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Sample records for calcium nitrates

  1. Electroreduction of uranyl ion in aqueous calcium nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electroreduction of uranyl ions in buffered and unbuffered 0.5 M calcium nitrate has been studied using polarography, cyclic voltammetry, chronopotentiometry, and chronoamperometry. The results are compared with those in molten calcium nitrate tetrahydrate. (author)

  2. Study of calcium chloride and calcium nitrate purification on inorganic sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purification of calcium chloride and calcium nitrate from iron, chromium, manganese and cobalt impurities by sorption on some inorganic collectors are considered in this article. Study was conducted by means of radioactive-tracer technique at concurrent use of several γ-radioactive isotopes. As a collectors were used hydrated aluminium and zirconium oxides. Dependence of effectiveness of precipitation by collectors on ph-value of medium, quantity of collector, nature and concentration of components is studied. Optimal parameters of purification of calcium chloride and calcium nitrate are defined.

  3. Anodic Behavior of Alloy 22 in Calcium Chloride and in Calcium Chloride Plus Calcium Nitrate Brines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, K J; Day, S D; Ilevbare, G O; Whalen, M T; King, K J; Hust, G A; Wong, L L; Estill, J C; Rebak, R B

    2003-05-13

    Alloy 22 (UNS N60622) is a nickel-based alloy, which is extensively used in aggressive industrial applications, especially due to its resistance to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in high chloride environments. The purpose of this work was to characterize the anodic behavior of Alloy 22 in concentrated calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}) brines and to evaluate the inhibitive effect of nitrate, especially to localized corrosion. Standard electrochemical tests such as polarization resistance and cyclic polarization were used. Results show that the corrosion potential of Alloy 22 was approximately -360 mV in the silver-silver chloride (SSC) scale and independent of the tested temperature. Cyclic polarization tests showed that Alloy 22 was mainly susceptible to localized attack in 5 M CaCl{sub 2} at 75 C and higher temperatures. The addition of nitrate in a molar ratio of chloride to nitrate equal to 10 increased the onset of localized corrosion to approximately 105 C. The addition of nitrate to the solution also decreased the uniform corrosion rate and the passive current of the alloy.

  4. Solvatation and ion association in calcium nitrate solutions in acetone on sound data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present article is devoted to solvatation and ion association in calcium nitrate solutions in acetone on sound data. The results of measurement of the rate of distribution and peak value of coefficient of adsorption of supersonic waves in the calcium nitrate solutions in acetone were considered. Measurements were carried out on impulse ultrasonic unit in the frequency range 9.7-106.7 MHz and at temperature range 289-313 K.

  5. Effects of Calcium Lignosulfonate and Silicic Acid on Ammonium Nitrate Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Ozan Gezerman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium nitrate salts are the most commonly used nitrogenous fertilizers in industry. However, storage of ammonium nitrate is problematic, since its initial properties can decline because of environmental factors, leading to large economic losses. In this study, in order to prevent the caking and degradation of ammonium nitrate, an alternative composition with additional calcium lignosulfonate and silicic acid was studied. The resulting fertilizer was analyzed by screening analysis, ion chromatography, and electron microscopy methods.

  6. Potential genesis and implications of calcium nitrate in Antarctic snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalinganathan, Kanthanathan; Thamban, Meloth

    2016-04-01

    Among the large variety of particulates in the atmosphere, calcic mineral dust particles have highly reactive surfaces that undergo heterogeneous reactions with atmospheric acids contiguously. The association between nssCa2+, an important proxy indicator of mineral dust, and NO3-, a dominant anion in the Antarctic snowpack, was analysed. A total of 41 snow cores ( ˜ 1 m each) that represent snow deposited during 2008-2009 were studied along coastal-inland transects from two different regions in East Antarctica - the Princess Elizabeth Land (PEL) and central Dronning Maud Land (cDML). Correlation statistics showed a strong association (at 99 % significance level) between NO3- and nssCa2+ at the near-coastal sections of both PEL (r = 0.74) and cDML (r = 0.82) transects. Similarly, a strong association between these ions was also observed in snow deposits at the inland sections of PEL (r = 0.73) and cDML (r = 0.84). Such systematic associations between nssCa2+ and NO3- are attributed to the interaction between calcic mineral dust and nitric acid in the atmosphere, leading to the formation of calcium nitrate (Ca(NO3)2) aerosol. Principal component analysis revealed common transport and depositional processes for nssCa2+ and NO3- both in PEL and cDML. Forward- and back-trajectory analyses using HYSPLIT model v. 4 revealed that southern South America (SSA) was an important dust-emitting source to the study region, aided by the westerlies. Particle size distribution showed that over 90 % of the dust was in the range < 4 µm, indicating that these dust particles reached the Antarctic region via long-range transport from the SSA region. We propose that the association between nssCa2+ and NO3- occurs during the long-range transport due to the formation of Ca(NO3)2 rather than to local neutralisation processes. However, the influence of local dust sources from the nunataks in cDML and the contribution of high sea salt in coastal PEL evidently mask such association in the

  7. Synthesis of porous poly(acrylamide hydrogels using calcium carbonate and its application for slow release of potassium nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Porous poly(acrylamide was synthesized using calcium carbonate microparticles and subsequent acid treatment to remove the calcium carbonate. Methylenebisacrylamide and ammonium persulfate/sodium metabisulfite were used as crosslinking agent and redox initiator, respectively. The porous structure of resulted hydrogels was confirmed using SEM micrographs. The effect of methylenebisacrylamide concentration and calcium carbonate amount on the swelling of the hydrogels was investigated. The results showed that the effect of methylenebisacrylamide and calcium carbonate variables on the swelling is reverse. The hydrogels were subsequently utilized for the loading of potassium nitrate. Potassium nitrate as active agent was loaded into hydrogels and subsequently the release of this active agent was investigated. In these series of investigation, the effect of content of loading, methylenebisacrylamide and calcium carbonate amount on the release of potassium nitrate from hydrogels was investigated.

  8. Calcium nitrate miscible displacement at different concentrations in packed soil columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previatello da Silva, Livia; Alves de Oliveira, Luciano; Honorio de Miranda, Jarbas

    2015-04-01

    Studies on miscible displacement provide us with rational means to understand the important physical phenomena involved leaching in soils, fertilizers, movement of ions and other similar processes. With current environmental concerns and the need to understand the processes that govern movement of water and solutes in soil, studies are needed to allow increasing the efficiency of input use in agriculture that somehow can mitigate the impact of activities of this sector on groundwater contamination. Contamination of soil and groundwater and surface water in areas with fertilizer application and reuse of effluent is closely linked to materials chemical characteristics, and retention and transmission of water and soil solutes. Solute mobility in soil is inversely related to their adsorption to solid fraction or to environmental conditions that favor ions precipitation. Ion adsorption to soil exchange complex makes ion maintains exchange with the soil solution, providing once their retention by the solid fraction, another its availability in aqueous medium. Nitrate leaching is a physical phenomenon, favored by low energy involved in adsorption to soil particles and also by its high solubility in water. This high solubility and the weak interaction with soil matrix to allow anion follow the wetting front. Therefore, the objective was determine nitrate transport parameters in soil, through Breakthrough Curves (BTC) development under conditions of disturbed soil samples (saturated soil and steady state conditions) in columns (20.0 cm in height and 5 cm in diameter), by calcium nitrate solution application at two concentrations, 50 and 130 g m-3 NO3-, in two tropical soil types, Yellow Oxisol (S1) and Anfisol (S2). Research was carried out in laboratory. Transport parameters for both soils and nitrate concentrations were obtained by numerical fit using STANMOD software, by the inverse modelling. Results showed predominance of convective transport in S1, which had a higher

  9. Role of barium nitrate on the sulfur fixation of calcium oxide`

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of Ba(NO3)2 on the efficiency of sulfur fixation of calcium oxide during coal combustion was studied. The results showed that addition of barium nitrate to the CaO can enhance the sulfur removal rate of CaO significantly. The X-ray diffraction spectrum of residual ash of coal added some sulfur fixative expressed that Ba2+ can form a compound of Ba-Al-Si-O which encloses the CaSO4 to prevent it's decomposition, so Ba2+ can improve the action of sulfur fixation of CaO. The combustion character os the original coal and original coal added sulfur fixative was researched with thermal-gravity analyzer and the results expressed that adding some sulfur fixative to the coal will make the combustion character of coal change little.

  10. Calcium-independent NO-synthase activity and nitrites/nitrates production in transient focal cerebral ischaemia in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Grandati, M; Verrecchia, C; Revaud, M L; Allix, M.; Boulu, R. G.; Plotkine, M.

    1997-01-01

    The temporal changes in constitutive NO-synthase (cNOS) and in calcium-independent NO-synthase activities were studied in mice subjected to 2 h of transient focal cerebral ischaemia. The changes in brain nitrites/nitrates (NOx) content were also studied.NOS activities were measured by the conversion of L-[14C]-arginine to L-[14C]-citrulline. Brain NOx contents were investigated by the Griess colourimetric method.cNOS activity in the infarcted cortical area was significantly reduced after 6 h ...

  11. Reducing nitrous oxide emissions by changing N fertiliser use from calcium ammonium nitrate (CAN) to urea based formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harty, M A; Forrestal, P J; Watson, C J; McGeough, K L; Carolan, R; Elliot, C; Krol, D; Laughlin, R J; Richards, K G; Lanigan, G J

    2016-09-01

    The accelerating use of synthetic nitrogen (N) fertilisers, to meet the world's growing food demand, is the primary driver for increased atmospheric concentrations of nitrous oxide (N2O). The IPCC default emission factor (EF) for N2O from soils is 1% of the N applied, irrespective of its form. However, N2O emissions tend to be higher from nitrate-containing fertilisers e.g. calcium ammonium nitrate (CAN) compared to urea, particularly in regions, which have mild, wet climates and high organic matter soils. Urea can be an inefficient N source due to NH3 volatilisation, but nitrogen stabilisers (urease and nitrification inhibitors) can improve its efficacy. This study evaluated the impact of switching fertiliser formulation from calcium ammonium nitrate (CAN) to urea-based products, as a potential mitigation strategy to reduce N2O emissions at six temperate grassland sites on the island of Ireland. The surface applied formulations included CAN, urea and urea with the urease inhibitor N-(n-butyl) thiophosphoric triamide (NBPT) and/or the nitrification inhibitor dicyandiamide (DCD). Results showed that N2O emissions were significantly affected by fertiliser formulation, soil type and climatic conditions. The direct N2O emission factor (EF) from CAN averaged 1.49% overall sites, but was highly variable, ranging from 0.58% to 3.81. Amending urea with NBPT, to reduce ammonia volatilisation, resulted in an average EF of 0.40% (ranging from 0.21 to 0.69%)-compared to an average EF of 0.25% for urea (ranging from 0.1 to 0.49%), with both fertilisers significantly lower and less variable than CAN. Cumulative N2O emissions from urea amended with both NBPT and DCD were not significantly different from background levels. Switching from CAN to stabilised urea formulations was found to be an effective strategy to reduce N2O emissions, particularly in wet, temperate grassland. PMID:27155080

  12. Measuring calcium, potassium, and nitrate in plant nutrient solutions using ion-selective electrodes in hydroponic greenhouse of some vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardar, Gökay; Altıkatoğlu, Melda; Ortaç, Deniz; Cemek, Mustafa; Işıldak, İbrahim

    2015-01-01

    Generally, the life cycle of plants depends on the uptake of essential nutrients in a balanced manner and on toxic elements being under a certain concentration. Lack of control of nutrient levels in nutrient solution can result in reduced plant growth and undesired conditions such as blossom-end rot. In this study, sensitivity and selectivity tests for various polyvinylchloride (PVC)-based ion-selective membranes were conducted to identify those suitable for measuring typical concentration ranges of macronutrients, that is, NO(3-), K(+), and Ca(2+), in hydroponic solutions. The sensitivity and selectivity of PVC-membrane-based ion-selective sensors prepared with tetradodecylammoniumnitrate for NO(3-), valinomycin for K(+), and Ca ionophore IV for Ca(2+) were found to be satisfactory for measuring NO(3-), K(+), and Ca(2+) ions in nutrient solutions over typical ranges of hydroponic concentrations. Potassium, calcium, and nitrate levels that were utilized by cucumber and tomato seedlings in the greenhouse were different. The findings show that tomato plants consumed less amounts of nitrate than cucumber plants over the first 2 months of their growth. We also found that the potassium intake was higher than other nutritional elements tested for all plants. PMID:25388287

  13. Comparative evaluation of a dentifrice containing calcium sodium phosphosilicate to a dentifrice containing potassium nitrate for dentinal hypersensitivity: A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya Satyapal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium sodium phosphosilicate is a recently introduced desensitizing agent which acts by occluding the dentinal tubules and also resists acid decalcification. This study was designed to assess the efficacy of a new toothpaste containing 5% calcium sodium phosphosilicate for the treatment of dentinal hypersensitivity and also compare it with 5% potassium nitrate. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients with the chief complaint of dentinal hypersensitivity were enrolled and randomly divided into two groups. The visual analog scale (VAS scores were taken for water and air stimuli at baseline, 3 weeks after usage of the respective toothpaste, and 3 weeks after discontinuation of the respective toothpaste. Results: Both the groups showed reduction in hypersensitivity scores at 3 weeks and 6 weeks for air stimulus and cold water. The calcium sodium phosphosilicate group, however, showed significantly reduction in hypersensitivity compared to the potassium nitrate group at any time point for both measures of hypersensitivity. Conclusion: The 5% calcium sodium phosphosilicate group showed immense reduction in dentinal hypersensitivity symptoms. The 5% calcium sodium phosphosilicate showed prolonged effects even after discontinuation as compared to 5% potassium nitrate, due to its dentinal tubular occlusion property.

  14. Comparative proteomics of root plasma membrane proteins reveals the involvement of calcium signalling in NaCl-facilitated nitrate uptake in Salicornia europaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Lingling; Feng, Juanjuan; Fan, Pengxiang; Chen, Xianyang; Guo, Jie; Lv, Sulian; Bao, Hexigeduleng; Jia, Weitao; Tai, Fang; Jiang, Ping; Wang, Jinhui; Li, Yinxin

    2015-08-01

    Improving crop nitrogen (N) use efficiency under salinity is essential for the development of sustainable agriculture in marginal lands. Salicornia europaea is a succulent euhalophyte that can survive under high salinity and N-deficient habitat conditions, implying that a special N assimilation mechanism may exist in this plant. In this study, phenotypic and physiological changes of S. europaea were investigated under different nitrate and NaCl levels. The results showed that NaCl had a synergetic effect with nitrate on the growth of S. europaea. In addition, the shoot nitrate concentration and nitrate uptake rate of S. europaea were increased by NaCl treatment under both low N and high N conditions, suggesting that nitrate uptake in S. europaea was NaCl facilitated. Comparative proteomic analysis of root plasma membrane (PM) proteins revealed 81 proteins, whose abundance changed significantly in response to NaCl and nitrate. These proteins are involved in metabolism, cell signalling, transport, protein folding, membrane trafficking, and cell structure. Among them, eight proteins were calcium signalling components, and the accumulation of seven of the above-mentioned proteins was significantly elevated by NaCl treatment. Furthermore, cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) was significantly elevated in S. europaea under NaCl treatment. The application of the Ca(2+) channel blocker LaCl3 not only caused a decrease in nitrate uptake rate, but also attenuated the promoting effects of NaCl on nitrate uptake rates. Based on these results, a possible regulatory network of NaCl-facilitated nitrate uptake in S. europaea focusing on the involvement of Ca(2+) signalling was proposed. PMID:25956883

  15. In vivo Spectrophotometric Assessment of the Tooth Whitening Effectiveness of Nite White 10% with Amorphous Calcium Phosphate, Potassium Nitrate and Fluoride, Over a 6-month Period

    OpenAIRE

    Grobler, Sias R; MAJEED, Abdul; Moola, Mohamad H; Rossouw, Roelof J; van Wyk Kotze, Theuns

    2011-01-01

    To clinically evaluate the effectiveness of Nite White 10% carbamide peroxide with amorphous calcium phosphate, potassium nitrate and fluoride over a 6-month follow-up period. Nite White was applied nightly for 14 days, according to the manufacturer’s instructions. The color of teeth 11 and 21 of twenty one subjects was measured with a spectrophotometer (L*; a*; b*). Subjects were instructed to take note of any tooth sensitivity and gingival irritation. For all three components (L*, a* and b*...

  16. Preparation of a calcium-substituted copper-rich yttrium barium copper oxide superconductor from a spray-dried nitrate precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A calcium-substituted YBa2Cu4O8 (1-2-4) high-temperature superconductor is synthesized from a precursor obtained by spray-drying of a nitrate solution containing the corresponding metals in a stoichiometric ratio. The synthesis takes place during one-stage heat-treatment of the precursor at 800 C in an oxygen flow under a pressure of 1 atm within a relatively short period of time, additives as well as intermediate grinding and pressing of the products being not needed. Measurements of the a.c. susceptibility have revealed a very sharp superconducting transition which is comparable with that of samples prepared under a high pressure. The transition in Ca-substituted YBa2Cu4O8 occurs at a temperature by about 8 K higher than Tc of the Ca-free phase. Raman spectra suggest that during the substitution calcium does not occupy barium positions in the YBa2Cu4O8 lattice

  17. Effect of NaCI and supplemental calcium on growth parameters and nitrate reductase activity in maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Sacała

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, investigated were the effects of NaCl (60 mmol/dm-3 and NaCl supplemented with different salts (5 mmol/dm-3 CaCl2, CaSO4, CaCO3, KCl, on growth of two maize varieties (Cyrkon and Limko. After 7 days of cultivation in nutrient solution the growth response to salinity of both maize varieties was similar. NaCl led to a dramatic decrease in growth of plants (approx. 50% reduction in fresh and dry weight of root, and 70% reduction in fresh weight of shoot. Addition of extra Ca2+ or K+ to nutrient solution containing NaCl did not definitely improve the growth parameters of maize. However, among the tested salts, CaCl2 had a beneficial visual effect on maize seedlings. In other cases the plants showed noticeable symptoms of salt damage. In long term exposure to salinity (two weeks growth of Cyrkon was more inhibited than Limko. Comparison of growth responses in short-term exposure to salinity (7 days with long-term (14 days showed that in Cyrkon variety the negative effects of NaCl were intensified and addition of CaCl2 to salinized solution had not positive effects on growth. On the contrary, in Limko variety, there was a significant improvement in growth (especially in root dry weight. This fact indicates that during longer exposure to salinity Limko was able to adapt to those conditions. Salinity caused a significant decrease in leaf nitrate reductase activity (60% and 30% reduction respectively in Limko and Cyrkon. Addition of CaCl2 to salinized nutrient solution resulted in greater enzyme inhibition in Cyrkon (50% decline in relation to plants grown under sole NaCl, and 30% increase in Limko. Inhibition of nitrate reductase activity did not cause a decrease in concentration of soluble protein in maize leaves.

  18. Preparation of U(VI) and Th(IV) α-sources from calcium nitrate solutions by combining solvent extraction and electrodeposition procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple method of preparing α-sources for alpha spectrometric analysis of uranium and thorium is investigated by combining solvent extraction and electrodeposition procedures. Extraction of these actinides is performed by diethyl ether from calcium nitrate solution with various nitric acid concentrations. Recoveries of 90%-100% are obtained for uranium and 83.5% for thorium. Good resolutions are also achieved under optimum conditions. The dependence of the overall yield of U(VI) and Th(IV) is examined in relation to the aqueous phase acidity. A procedure combining solvent extraction and electrodeposition is proposed for a selective α-source preparation of U(VI) and Th(IV). Uranium is first extracted at pH range about 1 to 2. At this acidity, thorium remains in the aqueous phase and may be subsequently extracted from this after acidification with 2 M HNO3. A second decontamination of a specific nuclide is achieved by a selective electrodeposition using electrolyte consisting of about 70% ethanol, 0.45 M hydrochloric acid, 0.09 M acetic acid and 108 μg Fe2O3, with concentrations above 0.48 M in HCl for U(VI) or 0.06 to 0.09 M in HNO3 for Th(IV). (orig.)

  19. An In Vitro Comparison of PMMA and Calcium Sulfate as Carriers for the Local Delivery of Gallium(III) Nitrate to Staphylococcal Infected Surgical Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Rebecca A; Tennent, David J; Chang, David; Wenke, Joseph C; Sanchez, Carlos J

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic-loaded bone cements, including poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and calcium sulfate (CaSO4), are often used for treatment of orthopaedic infections involving Staphylococcus spp., although the effectiveness of this treatment modality may be limited due to the emergence of antimicrobial resistance and/or the development of biofilms within surgical sites. Gallium(III) is an iron analog capable of inhibiting essential iron-dependent pathways, exerting broad antimicrobial activity against multiple microorganisms, including Staphylococcus spp. Herein, we evaluated PMMA and CaSO4 as carriers for delivery of gallium(III) nitrate (Ga(NO3)3) to infected surgical sites by assessing the release kinetics subsequent to incorporation and antimicrobial activity against S. aureus and S. epidermidis. PMMA and to a lesser extent CaSO4 were observed to be compatible as carriers for Ga(NO3)3, eluting concentrations with antimicrobial activity against planktonic bacteria, inhibiting bacterial growth, and preventing bacterial colonization of beads, and effective against established bacterial biofilms of S. aureus and S. epidermidis. Collectively, our in vitro results indicate that PMMA is a more suitable carrier compared to CaSO4 for delivery of Ga(NO3)3; moreover they provide evidence for the potential use of Ga(NO3)3 with PMMA as a strategy for the prevention and/or treatment for orthopaedic infections. PMID:26885514

  20. Shoot regeneration of limau purut (citrus hystrix) using shoot tip: assessment of calcium gluconate and silver nitrate in overcoming premature leaf senescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was carried out to establish an optimum In vitro shoot multiplication system using shoot tip explants derived from 7 week-old seedlings of Citrus hystrix. In the first experiment, shoot tips were cultured on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 0-13.33 mu M 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) for 8 weeks. Shoot tips cultured on 2.22 mu M BAP produced the highest mean number of shoots (3.42 shoots) but the shoots had low number of leaves (1.14 leaves) due to the occurrence of premature leaf senescence and callus formation. Meanwhile, the medium devoid of BAP produced the lowest mean number of shoots (1.50 shoots) but highest mean number of leaves (5.41 leaves) indicating that BAP was likely responsible for the premature leaf senescence. In order to overcome the occurrence of premature leaf senescence on medium with BAP, a second experiment was carried out whereby shoot tips were cultured on medium containing 2.22 micro M BAP fortified with 2.00, 4.00 and 6.00 mM calcium gluconate (Ca-glu) and a control treatment with 2.22 mu M BAP. The shoot and leaf numbers were increased with the addition of 4.00 and 6.00 mM Ca-glu. The presence of Ca-glu reduced premature leaf senescence and callus formation to some extent. In the third experiment, the addition of silver nitrate (AgNO/sub 3/) at 10-80 micro M in media with 2.22 micro M BAP and 2.22 micro M BAP + 4 mM Ca-glu could totally overcome premature leaf senescence and callus formation. Media supplemented with 2.22 mirco M BAP + 4 mM Ca-glu + 20 micro M AgNOsub 3/ significantly induced among the highest mean number of shoots and highest mean number of leaves per shoot. (author)

  1. Effect of Preharvest Calcium Treatments on Sweet Cherry Fruit Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Deniz EROGUL

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the effects of different foliar calcium compounds on fruit cracking and quality of sweet cherry variety ‘0900 Ziraat’ were investigated. Calcium caseinate, calcium chloride, calcium hydroxide and calcium nitrate were used as foliar sprays. Calcium applications reduced the cracking index 38% to 66% compared to cherries that did not receive foliar treatment. The most efficient applications for decreasing cracking were calcium hydroxide and calcium chloride. Calcium chloride and c...

  2. Waterproofing Materials for Ammonium Nitrate

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    R.S. Damse

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the possibility of overcoming the problem of hygroscopicity of ammonium nitrate by coating the particles with selected waterproofing materials. Gravimetric analysis ofthe samples of ammonium nitrate coated with eight different waterproofing materials, vis-a-vis, uncoated ammonium nitrate, were conducted at different relative humidity and exposuretime. The results indicate that mineral jelly is the promising waterproofing material for ammonium nitrate among the materials tested, viz, calcium stearate, dioctyl phthalate, kaoline, diethylphthalate, dinitrotoluene, shelac varnish, and beeswax. Attempts were made to confirm the waterproofing ability of mineral jelly to ammonium nitrate using differential thermal analysisand x-ray diffraction patterns as an experimental tool. Suitability of mineral jelly as an additive for the gun propellant was also assessed on the basis of theoretical calculations using THERMprogram.

  3. Effects of Brassinolide on the Growth and Isozyme Expression of Antioxidant Enzymes of Cucumber Seedlings Under Calcium Nitrate Stress%油菜素内酯对硝酸钙胁迫下黄瓜幼苗生长及其抗氧化酶同工酶表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆晓民; 高青海

    2011-01-01

    Ahydroponic experiment was conducted to study the effects of brassinolide (BR)on the growth and isozyme expression of antioxidant enzymes of cucumber seedling under calcium nitrate stress. These results showed the growth of cucumber seedlings were significantly inhibited while BR alleviated the growth inhibition in cucumber seedling which induced by calcium nitrate with increasing more fresh weight and dry weight after 9 days calcium nitrate stress and calcium nitrate induced the expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CATJand peroxidase (POD). However, BR increased the expression of SOD and POD isozymes by 14.77 % and 17.49% on the day 6 and decreased the expression of POD by 16.59% on the day 9.0ur results suggested that calcium nitrate stress inhibited the growth of cucumber seedling and BR might regulate the isozyme expression of antioxidant enzymes of cucumber seedling and alleviated the damage effects of calcium nitrate stress to cucumber seedling.%采用营养液水培,研究硝酸钙胁迫下油菜素内酯(BR)对黄瓜幼苗生长及其抗氧化酶同工酶表达的影响.结果表明,硝酸钙胁迫至第9天,黄瓜幼苗干鲜重下降,生长受到了显著的抑制,而硝酸钙胁迫下施用BR,黄瓜幼苗生长受抑制程度减轻,其鲜重、干重较单纯硝酸钙处理显著增加.硝酸钙胁迫增强了黄瓜幼苗超氧化物歧化酶(SOD)、过氧化氢酶(CAT)、过氧化物酶(POD)同工酶的表达,硝酸钙胁迫下施用外源BR的第6d,SOD、POD同工酶的表达比硝酸钙处理分别提高了14.77%、17.49%,第9天POD同工酶的表达比硝酸钙处理提高了16.59%,而CAT同工酶的表达变化均不明显.可见,硝酸钙胁迫抑制了黄瓜幼苗的生长,硝酸钙胁迫下施用BR可调节黄瓜幼苗SOD、POD同工酶的表达,并缓解硝酸钙胁迫对黄瓜幼苗的伤害.

  4. Intercomparison 9711. pH, conductivity, alkalinity, nitrate + nitrite, chloride, sulfate, calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, total aluminium, reactive and non-labile aluminium, dissolved organic carbon, and chemical oxygen demand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovind, Haavard

    1997-09-22

    The work described in this report was a part of an international cooperative programme for assessment and monitoring of acidification of rivers and lakes. Two sample sets were prepared for intercomparison, one for determination of the major ions, the other for determination of aluminium fractions and unspecified organic matter. The samples were sent to 50 laboratories and 47 laboratories from 22 countries submitted results. Good agreement was found for chloride, sulfate, calcium, magnesium, sodium and the unspecific organic compounds, dissolved organic carbon and chemical oxygen demand, more than 80% being evaluated as acceptable for these analytic variables. The results for nitrate + nitrite and aluminium species did not agree well, probably because different methods were used to determine the aluminium species. On the whole, 78% of the results were within the general target accuracy of plus or minus 20%. Laboratories with results outside this accuracy should improve their methods if they want to analyse low-concentration samples. To improve the compatibility of the analytical results for aluminium fractions, it seems necessary to normalize the analytical methods and determination techniques used for these determinations. A total error of plus minus 0.2 pH units seems to be a reasonable assessment of the accuracy for pH measurements when weakly acid or neutral water samples not in CO{sub 2} equilibrium are analyzed. 7 refs., 1 fig., 34 tabs.

  5. Bioactivity studies of calcium magnesium silicate prepared from eggshell waste by sol–gel combustion synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Rajan Choudhary; Sivasankar Koppala; Sasikumar Swamiappan

    2015-01-01

    The present study focused on the synthesis of calcium magnesium silicate (akermanite, Ca2MgSi2O7) using eggshell biowaste (as calcium source), magnesium nitrate and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as starting materials. Sol–gel combustion method was adopted to obtain calcium magnesium silicate. Citric acid was used as a fuel (reducing agent) and nitrate ions present in the metal nitrates acts as an oxidizing agent during combustion process. The characterization of synthesized calcium magnesiu...

  6. Method of processing radioactive liquid waste containing soduium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulfuric acid is added to radioactive liquid wastes containing sodium nitrate and heated to convert sodium nitrate into sodium sulfate and remove nitric acid as fumes. Then, calcium oxide or calcium hydroxide is added to the resultant liquid wastes containing sodium sulfate into a solution of calcium sulfate and sodium hydroxide. Then, solid-liquid separation is applied to take out, as a solid, calcium sulfate containing most portion of radioactive materials. Since no burnable materials such as asphalt are not used as in the prior art method, it is possible, according to the present invention, to reduce the fire hazard and remarkably decrease the formation of solidification products. (S.T.)

  7. Paliperidonium nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingshui Ge

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In the title molecular salt (systematic name: 3-{2-[4-(6-fluoro-1,2-benzoxazol-3-ylpiperidin-1-yl]ethyl}-9-hydroxy-2-methyl-1,6,7,8,9,9a-hexahydropyrido[1,2-a]pyrimidin-4-one nitrate, C23H29FN4O3+·NO3−, the piperidine ring displays a chair conformation and its N atom is protonated; the N—H bond is in an axial orientation. The ring bearing the hydroxy group exhibits a half-chair conformation. The hydroxy group as well as the adjacent methylene group are disordered over two sets of sites in a 0.823 (5:0.177 (5 ratio. In the crystal, O—H...N, O—H...O, N—H...O and N—H...N hydrogen bonds connect the components into a three-dimensional network.

  8. Calcium - urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003603.htm Calcium - urine To use the sharing features on this ... enable JavaScript. This test measures the amount of calcium in urine. All cells need calcium in order ...

  9. Calcium supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007477.htm Calcium supplements To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. WHO SHOULD TAKE CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS? Calcium is an important mineral for the ...

  10. Calcium Oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    Dupont, Geneviève; Combettes, Laurent; Bird, Gary S.; Putney, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Calcium signaling results from a complex interplay between activation and inactivation of intracellular and extracellular calcium permeable channels. This complexity is obvious from the pattern of calcium signals observed with modest, physiological concentrations of calcium-mobilizing agonists, which typically present as sequential regenerative discharges of stored calcium, a process referred to as calcium oscillations. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the underlyin...

  11. Nitrate absorption and strontium accumulation. Final report, 1 August 1973--31 December 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two basic objectives of this study to determine how strontium translocation, and discrimination between strontium and calcium in plants are influenced by nitrate uptake, assimilation, and translocation, and to characterize the relationships between nitrate uptake, nitrate assimilation, and nitrate translocation. Results are reported from studies using maize seedlings in which 85Sr and 45Ca were used as tracers. A list is included of publications that report the results of related studies

  12. Beyond-root calcium fertilization of apple trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazimierz Słowik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Investigations were performed in the period 1977-1979 on the apple tree cultivar 'Fantazja', on rootstock A 2, M 7 and MM 106 on the effect of spraying with solution containing calcium on the incidence of bitter pit, breakdown, calcium content in the fruit flesh and other features of the fruits. Threefold spraying with calcium nitrate, calcium chloride or Anti-Stipp significantly limited the appearance of bitter pit and breakdown.

  13. Biological denitrification of nitrate waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The studies leading to the design of the Oak Ridge Y-12 plant biological denitrification system are briefly described. The system uses a flow-through stirred-bed reactor. Methanol and lime-neutralized acetic acid were evaluated as C sources. The acetic acid was selected because the calcium carbonate generated in the process is needed for neutralization of the acid wastes. Excess organic will be used to ensure maximum amount of nitrate destroyed. The system will generate solids in the form of calcium carbonate, aluminum hydroxide, and organic carbon and N2 and CO2 gases. (JSR)

  14. Modeled Wet Nitrate Deposition

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Modeled data on nitrate wet deposition was obtained from Dr. Jeff Grimm at Penn State Univ. Nitrate wet depostion causes acidification and eutrophication of surface...

  15. Nitrate accumulation in spinach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steingröver, Eveliene Geertruda

    1986-01-01

    Leafy vegetables, like spinach, may contain high concentrations of nitrate. In the Netherlands, about 75% of mean daily intake of nitrate orginates from the consumption of vegatables. Hazards to human health are associated with the reduction of nitrate to nitrite. Acute nitrite poisoning causes meth

  16. Nitrate pollution of groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concern about the possible health risks associated with the consumption of nitrate has led many countries, including South Africa, to propose that 10mg of nitrogen (as nitrate or nitrite) per liter should be the maximum allowable limit for domestic water supplies. Groundwater in certain parts of South Africa and Namibia contains nitrate in concentrations which exceed this limit. The CSIR's Natural Isotope Division has been studying the nitrogen isotope composition of the nitrate as an aid to investigation into the sources of this nitrate contamination

  17. Mound Facility activities in chemical and physical research: January-June 1980. [OLECULES; VIRIAL EQUATION; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; DEUTERIUM; TRITIUM; CALCIUM NITRATES; HEAVY WATER; THERMAL DIFFUSION; WATER; CROSS SECTIONS; MOLECULAR BEAMS; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; CHELATING AGENTS; CHLOROFORM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-08-29

    I. Low temperature research covered Hydrogen Intermolecular Potential Functions: five potentials have been compared to bound state energies, second virial coefficients, and total and differential scattering cross sections, but none of them consistently fits all of the data. Using a Hartree-Fock-Dispersion form with a modified damping function, three out of the four sets of data can be represented with a single potential function. Reaction Rates of Deuterium-Tritium Mixtures: two mixing chambers are being designed and built for studying D/sub 2/-T/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/-T/sub 2/. Low Temperature Trennschaukel: a bench model trennschaukel has been instrumented. II. Separation research covered Liquid Thermal Diffusion: Isotopic separations as functions of time were measured for methyl chloride, ethyl chloride, 1-chloropropane and 1-chlorobutane. The campaign to enrich chlorine-37 by liquid thermal diffusion of methyl chloride was concluded after 240 g of enriched isotope had been produced. Calcium Isotope Separation: Calcium isotope separation in the Ca(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/-H/sub 2/O and -D/sub 2/O systems was measured using a 36.5 cm liquid phase thermal diffusion column. The largest separation was a 15% change in the calcium-48 abundance. Molecular Beam Scattering: a supersonic Ne beam through a cell containing Ar was used to measure low-energy, elastic, total cross sections of neon/argon in the velocity range of 4 to 10 (x 10/sup 4/) cm/s. Cross sections at onset of clustering were 7% higher than at minimum cluster conditions. Mutual Diffusion: Study continues on the temperature dependence of the mutal diffusion coefficients for binary noble gas mixtures, particularly argon with helium, neon, and xenon. Metal Chemical Exchange With Macrocyclic Ligands: The equilibrium single-stage separation factor was determined for two additional LiTFA/221 cryptand/CHCl/sub 3/ and two LiTFA/211 cryptand/CHCl/sub 3/ exchange systems.

  18. Field determination of nitrate using nitrate reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, E.R.; Corrigan, J.S.; Campbell, W.H. [Nitrate Elimination Co., Inc., Lake Linden, MI (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Nitrate is routinely measured in a variety of substrates - water, tissues, soils, and foods - both in the field and in laboratory settings. The most commonly used nitrate test methods involve the reduction of nitrate to nitrite via a copper-cadmium reagent, followed by reaction of the nitrite with the Griess dye reagents. The resulting color is translated into a nitrate concentration by comparison with a calibrated color chart or comparator, or by reading the absorbance in a spectrophotometer. This basic method is reliable and sufficiently sensitive for many applications. However, the cadmium reagent is quite toxic. The trend today is for continued increase in concern for worker health and safety; in addition, there are increasing costs and logistical problems associated with regulatory constraints on transport and disposal of hazardous materials. Some suppliers have substituted a zinc-based reagent powder for the cadmium in an effort to reduce toxicity. We describe here an enzyme-based nitrate detection method as an improvement on the basic Griess method that demonstrates equal or superior sensitivity, superior selectivity, and is more environmentally benign. Comparisons between the enzyme-based method and some standard field test kits being used today are made.

  19. Agricultural nitrate pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anker, Helle Tegner

    2015-01-01

    Despite the passing of almost 25 years since the adoption of the EU Nitrates Directive, agricultural nitrate pollution remains a major concern in most EU Member States. This is also the case in Denmark, although a fairly strict regulatory regime has resulted in almost a 50 per cent reduction...

  20. Sorption of UO22+ on calcium carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorption of uranyl ions on calcium carbonate from aqueous solutions featuring different concentration of calcium nitrate was studied experimentally. It is shown that uranium sorption decreases with calcium concentration growth in solution, irrespective of the ratio of solid phase and solution masses. Specific sorption of uranium per unit of the sorbent surface depends linearly on the ratio of UO22+ and Ca2+ ions activities in solution with proportionality factor (sorption equilibrium constant) 1.71 ± 0.16 mol/m2 at 20 deg C

  1. A low-temperature sol-gel route for the synthesis of bioactive calcium silicates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Sen Sun; Ai-Ling Li; Fu-Jian Xu; Dong Qiu

    2013-01-01

    Sol-gel-derived bioactive calcium silicates,synthesized from calcium nitrate tetrahydrate and calcium 2-methoxyethoxide as calcium precursor respectively,were calcified under different temperatures.A series of techniques including SEM,TGA,solid 29Si NMR,nitrogen adsorption,and simulated body fluids (SBF) soaking were employed to study their textural features and in vitro bioactivity.It was confirmed that calcium 2-methoxyethoxide is a promising candidate of calcium precursor for bioactive calcium silicates stabilized under low temperatures.This has implications in fabrication of organic-inorganic hybrid composites.

  2. Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... before being swallowed; do not swallow them whole. Drink a full glass of water after taking either the regular or chewable tablets or capsules. Some liquid forms of calcium carbonate must be shaken well before use.Do not ...

  3. Calcium Electroporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gibot, Laure; Madi, Moinecha;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calcium electroporation describes the use of high voltage electric pulses to introduce supraphysiological calcium concentrations into cells. This promising method is currently in clinical trial as an anti-cancer treatment. One very important issue is the relation between tumor cell kill...... efficacy-and normal cell sensitivity. METHODS: Using a 3D spheroid cell culture model we have tested the effect of calcium electroporation and electrochemotherapy using bleomycin on three different human cancer cell lines: a colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT29), a bladder transitional cell carcinoma (SW780......), and a breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB231), as well as on primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDF-n). RESULTS: The results showed a clear reduction in spheroid size in all three cancer cell spheroids three days after treatment with respectively calcium electroporation (p<0.0001) or...

  4. Calcium Calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Latvia - Lebanon - Libya - Lithuania - Luxembourg - Macedonia, Republic of - Malaysia - Malta - Mexico - Moldova - Morocco - Netherlands - New Zealand - Nigeria - ... and Statistics Popular content Calcium content of common foods What is Osteoporosis? The Board Introduction to Bone ...

  5. Thermochemical nitrate reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of preliminary experiments was conducted directed at thermochemically converting nitrate to nitrogen and water. Nitrates are a major constituent of the waste stored in the underground tanks on the Hanford Site, and the characteristics and effects of nitrate compounds on stabilization techniques must be considered before permanent disposal operations begin. For the thermochemical reduction experiments, six reducing agents (ammonia, formate, urea, glucose, methane, and hydrogen) were mixed separately with ∼3 wt% NO3- solutions in a buffered aqueous solution at high pH (13); ammonia and formate were also mixed at low pH (4). Reactions were conducted in an aqueous solution in a batch reactor at temperatures of 200 degrees C to 350 degrees C and pressures of 600 to 2800 psig. Both gas and liquid samples were analyzed. The specific components analyzed were nitrate, nitrite, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, and ammonia. Results of experimental runs showed the following order of nitrate reduction of the six reducing agents in basic solution: formate > glucose > urea > hydrogen > ammonia ∼ methane. Airnmonia was more effective under acidic conditions than basic conditions. Formate was also effective under acidic conditions. A more thorough, fundamental study appears warranted to provide additional data on the mechanism of nitrate reduction. Furthermore, an expanded data base and engineering feasibility study could be used to evaluate conversion conditions for promising reducing agents in more detail and identify new reducing agents with improved performance characteristics

  6. Bioactivity studies of calcium magnesium silicate prepared from eggshell waste by sol–gel combustion synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajan Choudhary

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study focused on the synthesis of calcium magnesium silicate (akermanite, Ca2MgSi2O7 using eggshell biowaste (as calcium source, magnesium nitrate and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS as starting materials. Sol–gel combustion method was adopted to obtain calcium magnesium silicate. Citric acid was used as a fuel (reducing agent and nitrate ions present in the metal nitrates acts as an oxidizing agent during combustion process. The characterization of synthesized calcium magnesium silicate was carried out by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM techniques. Calcium magnesium silicate crystallite size was observed in nano regime which can effectively mimic natural bone apatite composition. In-vitro bioactivity was investigated by immersing calcium magnesium silicate pellet in simulated body fluid (SBF for three weeks. Results show effective deposition of crystallized hydroxyapatite (HAP layer on its surface and predicting its possibilities for applications in hard tissue regeneration.

  7. Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease; CPPD disease; Acute CPPD arthritis; Pseudogout ... Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis is caused by the collection of salt called calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD). The buildup ...

  8. Calcium and bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone strength and calcium ... calcium (as well as phosphorus) to make healthy bones. Bones are the main storage site of calcium in ... your body does not absorb enough calcium, your bones can get weak or will not grow properly. ...

  9. Get Enough Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Calcium Print This Topic En español Get Enough Calcium Browse Sections The Basics Overview Foods and Vitamins ... 2 of 4 sections Take Action! Take Action: Calcium Sources Protect your bones – get plenty of calcium ...

  10. Calcium carbonate overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tums overdose; Calcium overdose ... Calcium carbonate can be dangerous in large amounts. ... Some products that contain calcium carbonate are certain: ... and mineral supplements Other products may also contain calcium ...

  11. Calcium paradox and calcium entry blockers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Slade, A.M.; Nayler, W.G.; Meijler, F.L.

    1984-01-01

    Reperfusion of isolated hearts with calcium-containing solution after a short period of calcium-free perfusion results in irreversible cell damage (calcium paradox). This phenomenon is characterized by an excessive influx of calcium into the cells, the rapid onset of myocardial contracture, exhausti

  12. Nitrates and nitrites intoxications’ management

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra Trif

    2007-01-01

    The study pointed out the major sources for clinical and subclinical intoxications with nitrates/nitrites (drinking water and nitrates containing fertilizers), circumstances that determine fertilizers to became sources of intoxication (excessive fertilization/consecutive high level of nitrates in fodders, free access of animals to the fertilizers, administration into the diet instead of natrium chloride), factors that determine high nitrates accumulation in fodders despite optimal fertilizati...

  13. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., described and defined as an oxidizer by the regulations of 49 CFR part 173 is handled, stored, stowed...) must be eliminated or plugged. Note: See 49 CFR 176.415 for permit requirements for nitro carbo nitrate... nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. 126.28 Section...

  14. Calcium-Mediated Abiotic Stress Signaling in Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Katie A; Matthus, Elsa; Swarbreck, Stéphanie M; Davies, Julia M

    2016-01-01

    Roots are subjected to a range of abiotic stresses as they forage for water and nutrients. Cytosolic free calcium is a common second messenger in the signaling of abiotic stress. In addition, roots take up calcium both as a nutrient and to stimulate exocytosis in growth. For calcium to fulfill its multiple roles must require strict spatio-temporal regulation of its uptake and efflux across the plasma membrane, its buffering in the cytosol and its sequestration or release from internal stores. This prompts the question of how specificity of signaling output can be achieved against the background of calcium's other uses. Threats to agriculture such as salinity, water availability and hypoxia are signaled through calcium. Nutrient deficiency is also emerging as a stress that is signaled through cytosolic free calcium, with progress in potassium, nitrate and boron deficiency signaling now being made. Heavy metals have the capacity to trigger or modulate root calcium signaling depending on their dose and their capacity to catalyze production of hydroxyl radicals. Mechanical stress and cold stress can both trigger an increase in root cytosolic free calcium, with the possibility of membrane deformation playing a part in initiating the calcium signal. This review addresses progress in identifying the calcium transporting proteins (particularly channels such as annexins and cyclic nucleotide-gated channels) that effect stress-induced calcium increases in roots and explores links to reactive oxygen species, lipid signaling, and the unfolded protein response. PMID:27621742

  15. Nitrate in drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schullehner, Jörg; Hansen, Birgitte; Sigsgaard, Torben

    Annual nationwide exposure maps for nitrate in drinking water in Denmark from the 1970s until today will be presented based on the findings in Schullehner & Hansen (2014) and additional work on addressing the issue of private well users and estimating missing data. Drinking water supply in Denmark...... is highly decentralized and fully relying on simple treated groundwater. At the same time, Denmark has an intensive agriculture, making groundwater resources prone to nitrate pollution. Drinking water quality data covering the entire country for over 35 years are registered in the public database Jupiter....... In order to create annual maps of drinking water quality, these data had to be linked to 2,852 water supply areas, which were for the first time digitized, collected in one dataset and connected to the Jupiter database. Analyses of the drinking water quality maps showed that public water supplies...

  16. Nitrates and nitrites intoxications’ management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Trif

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The study pointed out the major sources for clinical and subclinical intoxications with nitrates/nitrites (drinking water and nitrates containing fertilizers, circumstances that determine fertilizers to became sources of intoxication (excessive fertilization/consecutive high level of nitrates in fodders, free access of animals to the fertilizers, administration into the diet instead of natrium chloride, factors that determine high nitrates accumulation in fodders despite optimal fertilization (factors related to the plants, soil, clime, harvest methods, storage, agrotechnical measures, nitrates/nitrites toxicity (over 45 ppm nitrates in drinking water, over 0.5 g nitrate/100 g D.M fodder/diet, the factors that influence nitrates/nitrites toxicity ( species, age, rate of feeding, diet balance especially energetically, pathological effects and symptoms (irritation and congestions on digestive tract, resulting diarrhoea, transformation of hemoglobin into methemoglobin determining severe respiratory insufficiency, vascular collapse, low blood pressure inthe acute nitrates intoxication; hypotiroidism, hypovitaminosis A, reproductive disturbances(abortion, low rate of fertility, dead born offspring, diarrhoea and/or respiratory insufficiency in new born e.g. calves, immunosuppression, decrease of milk production in chronic intoxication. There were presented some suggestions concerning management practices to limit nitrate intoxication (analyze of nitrates/nitrites in water and fodders, good management of the situation of risk ,e .g. dilution of the diet with low nitrate content fodders, feeding with balanced diet in energy, protein, minerals and vitamins, accommodation to high nitrate level diet, avoid grazing one week after a frost period, avoid feeding chop green fodders stored a couple of days, monitoring of health status of animals fed with fodders containing nitrates at risk level, a.o..

  17. Rapid And Accurate Technique For Measuring N-15 Of Nitrate Method Development, Calibration And Validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A precise and simplified procedure for measuring nitrogen-15 of nitrate in water with moderate ionic strength and moderate to high organic loads is presented. The modified analytical train consists of two main steps: (a) extraction and purification of nitrate from liquid matrix and (b) pyrolysis of purified potassium nitrate. The presented method was evaluated with simulated solutions containing constant amounts of inter-laboratory nitrate standard salt (KNO3 , δ15N = -4.34 ± 0.32 % AirN2) and potentially interfering anions (SO42-, Cl- and HCO3-) as well as dissolved organic carbon (DOC) load. Dowex 1X8 anion exchange resin proved to be a suitable mean and provide accurate and reproducible δ15N values (SD: ± 0.48%).It tolerates high concentrations of chloride and sulfate ions for samples of small volumes (100 ml) of about four folds of the amounts enough to fully saturate the resin column. Rapid, accurate, precise, low-priced and less labour intensive activated graphite based offline pyrolysis technique for measuring N-15 content of nitrate has been developed and implemented. This involves combusting nitrate salt with activated graphite at 550oC for 30 minutes. Dramatic reduction in processing times needed for the analysis of N-15 of nitrate at natural abundance level was achieved. Performance characteristics of the modified analytical cascade showed that 1 to 2 hrs/sample/set of 5 samples processing time is required. The pyrolysis step of the developed method was validated using internationally distributed nitrate stable isotope reference materials. N-15 content of some selected nitrate salts, namely calcium nitrate, sodium nitrate, potassium nitrate and ammonium nitrate fertilizer, was measured using the modified technique, vacuum distillation method, modified ammonia diffusion method, microbial denitrifier method and EA-CF IRMS method at two different laboratories in Egypt and Germany. The results proved the validity and applicability of the modified

  18. Calcium and bones (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the growth, maintenance, and reproduction of the human ... body, are continually being re-formed and incorporate calcium into their structure. Calcium is essential for the ...

  19. Coronary Calcium Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Coronary Calcium Scan? A coronary calcium scan is a test ... you have calcifications in your coronary arteries. Coronary Calcium Scan Figure A shows the position of the ...

  20. Calcium hydroxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrate - calcium; Lime milk; Slaked lime ... Calcium hydroxide ... These products contain calcium hydroxide: Cement Limewater Many industrial solvents and cleaners (hundreds to thousands of construction products, flooring strippers, brick cleaners, cement ...

  1. Calcium source (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getting enough calcium to keep bones from thinning throughout a person's life may be made more difficult if that person has ... as a tendency toward kidney stones, for avoiding calcium-rich food sources. Calcium deficiency also effects the ...

  2. Calcium in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet - calcium ... Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the human body. It helps form and maintain healthy teeth and bones. A proper level of calcium in the body over a lifetime can help ...

  3. Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD) Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD) Fast Facts The risk of ... young people, too. Proper diagnosis depends on detecting calcium pyrophosphate crystals in the fluid of an affected ...

  4. Characterization of alkali-metal and alkaline-earth nitrates by vibrational spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez, S.; Acción, F.; Puertas, F.

    1992-01-01

    Infrared spectra of sodium and potassium alkaline-metal nitrates and magnesium and calcium alkali-earth nitrates in solid phase had been recorded in order to assign the fundamental bands. The influence of the dispersal médium (alkaline halide), employed in the solid sample preparation have been discussed. The quantitative measurements of the band in ten sities at 1387 cm-1 (present in the I.R. spectra of the four nitrates in KBr médium) allowed us to determine the Lambe...

  5. Nitrate biosensors and biological methods for nitrate determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohail, Manzar; Adeloju, Samuel B

    2016-06-01

    The inorganic nitrate (NO3‾) anion is present under a variety of both natural and artificial environmental conditions. Nitrate is ubiquitous within the environment, food, industrial and physiological systems and is mostly present as hydrated anion of a corresponding dissolved salt. Due to the significant environmental and toxicological effects of nitrate, its determination and monitoring in environmental and industrial waters are often necessary. A wide range of analytical techniques are available for nitrate determination in various sample matrices. This review discusses biosensors available for nitrate determination using the enzyme nitrate reductase (NaR). We conclude that nitrate determination using biosensors is an excellent non-toxic alternative to all other available analytical methods. Over the last fifteen years biosensing technology for nitrate analysis has progressed very well, however, there is a need to expedite the development of nitrate biosensors as a suitable alternative to non-enzymatic techniques through the use of different polymers, nanostructures, mediators and strategies to overcome oxygen interference. PMID:27130094

  6. Nitrate storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by eukaryotic microbes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp, Anja; Høgslund, Signe; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Stief, Peter

    2015-01-01

    storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by diverse marine eukaryotes placed into an eco-physiological context. The advantage of intracellular nitrate storage for anaerobic energy conservation in oxygen-depleted habitats is explained and the life style enabled by this metabolic trait is described. A...

  7. Calcium and Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home › Patients › Treatment › Calcium/Vitamin D Calcium/Vitamin D Getting enough calcium and vitamin D is essential ... counter medications and calcium supplements. What is Vitamin D and What Does it Do? Vitamin D plays ...

  8. [1-(Carboxymethylcyclohexyl]methanaminium nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise J. C. de Vries

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C9H18NO2+·NO3−, is an anhydrous nitrate salt of gabapentin, which is formed serendipitously in the presence of selected non-coordinating metals. The crystal structure involves extensive hydrogen bonding between the –NH3+ and –COOH groups and the nitrate anion.

  9. Evaluation of nitrate destruction methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wide variety of high nitrate-concentration aqueous mixed [radioactive and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous] wastes are stored at various US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. These wastes will ultimately be solidified for final disposal, although the waste acceptance criteria for the final waste form is still being determined. Because the nitrates in the wastes will normally increase the volume or reduce the integrity of all of the waste forms under consideration for final disposal, nitrate destruction before solidification of the waste will generally be beneficial. This report describes and evaluates various technologies that could be used to destroy the nitrates in the stored wastes. This work was funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Technology Development, through the Chemical/Physical Technology Support Group of the Mixed Waste Integrated Program. All the nitrate destruction technologies will require further development work before a facility could be designed and built to treat the majority of the stored wastes. Several of the technologies have particularly attractive features: the nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process produces an insoluble waste form with a significant volume reduction, electrochemical reduction destroys nitrates without any chemical addition, and the hydrothermal process can simultaneously treat nitrates and organics in both acidic and alkaline wastes. These three technologies have been tested using lab-scale equipment and surrogate solutions. At their current state of development, it is not possible to predict which process will be the most beneficial for a particular waste stream

  10. Avaliação de doses e épocas de aplicação de nitrato de cálcio em cobertura na cultura do rabanete Evaluation of calcium nitrate level and timing of top-dressing in radish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Ismael Inácio Cardoso

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Este experimento foi realizado para avaliar o efeito de doses e épocas de aplicação de nitrogênio em cobertura na cultura do rabanete (cultivar Redondo Vermelho. Foram avaliados sete tratamentos com cinco repetições e parcelas com 1,2 m x 0,8 m (espaçamento de 20 cm x 5 cm, no delineamento experimental em blocos ao acaso. Os tratamentos resultaram da combinação dos fatores época da adubação em cobertura [9 e 20 dias após a semeadura (DAS] e doses de nitrogênio (100; 200 e 300 kg/ha na forma de nitrato de cálcio, além da testemunha, sem adubação em cobertura. Em geral, a época de aplicação foi mais importante que o nível de N em cobertura. Quando a adubação foi realizada 9 DAS obteve-se uma produção de 10,30 t/ha de folhas, 10,6 t/ha de raízes (total e 6,20 t/ha de raízes comerciais, superior à adubação realizada aos 20 DAS (7,7 t/ha, 5,8 t/ha e 2,7 t/ha de folhas, raízes totais e raízes comerciais, respectivamente. Quanto às doses de N, a produção de raízes comerciais foi superior com 300 kg/ha (5,1 t/ha em comparação a 100 kg/ha (3,6 t/ha. Para as condições em que foi realizado este experimento, as maiores produções de raízes comerciais foram obtidas com 200 ou 300 kg/ha de N, aplicados 9 DAS, recomendando-se 200 kg/ha pelo menor gasto com este insumo.This trial was set out to evaluate the effect of levels and timing of top-dressing with calcium nitrate in radish (cv Redondo Vermelho. Seven treatments [resulted of the combination of two factors: timing of top-dressing (9 and 20 days after sowing-DAS and N level (100; 200 and 300 kg/ha, besides a standard without top-dressing] were evaluated in a randomized complete block design, with five replicates and plots with 1.2 m x 0.8 m. In general, timing of top-dressing was more important than N levels. When fertilization was made 9 DAS shoot yield was 10.3 t/ha, total root yield was 10.6 t/ha and commercial root yield was 6.2 t/ha, superior to fertilization

  11. Importance of Calcium

    OpenAIRE

    TANDOĞAN, Berivan; ULUSU, N. Nuray

    2005-01-01

    Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body. Calcium regulates many cellular processes and has important structural roles in living organisms. Skeletal muscle structure and function, polymerisation of fibrin and the conduction of impulses in the nervous system are regulated by calcium. Calcium is an important intracellular messenger in protozoa, plants, and animals. Calcium-transporting systems which are located in the plasma membrane and in the organelles, regulate the ionic concentrati...

  12. Effects of nitrate addition on phosphorus retention in an eutrophic reservoir : laboratory experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, T.; Janke, H.; Colzato, M.; Beraldo, D.; Mozeto, A. [Univ. Federal de Sao Carlos (Brazil); Botta, C. [Univ. de Sao Paulo (Brazil); Nascimento, M. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Brasilia (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The Ibrite reservoir in southeast Brazil is polluted with effluents from an oil refinery as well as domestic untreated sewage from cities in the region. In this study, calcium nitrate was used as a sediment remediation technology in order to reduce phosphorus availability. Experiments were conducted in microcosms incubated for up to 135 days. Ceriodaphnia silvestrii and Vibrio fisheri were used to conduct an acute toxicity assessment of the water column and pore water of the sediments. Chironomus xanthus was used to assess bulk sediments. Results of the chemical analyses showed that high values of acid volatile sulfide in the sediments decreased by 99 per cent after 135 days of incubation. Approximately 50 per cent of the soluble reactive phosphorus was removed from the water column. The toxicity of the tested organisms was attributed to high nitrate concentrations in pore water sediments. Results indicated that calcium nitrate is not suitable as a sediment remediation technology.

  13. Effects of nitrate addition on phosphorus retention in an eutrophic reservoir : laboratory experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ibrite reservoir in southeast Brazil is polluted with effluents from an oil refinery as well as domestic untreated sewage from cities in the region. In this study, calcium nitrate was used as a sediment remediation technology in order to reduce phosphorus availability. Experiments were conducted in microcosms incubated for up to 135 days. Ceriodaphnia silvestrii and Vibrio fisheri were used to conduct an acute toxicity assessment of the water column and pore water of the sediments. Chironomus xanthus was used to assess bulk sediments. Results of the chemical analyses showed that high values of acid volatile sulfide in the sediments decreased by 99 per cent after 135 days of incubation. Approximately 50 per cent of the soluble reactive phosphorus was removed from the water column. The toxicity of the tested organisms was attributed to high nitrate concentrations in pore water sediments. Results indicated that calcium nitrate is not suitable as a sediment remediation technology.

  14. The effect of nitrates on the alteration of the cementitious material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TRU waste includes various chemical compounds such as nitrates. The influence of the chemical compounds on the performance of the barrier system should be estimated. Since the temperature of the deep-underground is higher than that of the near surface and a part of the TRU waste generates the heat accompanied with the decay of the radioactive nuclides, the influences of the heat to the barrier material also should be taken into account. In this study, we estimated the influence of sodium nitrate and also that of the leachate from the ROBE-waste (borate-solidified body of concentrated low-level waste) to the degradation of the cementitious material. We also obtained the mineralogical data of cementitious mineral after alteration in elevated temperature conditions. Results in this year are described below. 1) Alteration of characteristics of cementitious material in nitrate solution were evaluated by the water permeation test using sodium nitrate solution. The enhancement of the alteration of cementitious material due to sodium nitrate was observed. The dissolution quantity of the calcium of sodium nitrate solution permeated sample was larger than that of deionized water permeated sample (denoted as 'blank' in following). Hydraulic conductivity of sodium nitrate solution permeated sample was lower than blank, but after changing permeation liquid from sodium nitrate solution to deionized water, hydraulic conductivity rose quickly. The increase of porosity and the decrease of compressive strength were observed in the case of sodium nitrate solution compared with blank. In the nitrate solution, sulfate type and carbonate type of AFm changed into the nitrate type AFm. The nitrate type AFm altered to the carbonate type AFm when the nitrate concentration was lowered. 2) The influence of the leachate from the two types of ROBE-waste on the dissolution of the cementitious material was evaluated by the leaching experiments. Dissolution of the calcium from the cementitious

  15. Excess nitrate loads to coastal waters reduces nitrate removal efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunau, Mirko; Voss, Maren; Erickson, Matthew;

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems are becoming increasingly nitrogen-saturated due to anthropogenic activities, such as agricultural loading with artificial fertilizer. Thus, more and more reactive nitrogen is entering streams and rivers, primarily as nitrate, where it is eventually transported towards the ...

  16. Influence of calcium precursors on the morphology and crystallinity of sol gel-derived hydroxyapatite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayalakshmi Natarajan, U.; Rajeswari, S.

    2008-10-01

    Nanosized hydroxyapatite (HAP) particles were prepared by sol-gel method from the water-based solution of calcium and phosphorus precursor. In this study, two calcium precursors such as calcium nitrate tetrahydrate and calcium acetate were chosen as calcium precursors. The influence of aging period, pH, viscosity and sintering temperature on crystallinity and morphology of the HAP particles were investigated for the two calcium precursors with triethyl phosphate precursor. The morphology of nano-HAP towards phosphorous precursor was dependent on the type of calcium precursor used. The HAP prepared from calcium nitrate and triethyl phosphate was spherically shaped whereas the one from calcium acetate was found to be fibrous in structure. Both HAPs were stable up to 1200 °C and their crystallinity increased with respect to the sintering temperature. The obtained sample was characterized through X-ray diffraction (XRD), P 31 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and TEM analysis. The sol derived from the optimized aging period for the two different calcium precursors was coated on 316L stainless-steel (SS) implant and its corrosion resistivity during long-term implantation was studied by cyclic polarization in Ringer's solution. Both HAPs have their own desirable qualities and were found to be corrosion resistive.

  17. Extraction of lanthanide (3) nitrates by trialkylmethylammonium nitrate in decane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extraction of lanthanide (3) nitrates (praseodymium (3) - lutetium (3)) by trialkylmethylammonium nitrate in decane at T=298.15 K and pH2 is studied. The extraction isotherms are described with an account of formation of compounds of the (R4N)i(Ln(NO3)3+i) composition. Extraction constants values, which become reduced in the praseodymium (3)-lutetium (3) series, are calculated

  18. Rare earth(3) nitrates extraction with trialkylmethylammonium nitrate in toluene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extraction of rare earth(3) nitrates [praseodymium(3)-lutetium(3)] with trialkylmethylammonium nitrate in toluene at T = 298.15 K and pH 2 is studied. Extraction isotherms are described with regard to formation of compounds of (R4N)i[Ln(NO3)3+i] composition (i = 2, 3) in organic phase. Values of extraction constants are calculated, they are decreasing in the praseodymium(3) - lutetium(3) series

  19. Scandium extraction by methyltrialkylammonium nitrate from nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemistry of scandium extraction by methyltrialkylammonium (MTAA) nitrate in toluene from nitrate solutions is studied. Methods of saturation, equilibrium shift, physicochemical analysis, isomolar series and UV-spectroscopy are used to determine the composition of extracted complexes. It is shown that with low saturation degrees of extractant (R4N)6Sc(NO3)9 complex is formed in organic phase and with saturation - (R4N)3xSc(NO3)6 complex

  20. Halomonas desiderata as a bacterial model to predict the possible biological nitrate reduction in concrete cells of nuclear waste disposals

    OpenAIRE

    Alquier, Marjorie; Kassim, Caroline; Bertron, Alexandra; Sablayrolles, Caroline; Rafrafi, Yan; Albrecht, Achim; Erable, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    After closure of a waste disposal cell in a repository for radioactive waste, resaturation is likely to cause the release of soluble species contained in cement and bituminous matrices, such as ionic species (nitrates, sulfates, calcium and alkaline ions, etc.), organic matter (mainly organic acids), or gases (from steel containers and reinforced concrete structures as well as from radiolysis within the waste packages). However, in the presence of nitrates in the near-field of waste, the wast...

  1. Synthesis and Formation Mechanisms of Calcium Ferrite Compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hesham I. Saleh

    2004-01-01

    Calcium ferrite compounds were prepared using calcium nitrate and iron nitrate with different molar ratios, 1:1, 0.5:1, and 1:0.5,respectively. The reactions of formation were investigated at different temperatures following the differential thermal analysis (DTA) results. Calcium ferrite compounds are CaFeO3, Ca2FeO3.5, Ca2Fe2O5, CaFe2O4, CaFe4O7, Ca7.2Fe0.8Fe30O53,Ca3Fe15O25, Ca4Fe14O25, and Ca4Fe9O17. Other reactive species of calcium nitrate are still present after firing at 450℃.Compounds were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), DTA, TG, magnetic susceptibility, infrared spectra and scanning electron microscope (SEM). It is concluded that the formation mechanism of Ca-ferrite compounds depends mainly on the valency of iron cations which in role depends on its molar ratio and the existing atmosphere.

  2. Biological denitrification of nitrate wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enriched uranium wastes are purified in the Y-12 Plant, and the uranium product is recycled. One purification method involves dissolving the waste in nitric acid followed by solvent extraction to recover uranium. The process generates nitrate waste solutions which must be discarded. For many years, these wastes were stored in unlined ponds. In 1976 a recycle process was installed, and about half of the wastes were recovered and reused. A biological process (stirred tank) was installed, and the remaining nitrate wastes were biologically decomposed to produce nitrogen gas. Some additional nitrate wastes, generated in other parts of the plant, continued to be placed in the open ponds which must now be decommissioned. In 1983 an in-situ biological process was developed and tested whereby the open ponds were successfully biologically treated. This paper describes the results of the stirred tank and the in-situ pond treatment processes used in the plant to decompose nitrate ions

  3. Calcium in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... best source. Milk and dairy products such as yogurt, cheeses, and buttermilk contain a form of calcium ... the amount of calcium in a dairy product. Yogurt, most cheeses, and buttermilk are excellent sources of ...

  4. Fenoprofen calcium overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenoprofen calcium is a type of medicine called a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. It is a prescription pain medicine used to relieve symptoms of arthritis . Fenoprofen calcium overdose occurs when someone takes more than the ...

  5. Calcium channel blocker overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002580.htm Calcium channel blocker overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Calcium channel blockers are a type of medicine used ...

  6. Fenoprofen calcium overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002649.htm Fenoprofen calcium overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Fenoprofen calcium is a type of medicine called a nonsteroidal ...

  7. Sensitivity of nitrate aerosols to ammonia emissions and to nitrate chemistry: implications for present and future nitrate optical depth

    OpenAIRE

    F. Paulot; Ginoux, P.; Cooke, W. F.; L. J. Donner; S. Fan; Lin, M; J. Mao; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L.W.

    2015-01-01

    We update and evaluate the treatment of nitrate aerosols in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) atmospheric model (AM3). Accounting for the radiative effects of nitrate aerosols generally improves the simulated aerosol optical depth, although nitrate concentrations at the surface are biased high. This bias can be reduced by increasing the deposition of nitrate to account for the near-surface volatilization of ammonium nitrate or by neglecting th...

  8. Calcium and magnesium disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, Jesse P

    2014-07-01

    Hypocalcemia is a clinical disorder that can be life threatening to the cow (milk fever) and predisposes the animal to various other metabolic and infectious disorders. Calcium homeostasis is mediated primarily by parathyroid hormone, which stimulates bone calcium resorption and renal calcium reabsorption. Parathyroid hormone stimulates the production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D to enhance diet calcium absorption. High dietary cation-anion difference interferes with tissue sensitivity to parathyroid hormone. Hypomagnesemia reduces tissue response to parathyroid hormone. PMID:24980727

  9. Calcium and Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  10. Calcium en cardioplegie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Meijler, F.L.

    1985-01-01

    Coronary perfusion with a calcium-free solution, followed by reperfusion with a calcium containing solution, may result in acute myocardial cell death and in irreversible loss of the e1ectrical and mechanical activity of the heart. This phenomenon is known as the calcium paradox. A number of cardiop

  11. Influência da aplicação de gesso na produção de matéria seca, na relação nitrogênio: enxofre e concentrações de enxofre, cobre, nitrogênio e nitrato em pastagens de Brachiaria decumbens Stapf Influence of calcium sulphate fertilization on dry matter yield, nitrogen/sulfur relation and sulphur, copper, nitrogen and nitrate concentrations in Brachiaria decumbens Stapf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.M. Guedes

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Em solo classificado como latossolo vermelho-amarelo, de pH igual a 5,2, foram estudados o efeito da adição crescente do gesso agrícola (CaSO4.2H2O nos níveis de 0 t/ha (T; 0,5 t/ha (TA; 1,0 t/ha (TB e 1,5 t/ha (TC, combinados com a aplicação de 20kg/ha de nitrogênio sob a forma de uréia mais 80kg de K2O/ha sob a forma de cloreto de potássio, sobre a produção de matéria seca (MS da Brachiaria decumbens Stapf, no período de janeiro a dezembro. O delineamento experimental foi o de blocos ao acaso, com quatro repetições. Foram realizados três cortes (após 77, 133 e 341 dias do início do experimento para determinar a produção de matéria seca/ha e as concentrações de enxofre (S, nitrogênio (N, cobre (Cu e nitrato na forrageira. Observou-se que a produção de MS foi influenciada pelos tratamentos e época de corte da forrageira. Porém, não houve aumento significativo na produção de MS para níveis de adubação acima de 0,5 t/ha. As concentrações de S, N, Cu e nitrato não foram influenciadas pelos tratamentos.The study was conducted in a Brachiaria decumbens pasture, in a dark red-yellow latosol, pH 5.2, with the objective of evaluating the influence of crescent levels of calcium sulphate application and cutting-age on dry matter yield and on N, S, Cu and nitrate content. Four treatments and three cuts were done as follow: T (control, 0 ton/ha of calcium sulphate; TA, 0.5 ton/ha; TB, 1.0 ton/ha; and TC, 1.5 ton/ha. The cuts were done 77, 133 and 341 days after the beginning of the experiment. The experiment was set in a randomized complete block design, with four replications. The dry matter yield of TA, TB and TC showed differences (P0.05 between TA, TB and TC. Concentrations of S, Cu, N and nitrate in dry matter did not show differences (P>0.05 between treatments. However, the grass cutting-age influenced grass mineral concentrations (P<0.05 in all treatments.

  12. Modelling crop root development and nitrate uptake

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Anders

    2008-01-01

    Nitrate leaching from agricultural areas is a political and environmental issue at both local scale in Denmark and at global scale. Plant-available nitrogen and nitrate in the rooting zone in the growing season is necessary in order to obtain satisfactory crop yields. However, surplus nitrogen leads to a risk of nitrate losses through leaching and denitrification. In addition to artificial applications of nitrate, nitrate is produced by mineralisation processes in the soil from plant residues...

  13. Catalyzed reduction of nitrate in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium nitrate and other nitrate salts in wastes is a major source of difficulty for permanent disposal. Reduction of nitrate using aluminum metal has been demonstrated, but NH3, hydrazine, or organic compounds containing oxygen would be advantageous for reduction of nitrate in sodium nitrate solutions. Objective of this seed money study was to determine minimum conditions for reduction. Proposed procedure was batchwise heating of aqueous solutions in closed vessels with monitoring of temperatures and pressures. A simple, convenient apparatus and procedure were demonstrated for observing formation of gaseous products and collecting samples for analyses. The test conditions were 250 degree C and 1000 psi max. Any useful reduction of sodium nitrate to sodium hydroxide as the primary product was not found. The nitrate present at pHs 3 or NH4NO3 is easily decomposed, and the effect of nitromethane at these low pHs was confirmed. When acetic acid or formic acid was added, 21 to 56% of the nitrate in sodium nitrate solutions was reduced by methanol or formaldehyde. With hydrazine and acetic acid, 73 % of the nitrate was decomposed to convert NaNO3 to sodium acetate. With hydrazine and formic acid, 36% of the nitrate was decomposed. If these products are more acceptable for final disposal than sodium nitrate, the reagents are cheap and the conversion conditions would be practical for easy use. Ammonium acetate or formate salts did not significantly reduce nitrate in sodium nitrate solutions

  14. Calcium absorption and achlorhydria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defective absorption of calcium has been thought to exist in patients with achlorhydria. The author compared absorption of calcium in its carbonate form with that in a pH-adjusted citrate form in a group of 11 fasting patients with achlorhydria and in 9 fasting normal subjects. Fractional calcium absorption was measured by a modified double-isotope procedure with 0.25 g of calcium used as the carrier. Mean calcium absorption (+/- S.D.) in the patients with achlorhydria was 0.452 +/- 0.125 for citrate and 0.042 +/- 0.021 for carbonate (P less than 0.0001). Fractional calcium absorption in the normal subjects was 0.243 +/- 0.049 for citrate and 0.225 +/- 0.108 for carbonate (not significant). Absorption of calcium from carbonate in patients with achlorhydria was significantly lower than in the normal subjects and was lower than absorption from citrate in either group; absorption from citrate in those with achlorhydria was significantly higher than in the normal subjects, as well as higher than absorption from carbonate in either group. Administration of calcium carbonate as part of a normal breakfast resulted in completely normal absorption in the achlorhydric subjects. These results indicate that calcium absorption from carbonate is impaired in achlorhydria under fasting conditions. Since achlorhydria is common in older persons, calcium carbonate may not be the ideal dietary supplement

  15. EXERCISE ENHANCING CALCIUM ABSORPTION MECHANISM

    OpenAIRE

    Muliani

    2013-01-01

    Calcium has important role in many biological processes therefore calcium homeostasis should be maintained. Imbalance in calcium homeostasis would affects the bone metabolism, neuromuscular function, blood coagulation, cell proliferation and signal transduction. Homeostasis of calcium is maintained by three major organs: gastrointestinal tract, bone and kidney. Intestinal calcium absorption is the sole mechanism to supply calcium to the body. Calcium absorption controlled by calcitropic hormo...

  16. A biological source of oceanic alkyl nitrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, E. E.; Lewis, C. B.; Velasco, F. L.; Escobar, C.; Kellogg, D.; Velcamp, M.

    2013-12-01

    Alkyl nitrates are an important component of reactive nitrogen in the troposphere. The oceans are a source of alkyl nitrates to the atmosphere, however the source of alkyl nitrates in the oceans is unknown. It has been demonstrated that the reaction of alkyl peroxy radicals (ROO) with nitric oxide (NO) produces alkyl nitrates in the aqueous phase. We hypothesize that alkyl nitrates may be formed by organisms through the same reaction and therefore biological production could be a source of alkyl nitrates to the troposphere. This work focuses on the production of alkyl nitrates by the diatoms Chaetoceros muelleri and Thalassiosira weisfloggi. Using chemostats, we measure alkyl nitrates formed under nitrate limited conditions. We also use triggers and inhibitors of nitric oxide formation to determine if alkyl nitrate formation is affected by changes in NO production. To date, the rates of production of alkyl nitrates in our cultures, lead us to estimate a production rate on the order of femtomolar/day for C1-C3 alkyl nitrates by diatom species in the equatorial Pacific Ocean. This suggests that diatoms may contribute to the overall ocean source of alkyl nitrates; however, it is possible that other types of phytoplankton, such as cyanobacteria, that are more abundant in the open ocean, may contribute to a greater extent.

  17. Dengue and Calcium

    OpenAIRE

    Shivanthan, Mitrakrishnan C; Rajapakse, Senaka

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is potentially fatal unless managed appropriately. No specific treatment is available and the mainstay of treatment is fluid management with careful monitoring, organ support, and correction of metabolic derangement. Evidence with regards to the role of calcium homeostasis in dengue is limited. Low blood calcium levels have been demonstrated in dengue infection and hypocalcemia maybe more pronounced in more severe forms. The cause of hypocalcemia is likely to be multifactorial. Calcium...

  18. Measurements of intracellular calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) has been measured in cultured cells by using Fura-2 load cells and a computer-controlled Perkin Elmer LS-5B spectrofluorometer. Increased [Ca2+]i in cells exposed to extracellular bilirubin was observed both with and without extracellular calcium. However, the increase was considerable larger with extracellular calcium. The enhancement of [Ca2+]i became smaller with decreasing bilirubin/BSA (bovine serum albumine) ratio. 5 refs., 5 figs

  19. Analytical Chemistry and Materials Characterization Results for Debris Recovered from Nitrate Salt Waste Drum S855793

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Patrick Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chamberlin, Rebecca M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schwartz, Daniel S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Worley, Christopher Gordon [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Garduno, Katherine [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lujan, Elmer J. W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Borrego, Andres Patricio [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Castro, Alonso [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Colletti, Lisa Michelle [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fulwyler, James Brent [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Holland, Charlotte S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Keller, Russell C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Klundt, Dylan James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Martinez, Alexander [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Martin, Frances Louise [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Montoya, Dennis Patrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Myers, Steven Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Porterfield, Donivan R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schake, Ann Rene [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schappert, Michael Francis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Soderberg, Constance B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Spencer, Khalil J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stanley, Floyd E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Thomas, Mariam R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Townsend, Lisa Ellen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Xu, Ning [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-16

    Solid debris was recovered from the previously-emptied nitrate salt waste drum S855793. The bulk sample was nondestructively assayed for radionuclides in its as-received condition. Three monoliths were selected for further characterization. Two of the monoliths, designated Specimen 1 and 3, consisted primarily of sodium nitrate and lead nitrate, with smaller amounts of lead nitrate oxalate and lead oxide by powder x-ray diffraction. The third monolith, Specimen 2, had a complex composition; lead carbonate was identified as the predominant component, and smaller amounts of nitrate, nitrite and carbonate salts of lead, magnesium and sodium were also identified. Microfocused x-ray fluorescence (MXRF) mapping showed that lead was ubiquitous throughout the cross-sections of Specimens 1 and 2, while heteroelements such as potassium, calcium, chromium, iron, and nickel were found in localized deposits. MXRF examination and destructive analysis of fragments of Specimen 3 showed elevated concentrations of iron, which were broadly distributed through the sample. With the exception of its high iron content and low carbon content, the chemical composition of Specimen 3 was within the ranges of values previously observed in four other nitrate salt samples recovered from emptied waste drums.

  20. Nitrate metabolism in the gromiid microbial universe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgslund, Signe; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Cedhagen, Tomas

    Eukaryotic nitrate respiration supported by intracellular nitrate storages contributes substantially to the nitrogen cycle. Research focus is currently directed towards two phyla: Foraminifera and diatoms, but the widespread Gromia in the Rhizaria may be another key organism. These giant protists...

  1. Metal nitrate conversion method, patent application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2008-01-01

    A method for converting a supported metal nitrate into the corresponding supported metal comprises heating the metal nitrate to effect its decomposition under a gas mixture that contains nitric oxide and has an oxygen content of

  2. A Novel Chemical Nitrate Destruction Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dziewinski, J.; Marczak, S.

    1999-03-01

    Nitrates represent one of the most significant pollutant discharged to the Baltic Sea by the Sliiamae hydrometallurgical plant. This article contains a brief overview of the existing nitrate destruction technologies followed by the description of a new process developed by the authors. The new chemical process for nitrate destruction is cost effective and simple to operate. It converts the nitrate to nitrogen gas which goes to the atmosphere.

  3. Observation of nitrate coatings on atmospheric mineral dust particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Li

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate compounds have recently received much attention because of their ability to alter the hygroscopic properties and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN activity of mineral dust particles in the atmosphere. However, very little is known about specific characteristics of nitrate-coated mineral particles in an individual particle scale in field study. The sample collection was conducted during brown haze and dust episodes occurred between 24 May and 21 June 2007 in Beijing, northern China. The sizes, morphologies, and compositions of mineral dust particles together with their coatings were analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM. 92% of the internally mixed mineral particles analyzed are covered with Ca-, Mg-, and Na-rich coatings, and 8% are associated with K- and S-rich coatings. The major coatings contain Ca, Mg, O, and N with minor amounts of S and Cl, suggesting that they are possibly nitrates mixed with less sulfates and chlorides. These nitrate coatings strongly relate with the presence of alkaline mineral components (e.g., calcite and dolomite within individual mineral particles. Calcium sulfate particles with the diameter from 10 to 500 nm were also detected within Ca(NO32 and Mg(NO32 coatings. Our results indicate that mineral particles in brown haze episodes were involved in atmospheric heterogeneous reactions with two or more acidic gases (e.g., SO2, NO2, HCl, and HNO3. Mineral particles that acquire hygroscopic coatings tend to be more spherical and larger. Such changes enhance their light scattering and CCN activity, both of which have cooling effects on the climate.

  4. Modeling nitrate removal in a denitrification bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denitrification beds are being promoted to reduce nitrate concentrations in agricultural drainage water to alleviate the adverse environmental effects associated with nitrate pollution in surface water. In this system, water flows through a trench filled with a carbon media where nitrate is transfor...

  5. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely used as a...

  6. Effect of Indole Butyric Acid on the Transportation of Stored Calcium in Malus hupehensis Rhed. Seedling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jia; YANG Hong-qiang; YAN Tian-li; SHU Huai-rui

    2006-01-01

    Calcium (Ca) plays an important role in the metabolism of higher plants. Recently, research on Ca2+ in plants has been focused especially at the cellular and molecular levels. Uptake, transport, and distribution are also very important for Ca to accomplish its function at the whole-plant level. In this experiment, one-year-old apple seedlings (M. hupehensis Rehd.) were investigated to determine the distribution of stored Ca, the different forms of Ca, and Ca2+-ATPase activity after treatment with indole butyric acid (IBA). The results showed that the total Ca measured in mature leaves and Ca2+-ATPase activity in tender leaves were higher compared with those in the control (CK). Calcium nitrate and calcium chloride (ALe-Ca) and calcium phosphate and calcium carbonate (HAC-Ca) decreased in both mature leaves and shoots,whereas water-soluble calcium (H2O-Ca), calcium pectate (NaCl-Ca), and calcium oxalate (HCl-Ca) increased. The percentage of active calcium, calcium pectate, and water-soluble calcium increased, whereas the percentage of calcium phosphate and calcium carbonate decreased. When treated with IBA, calcium fractions and percentage of the different forms of Ca was enhanced in 40 part per million (ppm) IBA compared with 20 ppm IBA and water. The results indicated that IBA increased the percentage of both active calcium (NaCl-Ca and H2O-Ca) in tender shoots and boosted the transportation of stored Ca in plants. IBA promoted Ca2+-ATPase activity and Ca2+ uptake in tender shoots of M. hupehensis. It can improve the total Ca contents and the relative percentage of Ca.

  7. Nitrate Uptake, Nitrate Reductase Distribution and their Relation to Proton Release in Five Nodulated Grain Legumes

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, X. H.; Tang, C; RENGEL, Z.

    2002-01-01

    Nitrate uptake, nitrate reductase activity (NRA) and net proton release were compared in five grain legumes grown at 0·2 and 2 mm nitrate in nutrient solution. Nitrate treatments, imposed on 22‐d‐old, fully nodulated plants, lasted for 21 d. Increasing nitrate supply did not significantly influence the growth of any of the species during the treatment, but yellow lupin (Lupinus luteus) had a higher growth rate than the other species examined. At 0·2 mm nitrate supply, nitrate uptake rates ran...

  8. High temperature interaction studies on equimolar nitrate mixture of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate and gadolinium nitrate hexahydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rare earths including gadolinium form a sizeable fraction of the fission products in the nuclear fission of fissile material in the reactor. These fission products can interact with uranium dioxide fuel and can form various compounds which can alter the thermal behavior of the fuel. The mixed oxide formed due to the high temperature interactions of mixture of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH) and gadolinium nitrate hexahydrate (GdNH) has been studied using thermal and X- ray diffraction techniques. The equimolar mixture of UNH and GdNH was prepared by mixing the weighed amount of individual nitrates and grinding gently with mortar and pestle. Thermogravimetry (TG) measurements were carried out by separately heating 100 mg of mixture and individual nitrates at heating rate of 10°C min-1 using Netzsch thermal analyzer (Model No.: STA 409 PC Luxx) in high purity nitrogen atmosphere with a flow rate of 120 mL min-1. The XRD measurement was carried out on a Philips X-ray diffractometer (Model PW1710) using nickel-filtered Cu-Kα radiation

  9. Calcium D-saccharate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, André Castilho; Hedegaard, Martina Vavrusova; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

    2016-01-01

    Molar conductivity of saturated aqueous solutions of calcium d-saccharate, used as a stabilizer of beverages fortified with calcium d-gluconate, increases strongly upon dilution, indicating complex formation between calcium and d-saccharate ions, for which, at 25 °C, Kassoc = 1032 ± 80, ΔHassoc......° = -34 ± 6 kJ mol-1, and ΔSassoc° = -55 ± 9 J mol-1 K-1, were determined electrochemically. Calcium d-saccharate is sparingly soluble, with a solubility product, Ksp, of (6.17 ± 0.32) × 10-7 at 25 °C, only moderately increasing with the temperature: ΔHsol° = 48 ± 2 kJ mol-1, and ΔSassoc° = 42 ± 7 J mol-1...... K-1. Equilibria in supersaturated solutions of calcium d-saccharate seem only to adjust slowly, as seen from calcium activity measurements in calcium d-saccharate solutions made supersaturated by cooling. Solutions formed by isothermal dissolution of calcium d-gluconate in aqueous potassium d...

  10. Serum Calcium Level in Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Hazari, Mohammed Abdul Hannan; Arifuddin, Mehnaaz Sameera; Muzzakar, Syed; Reddy, Vontela Devender

    2012-01-01

    Background: The alterations in extracellular calcium level may influence intracellular calcium level and possibly play a role in the pathogenesis of essential hypertension. Aim: The purpose was to find out the association between serum calcium levels and hypertension; and to compare the serum calcium levels between normotensive controls, hypertensive subjects on calcium channel blockers, and hypertensive subjects on antihypertensive medication other than calcium channel blockers. Materials an...

  11. Nitration of naphthalene and remarks on the mechanism of electrophilic aromatic nitration*

    OpenAIRE

    Olah, George A.; Narang, Subhash C.; Olah, Judith A.

    1981-01-01

    Naphthalene was nitrated with a variety of nitrating agents. Comparison of data with Perrin's electrochemical nitration [Perrin, C. L. (1977) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 99, 5516-5518] shows that nitration of naphthalene gives an α-nitronaphthalene to β-nitronaphthalene ratio that varies between 9 and 29 and is thus not constant. Perrin's data, therefore, are considered to be inconclusive evidence for the proposed one-electron transfer mechanism for the nitration of naphthalene and other reactive aroma...

  12. HYPERTHERMIA, INTRACELLULAR FREE CALCIUM AND CALCIUM IONOPHORES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STEGE, GJJ; WIERENGA, PK; KAMPINGA, HH; KONINGS, AWT

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that heat-induced increase of intracellular calcium does not correlate with hyperthermic cell killing. Six different cell lines were investigated; in four (EAT, HeLa S3, L5178Y-R and L5178Y-S) heat treatments killing 90% of the cells did not affect the levels of intracellular free calciu

  13. Deconstructing nitrate isotope dynamics in aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, J.

    2012-12-01

    The natural abundance N and O stable isotope ratios of nitrate provide an invaluable tool to differentiate N sources to the environment, track their dispersal, and monitor their attenuation by biological transformations. The interpretation of patterns in isotope abundances relies on knowledge of the isotope ratios of the source end-members, as well as on constraints on the isotope discrimination imposed on nitrate by respective biological processes. Emergent observations from mono-culture experiments of denitrifying bacteria reveal nitrate fractionation trends that appear at odds with trends ascribed to denitrification in soils and aquifers. This discrepancy raises the possibility that additional biological N transformations may be acting in tandem with denitrification. Here, the N and O isotope enrichments associated with nitrate removal by denitrification in aquifers are posited to bear evidence of coincident biological nitrate production - from nitrification and/or from anammox. Simulations are presented from a simple time-dependent one-box model of a groundwater mass ageing that is subject to net nitrate loss by denitrification with coincident nitrate production by nitrification or anammox. Within boundary conditions characteristic of freshwater aquifers, the apparent slope of the parallel enrichments in nitrate N and O isotopes associated with net N loss to denitrification can vary in proportion to the nitrate added simultaneous by oxidative processes. Pertinent observations from nitrate plumes in suboxic to anoxic aquifers are examined to validate this premise. In this perspective, nitrate isotope distributions suggest that we may be missing important N fluxes inherent to most aquifers.

  14. Process for the reduction of the radioactivity of calcium sulfate from phosphorites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioactivity of calcium sulphate prepared from phosphorites can be avoided by the addition of strong nitric or hydrochloric acid and ammonium salts, in particular ammonium nitrate or phosphate, either following or during acidic decomposition of the phosphorite. (orig./WI)

  15. Phase diagram of ammonium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) has often subjected to uses in improvised explosive devices, due to its wide availability as a fertilizer and its capability of becoming explosive with slight additions of organic and inorganic compounds. Yet, the origin of enhanced energetic properties of impure AN (or AN mixtures) is neither chemically unique nor well understood -resulting in rather catastrophic disasters in the past1 and thereby a significant burden on safety in using ammonium nitrates even today. To remedy this situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN at high pressure and temperature, using diamond anvil cells and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The present results confirm the recently proposed phase IV-to-IV' transition above 17 GPa2 and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 400 °C.

  16. Collection of Nitrate in a Denuder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Feig

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Data are given for aerosol nitrate (NO3- size distributions in the atmosphere as recorded by a cascade impactor and by an annular denuder. Using this data, our goal is to find the percent of nitrate in the atmosphere that the denuder is able to detect. This requires that we find the size distribution of nitrate that enters the denuder. From these data and calculations, we find that 32.8% of nitrate in the atmosphere can be detected by the denuder. Nitrate was measured to study its affects on seagrass in the Tampa Bay and to compare nitrate levels with seagrass growth and decline. Using a denuder for routine measurements will not allow scientists to accurately compare nitrate data to seagrass levels.

  17. 5-Chloro-8-hydroxyquinolinium nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seik Weng Ng

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The 5-chloro-8-hydroxyquinolinium cation in the the title ion pair, C9H7ClNO+·NO3−, is approximately coplanar with the nitrate anion [dihedral angle = 16.1 (1°]. Two ion pairs are hydrogen bonded (2 × O—H...O and 2 × N—H...O about a center of inversion, generating an R44(14 ring.

  18. 2-Amino-5-chloropyridinium nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donia Zaouali Zgolli

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The title structure, C5H6ClN2+·NO3−, is held together by extensive hydrogen bonding between the NO3− ions and 2-amino-5-chloropyridinium H atoms. The cation–anion N—H...O hydrogen bonds link the ions into a zigzag- chain which develops parallel to the b axis. The structure may be compared with that of the related 2-amino-5-cyanopyridinium nitrate.

  19. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  20. Electrolytic production of uranous nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efficient production of uranous nitrate is important in nuclear fuel reprocessing because U(IV) acts as a plutonium reductant in solvent extraction and can be coprecipitated with plutonium and/or throium as oxalates during fuel reprocessing. Experimental conditions are described for the efficient electrolytic production of uranous nitrate for use as a reductant in the SRP Purex process. The bench-scale, continuous-flow, electrolysis cell exhibits a current efficiency approaching 100% in combination with high conversion rates of U(VI) to U(IV) in simulated and actual SRP Purex solutions. High current efficiency is achieved with a voltage-controlled mercury-plated platinum electrode and the use of hydrazine as a nitrite scavenger. Conversion of U(VI) to U(IV) proceeds at 100% efficiency. Cathodic gas generation is minimal. The low rate of gas generation permits a long residence time within the cathode, a necessary condition for high conversions on a continuous basis. Design proposals are given for a plant-scale, continuous-flow unit to meet SRP production requirements. Results from the bench-scale tests indicate that an 8-kW unit can supply sufficient uranous nitrate reductant to meet the needs of the Purex process at SRP

  1. Sensitivity of nitrate aerosols to ammonia emissions and to nitrate chemistry: implications for present and future nitrate optical depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Paulot

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We update and evaluate the treatment of nitrate aerosols in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL atmospheric model (AM3. Accounting for the radiative effects of nitrate aerosols generally improves the simulated aerosol optical depth, although nitrate concentrations at the surface are biased high. This bias can be reduced by increasing the deposition of nitrate to account for the near-surface volatilization of ammonium nitrate or by neglecting the heterogeneous production of nitric acid to account for the inhibition of N2O5 reactive uptake at high nitrate concentrations. Globally, uncertainties in these processes can impact the simulated nitrate optical depth by up to 25 %, much more than the impact of uncertainties in the seasonality of ammonia emissions (6 % or in the uptake of nitric acid on dust (13 %. Our best estimate for present-day fine nitrate optical depth at 550 nm is 0.006 (0.005–0.008. We only find a modest increase of nitrate optical depth (2 (−40 % and ammonia (+38 % from 2010 to 2050. Nitrate burden is projected to increase in the tropics and in the free troposphere, but to decrease at the surface in the midlatitudes because of lower nitric acid concentrations. Our results suggest that better constraints on the heterogeneous chemistry of nitric acid on dust, on tropical ammonia emissions, and on the transport of ammonia to the free troposphere are needed to improve projections of aerosol optical depth.

  2. Association between calcium intake, parathormone levels and blood pressure during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anibal Nieto

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the association between calcium intake from diet, calciotropic hormones (PTH, PTH-rp, vasoactive regulators (endothelin, nitric oxide and blood pressure levels during pregnancy, birth and puerperium.Method: In a prospective study 149 healthy normotensive primigravidas were followed-up from 15 weeks of gestation to puerperium. Daily calcium intake, calciuria, PTH, PTH-rp, endothelin, nitrite-nitrate, and Holter Test were assessed. Linear regression models were performed to evaluate the association between calcium intake, blood pressure levels and the laboratory tests. Multivariate regression models were performed to control potential confounders.Results: A significant increase of calcium intake during pregnancy was observed (931±301 mg/day to 1,195±467 mg/day, p<0.001. Plasma PTH-rp, endothelin, and nitrite-nitrate levels did not change during pregnancy. Among the women 38 (25.4% had low calcium intake (<800 mg/day with a larger increase of systolic and diastolic blood pressure during pregnancy (p=0.04 birth (p=0.006 and puerperium (p=0.01. After adjusting for other factors the multivariate analyses showed statistical association between low calcium intake, high parathormone levels and high systolic blood pressure levels during pregnancy (p=0.002.Conclusion: Low calcium intake during pregnancy is associated with a larger increase of systolic blood pressure and high parathormone levels.

  3. Sensitivity of nitrate aerosols to ammonia emissions and to nitrate chemistry: implications for present and future nitrate optical depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulot, F.; Ginoux, P.; Cooke, W. F.; Donner, L. J.; Fan, S.; Lin, M.-Y.; Mao, J.; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2016-02-01

    We update and evaluate the treatment of nitrate aerosols in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) atmospheric model (AM3). Accounting for the radiative effects of nitrate aerosols generally improves the simulated aerosol optical depth, although nitrate concentrations at the surface are biased high. This bias can be reduced by increasing the deposition of nitrate to account for the near-surface volatilization of ammonium nitrate or by neglecting the heterogeneous production of nitric acid to account for the inhibition of N2O5 reactive uptake at high nitrate concentrations. Globally, uncertainties in these processes can impact the simulated nitrate optical depth by up to 25 %, much more than the impact of uncertainties in the seasonality of ammonia emissions (6 %) or in the uptake of nitric acid on dust (13 %). Our best estimate for fine nitrate optical depth at 550 nm in 2010 is 0.006 (0.005-0.008). In wintertime, nitrate aerosols are simulated to account for over 30 % of the aerosol optical depth over western Europe and North America. Simulated nitrate optical depth increases by less than 30 % (0.0061-0.010) in response to projected changes in anthropogenic emissions from 2010 to 2050 (e.g., -40 % for SO2 and +38 % for ammonia). This increase is primarily driven by greater concentrations of nitrate in the free troposphere, while surface nitrate concentrations decrease in the midlatitudes following lower concentrations of nitric acid. With the projected increase of ammonia emissions, we show that better constraints on the vertical distribution of ammonia (e.g., convective transport and biomass burning injection) and on the sources and sinks of nitric acid (e.g., heterogeneous reaction on dust) are needed to improve estimates of future nitrate optical depth.

  4. Preparation of TiO2 nanotubes/mesoporous calcium silicate composites with controllable drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chunling; Li, Ping; Liu, Yan; Luo, Fei; Xiao, Xiufeng

    2016-10-01

    Nanotube structures such as TiO2 nanotube (TNT) arrays produced by self-ordering electrochemical anodization have been extensively explored for drug delivery applications. In this study, we presented a new implantable drug delivery system that combined mesoporous calcium silicate coating with nanotube structures to achieve a controllable drug release of water soluble and antiphlogistic drug loxoprofen sodium. The results showed that the TiO2 nanotubes/mesoporous calcium silicate composites were successfully fabricated by a simple template method and the deposition of mesoporous calcium silicate increased with the soaking time. Moreover, the rate of deposition of biological mesoporous calcium silicate on amorphous TNTs was better than that on anatase TNTs. Further, zinc-incorporated mesoporous calcium silicate coating, produced by adding a certain concentration of zinc nitrate into the soaking system, displayed improved chemical stability. A significant improvement in the drug release characteristics with reduced burst release and sustained release was demonstrated. PMID:27287140

  5. Insights on Alterations to the Rumen Ecosystem by Nitrate and Nitrocompounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Elizabeth A.; Anderson, Robin C.; Pinchak, William E.; Nisbet, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate and certain short chain nitrocompounds and nitro-oxy compounds are being investigated as dietary supplements to reduce economic and environmental costs associated with ruminal methane emissions. Thermodynamically, nitrate is a preferred electron acceptor in the rumen that consumes electrons at the expense of methanogenesis during dissimilatory reduction to an intermediate, nitrite, which is primarily reduced to ammonia although small quantities of nitrous oxide may also be produced. Short chain nitrocompounds act as direct inhibitors of methanogenic bacteria although certain of these compounds may also consume electrons at the expense of methanogenesis and are effective inhibitors of important foodborne pathogens. Microbial and nutritional consequences of incorporating nitrate into ruminant diets typically results in increased acetate production. Unlike most other methane-inhibiting supplements, nitrate decreases or has no effect on propionate production. The type of nitrate salt added influences rates of nitrate reduction, rates of nitrite accumulation and efficacy of methane reduction, with sodium and potassium salts being more potent than calcium nitrate salts. Digestive consequences of adding nitrocompounds to ruminant diets are more variable and may in some cases increase propionate production. Concerns about the toxicity of nitrate's intermediate product, nitrite, to ruminants necessitate management, as animal poisoning may occur via methemoglobinemia. Certain of the naturally occurring nitrocompounds, such as 3-nitro-1-propionate or 3-nitro-1-propanol also cause poisoning but via inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase. Typical risk management procedures to avoid nitrite toxicity involve gradually adapting the animals to higher concentrations of nitrate and nitrite, which could possibly be used with the nitrocompounds as well. A number of organisms responsible for nitrate metabolism in the rumen have been characterized. To date a single rumen bacterium

  6. Effect of nitrate on microbial perchlorate reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Over the last decade perchlorate has been recognized as an important emerging water contaminant that poses a significant public health threat. Because of its chemical stability, low ionic charge density, and significant water solubility microbial remediation has been identified as the most feasible method for its in situ attenuation. Our previous studies have demonstrated that dissimilatory perchlorate reducing bacteria (DPRB) capable of the respiratory reduction of perchlorate into innocuous chloride are ubiquitous in soil and sedimentary environments. As part of their metabolism these organisms reduce perchlorate to chlorite which is subsequently dismutated into chloride and molecular oxygen. These initial steps are mediated by the perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase enzymes respectively. Previously we found that the activity of these organisms is dependent on the presence of molybdenum and is inhibited by the presence of oxygen and to different extents nitrate. However, to date, there is little understanding of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of perchlorate reduction by oxygen and nitrate. As a continuation of our studies into the factors that control DPRB activity we investigated these regulatory mechanisms in more detail as a model organism, Dechloromonas aromatica strain RCB, transitions from aerobic metabolism through nitrate reduction to perchlorate reduction. In series of growth transition studies where both nitrate and perchlorate were present, preference for nitrate to perchlorate was observed regardless of the nitrate to perchlorate ratio. Even when the organism was pre-grown anaerobically in perchlorate, nitrate was reduced prior to perchlorate. Using non-growth washed cell suspension, perchlorate- grown D. aromatica was capable of reducing both perchlorate and nitrate concomitantly suggesting the preferentially utilization of nitrate was not a result of enzyme functionality. To elucidate the mechanism for preferential utilization of

  7. Neuronal calcium sparks and intracellular calcium “noise”

    OpenAIRE

    Melamed-Book, Naomi; Kachalsky, Sylvia G.; Kaiserman, Igor; Rahamimoff, Rami

    1999-01-01

    Intracellular calcium ions are involved in many forms of cellular function. To accommodate so many control functions, a complex spatiotemporal organization of calcium signaling has developed. In both excitable and nonexcitable cells, calcium signaling was found to fluctuate. Sudden localized increases in the intracellular calcium concentration—or calcium sparks—were found in heart, striated and smooth muscle, Xenopus Laevis oocytes, and HeLa and P12 cells. In the nervous system, intracellular...

  8. Fast photolysis of carbonyl nitrates from isoprene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Jean-Francois; Peeters, Jozef; Stavrakou, Trisevgeni

    2014-05-01

    We show that photolysis is, by far, the major atmospheric sink of isoprene-derived carbonyl nitrates. Empirical evidence from published laboratory studies on the absorption cross sections and photolysis rates of α-nitrooxy ketones suggests that the presence of the nitrate group (i) greatly enhances the absorption cross sections, and (ii) facilitates dissociation to a point that the photolysis quantum yield is close to unity, with O-NO2 dissociation as the likely major channel. On this basis, we provide new recommendations for estimating the cross sections and photolysis rates of carbonyl nitrates. The newly estimated photorates are validated using a chemical box model against measured temporal profiles of carbonyl nitrates in an isoprene oxidation experiment by Paulot et al. (2009). The comparisons for ethanal nitrate and for the sum of methacrolein- and methylvinylketone nitrates strongly supports our assumptions of large cross section enhancements and a near-unit quantum yield for these compounds. These findings have significant atmospheric implications, as carbonyl nitrates constitute an important component of the total organic nitrate pool over vegetated areas: the photorates of key carbonyl nitrates from isoprene are estimated to be typically between ~3 and 20 times higher than their sink due to reaction with OH in relevant atmospheric conditions. Moreover, since the reaction is expected to release NO2, photolysis is especially effective in depleting the total organic nitrate pool.

  9. Caracterización de nitratos alcalinos y alcalinoterreos por espectroscopia vibracional Characterization of alkali-metal and alkaline-earth nitrates by vibrational spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez, S; Acción, F.; Puertas, F.

    1992-01-01

    [EN] Infrared spectra of sodium and potassium alkaline-metal nitrates and magnesium and calcium alkali-earth nitrates in solid phase had been recorded in order to assign the fundamental bands. The influence of the dispersal médium (alkaline halide), employed in the solid sample preparation have been discussed. The quantitative measurements of the band in ten sities at 1.387 cm~^ (present in the I.R. spectra of the four nitrates in KBr médium) allowed us to determine th...

  10. Calcium aluminate cements for nuclear wastes conditioning: literature review and new approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Encapsulate the diverse wastes produced by nuclear activities in cementitious binders may be very complex due to the adverse cement-waste interactions. Consequences are for example: strong delay, poor mechanical strength or low resistance to leaching. In this case, pure or blended calcium aluminate cements (CACs) may be valuable alternatives. This paper summarises the properties of CAC and blended CAC system and gives some examples from literature where calcium aluminate cements are used for conventional wastes or nuclear wastes conditioning. Moreover, it proposes another approach: using CAC not only as a binder, but also as a chemical reactant. After dissolution calcium aluminates ions can combine with many chemical species (sulphates, nitrates, chlorides, alkali metals, heavy metals) to precipitate specific hydrates allowing chemical trapping of these species. An example is given for the purification of Ni and Zn nitrates solutions. (authors)

  11. Calcium addition in straw gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risnes, H.; Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk;

    2003-01-01

    The present work focuses on the influence of calcium addition in gasification. The inorganic¿organic element interaction as well as the detailed inorganic¿inorganic elements interaction has been studied. The effect of calcium addition as calcium sugar/molasses solutions to straw significantly...... affected the ash chemistry and the ash sintering tendency but much less the char reactivity. Thermo balance test are made and high-temperature X-ray diffraction measurements are performed, the experimental results indicate that with calcium addition major inorganic¿inorganic reactions take place very late...... calcium binds silicon primarily as calcium silicates and less as potassium calcium silicates....

  12. Determination, source identification and GIS mapping for nitrate concentration in ground water from Bara aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study was carried-out determine the level of nitrate concentration in well water from Bara aquifer in North Kordofan State. The analysis was conducted for 69 wells from different villages within Bara basin. Physical characteristics were measured including pH, electrical conductivity and dissolved oxygen. Spectrophotometric analysis was used to determine nitrate, nitrite and ammonia. Chloride and hardness were determined telemetrically and flame photometer was used for major elements namely sodium and potassium, whereas atomic absorption spectroscopy was used for trace elements namely iron, manganese, zinc and copper. Results revealed that nitrate concentration range from 9.68 to 891 mg/1 in sampled wells with 81% exceeding the maximum permissible limits set for drinking water by WHO and SSMO. Animal waste and organic soil nitrogen were found to be the sources of nitrate in these wells as indicated by 15N%. Majority of wells with high nitrate are located in the north and the north-east part of the study area as shown by GIS predictive map. On the average, the concentrations of sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, manganese, zinc and copper were found to be within WHO limits for drinking water. (Author)

  13. Calcium binding by dietary fibre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietary fibre from plants low in phytate bound calcium in proportion to its uronic-acid content. This binding by the non-cellulosic fraction of fibre reduces the availability of calcium for small-intestinal absorption, but the colonic microbial digestion of uronic acids liberates the calcium. Thus the ability to maintain calcium balance on high-fibre diets may depend on the adaptive capacity on the colon for calcium. (author)

  14. Nitrate contamination of groundwater and its countermeasures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitamura, Hisayoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The inevitable increases of food production and energy consumption with an increase in world population become main causes of an increase of nitrate load to the environment. Although nitrogen is essential for the growth of animal and plant as a constituent element of protein, excessive nitrate load to the environment contaminates groundwater resources used as drinking water and leads to seriously adverse effects on the health of man and livestock. In order to clarify the problem of nitrate contamination of groundwater and search a new trend of technology development from the viewpoint of environment remediation and protection, the present paper has reviewed adverse effects of nitrate on human health, the actual state of nitrogen cycle, several kinds of nitrate sources, measures for reducing nitrate level, etc. (author)

  15. Nitrate contamination of groundwater and its countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inevitable increases of food production and energy consumption with an increase in world population become main causes of an increase of nitrate load to the environment. Although nitrogen is essential for the growth of animal and plant as a constituent element of protein, excessive nitrate load to the environment contaminates groundwater resources used as drinking water and leads to seriously adverse effects on the health of man and livestock. In order to clarify the problem of nitrate contamination of groundwater and search a new trend of technology development from the viewpoint of environment remediation and protection, the present paper has reviewed adverse effects of nitrate on human health, the actual state of nitrogen cycle, several kinds of nitrate sources, measures for reducing nitrate level, etc. (author)

  16. [Calcium suppletion for patients who use gastric acid inhibitors: calcium citrate or calcium carbonate?].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, H.J. de; Gans, R.O.; Huls, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Various calcium supplements are available for patients who have an indication for calcium suppletion. American guidelines and UpToDate recommend prescribing calcium citrate to patients who use antacids The rationale for this advice is that water-insoluble calcium carbonate needs acid for adequate ab

  17. Inhaled plutonium nitrate in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major objective of this project is to determine dose-effect relationships of inhaled plutonium nitrate in dogs to aid in predicting health effects of accidental exposure in man. For lifespan dose-effect studies, beagle dogs were given a single inhalation exposure to 239Pu(NO3)4, in 1976 and 1977. The earliest biological effect was on the hematopoietic system; lymphopenia and neutropenia occurred at the two highest dose levels. The authors have also observed radiation pneumonitis, lung cancer, and bone cancer at the three highest dose levels. 1 figure, 4 tables

  18. Inhaled plutonium nitrate in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major objective of this project is to determine dose-effect relationships of inhaled plutonium nitrate in dogs to aid in predicting health effects of accidental exposure in man. For lifespan dose-effect studies, beagle dogs were given a single inhalation exposure to 239Pu(NO3)4, in 1976 and 1977. The earliest biological effect was on the hematopoietic system; lymphopenia and neutropenia occurred at the two highest dose levels. They have also observed radiation pneumonitis, lung cancer, and bone cancer at the three highest dose levels. 1 figure, 3 tables

  19. Nitrate leaching from Silage Maize

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Elly Møller; Eriksen, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    During the last 20 years the area with maize in Denmark has increased dramatically and reached 163,000 ha in 2008. Silage maize is easy to grow, is a suitable fodder for cows and goes well with grass-clover in the diet. This means that silage maize is often found in crop rotations with grass-clover on sandy soils in western Denmark. The ploughing in of grass-clover fields poses a serious risk of increased nitrate leaching on a coarse sandy soil, even when carried out in spring. With increased...

  20. Physico-chemical properties and toxic effect of fruit-ripening agent calcium carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Asif

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ripening is the final stage of the maturation process, when the fruit changes color, softens and develops the flavor, texture and aroma that constitute optimum eating quality. This study was conducted to discuss the use of unsatisfactory calcium carbide to ripen fruits for domestic markets as well as their toxic effects on human health. The commonly used ripening agents are calcium carbide, acetylene, ethylene, propylene, ethrel (2-chloroethyl phosphonic acid, glycol, ethanol and some other agents. The calcium carbide is one of the most commonly used ripening agent for fruits, while other calcium salts like calcium ammonium nitrate, calcium chloride and calcium sulfate are used to delay fruit ripening agents for local fruit industries. The use of calcium carbide is being discouraged worldwide, due to associated health hazards. Calcium carbide treatment of food is extremely hazardous because it contains traces of arsenic and phosphorous, and once dissolved in water, it produces acetylene gas. Arsenic, phosphorous and acetylene gas may affect the different body organs and causes various health problems like headache, dizziness, mood disturbances, sleepiness, mental confusion, memory loss, cerebral edema, seizures and prolonged hypoxia.

  1. Water Pollution with Nitrates from Agricultural Sources

    OpenAIRE

    FLESERIU A.; OROIAN I.

    2010-01-01

    One of the biggest water pollution problem is created by nitrates resulted from agriculture. This paper is areview aimin to emphasiz the main water pollution problems produced by nitrates in Romania and EU. The excessnitrates can accumulate in soil in several ways. First, manure effluents containing both ammonia and organic forms ofnitrogen. Organic nitrogen can be converted to ammonia in the soil. The ammonia, together with any ammoniafertilizer applied, is converted to nitrate by soil bacte...

  2. Calcium in plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Schwartau

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the review on the role of calcium in many physiological processes of plant organisms, including growth and development, protection from pathogenic influences, response to changing environmental factors, and many other aspects of plant physiology. Initial intake of calcium ions is carried out by Ca2+-channels of plasma membrane and they are further transported by the xylem owing to auxins’ attractive ability. The level of intake and selectivity of calcium transport to ove-ground parts of the plant is controlled by a symplast. Ca2+enters to the cytoplasm of endoderm cells through calcium channels on the cortical side of Kaspary bands, and is redistributed inside the stele by the symplast, with the use of Ca2+-АТPases and Ca2+/Н+-antiports. Owing to regulated expression and activity of these calcium transporters, calclum can be selectively delivered to the xylem. Important role in supporting calcium homeostasis is given to the vacuole which is the largest depo of calcium. Regulated quantity of calcium movement through the tonoplast is provided by a number of potential-, ligand-gated active transporters and channels, like Ca2+-ATPase and Ca2+/H+ exchanger. They are actively involved in the inactivation of the calcium signal by pumping Ca2+ to the depo of cells. Calcium ATPases are high affinity pumps that efficiently transfer calcium ions against the concentration gradient in their presence in the solution in nanomolar concentrations. Calcium exchangers are low affinity, high capacity Ca2+ transporters that are effectively transporting calcium after raising its concentration in the cell cytosol through the use of protons gradients. Maintaining constant concentration and participation in the response to stimuli of different types also involves EPR, plastids, mitochondria, and cell wall. Calcium binding proteins contain several conserved sequences that provide sensitivity to changes in the concentration of Ca2+ and when you

  3. Denitration of Uranyl Nitrate Using Tridodecyl Amine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrate extraction from uranyl nitrate using extractant tridodecyl amine and paraffin has been carried out. The aim of this research was to prepare uranyl nitrate with low nitrate content (acid deficiency uranyl nitrate/ADUN). ADUN is a raw material for making kernels uranium oxide in a spherical from which cannot easily be broken/cracked. This ADUN was prepared by extracting nitric acid in uranyl nitrate solution with tridodecyl amine (TDA) and paraffin. Nitric acid in uranyl nitrate solution moved into organic phase due to the complex formation with TDA. The aqueous phase was ADUN, it was than analyzed its nitric and uranium contents using titration method. Tree variables were observed, i.e. uranium contents (80-125 g/l), process temperature (50-100 oC) and TDA/Nitrate molar ratio (0.5-1). Experiment results showed that optimum condition accurate at uranium content of 100 g/l, temperature extraction 60-70 oC and TDA to Nitrate molar ratio 0.75-0.80 with an efficiency of 77 %. (author)

  4. Water Pollution with Nitrates from Agricultural Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FLESERIU A.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the biggest water pollution problem is created by nitrates resulted from agriculture. This paper is areview aimin to emphasiz the main water pollution problems produced by nitrates in Romania and EU. The excessnitrates can accumulate in soil in several ways. First, manure effluents containing both ammonia and organic forms ofnitrogen. Organic nitrogen can be converted to ammonia in the soil. The ammonia, together with any ammoniafertilizer applied, is converted to nitrate by soil bacteria in a process called nitrification. Nitrification is importantbecause plants can only use nitrogen as nitrate. It is equally harmful in both, animals and humans.

  5. Photochemistry of Nitrate Adsorbed on Mineral Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gankanda, A.; Grassian, V. H.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral dust particles in the atmosphere are often associated with adsorbed nitrate from heterogeneous reactions with nitrogen oxides including HNO3 and NO2. Although nitrate ion is a well-studied chromophore in natural waters, the photochemistry of adsorbed nitrate on mineral dust particles is yet to be fully explored. In this study, wavelength dependence of the photochemistry of adsorbed nitrate on different model components of mineral dust aerosol has been investigated using transmission FTIR spectroscopy. Al2O3, TiO2 and NaY zeolite were used as model systems to represent non-photoactive oxides, photoactive semiconductor oxides and porous materials respectively, present in mineral dust aerosol. In this study, adsorbed nitrate is irradiated with 254 nm, 310 nm and 350 nm narrow band light. In the irradiation with narrow band light, NO2 is the only detectable gas-phase product formed from nitrate adsorbed on Al2O3 and TiO2. The NO2 yield is highest at 310 nm for both Al2O3 and TiO2. Unlike Al2O3 and TiO2, in zeolite, adsorbed nitrate photolysis to nitrite is observed only at 310 nm during narrow band irradiation. Moreover gas phase products were not detected during nitrate photolysis in zeolite at all three wavelengths. The significance of these differences as related to nitrate photochemistry on different mineral dust components will be highlighted.

  6. High dose potassium-nitrate chemical dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This dosimeter is used to control 10 kGY-order doses (1 Mrad). Nitrate suffers a radiolitic reduction phenomena, which is related to the given dose. The method to use potassium nitrate as dosimeter is described, as well as effects of the temperature of irradiation, pH, nitrate concentration and post-irradiation stability. Nitrate powder was irradiated at a Semi-Industrial Plant, at Centro Atomico Ezeiza, and also in a Gammacell-220 irradiator. The dose rates used were 2,60 and 1,80 KGY/hour, and the given doses varied between 1,0 and 150 KGY. The uncertainty was +-3% in all the range. (author)

  7. Nitrate reductase assay using sodium nitrate for rapid detection of multidrug resistant tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maíra Bidart Macedo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We validated the nitrate reductase assay (NRA for the detection of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB using sodium nitrate (NaNO3 in replacement of potassium nitrate (KNO3 as nitrate source. NaNO3 is cheaper than KNO3 and has no restriction on use which facilitates the implementation of NRA to detect MDR-TB.

  8. Additive methane-mitigating effect between linseed oil and nitrate fed to cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyader, J; Eugène, M; Meunier, B; Doreau, M; Morgavi, D P; Silberberg, M; Rochette, Y; Gerard, C; Loncke, C; Martin, C

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to test the effect of linseed oil and nitrate fed alone or in combination on methane (CH4) emissions and diet digestibility in cows. The experiment was conducted as a 2 × 2 factorial design using 4 multiparous nonlactating Holstein cows (initial BW 656 ± 31 kg). Each experimental period lasted 5 wk, with measures performed in the final 3 wk (wk 3 to 5). Diets given on a DM basis were 1) control (CON; 50% natural grassland hay and 50% concentrate), 2) CON with 4% linseed oil (LIN), 3) CON with 3% calcium nitrate (NIT), and 4) CON with 4% linseed oil plus 3% calcium nitrate (LIN+NIT). Diets were offered twice daily and were formulated to deliver similar amounts (DM basis) of CP (12.2%), starch (25.5%), and NDF (39.5%). Feed offer was restricted to 90% of voluntary intake (12.4 kg DMI/d). Total tract digestibility and N balance were determined from total feces and urine collected separately for 6 d during wk 4. Daily CH4 emissions were quantified using open chambers for 4 d during wk 5. Rumen fermentation and microbial parameters were analyzed from samples taken before and 3 h after the morning feeding. Rumen concentrations of dissolved hydrogen (H2) were measured continuously up to 6 h after feeding using a H2 sensor. Compared with the CON diet linseed oil and nitrate decreased (P 0.05) on total tract digestibility of nutrients, except linseed oil, which tended to reduce (P < 0.10) fiber digestibility. Nitrogen balance (% of N intake) was positive for all diets but retention was less (P = 0.03) with linseed oil. This study demonstrates an additive effect between nitrate and linseed oil for reducing methanogenesis in cows without altering diet digestibility. PMID:26440025

  9. Evaluation of nitrates in albanian wines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariola Morina

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Nitrates are important compounds in nature but not desirable if they are present in wine at increased amount. The high level of nitrate is attributed to the use of nitrogen fertilizers in the vineyards. Method of the reactive Gries I and Gries II was used for the determination of nitrates in wine. There were analyzed 45 white wines and 55 red wines produced in 2008 – 2010, as well as wines produced from Albanian grape varieties Shesh i Bardhë and Shesh i Zi in 2009 and 2010, as an authentic wines evidence with denominated origin. From the results of analyses was observed that, in 51 % of white wines was found that the content of nitrates were less than 5 mg/l, in 46% of them the nitrates level goes up to 10 mg/l and only in 3 % of them the amount of nitrates is up to 12 mg/l. None of white wine samples have the content of nitrates over 20 mg/l. In this case there is no doubt for water addition during wine preparation. In regards of red wines, in 34% of them the amount of nitrates is up to 5 mg/l, in 30% of them up to 10 mg/l, while in 26% of them the amount of nitrates is 20 mg/l. Only 10 % of red wines have nitrates content over 20 mg/l which raise dubiety for falsified wines where water and sugar is added in the red marc. The level of nitrates in wines with denominated origin was under 20 mg/L.

  10. Nitrate pollution of a karstic groundwater system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Bohemian karst, an extensive karst area formed by Devonian and Silurian limestone, is located SW of Prague. The largest of the karstic springs discharges in the village of Svaty Jan pod Skalou. With about 19 L/s of average discharge, the spring was formerly an important source of good quality drinking water in the ares. Because of increasing agricultural activity after World War II, both shallow and deep water resources, including the karstic systems, have been contaminated by infiltrating nitrates. The nitrate content of the Svaty Jan spring now varies from 40 mg/L to 60 mg/L. To specify the sources of nitrate pollution and collect sufficient data for possible prediction of future development, an extensive study of the spring was initiated in 1994. Flow dynamics, chemical, and isotopic composition (δ18O in water, δ15N in nitrate) are monitored in the spring and precipitation in the recharge area together with possible sources of nitrates (fertilizers, solutes in soil profile). The spring discharge responds to precipitation events very quickly but with a small amplitude and a low variability in δ18O (∼2 per mille). This reflects the large volume of the karstic system that dumps infiltrating precipitation and the low contribution of the direct discharge component. Even more contrasting is the relation between the low variability of nitrate content and periodic changes in δ15N of nitrate (from 5 per mille to 2 per mille). With regard to the specifics of the karstic groundwater system (piston-like flow) two alternative hypotheses of nitrate generation are suggested: (1) different rates of nitrate production in the recharge area and (2) different sources of nitrate localized along the recharge area. To verify the hypotheses, the record of fertilizer applied in the recharge area was studied together with actual nitrate content and its isotopic composition in deep soil profiles. (author)

  11. Nitrate reduction functional genes and nitrate reduction potentials persist in deeper estuarine sediments. Why?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokratis Papaspyrou

    Full Text Available Denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA are processes occurring simultaneously under oxygen-limited or anaerobic conditions, where both compete for nitrate and organic carbon. Despite their ecological importance, there has been little investigation of how denitrification and DNRA potentials and related functional genes vary vertically with sediment depth. Nitrate reduction potentials measured in sediment depth profiles along the Colne estuary were in the upper range of nitrate reduction rates reported from other sediments and showed the existence of strong decreasing trends both with increasing depth and along the estuary. Denitrification potential decreased along the estuary, decreasing more rapidly with depth towards the estuary mouth. In contrast, DNRA potential increased along the estuary. Significant decreases in copy numbers of 16S rRNA and nitrate reducing genes were observed along the estuary and from surface to deeper sediments. Both metabolic potentials and functional genes persisted at sediment depths where porewater nitrate was absent. Transport of nitrate by bioturbation, based on macrofauna distributions, could only account for the upper 10 cm depth of sediment. A several fold higher combined freeze-lysable KCl-extractable nitrate pool compared to porewater nitrate was detected. We hypothesised that his could be attributed to intracellular nitrate pools from nitrate accumulating microorganisms like Thioploca or Beggiatoa. However, pyrosequencing analysis did not detect any such organisms, leaving other bacteria, microbenthic algae, or foraminiferans which have also been shown to accumulate nitrate, as possible candidates. The importance and bioavailability of a KCl-extractable nitrate sediment pool remains to be tested. The significant variation in the vertical pattern and abundance of the various nitrate reducing genes phylotypes reasonably suggests differences in their activity throughout the

  12. Nitrate uptake, nitrate reductase distribution and their relation to proton release in five nodulated grain legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, X H; Tang, C; Rengel, Z

    2002-09-01

    Nitrate uptake, nitrate reductase activity (NRA) and net proton release were compared in five grain legumes grown at 0.2 and 2 mM nitrate in nutrient solution. Nitrate treatments, imposed on 22-d-old, fully nodulated plants, lasted for 21 d. Increasing nitrate supply did not significantly influence the growth of any of the species during the treatment, but yellow lupin (Lupinus luteus) had a higher growth rate than the other species examined. At 0.2 mM nitrate supply, nitrate uptake rates ranged from 0.6 to 1.5 mg N g(-1) d(-1) in the order: yellow lupin > field pea (Pisum sativum) > chickpea (Cicer arietinum) > narrow-leafed lupin (L angustifolius) > white lupin (L albus). At 2 mM nitrate supply, nitrate uptake ranged from 1.7 to 8.2 mg N g(-1) d(-1) in the order: field pea > chickpea > white lupin > yellow lupin > narrow-leafed lupin. Nitrate reductase activity increased with increased nitrate supply, with the majority of NRA being present in shoots. Field pea and chickpea had much higher shoot NRA than the three lupin species. When 0.2 mM nitrate was supplied, narrow-leafed lupinreleased the most H+ per unit root biomass per day, followed by yellow lupin, white lupin, field pea and chickpea. At 2 mM nitrate, narrow-leafed lupin and yellow lupin showed net proton release, whereas the other species, especially field pea, showed net OH- release. Irrespective of legume species and nitrate supply, proton release was negatively correlated with nitrate uptake and NRA in shoots, but not with NRA in roots. PMID:12234143

  13. Gravimetric Determination of Calcium as Calcium Carbonate Hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrickson, Charles H.; Robinson, Paul R.

    1979-01-01

    The gravimetric determination of calcium as calcium carbonate is described. This experiment is suitable for undergraduate quantitative analysis laboratories. It is less expensive than determination of chloride as silver chloride. (BB)

  14. Dietary Nitrate, Nitric Oxide, and Cardiovascular Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondonno, Catherine P; Croft, Kevin D; Hodgson, Jonathan M

    2016-09-01

    Emerging evidence strongly suggests that dietary nitrate, derived in the diet primarily from vegetables, could contribute to cardiovascular health via effects on nitric oxide (NO) status. NO plays an essential role in cardiovascular health. It is produced via the classical L-arginine-NO-synthase pathway and the recently discovered enterosalivary nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway. The discovery of this alternate pathway has highlighted dietary nitrate as a candidate for the cardioprotective effect of a diet rich in fruit and vegetables. Clinical trials with dietary nitrate have observed improvements in blood pressure, endothelial function, ischemia-reperfusion injury, arterial stiffness, platelet function, and exercise performance with a concomitant augmentation of markers of NO status. While these results are indicative of cardiovascular benefits with dietary nitrate intake, there is still a lingering concern about nitrate in relation to methemoglobinemia, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. It is the purpose of this review to present an overview of NO and its critical role in cardiovascular health; to detail the observed vascular benefits of dietary nitrate intake through effects on NO status as well as to discuss the controversy surrounding the possible toxic effects of nitrate. PMID:25976309

  15. Effect of ammonium nutrition on the nitrate utilization, nitrate reductase actvity and growth of Spirodela polyrrhiza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Tatkowska

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The influence of NH4+ ions on nitrate assimilation and growth of sterile Spirodela polyrrhiza cultures was investigated. S. polyrrhiza utilises both the nitrate and the ammonium form of nitrogen, it prefers, however, NH4+. Ammonium ions present in the nitrate medium inhibit the activity of nitrate reductase (NR, but they do not affect enzyme 'induction and only slightly reduce N03- uptake. These results sugest that the inhibitory effect of NH4+ on the NR activity is the main cause of the decrease in N03- assimilation by S. polyrrhiza cultures growing in nitrate-ammonium medium.

  16. Synthesis, processing behavior, and characterization of bismuth superconductors using freeze dried nitrate precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synthesis of Bi2-xPbxSr2Ca2Cu3O10 (Bi2223) powders from a freeze dried nitrate precursor is reported here. We examine the composition and morphology of the precursor material, describe the chemistry and kinetics of product formation, and evaluate the phase composition and superconducting properties of the products. A nitrate solution containing the appropriate ratio of cations was rapidly frozen and then freeze dried at low temperatures to form an atomic mixture of the component salts. The thermal processing of the freeze dried material consisted of three steps: (i) dehydration, (ii) denitration, and (iii) solid state reaction to form the Bi2223 superconducting product. Calcium substituted bismuthates and strontium-substituted calcium cuprate, not Bi2201, are the intermediates between the nitrates and the superconducting products. These highly disordered phases rapidly transform into Bi2212 or Bi2223 at higher temperatures (>790 degree C). The kinetics of product formation was studied using XRD analysis and magnetic susceptibility. The kinetics were shown to follow the nucleation and growth mechanism. Bi2223 formed after only 30 min at a few degrees below the melting point, and after 37 h Bi2223 products exhibited excellent phase composition and magnetic susceptibility characteristics

  17. CALCIUM SOAP LUBRICANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Alaz, Izer; Tugce, Nefise; Devrim, Balköse

    2014-01-01

    The article studies the properties of calcium stearate (CaSt2) and lubricants produced on its basis. These lubricants were prepared using sodium stearate and calcium chloride by subsidence from aqueous solutions. The CaSt2 and the light fraction of crude oil were mixed together to obtain lubricating substances. The article shows that CaSt2 had the melting temperature of 142.8 C that is higher than the melting temperature of crude oil (128 C). The compositions of obtained lubricants were stu...

  18. CALCIUM-INDUCED SUPRAMOLECULAR STRUCTURES IN THE CALCIUM CASEINATE SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The molecular details deciphering the spontaneous calcium-induced protein aggregation process in the calcium caseinate system remain obscure. Understanding this complex process could lead to potential new applications of this important food ingredient. In this work, we studied calcium-induced supra...

  19. Nitrate Transport, Sensing, and Responses in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, José A; Vega, Andrea; Bouguyon, Eléonore; Krouk, Gabriel; Gojon, Alain; Coruzzi, Gloria; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A

    2016-06-01

    Nitrogen (N) is an essential macronutrient that affects plant growth and development. N is an important component of chlorophyll, amino acids, nucleic acids, and secondary metabolites. Nitrate is one of the most abundant N sources in the soil. Because nitrate and other N nutrients are often limiting, plants have developed sophisticated mechanisms to ensure adequate supply of nutrients in a variable environment. Nitrate is absorbed in the root and mobilized to other organs by nitrate transporters. Nitrate sensing activates signaling pathways that impinge upon molecular, metabolic, physiological, and developmental responses locally and at the whole plant level. With the advent of genomics technologies and genetic tools, important advances in our understanding of nitrate and other N nutrient responses have been achieved in the past decade. Furthermore, techniques that take advantage of natural polymorphisms present in divergent individuals from a single species have been essential in uncovering new components. However, there are still gaps in our understanding of how nitrate signaling affects biological processes in plants. Moreover, we still lack an integrated view of how all the regulatory factors identified interact or crosstalk to orchestrate the myriad N responses plants typically exhibit. In this review, we provide an updated overview of mechanisms by which nitrate is sensed and transported throughout the plant. We discuss signaling components and how nitrate sensing crosstalks with hormonal pathways for developmental responses locally and globally in the plant. Understanding how nitrate impacts on plant metabolism, physiology, and growth and development in plants is key to improving crops for sustainable agriculture. PMID:27212387

  20. Acetate biodegradation by anaerobic microorganisms at high pH and high calcium concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acetate biodegradation at a high pH and a high calcium concentration was examined to clarify the effect of bacterial activity on the migration of organic 14C compounds in cementitious repositories. Tamagawa river sediment or Teganuma pond sediment was anaerobically cultured with 5 mM acetate and 10 mM nitrate at pH 9.5-12 at 30 oC. After 20 and 90 days, the acetate concentration of the culture medium was analyzed and found to have decreased below 5 mM at pH ≤ 11. On the other hand, it did not decrease when either sediment was incubated in the absence of nitrate. These results suggest that nitrate-reducing bacteria can biodegrade acetate under more alkaline conditions than the reported pH range in which nitrate-reducing bacteria can exhibit activity. Acetate biodegradation was also examined at a high calcium concentration. Sediments were anaerobically cultured at pH 9.5 with 5 mM acetate and 10 mM nitrate in solution, equilibrated with ordinary Portland cement hydrate, in which the Ca concentration was 14.6 mM. No decrease in acetate concentration after incubation of the sediments was observed, nor was it lower than in the absence of cementitious composition, suggesting that kinetics of acetate biodegradation by anaerobic microorganisms is lowered by a high Ca concentration. - Research highlights: → Acetate biodegradation at a high pH and a high calcium concentration was examined to clarify the effect of bacterial activity on the migration of organic 14C compounds in cementitious repositories. → Nitrate-reducing bacteria can biodegrade acetate at pH ≤ 11. → Kinetics of acetate biodegradation by anaerobic microorganisms might be lowered by a high Ca concentration.

  1. Impact of adding nitrate or increasing the lipid content of two contrasting diets on blood methaemoglobin and performance of two breeds of finishing beef steers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duthie, C-A; Rooke, J A; Troy, S; Hyslop, J J; Ross, D W; Waterhouse, A; Roehe, R

    2016-05-01

    Adding nitrate to the diet or increasing the concentration of dietary lipid are effective strategies for reducing enteric methane emissions. This study investigated their effect on health and performance of finishing beef cattle. The experiment was a two×two×three factorial design comprising two breeds (CHX, crossbred Charolais; LU, Luing); two basal diets consisting of (g/kg dry matter (DM), forage to concentrate ratios) 520 : 480 (Mixed) or 84 : 916 (Concentrate); and three treatments: (i) control with rapeseed meal as the main protein source replaced with either (ii) calcium nitrate (18 g nitrate/kg diet DM) or (iii) rapeseed cake (RSC, increasing acid hydrolysed ether extract from 25 to 48 g/kg diet DM). Steers (n=84) were allocated to each of the six basal diet×treatments in equal numbers of each breed with feed offered ad libitum. Blood methaemoglobin (MetHb) concentrations (marker for nitrate poisoning) were monitored throughout the study in steers receiving nitrate. After dietary adaptation over 28 days, individual animal intake, performance and feed efficiency were recorded for a test period of 56 days. Blood MetHb concentrations were low and similar up to 14 g nitrate/kg diet DM but increased when nitrate increased to 18 g nitrate/kg diet DM (P0.05). Neither basal diet nor treatment affected carcass quality (P>0.05), but CHX steers achieved a greater killing out proportion (Pbeef steers when used within the diets studied. PMID:26627142

  2. A sensor for calcium uptake

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Sean; Meyer, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria — the cell’s power plants — increase their energy production in response to calcium signals in the cytoplasm. A regulator of the elusive mitochondrial calcium channel has now been identified.

  3. Children's Bone Health and Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Trials Resources and Publications Children's Bone Health and Calcium: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links ... straight, walk, run, and lead an active life. Calcium is one of the key dietary building blocks ...

  4. Calcium ion channel and epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yudan Lü; Weihong Lin; Dihui Ma

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between calcium ion channel and epilepsy for well investigating the pathogenesis of epilepsy and probing into the new therapeutic pathway of epilepsy.DATA SOURCES: A computer-based online research Calcium ion channel and epilepsy related articles published between January 1994 and December 2006 in the CKNI and Wanfang database with the key words of "calcium influxion, epilepsy, calcium-channel blocker". The language was limited to Chinese. At the same time,related articles published between January 1993 and December 2006 in Pubmed were searched for on online with the key words of "calcium influxion, epilepsy" in English.STUDY SELECTION: The materials were selected firstly. Inclusive criteria: ① Studies related to calcium ion channel and the pat1hogenesis of epilepsy. ② Studies on the application of calcium ion channel blocker in the treatment of epilepsy. Exclusive criteria: repetitive or irrelated studies.DATA EXTRACTION: According to the criteria, 123 articles were retrieved and 93 were excluded due to repetitive or irrelated studies. Altogether 30 articles met the inclusive criteria, 11 of them were about the structure and characters of calcium ion channel, 10 about calcium ion channel and the pathogenesis of epilepsy and 9 about calcium blocker and the treatment of epilepsy.DATA SYNTHESIS: Calcium ion channels mainly consist of voltage dependent calcium channel and receptor operated calcium channel. Depolarization caused by voltage gating channel-induced influxion is the pathological basis of epileptic attack, and it is found in many studies that many anti-epileptic drugs have potential and direct effect to rivalizing voltage-dependent calcium ion channel.CONCLUSION: Calcium influxion plays an important role in the seizure of epilepsy. Some calcium antagonists seen commonly are being tried in the clinical therapy of epilepsy that is being explored, not applied in clinical practice. If there are enough evidences to

  5. Solar Imagery - Chromosphere - Calcium

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of full-disk images of the sun in Calcium (Ca) II K wavelength (393.4 nm). Ca II K imagery reveal magnetic structures of the sun from about...

  6. Impregnating Coal With Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Voecks, Gerald E.; Gavalas, George R.

    1991-01-01

    Relatively inexpensive process proposed for impregnating coal with calcium carbonate to increase rates of gasification and combustion of coal and to reduce emission of sulfur by trapping sulfur in calcium sulfide. Process involves aqueous-phase reactions between carbon dioxide (contained within pore network of coal) and calcium acetate. Coal impregnated with CO2 by exposing it to CO2 at high pressure.

  7. Acidosis and Urinary Calcium Excretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, R Todd; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Chambrey, Régine;

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis is associated with increased urinary calcium excretion and related sequelae, including nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis. The increased urinary calcium excretion induced by metabolic acidosis predominantly results from increased mobilization of calcium out of bone and...... renal tubule and then discuss why not all gene defects that cause renal tubular acidosis are associated with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis....

  8. Comparative evaluation of nitrate removal technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the extensive application of artificial nitrogen-based fertilizers and animal manure on land, many water agencies face problems of increasing concentrations of nitrate in groundwater. The contamination of groundwater by nitrate may pose a significant public health problem. The threat of methemoglobinemia is well documented and reflected in the U.S. drinking water standard of 10 mg/L as nitrate-nitrogen. Approximately 45% of Saskatchewan's population use groundwater for drinking purposes, out of which, approximately 23% (230,000) are rural residents. The water used is made available from over 48,000 privately owned wells in regions where there is an extensive application of chemical fertilizers. Biological denitrification, ion exchange and reveres osmosis (RO) processes were selected for further study. Field studies were conducted on these processes. The sulfur/limestone autotrophic denitrification (SLAD) process was selected to achieve biological removal of nitrate from groundwater. The feasibility of the system was evaluated under anaerobic conditions. An ion exchange study was conducted using Ionac A554 which is strong anion exchange resins. In the case of groundwater containing low sulfate concentrations, A554 offered high nitrate removal. However, the disposal of regenerant brine can be a problem. A reverse osmosis unit with Filmtec membrane elements (FT30-Element Family) was used in the study on nitrate removal. The unit effluent average nitrate concentration was less than the maximum allowable concentration. (author)

  9. The Laschamp geomagnetic excursion featured in nitrate record from EPICA-Dome C ice core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traversi, R.; Becagli, S.; Poluianov, S.; Severi, M.; Solanki, S. K.; Usoskin, I. G.; Udisti, R.

    2016-01-01

    Here we present the first direct comparison of cosmogenic 10Be and chemical species in the period of 38–45.5 kyr BP spanning the Laschamp geomagnetic excursion from the EPICA-Dome C ice core. A principal component analysis (PCA) allowed to group different components as a function of the main sources, transport and deposition processes affecting the atmospheric aerosol at Dome C. Moreover, a wavelet analysis highlighted the high coherence and in-phase relationship between 10Be and nitrate at this time. The evident preferential association of 10Be with nitrate rather than with other chemical species was ascribed to the presence of a distinct source, here labelled as “cosmogenic”. Both the PCA and wavelet analyses ruled out a significant role of calcium in driving the 10Be and nitrate relationship, which is particularly relevant for a plateau site such as Dome C, especially in the glacial period during which the Laschamp excursion took place. The evidence that the nitrate record from the EDC ice core is able to capture the Laschamp event hints toward the possibility of using this marker for studying galactic cosmic ray flux variations and thus also major geomagnetic field excursions at pluri-centennial-millennial time scales, thus opening up new perspectives in paleoclimatic studies. PMID:26819064

  10. Switching from nitrate therapy to ranolazine in patients with coronary artery disease receiving phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitors for erectile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udeoji, Dioma U; Schwarz, Ernst R

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) and erectile dysfunction (ED) frequently coexist. The introduction of phosphodiesterase type-5 (PDE-5) inhibitors has revolutionized medical management of organic ED; however, in patients with angina pectoris, a common symptom of CAD, coadministration of PDE-5 inhibitors and nitrates has been implicated in CAD-related deaths following sexual activity. The mechanism of action of PDE-5 inhibitors results in a potential cumulative drop in blood pressure (BP); thus, these agents are contraindicated in patients receiving nitrates. Beta-blockers and calcium channel antagonists are considered the mainstays of antianginal therapy, but may not be tolerated by all patients. Ranolazine is an antianginal agent that produces minimal reductions in heart rate and BP. Here we report three cases of men with CAD, chronic angina, and concomitant ED. We describe our treatment approach in these patients, using ranolazine as a potential substitute to nitrate therapy. PMID:25452706

  11. Microbial Uranium Immobilization Independent of Nitrate Reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At many uranium processing and handling facilities, including sites in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex, high levels of nitrate are present as co-contamination with uranium in groundwater. The daunting prospect of complete nitrate removal prior to the reduction of uranium provides a strong incentive to explore bioremediation strategies that allow for uranium bioreduction and stabilization in the presence of nitrate. Typical in-situ strategies involving the stimulation of metal-reducing bacteria are hindered by low pH environments at this study site and require that the persistent nitrate must first and continuously be removed or transformed prior to uranium being a preferred electron acceptor. This project investigates the possibility of stimulating nitrate-indifferent, pH-tolerant microorganisms to achieve bioreduction of U(VI) despite nitrate persistence. Successful enrichments from U-contaminated sediments demonstrated nearly complete reduction of uranium with very little loss of nitrate from pH 4.9-5.6 using methanol or glycerol as a carbon source. Higher pH enrichments also demonstrated similar U reduction capacity with 5-30% nitrate loss within one week. Bacterial 16S rRNA genes were amplified from uranium-reducing enrichments (pH 5.7-6.7) and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses classified the clone sequences into four distinct clusters. Data from sequencing and T-RFLP profiles indicated that the majority of the microorganisms stimulated by these enrichment conditions consisted of low G+C Gram-positive bacteria most closely related to Clostridium and Clostridium-like organisms. This research demonstrates that the stimulation of a natural microbial community to immobilize U through bioreduction is possible without the removal of nitrate.

  12. Photodegradation of Paracetamol in Nitrate Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Cui; Qu, Ruijuan; Liang, Jinyan; Yang, Xi

    2010-11-01

    The photodegradation of paracetamol in nitrate solution under simulated solar irradiation has been investigated. The degradation rates were compared by varying environmental parameters including concentrations of nitrate ion, humic substance and pH values. The quantifications of paracetamol were conducted by HPLC method. The results demonstrate that the photodegradation of paracetamol followed first-order kinetics. The photoproducts and intermediates of paracetamol in the presence of nitrate ions were identified by extensive GC-MS method. The photodegradation pathways involving. OH radicals as reactive species were proposed.

  13. Photodegradation of Paracetamol in Nitrate Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photodegradation of paracetamol in nitrate solution under simulated solar irradiation has been investigated. The degradation rates were compared by varying environmental parameters including concentrations of nitrate ion, humic substance and pH values. The quantifications of paracetamol were conducted by HPLC method. The results demonstrate that the photodegradation of paracetamol followed first-order kinetics. The photoproducts and intermediates of paracetamol in the presence of nitrate ions were identified by extensive GC-MS method. The photodegradation pathways involving. OH radicals as reactive species were proposed.

  14. Reactivity of nitrate and organic acids at the concrete–bitumen interface of a nuclear waste repository cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertron, A., E-mail: bertron@insa-toulouse.fr [Université de Toulouse (France); UPS, INSA (France); LMDC (Laboratoire Matériaux et Durabilité des Constructions), 135, avenue de Rangueil, F-31 077, Toulouse Cedex 04 (France); Jacquemet, N. [Université de Toulouse (France); UPS, INSA (France); LMDC (Laboratoire Matériaux et Durabilité des Constructions), 135, avenue de Rangueil, F-31 077, Toulouse Cedex 04 (France); Erable, B. [Université de Toulouse (France); INPT, UPS (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Génie Chimique, 4, Allée Emile Monso, F-31030 Toulouse (France); Sablayrolles, C. [Université de Toulouse (France); INP (France); LCA (Laboratoire de Chimie Agro-Industrielle), ENSIACET, 4 allée Emile Monso, BP 44 362, 31432 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); INRA (France); LCA (Laboratoire de Chimie Agro-Industrielle), F-31029 Toulouse (France); Escadeillas, G. [Université de Toulouse (France); UPS, INSA (France); LMDC (Laboratoire Matériaux et Durabilité des Constructions), 135, avenue de Rangueil, F-31 077, Toulouse Cedex 04 (France); Albrecht, A. [Andra, 1-7, rue Jean-Monnet, 92298 Châtenay-Malabry (France)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Interactions of cement paste and organic acid–nitrate solutions were investigated. • Cement leaching imposed alkaline pH (>10) very rapidly in the liquid media. • Acetic acid action on cement paste was similar to that of classical leaching. • Oxalic acid attack formed Ca-oxalate salts; organic matter in solution decreased. • Nitrate was stable under abiotic conditions and with organic matter. - Abstract: This study investigates the fate of nitrate and organic acids at the bitumen–concrete interface within repository cell for long-lived, intermediate-level, radioactive wastes. The interface was simulated by a multiphase system in which cementitious matrices (CEM V cement paste specimens) were exposed to bitumen model leachates consisting of nitrates and acetic acid with and without oxalic acid, chemical compounds likely to be released by bitumen. Leaching experiments were conducted with daily renewal of the solutions in order to accelerate reactions. The concentrations of anions (acetate, oxalate, nitrate, and nitrite) and cations (calcium, potassium) and the pH were monitored over time. Mineralogical changes of the cementitious matrices were analysed by XRD. The results confirmed the stability of nitrates in the abiotic conditions of the experiments. The action of acetic acid on the cementitious matrix was similar to that of ordinary leaching in the absence of organic acids (i.e. carried out with water or strong acids); no specific interaction was detected between acetate and cementitious cations. The reaction of oxalic acid with the cementitious phases led to the precipitation of calcium oxalate salts in the outer layer of the matrix. The concentration of oxalate was reduced by 65% inside the leaching medium.

  15. Reactivity of nitrate and organic acids at the concrete–bitumen interface of a nuclear waste repository cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Interactions of cement paste and organic acid–nitrate solutions were investigated. • Cement leaching imposed alkaline pH (>10) very rapidly in the liquid media. • Acetic acid action on cement paste was similar to that of classical leaching. • Oxalic acid attack formed Ca-oxalate salts; organic matter in solution decreased. • Nitrate was stable under abiotic conditions and with organic matter. - Abstract: This study investigates the fate of nitrate and organic acids at the bitumen–concrete interface within repository cell for long-lived, intermediate-level, radioactive wastes. The interface was simulated by a multiphase system in which cementitious matrices (CEM V cement paste specimens) were exposed to bitumen model leachates consisting of nitrates and acetic acid with and without oxalic acid, chemical compounds likely to be released by bitumen. Leaching experiments were conducted with daily renewal of the solutions in order to accelerate reactions. The concentrations of anions (acetate, oxalate, nitrate, and nitrite) and cations (calcium, potassium) and the pH were monitored over time. Mineralogical changes of the cementitious matrices were analysed by XRD. The results confirmed the stability of nitrates in the abiotic conditions of the experiments. The action of acetic acid on the cementitious matrix was similar to that of ordinary leaching in the absence of organic acids (i.e. carried out with water or strong acids); no specific interaction was detected between acetate and cementitious cations. The reaction of oxalic acid with the cementitious phases led to the precipitation of calcium oxalate salts in the outer layer of the matrix. The concentration of oxalate was reduced by 65% inside the leaching medium

  16. Effects of cropping system and rates of nitrogen in animal slurry and mineral fertilizer on nitrate leaching from a sandy loam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Ingrid Kaag; Hansen, Jørgen Frederik; Kjellerup, Viggo K.;

    1993-01-01

    Leaching of nitrate from a sandy loam cropped with spring barley, winter wheat and grass was compared in a 4-year lysimeter study. Crops were grown continuously or in a sequence including sugarbeet. Lysimeters were unfertilized or supplied with equivalent amounts of inorganic nitrogen in calcium...... ammonium nitrate (CAN) or animal slurry according to recommended rates (1N) or 50% above recommended rates (1.5N). Compared with unfertilized crops, leaching of nitrate increased only slightly when 1N (CAN) was added. Successive annual additions of 1.5N (CAN) or IN and 1.5N (animal slurry) caused...... the four years were similar for the crops when grown in rotation or continuously. When crops received 1:5N (CAN) or animal slurry, nitrate losses from the crops grown continuously exceeded those from crops in rotation. Including a catch crop in the continuous cropping system eliminated the differences...

  17. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Bradleigh; Tyerman, Stephen D.; Burton, Rachel A.; Gilliham, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact the development, physical traits and disease susceptibility of fruit through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g., blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples). This review works toward an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved knowledge of the calcium

  18. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Bradleigh; Tyerman, Stephen D; Burton, Rachel A; Gilliham, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact the development, physical traits and disease susceptibility of fruit through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g., blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples). This review works toward an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved knowledge of the calcium

  19. Separation of plutonium from sulphate bearing analytical waste by co-precipitation with calcium oxalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple approach for separation of Plutonium from sulfate bearing Analytical waste is presented here. The analytical waste is generated during analysis of plutonium using the Drummond-Grand potentiometric method mainly contains sulphate ions. The removal and recovery of plutonium from this waste is important due to radio toxicity associated with it as well as its strategic importance. Plutonium is co-precipitated with calcium oxalate by calcium nitrate and potassium oxalate mixture. The recovery is almost complete (99.96%). This method is adapted for routine use in our laboratory. (author)

  20. Calcium and calcitonin responses to calcium infusion in type I diabetes mellitus.

    OpenAIRE

    Amado, J. A.; C. Gomez; Obaya, S.; Otero, M; Gonzalez-Macias, J

    1987-01-01

    We studied calcium and calcium and calcitonin responses to intravenous calcium infusion (3 mg of elemental calcium/kg of body weight in 10 minutes) in 21 type I diabetic males and 17 age-matched normal males. Baseline total calcium, parathyroid hormone and calcitonin levels were normal in the diabetic group, but ionized calcium was lowered. Cortical bone status and osteocalcin levels were normal, suggesting a normal osteoblastic function. Total calcium and ionized calcium responses to calcium...

  1. Accelerated leaching of cementitious materials using ammonium nitrate (6 M): influence of test conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have focused on the test conditions influence on accelerated degradation of cementitious materials using ammonium nitrate. PH-buffering and renewal of the leaching solution were studied. PH-buffering appeared not to be very important when the renewal pH remains under eight. Renewal appeared to be the most influential feature. Its absence leads to calcium accumulation in the leaching solution inducing aggressiveness fall. Degradation is then less marked in terms of depth, flux and mineralogy. The resulting porosity increase is also smaller. (authors)

  2. DISTILLATION OF CALCIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, J.

    1954-07-27

    This invention relates to an improvement in the process for the purification of caicium or magnesium containing an alkali metal as impurity, which comprises distiiling a batch of the mixture in two stages, the first stage distillation being carried out in the presence of an inert gas at an absolute pressure substantially greater than the vapor pressure of calcium or maguesium at the temperature of distillation, but less than the vaper pressure at that temperature of the alkali metal impurity so that only the alkali metal is vaporized and condensed on a condensing surface. A second stage distilso that substantially only the calcium or magnesium distills under its own vapor pressure only and condenses in solid form on a lower condensing surface.

  3. Historic nitrate storage in groundwater system - a non-negligible process in nitrate water pollution management

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lei; Ward, Robert; Stuart, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Nitrate water pollution is not only an environmental issue but also a threat to the economy and human health. It remains an international problem and has been identified as a major threat to water quality and the delivery of the EU Water Framework and Nitrates Directives targets. It could take decades for nitrate derived from historic fertiliser application, which leaches into groundwater, to travel through thick unsaturated zones (UZs) and saturated zones, and arrive at rivers and boreho...

  4. ROE Wet Nitrate Deposition 1989-1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The raster data represent the amount of wet nitrate deposition in kilograms per hectare from 1989 to 1991. Summary data in this indicator were provided by EPA’s...

  5. Introduction to the nitrate in groundwater papers

    OpenAIRE

    Gooddy, Daren; Besien, T.

    2007-01-01

    Escalating concentrations of nitrate in groundwater supplies resulting from major changes in post-WWII agricultural production were first widely recognised in the 1970s, prompting discussion on the ‘nitrate time-bomb’ problem. The implications of this problem are now becoming clear with increasing numbers of water company groundwater abstractions needing expensive and energy intensive treatment. Since the 1970s, considerable research effort has been directed towards understanding and pred...

  6. Nitrate Concentration in Groundwater in Isfahan Province

    OpenAIRE

    S.F Mousavi; M. Afyuni; A. Jafari Malekabadi; Khosravi, A.

    2004-01-01

    In recent decades, the use of nitrogen fertilizers has increased irrespective of their effects on soil properties, agricultural products and, particularly, on environmental pollution. Nitrate easily leaches from soils into groundwater. The objective of this study was to determine temporal and spatial nitrate concentrations in groundwater in agricultural, industrial and urban regions in some parts of Isfahan Province. Water samples were collected monthly from 75 agricultural, industrial, and u...

  7. Nitrate Contamination of Groundwater: Determinants and Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Wick, Katharina; Heumesser, Christine; Schmid, Erwin

    2010-01-01

    Nitrogen is an important input to agricultural production but also detrimentally affects the environmental quality of air, soil and water. Identifying the determinants of nitrate pollution and in turn defining sensible performance indicators to design, enforce and monitor regulatory policies is therefore of utmost importance. Using data on more than 1000 Austrian municipalities, we provide a detailed econometric analysis of (1) the determinants of nitrate concentration in groundwater, and (2)...

  8. Nitrate Adsorption on Clay Kaolin: Batch Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Morteza Mohsenipour; Shamsuddin Shahid; Kumars Ebrahimi

    2015-01-01

    Soils possessing kaolin, gibbsite, goethite, and hematite particles have been found to have a natural capacity to attenuate pollution in aqueous phase. On the other hand, the hydroxyl group in soil increases anion exchange capacity under a low pH condition. The main objective of this paper was to evaluate effects of kaolin on nitrate reduction under acidic condition. In order to analyze the kaolin adsorption behaviour under various conditions, four different concentrations of nitrate, 45, 112...

  9. Is beetroot juice more effective than sodium nitrate? The effects of equimolar nitrate dosages of nitrate-rich beetroot juice and sodium nitrate on oxygen consumption during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flueck, Joelle Leonie; Bogdanova, Anna; Mettler, Samuel; Perret, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Dietary nitrate has been reported to lower oxygen consumption in moderate- and severe-intensity exercise. To date, it is unproven that sodium nitrate (NaNO3(-); NIT) and nitrate-rich beetroot juice (BR) have the same effects on oxygen consumption, blood pressure, and plasma nitrate and nitrite concentrations or not. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of different dosages of NIT and BR on oxygen consumption in male athletes. Twelve healthy, well-trained men (median [minimum; maximum]; peak oxygen consumption: 59.4 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1) [40.5; 67.0]) performed 7 trials on different days, ingesting different nitrate dosages and placebo (PLC). Dosages were 3, 6, and 12 mmol nitrate as concentrated BR or NIT dissolved in plain water. Plasma nitrate and nitrite concentrations were measured before, 3 h after ingestion, and postexercise. Participants cycled for 5 min at moderate intensity and further 8 min at severe intensity. End-exercise oxygen consumption at moderate intensity was not significantly different between the 7 trials (p = 0.08). At severe-intensity exercise, end-exercise oxygen consumption was ∼4% lower in the 6-mmol BR trial compared with the 6-mmol NIT (p = 0.003) trial as well as compared with PLC (p = 0.010). Plasma nitrite and nitrate concentrations were significantly increased after the ingestion of BR and NIT with the highest concentrations in the 12-mmol trials. Plasma nitrite concentration between NIT and BR did not significantly differ in the 6-mmol (p = 0.27) and in the 12-mmol (p = 0.75) trials. In conclusion, BR might reduce oxygen consumption to a greater extent compared with NIT. PMID:26988767

  10. Nitrate concentrations in the Morestead borehole, Twyford

    OpenAIRE

    Stuart, M.E.; Chilton, P J; Newell, A. J.; Butcher, A.S.

    2008-01-01

    This report describes work carried out at Morestead, Twyford as part of a BGS research project “Nitrate Mass Balance in the Saturated Zone”. The project aimed to evaluate the role of the diffusive exchange of nitrate between fracture water and porewater in the saturated zone of the aquifer. The approach adopted attempted to obtain a mass balance for the catchment to a public supply borehole by comparing nitrogen released from the soil with nitrogen held in the aquifer and nitro...

  11. Synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, David E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Nitrate esters have been known as useful energetic materials since the discovery of nitroglycerin by Ascanio Sobrero in 1846. The development of methods to increase the safety and utility of nitroglycerin by Alfred Nobel led to the revolutionary improvement in the utility of nitroglycerin in explosive applications in the form of dynamite. Since then, many nitrate esters have been prepared and incorporated into military applications such as double-based propellants, detonators and as energetic plasticizers. Nitrate esters have also been shown to have vasodilatory effects in humans and thus have been studied and used for treatments of ailments such as angina. The mechanism of the biological response towards nitrate esters has been elucidated recently. Interestingly, many of the nitrate esters used for military purposes are liquids (ethylene glycol dinitrate, propylene glycol dinitrate, etc). Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) is one of the only solid nitrate esters, besides nitrocellulose, that is used in any application. Unfortunately, PETN melting point is above 100 {sup o}C, and thus must be pressed as a solid for detonator applications. A more practical material would be a melt-castable explosive, for potential simplification of manufacturing processes. Herein we describe the synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester (1) that is a solid at ambient temperatures, has a melting point of 85-86 {sup o}C and has the highest density of any known nitrate ester composed only of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen. We also describe the chemical, thermal and sensitivity properties of 1 as well as some preliminary explosive performance data.

  12. European Community Measures to Reduce Nitrate Pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Al-hedny, Suhad

    2010-01-01

    Water protection proves to be a difficult task, whether it is dealt with through legislation or the implementation of a process to reduce further pollution. This study considers how the issue of water pollution from nitrates in agricultural practices has become better understood through the reforms of the common agriculture policy (CAP) and the enactment of various regulations and directives by EU. The implementation of the EC Nitrate Directive is a main focus of this study because it was a m...

  13. Models of calcium signalling

    CERN Document Server

    Dupont, Geneviève; Kirk, Vivien; Sneyd, James

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses the ways in which mathematical, computational, and modelling methods can be used to help understand the dynamics of intracellular calcium. The concentration of free intracellular calcium is vital for controlling a wide range of cellular processes, and is thus of great physiological importance. However, because of the complex ways in which the calcium concentration varies, it is also of great mathematical interest.This book presents the general modelling theory as well as a large number of specific case examples, to show how mathematical modelling can interact with experimental approaches, in an interdisciplinary and multifaceted approach to the study of an important physiological control mechanism. Geneviève Dupont is FNRS Research Director at the Unit of Theoretical Chronobiology of the Université Libre de Bruxelles;Martin Falcke is head of the Mathematical Cell Physiology group at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin;Vivien Kirk is an Associate Professor in the Depar...

  14. Bio nitrate Project: a new technology for water nitrate elimination by means of ionic exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of ion exchange resins for nitrate elimination from water generates a waste containing a sodium chloride mixture plus the retained nitrates. this waste must be correctly disposed. In this project, the resin ionic form is modified to be regenerated with other compounds, different from the common salt, which are interesting because of the presence of mineral nutrition. So, with Bio nitrate Project, nitrates are recovered and the regeneration waste is apt to be use as fertilizer, for agricultural uses, or as complementary contribution of nutrients in biological water treatment. (Author) 27 refs.

  15. Phase relations in the lanthanum nitrate (copper nitrate) - poly(vinylpyrrolidone) - water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Room-temperature isothermal sections of the phase diagrams of lanthanum nitrate-poly(vinylpyrrolidone)-water and copper nitrate-poly(vinylpyrrolidone)-water systems were studied. The following features were found: a wide region of homogeneous water-polymer solutions, liquid-liquid phase separation field, and a three-phase region in which two liquids coexist with salt crystals. In the lanthanum nitrate system, liquid-liquid phase separation has a lower critical solution point (polythermal sections were studied); in the copper nitrate system, it has an upper critical solution point. The type of diagram for unstudied systems is predicted based on the analysis of polymer-salt phase diagrams

  16. Solvent extraction of rare earth (3) nitrates by trialkylmethylammonium nitrate from multicomponent solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extraction of rare earth (3) [praseodymium-lutetium, yttrium (3)] nitrates 0.4-1.10 mol/dm3 by solution of trialkyl-methylammonium in kerosene was studied. It is found that di- and trisolvates of rare earth (3) nitrates is formed in organic phase, extraction constants are determined. Physicochemical and mathematical models descriptive of distribution of metal (3) nitrates in binary and multicomponent systems are given. Optimum field of concentrations of rare earth mixture in rare earths was established during use of solutions of trialkylmethyl-ammonium nitrate in diluent

  17. Supercritical fluid extraction of uranium and neodymium nitrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of uranyl nitrate and neodymium nitrate salts from a mixture was investigated in the present study using Sc-CO2 modified with various ligands such as organophosphorous compounds, amides, and diketones. Preferential extraction of uranyl nitrate over neodymium nitrate was demonstrated using Sc-CO2 modified with amide, di-(2ethylhexyl) isobutyramide (D2EHIBA). (author)

  18. Groundwater nitrate pollution in intensively farmed regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2011-12-01

    Intensified agricultural practices that have developed during the past century have helped improve food security for many people but have also added to nitrate pollution in water supply. Balancing the water needs for agriculture with the need for clean groundwater for drinking requires understanding factors such as the routes by which nitrate enters the water supply and how long nitrate remains in the water. The Thames River catchment provides a good study example because the water quality in the river, which supplies drinking water to millions of people, has been monitored for the past 140 years, and the region has undergone significant agricultural development over the past century. Howden et al. studied nitrate transport from agricultural land to water in the Thames basin using a simple model that considers an estimate of the amount of nitrate that could leach the groundwater based on land use practices along with an algorithm that determines the route nitrate would take to reach surface water or groundwater from agricultural areas.

  19. Nitrate Adsorption on Clay Kaolin: Batch Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Mohsenipour

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Soils possessing kaolin, gibbsite, goethite, and hematite particles have been found to have a natural capacity to attenuate pollution in aqueous phase. On the other hand, the hydroxyl group in soil increases anion exchange capacity under a low pH condition. The main objective of this paper was to evaluate effects of kaolin on nitrate reduction under acidic condition. In order to analyze the kaolin adsorption behaviour under various conditions, four different concentrations of nitrate, 45, 112.5, 225, and 450 mgNO3-/L, with a constant pH equal to 2, constant temperature equal to 25°C, and exposure period varying from 0 to 150 minutes were considered. The capacity of nitrate adsorption on kaolin has also been studied involving two well-known adsorption isotherm models, namely, Freundlich and Longmuir. The results revealed that approximately 25% of the nitrate present in the solution was adsorbed on clay kaolin. The laboratory experimental data revealed that Freundlich adsorption isotherm model was more accurate than Longmuir adsorption model in predicting of nitrate adsorption. Furthermore, the retardation factor of nitrate pollution in saturated zone has been found to be approximately 4 in presence of kaolin, which indicated that kaolin can be used for natural scavenger of pollution in the environment.

  20. Denitrification inhibition by high nitrate wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The processing of radioactive metal products at nuclear weapons plants and research labs has produced wastewaters containing high concentrations of nitrate, often greater than 50,000 mg/l N. The adaptation of activated sludge and inhibition of denitrification at high nitrate concentrations was studied using pH controlled bench-scale sequencing batch reactors (SBRs), operated with 50% of the SBR volume recycled (recycle volume = influent volume). Denitrification of 1,350 and 2,700 mg/l NO3--N was completed after approximately 5 hours and 15 hours, respectively. No denitrification of 5,400 mg/l NO3--N was observed. These results suggest that there is a progressive inhibition of denitrification as nitrate concentrations increase from 1,350 to 5,400 mg/l NO3--N. In a subsequent series of experiments at an initial reactor nitrate concentration of 1,350 mg/l N, a significant accumulation of nitrate was observed, resulting once in destabilization with loss of denitrification and once in successful adaptation of the activated sludge. At a nitrate concentration of 1,350 mg/l N, the adaptation of activated sludge appears to be unstable, resulting sometimes in stable denitrification and sometimes in biomass washout

  1. The determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks by flame photometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Henry

    1956-01-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks using the Beckman flame photometer, with photomultiplier attachement. The sample is dissolved in hydrofluoric, nitric, and perchloric acids, the hydrofluoric and nitric acids are expelled, a radiation buffer consisting of aluminum, magnesium, iron, sodium, potassium, phosphoric acid, and nitric acid is added, and the solution is atomized in an oxy-hydrogen flame with an instrument setting of 554 mµ. Measurements are made by comparison against calcium standards, prepared in the same manner, in the 0 to 50 ppm range. The suppression of calcium emission by aluminum and phosphate was overcome by the addition of a large excess of magnesium. This addition almost completely restores the standard curve obtained from a solution of calcium nitrate. Interference was noted when the iron concentration in the aspirated solution (including the iron from the buffer) exceeded 100 ppm iron. Other common rock-forming elements did not interfere. The results obtained by this procedure are within ± 2 percent of the calcium oxide values obtained by other methods in the range 1 to 95 percent calcium oxide. In the 0 to 1 percent calcium oxide range the method compares favorably with standard methods.

  2. Effect of dietary nitrate level on enteric methane production, hydrogen emission, rumen fermentation, and nutrient digestibility in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olijhoek, D W; Hellwing, A L F; Brask, M; Weisbjerg, M R; Højberg, O; Larsen, M K; Dijkstra, J; Erlandsen, E J; Lund, P

    2016-08-01

    Nitrate may lower methane production in ruminants by competing with methanogenesis for available hydrogen in the rumen. This study evaluated the effect of 4 levels of dietary nitrate addition on enteric methane production, hydrogen emission, feed intake, rumen fermentation, nutrient digestibility, microbial protein synthesis, and blood methemoglobin. In a 4×4 Latin square design 4 lactating Danish Holstein dairy cows fitted with rumen, duodenal, and ileal cannulas were assigned to 4 calcium ammonium nitrate addition levels: control, low, medium, and high [0, 5.3, 13.6, and 21.1g of nitrate/kg of dry matter (DM), respectively]. Diets were made isonitrogenous by replacing urea. Cows were fed ad libitum and, after a 6-d period of gradual introduction of nitrate, adapted to the corn-silage-based total mixed ration (forage:concentrate ratio 50:50 on DM basis) for 16d before sampling. Digesta content from duodenum, ileum, and feces, and rumen liquid were collected, after which methane production and hydrogen emissions were measured in respiration chambers. Methane production [L/kg of dry matter intake (DMI)] linearly decreased with increasing nitrate concentrations compared with the control, corresponding to a reduction of 6, 13, and 23% for the low, medium, and high diets, respectively. Methane production was lowered with apparent efficiencies (measured methane reduction relative to potential methane reduction) of 82.3, 71.9, and 79.4% for the low, medium, and high diets, respectively. Addition of nitrate increased hydrogen emissions (L/kg of DMI) quadratically by a factor of 2.5, 3.4, and 3.0 (as L/kg of DMI) for the low, medium, and high diets, respectively, compared with the control. Blood methemoglobin levels and nitrate concentrations in milk and urine increased with increasing nitrate intake, but did not constitute a threat for animal health and human food safety. Microbial crude protein synthesis and efficiency were unaffected. Total volatile fatty acid

  3. Reverse calcium affinity purification of Fab with calcium derivatized hydroxyapatite

    OpenAIRE

    Gagnon, Pete; Cheung, Chia-wei; Yazaki, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    This study introduces the application of calcium-derivatized hydroxyapatite for purification of Fab. Fab binds to native hydroxyapatite but fails to bind to the calcium derivatized form. IgG, Fc, and most other protein contaminants bind to the calcium form. This supports Fab purification by a simple flow-through method that achieves greater than 95% purity from papain digests and mammalian cell culture supernatants. Alternatively, Fab can be concentrated on native hydroxyapatite then eluted s...

  4. Open-Source Photometric System for Enzymatic Nitrate Quantification

    OpenAIRE

    Wittbrodt, B. T.; Squires, D. A.; Walbeck, J.; Campbell, E.; Campbell, W. H.; Pearce, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate, the most oxidized form of nitrogen, is regulated to protect people and animals from harmful levels as there is a large over abundance due to anthropogenic factors. Widespread field testing for nitrate could begin to address the nitrate pollution problem, however, the Cadmium Reduction Method, the leading certified method to detect and quantify nitrate, demands the use of a toxic heavy metal. An alternative, the recently proposed Environmental Protection Agency Nitrate Reductase Nitra...

  5. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: A hidden source of nitrite?

    OpenAIRE

    Balk, Melike; Anniet M Laverman; Keuskamp, Joost A.; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nit...

  6. Glycochenodeoxycholic acid inhibits calcium phosphate precipitation in vitro by preventing the transformation of amorphous calcium phosphate to calcium hydroxyapatite.

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu, S M; Wen, G.; Hirakawa, N; Soloway, R D; Hong, N K; Crowther, R S

    1991-01-01

    Calcium hydroxyapatite can be a significant component of black pigment gallstones. Diverse molecules that bind calcium phosphate inhibit hydroxyapatite precipitation. Because glycine-conjugated bile acids, but not their taurine counterparts, bind calcium phosphate, we studied whether glycochenodeoxycholic acid inhibits calcium hydroxyapatite formation. Glycochenodeoxycholic acid (2 mM) totally inhibited transformation of amorphous calcium phosphate microprecipitates to macroscopic crystalline...

  7. Relationships between nitrate uptake and nitrate reductase activity in Cucumis sativus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Kłobus

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Anti-NR IgG fragments obtained after papain digestion of polyclonal antibodies gave the positive immunological reaction with both, a soluble and plasma membrane-bound nitrate reductase. Anti-NR antibody as well as IgG fragments almost totally inhibited the nitrate reductase activity in cytosol proving a crossreaction of antibody with the catalytic site of a soluble NR. Anti-NR IgG fragments, but not undigested polyclonal antibodies affected the activity of the nitrate reductase associated with plasma membranes. Discrepancy in the action of intact antibodies and fragments obtained after they digestion were interpreted as a consequence of same differences in the ability of those molecules to the penetration through the membrane. Undigested anti-NR antibody have no effect on the nitrate uptake by intact plants, as well as by the right-side plasma membrane vesicles. On the other hand, IgG fragments of polyclonal antibodies abolished almost totally the nitrate uptake in the case of intact seedlings, but have only slight effect on the N03 uptake in plasma membranes. On the basis of above findings, some relations between nitrate uptake and its assimilation inside the cell are suggested. Since IgG fragments only slightly changed the N03 absorption in vesicles whereas the activity of plasmalemma associated nitrate reductase was strongly repressed, we concluded that the PM-NR is not structurally involved in the nitrate transport through the membrane.

  8. Nitration of naphthalene and remarks on the mechanism of electrophilic aromatic nitration*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olah, George A.; Narang, Subhash C.; Olah, Judith A.

    1981-01-01

    Naphthalene was nitrated with a variety of nitrating agents. Comparison of data with Perrin's electrochemical nitration [Perrin, C. L. (1977) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 99, 5516-5518] shows that nitration of naphthalene gives an α-nitronaphthalene to β-nitronaphthalene ratio that varies between 9 and 29 and is thus not constant. Perrin's data, therefore, are considered to be inconclusive evidence for the proposed one-electron transfer mechanism for the nitration of naphthalene and other reactive aromatics. Moodie and Schoefield [Hoggett, J. G., Moodie, R. B., Penton, J. R. & Schoefield, K. (1971) Nitration and Aromatic Reactivity (Cambridge Univ. Press, London)], as well as Perrin, independently concluded that, in the general scheme of nitration of reactive aromatics, there is the necessity to introduce into the classical Ingold mechanism an additional step involving a distinct intermediate preceding the formation of the Wheland intermediate (σ complexes). This view coincides with our two-step mechanistic picture [Kuhn, S. J. & Olah, G. A. (1961) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 83, 4564-4571] of the nitronium salt nitration of aromatic hydrocarbons (including benzene and toluene), in which low substrate selectivity but high positional selectivity was found, indicating the independence of substrate from positional selectivity. PMID:16593026

  9. Nitration of naphthalene and remarks on the mechanism of electrophilic aromatic nitration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olah, G A; Narang, S C; Olah, J A

    1981-06-01

    Naphthalene was nitrated with a variety of nitrating agents. Comparison of data with Perrin's electrochemical nitration [Perrin, C. L. (1977) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 99, 5516-5518] shows that nitration of naphthalene gives an alpha-nitronaphthalene to beta-nitronaphthalene ratio that varies between 9 and 29 and is thus not constant. Perrin's data, therefore, are considered to be inconclusive evidence for the proposed one-electron transfer mechanism for the nitration of naphthalene and other reactive aromatics. Moodie and Schoefield [Hoggett, J. G., Moodie, R. B., Penton, J. R. & Schoefield, K. (1971) Nitration and Aromatic Reactivity (Cambridge Univ. Press, London)], as well as Perrin, independently concluded that, in the general scheme of nitration of reactive aromatics, there is the necessity to introduce into the classical Ingold mechanism an additional step involving a distinct intermediate preceding the formation of the Wheland intermediate (sigma complexes). This view coincides with our two-step mechanistic picture [Kuhn, S. J. & Olah, G. A. (1961) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 83, 4564-4571] of the nitronium salt nitration of aromatic hydrocarbons (including benzene and toluene), in which low substrate selectivity but high positional selectivity was found, indicating the independence of substrate from positional selectivity. PMID:16593026

  10. Imbalance between vertical nitrate flux and nitrate assimilation on a continental shelf: Implications of nitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiozaki, Takuhei; Furuya, Ken; Kurotori, Hiroyuki; Kodama, Taketoshi; Takeda, Shigenobu; Endoh, Takahiro; Yoshikawa, Yutaka; Ishizaka, Joji; Matsuno, Takeshi

    2011-10-01

    The nitrate assimilation rate and diapycnal nitrate flux were simultaneously determined on the continental shelf of the East China Sea (ECS). Further, the archaeal amoA gene was quantified to examine the potential distribution of nitrification activity. Nitrate assimilation rates and distribution of the archaeal amoA gene were also investigated in the Philippine Sea and in the Kuroshio Current. At all the stations, while the surface nitrate was depleted (amoA was observed at shallower light depths, namely at or above 10% light depth, in the ECS than in other regions, suggesting that nitrification occurred within the euphotic zone in the ECS, especially on the shelf. Moreover, a station on the continental shelf of the ECS exhibited a considerable discrepancy between the nitrate assimilation rate (1500 μmolN m-2 d-1) and vertical nitrate flux (98 μmolN m-2 d-1). Here, 6.7 ± 3.1 × 103 and 2.5 ± 0.7 × 105 copies mL-1 of archaeal amoA were detected at 10% and 1% light depths relative to the surface, respectively. Thus nitrification within the euphotic zone would be attributed at least in part to the observed discrepancy between nitrate assimilation and vertical flux. These observations imply that the assumption of a direct relationship between new production, export production, and measured nitrate assimilation is misplaced, particularly regarding the continental shelf of the ECS.

  11. Nitrate removal and denitrification affected by soil characteristics in nitrate treatment wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying-Feng; Jing, Shuh-Ren; Lee, Der-Yuan; Chang, Yih-Feng; Shih, Kai-Chung

    2007-03-01

    Several small-scale surface flow constructed wetlands unplanted and planted (monoculture) with various macrophytes (Phragmites australis, Typha orientalis, Pennisetum purpureum, Ipomoea aquatica, and Pistia stratiotes) were established to continuously receive nitrate-contaminated groundwater. Soil characteristics and their effects on nitrate removal and soil denitrification were investigated. The results showed that planted wetland cells exhibited significantly higher (P < 0.05) nitrate removal efficiencies (70-99%) and soil denitrification rates (3.78-15.02 microg N2O-N/g dry soil/h) than an unplanted covered wetland cell (1%, 0.11 microg N2O-N/g/h). However, the unplanted uncovered wetland cell showed a nitrate removal efficiency (55%) lower than but a soil denitrification rate (9.12 microg N2O-N/g/h) comparable to the planted cells. The nitrate removal rate correlated closely and positively with the soil denitrification rate for the planted cells, indicating that soil denitrification is an important process for removing nitrate in constructed wetlands. The results of nitrogen budget revealed that around 68.9-90.7% of the overall nitrogen removal could be attributed to the total denitrification. The soil denitrification rate was found to correlate significantly (P < 0.01) with the extractable organic carbon, organic matter, and in situ-measured redox potential of wetland soil, which accordingly were concluded as suitable indicators of soil denitrification rate and nitrate removal rate in nitrate treatment wetlands. PMID:17365317

  12. Calcium – how and why?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J K Jaiswal

    2001-09-01

    Calcium is among the most commonly used ions, in a multitude of biological functions, so much so that it is impossible to imagine life without calcium. In this article I have attempted to address the question as to how calcium has achieved this status with a brief mention of the history of calcium research in biology. It appears that during the origin and early evolution of life the Ca2+ ion was given a unique opportunity to be used in several biological processes because of its unusual physical and chemical properties.

  13. Calcium addition in straw gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risnes, H.; Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk; Moilanen, A.; Norby, P.; Papadakis, K.; Posselt, D.; Sørensen, L. H.

    2003-01-01

    The present work focuses on the influence of calcium addition in gasification. The inorganic¿organic element interaction as well as the detailed inorganic¿inorganic elements interaction has been studied. The effect of calcium addition as calcium sugar/molasses solutions to straw significantly...... affected the ash chemistry and the ash sintering tendency but much less the char reactivity. Thermo balance test are made and high-temperature X-ray diffraction measurements are performed, the experimental results indicate that with calcium addition major inorganic¿inorganic reactions take place very late...

  14. Calcium Phosphate Biomaterials: An Update

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Current calcium phosphate (CaP) biomaterials for bone repair, substitution, augmentation and regeneration include hydroxyapatite ( HA ) from synthetic or biologic origin, beta-tricalcium phosphate ( β-TCP ) , biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP), and are available as granules, porous blocks, components of composites (CaP/polymer) cements, and as coatings on orthopedic and dental implants. Experimental calcium phosphate biomaterials include CO3- and F-substituted apatites, Mg-and Zn-substituted β-TCP, calcium phosphate glasses. This paper is a brief review of the different types of CaP biomaterials and their properties such as bioactivity, osteoconductivity, osteoinductivity.

  15. 21 CFR 573.240 - Calcium periodate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... with calcium hydroxide or calcium oxide to form a substance consisting of not less than 60 percent by... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium periodate. 573.240 Section 573.240 Food... Additive Listing § 573.240 Calcium periodate. The food additive calcium periodate may be safely used...

  16. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and... Listing § 573.260 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely used as an anticaking agent in animal feed, provided that the amount of calcium silicate does...

  17. Calcium measurement methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CarloAlberto Redi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Rightly stressed by prof. Wolfgang Walz in the Preface to the series Neuromethods series, the “careful application of methods is probably the most important step in the process of scientific inquiry”. Thus, I strongly suggest to all those interested in calcium signaling and especially to the new-comers in the hot topic of neuroscience (which has so much space even in science-society debate for its implications in legal issues and in the judge-decision process to take profit from this so well edited book. I am saying this since prof. Verkhratsky and prof. Petersen......

  18. Extracellular calcium sensing and extracellular calcium signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, E. M.; MacLeod, R. J.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    , localized changes in Ca(o)(2+) within the ECF can originate from several mechanisms, including fluxes of calcium ions into or out of cellular or extracellular stores or across epithelium that absorb or secrete Ca(2+). In any event, the CaR and other receptors/sensors for Ca(o)(2+) and probably for other extracellular ions represent versatile regulators of numerous cellular functions and may serve as important therapeutic targets.

  19. Structural and mechanistic insights on nitrate reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Catarina; Romão, Maria João

    2015-12-01

    Nitrate reductases (NR) belong to the DMSO reductase family of Mo-containing enzymes and perform key roles in the metabolism of the nitrogen cycle, reducing nitrate to nitrite. Due to variable cell location, structure and function, they have been divided into periplasmic (Nap), cytoplasmic, and membrane-bound (Nar) nitrate reductases. The first crystal structure obtained for a NR was that of the monomeric NapA from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans in 1999. Since then several new crystal structures were solved providing novel insights that led to the revision of the commonly accepted reaction mechanism for periplasmic nitrate reductases. The two crystal structures available for the NarGHI protein are from the same organism (Escherichia coli) and the combination with electrochemical and spectroscopic studies also lead to the proposal of a reaction mechanism for this group of enzymes. Here we present an overview on the current advances in structural and functional aspects of bacterial nitrate reductases, focusing on the mechanistic implications drawn from the crystallographic data. PMID:26362109

  20. Compartmentalization of the submembrane calcium activity during calcium influx and its significance in transmitter release.

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, S M; Llinás, R R

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative modeling indicates that, in presynaptic terminals, the intracellular calcium concentration profile during inward calcium current is characterized by discrete peaks of calcium immediately adjacent to the calcium channels. This restriction of intracellular calcium concentration suggests a remarkably well specified intracellular architecture such that calcium, as a second messenger, may regulate particular intracellular domains with a great degree of specificity.

  1. Nitrate promotes capsaicin accumulation in Capsicum chinense immobilized placentas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldana-Iuit, Jeanny G; Sauri-Duch, Enrique; Miranda-Ham, María de Lourdes; Castro-Concha, Lizbeth A; Cuevas-Glory, Luis F; Vázquez-Flota, Felipe A

    2015-01-01

    In chili pepper's pods, placental tissue is responsible for the synthesis of capsaicinoids (CAPs), the compounds behind their typical hot flavor or pungency, which are synthesized from phenylalanine and branched amino acids. Placental tissue sections from Habanero peppers (Capsicum chinense Jacq.) were immobilized in a calcium alginate matrix and cultured in vitro, either continuously for 28 days or during two 14-day subculture periods. Immobilized placental tissue remained viable and metabolically active for up to 21 days, indicating its ability to interact with media components. CAPs contents abruptly decreased during the first 7 days in culture, probably due to structural damage to the placenta as revealed by scanning electron microcopy. CAPs levels remained low throughout the entire culture period, even though a slight recovery was noted in subcultured placentas. However, doubling the medium's nitrate content (from 40 to 80 mM) resulted in an important increment, reaching values similar to those of intact pod's placentas. These data suggest that isolated pepper placentas cultured in vitro remain metabolically active and are capable of metabolizing inorganic nitrogen sources, first into amino acids and, then, channeling them to CAP synthesis. PMID:25710024

  2. Ammonium and nitrate tolerance in lichens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since lichens lack roots and take up water, solutes and gases over the entire thallus surface, these organisms respond more sensitively to changes in atmospheric purity than vascular plants. After centuries where effects of sulphur dioxide and acidity were in the focus of research on atmospheric chemistry and lichens, recently the globally increased levels of ammonia and nitrate increasingly affect lichen vegetation and gave rise to intense research on the tolerance of lichens to nitrogen pollution. The present paper discusses the main findings on the uptake of ammonia and nitrate in the lichen symbiosis and to the tolerance of lichens to eutrophication. Ammonia and nitrate are both efficiently taken up under ambient conditions. The tolerance to high nitrogen levels depends, among others, on the capability of the photobiont to provide sufficient amounts of carbon skeletons for ammonia assimilation. Lowly productive lichens are apparently predisposed to be sensitive to excess nitrogen. - Eutrophication has become a global threat for lichen diversity.

  3. Nitrate reduction in an unconfined sandy aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Diederik Jan; Boesen, Carsten; Kristiansen, Henning;

    1991-01-01

    vertical component of the water transport was modeled since, in contrast to rates along flow lines, the vertical rates are close to constant as required by the one-dimensional model. Average vertical transport rates of water in the saturated zone were obtained by tritium dating. The modeling process is a......Nitrate distribution and reduction processes were investigated in an unconfined sandy aquifer of Quaternary age. Groundwater chemistry was studied in a series of eight multilevel samplers along a flow line, deriving water from both arable and forested land. Results show that plumes of nitrate...... processes of O2 and NO3- occur at rates that are fast compared to the rate of downward water transport. Nitrate-contaminated groundwater contains total contents of dissolved ions that are two to four times higher than in groundwater derived from the forested area. The persistence of the high content of...

  4. Trend Analyses of Nitrate in Danish Groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, B.; Thorling, L.; Dalgaard, Tommy;

    2012-01-01

    This presentation assesses the long-term development in the oxic groundwater nitrate concentration and nitrogen (N) loss due to intensive farming in Denmark. Firstly, up to 20-year time-series from the national groundwater monitoring network enable a statistically systematic analysis...... of distribution, trends and trend reversals in the groundwater nitrate concentration. Secondly, knowledge about the N surplus in Danish agriculture since 1950 is used as an indicator of the potential loss of N. Thirdly, groundwater recharge CFC (Chlorofluorocarbon) age determination allows linking of the first...... two dataset. The development in the nitrate concentration of oxic groundwater clearly mirrors the development in the national agricultural N surplus, and a corresponding trend reversal is found in groundwater. Regulation and technical improvements in the intensive farming in Denmark have succeeded...

  5. Extraction of metal nitrates and nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considered are the effects of uranyl nitrate extraction with diethyl ether (DE) from binary and ternary solutions. Data are presented describing the extraction of uranyl nitrate at 25 deg C and a characteristic is given for the effect of salinators (NaNO3, Mg(NO3)2, Ca(NO3)2, Sr(NO3)2, Co(NO3)2, Zn(NO3)2 and Cd(NO3)2) on the extraction. A possibility is shown of describing the equilibrium in extraction of micro- and macro-quantities of uranyl nitrate from its binary and ternary solutions. Thermodynamic extraction and distribution constants have been calculated and tabulated basing on the assumption of the nonstochiometric hydration of solvates in organic phase

  6. Nitrate reduction in an unconfined sandy aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Diederik Jan; Boesen, Carsten; Kristiansen, Henning; Larsen, Flemming

    1991-01-01

    Nitrate distribution and reduction processes were investigated in an unconfined sandy aquifer of Quaternary age. Groundwater chemistry was studied in a series of eight multilevel samplers along a flow line, deriving water from both arable and forested land. Results show that plumes of nitrate......-contaminated groundwater emanate from the agricultural areas and spread through the aquifer. The aquifer can be subdivided into an upper 10- to 15-m thick oxic zone that contains O2 and NO3-, and a lower anoxic zone characterized by Fe2+-rich waters. The redox boundary is very sharp, which suggests that reduction...... processes of O2 and NO3- occur at rates that are fast compared to the rate of downward water transport. Nitrate-contaminated groundwater contains total contents of dissolved ions that are two to four times higher than in groundwater derived from the forested area. The persistence of the high content of...

  7. Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Balance › Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health March 2012 Download PDFs ... helps keep your bones strong. Why are vitamin D and calcium important to bone health? Vitamin D ...

  8. Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000490.htm Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones To use the sharing ... and maintain strong bones. How Much Calcium and Vitamin D Do I Need? Amounts of calcium are ...

  9. Calcium transport in turtle bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unidirectional 45Ca fluxes were measured in the turtle bladder under open-circuit and short-circuit conditions. In the open-circuited state net calcium flux (JnetCa) was secretory (serosa to mucosa). Ouabain reversed JnetCa to an absorptive flux. Amiloride reduced both fluxes such that JnetCa was not significantly different from zero. Removal of mucosal sodium caused net calcium absorption; removal of serosal sodium caused calcium secretion. When bladders were short circuited, JnetCa decreased to approximately one-third of control value but remained secretory. When ouabain was added under short-circuit conditions, JnetCa was similar in magnitude and direction to ouabain under open-circuited conditions (i.e., absorptive). Tissue 45Ca content was ≅30-fold lower when the isotope was placed in the mucosal bath, suggesting that the apical membrane is the resistance barrier to calcium transport. The results obtained in this study are best explained by postulating a Ca2+-ATPase on the serosa of the turtle bladder epithelium and a sodium-calcium antiporter on the mucosa. In this model, the energy for calcium movement would be supplied, in large part, by the Na+-K+-ATPase. By increasing cell sodium, ouabain would decrease the activity of the mucosal sodium-calcium exchanger (or reverse it), uncovering active calcium transport across the serosa

  10. An Improved Calcium Flame Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Robert S.

    1985-01-01

    Indicates that the true red color of calcium can be obtained (using the procedure described by Sorm and Logowski) if the calcium ion solution is mixed with an equal volume of saturated ammonium bromide solution. Suggestions for flame tests of other elements are also noted. (JN)

  11. Gallium increases bone calcium and crystallite perfection of hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockman, R S; Boskey, A L; Blumenthal, N C; Alcock, N W; Warrell, R P

    1986-12-01

    Gallium, a group IIIa metal, is known to interact with hydroxyapatite as well as the cellular components of bone. In recent studies we have found gallium to be a potent inhibitor of bone resorption that is clinically effective in controlling cancer-related hypercalcemia as well as the accelerated bone resorption associated with bone metastases. To begin to elucidate gallium's mechanism of action we have examined its effects on bone mineral properties. After short-term (14 days) administration to rats, gallium nitrate produced measurable changes in bone mineral properties. Using atomic absorption spectroscopy, low levels of gallium were noted to preferentially accumulate in regions of active bone formation, 0.54 +/- .07 microgram/mg bone in the metaphyses versus 0.21 +/- .03 microgram/mg bone in the diaphyses, P less than 0.001. The bones of treated animals had increased calcium content measured spectrophotometrically. Rats injected with radiolabeled calcium during gallium treatment had greater 45-calcium content compared to control animals. By wide-angle X-ray analyses, larger and/or more perfect hydroxyapatite was observed. The combined effects of gallium on bone cell function and bone mineral may explain its clinical efficacy in blocking accelerated bone resorption. PMID:3026592

  12. Effect of calcium on adsorption capacity of powdered activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Shang, Junteng; Wang, Ying; Li, Yansheng; Gao, Hong

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the effect of calcium ion on the adsorption of humic acid (HA) (as a target pollutant) by powered activated carbon. The HA adsorption isotherms at different pH and kinetics of two different solutions including HA alone and HA doped Ca(2+), were performed. It was showed that the adsorption capacity of powdered activated carbon (PAC) for HA was markedly enhanced when Ca(2+) was doped into HA. Also, HA and Ca(2+) taken as nitrate were tested on the uptake of each other respectively and it was showed that the adsorbed amounts of both of them were significantly promoted when HA and calcium co-existed. Furthermore, the adsorbed amount of HA slightly decreased with the increasing of Ca(2+) concentration, whereas the amount of calcium increased with the increasing of HA concentration, but all above the amounts without addition. Finally, the change of pH before and after adsorption process is studied. In the two different solutions including HA alone and HA doped Ca(2+), pH had a small rise, but the extent of pH of later solution was bigger. PMID:25078809

  13. Isotope tracing of nitrate : lessons from Malta

    OpenAIRE

    Heaton, Timothy; Stuart, Marianne; Sapiano, M.; Micallef Sultana, M.

    2010-01-01

    Average concentrations of nitrate in Malta’s groundwaters are probably the highest among EU member states. This compromises the quality of an important resource -almost 60% of Malta’s water supply being provided by groundwater. An 15N/14N + 18O/16O isotope study was undertaken as a core part of wide-ranging investigations into the potential sources of the nitrate pollution, its likely future trends, and possible ameliorative actions. The dual isotope (15N/14N + 18O/16O) approach was important...

  14. Factors controlling nitrate cracking of mild steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrite and hydroxide ions inhibit the growth of nitrate stress corrosion cracks in mild steel. Crack growth measurements showed that sufficient concentrations of nitrite and hydroxide ions can prevent crack growth; however, insufficient concentrations of these ions did not influence the Stage II growth rate or the threshold stress intensity, but extended the initiation time. Stage III growth was discontinuous. Oxide formed in the grain boundaries ahead of the crack tip and oxide dissolution (Stage II) and fracture (Stage III) are the proposed mechanisms of nitrate stress corrosion crack growth

  15. CALCIUM ENHANCES ANTIINFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF ASPIRIN

    OpenAIRE

    Choksi Krishna; Shenoy Ashoka M; A. R. Shabharaya; Lala Minaxi

    2011-01-01

    The objective of present study is to evaluate the effects of calcium carbonate and calcium gluconate on acute and subacute inflammation and to study their possible interactions with Aspirin. Calcium carbonate (10 mg/kg) and calcium gluconate (5 mg/kg) were administered individually and also co-administered along with sub therapeutic dose Aspirin (50mg/kg) to study their interaction. The inflammation was induced by carrageenan or a foreign body. Both calcium carbonate and calcium gluconate cou...

  16. Conductivity study of nitrogen-doped calcium zinc oxide prepared by spray pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yu-Ting; Lan, Wen-How; Huang, Kai-Feng; Lin, Jia-Ching; Chang, Kuo-Jen

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the spray pyrolysis method was used to prepare unintentionally doped and nitrogen-doped calcium zinc oxide films by using zinc acetate, calcium nitrate precursor, and ammonium acetate precursor. Morphological and structural analyses were conducted using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results indicated that film grain size decreased as the nitrogen doping was increased. Both calcium oxide and zinc oxide structures were identified in the unintentionally doped calcium zinc oxide. When nitrogen doping was introduced, the film mainly exhibited a zinc oxide structure with preferred (002) and (101) orientations. The concentration and mobility were investigated using a Hall measurement system. P-type films with a mobility and concentration of 10.6 cm2 V-1 s-1 and 2.8×1017 cm-3, respectively, were obtained. Moreover, according to a temperature-dependent conductivity analysis, an acceptor state with activation energy 0.266 eV dominated the p-type conduction for the unintentionally doped calcium zinc oxide. By contrast, a grain boundary with a barrier height of 0.274-0.292 eV dominated the hole conduction for the nitrogen-doped calcium zinc oxide films.

  17. Determination of the total nitrate content of thorium nitrate solution with a selective electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nitrate content of thorium nitrate solutions is determined with a liquid membrane nitrate selective electrode utilizing the known addition method in 0.1 M potassium fluoride medium as ionic strength adjustor. It is studied the influence of pH and the presence of chloride, sulphate, phosphate, meta-silicate, thorium, rare earths, iron, titanium, uranium and zirconium at the same concentrations as for the aqueous feed solutions in the thorium purification process. The method is tested in synthetic samples and in samples proceeding from nitric dissolutions of thorium hidroxide and thorium oxicarbonate utilized as thorium concentrates to be purified

  18. Limestone reaction in calcium aluminate cement–calcium sulfate systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports a study of ternary blends composed of calcium aluminate cement, calcium sulfate hemihydrate and limestone. Compressive strength tests and hydration kinetics were studied as a function of limestone and calcium sulfate content. The phase evolution and the total porosity were followed and compared to thermodynamic simulation to understand the reactions involved and the effect of limestone on these binders. The reaction of limestone leads to the formation of hemicarboaluminate and monocarboaluminate. Increasing the ratio between sulfate and aluminate decreases the extent of limestone reaction

  19. On the radiolysis of concentrated alkaline and calcium-nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies have shown that more nitrite is produced than can reasonably be accounted for by an indirect radiolysis mechanism based on the radical products of radiolysed water. Further results on the relative roles of indirect effect and direct effect (a chemical transformation in the solute due to its energy absorption) are presented. Major products are nitrite, peroxide and oxygen and yields can be accounted for using the electron fraction model. (author)

  20. EFFECT OF CALCIUM NITRATE, TRIETHANOLAMINE AND TRIISOPROPANOLAMINE ON COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH OF MORTARS

    OpenAIRE

    GÖK, Saadet Gökçe; KILINÇ, Kadir

    2015-01-01

    Chemical admixtures are used in concrete for various purposes such as water reducing, plasticizing, air entraining, bonding, viscosity modifying, colouring, corrosion inhibiting, permeability reducing, accelerating or retarding the initial setting time, and shrinkage reducing. The use of chemical admixtures in concrete helps to improve workability of fresh concrete and durability properties of hardened concrete as well as reducing the total cost of concrete production. In this study, three di...

  1. Degradation of tributylphosphate in plutonium nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degradation of tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) dissolved in aqueous nitrate systems containing Pu was investigated under various conditions. The difference of degradation rates of TBP observed in reprocessed Pu streams and in nitric acid is discussed. The followings were elucidated : (1) The degradation of TBP in plutonium nitrate solutions depends upon the Pu concentration although it indicates first-order kinetics. (2) The half life of TBP increases linearly with HNO3 concentration in plutonium nitrate solutions. The retardation by undissociated HNO3 is almost independent of Pu concentration. (3) No significant effect of HNO2, generated by radiolysis, on the TBP degradation rate was observed. (4) The retardation of the degradation of TBP can be described only with the concentrations of Pu and HNO3. (5) The G-values of TBP in plutonium nitrate solutions extremely decrease with increasing the concentrations of HNO3 and Pu. (6) Plutonium other than undissociated HNO3 would be involved in the retardation due to OH radical scavenging because Pu(III) and Pu(IV) give different degradation rates of TBP. (author)

  2. Biological denitrification of high nitrate waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological denitrification of solutions of nitrate salts and weak solutions of nitric acid used in the purification of uranium at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant is briefly discussed. Advantages of this system over others are mentioned. Techniques and accumulated experience are covered

  3. The Path to Nitrate Salt Disposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funk, David John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-16

    The topic is presented in a series of slides arranged according to the following outline: LANL nitrate salt incident as thermal runaway (thermally sensitive surrogates, full-scale tests), temperature control for processing, treatment options and down selection, assessment of engineering options, anticipated control set for treatment, and summary of the overall steps for RNS.

  4. Detonation characteristics of ammonium nitrate products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersten, R.J.A.; Hengel, E.I.V. van den; Steen, A.C. van der

    2006-01-01

    The detonation properties of ammonium nitrate (AN) products depend on many factors and are therefore, despite the large amount of information on this topic, difficult to assess. In order to further improve the understanding of the safety properties of AN, the European Fertilizer Manufacturers Associ

  5. 76 FR 46907 - Ammonium Nitrate Security Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ... common example is when fertilizer-grade ammonium nitrate is mixed with fuel oil and creates an explosive... Requirements 1. Mixture Requirement 2. Threshold Weight and Individual Products Exemptions 3. Explosives... Federal Bureau of Investigation FR Federal Register HMR Hazardous Materials Regulations HMT...

  6. Nitrate Salt Surrogate Blending Scoping Test Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anast, Kurt Roy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-13

    Test blending equipment identified in the “Engineering Options Assessment Report: Nitrate Salt Waste Stream Processing”. Determine if the equipment will provide adequate mixing of zeolite and surrogate salt/Swheat stream; optimize equipment type and operational sequencing; impact of baffles and inserts on mixing performance; and means of validating mixing performance

  7. Denitration of High Nitrate Salts Using Reductants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HD Smith; EO Jones; AJ Schmidt; AH Zacher; MD Brown; MR Elmore; SR Gano

    1999-05-03

    This report describes work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in conjunction with Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), to remove nitrates in simulated low-activity waste (LAW). The major objective of this work was to provide data for identifying and demonstrating a technically viable and cost-effective approach to condition LAW for immobilization (grout).

  8. Nitrates, Nitrites, and Health. Bulletin 750.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeb, Barbara S.; Sloan, Kenneth W.

    This review is intended to assess available literature in order to define the range of nitrate/nitrite effects on animals. Though the literature deals primarily with livestock and experimental animals, much of the contemporary research is concerned with human nitrite intoxication. Thus, the effects on man are discussed where appropriate. Some of…

  9. Calcium binding protein-mediated regulation of voltage-gated calcium channels linked to human diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nasrin NFJATBAKHSH; Zhong-ping FENG

    2011-01-01

    Calcium ion entry through voltage-gated calcium channels is essential for cellular signalling in a wide variety of cells and multiple physiological processes. Perturbations of voltage-gated calcium channel function can lead to pathophysiological consequences. Calcium binding proteins serve as calcium sensors and regulate the calcium channel properties via feedback mechanisms. This review highlights the current evidences of calcium binding protein-mediated channel regulation in human diseases.

  10. Evidence for a plasma-membrane-bound nitrate reductase involved in nitrate uptake of Chlorella sorokiniana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischner, R.; Ward, M. R.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    Anti-nitrate-reductase (NR) immunoglobulin-G (IgG) fragments inhibited nitrate uptake into Chlorella cells but had no affect on nitrate uptake. Intact anti-NR serum and preimmune IgG fragments had no affect on nitrate uptake. Membrane-associated NR was detected in plasma-membrane (PM) fractions isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning. The PM-associated NR was not removed by sonicating PM vesicles in 500 mM NaCl and 1 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and represented up to 0.8% of the total Chlorella NR activity. The PM NR was solubilized by Triton X-100 and inactivated by Chlorella NR antiserum. Plasma-membrane NR was present in ammonium-grown Chlorella cells that completely lacked soluble NR activity. The subunit sizes of the PM and soluble NRs were 60 and 95 kDa, respectively, as determined by sodium-dodecyl-sulfate electrophoresis and western blotting.

  11. Heating efficiency of microwave heating direct denitration of a mixture of uranyl nitrate and plutonium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mixture of plutonium nitrate and uranyl nitrate is co-converted to MOX powder by the microwave heating method developed by JAEA. The heating efficiency is very important for improving the energy-saving performance in this conversion process. In this study, the heating efficiency was measured using both experimental and engineering-scale microwave ovens in water, nitric acid and a mixture of plutonium nitrate and uranyl nitrate as a function of distance between the specimen and the base of the oven. In addition, the distribution of electromagnetic field strength and its absorption concentration in the solution were numerically evaluated by an electromagnetic field analysis code, MWS 2009. The experimental results could almost be explained by the numerical analysis results. When the distance of the specimen and the base of the oven was beyond 1/4 wavelength, the efficiency became constant because the influence disappeared. (author)

  12. Effect of chemical mixing state on the hygroscopicity and cloud nucleation properties of calcium mineral dust particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Sullivan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric mineral dust particles can alter cloud properties and thus climate by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN that form cloud droplets. The CCN activation properties of various calcium mineral dust particles were studied experimentally to investigate the consequences of field observations showing the segregation of sulphate from nitrate and chloride between individual aged Asian dust particles, and the enrichment of oxalic acid in Asian dust. Each mineral's observed apparent hygroscopicity was primarily controlled by its solubility, which determines the degree to which the mineral's intrinsic hygroscopicity can be expressed. The significant increase in hygroscopicity caused by mixing soluble hygroscopic material with insoluble mineral particles is also presented. Insoluble minerals including calcium carbonate, representing fresh unprocessed dust, and calcium sulphate, representing atmospherically processed dust, had similarly small apparent hygroscopicities. Their activation is accurately described by a deliquescence limit following the Kelvin effect and corresponded to an apparent single-hygroscopicity parameter, κ, of ~0.001. Soluble calcium chloride and calcium nitrate, representing atmospherically processed mineral dust particles, were much more hygroscopic, activating similar to ammonium sulphate with κ~0.5. Calcium oxalate monohydrate (κ=0.05 was significantly less CCN-active than oxalic acid (κ=0.3, but not as inactive as its low solubility would predict. These results indicate that the common assumption that all mineral dust particles become more hygroscopic and CCN-active after atmospheric processing should be revisited. Calcium sulphate and calcium oxalate are two realistic proxies for aged mineral dust that remain non-hygroscopic. The dust's apparent hygroscopicity will be controlled by its chemical mixing state, which is determined by its mineralogy and the chemical reaction pathways it experiences

  13. Effect of chemical mixing state on the hygroscopicity and cloud nucleation properties of calcium mineral dust particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Sullivan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric mineral dust particles can alter cloud properties and thus climate by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN that form cloud droplets. The CCN activation properties of various calcium mineral dust particles were studied experimentally to investigate the consequences of field observations showing the segregation of sulfate from nitrate and chloride between individual aged Asian dust particles, and the enrichment of oxalic acid in Asian dust. Each mineral's observed apparent hygroscopicity was primarily controlled by its solubility, which determines the degree to which the mineral's intrinsic hygroscopicity can be expressed. The significant increase in hygroscopicity caused by mixing soluble hygroscopic material with insoluble mineral particles is also presented. Insoluble minerals including calcium carbonate, representing fresh unprocessed dust, and calcium sulfate, representing atmospherically processed dust, had similarly small apparent hygroscopicities. Their activation is accurately described by a deliquescence limit following the Kelvin effect and corresponded to an apparent single-hygroscopicity parameter, κ, of ~0.001. Soluble calcium chloride and calcium nitrate, representing atmospherically processed mineral dust particles, were much more hygroscopic, activating similar to ammonium sulfate with κ~0.5. Calcium oxalate monohydrate (κ=0.05 was significantly less CCN-active than oxalic acid (κ=0.3, but not as inactive as its low solubility would predict. These results indicate that the common assumption that all mineral dust particles become more hygroscopic and CCN-active after atmospheric processing should be revisited. Calcium sulfate and calcium oxalate are two realistic proxies for aged mineral dust that remain non-hygroscopic. The dust's apparent hygroscopicity will be controlled by its chemical mixing state, which is determined by its mineralogy and the chemical reaction pathways it experiences during

  14. Nitrates in surface waters, inputs and seasonality: Phase 2

    OpenAIRE

    Casey, H.; Clarke, R. T.; Smith, S.

    1988-01-01

    Changes in management practices and agricultural productivity over the past twenty years have lead to nitrate pollution and eutrophication of lakes and rivers. Information on nitrate concentrations and discharge has been collected on the River Frome at East Stoke since 1965, using the same analytical nitrate method so that the results are comparable. These records of weekly spot values of nitrate concentration and daily mean discharges have been analysed for trends and seasonal patterns in bo...

  15. Atmospheric near surface nitrate at coastal Antarctic sites

    OpenAIRE

    D. Wagenbach; Legrand, M; Fischer, H.; Pichlmayer, F.; E. W. Wolff

    1998-01-01

    Records of atmospheric nitrate were obtained by year-round aerosol sampling at Neumayer and Dumont D'Urville stations, located in the Atlantic and Pacific sector of coastal Antarctica, respectively. Where possible, evaluation of the nitrate records is mainly based on concurrently measured radioisotopes (10Be, 7Be, 210Pb) as well as δ15N in nitrate nitrogen. Observations made at these (and two other coastal Antarctic sites [Savoie et al., 1993]) reveal a uniform nitrate background near 10 ng m...

  16. Spatial assessment of animal manure spreading and groundwater nitrate pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Roberta Infascelli; Raffaele Pelorosso; Lorenzo Boccia

    2009-01-01

    Nitrate concentration in groundwater has frequently been linked to non-point pollution. At the same time the existence of intensive agriculture and extremely intensive livestock activity increases the potential for nitrate pollution in shallow groundwater. Nitrate used in agriculture could cause adverse effects on human and animal health. In order to evaluate the groundwater nitrate pollution, and how it might evolve in time, it is essential to develop control systems and to improve policies ...

  17. Nitrate mass balance in the Padež stream watershed

    OpenAIRE

    Česnik, Katarina

    2014-01-01

    Graduation thesis analyzes changes in nitrate mass balance in a forested watersheds. The nitrate mass balance changes occur manly because of hydrological and biogeochemical mechanisms. The studied area, the Padež stream watershed, is mainly covered with forest. Between years 2006 and 2007 the hydrometeorological conditions and streamwater chemistry of Padež stream were continuously monitored. The differences in streamwater nitrate concentrations and nitrate concentrations in precipitations an...

  18. Electrochemical processing of nitrate waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The second phase of research performed at The Electrosynthesis Co., Inc. has demonstrated the successful removal of nitrite and nitrate from a synthetic effluent stream via a direct electrochemical reduction at a cathode. It was shown that direct reduction occurs at good current efficiencies in 1,000 hour studies. The membrane separation process is not readily achievable for the removal of nitrites and nitrates due to poor current efficiencies and membrane stability problems. A direct reduction process was studied at various cathode materials in a flow cell using the complete synthetic mix. Lead was found to be the cathode material of choice, displaying good current efficiencies and stability in short and long term tests under conditions of high temperature and high current density. Several anode materials were studied in both undivided and divided cell configurations. A divided cell configuration was preferable because it would prevent re-oxidation of nitrite by the anode. The technical objective of eliminating electrode fouling and solids formation was achieved although anode materials which had demonstrated good stability in short term divided cell tests corroded in 1,000 hour experiments. The cause for corrosion is thought to be F- ions from the synthetic mix migrating across the cation exchange membrane and forming HF in the acid anolyte. Other possibilities for anode materials were explored. A membrane separation process was investigated which employs an anion and cation exchange membrane to remove nitrite and nitrate, recovering caustic and nitric acid. Present research has shown poor current efficiencies for nitrite and nitrate transport across the anion exchange membrane due to co-migration of hydroxide anions. Precipitates form within the anion exchange membranes which would eventually result in the failure of the membranes. Electrochemical processing offers a highly promising and viable method for the treatment of nitrate waste solutions

  19. Amperometric nitrate biosensor based on Carbon nanotube/Polypyrrole/Nitrate reductase biofilm electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study describes the construction and characterization of an amperometric nitrate biosensor based on the Polypyrrole (PPy)/Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) film. Nitrate reductase (NR) was both entrapped into the growing PPy film and chemically immobilized via the carboxyl groups of CNTs to the CNT/PPy film electrode. The optimum amperometric response for nitrate was obtained in 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution (PBS), pH 7.5 including 0.1 M lithium chloride and 7 mM potassium ferricyanide with an applied potential of 0.13 V (vs. Ag/AgCl, 3 M NaCl). Sensitivity was found to be 300 nA/mM in a linear range of 0.44–1.45 mM with a regression coefficient of 0.97. The biosensor response showed a higher linear range in comparison to standard nitrate analysis methods which were tested in this study and NADH based nitrate biosensors. A minimum detectable concentration of 0.17 mM (S/N = 3) with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 5.4% (n = 7) was obtained for the biosensor. Phenol and glucose inhibit the electrochemical reaction strictly at a concentration of 1 μg/L and 20 mg/L, respectively. The biosensor response retained 70% of its initial response over 10 day usage period when used everyday. - Highlights: ► K3Fe(CN)6 has been used for the first time as mediator for nitrate reductase. ► Better performance was obtained in comparison to other nitrate biosensor studies operated with various mediators. ► Analytical parameters were better than standard nitrate analysis methods.

  20. Solubility of uranyl nitrate in nitric acid solutions of aluminum nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solubility of uranyl nitrate in nitric acid solutions of aluminum nitrate at 250C containing 10, 20 and 30 mass % of nitric acid has been studied by the isothermal method. The Schreinemakers method has been used to establish the composition of the solid phases, which has been confirmed by crystallographic and thermographic studies. Data are presented on the viscosity and density of saturated solutions

  1. Amperometric nitrate biosensor based on Carbon nanotube/Polypyrrole/Nitrate reductase biofilm electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Can, Faruk; Korkut Ozoner, Seyda; Ergenekon, Pinar; Erhan, Elif, E-mail: e.erhan@gyte.edu.tr

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the construction and characterization of an amperometric nitrate biosensor based on the Polypyrrole (PPy)/Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) film. Nitrate reductase (NR) was both entrapped into the growing PPy film and chemically immobilized via the carboxyl groups of CNTs to the CNT/PPy film electrode. The optimum amperometric response for nitrate was obtained in 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution (PBS), pH 7.5 including 0.1 M lithium chloride and 7 mM potassium ferricyanide with an applied potential of 0.13 V (vs. Ag/AgCl, 3 M NaCl). Sensitivity was found to be 300 nA/mM in a linear range of 0.44-1.45 mM with a regression coefficient of 0.97. The biosensor response showed a higher linear range in comparison to standard nitrate analysis methods which were tested in this study and NADH based nitrate biosensors. A minimum detectable concentration of 0.17 mM (S/N = 3) with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 5.4% (n = 7) was obtained for the biosensor. Phenol and glucose inhibit the electrochemical reaction strictly at a concentration of 1 {mu}g/L and 20 mg/L, respectively. The biosensor response retained 70% of its initial response over 10 day usage period when used everyday. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} has been used for the first time as mediator for nitrate reductase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Better performance was obtained in comparison to other nitrate biosensor studies operated with various mediators. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analytical parameters were better than standard nitrate analysis methods.

  2. Calcium carbonate and calcium sulfate in Martian meteorite EETA79001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, J. L.; Wentworth, S. J.

    1987-01-01

    Chips of glassy Lithology C of EETA79001 were studied by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to determine the mineralogy and petrogenesis of the glass that was shown by others to contain trapped Mars-like gases. Calcium carbonite was identified as massive to acicular crystals for which Ca, C, and O were the major elements. Calcium sulfate was identified as prismatic-acicular crystals with Ca and S as the major elements.

  3. Disposable nitrate-selective optical sensor based on fluorescent dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    A simple, disposable thin-film optical nitrate sensor was developed. The sensor was fabricated by applying a nitrate-selective polymer membrane on the surface of a thin polyester film. The membrane was composed of polyvinylchloride (PVC), plasticizer, fluorescent dye, and nitrate-selective ionophore...

  4. Nitrate to ammonia ceramic (NAC) bench scale stabilization study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caime, W.J.; Hoeffner, S.L. [RUST - Clemson Technical Center, Anderson, SC (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) sites such as the Hanford site, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Savannah River site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have large quantities of sodium-nitrate based liquid wastes. A process to reduce the nitrates to ammonia has been developed at ORNL. This technology creates a sludge lower in nitrates. This report describes stabilization possibilities of the sludge.

  5. Nitrate removal by electro-bioremediation technology in Korean soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nitrate concentration of surface has become a serious concern in agricultural industry through out the world. In the present study, nitrate was removed in the soil by employing electro-bioremediation, a hybrid technology of bioremediation and electrokinetics. The abundance of Bacillus spp. as nitrate reducing bacteria were isolated and identified from the soil sample collected from a greenhouse at Jinju City of Gyengsangnamdo, South Korea. The nitrate reducing bacterial species were identified by 16 s RNA sequencing technique. The efficiency of bacterial isolates on nitrate removal in broth was tested. The experiment was conducted in an electrokinetic (EK) cell by applying 20 V across the electrodes. The nitrate reducing bacteria (Bacillus spp.) were inoculated in the soil for nitrate removal process by the addition of necessary nutrient. The influence of nitrate reducers on electrokinetic process was also studied. The concentration of nitrate at anodic area of soil was higher when compared to cathode in electrokinetic system, while adding bacteria in EK (EK + bio) system, the nitrate concentration was almost nil in all the area of soil. The bacteria supplies electron from organic degradation (humic substances) and enhances NO3- reduction (denitrification). Experimental results showed that the electro-bio kinetic process viz. electroosmosis and physiological activity of bacteria reduced nitrate in soil environment effectively. Involvement of Bacillus spp. on nitrification was controlled by electrokinetics at cathode area by reduction of ammonium ions to nitrogen gas. The excellence of the combined electro-bio kinetics technology on nitrate removal is discussed.

  6. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: A hidden source of nitrite?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balk, Melike; Laverman, A.M.; Keuskamp, Joost A.; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought

  7. 21 CFR 176.320 - Sodium nitrate-urea complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate-urea complex. 176.320 Section 176... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.320 Sodium nitrate-urea complex. Sodium nitrate-urea complex may be safely used as a component of articles intended for use in...

  8. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Meusinger, Carl; Erbland, Joseph;

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric nitrate is preserved in Antarctic snow firn and ice. However, at low snow accumulation sites, post-depositional processes induced by sunlight obscure its interpretation. The goal of these studies (see also Paper I by Meusinger et al. [" Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarc...... reproduce the stable isotopic composition of nitrate found in Antarctic snow profiles. © 2014 Author(s)....

  9. 9 CFR 319.2 - Products and nitrates and nitrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... standard in this part and to which nitrate or nitrite is permitted or required to be added, may be prepared without nitrate or nitrite and labeled with such standard name when immediately preceded with the term... to such product as commonly prepared with nitrate and nitrite: And provided further, That...

  10. Extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate from aqueous nitric acid solutions with CMPO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOE sponsored development of the transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process for removing actinides from radioactive wastes. The solvent is a mixture of CMPO and TBP. Since the extraction characteristics of CMPO are not as well understood as those of TBP, the extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate with CMPO (dissolved in n-dodecane) were studied. Results indicate that CMPO extracts nitric acid with a 1:1 stoichiometry; equilibrium constant is 2. 660±0.092 at 25 C, and extraction enthalpy is -5. 46±0.46 kcal/mol. Slope analysis indicates that uranyl nitrate extracts with a mixed equilibria of 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries in nearly equal proportion. Equil. constant of the 2: 1 extraction was 1.213 x 106±3.56 x 104 at 25 C; reaction enthalpy was -9.610±0.594 kcal/mol. Nitration complexation constant is 8.412±0.579, with an enthalpy of -10.72±1.87 kcal/mol. Bismuth nitrate also extracts with a mixed equilibria of (perhaps) 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries. A 2:1 extraction equilibrium and a nitrate complexation adequately model the data. Kinetics and enthalpies were also measured

  11. Determination of cadmium, cobalt, manganese, copper, nickel, and chromium in concentrated solutions of calcium chloride by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procedure is developed for the direct determination of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, and Ni in concentrated solutions of calcium chloride by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Ascorbic and oxalic acids and magnesium nitrate were examined as chemical modifiers. Oxalic acid was found to be the best modifier. Although an atomic absorption spectrometer with a background correction system of relatively low efficiency (deuterium lamp) was used, elements under study can be reliably determined in the presence of oxalic acid at concentrations of calcium chloride in the solution up to 6%. Because cadmium is evaporated before the major part of the given matrix, it can be determined without modifier

  12. The nitrate time bomb : a numerical way to investigate nitrate storage and lag time in the unsaturated zone

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, L.; Butcher, A.S.; Stuart, M E; Gooddy, D.C.; Bloomfield, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrate pollution in groundwater, which is mainly from agricultural activities, remains an international problem. It threatens the environment, economics and human health. There is a rising trend in nitrate concentrations in many UK groundwater bodies. Research has shown it can take decades for leached nitrate from the soil to discharge into groundwater and surface water due to the ‘store’ of nitrate and its potentially long travel time in the unsaturated and satura...

  13. Estimation of presynaptic calcium currents and endogenous calcium buffers at the frog neuromuscular junction with two different calcium fluorescent dyes

    OpenAIRE

    Samigullin, Dmitry; Fatikhov, Nijaz; Khaziev, Eduard; Skorinkin, Andrey; Nikolsky, Eugeny; Bukharaeva, Ellya

    2015-01-01

    At the frog neuromuscular junction, under physiological conditions, the direct measurement of calcium currents and of the concentration of intracellular calcium buffers—which determine the kinetics of calcium concentration and neurotransmitter release from the nerve terminal—has hitherto been technically impossible. With the aim of quantifying both Ca2+ currents and the intracellular calcium buffers, we measured fluorescence signals from nerve terminals loaded with the low-affinity calcium dy...

  14. Variability of calcium absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Variability in calcium absorption was estimated in three groups of normal subjects in whom Ca absorption was measured by standard isotopic-tracer methods at interstudy intervals ranging from 1 to 4 mo. Fifty absorption tests were performed in 22 subjects. Each was done in the morning after an overnight fast with an identical standard breakfast containing a Ca load of approximately 250 mg. Individual fractional absorption values were normalized to permit pooling of the data. The coefficient of variation (CVs) for absorption for the three groups ranged from 10.57 to 12.79% with the size of the CV increasing with interstudy duration. One other published study presenting replicate absorption values was analyzed in a similar fashion and was found to have a CV of absorption of 9.78%. From these data we estimate that when the standard double-isotope method is used to measure Ca absorption there is approximately 10% variability around any given absorption value within an individual human subject and that roughly two-thirds of this represents real biological variability in absorption

  15. Calcium-sensitive immunoaffinity chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Maiken L; Lindhardt Madsen, Kirstine; Skjoedt, Karsten;

    2014-01-01

    homogeneity may be impossible due to contamination with abundant antigens. In this study, we purified the scarce, complement-associated plasma protein complex, collectin LK (CL-LK, complex of collectin liver 1 and kidney 1), by immunoaffinity chromatography using a calcium-sensitive anti-collectin-kidney-1 m......Ab. This antibody was characterized by binding to CL-LK at hypo- and physiological calcium concentrations and dissociated from CK-LK at hyperphysiological concentrations of calcium. We purified CL-LK from plasma to a purity of 41% and a yield of 38%, resulting in a purification factor of more than 88......,000 in a single step. To evaluate the efficiency of this new purification scheme, we purified CL-LK using the same calcium-sensitive mAb in combination with acidic elution buffer and by using calcium-dependent anti-CL-K1 mAbs in combination with EDTA elution buffer. We found that calcium...

  16. Catalytic hydrogenation of uranyl nitrate - engineering scale studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranous nitrate is employed as partitioning agent for the separation of plutonium from uranium in PUREX process, the conventional process for the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. It is currently produced from uranyl nitrate solution by the electrochemical route. Since the conversion is only 50%, an innovative method based on catalytic hydrogenation has been developed. Parametric studies have been carried out on 5 L scale using natural uranyl nitrate solution as fed. Based on these studies, number of runs were carried out on engineering scale using contaminated uranyl nitrate solution. More than 100 kg of uranous nitrate has been made. Performance of the reduction process is described in detail. (author)

  17. Groundwater pollution by nitrates from livestock wastes.

    OpenAIRE

    Goldberg, V M

    1989-01-01

    Utilization of wastes from livestock complexes for irrigation involves the danger of groundwater pollution by nitrates. In order to prevent and minimize pollution, it is necessary to apply geological-hydrogeological evidence and concepts to the situation of wastewater irrigation for the purposes of studying natural groundwater protectiveness and predicting changes in groundwater quality as a result of infiltrating wastes. The procedure of protectiveness evaluation and quality prediction is de...

  18. Potential of dietary nitrate in angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammos, Christos; Luedike, Peter; Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike; Rassaf, Tienush

    2015-10-26

    Endothelial dysfunction with impaired bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO) is the hallmark in the development of cardiovascular disease. Endothelial dysfunction leads to atherosclerosis, characterized by chronic inflammation of the arterial wall and stepwise narrowing of the vessel lumen. Atherosclerosis causes deprivation of adequate tissue blood flow with compromised oxygen supply. To overcome this undersupply, remodeling of the vascular network is necessary to reconstitute and sustain tissue viability. This physiological response is often not sufficient and therapeutic angiogenesis remains an unmet medical need in critical limb ischemia or coronary artery disease. Feasible approaches to promote blood vessel formation are sparse. Administration of pro-angiogenic factors, gene therapy, or targeting of microRNAs has not yet entered the daily practice. Nitric oxide is an important mediator of angiogenesis that becomes limited under ischemic conditions and the maintenance of NO availability might constitute an attractive therapeutic target. Until recently it was unknown how the organism provides NO under ischemia. In recent years it could be demonstrated that NO can be formed independently of its enzymatic synthesis in the endothelium by reduction of inorganic nitrite under hypoxic conditions. Circulating nitrite derives from oxidation of NO or reduction of inorganic nitrate by commensal bacteria in the oral cavity. Intriguingly, nitrate is a common constituent of our everyday diet and particularly high concentrations are found in leafy green vegetables such as spinach, lettuce, or beetroot. Evidence suggests that dietary nitrate supplementation increases the regenerative capacity of ischemic tissue and that this effect may offer an attractive nutrition-based strategy to improve ischemia-induced revascularization. We here summarize and discuss the regenerative capacity of dietary nitrate on the vascular system. PMID:26516419

  19. Potential of dietary nitrate in angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christos; Rammos; Peter; Luedike; Ulrike; Hendgen-Cotta; Tienush; Rassaf

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction with impaired bioavailability of nitric oxide(NO) is the hallmark in the development of cardiovascular disease. Endothelial dysfunction leads to atherosclerosis, characterized by chronic inflammation of the arterial wall and stepwise narrowing of the vessel lumen. Atherosclerosis causes deprivation of adequate tissue blood flow with compromised oxygen supply. To overcome this undersupply, remodeling of the vascular network is necessary to reconstitute and sustain tissue viability. This physiological response is often not sufficient and therapeutic angiogenesis remains an unmet medical need in critical limb ischemia or coronary artery disease. Feasible approaches to promote blood vessel formation are sparse. Administration of pro-angiogenic factors, gene therapy, or targeting of micro RNAs has not yet entered the daily practice. Nitric oxide is an important mediator of angiogenesis that becomes limited under ischemic conditions and the maintenance of NO availability might constitute an attractive therapeutic target. Until recently it was unknown how the organism provides NO under ischemia. In recent years it could be demonstrated that NO can be formed independently of its enzymatic synthesis in the endothelium by reduction of inorganic nitrite under hypoxic conditions. Circulating nitrite derives from oxidation of NO or reduction of inorganic nitrate by commensal bacteria in the oral cavity. Intriguingly, nitrate is a common constituent of our everyday diet and particularly high concentrations are found in leafy green vegetables such as spinach, lettuce, or beetroot. Evidence suggests that dietary nitrate supplementation increases the regenerative capacity of ischemic tissue and that this effect may offer an attractive nutrition-based strategy to improve ischemia-induced revascularization. We here summarize and discuss the regenerative capacity of dietary nitrate on the vascular system.

  20. Nitrates - loss processes in raw water

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, G. H.

    1988-01-01

    This project investigated the production of nitrate (nitrification) by bacteria in lakes. The work was undertaken as nitrification is a key process in the nitrogen cycle and previous estimates of rates of nitrification were unreliable. When different methods were used to estimate rates of nitrification within sediment deposits different results were obtained. Investigation' of specific aspects of these methodologies has allowed some rationalization of these observations and also enabled compa...

  1. Supplemental Cooling for Nitrate Salt Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, Mitchell S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-19

    In July 2015, Los Alamos National Laboratory completed installation of a supplemental cooling system in the structure where remediated nitrate salt waste drums are stored. Although the waste currently is in a safe configuration and is monitored daily,controlling the temperature inside the structure adds another layer of protection for workers, the public,and the environment.This effort is among several layers of precautions designed to secure the waste.

  2. Biological denitrification of nitrate waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on careful laboratory and pilot-plant work, the Y-12 Plant of the Nuclear Division of Union Carbide has designs to construct and operate a three-phase plant to eliminate nitrate as a potential pollutant of ground water. A still is being installed to distill and recover free nitric acid from condensates and raffinate for recycle in production operations. A crystallizer is in the process of being purchased and installed to recover and recycle Al(NO3)3.9H2O. The 25,000-gallon (95 m3) modified water-softening tanks with associated stirring equipment, plumbing, pumps and controls have been purchased. Either one or both of these vessels will be utilized as biological denitrifiers dependent upon the quantity of nitrate requiring disposal at any given time. One denitrifier may be utilized to maintain a standby working colony or culture of bacteria and simultaneously achieve an even lower nitrate concentration in the effluent stream than the present 40 to 100 mg/dm3 of solution. (U.S.)

  3. Organic Nitrates: A Complex Family of Atmospheric Trace Constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballschmiter, K.; Fischer, R. G.; Grünert, A.; Kastler, J.; Schneider, M.; Woidich, S.

    2003-04-01

    Biogenic and geogenic hydrocarbons are the precursors of organic nitrates that are formed as tropospheric photo-oxidation products in the presence of NOx. Air chemistry leads to a very complex pattern of nitric acid esters: alkyl nitrates, aryl-alkyl nitrates, and bifunctional nitrates like alkyl dinitrates, hydroxy alkyl nitrates and carbonyl alkyl nitrates. We have analyzed the pattern of organic nitrates in air samples after adsorption/thermal desorption (low volume sampling-LVS) or adsorption/solvent desorption (high volume sampling-HVS) by capillary gas chromatography with electron capture (ECD) and mass spectrometric detection (MSD) using air aliquotes of 100 up to 3000 liters on column. The complexity of the organic nitrates found in air requires a group pre-separation by normal phase liquid chromatography. A detection limit per compound of 0.005 ppt(v) is achieved by our approach. We have synthesized a broad spectrum of organic nitrates as reference compounds. Air samples were taken from central Europe, the US West (Utah, Nevada, California), and the North- and South Atlantic including Antarctica. Levels and patterns of the regional and global occurrence of the various groups of C1-C12 organic nitrates including dinitrates and hydroxy nitrates and nitrates of isoprene (2-methylbutadiene) are presented. Werner G., J. Kastler, R. Looser, K. Ballschmiter: "Organic nitrates of isoprene as atmospheric trace compounds" Angewandte Chemie - International Edition (1999) 38: 1634-1637. Woidich S., O. Froescheis, O. Luxenhofer, K. Ballschmiter: "EI- and NCI-mass spectrometry of arylalkyl nitrates and their occurrence in urban air" Fresenius J. Anal. Chem. (1999) 364 : 91-99. Kastler, J; Jarman, W; Ballschmiter, K.: "Multifunctional organic nitrates as constituents in European and US urban photo-smog" Fresenius J. Anal. Chem. (2000) 368:244-249. Schneider M., K. Ballschmiter: "C3-C14 alkyl nitrates in remote South Atlantic air" Chemosphere (1999) 38: 233-244. Fischer

  4. Amperometric nitrate biosensor based on Carbon nanotube/Polypyrrole/Nitrate reductase biofilm electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Faruk; Korkut Ozoner, Seyda; Ergenekon, Pinar; Erhan, Elif

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the construction and characterization of an amperometric nitrate biosensor based on the Polypyrrole (PPy)/Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) film. Nitrate reductase (NR) was both entrapped into the growing PPy film and chemically immobilized via the carboxyl groups of CNTs to the CNT/PPy film electrode. The optimum amperometric response for nitrate was obtained in 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution (PBS), pH 7.5 including 0.1 M lithium chloride and 7 mM potassium ferricyanide with an applied potential of 0.13 V (vs. Ag/AgCl, 3 M NaCl). Sensitivity was found to be 300 nA/mM in a linear range of 0.44-1.45 mM with a regression coefficient of 0.97. The biosensor response showed a higher linear range in comparison to standard nitrate analysis methods which were tested in this study and NADH based nitrate biosensors. A minimum detectable concentration of 0.17 mM (S/N=3) with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 5.4% (n=7) was obtained for the biosensor. Phenol and glucose inhibit the electrochemical reaction strictly at a concentration of 1 μg/L and 20 mg/L, respectively. The biosensor response retained 70% of its initial response over 10 day usage period when used everyday. PMID:23177766

  5. "Caged calcium" in Aplysia pacemaker neurons. Characterization of calcium-activated potassium and nonspecific cation currents

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    We have studied calcium-activated potassium current, IK(Ca), and calcium-activated nonspecific cation current, INS(Ca), in Aplysia bursting pacemaker neurons, using photolysis of a calcium chelator (nitr-5 or nitr-7) to release "caged calcium" intracellularly. A computer model of nitr photolysis, multiple buffer equilibration, and active calcium extrusion was developed to predict volume-average and front-surface calcium concentration transients. Changes in arsenazo III absorbance were used to...

  6. Stochastic Simulation of Cardiac Ventricular Myocyte Calcium Dynamics and Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Tuan, Hoang-Trong Minh; Williams, George S.B.; Chikando, Aristide C.; Sobie, Eric A.; Lederer, W. Jonathan; Jafri, M. Saleet

    2011-01-01

    A three dimensional model of calcium dynamics in the rat ventricular myocyte was developed to study the mechanism of calcium homeostasis and pathological calcium dynamics during calcium overload. The model contains 20,000 calcium release units (CRUs) each containing 49 ryanodine receptors. The model simulates calcium sparks with a realistic spontaneous calcium spark rate. It suggests that in addition to the calcium spark-based leak, there is an invisible calcium leak caused by the stochastic ...

  7. Aging and calcium as an environmental factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, T

    1985-12-01

    Calcium deficiency is a constant menace to land-abiding animals, including mammals. Humans enjoying exceptional longevity on earth are especially susceptible to calcium deficiency in old age. Low calcium and vitamin D intake, short solar exposure, decreased intestinal absorption, and falling renal function with insufficient 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D biosynthesis all contribute to calcium deficiency, secondary hyperparathyroidism, bone loss and possibly calcium shift from the bone to soft tissue, and from the extracellular to the intracellular compartment, blunting the sharp concentration gap between these compartments. The consequences of calcium deficiency might thus include not only osteoporosis, but also arteriosclerosis and hypertension due to the increase of calcium in the vascular wall, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and senile dementia due to calcium deposition in the central nervous system, and a decrease in cellular function, because of blunting of the difference in extracellular-intracellular calcium, leading to diabetes mellitus, immune deficiency and others (Fig. 6). PMID:2943880

  8. Transport of Calcium Ions into Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhaolong; Zhang, Dayong; He, Xiaolan; Huang, Yihong; Shao, Hongbo

    2016-06-01

    To uptake calcium ions of mitochondria is of significant functional connotation for cells, because calcium ions in mitochondria are involved in energy production, regulatory signals transfer, and mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening and even programmed cell death of apoptosis, further playing more roles in plant productivity and quality. Cytoplasmic calcium ions access into outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) from voltage dependent anion-selective channel (VDAC) and were absorbed into inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) by mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU), rapid mitochondrial calcium uptake (RaM) or mitochondrial ryanodine receptor (mRyR). Although both mitochondria and the mechanisms of calcium transport have been extensively studied, but there are still long-standing or even new challenges. Here we review the history and recent discoveries of the mitochondria calcium ions channel complex involved calcium assimilation, and discuss the role of calcium ions into mitochondria. PMID:27252588

  9. Optimizing calcium selective fluorimetric nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisiel, Anna; Kłucińska, Katarzyna; Gniadek, Marianna; Maksymiuk, Krzysztof; Michalska, Agata

    2015-11-01

    Recently it was shown that optical nanosensors based on alternating polymers e.g. poly(maleic anhydride-alt-1-octadecene) were characterized by a linear dependence of emission intensity on logarithm of concentration over a few of orders of magnitude range. In this work we focus on the material used to prepare calcium selective nanosensors. It is shown that alternating polymer nanosensors offer competitive performance in the absence of calcium ionophore, due to interaction of the nanospheres building blocks with analyte ions. The emission increase corresponds to increase of calcium ions contents in the sample within the range from 10(-4) to 10(-1) M. Further improvement in sensitivity (from 10(-6) to 10(-1) M) and selectivity can be achieved by incorporating calcium ionophore in the nanospheres. The optimal results were obtained for core-shell nanospheres, where the core was prepared from poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride) and the outer layer from poly(maleic anhydride-alt-1-octadecene). Thus obtained chemosensors were showing linear dependence of emission on logarithm of calcium ions concentration within the range from 10(-7) to 10(-1) M. PMID:26452839

  10. Isomorfic Substitutions of Calcium by Strontium in Calcium Hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By means of homogeneous precipitation it has been possible to synthesize crystalline solid solutions of calcium strontium hydroxyapatite from aqueous solutions. The lattice constants for the solid solutions were measured in the range Ca9Sr(PO4)6(OH)2 - CaSr9(PO4)6(OH)2. The investigations show that the discrimination of strontium against calcium is considerably smaller than reported elsewhere (1). Strontium is preferentially built into the c-axis direction of the apatite lattice

  11. Reductive denitrification of nitrate by scrap iron filings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Zhi-wei; XU Xin-hua; WANG Da-hui

    2005-01-01

    Reduction of nitrate by zero-valent iron is a highly exergonic reaction that has long been known to occur. Use of scrap iron filings (SIF) as the PRB (Permeable Reactive Barrier) material can be used to recycle certain by-products, and identify cheaper replacements for expensive conventional PRB materials, especially pure metallic iron. The feasibility of reductive denitrification of nitrate by SIF was studied by batch experiments. Operational parameters such as pH value, SIF dosage and initial concentration of nitrate were investigated. The removal efficiency of nitrate reached 80% under the conditions of pH of 2.5, nitrate initial concentration of 45 mg/L and SIF dosage of 100 g/L within 4 h. Results indicated that nitrate removal is inversely related to pH. Low pH value condition favors for the nitrate transformation. Different from the results of others who studied nitrate reduction using iron powder, we found that there was a lag time before nitrate reduction occurs, even at low pH. Finally, the possible mechanism of nitrate reduction by Fe0 is discussed.

  12. Canopy and seasonal profiles of nitrate reductase in soybeans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, J.E.; Hageman, R.H.

    1972-01-01

    Nitrate reductase activity of soybeans (Glycine max L. Merr.) was evaluated in soil plots and outdoor hydroponic gravel culture systems throughout the growing season. Nitrate reductase profiles within the plant canopy were also established. Mean activity per gram fresh weight per hour of the entire plant canopy was highest in the seedling stage while total activity (activity per gram fresh weight per hour times the total leaf weight) reached a maximum when plants were in the full bloom to midpod fill stage. Nitrate reductase activity per gram fresh weight per hour was highest in the uppermost leaf just prior to full expansion and declined with leaf positions lower in the canopy. Total nitrate reductase activity per leaf was also highest in the uppermost fully expanded leaf during early growth stages. Maximum total activity shifted to leaf positions lower in the plant canopy with later growth stages. Nitrate reductase activity of soybeans grown in hydroponic systems was significantly higher than activity of adjacent soil grown plants at later growth stages, which suggested that under normal field conditions the potential for nitrate utilization may not be realized. Nitrate reductase activity per gram fresh weight per hour and nitrate content were positively correlated over the growing season with plants grown in either soil or solution culture. Computations based upon the nitrate reductase assay of plants grown in hydroponics indicated that from 1.7 to 1.8 grams N could have been supplied to the plant via the nitrate reductase process. 11 references, 9 figures, 3 tables.

  13. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: a hidden source of nitrite?

    KAUST Repository

    Balk, Melike

    2015-03-02

    Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests. The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden by the presence of active nitrite-reducing microorganisms under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils.

  14. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: a hidden source of nitrite?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, Melike; Laverman, Anniet M; Keuskamp, Joost A; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests. The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden by the presence of active nitrite-reducing microorganisms under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils. PMID:25784903

  15. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: A hidden source of nitrite?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melike eBalk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests.The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils.

  16. Effect of anions or foods on absolute bioavailability of calcium from calcium salts in mice by pharmacokinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Ueda, Yukari; Taira, Zenei

    2013-01-01

    We studied the absolute bioavailability of calcium from calcium L-lactate in mice using pharmacokinetics, and reviewed the absolute bioavailability of calcium from three other calcium salts in mice previously studied: calcium chloride, calcium acetate, and calcium ascorbate. The results showed that calcium metabolism is linear between intravenous administration of 15 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg, and is not affected by anions. Results after oral calcium administration of 150 mg/kg showed that the intes...

  17. Extraction of uranyl nitrate from aqueous nitrate solutions by open cell polyurethane foam sponge (OCPUFS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extraction of uranyl nitrate into open cell polyurethane foam sponge (OCPUFS) from aqueous solution, in the presence of salting agents, was examined. The extraction efficiency was observed to depend on the concentration of uranyl and nitrate ions. The charge of the cation was also found to influence the distribution ratio. The effect of the change in temperature and pH was also studied. The results are interpreted in terms of OCPUFS acting as a viscous organic ether of moderate dielectric constant. (author) 14 refs.; 6 figs

  18. NITRATE DESTRUCTION LITERATURE SURVEY AND EVALUATION CRITERIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steimke, J.

    2011-02-01

    This report satisfies the initial phase of Task WP-2.3.4 Alternative Sodium Recovery Technology, Subtask 1; Develop Near-Tank Nitrate/Nitrite Destruction Technology. Some of the more common anions in carbon steel waste tanks at SRS and Hanford Site are nitrate which is corrosive, and nitrite and hydroxide which are corrosion inhibitors. At present it is necessary to periodically add large quantities of 50 wt% caustic to waste tanks. There are three primary reasons for this addition. First, when the contents of salt tanks are dissolved, sodium hydroxide preferentially dissolves and is removed. During the dissolution process the concentration of free hydroxide in the tank liquid can decrease from 9 M to less than 0.2 M. As a result, roughly half way through the dissolution process large quantities of sodium hydroxide must be added to the tank to comply with requirements for corrosion control. Second, hydroxide is continuously consumed by reaction with carbon dioxide which occurs naturally in purge air used to prevent buildup of hydrogen gas inside the tanks. The hydrogen is generated by radiolysis of water. Third, increasing the concentration of hydroxide increases solubility of some aluminum compounds, which is desirable in processing waste. A process that converts nitrate and nitrite to hydroxide would reduce certain costs. (1) Less caustic would be purchased. (2) Some of the aluminum solid compounds in the waste tanks would become more soluble so less mass of solids would be sent to High Level Vitrification and therefore it would be not be necessary to make as much expensive high level vitrified product. (3) Less mass of sodium would be fed to Saltstone at SRS or Low Level Vitrification at Hanford Site so it would not be necessary to make as much low level product. (4) At SRS less nitrite and nitrate would be sent to Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so less formic acid would be consumed there and less hydrogen gas would be generated. This task involves

  19. Nitrate Destruction Literature Survey And Evaluation Criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report satisfies the initial phase of Task WP-2.3.4 Alternative Sodium Recovery Technology, Subtask 1; Develop Near-Tank Nitrate/Nitrite Destruction Technology. Some of the more common anions in carbon steel waste tanks at SRS and Hanford Site are nitrate which is corrosive, and nitrite and hydroxide which are corrosion inhibitors. At present it is necessary to periodically add large quantities of 50 wt% caustic to waste tanks. There are three primary reasons for this addition. First, when the contents of salt tanks are dissolved, sodium hydroxide preferentially dissolves and is removed. During the dissolution process the concentration of free hydroxide in the tank liquid can decrease from 9 M to less than 0.2 M. As a result, roughly half way through the dissolution process large quantities of sodium hydroxide must be added to the tank to comply with requirements for corrosion control. Second, hydroxide is continuously consumed by reaction with carbon dioxide which occurs naturally in purge air used to prevent buildup of hydrogen gas inside the tanks. The hydrogen is generated by radiolysis of water. Third, increasing the concentration of hydroxide increases solubility of some aluminum compounds, which is desirable in processing waste. A process that converts nitrate and nitrite to hydroxide would reduce certain costs. (1) Less caustic would be purchased. (2) Some of the aluminum solid compounds in the waste tanks would become more soluble so less mass of solids would be sent to High Level Vitrification and therefore it would be not be necessary to make as much expensive high level vitrified product. (3) Less mass of sodium would be fed to Saltstone at SRS or Low Level Vitrification at Hanford Site so it would not be necessary to make as much low level product. (4) At SRS less nitrite and nitrate would be sent to Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so less formic acid would be consumed there and less hydrogen gas would be generated. This task involves

  20. Calcium release-activated calcium current in rat mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoth, M; Penner, R

    1993-06-01

    1. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings of membrane currents and fura-2 measurements of free intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) were used to study the biophysical properties of a calcium current activated by depletion of intracellular calcium stores in rat peritoneal mast cells. 2. Calcium influx through an inward calcium release-activated calcium current (ICRAC) was induced by three independent mechanisms that result in store depletion: intracellular infusion of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) or extracellular application of ionomycin (active depletion), and intracellular infusion of calcium chelators (ethylene glycol bis-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) or 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA)) to prevent reuptake of leaked-out calcium into the stores (passive depletion). 3. The activation of ICRAC induced by active store depletion has a short delay (4-14 s) following intracellular infusion of InsP3 or extracellular application of ionomycin. It has a monoexponential time course with a time constant of 20-30 s and, depending on the complementary Ca2+ buffer, a mean normalized amplitude (at 0 mV) of 0.6 pA pF-1 (with EGTA) and 1.1 pA pF-1 (with BAPTA). 4. After full activation of ICRAC by InsP3 in the presence of EGTA (10 mM), hyperpolarizing pulses to -100 mV induced an instantaneous inward current that decayed by 64% within 50 ms. This inactivation is probably mediated by [Ca2+]i, since the decrease of inward current in the presence of the fast Ca2+ buffer BAPTA (10 mM) was only 30%. 5. The amplitude of ICRAC was dependent on the extracellular Ca2+ concentration with an apparent dissociation constant (KD) of 3.3 mM. Inward currents were nonsaturating up to -200 mV. 6. The selectivity of ICRAC for Ca2+ was assessed by using fura-2 as the dominant intracellular buffer (at a concentration of 2 mM) and relating the absolute changes in the calcium-sensitive fluorescence (390 nm excitation) with the calcium current integral

  1. Studies on the production of thorium in nitrate from Eskisehir-Beylikahir thorium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large thorium deposit (380.000 tonne ThO2) has been found in Eskisehir-Beylikahir area in Turkey. Representative sample of 1000 Kg. thorium ore was taken from this deposit for the pre-concentration studies. Thorium pre-concentrate which has 1.41% Th02 grade and minus 0.105 mm. particle size was obtained after the physical treatment tests. Sulphuric acid leach was conducted on the thorium pre-concentrate and the thorium extraction recovery was over 90%. After these leach tests with sulphuric acid, thorium was precipitated as a sulphate from the leach slurry with 96% recovery. Thorium sulphate cake was dissolved in HCl and precipitated with ammonia to give a thorium hydroxide. During this process, aluminium iron and calcium were separated from the thorium. The thorium hydroxide was dissolved in nitric acid and the solution was evaporated to solid thorium nitrate. (author)

  2. Preparation and characterization of crosslinked alginate-CMC beads for controlled release of nitrate salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)/sodium alginate (SA) hydrogel beads were successfully prepared by Ca2+ ions crosslinking followed by gamma irradiation. The factors affecting beads formation are the composition of SA in the blend and concentration of calcium chloride as a crosslinking agent. The results indicated that the addition of CMC to SA increases the swelling (%) upto (1:3) (CMC:SA) ratio. The effect of different irradiation doses (2.5, 5, and 10 kGy) on swelling (%) was studied. At low doses, swelling (%) decreases upto 5 kGy then starts to increase at 10 kGy. The degree of the swelling (%) and release (%) of ammonium nitrate salt from beads were investigated under different pH (1.2, 5 and 7). The beads were characterized by FTIR, SEM and TGA to investigate molecular structure, morphology and thermal stability of beads. (author)

  3. The nitrate leached below maize root zone is available for deep-rooted wheat in winter wheat-summer maize rotation in the North China Plain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)-summer maize (Zea mays L.) rotation system in the North China Plain, maize roots do not extend beyond 1.2 m in the vertical soil profile, but wheat roots can reach up to 2.0 m. Increases in soil nitrate content at maize harvest and significant reductions after winter wheat harvest were observed in the 1.4-2.0 m depth under field conditions. The recovery of 15N isotope (calcium nitrate) from various (1.0, 1.2, 1.4, 1.6, 1.8 and 2.0 m) soil depths showed that deep-rooting winter wheat could use soil nitrate up to the 2.0 m depth. This accounted partially, for the reduced nitrate in the 1.4-2.0 m depth of the soil after harvest of wheat in the rotation system. - Deep-rooted wheat can recycle nitrate leached from maize root zone in winter wheat-summer maize rotation system

  4. Association of cardiac injury with iron-increased oxidative and nitrative modifications of the SERCA2a isoform of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xueli; Li, Wenliang; Gao, Zhonghong; Li, Hailing

    2016-08-01

    The role of iron in the etiology of diabetes complications is not well established. Thus, this study was performed to test whether the iron-induced increase of oxidative/nitrative damage is involved in SERCA2a-related diabetic heart complication. Four randomly divided groups of rats were used: normal control group; iron overload group; diabetes group, and diabetic plus iron overload group. Iron supplementation stimulated cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and led to an increase in cardiac protein carbonyls, nitrotyrosine (3-NT) formation, and iNOS protein expression, thus resulting in abnormal myocardium calcium homeostasis of diabetic rats. The levels of SECA2a oxidation/nitration were significantly increased in the iron overload diabetic rats, along with a decrease in SECA2a expression and activity. In order to elucidate the possible role of iron in SERCA2a dysfunction, the effects of iron (Fe(3+) or hemin) on peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) induced SERCA2a oxidation and nitration were further investigated in vitro. It was found that tyrosine nitration played more important role in SERCA2a inactivation than thiol oxidation. These results present a potential mechanism in which iron exacerbates the diabetes-induced oxidative/nitrative modification of SERCA2a, which may cause functional deficits in the myocyte associated with diabetic cardiac dysfunction. Our findings may help to further understand the role of iron in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. PMID:27222135

  5. The nitrate leached below maize root zone is available for deep-rooted wheat in winter wheat-summer maize rotation in the North China Plain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Shunli [Key Laboratory of Crop Cultivation and Farming System, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Agronomy and Biotechnology, China Agricultural University, 2 West Yuanmingyuan Road, Beijing 100094 (China)], E-mail: zhoushl@cau.edu.cn; Wu Yongcheng [Key Laboratory of Crop Cultivation and Farming System, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Agronomy and Biotechnology, China Agricultural University, 2 West Yuanmingyuan Road, Beijing 100094 (China); College of Agronomy, Si Chuan Agricultural University, Yaan 625014 (China); Wang Zhimin [Key Laboratory of Crop Cultivation and Farming System, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Agronomy and Biotechnology, China Agricultural University, 2 West Yuanmingyuan Road, Beijing 100094 (China); Lu Laiqing; Wang Runzheng [Wuqiao Experimental Station, China Agricultural University, Hebei 061802 (China)

    2008-04-15

    In winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)-summer maize (Zea mays L.) rotation system in the North China Plain, maize roots do not extend beyond 1.2 m in the vertical soil profile, but wheat roots can reach up to 2.0 m. Increases in soil nitrate content at maize harvest and significant reductions after winter wheat harvest were observed in the 1.4-2.0 m depth under field conditions. The recovery of {sup 15}N isotope (calcium nitrate) from various (1.0, 1.2, 1.4, 1.6, 1.8 and 2.0 m) soil depths showed that deep-rooting winter wheat could use soil nitrate up to the 2.0 m depth. This accounted partially, for the reduced nitrate in the 1.4-2.0 m depth of the soil after harvest of wheat in the rotation system. - Deep-rooted wheat can recycle nitrate leached from maize root zone in winter wheat-summer maize rotation system.

  6. Calcium phosphate in catheter encrustation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, A J; Harries, J E; Hukins, D W; Kennedy, A P; Sutton, T M

    1987-02-01

    Encrusted catheters from nine female patients were the source of samples of deposits which were examined by X-ray diffraction, atomic absorption spectroscopy, infra-red spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. In eight samples the only crystalline phase which could be clearly distinguished by X-ray diffraction was ammonium magnesium orthophosphate hexahydrate, NH4MgPO4 X 6H2O, which occurs naturally as the mineral struvite. However, atomic absorption spectroscopy revealed an appreciable concentration of calcium in all samples. Calcium phosphates have previously been detected in catheter deposits. Infra-red and EXAFS spectra were consistent with the calcium phosphate being present as a poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite. Thus the deposits appear to consist of a mixture of crystalline struvite and a form of hydroxyapatite which is not fully crystalline. PMID:3030487

  7. Characterization of alkali-metal and alkaline-earth nitrates by vibrational spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez, S.

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available Infrared spectra of sodium and potassium alkaline-metal nitrates and magnesium and calcium alkali-earth nitrates in solid phase had been recorded in order to assign the fundamental bands. The influence of the dispersal médium (alkaline halide, employed in the solid sample preparation have been discussed. The quantitative measurements of the band in ten sities at 1387 cm-1 (present in the I.R. spectra of the four nitrates in KBr médium allowed us to determine the Lambert-Beer law slopes for each compound. These values are differents (bearing in mind experimental random errors, so we have could to affirm the nonexistence of solid solution between the nitrate and the alkaline halide médium. The L-B law obtained by us can be used for the Identification differentiation and quantitative analysis of these nitrates in solid phase, even if they are present in a very low concentration.

    Se ha realizado la asignación de los espectros infrarrojo (IR de los nitratos alcalinos, sódico y potásico, y de los alcalinotérreos, magnésico y cálcico, en estado sólido. Se ha visto la influencia del medio dispersante (haluro alcalino, utilizado en la preparación de la muestra sólida. El estudio cuantitativo de la absorbencia de la banda a 1.387 cm-1 (presente en los espectros IR de los cuatro nitratos en medio KBr permite determinar las pendientes de la Ley de Lambert-Beer Se comprueba que dichas pendientes son diferentes lo que conduce a poder afirmar que no se produce disolución sólida entre el KBr y el nitrato alcalino o alcalinotérreo. La determinación de la ley de Lambert-Beer permite la identificación y el análisis cualitativo y cuantitativo por espectroscopia IR de estos nitratos cuando están presentes en bajas concentraciones en muestras sólidas.

  8. Recovery of uranium from uranyl nitrate raffinate. Contributed Paper PE-06

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At New Uranium Oxide Fuel Plant, NUOFP(O) of Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC), the Uranyl Nitrate Raffinate (UNR) generated during solvent extraction process is washed with Treated Lean Solvent(TLS) to recover residual U. Earlier this UNR consisting of 0.5-1 gm/l and 2.5 FA was neutralised with vapour ammonia. The slurry was then filtered over pre coat drum filter and the resultant Uranyl Nitrate Raffinate cake (UNRC) was stored in polyethylene lined MS drums. The valuable U was thus being locked up in UNRC. Also, the storage of UNRC drums required lot of floor space which have to be repacked frequently to contain the radioactivity. Hence the need has come to avoid the generation of UNRC and the recovery of U from the already generated UNRC. The generation of UNRC was avoided by developing alternate process of UNR treatment with Treated Lean Solvent for the removal of residual U and the resulting Acidic Raffinate Slurry (ARS) is disposed. The Uranium recovery from UNRC is done by dissolving the cake in Uranyl Nitrate Raffinate solution to leach the hexavalent Uranium by utilizing the free acidity in UNR. The leaching time is about six hours and the uranium forms uranyl nitrate. The resulting leach solutions are relatively dilute but complex acidic nitrate solutions containing wide variety of ions. Metallic ions commonly present include uranium, iron, magnesium, aluminium, sodium, calcium etc. The uranium concentration is normally 1-1.5 g/L. This uranium is separated by solvent extraction. The active agent in solvent extraction is Tri Butyl Phosphate in kerosene that can selectively extract uranium into an organic complex which is insoluble in aqueous. The organic used for extraction is Treated Lean Solvent in the quality of freshly prepared solvent and the resulting Acidic Raffinate Slurry is disposed by sale. The leaching of Uranium from UNRC was done in plant scale and about 1200 kgs of UNRC was successfully processed in trial batch. The paper deals with details of

  9. The influence of potassium and calcium ions on nitrogen metabolism of cucumber seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genowefa Kubik-Dobosz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available It was found that K+ or Ca2+ deficiency in a nitrate or ammonium medium increased the amount of accumulated total and non-protein nitrogen in some organs of cucumber seedlings, as also caused changes in accumulated potassium and calcium. Lack of K+ or Ca2+ in a medium which did not contain nitrogen led to an increased level of glutamate dehydrogenase, alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activity in the cotyledons and roots of cucumbers. Similar changes in the activity of these enzymes were noted in certain organs of seedlings growing in nitrate or ammonium medium with decreased K+ or Ca2+ contents, although the magnitude of these changes depended upon the applied dosage of these cations, the form of mineral nitrogen, developmental phase of plants and the plant organ dealt with.

  10. The effect of variable calcium and very low calcium diets on human calcium metabolism. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, J.

    1971-01-01

    The effects of a very low calcium diet, with variable high and low protein intake, on the dynamics of calcium metabolism and the mechanism of calciuretics, are examined. The experiment, using male subjects, was designed to study the role of intestinal calcium absorption on urinary calcium excretion, and the rate of production of endogeneously secreted calcium in the gastrointestinal tract. The study showed an average of 70% fractional absorption rate during very low calcium intake, and that a decrease in renal tubular reabsorption of calcium is responsible for calciuretic effects of high protein intake. The study also indicates that there is a tendency to develop osteoporosis after long periods of low calcium intake, especially with a concurrent high protein intake.

  11. Accumulation of Nitrate in Vegetables and Its Possible Implications to Human Health

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Shao-ting; ZHANG Yong-song; LIN Xian-yong

    2007-01-01

    In recent times, there are two kinds of completely opposite viewpoints about the impacts of nitrate on human health. To further objectively understand the effects of nitrate on human health, both of harmfulness and possible benefits of nitrate to human body, it is discussed in this review from the aspects of nitrate accumulation in vegetables, the source of nitrate ingested into human body, and the transformation of nitrate in human body, as well as the pathogenesis and physiological functions of nitrate metabolism.

  12. Evaluating Ecosystem Services for Reducing Groundwater Nitrate Contamination: Nitrate Attenuation in the Unsaturated and Saturated Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrates are the most common type of groundwater contamination in agricultural regions. Environmental policies targeting nitrates have focused on input control (e.g., restricted fertilizer application), intermediate loads control (e.g., reduce nitrate leached from crop fields), and final loads control (e.g., reduce catchment nitrate loads). Nitrate loads can be affected by hydrological processes in both unsaturated and saturated zones. Although many of these processes have been extensively investigated in literature, they are commonly modeled as exogenous to farm management. A couple of recent studies by scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory show that in some situations nitrate attenuation processes in the unsaturated/saturated zone, particularly denitrification, can be intensified by certain management practices to mitigate nitrate loads. Therefore, these nitrate attenuation processes can be regarded as a set of ecosystem services that farmers can take advantage of to reduce their cost of complying with environmental policies. In this paper, a representative California dairy farm is used as a case study to show how such ecosystem attenuation services can be framed within the farm owner's decision-making framework as an option for reducing groundwater nitrate contamination. I develop an integrated dynamic model, where the farmer maximizes discounted net farm profit over multiple periods subject to environmental regulations. The model consists of three submodels: animal-waste-crop, hydrologic, and economic model. In addition to common choice variables such as irrigation, fertilization, and waste disposal options, the farmer can also endogenously choose from three water sources: surface water, deep groundwater (old groundwater in the deep aquifer that is not affected by farm effluent in the short term), and shallow groundwater (drainage water that can be recycled via capture wells at the downstream end of the farm). The capture wells not only

  13. Nitrate sources and sinks in Elkhorn Slough, California: Results from long-term continuous in situ nitrate analyzers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, T.P.; Caffrey, J.M.; Jannasch, H.W.; Coletti, L.J.; Haskins, J.C.; Johnson, K.S.

    2004-01-01

    Nitrate and water quality parameters (temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, and depth) were measured continuously with in situ NO 3 analyzers and water quality sondes at two sites in Elkhorn Slough in Central California. The Main Channel site near the mouth of Elkhorn Slough was sampled from February to September 2001. Azevedo Pond, a shallow tidal pond bordering agricultural fields further inland, was sampled from December 1999 to July 2001. Nitrate concentrations were recorded hourly while salinity, temperature, depth, oxygen, and turbidity were recorded every 30 min. Nitrate concentrations at the Main Channel site ranged from 5 to 65 ??M. The propagation of an internal wave carrying water from ???100 m depth up the Monterey Submarine Canyon and into the lower section of Elkhorn Slough on every rising tide was a major source of nitrate, accounting for 80-90% of the nitrogen load during the dry summer period. Nitrate concentrations in Azevedo Pond ranged from 0-20 ??M during the dry summer months. Nitrate in Azevedo Pond increased to over 450 ??M during a heavy winter precipitation event, and interannual variability driven by differences in precipitation was observed. At both sites, tidal cycling was the dominant forcing, often changing nitrate concentrations by 5-fold or more within a few hours. Water volume flux estimates were combined with observed nitrate concentrations to obtain nitrate fluxes. Nitrate flux calculations indicated a loss of 4 mmol NO3 m -2 d-1 for the entire Elkhorn Slough and 1 mmol NO 3 m-2 d-1 at Azevedo Pond. These results suggested that the waters of Elkhorn Slough were not a major source of nitrate to Monterey Bay but actually a nitrate sink during the dry season. The limited winter data at the Main Channel site suggest that nitrate was exported from Elkhorn Slough during the wet season. Export of ammonium or dissolved organic nitrogen, which we did not monitor, may balance some or all of the NO 3 flux.

  14. Tumoral calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A report of two patients in which a soft tissue mass, initially regarded as a malignant tumor, was shown to be the result of calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease. The first case, a woman aged 71 years, presented with a mass involving the right fifth finger. In the second case, also a women aged 71 years, the lesion involved the tissues adjacent to the right hip. Each lesion consisted of a mass of highly cellular tissue containing deposits of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals. The clinical, radiological, and pathological features of the two cases are compared with those of seven similar cases reported in the literature. (orig.)

  15. Sustainability of natural attenuation of nitrate in agricultural aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Christopher T.; Bekins, Barbara A.

    2010-01-01

    Increased concentrations of nitrate in groundwater in agricultural areas, coinciding with increased use of chemical and organic fertilizers, have raised concern because of risks to environmental and human health. At some sites, these problems are mitigated by natural attenuation of nitrate as a result of microbially mediated reactions. Results from U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) research under the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program show that reactions of dissolved nitrate with solid aquifer minerals and organic carbon help lower nitrate concentrations in groundwater beneath agricultural fields. However, increased fluxes of nitrate cause ongoing depletion of the finite pool of solid reactants. Consumption of the solid reactants diminishes the capacity of the aquifer to remove nitrate, calling into question the long-term sustainability of these natural attenuation processes.

  16. Evaluation of ferrocyanide/nitrate explosive hazard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory agreed to assist Pacific Northwest Laboratory in the Ferrocyanide Safety Evaluation Program by helping to evaluate the explosive hazard of several mixtures of simulated ferrocyanide waste-tank sludge containing sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate. This report is an evaluation of the small-scale safety tests used to assess the safety of these materials from an explosive point of view. These tests show that these materials are not initiated by mechanical insult, and they require an external heat source before any exothermic chemical reaction can be observed

  17. Electrospun cellulose nitrate and polycaprolactone blended nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nartker, Steven; Hassan, Mohamed; Stogsdill, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Pure cellulose nitrate (CN) and blends of CN and polycaprolactone were electrospun to form nonwoven mats. Polymers were dissolved in a mixed solvent system of tetrahydrofuran and N,N-dimethylformamide. The concentrations were varied to obtain sub-micron and nanoscale fiber mats. Fiber mats were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, contact angle analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis. The fiber morphology, surface chemistry and contact angle data show that these electrospun materials are suitable for applications including biosensing, biomedical and tissue engineering.

  18. Periplasmic nitrate reductases: structural and spectroscopic studies

    OpenAIRE

    Javier Gonzalez, Pablo

    2006-01-01

    Dissertação apresentada para obtenção do grau de Doutor em Bioquímica, especialidade Bioquímica-Física, pela Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa Nitrate reduction occurs in the cell in order to incorporate nitrogen into biomolecules(assimilatory ammonification), as the final electron acceptor when bacteria are grown in anaerobic conditions (denitrification/dissimilatory ammonification) and to eliminate energy excess generated by the cell metabolism (dissimi...

  19. Simple approximation of nitrate diffusion from saltstone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes: (1) The justification for using one dimensional semi-infinite solid, with zero surface concentration, as an adequate model for saltstone leaching. (2) A simplified model involving leaching from a monolith into a well stirred tank to describe the transient salt concentration in the soil as the water in it migrates toward the saturated zone. (3) The effect, on the flux of sodium nitrate into the soil, of a slab of material such as clay or cement, placed between the saltstone and soil. It is assumed that the material in intermediate between that of the saltstone and soil

  20. Nitrate Paradigm Does Not Hold Up for Sugarcane

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Nicole; Brackin, Richard; Vinall, Kerry; Soper, Fiona; Holst, Jirko; Gamage, Harshi; Paungfoo-Lonhienne, Chanyarat; Rennenberg, Heinz; Lakshmanan, Prakash; Schmidt, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Modern agriculture is based on the notion that nitrate is the main source of nitrogen (N) for crops, but nitrate is also the most mobile form of N and easily lost from soil. Efficient acquisition of nitrate by crops is therefore a prerequisite for avoiding off-site N pollution. Sugarcane is considered the most suitable tropical crop for biofuel production, but surprisingly high N fertilizer applications in main producer countries raise doubt about the sustainability of production and are at o...

  1. Assessment of nitrate contamination risk: The Italian experience

    OpenAIRE

    Capri, E.; Delgado Huertas, Antonio; VASSALLO, M

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to show the results of the Italian research project of national interest (PRIN) launched in 2006 and finished in 2008, concerning the “assessment of groundwater contamination risk by nitrates assessment”. The project verified the IPNOA method for nitrate groundwater contamination risk assessment in four test-sites of Italy. The IPNOA is a parametric index which assesses the potential hazard of nitrate contamination originating from agriculture on a regional scale....

  2. Nitrate sensing and cell wall modification in Staphylococci

    OpenAIRE

    Niemann, Volker

    2015-01-01

    This thesis highlights two topics concerning the regulation of energy metabolism and the cell wall biosynthesis in Staphylococci. Most members of this genus are facultative anaerobic microorganisms able to respire on nitrate as final electron acceptor. The completely apathogenic organism Staphylococcus carnosus is used as starter culture in food industry. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction causes desired effects during the ripening process of sausages. First, the nitrate concentra...

  3. Nitrate pollution in groundwater: source identification using isotope ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotope ratios for identification of pollutant source is an emerging scientific tool. An investigation was carried out to find out the origin of nitrate in groundwater in an area which receives pollutant of different origin like inorganic fertilizers, organic manures besides urban wastes. The δ15N values of nitrate clearly indicated the possibility of groundwater pollution by nitrate originating from human and animal wastes. (author)

  4. Effects of long-term dietary nitrate supplementation in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Hezel, Michael P.; Ming Liu; Tomas A. Schiffer; Larsen, Filip J.; Antonio Checa; Wheelock, Craig E; Mattias Carlström; Lundberg, Jon O.; Eddie Weitzberg

    2015-01-01

    Background: Inorganic nitrate (NO3-) is a precursor of nitric oxide (NO) in the body and a large number of short-term studies with dietary nitrate supplementation in animals and humans show beneficial effects on cardiovascular health, exercise efficiency, host defense and ischemia reperfusion injury. In contrast, there is a long withstanding concern regarding the putative adverse effects of chronic nitrate exposure related to cancer and adverse hormonal effects. To address these concerns we p...

  5. The effect of light on nitrate uptake by wheat roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinzhi Li

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Illuminating shoots stimulates nitrate uptake by wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. ‘EM18’ roots. A method with a high time resolution (minutes, non-invasive technique, has enabled to measure the nitrate uptake time coarsely. The nitrate uptake by wheat roots increases in the light and decreases in the dark. The mechanism is thought to be via a signal carried in phloem, probably a sugar.

  6. Nitrate paradigm does not hold up for sugarcane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Robinson

    Full Text Available Modern agriculture is based on the notion that nitrate is the main source of nitrogen (N for crops, but nitrate is also the most mobile form of N and easily lost from soil. Efficient acquisition of nitrate by crops is therefore a prerequisite for avoiding off-site N pollution. Sugarcane is considered the most suitable tropical crop for biofuel production, but surprisingly high N fertilizer applications in main producer countries raise doubt about the sustainability of production and are at odds with a carbon-based crop. Examining reasons for the inefficient use of N fertilizer, we hypothesized that sugarcane resembles other giant tropical grasses which inhibit the production of nitrate in soil and differ from related grain crops with a confirmed ability to use nitrate. The results of our study support the hypothesis that N-replete sugarcane and ancestral species in the Andropogoneae supertribe strongly prefer ammonium over nitrate. Sugarcane differs from grain crops, sorghum and maize, which acquired both N sources equally well, while giant grass, Erianthus, displayed an intermediate ability to use nitrate. We conclude that discrimination against nitrate and a low capacity to store nitrate in shoots prevents commercial sugarcane varieties from taking advantage of the high nitrate concentrations in fertilized soils in the first three months of the growing season, leaving nitrate vulnerable to loss. Our study addresses a major caveat of sugarcane production and affords a strong basis for improvement through breeding cultivars with enhanced capacity to use nitrate as well as through agronomic measures that reduce nitrification in soil.

  7. A nitrate sensitive planar optode; performance and interferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse; Dechesne, Arnaud; Smets, Barth F.

    2015-01-01

    We present a newly developed nitrate sensitive planar optode. It exhibits a linear response to nitrate from 1 to 50 mM at pH 8.0, a fast response time below 10 s and a good lifetime, allowing for fast two dimensional nitrate measurements over long periods of time. Interference from nitrite, chlor......, chloride and thiocyanate, however, limits the optode's application in environments where these are encountered, notably seawater with its high chloride content....

  8. Nitrate Pollution in Inland Waters: Causes, Consequences and Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Raimundo Viejo Rubio

    2003-01-01

    This paper considers the problems related with excessive concentration of nitrates in inland waters. According to recent concerns about the level of nitrates in water, the British situation will be studied. Potential health and environmental problems are examined given new evidence for their linkage with nitrate concentrations. The paper will also consider the role that water companies play when treating polluted water and charging consumers for water supply. Current legislation dealing with ...

  9. Nitrate leaching in grazed grasslands of different composition and age

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksen, J.; Vinther, F.P.

    2002-01-01

    In a field experiment at Research Centre Foulum a suction cup technique was used to investigate nitrate leaching from grassland depending on composition (grass-clover or perennial ryegrass), management (grazing or cutting) and age of the swards. In 1997-2001 was investigated the successive nitrate leaching from 4-7 year old grazed grass-clover and ryegrass with cut plots of similar age and spring barley as reference. In 2000-2001 the simultaneous nitrate leaching from newly established swards...

  10. NITRATE AND NITRITE CONCENTRATION IN VEGETABLES GRAWING AROUND ISFAHAN CITY

    OpenAIRE

    R.A JAFARI; A AZIZ ZADEH; A FARZAN

    2001-01-01

    Introduction: The improper and excess use of chemical fertilizers by the farmers special in "urea" form may cause the commulation of nitrates and nitrites in vegetables and fruits. This investigation has been done to determine the concentration of nitrates and nitrites in some vegetables growing around Isfahan. Methods: One hundred and thirteen random samples from 15 different kinds of green lest tuber vegetables were measured by Cadmium Column Procedure for nitrates and nitrites. R...

  11. The effectiveness of nitrate vulnerable zones for limiting surface water nitrate concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrall, F.; Spencer, E.; Burt, T. P.

    2009-05-01

    SummaryThis study considers the surface water concentrations of nitrate in areas designated as nitrate vulnerable zones (NVZs) for between 12 and 15 years. The study proposes a range of tests of the effectiveness of nitrate management within the NVZs and in particular the results from within NVZs were compared to a range of controls. The tests show that: Sixty-nine percent of NVZs showed no significant improvement in surface water concentrations even after 15 years. In comparison to a control catchment 29% of NVZs showed a significant improvement but 31% showed a significant worsening. The average improvement relative to a control due to NVZ designation was 0.02 ± 0.08 mg N/l/yr. Differences between NVZs could not be significantly related to the size of the NVZ, uptake of the scheme, extent of uptake, land use change or geology of the local aquifer. Land use data suggest that NVZ designation buffered the designated areas against wider changes in arable farming in England and helped maintain a higher proportion of arable within the areas than would be expected. The lack of objective success for NVZ designation suggests that nitrate pollution control strategies based on input management need to be rethought.

  12. Impact of Sulfide on Nitrate Conversion in Eutrophic Nitrate-Rich Marine Sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwermer, Carsten U.; Krieger, Bärbel; Lavik, Gaute;

    2006-01-01

    Environmental Sciences, Volcani Research Center, Bet-Dagan, Israel Multiple anaerobic processes are responsible for carbon mineralization in eutrophic nitrate-rich marine environments (e.g., upwelling areas, estuaries, and aquacultures), involving electron acceptors from both the nitrogen and sulfur cycle. The...

  13. Impacts of drainage water management on subsurface drain flow, nitrate concentration, and nitrate loads in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drainage water management is a conservation practice that has the potential to reduce drainage outflow and nitrate (NO3) loss from agricultural fields while maintaining or improving crop yields. The goal of this study was to quantify the impact of drainage water management on dra...

  14. Multiple mechanisms of nitrate sensing by Arabidopsis nitrate transceptor NRT1.1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bouguyon, E.; Brun, F.; Meynard, D.; Kubeš, Martin; Pervent, M.; Leran, S.; Lacombe, B.; Krouk, G.; Guiderdoni, E.; Zažímalová, Eva; Hoyerová, Klára; Nacry, P.; Gojon, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 1, March (2015), s. 15015. ISSN 2055-026X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/0797 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : nitrate transceptor * Arabidopsis * lateral root development Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  15. Complex formation ions calcium with macromolecules pectin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In clause the mechanism of sorption of ions of calcium by macromolecules of pectin is opened. Is shown, that the linkage of ions of calcium descends on acid bunches of pectin, and process carries cooperative character

  16. Mechanism of store-operated calcium entry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Devkanya Dutta

    2000-12-01

    Activation of receptors coupled to the phospholipase C/IP3 signalling pathway results in a rapid release of calcium from its intracellular stores, eventually leading to depletion of these stores. Calcium store depletion triggers an influx of extracellular calcium across the plasma membrane, a mechanism known as the store-operated calcium entry or capacitative calcium entry. Capacitative calcium current plays a key role in replenishing calcium stores and activating various physiological processes. Despite considerable efforts, very little is known about the molecular nature of the capacitative channel and the signalling pathway that activates it. This review summarizes our current knowledge about store operated calcium entry and suggests possible hypotheses for its mode of activation.

  17. Dairy Dilemma: Are You Getting Enough Calcium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dairy Dilemma Dairy Dilemma Are You Getting Enough Calcium? You may be avoiding dairy products because of ... But dairy products are a major source of calcium, vitamin D and other nutrients that are important ...

  18. Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can break easily, even without an obvious injury. Vitamin D helps your body absorb calcium. Eat foods that provide the right amounts of calcium, vitamin D, and protein. This kind of diet will give ...

  19. Pitting behavior of 2024 aluminum alloy in nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitting of 2024 aluminum alloy was investigated in chloride-containing nitrate solutions. Potentiostatic and potentiokinetic experiments followed by examination of the sample surface were performed in order to relate the pitting behavior of the alloy to its microstructure. The SEM examination showed that copper-rich particles were preferential sites for pitting. These particles started dissolving during the polarization in nitrate solutions due to the agressivity of nitrate ions toward copper. In the presence of chloride ions, these particles were completely dissolved. Nitrate ions on the other hand appeared to have a very strong inhibitory effect toward pitting in the aluminum matrix. (author)

  20. Aluminum nitrate recrystallization and recovery from liquid extraction raffinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solid sludges resulting form biodenitrification of discarded aluminum nitrate are the largest Y-12 Plant process solid waste. Aluminum nitrate feedstocks also represent a major plant materials cost. The chemical constraints on aluminum nitrate recycle were investigated to determine the feasibility of increasing recycle while maintaining acceptable aluminum nitrate purity. Reported phase behavior of analogous systems, together with bench research, indicated that it would be possible to raise the recycle rate from 35% to between 70 and 90% by successive concentration and recrystallization of the mother liquor. A full scale pilot test successfully confirmed the ability to obtain 70% recycle in existing process equipment

  1. Endogenously Nitrated Proteins in Mouse Brain: Links To Neurodegenerative Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacksteder, Colette A.; Qian, Weijun; Knyushko, Tanya V.; Wang, Haixing H.; Chin, Mark H.; Lacan, Goran; Melega, William P.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Smith, Desmond J.; Squier, Thomas C.; Bigelow, Diana J.

    2006-07-04

    Increased nitrotyrosine modification of proteins has been documented in multiple pathologies in a variety of tissue types; emerging evidence suggests its additional role in redox regulation of normal metabolism. In order to identify proteins sensitive to nitrating conditions in vivo, a comprehensive proteomic dataset identifying 7,792 proteins from whole mouse brain, generated by LC/LC-MS/MS analyses, was used to identify nitrated proteins. This analysis resulted in identification of 31 unique nitrotyrosine sites within 29 different proteins. Over half of the nitrated proteins identified have been reported to be involved in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, or other neurodegenerative disorders. Similarly, nitrotyrosine immunoblots of whole brain homogenates show that treatment of mice with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), an experimental model of Parkinson's disease, induces increased nitration of the same protein bands observed to be nitrated in brains of untreated animals. Comparing sequences and available high resolution structures around nitrated tyrosines with those of unmodified sites indicates a preference of nitration in vivo for surface accessible tyrosines in loops, characteristics consistent with peroxynitrite-induced tyrosine modification. More striking is the five-fold greater nitration of tyrosines having nearby basic sidechains, suggesting electrostatic attraction of basic groups with the negative charge of peroxynitrite. Together, these results suggest that elevated peroxynitrite generation plays a role in neurodegenerative changes in the brain and provides a predictive tool of functionally important sites of nitration.

  2. Regioselective nitration of aromatic substrates in zeolite cages

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Esakkidurai; M Kumarraja; K Pitchumani

    2003-04-01

    Phenol is nitrated regioselectively by fuming nitric acid inside the cages of faujasite zeolites (dependent on the loading level) and a remarkable orthoselectivity is observed in solid state nitration. Toluene and chlorobenzene also containing ortho-/para-orienting substituents, undergo faster nitration, though the regioselectivity is less significant in zeolite media. The results are explained on the basis of diffusion and binding of phenol inside zeolite, which facilitate regioselectivity (and which is absent in toluene and chlorobenzene). Other advantages of employing zeolites as media for mild and selective nitration are also highlighted.

  3. Development of technology for ammonium nitrate dissociation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammonia and ammonium carbonate are frequently used as reagents in fuel production and processing of liquid radioactive wastes. In particular, liquid radioactive wastes that contain ammonium nitrate are generated during operations of metal precipitation. In closed vessels at elevated temperature, for example in evaporators or deposits in tubing, ammonium nitrate may explode due to generation of gaseous nitrogen oxides [2]. In this connection, steps have to be taken to rule out conditions that result in explosion. To do that, ammonium nitrate should be removed even prior to the initial stage of its formation. This report gives results of development of a method of dissociating ammonium nitrate

  4. Significant accumulation of nitrate in Chinese semi-humid croplands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Junyu; Gu, Baojing; Schlesinger, William H.; Ju, Xiaotang

    2016-04-01

    Soil nitrate is important for crop growth, but it can also leach to groundwater causing nitrate contamination, a threat to human health. Here, we report a significant accumulation of soil nitrate in Chinese semi-humid croplands based upon more than 7000 samples from 141 sites collected from 1994 to 2015. In the 0–4 meters depth of soil, total nitrate accumulation reaches 453 ± 39, 749 ± 75, 1191 ± 89, 1269 ± 114, 2155 ± 330 kg N ha‑1 on average in wheat, maize, open-field vegetables (OFV), solar plastic-roofed greenhouse vegetables (GHV) and orchard fields, respectively. Surprisingly, there is also a comparable amount of nitrate accumulated in the vadose-zone deeper than 4 meters. Over-use of N fertilizer (and/or manure) and a declining groundwater table are the major causes for this huge nitrate reservoir in the vadose-zone of semi-humid croplands, where the nitrate cannot be denitrified due to the presence of oxygen and lack of carbon sources. Future climatic change with more extreme rainfall events would increase the risk of accumulated nitrate moving downwards and threatening groundwater nitrate contamination.

  5. Hydrothermal oxidation of organic wastes using reclaimed ammonium nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proesmans, P.I.; Luan, L.; Buelow, S.J.

    1996-04-01

    Ammonium nitrate is being studied as an alternative for ammonium perchlorate as an oxidizing agent in Department of Defense 1.1 and 1.3 rocket propellants. Use of ammonium nitrate would eliminate the HCl produced by ammonium perchlorate upon thermal decomposition. To stabilize the ammonium nitrate, which suffers from phase instability, potassium dinitramide (KDN) is added. This increased use of ammonium nitrate will ultimately create a need for environmentally responsible processes to reuse ammonium nitrate extracted from demilitarized rocket motors. Ammonium Nitrate was investigated as an oxidizing agent for methanol, acetic acid and phenol. High removal of organic, ammonia and nitrate was achieved at stoichiometric concentrations. The oxidation of ammonia by nitrate was much faster than the oxidation of either methanol or acetic acid. Phenol, however, was in strong competition with ammonia for the oxidizer (nitrate). Nitrogen products included N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, NO{sub 2{sup {minus}}} as well as toxic NO and trace amounts of NO{sub 2}. Carbon products were CO{sub 2}, HCO{sub 3{sup {minus}}}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}, and CO.

  6. Calcium channel blockers and Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Tan; Yulin Deng; Hong Qing

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by two pathological hallmarks: amyloid plaques and neurofi-brillary tangles. In addition, calcium homeostasis is disrupted in the course of human aging. Recent research shows that dense plaques can cause functional alteration of calcium signals in mice with Alzheimer's disease. Calcium channel blockers are effective therapeutics for treating Alzheimer's disease. This review provides an overview of the current research of calcium channel blockers in-volved in Alzheimer's disease therapy.

  7. Calcium channel blockers and Alzheimer's disease★

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Yi; Deng, Yulin; Qing, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by two pathological hallmarks: amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. In addition, calcium homeostasis is disrupted in the course of human aging. Recent research shows that dense plaques can cause functional alteration of calcium signals in mice with Alzheimer's disease. Calcium channel blockers are effective therapeutics for treating Alzheimer's disease. This review provides an overview of the current research of calcium channel blockers involved in...

  8. Teaching Calcium-Induced Calcium Release in Cardiomyocytes Using a Classic Paper by Fabiato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Willmann

    2008-01-01

    This teaching paper utilizes the materials presented by Dr. Fabiato in his review article entitled "Calcium-induced release of calcium from the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum." In the review, supporting evidence of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is presented. Data concerning potential objections to the CICR theory are discussed as well. In…

  9. Electrophysical properties of calcium orthovanadate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electron conductivity, dielectric permeability and magnetic susceptibility of calcium orthovanadate are studied. It is shown that structural transformations bring about changes in the nature of electrophysical properties of Ca3(VO4)2 and cause the charge redistribution in VO43- anion groups

  10. Crystallization of sodium nitrate from radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the 1940s to the 1980s, the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IPC/RAS) conducted research and development on processes to separate acetate and nitrate salts and acetic acid from radioactive wastes by crystallization. The research objective was to decrease waste volumes and produce the separated decontaminated materials for recycle. This report presents an account of the IPC/RAS experience in this field. Details on operating conditions, waste and product compositions, decontamination factors, and process equipment are described. The research and development was generally related to the management of intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The waste solutions resulted from recovery and processing of uranium, plutonium, and other products from irradiated nuclear fuel, neutralization of nuclear process solutions after extractant recovery, regeneration of process nitric acid, equipment decontamination, and other radiochemical processes. Waste components include nitric acid, metal nitrate and acetate salts, organic impurities, and surfactants. Waste management operations generally consist of two stages: volume reduction and processing of the concentrates for storage, solidification, and disposal. Filtration, coprecipitation, coagulation, evaporation, and sorption were used to reduce waste volume. 28 figs., 40 tabs

  11. New infrared spectroscopic database for bromine nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Georg; Birk, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    Fourier transform infrared measurements of bromine nitrate have been performed in the spectral region 675-1400 cm-1 at 0.014 cm-1 spectral resolution. Absorption cross sections were derived from 38 spectra covering the temperature range from 203 to 296 K and air pressure range from 0 to 190 mbar. For line-by-line analysis, further spectra were recorded at 0.00094 cm-1 spectral resolution at 223 and 293 K. The sample was synthesized from ClONO2 and Br2. Band strengths of the bands ν3 around 803 cm-1 and ν2 around 1286 cm-1 were determined from three pure BrONO2 measurements at different temperatures and pressures. Number densities in the absorption cell were derived from pressure measurements of the purified sample taking into account small amounts of impurities determined spectroscopically. Resulting band strengths are Sν3 = 2.872(52) × 10-17 cm2 molec-1 cm-1 and Sν2 = 3.63(15) × 10-17 cm2 molec-1 cm-1. Absorption cross sections of all measurements were scaled to these band strengths. Further data reduction was achieved with an interpolation scheme based on two-dimensional polynomials in ln(pressure) and temperature. The database is well-suited for remote-sensing application and should reduce the atmospheric bromine nitrate error budget substantially.

  12. Thermal decomposition of supported lithium nitrate catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, Maria Lucia [INTEQUI (CONICET-UNSL), 25 de Mayo 384, V. Mercedes, 5730, San Luis (Argentina); Lick, Ileana Daniela [CINDECA (CONICET-UNLP), Calle 47 No 257, La Plata, 1900, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ponzi, Marta Isabel [INTEQUI (CONICET-UNSL), 25 de Mayo 384, V. Mercedes, 5730, San Luis (Argentina); Castellon, Enrique Rodriguez; Jimenez-Lopez, Antonio [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Cristalografia y Mineralogia. Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Malaga, Campus de Teatinos, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Ponzi, Esther Natalia, E-mail: eponzi@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [CINDECA (CONICET-UNLP), Calle 47 No 257, La Plata, 1900, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2010-02-20

    New catalysts for soot combustion were prepared by impregnation of different supports (SiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}.nH{sub 2}O) with a LiNO{sub 3} solution and then characterized by means of FTIR, XPS, TGA and UV-vis spectroscopy, whereby the presence of lithium nitrate in the prepared catalysts was identified and quantified. The soot combustion rate using this series of catalysts (LiNO{sub 3}/support) was compared with the activity of a series of impregnated catalysts prepared using LiOH (Li{sub 2}O/supports). Catalysts prepared using LiNO{sub 3} are found to be more active than those prepared using LiOH. The catalytic performance was also studied with a NO/O{sub 2} mixture in the feed, demonstrating that NO increases the combustion rate of soot, probably as a consequence of lithium oxide forming an 'in situ' nitrate ion.

  13. New infrared spectroscopic database for chlorine nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourier transform infrared measurements of chlorine nitrate have been performed in the spectral region 500-1330 cm-1 at 0.002-0.008 cm-1 spectral resolution. Absorption cross sections were derived from 23 spectra covering the temperature range from 190 to 296 K and air pressure range from 0 to 150 hPa. For line-by-line analysis, further spectra were recorded at 0.00094 cm-1 spectral resolution at 190 and 296 K. The sample was synthesized from N2O5 and Cl2O. Number densities in the absorption cell were derived from pressure measurements of the purified sample. Quality assurance included measurements with different sample pressures, spectroscopic purity check of the sample, comparison of integrated absorption cross sections over entire band systems, and assessment of residuals from remote-sensing retrievals. Multiplicative and additive errors were considered giving an overall uncertainty of +2.5/-3.5%. Further data reduction was achieved with an interpolation scheme based on two-dimensional polynomials in ln(pressure) and temperature. The worst-case error for the interpolated data is +4.5/-5.5%. The database is well-suited for remote-sensing application and should reduce the atmospheric chlorine nitrate error budget substantially

  14. Cement encapsulation of uranyl nitrate waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During decontamination of the former nuclear fuel reprocessing plant at West Valley, New York, low-level radioactive waste streams are being identified which require disposal in an environmentally acceptable manner. One such waste stream, consisting essentially of uranyl nitrate, has been located in one of the processing cells. A study was conducted on this waste stream to determine if it could be stably encapsulated in cement. First, a recipe was developed for cement-encapsulating this highly acidic waste. Samples were then made to perform waste qualification testing as described in the NRC Branch Technical Position-Waste Form to determine the stability of this waste form. The testing showed that the waste form had a compressive strength much greater than the 345 kPA (50 psi) minimum guideline after room-temperature cure, irradiation, thermal cycling, immersion, and biodegradation. In addition, the encapsulated waste had uranium and cerium leachability index values greater than six, which is the minimum recommended by the NRC position paper. The cement-encapsulated uranyl nitrate waste thus met the NRC stability guidelines for the disposal of Class B and Class C radioactive wastes

  15. Does the evidence about health risks associated with nitrate ingestion warrant an increase of the nitrate standard for drinking water?

    OpenAIRE

    Benjamin Nigel; Ward Mary H; van Grinsven Hans JM; de Kok Theo M

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Several authors have suggested that it is safe to raise the health standard for nitrate in drinking water, and save money on measures associated with nitrate pollution of drinking water resources. The major argument has been that the epidemiologic evidence for acute and chronic health effects related to drinking water nitrate at concentrations near the health standard is inconclusive. With respect to the chronic effects, the argument was motivated by the absence of evidence for adver...

  16. Nitrate concentrations in drainage water in marine clay areas : exploratory research of the causes of increased nitrate concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Boekel, van, M.A.J.S.; Roelsma, J.; Massop, H.T.L.; R. F. A. Hendriks; Goedhart, P.W.; Jansen, P.C.

    2013-01-01

    The nitrate concentrations measured in drainage water and groundwater at LMM farms (farms participating in the National Manure Policy Effects Measurement Network (LLM)) in marine clay areas have decreased with 50% since the mid-nineties. The nitrate concentrations in marine clay areas are on average below 50 mg/L EU target value. A geographical analysis of the monitoring results shows, however, that the nitrate concentrations in 22% of the measurements, mainly taken in the south-western and c...

  17. Does the evidence about health risks associated with nitrate ingestion warrant an increase of the nitrate standard for drinking water?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Nigel

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several authors have suggested that it is safe to raise the health standard for nitrate in drinking water, and save money on measures associated with nitrate pollution of drinking water resources. The major argument has been that the epidemiologic evidence for acute and chronic health effects related to drinking water nitrate at concentrations near the health standard is inconclusive. With respect to the chronic effects, the argument was motivated by the absence of evidence for adverse health effects related to ingestion of nitrate from dietary sources. An interdisciplinary discussion of these arguments led to three important observations. First, there have been only a few well-designed epidemiologic studies that evaluated ingestion of nitrate in drinking water and risk of specific cancers or adverse reproductive outcomes among potentially susceptible subgroups likely to have elevated endogenous nitrosation. Positive associations have been observed for some but not all health outcomes evaluated. Second, the epidemiologic studies of cancer do not support an association between ingestion of dietary nitrate (vegetables and an increased risk of cancer, because intake of dietary nitrate is associated with intake of antioxidants and other beneficial phytochemicals. Third, 2–3 % of the population in Western Europe and the US could be exposed to nitrate levels in drinking water exceeding the WHO standard of 50 mg/l nitrate, particularly those living in rural areas. The health losses due to this exposure cannot be estimated. Therefore, we conclude that it is not possible to weigh the costs and benefits from changing the nitrate standard for drinking water and groundwater resources by considering the potential consequences for human health and by considering the potential savings due to reduced costs for nitrate removal and prevention of nitrate pollution.

  18. 21 CFR 582.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.1217 Section 582.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  19. 21 CFR 182.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium phosphate. 182.1217 Section 182.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  20. 21 CFR 582.5217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.5217 Section 582.5217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  1. 21 CFR 582.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 582.1191 Section 582.1191 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  2. 21 CFR 582.5191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 582.5191 Section 582.5191 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  3. 21 CFR 73.1070 - Calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 73.1070 Section 73.1070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1070 Calcium carbonate. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive calcium carbonate is a fine,...

  4. 21 CFR 582.1205 - Calcium hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium hydroxide. 582.1205 Section 582.1205 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1205 Calcium hydroxide. (a) Product. Calcium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  5. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2227 Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate....

  6. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  7. Calcium dynamics in vascular smooth muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Amberg, Gregory C.; Navedo, Manuel F.

    2013-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells are ultimately responsible for determining vascular luminal diameter and blood flow. Dynamic changes in intracellular calcium are a critical mechanism regulating vascular smooth muscle contractility. Processes influencing intracellular calcium are therefore important regulators of vascular function with physiological and pathophysiological consequences. In this review we discuss the major dynamic calcium signals identified and characterized in vascular smooth muscle cells....

  8. Lactulose stimulates calcium absorption in postmenopausal women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, E.G.H.M. van den; Muijs, T.; Dokkum, W. van; Schaafsma, G.

    1999-01-01

    Animal studies have indicated that calcium absorption is increased by lactulose, a synthetic disaccharide. Therefore, the influence of lactulose on calcium absorption was measured in postmenopausal women who may benefit from the possible enhancing effect of lactulose on calcium absorption. Twelve po

  9. Influence of Carbon Source on Nitrate Removal by Nitrate-Tolerant Klebsiella oxytoca CECT 4460 in Batch and Chemostat Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Piñar, Guadalupe; Kovárová, Karin; Egli, Thomas; Ramos, Juan L.

    1998-01-01

    The nitrate-tolerant organism Klebsiella oxytoca CECT 4460 tolerates nitrate at concentrations up to 1 M and is used to treat wastewater with high nitrate loads in industrial wastewater treatment plants. We studied the influence of the C source (glycerol or sucrose or both) on the growth rate and the efficiency of nitrate removal under laboratory conditions. With sucrose as the sole C source the maximum specific growth rate was 0.3 h−1, whereas with glycerol it was 0.45 h−1. In batch cultures...

  10. Sodium/Calcium Exchangers Selectively Regulate Calcium Signaling in Mouse Taste Receptor Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Szebenyi, Steven A.; Laskowski, Agnieszka I.; Medler, Kathryn F.

    2010-01-01

    Taste cells use multiple signaling mechanisms to generate appropriate cellular responses to discrete taste stimuli. Some taste stimuli activate G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that cause calcium release from intracellular stores while other stimuli depolarize taste cells to cause calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). While the signaling mechanisms that initiate calcium signals have been described in taste cells, the calcium clearance mechanisms (CCMs) that contrib...

  11. Solidification of Acidic, High Nitrate Nuclear Wastes by Grouting or Absorption on Silica Gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. K. Herbst; S. V. Raman; R. J. Kirkham

    2004-01-01

    The use of grout and silica gel were explored for the solidification of four types of acidic, high nitrate radioactive wastes. Two methods of grouting were tested: direct grouting and pre-neutralization. Two methods of absorption on silica gel were also tested: direct absorption and rotary spray drying. The waste simulant acidity varied between 1 N and 12 N. The waste simulant was neutralized by pre-blending calcium hydroxide with Portland cement and blast furnace slag powders prior to mixing with the simulant for grout solidification. Liquid sodium hydroxide was used to partially neutralize the simulant to a pH above 2 and then it was absorbed for silica gel solidification. Formulations for each of these methods are presented along with waste form characteristics and properties. Compositional variation maps for grout formulations are presented which help determine the optimum "recipe" for a particular waste stream. These maps provide a method to determine the proportions of waste, calcium hydroxide, Portland cement, and blast furnace slag that provide a waste form that meets the disposal acceptance criteria. The maps guide researchers in selecting areas to study and provide an operational envelop that produces acceptable waste forms. The grouts both solidify and stabilize the wastes, while absorption on silica gel produces a solid waste that will not pass standard leaching procedures (TCLP) if required. Silica gel wastes can be made to pass most leach tests if heated to 600ºC.

  12. Solidification of Acidic, High Nitrate Nuclear Wastes by Grouting or Absorption on Silica Gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of grout and silica gel were explored for the solidification of four types of acidic, high nitrate radioactive wastes. Two methods of grouting were tested: direct grouting and pre-neutralization. Two methods of absorption on silica gel were also tested: direct absorption and rotary spray drying. The waste simulant acidity varied between 1 N and 12 N. The waste simulant was neutralized by pre-blending calcium hydroxide with Portland cement and blast furnace slag powders prior to mixing with the simulant for grout solidification. Liquid sodium hydroxide was used to partially neutralize the simulant to a pH above 2 and then it was absorbed for silica gel solidification. Formulations for each of these methods are presented along with waste form characteristics and properties. Compositional variation maps for grout formulations are presented which help determine the optimum ''recipe'' for a particular waste stream. These maps provide a method to determine the proportions of waste, calcium hydroxide, Portland cement, and blast furnace slag that provide a waste form that meets the disposal acceptance criteria. The maps guide researchers in selecting areas to study and provide an operational envelop that produces acceptable waste forms. The grouts both solidify and stabilize the wastes, while absorption on silica gel produces a solid waste that will not pass standard leaching procedures (TCLP) if required. Silica gel wastes can be made to pass most leach tests if heated to 600 C

  13. Calcium electroporation in three cell lines; a comparison of bleomycin and calcium, calcium compounds, and pulsing conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gissel, Hanne; Hojman, Pernille;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Electroporation with calcium (calcium electroporation) can induce ATP depletion-associated cellular death. In the clinical setting, the cytotoxic drug bleomycin is currently used with electroporation (electrochemotherapy) for palliative treatment of tumors. Calcium electroporation...... offers several advantages over standard treatment options: calcium is inexpensive and may readily be applied without special precautions, as is the case with cytostatic drugs. Therefore, details on the use of calcium electroporation are essential for carrying out clinical trials comparing calcium...... electroporation and electrochemotherapy. METHODS: The effects of calcium electroporation and bleomycin electroporation (alone or in combination) were compared in three different cell lines (DC-3F, transformed Chinese hamster lung fibroblast; K-562, human leukemia; and murine Lewis Lung Carcinoma). Furthermore...

  14. Effect of anions or foods on absolute bioavailability of calcium from calcium salts in mice by pharmacokinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Zenei Taira, Zenei

    2013-01-01

    Yukari Ueda, Zenei TairaFaculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokushima Bunri University, Tokushima, JapanAbstract: We studied the absolute bioavailability of calcium from calcium L-lactate in mice using pharmacokinetics, and reviewed the absolute bioavailability of calcium from three other calcium salts in mice previously studied: calcium chloride, calcium acetate, and calcium ascorbate. The results showed that calcium metabolism is linear between intravenous administration of 15 mg/kg and 30 ...

  15. Calcium signals and calcium channels in osteoblastic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, R. L.; Akanbi, K. A.; Farach-Carson, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) channels are present in non-excitable as well as in excitable cells. In bone cells of the osteoblast lineage, Ca2+ channels play fundamental roles in cellular responses to external stimuli including both mechanical forces and hormonal signals. They are also proposed to modulate paracrine signaling between bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts at local sites of bone remodeling. Calcium signals are characterized by transient increases in intracellular Ca2+ levels that are associated with activation of intracellular signaling pathways that control cell behavior and phenotype, including patterns of gene expression. Development of Ca2+ signals is a tightly regulated cellular process that involves the concerted actions of plasma membrane and intracellular Ca2+ channels, along with Ca2+ pumps and exchangers. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge concerning the structure, function, and role of Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ signals in bone cells, focusing on the osteoblast.

  16. Computational study of a calcium release-activated calcium channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Keka; Shantappa, Anil

    2016-05-01

    The naturally occurring proteins that form hole in membrane are commonly known as ion channels. They play multiple roles in many important biological processes. Deletion or alteration of these channels often leads to serious problems in the physiological processes as it controls the flow of ions through it. The proper maintenance of the flow of ions, in turn, is required for normal health. Here we have investigated the behavior of a calcium release-activated calcium ion channel with pdb entry 4HKR in Drosophila Melanogaster. The equilibrium energy as well as molecular dynamics simulation is performed first. The protein is subjected to molecular dynamics simulation to find their energy minimized value. Simulation of the protein in the environment of water and ions has given us important results too. The solvation energy is also found using Charmm potential.

  17. Measurement of the strontium and calcium concentrations in the Mumbai Harbour Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strontium and calcium concentration (mg/l) measurements were done in the surface sea water samples collected from six different locations of Mumbai Harbour Bay (MHB). Samples were analysed by Atomic Absorption spectrophotometer. Standard addition method was used to get the concentration of one sample. Secondary standards were prepared based on this. All the samples were analysed using the secondary standards. The results showed the variation of Strontium and Calcium as 5.9-9.3 mg/l and 331-480 mg/I respectively, as against the universally accepted values of Strontium (ie. 8 mg/l) and Calcium (ie. 400 mg/I). It was found that though the concentration of Strontium and Calcium varied, the ratio Ca/Sr remained nearly the same (49.8 to 54.8), hence it may not affect the radiochemical procedure of nitrate separation used for separation of 90Sr from Ca in MHB. Final recovery calculation of Strontium should take into account the variations in concentration of Strontium. (author)

  18. CO2 capture performance of synthetic sorbent prepared from carbide slag and aluminum nitrate hydrate by combustion synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Carbide slag as material is used to prepare CO2 sorbent by combustion synthesis. • Glycerol addition in preparation of synthetic sorbent improves its CO2 uptake. • The feasible combustion synthesis temperature for sorbent preparation is 800 °C. • Synthetic sorbent (mass ratio of CaO:Ca3Al2O6 = 73:27) shows higher CO2 uptake. • Synthetic sorbent possesses much higher sintering resistance than carbide slag. - Abstract: A new CO2 sorbent was prepared from carbide slag, aluminum nitrate hydrate and glycerol water solution by combustion synthesis method. The effects of the sorbent preparation conditions (glycerol addition, combustion synthesis temperature, ratio of carbide slag to aluminum nitrate hydrate) and carbonation/calcination conditions (temperature, atmosphere and time) on CO2 capture performance of the synthetic sorbent were investigated in the calcium looping cycles. The addition of glycerol during the sorbent preparation exhibits an improvement on the cyclic CO2 capture capacity. It was also found that the optimal combustion synthesis temperature for the synthetic sorbent was in the range of 750–800 °C. The synthetic sorbent contained the mass ratio of CaO derived from carbide slag to Al2O3 derived from aluminum nitrate hydrate = 90:10 exhibited higher CO2 capture capacity (0.38 g CO2/g sorbent after 50 cycles). X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the main compounds of the synthetic sorbent were CaO and Ca3Al2O6 by X-ray diffraction analysis. The synthetic sorbent showed higher CO2 capture capacity than the carbide slag under severe calcination conditions (950 °C, CO2) and at short carbonation time (<5 min). From the present investigation, it shows that a high active synthetic CO2 sorbent could be obtained using the carbide slag in the calcium looping technology

  19. Heat transfer behavior of molten nitrate salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Apurba K.; Clark, Michael M.; Teigen, Bard C.; Fiveland, Woodrow A.; Anderson, Mark H.

    2016-05-01

    The usage of molten nitrate salt as heat transfer fluid and thermal storage medium decouples the generation of electricity from the variable nature of the solar resource, allowing CSP plants to avoid curtailment and match production with demand. This however brings some unique challenges for the design of the molten salt central receiver (MSCR). An aspect critical to the use of molten nitrate (60wt%/40wt% - NaNO3/KNO3) salt as heat transfer fluid in the MSCR is to understand its heat transfer behavior. Alstom collaborated with the University of Wisconsin to conduct a series of experiments and experimentally determined the heat transfer coefficients of molten nitrate salt up to high Reynolds number (Re > 2.0E5) and heat flux (q″ > 1000 kW/m2), conditions heretofore not reported in the literature. A cartridge heater instrumented with thermocouples was installed inside a stainless steel pipe to form an annular test section. The test section was installed in the molten salt flow loop at the University of Wisconsin facility, and operated over a range of test conditions to determine heat transfer data that covered the expected operating regime of a practical molten salt receiver. Heat transfer data were compared to widely accepted correlations found in heat transfer literature, including that of Gnielinski. At lower Reynolds number conditions, the results from this work concurred with the molten salt heat transfer data reported in literature and followed the aforementioned correlations. However, in the region of interest for practical receiver design, the correlations did not accurately model the experimentally determined heat transfer data. Two major effects were observed: (i) all other factors remaining constant, the Nusselt numbers gradually plateaued at higher Reynolds number; and (ii) at higher Reynolds number a positive interaction of heat flux on Nusselt number was noted. These effects are definitely not modeled by the existing correlations. In this paper a new

  20. Distribution and Sources of Nitrate-Nitrogen in Kansas Groundwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret A. Townsend

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Kansas is primarily an agricultural state. Irrigation water and fertilizer use data show long- term increasing trends. Similarly, nitrate-N concentrations in groundwater show long-term increases and exceed the drinking-water standard of 10 mg/l in many areas. A statistical analysis of nitrate-N data collected for local and regional studies in Kansas from 1990 to 1998 (747 samples found significant relationships between nitrate-N concentration with depth, age, and geographic location of wells. Sources of nitrate-N have been identified for 297 water samples by using nitrogen stable isotopes. Of these samples, 48% showed fertilizer sources (+2 to +8 and 34% showed either animal waste sources (+10 to +15 with nitrate-N greater than 10 mg/l or indication that enrichment processes had occurred (+10 or above with variable nitrate-N or both. Ultimate sources for nitrate include nonpoint sources associated with past farming and fertilization practices, and point sources such as animal feed lots, septic systems, and commercial fertilizer storage units. Detection of nitrate from various sources in aquifers of different depths in geographically varied areas of the state indicates that nonpoint and point sources currently impact and will continue to impact groundwater under current land uses.

  1. Characterization of the winter midwestern particulate nitrate bulge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitchford, Marc L; Poirot, Richard L; Schichtel, Bret A; Maim, William C

    2009-09-01

    A previously unobserved multi-state region of elevated particulate nitrate concentration was detected as a result of the expansion of the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) network of remote-area particulate matter (PM) speciation monitoring sites into the midwestern United States that began in 2002. Mean winter ammonium nitrate concentrations exceed 4 microg/m3 in a region centered in Iowa, which makes it responsible for as much as half of the particle light extinction. Before these observations, particulate nitrate in the United States was only observed to be a dominant component of the fine PM (PM2.5) in parts of California and some urban areas. Comparisons of the spatial patterns of particulate nitrate with spatial patterns of ammonia and nitrogen oxide emissions suggest that the nitrate bulge is the result of the high emissions of ammonia associated with animal agriculture in the Midwest. Nitrate episodes at several locations in the eastern United States are shown to be associated with transport pathways over the Midwest, suggesting long-range transport of either ammonia or ammonium nitrate. Thermodynamic equilibrium modeling conducted by others on data from the Midwest shows the relative importance of atmospheric ammonia and nitric acid in the production of PM2.5. This is a particular concern as the sulfur dioxide emissions in the United States are reduced, which increases the amount of ammonia available for ammonium nitrate production. PMID:19785273

  2. Evaluation of nitrate and nitrite destruction/separation technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1997-08-29

    This report describes and evaluates four types of nitrate and nitrite destruction and separation technologies that could be used to treat the aqueous, alkaline, nitrate-bearing mixed waste that is generated by the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The technologies considered in this report include thermal, hydrothermal, chemical, and electrochemical technologies.

  3. Nitrate leaching and pesticide use in energy crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Uffe

    2006-01-01

    Nitrate leaching measured below willow and miscanthus is very low from the established crops. Pesticide use in energy crops is low as well.......Nitrate leaching measured below willow and miscanthus is very low from the established crops. Pesticide use in energy crops is low as well....

  4. Predicting SOA from organic nitrates in the southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organic nitrates have been identified as an important component of ambient aerosol in the Southeast United States. In this work, we use the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to explore the relationship between gas-phase production of organic nitrates and their subsequ...

  5. Densities concentrations of aqueous of uranyl nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ratio density-concentration of aqueous uranyl nitrate solutions expressed as U3O8 grams/liter, U grams/liter and hexahydrate uranyl nitrate weight percent at different temperatures, are established. Experimental values are graphically correlated and compared whit some published data. (Author) 2 refs

  6. Nitrate decontamination through functionalized chitosan in brackish water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appunni, Sowmya; Rajesh, Mathur P; Prabhakar, Sivaraman

    2016-08-20

    N, N, N-Triethyl ammonium functionalized cross-linked chitosan beads (TEACCB) was prepared by alkylation of glutaraldehyde cross-linked chitosan beads to remove nitrate from brackish water. Physico-chemical characteristics of TEACCB were analyzed using FTIR, SEM, EDAX, TGA, DTA, BET surface area, swelling ratio and pHzpc. The maximum nitrate removal capacity of TEACCB was 2.26meq/g and is higher than other reported chitosan based adsorbents. Nitrate removal ratio in the presence and absence of common anions like chloride and sulphate demonstrated the selectively of TEACCB towards nitrate. The kinetic data of nitrate removal fitted well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The thermodynamic parameters indicated that nitrate removal could be spontaneous and exothermic in nature. TEACCB was reused with 100% efficiency after regenerating with 0.05N HCl. Column study was carried out to remove nitrate from brackish water. These results are very significant to develop TEACCB based nitrate removal technology with great efficiency. PMID:27178960

  7. Removal of Nitrate From Aqueous Solution Using Rice Chaff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dehghani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Nitrate is largely dissolved in the surface and ground water, due to its high solubility. Continual uptake of nitrite through drinking water can lead to problems and diseases (such as blue baby for humans, especially children. Objectives The aim of this study was to develop a new and inexpensive method for the removal of nitrate from water. In this regard, the possibility of using chaff for removal of nitrate from aqueous solutions was studied and the optimum operating conditions of nitrate removal was determined. Materials and Methods This is a cross-sectional study conducted in laboratory scale. The UV spectrophotometer at a wavelength of maximum absorbance (220 nm was used to determine the nitrate concentration. The effect of pH, amount of chaff, temperature, and contact time were investigated. Results The result of this study revealed that chaff as an absorbent could remove nitrate from solutions, and the efficiency of adsorption increased as contact time increased from 5 to 30 minutes, amount of chaff increased from 1 to 3 g, temperature increased in a range of 300 - 400°C and the amount of pH decreased from 10 to 3. The maximum adsorption rate was around pH 3 (53.14%. Conclusions It was shown that the removal efficiency of nitrate was directly proportional to the amount of chaff, temperature, and contact time but inversely to the pH. This study showed that nitrate removal by chaff is a promising technique.

  8. NITRITE AND NITRATE DETERMINATIONS IN PLASMA - A CRITICAL-EVALUATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MOSHAGE, H; KOK, B; HUIZENGA, [No Value; JANSEN, PLM

    1995-01-01

    Plasma nitrite and nitrate determinations are increasingly being used in clinical chemistry as markers for the activity of nitric oxide synthase and the production of nitric oxide radicals. However, a systematic evaluation of the determination of nitrite and nitrate in plasma has not been performed.

  9. Effects of sludge disposal on groundwater nitrate concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, R. F.; Exner, M. E.; Martin, G. E.; Snow, D. D.

    1993-02-01

    More than 100 groundwater samples were collectd and analyzed for nitrate-nitrogen, δ 15N of the nitrate, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and chloride. Multilevel samplers and nested monitoring wells were located beneath and down-gradient from an irrigated cornfield on which human waste sludge was injected. The sampling delineated a 1.3km× 0.3km plume of nitrate contamination. Both the nitrate-nitrogen concentrations and the δ 15N values within the plume's centroid were homogeneous. The levels were 34 ± 3mg1 -1 and + 13.4 ± 1.2%, respectively. A retarding zone of clayey silt split the plume and separated the oxic water from the deeper anoxic water. Nitrate levels were lower in the anoxic water and declined rapidly with depth. The significant association ( r = - 0.91) between increasing δ 15N values and decreasing nitrate concentrations indicated that the nitrate was denitrified. High chloride concentrations in the anoxic zone beneath the retarding layer are thought to originate from the sludge storage lagoon and/or the sludge compost piles. Tritium and atrazine levels confirm that this is recent recharge water. Denitrification has utilized most of the original nitrate and DOC in the plume.

  10. CU(II): catalyzed hydrazine reduction of ferric nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is described for producing ferrous nitrate solutions by the cupric ion-catalyzed reduction of ferric nitrate with hydrazine. The reaction is complete in about 1.5 hours at 400C. Hydrazoic acid is also produced in substantial quantities as a reaction byproduct

  11. Spatial assessment of animal manure spreading and groundwater nitrate pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Infascelli

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate concentration in groundwater has frequently been linked to non-point pollution. At the same time the existence of intensive agriculture and extremely intensive livestock activity increases the potential for nitrate pollution in shallow groundwater. Nitrate used in agriculture could cause adverse effects on human and animal health. In order to evaluate the groundwater nitrate pollution, and how it might evolve in time, it is essential to develop control systems and to improve policies and incentives aimed at controlling the amount of nitrate entering downstream water systems. The province of Caserta in southern Italy is characterized by high levels of animal manure loading. A comparison between manure nitrogen production and nitrate concentration in groundwater was carried out in this area, using geostatistical tools and spatial statistics. The results show a discrepancy between modelling of nitrate leaching and monitoring of the groundwater and, moreover, no spatial correlation between nitrogen production in livestock farms and nitrate concentration in groundwater, suggesting that producers are not following the regulatory procedures for the agronomic use of manure. The methodology developed in this paper could be applied also in other regions in which European Union fertilization plans are not adequately followed.

  12. Substitution of calcium by strontium within selected calcium phosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokita, E.; Hermes, C.; Nolting, H.-F.; Ryczek, J.

    1993-06-01

    Sr incorporation in the molecules of amorphous calcium phosphate, apatitic tricalcium phosphate, hydroxyapatite, octacalcium phosphate and dicalcium phosphate dihydrate was investigated. The concentration of Sr ranged from 225 to 1010 μ g / g, i.e. it overlapped with the physiological range of Sr concentrations in human bone. The leading experimental technique was extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) at the Sr K edge. Results of these studies demonstrated the following: (1) Sr incorporation in the calcium phosphates is compound-dependent, (2) the coordination of incorporated Sr atoms in the Ca-P molecules is similar to that of Ca atoms, but interatomic distances are ≈0.015 nm larger, (3) in apatitic tricalcium phosphate, hydroxyapatite and octacalcium phosphate lattices Sr atoms may occupy selected Ca sites, which was not the case for dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, (4) in the apatite lattice Sr atoms are coordinated by 6 PO 4 tetrahedrals and (5) EXAFS spectra at the K edge of the incorporated Sr may be used to distinguish the structures of amorphous calcium phosphate, dicalcium phosphate dihydrate as well as apatite and its derivatives (apatitic tricalcium phosphate, octacalcium phosphate).

  13. Nitration of the tyrosine residues of porcine pancreatic colipase with tetranitromethane, and properties of the nitrated derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Caro, J D; Behnke, W D; Bonicel, J J; Desnuelle, P A; Rovery, M

    1983-09-28

    The nitration of the long form (N-terminal valine) of porcine pancreatic colipase with tetranitromethane was investigated under a variety of conditions. Fractionation of the nitrated monomers on DE-cellulose led to well-defined derivatives containing one, two and three nitrotyrosines per mol. Automated Edman degradation of the nitrated peptides, especially that of the staphylococcal proteinase peptide (49-64) showed that Tyr-54 was nitrated very fast under all conditions. This residue was the only one to be nitrated in water. Partial nitration of Tyr-59 was induced by bile salt micelles, while both Tyr-59 and Tyr-58 reacted extensively in the presence of lysophosphatidylcholine micelles (in which tetranitromethane is concentrated 150-fold compared to water) or of a liquid tetranitromethane-water interface. The strong negative Cotton effect at 410 nm which has already been observed using unfractionated preparations of nitrated colipase (Behnke W.D. (1982) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 708, 118-123) is linked with the nitration of Tyr-59 and it is markedly reduced by taurodeoxycholate micelles, suggesting a conformational change induced by the micelles in the tyrosine region. Moreover, the pKa of the nitrotyrosine residues in nitrated colipase is the same as that of free nitrotyrosine (pKa = 6.8) and it is shifted to 7.6 in the presence of taurodeoxycholate micelles. Micelles protected colipase against polymerization during nitration. These data suggest that Tyr-58 and Tyr-59 are part of the interface recognition site of colipase. The participation of Tyr-55 in binding is not excluded. The upwards nitrotyrosine pKa shift in the colipase micelle complex may explain why nitrated colipase can reactivate lipase in a triacylglycerol-taurodeoxycholate system at pH 7.5. PMID:6615844

  14. USING CALCIUM CARBONATE WHISKERS AS PAPERMAKING FILLER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu Chen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Whiskers, having large length/diameter ratio, are fiber-shaped single crystals. The technical possibility of using calcium carbonate whiskers as papermaking filler to replace conventional powder-like calcium carbonate was investigated. The results showed that it may be feasible to use calcium carbonate whisker as papermaking filler. Compared with conventional precipitated calcium carbonate, calcium carbonate whisker had higher retention efficiency. The use of calcium carbonate whisker also favorably affected the strength properties of paper sheets. A model was proposed to suggest the mechanism for paper strength improvement. The whiskers filled in paper sheets could increase the friction between fibers, thus increasing bonding strength. Moreover, the strength properties of paper were further improved because calcium carbonate whiskers were partly embedded in pulp fiber walls.

  15. CALCIUM ENHANCES ANTIINFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF ASPIRIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choksi Krishna

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of present study is to evaluate the effects of calcium carbonate and calcium gluconate on acute and subacute inflammation and to study their possible interactions with Aspirin. Calcium carbonate (10 mg/kg and calcium gluconate (5 mg/kg were administered individually and also co-administered along with sub therapeutic dose Aspirin (50mg/kg to study their interaction. The inflammation was induced by carrageenan or a foreign body. Both calcium carbonate and calcium gluconate could not show significant anti-inflammatory activity on their own in acute as well as subacute inflammation models. Aspirin at sub-anti-inflammatory dose (50mg/Kg when co-administered along with calcium salts produced the significant anti-inflammatory response which was comparable to anti-inflammatory response of aspirin at therapeutic dose (200mg/Kg. Also co-adminostration minimized the gastro-toxicity of aspirin.

  16. X-ray irradiation induced degradation of cellulose nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry was previously proposed to measure the thickness of the cellulose nitrate layer of the commonly used LR 115 solid-state nuclear track detector (SSNTD). The present work is devoted to the investigation whether the X-ray radiation involved in EDXRF spectrometry will induce degradation of the cellulose nitrate. For this purpose, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was employed to examine the nitrate functions (at the wavenumber 1598 cm-1) and the glycosidic bonds (at 1146 cm-1) for various irradiation time involved in the EDXRF spectrometry. No significant changes were observed even for X-ray irradiation up to 3000 live seconds, which was equivalent for 10 separate scans and should be far more than enough for a determination of the cellulose nitrate layer thickness. Therefore, EDXRF remains a fast and non-destructive method to measure the active layer thickness of the cellulose nitrate SSNTD

  17. Electrochemical processing of alkaline nitrate and nitrite wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Processing of high-level waste at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) will produce, as a by-product, a low-level, alkaline salt solution containing approximately 17% sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite. This solution will be incorporated into a cement formulation, saltstone, and placed in an engineered landfill. Electrochemical methods have been investigated to decrease the nitrate and nitrite in this solution in order to lower the leaching of nitrate and nitrite from saltstone and to reduce the volume of saltstone. Laboratory experiments have demonstrated the technical feasibility of electrolytically reducing the nitrate and nitrite in a synthetic salt solution similar in composition to that expected to be produced at SRP. Greater than 99% of the sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite can be reduced, producing ammonia, nitrogen, oxygen, and sodium hydroxide. In addition, significant reductions in the volume of saltstone may be realized if the sodium hydroxide produced by electrolysis can be recycled

  18. Method of processing nitrate-containing radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To efficiently concentrate nitrate-containing low level radioactive liquid wastes by electrolytically dialyzing radioactive liquid wastes to decompose the nitrate salt by using an electrolytic cell comprising three chambers having ion exchange membranes and anodes made of special materials. Method: Nitrate-containing low level radioactive liquid wastes are supplied to and electrolytically dialyzed in a central chamber of an electrolytic cell comprising three chambers having cationic exchange membranes and anionic exchange membranes made of flouro-polymer as partition membranes, whereby the nitrate is decomposed to form nitric acid in the anode chamber and alkali hydroxide compound or ammonium hydroxide in the cathode chamber, as well as concentrate the radioactive substance in the central chamber. Coated metals of at least one type of platinum metal is used as the anode for the electrolytic cell. This enables efficient industrial concentration of nitrate-containing low level radioactive liquid wastes. (Yoshihara, H.)

  19. Assessment of nitrate export from a high elevation watershed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrate leaching from forest soils can be detrimental to both the forest ecosystems and stream water quality. Nitrate moving through the soil transports plant nutrients and acidifying agents, hydrogen and aluminum, and can export them to streams. In the high elevation spruce-fir forests in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GRSM) nitrate has been found to be leaching from the rooting zone. Streams associated with these ecosystems are poorly buffered. Therefore rapid export of nitrate from the soils to the streams could lead to episodic acidification. The purpose of the Noland Divide watershed study is to assess the levels of nitrate export from the watershed to the streams and the potential impacts of the export to the ecosystem

  20. Electrolytic denitrification of alkaline nitrate and nitrite solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Processing of high-level waste at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) will produce a low-level alkaline salt solution, containing approximately 17% sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite. This solution will be incorporated into a cement wasteform, saltstone, and placed in an engineered landfill. Laboratory experiments have demonstrated the technical feasibility of electrochemically reducing the nitrate and nitrite in a synthetic, nonradioactive salt solution similar in composition to that expected to be produced at SRP. Greater than ninety-five percent of the sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite can be reduced electrolytically, producing ammonia, nitrogen, oxygen, and sodium hydroxide. Reduction of the nitrate and nitrite will reduce the leaching of nitrate and nitrite from the saltstone monolith. In addition, significant reductions in the volume of saltstone may be realized if the sodium hydroxide produced by electrolysis can be recycled

  1. Electrochemical processing of alkaline nitrate and nitrite solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Processing of high-level waste at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) will produce, as a by product, a low- level, alkaline salt solution containing approximately 17% sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite. This solution will be incorporated into a cement formulation, saltstone, and placed in an engineered landfill. Electrochemical methods have been investigated to decrease the nitrate and nitrite in this solution in order to lower the leaching of nitrate and nitrite from saltstone and to reduce the volume of saltstone. Laboratory experiments have demonstrated the technical feasibility of electrolytically reducing the nitrate and nitrite in a synthetic salt solution similar in composition to that expected to be produced at SRP. Greater than 99% of the sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite can be reduced, producing ammonia, nitrogen, oxygen, and sodium hydroxide. In addition, significant reductions in the volume of saltstone may be realized if the sodium hydroxide produced by electrolysis can be recycled

  2. Anoxic Activated Sludge Monitoring with Combined Nitrate and Titrimetric Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, B.; Gernaey, Krist; Vanrolleghem, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    An experimental procedure for anoxic activated sludge monitoring with combined nitrate and titrimetric measurements is proposed and evaluated successfully with two known carbon sources, (-)acetate and dextrose. For nitrate measurements an ion-selective nitrate electrode is applied to allow for...... frequent measurements, and thereby the possibility for detailed determination of the denitrification biokinetics. An internal nitrate electrode calibration is implemented in the experiments to avoid the often-encountered electrode drift problem. It was observed that the best experimental design was with...... the carbon source in excess, since excess nitrate provoked nitrite build-up thereby complicating the data interpretation. A conceptual model could quantitatively describe the experimental observations and thus link the experimentally measured proton production with the consumption of electron acceptor...

  3. Rovibronic Variational Calculations of the Nitrate Radical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changala, Bryan; Baraban, Joshua H.; Stanton, John F.

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, sophisticated diabatic Hamiltonians have been developed in order to understand the low-energy vibronic level structure of the nitrate radical (NO_3), which exhibits strong coupling between the ~X and doubly degenerate ~B states. Previous studies have reproduced the observed vibronic level positions up to 2000 wn~above the zero-point level, yet the rotational structure has remained uninvestigated with ab initio methods. In this talk, we present calculations of the N≥0 rovibronic structure of low-lying vibronic states of NO_3, in which complicated rovibrational and Coriolis interactions have been observed. Our results include calculations using both adiabatic and diabatic Hamiltonians, enabling a direct comparison between the two. We discuss extensions of our treatment to include spin-orbit and spin-rotation effects.

  4. Nitrate reduction in geologically heterogeneous catchments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Auken, Esben; Bamberg, Charlotte A.; Christensen, Britt Stenhøj Baun; Clausen, Thomas; Dalgaard, Esben; Effersø, Flemming; Ernstsen, Vibeke; Gertz, Flemming; Hansen, Anne Lausten; He, Xin; Jacobsen, Brian H.; Jensen, Karsten Høgh; Jørgensen, Flemming; Jørgensen, Lisbeth Flindt; Koch, Julian; Nilsson, Bertel; Petersen, Christian; De Schepper, Guillaume; Schamper, Cyril; Sørensen, Kurt I.; Therrien, Rene; Thirup, Christian; Viezzoli, Andrea

    zone is reduced in the saturated zone before reaching the streams, and vulnerable areas, where no subsurface reduction takes place, and then only impose regulations/restrictions on the vulnerable areas. Distributed hydrological models can make predictions at grid scale, i.e. at much smaller scale than...... the entire catchment. However, as distributed models often do not include local scale hydrogeological heterogeneities, they are typically not able to make accurate predictions at scales smaller than they are calibrated. We present a framework for assessing nitrate reduction in the subsurface and for...... assessing at which spatial scales modelling tools have predictive capabilities. A new instrument has been developed for airborne geophysical measurements, Mini-SkyTEM, dedicated to identifying geological structures and heterogeneities with horizontal and lateral resolutions of 30–50 m and 2 m, respectively...

  5. Thermal Decomposition of Nitrated Tributyl Phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contact between tributyl phosphate and aqueous solutions of nitric acid and/or heavy metal nitrate salts at elevated temperatures can lead to exothermic reactions of explosive violence. Even though such operations have been routinely performed safely for decades as an intrinsic part of the Purex separation processes, several so-called ''red oil'' explosions are known to have occurred in the United States, Canada, and the former Soviet Union. The most recent red oil explosion occurred at the Tomsk-7 separations facility in Siberia, in April 1993. That explosion destroyed part of the unreinforced masonry walls of the canyon-type building in which the process was housed, and allowed the release of a significant quantity of radioactive material

  6. Removal of gadolinium nitrate from heavy water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilde, E.W.

    2000-03-22

    Work was conducted to develop a cost-effective process to purify 181 55-gallon drums containing spent heavy water moderator (D2O) contaminated with high concentrations of gadolinium nitrate, a chemical used as a neutron poison during former nuclear reactor operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These drums also contain low level radioactive contamination, including tritium, which complicates treatment options. Presently, the drums of degraded moderator are being stored on site. It was suggested that a process utilizing biological mechanisms could potentially lower the total cost of heavy water purification by allowing the use of smaller equipment with less product loss and a reduction in the quantity of secondary waste materials produced by the current baseline process (ion exchange).

  7. Hydrogels made from chitosan and silver nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozicki, Marek; Kołodziejczyk, Marek; Szynkowska, Małgorzata; Pawlaczyk, Aleksandra; Leśniewska, Ewa; Matusiak, Aleksandra; Adamus, Agnieszka; Karolczak, Aleksandra

    2016-04-20

    This work describes a gelation of chitosan solution with silver nitrate. Above the critical concentration of chitosan (c*), continuous hydrogels of chitosan-silver can be formed. At lower concentrations, the formation of nano- and micro-hydrogels is discussed. The sol-gel analysis was performed to characterise the hydrogels' swelling properties. Moreover, the following were employed: (i) mechanical testing of hydrogels, (ii) inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) for the measurement of silver concentration, (iii) scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to examine the morphology of products obtained, and (iv) dynamic light scattering (DLS) and UV-vis spectrophotometry to examine products formed at low concentration of chitosan (c

  8. Registration probability of alphas in cellulose nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Registration 'thresholds' of alpha particles in cellulose nitrate plastic present a statistical behaviour. The effect depends on etching conditions. It is particularly large in strong etching conditions, in which registration is transposed to high energies: up to 7.7 MeV for the conditions and energies studied. 'Registration probability' expresses more adequately the effect of registration constraints. The study of registration probability indicates that the 'target theory' can describe the effect. The parameters of target theory, m (number of targets) and D0 (the equivalent of biological dose D37) were found to be: m = 5 and D0 = 3 x 107 erg cm-3. Dose distribution around the trajectory of alphas of various energies is estimated. It is also deduced that track development takes place when the required dose for registration is deposited at a distance r >= 20 A from particle trajectory. (author)

  9. Green and controllable metal-free nitrification and nitration of arylboronic acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuai Wang; Chun Chun Shu; Tao Wang; Jian Yu; Guo Bing Yan

    2012-01-01

    A novel and green nitrating reagent has been developed for the nitrification and nitration of arylboronic acids,which can be controlled by the reaction conditions.The process provides an attractive alternative to the traditional nitration protocols.

  10. Water rotational jump driven large amplitude molecular motions of nitrate ions in aqueous potassium nitrate solution

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Puja; Bagchi, Biman

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous potassium nitrate solution reveal a highly complex rotational dynamics of nitrate ions where, superimposed on the expected continuous Brownian motion, are large amplitude angular jumps that are coupled to and at least partly driven by similar large amplitude jump motions in water molecules which are associated with change in the hydrogen bonded water molecule. These jumps contribute significantly to rotational and translational motions of these ions. We explore the detailed mechanism of these correlated (or, coupled) jumps and introduce a new time correlation function to decompose the coupled orientational- jump dynamics of solvent and solute in the aqueous electrolytic solution. Time correlation function provides for the unequivocal determination of the time constant involved in orientational dynamics originating from making and breaking of hydrogen bonds. We discover two distinct mechanisms-both are coupled to density fluctuation but are of different types.

  11. ARRAYS OF BOTTLES OF PLUTONIUM NITRATE SOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2012-09-01

    In October and November of 1981 thirteen approaches-to-critical were performed on a remote split table machine (RSTM) in the Critical Mass Laboratory of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in Richland, Washington using planar arrays of polyethylene bottles filled with plutonium (Pu) nitrate solution. Arrays of up to sixteen bottles were used to measure the critical number of bottles and critical array spacing with a tight fitting Plexiglas® reflector on all sides of the arrays except the top. Some experiments used Plexiglas shells fitted around each bottles to determine the effect of moderation on criticality. Each bottle contained approximately 2.4 L of Pu(NO3)4 solution with a Pu content of 105 g Pu/L and a free acid molarity H+ of 5.1. The plutonium was of low 240Pu (2.9 wt.%) content. These experiments were sponsored by Rockwell Hanford Operations because of the lack of experimental data on the criticality of arrays of bottles of Pu solution such as might be found in storage and handling at the Purex Facility at Hanford. The results of these experiments were used “to provide benchmark data to validate calculational codes used in criticality safety assessments of [the] plant configurations” (Ref. 1). Data for this evaluation were collected from the published report (Ref. 1), the approach to critical logbook, the experimenter’s logbook, and communication with the primary experimenter, B. Michael Durst. Of the 13 experiments preformed 10 were evaluated. One of the experiments was not evaluated because it had been thrown out by the experimenter, one was not evaluated because it was a repeat of another experiment and the third was not evaluated because it reported the critical number of bottles as being greater than 25. Seven of the thirteen evaluated experiments were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments. A similar experiment using uranyl nitrate was benchmarked as U233-SOL-THERM-014.

  12. Effects of mineral dust on global atmospheric nitrate concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karydis, V. A.; Tsimpidi, A. P.; Pozzer, A.; Astitha, M.; Lelieveld, J.

    2016-02-01

    This study assesses the chemical composition and global aerosol load of the major inorganic aerosol components, focusing on mineral dust and aerosol nitrate. The mineral dust aerosol components (i.e., Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, Na+) and their emissions are included in the ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry model (EMAC). Gas/aerosol partitioning is simulated using the ISORROPIA-II thermodynamic equilibrium model that considers K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, NH4+, Na+, SO42-, NO3-, Cl-, and H2O aerosol components. Emissions of mineral dust are calculated online by taking into account the soil particle size distribution and chemical composition of different deserts worldwide. Presence of metallic ions can substantially affect the nitrate partitioning into the aerosol phase due to thermodynamic interactions. The model simulates highest fine aerosol nitrate concentration over urban and industrialized areas (1-3 µg m-3), while coarse aerosol nitrate is highest close to deserts (1-4 µg m-3). The influence of mineral dust on nitrate formation extends across southern Europe, western USA, and northeastern China. The tropospheric burden of aerosol nitrate increases by 44 % when considering interactions of nitrate with mineral dust. The calculated global average nitrate aerosol concentration near the surface increases by 36 %, while the coarse- and fine-mode concentrations of nitrate increase by 53 and 21 %, respectively. Other inorganic aerosol components are affected by reactive dust components as well (e.g., the tropospheric burden of chloride increases by 9 %, ammonium decreases by 41 %, and sulfate increases by 7 %). Sensitivity tests show that nitrate aerosol is most sensitive to the chemical composition of the emitted mineral dust, followed by the soil size distribution of dust particles, the magnitude of the mineral dust emissions, and the aerosol state assumption.

  13. [Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koitschev, C; Kaiserling, E; Koitschev, A

    2003-08-01

    Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPPD) of the temporomandibular joint is rare. The disorder is characterized by the presence of crystal deposits within the affected joint. The deposition of crystals in adjacent soft tissue may lead to the formation of pseudotumors. This form of the disease is called tophaceous pseudogout and typically affects the temporomandibular joint. It is difficult to differentiate the disease, particularly from malignant tumors, on the clinical and radiographic findings alone. The diagnosis is based on histological identification of the calcium pyrophosphate crystals. We present an unusually advanced case of tophaceous pseudogout of the temporomandibular joint. The etiology, clinical and diagnostic criteria as well as treatment options are discussed on the basis of our own experience and a review of the literature. PMID:12942180

  14. Testosterone increases urinary calcium excretion and inhibits expression of renal calcium transport proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hsu, Yu-Juei; Dimke, Henrik Anthony; Schoeber, Joost P H;

    2010-01-01

    Although gender differences in the renal handling of calcium have been reported, the overall contribution of androgens to these differences remains uncertain. We determined here whether testosterone affects active renal calcium reabsorption by regulating calcium transport proteins. Male mice had...... higher urinary calcium excretion than female mice and their renal calcium transporters were expressed at a lower level. We also found that orchidectomized mice excreted less calcium in their urine than sham-operated control mice and that the hypocalciuria was normalized after testosterone replacement...... calcium transport. Thus, our study shows that gender differences in renal calcium handling are, in part, mediated by the inhibitory actions of androgens on TRPV5-mediated active renal calcium transport....

  15. Determination of 15N nitrates in water samples using mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nitrogen element (Z = 7) has two stable isotopes, whose relative quantities are 99.64% for 14N and 0.36% for 15N. Nitrogen is part of many processes and reactions that are important to life and that affect the quality of the water. Within the nitrogen cycle there are kinetic and thermodynamic fractionation processes, which are potentially important for tracing its sources and demands. Water contamination due to nitrates is a serious problem that is affecting large parts of the biosphere. Surface water contamination can be remedied by prevention and control measures, but the problem becomes acute when the contamination penetrates to groundwater water. Contaminated groundwater can remain in the aquifers for centuries, even milleniums, and decontamination is very difficult, if not impossible. Isotopic techniques can help to evaluate how vulnerable the groundwater is to contamination from the surface when its displacement speed and extra load area are determined. Then the sources of surface contamination (natural, industrial, agricultural, domestic) can be identified. Isotopic techniques can also describe an incipient contamination, and they can provide an early alert when chemical or biological indicators do not reveal any signs for concern. The isotopic fractionation of several nitrogen compounds provide the basis for using 15N as a hydrological isotope tool. There are three main sources of nitrogen contamination in water, these are: organic nitrogen in the soil, nitrogenized fertilizers, domestic, industrial and animal wastes. The following technical procedure describes the method for determining the isotopic ration 15N/14N in nitrates in water. The nitrate is separated from the water using ion exchange columns through a resin, which is eluded with HCI and with the addition of silver oxide becomes silver nitrate. This solution is freeze-dried and submitted to combustion at 850 in a sealed quartz tube, using copper/copper oxide for the nitrogen reduction and

  16. Influence of calcium oxalate crystal accumulation on the calcium content of seeds from Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Paul A

    2012-04-01

    Crystals of calcium oxalate often form in cells adjacent to the vascular bundles in the tissues along the xylem stream. This spatial crystal pattern suggests a role for calcium oxalate formation in regulating calcium transport and partitioning to edible organs such as seeds. To investigate this potential role, microscopic and biochemical comparisons were conducted on the different tissues of Medicago truncatula wild-type and the calcium oxalate defective (cod) 5 which lacks the ability to accumulate prismatic crystals in the cells adjacent to the vascular bundles. Calcium measurements showed that cod5 seeds had more calcium and cod5 pods contained less calcium than the corresponding wild-type tissues. Roots, stems, and leaves from cod5 and wild-type had similar calcium content. Although cod5 was devoid of prismatic crystals, cod5 pods were observed to form druse crystals of calcium oxalate not found in wild-type pods. Taken together these findings suggest a functional role for calcium oxalate formation in regulating calcium transport to the seeds. Regulating calcium uptake at the roots also appeared to be another point of control in determining seed calcium content. Overall, regulating the long distance transport and partitioning of calcium to the seeds appears to be a complex process with multiple points of control. PMID:22325887

  17. Serum calcium in pulmonary tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Subhash C. Sharma

    1981-01-01

    Serum calcium was studied serially in 94 patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. An equal number of age- and sex-matched patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were controls. Seventy patients in the study group were normocalcaemic and 10 were hypercalcaemic. These 10 were on a higher supplement of vitamin D than the 70 normocalcaemic patients. There was a positive correlation between the daily vitamin intake and the degree and duration of hypercalcaemia. None of the controls...

  18. Drying dichloromethane over calcium hydride

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Lucas Kinard, Kurtis Kasper & Antonios Mikos ### Abstract This protocol describes the drying of dichloromethane by a simple 10 step procedure. One can implement this protocol using common lab glass and lab equipment. First, dichloromethane is refluxed with calcium hydride to remove water. Then, dichloromethane is distilled to separate it from the byproducts of the reflux reaction. This procedure can be implemented in 1 day. ### Introduction In many instances i...

  19. The oral bioavailability of nitrate from vegetables investigated in healthy volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Lambers AC; Kortboyer JM; Schothorst RC; Sips AJAM; Cleven RFMJ; Meulenbelt J; VIC; LBM; ARO; LAC

    2000-01-01

    The major source of human nitrate exposure comes from vegetables. Several studies were performed to estimate the total daily dietary nitrate intake based on the nitrate contents of food and drinking water. However, only nitrate that is absorbed from the gastro-intestinal tract may contribute to the toxicity of nitrate in the body. At present no data are available on the bioavailability of nitrate from vegetables. Therefore the present study was performed to evaluate the oral bioavailability o...

  20. CCN3 and calcium signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chang Long

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The CCN family of genes consists presently of six members in human (CCN1-6 also known as Cyr61 (Cystein rich 61, CTGF (Connective Tissue Growth Factor, NOV (Nephroblastoma Overexpressed gene, WISP-1, 2 and 3 (Wnt-1 Induced Secreted Proteins. Results obtained over the past decade have indicated that CCN proteins are matricellular proteins, which are involved in the regulation of various cellular functions, such as proliferation, differentiation, survival, adhesion and migration. The CCN proteins have recently emerged as regulatory factors involved in both internal and external cell signaling. CCN3 was reported to physically interact with fibulin-1C, integrins, Notch and S100A4. Considering that, the conformation and biological activity of these proteins are dependent upon calcium binding, we hypothesized that CCN3 might be involved in signaling pathways mediated by calcium ions. In this article, we review the data showing that CCN3 regulates the levels of intracellular calcium and discuss potential models that may account for the biological effects of CCN3.

  1. Toxicological assessment of indium nitrate on aquatic organisms and investigation of the effects on the PLHC-1 fish cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurita, Jorge L. [National Institute of Toxicology and Forensic Sciences, Av. Dr Fedriani s/n, 41009, Seville (Spain); Jos, Angeles [Area of Toxicology, University of Seville, Prof. Garcia Gonzalez 2, 41012, Seville (Spain); Peso, Ana del; Salguero, Manuel [National Institute of Toxicology and Forensic Sciences, Av. Dr Fedriani s/n, 41009, Seville (Spain); Camean, Ana M. [Area of Toxicology, University of Seville, Prof. Garcia Gonzalez 2, 41012, Seville (Spain); Lopez-Artiguez, Miguel [National Institute of Toxicology and Forensic Sciences, Av. Dr Fedriani s/n, 41009, Seville (Spain); Repetto, Guillermo [National Institute of Toxicology and Forensic Sciences, Av. Dr Fedriani s/n, 41009, Seville (Spain); Area of Toxicology, University of Seville, Prof. Garcia Gonzalez 2, 41012, Seville (Spain)], E-mail: repetto@us.es

    2007-11-15

    Indium nitrate is mainly used as a semiconductor in batteries, for plating and other chemical and medical applications. There is a lack of available information about the adverse effects of indium compounds on aquatic organisms. Therefore, the toxic effects on systems from four trophic levels of the aquatic ecosystem were investigated. Firstly, the bacterium Vibrio fischeri, the alga Chlorella vulgaris and the cladoceran Daphnia magna were used in the toxicological evaluation of indium nitrate. The most sensitive model was V. fischeri, with a NOAEL of 0.02 and an EC{sub 50} of 0.04 mM at 15 min. Although indium nitrate should be classified as harmful to aquatic organisms, it is not expected to represent acute risk to the aquatic biota. Secondly, PLHC-1 fish cell line was employed to investigate the effects and mechanisms of toxicity. Although protein content, neutral red uptake, methylthiazol metabolization, lysosomal function and acetylcholinesterase activity were reduced in cells, stimulations were observed for metallothionein levels and succinate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities. No changes were observed in ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity. To clarify the main events in PLHC-1 cell death induced by indium nitrate, nine modulators were applied. They were related to oxidative stress ({alpha}-tocopherol succinate, mannitol and sodium benzoate), disruption of calcium homeostasis (BAPTA-AM and EGTA), thiol protection (1,4-dithiotreitol), iron chelation (deferoxiamine) or regulation of glutathione levels (2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid and malic acid diethyl ester). The main morphological alterations were hydropic degeneration and loss of cells. At least, in partly, toxicity seems to be mediated by oxidative stress, and particularly by NADPH-dependent lipid peroxidation.

  2. Toxicological assessment of indium nitrate on aquatic organisms and investigation of the effects on the PLHC-1 fish cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indium nitrate is mainly used as a semiconductor in batteries, for plating and other chemical and medical applications. There is a lack of available information about the adverse effects of indium compounds on aquatic organisms. Therefore, the toxic effects on systems from four trophic levels of the aquatic ecosystem were investigated. Firstly, the bacterium Vibrio fischeri, the alga Chlorella vulgaris and the cladoceran Daphnia magna were used in the toxicological evaluation of indium nitrate. The most sensitive model was V. fischeri, with a NOAEL of 0.02 and an EC50 of 0.04 mM at 15 min. Although indium nitrate should be classified as harmful to aquatic organisms, it is not expected to represent acute risk to the aquatic biota. Secondly, PLHC-1 fish cell line was employed to investigate the effects and mechanisms of toxicity. Although protein content, neutral red uptake, methylthiazol metabolization, lysosomal function and acetylcholinesterase activity were reduced in cells, stimulations were observed for metallothionein levels and succinate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities. No changes were observed in ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity. To clarify the main events in PLHC-1 cell death induced by indium nitrate, nine modulators were applied. They were related to oxidative stress (α-tocopherol succinate, mannitol and sodium benzoate), disruption of calcium homeostasis (BAPTA-AM and EGTA), thiol protection (1,4-dithiotreitol), iron chelation (deferoxiamine) or regulation of glutathione levels (2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid and malic acid diethyl ester). The main morphological alterations were hydropic degeneration and loss of cells. At least, in partly, toxicity seems to be mediated by oxidative stress, and particularly by NADPH-dependent lipid peroxidation

  3. The role of calcium in human aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beto, Judith A

    2015-01-01

    Calcium is an essential nutrient that is necessary for many functions in human health. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body with 99% found in teeth and bone. Only 1% is found in serum. The serum calcium level is tightly monitored to remain within normal range by a complex metabolic process. Calcium metabolism involves other nutrients including protein, vitamin D, and phosphorus. Bone formation and maintenance is a lifelong process. Early attention to strong bones in childhood and adulthood will provide more stable bone mass during the aging years. Research has shown that adequate calcium intake can reduce the risk of fractures, osteoporosis, and diabetes in some populations. The dietary requirements of calcium and other collaborative nutrients vary slightly around the world. Lactose intolerance due to lactase deficiency is a common cause of low calcium intake. Strategies will be discussed for addressing this potential barrier to adequate intake. The purpose of this narrative review is a) to examine the role of calcium in human health, b) to compare nutrient requirements for calcium across lifecycle groups and global populations, c) to review relationships between calcium intake, chronic disease risk, and fractures, and d) to discuss strategies to address diet deficiencies and lactose intolerance. PMID:25713787

  4. Rapid screening assay for calcium bioavailability studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium bioavailability has been studied by numerous techniques. The authors report here the use of the gamma emitting isotope of calcium (47Ca) in a whole body retention assay system. In this system, calcium sources are administered by oral gavage and subsequent counts are determined and corrected for isotopic decay. Unlike iron and zinc retention curves, which exhibit a 2-3 day equilibration period, calcium reaches equilibration after 24 hours. Autoradiographic analysis of the femurs indicate that the newly absorbed calcium is rapidly distributed to the skeletal system. Moreover, the isotope is distributed along the entire bone. Comparisons of calcium bioavailability were made using intrinsic/extrinsic labeled milk from two species i.e. rat and goat as well as CaCO3. In addition, extrinsic labeled cow milk was examined. In the rat, the extrinsic labeled calcium from milk was better absorbed than the intrinsic calcium. This was not the case in goat milk or the calcium carbonate which exhibited no significant differences. Chromatographic analysis of the labeled milk indicates a difference in distribution of the 47Ca. From these data, the authors recommend the use of this assay system in calcium bioavailability studies. The labeling studies and comparisons indicate caution should be used, however, in labeling techniques and species milk comparison

  5. Effects of Amino Acids Replacing Nitrate on Growth, Nitrate Accumulation, and Macroelement Concentrations in Pak-choi (Brassica chinensis L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A hydroponic experiment was carried out to determine the influence of replacing 20% of nitrate-N in nutrient solutions with 20 individual amino acids on growth, nitrate accumulation, and concentrations of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) in pak-choi (Brassica chinensis L.) shoots. When 20% of nitrate-N was replaced with arginine (Arg)compared to the full nitrate treatment, pak-choi shoot fresh and dry weights increased significantly (P ≤ 0.05), but when 20% of nitrate-N was replaced with alanine (Ala), valine (Val), leucine (Leu), isoleucine (Ile), proline (Pro), phenylalanine (Phe), methionine (Met), aspartic acid (Asp), glutamic acid (Glu), lysine (Lys), glycine (Gly), serine (Ser), threonine(Thr), cysteine (Cys), and tyrosine (Tyr), shoot fresh and dry weights decreased significantly (P ≤ 0.05). After replacing 20% of nitrate-N with asparagine (Asn) and glutamine (Gln), shoot fresh and dry weights were unaffected. Compared to the full nitrate treatment, amino acid replacement treatments, except for Cys, Gly, histidine (His), and Arg, significantly reduced (P ≤ 0.05) nitrate concentrations in plant shoots. Except for Cys, Leu, Pro, and Met, total N concentrations in plant tissues of the other amino acid treatments significantly increased (P ≤ 0.05). Amino acids also affected total P and K concentrations, but the effects differed depending on individual amino acids. To improve pak-choi shoot quality, Gln and Asn, due to their insignificant effects on pak-choi growth, their significant reduction in nitrate concentrations, and their increase in macroelement content in plants, may be used to partially replace nitrate-N.

  6. STIM1 is a Calcium Sensor Specialized for Digital Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Bird, Gary S.; Hwang, Sung-Yong; Smyth, Jeremy T.; Fukushima, Miwako; Boyles, Rebecca R.; Putney, James W.

    2009-01-01

    When cells are activated by calcium-mobilizing agonists at low, physiological concentrations, the resulting calcium signals generally take the form of repetitive regenerative discharges of stored calcium, termed calcium oscillations [1]. These intracellular calcium oscillations have long fascinated biologists as representing a mode of digitized intracellular signaling. Recent work has highlighted the role of calcium influx as an essential component of calcium oscillations [2]. This influx occ...

  7. Self-healing protective films prepared on zinc electrodes by treatment in a cerium(III) nitrate solution and modification with sodium phosphate and calcium or magnesium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Self-healing protective films were prepared on a zinc electrode by treatment in a Ce(NO3)3 solution and modification with Na3PO4 and Ca(NO3)2 or Mg(NO3)2. The protective and self-healing abilities of the films were examined by polarization measurements and observation of pit formation after the electrode was scratched with a knife-edge and immersed in aerated 0.5 M NaCl for many hours. The protective efficiency of the film modified with Ca(NO3)2 was higher than that of the film without Ca(NO3)2 but the self-healing ability of the former film was not sufficiently high during the prolonged immersion. Mechanisms of the protective and self-healing activities were discussed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and electron-probe microanalysis

  8. Nitrate concentrations in soil solutions below Danish forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Ingeborg; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten; Gundersen, Per;

    1999-01-01

    Nitrate in the soil water below the root zone is a pre-condition for nitrate leaching, and it indicates loss of nutrients from the forest ecosystem. Nitrate leaching may potentially cause eutrophication of surface water and contamination of ground water. In order to evaluate the extent of nitrate...... leaching in relation to land-use, a national monitoring programme has established sampling routines in a 7x7 km grid including 111 points in forests. During winters of 1986-1993, soil samples were obtained from a depth of 0-25, 25-50, 50-75 and 75-100 cm. Nitrate concentrations in soil solutions were...... determined by means of a 1 M KCl extraction. The influence of forest size, forest-type, soil-type, tree species and sampling time on the nitrate concentrations was analysed in a statistical model. The analysis focused on data from depth 75-100 cm, as nitrate is considered potentially lost from the ecosystem...

  9. Waste generation reduction: nitrates. FY 1984 status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was initiated at Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) to develop and demonstrate technology to eliminate nitrates in low-level waste streams without generating objectionable oxides of nitrogen. Various chemical and thermal methods of denitrification were investigated earlier in this program. Work in FY 1984 was conducted on the Thagard High Temperature Fluid Wall Reactor (HTFWR) and on an aqueous two-step process. Preliminary tests were conducted on a plasma torch system. Testing was completed with actual RFP nitrate wastes on an aqueous process consisting of formic and sulfuric acid reflux, followed by evaporation of the liquid to dryness. Results from this process show promising nitrate destruction, but with production of some NO/sub x/ in the off-gas. Also completed in aqueous testing were laser excitation techniques, indicating that the high activation energy of the nitrate ion can be overcome with a simpler chemical reaction with additional energy applied. Experiments were conducted using an HTFWR to determine its nitrate/nitrite destruction efficiency on simulated RFP and Savannah River Plant waste streams. These streams included nitrate-contaminated soils and feeds containing surrogate fission products. Various additives were tested to enhance nitrate destruction, reduce NO/sub x/ off-gas generation, and produce an acceptable final waste form

  10. Isoprene nitrates: preparation, separation, identification, yields, and atmospheric chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Lockwood

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Isoprene is an important atmospheric volatile organic compound involved in ozone production and NOx (NO+NO2 sequestration and transport. Isoprene reaction with OH in the presence of NO can form either isoprene hydroxy nitrates ("isoprene nitrates" or convert NO to NO2 which can photolyze to form ozone. While it has been shown that isoprene nitrate production can represent an important sink for NOx in forest impacted environments, there is little experimental knowledge of the relative importance of the individual isoprene nitrate isomers, each of which has a different fate and reactivity. In this work, we have identified the 8 individual isomers and determined their total and individual production yields. The overall yield of isoprene nitrates at atmospheric pressure and 295 K was found to be 0.070(+0.025/−0.015. Three isomers, representing nitrates resulting from OH addition to a terminal carbon, represent 90% of the total IN yield. We also determined the ozone rate constants for three of the isomers, and have calculated their atmospheric lifetimes, which range from ~1–2 h, making their oxidation products likely more important as atmospheric organic nitrates and sinks for nitrogen.

  11. Implementation of the eu nitrates directive in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice BİLGİN YILDIRIM

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The EU Nitrates Directive is of a prime importance in respect of sustaining the natural resources for the reduction and prevention of nitrate pollution resulting from agricultural activities, and it constitutes an integral part of the EU Water Framework Directive. Accepted by the European Council in 1991, the directive entered into force being published in Official Gazette in 2004 in Turkey as “Regulation on the Protection of Waters against Pollution Caused by Nitrates from Agricultural Sources.” As of this date, works on harmonization have been intensely continued. The works brought together multiple organizations that are notable in terms of waterworks and ensured informatory exchange through the contributions of the EU member states. Approaching to the finalization of its harmonization process, Turkey will proclaim its country either a “border to border nitrate-sensitive zone” or “nitrate vulnerable zone” in order to issue the secondary legislations required by the Nitrates Directive in accordance with these approaches. This paper covers the current works conducted with regard to the implementation of the Nitrates Directive and it has been prepared aiming at inviting attentions to the current and possible complications in the implementation process.

  12. Sources of Nitrate Contamination in Groundwater Under Developing Asian Megacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezawa, Y.; Hosono, T.; Onodera, S.; Siringan, F.; Buapeng, S.; Delinom, R. M.; Yoshimizu, C.; Tayasu, I.; Nagata, T.; Taniguchi, M.

    2008-12-01

    The status of nitrate, nitrite and ammonium contamination in the water systems, and the mechanisms controlling their sources, pathways, and distributions were investigated for the Southeast Asian cities of Metro Manila, Bangkok, and Jakarta. GIS-based monitoring and dual isotope approach (nitrate d15N and d18O) suggested that human waste via severe sewer leakage was the major source of nutrient contaminants in Metro Manila and Jakarta urban areas. Furthermore, the characteristics of the nutrient contamination differed depending on the agricultural land use pattern in the suburban areas. The exponential increase in nitrate d15N along with the nitrate reduction and clear d18O/d15N slopes of nitrate (~0.5) indicated the occurrence of denitrification. An anoxic subsurface system associated with the natural geological setting (e.g., the old tidal plain at Bangkok) and artificial pavement coverage served to buffer nitrate contamination via active denitrification and reduced nitrification. Our results showed that nitrate and ammonium contamination of the aquifers in Metro Manila, Bangkok, and Jakarta was not excessive, suggesting low risk of drinking groundwater to human health, at present. However, the increased nitrogen load and increased per capita gross domestic product (GDP) in these developing cities may increase this contamination in the very near future. Continuous monitoring and management of the groundwater system is needed to minimize groundwater pollution in these areas.

  13. Nitrate contamination of groundwater: A conceptual management framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In many countries, public concern over the deterioration of groundwater quality from nitrate contamination has grown significantly in recent years. This concern has focused increasingly on anthropogenic sources as the potential cause of the problem. Evidence indicates that the nitrate (NO3) levels routinely exceed the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 mg/l NO3-N in many aquifer systems that underlie agriculture-dominated watersheds. Degradation of groundwater quality due to nitrate pollution along with the increasing demand for potable water has motivated the adoption of restoration actions of the contaminated aquifers. Restoration efforts have intensified the dire need for developing protection alternatives and management options such that the ultimate nitrate concentrations at the critical receptors are below the MCL. This paper presents a general conceptual framework for the management of groundwater contamination from nitrate. The management framework utilizes models of nitrate fate and transport in the unsaturated and saturated zones to simulate nitrate concentration at the critical receptors. To study the impact of different management options considering both environmental and economic aspects, the proposed framework incorporates a component of a multi-criteria decision analysis. To enhance spatiality in model development along with the management options, the utilization of a land use map is depicted for the allocation and computation of on-ground nitrogen loadings from the different sources

  14. NITRATE AND NITRITE CONCENTRATION IN VEGETABLES GRAWING AROUND ISFAHAN CITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A JAFARI

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The improper and excess use of chemical fertilizers by the farmers special in "urea" form may cause the commulation of nitrates and nitrites in vegetables and fruits. This investigation has been done to determine the concentration of nitrates and nitrites in some vegetables growing around Isfahan. Methods: One hundred and thirteen random samples from 15 different kinds of green lest tuber vegetables were measured by Cadmium Column Procedure for nitrates and nitrites. Results: The mean of the nitrates level in green leaf and tuber-vegetables was 287.9 and 76.3 mg/kg, respectively. These amounts were more higher than standard value (67 mg/kg in the basis of wet material, significantly. The mean of the nitrite level in green leaf and tuber vegetables were 1.7 and 1 mg/kg, repectively, which were more higher than standard value (zero mg/kg in the basis of wet matrial. The most high concentration of nitrites and nitrates was seen in commondill and leek, repectively. Discussion: Amounts of nitrites and nitrates in our analysed samples exceeded the perimissible limits. The comulation of nitrates in some of the vegetables depend on the application of chemical fertilizers, temprature and wether, but the nitrites in vegetables is unusual in normal condition and the unsuitable storage of them causes it"s expansion.

  15. Fortification of all-purpose wheat-flour tortillas with calcium lactate, calcium carbonate, or calcium citrate is acceptable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanchik-Cerpovicz, Joelle E; McKemie, Rebecca J

    2007-03-01

    Fortification helps provide adequate nutrients for individuals not meeting daily needs. Foods may be fortified with calcium to assist individuals with lactose intolerance and others preferring not to consume traditional forms of dairy. This study examined the quality of all-purpose wheat-flour tortillas fortified with calcium lactate, calcium carbonate, or calcium citrate. These tortillas were compared to similarly prepared nonfortified flour tortillas (control) and commercial nonfortified flour tortillas. Calcium-fortified tortillas contained 114 mg elemental calcium per standard serving (48 g tortilla), an 8.6-fold increase compared to nonfortified tortillas. Moisture contents and rollabilities of all tortillas were similar. Consumers (N=87) evaluated each tortilla in duplicate using a hedonic scale and reported liking the appearance, texture, flavor, aftertaste, and overall acceptability of all tortillas. However, the appearance of control tortillas was preferred over commercial tortillas (Ptortillas or those fortified with calcium carbonate was preferred over the control (Ptortillas, suggesting that appearance and aftertaste may not influence willingness to purchase. Overall, this study shows that fortification of flour tortillas with various forms of calcium is a feasible alternative calcium source. PMID:17324671

  16. Characterization of a calcium phosphate cement based on alpha-tricalcium phosphate obtained by wet precipitation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are several systems of calcium phosphate cements being studied. Those based on alpha-tricalcium phosphate are of particular interest. After setting they produce calcium deficient hydroxyapatite similar to bone like hydroxyapatite. This work aims to obtain alpha-tricalcium phosphate powders by the wet precipitation process, using calcium nitrate and phosphoric acid as reagents. This powder was characterized by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and particle size distribution. In order to prepare the calcium phosphate cement, the powder was mixed with an accelerator in an aqueous solution. The mechanical properties of the cement were assessed and it was evaluated by means of apparent density, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The described method produced crystalline alpha-tricalcium phosphate as the major phase. The calcium phosphate cement showed high values of compression strength (50 MPa). The soaking of the cement in a simulated body fluid (SBF) formed a layer of hydroxyapatite like crystals in the surface of the samples. (author)

  17. Binding of calcium and carbonate to polyacrylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribello, Gareth A; Liew, CheeChin; Parrinello, Michele

    2009-05-21

    Polyacrylate molecules can be used to slow the growth of calcium carbonate. However, little is known about the mechanism by which the molecules impede the growth rate. A recent computational study (Bulo et al. Macromolecules 2007, 40, 3437) used metadynamics to investigate the binding of calcium to polyacrylate chains and has thrown some light on the coiling and precipitation of these polymers. We extend these simulations to examine the binding of calcium and carbonate to polyacrylate chains. We show that calcium complexed with both carbonate and polyacrylate is a very stable species. The free energies of calcium-carbonate-polyacrylate complexes, with different polymer configurations, are calculated, and differences in the free energy of the binding of carbonate are shown to be due to differences in the amount of steric hindrance about the calcium, which prevents the approach of the carbonate ion. PMID:19400592

  18. Biological denitrification of high sodium nitrate bearing actual reprocessing waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High nitrate bearing alkaline waste solution of reprocessing plant origin was decontaminated by adopting an ion exchange followed by a chemical treatment based process. The resulting effluent was then subjected to nitrate removal by biodenitrification. A flow through bioreactor provided with stainless steel modules as support for biomass growth was setup and the biomass in reactor was acclimatized to a NaNO3 solution of concentration level comparable to actual effluents. The bioreactor was used for denitrification of the actual effluent in continuous mode and complete denitrification of the actual reprocessing waste solution containing 17,500 ppm of nitrate has been successfully demonstrated. (author)

  19. Electrolytic Removal of Nitrate From CELSS Crop Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon, Guillermo; Sager, John

    1996-01-01

    The controlled ecological life support system (CELSS) resource recovery system is a waste processing system using aerobic and anaerobic bioreactors to recover plant nutrients and secondary foods from inedible biomass. Crop residues contain significant amounts of nitrate which presents two problems: (1) both CELSS biomass production and resource recovery consume large quantities of nitric acid, (2) nitrate causes a variety of problems in both aerobic and anaerobic bioreactors. A technique was proposed to remove the nitrate from potato inedible biomass leachate and to satisfy the nitric acid demand using a four compartment electrolytic cell.

  20. Effect of Ammonium Nitrate on Nanoparticle Size Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyana C. Pingali

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium nitrate was added to the spraying solution as a foaming agent to reduce the particle size of nanoparticles synthesized in the spray-pyrolysis process. Ammonium nitrate was effective in breaking the aerosol droplet size and generating nanoparticles that were of approximately one order-of-magnitude (from 200 to 20 nm smaller diameter than those created in the absence of ammonium nitrate in the feed solution. This technique makes it possible to control the particle diameter of metallic nanoparticles below 20 nm.

  1. Biphasic calcium phosphate in periapical surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Suneelkumar, Chinni; Datta, Krithika; Manali R Srinivasan; Kumar, Sampath T

    2008-01-01

    Calcium phosphate ceramics like hydroxyapatite and β -tricalcium phosphate (β -TCP) possess mineral composition that closely resembles that of the bone. They can be good bone substitutes due to their excellent biocompatibility. Biphasic calcium phosphate is a bone substitute which is a mixture of hydroxyapatite and β -tricalcium phosphate in fixed ratios. Studies have demonstrated the osteoconductive potential of this composition. This paper highlights the clinical use of biphasic calcium pho...

  2. Gravity, Calcium, And Bone: Update, 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Morey-Holton, Emily

    1992-01-01

    Report reviews short-term flight and ground-based experiments on effects of 1 g and 0 g on skeletal adaptation, calcium metabolism, and growth processes. Results indicate two principal components of calcium metabolism-calcium endocrine system and bone - respond within days to changes in orientation of body in gravitation and to weightlessness. Effects of spaceflight or bed rest on biomechanics of bones more severe than on total body bone mass.

  3. Gravity, calcium, and bone - Update, 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Morey-Holton, Emily

    1990-01-01

    Recent results obtained on skeletal adaptation, calcium metabolism, and bone browth during short-term flights and ground simulated-microgravity experiments are presented. Results demonstrate that two principal components of calcium metabolism respond within days to changes in body position and to weightlessness: the calcium endocrine system and bone characteristics. Furthermore, results of recent studies imply that bone biomechanics are more severely affected by spaceflight exposures than is the bone mass.

  4. Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia and calcium sensing receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mrgan, Monija; Nielsen, Sanne; Brixen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) is a lifelong, benign autosomal dominant disease characterized by hypercalcemia, normal to increased parathyroid hormone level, and a relatively low renal calcium excretion. Inactivation of the calcium-sensing receptor in heterozygous patients results in...... FHH, while in homozygous patients as well as in compound heterozygous or dominant negative heterozygous patients, it may result in neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism (NSHPT). Parathyroid surgery is not indicated in FHH and does not lower plasma calcium unless total parathyroidectomy is performed, in...

  5. Overbased Calcium sulfonate Detergent Technology Overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Qing-gao; MUIR Ronald J.

    2009-01-01

    Overbased calcium sulfonate is used widely as detergent in automotive and marine lubricants, as well as various industrial oil applications. In this paper, the process to produce overbased calcium sulfonate is overviewed. The sulfonate structure and molecular weight and its molecular weight distribution, the enclosed calcium carbonate nanoparticle size and crystalline structure, properties of the carrier oil, all influence its properties, such as stability, viscosity, and detergency of the system.

  6. Calcium hydroxide isotope effect in calcium isotope enrichment by ion exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jepson, B.E.; Shockey, G.C.

    1984-01-01

    The enrichment of calcium isotopes has been observed in ion-exchange chromatography with an aqueous phase of calcium hydroxide and a solid phase of sulfonic acid resin. The band front was exceedingly sharp as a result of the acid-base reaction occuring at the front of the band. Single-stage separation coefficients were found to be epsilon(/sup 44/Ca//sup 40/Ca) = 11 x 10 /sup -4/ and epsilon(/sup 48/Ca//sup 40/Ca) = 18 x 10/sup -4/. The maximum column separation factors achieved were 1.05 for calcium-44 and 1.09 for calcium-48 with the heavy isotopes enriching in the fluid phase. The calcium isotope effect between fully hydrated aqueous calcium ions and undissociated aqueous calcium hydroxide was estimated. For the calcium-44/40 isotope pair the separation coefficient was 13 x 10/sup -4/. 20 references, 2 figures.

  7. Calcium carboorthovanadate - a new compound with the apa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on calcium carboorthovanadate, Ca10(VO4)6CO3, a new compound with an appatite structure based on calcium orthovanadate, are reported. The synthesis has been conducted in a stoichiometric mixture of finely ground calcium carbonate and calcium orthovanadate. It is found that calcium carboorthovanadate belongs to the hexagonal syngony and has an apatite structure. An analysis of the infrared spectra of initial compounds and calcium carboorthovanadate confirmed the presence of carbonate (CO3)2- and orthovanadate (VO4)3 groupings in the latter. On heating in air, beginning with 450 deg C calcium carboorthovanadate decomposes at a slow rate into calcium oxide, calcium orthovanadate, and carbon dioxide

  8. Calcium supplements: do they help or harm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, Joann E; Bassuk, Shari S

    2014-01-01

    Current recommendations for calcium intake call for 1,000 mg per day for women ages 19-50 and 1,200 mg per day for women over age 50 to ensure bone health. Given recent concerns that calcium supplements may raise risk for cardiovascular disease and kidney stones, women should aim to meet this recommendation primarily by eating a calcium-rich diet and taking calcium supplements only if needed to reach the RDA goal (often only approximately 500 mg per day in supplements is required). PMID:23880796

  9. Presynaptic calcium signalling in cerebellar mossy fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Jörntell, Henrik; Midtgaard, Jens

    2010-01-01

    appeared to be isolated from one another in terms of calcium signalling. CGP55845 application showed that GABA B receptors mediated presynaptic inhibition of the calcium signal over the entire firing frequency range of mossy fibres. A paired-pulse depression of the calcium signal lasting more than 1 s...... affected burst firing in mossy fibres; this paired-pulse depression was reduced by GABA B antagonists. While our results indicated that a presynaptic rosette electrophysiologically functioned as a unit, topical GABA application showed that calcium signals in the branches of complex rosettes could be...

  10. Peroxisome is a reservoir of intracellular calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raychaudhury, Bikramjit; Gupta, Shreedhara; Banerjee, Shouvik; Datta, Salil C

    2006-07-01

    We have examined fura 2-loaded purified peroxisomes under confocal microscope to prove that this mammalian organelle is a store of intracellular calcium pool. Presence of calcium channel and vanadate sensitive Ca(2+)-ATPase in the purified peroxisomal membrane has been demonstrated. We have further observed that machineries to maintain calcium pool in this mammalian organelle are impaired during infection caused by Leishmania donovani. Results reveal that peroxisomes have a merit to play a significant role in the metabolism of intracellular calcium. PMID:16713100

  11. How calcium makes endocytic receptors attractive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian B F; Moestrup, Søren K

    2014-01-01

    receptor. Endosomal acidification and calcium efflux lead to the essential ligand-receptor affinity switch and separation. Recent data, including crystal structures of receptor-ligand complexes, now reveal how calcium, in different types of domain scaffolds, functions in a common way as a removable...... 'lynchpin' that stabilizes favorable positioning of ligand-attractive receptor residues. In addition to explaining how calcium depletion can cause ligand-receptor dissociation, the new data add further insight into how acidification contributes to dissociation through structural changes that affect the...... receptor calcium sites....

  12. Calcium wave of Brain Astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell Bell, A. H.

    1997-03-01

    Time lapse confocal scanning laser microscopy was used to study hippocampal astrocyte cultures loaded with a calcium indicator, Fluo3-AM (4 uM). kThe neurotransmitter kainate (100uM) overwhelms the Na+-buffering capacity of astrocytes within 100 sec resulting in reversal of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. This results in a subcellular site where Ca2+ entering the cytoplasm contributes to a long-distance Ca2+ wave which travels at 20 um/sec without decrement. Image analysis has shown calcium waves not only at a high Kainate dose, but also at a low Kainate dose, e.g. 10uM. These are, however, shortlived and burried in an extremely noisy background and only detectable by analyzing the calcium waves images for spatio-temporal coherence. As the kainate dose increases, more large scale coherent structures with visible geometric features (spiral waves and target waves) can be observed. Multiple spiral waves are produced when the Kainate dose increases to 100 uM. These waves travel at a constant velocity across entire microscope fields for long time periods (>30 mins). Na+ channels have no effect on the Kainate wave. Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels are not involved and Ca2+ enters through reversal of the exchanger. Ca2+ release from stores does not contribute to the kainate wave. Removal of Na+ or Ca2+ from outside and the specific Na+/Ca2+ exchange inhibitor benzamil (10 uM) inhibit the kainate wave. A functional antibody to alpha6-Integrin which is localized to membrane regions between cells inhibits the spread of the kainate wave in a dose and time-dependent manner. Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleach (FRAP) techniques indicate that gap junctions remain open between cells. This would imply that Ca2+ or IP3 need not pass through the gap junction, but reversal of the exchanger would propel the Ca2+ wave at the cell surface.

  13. Calcium and magnesium silicate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deep geological disposals are planed to discard long-lived intermediate-level and high-level radioactive wastes. Clay-based geological barriers are expected to limit the ingress of groundwater and to reduce the mobility of radioelements. In the interaction zone between the cement and the clay based material alteration can occur. Magnesium silicate hydrates (M-S-H) have been observed due to the reaction of magnesium sulfate containing groundwater with cements or in the interaction zone between low-pH type cement and clays. M-S-H samples synthesized in the laboratory showed that M-S-H has a variable composition within 0.7 ≤ Mg/Si ≤ 1.5. TEM/EDS analyses show an homogeneous gel with no defined structure. IR and 29Si NMR data reveal a higher polymerization degree of the silica network in M-S-H compared to calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H). The presence of mainly Q3 silicate tetrahedrons in M-S-H indicates a sheet like or a triple-chain silica structure while C-S-H is characterised by single chain-structure. The clear difference in the silica structure and the larger ionic radius of Ca2+ (1.1 Angstrom) compared to Mg2+ (0.8 Angstrom) make the formation of an extended solid solution between M-S-H and C-S-H gel improbable. In fact, the analyses of synthetic samples containing both magnesium and calcium in various ratios indicate the formation of separate M-S-H and C-S-H gels with no or very little uptake of magnesium in CS-H or calcium in M-S-H

  14. Calcium Absorption from Fortified Ice Cream Formulations Compared with Calcium Absorption from Milk

    OpenAIRE

    van der Hee, Regine M.; Miret, Silvia; Slettenaar, Marieke; Duchateau, Guus S.M.J.E.; Rietveld, Anton G.; Wilkinson, Joy E.; Quail, Patricia J.; Berry, Mark J.; Dainty, Jack R.; Teucher, Birgit; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2009-01-01

    Objective Optimal bone mass in early adulthood is achieved through appropriate diet and lifestyle, thereby protecting against osteoporosis and risk of bone fracture in later life. Calcium and vitamin D are essential to build adequate bones, but calcium intakes of many population groups do not meet dietary reference values. In addition, changes in dietary patterns are exacerbating the problem, thereby emphasizing the important role of calcium-rich food products. We have designed a calcium-fort...

  15. Association of Urinary Calcium Excretion with Serum Calcium and Vitamin D Levels

    OpenAIRE

    A Rathod; Bonny, O; Guessous, I; Suter, P M; Conen, D; Erne, P; Binet, I; Gabutti, L; Gallino, A; Muggli, F; Hayoz, D; Pechere-Bertschi, A; Paccaud, F.; Burnier, M.; Bochud, M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Population-based data on urinary calcium excretion are scarce. The association of serum calcium and circulating levels of vitamin D [25(OH)D2 or D3] with urinary calcium excretion in men and women from a population-based study was explored. DESIGN, SETTINGS, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: Multivariable linear regression was used to explore factors associated with square root-transformed 24-hour urinary calcium excretion (milligrams per 24 hours) taken as the dep...

  16. Drosophila mushroom body Kenyon cells generate spontaneous calcium transients mediated by PLTX-sensitive calcium channels.

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Shaojuan Amy; Campusano, Jorge M.; Su, Hailing; O'Dowd, Diane K.

    2005-01-01

    Spontaneous calcium oscillations in mushroom bodies of late stage pupal and adult Drosophila brains have been implicated in memory consolidation during olfactory associative learning. This study explores the cellular mechanisms regulating calcium dynamics in Kenyon cells, principal neurons in mushroom bodies. Fura-2 imaging shows that Kenyon cells cultured from late stage Drosophila pupae generate spontaneous calcium transients in a cell autonomous fashion, at a frequency similar to calcium o...

  17. Chemical denitration of aqueous nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Plant for Active Waste Liquids (PAWL) at CRNL will immobilize in glass the fission products in waste from Mo-99 production. The nitrate ions in the waste can be destroyed by heating, but also by chemical reaction with formic acid (HCOOH). Since chemical denitration has several advantages over thermal denitration it was studied in the course of vitrification process development. Two free radical mechanisms are examined here to explain kinetic data on chemical denitration of nitric acid solutions with formic acid. One mechanism is applicable at > 1 mol/L HNO3 and involves the formate radical (HCOO.). The second mechanism holds at 3 and involves the hyponitrous radical (HNO.). Mass balances for various species were written based on the law of mass action applied to the equations describing the reaction mechanism. Analytical and numerical solutions were obtained and compared. Literature data on batch denitration were used to determine some of the rate constants while others were set arbitrarily. Observed stoichiometry and trends in reactant concentrations are predicted accurately for batch data. There are no literature data to compare with the prediction of negligible induction time

  18. Reaction of lanthanide nitrates with macrocyclic amidoacylhydrazones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinka, E.V.; Bondarev, M.L.; Bel' tyukova, S.V.; Poleuktov, N.S.; Nazarenko, N.A.

    1987-09-01

    This paper deals with a study of the reaction of neodymium and europium nitrates with 3,5,14,16-tetraazasubstituted dibenzo (d,j) (1,2,6,9,13,14) hexaazahexadeca-2,4,10,12-tetraene-7,8,15,16-tetraones. The authors carried out the investigations by means of conductimetry, UV luminescence, IR spectroscopy, and mass spectroscopy. Conductimetric titrations of the neodymium complexes were carried out on an OK-102/1 conductimeter. The luminescence spectra of the europium ion in the region of the /sup 5/D/sub 0/ ..-->.. /sup 7/F/sub 1/ and /sup 5/D/sub 0/ ..-->.. /sup 7/F/sub 2/ transitions (550-620 nm) were recorded on an ISP-51 spectrograph with an FEP-1 photoelectric attachment, using excitation by an SVD-120A mercury quartz lamp. The UV spectra of solutions of the compounds and the IR spectra of the solid substances in KBr disks were recorded on SpecordUViS and UR-20 spectrophotometers, respectively, and the mass spectra on a Varian Mat-112 spectrometer.

  19. Oxidative and nitrative stress in neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Catherine A; Cole, Marsha P

    2015-12-01

    Aerobes require oxygen for metabolism and normal free radical formation. As a result, maintaining the redox homeostasis is essential for brain cell survival due to their high metabolic energy requirement to sustain electrochemical gradients, neurotransmitter release, and membrane lipid stability. Further, brain antioxidant levels are limited compared to other organs and less able to compensate for reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) generation which contribute oxidative/nitrative stress (OS/NS). Antioxidant treatments such as vitamin E, minocycline, and resveratrol mediate neuroprotection by prolonging the incidence of or reversing OS and NS conditions. Redox imbalance occurs when the antioxidant capacity is overwhelmed, consequently leading to activation of alternate pathways that remain quiescent under normal conditions. If OS/NS fails to lead to adaptation, tissue damage and injury ensue, resulting in cell death and/or disease. The progression of OS/NS-mediated neurodegeneration along with contributions from microglial activation, dopamine metabolism, and diabetes comprise a detailed interconnected pathway. This review proposes a significant role for OS/NS and more specifically, lipid peroxidation (LPO) and other lipid modifications, by triggering microglial activation to elicit a neuroinflammatory state potentiated by diabetes or abnormal dopamine metabolism. Subsequently, sustained stress in the neuroinflammatory state overwhelms cellular defenses and prompts neurotoxicity resulting in the onset or amplification of brain damage. PMID:26024962

  20. Thorium Nitrate Stockpile Drum Characterization Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorium nitrate (ThN) has been stored at depots for several decades and the Defense National Stockpile Center (DNSC) has evaluated options for its disposition. In support of this project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has directed a characterization campaign for the ThN. The analytical results lead to the following conclusions: the ThN could be classified as LSA-1; the ThN does not contain hazardous contaminants at concentrations that would cause it to be categorized as a mixed waste if were declared to be a waste; the ThN is not required to be classfied as a Division 5.1 oxidizer per the US Dept. of Transportation definition; and, the disposal of the ThN would not be regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and thus it could be accepted for disposal at the Nevada Test Site. This report disucsses the regulatory requirements involved with the packaging, transportation, and disposal of the ThN stockpile at the NTS. It also provides background information about the ThN stockpile, the current packaging configurations, and the current storage arrangements. The reader is also provided a description of the ThN and headspace gas sampling activities that wer conducted in 2002 and 2003 respectively. The basis for using ISO containers to transport and dispose of the ThN is discussed

  1. The Electronic Structure of Calcium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jan, J.-P.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1981-01-01

    The electronic structure of calcium under pressure is re-examined by means of self-consistent energy band calculations based on the local density approximation and using the linear muffin-tin orbitals (LMTO) method with corrections to the atomic sphere approximation included. At zero pressure.......149 Ryd, respectively, relative to the s band, give the best possible agreement. Under increasing pressure the s and p electrons are found to transfer into the d band, and Ca undergoes metal-semimetal-metal electronic transitions. Calculations of the bandstructure and the electronic pressure, including...

  2. Physicochemical investigation of calcium bromtechnetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium hexabromotechnetate is extracted for the first time and its composition corresponding to the CaTcBr6 formula is determined. Using the thermal analysis method the anhydrous salt stability boundaries are found. The X-ray phase analysis has shown the compound to be isostructural with (NH4)2TcI6 and has a rhombic b.c.c. crystal lattice with the following parameters: a=10.39+-0.01, b=7.34+-0.01 and c=7.45+-0.001A. At 380-420 deg C CaTcBr6 decomposes to Tc, CaBr2 and Br

  3. Calcium Imaging Perspectives in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chidananda Nagamangala Kanchiswamy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The calcium ion (Ca2+ is a versatile intracellular messenger. It provides dynamic regulation of a vast array of gene transcriptions, protein kinases, transcription factors and other complex downstream signaling cascades. For the past six decades, intracellular Ca2+ concentration has been significantly studied and still many studies are under way. Our understanding of Ca2+ signaling and the corresponding physiological phenomenon is growing exponentially. Here we focus on the improvements made in the development of probes used for Ca2+ imaging and expanding the application of Ca2+ imaging in plant science research.

  4. Barium calcium hydroxyapatite solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The replacement of calcium by barium in the hydroxyapatite structure by solid-state reaction at different temperatures and by precipitation from an aqueous system has been investigated by X-ray diffraction and i.r. absorption analyses. The products obtained by solid-state reaction at 1200 deg C are solid solutions over the range of barium concentration 60 to 100 atom %. The lattice dimensions and the i.r. frequencies of the solid solutions vary linearly with the atom % of barium. Only small amounts of barium can be incorporated in hydroxyapatite by precipitation from the aqueous system. (author)

  5. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for lunch; and beans, salsa, taco sauce, and cheese for dinner. Create mini-pizzas by topping whole-wheat English muffins or bagels with pizza sauce and low-fat mozzarella or soy cheese. Try whole-grain crackers with low-fat cheese ...

  6. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eliminates in urine, feces, and sweat. These include consumption of alcohol- and caffeine-containing beverages as well as intake ... and older 2,000 mg Pregnant and breastfeeding teens 3,000 mg Pregnant and breastfeeding adults 2, ...

  7. Nitration of Polystyrene Part-I Effect of Molecular Weight of Polymer on Nitration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Bajaj

    1967-01-01

    Full Text Available Polystyrene in the molecular weight range, 3.67*10/Sup4 to 47.86*10/Sup10 has been nitrated in fuming nitric acid at 50 Degree C and degree of substitution of nitro group per monomeric unit in the polymer chains varying from 1.03 to 1.11 has been obtained. Molecular weight of the initial polymers have been found no appreciable effect on the degree of substitution. Degradation of the polymer chain is, however, found to be more pronounced in high molecular weight polymers.

  8. Effect of Coated Urea with Humic-Calcium on Transformation of Nitrogen in Coastal Sandy Soil: A Soil Column Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulakhudin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of Coated Urea with Humic-Calcium on Transformation of Nitrogen in Coastal Sandy Soil: A Soil ColumnMethod (Sulakhudin, A Syukur, D Shiddieq and T Yuwono: In coastal sandy soil, mainly nitrogen losses due toleaching resulted to low fertilizer efficiency. Slow-release N fertilizers are proposed to minimize these losses, andhumic-calcium coated urea has been examined. A soil column method was used to compare the effects of coated ureawith humic-calcium on transformation and leaching loss of N in coastal sandy soil. The experiment aid to compare twokinds sources of humic substances (cow manure and peat which mixed with calcium as coated urea on transformation,vertical distribution and leaching N in coastal sandy soil. The concentration of humic-calcium coated urea i.e.1%, 5%and 10% based on their weight. The results showed that urea coated with humic-calcium from cow manure (UCHMand humic-calcium from peat (UCHP increased the N total and available N in the soil and decreased leaching loss ofN from the soil column. Compared to UCHP, UCHM in all concentration showed N-nitrate higher than N-ammonium onincubation length 2, 4 and 6 weeks. The N leached from a costal sandy soil with application coated urea with UCHMranged from 21.18% to 23.72% of the total N added as fertilizer, for coated urea with UCHP they ranged between21.44% and 23.25%, whereas for urea (control reached 29.48%. Leaching losses of mineral N were lower when ureacoated with UCHM compared to urea coated with UCHP or urea fertilizer. The study concluded that the UCHM isbetter than UCHP in decreasing N leached from coastal sandy soil

  9. Evaluation of nitrate pollution of groundwater in Mnasra region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharb area is one of the most important agricultural regions in Morocco, where the application of fertilizers is conducted in many cases without any respect of standards. This situation may generate negative environmental impact in vulnerable areas such as Mnasra groundwater. Our study tends to evaluate the level of contamination by nitrate of groundwater in a Mnasra area. The results show that 80% of the sampled wells are highly concentrated in nitrates in comparison with the standard of WHO. Intensification of agriculture in the area associated to excessive fertilizer application, repeated applications, irrigation and rainfall are reasons for an increasing nitrates pollution of water resources. Leaching of nitrate to the groundwater should receive more attention for its potential high mobile propriety which could cause serious damages for the environment and negative impact to the health of population.

  10. Evaluation of nitrate dynamics in riparian zones using environmental isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrate contamination, often associated with agricultural activities, is a major problem in some shallow aquifers in Canada and is an increasing threat to groundwater supplies and surface water quality. The studies to be presented at this conference are part of a major project aiming to examine the function of riparian zones in watersheds dominated by agricultural areas. Specifically, this project focuses on the role of vegetation strips and wetlands as buffer zones to attenuate groundwater nitrate generated by agricultural activities, that ultimately impact surface water. Our research approach involves combining the hydrology, geochemistry, ecology and stratigraphic analyses of the riparian zone in a multi-disciplinary way. 15N and 18O in nitrate are being used to provide information on the sources and to allow us to separate denitrification from nitrate attenuation by dilution

  11. Heterogeneous Interaction of Peroxyacetyl Nitrate on Liquid Sulfuric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Renyi; Leu, Ming-Taun

    1996-01-01

    The uptake of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) on liquid sulfuric acid surfaces has been investigated using a fast-flow reactor coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer. PAN was observed to be reversibly adsorbed on sulfuric acid.

  12. Deprotection of oximes using urea nitrate under microwave irradiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P T Perumal; M Anniyappan; D Muralidharan

    2004-08-01

    A new mild and efficient method for the cleavage of oximes to carbonyl compounds using readily available urea nitrate in acetonitrile-water (95 : 5), under microwave irradiation within 2 min, in good yields is reported.

  13. Nitrates in the human diet - good or bad?

    OpenAIRE

    Benjamin, Nigel

    2000-01-01

    Les nitrates dans l'alimentation humaine : une bonne ou une mauvaise chose ? Bien que les nitrates soient connus depuis des siècles, c'est seulement depuis peu qu'il a été découvert que les nitrates sont synthétisés chez les mammifères à partir du monoxyde d'azote, et que les nitrates formés ont la capacité de tuer les bactéries présentes dans les aliments consommés. Les mécanismes par lesquels le monoxyde d'azote et d'autres oxydes d'azote manifestent une toxicité sélective vis-à-vis de bact...

  14. Synthesis and characterization of Ag-containing calcium phosphates with various Ca/P ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ag-containing calcium phosphate (CaP) powders were synthesized by a precipitation method using aqueous solutions of calcium nitrate, silver nitrate, and ammonium phosphate. The powders were sintered at temperatures ranging from 1173 to 1473 K. The charged atomic ratios of (Ca + Ag)/P and Ag/(Ca + Ag) in solution were varied from 1.33 to 1.67 and from 0 to 0.30, respectively. The Ag content in the as-precipitated CaP powders increased with the charged Ag/(Ca + Ag) atomic ratio in solution and was lower than the charged Ag/(Ca + Ag) value. The as-precipitated CaP powders consisted of hydroxyapatite (HA) as the main phase. Ag nanoparticles were observed on the as-precipitated HA particles under all conditions of Ag addition. After the sintering, HA, β-TCP (tricalcium phosphate), α-TCP, and β-CPP (calcium pyrophosphate) were mainly detected as CaPs on the basis of the Ca/P atomic ratio of the as-precipitated powders. The addition of Ag stabilized the β-TCP phase, and the distribution of Ag in β-TCP was homogeneous. A metallic Ag phase coexisted with HA. The solubility of Ag in HA was estimated to be 0.0019–0.0061 (Ag/(Ca + Ag)) atomic ratio, which was lower than that in β-TCP (higher than 0.0536) and higher than that of β-CPP (below the detection limit of analyses). - Highlights: • The HA powders with Ag nanoparticles were synthesized by a precipitation method. • Metallic Ag particles were detected with the HA phase after sintering. • The distribution of Ag in β-TCP was homogeneous after sintering. • The addition of Ag stabilized the β-ΤCP phase. • β-TCP exhibited higher solubility of Ag than HA and β-CPP

  15. Synthesis and characterization of Ag-containing calcium phosphates with various Ca/P ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokcekaya, Ozkan, E-mail: gokcekaya@dc.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Materials Processing, Tohoku University, 6-6-02 Aza Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan); Ueda, Kyosuke; Narushima, Takayuki [Department of Materials Processing, Tohoku University, 6-6-02 Aza Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan); Ergun, Celaletdin [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Istanbul Technical University, 65 Inonu Street, Gumussuyu, Istanbul 34437 (Turkey)

    2015-08-01

    Ag-containing calcium phosphate (CaP) powders were synthesized by a precipitation method using aqueous solutions of calcium nitrate, silver nitrate, and ammonium phosphate. The powders were sintered at temperatures ranging from 1173 to 1473 K. The charged atomic ratios of (Ca + Ag)/P and Ag/(Ca + Ag) in solution were varied from 1.33 to 1.67 and from 0 to 0.30, respectively. The Ag content in the as-precipitated CaP powders increased with the charged Ag/(Ca + Ag) atomic ratio in solution and was lower than the charged Ag/(Ca + Ag) value. The as-precipitated CaP powders consisted of hydroxyapatite (HA) as the main phase. Ag nanoparticles were observed on the as-precipitated HA particles under all conditions of Ag addition. After the sintering, HA, β-TCP (tricalcium phosphate), α-TCP, and β-CPP (calcium pyrophosphate) were mainly detected as CaPs on the basis of the Ca/P atomic ratio of the as-precipitated powders. The addition of Ag stabilized the β-TCP phase, and the distribution of Ag in β-TCP was homogeneous. A metallic Ag phase coexisted with HA. The solubility of Ag in HA was estimated to be 0.0019–0.0061 (Ag/(Ca + Ag)) atomic ratio, which was lower than that in β-TCP (higher than 0.0536) and higher than that of β-CPP (below the detection limit of analyses). - Highlights: • The HA powders with Ag nanoparticles were synthesized by a precipitation method. • Metallic Ag particles were detected with the HA phase after sintering. • The distribution of Ag in β-TCP was homogeneous after sintering. • The addition of Ag stabilized the β-ΤCP phase. • β-TCP exhibited higher solubility of Ag than HA and β-CPP.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of Ag-containing calcium phosphates with various Ca/P ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokcekaya, Ozkan; Ueda, Kyosuke; Narushima, Takayuki; Ergun, Celaletdin

    2015-08-01

    Ag-containing calcium phosphate (CaP) powders were synthesized by a precipitation method using aqueous solutions of calcium nitrate, silver nitrate, and ammonium phosphate. The powders were sintered at temperatures ranging from 1173 to 1473 K. The charged atomic ratios of (Ca+Ag)/P and Ag/(Ca+Ag) in solution were varied from 1.33 to 1.67 and from 0 to 0.30, respectively. The Ag content in the as-precipitated CaP powders increased with the charged Ag/(Ca+Ag) atomic ratio in solution and was lower than the charged Ag/(Ca+Ag) value. The as-precipitated CaP powders consisted of hydroxyapatite (HA) as the main phase. Ag nanoparticles were observed on the as-precipitated HA particles under all conditions of Ag addition. After the sintering, HA, β-TCP (tricalcium phosphate), α-TCP, and β-CPP (calcium pyrophosphate) were mainly detected as CaPs on the basis of the Ca/P atomic ratio of the as-precipitated powders. The addition of Ag stabilized the β-TCP phase, and the distribution of Ag in β-TCP was homogeneous. A metallic Ag phase coexisted with HA. The solubility of Ag in HA was estimated to be 0.0019-0.0061 (Ag/(Ca+Ag)) atomic ratio, which was lower than that in β-TCP (higher than 0.0536) and higher than that of β-CPP (below the detection limit of analyses). PMID:26042697

  17. Nitrate leaching from short-hydroperiod floodplain soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Huber

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have shown the importance of riparian zones to reduce nitrate (NO3 contamination coming from adjacent agricultural land. Much less is known about nitrogen (N transformations and nitrate fluxes in riparian soils with short hydroperiods (1–3 days of inundation and there is no study that could show whether these soils are a N sink or source. Within a restored section of the Thur River in NE Switzerland, we measured nitrate concentrations in soil solutions as an indicator of the net nitrate production. Samples were collected along a quasi-successional gradient from frequently inundated gravel bars to an alluvial forest, at three different depths (10, 50 and 100 cm over a one-year period. Along this gradient we quantified N input (atmospheric deposition and sedimentation and N output (leaching to create a nitrogen balance and assess the risk of nitrate leaching from the unsaturated soil to the groundwater. Overall, the main factor explaining the differences in nitrate concentrations was the field capacity (FC. In subsoils with high FCs and VWC near FC, high nitrate concentrations were observed, often exceeding the Swiss and EU groundwater quality criterions of 400 and 800 μmol L−1, respectively. High sedimentation rates of river-derived nitrogen led to apparent N retention up to 200 kg N ha−1 yr−1 in the frequently inundated zones. By contrast, in the mature alluvial forest, nitrate leaching exceeded total N input most of the time. As a result of the large soil N pools, high amounts of nitrate were produced by nitrification and up to 94 kg N-NO3 ha−1 yr−1 were leached into the groundwater. Thus, during flooding when water fluxes are high, nitrate from soils can contribute up to 11% to the total nitrate load in groundwater.

  18. Nitrate leaching from short-hydroperiod floodplain soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Huber

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have shown the importance of riparian zones to reduce nitrate (NO3 contamination coming from adjacent agricultural land. Much less is known about nitrogen (N transformations and nitrate fluxes in riparian soils with short hydroperiods (1–3 days of inundation and there is no study that could show whether these soils are a N sink or source.

    Within a restored section of the Thur River in NE Switzerland, we measured nitrate concentrations in soil solutions as an indicator of the net nitrate production. Samples were collected along a quasi-successional gradient from frequently inundated gravel bars to an alluvial forest, at three different depths (10, 50 and 100 cm over a one-year period. Along this gradient we quantified N input (atmospheric deposition and sedimentation and N output (leaching to create a nitrogen balance and assess the risk of nitrate leaching from the unsaturated soil to the groundwater.

    Overall, the main factor explaining the differences in nitrate concentrations was the variability in soil texture and volumetric water content (VWC at field capacity (FC. In subsoils with high VWC at FC and VWC near 100 % FC, high nitrate concentrations were observed, often exceeding the Swiss and EU groundwater quality criterions of 400 and 800 μmol l−1, respectively. High sedimentation rates of river-derived nitrogen led to apparent N retention up to 200 kg N ha−1 yr−1 in the frequently inundated zones. By contrast, in the mature alluvial forest, nitrate leaching exceeded total N input most of the time. As a result of the large soil N pools, high amounts of nitrate were produced by nitrification and up to 94 kg N-NO3 ha−1 yr−1 were leached into the groundwater. Thus, during flooding when water fluxes are high, nitrate from soils can contribute up to 11 % to the total nitrate load in groundwater.

  19. REMEDIATION OF NITRATE-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER USING A BIOBARRIER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A biobarrier system has been developed for use in remediating shallow alluvial groundwater. This barrier is made from highly porous materials that are relatively long-lasting, carbon-based (to supply a limiting nutrient in nitrate destruction, in most cases), and extremely inexpensive and easy to emplace. In a series of laboratory studies, we have determined the effectiveness of this barrier at destroying nitrate and perchlorate in groundwater from Mortandad Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This groundwater was obtained from a monitoring well, MCO-5, which is located in the flowpath of the discharge waters from the LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF). Water with elevated nitrate levels has been discharged from this plant for many years, until recently when the nitrate levels have been brought under the discharge limits. However, the historical discharge has resulted in a nitrate plume in the alluvial groundwater in this canyon. The LANL Multi-Barrier project was initiated this past year to develop a system of barriers that would prevent the transport of radionuclides, metals, colloids and other contaminants, including nitrate and perchlorate, further down the canyon in order to protect populations down-gradient. The biobarrier. will be part of this Multi-Barrier system. We have demonstrated the destruction of nitrate at levels up to 6.5-9.7 mhl nitrate (400-600 mg/L), and that of perchlorate at levels of about 4.3 microM perchlorate (350 ppb). We have quantified the populations of microorganisms present in the biofilm that develops on the biobarrier. The results of this research will be discussed along with other potential applications of this system

  20. REMEDIATION OF NITRATE-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER USING A BIOBARRIER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. STRIETELMEIER; M. ESPINOSA

    2001-01-01

    A biobarrier system has been developed for use in remediating shallow alluvial groundwater. This barrier is made from highly porous materials that are relatively long-lasting, carbon-based (to supply a limiting nutrient in nitrate destruction, in most cases), extremely inexpensive, and easy to replace. In a series of laboratory studies, we have determined the effectiveness of this barrier at destroying nitrate and perchlorate in groundwater from Mortandad Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This groundwater was obtained from a monitoring well, MCO-5, which is located in the flowpath of the discharge waters from the LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF). Water with elevated nitrate levels was discharged from this plant for many years. Recently, the nitrate levels have been brought under the discharge limits. However, the historical discharge has resulted in a nitrate plume in the alluvial groundwater in this canyon. The LANL Multi-Barrier project was initiated in 1999 to develop a system of barriers that would prevent the transport of radionuclides, metals, colloids and other contaminants, including nitrate and perchlorate, further down the canyon in order to protect populations down-gradient. The biobarrier will be part of this Multi-Barrier system. We have demonstrated the destruction of nitrate at levels up to 6.5-9.7 mM nitrate (400-600 mg/L), and that of perchlorate at levels of about 4.3 {micro}M perchlorate (350 ppb). We have quantified the populations of microorganisms present in the biofilm that develops on the biobarrier. The results of this research will be discussed along with other potential applications of this system.

  1. REMEDIATION OF NITRATE-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER USING A BIOBARRIER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. STRIETELMEIR; ET AL

    2000-12-01

    A biobarrier system has been developed for use in remediating shallow alluvial groundwater. This barrier is made from highly porous materials that are relatively long-lasting, carbon-based (to supply a limiting nutrient in nitrate destruction, in most cases), and extremely inexpensive and easy to emplace. In a series of laboratory studies, we have determined the effectiveness of this barrier at destroying nitrate and perchlorate in groundwater from Mortandad Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This groundwater was obtained from a monitoring well, MCO-5, which is located in the flowpath of the discharge waters from the LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF). Water with elevated nitrate levels has been discharged from this plant for many years, until recently when the nitrate levels have been brought under the discharge limits. However, the historical discharge has resulted in a nitrate plume in the alluvial groundwater in this canyon. The LANL Multi-Barrier project was initiated this past year to develop a system of barriers that would prevent the transport of radionuclides, metals, colloids and other contaminants, including nitrate and perchlorate, further down the canyon in order to protect populations down-gradient. The biobarrier. will be part of this Multi-Barrier system. We have demonstrated the destruction of nitrate at levels up to 6.5-9.7 mhl nitrate (400-600 mg/L), and that of perchlorate at levels of about 4.3 {micro}M perchlorate (350 ppb). We have quantified the populations of microorganisms present in the biofilm that develops on the biobarrier. The results of this research will be discussed along with other potential applications of this system.

  2. Low serum total nitrite and nitrate levels in severe leptospirosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kalugalage, Thilini; Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Vithanage, Thamal; Somaratne, Pranitha; de Silva, H. Janaka; Handunnetti, Shiroma; Rajapakse, Senaka

    2013-01-01

    Background The relationship between inducible nitric oxide synthatase activity and disease severity in leptospirosis is unclear. Nitric oxide is converted to nitrites and nitrates, thus nitrite and nitrate levels (NOx) in serum are considered surrogate markers for nitric oxide. NOx are excreted through the kidneys, and elimination is diminished in renal impairment. We assessed the correlation of NOx with disease severity in patients with leptospirosis, compared with healthy controls and non-l...

  3. Radiolysis studies of uranyl nitrate solution in nitric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiolysis of acidic uranyl nitrate solutions was investigated using Co-60 gamma radiation. Hydrogen peroxide was determined as a function of increasing dose. The UV-vis absorption spectra of the irradiated solutions were measured and the spectral changes were analyzed. The increasing dose increases the absorbance intensities, possibly by an increment in nitrate concentration produced by radiolysis, which can originate the formation of different uranyl complexes in solution. (author)

  4. Nitrate assimilation in plant shoots depends on photorespiration

    OpenAIRE

    Rachmilevitch, Shimon; Cousins, Asaph B.; Bloom, Arnold J.

    2004-01-01

    Photorespiration, a process that diminishes net photosynthesis by ≈25% in most plants, has been viewed as the unfavorable consequence of plants having evolved when the atmosphere contained much higher levels of carbon dioxide than it does today. Here we used two independent methods to show that exposure of Arabidopsis and wheat shoots to conditions that inhibited photorespiration also strongly inhibited nitrate assimilation. Thus, nitrate assimilation in both dicotyledonous and monocotyledono...

  5. Multiparameter emergency-situation evaluation system for nitration processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakhnenko, V.I.; Serov, Y.V.; Ulanov, V.N. [Technological Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1992-08-10

    Nitration is widely used in making drugs, vitamins, dyes, perfumery components, corrosion inhibitors to be added to engine fuels, and additives for fuels to raise the cetane numbers. In nitration systems, emergency control measures may be based on majority-logic processing (two out of three), which improves the probability of fault-free operation in the protection system. The theoretical concepts are supported by experiments and calculations. 18 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Nitrates and Nitrites in the Treatment of Ischemic Cardiac Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Nossaman, Vaughn E.; Nossaman, Bobby D.; Kadowitz, Philip J.

    2010-01-01

    The organic nitrite, amyl of nitrite, was initially used as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of angina pectoris in 1867, but was replaced over a decade later by the organic nitrate, nitroglycerin (NTG), due to the ease of administration and longer duration of action. The administration of organic nitrate esters, such as NTG, continues to be used in the treatment of angina pectoris and heart failure during the birth of modern pharmacology. The clinical effectiveness is due to vasodilator a...

  7. Sucrose mimics the light induction of Arabidopsis nitrate reductase gene transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Chi-Lien; Acedo, Gregoria N; Kristensen, Michael;

    1992-01-01

    Nitrate reductase, the first enzyme in nitrate assimilation, is located at the crossroad of two energy-consuming pathways: nitrate assimilation and carbon fixation. Light, which regulates the expression of many higher-plant carbon fixation genes, also regulates nitrate reductase gene expression. ...

  8. Bioactive nanocrystalline wollastonite synthesized by sol–gel combustion method by using eggshell waste as calcium source

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    U Anjaneyulu; S Sasikumar

    2014-04-01

    The sol–gel combustion method was employed to synthesize the nanocrystalline wollastonite by taking the raw eggshell powder as a calcium source and TEOS as a source of silicate. Glycine was used as a reductant or fuel and nitrate ions present in metal nitrate acts as an oxidizer. The phase purity of the wollastonite was analysed by powder XRD and the product is found to contain single-phasic wollastonite. FT–IR spectrum shows the characteristic peaks of the functional groups present in the wollastonite. SEM images show that particles are agglomerated and the particle size is found to be in the nanoregime. The calcination temperature was optimized based on the thermal analysis of the precursor. The bioactivity of wollastonite was investigated by immersing the scaffold in a simulated body fluid for 15 days at 37°C and intermediate analysis of the surface by XRD shows the deposition of hydroxyapatite layer after 5 days.

  9. Nitrate from agriculture: moving from uncertain data to operational responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Alwyn; Bieroza, Magdalena

    2015-04-01

    The Nitrates Directive (91/676/EEC) is designed to protect waters against nitrate pollution from agricultural sources. It requires Member States to identify waters which are, or could become, polluted by nitrates and to designate as Nitrate Vulnerable Zones (NVZs) all land draining to those waters and contributing to the pollution. To meet these requirements, Department for Environment Food & Rural Affairs (Defra) have commissioned reviews that designated NVZs in 1993, 1998, 2002, 2008 and 2013. The designation methods used have evolved over this time and have been developed with the close involvement of farming and water company representatives and with advice and guidance from a number of independent external technical experts. The monitoring network and methods change frequently and methods need to be developed which are robust enough to cope with gaps in data, both geographical and temporal. This project is aimed at investigating new approaches for identifying waters that are at risk of nitrate pollution and the land that drains to these and builds on a large body of evidence supporting understanding of nitrate in the environment. The work will demonstrate to Defra and to the wider community that the most cost efficient and appropriate methods to designate NVZ areas for groundwater and surface water are used.

  10. Photochemistry of adsorbed nitrate on aluminum oxide particle surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubasinghege, Gayan; Grassian, Vicki H

    2009-07-01

    Nitrogen oxides, including nitrogen dioxide and nitric acid, react with mineral dust particles in the atmosphere to yield adsorbed nitrate. Although nitrate ion is a well-known chromophore in natural waters, little is known about the surface photochemistry of nitrate adsorbed on mineral particles. In this study, nitrate adsorbed on aluminum oxide, a model system for mineral dust aerosol, is irradiated with broadband light (lambda > 300 nm) as a function of relative humidity (RH) in the presence of molecular oxygen. Upon irradiation, the nitrate ion readily undergoes photolysis to yield nitrogen-containing gas-phase products including NO(2), NO, and N(2)O, with NO being the major product. The relative ratio and product yields of these gas-phase products change with RH, with N(2)O production being highest at the higher relative humidities. Furthermore, an efficient dark reaction readily converts the major NO product into NO(2) during post-irradiation. Photochemical processes on mineral dust aerosol surfaces have the potential to impact the chemical balance of the atmosphere, yet little is known about these processes. In this study, the impact that adsorbed nitrate photochemistry may have on the renoxification of the atmosphere is discussed. PMID:19534452

  11. Immobilization of sodium nitrate waste with polymers: Topical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the development of solidification systems for sodium nitrate waste. Sodium nitrate waste was solidified in the polymers polyethylene, polyester-styrene (PES), and water-extendible polyester-styrene (WEP). Evaluations were made of the properties of waste forms containing various amounts of sodium nitrate by leaching immersion in water, measuring compressive strengths and by the EPA Extraction Procedure. Results of the leaching test are presented as cumulative fraction leached (CFL), incremental leaching rate, and average leaching indices (LI). For waste forms containing 30 to 70 wt% sodium nitrate, the CFL ranged from 9.0 x 10-3 to 7.3 x 10-1 and the LI from 11 to 7.8. After ninety days immersion in water, the compressive strengths ranged from 720 psi to 2550 psi. The nitrate releases from these samples using the EPA Extraction Procedure were below 500 ppM. The nitrate releases from PES waste forms were similar to those from polyethylene waste forms at the same waste loadings. The compressive yield strengths, measured after ninety-day immersion in water, ranged between 2070 and 7710 psi. In the case of WEP waste forms, only 30 wt% loaded samples passed the immersion test. 23 refs., 24 figs., 12 tabs

  12. Denitrifying Bioreactors for Nitrate Removal: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addy, Kelly; Gold, Arthur J; Christianson, Laura E; David, Mark B; Schipper, Louis A; Ratigan, Nicole A

    2016-05-01

    Meta-analysis approaches were used in this first quantitative synthesis of denitrifying woodchip bioreactors. Nitrate removal across environmental and design conditions was assessed from 26 published studies, representing 57 separate bioreactor units (i.e., walls, beds, and laboratory columns). Effect size calculations weighted the data based on variance and number of measurements for each bioreactor unit. Nitrate removal rates in bed and column studies were not significantly different, but both were significantly higher than wall studies. In denitrifying beds, wood source did not significantly affect nitrate removal rates. Nitrate removal (mass per volume) was significantly lower in beds with effects with bed temperature; a of 2.15 was quite similar to other studies. Lessons from this meta-analysis can be incorporated into bed designs, especially extending hydraulic retention times to increase nitrate removal under low temperature and high flow conditions. Additional column studies are warranted for comparative assessments, as are field-based studies for assessing in situ conditions, especially in aging beds, with careful collection and reporting of design and environmental data. Future assessment of these systems might take a holistic view, reviewing nitrate removal in conjunction with other processes, including greenhouse gas and other unfavorable by-product production. PMID:27136153

  13. Nitrate-transformations during simulated drought on a restored floodplain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoagland, B.; Russo, T. A.; Schmidt, C. M.; Tran, D.

    2015-12-01

    Water resources in the California Central Valley face challenges due to recurring drought, aging levee systems, and nitrate contamination. As decisions are made to restore floodplain connectivity, soil microbial metabolic pathways such as denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) transform nitrate under saturated soil conditions and may each affect downstream water quality. However, few studies have quantified the contribution of all three pathways to nitrate retention in freshwater systems, and specifically in restored floodplains. Additionally, no former studies quantify the rates of these microbial nitrate transformations during floods after prolonged periods of drought. To test how flood duration impacts nitrogen cycling we added 15N-enriched tracer to soil mesocosms to measure denitrification, anammox, and DNRA transformation rates. In July 2015, we extracted seven soil mesocosms from the floodplain and riverbed of the Lower Cosumnes River in the San Joaquin Basin of California. Cosumnes River water enriched with 15N-NO3- tracer was pumped into each mesocosm at a constant rate simulating flood durations of 20 h, 30 h, and 96 h. Samples were collected from the surface water, soil pore water, drain water, and sediment for measurements of NO3-, NO2-, NH4+, gas isotopes, and DNA extraction. This study aims to demonstrate the relevance of anammox and DNRA to total nitrate retention and characterize the hydrologic conditions most favorable to each pathway.

  14. Effect of nitrate poisoning on some biochemical parameters in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Mahmood

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to investigate the toxicity of potassium nitrate on glucose, cholesterol, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, and the possible ameliorative effect of ascorbic acid (Vitamin C. Male Wister rats are used as experimental model divided into three groups (each of 6-8 rats and treated for six weeks as follows: Group 1: served as control; Group 2: received 2 % potassium nitrate added to the forage and Group 3: received 2 % potassium nitrate together with 1 % ascorbic acid added to rat's forage. Nitrate treatment in group 2 leads to high significant increase levels of glucose in 3rd, 4th, and 5th weeks, cholesterol level increased significantly in both 4th and 5th weeks, while ALT levels increased in the 4th, 5th and 6th weeks, and AST increased significantly in the 5th and 6th weeks. Addition of ascorbic acid with potassium nitrate, lead to reverse all the parameters nearly to normal. It was concluded that potassium nitrate causes significant toxic effect on some biochemical parameters which was ameliorated by ascorbic acid.

  15. Tidal pumping facilitates dissimilatory nitrate reduction in intertidal marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yanling; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Min; Liu, Zhanfei; Li, Xiaofei; Lin, Xianbiao; Yin, Guoyu; Gao, Juan; Yu, Chendi; Wang, Rong; Jiang, Xiaofen

    2016-02-01

    Intertidal marshes are alternately exposed and submerged due to periodic ebb and flood tides. The tidal cycle is important in controlling the biogeochemical processes of these ecosystems. Intertidal sediments are important hotspots of dissimilatory nitrate reduction and interacting nitrogen cycling microorganisms, but the effect of tides on dissimilatory nitrate reduction, including denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium, remains unexplored in these habitats. Here, we use isotope-tracing and molecular approaches simultaneously to show that both nitrate-reduction activities and associated functional bacterial abundances are enhanced at the sediment-tidal water interface and at the tide-induced groundwater fluctuating layer. This pattern suggests that tidal pumping may sustain dissimilatory nitrate reduction in intertidal zones. The tidal effect is supported further by nutrient profiles, fluctuations in nitrogen components over flood-ebb tidal cycles, and tidal simulation experiments. This study demonstrates the importance of tides in regulating the dynamics of dissimilatory nitrate-reducing pathways and thus provides new insights into the biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen and other elements in intertidal marshes.

  16. Characterisation of occupational exposure to air contaminants in a nitrate fertiliser production plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovland, Kristin H; Thomassen, Yngvar; Skaugset, Nils Petter; Skyberg, Knut; Skogstad, Marit; Bakke, Berit

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise personal exposures to dust, acid vapours, and gases among workers in a Norwegian nitrate fertiliser production plant, as part of an ongoing epidemiological study. In total, 178 inhalable and 179 thoracic aerosol mass fraction samples were collected from randomly chosen workers (N = 141) from three compound fertiliser departments (A, B and C), a calcium nitrate fertiliser production department, nitric acid- and ammonia-production departments, and a shipping department. The overall median inhalable and thoracic aerosol mass concentrations were generally low (1.1 mg m(-3) (min-max: production goes from raw material with phosphate rock towards the final product of fertilisers. Overall, the arithmetic mean of water-soluble Ca in the thoracic mass fraction was 51% (min-max: 1-100). A total of 169 personal samples were analysed for HNO(3) vapour and HF. The highest median concentration of HNO(3) (0.63 mg m(-3)) was in the compound fertiliser departments B, and all measurements but four of the HF concentrations were below the LOD of 190 μg m(-3). Exposures to NH(3), CO and NO(2) were measured using direct-reading electrochemical sensors and the time weighted overall averages were all below the LODs of the respective sensors, NH(3) 2 ppm; CO 2 ppm; and NO(2) 0.2 ppm, but some short-term peaks were detected. Even though our results indicate that the workers may experience peak exposure episodes when performing job tasks such as cleaning or maintenance work, the overall air concentrations are well below what is considered to cause known health risks. PMID:22777595

  17. Use of the δ18O and δ15N of nitrate to determine sources of nitrate in early spring runoff in forested catchments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many upland catchments have increased nitrate and hydrogen ion concentrations in stream water during the early snowmelt period. The dominant source of this nitrate is not well known, but likely contributors include atmospheric deposition of nitrate and ammonium in the snowpack, and soil derived nitrate. Pilot studies initiated in three catchments during the 1994 snowmelt season show that analysis of both the δ18O and δ15N of nitrate provides excellent separation of nitrate sources. Almost all the stream samples have nitrate δ18O and δ15N values within the range of the pre-melt soil and stream waters, suggesting that atmospheric nitrate eluted from the 1994 snowpack is a minor source of nitrate in early streamflow. Therefore, the nitrate eluted from the 1994 snowpack appears to go into storage, and most of the nitrate in streamflow during the period of potential acidification was derived from pre-melt sources. The δ18O of pre-melt nitrate in soil and stream waters is intermediate between the compositions of atmospheric and solid derived nitrate, indicating a mixture of sources. The enriched composition of the pre-melt nitrate suggests that either atmospheric nitrate is actually a dominant source of nitrate to the catchment on a yearly basis, or that there is recharge of shallow storage by percolating snowmelt during midwinter thaws. In either case, the nitrate pulse in stream water during early melt appears to be largely derived from precipitation from previous months or years that is flushed from storage. (author). 12 refs, 2 figs

  18. 3D Computational Simulation of Calcium Leaching in Cement Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaitero, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Calcium leaching is a degradation process consisting in progressive dissolution of the cement paste by migration of calcium atoms to the aggressive solution. It is therefore, a complex phenomenon involving several phases and dissolution and diffusion processes simultaneously. Along this work, a new computational scheme for the simulation of the degradation process in three dimensions was developed and tested. The toolkit was used to simulate accelerated calcium leaching by a 6M ammonium nitrate solution in cement matrices. The obtained outputs were the three dimensional representation of the matrix and the physicochemical properties of individual phases as a consequence of the degradation process. This not only makes it possible to study the evolution of such properties as a function of time but also as a function of the position within the matrix. The obtained results are in good agreement with experimental values of the elastic modulus in degraded and undegraded samples.El lixiviado de calcio es un proceso de degradación consistente en la disolución progresiva de la pasta de cemento por la migración de los átomos de calcio a la disolución agresiva. Se trata por tanto de un fenómeno complejo que involucra simultáneamente diferentes fases y procesos de disolución y difusión. En este trabajo se desarrolló y probó una nueva herramienta computacional para la simulación del proceso de degradación en tres dimensiones. Para ello se simuló el lixiviado de calcio acelerado provocado por una disolución de nitrato amónico 6M en matrices de cemento. Como resultado se obtuvieron la representación tridimensional de la matriz y las propiedades físico-químicas sus fases a lo largo del tiempo. Esto permitió estudiar la evolución de dichas propiedades a lo largo del proceso de degradación así como en función de su posición dentro de la matriz. Los resultados obtenidos coinciden con los valores experimentales del módulo elástico tanto

  19. Monitoring of nitrate content of vegetable crops in Uzhgorod district

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.I. Mykaylo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our research was to conduct a monitoring study of nitrate content in plant products of Uzhgorod district and to accomplish comparative analysis of the survey results in different periods of crop ripening. Selection of vegetable samples was carried out in Uzhgorod district in the early spring and summer periods. Determination of the nitrate content was performed using an ion-selective method at the Chemical and Toxicological Department of the Regional State Veterinary Medicine Laboratory in the Transcarpathian region of Ukraine. Vegetables were tested for nitrate content using the ion-selective method with the laboratory ion meter AI-123. Core investigation samples were crushed and homogenized. A 10.0 g weight of the investigated product, which was prepared according to MIR № 5048-89, was placed in a flat-bottomed or a conical flask, which was then filled with 50 cm3 potassium alumens solution and shaken in a shaking-machine for 5 minutes and then transferred into a measuring glass. The nitrate weight fraction in milligrams per kilogram was obtained together with the weight concentration value of nitrate ions in solution. For our study we selected vegetables grown in both public and private gardens of Uzhgorod district, namely: common onions, radishes, garden parsley, cucumbers, tomatoes, bell peppers, white cabbages, carrots and table beets. 25 samples were selected for each type of vegetable. Nitrate content was determined in the early spring growing period (from February 9 to May 27, 2011 and in the summer growing period (from June 3 to September 28, 2011, because in these particular periods we recorded the most frequent cases of food poisoning from nitrates among the population of the region. A clear trend has been traced towards increasing the nitrate content in food plant production, at levels which exceed the maximum permissible concentration (MPC. The results of our research demonstrate that the nitrate content exceeded the

  20. Calcium and Vitamin D: Important at Every Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... supported by your browser. Home Bone Basics Nutrition Calcium and Vitamin D: Important at Every Age Publication ... Osteoporosis Program For Your Information The Role of Calcium Calcium is needed for our heart, muscles, and ...