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Sample records for calcium oxides

  1. Barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide free glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Peizhen Kathy; Mahapatra, Manoj Kumar

    2013-09-24

    A glass composition consisting essentially of about 10-45 mole percent of SrO; about 35-75 mole percent SiO.sub.2; one or more compounds from the group of compounds consisting of La.sub.2O.sub.3, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, B.sub.2O.sub.3, and Ni; the La.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 20 mole percent; the Al.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 25 mole percent; the B.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 15 mole percent; and the Ni less than about 5 mole percent. Preferably, the glass is substantially free of barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide. Preferably, the glass is used as a seal in a solid oxide fuel/electrolyzer cell (SOFC) stack. The SOFC stack comprises a plurality of SOFCs connected by one or more interconnect and manifold materials and sealed by the glass. Preferably, each SOFC comprises an anode, a cathode, and a solid electrolyte.

  2. 21 CFR 582.5210 - Calcium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium oxide. 582.5210 Section 582.5210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance... manganese strontium oxide (PMN P-00-1124; CAS No. 359427-90-0) is subject to reporting under this section...

  4. Mercury Control with Calcium-Based Sorbents and Oxidizing Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas K. Gale

    2005-07-01

    This Final Report contains the test descriptions, results, analysis, correlations, theoretical descriptions, and model derivations produced from many different investigations performed on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, to investigate calcium-based sorbents and injection of oxidizing agents for the removal of mercury. Among the technologies were (a) calcium-based sorbents in general, (b) oxidant-additive sorbents developed originally at the EPA, and (c) optimized calcium/carbon synergism for mercury-removal enhancement. In addition, (d) sodium-tetrasulfide injection was found to effectively capture both forms of mercury across baghouses and ESPs, and has since been demonstrated at a slipstream treating PRB coal. It has been shown that sodium-tetrasulfide had little impact on the foam index of PRB flyash, which may indicate that sodium-tetrasulfide injection could be used at power plants without affecting flyash sales. Another technology, (e) coal blending, was shown to be an effective means of increasing mercury removal, by optimizing the concentration of calcium and carbon in the flyash. In addition to the investigation and validation of multiple mercury-control technologies (a through e above), important fundamental mechanism governing mercury kinetics in flue gas were elucidated. For example, it was shown, for the range of chlorine and unburned-carbon (UBC) concentrations in coal-fired utilities, that chlorine has much less effect on mercury oxidation and removal than UBC in the flyash. Unburned carbon enhances mercury oxidation in the flue gas by reacting with HCl to form chlorinated-carbon sites, which then react with elemental mercury to form mercuric chloride, which subsequently desorbs back into the flue gas. Calcium was found to enhance mercury removal by stabilizing the oxidized mercury formed on carbon surfaces. Finally, a model was developed to describe these mercury adsorption, desorption, oxidation, and removal mechanisms, including

  5. Preparation Calcium Oxide From Chicken Eggshells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risfidian Mohadi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The preparation of metal oxide CaO from chicken eggshell has been carried out by decomposition at various temperatures 600, 700, 800, 900, and 1000oC. The metal oxide CaO was characterized using XRD. Furthermore, The optimum temperature for preparation of CaO was determined based on the XRD pattern, then the characterization of CaO was extended using FT-IR spectrophotometer and BET analysis. The results show that the optimum temperature for preparation of CaO from chicken eggshell is 900oC with peak of 2Ө at 32.3o, 37.4o, 53.9o, 64.2o and 67.5o, respectively. The FT-IR spectrums show the unique vibration for Ca-O at 393 cm-1. The BET analysis show that CaO has surface area 68 m2/g with pore volume 1.65 cm3/g and pore size 6.6 nm which can be classified as mesoporous.

  6. Kinetics of calcium sulfoaluminate formation from tricalcium aluminate, calcium sulfate and calcium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xuerun, E-mail: xuerunli@163.com; Zhang, Yu; Shen, Xiaodong, E-mail: xdshen@njut.edu.cn; Wang, Qianqian; Pan, Zhigang

    2014-01-15

    The formation kinetics of tricalcium aluminate (C{sub 3}A) and calcium sulfate yielding calcium sulfoaluminate (C{sub 4}A{sub 3}$) and the decomposition kinetics of calcium sulfoaluminate were investigated by sintering a mixture of synthetic C{sub 3}A and gypsum. The quantitative analysis of the phase composition was performed by X-ray powder diffraction analysis using the Rietveld method. The results showed that the formation reaction 3Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6} + CaSO{sub 4} → Ca{sub 4}Al{sub 6}O{sub 12}(SO{sub 4}) + 6CaO was the primary reaction < 1350 °C with and activation energy of 231 ± 42 kJ/mol; while the decomposition reaction 2Ca{sub 4}Al{sub 6}O{sub 12}(SO{sub 4}) + 10CaO → 6Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6} + 2SO{sub 2} ↑ + O{sub 2} ↑ primarily occurred beyond 1350 °C with an activation energy of 792 ± 64 kJ/mol. The optimal formation region for C{sub 4}A{sub 3}$ was from 1150 °C to 1350 °C and from 6 h to 1 h, which could provide useful information on the formation of C{sub 4}A{sub 3}$ containing clinkers. The Jander diffusion model was feasible for the formation and decomposition of calcium sulfoaluminate. Ca{sup 2+} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} were the diffusive species in both the formation and decomposition reactions. -- Highlights: •Formation and decomposition of calcium sulphoaluminate were studied. •Decomposition of calcium sulphoaluminate combined CaO and yielded C{sub 3}A. •Activation energy for formation was 231 ± 42 kJ/mol. •Activation energy for decomposition was 792 ± 64 kJ/mol. •Both the formation and decomposition were controlled by diffusion.

  7. Energetic basis of catalytic activity of layered nanophase calcium manganese oxides for water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkner, Nancy; Nayeri, Sara; Pashaei, Babak; Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Casey, William H; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2013-05-28

    Previous measurements show that calcium manganese oxide nanoparticles are better water oxidation catalysts than binary manganese oxides (Mn3O4, Mn2O3, and MnO2). The probable reasons for such enhancement involve a combination of factors: The calcium manganese oxide materials have a layered structure with considerable thermodynamic stability and a high surface area, their low surface energy suggests relatively loose binding of H2O on the internal and external surfaces, and they possess mixed-valent manganese with internal oxidation enthalpy independent of the Mn(3+)/Mn(4+) ratio and much smaller in magnitude than the Mn2O3-MnO2 couple. These factors enhance catalytic ability by providing easy access for solutes and water to active sites and facile electron transfer between manganese in different oxidation states.

  8. Energetic basis of catalytic activity of layered nanophase calcium manganese oxides for water oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkner, Nancy; Nayeri, Sara; Pashaei, Babak; Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Casey, William H.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Previous measurements show that calcium manganese oxide nanoparticles are better water oxidation catalysts than binary manganese oxides (Mn3O4, Mn2O3, and MnO2). The probable reasons for such enhancement involve a combination of factors: The calcium manganese oxide materials have a layered structure with considerable thermodynamic stability and a high surface area, their low surface energy suggests relatively loose binding of H2O on the internal and external surfaces, and they possess mixed-valent manganese with internal oxidation enthalpy independent of the Mn3+/Mn4+ ratio and much smaller in magnitude than the Mn2O3-MnO2 couple. These factors enhance catalytic ability by providing easy access for solutes and water to active sites and facile electron transfer between manganese in different oxidation states. PMID:23667149

  9. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter in Drosophila transfers calcium between the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria in oxidative stress-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sekyu; Quan, Xianglan; Bang, Sunhoe; Yoo, Heesuk; Kim, Jiyoung; Park, Jiwon; Park, Kyu-Sang; Chung, Jongkyeong

    2017-09-01

    Mitochondrial calcium plays critical roles in diverse cellular processes ranging from energy metabolism to cell death. Previous studies have demonstrated that mitochondrial calcium uptake is mainly mediated by the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) complex. However, the roles of the MCU complex in calcium transport, signaling, and dysregulation by oxidative stress still remain unclear. Here, we confirmed that Drosophila MCU contains evolutionarily conserved structures and requires essential MCU regulator (EMRE) for its calcium channel activities. We generated Drosophila MCU loss-of-function mutants, which lacked mitochondrial calcium uptake in response to caffeine stimulation. Basal metabolic activities were not significantly affected in these MCU mutants, as observed in examinations of body weight, food intake, body sugar level, and starvation-induced autophagy. However, oxidative stress-induced increases in mitochondrial calcium, mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization, and cell death were prevented in these mutants. We also found that inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor genetically interacts with Drosophila MCU and effectively modulates mitochondrial calcium uptake upon oxidative stress. Taken together, these results support the idea that Drosophila MCU is responsible for endoplasmic reticulum-to-mitochondrial calcium transfer and for cell death due to mitochondrial dysfunction under oxidative stress. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Electrosynthesis of Biomimetic Manganese-Calcium Oxides for Water Oxidation Catalysis--Atomic Structure and Functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Flores, Diego; Zaharieva, Ivelina; Heidkamp, Jonathan; Chernev, Petko; Martínez-Moreno, Elías; Pasquini, Chiara; Mohammadi, Mohammad Reza; Klingan, Katharina; Gernet, Ulrich; Fischer, Anna; Dau, Holger

    2016-02-19

    Water-oxidizing calcium-manganese oxides, which mimic the inorganic core of the biological catalyst, were synthesized and structurally characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the manganese and calcium K edges. The amorphous, birnesite-type oxides are obtained through a simple protocol that involves electrodeposition followed by active-site creation through annealing at moderate temperatures. Calcium ions are inessential, but tune the electrocatalytic properties. For increasing calcium/manganese molar ratios, both Tafel slopes and exchange current densities decrease gradually, resulting in optimal catalytic performance at calcium/manganese molar ratios of close to 10 %. Tracking UV/Vis absorption changes during electrochemical operation suggests that inactive oxides reach their highest, all-Mn(IV) oxidation state at comparably low electrode potentials. The ability to undergo redox transitions and the presence of a minor fraction of Mn(III) ions at catalytic potentials is identified as a prerequisite for catalytic activity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. An engineered polypeptide around nano-sized manganese-calcium oxide: copying plants for water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Ghobadi, Mohadeseh Zarei; Sarvi, Bahram; Haghighi, Behzad

    2015-09-14

    Synthesis of new efficient catalysts inspired by Nature is a key goal in the production of clean fuel. Different compounds based on manganese oxide have been investigated in order to find their water-oxidation activity. Herein, we introduce a novel engineered polypeptide containing tyrosine around nano-sized manganese-calcium oxide, which was shown to be a highly active catalyst toward water oxidation at low overpotential (240 mV), with high turnover frequency of 1.5 × 10(-2) s(-1) at pH = 6.3 in the Mn(III)/Mn(IV) oxidation range. The compound is a novel structural and efficient functional model for the water-oxidizing complex in Photosystem II. A new proposed clever strategy used by Nature in water oxidation is also discussed. The new model of the water-oxidizing complex opens a new perspective for synthesis of efficient water-oxidation catalysts.

  12. Water-oxidation catalysis by synthetic manganese oxides--systematic variations of the calcium birnessite theme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Carolin E; Wiechen, Mathias; Kurz, Philipp

    2014-03-21

    Layered manganese oxides from the birnessite mineral family have been identified as promising heterogeneous compounds for water-oxidation catalysis (WOC), a key reaction for the conversion of renewable energy into storable fuels. High catalytic rates were especially observed for birnessites which contain calcium as part of their structures. With the aim to systematically improve the catalytic performance of such oxide materials, we used a flexible synthetic route to prepare three series of calcium birnessites, where we varied the calcium concentrations, the ripening times of the original precipitates and the temperature of the heat treatment following the initial synthetic steps (tempering) during the preparation process. The products were carefully analysed by a number of analytical techniques and then probed for WOC activity using the Ce(4+)-system. We find that our set of twenty closely related manganese oxides shows large, but somewhat systematic alterations in catalytic rates, indicating the importance of synthesis parameters for maximum catalytic performance. The catalyst of the series for which the highest water-oxidation rate was found is a birnessite of medium calcium content (Ca : Mn ratio 0.2 : 1) that had been subjected to a tempering temperature of 400 °C. On the basis of the detailed analysis of the results, a WOC reaction scheme for birnessites is proposed to explain the observed trends in reactivity.

  13. Biodiesel Production from Castor Oil by Using Calcium Oxide Derived from Mud Clam Shell

    OpenAIRE

    Ismail, S.; Ahmed, A.S.; Reddy Anr; Hamdan, S

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic potential of calcium oxide synthesized from mud clam shell as a heterogeneous catalyst for biodiesel production was studied. The mud clam shell calcium oxide was characterized using particle size analyzer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and BET gas sorption analyzer. The catalyst performance of mud clam shell calcium oxide was studied in the transesterification of castor oil as biodiesel. Catalyst characterization and transesterification s...

  14. Potassium/calcium/nickel oxide catalysts for the oxidative coupling of methane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dooley, K.; Dooley, Kerry M.; Ross, J.R.H.; Ross, Julian R.H.

    1992-01-01

    A series of potassium/calcium/nickel oxides were tested for the oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) at 843–943 K and water addition to the feed at 0–66 mol-%. The K/Ni ratios varied from 0.0–0.6 and Ca/Ni from 0.0–11; catalysts with no nickel were also tested. At least 10% water in the feed and

  15. Changes in the level of cytosolic calcium, nitric oxide and nitric oxide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Variceal bleeding due to abnormal platelet function is a well-known complication of cirrhosis. Nitric oxide-related stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of liver cirrhosis. In the present investigation, we evaluated the level of platelet aggregation and concomitant changes in the level of platelet cytosolic calcium ...

  16. First evidence on phloem transport of nanoscale calcium oxide in groundnut using solution culture technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepa, Manchala; Sudhakar, Palagiri; Nagamadhuri, Kandula Venkata; Balakrishna Reddy, Kota; Giridhara Krishna, Thimmavajjula; Prasad, Tollamadugu Naga Venkata Krishna Vara

    2015-06-01

    Nanoscale materials, whose size typically falls below 100 nm, exhibit novel chemical, physical and biological properties which are different from their bulk counterparts. In the present investigation, we demonstrated that nanoscale calcium oxide particles (n-CaO) could transport through phloem tissue of groundnut unlike the corresponding bulk materials. n-CaO particles are prepared using sol-gel method. The size of the as prepared n-CaO measured (69.9 nm) using transmission electron microscopic technique (TEM). Results of the hydroponics experiment using solution culture technique revealed that foliar application of n-CaO at different concentrations (10, 50, 100, 500, 1,000 ppm) on groundnut plants confirmed the entry of calcium into leaves and stems through phloem compared to bulk source of calcium sprayed (CaO and CaNO3). After spraying of n-CaO, calcium content in roots, shoots and leaves significantly increased. Based on visual scoring of calcium deficiency correction and calcium content in plant parts, we may establish the fact that nanoscale calcium oxide particles (size 69.9 nm) could move through phloem tissue in groundnut. This is the first report on phloem transport of nanoscale calcium oxide particles in plants and this result points to the use of nanoscale calcium oxide particles as calcium source to the plants through foliar application, agricultural crops in particular, as bulk calcium application through foliar nutrition is restricted due to its non-mobility in phloem.

  17. Use of calcium oxide in palm oil methyl ester production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulchanat Prasertsit

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introducing an untreated calcium oxide (CaO as a solid heterogeneous catalyst for biodiesel production from palm oil by transesterification was studied in this work. The four studied parameters were methanol to oil molar ratio, CaO catalyst concentration, reaction time, and water content. The results for palm oil show that when the water content is higher than 3%wt and the amount of CaO greater than 7%wt soap formation from saponification occurs. A higher methanol to oil molar ratio requires a higher amount of CaO catalyst to provide the higher product purity. The appropriate methanol to CaO catalyst ratio is about 1.56. Commercial grade CaO gives almost the same results as AR grade CaO. In addition, reusing commercial grade CaO for about 5 to 10 repetitions without catalyst regeneration drops the percentage of methyl ester purity approximately 5 to 10%, respectively.

  18. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Turn to calcium-fortified (or "calcium-set") tofu, soy milk, tempeh, soy yogurt, and cooked soybeans (edamame). Calcium-fortified foods. Look for calcium-fortified orange juice, soy or rice milk, breads, and cereal. Beans. You can get decent ...

  19. Nacre-like calcium carbonate controlled by ionic liquid/graphene oxide composite template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Chengli; Xie, Anjian; Shen, Yuhua; Zhu, Jinmiao; Li, Hongying

    2015-06-01

    Nacre-like calcium carbonate nanostructures have been mediated by an ionic liquid (IL)-graphene oxide (GO) composite template. The resultant crystals were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD). The results showed that either 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM]BF4) or graphene oxide can act as a soft template for calcium carbonate formation with unusual morphologies. Based on the time-dependent morphology changes of calcium carbonate particles, it is concluded that nacre-like calcium carbonate nanostructures can be formed gradually utilizing [BMIM]BF4/GO composite template. During the process of calcium carbonate formation, [BMIM]BF4 acted not only as solvents but also as morphology templates for the fabrication of calcium carbonate materials with nacre-like morphology. Based on the observations, the possible mechanisms were also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. PREPARATION OF CALCIUM OXIDE FROM Achatina fulica AS CATALYST FOR PRODUCTION OF BIODIESEL FROM WASTE COOKING OIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldes Lesbani

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Preparation of calcium oxide from Achatina fulica shell has been carried out systematically by decomposition for 3 h at various temperatures i.e. 600, 700, 800 and 900 °C. Formation of calcium oxide was characterized using XR diffractometer. The calcium oxide obtained with the optimum temperature decomposition was characterized using FTIR spectroscopy to indicate the functional group in the calcium oxide. The results showed that XRD pattern of materials obtained from decomposition of Achatina fulica shell at 700 °C is similar with XRD pattern of calcium oxide standard from Joint Committee on Powder Diffraction Standards (JCPDS. The IR spectra of calcium oxide appear at wavenumber 362 cm-1 which is characteristic of CaO vibration. Application of calcium oxide from Achatina fulica shell for synthesis of biodiesel from waste cooking oil results in biodiesel with density are in the range of ASTM standard.

  1. Calcium dobesilate reduces oxidative stress in cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CERRAHOGLU, M; TANER KURDAL, A; ISKESEN, I; ONUR, E; SIRIN, H

    2009-10-01

    Calcium dobesilate (CD) is a synthetic benzene sulfonate derivative and an angioprotective agent used orally. It can be used in patients who have diabetic retinopathy or chronic venous insufficiency. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of CD on the reduction of oxidative stress during coronary artery bypass graft operations on cardiopulmonary bypass. A double-blind prospective randomized study was carried out on 30 patients who underwent coronary artery bypass operations. The control and study groups were composed of 15 patients each. Pretreatment with CD started two weeks before the operation. Serial blood samples for superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase were collected for the serum concentration measurements of the major endogenous antioxidant enzyme systems and malondialdehyde for scavenging capacity. After the release of cross clamp levels of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase. they were significantly higher in the study group than in the control group (P<0.05). Malondialdehyde levels in the study group were significantly lower than those of the control group (P<0.05). The cardiac function after aortic declamping was affected by CD, indicating contribution of CD to myocardial injury from ischemia/reperfusion. The study suggests that pretreatment with CD alleviates malondialdehyde production and preserves endogenous antioxidant capacity during cardiopulmonary bypass and cardioplegic arrest.

  2. Fast pyrolysis of cotton stalk biomass using calcium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xu; Chen, Yingquan; Yang, Haiping; Chen, Wei; Wang, Xianhua; Chen, Hanping

    2017-06-01

    We herein investigate the various roles of calcium oxide in the pyrolysis of biomass at a variant temperatures. The evolution of pyrolysis products was examined to propose the various roles of Ca at a range of temperatures and CaO addition ratios with cotton stalk on a fixed-bed reactor. We found that upon the addition of CaO, the content of ketones produced increased, while that of acidic compounds decreased. Under similar conditions, the concentration of evolved H2 and CH4 increased, while that of CO2 decreased. Thus, variation in the CaO/biomass (Ca/B) mass ratios and pyrolysis temperatures indicated that CaO could act as a reactant, an absorbent, and a catalyst at Ca/B ratios of 0.2, and >0.4, respectively. Moreover, at temperatures >600°C, the roles of CaO as an absorbent and a reactant were less apparent, while its role as a catalyst was enhanced. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of Calcium Oxide Microstructure on the Diffusion of Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes Ramos, João Pedro; Stora, T

    2012-01-01

    Calcium oxide (CaO) powder targets have been successfully used at CERN-ISOLDE to produce neutron deficient exotic argon and carbon isotopes under proton irradiation at high temperatures (>1000°C). These targets outperform the other related targets for the production of the same beams. However, they presented either slow release rates (yields) from the beginning or a rapid decrease over time. This problem was believed to come from the target microstructure degradation, justifying the material investigation. In order to do so, the synthesis, reactivity in ambient air and sintering kinetics of CaO were studied, through surface area determination by N2 adsorption, X-ray diffraction for crystalline phase identification and crystallite size determination, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy to investigate the microstructure. The synthesis studies revealed that a nanometric material is obtained from the decarbonation of CaCO3 in vacuum at temperatures higher than 550°C, which is very reactive in air....

  4. A microstructural study of the degradation and calcium release from hydroxyapatite-calcium oxide ceramics made by infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qinghao; Schmelzer, Eva; Gerlach, Jörg C; Nettleship, Ian

    2017-04-01

    Hydroxyapatite pellets, partially densified in a low-temperature heat treatment, were infiltrated with calcium nitrate solution followed by in-situ precipitation of Ca(OH)2 and CaCO3. The infiltrated bodies were then densified to high relative density and the calcium carbonate transformed to calcium oxide during sintering and resulted in biphasic hydroxyapatite-CaO ceramics. This work investigated the influence of the infiltration on surface morphology, weight change, and microstructural-level degradation caused by exposure to saline at pH=7.4 and a temperature of 20°C. The CaO rendered the materials more susceptible to degradation, and released calcium into the saline faster than single phase, calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (HA) that were used as a control. In consequence, these ceramics could be used to release calcium into the culture microenvironments of bone tissue or bone marrow cells next to a scaffold surface. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Calcium-Sensitive MRI Contrast Agents Based on Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Calmodulin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tatjana Atanasijevic; Maxim Shusteff; Peter Fam; Alan Jasanoff

    2006-01-01

    We describe a family of calcium indicators for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), formed by combining a powerful iron oxide nanoparticle-based contrast mechanism with the versatile calciumsensing protein calmodulin and its targets...

  6. In vitro effect of calcium dobesilate on oxidative/inflammatory stress in human varicose veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alda, O; Valero, M S; Pereboom, D; Serrano, P; Azcona, J M; Garay, R P

    2011-12-01

    To determine whether calcium dobesilate can act in chronic venous insufficiency by similar antioxidant, anti-inflammatory mechanisms as in diabetic retinopathy. Calcium dobesilate was tested in vitro for its protective action against oxidative/inflammatory stress in human varicose veins. Varicose greater saphenous veins were obtained from 14 patients (11 men, 3 women) aged 53-65 years. Oxidative stress was induced exogenously in the vein segments, with the phenazine methosulphate (PMS)/NADH couple. Total antioxidant status (TAS) and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents were used as markers of oxidative stress. Calcium dobesilate significantly prevented oxidative disturbances in the micromolar range. PMS/NADH-dependent TAS decrease was fully prevented with IC(50) = 11.4 ± 2.3 µmol/L (n = 6 veins), whereas MDA increase was fully prevented with IC(50) = (102 ± -3) µmol/L (n = 6 veins). Calcium dobesilate acted quali- and quantitatively like rutin, the reference compound. Comparison with pharmacokinetic data suggests that calcium dobesilate can act at therapeutic concentrations. Calcium dobesilate protected human varicose veins against oxidative stress in vitro at levels that correspond to therapeutic concentrations. Further studies are required to investigate whether a similar action is found in varicose veins from patients orally treated with calcium dobesilate.

  7. Increasing Calcium Oxide (Cao) to Accelerate Moulting and Survival Rate Vannamei Shrimp (Litopenaeus Vannamei))

    OpenAIRE

    Erlando, Gito; ', Rusliadi; Mulyadi,

    2016-01-01

    The research about the increasing Calcium Oxide (CaO) to accelerate moulting and survival rate vannamei shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) was conducted from Agustus until September 2015 at Balai Perikanan Budidaya Air Payau, Instalasi Pembenihan Udang (IPU) Gelung, Situbondo Provinsi Jawa Timur. The purpose of this research was to investigate optimum doses calcium oxide to accelerate moulting and the survival rate vannamei shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei). Vannamei shrimp with size PL25 were used in...

  8. Calcium incorporation in graphene oxide particles: A morphological, chemical, electrical, and thermal study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Kelly L.S. [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia, Av. Nossa Sra. das Graças, 50, 25250-020 Duque de Caxias (Brazil); Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Av. Athos da Silveira Ramos, 149, 21941-909 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Curti, Raphael V.; Araujo, Joyce R.; Landi, Sandra M.; Ferreira, Erlon H.M.; Neves, Rodrigo S.; Kuznetsov, Alexei; Sena, Lidia A. [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia, Av. Nossa Sra. das Graças, 50, 25250-020 Duque de Caxias (Brazil); Archanjo, Braulio S., E-mail: bsarchanjo@inmetro.gov.br [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia, Av. Nossa Sra. das Graças, 50, 25250-020 Duque de Caxias (Brazil); Achete, Carlos A. [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia, Av. Nossa Sra. das Graças, 50, 25250-020 Duque de Caxias (Brazil); Departamento de Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Surface chemical modification and functionalization are common strategies used to provide new properties or functionalities to a material or to enhance existing ones. In this work, graphene oxide prepared using Hummers' method has been chemically modified with calcium ions by immersion in a calcium carbonate solution. Transmission electron microscopy analyses showed that graphene oxide (GO) and calcium incorporated graphene oxide have a morphology similar to an ultra-thin membrane composed of overlapping sheets. X-ray diffraction and Fourier-infrared spectroscopy show that calcium carbonate residue was completely removed by hydrochloric acid washes. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy mapping showed spatially homogeneous calcium in Ca-incorporated graphene oxide sample after HCl washing. This Ca is mainly ionic according to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and its incorporation promoted a small reduction in the graphene oxide structure, corroborated also by four-point probe measurements. A thermal study shows a remarkable increase in the GO stability with the presence of Ca{sup 2+} ions. - Highlights: • Graphene oxide has been chemically modified with Ca ions by immersion in a CaCO{sub 3} solution. • GO–Ca has morphology similar to an ultra-thin membrane composed of overlapping sheets. • CaCO{sub 3} residue was completely removed by acid washes, leaving only ionic calcium. • EDS maps show that Ca incorporation is spatially homogeneous in GO structure. • Thermal analyses show a remarkable increase in GO stability after Ca incorporation.

  9. A Novel Synthesis Method of Porous Calcium Silicate Hydrate Based on the Calcium Oxide/Polyethylene Glycol Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Guan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposed a novel method to prepare porous calcium silicate hydrate (CSH based on the calcium oxide/polyethylene glycol (CaO/PEG2000 composites as the calcium materials. The porosity formation mechanism was revealed via X-ray diffraction (XRD, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET, and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR. The reactivity of silica materials (SiO2 enhanced by increasing pH value. Ca2+ could not sustain release from CaO/PEG2000 and reacted with caused by silica to form CSH until the hydrothermal temperature reached to 170°C, avoiding the hardly dissolved intermediates formation efficiently. The as-prepared CSH, due to the large specific surface areas, exhibited excellent release capability of Ca2+ and OH−. This porous CSH has potential application in reducing the negative environmental effects of continual natural phosphate resource depletion.

  10. Preparation And Characterization Of Modified Calcium Oxide From Natural Sources And Their Application In The Transesterification Of Palm Oil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aqliliriana; C; M; Ernee; N; Irmawati; R

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Calcium oxide catalysts were prepared from natural calcium sources such as limestone and mud creeper shell and the catalytic activities were evaluated in the transesterification of palm oil...

  11. Calcium Oxide Supported on Monoclinic Zirconia as a Highly Active Solid Base Catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frey, A.M.; Haasterecht, van T.; Jong, de K.P.; Bitter, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium oxide supported on ZrO2 is a highly active catalyst for base-catalyzed reactions such as aldol-type reactions and transesterification reactions. The role of key parameters during preparation, that is, impregnation versus precipitation, heat treatment, and metal oxide loading on the basicity

  12. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and blood vessels contract and expand, to secrete hormones and enzymes and to send messages through the nervous system. It is important to get plenty of calcium in the foods you eat. Foods rich in calcium include Dairy products such as milk, cheese, and yogurt Leafy, green vegetables Fish with ...

  13. Calcium Co-regulates Oxidative Metabolism and ATP Synthase-dependent Respiration in Pancreatic Beta Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchi, Umberto; Thevenet, Jonathan; Hermant, Aurelie; Dioum, Elhadji; Wiederkehr, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial energy metabolism is essential for glucose-induced calcium signaling and, therefore, insulin granule exocytosis in pancreatic beta cells. Calcium signals are sensed by mitochondria acting in concert with mitochondrial substrates for the full activation of the organelle. Here we have studied glucose-induced calcium signaling and energy metabolism in INS-1E insulinoma cells and human islet beta cells. In insulin secreting cells a surprisingly large fraction of total respiration under resting conditions is ATP synthase-independent. We observe that ATP synthase-dependent respiration is markedly increased after glucose stimulation. Glucose also causes a very rapid elevation of oxidative metabolism as was followed by NAD(P)H autofluorescence. However, neither the rate of the glucose-induced increase nor the new steady-state NAD(P)H levels are significantly affected by calcium. Our findings challenge the current view, which has focused mainly on calcium-sensitive dehydrogenases as the target for the activation of mitochondrial energy metabolism. We propose a model of tight calcium-dependent regulation of oxidative metabolism and ATP synthase-dependent respiration in beta cell mitochondria. Coordinated activation of matrix dehydrogenases and respiratory chain activity by calcium allows the respiratory rate to change severalfold with only small or no alterations of the NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ ratio. PMID:24554722

  14. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from dietary supplements are linked to a greater risk of kidney stones, especially among older adults. But calcium from foods does not appear to cause kidney stones. For most people, other factors (such as not drinking enough fluids) probably have ...

  15. Formate oxidation driven calcium carbonate precipitation by Methylocystis parvus OBBP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganendra, G; De Muynck, W; Ho, A.; Arvaniti, EC; Hosseinkhani, B; Ramos, JA; Rahier, H; Boon, N.

    2014-01-01

    Microbially Induced Carbonate Precipitation (MICP) applied in the construction industry poses several disadvantages such as ammonia release to the air and nitric acid production. An alternative MICP from calcium formate by Methylocystis parvus OBBP is presented in this study to overcome these

  16. Nano-thick calcium oxide armed titanium: boosts bone cells against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huiliang; Qin, Hui; Zhao, Yaochao; Jin, Guodong; Lu, Tao; Meng, Fanhao; Zhang, Xianlong; Liu, Xuanyong

    2016-02-01

    Since the use of systemic antibiotics for preventing acute biomaterial-associated infections (BAIs) may build up bacterial resistance and result in huge medical costs and unpredictable mortality, new precaution strategies are required. Here, it demonstrated that titanium armed with a nano-thick calcium oxide layer was effective on averting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections in rabbits. The calcium oxide layer was constructed by, firstly, injecting of metallic calcium into titanium via a plasma immersion ion implantation process, and then transforming the outer most surface into oxide by exposing to the atmosphere. Although the calcium oxide armed titanium had a relative low reduction rate (~74%) in growth of MRSA in vitro, it could markedly promote the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs), restore local bone integration against the challenge of MRSA, and decrease the incidence of MRSA infection with a rate of 100% (compared to the titanium control). This study demonstrated for the first time that calcium, as one of the major elements in a human body, could be engineered to avert MRSA infections, which is promising as a safe precaution of disinfection for implantable biomedical devices.

  17. Involvement of Nitric Oxide in the Inhibition of Aortic Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation by Calcium Dobesilate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parés-Herbuté; Fliche; Monnier

    1999-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation is a key process in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Numerous factors are involved in the regulation of SMC growth. Nitric oxide (NO) induces the inhibition of SMC proliferation whereas oxidized low-density lipoproteins (LDL) have a mitogenic effect. Calcium dobesilate (Doxium) is an angioprotective agent for treating vascular diseases. It has been shown to increase NO production and to have antioxidant properties but its mechanism of action is not yet fully understood. This study investigated the effect of calcium dobesilate on proliferation of rat aortic SMC in culture. Proliferation was evaluated by cell number and DNA synthesis. Orally administered calcium dobesilate (30, 100, or 200 mg/kg/day for 7 days) induced a dose-dependent decrease of proliferation of SMC in primary culture compared with controls. In vitro treatment with calcium dobesilate (0.05-5 mM) inhibited both DNA synthesis and proliferation in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. In both ex vivo and in vitro models, the inhibition was reversible upon removal of the drug. Calcium dobesilate also stimulated NO production and NO synthase activity. Inhibitors of NO synthesis attenuated the inhibitory effect of calcium dobesilate (300 µM) on DNA synthesis. In addition, calcium dobesilate (2.5-40 µM) induced a dose-dependent protection of cooper-induced LDL oxidation. These results showed that calcium dobesilate inhibits SMC proliferation, partly by a NO-dependent mechanism, and suggest that it could be effective in the treatment of pathological disorders associated with vascular SMC proliferation.

  18. Analysis of the color alteration and radiopacity promoted by bismuth oxide in calcium silicate cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciano, Marina Angélica; Estrela, Carlos; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Ordinola-Zapata, Ronald; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine if the increase in radiopacity provided by bismuth oxide is related to the color alteration of calcium silicate-based cement. Calcium silicate cement (CSC) was mixed with 0%, 15%, 20%, 30% and 50% of bismuth oxide (BO), determined by weight. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was the control group. The radiopacity test was performed according to ISO 6876/2001. The color was evaluated using the CIE system. The assessments were performed after 24 hours, 7 and 30 days of setting time, using a spectrophotometer to obtain the ΔE, Δa, Δb and ΔL values. The statistical analyses were performed using the Kruskal-Wallis/Dunn and ANOVA/Tukey tests (pbismuth oxide was added showed radiopacity corresponding to the ISO recommendations (>3 mm equivalent of Al). The MTA group was statistically similar to the CSC/30% BO group (p>0.05). In regard to color, the increase of bismuth oxide resulted in a decrease in the ΔE value of the calcium silicate cement. The CSC group presented statistically higher ΔE values than the CSC/50% BO group (pbismuth oxide has no relation to the color alteration of calcium silicate-based cements.

  19. Oxidative Regulation of Large Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiang D.; Daggett, Heather; Hanner, Markus; Garcia, Maria L.; McManus, Owen B.; Brot, Nathan; Weissbach, Herbert; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2001-01-01

    Reactive oxygen/nitrogen species are readily generated in vivo, playing roles in many physiological and pathological conditions, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, by oxidatively modifying various proteins. Previous studies indicate that large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BKCa or Slo) are subject to redox regulation. However, conflicting results exist whether oxidation increases or decreases the channel activity. We used chloramine-T, which preferentially oxidizes methionine, to examine the functional consequences of methionine oxidation in the cloned human Slo (hSlo) channel expressed in mammalian cells. In the virtual absence of Ca2+, the oxidant shifted the steady-state macroscopic conductance to a more negative direction and slowed deactivation. The results obtained suggest that oxidation enhances specific voltage-dependent opening transitions and slows the rate-limiting closing transition. Enhancement of the hSlo activity was partially reversed by the enzyme peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase, suggesting that the upregulation is mediated by methionine oxidation. In contrast, hydrogen peroxide and cysteine-specific reagents, DTNB, MTSEA, and PCMB, decreased the channel activity. Chloramine-T was much less effective when concurrently applied with the K+ channel blocker TEA, which is consistent with the possibility that the target methionine lies within the channel pore. Regulation of the Slo channel by methionine oxidation may represent an important link between cellular electrical excitability and metabolism. PMID:11222629

  20. Shear stress induction of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene is calcium-dependent but not calcium-activated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Z; Zhang, Z; Ranjan, V; Diamond, S L

    1997-05-01

    Arterial levels of shear stress (25 dynes/cm2) can elevate constitutive endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene expression in cultured endothelial cells (Ranjan et al., 1995). By PhosphorImaging of Northern blots, we report that the eNOS/glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) messenger RNA (mRNA) ratio in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) increased by 4.8- and 7.95-fold after 6-hr shear stress exposure of 4 and 25 dynes/cm2, respectively. Incubation of BAEC with dexamethasone (1 microM) had no effect on shear stress induction of eNOS mRNA. Buffering of intracellular calcium in BAEC with bis-(o-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid, tetra(acetoxymethyl)-ester (BAPTA/AM) reduced shear stress induction of eNOS mRNA by 70%. Yet, stimulation of BAEC with ionomycin (0.1-1.0 microM) for 6-24 hr to elevate intracellular calcium had no effect on eNOS mRNA. These studies indicated that the shear stress induction of eNOS mRNA was a calcium-dependent, but not calcium-activated, process. Shear stress was a very potent and rapid inducer of the eNOS mRNA, which could not be mimicked with phorbol myristrate acetate or endotoxin. Inhibition of tyrosine kinases with genistein (10 microM) or tyrphostin B46 (10 microM) or inhibition of G-protein signaling with guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP-betaS) (600 microM, 6-hr preincubation) did not block the shear stress elevation of eNOS mRNA.

  1. Serum Calcium Response Following Oral Zinc Oxide Administrations in Dairy Cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jørgensen RJ

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Six non-pregnant cows were allocated into 3 groups. Group 1 comprised a pair of lactating cows, whereas groups 2 and 3 each comprised a pair of non-lactating cows. The cows in groups 1 and 2 were dosed intraruminally by stomach tube with zinc oxide at 120 mg Zn per kg of bodyweight at weekly intervals for a period of 33 days. Each cow received a total of 4 doses of zinc oxide. Group 3 served as non-treated control group. Blood samples were collected from all 6 cows daily. Serum was analysed for concentration of calcium. Within 12–24 h of each zinc oxide administration the serum calcium of the lactating cows dropped dramatically indicating the existence of an antagonistic effect between Zn and Ca. The first Zn induced hypocalcaemic episode in the lactating cows was followed by a rise in serum calcium to a level above the pre-dosing level and above the mean value of the control group. The depth of the hypocalcaemic response decreased with the number of zinc oxide dosings. This effect was explained as a response from the stimulation of the calcium homeostatic mechanisms. In the Zn dosed non-lactating cows responses were similar but less clear. The perspective of these findings is discussed in relation to resistance towards parturient hypocalcaemia.

  2. Concentration dependent effect of calcium on brain mitochondrial bioenergetics and oxidative stress parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jignesh D. Pandya

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction following traumatic brain and spinal cord injury (TBI and SCI plays a pivotal role in the development of secondary pathophysiology and subsequent neuronal cell death. Previously, we demonstrated a loss of mitochondrial bioenergetics in the first 24 h following TBI and SCI initiates a rapid and extensive necrotic event at the primary site of injury. Within the mitochondrial derived mechanisms, the cross talk and imbalance amongst the processes of excitotoxicity, Ca2+ cycling/overload, ATP synthesis, free radical production, and oxidative stress damage ultimately leading to mitochondrial damage followed by neuronal cell death and loss of behaviors. Mitochondria are one of the most important organelles that regulate for intracellular calcium (Ca2+ homeostasis; and are equipped with a tightly regulated Ca2+ transport system. However, owing to the lack of consensus and the link between the downstream effects of calcium in published literature, we undertook a systematic in vitro study for measuring concentration dependent effects of calcium (100-1000 nmols/mg mitochondrial protein on mitochondrial respiration, enzyme activities, reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS generation, membrane potential (∆Ψ and oxidative damage markers in isolated brain mitochondria. We observed a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of mitochondrial respiration by calcium without influencing mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC and NADH dehydrogenase (Complex I enzyme activities. We observed dose-dependent decreased production of hydrogen peroxide and total ROS/RNS species generation by calcium and no significant changes in protein and lipid oxidative damage markers. These results may shed new light on the prevailing dogma of the direct effects of calcium on mitochondrial bioenergetics, free radical production and oxidative stress parameters that are primary regulatory mitochondrial mechanisms following neuronal injury.

  3. Astaxanthin protects against oxidative stress and calcium-induced porcine lens protein degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tzu-Hua; Liao, Jiahn-Haur; Hou, Wen-Chi; Huang, Fu-Yung; Maher, Timothy J; Hu, Chao-Chien

    2006-03-22

    Astaxanthin (ASTX), a carotenoid with potent antioxidant properties, exists naturally in various plants, algae, and seafoods. In this study, we investigated the in vitro ability of ASTX to protect porcine lens crystallins from oxidative damage by iron-mediated hydroxyl radicals or by calcium ion-activated protease (calpain), in addition to the possible underlying biochemical mechanisms. ASTX (1 mM) was capable of protecting lens crystallins from being oxidized, as measured by changes in tryptophan fluorescence, in the presence of a Fenton reaction solution containing 0.2 mM Fe2+ and 2 mM H2O2. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis demonstrated that beta(high)-crystallin was the most vulnerable protein under these conditions of free radical exposure. The proteolysis of lens crystallins induced by calcium ion-activated calpain was also inhibited by ASTX (0.03-1 mM) as determined by daily measurement of the light-scattering intensity at 405 nm for five consecutive days. ASTX at 1 mM was as potent as a concentration of 0.1 mM calpain inhibitor E64 in protecting the oxidative damage/hydrolysis of porcine crystallins. At a concentration of 1 mM, ASTX provided better protection than the endogenous antioxidant glutathione in terms of suppressing calcium-induced turbidity of lens proteins. Thin-layer chromatography analysis indicated that ASTX interacted with calcium ions to form complexes, which we believe interfere with the hydrolysis of lens crystallins by calcium-activated calpain. This in vitro study shows that ASTX is capable of protecting porcine lens proteins from oxidative insults and degradation by calcium-induced calpain.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as calcium-responsive MRI contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Pengfei [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Nonferrous Metals and Specific Materials Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Guilin University of Technology, Jian Gan Road 12, Guilin 541004 (China); Shen, Zhiwei [Second Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Dong Xia North Road, Shantou 515041,China (China); Zhang, Baolin, E-mail: baolinzhang@ymail.com [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Nonferrous Metals and Specific Materials Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Guilin University of Technology, Jian Gan Road 12, Guilin 541004 (China); Wang, Jun [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Nonferrous Metals and Specific Materials Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Guilin University of Technology, Jian Gan Road 12, Guilin 541004 (China); Wu, Renhua, E-mail: rhwu@stu.edu.cn [Second Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Dong Xia North Road, Shantou 515041,China (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • SPIONs were conjugated with EGTA by EDC/sulfo-NHS method. • The presence of Ca{sup 2+} induced the aggregation of EGTA-SPIONs. • The aggregation of EGTA-SPIONs increased the T2 relaxation time. • EGTA-SPIONs can be used for the calcium imaging with MRI. - Abstract: Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as T2 contrast agents have great potential to sense calcium ion (Ca{sup 2+}) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here we prepared calcium-responsive SPIONs for MRI, formed by combining poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and polyethylenimine (PEI) coated iron oxide nanoparticle (PEI/PEG-SPIONs) contrast agents with the straightforward calcium-sensing compound EGTA (ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid). EGTA was conjugated onto PEI/PEG-SPIONs using EDC/sulfo-NHS method. EGTA-SPIONs were characterized using TEM, XPS, DSL, TGA and SQUIID. DSL results show that the SPIONs aggregate in the presence of Ca{sup 2+}. MRI analyses indicate that the water proton T2 relaxation rates in HEPES suspensions of the EGTA-SPIONs significantly increase with the calcium concentration because the SPIONs aggregate in the presence of Ca{sup 2+}. The T2 values decreased 25% when Ca{sup 2+} concentration decreased from 1.2 to 0.8 mM. The aggregation of EGTA-SPIONs could be reversed by EDTA. EGTA-SPIONs have potential as smart contrast agents for Ca{sup 2+}-sensitive MRI.

  5. Serum calcium response following oral zinc oxide administrations in dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilsing-Hansen, T; Jørgensen, R J; Thilsing, Trine

    2001-01-01

    Six non-pregnant cows were allocated into 3 groups. Group 1 comprised a pair of lactating cows, whereas groups 2 and 3 each comprised a pair of non-lactating cows. The cows in groups 1 and 2 were dosed intraruminally by stomach tube with zinc oxide at 120 mg Zn per kg of bodyweight at weekly...... intervals for a period of 33 days. Each cow received a total of 4 doses of zinc oxide. Group 3 served as non-treated control group. Blood samples were collected from all 6 cows daily. Serum was analysed for concentration of calcium. Within 12-24 h of each zinc oxide administration the serum calcium...... of the hypocalcaemic response decreased with the number of zinc oxide dosings. This effect was explained as a response from the stimulation of the calcium homeostatic mechanisms. In the Zn dosed non-lactating cows responses were similar but less clear. The perspective of these findings is discussed in relation...

  6. Nitric oxide: a downstream mediator of calcium toxicity in the ischemic cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiese, K; Wagner, J; Boccone, L

    1994-01-17

    Loss of cellular calcium homeostasis or the production of nitric oxide (NO) have been cited as possible mechanisms that may contribute to neuronal degeneration during ischemia. We therefore examined whether cellular calcium blockade, using the agent HA1077, was protective during anoxia in hippocampal neuronal cell cultures, and whether the in vitro effects of this drug were linked to the NO pathway. Administration of the agent during anoxia was neuroprotective in neuronal cell culture. In contrast, HA1077 did not protect hippocampal neurons during NO exposure. In addition, inhibition of NO synthesis in conjunction with HA1077 application during anoxia did not significantly increase survival beyond the maximum protection afforded by HA1077 alone. These results suggest that calcium may be an initial messenger in the ischemic cascade, but that subsequent neuronal degeneration is dependent upon the NO pathway.

  7. Applications of magnetochemistry to the characterization of calcium-nickel-potassium oxide catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, D.L.; Berdahl, P.H.; Perrino, C. [Lawrence Berkely Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Magnetochemical studies, using SQUID magnetometry, have been conducted on calcium-nickel-potassium oxide phases that have been shown to be active in the catalyzed gasification of carbonaceous materials. The research has focused on the chemical state of the paramagnetic nickel(II) oxide system and the paramagnetic oxygen binary compounds with potassium. Studies were performed on various samples of the quaternary metal oxide system that has been synthesized by a variety of routes, including dehydration of hydroxides, thermal decomposition of the parent metal salts (such as nitrates), and the calcining of their parent metal oxides. The magetochemistry is discussed in relationship to the different particles sizes of NiO{sub 3}, the temperature and periods of time of annealing the oxide system, and the synthetic routes used to prepare the compounds. Data are compared to those obtained for the compounds using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as calcium-responsive MRI contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pengfei; Shen, Zhiwei; Zhang, Baolin; Wang, Jun; Wu, Renhua

    2016-12-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as T2 contrast agents have great potential to sense calcium ion (Ca2+) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here we prepared calcium-responsive SPIONs for MRI, formed by combining poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and polyethylenimine (PEI) coated iron oxide nanoparticle (PEI/PEG-SPIONs) contrast agents with the straightforward calcium-sensing compound EGTA (ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid). EGTA was conjugated onto PEI/PEG-SPIONs using EDC/sulfo-NHS method. EGTA-SPIONs were characterized using TEM, XPS, DSL, TGA and SQUIID. DSL results show that the SPIONs aggregate in the presence of Ca2+. MRI analyses indicate that the water proton T2 relaxation rates in HEPES suspensions of the EGTA-SPIONs significantly increase with the calcium concentration because the SPIONs aggregate in the presence of Ca2+. The T2 values decreased 25% when Ca2+ concentration decreased from 1.2 to 0.8 mM. The aggregation of EGTA-SPIONs could be reversed by EDTA. EGTA-SPIONs have potential as smart contrast agents for Ca2+-sensitive MRI.

  9. Calcium signaling alterations, oxidative stress, and autophagy in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ureshino, Rodrigo Portes; Rocha, Katiucha Karolina; Lopes, Guiomar Silva; Bincoletto, Cláudia; Smaili, Soraya Soubhi

    2014-07-01

    Aging is a multi-factorial process that may be associated with several functional and structural deficits which can evolve into degenerative diseases. In this review, we present data that may depict an expanded view of molecular aging theories, beginning with the idea that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are the major effectors in this process. In addition, we have correlated the importance of autophagy as a neuroprotective mechanism and discussed a link between age-related molecules, Ca(2+) signaling, and oxidative stress. There is evidence suggesting that alterations in Ca(2+) homeostasis, including mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload and alterations in electron transport chain (ETC) complexes, which increase cell vulnerability, are linked to oxidative stress in aging. As much as Ca(2+) signaling is altered in aged cells, excess ROS can be produced due to an ineffective coupling of mitochondrial respiration. Damaged mitochondria might not be removed by the macroautophagic system, which is hampered in aging by lipofuscin accumulation, boosting ROS generation, damaging DNA, and, ultimately, leading to apoptosis. This process can lead to altered protein expression (such as p53, Sirt1, and IGF-1) and progress to cell death. This cycle can lead to increased cell vulnerability in aging and contribute to an increased susceptibility to degenerative processes. A better understanding of Ca(2+) signaling and molecular aging alterations is important for preventing apoptosis in age-related diseases. In addition, caloric restriction, resveratrol and autophagy modulation appear to be predominantly cytoprotective, and further studies of this process are promising in age-related disease therapeutics.

  10. Effect of oral drenching with zinc oxide or synthetic zeolite A on total blood calcium in dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, R J; Hansen, T; Jensen, M L

    2001-01-01

    values. Oral drenching with a single dose of zinc oxide of 100 mg/kg of body weight as well as with zeolite in doses of 500 g of zeolite/cow twice a day for 2.5 d was reflected in serum calcium levels. In the group given zeolite A, there was a depression in evening values of total serum calcium although...

  11. Analysis of the color alteration and radiopacity promoted by bismuth oxide in calcium silicate cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Angelica Marciano

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine if the increase in radiopacity provided by bismuth oxide is related to the color alteration of calcium silicate-based cement. Calcium silicate cement (CSC was mixed with 0%, 15%, 20%, 30% and 50% of bismuth oxide (BO, determined by weight. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA was the control group. The radiopacity test was performed according to ISO 6876/2001. The color was evaluated using the CIE system. The assessments were performed after 24 hours, 7 and 30 days of setting time, using a spectrophotometer to obtain the ΔE, Δa, Δb and ΔL values. The statistical analyses were performed using the Kruskal-Wallis/Dunn and ANOVA/Tukey tests (p 3 mm equivalent of Al. The MTA group was statistically similar to the CSC / 30% BO group (p > 0.05. In regard to color, the increase of bismuth oxide resulted in a decrease in the ΔE value of the calcium silicate cement. The CSC group presented statistically higher ΔE values than the CSC / 50% BO group (p < 0.05. The comparison between 24 hours and 7 days showed higher ΔE for the MTA group, with statistical differences for the CSC / 15% BO and CSC / 50% BO groups (p < 0.05. After 30 days, CSC showed statistically higher ΔE values than CSC / 30% BO and CSC / 50% BO (p < 0.05. In conclusion, the increase in radiopacity provided by bismuth oxide has no relation to the color alteration of calcium silicate-based cements.

  12. Effect of calcium oxide on the efficiency of ferrous ion oxidation and total iron precipitation during ferrous ion oxidation in simulated acid mine drainage treatment with inoculation of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fenwu; Zhou, Jun; Jin, Tongjun; Zhang, Shasha; Liu, Lanlan

    2016-01-01

    Calcium oxide was added into ferrous ion oxidation system in the presence of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans at concentrations of 0-4.00 g/L. The pH, ferrous ion oxidation efficiency, total iron precipitation efficiency, and phase of the solid minerals harvested from different treatments were investigated during the ferrous ion oxidation process. In control check (CK) system, pH of the solution decreased from 2.81 to 2.25 when ferrous ions achieved complete oxidation after 72 h of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans incubation without the addition of calcium oxide, and total iron precipitation efficiency reached 20.2%. Efficiency of ferrous ion oxidation and total iron precipitation was significantly improved when the amount of calcium oxide added was ≤1.33 g/L, and the minerals harvested from systems were mainly a mixture of jarosite and schwertmannite. For example, the ferrous ion oxidation efficiency reached 100% at 60 h and total iron precipitation efficiency was increased to 32.1% at 72 h when 1.33 g/L of calcium oxide was added. However, ferrous ion oxidation and total iron precipitation for jarosite and schwertmannite formation were inhibited if the amount of calcium oxide added was above 2.67 g/L, and large amounts of calcium sulfate dihydrate were generated in systems.

  13. Highly Stable Aqueous Zinc-ion Storage Using Layered Calcium Vanadium Oxide Bronze Cathode

    KAUST Repository

    Xia, Chuan

    2018-02-12

    Cost-effective aqueous rechargeable batteries are attractive alternatives to non-aqueous cells for stationary grid energy storage. Among different aqueous cells, zinc-ion batteries (ZIBs), based on Zn2+ intercalation chemistry, stand out as they can employ high-capacity Zn metal as anode material. Herein, we report a layered calcium vanadium oxide bronze as cathode material for aqueous Zn batteries. For the storage of Zn2+ ions in aqueous electrolyte, we demonstrate that calcium based bronze structure can deliver a high capacity of 340 mAh g-1 at 0.2 C, good rate capability and very long cycling life (96% retention after 3000 cycles at 80 C). Further, we investigate the Zn2+ storage mechanism, and the corresponding electrochemical kinetics in this bronze cathode. Finally, we show that our Zn cell delivers an energy density of 267 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 53.4 W kg-1.

  14. Photo-oxidation of PAHs with calcium peroxide as a source of the hydroxyl radicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozak Jolanta

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of the removal of selected PAHs from the pretreated coking wastewater with usage of CaO2, Fenton reagent (FeSO4 and UV rays are presented in this article. The investigations were carried out using coking wastewater originating from biological, industrial wastewater treatment plant. At the beginning of the experiment, the calcium peroxide (CaO2 powder as a source of hydroxyl radicals (OH• and Fenton reagent were added to the samples of wastewater. Then, the samples were exposed to UV rays for 360 s. The process was carried out at pH 3.5-3.8. After photo-oxidation process a decrease in the PAHs concentration was observed. The removal efficiency of selected hydrocarbons was in the ranged of 89-98%. The effectiveness of PAHs degradation was directly proportional to the calcium peroxide dose.

  15. Decomposition pathways of polytetrafluoroethylene by co-grinding with strontium/calcium oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Jun; He, Xiaoman; Zhang, Qiwu; Liu, Xinzhong; Saito, Fumio

    2017-06-01

    Waste polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) could be easily decomposed by co-grinding with inorganic additive such as strontium oxide (SrO), strontium peroxide (SrO 2 ) and calcium oxide (CaO) by using a planetary ball mill, in which the fluorine was transformed into nontoxic inorganic fluoride salts such as strontium fluoride (SrF 2 ) or calcium fluoride (CaF 2 ). Depending on the kind of additive as well as the added molar ratio, however, the reaction mechanism of the decomposition was found to change, with different compositions of carbon compounds formed. CO gas, the mixture of strontium carbonate (SrCO 3 ) and carbon, only SrCO 3 were obtained as reaction products respectively with equimolar SrO, excess SrO and excess SrO 2 to the monomer unit CF 2 of PTFE were used. Excess amount of CaO was needed to effectively decompose PTFE because of its lower reactivity compared with strontium oxide, but it promised practical applications due to its low cost.

  16. QSAR analysis for nano-sized layered manganese-calcium oxide in water oxidation: An application of chemometric methods in artificial photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazy, Mohammad; Kompany-Zareh, Mohsen; Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi

    2015-11-01

    Water oxidation is among the most important reactions in artificial photosynthesis, and nano-sized layered manganese-calcium oxides are efficient catalysts toward this reaction. Herein, a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model was constructed to predict the catalytic activities of twenty manganese-calcium oxides toward water oxidation using multiple linear regression (MLR) and genetic algorithm (GA) for multivariate calibration and feature selection, respectively. Although there are eight controlled parameters during synthesizing of the desired catalysts including ripening time, temperature, manganese content, calcium content, potassium content, the ratio of calcium:manganese, the average manganese oxidation state and the surface of catalyst, by using GA only three of them (potassium content, the ratio of calcium:manganese and the average manganese oxidation state) were selected as the most effective parameters on catalytic activities of these compounds. The model's accuracy criteria such as R(2)test and Q(2)test in order to predict catalytic rate for external test set experiments; were equal to 0.941 and 0.906, respectively. Therefore, model reveals acceptable capability to anticipate the catalytic activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Absorption of calcium ions on oxidized graphene sheets and study its dynamic behavior by kinetic and isothermal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Fathy

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sorption of calcium ion from the hard underground water using novel oxidized graphene (GO sheets was studied in this paper. Physicochemical properties and microstructure of graphene sheets were investigated using Raman spectrometer, thermogravimetry analyzer, transmission electron microscope, scanning electron microscope. The kinetics adsorption of calcium on graphene oxide sheets was examined using Lagergren first and second orders. The results show that the Lagergren second-order was the best-fit model that suggests the conception process of calcium ion adsorption on the Go sheets. For isothermal studies, the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were used at temperatures ranging between 283 and 313 K. Thermodynamic parameters resolved at 283, 298 and 313 K indicating that the GO adsorption was exothermic spontaneous process. Finally, the graphene sheets show high partiality toward calcium particles and it will be useful in softening and treatment of hard water.

  18. Reactions of calcium orthosilicate and barium zirconate with oxides and sulfates of various elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaplatynsky, I.

    1979-01-01

    Calcium orthosilicate and barium zirconate were evaluated as the insulation layer of thermal barrier coatings for air cooled gas turbine components. Their reactions with various oxides and sulfates were studied at 1100 C and 1300 C for times ranging up to 400 and 200 hours, respectively. These oxides and sulfates represent potential impurities or additives in gas turbine fuels and in turbine combustion air, as well as elements of potential bond coat alloys. The phase compositions of the reaction products were determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. BaZrO3 and 2CaO-SiO2 both reacted with P2O5, V2O5, Cr2O3, Al2O3, and SiO2. In addition, 2CaO-SiO2 reacted with Na2O, BaO, MgO, and CoO and BaZrO3 reacted with Fe2O3.

  19. XPS and GDOES Characterization of Porous Coating Enriched with Copper and Calcium Obtained on Tantalum via Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Rokosz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available XPS and GDOES characterizations of porous coatings on tantalum after Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO at 450 V for 3 minutes in electrolyte containing concentrated (85% phosphoric acid with calcium nitrate and copper (II nitrate are described. Based on the obtained data, it may be concluded that the PEO coating consists of tantalum (Ta5+, calcium (Ca2+, copper (Cu2+  and Cu+, and phosphates (PO43-. It has to be pointed out that copper and calcium are distributed throughout the volume. The authors also propose a new model of PEO, based on the derivative of GDOES signals with sputtering time.

  20. Catalytic activity of calcium-based mixed metal oxides nanocatalysts in transesterification reaction of palm oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Noraakinah; Ismail, Kamariah Noor; Hamid, Ku Halim Ku; Hadi, Abdul

    2017-12-01

    Nowadays, biodiesel has become the forefront development as an alternative diesel fuel derived from biological sources such as oils of plant and fats. Presently, the conventional transesterification of vegetable oil to biodiesel gives rise to some technological problem. In this sense, heterogeneous nanocatalysts of calcium-based mixed metal oxides were synthesized through sol-gel method. It was found that significant increase of biodiesel yield, 91.75 % was obtained catalyzed by CaO-NbO2 from palm oil compared to pure CaO of 53.99 % under transesterification conditions (methanol/oil ratio 10:1, reaction time 3 h, catalyst concentration 4 wt%, reaction temperature 60 °C, and mixing speed of 600 rpm). The phase structure and crystallinity as well as the texture properties of the prepared catalysts were characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and the textural properties were characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption analysis. Sol-gel method has been known as versatile method in controlling the structural and chemical properties of the catalyst. Calcium-based mixed oxide synthesized from sol-gel method was found to exist as smaller crystallite size with high surface area.

  1. The β1 Subunit Enhances Oxidative Regulation of Large-Conductance Calcium-activated K+ Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarelli, Lindsey Ciali; Chen, Jianguo; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2004-01-01

    Oxidative stress may alter the functions of many proteins including the Slo1 large conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (BKCa). Previous results demonstrated that in the virtual absence of Ca2+, the oxidant chloramine-T (Ch-T), without the involvement of cysteine oxidation, increases the open probability and slows the deactivation of BKCa channels formed by human Slo1 (hSlo1) α subunits alone. Because native BKCa channel complexes may include the auxiliary subunit β1, we investigated whether β1 influences the oxidative regulation of hSlo1. Oxidation by Ch-T with β1 present shifted the half-activation voltage much further in the hyperpolarizing direction (−75 mV) as compared with that with α alone (−30 mV). This shift was eliminated in the presence of high [Ca2+]i, but the increase in open probability in the virtual absence of Ca2+ remained significant at physiologically relevant voltages. Furthermore, the slowing of channel deactivation after oxidation was even more dramatic in the presence of β1. Oxidation of cysteine and methionine residues within β1 was not involved in these potentiated effects because expression of mutant β1 subunits lacking cysteine or methionine residues produced results similar to those with wild-type β1. Unlike the results with α alone, oxidation by Ch-T caused a significant acceleration of channel activation only when β1 was present. The β1 M177 mutation disrupted normal channel activation and prevented the Ch-T–induced acceleration of activation. Overall, the functional effects of oxidation of the hSlo1 pore-forming α subunit are greatly amplified by the presence of β1, which leads to the additional increase in channel open probability and the slowing of deactivation. Furthermore, M177 within β1 is a critical structural determinant of channel activation and oxidative sensitivity. Together, the oxidized BKCa channel complex with β1 has a considerable chance of being open within the physiological voltage

  2. Biogeochemical oxidation of calcium sulfite hemihydrate to gypsum in flue gas desulfurization byproduct using sulfur-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Duane; Smith, Jacques J; Chen, Linxi; Kreinberg, Allison; Wallace, Brianna; White, Robby

    2017-10-01

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is a well-established air treatment technology for coal and oil combustion gases that commonly uses lime or pulverized limestone aqueous slurries to precipitate sulfur dioxide (SO2) as crystalline calcium salts. Under forced oxidation (excess oxygen) conditions, FGD byproduct contains almost entirely (>92%) gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O), a useful and marketable commodity. In contrast, FGD byproduct formed in oxygen deficient oxidation systems contains a high percentage of hannebachite (CaSO3·0.5H2O) to yield a material with no commercial value, poor dewatering characteristics, and that is typically disposed in landfills. Hannebachite in FGD byproduct can be chemically converted to gypsum; however, the conditions that support rapid formation of gypsum require large quantities of acids or oxidizers. This work describes a novel, patent pending application of microbial physiology where a natural consortium of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) was used to convert hannebachite-enriched FGD byproduct into a commercially valuable, gypsum-enriched product (US Patent Assignment 503373611). To optimize the conversion of hannebachite into gypsum, physiological studies on the SOB were performed to define their growth characteristics. The SOB were found to be aerobic, mesophilic, neutrophilic, and dependent on a ready supply of ammonia. They were capable of converting hannebachite to gypsum at a rate of approximately five percent per day when the culture was applied to a 20 percent FGD byproduct slurry and SOB growth medium. 16S rDNA sequencing revealed that the SOB consortium contained a variety of different bacterial genera including both SOB and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Halothiobacillus, Thiovirga and Thiomonas were the dominant sulfur-oxidizing genera. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. White light emission of dysprosium doped lanthanum calcium phosphate oxide and oxyfluoride glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luewarasirikul, N.; Kim, H. J.; Meejitpaisan, P.; Kaewkhao, J.

    2017-04-01

    Lanthanum calcium phosphate oxide and oxyfluoride glasses doped with dysprosium oxide were prepared by melt-quenching technique with chemical composition 20La2O3:10CaO:69P2O5:1Dy2O3 and 20La2O3:10CaF2:69P2O5:1Dy2O3. The physical, optical and luminescence properties of the glass samples were studied to evaluate their potential to using as luminescence materials for solid-state lighting applications. The density, molar volume and refractive index of the glass samples were carried out. The optical and luminescence properties were studied by investigating absorption, excitation, and emission spectra of the glass samples. The absorption spectra were investigated in the UV-Vis-NIR region from 300 to 2000 nm. The excitation spectra observed under 574 nm emission wavelength showed the highest peak centered at 349 nm (6H15/2 → 6P7/2). The emission spectra, excited with 349 nm excitation wavelength showed two major peaks corresponding to 482 nm blue emission (4F9/2 → 6H15/2) and 574 nm yellow emission (4F9/2 → 6H13/2). The experimental lifetime were found to be 0.539 and 0.540 for oxide and oxyfluoride glass sample, respectively. The x,y color coordinates under 349 nm excitation wavelength were (0.38, 0.43) for both glass samples, that be plotted in white region of CIE 1931 chromaticity diagram. The CCT values obtained from the glass samples are 4204 K for oxide glass and 4228 K for oxyfluoride glass corresponding to the commercial cool white light (3100-4500 K). Judd-Ofelt theory had also been employed to obtain the J-O parameters (Ω2, Ω4 and Ω6), oscillator strength, radiative transition possibility, stimulated emission cross section and branching ratio. The Ω2 > Ω4 > Ω6 trend of J-O parameters of both glass samples may indicate the good quality of a glass host for using as optical device application. Temperature dependence of emission spectra was studied from 300 K to 10 K and found that the intensity of the emission peak was found to be increased with

  4. Lithocholic acid: a new emergent protector of intestinal calcium absorption under oxidant conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchionatti, Ana M; Pérez, Adriana; Rivoira, María A; Rodríguez, Valeria A; Tolosa de Talamoni, Nori G

    2017-04-01

    LCA and 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 are vitamin D receptor ligands with different binding affinity. The secosteroid stimulates intestinal Ca 2+ absorption. Whether LCA alters this process remains unknown. The aim of our work was to determine the effect of LCA on intestinal Ca 2+ absorption in the absence or presence of NaDOC, bile acid that inhibits the cation transport. The data show that LCA by itself did not alter intestinal Ca 2+ absorption, but prevented the inhibitory effect of NaDOC. The concomitant administration of LCA avoided the reduction of intestinal alkaline phosphatase activity caused by NaDOC. In addition, LCA blocked a decrease caused by NaDOC on gene and protein expression of molecules involved in the transcellular pathway of intestinal Ca 2+ absorption. The oxidative stress and apoptosis triggered by NaDOC were abrogated by LCA co-treatment. In conclusion, LCA placed in the intestinal lumen protects intestinal Ca 2+ absorption against the inhibitory effects caused by NaDOC. LCA avoids the reduction of the transcellular Ca 2+ movement, apparently by blocking the oxidative stress and apoptosis triggered by NaDOC, normalizing the gene and protein expression of molecules involved in Ca 2+ movement. Therefore, LCA might become a possible treatment to improve intestinal calcium absorption under oxidant conditions.

  5. Magnesium supplementation through seaweed calcium extract rather than synthetic magnesium oxide improves femur bone mineral density and strength in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Yun Jung; Bu, So Young; Kim, Jae Young; Yeon, Jee-Young; Sohn, Eun-Wha; Jang, Ki-Hyo; Lee, Jae-Cheol; Kim, Mi-Hyun

    2011-12-01

    Commercially available seaweed calcium extract can supply high amounts of calcium as well as significant amounts of magnesium and other microminerals. The purpose of this study was to investigate the degree to which the high levels of magnesium in seaweed calcium extract affects the calcium balance and the bone status in ovariectomized rats in comparison to rats supplemented with calcium carbonate and magnesium oxide. A total of 40 Sprague-Dawley female rats (7 weeks) were divided into four groups and bred for 12 weeks: sham-operated group (Sham), ovariectomized group (OVX), ovariectomized with inorganic calcium and magnesium supplementation group (OVX-Mg), and ovariectomized with seaweed calcium and magnesium supplementation group (OVX-SCa). All experimental diets contained 0.5% calcium. The magnesium content in the experimental diet was 0.05% of the diet in the Sham and OVX groups and 0.1% of the diet in the OVX-Mg and OVX-SCa groups. In the calcium balance study, the OVX-Mg and OVX-SCa groups were not significantly different in calcium absorption compared to the OVX group. However, the femoral bone mineral density and strength of the OVX-SCa group were higher than those of the OVX-Mg and OVX groups. Seaweed calcium with magnesium supplementation or magnesium supplementation alone did not affect the serum ALP and CTx levels in ovariectomized rats. In summary, consumption of seaweed calcium extract or inorganic calcium carbonate with magnesium oxide demonstrated the same degree of intestinal calcium absorption, but only the consumption of seaweed calcium extract resulted in increased femoral bone mineral density and strength in ovariectomized rats. Our results suggest that seaweed calcium extract is an effective calcium and magnesium source for improving bone health compared to synthetic calcium and magnesium supplementation.

  6. Functionalization of Calcium Sulfate/Bioglass Scaffolds with Zinc Oxide Whisker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Cijun; Zhou, Jianhua; Gao, Dan; Gao, Chengde; Feng, Pei; Peng, Shuping

    2016-03-18

    There are urgent demands for satisfactory antibacterial activity and mechanical properties of bone scaffolds. In this study, zinc oxide whisker (ZnOw) was introduced into calcium sulfate/bioglass scaffolds. Antimicrobial behavior was analyzed using Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The results showed that the scaffolds presented a strong antibacterial activity after introducing ZnOw, due to the antibacterial factors released from the degradation of ZnO. Moreover, ZnOw was also found to have a distinct reinforcing effect on mechanical properties. This was ascribed to whisker pull-out, crack bridging, crack deflection, crack branching and other toughening mechanisms. In addition, the cell culture experiments showed that the scaffolds with ZnOw had a good biocompatibility.

  7. Functionalization of Calcium Sulfate/Bioglass Scaffolds with Zinc Oxide Whisker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cijun Shuai

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There are urgent demands for satisfactory antibacterial activity and mechanical properties of bone scaffolds. In this study, zinc oxide whisker (ZnOw was introduced into calcium sulfate/bioglass scaffolds. Antimicrobial behavior was analyzed using Escherichia coli (E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus. The results showed that the scaffolds presented a strong antibacterial activity after introducing ZnOw, due to the antibacterial factors released from the degradation of ZnO. Moreover, ZnOw was also found to have a distinct reinforcing effect on mechanical properties. This was ascribed to whisker pull-out, crack bridging, crack deflection, crack branching and other toughening mechanisms. In addition, the cell culture experiments showed that the scaffolds with ZnOw had a good biocompatibility.

  8. INGESTIVE BEHAVIOR IN HEIFERS FED DIETS CONTAINING SUGARCANE TREATED OR NOT WITH CALCIUM OXIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Giovani Pancoti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to evaluate the ingestive behavior of 18 Holstein-Zebu heifers with average initial live weight of 250 kg, confined in Tie Stall system with individual feeders and drinkers, divided in blocks, fed with sugarcane treated or not with 1% in natural matter of calcium oxide (CaO after 24 hours of hydrolysis, at different times of administration of the mixture of urea and ammonium sulfate (zero and 24 hours. The animals were observed every ten minutes during 24 hours to determine the time (minutes spent on feeding, water drinking, ruminating and idle. Differences between means were evaluated by SNK test at 5% significance. There was increased (P

  9. Effect of calcium on adsorptive removal of As(III) and As(V) by iron oxide-based adsorbents

    KAUST Repository

    Uwamariya, V.

    2014-06-25

    The effects of calcium on the equilibrium adsorption capacity of As(III) and As(V) onto iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS) and granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) were investigated through batch experiments, rapid small-scale column tests (RSSCT) and kinetics modelling. Batch experiments showed that at calcium concentrations≤20 mg/L, high As(III) and As(V) removal efficiencies by IOCS and GFH are achieved at pH 6. An increase of the calcium concentration to 40 and 80 mg/L reversed this trend, giving higher removal efficiencies at higher pH (8). The adsorption capacities of IOCS and GFH at an equilibrium arsenic concentration of 10 g/L were found to be between 2.0 and 3.1 mg/g for synthetic water without calcium and between 2.8 and 5.3 mg/g when 80 mg/L of calcium was present at the studied pH values. After 10 hours of filter run in RSSCT, approximately 1000 empty bed volumes, the ratios of C/Co for As(V) were 26% and 18% for calcium-free model water; and only 1% and 0.2% after addition of 80 mg/L of Ca for filter columns with IOCS and GFH, respectively. The adsorption of As(III) and As(V) onto GFH follows a second-order reaction, with and without addition of calcium. The adsorption of As(III) and As(V) onto IOCS follows a first-order reaction without calcium addition, and moves to the second-reaction-order kinetics when calcium is added. Based on the intraparticle diffusion model, the main controlling mechanism for As(III) adsorption is intraparticle diffusion, while surface diffusion contributes greatly to the adsorption of As(V).

  10. Oxidative Stress Tolerance by Calcium and Histidine in Two Tomato Cultivars Under Nickel Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozafari H.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigated calcium (Ca and L-histidine (His interaction on nickel (Ni-induced oxidative stress tolerance in two tomato (Solanum lycopersicum Mill. cultivars including Cal-J N3 and Petoearly CH. CaCl2 (0 and 300 µM and L-histidine (0 and 300 µM effects on the oxidative responses in these cultivars cultured were compared in the hydroponic media under Ni stress (NiSO4; 0,150 and 300 µM. The activities of antioxidative enzymes including catalase (CAT, guaiacol peroxidase (GPX, ascorbate peroxidase (APX, superoxide dismutase (SOD and total content of proteins, malondialdehyde (MDA, other aldehydes, H2O2, Ca2+, Ni2+, ascorbate (ASC, dehydroascorbate (DHA and electrolytes leakage (EL were determined. The obtained results indicated that the application of Ca and His generally reduced oxidative markers such as the contents of EL, H2O2, MDA and activity of CAT as well as the Ni2+content of root and shoot organs under nickel toxicity, while application of Ni treatment without Ca+His increased these oxidative parameters and accumulation of Ni2+, compared to the control. Applying Ni without Ca and His has resulted in reduction of GPX, APX and SOD activities as well as concentrations of root and shoot Ca2+and ASC in the two mentioned cultivars. Application of Ca and His lead to the elevated contents of Ca2+ and ASC, increased activities of GPX, APX and SOD as well as inhibition of Ni2+ accumulation differently in both cultivars. Ca and His also alleviated the adverse effects of Ni stress on the selected investigated parameters especially in Petoearly CH cultivar. Thus, interaction of Ca and His appeared to improve adaptive responses to Ni stress leading to decreasing Ni-induced oxidative stress in the tomato plants. Therefore, our results suggest that Ca+His alleviated nickel-induced oxidative stress by uptake and inhibition of translocation of Ni2+ plus Ni chelating mechanism improvement in the tomato cultivars.

  11. Nitric oxide regulates neuronal activity via calcium-activated potassium channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Ray Zhong

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is an unconventional membrane-permeable messenger molecule that has been shown to play various roles in the nervous system. How NO modulates ion channels to affect neuronal functions is not well understood. In gastropods, NO has been implicated in regulating the feeding motor program. The buccal motoneuron, B19, of the freshwater pond snail Helisoma trivolvis is active during the hyper-retraction phase of the feeding motor program and is located in the vicinity of NO-producing neurons in the buccal ganglion. Here, we asked whether B19 neurons might serve as direct targets of NO signaling. Previous work established NO as a key regulator of growth cone motility and neuronal excitability in another buccal neuron involved in feeding, the B5 neuron. This raised the question whether NO might modulate the electrical activity and neuronal excitability of B19 neurons as well, and if so whether NO acted on the same or a different set of ion channels in both neurons. To study specific responses of NO on B19 neurons and to eliminate indirect effects contributed by other cells, the majority of experiments were performed on single cultured B19 neurons. Addition of NO donors caused a prolonged depolarization of the membrane potential and an increase in neuronal excitability. The effects of NO could mainly be attributed to the inhibition of two types of calcium-activated potassium channels, apamin-sensitive and iberiotoxin-sensitive potassium channels. NO was found to also cause a depolarization in B19 neurons in situ, but only after NO synthase activity in buccal ganglia had been blocked. The results suggest that NO acts as a critical modulator of neuronal excitability in B19 neurons, and that calcium-activated potassium channels may serve as a common target of NO in neurons.

  12. Improved sugar cane juice clarification by understanding calcium oxide-phosphate-sucrose systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, William O S

    2011-03-09

    It is accepted that the efficiency of sugar cane clarification is closely linked with sugar juice composition (including suspended or insoluble impurities), the inorganic phosphate content, the liming condition and type, and the interactions between the juice components. These interactions are not well understood, particularly those between calcium, phosphate, and sucrose in sugar cane juice. Studies have been conducted on calcium oxide (CaO)/phosphate/sucrose systems in both synthetic and factory juices to provide further information on the defecation process (i.e., simple liming to effect impurity removal) and to identify an effective clarification process that would result in reduced scaling of sugar factory evaporators, pans, and centrifugals. Results have shown that a two-stage process involving the addition of lime saccharate to a set juice pH followed by the addition of sodium hydroxide to a final juice pH or a similar two-stage process where the order of addition of the alkalis is reversed prior to clarification reduces the impurity loading of the clarified juice compared to that of the clarified juice obtained by the conventional defecation process. The treatment process showed reductions in CaO (27% to 50%) and MgO (up to 20%) in clarified juices with no apparent loss in juice clarity or increase in residence time of the mud particles compared to those in the conventional process. There was also a reduction in the SiO2 content. However, the disadvantage of this process is the significant increase in the Na2O content.

  13. Survival of pathogenic enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) and control with calcium oxide in frozen meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Eun Young; Ko, Young Mi; Yoon, Ki Sun

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated both the level of microbial contamination and the presence of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) in frozen meat products, followed by the evaluation of its survival over 180 days under frozen temperature. We also examined the effect of calcium oxide on the populations of EHEC, E. coli O157:H7 and EPEC under both 10 °C and -18 °C storage conditions. Afterward, the morphological changes occurring in EHEC cells in response to freezer storage temperature and calcium oxide (CaO) treatments were examined using transmission electron microscopy. Among the frozen meat products tested, the highest contamination levels of total aerobic counts, coliforms and E. coli were observed in pork cutlets. Examination showed that 20% of the frozen meat products contained virulence genes, including verotoxin (VT) 1 and 2. Over 180 days of frozen storage and after 3 freeze-thaw cycles, the population of EHEC did not change regardless of the type of products or initial inoculated concentration, indicating the strong survival ability of EHEC. Subsequent testing revealed that the growth of three pathogenic E. coli strains was completely inhibited in meat patties prepared with 1% CaO, stored at 10 °C. However, the addition of 2% CaO was necessary to control the survival of EHEC, E. coli O157:H7 and EPEC in meat patties stored at -18 °C. CaO reduced the population of E. coli O157:H7 more effectively than the other EHEC and EPEC strains at both 10 °C and -18 °C. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that exposed EHEC cells were resistant to the freezer storage temperature, although some cells incurred injury and death after several freeze-thaw cycles. Most of the cells exposed to CaO were found to have died or lost their cellular integrity and membranes, indicating that CaO has the potential to be used as a powerful antimicrobial agent for manufacturing frozen meat products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization and Utilization of Calcium Oxide (CaO Thermally Decomposed from Fish Bones as a Catalyst in the Production of Biodiesel from Waste Cooking Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldes Lesbani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Thermal decomposition of fish bones to obtain calcium oxide (CaO was conducted at various temperatures of 400, 500, 800, 900, 1000, and 1100 °C. The calcium oxide was then characterized using X-ray diffractometer, FTIR spectrophotometer, and SEM analysis. The calcium oxide obtained from the decomposition at 1000 °C was then used as a catalyst in the production of biodiesel from waste cooking oil. Diffraction pattern of the calcium oxide produced from decomposition at 1000 °C showed a pattern similar to that of the calcium oxide produced by the Joint Committee on Powder Diffraction Standard (JCDPS. The diffractions of 2θvalues at 1000 °C were 32.2, 37.3, 53.8, 64.1, and67.3 deg. The FTIR spectrum of calcium oxide decomposed at 1000 °C has a specific vibration at wave-length 362 cm-1, which is similar to the specific vibration of Ca-O. SEM analysis of the calcium oxide indicated that the calcium oxide’s morphology shows a smaller size and a more homogeneous structure, compared to those of fish bones. Theuse of calcium oxide as a catalyst in the production of biodiesel from waste cooking oil resulted in iod number of 15.23 g/100 g KOH, density of 0.88 g/cm3, viscosity of 6.00 cSt, and fatty acid value of 0.56 mg/KOH. These characteristic values meet the National Standard of Indonesia (SNI for biodiesel.

  15. Antibacterial properties of Ag (or Pt)-containing calcium phosphate coatings formed by micro-arc oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Won-Hoon; Ryu, Hyun Sam; Hong, Seong-Hyeon

    2009-01-01

    Silver (or platinum)-containing calcium phosphate (hydroxyapatite (HA) and tricalcium phosphate (alpha-TCP)) coatings on titanium substrates were formed by micro-arc oxidation (MAO) and their in vitro antibacterial activity and in vitro cytotoxicity were evaluated. MAO was performed in an electrolytic solution containing beta-glycerophosphate disodium salt pentahydrate (beta-GP) and calcium acetate monohydrate (CA), and Ag and Pt were introduced in the form of AgNO(3) (or CH(3)COOAg) and H(2)PtCl(6), respectively. The MG63 and human osteosarcoma (HOS) cell lines were used to investigate the proliferation and differentiation behavior of the cells, respectively, whereas two strains of bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, were used to evaluate the antibacterial activity of the coatings. The phase, morphology, and Ag content of the coatings were strongly dependent on the applied voltage and Ag precursor concentration. HA and alpha-TCP phases were detected in the coatings oxidized above 400 V and the presence of Ag was confirmed by EDS. While the coatings with a high content of Ag were cytotoxic and those obtained in the Pt-containing electrolyte had no apparent antibacterial activity, the calcium phosphate coatings obtained in the low Ag concentration electrolyte exhibited in vitro antibacterial activity but no cytotoxicity. Thus, biocompatible calcium phosphate coatings on Ti implants with antibacterial activity can be achieved by one-step MAO. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Exogenous application of calcium and silica alleviates cadmium toxicity by suppressing oxidative damage in rice seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Rajneesh Kumar; Pandey, Poonam; Rajpoot, Ritika; Rani, Anjana; Gautam, Arti; Dubey, R S

    2015-07-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine the possible roles of calcium (Ca(2+)) and silica (Si) in protection against oxidative damage due to Cd(2+) toxicity in rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings grown in hydroponics. Rice seedlings raised for 12 days in hydroponics containing Cd(NO3)2 (75 μM) showed reduced growth; increase in the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) (O2 (·-) and H2O2), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARSs) and protein carbonylation; and increase in the activity of antioxidant enzymes-superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) compared to untreated controls. Exogenously added Ca(2+) (2 mM) and Si (200 μM) significantly alleviated negative effect of Cd(2+) by restoration of growth of the seedlings, suppression of Cd(2+) uptake and restoration of root plasma membrane integrity. The levels of O2 (·-), H2O2, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyls were much lower when Ca(2+) and Si were added in the growth medium along with Cd(2+) as compared to Cd-alone-treated seedlings. Ca(2+) and Si lowered Cd-induced increase in SOD, GPX and APX activities while they elevated Cd-induced decline in CAT activity. Using histochemical staining of O2 (·-) and H2O2 in leaf tissues, it was further confirmed that added Ca(2+) and Si suppressed Cd-induced accumulation of O2 (·-) and H2O2 in the leaves. The results suggest that exogenous application of Ca(2+) and Si appears to be advantageous for rice plants in alleviating Cd(2+) toxicity effects by reducing Cd(2+) uptake, decreasing ROS production and suppressing oxidative damage. The observations indicate that Ca(2+) and Si treatments can help in reducing Cd(2+) toxicity in rice plants.

  17. Calcium- and Cobalt-doped Yttrium Chromites as an Interconnect Material for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Kyung J.; Cramer, Carolyn N.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Coyle, Christopher A.; Coffey, Greg W.; Marina, Olga A.

    2010-04-23

    The structural, thermal and electrical characteristics of calcium- and cobalt-doped yttrium chromites were studied for a potential use as the interconnect material in high temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) as well as other high temperature electrochemical and thermoelectric devices. The Y0.8Ca0.2Cr1-xCoxO3±δ (x=0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3) compositions had single phase orthorhombic perovskite structures in the wide range of oxygen pressures. Sintering behavior was remarkably enhanced upon cobalt doping and densities 95% and 97% of theoretical density were obtained after sintering at 1300oC in air, when x was 0.2 and 0.3, respectively. The electrical conductivity in both oxidizing and reducing atmospheres was significantly improved with cobalt content, and values of 49 and 10 S/cm at 850oC and 55 and 14 S/cm at 950oC in air and forming gas, respectively, were reported for x=0.2. The conductivity increase was attributed to the charge carrier density increase upon cobalt substitution for chromium confirmed with Seebeck measurements. The thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) was increased with cobalt content and closely matched to that of an 8 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte for 0.1 ≤ x ≤ 0.2. The chemical compatibility between Y0.8Ca0.2Cr1-xCoxO3±δ and YSZ was evaluated firing the two at 1400oC and no reaction products were found if x value was kept lower than 0.2.

  18. Calcium, zinc and vitamin E ameliorate cadmium-induced renal oxidative damage in albino Wistar rats

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    Pradeepkiran Jangampalli Adi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to examine the protective effects of supplementation with calcium + zinc (Ca + Zn or vitamin E (Vit-E on Cd-induced renal oxidative damage. Young albino Wistar rats (180 ± 10 g (n = 6 control rats, Cd, Cd + Ca + Zn, and Cd + Vit-E experimental groups and the experimental period was 30 days. Rats were exposed to Cd (20 mg/kg body weight alone treated as Cd treated group and the absence or presence of Ca + Zn (2 mg/kg each or Vit-E (20 mg/kg body weight supplementation treated as two separate groups. The activities of the stress marker enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione reductase (GR, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, glutathione-S-transferase (GST and lipid peroxidase (LPx were determined in renal mitochondrial fractions of experimental rats. We observed quantitative changes in SOD isoenzymatic patterns by non-denaturing PAGE analysis, and quantified band densities. These results showed that Cd exposure leads to decreases in SOD, CAT, GR, and GPx activities and a concomitant increase in LPx and GST activities. Ca + Zn and Vit-E administration with Cd significantly reversed Cd-induced perturbations in oxidative stress marker enzymes. However, Vit-E showed more inhibitory activity against Cd than did Ca + Zn, and it protected against Cd-induced nephrotoxicity.

  19. Multivariate regression models for the simultaneous quantitative analysis of calcium and magnesium carbonates and magnesium oxide through drifts data

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    Marder Luciano

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work multivariate regression models were developed for the quantitative analysis of ternary systems using Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS to determine the concentration in weight of calcium carbonate, magnesium carbonate and magnesium oxide. Nineteen spectra of standard samples previously defined in ternary diagram by mixture design were prepared and mid-infrared diffuse reflectance spectra were recorded. The partial least squares (PLS regression method was applied to the model. The spectra set was preprocessed by either mean-centered and variance-scaled (model 2 or mean-centered only (model 1. The results based on the prediction performance of the external validation set expressed by RMSEP (root mean square error of prediction demonstrated that it is possible to develop good models to simultaneously determine calcium carbonate, magnesium carbonate and magnesium oxide content in powdered samples that can be used in the study of the thermal decomposition of dolomite rocks.

  20. Biodiesel Production from Waste Palm Oil Catalyzed by Hierarchical ZSM-5 Supported Calcium Oxide

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    Yusuf Muhammad Zein

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel production from waste palm oil catalyzed by hierarchical ZSM-5 supported calcium oxide was studied. The activity of CaO increased after supported on h-ZSM-5 resulting an increase in conversion from 93.17% to 95.40%. A maximum conversion of 95.40% was achieved at 6 h reaction time, 3 wt.% catalyst amount, 12:1 methanol to oil molar ratio and 65 °C reaction temperature. The waste palm oil showed a high potential as a feedstock in biodiesel production in which there was no significant different in the conversion of fresh and waste palm oil. The properties of the obtained biodiesel required the limits of biodiesel specification according to ASTM D6751-08 and EN 14214 with the methyl ester content of 97.18%, the acid value of 0.24 mg KOH/g, the kinematic viscosity of 4.64 cSt and the density of 869.9 kg/m3.

  1. Evaluation of elevated temperature properties of asphalt cement modified with aluminum oxide and calcium carbonate nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrka Ali, Shaban Ismael; Ismail, Amiruddin; AlMansob, Ramez A.; Alhmali, Dhawo Ibrahim

    2017-09-01

    Higher temperature properties of the asphalt cement have been characterized before and after modification using dynamic shear rheometer (DSR) and viscosity testing. In this study, calcium carbonate nanoparticles (CaCO3) and aluminum oxide nanoparticles (Al2O3) have been added to the base asphalt cement with concentrations of 3, 5 and 7%.wt by the weight of the asphalt cement. The increase of CaCO3 and Al2O3 content has significant effect on the properties of asphalt cement. The viscosity of the modified asphalt cement increased up to 90 and 108% respectively compared to the base asphalt cement. In addition, the results showed that both modifiers have great storage stability and compatibility at elevated temperature. The evaluation of the rheological properties of asphalt cements revealed that the stiffness of the modified samples improved with additional increase of the modifier concentration of up to 5%, which indicates better resistance to rutting parameter. The enhancement was up to 388.89% for Al2O3 and 74.07% for CaCO3. As a result, the usage of CaCO3 and Al2O3 nanoparticles can be considered as appropriate alternative materials to modify asphalt cement.

  2. Qualitative parameters of sugarcane silages treated with urea and calcium oxide

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    Susi Cristina dos Santos Guimarães Martins

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to evaluate the fermentation parameters, chemical composition and fractionation of carbohydrates of sugarcane silages treated with urea and calcium oxide (CaO. Upon ensiling, the treatments applied to the sugarcane were: 1% urea; 0.5% urea + 0.5% CaO; and 1% CaO, in relation to a control silage, without additive. The chemical additives (urea and CaO were added at ensiling, in an amount calculated based on the fresh matter (as is. A completely randomized design consisting of four treatments (silages and nine replicates was adopted. The material was conditioned in PVC mini-silos for five months. At the end of the storage period, silos were weighed again and samples were collected to quantify the losses caused by fermentation, dry matter recovery, pH, and ammonia nitrogen (N-NH3 of the silages and to evaluate the chemical composition and fractionation of carbohydrates. The silage with 1% CaO showed the highest recovery of dry matter, and in terms of carbohydrate fractionation, it showed the highest levels of soluble and potentially soluble carbohydrates. Addition of 1% CaO during ensiling reduces the fermentation losses of sugarcane silages.

  3. Formate Oxidation-Driven Calcium Carbonate Precipitation by Methylocystis parvus OBBP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganendra, Giovanni; De Muynck, Willem; Ho, Adrian; Arvaniti, Eleni Charalampous; Hosseinkhani, Baharak; Ramos, Jose Angel; Rahier, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    Microbially induced carbonate precipitation (MICP) applied in the construction industry poses several disadvantages such as ammonia release to the air and nitric acid production. An alternative MICP from calcium formate by Methylocystis parvus OBBP is presented here to overcome these disadvantages. To induce calcium carbonate precipitation, M. parvus was incubated at different calcium formate concentrations and starting culture densities. Up to 91.4% ± 1.6% of the initial calcium was precipitated in the methane-amended cultures compared to 35.1% ± 11.9% when methane was not added. Because the bacteria could only utilize methane for growth, higher culture densities and subsequently calcium removals were exhibited in the cultures when methane was added. A higher calcium carbonate precipitate yield was obtained when higher culture densities were used but not necessarily when more calcium formate was added. This was mainly due to salt inhibition of the bacterial activity at a high calcium formate concentration. A maximum 0.67 ± 0.03 g of CaCO3 g of Ca(CHOOH)2−1 calcium carbonate precipitate yield was obtained when a culture of 109 cells ml−1 and 5 g of calcium formate liter−1 were used. Compared to the current strategy employing biogenic urea degradation as the basis for MICP, our approach presents significant improvements in the environmental sustainability of the application in the construction industry. PMID:24837386

  4. Formate oxidation-driven calcium carbonate precipitation by Methylocystis parvus OBBP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganendra, Giovanni; De Muynck, Willem; Ho, Adrian; Arvaniti, Eleni Charalampous; Hosseinkhani, Baharak; Ramos, Jose Angel; Rahier, Hubert; Boon, Nico

    2014-08-01

    Microbially induced carbonate precipitation (MICP) applied in the construction industry poses several disadvantages such asammonia release to the air and nitric acid production. An alternative MICP from calcium formate by Methylocystis parvus OBBP is presented here to overcome these disadvantages. To induce calcium carbonate precipitation, M. parvus was incubated at different calcium formate concentrations and starting culture densities. Up to 91.4% ± 1.6% of the initial calcium was precipitated in the methane-amended cultures compared to 35.1% ± 11.9% when methane was not added. Because the bacteria could only utilize methane for growth, higher culture densities and subsequently calcium removals were exhibited in the cultures when methane was added. A higher calcium carbonate precipitate yield was obtained when higher culture densities were used but not necessarily when more calcium formate was added. This was mainly due to salt inhibition of the bacterial activity at a high calcium formate concentration. A maximum 0.67 ± 0.03 g of CaCO3 g of Ca(CHOOH)2(-1) calcium carbonate precipitate yield was obtained when a culture of 10(9) cells ml(-1) and 5 g of calcium formate liter(-)1 were used. Compared to the current strategy employing biogenic urea degradation as the basis for MICP, our approach presents significant improvements in the environmental sustainability of the application in the construction industry.

  5. Effect of manure, clay, charcoal, zeolite, and calcium oxide on some properties of soil contaminated with cobalt

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    Kosiorek Milena

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The study has been undertaken in order to determine the influence of different substances (manure, clay, charcoal, zeolite and calcium oxide on soil pH, hydrolytic acidity, total exchangeable bases, cation exchange capacity, the base saturation of soil contaminated with cobalt (0, 20, 40, 80, 160, 320 mg·kg−1 of soil. The analysed properties of soil proved to be dependent on the cobalt contamination and the kind of substances. In the series without substances soil contamination with the highest doses of cobalt raised the soil’s hydrolytic acidity but depressed its pH, total exchangeable bases and base saturation. Among the substances applied to soil in order to neutralize the effect of contamination with cobalt, calcium oxide had the strongest influence on the soil’s properties. In the series with calcium oxide application the hydrolytic acidity was decreased and other soil properties were increased. Manure addition to soil had positive but weaker effect on analysed soil properties.

  6. Interactive role of nitric oxide and calcium chloride in enhancing tolerance to salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M Nasir; Siddiqui, Manzer H; Mohammad, Firoz; Naeem, M

    2012-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a small diffusible, ubiquitous bioactive molecule, acts as prooxidant as well as antioxidant, and also regulates remarkable spectrum of plant cellular mechanisms. The present work was undertaken to investigate the role of nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and/or calcium chloride (CaCl(2)) in the tolerance of excised mustard leaves to salt stress. After 24h, salt stressed leaves treated with SNP and/or CaCl(2), showed an improvement in the activities of carbonic anhydrase (CA) and nitrate reductase (NR), and leaf chlorophyll (Chl) content, leaf relative water content (LRWC) and leaf ion concentration as compared with the leaves treated with NaCl only. Salinity stress caused a significant increase in H(2)O(2) content and membrane damage which is witnessed by enhanced levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and electrolyte leakage. By contrast, such increases were blocked by the application of 0.2mM SNP and 10mM CaCl(2) to salt stressed leaves. Application of SNP and/or CaCl(2) alleviated NaCl stress by enhancing the activities of antioxidative enzymes viz. superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POX), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and glutathione reductase (GR) and by enhancing proline (Pro) and glycinebetaine (GB) accumulation with a concomitant decrease in H(2)O(2) content, TBARS and electrolyte leakage, which is manifested in the tolerance of plants to salinity stress. Moreover, application of SNP with CaCl(2) was more effective to reduce the detrimental effects of NaCl stress on excised mustard leaves. In addition to this, ameliorating effect of SNP was not effective in presence of NO scavenger cPTIO [2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide]. To put all these in a nut shell, the results advocate that SNP in association with CaCl(2) plays a role in enhancing the tolerance of plants to salt stress by improving antioxidative defence system, osmolyte accumulation and ionic

  7. Azelnidipine prevents cardiac dysfunction in streptozotocin-diabetic rats by reducing intracellular calcium accumulation, oxidative stress and apoptosis

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    Kain Vasundhara

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous evidences suggest that diabetic heart is characterized by compromised ventricular contraction and prolonged relaxation attributable to multiple causative factors including calcium accumulation, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Therapeutic interventions to prevent calcium accumulation and oxidative stress could be therefore helpful in improving the cardiac function under diabetic condition. Methods This study was designed to examine the effect of long-acting calcium channel blocker (CCB, Azelnidipine (AZL on contractile dysfunction, intracellular calcium (Ca2+ cycling proteins, stress-activated signaling molecules and apoptosis on cardiomyocytes in diabetes. Adult male Wistar rats were made diabetic by a single intraperitoneal (IP injection of streptozotocin (STZ. Contractile functions were traced from live diabetic rats to isolated individual cardiomyocytes including peak shortening (PS, time-to-PS (TPS, time-to-relengthening (TR90, maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening (± dL/dt and intracellular Ca2+ fluorescence. Results Diabetic heart showed significantly depressed PS, ± dL/dt, prolonged TPS, TR90 and intracellular Ca2+ clearing and showed an elevated resting intracellular Ca2+. AZL itself exhibited little effect on myocyte mechanics but it significantly alleviated STZ-induced myocyte contractile dysfunction. Diabetes increased the levels of superoxide, enhanced expression of the cardiac damage markers like troponin I, p67phox NADPH oxidase subunit, restored the levels of the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD, calcium regulatory proteins RyR2 and SERCA2a, and suppressed the levels of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein. All of these STZ-induced alterations were reconciled by AZL treatment. Conclusion Collectively, the data suggest beneficial effect of AZL in diabetic cardiomyopathy via altering intracellular Ca2+ handling proteins and preventing apoptosis by its antioxidant property.

  8. The simultaneous removal of calcium, magnesium and chloride ions from industrial wastewater using magnesium-aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi, Roya; Kahforoushan, Davood; Fatehifar, Esmaeil

    2013-01-01

    In this article, a method for simultaneous removal of calcium, magnesium and chloride by using Mg0.80Al0.20O1.10 as a Magnesium-Aluminum oxide (Mg‒Al oxide) was investigated. Mg‒Al oxide obtained by thermal decomposition of the Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (Mg-Al LDH). The synthesized Mg‒Al oxide were characterized with respect to nitrogen physicosorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field emission scan electron microscopy (FESEM) morphology. Due to high anion-exchange capacity of Mg‒Al oxide, it was employed in simultaneously removal of Cl(-), Mg(+2) and Ca(+2) from distiller waste of a sodium carbonate production factory. For this purpose, experiments were designed to evaluate the effects of quantity of Mg‒Al oxide, temperature and time on the removal process. The removal of Cl(-), Mg(+2) and Ca(+2) from wastewater was found 93.9%, 93.74% and 93.25% at 60°C after 0.5 h, respectively. Results showed that the removal of Cl(-), Mg(+2) and Ca(+2) by Mg‒Al oxide increased with increasing temperature, time and Mg‒Al oxide quantity.

  9. Seeking homeostasis: Temporal trends in respiration, oxidation, and calcium in SOD1 G93A Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis mice

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    Cameron W Irvin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Impairments in mitochondria, oxidative regulation, and calcium homeostasis have been well documented in numerous amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS experimental models, especially in the superoxide dismutase 1 glycine 93 to alanine (SOD1 G93A transgenic mouse. However, the timing of these deficiencies has been debatable. In a systematic review of 45 articles, we examine experimental measurements of cellular respiration, mitochondrial mechanisms, oxidative markers, and calcium regulation. We evaluate the quantitative magnitude and statistical temporal trend of these aggregated assessments in high transgene copy SOD1 G93A mice compared to wild type mice. Analysis of overall trends reveals cellular respiration, intracellular ATP, and corresponding mitochondrial elements (Cox, cytochrome c, complex I, enzyme activity are depressed for the entire lifespan of the SOD1 G93A mouse. Oxidant markers (H2O2, 8OH2’dG, MDA are initially similar to wild type but are double that of wild type by the time of symptom onset despite early post-natal elevation of protective heat shock proteins. All aspects of calcium regulation show early disturbances, although a notable and likely compensatory convergence to near wild type levels appears to occur between 40-80 days (pre-onset, followed by a post-onset elevation in intracellular calcium. The identified temporal trends and compensatory fluctuations provide evidence that the cause of ALS may lay within failed homeostatic regulation, itself, rather than any one particular perturbing event or cellular mechanism. We discuss the vulnerabilities of motoneurons to regulatory instability and possible hypotheses regarding failed regulation and its potential treatment in ALS.

  10. ITH14001, a CGP37157-Nimodipine Hybrid Designed to Regulate Calcium Homeostasis and Oxidative Stress, Exerts Neuroprotection in Cerebral Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buendia, Izaskun; Tenti, Giammarco; Michalska, Patrycja; Méndez-López, Iago; Luengo, Enrique; Satriani, Michele; Padín-Nogueira, Fernando; López, Manuela G; Ramos, M Teresa; García, Antonio G; Menéndez, J Carlos; León, Rafael

    2017-01-18

    During brain ischemia, oxygen and glucose deprivation induces calcium overload, extensive oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and, finally, massive neuronal loss. In the search of a neuroprotective compound to mitigate this neuronal loss, we have designed and synthesized a new multitarget hybrid (ITH14001) directed at the reduction of calcium overload by acting on two regulators of calcium homeostasis; the mitochondrial Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (mNCX) and L-type voltage dependent calcium channels (VDCCs). This compound is a hybrid of CGP37157 (mNCX inhibitor) and nimodipine (L-type VDCCs blocker), and its pharmacological evaluation revealed a moderate ability to selectively inhibit both targets. These activities conferred concentration-dependent neuroprotection in two models of Ca(2+) overload, such as toxicity induced by high K(+) in the SH-SY5Y cell line (60% protection at 30 μM) and veratridine in hippocampal slices (26% protection at 10 μM). It also showed neuroprotective effect against oxidative stress, an activity related to its nitrogen radical scavenger effect and moderate induction of the Nrf2-ARE pathway. Its Nrf2 induction capability was confirmed by the increase of the expression of the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory enzyme heme-oxygenase I (3-fold increase). In addition, the multitarget profile of ITH14001 led to anti-inflammatory properties, shown by the reduction of nitrites production induced by lipopolysaccharide in glial cultures. Finally, it showed protective effect in two acute models of cerebral ischemia in hippocampal slices, excitotoxicity induced by glutamate (31% protection at 10 μM) and oxygen and glucose deprivation (76% protection at 10 μM), reducing oxidative stress and iNOS deleterious induction. In conclusion, our hybrid derivative showed improved neuroprotective properties when compared to its parent compounds CGP37157 and nimodipine.

  11. Radioprotective effect of calcium given with feed on exposure to tritium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazbekova, D.A.; Kalistratova, V.S.; Kulyamin, V.A.

    1979-12-01

    A 1.5-fold increase in calcium content of the rat diet attenuates the symptoms of radiation sickness induced by tritium and prolongs survival time. Elevation of blood serum nonspecific cholinesterase level and stimulation of lymphopoiesis were observed. The possible mechanisms of radioprotective action of calcium are discussed.

  12. Diets based on sugar cane treated with calcium oxide for lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, G G P; Garcia, R; Pires, A J V; Silva, R R; Detmann, E; Filho, A Eustaquio; Ribeiro, L S O; Carvalho, L M

    2013-02-01

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate the intake, nutrient apparent digestibility and the effect of total collection days (two and four days) on apparent digestibility estimates for lambs fed diets containing sugar cane treated with calcium oxide (CaO). Eight Santa Inês castrated male lambs with a 16.6±1.8 kg body weight were used. The lambs were distributed in two 4×4 Latin squares, with four experimental periods of 14 d each. The animals were kept in 1.2 m(2) individual pens, and the intake and digestibility evaluations were performed during the last four days of each period. The diets were formulated to be isonitrogenous, containing 14% crude protein (CP), and presenting 70% sugar cane treated with 0, 0.75, 1.5 or 2.25% of CaO (as-fed basis), corrected with 1% urea, and 30% concentrate. The sugar cane with added CaO was chopped, treated, and offered to the animals after 24 h of storage. The sugar cane with CaO increased the DM, OM, CP, NDF, NDFap, TC, NFCap and TDN intake (kg/d), when compared to natural sugar cane, and produced the same intake expressed as a percentage of body weight (% BW). The NFCap digestibility of the CaO-treated sugar cane was inferior to the NFCap digestibility in natural sugar cane. There was a linear increase in the DM intake with the CaO-added sugar cane, but the DM and NDF digestibility and the TDN content decreased linearly. The chemical treatment of sugar cane with CaO increases the intake but does not improve the nutrient digestibility. Two days of total fecal collection were found to be sufficient to estimate the total apparent digestibility in lambs.

  13. Optimization of transesterification of rubber seed oil using heterogeneous catalyst calcium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inggrid, Maria; Kristanto, Aldi; Santoso, Herry

    2015-12-01

    Biodiesel is an alternative fuel manufactured with the help of alkali hydroxide catalyst through transesterification reaction of vegetable oil. This study aims to examine methods and the most suitable conditions for transesterification reaction producing biodiesel from crude rubber seed oil by varying process parameters such as the molar ratio of alcohol, CaO amount as the alkaline catalyst, and reaction time. The rubber seed oil has a high level of free fatty acid content, which means the use of homogenous alkaline catalyst gives some technological problems such as soap formation which leaded in difficulty in the separation and purification of the product. Calcium oxide (CaO) is one of the most favorable heterogeneous base catalysts because it's reusable, noncorrosive, and low cost. Pre-treatment was performed by acid esterification with H2SO4 as the catalyst to decrease the content of free fatty acid in the rubber seed oil, in this pretreatment process the 12% FFA of crude oil could be reduced to below 3% FFA. The product after esterification process was then transesterified by alkaline transesterification by varying process parameters to convert triglyceride into biodiesel. The study found that maximum curvature for biodiesel yield occurred at 9:1 molar ratio of alcohol, 5%w catalyst loading, and 3 hours reaction time. Design expert software is used to determine the optimum point from experimental data. The result showed that the optimum yield of methyl ester from transesterification was 73.5 % by mass with 0.69 degree of desirability. The yielded methyl ester was tested for its density, viscosity, acid number, and solubility to meet SNI requirement standards.

  14. HAp granules encapsulated oxidized alginate-gelatin-biphasic calcium phosphate hydrogel for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, Avik; Amirian, Jhaleh; Min, Young Ki; Lee, Byong Taek

    2015-11-01

    Bone repair in the critical size defect zone using 3D hydrogel scaffold is still a challenge in tissue engineering field. A novel type of hydrogel scaffold combining ceramic and polymer materials, therefore, was fabricated to meet this challenge. In this study, oxidized alginate-gelatin-biphasic calcium phosphate (OxAlg-Gel-BCP) and spherical hydroxyapatite (HAp) granules encapsulated OxAlg-Gel-BCP hydrogel complex were fabricated using freeze-drying method. Detailed morphological and material characterizations of OxAlg-Gel-BCP hydrogel (OGB00), 25wt% and 35wt% granules encapsulated hydrogel (OGB25 and OGB35) were carried out for micro-structure, porosity, chemical constituents, and compressive stress analysis. Cell viability, cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation behavior of rat bone marrow-derived stem cell (BMSC) on OGB00, OGB25 and OGB35 scaffolds were confirmed by MTT assay, Live-Dead assay, and confocal imaging in vitro experiments. Finally, OGB00 and OGB25 hydrogel scaffolds were implanted in the critical size defect of rabbit femoral chondyle for 4 and 8 weeks. The micro-CT analysis and histological studies conducted by H&E and Masson's trichrome demonstrated that a significantly higher (***p<0.001) and earlier bone formation happened in case of 25% HAp granules encapsulated OxAlg-Gel-BCP hydrogel than in OxAlg-Gel-BCP complex alone. All results taken together, HAp granules encapsulated OxAlg-Gel-BCP system can be a promising 3D hydrogel scaffold for the healing of a critical bone defect. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. CO{sub 2} separation by calcium looping from full and partial fuel oxidation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivalingam, Senthoorselvan

    2013-06-05

    This thesis work deals with the research and development of calcium looping process for CO{sub 2} separation from full and partial fuel oxidation based power generation systems. CO{sub 2} is the main greenhouse gas and undoubtedly a major contributor to the global warming. It is estimated that more than one third of the total anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions come from fossil fuel based heat and power generation. Moreover, fossil fuels are unlikely to be phased out rapidly, since developing alternative energy sources not only take time but also require huge investments and infrastructure. An alternative way to reduce emissions in a medium term is to capture the CO{sub 2} from fossil fueled power plants and store it away from the atmosphere. This process system combining a bunch of technologies is called carbon capture and storage (CCS). CO{sub 2} capture is an important and costly part of CCS and an array of technologies is considered for this. Calcium looping (CaL) is one of such and seems to offer effective and efficient CO{sub 2} separation from fuel oxidation processes. CaL process involves separation of CO{sub 2} at high temperatures (600-700 C) by calcium sorbents (CaO). CO{sub 2} reacts with CaO in a carbonation process and produces CaCO{sub 3}. In a subsequent thermal regeneration (>850 C) called calcination, the CO{sub 2} is released from CaCO{sub 3}. By alternating carbonations and calcinations over multiple cycles, CO{sub 2} is separated from a gas stream. Moreover, the CaL is realised in industrial scale with dual fluidised bed reactors for CO{sub 2} capture (the carbonator) and sorbent regeneration (the calciner). As a process in the development, research is still required in many aspects from thermodynamic modeling to experimental studies. Research works have been carried out in process simulations, sorbent reactivity and optimisation studies in a controlled reactor environment and process parametric studies in a semi-pilot scale CaL test facility

  16. Mitochondrial dysfunction in oxidative stress : On the impact of neuronal KCa channels & calcium signaling in neurodegeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honrath, Birgit

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondriale dysfunctie in oxidatieve stress – over de impact van neuronale KCa kanalen en calcium signalering in neurodegeneratie (246 words) Neurodegeneratieve ziektes, zoals de ziekte van Alzheimer of Parkinson, worden gekarakteriseerd door een verlies van neuronen in verschillende

  17. In situ Observation of Calcium Oxide Treatment of Inclusions in Molten Steel by Confocal Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Bharat; Spooner, Stephen; Rao, M. B. V.; Roy, Gour Gopal; Srirangam, Prakash

    2017-06-01

    Calcium treatment of aluminum killed steel was observed in situ using high-temperature confocal scanning laser microscope (HT-CSLM). This technique along with a novel experimental design enables continuous observation of clustering behavior of inclusions before and after the calcium treatment. Results show that the increase in average inclusion size in non-calcium-treated condition was much faster compared to calcium-treated condition. Results also show that the magnitude of attractive capillary force between inclusion particles in non-treated condition was about 10-15 N for larger particles (10 µm) and 10-16 N for smaller particles (5 µm) and acting length of force was about 30 µm. In the case of calcium-treated condition, the magnitude and acting length of force was reduced to 10-16 N and 10 µm, respectively, for particles of all sizes. This change in attractive capillary attractive force is due to change in inclusion morphology from solid alumina disks to liquid lens particles during calcium treatment.

  18. Mitochondrial hyperfusion during oxidative stress is coupled to a dysregulation in calcium handling within a C2C12 cell model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calum J Redpath

    Full Text Available Atrial Fibrillation is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia worldwide harming millions of people every year. Atrial Fibrillation (AF abruptly induces rapid conduction between atrial myocytes which is associated with oxidative stress and abnormal calcium handling. Unfortunately this new equilibrium promotes perpetuation of the arrhythmia. Recently, in addition to being the major source of oxidative stress within cells, mitochondria have been observed to fuse, forming mitochondrial networks and attach to intracellular calcium stores in response to cellular stress. We sought to identify a potential role for rapid stimulation, oxidative stress and mitochondrial hyperfusion in acute changes to myocyte calcium handling. In addition we hoped to link altered calcium handling to increased sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR-mitochondrial contacts, the so-called mitochondrial associated membrane (MAM. We selected the C2C12 murine myotube model as it has previously been successfully used to investigate mitochondrial dynamics and has a myofibrillar system similar to atrial myocytes. We observed that rapid stimulation of C2C12 cells resulted in mitochondrial hyperfusion and increased mitochondrial colocalisation with calcium stores. Inhibition of mitochondrial fission by transfection of mutant DRP1K38E resulted in similar effects on mitochondrial fusion, SR colocalisation and altered calcium handling. Interestingly the effects of 'forced fusion' were reversed by co-incubation with the reducing agent N-Acetyl cysteine (NAC. Subsequently we demonstrated that oxidative stress resulted in similar reversible increases in mitochondrial fusion, SR-colocalisation and altered calcium handling. Finally, we believe we have identified that myocyte calcium handling is reliant on baseline levels of reactive oxygen species as co-incubation with NAC both reversed and retarded myocyte response to caffeine induced calcium release and re-uptake. Based on these results we

  19. Calcium manganese oxides as oxygen evolution catalysts: O2 formation pathways indicated by 18O-labelling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevela, Dmitriy; Koroidov, Sergey; Najafpour, M Mahdi; Messinger, Johannes; Kurz, Philipp

    2011-05-02

    Oxygen evolution catalysed by calcium manganese and manganese-only oxides was studied in (18)O-enriched water. Using membrane-inlet mass spectrometry, we monitored the formation of the different O(2) isotopologues (16)O(2), (16)O(18)O and (18)O(2) in such reactions simultaneously with good time resolution. From the analysis of the data, we conclude that entirely different pathways of dioxygen formation catalysis exist for reactions involving hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), hydrogen persulfate (HSO(5)(-)) or single-electron oxidants such as Ce(IV) and [Ru(III) (bipy)(3)](3+) . Like the studied oxide catalysts, the active sites of manganese catalase and the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) consist of μ-oxido manganese or μ-oxido calcium manganese sites. The studied processes show very similar (18)O-labelling behaviour to the natural enzymes and are therefore interesting model systems for in vivo oxygen formation by manganese metalloenzymes such as PSII. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Antimicrobial Activity and pH of Calcium Hydroxide and Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles Intracanal Medication and Association with Chlorhexidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Alana Souza; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane M; Faria, Gisele; Leonardo, Renato Toledo; Tanomaru-Filho, Mario

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate pH and antibacterial activity of pastes with calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)2] and zinc oxide (ZnO) microparticles (micro) or nanoparticles (nano) and association with 0.4% chlorhexidine against Enterococcus faecalis. The following pastes were analyzed: Ca(OH)2/ZnO micro, (2) Ca(OH)2/ZnO nano, (3) Ca(OH)2/ ZnO micro + 0.4% chlorhexidine, (4) Ca(OH)2/ZnO nano + 0.4% chlorhexidine. Antibacterial activity against E. faecalis was evaluated by agar diffusion test. The direct contact test on planktonic cells of E. faecalis was performed for 30 and 60 seconds. Root canals from bovine teeth were filled with the pastes and pH was evaluated after 1, 7, 14, 21, 30 and 60 days. The data obtained were submitted to the statistical tests analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey or Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn test, with a 5% significance level. Calcium hydroxide and zinc oxide nano, and the pastes with 0.4% chlorhexidine were more effective in agar diffusion test. In the direct contact test, the pastes with chlorhexidine showed the highest effect after 30 seconds. All pastes eliminated E. faecalis after 60 seconds. All pastes promoted an increase in pH. The highest increase in pH was observed with nanoparticle medications after 1 and 7 days (p chlorhexidine. Although nanoparticles of calcium hydroxide and zinc oxide promoted antibacterial effect, the activity against E. faecalis is favored by association with chlorhexidine.

  1. Reduction of chromium oxides with calcium carbide during thestainless steelmaking process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Arh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available An efficient reduction of chromium from slag requires an appropriate reduction agent for the given steelmaking technology. The usual slag reduction praxis consists of carbon injections and additions of ferrosilicon and aluminum.Reduction of chromium containing slags with calcium carbide is an appealing alternative. Calcium carbide is a strong reduction agent that unlike ferrosilicon and aluminum also provides the possibility of foaming slag formation.Experimental work regarding chromium slag reduction with calcium carbide towards usual slag reduction praxis is described in this work. The results show that higher reduction rates in the stage of refining period of the melt and higher level of overall chromium reduction from slag can be reached with the blowing of CaC2.

  2. Synthesis, mechanical properties, and in vitro biocompatibility with osteoblasts of calcium silicate-reduced graphene oxide composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrali, Mehdi; Moghaddam, Ehsan; Shirazi, Seyed Farid Seyed; Baradaran, Saeid; Mehrali, Mohammad; Latibari, Sara Tahan; Metselaar, Hendrik Simon Cornelis; Kadri, Nahrizul Adib; Zandi, Keivan; Osman, Noor Azuan Abu

    2014-03-26

    Calcium silicate (CaSiO3, CS) ceramics are promising bioactive materials for bone tissue engineering, particularly for bone repair. However, the low toughness of CS limits its application in load-bearing conditions. Recent findings indicating the promising biocompatibility of graphene imply that graphene can be used as an additive to improve the mechanical properties of composites. Here, we report a simple method for the synthesis of calcium silicate/reduced graphene oxide (CS/rGO) composites using a hydrothermal approach followed by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). Adding rGO to pure CS increased the hardness of the material by ∼40%, the elastic modulus by ∼52%, and the fracture toughness by ∼123%. Different toughening mechanisms were observed including crack bridging, crack branching, crack deflection, and rGO pull-out, thus increasing the resistance to crack propagation and leading to a considerable improvement in the fracture toughness of the composites. The formation of bone-like apatite on a range of CS/rGO composites with rGO weight percentages ranging from 0 to 1.5 has been investigated in simulated body fluid (SBF). The presence of a bone-like apatite layer on the composite surface after soaking in SBF was demonstrated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The biocompatibility of the CS/rGO composites was characterized using methyl thiazole tetrazolium (MTT) assays in vitro. The cell adhesion results showed that human osteoblast cells (hFOB) can adhere to and develop on the CS/rGO composites. In addition, the proliferation rate and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of cells on the CS/rGO composites were improved compared with the pure CS ceramics. These results suggest that calcium silicate/reduced graphene oxide composites are promising materials for biomedical applications.

  3. Intercellular calcium signaling and nitric oxide feedback during constriction of rabbit renal afferent arterioles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhrenholt, Torben Rene; Schjerning, J; Vanhoutte, Paul M. G.

    2007-01-01

    calciseptine. After a delay of 10 s, [Ca(2+)](i) increased in endothelial cells immediately adjacent to reactive smooth muscle cells, and this calcium wave spread in a nonregenerative fashion laterally into the endothelial cell layer with a velocity of 1.2 microm/s. Depolarization with 100 mmol/l KCl led...

  4. Micro-arc oxidation as a tool to develop multifunctional calcium-rich surfaces for dental implant applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, A.R., E-mail: arribeiro@inmetro.gov.br [Department of Periodontology, Araraquara Dental School, University Estadual Paulista, Rua Humaitá 1680, 14801-903 Araraquara, São Paulo (Brazil); Directory of Metrology Applied to Life Science, National Institute of Metrology Quality and Technology, Av. N. S. das Graças 50, Xerém, Duque de Caxias, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Brazilian Branch of Institute of Biomaterials, Tribocorrosion and Nanomedicine (IBTN/Br) (Brazil); Oliveira, F., E-mail: fernando@dem.uminho.pt [Brazilian Branch of Institute of Biomaterials, Tribocorrosion and Nanomedicine (IBTN/Br) (Brazil); Centre for Mechanical and Materials Technologies, University of Minho, Campus de Azurém, 4800-058 Guimarães (Portugal); Boldrini, L.C., E-mail: lcboldrini@inmetro.gov.br [Directory of Metrology Applied to Life Science, National Institute of Metrology Quality and Technology, Av. N. S. das Graças 50, Xerém, Duque de Caxias, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Leite, P.E., E-mail: leitepec@gmail.com [Directory of Metrology Applied to Life Science, National Institute of Metrology Quality and Technology, Av. N. S. das Graças 50, Xerém, Duque de Caxias, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Falagan-Lotsch, P., E-mail: prifalagan@gmail.com [Directory of Metrology Applied to Life Science, National Institute of Metrology Quality and Technology, Av. N. S. das Graças 50, Xerém, Duque de Caxias, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Linhares, A.B.R., E-mail: adrianalinhares@hotmail.com [Clinical Research Unit, Antonio Pedro Hospital, Fluminense Federal University, Niterói (Brazil); and others

    2015-09-01

    Titanium (Ti) is commonly used in dental implant applications. Surface modification strategies are being followed in last years in order to build Ti oxide-based surfaces that can fulfill, simultaneously, the following requirements: induced cell attachment and adhesion, while providing a superior corrosion and tribocorrosion performance. In this work micro-arc oxidation (MAO) was used as a tool for the growth of a nanostructured bioactive titanium oxide layer aimed to enhance cell attachment and adhesion for dental implant applications. Characterization of the surfaces was performed, in terms of morphology, topography, chemical composition and crystalline structure. Primary human osteoblast adhesion on the developed surfaces was investigated in detail by electronic and atomic force microscopy as well as immunocytochemistry. Also an investigation on the early cytokine production was performed. Results show that a relatively thick hybrid and graded oxide layer was produced on the Ti surface, being constituted by a mixture of anatase, rutile and amorphous phases where calcium (Ca) and phosphorous (P) were incorporated. An outermost nanometric-thick amorphous oxide layer rich in Ca was present in the film. This amorphous layer, rich in Ca, improved fibroblast viability and metabolic activity as well as osteoblast adhesion. High-resolution techniques allowed to understand that osteoblasts adhered less in the crystalline-rich regions while they preferentially adhere and spread over in the Ca-rich amorphous oxide layer. Also, these surfaces induce higher amounts of IFN-γ cytokine secretion, which is known to regulate inflammatory responses, bone microarchitecture as well as cytoskeleton reorganization and cellular spreading. These surfaces are promising in the context of dental implants, since they might lead to faster osseointegration. - Highlights: • A nanometric-structured calcium-rich amorphous layer with improved bioactivity was produced on titanium surfaces.

  5. Trolox-sensitive reactive oxygen species regulate mitochondrial morphology, oxidative phosphorylation and cytosolic calcium handling in healthy cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distelmaier, Felix; Valsecchi, Federica; Forkink, Marleen; van Emst-de Vries, Sjenet; Swarts, Herman G; Rodenburg, Richard J T; Verwiel, Eugène T P; Smeitink, Jan A M; Willems, Peter H G M; Koopman, Werner J H

    2012-12-15

    Cell regulation by signaling reactive oxygen species (sROS) is often incorrectly studied through extracellular oxidant addition. Here, we used the membrane-permeable antioxidant Trolox to examine the role of sROS in mitochondrial morphology, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), and cytosolic calcium (Ca(2+)) handling in healthy human skin fibroblasts. Trolox treatment reduced the levels of 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydro-fluorescein (CM-H(2)DCF) oxidizing ROS, lowered cellular lipid peroxidation, and induced a less oxidized mitochondrial thiol redox state. This was paralleled by increased glutathione- and mitofusin-dependent mitochondrial filamentation, increased expression of fully assembled mitochondrial complex I, elevated activity of citrate synthase and OXPHOS enzymes, and a higher cellular O(2) consumption. In contrast, Trolox did not alter hydroethidium oxidation, cytosolic thiol redox state, mitochondrial NAD(P)H levels, or mitochondrial membrane potential. Whole genome expression profiling revealed that Trolox did not trigger significant changes in gene expression, suggesting that Trolox acts downstream of this process. Cytosolic Ca(2+) transients, induced by the hormone bradykinin, were of a higher amplitude and decayed faster in Trolox-treated cells. These effects were dose-dependently antagonized by hydrogen peroxide. Our findings suggest that Trolox-sensitive sROS are upstream regulators of mitochondrial mitofusin levels, morphology, and function in healthy human skin fibroblasts. This information not only facilitates the interpretation of antioxidant effects in cell models (of oxidative-stress), but also contributes to a better understanding of ROS-related human pathologies, including mitochondrial disorders.

  6. Calcium dobesilate prevents the oxidative stress and inflammation induced by diabetes in the retina of db/db mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, Patricia; Solà-Adell, Cristina; Hernández, Cristina; García-Ramírez, Marta; Sampedro, Joel; Simó-Servat, Olga; Valeri, Marta; Pasquali, Christian; Simó, Rafael

    2017-10-01

    Calcium dobesilate (CaD) is beneficial in early stages of diabetic retinopathy (DR), but its mechanisms of action remains to be elucidated. The aim was to investigate the effect of CaD on proinflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress. db/db mice were randomly assigned to daily oral treatment with CaD (200mg/kg/day) or vehicle for 15days. Biomarkers of oxidative stress (dihydroethidium, malondialdehyde), NF-κB, and proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, MCP-1) were examined in the retina by immunohistochemical analysis. Cultures of human retinal endothelial cells (HRECs) were used for complementary experiments. CaD significantly reduced the biomarkers of oxidative stress in the retina of db/db mice. In addition, CaD prevented the increase of NF-κB, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and MCP-1 induced by diabetes. CaD inhibited the activation of NF-kβ induced by IL-1β by preventing IKKB-α phosphorylation in HRECs and reduced the upregulation of IL-6 and IL-18 induced by TNF-α in a dose-dependent manner. Our results suggest that antioxidant and antiinflammatory effects are crucial in accounting for the effectiveness of CaD for treating DR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases are involved in growth, thermotolerance, oxidative stress survival, and fertility in Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ravi; Tamuli, Ranjan

    2014-04-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases (Ca(2+)/CaMKs) are Ser/Thr protein kinases that respond to change in cytosolic free Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]c) and play multiple cellular roles in organisms ranging from fungi to humans. In the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, four Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent kinases, Ca(2+)/CaMK-1 to 4, are encoded by the genes NCU09123, NCU02283, NCU06177, and NCU09212, respectively. We found that camk-1 and camk-2 are essential for full fertility in N. crassa. The survival of ∆camk-2 mutant was increased in induced thermotolerance and oxidative stress conditions. In addition, the ∆camk-1 ∆camk-2, ∆camk-4 ∆camk-2, and ∆camk-3 ∆camk-2 double mutants display slow growth phenotype, reduced aerial hyphae, decreased thermotolerance, and increased sensitivity to oxidative stress, revealing the genetic interactions among these kinases. Therefore, Ca(2+)/CaMKs are involved in growth, thermotolerance, oxidative stress tolerance, and fertility in N. crassa.

  8. Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein (ox-LDL) Cholesterol Induces the Expression of miRNA-223 and L-type Calcium Channel Protein in Atrial Fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fengping; Xu, Xin; Yuan, Shuguo; Tan, Liangqiu; Gao, Lingjun; Ma, Shaochun; Zhang, Shebin; Ma, Zhanzhong; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Fenglian; Chen, Baofeng; Zhang, Beibei; Pang, Jungang; Huang, Xiuyan; Weng, Jiaqiang

    2016-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia causing high morbidity and mortality. While changing of the cellular calcium homeostasis plays a critical role in AF, the L-type calcium channel α1c protein has suggested as an important regulator of reentrant spiral dynamics and is a major component of AF-related electrical remodeling. Our computational modeling predicted that miRNA-223 may regulate the CACNA1C gene which encodes the cardiac L-type calcium channel α1c subunit. We found that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) cholesterol significantly up-regulates both the expression of miRNA-223 and L-type calcium channel protein. In contrast, knockdown of miRNA-223 reduced L-type calcium channel protein expression, while genetic knockdown of endogenous miRNA-223 dampened AF vulnerability. Transfection of miRNA-223 by adenovirus-mediated expression enhanced L-type calcium currents and promoted AF in mice while co-injection of a CACNA1C-specific miR-mimic counteracted the effect. Taken together, ox-LDL, as a known factor in AF-associated remodeling, positively regulates miRNA-223 transcription and L-type calcium channel protein expression. Our results implicate a new molecular mechanism for AF in which miRNA-223 can be used as an biomarker of AF rheumatic heart disease.

  9. Characterization and evaluation of antibacterial activity of plant mediated calcium oxide (CaO) nanoparticles by employing Mentha pipertia extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijaz, Umber; Bhatti, Ijaz Ahmed; Mirza, Saima; Ashar, Ambreen

    2017-10-01

    The antibacterial activity of green synthesized calcium oxide nanoparticles was investigated using leaf extract of Mentha piperita in this study. The synthesized nanomaterial was subjected to characterization using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The SEM images showed agglomeration of disc shaped nanoparticles, and FTIR and EDX spectroscopy indicated intensive peaks for calcium ions and oxygen. Subsequently, the potential of nanoscale CaO was also evaluated for antimicrobial index against E. coli using the well diffusion method. A maximum zone of inhibition up to 42 mm was observed when 100 µg ml-1 material was loaded with inoculum size 50 µl of E. coli in sunlight exposure of 5 h. The experimental conditions were optimized using a central composite design using a response surface methodology. The maximum antimicrobial index of the CaO nanoparticle was 6 mm as a result of the optimized response. Furthermore, the minimum inhibitory concentration of the CaO nanoparticle showed 25 µg ml-1, an effective initial concentration for E.coli removal. The results revealed that the CaO nanocomposite synthesized via a green route was a promising candidate for the removal of E. coli present in drinking water, which is an important fecal indicator.

  10. Characterization of calcium oxide catalysts from natural sources and their application in the transesterification of sunflower oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Leandro Marques; Saboya, Rosana Maria Alves; Campelo, Natália de Sousa; Cecilia, Juan Antonio; Rodríguez-Castellón, Enrique; Cavalcante, Célio Loureiro; Vieira, Rodrigo Silveira

    2014-01-01

    The catalytic activities of calcium oxide obtained from natural sources (crab shell and eggshell) were characterized and evaluated in the transesterification of vegetable oil. These catalysts are mainly composed of calcium carbonate, which is partially converted into CaO after calcination (900°C for 2h). The catalysts have some advantages, such as abundant occurrence, low cost, porous structure, and nontoxic. The materials were characterized by XRD, FTIR, TG/DTG, CO2-TPD, XPS, SEM, and BET methods. The thermal treatment produces small particles of CaCO3 and CaO that are responsible for the catalytic activity. The conversion from triglycerides to methyl ester was not observed in transesterification carried out using natural crab shell and eggshell. Under optimized reaction conditions, the conversions to YFAME using the calcined catalysts were: crab shell (83.10±0.27 wt.%) and eggshell (97.75±0.02 wt.%). These results, showed that these materials have promising viability in transesterification for biodiesel production. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Antibacterial activity of intracanal medications based on calcium hydroxide and zinc oxide micro- or nanoparticles: an ex vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Maria GUERREIRO-TANOMARU

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Nanoparticles and associations to calcium hydroxide can be used to increase antimicrobial activity. Objective To evaluate antibacterial activity against Enterococcus faecalis and pH of intracanal medications (IM based on calcium hydroxide (CH and zinc oxide (ZnO micro- or nanoparticles, and their association with 0.4% chlorhexidine (CHX. Material and method Root canals from single-rooted human teeth were inoculated and incubated for 21 days. After sample (S1, the root canals were filled with the medications for 7 days and samples were collected immediately after medication (S2 and 7 days later (S3. Counting of CFU mL-1 was performed. Polyethylene tubes filled with the medications were used for the pH evaluation after 3, 7, 14 and 28 days. Data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey tests (p<0.05. Result All IM promoted elimination of E. faecalis immediately after medication (S2. All the pastes promoted a similar pH increase. Conclusion CH/ZnO micro- or nanoparticles associated with CHX promoted greater bacterial reduction in the root canals and similar pH.

  12. The Retentive Strength of Cemented Zirconium Oxide Crowns after Dentin Pretreatment with Desensitizing Paste Containing 8% Arginine and Calcium Carbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Pilo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of dentin pretreatment with Desensitizing Paste containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate on the retention of zirconium oxide (Y-TZP crowns was tested. Forty molar teeth were mounted and prepared using a standardized protocol. Y-TZP crowns were produced using computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM technology. The 40 prepared teeth were either pretreated with Desensitizing Paste or not pretreated. After two weeks, each group was subdivided into two groups, cemented with either Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (RMGIC or Self Adhesive Resin Cement (SARC. Prior to cementation, the surface areas of the prepared teeth were measured. After aging, the cemented crown-tooth assemblies were tested for retentive strength using a universal testing machine. The debonded surfaces of the teeth and crowns were examined microscopically at 10× magnification. Pretreating the dentin surfaces with Desensitizing Paste prior to cementation did not affect the retention of the Y-TZP crowns. The retentive values for RMGIC (3.04 ± 0.77 MPa were significantly higher than those for SARC (2.28 ± 0.58 MPa. The predominant failure modes for the RMGIC and SARC were adhesive cement-dentin and adhesive cement-crown, respectively. An 8.0% arginine and calcium carbonate in-office desensitizing paste can be safely used to reduce post-cementation sensitivity without reducing the retentive strength of Y-TZP crowns.

  13. The Retentive Strength of Cemented Zirconium Oxide Crowns after Dentin Pretreatment with Desensitizing Paste Containing 8% Arginine and Calcium Carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilo, Raphael; Harel, Noga; Nissan, Joseph; Levartovsky, Shifra

    2016-03-25

    The effect of dentin pretreatment with Desensitizing Paste containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate on the retention of zirconium oxide (Y-TZP) crowns was tested. Forty molar teeth were mounted and prepared using a standardized protocol. Y-TZP crowns were produced using computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology. The 40 prepared teeth were either pretreated with Desensitizing Paste or not pretreated. After two weeks, each group was subdivided into two groups, cemented with either Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (RMGIC) or Self Adhesive Resin Cement (SARC)). Prior to cementation, the surface areas of the prepared teeth were measured. After aging, the cemented crown-tooth assemblies were tested for retentive strength using a universal testing machine. The debonded surfaces of the teeth and crowns were examined microscopically at 10× magnification. Pretreating the dentin surfaces with Desensitizing Paste prior to cementation did not affect the retention of the Y-TZP crowns. The retentive values for RMGIC (3.04 ± 0.77 MPa) were significantly higher than those for SARC (2.28 ± 0.58 MPa). The predominant failure modes for the RMGIC and SARC were adhesive cement-dentin and adhesive cement-crown, respectively. An 8.0% arginine and calcium carbonate in-office desensitizing paste can be safely used to reduce post-cementation sensitivity without reducing the retentive strength of Y-TZP crowns.

  14. Calcium oxide derived from waste shells of mussel, cockle, and scallop as the heterogeneous catalyst for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buasri, Achanai; Chaiyut, Nattawut; Loryuenyong, Vorrada; Worawanitchaphong, Phatsakon; Trongyong, Sarinthip

    2013-01-01

    The waste shell was utilized as a bioresource of calcium oxide (CaO) in catalyzing a transesterification to produce biodiesel (methyl ester). The economic and environmen-friendly catalysts were prepared by a calcination method at 700-1,000°C for 4 h. The heterogeneous catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method. The effects of reaction variables such as reaction time, reaction temperature, methanol/oil molar ratio, and catalyst loading on the yield of biodiesel were investigated. Reusability of waste shell catalyst was also examined. The results indicated that the CaO catalysts derived from waste shell showed good reusability and had high potential to be used as biodiesel production catalysts in transesterification of palm oil with methanol.

  15. Calcium Oxide Derived from Waste Shells of Mussel, Cockle, and Scallop as the Heterogeneous Catalyst for Biodiesel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achanai Buasri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The waste shell was utilized as a bioresource of calcium oxide (CaO in catalyzing a transesterification to produce biodiesel (methyl ester. The economic and environmen-friendly catalysts were prepared by a calcination method at 700–1,000°C for 4 h. The heterogeneous catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, X-ray fluorescence (XRF, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET method. The effects of reaction variables such as reaction time, reaction temperature, methanol/oil molar ratio, and catalyst loading on the yield of biodiesel were investigated. Reusability of waste shell catalyst was also examined. The results indicated that the CaO catalysts derived from waste shell showed good reusability and had high potential to be used as biodiesel production catalysts in transesterification of palm oil with methanol.

  16. Productive performance and efficiency of utilization of the diet components in dairy cows fed castor meal treated with calcium oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Variz Cobianchi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect of replacing of 0; 0.33; 0.67 and 1.0 (kg/kg of soybean meal (SBM by undecorticated castor seed meal treated with calcium oxide (CMT - 60 g/kg was evaluated on performance and efficiency of nutrient utilization in dairy cows. Sixteen Holstein and crossbred cows were distributed in four 4 × 4 latin squares. Animals received concentrated feed at a ratio of 1 kg for 3 kg of milk produced, in the natural matter. The diets had the same amount of nitrogen (150.4 g crude protein/kg DM, containing 325.6 g of concentrated feed/kg DM. There was no effect on the serum concentration of transaminase and the animals showed no clinical symptoms of intoxication by ricin. The intake of DM, crude protein (CP and non-fibrous carbohydrates (NFC reduced from 0.67 replacement of SBM by CMT. The intake of neutral detergent fibers corrected for ash and protein (NDFap increased from 0.33 replacement of SBM with CMT. Although the digestibility of dietary components decreased from 0.33 replacement, the intake of digestible components only reduced from 0.67 replacement. Because of the reduction of digestible energy, the synthesis of microbial CP and the utilization efficiency of rumen-degradable protein for the synthesis of microbial CP reduced with full replacement of SBM by CMT. Milk yield, milk composition, daily variation of body weight and the efficiency of utilization of the nutrients for the synthesis of N in milk reduced from 0.67 replacement of SBM by CMT. Castor seed meal treated with calcium oxide can replace up to 0.33 of SBM (50 g/kg DM diet DM in the diet of dairy cows with an average milk production of 20 kg/day.

  17. Tandem oxidation/rearrangement of beta-ketoesters to tartronic esters with molecular oxygen catalyzed by calcium iodide under visible light irradiation with fluorescent lamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Naohiko; Nakayama, Hiroki; Tada, Norihiro; Itoh, Akichika

    2010-05-07

    It was found that beta-ketoesters were directly transformed to the corresponding alpha-hydroxymalonic esters, tartronic esters, with molecular oxygen catalyzed by calcium iodide under visible light irradiation from fluorescent lamp. This reaction includes tandem oxidation/rearrangement and has received much attention from the viewpoint of reduction of energy consumption, labor, and solvents.

  18. Lipid oxidation in fish oil enriched mayonnaise : Calcium disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate, but not gallic acid, strongly inhibited oxidative deterioration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte; Hartvigsen, Karsten; Thomsen, Mikael Holm

    2001-01-01

    was attributed to its ability to chelate free metal ions and iron from egg yolk located at the oil-water interface. Gallic acid reduced the levels of both free radicals and lipid hydroperoxides but promoted slightly the oxidative flavor deterioration in mayonnaise and influenced the profile of volatiles. Gallic...

  19. Antimicrobial, anti-oxidant and calcium channel blocking activities of Amberboa divaricata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid Muhammad Iqbal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Traditional healers in Pakistan use the herb Amberboa divaricata as tonic, aperiant, deobstruent, febrifuge, anti-diarrheal, antiperiodic, antipyretic, anti-cough and in skin disorders. In vitro tissue experiments were carried out on rabbit jejunum to elucidate the possible mechanism of its prescribed effects on gastrointestinal tract, while antibacterial and antioxidant experiments were performed to provide pharmacological evidence of its traditional use in skin disorders. The 70%methanolic crude extract of A. divaricata produced dose dependent relaxation in isolated rabbit jejunum tissue in a concentration range of 0.1–3.0 mg/mL (n=5. Calcium response curves were constructed at concen-tration of 0.03 and 0.1 mg/mL (n=5, which produced rightward shift in a pattern similar to that of verapamil, confirming the calcium channel blocking activity. Agar disc diffusion assay at a concentration of 10 mg crude extract/disc showed clear zones of inhibition.

  20. Reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide mediate plasticity of neuronal calcium signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yermolaieva, Olena; Brot, Nathan; Weissbach, Herbert; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2000-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) are important participants in signal transduction that could provide the cellular basis for activity-dependent regulation of neuronal excitability. In young rat cortical brain slices and undifferentiated PC12 cells, paired application of depolarization/agonist stimulation and oxidation induces long-lasting potentiation of subsequent Ca2+ signaling that is reversed by hypoxia. This potentiation critically depends on NO production and involves cellular ROS utilization. The ability to develop the Ca2+ signal potentiation is regulated by the developmental stage of nerve tissue, decreasing markedly in adult rat cortical neurons and differentiated PC12 cells.

  1. Success of pulpectomy with zinc oxide-eugenol vs calcium hydroxide/iodoform paste in primary molars: a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trairatvorakul, Chutima; Chunlasikaiwan, Salinee

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare clinical and radiographic success rates of zinc oxide-eugenol cement (ZOE) vs calcium hydroxide/iodoform paste (Vitapex) in pulpectomized primary molars at 6 and 12 months. Fifty-four mandibular primary molars from 42 children (average age 5.6 +/- 1.2 years) that met the inclusion criteria were allocated to either test material via block randomization. A 1-visit pulpectomy and stainless steel crown was performed by 1 investigator. The clinical and radiographic diagnoses were blindly assessed by another investigator with an intraexaminer reliability of 0.85 to 0.95 (kappa value). At 6 and 12 months, the ZOE success rates were 48% and 85%, respectively, and the Vitopex success rates were 78% and 89%. The difference in success rates between materials at 6 months was statistically significant, but at 12 months it was not. Vitapex appeared to resolve furcation pathology at a foster rate than zinc oxide-eugenol at 6 months, while at 12 months, both materials yielded similar results.

  2. Calcium-borosilicate glass-ceramics wasteforms to immobilize rare-earth oxide wastes from pyro-processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Miae [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Jong, E-mail: jheo@postech.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Engineering, Adama Science and Technology University (ASTU), PO Box 1888, Adama (Ethiopia)

    2015-12-15

    Glass-ceramics containing calcium neodymium(cerium) oxide silicate [Ca{sub 2}Nd{sub 8-x}Ce{sub x}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2}] crystals were fabricated for the immobilization of radioactive wastes that contain large portions of rare-earth ions. Controlled crystallization of alkali borosilicate glasses by heating at T ≥ 750 °C for 3 h formed hexagonal Ca–silicate crystals. Maximum lanthanide oxide waste loading was >26.8 wt.%. Ce and Nd ions were highly partitioned inside Ca–silicate crystals compared to the glass matrix; the rare-earth wastes are efficiently immobilized inside the crystalline phases. The concentrations of Ce and Nd ions released in a material characterization center-type 1 test were below the detection limit (0.1 ppb) of inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Normalized release values performed by a product consistency test were 2.64·10{sup −6} g m{sup −2} for Ce ion and 2.19·10{sup −6} g m{sup −2} for Nd ion. Results suggest that glass-ceramics containing calcium neodymium(cerium) silicate crystals are good candidate wasteforms for immobilization of lanthanide wastes generated by pyro-processing. - Highlights: • Glass-ceramic wasteforms containing Ca{sub 2}Nd{sub 8-x}Ce{sub x}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2} crystals were synthesized to immobilize lanthanide wastes. • Maximum lanthanide oxide waste loading was >26.8 wt.%. • Ce and Nd ions were highly partitioned inside Ca–Nd–silicate crystals compared to glass matrix. • Amounts of Ce and Nd ions released in the material characterization center-type 1 were below the detection limit (0.1 ppb). • Normalized release values performed by a PCT were 2.64• 10{sup −6} g m{sup −2} for Ce ions and 2.19• 10{sup −6} g m{sup −2} for Nd ions.

  3. Calcium-Mediated Control of Polydopamine Film Oxidation and Iron Chelation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Klosterman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The facile preparation of conformal polydopamine (PDA films on broad classes of materials has prompted extensive research into a wide variety of potential applications for PDA. The constituent molecular species in PDA exhibit diverse chemical moieties, and therefore highly variable properties of PDA-based devices may evolve with post-processing conditions. Here we report the use of redox-inactive cations for oxidative post-processing of deposited PDA films. PDA films incubated in alkaline CaCl2 solutions exhibit accelerated oxidative evolution in a dose-dependent manner. PDA films incubated in CaCl2 solutions exhibit 53% of the oxidative charge transfer compared to pristine PDA films. Carboxylic acid groups generated from the oxidation process lower the isoelectric point of PDA films from pH = 4.0 ± 0.2 to pH = 3.1 ± 0.3. PDA films exposed to CaCl2 solutions during post-processing also enhance Fe2+/Fe3+ chelation compared to pristine PDA films. These data illustrate that the molecular heterogeneity and non-equilibrium character of as-deposited PDA films afford control over the final composition by choosing post-processing conditions, but also demands forethought into how the performance of PDA-incorporated devices may change over time in salt solutions.

  4. Calcium-Mediated Control of Polydopamine Film Oxidation and Iron Chelation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosterman, Luke; Bettinger, Christopher J

    2016-12-22

    The facile preparation of conformal polydopamine (PDA) films on broad classes of materials has prompted extensive research into a wide variety of potential applications for PDA. The constituent molecular species in PDA exhibit diverse chemical moieties, and therefore highly variable properties of PDA-based devices may evolve with post-processing conditions. Here we report the use of redox-inactive cations for oxidative post-processing of deposited PDA films. PDA films incubated in alkaline CaCl₂ solutions exhibit accelerated oxidative evolution in a dose-dependent manner. PDA films incubated in CaCl₂ solutions exhibit 53% of the oxidative charge transfer compared to pristine PDA films. Carboxylic acid groups generated from the oxidation process lower the isoelectric point of PDA films from pH = 4.0 ± 0.2 to pH = 3.1 ± 0.3. PDA films exposed to CaCl₂ solutions during post-processing also enhance Fe2+/Fe3+ chelation compared to pristine PDA films. These data illustrate that the molecular heterogeneity and non-equilibrium character of as-deposited PDA films afford control over the final composition by choosing post-processing conditions, but also demands forethought into how the performance of PDA-incorporated devices may change over time in salt solutions.

  5. Electrophoretic deposition of calcium silicate-reduced graphene oxide composites on titanium substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehrali, Mehdi; Akhiani, Amir Reza; Talebian, Sepehr

    2016-01-01

    silicate-reduced graphene oxide (CS-rGO) composites were synthesized, using an in situ hydrothermal method. CS nanowires were uniformly decorated on the rGO, with an appropriate interfacial bonding. The CS-rGO composites behaved like hybrid composites when deposited on a titanium substrate by cathodic...

  6. Kinetics and mechanism of heterogeneous oxidation of sulfur dioxide by ozone on surface of calcium carbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Li

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfate particles play a key role in the air quality and the global climate, but the heterogeneous formation mechanism of sulfates on surfaces of atmospheric particles is not well established. Carbonates, which act as a reactive component in mineral dust due to their special chemical properties, may contribute significantly to the sulfate formation by heterogeneous processes. This paper presents a study on the oxidation of SO2 by O3 on CaCO3 particles. Using Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS, the formation of sulfite and sulfate on the surface was identified, and the roles of O3 and water in oxidation processes were determined. The results showed that in the presence of O3, SO2can be oxidized to sulfate on the surface of CaCO3 particles. The reaction is first order in SO2 and zero order in O3. The reactive uptake coefficient for SO2 [(0.6–9.8×1014 molecule cm-3] oxidation by O3 [(1.2–12×1014 molecule cm-3] was determined to be (1.4±0.3×10-7 using the BET area as the reactive area and (7.7±1.6×10-4 using the geometric area. A two-stage mechanism that involves adsorption of SO2 followed by O3 oxidation is proposed and the adsorption of SO2 on the CaCO3 surface is the rate-determining step. The proposed mechanism can well explain the experiment results. The atmospheric implications were explored based on a box model calculation. It was found that the heterogeneous reaction might be an important pathway for sulfate formation in the atmosphere.

  7. Effects of temperature on the heterogeneous oxidation of sulfur dioxide by ozone on calcium carbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Y. Wu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The heterogeneous oxidation of sulfur dioxide by ozone on CaCO3 was studied as a function of temperature (230 to 298 K at ambient pressure. Oxidation reactions were followed in real time using diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectrometry (DRIFTS to obtain kinetic and mechanistic data. From the analysis of the spectral features, the formation of sulfate was identified on the surface in the presence of O3 and SO2 at different temperatures from 230 to 298 K. The results showed that the heterogeneous oxidation and the rate of sulfate formation were sensitive to temperature. An interesting stage-transition region was observed at temperatures ranging from 230 to 257 K, but it became ambiguous gradually above 257 K. The reactive uptake coefficients at different temperatures from 230 to 298 K were acquired for the first time, which can be used directly in atmospheric chemistry modeling studies to predict the formation of secondary sulfate aerosol in the troposphere. Furthermore, the rate of sulfate formation had a turning point at about 250 K. The sulfate concentration at 250 K was about twice as large as that at 298 K. The rate of sulfate formation increased with decreasing temperature at temperatures above 250 K, while there is a contrary temperature effect at temperatures below 250 K. The activation energy for heterogeneous oxidation at temperatures from 245 K to 230 K was determined to be 14.63 ± 0.20 kJ mol−1. A mechanism for the temperature dependence was proposed and the atmospheric implications were discussed.

  8. Preventing oxidative stress in rats with aldosteronism by calcitriol and dietary calcium and magnesium supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Kayla D; Ahokas, Robert A; Bhattacharya, Syamal K; Sun, Yao; Gerling, Ivan C; Weber, Karl T

    2006-08-01

    Prominent features of the clinical syndrome of congestive heart failure (CHF) include aldosteronism and the presence of oxidative stress. Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) accompanies aldosteronism due to increased urinary and fecal excretion of Ca. SHPT accounts for intracellular Ca overloading of diverse cells, including peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), and the appearance of oxidative stress. Parathyroidectomy or a Ca channel blocker each prevent these responses. Herein, we hypothesized calcitriol, or 1,25(OH)2D3, plus a diet supplemented with Ca and Mg (CMD) would prevent SHPT and Ca overloading of PBMC and thereby oxidative stress in these cells in rats receiving aldosterone/salt treatment (ALDOST). In rats with ALDOST for 4 weeks, without or with CMD, we monitored plasma-ionized [Ca]o and parathyroid hormone (PTH), and PBMC cytosolic-free [Ca]i and H2O2 production. Untreated, age- and gender-matched rats served as controls. Compared to controls, ALDOST led to an expected fall in plasma [Ca]o level with accompanying rise in plasma PTH level and intracellular Ca overloading of PBMC and their increased production of H2O2. CMD prevented SHPT and abrogated intracellular Ca overloading of PBMC and their increased H2O2 production. The appearance of SHPT in aldosteronism, induced by fallen plasma [Ca]o, leads to PTH-mediated Ca overloading of PBMC and their increased production of H2O2. SHPT in rats with aldosteronism can be prevented by calcitriol and a diet supplemented with Ca and Mg. These findings raise the prospect that the SHPT found in CHF could be managed with macro- and micronutrients.

  9. Different oxidative status and expression of calcium channel components in stress-induced dysfunctional chicken muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, T; Zhao, X; Wang, P; Chen, H; Xu, X; Zhou, G

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effects of transport stress at high ambient temperatures on the oxidation status and the expression of essential elements responsible for the Ca transport (sarco- (endo-) plasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase (SERCA1) and the ryanodine receptor (RyR) in (PM) muscles of broilers. Briefly, Arbor Acres broiler chickens ( = 112) were randomly categorized into 2 treatments: unstressed control (C) and 0.5 h transport (T). Each treatment consisted of 8 replicates of 7 birds each. Birds were transported according to a designed protocol. PM muscle samples in T group were collected and classified as normal (T-NOR) or pale, soft, and exudative-like (T-PSE) using meat quality parameters. The results indicated that production of corticosterone (CORT) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased significantly after transportation ( biochemical changes which may lead to different oxidative states and, importantly, to different expressions of SERCA and RyR. These induced changes in abnormal sarcoplasmic Ca homeostasis have significant implications for the development of PSE-like meat.

  10. Electrolytic reduction of mixed (Fe, Ti) oxide using molten calcium chloride electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panigrahi, Mrutyunjay, E-mail: mp@mail.tagen.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials (IMRAM), Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aobaku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Iizuka, Atsushi; Shibata, Etsuro; Nakamura, Takashi [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials (IMRAM), Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aobaku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tan et al. have electrolyzed mixtures of TiO{sub 2} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} to produce alloys containing Fe-Ti intermetallic phases such as FeTi and Fe{sub 2}Ti using the FFC process. However, the produced alloys have a porous structure with many carbon impurities, e.g., titanium carbide (TiC). Most of the carbon contamination could be caused by the presence of carbon particles in the porous alloy structure. They did not mention any obvious ways of excluding carbon and other impurities, and only suggested that the use of mixed oxides with refined structures or using a single phase, namely ilmenite (FeO{center_dot}TiO{sub 2}), were methods of decreasing impurities in the formed alloys. For future industrialization, there is an urgent need for obvious ways of producing purer Fe-Ti alloys with dense structures, rather than porous structures, as these absorb carbon impurities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Finally, we successfully reduced to a highly purified Fe-Ti intermetallic alloy of FeTi and {beta}-Ti (FeTi{sub 4}) phases. FeTi phases of size around 5-10 {mu}m were dispersed in a matrix of the {beta}-Ti (FeTi{sub 4}) phase. The carbon content of the electrolyzed alloy was as low as less than 0.01 mass%. It was suggested that the dense structure of the alloy of FeTi and {beta}-Ti (FeTi{sub 4}) avoided the inclusion of carbon particle impurities, unlike the porous alloy structure. - Abstract: The production of high-purity metals or alloys using effective technologies is critical for future industrialization. With this aim in mind, a fundamental study of electrolysis in molten CaCl{sub 2} electrolytes was conducted to develop a new production process for ferrotitanium (Fe-Ti) intermetallic alloys. Mixed solid oxides of TiO{sub 2} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were used in a molar ratio of 5.44:1.00. In this composition of Ti and Fe, FeTi and {beta}-Ti containing iron can co-exist in equilibrium. A mixed solid (Fe, Ti) oxide was reduced

  11. Isolation and prevention of calcium oxalate-induced apoptotic death and oxidative stress in MDCK cells by diosgenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Sarmistha; Goswami, Gagan; Pandrangi, Anupama

    2014-12-05

    Calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) has been shown to be the most frequent constituent of kidney stones. The interactions of cells with COM crystals produce a variety of physiological and pathological changes including the development of oxidative stress, cellular injury and apoptosis. On the other hand, diosgenin, a steroidal sapogenin, is well known for its antioxidant activity. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate whether diosgenin protects MDCK renal epithelial cells from COM-induced apoptotic death. Diosgenin was isolated from fruits of Solanum xanthocarpum by silica gel column chromatography. It was obtained in high yields (1.23%) and the purity was ascertained by HPTLC analysis. Characterization of diosgenin was done by mp, UV-visible spectrophotometry, elemental analysis, FT-IR, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR analysis. Cells were co-incubated with COM (80μg/cm(2)) and diosgenin (2.5, 5, 7.5 and 10μg/mL) for 24h. It was found that diosgenin attenuated the apoptotic death induced by COM as measured in terms of cell viability, caspase -9/3 activities and DNA fragmentation percent. The inhibitory role of diosgenin on caspase -9/3 activities was also analyzed using molecular docking experiments, which showed interactions to their active sites by H-bonds. Diosgenin also attenuated the increase in lipid peroxidation and glutathione depletion induced by COM crystals. In conclusion, the preventive effect of diosgenin is associated to the inhibition of oxidative stress and caspases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Bile composition, plasma lipids and oxidative hepatic damage induced by calcium supplementation; effects of goat or cow milk consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Castro, Javier; Alférez, María J M; López-Aliaga, Inmaculada; Nestares, Teresa; Sánchez-Alcover, Ana; Campos, Margarita S

    2013-05-01

    Calcium-fortified foods, especially milk and dairy products are recommended to be consumed daily for groups in risk of nutritional deficiency, including children, young adults, menopausal women, pregnant women and the elderly, however Ca-supplementation promotes gallstone formation because Ca is a nucleating factor. The objective of the current study was to assess the influence of cow or goat milk-based diets, either normal or Ca-supplemented, on bile composition, biochemical parameters and hepatic antioxidant status. Weanling male rats were randomly divided into six groups, fed standard, goat or cow milk-based diets, either with normal Ca content (5.0 g/kg), or Ca-supplemented (10.0 g/kg), for 2 weeks. Bile cholesterol concentration and output was higher in rats fed goat milk in comparison with those fed with standard and cow-milk-based diet. Ca-supplementation increased lithogenic index with the standard and cow-milk based diets, this change was not observed with the goat milk diet. Activities of plasma transaminases were also lower in the animals fed Ca-supplemented goat milk, in comparison with the other diets assayed. In general, Ca-supplement in the diet led to an increase in the hepatic oxidative damage, with an increase in the activities of all the antioxidant enzymes studied in the standard and cow milk diet, but not with goat milk. The habitual consumption of goat milk has positive effects on the plasma lipid profile, biliary composition and hepatic antioxidant defence. In addition, under our experimental conditions, Ca-supplementation of this type of milk does not increase the lithogenic index, or hepatic oxidative damage.

  13. Water deficit stress mitigation by calcium chloride in Catharanthus roseus: effects on oxidative stress, proline metabolism and indole alkaloid accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaleel, C Abdul; Manivannan, P; Sankar, B; Kishorekumar, A; Gopi, R; Somasundaram, R; Panneerselvam, R

    2007-10-15

    The present investigation was conducted to determine whether CaCl(2) increases Catharanthus roseus drought tolerance and if such tolerance is correlated with changes in oxidative stress, osmoregulation and indole alkaloid accumulation. C. roseus plants were grown under water deficit environments with or without CaCl(2). Drought induced oxidative stress was measured in terms of lipid peroxidation (LPO) and H(2)O(2) contents, osmolyte concentration, proline (PRO) metabolizing enzymes and indole alkaloid accumulation. The plants under pot culture were subjected to 10, 15 and 20 days interval drought (DID) stress and drought stress with 5mM CaCl(2) and 5mM CaCl(2) alone from 30 days after planting (DAP) and regular irrigation was kept as control. The plants were uprooted on 41 DAS (10 DID), 46 DAS (15 DID) and 51 DAS (20 DID). Drought stressed plants showed increased LPO, H(2)O(2), glycine betaine (GB) and PRO contents and decreased proline oxidase (PROX) activity and increased gamma-glutamyl kinase (gamma-GK) activity when compared to control. Addition of CaCl(2) to drought stressed plants lowered the PRO concentration by increasing the level of PROX and decreasing the gamma-GK activities. Calcium ions increased the GB contents. CaCl(2) appears to confer greater osmoprotection by the additive role with drought in GB accumulation. The drought with CaCl(2)-treated C. roseus plants showed an increase in total indole alkaloid content in shoots and roots when compared to drought stressed and well-watered plants.

  14. A Simulation Study on the Feasibility of Radio Enhancement Therapy with Calcium Tungstate and Hafnium Oxide Nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Sherck, Nicholas J

    2016-01-01

    Herein is a simulation study on the radio enhancement potential of calcium tungstate (CaWO4) and hafnium oxide (HfO2) nanoparticles (NPs) relative to gold (Au) NPs. The work utilizes the extensively studied Au NP as the "gold standard" to which the novel materials can be compared. All three materials were investigated in-silico with the software Penetration and Energy Loss of Positrons and Electrons (PENELOPE) developed by Francesc Salvat and distributed in the United States by the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The aims are: (1) Do CaWO4 and HfO2 NPs function like Au?, and (2) if not, how else might they function to enhance radio therapy? Our investigations have found that HfO2 likely functions as Au, but not as effectively. CaWO4 likely does not function as Au, and we propose that CaWO4 may exhibit cancer killing traits through its intrinsic UV luminescence property.

  15. Calcium-activated potassium channels - a therapeutic target for modulating nitric oxide in cardiovascular disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Thomas; Kroigaard, Christel; Simonsen, Ulf

    2010-01-01

    IMPORTANCE OF THE FIELD: Cardiovascular risk factors are often associated with endothelial dysfunction, which is also prognostic for occurrence of cardiovascular events. Endothelial dysfunction is reflected by blunted vasodilatation and reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Endothelium......-dependent vasodilatation is mediated by NO, prostacyclin, and an endothelium-derived hyperpolarising factor (EDHF), and involves small (SK) and intermediate (IK) conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels. Therefore, SK and IK channels may be drug targets for the treatment of endothelial dysfunction in cardiovascular...... disease. AREAS COVERED IN THIS REVIEW: SK and IK channels are involved in EDHF-type vasodilatation, but recent studies suggest that these channels are also involved in the regulation of NO bioavailability. Here we review how SK and IK channels may regulate NO bioavailability. WHAT THE READER WILL GAIN...

  16. Effective degradation of nitrotoluenes in wastewater by heterogeneous catalytic ozonation in the presence of calcium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Minhui; Chen, Jida; Li, Lingxing; He, Huirong; Lu, Lansi; Fu, Denglin

    2017-10-01

    CaO was utilized as a heterogeneous catalyst for ozonation of nitrotoluenes wastewater. Results showed that CaO could promote ozone to generate more hydroxyl radicals (.OHs) that non-selectively degrade p-nitrotoluene (PNT) at an over double oxidation rate of alone ozone in simulated wastewater. A possible degradation pathway of PNT was proposed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. CaO maintained a good pH and catalytic activity after several repeated use in CaO/O3. The removal efficiency of chemical oxygen demand (CODcr), content of nitrotoluenes, chromaticity and odour reached 97.97%, 99.96%, 100% and 100% in wastewater at the same time, respectively.

  17. DEGRADATION OF SM2ZR2O7 THERMAL BARRIER COATING CAUSED BY CALCIUM-MAGNESIUM-ALUMINUM-SILICON OXIDE (CMAS) DEPOSITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Honglong; Sheng, Zhizhi; Tarwater, Emily; Zhang, Xingxing; Dasgupta, Sudip; Fergus, Jeffrey

    2015-03-16

    Rare earth zirconates are promising materials for use as thermal barrier coatings in gas turbine engines. Among the lanthanide zirconate materials, Sm2Zr2O7 with the pyrochlore structure has lower thermal conductivity and better corrosion resistance against calcium-magnesium-aluminum-silicon oxide (CMAS). In this work, after reaction with CMAS, the pyrochlore structure transforms to the cubic fluorite structure and Ca2Sm8(SiO4)6O2 forms in elongated grain.

  18. Steel treatment with calcium-aluminate synthetic slag and addition of titanium oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putan, A.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper introduces the results of the experiments on synthetic slag desulphurization and deoxidizing using slag belonging to the ternary system CaO-Al2O3-TiO2. The experiments have been done in a 10 kg induction furnace. In order to obtain the reducing slag we used a mixture of lime, alumina and titanium oxide, representing 2 % of the charge weight. The experiments were done on mechanical mixtures produced according to various recipes; for each experiment, the slag was sampled in order to determine its chemical composition and the steel was also sampled, in order to determine its contents in sulphur and oxygen. The resulting data have been processed in EXCEL, which gave the correlation equations between the desulphurization and deoxidizing output and the chemical composition of the synthetic slag, respectively the ratio and sum of the oxides.

    En el trabajo se presentan los resultados del experimento que se refiere a la desulfuración y desoxidación de las escorias sintéticas con escorias del sistema ternario CaO-Al2O3-TiO2.. Los experimentos se hicieron en un horno con inducción de 10 kg de capacidad. Para formar las escorias reductoras se ha utilizado una mezcla compuesta de cal, alúmina y óxido de titanio en porcentaje de 2 % del peso de la carga de acero más escoria sintética. Para los experimentos se usaron mezclas mecánicas producidas por varias recetas y de cada experimento se tomaron muestras de escorias para determinar la composición química y muestras de acero para determinar el contenido de azúfre y oxígeno. Los datos obtenidos fueron procesados en el programa de cálculo EXCEL, obteniéndose ecuaciones de correlación entre la eficiencia de la desulfuración y desoxidación y la composición química de la escoria sintética.

  19. Particulate air pollution induces arrhythmia via oxidative stress and calcium calmodulin kinase II activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin-Bae [The Division of Cardiology, Kyung Hee University College of Medicine, 1 Hoegi-dong, Dongdaemun-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Changsoo [The Department of Preventive Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seungsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eunmi [Cardiovascular Research Institute and Severance Biomedical Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seungsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sanghoon; Park, Hyelim; Pak, Hui-Nam; Lee, Moon-Hyoung [The Division of Cardiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seungsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Dong Chun [The Department of Preventive Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seungsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Ki-Chul [Cardiovascular Research Institute and Severance Biomedical Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seungsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); The Division of Cardiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seungsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seungsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Joung, Boyoung, E-mail: cby6908@yuhs.ac [The Division of Cardiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seungsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) can increase the incidence of arrhythmia. However, the arrhythmogenic mechanism of PM is poorly understood. This study investigated the arrhythmogenic mechanism of PM. In Sprague–Dawley rats, QT interval was increased from 115.0 ± 14.0 to 142.1 ± 18.4 ms (p = 0.02) after endotracheal exposure of DEP (200 μg/ml for 30 min, n = 5). Ventricular premature contractions were more frequently observed after DEP exposure (100%) than baseline (20%, p = 0.04). These effects were prevented by pretreatment of N-acetylcysteine (NAC, 5 mmol/L, n = 3). In 12 Langendorff-perfused rat hearts, DEP infusion of 12.5 μg/ml for 20 min prolonged action potential duration (APD) at only left ventricular base increasing apicobasal repolarization gradients. Spontaneous early afterdepolarization (EAD) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) were observed in 8 (67%) and 6 (50%) hearts, respectively, versus no spontaneous triggered activity or VT in any hearts before DEP infusion. DEP-induced APD prolongation, EAD and VT were successfully prevented with NAC (5 mmol/L, n = 5), nifedipine (10 μmol/L, n = 5), and active Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) blockade, KN 93 (1 μmol/L, n = 5), but not by thapsigargin (200 nmol/L) plus ryanodine (10 μmol/L, n = 5) and inactive CaMKII blockade, KN 92 (1 μmol/L, n = 5). In neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, DEP provoked ROS generation in dose dependant manner. DEP (12.5 μg/ml) induced apoptosis, and this effect was prevented by NAC and KN 93. Thus, this study shows that in vivo and vitro exposure of PM induced APD prolongation, EAD and ventricular arrhythmia. These effects might be caused by oxidative stress and CaMKII activation. -- Highlights: ► The ambient PM consistently prolonged repolarization. ► The ambient PM induced triggered activity and ventricular arrhythmia. ► These effects were prevented by antioxidants, I{sub CaL} blockade and CaMKII blockade. ► The ambient PM can induce

  20. Physicochemical properties and in vitro cytocompatibility of modified titanium surfaces prepared via micro-arc oxidation with different calcium concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Sui-Dan; Zhang, Hui [Guanghua School of Stomatology, Hospital of Stomatology, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510055 (China); Dong, Xu-Dong [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3 (Canada); Ning, Cheng-Yun [College of Material Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Fok, Alex S.L. [Minnesota Dental Research Center of Biomaterials and Biomechanics, School of Dentistry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55414 (United States); Wang, Yan, E-mail: wyan65@163.com [Guanghua School of Stomatology, Hospital of Stomatology, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510055 (China)

    2015-02-28

    Highlights: • MAO coating improves the surface characteristics and cytocompatibility of titanium. • Composition of MAO coating varies with the electrolyte concentration. • MAO coating properties can be optimized by adjusting the electrolyte concentration. • Higher CA concentration contributes to more favorable MAO coating cytocompatibility. - Abstract: Objective: To explore the effect of calcium concentration in the electrolyte solution on the physicochemical properties and biocompatibility of coatings formed by micro-arc oxidation (MAO) on titanium surfaces. Methods: The surfaces of pure titanium plates were modified by MAO in an electrolytic solution containing calcium acetate (CA; C{sub 4}H{sub 6}CaO{sub 4}) at concentrations of 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, or 0.3 M and β-glycerophosphate disodium salt pentahydrate (β-GP; C{sub 3}H{sub 7}Na{sub 2}O{sub 6}P·5H{sub 2}O) at a fixed concentration of 0.02 M. Surface topography, elemental characteristics, phase composition, and roughness were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray diffraction, and a surface roughness tester, respectively. To assess the cytocompatibility and osteoinductivity of the surfaces, MC3T3-E1 preosteoblasts were cultured on the surfaces in vitro, and cell morphology, adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation were observed. Results: The porous MAO coating was composed primarily of TiO{sub 2} rutile and anatase. The amount of TiO{sub 2} rutile, the Ca/P ratio, and the surface roughness of the MAO coating increased with increasing CA concentration in the electrolyte solution. Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}, CaCO{sub 3}, and CaTiO{sub 3} were formed on MAO-treated surfaces prepared with CA concentrations of 0.2 and 0.3 M. Cell proliferation and differentiation increased with increasing CA concentration, with MC3T3-E1 cells exhibiting favorable morphologies for bone–implant integration. Conclusions: MAO coating improves the surface characteristics and

  1. Woody biomass and RPF gasification using reforming catalyst and calcium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Jun; Kawamoto, Katsuya; Fukushima, Ryutaro; Tanaka, Shingo

    2011-05-01

    This study focused on steam gasification and reforming of waste biomass using a reforming catalyst. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the durability of a commercial Ni reforming catalyst and the effect of CaO on the reforming behavior, and to clarify detailed factors of catalytic performance, as well as the effect of operating parameters on the characteristics of produced gas composition. Moreover, catalyst regeneration was carried out and the behavior of catalytic activity based on gas composition was investigated. Using a fluidized bed gasifier and a fixed bed reformer, gasification and reforming of waste biomass were carried out. Commercial Ni-based catalyst and calcined limestone (CaO) were applied to the reforming reaction. Temperature of the gasifier and reformer was almost 1023K. Ratio of steam to carbon in the feedstock [molmol(-1)] and equivalence ratio (i.e., ratio of actual to theoretical amount of oxygen) [-] were set at about 2 and 0.3, respectively. The feed rate of the feedstock into the bench-scale gasifier was almost 15kgh(-1). The results of waste biomass gasification confirmed the improvement in H(2) composition by the CO(2) absorption reaction using the reforming catalyst and CaO. In addition, CaO proved to be especially effective in decreasing the tar concentration in the case of woody biomass gasification. Catalytic activity was maintained by means of catalyst regeneration processing by hydrogen reduction after air oxidation when woody biomass was used as feedstock. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Particulate air pollution induces arrhythmia via oxidative stress and calcium calmodulin kinase II activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Bae; Kim, Changsoo; Choi, Eunmi; Park, Sanghoon; Park, Hyelim; Pak, Hui-Nam; Lee, Moon-Hyoung; Shin, Dong Chun; Hwang, Ki-Chul; Joung, Boyoung

    2012-02-15

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) can increase the incidence of arrhythmia. However, the arrhythmogenic mechanism of PM is poorly understood. This study investigated the arrhythmogenic mechanism of PM. In Sprague-Dawley rats, QT interval was increased from 115.0±14.0 to 142.1±18.4ms (p=0.02) after endotracheal exposure of DEP (200μg/ml for 30min, n=5). Ventricular premature contractions were more frequently observed after DEP exposure (100%) than baseline (20%, p=0.04). These effects were prevented by pretreatment of N-acetylcysteine (NAC, 5mmol/L, n=3). In 12 Langendorff-perfused rat hearts, DEP infusion of 12.5μg/ml for 20min prolonged action potential duration (APD) at only left ventricular base increasing apicobasal repolarization gradients. Spontaneous early afterdepolarization (EAD) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) were observed in 8 (67%) and 6 (50%) hearts, respectively, versus no spontaneous triggered activity or VT in any hearts before DEP infusion. DEP-induced APD prolongation, EAD and VT were successfully prevented with NAC (5mmol/L, n=5), nifedipine (10μmol/L, n=5), and active Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) blockade, KN 93 (1μmol/L, n=5), but not by thapsigargin (200nmol/L) plus ryanodine (10μmol/L, n=5) and inactive CaMKII blockade, KN 92 (1μmol/L, n=5). In neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, DEP provoked ROS generation in dose dependant manner. DEP (12.5μg/ml) induced apoptosis, and this effect was prevented by NAC and KN 93. Thus, this study shows that in vivo and vitro exposure of PM induced APD prolongation, EAD and ventricular arrhythmia. These effects might be caused by oxidative stress and CaMKII activation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Structural Studies of a Complex Between Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase and Calmodulin at Physiological Calcium Concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Michael; Dieckmann, Thorsten; Guillemette, Joseph Guy

    2016-10-04

    The small acidic protein Calmodulin (CaM) serves as a Ca(2+) sensor and control element for many enzymes including nitric oxide synthase (NOS) enzymes that play major roles in key physiological and pathological processes. CaM binding causes a conformational change in NOS to allow for the electron transfer between the reductase and oxygenase domains through a process that is thought to be highly dynamic. In this report, NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the solution structure of the endothelial NOS (eNOS) peptide in complex with CaM at the lowest Ca(2+) concentration (225 nM) required for CaM to bind to eNOS and corresponds to a physiological elevated Ca2+ level found in mammalian cells. Under these conditions, the CaM-eNOS complex has a Ca(2+)-replete C-terminal lobe bound the eNOS peptide and a Ca(2+) free N-terminal lobe loosely associated to the eNOS peptide. With increasing Ca(2+) concentration, the binding of Ca(2+) by the N-lobe of CaM results in a stronger interaction with the C-terminal region of the eNOS peptide and increased α-helical structure of the peptide that may be part of the mechanism resulting in electron transfer from the FMN to the heme in the oxygenase domain of the enzyme. SPR studies performed under the same conditions show Ca(2+) concentration dependent binding kinetics were consistent with the NMR structural results. This investigation shows that structural studies performed under more physiological relevant conditions provide information on subtle changes in structure that may not be apparent when experiments are performed in excess Ca(2+) concentrations.

  4. Dynamics of nitric oxide synthase-calmodulin interactions at physiological calcium concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Michael; Guillemette, J Guy; Dieckmann, Thorsten

    2015-03-24

    The intracellular Ca²⁺ concentration is an important regulator of many cellular functions. The small acidic protein calmodulin (CaM) serves as a Ca²⁺ sensor and control element for many enzymes. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is one of the proteins that is activated by CaM and plays a major role in a number of key physiological and pathological processes. Previous studies have shown CaM to act like a switch that causes a conformational change in NOS to allow for the electron transfer between the reductase and oxygenase domains through a process that is thought to be highly dynamic. We have analyzed the structure and dynamics of complexes formed by peptides based on inducible NOS (iNOS) and endothelial NOS (eNOS) with CaM at Ca²⁺ concentrations that mimic the physiological basal (17 and 100 nM) and elevated levels (225 nM) found in mammalian cells using fluorescence techniques and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The results show the CaM-NOS complexes have similar structures at physiological and fully saturated Ca²⁺ levels; however, their dynamics are remarkably different. At 225 nM Ca²⁺, the CaM-NOS complexes show overall an increase in backbone dynamics, when compared to the dynamics of the complexes at saturating Ca²⁺ concentrations. Specifically, the N-lobe of CaM in the CaM-iNOS complex displays a lower internal mobility (higher S²) and higher exchange protection compared to those of the CaM-eNOS complex. In contrast, the C-lobe of CaM in the CaM-eNOS complex is less dynamic. These results illustrate that structures of CaM-NOS complexes determined at saturated Ca²⁺ concentrations cannot provide a complete picture because the differences in intramolecular dynamics become visible only at physiological Ca²⁺ levels.

  5. Calcium - urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urinary Ca+2; Kidney stones - calcium in urine; Renal calculi - calcium in your urine; Parathyroid - calcium in urine ... Urine calcium level can help your provider: Decide on the best treatment for the most common type of kidney ...

  6. Preparation and characterization of calcium oxide from crab shells (Portunus pelagicus and its application in biodiesel synthesis of waste cooking oil, palm and coconut oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minaria Minaria

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Preparation of calcium oxide from Portunus pelagicus through thermal decomposition for 3 hours at various temperature 700°C, 800°C,900°C,1000°C, and 1100°C. The calcium oxidefrom decomposition was carried out and characterized by X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD, FT-IR spectrophotometer and SEM-EDX analyses. The result of XRD show decomposition Portunus pelagicus at 1000°C have diffraction pattern agree with the CaO diffraction standard with 2θ value  32.4º, 37.5º, 64.3º, and 67,5º. The FT-IR spectrum show vibration of CaO at wavenumber 354.9 cm-1. SEM-EDX data indicated the surface morphology  calcium oxide of Portunus pelagicus more homogen than Portunus pelagicus before decomposition. The decomposition of CaO at 1000°C was applied in the syntesis of biodiesel from waste cooking oil, palm oil, and coconut oil. The biodiesel products  have density  0.8621, 0.8725, and 0.8688 g/cm3. Viscosity are 5.27, 3.71, and 2.45 mm2/s(cst. Acid values respectively are 0.3069, 0.2423 and 0.2100 mg/KOH and Iodine numbers 39.48, 36.12 and 9.24 g I2/100g. All characteristic of biodiesel from waste cooking oil, palm oil, and coconut oil are agree with SNI standard.  The best biodiesel product derived from coconut oil is agree to the parameter value of biodiesel standard.  Keywords: biodiesel. Portunus pelagicus. calcium oxide. catalyst.

  7. Methylxanthines and calcium-mobilizing agents inhibit the expression of cytokine-inducible nitric oxide synthase and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in murine microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereta, M; Bereta, J; Georgoff, I; Coffman, F D; Cohen, S; Cohen, M C

    1994-06-01

    In response to exposure to the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), murine brain microvascular endothelial cells (MME) synthesize the cell surface molecule, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and the intracellular enzyme, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). However, iNOS synthesis requires the presence of both TNF and IFN-gamma, while VCAM-1 can be induced by either cytokine alone. We examined the induction of VCAM-1 and iNOS under a variety of conditions to better define the regulation of TNF and IFN-gamma signal transduction pathways in MME. We utilized the analysis of steady-state levels of iNOS mRNA as well as the measurement of MME-released NO-EDRF (nitric oxide as an endothelium-derived relaxing factor) activity and accumulation of nitrite in the culture medium to define iNOS expression and activity. VCAM-1 expression was determined by flow cytometric analysis. Our data indicate that low density lipoproteins inhibited cytokine-induced iNOS activity by affecting the steady-state levels of iNOS mRNA. Methylxanthines (caffeine and theophylline) as well as several calcium-mobilizing agents inhibited the expression/activity of both iNOS and VCAM-1 in MME. The effectiveness of these agents was dependent upon the degree of disruption in cell calcium homeostasis during cytokine treatment. Cells which had been pretreated with calcium-modulating drugs and then washed and allowed to return to normal calcium homeostasis showed little to no effect from these agents. In addition, our results suggest that NO produced by iNOS acts as a metabolic switch during inflammation by inhibiting oxidative phosphorylation and forcing vascular endothelial cells to temporarily utilize anaerobic energy metabolism.

  8. Calcium chloride effects on salinity-induced oxidative stress, proline metabolism and indole alkaloid accumulation in Catharanthus roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaleel, Cheruth Abdul; Manivannan, Paramasivam; Sankar, B; Kishorekumar, Ashok; Panneerselvam, Rajaram

    2007-09-01

    Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don. plants were grown with NaCl and CaCl2 in order to study the effect of CaCl2 on NaCl-induced oxidative stress in terms of lipid peroxidation (TBARS content), H2O2 content, osmolyte concentration, proline (PRO)-metabolizing enzymes, antioxidant enzyme activities, and indole alkaloid accumulation. The plants were treated with solutions of 80 mM NaCl, 80 mM NaCl with 5 mM CaCl2 and 5 mM CaCl2 alone. Groundwater was used for irrigation of control plants. Plants were uprooted randomly on 90 days after sowing (DAS). NaCl-stressed plants showed increased TBARS, H2O2, glycine betaine (GB) and PRO contents, decreased proline oxidase (PROX) activity, and increased gamma-glutamyl kinase (gamma-GK) activity when compared to control. Addition of CaCl2 to NaCl-stressed plants lowered the PRO concentration by increasing the level of PROX and decreasing the gamma-GK activities. Calcium ions increased the GB contents. CaCl2 appears to confer greater osmoprotection by the additive role with NaCl in GB accumulation. The antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POX) and catalase (CAT) were increased under salinity and further enhanced due to CaCl2 treatment. The NaCl-with-CaCl2-treated C. roseus plants showed an increase in total indole alkaloid content in shoots and roots when compared to NaCl-treated and untreated plants.

  9. Rhythmical changes of a level nitric oxide (NO in roots etiolated seedlings of pea (Pisum sativum L. and influence of exogenous calcium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K. Glyan’ko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Studied time dynamics (during 60 mines a level oxide nitric (NO in cross cuts of roots 2 – day etiolated seedlings of pea sowing (Pisum sativum L. by use of fluorescent probe DAF-2DA and a fluorescent microscope depending on action exogenous calcium (Ca2+. During an exposition of seedlings on water, solution CaCl2 are shown fluctuation in level NO in roots – his increase and decrease that testifies to the certain rhythm in generation NO. Exogenous factors (Ca2+ change time dynamics of level NO in comparison with variant “water”. Ca2+chelate EGTA removes action exogenous calcium on rhythmical change of a level NO in roots. Results are discussed in aspect of close interference of signaling systems and molecules (Ca2+, NO, Н2О2.

  10. Fabrication and characterization of nano-HA-45S5 bioglass composite coatings on calcium-phosphate containing micro-arc oxidized CP-Ti substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farnoush, Hamidreza, E-mail: farnoush@aut.ac.ir [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Kashan, P.O. Box 87317-51167, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Muhaffel, Faiz; Cimenoglu, Huseyin [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Istanbul Technical University, 34469 Maslak, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Introducing a calcium-containing titanium oxide interlayer by MAO on CP-Ti. • EPD was utilized for HA and HA-BG coatings on MAO CP-Ti substrates. • Highest bonding strength was obtained for HA-BG/MAO 360 Ti sample. • Enhancement of corrosion resistance for HA-BG/MAO 360 Ti sample in SBF. - Abstract: In the present study, micro-arc oxidation (MAO) was carried out on commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti) to fabricate porous titanium oxide coatings containing calcium phosphates (CaP) at different applied voltages of 300, 330 and 360 V for 5 min. Subsequently, nano-hydroxyapatite (HA) and HA-45S5 bioglass (BG) composite were effectively coated on micro-arc oxidized substrate by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) at a constant voltage of 30 V for 120 s. The phase, structural agents, microstructure and composition of MAO interlayer and subsequent EPD coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, respectively. Thermal stability of the as-deposited coatings was analyzed by simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry and thermal gravimetery. The pull-off adhesion tests showed the highest bonding strength was obtained for HA-BG coating on micro-oxidized sample at 360 V. The results of potentiodynamic polarization and impedance spectroscopic measurements in simulated body fluid solution depicted that the combination of MAO treatment at 360 V and EPD of HA-BG composite could effectively increase the corrosion resistance of CP-Ti substrates.

  11. An Efficient Green Procedure for Synthesis of Some Fluorinated Curcumin Analogues Catalyzed by Calcium Oxide under Microwave Irradiation and Its Antibacterial Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Elavarasan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of fluorine substituted curcumin analogues have been synthesized in a cheaper and greener method using calcium oxide as catalyst under microwave irradiation. All the synthesized compounds have been characterized by FT-IR, MS, elemental analysis, and 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopic techniques and screened for antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus, β-Heamolytic streptococcus, Shigella flexneri, Vibrio cholerae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumonia. All the synthesized compounds are showing good zone of inhibition against the tested bacterial strains.

  12. Oxidative stability of a heme iron-fortified bakery product: Effectiveness of ascorbyl palmitate and co-spray-drying of heme iron with calcium caseinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemán, Mercedes; Bou, Ricard; Tres, Alba; Polo, Javier; Codony, Rafael; Guardiola, Francesc

    2016-04-01

    Fortification of food products with iron is a common strategy to prevent or overcome iron deficiency. However, any form of iron is a pro-oxidant and its addition will cause off-flavours and reduce a product's shelf life. A highly bioavailable heme iron ingredient was selected to fortify a chocolate cream used to fill sandwich-type cookies. Two different strategies were assessed for avoiding the heme iron catalytic effect on lipid oxidation: ascorbyl palmitate addition and co-spray-drying of heme iron with calcium caseinate. Oxidation development and sensory acceptability were monitored in the cookies over one-year of storage at room temperature in the dark. The addition of ascorbyl palmitate provided protection against oxidation and loss of tocopherols and tocotrienols during the preparation of cookies. In general, ascorbyl palmitate, either alone or in combination with the co-spray-dried heme iron, prevented primary oxidation and hexanal formation during storage. The combination of both strategies resulted in cookies that were acceptable from a sensory point of view after 1year of storage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium carbonate is a dietary supplement used when the amount of calcium taken in the diet is not ... for healthy bones, muscles, nervous system, and heart. Calcium carbonate also is used as an antacid to relieve ...

  14. Calcium supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007477.htm Calcium supplements To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. WHO SHOULD TAKE CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS? Calcium is an important mineral for the ...

  15. Dietary Calcium and Dairy Modulation of Oxidative Stress and Mortality in aP2-Agouti and Wild-type Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Bruckbauer

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative and inflammatory stress have been implicated as major contributors to the aging process. Dietary Ca reduced both factors in short-term interventions, while milk exerted a greater effect than supplemental Ca. In this work, we examined the effects of life-long supplemental and dairy calcium on lifespan and life-span related biomarkers in aP2-agouti transgenic (model of diet-induced obesity and wild-type mice fed obesigenic diets until their death. These data demonstrate that dairy Ca exerts sustained effects resulting in attenuated adiposity, protection against age-related muscle loss and reduction of oxidative and inflammatory stress in both mouse strains. Although these effects did not alter maximum lifespan, they did suppress early mortality in wild-type mice, but not in aP2-agouti transgenic mice.

  16. The effect of calcium dobesilate on vascular endothelial function, blood pressure, and markers of oxidation in obese male smokers: a placebo-controlled randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schram, Miranda T; Stam, Frank; de Jongh, Renate T; de Vries, Greetje; van Dijk, Rob A J M; Serné, Erik H; Lampe, Deva; Nanayakkara, Prabath W B; Tushuizen, Maarten E; Scheffer, Peter G; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Kamper, Ad M; Stehouwer, Coen D A

    2003-09-01

    This randomised double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical trial investigated the effect of 3 months of treatment with calcium dobesilate on endothelium-dependent vasodilation, markers of endothelial function, blood pressure, and markers of oxidation in obese, male smokers. Vascular effects may depend on the type of vessel and we, therefore, investigated both smaller arteries, i.e. resistance arteries and small arterioles, and large conduit arteries. Vascular function was measured by acetylcholine- and sodium-nitroprusside-mediated vasodilation, and capillary recruitment, in the skin microcirculation; by forearm blood flow (FBF) responses to several agonists and to N-G-monomethyl L-arginine (L-NMMA) in the forearm vascular bed; by flow-mediated vasodilation in the brachial artery; and by determination of soluble levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and E-selectin. Twenty-eight individuals received dobesilate and 24 placebo. No effect of calcium dobesilate on endothelial function, blood pressure or markers of oxidation was observed compared with placebo. The difference in acetylcholine-mediated vasodilation in the microcirculation was -52.1%-point (95% confidence interval -132.8 to 28.1); in sodium-nitroprusside-mediated vasodilation in the microcirculation, 2.6%-point (-95.1 to 100.2); in capillary recruitment, 2.5%-point (-6.8 to 11.7); in acetylcholine-induced increases in FBF (n=28), 23%-point (-173 to 126); in L-NMMA-induced reduction of basal FBF, -2.8%-point (-29.3 to 23.8); in flow-mediated vasodilation of the brachial artery, 0.3%-points (-2.7 to 3.3); in 24-h systolic blood pressure, 2.1 mmHg (-1.3 to 5.5); in soluble VCAM-1, 54 ng/ml (-8 to 115); in soluble ICAM-1, 9 ng/ml (-49 to 67); in sE-selectin, -17 ng/ml (-44 to 11); in ketocholesterol 5 nM (-17 to 26); and in oxidised LDL -1.6 U/l (-6.7 to 3.5). We have shown that endothelial function, blood pressure, and markers of oxidation were not

  17. Nitric Oxide Protects L-Type Calcium Channel of Cardiomyocyte during Long-Term Isoproterenol Stimulation in Tail-Suspended Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Zhi-Jie; Xu, Peng-Tao; Jiao, Bo; Chang, Hui; Song, Zhen; Xie, Man-Jiang; Yu, Zhi-Bin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) on L-type calcium channel (LTCC) gating properties of cardiomyocytes during long-term isoproterenol (ISO) stimulation. Expression and activity of nNOS as well as S-nitrosylation of LTCC α1C subunit significantly decreased in the myocardium of SUS rats. Long-term ISO stimulation increased ROS in cardiomyocytes of SUS rats. ISO-enhanced calcium current (I Ca,L) in the SUS group was less than that in the CON group. The maximal I Ca,L decreased to about 80% or 60% of initial value at the 50th minute of ISO treatment in CON or SUS group, respectively. Specific inhibitor NAAN of nNOS reduced maximal I Ca,L to 50% of initial value in the CON group; in contrast, NO donor SNAP maintained maximal I Ca,L in SUS group to similar extent of CON group after 50 min of ISO treatment. Long-term ISO stimulation also changed steady-state activation (P < 0.01), inactivation (P < 0.01), and recovery (P < 0.05) characteristics of LTCC in SUS group. In conclusion, NO-induced S-nitrosylation of LTCC α1C subunit may competitively prevent oxidation from ROS at the same sites. Furthermore, LTCC can be protected by NO during long-term ISO stimulation.

  18. Nitric Oxide Protects L-Type Calcium Channel of Cardiomyocyte during Long-Term Isoproterenol Stimulation in Tail-Suspended Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Jie Yue

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of nitric oxide (NO and reactive oxygen species (ROS on L-type calcium channel (LTCC gating properties of cardiomyocytes during long-term isoproterenol (ISO stimulation. Expression and activity of nNOS as well as S-nitrosylation of LTCC α1C subunit significantly decreased in the myocardium of SUS rats. Long-term ISO stimulation increased ROS in cardiomyocytes of SUS rats. ISO-enhanced calcium current (ICa,L in the SUS group was less than that in the CON group. The maximal ICa,L decreased to about 80% or 60% of initial value at the 50th minute of ISO treatment in CON or SUS group, respectively. Specific inhibitor NAAN of nNOS reduced maximal ICa,L to 50% of initial value in the CON group; in contrast, NO donor SNAP maintained maximal ICa,L in SUS group to similar extent of CON group after 50 min of ISO treatment. Long-term ISO stimulation also changed steady-state activation (P<0.01, inactivation (P<0.01, and recovery (P<0.05 characteristics of LTCC in SUS group. In conclusion, NO-induced S-nitrosylation of LTCC α1C subunit may competitively prevent oxidation from ROS at the same sites. Furthermore, LTCC can be protected by NO during long-term ISO stimulation.

  19. Estradiol coupling to human monocyte nitric oxide release is dependent on intracellular calcium transients: evidence for an estrogen surface receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefano, G B; Prevot, V; Beauvillain, J C; Fimiani, C; Welters, I; Cadet, P; Breton, C; Pestel, J; Salzet, M; Bilfinger, T V

    1999-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that estrogen acutely stimulates constitutive NO synthase (cNOS) activity in human peripheral monocytes by acting on an estrogen surface receptor. NO release was measured in real time with an amperometric probe. 17beta-estradiol exposure to monocytes stimulated NO release within seconds in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas 17alpha-estradiol had no effect. 17beta-estradiol conjugated to BSA (E2-BSA) also stimulated NO release, suggesting mediation by a membrane surface receptor. Tamoxifen, an estrogen receptor inhibitor, antagonized the action of both 17beta-estradiol and E2-BSA, whereas ICI 182,780, a selective inhibitor of the nuclear estrogen receptor, had no effect. We further showed, using a dual emission microfluorometry in a calcium-free medium, that the 17beta-estradiol-stimulated release of monocyte NO was dependent on the initial stimulation of intracellular calcium transients in a tamoxifen-sensitive process. Leeching out the intracellular calcium stores abolished the effect of 17beta-estradiol on NO release. RT-PCR analysis of RNA obtained from the cells revealed a strong estrogen receptor-alpha amplification signal and a weak beta signal. Taken together, a physiological dose of estrogen acutely stimulates NO release from human monocytes via the activation of an estrogen surface receptor that is coupled to increases in intracellular calcium.

  20. Fabrication and characterization of nano-HA-45S5 bioglass composite coatings on calcium-phosphate containing micro-arc oxidized CP-Ti substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnoush, Hamidreza; Muhaffel, Faiz; Cimenoglu, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, micro-arc oxidation (MAO) was carried out on commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti) to fabricate porous titanium oxide coatings containing calcium phosphates (CaP) at different applied voltages of 300, 330 and 360 V for 5 min. Subsequently, nano-hydroxyapatite (HA) and HA-45S5 bioglass (BG) composite were effectively coated on micro-arc oxidized substrate by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) at a constant voltage of 30 V for 120 s. The phase, structural agents, microstructure and composition of MAO interlayer and subsequent EPD coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, respectively. Thermal stability of the as-deposited coatings was analyzed by simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry and thermal gravimetery. The pull-off adhesion tests showed the highest bonding strength was obtained for HA-BG coating on micro-oxidized sample at 360 V. The results of potentiodynamic polarization and impedance spectroscopic measurements in simulated body fluid solution depicted that the combination of MAO treatment at 360 V and EPD of HA-BG composite could effectively increase the corrosion resistance of CP-Ti substrates.

  1. Anti-tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha (Infliximab) Attenuates Apoptosis, Oxidative Stress, and Calcium Ion Entry Through Modulation of Cation Channels in Neutrophils of Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugan, Yunus; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Şahin, Mehmet; Aykur, Mehmet

    2016-08-01

    Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) is known to be associated with increased neutrophil activation and oxidative stress, however, the mechanism of neutrophil activation is still unclear. We have hypothesized that the antioxidant and anti-tumor necrosis factor properties of infliximab may affect intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in the neutrophils of AS patients. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of infliximab on calcium signaling, oxidative stress, and apoptosis in neutrophils of AS patients. Neutrophils collected from ten patients with AS and ten healthy controls were used in the study. In a cell viability test, the ideal non-toxic dose and incubation time of infliximab were found as 100 μM and 1 h, respectively. In some experiments, the neutrophils were incubated with the voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) blockers verapamil + diltiazem (V + D) and the TRPM2 channel blocker 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate (2-APB). Intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, lipid peroxidation, apoptosis, caspase 3, and caspase 9 values were high in neutrophils of AS patients and were reduced with infliximab treatment. Reduced glutathione level and glutathione peroxidase activity were low in the patients and increased with infliximab treatment. The intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations were low in 2-APB and V + D groups. In conclusion, the current study suggests that infliximab is useful against apoptotic cell death and oxidative stress in neutrophils of patients with AS, which seem to be dependent on increased levels of intracellular Ca(2+) through activation of TRPM2 and VGCC.

  2. Full scale calcium bromide injection with subsequent mercury oxidation and removal within wet flue gas desulphurization system: Experience at a 700 MW coal-fired power facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Mark Simpson

    The Environmental Protection Agency promulgated the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards rule, which requires that existing power plants reduce mercury emissions to meet an emission rate of 1.2 lb/TBtu on a 30-day rolling average and that new plants meet a 0.0002 lb/GWHr emission rate. This translates to mercury removals greater than 90% for existing units and greater than 99% for new units. Current state-of-the-art technology for the control of mercury emissions uses activated carbon injected upstream of a fabric filter, a costly proposition. For example, a fabric filter, if not already available, would require a 200M capital investment for a 700 MW size unit. A lower-cost option involves the injection of activated carbon into an existing cold-side electrostatic precipitator. Both options would incur the cost of activated carbon, upwards of 3M per year. The combination of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) reactors and wet flue gas desulphurization (wet FGD) systems have demonstrated the ability to substantially reduce mercury emissions, especially at units that burn coals containing sufficient halogens. Halogens are necessary for transforming elemental mercury to oxidized mercury, which is water-soluble. Plants burning halogen-deficient coals such as Power River Basin (PRB) coals currently have no alternative but to install activated carbon-based approaches to control mercury emissions. This research consisted of investigating calcium bromide addition onto PRB coal as a method of increasing flue gas halogen concentration. The treated coal was combusted in a 700 MW boiler and the subsequent treated flue gas was introduced into a wet FGD. Short-term parametric and an 83-day longer-term tests were completed to determine the ability of calcium bromine to oxidize mercury and to study the removal of the mercury in a wet FGD. The research goal was to show that calcium bromine addition to PRB coal was a viable approach for meeting the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards rule

  3. Trolox-sensitive reactive oxygen species regulate mitochondrial morphology, oxidative phosphorylation and cytosolic calcium handling in healthy cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Distelmaier, F.; Valsecchi, F.; Forkink, M.; Emst-de Vries, S.E. van; Swarts, H.G.P.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.; Verwiel, E.T.P.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Koopman, W.J.H.

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: Cell regulation by signaling reactive oxygen species (sROS) is often incorrectly studied through extracellular oxidant addition. Here, we used the membrane-permeable antioxidant Trolox to examine the role of sROS in mitochondrial morphology, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), and cytosolic

  4. Tantalum oxide and barium sulfate as radiopacifiers in injectable calcium phosphate-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) cements for monitoring in vivo degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, Jan Willem M; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C G; Bronkhorst, Ewald M; Meijer, Gert J; Jansen, John A

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring the degradation of calcium phosphate-based bone substitute materials in vivo by means of noninvasive techniques (e.g., radiography) is often a problem due to the chemical resemblance of those substitutes with the mineral phase of bone. In the view of that, the present study aimed at enhancing the radiopacity of calcium phosphate cement enriched with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (CPC-PLGA) microspheres, by adding tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) or the more traditional radiopacifier barium sulfate (BaSO4). The radiopacifying capacity of these radiopacifiers was first evaluated in vitro by microcomputed tomography (μCT). Thereafter, both radiopacifiers were tested in vivo using a distal femoral condyle model in rabbits, with subsequent ex vivo μCT analysis in parallel with histomorphometry. Addition of either one of the radiopacifiers proved to enhance radiopacity of CPC-PLGA in vitro. The in vivo experiment showed that both radiopacifiers did not induce alterations in biological performance compared to plain CPC-PLGA, hence both radiopacifiers can be considered safe and biocompatible. The histomorphometrical assessment of cement degradation and bone formation showed similar values for the three experimental groups. Interestingly, μCT analysis showed that monitoring cement degradation becomes feasible upon incorporation of either type of radiopacifier, albeit that BaSO4 showed more accuracy compared to Ta2O5. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley Company.

  5. Preparation of magnetic and bioactive calcium zinc iron silicon oxide composite for hyperthermia treatment of bone cancer and repair of bone defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yumin; Ou, Jun; Zhang, Zhanhe; Qin, Qing-Hua

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, a calcium zinc iron silicon oxide composite (CZIS) was prepared using the sol-gel method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was then employed to test the CZIS composite. The results from the test showed that the CZIS had three prominent crystalline phases: Ca(2)Fe(1.7)Zn(0.15)Si(0.15)O(5), Ca(2)SiO(4), and ZnFe(2)O(4). Calorimetric measurements were then performed using a magnetic induction furnace. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis were conducted to confirm the growth of a precipitated hydroxyapatite phase after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). Cell culture experiments were also carried out, showing that the CZIS composite more visibly promoted osteoblast proliferation than ZnFe(2)O(4) glass ceramic and HA, and osteoblasts adhered and spread well on the surfaces of composite samples.

  6. High-Yield Method for Isolation and Culture of Endothelial Cells from Rat Coronary Blood Vessels Suitable for Analysis of Intracellular Calcium and Nitric Oxide Biosynthetic Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nistri Silvia

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe here a method for isolating endothelial cells from rat heart blood vessels by means of coronary microperfusion with collagenase. This methods makes it possible to obtain high amounts of endothelial cells in culture which retain the functional properties of their in vivo counterparts, including the ability to uptake fluorescently-labeled acetylated low-density lipoproteins and to respond to vasoactive agents by modulating intracellular calcium and by upregulating intrinsic nitric oxide generation. The main advantages of our technique are: (i good reproducibility, (ii accurate sterility that can be maintained throughout the isolation procedure and (iii high yield of pure endothelial cells, mainly due to microperfusion and temperature-controlled incubation with collagenase which allow an optimal distribution of this enzyme within the coronary vascular bed.

  7. Synthesis, characterization and application of calcium oxides for the adsorption of carbon dioxide; Sintesis, caracterizacion y aplicacion de oxidos de calcio para la adsorcion de dioxido de carbono

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granados P, A.

    2016-07-01

    In this research, calcium oxide (Ca O), nanocrystalline calcium oxide and their Fe and Ni nano composites were synthesized by solution combustion and high-energy ball-milling processes respectively, in order to study their CO{sub 2} adsorption behavior under different pressure and temperature conditions. The obtained materials were characterized by different analytical techniques: XRD, Sem-EDS and N{sub 2} physisorption measurements. CO{sub 2} adsorption experiments on adsorbents at different temperatures and pressures, were carried in a stainless steel Parr type high vacuum reactor. The CO{sub 2} adsorbed on the materials was determined by thermogravimetric analysis and mass spectrophotometry. The results showed that the synthesis methods, solution combustion and high energy ball milling allowed to improve the materials textural and structural properties such as specific surface area, total pore volume, pore size distribution and nano crystallinity, which played an important effect on the CO{sub 2} adsorption behavior. It was found that the Ca O obtained by solution combustion and milled during 2.5 h, showed the maximum CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity per gram of material (9.311 mmol/g) at ambient temperature and pressure, by chemisorption as adsorption mechanism, due CaCO{sub 3} formation, which was confirmed by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and X photoelectron spectroscopy studies. In general, the investigation results show the potential benefits of these materials efficient use, based on Ca O obtained by solution combustion and treated by high-energy ball milling, as well as that will mitigate environmental problems posed by global warming and reduce the negative impacts to the environment and living beings. (Author)

  8. Hybrid zero valent iron (ZVI)/H2O2 oxidation process for landfill leachate treatment with novel nanosize metallic calcium/iron composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Son Dong; Mallampati, Srinivasa Reddy; Lee, Byoung Ho

    2017-04-01

    A novel nanosize metallic calcium/iron dispersed reagent was synthesized and tested as coagulant/catalyst in a hybrid zero valent iron (ZVI)/H2O2 oxidation process to treat leachate. Two different types of leachates, one from municipal solid waste (MSW) tipping hall (MSWIL) and second from an MSW landfill site (MSWLL), were collected and characterized. The morphology, elemental composition, and mineral phases of the nano-Ca/CaO and nano-Fe/Ca/CaO were characterized by scanning electron microscopy-electron dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and x-ray powder diffraction (XRD) analysis. The coagulation process with 2.5 g L-1 nano-Ca/CaO attained 64.0, 56.0, and 20.7% removal of color, chemical oxygen demand (COD), and total suspended solids (TSS) in MSWLL. With only 1.0 g L-1 of nano-Fe/Ca/CaO, relatively high color, COD and TSS removal was achieved in MSWLL at 67.5, 60.2, and 37.7%, respectively. The heavy metal removal efficiency reached 91-99% after treatment with nano-Fe/Ca/CaO in both leachate samples. The coupling process, using 1.0 g L-1 of nano-Fe/Ca/CaO and 20 mM H2O2 doses, achieved enhancement removal of color, COD, and TSS, up to 95%, 96%, and 66%, respectively, without initial pH control. After this treatment, the color, COD, TSS, and heavy metals were significantly decreased, fitting the Korean discharge regulation limit. A hybrid coupled zero valent iron (ZVI)/H2O2 oxidation process with novel nanosized metallic calcium/iron dispersed reagent proved to be a suitable treatment for dealing with leachate samples. Conventional treatments (biological or physicochemical) are not sufficient anymore to reach the level of purification needed to fully reduce the negative impact of landfill leachates on the environment. This implies that new treatment alternatives species must be proposed. A coupled zero valent iron (ZVI)/H2O2 oxidation process proved to be a suitable treatment for dealing with leachate samples. Coagulation with nFe/Ca/CaO allows 91-99% of heavy

  9. Role of oxidative stress, mitochondrial membrane potential, and calcium homeostasis in human lymphocyte death induced by nickel carbonate hydroxide in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M' Bemba-Meka, Prosper [Faculty of Medicine, Universite de Montreal, QC (Canada); University of Louisville, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Center for Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States); Lemieux, Nicole [Universite de Montreal, Department of Pathology and Cellular Biology, Main Station, P.O. Box 6128, Montreal, QC (Canada); Chakrabarti, Saroj K. [Faculty of Medicine, Universite de Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2006-07-15

    When isolated human lymphocytes were treated in vitro with various concentrations of soluble form of nickel carbonate hydroxide (NiCH) (0-1 mM), at 37 C for 4 h, both concentration- and time-dependent effects of NiCH on lymphocyte death were observed. Increased generation of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), superoxide anion (O{sub 2} {sup -}), depletion of both no protein (NP-) and protein (P-) sulfhydryl (SH) contents and lipid peroxidation (LPO) were induced by NiCH. Pretreatment of lymphocytes with either catalase (H{sub 2}O{sub 2} scavenger), or deferoxamine (DFO) (iron chelator), or excess glutathione (GSH) (an antioxidant) not only significantly reduced the NiCH-induced generation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and LPO, but also increased the NP-SH and P-SH contents initially reduced by NiCH. NiCH-induced generation of excess O{sub 2} {sup -} but not excess LPO was significantly reduced by pretreatment with superoxide dismutase (SOD). NiCH-induced lymphocyte death was significantly prevented by pre-treatment with either catalase, or dimethylthiourea/mannitol (hydroxyl radical scavengers), or DFO, or excess GSH/N-acetylcysteine. NiCH-induced lymphocyte death was also significantly prevented by pretreatment with excess SOD. Thus, various types of oxidative stresses play an important role in NiCH-induced lymphocyte death. Cotreatment with cyclosporin A, a specific inhibitor of alteration in mitochondrial membrane potential ({delta}{psi}{sub m}), not only inhibited NiCH-induced alteration in {delta}{psi}{sub m}, but also significantly prevented Ni-compound-induced lymphocyte death. Furthermore, NiCH-induced destabilization of cellular calcium homeostasis. As such, NiCH-induced lymphocyte death was significantly prevented by modulating intracellular calcium fluxes such as Ca{sup 2+} channel blockers and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} antagonist. Thus, the mechanism of NiCH (soluble form)-induced activation of lymphocyte death signalling pathways involves not only the excess

  10. Augmenting in vitro osteogenesis of a glycine-arginine-glycine-aspartic-conjugated oxidized alginate-gelatin-biphasic calcium phosphate hydrogel composite and in vivo bone biogenesis through stem cell delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linh, Nguyen Tb; Paul, Kallyanashis; Kim, Boram; Lee, Byong-Taek

    2016-11-01

    A functionally modified peptide-conjugated hydrogel system was fabricated with oxidized alginate/gelatin loaded with biphasic calcium phosphate to improve its biocompatibility and functionality. Sodium alginate was treated by controlled oxidation to transform the cis-diol group into an aldehyde group in a controlled manner, which was then conjugated to the amine terminus of glycine-arginine-glycine-aspartic. Oxidized alginate glycine-arginine-glycine-aspartic was then combined with gelatin-loaded biphasic calcium phosphate to form a hydrogel of composite oxidized alginate/gelatin/biphasic calcium phosphate that displayed enhanced human adipose stem cell adhesion, spreading and differentiation. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis confirmed that the glycine-arginine-glycine-aspartic was successfully grafted to the oxidized alginate. Co-delivery of glycine-arginine-glycine-aspartic and human adipose stem cell in a hydrogel matrix was studied with the results indicating that hydrogel incorporated modified with glycine-arginine-glycine-aspartic and seeded with human adipose stem cell enhanced osteogenesis in vitro and bone formation in vivo. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Hydrolytic and oxidate stability of L-(+) -ascorbic acid supported in pectin films: Influence of the macromolecular structure and calcium presence

    Science.gov (United States)

    The hydrolytic and oxidative stability of L-(+)-ascorbic acid (AA) into plasticized pectin films were separately studied in view of preserving vitamin C activity and/or to achieve localized antioxidant activity at pharmaceutical and food interfaces. Films were made with each one of the enzymatically...

  12. Effects of selenium on calcium signaling and apoptosis in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons induced by oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uğuz, Abdülhadi Cihangir; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa

    2012-08-01

    Ca(2+) is well known for its role as crucial second messenger in modulating many cellular physiological functions, Ca(2+) overload is detrimental to cellular function and may present as an important cause of cellular oxidative stress generation and apoptosis. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of selenium on lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), cytosolic Ca(2+) release, cell viability (MTT) and apoptosis values in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons of rats. DRG cells were divided into four groups namely control, H(2)O(2) (as a model substance used as a paradigm for oxidative stress), selenium, selenium + H(2)O(2). Moderate doses and times of H(2)O(2) and selenium were determined by MTT test. Cells were preterated 200 nM selenium for 30 h before incubatation with 1 μM H(2)O(2) for 2 h. Lipid peroxidation levels were lower in the control, selenium, selenium + H(2)O(2) groups than in the H(2)O(2) group. GSH-Px activities were higher in the selenium groups than in the H(2)O(2) group. GSH levels were higher in the control, selenium, selenium + H(2)O(2) groups than in the H(2)O(2) group. Cytosolic Ca(2+) release was higher in the H(2)O(2) group than in the control, selenium, selenium + H(2)O(2) groups. Cytosolic Ca(2+) release was lower in the selenium + H(2)O(2) group than in the H(2)O(2). In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that selenium induced protective effects on oxidative stress, [Ca(2+)](c) release and apoptosis in DRG cells. Since selenium deficiency is a common feature of oxidative stress-induced neurological diseases of sensory neurons, our findings are relevant to the etiology of pathology in oxidative stress-induced neurological diseases of the DRG neurons.

  13. A novel network analysis approach reveals DNA damage, oxidative stress and calcium/cAMP homeostasis-associated biomarkers in frontotemporal dementia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Palluzzi

    Full Text Available Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD is the form of neurodegenerative dementia with the highest prevalence after Alzheimer's disease, equally distributed in men and women. It includes several variants, generally characterized by behavioural instability and language impairments. Although few mendelian genes (MAPT, GRN, and C9orf72 have been associated to the FTD phenotype, in most cases there is only evidence of multiple risk loci with relatively small effect size. To date, there are no comprehensive studies describing FTD at molecular level, highlighting possible genetic interactions and signalling pathways at the origin FTD-associated neurodegeneration. In this study, we designed a broad FTD genetic interaction map of the Italian population, through a novel network-based approach modelled on the concepts of disease-relevance and interaction perturbation, combining Steiner tree search and Structural Equation Model (SEM analysis. Our results show a strong connection between Calcium/cAMP metabolism, oxidative stress-induced Serine/Threonine kinases activation, and postsynaptic membrane potentiation, suggesting a possible combination of neuronal damage and loss of neuroprotection, leading to cell death. In our model, Calcium/cAMP homeostasis and energetic metabolism impairments are primary causes of loss of neuroprotection and neural cell damage, respectively. Secondly, the altered postsynaptic membrane potentiation, due to the activation of stress-induced Serine/Threonine kinases, leads to neurodegeneration. Our study investigates the molecular underpinnings of these processes, evidencing key genes and gene interactions that may account for a significant fraction of unexplained FTD aetiology. We emphasized the key molecular actors in these processes, proposing them as novel FTD biomarkers that could be crucial for further epidemiological and molecular studies.

  14. Extracellular Protein Kinase A Modulates Intracellular Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II, Nitric Oxide Synthase, and the Glutamate-Nitric Oxide-cGMP Pathway in Cerebellum. Differential Effects in Hyperammonemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Llansola, Marta; Felipo, Vicente

    2016-12-21

    Extracellular protein kinases, including cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), modulate neuronal functions including N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent long-term potentiation. NMDA receptor activation increases calcium, which binds to calmodulin and activates nitric oxide synthase (NOS), increasing nitric oxide (NO), which activates guanylate cyclase, increasing cGMP, which is released to the extracellular fluid, allowing analysis of this glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway in vivo by microdialysis. The function of this pathway is impaired in hyperammonemic rats. The aims of this work were to assess (1) whether the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway is modulated in cerebellum in vivo by an extracellular PKA, (2) the role of phosphorylation and activity of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and NOS in the pathway modulation by extracellular PKA, and (3) whether the effects are different in hyperammonemic and control rats. The pathway was analyzed by in vivo microdialysis. The role of extracellular PKA was analyzed by inhibiting it with a membrane-impermeable inhibitor. The mechanisms involved were analyzed in freshly isolated cerebellar slices from control and hyperammonemic rats. In control rats, inhibiting extracellular PKA reduces the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway function in vivo. This is due to reduction of CaMKII phosphorylation and activity, which reduces NOS phosphorylation at Ser1417 and NOS activity, resulting in reduced guanylate cyclase activation and cGMP formation. In hyperammonemic rats, under basal conditions, CaMKII phosphorylation and activity are increased, increasing NOS phosphorylation at Ser847, which reduces NOS activity, guanylate cyclase activation, and cGMP. Inhibiting extracellular PKA in hyperammonemic rats normalizes CaMKII phosphorylation and activity, NOS phosphorylation, NOS activity, and cGMP, restoring normal function of the pathway.

  15. NIR fluorescence spectroscopic investigations of Er{sup 3+}-ions doped borate based tellurium calcium zinc niobium oxide glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravi, O. [Department of Instrumentation, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517502 (India); Dhoble, S.J. [Department of Physics, RTM Nagpur University, Nagpur 440033 (India); Ramesh, B.; Devarajulu, G. [Department of Physics, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517502 (India); Reddy, C. Madhukar [Department of Physics, AP Model School, Yerravaripalem 517194 (India); Linganna, K. [Department of Physics, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517502 (India); Reddy, G. Rajasekhar [Department of Instrumentation, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517502 (India); Raju, B. Deva Prasad, E-mail: drdevaprasadraju@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517502 (India); Department of Future Studies, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517502 (India)

    2015-08-15

    A series of Er{sup 3+} ions doped tellurium calcium zinc niobium borate glasses were prepared by the melt quenching technique. The prepared samples were investigated by optical absorption and near infrared fluorescence spectroscopic studies. The obtained Judd–Ofelt intensity parameters Ω{sub λ} (λ=2, 4 and 6) were determined through experimental and calculated oscillator strengths obtained from absorption spectra and their results are studied and compared with reported literature. The stark-level energies of {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} excited and {sup 4}I{sub 15/2} ground states were evaluated by using both the absorption and emission measurements. The effect of Er{sup 3+} ion concentration on the emission intensity of {sup 4}I{sub 13/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} transition was discussed. Intense and broad 1.53 µm infrared fluorescence is observed at 980 nm diode laser excitation. Photoluminescence (PL) and its decay behavior studies were carried out for the transition {sup 4}I{sub 13/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} at 1.53 µm emission. The broad emission together with higher values of the bandwidth (81 nm), stimulated emission cross-section (32.25×10{sup −22} cm{sup 2}) and lifetime (530 µs for 1.0 mol% of Er{sup 3+}) of level {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} make these glasses attractive for broadband amplifiers. From the analysis of spectroscopic data, the present glass is a prospective photonic material for practical applications in the visible and NIR region. - Highlights: • In this study we prepared TCZNB glasses doped with Er{sup 3+} ions. • Glasses are characterized with absorption, emission and lifetime analysis. • Judd–Ofelt theory is used to calculate radiative properties. • TCZNB glasses could be used as NIR lasers.

  16. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition exaggerates the hypotensive response to ghrelin: role of calcium-activated potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Urmila A; Desai, Kaushik M; Yu, Changhua; Gopalakrishnan, Venkat

    2005-04-01

    To investigate the mechanism underlying the observation that infusion of the growth hormone secretagogue peptide, ghrelin, produces a decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP) with no change in heart rate. The effect of a single bolus infusion of ghrelin (12 nmol/kg intravenously) on the changes in MAP and heart rate was determined in 12-week-old male anaesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to pretreatment with either the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 0.7 mg/ml by mouth for 5 days), or vehicle (control). Ghrelin produced a significant decrease in MAP at 20 min (P ghrelin-evoked decrease in MAP was much greater (P ghrelin in both control and NOS-inhibited rats. A sodium nitroprusside-induced decrease in MAP was unaffected in the presence of apamin-ChTX, but acetylcholine-evoked hypotension was significantly reduced in both groups. These data suggest that the Ca-activated, K-channel-mediated, ghrelin-evoked decrease in MAP may be significant in states of endothelial dysfunction associated with reduced nitric oxide availability.

  17. Effect of Calcium Oxide on the Crushing Strength, Reduction, and Smelting Performance of High-Chromium Vanadium–Titanium Magnetite Pellets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gongjin Cheng

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of calcium oxide on the crushing strength, reduction, and smelting performance of high-chromium vanadium–titanium magnetite pellets (HCVTMP was studied in this work. The main characterization methods of an electronic universal testing machine (EUTM, X-ray fluorescent (XRF, inductively-coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and scanning electron microscope-energy disperse spectroscopy (SEM-EDS were employed. The crushing strength was affected by the mineral phases generated during oxidative baking and the subsequently-formed pellet microstructures owing to CaO addition. The reduction and smelting properties of HCVTMP with different CaO additives were measured and characterized with different softening-melting-dripping indices. Although HCVTMP showed the highest crushing strength with CaO addition of ca. 2 wt %, more CaO addition may be needed to achieve high permeability of the furnace burdens and a good separation condition of the slag and melted iron. In the formation process of the slag and melted iron, it can be determined that CaO could have a relationship with the transformation behavior of Cr, V, and Ti to some extent, with respect to the predominant chemical composition analysis of ICP-AES and XRF. With the microscopic examination, the restraining formation of Ti(C,N and the promoting formation of CaTiO3 are in accordance with the improved melting-dripping indices, including the decrease of the maximum external static load and gas permeability, and the increase of the melting-dripping zone and dripping difficulty.

  18. Calcium Dobesilate Is Protective against Inflammation and Oxidative/Nitrosative Stress in the Retina of a Type 1 Diabetic Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voabil, Paula; Liberal, Joana; Leal, Ermelindo C; Bauer, Jacques; Cunha-Vaz, José; Santiago, Ana Raquel; Ambrósio, António Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Calcium dobesilate (CaD) has been prescribed to some patients in the early stages of diabetic retinopathy to delay its progression. We previously reported that the treatment of diabetic animals (4 weeks of diabetes) with CaD, during the last 10 days of diabetes, prevents blood-retinal barrier breakdown. Here, we aimed to investigate whether later treatment of diabetic rats with CaD would reverse inflammatory processes in the retina. Diabetes was induced with streptozotocin, and 6 weeks after diabetes onset, CaD (100 mg/kg/day) was administered for 2 weeks. The treatment with CaD significantly increased glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) levels in the retina of nondiabetic animals (138.6 ± 12.8% of control) and enhanced the diabetes-induced increase in GFAP levels (174.8 ± 5.6% of control). In addition, CaD prevented the increase in mRNA and protein expression of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1β, as well as the formation of oxidized carbonyl residues and the increase in nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity, particularly in the ganglion cell layer of diabetic animals. We demonstrate that the treatment of diabetic animals with CaD can reverse the established proinflammatory processes in the retina. These beneficial effects appear to be attributed, at least partially, to the antioxidant properties of CaD. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. The Nitric Oxide Donor SNAP-Induced Amino Acid Neurotransmitter Release in Cortical Neurons. Effects of Blockers of Voltage-Dependent Sodium and Calcium Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, José Joaquín; Arce, Carmen; Naddaf, Ahmad; Bellver-Landete, Victor; Oset-Gasque, Maria Jesús; González, María Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Background The discovery that nitric oxide (NO) functions as a signalling molecule in the nervous system has radically changed the concept of neuronal communication. NO induces the release of amino acid neurotransmitters but the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Findings The aim of this work was to study the effect of NO on amino acid neurotransmitter release (Asp, Glu, Gly and GABA) in cortical neurons as well as the mechanism underlying the release of these neurotransmitters. Cortical neurons were stimulated with SNAP, a NO donor, and the release of different amino acid neurotransmitters was measured by HPLC. The involvement of voltage dependent Na+ and Ca2+ channels as well as cGMP in its mechanism of action was evaluated. Conclusions Our results indicate that NO induces release of aspartate, glutamate, glycine and GABA in cortical neurons and that this release is inhibited by ODQ, an inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase. Thus, the NO effect on amino acid neurotransmission could be mediated by cGMP formation in cortical neurons. Our data also demonstrate that the Na+ and Ca2+ voltage- dependent calcium channels are involved in the NO effects on cortical neurons. PMID:24598811

  20. Simultaneous stripping recovery of ammonia-nitrogen and precipitation of manganese from electrolytic manganese residue by air under calcium oxide assist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongliang; Liu, Renlong; Shu, Jiancheng; Li, Wensheng

    2015-01-01

    Leaching tests of electrolytic manganese residue (EMR) indicated that high contents of soluble manganese and ammonia-nitrogen posed a high environmental risk. This work reports the results of simultaneous stripping recovery of ammonia-nitrogen and precipitation of manganese by air under calcium oxide assist. The ammonia-nitrogen stripping rate increased with the dosage of CaO, the air flow rate and the temperature of EMR slurry. Stripped ammonia-nitrogen was absorbed by a solution of sulfuric acid and formed soluble (NH4)2SO4 and (NH4)3H(SO4)3. The major parameters that effected soluble manganese precipitation were the dosage of added CaO and the slurry temperature. Considering these two aspects, the efficient operation conditions should be conducted with 8 wt.% added CaO, 60°C, 800 mL min(-1) air flow rate and 60-min reaction time. Under these conditions 99.99% of the soluble manganese was precipitated as Mn3O4, which was confirmed by XRD and SEM-EDS analyses. In addition, the stripping rate of ammonia-nitrogen was 99.73%. Leaching tests showed the leached toxic substances concentrations of the treated EMR met the integrated wastewater discharge standard of China (GB8978-1996).

  1. Critical role of gap junction communication, calcium and nitric oxide signaling in bystander responses to focal photodynamic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calì, Bianca; Ceolin, Stefano; Ceriani, Federico; Bortolozzi, Mario; Agnellini, Andrielly H R; Zorzi, Veronica; Predonzani, Andrea; Bronte, Vincenzo; Molon, Barbara; Mammano, Fabio

    2015-04-30

    Ionizing and nonionizing radiation affect not only directly targeted cells but also surrounding "bystander" cells. The underlying mechanisms and therapeutic role of bystander responses remain incompletely defined. Here we show that photosentizer activation in a single cell triggers apoptosis in bystander cancer cells, which are electrically coupled by gap junction channels and support the propagation of a Ca2+ wave initiated in the irradiated cell. The latter also acts as source of nitric oxide (NO) that diffuses to bystander cells, in which NO levels are further increased by a mechanism compatible with Ca(2+)-dependent enzymatic production. We detected similar signals in tumors grown in dorsal skinfold chambers applied to live mice. Pharmacological blockade of connexin channels significantly reduced the extent of apoptosis in bystander cells, consistent with a critical role played by intercellular communication, Ca2+ and NO in the bystander effects triggered by photodynamic therapy.

  2. Melatonin prevents cytosolic calcium overload, mitochondrial damage and cell death due to toxically high doses of dexamethasone-induced oxidative stress in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwanjang, Wilasinee; Abramov, Andrey Y; Charngkaew, Komgrid; Govitrapong, Piyarat; Chetsawang, Banthit

    2016-07-01

    Stressor exposure activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and causes elevations in the levels of glucocorticoids (GC) from the adrenal glands. Increasing evidence has demonstrated that prolonged exposure to high GC levels can lead to oxidative stress, calcium deregulation, mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis in a number of cell types. However, melatonin, via its antioxidant activity, exhibits a neuroprotective effect against oxidative stress-induced cell death. Therefore, in the present study, we explored the protective effect of melatonin in GC-induced toxicity in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Cellular treatment with the toxically high doses of the synthetic GC receptor agonist, dexamethasone (DEX) elicited marked decreases in the levels of glutathione and increases in ROS production, lipid peroxidation and cell death. DEX toxicity also induced increases in the levels of cytosolic calcium and mitochondrial fusion proteins (Mfn1 and Opa1) but decreases in the levels of mitochondrial fission proteins (Fis1 and Drp1). Mitochondrial damage was observed in large proportions of the DEX-treated cells. Pretreatment of the cells with melatonin substantially prevented the DEX-induced toxicity. These results suggest that melatonin might exert protective effects against oxidative stress, cytosolic calcium overload and mitochondrial damage in DEX-induced neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Nifedipine treatment reduces resting calcium concentration, oxidative and apoptotic gene expression, and improves muscle function in dystrophic mdx mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Altamirano

    Full Text Available Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD is a recessive X-linked genetic disease, caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin. DMD is characterized in humans and in mdx mice by a severe and progressive destruction of muscle fibers, inflammation, oxidative/nitrosative stress, and cell death. In mdx muscle fibers, we have shown that basal ATP release is increased and that extracellular ATP stimulation is pro-apoptotic. In normal fibers, depolarization-induced ATP release is blocked by nifedipine, leading us to study the potential therapeutic effect of nifedipine in mdx muscles and its relation with extracellular ATP signaling. Acute exposure to nifedipine (10 µM decreased [Ca(2+]r, NF-κB activity and iNOS expression in mdx myotubes. In addition, 6-week-old mdx mice were treated with daily intraperitoneal injections of nifedipine, 1 mg/Kg for 1 week. This treatment lowered the [Ca(2+]r measured in vivo in the mdx vastus lateralis. We demonstrated that extracellular ATP levels were higher in adult mdx flexor digitorum brevis (FDB fibers and can be significantly reduced after 1 week of treatment with nifedipine. Interestingly, acute treatment of mdx FDB fibers with apyrase, an enzyme that completely degrades extracellular ATP to AMP, reduced [Ca(2+]r to a similar extent as was seen in FDB fibers after 1-week of nifedipine treatment. Moreover, we demonstrated that nifedipine treatment reduced mRNA levels of pro-oxidative/nitrosative (iNOS and gp91(phox/p47(phox NOX2 subunits and pro-apoptotic (Bax genes in mdx diaphragm muscles and lowered serum creatine kinase (CK levels. In addition, nifedipine treatment increased muscle strength assessed by the inverted grip-hanging test and exercise tolerance measured with forced swimming test in mdx mice. We hypothesize that nifedipine reduces basal ATP release, thereby decreasing purinergic receptor activation, which in turn reduces [Ca(2+]r in mdx skeletal muscle cells. The results in this work open new

  4. Calcium- and Nitric Oxide-Dependent Nuclear Accumulation of Cytosolic Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase in Response to Long Chain Bases in Tobacco BY-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testard, Ambroise; Da Silva, Daniel; Ormancey, Mélanie; Pichereaux, Carole; Pouzet, Cécile; Jauneau, Alain; Grat, Sabine; Robe, Eugénie; Brière, Christian; Cotelle, Valérie; Mazars, Christian; Thuleau, Patrice

    2016-10-01

    Sphinganine or dihydrosphingosine (d18:0, DHS), one of the most abundant free sphingoid long chain bases (LCBs) in plants, is known to induce a calcium-dependent programmed cell death (PCD) in plants. In addition, in tobacco BY-2 cells, it has been shown that DHS triggers a rapid production of H 2 O 2 and nitric oxide (NO). Recently, in analogy to what is known in the animal field, plant cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPC), a ubiquitous enzyme involved in glycolysis, has been suggested to fulfill other functions associated with its oxidative post-translational modifications such as S-nitrosylation on cysteine residues. In particular, in mammals, stress signals inducing NO production promote S-nitrosylation of GAPC and its subsequent translocation into the nucleus where the protein participates in the establishment of apoptosis. In the present study, we investigated the behavior of GAPC in tobacco BY-2 cells treated with DHS. We found that upon DHS treatment, an S-nitrosylated form of GAPC accumulated in the nucleus. This accumulation was dependent on NO production. Two genes encoding GAPCs, namely Nt(BY-2)GAPC1 and Nt(BY-2)GAPC2, were cloned. Transient overexpression of Nt(BY-2)GAPC-green fluorescent protein (GFP) chimeric constructs indicated that both proteins localized in the cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus. Mutating into serine the two cysteine residues thought to be S-nitrosylated in response to DHS did not modify the localization of the proteins, suggesting that S-nitrosylation of GAPCs was probably not necessary for their nuclear relocalization. Interestingly, using Förster resonance energy transfer experiments, we showed that Nt(BY-2)GAPCs interact with nucleic acids in the nucleus. When GAPCs were mutated on their cysteine residues, their interaction with nucleic acids was abolished, suggesting a role for GAPCs in the protection of nucleic acids against oxidative stress. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on

  5. Thermoelectric properties of antiperovskite calcium oxides Ca3PbO and Ca3SnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Y.; Sakamaki, A.; Takenaka, K.

    2016-05-01

    We report the thermoelectric properties of polycrystalline samples of Ca3Pb1-xBixO (x = 0, 0.1, 0.2) and Ca3SnO, both crystallizing in a cubic antiperovskite-type structure. The Ca3SnO sample shows metallic resistivity and its thermoelectric power approaches 100 μV K-1 at room temperature, resulting in the thermoelectric power factor of Ca3SnO being larger than that of Ca3Pb1-xBixO. On the basis of Hall and Sommerfeld coefficients, the Ca3SnO sample is found to be a p-type metal with a carrier density of ˜1019 cm-3, a mobility of ˜80 cm2 V-1 s-1, both comparable to those in degenerated semiconductors, and a moderately large hole carrier effective mass. The coexistence of moderately high mobility and large effective mass observed in Ca3SnO, as well as possible emergence of a multivalley electronic structure with a small band gap at low-symmetry points in k-space, suggests that the antiperovskite Ca oxides have strong potential as a thermoelectric material.

  6. Induction of nitric oxide synthase mRNA by shear stress requires intracellular calcium and G-protein signals and is modulated by PI 3 kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, A M; Jiang, L; Lee, I; Sessa, W C; Izumo, S; Alper, S L

    1999-01-08

    We have investigated the signaling pathways by which shear stress induces accumulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mRNA in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). Steady laminar fluid shear stress (20 dyn/cm2) induced a time-dependent increase in eNOS mRNA levels that did not require de novo protein synthesis and was in part transcriptional. Shear responsiveness was conferred on a luciferase reporter by a portion of the eNOS gene promoter encoding the 5'-flanking region between nt -1600 and -779. Shear-mediated induction of eNOS mRNA was abolished by chelation of intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) with BAPTA-AM, and inhibited by blockade of calcium entry with SKF96535. In contrast, eNOS mRNA upregulation by shear was potentiated by thapsigargin-mediated depletion of Ca2+i stores. Pertussis toxin (PTX) inhibited both the shear-induced elevation in [Ca2+]i and the subsequent increase in eNOS mRNA, implicating a PTX-sensitive G-protein in both responses. Shear-induced upregulation of eNOS mRNA was unaffected by the calmodulin inhibitor W-7 and by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor herbimycin A, suggesting that neither calmodulin nor tyrosine kinases are required. However, eNOS mRNA upregulation was potentiated by the PI 3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002, suggesting that PI 3-kinase inhibits the shear response. Although microtubule integrity is required for the shear-induced regulation of endothelin-1 mRNA and the morphological and cytoskeletal responses to flow, neither microtubule dissolution with nocodazole nor microtubule stabilization with taxol altered shear-induced [Ca2+]i elevation or upregulation of eNOS mRNA. In conclusion, shear stress of BAEC increases eNOS transcriptional rate and upregulates eNOS mRNA levels by a process that requires calmodulin-independent [Ca2+]i signaling and a PTX-sensitive G-protein, is inhibited by PI 3-kinase, and is independent of microtubule integrity and tyrosine kinase activity. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  7. Grape seed proanthocyanidin extract inhibits glutamate-induced cell death through inhibition of calcium signals and nitric oxide formation in cultured rat hippocampal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Myung-Jun

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proanthocyanidin is a polyphenolic bioflavonoid with known antioxidant activity. Some flavonoids have a modulatory effect on [Ca2+]i. Although proanthocyanidin extract from blueberries reportedly affects Ca2+ buffering capacity, there are no reports on the effects of proanthocyanidin on glutamate-induced [Ca2+]i or cell death. In the present study, the effects of grape seed proanthocyanidin extract (GSPE on glutamate-induced excitotoxicity was investigated through calcium signals and nitric oxide (NO in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Results Pretreatment with GSPE (0.3-10 μg/ml for 5 min inhibited the [Ca2+]i increase normally induced by treatment with glutamate (100 μM for 1 min, in a concentration-dependent manner. Pretreatment with GSPE (6 μg/ml for 5 min significantly decreased the [Ca2+]i increase normally induced by two ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists, N-methyl-D-aspartate and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA. GSPE further decreased AMPA-induced response in the presence of 1 μM nimodipine. However, GSPE did not affect the 50 mM K+-induced increase in [Ca2+]i. GSPE significantly decreased the metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist (RS-3,5-Dihydroxyphenylglycine-induced increase in [Ca2+]i, but it did not affect caffeine-induced response. GSPE (0.3-6 μg/ml significantly inhibited synaptically induced [Ca2+]i spikes by 0.1 mM [Mg2+]o. In addition, pretreatment with GSPE (6 μg/ml for 5 min inhibited 0.1 mM [Mg2+]o- and glutamate-induced formation of NO. Treatment with GSPE (6 μg/ml significantly inhibited 0.1 mM [Mg2+]o- and oxygen glucose deprivation-induced neuronal cell death. Conclusions All these data suggest that GSPE inhibits 0.1 mM [Mg2+]o- and oxygen glucose deprivation-induced neurotoxicity through inhibition of calcium signals and NO formation in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

  8. TRPV4 calcium-permeable channel is a novel regulator of oxidized LDL-induced macrophage foam cell formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Rishov; Merth, Michael; Sharma, Shweta; Alharbi, Mazen O; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim; Zhu, Xiaoping; Rahaman, Shaik O

    2017-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death in United States, and atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory arterial disease, is the most dominant underlying pathology. Macrophages are thought to orchestrate atherosclerosis by generating lipid-laden foam cells and by secreting inflammatory mediators. Emerging data support a role for a mechanical factor, e.g., matrix stiffness, in regulation of macrophage function, vascular elasticity, and atherogenesis. However, the identity of the plasma membrane mechanosensor and the mechanisms by which pro-atherogenic signals are transduced/maintained are unknown. We have obtained evidence that TRPV4, an ion channel in the transient receptor potential vanilloid family and a known mechanosensor, is the likely mediator of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-dependent macrophage foam cell formation, a critical process in atherogenesis. Specifically, we found that: i) genetic ablation of TRPV4 or pharmacologic inhibition of TRPV4 activity by a specific antagonist blocked oxLDL-induced macrophage foam cell formation, and ii) TRPV4 deficiency prevented pathophysiological range matrix stiffness or scratch-induced exacerbation of oxLDL-induced foam cell formation. Mechanistically, we found that: i) plasma membrane localization of TRPV4 was sensitized to the increasing level of matrix stiffness, ii) lack of foam cell formation in TRPV4 null cells was not due to lack of expression of CD36, a major receptor for oxLDL, and iii) TRPV4 channel activity regulated oxLDL uptake but not its binding on macrophages. Altogether, these findings identify a novel role for TRPV4 in regulating macrophage foam cell formation by modulating uptake of oxLDL. These findings suggest that therapeutic targeting of TRPV4 may provide a selective approach to the treatment of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Simultaneous measurement of intracellular nitric oxide and free calcium levels in chordate eggs demonstrates that nitric oxide has no role at fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyslop, L A; Carroll, M; Nixon, V L; McDougall, A; Jones, K T

    2001-06-01

    At fertilization in sea urchin, the free radical nitric oxide (NO) has recently been suggested to cause the intracellular Ca(2+) rise responsible for egg activation. The authors suggested that NO could be a universal activator of eggs and the present study was set up to test this hypothesis. Intracellular NO and Ca(2+) levels were monitored simultaneously in eggs of the mouse or the urochordate ascidian Ascidiella aspersa. Eggs were either fertilized or sperm extracts microinjected. Sperm-induced Ca(2+) rises were not associated with any global, or local, change in intracellular NO, although we were able to detect NO produced by the addition of a NO donor. Furthermore, the NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester had no effect on sperm-induced Ca(2+) release but did block completely ionomycin-induced NO synthase activation. Therefore, we suggest that the current data provide evidence that NO has no role in the fertilization of these two chordate eggs. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  10. Calcium Electroporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gibot, Laure; Madi, Moinecha

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calcium electroporation describes the use of high voltage electric pulses to introduce supraphysiological calcium concentrations into cells. This promising method is currently in clinical trial as an anti-cancer treatment. One very important issue is the relation between tumor cell kill...... efficacy-and normal cell sensitivity. METHODS: Using a 3D spheroid cell culture model we have tested the effect of calcium electroporation and electrochemotherapy using bleomycin on three different human cancer cell lines: a colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT29), a bladder transitional cell carcinoma (SW780......), and a breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB231), as well as on primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDF-n). RESULTS: The results showed a clear reduction in spheroid size in all three cancer cell spheroids three days after treatment with respectively calcium electroporation (p

  11. The Effects of Vitamin D-K-Calcium Co-Supplementation on Endocrine, Inflammation, and Oxidative Stress Biomarkers in Vitamin D-Deficient Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, M; Jamilian, M; Karamali, M; Bahmani, F; Aghadavod, E; Asemi, Z

    2016-07-01

    The current study was conducted to assess the effects of vitamin D-K-calcium co-supplementation on endocrine, inflammation, and oxidative stress biomarkers in vitamin D-deficient women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed on 60 vitamin D-deficient women diagnosed with PCOS aged 18-40 years old. Participants were randomly allocated into 2 groups to intake either 200 IU vitamin D, 90 μg vitamin K plus, 500 mg calcium supplements (n=30), or placebo (n=30) twice a day for 8 weeks. Endocrine, inflammation, and oxidative stress biomarkers were quantified at the beginning and the end of the study. After 8 weeks of intervention, compared with the placebo, vitamin D-K-calcium co-supplementation resulted in a significant reduction in serum-free testosterone (- 2.1±1.6 vs.+0.1±1.0 pg/ml, p<0.001) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) levels (- 0.8±1.0 vs.-0.1±0.5 μg/ml, p=0.006). In addition, a significant increase in plasma total antioxidant capacity (TAC) (+ 75.7±126.1 vs.-80.4±242.8 mmol/l, p=0.005) and a significant difference in plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations (+ 0.03±0.6 vs.+1.4±2.4 μmol/l, p=0.005) was observed following the supplementation with vitamin D-K-calcium compared with the placebo. A trend toward a greater decrease in luteinizing hormone was observed in vitamin D-K-calcium co-supplement group compared to placebo group (- 7.0 vs.-1.2 IU/l, p=0.09). We did not find any significant effect of vitamin D-K-calcium co-supplementation on prolactin, follicle-stimulating hormone, 17-OH progesterone, inflammatory markers, and glutathione levels. Overall, vitamin D-K-calcium co-supplementation for 8 weeks among vitamin D-deficient women with PCOS had beneficial effects on serum DHEAS, free testosterone, plasma TAC, and MDA levels. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Intake and performance of feedlot cattle fed diets based on high and low Brix sugar cane with or without calcium oxide and corn silage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Antunes Magalhães

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate low and high Brix diets, treated or not with 5 g of calcium oxide per kg of natural matter, and corn silage on intake, digestibility and performance of beef cattle. Forty cattle with initial body weight (BW of 350 kg were used: five composed the control group, 30 were distributed into random blocks (control and the other five were distributed in a 5 × 5 incomplete Latin square, with the objective of determining digestibility. The 30 animals evaluated for performance were slaughtered and empty body weight (EPW, carcass dressing and meat cuts were determined. The diet with corn silage (CS presented the best intake of the other ingredients and the best weight gain, except for neutral detergent fiber intake in g/kg of BW. Only carcass dressing, in relation to BW and EBW, was not affected by the treatments, and the others were greater for animals fed diets with sugar cane silage. Animals fed diets with high brix sugar cane silage and treated high brix sugar cane silage presented lower intake of indigestible neutral detergent fiber and neutral detergent fiber corrected for ash and protein (g/kg of BW in relation to diets with low and high brix sugar cane silage, respectively. Animals fed diets with corn silage presented higher digestibility, except for crude protein and non-fibrous carbohydrates. Animals subjected to diets with corn silage presented low excretion of nitrogen compounds and higher microbial crude protein synthesis. Animals fed sugar cane silage present greater intake, performance and digestibility. The use of lime during 15 or 20º Brix sugar cane ensilage does not alter intake, digestibility or performance of beef cattle.

  13. Technical Note: A simulation study on the feasibility of radiotherapy dose enhancement with calcium tungstate and hafnium oxide nano- and microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherck, Nicholas J; Won, You-Yeon

    2017-12-01

    To assess the radiotherapy dose enhancement (RDE) potential of calcium tungstate (CaWO4 ) and hafnium oxide (HfO2 ) nano- and microparticles (NPs). A Monte Carlo simulation study was conducted to gauge their respective RDE potentials relative to that of the broadly studied gold (Au) NP. The study was warranted due to the promising clinical and preclinical studies involving both CaWO4 and HfO2 NPs as RDE agents in the treatment of various types of cancers. The study provides a baseline RDE to which future experimental RDE trends can be compared to. All three materials were investigated in silico with the software Penetration and Energy Loss of Positrons and Electrons (PENELOPE 2014) developed by Francesc Salvat and distributed in the United States by the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The work utilizes the extensively studied Au NP as the "gold standard" for a baseline. The key metric used in the evaluation of the materials was the local dose enhancement factor (DEFloc ). An additional metric used, termed the relative enhancement ratio (RER), evaluates material performance at the same mass concentrations. The results of the study indicate that Au has the strongest RDE potential using the DEFloc metric. HfO2 and CaWO4 both underperformed relative to Au with lower DEFloc of 2-3 × and 4-100 ×, respectively. The computational investigation predicts the RDE performance ranking to be: Au > HfO2 > CaWO4 . © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  14. Application of calcium oxide (CaO, heated scallop-shell powder) for the reduction of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms on eggshell surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S Y; Jung, S-J; Kang, I; Ha, S-D

    2017-12-13

    This study investigated bactericidal activity of 0.05 to 0.50% calcium oxide (CaO) against planktonic cells in tryptic soy broth (TSB) and biofilms of Listeria monocytogenes on eggshell surfaces. The bactericidal activity of CaO against planktonic cells and biofilms of L. monocytogens significantly (P < 0.05) increased log reductions with increasing concentrations of CaO. Exposure to 0.05 to 0.50% CaO for one min reduced planktonic cells in TSB cell suspensions by 0.47 to 3.86 log10CFU/mL and biofilm cells on the shell surfaces by 0.14 to 2.32 log10CFU/cm2. The Hunter colors of eggshells ("L" for lightness, "a" for redness, and "b" for yellowness), shell thickness (puncture force), and sensory quality (egg taste and yolk color) were not changed by 0.05 to 0.50% CaO treatment. The nonlinear Weibull model was used to calculate CR = 3 values as the CaO concentration of 3 log (99.9%) reduction for planktonic cells (R2 = 0.96, RMSE = 0.26) and biofilms (R2 = 0.95, RMSE = 0.18) of L. monocytogens. The CR = 3 value, 0.31% CaO for planktonic cells, was significantly (P < 0.05) lower than 0.57% CaO for biofilms. CaO could be an alternative disinfectant to reduce planktonic cells and biofilms L. monocytogenes on eggshell surface in egg processing plants. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  15. Bactericidal Effect of Calcium Oxide (Scallop-Shell Powder) Against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm on Quail Egg Shell, Stainless Steel, Plastic, and Rubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Soo-Jin; Park, Shin Young; Kim, Seh Eun; Kang, Ike; Park, Jiyong; Lee, Jungwon; Kim, Chang-Min; Chung, Myung-Sub; Ha, Sang-Do

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bactericidal effect of calcium oxide (CaO) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms on quail eggshells and major egg contacting surfaces (stainless steel, plastic, and rubber). The samples were subjected to CaO treatments (0%, 0.01%, 0.05%, 0.10%, 0.15%, 0.20%, 0.25%, and 0.30%) for 1 min. All the CaO treatments significantly reduced P. aeruginosa biofilms on all tested surfaces as compared to controls. In comparison of biofilm stability, the strongest and most resistant biofilm was formed on eggshell against the CaO treatment, followed by rubber, stainless steel, and plastic. In evaluation of bactericidal effect, the largest reduction (3.16 log CFU) was observed in plastic even at the lowest concentration of CaO (0.01%), whereas the least reduction was found in eggshells, regardless of CaO concentration. In addition, stainless steel showed a significant reduction in biofilm formation at all concentrations except 0.10% to 0.15% CaO. At 0.30% CaO, the reduction of P. aeruginosa in biofilms on stainless steel, plastic, rubber, and eggshell were 5.48, 6.37, 4.87, and 3.14 log CFU/cm 2 (CFU/egg), respectively. Biofilm reduction after CaO treatment was also observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Based on the FE-SEM images, we observed that P. aeruginosa biofilms formed compact aggregations on eggshell surfaces with CaO treatments up to 0.30%. More specifically, a 0.20% CaO treatment resulted in the reductions of 3 to 6 log CFU in all materials. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  16. Dystrophin Threshold Level Necessary for Normalization of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase, Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase, and Ryanodine Receptor-Calcium Release Channel Type 1 Nitrosylation in Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy Dystrophinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentil, Christel; Le Guiner, Caroline; Falcone, Sestina; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Peccate, Cécile; Lorain, Stéphanie; Benkhelifa-Ziyyat, Sofia; Guigand, Lydie; Montus, Marie; Servais, Laurent; Voit, Thomas; Piétri-Rouxel, France

    2016-09-01

    At present, the clinically most advanced strategy to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the exon-skipping strategy. Whereas antisense oligonucleotide-based clinical trials are underway for DMD, it is essential to determine the dystrophin restoration threshold needed to ensure improvement of muscle physiology at the molecular level. A preclinical trial has been conducted in golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dogs treated in a forelimb by locoregional delivery of rAAV8-U7snRNA to promote exon skipping on the canine dystrophin messenger. Here, we exploited rAAV8-U7snRNA-transduced GRMD muscle samples, well characterized for their percentage of dystrophin-positive fibers, with the aim of defining the threshold of dystrophin rescue necessary for normalization of the status of neuronal nitric oxide synthase mu (nNOSμ), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and ryanodine receptor-calcium release channel type 1 (RyR1), crucial actors for efficient contractile function. Results showed that restoration of dystrophin in 40% of muscle fibers is needed to decrease abnormal cytosolic nNOSμ expression and to reduce overexpression of iNOS, these two parameters leading to a reduction in the NO level in the muscle fibers. Furthermore, the same percentage of dystrophin-positive fibers of 40% was associated with the normalization of RyR1 nitrosylation status and with stabilization of the RyR1-calstabin1 complex that is required to facilitate coupled gating. We concluded that a minimal threshold of 40% of dystrophin-positive fibers is necessary for the reinstatement of central proteins needed for proper muscle contractile function, and thus identified a rate of dystrophin expression significantly improving, at the molecular level, the dystrophic muscle physiology.

  17. Calcium in plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Schwartau

    2014-04-01

    connect ion conformationally rearranged, thus passing the signal through the chain of intermediaries. The most important function of calcium is its participation in many cell signaling pathways. Channels, pumps, gene expression, synthesis of alkaloids, protective molecules, NO etc. respond to changes in [Ca2+]cyt, while transductors are represented by a number of proteins. The universality of calcium is evident in the study in connection with other signaling systems, such as NO, which is involved in the immune response and is able to control the feedback activity of protein activators channels, producing nitric oxide. Simulation of calcium responses can determine the impact of key level and their regulation, and also depends on the type of stimulus and the effector protein that specifically causes certain changes. Using spatiotemporal modeling, scientists showed that the key components for the formation of Ca2+ bursts are the internal and external surfaces of the nucleus membrane. The research was aimed at understanding of the mechanisms of influence of Ca2+-binding components on Ca2+ oscillations. The simulation suggests the existence of a calcium depot EPR with conjugated lumen of the nucleus which releases its contents to nucleoplasm. With these assumptions, the mathematical model was created and confirmed experimentally. It describes the oscillation of nuclear calcium in root hairs of Medicago truncatula at symbiotic relationship of plants and fungi (rhizobia. Calcium oscillations are present in symbiotic relationships of the cortical layer of plant root cells. Before penetration of bacteria into the cells, slow oscillations of Ca2+ are observed, but with their penetration into the cells the oscillation frequency increases. These processes take place by changing buffer characteristics of the cytoplasm caused by signals from microbes, such as Nod-factor available after penetration of bacteria through the cell wall. Thus, the basic known molecular mechanisms for

  18. Proteomic analysis of human bladder epithelial cells by 2D blue native SDS-PAGE reveals TCDD-induced alterations of calcium and iron homeostasis possibly mediated by nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Nisha; Pink, Mario; Petrat, Frank; Rettenmeier, Albert W; Schmitz-Spanke, Simone

    2015-01-02

    A proteomic analysis of the interaction among multiprotein complexes involved in 2,3,7,8-dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-mediated toxicity in urinary bladder epithelial RT4 cells was performed using two-dimensional blue native SDS-PAGE (2D BN/SDS-PAGE). To enrich the protein complexes, unexposed and TCDD-exposed cells were fractionated. BN/SDS-PAGE of the resulting fractions led to an effective separation of proteins and protein complexes of various origins, including cell membrane, mitochondria, and other intracellular compartments. Major differences between the proteome of control and exposed cells involved the alteration of many calcium-regulated proteins (calmodulin, protein S100-A2, annexin A5, annexin A10, gelsolin isoform b) and iron-regulated proteins (ferritin, heme-binding protein 2, transferrin). On the basis of these findings, the intracellular calcium concentration was determined, revealing a significant increase after 24 h of exposure to TCDD. Moreover, the concentration of the labile iron pool (LIP) was also significantly elevated in TCDD-exposed cells. This increase was strongly inhibited by the calmodulin (CaM) antagonist W-7, which pointed toward a possible interaction between iron and calcium signaling. Because nitric oxide (NO) production was significantly enhanced in TCDD-exposed cells and was also inhibited by W-7, we hypothesize that alterations in calcium and iron homeostasis upon exposure to TCDD may be linked through NO generated by CaM-activated nitric oxide synthase. In our model, we propose that NO produced upon TCDD exposure interacts with the iron centers of iron-regulatory proteins (IRPs) that modulate the alteration of ferritin and transferrin, resulting in an augmented cellular LIP and, hence, increased toxicity.

  19. Calcium dobesilate: pharmacology and future approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejerina, T; Ruiz, E

    1998-09-01

    1. Calcium dobesilate (2,5-dihydroxybenzene sulfonate) is a drug commonly used in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy and chronic venous insufficiency. 2. The pharmacology of calcium dobesilate reveals its ability to decrease capillary permeability, as well as platelet aggregation and blood viscosity. 3. Furthermore, recent data show that calcium dobesilate increases endothelium-dependent relaxation owing to an increase in nitric oxide synthesis.

  20. Get Enough Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Calcium Print This Topic En español Get Enough Calcium Browse Sections The Basics Overview Foods and Vitamins ... women, don't get enough calcium. How much calcium do I need every day? Women: If you ...

  1. Calcium carbonate overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tums overdose; Calcium overdose ... Calcium carbonate can be dangerous in large amounts. ... Some products that contain calcium carbonate are certain: ... and mineral supplements Other products may also contain calcium ...

  2. Influence of calcium sources on microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation by Bacillus sp. CR2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achal, Varenyam; Pan, Xiangliang

    2014-05-01

    Stimulation of microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICCP) is likely to be influenced by calcium sources. In order to study such influences, we performed MICCP using Bacillus sp. CR2 in nutrient broth containing urea, supplemented with different calcium sources (calcium chloride, calcium oxide, calcium acetate and calcium nitrate). The experiment lasted 7 days, during which bacterial growth, urease activity, calcite production and pH were measured. Our results showed that calcium chloride is the better calcium source for MICCP process, since it provides higher urease activity and more calcite production. The influences of calcium sources on MICCP were further studied using Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses. These analyses confirmed that the precipitate formed was CaCO3 and composed of predominantly calcite crystals with a little amount of aragonite and vaterite crystals. The maximum yield of calcite precipitation was achievable with calcium chloride followed by calcium nitrate as a calcium source. The results of present study may be applicable to media preparation during efficient MICCP process.

  3. Magnesium: Origin and role in calcium-treated inclusions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pistorius, CP

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available in calcium-treated steel is not fully clear, nor is the origin of the several percent of magnesium oxide that is often present in calcium-treated inclusions. To study this, steel was sampled after calcium treatment at an industrial steel plant...

  4. Calcium paradox and calcium entry blockers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Slade, A.M.; Nayler, W.G.; Meijler, F.L.

    1984-01-01

    Reperfusion of isolated hearts with calcium-containing solution after a short period of calcium-free perfusion results in irreversible cell damage (calcium paradox). This phenomenon is characterized by an excessive influx of calcium into the cells, the rapid onset of myocardial contracture,

  5. Removal of Oil Spills from Salt Water by Magnesium, Calcium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Magnesium, calcium carbonates and oxides that are widely used in cement industries were employed in studying sorption of petroleum oil spills from salt water at different condition parameters such as temperature, loading weight, degree of salinity. Treatment of magnesium, calcium carbonates and oxides by dodecyl ...

  6. Coronary Calcium Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back To Health Topics / Coronary Calcium Scan Coronary Calcium Scan Also known as Calcium Scan Test A coronary calcium scan is a CT scan of your heart that detects and measures the amount of calcium in the walls of your coronary arteries. Overview ...

  7. Comportamento ingestivo em caprinos alimentados com dietas contendo cana-de-açúcar tratada com óxido de cálcio Ingestive behavior in goats fed diets containing sugar cane treated with calcium oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleidson Giordano Pinto de Carvalho

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar o efeito do tratamento da cana-de-açúcar com óxido de cálcio (CaO sobre o comportamento ingestivo em caprinos. Foram utilizados oito caprinos da raça Saanen, machos castrados, com peso corporal médio de 22,6 kg e 4 meses de idade, distribuídos em dois quadrados latinos 4 × 4, com quatro períodos experimentais de 14 dias. Os animais foram mantidos em baias individuais de 1,2 m², com piso ripado de madeira, providas de comedouros e bebedouros individuais. As dietas foram formuladas para ser isoproteicas e conter 14% de proteína bruta (PB e apresentaram 70% de cana-de-açúcar tratada com 0; 0,75; 1,5 ou 2,25% de óxido de cálcio (com base na matéria natural corrigida com 1% de ureia e 30% de concentrado fornecidas a vontade. A cana-de-açúcar com a adição das doses de óxido de cálcio, foi triturada em desintegradora estacionária, pesada e acondicionada em baldes plásticos de 50 L, tratada com o óxido de cálcio e fornecida aos animais após 24 horas de armazenamento. Os tempos despendidos em alimentação, ruminação (min/dia, min/kg MS e min/kg FDN e ócio (min/dia não foram afetados pela adição de óxido de cálcio à cana-de-açúcar. A adição de óxido de cálcio à cana-de-açúcar não influenciou a eficiência em alimentação e ruminação, mas provocou redução do tempo médio despendido por período de alimentação. O comportamento ingestivo de caprinos em crescimento não é afetado pela utilização de dietas contendo cana-de-açúcar tratada com até 2,25% de óxido de cálcio.The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of sugar cane treated with calcium oxide (CaO on ingestive behavior in goats. It was used eight castrated male Saanen goats, with 22.6 kg average body weight and at four months of age, distributed in two 4 × 4 Latin squares, with four 14-day experimental periods. The animals were kept in individual 1.2-m² stalls, with wood battened floor, provided with

  8. Calcium source (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getting enough calcium to keep bones from thinning throughout a person's life may be made more difficult if that person has ... as a tendency toward kidney stones, for avoiding calcium-rich food sources. Calcium deficiency also effects the ...

  9. Calcium and bones (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the growth, maintenance, and reproduction of the human ... body, are continually being re-formed and incorporate calcium into their structure. Calcium is essential for the ...

  10. Calcium hydroxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrate - calcium; Lime milk; Slaked lime ... Calcium hydroxide ... These products contain calcium hydroxide: Cement Limewater Many industrial solvents and cleaners (hundreds to thousands of construction products, flooring strippers, brick cleaners, cement ...

  11. Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD) Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD) Fast Facts The risk of ... young people, too. Proper diagnosis depends on detecting calcium pyrophosphate crystals in the fluid of an affected ...

  12. Calcium blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003477.htm Calcium blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The calcium blood test measures the level of calcium in the blood. ...

  13. Attenuating effect of Acorus calamus extract in chronic constriction injury induced neuropathic pain in rats: an evidence of anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective and calcium inhibitory effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Nirmal

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acorus calamus (family: Araceae, is an indigenous plant, traditionally it is used as an ingredient of various cocktail preparations and for the management of severe inflammatory disorders in Indian system of medicine. Present study investigated the attenuating role of Acorus calamus plant extract in chronic constriction injury (CCI of sciatic nerve induced peripheral neuropathy in rats. Methods Hot plate, plantar, Randall Selitto, Von Frey Hair, pin prick, acetone drop, photoactometer and rota-rod tests were performed to assess degree of thermal, radiant, mechanical, chemical sensation, spontaneous motor activity and motor co-ordination changes respectively, at different time intervals i.e., day 0, 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18 and 21. Tissue myeloperoxidase, superoxide anion and total calcium levels were determined after 21st day to assess biochemical alterations. Histopathological evaluations were also performed. Hydroalcoholic extract of Acorus calamus (HAE-AC, 100 and 200 mg/kg, p.o. and pregabalin (10 mg/kg, p.o. were administered from the day of surgery for 14 days. Results CCI of sciatic nerve significantly induced thermal, radiant, mechanical hyperalgesia and thermal, chemical, tactile allodynia, along with increase in the levels of superoxide anion, total calcium and myeloperoxidase activity. Moreover significant histological changes were also observed. HAE-AC attenuated CCI induced development of painful behavioural, biochemical and histological changes in a dose dependent manner similar to that of pregabalin serving as positive control. Conclusions Acorus calamus prevented CCI induced neuropathy which may be attributed to its multiple actions including anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective and calcium inhibitory actions.

  14. Synthesis of modified calcium aluminate with lanthanum manganite (LSM) for possible use in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC); Sintese de aluminato de calcio modificado com manganita de lantanio (LSM) para possivel utilizacao em celula combustivel de oxido solido (SOFC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veiga, F.C.T.; Jurado, J.; Sousa, V.C. de, E-mail: faili.cintia@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Departamento de Materiais; Cava, S.S. [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, RS (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    The fuel cells solid oxide (SOFC) is made up of three basic elements: two electrodes, the anode and cathode and a conductive electrolyte ions. The objective of this work consists of calcium aluminate synthesis modified LSM in a 1: 1 by combustion synthesis method with a view to its use as a cathode in SOFC. The characterization of the post was carried out by the methods of XRD, TEM and EIS. After heat treatment at 1200°C/4 hours it was possible to obtain Ca0.5Sr1.5MnO4 and CaMnO2.56 phases. The material showed a semiconductor characteristics because with increasing temperature the electrical resistance value tends to decrease obtaining electrical conductivity greater than 10-6S / cm featuring an extrinsic semiconductor with an activation energy of 0.12. Therefore, with an activation energy value within the range of materials used for a SOFC cathodes. (author)

  15. Role of oxidative stress and intracellular calcium in nickel carbonate hydroxide-induced sister-chromatid exchange, and alterations in replication index and mitotic index in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M' Bemba-Meka, Prosper [Universite de Montreal, Human Toxicology Research Group (TOXHUM), Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Main Station, P.O. Box 6128, Montreal, QC (Canada); University of Louisville, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Center for Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States); Lemieux, Nicole [Universite de Montreal, Department of Pathology and Cellular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Main Station, P.O. Box 6128, Montreal, QC (Canada); Chakrabarti, Saroj K. [Universite de Montreal, Human Toxicology Research Group (TOXHUM), Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Main Station, P.O. Box 6128, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2007-02-15

    Human peripheral lymphocytes from whole blood cultures were exposed to either soluble form of nickel carbonate hydroxide (NiCH) (0-60 {mu}M), or of nickel subsulfide (Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2}) (0-120 {mu}M), or of nickel oxide (NiO) (0-120 {mu}M), or nickel sulfate (NiSO{sub 4}) (0-120 {mu}M) for a short duration of 2 h. The treatments occurred 46 h after the beginning of the cultures. The cultures were harvested after a total incubation of 72 h, and sister-chromatid exchange (SCE), replication index (RI), and mitotic index (MI) were measured for each nickel compound. The soluble form of NiCH at 30 {mu}M but those of Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} and NiO at 120 {mu}M produced significant increase in the SCE per cell compared to the control value, whereas NiSO{sub 4} failed to produce any such significant increase. Except NiSO{sub 4}, the soluble forms of NiCH, Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2}, and NiO produced significant cell-cycle delay (as measured by the inhibition of RI) as well as significant inhibition of the MI at respective similar concentrations as mentioned above. Pretreatment of human blood lymphocytes with catalase (H{sub 2}O{sub 2} scavenger), or superoxide dismutase (superoxide anion scavenger), or dimethylthiourea (hydroxyl radical scavenger), or deferoxamine (iron chelator), or N-acetylcysteine (general antioxidant) inhibited NiCH-induced SCE, and changes in RI and MI. This suggests the participation of oxidative stress involving H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, the superoxide anion radical, the hydroxyl radical, and iron in the NiCH-induced genotoxic responses. Cotreatment of NiCH with either verapamil (inhibitor of intracellular calcium ion ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) movement through plasma membranes), or dantrolene (inhibitor of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} release from sarcoplasmic reticulum), or BAPTA (Ca{sup 2+} chelator) also inhibited the NiCH-induced responses. These results suggest that [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} is also implicated in the genotoxicity of NiCH. Overall these data indicate that various types

  16. Investigation of the effects of distance from sources on apoptosis, oxidative stress and cytosolic calcium accumulation via TRPV1 channels induced by mobile phones and Wi-Fi in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çiğ, Bilal; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa

    2015-10-01

    TRPV1 is a Ca2+ permeable channel and gated by noxious heat, oxidative stress and capsaicin (CAP). Some reports have indicated that non-ionized electromagnetic radiation (EMR)-induces heat and oxidative stress effects. We aimed to investigate the effects of distance from sources on calcium signaling, cytosolic ROS production, cell viability, apoptosis, plus caspase-3 and -9 values induced by mobile phones and Wi-Fi in breast cancer cells MCF-7 human breast cancer cell lines were divided into A, B, C and D groups as control, 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz groups, respectively. Cells in Group A were used as control and were kept in cell culture conditions without EMR exposure. Groups B, C and D were exposed to the EMR frequencies at different distances (0 cm, 1 cm, 5 cm, 10 cm, 20 cm and 25 cm) for 1h before CAP stimulation. The cytosolic ROS production, Ca2+ concentrations, apoptosis, caspase-3 and caspase-9 values were higher in groups B, C and D than in A group at 0 cm, 1 cm and 5 cm distances although cell viability (MTT) values were increased by the distances. There was no statistically significant difference in the values between control, 20 and 25 cm. Wi-Fi and mobile phone EMR placed within 10 cm of the cells induced excessive oxidative responses and apoptosis via TRPV1-induced cytosolic Ca2+ accumulation in the cancer cells. Using cell phones and Wi-Fi sources which are farther away than 10 cm may provide useful protection against oxidative stress, apoptosis and overload of intracellular Ca2+. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Conversion coatings prepared or treated with calcium hydroxide solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minevski, Zoran (Inventor); Clarke, Eric (Inventor); Maxey, Jason (Inventor); Nelson, Carl (Inventor); Eylem, Cahit (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A conversion coating process that forms a stable and corrosion-resistant oxide layer on metal or metal oxide substrates or layers. Particularly, the conversion coating process involves contacting the metal or metal oxide substrate or layer with the aqueous calcium hydroxide solutions in order to convert the surface of the substrate to a stable metal oxide layer or coating. According to the present invention, the calcium hydroxide solution is prepared by removing carbon dioxide from water or an aqueous solution before introducing the calcium hydroxide. In this manner, formation of calcium carbonate particles is avoided and the porosity of the conversion coating produced by the calcium hydroxide solution is reduced to below about 1%.

  18. Selective oxidation of toluene to benzaldehyde by O{sub 2} with visible light in barium(2+)- and calcium(2+)-exchanged zeolite Y

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, H.; Blatter, F.; Frei, H. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-08-24

    High selectivity has been demonstrted upon visible light induced oxygenation of toluene to benzaldehyde in alkaline earth exchanged zeolite Y. We attribute the tight product control to mainly two factors. One is access to the C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 3}-O{sub 2} excited charge-transfer state by light of sufficiently long wavelength to prevent loss of product control by photofragmentation of primary products or by homolysis of the proposed hydroperoxide intermediate. The second is confinement of benzyl/HO{sub 2} radical pairs to the zeolite matrix cage, which suppresses indiscriminate attack of these radicals and forces them to combine. The Co{sup 3+}-catalyzed radical oxidation of toluene by O{sub 2} in solution used currently in an industrial process for benzaldehyde synthesis lacks this selectivity, mainly because of continued oxidation of the aldehyde to benzoic acid. 24 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Substitutions in Calcium Aluminates and Calcium Aluminoferrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALUMINUM COMPOUNDS, *CEMENTS, * CALCIUM COMPOUNDS, * FERRITES , *SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH, INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY, X RAY DIFFRACTION, CHEMICAL COMPOSITION, SUBSTITUTES, CHEMICAL ANALYSIS, ALKALI METAL COMPOUNDS.

  20. Localization of Nitric Oxide Synthase-containing Neurons in the Bat Visual Cortex and Co-localization with Calcium-binding Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ya-Nan; Kim, Hang-Gu; Jeon, Chang-Jin

    2015-08-27

    Microchiroptera (microbats) is a suborder of bats thought to have degenerated vision. However, many recent studies have shown that they have visual ability. In this study, we labeled neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-the synthesizing enzyme of the gaseous non-synaptic neurotransmitter nitric oxide-and co-localized it with calbindin D28K (CB), calretinin (CR), and parvalbumin (PV) in the visual cortex of the greater horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum, a species of microbats). nNOS-immunoreactive (IR) neurons were found in all layers of the visual cortex. Intensely labeled neurons were most common in layer IV, and weakly labeled neurons were most common in layer VI. Majority of the nNOS-IR neurons were round- or oval-type neurons; no pyramidal-type neurons were found. None of these neurons co-localized with CB, CR, or PV. However, the synthesis of nitric oxide in the bat visual cortex by nNOS does not depend on CB, CR, or PV.

  1. The Function of the Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajin Liao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU—a calcium uniporter on the inner membrane of mitochondria—controls the mitochondrial calcium uptake in normal and abnormal situations. Mitochondrial calcium is essential for the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP; however, excessive calcium will induce mitochondrial dysfunction. Calcium homeostasis disruption and mitochondrial dysfunction is observed in many neurodegenerative disorders. However, the role and regulatory mechanism of the MCU in the development of these diseases are obscure. In this review, we summarize the role of the MCU in controlling oxidative stress-elevated mitochondrial calcium and its function in neurodegenerative disorders. Inhibition of the MCU signaling pathway might be a new target for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.

  2. High Current Oxide Cathodes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luhmann, N

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the AASERT supported research is to develop the plasma deposition/implantation process for coating barium, strontium and calcium oxides on nickel substrates and to perform detailed surface...

  3. Calcium channel blocker overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002580.htm Calcium-channel blocker overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Calcium-channel blockers are a type of medicine used to ...

  4. Fenoprofen calcium overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002649.htm Fenoprofen calcium overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Fenoprofen calcium is a type of medicine called a nonsteroidal ...

  5. Mitochondrial-driven ubiquinone enhances extracellular calcium-dependent nitric oxide production and reduces glycochenodeoxycholic acid-induced cell death in hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rubio, Sandra; Hidalgo, Ana B; Ferrín, Gustavo; Bello, Rosario I; González, Raul; Gahete, Manuel D; Ranchal, Isidora; Rodríguez, Blanca A; Barrera, Pilar; Aguilar-Melero, Patricia; Linares, Clara I; Castaño, Justo P; Victor, Victor M; De la Mata, Manuel; Muntané, Jordi

    2009-12-01

    Ca(2+) mobilization, nitric oxide (NO), and oxidative stress have been involved in cell death induced by hydrophobic bile acid in hepatocytes. The aim of the study was the elucidation of the effect of the antioxidant mitochondrial-driven ubiquinone (Mito Q) on the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, NO production, and cell death in glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA)-treated HepG2 cells. The role of the regulation of the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration by Ca(2+) chelators (EGTA or BAPTA-AM), agonist of Ca(2+) entrance (A23187) or NO (L-NAME or NO donor), was assessed during Mito Q cytoprotection in GCDCA-treated HepG2 cells. Cell death, NO synthase (NOS)-1, -2, and -3 expression, Ca(2+) mobilization, and NO production were evaluated. GCDCA reduced the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and NOS-3 expression and enhanced cell death in HepG2. NO donor prevented and L-NAME enhanced GCDCA-induced cell death. The reduction of Ca(2+) entry by EGTA, but not its release from intracellular stores by BAPTA-AM, reduced the expression of NOS-3 and enhanced cell death in control and GCDCA-treated cells. Mito Q prevented the reduction of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, NOS-3 expression, NO production, and cell death in GCDCA-treated HepG2 cells. The conclusion is that the recovery of Ca(2+)-dependent NOS-3 expression by Mito Q may be considered an additional cytoprotective property of an antioxidant.

  6. Calcium and Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  7. Calcium en cardioplegie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Meijler, F.L.

    1985-01-01

    Coronary perfusion with a calcium-free solution, followed by reperfusion with a calcium containing solution, may result in acute myocardial cell death and in irreversible loss of the e1ectrical and mechanical activity of the heart. This phenomenon is known as the calcium paradox. A number of

  8. Ovariectomy-Induced Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress, Apoptosis, and Calcium Ion Influx Through TRPA1, TRPM2, and TRPV1 Are Prevented by 17β-Estradiol, Tamoxifen, and Raloxifene in the Hippocampus and Dorsal Root Ganglion of Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazğan, Yener; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa

    2017-12-01

    Relative 17β-estradiol (E2) deprivation and excessive production of mitochondrial oxygen free radicals (OFRs) with a high amount of Ca2+ influx TRPA1, TRPM2, and TRPV1 activity is one of the main causes of neurodegenerative disease in postmenopausal women. In addition to the roles of tamoxifen (TMX) and raloxifene (RLX) in cancer and bone loss treatments, regulator roles in Ca2+ influx and mitochondrial oxidative stress in neurons have not been reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether TMX and RLX interactions with TRPA1, TRPM2, and TRPV1 in primary hippocampal (HPC) and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron cultures of ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Forty female rats were divided into five groups: a control group, an OVX group, an OVX+E2 group, an OVX+TMX group, and an OVX+RLX group. The OVX+E2, OVX+TMX, and OVX+RLX groups received E2, TMX, and RLX, respectively, for 14 days after the ovariectomy. E2, ovariectomy-induced TRPA1, TRPM2, and TRPV1 current densities, as well as accumulation of cytosolic free Ca2+ in the neurons, were returned to the control levels by E2, TMX, and RLX treatments. In addition, E2, TMX, and RLX via modulation of TRPM2 and TRPV1 activity reduced ovariectomy-induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization, apoptosis, and cytosolic OFR production. TRPM2, TRPV1, PARP, and caspase-3 and caspase-9 expressions were also decreased in the neurons by the E2, TMX, and RLX treatments. In conclusion, we first reported the molecular effects of E2, TMX, and RLX on TRPA1, TRPM2, and TRPV1 channel activation in the OVX rats. In addition, we observed neuroprotective effects of E2, RLX, and TMX on oxidative and apoptotic injuries of the hippocampus and peripheral pain sensory neurons (DRGs) in the OVX rats. Graphical Abstract Possible molecular pathways of involvement of DEX in cerebral ischemia-induced apoptosis, oxidative stress, and calcium accumulation through TRPA1, TRPM2 and TRPV1 in the hippocampus and DRG neurons of rats. The N domain of the

  9. Opening of small and intermediate calcium-activated potassium channels induces relaxation mainly mediated by nitric-oxide release in large arteries and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor in small arteries from rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stankevicius, Edgaras; Dalsgaard, Thomas; Kroigaard, Christel

    2011-01-01

    current, and NO release that were blocked by apamin and TRAM-34 or charybdotoxin. These findings suggest that opening of SK(Ca) and IK(Ca) channels leads to endothelium-dependent relaxation that is mediated mainly by NO in large mesenteric arteries and by EDHF-type relaxation in small mesenteric arteries......This study was designed to investigate whether calcium-activated potassium channels of small (SK(Ca) or K(Ca)2) and intermediate (IK(Ca) or K(Ca)3.1) conductance activated by 6,7-dichloro-1H-indole-2,3-dione 3-oxime (NS309) are involved in both nitric oxide (NO) and endothelium......-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF)-type relaxation in large and small rat mesenteric arteries. Segments of rat superior and small mesenteric arteries were mounted in myographs for functional studies. NO was recorded using NO microsensors. SK(Ca) and IK(Ca) channel currents and mRNA expression were investigated...

  10. Structure of short-range-ordered iron(III)-precipitates formed by iron(II) oxidation in water containing phosphate, silicate, and calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voegelin, A.; Frommer, J.; Vantelon, D.; Kaegi, R.; Hug, S. J.

    2009-04-01

    The oxidation of Fe(II) in water leads to the formation of Fe(III)-precipitates that strongly affect the fate of nutrients and contaminants in natural and engineered systems. Examples include the cycling of As in rice fields irrigated with As-rich groundwater or the treatment of drinking water for As removal. Knowledge of the types of Fe(III)-precipitates forming in such systems is essential for the quantitative modeling of nutrient and contaminant dynamics and for the optimization of water purification techniques on the basis of a mechanistic understanding of the relevant biogeochemical processes. In this study, we investigated the local coordination of Fe, P, and Ca in Fe(III)-precipitates formed by aeration of synthetic Fe(II)-containing groundwater with variable composition (pH 7, 2-30 mg/L Fe(II), 2-20 mg/L phosphate-P, 2-20 mg/L silicate-Si, 8 mM Na-bicarbonate or 2.5 mM Ca-&1.5 mM Mg-bicarbonate). After 4 hours of oxidation, Fe(III)-precipitates were collected on 0.2 µm nylon filters and dried. The precipitates were analyzed by Fe K-edge EXAFS (XAS beamline, ANKA, Germany) and by P and Ca K-edge XANES spectroscopy (LUCIA beamline, SLS, Switzerland). The Fe K-edge EXAFS spectra indicated that local Fe coordination in the precipitates systematically shifted with water composition. As long as water contained P, mainly short-range-ordered Fe(III)-phosphate formed (with molar P/Fe ~0.5). In the absence of P, Fe(III) precipitated as hydrous ferric oxide at high Si/Fe>0.5, as ferrihydrite at intermediate Si/Fe, and mainly as lepidocrocite at Si/Fepatterns. The P K-edge XANES spectra revealed that phosphate was bound to both Fe as well as Ca (if present). The Ca K-edge XANES spectra showed that the mode of Ca uptake by the Fe(III)-precipitates shifted from mainly adsorption at high Fe/P to coprecipitation at low Fe/P ratio. Despite oversaturation, neither calcite nor hydroxyapatite formed to a significant extent. The results from this study indicated that

  11. Thermoelectric properties of antiperovskite calcium oxides Ca{sub 3}PbO and Ca{sub 3}SnO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Y., E-mail: yokamoto@nuap.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Institute for Advanced Research, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Sakamaki, A.; Takenaka, K. [Department of Applied Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2016-05-28

    We report the thermoelectric properties of polycrystalline samples of Ca{sub 3}Pb{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x}O (x = 0, 0.1, 0.2) and Ca{sub 3}SnO, both crystallizing in a cubic antiperovskite-type structure. The Ca{sub 3}SnO sample shows metallic resistivity and its thermoelectric power approaches 100 μV K{sup −1} at room temperature, resulting in the thermoelectric power factor of Ca{sub 3}SnO being larger than that of Ca{sub 3}Pb{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x}O. On the basis of Hall and Sommerfeld coefficients, the Ca{sub 3}SnO sample is found to be a p-type metal with a carrier density of ∼10{sup 19 }cm{sup −3}, a mobility of ∼80 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}, both comparable to those in degenerated semiconductors, and a moderately large hole carrier effective mass. The coexistence of moderately high mobility and large effective mass observed in Ca{sub 3}SnO, as well as possible emergence of a multivalley electronic structure with a small band gap at low-symmetry points in k-space, suggests that the antiperovskite Ca oxides have strong potential as a thermoelectric material.

  12. The effects of excess calcium on the handling and mechanical properties of hydrothermal derived calcium phosphate bone cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razali, N. N.; Sukardi, M. A.; Sopyan, I.; Mel, M.; Salleh, H. M.; Rahman, M. M.

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the effects of excess calcium on the handling and mechanical properties of hydrothermal derived calcium phosphate cement (CPC) for bone filling applications. Hydroxyapatite powder was synthesized via hydrothermal method using calcium oxide, CaO and ammonium dihydrogen phosphate, NH4H2PO4 as the calcium and phosphorus precursors respectively. The effects of calcium excess were evaluated by varying the CaO content at 0, 5 and 15 mole %. The precursors were then refluxed in distilled water at 90-100°C and dried overnight until the calcium phosphate powder was formed. CPC was then produced by mixing the synthesized powder with distilled water at the powder-to-liquid (P/L) ratio of 1.5. The result from the morphological properties of CPC shows the increase in agglomeration and particles size with 5 mole % of calcium excess but decreased with 15 mole % of calcium excess in CPC. This result was in agreement with the compressive strength result where the CPC increased its strength with 5 mole % of calcium excess but reduced with 15 mole % of calcium excess. The excess in calcium precursor also significantly improved the setting time but reduced the injectability of CPC.

  13. Melatonin and amfenac modulate calcium entry, apoptosis, and oxidative stress in ARPE-19 cell culture exposed to blue light irradiation (405 nm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argun, M; Tök, L; Uğuz, A C; Çelik, Ö; Tök, Ö Y; Naziroğlu, M

    2014-06-01

    Under conditions of oxidative stress, cell apoptosis is triggered through the mitochondrial intrinsic pathway. Increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are linked to excess cell loss and mediate the initiation of apoptosis in a diverse range of cell types. The aims of this study were to assess intracellular Ca(2+) release, ROS production, and caspase-3, and -9 activation in ARPE-19 cells during the blue light-mediated cell death, and to examine a potential protective effect of melatonin and amfenac, in the apoptotic cascade. ARPE-19 cells were cultured in their medium. First, MTT tests were performed to determine the protective effects of amfenac and melatonin. Cells were then exposed to blue light irradiation in an incubator. Intracellular Ca(2+) release experiments, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, apoptosis assay, glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and ROS experiments were done according to the method stated in the Materials and methods section. Cell death was clearly associated with increased levels of ROS production, as measured by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence, and associated increase in Ca(2+) levels, as measured by Fura-2-AM. Blue light-induced cell death was associated with an increased level of caspase-3 and 9, suggesting mediation via the apoptotic pathway. Cell death was also associated with mitochondrial depolarization. Melatonin was shown to delay these three steps. Melatonin, amfenac, and their combination protect ARPE-19 cells against blue light-triggered ROS accumulation and caspase-3 and -9 activation. The antiapoptotic effect of melatonin and amfenac at doses inhibiting caspase synthesis modified Ca(2+) release and prevented excessive ROS production, suggesting a new therapeutic approach to age-related macular degeneration.

  14. Bromatological and microbiological characteristics of sugarcane silages treated with calcium oxide Características bromatológicas e microbiológicas de silagens de cana- de- açúcar tratadas com óxido de cálcio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jucilene Cavali

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available It was evaluated the addition of calcium oxide (0; 0.5; 1.0; 1.5; and 2.0% of dry matter effect on the chemical composition and ruminal degradability of the dry matter and neutral detergent fiber, on the losses of dry matter, and on the microbial population in sugar cane silages. A design with five levels of calcium oxide and three replications was used. All the variables were influenced by the addition of calcium oxide in the silages, except the composition in acid detergent insoluble protein, water soluble carbohydrates and lignin. The dry matter content and pH linearly increased while the contents of organic matter, hemicellulose and crude protein linearly decreased with the levels of calcium oxide. Neutral detergent fiber corrected for ashes and protein and acid detergent fiber were adjusted for the quadratic models with calculated minimal values of 33.3 and 22.5% for the levels 1.73 and 1.49% of calcium oxide, respectively. The in vitro digestibility of the dry matter and the content of amoniacal nitrogen adjusted to quadratic models with maximal levels of 80.1% and 9.1% for the levels of 1.8 and 0.7% of calcium oxide, respectively. The minimal production of gas (3.18% was observed at the level of 1.39% of calcium oxide. Production of effluent and recovery of dry matter of the ensiled mass showed a reduction and a linear increase, respectively, with addition of calcium oxide. The highest lactic acid bacterial population was observed in the silage treated with 1.5% of calcium oxide. The addition of calcium oxide increased degradability of the soluble fraction of the dry matter, which was higher than 50% and reduced the non- degradable fraction of the neutral detergent fiber. Addition of calcium oxide level higher than 1.0% in the sugar cane during ensilage improves in vitro dry matter digestibility and the recovery of dry matter, increases populations of lactic acid bacteria and reduces production of yeasts.Avaliou- se o efeito da adi

  15. Calcium channel blocker poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miran Brvar

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium channel blockers act at L-type calcium channels in cardiac and vascular smooth muscles by preventing calcium influx into cells with resultant decrease in vascular tone and cardiac inotropy, chronotropy and dromotropy. Poisoning with calcium channel blockers results in reduced cardiac output, bradycardia, atrioventricular block, hypotension and shock. The findings of hypotension and bradycardia should suggest poisoning with calcium channel blockers.Conclusions: Treatment includes immediate gastric lavage and whole-bowel irrigation in case of ingestion of sustainedrelease products. All patients should receive an activated charcoal orally. Specific treatment includes calcium, glucagone and insulin, which proved especially useful in shocked patients. Supportive care including the use of catecholamines is not always effective. In the setting of failure of pharmacological therapy transvenous pacing, balloon pump and cardiopulmonary by-pass may be necessary.

  16. Lasing transition at 1.06 μm emission in Nd(3)(+) -doped borate-based tellurium calcium zinc niobium oxide glasses for high-power solid-state lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, O; Prasad, K; Jain, Rajiv; Venkataswamy, M; Chaurasia, Shivanand; Deva Prasad Raju, B

    2017-08-01

    The spectroscopic properties of Tellurium Calcium Zinc Niobium oxide Borate (TCZNB) glasses of composition (in mol%) 10TeO2  + 15CaO + 5ZnO + 10 Nb2 O5  + (60 - x)B2 O3  + Nd2 O3 (x = 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 or 1.5 mol%) have been investigated experimentally. The three phenomenological intensity parameters Ω2 , Ω4, Ω6 have been calculated using the Judd-Ofelt theory and in turn radiative properties such as radiative transition probabilities, emission cross-sections, branching ratios and radiative lifetimes have been estimated. The trend found in the JO intensity parameter is Ω2  > Ω6  > Ω4 If Ω6  > Ω4 , the glass system is favourable for the laser emission (4) F3/2  → (4) I11/2 in the infrared (IR) wavelength. The experimental values of branching ratio of (4) F3/2  → (4) I11/2 transition indicate favourable lasing action with low threshold power. The evaluated total radiative transition probabilities (AT ), stimulated emission cross-section (σe ) and gain bandwidth parameters (σe  × Δλp ) were compared with earlier reports. An energy level analysis has been carried out considering the experimental energy positions of the absorption and emission bands. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Acidosis and Urinary Calcium Excretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, R Todd; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Chambrey, Régine

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis is associated with increased urinary calcium excretion and related sequelae, including nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis. The increased urinary calcium excretion induced by metabolic acidosis predominantly results from increased mobilization of calcium out of bone and inhibi...

  18. Calcium and bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eat in their diet. Vitamin D is the hormone that helps the gut absorb more calcium. Many older adults have common risks that make bone health worse. Calcium intake in the diet (milk, cheese, yogurt) is low. Vitamin D levels are ...

  19. Calcium D-saccharate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, André Castilho; Hedegaard, Martina Vavrusova; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

    2016-01-01

    Molar conductivity of saturated aqueous solutions of calcium d-saccharate, used as a stabilizer of beverages fortified with calcium d-gluconate, increases strongly upon dilution, indicating complex formation between calcium and d-saccharate ions, for which, at 25 °C, Kassoc = 1032 ± 80, ΔHassoc......° = -34 ± 6 kJ mol-1, and ΔSassoc° = -55 ± 9 J mol-1 K-1, were determined electrochemically. Calcium d-saccharate is sparingly soluble, with a solubility product, Ksp, of (6.17 ± 0.32) × 10-7 at 25 °C, only moderately increasing with the temperature: ΔHsol° = 48 ± 2 kJ mol-1, and ΔSassoc° = 42 ± 7 J mol-1...... K-1. Equilibria in supersaturated solutions of calcium d-saccharate seem only to adjust slowly, as seen from calcium activity measurements in calcium d-saccharate solutions made supersaturated by cooling. Solutions formed by isothermal dissolution of calcium d-gluconate in aqueous potassium d...

  20. Extracellular Calcium and Magnesium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. The cause of preeclampsia remains unknown and calcium and magnesium supplement are being suggested as means of prevention. The objective of this study was to assess magnesium and calcium in the plasma and cerebrospinal fluid of Nigerian women with preedamp sia and eclampsia. Setting was ...

  1. HYPERTHERMIA, INTRACELLULAR FREE CALCIUM AND CALCIUM IONOPHORES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STEGE, GJJ; WIERENGA, PK; KAMPINGA, HH; KONINGS, AWT

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that heat-induced increase of intracellular calcium does not correlate with hyperthermic cell killing. Six different cell lines were investigated; in four (EAT, HeLa S3, L5178Y-R and L5178Y-S) heat treatments killing 90% of the cells did not affect the levels of intracellular free

  2. Calcium sensing in exocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Wu, Bingbing; Han, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    Neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones are released through regulated exocytosis of synaptic vesicles and large dense core vesicles. This complex and highly regulated process is orchestrated by SNAREs and their associated proteins. The triggering signal for regulated exocytosis is usually...... an increase in intracellular calcium levels. Besides the triggering role, calcium signaling modulates the precise amount and kinetics of vesicle release. Thus, it is a central question to understand the molecular machineries responsible for calcium sensing in exocytosis. Here we provide an overview of our...

  3. Bone repair in calcium-deficient rats: comparison of xylitol+calcium carbonate with calcium carbonate, calcium lactate and calcium citrate on the repletion of calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hämäläinen, M M

    1994-06-01

    The potential value of xylitol in calcium therapy was evaluated by comparing the effect of dietary xylitol (50 g/kg diet) + calcium carbonate with the effects of calcium carbonate, calcium lactate and calcium citrate on bone repair of young male rats after the rats consumed for 3 wk a calcium-deficient diet (0.2 g Ca/kg diet). After this calcium-depletion period, the rats were fed for 2 wk one of four diets, each containing 5 g Ca/kg diet as one of the four dietary calcium sources. The diet of the control animals was supplemented with CaCO3 (5 g Ca/kg diet) throughout the study. The Ca-deficient rats showed low bone mass, low serum calcium and high serum 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, parathyroid hormone (1-34 fraction) and osteocalcin concentrations. They also excreted magnesium, phosphate and hydroxyproline in the urine in high concentrations, and had high bone alkaline phosphatase and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activities. Most of these changes were reversed by the administered of the calcium salts. The highest recoveries of femoral dry weight, calcium, magnesium and phosphate were observed in the groups receiving xylitol+CaCO3 and calcium lactate. Calcium lactate and calcium citrate caused low serum phosphate concentration compared with rats receiving CaCO3 and with the age-matched Ca-replete controls. Xylitol-treated rats excreted more calcium and magnesium in urine than did the other rats, probably due to increased absorption of these minerals from the gut. These results suggest that dietary xylitol improves the bioavailability of calcium salts.

  4. Calcium – how and why?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Calcium is among the most commonly used ions, in a multitude of biological functions, so much so that it is impossible to imagine life without calcium. In this article I have attempted to address the question as to how calcium has achieved this status with a brief mention of the history of calcium research in biology. It appears ...

  5. Calcium and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Milk Allergy Figuring Out Food Labels What's a Vegetarian? Osteoporosis Minerals Your Bones Mineral Chart Vitamin D ... Need to Drink Milk? Lactose Intolerance Becoming a Vegetarian Soy Foods and Health Calcium Bones, Muscles, and ...

  6. Stoichiometry of Calcium Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    The topic of calcium supplement and its effects on human lives is presented in the way of questions to the students. It enables the students to realize the relevance of chemistry outside the classroom surrounding.

  7. Magnesium, calcium and cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anghileri, Leopoldo J

    2009-01-01

    Magnesium ion (Mg(2+)) and calcium ion (Ca(2+)) control a diverse and important range of cellular processes, such as gene transcription, cell proliferation, neoplastic transformation, immune response and therapeutic treatment...

  8. [Calcium suppletion for patients who use gastric acid inhibitors: calcium citrate or calcium carbonate?].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, H.J. de; Gans, R.O.; Huls, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Various calcium supplements are available for patients who have an indication for calcium suppletion. American guidelines and UpToDate recommend prescribing calcium citrate to patients who use antacids The rationale for this advice is that water-insoluble calcium carbonate needs acid for adequate

  9. [Microbial geochemical calcium cycle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavarzin, G A

    2002-01-01

    The participation of microorganisms in the geochemical calcium cycle is the most important factor maintaining neutral conditions on the Earth. This cycle has profound influence on the fate of inorganic carbon, and, thereby, on the removal of CO2 from the atmosphere. The major part of calcium deposits was formed in the Precambrian, when prokaryotic biosphere predominated. After that, calcium recycling based on biogenic deposition by skeletal organisms became the main process. Among prokaryotes, only a few representatives, e.g., cyanobacteria, exhibit a special calcium function. The geochemical calcium cycle is made possible by the universal features of bacteria involved in biologically mediated reactions and is determined by the activities of microbial communities. In the prokaryotic system, the calcium cycle begins with the leaching of igneous rock predominantly through the action of the community of organotrophic organisms. The release of carbon dioxide to the soil air by organotrophic aerobes leads to leaching with carbonic acid and soda salinization. Under anoxic conditions, of major importance is the organic acid production by primary anaerobes (fermentative microorganisms). Calcium carbonate is precipitated by secondary anaerobes (sulfate reducers) and to a smaller degree by methanogens. The role of the cyanobacterial community in carbonate deposition is exposed by stromatolites, which are the most common organo-sedimentary Precambrian structures. Deposition of carbonates in cyanobacterial mats as a consequence of photoassimilation of CO2 does not appear to be a significant process. It is argued that carbonates were deposited at the boundary between the "soda continent", which emerged as a result of subaerial leaching with carbonic acid, and the ocean containing Ca2+. Such ecotones provided favorable conditions for the development of the benthic cyanobacterial community, which was a precursor of stromatolites.

  10. Calcium orthophosphates in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V

    2013-06-01

    Dental caries, also known as tooth decay or a cavity, remains a major public health problem in the most communities even though the prevalence of disease has decreased since the introduction of fluorides for dental care. Therefore, biomaterials to fill dental defects appear to be necessary to fulfill customers' needs regarding the properties and the processing of the products. Bioceramics and glass-ceramics are widely used for these purposes, as dental inlays, onlays, veneers, crowns or bridges. Calcium orthophosphates belong to bioceramics but they have some specific advantages over other types of bioceramics due to a chemical similarity to the inorganic part of both human and mammalian bones and teeth. Therefore, calcium orthophosphates (both alone and as components of various formulations) are used in dentistry as both dental fillers and implantable scaffolds. This review provides brief information on calcium orthophosphates and describes in details current state-of-the-art on their applications in dentistry and dentistry-related fields. Among the recognized dental specialties, calcium orthophosphates are most frequently used in periodontics; however, the majority of the publications on calcium orthophosphates in dentistry are devoted to unspecified "dental" fields.

  11. Calcium Signalling: Fishing Out Molecules of Mitochondrial Calcium Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Hajnóczky, György; Csordás, György

    2010-01-01

    Cellular energy metabolism, survival and death are controlled by mitochondrial calcium signals originating in the cytoplasm. Now, RNAi studies link three proteins — MICU1, NCLX and LETM1 — to the previously unknown molecular mechanism of mitochondrial calcium transport.

  12. Gravimetric Determination of Calcium as Calcium Carbonate Hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrickson, Charles H.; Robinson, Paul R.

    1979-01-01

    The gravimetric determination of calcium as calcium carbonate is described. This experiment is suitable for undergraduate quantitative analysis laboratories. It is less expensive than determination of chloride as silver chloride. (BB)

  13. Hybrid calcium phosphate coatings for implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malchikhina, Alena I.; Shesterikov, Evgeny V.; Bolbasov, Evgeny N.; Ignatov, Viktor P.; Tverdokhlebov, Sergei I.

    2016-08-01

    Monophasic biomaterials cannot provide all the necessary functions of bones or other calcined tissues. It is necessary to create for cancer patients the multiphase materials with the structure and composition simulating the natural bone. Such materials are classified as hybrid, obtained by a combination of chemically different components. The paper presents the physical, chemical and biological studies of coatings produced by hybrid technologies (HT), which combine primer layer and calcium phosphate (CaP) coating. The first HT type combines the method of vacuum arc titanium primer layer deposition on a stainless steel substrate with the following micro-arc oxidation (MAO) in phosphoric acid solution with addition of calcium compounds to achieve high supersaturated state. MAO CaP coatings feature high porosity (2-8%, pore size 5-7 µm) and surface morphology with the thickness greater than 5 µm. The thickness of Ti primer layer is 5-40 µm. Amorphous MAO CaP coating micro-hardness was measured at maximum normal load Fmax = 300 mN. It was 3.1 ± 0.8 GPa, surface layer elasticity modulus E = 110 ± 20 GPa, roughness Ra = 0.9 ± 0.1 µm, Rz = 7.5 ± 0.2 µm, which is less than the titanium primer layer roughness. Hybrid MAO CaP coating is biocompatible, able to form calcium phosphates from supersaturated body fluid (SBF) solution and also stimulates osteoinduction processes. The second HT type includes the oxide layer formation by thermal oxidation and then CaP target radio frequency magnetron sputtering (RFMS). Oxide-RFMS CaP coating is a thin dense coating with good adhesion to the substrate material, which can be used for metal implants. The RFMS CaP coating has thickness 1.6 ± 0.1 µm and consists of main target elements calcium and phosphorus and Ca/P ratio 2.4. The second HT type can form calcium phosphates from SBF solution. In vivo study shows that hybrid RFMS CaP coating is biocompatible and produces fibrointegration processes.

  14. Effet de différents sels de calcium in vitro et in vivo sur le ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of silicate, hydroxide, oxide, sulfate and calcium hypochlorite were tested on the development of fungi responsible for storage rot in melon fruit. Methodology and results : Calcium salts were tested in vitro at 200, 400, 600, 800 and 1000 ppm and in vivo at 600 ppm against Alternaria ...

  15. Children's Bone Health and Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Share Dialog × Print Children's Bone Health and Calcium: Condition Information What is bone health and how ... straight, walk, run, and lead an active life. Calcium is one of the key dietary building blocks ...

  16. Magnetic properties study on Fe-doped calcium phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, C C; Valente, M A [Physics Department (I3N), Aveiro University (Portugal); Vasconcelos, I F [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Federal University of Ceara, Campus do Pici, 714 Block, 60455-760, Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil); Sombra, A S B [Telecommunications and Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory (LOCEM), Department of Physics, Federal University of Ceara, Campus do Pici, Postal Code 6030, 60455-760, Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil)], E-mail: ccsilva@ua.pt, E-mail: ccsilva@fisica.ufc.br

    2009-11-15

    Calcium phosphates are very important for applications in medicine due to their properties such as biocompatibility and bioactivity. In order to enhance these properties, substitution of calcium with other ions has been proposed. Partial substitution of calcium by different ions has been made in order to improve the properties of the calcium phosphates and also to allow new applications of apatite in medicine. In this work, hydroxyapatite [Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}-HAP] was prepared by high-energy dry milling (20 h) and mixed with iron oxide (5 wt.%). The mixture was calcinated at 900 deg. C for 5 h with a heating rate of 3 deg. C min{sup -1} in an attempt to introduce iron oxide into the HAP structure. The sintered sample was characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and magnetization. The {sup 57}Fe-Moessbauer spectra of the calcium phosphate oxides were also measured, revealing the presence of iron in three different phases: Ca{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 5}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and hydroxyapatite.

  17. Stable prenucleation calcium carbonate clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Gebauer, Denis; Völkel, Antje; Cölfen, Helmut

    2008-01-01

    Calcium carbonate forms scales, geological deposits, biominerals, and ocean sediments. Huge amounts of carbon dioxide are retained as carbonate ions, and calcium ions represent a major contribution to water hardness. Despite its relevance, little is known about the precipitation mechanism of calcium carbonate, and specified complex crystal structures challenge the classical view on nucleation considering the formation of metastable ion clusters. We demonstrate that dissolved calcium carbonate...

  18. Assay for calcium channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glossmann, H.; Ferry, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter focuses on biochemical assays for Ca/sup 2 +/-selective channels in electrically excitable membranes which are blocked in electrophysiological and pharmacological experiments by verapamil, 1,4-dihydropyridines, diltiazen (and various other drugs), as well as inorganic di- or trivalent cations. The strategy employed is to use radiolabeled 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives which block calcium channels with ED/sub 50/ values in the nanomolar range. Although tritiated d-cis-diltiazem and verapamil can be used to label calcium channels, the 1,4-dihydropyridines offer numerous advantages. The various sections cover tissue specificity of channel labeling, the complex interactions of divalent cations with the (/sup 3/H)nimodipine-labeled calcium channels, and the allosteric regulation of (/sup 3/H)nimodipine binding by the optically pure enantiomers of phenylalkylamine and benzothiazepine calcium channel blockers. A comparison of the properties of different tritiated 1,4-dihydropyridine radioligands and the iodinated channel probe (/sup 125/I)iodipine is given.

  19. Solar Imagery - Chromosphere - Calcium

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of full-disk images of the sun in Calcium (Ca) II K wavelength (393.4 nm). Ca II K imagery reveal magnetic structures of the sun from about 500...

  20. The Plasma Membrane Calcium Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, H.

    1983-01-01

    Three aspect of cellular calcium metabolism in animal cells was discussed including the importance of the plasma membrane in calcium homeostasis, experiments dealing with the actual mechanism of the calcium pump, and the function of the pump in relationship to the mitochondria and to the function of calmodulin in the intact cell.

  1. Calcium addition in straw gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risnes, H.; Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    2003-01-01

    The present work focuses on the influence of calcium addition in gasification. The inorganic¿organic element interaction as well as the detailed inorganic¿inorganic elements interaction has been studied. The effect of calcium addition as calcium sugar/molasses solutions to straw significantly...

  2. Impregnating Coal With Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Voecks, Gerald E.; Gavalas, George R.

    1991-01-01

    Relatively inexpensive process proposed for impregnating coal with calcium carbonate to increase rates of gasification and combustion of coal and to reduce emission of sulfur by trapping sulfur in calcium sulfide. Process involves aqueous-phase reactions between carbon dioxide (contained within pore network of coal) and calcium acetate. Coal impregnated with CO2 by exposing it to CO2 at high pressure.

  3. Involvement of calcium and calmodulin signaling in adaptation to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heat stress is a common form of stress suffered by plants. Therefore, plants have evolved mechanisms to cope with the problems caused by high temperatures. In this study, the involvement of calcium ion and calmodulin (Ca2+-CaM) in the protection against heat stress-induced oxidative damage in tomato (Solanum ...

  4. A study of serum magnesium, calcium and phosphorus level, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study of serum magnesium, calcium and phosphorus level, and cognition in the elderly population of South India. ... Macronutrients have been involved in many metabolic activities of the body including oxidation and reduction reactions in the central nervous system. This involvement of macronutrients in the activities of ...

  5. properties of cement paste and concrete containing calcium carbide

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2017-01-01

    Jan 1, 2017 ... 1 DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING, BAYERO UNIVERSITY, PMB 3011 KANO, KANO STATE, NIGERIA. 2 NIGERIAN ... The results of the investigations showed that CCW was predominantly of calcium oxide (95.69 %) and a combined SiO2, ..... concrete”, International Journal of Innovative Science,.

  6. Calcium signaling in taste cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medler, Kathryn F

    2015-09-01

    The sense of taste is a common ability shared by all organisms and is used to detect nutrients as well as potentially harmful compounds. Thus taste is critical to survival. Despite its importance, surprisingly little is known about the mechanisms generating and regulating responses to taste stimuli. All taste responses depend on calcium signals to generate appropriate responses which are relayed to the brain. Some taste cells have conventional synapses and rely on calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels. Other taste cells lack these synapses and depend on calcium release to formulate an output signal through a hemichannel. Beyond establishing these characteristics, few studies have focused on understanding how these calcium signals are formed. We identified multiple calcium clearance mechanisms that regulate calcium levels in taste cells as well as a calcium influx that contributes to maintaining appropriate calcium homeostasis in these cells. Multiple factors regulate the evoked taste signals with varying roles in different cell populations. Clearly, calcium signaling is a dynamic process in taste cells and is more complex than has previously been appreciated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Hybrid Calcium Phosphate Coatings for Titanium Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharapudchenko, E.; Ignatov, V.; Ivanov, V.; Tverdokhlebov, S.

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid multilayer coatings were obtained on titanium substrates by the combination of two methods: the micro-arc oxidation in phosphoric acid solution with the addition of calcium compounds to high supersaturated state and RF magnetron sputtering of the target made of synthetic hydroxyapatite. 16 different groups of coatings were formed on titanium substrates and in vitro studies were conducted in accordance with ISO 23317 in the solution simulating body fluid. The studies using SEM, XRD of the coatings of the samples before and after exposure to SBF were performed. The features of morphology, chemical and phase composition of the studied coatings are shown.

  8. DISTILLATION OF CALCIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, J.

    1954-07-27

    This invention relates to an improvement in the process for the purification of caicium or magnesium containing an alkali metal as impurity, which comprises distiiling a batch of the mixture in two stages, the first stage distillation being carried out in the presence of an inert gas at an absolute pressure substantially greater than the vapor pressure of calcium or maguesium at the temperature of distillation, but less than the vaper pressure at that temperature of the alkali metal impurity so that only the alkali metal is vaporized and condensed on a condensing surface. A second stage distilso that substantially only the calcium or magnesium distills under its own vapor pressure only and condenses in solid form on a lower condensing surface.

  9. Calcium metabolism and cardiovascular function after spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, Daniel C.; Yue, Qi; Dierickx, Jacqueline; Roullet, Chantal; Otsuka, Keiichi; Watanabe, Mitsuaki; Coste, Sarah; Roullet, Jean Baptiste; Phanouvang, Thongchan; Orwoll, Eric; hide

    2002-01-01

    To determine the influence of dietary calcium on spaceflight-induced alterations in calcium metabolism and blood pressure (BP), 9-wk-old spontaneously hypertensive rats, fed either high- (2%) or low-calcium (0.02%) diets, were flown on an 18-day shuttle flight. On landing, flight animals had increased ionized calcium (P platelet free calcium (intracellular calcium concentration) were also reduced (P metabolism (P metabolism are relatively impervious to dietary calcium in the short term, 2) increased ionized calcium did not normalize low-calcium-induced elevations of BP, and 3) parathyroid hormone was paradoxically increased in the high-calcium-fed flight animals after landing.

  10. Models of calcium signalling

    CERN Document Server

    Dupont, Geneviève; Kirk, Vivien; Sneyd, James

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses the ways in which mathematical, computational, and modelling methods can be used to help understand the dynamics of intracellular calcium. The concentration of free intracellular calcium is vital for controlling a wide range of cellular processes, and is thus of great physiological importance. However, because of the complex ways in which the calcium concentration varies, it is also of great mathematical interest.This book presents the general modelling theory as well as a large number of specific case examples, to show how mathematical modelling can interact with experimental approaches, in an interdisciplinary and multifaceted approach to the study of an important physiological control mechanism. Geneviève Dupont is FNRS Research Director at the Unit of Theoretical Chronobiology of the Université Libre de Bruxelles;Martin Falcke is head of the Mathematical Cell Physiology group at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin;Vivien Kirk is an Associate Professor in the Depar...

  11. Elemental calcium intake associated with calcium acetate/calcium carbonate in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rosamund J; Copley, J Brian

    2017-01-01

    Calcium-based and non-calcium-based phosphate binders have similar efficacy in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia; however, calcium-based binders may be associated with hypercalcemia, vascular calcification, and adynamic bone disease. A post hoc analysis was carried out of data from a 16-week, Phase IV study of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who switched to lanthanum carbonate monotherapy from baseline calcium acetate/calcium carbonate monotherapy. Of the intent-to-treat population (N=2520), 752 patients with recorded dose data for calcium acetate (n=551)/calcium carbonate (n=201) at baseline and lanthanum carbonate at week 16 were studied. Elemental calcium intake, serum phosphate, corrected serum calcium, and serum intact parathyroid hormone levels were analyzed. Of the 551 patients with calcium acetate dose data, 271 (49.2%) had an elemental calcium intake of at least 1.5 g/day at baseline, and 142 (25.8%) had an intake of at least 2.0 g/day. Mean (95% confidence interval [CI]) serum phosphate levels were 6.1 (5.89, 6.21) mg/dL at baseline and 6.2 (6.04, 6.38) mg/dL at 16 weeks; mean (95% CI) corrected serum calcium levels were 9.3 (9.16, 9.44) mg/dL and 9.2 (9.06, 9.34) mg/dL, respectively. Of the 201 patients with calcium carbonate dose data, 117 (58.2%) had an elemental calcium intake of at least 1.5 g/day, and 76 (37.8%) had an intake of at least 2.0 g/day. Mean (95% CI) serum phosphate levels were 5.8 (5.52, 6.06) mg/dL at baseline and 5.8 (5.53, 6.05) mg/dL at week 16; mean (95% CI) corrected serum calcium levels were 9.7 (9.15, 10.25) mg/dL and 9.2 (9.06, 9.34) mg/dL, respectively. Calcium acetate/calcium carbonate phosphate binders, taken to control serum phosphate levels, may result in high levels of elemental calcium intake. This may lead to complications related to calcium balance.

  12. Copper and calcium uptake in colored hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, K E; Kilburn, M; Schroeder, M; Martin, B G H; Hawes, C; Marsh, J M; Grovenor, C R M

    2009-01-01

    During hair coloring a number of disulfide bonds in cystine are oxidized (1) to create cysteic acid, forming binding sites for metal ions such as Ca(2+ )and Cu(2+ )from tap water (2). The increased uptake of these metals can have a detrimental impact on fiber properties-for example, reducing shine and causing a poor wet and dry feel (3). In addition, the increased uptake of copper can also contribute to further fiber damage during subsequent coloring due to its ability to take part in metal-induced radical chemistry (4). It is important to know where in the fibers these metals are located in order to either effectively remove these metals or control their chemistry. Nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) has been used to locate the calcium and copper within hair that has been treated with a colorant and washed multiple times in tap water containing these ions. Untreated hair is used as a baseline standard material. Images with up to 50-nm spatial resolution of the preferential locations of calcium uptake were obtained, showing a high concentration of calcium in the cuticle region of colored hair, specifically in the sulfur-rich regions (A-layer and exocuticle).

  13. Limestone reaction in calcium aluminate cement–calcium sulfate systems

    OpenAIRE

    Bizzozero, Julien; Scrivener, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports a study of ternary blends composed of calcium aluminate cement, calcium sulfate hemihydrate and limestone. Compressive strength tests and hydration kinetics were studied as a function of limestone and calcium sulfate content. The phase evolution and the total porosity were followed and compared to thermodynamic simulation to understand the reactions involved and the effect of limestone on these binders. The reaction of limestone leads to the formation of hemicarboaluminate ...

  14. Mixed calcium-magnesium pre-nucleation clusters enrich calcium

    OpenAIRE

    Verch, Andreas; Antonietti, Markus; Cölfen, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    It is demonstrated that magnesium and carbonate ions can form pre-nucleation clusters in analogy to calcium carbonate. If a mixed calcium and magnesium solution is brought in contact with carbonate ions, mixed pre-nucleation clusters form. The equilibrium constants for their formation are reported revealing that over the entire range of possible cation mixing ratios, calcium gets enriched over magnesium in the pre-nucleation clusters. This can explain high magnesium contents in amorphous calc...

  15. Sulfur Oxides Control Burner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    calcium oxide (CaO). Dolomite is a mixture of calcium and magnesium carbonates (CaCO-3 .!gCO ). Neither lime nor limestone react well with SO2 at ambient...temperaturel. At high temperatures (1500*F - 1800*F), both CaCO and CaO appear to react with SO2 . At these temperatures, CaCO is radily calcinated to...process development has been placed on naturally occurring materials, such as limestone and dolomite . APPROACH This investigation evolved from prior

  16. Bioactivity studies of calcium magnesium silicate prepared from eggshell waste by sol–gel combustion synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajan Choudhary

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study focused on the synthesis of calcium magnesium silicate (akermanite, Ca2MgSi2O7 using eggshell biowaste (as calcium source, magnesium nitrate and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS as starting materials. Sol–gel combustion method was adopted to obtain calcium magnesium silicate. Citric acid was used as a fuel (reducing agent and nitrate ions present in the metal nitrates acts as an oxidizing agent during combustion process. The characterization of synthesized calcium magnesium silicate was carried out by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM techniques. Calcium magnesium silicate crystallite size was observed in nano regime which can effectively mimic natural bone apatite composition. In-vitro bioactivity was investigated by immersing calcium magnesium silicate pellet in simulated body fluid (SBF for three weeks. Results show effective deposition of crystallized hydroxyapatite (HAP layer on its surface and predicting its possibilities for applications in hard tissue regeneration.

  17. Biological Reactions to Calcium Phosphate-coated Calcium Carbonate Particles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tetsunari NISHIKAWA; Kazuya MASUNO; Tomoharu OKAMURA; Kazuya TOMINAGA; Masahiro WATO; Mayu KOKUBU; Koichi IMAI; Shoji TAKEDA; Yoichro TAGUCHI; Masatoshi UEDA; Akio TANAKA

    2010-01-01

    [SYNOPSIS][Objectives]: In order to histopathologically investigate biological reactions to materials used for scaffolds, we examined the cytotoxicity to calcium particles in vitro and bioabsorption in vivo...

  18. Calcium phosphate bioceramics prepared from wet chemically precipitated powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine Salma

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work calcium phosphates were synthesized by modified wet chemical precipitation route. Contrary to the conventional chemical precipitation route calcium hydroxide was homogenized with planetary mill. Milling calcium oxide and water in planetary ball mill as a first step of synthesis provides a highly dispersed calcium hydroxide suspension. The aim of this work was to study the influence of main processing parameters of wet chemical precipitation synthesis product and to control the morphology, phase and functional group composition and, consequently, thermal stability and microstructure of calcium phosphate bioceramics after thermal treatment. The results showed that it is possible to obtain calcium phosphates with different and reproducible phase compositions after thermal processing (hydroxyapatite [HAp], β-tricalcium phosphate [β-TCP] and HAp/β-TCP by modified wet-chemical precipitation route. The β-TCP phase content in sintered bioceramics samples is found to be highly dependent on the changes in technological parameters and it can be controlled with ending pH, synthesis temperature and thermal treatment. Pure, crystalline and highly thermally stable (up to 1300°C HAp bioceramics with homogenous grainy microstructure, grain size up to 200–250 nm and high open porosity can be successfully obtained by powder synthesized at elevated synthesis temperature of 70°C and stabilizing ending pH at 9.

  19. Osteoporosis, calcium and physical activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, A. D.; Houston, C S

    1987-01-01

    Sales of calcium supplements have increased dramatically since 1983, as middle-aged women seek to prevent or treat bone loss due to osteoporosis. However, epidemiologic studies have failed to support the hypothesis that larger amounts of calcium are associated with increased bone density or a decreased incidence of fractures. The authors examine the evidence from controlled trials on the effects of calcium supplementation and physical activity on bone loss and find that weight-bearing activit...

  20. Preparation and Characterization of a Calcium Carbonate Aerogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Plank

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on a facile method for the preparation of a calcium carbonate aerogel consisting of aggregated secondary vaterite particles with an approximate average diameter of 50 nm. It was synthesized via a sol-gel process by reacting calcium oxide with carbon dioxide in methanol and subsequent supercritical drying of the alcogel with carbon dioxide. The resulting monolith was opaque, brittle and had overall dimensions of 6×2×1 cm. It was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, nitrogen adsorption method (BET, and scanning electron microscopy.

  1. Cardiovascular Effects of Calcium Supplements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian R. Reid

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Calcium supplements reduce bone turnover and slow the rate of bone loss. However, few studies have demonstrated reduced fracture incidence with calcium supplements, and meta-analyses show only a 10% decrease in fractures, which is of borderline statistical and clinical significance. Trials in normal older women and in patients with renal impairment suggest that calcium supplements increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. To further assess their safety, we recently conducted a meta-analysis of trials of calcium supplements, and found a 27%–31% increase in risk of myocardial infarction, and a 12%–20% increase in risk of stroke. These findings are robust because they are based on pre-specified analyses of randomized, placebo-controlled trials and are consistent across the trials. Co-administration of vitamin D with calcium does not lessen these adverse effects. The increased cardiovascular risk with calcium supplements is consistent with epidemiological data relating higher circulating calcium concentrations to cardiovascular disease in normal populations. There are several possible pathophysiological mechanisms for these effects, including effects on vascular calcification, vascular cells, blood coagulation and calcium-sensing receptors. Thus, the non-skeletal risks of calcium supplements appear to outweigh any skeletal benefits, and are they appear to be unnecessary for the efficacy of other osteoporosis treatments.

  2. Laser Sintered Calcium Phosphate Bone

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vail, Neil

    1999-01-01

    ...) technology selective laser sintering (SLS). BME has successfully implemented a pilot facility to fabricate calcium phosphate implants using anatomical data coupled with the selective laser sintering process...

  3. 21 CFR 73.1070 - Calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... precipitated calcium carbonate (CaCO3). (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with calcium carbonate... precipitated calcium carbonate in the United States Pharmacopeia XX (1980). (c) Uses and restrictions. Calcium... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 73.1070 Section 73.1070 Food...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium carbonate. 184.1191 Section 184.1191 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Calcium carbonate (CaCO3, CAS Reg... soda process”; (2) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium hydroxide in the “Carbonation...

  5. Selenium potentiates the anticancer effect of cisplatin against oxidative stress and calcium ion signaling-induced intracellular toxicity in MCF-7 breast cancer cells: involvement of the TRPV1 channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakallı Çetin, Esin; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Çiğ, Bilal; Övey, İshak Suat; Aslan Koşar, Pınar

    2017-02-01

    In breast cancers, calcium signaling is a main cause of proliferation and apoptosis of breast cancer cells. Although previous studies have implicated the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) cation channel, the synergistic inhibition effects of selenium (Se) and cisplatin in cancer and the suppression of ongoing apoptosis have not yet been investigated in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. This study investigates the anticancer properties of Se through TRPV1 channel activity in MCF-7 breast cancer cell line cultures when given alone or in combination with cisplatin. The MCF-7 cells were divided into four groups: the control group, the Se-treated group (200 nM), the cisplatin-treated group (40 μM) and the Se + cisplatin-treated group. The intracellular free calcium ion concentration and current densities increased with TRPV1 channel activator capsaicin (0.01 mM), but they decreased with the TRPV1 blocker capsazepine (0.1 mM), Se, cisplatin, and Se + cisplatin incubations. However, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, apoptosis, and the caspase 3, and caspase 9 values increased in the Se-treated group and the cisplatin-treated group, although Western blot (procaspase 3 and 9) results and the cell viability levels decreased with the Se and Se + cisplatin treatments. Apoptosis and caspase-3 were further increased with the Se + cisplatin treatment. Intracellular reactive oxygen species production increased with the cisplatin treatment, but not with the Se treatment. This study's results report, for the first time, that at a cellular level, Se and cisplatin interact on the same intracellular toxic cascade, and the combination of these two drugs can result in a remarkable anticancer effect through modulation of the TRPV1.

  6. Calcium signalling: fishing out molecules of mitochondrial calcium transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajnóczky, György; Csordás, György

    2010-10-26

    Cellular energy metabolism, survival and death are controlled by mitochondrial calcium signals originating in the cytoplasm. Now, RNAi studies link three proteins - MICU1, NCLX and LETM1 - to the previously unknown molecular mechanism of mitochondrial calcium transport. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Calcium electroporation in three cell lines; a comparison of bleomycin and calcium, calcium compounds, and pulsing conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gissel, Hanne; Hojman, Pernille

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Electroporation with calcium (calcium electroporation) can induce ATP depletion-associated cellular death. In the clinical setting, the cytotoxic drug bleomycin is currently used with electroporation (electrochemotherapy) for palliative treatment of tumors. Calcium electroporation off...

  8. Desempenho e digestibilidade aparente dos nutrientes em ovinos alimentados com dietas contendo bagaço de cana-de-açúcar tratado com óxido de cálcio Performance and nutrients apparent digestibility in sheep fed diets containing sugar cane bagasse treated with calcium oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Mendes Murta

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Foram estudados os efeitos da adição de 0,0; 0,75; 1,5 e 2,25% de óxido de cálcio no bagaço de cana-de-açúcar (com base na matéria natural com o objetivo de avaliar o desempenho, o consumo de nutrientes e a digestibilidade aparente das dietas e dos nutrientes em ovinos mestiços da raça Santa Inês e raças nativas. Vinte e quatro ovinos, mantidos em total confinamento, foram distribuídos em delineamento inteiramente ao acaso, com quatro níveis de óxido de cálcio e seis repetições. Os animais foram mantidos em baias individuais, por 77 dias. Os primeiros 14 dias foram de adaptação e, então, seguiram-se três períodos de 21 dias de coleta de dados. Na determinação da digestibilidade, utilizou-se o método de coleta total de fezes, que foi realizada nos quatro últimos dias do período experimental. As fezes foram coletadas três vezes ao dia, às 7, 13 e 18 h. O uso do óxido de cálcio não influenciou os consumos de matéria seca, proteína bruta, fibra em detergente neutro, fibra em detergente ácido e nutrientes digestíveis totais, mas houve efeito linear sobre ganho de peso, com o aumento nas doses de óxido de cálcio, mas não sobre a conversão alimentar e os coeficientes de digestibilidade aparente da matéria seca, proteína bruta e fibra em detergente ácido. Entretanto, foi observado efeito quadrático para o coeficiente de digestibilidade aparente da fibra em detergente. A utilização do bagaço de cana hidrolisado com óxido de cálcio em níveis a partir de 1,5% da matéria natural promove melhoras no desempenho de ovinos e aumenta a digestibilidade apenas da fibra em detergente neutro.The addition effects of 0.0; 0.75; 1.5 and 2.25% of calcium oxide on sugar-cane bagasse (on natural matter basis were studied to evaluate the performance, nutrients intake and apparent digestibility of the diets and nutrients in crossbred sheep of Santa Inês and native breeds. Twenty-four sheep, maintened in total confinement

  9. Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000490.htm Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones To use the sharing ... and maintain strong bones. How Much Calcium and Vitamin D do I Need? Amounts of calcium are ...

  10. Calcium Supplements: Do Men Need Them Too?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lifestyle Nutrition and healthy eating Should men take calcium supplements? Answers from Katherine Zeratsky, R.D., L. ... Most healthy men don't need to take calcium supplements. Calcium is important for men for optimal ...

  11. Stable prenucleation calcium carbonate clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebauer, Denis; Völkel, Antje; Cölfen, Helmut

    2008-12-19

    Calcium carbonate forms scales, geological deposits, biominerals, and ocean sediments. Huge amounts of carbon dioxide are retained as carbonate ions, and calcium ions represent a major contribution to water hardness. Despite its relevance, little is known about the precipitation mechanism of calcium carbonate, and specified complex crystal structures challenge the classical view on nucleation considering the formation of metastable ion clusters. We demonstrate that dissolved calcium carbonate in fact contains stable prenucleation ion clusters forming even in undersaturated solution. The cluster formation can be characterized by means of equilibrium thermodynamics, applying a multiple-binding model, which allows for structural preformation. Stable clusters are the relevant species in calcium carbonate nucleation. Such mechanisms may also be important for the crystallization of other minerals.

  12. Composition and structure of calcium aluminosilicate microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharonova, O. M.; Oreshkina, N. A.; Zhizhaev, A. M.

    2017-06-01

    The composition was studied of calcium aluminosilicate microspheres of three morphological types in high-calcium fly ash from combustion of brown coal from the Kansk-Achinsk basin in slag-tap boilers at temperatures from 1400 to 1500°C and sampled in the first field of electrostatic precipitators at the Krasnoyarsk Cogeneration Power Station no. 2 (TETs-2). Gross compositions and the composition of local areas were determined using a scanning electron microscopy technique and an energy-dispersive analysis with full mapping of globules. With a high content of basic oxides O ox (68 to 79 wt %) and a low content of acid oxides K ox (21 to 31 wt %), type 1 microspheres are formed. They consist of heterogeneous areas having a porous structure and crystalline components in which the content of CaO, SiO2, or Al2O3 differs by two to three times and the content of MgO differs by seven times. With a lower content of O ox (55 to 63 wt %) and an elevated content of K ox (37 to 45 wt %), type 2 microspheres are formed. They are more homogeneous in the composition and structure and consist of similar crystalline components. Having a close content of O ox (46 to 53 wt %) and K ox (47 to 54 wt %), type 3 microspheres, which are a dense matter consisting of amorphous substance with submicron- and nanostructure of crystalline components, are formed. The basic precursor in formation of high-calcium aluminosilicate microspheres is calcium from the organomineral matter of coals with various contribution of Mg, Fe, S, or Na from the coal organic matter and Al, Fe, S, or Si in the form of single mineral inclusions in a coal particle. On the basis of the available data, the effect was analyzed of the composition of a CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-FeO system on the melting and viscous properties of the matter in microspheres and formation of globules of different morphology. The results of this analysis will help to find a correlation with properties of microspheres in their use as functional

  13. Calcium dobesilate may improve hemorheology in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besirli, Kazim; Aydemir, Birsen; Arslan, Caner; Kiziler, Ali Riza; Canturk, Emir; Kayhan, Bekir

    2012-01-01

    Calcium dobesilate is an angioprotective agent that has positive effects on hemorheological parameters. It is an antioxidant that increases endothelial-derived vasodilator substance secretion, there are none that analyze its effects during the postoperative period of patients undergoing myocardial revascularization. We aimed to determine the effects of calcium dobesilate on hemorheological parameters, such as reduced glutathione and malondialdehyde in patients with ischemic heart disease undergoing myocardial revascularization in the postoperative period. One hundred and thirty-four patients operated for coronary heart disease were included in this study. Hemorheological, oxidant and antioxidant parameters were measured two days after surgery and after a period of treatment with calcium dobesilate. Then, 500 mg of calcium dobesilate was given twice a day to one group of 68 patients for three months. The control group was composed of 66 patients who did not receive this medication. The increase in the erythrocyte deformability index was found to be significant compared with both the pretreatment values and with the 1st and 2nd values of the control group after calcium dobesilate administration, whereas there were no significant changes in blood viscosity, glutathione (GSH) or malondialdehyde (MDA) values after the calcium dobesilate administration. The same improvement in the CCS class was observed in patients regardless of they received the calcium dobesilate treatment. In the present investigation, the same improvement in the CCS class was observed in patients regardless of they received the calcium dobesilate treatment. Improvements with calcium dobesilate were statistically significant only in the increase in erythrocyte flexibility.

  14. Concentração residual de hexaclorociclohexano em área contaminada na Cidade dos Meninos, Duque de Caxias, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil, após tratamento com óxido de cálcio Residual concentration of hexachlorocyclohexane in a contaminated site in Cidade dos Meninos, Duque de Caxias, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, after calcium oxide treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosália Maria de Oliveira

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Os hexaclorociclohexanos (HCHs são atualmente considerados carcinógenos humanos. No Brasil, uma severa contaminação de solo causada por HCHs é observada na Cidade dos Meninos, Duque de Caxias, Rio de Janeiro, onde uma antiga fábrica desses compostos foi abandonada há quarenta anos, ameaçando seus 1.700 habitantes. Para remediar a área pesadamente contaminada (área foco, um tratamento com óxido de cálcio foi realizado. Análises de solo coletadas superficialmente na área tratada, anos após o tratamento, mostraram ainda altas concentrações residuais de HCHs. Níveis de concentração tão alto quanto 6.200mg/Kg e 7.320mg/Kg foram encontrados para os isômeros gama- e delta-HCH. Para os isômeros alfa- e beta-HCH, as concentrações observadas foram superiores a 140mg/Kg e 530mg/Kg, respectivamente. Estes resultados mostraram que o tratamento com óxido de cálcio não foi eficiente para a descontaminação do solo desta área.Hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs are currently considered potentially carcinogenic to humans. In Brasil, severe soil contamination by HCHs has been identified at Cidade dos Meninos, Duque de Caxias, Rio de Janeiro, where an old HCH factory was abandoned 40 years ago, leaving 1,700 local residents at risk. Calcium oxide treatment was performed on the most heavily contaminated (focus area. Analysis of superficial soil samples collected years after treatment still showed high residual HCH. Contamination levels as high as 6,200mg/Kg and 7,320mg/Kg were found for alpha- and beta-HCH isomers. For the gamma- and delta-HCH isomers, concentrations reached up to 140mg/Kg and 530mg/Kg, respectively. The results showed that calcium oxide treatment was not efficient to decontaminate the soil in this area.

  15. Experimental study and thermodynamic modelling of the calcium oxide-silicon oxide-aluminum oxide-calcium fluoride system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Geun

    Mould flux for the continuous casting process is a major concern for the steelmaking industry. Nowadays, more than 90 % of steel is being produced by the continuous casting process, which requires mould flux as an essential additive. The development of mould flux has been achieved by the conventional trial and error approach since it was first introduced in industry in the 1960s. Recently, the interest on the properties of fluorine has increased a lot since it is reported that fluorine has important functions such as playing a critical role on the crystallization behavior, and decreasing the melting point and viscosity of slag. However, the conventional way to find a suitable mould flux is not efficient to face the increasingly stringent requirements of the continuous casting process such as thin slab casting and higher casting speed. Therefore, fundamental phase diagram study on mould flux systems is clearly necessary, and thermodynamic modeling is the most effective way to design new mould flux in terms of time and money saving. The major components of mould flux, the CaO-SiO2-Al2O 3-CaF2 system, are investigated in this study as these four constituents will mostly affect the largest numbers of properties. Unfortunately, fluorine has high volatility at high temperature and high reactivity with other materials. Therefore, the results of previous experiments on F-containing systems are characterized by large discrepancies due to composition alteration and unexpected reactions during the experiment. As literature data show inconsistent results between each other, key phase diagram experiments were performed in this study. The phase diagram experiments were conducted with the quenching method in sealed Pt capsules to prevent fluorine loss during the experiment. The analyses were performed using a FE-SEM equipped with an EDS system, and a newly developed technique which produces more precise quantitative results for the equilibrium phase composition. The CaO liquidus of the CaO-CaF 2 binary system, which the literature data differ from each other by up to 50 mol %, was confirmed. The CaO solubility in solid CaF2 was found for the first time and reaches about 5 mol % at the eutectic temperature. The liquidus of the CaO-Al2O3-CaF2 and CaO-SiO 2-CaF2 systems were carefully studied and the miscibility gap in the CaO-Al2O3-CaF2 system was proved to be much smaller than that reported in literature. Also, thermal analysis was performed using DSC in a Pt crucible. The eutectic temperatures of the CaO-CaF2 and CaAl2O4-CaF2 systems were successfully measured and the alpha to beta-CaF2 polymorphic transition was confirmed. Based on the new experimental data and reliable literature data, thermodynamic modeling of the CaO-SiO2-Al 2O3-CaF2 system was also carried out. The results of thermodynamic calculation can be very beneficial for new mould flux design.

  16. Calcium metabolism & hypercalcemia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumachi, F; Motta, R; Cecchin, D; Ave, S; Camozzi, V; Basso, S M M; Luisetto, G

    2011-01-01

    Calcium is essential for many metabolic process, including nerve function, muscle contraction, and blood clotting. The metabolic pathways that contribute to maintain serum calcium levels are bone remodeling processes, intestinal absorption and secretion, and renal handling, but hypercalcemia occurs when at least 2 of these 3 metabolic pathways are altered. Calcium metabolism mainly depends on the activity of parathyroid hormone (PTH). Its secretion is strictly controlled by the ionized serum calcium levels through a negative feed-back, which is achieved by the activation of calcium-sensing receptors (CaSRs) mainly expressed on the surface of the parathyroid cells. The PTH receptor in bone and kidney is now referred as PTHR1. The balance of PTH, calcitonin, and vitamin D has long been considered the main regulator of calcium metabolism, but the function of other actors, such as fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23), Klotho, and TPRV5 should be considered. Primary hyperparathyroidism and malignancy are the most common causes of hypercalcemia, accounting for more than 90% of cases. Uncontrolled hypercalcemia may cause renal impairment, both temporary (alteration of renal tubular function) and progressive (relapsing nephrolithiasis), leading to a progressive loss of renal function, as well as severe bone diseases, and heart damages. Advances in the understanding of all actors of calcium homeostasis will be crucial, having several practical consequences in the treatment and prevention of hypercalcemia. This would allow to move from a support therapy, sometimes ineffective, to a specific and addressed therapy, especially in patients with chronic hypercalcemic conditions unsuitable for surgery.

  17. Metabolismo de nitrogênio em novilhas alimentadas com dietas contendo cana-de-açúcar tratada com óxido de cálcio Nitrogen metabolism in heifers fed with diets containing sugar cane treated with calcium oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleidson Giordano Pinto de Carvalho

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Esta pesquisa foi realizada para avaliar o balanço de nitrogênio, as concentrações de ureia na urina e no plasma e a síntese de proteína microbiana em novilhas alimentadas com dietas contendo cana-de-açúcar tratada com óxido de cálcio. Utilizaram-se 20 novilhas mestiças Holandês-Zebu com peso corporal médio inicial de 200 kg distribuídas em delineamento inteiramente ao acaso, com quatro tratamentos e cinco repetições. Os animais foram alojados em baias individuais cobertas, com piso de concreto, providas de cocho individual de concreto para alimentação e bebedouro automático comum a duas baias. O período experimental foi de 21 dias, e a coleta de dados foi realizada nos sete dias finais. As dietas foram formuladas para ser isoproteicas, com 14% de proteína bruta, e continham 71% de cana-de-açúcar (com 0; 0,75; 1,5 ou 2,25% de óxido de cálcio na matéria natural corrigida com 1% de mistura ureia e sulfato de amônio (9:1 e 29% de concentrado. A cana-de-açúcar foi fornecida aos animais após 24 horas de tratamento com óxido de cálcio. O tratamento da cana-de-açúcar com óxido de cálcio influenciou o balanço de nitrogênio, pois ocasionou redução tanto no consumo como na quantidade de nitrogênio digerido e retido. O nitrogênio retido (em % do N ingerido e do N digerido também reduziu linearmente conforme aumentaram os níveis de óxido de cálcio na cana-de-açucar. O uso de óxido de cálcio em níveis de até 2,25% no tratamento da cana-de-açúcar não afeta as concentrações de ureia na urina e no plasma nem a excreção de ureia na urina e a síntese de proteína microbiana em novilhas.This study was carried out to evaluate the nitrogen balance, the urea concentrations in urine and plasma and the microbial protein synthesis in heifers fed diets containing sugar cane treated with calcium oxide. Twenty Holstein-zebu crossbred heifers, with average initial body weight of 200 kg were used, distributed in a

  18. Calcium and Calcium Supplements: Achieving the Right Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Duyff RL. American Dietetic Association Complete Food and Nutrition Guide. 4th ed. Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons; 2012:140. Rosen HN. Calcium and vitamin D supplementation in osteoporosis. http://www.uptodate.com/home/index. ...

  19. Calcium carbonate and calcium sulfate in Martian meteorite EETA79001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, J. L.; Wentworth, S. J.

    1987-01-01

    Chips of glassy Lithology C of EETA79001 were studied by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to determine the mineralogy and petrogenesis of the glass that was shown by others to contain trapped Mars-like gases. Calcium carbonite was identified as massive to acicular crystals for which Ca, C, and O were the major elements. Calcium sulfate was identified as prismatic-acicular crystals with Ca and S as the major elements.

  20. Synthesis of fatty acid methyl ester from the transesterification of high- and low-acid-content crude palm oil (Elaeis guineensis) and karanj oil (Pongamia pinnata) over a calcium-lanthanum-aluminum mixed-oxides catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syamsuddin, Y; Murat, M N; Hameed, B H

    2016-08-01

    The synthesis of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) from the high- and low-acid-content feedstock of crude palm oil (CPO) and karanj oil (KO) was conducted over CaO-La2O3-Al2O3 mixed-oxide catalyst. Various reaction parameters were investigated using a batch reactor to identify the best reaction condition that results in the highest FAME yield for each type of oil. The transesterification of CPO resulted in a 97.81% FAME yield with the process conditions of 170°C reaction temperature, 15:1 DMC-to-CPO molar ratio, 180min reaction time, and 10wt.% catalyst loading. The transesterification of KO resulted in a 96.77% FAME yield with the conditions of 150°C reaction temperature, 9:1 DMC-to-KO molar ratio, 180min reaction time, and 5wt.% catalyst loading. The properties of both products met the ASTM D6751 and EN 14214 standard requirements. The above results showed that the CaO-La2O3-Al2O3 mixed-oxide catalyst was suitable for high- and low-acid-content vegetable oil. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Postprandial Energy Metabolism in the Regulation of Body Weight: Is there a Mechanistic Role for Dietary Calcium?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario J. Soares

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available There has been much interest in the mechanisms by which calcium may attenuate weight gain or accelerate body fat loss. This review focuses on postprandial energy metabolism and indicates that dietary calcium increases whole body fat oxidation after single and multiple meals. There is, as yet, no conclusive evidence for a greater diet induced thermogenesis, an increased lipolysis or suppression of key lipogenic enzyme systems. There is however convincing evidence that higher calcium intakes promote a modest energy loss through increased fecal fat excretion. Overall, there is a role for dietary calcium in human energy metabolism. Future studies need to define threshold intakes for metabolic and gastrointestinal outcomes.

  2. Antioxidant properties of calcium dobesilate in ischemic/reperfused diabetic rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, M E; Haines, D; Garay, E; Chiavaroli, C; Farine, J C; Hannaert, P; Berta, A; Garay, R P

    2001-10-05

    Calcium dobesilate possesses antioxidant properties and protects against capillary permeability by reactive oxygen species in the rat peritoneal cavity, but whether a similar action can take place in the diabetic rat retina is unknown. We investigated the oral treatment of diabetic rats with calcium dobesilate on the prevention of free radical-mediated retinal injury induced by ischemia/reperfusion (90 min ischemia followed by 3 min and/or 24 h of reperfusion). Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were orally treated with 50 and 100 mg/kg of calcium dobesilate for 10 days (n=12 in each group). In the first series of studies, calcium dobesilate was found to significantly reduce the maldistribution of ion content in diabetic ischemic/reperfused rat retina. Thus, in diabetic rats treated with 100 mg/kg/day calcium dobesilate, ischemia/reperfusion provoked: (i) 27.5% increase in retinal Na(+) content compared to 51.8% in the vehicle-treated group (Pdobesilate was found to significantly protect diabetic rat retina against inhibition of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and Ca(2+)/Mg(2+)-ATPase activities by ischemia/reperfusion (54% and 41% reduction, respectively, with 100 mg/kg of calcium dobesilate) and also against changes in retinal ATP, reduced glutathione (GSH), and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) contents. In the third series of experiments, rats treated with 100 mg/kg of calcium dobesilate reduced the hydroxyl radical signal intensity to 41% (measured by electron paramagnetic resonance), induced by ischemia/reperfusion in diabetic rat retina. Finally, 100 mg/kg calcium dobesilate significantly reduced retinal edema (measured by the thickness of the inner plexiform layer) in diabetic rats. In conclusion, oral treatment with calcium dobesilate significantly protected diabetic rat retina against oxidative stress induced by ischemia/reperfusion. Whether the antioxidant properties of calcium dobesilate explain, at least in part, its beneficial therapeutic effects in diabetic

  3. 21 CFR 184.1187 - Calcium alginate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium alginate. 184.1187 Section 184.1187 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1187 Calcium alginate. (a) Calcium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005.... Calcium alginate is prepared by the neutralization of purified alginic acid with appropriate pH control...

  4. Extracellular and Intracellular Regulation of Calcium Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Bronner

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available An organism with an internal skeleton must accumulate calcium while maintaining body fluids at a well-regulated, constant calcium concentration. Neither calcium absorption nor excretion plays a significant regulatory role. Instead, isoionic calcium uptake and release by bone surfaces causes plasma calcium to be well regulated. Very rapid shape changes of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, in response to hormonal signals, modulate the available bone surfaces so that plasma calcium can increase when more low-affinity bone calcium binding sites are made available and can decrease when more high-affinity binding sites are exposed. The intracellular free calcium concentration of body cells is also regulated, but because cells are bathed by fluids with vastly higher calcium concentration, their major regulatory mechanism is severe entry restriction. All cells have a calcium-sensing receptor that modulates cell function via its response to extracellular calcium. In duodenal cells, the apical calcium entry structure functions as both transporter and a vitamin D–responsive channel. The channel upregulates calcium entry, with intracellular transport mediated by the mobile, vitamin D–dependent buffer, calbindin D9K, which binds and transports more than 90% of the transcellular calcium flux. Fixed intracellular calcium binding sites can, like the body's skeleton, take up and release calcium that has entered the cell, but the principal regulatory tool of the cell is restricted entry.

  5. Calcium phosphates for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canillas, M.; Pena, P.; Aza, A.H. de; Rodriguez, M.A.

    2017-07-01

    The history of calcium phosphates in the medicine field starts in 1769 when the first evidence of its existence in the bone tissue is discovered. Since then, the interest for calcium phosphates has increased among the scientific community. Their study has been developed in parallel with new advances in materials sciences, medicine or tissue engineering areas. Bone tissue engineering is the field where calcium phosphates have had a great importance. While the first bioceramics are selected according to bioinert, biocompatibility and mechanical properties with the aim to replace bone tissue damaged, calcium phosphates open the way to the bone tissue regeneration challenge. Nowadays, they are present in the majority of commercial products directed to repair or regenerate damaged bone tissue. Finally, in the last few decades, they have been suggested and studied as drug delivering devices and as vehicles of DNA and RNA for the future generation therapies. (Author)

  6. Polysulfide calcium as multyfunctional product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Abramova

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A modified method of producing of polysulfide calcium, the influence of various factors on the degree of polysulfide of product, as well as possible directions for its use as a multifunctional compound were considered.

  7. [Calcium metabolism after the menopause].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanovitch, D; Klotz, H P

    1976-02-16

    The authors recall the antagonism between estradiol and parathormone. Estradiol tends to lower serum calcium and fix calcium in the bones as shown by one of us 25 years ago. The mechanism of this action of estrogen on calcium metabolism has been determined by numerous authors but some points are still not clear, e.g. the interferences between estrogen and calcitonin. Classically, parathormone is known to increase bony reabsorption and raise serum calcium. After the menopause the gradual reduction in estradiol secretion leads to post-menopausal osteoporosis. It is better to administer estrogens prophylactically to women after the menopause provided a cervical smear and mammography have been carried out to eliminate latent carcinoma of the breast or uterine cervix.

  8. Calcium-sensing beyond neurotransmitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Han, Weiping

    2009-01-01

    Neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones are released through the regulated exocytosis of SVs (synaptic vesicles) and LDCVs (large dense-core vesicles), a process that is controlled by calcium. Synaptotagmins are a family of type 1 membrane proteins that share a common domain structure. Most....... Also, we discuss potential roles of synaptotagmins in non-traditional endocrine systems....... synaptotagmins are located in brain and endocrine cells, and some of these synaptotagmins bind to phospholipids and calcium at levels that trigger regulated exocytosis of SVs and LDCVs. This led to the proposed synaptotagmin-calcium-sensor paradigm, that is, members of the synaptotagmin family function...... as calcium sensors for the regulated exocytosis of neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones. Here, we provide an overview of the synaptotagmin family, and review the recent mouse genetic studies aimed at understanding the functions of synaptotagmins in neurotransmission and endocrine-hormone secretion...

  9. ER calcium release promotes mitochondrial dysfunction and hepatic cell lipotoxicity in response to palmitate overload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egnatchik, Robert A.; Leamy, Alexandra K.; Jacobson, David A.; Shiota, Masakazu; Young, Jamey D.

    2014-01-01

    Palmitate overload induces hepatic cell dysfunction characterized by enhanced apoptosis and altered citric acid cycle (CAC) metabolism; however, the mechanism of how this occurs is incompletely understood. We hypothesize that elevated doses of palmitate disrupt intracellular calcium homeostasis resulting in a net flux of calcium from the ER to mitochondria, activating aberrant oxidative metabolism. We treated primary hepatocytes and H4IIEC3 cells with palmitate and calcium chelators to identify the roles of intracellular calcium flux in lipotoxicity. We then applied 13C metabolic flux analysis (MFA) to determine the impact of calcium in promoting palmitate-stimulated mitochondrial alterations. Co-treatment with the calcium-specific chelator BAPTA resulted in a suppression of markers for apoptosis and oxygen consumption. Additionally, 13C MFA revealed that BAPTA co-treated cells had reduced CAC fluxes compared to cells treated with palmitate alone. Our results demonstrate that palmitate-induced lipoapoptosis is dependent on calcium-stimulated mitochondrial activation, which induces oxidative stress. PMID:25061559

  10. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. 172.330 Section 172.330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate may...

  11. Calcium affects on vascular endpoints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Vaishali B

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Calcium is one of the most abundant minerals in the body and its metabolism is one of the basic biologic processes in humans. Although historically linked primarily to bone structural development and maintenance, calcium is now recognized as a key component of many physiologic pathways necessary for optimum health including cardiovascular, neurological, endocrine, renal, and gastrointestinal systems. A recent meta-analysis published in August 2011 showed a potential increase in cardiovascular events related to calcium supplementation. The possible mechanism of action of this correlation has not been well elucidated. This topic has generated intense interest due to the widespread use of calcium supplements, particularly among the middle aged and elderly who are at the most risk from cardiac events. Prior studies did not control for potential confounding factors such as the use of statins, aspirin or other medications. These controversial results warrant additional well-designed studies to investigate the relationship between calcium supplementation and cardiovascular outcomes. The purpose of this review is to highlight the current literature in regards to calcium supplementation and cardiovascular health; and to identify areas of future research.

  12. Calcium dobesilate for prevention of gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarey, Mostafa; Changizi Ashtiyani, Saeed; Najafi, Houshang

    2014-01-01

    Calcium dobesilate is an antioxidant drug and this study is aimed to investigate the effects of calcium dobesilate on gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. This experimental study was conducted on 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were randomly divided into the following 5 groups: control, sham, gentamicin (100 mg/kg/d, intraperitoneal), gentamicin and calcium dobesilate (50 mg/kg body weight), gentamicin and calcium dobesilate (50 mg/kg body weight). Treatment was provided once a day in a 7-day period. At the end of the 7th day, plasma and urine samples were taken and the concentrations of creatinine, urea nitrogen, sodium, potassium, and osmolarity were measured in both samples. The level of oxidative stress in the left kidney tissue samples was also assessed by measuring malondialdehyde and ferric reducing antioxidant power. Calcium dobesilate intake with both doses led to a significant decrease in the elevated concentration of creatinine, urea nitrogen, and fractional excretion of sodium by gentamicin, and an increase in creatinine clearance and absolute excretion of potassium as compared to the gentamicin group. Furthermore, calcium dobesilate decreased tissue malondialdehyde and increased tissue ferric reducing antioxidant power at both doses, in comparison to those in the gentamicin group. Calcium dobesilate is capable of protecting rats against gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. This protective effect of calcium dobesilate is probably dependent on its antioxidant properties.

  13. The possibilities of obtaining metallic calcium from Serbian carbonate mineral raw materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokić Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental investigations defined both the technological scheme of the calcium production from limestone by aluminothermic process and the basic operating parameters of the particular technological phases. The limestone with high content of Mg, Na and K was used in the paper. X-ray analysis reveals that the samples contain mainly calcite with small amount of dolomite. At first, the influence of temperature, time and granulometry on the calcium carbonate calcination was examined. The dissociation process was completed in 10-15 min at 1200°C, and dissociation rate increases with decreasing of particle size up to 5 mm. Afterwards, the aluminothermic reduction process of calcium oxide was investigated. At the temperature 1200°C, and vacuum of at least 3 kPa, the reduction process completed within 2 hours. The chemical composition of calcium oxide and calcium showed increased content of magnesium oxide and alkaline oxides (especially sodium.[Projekat Ministartsva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR34002 i br. TR34023

  14. Calcium: the molecular basis of calcium action in biology and medicine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pochet, Roland; Donato, Rosario

    2000-01-01

    ... of Calcium Calcium Signalling in Excitable Cells Ca2+ Release in Muscle Cells by N. Macrez and J. Mironneau Calcium Signalling in Neurons Exemplified by Rat Sympathetic Ganglion Cells by S.J. M...

  15. Hydration characteristics of calcium silicate cements with alternative radiopacifiers used as root-end filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Josette

    2010-03-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is composed of calcium silicate cement and bismuth oxide added for radiopacity. The bismuth oxide in MTA has been reported to have a deleterious effect on the physical and chemical properties of the hydrated material. This study aimed to investigate the hydration mechanism of calcium silicate cement loaded with different radiopacifiers for use as a root-end filling material. Calcium silicate cement loaded with barium sulfate, gold, or silver/tin alloy was hydrated, and paste microstructure was assessed after 30 days. In addition, atomic ratio plots of Al/Ca versus Si/Ca and S/Ca and Al/Ca were drawn, and X-ray energy dispersive analysis of the hydration products was performed to assess for inclusion of heavy metals. The leachate produced from the cements after storage of the cements in water for 28 days and the leaching of the radiopacifiers in an alkaline solution was assessed by using inductively coupled plasma. The hydrated calcium silicate cement was composed of calcium silicate hydrate, calcium hydroxide, ettringite, and monosulfate. Unhydrated cement particles were few. No heavy metals were detected in the calcium silicate hydrate except for the bismuth in MTA. Calcium was leached out early in large quantities that reduced with time. The barium and bismuth were leached in increasing amounts. Copper was the most soluble in alkaline solution followed by bismuth and barium in smaller amounts. The bismuth oxide can be replaced by other radiopacifiers that do not affect the hydration mechanism of the resultant material. Copyright (c) 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Presynaptic calcium signalling in cerebellar mossy fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Jörntell, Henrik; Midtgaard, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Whole-cell recordings were obtained from mossy fibre terminals in adult turtles in order to characterize the basic membrane properties. Calcium imaging of presynaptic calcium signals was carried out in order to analyse calcium dynamics and presynaptic GABA B inhibition. A tetrodotoxin (TTX....... Calcium imaging using Calcium-Green dextran revealed a stimulus-evoked all-or-none TTX-sensitive calcium signal in simple and complex rosettes. All compartments of a complex rosette were activated during electrical activation of the mossy fibre, while individual simple and complex rosettes along an axon...... appeared to be isolated from one another in terms of calcium signalling. CGP55845 application showed that GABA B receptors mediated presynaptic inhibition of the calcium signal over the entire firing frequency range of mossy fibres. A paired-pulse depression of the calcium signal lasting more than 1 s...

  17. Idiopathic recurrent calcium urolithiasis (IRCU: pathophysiology evaluated in light of oxidative metabolism, without and with variation of several biomarkers in fasting urine and plasma - a comparison of stone-free and -bearing male patients, emphasizing mineral, acid-base, blood pressure and protein status*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwilie PO

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background IRCU is traditionally considered as lifestyle disease (associations with, among others, overweight, obesity, hypertension, type-2 diabetes, arising from excess, in 24 h urine, of calcium (Ca salts (calcium oxalate (CaOx, calcium phosphate (CaPi, supersaturation of, and crystallization in, tubular fluid and urine, causing crystal-induced epithelial cell damage, proteinuria, crystal aggregation and uroliths. Methods Another picture emerges from the present uncontrolled study of 154 male adult IRCU patients (75 stone-bearing (SB and 79 age-matched stone-free (SF, in whom stone-forming and other parameters in fasting urine and plasma were contrasted with five biomarkers (see footnote of oxidative metabolism (OM, without and with variation of markers. Results 1 In SB vs. SF unstratified OM biomarkers were statistically unchanged, but the majority of patients was overweight; despite, in SB vs. SF urine pH, total and non-albumin protein concentration were elevated, fractional urinary uric acid excretion and blood bicarbonate decreased, whereas urine volume, sodium, supersaturation with CaOx and CaPi (as hydroxyapatite were unchanged; 2 upon variation of OM markers (strata below and above median numerous stone parameters differed significant!', among others urine volume, total protein, Ca/Pi ratio, pH, sodium, potassium, plasma Ca/Pi ratio and parathyroid hormone, blood pressure, renal excretion of non-albumin protein and other substances; 3 a significant shift from SF to SB patients occurred with increase of urine pH, decrease of blood bicarbonate, and increase of diastolic blood pressure, whereas increase of plasma uric acid impacted only marginally; 4 in both SF and SB patients a strong curvilinear relationship links a rise of urine Ca/Pi to urine Ca/Pi divided by plasma Ca/Pi, but in SB urine Ca/Pi failed to correlate significantly with urine hydroxyapatite supersaturation; 5 also in SB, plasma Ca/Pi and urinary nitrate were

  18. Calcium metabolism and cardiovascular function after spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, Daniel C.; Yue, Qi; Dierickx, Jacqueline; Roullet, Chantal; Otsuka, Keiichi; Watanabe, Mitsuaki; Coste, Sarah; Roullet, Jean Baptiste; Phanouvang, Thongchan; Orwoll, Eric; hide

    2002-01-01

    To determine the influence of dietary calcium on spaceflight-induced alterations in calcium metabolism and blood pressure (BP), 9-wk-old spontaneously hypertensive rats, fed either high- (2%) or low-calcium (0.02%) diets, were flown on an 18-day shuttle flight. On landing, flight animals had increased ionized calcium (P parathyroid hormone levels (P animals (P = 0.057). However, mean arterial pressure was elevated (P animals fed low- compared with high-calcium diets (P parathyroid hormone was paradoxically increased in the high-calcium-fed flight animals after landing.

  19. [Regulatory mechanism of calcium metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozono, Keiichi

    It is often difficult for terrestrial animals to take enough calcium. To maintain serum or extracellular calcium levels is very important for muscle and nerve function. Two major regulators to increase the serum calcium levels are parathyroid hormone(PTH)and vitamin D. PTH binds to the G protein coupling receptor, PTH1R, and increases intracellular cAMP levels. Impirement in the PTH signalling causes many diseases such as pseudohypoparathyroidism and acrodysostosis with hormone resistance. Vitamin D is activated to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D[1,25(OH)2D]by two steps of hydroxylation which occurs in the Liver and Kidney. Then, 1,25(OH)2D binds to vitamin D receptor(VDR), which works as a ligand-dependent transcription factor. Hypocalcemia and hypercalcemia are caused by various disorders including abnormal regulation of PTH and vitamin D production and their signal transduction.

  20. Calcium signaling and cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Mauro Cunha Xavier; Kihara, Alexandre Hiroaki; Goulart, Vânia A M; Tonelli, Fernanda M P; Gomes, Katia N; Ulrich, Henning; Resende, Rodrigo R

    2015-11-01

    Cell proliferation is orchestrated through diverse proteins related to calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling inside the cell. Cellular Ca(2+) influx that occurs first by various mechanisms at the plasma membrane, is then followed by absorption of Ca(2+) ions by mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, and, finally, there is a connection of calcium stores to the nucleus. Experimental evidence indicates that the fluctuation of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum provides a pivotal and physiological role for cell proliferation. Ca(2+) depletion in the endoplasmatic reticulum triggers Ca(2+) influx across the plasma membrane in an phenomenon called store-operated calcium entries (SOCEs). SOCE is activated through a complex interplay between a Ca(2+) sensor, denominated STIM, localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and a Ca(2+) channel at the cell membrane, denominated Orai. The interplay between STIM and Orai proteins with cell membrane receptors and their role in cell proliferation is discussed in this review. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Magnesium: Effect on ocular health as a calcium channel antagonist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şafak Korkmaz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium is the physiologic calcium channel blocker,involving in many different metabolic processes by maintainingcell membrane function, modulating smooth musclecontraction and influencing enzymatic activities. Magnesiumhas been shown to increase blood flow to tissuesby modifying endothelial function via endothelin-1 (ET-1and nitric Oxide (NO pathways. Magnesium also exhibitsneuroprotective role by blocking N-methyl-D-aspartate(NMDA receptor related calcium influx and by inhibitingthe release of glutamate, hence protects the cell againstoxidative stress and apoptosis. Both increase in bloodflow and its neuroprotective effect make magnesium agood candidate for glaucoma studies. Magnesium hasbeen shown to decrease oxidative stress and apoptosisin retinal tissue and to have retinal ganglion cell sparingeffect. A series of studies has been conducted aboutmagnesium could decrease insulin resistance in diabeticpatients, ease glycemia control and prevent diabetic retinopathy.Magnesium is found to be critically important inmaintaining normal ionic homeostasis of lens. Magnesiumdeficiency has been shown to cause increased lenticularoxidative stress and ionic imbalance in the lens so triggercataractogenesis. J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4 (2: 244-251Key words: Magnesium, calcium channel blockage,glaucoma, neuroprotection, diabetic retinopathy, cataract

  2. Calcium regulation of muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szent-Györgyi, A G

    1975-07-01

    Calcium triggers contraction by reaction with regulatory proteins that in the absence of calcium prevent interaction of actin and myosin. Two different regulatory systems are found in different muscles. In actin-linked regulation troponin and tropomyosin regulate actin by blocking sites on actin required for complex formation with myosin; in myosin-linked regulation sites on myosin are blocked in the absence of calcium. The major features of actin control are as follows: there is a requirement for tropomyosin and for a troponin complex having three different subunits with different functions; the actin displays a cooperative behavior; and a movement of tropomyosin occurs controlled by the calcium binding on troponin. Myosin regulation is controlled by a regulatory subunit that can be dissociated in scallop myosin reversibly by removing divalent cations with EDTA. Myosin control can function with pure actin in the absence of tropomyosin. Calcium binding and regulation of molluscan myosins depend on the presence of regulatory light chains. It is proposed that the light chains function by sterically blocking myosin sites in the absence of calcium, and that the "off" state of myosin requires cooperation between the two myosin heads. Both myosin control and actin control are widely distributed in different organisms. Many invertebrates have muscles with both types of regulation. Actin control is absent in the muscles of molluscs and in several minor phyla that lack troponin. Myosin control is not found in striated vertebrate muscles and in the fast muscles of crustacean decapods, although regulatory light chains are present. While in vivo myosin control may not be excluded from vertebrate striated muscles, myosin control may be absent as a result of mutations of the myosin heavy chain.

  3. Composição química e digestibilidade da matéria seca do bagaço de cana-de-açúcar tratado com óxido de cálcio Chemical composition and dry matter digestibility of sugarcane bagasse treated with calcium oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.G.P. Carvalho

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Avaliaram-se a composição química e a digestibilidade in vitro da matéria seca (DIVMS do bagaço de cana-de-açúcar hidrolisado com óxido de cálcio em dois períodos. As doses de óxido de cálcio aplicadas ao bagaço foram 0; 1,25; 2,5 e 3,75% (na base da MS e os períodos de tratamento, 12 e 36 horas. O teor de matéria seca (MS do bagaço de cana foi maior quando hidrolisado por 36 horas. O valor médio da proteína bruta foi de 2,4% e não foi influenciado pelo período, pela dose de óxido de cálcio nem pela interação período × dose de óxido de cálcio. Os teores de fibra em detergente neutro, fibra em detergente ácido, celulose e lignina diminuíram linearmente com a adição de óxido de cálcio. A digestibilidade in vitro da matéria seca, no entanto, aumentou 1,2% a cada unidade de óxido de cálcio adicionada ao bagaço da cana-de-açúcar. O tratamento com óxido de cálcio por 12 ou 36 horas melhora o valor nutritivo do bagaço de cana-de-açúcar.The chemical composition and in vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD of sugarcane bagasse hydrolyzed with calcium oxide (CaO in two periods were evaluated. The doses of calcium oxide applied to bagasse were 0; 1.25; 2.5; and 3.75% (dry matter basis and the treatment periods were 12 and 36 hours. The dry matter sugarcane bagasse was larger when hydrolyzed for 36 hours. The crude protein mean value observed was 2.4%, with no effects of period, CaO doses, or period and CaO interaction. The neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber, celluloses, and lignin levels linearly reduced with CaO added. The IVDMD increased with CaO add, estimating increase of 1.2% for each CaO unit added to sugarcane bagasse. The periods of 12 or 36 hours can be adopted to sugarcane bagasse treatment with CaO. The CaO addiction to sugarcane bagasse improve its nutritive value.

  4. Can total cardiac calcium predict the coronary calcium score?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressman, Gregg S; Crudu, Vitalie; Parameswaran-Chandrika, Anoop; Romero-Corral, Abel; Purushottam, Bhaskar; Figueredo, Vincent M

    2011-01-21

    Mitral annular calcification (MAC) shares the same risk factors as atherosclerosis and is associated with coronary artery disease as well as cardiovascular events. However, sensitivity and positive predictive value are low. We hypothesized that a global echocardiographic calcium score would better predict coronary atherosclerotic burden, as assessed by coronary artery calcium score (CAC), than MAC alone. An echocardiographic score was devised to measure global cardiac calcification in a semi-quantitative manner; this included calcification in the aortic valve and root, the mitral valve and annulus, and the sub-mitral apparatus. This score, and a simplified version, were compared with a similar calcification score by CT scan, as well as the CAC. There was a good correlation between the two global calcification scores; the echocardiographic score also correlated with CAC. Using CAC >400 as a measure of severe coronary atherosclerosis, an echocardiographic score ≥5 had a positive predictive value of 60%. Importantly, the simplified score performed equally well (≥3 had a positive predictive value of 62%). Global cardiac calcification, assessed by CT scan or echocardiography, correlates with the extent of coronary calcium. A semi-quantitative calcium score can be easily applied during routine echocardiographic interpretation and can alert the reader to the possibility of severe coronary atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Calcium ferrite formation from the thermolysis of calcium tris (maleato)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    stoichiometric quantities of aqueous solutions of calcium maleate, iron(III) maleate and maleic acid. The reaction mixture was concentrated on a water bath until a brown coloured product formed after the addition of excess of acetone. The complex was vacuum dried and its identity was established by chemical analysis.

  6. Calcium ferrite formation from the thermolysis of calcium tris ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Various physico-chemical techniques i.e. TG, DTG, DTA, Mössbauer, XRD, IR etc have been used to study the decomposition behaviour from ambient to 900°C and ferrite formation. Three consecutive decomposition steps leading to the formation of -Fe2O3 and calcium carbonate have been observed at various stages of ...

  7. Estimation of presynaptic calcium currents and endogenous calcium buffers at the frog neuromuscular junction with two different calcium fluorescent dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry eSamigullin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available At the frog neuromuscular junction, under physiological conditions, the direct measurement of calcium currents and of the concentration of intracellular calcium buffers—which determine the kinetics of calcium concentration and neurotransmitter release from the nerve terminal—has hitherto been technically impossible. With the aim of quantifying both Ca2+ currents and the intracellular calcium buffers, we measured fluorescence signals from nerve terminals loaded with the low-affinity calcium dye Magnesium Green or the high-affinity dye Oregon Green BAPTA-1, simultaneously with microelectrode recordings of nerve-action potentials and end-plate currents. The action-potential-induced fluorescence signals in the nerve terminals developed much more slowly than the postsynaptic response. To clarify the reasons for this observation and to define a spatiotemporal profile of intracellular calcium and of the concentration of mobile and fixed calcium buffers, mathematical modeling was employed. The best approximations of the experimental calcium transients for both calcium dyes were obtained when the calcium current had an amplitude of 1.6 ± 0.08 рА and a half-decay time of 1.2 ± 0.06 ms, and when the concentrations of mobile and fixed calcium buffers were 250 ± 13 µM and 8 ± 0.4 mM, respectively. High concentrations of endogenous buffers define the time course of calcium transients after an action potential in the axoplasm, and may modify synaptic plasticity.

  8. Calcium fertilization increases the concentration of calcium in sapwood and calcium oxalate in foliage of red spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin T. Smith; Walter C. Shortle; Jon H. Connolly; Rakesh Minocha; Jody Jellison

    2009-01-01

    Calcium cycling plays a key role in the health and productivity of red spruce forests in the northeastern US. A portion of the flowpath of calcium within forests includes translocation as Ca2+ in sapwood and accumulation as crystals of calcium oxalate in foliage. Concentrations of Ca in these tree tissues have been used as markers of...

  9. Inhibition of endogenous heat shock protein 70 attenuates inducible nitric oxide synthase induction via disruption of heat shock protein 70/Na(+) /H(+) exchanger 1-Ca(2+) -calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II/transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1-nuclear factor-κB signals in BV-2 microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Lu, Xu; Wang, Jia; Tong, Lijuan; Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) critically contributes to inflammation and host defense. The inhibition of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) prevents iNOS induction in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages. However, the role and mechanism of endogenous Hsp70 in iNOS induction in microglia remains unclear. This study addresses this issue in BV-2 microglia, showing that Hsp70 inhibition or knockdown prevents LPS-induced iNOS protein expression and nitric oxide production. Real-time PCR experiments showed that LPS-induced iNOS mRNA transcription was blocked by Hsp70 inhibition. Further studies revealed that the inhibition of Hsp70 attenuated LPS-stimulated nuclear translocation and phosphorylation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB as well as the degradation of inhibitor of κB (IκB)-α and phosphorylation of IκB kinase β (IKKβ). This prevention effect of Hsp70 inhibition on IKKβ-NF-κB activation was found to be dependent on the Ca(2+) /calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII)/transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) signals based on the following observations: 1) chelation of intracellular Ca(2+) or inhibition of CaMKII reduced LPS-induced increases in TAK1 phosphorylation and 2) Hsp70 inhibition reduced LPS-induced increases in CaMKII/TAK1 phosphorylation, intracellular pH value, [Ca(2+) ]i , and CaMKII/TAK1 association. Mechanistic studies showed that Hsp70 inhibition disrupted the association between Hsp70 and Na(+) /H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1), which is an important exchanger responsible for Ca(2+) influx in LPS-stimulated cells. These studies demonstrate that the inhibition of endogenous Hsp70 attenuates the induction of iNOS, which likely occurs through the disruption of NHE1/Hsp70-Ca(2+) -CaMKII/TAK1-NF-κB signals in BV-2 microglia, providing further insight into the functions of Hsp70 in the CNS. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Calcium release from experimental dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okulus, Zuzanna; Buchwald, Tomasz; Voelkel, Adam

    2016-11-01

    The calcium release from calcium phosphate-containing experimental dental restorative materials was examined. The possible correlation of ion release with initial calcium content, solubility and degree of curing (degree of conversion) of examined materials was also investigated. Calcium release was measured with the use of an ion-selective electrode in an aqueous solution. Solubility was established by the weighing method. Raman spectroscopy was applied for the determination of the degree of conversion, while initial calcium content was examined with the use of energy-dispersive spectroscopy. For examined materials, the amount of calcium released was found to be positively correlated with solubility and initial calcium content. It was also found that the degree of conversion does not affect the ability of these experimental composites to release calcium ions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia and calcium sensing receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mrgan, Monija; Nielsen, Sanne; Brixen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) is a lifelong, benign autosomal dominant disease characterized by hypercalcemia, normal to increased parathyroid hormone level, and a relatively low renal calcium excretion. Inactivation of the calcium-sensing receptor in heterozygous patients results in...

  12. Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bone Health Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health March 2012 Download ... also helps keep your bones strong. Why are vitamin D and calcium important to bone health? Vitamin ...

  13. Calcium Binding Ability of Recombinant Buffalo Regucalcin: A Study Using Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harikrishna, P; Thomas, Jobin; Shende, A M; Bhure, S K

    2017-04-01

    Regucalcin is a calcium regulating multifunctional protein reported to have many important functions like calcium homeostasis, anti-oxidative, anti-apoptotic and anti-cancerous functions. Although it is demonstrated as a calcium regulating protein, the calcium binding ability of regucalcin is still a controversy. The main reason for the controversy is that it lacks a typical EF hand motif which is common to most of the calcium binding proteins. Even though many studies reported regucalcin as a calcium binding protein, there are some studies reporting regucalcin as non-calcium binding also. In the present study, we investigated the calcium binding ability of recombinant buffalo regucalcin by assessing the secondary structural changes of the protein using circular dichroism spectroscopy after adding Ca(2+) to the protein solution. Two types of calcium binding studies were done, one with different concentration of calcium chloride (0.5 mM CaCl2, 1 mM CaCl2, 2 mM CaCl2) and other at different time interval (no incubation and 10 min incubation) after addition of calcium chloride. Significant structural changes were observed in both studies which prove the calcium binding ability of recombinant regucalcin. A constant increase in the α-helix (1.1% with 0.5 mM CaCl2, 1.4% with 1 mM CaCl2, 3.5% with 2 mM CaCl2) and a decrease in β-sheets (78.5% with 0.5 mM CaCl2, 77.4% with 1 mM CaCl2, 75.7% with 2 mM CaCl2) were observed with the increase in calcium chloride concentration. There was a rapid increase in α-helix and decrease in β-sheets immediately after addition of calcium chloride, which subsides after 10 min incubation.

  14. Bioactive calcium phosphate coatings on metallic implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedelnikova, M. B.; Komarova, E. G.; Sharkeev, Yu. P.; Tolkacheva, T. V.; Khlusov, I. A.; Sheikin, V. V.

    2017-09-01

    Biocomposites based on bioinert metals or alloys and bioactive calcium phosphate coatings are a promising tendency of the new-generation implants development. In recent years, the approach of regenerative medicine based on the use of biodegradable biomaterials has been priority direction. Such materials are capable of initiating the bone tissue regeneration and replaced by the newly formed bone. The microarc oxidation (MAO) method allows obtaining the bioactive coatings with a porous structure, special functional properties, and modified by the essential elements. During the last decade, the investigations in the field of the nanostructured biocomposites based on bioinert Ti, Zr, Nb and their alloys with a calcium phosphate coatings deposited by the MAO method have been studied in the Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk. In this article the possibility to produce the bioactive coatings with high antibacterial and osseoconductive properties due to the introduction in the coatings of Zn, Cu, Ag, La, Si elements and wollastonite CaSiO3 was shown. The high hydrophilic and bioresorbed coatings stimulate the processes of osseointegration of the implant into the bone tissue. A promising direction in the field of the medical material science is a development of the metallic implants with good biomechanical compatibility to the bone, such as Ti-Nb alloys with a low elastic modulus that can be classified as biomaterials of the second generation. Zr and its alloys are promising materials for the dentistry and orthopedic surgery due to their high strength and corrosion resistance. Biodegradable Mg alloys are biomaterials of third generation. Such materials can dissolve with a certain speed in human body and excreted from the body thereby excluding the need for reoperation. This article presents the analysis of the study results of bioactive MAO coatings on Ti, Ti-Nb, Zr-Nb and Mg alloys and their promising medical application.

  15. 21 CFR 184.1229 - Calcium stearate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1229 Calcium stearate. (a) Calcium stearate (Ca(C17H35COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 1529-23-0) is the calcium salt of stearic acid derived from edible sources. It is prepared as... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium stearate. 184.1229 Section 184.1229 Food...

  16. Bioactive and Hemocompatible Calcium Sulphoaluminate Cement

    OpenAIRE

    Acuña-Gutiérrez, Iván Omar; Escobedo-Bocardo, José Concepción; Almanza-Robles, José Manuel; Cortés-Hernández, Dora Alicia; Saldívar-Ramírez, Mirna María Guadalupe; Reséndiz-Hernández, Perla Janet; Zugasti-Cruz, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Calcium sulphoaluminate cement (CSAC) is an attractive candidate for biomedical applications due to its appropriate mechanical properties and high calcium content. In vitro bioactivity and hemocompatibility of calcium sulphoaluminate cement were assessed. The cement was prepared from a mixture of calcium sulphoaluminate (CSA) clinker, gypsum and water. Cement samples were immersed in a simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 °C for different periods of time (7, 14 and 21 days). The analyses of these...

  17. Calcium Balance in Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hill Gallant, Kathleen M.; Spiegel, David M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of Review The kidneys play a critical role in the balance between the internal milieu and external environment. Kidney failure is known to disrupt a number of homeostatic mechanisms that control serum calcium and normal bone metabolism. However, our understanding of calcium balance throughout the stages of chronic kidney disease is limited and the concept of balance itself, especially with a cation as complex as calcium, is often misunderstood. Both negative and positive calcium balan...

  18. Calcium Balance in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill Gallant, Kathleen M; Spiegel, David M

    2017-06-01

    The kidneys play a critical role in the balance between the internal milieu and external environment. Kidney failure is known to disrupt a number of homeostatic mechanisms that control serum calcium and normal bone metabolism. However, our understanding of calcium balance throughout the stages of chronic kidney disease is limited and the concept of balance itself, especially with a cation as complex as calcium, is often misunderstood. Both negative and positive calcium balance have important implications in patients with chronic kidney disease, where negative balance may increase risk of osteoporosis and fracture and positive balance may increase risk of vascular calcification and cardiovascular events. Here, we examine the state of current knowledge about calcium balance in adults throughout the stages of chronic kidney disease and discuss recommendations for clinical strategies to maintain balance as well as future research needs in this area. Recent calcium balance studies in adult patients with chronic kidney disease show that neutral calcium balance is achieved with calcium intake near the recommended daily allowance. Increases in calcium through diet or supplements cause high positive calcium balance, which may put patients at risk for vascular calcification. However, heterogeneity in calcium balance exists among these patients. Given the available calcium balance data in this population, it appears clinically prudent to aim for recommended calcium intakes around 1000 mg/day to achieve neutral calcium balance and avoid adverse effects of either negative or positive calcium balance. Assessment of patients' dietary calcium intake could further equip clinicians to make individualized recommendations for meeting recommended intakes.

  19. Oxalate co-precipitation synthesis of calcium zirconate and calcium titanate powders.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Sanchez, Bernadette A.; Tuttle, Bruce Andrew

    2009-06-01

    Fine powders of calcium zirconate (CaZrO{sub 3}, CZ) and calcium titanate (CaTiO{sub 3}, CT) were synthesized using a nonaqueous oxalate co-precipitation route from Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}4 H{sub 2}O and group(IV) n-butoxides (Ti(OBu{sup n}){sub 4} or Zr(OBu{sup n}){sub 4}). Several reaction conditions and batch sizes (2-35 g) were explored to determine their influence on final particle size, morphology, and phase. Characterization of the as-prepared oxalate precursors, oven dried oxalate precursors (60-90 C), and calcined powders (635-900 C) were analyzed with TGA/DTA, XRD, TEM, and SEM. Densification and sintering studies on pressed CZ pellets at 1375 and 1400 C were also performed. Through the developed oxalate co-precipitation route, densification temperatures for CZ were lowered by 125 C from the 1500 C firing temperature required for conventional mixed oxide powders. Low field electrical tests of the CZ pellets indicated excellent dielectric properties with dielectric constants of {approx}30 and a dissipation factor of 0.0004 were measured at 1 kHz.

  20. Electrochemical Induced Calcium Phosphate Precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lei, Yang; Song, Bingnan; Weijden, van der Renata D.; Saakes, M.; Buisman, Cees J.N.

    2017-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient for living organisms and cannot be replaced or substituted. In this paper, we present a simple yet efficient membrane free electrochemical system for P removal and recovery as calcium phosphate (CaP). This method relies on in situ formation of hydroxide

  1. Studies on magnetic properties of chemically synthesized crystalline calcium ferrite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, A.; Bera, A.; Chattopadhyay, K. K.; Saha, B.

    2016-05-01

    Spinel-type ferrites have taken a very important role for modern electronic industry. Most of these ferrites exhibit low-loss dielectric properties, high resistivity, low eddy current and also high temperature ferromagnetism. Calcium ferrite is one such important metal oxide which is environmentally safe, chemically stable, low cost and greatly abundant. This outstanding material of calcium ferrite is synthesized by a simple chemical precipitation method using NaOH as the precipitating agent. Ferric chloride anhydrous (FeCl3) and Calcium chloride dihydrate (CaCl2.2H2O) were used as iron and calcium sources respectively. The samples were heated at 200°C for 8h to obtain homogeneous powder of Calcium ferrite. The powders were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), Transmission electrical microscopy (TEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) measurements. The polycrystalline nature of the sample was confirmed by X-ray diffraction study. The magnetic properties of the sample were investigated by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) measurements. Magnetization curve of the prepared sample depicts that as synthesized calcium ferrite nanoparticles have saturation magnetic moment of 1.74 emu/g and the coercivity of 35.08 Oe with superparamagnetic behavior. The synthesized calcium ferrite nanoparticles with such magnetic properties will be a candidate material for different applications in electronics and exploring its functionality in the field of recently developing semiconductor device physics and spintronics.

  2. Studies on magnetic properties of chemically synthesized crystalline calcium ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debnath, A., E-mail: debnathanimesh@gmail.com [Department of Civil Engineering, National Institute of Technology Agartala, Jirania, West Tripura, 799046 India (India); Bera, A.; Saha, B. [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Agartala, Jirania, West Tripura 799046 (India); Chattopadhyay, K. K. [Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India)

    2016-05-23

    Spinel-type ferrites have taken a very important role for modern electronic industry. Most of these ferrites exhibit low-loss dielectric properties, high resistivity, low eddy current and also high temperature ferromagnetism. Calcium ferrite is one such important metal oxide which is environmentally safe, chemically stable, low cost and greatly abundant. This outstanding material of calcium ferrite is synthesized by a simple chemical precipitation method using NaOH as the precipitating agent. Ferric chloride anhydrous (FeCl{sub 3}) and Calcium chloride dihydrate (CaCl{sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O) were used as iron and calcium sources respectively. The samples were heated at 200°C for 8h to obtain homogeneous powder of Calcium ferrite. The powders were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), Transmission electrical microscopy (TEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) measurements. The polycrystalline nature of the sample was confirmed by X-ray diffraction study. The magnetic properties of the sample were investigated by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) measurements. Magnetization curve of the prepared sample depicts that as synthesized calcium ferrite nanoparticles have saturation magnetic moment of 1.74 emu/g and the coercivity of 35.08 Oe with superparamagnetic behavior. The synthesized calcium ferrite nanoparticles with such magnetic properties will be a candidate material for different applications in electronics and exploring its functionality in the field of recently developing semiconductor device physics and spintronics.

  3. Calcium Binding and Disulfide Bonds Regulate the Stability of Secretagogin towards Thermal and Urea Denaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanagavarapu, Kalyani; Weiffert, Tanja; Ní Mhurchú, Niamh; O'Connell, David; Linse, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Secretagogin is a calcium-sensor protein with six EF-hands. It is widely expressed in neurons and neuro-endocrine cells of a broad range of vertebrates including mammals, fishes and amphibia. The protein plays a role in secretion and interacts with several vesicle-associated proteins. In this work, we have studied the contribution of calcium binding and disulfide-bond formation to the stability of the secretagogin structure towards thermal and urea denaturation. SDS-PAGE analysis of secretagogin in reducing and non-reducing conditions identified a tendency of the protein to form dimers in a redox-dependent manner. The denaturation of apo and Calcium-loaded secretagogin was studied by circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy under conditions favoring monomer or dimer or a 1:1 monomer: dimer ratio. This analysis reveals significantly higher stability towards urea denaturation of Calcium-loaded secretagogin compared to the apo protein. The secondary and tertiary structure of the Calcium-loaded form is not completely denatured in the presence of 10 M urea. Reduced and Calcium-loaded secretagogin is found to refold reversibly after heating to 95°C, while both oxidized and reduced apo secretagogin is irreversibly denatured at this temperature. Thus, calcium binding greatly stabilizes the structure of secretagogin towards chemical and heat denaturation.

  4. 21 CFR 582.7187 - Calcium alginate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium alginate. 582.7187 Section 582.7187 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium alginate. (a) Product. Calcium alginate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  5. Abnormalities of serum calcium and magnesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neonatal hypocalcemia is defined as a total serum calcium concentration of <7 mg/dL or an ionized calcium concentration of <4 mg/dL (1mmol/L). In very low birth weight (VLBW) infants, ionized calcium values of 0.8 to 1 mmol/L are common and not usually associated with clinical symptoms. In larger in...

  6. Modularized study of human calcium signalling pathway

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    When there is an extracellular change, cells get the message either by introduction of calcium ions into ... as it precipitates phosphate, the established energy currency of cells. Prolonged high intracellular calcium ... trigger proteins upon binding with free calcium ion(s) change their confirmation to modulate enzymes and ion ...

  7. 21 CFR 582.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Additives § 582.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use. This... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 582.1191 Section 582.1191 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL...

  8. 21 CFR 582.5191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Supplements 1 § 582.5191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use. This... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 582.5191 Section 582.5191 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL...

  9. Mechanism of store-operated calcium entry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Activation of receptors coupled to the phospholipase C/IP3 signalling pathway results in a rapid release of calcium from its intracellular stores, eventually leading to depletion of these stores. Calcium store depletion triggers an influx of extracellular calcium across the plasma membrane, a mechanism known as the ...

  10. Mitochondrial Calcium Sparkles Light Up Astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacVicar, Brian A; Ko, Rebecca W Y

    2017-02-27

    Discrete calcium signals in the fine processes of astrocytes are a recent discovery and a new mystery. In a recent issue of Neuron, Agarwal et al. (2017) report that calcium efflux from mitochondria during brief openings of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) contribute to calcium microdomains. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. 21 CFR 182.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium phosphate. 182.1217 Section 182.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b...

  12. 21 CFR 582.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.1217 Section 582.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b...

  13. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Calcium supplementation to prevent pre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ORIGINAL ARTICLES. Calcium supplementation to prevent pre-eclampsia - a systematic review. G J Hofmeyr, A Roodt, A N Atallah, L Duley. Background. Calcium supplementation during pregnancy may prevent high blood pressure and preterm labour. Objective. To assess the effects of calcium supplementation.

  14. Evaluation of cellular influences caused by calcium carbonate nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horie, Masanori; Nishio, Keiko; Kato, Haruhisa; Endoh, Shigehisa; Fujita, Katsuhide; Nakamura, Ayako; Kinugasa, Shinichi; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Iwahashi, Hitoshi

    2014-03-05

    The cellular effects of calcium carbonate (CaCO₃) nanoparticles were evaluated. Three kinds of CaCO₃ nanoparticles were employed in our examinations. One of the types of CaCO₃ nanoparticles was highly soluble. And solubility of another type of CaCO₃ nanoparticle was lower. A stable CaCO₃ nanoparticle medium dispersion was prepared and applied to human lung carcinoma A549 cells and human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. Then, mitochondrial activity, cell membrane damage, colony formation ability, DNA injury, induction of oxidative stress, and apoptosis were evaluated. Although the influences of CaCO₃ nanoparticles on mitochondrial activity and cell membrane damage were small, "soluble" CaCO₃ nanoparticles exerted some cellular influences. Soluble CaCO₃ nanoparticles also induced a cell morphological change. Colony formation was inhibited by CaCO₃ nanoparticle exposure. In particular, soluble CaCO₃ nanoparticles completely inhibited colony formation. The influence on intracellular the reactive oxygen species (ROS) level was small. Soluble CaCO₃ nanoparticles caused an increase in C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP) expression and the activation of caspase-3. Moreover, CaCO₃ exposure increased intracellular the Ca²⁺ level and activated calpain. These results suggest that cellular the influences of CaCO₃ nanoparticles are mainly caused by intracellular calcium release and subsequently disrupt the effect of calcium signaling. In conclusion, there is possibility that soluble CaCO₃ nanoparticles induce cellular influences such as a cell morphological change. Cellular influence of CaCO₃ nanoparticles is caused by intracellular calcium release. If inhaled CaCO₃ nanoparticles have the potential to influence cellular events. However, the effect might be not severe because calcium is omnipresent element in cell. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Calcium Orthophosphate-Based Bioceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Dorozhkin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Various types of grafts have been traditionally used to restore damaged bones. In the late 1960s, a strong interest was raised in studying ceramics as potential bone grafts due to their biomechanical properties. A bit later, such synthetic biomaterials were called bioceramics. In principle, bioceramics can be prepared from diverse materials but this review is limited to calcium orthophosphate-based formulations only, which possess the specific advantages due to the chemical similarity to mammalian bones and teeth. During the past 40 years, there have been a number of important achievements in this field. Namely, after the initial development of bioceramics that was just tolerated in the physiological environment, an emphasis was shifted towards the formulations able to form direct chemical bonds with the adjacent bones. Afterwards, by the structural and compositional controls, it became possible to choose whether the calcium orthophosphate-based implants remain biologically stable once incorporated into the skeletal structure or whether they were resorbed over time. At the turn of the millennium, a new concept of regenerative bioceramics was developed and such formulations became an integrated part of the tissue engineering approach. Now calcium orthophosphate scaffolds are designed to induce bone formation and vascularization. These scaffolds are often porous and harbor different biomolecules and/or cells. Therefore, current biomedical applications of calcium orthophosphate bioceramics include bone augmentations, artificial bone grafts, maxillofacial reconstruction, spinal fusion, periodontal disease repairs and bone fillers after tumor surgery. Perspective future applications comprise drug delivery and tissue engineering purposes because calcium orthophosphates appear to be promising carriers of growth factors, bioactive peptides and various types of cells.

  16. Glutathione-Induced Calcium Shifts in Chick Retinal Glial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hercules R Freitas

    Full Text Available Neuroglia interactions are essential for the nervous system and in the retina Müller cells interact with most of the neurons in a symbiotic manner. Glutathione (GSH is a low-molecular weight compound that undertakes major antioxidant roles in neurons and glia, however, whether this compound could act as a signaling molecule in neurons and/or glia is currently unknown. Here we used embryonic avian retina to obtain mixed retinal cells or purified Müller glia cells in culture to evaluate calcium shifts induced by GSH. A dose response curve (0.1-10 mM showed that 5-10 mM GSH, induced calcium shifts exclusively in glial cells (later labeled and identified as 2M6 positive cells, while neurons responded to 50 mM KCl (labeled as βIII tubulin positive cells. BBG 100 nM, a P2X7 blocker, inhibited the effects of GSH on Müller glia. However, addition of DNQX 70 μM and MK-801 20 μM, non-NMDA and NMDA blockers, had no effect on GSH calcium induced shift. Oxidized glutathione (GSSG at 5 mM failed to induce calcium mobilization in glia cells, indicating that the antioxidant and/or structural features of GSH are essential to promote elevations in cytoplasmic calcium levels. Indeed, a short GSH pulse (60s protects Müller glia from oxidative damage after 30 min of incubation with 0.1% H2O2. Finally, GSH induced GABA release from chick embryonic retina, mixed neuron-glia or from Müller cell cultures, which were inhibited by BBG or in the absence of sodium. GSH also induced propidium iodide uptake in Müller cells in culture in a P2X7 receptor dependent manner. Our data suggest that GSH, in addition to antioxidant effects, could act signaling calcium shifts at the millimolar range particularly in Müller glia, and could regulate the release of GABA, with additional protective effects on retinal neuron-glial circuit.

  17. Morphological Investigation of Calcium Carbonate during Ammonification-Carbonization Process of Low Concentration Calcium Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Huaigang Cheng; Xiaoxi Zhang; Huiping Song

    2014-01-01

    Ultrafine calcium carbonate is a widely used cheap additive. The research is conducted in low degree supersaturation solution in order to study the polymorphic phases’ change and its factors of the calcium carbonate precipitate in the ammonification-carbonization process of the solution with calcium. Fine particles of calcium carbonate are made in the solution containing 0.015 mol/L of Ca2+. Over 98% of the calcium carbonate precipitate without ammonification resembles the morphology of calci...

  18. Mammary-Specific Ablation of the Calcium-Sensing Receptor During Lactation Alters Maternal Calcium Metabolism, Milk Calcium Transport, and Neonatal Calcium Accrual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamillapalli, Ramanaiah; VanHouten, Joshua; Dann, Pamela; Bikle, Daniel; Chang, Wenhan; Brown, Edward

    2013-01-01

    To meet the demands for milk calcium, the lactating mother adjusts systemic calcium and bone metabolism by increasing dietary calcium intake, increasing bone resorption, and reducing renal calcium excretion. As part of this adaptation, the lactating mammary gland secretes PTHrP into the maternal circulation to increase bone turnover and mobilize skeletal calcium stores. Previous data have suggested that, during lactation, the breast relies on the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) to coordinate PTHrP secretion and milk calcium transport with calcium availability. To test this idea genetically, we bred BLG-Cre mice with CaSR-floxed mice to ablate the CaSR specifically from mammary epithelial cells only at the onset of lactation (CaSR-cKO mice). Loss of the CaSR in the lactating mammary gland did not disrupt alveolar differentiation or milk production. However, it did increase the secretion of PTHrP into milk and decreased the transport of calcium from the circulation into milk. CaSR-cKO mice did not show accelerated bone resorption, but they did have a decrease in bone formation. Loss of the mammary gland CaSR resulted in hypercalcemia, decreased PTH secretion, and increased renal calcium excretion in lactating mothers. Finally, loss of the mammary gland CaSR resulted in decreased calcium accrual by suckling neonates, likely due to the combination of increased milk PTHrP and decreased milk calcium. These results demonstrate that the mammary gland CaSR coordinates maternal bone and calcium metabolism, calcium transport into milk, and neonatal calcium accrual during lactation. PMID:23782944

  19. Apatite Formation from Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Mixed Amorphous Calcium Phosphate/Amorphous Calcium Carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibsen, Casper J S; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Birkedal, Henrik

    2016-08-22

    Crystallization from amorphous phases is an emerging pathway for making advanced materials. Biology has made use of amorphous precursor phases for eons and used them to produce structures with remarkable properties. Herein, we show how the design of the amorphous phase greatly influences the nanocrystals formed therefrom. We investigate the transformation of mixed amorphous calcium phosphate/amorphous calcium carbonate phases into bone-like nanocrystalline apatite using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy. The speciation of phosphate was controlled by pH to favor HPO4 (2-) . In a carbonate free system, the reaction produces anisotropic apatite crystallites with large aspect ratios. The first formed crystallites are highly calcium deficient and hydrogen phosphate rich, consistent with thin octacalcium phosphate (OCP)-like needles. During growth, the crystallites become increasingly stoichiometric, which indicates that the crystallites grow through addition of near-stoichiometric apatite to the OCP-like initial crystals through a process that involves either crystallite fusion/aggregation or Ostwald ripening. The mixed amorphous phases were found to be more stable against phase transformations, hence, the crystallization was inhibited. The resulting crystallites were smaller and less anisotropic. This is rationalized by the idea that a local phosphate-depletion zone formed around the growing crystal until it was surrounded by amorphous calcium carbonate, which stopped the crystallization. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Energetics of sodium-calcium exchanged zeolite A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, H; Wu, D; Guo, X; Shen, B; Navrotsky, A

    2015-05-07

    A series of calcium-exchanged zeolite A samples with different degrees of exchange were prepared. They were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). High temperature oxide melt drop solution calorimetry measured the formation enthalpies of hydrated zeolites CaNa-A from constituent oxides. The water content is a linear function of the degree of exchange, ranging from 20.54% for Na-A to 23.77% for 97.9% CaNa-A. The enthalpies of formation (from oxides) at 25 °C are -74.50 ± 1.21 kJ mol(-1) TO2 for hydrated zeolite Na-A and -30.79 ± 1.64 kJ mol(-1) TO2 for hydrated zeolite 97.9% CaNa-A. Dehydration enthalpies obtained from differential scanning calorimetry are 32.0 kJ mol(-1) H2O for hydrated zeolite Na-A and 20.5 kJ mol(-1) H2O for hydrated zeolite 97.9% CaNa-A. Enthalpies of formation of Ca-exchanged zeolites A are less exothermic than for zeolite Na-A. A linear relationship between the formation enthalpy and the extent of calcium substitution was observed. The energetic effect of Ca-exchange on zeolite A is discussed with an emphasis on the complex interactions between the zeolite framework, cations, and water.

  1. Fluctuations in Cytosolic Calcium Regulate the Neuronal Malate-Aspartate NADH Shuttle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Satrústegui, Jorgina; Bak, Lasse K

    2015-01-01

    that MAS is regulated by fluctuations in cytosolic Ca(2+) levels, and that this regulation is required to maintain a tight coupling between neuronal activity and mitochondrial respiration and oxidative phosphorylation. At cytosolic Ca(2+) fluctuations below the threshold of the mitochondrial calcium...

  2. Computational study of a calcium release-activated calcium channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Keka; Shantappa, Anil

    2016-05-01

    The naturally occurring proteins that form hole in membrane are commonly known as ion channels. They play multiple roles in many important biological processes. Deletion or alteration of these channels often leads to serious problems in the physiological processes as it controls the flow of ions through it. The proper maintenance of the flow of ions, in turn, is required for normal health. Here we have investigated the behavior of a calcium release-activated calcium ion channel with pdb entry 4HKR in Drosophila Melanogaster. The equilibrium energy as well as molecular dynamics simulation is performed first. The protein is subjected to molecular dynamics simulation to find their energy minimized value. Simulation of the protein in the environment of water and ions has given us important results too. The solvation energy is also found using Charmm potential.

  3. The Calcium Wave of Vegetable Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TD. Geydan

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Calcium is an essential nutrient for plants; it is involved in developmental processes and in responses to biotic and abiotic factors. Several signals that modify the calcium concentration in the cytoplasm, endoplasmic reticulum, nucleus and/or plastids have been observed. These changes in the calcium concentration in the cell interior are rapidly returned to basal levels, in the meantime, innumerable and complex signaling cascades. This note exposes the mechanisms of calcium transport through the cell membranes of the entrance of calcium in the plant cells.

  4. Calcium Intake in the Moroccan Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebbar El-houcine

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Calcium intakes of elderly people are often below the recommendations which are 1200 mg/day. The advancing age may be accompanied by a loss of capacity to absorb additional calcium in case of deficiency. The aim of our work is to evaluate the calcium intake in the Moroccan elderly. Methods: The version translated into Arabic dialect Fardellone questionnaire is tested on a sample of 159 subjects aged over 60 years. Results: The study population includes 87 women (55%, 72 men (45%. The mean calcium intake was respectively 3078 mg by week (that means 440 mg/day. The assessment of calcium intake showed a deficiency and the average consumption of calcium per day is significantly lower than the recommended daily amount for this population. The comparison of both gender found a deficit higher among women than among men. Conclusion: Evaluation of the calcium intake is an essential tool for better management of metabolic bone diseases.

  5. Calcium Impact on Milk Gels Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koutina, Glykeria

    Calcium is one of the several elements that can be found in milk distributed between the micellar and the serum milk phase. Calcium is important from a nutritional point of view, but its contribution to the functional and structural properties of dairy products has only recently been...... acknowledgement. The presence of calcium in a dynamic equilibrium between the serum and the micellar milk phase make the distribution susceptible to certain physicochemical conditions and to technological treatments of milk resulting in fluctuations in pH and temperature and also sensitive to addition of calcium...... salts. The perturbation of calcium equilibria by these factors will affect the final properties of acid, calcium and rennet milk gels. By decreasing the pH from 6.0 to 5.2 (acid gels), the calcium equilibrium was significantly affected by temperature (4, 20, 30, 40 oC), and different combinations...

  6. Exopolysaccharides regulate calcium flow in cariogenic biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astasov-Frauenhoffer, Monika; Varenganayil, Muth M; Decho, Alan W; Waltimo, Tuomas; Braissant, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Caries-associated biofilms induce loss of calcium from tooth surfaces in the presence of dietary carbohydrates. Exopolysaccharides (EPS) provide a matrix scaffold and an abundance of primary binding sites within biofilms. The role of EPS in binding calcium in cariogenic biofilms is only partially understood. Thus, the aim of the present study is to investigate the relationship between the calcium dissolution rates and calcium tolerance of caries-associated bacteria and yeast as well as to examine the properties of EPS to quantify its binding affinity for dissolved calcium. Calcium dissolution was measured by dissolution zones on Pikovskaya's agar. Calcium tolerance was assessed by isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC) by adding CaCl2 to the bacterial cultures. Acid-base titration and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to identify possible functional groups responsible for calcium binding, which was assessed by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Lactobacillus spp. and mutans streptococci demonstrated calcium dissolution in the presence of different carbohydrates. All strains that demonstrated high dissolution rates also revealed higher rates of calcium tolerance by IMC. In addition, acidic functional groups were predominantly identified as possible binding sites for calcium ions by acid-base titration and FTIR. Finally, ITC revealed EPS to have a higher binding affinity for calcium compared, for example, to lactic acid. In conclusion, this study illustrates the role of EPS in terms of the calcium tolerance of cariogenic microbiota by determining the ability of EPS to control free calcium concentrations within the biofilms as a self-regulating mode of action in the pathogenesis of dental caries.

  7. Exopolysaccharides regulate calcium flow in cariogenic biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Astasov-Frauenhoffer

    Full Text Available Caries-associated biofilms induce loss of calcium from tooth surfaces in the presence of dietary carbohydrates. Exopolysaccharides (EPS provide a matrix scaffold and an abundance of primary binding sites within biofilms. The role of EPS in binding calcium in cariogenic biofilms is only partially understood. Thus, the aim of the present study is to investigate the relationship between the calcium dissolution rates and calcium tolerance of caries-associated bacteria and yeast as well as to examine the properties of EPS to quantify its binding affinity for dissolved calcium. Calcium dissolution was measured by dissolution zones on Pikovskaya's agar. Calcium tolerance was assessed by isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC by adding CaCl2 to the bacterial cultures. Acid-base titration and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy were used to identify possible functional groups responsible for calcium binding, which was assessed by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC. Lactobacillus spp. and mutans streptococci demonstrated calcium dissolution in the presence of different carbohydrates. All strains that demonstrated high dissolution rates also revealed higher rates of calcium tolerance by IMC. In addition, acidic functional groups were predominantly identified as possible binding sites for calcium ions by acid-base titration and FTIR. Finally, ITC revealed EPS to have a higher binding affinity for calcium compared, for example, to lactic acid. In conclusion, this study illustrates the role of EPS in terms of the calcium tolerance of cariogenic microbiota by determining the ability of EPS to control free calcium concentrations within the biofilms as a self-regulating mode of action in the pathogenesis of dental caries.

  8. Dietary calcium regulates ROS production in aP2-agouti transgenic mice on high-fat/high-sucrose diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, X; Zemel, M B

    2006-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated that 1alpha, 25(OH)2D3 promotes adipocyte reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. We have now evaluated whether decreasing 1alpha, 25(OH)2D3 levels by increasing dietary calcium will decrease oxidative stress in vivo. We fed low-calcium (0.4% Ca) and high-calcium (1.2% Ca from CaCO3) obesity-promoting (high sucrose/high fat) diets to aP2-agouti transgenic mice and assessed regulation of ROS production in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Mice on the high-calcium diet gained 50% of the body weight (P=0.04) and fat (Pcalcium diet (0.4% Ca). The high-calcium diet significantly reduced adipose intracellular ROS production by 64 and 18% (Pphosphate oxidase expression by 49% (P=0.012) and 63% (P=0.05) in visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue, respectively. Adipocyte intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) levels were suppressed in mice on the high-calcium diet by 73-80% (Pcalcium diet also induced 367 and 191% increases in adipose mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) expression (Pcalcium diet also suppressed 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11beta-HSD) expression in visceral adipose tissue by 39% (P=0.034). 11beta-HSD expression was markedly higher in visceral vs subcutaneous adipose tissue in mice on the low-calcium diet (P=0.034), whereas no difference was observed between the fat depots in mice on the high-calcium diet. These data support a potential role for dietary calcium in the regulation of obesity-induced oxidative stress.

  9. Calcium precipitate induced aerobic granulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Chunli; Lee, Duu-Jong; Yang, Xue; Wang, Yayi; Wang, Xingzu; Liu, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Aerobic granulation is a novel biotechnology for wastewater treatment. This study refined existing aerobic granulation mechanisms as a sequencing process including formation of calcium precipitate under alkaline pH to form inorganic cores, followed by bacterial attachment and growth on these cores to form the exopolysaccharide matrix. Mature granules comprised an inner core and a matrix layer and a rim layer with enriched microbial strains. The inorganic core was a mix of different crystals of calcium and phosphates. Functional strains including Sphingomonas sp., Paracoccus sp. Sinorhizobium americanum strain and Flavobacterium sp. attached onto the cores. These functional strains promote c-di-GMP production and the expression by Psl and Alg genes for exopolysaccharide production to enhance formation of mature granules. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Testosterone increases urinary calcium excretion and inhibits expression of renal calcium transport proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hsu, Yu-Juei; Dimke, Henrik Anthony; Schoeber, Joost P H

    2010-01-01

    Although gender differences in the renal handling of calcium have been reported, the overall contribution of androgens to these differences remains uncertain. We determined here whether testosterone affects active renal calcium reabsorption by regulating calcium transport proteins. Male mice had...... higher urinary calcium excretion than female mice and their renal calcium transporters were expressed at a lower level. We also found that orchidectomized mice excreted less calcium in their urine than sham-operated control mice and that the hypocalciuria was normalized after testosterone replacement...... calcium transport. Thus, our study shows that gender differences in renal calcium handling are, in part, mediated by the inhibitory actions of androgens on TRPV5-mediated active renal calcium transport....

  11. Modified calcium oxide as stable solid base catalyst for Aldol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    obtaining many fine chemicals of commercial interest. This kind of reaction can catalytically undergo in the presence of a strong base or acid in liquid phase.1–3. However, high operating costs and serious environmen- tal issues associated with product separation, purifi- cation, corrosion and waste generation attract great.

  12. High quality fuel gas from biomass pyrolysis with calcium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Baofeng; Zhang, Xiaodong; Chen, Lei; Sun, Laizhi; Si, Hongyu; Chen, Guanyi

    2014-03-01

    The removal of CO2 and tar in fuel gas produced by biomass thermal conversion has aroused more attention due to their adverse effects on the subsequent fuel gas application. High quality fuel gas production from sawdust pyrolysis with CaO was studied in this paper. The results of pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) experiments indicate that the mass ratio of CaO to sawdust (Ca/S) remarkably affects the behavior of sawdust pyrolysis. On the basis of Py-GC/MS results, one system of a moving bed pyrolyzer coupled with a fluid bed combustor has been developed to produce high quality fuel gas. The lower heating value (LHV) of the fuel gas was above 16MJ/Nm(3) and the content of tar was under 50mg/Nm(3), which is suitable for gas turbine application to generate electricity and heat. Therefore, this technology may be a promising route to achieve high quality fuel gas for biomass utilization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Modified calcium oxide as stable solid base catalyst for Aldol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It was found that modified CaO can effectively catalyse the Aldol condensation of cyclohexanone and benzaldehyde, as well as various benzaldehydes, to produce 2-benzylidenecyclohexanone with a good selectivity and high yield. Higher yield of 95.8% was obtained over modified CaO after 3 h, which is short compared ...

  14. A Closer look at calcium absorption and the benefits and risks of dietary versus supplemental calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Anna; Camacho, Pauline

    2013-11-01

    To perform a thorough search of the literature on calcium research and specifically address the topic of calcium absorption. PubMed and Ovid were the main engines used for primary literature searches; textbooks, review articles, and book chapters are examples of the other sources used for supplemental information. Regarding calcium absorption, it seems apparent that the absorption efficiency of all calcium salts, regardless of solubility, is fairly equivalent and not significantly less than the absorption efficiency of dietary calcium. However, dietary calcium has been shown to have greater impact in bone building than supplemental calcium. This is likely due to improved absorption with meals and the tendency of people to intake smaller amounts more frequently, which is more ideal for the body's method of absorption. In addition, the cardiovascular risks of excessive calcium intake appear to be more closely related to calcium supplements than dietary calcium; this relationship continues to be controversial in the literature. We conclude that further studies are needed for direct comparison of supplemental and dietary calcium to fully establish if one is superior to the other with regard to improving bone density. We also propose further studies on the cardiovascular risk of long-term increased calcium intake and on physician estimates of patients' daily calcium intake to better pinpoint those patients who require calcium supplementation.

  15. CCN3 and calcium signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chang Long

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The CCN family of genes consists presently of six members in human (CCN1-6 also known as Cyr61 (Cystein rich 61, CTGF (Connective Tissue Growth Factor, NOV (Nephroblastoma Overexpressed gene, WISP-1, 2 and 3 (Wnt-1 Induced Secreted Proteins. Results obtained over the past decade have indicated that CCN proteins are matricellular proteins, which are involved in the regulation of various cellular functions, such as proliferation, differentiation, survival, adhesion and migration. The CCN proteins have recently emerged as regulatory factors involved in both internal and external cell signaling. CCN3 was reported to physically interact with fibulin-1C, integrins, Notch and S100A4. Considering that, the conformation and biological activity of these proteins are dependent upon calcium binding, we hypothesized that CCN3 might be involved in signaling pathways mediated by calcium ions. In this article, we review the data showing that CCN3 regulates the levels of intracellular calcium and discuss potential models that may account for the biological effects of CCN3.

  16. Biodiesel production through transesterification over natural calciums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngamcharussrivichai, Chawalit [Fuels Research Center, Department of Chemical Technology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Phyathai Rd., Patumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Center of Excellence for Petroleum, Petrochemicals and Advanced Materials, Chulalongkorn University, Phyathai Rd., Patumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Nunthasanti, Pramwit; Tanachai, Sithikorn; Bunyakiat, Kunchana [Fuels Research Center, Department of Chemical Technology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Phyathai Rd., Patumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)

    2010-11-15

    Transesterification of palm kernel oil (PKO) with methanol over various natural calciums, including limestone calcite, cuttlebone, dolomite, hydroxyapatite, and dicalcium phosphate, has been investigated at 60 C and 1 atm. The study showed that dolomite, mainly consisting of CaCO{sub 3} and MgCO{sub 3}, is the most active catalyst. The calcination temperature largely affected the physicochemical properties, as evidenced by N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption measurement, TGA, SEM and XRD, and the transesterification performance of the resultant catalysts. It was found that the calcination of dolomite at 800 C resulted in a highly active mixed oxide. CaO was suggested to be the catalytically active site responsible for the methyl ester formation. Under the suitable reaction conditions, the amount of dolomite calcined at 800 C = 6 wt.% based on the weight of oil, the methanol/oil molar ratio = 30, and the reaction time = 3 h, the methyl ester content of 98.0% can be achieved. The calcined dolomite can be reused many times. The analyses of some important fuel properties indicated that the biodiesel produced had the properties that meet the standard of biodiesel and diesel fuel issued by the Department of Energy Business, Ministry of Energy, Thailand. (author)

  17. The Role of Calcium in Osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, C. D.; Sanchez, S. D.

    1991-01-01

    Calcium requirements may vary throughout the lifespan. During the growth years and up to age 25 to 30, it is important to maximize dietary intake of calcium to maintain positive calcium balance and achieve peak bone mass, thereby possibly decreasing the risk of fracture when bone is subsequently lost. Calcium intake need not be greater than 800 mg/day during the relatively short period of time between the end of bone building and the onset of bone loss (30 to 40 years). Starting at age 40 to 50, both men and women lose bone slowly, but women lose bone more rapidly around the menopause and for about 10 years after. Intestinal calcium absorption and the ability to adapt to low calcium diets are impaired in many postmenopausal women and elderly persons owing to a suspected functional or absolute decrease in the ability of the kidney to produce 1,25(OH)2D2. The bones then become more and more a source of calcium to maintain critical extracellular fluid calcium levels. Excessive dietary intake of protein and fiber may induce significant negative calcium balance and thus increase dietary calcium requirements. Generally, the strongest risk factors for osteoporosis are uncontrollable (e.g., sex, age, and race) or less controllable (e.g., disease and medications). However, several factors such as diet, physical activity, cigarette smoking, and alcohol use are lifestyle related and can be modified to help reduce the risk of osteoporosis.

  18. Assessment of calcium intake by adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Franco de Oliveira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the daily calcium intake of adolescents in schools from Chapecó, Santa Catarina, Southern Brazil, to check if calcium intake is in accordance with the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI, and to investigate variables associated with daily calcium intake.METHODS: Cross-sectional study approved by the Institutional Review Board and developed in 2010. Students of the 8th grade completed questionnaires with personal data and questions about the calcium-rich foods intake frequency. In order to compare students with adequate (1300mg or inadequate intake of calcium/day (<1300mg, parametric and nonparametric tests were used.RESULTS: A total of 214 students with a mean age of 14.3±1.0 years were enrolled. The median daily calcium intake was 540mg (interquartile range - IQ: 312-829mg and only 25 students (11.7% had calcium intake within the recommendations of the DRI for age. Soft drink consumption ≥3 times/week was associated with a lower intake of calcium.CONCLUSIONS: Few students ingested adequate levels of calcium for the age group. It is necessary to develop a program to encourage a greater intake of calcium-rich foods in adolescence.

  19. The Risks and Benefits of Calcium Supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Soo Shin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The association between calcium supplementation and adverse cardiovascular events has recently become a topic of debate due to the publication of two epidemiological studies and one meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials. The reports indicate that there is a significant increase in adverse cardiovascular events following supplementation with calcium; however, a number of experts have raised several issues with these reports such as inconsistencies in attempts to reproduce the findings in other populations and questions concerning the validity of the data due to low compliance, biases in case ascertainment, and/or a lack of adjustment. Additionally, the Auckland Calcium Study, the Women's Health Initiative, and many other studies included in the meta-analysis obtained data from calcium-replete subjects and it is not clear whether the same risk profile would be observed in populations with low calcium intakes. Dietary calcium intake varies widely throughout the world and it is especially low in East Asia, although the risk of cardiovascular events is less prominent in this region. Therefore, clarification is necessary regarding the occurrence of adverse cardiovascular events following calcium supplementation and whether this relationship can be generalized to populations with low calcium intakes. Additionally, the skeletal benefits from calcium supplementation are greater in subjects with low calcium intakes and, therefore, the risk-benefit ratio of calcium supplementation is likely to differ based on the dietary calcium intake and risks of osteoporosis and cardiovascular diseases of various populations. Further studies investigating the risk-benefit profiles of calcium supplementation in various populations are required to develop population-specific guidelines for individuals of different genders, ages, ethnicities, and risk profiles around the world.

  20. RCAN1 overexpression exacerbates calcium overloading-induced neuronal apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiulian Sun

    Full Text Available Down Syndrome (DS patients develop characteristic Alzheimer's Disease (AD neuropathology after their middle age. Prominent neuronal loss has been observed in the cortical regions of AD brains. However, the underlying mechanism leading to this neuronal loss in both DS and AD remains to be elucidated. Calcium overloading and oxidative stress have been implicated in AD pathogenesis. Two major isoforms of regulator of calcineurin 1 (RCAN1, RCAN1.1 and RCAN1.4, are detected in human brains. In this report we defined the transcriptional regulation of RCAN1.1 and RCAN1.4 by two alternative promoters. Calcium overloading upregulated RCAN1.4 expression by activating RCAN1.4 promoter through calcineurin-NFAT signaling pathway, thus forming a negative feedback loop in isoform 4 regulation. Furthermore, RCAN1.4 overexpression exacerbated calcium overloading-induced neuronal apoptosis, which was mediated by caspase-3 apoptotic pathway. Our results suggest that downregulating RCAN1.4 expression in neurons could be beneficial to AD patients.

  1. RCAN1 overexpression exacerbates calcium overloading-induced neuronal apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiulian; Wu, Yili; Herculano, Bruno; Song, Weihong

    2014-01-01

    Down Syndrome (DS) patients develop characteristic Alzheimer's Disease (AD) neuropathology after their middle age. Prominent neuronal loss has been observed in the cortical regions of AD brains. However, the underlying mechanism leading to this neuronal loss in both DS and AD remains to be elucidated. Calcium overloading and oxidative stress have been implicated in AD pathogenesis. Two major isoforms of regulator of calcineurin 1 (RCAN1), RCAN1.1 and RCAN1.4, are detected in human brains. In this report we defined the transcriptional regulation of RCAN1.1 and RCAN1.4 by two alternative promoters. Calcium overloading upregulated RCAN1.4 expression by activating RCAN1.4 promoter through calcineurin-NFAT signaling pathway, thus forming a negative feedback loop in isoform 4 regulation. Furthermore, RCAN1.4 overexpression exacerbated calcium overloading-induced neuronal apoptosis, which was mediated by caspase-3 apoptotic pathway. Our results suggest that downregulating RCAN1.4 expression in neurons could be beneficial to AD patients.

  2. Calcium signals can freely cross the nuclear envelope in hippocampal neurons: somatic calcium increases generate nuclear calcium transients

    OpenAIRE

    Eder, Anja; Bading, Hilmar

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background In hippocampal neurons, nuclear calcium signaling is important for learning- and neuronal survival-associated gene expression. However, it is unknown whether calcium signals generated by neuronal activity at the cell membrane and propagated to the soma can unrestrictedly cross the nuclear envelope to invade the nucleus. The nuclear envelope, which allows ion transit via the nuclear pore complex, may represent a barrier for calcium and has been suggested to insulate the nuc...

  3. Antagonistic modulatory roles of magnesium and calcium on release of endothelium-derived relaxing factor and smooth muscle tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, M E; Buga, G M; Wood, K S; Byrns, R E; Chaudhuri, G; Ignarro, L J

    1990-02-01

    The objective of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms associated with the reciprocal relation between magnesium and calcium on vascular smooth muscle tone in bovine pulmonary artery and vein. Rapid removal of magnesium from Krebs-bicarbonate medium used to bathe isolated rings of precontracted artery or vein caused transient endothelium- and calcium-dependent relaxation and cyclic GMP accumulation. Both responses were antagonized by oxyhemoglobin, methylene blue, or superoxide anion and were enhanced by superoxide dismutase. The transient relaxation was followed by sustained endothelium-independent contraction. Endothelium-denuded vascular rings contracted in response to extracellular magnesium depletion without alteration in cyclic GMP levels. The data suggest that vascular endothelium-derived nitric oxide is responsible for the calcium-dependent relaxation elicited by extracellular magnesium depletion. Indeed, in bioassay cascade studies, magnesium removal from the medium used to perfuse intact artery or vein enhanced the formation and/or release of an endothelium-derived relaxing factor by calcium-dependent mechanisms. In the absence of both extracellular magnesium and calcium, calcium readdition caused transient endothelium-dependent relaxation and cyclic GMP accumulation, and both responses were abolished by oxyhemoglobin or methylene blue. In the presence of magnesium, however, readdition of calcium to calcium-depleted medium caused only contractile responses. Addition of magnesium to calcium-containing medium consistently caused endothelium- and cyclic GMP-independent relaxation that was not altered by oxyhemoglobin or methylene blue. Thus, magnesium and calcium elicit reciprocal or mutually antagonistic effects at the levels of both endothelium-derived relaxing factor formation and/or release and smooth muscle contraction. This relation may be of physiological importance, and the possibility that a reduction in circulating magnesium levels could lead

  4. Properties of advanced (reduced) graphene oxide-alginate biopolymer films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vilcinskas, K.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, properties of Calcium alginate-reduced graphene oxide and Barium alginate‐reduced graphene oxide composite films are explored. In addition, the properties of the divalent metal ion-cross-linked alginate composite films are compared to the analogous properties of uncross‐linked Sodium

  5. Calcium gluconate supplementation is effective to balance calcium homeostasis in patients with gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, M; Keller, J; Beil, B; van Driel, I; Zustin, J; Barvencik, F; Schinke, T; Amling, M

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate histological evidence for hyperparathyroidism in patients with gastrectomy. This is, at least in part, explained by impaired calcium absorption, resulting in mineralization defects and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Additionally, we demonstrate improved bone mineralization in patients with gastrectomy after gluconate therapy and showed the effectiveness of calcium gluconate over carbonate to balance impaired calcium hemostasis in mice. Gastrectomy and hypochlorhydria due to long-term proton pump inhibitor therapy are associated with increased fracture risk because of intestinal calcium malabsorption. Hence, our objectives were to histologically investigate bone metabolism in patients with gastrectomy and to analyze the impact of calcium gluconate supplementation on skeletal integrity in the setting of impaired gastric acidification. Undecalcified bone biopsies of 26 gastrectomized individuals were histologically analyzed. In the clinical setting, we retrospectively identified 5 gastrectomized patients with sufficient vitamin D level, who were additionally supplemented with calcium gluconate and had a real bone mineral density (aBMD) follow-up assessments. A mouse model of achlorhydria (ATP4b-/-) was used to compare the effect of calcium gluconate and calcium carbonate supplementation on bone metabolism. Biopsies from gastrectomized individuals showed significantly increased osteoid, osteoclast, and osteoblast indices and fibroosteoclasia (p < 0.05) as well as impaired calcium distribution in mineralized bone matrix compared to healthy controls. Five gastrectomized patients with sufficient vitamin D level demonstrated a significant increase in aBMD after a treatment with calcium gluconate alone for at least 6 months (p < 0.05). Calcium gluconate was superior to calcium carbonate in maintaining calcium metabolism in a mouse model of achlorhydria. Gastrectomy is associated with severe osteomalacia, marrow fibrosis, and impaired calcium distribution

  6. Calcium signals can freely cross the nuclear envelope in hippocampal neurons: somatic calcium increases generate nuclear calcium transients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bading Hilmar

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In hippocampal neurons, nuclear calcium signaling is important for learning- and neuronal survival-associated gene expression. However, it is unknown whether calcium signals generated by neuronal activity at the cell membrane and propagated to the soma can unrestrictedly cross the nuclear envelope to invade the nucleus. The nuclear envelope, which allows ion transit via the nuclear pore complex, may represent a barrier for calcium and has been suggested to insulate the nucleus from activity-induced cytoplasmic calcium transients in some cell types. Results Using laser-assisted uncaging of caged calcium compounds in defined sub-cellular domains, we show here that the nuclear compartment border does not represent a barrier for calcium signals in hippocampal neurons. Although passive diffusion of molecules between the cytosol and the nucleoplasm may be modulated through changes in conformational state of the nuclear pore complex, we found no evidence for a gating mechanism for calcium movement across the nuclear border. Conclusion Thus, the nuclear envelope does not spatially restrict calcium transients to the somatic cytosol but allows calcium signals to freely enter the cell nucleus to trigger genomic events.

  7. Calcium signals can freely cross the nuclear envelope in hippocampal neurons: somatic calcium increases generate nuclear calcium transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Anja; Bading, Hilmar

    2007-01-01

    Background In hippocampal neurons, nuclear calcium signaling is important for learning- and neuronal survival-associated gene expression. However, it is unknown whether calcium signals generated by neuronal activity at the cell membrane and propagated to the soma can unrestrictedly cross the nuclear envelope to invade the nucleus. The nuclear envelope, which allows ion transit via the nuclear pore complex, may represent a barrier for calcium and has been suggested to insulate the nucleus from activity-induced cytoplasmic calcium transients in some cell types. Results Using laser-assisted uncaging of caged calcium compounds in defined sub-cellular domains, we show here that the nuclear compartment border does not represent a barrier for calcium signals in hippocampal neurons. Although passive diffusion of molecules between the cytosol and the nucleoplasm may be modulated through changes in conformational state of the nuclear pore complex, we found no evidence for a gating mechanism for calcium movement across the nuclear border. Conclusion Thus, the nuclear envelope does not spatially restrict calcium transients to the somatic cytosol but allows calcium signals to freely enter the cell nucleus to trigger genomic events. PMID:17663775

  8. Induced calcium carbonate precipitation using Bacillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifan, Mostafa; Samani, Ali Khajeh; Berenjian, Aydin

    2016-12-01

    Microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation is an emerging process for the production of self-healing concrete. This study was aimed to investigate the effects and optimum conditions on calcium carbonate biosynthesis. Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus sphaericus, yeast extract, urea, calcium chloride and aeration were found to be the most significant factors affecting the biomineralization of calcium carbonate. It was noticed that the morphology of microbial calcium carbonate was mainly affected by the genera of bacteria (cell surface properties), the viscosity of the media and the type of electron acceptors (Ca2+). The maximum calcium carbonate concentration of 33.78 g/L was achieved at the optimum conditions This value is the highest concentration reported in the literature.

  9. Calcium excretion in feces of ungulates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schryver, H F; Foose, T J; Williams, J; Hintz, H F

    1983-01-01

    1. Fecal excretion of calcium was examined in 122 individual ungulates representing 7 species of Equidae, 3 species of Tapiridae, 3 species of Rhinocerotidae, 2 species of Elephantidae, 2 species of Hippopotamidae, 12 species of Bovidae, 2 species of Cervidae, 3 species of Camellidae and 1 species of Giraffidae. 2. Animals were fed timothy hay, a low calcium diet or alfalfa hay, a high calcium diet. 3. In a few cases oat straw or prairie hay was used instead of timothy hay. 4. Samples of feces were obtained from individuals daily for 4 days following a 20 day dietary equilibration period. 5. Feces of equids, tapirs, rhinoceros and elephants had a lower calcium concentration and a lower Ca/P ratio than feces of ruminants when the animals were fed diets of equivalent calcium content. 6. The findings suggest that the non-ruminant ungulate equids, tapirs, rhinoceros and elephants absorb a larger proportion of dietary calcium than ruminants do.

  10. Binding of calcium and carbonate to polyacrylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribello, Gareth A; Liew, CheeChin; Parrinello, Michele

    2009-05-21

    Polyacrylate molecules can be used to slow the growth of calcium carbonate. However, little is known about the mechanism by which the molecules impede the growth rate. A recent computational study (Bulo et al. Macromolecules 2007, 40, 3437) used metadynamics to investigate the binding of calcium to polyacrylate chains and has thrown some light on the coiling and precipitation of these polymers. We extend these simulations to examine the binding of calcium and carbonate to polyacrylate chains. We show that calcium complexed with both carbonate and polyacrylate is a very stable species. The free energies of calcium-carbonate-polyacrylate complexes, with different polymer configurations, are calculated, and differences in the free energy of the binding of carbonate are shown to be due to differences in the amount of steric hindrance about the calcium, which prevents the approach of the carbonate ion.

  11. WAYS TO CORRECT CALCIUM DEFFICIT AMONG CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.I. Taibulatov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the urgent issue of the pediatrics — calcium deficit among children. The authors provide modern data on the scheme of the normal calcium exchange in the human body. They also review the main diseases related to the disorders of the pho sphorocalcic metabolism, requiring prompt prevention and treatment by calcium based medications. The researchers stress the diseases of the musculoskeletal system, as insufficient calcium, phosphorus and vitamins supply of the child's body chiefly effects the state of the skeletal and muscular tissue. They give recommendations how to use the vitamin and mineral complex to correct calcium deficit.Key words: calcium deficit, diseases of the musculoskeletal system, vitamin and mineral complex, children.

  12. Altered calcium signaling in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Teneale A; Yapa, Kunsala T D S; Monteith, Gregory R

    2015-10-01

    It is the nature of the calcium signal, as determined by the coordinated activity of a suite of calcium channels, pumps, exchangers and binding proteins that ultimately guides a cell's fate. Deregulation of the calcium signal is often deleterious and has been linked to each of the 'cancer hallmarks'. Despite this, we do not yet have a full understanding of the remodeling of the calcium signal associated with cancer. Such an understanding could aid in guiding the development of therapies specifically targeting altered calcium signaling in cancer cells during tumorigenic progression. Findings from some of the studies that have assessed the remodeling of the calcium signal associated with tumorigenesis and/or processes important in invasion and metastasis are presented in this review. The potential of new methodologies is also discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterization of set Intermediate Restorative Material, Biodentine, Bioaggregate and a prototype calcium silicate cement for use as root-end filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grech, L; Mallia, B; Camilleri, J

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the composition of materials and leachate of a hydrated prototype cement composed of tricalcium silicate and radiopacifier and compare this to other tricalcium silicate-based cements (Biodentine and Bioaggregate) to assess whether the additives in the proprietary brand cements affect the hydration of the materials, using Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM), a standard root-end filling material as a control. The materials investigated included a prototype-radiopacified tricalcium silicate cement, Biodentine, Bioaggregate and Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM). The pH and calcium ion concentration of the leachate were investigated. The hydrated cements were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray energy dispersive analysis (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). All the cements tested were alkaline. The tricalcium silicate-based cements leached calcium in solution. Scanning electron microscopy of the prototype-radiopacified tricalcium silicate cement, Biodentine and Bioaggregate displayed hydrating cement grains, surrounded by a matrix composed of calcium silicate hydrate and calcium hydroxide. The presence of calcium hydroxide was evident from the XRD plots. FT-IR indicated the occurrence of a poorly crystalline calcium silicate hydrate. Biodentine displayed the presence of calcium carbonate. Bioaggregate incorporated a phosphate-containing phase. IRM consisted of zinc oxide interspersed in an organic matrix. The hydration of prototype-radiopacified tricalcium silicate cement, Biodentine and Bioaggregate resulted in the formation of calcium silicate hydrate and calcium hydroxide, which was leached in solution. The hydrated materials were composed of a cementitous phase that was rich in calcium and silicon and a radiopacifying material. Biodentine included calcium carbonate, and Bioaggregate included silica and calcium phosphate in the powders. IRM was composed of zinc oxide

  14. Presynaptic calcium dynamics of learning neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Erler, Frido; Soff, Gerhard

    2002-01-01

    We present a new model for the dynamics of the presynaptic intracellular calcium concentration in neurons evoked by various stimulation protocols. The aim of the model is twofold: We want to discuss the calcium transients during and after specific stimulation protocols as they are used to induce long-term-depression and long-term-potentiation. In addition we would like to provide a general tool which allows the comparison of different calcium experiments. This may help to draw conclusions on ...

  15. Protein-Mediated Precipitation of Calcium Carbonate

    OpenAIRE

    Izabela Polowczyk; Anna Bastrzyk; Marta Fiedot

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carbonate is an important component in exoskeletons of many organisms. The synthesis of calcium carbonate was performed by mixing dimethyl carbonate and an aqueous solution of calcium chloride dihydrate. The precipitation product was characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements. In addition, the turbidity of the reaction solution was acquire...

  16. Mechanical Properties of a Calcium Dietary Supplement, Calcium Fumarate Trihydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shijing; Henke, Sebastian; Wharmby, Michael T; Yeung, Hamish H-M; Li, Wei; Cheetham, Anthony K

    2015-12-07

    The mechanical properties of calcium fumarate trihydrate, a 1D coordination polymer considered for use as a calcium source for food and beverage enrichment, have been determined via nanoindentation and high-pressure X-ray diffraction with single crystals. The nanoindentation studies reveal that the elastic modulus (16.7-33.4 GPa, depending on crystallographic orientation), hardness (1.05-1.36 GPa), yield stress (0.70-0.90 GPa), and creep behavior (0.8-5.8 nm/s) can be rationalized in view of the anisotropic crystal structure; factors include the directionality of the inorganic Ca-O-Ca chain and hydrogen bonding, as well as the orientation of the fumarate ligands. High-pressure single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies show a bulk modulus of ∼ 20 GPa, which is indicative of elastic recovery intermediate between small molecule drug crystals and inorganic pharmaceutical ingredients. The combined use of nanoindentation and high-pressure X-ray diffraction techniques provides a complementary experimental approach for probing the critical mechanical properties related to tableting of these dietary supplements.

  17. Calcium dependence of inactivation of calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in skeletal muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, B J; Klein, M G; Schneider, M F

    1991-03-01

    The steady-state calcium dependence of inactivation of calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum was studied in voltage-clamped, cut segments of frog skeletal muscle fibers containing two calcium indicators, fura-2 and anti-pyrylazo III (AP III). Fura-2 fluorescence was used to monitor resting calcium and relatively small calcium transients during small depolarizations. AP III absorbance signals were used to monitor larger calcium transients during larger depolarizations. The rate of release (Rrel) of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum was calculated from the calcium transients. The equilibrium calcium dependence of inactivation of calcium release was determined using 200-ms prepulses of various amplitudes to elevate [Ca2+] to various steady levels. Each prepulse was followed by a constant test pulse. The suppression of peak Rrel during the test pulse provided a measure of the extent of inactivation of release at the end of the prepulse. The [Ca2+] dependence of inactivation indicated that binding of more than one calcium ion was required to inactivate each release channel. Half-maximal inactivation was produced at a [Ca2+] of approximately 0.3 microM. Variation of the prepulse duration and amplitude showed that the suppression of peak release was consistent with calcium-dependent inactivation of calcium release but not with calcium depletion. The same calcium dependence of inactivation was obtained using different amplitude test pulses to determine the degree of inactivation. Prepulses that produced near maximal inactivation of release during the following test pulse produced no suppression of intramembrane charge movement during the test pulse, indicating that inactivation occurred at a step beyond the voltage sensor for calcium release. Three alternative set of properties that were assumed for the rapidly equilibrating calcium-binding sites intrinsic to the fibers gave somewhat different Rrel records, but gave very similar calcium dependence of

  18. Serum calcium levels are associated with novel cardiometabolic risk factors in the population-based CoLaus study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idris Guessous

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Associations of serum calcium levels with the metabolic syndrome and other novel cardio-metabolic risk factors not classically included in the metabolic syndrome, such as those involved in oxidative stress, are largely unexplored. We analyzed the association of albumin-corrected serum calcium levels with conventional and non-conventional cardio-metabolic risk factors in a general adult population. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The CoLaus study is a population-based study including Caucasians from Lausanne, Switzerland. The metabolic syndrome was defined using the Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Non-conventional cardio-metabolic risk factors considered included: fat mass, leptin, LDL particle size, apolipoprotein B, fasting insulin, adiponectin, ultrasensitive CRP, serum uric acid, homocysteine, and gamma-glutamyltransferase. We used adjusted standardized multivariable regression to compare the association of each cardio-metabolic risk factor with albumin-corrected serum calcium. We assessed associations of albumin-corrected serum calcium with the cumulative number of non-conventional cardio-metabolic risk factors. We analyzed 4,231 subjects aged 35 to 75 years. Corrected serum calcium increased with both the number of the metabolic syndrome components and the number of non-conventional cardio-metabolic risk factors, independently of the metabolic syndrome and BMI. Among conventional and non-conventional cardio-metabolic risk factors, the strongest positive associations were found for factors related to oxidative stress (uric acid, homocysteine and gamma-glutamyltransferase. Adiponectin had the strongest negative association with corrected serum calcium. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Serum calcium was associated with the metabolic syndrome and with non-conventional cardio-metabolic risk factors independently of the metabolic syndrome. Associations with uric acid, homocysteine and gamma-glutamyltransferase were the strongest. These

  19. Effects of calcium at toxic concentrations of cadmium in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Danlian; Gong, Xiaomin; Liu, Yunguo; Zeng, Guangming; Lai, Cui; Bashir, Hassan; Zhou, Lu; Wang, Dafei; Xu, Piao; Cheng, Min; Wan, Jia

    2017-05-01

    This review provides new insight that calcium plays important roles in plant growth, heavy metal accumulation and translocation, photosynthesis, oxidative damage and signal transduction under cadmium stress. Increasing heavy metal pollution problems have raised word-wide concerns. Cadmium (Cd), being a highly toxic metal, poses potential risks both to ecosystems and human health. Compared with conventional technologies, phytoremediation, being cost-efficient, highly stable and environment-friendly, is believed to be a promising green technology for Cd decontamination. However, Cd can be easily taken up by plants and may cause severe phytotoxicity to plants, thus limiting the efficiency of phytoremediation. Various researches are being done to investigate the effects of exogenous substances on the mitigation of Cd toxicity to plants. Calcium (Ca) is an essential plant macronutrient that involved in various plant physiological processes, such as plant growth and development, cell division, cytoplasmic streaming, photosynthesis and intracellular signaling transduction. Due to the chemical similarity between Ca and Cd, Ca may mediate Cd-induced physiological or metabolic changes in plants. Recent studies have shown that Ca could be used as an exogenous substance to protect plants against Cd stress by the alleviation of growth inhibition, regulation of metal uptake and translocation, improvement of photosynthesis, mitigation of oxidative damages and the control of signal transduction in the plants. The effects of Ca on toxic concentrations of Cd in plants are reviewed. This review also provides new insight that plants with enhanced Ca level have improved resistance to Cd stress.

  20. Protein-Mediated Precipitation of Calcium Carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polowczyk, Izabela; Bastrzyk, Anna; Fiedot, Marta

    2016-11-22

    Calcium carbonate is an important component in exoskeletons of many organisms. The synthesis of calcium carbonate was performed by mixing dimethyl carbonate and an aqueous solution of calcium chloride dihydrate. The precipitation product was characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements. In addition, the turbidity of the reaction solution was acquired to monitor the kinetics of the calcium carbonate structure's growth in the investigated system. In this study, samples of CaCO₃ particles obtained with individual proteins, such as ovalbumin, lysozyme, and a mixture of the proteins, were characterized and compared with a control sample, i.e., synthesized without proteins. The obtained data indicated that the addition of ovalbumin to the reaction changed the morphology of crystals from rhombohedral to 'stack-like' structures. Lysozyme, however, did not affect the morphology of calcium carbonate, yet the presence of the protein mixture led to the creation of more complex composites in which the calcium carbonate crystals were constructed in protein matrices formed by the ovalbumin-lysozyme interaction. It was also observed that in the protein mixture, ovalbumin has a major influence on the CaCO₃ formation through a strong interaction with calcium ions, which leads to the coalescence and creation of a steric barrier reducing particle growth. The authors proposed a mechanism of calcium carbonate grain growth in the presence of both proteins, taking into account the interaction of calcium ions with the protein.

  1. Diuretics and disorders of calcium homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieff, Marvin; Bushinsky, David A

    2011-11-01

    Diuretics commonly are administered in disorders of sodium balance. Loop diuretics inhibit the Na-K-2Cl transporter and also increase calcium excretion. They are often used in the treatment of hypercalcemia. Thiazide diuretics block the thiazide-sensitive NaCl transporter in the distal convoluted tubule, and can decrease calcium excretion. They are often used in the treatment of nephrolithiasis. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors decrease bicarbonate absorption and the resultant metabolic acidosis can increase calcium excretion. Their use can promote nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis. This review will address the use of diuretics on disorders of calcium homeostasis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [ZINK IS ACTIVATOR OF ENTERAL CALCIUM METABOLISM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyakova, E P; Ksenofontov, D A; Revyakin, A O; Ivanov, A A

    2015-01-01

    Experiments on goats and rabbits showed that zinc supplement to the diet leads to calcium concentration rise in muscle, bone and blood of animals. However, this rise was not adequate to increase in.zinc consumption. The bulk of alimentary zinc stayed in soluble fraction, dense endogen fraction and infusoria fraction of digesta and stimulated calcium release from food particles, it's accumulation in digesta fractions and calcium utilization on the whole. Authors estimate animal digesta as homeostatic, spatial organized, endogenic formation in which zinc and calcium are functionally dependent through enteral mucosa.

  3. The Electronic Structure of Calcium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jan, J.-P.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1981-01-01

    .149 Ryd, respectively, relative to the s band, give the best possible agreement. Under increasing pressure the s and p electrons are found to transfer into the d band, and Ca undergoes metal-semimetal-metal electronic transitions. Calculations of the bandstructure and the electronic pressure, including......The electronic structure of calcium under pressure is re-examined by means of self-consistent energy band calculations based on the local density approximation and using the linear muffin-tin orbitals (LMTO) method with corrections to the atomic sphere approximation included. At zero pressure...

  4. Short communication: Urinary oxalate and calcium excretion by dogs and cats diagnosed with calcium oxalate urolithiasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijcker, J.C.; Kummeling, A.; Hagen-Plantinga, E.A.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Urine concentrations of oxalate and calcium play an important role in calcium oxalate (CaOx) urolith formation in dogs and cats, with high excretions of both substances increasing the chance of CaOx urolithiasis. In 17 CaOx-forming dogs, urine calcium:creatinine ratio (Ca:Cr) was found

  5. Impaired body calcium metabolism with low bone density and compensatory colonic calcium absorption in cecectomized rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongwattanapisan, P.; Suntornsaratoon, P.; Wongdee, K.; Dorkkam, N.; Krishnamra, N.; Charoenphandhu, N.

    2012-01-01

    An earlier study reported that cecal calcium absorption contributes less than 10% of total calcium absorbed by the intestine, although the cecum has the highest calcium transport rate compared with other intestinal segments. Thus, the physiological significance of the cecum pertaining to body

  6. Plasma membrane calcium pump and sodium-calcium exchanger in maintenance and control of calcium concentrations in platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juska, Alfonsas

    2010-01-29

    The purpose of this research was to elucidate the activity of the mechanisms responsible for control of cytosolic calcium concentration in platelets by modeling the time-course of the concentration changing in response to discharge of the intracellular stores or store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). The parameters estimated as a result of model fitting to experimental data are related to physiological or pathological state of the cells. It has been shown that: (a) the time-course is determined by the passive calcium fluxes and activities of the corresponding mechanisms; (b) the decline in the concentration (after its rise) develops due to activity of plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) both in the case of discharge of the stores of platelets contained in calcium-free medium and in the case of SOCE; (c) impulsive extrusion of calcium in response to its sudden influx, presumably, is the main function of PMCA; (d) the function of sodium-calcium exchanger (NCX) is to extrude calcium excess by permanent counteracting its influx. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Pseudogout and Calcium Pyrophosphate Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Williamson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 53-year-old male presented with worsening right knee pain and swelling over the past 48 hours. He denied recent trauma to the knee, history of IV drug use, and recent illness. He had no history of diabetes, immunodeficiency, chronic steroids, rheumatologic disease, or knee replacement. He described the pain as sharp, non-radiating, and worse with movement. He was unable to walk due to pain. Significant findings: Radiographs of the knee showed multiple radio-dense lines paralleling the articular surface (see red arrows consistent with calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition within the joint often seen in calcium pyrophosphate disease (CPPD also known as pseudogout. Discussion: Patients commonly present to the emergency department with non-traumatic joint pain. Arthrocentesis is an important diagnostic tool to evaluate for septic arthritis, gout, or pseudogout. Arthrocentesis can demonstrate crystals or abnormal cell count, gram stain, and culture.[1] In the evaluation of joint pain, plain films are usually obtained to evaluate for fracture, dislocation, effusion, or secondary signs of infection. In this case the classic x-ray supported the diagnosis of CPPD.2 The patient was found to have positively birefringent rhomboid shaped crystals consistent with pseudogout on arthrocentesis. Gram stain and culture were both negative. The patient was discharged with NSAIDs and had significant improvement in symptoms upon follow up with primary care physician in 3 days.

  8. Paclitaxel induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells through different calcium--regulating mechanisms depending on external calcium conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhi; Avila, Andrew; Gollahon, Lauren

    2014-02-17

    Previously, we reported that endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores were a direct target for paclitaxel initiation of apoptosis. Furthermore, the actions of paclitaxel attenuated Bcl-2 resistance to apoptosis through endoplasmic reticulum-mediated calcium release. To better understand the calcium-regulated mechanisms of paclitaxel-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells, we investigated the role of extracellular calcium, specifically; whether influx of extracellular calcium contributed to and/or was necessary for paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. Our results demonstrated that paclitaxel induced extracellular calcium influx. This mobilization of extracellular calcium contributed to subsequent cytosolic calcium elevation differently, depending on dosage. Under normal extracellular calcium conditions, high dose paclitaxel induced apoptosis-promoting calcium influx, which did not occur in calcium-free conditions. In the absence of extracellular calcium an "Enhanced Calcium Efflux" mechanism in which high dose paclitaxel stimulated calcium efflux immediately, leading to dramatic cytosolic calcium decrease, was observed. In the absence of extracellular calcium, high dose paclitaxel's stimulatory effects on capacitative calcium entry and apoptosis could not be completely restored. Thus, normal extracellular calcium concentrations are critical for high dose paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. In contrast, low dose paclitaxel mirrored controls, indicating that it occurs independent of extracellular calcium. Thus, extracellular calcium conditions only affect efficacy of high dose paclitaxel-induced apoptosis.

  9. Spatiotemporal intracellular calcium dynamics during cardiac alternans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Juan G.; Karma, Alain

    2009-09-01

    Cellular calcium transient alternans are beat-to-beat alternations in the peak cytosolic calcium concentration exhibited by cardiac cells during rapid electrical stimulation or under pathological conditions. Calcium transient alternans promote action potential duration alternans, which have been linked to the onset of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. Here we use a recently developed physiologically detailed mathematical model of ventricular myocytes to investigate both stochastic and deterministic aspects of intracellular calcium dynamics during alternans. The model combines a spatially distributed description of intracellular calcium cycling, where a large number of calcium release units are spatially distributed throughout the cell, with a full set of ionic membrane currents. The results demonstrate that ion channel stochasticity at the level of single calcium release units can influence the whole-cell alternans dynamics by causing phase reversals over many beats during fixed frequency pacing close to the alternans bifurcation. They also demonstrate the existence of a wide range of dynamical states. Depending on the sign and magnitude of calcium-voltage coupling, calcium alternans can be spatially synchronized or desynchronized, in or out of phase with action potential duration alternans, and the node separating out-of-phase regions of calcium alternans can be expelled from or trapped inside the cell. This range of states is found to be larger than previously anticipated by including a robust global attractor where calcium alternans can be spatially synchronized but out of phase with action potential duration alternans. The results are explained by a combined theoretical analysis of alternans stability and node motion using general iterative maps of the beat-to-beat dynamics and amplitude equations.

  10. Calcium Blood Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/labtests/calciumbloodtest.html Calcium Blood Test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. What is a Calcium Blood Test? A calcium blood test measures the ...

  11. Rates of calcium carbonate removal from soils.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breemen, van N.; Protz, R.

    1988-01-01

    Mean annual rates of calcium carbonate removal from soils in a subarctic climate estimated from data on two chronosequences of calcareous storm ridges, appeared to be relatively constant through time. Concentrations of dissolved calcium carbonate in the soil solution in the study sites calculated

  12. Calcium and M'yocardial Infarction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-03-16

    Mar 16, 1974 ... Urinary excretion of calcium tended to be even lower in these .... 16 March 1974. S.A. MEDICAL JOURNAL. 525. 150. 50. Fig. 5. Urine calcium in myocardial infarction (means and standard error relative to age). AGE OF PATIENT .... Plasma proteins and blood urea were also measured in. 10 consecutive ...

  13. Calcium, snails, and birds: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mänd

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that wild birds breeding in acidified areas have difficulties with obtaining sufficient calcium for their eggshells, and that the cause of it is the shortage of land snails. Many birds have to search for Ca-rich snail shells on a daily basis during egg production. Molluscs depend on litter calcium, which has decreased due to acidification of the environment. Calcium limitation may be a widespread phenomenon also in non-acidified, naturally Ca-poor areas. The problem is that while in the latter areas the time for development of specific adaptations may have been sufficient, then in acidified areas, on the contrary, calcium shortage is a recent phenomenon. Therefore, since the extent of calcium limitation in non-acidified areas is hard to derive from observational data, experimental approach is needed. We provide experimental evidence that specific calcium deficit does affect reproductive traits also in the birds breeding in naturally base-poor habitats. Our study was conducted in a heterogeneous woodland area in Estonia containing deciduous forest patches as well as base-poor pine forest with low snail abundance. Ca supplementation, using snail shell and chicken eggshell fragments, was carried out for pied flycatchers and great tits. Extra calcium affected positively several reproductive traits like egg volume and eggshell thickness, start of breeding, and fledglings’ parameters. The negative relationship between calcium availability and lay-date suggests that birds adjust their breeding tactics to conditions of Ca deficiency, for example, by postponing laying.

  14. 21 CFR 182.8223 - Calcium pyrophosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium pyrophosphate. 182.8223 Section 182.8223 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8223 Calcium...

  15. 21 CFR 182.8217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium phosphate. 182.8217 Section 182.8217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8217 Calcium...

  16. Elements from chlorine to calcium nuclear reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kunz, Wunibald

    1968-01-01

    Nuclear Tables: Part II Nuclear Reactions, Volume 3: The Elements from Chlorine to Calcium contains tabulations of the nuclear reaction values of elements chlorine, argon, potassium, and calcium. These tabulations provide the calculated Q-values of the elements and their isotopes. This book will be of value to general chemistry researchers.

  17. Role of calcium in selenium cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, T R; David, L L

    The purpose of this research was to test the role of certain minerals in the formation of cataract caused by an overdose of selenium. Several pieces of information indicated that lenticular calcium may play an important role in selenite cataractogenesis: 1) Lens calcium concentrations in selenite treated rats were increased more than 5-fold, and the increase in lens calcium was localized in the nucleus. 2) Lens calcium concentrations were elevated at least one full day before actual formation of nuclear cataract, but serum calcium levels were not changed. 3) In older rats not susceptible to selenite cataract, lens calcium was not significantly increased. 4) No evidence was found for a generalized disruption in lens permeability, since no major changes in lens water, sodium, and potassium levels were observed, and 5) when levels of calcium observed in selenite cataract were added to solutions of soluble proteins from rat lenses, light scattering was increased. Selenium-overdose cataracts may provide an important model for studies on the role of calcium in cataractogenesis.

  18. Adding calcium improves lithium ferrite core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessoff, H.

    1969-01-01

    Adding calcium increases uniformity of grain growth over a wide range of sintering temperatures and reduces porosity within the grain. Ferrite cores containing calcium have square hysteresis loops and high curie temperatures, making them useful in coincident current memories of digital electronic computers.

  19. ALG-2, a multifunctional calcium binding protein?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarabykina, Svetlana; Mollerup, Jens; Winding Gojkovic, P.

    2004-01-01

    ALG-2 was originally discovered as a pro-apoptotic protein in a genetic screen. Due to its ability to bind calcium with high affinity it was postulated to provide a link between the known effect of calcium in programmed cell death and the molecular death execution machinery. This review article...

  20. Comparison of Serum Calcium and Magnesium Between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study compared serum calcium and magnesium in forty preeclamptic (cases) and forty normotensive (control) pregnant women matched for age, parity, and socioeconomic status. Serum calcium and magnesium levels were measured using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Statistical analysis was done ...

  1. Dairy Dilemma: Are You Getting Enough Calcium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body also needs vitamin D to absorb calcium. Nutrition surveys have shown that most people in the U.S. aren’t getting the calcium they need. If you’re avoiding milk and dairy ... taking nutritional supplements and choosing reduced-lactose or non-dairy ...

  2. CALCIUM AND THE PREVENTION OF COLON CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WELBERG, JWM; KLEIBEUKER, JH; VANDERMEER, R; MULDER, NH; DEVRIES, EGE

    1991-01-01

    Diet is a major determinant of colon cancer risk. Calcium may protect against colon cancer, presumably by binding cytotoxic bile acids and fatty acids. Numerous studies support this proposition. In subjects at risk for colon cancer oral calcium supplementation has been shown to reduce rectal

  3. Calcium Impact on Milk Gels Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koutina, Glykeria

    salts. The perturbation of calcium equilibria by these factors will affect the final properties of acid, calcium and rennet milk gels. By decreasing the pH from 6.0 to 5.2 (acid gels), the calcium equilibrium was significantly affected by temperature (4, 20, 30, 40 oC), and different combinations...... of temperature and pH may result in different final structure properties in dairy products such as cheese. A significant amount of calcium remained in the micelles between pH 4.8 and 4.6, this can contribute to the final strength of acid milk gels, such as in yogurt or in cream cheeses. After the gelation point......, a sudden solubilization of micellar calcium was observed at 50 oC and 60 oC, which revealed an interesting role of calcium during acidification at elevated temperatures. After enrichment of milk with calcium D-lactobionate, the added calcium was distributed between the micellar and serum milk phase at pH 6...

  4. Bespuiten met calcium kan neusrot voorkomen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom-Zandstra, Greet; Marcelis, L.F.M.

    2000-01-01

    Oorzaak van neusrot bij paprika is een calciumtekort in de vrucht. Een bespuiting met calcium vlak na de bloei heeft een zeer gunstig effect. In bijgaande tabel gegevens over het effect van spuiten met calcium op het optreden van neusrot bij paprika

  5. Calcium in the pathomechanism of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis - Taking center stage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patai, Roland; Nógrádi, Bernát; Engelhardt, József I; Siklós, László

    2017-02-19

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is an incurable, relentlessly progressive disease primarily affecting motor neurons. The cause of the disease, except for the mutations identified in a small fraction of patients, is unknown. The major mechanisms contributing to the degeneration of motor neurons have already been disclosed and characterized, including excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and immune/inflammatory processes. During the progression of the disease these toxic processes are not discrete, but each facilitates the deleterious effect of the other. However, due to their common reciprocal calcium dependence, calcium ions may act as a common denominator and through a positive feedback loop may combine the individual pathological processes into a unified escalating mechanism of neuronal destruction. This mini-review provides an overview of the mutual calcium dependence of the major toxic mechanisms associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Calcium and caffeine interaction in increased calcium balance in ovariectomized rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Tavares da Silva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the effects of caffeine intake associated with inadequate or adequate calcium intake in laparotomized or ovariectomized rats by means of the calcium balance. Forty adults Wistar rats were ovariectomized or laparotomized. METHODS: The animals (n=40 were randomly placed in eight groups receiving the AIN-93 diet with 100% or 50% of the recommended calcium intake with or without added caffeine (6mg/kg/day. The animals were kept in individuals metabolic cages at a temperature of 24°±2ºC, light/dark cycles of 12/12 hours, and deionized water available ad libitum. On the 8th week of the experiment, food consumption was measured and 24-hour urine and 4-day feces were collected to determine calcium balance [Balance=Ca intake-(Urinary Ca+Fecal Ca]. RESULTS: Animals with adequate calcium intake presented higher balances and rates of calcium absorption and retention (p<0.05 than those with inadequate calcium intake, regardless of caffeine intake (p<0.05. Caffeine intake did not affect urinary calcium excretion but increased balance (p<0.05 in the groups with adequate calcium intake. CONCLUSION: Adequate calcium intake attenuated the negative effects of estrogen deficiency and improved calcium balance even in the presence of caffeine.

  7. Store-operated calcium entry is essential for glial calcium signalling in CNS white matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, M; Lewis, A; Butt, A M

    2017-02-28

    'Calcium signalling' is the ubiquitous response of glial cells to multiple extracellular stimuli. The primary mechanism of glial calcium signalling is by release of calcium from intracellular stores of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Replenishment of ER Ca(2+) stores relies on store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). However, despite the importance of calcium signalling in glial cells, little is known about their mechanisms of SOCE. Here, we investigated SOCE in glia of the mouse optic nerve, a typical CNS white matter tract that comprises bundles of myelinated axons and the oligodendrocytes and astrocytes that support them. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we identified Orai1 channels, both Stim1 and Stim2, and the transient receptor potential M3 channel (TRPM3) as the primary channels for SOCE in the optic nerve, and their expression in both astrocytes and oligodendrocytes was demonstrated by immunolabelling of optic nerve sections and cultures. The functional importance of SOCE was demonstrated by fluo-4 calcium imaging on isolated intact optic nerves and optic nerve cultures. Removal of extracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]o) resulted in a marked depletion of glial cytosolic calcium ([Ca(2+)]i), which recovered rapidly on restoration of [Ca(2+)]o via SOCE. 2-aminoethoxydiphenylborane (2APB) significantly decreased SOCE and severely attenuated ATP-mediated calcium signalling. The results provide evidence that Orai/Stim and TRPM3 are important components of the 'calcium toolkit' that underpins SOCE and the sustainability of calcium signalling in white matter glia.

  8. Nitric oxide in the rat vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, A; Blythe, W R; Zdanski, C J; Prazma, J; Pillsbury, H C

    1994-10-01

    Nitric oxide is known to function as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. It is also known to be involved in the central nervous system excitatory amino acid neurotransmission cascade. Activation of excitatory amino acid receptors causes an influx of calcium, which activates nitric oxide synthase. The resulting increase in intracellular nitric oxide activates soluble guanylate cyclase, leading to a rise in cyclic guanosine monophosphate. The excitatory amino acids glutamate and aspartate are found in the vestibular system and have been postulated to function as vestibular system neurotransmitters. Although nitric oxide has been investigated as a neurotransmitter in other tissues, no published studies have examined the role of nitric oxide in the vestibular system. Neuronal NADPH-diaphorase has been characterized as a nitric oxide synthase. This enzyme catalyzes the conversion of L-arginine to L-citrulline, producing nitric oxide during the reaction. We used a histochemical stain characterized by Hope et al. (Proc Natl Acad Sci 1991;88:2811) as specific for neuronal nitric oxide synthase to localize the enzyme in the rat vestibular system. An immunocytochemical stain was used to examine rat inner ear tissue for the presence of the enzyme's end product, L-citrulline, thereby demonstrating nitric oxide synthase activity. Staining of vestibular ganglion sections showed nitric oxide synthase presence and activity in ganglion cells and nerve fibers. These results indicate the presence of active nitric oxide synthase in these tissues and suggest modulation of vestibular neurotransmission by nitric oxide.

  9. Plant Calcium Content: Ready to Remodel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Lou Guerinot

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available By identifying the relationship between calcium location in the plant cell and nutrient bioavailability, the plant characteristics leading to maximal calcium absorption by humans can be identified. Knowledge of plant cellular and molecular targets controlling calcium location in plants is emerging. These insights should allow for better strategies for increasing the nutritional content of foods. In particular, the use of preparation-free elemental imaging technologies such as synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF microscopy in plant biology may allow researchers to understand the relationship between subcellular location and nutrient bioavailability. These approaches may lead to better strategies for altering the location of calcium within the plant to maximize its absorption from fruits and vegetables. These modified foods could be part of a diet for children and adults identified as at-risk for low calcium intake or absorption with the ultimate goal of decreasing the incidence and severity of inadequate bone mineralization.

  10. Endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores in dendritic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Menahem; Korkotian, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the role of calcium stores in dendritic spines structure, function and plasticity is still debated. The reasons for this may have to do with the multitude of overlapping calcium handling machineries in the neuron, including stores, voltage and ligand gated channels, pumps and transporters. Also, different cells in the brain are endowed with calcium stores that are activated by different receptor types, and their differential compartmentalization in dendrites, spines and presynaptic terminals complicates their analysis. In the present review we address several key issues, including the role of calcium stores in synaptic plasticity, their role during development, in stress and in neurodegenerative diseases. Apparently, there is increasing evidence for a crucial role of calcium stores, especially of the ryanodine species, in synaptic plasticity and neuronal survival.

  11. Application of Calcium Phosphate Materials in Dentistry

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    Jabr S. Al-Sanabani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate materials are similar to bone in composition and in having bioactive and osteoconductive properties. Calcium phosphate materials in different forms, as cements, composites, and coatings, are used in many medical and dental applications. This paper reviews the applications of these materials in dentistry. It presents a brief history, dental applications, and methods for improving their mechanical properties. Notable research is highlighted regarding (1 application of calcium phosphate into various fields in dentistry; (2 improving mechanical properties of calcium phosphate; (3 biomimetic process and functionally graded materials. This paper deals with most common types of the calcium phosphate materials such as hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate which are currently used in dental and medical fields.

  12. Calcium phosphate: a substitute for aluminum adjuvants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Jean-Daniel; Thibaudon, Michel; Bélec, Laurent; Crépeaux, Guillemette

    2017-03-01

    Calcium phosphate was used as an adjuvant in France in diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and poliomyelitis vaccines. It was later completely substituted by alum salts in the late 80's, but it still remains as an approved adjuvant for the World Health Organization for human vaccination. Area covered: Thus, calcium phosphate is now considered as one of the substances that could replace alum salts in vaccines. The aim of this paper is to draw a review of existing data on calcium phosphate as an adjuvant in order to bring out the strengths and weaknesses for its use on a large scale. Expert commentary: Calcium phosphate is a compound naturally present in the organism, safe and already used in human vaccination. Beyond comparisons with the other adjuvants, calcium phosphate represents a good candidate to replace or to complete alum salts as a vaccine adjuvant.

  13. Plant Calcium Content: Ready to Remodel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Punshon, Tracy; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Hirschi, Kendal D.

    2012-01-01

    By identifying the relationship between calcium location in the plant cell and nutrient bioavailability, the plant characteristics leading to maximal calcium absorption by humans can be identified. Knowledge of plant cellular and molecular targets controlling calcium location in plants is emerging. These insights should allow for better strategies for increasing the nutritional content of foods. In particular, the use of preparation-free elemental imaging technologies such as synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microscopy in plant biology may allow researchers to understand the relationship between subcellular location and nutrient bioavailability. These approaches may lead to better strategies for altering the location of calcium within the plant to maximize its absorption from fruits and vegetables. These modified foods could be part of a diet for children and adults identified as at-risk for low calcium intake or absorption with the ultimate goal of decreasing the incidence and severity of inadequate bone mineralization. PMID:23016135

  14. The calcium and vitamin D controversy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo

    2017-01-01

    or subanalyses while maintaining balancing. Though large clinical RCTs currently evaluate the effects of higher vitamin D doses (equivalent to 50–83 μg/d) there is no current research effort regarding the calcium controversy. In the absence of such studies it is not possible to provide clinicians with evidence......Areas of the world where vitamin D levels are low for months of the year and intakes of calcium are high have a high prevalence of osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease. This suggests a public health message of avoiding calcium supplements and increasing vitamin D intake. No message could be more...... welcome as vitamin D can be given as a bolus while calcium must be taken daily and may be poorly tolerated. This approach is based on no evidence from intervention studies. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) suggest that vitamin D given with calcium elicits a small reduction in fracture risk and deaths...

  15. Expert review on coronary calcium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Budoff

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Matthew J Budoff, Khawar M GulDivision of Cardiology, Saint John’s Cardiovascular Research Center, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA, Torrance, California, USAAbstract: While there is no doubt that high risk patients (those with >20% ten year risk of future cardiovascular event need more aggressive preventive therapy, a majority of cardiovascular events occur in individuals at intermediate risk (10%–20% ten year risk. Accurate risk assessment may be helpful in decreasing cardiovascular events through more appropriate targeting of preventive measures. It has been suggested that traditional risk assessment may be refined with the selective use of coronary artery calcium (CAC or other methods of subclinical atherosclerosis measurement. Coronary calcification is a marker of atherosclerosis that can be quantified with the use of cardiac CT and it is proportional to the extent and severity of atherosclerotic disease. The published studies demonstrate a high sensitivity of CAC for the presence of coronary artery disease but a lower specificity for obstructive CAD depending on the magnitude of the CAC. Several large clinical trials found clear, incremental predictive value of CAC over the Framingham risk score when used in asymptomatic patients. Based on multiple observational studies, patients with increased plaque burdens (increased CAC are approximately ten times more likely to suffer a cardiac event over the next 3–5 years. Coronary calcium scores have outperformed conventional risk factors, highly sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP and carotid intima media thickness (IMT as a predictor of cardiovascular events. The relevant prognostic information obtained may be useful to initiate or intensify appropriate treatment strategies to slow the progression of atherosclerotic vascular disease. Current data suggests intermediate risk patients may benefit most from further risk stratification with cardiac CT, as CAC testing is

  16. CARCASS CHARACTERISTICS OF FEEDLOT SHEEP FED WITH SUGARCANE BAGASSE HYDROLYZED WITH CALCIUM OXIDE GANHO EM PESO E CARACTERÍSTICAS DA CARCAÇA DE OVINOS CONFINADOS ALIMENTADOS COM BAGAÇO DE CANA HIDROLISADO COM ÓXIDO DE CÁLCIO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Willian Barbosa Fernandes

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the addition of calcium oxide (0.75; 1.5 and 2.25% in the sugarcane bagasse were studied with the objective of evaluating characteristics of the carcass in crossbred Santa Ines lambs. Twenty animals, with average live weight of 14 ± 4,5 kg were distributed in a completely randomized experimental design. The animals received concentrated containing corn, soybean meal and urea, and also the sugar cane bagasse. The slaughter reached 81 days of confinement. Means for hot and cold carcass weights, hot and cold carcass revenues, and chilling lost were 14.66 kg, 14.35 kg, 46.62%, 45.45% and 2.09%, respectively. Treatments did not affect the subjective measures, degree of fat covering and shape form, and the objective measures, ribeye area and kidney and cavity fat. The treatment of the sugar-cane bagasse with CaO increased the live weight, but did not affect the carcass characteristics in sheep.

    KEY WORDS:  Carcass quality, co-products, ruminant. Foram estudados os efeitos da adição de teores crescentes de óxido de cálcio (0,75; 1,5 e 2,25% no bagaço de cana-de-açúcar fornecido a ovinos mestiços da raça Santa Inês no ganho de peso e nas características da carcaça. Vinte ovinos, com peso vivo médio de 14 ± 4.5 kg, foram distribuídos em um delineamento inteiramente ao acaso. Os animais receberam concentrado contendo milho, farelo de soja e ureia, e o bagaço com as doses de CaO. Realizou-se o abate dos ovinos após 67 dias de confinamento. As médias do peso de carcaça quente, peso de carcaça fria, rendimento de carcaça quente, rendimento de carcaça fria e quebra no resfriamento foram de 14,66 kg, 14,35 kg, 46,62%, 45,45% e 2,09%, respectivamente, não se observando efeito dos tratamentos, o que ocorreu também para as medidas subjetivas (grau de cobertura de gordura e conformação e para as medidas objetivas (área de olho de lombo, gordura perirenal e gordura cavitária. O tratamento do bagaço de cana

  17. Laboratory study on the high-temperature capture of HCl gas by dry-injection of calcium-based sorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemwell, B; Levendis, Y A; Simons, G A

    2001-01-01

    This is a laboratory study on the reduction of combustion-generated hydrochloric acid (HCl) emissions by in-furnace dry-injection of calcium-based sorbents. HCl is a hazardous gaseous pollutant emitted in significant quantities by municipal and hazardous waste incinerators, coal-fired power plants, and other industrial furnaces. Experiments were conducted in a laboratory furnace at gas temperatures of 600-1000 degrees C. HCl gas diluted with N2, and sorbent powders fluidized in a stream of air were introduced into the furnace concurrently. Chlorination of the sorbents occurred in the hot zone of the furnace at gas residence times approximately 1 s. The sorbents chosen for these experiments were calcium formate (CF), calcium magnesium acetate (CMA), calcium propionate (CP), calcium oxide (CX), and calcium carbonate (CC). Upon release of organic volatiles, sorbents calcine to CaO at approximately 700 degrees C, and react with the HCl according to the reaction CaO + 2HCl CaCl2 + H2O. At the lowest temperature case examined herein, 600 degrees C, direct reaction of HCl with CaCO3 may also be expected. The effectiveness of the sorbents to capture HCl was interpreted using the "pore tree" mathematical model for heterogeneous diffusion reactions. Results show that the thin-walled, highly porous cenospheres formed from the pyrolysis and calcination of CF, CMA, and CP exhibited high relative calcium utilization at the upper temperatures of this study. Relative utilizations under these conditions reached 80%. The less costly low-porosity sorbents, calcium carbonate and calcium oxide also performed well. Calcium carbonate reached a relative utilization of 54% in the mid-temperature range, while the calcium oxide reached an 80% relative utilization at the lowest temperature examined. The data matched theoretical predictions of sorbent utilization using the mathematical model, with activation energy and pre-exponential factors for the calcination reaction of 17,000 K and 300

  18. Strontium Substitution for Calcium in Lithogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaschko, Sarah D.; Chi, Thomas; Miller, Joe; Flechner, Lawrence; Fakra, Sirine; Kapahi, Pankaj; Kahn, Arnold; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Strontium has chemical similarity to calcium, which enables the replacement of calcium by strontium in biomineralization processes. Incorporating strontium into human bone and teeth has been studied extensively but little research has been performed of the incorporation of strontium into urinary calculi. We used synchrotron based x-ray fluorescence and x-ray absorption techniques to examine the presence of strontium in different types of human kidney stones. Materials and Methods Multiple unique human stone samples were obtained via consecutive percutaneous nephrolithotomies/ureteroscopies. A portion of each stone was sent for standard laboratory analysis and a portion was retained for x-ray fluorescence and x-ray absorption measurements. X-ray fluorescence and x-ray absorption measurements determined the presence, spatial distribution and speciation of strontium in each stone sample. Results Traditional kidney stone analyses identified calcium oxalate, calcium phosphate, uric acid and cystine stones. X-ray fluorescence measurements identified strontium in all stone types except pure cystine. X-ray fluorescence elemental mapping of the samples revealed co-localization of calcium and strontium. X-ray absorption measurements of the calcium phosphate stone showed strontium predominately present as strontium apatite. Conclusions Advanced x-ray fluorescence imaging identified strontium in all calcium based stones, present as strontium apatite. This finding may be critical since apatite is thought to be the initial nidus for calcium stone formation. Strontium is not identified by standard laboratory stone analyses. Its substitution for calcium can be reliably identified in stones from multiple calcium based stone formers, which may offer opportunities to gain insight into early events in lithogenesis. PMID:23260568

  19. A comparison of total calcium, corrected calcium, and ionized calcium concentrations as indicators of calcium homeostasis among hypoalbuminemic dogs requiring intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Claire R; Kerl, Marie E; Mann, F A

    2009-12-01

    (1) To evaluate whether total calcium (tCa) correlates with ionized calcium (iCa) in hypoalbuminemic dogs; (2) to evaluate whether calcium adjusted for albumin (Alb), or total protein (TP), or both accurately predict iCa concentrations and hence can be used to monitor calcium homeostasis in critically ill hypoalbuminemic dogs; and (3) to evaluate factors associated with any potential discrepancy in calcium classification between corrected total and ionized values. Prospective observational clinical study. Small animal intensive care unit in a veterinary medical teaching hospital. Twenty-eight client-owned dogs with hypoalbuminemia. None. iCa was determined using ion-specific electrode methodology, on heparinized plasma. The tCa concentration was adjusted for Alb and TP using published equations. In total 29% (8/28) of the hypoalbuminemic, critically ill dogs in this study were hypocalcemic at intensive care unit admission, as determined by iCa measurement. Corrected calcium values failed to accurately classify calcium status in 67.9% and 64.3% of cases, according to whether the Alb-adjusted or TP-adjusted values, respectively, were used. The sensitivity and specificity of the tCa to evaluate hypocalcemia was 100% and 47%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the correction formulae were 37.5% and 79% for the Alb-adjusted values and 37.5% and 74% for TP-adjusted values. tCa overestimated the presence of hypocalcemia and underestimated the presence of normocalcemia, while corrected calcium values overestimated the presence of normocalcemia and underestimated the presence of hypocalcemia. Calcium homeostasis in hypoalbuminemic critically ill dogs should be evaluated by iCa concentrations rather than tCa or calcium adjusted for Alb or TP. Given that tCa has 100% sensitivity for detecting hypocalcemia in this population it is recommended that all hypoalbuminemic and critically ill patients with low tCa should be evaluated with an iCa measurement.

  20. Tuning local calcium availability: cell-type-specific immobile calcium buffer capacity in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Elizabeth A; Schoch, Susanne; Dietrich, Dirk

    2013-09-04

    It has remained difficult to ascribe a specific functional role to immobile or fixed intracellular calcium buffers in central neurons because the amount of these buffers is unknown. Here, we explicitly isolated the fixed buffer fraction by prolonged whole-cell patch-clamp dialysis and quantified its buffering capacity in murine hippocampal slices using confocal calcium imaging and the "added-buffer" approach. In dentate granule cells, the calcium binding ratio (κ) after complete washout of calbindin D28k (Cb), κfixed, displayed a substantial value of ∼100. In contrast, in CA1 oriens lacunosum moleculare (OLM) interneurons, which do not contain any known calcium-binding protein(s), κfixed amounted to only ∼30. Based on these values, a theoretical analysis of dendritic spread of calcium after local entry showed that fixed buffers, in the absence of mobile species, decrease intracellular calcium mobility 100- and 30-fold in granule cells and OLM cells, respectively, and thereby strongly slow calcium signals. Although the large κfixed alone strongly delays the spread of calcium in granule cells, this value optimizes the benefits of additionally expressing the mobile calcium binding protein Cb. With such high κfixed, Cb effectively increases the propagation velocity to levels seen in OLM cells and, contrary to expectation, does not affect the peak calcium concentration close to the source but sharpens the spatial and temporal calcium gradients. The data suggest that the amount of fixed buffers determines the temporal availability of calcium for calcium-binding partners and plays a pivotal role in setting the repertoire of cellular calcium signaling regimens.

  1. The effects of prolonged oral administration of the disinfectant calcium hypochlorite in Nigerian commercial cockerels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temitayo O. Iji

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate the effects of prolonged oral administration of calcium hypochlorite in the drinking water of commercial cockerels. It was carried out in order to ascertain probable toxicity associated with prolonged exposure to calcium hypochlorite. Thirty-two healthy birds were used; they were grouped into four groups of eight. Group 1, which served as the control, received 10 mL/kg body weight of physiological saline. Groups 2, 3 and 4 received 0.0375 g, 0.375 g and 0.75 g of calcium hypochlorite per 10 litres of drinking water for six weeks respectively. Six weeks after the administration of calcium hypochlorite, blood was collected from the jugular vein to assess liver function, lipid profiles and for markers of oxidative stress. The results revealed a significant (p < 0.05 increase in alanine aminotransferase activity in a dose-dependent manner when compared with the control. Also, there was a significant (p < 0.05 increase in aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase activity. Similarly, there was a significant (p < 0.05 increase in total cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein levels compared with the control. There was a significant increase in malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide generation with a concomitant significant (p < 0.05 decrease in serum glutathione level in a dose-dependent manner when compared with the control. In this study, calcium hypochloriteinduced hepatic damage via oxidative stress and decrease in antioxidant defense system was found. Therefore, prolonged exposure of chickens to calcium hypochlorite is potentially harmful.

  2. Diagnosis and assessment of skeletal related disease using calcium 41

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillegonds, Darren J [Oakland, CA; Vogel, John S [San Jose, CA; Fitzgerald, Robert L [Encinitas, CA; Deftos, Leonard J [Del Mar, CA; Herold, David [Del Mar, CA; Burton, Douglas W [San Diego, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of determining calcium metabolism in a patient comprises the steps of administering radioactive calcium isotope .sup.41Ca to the patient, allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and reaction of the radioactive calcium isotope .sup.41Ca by the patient, obtaining a sample of the radioactive calcium isotope .sup.41Ca from the patient, isolating the calcium content of the sample in a form suitable for precise measurement of isotopic calcium concentrations, and measuring the calcium content to determine parameters of calcium metabolism in the patient.

  3. Electrochemical characterization of calcium cobaltite based porous electrodes; Caracterizacao eletroquimica de eletrodos porosos a base de cobaltita de calcio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulgencio, E.B.G.A.; Vasconcelos, K.; Silva, R.M.; Melo, P.; Caetano, A.A.; Campos, L.F.A.; Dutra, R.P.S.; Macedo, D.A., E-mail: erikbgrisi@gmail.com [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), PB (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Materials based on alkali metal oxides and alkaline earth metal have shown high technological interest in recent years. Among these materials, calcium and cobalt oxide composition Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9} (C349) has emerged as thermoelectric material and, more recently, as cathode for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). In this study, C349 powder was obtained by solid state reaction of a mixture containing cobalt oxide and calcium carbonate from shellfish shells (CaCO{sub 3} ∼ 98%), previously calcined at 550° C. Symmetrical cells (cathode / substrate / cathode) were prepared by screen printing of C349 electrodes in gadolinium-doped ceria substrates. The characterization by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy revealed that the C349 obtained in this work has an area specific resistance compatible with electrodes obtained by chemical routes (from literature). (author)

  4. Polymorph-selective crystallization of calcium carbonate inspired by biomineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Il Won

    This dissertation primarily examines bioinspired mineralization, focusing on the polymorph-selective crystallization of calcium carbonate. (1) The effect of epitaxy on the polymorphic control of calcium carbonate was studied with aragonite-type inorganic substrates. The critical epitaxial mismatch for aragonite growth, when conditions disfavor aragonite, seems to be less than 7.1%. Larger epitaxial strain appeared to prohibit aragonite formation even though the substrates had the same crystal structure. The epitaxy required for aragonite nucleation seems to be more precise than that often suggested for biological systems. (2) Polymers of different aqueous-solution properties were tested to observe the effect on the crystallization of calcium carbonate. Near exclusive formation of aragonite was attained through the inhibition of more stable calcite with poly(vinyl alcohol). The contributing characteristics of poly(vinyl alcohol) seemed to be its ability to hydrogen bond and its tendency to adsorb non-specifically onto solid surfaces. Similar inhibition activity is suggested for various biomacromolecules involved in biogenic aragonite formation of mollusks, with the biomacromolecules acting in the same way as poly(vinyl alcohol). (3) Polymer surfaces imprinted by aragonite-type crystals (strontium carbonate) were studied as substrates for the crystallization of calcium carbonate. Only calcite formed under vaterite-, aragonite-, and calcite-favorable conditions. This result seemed to arise from the nature of functional groups, rather than from the molecular structure of the imprint. Interaction between the functional groups and calcium carbonate is suggested to have enhanced the crystallization rate, resulting in the rapid formation of the thermodynamically stable calcite irrespective of the bulk crystallization conditions. (4) A catechol-based monomer was synthesized in the course of developing a dental adhesive, which mimics the functionalities of mussel adhesive

  5. Non-calcium desulphurisation technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian Zhu [IEA Clean Coal Centre, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    Flue gas desulphurisation (FGD) is traditionally based on limestone/lime sorbent. The majority of the installed FGD systems worldwide use limestone or lime as sorbent. However, technologies are rapidly evolving that allow desulphurisation in regions where there are limited resources of lime or limestone. These technologies provide alternatives to limestone/lime scrubbers for efficient and cost effective control of SO{sub 2} emissions from coal combustion. This report reviews the existing and emerging non-calcium based FGD processes as well as FGD technologies currently under development that apply new concepts and different approaches. It looks at the fundamentals and features of these processes, the recent technical advances and their applications in coal-fired power plants. The capital and operating costs of the processes are evaluated where information available. 66 refs., 15 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. Calcium-sensitive immunoaffinity chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Maiken L; Lindhardt Madsen, Kirstine; Skjoedt, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Immunoaffinity chromatography is a powerful fractionation technique that has become indispensable for protein purification and characterization. However, it is difficult to retrieve bound proteins without using harsh or denaturing elution conditions, and the purification of scarce antigens...... to homogeneity may be impossible due to contamination with abundant antigens. In this study, we purified the scarce, complement-associated plasma protein complex, collectin LK (CL-LK, complex of collectin liver 1 and kidney 1), by immunoaffinity chromatography using a calcium-sensitive anti-collectin-kidney-1 m...... chromatography was superior to the traditional immunoaffinity chromatographies and resulted in a nine-fold improvement of the purification factor. The technique is applicable for the purification of proteins in complex mixtures by single-step fractionation without the denaturation of eluted antigens...

  7. Catalytic oxidation using nitrous oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Beltran-Prieto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrous oxide is a very inert gas used generally as oxidant as it offers some advantage compared with other oxidants such as O2 but a considerably higher temperature (> 526 °C is often required. For particular cases such as the oxidation of sugar alcohols, especially for the oxidation of primary alcohols to aldehydes, N2O has the advantage over O2 of a higher reaction selectivity. In the present paper we present the modelling of oxidation reaction of sugar alcohols using an oxidizing agent in low concentrations, which is important to suppress subsequent oxidation reactions due to the very low residual concentrations of the oxidizing agent. For orientation experiments we chose nitrous oxide generated by thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate. Kinetic modeling of the reaction was performed after determination of the differential equations that describe the system under study.

  8. Catalytic iron oxide for lime regeneration in carbonaceous fuel combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ming-Shing; Yang, Ralph T.

    1980-01-01

    Lime utilization for sulfurous oxides absorption in fluidized combustion of carbonaceous fuels is improved by impregnation of porous lime particulates with iron oxide. The impregnation is achieved by spraying an aqueous solution of mixed iron sulfate and sulfite on the limestone before transfer to the fluidized bed combustor, whereby the iron compounds react with the limestone substrate to form iron oxide at the limestone surface. It is found that iron oxide present in the spent limestone acts as a catalyst to regenerate the spent limestone in a reducing environment. With only small quantities of iron oxide the calcium can be recycled at a significantly increased rate.

  9. Impaired mitochondria and intracellular calcium transients in the salivary glands of obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ittichaicharoen, Jitjiroj; Apaijai, Nattayaporn; Tanajak, Pongpan; Sa-Nguanmoo, Piangkwan; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2017-04-01

    Long-term consumption of a high-fat diet (HFD) causes not only obese-insulin resistance, but is also associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in several organs. However, the effect of obese-insulin resistance on salivary glands has not been investigated. We hypothesized that obese-insulin resistance induced by HFD impaired salivary gland function by reducing salivation, increasing inflammation, and fibrosis, as well as impairing mitochondrial function and calcium transient signaling. Male Wistar rats (200-220 g) were fed either a ND or an HFD (n = 8/group) for 16 weeks. At the end of week 16, salivary flow rates, metabolic parameters, and plasma oxidative stress were determined. Rats were then sacrificed and submandibular glands were removed to determine inflammation, fibrosis, apoptosis, mitochondrial function and dynamics, and intracellular calcium transient signaling. Long-term consumption of an HFD caused obese-insulin resistance and increased oxidative stress, fibrosis, inflammation, and apoptosis in the salivary glands. In addition, impaired mitochondrial function, as indicated by increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and mitochondrial swelling in salivary glands and impaired intracellular calcium regulation, as indicated by a reduced intracellular calcium transient rising rate, decay rates, and amplitude of salivary acinar cells, were observed in HFD-fed rats. However, salivary flow rate and level of aquaporin 5 protein were not different between both groups. Although HFD consumption did not affect salivation, it caused obese-insulin resistance, leading to pathophysiological alteration of salivary glands, including impaired intracellular calcium transients, increased oxidative stress and inflammation, and salivary mitochondrial dysfunction.

  10. Methods of use of calcium hexa aluminate refractory linings and/or chemical barriers in high alkali or alkaline environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGowan, Kenneth A; Cullen, Robert M; Keiser, James R; Hemrick, James G; Meisner, Roberta A

    2013-10-22

    A method for improving the insulating character/and or penetration resistance of a liner in contact with at least one of an alkali and/or alkaline environments is provided. The method comprises lining a surface that is subject to wear by an alkali environment and/or an alkaline environment with a refractory composition comprising a refractory aggregate consisting essentially of a calcium hexa aluminate clinker having the formula CA.sub.6, wherein C is equal to calcium oxide, wherein A is equal to aluminum oxide, and wherein the hexa aluminate clinker has from zero to less than about fifty weight percent C.sub.12A.sub.7, and wherein greater than 98 weight percent of the calcium hexa aluminate clinker having a particle size ranging from -20 microns to +3 millimeters, for forming a liner of the surface. This method improves the insulating character/and or penetration resistance of the liner.

  11. Dysregulation of cellular calcium homeostasis in Alzheimer's disease: bad genes and bad habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, M P; Chan, S L

    2001-10-01

    Calcium is one of the most important intracellular messengers in the brain, being essential for neuronal development, synaptic transmission and plasticity, and the regulation of various metabolic pathways. The findings reviewed in the present article suggest that calcium also plays a prominent role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Associations between the pathological hallmarks ofAD (neurofibrillary tangles [NFT] and amyloid plaques) and perturbed cellular calcium homeostasis have been established in studies of patients, and in animal and cell culture models of AD. Studies of the effects of mutations in the beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilins on neuronal plasticity and survival have provided insight into the molecular cascades that result in synaptic dysfunction and neuronal degeneration in AD. Central to the neurodegenerative process is the inability of neurons to properly regulate intracellular calcium levels. Increased levels of amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) induce oxidative stress, which impairs cellular ion homeostasis and energy metabolism and renders neurons vulnerable to apoptosis and excitotoxicity. Subtoxic levels of Abeta may induce synaptic dysfunction by impairing multiple signal transduction pathways. Presenilin mutations perturb calcium homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum in a way that sensitizes neurons to apoptosis and excitotoxicity; links between aberrant calcium regulation and altered APP processing are emerging. Environmental risk factors for AD are being identified and may include high calorie diets, folic acid insufficiency, and a low level of intellectual activity (bad habits); in each case, the environmental factor impacts on neuronal calcium homeostasis. Low calorie diets and intellectual activity may guard against AD by stimulating production of neurotrophic factors and chaperone proteins. The emerging picture of the cell and molecular biology of AD is revealing novel preventative and therapeutic

  12. Effects of thyroid hormones on calcium contents and 45Ca exchange in rat skeletal muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everts, M.E.; Clausen, T.

    1986-09-01

    In 4-wk-old rats, pretreatment with L-triiodothyronine (T3) increased calcium content by 100% and the 30-min /sup 45/Ca uptake by 64% in the soleus, whereas the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle showed no significant change. The stimulation of /sup 45/Ca uptake was resistant to dantrolene and methoxyverapamil (D600) and could not be attributed to altered permeability of the plasma membrane to calcium, but appears to reflect increased net accumulation of calcium in intracellular pools. The stimulating effect of high K0 (20 mM) on /sup 45/Ca uptake was more pronounced in soleus than in EDL and could be suppressed by dantrolene and D600. The results indicate that the effects of T3 on calcium content and /sup 45/Ca exchange are primarily exerted on muscles containing a large proportion of slow-twitch, oxidative fibers. In soleus muscle from hyperthyroid rats the stimulating effects of high K0 on /sup 45/Ca uptake and lactate production were, respectively, 3.4 and 4.5 times larger than in those obtained from controls. These observations further support the earlier proposed idea (C. van Hardeveld and T. Clausen. Am. J. Physiol. 247 (Endocrinol. Metab. 10): E421-E430, 1984) that the metabolic effects of thyroid hormone depend on the availability of cellular as well as extracellular calcium.

  13. Low temperature pyrolysis of coal or oil shale in the presence of calcium compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. Rashid

    1988-01-01

    A coal pyrolysis technique or process is described in which particulate coal is pyrolyzed in the presence of about 5 to 21 wt. % of a calcium compound selected from calcium oxide, calcined (hydrate) dolomite, or calcined calcium hydrate to produce a high quality hydrocarbon liquid and a combustible product gas which are characterized by low sulfur content. The pyrolysis is achieved by heating the coal-calcium compound mixture at a relatively slow rate at a temperature of about 450.degree. to 700.degree. C. over a duration of about 10 to 60 minutes in a fixed or moving bed reactor. The gas exhibits an increased yield in hydrogen and C.sub.1 -C.sub.8 hydrocarbons and a reduction in H.sub.2 S over gas obtainable by pyrolyzing cola without the calcium compound. The liquid product obtained is of a sufficient quality to permit its use directly as a fuel and has a reduced sulfur and oxygen content which inhibits polymerization during storage.

  14. Relationship of calcium absorption with 25(OH)D and calcium intake in children with rickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacher, Tom D; Abrams, Steven A

    2010-11-01

    Nutritional rickets has long been considered a disease caused by vitamin D deficiency, but recent data indicate that inadequate dietary calcium intake is an important cause of rickets, particularly in tropical countries. Children with rickets due to calcium deficiency do not have very low 25(OH)D concentrations, and serum 1,25(OH)(2) D values are markedly elevated. Studies of Nigerian children with rickets demonstrated they have high fractional calcium absorption. A high-phytate diet was demonstrated to increase calcium absorption compared with the fasting state, and enzymatic dephytinization did not significantly improve calcium absorption. When given vitamin D, children with rickets have a marked increase in 1,25(OH)(2) D concentrations without any change in fractional calcium absorption. No positive relationship was found between fractional calcium absorption and serum 25(OH)D concentrations in children on low-calcium diets. More research is needed to understand the interaction between calcium and vitamin D and the role of vitamin D in calcium absorption. © 2010 International Life Sciences Institute.

  15. Calcium phosphate scaffold from biogenic calcium carbonate by fast ambient condition reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Abhishek; Fermani, Simona; Arjun Tekalur, Srinivasan; Vanderberg, Abigail; Falini, Giuseppe

    2011-12-01

    Calcium phosphate biogenic materials are biocompatible and promote bioactivity and osteoconductivity, which implies their natural affinity and tendency to bond directly to bones subsequently replacing the host bone after implantation owing to its biodegradability. Calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate, CaHPO 4·2H 2O, is known to be a nucleation precursor, in aqueous solutions, for apatitic calcium phosphates and, hence, a potential starting material for bone substitutes. Numerous approaches, via hydrothermal and ambient synthetic routes, have been used to produce calcium phosphate from biogenic calcium carbonate, taking advantage of the peculiar architecture and composition of the latter. In this article, the lamellar region of the cuttlefish bone ( Sepia officinalis) was used as a framework for the organized deposition of calcium phosphate crystals, at ambient conditions via a fast procedure involving an amorphous calcium carbonate intermediate, and ending with a conversion to calcium phosphate and a fixation procedure, thereby resulting in direct conversion of biogenic calcium carbonate into calcium phosphates at ambient conditions from the scale of months to hours.

  16. Transgenic plants with increased calcium stores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Sarah (Inventor); Tsou, Pei-Lan (Inventor); Robertson, Dominique (Inventor); Boss, Wendy (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention provides transgenic plants over-expressing a transgene encoding a calcium-binding protein or peptide (CaBP). Preferably, the CaBP is a calcium storage protein and over-expression thereof does not have undue adverse effects on calcium homeostasis or biochemical pathways that are regulated by calcium. In preferred embodiments, the CaBP is calreticulin (CRT) or calsequestrin. In more preferred embodiments, the CaBP is the C-domain of CRT, a fragment of the C-domain, or multimers of the foregoing. In other preferred embodiments, the CaBP is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum by operatively associating the transgene encoding the CaBP with an endoplasmic reticulum localization peptide. Alternatively, the CaBP is targeted to any other sub-cellular compartment that permits the calcium to be stored in a form that is biologically available to the plant. Also provided are methods of producing plants with desirable phenotypic traits by transformation of the plant with a transgene encoding a CaBP. Such phenotypic traits include increased calcium storage, enhanced resistance to calcium-limiting conditions, enhanced growth and viability, increased disease and stress resistance, enhanced flower and fruit production, reduced senescence, and a decreased need for fertilizer production. Further provided are plants with enhanced nutritional value as human food or animal feed.

  17. In vitro antioxidant properties of calcium dobesilate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, J; Farine, J C; Garay, R P; Hannaert, P

    1998-01-01

    Calcium dobesilate, a vascular protective agent, was tested in vitro for its scavenging action against oxygen free radicals. Calcium dobesilate was as potent as rutin to scavenge hydroxyl radicals (IC50 = 1.1 vs 0.7 microM, respectively). It was also able to scavenge superoxide radicals, but with 23 times less potency than rutin (IC50 = 682 vs 30 microM, respectively). Calcium dobesilate significantly reduced platelet activating factor (PAF)-induced chemiluminescence in human PMN cells and lipid peroxidation by oxygen free radicals in human erythrocyte membranes, although these actions required calcium dobesilate concentrations > or = 50 microM. Finally, in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells, magnesium dobesilate reduced the increase in cytosolic free calcium induced by hydrogen peroxide and inhibited phenazine methosulfate-induced cell potassium loss. In conclusion, calcium dobesilate was effective in scavenging hydroxyl radicals in vitro, at therapeutically relevant concentrations. Conversely, higher concentrations of the compound were required to scavenge superoxide radicals or to protect the cells against the deleterious effects of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Further studies in vivo are required to determine if these antioxidant properties of calcium dobesilate can play a role in its vascular protective mechanisms.

  18. Intracellular sphingosine releases calcium from lysosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglinger, Doris; Haberkant, Per; Aguilera-Romero, Auxiliadora; Riezman, Howard; Porter, Forbes D; Platt, Frances M; Galione, Antony; Schultz, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate new functions of sphingosine (Sph), we demonstrate that the spontaneous elevation of intracellular Sph levels via caged Sph leads to a significant and transient calcium release from acidic stores that is independent of sphingosine 1-phosphate, extracellular and ER calcium levels. This photo-induced Sph-driven calcium release requires the two-pore channel 1 (TPC1) residing on endosomes and lysosomes. Further, uncaging of Sph leads to the translocation of the autophagy-relevant transcription factor EB (TFEB) to the nucleus specifically after lysosomal calcium release. We confirm that Sph accumulates in late endosomes and lysosomes of cells derived from Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) patients and demonstrate a greatly reduced calcium release upon Sph uncaging. We conclude that sphingosine is a positive regulator of calcium release from acidic stores and that understanding the interplay between Sph homeostasis, calcium signaling and autophagy will be crucial in developing new therapies for lipid storage disorders such as NPC. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10616.001 PMID:26613410

  19. Calcium content of different compositions of gallstones and pathogenesis of calcium carbonate gallstones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ji-Kuen; Pan, Huichin; Huang, Shing-Moo; Huang, Nan-Lan; Yao, Chung-Chin; Hsiao, Kuang-Ming; Wu, Chew-Wun

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the calcium content of different gallstone compositions and the pathogenic mechanisms of calcium carbonate gallstones. Between August 2001 and July 2007, gallstones from 481 patients, including 68 calcium carbonate gallstones, were analyzed for total calcium content. Gallbladder bile samples from 33 cases and six controls were analyzed for pH, carbonate anion level, free-ionized calcium concentration and saturation index for calcium carbonate. Total calcium content averaged 75.6 %, 11.8 %, and 4.2 % for calcium carbonate, calcium bilirubinate and cholesterol gallstones. In 29.4 % of patients, chronic and/or intermittent cystic duct obstructions were caused by polypoid lesions in the neck region and 70.6 % were caused by stones. A total of 82 % of patients had chronic low-grade inflammation of the gallbladder wall and 18.0 % had acute inflammatory exacerbations. In the bile, we found the mean pH, mean carbonate anion, free-ionized calcium concentrations, and mean saturation index for calcium carbonate to be elevated in comparison to controls. From our study, we found chronic and/or intermittent cystic duct obstructions and low-grade GB wall inflammation lead to GB epithelium hydrogen secretion dysfunction. Increased calcium ion efflux into the GB lumen combined with increased carbonate anion presence increases SI_CaCO(3) from 1 to 22.4. Thus, in an alkaline milieu with pH 7.8, calcium carbonate begins to aggregate and precipitate. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Effect of calcium intake on urinary oxalate excretion in calcium stone-forming patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishiura J.L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Dietary calcium lowers the risk of nephrolithiasis due to a decreased absorption of dietary oxalate that is bound by intestinal calcium. The aim of the present study was to evaluate oxaluria in normocalciuric and hypercalciuric lithiasic patients under different calcium intake. Fifty patients (26 females and 24 males, 41 ± 10 years old, whose 4-day dietary records revealed a regular low calcium intake (<=500 mg/day, received an oral calcium load (1 g/day for 7 days. A 24-h urine was obtained before and after load and according to the calciuria under both diets, patients were considered as normocalciuric (NC, N = 15, diet-dependent hypercalciuric (DDHC, N = 9 or diet-independent hypercalciuric (DIHC, N = 26. On regular diet, mean oxaluria was 30 ± 14 mg/24 h for all patients. The 7-day calcium load induced a significant decrease in mean oxaluria compared to the regular diet in NC and DIHC (20 ± 12 vs 26 ± 7 and 27 ± 18 vs 32 ± 15 mg/24 h, respectively, P<0.05 but not in DDHC patients (22 ± 10 vs 23 ± 5 mg/24 h. The lack of an oxalate decrease among DDHC patients after the calcium load might have been due to higher calcium absorption under higher calcium supply, with a consequent lower amount of calcium left in the intestine to bind with oxalate. These data suggest that a long-lasting regular calcium consumption <500 mg was not associated with high oxaluria and that a subpopulation of hypercalciuric patients who presented a higher intestinal calcium absorption (DDHC tended to hyperabsorb oxalate as well, so that oxaluria did not change under different calcium intake.

  1. Recruited renin-containing renal microvascular cells demonstrate the calcium paradox regulatory phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacGriff S

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spencer MacGriff,1 Richard E Woo,1 M Cecilia Ortiz-Capisano,1 Douglas K Atchison,1,2 William H Beierwaltes1,2 1Department of Internal Medicine, Hypertension and Vascular Research Division, Henry Ford Hospital, 2Department of Physiology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA Abstract: Renin is the critical regulatory enzyme for production of angiotensin (Ang-II, a potent vasoconstrictor involved in regulating blood pressure and in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Chronic sodium deprivation enhances renin secretion from the kidney, due to recruitment of additional cells from the afferent renal microvasculature to become renin-producing rather than just increasing release from existing juxtaglomerular (JG cells. JG cells secrete renin inversely proportional to extra- and intracellular calcium, a unique phenomenon characteristic of the JG regulatory phenotype known as the “calcium paradox.” It is not known if renin secreted from recruited renin-containing cells is regulated similarly to native JG cells, and therefore acquires this JG cell phenotype. We hypothesized that non-JG cells in renal microvessels recruited to produce renin in response to chronic dietary sodium restriction would demonstrate the calcium paradox, characteristic of the JG cell phenotype. Histology showed recruitment of upstream arteriolar renin in response to sodium restriction compared to normal-diet rats. Renin fluorescence intensity increased 53% in cortices of sodium-restricted rats (P<0.001. We measured renin release from rat afferent microvessels, isolated using iron oxide nanopowder and incubated in either normal or low-calcium media. Basal renin release from normal sodium-diet rat microvessels in normal calcium media was 298.1±44.6 ng AngI/mL/hour/mg protein, and in low-calcium media increased 39% to 415.9±71.4 ng AngI/mL/hour/mg protein (P<0.025. Renin released from sodium-restricted rat microvessels increased 50% compared to samples from

  2. Tribological and Antioxidation Synergistic Effect Study of Sulfonate-Modified Nano Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhongyi, He; Liping, Xiong; Sheng, Han; Aixi, Chen; Jianwei, Qiu; Xisheng, Fu

    2013-01-01

    A middle base number sulphonate-modified nano calcium carbonate (SMC) with an average size of 35 nm was synthesized, and its tribological and antioxidation synergistic behaviors with ashless antioxidant N-phenyl-α-naphthylamine (T531) in hydrogenated oil (5Cst) were evaluated. The results demonstrate that adding this synethesized additive even at a low amount (chemical composition of the rubbing surface which formed on the boundary film was analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicating that the excellent antiwear and load-carrying performance could be attributed to the forming of boundary lubrication film which composed of calcium carbonate, oxides, ferrites, sulphide and FeSO4, and so on. Its ability to increase oxidation free energy of base oil is the main reason for increasing its antioxidant collaboration property with ashless antioxidant T531. PMID:23658705

  3. c Effec control prim cts of c lling sh mocan calcium hoot n ne-fruit m ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    explants. These problems are partly caused by oxidation of polyphenols which are abundant in raspberry. (Mederos-Molina and Trujillo, 1999) and/or by calcium deficiency that occurs during shoot initiation of culture. (Abousalim and Mantell, 1994). Other reasons of shoot necrosis during micropropagation include drop of ...

  4. Nuclear Calcium Buffering Capacity Shapes Neuronal Architecture*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauceri, Daniela; Hagenston, Anna M.; Schramm, Kathrin; Weiss, Ursula; Bading, Hilmar

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) such as parvalbumin are part of the cellular calcium buffering system that determines intracellular calcium diffusion and influences the spatiotemporal dynamics of calcium signals. In neurons, CaBPs are primarily localized to the cytosol and function, for example, in nerve terminals in short-term synaptic plasticity. However, CaBPs are also expressed in the cell nucleus, suggesting that they modulate nuclear calcium signals, which are key regulators of neuronal gene expression. Here we show that the calcium buffering capacity of the cell nucleus in mouse hippocampal neurons regulates neuronal architecture by modulating the expression levels of VEGFD and the complement factor C1q-c, two nuclear calcium-regulated genes that control dendrite geometry and spine density, respectively. Increasing the levels of nuclear calcium buffers by means of expression of a nuclearly targeted form of parvalbumin fused to mCherry (PV.NLS-mC) led to a reduction in VEGFD expression and, as a result, to a decrease in total dendritic length and complexity. In contrast, mRNA levels of the synapse pruning factor C1q-c were increased in neurons expressing PV.NLS-mC, causing a reduction in the density and size of dendritic spines. Our results establish a close link between nuclear calcium buffering capacity and the transcription of genes that determine neuronal structure. They suggest that the development of cognitive deficits observed in neurological conditions associated with CaBP deregulation may reflect the loss of necessary structural features of dendrites and spines. PMID:26231212

  5. Protein-Mediated Precipitation of Calcium Carbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Polowczyk

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Calcium carbonate is an important component in exoskeletons of many organisms. The synthesis of calcium carbonate was performed by mixing dimethyl carbonate and an aqueous solution of calcium chloride dihydrate. The precipitation product was characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR measurements. In addition, the turbidity of the reaction solution was acquired to monitor the kinetics of the calcium carbonate structure’s growth in the investigated system. In this study, samples of CaCO3 particles obtained with individual proteins, such as ovalbumin, lysozyme, and a mixture of the proteins, were characterized and compared with a control sample, i.e., synthesized without proteins. The obtained data indicated that the addition of ovalbumin to the reaction changed the morphology of crystals from rhombohedral to ‘stack-like’ structures. Lysozyme, however, did not affect the morphology of calcium carbonate, yet the presence of the protein mixture led to the creation of more complex composites in which the calcium carbonate crystals were constructed in protein matrices formed by the ovalbumin-lysozyme interaction. It was also observed that in the protein mixture, ovalbumin has a major influence on the CaCO3 formation through a strong interaction with calcium ions, which leads to the coalescence and creation of a steric barrier reducing particle growth. The authors proposed a mechanism of calcium carbonate grain growth in the presence of both proteins, taking into account the interaction of calcium ions with the protein.

  6. Protein-Mediated Precipitation of Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polowczyk, Izabela; Bastrzyk, Anna; Fiedot, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carbonate is an important component in exoskeletons of many organisms. The synthesis of calcium carbonate was performed by mixing dimethyl carbonate and an aqueous solution of calcium chloride dihydrate. The precipitation product was characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements. In addition, the turbidity of the reaction solution was acquired to monitor the kinetics of the calcium carbonate structure’s growth in the investigated system. In this study, samples of CaCO3 particles obtained with individual proteins, such as ovalbumin, lysozyme, and a mixture of the proteins, were characterized and compared with a control sample, i.e., synthesized without proteins. The obtained data indicated that the addition of ovalbumin to the reaction changed the morphology of crystals from rhombohedral to ‘stack-like’ structures. Lysozyme, however, did not affect the morphology of calcium carbonate, yet the presence of the protein mixture led to the creation of more complex composites in which the calcium carbonate crystals were constructed in protein matrices formed by the ovalbumin-lysozyme interaction. It was also observed that in the protein mixture, ovalbumin has a major influence on the CaCO3 formation through a strong interaction with calcium ions, which leads to the coalescence and creation of a steric barrier reducing particle growth. The authors proposed a mechanism of calcium carbonate grain growth in the presence of both proteins, taking into account the interaction of calcium ions with the protein. PMID:28774065

  7. Histopathological and histomicrobiological study of root canal therapy medication, comparison of calcium hydroxide versus gutta-percha with zinc oxide/eugenol in the teeth of dogs Avaliação histopatológica e histomicrobiológica de dentes de cães, após tratamento endodôntico com hidróxido de cálcio e guta-percha com óxido de zinco e eugenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Léslie M. Domingues-Falqueiro

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The presence of microorganisms in dental structures with experimentally induced necrosis was evaluated. The materials were tested to evaluate their antimicrobial activity and tissue repair efficacy. Four dogs were used in this experiment, with a total of 64 roots of premolar teeth, divided into three groups. The root canals of Group I were filled with gutta-percha and zinc oxide/eugenol cement; Group II were filled with calcium hydroxide, and Group III were not filled. All animals were clinically and radiographically examined 15 days after surgery andthen again every subsequent 15 days until 120 days, when the teeth were extracted en bloc.Histopathological analysis showed inflammatory infiltration, cement and bone resorption andnecrotic tissue in the apical delta in different proportions. Histomicrobiological analysis showedthe presence of microorganisms inside the teeth structures, with different concentrationsaccording to the treatment used. There was statistical significance between the groups(p>0.05. Gutta-percha with zinc oxide/eugenol demonstrated good antimicrobial activity;calcium hydroxide was not efficient. The conclusion of this study is that gutta-percha withzinc oxide/eugenol is the better protocol for filling root canals in dogs.Avaliou-se a presença de microrganismos nas estruturas dentais com necrose pulpar induzida experimentalmente, testando a eficácia de materiais com relação à atividade antibacteriana e influência no reparo tecidual. Utilizaram-se quatro cães, totalizando 64 raízes, provenientes de pré-molares, divididas em grupos. O Grupo I foi obturado com guta percha e cimento à base de óxido de zinco e eugenol, o Grupo II, com hidróxido de cálcio e o Grupo III, não foram obturados. Todos tiveram controle clínico e radiográfico quinzenal e após 120 dias, foram extraídos em bloco para análises. A histopatologia evidenciou infiltrado inflamatório, reabsorção cementária e óssea e tecido necrótico no

  8. Calcium Signaling Is Required for Erythroid Enucleation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina B Wölwer

    Full Text Available Although erythroid enucleation, the property of erythroblasts to expel their nucleus, has been known for 7ore than a century, surprisingly little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms governing this unique developmental process. Here we show that similar to cytokinesis, nuclear extrusion requires intracellular calcium signaling and signal transduction through the calmodulin (CaM pathway. However, in contrast to cytokinesis we found that orthochromatic erythroblasts require uptake of extracellular calcium to enucleate. Together these functional studies highlight a critical role for calcium signaling in the regulation of erythroid enucleation.

  9. Coronary artery calcium score: current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Priscilla Ornellas; Andrade, Joalbo; Monção, Henry

    2017-01-01

    The coronary artery calcium score plays an Important role In cardiovascular risk stratification, showing a significant association with the medium- or long-term occurrence of major cardiovascular events. Here, we discuss the following: protocols for the acquisition and quantification of the coronary artery calcium score by multidetector computed tomography; the role of the coronary artery calcium score in coronary risk stratification and its comparison with other clinical scores; its indications, interpretation, and prognosis in asymptomatic patients; and its use in patients who are symptomatic or have diabetes. PMID:28670030

  10. Sulfur Cycling Mediates Calcium Carbonate Geochemistry in Modern Marine Stromatolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visscher, P. T.; Hoeft, S. E.; Bebout, B. M.; Reid, R. P.

    2004-01-01

    Modem marine stromatolites forming in Highborne Cay, Exumas (Bahamas), contain microbial mats dominated by Schizothrix. Although saturating concentrations of Ca2+ and CO32- exist, microbes mediate CaCO3 precipitation. Cyanobacterial photosynthesis in these stromatolites aids calcium carbonate precipitation by removal of HS+ through CO2 use. Photorespiration and exopolymer production predominantly by oxygenic phototrophs fuel heterotrophic activity: aerobic respiration (approximately 60 umol/sq cm.h) and sulfate reduction (SR; 1.2 umol SO42-/sq cm.h) are the dominant C- consuming processes. Aerobic microbial respiration and the combination of SR and H2S oxidation both facilitate CaCO3 dissolution through H+ production. Aerobic respiration consumes much more C on an hourly basis, but duel fluctuating O2 and H2 depth profiles indicate that overall, SR consumes only slightly less (0.2-0.5) of the primary production. Moreover, due to low O2 concentrations when SR rates are peaking, reoxidation of the H2S formed is incomplete: both thiosulfate and polythionates are formed. The process of complete H2S oxidation yields H+. However, due to a low O2 concentration late in the day and relatively high O2 concentrations early in the following morning, a two-stage oxidation takes place: first, polythionates are formed from H2S, creating alkalinity which coincides with CaCO3 precipitation; secondly, oxidation of polythionates to sulfate yields acidity, resulting in dissolution, etc. Vertical profiles confirmed that the pH peaked late in the afternoon (greater than 8.8) and had the lowest values (less than 7.4) early in the morning. Thus, the effect of this S-cycling through alkalinity production, followed by acidification during H2S oxidation, results in a six times stronger fluctuation in acidity than photosynthesis plus aerobic respiration accomplish. This implies that anaerobic processes play a pivotal role in stromatolite formation.

  11. Structures of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases reveal mechanism of activation by calcium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wernimont, Amy K; Artz, Jennifer D.; Jr, Patrick Finerty; Lin, Yu-Hui; Amani, Mehrnaz; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Senisterra, Guillermo; Vedadi, Masoud; Tempel, Wolfram; Mackenzie, Farrell; Chau, Irene; Lourido, Sebastian; Sibley, L. David; Hui, Raymond (Toronto); (WU-MED)

    2010-09-21

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) have pivotal roles in the calcium-signaling pathway in plants, ciliates and apicomplexan parasites and comprise a calmodulin-dependent kinase (CaMK)-like kinase domain regulated by a calcium-binding domain in the C terminus. To understand this intramolecular mechanism of activation, we solved the structures of the autoinhibited (apo) and activated (calcium-bound) conformations of CDPKs from the apicomplexan parasites Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. In the apo form, the C-terminal CDPK activation domain (CAD) resembles a calmodulin protein with an unexpected long helix in the N terminus that inhibits the kinase domain in the same manner as CaMKII. Calcium binding triggers the reorganization of the CAD into a highly intricate fold, leading to its relocation around the base of the kinase domain to a site remote from the substrate binding site. This large conformational change constitutes a distinct mechanism in calcium signal-transduction pathways.

  12. Nanoporous Calcium Silicate and PLGA Biocomposite for Bone Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiacan Su

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoporous calcium silicate (n-CS with high surface area was synthesized using the mixed surfactants of EO20PO70EO20 (polyethylene oxide20(polypropylene oxide70(polyethylene oxide20, P123 and hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB as templates, and its composite with poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid (PLGA were fabricated. The results showed that the n-CS/PLGA composite (n-CPC with 20 wt% n-CS could induce a dense and continuous layer of apatite on its surface after soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF for 1 week, suggesting the excellent in vitro bioactivity. The n-CPC could promote cell attachment on its surfaces. In addition, the proliferation ratio of MG63 cells on n-CPC was significantly higher than PLGA; the results demonstrated that n-CPC had excellent cytocompatibility. We prepared n-CPC scaffolds that contained open and interconnected macropores ranging in size from 200 to 500 μm. The n-CPC scaffolds were implanted in femur bone defect of rabbits, and the in vivo biocompatibility and osteogenicity of the scaffolds were investigated. The results indicated that n-CPC scaffolds exhibited good biocompatibility, degradability, and osteogenesis in vivo. Collectively, these results suggested that the incorporation of n-CS in PLGA produced biocomposites with improved bioactivity and biocompatibility.

  13. Pre-treatment with calcium prevents endothelial cell activation induced by multiple activators, necrotic trophoblastic debris or IL-6 or preeclamptic sera: possible relevance to the pathogenesis of preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q; Zhang, Y; Tong, M; Wu, M; Snowise, S; Stone, P; Chamley, L W

    2013-12-01

    A hallmark of preeclampsia is endothelial cell dysfunction/activation in response to "toxins" from the placenta. Necrotic trophoblastic debris (NTD) is one possible placental toxin and others include inflammatory cytokines. Calcium supplementation appears to protect "at-risk" women from developing preeclampsia by an unknown mechanism. In this study we investigate whether the addition of high levels of calcium to endothelial cells prior to their exposure to the preeclampsia-associated activators could reduce the endothelial cell activation. NTD was harvested from 1st trimester placental explants. Endothelial cells were treated with varied concentrations of calcium prior to exposure to NTD, IL-6 or preeclamptic sera or low levels of calcium. Activation was monitored by quantifying endothelial cell-surface ICAM-1 by ELISA or U937 adhesion to endothelial cells. The activity of endothelial cell nitric oxide synthetase was blocked with L-NAME. Pre-treatment with increasing concentrations of calcium inhibited the activation of endothelial cells in response to NTD or IL-6 or preeclamptic sera. Inhibiting nitric oxide synthetase, using L-NAME, reduced the ability of high calcium levels to protect endothelial cell activation. Pre-treatment with calcium did not prevent endothelial cell activation induced by the reduction of the levels of calcium but additional calcium treatment did prevent endothelial cell activation induced by low calcium. Our results demonstrate calcium supplementation may prevent the activation of the endothelium in response to activators. These results may partially explain the benefits of calcium supplementation in the reduction of risk for developing preeclampsia and provide in vitro mechanistic support for the use of calcium supplementation in at-risk women. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Calcium absorption from fortified ice cream formulations compared with calcium absorption from milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hee, Regine M; Miret, Silvia; Slettenaar, Marieke; Duchateau, Guus S M J E; Rietveld, Anton G; Wilkinson, Joy E; Quail, Patricia J; Berry, Mark J; Dainty, Jack R; Teucher, Birgit; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2009-05-01

    Optimal bone mass in early adulthood is achieved through appropriate diet and lifestyle, thereby protecting against osteoporosis and risk of bone fracture in later life. Calcium and vitamin D are essential to build adequate bones, but calcium intakes of many population groups do not meet dietary reference values. In addition, changes in dietary patterns are exacerbating the problem, thereby emphasizing the important role of calcium-rich food products. We have designed a calcium-fortified ice cream formulation that is lower in fat than regular ice cream and could provide a useful source of additional dietary calcium. Calcium absorption from two different ice cream formulations was determined in young adults and compared with milk. Sixteen healthy volunteers (25 to 45 years of age), recruited from the general public of The Netherlands, participated in a randomized, reference-controlled, double-blind cross-over study in which two test products and milk were consumed with a light standard breakfast on three separate occasions: a standard portion of ice cream (60 g) fortified with milk minerals and containing a low level (3%) of butter fat, ice cream (60 g) fortified with milk minerals and containing a typical level (9%) of coconut oil, and reduced-fat milk (1.7% milk fat) (200 mL). Calcium absorption was measured by the dual-label stable isotope technique. Effects on calcium absorption were evaluated by analysis of variance. Fractional absorption of calcium from the 3% butterfat ice cream, 9% coconut oil ice cream, and milk was 26%+/-8%, 28%+/-5%, and 31%+/-9%, respectively, and did not differ significantly (P=0.159). Results indicate that calcium bioavailability in the two calcium-fortified ice cream formulations used in this study is as high as milk, indicating that ice cream may be a good vehicle for delivery of calcium.

  15. Diverse effects of calcium antagonists on glomerular hemodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arima, S; Ito, S; Omata, K; Tsunoda, K; Yaoita, H; Abe, K

    1996-06-01

    This study examined the direct effects of calcium antagonists on glomerular hemodynamics. Rabbit afferent (Af-) or efferent arterioles (Ef-Arts) were microperfused in vitro at constant pressure. Ef-Arts were perfused from the distal end of Af-Art through the glomerulus. Increasing doses (10(-10) to 10(-7) M) of nifedipine (Nif), nicardipine (Nic) or manidipine (Man) were added into the lumen of Af- or Ef-Arts preconstricted (by about 40%) with norepinephrine. Although Nif and Nic dilated Af-Arts in a dose-dependent manner, they did not cause any dilation in Ef-Arts. In contrast, Man dilated both Af- and Ef-Arts in a dose dependent manner; Man at 10(-7) M dilated Af- and Ef-Arts by 71 +/- 12% (N = 7) and 38 +/- 3% (N = 6), respectively. Although Man's dilator effect on Ef-Art was not affected by inhibiting nitric oxide (NO) synthesis (N = 6), it was markedly attenuated by eliminating the influence of glomerulus (14 +/- 3% by Man at 10(-7) M, N = 5). These results demonstrate that in addition to dilating Af-Art, Man, but not Nif or Nic, dilates Ef-Art through a glomerulus-derived vasodilator(s) other than NO. Such diverse actions should be taken into consideration when calcium antagonists are used in the treatment of patients with cardiovascular and renal diseases.

  16. Effects of Adding Chymosin to Milk on Calcium Homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ulla Kristine; Jensen, Lars Thorbjørn; Mosekilde, Leif

    2014-01-01

    either chymosin or similar placebo was added. Compared with placebo, chymosin did not affect 24-h urinary calcium, calcium/creatinine ratio, plasma parathyroid hormone, calcitonin or ionized calcium levels. However, during the first 4 h after intake of milk with chymosin, urinary calcium-creatinine ratio...

  17. Does calcium constrain reproductive activity in insectivorous bats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Insects are a poor source of dietary calcium and since they are seasonally abundant, it has been suggested that calcium availability may play a significant role in controlling the timing of reproduction in insectivorous bats. To assess the possible role of dietary calcium, we have measured bone calcium concentrations in ...

  18. Model of intracellular calcium cycling in ventricular myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiferaw, Y; Watanabe, M A; Garfinkel, A; Weiss, J N; Karma, A

    2003-12-01

    We present a mathematical model of calcium cycling that takes into account the spatially localized nature of release events that correspond to experimentally observed calcium sparks. This model naturally incorporates graded release by making the rate at which calcium sparks are recruited proportional to the whole cell L-type calcium current, with the total release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) being just the sum of local releases. The dynamics of calcium cycling is studied by pacing the model with a clamped action potential waveform. Experimentally observed calcium alternans are obtained at high pacing rates. The results show that the underlying mechanism for this phenomenon is a steep nonlinear dependence of the calcium released from the SR on the diastolic SR calcium concentration (SR load) and/or the diastolic calcium level in the cytosol, where the dependence on diastolic calcium is due to calcium-induced inactivation of the L-type calcium current. In addition, the results reveal that the calcium dynamics can become chaotic even though the voltage pacing is periodic. We reduce the equations of the model to a two-dimensional discrete map that relates the SR and cytosolic concentrations at one beat and the previous beat. From this map, we obtain a condition for the onset of calcium alternans in terms of the slopes of the release-versus-SR load and release-versus-diastolic-calcium curves. From an analysis of this map, we also obtain an understanding of the origin of chaotic dynamics.

  19. Vitamin D with calcium reduces mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rejnmark, Lars; Avenell, Alison; Masud, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    Introduction:Vitamin D may affect multiple health outcomes. If so, an effect on mortality is to be expected. Using pooled data from randomized controlled trials, we performed individual patient data (IPD) and trial level meta-analyses to assess mortality among participants randomized to either...... calcium (odds ratio, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.88-0.99), but not with vitamin D alone (odds ratio, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.91-1.06).Conclusion:Vitamin D with calcium reduces mortality in the elderly, whereas available data do not support an effect of vitamin D alone....... vitamin D alone or vitamin D with calcium.Subjects and Methods:Through a systematic literature search, we identified 24 randomized controlled trials reporting data on mortality in which vitamin D was given either alone or with calcium. From a total of 13 trials with more than 1000 participants each, eight...

  20. Calcium Signaling and Cardiac Arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landstrom, Andrew P; Dobrev, Dobromir; Wehrens, Xander H T

    2017-06-09

    There has been a significant progress in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which calcium (Ca2+) ions mediate various types of cardiac arrhythmias. A growing list of inherited gene defects can cause potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmia syndromes, including catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, congenital long QT syndrome, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. In addition, acquired deficits of multiple Ca2+-handling proteins can contribute to the pathogenesis of arrhythmias in patients with various types of heart disease. In this review article, we will first review the key role of Ca2+ in normal cardiac function-in particular, excitation-contraction coupling and normal electric rhythms. The functional involvement of Ca2+ in distinct arrhythmia mechanisms will be discussed, followed by various inherited arrhythmia syndromes caused by mutations in Ca2+-handling proteins. Finally, we will discuss how changes in the expression of regulation of Ca2+ channels and transporters can cause acquired arrhythmias, and how these mechanisms might be targeted for therapeutic purposes. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Morphological Investigation of Calcium Carbonate during Ammonification-Carbonization Process of Low Concentration Calcium Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaigang Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafine calcium carbonate is a widely used cheap additive. The research is conducted in low degree supersaturation solution in order to study the polymorphic phases’ change and its factors of the calcium carbonate precipitate in the ammonification-carbonization process of the solution with calcium. Fine particles of calcium carbonate are made in the solution containing 0.015 mol/L of Ca2+. Over 98% of the calcium carbonate precipitate without ammonification resembles the morphology of calcite, while the introduction of ammonia can benefit the formation of vaterite. It was inferred that the main cause should be serious partial oversaturation or steric effects. Ammonia also helps to form the twin spherical calcium carbonate. However, particles formed in the process of ammonification-carbonization in solution with low concentration degree of calcium are not even with a scale of the particle diameter from 5 to 12 μm. Inorganic salts, alcohol, or organic acid salts have significant controlling effect on the particle diameter of calcium carbonate and can help to decrease the particle diameter to about 3 μm. Anionic surfactants can prevent the conglobation of calcium carbonate particles and shrink its diameter to 500 nm–1 μm.

  2. Calcium-induced calcium release supports recruitment of synaptic vesicles in auditory hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano-Muñoz, Manuel; Schnee, Michael E; Ricci, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    Hair cells from auditory and vestibular systems transmit continuous sound and balance information to the central nervous system through the release of synaptic vesicles at ribbon synapses. The high activity experienced by hair cells requires a unique mechanism to sustain recruitment and replenishment of synaptic vesicles for continuous release. Using pre- and postsynaptic electrophysiological recordings, we explored the potential contribution of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) in modulating the recruitment of vesicles to auditory hair cell ribbon synapses. Pharmacological manipulation of CICR with agents targeting endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores reduced both spontaneous postsynaptic multiunit activity and the frequency of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). Pharmacological treatments had no effect on hair cell resting potential or activation curves for calcium and potassium channels. However, these drugs exerted a reduction in vesicle release measured by dual-sine capacitance methods. In addition, calcium substitution by barium reduced release efficacy by delaying release onset and diminishing vesicle recruitment. Together these results demonstrate a role for calcium stores in hair cell ribbon synaptic transmission and suggest a novel contribution of CICR in hair cell vesicle recruitment. We hypothesize that calcium entry via calcium channels is tightly regulated to control timing of vesicle fusion at the synapse, whereas CICR is used to maintain a tonic calcium signal to modulate vesicle trafficking. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Polysulfide promotes neuroblastoma cell differentiation by accelerating calcium influx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Shin; Shibuya, Norihiro; Kimura, Hideo; Ishii, Kazuyuki; Ogasawara, Yuki

    2015-04-10

    Polysulfides are a typical type of bound sulfur, which is physiologically stable form of sulfur species, derived from the hydrogen sulfide (H2S) that is generated endogenously in cells. We previously reported that bound sulfur protects neuronal cells from oxidative injury. In the present study, we demonstrated that polysulfides inhibited cell growth and promoted neurite outgrowth in mouse neuroblastoma Neuro2A (N2A) cells. However, Na2S showed no effect on neurite outgrowth in N2A cells. Furthermore, 2-APB and SKF96365, which are typical transient receptor potential (TRP) channel inhibitors, suppressed the neurite outgrowth induced by Na2S4. These new findings suggest that bound sulfur could induce neurite outgrowth and cell differentiation of N2A cells by accelerating calcium influx. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Fractal aspects of calcium binding protein structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isvoran, Adriana [West University of Timisoara, Department of Chemistry, Pestalozzi 16, 300115 Timisoara (Romania)], E-mail: aisvoran@cbg.uvt.ro; Pitulice, Laura [West University of Timisoara, Department of Chemistry, Pestalozzi 16, 300115 Timisoara (Romania); Craescu, Constantin T. [INSERM U759/Institute Curie-Recherche, Centre Universitaire Paris-Sud, Batiment 112, 91405 Orsay (France); Chiriac, Adrian [West University of Timisoara, Department of Chemistry, Pestalozzi 16, 300115 Timisoara (Romania)

    2008-03-15

    The structures of EF-hand calcium binding proteins may be classified into two distinct groups: extended and compact structures. In this paper we studied 20 different structures of calcium binding proteins using the fractal analysis. Nine structures show extended shapes, one is semi-compact and the other 10 have compact shapes. Our study reveals different fractal characteristics for protein backbones belonging to different structural classes and these observations may be correlated to the physicochemical forces governing the protein folding.

  5. Understanding calcium dynamics experiments and theory

    CERN Document Server

    Malchow, Dieter

    2003-01-01

    Intracellular Calcium is an important messenger in living cells. Calcium dynamics display complex temporal and spatial structures created by the concentration patterns which are characteristic for a nonlinear system operating far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Written as a set of tutorial reviews on both experimental facts and theoretical modelling, this volume is intended as an introduction and modern reference in the field for graduate students and researchers in biophysics, biochemistry and applied mathematics.

  6. Analytical models of calcium binding in a calcium channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jinn-Liang [Department of Applied Mathematics, National Hsinchu University of Education, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Eisenberg, Bob [Department of Molecular Biophysics and Physiology, Rush University, Chicago, Illinois 60612 (United States)

    2014-08-21

    The anomalous mole fraction effect of L-type calcium channels is analyzed using a Fermi like distribution with the experimental data of Almers and McCleskey [J. Physiol. 353, 585 (1984)] and the atomic resolution model of Lipkind and Fozzard [Biochemistry 40, 6786 (2001)] of the selectivity filter of the channel. Much of the analysis is algebraic, independent of differential equations. The Fermi distribution is derived from the configuration entropy of ions and water molecules with different sizes, different valences, and interstitial voids between particles. It allows us to calculate potentials and distances (between the binding ion and the oxygen ions of the glutamate side chains) directly from the experimental data using algebraic formulas. The spatial resolution of these results is comparable with those of molecular models, but of course the accuracy is no better than that implied by the experimental data. The glutamate side chains in our model are flexible enough to accommodate different types of binding ions in different bath conditions. The binding curves of Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} for [CaCl{sub 2}] ranging from 10{sup −8} to 10{sup −2} M with a fixed 32 mM background [NaCl] are shown to agree with published Monte Carlo simulations. The Poisson-Fermi differential equation—that includes both steric and correlation effects—is then used to obtain the spatial profiles of energy, concentration, and dielectric coefficient from the solvent region to the filter. The energy profiles of ions are shown to depend sensitively on the steric energy that is not taken into account in the classical rate theory. We improve the rate theory by introducing a steric energy that lumps the effects of excluded volumes of all ions and water molecules and empty spaces between particles created by Lennard-Jones type and electrostatic forces. We show that the energy landscape varies significantly with bath concentrations. The energy landscape is not constant.

  7. Contribution of calcium oxalate to soil-exchangeable calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauer, Jenny M.; Perakis, Steven S.

    2013-01-01

    Acid deposition and repeated biomass harvest have decreased soil calcium (Ca) availability in many temperate forests worldwide, yet existing methods for assessing available soil Ca do not fully characterize soil Ca forms. To account for discrepancies in ecosystem Ca budgets, it has been hypothesized that the highly insoluble biomineral Ca oxalate might represent an additional soil Ca pool that is not detected in standard measures of soil-exchangeable Ca. We asked whether several standard method extractants for soil-exchangeable Ca could also access Ca held in Ca oxalate crystals using spike recovery tests in both pure solutions and soil extractions. In solutions of the extractants ammonium chloride, ammonium acetate, and barium chloride, we observed 2% to 104% dissolution of Ca oxalate crystals, with dissolution increasing with both solution molarity and ionic potential of cation extractant. In spike recovery tests using a low-Ca soil, we estimate that 1 M ammonium acetate extraction dissolved sufficient Ca oxalate to contribute an additional 52% to standard measurements of soil-exchangeable Ca. However, in a high-Ca soil, the amount of Ca oxalate spike that would dissolve in 1 M ammonium acetate extraction was difficult to detect against the large pool of exchangeable Ca. We conclude that Ca oxalate can contribute substantially to standard estimates of soil-exchangeable Ca in acid forest soils with low soil-exchangeable Ca. Consequently, measures of exchangeable Ca are unlikely to fully resolve discrepancies in ecosystem Ca mass balance unless the contribution of Ca oxalate to exchangeable Ca is also assessed.

  8. Self-Setting Calcium Orthophosphate Formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V.

    2013-01-01

    In early 1980s, researchers discovered self-setting calcium orthophosphate cements, which are bioactive and biodegradable grafting bioceramics in the form of a powder and a liquid. After mixing, both phases form pastes, which set and harden forming either a non-stoichiometric calcium deficient hydroxyapatite or brushite. Since both of them are remarkably biocompartible, bioresorbable and osteoconductive, self-setting calcium orthophosphate formulations appear to be promising bioceramics for bone grafting. Furthermore, such formulations possess excellent molding capabilities, easy manipulation and nearly perfect adaptation to the complex shapes of bone defects, followed by gradual bioresorption and new bone formation. In addition, reinforced formulations have been introduced, which might be described as calcium orthophosphate concretes. The discovery of self-setting properties opened up a new era in the medical application of calcium orthophosphates and many commercial trademarks have been introduced as a result. Currently such formulations are widely used as synthetic bone grafts, with several advantages, such as pourability and injectability. Moreover, their low-temperature setting reactions and intrinsic porosity allow loading by drugs, biomolecules and even cells for tissue engineering purposes. In this review, an insight into the self-setting calcium orthophosphate formulations, as excellent bioceramics suitable for both dental and bone grafting applications, has been provided. PMID:24956191

  9. Calcium signaling in human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apáti, Ágota; Berecz, Tünde; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2016-03-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells provide new tools for developmental and pharmacological studies as well as for regenerative medicine applications. Calcium homeostasis and ligand-dependent calcium signaling are key components of major cellular responses, including cell proliferation, differentiation or apoptosis. Interestingly, these phenomena have not been characterized in detail as yet in pluripotent human cell sates. Here we review the methods applicable for studying both short- and long-term calcium responses, focusing on the expression of fluorescent calcium indicator proteins and imaging methods as applied in pluripotent human stem cells. We discuss the potential regulatory pathways involving calcium responses in hPS cells and compare these to the implicated pathways in mouse PS cells. A recent development in the stem cell field is the recognition of so called "naïve" states, resembling the earliest potential forms of stem cells during development, as well as the "fuzzy" stem cells, which may be alternative forms of pluripotent cell types, therefore we also discuss the potential role of calcium homeostasis in these PS cell types. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. High speed two-photon imaging of calcium dynamics in dendritic spines: consequences for spine calcium kinetics and buffer capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelisse, L.N.; van Elburg, R.A.J.; Meredith, R.M.; Yuste, R.; Mansvelder, H.D.

    2007-01-01

    Rapid calcium concentration changes in postsynaptic structures are crucial for synaptic plasticity. Thus far, the determinants of postsynaptic calcium dynamics have been studied predominantly based on the decay kinetics of calcium transients. Calcium rise times in spines in response to single action

  11. High Speed Two-Photon Imaging of Calcium Dynamics in Dendritic Spines: : Consequences for Spine Calcium Kinetics and Buffer Capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elburg, R.A.J.; Cornelisse, L.N; Meredith, R.M; Yuste, R; Mansvelder, H.D

    2007-01-01

    Rapid calcium concentration changes in postsynaptic structures are crucial for synaptic plasticity. Thus far, the determinants of postsynaptic calcium dynamics have been studied predominantly based on the decay kinetics of calcium transients. Calcium rise times in spines in response to single action

  12. Oral calcium carbonate affects calcium but not phosphorus balance in stage 3-4 chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kathleen M; Martin, Berdine R; Wastney, Meryl E; McCabe, George P; Moe, Sharon M; Weaver, Connie M; Peacock, Munro

    2013-05-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are given calcium carbonate to bind dietary phosphorus, reduce phosphorus retention, and prevent negative calcium balance; however, data are limited on calcium and phosphorus balance during CKD to support this. Here, we studied eight patients with stage 3 or 4 CKD (mean estimated glomerular filtration rate 36 ml/min) who received a controlled diet with or without a calcium carbonate supplement (1500 mg/day calcium) during two 3-week balance periods in a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over design. All feces and urine were collected during weeks 2 and 3 of each balance period and fasting blood, and urine was collected at baseline and at the end of each week. Calcium kinetics were determined using oral and intravenous (45)calcium. Patients were found to be in neutral calcium and phosphorus balance while on the placebo. Calcium carbonate supplementation produced positive calcium balance, did not affect phosphorus balance, and produced only a modest reduction in urine phosphorus excretion compared with placebo. Calcium kinetics demonstrated positive net bone balance but less than overall calcium balance, suggesting soft-tissue deposition. Fasting blood and urine biochemistries of calcium and phosphate homeostasis were unaffected by calcium carbonate. Thus, the positive calcium balance produced by calcium carbonate treatment within 3 weeks cautions against its use as a phosphate binder in patients with stage 3 or 4 CKD, if these findings can be extrapolated to long-term therapy.

  13. The influence of environmental calcium concentrations on calcium flux, compensatory drinking and epithelial calcium channel expression in a freshwater cartilaginous fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Peter J; Weihrauch, Dirk; Grandmaison, Vanessa; Dasiewicz, Patricia; Peake, Stephan J; Anderson, W Gary

    2011-03-15

    Calcium metabolism and mRNA levels of the epithelial calcium channel (ECaC) were examined in a freshwater cartilaginous fish, the lake sturgeon Acipenser fulvescens. Lake sturgeon were acclimated for ≥2 weeks to 0.1 (low), 0.4 (normal) or 3.3 (high) mmol l(-1) environmental calcium. Whole-body calcium flux was examined using (45)Ca as a radioactive marker. Net calcium flux was inward in all treatment groups; however, calcium influx was greatest in the low calcium environment and lowest in the high calcium environment, whereas efflux had the opposite relationship. A significant difference in the concentration of (45)Ca in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of fish in the low calcium environment led to the examination of drinking rate and calcium flux across the anterior-middle (mid) intestine. Drinking rate was not different between treatments; however, calcium influx across the mid-intestine in the low calcium treatment was significantly greater than that in both the normal and high calcium treatments. The lake sturgeon ECaC was 2831 bp in length, with a predicted protein sequence of 683 amino acids that shared a 66% identity with the closest sequenced ECaCs from the vertebrate phyla. ECaC mRNA levels were examined in the gills, kidney, pyloric caeca, mid-intestine and spiral intestine. Expression levels were highest in the gills, then the kidneys, and were orders of magnitude lower in the GIT. Contrary to existing models for calcium uptake in the teleost gill, ECaC expression was greatest in high calcium conditions and kidney ECaC expression was lowest in low calcium conditions, suggesting that cellular transport mechanisms for calcium may be distinctly different in these freshwater cartilaginous fishes.

  14. [Role of calcium ions in the mechanism of action of acetylcholine on energy metabolism in rat liver mitochondria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatamaniuk, M Z; Artym, V V; Kuka, O B; Doliba, M M; Shostakovs'ka, I V

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that administration of acetylcholine to animals (50 micrograms per 100 g of body weight) leads to the activation of respiration and oxidative phosphorylation in the rat liver mitochondria under oxidation of alpha-ketoglutarate; this effect depends on the concentration of calcium ions in the incubation medium of mitochondria. The rate of ADP-stimulated respiration of mitochondria of experimental animals reaches its maximum level under lower concentrations of Ca2+ than in the control animals. The results of investigation of dependence of acetyl choline effect on respiration of mitochondria on the concentration of alpha-ketoglutarate in calcium and calcium-free incubation medium have shown that the half-maximum effect of acetylcholine is observed in calcium medium at lower concentration of the substrate than in calcium-free medium. The latter indicates to the increase of affinity of alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase to alpha-ketoglutarate under these conditions. It is found out that acetylcholine (1.10(-8) M) increases the rate of ADP- and Ca(2+)-stimulated respiration of mitochondria of isolated perfused rat liver, while mutual effect of verapamyl and niphedipin removes this effect.

  15. Acute effects of calcium carbonate, calcium citrate and potassium citrate on markers of calcium and bone metabolism in young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Heini J; Ketola, Maarit E; Lamberg-Allardt, Christel J E

    2009-11-01

    Both K and Ca supplementation may have beneficial effects on bone through separate mechanisms. K in the form of citrate or bicarbonate affects bone by neutralising the acid load caused by a high protein intake or a low intake of alkalising foods, i.e. fruits and vegetables. Ca is known to decrease serum parathyroid hormone (S-PTH) concentration and bone resorption. We compared the effects of calcium carbonate, calcium citrate and potassium citrate on markers of Ca and bone metabolism in young women. Twelve healthy women aged 22-30 years were randomised into four controlled 24 h study sessions, each subject serving as her own control. At the beginning of each session, subjects received a single dose of calcium carbonate, calcium citrate, potassium citrate or a placebo in randomised order. The diet during each session was identical, containing 300 mg Ca. Both the calcium carbonate and calcium citrate supplement contained 1000 mg Ca; the potassium citrate supplement contained 2250 mg K. Markers of Ca and bone metabolism were followed. Potassium citrate decreased the bone resorption marker (N-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen) and increased Ca retention relative to the control session. Both Ca supplements decreased S-PTH concentration. Ca supplements also decreased bone resorption relative to the control session, but this was significant only for calcium carbonate. No differences in bone formation marker (bone-specific alkaline phosphatase) were seen among the study sessions. The results suggest that potassium citrate has a positive effect on the resorption marker despite low Ca intake. Both Ca supplements were absorbed well and decreased S-PTH efficiently.

  16. H2O2augments cytosolic calcium in nucleus tractus solitarii neurons via multiple voltage-gated calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, Tim D; Dantzler, Heather A; Polo-Parada, Luis; Kline, David D

    2017-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a profound role in cardiorespiratory function under normal physiological conditions and disease states. ROS can influence neuronal activity by altering various ion channels and transporters. Within the nucleus tractus solitarii (nTS), a vital brainstem area for cardiorespiratory control, hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) induces sustained hyperexcitability following an initial depression of neuronal activity. The mechanism(s) associated with the delayed hyperexcitability are unknown. Here we evaluate the effect(s) of H 2 O 2 on cytosolic Ca 2+ (via fura-2 imaging) and voltage-dependent calcium currents in dissociated rat nTS neurons. H 2 O 2 perfusion (200 µM; 1 min) induced a delayed, slow, and moderate increase (~27%) in intracellular Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+ ] i ). The H 2 O 2 -mediated increase in [Ca 2+ ] i prevailed during thapsigargin, excluding the endoplasmic reticulum as a Ca 2+ source. The effect, however, was abolished by removal of extracellular Ca 2+ or the addition of cadmium to the bath solution, suggesting voltage-gated Ca 2+ channels (VGCCs) as targets for H 2 O 2 modulation. Recording of the total voltage-dependent Ca 2+ current confirmed H 2 O 2 enhanced Ca 2+ entry. Blocking VGCC L, N, and P/Q subtypes decreased the number of cells and their calcium currents that respond to H 2 O 2 The number of responder cells to H 2 O 2 also decreased in the presence of dithiothreitol, suggesting the actions of H 2 O 2 were dependent on sulfhydryl oxidation. In summary, here, we have shown that H 2 O 2 increases [Ca 2+ ] i and its Ca 2+ currents, which is dependent on multiple VGCCs likely by oxidation of sulfhydryl groups. These processes presumably contribute to the previously observed delayed hyperexcitability of nTS neurons in in vitro brainstem slices. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Changes in the level of cytosolic calcium, nitric oxide and nitric oxide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR G

    stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of liver cirrhosis. In the present investigation, we evaluated the level of .... grade C according to the Child–Pugh score, which is based on the levels of serum bilirubin, albumin, ... 35–55. Aetiology. Alcoholic. 33. -. Metabolic. 7. -. Grade (according to Child–Pugh class). A. 2.

  18. PTHrP regulation and calcium balance in sea bream (Sparus auratus L.) under calcium constraint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbink, W.; Bevelander, G.S.; Hang, X.; Lu, W.; Guerreiro, P.M.; Spanings, T.; Canario, A.V.; Flik, G.

    2006-01-01

    Juvenile gilthead sea bream were exposed to diluted seawater (2.5 per thousand salinity; DSW) for 3 h or, in a second experiment, acclimated to DSW and fed a control or calcium-deficient diet for 30 days. Branchial Ca(2+) influx, drinking rate and plasma calcium levels were assessed. Sea bream

  19. Calcium spikes and calcium plateaux evoked by differential polarization in dendrites of turtle motoneurones in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounsgaard, J; Kiehn, O

    1993-01-01

    The ability of dendrites in turtle motoneurones to support calcium spikes and calcium plateaux was investigated using differential polarization by applied electric fields. 2. Electric fields were generated by passing current through transverse slices of the turtle spinal cord between two plate......+ spikes and Ca2+ plateaux are present in dendrites of spinal motoneurones of the turtle....

  20. Eggshell powder, a comparable or better source of calcium than purified calcium carbonate: Piglet studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, A.; Beelen, G.M.

    1999-01-01

    Powdered chicken eggshells might be an interesting and widely available source of calcium. In two studies using piglets we determined the digestibility of calcium from different diets. The first study compared casein-based diets with CaCO3 (CasCC) or eggshell powder (CasES). The second study