that causes this phenomenon. Experimental results show that CL-SB affects the liquid-phase composition of fly ash cement paste remarkably. As a result, ettringite crystallizes out in the shape of needles from the solution. These needle-like crystal particles are distributed in the solution at a certain distance from the surface of clinker particles. At the initial hydration stage, the crystallization of ettringite is stronger in fly ash cement with calcined gypsum than in fly ash cement with gypsum. 5 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. The calcium-paracaseinate-phosphate-complex under conditions similar to those in cheese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monib, A.M.M.F.

    1962-01-01

    The complex of calcium-paracaseinate-phosphate is the matrix substance of cheese. The changes it undergoes during maturing determines many characteristics of the finished product.

    The preliminary studies of the effect of pH and sodium chloride on the swelling and solubility of the

  8. Nano-scale study of the nucleation and growth of calcium phosphate coating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrère, F.; Snel, M.M.E.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Groot, K.; Layrolle, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    The nucleation and growth of a calcium phosphate (Ca-P) coating deposited on titanium implants from simulated body fluid was investigated by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Forty titanium alloy plates were assigned into two groups. One group

  9. Evaluation of a setting reaction pathway in the novel composite TiHA-CSD bone cement by FT-Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluszkiewicz, Czesława; Czechowska, Joanna; Ślósarczyk, Anna; Paszkiewicz, Zofia

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine a setting reaction pathway in a novel, surgically handy implant material, based on calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) and titanium doped hydroxyapatite (TiHA). The previous studies confirmed superior biological properties of TiHA in comparison to the undoped hydroxyapatite (HA) what makes it highly attractive for future medical applications. In this study the three types of titanium modified HA powders: untreated, calcined at 800 °C, sintered at 1250 °C and CSH were used to produce bone cements. The Fourier Transform-InfraRed (FT-IR) spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy were applied to evaluate processes taking place during the setting of the studied materials. Our results undoubtedly confirmed that the reaction pathways and the phase compositions differed significantly for set cements and were dependent on the initial heat treatment of TiHA powder. Final materials were multiphase composites consisting of calcium sulfate dihydrate, bassanite, tricalcium phosphate, hydroxyapatite and calcium titanate (perovskite). The FT-IR and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) measurements performed after the incubation of the cement samples in the simulated body fluid (SBF), indicate on high bioactive potential of the obtained bone cements.

  10. Hydration characteristics of zirconium oxide replaced Portland cement for use as a root-end filling material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, J; Cutajar, A; Mallia, B

    2011-08-01

    cement. A prototype dental material composed of Portland cement replaced with 30% zirconium oxide as radiopacifier leached calcium ions on hydration which reacted with phosphates present in simulated tissue fluids. This resulted in bioactive cement that could prospectively be used as a root-end filling material. The zirconium oxide acted as inert filler and did not participate in the hydration reaction of the Portland cement. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Hydration studies of calcium sulfoaluminate cements blended with fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Maté, M.; De la Torre, A.G. [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Cristalografía y Mineralogía, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain); León-Reina, L. [Servicios Centrales de Apoyo a la Investigación, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain); Aranda, M.A.G. [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Cristalografía y Mineralogía, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain); CELLS-Alba synchrotron, Carretera BP 1413, Km. 3.3, E-08290 Cerdanyola, Barcelona (Spain); Santacruz, I., E-mail: isantacruz@uma.es [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Cristalografía y Mineralogía, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain)

    2013-12-15

    The main objective of this work is to study the hydration and properties of calcium sulfoaluminate cement pastes blended with fly ash (FA) and the corresponding mortars at different hydration ages. Laboratory X-ray powder diffraction, rheological studies, thermal analysis, porosimetry and compressive strength measurements were performed. The analysis of the diffraction data by Rietveld method allowed quantifying crystalline phases and overall amorphous contents. The studied parameters were: i) FA content, 0, 15 and 30 wt.%; and ii) water addition, water-to-CSA mass ratio (w/CSA = 0.50 and 0.65), and water-to-binder mass ratio (w/b = 0.50). Finally, compressive strengths after 6 months of 0 and 15 wt.% FA [w/CSA = 0.50] mortars were similar: 73 ± 2 and 72 ± 3 MPa, respectively. This is justified by the filler effect of the FA as no strong evidences of reactivity of FA with CSA were observed. These results support the partial substitution of CSA cements with FA with the economic and environmental benefits.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of nanosized calcium phosphates by flame spray pyrolysis, and their effect on osteogenic differentiation of stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ataol, Sibel; Tezcaner, Ayşen [Middle East Technical University, Department of Biomedical Engineering (Turkey); Duygulu, Ozgur [TUBITAK Marmara Research Center, Materials Institute (Turkey); Keskin, Dilek [Middle East Technical University, Department of Biomedical Engineering (Turkey); Machin, Nesrin E., E-mail: nesrinmachin@gmail.com [Kocaeli University, Department of Chemical Engineering (Turkey)

    2015-02-15

    The present study evaluates the synthesis of biocompatible osteoconductive and osteoinductive nano calcium phosphate (CaP) particles by industrially applied, aerosol-derived flame spray pyrolysis method for biomedical field. Calcium phosphate nanoparticles were produced in a range of calcium-to-phosphorus ratio, (1.20–2.19) in order to analyze the morphology and crystallinity changes, and to test the bioactivity of particles. The characterization results confirmed that nanometer-sized, spherical calcium phosphate particles were produced. The average primary particle size was determined as 23 nm by counting more than 500 particles in TEM pictures. XRD patterns, HRTEM, SAED, and SEM analyses revealed the amorphous nature of the as-prepared nano calcium phosphate particles at low Ca/P ratios. Increases in the specific surface area and crystallinity were observed with the increasing Ca/P ratio. TGA–DTA analysis showed that the thermally stable crystal phases formed after 700 °C. Cell culture studies were conducted with urine-derived stem cells that possess the characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells. Synthesized amorphous nanoparticles did not have cytotoxic effect at 5–50 μg/ml concentration range. Cells treated with the as-prepared nanoparticles had higher alkaline phosphatase (ALP) enzyme activity than control cells, indicating osteogenic differentiation of cells. A slight decrease in ALP activity of cells treated with two highest Ca:P ratios at 50 μg/ml concentration was observed at day 7. The findings suggest that calcium phosphate nanoparticles produced in this work have a potential to be used as biomaterials in biomedical applications.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of nanosized calcium phosphates by flame spray pyrolysis, and their effect on osteogenic differentiation of stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataol, Sibel; Tezcaner, Ayşen; Duygulu, Ozgur; Keskin, Dilek; Machin, Nesrin E.

    2015-02-01

    The present study evaluates the synthesis of biocompatible osteoconductive and osteoinductive nano calcium phosphate (CaP) particles by industrially applied, aerosol-derived flame spray pyrolysis method for biomedical field. Calcium phosphate nanoparticles were produced in a range of calcium-to-phosphorus ratio, (1.20-2.19) in order to analyze the morphology and crystallinity changes, and to test the bioactivity of particles. The characterization results confirmed that nanometer-sized, spherical calcium phosphate particles were produced. The average primary particle size was determined as 23 nm by counting more than 500 particles in TEM pictures. XRD patterns, HRTEM, SAED, and SEM analyses revealed the amorphous nature of the as-prepared nano calcium phosphate particles at low Ca/P ratios. Increases in the specific surface area and crystallinity were observed with the increasing Ca/P ratio. TGA-DTA analysis showed that the thermally stable crystal phases formed after 700 °C. Cell culture studies were conducted with urine-derived stem cells that possess the characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells. Synthesized amorphous nanoparticles did not have cytotoxic effect at 5-50 μg/ml concentration range. Cells treated with the as-prepared nanoparticles had higher alkaline phosphatase (ALP) enzyme activity than control cells, indicating osteogenic differentiation of cells. A slight decrease in ALP activity of cells treated with two highest Ca:P ratios at 50 μg/ml concentration was observed at day 7. The findings suggest that calcium phosphate nanoparticles produced in this work have a potential to be used as biomaterials in biomedical applications.

  14. [Endodontics in motion: new concepts, materials and techniques 1. Hydraulic Calcium Silicate Cements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moinzadeh, A T; Jongsma, L; de Groot-Kuin, D; Cristescu, R; Neirynck, N; Camilleri, J

    2015-01-01

    Hydraulic Calcium Silicate Cements (HCSCs) constitute a group of materials that have become increasingly popular in endodontics since the introduction of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) in the 1990s. MTA is Portland cement to which bismuth oxide has been added to increase its radiopacity. The most important property of MTA is its capacity to set in water or a humid environment. However, MTA also has important limitations, for example, it's difficult to work with and can discolour teeth. Recently, numerous products based on HCSC chemistry, which can be considered as modifications of MTA intended to reduce its limitations, have become available on the market. Despite their potential advantages, all of these materials have their own specific limitations that are currently insufficiently known and investigated.

  15. Calcium phosphate-gold nanoparticles nanocomposite for protein adsorption and mediator-free H{sub 2}O{sub 2} biosensor construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Qin [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225002 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Environmental Engineering and Monitoring, Yangzhou 225002 (China); Lu Guiju; Bian XiaoJun; Jin Gendi [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225002 (China); Wang Wei [School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Yancheng, 224051 (China); Hu Xiaoya, E-mail: xyhu@yzu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225002 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Environmental Engineering and Monitoring, Yangzhou 225002 (China); Wang Yang; Yang Zhanjun [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225002 (China)

    2012-04-01

    This work reports a new method for the preparation and application of a kind of biocompatible calcium phosphate-gold nanoparticles (Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}-AuNPs) nanocomposite. UV-vis spectroscopy and transmittance electron microscopy (TEM) have been used to monitor the formation process of the nanocomposite and to examine the interaction between calcium phosphate and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The nanocomposite has multiple sites and improved conductivity which make it suitable for the binding of proteins to construct electrochemical sensors. Myoglobin (Mb) adsorbed on the nanocomposite retained its native structure which was proved by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Direct electron transfer between the adsorbed Mb and the electrode was observed. Further results demonstrated that the adsorbed Mb has good electrocatalytic activity towards the reduction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in the absence of any mediator. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using gelatin modified gold nanoparticles to prepare needle-like calcium phosphate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calcium phosphate provides multiple sites for protein adsorption. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gold nanoparticles act as electron tunneling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Myoglobin adsorbed on the material showed direct electrochemistry and good catalysis.

  16. Microstructural characterization of dental zinc phosphate cements using combined small angle neutron scattering and microfocus X-ray computed tomography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Viani, Alberto; Sotiriadis, Konstantinos; Kumpová, Ivana; Mancini, L.; Appavou, M.-S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 4 (2017), s. 402-417 ISSN 0109-5641 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : zinc phosphate cements * small angle neutron scattering * X-ray micro-computed tomography * X-ray powder diffraction * zinc oxide * acid-base cements Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials OBOR OECD: Composites (including laminates, reinforced plastics, cermets, combined natural and synthetic fibre fabrics Impact factor: 4.070, year: 2016 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0109564116305127

  17. Calcium carbonate phosphate binding ion exchange filtration and accelerated denitrification improve public health standards and combat eutrophication in aquatic ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanamadala, Vijay

    2005-01-01

    Cultural eutrophication, the process by which a lake becomes rich in dissolved nutrients as a result of point and nonpoint pollutant sources, is a major cause of the loss of natural lake ecosystems throughout the world. The process occurs naturally in all lakes, but phosphate-rich nutrient runoff from sources such as storm drains and agricultural runoff is a major cause of excess phosphate-induced eutrophication. Especially in Madrona Marsh, one of the last remaining vernal marshes in the greater Los Angeles area, California, cultural eutrophication has become a major problem. In this study, calcium carbonate was found to be an excellent phosphate binder, reducing up to 70% of the phosphates in a given sample of water, and it posed relatively negligent ecological repercussions. This study involved the testing of this principle in both the laboratory and the real ecosystem. A calcium carbonate lacing procedure was first carried out to determine its efficacy in Madrona Marsh. Through this, ammonia was found to interfere with the solubility of calcium carbonate and therefore to be a hindrance to the reduction of phosphate. Therefore, various approaches for reduction of ammonia were tested, including aeration, use of fiber growth media, and plants, mainly Caulerpa verticellata, chosen for it hardiness, primarily in an attempt to increase population of Nitrobacter and Nitrosomonas. All were successful in moderately reducing ammonia levels. In addition, soil sampling, sediment analysis, microscopic plant analysis, microorganism and macroinvertebrate identification, and rate law formulations were conducted. The effect of phosphate and ammonia reduction on the populations of enterobacteria was also an important focus of this experiment. Varying concentrations of phosphate, ammonia, and calcium carbonate in conjunction with phosphate were tested in Madrona Marsh to determine their effects on the populations of enteropathogens on nonspecific blood agar, MacConkey agar, and

  18. Cooperation of phosphates and carboxylates controls calcium oxalate crystallization in ultrafiltered urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grohe, Bernd; Chan, Brian P H; Sørensen, Esben S; Lajoie, Gilles; Goldberg, Harvey A; Hunter, Graeme K

    2011-10-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is one of a group of proteins found in urine that are believed to limit the formation of kidney stones. In the present study, we investigate the roles of phosphate and carboxylate groups in the OPN-mediated modulation of calcium oxalate (CaOx), the principal mineral phase found in kidney stones. To this end, crystallization was induced by addition of CaOx solution to ultrafiltered human urine containing either human kidney OPN (kOPN; 7 consecutive carboxylates, 8 phosphates) or synthesized peptides corresponding to residues 65-80 (pSHDHMDDDDDDDDDGD; pOPAR) or 220-235 (pSHEpSTEQSDAIDpSAEK; P3) of rat bone OPN. Sequence 65-80 was also synthesized without the phosphate group (OPAR). Effects on calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and dihydrate (COD) formation were studied by scanning electron microscopy. We found that controls form large, partly intergrown COM platelets; COD was never observed. Adding any of the polyelectrolytes was sufficient to prevent intergrowth of COM platelets entirely, inhibiting formation of these platelets strongly, and inducing formation of the COD phase. Strongest effects on COM formation were found for pOPAR and OPAR followed by kOPN and then P3, showing that acidity and hydrophilicity are crucial in polyelectrolyte-affected COM crystallization. At higher concentrations, OPAR also inhibited COD formation, while P3, kOPN and, in particular, pOPAR promoted COD, a difference explainable by the variations of carboxylate and phosphate groups present in the molecules. Thus, we conclude that carboxylate groups play a primary role in inhibiting COM formation, but phosphate and carboxylate groups are both important in initiating and promoting COD formation.

  19. Interaction between calcium and phosphate adsorption on goethite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietra, R P; Hiemstra, T; van Riemsdijk, W H

    2001-08-15

    Quantitatively, little is known about the ion interaction processes that are responsible for the binding of phosphate in soil, water, and sediment, which determine the bioavailability and mobility of phosphate. Studies have shown that metal hydroxides are often responsible for the binding of PO4 in soils and sediments, but the binding behavior of PO4 in these systems often differs significantly from adsorption studies on metal hydroxides in laboratory. The interaction between PO4 and Ca adsorption was studied on goethite because Ca can influence the PO4 adsorption equilibria. Since adsorption interactions are very difficult to discriminate from precipitation reactions, conditions were chosen to prevent precipitation of Ca-PO4 solids. Adsorption experiments of PO4 and Ca, individually and in combination, show a strong interaction between adsorbed Ca and PO4 on goethite for conditions below the saturation index of apatite. It is shown that it is possible to predict the adsorption and interaction of PO4 and Ca on electrostatic arguments using the model parameter values derived from the single-ion systems and without invoking ternary complex formation or precipitation. The model enables the prediction of the Ca-PO4 interaction for environmentally relevant calcium and phosphate concentrations.

  20. THE CURRENT STATE OF CALCIUM SILICATE CEMENTS IN RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY: A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Corral-Núñez, Camila; Fernández-Godoy, Eduardo; Casielles, Javier Martín; Estay, Juan; Bersezio-Miranda, Cristian; Cisternas-Pinto, Patricia; Batista-de Oliveira Jr, Osmir

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Calcium silicate cements have been used as dental materials for more than twenty years; however, their use in restorative dentistry is more recent. Better mechanical properties and shorter curing times make them suitable for a variety of applications in which they are used as a substitute of dentin, including direct/indirect pulp capping and as cavity base/liner. These materials may also be used to restore enamel temporarily. This article seeks to review the available scientific evid...

  1. Osteogenesis and angiogenesis properties of dental pulp cell on novel injectable tricalcium phosphate cement by silica doped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ying-Fang; Lin, Chi-Chang; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Chou, Ming-Yung; Yang, Jaw-Ji; Shie, Ming-You

    2014-09-01

    β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is an osteoconductive material in clinical. In this study, we have doped silica (Si) into β-TCP and enhanced its bioactive and osteostimulative properties. To check its effectiveness, a series of Si-doped with different ratios were prepared to make new bioactive and biodegradable biocomposites for bone repair. Formation of the diametral tensile strength, ions released and weight loss of cements was considered after immersion. In addition, we also examined the behavior of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured on Si-doped β-TCP cements. The results showed that setting time and injectability of the Si-doped β-TCP cements were decreased as the Si content was increased. At the end of the immersion point, weight losses of 30.1%, 36.9%, 48.1%, and 55.3% were observed for the cement doping 0%, 10%, 20%, and 30% Si into β-TCP cements, respectively. In vitro cell experiments show that the Si-rich cements promote human dental pulp cell (hDPC) proliferation and differentiation. However, when the Si-doped in the cement is more than 20%, the amount of cells and osteogenesis protein of hDPCs was stimulated by Si released from Si-doped β-TCP cements. The degradation of β-TCP and osteogenesis of Si gives a strong reason to believe that these Si-doped β-TCP cements may prove to be promising bone repair materials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Influences of ambient gases on the structure and the composition of calcium phosphate films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hye-Lee; Kim, Young-Sun; Kim, Dae-Joon; Lee, Won-Jun; Han, Jung-Suk

    2006-01-01

    Calcium phosphate films were prepared by using a pulsed KrF-laser deposition (PLD) method with a hydroxyapatite target in various ambient gases, such as Ar, O 2 and H 2 O. The influence of the ambient gas on the properties of the deposited films was investigated. The chamber pressure and the substrate temperature were fixed at 0.25 Torr and 600 .deg. C, respectively. Calcium-rich amorphous calcium phosphate films were deposited with a low density in Ar due to the preferential resputtering of phosphorus from the growing film. In an O 2 ambient, the density and the Ca/P ratio of the films were similar to those of the target. However, the deposited film was amorphous calcium phosphate and did not contain OH - groups. Polycrystalline hydroxyapatite films can be deposited in a H 2 O ambient because a sufficient supply of OH - groups from the ambient gas is essential for the growth of a hydroxyapatite film.

  3. Influences of ambient gases on the structure and the composition of calcium phosphate films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hye-Lee; Kim, Young-Sun; Kim, Dae-Joon; Lee, Won-Jun [Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jung-Suk [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-11-15

    Calcium phosphate films were prepared by using a pulsed KrF-laser deposition (PLD) method with a hydroxyapatite target in various ambient gases, such as Ar, O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The influence of the ambient gas on the properties of the deposited films was investigated. The chamber pressure and the substrate temperature were fixed at 0.25 Torr and 600 .deg. C, respectively. Calcium-rich amorphous calcium phosphate films were deposited with a low density in Ar due to the preferential resputtering of phosphorus from the growing film. In an O{sub 2} ambient, the density and the Ca/P ratio of the films were similar to those of the target. However, the deposited film was amorphous calcium phosphate and did not contain OH{sup -} groups. Polycrystalline hydroxyapatite films can be deposited in a H{sub 2}O ambient because a sufficient supply of OH{sup -} groups from the ambient gas is essential for the growth of a hydroxyapatite film.

  4. In vitro and in vivo reactivity of porous, electrosprayed calcium phosphate coatings.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwenburgh, S.C.G.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Siebers, M.C.; Schoonman, J.; Jansen, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    The dissolution and/or precipitation behaviour of porous calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings, deposited using electrostatic spray deposition (ESD), was investigated (a) in vitro after soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF) for several time periods (2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks), and (b) in vivo after

  5. Microporous calcium phosphate ceramics driving osteogenesis through surface architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingwei; Barbieri, Davide; ten Hoopen, Hetty; de Bruijn, Joost D; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Yuan, Huipin

    2015-03-01

    The presence of micropores in calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramics has shown its important role in initiating inductive bone formation in ectopic sites. To investigate how microporous CaP ceramics trigger osteoinduction, we optimized two biphasic CaP ceramics (i.e., BCP-R and BCP-S) to have the same chemical composition, equivalent surface area per volume, comparable protein adsorption, similar ion (i.e., calcium and phosphate) exchange and the same surface mineralization potential, but different surface architecture. In particular, BCP-R had a surface roughness (Ra) of 325.4 ± 58.9 nm while for BCP-S it was 231.6 ± 35.7 nm. Ceramic blocks with crossing or noncrossing channels of 250, 500, 1000, and 2000 µm were implanted in paraspinal muscle of dogs for 12 weeks. The percentage of bone volume in the channels was not affected by the type of pores (i.e., crossing vs. closed) or their size, but it was greatly influenced by the ceramic type (i.e., BCP-R vs. BCP-S). Significantly, more bone was formed in the channels of BCP-R than in those of BCP-S. Since the two CaP ceramics differed only in their surface architecture, the results hereby demonstrate that microporous CaP ceramics may induce ectopic osteogenesis through surface architecture. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Development of an Improved Cement for Geothermal Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trabits, George [Trabits Group, LLC, Wasilla, AK (United States)

    2015-04-20

    After an oil, gas, or geothermal production well has been drilled, the well must be stabilized with a casing (sections of steel pipe that are joined together) in order to prevent the walls of the well from collapsing. The gap between the casing and the walls of the well is filled with cement, which locks the casing into place. The casing and cementing of geothermal wells is complicated by the harsh conditions of high temperature, high pressure, and a chemical environment (brines with high concentrations of carbon dioxide and sulfuric acid) that degrades conventional Portland cement. During the 1990s and early 2000s, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) provided support for the development of fly-ash-modified calcium aluminate phosphate (CaP) cement, which offers improved resistance to degradation compared with conventional cement. However, the use of CaP cements involves some operational constraints that can increase the cost and complexity of well cementing. In some cases, CaP cements are incompatible with chemical additives that are commonly used to adjust cement setting time. Care must also be taken to ensure that CaP cements do not become contaminated with leftover conventional cement in pumping equipment used in conventional well cementing. With assistance from GTO, Trabits Group, LLC has developed a zeolite-containing cement that performs well in harsh geothermal conditions (thermal stability at temperatures of up to 300°C and resistance to carbonation) and is easy to use (can be easily adjusted with additives and eliminates the need to “sterilize” pumping equipment as with CaP cements). This combination of properties reduces the complexity/cost of well cementing, which will help enable the widespread development of geothermal energy in the United States.