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Sample records for calcium lime mortars

  1. Consolidation of weak lime mortars by means of saturated solution of calcium hydroxide or barium hydroxide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slížková, Zuzana; Drdácký, Miloš; Viani, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 4 (2015), s. 452-460 ISSN 1296-2074 R&D Projects: GA MK(CZ) DF11P01OVV012; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : lime water * barium water * lime mortar * consolidation * peeling test * mechanical characteristic * physical characteristic * metakaolin Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage Impact factor: 1.533, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1296207414001150

  2. Durability of air lime mortar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    This contribution deals with the physical and chemical reasons why pure air lime mortars used in masonry of burned bricks exposed to outdoor climate have shown to be durable from the Middle Ages to our days. This sounds strange in modern times where pure air lime mortars are regarded as weak...... materials, which are omitted from standards for new masonry buildings, where use of hydraulic binders is prescribed. The reasons for the durability seam to be two: 1. The old mortars have high lime contents. 2. The carbonation process creates a pore structure with a fine pored outer layer and coarser pores...

  3. Influence of the mechanical properties of lime mortar on the strength of brick masonry

    OpenAIRE

    PAVIA, SARA

    2013-01-01

    PUBLISHED This paper aims at improving the quality of lime mortar masonry by understanding the mechanics of mortars and masonry and their interaction. It investigates how the mortar?s compressive and flexural strengths impact the compressive and bond strength of clay brick masonry bound with calcium lime (CL) and natural hydraulic lime (NHL) mortars. It concludes that the strength of the bond has a greater impact on the compressive strength of masonry than the mortar?s st...

  4. Potential Use Of Carbide Lime Waste As An Alternative Material To Conventional Hydrated Lime Of Cement-Lime Mortars

    OpenAIRE

    Al Khaja, Waheeb A.

    1992-01-01

    The present study aimed at the possibility of using the carbide lime waste as an alternative material to the conventional lime used for cement-lime mortar. The waste is a by-product obtained in the generation of acetylene from calcium carbide. Physical and chemical properties of the wastes were studied. Two cement-lime-sand mix proportions containing carbide lime waste were compared with the same mix proportions containing conventional lime along with a control mix without lime. Specimens wer...

  5. A nano approach to consolidation of degraded historic lime mortars

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drdácký, Miloš; Slížková, Zuzana; Ziegenbalg, G.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 2 (2009), s. 13-22 ISSN 1662-5250 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA103/06/1609 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Keywords : lime water * calcium hydroxide nanosuspension * lime mortar Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage Impact factor: 0.571, year: 2009

  6. Simple Analysis of Historical Lime Mortars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Joa~o

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is described in which a simple characterization of a historical lime mortar is made by the determination of its approximate composition by a gravimetric method. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) are also used for the qualitative characterization of the lime mortar components. These…

  7. Simulation of the self-healing of dolomitic lime mortar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubelli, B.; Nijland, T.G.; Hees, R.P.J. van

    2012-01-01

    A test procedure was set up to reproduce laboratory self-healing on lime-based (both pure calcium and magnesium-calcium) mortar specimens. After a few months of testing, during which time the specimens were submitted to wet-dry cycles, thin sections of the specimens were prepared and observed using

  8. Simulation of self-healing of dolomitic lime mortar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubelli, B.; Nijland, T.G.; Van Hees, R.P.J.

    2011-01-01

    In the present research a test procedure was set up to reproduce self-healing on lime-based (both pure calcium and magnesium-calcium) mortar specimens in laboratory. After few months testing, during which the specimens were subjected to wet-dry cycles, thin sections of the specimens were prepared

  9. Recycled sand in lime-based mortars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanidou, M; Anastasiou, E; Georgiadis Filikas, K

    2014-12-01

    The increasing awareness of the society about safe guarding heritage buildings and at the same time protecting the environment promotes strategies of combining principles of restoration with environmentally friendly materials and techniques. Along these lines, an experimental program was carried out in order to investigate the possibility of producing repair, lime-based mortars used in historic buildings incorporating secondary materials. The alternative material tested was recycled fine aggregates originating from mixed construction and demolition waste. Extensive tests on the raw materials have been performed and mortar mixtures were produced using different binding systems with natural, standard and recycled sand in order to compare their mechanical, physical and microstructure properties. The study reveals the improved behavior of lime mortars, even at early ages, due to the reaction of lime with the Al and Si constituents of the fine recycled sand. The role of the recycled sand was more beneficial in lime mortars rather than the lime-pozzolan or lime-pozzolan-cement mortars as a decrease in their performance was recorded in the latter cases due to the mortars' structure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Lime-water consolidation effects on poor lime mortars

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drdácký, Miloš; Slížková, Zuzana

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 1 (2012), s. 31-36 ISSN 0044-9466 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA103/09/2067 Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : lime mortar s * lime -water consolidation * conservation Subject RIV: JN - Civil Engineering

  11. Self-healing of lime based mortars : Microscopy observations on case studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubelli, B.; Nijland, T.G.; Van Hees, R.P.J.

    2011-01-01

    Lime mortars have, up to a certain extent, a self-healing capacity which may contribute to their durability. Self-healing in lime mortars consists of a process of dissolution, transport and re-precipitation of calcium compounds to heal cracks and fissures. The spontaneous occurrence of self-healing

  12. Self-healing of lime based mortars: Microscopy observations on case studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubelli, B.; Nijland, T.G.; Hees, R.P.J. van

    2011-01-01

    Lime mortars have, up to a certain extent, a self-healing capacity which may contribute to their durability. Self-healing in lime mortars consists of a process of dissolution, transport and re-precipitation of calcium compounds to heal cracks and fissures. The spontaneous occurrence of self-healing

  13. Comparative evaluation of aerial lime mortars for architectural conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Faria, Paulina; Henriques, Fernando M.A.; Rato, Vasco

    2008-01-01

    Journal of Cultural Heritage 9 (2008) 338-346 International bibliography on conservation usually refers that mortars made with lime putty with long extinction periods behave better than others made with the current dry hydrated limes. In order to evaluate this assess, an experimental study of lime mortars was carried out, using dry hydrated lime and two lime putties. It becomes clear that the use of lime putties with long extinction periods in mortars allow better performances, pa...

  14. Study of sticky rice-lime mortar technology for the restoration of historical masonry construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fuwei; Zhang, Bingjian; Ma, Qinglin

    2010-06-15

    mortar is a special organic-inorganic composite material. The inorganic component is calcium carbonate, and the organic component is amylopectin, which is presumably derived from the sticky rice soup added to the mortar. A systematic study of sticky rice-lime mortar technology was conducted to help determine the proper courses of action in restoring ancient buildings. Lime mortars with varying sticky rice content were prepared and tested. The physical properties, mechanical strength, and compatibility of lime mortar were found to be significantly improved by the introduction of sticky rice, suggesting that sticky rice-lime mortar is a suitable material for repairing mortar in ancient masonry. Moreover, the amylopectin in the lime mortar was found to act as an inhibitor; the growth of the calcium carbonate crystals is controlled by its presence, and a compact structure results, which may explain the enhanced performance of this organic-inorganic composite compared to single-component lime mortar.

  15. Modification of Lime Mortars with Synthesized Aluminosilicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganina, Valentina I.; Sadovnikova, Marija E.; Jezierski, Walery; Małaszkiewicz, Dorota

    2017-10-01

    The increasing attention for restoration of buildings of historical and architectural importance has increased the interest for lime-based binders, which could be applied for manufacturing repair mortars and plasters compatible with historical heritage. Different additives, admixtures or fibers may be incorporated to improve mechanical and thermal features of such materials. In this study synthesized aluminosilicates (SA) were applied as an additive for lime mortar. The technology of synthesis consisted in the deposition of aluminosilicates from a sodium liquid glass by the aluminum sulphate Al2(SO4)3. The goal of this investigation was developing a new method of aluminosilicates synthesis from a sodium liquid glass and using this new material as a component for a lime mortar. Aluminosilicates were precipitated from the solution of aluminum sulphate Al2(SO)3 and sodium silicate. SA were then used as an additive to calcareous compositions and their influence was tested. Mortars were prepared with commercial air lime and siliceous river sand. Air lime binder was replaced by 5 and 10 wt.% of SA. Calcareous composition specimens were formed at water/lime ratio 1.0. The following analyses were made: grain size distribution of SA, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), sorption properties, plastic strength and compressive strength of lime mortars. XRD pattern of the SA shows the presence of thenardite, gibbsite and amorphous phase represented by aggregate of nano-size cristobalite-like crystallites. Application of SA leads to increase of compressive strength after 90 days of hardening by 28% and 53% at SA content 5 and 10% respectively comparing to specimens without this additive. Contents of chemically bound lime in the reference specimens after 28 days of hardening in air-dry conditions was 46.5%, while in specimens modified with SA contained 50.0-55.3% of bound lime depending on filtrate pH. This testifies to high activity of calcareous composition. The new blended lime

  16. Earth mortars and earth-lime renders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernandes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Earth surface coatings play a decorative architectural role, apart from their function as wall protection. In Portuguese vernacular architecture, earth mortars were usually applied on stone masonry, while earth renders and plasters were used on indoors surface coatings. Limestone exists only in certain areas of the country and consequently lime was not easily available everywhere, especially on granite and schist regions where stone masonry was a current building technique. In the central west coast of Portugal, the lime slaking procedure entailed slaking the quicklime mixed with earth (sandy soil, in a pit; the resulting mixture would then be combined in a mortar or plaster. This was also the procedure for manufactured adobes stabilized with lime. Adobe buildings with earth-lime renderings and plasters were also traditional in the same region, using lime putty and lime wash for final coat and decoration. Classic decoration on earth architecture from the 18th-19th century was in many countries a consequence of the François Cointeraux (1740-1830 manuals - Les Cahiers d'Architecture Rurale" (1793 - a French guide for earth architecture and building construction. This manual arrived to Portugal in the beginning of XIX century, but was never translated to Portuguese. References about decoration for earth houses were explained on this manual, as well as procedures about earth-lime renders and ornamentation of earth walls; in fact, these procedures are exactly the same as the ones used in adobe buildings in this Portuguese region. The specific purpose of the present paper is to show some cases of earth mortars, renders and plasters on stone buildings in Portugal and to explain the methods of producing earth-lime renders, and also to show some examples of rendering and coating with earth-lime in Portuguese adobe vernacular architecture.

  17. Effect of hydrated lime on compressive strength mortar of fly ash laterite soil geopolymer mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangsa, F. A.; Tjaronge, M. W.; Djamaluddin, A. R.; Muhiddin, A. B.

    2017-11-01

    This paper explored the suitability of fly ash, hydrated lime, and laterite soil with several activator (sodium hydroxide and sodium tiosulfate) to produce geopolymer mortar. Furthermore, the heat that released by hydrated lime was used instead of oven curing. In order to produce geopolymer mortar without oven curing, three variations of curing condition has been applied. Based on the result, all the curing condition showed that the hardener mortar can be produced and exhibited the increasing of compressive strength of geopolymer mortar from 3 days to 7 days without oven curing.

  18. Repair mortars based on lime. Accelerated aging tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Ramírez, S.

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available The behaviour under different accelerated aging tests (freeze/thaw and crystallization cycles of a new lime mortar with biocide properties destinated to monumental repair has been studied. New mortars (which have the biocide impregnated in a clay called sepiolite have a similar behaviour to lime mortars used as a reference. After the aging tests, the biocide properties of the mortars have been tried.

    Se ha estudiado el comportamiento frente a distintos ensayos de envejecimiento acelerado (ciclos de hielo/deshielo y cristalización de sales de un nuevo mortero de cal con propiedades biocidas, destinado a la reparación monumental. Se ha comprobado que los nuevos morteros (que llevan incorporado el biocida impregnado en una arcilla denominada sepiolita tienen un comportamiento muy similar a los morteros de cal utilizados como referencia. Tras los ensayos de envejecimiento se ha visto que las propiedades biocidas de los morteros se mantienen.

  19. Luminescence quartz dating of lime mortars. A first research approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacharias, N.; Mauz, B.; Michael, C.T.

    2002-01-01

    Lime mortars mixed with sand are well suited for connecting structural materials, like stones and bricks, due to the mechanical properties this material exhibits. Their extensive use in architectural and decorative works during the last 4000 years motivated the introduction of the 'Luminescence clock' for age determination of mortars. The same principles as for quartz optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of sediments were applied for age estimation of a mortar fragment removed from a Byzantine church monument dated by archaeological means to 1050-1100 years ago (the first half of the 10th century). The OSL from the quartz was monitored under blue light stimulation and UV detection, using a single-aliquot-regenerative-dose protocol. The quartz-OSL dating of the mortar resulted in 870±230 a. TL polymineral fine grain dating was also performed on a brick fragment which was connected to the mortar, resulting in a TL age of 1095±190 a. (author)

  20. Lime-pozzolana mortars in Roman catacombs: composition, structures and restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Moral, Sergio; Luque, Luis; Canaveras, Juan-Carlos; Soler, Vicente; Garcia-Guinea, Javier; Aparicio, Alfredo

    2005-01-01

    Analyses of microsamples collected from Roman catacombs and samples of lime-pozzolana mortars hardened in the laboratory display higher contents in carbonated binder than other subaerial Roman monuments. The measured environmental data inside the Saint Callistus and Domitilla catacombs show a constant temperature of 15-17 deg C, a high CO 2 content (1700 to 3500 ppm) and a relative humidity close to 100%. These conditions and particularly the high CO 2 concentration speed-up the lime calcitization roughly by 500% and reduce the cationic diffusion to form hydrous calcium aluminosilicates. The structure of Roman catacomb mortars shows (i) coarser aggregates and thicker beds on the inside, (ii) thin, smoothed, light and fine-grained external surfaces with low content of aggregates and (iii) paintings and frescoes on the outside. The observed high porosity of the mortars can be attributed to cracking after drying linked with the high binder content. Hardened lime lumps inside the binder denote low water/mortar ratios for slaking. The aggregate tephra pyroclasts rich in aluminosilicate phases with accessorial amounts of Ba, Sr, Rb, Cu and Pb were analysed through X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) and also by environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) to identify the size and distribution of porosity. Results support procedures using local materials, special mortars and classic techniques for restoration purposes in hypogeal backgrounds

  1. Freezing and thawing resistance of aerial lime mortar with metakaolin\

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nunes, Cristiana Lara; Slížková, Zuzana

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 114, July (2016), s. 896-905 ISSN 0950-0618 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP105/12/G059 Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : freeze-thaw * lime * metakaolin * linseed oil * mortar * water-repellency Subject RIV: JN - Civil Engineering Impact factor: 3.169, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0950061816305645

  2. Accelerator mass spectrometry 14C dating of lime mortars: Methodological aspects and field study applications at CIRCE (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzaioli, Fabio; Nonni, Sara; Passariello, Isabella; Capano, Manuela; Ricci, Paola; Lubritto, Carmine; De Cesare, Nicola; Eramo, Giacomo; Quirós Castillo, Juan Antonio; Terrasi, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental heritage (CIRCE) has, recently, obtained some promising results in testing the feasibility of mortar radiocarbon dating by means of an ad hoc developed purification procedure (CryoSoniC: Cryobraking, Sonication, Centrifugation) applied to a series of laboratory mortars. Observed results encouraged CryoSoniC accuracy evaluation on genuine mortars sampled from archeological sites of known or independently constrained age (i.e., other 14C dates on different materials). In this study, some 14C measurements performed on genuine mortars will be discussed and compared with independently estimated (i.e., radiocarbon/archaeometrical dating) absolute chronologies of two Spanish sites. Observed results confirm the agreement of the CryoSoniC mortar dates with the archaeological expectations for both examined cases. Several authors reported the possibility of obtaining accurate radiocarbon dates of mortar matrices by analyzing lime lumps: binder-related particles of different sizes exclusively composed of calcium carbonate. In this paper, preliminary data for the absolute chronology reconstruction of the Basilica of the cemetery complex of Ponte della Lama (Canosa di Puglia, Italy) based on lime lumps will also be discussed. Dating accuracy will be quantified by comparing 14C data on mortar lime lumps from a funerary inscription of known age found near the Basilica, in the same study site. For this site, a comparison between absolute chronologies performed by bulk and CryoSoniC purified lime lumps, and charcoal incased in mortars (when found) will also be discussed. Observed results for this site provide evidence of how bulk lime lump dating may introduce systematic overestimations of the analyzed sample while CryoSoniC purification allows accurate dating.

  3. Accelerator mass spectrometry {sup 14}C dating of lime mortars: Methodological aspects and field study applications at CIRCE (Italy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzaioli, Fabio, E-mail: fabio.marzaioli@unina2.it [CIRCE, INNOVA and Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli, Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Caserta (Italy); Nonni, Sara, E-mail: sara.nonni@uniroma1.it [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, ' Sapienza' Universita di Roma (Italy); Passariello, Isabella, E-mail: isabella.passariello@unina2.it [CIRCE, INNOVA and Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli, Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Caserta (Italy); Capano, Manuela, E-mail: manuela.capano@unina2.it [CIRCE, INNOVA and Dipartimento di Studio delle Componenti Culturali del Territorio, Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli, Santa Maria Capua Vetere, Caserta (Italy); Ricci, Paola, E-mail: paola.ricci@unina2.it [CIRCE, INNOVA and Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli, Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Caserta (Italy); Lubritto, Carmine, E-mail: carmine.lubritto@unina2.it [CIRCE, INNOVA and Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli, Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Caserta (Italy); De Cesare, Nicola, E-mail: nicola.decesare@unina2.it [CIRCE, INNOVA and Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli, Dipartimento di Scienze della Vita, Caserta (Italy); Eramo, Giacomo, E-mail: giacomo.eramo@uniba.it [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra e Geoambientali, Universita degli Studi di Bari ' Aldo Moro' , Bari (Italy); Quiros Castillo, Juan Antonio, E-mail: quiros.castillo@ehu.es [Universidad del Pais Vasco-Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Dipartimento di Geografia, Prehistoria y Arqueologia, Vitoria-Gasteiz (Spain); and others

    2013-01-15

    Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental heritage (CIRCE) has, recently, obtained some promising results in testing the feasibility of mortar radiocarbon dating by means of an ad hoc developed purification procedure (CryoSoniC: Cryobraking, Sonication, Centrifugation) applied to a series of laboratory mortars. Observed results encouraged CryoSoniC accuracy evaluation on genuine mortars sampled from archeological sites of known or independently constrained age (i.e., other {sup 14}C dates on different materials). In this study, some {sup 14}C measurements performed on genuine mortars will be discussed and compared with independently estimated (i.e., radiocarbon/archaeometrical dating) absolute chronologies of two Spanish sites. Observed results confirm the agreement of the CryoSoniC mortar dates with the archaeological expectations for both examined cases. Several authors reported the possibility of obtaining accurate radiocarbon dates of mortar matrices by analyzing lime lumps: binder-related particles of different sizes exclusively composed of calcium carbonate. In this paper, preliminary data for the absolute chronology reconstruction of the Basilica of the cemetery complex of Ponte della Lama (Canosa di Puglia, Italy) based on lime lumps will also be discussed. Dating accuracy will be quantified by comparing {sup 14}C data on mortar lime lumps from a funerary inscription of known age found near the Basilica, in the same study site. For this site, a comparison between absolute chronologies performed by bulk and CryoSoniC purified lime lumps, and charcoal incased in mortars (when found) will also be discussed. Observed results for this site provide evidence of how bulk lime lump dating may introduce systematic overestimations of the analyzed sample while CryoSoniC purification allows accurate dating.

  4. Strengthening Masonry Arches with Lime-Based Mortar Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Alecci

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, many strengthening interventions on masonry elements were performed by using fiber reinforced polymers (FRPs. These advanced materials proved to be effective to increase the load-carrying capacity of masonry elements and to improve their structural behavior, avoiding the most critical failure modes. Despite the advantages of this technique compared to more traditional methods, FRP systems have disadvantages related to their low resistance to high temperatures, impossibility of application on wet surfaces, low permeability, and poor compatibility with masonry supports. Therefore, composite materials made of a fiber textile embedded in an inorganic matrix were recently proposed as alternatives to FRPs for strengthening historic masonry constructions. These composite materials are easier to install, have higher resistance to high temperatures, and permit higher vapor permeability than FRPs. The inorganic matrix is frequently a cement-based mortar, and the composite materials made of a fiber textile embedded in a cement-based mortar are usually identified as FRCM (fabric reinforced cementitious matrix composites. More recently, the use of natural lime mortar as an inorganic matrix has been proposed as an alternative to cement-based mortars when historic compatibility with the substrate is strictly required, as in case of restoration of historic buildings. In this paper, the effectiveness of a fabric made of basalt fibers embedded in lime mortar matrix (Basalt-FRLM for the strengthening of masonry arches is investigated. An experimental investigation was performed on 1:2 scaled brick masonry arches strengthened at the extrados with a layer of Basalt-FRLM and tested under vertical load. The results obtained are compared with previous results obtained by the authors by testing masonry arches strengthened at their extrados with FRCM and FRP composites. This investigation highlights the effectiveness of Basalt-FRLM in increasing load

  5. Influence of water-repellent treatment on the properties lime and lime pozzolan mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fortes Revilla, C.

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence that water-repellent products can have on physical and micro-structural properties of lime mortars, and lime plus pozzolan mortars has been studied. Three water repellent products have been used. Mixes of the previously mentioned three water repellents plus a biocide product were also applied. Treatments make the total porosity and saturation coefficient of both mortars to decrease, while colorimetric coordinates bear little alteration. All treatments with water repellent products provided mortars with a hydrophobic property index close to 100%. Durability of such mortars has been also studied: salt crystallization test, frost-thaw and dry-wet cycles, as well as ultraviolet radiation test were carried out. Relationship between mortars behavior and their porosity and saturation coefficient were found.

    En el presente trabajo se ha estudiado la influencia de la aplicación de productos hidrofugantes a morteros de cal y morteros de cal y puzolana sobre sus propiedades físicas y microestructurales. Se han estudiado tres productos hidrofugantes. También han sido estudiados dichos productos junto con un biocida. La porosidad total y el coeficiente de saturación de ambos tipos de morteros se ve reducido por el efecto de los tratamientos mientras que las coordenadas colorimétricas se ven poco alteradas. Todos los tratamientos confieren un índice de hidrofobicidad a los morteros próximo al 100%. Asimismo, también se ha estudiado la durabilidad de dichos morteros frente a la cristalización de sales, hielo-deshielo, los ciclos de humedad-sequedad y radiaciones ultravioleta. Se relaciona el comportamiento de los morteros con su porosidad y el coeficiente de saturación.

  6. Characterization of historic lime mortars by neutron scattering and mercury porosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zouridakis, N.; Stefanopoulos, K.L.; Treimer, W.

    1999-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Lime mortars were commonly used in building from ancient Greek times through to the beginning of the nineteenth century [1]. In the past few years, the increased interest in conservation and restoration of historic monuments requires a better knowledge of the structure and composition of lime mortars resulting from the various additives, as well as the preparation technique each time used. Lime mortars from ancient Greek monuments have been dated by using the radiocarbon method [2]. Furthermore, a wide selection of lime mortars from known historic periods and monuments in Greece has been examined by mercury porosimetry. It was found that their structure depends on the utilization of the monument which come from. In specific, lime mortars coming from residences have more or less the same structure, whereas the preparation technique differs for lime mortars coming from tombs and walls. The weathering effects on the porous system of the mortars are studied by neutron scattering. (author) [1] Brown, P.W., and Clifton, J.R., 'Air pollution and conservation', eds. J. Roswall and S. Aleby, 225 (1988), Elsevier, Amsterdam.; [2] N. Zouridakis, J.F. Sliege, A. Person et al., Archaeometry, 60 (1987) 29

  7. A lime based mortar for thermal insulation of medieval church vaults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, P.K.; Hansen, Tessa Kvist

    A new mortar for thermal insulation of medieval church vaults was tested in a full scale experiment in Annisse Church, DK. The mortar consists of perlite, a highly porous aggregate, mixed with slaked lime. These materials are compatible with the fired clay bricks and the lime mortar joints....... The lambda-value of the insulation mortar is 0.08 W/m K or twice the lambda-value for mineral wool. The water vapour permeability is equal to a medieval clay brick, and it has three times higher capacity for liquid water absorption. The mortar was applied to the top side of the vaults in a thickness of 10 cm......, despite a water vapour pressure gradient up to 500 Pa between the nave and attic. There was no reduction in energy consumption the first winter, possibly due to the increased heat loss related to the drying of the mortar....

  8. Carbonation kinetics in roman-like lime mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez-Moral, S.

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic parameterisation of lime mortar carbonation is a useful technique for understanding ancient building methods and the long-lived physical-chemical stability of roman monuments. Portlandite (Ca(OH2 binders harden in the air on contact with atmospheric CO2, producing CaCO3. Water evaporation and the presence of silicate aggregates have a three-fold effect: prompting the development of a pore system that permits CO2, self-diffusion, reducing shrinkage and cracking during drying and (possibly giving rise to subsequent pozzolanic reactions. The present survey involved air-hardening a series of roman-like lime mortars which differed in terms of: (i type of aggregate, volcanic tephra and arkose; (ii aggregate/binder ratio, 1:2 as used in the catacombs and 1:4 as found in standard roman construction and (iii temperature, the 17 ºC prevailing in underground environments and the 30 ºC typical of warm Mediterranean areas. The analyses that provided the most useful information were performed in a classic X-ray diffractometer adapted to accommodate an author-designed chamber in which temperature control was achieved by an internal refrigerant and a PID-governed electrical heater Additional data were obtained with DTA and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM. The tests conducted on the Roman-like lime mortars manufactured for the experiment showed that the hardening temperature is a critical factor in the initial phases of carbonation. Calcite precipitation rates and total mineral precipitation increased with temperature, but fell very quickly as calcite precipitated. In theoretical calculations assuming an open reactor with continuous CO2, input, total calcitisation time was found to be 156 m in. at 30 ºC and 175 min. at 17 ºC, whilst in the mortars actually hardened in the experimental part of the study, calcitisation gradually blocked the flow or CO2, gas into the

  9. Limiting salt crystallization damage in lime mortar by using crystallization modifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granneman, S.J.C.; Shahidzadeh, N.; Lubelli, B.A.; Hees, R.P.J. van

    2014-01-01

    Salt crystallization is a recurrent cause of damage in porous building materials. Lime-based mortars, which were widely used in construction of ancient masonry, are especially prone to salt damage, due to their low mechanical strength. Existing solutions to tackle salt damage in mortars have been

  10. Investigation of Hydraulic Binding Characteristics of Lime Based Mortars Used in Historical Masonry Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binal, Adil

    2017-10-01

    In the historic masonry structures, hard and large rock fragments were used as the construction materials. The hydraulic binder material prepared to keep this used material in its entirety is a different material than the cement used today. Khorasan mortar made by using aggregate and lime exhibits a more flexible structure than the concrete. This feature allows the historic building to be more durable. There is also a significant industrial value because of the use of Khorasan mortar in the restoration of historic masonry structures. Therefore, the calculation of the ideal mixture of Khorasan mortar and the determination of its mechanical and physical properties are of great importance regarding preserving historic buildings. In this study, the mixtures of different lime and brick fractions were prepared. It was determined that Khorasan mortar shows the highest compressive strength in mixtures with water/lime ratio of 0.55 and lime/aggregate ratio of 0.66. By keeping the mixing ratio constant, it was observed that the strengths of the samples kept in the humidity chamber for different curing times increased day by day. The early strength values of samples with the high lime/aggregate ratio (l/a: 0.83) were higher than those with the low lime/aggregate ratio (l/a: 0.5). For the samples with low lime/aggregate ratio, there was an increase in the strength values depending on the curing period. As the cure duration increases, a chemical reaction takes place between the lime and the brick fracture, and as a result of this reaction, the strength values are increased.

  11. HEAT INSULATING LIME DRY MORTARS FOR FINISHING OF WALLS MADE OF FOAM CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loganina Valentina Ivanovna

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Different aerated mortars are used for pargeting of walls made of aerated concrete. Though the regulatory documents don’t specify the dependence of plaster density from the density grade of gas-concrete blocks. In case of facing of gas-concrete blocks with the grade D500 using plaster mortars with the density 1400…1600 km/m3 there occurs a dismatch in the values of thermal insulation and vapor permeability of the plaster and base. The authors suggest using dry mortars for finishing of gas-concrete block of the grades D500 и D600, which allow obtaining facing thermal insulating coatings. The efficiency of using four different high-porous additives in the lime dry mortar was compared. They were: hollow glass microspheres, aluminosilicate ash microspheres, expanded vermiculite sand, expanded pearlitic sand. The high efficiency of hollow glass microspheres in heat insulating finishing mortars compared to other fillers is proved.

  12. Mitigating salt damage in lime-based mortars with mixed-in crystallization modifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granneman, S.J.C.; Lubelli, B.; van Hees, R.P.J.; Quist, W.J.; Granneman, S.J.C.; van Hees, R.P.J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes some of the most important results of a four year PhD research on the use of crystallization modifiers mixed in lime mortar to mitigate salt crystallization damage. The research focused on two of the most damaging salts, sodium chloride and sodium sulfate, and suitable

  13. Mitigating salt damage in lime-based mortars with mixed-in crystallization modifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granneman, S.J.C.; Lubelli, B.; van Hees, R.P.J.; Laue, S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the most important results of a research project which
    focused on the use of crystallization modifiers mixed in lime mortar to mitigate
    salt crystallization damage. The research focused on two of the most damaging
    salts, sodium chloride and sodium sulfate, and

  14. Pozzolanic properties of brick powders and their effect on the properties of modified lime mortars

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Navrátilová, Eva; Rovnaníková, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 120, SEP 1 (2016), s. 530-539 ISSN 0950-0618 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : materials Science * pozzolanic activity * amorphous phase * modified lime mortars * compressive strength Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.169, year: 2016

  15. Characterization of lime mortar additivated with crystallization modifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granneman, S.J.C.; Lubelli, B.; van Hees, R.P.J.

    2018-01-01

    Additivating mortars with crystallization modifiers is a novel approach to mitigate salt crystallization damage in historic masonry. Once verified the effectiveness of crystallization modifiers in bulk solution, the next step consists in verifying whether: (i) modifiers are still effective when

  16. Effect of chitosan ethers on fresh state properties of lime mortars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyšvařil, M.; Žižlavský, T.

    2017-10-01

    The fresh state properties of mortars are eminently important since determine the material workability and also have a great influence on its hardened state characteristics. In this paper, the behaviour of fresh lime mortars modified by etherified derivatives of chitosan (hydroxypropylchitosan (HPCH) and carboxymethylchitosan (CMCH)) is assessed with the purpose of exploring a new application of such derivatives as lime mortar admixtures. The rheological parameters (relative yield stress, consistency coefficient and fluidity index) and viscoelastic properties were correlated with flow table tests, relative density measurements, water retention abilities of mortars and air content in mortars. Results were seen to be strongly dependent on substituents of the chitosan. Non-ionic derivative (HPCH) had a plasticizing influence on the mortars; the ionic CMCH showed the thickening effect. The effect of chitosan ethers was found to be dosage-dependent. CMCH had low impact on water retention, while HPCH displayed high water retention capability. It was concluded, that the ionic derivative (CMCH) is very similar by its viscosity enhancing effect to starch ether.

  17. Mortar and concrete based on calcium sulphate binders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, J.J.F.; Brouwers, H.J.H.; Fischer, H.B

    2006-01-01

    In this study both hemi-hydrate and anhydrite are tested as calcium sulphate binders for structural mortar and concrete. The advantage of using calcium sulphates instead of cement as a binder is the fact that the production of calcium sulphate is more environmental friendly than that of cement. For

  18. Masonry repair lime-based mortars: factors affecting the mechanical behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanas, J.; Alvarez-Galindo, Jose I.

    2003-01-01

    The increasing use of lime-based mortars for the restoration of historic buildings and structures justifies the research on these materials. The focus of this paper is the effect of technological variables on pore structure and mechanical properties of lime-based mortars. The influence of curing time, binder-aggregate (B/Ag) ratio, aggregate attributes and porosity is discussed. Mortars prepared with aerial lime, varying aggregate types and B/Ag ratios ranging from 1:1 to 1:5 by volume were tested. Compressive and flexural strength measurements, as well as X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermal studies, were performed after 3, 7, 28, 91, 182 and 365 days. A strong increase in strength of mortar mixtures after 365 curing days (as compared to 28 curing days) is found. In spite of the fact that larger amounts of binder increase the total porosity, the strength of these mixtures is also increased. A good interlocked structure is obtained as binder contents increase. Also, higher porosities allow better portlandite carbonation. A relationship between mechanical properties and pore structure was established. However, in case of binder excess, the increase in voids leads to a strength reduction. The use of calcareous aggregates improves strength more as compared to the use of siliceous aggregates. Factors as grain size distribution and grain shape of the aggregates have also been considered

  19. Characterization of Historica Lime Mortar from the Spanish Colonial Period in the Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Michael C. Cayme

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Detailed scientific research applied to the field of cultural heritage is rarely practiced in the Philippines. This study intends to present a systematic approach to the proper chemical characterization of an old lime mortar sample from a Spanish-era church ruin. The analytical techniques employed were: atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS, infrared spectroscopy (IR, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. Results showed that the binder is mostly calcitic, non-dolomitic and air-hardening lime. A slight hydraulic character was observed due to possible clay impurities. Besides the typical sand mixture in mortars, crushed shell fragments were used as aggregates. Possible organic compounds were also identified. The data obtained from this study is very important in understanding traditional building techniques that can enhance heritage conservation work in the Philippines.

  20. Characterization of the Lime Mortars of the Rui Barbosa House Museum in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Pereira da Silva Dalto

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to characterize the mortars of the Rui Barbosa House Museum, built in 1850, in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, using X-ray diffraction (XRD, gel-CSH determination, Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometry (FTIR, Wavelength-Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence spectrometry (WDXRF, Thermo gravimetric analysis (TG-DTG, and granulometric analysis. Also, petrographic and physical characteristics such as porosity, water absorption, and apparent density of the mortars were used to identify the raw materials employed in their preparation. Mineralogical associations found are similar (quartz, calcite, kaolinite, microcline, muscovite, and albite for the majority of samples and only vary in their proportions; the most prominent phases are quartz and calcite. The collected data, indicating that the binder is hydrated lime, lead us to conclude that the analyzed samples are lime mortars, discarding the possibility of cement as the binder material. Two samples, located on the corner of the building, which underwent repairs, present a differentiated behavior, with high levels of dolomite and the presence of pozzolanic material, with greater water absorption and higher density, indicating the use of a different mortar type. In addition, it was verified that the WDXRF and XRD methods are able to determine the trace element composition with comparable precision with respect to the methodological approach proposed by Teutonico (1988. In addition, it has been verified that the major pollutant causing degradation of building are sulfur emitted by the vehicles and saline spray.

  1. Mechanical Performance of Asphalt Mortar Containing Hydrated Lime and EAFSS at Low and High Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Ki Hoon; Falchetto, Augusto Cannone; Wang, Di; Riccardi, Chiara; Wistuba, Michael P

    2017-07-03

    In this paper, the possibility of improving the global response of asphalt materials for pavement applications through the use of hydrated lime and Electric Arc-Furnace Steel Slag (EAFSS) was investigated. For this purpose, a set of asphalt mortars was prepared by mixing two different asphalt binders with fine granite aggregate together with hydrated lime or EAFSS at three different percentages. Bending Beam Rheometer (BBR) creep tests and Dynamic Shear Rheometer (DSR) complex modulus tests were performed to evaluate the material response both at low and high temperature. Then, the rheological Huet model was fitted to the BBR creep results for estimating the impact of filler content on the model parameters. It was found that an addition of hydrated lime and EAFSS up to 10% and 5%, respectively, results in satisfactory low-temperature performance with a substantial improvement of the high-temperature behavior.

  2. Mechanical Performance of Asphalt Mortar Containing Hydrated Lime and EAFSS at Low and High Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Hoon Moon

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the possibility of improving the global response of asphalt materials for pavement applications through the use of hydrated lime and Electric Arc-Furnace Steel Slag (EAFSS was investigated. For this purpose, a set of asphalt mortars was prepared by mixing two different asphalt binders with fine granite aggregate together with hydrated lime or EAFSS at three different percentages. Bending Beam Rheometer (BBR creep tests and Dynamic Shear Rheometer (DSR complex modulus tests were performed to evaluate the material response both at low and high temperature. Then, the rheological Huet model was fitted to the BBR creep results for estimating the impact of filler content on the model parameters. It was found that an addition of hydrated lime and EAFSS up to 10% and 5%, respectively, results in satisfactory low-temperature performance with a substantial improvement of the high-temperature behavior.

  3. The Use of Fly Ash and Lime Sludge as Partial Replacement of Cement in Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishali Sahu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The increased demand of drinking water and power has led huge generation of water treatment plant residue i.e. sludge and the thermal power plant by-product such as fly ash. Large quantities of sludge and fly ash are produced in India and disposed off by landfilling or dumping in and around sites. In this study fly ash and water softening sludge (lime sludge has been utilized in mortar. Two types of mortar (type I and II with four binder combinations have been tried. Binder I consists of 70% fly ash (FA and 30% lime sludge (LS , 0 % gypsum (G, binder II is 70% FA, 30% LS and 1% G, binder III is 50% FA, 30% LS and 20% cement and the binder IV is 40% FA, 40% LS with 20% cement. The effect of various combinations on strength has been discussed here. This paper outlines the composition of the composite material, method of preparation of mortar specimen, testing procedure and salient results thereof.

  4. Development of lime based mortars for repairing glazed tile coatings of historic buildings in the city of Ovar, Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Teixeira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Portugal is one of the European countries in which built heritage is a testimony of its history. In this context, the legacy of the decorative glazed tile coatings of facades must be preserved and restored. This research is dedicated to the conservation of such facades in the city of Ovar, considered an example due to its rich heritage in glazed tiles, a high percentage of which requires a deep intervention. Therefore, this work is focused on the study of lime renders serving as a support for this type of tile facades. For this, samples were collected from several buildings in the city, targeting their mechanical and physical study with the aim of producing compatible mortars to be used for application of detached tiles in these buildings and generally for the repair of the facades with glazed tile coatings. For this purpose, four lime mortar formulations with different volumetric ratios were composed. The aggregates used were: ordinary river sand and local gravel. In three of the mixtures, metakaolin was added, with the intention of acting as an artificial pozzolan and thus improving the performance of these mortars. The use of a pozzolanic addition promotes hardening of lime mortars in cases when the ingression of carbon dioxide is low as is the case of mortars placed below glazed tile coatings. These mortars were also tested in the laboratory taking into account their physical and mechanical characteristics. The mechanical characteristics determined were: modulus of elasticity by two different methods, compressive strength and flexural strength. In turn, the physical characteristics determined were: water vapour permeability and water absorption by total immersion and capillary action. The best mechanical behaviour (compressive and flexural was observed in the mortar with pozzolanic additions. Similarly, the value of the modulus of elasticity was better in mortars with pozzolanic additions. The performance of these mortars was also adequate

  5. Mechanical-physical experimental tests on lime mortars and bricks reinforced with hemp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formisano, Antonio; Dessı, Enzo; Landolfo, Raffaele

    2017-11-01

    Hemp is an agricultural product used for various applications. In the Civil Engineering field, only a limited use of this natural material, called the "green pig" since exploitation of all its constituent parts is allowed, has been done. For this reason, in the paper an experimental activity on lime mortars and bricks reinforced with hemp components has been performed. Compression and bending tests have been carried out on specimens manufactured with hemp shives and fibres, respectively. The achieved results have shown that hemp products change the failure modes from brittle to ductile, leaving basically unaltered the strength capacity of reinforced specimens with respect to unreinforced ones.

  6. Effect of a biodegradable natural polymer on the properties of hardened lime-based mortars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izaguirre, A.; Lanas, J.; Alvarez, J. I.

    2011-01-01

    As an environmentally friendly and energy-saving alternative to cement-based materials and to some chemically obtained water-reducers, a commercialized starch was incorporated into aerial lime-based matrix. Different dosages were tested in order to study the influence that the amount of additive exerted on the properties of the material. Density, shrinkage, water absorption through capillarity, water vapour permeability, mechanical strengths, porosity, pore size distribution, and durability in the face of freezing-thawing cycles were studied in the mortars. The tested starch acted as a thickener for dosages up to 0.30%, and changed its behaviour for the largest dosage (0.50%): in that case it behaved as a plasticizer, dispersing the lime through the fresh mass and generating a more workable material. As a result, the matrix of the hardened mortar presented great coherence, owing to its large density and low porosity, characteristics which led to lower capillarity and permeability, better mechanical properties and durability. (Author) 46 refs.

  7. Experimental Investigation of Lime Mortar Used in Historical Buildings in Becin, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adem SOLAK

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available It is of great importance that the architectural and engineering disciplines work together in the restoration studies of historical buildings which are our cultural heritages. It is required that the bearing system and the materials of the structures should be investigated in detail prior to any conservation. The determination of the properties and compositions of the mortar material used in the construction of the historical building is one of the most important phases of the conservation studies and it is the main purpose of this study. In the scope of the study, the basic physical and mechanical properties, micro structures, raw material compositions, mineralogical and chemical properties of historical mortars taken from Kizil Khan, Karapasah Madrasah and Yelli Mosque structures in Becin antique city are determined. As a result of the study, it is determined that all mortar samples have hydraulic properties that is a result of hydraulic properties of binder lime.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.1.9022

  8. Mineralogical, textural and physical-mechanical study of hydraulic lime mortars cured under different moisture conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arizzi, A.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on the chemical-mineralogical, textural and physical-mechanical properties of hydraulic lime mortars made with siliceous and calcareous aggregate. Mortars were cured at 60% and 90% of relative humidity, so as to assess the variability of mortar petrophysical properties in the hardened state due to the moisture conditions. The final aim was to determine the most adequate moisture conditions to be maintained during application and hardening of hydraulic mortars intended for repair interventions. We found out that using a calcareous aggregate and curing mortar at 90% of relative humidity give place to better textural and mechanical properties. However, these characteristics mostly depend on the maximum size of the aggregate grains, which should be smaller than 6 mm, in order to avoid the occurrence of mechanical discontinuities in the mortar.En este trabajo se han estudiado las propiedades químico-mineralógicas, texturales y físico-mecánicas de morteros de cal hidráulica elaborados con áridos silíceo y calcítico. Estos morteros se han curado al 60% y 90% de humedad relativa, con el fin de evaluar las eventuales diferencias en las propiedades petrofísicas de los morteros una vez endurecidos y así establecer cuál de los dos ambientes es recomendable durante la aplicación y fraguado de morteros de cal hidráulica destinados a obras de restauración. Se ha encontrado que el uso de un árido de composición calcítica y el curado al 90% de humedad relativa dan lugar a morteros hidráulicos con mejores características texturales y propiedades mecánicas. De todas formas, estas características dependen principalmente del tamaño máximo del árido empleado, que debería ser inferior a 6 mm para evitar discontinuidades mecánicas en el mortero.

  9. Lime mud from cellulose industry as raw material in cement mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modolo, R. C.E.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the use of lime mud (LM in cement-based-mortars. Lime mud is a waste generated in the production of cellulose by the kraft mill process. It is mainly composed of CaCO3, a small amount of magnesium carbonate and other trace minerals. Mortars were prepared by adding different amounts of LM (10, 20 and 30% by weight of cement in dry weight. The mortar compositions were evaluated through rheology and flow table measurements, assuring that all the samples exhibited adequate conditions for testing in both equipments. The hardened state properties were also evaluated through mechanical strengths at 7, 28 and 90 days of curing. Following a waste management solution perspective, this work intend to provide a general evaluation of LM application in cement based mortars, looking at both fresh and hardened properties in order to guarantee that the final application requirements are not hindered.Este estudio revela el uso de lodo de carbonato (LM en morteros de cemento. El LM es un residuo compuesto principalmente por CaCO3 generado en la producción de pasta de papel por el método Kraft. Los morteros se prepararon a partir de la adición de diferentes niveles de LM (10, 20 y 30% en peso de cemento en peso seco. Las composiciones de los morteros fueron caracterizadas através de mediciones de reología de mesa y de flujo, asegurando que las muestras exhibían condiciones adecuadas para su caracterización en ambos equipamientos. Las propiedades en estado endurecido también se evaluaron através de resistencias mecánicas a los 7, 28 y 90 días de cura. Con objeto de gestión de residuos, este trabajo tiene la intención de proporcionar una visión general de la aplicación de LM en los morteros, haciendo hincapié en las propiedades con el fin de garantizar que los requisitos para su aplicación final no se vean obstaculizados.

  10. Calcium Sulfoaluminate, Geopolymeric, and Cementitious Mortars for Structural Applications

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    Alessandra Mobili

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the study of calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA and geopolymeric (GEO binders as alternatives to ordinary Portland cement (OPC for the production of more environmentally-friendly construction materials. For this reason, three types of mortar with the same mechanical strength class (R3 ≥ 25 MPa, according to EN 1504-3 were tested and compared; they were based on CSA cement, an alkaline activated coal fly ash, and OPC. Firstly, binder pastes were prepared and their hydration was studied by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD and differential thermal-thermogravimetric (DT-TG analyses. Afterwards, mortars were compared in terms of workability, dynamic modulus of elasticity, adhesion to red clay bricks, free and restrained drying shrinkage, water vapor permeability, capillary water absorption, and resistance to sulfate attack. DT-TG and XRD analyses evidenced the main reactive phases of the investigated binders involved in the hydration reactions. Moreover, the sulfoaluminate mortar showed the smallest free shrinkage and the highest restrained shrinkage, mainly due to its high dynamic modulus of elasticity. The pore size distribution of geopolymeric mortar was responsible for the lowest capillary water absorption at short times and for the highest permeability to water vapor and the greatest resistance to sulfate attack.

  11. Simple method of dynamic Young’s modulus determination in lime and cement mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosell, J. R.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The present work explains a simple method to determine the dynamic Young module (MOE by inducing a set of small mechanical perturbation to samples of lime and cement mortars and correlating the results obtained with results determined using other techniques and methods. The procedure described herein follows the instructions stated in the UNE-EN ISO 12680-1 standard for refractory products although in this study the instructions are applied to standardized RILEM 4x4x16 cm test samples made of lime and cement mortars. In addition, MOE determinations are obtained by using ultrasonic impulse velocity while static Young's modulus determinations are obtained by performing conventional bending tests. The ability of this procedure to correlate with results from other techniques, along with its simplicity, suggests that it can be widely adapted to determine the deformability of mortars under load using standardized samples.

    El presente trabajo muestra un método simple para determinar el módulo de Young dinámico (MOE a partir de pequeñas perturbaciones mecánicas producidas a probetas de mortero de cal y de cemento, correlacionando los resultados obtenidos con las correspondientes mediciones realizadas con otras técnicas. El procedimiento sigue básicamente las instrucciones fijadas en la norma UNE-EN ISO 12680-1 de productos refractarios, pero aplicándolo a probetas normalizadas RILEM 4x4x16 de morteros confeccionados con cal y cemento. Paralelamente se realizan determinaciones del MOE a partir de la velocidad de paso de impulsos ultrasónicos y determinaciones del módulo de Young estático a partir de ensayos de flexión convencionales. La simplicidad del método aplicado y la correlación de los resultados obtenidos con las variables medidas permiten concluir que esta metodología es de aplicación directa para determinar la deformabilidad bajo carga de los morteros a partir de probetas normalizadas.

  12. Influence of aggregate and supplementary cementitious materials on the properties of hydrated lime (CL90s mortars

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    S. Pavía

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydrated lime is a historic material currently used in conservation. It hardens slowly by carbonation slowing construction however, supplementary cementitious materials accelerate hardening enhancing strength. Hydrated-lime mortars with rice husk ash–RHA-; ground granulated blastfurnace slag–GGBS- and increasing amounts of two aggregates were studied. Increasing aggregate lowered strength as interfacial zones proliferate; it lowered hygric properties and raised water demand. Aggregate content/composition didn’t affect the high water retention. For the higher aggregate contents (90 days, limestone mortars are c.20% stronger than silica mortars while the (1:1 silica sand mortars are 56% stronger in flexion. Additions increased strength with little impact on hygric properties. GGBS increased strength c.six times. RHA increased strength with little impact on hygric properties due to its great specific surface and high water-demand increasing porosity. GGBS and RHA properties ruling hydrate production and the kinetics of the pozzolanic reaction are considered partially responsible for the mortar property variation.

  13. Properties, characterization, and decay of sticky rice–lime mortars from the Wugang Ming dynasty city wall (China)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Ya [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Cultural Relics and Archaeology Institute of Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); Fu, Xuan; Gu, Haibing [Cultural Relics and Archaeology Institute of Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); Gao, Feng [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Liu, Shaojun, E-mail: liumatthew@csu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2014-04-01

    Urgent restoration of the Wugang Ming dynasty city wall brings about the need for a study of the formulation and properties of mortars. In the present paper, mortar samples from the Wugang Ming dynasty city wall were characterized in a combination of sheet polarized light optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with X-ray energy dispersive spectrometer, thermogravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy. Results show that mortars are mainly built up from inorganic calcium carbonate based organic–inorganic hybrid material with a small amount of sticky rice, which plays a crucial role in forming dense and compact microstructure of mortars and effectively hindering penetration of water and air into mortars. Analysis of decayed products shows that the detrimental soluble salts originates from ambient environment. - Highlights: • Mortars used in the Wugang city wall are a calcium carbonate-sticky rice hybrid bonding material. • Carbonation processing is extremely slow due to dense and compact microstructure of mortars. • Decying of mortars results from the appearance of soluble salt from ambient environment.

  14. Properties, characterization, and decay of sticky rice–lime mortars from the Wugang Ming dynasty city wall (China)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Ya; Fu, Xuan; Gu, Haibing; Gao, Feng; Liu, Shaojun

    2014-01-01

    Urgent restoration of the Wugang Ming dynasty city wall brings about the need for a study of the formulation and properties of mortars. In the present paper, mortar samples from the Wugang Ming dynasty city wall were characterized in a combination of sheet polarized light optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with X-ray energy dispersive spectrometer, thermogravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy. Results show that mortars are mainly built up from inorganic calcium carbonate based organic–inorganic hybrid material with a small amount of sticky rice, which plays a crucial role in forming dense and compact microstructure of mortars and effectively hindering penetration of water and air into mortars. Analysis of decayed products shows that the detrimental soluble salts originates from ambient environment. - Highlights: • Mortars used in the Wugang city wall are a calcium carbonate-sticky rice hybrid bonding material. • Carbonation processing is extremely slow due to dense and compact microstructure of mortars. • Decying of mortars results from the appearance of soluble salt from ambient environment

  15. Effect of a biodegradable natural polymer on the properties of hardened lime-based mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izaguirre, A.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available As an environmentally friendly and energy-saving alternative to cement-based materials and to some chemically obtained water-reducers, a commercialized starch was incorporated into aerial lime-based matrix. Different dosages were tested in order to study the influence that the amount of additive exerted on the properties of the material. Density, shrinkage, water absorption through capillarity, water vapour permeability, mechanical strengths, porosity, pore size distribution, and durability in the face of freezing-thawing cycles were studied in the mortars. The tested starch acted as a thickener for dosages up to 0.30%, and changed its behaviour for the largest dosage (0.50%: in that case it behaved as a plasticizer, dispersing the lime through the fresh mass and generating a more workable material. As a result, the matrix of the hardened mortar presented great coherence, owing to its large density and low porosity, characteristics which led to lower capillarity and permeability, better mechanical properties and durability.

    Como alternativa a los materiales con base cemento y a plastificantes obtenidos por vía química, se estudió el efecto de un almidón comercial incorporado a morteros de cal aérea. Se ensayaron dosificaciones diferentes para analizar su influencia sobre las propiedades del material. En los morteros se determinaron densidad, retracción, absorción de agua por capilaridad, permeabilidad, resistencias mecánicas, porosidad, distribución de tamaños de poro y durabilidad frente a ciclos de hielo-deshielo. El almidón actuó como espesante hasta la dosis de 0,30%, pero cambió al añadirlo en la dosis más alta (0,50%: en este caso, se comportó como un plastificante, dispersando la cal a través de la mezcla en fresco, dando lugar a un material más trabajable. Como resultado, en la dosis 0,50%, la matriz del mortero endurecido presentó gran coherencia, por su mayor densidad y menor porosidad, lo que implicó una

  16. Influence of supplementary cementitious materials on water transport kinetics and mechanical properties of hydrated lime and cement mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ince, C.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is an investigation of the possible role of supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs on water transport kinetics and mechanical properties of hydrated lime (CL90 and Portland cement (PC mortars. The properties of hydrated lime are significantly different from those of cement and therefore modifying fresh and hardened properties of these mortars are vital for mortar/substrate optimisation in masonry construction. The parameters investigated in this paper often are the main barriers to the use of hydrated lime in construction practice. The results show that transfer sorptivity and time to dewater freshly-mixed hydrated lime mortars can be modified when binder is partially replaced with SCMs. Compressive strength of CL90 mortars is increased systematically with the increased replacement levels of SCMs and the results are supported with the microstructural images. The ability to modify the water transport kinetics and mechanical properties allows compatibility between the mortar and the substrate unit in masonry construction.El objetivo de este artículo es investigar el papel de los materiales cementantes suplementarios (SCMs en la cinética de transporte del agua y en las propiedades mecánicas de los morteros de cal hidratada (CL90 y cemento Portland. Las propiedades de la cal hidratada son significativamente diferentes a las del cemento y por lo tanto el control de las propiedades de los morteros frescos y endurecidos es fundamental en la optimización mortero/substrato en albañilería. Los parámetros estudiados en este trabajo son a menudo las principales barreras para el uso de la cal hidratada en la práctica de la construcción. Los resultados indican que la absortividad y el tiempo necesario para deshidratar morteros de cal hidratada recién mezclados pueden ser controlados cuando el conglomerante es parcialmente remplazado por SCMs. La resistencia a compresión de los morteros CL90 aumenta sistem

  17. Irreversible dilation of NaCl contaminated lime-cement mortar due to crystallization cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubelli, B.; Hees, R.P.J. van; Huinink, H.P.; Groot, C.J.W.P.

    2006-01-01

    The mechanism of damage occurring in NaCl contaminated materials has not been clarified yet. Apart from crystallization pressure, other hypotheses have been proposed to explain the cause of decay. Irreversible dilation has been observed in a few cases but has never been studied in a more systematic way. The aim of the research is to contribute to the modeling of this phenomenon. In the present paper the effect of NaCl on the hydric and hygric behavior of a lime-cement mortar is extensively studied. The results indicate that NaCl influences the hydric and hygric dilation behavior of the material. The material contaminated with NaCl shrinks during dissolution and dilates during crystallization of the salt. This dilation is irreversible and sufficient to damage the material after few dissolution/crystallization cycles. This behavior is not restricted to NaCl, but is observed in the presence of other salts as well (NaNO 3 and KCl). Outcomes of electron microscopy studies suggest that salts causing irreversible dilation tend to crystallize as layers on the pore wall

  18. Differences in the rheological properties of calcitic and dolomitic lime slurries: influence of particle characteristics and practical implications in lime-based mortar manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arizzi, A.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of the rheological properties of lime suspensions is a useful means to evaluate the workability of lime mortars. In this work, we studied the flow behaviour of two industrial hydrated limes, one of calcitic and the other of dolomitic composition, by means of two types of rheometer with different geometry and setup mode. The obtained results were interpreted taking into account the differences in microstructure and surface properties of the suspended particles. Calcitic lime dry particles are formed by angular and polydisperse clusters and, once dispersed in water, they behave like thixotropic materials. On the other hand, the dolomitic lime is formed by nanoparticles and small round cluster and it shows a pronounced plastic behaviour in suspension. This fundamental difference between the two materials explains the traditional preference for dolomitic lime mortars for plastering and rendering applications.

    El estudio de las propiedades reológicas de suspensiones de cal es una herramienta muy útil para evaluar la trabajabilidad de morteros de cal. En este trabajo se ha estudiado el comportamiento en suspensión de dos cales hidratadas, de composición calcítica y dolomítica, mediante dos tipos de reómetros con geometría y modalidades distintas de medida. Los resultados obtenidos se han interpretado teniendo en cuenta las diferencias en la microestructura y las propiedades de superficie de las partículas en suspensión. Las partículas de cal calcítica están formadas por aglomerados angulares y polidispersos y, una vez dispersadas en agua, presentan un comportamiento tixotrópico. Por su parte, la cal dolomítica está formada por nanopartículas y pequeños agregados redondeados y muestra en suspensión un pronunciado comportamiento plástico. Esta importante diferencia entre las dos cales explica la preferencia tradicional de morteros de cal dolomítica para aplicaciones en revocos.

  19. Aging and Curing Temperature Effects on Compressive Strength of Mortar Containing Lime Stone Quarry Dust and Industrial Granite Sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Nasir Amin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the researchers investigated the potential use of locally available waste materials from the lime stone quarry and the granite industry as a partial replacement of cement. Quarry sites and granite industry in the eastern province of Saudi Arabia produces tons of powder wastes in the form of quarry dust (QD and granite sludge (GS, respectively, causing serious environmental problems along with frequent dust storms in the area. According to ASTM C109, identical 50-mm3 specimens were cast throughout this study to evaluate the compressive strength development of mortars (7, 28 and 91 days containing these waste materials. Experimental variables included different percentage replacement of cement with waste materials (GS, QD, fineness of GS, various curing temperatures (20, 40 and 60 °C as local normal and hot environmental temperatures and curing moisture (continuously moist and partially moist followed by air curing. Finally, the results of mortar containing waste materials were compared to corresponding results of control mortar (CM and mortar containing fly ash (FA. The test results indicated that under normal curing (20 °C, moist cured, the compressive strength of mortar containing the different percentage of waste materials (QD, GS, FA and their combinations remained lower than that of CM at all ages. However, the compressive strength of mortar containing waste materials slightly increased with increased fineness of GS and significantly increased under high curing temperatures. It was recommended that more fineness of GS be achieved to use its high percentage replacement with cement (30% or more incorporating local environmental conditions.

  20. Changes in Properties of Cement and Lime Mortars When Incorporating Fibers from End-of-Life Tires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluís Gil

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the addition of fibers from end-of-life tires to commercial mortar mixtures. Two different types of mortar, one lime-plastic and other cement-fluid, are mixed with different percentage of fibers ranging from 0% to 1%. The changes in bulk density, consistency, compressive and flexural strength, dynamic Young modulus and water absorption are studied. According to the results, consistency is the property that shows more relevant changes for an addition of 0.25% fibers. Consistency is related to workability and affects the water absorption and the Young modulus values. On the contrary, bulk density and mechanical properties did not change with the addition of fibers. The results prove that this fiber, considered a waste from recycling of end-of-life tires, can be used in commercial mixtures without losing strength. On the other hand, mortar workability limits the amount of fibers that can be included in the mixture and this parameter determines the performance of the mortar.

  1. THE USE OF NATURAL TRASS FROM SAYUTAN MAGETAN AND LIME FROM NGAMPEL BLORA AS THE MATERIAL OF CEMENT SUBSTITUTION FOR MORTAR MIXTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Nurzain

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Construction works in the Regency of Magetan, as well as in the mountain area far from capital cities and remote from transportation facilities, require large amount of material. In order to cope with the need of sand, people uses natural trass which are plenty to be found in the area. Test and research on its characteristic and strength with its potentials to be used as cement substitution have never been carried out. Lime was taken from Ngampel village, Blora as it is commonly sold in the area. The planned mixture of lime-trass paste was in the effort to obtain the best composition. The weight ratios used were 100%:0%, 80%:20%, 60%:40%, 40%:60%, 20%:80 and 0%:100%. The mortar mixture with cement substitution was 100%, 80%, 60%, 40%, 20% and 0%.The compressive strength of the lime-trash mixture was between 0.000 MPa and 2.545 MPa. The mortar compressive strength achieved was 0.373 MPa - 26.585 MPa. The test results of mortar compressive strength showed that the more cement substitution amount used, the less the compressive strength would be. The mortar compressive strength increased in line to the age of the mortar. The mortar tensile strength obtained was 0.000 MPa - 2.169 MPa. The block compressive strength obtained was 3.336 MPa - 3.403 MPa. Water absorbency of the block was 15.831% -16.056%.

  2. Forced and natural carbonation of lime-based mortars with and without additives: Mineralogical and textural changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cultrone, G.; Sebastian, E.; Huertas, M. Ortega

    2005-01-01

    We have studied the carbonation process in different types of mortars, with and without pozzolana or air-entraining additives, subject to a CO 2 -rich atmosphere and compared the results with those of similar naturally carbonated mortars. We used X-ray diffraction technique to demonstrate that high CO 2 concentrations favour a faster, more complete carbonation process with 8 days being sufficient to convert portlandite into 90 wt.% calcite. Full carbonation, however, is not reached during the life-span of the tests, not even in forced carbonation experiments. This could be due to at least one of the following phenomena: a premature drying of samples during carbonation reaction, the temperature at which the carbonation process was carried out or the reduction of pore volume occupied by newly formed calcite crystals. This last option seems to be the least probable. We observed a more prolific development of calcite crystals in the pores and fissures through which the carbonic anhydride flows. Under natural conditions, carbonation is much slower and similar levels are not reached for 6 months. These differences suggest that the carbonation process is influenced by the amount of CO 2 used. Both the mineralogy and texture of mortars vary depending on the type of additive used but the speed of the portlandite-calcite transformation does not change significantly. Pozzolana produces hydraulic mortars although the quantity of calcium aluminosilicate crystals is low. The air-entraining agent significantly alters the texture of the mortars creating rounded pores and eliminating or reducing the drying cracks

  3. 14C chronology of the oldest Scandinavian church in use. An AMS/PIXE study of lime lump carbonate in the mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindroos, Alf; Ranta, Heikki; 14C Dating Laboratory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus (Denmark))" data-affiliation=" (AMS 14C Dating Laboratory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus (Denmark))" >Heinemeier, Jan; Lill, Jan-Olof

    2014-01-01

    Mortar dating was applied to newly revealed, original mortar in the church of Dalby in Scania, southern Sweden which is considered to be the oldest still standing church in Scandinavia. Small white lime lumps were sampled by chipping from the supporting pillars in the interior of the church. Special emphasis was in sampling lime lumps because the church is situated in the Scania limestone area and aggregate limestone contamination was anticipated in the bulk mortars. Earlier studies have, however, shown that lime lumps do not contain aggregate material but only possible limestone rests from incomplete calcination. The sampled material was prepared for radiocarbon AMS dating. The carbonate in the lime lumps was hydrolyzed according to the sequential leaching technique developed for the Århus 14 C laboratory in Denmark. Prior to the hydrolysis the lime lumps were examined for dead-carbon contamination using a stereo microscope and cathodoluminescence. The lime lumps displayed heterogeneous carbonate luminescence. This is, however, common and it was not considered a problem because carbonate growth in changing pH/Eh conditions often leads to changing luminescence colors. Two lumps had little dead carbon contamination and an early second millennium 14 C signature. One lump, however, seemed to be heavily contaminated with dead carbon. Since the sample passed the microscopic screening, the leftovers of the lump was subjected to PIXE analysis and compared with the other two lumps. The well-defined, early 2nd millennium 14 C age of the lime lumps of this particular church is an important contribution to the discussion on stone church chronology in Scandinavia

  4. {sup 14}C chronology of the oldest Scandinavian church in use. An AMS/PIXE study of lime lump carbonate in the mortar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindroos, Alf, E-mail: alf.lindroos@abo.fi [Geology and Mineralogy, Department of Natural Sciences, Åbo Akademi University (Finland); Art History, Faculty of Art, Åbo Akademi University (Finland); Ranta, Heikki [Diocese of Lund, Church of Sweden (Sweden); Heinemeier, Jan [AMS " 1" 4C Dating Laboratory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus (Denmark); Lill, Jan-Olof [Accelerator Laboratory, Turku PET Centre, Åbo Akademi University (Finland)

    2014-07-15

    Mortar dating was applied to newly revealed, original mortar in the church of Dalby in Scania, southern Sweden which is considered to be the oldest still standing church in Scandinavia. Small white lime lumps were sampled by chipping from the supporting pillars in the interior of the church. Special emphasis was in sampling lime lumps because the church is situated in the Scania limestone area and aggregate limestone contamination was anticipated in the bulk mortars. Earlier studies have, however, shown that lime lumps do not contain aggregate material but only possible limestone rests from incomplete calcination. The sampled material was prepared for radiocarbon AMS dating. The carbonate in the lime lumps was hydrolyzed according to the sequential leaching technique developed for the Århus {sup 14}C laboratory in Denmark. Prior to the hydrolysis the lime lumps were examined for dead-carbon contamination using a stereo microscope and cathodoluminescence. The lime lumps displayed heterogeneous carbonate luminescence. This is, however, common and it was not considered a problem because carbonate growth in changing pH/Eh conditions often leads to changing luminescence colors. Two lumps had little dead carbon contamination and an early second millennium {sup 14}C signature. One lump, however, seemed to be heavily contaminated with dead carbon. Since the sample passed the microscopic screening, the leftovers of the lump was subjected to PIXE analysis and compared with the other two lumps. The well-defined, early 2nd millennium {sup 14}C age of the lime lumps of this particular church is an important contribution to the discussion on stone church chronology in Scandinavia.

  5. Lime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, US lime production was 20 Mt with a value of $1.5 billion. Production was unchanged compared with 2004. Captive production was 1.4 Mt. US consumption was 20.2 Mt. Most of the US lime trade was with Canada and Mexico. Despite some disruptions due to hurricanes Katrina and Rita, normal sales activities remained healthy.

  6. Hydrophobic lime based mortars with linseed oil: Characterization and durability assessment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nunes, Cristiana Lara; Slížková, Zuzana

    61-62, July-August (2014), s. 28-39 ISSN 0008-8846 R&D Projects: GA MK(CZ) DF11P01OVV008 Keywords : durability * transport properties * metakaolin * mortar Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage Impact factor: 2.864, year: 2014 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0008884614000738

  7. Historic trass - lime mortars with expansive reactions: Characterization and repair strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hees, R.P.J. van; Nijland, T.G.; Larbi, J.A.; Wijffels, T.J.; Brocken, H.J.P.

    2005-01-01

    The characterisation of two ancient mortars in historic bridges, suffering damage due to thaumasite and other swelling compounds is described. Characterisation was part of the analysis of damage occurring to the brick masonry structure. Expansive reactions were found to have taken place, being the

  8. Calcium Extraction from Blast-Furnace-Slag-Based Mortars in Sulphate Bacterial Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Estokova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Wastewater structures, such as treatment plants or sewers can be easily affected by bio-corrosion influenced by microorganisms living in waste water. The activity of these microbes results in deterioration and can cause the reduction in structural performance of such structures. In order to improve the durability of mortar and concrete, different admixtures are being used and the best impact is observed in cement based materials combined with blast furnace slag. In this study, mortar samples with blast furnace slag were exposed to bacterial sulphate attack for 90 and 180 days. The leaching of calcium ions from the cement matrix and equivalent damaged depths of studied mortar samples were evaluated. The results showed more significant leaching of samples placed in bacterial environment, compared to the samples placed in non-bacterial environment. Similarly, the equivalent damaged depths of mortars were much higher for the bacteria-influenced samples. The slag-based cement mortars did not clearly show improved resistance in bacterial medium in terms of calcium leaching.

  9. Chromatic reintegration of historical mortars with lime-based pozzolanic consolidant products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borsoi, G.; Pascoal, P.; Pinto, J.P.; Veiga, R.; Faria, P.; Santos Silva, A.

    2013-01-01

    The consolidation process of old renders with loss of cohesion is nowadays performed usually with inorganic compatible products, such as calcium or barium hydroxide or ethyl silicate. The use of organic consolidants as acrylic or vinilic resins is discouraged due to its physico-chemical

  10. Effect of the preparation of lime putties on their properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navrátilová, Eva; Tihlaříková, Eva; Neděla, Vilém; Rovnaníková, Pavla; Pavlík, Jaroslav

    2017-12-08

    In the study of lime as the basic component of historical mortars and plasters, four lime putties prepared from various kinds of lime of various granulometry and by various ways of preparation were evaluated. The rheological properties and micro-morphologic changes, growing of calcite crystals, and rate of carbonation were monitored. The lime putty prepared from lump lime achieves the best rheological properties, yield stress 214.7 Pa and plastic viscosity 2.6 Pa·s. The suitability of this lime putty was checked by testing the development of calcium hydroxide and calcite crystals using scanning electron microscopy and environmental scanning electron microscopy. The disordered crystals of calcium hydroxide exhibit better carbonation resulting in the large crystals of calcite; therefore, the mortar prepared from the lump lime has the highest flexural strength and compressive strength 0.8/2.5 MPa, its carbonation is the fastest and exhibits the longest durability. Also, thanks to the micro-morphological characterization of samples in their native state by means of environmental scanning electron microscopy, the new way of lime putty preparation by mixing was proven. The preparation consists in the mechanical crash of the lime particles immediately after hydration. This enables the properties of putty prepared from lump lime to be nearly reached.

  11. Incorporation of bitumen and calcium silicate in cement and lime stabilized soil blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, W. H.; Cheah, C. B.; Ramli, M.; Al-Sakkaf, Y. K.

    2017-04-01

    Providing affordable housing is the most critical problem in many of the developing countries. Using earth materials in building construction is one of the feasible methods to address this issue and it can be a way towards sustainable construction as well. However, the published information on the stabilized soil blocks is limited. Therefore, the present study is conducted to examine the characterization of the soils and engineering properties of the stabilized soil blocks. Four types of stabilizer were used in the study, namely; cement, slaked lime, bitumen emulsion and calcium silicate. Cement and slaked lime were added at different percentages in the range of 5% to 15%, with interval of 2.5%. The percentage was determined based on weight of soil. Meanwhile, bitumen emulsion and calcium silicate were incorporated at various percentages together with 10% of cement. Dosage of bitumen emulsion is in the range of 2% to 10% at interval of 2% while calcium silicate was incorporated at 0.50%, 0.75%, 1.00%, 1.25%, 1.50% and 2.00%. Results show that cement is the most viable stabilizer for the soil block among all stabilizers in this study. The bulk density, optimum moisture content and compressive strengths were increased with the increasing cement content. The most suitable cement content was 10% added at moisture content of 12%. Lime, bitumen and calcium contents were recommended at 5.0%, 6.0% and 1.25%, respectively.

  12. Arsenic immobilization by calcium-arsenic precipitates in lime treated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Deok Hyun; Dermatas, Dimitris; Menounou, Nektaria

    2004-01-01

    Lime-based stabilization/solidification (S/S) can be an effective remediation alternative for the immobilization of arsenic (As) in contaminated soils and sludges. However, the exact immobilization mechanism has not been well established. Based on previous research, As immobilization could be attributed to sorption and/or inclusion in pozzolanic reaction products and/or the formation of calcium-arsenic (Ca-As) precipitates. In this study, suspensions of lime-As and lime-As-kaolinite were studied in an attempt to elucidate the controlling mechanism of As immobilization in lime treated soils. Aqueous lime-As suspensions (slurries) with varying Ca/As molar ratios (1:1, 1.5:1, 2:1, 2.5:1 and 4:1) were prepared and soluble As concentrations were determined. X-Ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were used to establish the resulting mineralogy of crystalline precipitate formation. Depending on the redox state of the As source, different As precipitates were identified. When As (III) was used, the main precipitate formation was Ca-As-O. With As(V) as the source, Ca 4 (OH) 2 (AsO 4 ) 2 ·4H 2 O formed at Ca/As molar ratios greater than 1:1. A significant increase in As (III) immobilization was observed at Ca/As molar ratios greater than 1:1. Similarly, a substantial increase in As (V) immobilization was noted at Ca/As molar ratios greater than or equal to 2.5:1. This observation was also confirmed by XRD. Lime-As-kaolinite slurries were also prepared at different Ca/As molar ratios. These slurries were used to specifically investigate the possibility of forming pozzolanic reaction products. Such products would immobilize As by sorption and/or inclusion along with the formations of different As precipitates. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) tests were used to evaluate As leachability in these slurries. XRD analyses revealed no pozzolanic reaction product formation. Instead, As immobilization was found to be precipitation controlled. The same Ca-As precipitate, Ca

  13. Investigation of crushed brick-matrix interface in lime-based ancient mortar by microscopy and nanoindentation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nežerka, V.; Němeček, J.; Slížková, Zuzana; Tesárek, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 55, January (2015), s. 122-128 ISSN 0958-9465 R&D Projects: GA MK(CZ) DF11P01OVV008 Keywords : nanoindentation * historic mortars * cocciopesto * reaction rim * ITZ Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage Impact factor: 3.399, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0958946514001619

  14. Lime-based mortars with linseed oil: sodium chloride resistance assessment and characterization of the degraded material

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nunes, Cristiana Lara; Slížková, Zuzana; Janotová, Dana

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 3 (2013), s. 411-427 ISSN 0369-8963 R&D Projects: GA MK(CZ) DF11P01OVV008 Keywords : linseed oil * lime * metakaolin * durability Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage Impact factor: 0.804, year: 2013 http://www.periodicodimineralogia.it/index.php/mineralogia/issue/view/14/showToc

  15. Hydration products of lime-metakaolin pastes at ambient temperature with ageing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gameiro, A., E-mail: agameiro@lnec.pt [National Laboratory of Civil Engineering, Materials Department, Av. do Brasil, 101, 1700 Lisbon (Portugal); Santos Silva, A., E-mail: ssilva@lnec.pt [National Laboratory of Civil Engineering, Materials Department, Av. do Brasil, 101, 1700 Lisbon (Portugal); Veiga, R., E-mail: rveiga@lnec.pt [National Laboratory of Civil Engineering, Buildings Department, Av. do Brasil, 101, 1700 Lisbon (Portugal); Velosa, A., E-mail: avelosa@ua.pt [Department of Civil Engineering, Geobiotec, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2012-05-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study the compounds formed in lime/MK blended pastes and their stability over time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different mixes of lime/MK pastes show different reaction kinetics during curing time, being the pozzolanic compounds formed directly proportional to the lime by MK replacement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some pozzolanic products are found to be unstable during the hydration reaction employed in our study. - Abstract: Mortars constituted of lime mixtures with pozzolanic additions have been extensively used in the past for the construction of historic and traditional buildings. This paper presents the results of blended pastes of lime and metakaolin (MK), namely compounds formed and their stability over time. This research is part of an extensive study aiming at the formulation of lime based mortars for restoration purposes. It has been shown for several years that MK has been applied in inorganic binders due to its capacity to react vigorously with calcium hydroxide (CH). In the presence of water originating a series of major hydrated phases, namely tetra calcium aluminate hydrate (C{sub 4}AH{sub 13}), calcium silicates hydrates (CSH) and calcium aluminium silicate hydrates (stratlingite - C{sub 2}ASH{sub 8}). Several blended pastes of lime and MK, with different substitution rates of lime by MK (wt%) were prepared and cured at a temperature of 20 Degree-Sign C and relative humidity RH > 95%. The phase composition of the formed hydrated phases was determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and simultaneous thermal analysis (TG-DTA). The obtained results showed that lime/MK pastes compositions displayed different reaction kinetics during curing time, being the pozzolanic products content directly proportional to the substitution rate of lime by MK. Also, a relationship between the increase stratlingite content and the MK substitution rate of lime by MK was found.

  16. Effects of Applying Lime and CalciumMontmorillonite on Nitrification Dynamics in Acidic Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Mei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil acidification is known as a natural and slow process along with clay mineral weathering. In recent years however, with inten sive soil utilization in agriculture, soil acidification has increased dramatically and nitrification of ammonium nitrogen fertilizer is one of the main contributors to soil acidification. Lime application is the traditional practice to improve acidic soils but it often makes the soil acidic a gain leading to soil compaction in most cases. Montmorillonite is the main clay mineral component of alkaline or neutral soils, more so it is known to undergo further weathering processes during soil acidification. The laboratory-based incubations were used in this study, and nitri fication was measured while kinetic curves were fitted to check the effects of decreasing soil acidity by lime(Ca-OHand montmorillonite (Ca-Mon nitrification of the acidic soil. The results showed that significant nitrification was observed both in Ca-OH and Ca-M treatments, and the nitrification process was fitted in the first-order kinetic model, NNO3=N0+Np(1-exp(-k1t(P-1·d-1was significantly higher than that of Ca-M treatment(2.381 mg·kg-1·d-1. The potential nitrifi cation rate(Vpwere 6.42, 8.58 mg N·kg-1·d-1 at pH 5.7 and 6.2 respectively, and the average nitrification rate(Vaof Ca-OH treatment were 2.71, 3.88 mg N·kg-1·d-1 respectively, which were significantly greater than those of Ca-M treatment(Vp were 3.40, 4.56 mg N·kg-1·d-1 and Va were 2.36, 3.04 mg N·kg-1·d-1 at pH 5.7 and 6.2 respectively. Therefore the net nitrification rate, potential nitrification rate(Vp and average nitrification rate(Vaof Ca-OH treatment were significantly higher than that of Ca-M treatment, suggesting that the possibili ty and degree of soil reacidification by using lime to improve acidic soil is greater than using calcium montmorillonite. This study will provide a new reference for the improvement of acid soils.

  17. A case study and mechanism investigation of typical mortars used on ancient architecture in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Yuyao; Zhang Bingjian; Liang Xiaolin

    2008-01-01

    Mortars sampled from Dutifulness Monument, where typical ancient China mortar formulas and manufacturing processes were used, were analyzed by starch-iodine test, FTIR, DSC-TG, SEM and XRD methods. Several modeling samples were then made according to historical records of Chinese ancient mortar formulas and analyzed with the same techniques. The modeling formulas also were used to consolidate loose specimens. The results show that sticky rice plays a crucial role in the microstructure and the consolidation properties of lime mortars. A possible mechanism was suggested that biomineralization may occur during the carbonation of calcium hydroxide, where the sticky rice functions as a template and controls the growth of calcium carbonate crystal. The organic-inorganic materials formed based on this mechanism will be more favorable for consolidating the loose samples both in strength improvement and durability

  18. Application of sphagnum peat, calcium carbonate and hydrated lime for immobilizing radioactive and hazardous contaminants in the subsurface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longmire, P.A.; Thomson, B.M.; Eller, P.G.; Barr, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    Batch experiments, mineralogical studies, and geochemical modeling were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of sphagnum peat, calcium carbonate, and hydrated lime in removing dissolved concentrations of As, Mo, NO 3 , and U present in uranium-tailings pore water at Gunnison, Colorado. Amounts of As, Mo, and U removal by sphagnum peat, calcium carbonate, and hydrated lime at 5.0,2.5, and 2.5 wt.%, respectively, were typically above 97%. Nitrate removal ranged between 55 and 80%. Significant contaminant removal was achieved by sphagnum peat alone at pH 3.18. Results from base potentiometric titration and IR spectroscopy investigations suggest that U(VI) binds onto carboxylate and phenolate groups. Addition of 2.5 wt.% hydrated lime to the acidic tailings increased Mo concentrations by a factor of 2 under moderately alkaline conditions (pH 12). During neutralization of tailings-pore water, precipitation of ferric oxyhydroxides may provide additional removal of As, Mo, and U(VI) from solution through adsorption and coprecipitation processes. Sphagnum peat and other forms of solid organic matter effectively remove anthropogenic organic compounds from solution through hydrophobic sorption and partitioning processes

  19. Effect of a biodegradable natural polymer on the properties of hardened lime-based mortars; Efecto de un polimero natural biodegradable en las propiedades de morteros de cal en estado endurecido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izaguirre, A.; Lanas, J.; Alvarez, J. I.

    2011-07-01

    As an environmentally friendly and energy-saving alternative to cement-based materials and to some chemically obtained water-reducers, a commercialized starch was incorporated into aerial lime-based matrix. Different dosages were tested in order to study the influence that the amount of additive exerted on the properties of the material. Density, shrinkage, water absorption through capillarity, water vapour permeability, mechanical strengths, porosity, pore size distribution, and durability in the face of freezing-thawing cycles were studied in the mortars. The tested starch acted as a thickener for dosages up to 0.30%, and changed its behaviour for the largest dosage (0.50%): in that case it behaved as a plasticizer, dispersing the lime through the fresh mass and generating a more workable material. As a result, the matrix of the hardened mortar presented great coherence, owing to its large density and low porosity, characteristics which led to lower capillarity and permeability, better mechanical properties and durability. (Author) 46 refs.

  20. Observation of the failure mechanism of brick masonry doublets with cement and lime mortars by microfocus X-ray computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Hendrickx, Roel; Bruyninckx, Katrien; Schueremans, Luc; Kerckhofs, Greet; Verstrynge, Els; Wevers, Martine; Van Balen, Koenraad

    2010-01-01

    The nature of the failure mechanism of masonry under compression depends on the properties of the brick and mortar. It is well-known that the ratio of stiffness of both materials has an important effect. Furthermore the pattern of crack development and propagation and the occurrence of local compaction of soft mortars have been the subject of some study, but remained difficult to observe. This study aims at the visualisation of these phenomena by using a hydraulic press inside a microfocus X-...

  1. Effect of vermicomposting on calcium, sulphur and some heavy metal content of different biodegradable organic wastes under liming and microbial inoculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Debabrata; Bhattacharyya, Pradip; Ghosh, B C; Banik, Pabitra

    2012-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the changes in total calcium and sulphur and some heavy metal (Zn, Cu, and Pb) concentration of different organic wastes affected by liming and microorganism inoculation. Vermicomposting was an effective technology for disposal of organic substrates like municipal solid wastes (MSW), possessing comparatively higher concentration of heavy metals. The addition of lime in initial organic substrates significantly (P ≤ 0.05) increased total calcium and total sulphur content of vermicomposts. Inoculation of microorganisms significantly (P ≤ 0.05) reduced the heavy metal content of final products as compared to control. Fungal strains were comparatively more effective in detoxification of heavy metals than B. polymyxa.

  2. Self healing phenomena in concretes and masonry mortars: A microscopic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, T.G.; Larbi, J.A.; Hees, R.P.J. van; Lubelli, B.A.; Rooij, M.R. de

    2007-01-01

    A microscopic survey of over 1000 of samples of concrete and masonry mortars from structures in the Netherlands shows that, in practice, self healing occurs in historic lime and lime – puzzolana mortars, in contrast to modern cement bound concretes and mortars. Self healing may be effected by the

  3. Preparation of Lime by Roasting the Limestone Deposits of Strezovci (Republic of Kosovo and Its Use for the Aluminothermic Production of Calcium Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoda, S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The goal of producing and processing limestone ore (mostly CaCO3 is to obtain high-quality refractory materials based on lime (CaO. Lime is the raw material for obtaining calcium metal as a strategic and fundamental component in lead metallurgy (production of refined lead, Pb-Ca alloys in the battery and cable industry, ferroalloys production with the addition of silicon and calcium, production of alloy steel and high-quality steel. This paper explores the preparation of lime by roasting the limestone deposits of Strezovci (Republic of Kosovo and its use for obtaining calcium through the aluminothermic process. Through research and analysis of the chemical composition of certain types of lime, its suitabi- lity for obtaining calcium metal was determined, and by analyzing the samples of the slag, determined was the possibility of its use in the production of fire-resistant cement for which the evaluation is needed. Based on previous research, the following was chosen: optimal composition of the cast, volume of added reducing agents, and conditions of the reduction process performance: temperature-time and initial vacuum. According to the authors’ knowledge, not one Southeast European country has applied this method, and it includes the use of by-products (slag, which can cause environmental pollution. The goal of this research was to prepare lime by roasting limestone of domestic origin in order to obtain calcium metal through the aluminothermic process. The procedure of calcium metal production includes the following operations: decarbonatization of limestone ore (CaCO3 , grinding of the obtained lime (CaO, homogenization of CaO and alumina, agglomeration, and aluminothermic reduction in vacuum furnaces. For the efficiency of the process, the most important technological operations are decarbonatization and reduction, provided the other operations are performed correctly. The estimated total world capacity for production of calcium metal is 25

  4. Drilling mortar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodorescu, V; Ditulescu, E

    1979-01-30

    A method is proposed for producing stable drilling mortar from drilled rock which makes it possible to stabilize the walls of the borehole and to maintain producing horizons of oil and gas wells in an undisturbed state. The proposed drilling mortar includes 5-12 wt.-% dry modified calcium lignosulfonate in the form of a solution containing about 30% dry matter with the addition of 0.1 wt.-% anti-foaming agent consisting of C/sub 19/-C/sub 20/ alcohol dissolved in a light petroleum product; cream of milk with about 10 wt.-% Ca(OH)/sub 2/ in a quantity sufficient for reducing the pH value of the ions down to 10.5; sodium chloride in amounts from 5 mg to 100 ml (aqueous phase); ordinarily used agents for ensuring the necessary density, viscosity, and filterability. For example, the preparation of the drilling fluid begins with the processing under laboratory conditions of lignosulfonic pulp obtained in the production of yeast fodder with the following characteristics: specific density, 1.15 kgf/dm/sup 3/; water content, 67% (according to the Dean and Stark method); pH 4.0. In the vessel is placed 1000 cm/sup 3/ lignosulfonic pulp containing 33% dry matter, and the pulp is heated to 90-95/sup 0/C by means of a water bath. To the heated pulp 33 cm/sup 3/ formic acid at a 40-% concentration is added by mixing. The specific temperature of the pulp is maintained in the constant mixing process for two hours. Then the cream of milk containing 10 wt.-% Ca(OH)/sub 2/ is added to raise the pH to 10.5. The cooled product is calcium lignosulfonate. To produce a stable form of the drilling mortar, 750 g clay and 10 g trass gel are added to a vessel containing 1500 cm/sup 3/ fresh water by means of mixing. The resulting dispersed mass remains at rest for 12 hours for purposes of hydration. Then 2 g of an anti-foaming agent dissolved in 6 cm/sup 3/ benzene is introduced to 1000 cm/sup 3/ modified calcium lignosulfonate produced by the above method.

  5. Effect of calcium cyanamide, ammonium bicarbonate and lime mixture, and ammonia water on survival of Ralstonia solanacearum and microbial community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lijuan; Sun, Chengliang; Liu, Xingxing; He, Xiaolin; Liu, Miao; Wu, Hao; Tang, Caixian; Jin, Chongwei; Zhang, Yongsong

    2016-01-01

    The inorganic nitrogenous amendments calcium cyanamide (CC), ammonia water (AW), and a mixture of ammonium bicarbonate with lime (A+L) are popularly used as fumigants to control soil-borne disease in China. However, it is unclear which of these fumigants is more effective in controlling R. solanacearum. This present study compared the efficiencies of the three nitrogenous amendments listed above at four nitrogen levels in suppressing the survival of R. solanacearum in soil. The CC showed the best ability to suppress R. solanacearum due to its highest capacity to increase soil and NO2− contents and pH. However, AW was more suitable to controlling bacterial wilt caused by R. solanacearum because it had a lower cost and its application rate of 0.25 g N kg−1 soil could effectively suppress the survival of R. solanacearum. Additionally, soil microbial activity and community populations were restored to their initial state four weeks after the application of each fumigant, indicating that the three fumigants had few detrimental impacts on soil microbial activity and community structure with an exception of the suppression of R. solanacearum. The present study provides guidance for the selection of a suitable alkaline nitrogenous amendment and its application rate in controlling bacterial wilt. PMID:26738601

  6. Effect of calcium cyanamide, ammonium bicarbonate and lime mixture, and ammonia water on survival of Ralstonia solanacearum and microbial community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lijuan; Sun, Chengliang; Liu, Xingxing; He, Xiaolin; Liu, Miao; Wu, Hao; Tang, Caixian; Jin, Chongwei; Zhang, Yongsong

    2016-01-01

    The inorganic nitrogenous amendments calcium cyanamide (CC), ammonia water (AW), and a mixture of ammonium bicarbonate with lime (A+L) are popularly used as fumigants to control soil-borne disease in China. However, it is unclear which of these fumigants is more effective in controlling R. solanacearum. This present study compared the efficiencies of the three nitrogenous amendments listed above at four nitrogen levels in suppressing the survival of R. solanacearum in soil. The CC showed the best ability to suppress R. solanacearum due to its highest capacity to increase soil and NO2- contents and pH. However, AW was more suitable to controlling bacterial wilt caused by R. solanacearum because it had a lower cost and its application rate of 0.25 g N kg-1 soil could effectively suppress the survival of R. solanacearum. Additionally, soil microbial activity and community populations were restored to their initial state four weeks after the application of each fumigant, indicating that the three fumigants had few detrimental impacts on soil microbial activity and community structure with an exception of the suppression of R. solanacearum. The present study provides guidance for the selection of a suitable alkaline nitrogenous amendment and its application rate in controlling bacterial wilt.

  7. Mechanical resilience and cementitious processes in Imperial Roman architectural mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Marie D; Landis, Eric N; Brune, Philip F; Vitti, Massimo; Chen, Heng; Li, Qinfei; Kunz, Martin; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Monteiro, Paulo J M; Ingraffea, Anthony R

    2014-12-30

    The pyroclastic aggregate concrete of Trajan's Markets (110 CE), now Museo Fori Imperiali in Rome, has absorbed energy from seismic ground shaking and long-term foundation settlement for nearly two millenia while remaining largely intact at the structural scale. The scientific basis of this exceptional service record is explored through computed tomography of fracture surfaces and synchroton X-ray microdiffraction analyses of a reproduction of the standardized hydrated lime-volcanic ash mortar that binds decimeter-sized tuff and brick aggregate in the conglomeratic concrete. The mortar reproduction gains fracture toughness over 180 d through progressive coalescence of calcium-aluminum-silicate-hydrate (C-A-S-H) cementing binder with Ca/(Si+Al) ≈ 0.8-0.9 and crystallization of strätlingite and siliceous hydrogarnet (katoite) at ≥ 90 d, after pozzolanic consumption of hydrated lime was complete. Platey strätlingite crystals toughen interfacial zones along scoria perimeters and impede macroscale propagation of crack segments. In the 1,900-y-old mortar, C-A-S-H has low Ca/(Si+Al) ≈ 0.45-0.75. Dense clusters of 2- to 30-µm strätlingite plates further reinforce interfacial zones, the weakest link of modern cement-based concrete, and the cementitious matrix. These crystals formed during long-term autogeneous reaction of dissolved calcite from lime and the alkali-rich scoriae groundmass, clay mineral (halloysite), and zeolite (phillipsite and chabazite) surface textures from the Pozzolane Rosse pyroclastic flow, erupted from the nearby Alban Hills volcano. The clast-supported conglomeratic fabric of the concrete presents further resistance to fracture propagation at the structural scale.

  8. Calcium hydroxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrate - calcium; Lime milk; Slaked lime ... Calcium hydroxide ... These products contain calcium hydroxide: Cement Limewater Many industrial solvents and cleaners (hundreds to thousands of construction products, flooring strippers, brick cleaners, cement ...

  9. Dolomitic lime containing hydraulic additive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagzdina, S.; Sedmalis, U.; Bidermanis, L.; Liepins, J.; Grosvalds, I.

    1997-01-01

    To obtain qualitative dolomitic lime the optimum calcination temperature of dolomite containing about 9 % of clayey substances is 900 deg C. The mechanical strength of dolomitic lime containing 30 % of brick waste additive after 6-9 months of hardening is 1.4-1.5 times higher than that of samples without hydraulic additive, for calcium lime - 2.2-2.6 times higher. Generally the mechanical strength of dolomitic lime is higher than that one of calcium lime. It can be explained by the active role of MgO in the hydration and hardening processes of dolomitic lime. Xray diffraction phase analysis was performed by X-ray diffractometer DPON-3M with Cu-K α emission filter

  10. Trichloroethylene decomposition and in-situ dry sorption of Cl-products by calcium oxides prepared from hydrated limes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Yoshimi; Iwata, Goichi; Choh, Kyaw; Kubota, Mitsuhiro; Matsuda, Hitoki

    2011-10-01

    A comparison of CaOs produced by calcining two types of hydrated lime and calcium carbonate was made for decomposition of trichloroethylene and in-situ dry sorption of the decomposed Cl-products using a lab-scale gas flow type tubular packed bed reactor. About 20 mg of CaO sample was mixed with about 2 g of Al2O3 particles and packed in the reactor and allowed to react with a flowing standard gas containing 500 ppm of C2HCl3 (N2 balance) at 673 and 873 K, under the condition that the reaction of CaO with C2HCl3 might be completed within a few hours. It was found that no thermal decomposition of C2HCl3 at or below 673 K was observed in a reactor packed only with Al2O3 particles. However, a considerable amount of decomposition of C2HCl3 was obtained in a reactor packed with CaO and Al2O3, even at 673 K. For 1 mol of CaO prepared by calcining highly reactive Ca(OH)2 at 673 K, decomposition of 0.42 mol of C2HCl3 and in-situ absorption product of 0.53 mol of CaCl2 were obtained. At 873 K, about 46% of C2HCl3 was thermally decomposed. The total amount of C2HCl3 decomposed in CaO-Al2O3 particle bed at 873 K became nearly twice larger than that at 673 K. For 1 mol of CaO prepared by calcining highly reactive Ca(OH)2 at 873 K, decomposition of 0.59 mol of C2HCl3 and in-situ absorption product of 0.67 mol of CaCl2 were obtained. Small amounts of C2Cl2, C2Cl4, CCl4, etc. were detected during decomposition of C2HCl3 at 673 and 873 K. It was recognized that the data on decomposition of C2HCl3 as well as in-situ dry sorption of Cl-products in CaO particle bed were correlated with specific surface area of the CaO employed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Radiocarbon dating of mortars from ancient Greek palaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zouridakis, N.; Saliege, J.F.; Person, A.; Filippakis, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    The study deals with radiocarbon dating of lime mortars which were used as supports for Mycenaean and Minoan paintings. The 14 C dates are, on the whole, compatible with the historical data, and thus show that a large proportion of the Mycenaean surficial coatings can be dated by the radiocarbon method. However, in order to determine the age of the mortars accurately, it is necessary to evaluate the amount of sedimentary carbonate which may have been added to them. It is shown here that the oxygen and carbon isotope compositions of lime mortars are significant indicators that such a mixing actually took place. (author)

  12. Radiocarbon dating of mortars from ancient Greek palaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zouridakis, N.; Saliege, J.F.; Person, A.; Filippakis, S.E.

    1987-02-01

    The study deals with radiocarbon dating of lime mortars which were used as supports for Mycenaean and Minoan paintings. The /sup 14/C dates are, on the whole, compatible with the historical data, and thus show that a large proportion of the Mycenaean surficial coatings can be dated by the radiocarbon method. However, in order to determine the age of the mortars accurately, it is necessary to evaluate the amount of sedimentary carbonate which may have been added to them. It is shown here that the oxygen and carbon isotope compositions of lime mortars are significant indicators that such a mixing actually took place.

  13. Compressive strength of brick masonry made with weak mortars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Erik Steen; Hansen, Klavs Feilberg

    2013-01-01

    in the joint will ensure a certain level of load-carrying capacity. This is due to the interaction between compression in the weak mortar and tension in the adjacent bricks. This paper proposes an expression for the compressive strength of masonry made with weak lime mortars (fm... of masonry depends only on the strength of the bricks. A compression failure in masonry made with weak mortars occurs as a tension failure in the bricks, as they seek to prevent the mortar from being pressed out of the joints. The expression is derived by assuming hydrostatic pressure in the mortar joints......, which is the most unfavourable stress distribution with respect to tensile stresses in bricks. The expression is compared with the results of compression tests of masonry made with weak mortars. It can take into account bricks with arbitrary dimensions as well as perforated bricks. For a stronger mortar...

  14. The Impact of Additive on the Properties of Fresh and Hardened Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurga Šeputytė

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the impact of additives on the properties of mortar. For investigation purposes, two types of Portland cement (CEM II/A-LL 42.5 N and CEM I N (MA, fine aggregate sand, lime, water and air-entraining and stabilizing additives were used. To determine the effects of additives on the mortar mix, the analysis of cone penetration into the mix, mortar mobility, water extraction out of mortar, density and flexural and compressive testing were conducted. When put into mortar, air-entraining and stabilizing additives changed structure. In this case, density and flexural and compressive strength of mortar are reduced.

  15. Application of microbial biocementation to improve the physico-mechanical properties of cement mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Abo-El-Enein

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Calcite is one of the most common and wide spread mineral on Earth constituting 4 wt% of the Earth’s crust. It is naturally found in extensive sedimentary rock masses, as lime stone marble and calcareous sandstone in marine, fresh water and terrestrial environments. Calcium carbonate is one of the most well known mineral that bacteria deposit by the phenomenon called biocementation or microbiologically induced calcite precipitation (MICP. Such deposits have recently emerged as promising binders for protecting and consolidating various building materials. Microbially enhanced calcite precipitation on concrete or mortar has become an important area of research regarding construction materials. This study describes a method of strength and water absorption improvement of cement–sand mortar by the microbiologically induced calcium carbonate precipitation. A moderately alkalophilic aerobic Sporosarcina pasteurii was incorporated at different cell concentrations with the mixing water. The study showed that a 33% increase in 28 days compressive strength of cement mortar was achieved with the addition of about one optical density (1 OD of bacterial cells with mixing water. The strength and water absorption improvement are due to the growth of calcite crystals within the pores of the cement–sand matrix as indicated from the microstructure obtained from scanning electron microscopy (SEM examination.

  16. [Study on Archaeological Lime Powders from Taosi and Yinxu Sites by FTIR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guo-feng; Zhang, Chen; Chen, Guo-liang; He, Yu-ling; Gao, Jiang-tao; Zhang, Bing-jian

    2015-03-01

    Archaeological lime powders samples from Taosi and Yinxu sites, natural limestone and experimentally prepared lime mortar were investigated by means of Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) to identify the raw material of lime powders from Taosi and Yinxu sites. Results show that ν2/ν4 ratio of calcite resulted from carbonation reaction of man-made lime is around 6.31, which is higher than that of calcite in natural limestone and reflects the difference in the disorder of calcite crystal structure among the natural limestone and prepared lime mortar. With additional grinding, the values of v2 and ν4 in natural limestone and prepared lime mortar decrease. Meanwhile, the trend lines of ν2 versus ν4 for calcite in experimentally prepared lime mortar have a steeper slope when compared to calcite in natural limestone. These imply that ν2/ν4 ratio and the slope of the trend lines of ν2 versus ν4 can be used to determine the archaeological man-made lime. Based on the experiment results, it is possible that the archaeological lime powder from Taosi and Yinxu sites was prepared using man-made lime and the ancient Chinese have mastered the calcining technology of man-made lime in the late Neolithic period about 4 300 years ago.

  17. MORTAR WITH UNSERVICEABLE TIRE RESIDUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Canova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the effects of unserviceable tire residues on rendering mortar using lime and washed sand at a volumetric proportion of 1:6. The ripened composite was dried in an oven and combined with both cement at a volumetric proportion of 1:1.5:9 and rubber powder in proportional aggregate volumes of 6, 8, 10, and 12%. Water exudation was evaluated in the plastic state. Water absorption by capillarity, fresh shrinkage and mass loss, restrained shrinkage and mass loss, void content, flexural strength, and deformation energy under compression were evaluated in the hardened state. There was an improvement in the water exudation and water absorption by capillarity and drying shrinkage, as well as a reduction of the void content and flexural strength. The product studied significantly aided the water exudation from mortar and, capillary elevation in rendering.

  18. MORTAR WITH UNSERVICEABLE TIRE RESIDUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Aparecido Canova

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the effects of unserviceable tire residues on rendering mortar using lime and washed sand at a volumetric proportion of 1:6. The ripened composite was dried in an oven and combined with both cement at a volumetric proportion of 1:1.5:9 and rubber powder in proportional aggregate volumes of 6, 8, 10, and 12%. Water exudation was evaluated in the plastic state. Water absorption by capillarity, fresh shrinkage and mass loss, restrained shrinkage and mass loss, void content, flexural strength, and deformation energy under compression were evaluated in the hardened state. There was an improvement in the water exudation and water absorption by capillarity and drying shrinkage, as well as a reduction of the void content and flexural strength. The product studied significantly aided the water exudation from mortar and, capillary elevation in rendering.

  19. PREPARATION OF MORTARS FOR RESTORATION OF ARCHITECTURAL MONUMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TEREZA TRIBULOVÁ

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mortar mixtures were prepared considering the microscopic observation, granulometric analysis, mercury porosimetry, XRD analysis, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis of the original plaster. Two series of lime mortar samples containing identical mixture of aggregates and admixtures but varying in the kind of a lime binder were prepared. In addition, the sample series varied in the ratio between mixing aggregate and binder. Prepared test bodies were subjected to accelerated carbonation process. Carbonated samples were characterized by the measurement of compressive strength, open porosity, water absorption and resistance to salt crystallization. The samples were also again compared with the original plaster by optical microscopy and XRD analysis. Based on the results of analyses of the original plasters and prepared samples of repair mortar the sample containing lime slurry with the mixture of aggregates in the mixing ratio of 1 : 2 was recommended for the restoration procedure.

  20. Mørtelegenskaber og billedbehandling (Mortar properties and image processing)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders

    1998-01-01

    The properties of lime mortars can be essentially improved by adding fillers to the mortars in an intelligent way. This is shown in the thesis of Thorborg von Konow (1997).The changes in the pore structure and the following changes in properties can be treated by means of the rules in materials m...... mechanics developed by Lauge Fuglsang Nielsen on this institute. The necessary pore characteristics are measured by means of image processing....

  1. Time evolution of pore system in lime - Pozzolana composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doleželová, Magdaléna; Čáchová, Monika; Scheinherrová, Lenka; Keppert, Martin

    2017-11-01

    The lime - pozzolana mortars and plasters are used in restoration works on building cultural heritage but these materials are also following the trend of energy - efficient solutions in civil engineering. Porosity and pore size distribution is one of crucial parameters influencing engineering properties of porous materials. The pore size distribution of lime based system is changing in time due to chemical processes occurring in the material. The present paper describes time evolution of pore system in lime - pozzolana composites; the obtained results are useful in prediction of performance of lime - pozzolana systems in building structures.

  2. Properties of Calcium Acetate Manufactured with Etching Waste Solution and Limestone Sludge as a Cementitious High-Early-Strength Admixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deuck-Mo Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is one of the most widely used construction materials. There are several methods available to improve its performance, with one of them being the use of high-early-strength admixtures (HESAs. Typical HESAs include calcium nitrate, calcium chloride, and calcium formate (CF. Industrial by-products, such as acetic acid and lime stone sludge (LSS, can be used together to produce calcium acetate (CA, which can subsequently be used as a cementitious HESA. In this study, calcium carbonate and LSS were mixed with cement in weight ratios of 1 : 1, 1 : 1.5, and 1 : 2, and the properties of the as-produced CA were evaluated. CA and CF were mixed with cement in different weight ratios (0, 1, 2, and 3 wt% to obtain CA- and CF-mortars, respectively. The flow behavior, setting time, pH, and compressive strength of these mortars were evaluated, and their X-ray diffraction patterns were also analyzed. It was found that as the CF content in the CF-mortar increased, the initial strength of the mortar also increased. However, it impaired its long-term strength. On the other hand, when 1% CA was mixed with cement, satisfactory early and long-term strengths were achieved. Thus, CA, which is obtained from industrial by-products, can be an effective HESA.

  3. Water extraction out of mortar during brick laying: A NMR study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brocken, H.J.P.; Spiekman, M.E.; Pel, L.; Kopinga, K.; Larbi, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    The water extraction out of mortar during brick laying was studied using nuclear magnetic resonance. The experiments show that using a fired-clay brick, the water is extracted out of the mortar within 3 minutes, whereas in the case of a sand-lime brick this takes about 10 minutes. Prewetting a

  4. Water extraction out of mortar during brick laying : a NMR study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brocken, H.J.P.; Spiekman, M.E.; Kopinga, K.; Larbi, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    The water extraction out of mortar during brick laying was studied using nuclear magnetic resonance. The experiments show that using a fired-clay brick, the water is extracted out of the mortar within 3 minutes, whereas in the case of a sand-lime brick this takes about 10 minutes. Prewetting a

  5. Stiffness plasticity degradation of masonry mortar under compression: preliminary results : Perda de rigidez da argamassa de assentamento da alvenaria comprimida: resultados preliminares

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohamad, G.; Fonseca, F.S.; Vermeltfoort, A.T.; Lubeck, A.

    2018-01-01

    The main goal of this research is to determine the mechanical properties of bedding mortar by assessing the mortar damage onset, the stiff ness plasticity degradation and the apparent Poisson´s ratio under compression. Two mortar types, 1:0.5:4 and 1:1:6 (cement:lime:sand ratio), were used and

  6. Comparative investigation of mortars from Roman Colosseum and cistern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, D.A. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 725 Davis Hall 94720-1710, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (United States)]. E-mail: denise@ecv.ufsc.br; Wenk, H.R. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, 497 McCone 94720-4767, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (United States); Monteiro, P.J.M. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 725 Davis Hall 94720-1710, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2005-11-01

    Mortar from the Roman Colosseum and a Roman cistern from Albano Laziale were characterized with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and thermal analysis (differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)). The different techniques provided consistent results that the mortar of the Colosseum is mainly calcareous lime, while the mortar of the cistern is pozzolanic siliceous material. The study highlights the capabilities of the different methods for the analysis of cement. For routine analysis XRD is adequate but for characterization of poorly crystalline phases FT-IR and TGA have definite advantages.

  7. Comparative investigation of mortars from Roman Colosseum and cistern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, D.A.; Wenk, H.R.; Monteiro, P.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Mortar from the Roman Colosseum and a Roman cistern from Albano Laziale were characterized with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and thermal analysis (differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)). The different techniques provided consistent results that the mortar of the Colosseum is mainly calcareous lime, while the mortar of the cistern is pozzolanic siliceous material. The study highlights the capabilities of the different methods for the analysis of cement. For routine analysis XRD is adequate but for characterization of poorly crystalline phases FT-IR and TGA have definite advantages

  8. Subgrade stabilization alternatives to lime and cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-15

    This project involved four distinct research activities, (1) the influence of temperature on lime-stabilized soils, (2) the influence of temperature on cement-stabilized soils (3) temperature modeling of stabilized subgrade and (4) use of calcium chl...

  9. Study on effective modifiers for damaging salts in mortar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granneman, S.J.C.; Ruiz-Agudo, E.; Lubelli, B.A.; Hees, R.P.J. van; Rodgriguez-Navarro

    2014-01-01

    The use of crystallization modifiers for the prevention or mitigation of salt crystallization damage has recently received a lot of research interest in the field of building conservation. However, the use of crystallization modifiers mixed in a lime-based mortar, is still a very new field of

  10. AMS radiocarbon dating of mortar: The case study of the medieval UNESCO site of Modena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmine, Lubritto [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Ambientali, Biologiche e Farmaceutiche & CIRCE lab, Seconda Università degli Studi di Napoli, I-81100 Caserta (Italy); Caroselli, Marta; Lugli, Stefano [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Geologiche, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, I-41100 Modena (Italy); Marzaioli, Fabio [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica & CIRCE lab, Seconda Università degli Studi di Napoli, I-81100 Caserta (Italy); Nonni, Sara [Università degli Studi “Sapienza”, Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Marchetti Dori, S. [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Geologiche, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, I-41100 Modena (Italy); Terrasi, Filippo [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica & CIRCE lab, Seconda Università degli Studi di Napoli, I-81100 Caserta (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    The carbon dioxide contributing to binder formation during the set of a lime mortar reflects the atmospheric {sup 14}C content at the time of construction of a building. For this reason, the {sup 14}C dating of mortars is used with increasing frequencies in archaeological and architectural research. Mortars, however, may also contain carbonaceous contaminants potentially affecting radiocarbon dating. The Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental heritage (CIRCE) of the Second University of Naples (SUN) has recently obtained some promising results in mortar radiocarbon dating thanks to the development of a procedure (i.e. CryoSoniC/Cryo2SoniC) aiming to eliminate exogenous C contamination that may occur in a mortar. The construction history of the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Modena (Italy) is still controversial and represents a challenging case study for the application of absolute dating methodologies for different reasons. From the point of view of {sup 14}C dating, for example, given the high percentage of carbonate aggregates composing these samples, Modena mortars represent an experimental test particularly indicative of exogenous carbon sources suppression ensuring methodology accuracy. In this paper several AMS Radiocarbon dates were carried out on lime lumps with the aim to: (i) verify procedure accuracy by a comparison of the results obtainable from lime lumps dated after different treatments (i.e. bulk lime lumps vs. CryoSoniC purified lime lumps); (ii) compare different building phases absolute chronology for the medieval UNESCO site of Modena, with that assumed by historical sources in order to assess preliminary the {sup 14}C dating feasibility for of the site. Historical temporal constraints and mortar clustering, based on petrography, have been applied to define a temporal framework of the analyzed structure. Moreover, a detailed petrographic characterization of mortars was used both as a preliminary tool for the choice of samples

  11. Specification and time required for the application of a lime-based render inside historic buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasco Peixoto de Freitas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Intervention in ancient buildings with historical and architectural value requires traditional techniques, such as the use of lime mortars for internal and external wall renderings. In order to ensure the desired performance, these rendering mortars must be rigorously specified and quality controls have to be performed during application. The choice of mortar composition should take account of factors such as compatibility with the substrate, mechanical requirements and water behaviour. The construction schedule, which used to be considered a second order variable, nowadays plays a decisive role in the selection of the rendering technique, given its effects upon costs. How should lime-based mortars be specified? How much time is required for the application and curing of a lime-based render? This paper reflects upon the feasibility of using traditional lime mortars in three-layer renders inside churches and monasteries under adverse hygrothermal conditions and when time is critical. A case study is presented in which internal lime mortar renderings were applied in a church in Northern Portugal, where the very high relative humidity meant that several months were necessary before the drying process was complete.

  12. Scientific studies on decorated mud mortar of Ajanta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is an attempt to reveal the decorated earthen plaster of Ajanta. The mud plaster of Ajanta caves has been analyzed with the help of physical and analytical tools. The results indicate that high silt (>70% low clay soil may have been mixed purposefully with lime (calcite for the reason to enhance the cementing characteristics. The presence of calcium oxalate was detected from FTIR spectra may have been the resultant product of proteic materials presented in mud plaster. Ferrugineous silicate along with rarer gluconite–celendonite and white zeolites were also perceived from SEM and FTIR spectral analysis. The existence of quartz and sepiolite in mud mortar was also detected from XRD and SEM studies. The vegetal matter might have been added to tailor the construction behavior. The analytical results authenticate the similarity of earthen plaster of Ajanta and alluvion deposits of Waghura River just in front of caves, probably used as raw material in improvement of new material that suits for restoration for optimize performance and compatibility with the existing materials.

  13. Uso do residuo de beneficiamento de rochas ornamentais na producao de argamassa de multiplo uso; Use of the ornamental rock waste in mortar multiple-use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faial, Alline Silveira Ribeiro; Xavier, Gustavo de Castro; Alexandre, Jonas; Maia, Paulo Cesar de Almeida; Albuquerque Junior, Fernando Saboya, E-mail: gxavier@uenf.br [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense Darcy Ribeiro (UENF/LECIV), Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Engenharia Civil

    2012-07-01

    The municipal district of Itapemirim-ES is the largest producer of ornamental stones in Brazil. The processing of these rocks for the manufacture of floor and produces a large amount of waste approximately 15,000 tons/month, which still are responsible for damage to the environment. Aiming at the use of this waste, this paper studies experimentally the production of mortars of multiple use, making the replacement of the use of hydrated lime, widely used in the manufacture of mortars in construction, by the waste of the processing of a marble industry Itapemirim -ES. The mortar waste was characterized and evaluated by comparing performance with mortar with the addition of hydrated lime. We used a slurry with lime as a reference, ie the mixture was made of 1:1:8 (cement: waste / lime sand), where the workability and the properties of the hardened condition were evaluated and compared with the mortars made with the waste of marble. The compressive strength results showed that the waste with lime mortars were 1.6 ± 0.5 MPa and 1.4 MPa respectively ± 0.6 after 28 days of curing, two were classified as P1 (ABNT 13279, 2005), can replace the waste lime, thereby reducing the cost of manufacture of the mortar. (author)

  14. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You can get decent amounts of calcium from baked beans, navy beans, white beans, and others. Canned fish. You're in luck if you like sardines and canned salmon with bones. Almond milk. Working Calcium Into Your ...

  15. Immobilization of IFR salt wastes in mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, D.F.; Johnson, T.R.

    1988-01-01

    Portland cement-base mortars are being considered for immobilizing chloride salt wastes produced by the fuel cycles of Integral Fast Reactors (IFR). The IFR is a sodium-cooled fast reactor with metal alloy fuels. It has a close-coupled fuel cycle in which fission products are separated from the actinides in an electrochemical cell operating at 500/degree/C. This cell has a liquid cadmium anode in which the fuels are dissolved and a liquid salt electrolyte. The salt will be a mixture of either lithium, potassium, and sodium chlorides or lithium, calcium, barium, and sodium chlorides. One method being considered for immobilizing the treated nontransuranic salt waste is to disperse the salt in a portland cement-base mortar that will be sealed in corrosion-resistant containers. For this application, the grout must be sufficiently fluid that it can be pumped into canister-molds where it will solidify into a strong, leach-resistant material. The set times must be longer than a few hours to allow sufficient time for processing, and the mortar must reach a reasonable compressive strength (/approximately/7 MPa) within three days to permit handling. Because fission product heating will be high, about 0.6 W/kg for a mortar containing 10% waste salt, the effects of elevated temperatures during curing and storage on mortar properties must be considered

  16. Liming of acid tropical soils: practice, prospects and constraints ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    But the incidental inclusion of liming materials in fertilizers has not been effective and sustainable due to the intensive land use activities, constant application of acid-forming chemical fertilizers, leaching losses of bases and crop removal. Liming materials themselves vary in their calcium and magnesium contents and ...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1210 - Calcium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium oxide. 184.1210 Section 184.1210 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1210 Calcium oxide. (a) Calcium oxide (CaO, CAS Reg. No. 1305-78-8) is also known as lime, quick lime, burnt lime, or calx. It is produced from calcium carbonate, limestone, or...

  18. Experimental Effects of Lime Application on Aquatic Macrophytes: 2. Growth Response Versus Treatment Time and Lime Concentration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    James, William F; Barko, John W

    2006-01-01

    This research investigated the effects of applying lime (as calcium hydroxide; Ca(OH)2) either early or later in the life cycle on the growth, survivorship, and reproductive success of Sago Pondweed...

  19. Influence of Chloride-Ion Adsorption Agent on Chloride Ions in Concrete and Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gai-Fei Peng

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The influence of a chloride-ion adsorption agent (Cl agent in short, composed of zeolite, calcium aluminate hydrate and calcium nitrite, on the ingress of chloride ions into concrete and mortar has been experimentally studied. The permeability of concrete was measured, and the chloride ion content in mortar was tested. The experimental results reveal that the Cl agent could adsorb chloride ions effectively, which had penetrated into concrete and mortar. When the Cl agent was used at a dosage of 6% by mass of cementitious materials in mortar, the resistance to the penetration of chloride ions could be improved greatly, which was more pronounced when a combination of the Cl agent and fly ash or slag was employed. Such an effect is not the result of the low permeability of the mortar, but might be a result of the interaction between the Cl agent and the chloride ions penetrated into the mortar. There are two possible mechanisms for the interaction between the Cl agent and chloride ion ingress. One is the reaction between calcium aluminate hydrate in the Cl agent and chloride ions to form Friedel’s salt, and the other one is that calcium aluminate hydrate reacts with calcium nitrite to form AFm during the early-age hydration of mortar and later the NO2− in AFm is replaced by chloride ions, which then penetrate into the mortar, also forming Friedel’s salt. More research is needed to confirm the mechanisms.

  20. Application and properties of pure lime façades - case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta Bokan Bosiljkov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents experiences obtained during application and testing of different pure lime façades that could be successfully used in restoration of historical buildings in Slovenia. The lime façade consists of a rendering layer (rough mortar, a finishing layer (fine mortar and a protective layer of lime wash. For the design of the mortars different industrially and traditionally produced limes were chosen, based on the results of preliminary studies of the authors and experiences of a small enterprise (SE involved in the study. The façade layers were applied to the most problematic northern wall of the historic chapel made from rubble masonry. The chapel belongs to the castle Crnelo, built at the end of the 17th century in the village Turnše, not far from Ljubljana, the capital of Slovenia. The façade layers were made by skilled workers of SE, with about one year time difference between application of rendering and finishing layers, and with a protective layer of coloured lime wash applied to one to three day old finishing layers. On the rendering layers, visual inspection, water absorption tests and determination of carbonation depth were carried out before subsequent finishing layers were applied. The same on-site tests were carried out also on finished façade layers. So far, parallel to the on-site tests, compressive and water absorption tests on prisms prepared from rough mortars were carried out in laboratory.

  1. Removal of phosphate from greenhouse wastewater using hydrated lime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunets, C Siobhan; Zheng, Youbin

    2014-01-01

    Phosphate (P) contamination in nutrient-laden wastewater is currently a major topic of discussion in the North American greenhouse industry. Precipitation of P as calcium phosphate minerals using hydrated lime could provide a simple, inexpensive method for retrieval. A combination of batch experiments and chemical equilibrium modelling was used to confirm the viability of this P removal method and determine lime addition rates and pH requirements for greenhouse wastewater of varying nutrient compositions. Lime: P ratio (molar ratio of CaMg(OH)₄: PO₄‒P) provided a consistent parameter for estimating lime addition requirements regardless of initial P concentration, with a ratio of 1.5 providing around 99% removal of dissolved P. Optimal P removal occurred when lime addition increased the pH from 8.6 to 9.0, suggesting that pH monitoring during the P removal process could provide a simple method for ensuring consistent adherence to P removal standards. A Visual MINTEQ model, validated using experimental data, provided a means of predicting lime addition and pH requirements as influenced by changes in other parameters of the lime-wastewater system (e.g. calcium concentration, temperature, and initial wastewater pH). Hydrated lime addition did not contribute to the removal of macronutrient elements such as nitrate and ammonium, but did decrease the concentration of some micronutrients. This study provides basic guidance for greenhouse operators to use hydrated lime for phosphate removal from greenhouse wastewater.

  2. Interpreting chemistry and technology of lime binders and implementing it in the conservation field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Zacharopoulou

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper is the compilation, review and dissemination of updated scientific knowledge on lime theory and technology in the field of heritage conservation. The strong evidence of the last decade's research on the positive effect of the - not demonstrable by a chemical equation – 'key' missing link of the maturation process is highlighted. It is demonstrated that the exceptional perfor -mance characteristics of durable lime based mortars predominately rely on the capacity for rapid, efficient and extensive carbonation of the air-hardening phase of limes, in particular when matured (nanoparticle wet slaked lime putties are used; and on the chemical and mechanical stability of the strength components (principally CSHs of the hydraulic phase of limes, which is higher in their more crystalline forms of historical lime-pozzolan mixtures than in their amorphous forms of modern cements. Hence, physicochemical adhesion and cohesion bonds both at the lime matrix and at the binder/aggregate interfaces are ensured imparting minimization of cracks and durability to lime based mortars and historic masonries. The comprehensive documentation of the former leads to optimal materials and procedures to preserve our cultural heritage.

  3. Hygroscopic slaking of lime with steam or humid air. New energy effective lime slaking technology in kraft pulping; Hygroskopisk slaeckning av kalk med aanga eller fuktig luft. Ny energieffektiv teknik foer slaeckning av mesakalk i sulfatmassaindustrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundqvist, Roland

    2005-12-15

    Lime stone is widely used in chemical recovery for regeneration of white liquor in kraft pulping. Slaked (hydrated) lime is used to convert (causticize) sodium carbonate into sodium hydroxide, whereby lime mud (calcium carbonate) precipitates from the solution. Lime mud is dried and reburned in a lime kiln, where burned lime (calcium oxide) is formed. The circle is closed when lime is slaked (hydrated) in green liquor in an exotherm reaction. Problems with traditional slaking method is that heat is recovered at low temperatures. With the method described in this report there is potential to increase heat recovery in the causticizing plant. The forecasted method means that lime is slaked with steam or humid air, for example combined with a lime mud drier and a lime kiln. The task has included slaking of burned lime with steam or humid hot air, on purpose to test a specific machine equipment in pilote scale, and to investigate temperatures and hydratization rates able to reach. Also the lime slaked with steam/humid air should be compared with burned lime slaked in green liquor when green liquor is causticized, and to investigate the dewatering properties of formed lime mud. The target group is pulp and paper industry using the kraft process. The tests have been performed at SMA Svenska Mineral AB plant (lime burning) at Sandarne Sweden in years 2004-2005. Hydrated lime of varying slaking rates has been produced at temperatures up to 270 deg C. Caustizicing being performed show that dewatering properties of lime mud formed is quite up to the standard of lime mud from burned lime slaked in green liquor. The apprehension, that the hygroscopic slaked lime should result in lime mud difficult to dewater, has not become true. Important experiences have come out which could be used as a base in further investigations.

  4. AMS radiocarbon dating of mortar: The case study of the medieval UNESCO site of Modena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmine, Lubritto; Caroselli, Marta; Lugli, Stefano; Marzaioli, Fabio; Nonni, Sara; Marchetti Dori, S.; Terrasi, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    The carbon dioxide contributing to binder formation during the set of a lime mortar reflects the atmospheric "1"4C content at the time of construction of a building. For this reason, the "1"4C dating of mortars is used with increasing frequencies in archaeological and architectural research. Mortars, however, may also contain carbonaceous contaminants potentially affecting radiocarbon dating. The Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental heritage (CIRCE) of the Second University of Naples (SUN) has recently obtained some promising results in mortar radiocarbon dating thanks to the development of a procedure (i.e. CryoSoniC/Cryo2SoniC) aiming to eliminate exogenous C contamination that may occur in a mortar. The construction history of the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Modena (Italy) is still controversial and represents a challenging case study for the application of absolute dating methodologies for different reasons. From the point of view of "1"4C dating, for example, given the high percentage of carbonate aggregates composing these samples, Modena mortars represent an experimental test particularly indicative of exogenous carbon sources suppression ensuring methodology accuracy. In this paper several AMS Radiocarbon dates were carried out on lime lumps with the aim to: (i) verify procedure accuracy by a comparison of the results obtainable from lime lumps dated after different treatments (i.e. bulk lime lumps vs. CryoSoniC purified lime lumps); (ii) compare different building phases absolute chronology for the medieval UNESCO site of Modena, with that assumed by historical sources in order to assess preliminary the "1"4C dating feasibility for of the site. Historical temporal constraints and mortar clustering, based on petrography, have been applied to define a temporal framework of the analyzed structure. Moreover, a detailed petrographic characterization of mortars was used both as a preliminary tool for the choice of samples and to infer

  5. Mineralogical and microstructural studies of mortars from the bath complex of the Roman villa rustica near Mosnje (Slovenia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramar, Sabina; Zalar, Vesna; Urosevic, Maja; Koerner, Wilfried; Mauko, Alenka; Mirtic, Breda; Lux, Judita; Mladenovic, Ana

    2011-01-01

    This study deals with the characterization of mortars collected from bath complex of the Roman villa rustica from an archeological site near Mosnje (Slovenia). The mortar layers of the mosaics, wall paintings and mortar floors were investigated. A special aggregate consisting of brick fragments was present in the mortars studied. The mineralogical and petrographic compositions of the mortars were determined by means of optical microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and FTIR spectroscopy. Analysis of aggregate-binder interfaces using SEM-EDS revealed various types of reactivity rims. In order to assess the hydraulic characteristics of the mortars, the acid-soluble fractions were determined by ICP-OES. Furthermore, the results of Hg-porosimetry and gas sorption isotherms showed that mortars with a higher content of brick fragments particles exhibited a higher porosity and a greater BET surface area but a lower average pore diameter compared to mortars lacking this special aggregate. - Highlights: → Mineral and microstructural characterizations of brick-lime mortars. → Hydraulic character of mortars in Roman baths complex. → Reaction rims were observed around brick fragments and dolomitic grains. → Higher content of brick particles yielded a higher BET surface area. → Addition of brick particles increased porosity and diminished pore size diameter.

  6. Using Mortar Mixing Pump for Magnesia Mortars Preparing and Transporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyanets, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    The article is devoted to the problem of preparation and transportation of magnesia mortars with the help of screw mortar mixing pumps. The urgency of the wide use of mortars on magnesia binders (Sorel’s cement) in construction is substantiated due to their high characteristics: strength, hardening speed, wear resistance, possibility of using organic and mineral aggregates, ecological purity and economic efficiency. The necessity for the development of a technique for calculating the main parameters of a mortar mixing pump for its application in the technology of preparation and transportation of magnesia mortars is demonstrated. The analysis of various types of modern mortar mixing pumps is given. The conclusions are drawn about the advantages and disadvantages of standard schemes. The description of the experiment for determination of the productivity of a mortar mixing pump is described depending on the plasticity (mobility) of the used magnesia mortar. The graph and description of the mathematical dependency of the productivity of the mortar mixing pump on the magnesia mortar plasticity are given. On the basis of the obtained dependency, as well as the already known formulas given in the article, a new method is proposed for calculating the main parameters of the screw mortar mixing pump in preparation and transportation of magnesia mortar: productivity, feed range, supply pressure, drive power.

  7. Applying a biodeposition layer to increase the bond of a repair mortar on a mortar substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Snoeck, Didier; Wang, Jianyun; Bentz, D. P.; De Belie, Nele

    2018-01-01

    One of the major concerns in infrastructure repair is a sufficient bond between the substrate and the repair material, especially for the long-term performance and durability of the repaired structure. In this study, the bond of the repair material on the mortar substrate is promoted via the biodeposition of a calcium carbonate layer by a ureolytic bacterium. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to examine the interfaces between the repair material and the substrate, a...

  8. Improved mortar setup technique

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Villiers, D

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available bearing sensor. This concept focuses directly on one of the most cumbersome aspects of a mortar set-up, namely the use of aiming posts. The prismatic mirror and bearing dials is described as well as the required setup procedures. The measurement...

  9. The physical, chemical, and microscopic properties of masonry mortars from Alhambra Palace (Spain in reference to their earthquake resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanifi Binici

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Al-Andalus mortar is an ancient binding material (lime mortar that was used for centuries in numerous historical buildings in Al-Andalus, Granada (Spain. The physico-chemical and microscopic properties of Al-Andalus mortars in Granada were studied as part of an investigation into the mineral raw materials present in the territory of Spain. Scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction analyses of eight main types of mortars were performed to show the presence of calcite, gypsum, quartz, and muscovite minerals with organic fibers. Chemical analyses of the specimens showed that high SiO2+Al2O3+Fe2O3 contents yielded high values of hydraulicity and cementation indices. A significant result of this study was that mortars with high hydraulicity and cementation indices have high mechanical strengths. This characteristic may be the main reason for the earthquake resistance of the historical Alhambra Palace.

  10. Durability of Mortar Made with Fine Glass Powdered Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary Bom Conselho Sales

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Different studies investigate the use of waste glass in Portland cement compounds, either as aggregates or as supplementary cementitious materials. Nevertheless, it seems that there is no consensus about the influence of particle color and size on the behavior of the compounds. This study addresses the influence of cement replacement by 10 and 20% of the colorless and amber soda-lime glass particles sized around 9.5 μm on the performance of Portland cement mortars. Results revealed that the partial replacement of cement could contribute to the production of durable mortars in relation to the inhibition of the alkali-aggregate reaction. This effect was more marked with 20% replacement using amber glass. Samples containing glass microparticles were more resistant to corrosion, in particular those made of colorless glass. The use of colorless and amber glass microparticles promoted a reduction in wear resistance.

  11. An Aerobic Digestion of Lime Sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    removal. 1,2 After lime addition, phosphorus is considered to be in the form of calcium hydroxyapatite (Ca5-(OH)(P04 )3 ), which will not resolubilize...U: c a e - ~ -’ tr *cr. V. (r. C . -~~~ C c C C&c cj Ir u -. C Fy. - U C C - C F.~-cc 0.c gC - - gg MFC - - C -66 TABLE 20. SUMMARY OF LEAST

  12. 2nd Historic Mortars Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Hughes, John; Groot, Caspar; Historic Mortars : Characterisation, Assessment and Repair

    2012-01-01

    This volume focuses on research and practical issues connected with mortars on historic structures. The book is divided into four sections: Characterisation of Historic Mortars, Repair Mortars and Design Issues, Experimental Research into Properties of Repair Mortars, and Assessment and Testing. The papers present the latest work of researchers in their field. The individual contributions were selected from the contributions to the 2nd Historic Mortars Conference, which took place in Prague, September, 22-24, 2010. All papers were reviewed and improved as necessary before publication. This peer review process by the editors resulted in the 34 individual contributions included in here. One extra paper reviewing and summarising State-of-the-Art knowledge covered by this publication was added as a starting and navigational point for the reader. The editors believe that having these papers in print is important and they hope that it will stimulate further research into historic mortars and related subjects. 

  13. Lime kiln dust as a potential raw material in portland cement manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. Michael; Callaghan, Robert M.

    2004-01-01

    In the United States, the manufacture of portland cement involves burning in a rotary kiln a finely ground proportional mix of raw materials. The raw material mix provides the required chemical combination of calcium, silicon, aluminum, iron, and small amounts of other ingredients. The majority of calcium is supplied in the form of calcium carbonate usually from limestone. Other sources including waste materials or byproducts from other industries can be used to supply calcium (or lime, CaO), provided they have sufficiently high CaO content, have low magnesia content (less than 5 percent), and are competitive with limestone in terms of cost and adequacy of supply. In the United States, the lime industry produces large amounts of lime kiln dust (LKD), which is collected by dust control systems. This LKD may be a supplemental source of calcium for cement plants, if the lime and cement plants are located near enough to each other to make the arrangement economical.

  14. Rootstocks for 'Tahiti' lime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stenzel Neusa Maria Colauto

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The 'Tahiti' lime (Citrus latifolia Tanaka is an important commercial citrus cultivar in Brazil. 'Rangpur' lime has being used as its main rootstock, but it is susceptible to root rot caused by Phytophthora, reducing tree longevity. An experiment was set up in a randomized block design, with three trees per plot of each rootstock and four replicates, and run for 12 years, aiming to compare the performance of 'IAC-5 Tahiti' lime, budded on 'Rangpur' lime (Citrus limonia Osb.; 'C-13' citrange (Citrus sinensis (L. Osb. × Poncirus trifoliata (L. Raf.; 'African' rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri Lush.; 'Volkamer' lemon (Citrus volkameriana Ten. & Pasq.; trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata (L. Raf.; 'Sunki' mandarin (Citrus sunki Hort. ex Tan. and 'Cleopatra' mandarin (Citrus reshni Hort. ex Tan.. Eleven years after the establishment of the orchard, trees with the greatest canopy development were budded on 'C-13' citrange and 'African' rough lemon, and both differed significantly from trees budded on trifoliate orange, 'Sunki' and 'Cleopatra' mandarins, which presented the smallest canopy development. Trees budded on 'Rangpur' lime and 'C-13' citrange had the highest cumulative yields, and were different from trees budded on trifoliate orange, 'Cleopatra' and 'Sunki' mandarins. There was no rootstock effect on mean fruit weight and on the total soluble solid/acid ratio in the juice. The 'Rangpur' lime and the 'Cleopatra' mandarin rootstocks reduced longevity of plants.

  15. Ancient mortars from Cape Verde: mineralogical and physical characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Fernando; Costa, Cristiana; Velosa, Ana; Quintela, Ana; Terroso, Denise; Marques, Vera

    2014-05-01

    Times and locations of different building constructions means different knowledge, habits, different construction methods and materials. The study and safeguarding of the architectural heritage takes nowadays a progressive importance as a vehicle for transmission of cultures and history of nations. The coatings are of great importance in the durability of a building due to the protective role of the masonry. The compatibility between the materials with which they are executed (masonry, mortar and grout settlement) promotes the proper functioning of the wall and a consequent increase in durability. Therefore, it becomes important to study and characterize the mortar coating of buildings to know its characteristics and to use compatible materials in the rehabilitation and maintenance of buildings. This study aims to characterize the chemical, physical, mechanical and mineralogical mortar samples collected in buildings in three islands of Cape Verde, for the conservation, rehabilitation and preservation of them. The collected samples belong to buildings constructed in the end of XIX century and in the beginning of XX century. In order to characterize the mortar samples some tests was made, such as X-Ray Diffraction, X- Ray Fluorescence, acid attack and mechanical strength. The samples were divided into three groups depending on origin; so we have a first group collected on the island of Santiago, the second on the island of Saint Vincent and the third on the island of Santo Antao. The samples are all carbonated, but Santiago samples have a lower carbonates content. In terms of insoluble residue (from the acid attack) it was concluded that the samples have similar value ranging from 9 to 26%. The compressive strength of the mortars have a range between 1.36 and 4.55 MPa, which is related to the presence of more binder in samples with higher resistance. The chemical and mineralogical analyzes showed that these consist of lime mortars (binder), natural pozzolan and

  16. Effect of the Fineness of Artificial Pozzolana (Sarooj on the Properties of Lime-Pozzolana Mixes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel Wahid Hago

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Strength development of lime-pozzolana mortars is affected by the fineness of the pozzolan. This paper examines the effect of the fineness of artificial pozzolana on the strength development of lime-pozzolana mixtures. An artificial pozzolana produced by calcining clays from Oman was used in this study. The artificial pozzolana is locally known as “Sarooj”, and is currently being used in a big project for the restoration of historical monuments undertaken by the Omani Ministry of National Heritage and Culture. The artificial pozzolana was ground to various degrees of fineness, blended with hydrated lime with a ratio of 3:1, and the resulting mortar was used to make hardened mortar cubes. Strength of mortar cubes was measured at ages of 7, 14, 28 and 90 days of casting. The experimental results show that good artificial pozzolanas show a linear correlation between the Blaine fineness of the artificial pozzolana and the compressive strength, but such relationship does not exists for weak type pozzolanas. The fineness of the artificial pozzolana has its most significant effect on delayed strength gain, with more pronounced effect for good type pozzolan.

  17. Moisture transport properties of mortar and mortar joint: A NMR study

    OpenAIRE

    Brocken, H.J.P.; Adant, O.C.G.; Pel, L.

    1997-01-01

    The moisture transport in mortar and mortar joint often is an important parameter in degeneration of brick masonry and other block constructions. In this study, the influence of single additives on the moisture transport properties of mortar is investigated. Due to water extraction during brick laying, curing conditions of mortar in mortar joint differ from curing conditions of separately cured mortar. Consequently, the moisture transport properties of mortar joint differ. In addition to the ...

  18. Moisture transport properties of mortar and mortar joint: a NMR study

    OpenAIRE

    Brocken, H.J.P.; Adan, O.C.G.; Pel, L.

    1997-01-01

    The moisture transport in mortar and mortar joint often is an important parameter in degeneration of brick masonry and other block constructions. In this study, the influence of single additives on the moisture transport properties of mortar is investigated. Due to water extraction during brick laying, curing conditions of mortar in mortar joint differ from curing conditions of separately cured mortar. Consequently, the moisture transport properties of mortar joint differ. In addition to the ...

  19. Substrate pH and butterfly bush response to dolomitic lime or steel slag amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel slag is a fertilizer amendment with a high concentration of calcium oxide, and thus capable of raising substrate pH similar to dolomitic lime. Steel slag, however, contains higher concentrations of some nutrients, such as iron, manganese, and silicon, compared to dolomitic lime. The objectiv...

  20. Water Utility Lime Sludge Reuse – An Environmental Sorbent ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lime sludge can be used as an environmental sorbent to remove sulfur dioxide (SO2) and acid gases, by the ultra-fine CaCO3 particles, and to sequester mercury and other heavy metals, by the Natural Organic Matter and residual activated carbon. The laboratory experimental set up included a simulated flue gas preparation unit, a lab-scale wet scrubber, and a mercury analyzer system. The influent mercury concentration was based on a range from 22 surveyed power plants. The reactivity of the lime sludge sample for acid neutralization was determined using a method similar to method ASTM C1318-95. Similar experiments were conducted using reagent calcium carbonate and calcium sulfate to obtain baseline data for comparing with the lime sludge test results. The project also evaluated the techno-economic feasibility and sustainable benefits of reusing lime softening sludge. If implemented on a large scale, this transformative approach for recycling waste materials from water treatment utilities at power generation utilities for environmental cleanup can save both water and power utilities millions of dollars. Huge amounts of lime sludge waste, generated from hundreds of water treatment utilities across the U.S., is currently disposed in landfills. This project evaluated a sustainable and economically-attractive approach to the use of lime sludge waste as a valuable resource for power generation utilities.

  1. NMR relaxometry study of plaster mortar with polymer additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jumate, E.; Manea, D. [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Faculty of Civil Engineering. 15 C Daicoviciu Str., 400020, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Moldovan, D.; Fechete, R. [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Department of Physics and Chemistry, 25 G. Baritiu Str., 400027, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13

    The cement mixed with water forms a plastic paste or slurry which stiffness in time and finally hardens into a resistant stone. The addition of sand aggregates, polymers (Walocel) and/or calcium carbonate will modify dramatically the final mortar mechanic and thermal properties. The hydration processes can be observed using the 1D NMR measurements of transverse T{sub 2} relaxation times distributions analysed by a Laplace inversion algorithm. These distributions were obtained for mortar pasta measured at 2 hours after preparation then at 3, 7 and 28 days after preparation. Multiple components are identified in the T{sub 2} distributions. These can be associated with the proton bounded chemical or physical to the mortar minerals characterized by a short T{sub 2} relaxation time and to water protons in pores with three different pore sizes as observed from SEM images. The evaporation process is faster in the first hours after preparation, while the mortar hydration (bonding of water molecules to mortar minerals) can be still observed after days or months from preparation. Finally, the mechanic resistance was correlated with the transverse T{sub 2} relaxation rates corresponding to the bound water.

  2. NMR relaxometry study of plaster mortar with polymer additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumate, E.; Moldovan, D.; Fechete, R.; Manea, D.

    2013-11-01

    The cement mixed with water forms a plastic paste or slurry which stiffness in time and finally hardens into a resistant stone. The addition of sand aggregates, polymers (Walocel) and/or calcium carbonate will modify dramatically the final mortar mechanic and thermal properties. The hydration processes can be observed using the 1D NMR measurements of transverse T2 relaxation times distributions analysed by a Laplace inversion algorithm. These distributions were obtained for mortar pasta measured at 2 hours after preparation then at 3, 7 and 28 days after preparation. Multiple components are identified in the T2 distributions. These can be associated with the proton bounded chemical or physical to the mortar minerals characterized by a short T2 relaxation time and to water protons in pores with three different pore sizes as observed from SEM images. The evaporation process is faster in the first hours after preparation, while the mortar hydration (bonding of water molecules to mortar minerals) can be still observed after days or months from preparation. Finally, the mechanic resistance was correlated with the transverse T2 relaxation rates corresponding to the bound water.

  3. NMR relaxometry study of plaster mortar with polymer additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jumate, E.; Manea, D.; Moldovan, D.; Fechete, R.

    2013-01-01

    The cement mixed with water forms a plastic paste or slurry which stiffness in time and finally hardens into a resistant stone. The addition of sand aggregates, polymers (Walocel) and/or calcium carbonate will modify dramatically the final mortar mechanic and thermal properties. The hydration processes can be observed using the 1D NMR measurements of transverse T 2 relaxation times distributions analysed by a Laplace inversion algorithm. These distributions were obtained for mortar pasta measured at 2 hours after preparation then at 3, 7 and 28 days after preparation. Multiple components are identified in the T 2 distributions. These can be associated with the proton bounded chemical or physical to the mortar minerals characterized by a short T 2 relaxation time and to water protons in pores with three different pore sizes as observed from SEM images. The evaporation process is faster in the first hours after preparation, while the mortar hydration (bonding of water molecules to mortar minerals) can be still observed after days or months from preparation. Finally, the mechanic resistance was correlated with the transverse T 2 relaxation rates corresponding to the bound water

  4. Modern restoration products based on nanoparticles: The case of the Nano-Lime, interaction and compatibility with limestone and dolostones surfaces, advantages and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Villalba, L. S.; López-Arce, P.; Zornoza-Indart, A.; Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Fort, R.

    2012-04-01

    Calcium hydroxide (also known as lime) is one of the oldest products used in construction, mainly as a binder in mortars (joint mortars, renderings, wall fillings, etc), in mural paintings, as a consolidant product, together with other materials such as rammed-earth. . In Conservation Science it can be used to restore the cohesion loss by filling the porosity of the limestone. When calcium hydroxide is exposed to atmospheric CO2 in wet conditions, the layered network of its hexagonal packing crystal structure favors the incorporation of such CO2 to the structure producing the carbonation process, which consists of reacting and transforming into calcium carbonate. However, this approach has resulted in many cases unsatisfactory by the poor penetration of the dissolution inside the stone material and its inability to achieve complete consolidation of the damaged area of the material. The development in recent years of nanoscience and nanotechnology has opened the possibility for different scientific areas. This new science enables new applications of materials that were previously unfeasible, since the behavior of materials at the nanoscale is modified as a result of particle size reduction. Nanotechnology contributes to the science of cultural heritage conservation with new products that can modify its properties and that among other applications, are used in protection and consolidation of geomaterials. However, it is important to assess whether their characteristics are compatible or not with petrological aspects, diagenetic and geochemical conditions and/or mineralogical, or local environmental conditions they are exposed and amend the process and therefore its effectiveness. Like all products used in treatments of consolidation, consolidating products based on nanoparticles, different agents are susceptible to extrinsic and intrinsic factors that influence its stability and can, at a given time, alter their specific properties. That is why the same factors that

  5. Study of the creep of lime-stabilised zirconia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saint-Jacques, Robert G.

    1971-09-01

    This research thesis reports the study of creep of stabilised zirconia containing between 13 and 20 per cent of lime, at temperatures between 1.200 and 1.400 C, and under compression stresses between 500 and 4.000 pounds by square inch. Specimens are polycrystalline with an average grain diameter between 7 and 29 microns. The author notably shows that the creep rate of lime-stabilised zirconia is directly proportional to the applied stress, and that the creep apparent activation energy is close to activation energy of volume self-diffusion of calcium and zirconium in lime-stabilised zirconia. Results of creep tests show that, in the studied conditions, the creep rate is directly proportional to the inverse of the grain average diameter, and this is in compliance with the Gifkins and Snowden theory of creep by sliding at grain boundaries. The author also shows that the creep rate of the lime stabilised zirconia varies with lime content, and reaches a maximum when zirconia contains about 15 per cent of lime. Lower creep rates obtained for higher and lower lime contents are explained [fr

  6. Effect of lime concentration on gelatinized maize starch dispersions properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato-Calleros, C; Hernandez-Jaimes, C; Chavez-Esquivel, G; Meraz, M; Sosa, E; Lara, V H; Alvarez-Ramirez, J; Vernon-Carter, E J

    2015-04-01

    Maize starch was lime-cooked at 92 °C with 0.0-0.40% w/w Ca(OH)2. Optical micrographs showed that lime disrupted the integrity of insoluble remnants (ghosts) and increased the degree of syneresis of the gelatinized starch dispersions (GSD). The particle size distribution was monomodal, shifting to smaller sizes and narrower distributions with increasing lime concentration. X-ray patterns and FTIR spectra showed that crystallinity decreased to a minimum at lime concentration of 0.20% w/w. Lime-treated GSD exhibited thixotropic and viscoelastic behaviour. In the linear viscoelastic region the storage modulus was higher than the loss modulus, but a crossover between these moduli occurred in the non-linear viscoelastic region. The viscoelastic properties decreased with increased lime concentration. The electrochemical properties suggested that the amylopectin-rich remnants and the released amylose contained in the continuous matrix was firstly attacked by calcium ions at low lime levels (<0.20% w/w), disrupting the starch gel microstructure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Study on compressive strength of self compacting mortar cubes under normal & electric oven curing methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanna Venkatesh, G. J.; Vivek, S. S.; Dhinakaran, G.

    2017-07-01

    In the majority of civil engineering applications, the basic building blocks were the masonry units. Those masonry units were developed as a monolithic structure by plastering process with the help of binding agents namely mud, lime, cement and their combinations. In recent advancements, the mortar study plays an important role in crack repairs, structural rehabilitation, retrofitting, pointing and plastering operations. The rheology of mortar includes flowable, passing and filling properties which were analogous with the behaviour of self compacting concrete. In self compacting (SC) mortar cubes, the cement was replaced by mineral admixtures namely silica fume (SF) from 5% to 20% (with an increment of 5%), metakaolin (MK) from 10% to 30% (with an increment of 10%) and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS) from 25% to 75% (with an increment of 25%). The ratio between cement and fine aggregate was kept constant as 1: 2 for all normal and self compacting mortar mixes. The accelerated curing namely electric oven curing with the differential temperature of 128°C for the period of 4 hours was adopted. It was found that the compressive strength obtained from the normal and electric oven method of curing was higher for self compacting mortar cubes than normal mortar cube. The cement replacement by 15% SF, 20% MK and 25%GGBS obtained higher strength under both curing conditions.

  8. Mineralogical and textural characterization of mortars and plasters from the archaeological site of Barsinia, northern Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Mohammad AL-Naddaf

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Twelve mortar and plaster samples excavated in the archaeological site of Barsinia were mineralogically and petrographically examined by XRay Diffraction (XRD and Stereo and Polarized Light Microscopy, while the total carbonate content was measured using a DietrichFruhling Calcimeter. The physical properties of the samples, such as water uptake under atmospheric pressure and under vacuum, together with density and porosity, were measured. Only twelve samples were available for the purposes of this study: 8 plaster samples and 4 mortar samples. Eleven samples out of the total number of samples were mortars or plasters with lime binder and silica aggregate; calcite and quartz were identified in all of these samples. In most of the samples one or more pozzolanic components were detected; a hydraulic effect therefore exists in practically most of the studied mortars. Excluding the plasters taken from waterbearing constructions such as cisterns, and the mortar sample from the compact floor, the binder content is high; in general, the overall porosity of the studied samples is high. Porosity and petrographic investigation results suggest that the burning temperature of the limestone was low and/or the duration of the combustion was short; such preparation conditions produce a desirable quicklime. Owing to the significant compositional and textural differences between the samples that were reported, there is consequently no suitable general mortar that can be adopted for the restoration of the whole site.

  9. Aired-time and chamotte hydraulic mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González Cortina, M.

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research project has been to obtain aired-li me based hydraulic mortars with the addition of chamotte or burnt clay powder obtained from the ceramic industry waste. By doing this, hydraulic properties have been included into lime and hydraulic mortars with a great improvement in mechanical properties. In order to achieve this, different types of chamotte obtained from clay burnt at different temperatures have been tested, changing, at the same time, the proportions of lime, sand, chamotte and water. All the tests have been performed preparing a double set of test pieces to be kept at room temperature or to be immersed in water, determining the Shore C hardness and the mechanical compressive and tensile strengths. Further on, X-ray diffraction analysis have been developed to determine the qualitative composition of the crystalline structure, as well as micro structural analysis, using stereomicroscope and electric microscope scanning, with X-ray microanalysis have been used. As a conclusion, several types of mortars have been created with different proportions, which can be used, due to its characteristics, as keying mortars in brickwork, for restoration works as well as for new constructions.

    El objetivo de éste trabajo es el conseguir morteros hidráulicos, a partir de la cal aérea, con adición de chamota o polvo de arcilla cocida, obtenida de los residuos-desechos de la industria cerámica. De este modo se pretende infundir propiedades hidráulicas a la cal y obtener morteros hidráulicos, con una mejora sustancial de sus propiedades mecánicas. Para ello, se ha experimentado con diversos tipos de chamotas, obtenidas a partir de arcillas cocidas a diferentes temperaturas, y con diversas granulometrías, y se han realizado morteros con distintas dosificaciones, variando las proporciones de cal, arena, chamota y agua. En todos los casos se ha preparado una doble serie de probetas, para conservarlas al aire o

  10. Effect of liquid liming on sorghum growth in an Ultisol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel E. Camacho

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available   The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the application of liquid lime on sorghum growth in an Ultisol. This research was conducted between August and November, 2011 at the Agricultural Research Center, San José, Costa Rica. In an Ultisol planted with sorghum, in pots of 800 ml, the following treatments where applied: control without lime, calcium carbonate at doses of 10 and 20 l/ha, magnesium oxide at doses of 10 and 20 l/ha, calcium carbonate + magnesium oxide at doses of 5 + 5 and 10 + 10 l/ha, respectively. Six weeks after planting, sorghum was harvested, measuring leaf area, dry and fresh weight of the aerial and root biomass, nutrient absorption and the soil chemical characteristics. Treatments using calcium carbonate and calcium carbonate + magnesium oxide obtained the best values of leaf area and the higher weight of the aerial and root biomass of sorghum. Even though there were no significant differences between liquid lime treatments, there were regarding control without lime and weight biomass variables. Liquid calcium carbonate significantly increased Ca absorption, and the calcium carbonate + magnesium oxide treatment at doses of 10 l/h showed the highest Mg absorption. All amendment treatments caused an improvement of the soil fertility, the most notable being the application of 20 l/ha of magnesium oxide that dropped the exchangeable acidity from 9.02 to 0.36 cmol(+/l, acidity saturation dropped from 95 to 3.3%, and pH increased from 5 to 5.7. It was concluded that the liquid liming amendments had a positive effect over the crop and the soil fertility.

  11. Performance Characteristics of Waste Glass Powder Substituting Portland Cement in Mortar Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, P.; Csetényi, L. J.; Borosnyói, A.

    2016-04-01

    In the present work, soda-lime glass cullet (flint, amber, green) and special glass cullet (soda-alkaline earth-silicate glass coming from low pressure mercury-discharge lamp cullet and incandescent light bulb borosilicate glass waste cullet) were ground into fine powders in a laboratory planetary ball mill for 30 minutes. CEM I 42.5N Portland cement was applied in mortar mixtures, substituted with waste glass powder at levels of 20% and 30%. Characterisation and testing of waste glass powders included fineness by laser diffraction particle size analysis, specific surface area by nitrogen adsorption technique, particle density by pycnometry and chemical analysis by X-ray fluorescence spectrophotometry. Compressive strength, early age shrinkage cracking and drying shrinkage tests, heat of hydration of mortars, temperature of hydration, X-ray diffraction analysis and volume stability tests were performed to observe the influence of waste glass powder substitution for Portland cement on physical and engineering properties of mortar mixtures.

  12. Mechanical resilience and cementitious processes in Imperial Roman architectural mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Eric N.; Brune, Philip F.; Vitti, Massimo; Chen, Heng; Li, Qinfei; Kunz, Martin; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    2014-01-01

    The pyroclastic aggregate concrete of Trajan’s Markets (110 CE), now Museo Fori Imperiali in Rome, has absorbed energy from seismic ground shaking and long-term foundation settlement for nearly two millenia while remaining largely intact at the structural scale. The scientific basis of this exceptional service record is explored through computed tomography of fracture surfaces and synchroton X-ray microdiffraction analyses of a reproduction of the standardized hydrated lime–volcanic ash mortar that binds decimeter-sized tuff and brick aggregate in the conglomeratic concrete. The mortar reproduction gains fracture toughness over 180 d through progressive coalescence of calcium–aluminum-silicate–hydrate (C-A-S-H) cementing binder with Ca/(Si+Al) ≈ 0.8–0.9 and crystallization of strätlingite and siliceous hydrogarnet (katoite) at ≥90 d, after pozzolanic consumption of hydrated lime was complete. Platey strätlingite crystals toughen interfacial zones along scoria perimeters and impede macroscale propagation of crack segments. In the 1,900-y-old mortar, C-A-S-H has low Ca/(Si+Al) ≈ 0.45–0.75. Dense clusters of 2- to 30-µm strätlingite plates further reinforce interfacial zones, the weakest link of modern cement-based concrete, and the cementitious matrix. These crystals formed during long-term autogeneous reaction of dissolved calcite from lime and the alkali-rich scoriae groundmass, clay mineral (halloysite), and zeolite (phillipsite and chabazite) surface textures from the Pozzolane Rosse pyroclastic flow, erupted from the nearby Alban Hills volcano. The clast-supported conglomeratic fabric of the concrete presents further resistance to fracture propagation at the structural scale. PMID:25512521

  13. Characterization of Mechanical and Bactericidal Properties of Cement Mortars Containing Waste Glass Aggregate and Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Sikora

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The recycling of waste glass is a major problem for municipalities worldwide. The problem concerns especially colored waste glass which, due to its low recycling rate as result of high level of impurity, has mostly been dumped into landfills. In recent years, a new use was found for it: instead of creating waste, it can be recycled as an additive in building materials. The aim of the study was to evaluate the possibility of manufacturing sustainable and self-cleaning cement mortars with use of commercially available nanomaterials and brown soda-lime waste glass. Mechanical and bactericidal properties of cement mortars containing brown soda-lime waste glass and commercially available nanomaterials (amorphous nanosilica and cement containing nanocrystalline titanium dioxide were analyzed in terms of waste glass content and the effectiveness of nanomaterials. Quartz sand is replaced with brown waste glass at ratios of 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% by weight. Study has shown that waste glass can act as a successful replacement for sand (up to 100% to produce cement mortars while nanosilica is incorporated. Additionally, a positive effect of waste glass aggregate for bactericidal properties of cement mortars was observed.

  14. Characterization of Mechanical and Bactericidal Properties of Cement Mortars Containing Waste Glass Aggregate and Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Pawel; Augustyniak, Adrian; Cendrowski, Krzysztof; Horszczaruk, Elzbieta; Rucinska, Teresa; Nawrotek, Pawel; Mijowska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    The recycling of waste glass is a major problem for municipalities worldwide. The problem concerns especially colored waste glass which, due to its low recycling rate as result of high level of impurity, has mostly been dumped into landfills. In recent years, a new use was found for it: instead of creating waste, it can be recycled as an additive in building materials. The aim of the study was to evaluate the possibility of manufacturing sustainable and self-cleaning cement mortars with use of commercially available nanomaterials and brown soda-lime waste glass. Mechanical and bactericidal properties of cement mortars containing brown soda-lime waste glass and commercially available nanomaterials (amorphous nanosilica and cement containing nanocrystalline titanium dioxide) were analyzed in terms of waste glass content and the effectiveness of nanomaterials. Quartz sand is replaced with brown waste glass at ratios of 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% by weight. Study has shown that waste glass can act as a successful replacement for sand (up to 100%) to produce cement mortars while nanosilica is incorporated. Additionally, a positive effect of waste glass aggregate for bactericidal properties of cement mortars was observed. PMID:28773823

  15. The Chemical Composition of Different Sources of Liming Materials ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An incubation experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of some liming materials on soil chemical properties. The treatments comprised Cocoa Husk Pod Ash (CPHA), Oyster Shell Ash (OSA), Palm Bunch Ash (PBA), Calcium Carbonate (CaCO3), Kitchen Residues Ash (KRA) and Saw Dust Ash (SDA) at five levels ...

  16. Mortar fights acid corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-05-14

    The burning of coal or oil to produce heat required to operate a power boiler also generates a severe corrosion problem within the interior of the duct and stacks used to emit the flue gas into the atmosphere. How can concrete and steel be protected from the effects of acid attack, when the acids are carried in a gas form, or come into direct contact with the steel or concrete from spillage or immersion conditions. Industry in North America has found that the solution to this problem is to build an outside concrete column, in this case of Portland cement, and inside that column, build a totally independent brick liner bonded with Sauereisen mortar.

  17. Action time effect of lime on its depressive ability for pyrite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tichang Sun

    2004-01-01

    Two sample groups of bulk concentrates consisting mainly of pyrite and chalcopyrite from Daye and Chenghchao Mines in Hubei Province of China were used to investigate the effect of the action time of lime on its depressive ability for pyrite. The experimental results conducted with different samples and collectors showed that the action time between lime and pyrite markedly influences the depressive ability of lime. The depressive ability of lime increased with the action time increasing. It was also proved that the depressive results obtained at a large lime dosage after a shorter action time are similar to those obtained at a small lime dosage after a longer action time. The increase of depressive ability of lime after a longer action time is because that there are different mechanisms in different action time. The composition on the surface of pyrite acted for different time with lime was studied by using ESCA (Electron Spectroscopic Chemical Analysis). The results showed that iron hydroxide and calcium sulphate formed on the pyrite surface at the presence of lime in the pulp but the amounts of iron hydroxide and calcium sulphate were different at different action time. At the beginning action time the compound formed on the pyrite surface was mainly calcium sulphate and almost no iron hydroxide formed; but with the action time increasing, iron hydroxide formed. The longer the action time, the more iron hydroxide and the less calcium sulphate formed. It was considered that the stronger depressive ability of lime after a longer action time is because more iron hydroxide forms on the pyrite surface.

  18. Copper tailings in stucco mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Pavez

    Full Text Available Abstract This investigation addressed the evaluation of the use of copper tailings in the construction industry in order to reduce the impact on the environment. The evaluation was performed by a technical comparison between stucco mortars prepared with crushed conventional sand and with copper tailings sand. The best results were achieved with the stucco mortars containing tailings. The tailings presented a fine particles size distribution curve different from that suggested by the standard. The values of compressive strength, retentivity, and adherence in the stucco mortars prepared with copper tailings were much higher than those obtained with crushed sand. According to the results from this study, it can be concluded that the preparation of stucco mortars using copper tailings replacing conventional sand is a technically feasible alternative for the construction industry, presenting the benefit of mitigating the impact of disposal to the environment.

  19. Method of producing grouting mortar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelomov, I K; Alchina, S I; Dizer, E I; Gruzdeva, G A; Nikitinskii, V I; Sabirzyanov, A K

    1980-10-07

    A method of producing grouting mortar by mixing the cement with an aqueous salt solution is proposed. So as to increase the quality of the mortar through an acceleration of the time for hardening, the mixture is prepared in two stages, in the first of which 20-30% of the entire cement batch hardens, and in the second of which the remainder of the cement hardens; 1-3-% of an aqueous salt solution is used in quantities of 0.5/1 wt.-% of weight of the cement. The use of this method of producing grouting mortar helps to increase the flexural strength of the cement brick up to 50% after two days ageing by comparison with the strength of cement brick produced from grouting mortar by ordinary methods utilizing identical quantities of the initial components (cement, water, chloride).

  20. Hygroscopic slaking of lime with steam or humid air. New energy effective lime slaking technology in kraft pulping; Hygroskopisk slaeckning av kalk med aanga eller fuktig luft. Ny energieffektiv teknik foer slaeckning av mesakalk i sulfatmassaindustrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundqvist, Roland

    2003-07-15

    Lime stone is widely used in chemical recovery for regeneration of white liquor in kraft pulping. Slaked (hydrated) lime is used to convert (causticize) sodium carbonate into sodium hydroxide, whereby lime mud (calcium carbonate) precipitates from the solution. Lime mud is dried and reburned in a lime kiln, where burned lime (calcium oxide) is formed. The circle is closed when lime is slaked (hydrated) in green liquor in an exotherm reaction. Problems with traditional slaking method is that heat is recovered at low temperatures. With the method described in this report there is potential to increase heat recovery in the causticizing plant. The forecasted method means that lime is slaked with steam or humid air, for example combined with a lime mud drier and a lime kiln. The task has included slaking of burned lime with steam or humid hot air, on purpose to test a specific machine equipment in pilote scale, and to investigate temperatures and hydratization rates able to reach. Also the lime slaked with steam/humid air should be compared with burned lime slaked in green liquor when green liquor is causticized, and to investigate the dewatering properties of formed lime mud. The target group is pulp and paper industry using the kraft process. The tests have been performed at SMA Svenska Mineral AB plant (lime burning) at Sandarne Sweden in years 2004-2005. Project owner has been the Swedish company Torkapparater AB, and the project is performed inside the 'Vaermeforsk Program for Pulp and Paper Industry 2004-2005'. Other partners, besides SMA Svenska Mineral AB, has been Stora Enso Skoghalls Bruk, Carnot AB, AaF Process AB and KTH Energiprocesser. Hydrated lime of varying slaking rates has been produced at temperatures up to 270 deg C. Caustizicing being performed show that dewatering properties of lime mud formed is quite up to the standard of lime mud from burned lime slaked in green liquor. The apprehension, that the hygroscopic slaked lime should result

  1. Effect of lime addition during sewage sludge treatment on characteristics of resulting SSA when it is used in cementitious materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vouk, D; Nakic, D; Štirmer, N; Baricevic, A

    2017-02-01

    Final disposal of sewage sludge is important not only in terms of satisfying the regulations, but the aspect of choosing the optimal wastewater treatment technology, including the sludge treatment. In most EU countries, significant amounts of stabilized and dewatered sludge are incinerated, and sewage sludge ash (SSA) is generated as a by product. At the same time, lime is one of the commonly used additives in the sewage sludge treatment primarily to stabilize the sludge. In doing so, the question arose how desirable is such addition of lime if the sludge is subsequently incinerated, and the generated ash is further used in the production of cementitious materials. A series of mortars were prepared where 10-20% of the cement fraction was replaced by SSA. Since all three types of analyzed SSA (without lime, with lime added during sludge stabilization and with extra lime added during sludge incineration) yielded nearly same results, it can be concluded that if sludge incineration is accepted solution, lime addition during sludge treatment is unnecessary even from the standpoint of preserving the pozzolanic properties of the resulting SSA. Results of the research carried out on cement mortars point to the great possibilities of using SSA in concrete industry.

  2. The growth of Scots pine and the availability of nutrients in old Finnish liming experiments on drained peatlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieminen, M.; Paetilae, A.

    1994-01-01

    Liming (with applications of 1000 to 8000 kg/ha) had no long- term (1929-1985) effect on the growth of Scots pine on drained oligotrophic peatlands. Liming plus NPK fertilization had a variable effect on the growth of stands. The same treatment could result in a very different response in different experimental areas. Both liming alone and liming plus NPK fertilization increased the calcium, magnesium and nitrogen contents of peat and decreased the C/Nratio and acidity. Liming plus fertilization decreased needle boron and manganese and increased calcium and nitrogen concentrations. The results of peat and needle analysis indicated that the changes in nitrogen availability to trees caused by liming have not been sufficient enough to affect tree growth. It was also concluded that boron deficiency was the main reason for the lowered yield. (26 refs., 6 tabs., 8 figs.) (author)

  3. Evaluation of electric properties of cement mortars containing pozzolans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cruz, J. M.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the evolution of the microstructure of Portland cement mortar is analyzed, by using electrical impedance measurements. Cement mortars are compared without and with two pozzolanic substitutions: spent fluid catalytic cracking catalyst (FCC and metakaolin (MK. The measurement method is described and the model for analyzing the electrical impedance spectra is developed. Three electrical parameters are defined: electrical resistivity, capacitance exponent, and capacitive factor. The results show a significant increase in resistivity of the mortars with pozzolans after 7 days of curing, especially in mortars with MK. This increase is correlated with lime-fixing by the pozzolans. The capacitive properties evolve differently at early age, but reach the same values after 148 days. The electrical and mineralogical data show that the evolution of the microstructure in the mortar with MK starts before it does in the mortars with FCC and that the final microstructure becomes different.

    En este trabajo se analiza la microestructura de morteros de cemento Portland, mediante medidas de impedancia eléctrica. Se comparan morteros de cemento sin y con dos sustituciones puzolánicas: residuo de catalizador de craqueo catalítico (FCC y metacaolín (MK. Se describe el método de medida y se desarrolla el modelo de análisis de los espectros de impedancia eléctrica. Se definen tres parámetros eléctricos: resistividad eléctrica, exponente capacitivo, y factor capacitivo. Se observa un aumento importante de la resistividad de los morteros con puzolana a partir de los 7 días de curado, sobre todo en morteros con MK. Este aumento está correlacionado con la fijación de cal de las puzolanas. Las propiedades capacitivas son diferentes a edad temprana, pero se igualan a los 148 días. Los resultados eléctricos y mineralógicos muestran que la evolución microestructural comienza antes en los morteros con MK que con FCC y que la microestructura

  4. [Review of lime carbon sink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li Li; Ling, Jiang Hua; Tie, Li; Wang, Jiao Yue; Bing, Long Fei; Xi, Feng Ming

    2018-01-01

    Under the background of "missing carbon sink" mystery and carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology development, this paper summarized the lime material flow process carbon sink from the lime carbonation principles, impact factors, and lime utilization categories in chemical industry, metallurgy industry, construction industry, and lime kiln ash treatment. The results showed that the lime carbonation rate coefficients were mainly impacted by materials and ambient conditions; the lime carbon sink was mainly in chemical, metallurgy, and construction industries; and current researches focused on the mechanisms and impact factors for carbonation, but their carbon sequestration calculation methods had not been proposed. Therefore, future research should focus on following aspects: to establish a complete system of lime carbon sequestration accounting method in view of material flow; to calculate lime carbon sequestration in both China and the world and explain their offset proportion of CO 2 emission from lime industrial process; to analyze the contribution of lime carbon sequestration to missing carbon sink for clarifying part of missing carbon sinks; to promote the development of carbon capture and storage technology and provide some scientific bases for China's international negotiations on climate change.

  5. Mortar alteration: experimental study and ancient analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassineux, Francois

    1987-01-01

    As the durability of cemented matrices is a matter of great importance in numerous domains, notably for the long term reliability of surface storages of radioactive wastes, the objective of this research thesis is to define mechanisms of evolution of cemented matrices when in contact with diluted aqueous solutions. The author notably studied the influence of the lixiviation mode on the evolution of two mortars having different compositions (pH, CO 2 pressure, system containment, and cement mineralogical nature appear to be the main governing parameters), the alteration (dissolution is the prevailing process in the interaction between cemented matrices and a diluted solution such as rain water), and ancient binders (archaeological binders containing mineral phases such as hydrated calcium silicates or hydro-grossulars). The obtained results lead to the definition of alteration mechanisms in modern cements, and highlight factors governing the durability of these materials when submitted to meteoric alteration [fr

  6. Mechanical characteristics of historic mortars from tests on small-sample non-standard on small-sample non-standard specimens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drdácký, Miloš; Slížková, Zuzana

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 1 (2008), s. 20-29 ISSN 1407-7353 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA103/06/1609 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Keywords : small-sample non-standard testing * lime * historic mortar Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage

  7. Finite Element Analysis of Crack-Path Selection in a Brick and Mortar Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrafi-Nour, Reza; Manoharan, Mohan; Johnson, Curtis A.

    Many natural composite materials rely on organized architectures that span several length scales. The structures of natural shells such as nacre (mother-of-pearl) and conch are prominent examples of such organizations where the calcium carbonate platelets, the main constituent of natural shells, are held together in an organized fashion within an organic matrix. At one or multiple length scales, these organized arrangements often resemble a brick-and-mortar structure, with calcium carbonate platelets acting as bricks connected through the organic mortar phase.

  8. Altered cement hydration and subsequently modified porosity, permeability and compressive strength of mortar specimens due to the influence of electrical current

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susanto, A.; Koleva, D.A.; Van Breugel, K.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the influence of stray current flow on microstructural prop-erties, i.e. pore connectivity and permeability of mortar specimens, and link these to the observed alterations in mechanical properties and cement hydration. Mortar specimens were partly submerged in water and calcium

  9. Improved mortar set-up technique

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Villiers, D

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available -up Technique Presented at the Mortar Systems Conference By D de Villiers May 2009 Mobile Mortars Slide 2 © CSIR 2008 www.csir.co.za Mobile Mortars Slide 3 © CSIR 2008 www.csir.co.za Mobile Mortars Slide 4... © CSIR 2008 www.csir.co.za Mortar Tests Slide 5 © CSIR 2008 www.csir.co.za Mortar Tests Slide 6 © CSIR 2008 www.csir.co.za Electronic Sensors Slide 7 © CSIR 2008...

  10. Crushed and River-Origin Sands Used as Aggregates in Repair Mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Stefanidou

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The systematic analysis of mortars from monuments or historic buildings and the simultaneous study of the construction environment show that it was common practice to use naturally occurring sand from local rivers or streams for the production of the mortars. There are cases though, mainly on islands, where sands of natural origin were limited, and marine or crushed sands were used possibly after elaboration. In all cases the particle size analysis of old mortar confirms the presence of even distribution of the granules. As regards the design of the repair mortars, there are criteria that should be taken into consideration in order to produce materials with compatible properties. The main properties concerning sands are the grain distribution and maximum size, the color, the content of fines, and soluble salts. The objective of this research is the study of the physical characteristics of the sands such as the sand equivalent, the gradation, the apparent density, the morphology of the grains, their mineralogical composition and the influence of these properties on the behavior of lime mortars, notably the mechanical and physical properties acquired.

  11. PERFORMANCE OF CEMENT MORTARS REPLACED BY GROUND WASTE BRICK IN DIFFERENT AGGRESSIVE CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ILHAMI DEMIR

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the sulphate resistance of cement mortars when subjected to different exposure conditions. Cement mortars were prepared using ground waste brick (GWB as a pozzolanic partial replacement for cement at replacement levels of 0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5, 10%, 12.5 and 15%. Mortar specimens were stored under three different conditions: continuous curing in lime-saturated tab water (TW, continuous exposure to 5% sodium sulphate solution (SS, and continuous exposure to 5% ammonium nitrate solution (AN, at a temperature of 20 ± 3 ºC, for 7, 28, 90, and 180 days. Prisms with dimensions of 25×25×285 mm, to determine the expansions of the mortar samples; and another set of prisms with dimensions of 40×40×160 mm, were prepared to calculate the compressive strength of the samples. It was determined that the GWB replacement ratios between 2.5% and 10% decreased the 180 days expansion values. The highest compressive strength values were found for the samples with 10% replacement ratio in the TW, SS, and AN conditions for 180 days. The microstructure of the mortars were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and the Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX.

  12. Resistance of biofilm-covered mortars to microbiologically influenced deterioration simulated by sulfuric acid exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soleimani, Sahar, E-mail: ssoleima@connect.carleton.ca; Isgor, O. Burkan, E-mail: burkan_isgor@carleton.ca; Ormeci, Banu, E-mail: banu_ormeci@carleton.ca

    2013-11-15

    Following the reported success of biofilm applications on metal surfaces to inhibit microbiologically influenced corrosion, effectiveness and sustainability of E. coli DH5α biofilm on mortar surface to prevent microbiologically influenced concrete deterioration (MICD) are investigated. Experiments simulating microbial attack were carried out by exposing incrementally biofilm-covered mortar specimens to sulfuric acid solutions with pH ranging from 3 to 6. Results showed that calcium concentration in control reactors without biofilm was 23–47% higher than the reactors with biofilm-covered mortar. Formation of amorphous silica gel as an indication of early stages of acid attack was observed only on the control mortar specimens without biofilm. During acidification, the biofilm continued to grow and its thickness almost doubled from ∼ 30 μm before acidification to ∼ 60 μm after acidification. These results demonstrated that E. coli DH5α biofilm was able to provide a protective and sustainable barrier on mortar surfaces against medium to strong sulfuric acid attack. -- Highlights: •Effectiveness of E.coli DH5α biofilm to prevent MICD was studied. •Conditions that lead to MICD were simulated by chemical acidification. •Biofilm-covered mortar specimens were exposed to sulfuric acid solutions. •The presence of biofilm helped reduce the chemically-induced mortar deterioration. •Biofilm remained alive and continued to grow during the acidification process.

  13. Resistance of biofilm-covered mortars to microbiologically influenced deterioration simulated by sulfuric acid exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soleimani, Sahar; Isgor, O. Burkan; Ormeci, Banu

    2013-01-01

    Following the reported success of biofilm applications on metal surfaces to inhibit microbiologically influenced corrosion, effectiveness and sustainability of E. coli DH5α biofilm on mortar surface to prevent microbiologically influenced concrete deterioration (MICD) are investigated. Experiments simulating microbial attack were carried out by exposing incrementally biofilm-covered mortar specimens to sulfuric acid solutions with pH ranging from 3 to 6. Results showed that calcium concentration in control reactors without biofilm was 23–47% higher than the reactors with biofilm-covered mortar. Formation of amorphous silica gel as an indication of early stages of acid attack was observed only on the control mortar specimens without biofilm. During acidification, the biofilm continued to grow and its thickness almost doubled from ∼ 30 μm before acidification to ∼ 60 μm after acidification. These results demonstrated that E. coli DH5α biofilm was able to provide a protective and sustainable barrier on mortar surfaces against medium to strong sulfuric acid attack. -- Highlights: •Effectiveness of E.coli DH5α biofilm to prevent MICD was studied. •Conditions that lead to MICD were simulated by chemical acidification. •Biofilm-covered mortar specimens were exposed to sulfuric acid solutions. •The presence of biofilm helped reduce the chemically-induced mortar deterioration. •Biofilm remained alive and continued to grow during the acidification process

  14. Petrographic microscope investigation of mortar and ceramic technologies for the conservation of the built heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavia, S.; Caro, S.

    2007-07-01

    Polarised-light (or petrographic) microscopy has been widely applied to heritage materials to assess composition and diagnose damage. However, instead, this paper focuses on the petrographic investigation of brick and mortar technologies for the production of quality repair materials compatible with their adjacent fabrics. Furthermore, the paper relates production technologies to the physical properties of the materials fabricated, and thus their final quality and durability. According to Cesare Brandi´s theory of compatibility (the 20th century architect on whose work modern conservation theory and practice are largely based) existing historic materials should be replaced with their equivalent. This paper demonstrates that polarised-light microscopy provides data on the origin and nature of raw materials, and processing parameters such as blending, mixing, firing, calcination and slaking, and how these relate to the quality of the final product. In addition, this paper highlights the importance of production technologies as these directly impact the physical properties of the materials fabricated and thus determine their final quality and durability. In this context, the paper investigates mortar calcination and slaking, two important operations in the manufacture of building limes that govern the reactivity, shrinkage and water retention of a lime binder which will impact mortar's properties such as workability, plasticity and carbonation speed, and these in turn will determine the ease of execution, durability and strength of a lime mortar. Petrographic analysis also provides evidence of ceramic technology including identification of local or foreign production and processing parameters such as sieving, blending, mixing and firing. A petrographic study of the ceramic matrix coupled to the diagnosis of mineral phases formed during firing allows to quantify sintering and vitrification and thus determine firing temperatures. Finally, certain features of the raw

  15. Synthesis of Expansive Mortar Developed in Laboratory for Dismounting of Ornamental Rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucena D V; Campos D B C; Lira H L; Neves G A

    2011-01-01

    The expansive mortar is constituted by a mixture of watery phase with an agent expander, when hydrated, presents volume increase and the generation of fictions in the rock due to generated pressure. The objective of this work is to synthecize expansive mortar that they present enough expansive pressure for the dismounting of granite and marble. They had been used as raw materials: carbonate of calcium, Portland cement and additives for control of the expansion. The formularizations had been synthecized on the basis of the chemical analysis of a mortar commercial and characterized by XRD, laser particle size measurements and evaluation of expansive pressure. All the developed formularizations had presented similar characteristics to the ones of the commercial mortar.

  16. LIME REQUIREMENT DETERMINATION AND LIMING IMPACT ON SOIL NUTRIENT STATUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krunoslav Karalić

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of conducted research was to determine the influence of liming, mineral and organic fertilization on soil chemical properties and nutrient availability in the soil, yield height and mineral composition of alfalfa. Results were used to create regression models for prediction of liming impact on soil chemical properties. Liming and fertilization experiment was sat up in 20 L volume plastic pots with two types of acid soils with different texture from two sites. Ten liming and fertilization treatments were applied in four repetitions. Lime treatments increased soil pH values and decreased hydrolytic acidity. Mineral and organic fertilization affected additional soil acidification. Application of lime intensified mineralization and humus decomposition, while organic fertilization raised humus content. The results showed significant increase of AL-P2O5 and K2O availability. The treatments increased soil Ca concentrations, but at the same time decreased exchangeable Mg concentrations. Soil pH increase resulted in lower Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu availability. Soil CEC was increased by applied treatments. Lime rates increased number and height of alfalfa plants, as well as yield of leaf, stalk increased concentrations of N, P, K and Ca in alfalfa leaf and stalk, but decreased leaf Mg and Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu concentrations. Regression computer models predicted with adequate accuracy P, Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu availability and final pH value as a result of liming and fertilization impact.

  17. A systematic review of the effectiveness of liming to mitigate impacts of river acidification on fish and macro-invertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mant, Rebecca C.; Jones, David L.; Reynolds, Brian; Ormerod, Steve J.; Pullin, Andrew S.

    2013-01-01

    The addition of calcium carbonate to catchments or watercourses – liming – has been used widely to mitigate freshwater acidification but the abatement of acidifying emissions has led to questions about its effectiveness and necessity. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the impact of liming streams and rivers on two key groups of river organisms: fish and invertebrates. On average, liming increased the abundance and richness of acid-sensitive invertebrates and increased overall fish abundance, but benefits were variable and not guaranteed in all rivers. Where B-A-C-I designs (before-after-control-impact) were used to reduce bias, there was evidence that liming decreased overall invertebrate abundance. This systematic review indicates that liming has the potential to mitigate the symptoms of acidification in some instances, but effects are mixed. Future studies should use robust designs to isolate recovery due to liming from decreasing acid deposition, and assess factors affecting liming outcomes. -- Highlights: •In a systematic review and meta-analysis, we asked how river liming affected fish and invertebrates. •On average, liming increased fish abundance. •Liming also increased average abundance and richness of acid-sensitive invertebrates. •However, benefits were variable and not guaranteed in all acidified rivers. -- A systematic review showed lime application to acidified rivers increased average fish abundance, and abundance and richness in acid-sensitive invertebrates, but not always

  18. The use of hydrated lime in acid mine drainage treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Anuar; Sulaiman, Azli; Sulaiman, Shamsul Kamal

    2017-05-01

    Hydrated lime also known as calcium hydroxide with chemical formula Ca(OH)2 was used in this study as neutralization agent in acid mine drainage (AMD) treatment. Hydrated lime that is used to treat pool water samples from tin tailings located in Pengkalan Hulu, Perak was obtained from Simpang Pulai, Perak. The pH of water sample was around 2.6 to 2.8. Ten different variables of hydrated lime weights were used to treat 1 L of water sample. The weights of hydrated lime used were 0.2 g, 0.4 g, 0.6 g, 0.8 g, 1.0 g, 1.2 g, 1.4 g, 1.6 g, 1.8 g and 2.0 g. Time interval used was every 5 minutes up to minutes 30. Jar test method was used in this study. The maximum pH value of 5.93 ± 0.03 most approaches standard A and had complied standard B have been obtained using 2.0 g hydrated lime in 30-minute time interval. The concentration of arsenic, cadmium and chromium had decreased but only cadmium concentration did not comply with Standards A and B.

  19. FRP confined smart concrete/mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Y.; Zhu, P. S.; Choi, K. G.; Wu, Y. T.; Huang, Z. Y.; Shan, B.

    2006-03-01

    In this study, fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) confined smart concrete/mortar sensors were invented and validated for significantly improved measurement range. Several trial mixes were made using cement mortar and micron-phase graphite powders at different mix proportions. Compressive loading tests were conducted on smart mortar cylinder specimens with or without FRP confinement. Two-probe method was used to detect the electrical resistance of the smart cement mortar specimens. Strong correlation was recognized between the stress and electric resistance of the smart mortar. The test results indicated that the FRP wrapping could significantly enlarge the range of such self-sensing property as a consequence of confinement.

  20. Cross-contamination in Porcelain Mortars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer-Brandl, A; Falck, A; Ingebrigtsen, L; Nilson, C

    2001-01-01

    Porcelain mortars and pestles are frequently used to comminute drug substances on a small scale and (in some cases) in the production of liquid and semisolid suspensions. Although it is generally accepted that removal of a drug substance from a rough surface by rinsing may be difficult and may lead to cross-contamination, no hard data support that theory. In this study, the amount of salicylic acid remaining on a porcelain mortar after different washing procedures was quantified and compared with the amount remaining on a plastic mortar. Drug residues in the "mg" range on the porcelain mortars made common rinsing procedures appear inappropriate, but no traces of drug were detected on plastic mortars. In addition, the quality of suspension ointments with respect to particle size and homogeneity produced by the two types of mortars was compared. Porcelain and plastic mortars appeared equally suitable for use in the production of semisolid suspensions.

  1. Binder characterisation of mortars used at different ages in the San Lorenzo church in Milan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolini, Luca; Carsana, Maddalena; Gastaldi, Matteo; Lollini, Federica; Redaelli, Elena

    2013-01-01

    The paper describes a study on the mortars of the basilica of San Lorenzo in Milan, which was carried out to support an archaeological study aimed at dating and documenting the construction techniques used throughout the centuries. The church, which was founded between the 4th and 5th century, at the end of the period when Milan was the capital of the Roman Empire, was subjected in time to extensions, collapses and reconstructions that lasted until the Renaissance period and even later on. Thanks to the good state of conservation, San Lorenzo church is a collection of materials and construction techniques throughout a period of more than a millennium. Mortars were investigated in order to compare the binders used for structural elements built in different historical ages. From an archaeological study, samples of mortars attributed to the late Roman period, the Middle Ages and the Renaissance were available. The binder of each sample was separated by the aggregates and it was characterised on the basis of X-ray diffraction analysis, thermogravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Constituents of the binder were identified and their origin is discussed in order to investigate if they could be attributed to the original composition of the binder or to possible alteration in time due to atmospheric pollution. Results show that, even though the binder is mainly based on magnesian lime, there are significant differences in the microstructure of the binding matrix used in mortars ascribed to the different historical periods. In the Roman period, in correspondence of the structural elements that required higher strength, also hydraulic cocciopesto mortars were detected. Gypsum was found in most samples, which was maybe added intentionally. - Highlights: • Binders of mortars of San Lorenzo church in Milan were investigated. • Roman, Middle Ages and Renaissance samples were studied by XRD, TG and SEM. • Magnesian-lime binders containing silico

  2. A Study on the Properties of Carbon Black Mortar Using Granulated Blast Furnace Slag and Polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hong-Seok; Jeon, Ui-Hyeon; So, Seung-Young

    2015-11-01

    White Portland Cement (WPC) and inorganic pigment have been used in colored concrete, but there are some physical problems such as increases in efflorescence, and poor workability and low economics. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of GBFS and polymer (methyl cellulose) on the physical properties of carbon black mortar. For this purpose, a flow test, compressive strength test and color evaluation and was carried out on cement mortar mixed with polymer by changing the proportion of cement and ratio of GBFS. The results show that the addition of polymer influences significantly the color value efficiency in colored mortar. This is due to the reduction of overall amount of micro pore. This polymer films prevent the transport of soluble calcium towards the surface, and decreases efflorescence. And the flow of colored mortar was increased in proportion to the addition rate of the GBFS. In addition the strength of colored mortars with GBFS at the long-term aged (after 28 days) was higher than that of the general WPC mortar, although its strength was developed slowly at the early ages.

  3. FREEZE-THAW AND FIRE RESISTANCE OF GEOPOLYMER MORTAR BASED ON NATURAL AND WASTE POZZOLANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.Nurhayat Degirmenci

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to investigate the resistance of pozzolan-based geopolymer mortars subjected to high temperatures and freeze-thaw cycles. Low calcium fly ash and granulated blast furnace slag as waste pozzolans and natural zeolite as a natural pozzolan were used as base materials for producing geopolymer mortar. The other purpose the research was to study the effect of alkaline activator ratio (Na₂SiO₃/NaOH on the performance of pozzolan-based geopolymer mortar specimens subjected to extreme temperatures. The influence of high temperatures on the properties of mortars was investigated at 300°C, 600°C, and 900°C. Fire and freeze-thaw and resistance of mortars were investigated in terms of visual appearance, weight loss and residual compressive strength. The minimal values of the residual compressive strength were obtained at 900°C for all mixtures. The residual compressive strength of all specimens was lower than the values obtained for specimens not subjected to any freeze-thaw resistance test, except those containing GGBS. The Na₂SiO₃/NaOH ratios of the alkaline activator solution used to prepare the geopolymer mortars have an effect on the weight losses and residual compressive strengths of the specimens subjected to high temperatures and freeze-thaw cycles. As the Na2SiO3/NaOH ratios increased, the weight and strength losses decreased.

  4. Flowability in crushed sand mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabrera, O. A.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The present experimental study explored the relationship between mortar flowability and the voids content in crushed sand to determine the effect of grain shape and surface texture as well as dust content on the behaviour of fresh mortar. The findings revealed a close correlation between voids content and the volume of paste needed for mortar to begin to flow as a continuous material, mortar flowability and the water content needed to attain a given flowability. The comparison of the empirical findings to the results obtained with the Larrard (1, 2 model provided further information on the effect of sand grain morphology on fresh mortars.

    En el presente trabajo se plantea un estudio experimental de la fluidez de morteros basado en el contenido de vacíos de arenas machacadas, para comprender la influencia de la forma y textura superficial de los granos de arena y del contenido de polvo de las mismas sobre el estado fresco de morteros. Los resultados muestran la estrecha relación entre el contenido de vacíos entre granos y los volúmenes de pasta necesarios para iniciar el escurrimiento como un material continuo, la fluidez de los morteros, el contenido de agua para alcanzar una determinada fluidez, etc. El comportamiento evaluado se compara con resultados obtenidos aplicando el modelo de F. de Larrard (1, 2, permitiendo de este modo obtener mayor información de la influencia de la morfología de los granos de la arena sobre el estado fresco de los morteros.

  5. Effects of liming on forage availability and nutrient content in a forest impacted by acid rain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Pabian

    Full Text Available Acidic deposition and subsequent forest soil acidification and nutrient depletion can affect negatively the growth, health and nutrient content of vegetation, potentially limiting the availability and nutrient content of forage for white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus and other forest herbivores. Liming is a mitigation technique that can be used to restore forest health in acidified areas, but little is known about how it affects the growth or nutrient content of deer forage. We examined the effects of dolomitic limestone application on the growth and chemical composition of understory plants in an acidified forest in central Pennsylvania, with a focus on vegetative groups included as white-tailed deer forage. We used a Before-After-Control-Impact study design with observations 1 year before liming and up to 5 years post-liming on 2 treated and 2 untreated 100-ha sites. Before liming, forage availability and several nutrients were below levels considered optimal for white-tailed deer, and many vegetative characteristics were related to soil chemistry. We observed a positive effect of liming on forb biomass, with a 2.7 fold increase on limed sites, but no biomass response in other vegetation groups. We observed positive effects of liming on calcium and magnesium content and negative effects on aluminum and manganese content of several plant groups. Responses to liming by forbs and plant nutrients show promise for improving vegetation health and forage quality and quantity for deer.

  6. Microscopic characterisation of old mortars from the Santa Maria Church in Evora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adriano, P.; Santos Silva, A.; Veiga, R.; Mirao, J.; Candeias, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    Evora Cathedral (one of the most emblematic monuments of Evora - Portugal) has suffered several conservation and restoration interventions through the ages, without, however, any type of previous knowledge about mortars and materials used. This work was carried out in order to identify the mortar's composition in different locations, which were attributed to different construction or conservation periods. The characterisation methodology involved a multidisciplinary set of chemical, physical, microstructural and mechanical techniques, and gave special attention to the use of microstructural characterisation techniques, particularly petrographical analysis and scanning electron microscopy for the identification of the mortar's constituents as well as in the evaluation of the state of conservation. The test results showed that two types of aerial binders were used, dolomitic and calcitic limes, the former being predominant. The aggregates used have a siliceous nature and are similar in composition to the granodiorites of the region around Evora. The mortars differ in the aggregate contents and, in some cases, crushed bricks were used as an additive.

  7. Investigations of salt mortar containing saliferous clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, F.

    1992-01-01

    Saliferous clay mortar might be considered for combining individual salt bricks into a dense and tight long-term seal. A specific laboratory program was started to test mortars consisting of halite powder and grey saliferous clay of the Stassfurt from the Bleicherode salt mine. Clay fractions between 0 and 45% were used. The interest focused upon obtaining good workabilities of the mixtures as well as upon the permeability and compression strength of the dried mortar samples. Test results: 1) Without loss of quality the mortar can be mixed using fresh water. Apprx. 18 to 20 weight-% of the solids must be added as mixing water. 2) The porosity and the permeability of the mortar samples increases distinctly when equally coarse-grained salt power is used for mixing. 3) The mean grain size and the grain size distribution of the saliferous clay and the salt powder should be very similar to form a useful mortar. 4) The permeability of the mortar samples decreases with increasing clay fraction from 2 10 -12 m 2 to 2 10 -14 m 2 . The investigated samples, however, were large and dried at 100degC. 5) The uniaxial compressive strength of the clay mortar equals, at an average, only 4 MPa and decreases clearly with increasing clay fraction. Moist mortar samples did not show any measurable compressive strength. 6) Moistened saliferous clay mortar may show little temporary swelling. (orig./HP)

  8. Calcium chromate process related investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillard, B.M.

    1979-01-01

    A pilot plant for production of calcium chromate has been scaled up to a small production facility at the General Electric Neutron Devices Department. In preparation for this scale-up, the process and final product were studied in order to evaluate problems not considered previously. The variables and processes studied included: (1) the determination of optimum drying temperature and time for product analysis; (2) the effect of the grade of lime used as the precipitating agent on the purity of the calcium chromate; (3) product purity when calcium chromate is precipitated by the addition of ammonium chromate to slaked lime; (4) the reagents best suited for cleaning calcium chromate spills; and (5) methods for determining hydroxide ion concentration in calcium chromate. The optimum drying time for the product before analysis is four hours at 600 0 C. Gases evolved at various temperatures during the drying process were carbon dioxide and water vapor. Technical grade lime produced calcium chromate of the highest purity. Both nitric and acetic acids were efficient dissolvers of calcium chromate spills. Direct titration of hydroxide ion with sulfuric acid gave an average recovery of 93% for samples spiked with calcium hydroxide. 1 figure, 17 tables

  9. Chemical composition influence of cement based mortars on algal biofouling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estelle, Dalod; Alexandre, Govin; Philippe, Grosseau; Christine, Lors; René, Guyonnet; Denis, Damidot

    2013-04-01

    The main cause of building-facade biodegradation is the growth of microorganisms. This phenomenon depends on several parameters such as the geographical situation, the environmental conditions and the surface state of the substrate. Several researches have been devoted to the study of the effect of porosity and roughness on the biofouling of stones and mortars. However, none of them have addressed the influence of the mortar chemistry on the microorganism growth kinetic. The main objective of this study is to highlight the influence of the mortar chemistry in relationship with its physical properties on biological weathering. Earlier work showed a good resistance of Calcium Aluminate Cements to biodeterioration by acidogenic bacteria (Thiobacillus) and fungi (Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus Niger and Coniosporium uncinatum). In order to characterize the influence of the mortar chemistry on biofouling, two Portland cements and two alumina cements are used. Among micro-organisms able to grow, green algae are most involved in the aesthetic deterioration of facades. Indeed, they can colonize any type of media and can be a source of nutrients for other micro-organisms such as fungi. The green algae Klebsormidium flaccidum is chosen because of its representativeness. It is indeed the species the most frequently identified and isolated from samples taken on sites. The biofouling kinetic is followed on samples exposed outdoor and on samples tested in a laboratory bench which consists in spraying an algae culture on mortar specimens. The results obtained by in situ trials are compared with the results obtained on the laboratory bench. The microorganism growth kinetic is measured by image analysis. To improve the detection of algae on the surface of the cementitious samples, the raw image is converted in the YIQ color space. Y, I and Q correspond respectively to luminance, in-phase, and quadrature. On the Q channel, the areas covered by algae and the areas of clean mortar

  10. 21 CFR 184.1185 - Calcium acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium acetate. 184.1185 Section 184.1185 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1185 Calcium acetate. (a) Calcium acetate (Ca (C2H3O2)2, CAS Reg. No. 62-54-4), also known as acetate of lime or vinegar salts, is the calcium salt of acetic acid. It may be...

  11. Microstructural characterization of phases and interfaces of Portland cement mortar using high resolution microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreto, M.F.O.; Brandao, P.R.G.

    2014-01-01

    In Portland cement mortars it is of paramount importance to investigate the bond strength between mortar and masonry by means of the study of interfaces and surfaces that make up the system mortar/ceramic block. In this work the aim was to characterize the chemical compositions, microstructures, surfaces and interfaces of mortars applied on ceramic blocks. Therefore, two important characterization tools were used: field-effect gun (FEG) scanning electron microscope (SEM) - FEI Quanta 200 with energy-dispersive (X-ray) spectrometer (EDS) and SEM system with EGF Nanofabrication FIB - FEI Quanta 3D FEG also with an EDS coupled. To date the results obtained from the research show that the characterization of cementitious materials with high resolution SEM is an important tool in the detection and differentiation of hydrated calcium silicates (CSH), calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2), ettringite and calcium carbonate by means of morphological, topographical and chemical data, thus providing extremely reliable as well as qualitative data from the structure of cementitious materials. (author)

  12. Microstructural characterization of phases and interfaces of Portland cement mortar using high resolution microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, M.F.O.; Brandao, P.R.G., E-mail: matheusfob@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: pbrandao@demin.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), MG (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    In Portland cement mortars it is of paramount importance to investigate the bond strength between mortar and masonry by means of the study of interfaces and surfaces that make up the system mortar/ceramic block. In this work the aim was to characterize the chemical compositions, microstructures, surfaces and interfaces of mortars applied on ceramic blocks. Therefore, two important characterization tools were used: field-effect gun (FEG) scanning electron microscope (SEM) - FEI Quanta 200 with energy-dispersive (X-ray) spectrometer (EDS) and SEM system with EGF Nanofabrication FIB - FEI Quanta 3D FEG also with an EDS coupled. To date the results obtained from the research show that the characterization of cementitious materials with high resolution SEM is an important tool in the detection and differentiation of hydrated calcium silicates (CSH), calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2), ettringite and calcium carbonate by means of morphological, topographical and chemical data, thus providing extremely reliable as well as qualitative data from the structure of cementitious materials. (author)

  13. Strength of mortar containing rubber tire particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jusoh, M. A.; Abdullah, S. R.; Adnan, S. H.

    2018-04-01

    The main focus in this investigation is to determine the strength consist compressive and tensile strength of mortar containing rubber tire particle. In fact, from the previous study, the strength of mortar containing waste rubber tire in mortar has a slightly decreases compare to normal mortar. In this study, rubber tire particle was replacing on volume of fine aggregate with 6%. 9% and 12%. The sample were indicated M0 (0%), M6 (6%), M9 (9%) and M12 (12%). In this study, two different size of sample used with cube 100mm x 100mm x 100mm for compressive strength and 40mm x 40mm x 160mm for flexural strength. Morphology test was conducted by using Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) were done after testing compressive strength test. The concrete sample were cured for day 3, 7 and 28 before testing. Results compressive strength and flexural strength of rubber mortar shown improved compare to normal mortar.

  14. Examination of solidified and stabilized matrices as a result of solidification and stabilization process of arseniccontaining sludge with portland cement and lime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanapon Phenrat

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available By solidification and stabilization (S/S with Portland cement and lime, it is possible to reduce arsenic concentration in leachate of the arsenic-containing sludge from arsenic removal process by coagulation with ferric chloride. From the initial arsenic concentration in leachate of unsolidified /unstabilized sludge which was around 20.75 mg/L, the arsenic concentrations in leachate of solidified/stabilized waste were reduced to 0.3, 0.58, 1.09, and 1.85 mg/L for the waste-to-binder ratios of 0.15, 0.25, 0.5, and 1, respectively, due tothe formation of insoluble calcium-arsenic compounds. To be more cost effective for the future, alternative uses of these S/S products were also assessed by measurement of compressive strength of the mortar specimens. It was found that the compressive strengths of these matrices were from 28 ksc to 461 ksc. In conclusion, considering compressive strength and leachability of the solidified matrices, some of these solidified/ stabilized products have potential to serve as an interlocking concrete paving block.

  15. Micro and nanostructural characterization of surfaces and interfaces of Portland cement mortars using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreto, M.F.O.; Brandao, P.R.G.

    2014-01-01

    The characterization of Portland cement mortars is very important in the study the interfaces and surfaces that make up the system grout/ceramic block. In this sense, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive (X-ray) spectrometer are important tools in investigating the morphology and chemical aspects. However, more detailed topographic information can be necessary in the characterization process. In this work, the aim was to characterize topographically surfaces and interfaces of mortars applied onto ceramic blocks. This has been accomplished by using the atomic force microscope (AFM) - MFP-3D-SA Asylum Research. To date, the results obtained from this research show that the characterization of cementitious materials with the help of AFM has an important contribution in the investigation and differentiation of hydrated calcium silicates (CSH), calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2, ettringite and calcium carbonate by providing morphological and micro topographical data, which are extremely important and reliable for the understanding of cementitious materials. (author)

  16. Moisture transport properties of mortar and mortar joint: A NMR study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brocken, H.J.P.; Adant, O.C.G.; Pel, L.

    1997-01-01

    The moisture transport in mortar and mortar joint often is an important parameter in degeneration of brick masonry and other block constructions. In this study, the influence of single additives on the moisture transport properties of mortar is investigated. Due to water extraction during brick

  17. Moisture transport properties of mortar and mortar joint: a NMR study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brocken, H.J.P.; Adan, O.C.G.; Pel, L.

    1997-01-01

    The moisture transport in mortar and mortar joint often is an important parameter in degeneration of brick masonry and other block constructions. In this study, the influence of single additives on the moisture transport properties of mortar is investigated. Due to water extraction during brick

  18. Liming and postharvest quality of carambola fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato de Mello Prado

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available To determine the effects of lime application on the postharvest quality of carambola fruit, an experiment with carambola trees cultivated on an acid soil was conducted at the Bebedouro, São Paulo, Brazil. The trees were treated with increasing doses of lime during the pre-planting period. Liming led to a increase in calcium concentration of carambola leaves and fruits. Adequate nutrition of the plant with calcium improved post-harvest fruit quality, permitting a longer (~ 2 days period of storage under ambient conditions.Tendo como objetivo avaliar os efeitos da aplicação de doses crescentes de calcário ao solo, na qualidade de frutos de caramboleira pela avaliação das alterações físico-químicas dos frutos após a colheita, foi instalado um experimento em Bebedouro-SP,Brasil, sobre um Latossolo Vermelho distrófico, ácido. Os tratamentos foram doses crescentes de calcário, em pré-plantio, como segue: D0 = zero; D1 = metade da dose; D2 = a dose; D3 = 1,5 vez a dose; e D4 = 2 vezes a dose para elevar V= 70%. No florescimento da caramboleira, avaliou-se o teor de cálcio na folha. Após a colheita dos frutos, determinou-se o teor de cálcio na polpa, o peso dos frutos, diâmetro transversal, comprimento, peso da polpa, % de polpa, ºBrix, acidez titulável e Ratio dos frutos. Diariamente, durante sete dias de armazenamento em condições ambiente, determinou-se a perda de massa fresca e a firmeza dos frutos. A calagem proporcionou um aumentou linear de cálcio nas folhas e nos frutos da caramboleira. A nutrição adequada da planta com cálcio melhorou a qualidade dos frutos pós-colheita, permitindo um período de armazenamento mais longo (~ 2 days, em condições ambiente.

  19. Characterization of mudejar mortars from St. Gil Abbot church (Zaragoza, Spain: Investigation of the manufacturing technology of ancient gypsum mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igea, J.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This work has been focused on the investigation of the technological procedure of Mudejar mortars applied to the characterization of a group of unaltered samples from an example church of Mudejar architecture of Aragon. The research was carried out using multi-analytical techniques including petrographic study, chemistry and mineralogical analysis. All mortars present a homogeneous composition. The binder is made up of a mixture of gypsum and a very low proportion of lime, while the main components of the aggregate are gypsum and carbonate rock fragments, both in a different thermal state of decomposition. The results have proved that both, binder and aggregates display the same composition in these mortars. These aggregates are the by-product of a grinding process of the previously burnt raw materials which have had a positive influence on the properties of the mortars in improving their quality.

    Este trabajo se ha centrado en la investigación de la tecnología de fabricación de morteros mudéjares mediante la caracterización de un conjunto de muestras inalteradas procedentes de una iglesia representativa de la arquitectura Mudéjar aragonesa. La investigación se llevó a cabo mediante el uso combinado de técnicas analíticas incluyendo el estudio petrográfico y el análisis químico y mineralógico. Todos los morteros presentan una composición constante formada por una mezcla de yeso y cal, en muy baja proporción, como ligante, mientras que el árido está formado por fragmentos de rocas yesíferas y carbonatadas en distinto estado de descomposición térmica. Los resultados confirman que en la fabricación de los morteros, ligante y áridos presentan la misma composición, siendo éstos últimos el subproducto de la misma materia prima calcinada, incorporados para elaborar el mortero, tras un proceso de molienda. Esta característica ha influido positivamente en las propiedades de los morteros, mejorando su calidad.

  20. Thaumasite formation in hydraulic mortars by atmospheric SO2 deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanco-Varela, M. T.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Sulphation of mortars and concretes is a function of diverse environmental factors (SO2 aerosol, temperature, etc as well as some material characteristics. One of the phases that could be formed as consequence of the sulphation of the hydraulic binder is thaumasite. In this paper different hydraulic mortars have been exposed to laboratory exposure chambers in order to reproduce thaumasite formation due to atmospheric SO2. Under the laboratory exposure conditions, thaumasite was formed in hydraulic lime mortars, and mortars elaborated with ordinary Portland cement as well as mineralized white portland cement. However, thaumasite was not formed in mortars made of lime and pozzolan. The first product formed as a result of the SO2-mortar interaction was gypsum. Gypsum reacted with calcite and C-S-H gel, present in the samples, giving place to thaumasite. Low temperature promotes thaumasite formation.

    La sulfatación de morteros y hormigones depende de las condiciones ambientales (SO2 aerosol, temperatura, etc., así como de las características del material. Una de las fases que se puede formar como consecuencia de la sulfatación de los ligantes hidráulicos es la taumasita. En este trabajo se han expuesto diferentes morteros hidráulicos en cámaras de laboratorio con el fin de reproducir la formación de taumasita por efecto del SO2 atmosférico. Bajo las condiciones de laboratorio se formó taumasita en los morteros de cal hidráulica y en los morteros fabricados con cemento portland y cemento blanco mineralizado. Sin embargo, cuando el ligante utilizado en los morteros fue cal y puzolana, no se formó taumasita. El yeso fue el primer producto formado en la interacción entre los morteros y el SO2. A continuación, este yeso reaccionó con la calcita y el gel C-S-H dando lugar a la formación de taumasita. Las bajas temperaturas favorecieron la formación de taumasita.

  1. Non-calcium desulphurisation technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian Zhu [IEA Clean Coal Centre, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    Flue gas desulphurisation (FGD) is traditionally based on limestone/lime sorbent. The majority of the installed FGD systems worldwide use limestone or lime as sorbent. However, technologies are rapidly evolving that allow desulphurisation in regions where there are limited resources of lime or limestone. These technologies provide alternatives to limestone/lime scrubbers for efficient and cost effective control of SO{sub 2} emissions from coal combustion. This report reviews the existing and emerging non-calcium based FGD processes as well as FGD technologies currently under development that apply new concepts and different approaches. It looks at the fundamentals and features of these processes, the recent technical advances and their applications in coal-fired power plants. The capital and operating costs of the processes are evaluated where information available. 66 refs., 15 figs., 10 tabs.

  2. Arsenic removal by lime softening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaosol, T.; Suksaroj, C.; Bregnhøj, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    This paper focuses on the study of arsenic removal for drinking water by lime softening. The initial arsenic (V) concentration was 500 and 1,000 ug/L in synthetic groundwater. The experiments were performed as batch tests with varying lime dosages and mixing time. For the synthetic groundwater......, arsenic (V) removal increased with increasing lime dosage and mixing time, as well as with the resulting pH. The residual arsenic (V) in all cases was lower than the WHO guideline of 10 ug/L at pH higher than 11.5. Kinetic of arsenic (V) removal can be described by a first-order equation as C1 = C0*e......^-k*t. The relation between the constant (k value) and increasing lime dosage was found to be linear, described by k = 0.0034 (Dlime). The results support a theory from the literature that the arsenic (V) was removed by precipitation af Ca3(AsO4)2. The results obtained in the present study suggest that lime...

  3. Separation of hemicellulose-derived saccharides from wood hydrolysate by lime and ion exchange resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojun; Zhuang, Jingshun; Fu, Yingjuan; Tian, Guoyu; Wang, Zhaojiang; Qin, Menghua

    2016-04-01

    A combined process of lime treatment and mixed bed ion exchange was proposed to separate hemicellulose-derived saccharides (HDS) from prehydrolysis liquor (PHL) of lignocellulose as value added products. The optimization of lime treatment achieved up to 44.2% removal of non-saccharide organic compounds (NSOC), mainly colloidal substances, with negligible HDS degradation at 0.5% lime level and subsequent neutralization by phosphoric acid. The residual NSOC and calcium ions in lime-treated PHL were eliminated by mixed bed ion exchange. The breakthrough curves of HDS and NSOC showed selective retention toward NSOC, leading to 75% HDS recovery with 95% purity at 17 bed volumes of exchange capacity. In addition, macroporous resin showed higher exchange capacity than gel resin as indicated by the triple processing volume. The remarkable selectivity of the combined process suggested the feasibility for HDS separation from PHL. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Amendment of biosolids with waste materials and lime: Effect on geoenvironmental properties and leachate production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayser, Claudia; Larkin, Tam; Singhal, Naresh

    2015-12-01

    Residuals from wastewater treatment operations (biosolids) were mixed with lime, fly ash, lime kiln dust, or two smelter slags to assess their efficacy as potential stabilisation agents by assessing their effects on the shear strength, compressibility, and solids content of mixtures. In addition, the minerals formed and leachate produced during stabilisation were determined. Tests were performed to explore the change of the geoenvironmental properties of the amended biosolids, while under pressure, at different scales using laboratory, pilot and field scale tests. The settlement characteristics of the amended biosolids under a range of applied pressures were determined using a consolidometer. All amended biosolids mixtures showed higher strength than the unamended biosolids, with mixtures containing a combination of 20% fly ash and 20% lime giving the highest (up to eightfold) increase in strength, and that with lime kiln dust and the smelter slags showing the lowest (up to twofold). The biosolids mixtures with only lime gave the second highest increase in strength (up to fourfold), but produced the largest amount of leachate, with higher level of dissolved calcium. The increase in strength correlated with availability of calcium oxide in the mixtures which lead to calcium carbonate formation, accompanied with higher leachate production and settlement during consolidation. Copper, nickel and zinc concentrations increased with alkaline additives and corresponded to higher pH and DOC levels. Nonetheless, concentrations were within the New Zealand regulatory limits for Class A landfills. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Steam slaking of lime - kinetics and technology. New energy effective lime slaking technology in kraft pulping; Aangslaeckning av kalk - kinetik och teknik. Ny energieffektiv teknik foer slaeckning av mesakalk i sulfatmassaindustrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundqvist, Roland

    2008-06-15

    Lime stone is widely used in chemical recovery for regeneration of white liquor in kraft pulping. Slaked (hydrated) lime is used to convert (causticize) sodium carbonate into sodium hydroxide, whereby lime mud (calcium carbonate) precipitates from the solution. Lime mud is dried and reburned in a lime kiln, where burned lime (calcium oxide) is formed. The circle is closed when lime is slaked (hydrated) in green liquor in an exotherm reaction. Problems with traditional lime burning and slaking methods are that heat recovery is bad and heat is recovered at low temperatures. With the method described in this report there is potential to increase heat recovery in the causticizing plant, and to recover heat at higher temperatures. The forecasted method means that lime is slaked with water vapour, for example combined with an indirect heated lime mud drier and a lime kiln. This project is a follow-up to pilot tests performed in a specific machine equipment at year 2006. The target group is pulp and paper industry using the kraft process. The owner of this new project is Carnot AB and the project is performed inside the Vaermeforsk Program for Pulp and Paper Industry 2006-2008. Partners and advisers in project group have been KTH Energy Processes, CTH Energy and Environment, LTH Chemical Technology, SMA Mineral AB, and reference group from STORA Enso Skoghall, Sodra Cell, M-Real Husum and SCA Packaging Piteaa. The task in this stage has included market investigations and laboratory tests. Contacts have been made with suppliers, preliminary dimensioning of process equipment and budget offers are received. Economic calculations have been made out of the offers. The laboratory tests are done as an examination paper at KTH Energiprocesser on the reactivity of burned lime from kraft lime kiln when it is slaked with water vapour instead of green liquor. The vapour intended to be used is at atmospheric pressure or even down to 0,2 atm. Complementary addition to these laboratory

  6. Incorporation of limestone residue from marble processing plant in the city of Cachoeiro do Itapemirim, Espirito Santo, Brazil, in the production of mortars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, G.P.; Alexandre, J.; Dias, D.P.; Dias Junior, N.S.; Anderson, R.B.

    2010-01-01

    Cachoeiro do Itapemirim city (ES), located 136 km from Vitoria, the state's capital, is the largest ornamental stones producer in Brazil, whose beneficiation produces a large amount of waste that, even today, is responsible for major damages done to the environment. This article aims the experimental study of hydrated lime use (product marketed to be used in mortar) by a residue from marble beneficiation from an industry located in that city. Two mixes were made with cement:sand:hydrated lime and cement:sand:residue. The mortars were evaluated by their properties comparisons in fresh and hardened states, namely: consistency index, mass density and incorporated air content, compressive strength, tensile and bending grip for traction. Chemical and mineralogical analysis by X-ray diffraction were also made. The obtained results met the requirements prescribed by ABNT NBR 13 281 (2005). (author)

  7. Freeze concentration of lime juice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ampawan Tansakul

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this research was to study the effects of processing conditions, i.e. cooling medium temperature (-6, -12 and -18C and scraper blade rotational speed (50, 100 and 150 rpm on the freeze concentration of lime juice. The initial soluble solid content of lime juice was 7.6 Brix. Results showed that soluble solid content of lime juice increased as cooling medium temperature decreased while scraper blade rotational speed increased. It was also found that the processing condition with -18˚C cooling medium temperature and 150 rpm rotational speed of the scraper blade was the best among all studied conditions, although the loss of the soluble solids with ice crystals during ice separation was relatively high at 35%.

  8. Assessment of Pb-slag, MSWI bottom ash and boiler and fly ash for using as a fine aggregate in cement mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Nabajyoti; Cornelis, Geert; Mertens, Gilles; Elsen, Jan; Van Balen, Koenraad; Van Gerven, Tom; Vandecasteele, Carlo

    2008-06-15

    Three types of wastes, metallurgical slag from Pb production (SLG), the sand-sized (0.1-2 mm) fraction of MSWI bottom ash from a grate furnace (SF), and boiler and fly ash from a fluidised bed incinerator (BFA), were characterized and used to replace the fine aggregate during preparation of cement mortar. The chemical and mineralogical behaviour of these wastes along with the reactivities of the wastes with lime and the hydration behaviour of ordinary Portland cement paste with and without these wastes added were evaluated by various chemical and instrumental techniques. The compressive strengths of the cement mortars containing waste as a partial substitution of fine aggregates were also assessed. Finally, leaching studies of the wastes and waste containing cement mortars were conducted. SLG addition does not show any adverse affect during the hydration of cement, or on the compressive strengths behaviours of mortars. Formation of expansive products like ettringite, aluminium hydroxide and H2 gas due to the reaction of some constituents of BFA and SF with alkali creates some cracks in the paste as well as in the cement mortars, which lower the compressive strength of the cement mortars. However, utilization of all materials in cement-based application significantly improves the leaching behaviour of the majority of the toxic elements compared to the waste as such.

  9. Optimization of lime treatment processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinck, J. M.; Aube, B. C.

    2000-01-01

    Lime neutralization technology used in the treatment of acid mine drainage and other acidic effluents is discussed. Theoretical studies and laboratory experiments designed to optimize the technology of lime neutralization processes and to improve the cost efficiency of the treatment process are described. Effluent quality, slaking temperature, aeration, solid-liquid separation, sludge production and geochemical stability have been studied experimentally and on site. Results show that through minor modification of the treatment process, costs, sludge volume generated, and metal released to the environment can be significantly reduced. 17 refs., 4 figs

  10. Adsorption of carbon-14 on mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Junko; Banba, Tsunetaka; Muraoka, Susumu

    1995-01-01

    The sorption experiments of carbon-14 on the mortar grain (grain size: 0.50--1.0 mm) focused on the chemical form of the carbon-14 were carried out by the batch method. Three kinds of carbon-14 chemical form were used for the experiments: sodium carbonate (Na 2 14 CO 3 ) as the inorganic radiocarbon, and sodium acetate (CH 3 14 COONa) and acetaldehyde ( 14 CH 3 14 CHO) as the organic radiocarbons. 0.30 gram samples of mortar were soaked in the solution with carbon-14 at 15 C for periods of up to 160 days. At the end of each run, carbon-14 concentrations in the supernatants were determined before and after centrifugation (3,500 rpm., 1 hr). In the mortar-sodium carbonate system, the retention process of carbon-14 related to reaction on the surface of the mortar was speculated as follows. First, 3CaO-SiO 2 and 2CaO-SiO 2 of the mortar components contact with water and produce Ca(OH) 2 . Ca(OH) 2 produces Ca 2+ and OH - in the solution. Then, calcite forms from Ca 2+ and CO 3 2- in the solution. Thus, the sorption ratio of carbon-14 onto mortar will be high until mortar has been completely carbonated because Ca 2+ is rich in the mortar and the solubility of calcite is low. In the mortar-organic carbon system, the soluble organic carbon-14 is hardly sorbed on the surface of the mortar. Therefore, the cementitious materials may not inhibit the release of organic radiocarbons from the low-level radioactive wastes, contrary to the case of inorganic radiocarbon

  11. New waste based clinkers: Belite and lime formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raupp-Pereira, Fabiano; Ball, Richard James; Rocha, Joao; Labrincha, Joao A.; Allen, Geoffrey C.

    2008-01-01

    This work describes the formulation of new belite-based (CR2) and lime-based (CR3) cementitious materials derived from industrial wastes, such as sludges (generated in the Al-anodising and surface coating industrial processes, potable water filtration/cleaning operations and in marble sawing processes) and foundry sand. Powder mixtures were prepared and fired at different temperatures. For comparison, similar formulations were prepared with pre-treated and commercially available natural raw materials and processed in similar conditions. The thermal process was followed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and high-temperature powder X-ray diffraction (HT-XRD) studies. The CR2 clinker was found to contain belite as the main cementitious phase, the main polymorph being identified by NMR. The CR3 clinker contained common cementitious phases, such as C 3 A and C 3 S, but free lime and calcium aluminium oxide sulphates were also identified by high temperature XRD and NMR. Then the corresponding cement was prepared and the evolution of the mechanical strength with time was evaluated. The lime-based cement obtained from wastes shows a stronger hardening character than the standard material, which tends to show dusting phenomena due to the presence of a reasonable amount of free lime (as the result of its expansive reaction with ambient moisture). Some fluxing impurities (e.g. alkalis) present in the waste materials improve the overall reactivity of the mixture and induces the combination of the lime in CR3. Raman, XPS and FIB techniques were used to fully characterise the aged cements

  12. Fire Related Temperature Resistance of Fly Ash Based Geopolymer Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeyalakshmi R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study presented in this paper is on the effect of heat treatment on fly ash based geopolymer mortar synthesized from fly ash (Class F –Low lime using alkaline binary activator solution containing sodium hydroxide (18 M and sodium silicate solution (MR 2.0, cured at 80oC for 24 h. 7 days aged specimen heated at elevated temperature (200°C, 400°C, 600°C and 800°C for the sustained period of 2hrs. The TGA/DTA analysis and thermal conductivity measurement as per ASTM C113 were carried out besides the compressive strengths. The thermal stability of the fly ash mortar at elevated temperature was found to be high as reflected in the observed value of f800°C/f30°C being more than 1 and this ratio was raised to about 1.3 with the addition of 2% Zirconium di oxide (ZrO2. No visible cracks were found on the specimens with and without ZrO2 when 800°C was sustained for 4 hrs in smaller specimens of size: 50 mm diameter x 100 mm height and in also bigger size specimens: 22 cm × 11 cm × 7 cm specimens. TGA/DTA analysis of the geopolymer paste showed that the retention of mass was around 90%. The addition of ZrO2 improved thermal resistance. The micro structure of the matrix found to be intact even at elevated temperature that was evident from the FESEM studies.

  13. Mineral Resource of the Month: Lime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corathers, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    Lime is the common term for several chemicals in three major categories: quicklime, hydrated lime and refractory dead-burned dolomite. Lime is almost never found naturally. It is primarily manufactured by burning limestone in kilns, followed by hydration when necessary. 

  14. Compressive and flexural strength of cement mortar stabilized with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mortar is a material with wide range of applications in the construction industry. However, plain mortar matrices are usually brittle and often cracks and fails more suddenly than reinforced mortars. In this study, the compressive and flexural strengths of cement mortar stabilized with Raffia Palm Fruit Peel (RPFP) as fibre were ...

  15. Comparative effects of commercial lime (CaCO 3 ) and ground ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Greenhouse study was carried out to investigate the comparative effect of commercial lime (CaCO3) and ground eggshell on the uptake of calcium and dry matter yield of maize in an ultisol of Southeastern Nigeria using maize (variety Oba supper 92) as the test crop. The soil was acidic and deficient in N, O.C., K, Ca and ...

  16. Materials and proportion's design of self-compacting mortar used for low diffusion layer in sub-surface radioactive waste disposal facility in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwase, Kazuhito; Sugihashi, Naoyuki; Tsuji, Yukikazu

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the design procedure for the material selection and mix proportion of the self-compacting mortar used for low diffusion layer cementitious material in the sub-surface radioactive waste disposal facility in Japan. The low diffusion layer is required for reducing transportation by controlling diffusion of a radionuclide. Therefore the low diffusion, cracks control, and low leaching are the important matters in the mix design. The process to select mortar mix design of the low diffusion layer is explained in detail. Of 33 kinds mix proportions used in laboratory comparative testing, the combinations of low heat portland cement, fly ash, lime powder and expansive addition was provisionally set to the mix proportion of the self-compacting mortar used for low diffusion layer. (author)

  17. Evaluation of red mud as pozzolanic material in replacement of cement for production of mortars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manfroi, E.P.; Cheriaf, M.; Rocha, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    Red mud is a by-product of the alkaline extraction of aluminum from the bauxite and represents a renewed environmental problem due the significant annual throughput by the plants. In the present work, the pozzolanic properties of Brazilian red mud fired at 600, 700, 800 and 900 deg C were investigated by monitoring lime consumption using DTA analysis and Brazilian standard methodology NBR 5772 (1992). Products and kinetics of hydration were determined in cement pastes produced with 5 and 15% red mud using x-ray diffraction and DTA analysis. Compressive strength and capillary absorption tests were realized on mortars constituted by 5, 10 and 15% red mud in replacement of cement. When calcined at 600 deg C, the red mud develops good pozzolanic properties, and the compressive strength of mortars produced with this waste meet values in accordance with regulatory standard. These results shown than red mud can be used, in partial replacement of cement, as new construction material to produce sustainable mortars with low environmental impact. (author)

  18. Rendering mortars in Medina Azahara, Part II: Material characterization and alteration causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanco-Varela, M. T.

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the depicted coat that covers some of the mortars exposed to weathering in the Medina Azahara archaeological site is .studied. That coat is characterized from the compositional and physical viewpoint and the main causes for its decay are determined. The depicted coat is formed by cal cite and iron oxides. It is quite compact and homogeneous. It is approximately 0.1 to 1 mm thick. The depicted coats supposed by lime mortars have CaCO3 deposits over polychromy rests. Depicted coats supported by gypsum mortars or mixed lime and gypsum mortars have gypsum deposits over polychromy rests. The processes of rendering mortars dissolution and the later crystallization of salts on their surface, together with biological growth, are the main causes of the decay of the depicted coats.

    En el presente trabajo se estudia la capa de policromía que recubre algunos de los morteros conservados a la intemperie en la ciudad de Medina Azahara. Dicha capa se caracteriza desde el punto de vista composicional y físico, determinándose las principales causas de su deterioro. La capa de policromía está formada por calcita y óxidos de hierro. Dicha capa es bastante homogénea y compacta. Su espesor es de 0,1 a 1 mm aproximadamente. Las capas de pintura sustentadas por morteros de cal tienen un depósito de CaCO sobre los restos de policromía. Las capas de pintura sustentadas por morteros de yeso o bastardos de cal y yeso tienen depósitos de yeso sobre los restos de policromía. Los procesos de disolución de los revocos y la posterior cristalización de las sales en su superficie, junto con la colonización biológica, son las principales causas de deterioro de la capa de policromía de su superficie.

  19. Lime treatment of stabilized leachates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renou, S.; Poulain, S.; Givaudan, J. G.; Sahut, C.; Moulin, P.

    2009-01-01

    Reverse Osmosis is the most widely used method for treating municipal solid waste landfill leachates, since it produces a permeate in compliance with reject requirements. However, the efficiency of this process at the industrial scale is limited mainly because of membrane fouling and the high osmotic pressures involved. Although lime precipitation is traditionally used to eliminate the temporary hardness of water by de-carbonation, it has also been shown to be highly efficient in removing humic substances which are known to have strong fouling potential towards membranes. Our objective is to study the lime/leachate physico-chemistry, in order to determine the potential of the lime precipitation as pre-treatment for reverse osmosis. The results show that the lime treatment makes it possible (i) to act efficiently on the inorganic fraction of leachates through a de-carbonation mechanism which entails massive precipitation of the carbonates under the form of CaCO 3 , (ii) to eliminate by co-precipitation the high Molecular Weight (MW) organic macromolecules (≥ 50, 000 g.mol -1 ) such as humic acids, and (iii) to generate a stable residue that can be easily stored at a landfill. The reverse osmosis step will be facilitated through significant reduction of the osmotic pressures and prevention of membrane fouling. (authors)

  20. Ranking procedure based on mechanical, durability and thermal behavior of mortars with incorporation of phase change materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunha, S.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, considering the high variety of construction products, adequate material selection, based on their properties and function, becomes increasingly important. In this research, a ranking procedure developed by Czarnecki and Lukowski is applied in mortars with incorporation of phase change materials (PCM. The ranking procedure transforms experimental results of properties into one numerical value. The products can be classified according to their individual properties or even an optimized combination of different properties. The main purpose of this study was the ranking of mortars with incorporation of different contents of PCM based in different binders. Aerial lime, hydraulic lime, gypsum and cement were the binders studied. For each binder, three different mortars were developed. Reference mortars, mortars with incorporation of 40% of PCM and mortars with incorporation of 40% of PCM and 1% of fibers, were tested. Results show that the incorporation of PCM in mortars changes their global performance.Actualmente, existen varios productos de construcción, siendo importante una adecuada selección, con base en sus principales propiedades y funciones. En esta investigación se aplicó un procedimiento de clasificación desarrollado por Czarnecki y Lukowski, en morteros con incorporación de materiales de cambio de fase (PCM. Este procedimiento transforma los resultados experimentales de las propiedades en un único valor numérico. Los productos se clasifican de acuerdo con sus propiedades individuales o en una combinación optimizada de diferentes propiedades. El principal objetivo de este estudio fue la clasificación de morteros basado en los diferentes aglutinantes con incorporación de diferentes cantidades de PCM. Los aglutinantes utilizados fueran la cal aérea, cal hidráulica, yeso y cemento. Para cada aglutinante se han desarrollado tres morteros, siendo morteros de referencia, con incorporación de 40% de PCM y con incorporaci

  1. Mortars for 3D printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demyanenko Olga

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is aimed at developing scientifically proven compositions of mortars for 3D printing modified by a peat-based admixture with improved operational characteristics. The paper outlines the results of experimental research on hardened cement paste and concrete mixture with the use of modifying admixture MT-600 (thermally modified peat. It is found that strength of hardened cement paste increases at early age when using finely dispersed admixtures, which is the key factor for formation of construction and technical specifications of concrete for 3D printing technologies. The composition of new formations of hardened cement paste modified by MT-600 admixture were obtained, which enabled to suggest the possibility of their physico-chemical interaction while hardening.

  2. Effects of the addition of micro silica on the durability of mortars exposed to the sodium sulfate attack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasser, C.; Meriam, M.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a detailed experimental study on the sulfate attack of mortars of self compacting concrete, and the effectiveness of employs micro silica and limestone fillers in the minimization of the damage resulting from such an attack. The test solution used to supply the sulfate ions and the cations was the sodium sulfate solution 4.5%. The solution saturated with lime was employed as the reference solution. The main variables investigated in the study were the type of cement and mineral addition. The expansion measured on p rims of mortar of (40x40x160) millimeters was employed to estimate their durability after exposure to the sodium sulfate solution attack during 91 days-Specimens of mortars were visually examined to assess the extent of deterioration due to the sulfate attack. The x-ray diffraction was used to evaluate the microstructural nature of the sulfate attack. The test results proved that the use of micro silica had a beneficial effect on the expansion due to the sodium sulfate attack. While mortars with limestone filler have undergoes degradation even with the use of cement resistant to sulfates. (authors).

  3. Effects of hydrated lime on radionuclides stabilization of Hanford tank residual waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guohui; Um, Wooyong; Cantrell, Kirk J; Snyder, Michelle M V; Bowden, Mark E; Triplett, Mark B; Buck, Edgar C

    2017-10-01

    Chemical stabilization of tank residual waste is part of a Hanford Site tank closure strategy to reduce overall risk levels to human health and the environment. In this study, a set of column leaching experiments using tank C-104 residual waste were conducted to evaluate the leachability of uranium (U) and technetium (Tc) where grout and hydrated lime were applied as chemical stabilizing agents. The experiments were designed to simulate future scenarios where meteoric water infiltrates through the vadose zones into the interior of the tank filled with layers of grout or hydrated lime, and then contacts the residual waste. Effluent concentrations of U and Tc were monitored and compared among three different packing columns (waste only, waste + grout, and waste + grout + hydrated lime). Geochemical modeling of the effluent compositions was conducted to determine saturation indices of uranium solid phases that could control the solubility of uranium. The results indicate that addition of hydrated lime strongly stabilized the uranium through transforming uranium to a highly insoluble calcium uranate (CaUO 4 ) or similar phase, whereas no significant stabilization effect of grout or hydrated lime was observed on Tc leachability. The result implies that hydrated lime could be a great candidate for stabilizing Hanford tank residual wastes where uranium is one of the main concerns. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. A Comparison between Lime and Alkaline Hydrogen Peroxide Pretreatments of Sugarcane Bagasse for Ethanol Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabelo, Sarita C.; Filho, Rubens Maciel; Costa, Aline C.

    Pretreatment procedures of sugarcane bagasse with lime (calcium hydroxide) or alkaline hydrogen peroxide were evaluated and compared. Analyses were performed using 2 × 2 × 2 factorial designs, with pretreatment time, temperature, and lime loading and hydrogen peroxide concentration as factors. The responses evaluated were the yield of total reducing sugars (TRS) and glucose released from pretreated bagasse after enzymatic hydrolysis. Experiments were performed using the bagasse as it comes from an alcohol/ sugar factory and bagasse in the size range of 0.248 to 1.397 mm (12-60 mesh). The results show that when hexoses and pentoses are of interest, lime should be the pretreatment agent chosen, as high TRS yields are obtained for nonscreened bagasse using 0.40 g lime/g dry biomass at 70 °C for 36 h. When the product of interest is glucose, the best results were obtained with lime pretreatment of screened bagasse. However, the results for alkaline peroxide and lime pretreatments of nonscreened bagasse are not very different.

  5. Titanium Socket for 120 mm Mortar Base

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2004-01-01

    .... However, its unique properties also make it difficult to machine productively. ARDEC was spending excessive time turning a profile of a ball socket into the component that supports the mortar tube...

  6. Terrestrial liming benefits birds in an acidified forest in the northeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabian, Sarah E; Brittingham, Margaret C

    2007-12-01

    Studies in Europe have reported negative effects of acid deposition on forest birds, and research in North America has identified links between forest bird abundance and rates of acid deposition. We examined the bird community in an acidified forest in central Pennsylvania (USA) and evaluated the effects of terrestrial lime application on birds. We used a before-after control-impact (BACI) study design, with one year of observation before (2003) and three years after lime application (2004, 2005, and 2006). Between the 2003 and 2004 field seasons, 4500 kg/ha of dolomitic lime were applied to two of four 100-ha watersheds. Each year, we monitored bird abundance and Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla) eggshell thickness and territory size. Soil and snail abundance data were also collected. The bird community and territory size results indicated that the study area may be providing low-quality habitat for forest birds, perhaps as a result of acid deposition. We found lower forest bird abundances than have been found in less acidified areas of Pennsylvania, and larger Ovenbird territory sizes than have been found in other studies. We found a significant positive relationship between soil calcium and bird abundance, indicating that soil calcium may affect bird abundance. Liming increased soil calcium and pH and led to increased snail and bird abundances. After liming, bird abundance was positively related to snail abundance. No significant changes occurred in Ovenbird territory size or eggshell thickness. Our results suggest that acid deposition could be responsible for reduced bird abundance, and that liming is a potential mitigation technique.

  7. Mechanical characterization of sisal reinforced cement mortar

    OpenAIRE

    R. Fujiyama; F. Darwish; M.V. Pereira

    2014-01-01

    This work aims at evaluating the mechanical behavior of sisal fiber reinforced cement mortar. The composite material was produced from a mixture of sand, cement, and water. Sisal fibers were added to the mixture in different lengths. Mechanical characterization of both the composite and the plain mortar was carried out using three point bend, compression, and impact tests. Specimens containing notches of different root radii were loaded in three point bending in an effort to determine the eff...

  8. Rilem TC 203-RHM: Repair mortars for historic masonry. Requirements for repointing mortars for historic masonry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hees, R.P.J. van; Groot, C.; Hughes, J.J.; Balen, K. van; Bicer-Simsir, B.; Binda, L.; Elsen, J.; Konow, T. von; Lindqvist, J.E.; Papayanni, I.; Subercaseaux, M.; Tedeschi, C.; Toumbakari, E.E.; Thompson, B.

    2012-01-01

    This paper gives a summary of functional and performance requirements for repointing mortars for historic masonry (design, execution and maintenance). Successful performance of repair and conservation of mortar in historic masonry requires more care with design and execution than with modern

  9. Effects of environmental factor on gas evolution behavior from Al in simulating mortar environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashizume, Shuji; Matsumoto, Junko; Banba, Tsunetaka

    1998-01-01

    Dry Low-Level Radioactive Wastes (LLW) which mean incombustible solid LLW generated from nuclear power stations are scheduled to be packed in steel drums followed by solidification with mortar. The solidified dry LLW is then to be disposed to shallow under-ground at Rokkasho LLW Disposal Center. Dry LLW includes some amphoteric metals among which aluminum is the most corrosive with gas evolution in high alkaline media such as mortar. The evolved gas may accelerate the leaching of solidified dry LLW with mortar. Despite the planned removal of aluminum from dry LLW, small inclusion of aluminum is unavoidable. The present study focuses on the effect of environmental factors such as pH and temperature on gas evolution behavior caused by aluminum corrosion. Large effects of pH and temperature on corrosion rate of aluminum and gas evolution were recognized. Principal corrosion product of aluminum was calcium aluminate compound when it was immersed in simulated mortar environments. It is demonstrated that 1.5 mol hydrogen gas evolves with the corrosion of 1 mol aluminum in environments of 12 < pH < 13 at temperatures below 60degC. (author)

  10. Enhancing self-healing of lime mortars by built-in crystallization inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granneman, S.J.C.; Lubelli, B.; Van Hees, R.P.J.

    2013-01-01

    The weathering of porous materials due to the presence of salts has been known since antiquity. However, serious studies and investigations were not conducted until the 19th century. One of the fi elds of interest includes historic masonry, where salt damage can affect natural stone, brick and

  11. Lime mortar with mixed in crystallization modifiers to mitigate salt damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granneman, S.J.C.; Lubelli, B.; Hees, R.P.J. van

    2016-01-01

    Although salt crystallization damage is a widespread damage process in the porous materials of our built cultural heritage, no definite solution yet exists to improve the durability of materials with respect to salt crystallization. Most research focuses on improving material properties, whereas

  12. Irreversible dilation of NaCl contaminated lime-cement mortar due to crystallization cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubelli, B.; van Hees, R.P.J.; Huinink, H.P.; Groot, C.J.W.P.

    2006-01-01

    The mechanism of damage occurring in NaCl contaminated materials has not been clarified yet. Apart from crystn. pressure, other hypotheses have been proposed to explain the cause of decay. Irreversible dilation has been obsd. in a few cases but has never been studied in a more systematic way. The

  13. Methods and systems for utilizing carbide lime or slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devenney, Martin; Fernandez, Miguel; Chen, Irvin; Calas, Guillaume; Weiss, Michael Joseph; Tester, Chantel Cabrera

    2018-02-27

    Provided herein are methods comprising a) treating a slag solid or carbide lime suspension with an ammonium salt in water to produce an aqueous solution comprising calcium salt, ammonium salt, and solids; b) contacting the aqueous solution with carbon dioxide from an industrial process under one or more precipitation conditions to produce a precipitation material comprising calcium carbonate and a supernatant aqueous solution wherein the precipitation material and the supernatant aqueous solution comprise residual ammonium salt; and c) removing and optionally recovering ammonia and/or ammonium salt using one or more steps of (i) recovering a gas exhaust stream comprising ammonia during the treating and/or the contacting step; (ii) recovering the residual ammonium salt from the supernatant aqueous solution; and (iii) removing and optionally recovering the residual ammonium salt from the precipitation material.

  14. Research of calcium oxide hydration in calcium nitrate solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Oliynyk

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mineral fertilizers are one of the important factors of agriculture intensification and increasing of food products quantity. The volume of fertilizers production and its domestic consumption in Ukraine indicate that nitrogen fertilizer using only comes nearer to the required number of science-based. One of the most widespread artificial fertilizers is the calcium nitrate. Aim: The aim is to study and theoretically substantiate the processes occurring in the preparation of suspensions of calcium hydroxide Са(ОН2 in solution of calcium nitrate Ca(NО32. Materials and Methods: The technical calcium oxide (quicklime DSTU BV.2.7-90-99, solutions of calcium nitrate of 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40% Ca(NО32 concentrations were used in the work. The content of lime in the preparation of a suspension in the solution changed (in terms of calcium oxide CaO from 150 g/dm3 to the maximum possible. Each of these solutions saturated at 40°С in lime to maximum concentration. Suitable for use in these experiments and in the technology of calcium nitrate obtaining are considered the solutions (suspensions that within 12 hours did not lose their mobility (transportability. Results: The experimental results show that increasing of the concentration of calcium nitrate in solution within the range 15...40%, the amount of lime that you can put into the solution without loss of transportability decreases. Further increasing of lime quantity in solutions concentrations causes to its solidifying, loss of mobility (transportability. Calculations showed that in the presence of calcium nitrate the solubility of Са(ОН2 is reduced nearly by order that can lead to the formation of calcium oxide CaO the solid phase Са(ОН2 on the surface, which also can form hydrogen bonds with the components of the solution. As the probability of formation of hydrogen bonds in solutions is high, there is a possibility of formation of clusters.

  15. Métodos de determinação de cálcio e magnésio trocáveis e estimativa do calcário residual em um Latossolo submetido à aplicação de calcário e gesso em superfície Methods for determining soil exchangeable calcium and magnesium and residual lime in an oxisol submitted to surface application of lime and phosphogypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Peres Soratto

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A determinação da fração do calcário remanescente no solo ("calcário residual", em área onde foi realizada aplicação de calcário em superfície, sem incorporação, na implantação do sistema plantio direto, pode ser uma ferramenta importante para auxiliar na definição do momento em que se faz necessária a reaplicação de calcário. Nesse sentido, os objetivos deste trabalho foram avaliar: quais os teores de Ca e Mg trocáveis, extraídos por percolação com solução de KCl e resina trocadora de íons; a quantidade do calcário aplicado que ainda não havia reagido no solo, mediante a determinação dos teores de Ca e Mg não-trocáveis; e qual a influência do gesso nos teores de Ca e Mg trocáveis e na dissolução do calcário, 18 meses após a aplicação em superfície. O experimento foi realizado em um Latossolo Vermelho distroférrico, em Botucatu (SP. O delineamento experimental foi de blocos casualizados com parcelas subdivididas e quatro repetições. Nas parcelas, foram aplicadas quatro doses de calcário dolomítico (0, 1.100, 2.700 e 4.300 kg ha-1, com PRNT = 71,2 %, e nas subparcelas, duas doses de gesso agrícola (0 e 2.100 kg ha-1. O calcário e o gesso foram aplicados em superfície, sem incorporação. Houve alta correlação na determinação de Ca e Mg trocável entre os métodos de percolação com solução de KCl e resina trocadora de íons. A extração pelo método da resina trocadora de íons superestimou os teores de Ca e Mg trocáveis em solo com recente aplicação de calcário em superfície. A aplicação de gesso em superfície reduziu a dissolução do calcário na camada superficial (0-0,10 m. Os teores de Ca e Mg não-trocáveis podem ser utilizados para estimar a quantidade de calcário residual no solo.The determination of the non-reacted lime fraction in the soil ("residual lime" after initial surface application of lime without incorporation in no-tillage systems can be important to

  16. Ectomycorrhizal activity as affected by soil liming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Solbritt

    1996-05-01

    Acidification of the forest soils in southern Sweden due to atmospheric deposition has become evident during recent decades. To counteract further acidification, liming of forests in the most affected areas has been proposed. Most forest trees in the temperate and boreal forest ecosystems live in symbiosis with ectomycorrhizal fungi, and their uptake of mineral nutrients from the soil is greatly influenced by the symbiosis. In this thesis effects of liming on ectomycorrhiza have been studied in relation to effects on root colonization, fungal growth and nitrogen uptake. In field experiments the effects of liming on ectomycorrhizal colonization of root tips were variable, possibly due to different soil types and climatic variations. However, a changed mycorrhizal community structure could be detected. Laboratory studies also showed that the substrate may influence the outcome of lime applications; the nutrient status of the substrate had a marked effect on how mycelial growth was affected by liming. Under the experimental conditions used in the studies presented in this thesis, liming reduced the uptake of nitrogen and phosphorus by both mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal plants. The amount of extractable nitrogen and phosphorus in the peat was also reduced by liming. The latter could be due to either microbial or chemical immobilization. The lime induced decrease in nitrogen uptake was stronger in non-mycorrhizal plants than in mycorrhizal plants. Thus, the mycorrhizal plants had a higher ability to deal with the negative effects of liming on nitrogen availability. This was not the case for phosphorus. The lime induced decrease in phosphorus uptake was stronger for mycorrhizal plants, and in the highest lime treatment there was no significant difference between the mycorrhizal and the non-mycorrhizal spruce plants. 76 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab

  17. Cement Pastes and Mortars Containing Nitrogen-Doped and Oxygen-Functionalized Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Martínez-Alanis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cement pastes and mortars based on ordinary Portland cement containing nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-Nx or oxygen-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-Ox are investigated. To incorporate MWCNTs into the cementitious matrix, the as-produced carpets are dispersed over periods of 1 and 2 hours in distilled water at pH levels of 1 and 7. The cement pastes are prepared by adding 0.1 wt% of MWCNTs to cement powder, followed by characterization with SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD at an early age (first hours of hydration. The mortars are mechanically characterized during the hydration process for a period of 28 days. SEM characterization of cement pastes revealed that the carbon nanotubes are well incorporated in the cementitious matrix, with the hydrated cement grains interconnected by long carbon nanotubes. XRD characterizations demonstrated that, during the hydration of cement pastes, different peaks emerged that were associated with ettringite, hydrated calcium silicate, and calcium hydroxide, among other structures. Results of the compressive strength measurements for mortars simultaneously mixed with MWCNT-Nx and MWCNT-Ox reached an increment of approximately 30% in compressive strength. In addition, density functional theory calculations were performed in nitrogen-doped and oxygen-functionalized carbon nanotubes interacting with a cement grain.

  18. Cement-latex grouting mortar for cementing boreholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kateev, I S; Golyshkina, L A; Gorbunova, I V; Kurochkin, B M; Vakula, Ya V

    1980-01-01

    The need for the development of cement-latex grouting mortar for the purpose of separating strata when reinforcing boreholes at deposits in the Tatar Associated SSR is evaluated. Results of studies of the physical and mechanical properties of cement-latex grouting mortar systems (mortar plus brick) are presented. Formulas for preparing cement-latex grouting mortor are evaluated and results of industrial tests of such mortars shown.

  19. Effect of colloidal nano-silica on the mechanical and physical behaviour of waste-glass cement mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, M.; Hashmi, M.S.J.; Olabi, A.G.; Messeiry, M.; Abadir, E.F.; Hussain, A.I.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → Glass powder (GP) and nano-silica (CS) were used as a partial cement replacement in cement mortar (CM). → No damaging effect can be detected due to the reaction between GP and CM with particle size up to 75 μm. → Hybrid combination of GP/CS greatly improved mechanical properties and microstructure of CM. -- Abstract: This paper presents a laboratory study of the properties of colloidal nano-silica (CS)/waste glass cement composites. The microstructure, alkali-silica reaction (ASR), and the mechanical properties of cement mortars containing waste glass powder (WG) as a cement replacement with and without CS are investigated and compared with plain mortar. In addition, the hydration of cement compounds was followed by differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that incorporation of WG has a positive effect on the mechanical properties of cement mortars especially when CS is presented. In addition, the DTA/TGA results and XRD analysis show a reduction in the calcium hydroxide (CH) content in mortars with both WG and a hybrid combination of WG and CS. This confirms the improvement of mechanical properties and the occurrence of the pozzolanic reaction after 28 days of hydration.

  20. Corrosion effects on soda lime glass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, F.A.; Rodichev, Y.M.

    2010-01-01

    Although soda lime glass is the most common used transparent material in architecture, little is known about the corrosion effects on long term strength and the interaction between corrosion and defects. Extensive testing on soda lime bars under different environmental conditions and different

  1. Hydrogen Chloride Reaction with Lime and Limestone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erik Weinell, Claus; Jensen, Peter I.; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1992-01-01

    The capacity of solid slaked lime and limestone for binding HCl from a gas phase has been investigated in the temperature range 60-1000 °C. The binding capacity is largest in the range 500-600 °C. However, for slaked lime in the presence of water, a large binding capacity is observed also below 150...

  2. Towards the industrial solar production of lime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, A.; Bonaldi, E. [QualiCal SA, Bergamo (Italy); Cella, G.M. [QualiCal SA, Bergamo (Italy); Lipinski, W.; Palumbo, R.; Steinfeld, A. [ETH Zuerich (Switzerland) and PSI; Wieckert, C.; Wuillemin, D.

    2002-03-01

    A new industrial concept that aims at the development of the chemical engineering technology for the solar production of lime is being examined. To establish the technical feasibility, a 10 kW solar reactor has been designed, constructed, and experimentally tested at a high-flux solar furnace. The quality of the produced solar lime meets industrial standards. (author)

  3. Mechanical characterization of sisal reinforced cement mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Fujiyama

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work aims at evaluating the mechanical behavior of sisal fiber reinforced cement mortar. The composite material was produced from a mixture of sand, cement, and water. Sisal fibers were added to the mixture in different lengths. Mechanical characterization of both the composite and the plain mortar was carried out using three point bend, compression, and impact tests. Specimens containing notches of different root radii were loaded in three point bending in an effort to determine the effect of the fibers on the fracture toughness of the material. The results obtained indicate that, while fiber reinforcement leads to a decrease in compressive strength, J-integral calculations at maximum load for the different notch root radii have indicated, particularly for the case of long fibers, a significant superiority of the reinforced material in comparison with the plain cement mortar, in consistence with the impact test data.

  4. Gas evolution behavior of aluminum in mortar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashizume, Shuji; Matsumoto, Junko; Banba, Tsunetaka [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1996-10-01

    As a part of study of leaching behavior for solidified dry low level radioactive waste, gas evolution behavior of aluminum in mortar was investigated, and a plan of our research was proposed. The effect of pH on corrosion rate of aluminum, corrosion product, time dependency of corrosion rate of aluminum in mortar, change of corrosion mechanism, the effects of Na, Ca and Cl ions on corrosion rate of aluminum in mortar and corrosion behavior of aluminum when aluminum was used as sacrificed anode in reinforced concrete were previously clarified. Study of the effects of environmental factors such as pH, kind of ions and temperature on gas evolution behavior of aluminum and the effect of aluminum/carbon steel surface ratio no gas evolution behavior of aluminum were planed. (author). 75 refs.

  5. Gas evolution behavior of aluminum in mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashizume, Shuji; Matsumoto, Junko; Banba, Tsunetaka

    1996-10-01

    As a part of study of leaching behavior for solidified dry low level radioactive waste, gas evolution behavior of aluminum in mortar was investigated, and a plan of our research was proposed. The effect of pH on corrosion rate of aluminum, corrosion product, time dependency of corrosion rate of aluminum in mortar, change of corrosion mechanism, the effects of Na, Ca and Cl ions on corrosion rate of aluminum in mortar and corrosion behavior of aluminum when aluminum was used as sacrificed anode in reinforced concrete were previously clarified. Study of the effects of environmental factors such as pH, kind of ions and temperature on gas evolution behavior of aluminum and the effect of aluminum/carbon steel surface ratio no gas evolution behavior of aluminum were planed. (author). 75 refs

  6. Stone mortars in Roman Cisalpine: new specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Caffini

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The mortar, made of stone or marble, represents artifact in Cisalpine widespread elsewhere in the Roman world. the morphologies are substantially grouped into two basic shapes: type 1 presents a hemispherical bowl more or less flattened, Type 2 is characterized by a conical reverse body, more or less flared. In the mortars were subjected to pounding and grinding, using a pestle driven by hand, raw materials of various origin. The fields of application were mainly three: alimentary, officinal and cosmetic. In some cases the generic definition of mortar is applied improperly to marble containers probably only be used for ornamental. It 'also demonstrated the use of artifacts attributable to type 2 as a function of urns. Therefore, in reference to decontextualized pieces, you should use a definition not unique, reflecting the different possible meanings of the artifact.

  7. Moisture transport over the brick/mortar interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brocken, H.J.P.; Pel, L.

    1995-01-01

    The moisture transport in brick, mortar that was cured separately, and combined brick/mortar samples was studied using NMR. The experimental results show that the mortar is less permeable if it is cured bonded to the brick instead of cured separately. Models of the moisture transport are usually

  8. Properties of Roman bricks and mortars used in Serapis temple in the city of Pergamon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozkaya, Ozlem Aslan; Boeke, Hasan

    2009-01-01

    Serapis temple, which was constructed in the Roman period in the city of Pergamon (Bergama/Turkey), is one of the most important monuments of the world heritage. In this study, the characteristics of bricks and mortars used in the temple have been determined in order to define the necessary characteristics of the intervention materials, which will be used in the conservation works of the temple. Several analyses were carried out to determine their basic physical properties, raw material compositions, mineralogical and microstructural properties using X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscope and a Thermo Gravimetric Analyzer. Analysis results indicated that the mortars are stiff, compact and hydraulic due to the use of natural pozzolanic aggregates. The Roman bricks are of low density, high porosity and were produced from raw materials containing calcium poor clays fired at low temperatures.

  9. Microstructure engineering of Portland cement pastes and mortars through addition of ultrafine layer silicates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgreen, Holger; Geiker, Mette; Krøyer, Hanne

    2008-01-01

    Pozzolanic submicron-sized silica fume and the non-pozzolanic micron- and nano-sized layer silicates (clay minerals) kaolinite, smectite and palygorskite have been used as additives in Portland cement pastes and mortars. These layer silicates have different particle shape (needles and plates......), surface charge, and size (micron and nano). The structure of the resulting cement pastes and mortars has been investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), helium porosimetry, nitrogen adsorption (specific surface area and porosity), low-temperature calorimetry (LTC) and thermal analysis. The main result...... is that the cement paste structure and porosity can be engineered by addition of selected layer silicates having specific particle shapes and surface properties (e.g., charge and specific surface area). This seems to be due to the growth of calcium-silicate hydrates (C-S-H) on the clay particle surfaces...

  10. R7T7 glass alteration in the presence of mortar: effect of the cement grade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andriambololona, Z.; Godon, N.; Vernaz, E.

    1991-01-01

    R7T7 glass alteration was investigated in the presence of four mortars prepared from four different cement grades: 'CPA' Portland cement (mortar M1), CPA with pozzolana additive (M2), CPA with amorphous silica additive (M3) and 'CLK' blast furnace slag cement (M4). Glass specimens were also altered in Volvic mineral water and in a cement effluent. Glass corrosion in the cement media was greater than in Volvic water, but well below what could be expected from the high pH (approx 12.5). The relatively low alteration was probably related to the protective action of the calcium-enriched gel layer that formed at the glass surface. The glass corrosion rate was 2 to 3 times lower with cement containing pozzolana or silica gel additives or with CLK cement than with CPA cement alone. 8 refs., 8 figs

  11. LANDSCAPE ARCHAEOLOGY ALONG LIMES TRANSALUTANUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugen S. Teodor

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The project addresses the historical monuments comprised in the longest Roman ‘linear defence’ structure present on the Romanian territory.Despite it being the longest, this historic structure is the least protected and the least known in its technical details. Was indeed Limes Transalutanus an incomplete limes (lacking civilian settlements, for example, an odd construction (a vallum without fossa, an early-alarm line rather than a proper defensive line? Taking on these historical and archaeological challenges, the team attempts to develop an investigation technology applicable to large scale archaeological landscapes - a full evaluation chain, involving aerial survey, surface survey, geophysical investigation, multispectral images analysis, statistic evaluation and archaeological diggings. This technological chain will be systematically applied on the whole length of the objective, that is, on a 155 km distance. The attempt to find answers to issues related to the earth works’ functionality, layout, structure, chronology and relation with adjacent sites will be grounded on exploring the relations of the monument with the surrounding environment, by focussing on finding methods to reconstruct the features of the ancient landscapes, like systematic drilling, palynological tests and toponymical studies.

  12. Development of a three-dimensional CFD model for rotary lime kilns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lixin Tao; Blom, Roger (FS Dynamics Sweden AB, Goeteborg (Sweden)); Nordgren, Daniel (Innventia, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-11-15

    In the calcium loop of the recovery cycle in a Kraft process of pulp and paper production, rotary lime kilns are used to convert the lime mud, mainly CaCO3, back to quick lime, CaO, for re-use in the causticizing process. The lime kilns are one of the major energy consumption devices for paper and pulp industry. Because of the rising oil price and new emission limits, the pulp mills have been forced to look for alternative fuels for their lime kilns. One interesting alternative to oil, often easily available at pulp mills, is biofuels such as sawdust and bark. However the practical kiln operation often encounters some difficulties because of the uncertainties around the biofuel impact on the lime kiln performance. A deeper understanding of the flame characteristics is required when shifting from oil to biofuels. Fortunately recent advances in modern Computational Fluid Dynamics, CFD, have provided the possibility to study and predict the detailed flame characteristics regarding the lime kiln performance. In this project a three-dimensional CFD model for rotary lime kilns has been developed. To simulate a rotary lime kiln the developed CFD model integrates the three essential sub-models, i.e. the freeboard hot flow model, the lime bed model and the rotating refractory wall model and it is developed based on the modern CFD package: FLUENT which is commercially available on the market. The numerical simulations using the developed CFD model have been performed for three selected kiln operations fired with three different fuel mixtures. The predicted results from the CFD modelling are presented and discussed in order to compare the impacts on the kiln performance due to the different firing conditions. During the development, the lime kiln at the Soedra Cell Moensteraas mill has been used as reference kiln. To validate the CFD model, in-plant measurements were carried out in the Moensteraas lime kiln during an experiment campaign. The results obtained from the

  13. Intensified Pozzolanic Reaction on Kaolinite Clay-Based Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-Hee Kwon

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to develop and characterize kaolinite clay-based structural mortar. The pozzolanic reaction induced from two mineral additives, i.e., calcium hydroxide and silica fume (SF, and the physical filling effect from SF, were found to be effective on the enhancement of structural properties. Based on several preliminary experiments, 7:3 ratio of kaolinite clay/calcium hydroxide was selected as a basic binder. Then, the amount of SF was chosen as 0%, 7.5%, and 15% of the total binder to consider both the chemical and physical effects. The results showed that compressive strengths of samples with 7.5% and 15% SF are significantly increased by approximately 200% and 350%, respectively, at 28 days compared to the sample without SF. However, based on the results of the sample with 15% SF, it is found that excessive addition of SF causes long-term strength loss, possibly owing to micro cracks. With the careful consideration on this long-term behavior, this suggested new mix design can be further extended to develop sustainable structural materials using natural minerals or waste materials with nonbinding properties.

  14. Mortar modified with sulfonated polystyrene produced from waste plastic cups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. C. MOTTA

    Full Text Available Abstract In this work, we studied the addition of sulfonated polystyrene produced from waste plastic cups as an admixture for mortars. Mortars were analyzed with polystyrene content of 0.0; 0.2; 0.6; 1.0 and 1.4% in relation to the cement mass. The influence of polystyrene on the mortars' properties was evaluated by the consistency index, water retention, water absorption, porosity, elasticity modulus, compressive strength, flexural strength, bond tensile strength and microscopy. The increase in the sulfonated polystyrene content decreased the elasticity modulus of the mortar and, despite higher porosity, there was a reduction of water absorption by capillarity. In relation to mortar without admixture, the modified mortar showed an increase in water retention and consistency index, and a large increase in flexural strength and bond tensile strength. The significant increase of bond tensile strength (214% with admixture 1% highlights the potential of the produced material as an adhesive mortar.

  15. Studies on diffusion of 137Cs in cement mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takebe, Shinichi; Shimooka, Kenji; Wadachi, Yoshiki; Kuramoto, Yuzuru.

    1989-12-01

    Penetration experiment of 137 Cs into the impermeable cement mortar which has been treated by the impermeable reagent (XYPEX reagent) was carried out in order to advance the performance of engineered barrier for Low Level Radioactive Waste. The result showed that the radioactive concentration at deeper region in the impermeable cement mortar specimen was decreased about 1 order of magnitude below that in the untreated specimen. Diffusion coefficient calculated from the radioactive concentration of 137 Cs in the cement mortar specimen was 9.1 x 10 -5 cm 2 /day for untreated cement mortar specimen and 4.0 x 10 -5 cm 2 /day for the impermeable cement mortar specimen, respectively. Treatment of cement mortar by the impermeable reagent was found to be effective to reduce the value of appearent diffusion coefficient for 137 Cs in the cement mortar. (author)

  16. Chloride ingress in cement paste and mortar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Coats, Alison M.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper chloride ingress in cement paste and mortar is followed by electron probe microanalysis. The influence of several paste and exposure parameters on chloride ingress are examined (e.g., water-cement ratio, silica fume addition, exposure time, and temperature), The measurements...

  17. Gas generation from the irradiation of mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, M.A.; Warren, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    A mortar formulation capable of immobilizing chloride salts with high levels of radioactivity is being developed. As part of the developmental effort, radiation effects are being investigated. The radiolytic generation of gas(es) from irradiated mortar formulations was determined for several formulations with variable salt loadings at several test temperatures. The irradiation of a mortar formulation consisting of cement, slag, fly ash, water and 0 to 10 wt % salt led to the generation of hydrogen. The rate of generation was approximately constant, steady state pressures were not attained and final pressures were comparatively high. Higher salt concentrations were correlated with higher hydrogen generation rates for experiments at ambient temperature while lower rates were observed at 120/degree/C. The irradiation of a mortar consisting of cement, fly ash, water and salt led to the radiolytic generation of both oxygen and hydrogen. The addition of 2 wt % FeS or CaS inhibited oxygen generation and changed the hydrogen production rate. 10 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Estudo da durabilidade de argamassas alternativas contendo resíduos Durability study of alternative mortars containing wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Farias Filho

    2011-12-01

    study the durability of the alternative mortar incorporated with residues from civil construction and from granite industry. To quantify the durability of the studied materials, it was made test of natural and accelerated weathering through wetting and drying cycles. The materials were submitted to conditions that simulated their use to evaluate their degradation. In the studies of durability of the mortar elevation, percentages of substitutions of lime by recycling residue were used. The amount changed from 30% to 50%. The natural weathering cause a compromise in the durability of the material after 60 days with a decrease in the mechanical behavior and the best results occur to the sample with 30% and 50% of residue. In the accelerated weathering, the results show indicate the formation of calcium and potassium aluminosilicates that can give an increase in the mechanical behavior, however, it was not observed a compromise in the material durability.

  19. Assessing the effects of soil liming with dolomitic limestone and sugar foam on soil acidity, leaf nutrient contents, grape yield and must quality in a Mediterranean vineyard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olego, M.A.; Visconti, F.; Quiroga, M.J.; Paz, J.M. De; Garzón-Jimeno, E.

    2016-11-01

    Aluminium toxicity has been recognized as one of the most common causes of reduced grape yields in vineyard acid soils. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two liming materials, i.e. dolomitic lime and sugar foam, on a vineyard cultivated in an acid soil. The effects were studied in two soil layers (0-30 and 30-60 cm), as well as on leaf nutrient contents, must quality properties and grape yield, in an agricultural soil dedicated to Vitis vinifera L. cv. ‘Mencía’ cultivation. Data management and analysis were performed using analysis of variance (ANOVA). As liming material, sugar foam was more efficient than dolomitic limestone because sugar foam promoted the highest decrease in soil acidity properties at the same calcium carbonate equivalent dose. However, potassium contents in vines organs, including leaves and berries, seemed to decrease as a consequence of liming, with a concomitant increase in must total acidity. Soil available phosphorus also decreased as a consequence of liming, especially with sugar foam, though no effects were observed in plants. For these reasons fertilization of this soil with K and P is recommended along with liming. Grape yields in limed soils increased, although non-significantly, by 30%. This research has therefore provided an important opportunity to advance in our understanding of the effects of liming on grape quality and production in acid soils. (Author)

  20. The antifungal efficiency of carbide lime slurry compared with the commercial lime efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strigac, J.; Mikusinec, J.; Strigacova, J.; Stevulova, N.

    2017-10-01

    The article deals with studying the antifungal efficiency of carbide lime slurry compared to industrially manufactured commercial lime. Antifungal efficiency expressed as mould proofness properties was tested on the fungi using the procedure given in standard CSN 72 4310. A mixture of fungi Aspergillus niger, Chaetomium globosum, Penicillium funiculosum, Paecilomyces variotii and Gliocladium virens was utilized for testing. The scale for evaluating mould proofness properties according to CSN 72 4310 is from 0 to 5 in degree of fungi growth, where 0 means that no fungi growth occurs and the building products and materials possess fungistatic properties. The study confirms the fungistatic propeties of carbide lime slurry as well as industrially manufactured commercial lime. However, carbide lime slurry and industrially manufactured commercial lime possess no fungicidal effect.

  1. Analysis of tree samples from an acidic and a limed environment by means of PIXE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pernestaal, K.; Li, Hong-Ko; Jonsson, B.; Haellgren, J.-E.

    1991-01-01

    Three tree core samples of Norway spruce (Picea Abies) have been analysed by PIXE. The concentration profiles for 17 elements heavier than sodium have been determined by means of one PIXE measurement every 2 mm along the samples. The samples were collected at Faexboda, an experimental area north of Uppsala where artificially acidified and limed environmental experiments are made. One sample from each of an acidified, a limed and a reference area has been collected. The main interest is focused on potassium, calcium, manganese, iron, copper and zinc. All three samples have about the same concentration profile in the heartwood. Large differences are observed in the sapwood. In the sample from the limed area the calcium content is much higher and the iron and chromium contents are lower than in the sample from the reference area. In the sample from the acidified area the calcium and potassium contents are lower and the manganese, iron and chromium contents are much higher than in the sample from the reference area. The observed concentration profiles of trace elements in trees indicate that changes in the environment due to acidification can be quantified at an early stage by means of PIXE. (author)

  2. Combined effect of nano-SiO2 and nano-Fe2O3 on compressive strength, flexural strength, porosity and electrical resistivity in cement mortars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanjuán, M.A.; Argiz, C.; Gálvez, J.C.; Reyes, E.

    2018-01-01

    The compressive strength, flexural strength, porosity and electrical resistivity properties of cement mortars with nano-Fe2O3 and nano-SiO2 are studied. Amorphous silica is the main component of pozzolanic materials due to its reaction with calcium hydroxide formed from calcium silicate (C3S and C2S) hydration. The pozzolanic reaction rate is not only proportional to the amount of amorphous silica but also to the surface area available for reaction. Subsequently, fine nano-Fe2O3 and nano-SiO2 particles in mortars are expected to improve mortar performance. The experimental results showed that the compressive strength of mortars with nano-Fe2O3 and nano-SiO2 particles were lower than those obtained with the reference mortar at seven and 28 days. It was shown that the nano-particles were not able to enhance mechanical strength on every occasion. The continuous microstructural progress monitored by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) measurements, pore-size distribution (PSD), total porosity and critical pore diameter also confirmed such results. [es

  3. Combined effect of nano-SiO2 and nano-Fe2O3 on compressive strength, flexural strength, porosity and electrical resistivity in cement mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Sanjuán

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The compressive strength, flexural strength, porosity and electrical resistivity properties of cement mortars with nano-Fe2O3 and nano-SiO2 are studied. Amorphous silica is the main component of pozzolanic materials due to its reaction with calcium hydroxide formed from calcium silicate (C3S and C2S hydration. The pozzolanic reaction rate is not only proportional to the amount of amorphous silica but also to the surface area available for reaction. Subsequently, fine nano-Fe2O3 and nano-SiO2 particles in mortars are expected to improve mortar performance. The experimental results showed that the compressive strength of mortars with nano-Fe2O3 and nano-SiO2 particles were lower than those obtained with the reference mortar at seven and 28 days. It was shown that the nano-particles were not able to enhance mechanical strength on every occasion. The continuous microstructural progress monitored by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP measurements, pore-size distribution (PSD, total porosity and critical pore diameter also confirmed such results.

  4. CHEMICAL SOIL ATTRIBUTES AS AFFECTED BY LIME AND GYPSUM SURFACE APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mantovani

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The gypsum is a soil condition end it has to function contribute to the elimination or reduction of aluminum in the soil in depth. Still, it can contribute to the distribution of nutrients in the soil profile more uniformly and thus increasing the productivity of crops. This study aimed to evaluate the influence of gypsum application, with and without lime, on soil chemical properties and soybean yield, in a no-till system. The experiment was carried in Campos Novos, Santa Catarina State, Brazil, with a randomized block design and split plot design with four replications, the main portion was distributed gypsum doses (1000, 2000, 4000 and 6000 kg ha-1 without incorporation, and the split plot (with and without lime and the liming was 2,000 kg ha-1. We evaluated the performance of components and productivity of soybeans. It was also analyzed the soil pH and Ca, Mg, S and Al at 0-20 and 20-40 cm. The application of gypsum at the rates tested surface with and without lime did not affect the yield components and soybean productivity. At 0-20 cm soil depth lime application increased soil pH by 0.3 units on the average rates of gypsum, but in the 20-40 cm layer was not found effect of lime and gypsum in pH ground due to the short time between application and evaluation. In areas with and without lime contents of Ca and S in the two layers evaluated increased with increasing rates of gypsum, since Mg has difference with the lime application on a 0-20 cm to dose 4000 kg ha-1 and the lime in the gypsum rates and Al decreased with increasing dose gypsum average in the 20-40 cm layer depth. The application of gypsum and limestone softened the negative effects of soil acidity and the increase mainly of calcium and sulfur at 0-20 cm, with less efficient effects in the 20-40 cm layer due to the soil is clayey and the period between the implementation and evaluation be 120 days.

  5. Evaluation of the influence of sprinkling powdered slaked lime on microorganisms for the prevention of domestic animal infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Miho; Sakagami, Yoshikazu; Hamazaki, Yousuke; Jojima, Toru

    2018-04-23

    When infectious diseases arise in domestic animals, a large amount of slaked lime is sprinkled on cattle sheds and their surroundings for disinfection and prevention. However, optimal sprinkling methods, standard and upper limit of slaked lime, and influence of slaked lime on non-target microorganisms remain unclear. In this study, we clarified detailed microbicidal effects of slaked lime via in vitro experiments and the influence of sprinkling powdered slaked lime (PSL) in field soil on microorganisms. In vitro disinfection tests assessing the appropriate amount of water and ventilation conditions were also performed in sterilized glass bottles with soil and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Under conditions with a small amount of water relative to the amount of PSL, the bactericidal effect and sustainability of powdered slaked lime (PSL) tended to be lower than those without spraying water. Moreover, the sterilization effect markedly decreased after 7 days under conditions with abundant water. These results indicate that the amount of sprayed water is very important for the bactericidal effect and persistence of PSL. A field experiment showed that the pH and exchange calcium (Ca) content of the soil sprinkled with over 1000 g m -2 PSL remained high even after a long period (≥1 year), with values of approximately 0.5-1.0 and approximately 3-11 times the level without PSL, respectively. However, sprinkling PSL did not influence viable microbial counts at any concentration.

  6. Inactivation of Adenovirus Type 5, Rotavirus WA and Male Specific Coliphage (MS2 in Biosolids by Lime Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron B. Margolin

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of lime to reduce or eliminate pathogen content is a cost-effective treatment currently employed in many Class B biosolids production plants in the United States. A bench scale model of lime stabilization was designed to evaluate the survival of adenovirus type 5, rotavirus Wa, and the male specific bacteriophage, MS2, in various matrices. Each virus was initially evaluated independently in a reverse osmosis treated water matrix limed with an aqueous solution of calcium hydroxide for 24-hr at 22 ± 5°C. In all R/O water trials, adenovirus type 5, rotavirus Wa and MS2 were below detectable levels (<100.5 TCID50/mL and <1 PFU/mL respectively following 0.1-hr of liming. Adenovirus type 5, rotavirus Wa, and MS2, were inoculated into composted, raw and previously limed matrices, representative of sludge and biosolids, to achieve a final concentration of approximately 104 PFU or TCID50/mL. Each matrix was limed for 24-hr at 22 ± 5°C and 4 ± 2°C. In all trials virus was below detectable levels following a 24-hr incubation. The time required for viral inactivation varied depending on the temperature and sample matrix. This research demonstrates reduction of adenovirus type 5, rotavirus Wa, and male-specific bacteriophage, in water, sludge and biosolids matrices following addition of an 8% calcium hydroxide slurry to achieve a pH of 12 for 2-hr reduced to 11.5 for 22-hr by addition of 0.1 N HCl. In these trials, MS2 was a conservative indicator of the efficacy of lime stabilization of adenovirus Type 5 and rotavirus Wa and therefore is proposed as a useful indicator organism.

  7. Orientation of Steel Fibers in Magnetically Driven Concrete and Mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wen; Chen, Ju; Xie, Fang; Feng, Bing

    2018-01-22

    The orientation of steel fibers in magnetically driven concrete and magnetically driven mortar was experimentally studied in this paper using a magnetic method. In the magnetically driven concrete, a steel slag was used to replace the coarse aggregate. In the magnetically driven mortar, steel slag and iron sand were used to replace the fine aggregate. A device was established to provide the magnetic force. The magnetic force was used to rotate the steel fibers. In addition, the magnetic force was also used to vibrate the concrete and mortar. The effect of magnetic force on the orientation of steel fibers was examined by comparing the direction of fibers before and after vibration. The effect of magnetically driven concrete and mortar on the orientation of steel fibers was also examined by comparing specimens to normal concrete and mortar. It is shown that the fibers could rotate about 90° in magnetically driven concrete. It is also shown that the number of fibers rotated in magnetically driven mortar was much more than in mortar vibrated using a shaking table. A splitting test was performed on concrete specimens to investigate the effect of fiber orientation. In addition, a flexural test was also performed on mortar test specimens. It is shown that the orientation of the steel fibers in magnetically driven concrete and mortar affects the strength of the concrete and mortar specimens.

  8. Industrial Wastes as Alternative Mineral Addition in Portland Cement and as Aggregate in Coating Mortars

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Kamilla Almeida; Nazário, Bruna Inácio; Oliveira, Antonio Pedro Novaes de; Hotza, Dachamir; Raupp-Pereira, Fabiano

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation study of wastes from pulp and paper as well as construction and demolition industries for application in cement-based materials. The alternative raw materials were used as a source of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) and as pozzolanic material (water-reactive SiO2) in partial replacement of Portland cement. In addition to the hydraulic binder, coating mortars were composed by combining the pulp and paper fluidized bed sand residue with construction and demolition wa...

  9. Application of lime (CaCO3) to promote forest recovery from severe acidification increases potential for earthworm invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, Caitlin; Beirer, Colin M; McCay, Timothy S; Lawrence, Gregory B.

    2016-01-01

    The application of lime (calcium carbonate) may be a cost-effective strategy to promote forest ecosystem recovery from acid impairment, under contemporary low levels of acidic deposition. However, liming acidified soils may create more suitable habitat for invasive earthworms that cause significant damage to forest floor communities and may disrupt ecosystem processes. We investigated the potential effects of liming in acidified soils where earthworms are rare in conjunction with a whole-ecosystem liming experiment in the chronically acidified forests of the western Adirondacks (USA). Using a microcosm experiment that replicated the whole-ecosystem treatment, we evaluated effects of soil liming on Lumbricus terrestris survivorship and biomass growth. We found that a moderate lime application (raising pH from 3.1 to 3.7) dramatically increased survival and biomass of L. terrestris, likely via increases in soil pH and associated reductions in inorganic aluminum, a known toxin. Very few L. terrestris individuals survived in unlimed soils, whereas earthworms in limed soils survived, grew, and rapidly consumed leaf litter. We supplemented this experiment with field surveys of extant earthworm communities along a gradient of soil pH in Adirondack hardwood forests, ranging from severely acidified (pH 5). In the field, no earthworms were observed where soil pH 4.4 and human dispersal vectors, including proximity to roads and public fishing access, were most prevalent. Overall our results suggest that moderate lime additions can be sufficient to increase earthworm invasion risk where dispersal vectors are present.

  10. Balancing guava nutrition with liming and fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Hernandes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Guava response to liming and fertilization can be monitored by tissue testing. Tissue nutrient signature is often diagnosed against nutrient concentration standards. However, this approach has been criticized for not considering nutrient interactions and to generate numerical biases as a result of data redundancy, scale dependency and non-normal distribution. Techniques of compositional data analysis can control those biases by balancing groups of nutrients, such as those involved in liming and fertilization. The sequentially arranged and orthonormal isometric log ratios (ilr or balances avoid numerical bias inherent to compositional data. The objectives were to relate tissue nutrient balances with the production of "Paluma" guava orchards differentially limed and fertilized, and to adjust the current patterns of nutrient balance with the range of more productive guava trees. It was conducted one experiment of 7-yr of liming and three experiments of 3-yr with N, P and K trials in 'Paluma' orchards on an Oxisol. Plant N, P, K, Ca and Mg were monitored yearly. It was selected the [N, P, K | Ca, Mg], [N, P | K], [N | P] and [Ca | Mg] balances to set apart the effects of liming (Ca-Mg and fertilizers (N-K on macronutrient balances. Liming largely influenced nutrient balances of guava in the Oxisol while fertilization was less influential. The large range of guava yields and nutrient balances allowed defining balance ranges and comparing them with the critical ranges of nutrient concentration values currently used in Brazil and combined into ilr coordinates.

  11. Sulfate and acid resistant concrete and mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction and other applications, which hardenable mixtures demonstrate significant levels of acid and sulfate resistance while maintaining acceptable compressive strength properties. The acid and sulfate hardenable mixtures of the invention containing fly ash comprise cementitious materials and a fine aggregate. The cementitous materials may comprise fly ash as well as cement. The fine aggregate may comprise fly ash as well as sand. The total amount of fly ash in the hardenable mixture ranges from about 60% to about 120% of the total amount of cement, by weight, whether the fly ash is included as a cementious material, fine aggregate, or an additive, or any combination of the foregoing. In specific examples, mortar containing 50% fly ash and 50% cement in cementitious materials demonstrated superior properties of corrosion resistance.

  12. Quartzite mining waste for adhesive mortar production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, L.S.; Mol, R.M.R.; Silva, K.D.C.; Campos, P.A.M.; Mendes, J.C.; Peixoto, R.A.F.

    2016-01-01

    The construction sector is responsible for a high consumption of natural resources. Moreover, the mining industry generates and discard waste improperly in the environment aggravating environmental problems. In order to reduce the natural sand extraction and provide the environmentally correct disposal of mining waste, this work proposes the use of quartzite mining waste to replace natural sand for the production of adhesive mortars. The quartzite mining tailings was chemically characterized using X-ray fluorescence, and morphologically by optical microscopy. In sequence, the mortars were subjected to characterization tests in the fresh state as consistency index, slip, water retention, entrained air content, bulk density and Squeeze Flow. The results were satisfactory, indicating the viability of this material as fine aggregate in total replacement of natural aggregate, allowing the reduction of environmental impacts. (author)

  13. Effect of calcium hydroxide application to feedlot pen surface material on ammonia, odor, and greenhouse gas emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium hydroxide (lime) is used to reduce microorganisms and odors in human biosolids, animal and poultry manures, and abattoir wastes. In the cattle industry, lime has been used as a disinfectant and is spread on the pen surface to control infections such as diarrhea and foot rot. The increase in ...

  14. Development of low weight self-levelling mortars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padilla, A; Panama, I; Toledo, A; Flores, A

    2015-01-01

    This work shows the development of self levelling mortars, using micro bubbles based on aluminium silicate with a density of 0.25 g/cm 3 . Mortars formulations are composed by 8 different components in order to achieve properties balance between fresh and solid state. The mean objective is development light weight mortars with high fluidity and compression strength using micro bubbles and some additives. Formulations were designed employing Taguchi DOE of 8 variables and 3 states. Result analysis according to Taguchi method lets indentify the preponderant effect of each variable on the cited properties. Several formulations reached fluidity higher than 250%, with compression strength around 100 kg/cm 2 and a low volumetric weigh. Obtained volumetric weights are 20% less than commercial self levelling mortars weight. Finally some relations are presented such: as relation water/cement with fluidity, and micro bubble content versus mortars volumetric weight, and finally compression strength versus the volumetric weight of mortars

  15. Domain decomposition methods for mortar finite elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widlund, O.

    1996-12-31

    In the last few years, domain decomposition methods, previously developed and tested for standard finite element methods and elliptic problems, have been extended and modified to work for mortar and other nonconforming finite element methods. A survey will be given of work carried out jointly with Yves Achdou, Mario Casarin, Maksymilian Dryja and Yvon Maday. Results on the p- and h-p-version finite elements will also be discussed.

  16. Improved control of sucrose losses and clarified juice turbidity with lime saccharate in hot lime clarification of sugarcane juice and other comparisons with milk of lime

    Science.gov (United States)

    A comparative investigation of adding milk of lime (MOL) versus lime saccharate (SACCH) in hot lime clarification of juice at a U.S. sugarcane factory was undertaken to quantify performance across the 2009 processing season after a preliminary factory study in 2008. SACCH was prepared by adding hyd...

  17. Effects of Biochar and Lime on Soil Physicochemical Properties and Tobacco Seedling Growth in Red Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHU Pan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Red soil, mainly found in the southern China, is developed in a warm, moist climate. The main property of the soils is strong acidity, aluminum toxicity, and low available nutrients. In this study, different effects of biochar and lime on soil physicochemical properties and tobacco growth were determined in red soil, so as to provide a scientific foundation for soil improvement tobacco field. A pot experiment was designed and conducted at four biochar levels(0, 0.5%, 1%, 2% and normal lime level (0.3% to study effects of two different soil amendments on red soil pH, exchangeable aluminum(Exc-Al and exchangeable manganese(Exc-Mn, available nutrients and organic carbon (SOC. Meanwhile, agronomic traits, biomass and leaves elements of tobacco were also tested. Results showed that the agronomic characters and biomass of tobacco seedling had changed effectively after biochar or lime was added. Under 0.5%, 1% biochar treatment, the content of nitrogen(N, phosphorus(P, potassium(K, calcium(Ca and magnesium(Mg in tobacco leaves substantially raised. However, when 2% biochar was applied, leaves N content declined by 9.3%. Compared with the control, leaves N, P and Ca content increased observably in the lime treatment. However, its K and Mg content decreased by 9.0% and 13.3% respectively. Alkaline nitrogen(SAN, available phosphorus (SAP, available potassium (SAK, and exchangeable calcium (Exc-Ca and exchangeable magnesium (Exc-Mg were improved obviously in soil applied with biochar. Only the content of Exc-Ca was significantly increased in lime treatment. In addition, it was beneficial to improve soil pH and reduce soil Exc-Al when biochar or lime had been used. Thus, both biochar and lime are propitious to increase soil pH value, lessen soil Exc-Al content, and improve the growth of tobacco seedling. Furthermore, biochar application also can raise the content of available nutrient and SOC in red soil.

  18. Mortar modified with sulfonated polystyrene produced from waste plastic cups

    OpenAIRE

    MOTTA,L. A. C.; VIEIRA,J. G.; OMENA,T. H.; FARIA,F. A. C.; RODRIGUES FILHO,G.; ASSUNÇÃO,R. M. N.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this work, we studied the addition of sulfonated polystyrene produced from waste plastic cups as an admixture for mortars. Mortars were analyzed with polystyrene content of 0.0; 0.2; 0.6; 1.0 and 1.4% in relation to the cement mass. The influence of polystyrene on the mortars' properties was evaluated by the consistency index, water retention, water absorption, porosity, elasticity modulus, compressive strength, flexural strength, bond tensile strength and microscopy. The increase...

  19. Study of mortars with industrial residual plastic scales

    OpenAIRE

    Magariños, O. E.; Alderete, C. E.; Arias, L. E.; Lucca, M. E.

    1998-01-01

    This work proposes the utilization of industrial residues of PET (Polyethylene Terephtalate) as a partial substitute of arids (sand) in mortar making for construction components. Therefore, the environmental impact of large volumes of plastic of urban residues could be decreased. When PET scales were added to mortars in partial replacement of sand, lower unitary weight, acceptable absorption and resistances according to international specifications were achieved. Mortars with 66% of sand...

  20. Moisture transfer across the interface between brick and mortar joint

    OpenAIRE

    Derluyn, Hannelore; Moonen, Peter; Carmeliet, Jan

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on experimental and modelling work on moisture transport in masonry, with special attention to the liquid transport across the interface between brick and mortar joint. Experiments and simulations reveal that two aspects need to be taken into account: (1) the dependence of moisture transport properties on the curing of the mortar; (2) the presence of a hydraulic interface resistance between brick and mortar. The resistance is due to imperfect contact between brick and morta...

  1. Nutritional value of organic acid lime juice (Citrus latifolia T., cv. Tahiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Netto Rangel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Acid lime can be used as fresh fruit or as juice to increase the flavor of drinks. Therefore, it is necessary to analyze organic acid lime nutritional composition in order to evaluate if there are important differences among those conventionally produced. No significant differences in total titrable acidity, pH, ascorbic acid, sucrose, calcium, and zinc were found between the acid lime juice from organic biodynamic crops and conventional crops. However, the organic biodynamic fruits presented higher peel percentage than the conventional ones leading to lower juice yield. On the other hand, fructose, glucose, total soluble solids contents, potassium, manganese, iron, and copper were higher in the conventional samples. These results indicated few nutritional differences between organic and conventional acid lime juices in some constituents. Nevertheless, fruit juice from biodynamic crops could be a good choice since it is free from pesticides and other agents that cause problems to human health maintaining the levels similar to those of important nutritional compounds.

  2. The Aesthetical quality of SSA-containing mortar and concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kappel, Annemette; Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2014-01-01

    that gives a characteristic red colour. The process of grinding SSA has shown to improve the compressive strength of SSA- containing mortar (Donatello et al. 2010). Thus, in this study SSA was grinded in 6 different intervals ranging from 0 – 10 min, and then added to the mortar mix replacing 20% of cement....... The experiment revealed that the colour of the SSA-containing mortar intensified as the time interval of the grinding process increased. Each of the 6 steps within the time interval provided an additional colour tone and generated a colour scale consisting of mortar samples ranging from greyish to a more...

  3. Properties of Calcium Acetate Manufactured with Etching Waste Solution and Limestone Sludge as a Cementitious High-Early-Strength Admixture

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Deuck-Mo; Ryu, Hwa-Sung; Shin, Sang-Heon; Park, Won-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Concrete is one of the most widely used construction materials. There are several methods available to improve its performance, with one of them being the use of high-early-strength admixtures (HESAs). Typical HESAs include calcium nitrate, calcium chloride, and calcium formate (CF). Industrial by-products, such as acetic acid and lime stone sludge (LSS), can be used together to produce calcium acetate (CA), which can subsequently be used as a cementitious HESA. In this study, calcium carbona...

  4. Mortar cohesión. The effect of additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castro, J. H.

    1975-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was concerned with the hydration of clinker compounds in the presence of different additives; it appeared that accelerating additives, such as calcium chloride and silicic acid, produce longer fibers of tobermorite, whereas inhibitors, such as sugar, produce shorter fibers of tobermorite. This same effect was observed in the hydration of anhydrite, in which large crystals of gypsum were produced in the presence of sodium sulphate. So the cohesion in mortars of cement and anhydrite is explained in terms of the role of fibers.Se estudia la hidratación del clínker en presencia de diferentes aditivos encontrándose que los aceleradores, como el cloruro cálcico y el ácido salicílico, producen tobermorita de fibra larga y los inhibidores, como el azúcar, tobermorita de fibra corta. Este mismo efecto se encuentra en la anhidrita, produciéndose cristales de yeso largo, en presencia del sulfato de sodio, y cristales cortos en ausencia del catalizador. La cohesión de un mortero depende luego del largo de sus fibras. Así la cohesión de los morteros de cemento y anhidrita se explican en función del rol de la fibra.

  5. Lime in gold and uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Staden, C.M.

    1979-01-01

    In this article the author discusses the role of lime in gold and uranium extraction and looks more closely at the industry's efforts to improve the environment by vegetation of sand dumps and slimes dams. He then comes to the conclusion that lime has been and still is the most effective, practical and cheapest chemical that can be used in the South African gold and uranium mining industry to settle pulps, protect cyanide solutions, aid the vegetation of dumps and neutralise acidic waters and residues. The gold and uranium industry is very pollution concious, and in South Africa the importance of the role that lime plays in combating air and water pollution cannot be over emphasised

  6. Use or rice husk ash an addition in mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez de Rojas, M. Isabel

    1986-09-01

    Full Text Available With the aid of a 400-litre capacity pilot furnace, in which 40 Kg of rice husk is submitted to controlled combustion, an ash (RHA is obtained for use as an addition, the physicochemical properties of which form the focal point of this work. Results will also be presented for the combustion power of the husk ≃ 4000 kcal/kg, being greater than half the value for normal bituminous coals. Conglomerates have been obtained by mixing RHA with different proportions of lime and portland cement, and their properties are studied with regard to both mortars and concretes. The ultimate aim of the work is to demonstrate how rice husk (world production of which is estimated at 500.106 m3 per annum may be feasibly applied as an addition, without forgetting its excellent properties as a fuel, which makes it particularly suitable for developing countries with a shortage of cement and energy resources.

    Mediante la utilización de un horno-piloto de unos 400 litros de capacidad, en el que se realiza la combustión controlada de unos 40 kg de cáscara de arroz, se consigue una ceniza (RHA, sobre cuyas propiedades físico-químicas se centra el trabajo, para su empleo como adición. Se presentan igualmente resultados sobre el poder de combustión de la cascara ≃ 4.000 kcal/kg, superior a la mitad del valor de los carbones bituminosos normales. Mediante mezclas de RHA con distintas proporciones de cal o de cemento portland, se han conseguido conglomerantes cuyas propiedades se estudian, tanto sobre morteros, como sobre hormigones. El objetivo último del trabajo es mostrar la factible aplicabilidad de la cascara de arroz (cuya "producción" mundial se estima en 500.106 m3 anuales como adición, sin olvidar sus excelentes cualidades como combustible lo que hace especialmente idónea en países en vías de desarrollo, deficitarios en cemento y recursos energéticos.

  7. Terrestrial liming to promote Atlantic Salmon recovery in Nova Scotia - approaches needed and knowledge gained after a trial application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, S. M.; Angelidis, C.; Armstrong, M.; Biagi, K. M.; Clair, T. A.; Jackson, N.; Breen, A.

    2014-09-01

    Populations of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) in Southwest Nova Scotia (SWNS) have plummeted since the 1980s. Acidification is considered a main threat to this population. The lakes and streams of SWNS were among the most heavily acidified in North America during the last century and calcium levels are predicted to continue to fall in coming decades. One of the most promising mitigation options to reduce the risk of extirpation of the SWNS Salmo salar is terrestrial liming; however, both the chemistry of SWNS rivers, and effective strategies for terrestrial liming in SWNS are poorly understood. Here we have launched the first terrestrial liming study in Nova Scotia, employing a test hydrologic source area liming strategy in a 5 ha experimental catchment in SWNS, Maria Brook; we apply an average local application rate of 13 t ha-1 to 10% of the 47 ha catchment. We employ high frequency stream monitoring to complement grab sampling to identify which constituents pose a threat to Salmo salar and to identify strategies for larger scale terrestrial liming that would fit the local conditions. Results indicate that the water chemistry conditions are currently at toxic levels for Salmo salar throughout the year, with levels of ionic aluminium exceeding toxic thresholds almost 100% of the time. The stream chemistry in Maria Brook is remarkably similar to pre-recovery conditions in other heavily acidified watersheds, such as Birkenes in Norway. Our results support the hypothesis that there has been no recovery from acidification in SWNS. Results from the first year of post-liming do not show an improvement in stream chemistry levels, and further lime application is needed to improve the water chemistry conditions to needed levels for the recovery of Salmo salar.

  8. Calcium supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007477.htm Calcium supplements To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. WHO SHOULD TAKE CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS? Calcium is an important mineral for the ...

  9. Early age fracture properties of microstructurally-designed mortars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Bella, Carmelo; Michel, Alexander; Stang, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    This paper compares the fracture properties as well as crack initiation and propagation of real and equivalent mortars. The development of the elastic modulus, tensile strength, and fracture energy at different hydration stages were determined by inverse analysis of load-displacement curves...... the two mortars. At early age, the moisture content has a considerable influence on the tensile strength and the fracture energy....

  10. Effects of water on mortar-brick bond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, C.J.W.P.

    1995-01-01

    The quality of bond in masonry is, to a large extent, a function of the (i) the hydration conditions and (ii) the mortar composition of the mortar-brick interface. For insight into the effects of these parameters on bond performance it is essential to dispose of quantitative information about water

  11. Advanced Experimental Evaluation of Asphalt Mortar for Induction Healing Purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apostolidis, P.; Liu, X.; Scarpas, Athanasios; van Bochove, G; van de Ven, M.F.C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper studied the induction heating and healing capacity of asphalt mortar by adding electrically conductive additives (e.g. iron powder and steel fibers), and examined the influence of different combinations of them on the mechanical response of asphalt mortars. Induction heating technique is

  12. Restoration of high zinc and lead tailings with municipal biosolids and lime: a field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sally; Svendsen, Alex; Henry, Chuck

    2009-01-01

    A field study was conducted to test the ability of biosolids (BS) and different types of lime to increase soil pH, neutralize subsoil acidity, and restore a vegetative cover to alluvial mine tailings in Leadville, CO. The tailings had soil pH of 5.2 and total Cd, Pb, and Zn of 75+/-20, 2600+/-1100, and 6700+/-1900 mg kg(-1). Types of lime included agricultural lime (AL), sugar beet lime (SBL), and lime kiln dust (LKD) applied at 224 Mg ha(-1) calcium carbonate equivalent. Plots were established in 2000 and monitored intermittently through 2007. All amendments increased pH in surface and subsurface depths, with LKD, LKD+BS, and SBL+BS being the most effective. Amendments also reduced 0.01 mol L(-1) Ca(NO3)2 extractable Zn and Cd compared to the control. Plant growth was sparse on all treatments with limited yield for three of four harvests. Poor growth may have been related to elevated electrical conductivity (EC). All amendments except LKD alone (5.79 dS m(-1)) increased EC compared to the control treatment (5.28 dS m(-1)). Electrical conductivity was highest in 2002 which had the lowest summer rainfall. In 2005 EC in all treatments except the SBL+BS was similar in the surface soil. Aboveground plant tissue concentrations of Zn and Cd were also elevated. Limited precipitation and high electrical conductivity may be responsible for poor plant growth. Higher rainfall for the last sampling period resulted in significant growth in the LKD+BS, SBL+BS, and LKD alone treatments.

  13. Incorporation of limestone residue from marble processing plant in the city of Cachoeiro do Itapemirim, Espirito Santo, Brazil, in the production of mortars; Incorporacao de residuo proveniente de usina de beneficiamento de marmore do municipio de Cachoeiro do Itapemirim, ES, Brasil, na confeccao de argamassas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, G.P.; Alexandre, J.; Dias, D.P.; Dias Junior, N.S.; Anderson, R.B., E-mail: gabrielkgbs@gmail.co [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (LECIV/UENF), Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Ciencia e Tecnologia. Lab. de Engenharia Civil

    2010-07-01

    Cachoeiro do Itapemirim city (ES), located 136 km from Vitoria, the state's capital, is the largest ornamental stones producer in Brazil, whose beneficiation produces a large amount of waste that, even today, is responsible for major damages done to the environment. This article aims the experimental study of hydrated lime use (product marketed to be used in mortar) by a residue from marble beneficiation from an industry located in that city. Two mixes were made with cement:sand:hydrated lime and cement:sand:residue. The mortars were evaluated by their properties comparisons in fresh and hardened states, namely: consistency index, mass density and incorporated air content, compressive strength, tensile and bending grip for traction. Chemical and mineralogical analysis by X-ray diffraction were also made. The obtained results met the requirements prescribed by ABNT NBR 13 281 (2005). (author)

  14. Incorporation of limestone residue from marble processing plant in the city of Cachoeiro do Itapemirim, Espirito Santo, Brazil, in the production of mortars; Incorporacao de residuo proveniente de usina de beneficiamento de marmore do municipio de Cachoeiro do Itapemirim, ES, Brasil, na confeccao de argamassas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, G P; Alexandre, J; Dias, D P; Dias, Junior, N S; Anderson, R.B., E-mail: gabrielkgbs@gmail.co [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (LECIV/UENF), Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Ciencia e Tecnologia. Lab. de Engenharia Civil

    2010-07-01

    Cachoeiro do Itapemirim city (ES), located 136 km from Vitoria, the state's capital, is the largest ornamental stones producer in Brazil, whose beneficiation produces a large amount of waste that, even today, is responsible for major damages done to the environment. This article aims the experimental study of hydrated lime use (product marketed to be used in mortar) by a residue from marble beneficiation from an industry located in that city. Two mixes were made with cement:sand:hydrated lime and cement:sand:residue. The mortars were evaluated by their properties comparisons in fresh and hardened states, namely: consistency index, mass density and incorporated air content, compressive strength, tensile and bending grip for traction. Chemical and mineralogical analysis by X-ray diffraction were also made. The obtained results met the requirements prescribed by ABNT NBR 13 281 (2005). (author)

  15. 27 CFR 9.27 - Lime Kiln Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lime Kiln Valley. 9.27... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.27 Lime Kiln Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Lime Kiln Valley...

  16. 46 CFR 148.04-23 - Unslaked lime in bulk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Unslaked lime in bulk. 148.04-23 Section 148.04-23... HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN BULK Special Additional Requirements for Certain Material § 148.04-23 Unslaked lime in bulk. (a) Unslaked lime in bulk must be transported in unmanned, all steel, double-hulled barges...

  17. The central tower of the cathedral of Schleswig - New investigations to understand the alcali-silica reaction of historical mortars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedekind, Wanja; Protz, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The damaging alcali-silica reaction leads to crack-formation and structural destruction at noumerous, constructed with cement mortar, buildings worldwide. The ASR-reaction causes the expansion of altered aggregates by the formation of a swelling gel. This gel consists of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) that increases in volume with water, which exerts an expansive pressure inside the material. The cathedral of Schleswig is one of the oldest in northern Germany. The first church was built in 985-965. The Romanesque building part was erected around 1180 and the Gothic nave at the end of the 13th century. The central tower was constructed between 1888 and 1894 with brick and cement mortar. With 112 meters, the tower is the second-largest church spire of the country of Schleswig-Holstein in northern Germany. Due to the formation of cracks and damages from 1953 to 1956 first restoration works took place. Further developments of cracks are making restoration necessary again today. For developing a suitable conservation strategy, different investigations were done. The investigation included the determination of the pore space properties, the hygric and thermal dilatation and mercury porosimetry measurements. Furthermore, the application of cathodoluminescence microscopy may give information about the alteration process and microstructures present and reveal the differences between unaltered and altered mortars. An obvious relation between the porosity and the swelling intensity could be detected. Furthermore it becomes apparent, that a clear zonation of the mortar took place. The mortar near the surface is denser with a lower porosity and has a significantly lower swelling or dilatation.

  18. Brick mortar exposure and chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovic-Denic, L; Jankovic, S; Marinkovic, J; Radovanovic, Z

    1995-01-01

    A case-control study of 130 patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and 130 controls matched with respect to sex, age (2 years), type of residence (urban-rural) and area of residence (according to the national per capita income) was carried out. Conditional logistic regression analysis showed that, apart of four risk factors already described in the literature (work in a hazardous industry, hair dye use, family history of leukemia and exposure to electromagnetic radiation), brick mortar exposure was also significantly related to CLL.

  19. Brick mortar exposure and chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovic-Denic, Lj.; Jankovic, S.; Marinkovic, J.; Radovanovic, Z.

    1995-01-01

    A case-control study of 130 patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and 130 controls matched with respect to sex, age (2 years), type of residence, (urban-rural) and area of residence (according to the national per capita income) was carried out. Conditional logistic regression analysis showed that, apart of four risk factors already described in the literature (work in a hazardous industry, hair dye use, family history of leukemia and exposure to electromagnetic radiation), brick mortar exposure was also significantly related to CLL. (author)

  20. Brick mortar exposure and chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markovic-Denic, Lj; Jankovic, S [Institute of Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Marinkovic, J [Institute of Social Medicine, Statistics and Healt Research, Faculty of Medicine, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Radovanovic, Z [Department of Community Medicine and Behavioural Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, 13110 Safat (Kuwait)

    1996-12-31

    A case-control study of 130 patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and 130 controls matched with respect to sex, age (2 years), type of residence, (urban-rural) and area of residence (according to the national per capita income) was carried out. Conditional logistic regression analysis showed that, apart of four risk factors already described in the literature (work in a hazardous industry, hair dye use, family history of leukemia and exposure to electromagnetic radiation), brick mortar exposure was also significantly related to CLL. (author) 1 tab., 30 refs.

  1. Dating mortars: three medieval Spanish architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quirós Castillo, Juan Antonio

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the major issues in building archaeology is finding the age of elements and structures discovered. Mortars represent a class of material basically constituted by a mixture of different phases (i.e. binder, aggregates, water and are widely used for constructive uses and artworks. Current scientific literature regarding the possibility of accurate radiocarbon dating for mortars reports different and still contradictory results. In this study, a new protocol for radiocarbon dating of mortar developed at the Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental heritage (CIRCE is used to perform 14C measurements on archaeological mortars coming from three medieval architectures of northern Spain (two churches and the walls of a castle. Results observed will be discussed and compared with independent age estimations (i.e. radiocarbon dating performed on organic materials found in the same study site, archaeological analyses in order to frame experimental observations in the actual site knowledge by means of a multidisciplinary approach.Una de las principales problemáticas a las que se enfrenta la arqueología de la arquitectura es datar los elementos y las estructuras. Las argamasas son un tipo de material constituido por una mezcla de diferentes elementos (agregados, agua y empleadas en muchos tipos de construcciones. Los estudios realizados hasta la actualidad en torno a la posibilidad de realizar dataciones radiocarbónicas precisas han proporcionado resultados contradictorios. El objetivo de este artículo es el de presentar un nuevo protocolo para datar la arquitectura histórica desarrollado por el Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Enviromental Heritage (CIRCE, basado en la realización de dataciones radiocarbónicas de argamasas a partir del análisis de tres arquitecturas medievales del norte del España, dos iglesias y la muralla de un castillo. Los resultados obtenidos han sido confrontados y comparados con otros

  2. Development of soda-lime glasses from ornamental rock wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babisk, Michelle Pereira

    2009-01-01

    During the ornamental rocks production, among other steps, one saw the rock blocks in order to transform them into semi-finished plates. In this step, expressive amounts of residues are generated, which are not properly discharged in nature, without any programmed utilization. The residues of silicide rocks present, in their compositions, oxides which are raw materials employed to fabricate soda-lime type glasses (containing SiO_2, Al_2O_3, CaO, Na_2O and K_2O). On the other hand the residues of carbonatic rocks are constituted of glass net modifier oxides, like CaO and MgO. In this work it was developed four types of soda-lime glasses using ornamental rock residues, where the glasses compositions were adjusted by adding sand, as silica source, as well as sodium and calcium carbonates as sources of Na_2O and CaO, respectively. The obtained glasses were characterized by means of Archimed's method for densities measurements, microstructure by using optical and electronic microscopy, phases by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), hardness by Vickers indentation, spectroscopy (UV/VIS), and hydrolytic resistance according to ISO 719. The XRD analyses confirmed the compositions total vitrification, where the greened aspect of the samples was due to the presence of the iron oxides. The produced glasses properties were compared with those of commercial glasses aiming their industrial employment. The main difference between the produced glasses and those commercials varied primarily regarding the amount of carbonates incorporated. The results showed that the ornamental rocks residues may be used as raw materials for glasses fabrication, and they found a useful economic destination rather than discharge which promotes undesirable environmental impact. (author)

  3. RILEM TC 203-RHM: Repair mortars for historic masonry The role of mortar in masonry: an introduction to requirements for the design of repair mortars

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Groot, C.; van Balen, K.; Bicer-Simsir, B.; Binda, L.; Elsen, J.; van Hees, R.; von Konow, T.; Lindqvist, J.; Mauerbrecher, P.; Papayanni, I.; Subercaseaux, M.; Tedeschi, C.; Toumbakari, E.; Thompson, M.; Válek, Jan; Veiga, R.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 9 (2012), s. 1287-1294 ISSN 1359-5997 Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : mortar * classification * requirements Subject RIV: JN - Civil Engineering Impact factor: 1.184, year: 2012

  4. Fertilizer and Lime: Why They Are Used.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaslin, Judith Strand

    This unit teaching guide is designed to help teachers explain the principles of fertilizer and lime use. The first of four major sections is a teaching outline keyed to transparency masters and student handouts. Thirteen major areas are covered in the teaching outline: (1) plant needs; (2) uses of fertilizer; (3) nutrients for plant growth; (4)…

  5. Peat Soil Stabilization using Lime and Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Zambri Nadhirah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of the comparison between two additive Lime and Cement for treating peat soil in term of stabilization. Peat and organic soils are commonly known for their high compressibility, extremely soft, and low strength. The aim of this paper is to determine the drained shear strength of treated peat soil from Perlis for comparison purposes. Direct Shear Box Test was conducted to obtain the shear strength for all the disturbed peat soil samples. The quick lime and cement was mixed with peat soil in proportions of 10% and 20% of the dry weight peat soil. The experiment results showed that the addition of additives had improved the strength characteristics of peat soil by 14% increment in shear strength. In addition, the mixture of lime with peat soil yield higher result in shear strength compared to cement by 14.07% and 13.5% respectively. These findings indicate that the lime and cement is a good stabilizer for peat soil, which often experienced high amount of moisture content.

  6. Peat Soil Stabilization using Lime and Cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambri, Nadhirah Mohd; Ghazaly, Zuhayr Md.

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents a study of the comparison between two additive Lime and Cement for treating peat soil in term of stabilization. Peat and organic soils are commonly known for their high compressibility, extremely soft, and low strength. The aim of this paper is to determine the drained shear strength of treated peat soil from Perlis for comparison purposes. Direct Shear Box Test was conducted to obtain the shear strength for all the disturbed peat soil samples. The quick lime and cement was mixed with peat soil in proportions of 10% and 20% of the dry weight peat soil. The experiment results showed that the addition of additives had improved the strength characteristics of peat soil by 14% increment in shear strength. In addition, the mixture of lime with peat soil yield higher result in shear strength compared to cement by 14.07% and 13.5% respectively. These findings indicate that the lime and cement is a good stabilizer for peat soil, which often experienced high amount of moisture content.

  7. Sources of uncertainties in OSL dating of archaeological mortars: The case study of the Roman amphitheatre “Palais-Gallien” in Bordeaux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbanova, P.; Hourcade, D.; Ney, C.; Guibert, P.

    2015-01-01

    Archaeological mortars are more convenient and much more representative for the chronology of buildings than brick or wood constructions that can be re-used from older buildings. Before dating unknown samples of mortars, further investigation of OSL from mortars is required and the most efficient methodology needs to be established. In this study we compared the ages obtained by OSL dating of quartz extracted from mortars of the Roman amphitheatre Palais-Gallien in Bordeaux with independent age information. Resetting of the OSL signal occurred during the preparation of mortar when grains of sand (quartz) were extracted and mixed with lime and water. The mortar was subsequently hidden from light by embedding within the structure which is the event to be dated. Various factors contribute to uncertainties in the age determination. The frequency of measured equivalent doses reveals a large scattering. Optical bleaching of certain grains can be partial due to the short duration of the exposure to light. We worked with the single grain technique in order to find and select the grains that were sufficiently exposed to daylight. To determine the average equivalent dose, we tried three different approaches: a calculation of an arithmetic mean and one following either the central age model or the 3-parameter minimum age model, the latter turned out to be the only relevant way to evaluate the experimental data. The proportion of grains included in the calculation of the average equivalent dose represents 2.7–4.7 % of the overall analysed grains. The results obtained for the three out of four samples are approaching the expected age, however, the minimum doses and the corresponding ages are significantly over-estimated in case of two samples. The studied material is very coarse, which causes heterogeneity of irradiation at the single grain scale, and contributes to a dispersion of equivalent doses. Different analytical methods (scanning electron microscopy with energy

  8. Tamping Mortars with Stabilizing and Plasticizing Admixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terlyha, Volodymir; Sobol, Khrystyna

    2012-06-01

    Boreholes cementing operations at the depth of several kilometers requires the best technology as well as the best materials. To produce the materials satisfying all the requirements concerning the tamping works is possible using the technology of dry building mixes (DBM) prepared at the factories by thorough mixing of accurately dosed components. Using of chemical admixtures allows improving some properties of these mixes. In this work the influence of mineral fillers and chemical admixtures on the properties of the fresh mixture and hardened tamping mortar was investigated. It is established that introduction of the admixture with complex action on the basis of stabilizer Walocel 15-01 and plasticizer Melflux 2651 allows obtaining the fresh mixture with high spreadability. At the same time the value of dehydration approaches to zero which favorably effects on stabilization of fresh mixture and not allows the sedimentation processes to take place. By the X-ray analysis, the positive influence of modification admixtures on the hydration processes in the tamping mortars by activating them was identified. In the result of this, the formation of hydrate phases is accelerated; these phases tightly mud the pore area of tamping stone increasing by this its strength.

  9. The Stabilization of Weathered Dolerite Aggregates with Cement, Lime, and Lime Fly Ash for Pavement Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix N. Okonta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental program was performed on weathered dolerite specimens stabilized by adding varying percentages of cement (4, 8, 12, and 16 % and lime (6 and 12 % and a combination of lime and fly ash (6% lime + 12% Fly ash and 12% lime + 12% Fly ash % by dry weight of soil. The strength was examined under three different curing methods, namely, membrane curing (MBC, alternate moist-air curing (MAC, and water curing (WAC, by conducting unconfined compressive strength (UCS tests. Simple polynomial and linear functions (regression models were used to define the relationships between the variables investigated. Membrane curing (MBC gave results close enough to the water curing (WAC to indicate that it can be confidently used on the field during pavement construction. From the results obtained, for class B (interurban collector and major rural roads pavement construction, addition of 8% cement was recommended for road base construction with stabilized WDA. Also the addition of 12 + 12% Lime and Fly Ash was recommended for road subbase construction with stabilized WDA. Stabilized WDA against the prejudiced myths would perform satisfactorily for base and subbase construction in both heavily trafficked and low volume roads with economic quantities of cement, lime, and fly ash in South Africa.

  10. Calcium absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlmark, B.; Reizenstein, P.; Dudley, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    The methods most commonly used to measure the absorption and retention of orally administered calcium are reviewed. Nearly all make use of calcium radioisotopes. The magnitude of calcium absorption and retention depends upon the chemical form and amount of calcium administered, and the clinical and nutritional status of the subject; these influences are briefly surveyed. (author)

  11. Neutralization of acid-mine water with calcium-carbonate

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maree, JP

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, Lime is used for the neutralization of acidic effluents. Calcium carbonate should be considered as an alternative because of considerations such as lower cost, low solubility at pH values greater than 7 and simple dosing system...

  12. A possible medieval lighthouse at Mul Dwarka (Kodinar) Saurashtra Coast, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaur, A.S.; Sundaresh; Rao, B.R.; Tripati, S.; Khedekar, V.D.

    ) of the ancient Mesopotamia (Woolley, 1939). Then lime mortars were used in the masonry work worldwide from ancient times until usage of modern cements (Portland) in the late 19th century. SEM-EDS analysis of the sample suggests that the major component.... The composition in modern Portland cement includes two third parts calcium oxide and ~20 % of silica. However, while preparing cement mortar a certain proportion of sand is added whereas lime mortar was directly used for construction purpose in ancient times...

  13. Environmental deterioration of ancient and modern hydraulic mortars (EDAMM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Balen, K.; Toumbakari, E.E.; Blanco-Varela, M.T. (and others) (eds.)

    2002-07-01

    Environmental damage to ancient and modern mortars (EDAMM) is a European Commission funded project in which three European research institutes from Belgium, Spain and Italy have been collaborating. The project has provided a better understanding of the role of environmental pollution on the deterioration of ancient and modern hydraulic mortars. Recent monuments built in the 19th and 20th century, were constructed using these types of hydraulic mortars. Increasing numbers of these monuments need restoration all over Europe. Similar hydraulic mortars have been widely used in treatments carried out during last and the present century. Tests have been carried out on the identification of historic hydraulic mortars, on the evaluation of damage on samples taken from historic buildings and on the laboratory simulations carried out to investigate damage mechanisms. Among pollutants, SO{sub 2} is the main component of pollution causing damage to hydraulic mortars. Hydraulic mortars have been identified as the most sensitive building materials because of the formation of primary and secondary damage products, such as ettringite and thaumasite. Although the important implications of these results are for the development of conservation strategies for monuments and historic buildings, they are also of great relevance to the development of sustainable construction methods as the building industry still uses these materials today.

  14. Measurement of lime/silica ratio in concrete using PGNAA technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naqvi, A.A. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)]. E-mail: aanaqvi@kfupm.edu.sa; Nagadi, M.M. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Amoudi, O.S.B. [Department of Civil Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2005-12-01

    Prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) technique has been used to determine lime/silica ratio in concrete samples using an accelerator-based PGNAA facility. The ratio was determined from the measured yield of 6.42 MeV prompt {gamma}-rays of calcium and 4.93 MeV {gamma}-rays of silicon from the six concrete samples. The experimental results were compared with the results of the Monte Carlo simulations. An excellent agreement has been achieved between the two. The study has demonstrated successful use of the accelerator-based PGNAA setup in non-destructive analysis of the concrete samples.

  15. Tensile capacity of loop connections grouted with concrete or mortar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Harrild; Hoang, Linh Cao; Olesen, John Forbes

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a study of grout failure in symmetric U-bar loop connections loaded in tension, with focus on the performance of two grouting materials – concrete and mortar. The study contains an experimental investigation as well as a rigid-plastic modelling of the tensile capacity. The test...... to allow yielding of the U-bars. The experimental work showed that connections grouted with concrete performed better than the connections grouted with mortar. In the theoretical models, the difference in tested capacity is explained by the difference in the internal angle of friction and in the softening...... behaviour of concrete as compared with mortar....

  16. Test Method for Rheological Behavior of Mortar for Building Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korobko Bogdan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper offers a test method for rheological behavior of mortars with different mobility and different composition, which are used for execution of construction work. This method is based on investigation of the interaction between the valve ball and the mortar under study and allows quick defining of experimental variables for any composition of building mortars. Certain rheological behavior will permit to calculate the design parameters of machines for specific conditions of work performance – mixing (pre-operation, pressure generation, pumping to the work site, workpiece surfacing.

  17. The influence of surface and incorporated lime and gypsiferous by-products on surface and subsurface soil acidity. II. Root growth and agronomic implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H.L.; Hedley, M.J.; Bolan, N.S.; Horne, D.J. [New Zealand Forest Research Institute, Rotorua (New Zealand)

    1999-04-01

    Lucerne (Medicago sativa. L) root elongation in acid soils amended by gypsiferous coal combustion by-products was investigated in a glasshouse study. Lime, fluidised bed boiler ash (FBA), and flue gas desulfurisation gypsum (FGDG) were mixed into the surface 50 mm of either an Allophanic (the Patua sand loam) or an Ultic (the Kaawa clay loam) soil column, at rates containing calcium equivalent to 5000 kg/ha of CaCO{sub 3}. Lucerne was grown on each column after it was leached with 400 mm of water. Whereas the lime treatment had no effect on root elongation in the acidic subsurface of the Patua soil, the FBA and FGDG treatments significantly improved lucerne root penetration into the subsurface soil. This was due to the `self liming effect` induced by sulfate adsorption. In contrast, topsoil incorporated amendments did not influence root penetration into the acidic subsurface of the Kaawa soil, which is dominated by permanently charged clay minerals. The `self-liming erect` caused by gypsum application is not a sustainable practice. Lime should be applied to neutralise the topsoil acidity, when gypsum is used as subsurface soil acidity ameliorant. FBA, which contains both lime and gypsum, can meet these requirements.

  18. Composition of mortar as a function of distance to the brick-mortar interface : A study on the formation of cured mortar structure in masonry using NMR, PFM and XRD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brocken, H.J.P.; Larbi, J.A.; Pel, L.; Pers, N.M. van der

    1999-01-01

    The formation of cured mortar structure in masonry was studied using multiple experimental techniques. Starting with fresh mortar, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used to measure the water extraction during brick laying. After curing, the composition of cured mortar was investigated with

  19. Hospital waste ashes in Portland cement mortars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genazzini, C.; Zerbino, R.; Ronco, A.; Batic, O.; Giaccio, G.

    2003-01-01

    Nowadays, most concretes incorporate mineral additions such as pozzolans, fly ash, silica fume, blast furnace slag, and calcareous filler among others. Although the technological and economical benefits were the main reasons for the use of mineral additions, the prevention of environmental contamination by means of proper waste disposal becomes a priority. The chance of incorporating hospital waste ashes in Portland cement-based materials is presented here. Ash characterization was performed by chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction, radioactive material detection, and fineness and density tests. Conduction calorimetry and setting time tests were developed on pastes including ash contents from 0% to 100%. Mortars were prepared including ash contents up to 50% of cement. The results of setting time, temperature development, flexural and compressive strengths, water absorption, density, and leachability are analyzed. Results indicate that Portland cement systems could become an alternative for the disposal of this type of ashes

  20. Immobilization of IFR salt wastes in mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.F.; Johnson, T.R.

    1988-01-01

    Portland cement-base mortars are being considered for immobilizing chloride salt wastes from the fuel cycle of an integral fast reactor (IFR). The IFR is a sodium-cooled fast reactor with metal fuel. It has a close-coupled fuel cycle in which fission products are separated from the actinides in an electrochemical cell operating at 500 degrees C. This cell has a cadmium anode and a liquid salt electrolyte. The salt will be a low-melting mixture of alkaline and alkaline earth chlorides. This paper discusses one method being considered for immobilizing this treated salt, to disperse it in a portland cement-base motar, which would then be sealed in corrosion-resistant containers. For this application, the grout must be sufficiently fluid that it can be pumped into canisters where it will solidify into a strong, leach-resistant material

  1. Acceleration of Intended Pozzolanic Reaction under Initial Thermal Treatment for Developing Cementless Fly Ash Based Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-Hee Kwon

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Without using strong alkaline solution or ordinary Portland cement, a new structural binder consisting of fly ash and hydrated lime was hardened through an intensified pozzolanic reaction. The main experimental variables are the addition of silica fume and initial thermal treatment (60 °C for 3 days. A series of experiments consisting of mechanical testing (compressive and flexural strength, modulus of elasticity, X-ray diffraction, and measurements of the heat of hydration, pore structure, and shrinkage were conducted. These tests show that this new fly ash-based mortar has a compressive strength of 15 MPa at 91 days without any silica fume addition or initial thermal treatment. The strength increased to over 50 MPa based on the acceleration of the intensified pozzolanic reaction from the silica fume addition and initial thermal treatment. This is explained by a significant synergistic effect induced by the silica fume. It intensifies the pozzolanic reaction under thermal treatment and provides a space filling effect. This improved material performance can open a new pathway to utilize the industrial by-product of fly ash in cementless construction materials.

  2. A multiscale mortar multipoint flux mixed finite element method

    KAUST Repository

    Wheeler, Mary Fanett; Xue, Guangri; Yotov, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a multiscale mortar multipoint flux mixed finite element method for second order elliptic problems. The equations in the coarse elements (or subdomains) are discretized on a fine grid scale by a multipoint flux mixed finite

  3. Future Combat Systems (FCS) Creates Cannon and Mortar Synergy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beard, Kirby; James, Jeff; Tolbert, Vincent J

    2008-01-01

    .... The NLOS-C is one of the eight MGVs. Program Manager FCS (Brigade Combat Team (PM FCS(BCT)) is leveraging previous and current research and development efforts to create synergy between cannons and mortars, without duplication of effort...

  4. compressive and flexural strength of cement mortar stabilized with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. BARTH EKWEME

    concrete. However, plain mortar materials are usually brittle and often crack more easily and fail more suddenly than ... impact strength, higher elastic modulus, better sound proofness ..... in Concrete. Unpublished Ph.D. Thesis, Department.

  5. The Provisional Irish Republican Army and the Development of Mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Ackerman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Provisional Irish Republican Army (PIRA repeatedly showed itself to be one of the most inventive and adaptive of all the violent non-state actors who operated in the latter part of the twentieth century. Among its most innovative exploits was the PIRA’s successful development and fielding – spanning almost its entire operational lifetime – of improvised mortar systems. This chapter will trace the sustained development of mortars, including the underlying motivations for pursuing mortars as a complex engineering effort, the process by which the development took place and the underpinnings of its success. The discussion will show that the PIRA’s mortar development program was born out of tactical necessity but enabled by good organizational practices and the organization’s access to materials, expertise and places in which to leverage these.

  6. A Study of Array Direction HDPE Fiber Reinforced Mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamsuwan, Trithos

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents the effect of array direction HDPE fiber using as the reinforced material in cement mortar. The experimental data were created reference to the efficiency of using HDPE fiber reinforced on the tensile properties of cement mortar with different high drawn ratio of HDPE fibers. The fiber with the different drawn ratio 25x (d25 with E xx), and 35x (d35 with E xx) fiber volume fraction (0%, 1.0%, 1.5%) and fiber length 20 mm. were used to compare between random direction and array direction of HDPE fibers and the stress - strain displacement relationship behavior of HDPE short fiber reinforced cement mortar were investigated. It was found that the array direction with HDPE fibers show more improved in tensile strength and toughness when reinforced in cement mortar.

  7. A chemometric approach to the characterisation of historical mortars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rampazzi, L.; Pozzi, A.; Sansonetti, A.; Toniolo, L.; Giussani, B.

    2006-01-01

    The compositional knowledge of historical mortars is of great concern in case of provenance and dating investigations and of conservation works since the nature of the raw materials suggests the most compatible conservation products. The classic characterisation usually goes through various analytical determinations, while conservation laboratories call for simple and quick analyses able to enlighten the nature of mortars, usually in terms of the binder fraction. A chemometric approach to the matter is here undertaken. Specimens of mortars were prepared with calcitic and dolomitic binders and analysed by Atomic Spectroscopy. Principal Components Analysis (PCA) was used to investigate the features of specimens and samples. A Partial Least Square (PLS1) regression was done in order to predict the binder/aggregate ratio. The model was applied to historical mortars from the churches of St. Lorenzo (Milan) and St. Abbondio (Como). The accordance between the predictive model and the real samples is discussed

  8. Geomechanical properties of lime stabilized clayey sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arabani, M.; Karami, M. Veis

    2007-01-01

    Clayey sands that have low plasticity, low compressibility and high strength under loads, are suitable as a base material for any engineering construction projects as well as for roads and building construction. Decrease of plasticity and compressibility as well as increase in strength of these materials can be obtained by many different methods. Of these methods, lime stabilization is a common, applicable, and easy to use approach that can improve geomechanical and geotechnical properties of clayey sand fills. In this study some important geomechanical properties and geotechnical properties of clayey sands including compressive strength, CBR and elastic plastic behavior are investigated. A range of gradations representative of those gradations found in situ in the north of Iran were selected for testing and samples were artificially rebuilt in the laboratory. The mixes were then stabilized with hydrated lime and cured. Different mechanical tests were performed on mature materials. The stress-strain behavior of lime-stabilized mixes was plotted and a parabolic function was used to estimate the trend of stress-strain behavior. The data show that there is a correlation among the results of uniaxial load test, tensile strength, and CBR of the tested specimens. Also, results of the unconfined compression test and the indirect tensile strength test show that an increase in clay content up to a certain percent, in the clay-sand fills, tends to increase the strength of the materials in compression as well as in tension. (author)

  9. Imperial Limes - Projections in Medieval Imperial Idea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z.Z. Zhekov

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Roman imperial limes from I - V BC was the first state border in world history, which in some sense corresponds to the modern concept of political boundary. It represents sustainable political, military and economic barrier between the Romans and the rest of the world. With minor modifications it retains their basic strategic concept during the period as expressed from the emperors Augustus and Tiberius. Limes become powerful barrier that separates cultural Roman Hellenistic world of the wild barbarian but at the same time limits the constructed infrastructure of roads, forts and towns became a natural cultural, commercial and political mediator between these two initially hostile worlds. In border towns developed a lively trade between Romans and barbarians. Roman traders penetrate inside the barbarian lands getting to know their culture and history. Studying foreign peoples and countries they convey information gathered imperial legate of the Roman population. The same process was developed and of course in the opposite direction. Exchange of information on the other promotes mutual understanding and open living on both sides of the Roman Limes.

  10. Neutron radiography of heated high-performance mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber B.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Neutron radiography was applied to investigate the water distribution in mortar samples heated from one side to 600 °C. In mortar, aggregates and anhydrous cement are almost transparent to neutrons, while hydration products and water-filled capillary pores bear the largest attenuation. The evolution of the moisture profile shows a sharp dehydration front and accumulation of water due to condensation of water vapor behind this front.

  11. Application of natural seaweed modified mortar for sustainable concrete production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddique, M. N. I.; Zularisam, A. W.

    2018-04-01

    The effect of seaweed such as Eucheuma Cottonii (gel) and Gracilaria Sp. modified mortar on the properties of sustainable concrete was investigated. Pre-experiment and main-experiment was conducted to carry out this study. Pre-experiment was conducted to study the compressive strength of the sustainable concrete. The main-experiment studied the compressive and splitting strength. Results showed that seaweed modified mortar yielded satisfactory compressive and splitting strength of 30 MPa and 5 MPa at 28 days.

  12. Applicability of Carbonated Electric Arc Furnace Slag to Mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, S; Izaki, M; Arisawa, R; Hisyamudin, M N N; Murakami, K; Maegawa, A

    2012-01-01

    Authors have been studying the absorption of CO 2 in the steelmaking slag. In this study, an application of the electric arc furnace slag after the carbonation to admixture of mortar was investigated with the JIS (A6206-1997) method for ground granulated blast-furnace slag for concrete. The percent flows for the test mortar were smaller than that for the standard mortar. The percent flow of the carbonated slag whose average particle size of more than approximately 4 μm increased with an increase in the average size of the particles. Because the compressive strengths of the test mortar cured for 91 days were almost the same as those cured 28 days, the slag after the carbonation was thought not to have self-hardening property for a medium and long term. The compressive strength for the test mortar was almost unchanged within a range of approximately 2 to 7 μm of the average particle size, and it in this range was highest. The activity indexes for the test mortar prepared with the slag after the carbonation ranged from approximately 40 to 60%.

  13. Reuse of ground waste glass as aggregate for mortars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corinaldesi, V; Gnappi, G; Moriconi, G; Montenero, A

    2005-01-01

    This work was aimed at studying the possibility of reusing waste glass from crushed containers and building demolition as aggregate for preparing mortars and concrete. At present, this kind of reuse is still not common due to the risk of alkali-silica reaction between the alkalis of cement and silica of the waste glass. This expansive reaction can cause great problems of cracking and, consequently, it can be extremely deleterious for the durability of mortar and concrete. However, data reported in the literature show that if the waste glass is finely ground, under 75mum, this effect does not occur and mortar durability is guaranteed. Therefore, in this work the possible reactivity of waste glass with the cement paste in mortars was verified, by varying the particle size of the finely ground waste glass. No reaction has been detected with particle size up to 100mum thus indicating the feasibility of the waste glass reuse as fine aggregate in mortars and concrete. In addition, waste glass seems to positively contribute to the mortar micro-structural properties resulting in an evident improvement of its mechanical performance.

  14. Strength and Drying Shrinkage of Alkali-Activated Slag Paste and Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-chieh Chi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the strengths and drying shrinkage of alkali-activated slag paste and mortar. Compressive strength, tensile strength, and drying shrinkage of alkali-activated slag paste and mortar were measured with various liquid/slag ratios, sand/slag ratios, curing ages, and curing temperatures. Experimental results show that the higher compressive strength and tensile strength have been observed in the higher curing temperature. At the age of 56 days, AAS mortars show higher compressive strength than Portland cement mortars and AAS mortars with liquid/slag ratio of 0.54 have the highest tensile strength in all AAS mortars. In addition, AAS pastes of the drying shrinkage are higher than AAS mortars. Meanwhile, higher drying shrinkage was observed in AAS mortars than that observed comparable Portland cement mortars.

  15. Calcium - ionized

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diuretics Thrombocytosis (high platelet count) Tumors Vitamin A excess Vitamin D excess Lower-than-normal levels may be due to: Hypoparathyroidism Malabsorption Osteomalacia Pancreatitis Renal failure Rickets Vitamin D deficiency Alternative Names Free calcium; Ionized calcium ...

  16. Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Calcium is needed by the body for healthy bones, muscles, nervous system, and heart. Calcium carbonate also ... to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in ...

  17. Effect of nano clay particles on mechanical, thermal and physical behaviours of waste-glass cement mortars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, M.; Hashmi, M.S.J.; Olabi, A.G.; Messeiry, M.; Hussain, A.I.

    2011-01-01

    those of plain mortar and with glass powder after 28 days of hydration. In addition, the DTA/TGA results and XRD analysis showed a reduction in the calcium hydroxide (CH) content in mortars with glass powder and with a hybrid combination of glass powder and NC, which confirms the improvements of mechanical properties and occurrence of pozzolanic reaction after 28 days of hydration.

  18. Characteristic Asphalt Concrete Wearing Course (ACWC) Using Variation Lime Filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permana, R. A.; Pramesti, F. P.; Setyawan, A.

    2018-03-01

    This research use of lime filler Sukaraja expected add durability layers of concrete pavement is asphalt damage caused by the weather and load traffic. This study attempts to know how much value characteristic Marshall on a mixture of concrete asphalt using lime filler. This research uses experimental methods that is with a pilot to get results, thus will look filler utilization lime on construction concrete asphalt variation in filler levels 2 %, 3 %, 4 %.The results showed that the use of lime filler will affect characteristic a mixture of concrete asphalt. The more filler chalk used to increase the value of stability. On the cretaceous filler 2 % value of stability is 1067,04 kg. When lime filler levels added to the levels of filler 4 %, the value of stability increased to 1213,92 kg. The flexibility increased the number of filler as levels lime 2 % to 4 % suggests that are conducted more stiff mix.

  19. Effects of corn cob ash on lime stabilized lateritic soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nnochiri, Emeka Segun

    2018-03-01

    This study assesses the effects of Corn Cob Ash (CCA) on lime-stabilized lateritic soil. Preliminary tests were carried out on the natural soil sample for purpose of identification and classification. Lime being the main stabilizing material was thoroughly mixed with the soil sample to determine the optimum lime requirement of the sample as a basis for evaluating the effects of the CCA. The optimum lime requirement was 10%. The CCA was thereafter added to the lime stabilized soil in varying proportions of 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10%. Unsoaked CBR increased from 83% at 0% CCA to highest value of 94% at 4% CCA. Unconfined Compressive Strength (UCS) values increased from 1123kN/m2 at 0% CCA to highest value of 1180kN/m2 at 4% CCA. It was therefore concluded that CCA can serve as a good complement for lime stabilization in lateritic soil.

  20. Liming as a method to remedy lakes contaminated by radiostrontium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haakanson, Lars

    2003-01-01

    This work has identified the characteristics regulating lake sensitivity to 90 Sr-contamination and why certain lakes are likely to respond positively to lake liming (Ca-treatment) and when this would not be a feasible or economic remedial measure to lower 90 Sr-levels in fish. The results demonstrate that liming would work best in (1) small, (2) low-productive, (3) oligohumic, (4) acid lakes with (5) low initial Ca-concentrations. It is important to start the liming as soon as possible after the fallout. The liming model discussed in this work can be used to calculate the changes in lake Ca-concentrations and the duration of the liming. The Sr-model can be used to calculate changes in Sr-levels in water, sediments and fish. At best, these simulations indicate that it is realistic to expect that lake liming can reduce peak levels of 90 Sr in fish by 25-40%

  1. Use of demolition residues construction in soil-lime bricks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueiredo, S.S.; Silva, C.G.; Silva, I.A.; Neves, G.A.

    2011-01-01

    Besides being responsible for several environmental damage caused by its residues, the construction industry is also considered the greatest natural resources consumer. When finely ground, such residues can exhibit cementing properties, which may replace part of the lime used in the manufacture of soil-lime bricks. This study aimed to verify the viability of using demolition residues (DR) in soil-lime bricks without structural function. For this, test specimens were prepared using mixes in a 1:10 ratio of lime:soil and embedding residue in partial replacement of lime in the proportions of 25%, 50% and 75%. The test specimens were submitted to curing periods of 28 and 52 days, then it was determined the compression strength. The results showed that when embedded on moderate percentages, demolition residues construction can be used in the production of soil-lime bricks. (author)

  2. Energy efficiency opportunity guide in the lime industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The lime industry processes limestone, an abundant inorganic mineral, for metallurgical, industrial and chemical, environmental, and construction applications. The energy the industry uses results in greenhouse gas emissions and the Canadian Lime Institute, in collaboration with Natural Resources Canada, sponsored the development of this guidebook which is intended to provide ideas for saving energy in the lime industry. This document is a practical source of information and can be used to develop self-audit and evaluation techniques to monitor energy usage. The report first provides an overview of the lime industry, then presents its energy costs. General energy efficiency methodologies are highlighted and, in conclusion, advice on improving energy efficiency in general and specifically for lime industry operations is given. This guidebook provides useful information for lime industry operators who are trying to improve the energy efficiency of their operations.

  3. Mortars and treatments in the restoration of the Altarpiece of the High Altar of the Pilar Basilica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luxán, M. P.

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The altarpiece of the Assumption of Mary is located in the High Altar of the Pilar Basilica in Zaragoza and is one of the most important works of the Spanish Artistic Heritage. The work, sculptured in alabaster, was carried out between 1509 and 1518 by Damián Forment. The present paper covers the guidelines for the design of repair mortars used to restore the altarpiece. They are based on compatibility criteria with the existing materials and treatments in the altarpiece, according to research carried out during the recent works of cleaning and restoration. During the previous research, the composition of the original mortars was tested, the aggregate granulometry, and the composition of the organic additives used. The patina of the altarpiece was also analyzed and identified. The original mortars were made up of a mixture of gypsum and lime with the addition of oil or fats. In many cases various types of fibre were detected in the mortar, used to improve its mechanical characteristics. The repair mortars were designed with a composition similar to the originals, with a mixture of gypsum and lime, and their compatibility with the alabaster was studied, while also optimizing the granulometry of the aggregates used.

    El retablo de la Asunción de María está situado en el Altar Mayor de la Basílica del Pilar en Zaragoza y es una de las grandes obras del Patrimonio artístico español. La obra, esculpida en alabastro, fue realizada entre 1509 y ¡518 por Damián Forment. En este trabajo se recogen las directrices para el diseño de los morteros de reparación utilizados en la restauración del retablo. Se basaron en criterios de compatibilidad de los materiales y tratamientos existentes en el retablo, según la investigación realizada durante las obras de la última actuación realizada para la limpieza y restauración. En la investigación realizada se comprobó la composición de los morteros originales, la granulometría de los

  4. Innovative method and apparatus for the deep cleaning of soluble salts from mortars and lithic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaggero, Laura; Ferretti, Maurizio; Torrielli, Giulia; Caratto, Valentina

    2016-04-01

    Porous materials (e.g. plasters, mortars, concrete, and the like) used in the building industry or in artworks fail to develop, after their genesis, salts such as nitrates, carbonates (e.g. potassium carbonate, magnesium carbonate, calcium carbonate), chlorides (e.g. sodium chloride) and/or others, which are a concurrent cause of material deterioration phenomena. In the case of ancient or cultural heritage buildings, severe damage to structures and works of art, such as fresco paintings are possible. In general, in situ alteration pattern in mortars and frescoes by crystallization of soluble salts from solutions is caused by capillar rise or circulation in damp walls. Older buildings can be more subject to capillary rise of ion-rich waters, which, as water evaporates, create salt crystals inside the walls. If this pattern reveals overwhelming upon other environmental decay factors, the extraction of salts is the first restoration to recover the artpiece after the preliminary assessment and mitigation of the causes of soaking. A new method and apparatus, patented by University of Genoa [1] improves the quality and durability of decontamination by soluble salts, compared with conventional application of sepiolite or cellulose wraps. The conventional application of cellulose or sepiolite requires casting a more or less thick layer of wrap on the mortar, soaking with distilled water, and waiting until dry. The soluble salts result trapped within the wrap. A set of artificial samples reproducing the stratigraphy of frescoes was contaminated with saline solution of known concentration. The higher quality of the extraction was demonstrated by trapping the salts within layers of Japanese paper juxtaposed to the mortar; the extraction with the dedicated apparatus was operated in a significantly shorter time than with wraps (some hours vs. several days). Two cycles of about 15 minutes are effective in the deep cleaning from contaminant salts. The decontamination was

  5. Properties of microcement mortar with nano particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimeneti, Narasimha Reddy

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and Carbon nanofibers (CNF) are one of the toughest and stiffest materials in the world presently with extreme properties yet to be discovered in terms of elastic modulus and tensile strength. Due to the advanced properties of these materials they are being used in almost all fields of science at nanolevel and are being used in construction industry recently for improvement of material properties. Microcement is fine ground cement which as half the particle size of ordinary Portland cement. In this research the behavior of cement mortar of micro cement with the addition of nanoparticles is studied. Due to high aspect ratio and strong van der Waal forces between the particles of CNT and CNF, they agglomerate and form bundles when mixed with water, sonication method is used to mix nanoparticles with few drops of surfactant and super plasticizer. Mechanical properties such as compressive strength and flexural strength with CNT and CNF composites are examined and compared with control samples. 0.1% and 0.05 % of nanoparticles (both CNT and CNF) by the weight of cement are used in this research and 0.8% of super plasticizer by weight of cement was also used along with 0.4, 0.45 and 0.50 water cement ratios for making specimens for compression test. The compressive strength results are not satisfactory as there was no constant increase in strength with all the composites, however strength of few nanocomposites increased by a good percentage. 0.5 water cement ratio cement mortar had compressive strength of 7.15 ksi (49.3 MPa), whereas sample with 0.1% CNT showed 8.38 ksi (57.8 MPa) with 17% increase in strength after 28 days. Same trend was followed by 0.4 water cement ratio as the compressive strength of control sample was 8.89 ksi (61.3 MPa), with 0.05% of CNT strength increased to 10.90 ksi (75.2 MPa) with 23% increase in strength. 0.4 water cement ratio was used for flexural tests including 0.1%, 0.05% of CNT and 0.1%, 0.05% of CNF with 0

  6. Effect of NaCI on the hydric and hygric dilation behaviour of lime-cement mortar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubelli, B.A.; Hees, R.P.J. van

    2006-01-01

    The mechanism of damage due to NaCl crystallization has not been clarified yet. Apart from crystallization pressure, other hypotheses have been proposed to explain the decay. Irreversible dilation during NaCl crystallization has been observed in a few cases but has never been studied in a systematic

  7. Effect of NaCl on the hydric and hygric dilation behaviour of lime-cement mortar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubelli, B.; van Hees, R.P.J.; Huinink, H.P.

    2006-01-01

    The mechanism of damage due to NaCl crystallization has not been clarified yet. Apart from crystallization pressure, other hypotheses have been proposed to explain the decay. Irreversible dilation during NaCl crystallization has been observed in a few cases but has never been studied in a systematic

  8. Effect of mixed-in crystallization inhibitor on resistance of lime-cement mortar against NaCI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubelli, B.A.; Nijland, T.G.; Hees, R.P.J. van; Hacquebord, A.

    2010-01-01

    Salt crystallization is a common cause of damage to porous building materials. Recent research has shown that some chemical compounds may inhibit salt crystallization or alter the mode of crystallization, thus limiting salt damage development, provided that the inhibitor was introduced prior to salt

  9. Calcium carbonate crystallizations on hypogean mural paintings: a pilot study of monitoring and diagnostics in Roman catacombs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapete, D.; Fratini, F.; Mazzei, B.; Camaiti, M.; Cantisani, E.; Riminesi, C.; Manganelli Del Fà, R.; Cuzman, O.; Tiano, P.

    2012-04-01

    One of the deterioration processes affecting mural paintings and rock surfaces within manmade hypogea consists in the formation of calcium carbonate crystallizations, which can create thick coverage and incrustations, even in some cases speleothems. These chemical reactions necessarily require the availability of calcium sources, which can be also of anthropogenic origin (e.g., lime-based mortars). Microclimate parameters also represent environmental forcing factors, on which the morphology and the degree of crystallinity of the precipitated carbonates depend. Understanding past/recent dynamics of carbonate precipitation implies a deep knowledge of the relationships between the exposed surfaces and the microclimate conditions, the impacts of external factors (e.g., groundwater infiltration and percolation from the overlying soil) and how they change over time. This is particularly fundamental for the preservation of hypogean sites which have not comparison with other typologies of environment due to their uniqueness, such as the ancient catacombs carved underneath the suburbs of Rome (Italy), since the 2nd century AD. In this paper we present the multidisciplinary methodological approach designed for the instrumental monitoring of the microphysical environment of the Catacombs of Saints Mark, Marcellian and Damasus, in the framework of the co-operation between the Institute for the Conservation and Valorization of Cultural Heritage and Pontifical Commission for Sacred Archaeology, Vatican, on the project HYPOGEA. Temperature inside the catacomb and on the surfaces, air relative humidity and CO2 concentration are the main of the parameters continuously measured by means of data loggers installed within the cubicles. Contemporarily, standardized methods of photographic documentation and digital micro-photogrammetry are used for change detection analysis of the painted surfaces and ancient plasters, as well as of the test areas purposely realized by applying fresh

  10. Effect of Curing Conditions and Freeze-Thaw Cycles on the Strength of an Expansive Soil Stabilized with a Combination of Lime, Jaggery, and Gallnut Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jijo James

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This investigation involved the utilization of the combination of lime, jaggery, and gallnut powder, adopted in South India traditionally. This combination of materials, used for the manufacture of lime-based mortars, was adopted in stabilization of an expansive soil. Three combinations of lime, jaggery, and gallnut powder (LJG in the ratios of 8 : 2 : 2, 8 : 2 : 1, and 8 : 1 : 2 were put into use. The effect of subjecting the combinations to alternate cycles of freeze-thaw (up to 3 cycles and three different curing conditions of air, moisture, and heat was also investigated. In addition, a mineralogical investigation for studying the reaction products was also carried out. The investigation proceeded with the determination of the unconfined compression strength (UCS of stabilized specimens of dimensions 38 mm × 76 mm, cured for periods of 3, 7, 14, and 28 days. The results of the investigation revealed that the addition of LJG resulted in an increase in the strength of the stabilized soil. Freeze-thaw cycles resulted in a reduction in strength with LJG821 proving to be the most optimal combination developing the maximum strength and least strength loss due to freeze-thaw cycles. Thermal curing proved to be the most optimal curing condition out of all curing conditions evaluated.

  11. Calcium induces long-term legacy effects in a subalpine ecosystem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urs Schaffner

    Full Text Available Human activities have transformed a significant proportion of the world's land surface, with profound effects on ecosystem processes. Soil applications of macronutrients such as nitrate, phosphorus, potassium or calcium are routinely used in the management of croplands, grasslands and forests to improve plant health or increase productivity. However, while the effects of continuous fertilization and liming on terrestrial ecosystems are well documented, remarkably little is known about the legacy effect of historical fertilization and liming events in terrestrial ecosystems and of the mechanisms involved. Here, we show that more than 70 years after the last application of lime on a subalpine grassland, all major soil and plant calcium pools were still significantly larger in limed than in unlimed plots, and that the resulting shift in the soil calcium/aluminium ratio continues to affect ecosystem services such as primary production. The difference in the calcium content of the vegetation and the topmost 10 cm of the soil in limed vs. unlimed plots amounts to approximately 19.5 g m(-2, equivalent to 16.3% of the amount that was added to the plots some 70 years ago. In contrast, plots that were treated with nitrogen-phosphorus-potassium fertilizer in the 1930s did not differ from unfertilized plots in any of the soil and vegetation characteristics measured. Our findings suggest that the long-term legacy effect of historical liming is due to long-term storage of added calcium in stable soil pools, rather than a general increase in nutrient availability. Our results demonstrate that single applications of calcium in its carbonated form can profoundly and persistently alter ecosystem processes and services in mountain ecosystems.

  12. The effect of fly ash on the quality of mortars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovy, M F [Blue Circle Cement (Pty) Ltd., Industria West (South Africa)

    1994-12-31

    A comparative study of the commercially available blends of the fly cement was made. The focus of the research was to determine the suitability of fly ash blends in mortars. A comparative evaluation was made to establish the differences between laboratory analysis and on site practice. These comparisons were made using 4 different building sands. The laboratory evaluations were confined to specified test methods to determine the suitability of the mortar. However, the in-situ tests required an innovative approach such as: conducting tests on mortar joints to determine the in-situ compressive strengths. (A new technique was developed, which involves shooting nails into the mortar joint, determining the penetration depth and its pull out strength. This is then calibrated against cube strengths); and conducting tests using the SABS approach to determine the resistance to water penetration through a brick wall. The trends in the laboratory evaluations were as expected in terms of improved water demands, water retention and reduced compressive strengths. The in-situ mortar compressive strengths were marginally lower when using fly ash blends compared to ordinary portland cement. The use of fly ash blends improved the resistance of water penetration through a brick wall. In-situ tests are probably the only meaningful way to determine the effectiveness of a mortar in fulfilling its functions in a wall as laid down by SABS 0164:1990. With this in mind, the same quality or an improved quality mortar will be obtained using fly ash blended cements rather than ordinary portland cement. 10 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. LIMES Large Infrastructure in Mathematics - Enhanced Services

    CERN Document Server

    Fachinformationszentrum Energie, Physik, Mathematik. Karlsruhe

    The Large Infrastructure in Mathematics - Enhanced Services (LIMES) Project is a RTD project within the Fifth (EC) Framework Programme - Horizontal Programme "Improving human research potential and the socio-economic knowledge base", Access to Resear The objective of this project is to upgrade the existing database Zentralblatt-MATH into a European based world class database for mathematics (pure and applied) by a process of technical improvement and wide Europeanisation, improving the present distribuited system. The goal is to make Zentralblatt MATH a world reference database, offering full coverage of the mathematics literature worldwide ncluding bibliographic data, peer reviews and/or abstracts, indexing, classification and search,

  14. Sulfur-free lignins from alkaline pulping tested in mortar for use as mortar additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadif, A; Hunkeler, D; Käuper, P

    2002-08-01

    Sulfur-free lignin, obtained through the acid precipitation of black liquor from the soda pulping process, has been tested as water reducer in mortar. It has also been compared to existing commercial additives such as naphthalene sulfonates and lignosulfonates. The ash content and sugar content of these lignins are low in comparison to lignosulfonates, conferring on them higher purity. A procedure for small scale testing derived from the industrial norms SN-EN196 and ASTM (Designation C230-90) is presented. Specifically, all the sulfur-free lignins tested improved the flow of the mortar. Selected flax lignins performed better than lignosulfonates though still less than naphthalene sulfonates. Furthermore, certain hemp lignins gave comparable results to the lignosulfonates. Overall, the straw lignin prepared herein is comparable in performance to commercially available lignins, such as Organocell, Alcell and Curan 100. The plant from which the lignin was isolated, and the process of the pulp mill are the primary influences on the performance of the lignin.

  15. Rilem TC 203-RHM. Repair mortars for historic masonry. The role of mortar in masonry: an introduction to requirements for the design of repair mortars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hees, R.P.J. van; Groot, C.; Balen, K. van; Bicer-Simsir, B.; Binda, L.; Elsen, J.; Konow, T. von; Lindqvist, J.E.; Maurenbrecher, P.; Papayanni, I.; Subercaseaux, M.; Tedeschi, C.; Toumbakari, E.E.; Thompson, M.

    2012-01-01

    Mortar has been in use for many thousands of years and is integral to most masonry construction. Its use is widespread in every culture where masonry is constructed. It is present in the majority of the global built cultural heritage, and is therefore a major consideration in building conservation.

  16. Evaluating and quantifying the liming potential of phosphate rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikora, F.J.

    2002-01-01

    The liming potential of phosphate rock was evaluated with theoretical calculations and quantified by laboratory titration and soil incubation. Three anions present in the carbonate apatite structure of phosphate rock that can consume protons and cause an increase in pH when dissolved from apatite are PO 4 3- , CO 3 2- , and F - . The pKa for HF is so low that F - has very little effect on increasing pH. The pKa for 2 protons on H 2 PO 4 - and H 2 CO 3 are sufficiently high enough to cause an increase in pH with PO 4 3- and CO 3 2- released into solution if the pH range is between 4 and 6. Because of the greater molar quantity of PO 4 3- compared toCO 3 2- , PO 4 3- exerts a greater affect on the liming potential of P rock. For a variety of phosphate rocks with a axes ranging from 9.322 to 9.374 A in the carbonate apatite structure, the theoretical % calcium carbonate equivalence (CCE) ranges from 59.5 to 62%. With the presence of gangue carbonate minerals from 2.5 to 10% on a weight basis in the phosphate rocks, the theoretical %CCE ranges from 59.5 to 63.1%. Use of AOAC method 955.01 for quantifying the %CCE of North Carolina phosphate rock (NCPR) and Idaho phosphate rock (IDPR) resulted in %CCE ranging from 39.9 to 53.7% which were less than the theoretical values. The lower values measured in the AOAC method was presumed to be due to formation of CaHPO 4 or CaHPO 4 ·2H 2 O precipitates which would result in less than 2 protons neutralized per mole of PO 4 3- released from carbonate apatite. The highly concentrated solution formed in the method was considered not indicative of a soil solution and thus determined %CCE values would be suspect. A soil incubation study was conducted to determine a more appropriate %CCE value in a soil environment using Copper Basin, Tennessee soil with a soil pH of 4.2. Agricultural limestone, NCPR, IDPR, and a granulated IDPR were added to 100 g of soil at rates of 0.1, 0.3, 1, 3, and 10 g/kg soil, incubated for 105 days at field

  17. Use of rubble from building demolition in mortars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corinaldesi, V; Giuggiolini, M; Moriconi, G

    2002-01-01

    Because of increasing waste production and public concerns about the environment, it is desirable to recycle materials from building demolition. If suitably selected, ground, cleaned and sieved in appropriate industrial crushing plants, these materials can be profitably used in concrete. Nevertheless, the presence of masonry instead of concrete rubble is particularly detrimental to the mechanical performance and durability of recycled-aggregate concrete and the same negative effect is detectable when natural sand is replaced by fine recycled aggregate fraction. An alternative use of both masonry rubble and fine recycled material fraction could be in mortars. These could contain either recycled instead of natural sand or powder obtained by bricks crushing as partial cement substitution. In particular, attention is focused on the modification that takes place when either polypropylene or stainless steel fibers are added to these mortars. Polypropylene fibers are added in order to reduce shrinkage of mortars, stainless steel fibers for improving their flexural strength. The combined use of polypropylene fibers and fine recycled material from building demolition could allow the preparation of mortars showing good performance, in particular when coupled with bricks. Furthermore, the combined use of stainless steel fibers and mortars containing brick powder seems to be an effective way to guarantee a high flexural strength.

  18. MODIFICATION OF FOAMED CEMENT-CLAY MORTARS BY STABILIZERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panfilova Marina Ivanovna

    2012-10-01

    by-product generated in the course of combustion of crossties, and reduction of the cement consumption rate. The authors have identified that ash added into the injection does not cause any deterioration of the mortar strength; rather, it assures its structural stability and prevents any leaching of heavy metals that it contains. The authors have identified that adding 20 to 26 % of flue ash into the injection reduces the mortar hardening time by 30 %, while the strength of the mortar that has 20 % of ash is almost equal to the one of the benchmark sample. However, any higher ash content causes deterioration of the hardening strength of the mortar. Therefore, the authors have discovered that 20 % of the cement may be replaced by the ash generated in the course of combustion of waste crossties. This replacement is to be performed in the course of preparation of mortars, and it is aimed at the strengthening of the soil. This operation is to be performed in the incinerator to preserve the solution properties. This technology reduces the amount of hazardous by-products through their recycling.

  19. A multiscale mortar multipoint flux mixed finite element method

    KAUST Repository

    Wheeler, Mary Fanett

    2012-02-03

    In this paper, we develop a multiscale mortar multipoint flux mixed finite element method for second order elliptic problems. The equations in the coarse elements (or subdomains) are discretized on a fine grid scale by a multipoint flux mixed finite element method that reduces to cell-centered finite differences on irregular grids. The subdomain grids do not have to match across the interfaces. Continuity of flux between coarse elements is imposed via a mortar finite element space on a coarse grid scale. With an appropriate choice of polynomial degree of the mortar space, we derive optimal order convergence on the fine scale for both the multiscale pressure and velocity, as well as the coarse scale mortar pressure. Some superconvergence results are also derived. The algebraic system is reduced via a non-overlapping domain decomposition to a coarse scale mortar interface problem that is solved using a multiscale flux basis. Numerical experiments are presented to confirm the theory and illustrate the efficiency and flexibility of the method. © EDP Sciences, SMAI, 2012.

  20. Incorporation of turmeric-lime mixture during the preparation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    2007-03-19

    Mar 19, 2007 ... behaviour) of 2 min-blanched samples (both treated and control) were the maximum among other corresponding puree samples. Thus, 2 min blanching time may be preferred for the preparation of this new type of turmeric-lime treated tomato puree product. Key words: Turmeric-lime, Lycopersicon ...

  1. Carbonation of lime and cement stabilized layers in road construction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Netterberg, F

    1984-04-01

    Full Text Available The problem of deterioration of lime, lime-slag and cement stabilized pavement layers during curing, before sealing and in service is partly ascribed to carbonation of the stabilizer during curing and subsequent exposure to the atmosphere before...

  2. Investigation of Copper Sorption by Sugar Beet Processing Lime Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the western United States, sugar beet processing for sugar recovery generates a lime-based waste product (~250,000 Mg yr-1) that has little liming value in the region’s calcareous soils. This area has recently experienced an increase in dairy production, with dairi...

  3. 76 FR 82295 - Central Power & Lime LLC; Notice of Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket Nos. EL12-18-000; QF82-207-007] Central Power & Lime LLC; Notice of Filing December 23, 2011. Take notice that on December 22, 2011, Central Power & Lime LLC, pursuant to sections 18 CFR 292.205(c) and 385.207 of the Federal Energy...

  4. Efficacy and phytotoicity of lime sulphur in organic apple production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holb, I.J.; Jong, de P.F.; Heijne, B.

    2003-01-01

    Curative and preventive efficacy and phytotoxicity of lime sulphur spray schedules, based on a warning system, were evaluated in the Netherlands during two growing seasons under field conditions. In most cases, lime sulphur treatments applied either curatively or preventively resulted in

  5. Stabilization of expansive soil using bagasse ash & lime | Wubshet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    7-5 soil on the AASHTO classification was stabilized using 3% lime, 15% bagasse ash and 15% bagasse ash in combination with 3% lime by dry weight of the soil. The effect of the additives on the soil was investigated with respect to plastcity, ...

  6. Engineering Properties of Bentonite Stabilized with Lime and Phosphogypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Sujeet

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Engineering properties such as compaction, unconfined compressive strength, consistency limits, percentage swell, free swell index, the California bearing ratio and the consolidation of bentonite stabilized with lime and phosphogypsum are presented in this paper. The content of the lime and phosphogypsum varied from 0 to 10 %. The results reveal that the dry unit weight and optimum moisture content of bentonite + 8 % lime increased with the addition of 8 % phosphogypsum. The percentage of swell increased and the free swell index decreased with the addition of 8 % phosphogypsum to the bentonite + 8 % lime mix. The unconfined compressive strength of the bentonite + 8 % lime increased with the addition of 8 % phosphogypsum as well as an increase in the curing period up to 14 days. The liquid limit and plastic limit of the bentonite + 8 % lime increased, whereas the plasticity index remained constant with the addition of 8 % phosphogypsum. The California bearing ratio, modulus of subgrade reaction, and secant modulus increased for the bentonite stabilized with lime and phosphogypsum. The coefficient of the consolidation of the bentonite increased with the addition of 8 % lime and no change with the addition of 8 % phosphogypsum.

  7. Some studies on the reaction between fly ash and lime

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Blain's air permeability apparatus was used for ... Pulverized lime with high per- centage of CaO (> 80 ... kept in a low-pressure autoclave at an average steam pressure and ... ing the solubility of lime in a solvent containing 1 part by volume of ...

  8. Microstructure and mechanical performance of modified mortar using hemp fibres and carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Hamzaoui, Rabah; Guessasma, Sofiane; Mecheri, Boubakeur; Eshtiaghi, Amir M.; Bennabi, Abdelkrim

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical performance of modified mortar using hemp fibres is studied following various processing conditions. Hemp fibres combined with carbon nanotubes (CNT) are introduced in mortar and their effect is studied as function of curing time

  9. Mineral phases of green liquor dregs, slaker grits, lime mud and wood ash of a Kraft pulp and paper mill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Fernanda Machado [Laboratorio de Quimica Mineral Aplicada, Departamento de Quimica-UFPR, Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), CP 19081, CEP 81531990, Curitiba-PR (Brazil); Munhoz Martins, Joaniel [Laboratorio de Analise de Minerais e Rochas (LAMIR-UFPR) (Brazil); Ferracin, Luiz Carlos [Laboratorio Quimico da Votorantin Cimentos (Brazil); Cunha, Carlos Jorge da [Laboratorio de Quimica Mineral Aplicada, Departamento de Quimica-UFPR, Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), CP 19081, CEP 81531990, Curitiba-PR (Brazil)]. E-mail: cjdcunha@quimica.ufpr.br

    2007-08-17

    Four residues generated in a Kraft, pulp and paper plant, were characterized by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XFA), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimmetric analysis (TG) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). A quantitative phase composition model, that accounts for the observed data and for the physico-chemical conditions of formation, was postulated for each material. Emphasis was given on the identification of the mineral components of each material. The green liquor dregs and the lime mud contain Calcite and Gipsite. The slaker grits contains Calcite, Portlandite, Pirssonite, Larnite and Brucite. The Calcite phase, present in the dregs and in the lime mud, has small amounts of magnesium replacing calcium. The wood ash contains Quartz as the major crystalline mineral phase.

  10. Mineral phases of green liquor dregs, slaker grits, lime mud and wood ash of a Kraft pulp and paper mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Fernanda Machado; Munhoz Martins, Joaniel; Ferracin, Luiz Carlos; Cunha, Carlos Jorge da

    2007-01-01

    Four residues generated in a Kraft, pulp and paper plant, were characterized by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XFA), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimmetric analysis (TG) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). A quantitative phase composition model, that accounts for the observed data and for the physico-chemical conditions of formation, was postulated for each material. Emphasis was given on the identification of the mineral components of each material. The green liquor dregs and the lime mud contain Calcite and Gipsite. The slaker grits contains Calcite, Portlandite, Pirssonite, Larnite and Brucite. The Calcite phase, present in the dregs and in the lime mud, has small amounts of magnesium replacing calcium. The wood ash contains Quartz as the major crystalline mineral phase

  11. Effects of lime and wood ash on soil-solution chemistry, soil chemistry and nutritional status of a pine stand in northern Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, Bernard; Rumpf, Sabine; Mindrup, Michael; Meiwes, Karl-Josef; Khanna, Partap K.

    2002-01-01

    Lime and wood ash may be useful to improve acidic forest soils. A field experiment was conducted in a pine stand on a sandy podzol at Fuhrberg, Germany, which involved an application of dolomitic lime (3 t/ha) with three replications or wood ash (4.8 t/ha) without replications on the forest floor. During the 2 yr study period, lime affected the soil solution composition only slightly. Ash had a marked effect on solution chemistry of the mineral soil at 10 cm and the pH values dropped temporarily from 3.7 to 3.1. Nineteen months after the treatments, exchangeable calcium in the organic layer and mineral soil increased by 222 (lime addition) or 411 kg/ha (ash addition) and exchangeable magnesium increased by 101 (lime addition) or 39 kg/ha (ash addition). After ash addition, no marked change in heavy metal content was found below 4 cm of the organic layer. In the ash treatment, the potassium concentration of the 1-yr-old pine needles increased from 5.6 to 5.9 g/kg. This study suggests that ash from untreated wood may be recommended for amelioration of forest soils

  12. The influence of surface incorporated lime and gypsiferous by-products on surface and subsurface soil acidity. I. Soil solution chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H.L.; Hedley, M.J.; Bolan, N.S.; Horne, D.J. [New Zealand Forest Research Institute, Rotorua (New Zealand)

    1999-04-01

    Lime, fluidised bed boiler ash (FBA) and flue gas desulfurisation gypsum (FGDG) were incorporated in the top 50 mm of repacked columns of either an Allophanic (the Patua sand loam) or an Ultic (the Kaawa clay loam) soil, at rates containing calcium equivalent to 5000 kg/ha of CaCO{sub 3}. After leaching with water, the columns were sliced into sections for chemical analysis. In the columns of the variable-charged, allophanic Patua soil, topsoil-incorporated FBA ameliorated top and subsurface soil acidity through liming and the `self liming effect` induced by sulfate sorption, respectively. The soil solution pH of the top and subsurface layers of the Patua soil were raised to pH 6.40 and 5.35, respectively, by the FBA treatment. Consequently , phytotoxic labile monomeric aluminium (Al) concentration in the soil solution of the FBA treatment was reduced to {lt} 0.1 {mu}M Al. FGDG had a similar `self-liming effect` on subsurface of the Patua soil, but not the topsoil. Whereas FBA raised the pH of the Kaawa topsoil, no `self-liming effect` of subsurface soil by sulfate sorption was observed on the Kaawa subsurface soil, which is dominated by permanently charged clay minerals. Application of FBA and FGDG to both soils, however, caused significantly leaching of native soil Mg{sup 2+} and K{sup +}.

  13. Drainage, liming and fertilization of organic soils. 1. Long-term effects on acid/base relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braekke, F.H.

    1999-01-01

    Long-term changes of the acid/base relations of organic soils after drainage, fertilization and/or liming at three experimental sites - two ombrogenous and one soligenous - in south-central Norway are discussed. These sites were drained, fertilized and/or limed in 1953-1956 and sampled in 1991-1992. Drainage at the ombrogenous sites caused: insignificant shifts of pH, higher bulk densities to 40 cm depth, higher ash percentage, higher contents of N and P to 20 cm depth and reduced concentrations of total Ca, K, Mg, Na, Al and Fe in soil layers deeper than 20 cm. The soligenous site was not effectively drained; despite this, pH dropped about 0.5 unit in the surface and subsurface soil layers of the control plots, while small changes were measured for most other soil variables. The suggested reason for the pH drop is limited sulphide oxidation in the upper 20 cm drained layer. Base saturation at actual soil pH, when all treatments were included, was estimated with good precision by four regressors: pH, extractable Al, extractable Fe and extractable Ca (R 2 = 0.90-0.95). Similar models explained 97-99% of the variation in base saturation at soil pH = 7.0. The lime effects at the properly drained oligotrophic sites were proportional to applied doses; for pH to 40 cm, base saturation to 60 cm, and Ca concentration to 60 cm depth. At the less well-drained soligenous site, effects were limited to the upper 30 cm layer. Both drainage and liming caused higher cation exchange capacities and proper drainage seems to be a prerequisite for the liming effect. Estimated recovery of calcium to 60 cm depth was 64-79% at the ombrogenous sites and 42-46% at the soligenous site 28 refs, 3 figs, 8 tabs

  14. Energy saving plan for lime calcining kiln

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Lime calcining kilns operating in China are of old type, consuming more heat energy by 30% or more than the latest type kilns. For the purpose of the COP3 joint implementation, a renewal plan was discussed taking up Benxi Steel Group Company as the object. The new type kiln is a parallel flow energy regenerating (Maerz) kiln. It has as high thermal efficiency as 900 kcal/kg of product. Annual fuel conservation as converted into crude oil will be 7.49x10{sup 3} tons, annual fuel cost reduction will be 101,200,000 yuan, and annual reduction in CO2 emission will be 23,200 tons. The estimated cost required for the project will be 991 million yen, or 66,070,000 yuan if the exchange rate is assumed to be 15 yen to one yuan. The profitability was discussed based on using bank loans and the special environmental yen loan. The investment recovering period was calculated as 7.9 years. This provides no realizability as a project on the business base. However, China strongly desires renewal of the facilities because of discharge of dust from old type facilities, and inferior quality of lime products. The project could be a candidate without doubt if the CDM system will have been established. (NEDO)

  15. Root distribution of rootstocks for 'Tahiti' lime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neves Carmen Silvia Vieira Janeiro

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Field studies on citrus roots are important for genetic selection of cultivars and for management practices such as localized irrigation and fertilization. To characterize root systems of six rootstocks, taking into consideration chemical and physical characteristics of a clayey Typic Hapludox of the Northern State of Paraná, this study was performed having as scion the 'IAC-5 Tahiti' lime [Citrus latifolia (Yu. Tanaka]. The rootstocks 'Rangpur' lime (C. limonia Osbeck, 'Africa Rough' lemon (C. jambhiri Lush., 'Sunki' mandarin [C. sunki (Hayata hort. ex Tan.], Poncirus trifoliata (L. Raf., 'C13' citrange [C. sinensis (L. Osb. x P. trifoliata (L. Raf] and 'Catânia 2' Volkamer lemon (C. volkameriana Ten. & Pasq. were used applying the trench profile method and the SIARCS® 3.0 software to determine root distribution. 'C-13' citrange had the largest root system. 'Volkamer' lemon and 'Africa Rough' lemon presented the smallest amount of roots. The effective depth for 80 % of roots was 31-53 cm in rows and 67-68 cm in inter-rows. The effective distance of 80 % of roots measured from the tree trunk exceeded the tree canopy for P. trifoliata, 'Sunki' mandarin, and 'Volkamer' and 'Africa Rough' lemons.

  16. Wetland vegetation responses to liming an Adirondack watershed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackun, I.R.

    1993-01-01

    Watershed liming as a long-term mitigation strategy to neutralize lake acidity, from increasing acid deposition, was initiated in North America at Woods Lake in the west central Adirondack region of New York. In October 1989, a dose of 10 MT lime (83.5% CaCO[sub 3]) ha[sup [minus]1] was aerially applied to 48% of the watershed. The wetlands adjacent to Woods Lake showed two distinct community types: one dominated by Chamaedaphne calyculata, and one dominated by graminoids and other herbaceous species. Within two years, liming did not alter the structure of either community type, and changed the cover or frequency of only 6 of 64 individual taxa. Most of these changes occurred in the herbaceous community type. The only strong positive response to liming was a nearly threefold increase in cover of the rhizomatous sedge Cladium mariscoides. The cover of Carex interior and Sphagnum spp. benefited from lime addition, while cover of Drosera intermedia and Muhlenbergia uniflora, and frequency of Hypericum canadense responded negatively to lime. Liming influenced the competitive release of only three taxa, all forbs with small growth forms. The tissue chemistry of foliage and twigs of Myrica gale, Chamaedaphne calyculata, and Carex stricta in the Chamaedaphne calyculata community type clearly illustrated species-specific patterns of nutrient accumulation and allocation both before and after liming. Concentrations of 17 of 20 elements responded to liming, although the responses varied among species and plant parts. Carex foliage was least responsive to liming, and Chamaedaphne twigs were most responsive. Elemental changes in plant tissues will be reflected in litter and many influence long-term nutrient dynamics in the wetland community.

  17. Evaluation of pulp and mortar to pack bitumen radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregorio, Marina da S.; Vieira, Vanessa M.; Tello, Cledola C.O.

    2013-01-01

    According to international experience, for the deposition of cement in surface repository, is necessary the use of cement mortar pastes to immobilize the product. Determining the most efficient folder or for the packed mortar, as well as its ideal formulation, is the goal of this study. To do various experiments with samples of cement paste and mortar, with presence of fluxing and / or clay were performed. Viscosity, density, setting time and compressive strength were evaluated. This study will be presented only the results found in testing of compressive strength to be an essential parameter in the transport, storage and disposal of the product. From the results found will be selected the best formulations for use in packed bitumen tailings from the National Radioactive Waste Repository

  18. Reuse of ash coal in the formulation of mortars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siqueira, J.S.; Souza, C.A.G.; Souza, J.A.S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to study the ash incorporation from the combustion of coal in fluidized bed boilers, in production of mortar, replacing part of cement. Specimens were prepared using Portland cement to the specifications CPII-E-32 of normal characteristics and classification of sand below 100 mesh. Blends in the 4:1 ratio, that is, 4 parts of aggregate to 1 part of cement, with insertion of ashes in the proportions 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50%. The mortar was developed in mixing and casting was made in a mold of 5 cm x 10 cm. The behavior of compressive strength was evaluated after 28 days; the strength decreases with increasing percentage of ash. Additional analysis was carried out by X-ray diffraction, and it was found that the substitution of this waste can be successfully used in mortars with blends of up to 30%. (author)

  19. The dynamic behavior of mortar under impact-loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Nobuaki; Inoue, Kenji; Misawa, Satoshi; Tanaka, Kyoji; Hayashi, Shizuo; Kondo, Ken-Ichi; Riedel, Werner

    2007-06-01

    Concrete and mortar are the most fundamental structural material. Therefore, considerable interest in characterizing the dynamic behavior of them under impact-loading exists. In this study, plate impact experiments have been performed to determine the dynamic behavior of mortar. Longitudinal and lateral stresses have been directly measured by means of embedded polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) gauges up to 1 GPa. A 200 mm-cal. powder gun enable us to measure longitudinal and lateral stresses at several point from the impact surface, simultaneously. The shear strength under impact-loading has been obtained from measured longitudinal and lateral stresses. The longitudinal stress profile shows a two-wave structure. It is indicated that this structure is associated with the onset of pore compaction and failure of mortar by comparing with hydrocode simulations using an elastic-plastic damage model for concrete.

  20. Characterization of Incorporation the Glass Waste in Adhesive Mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, D. P.; Azevedo, A. R. G.; Hespanhol, R. L.; Alexandre, J.

    Ehe search for reuse generated waste in urban centers, intending to preserve natural resources, has remained fairly constant, both in context of preventing exploitation of resources as the emplacement of waste on the environment. Glass waste glass created a serious environmental problem, mainly because of inconsistency of its flows. Ehe use of this product as a mineral additive, finely ground, cement replacement and aggregate is a promising direction for recycling. This work aims to study the influence of glass waste from cutting process in adhesive mortar, replacing part of cement. Ehe glass powder is used replacing Portland cement at 10, 15 and 20% by mass. Ehe produced mortars will be evaluated its performance in fresh and hardened states through tests performed in laboratory. Ehe selected feature is indicated by producers of additive and researchers to present good results when used as adhesive mortar.

  1. Use of red mud as addition for portland cement mortars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, D.V.; Morelli, M.R.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present research work was to investigate the possibility of adding red mud, an alkaline leaching waste that is obtained from bauxite during the Bayer process for alumina production, in the raw meal of Portland cement mortars. The red mud is classified as dangerous, according to NBR 10004/2004, and world while generation reached over 117 million tons/year. This huge production requires high consuming products to be used as incorporation matrix and we studied the influence of red mud addition on the characteristics of cement mortars and concrete. In this paper the properties of Portland cement mortars incorporating high amounts of red mud was evaluated: pH variation, fresh (setting time, workability or normal consistency and water retention), and hardened state (mechanical strength, capillary water absorption, density and apparent porosity). Results seem promising for red mud additions up to 20 wt%. (author)

  2. Characterization of an ecological binder for mortars obtained from recycling of ladle furnace slag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinho, A.B.; Santos, C.M.; Fontes, W.C.; Matias, A.C.P.; Brigolini, G.J.; Peixoto, R.A.F.; Carvalho, J.F.

    2016-01-01

    A sustainable binder obtained from recycling of a ladle furnace slag from Piracicaba, Sao Paulo, was produced in Laboratory of Construction Materials of Federal University of Ouro Preto (UFOP). A characterization work was performed and the results are presented. The physical, chemical and mineralogical properties was obtained using, among others, the following techniques: X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) with Rietveld refining method, optical microscopy and Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The chemical analysis showed predominance of CaO and SiO_3; the mineralogical analysis pointed the predominant presence of calcium-olivine, merwinite and pyroxene and; the images showed predominance of angulous and elongated grains. According to results, the material was classified as a hydraulic binder, with characteristics comparable to hydraulic limes. (author)

  3. Damages to masonry due to interaction(s) between mortar and brick

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klugt, L.J.A.R. van der

    1995-01-01

    Masonry consists of brick and mortar. Next to the laying mortar there can be a separate pointing mortar as well. Each of these components can suffer damage. Such damages, of course, have to do with the properties of the components and with the agressiveness of the environment. However, next to their

  4. Water extraction out of mortar during brick laying. An NMR study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brocken, H.J.P.

    1996-01-01

    The water extraction out of mortar during brick laying was studied by nuclear magnetic resonance. The water extraction is an important parameter that determines, e.g., the stiffness of the mortar due to compaction of the cement particles and the bond strength of the cured-mortar interfaces but allo

  5. Homogeneity and Strength of Mortar Joints in Pearl-Chain Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Mia Schou Møller; Arvidsson, Michael; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2015-01-01

    -to-mix mortar products are tested. To the authors’ knowledge, no previous published work has documented the homogeneity and properties of mortar joints of such a height. Hence, the present study documents a practical test procedure where the homogeneity of three mortar joints measuring 20 x 220 x 2400 mm has...

  6. Various mortars for anti-fouling purposes in marine environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanematsu, Hideyuki; Masuda, Tomoka; Miura, Yoko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Hirai, Nobumitsu; Yokoyama, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    The antifouling properties for some mortars with steel making slags were investigated by real marine immersion tests and a unique laboratory acceleration tests with a specially devised biofilm acceleration reactors. Mortars mixed with steel making slags containing abundant iron elements tended to form biofilm and also bifouling. The two kinds of biofilm formation tests were used in this study. Real immersion in marine environments and laboratory test with a specially devised biofilm acceleration reactor. The former evaluated the biofouling characteristics more properly, while the latter did the biofilm formation characteristics more effectively

  7. The colour potentials of SSA-containing mortar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kappel, Annemette; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports an experimental study of aesthetical qualities of mortar containing sewage sludgeash (SSA). SSA is the residue produced at water treatment plants where incineration of the sludge is applied in order to decrease volume and to prevent pathogens from spreading. Today SSA is with a......This paper reports an experimental study of aesthetical qualities of mortar containing sewage sludgeash (SSA). SSA is the residue produced at water treatment plants where incineration of the sludge is applied in order to decrease volume and to prevent pathogens from spreading. Today SSA...

  8. Various mortars for anti-fouling purposes in marine environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanematsu, Hideyuki; Masuda, Tomoka [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Suzuka National College of Technology, Shiroko-cho, Suzuka, Mie 510-0294 (Japan); Miura, Yoko; Kuroda, Daisuke [Department of General Education, The Company, Suzuka National College of Technology, Shiroko-cho, Suzuka, Mie 510-0294 (Japan); Hirai, Nobumitsu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Suzuka National College of Technology, Shiroko-cho, Suzuka, Mie 510-0294 (Japan); Yokoyama, Seiji [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1, Hibarigaoka, Tenpaku, Toyohashi, Aichi, 441-8580 (Japan)

    2014-02-20

    The antifouling properties for some mortars with steel making slags were investigated by real marine immersion tests and a unique laboratory acceleration tests with a specially devised biofilm acceleration reactors. Mortars mixed with steel making slags containing abundant iron elements tended to form biofilm and also bifouling. The two kinds of biofilm formation tests were used in this study. Real immersion in marine environments and laboratory test with a specially devised biofilm acceleration reactor. The former evaluated the biofouling characteristics more properly, while the latter did the biofilm formation characteristics more effectively.

  9. Study on basalt fiber parameters affecting fiber-reinforced mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, A. A.; Chernykh, T. N.; Sashina, A. V.; Bogusevich, D. V.

    2015-01-01

    This article considers the effect of different dosages and diameters of basalt fibers on tensile strength increase during bending of fiberboard-reinforced mortar samples. The optimal dosages of fiber, providing maximum strength in bending are revealed. The durability of basalt fiber in an environment of cement, by means of microscopic analysis of samples of fibers and fiberboard-reinforced mortar long-term tests is examined. The article also compares the behavior of basalt fiber in the cement stone environment to a glass one and reveals that the basalt fiber is not subject to destruction.

  10. Calcium waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Lionel F

    2008-04-12

    Waves through living systems are best characterized by their speeds at 20 degrees C. These speeds vary from those of calcium action potentials to those of ultraslow ones which move at 1-10 and/or 10-20 nm s(-1). All such waves are known or inferred to be calcium waves. The two classes of calcium waves which include ones with important morphogenetic effects are slow waves that move at 0.2-2 microm s(-1) and ultraslow ones. Both may be propagated by cycles in which the entry of calcium through the plasma membrane induces subsurface contraction. This contraction opens nearby stretch-sensitive calcium channels. Calcium entry through these channels propagates the calcium wave. Many slow waves are seen as waves of indentation. Some are considered to act via cellular peristalsis; for example, those which seem to drive the germ plasm to the vegetal pole of the Xenopus egg. Other good examples of morphogenetic slow waves are ones through fertilizing maize eggs, through developing barnacle eggs and through axolotl embryos during neural induction. Good examples of ultraslow morphogenetic waves are ones during inversion in developing Volvox embryos and across developing Drosophila eye discs. Morphogenetic waves may be best pursued by imaging their calcium with aequorins.

  11. Kaffir lime leaves extract inhibits biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooltheat, Nateelak; Kamuthachad, Ludthawun; Anthapanya, Methinee; Samakchan, Natthapon; Sranujit, Rungnapa Pankla; Potup, Pachuen; Ferrante, Antonio; Usuwanthim, Kanchana

    2016-04-01

    Although kaffir lime has been reported to exhibit antioxidant and antileukemic activity, little is known about the antimicrobial effect of kaffir lime extract. Because Streptococcus mutans has been known to cause biofilm formation, it has been considered the most important causative pathogen of dental caries. Thus, the effective control of its effects on the oral biofilm is the key to the prevention of dental caries. The aims of the present study were to investigate the effect of kaffir lime leaves extract on biofilm formation and its antibacterial activity on S. mutans. We examined the effect of kaffir lime leaves extract on growth and biofilm formation of S. mutans. For the investigation we used a kaffir lime extract with high phenolic content. The minimum inhibitory concentration of the extract was determined by broth microdilution assay. The inhibitory effect of the test substances on biofilm formation was also investigated by biofilm formation assay and qRT-PCR of biofilm formation-associated genes. Kaffir lime leaves extract inhibits the growth of S. mutans, corresponding to the activity of an antibiotic, ampicillin. Formation of biofilm by S. mutans was also inhibited by the extract. These results were confirmed by the down-regulation of genes associated with the biofilm formation. The findings highlight the ability of kaffir lime leaves extract to inhibit S. mutans activity, which may be beneficial in the prevention of biofilm formation on dental surface, reducing dental plaque and decreasing the chance of dental carries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Phytochemical fingerprints of lime honey collected in serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gašić, Uroš; Šikoparija, Branko; Tosti, Tomislav; Trifković, Jelena; Milojković-Opsenica, Dušanka; Natić, Maja; Tešić, Živoslav

    2014-01-01

    Composition of phenolic compounds and the sugar content were determined as the basis for characterization of lime honey from Serbia. Particular attention was given to differences in phytochemical profiles of ripe and unripe lime honey and lime tree nectar. Melissopalynological analysis confirmed domination of Tilia nectar in all analyzed samples. Phenolic acids, abscisic acid, flavonoids, and flavonoid glycosides were determined by means of ultra-HPLC coupled with a hybrid mass spectrometer (UHPLC-OrbiTrap). Sugar content was determined using high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with amperometric detection. Similar phenolic compounds characterized unripe and ripe honeys, while the lime tree nectar profile showed notable differences. Compared to lime tree nectar, a high amount of chrysin, pinocembrin, and galangin were detected in both ripe and unripe lime honey. Fructose and glucose were the major constituents of all investigated samples, and amounts were within the limits established by European Union legislation. Sucrose content in the nectar sample was up to two-fold higher when compared to all honey samples. Isomaltose and gentiobiose with turanose content were different in analyzed production stages of lime honey.

  13. Managing ecosystems without prior knowledge: pathological outcomes of lake liming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Angeler

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Management actions often need to be taken in the absence of ecological information to mitigate the impact of pressing environmental problems. Managers counteracted the detrimental effects of cultural acidification on aquatic ecosystems during the industrial era using liming to salvage biodiversity and ecosystem services. However, historical contingencies, i.e., whether lakes were naturally acidic or degraded because of acidification, were largely unknown and therefore not accounted for in management. It is uncertain whether liming outcomes had a potentially detrimental effect on naturally acidic lakes. Evidence from paleolimnological reconstructions allowed us to analyze community structure in limed acidified and naturally acidic lakes, and acidified and circumneutral references. We analyzed community structure of phytoplankton, zooplankton, macroinvertebrates (littoral, sublittoral, profundal, and fish between 2000 and 2004. Naturally acidic limed lakes formed communities that were not representative of the other lake types. The occurrence of fish species relevant for ecosystem service provisioning (fisheries potential in naturally acidic limed lakes were confounded by biogeographical factors. In addition, sustained changes in water quality were conducive to harmful algal blooms. This highlights a pathological outcome of liming lakes when their naturally acidic conditions are not accounted for. Because liming is an important social-ecological system, sustained ecological change of lakes might incur undesired costs for societies in the long term.

  14. Lime stabilization of expansive soil from Sergipe - Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leite Rafaella

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Expansive soils are characterized by volumetric changes caused by variations in moisture. They can cause several damages to civil constructions, especially to lightweight structures, including cracks and fissures. Chemical stabilization through addition of lime is one of the most effective techniques used to treat this type of soil. Due to cationic exchanges, lime can significantly reduce swell potential. This research studied a disturbed sample of expansive soil collected in Nossa Senhora do Socorro – Sergipe, Brazil, through the following laboratory tests: sieve and hydrometer tests, Atterberg Limits, compaction, free swell and swell pressure. All direct and indirect methods mentioned in this paper indicated that the natural soil presented high to very high degree of expansion, which reached approximately 20% of free swell and nearly 200 kPa of swell pressure. In order to evaluate the effect of lime, the same tests were conducted in soil-lime mixtures, using lime contents of 3%, 6% and 9%. The results confirmed the efficiency of lime stabilization. It was noted that, as lime content increased, there was reduction of clay fraction and increment of silt fraction; plasticity index decreased to nearly its half; compaction curve was displaced; and free swell and swell pressure reduced significantly.

  15. Lime utilization in the laboratory, field, and design of pavement layers : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to review and report the best practices of using lime (i.e., granulated lime, hydrated lime, and slurry lime) to dry soil, in working tables, and in pavement applications. The project also reviewed and documented the i...

  16. Light brick mortar with low thermal conductivity for stressed brickwork. Types, properties, limits of application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plank, A [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialpruefung, Berlin (Germany, F.R.)

    1980-03-01

    Between 40 and 50% of the total energy consumption are used for space heating. 40% of the total heat loss dissipate through external walls due to transmission. The heat insulation properties of a brickwork is decisively determined by the mortar joints. Using light brick mortars with low thermal conductivity an improvement of the total thermal insulation of nearly 20% can be reached in most of the cases. The mechanical properties of these mortars that differ from the common mortars decisively reduce the application of the light brick mortar in brick working and require special measures for stability which are described in detail.

  17. Properties of Foamed Mortar Prepared with Granulated Blast-Furnace Slag

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Xiao; Lim, Siong-Kang; Tan, Cher-Siang; Li, Bo; Ling, Tung-Chai; Huang, Runqiu; Wang, Qingyuan

    2015-01-01

    Foamed mortar with a density of 1300 kg/m3 was prepared. In the initial laboratory trials, water-to-cement (w/c) ratios ranging from 0.54 to 0.64 were tested to determine the optimal value for foamed mortar corresponding to the highest compressive strength without compromising its fresh state properties. With the obtained optimal w/c ratio of 0.56, two types of foamed mortar were prepared, namely cement-foamed mortar (CFM) and slag-foamed mortar (SFM, 50% cement was replaced by slag weight). ...

  18. Use of lime cement stabilized pavement construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, M.A.; Raju, G.V.R.P. [JNTU College of Engineering, Kakinada (India). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2009-08-15

    Expansive clay is a major source of heave induced structural distress. Swelling of expansive soils causes serious problems and produce damages to many structures. Many research organizations are doing extensive work on waste materials concerning the feasibility and environmental suitability. Fly ash, a waste by product from coal burning in thermal power stations, is abundant in India causing severe health, environmental and disposal problems. Attempts are made to investigate the stabilization process with model test tracks over expansive subgrade in flexible pavements. Cyclic plate load tests are carried out on the tracks with chemicals like lime and cement introduced in fly ash subbase laid on sand and expansive subgrades. Test results show that maximum load carrying capacity is obtained for stabilized fly ash subbase compared to untreated fly ash subbase.

  19. Evaluation of red mud as pozzolanic material in replacement of cement for production of mortars; Avaliacao da lama vermelha como material pozolanico em substituicao ao cimento para producao de argamassas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manfroi, E.P.; Cheriaf, M.; Rocha, J.C., E-mail: elizmanfroi@yahoo.com.b, E-mail: malik@valores.ufsc.b [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Civil

    2010-07-01

    Red mud is a by-product of the alkaline extraction of aluminum from the bauxite and represents a renewed environmental problem due the significant annual throughput by the plants. In the present work, the pozzolanic properties of Brazilian red mud fired at 600, 700, 800 and 900 deg C were investigated by monitoring lime consumption using DTA analysis and Brazilian standard methodology NBR 5772 (1992). Products and kinetics of hydration were determined in cement pastes produced with 5 and 15% red mud using x-ray diffraction and DTA analysis. Compressive strength and capillary absorption tests were realized on mortars constituted by 5, 10 and 15% red mud in replacement of cement. When calcined at 600 deg C, the red mud develops good pozzolanic properties, and the compressive strength of mortars produced with this waste meet values in accordance with regulatory standard. These results shown than red mud can be used, in partial replacement of cement, as new construction material to produce sustainable mortars with low environmental impact. (author)

  20. Determination of the chloride diffusion coefficient in blended cement mortars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elfmarkova, V.; Spiesz, P.R.; Brouwers, H.J.H.; Bilek, V.; Kersner, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Literature shows that the RCM test development and experience concerns only Ordinary Portland cement. Therefore, a validation of this test method is needed for other types of binders. This study analyzes the application of RCM test for mortars prepared with different binders: Ordinary Portland

  1. Chloride penetration into cementitious mortar at early age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caballero, J.; Polder, R.B.; Leegwater, G.A.; Fraaij, A.L.A.

    2012-01-01

    Modern service life design methods for concrete structures use chloride diffusion data as an input parameter. Abundant data exist for concrete at 28 days and, to a lesser extent, at later ages. This paper presents chloride diffusion data for mortar at ages between 1 day and 28 days age. Rapid

  2. Low Carbon Footprint mortar from Pozzolanic Waste Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmannavaz, Taha; Mehman navaz, Hossein Ali; Moayed Zefreh, Fereshteh; Aboata, Zahra

    2017-04-01

    Nowadays, Portland cement clinker leads to emission of CO2 into the atmosphere and therefore causes greenhouse effect. Incorporating of Palm Oil Fuel Ash (POFA) and Pulverized Fuel Ash (PFA) as partial cement replacement materials into mix of low carbon mortar decreases the amount of cement use and reduces high dependence on cements compared to ordinary mortar. The result of this research supported use of the new concept in preparing low carbon mortar for industrial constructions. Strength of low carbon mortar with POFA and PFA replacement in cement was affected and changed by replacing percent finesse, physical and chemical properties and pozzolanic activity of these wastes. Waste material replacement instead of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) was used in this study. This in turn was useful for promoting better quality of construction and innovative systems in construction industry, especially in Malaysia. This study was surely a step forward to achieving quality products which were affordable, durable and environmentally friendly. Disposing ash contributes to shortage of landfill space in Malaysia. Besides, hazard of ash might be another serious issue for human health. The ash disposal area also might create a new problem, which is the area's sedimentation and erosion.

  3. Do Schools Still Need Brick-and-Mortar Libraries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Doug; Mastrion, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Do all schools need brick-and-mortar libraries? In this article, Johnson and Mastrion share their contradictory thoughts to the question. Johnson says some schools don't need library facilities or programs or librarians. These schools' teachers and administrators: (1) feel no need for a collaborative learning space; (2) feel the ability to process…

  4. Finite element stress analysis of brick-mortar masonry under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stress analysis of a brick-mortar couplet as a substitute for brick wall structure has been performed by finite element method, and algorithm for determining the element stiffness matrix for a plane stress problem using the displacement approach was developed. The nodal displacements were derived for the stress in each ...

  5. Study of the laboratory Vane test on mortars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Elton [Post-Graduate Program in Structures and Civil Construction, Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, University of Brasilia Campus Universitario Darcy Ribeiro Asa Norte, 70910-900 Brasilia/DF (Brazil); Sousa, Jose G.G. de [Federal University of Vale do Sao Francisco, Av. Presidente Tancredo Neve, 100-56306-410 Petroline/PE (Brazil); Guimaraes, Elvio A. [University of Feira de Santana, Campus Universitario-BR 116, Km 03-44031-460-Feira de Santana/BA (Brazil); Silva, Francisco Gabriel S. [Post-Graduate Program in Structures and Civil Construction, University of Brasilia Campus Universitario Darcy Ribeiro Asa Norte, 70910-900 Brasilia/DF (Brazil)

    2007-01-15

    The Vane method (Vane test) is a simple but efficient method to measure the yield stress among other properties of non-Newtonian fluids. These fluids exhibit big flow effects in flat surfaces which are common in rheometers devices of different types (parallel disk or coaxial cylinder types). The yield stress values obtained with Vane method, in pastes, gels, soils and concentrated suspensions, have presented good agreement with results found elsewhere by most of the rheologic methods shown in the literature. The aim of this work is presenting a discussion on the capabilities of the Vane method, highlighting the theoretical basis, the functioning principle with some operational particularities, and some applications of the method in investigating the properties of fresh rendering mortars. Works of several authors that used the same method for fresh mortars were reviewed and experimental results of tests done by the authors of this paper using the method are also presented and discussed, focusing on the desirable workability for mortars. The Vane test method is an important tool in studying rheological properties in freshly applied mortar. It is able to define clear conditions in the applying of this material. (author)

  6. A Preliminary Study on Cathodic Prevention in Reinforced Mortar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.; Van Breugel, K.; Mol, J.M.C.; De Wit, J.H.W.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents the preliminary tests on the performance of cathodic prevention (CPre) in reinforced mortar, subjected to aggressive (10% NaCl environment). Cathodic prevention is an electrochemical technique for minimizing, actually "preventing" any eventual corrosion of the steel bars in

  7. Investigation of Induction Heating in Asphalt Mortar: Numerical Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apostolidis, P.; Liu, X.; Scarpas, Athanasios; van de Ven, M.F.C.; van Bochove, G

    2016-01-01

    The research reported in this paper focuses on utilization of advanced finite-element analyses (COMSOL) for the design and assessment of the induction heating capacity of asphalt mortar by adding electrically conductive additives (e.g., steel fibers), and to understand the factors that influence the

  8. Dispersibility of silica fume in mortar and its effect on properties of mortar. Silica fume no bunsan to mortar no shotokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oga, H; Uomoto, T [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Institute of Industrial Science

    1992-08-01

    Effect of silica fume dispersibility on concrete characteristics was discussed. Properties of mortar mixed with silica fume to exhibit compression strength varied with displacement rates, patterns, and mixing time of silica fume. In submerged curing age of 28 days, the compression strength in a mortar mixed with silica fume at 10% was affected only very little by the mixing time for both pelletizing and non-pelletizing types for up to 180 seconds. The strength increased thereafter with the mixing time. The compression strength at 1020 seconds showed higher value by about 150 kgf/cm [sup 2] than when no silica fume is added, with a difference because of patterns disappearing. In the case of a mixing time of 1020 seconds, neutralization depth receives very little effect from a pattern difference, and decreases with increasing displacement rate. Neutralization coefficient of the mortar mixed with silica fume at 10% decreased with the mixing time, and it was possible to suppress the neutralization coefficient to 25% of the case without silica fume addition in a 1020-second mixing. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Plasticity, Swell-Shrink, and Microstructure of Phosphogypsum Admixed Lime Stabilized Expansive Soil

    OpenAIRE

    James, Jijo; Pandian, P. Kasinatha

    2016-01-01

    The study involved utilization of an industrial waste, Phosphogypsum (PG), as an additive to lime stabilization of an expansive soil. Three lime dosages, namely, initial consumption of lime (ICL), optimum lime content (OLC), and less than ICL (LICL), were identified for the soil under study for stabilizing the soil. Along with lime, varying doses of PG were added to the soil for stabilization. The effect of stabilization was studied by performing index tests, namely, liquid limit, plastic lim...

  10. Adsorption of cesium on cement mortar from aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volchek, Konstantin, E-mail: konstantin.volchek@ec.gc.ca [Emergencies Science and Technology Section, Environment Canada, 335 River Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0H3 (Canada); Miah, Muhammed Yusuf [Emergencies Science and Technology Section, Environment Canada, 335 River Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0H3 (Canada); Department of Applied Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Noakhali Science and Technology University (Bangladesh); Kuang, Wenxing; DeMaleki, Zack [Emergencies Science and Technology Section, Environment Canada, 335 River Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0H3 (Canada); Tezel, F. Handan [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Ottawa, 161 Louis-Pasteur, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2011-10-30

    Highlights: {yields} The adsorption of cesium on cement mortar was investigated in a range of temperatures and cesium concentrations. {yields} The pseudo-second order kinetic model produced a good fit with the experimental kinetic data. {yields} Equilibrium test results correlated well with the Freundlich isotherm adsorption model. {yields} The interaction between cesium ions and cement mortar was dominated by chemical adsorption. - Abstract: The adsorption of cesium on cement mortar from aqueous solutions was studied in series of bench-scale tests. The effects of cesium concentration, temperature and contact time on process kinetics and equilibrium were evaluated. Experiments were carried out in a range of initial cesium concentrations from 0.0103 to 10.88 mg L{sup -1} and temperatures from 278 to 313 K using coupons of cement mortar immersed in the solutions. Non-radioactive cesium chloride was used as a surrogate of the radioactive {sup 137}Cs. Solution samples were taken after set periods of time and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Depending on the initial cesium concentration, its equilibrium concentration in solution ranged from 0.0069 to 8.837 mg L{sup -1} while the respective surface concentration on coupons varied from 0.0395 to 22.34 {mu}g cm{sup -2}. Equilibrium test results correlated well with the Freundlich isotherm model for the entire test duration. Test results revealed that an increase in temperature resulted in an increase in adsorption rate and a decrease in equilibrium cesium surface concentration. Among several kinetic models considered, the pseudo-second order reaction model was found to be the best to describe the kinetic test results in the studied range of concentrations. The adsorption activation energy determined from Arrhenius equation was found to be approximately 55.9 kJ mol{sup -1} suggesting that chemisorption was the prevalent mechanism of interaction between cesium ions and cement mortar.

  11. The potential use of silica sand as nanomaterials for mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiati, N. Retno

    2017-11-01

    The development of nanotechnology is currently experiencing rapid growth. The use of the term nanotechnology is widely applied in areas such as healthcare, industrial, pharmaceutical, informatics, or construction. By the nanotechnology in the field of concrete construction, especially the mechanical properties of concrete are expected to be better than conventional concrete. This study aims to determine the effect of the potential of silica sand as a nanomaterial that is added into the concrete mix The methodology used consist of nanomaterial synthesis process of silica sand using Liquid Polishing Milling Technology (PLMT). The XRF and XRD testing were conducted to determine the composition of silica contained in the silica sand and the level of reactivity of the compound when added into the concrete mix. To determine the effect of nano silica on mortar, then made the specimen with size 50 mm x 50 mm x 50 mm. The composition of mortar is made in two variations, ie by the addition of 3% nano silica and without the addition of nanosilica. To know the mechanical properties of mortar, it is done testing of mortar compressive strength at the age of 28 days. Based on the analysis and evaluation, it is shown that compounds of silica sand in Indonesia, especially Papua reached more than 99% SiO2 and so that the amorphous character of silica sand can be used as a nanomaterial for concrete construction. The results of mechanical tests show that there is an increase of 12% compressive strength of mortar that is added with 3% nano silica.

  12. The adherence in the union stone-mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez García, María Reyes

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Stones placates present a wide of problems that result in the fall of plates. One of the causes is the lack of adherence stone-mortar. We considered a study to determine the adherence between several cement mortars (1:3, 1:5, 1:7, 1:9 and a especial mortar prepared with latex and stones (white granite, pink granites, black granites, white marble and cream limestones. The results obtained suggest that only adequate adherence rates (higher than 3 kgf/cm2 achieved with cement mortar 1:3 and especial mortar. Besides it is observed that in the stones studied there is no relation between adherence and the absorption values.

    Los aplacados de piedra presentan una extensa patología que se traduce en la caída de las placas colocadas. Una de las causas es la falta de adherencia mortero-piedra. El estudio se realiza para determinar la tensión de adherencia entre diversos morteros de cemento (1:3, 1:5, 1:7, 1:9 y otro compuesto por mortero y látex y piedras (granito blanco, granitos rosa, granitos negros, mármol blanco y calizas crema. De los resultados obtenidos se deduce que los únicos morteros que permiten valores de adherencia aceptables (superiores a 3 kp/cm2 son el mortero de cemento 1:3 y el especial. Igualmente se comprueba que, en las piedras estudiadas, no existe relación alguna entre la adherencia y la absorción de agua.

  13. Calcium Electroporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gibot, Laure; Madi, Moinecha

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calcium electroporation describes the use of high voltage electric pulses to introduce supraphysiological calcium concentrations into cells. This promising method is currently in clinical trial as an anti-cancer treatment. One very important issue is the relation between tumor cell kill...... efficacy-and normal cell sensitivity. METHODS: Using a 3D spheroid cell culture model we have tested the effect of calcium electroporation and electrochemotherapy using bleomycin on three different human cancer cell lines: a colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT29), a bladder transitional cell carcinoma (SW780......), and a breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB231), as well as on primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDF-n). RESULTS: The results showed a clear reduction in spheroid size in all three cancer cell spheroids three days after treatment with respectively calcium electroporation (p

  14. The calcium oxide influence on formation of manganese, calcium pyrovanadate solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatolin, N.A.; Volkova, P.I.; Sapozhnikova, T.V.; Ovchinnikova, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    The X-ray graphic, derivatographic, microscopic and chemical methods are used to study solid solutions of manganese, calcium pyrovanadates containing 1-10 mass% CaO and the products of interaction of reprocessing charges of vanadium-containing converter slags intended for he formation of manganese and calcium pyrovanadates with additions of calcium oxide within 10-90 mass%. It is established that in the case of 1-6 mass% CaO content in manganese pyrovanadate solid interstitial solutions appear, while at 6-20 mass% CaO - solid substitution solutions form. The results of calculating elementary cell parameters as well as melting temperatures and pyrovanadate solid solution solubility depending on CaO content are presented. The best solubility of introduction solid solutions during vanadium extraction according to the lime technology is found

  15. Economic evaluation of the industrial solar production of lime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, Anton; Gremaud, Nicolas; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2005-01-01

    The use of concentrated solar energy in place of fossil fuels for driving the endothermic calcination reaction CaCO 3 → CaO + CO 2 at above 1300 K has the potential of reducing CO 2 emissions by 20% in a state-of-the-art lime plant and up to 40% in a conventional cement plant. An economic assessment for an industrial solar calcination plant with 25 MW th solar input indicates that the cost of solar produced lime ranges between 128 and 157 $/t, about twice the current selling price of conventional lime. The solar production of high purity lime for special sectors in the chemical and pharmaceutical industry might be competitive with conventional fossil fuel based calcination processes at current fuel prices

  16. occupational health problems studied among the workers of lime

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAMGANES

    In present study, an extensive health survey of 573 lime kiln workers of Maihar and Jhukehi region of ... Among the observed health anomalies, ..... Health benefits of air pollution control in ... “Association of Indoor and Outdoor Particulate.

  17. Ring Formation in Lime Kilns; Ringbildning i Mesaugnar II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhak, Janice [AaF-Process AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2003-07-15

    The key to a cost efficient and high performance pulp production is low variations in the production level. Despite the fact that all pulp mills always work with improvements to eliminate problems with ring formations, AaF has at several mill seen that the operation of a lime kiln still often is disturbed by ring formation. In 1999 AAF made an extensive investigation of more than 10 lime kilns in Sweden, considering operational data, kiln data and lime chemical analyzes. The result pointed out the importance of how the lime kiln is operated and that dead load and contaminants in the lime was less important. The report suggested that it is the difference in the temperature between the flue gas and the lime that is of importance. There are no quantified process values available that guides for a 'best practice' way to run a lime kiln to avoid ring formation. The goal with this project has been to develop a strategy for operation of a kiln in a way that lowers the risk for ring formation. The results from simulations of a number of lime kilns in this project could not proof that a low difference in the temperature between the flue gas and the lime was the main cause of problems with ring formation and thus it was not possible to quantify the optimal difference to avoid rings. Probably the most important information from the simulations was that it is not the temperature difference in number of degrees that is of importance, rather the fact that the temperature difference in the kalcining zone varies, and time to time reach below the critical level were lime occasionally is cooled down. It can be the case if the temperature profile of the flue gas temporarily changes or if the lime mud temperature profile is changed. The reason for changes in the temperature profile is discussed in the report. The most important factors discussed are: Variations in the energy input e.g. oil and methanol/strong gases in cocombustion. One single fuel is easier to control

  18. Producer gas and its use for the manufacture of lime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, A K; Kumar, S

    1976-04-01

    An analysis of available data indicates that coal-based producer gas is superior to coal or wood as a fuel for lime kilns and much more readily available than oil or natural gas. With producer gas, chemical-grade lime is obtained, and the kiln capacity is increased, so that a smaller unit can be used or more lime obtained. With a mixture of coal and wood as the fuel, the lime produced is contaminated with ash. The added cost of the gas-producer unit can be paid out in one year owing to the greater demand for and the consequent higher prices obtainable for the chemical-grade product. In addition, the flue gases from the kiln can be used in place of steam to heat the gas producer, but experimental studies are needed to determine the magnitude of the savings in fuel consumption. 15 references.

  19. Analysis on soil compressibility changes of samples stabilized with lime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena-Andreea CALARASU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to manage and control the stability of buildings located on difficult foundation soils, several techniques of soil stabilization were developed and applied worldwide. Taking into account the major significance of soil compressibility on construction durability and safety, the soil stabilization with a binder like lime is considered one of the most used and traditional methods. The present paper aims to assess the effect of lime content on soil geotechnical parameters, especially on compressibility ones, based on laboratory experimental tests, for several soil categories in admixture with different lime dosages. The results of this study indicate a significant improvement of stabilized soil parameters, such as compressibility and plasticity, in comparison with natural samples. The effect of lime stabilization is related to an increase of soil structure stability by increasing the bearing capacity.

  20. [Severe ocular burns by calcium carbide in a speleologist: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testud, F; Voegtlé, R; Nordmann, J P; Descotes, J

    2002-03-01

    A case of severe ocular burns in an amateur speleologist is reported. The explosion of his acetylene lamp caused the projection of calcium carbide particles, which induced burning of the cornea and conjunctiva in both eyes. He slowly recovered in several months. The pathophysiology of the burns, linked to the in situ production of lime, and their management are discussed.

  1. Audiovisual Documentation of an International Seminar : Case: LIME

    OpenAIRE

    Tikkanen, Kirsti; Rönnberg, Mira

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this Bachelor’s thesis is to create a documentary video of an international seminar held in Kerava, Finland, in June 2013. The seminar was called Learning on Immigration and Multicultural Education (LIME) and it was conducted by Kerava Adult Education Center (later Keravan Opisto). LIME was a two-year intercultural project funded by the European Union. Different non-governmental organizations and adult education centers from eight European countries took part on the project. The ai...

  2. Lime helps establish crownvetch on coal-breaker refuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miroslaw M. Czapowskyj; Edward A. Sowa

    1976-01-01

    A study was begun in 1965 to determine the effect of lime fertilizer, and mulch on the establishment and growth of crownvetch crowns planted on anthracite coal-breaker refuse. After 7 years the lime application had by far the strongest effect. Both 2.5 and 5.0 tons per acre increased survival and ground cover manyfold, and both treatments were equally beneficial from...

  3. Fiber-reinforced neutron shielding mortar concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaji, Keisuke; Okazaki, Masaki; Ohigashi, Toshihide; Mayahara, Mitsuro.

    1989-01-01

    To improve the moldability, durability and economicity by adding cement curing promotors and reinforcing fibers to cement and boron compound which has been considered difficult so far, thereby enabling to add a great amount of the boron compound. The boron compound is added by from 5 to 200% by weight of powder of colemanite or borocarcite as natural ores or boric acid, borax or titanium boride, etc. as synthesis products and lithium hydroxide. calcium aluminate, etc. is added by more than 0.1% x boron compound blending ration (%) as the curing promoter. 0.3 to 5% by weight of polyvinyl alcohol type synthetic fibers, polyacrilonitrile type synthetic fibers or carbon fibers, etc. are added as the reinforcing fibers. This can prevent instantaneous coagulation, curing delay, etc. due to sulfur ions, enable easy application and molding and improve the durability and economicity. (T.M.)

  4. Elemental analysis of Taiwanese areca nut and limes with INAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Y.Y.; Chung, C.

    1997-01-01

    The popular areca nuts were sampled and their stuffed white and red lime were collected simultaneously from four marketplaces in Taiwan in different growing seasons. Samples of areca nut were treated via homogenizer prior to freeze drying, about 100-150 mg each of the areca nut and lime were packed into PE bag. Samples were irradiated with neutron flux about 10 12 n x cm -2 x s -1 . A total of 17, 18, and 13 elements was analyzed with INAA for white lime, red lime, and areca nut, respectively. The results indicated that Ca have the highest concentration in both limes. Most elements in collected samples have wide range of concentrations among different seasons and marketplaces. It is suggested that the elemental concentration of areca nut and limes exists in divergence originated from various farms in Taiwan. In addition, four elements of Ca, Fe, Mg, and Sc are probably overtaken by persons having chewing habit of areca nut and their effects on oral cancer are discussed. (author)

  5. Study of lime vs. no lime in cold in-place recycled asphalt concrete pavements : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    The resilient characteristics of cold in-place recycled asphalt concrete with and without lime were examined. Six core samples were obtained from a site two months after construction; six months later, six additional core samples were obtained from t...

  6. Sulfate resistance of nanosilica contained Portland cement mortars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batilov, Iani B.

    Soils, sea water and ground water high in sulfates are commonly encountered hostile environments that can attack the structure of concrete via chemical and physical mechanisms which can lead to costly repairs or replacement. Sulfate attack is a slow acting deteriorative phenomenon that can result in cracking, spalling, expansion, increased permeability, paste-to-aggregate bond loss, paste softening, strength loss, and ultimately, progressive failure of concrete. In the presented research study, Portland cement (PC) mortars containing 1.5% to 6.0% nanosilica (nS) cement replacement by weight were tested for sulfate resistance through full submersion in sodium sulfate to simulate external sulfate attack. Mortars with comparable levels of cement replacement were also prepared with microsilica (mS). Three cement types were chosen to explore nS' effectiveness to reduce sulfate expansion, when paired with cements of varying tricalcium aluminate (C3A) content and Blaine fineness, and compare it to that of mS. Mortars were also made with combined cement replacement of equal parts nS and mS to identify if they were mutually compatible and beneficial towards sulfate resistance. Besides sulfate attack expansion of mortar bars, the testing program included investigations into transport and microstructure properties via water absorption, sulfate ion permeability, porosimetry, SEM with EDS, laser diffraction, compressive strength, and heat of hydration. Expansion measurements indicated that mS replacement mortars outperformed both powder form nS, and nS/mS combined replacement mixtures. A negative effect of the dry nS powder replacement attributed to agglomeration of its nanoparticles during mixing negated the expected superior filler, paste densification, and pozzolanic activity of the nanomaterial. Agglomerated nS was identified as the root cause behind poor performance of nS in comparison to mS for all cement types, and the control when paired with a low C3A sulfate resistant

  7. Inhibition of Cracks on the Surface of Cement Mortar Using Estabragh Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Soleimani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of adding Estabragh fibers into the cement composites of mortar on surface cracks and mechanical properties of mortar has been studied at various fiber proportions of 0.25%, 0.5%, and 0.75%. The mortar shrinkage was evaluated by counting the number of cracks and measuring the width of cracks on the surface of mortar specimens. Although the Estabragh fibers loss their strength in an alkali environment of cement composites, the ability of Estabragh fibers to bridge on the microcracks in the mortar matrix causes a decrease in the number of cracks and in their width on the surface of the mortar samples in comparison with the plain mortar. However, considering the mechanical properties of specimens such as bending strength and compressive strength, among all fiber proportions, only the specimens with 0.25% of Estabragh fiber performed better in all respects compared to the physical and mechanical properties of reinforced cement composite of mortar. Consequently, by adding 0.25% of Estabragh fibers to the cement mortar, a remarkable inhibition in crack generation on fiber-containing cement composite of mortar is achieved.

  8. Mechanical and chemical properties of polyvinyl alcohol modified cement mortar with silica fume used as matrix including radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dakroury, A. M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discussed the mechanical and chemical properties of polyvinyl alcohol - modified cement mortar with silica fume to assess the safety for disposal of radioactive waste. The modified cement mortars containing polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) in the presence of 10 % silica fume (SF) .The chemical reaction between polymer and cement - hydrated product were investigated by the Infrared Spectral Technology, Differential Thermal Analysis and X-ray diffraction. The leaching of 137Cs from a waste composite into a surrounding fluid has been studied .The results shown that PVA increases the strength and decreases the porosity. The increase in strength duo to the interaction of PVA with cement , may be forming some new compound that fill the pores or improve the bond between the cement . The pozzolanic reaction of the SF increases the calcium silicate hydrates in the hardening matrix composites. There is distinct change in the refinement of the pore structure in cement composites giving fewer capillary pores and more of the finer gel pores

  9. Interpretation of the lime column penetration test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liyanapathirana, D S; Kelly, R B

    2010-01-01

    Dry soil mix (DSM) columns are used to reduce the settlement and to improve the stability of embankments constructed on soft clays. During construction the shear strength of the columns needs to be confirmed for compliance with technical assumptions. A specialized blade shaped penetrometer known as the lime column probe, has been developed for testing DSM columns. This test can be carried out as a pull out resistance test (PORT) or a push in resistance test (PIRT). The test is considered to be more representative of average column shear strength than methods that test only a limited area of the column. Both PORT and PIRT tests require empirical correlations of measured resistance to an absolute measure of shear strength, in a similar manner to the cone penetration test. In this paper, finite element method is used to assess the probe factor, N, for the PORT test. Due to the large soil deformations around the probe, an Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) based finite element formulation has been used. Variation of N with rigidity index and the friction at the probe-soil interface are investigated to establish a range for the probe factor.

  10. Study on properties of mortar using silica fume and ground blast furnace slag. Silica fume oyobi koro slag funmatsu wo mochiita mortar no tokusei ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiiba, H; Honda, S; Araki, A [Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1992-09-01

    The effect of silica fume and ground blast furnace slag in concrete on the content of superplasticizer, and dynamic properties of hardened mortar with such admixtures were studied experimentally. Although the dependence of a flow value on the superplasticizer was dominated by kinds of superplasticizers, blast furnace slag enhanced the flow value resulting in a high fluidity. Adsorption of superplasticizers onto admixtures was dependent on kinds of superplasticizers, and adsorption onto blast furnace slag was 1.3-2 times that onto normal Portland cement (NPC). The compressive strength of mortar increased by mixing admixtures, while the bending strength was enhanced only by mixing silica fume. Mixing mortar was lower in dynamic elastic modulus than NPC mortar at the same compressive strength, and the velocity of supersonic wave in mortar was scarcely affected by mixing. 11 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Equilíbrio de bases no solo e produção de matéria seca de milho (Zea mays L. em solos tratados com lodo de esgoto, carbonato de cálcio e cal virgem = Balance of basis in the soil and dry matter production in maze (Zea mays L. in soils treated with sewage sludge, calcium carbonate and unslaked lime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziela Moraes de Cesare Barbosa

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available O lodo de esgoto pode ter diferentes disposições finais, dentre os quais o uso agronômico. Nesse caso, é necessário conhecer as características do lodo, do solo, da planta e suas interações, bem como o clima e o local a ser aplicado. Este trabalho teve o objetivo de verificar a influência do lodo de esgoto, com e sem adição de cal, no equilíbrio do solo e na produção de matéria seca do milho. O experimento foi conduzido em vasos e em ambiente de casa devegetação, utilizando-se terra da camada superficial (0-15 cm de dois solos: a primeira amostra (S1, com textura argilosa, foi coletada em um Latossolo Vermelho eutroférrico sob plantiodireto, e a segunda amostra (S2, com textura arenosa, foi coletada em um Latossolo Vermelho distrófico sob pastagem. Utilizaram-se os seguintes tratamentos no solo S1: T1A – testemunha; T2A – 9 t ha-1 lodo de esgoto; T3A – 18 t ha-1 lodo de esgoto caleado (9 t ha-1 de lodo de esgoto + 9 t ha-1 de cal virgem; T4A – 9 t ha-1 cal virgem; e para o solo S2: T1B – testemunha; T2B – 9 t ha-1 lodo de esgoto; T3B – 18 t ha-1 lodo de esgoto caleado (9 t ha-1 de lodo de esgoto + 9 t ha-1 de cal virgem; T4B – 9 t ha-1 cal virgem; T5B – calagem recomendada. A produção de matéria seca de plantas de milho cultivadas em Latossolo Vermelho, textura arenosa, aumentou com aaplicação de lodo de esgoto sem cal. A aplicação de lodo de esgoto caleado, nos dois solos, elevaram os teores de Mg e P (S1 e S2 e Na (S2. O aumento nos valores de pH poderá ser um fator limitante para a sua aplicação.Sewage sludge may have different uses, among which the agronomic use. In this case, it is necessary to know the characteristics of the sludge, the soil, the plant and its interactions, as well as the climate and the site where it will be applied. This work aimed at investigating the influence of sewage sludge, with or without addition of lime, in the balance of the soil and in the maize dry matter

  12. Preparation of soda-lime glass using rock wool waste; Preparacao de vidros sodo-calcicos utilizando residuo de la de rocha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleixo, F.C.; Della, V.P. [Instituto Federal do Espirito Santo, Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Ballmann, T.J.S.; Folgueras, M.V. [Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina (UESC), Joinville, SC (Brazil); Junkes, J.A., E-mail: janajunkes@gmail.com [Centro Universitario Tiradentes, Maceio, AL (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    Discarded by the mining industry during the maintenance stoppages of pelletizing furnaces, rock wool has in its composition SiO{sub 2} (56%), Na{sub 2} O (12%) and CaO (7%) propitious for obtaining soda-lime glasses. Under this focus, this work developed soda-lime glasses formulations, using as main raw-material rock wool waste in proportions from 50 to 100% by adjusting the chemical composition of the formulations with sand, sodium and calcium carbonates, as silica, soda and lime sources, respectively. In some formulations the sodium carbonate was replaced by sodium sulfate, which acts as a refining agent, improving homogenization and reducing the bubble formation during the melting. Initially, the raw-materials were evaluated by X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis. The tests showed that the rock wool waste has potential to be used in soda-lime glasses production, however, the chemical composition must be corrected. After knowing the waste potential, seven mixtures were prepared and molten at 1550 °C for 1 to 2 h. It has been found that the maximum rock wool waste percentage that can be used is between 60 and 80%, and that the 2 h melting time resulted in more homogeneous glasses and fewer bubbles according to the addition of sodium sulfate which is efficient for bubbles removal. (author)

  13. Ecological comparison between hydrated lime and sodium bicarbonate when used for dry flue gas purification; Oekologischer Vergleich von Kalkhydrat und Natriumbicarbonat beim Einsatz in der trockenen Rauchgasreinigung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wecker, Andreas [Federal German Association of the Lime Industry, Koeln (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Lime plays an important role in environmental protection. Not only due to its properties but also due to its natural occurrence, it is suitable and accepted for universal application in the environment sector. Lime and its refined products can be used in various processes to remove the acid gases, the gaseous metal compounds and organic trace constituents from the flue gas of waste incineration plants. The choice of the suitable process depends on the raw gas load, the separation efficiency to be achieved and the way of recovery of the reaction product obtained as a result of flue gas cleaning. The dry sorption processes have been established for many years and have been continuously further developed, in which lime is injected into the flue gas flow and the reaction product is retained via a filtering separator. As an alternative to lime products, it is also possible, under certain boundary conditions, to use sodium hydrogen-carbonate NaHCO{sub 3} (below called sodium bicarbonate) as a basic reaction component in the dry sorption process. As opposed to calcium hydroxide, there are differences, for example as regards the reaction temperature required and the necessary amount of sorbent to achieve the desired purification effect. (orig.)

  14. Lime and gypsum application on the wheat crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caires Eduardo Fávero

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Root growth and crop yield can be affected by chemical modifications of the soil profile owing to lime and gypsum applications. A field trial was carried out on a dystrophic Clayey Rhodic Hapludox at Ponta Grossa, PR, Brazil, aiming to evaluate lime (without or with incorporation into the soil and gypsum effects on root growth, mineral nutrition and grain yield of wheat (cv. OR 1. A randomized complete block design was used, with three replications, in a split-plot experiment. Treatments with dolomitic limestone (without lime and 4.5 t ha-1 of lime applied on the surface, in total rate and 1/3 of the requirement per year during 3 years, or incorporated into the soil were applied in July 1998 (main plots and the rates of gypsum (0, 3, 6 and 9 t ha-1 in October 1998 (subplots. Wheat was evaluated in the 2000 winter season. In conditions of water deficit absence, there was no limitation in root growth in depth, for exchangeable Ca of 6 mmol c dm-3. Lime incorporation of lime increased the Mg concentration in the leaves, but wheat yield was not influenced by the correction of soil acidity through liming treatments. Gypsum increased the concentrations of Ca and S in wheat leaves, with significant effects on grain yield. The critical level of S-SO4(2- in the 0-20 cm soil layer, extracted by ammonium acetate 0.5 mol L-1 in acetic acid 0.25 mol L-1, was 25.8 mg dm-3.

  15. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

  16. Finite cover method with mortar elements for elastoplasticity problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurumatani, M.; Terada, K.

    2005-06-01

    Finite cover method (FCM) is extended to elastoplasticity problems. The FCM, which was originally developed under the name of manifold method, has recently been recognized as one of the generalized versions of finite element methods (FEM). Since the mesh for the FCM can be regular and squared regardless of the geometry of structures to be analyzed, structural analysts are released from a burdensome task of generating meshes conforming to physical boundaries. Numerical experiments are carried out to assess the performance of the FCM with such discretization in elastoplasticity problems. Particularly to achieve this accurately, the so-called mortar elements are introduced to impose displacement boundary conditions on the essential boundaries, and displacement compatibility conditions on material interfaces of two-phase materials or on joint surfaces between mutually incompatible meshes. The validity of the mortar approximation is also demonstrated in the elastic-plastic FCM.

  17. Fracture mechanics of polymer mortar made with recycled raw materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Godoy Jurumenha

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to show that industrial residues could be used in construction applications so that production costs as well as environmental protection can be improved. The fracture properties of polymer mortar manufactured with recycled materials are investigated to evaluate the materials behaviour to crack propagation. The residues used in this work were spent sand from foundry industry as aggregate, unsaturated polyester resin from polyethylene terephthalate (PET as matrix and polyester textile fibres from garment industry, producing an unique composite material fully from recycled components with low cost. The substitution of fresh by used foundry sand and the insertions of textile fibres contribute to a less brittle behaviour of polymer mortar.

  18. Radiation chemical treatment of cement mortar - polymer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younes, M.M.

    1994-01-01

    The development of the hardened cement pastes,mortars and concretes which contain polymers has progressed rapidly in years. Developmental work has identified a number of applications where the high strength and excellent durability of the composite materials will provide definite advantages over conventional mortars and concretes. The first investigations of polymer - impregnated concrete tried mainly to increase the quantity of absorbed and polymerised monomer because this gave a greater decrease in the original of concrete and a subsequent improvement in physico - mechanical properties. However, the production costs which is due mainly to the organic polymer, becomes the most important item. In this respect recent research showed the possibility of obtaining with a very compact concrete, of relative low porosity, a compound material with high performances after impregnation 26 tabs.,28 figs.,109 refs

  19. Effect of temperature on the mechanical properties of polymer mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Marciano Laredo dos Reis

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of an experimental program to investigate the effect of temperature on the performance of epoxy and unsaturated polyester polymer mortars (PM. PM is a composite material in which polymeric materials are used to bond the aggregates in a fashion similar to that used in the preparation of Portland cement concrete. For this purpose, prismatic and cylindrical specimens were prepared for flexural and compressive tests, respectively, at different temperatures. Measurements of the temperature-dependent elastic modulus and the compressive and flexural strength were conducted using a thermostatic chamber attached to a universal test machine for a range of temperatures varying from room temperature to 90 ºC. The flexural and compressive strength decreases as temperature increases, especially after matrix HDT. Epoxy polymer mortars are more sensitive to temperature variation than unsaturated polyester ones.

  20. Valorization of mud from Fergoug dam in manufacturing mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Laoufi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The production of calcined mud, with pozzolanic properties, from the large quantities of sediments dredged from Algerian dams, could be a good opportunity for the formulation of high performance mortars and pozzolanic concretes, with lower costs and less greenhouse gas (CO2 emissions. The optimal temperatures selected for calcination were 750, 850 and 950 °C. The burning operation was continuous over a period of 3 h. Therefore, a series of physical, chemical, mechanical and microstructural analyses were conducted on sediment samples, collected from the waters of Fergoug dam. The results obtained from the analyses of the calcined mud, from the dam, allowed saying that mortars with different percentages of that mud represent a potential source of high reactivity pozzolanic materials.

  1. Characterization of civil construction waste and its incorporation to mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, G.A.; Andrade, A.C.D.; Souza, J.M.M.; Evangelista, A.C.J.; Almeida, V.C.

    2009-01-01

    As the preservation of the environment is a big concern nowadays, plenty of studies have arisen in order to decrease the production or reuse the waste from human activities. In this context, the civil construction industry comes up, as it is able to incorporate waste to mortar, being a great alternative for the reuse of solid waste. The scope of this work has been the characterization of Construction and Demolishment Waste (RCD) and its incorporation to the mortar aiming at the development of alternative construction materials in the future for the economical reutilization of waste discharged in embankments and landfills so far preserving the environment so far. The experimental studies taken with sample bodies, such as water absorption, resistance to compression, X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence and scanning electronic microscopy, elicits the viability of the partial substitution of cement by RCD mixed waste, taking its different applications into consideration. (author)

  2. Interfacial (Fiber-matrix) Properties of High-strength Mortar (150 MPa) from Fiber Pullout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shannag, M.J.; Brincker, Rune; Hansen, Will

    1996-01-01

     The steel fiber-matrix properties of high-strength mortar (150 MPa), such as DSP (densified small particle), are obtained and compared to an ordinary strength mortar (40 MPa) using a specially designed fiber pullout apparatus. A new method for estimating the debonding energy of the interfacial z......-strength DSP mortar has significantly improved interfacial properties compared to ordinary strength mortar. These results are important in the understanding of the role of steel fibers in improving the tensile properties of high-strength, brittle, cement-matrix composites....... The steel fiber-matrix properties of high-strength mortar (150 MPa), such as DSP (densified small particle), are obtained and compared to an ordinary strength mortar (40 MPa) using a specially designed fiber pullout apparatus. A new method for estimating the debonding energy of the interfacial...

  3. Plastic shrinkage of mortars with shrinkage reducing admixture and lightweight aggregates studied by neutron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrzykowski, Mateusz, E-mail: mateusz.wyrzykowski@empa.ch [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Concrete and Construction Chemistry Laboratory, Dübendorf (Switzerland); Lodz University of Technology, Department of Building Physics and Building Materials, Lodz (Poland); Trtik, Pavel [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory for Neutron Scattering and Imaging, Villigen (Switzerland); Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Concrete and Construction Chemistry Laboratory, Dübendorf (Switzerland); Münch, Beat [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Concrete and Construction Chemistry Laboratory, Dübendorf (Switzerland); Weiss, Jason [Purdue University, School of Civil Engineering, West Lafayette (United States); Vontobel, Peter [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory for Neutron Scattering and Imaging, Villigen (Switzerland); Lura, Pietro [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Concrete and Construction Chemistry Laboratory, Dübendorf (Switzerland); ETH Zurich, Institute for Building Materials (IfB), Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-07-15

    Water transport in fresh, highly permeable concrete and rapid water evaporation from the concrete surface during the first few hours after placement are the key parameters influencing plastic shrinkage cracking. In this work, neutron tomography was used to determine both the water loss from the concrete surface due to evaporation and the redistribution of fluid that occurs in fresh mortars exposed to external drying. In addition to the reference mortar with a water to cement ratio (w/c) of 0.30, a mortar with the addition of pre-wetted lightweight aggregates (LWA) and a mortar with a shrinkage reducing admixture (SRA) were tested. The addition of SRA reduced the evaporation rate from the mortar at the initial stages of drying and reduced the total water loss. The pre-wetted LWA released a large part of the absorbed water as a consequence of capillary pressure developing in the fresh mortar due to evaporation.

  4. Plastic shrinkage of mortars with shrinkage reducing admixture and lightweight aggregates studied by neutron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyrzykowski, Mateusz; Trtik, Pavel; Münch, Beat; Weiss, Jason; Vontobel, Peter; Lura, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Water transport in fresh, highly permeable concrete and rapid water evaporation from the concrete surface during the first few hours after placement are the key parameters influencing plastic shrinkage cracking. In this work, neutron tomography was used to determine both the water loss from the concrete surface due to evaporation and the redistribution of fluid that occurs in fresh mortars exposed to external drying. In addition to the reference mortar with a water to cement ratio (w/c) of 0.30, a mortar with the addition of pre-wetted lightweight aggregates (LWA) and a mortar with a shrinkage reducing admixture (SRA) were tested. The addition of SRA reduced the evaporation rate from the mortar at the initial stages of drying and reduced the total water loss. The pre-wetted LWA released a large part of the absorbed water as a consequence of capillary pressure developing in the fresh mortar due to evaporation

  5. The long term effect on cement mortar by admixture of spray drying absorption products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeppesen, K.G.

    1988-01-01

    Preliminary investigations have shown that the substitutions of up to 10% fly ash (FA), with spray drying absorption products (SDA), in cement mortars (cement: 80% rapid portland cement (RPC), 10-20% FA, 0-10% SDA) results in low early strength of the same magnitude as in mortar with 80% RPC + 20% FA. Use of the modified instructions for preparation of mortar prisms containing SDA resulted in satisfactory early strengths. A series of mortar prisms with increasing content of SDA (x% RPC, (100-x)% SDA in cements; 0 80% cannot be stored wet. The effects on mortars of the individual constituents of the SDA-products are studied by XRD, development in strength and density. Fragments of 2 year old SDA containing cement mortars and SDA containing concrete from a parking place have been studied

  6. Fracture mechanics of polymer mortar made with recycled raw materials

    OpenAIRE

    Jurumenha,Marco Antonio Godoy; Reis,João Marciano Laredo dos

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to show that industrial residues could be used in construction applications so that production costs as well as environmental protection can be improved. The fracture properties of polymer mortar manufactured with recycled materials are investigated to evaluate the materials behaviour to crack propagation. The residues used in this work were spent sand from foundry industry as aggregate, unsaturated polyester resin from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) as matrix and po...

  7. Compressive and flexural strength of high strength phase change mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Qingyao; Fang, Changle

    2018-04-01

    High-strength cement produces a lot of hydration heat when hydrated, it will usually lead to thermal cracks. Phase change materials (PCM) are very potential thermal storage materials. Utilize PCM can help reduce the hydration heat. Research shows that apply suitable amount of PCM has a significant effect on improving the compressive strength of cement mortar, and can also improve the flexural strength to some extent.

  8. Environmental Factors Affecting the Strength Characteristics of Modified Resin Mortars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debska, Bernardeta; Licholai, Lech

    2017-12-01

    Resin concretes are composites in which a cement binder has been completely replaced by a synthetic resin. These materials are a good choice for the construction industry, especially in solutions requiring high strength, fast curing and durability. Polymer mortars are mainly used for the manufacture of industrial floors and prefabricated products such as tanks for aggressive chemicals, sewage pipes, or road and bridge drainage systems, as well as for the repair of damaged concrete structures. In all these applications, the strength and high chemical resistance of the applied material solutions are of key importance. It is particularly crucial to obtain information on how resin composites behave when exposed to aggressive agents over extended periods of time. It is also very important to use waste materials in order to obtain resin composites, as these activities are very well inscribed in the idea of environmental protection and meet the criteria of sustainable construction. The mortars described in this article meet the above principles. The article presents how the compressive strength of glycolyzate-modified epoxy mortars, obtained with the use of poly(ethylene terephthalate), changes after they are immersed in 10% sodium chloride solution. Sodium chloride solution was chosen due to the prospective applicability of the tested composites as repair materials used for e.g. bridges or overpasses that are exposed to this salt solution in wintertime. Changes in the properties of the composite samples were monitored over the period of one year. Statistical analysis of the test results was carried out with the use of Statistica programme. The module available in the mentioned program called Nonparametric Statistics - Comparing multiple independent samples made it possible to check the monitoring times during which the compressive strength values differed significantly. The obtained results allowed for determining the equation of the function approximating the course of

  9. Properties of Fiber-Reinforced Mortars Incorporating Nano-Silica

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed Ghazy; Mohamed T. Bassuoni; Eugene Maguire; Mark O’Loan

    2016-01-01

    Repair and rehabilitation of deteriorating concrete elements are of significant concern in many infrastructural facilities and remain a challenging task. Concerted research efforts are needed to develop repair materials that are sustainable, durable, and cost-effective. Research data show that fiber-reinforced mortars/concretes have superior performance in terms of volume stability and toughness. In addition, it has been recently reported that nano-silica particles can generally improve the m...

  10. Optimization of superplasticizer in portland pozzolana cement mortar and concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyan, Dhanya; Anand, K. B.; Mini, K. M.; Aparna, S.

    2018-02-01

    Chemical Admixtures are added to concrete at the time of mixing of its constituents to impart workability. The requirement of right workability is the essence of good concrete. It has been found that the use of optimum use of admixtures is very important since low dosage may result in loss of fluidity and over dosage could lead to segregation, bleeding, excessive air entrainment etc in concrete. Hence it is essential to find optimum dosage of superplasticizer for getting good strength and workability. But large number of trial tests are required in the field to find the saturation dosage of superplasticizer in concrete which requires more materials and consume more time. The paper deals with developing a co-relation between the quantity requirements of superplasticiser in mortar to that of cement concrete to get good workability. In this work for preparing mortar and concrete 4 brands of locally available Portland pozzolana cement (PPC) and superplasticizer (SP) belonging to 4 different families namely Polycarboxylate Ether (PCE), Lignosulphate (LS), Sulfonated Naphthalene Formaldehyde (SNF) and Sulfonated Melamine Formaldehyde (SMF) are used. Two different brands of SP’s are taken from each family. Workability study on the superplasticized mortar with cement to sand ratio 1:1.5 and water cement ratio of 0.4 was performed using marsh cone and flow table test and workability study on the concrete with same cement/sand ratio and water cement ratio was done using slump cone and flow table test. Saturation dosage of superplasticizer in mortar and concrete determined experimentally was compared to study the correlation between two. Compressive strength study on concrete cubes were done on concrete mixes with a superplasticizer dosage corresponding to the saturation dosage and a comparative study were done to analyse the improvement in the compressive strength with addition of superplasticizer from different family.

  11. Strength Performance of Blended Ash Based Geopolymer Mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahib, Zaidahtulakmal M.; Kamaruddin, Kartini; Saman, Hamidah M.

    2018-03-01

    Geopolymer is a based on inorganic alumino-silicate binder system. Geopolymeric materials are formed using materials that containing silica and aluminium such as fly ash and rice husk ash, which activated by alkaline solution. This paper presents the study on the effect of replacement of SSA in RHA based geopolymer, types of curing and different molarity of NaOH used on the strength of Sewage Sludge Ash (SSA) and Rice Husk Ash (RHA) based geopolymer mortar incorporating with three (3) different mix proportions. Based geopolymer mortar was synthesized from treated sewage sludge and rice husk undergoing incineration process in producing ashes, activated with sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide solution by ratio of 2.5:1 and solution to ash ratio of 1:1. Molarity of 8M and 10M NaOH were used. The percentages of SSA replacement were 0%, 10% and 20% by weight. Compressive strength was conducted at age 7, 14 and 28 days to see the development of strength with two curing regimes, which are air curing and oven curing (60°C for 24 hours). From the research conducted, the ultimate compressive strength (6.28MPa) was obtained at zero replacement of SSA taken at 28 days of oven curing with 10M of NaOH. This shows that RHA, which is rich in silica content is enough to enhance the strength of geopolymer mortar especially with high molarity of NaOH.

  12. Techniques for measuring ammonia in fly ash, mortar, and concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathbone, R.F. [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Reseach; Majors, R.K. [Boral Material Technologies, Inc., San Antonio, TX (United States). Engineered Materials

    2003-12-01

    The presence of ammonia in fly ash that is to be used in mortar and concrete is of increasing concern in the U.S., mainly due to the installation of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) DeNOx systems. When the SCR catalyst is new, contamination of the fly ash with ammonia is generally not a concern. However, as the catalyst in the SCR ages and becomes less efficient, the ammonia slip increases and results in a greater amount of ammonium salt being precipitated on the fly ash. The increase in ammonia concentration is compounded by variability that can occur on a day-to-day basis. When marketing ammonia-laden fly ash for use in mortar and concrete it is imperative that the concentration of ammonia is known. However, there currently is no widely accepted or ''standard'' method for ammonia measurement in fly ash. This paper describes two methods that have been developed and used by the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and Boral Material Technologies, Inc. One of the methods uses gas detection tubes and can provide an accurate determination within five to ten minutes. Thus it is suitable as a rapid field technique. The other method employs a gas-sensing electrode and requires a longer period of time to complete the measurement. However, this second method can also be used to determine the quantity of ammonia in fresh mortar and concrete. (orig.)

  13. Fatigue behaviour analysis for the durability prequalification of strengthening mortars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocca, P; Grazzini, A; Masera, D

    2011-01-01

    An innovative laboratory procedure used as a preliminary design stage for the pre-qualification of strengthening mortars applied to historical masonry buildings is described. In the analysis of the behaviour of masonry structures and their constituent materials, increasing importance has been assumed by the study of the long-term evolution of deformation and mechanical characteristics, which may be affected by both loading and environmental conditions. Through static and fatigue tests on mixed specimens historical brick-reinforced mortar it has been possible to investigate the durability of strengthening materials, in order to select, from a range of alternatives, the most suitable for the historical masonry. Cyclic fatigue stress has been applied to accelerate the static creep and to forecast the corresponding creep behaviour of the historical brick-strengthening mortar system under static long-time loading. This methodology has proved useful in avoiding the errors associated with materials that are not mechanically compatible and guarantees the durability of strengthening work. The experimental procedure has been used effectively in the biggest restoration building site in Europe, the Royal Palace of Venaria, and it is in progress of carrying out at the Special Natural Reserve of the Sacro Monte di Varallo, in Piedmont (Italy).

  14. SELECTED PROPERTIES OF EPOXY MORTARS WITH PERLITE AGGREGATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardeta Dębska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporarily designed, new polymer concrete-like composites are increasingly often used in construction, particularly where high chemical resistance of the material is important. However, their widespread use is limited, mainly due to the cost of resin binders used. This is a significant problem, especially in a situation where it is necessary to obtain elements of a substantial volume. One solution to this inconvenience is to develop lighter concrete. The article presents a lightweight resin mortar obtained by substitution of sand with expanded perlite. Thanks to its properties, this aggregate allows for the production of a material with a more porous structure, which is highlighted by the received SEM photos. The binder in the mortars was epoxy resin, hardened with triethylenetetramine. The results of the tests carried out allow us to conclude that despite the significant reduction of strength parameters of mortar, we can obtain a material with lower weight, good chemical resistance and low water absorption, and characterized by significant thermal insulation. This type of composites can be used, among others, as cores in sandwich panels.

  15. The Interfacial Transition Zone in Alkali-Activated Slag Mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rackel eSan Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The interfacial transition zone (ITZ is known to strongly influence the mechanical and transport properties of mortars and concretes. This paper studies the ITZ between siliceous (quartz aggregates and alkali activated slag binders in the context of mortar specimens. Backscattered electron images (BSE generated in an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM are used to identify unreacted binder components, reaction products and porosity in the zone surrounding aggregate particles, by composition and density contrast. X-ray mapping is used to exclude the regions corresponding to the aggregates from the BSE image of the ITZ, thus enabling analysis of only the binder phases, which are segmented into binary images by grey level discrimination. A distinct yet dense ITZ region is present in the alkali-activated slag mortars, containing a reduced content of unreacted slag particles compared to the bulk binder. The elemental analysis of this region shows that it contains a (C,N-A-S-H gel which seems to have a higher content of Na (potentially deposited through desiccation of the pore solution and a lower content of Ca than the bulk inner and outer products forming in the main binding region. These differences are potentially important in terms of long-term concrete performance, as the absence of a highly porous interfacial transition zone region is expected to provide a positive influence on the mechanical and transport properties of alkali-activated slag concretes.

  16. Physico Mechanical Properties of Irradiated Waste Rubber Cement Mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younes, M.M.

    2010-01-01

    In the present study a partial replacement of aggregate with two different ratios of waste rubber (5%, 10%) with the addition of a constant ratio of rice husk ash (RHA), 5% was carried out. The hardened cement mortar used the optimum water of consistency. The specimens were molded into 1 inch cubic moulds .The specimens were first cured for 24 hours, at 100% relative humidity and then cured under tap water for 3, 7 and 28 days followed by irradiation at different doses of gamma irradiation namely 5 and 10 kGy. The physico-chemical and mechanical properties such as compressive strength, total porosity and bulk density were studied for the three types of specimens. The results showed that the values of the compressive strength, bulk density and chemically combined water of the blended cement mortar paste (OPC-RHA) increase ,while blended cement mortar paste with 5% RHA and 5, 10% waste rubber decrease. The results were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and thermal behavior of the specimens. Also, it was observed that the irradiated sample was thermally more stable than the unirradiated one

  17. Acidic Attack Resistance of Cement Mortar Treated with Alkaline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Nazhat Sabeeh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The negative effect of acidic attack on the properties of concrete and cement mortar is a topic of increasing significance in the recent years. Many attempts has occurred to mitigate this negative impact by improving the properties of concrete and increase resistance to acids by using additives. The present study includes treatment of sand by alkaline material and examine the effect of treatment on cement mortar resistance towards hydrochloric and sulfuric acid. Results show that sand treatment by alkaline material significantly enhance mortar ability to resist acids. In terms of loss weight, the maximum weight rate gain was 25.54% for specimens immersed in Hydrochloric acid with water cement ratio 40%. For specimens immersed in HCl, the average gain in compressive strength is (20.15-19.433% for w/c (40-45% respectively. The average gain in modulus of rupture toward the influence of H2SO4 is (18.37–17.99% for w/c (40-45%, respectively.

  18. Properties of Fiber-Reinforced Mortars Incorporating Nano-Silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Ghazy

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Repair and rehabilitation of deteriorating concrete elements are of significant concern in many infrastructural facilities and remain a challenging task. Concerted research efforts are needed to develop repair materials that are sustainable, durable, and cost-effective. Research data show that fiber-reinforced mortars/concretes have superior performance in terms of volume stability and toughness. In addition, it has been recently reported that nano-silica particles can generally improve the mechanical and durability properties of cement-based systems. Thus, there has been a growing interest in the use of nano-modified fiber-reinforced cementitious composites/mortars (NFRM in repair and rehabilitation applications of concrete structures. The current study investigates various mechanical and durability properties of nano-modified mortar containing different types of fibers (steel, basalt, and hybrid (basalt and polypropylene, in terms of compressive and flexural strengths, toughness, drying shrinkage, penetrability, and resistance to salt-frost scaling. The results highlight the overall effectiveness of the NFRM owing to the synergistic effects of nano-silica and fibers.

  19. The transformation of waste Bakelite to replace natural fine aggregate in cement mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nopagon Usahanunth

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bakelite material has been used to produce the various components for cars and consumer goods industry in Thailand. The growth of Bakelite consumption increases Bakelite waste. Bakelite waste is prohibited from disposing of direct landfilling and open burning because of the improper disposal and emission reasons. A large amount of this waste needs the large safe space of warehouse area for keeping which becomes a waste management problem. Size reduction by milling machine is helpful for waste handling and storing, however, the post-milling waste Bakelite plastic utilization shall be studied to maintain the waste storing capacity. There are some studies of the milling machine used for waste plastic size reduction. However, the particular study of milling machine application for waste size reduction and its milling waste utilization is still insufficient in Thailand. The purpose of this research is the use of waste Bakelite aggregate milling machine for Bakelite waste size reduction and use of the post-milling waste Bakelite as a fine aggregate to replace natural sand material in cement mortar. The waste Bakelite fine aggregate (WBFA was mixed in cement mortar mixture with the proportion 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% and 100% by volume for cement mortar sample preparation. The mortar sample was tested for compressive strength follow ASTM standard. The compressive test result of mortar samples will be compared between conventional mortar (0% WBFA and waste Bakelite mortar (WBM as well as comparing with the mortar standard. From an analysis of the sample test data found that the WBFA content in cement mortar mixture can predict the strength of WBM. The compressive strength of WBM at 28 days age with the fraction of WBFA is not exceeded 11.03%, and 23.08% respectively can be met the mortar standard according to the equation. The utilization of WBM to develop mortar non-structural mortar product can be usable from a technical point of view.

  20. Effect of cement fineness and polycarboxylate dosage on the rheological and mechanical behavior of a mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahia Didouche

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of certain organic additives in the production of mortar and concrete influences the workability and the hydration kinetic of mortar. This results in a modification of some properties, namely rheological behavior and mechanical strength. The objective of this work is to evaluate the rheological and mechanical behavior of a mortar by varying the fineness of the cement and using the superplasticizer Polycarboxylate.

  1. Get Enough Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Calcium Print This Topic En español Get Enough Calcium Browse Sections The Basics Overview Foods and Vitamins ... women, don't get enough calcium. How much calcium do I need every day? Women: If you ...

  2. Calcium - urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Female urinary tract Male urinary tract Calcium urine test References Bringhurst FR, Demay MB, Kronenberg HM. Hormones and disorders of mineral metabolism. In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, Kronenberg HM, eds. Williams Textbook of Endocrinology . 13th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; ...

  3. LIME EFFECTIVENESS OF SOME FERTILIZERS IN A TROPICAL ACID ALFISOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercy Omogbohu Anetor

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Liming increases production costs and environmentally unfriendly. Effectiveness of crystalliser (CRYS, single super phosphate (SSP and organic fertilizer (OF for liming was evaluated by determining pH and phosphorus- (P- availability in an acid alfisol incubated with the amendments, Ca(OH2 being reference. Treatments were replicated thrice in completely randomised design. Un-amended soil remained acidic (pH 4.8 but liming raised pH (6.1-6.6, enhancing maximum (15.09-17.33 mg kg-1 P–release (un-amended having 4.24-7.09 mg P kg-1. Lime (L and L+P treatments resulted in maximum pH increases (7.0-7.2, decreasing with incubation. Fertilizer treatments also raised pH (5.0-5.5 for OF, CRYS or SSP; 5.6-5.8 for CRYS +SSP, CRYS+OF and OF+SSP relative to control (5.2. Acid soil infertility-ameliorating potential of CRYS and OF was revealed. They could be used multi-purposely as lime and P fertilizers by poor-resource farmers challenged by acid soil infertility factors.

  4. Experimental investigation and constitutive model for lime mudstone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junbao; Liu, Xinrong; Zhao, Baoyun; Song, Zhanping; Lai, Jinxing

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate the mechanical properties of lime mudstone, conventional triaxial compression tests under different confining pressures (0, 5, 15 and 20 MPa) are performed on lime mudstone samples. The test results show that, from the overall perspective of variation law, the axial peak stress, axial peak strain and elastic modulus of lime mudstone tend to gradually increase with increasing confining pressure. In the range of tested confining pressure, the variations in axial peak stress and elastic modulus with confining pressure can be described with linear functions; while the variation in axial peak strain with confining pressure can be reflected with a power function. To describe the axial stress-strain behavior in failure process of lime mudstone, a new constitutive model is proposed, with the model characteristics analyzed and the parameter determination method put forward. Compared with Wang' model, only one parameter n is added to the new model. The comparison of predicted curves from the model and test data indicates that the new model can preferably simulate the strain softening property of lime mudstone and the axial stress-strain response in rock failure process.

  5. Soil Stabilization with Lime for the Construction of Forest Roads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reginaldo Sérgio Pereira

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The mechanical performance of soil stabilization using lime to improve forest roads was assessed. This study was conducted with lateritic soil (LVAd30 using lime content of 2% in the municipality of Niquelândia, Goiás state, Brazil. Geotechnical tests of soil characterization, compaction, and mechanical strength were performed applying different compaction efforts and curing periods. The results showed that lime content significantly changed the mechanical performance of natural soil, increasing its mechanical strength and load-carrying capacity. Compaction effort and curing time provided different responses in the unconfined compressive strength (UCS and California Bearing Ratio (CBR tests. The best UCS value (786.59 kPa for the soil-lime mixture was achieved with modified compaction effort and curing time of 28 days. In the CBR test, soil-lime mixtures compacted at intermediate and modified efforts and cured for 28 days were considered for application as subbase material of flexible road pavements, being a promising alternative for use in layers of forest roads.

  6. Reuse of waste of glass wool in the production of mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, P.L.C.; Santos, N.A.; Louzada, D.M.; Araujo, G.S.; Della, V.P.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the incorporation of alternative materials, especially waste, in mortars and concretes has become a common practice in the building industry. Against this background, this paper seeks to examine the possibility of using waste glass wool resulting from the steel industry in mortars in partial replacement the thin fraction of sand. To the knowledge of their chemical and mineralogical composition, the waste was subjected to x-ray fluorescence and diffraction assays. Mortars with different percentages of incorporation of waste were produced and performed flow test assays, Water Absorption by capillarity, compressive strength and compressive flexural strength. The results were compared with a reference mortar without residue. (author)

  7. Recycling alternatives of converter slag in concrete and mortars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorim, Aldo Siervo de

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this work is the study of the use of a residue of a steel plant (COSIPA-SP), constituted by magnetite, in components of the civil construction, aiming to increase the recycling and, consequently, to decrease the impact of that residue in the environment. To reach this objective, additions of this residue were tested in the formulation of concrete with the purpose of radiation shielding, as pellets in coarse aggregate, and as substitute of the fine fraction of sand in the composition of a coating mortar. The concrete produced with purpose of radiation shielding showed that for small residue additions (up to 30%), there was not significant variation in the mechanical properties, nor in the attenuation properties to the radiation. Therefore, it did not justify its addition for purpose of heavy concrete. The results obtained on pelletizing process show that the obtained pellets presented value of specific gravity (2,75 g.cm -3 ) very close to the one of the common crushed stone (2,55 g.cm -3 ), however, they presented a low resistance to the compression, (0,2 KN) for the pellets when compared to regular crushed stones (5,8 KN). These results show that its use could commit the mechanical resistance of the concrete without bringing any advantage on density increase or increment of radiation attenuation. The mortars produced by the addition of the fine residue in substitution to the sand, showed an improvement in the retention of water in green (95%), in comparison to the produced without residue (41%). Also, for ali the tested proportions of substitutions, the same resistance to the compression (approximately 40 MPa) was achieved The results of the leaching and solubility tests showed that even in case of largest amount of substitution of sand for residue (14,55%), there were not great variations on the analyzed elements in the extract, allowing to conclude that the residue behaved satisfactorily to the mortar. Its use as part of mortar composition

  8. A comparative study on different burning method of sewage sludge ash in mortar brick with eggshell powder as additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ing, Doh Shu; Azed, Muhammad Aizat; Chin, Siew Choo

    2017-11-01

    Population growth that increase every year has led to the increasing amount of waste generated annually. The content of heavy metal Cadmium (Cd), Lead (Pb) and Zinc (Zn) represent the biggest concentrations of heavy metals in sewage sludge waste which can be the source of pollution. Furthermore, the excessive disposal of eggshells waste to landfills may attract rats and worms due to the organic protein matrix that may pose health problem to the public. In the last decade, the demand on cement mortar brick has increased has resulted in higher cement production. However, cement plant is one of the major contributors of carbon dioxide emission. Hence, this research focuses on the production of environmental friendly cement with sewage sludge since there is occurrence of pozolonic material in Sewage Sludge Ash (SSA). From the initial finding, the major components of SSA are Silicon Dioxide (SiO2), Calcium oxide (CaO), Aluminium Oxide (Al2O3), Iron (III) Oxide (Fe2O3), Sodium Oxide (Na2O), Potassium oxide (K2O), Magnesium Oxide (MgO) and Iron (II) Oxide (FeO). Sewage sludge needed to be incinerated to remove the heavy metal before it can be used as cement replacement in mortar brick production. The sewage sludge were treated using two methods namely incineration and microwave. Both types of sewage sludge were then added with eggshell powder as additive. Eggshell powder act as additive in this research due to its high content of calcium carbonate and has nearly same composition of limestone used in the production of cement. Different percentages of Eggshell Powder (ESP) (0%, 5%, 10%, 15%) and 10% fixed of Microwaved Sewage Sludge Ash (MSSA) and Incinerated Sewage Sludge Ash (ISSA) as optimum dosage partially replacing the cement used to test the brick mortar properties in term of compressive strength, flexural strength and also water absorption. Result showed that ISSA with 5% of ESP is the most optimum brick with highest compressive strength and flexural strength

  9. The refilling of pores in cement mortars treated by chemicals and desiccation at different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menéndez Pazos, Ignacio

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available Bases under the law of solubility product, the pores of the cement mortar are refilled by impregnation with two salts that form another insoluble salt. The number of treatments to be underdone and the drying temperatures more suitable in each case. The calcium salts like impregnants and urea sodium oxalate and sugar like precipitates are employed, obtained in each case the corresponding pores are occupied, which depends generally on the number of treatments and in particular the drier temperature.

    Basados en los principios del producto de solubilidad, se rellenan los poros de las probetas de mortero de cemento por impregnación con dos sales que forman otra insoluble. Se determina el número de tratamientos a realizar y las temperaturas de secado más idóneas en cada caso. Se emplean sales cálcicas como impregnantes, y urea, oxalato sódico y azúcar como precipitantes, obteniéndose en cada caso las correspondientes ocupaciones de poros que dependen, por lo general, del número de tratamientos y, en particular, de la temperatura de secado.

  10. EVALUATION OF BIOAEROSOL COMPONENTS, GENERATION FACTORS, AND AIRBORNE TRANSPORT ASSOCIATED WITH LIME TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lime treatment has been used in contaminated sediment management activities for many purposes such as dewatering, improvement of physical properties, and reducing contaminant mobility. Exothermic volatilization of volatile organic compounds from lime-treated sediment is well kno...

  11. REMOVAL OF BERYLLIUM FROM DRINKING WATER BY CHEMICAL COAGULATION AND LIME SOFTENING

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effectiveness of conventional drinking water treatment and lime softening was evaluated for beryllium removal from two drinking water sources. ar test studies were conducted to determine how common coagulants (aluminum sulfate and ferric chloride and lime softening performed ...

  12. Liming Poultry Manures to Kill Pathogens and Decrease Soluble Phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maguire, R.; Hesterberg, D.; Gernat, A.; Anderson, K.; Wineland, M.; Grimes, J.

    2006-01-01

    Received for publication September 9, 2005. Stabilizing phosphorus (P) in poultry waste to reduce P losses from manured soils is important to protect surface waters, while pathogens in manures are an emerging issue. This study was conducted to evaluate CaO and Ca(OH) 2 for killing manure bacterial populations (pathogens) and stabilizing P in poultry wastes and to investigate the influence on soils following amendment with the treated wastes. Layer manure and broiler litter varying in moisture content were treated with CaO and Ca(OH) 2 at rates of 2.5, 5, 10, and 15% by weight. All treated wastes were analyzed for microbial plate counts, pH, and water-soluble phosphorus (WSP), while a few selected layer manures were analyzed by phosphorus X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES). A loamy sand and a silt loam were amended with broiler litter and layer manure treated with CaO at rates of 0, 2.5, 5, 10, and 15% and soil WSP and pH were measured at times 1, 8, and 29 d. Liming reduced bacterial populations, with greater rates of lime leading to greater reductions; for example 10% CaO applied to 20% solids broiler litter reduced the plate counts from 793 000 to 6500 mL -1 . Liming also reduced the WSP in the manures by over 90% in all cases where at least 10% CaO was added. Liming the manures also reduced WSP in soils immediately following application and raised soil pH. The liming process used successfully reduced plate counts and concerns about P losses in runoff following land application of these limed products due to decreased WSP

  13. Thermodynamic investigation of lime-enhanced molybdenite reduction using methane-containing gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najafabadi, Samad Ghasemi; Abbasi, Mohammad Hasan; Saidi, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Lime-enhanced molybdenite reduction (LEMR) with methane-containing gases has been thermodynamically studied. The reaction proceeds through the direct oxidation of MoS 2 by CaO to form intermediate molybdenum oxidized species, MoO 2 and CaMoO 4 . The thermodynamics of Mo-O-C-H and Mo-Ca-O-C-H systems has been investigated instead of Mo-Ca-S-O-C-H system, as the sulfur is captured by calcium and forms a neutral compound (i.e. calcium sulfide). The role of reducing agent is the reduction of these oxidized species. Reduction of oxidized species by methane will yield Mo, Mo 2 C or MoC. The thermodynamic investigation resulted in construction of stability diagrams of molybdenum compounds. These diagrams were constructed for CH 4 -H 2 , CH 4 -H 2 -Ar and CH 4 -CO 2 -H 2 O gas mixtures. In addition to stability regions of Mo, Mo 2 C and MoC, the carbon deposition area was also identified. The results showed that by using appropriate gas composition and temperature, different molybdenum-containing phases would be stable thermodynamically while soot formation can be avoided.

  14. Thermodynamic investigation of lime-enhanced molybdenite reduction using methane-containing gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najafabadi, Samad Ghasemi, E-mail: samad_ghasemi@yahoo.com [Materials Engineering Department, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abbasi, Mohammad Hasan; Saidi, Ali [Materials Engineering Department, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-05-20

    Lime-enhanced molybdenite reduction (LEMR) with methane-containing gases has been thermodynamically studied. The reaction proceeds through the direct oxidation of MoS{sub 2} by CaO to form intermediate molybdenum oxidized species, MoO{sub 2} and CaMoO{sub 4}. The thermodynamics of Mo-O-C-H and Mo-Ca-O-C-H systems has been investigated instead of Mo-Ca-S-O-C-H system, as the sulfur is captured by calcium and forms a neutral compound (i.e. calcium sulfide). The role of reducing agent is the reduction of these oxidized species. Reduction of oxidized species by methane will yield Mo, Mo{sub 2}C or MoC. The thermodynamic investigation resulted in construction of stability diagrams of molybdenum compounds. These diagrams were constructed for CH{sub 4}-H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}-H{sub 2}-Ar and CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O gas mixtures. In addition to stability regions of Mo, Mo{sub 2}C and MoC, the carbon deposition area was also identified. The results showed that by using appropriate gas composition and temperature, different molybdenum-containing phases would be stable thermodynamically while soot formation can be avoided.

  15. Sulfates removal by the GYP-CIX process following lime treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, A.M.; Everett, D.J.; Plessis, N.J. Du

    1994-01-01

    The treatment of acid mine drainage by limiting results in the discharge of water saturated in gypsum and containing residual metal concentrations. These waters may exceed drinking and irrigation water standards for TDS, sulfates and some metals. The scaling nature of the saturated gypsum solution makes it unsuitable for industrial use and makes further processing difficult and costly. This paper discusses a novel ion exchange process that is suitable to desalinate large volumes of mine and industrial waters with a TDS of up to 6,500 mg/l which is also high in calcium and sulfates, to meet effluent discharge specifications. The GYP-CIX process is a continuous fluidized bed ion-exchange process that effectively removes calcium sulfate from gypsum saturated waters. It uses low cost chemicals such as lime and sulfuric acid for resin regeneration. The only waste product is gypsum and the treated water produced meets standards for reuse or discharge. This process consists of a two stage operation. The first is the removal of cations in a multistage continuous loading train, using cation exchange resin. The second operation is the removal of anions, again in a multistage continuous loading train using anion exchange resin

  16. Glass-Forming Ability of Soda Lime Borate Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Qiuju; Mauro, J.C.; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the composition dependence of glass-forming ability (GFA) of a series of iron-containing soda lime borate liquids by substituting Na2O for B2O3. We have characterized GFA by measuring the glass stability against crystallization using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC......). The results show that the GFA decreases when substituting Na2O for B2O3. Moreover, we find that there is no direct link between the kinetic fragility and GFA for the soda lime borate series studied herein. We have also discovered and clarified a striking thermal history dependence of the glass stability...

  17. Solidification of radioactive waste in a cement/lime mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, H.; Colombo, P.

    1984-01-01

    The suitability of a cement/lime mixture for use as a solidification agent for different types of wastes was investigated. This work includes studies directed towards determining the wasted/binder compositional field over which successful solidification occurs with various wastes and the measurement of some of the waste from properties relevant to evaluating the potential for the release of radionuclides to the environment. In this study, four types of low-level radioactive wastes were simulated for incorporation into a cement/lime mixture. These were boric acid waste, sodium sulfate wastes, aion exchange resins and incinerator ash. 7 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  18. Biodiesel production from palm oil using hydrated lime-derived CaO as a low-cost basic heterogeneous catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roschat, Wuttichai; Siritanon, Theeranun; Yoosuk, Boonyawan; Promarak, Vinich

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Hydrated lime-derived CaO can be utilized as high efficient heterogeneous solid catalyst for transesterification of palm oil to biodiesel product. - Highlights: • CaO with high surface area and pore volume was successfully prepared from hydrated lime using a simple method. • Hydrated lime-derived CaO were used as a catalyst in transesterification of palm oil to biodiesel. • Over 97% FAME yield was achieved from transesterification of palm oil in 2 h. • This CaO has high potential for applications as green and low-cost catalyst. - Abstract: In this study, hydrated lime-derived calcium oxide (CaO) was used as a catalyst for the transesterification of palm oil. The catalysts were characterized by TG-DTA, XRD, XRF, FT-IR, SEM, Hammett indicator method, TPD-CO_2 and BET by N_2 adsorption. Under the optimal conditions at catalyst loading of 6 wt.%, methanol/oil molar ratio of 15:1, reaction temperature 65 °C, and stirring rate of 200 rpm; 97% yield of biodiesel could be achieved in 2 h. Effects of water amount were investigated and the catalyst could tolerate high water content of 5 wt.%. The kinetic of the reaction followed pseudo-first order with the activation energy (Ea) of 121.12 kJ/mol and frequency factor (A) of 1.203 × 10"1"7 min"−"1. After treatments, high quality biodiesel was obtained which indicated that the very cheap hydrated lime-derived CaO showed excellent catalytic activity and high potential for applications in biodiesel production.

  19. Calcium paradox and calcium entry blockers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Slade, A.M.; Nayler, W.G.; Meijler, F.L.

    1984-01-01

    Reperfusion of isolated hearts with calcium-containing solution after a short period of calcium-free perfusion results in irreversible cell damage (calcium paradox). This phenomenon is characterized by an excessive influx of calcium into the cells, the rapid onset of myocardial contracture,

  20. 40 CFR 180.1232 - Lime-sulfur; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lime-sulfur; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1232 Lime-sulfur; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of lime-sulfur. [70 FR 33363, June...

  1. 40 CFR 180.1231 - Lime; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lime; exemption from the requirement... From Tolerances § 180.1231 Lime; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of lime. [70 FR 33363, June 8, 2005] ...

  2. Lime treatment of liquid waste containing heavy metals, radionuclides and organics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DuPont, A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on lime treatment of liquid waste containing heavy metals, radio nuclides and organics. Lime is wellknown for its use in softening drinking water the treatment of municipal wastewaters. It is becoming important in the treatment of industrial wastewater and liquid inorganic hazardous waste; however, there are many questions regarding the use of lime for the treatment of liquid hazardous waste

  3. Suitability of a lime source high in manganese as a feed ingredient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    plasma enzyme levels, mineral concentrations in plasma, faeces and kidneys, mineral content of livers, haematology, hislopathol- ogy of livers and kidneys and bone measurements.It is concluded that the Ouplaas lime, .... Table 1 Mineral composition of the pure lime sources (dry basis). Lime sources. Na. (vo). Mg. (vo). K.

  4. Kinetics of the reaction of hydrated lime with SO{sub 2} at low temperatures: effects of the presence of CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and NOx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C.F.; Shih, S.M. [National Taiwan University, Taipei (Taiwan). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2008-12-15

    The effects of the presence Of CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and NOx in the flue gas on the kinetics of the sulfation of hydrated lime at low temperatures were studied using a differential fixed-bed reactor. When O{sub 2} and NOx were not present together the reaction kinetics was about the same as that under gas mixtures containing SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and N2 only. When both O{sub 2} and NOx were present, sulfation of hydrated lime was greatly enhanced, forming a large amount of calcium sulfate in addition to calcium sulfite. Sulfation of hydrated lime was well described by the surface coverage model, despite the gas-phase conditions being different. Relative humidity is the major factor affecting the reaction, and its effect was more marked when both O{sub 2} and NOx were present. The kinetic model equations obtained in this work can be used to describe the sulfation of hydrated lime in the low-temperature dry and semidry flue gas desulfurization processes with or without an upstream NOx removal unit.

  5. The effects of silica fume and hydrated lime on the strength development and durability characteristics of concrete under hot water curing condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability is considered to be highly important for preserving continued industrial growth and human development. Concrete, being the world’s largest manufacturing material comprises cement as an essential binding component for strength development. However, excessive production of cement due to high degree of construction practices around the world frames cement as a leading pollutant of releasing significant amounts of CO2 in the atmosphere. To overcome this environmental degradation, silica fume and hydrated lime are used as partial replacements to cement. This paper begins with the examination of the partial replacement levels of hydrated lime and silica fume in concrete and their influence on the mechanical properties and durability characteristics of concrete. The effect of hot water curing on concrete incorporated with both silica fume and hydrated lime is also investigated in this paper. The results reported in this paper show that the use of silica fume as a partial replacement material improved both the mechanical properties and durability characteristics of concrete due to the formation of calcium silica hydrate crystals through the pozzolanic reaction. Although the hydrated lime did not significantly contribute in the development of strength, its presence enhanced the durability of concrete especially at long-term. The results also showed that hot water curing enhanced the strength development of concrete incorporated with silica fume due to the accelerated rate of both the hydration and pozzolanic reaction that takes place between silica fume and calcium hydroxide of the cement matrix particularly at early times. The results reported in this paper have significant contribution in the development of sustainable concrete. The paper does not only address the use of alternative binders as a partial replacement material in concrete but also suggest proper curing conditions for the proposed replacement materials. These practices

  6. Biological effects in limed forests; Biologiska effekter i kalkad skog. Aarsrapport 1998. Effektuppfoeljning av Skogsstyrelsens program foer kalkning och vitaliseringsgoedsling av skogsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, Per-Erik; Akselsson, Cecilia; Bengtsson, Roland; Bjelke, Ulf

    1999-10-01

    The Swedish Board of Forestry experimental work with liming and vitalising (nutrient compensation) of forest soil includes an extensive review program of the effects of this work. Results from the experimental work are presented in annual reports. This report gives an account of the review program carried out to indicate the results of the biological effects. The studies are performed within the Swedish Board of Forestry's large-scale experiments with the liming and vitalising fertilisation of forest soil. The report covers the time period, or parts of the period, from 1991 to 1998. The results in short are as follows: (1) Benthic invertebrate: The investigation revealed that a dose of 3 tonnes per hectare was insufficient to have a substantial effect on the fauna in acidified streams during the first seven years after treatment. An increase in the number of species and taxon or larger bio-diversity could not be confirmed. No indications of harmful effects on the fauna, caused by high lime concentrations, were found., (2) Benthic algae: Changes to benthic flora in streams after soil treatment was minimal. The total number of species increased slightly after lime treatment. At the same time the number of acid indicating species diminished. In other words, the decrease in acidity has improved the water quality. No negative effects, as a result of soil treatment were found., (3) Nutritional status in needles: The trees reacted quickly to the treatments. The soil treatment led to an increase in levels of calcium in the needles. Treatment using wood ash and the vitalising agent 'Skogvital' led to an increase in calcium and boron levels. Treatment using a mixture of wood ash and lime resulted in increased magnesium and manganese levels. Samples were taken one and three years respectively after treatment. A longer period of time is required to carry out a detailed evaluation of the nutritional status of the needles., and (4) Tree vitality: It is not

  7. Composite cement mortars based on marine sediments and oyster shell powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ez-zaki, H.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Additions of dredged marine sediments and oyster shell powder (OS as cement substitute materials in mortars are examined by several techniques. The sediments have high water and chloride contents and calcite, quartz, illite and kaolinite as principal minerals. The OS powders are entirely composed of calcium carbonate and traces of other impurities. Four mixtures of treated sediments and OS powders at 650 °C and 850 °C are added to Portland cement at 8%, 16% and 33% by weight. The hydration of composite pastes is followed by calorimetric tests, the porosity accessible to water, the bulk density, the permeability to gas, the compressive strength and the accelerated carbonation resistance are measured. In general, the increase of addition amounts reduced the performance of mortars. However, a reduction of gas permeability was observed when the addition was up to 33%. Around 16% of addition, the compressive strength and carbonation resistance were improved.En este trabajo se ha valorado la sustitución de cemento en morteros por sedimentos marinos dragados y polvo de concha de ostra (OS. Los sedimentos tienen altos contenidos de agua, cloruros, calcita, cuarzo, illita y caolinita como minerales principales. Los polvos OS están compuestos de carbonato cálcico y trazas de otras impurezas. Se añadieron a un cemento Portland, cuatro mezclas de los sedimentos y polvos de OS tratados a 650 °C y 850 °C en proporciones del 8%, 16% y 33% en peso. La hidratación de pastas se estudió a través de calorimetría. Se estudió además la porosidad accesible al agua, densidad aparente, permeabilidad al gas, resistencia a compresión y carbonatación acelerada. En general, un aumento en la adición produjo una reducción del rendimiento de los morteros. Se observó, sin embargo, una reducción de la permeabilidad a los gases con porcentajes de adición de hasta el 33%. Con valores del 16% de sustitución, mejoraron las resistencias mecánicas y la

  8. Carbon fibre-reinforced, alkali-activated slag mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcés, P.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the effect of carbon fibre on alkaliactivated slag mortar (AAS mechanical strength, volume stability and reinforcing steel corrosion, compared to its effect on the same properties in Portland cement (PC properties. Mechanical strength and volume stability tests were performed as set out in the respective Spanish UNE standards. The corrosion rate of steel embedded in the specimens studied was determined from polarization resistance analysis. One of the findings of the study performed was that carbon fibre failed to improve AAS or CP mortar strength. As far as volume stability is concerned, the inclusion of carbon fibres in AAS with a liquid/solid ratio of 0.5 reduced drying shrinkage by about 50%. The effect of carbon fibre on PC mortars differed from its effect on AAS mortars. Studies showed that in the presence of carbonation, steel corrosion reached higher levels in carbon-fibre reinforced AAS mortars; the inclusion of 1% carbon fibre improved corrosion resistance perceptibly in these same mortars, however, when exposed to chloride attack.Se ha estudiado el efecto de la incorporación de fibras de carbón en el comportamiento mecánico, estabilidad de volumen y nivel de corrosión de la armadura en morteros de escorias activadas alcalinamente (AAS. Se evalúa la influencia de las fibras de carbón en el comportamiento de morteros alcalinos en comparación con el efecto que producen en morteros de Portland (CP. Los ensayos mecánicos y de estabilidad de volumen se han realizado según lo establecido en la norma UNE que los regula. Se ha utilizado la técnica de la Resistencia a la Polarización para determinar la velocidad de corrosión del acero embebido en las muestras estudiadas. Como consecuencia del estudio realizado, se ha podido concluir que la adición de fibras de carbón a morteros de AAS y CP no mejora las características resistentes de los mismos. En relación con la estabilidad de volumen, la incorporación de

  9. Influence of moisture condition on chloride diffusion in partially saturated ordinary Portland cement mortar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.; Zhang, M.; Ye, G.

    2018-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out to study the influence of moisture condition, including moisture content and its distribution, on the chloride diffusion in partially saturated ordinary Portland cement mortar. The mortar samples with water-to-cement (w/c) ratios of 0.4, 0.5 and 0.6, cured for 1

  10. Experimental study of chloride diffusivity in unsaturated ordinary Portland cement mortar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.; Ye, G.; Santhanam, M.

    2017-01-01

    Experiments are carried out to investigate the chloride diffusivity in partially saturated ordinary Portland cement mortars with water-to-cement (w/c) ratios of 0.4, 0.5 and 0.6. Based on resistivity measurement and Nernst-Einstein equation, the chloride diffusivities of cement mortars at various

  11. Drying Shrinkage of Mortar Incorporating High Volume Oil Palm Biomass Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukor Lim, Nor Hasanah Abdul; Samadi, Mostafa; Rahman Mohd. Sam, Abdul; Khalid, Nur Hafizah Abd; Nabilah Sarbini, Noor; Farhayu Ariffin, Nur; Warid Hussin, Mohd; Ismail, Mohammed A.

    2018-03-01

    This paper studies the drying shrinkage of mortar incorporating oil palm biomass waste including Palm Oil Fuel Ash, Oil Palm Kernel Shell and Oil Palm Fibre. Nano size of palm oil fuel ash was used up to 80 % as cement replacement by weight. The ash has been treated to improve the physical and chemical properties of mortar. The mass ratio of sand to blended ashes was 3:1. The test was carried out using 25 × 25 × 160 mm prism for drying shrinkage tests and 70 × 70 ×70 mm for compressive strength test. The results show that the shrinkage value of biomass mortar is reduced by 31% compared with OPC mortar thus, showing better performance in restraining deformation of the mortar while the compressive strength increased by 24% compared with OPC mortar at later age. The study gives a better understanding of how the biomass waste affect on mortar compressive strength and drying shrinkage behaviour. Overall, the oil palm biomass waste can be used to produce a better performance mortar at later age in terms of compressive strength and drying shrinkage.

  12. The Roman mortars used in the construction of the Ponte di Augusto (Narni, Italy)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drdácký, Miloš; Fratini, F.; Frankeová, Dita; Slížková, Zuzana

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 1 (2013), s. 1117-1128 ISSN 0950-0618 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP105/12/G059 Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : historic mortar * roman mortar * Narni bridge Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage Impact factor: 2.265, year: 2013

  13. Repair mortars for historic masonry : Effects of the binder choice on durability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, C.J.W.P.

    2016-01-01

    Factors affecting the design of repair mortars for historic masonry are: the type of masonry, the condition of the masonry and the exposure conditions. Especially in case of low-strength masonry exposed to heavy rain and high salt contents the design of a repair mortar may be a challenge. The most

  14. Effect of MHEC on evaporation and hydration characteristics of glue mortar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faiyas, A.P.A.; Erich, S.J.F.; Huinink, H.P.; Adan, O.C.G; Nijland, T.G.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of methylhydroxyethylcellulose (MHEC) on both moisture distribution and hydration characteristics of glue mortar using nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMR) is investigated. MHEC is added to glue mortar in order to control the drying rate by increasing the open time. Besides drying,

  15. Natural radioactivity levels and danger ratio in cements, concretes and mortars used in construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneses, J.; Pacheco, C.; Avila, J. M.; Miro, C.

    2010-01-01

    We have determined the natural radiation level in three types of adhesive cements, five types of concrete and two types of mortars of different strength normally used in the construction field. Of these materials, both concrete and mortars were prepared in our laboratories, cements the contrary were of a commercial nature.

  16. Influence of recycled fine aggregates on the resistance of mortars to magnesium sulfate attack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung-Tae

    2009-01-01

    The influence of recycled fine aggregates, which had been reclaimed from field-demolished concretes, on the resistance of mortar specimens to magnesium sulfate attack was investigated. Mortar specimens were prepared with recycled fine aggregates at different replacement levels (0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of natural fine aggregate by mass). The mortar specimens were exposed to 4.24% magnesium sulfate solution for about 1 year at ambient temperature, and regularly monitored for visual appearance, compressive strength loss and expansion. Additionally, in order to identify products of magnesium sulfate attack, mortar samples incorporating 0%, 25% and 100% replacement levels of the recycled fine aggregates were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. Experimental results confirmed that the use of recycled fine aggregates up to a maximum 50% replacement level is effective under severe magnesium sulfate environment, irrespective of type of recycled fine aggregates. However, the worse performance was observed in mortar specimens incorporating 100% replacement level. It was found that the water absorption of recycled fine aggregates affected deterioration of mortar specimens, especially at a higher replacement level. XRD results indicated that the main cause of deterioration of the mortar specimens was primarily due to the formation of gypsum and thaumasite by magnesium sulfate attack. In addition, it appeared that the conversion of C-S-H into M-S-H by the attack probably influenced mechanical deterioration of mortar specimens with recycled fine aggregates.

  17. Influence of light masonry mortar on the thermal insulation of a solid brick wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupke, C

    1980-12-01

    For calculations of the thermal insulation of structural components according to DIN 4108 and to the Thermal Insulation Ordinance, characteristic data of thermal conductivity are used which are contained in DIN 4108 and in the Bundesanzeiger in Supplements to the publication of material characteristics for the calculation of thermal insulation according to the Thermal Insulation Ordinance. For masonry, this value is equivalent to the thermal conductivity of the bricks, including mortar joints. The mortar considered is standard mortar, group II, according to DIN 1053. In the last few years, in order to improve the thermal insulation, mortars of low thermal conductivity and low volume weight - so-called light masonry mortars - have been used to an increasing extent. The improvement in thermal conductivity as compared with standard mortar is referred to as ..delta..lambda; it depends mostly on the thermal conductivity of the light mortar and the bricks. In the article, the laws governing the influence of light masonry mortar on the thermal insulation of masonry of solid bricks and solid blocks are reviewed.

  18. Economic Analysis of Small Scale Forest-Based Mortar and Pestles ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The problems militating against the production of mortar and pestles in the area were high transportation cost, high cost of tools, poor weather condition, poor road network, finance and marketing problems. To bring about sustainable production and enhance the level of profitability from production of mortar and pestle, there ...

  19. Properties of Foamed Mortar Prepared with Granulated Blast-Furnace Slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Foamed mortar with a density of 1300 kg/m3 was prepared. In the initial laboratory trials, water-to-cement (w/c ratios ranging from 0.54 to 0.64 were tested to determine the optimal value for foamed mortar corresponding to the highest compressive strength without compromising its fresh state properties. With the obtained optimal w/c ratio of 0.56, two types of foamed mortar were prepared, namely cement-foamed mortar (CFM and slag-foamed mortar (SFM, 50% cement was replaced by slag weight. Four different curing conditions were adopted for both types of foamed mortar to assess their compressive strength, ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV and thermal insulation performance. The test results indicated that utilizing 50% of slag as cement replacement in the production of foamed mortar improved the compressive strength, UPV and thermal insulation properties. Additionally, the initial water curing of seven days gained higher compressive strength and increased UPV values as compared to the air cured and natural weather curing samples. However, this positive effect was more pronounced in the case of compressive strength than in the UPV and thermal conductivity of foamed mortar.

  20. Properties of Foamed Mortar Prepared with Granulated Blast-Furnace Slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiao; Lim, Siong-Kang; Tan, Cher-Siang; Li, Bo; Ling, Tung-Chai; Huang, Runqiu; Wang, Qingyuan

    2015-01-30

    Foamed mortar with a density of 1300 kg/m³ was prepared. In the initial laboratory trials, water-to-cement (w/c) ratios ranging from 0.54 to 0.64 were tested to determine the optimal value for foamed mortar corresponding to the highest compressive strength without compromising its fresh state properties. With the obtained optimal w/c ratio of 0.56, two types of foamed mortar were prepared, namely cement-foamed mortar (CFM) and slag-foamed mortar (SFM, 50% cement was replaced by slag weight). Four different curing conditions were adopted for both types of foamed mortar to assess their compressive strength, ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) and thermal insulation performance. The test results indicated that utilizing 50% of slag as cement replacement in the production of foamed mortar improved the compressive strength, UPV and thermal insulation properties. Additionally, the initial water curing of seven days gained higher compressive strength and increased UPV values as compared to the air cured and natural weather curing samples. However, this positive effect was more pronounced in the case of compressive strength than in the UPV and thermal conductivity of foamed mortar.