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Sample records for calcium dynamics regulate

  1. Calcium induced regulation of skeletal troponin--computational insights from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgi Z Genchev

    Full Text Available The interaction between calcium and the regulatory site(s of striated muscle regulatory protein troponin switches on and off muscle contraction. In skeletal troponin binding of calcium to sites I and II of the TnC subunit results in a set of structural changes in the troponin complex, displaces tropomyosin along the actin filament and allows myosin-actin interaction to produce mechanical force. In this study, we used molecular dynamics simulations to characterize the calcium dependent dynamics of the fast skeletal troponin molecule and its TnC subunit in the calcium saturated and depleted states. We focused on the N-lobe and on describing the atomic level events that take place subsequent to removal of the calcium ion from the regulatory sites I and II. A main structural event - a closure of the A/B helix hydrophobic pocket results from the integrated effect of the following conformational changes: the breakage of H-bond interactions between the backbone nitrogen atoms of the residues at positions 2, 9 and sidechain oxygen atoms of the residue at position 12 (N(2-OE(12/N(9-OE(12 in sites I and II; expansion of sites I and II and increased site II N-terminal end-segment flexibility; strengthening of the β-sheet scaffold; and the subsequent re-packing of the N-lobe hydrophobic residues. Additionally, the calcium release allows the N-lobe to rotate relative to the rest of the Tn molecule. Based on the findings presented herein we propose a novel model of skeletal thin filament regulation.

  2. Calcium dynamics in vascular smooth muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Amberg, Gregory C.; Navedo, Manuel F.

    2013-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells are ultimately responsible for determining vascular luminal diameter and blood flow. Dynamic changes in intracellular calcium are a critical mechanism regulating vascular smooth muscle contractility. Processes influencing intracellular calcium are therefore important regulators of vascular function with physiological and pathophysiological consequences. In this review we discuss the major dynamic calcium signals identified and characterized in vascular smooth muscle cells....

  3. Disrupted-in-schizophrenia-1 (DISC1) Regulates Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Jin; Jeong, Jaehoon; Park, Young-Un; Park, Kyung-Sun; Lee, Haeryun; Lee, Namgyu; Kim, Sung-Mo; Kuroda, Keisuke; Nguyen, Minh Dang; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Park, Sang Ki

    2015-01-01

    Disrupted-in-schizophrenia-1 (DISC1) has emerged as a convincing susceptibility gene for multiple mental disorders, but its mechanistic link to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia related psychiatric conditions is yet to be further understood. Here, we showed that DISC1 localizes to the outer surface of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). EXOC1, a subunit of the exocyst complex, interacted with DISC1 and affected its recruitment to inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor 1 (IP3R1). Notably, knockdown of DISC1 and EXOC1 elicited an exaggerated ER calcium response upon stimulation of IP3R agonists. Similar abnormal ER calcium responses were observed in hippocampal neurons from DISC1-deficient mutant mice. Moreover, perturbation of ER calcium dynamics upon DISC1 knockdown was effectively reversed by treatment with antipsychotic drugs, such as clozapine and haloperidol. These results collectively indicate that DISC1 is a regulatory factor in ER calcium dynamics, linking a perturbed intracellular calcium signaling and schizophrenia pathogenesis. PMID:25732993

  4. Actin Dynamics Regulates Voltage-Dependent Calcium-Permeable Channels of the Vicia faba Guard Cell Plasma Membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Liu-Min Fan

    2009-01-01

    Free cytosolic Ca~(2+) ([Ca~(2+)]_(cyt)) is an ubiquitous second messenger in plant cell signaling, and [Ca~(2+)]_(cyt) elevation is associated with Ca~(2+)-permeable channels in the plasma membrane and endomembranes regulated by a wide range of stimuli. However, knowledge regarding Ca~(2+) channels and their regulation remains limited in planta. A type of voltage-dependent Ca~(2+)-permeable channel was identified and characterized for the Vicia faba L. guard cell plasma membrane by using patch-clamp techniques. These channels are permeable to both Ba~(2+) and Ca~(2+), and their activities can be inhibited by micromolar Gd~(3+). The unitary conductance and the reversal potential of the channels depend on the Ca~(2+) or Ba~(2+) gradients across the plasma membrane. The inward whole-cell Ca~(2+) (Ba~(2+)) current, as well as the unitary current amplitude and NP. of the single Ca~(2+) channel, increase along with the membrane hyperpolarization. Pharmacological experiments suggest that actin dynamics may serve as an upstream regulator of this type of calcium channel of the guard cell plasma membrane. Cytochalasin D, an actin polymerization blocker, activated the NP_o of these channels at the single channel level and increased the current amplitude at the whole-cell level. But these channel activations and current increments could be restrained by pretreatment with an F-actin stabilizer, phalloidin. The potential physiological significance of this regulatory mechanism is also discussed.

  5. Constant change: dynamic regulation of membrane transport by calcium signalling networks keeps plants in tune with their environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleist, Thomas J; Luan, Sheng

    2016-03-01

    Despite substantial variation and irregularities in their environment, plants must conform to spatiotemporal demands on the molecular composition of their cytosol. Cell membranes are the major interface between organisms and their environment and the basis for controlling the contents and intracellular organization of the cell. Membrane transport proteins (MTPs) govern the flow of molecules across membranes, and their activities are closely monitored and regulated by cell signalling networks. By continuously adjusting MTP activities, plants can mitigate the effects of environmental perturbations, but effective implementation of this strategy is reliant on precise coordination among transport systems that reside in distinct cell types and membranes. Here, we examine the role of calcium signalling in the coordination of membrane transport, with an emphasis on potassium transport. Potassium is an exceptionally abundant and mobile ion in plants, and plant potassium transport has been intensively studied for decades. Classic and recent studies have underscored the importance of calcium in plant environmental responses and membrane transport regulation. In reviewing recent advances in our understanding of the coding and decoding of calcium signals, we highlight established and emerging roles of calcium signalling in coordinating membrane transport among multiple subcellular locations and distinct transport systems in plants, drawing examples from the CBL-CIPK signalling network. By synthesizing classical studies and recent findings, we aim to provide timely insights on the role of calcium signalling networks in the modulation of membrane transport and its importance in plant environmental responses. PMID:26139029

  6. Calcium binding protein-mediated regulation of voltage-gated calcium channels linked to human diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nasrin NFJATBAKHSH; Zhong-ping FENG

    2011-01-01

    Calcium ion entry through voltage-gated calcium channels is essential for cellular signalling in a wide variety of cells and multiple physiological processes. Perturbations of voltage-gated calcium channel function can lead to pathophysiological consequences. Calcium binding proteins serve as calcium sensors and regulate the calcium channel properties via feedback mechanisms. This review highlights the current evidences of calcium binding protein-mediated channel regulation in human diseases.

  7. Stochastic Simulation of Cardiac Ventricular Myocyte Calcium Dynamics and Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Tuan, Hoang-Trong Minh; Williams, George S.B.; Chikando, Aristide C.; Sobie, Eric A.; Lederer, W. Jonathan; Jafri, M. Saleet

    2011-01-01

    A three dimensional model of calcium dynamics in the rat ventricular myocyte was developed to study the mechanism of calcium homeostasis and pathological calcium dynamics during calcium overload. The model contains 20,000 calcium release units (CRUs) each containing 49 ryanodine receptors. The model simulates calcium sparks with a realistic spontaneous calcium spark rate. It suggests that in addition to the calcium spark-based leak, there is an invisible calcium leak caused by the stochastic ...

  8. Understanding calcium dynamics experiments and theory

    CERN Document Server

    Malchow, Dieter

    2003-01-01

    Intracellular Calcium is an important messenger in living cells. Calcium dynamics display complex temporal and spatial structures created by the concentration patterns which are characteristic for a nonlinear system operating far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Written as a set of tutorial reviews on both experimental facts and theoretical modelling, this volume is intended as an introduction and modern reference in the field for graduate students and researchers in biophysics, biochemistry and applied mathematics.

  9. Discrete stochastic modeling of calcium channel dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Baer, M E; Levine, H; Tsimring, L S; Baer, Markus; Falcke, Martin; Levine, Herbert; Tsimring, Lev S.

    1999-01-01

    We propose a simple discrete stochastic model for calcium dynamics in living cells. Specifically, the calcium concentration distribution is assumed to give rise to a set of probabilities for the opening/closing of channels which release calcium thereby changing those probabilities. We study this model in one dimension, analytically in the mean-field limit of large number of channels per site N, and numerically for small N. As the number of channels per site is increased, the transition from a non-propagating region of activity to a propagating one changes in nature from one described by directed percolation to that of deterministic depinning in a spatially discrete system. Also, for a small number of channels a propagating calcium wave can leave behind a novel fluctuation-driven state, in a parameter range where the limiting deterministic model exhibits only single pulse propagation.

  10. Discrete Stochastic Modeling of Calcium Channel Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a discrete stochastic model for calcium dynamics in living cells. A set of probabilities for the opening/closing of calcium channels is assumed to depend on the calcium concentration. We study this model in one dimension, analytically in the limit of a large number of channels per site N , and numerically for small N . As the number of channels per site is increased, the transition from a nonpropagating region of activity to a propagating one changes from one described by directed percolation to that of deterministic depinning in a spatially discrete system. Also, for a small number of channels a propagating calcium wave can leave behind a novel fluctuation-driven state. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  11. Calcium regulates caveolin-1 expression at the transcriptional level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Caveolin-1 expression is regulated by calcium signaling at the transcriptional level. ► An inhibitor of or siRNA to L-type calcium channel suppressed caveolin-1 expression. ► Cyclosporine A or an NFAT inhibitor markedly reduced caveolin-1 expression. ► Caveolin-1 regulation by calcium signaling is observed in several mouse cell lines. -- Abstract: Caveolin-1, an indispensable component of caveolae serving as a transformation suppressor protein, is highly expressed in poorly metastatic mouse osteosarcoma FBJ-S1 cells while highly metastatic FBJ-LL cells express low levels of caveolin-1. Calcium concentration is higher in FBJ-S1 cells than in FBJ-LL cells; therefore, we investigated the possibility that calcium signaling positively regulates caveolin-1 in mouse FBJ-S1 cells. When cells were treated with the calcium channel blocker nifedipine, cyclosporin A (a calcineurin inhibitor), or INCA-6 (a nuclear factor of activated T-cells [NFAT] inhibitor), caveolin-1 expression at the mRNA and protein levels decreased. RNA silencing of voltage-dependent L-type calcium channel subunit alpha-1C resulted in suppression of caveolin-1 expression. This novel caveolin-1 regulation pathway was also identified in mouse NIH 3T3 cells and Lewis lung carcinoma cells. These results indicate that caveolin-1 is positively regulated at the transcriptional level through a novel calcium signaling pathway mediated by L-type calcium channel/Ca2+/calcineurin/NFAT.

  12. The mechanism of hetero-synaptic interaction based on spatiotemporal intracellular calcium dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiki Futagi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent physiological experiments focusing on synaptic plasticity, it is shown that synaptic modifications induced at one synapse are accompanied by hetero-synaptic changes at neighbor sites (Bi, 2002. These evidences imply that the hetero-synaptic interaction plays an important role in reconfiguration of synaptic connections to form and maintain functional neural circuits (Takahashi et al., 2012. Although the mechanism of the interaction is still unclear, some physiological studies suggest that the hetero-synaptic interaction could be caused by propagation of intracellular calcium signals (Nishiyama et al., 2000. Concretely, a spike-triggered calcium increase initiates calcium ion propagation along a dendrite through activation of molecular processes at neighboring sites. Here we hypothesized that the mechanism of the hetero-synaptic interaction was based on the intracellular calcium signaling, which is regulated by interactions between NMDA receptors (NMDARs, voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs and Ryanodine receptors (RyRs on endoplasmic reticulum (ER. To assess realizability of the hypothesized interaction mechanism, we simulated intracellular calcium dynamics at a cellular level, using the computational model that integrated the model of intracellular calcium dynamics (Keizer and Levine, 1996 and the multi-compartment neuron model (Poirazi et al., 2003. Using the proposed computational model, we induced calcium influxes at a local site in postsynaptic dendrite by controlling the spike timings of pre- and postsynaptic neurons. As a result, synchronized calcium influxes through NMDARs and VDCCs caused calcium release from ER. According to the phase plane analysis, RyR-mediated calcium release occurred when the calcium concentration in cytoplasm sufficiently increased under the condition of a high calcium concentration in ER. An NMDAR-mediated calcium influx was slow and persistent, consequently responsible for maintaining a high

  13. Buffer regulation of calcium puff sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puffs are localized Ca2+ signals that arise in oocytes in response to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). They are the result of the liberation of Ca2+ from the endoplasmic reticulum through the coordinated opening of IP3 receptor/channels clustered at a functional release site. The presence of buffers that trap Ca2+ provides a mechanism that enriches the spatio–temporal dynamics of cytosolic calcium. The expression of different types of buffers along the cell's life provides a tool with which Ca2+ signals and their responses can be modulated. In this paper we extend the stochastic model of a cluster of IP3R-Ca2+ channels introduced previously to elucidate the effect of buffers on sequences of puffs at the same release site. We obtain analytically the probability laws of the interpuff time and of the number of channels that participate of the puffs. Furthermore, we show that under typical experimental conditions the effect of buffers can be accounted for in terms of a simple inhibiting function. Hence, by exploring different inhibiting functions we are able to study the effect of a variety of buffers on the puff size and interpuff time distributions. We find the somewhat counter-intuitive result that the addition of a fast Ca2+ buffer can increase the average number of channels that participate of a puff. (paper)

  14. Intracellular calcium ions as regulators of renal tubular sodium transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windhager, E; Frindt, G; Yang, J M; Lee, C O

    1986-09-15

    This review addresses the putative role of intracellular calcium ions in the regulation of sodium transport by renal tubules. Cytoplasmic calcium-ion activities in proximal tubules of Necturus are less than 10(-7) M and can be increased by lowering the electrochemical potential gradient for sodium ions across the peritubular cell membrane, or by addition of quinidine or ionomycin to peritubular fluid. Whereas lowering of the peritubular Na concentration increases cytosolic [Ca++] and [H+], ionomycin, a calcium ionophore, raises intracellular [Ca++] without decreasing pHi. The intracellular calcium-ion level is maintained by transport processes in the plasma membrane and membranes of intracellular organelles, as well as by calcium-binding proteins. Calcium ions inhibit net transport of sodium by reducing the rate of sodium entry across the luminal cell membrane. In the collecting tubule this inhibition is caused, at least in part, by an indirect reduction in the activity of the amiloride-sensitive sodium channel. PMID:2430134

  15. Calcium regulates caveolin-1 expression at the transcriptional level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiao-Yan; Huang, Cheng-Cheng; Kan, Qi-Ming [Laboratory of Tumor Biology and Glycobiology, Department of Life Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016, People' s Republic of China (China); Li, Yan [Experimental Animal Center, Department of Life Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016, People' s Republic of China (China); Liu, Dan; Zhang, Xue-Cheng [Laboratory of Tumor Biology and Glycobiology, Department of Life Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016, People' s Republic of China (China); Sato, Toshinori [Department of Biosciences and Informatics, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Yamagata, Sadako [Laboratory of Tumor Biology and Glycobiology, Department of Life Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016, People' s Republic of China (China); Yamagata, Tatsuya, E-mail: tcyamagata@gmail.com [Laboratory of Tumor Biology and Glycobiology, Department of Life Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016, People' s Republic of China (China)

    2012-09-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Caveolin-1 expression is regulated by calcium signaling at the transcriptional level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An inhibitor of or siRNA to L-type calcium channel suppressed caveolin-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyclosporine A or an NFAT inhibitor markedly reduced caveolin-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Caveolin-1 regulation by calcium signaling is observed in several mouse cell lines. -- Abstract: Caveolin-1, an indispensable component of caveolae serving as a transformation suppressor protein, is highly expressed in poorly metastatic mouse osteosarcoma FBJ-S1 cells while highly metastatic FBJ-LL cells express low levels of caveolin-1. Calcium concentration is higher in FBJ-S1 cells than in FBJ-LL cells; therefore, we investigated the possibility that calcium signaling positively regulates caveolin-1 in mouse FBJ-S1 cells. When cells were treated with the calcium channel blocker nifedipine, cyclosporin A (a calcineurin inhibitor), or INCA-6 (a nuclear factor of activated T-cells [NFAT] inhibitor), caveolin-1 expression at the mRNA and protein levels decreased. RNA silencing of voltage-dependent L-type calcium channel subunit alpha-1C resulted in suppression of caveolin-1 expression. This novel caveolin-1 regulation pathway was also identified in mouse NIH 3T3 cells and Lewis lung carcinoma cells. These results indicate that caveolin-1 is positively regulated at the transcriptional level through a novel calcium signaling pathway mediated by L-type calcium channel/Ca{sup 2+}/calcineurin/NFAT.

  16. The calcium-modulated proteins, S100A1 and S100B, as potential regulators of the dynamics of type III intermediate filaments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Garbuglia

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available The Ca2+-modulated, dimeric proteins of the EF-hand (helix-loop-helix type, S100A1 and S100B, that have been shown to inhibit microtubule (MT protein assembly and to promote MT disassembly, interact with the type III intermediate filament (IF subunits, desmin and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, with a stoichiometry of 2 mol of IF subunit/mol of S100A1 or S100B dimer and an affinity of 0.5-1.0 µM in the presence of a few micromolar concentrations of Ca2+. Binding of S100A1 and S100B results in inhibition of desmin and GFAP assemblies into IFs and stimulation of the disassembly of preformed desmin and GFAP IFs. S100A1 and S100B interact with a stretch of residues in the N-terminal (head domain of desmin and GFAP, thereby blocking the head-to-tail process of IF elongation. The C-terminal extension of S100A1 (and, likely, S100B represents a critical part of the site that recognizes desmin and GFAP. S100B is localized to IFs within cells, suggesting that it might have a role in remodeling IFs upon elevation of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration by avoiding excess IF assembly and/or promoting IF disassembly in vivo. S100A1, that is not localized to IFs, might also play a role in the regulation of IF dynamics by binding to and sequestering unassembled IF subunits. Together, these observations suggest that S100A1 and S100B may be regarded as Ca2+-dependent regulators of the state of assembly of two important elements of the cytoskeleton, IFs and MTs, and, potentially, of MT- and IF-based activities.

  17. Concurrent Imaging of Synaptic Vesicle Recycling and Calcium Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Haiyan; Foss, Sarah M.; Dobryy, Yuriy L.; Park, C. Kevin; Hires, Samuel Andrew; Shaner, Nathan C.; Tsien, Roger Y.; Osborne, Leslie C.; Voglmaier, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Synaptic transmission involves the calcium dependent release of neurotransmitter from synaptic vesicles. Genetically encoded optical probes emitting different wavelengths of fluorescent light in response to neuronal activity offer a powerful approach to understand the spatial and temporal relationship of calcium dynamics to the release of neurotransmitter in defined neuronal populations. To simultaneously image synaptic vesicle recycling and changes in cytosolic calcium, we developed a red-sh...

  18. Concurrent imaging of synaptic vesicle recycling and calcium dynamics.

    OpenAIRE

    Haiyan eLi; Foss, Sarah M.; Yuriy eDobryy; C. Kevin ePark; Samuel Andrew Hires; Shaner, Nathan C.; Tsien, Roger Y.; Osborne, Leslie C.; Voglmaier, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Synaptic transmission involves the calcium-dependent release of neurotransmitter from synaptic vesicles. Genetically encoded optical probes emitting different wavelengths of fluorescent light in response to neuronal activity offer a powerful approach to understand the spatial and temporal relationship of calcium dynamics to the release of neurotransmitter in defined neuronal populations. To simultaneously image synaptic vesicle recycling and changes in cytosolic calcium, we developed a red-...

  19. Membrane associated complexes in calcium dynamics modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitochondria not only govern energy production, but are also involved in crucial cellular signalling processes. They are one of the most important organelles determining the Ca2+ regulatory pathway in the cell. Several mathematical models explaining these mechanisms were constructed, but only few of them describe interplay between calcium concentrations in endoplasmic reticulum (ER), cytoplasm and mitochondria. Experiments measuring calcium concentrations in mitochondria and ER suggested the existence of cytosolic microdomains with locally elevated calcium concentration in the nearest vicinity of the outer mitochondrial membrane. These intermediate physical connections between ER and mitochondria are called MAM (mitochondria-associated ER membrane) complexes. We propose a model with a direct calcium flow from ER to mitochondria, which may be justified by the existence of MAMs, and perform detailed numerical analysis of the effect of this flow on the type and shape of calcium oscillations. The model is partially based on the Marhl et al model. We have numerically found that the stable oscillations exist for a considerable set of parameter values. However, for some parameter sets the oscillations disappear and the trajectories of the model tend to a steady state with very high calcium level in mitochondria. This can be interpreted as an early step in an apoptotic pathway. (paper)

  20. Nitrogen enrichment regulates calcium sources in forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynicka, Justin D.; Pett-Ridge, Julie C; Perakis, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is a key nutrient that shapes cycles of other essential elements in forests, including calcium (Ca). When N availability exceeds ecosystem demands, excess N can stimulate Ca leaching and deplete Ca from soils. Over the long term, these processes may alter the proportion of available Ca that is derived from atmospheric deposition vs. bedrock weathering, which has fundamental consequences for ecosystem properties and nutrient supply. We evaluated how landscape variation in soil N, reflecting long-term legacies of biological N fixation, influenced plant and soil Ca availability and ecosystem Ca sources across 22 temperate forests in Oregon. We also examined interactions between soil N and bedrock Ca using soil N gradients on contrasting basaltic vs. sedimentary bedrock that differed 17-fold in underlying Ca content. We found that low-N forests on Ca-rich basaltic bedrock relied strongly on Ca from weathering, but that soil N enrichment depleted readily weatherable mineral Ca and shifted forest reliance toward atmospheric Ca. Forests on Ca-poor sedimentary bedrock relied more consistently on atmospheric Ca across all levels of soil N enrichment. The broad importance of atmospheric Ca was unexpected given active regional uplift and erosion that are thought to rejuvenate weathering supply of soil minerals. Despite different Ca sources to forests on basaltic vs. sedimentary bedrock, we observed consistent declines in plant and soil Ca availability with increasing N, regardless of the Ca content of underlying bedrock. Thus, traditional measures of Ca availability in foliage and soil exchangeable pools may poorly reflect long-term Ca sources that sustain soil fertility. We conclude that long-term soil N enrichment can deplete available Ca and cause forests to rely increasingly on Ca from atmospheric deposition, which may limit ecosystem Ca supply in an increasingly N-rich world.

  1. Concurrent imaging of synaptic vesicle recycling and calcium dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan eLi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic transmission involves the calcium-dependent release of neurotransmitter from synaptic vesicles. Genetically encoded optical probes emitting different wavelengths of fluorescent light in response to neuronal activity offer a powerful approach to understand the spatial and temporal relationship of calcium dynamics to the release of neurotransmitter in defined neuronal populations. To simultaneously image synaptic vesicle recycling and changes in cytosolic calcium, we developed a red-shifted reporter of vesicle recycling based on a vesicular glutamate transporter, VGLUT1-mOrange2 (VGLUT1-mOr2, and a presynaptically-localized green calcium indicator, synaptophysin-GCaMP3 (SyGCaMP3 with a large dynamic range. The fluorescence of VGLUT1-mOr2 is quenched by the low pH of synaptic vesicles. Exocytosis upon electrical stimulation exposes the luminal mOr2 to the neutral extracellular pH and relieves fluorescence quenching. Re-acidification of the vesicle upon endocytosis again reduces fluorescence intensity. Changes in fluorescence intensity thus monitor synaptic vesicle exo- and endocytosis, as demonstrated previously for the green VGLUT1-pHluorin. To monitor changes in calcium, we fused the synaptic vesicle protein synaptophysin to the recently improved calcium indicator GCaMP3. SyGCaMP3 is targeted to presynaptic varicosities, and exhibits changes in fluorescence in response to electrical stimulation consistent with changes in calcium concentration. Using real-time imaging of both reporters expressed in the same synapses, we determine the time course of changes in VGLUT1 recycling in relation to changes in presynaptic calcium concentration. Inhibition of P/Q- and N-type calcium channels reduces calcium levels, as well as the rate of synaptic vesicle exocytosis and the fraction of vesicles released.

  2. Concurrent Imaging of Synaptic Vesicle Recycling and Calcium Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiyan; Foss, Sarah M.; Dobryy, Yuriy L.; Park, C. Kevin; Hires, Samuel Andrew; Shaner, Nathan C.; Tsien, Roger Y.; Osborne, Leslie C.; Voglmaier, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Synaptic transmission involves the calcium dependent release of neurotransmitter from synaptic vesicles. Genetically encoded optical probes emitting different wavelengths of fluorescent light in response to neuronal activity offer a powerful approach to understand the spatial and temporal relationship of calcium dynamics to the release of neurotransmitter in defined neuronal populations. To simultaneously image synaptic vesicle recycling and changes in cytosolic calcium, we developed a red-shifted reporter of vesicle recycling based on a vesicular glutamate transporter, VGLUT1-mOrange2 (VGLUT1-mOr2), and a presynaptically localized green calcium indicator, synaptophysin-GCaMP3 (SyGCaMP3) with a large dynamic range. The fluorescence of VGLUT1-mOr2 is quenched by the low pH of synaptic vesicles. Exocytosis upon electrical stimulation exposes the luminal mOr2 to the neutral extracellular pH and relieves fluorescence quenching. Reacidification of the vesicle upon endocytosis again reduces fluorescence intensity. Changes in fluorescence intensity thus monitor synaptic vesicle exo- and endocytosis, as demonstrated previously for the green VGLUT1-pHluorin. To monitor changes in calcium, we fused the synaptic vesicle protein synaptophysin to the recently improved calcium indicator GCaMP3. SyGCaMP3 is targeted to presynaptic varicosities, and exhibits changes in fluorescence in response to electrical stimulation consistent with changes in calcium concentration. Using real time imaging of both reporters expressed in the same synapses, we determine the time course of changes in VGLUT1 recycling in relation to changes in presynaptic calcium concentration. Inhibition of P/Q- and N-type calcium channels reduces calcium levels, as well as the rate of synaptic vesicle exocytosis and the fraction of vesicles released. PMID:22065946

  3. Regulation of PKC mediated signaling by calcium during visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Nivedita; Chakraborty, Supriya; Paul Chowdhury, Bidisha; Banerjee, Sayantan; Halder, Kuntal; Majumder, Saikat; Majumdar, Subrata; Sen, Parimal C

    2014-01-01

    Calcium is an ubiquitous cellular signaling molecule that controls a variety of cellular processes and is strictly maintained in the cellular compartments by the coordination of various Ca2+ pumps and channels. Two such fundamental calcium pumps are plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) and Sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) which play a pivotal role in maintaining intracellular calcium homeostasis. This intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis is often disturbed by the protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani, the causative organism of visceral leishmaniasis. In the present study we have dileneated the involvement of PMCA4 and SERCA3 during leishmaniasis. We have observed that during leishmaniasis, intracellular Ca2+ concentration was up-regulated and was further controlled by both PMCA4 and SERCA3. Inhibition of these two Ca2+-ATPases resulted in decreased parasite burden within the host macrophages due to enhanced intracellular Ca2+. Contrastingly, on the other hand, activation of PMCA4 was found to enhance the parasite burden. Our findings also highlighted the importance of Ca2+ in the modulation of cytokine balance during leishmaniasis. These results thus cumulatively suggests that these two Ca2+-ATPases play prominent roles during visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:25329062

  4. Regulation of PKC mediated signaling by calcium during visceral leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nivedita Roy

    Full Text Available Calcium is an ubiquitous cellular signaling molecule that controls a variety of cellular processes and is strictly maintained in the cellular compartments by the coordination of various Ca2+ pumps and channels. Two such fundamental calcium pumps are plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA and Sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA which play a pivotal role in maintaining intracellular calcium homeostasis. This intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis is often disturbed by the protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani, the causative organism of visceral leishmaniasis. In the present study we have dileneated the involvement of PMCA4 and SERCA3 during leishmaniasis. We have observed that during leishmaniasis, intracellular Ca2+ concentration was up-regulated and was further controlled by both PMCA4 and SERCA3. Inhibition of these two Ca2+-ATPases resulted in decreased parasite burden within the host macrophages due to enhanced intracellular Ca2+. Contrastingly, on the other hand, activation of PMCA4 was found to enhance the parasite burden. Our findings also highlighted the importance of Ca2+ in the modulation of cytokine balance during leishmaniasis. These results thus cumulatively suggests that these two Ca2+-ATPases play prominent roles during visceral leishmaniasis.

  5. Dynamic response of porous calcium carbonate minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A theoretical study of the shock-loaded response of calcium carbonate materials is presented in which both dry and water-saturated samples with porosities up to 50 percent are considered. Data are presented for the unloading response from 15.0 and 18.5 GPa, and calculations from a mixture model using a Mie-Grueneisen equation of state with volume-dependent parameters are compared to both the Hugoniot and the isentropic unloading response

  6. Calcium-sensing receptor regulates stomatal closure through hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide in response to extracellular calcium in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wen-Hua; Yi, Xiao-Qian; Han, Ai-Dong; Liu, Ting-Wu; Chen, Juan; Wu, Fei-Hua; Dong, Xue-Jun; He, Jun-Xian; Pei, Zhen-Ming; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2011-01-01

    The Arabidopsis calcium-sensing receptor CAS is a crucial regulator of extracellular calcium-induced stomatal closure. Free cytosolic Ca2+ (Ca2+ i) increases in response to a high extracellular calcium (Ca2+ o) level through a CAS signalling pathway and finally leads to stomatal closure. Multidisciplinary approaches including histochemical, pharmacological, fluorescent, electrochemical, and molecular biological methods were used to discuss the relationship of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitr...

  7. TRPV4 and AQP4 Channels Synergistically Regulate Cell Volume and Calcium Homeostasis in Retinal Müller Glia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jo, Andrew O; Ryskamp, Daniel A; Phuong, Tam T T;

    2015-01-01

    facilitates the time course and amplitude of hypotonicity-induced swelling and regulatory volume decrease. We confirm the crucial facets of the signaling mechanism in heterologously expressing oocytes. These results identify the molecular mechanism that contributes to dynamic regulation of glial volume but...... Ca(2+) entry through TRPV4 channels reciprocally modulates volume regulation, swelling, and Aqp4 gene expression. Therefore, TRPV4-AQP4 interactions constitute a molecular system that fine-tunes astroglial volume regulation by integrating osmosensing, calcium signaling, and water transport and, when...... complex set of mechanisms involving reciprocal interactions at the level of glial gene expression, calcium homeostasis, swelling, and volume regulation. Specifically, water influx through AQP4 drives calcium influx via TRPV4 in the glial end foot, which regulates expression of Aqp4 and Kir4.1 genes and...

  8. Monitoring the intracellular calcium response to a dynamic hypertonic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaowen; Yue, Wanqing; Liu, Dandan; Yue, Jianbo; Li, Jiaqian; Sun, Dong; Yang, Mengsu; Wang, Zuankai

    2016-03-01

    The profiling of physiological response of cells to external stimuli at the single cell level is of importance. Traditional approaches to study cell responses are often limited by ensemble measurement, which is challenging to reveal the complex single cell behaviors under a dynamic environment. Here we report the development of a simple microfluidic device to investigate intracellular calcium response to dynamic hypertonic conditions at the single cell level in real-time. Interestingly, a dramatic elevation in the intracellular calcium signaling is found in both suspension cells (human leukemic cell line, HL-60) and adherent cells (lung cancer cell line, A549), which is ascribed to the exposure of cells to the hydrodynamic stress. We also demonstrate that the calcium response exhibits distinct single cell heterogeneity as well as cell-type-dependent responses to the same stimuli. Our study opens up a new tool for tracking cellular activity at the single cell level in real time for high throughput drug screening.

  9. Reciprocal regulation of reactive oxygen species and phospho-CREB regulates voltage gated calcium channel expression during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arti Selvakumar

    Full Text Available Our previous work has demonstrated the roles played by L-type Voltage Gated Calcium Channels (VGCC in regulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb survival and pathogenesis. Here we decipher mechanisms and pathways engaged by the pathogen to regulate VGCC expression in macrophages. We show that M. tb and its antigen Rv3416 use phospho-CREB (pCREB, Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS, Protein Kinase C (PKC and Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK to modulate VGCC expression in macrophages. siRNA mediated knockdown of MyD88, IRAK1, IRAK2 or TRAF6 significantly inhibited antigen mediated VGCC expression. Inhibiting Protein Kinase C (PKC or MEK-ERK1/2 further increased VGCC expression. Interestingly, inhibiting intracellular calcium release upregulated antigen mediated VGCC expression, while inhibiting extracellular calcium influx had no significant effect. siRNA mediated knockdown of transcription factors c-Jun, SOX5 and CREB significantly inhibited Rv3416 mediated VGCC expression. A dynamic reciprocal cross-regulation between ROS and pCREB was observed that in turn governed VGCC expression with ROS playing a limiting role in the process. Further dissection of the mechanisms such as the interplay between ROS and pCREB would improve our understanding of the regulation of VGCC expression during M. tb infection.

  10. Sodium/Calcium Exchangers Selectively Regulate Calcium Signaling in Mouse Taste Receptor Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Szebenyi, Steven A.; Laskowski, Agnieszka I.; Medler, Kathryn F.

    2010-01-01

    Taste cells use multiple signaling mechanisms to generate appropriate cellular responses to discrete taste stimuli. Some taste stimuli activate G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that cause calcium release from intracellular stores while other stimuli depolarize taste cells to cause calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). While the signaling mechanisms that initiate calcium signals have been described in taste cells, the calcium clearance mechanisms (CCMs) that contrib...

  11. Regulation of Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent Kinase IV by O-GlcNAc Modification*

    OpenAIRE

    Dias, Wagner B.; Cheung, Win D.; Wang, Zihao; Hart, Gerald W.

    2009-01-01

    Similar to phosphorylation, GlcNAcylation (the addition of O-GlcNAc to Ser(Thr) residues on polypeptides) is an abundant, dynamic, and inducible post-translational modification. GlcNAcylated proteins are crucial in regulating virtually all cellular processes, including signaling, cell cycle, and transcription. Here we show that calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase IV (CaMKIV) is highly GlcNAcylated in vivo. In addition, we show that upon activation of HEK293 cells, hemagglutinin-tagged CaMKIV ...

  12. Calcium and cargoes as regulators of myosin 5a activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myosin 5a is a two-headed actin-dependent motor that transports various cargoes in cells. Its enzymology and mechanochemistry have been extensively studied in vitro. It is a processive motor that takes multiple 36 nm steps on actin. The enzymatic activity of myosin 5 is regulated by an intramolecular folding mechanism whereby its lever arms fold back against the coiled-coil tail such that the motor domains directly bind the globular tail domains. We show that the structure seen in individual folded molecules is consistent with electron density map of two-dimensional crystals of the molecule. In this compact state, the actin-activated MgATPase activity of the molecule is markedly inhibited and the molecule cannot move processively on surface bound actin filaments. The actin-activated MgATPase activity of myosin 5a is activated by increasing the calcium concentration or by binding of a cargo-receptor molecule, melanophilin, in vitro. However, calcium binding to the calmodulin light chains results in dissociation of some of the calmodulin which disrupts the ability of myosin 5a to move on actin filaments in vitro. Thus we propose that the physiologically relevant activation pathway in vivo involves binding of cargo-receptor proteins

  13. A quantitative model for presynaptic free calcium dynamics during the induction of long-term effects

    CERN Document Server

    Erler, F; Soff, G; Erler, Frido; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Soff, Gerhard

    2002-01-01

    The presynaptic free calcium dynamics of neurons due to various stimulation protocols is investigated in a mathematical model. Especially, connections between free calcium dynamics and the induction of synaptic long-term effects are considered. The model includes calcium influx through voltage-directed calcium channels, calcium buffering by endogenous and exogenous buffers as well as calcium efflux through ATP-driven plasma membrane calcium pumps and sodium/calcium exchangers. A classification of parameters into universal (widely independent of neuron types) and specific ones (depending on neuron type and experimental setup) allows the applications of the model to different classes of neurons and experiments. This is demonstrated for single boutons of pyramidal neurons of the rat neocortex. The model parameters are determined using corresponding fluorescence measurements. The model enables us to reconstruct the free calcium dynamics in neurons as it would have been without fluorescence indicators starting fro...

  14. Physiology and Regulation of Calcium Channels in Stomatal Guard Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Julian I.

    2007-05-02

    Stomatal pores in the epidermis of leaves regulate the diffusion of CO2 into leaves for photosynthetic carbon fixation and control water loss of plants during drought periods. Guard cells sense CO2, water status, light and other environmental conditions to regulate stomatal apertures for optimization of CO2 intake and plant growth under drought stress. The cytosolic second messenger calcium contributes to stomatal movements by transducing signals and regulating ion channels in guard cells. Studies suggest that both plasma membrane Ca2+ influx channels and vacuolar/organellar Ca2+ release channels contribute to ABA-induced Ca2+ elevations in guard cells. Recent research in the P.I.'s laboratory has led to identification of a novel major cation-selective Ca2+-permeable influx channel (Ica) in the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis guard cells. These advances will allow detailed characterization of Ica plasma membrane Ca2+ influx channels in guard cells. The long term goal of this research project is to gain a first detailed characterization of these novel plasma membrane Ca2+-permeable channel currents in Arabidopsis guard cells. The proposed research will investigate the hypothesis that Ica represents an important Ca2+ influx pathway for ABA and CO2 signal transduction in Arabidopsis guard cells. These studies will lead to elucidation of key signal transduction mechanisms by which plants balance CO2 influx into leaves and transpirational water loss and may contribute to future strategies for manipulating gas exchange for improved growth of crop plants and for biomass production.

  15. A mathematical model of T lymphocyte calcium dynamics derived from single transmembrane protein properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Dorothee Schmeitz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Fate decision processes of T lymphocytes are crucial for health and disease. Whether a T lymphocyte is activated, divides, gets anergic or initiates apoptosis depends on extracellular triggers and intracellular signalling. Free cytosolic calcium dynamics plays an important role in this context. The relative contributions of store-derived calcium entry and calcium entry from extracellular space to T lymphocyte activation are still a matter of debate. Here we develop a quantitative mathematical model of T lymphocyte calcium dynamics in order to establish a tool which allows to disentangle cause-effect relationships between ion fluxes and observed calcium time courses. The model is based on single transmembrane protein characteristics which have been determined in independent experiments. This reduces the number of unknown parameters in the model to a minimum and ensures the predictive power of the model. Simulation results are subsequently used for an analysis of whole cell calcium dynamics measured under various experimental conditions. The model accounts for a variety of these conditions, which supports the suitability of the modelling approach. The simulation results suggest a model in which calcium dynamics dominantly relies on the opening of channels in calcium stores while calcium entry through calcium-release activated channels (CRAC is more associated with the maintenance of the T lymphocyte calcium levels and prevents the cell from calcium depletion. Our findings indicate that CRAC guarantees a long-term stable calcium level which is required for cell survival and sustained calcium enhancement.

  16. Regulation of intracellular calcium in resting and stimulated rat basophilic leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intracellular calcium regulation was studied in a cell line of mast cells, the rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cells with the purpose of determining (1) The properties of the plasma membrane calcium permeability pathway and (2) The role of intracellular calcium stores. The first set of experiments showed that depolarization did not induce calcium entry or secretion in resting cells and did inhibit antigen-stimulated calcium uptake and secretion. In the second set of experiments the ionic basis of antigen-induced depolarization was studied using the fluorescent potential-sensitive probe bis-oxonol. The properties of the calcium entry pathway were more consistent with a calcium channel than a calcium transport mechanism such as Na:Ca exchange. The third set of experiments examined the effects of the proton ionophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) on RBL cells. CCCP inhibited antigen-stimulated 45Ca uptake and secretion by depolarizing the plasma membrane

  17. Regulation of microtubule dynamic instability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. van der Vaart (Babet); A.S. Akhmanova (Anna); A. Straube (Anne)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractProper regulation of MT (microtubule) dynamics is essential for various vital processes, including the segregation of chromosomes, directional cell migration and differentiation. MT assembly and disassembly is modulated by a complex network of intracellular factors that co-operate or ant

  18. Spatiotemporal dynamics of calcium-driven cardiac alternans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skardal, Per Sebastian; Karma, Alain; Restrepo, Juan G.

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the dynamics of spatially discordant alternans (SDA) driven by an instability of intracellular calcium cycling using both amplitude equations [P. S. Skardal, A. Karma, and J. G. Restrepo, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 108103 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.108103] and ionic model simulations. We focus on the common case where the bidirectional coupling of intracellular calcium concentration and membrane voltage dynamics produces calcium and voltage alternans that are temporally in phase. We find that, close to the alternans bifurcation, SDA is manifested as a smooth wavy modulation of the amplitudes of both repolarization and calcium transient (CaT) alternans, similarly to the well-studied case of voltage-driven alternans. In contrast, further away from the bifurcation, the amplitude of CaT alternans jumps discontinuously at the nodes separating out-of-phase regions, while the amplitude of repolarization alternans remains smooth. We identify universal dynamical features of SDA pattern formation and evolution in the presence of those jumps. We show that node motion of discontinuous SDA patterns is strongly hysteretic even in homogeneous tissue due to the novel phenomenon of "unidirectional pinning": node movement can only be induced towards, but not away from, the pacing site in response to a change of pacing rate or physiological parameter. In addition, we show that the wavelength of discontinuous SDA patterns scales linearly with the conduction velocity restitution length scale, in contrast to the wavelength of smooth patterns that scales sublinearly with this length scale. Those results are also shown to be robust against cell-to-cell fluctuations due to the property that unidirectional node motion collapses multiple jumps accumulating in nodal regions into a single jump. Amplitude equation predictions are in good overall agreement with ionic model simulations. Finally, we briefly discuss physiological implications of our findings. In particular, we

  19. Raloxifene neutralizes the adverse effects of glutamate on cultured neurons by regulation of calcium oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiangyu; Yang, Zhendong; Han, Li; Li, Xiaoyong; Feng, Meina; Zhang, Teng; Luo, Hongbin; Zhu, Liping; Zhang, Jiwei; Zhang, Qi; Hu, Qinghua

    2015-10-01

    Calcium dyshomeostasis is an important pathology of memory impairment. However, the mechanism of how calcium dyshomeostasis impairs neurons has remained elusive. The aim of the present study was to reveal the influence of calcium dyshomeostasis on the expression of calcium memory‑associated proteins and the ability of raloxifene to neutralize the adverse effects of glutamate on cultured neurons by regulation of calcium oscillations. After neurons were treated with various concentrations of glutamate alone or with raloxifene, the expression of calcium memory‑associated proteins and the influence on calcium dyshomeostasis was assessed. The results indicated that glutamate regulated calcium oscillation waves and expression of calcium memory‑associated protein in a concentration‑dependent manner. Raloxifene increased the expression of these proteins as well as neuronal survival. It is therefore concluded that glutamate regulated calcium oscillations in a dose‑dependent manner, while raloxifene protected neurons from destruction through glutamate exposure and at the same time neutralized the decrease in expression of the memory‑associated proteins. PMID:26252350

  20. The role of uncoupling protein 3 regulating calcium ion uptake into mitochondria during sarcopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikawa, Takeshi; Choi, Inho; Haruna, Marie; Hirasaka, Katsuya; Maita Ohno, Ayako; Kondo Teshima, Shigetada

    Overloaded mitochondrial calcium concentration contributes to progression of mitochondrial dysfunction in aged muscle, leading to sarcopenia. Uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) is primarily expressed in the inner membrane of skeletal muscle mitochondria. Recently, it has been reported that UCP3 is associated with calcium uptake into mitochondria. However, the mechanisms by which UCP3 regulates mitochondrial calcium uptake are not well understood. Here we report that UCP3 interacts with HS-1 associated protein X-1 (Hax-1), an anti-apoptotic protein that is localized in mitochondria, which is involved in cellular responses to calcium ion. The hydrophilic sequences within the loop 2, matrix-localized hydrophilic domain of mouse UCP3 are necessary for binding to Hax-1 of the C-terminal domain in adjacent to mitochondrial innermembrane. Interestingly, these proteins interaction occur the calcium-dependent manner. Indeed, overexpression of UCP3 significantly enhanced calcium uptake into mitochondria on Hax-1 endogenously expressing C2C12 myoblasts. In addition, Hax-1 knock-down enhanced calcium uptake into mitochondria on both UCP3 and Hax-1 endogenously expressing C2C12 myotubes, but not myoblasts. Finally, the dissociation of UCP3 and Hax-1 enhances calcium uptake into mitochondria in aged muscle. These studies identify a novel UCP3-Hax-1 complex regulates the influx of calcium ion into mitochondria in muscle. Thus, the efficacy of UCP3-Hax-1 in mitochondrial calcium regulation may provide a novel therapeutic approach against mitochondrial dysfunction-related disease containing sarcopenia.

  1. Osteoclast cytosolic calcium, regulated by voltage-gated calcium channels and extracellular calcium, controls podosome assembly and bone resorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyauchi, A.; Hruska, K. A.; Greenfield, E. M.; Duncan, R.; Alvarez, J.; Barattolo, R.; Colucci, S.; Zambonin-Zallone, A.; Teitelbaum, S. L.; Teti, A.

    1990-01-01

    The mechanisms of Ca2+ entry and their effects on cell function were investigated in cultured chicken osteoclasts and putative osteoclasts produced by fusion of mononuclear cell precursors. Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCC) were detected by the effects of membrane depolarization with K+, BAY K 8644, and dihydropyridine antagonists. K+ produced dose-dependent increases of cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]i) in osteoclasts on glass coverslips. Half-maximal effects were achieved at 70 mM K+. The effects of K+ were completely inhibited by dihydropyridine derivative Ca2+ channel blocking agents. BAY K 8644 (5 X 10(-6) M), a VGCC agonist, stimulated Ca2+ entry which was inhibited by nicardipine. VGCCs were inactivated by the attachment of osteoclasts to bone, indicating a rapid phenotypic change in Ca2+ entry mechanisms associated with adhesion of osteoclasts to their resorption substrate. Increasing extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]e) induced Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and Ca2+ influx. The Ca2+ release was blocked by dantrolene (10(-5) M), and the influx by La3+. The effects of [Ca2+]e on [Ca2+]i suggests the presence of a Ca2+ receptor on the osteoclast cell membrane that could be coupled to mechanisms regulating cell function. Expression of the [Ca2+]e effect on [Ca2+]i was similar in the presence or absence of bone matrix substrate. Each of the mechanisms producing increases in [Ca2+]i, (membrane depolarization, BAY K 8644, and [Ca2+]e) reduced expression of the osteoclast-specific adhesion structure, the podosome. The decrease in podosome expression was mirrored by a 50% decrease in bone resorptive activity. Thus, stimulated increases of osteoclast [Ca2+]i lead to cytoskeletal changes affecting cell adhesion and decreasing bone resorptive activity.

  2. Paclitaxel Induces Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells through Different Calcium—Regulating Mechanisms Depending on External Calcium Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Pan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we reported that endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores were a direct target for paclitaxel initiation of apoptosis. Furthermore, the actions of paclitaxel attenuated Bcl-2 resistance to apoptosis through endoplasmic reticulum-mediated calcium release. To better understand the calcium-regulated mechanisms of paclitaxel-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells, we investigated the role of extracellular calcium, specifically; whether influx of extracellular calcium contributed to and/or was necessary for paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. Our results demonstrated that paclitaxel induced extracellular calcium influx. This mobilization of extracellular calcium contributed to subsequent cytosolic calcium elevation differently, depending on dosage. Under normal extracellular calcium conditions, high dose paclitaxel induced apoptosis-promoting calcium influx, which did not occur in calcium-free conditions. In the absence of extracellular calcium an “Enhanced Calcium Efflux” mechanism in which high dose paclitaxel stimulated calcium efflux immediately, leading to dramatic cytosolic calcium decrease, was observed. In the absence of extracellular calcium, high dose paclitaxel’s stimulatory effects on capacitative calcium entry and apoptosis could not be completely restored. Thus, normal extracellular calcium concentrations are critical for high dose paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. In contrast, low dose paclitaxel mirrored controls, indicating that it occurs independent of extracellular calcium. Thus, extracellular calcium conditions only affect efficacy of high dose paclitaxel-induced apoptosis.

  3. Connexins regulate calcium signaling by controlling ATP release

    OpenAIRE

    Cotrina, Maria Luisa; Lin, Jane H.-C.; Alves-Rodrigues, Alexandra; Liu, Shujun; Li, Jiang; Azmi-Ghadimi, Hooman; Kang, Jian; Naus, Christian C.G.; Nedergaard, Maiken

    1998-01-01

    Forced expression of gap junction proteins, connexins, enables gap junction-deficient cell lines to propagate intercellular calcium waves. Here, we show that ATP secretion from the poorly coupled cell lines, C6 glioma, HeLa, and U373 glioblastoma, is potentiated 5- to 15-fold by connexin expression. ATP release required purinergic receptor-activated intracellular Ca2+ mobilization and was inhibited by Cl− channel blockers. Calcium wave propagation also was reduced by purinergic receptor antag...

  4. Regulation of Arterial Tone by Activation of Calcium-Dependent Potassium Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brayden, Joseph E.; Nelson, Mark T.

    1992-04-01

    Blood pressure and tissue perfusion are controlled in part by the level of intrinsic (myogenic) vascular tone. However, many of the molecular determinants of this response are unknown. Evidence is now presented that the degree of myogenic tone is regulated in part by the activation of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in arterial smooth muscle. Tetraethylammonium ion (TEA^+) and charybdotoxin (CTX), at concentrations that block calcium-activated potassium channels in smooth muscle cells isolated from cerebral arteries, depolarized and constricted pressurized cerebral arteries with myogenic tone. Both TEA^+ and CTX had little effect on arteries when intracellular calcium was reduced by lowering intravascular pressure or by blocking calcium channels. Elevation of intravascular pressure through membrane depolarization and an increase in intracellular calcium may activate calcium-activated potassium channels. Thus, these channels may serve as a negative feedback pathway to control the degree of membrane depolarization and vasoconstriction.

  5. Regulating Intracellular Calcium in Plants: From Molecular Genetics to Physiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heven Sze

    2008-06-22

    To grow, develop, adapt, and reproduce, plants have evolved mechanisms to regulate the uptake, translocation and sorting of calcium ions into different cells and subcellular compartments. Yet how plants accomplish this remarkable feat is still poorly understood. The spatial and temporal changes in intracellular [Ca2+] during growth and during responses to hormonal and environmental stimuli indicate that Ca2+ influx and efflux transporters are diverse and tightly regulated in plants. The specific goals were to determine the biological roles of multiple Ca pumps (ECAs) in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We had pioneered the use of K616 yeast strain to functionally express plant Ca pumps, and demonstrated two distinct types of Ca pumps in plants (Sze et al., 2000. Annu Rev Plant Biol. 51,433). ACA2 represented one type that was auto-inhibited by the N-terminal region and stimulated by calmodulin. ECA1 represented another type that was not sensitive to calmodulin and phylogenetically distinct from ACAs. The goal to determine the biological roles of multiple ECA-type Ca pumps in Arabidopsis has been accomplished. Although we demonstrated ECA1 was a Ca pump by functional expression in yeast, the in vivo roles of ECAs was unclear. A few highlights are described. ECA1 and/or ECA4 are Ca/Mn pumps localized to the ER and are highly expressed in all cell types. Using homozygous T-DNA insertional mutants of eca1, we demonstrated that the ER-bound ECA1 supports growth and confers tolerance of plants growing on medium low in Ca or containing toxic levels of Mn. This is the first genetic study to determine the in vivo function of a Ca pump in plants. A phylogenetically distinct ECA3 is also a Ca/Mn pump that is localized to endosome, such as post-Golgi compartments. Although it is expressed at lower levels than ECA1, eca3 mutants are impaired in Ca-dependent root growth and in pollen tube elongation. Increased secretion of wall proteins in mutants suggests that Ca and Mn

  6. Regulating Intracellular Calcium in Plants: From Molecular Genetics to Physiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To grow, develop, adapt, and reproduce, plants have evolved mechanisms to regulate the uptake, translocation and sorting of calcium ions into different cells and subcellular compartments. Yet how plants accomplish this remarkable feat is still poorly understood. The spatial and temporal changes in intracellular (Ca2+) during growth and during responses to hormonal and environmental stimuli indicate that Ca2+ influx and efflux transporters are diverse and tightly regulated in plants. The specific goals were to determine the biological roles of multiple Ca pumps (ECAs) in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We had pioneered the use of K616 yeast strain to functionally express plant Ca pumps, and demonstrated two distinct types of Ca pumps in plants (Sze et al., 2000. Annu Rev Plant Biol. 51,433). ACA2 represented one type that was auto-inhibited by the N-terminal region and stimulated by calmodulin. ECA1 represented another type that was not sensitive to calmodulin and phylogenetically distinct from ACAs. The goal to determine the biological roles of multiple ECA-type Ca pumps in Arabidopsis has been accomplished. Although we demonstrated ECA1 was a Ca pump by functional expression in yeast, the in vivo roles of ECAs was unclear. A few highlights are described. ECA1 and/or ECA4 are Ca/Mn pumps localized to the ER and are highly expressed in all cell types. Using homozygous T-DNA insertional mutants of eca1, we demonstrated that the ER-bound ECA1 supports growth and confers tolerance of plants growing on medium low in Ca or containing toxic levels of Mn. This is the first genetic study to determine the in vivo function of a Ca pump in plants. A phylogenetically distinct ECA3 is also a Ca/Mn pump that is localized to endosome, such as post-Golgi compartments. Although it is expressed at lower levels than ECA1, eca3 mutants are impaired in Ca-dependent root growth and in pollen tube elongation. Increased secretion of wall proteins in mutants suggests that Ca and Mn

  7. Regulation of Differentiation by Calcium-Sensing Receptor in Normal and Tumoral Developing Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo-Lozano, Silvia; García, Marta; Rodríguez-Hernández, Carlos J.; de Torres, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    During normal development of the nervous system (NS), neural progenitor cells (NPCs) produce specialized populations of neurons and glial cells upon cell fate restriction and terminal differentiation. These sequential processes require the dynamic regulation of thousands of genes. The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is temporally and spatially regulated in both neurons and glial cells during development of the NS. In particular, CaSR expression and function have been shown to play a significant role during differentiation of NPCs toward the oligodendrocyte lineage and also in maturation of cerebellar granule cell precursors (GCPs). Moreover, CaSR regulates axonal and dendritic growth in both central and peripheral nervous systems (PNSs), a process necessary for proper construction of mature neuronal networks. On the other hand, several lines of evidence support a role for CaSR in promotion of cell differentiation and inhibition of proliferation in neuroblastoma, a tumor arising from precursor cells of developing PNS. Thus, among the variety of NS functions in which the CaSR participates, this mini-review focuses on its role in differentiation of normal and tumoral cells. Current knowledge of the mechanisms responsible for CaSR regulation and function in these contexts is also discussed, together with the therapeutic opportunities provided by CaSR allosteric modulators.

  8. Paclitaxel Induces Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells through Different Calcium—Regulating Mechanisms Depending on External Calcium Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Zhi Pan; Andrew Avila; Lauren Gollahon

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we reported that endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores were a direct target for paclitaxel initiation of apoptosis. Furthermore, the actions of paclitaxel attenuated Bcl-2 resistance to apoptosis through endoplasmic reticulum-mediated calcium release. To better understand the calcium-regulated mechanisms of paclitaxel-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells, we investigated the role of extracellular calcium, specifically; whether influx of extracellular calcium contributed to and...

  9. New dynamic model for non-Fickian diffusion of calcium spark in cardiac myocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Wenchang; LIU Shiqiang; GUO Jingjing; WANG Shiqiang; CHENG Heping; T. Masuoka

    2003-01-01

    A new dynamic model for non-Fickian diffusion of calcium spark in cardiac myocytes was developed by introducing time lags on the basis of the microscale mass transport theory. Numerical simulation showed that the size of the calcium spark produced by the new dynamic model was larger than that of Fick diffusion and was in more agreement with experimental results. In addition, the time lags of the calcium spark in cardiac myocytes were about 0.1-0.8 ms. These results can be used to understand the mechanism of calcium spark diffusion in cardiac myocytes.

  10. Dynamic Changes in the Calcium Content of Several Apple Cultivars During the Growing Season

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Wei-wei; YOU Chun-xiang; DU Zhong-jun; ZHAI Heng

    2006-01-01

    Dynamic changes in calcium content were investigated in eight apple cultivars. The results showed that thecalcium concentration in leaves and shoots increased with fruit development. The cultivars displayed only a small difference in the calcium concentration during the early stage of development, the difference became very significant at the late stage of development, especially in shoots. In shoots, for example, calcium content was highest in Starkrimson (19 638.6 mg kg-1) and lowest in Fuji (8 751.3 mg kg-1). Calcium concentration was highest in young fruits and was found to decrease with the growth of fruit, and was characterized by a dramatic drop at the rapid expansion stage. There was a significant difference among cultivars. Young Starkrimson fruits contained the highest calcium concentration of 506.52 mg kg-1 among cultivars tested, followed by Pink Lady and Fuji. The calcium concentration in mature fruits from high to low is as follows: Starkrimson, Sansa, Pink Lady, Senshu, Gala,Fuji, Red General and New Century. In this study, it was found that eight cultivars continuously assimilated calcium during the whole growing season, especially at the young stage when fruit took up 35-46% of total calcium. The calcium content in fruitlets was low in all cultivars; in the expansion stage, there was rapid absorptionof about 30% of total calcium, whereas in the ripening fruit, content of calcium was reduced. The calcium accumulation increased with fruit growth in stalk, similar to that in fruit.

  11. Calcium and phosphate homeostasis: concerted interplay of new regulators.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renkema, K.Y.R.; Alexander, R.T.; Bindels, R.J.M.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.

    2008-01-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) and phosphate (P(i)) are essential to many vital physiological processes. Consequently the maintenance of Ca(2+) and P(i) homeostasis is essential to a healthy existence. This occurs through the concerted action of intestinal, renal, and skeletal regulatory mechanisms. Ca(2+) and P(

  12. Skeletal muscle sarcolemma in malignant hyperthermia: evidence for a defect in calcium regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickelson, J R; Ross, J A; Hyslop, R J; Gallant, E M; Louis, C F

    1987-03-12

    Sarcolemmal properties implicated in the skeletal muscle disorder, malignant hyperthermia (MH), were examined using sarcolemma-membrane vesicles isolated from normal and MH-susceptible (MHS) porcine skeletal muscle. MHS and normal sarcolemma did not differ in the distribution of the major proteins, cholesterol or phospholipid content, vesicle size and sidedness, (Na+ + K+)-ATPase activity, ouabain binding, or adenylate cyclase activity (total and isoproterenol sensitivity). The regulation of the initial rates of MHS and normal sarcolemmal ATP-dependent calcium transport (calcium uptake after 1 min) by Ca2+ (K1/2 = 0.64-0.81 microM), calmodulin, and cAMP-dependent protein kinase were similar. However, when sarcolemmal calcium content was measured at either 2 or 20 min after the initiation of active calcium transport, a significant difference between MHS and normal sarcolemmal calcium uptake became apparent, with MHS sarcolemma accumulating approximately 25% less calcium than normal sarcolemma. Calcium transport by MHS and normal sarcolemma, at 2 or 20 min, had a similar calmodulin dependence (C1/2 = 150 nM), and was stimulated to a similar extent by cAMP-dependent protein kinase or calmodulin. Halothane inhibited MHS and normal sarcolemmal active calcium uptake in a similar fashion (half-maximal inhibition at 10 mM halothane), while dantrolene (30 microM) and nitrendipine (1 microM) had little effect on either MHS or normal sarcolemmal calcium transport. After 20 min of ATP-supported calcium uptake, 2 mM EGTA plus 10 microM sodium orthovanadate were added to initiate sarcolemmal calcium efflux. Following an initial rapid phase of calcium release, an extended slow phase of calcium efflux (k = 0.012 min-1) was similar for both MHS and normal sarcolemma vesicles. We conclude that although a number of sarcolemmal properties, including passive calcium permeability, are normal in MH, a small but significant defect in MHS sarcolemmal ATP-dependent calcium transport may

  13. T-type voltage-gated calcium channels regulate the tone of mouse efferent arterioles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Christian B; Al-Mashhadi, Rozh H; Cribbs, Leanne L;

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are important for the regulation of renal blood flow and the glomerular filtration rate. Excitation-contraction coupling in afferent arterioles is known to require activation of these channels and we studied their role in the regulation of cortical efferent arteriolar...... tone. We used microdissected perfused mouse efferent arterioles and found a transient vasoconstriction in response to depolarization with potassium; an effect abolished by removal of extracellular calcium. The T-type voltage-gated calcium channel antagonists mibefradil and nickel blocked this potassium....... Low concentrations of nickel, an agent that blocks Ca(v)3.2, had a similar effect. Thus, T-type voltage-gated calcium channels are functionally important for depolarization-induced vasoconstriction and subsequent dilatation in mouse cortical efferent arterioles.Kidney International advance online...

  14. Calcium regulates the expression of a Dictyostelium discoideum asparaginyl tRNA synthetase gene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jyoti K Jaiswal; Vidyanand Nanjundiah

    2003-12-01

    In a screen for calcium-regulated gene expression during growth and development of Dictyostelium discoideum we have identified an asparaginyl tRNA synthetase (ddAsnRS) gene, the second tRNA synthetase gene identified in this organism. The ddAsnRS gene shows many unique features. One, it is repressed by lowering cellular calcium, making it the first known calcium-regulated tRNA synthetase. Two, despite the calcium-dependence, its expression is unaltered during the cell cycle, making this the first D. discoideum gene to show a calcium-dependent but cell cycle phase-independent expression. Finally, the N-terminal domain of the predicted ddAsnRS protein shows higher sequence similarity to Glutaminyl tRNA synthetases than to other Asn tRNA synthetases. These unique features of the AsnRS from this primitive eukaryote not only point to a novel mechanism regulating the components of translation machinery and gene expression by calcium, but also hint at a link between the evolution of GlnRS and AsnRS in eukaryotes.

  15. Plasma membrane calcium ATPase proteins as novel regulators of signal transduction pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mary; Louisa; Holton; Michael; Emerson; Ludwig; Neyses; Angel; L; Armesilla

    2010-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that plasma membrane calcium ATPases (PMCAs) play a key role as regulators of calcium-triggered signal transduction pathways via interaction with partner proteins. PMCAs regulate these pathways by targeting specific proteins to cellular sub-domains where the levels of intracellular freecalcium are kept low by the calcium ejection properties of PMCAs. According to this model, PMCAs have been shown to interact functionally with the calcium-sensitive proteins neuronal nitric oxide synthase, calmodulindependent serine protein kinase, calcineurin and endothelial nitric oxidase synthase. Transgenic animals with altered expression of PMCAs are being used to evaluate the physiological significance of these interactions. To date, PMCA interactions with calcium-dependent partner proteins have been demonstrated to play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system via regulation of the nitric oxide and calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells pathways. This new evidence suggests that PMCAs play a more sophisticated role than the mere ejection of calcium from the cells, by acting as modulators of signaling transduction pathways.

  16. Calcium dynamics and buffering in motoneurones of the mouse spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palecek, J; Lips, M B; Keller, B U

    1999-10-15

    1. A quantitative analysis of endogenous calcium homeostasis was performed on 65 motoneurones in slices of the lumbar spinal cord from 2- to 8-day-old mice by simultaneous patch-clamp and microfluorometric calcium measurements. 2. Somatic calcium concentrations were monitored with a temporal resolution in the millisecond time domain. Measurements were performed by using a monochromator for excitation and a photomultiplier detection system. 3. Somatic calcium signalling was investigated during defined voltage-clamp protocols. Calcium responses were observed for membrane depolarizations positive to -50 mV. A linear relation between depolarization time and free calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]i) indicated that voltage-dependent calcium influx dominated the response. 4. Endogenous calcium homeostasis was quantified by using the 'added buffer' approach. In the presence of fura-2 and mag-fura-5, calcium transients decayed according to a monoexponential function. Decay-time constants showed a linear dependence on dye concentration and the extrapolated constant in the absence of indicator dye was 371 +/- 120 ms (n = 13 cells, 21 C). 5. For moderate elevations (< 1 microM), recovery kinetics of depolarization-induced calcium transients were characterized by a calcium-independent, 'effective' extrusion rate gamma = 140 +/- 47 s-1 (n = 13 cells, 21 C). 6. The endogenous calcium binding ratio for fixed buffers in spinal motoneurones was kappaB' = 50 +/- 17 (n = 13 cells), indicating that less than 2 % of cytosolic calcium ions contributed to [Ca2+]i. 7. Endogenous binding ratios in spinal motoneurones were small compared to those found in hippocampal or cerebellar Purkinje neurones. From a functional perspective, they provided motoneurones with rapid dynamics of cytosolic [Ca2+]i for a given set of influx, extrusion and uptake mechanisms. 8. With respect to pathophysiological conditions, our measurements are in agreement with a model where the selective vulnerability of spinal

  17. MicroRNA-30 family members regulate calcium/calcineurin signaling in podocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junnan; Zheng, Chunxia; Wang, Xiao; Yun, Shifeng; Zhao, Yue; Liu, Lin; Lu, Yuqiu; Ye, Yuting; Zhu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Changming; Shi, Shaolin; Liu, Zhihong

    2015-01-01

    Calcium/calcineurin signaling is critical for normal cellular physiology. Abnormalities in this pathway cause many diseases, including podocytopathy; therefore, understanding the mechanisms that underlie the regulation of calcium/calcineurin signaling is essential. Here, we showed that critical components of calcium/calcineurin signaling, including TRPC6, PPP3CA, PPP3CB, PPP3R1, and NFATC3, are the targets of the microRNA-30 family (miR-30s). We found that these 5 genes are highly expressed as mRNA, but the level of the proteins is low in normal podocytes. Conversely, protein levels were markedly elevated in podocytes from rats treated with puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN) and from patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). In both FSGS patients and PAN-treated rats, miR-30s were downregulated in podocytes. In cultured podocytes, PAN or a miR-30 sponge increased TRPC6, PPP3CA, PPP3CB, PPP3R1, and NFATC3 expression; calcium influx; intracellular Ca2+ concentration; and calcineurin activity. Moreover, NFATC3 nuclear translocation, synaptopodin degradation, integrin β3 (ITGB3) activation, and actin fiber loss, which are downstream of calcium/calcineurin signaling, were induced by miR-30 reduction but blocked by the calcineurin inhibitor FK506. Podocyte-specific expression of the miR-30 sponge in mice increased calcium/calcineurin pathway component protein expression and calcineurin activity. The mice developed podocyte foot process effacement and proteinuria, which were prevented by FK506. miR-30s also regulated calcium/calcineurin signaling in cardiomyocytes. Together, our results identify miR-30s as essential regulators of calcium/calcineurin signaling. PMID:26436650

  18. MARCKS protein is phosphorylated and regulates calcium mobilization during human acrosomal exocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo J Rodriguez Peña

    Full Text Available Acrosomal exocytosis is a calcium-regulated exocytosis that can be triggered by PKC activators. The involvement of PKC in acrosomal exocytosis has not been fully elucidated, and it is unknown if MARCKS, the major substrate for PKC, participates in this exocytosis. Here, we report that MARCKS is expressed in human spermatozoa and localizes to the sperm head and the tail. Calcium- and phorbol ester-triggered acrosomal exocytosis in permeabilized sperm was abrogated by different anti-MARCKS antibodies raised against two different domains, indicating that the protein participates in acrosomal exocytosis. Interestingly, an anti-phosphorylated MARCKS antibody was not able to inhibit secretion. Similar results were obtained using recombinant proteins and phospho-mutants of MARCKS effector domain (ED, indicating that phosphorylation regulates MARCKS function in acrosomal exocytosis. It is known that unphosphorylated MARCKS sequesters PIP2. This phospholipid is the precursor for IP3, which in turn triggers release of calcium from the acrosome during acrosomal exocytosis. We found that PIP2 and adenophostin, a potent IP3-receptor agonist, rescued MARCKS inhibition in permeabilized sperm, suggesting that MARCKS inhibits acrosomal exocytosis by sequestering PIP2 and, indirectly, MARCKS regulates the intracellular calcium mobilization. In non-permeabilized sperm, a permeable peptide of MARCKS ED also inhibited acrosomal exocytosis when stimulated by a natural agonist such as progesterone, and pharmacological inducers such as calcium ionophore and phorbol ester. The preincubation of human sperm with the permeable MARCKS ED abolished the increase in calcium levels caused by progesterone, demonstrating that MARCKS regulates calcium mobilization. In addition, the phosphorylation of MARCKS increased during acrosomal exocytosis stimulated by the same activators. Altogether, these results show that MARCKS is a negative modulator of the acrosomal exocytosis

  19. Novel effect of interplay of internal and external noise on the dynamics of calcium oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: When the external noise is small (D ≤ 0.8), R goes through a maximum at an optimal system size V, indicating the occurring of internal-noise stochastic resonance (INSR), and the curves become higher with the increases of D, which shows that INSR can be enhanced by the external noise in a certain range of external noise intensity ((D ≤ 0.8). If D > 0.8, R monotonically increases and the peak disappears. When D increases further, the R curve becomes lower. Research highlights: → External noise coherence resonance (ENCR) can be suppressed by internal noise. → Internal noise stochastic resonance (INSR) can be enhanced by external noise. → When INSR occurs, the optimal system size can be regulated by the external noise. - Abstract: Using a mesoscopic stochastic model, the effect of interplay of external and internal noise on the dynamics of calcium oscillations was studied. When the system was tuned near a Hopf bifurcation point and driven by external noise or internal noise only, the existence of external noise coherence resonance (ENCR) or internal-noise stochastic resonance (INSR) was found, respectively. When both of the noises were considered, it was found that ENCR could be suppressed by internal noise, while INSR could be enhanced by external noise in a certain range of external noise intensity. It was also interesting to note that the optimal system size can be regulated by the external noise when the INSR occurs. The cell system may adapt to adjust the optimal size according to the external noise, indicating some kind of self-tuning mechanism involved in stochastic calcium dynamics.

  20. Lipid body accumulation alters calcium signaling dynamics in immune cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greineisen, William E.; Speck, Mark; Shimoda, Lori M.N.; Sung, Carl; Phan, Nolwenn; Maaetoft-Udsen, Kristina; Stokes, Alexander J.; Turner, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Summary There is well-established variability in the numbers of lipid bodies (LB) in macrophages, eosinophils, and neutrophils. Similarly to the steatosis observed in adipocytes and hepatocytes during hyperinsulinemia and nutrient overload, immune cell LB hyper-accumulate in response to bacterial and parasitic infection and inflammatory presentations. Recently we described that hyperinsulinemia, both in vitro and in vivo, drives steatosis and phenotypic changes in primary and transformed mast cells and basophils. LB reach high numbers in these steatotic cytosols, and here we propose that they could dramatically impact the transcytoplasmic signaling pathways. We compared calcium release and influx responses at the population and single cell level in normal and steatotic model mast cells. At the population level, all aspects of FcεRI-dependent calcium mobilization, as well as activation of calcium-dependent downstream signalling targets such as NFATC1 phosphorylation are suppressed. At the single cell level, we demonstrate that LB are both sources and sinks of calcium following FcεRI cross-linking. Unbiased analysis of the impact of the presence of LB on the rate of trans-cytoplasmic calcium signals suggest that LB enrichment accelerates calcium propagation, which may reflect a Bernoulli effect. LB abundance thus impacts this fundamental signalling pathway and its downstream targets. PMID:25016314

  1. Calcium influx through CRAC channels controls actin organization and dynamics at the immune synapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, Catherine A; Jankowska, Katarzyna I; Burkhardt, Janis K; Lewis, Richard S

    2016-01-01

    T cell receptor (TCR) engagement opens Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels and triggers formation of an immune synapse between T cells and antigen-presenting cells. At the synapse, actin reorganizes into a concentric lamellipod and lamella with retrograde actin flow that helps regulate the intensity and duration of TCR signaling. We find that Ca2+ influx is required to drive actin organization and dynamics at the synapse. Calcium acts by promoting actin depolymerization and localizing actin polymerization and the actin nucleation promotion factor WAVE2 to the periphery of the lamellipod while suppressing polymerization elsewhere. Ca2+-dependent retrograde actin flow corrals ER tubule extensions and STIM1/Orai1 complexes to the synapse center, creating a self-organizing process for CRAC channel localization. Our results demonstrate a new role for Ca2+ as a critical regulator of actin organization and dynamics at the synapse, and reveal potential feedback loops through which Ca2+ influx may modulate TCR signaling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14850.001 PMID:27440222

  2. Calcium influx through CRAC channels controls actin organization and dynamics at the immune synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, Catherine A; Jankowska, Katarzyna I; Burkhardt, Janis K; Lewis, Richard S

    2016-01-01

    T cell receptor (TCR) engagement opens Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels and triggers formation of an immune synapse between T cells and antigen-presenting cells. At the synapse, actin reorganizes into a concentric lamellipod and lamella with retrograde actin flow that helps regulate the intensity and duration of TCR signaling. We find that Ca(2+) influx is required to drive actin organization and dynamics at the synapse. Calcium acts by promoting actin depolymerization and localizing actin polymerization and the actin nucleation promotion factor WAVE2 to the periphery of the lamellipod while suppressing polymerization elsewhere. Ca(2+)-dependent retrograde actin flow corrals ER tubule extensions and STIM1/Orai1 complexes to the synapse center, creating a self-organizing process for CRAC channel localization. Our results demonstrate a new role for Ca(2+) as a critical regulator of actin organization and dynamics at the synapse, and reveal potential feedback loops through which Ca(2+) influx may modulate TCR signaling. PMID:27440222

  3. Dynamic visualization of calcium-dependent signaling in cellular microdomains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sohum; Zhang, Jin

    2015-10-01

    Cells rely on the coordinated action of diverse signaling molecules to sense, interpret, and respond to their highly dynamic external environment. To ensure the specific and robust flow of information, signaling molecules are often spatially organized to form distinct signaling compartments, and our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that guide intracellular signaling hinges on the ability to directly probe signaling events within these cellular microdomains. Ca(2+) signaling in particular owes much of its functional versatility to this type of exquisite spatial regulation. As discussed below, a number of methods have been developed to investigate the mechanistic and functional implications of microdomains of Ca(2+) signaling, ranging from the application of Ca(2+) buffers to the direct and targeted visualization of Ca(2+) signaling microdomains using genetically encoded fluorescent reporters. PMID:25703691

  4. Regulation of Intestinal Epithelial Calcium Transport Proteins by Stanniocalcin-1 in Caco2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Jinmei; Guo, Rui; Wan, Chunyun; Wu, Liming; Yang, Shijin; Guo, Dingzong

    2016-01-01

    Stanniocalcin-1 (STC1) is a calcium and phosphate regulatory hormone. However, the exact molecular mechanisms underlying how STC1 affects Ca(2+) uptake remain unclear. Here, the expression levels of the calcium transport proteins involved in transcellular transport in Caco2 cells were examined following over-expression or inhibition of STC1. These proteins include the transient receptor potential vanilloid members (TRPV) 5 and 6, the plasma membrane calcium ATPase 1b (PMCA1b), the sodium/calcium exchanger (NCX1), and the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Both gene and protein expressions of TRPV5 and TRPV6 were attenuated in response to over-expression of STC1, and the opposite trend was observed in cells treated with siRNASTC1. To further investigate the ability of STC1 to influence TRPV6 expression, cells were treated with 100 ng/mL of recombinant human STC1 (rhSTC1) for 4 h following pre-transfection with siRNASTC1 for 48 h. Intriguingly, the increase in the expression of TRPV6 resulting from siRNASTC1 was reversed by rhSTC1. No significant effect of STC1 on the expression of PMCA1b, NCX1 or VDR was observed in this study. In conclusion, the effect of STC1 on calcium transport in intestinal epithelia is due to, at least in part, its negative regulation of the epithelial channels TRPV5/6 that mediate calcium influx. PMID:27409607

  5. Calcium control of gene regulation in rat hippocampal neuronal cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinato, Giulietta; Pegoraro, Silvia; Iacono, Giovanni; Ruaro, Maria Elisabetta; Torre, Vincent

    2009-09-01

    Blockage of GABA-A receptors in hippocampal neuronal cultures triggers synchronous bursts of spikes initiating neuronal plasticity, partly mediated by changes of gene expression. By using specific pharmacological blockers, we have investigated which sources of Ca2+ entry primarily control changes of gene expression induced by 20 microM gabazine applied for 30 min (GabT). Intracellular Ca2+ transients were monitored with Ca2+ imaging while recording electrical activity with patch clamp microelectrodes. Concomitant transcription profiles were obtained using Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarrays and confirmed with quantitative RT-PCR. Blockage of NMDA receptors with 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV) did not reduce significantly somatic Ca2+ transients, which, on the contrary, were reduced by selective blockage of L, N, and P/Q types voltage gated calcium channels (VGCCs). Therefore, we investigated changes of gene expression in the presence of blockers of NMDA receptors and L, N, and P/Q VGCCs. Our results show that: (i) among genes upregulated by GabT, there are genes selectively dependent on NMDA activation, genes selectively dependent on L-type VGCCs and genes dependent on the activation of both channels; (ii) the majority of genes requires the concomitant activation of NMDA receptors and Ca2+ entry through VGCCs; (iii) blockage of N and P/Q VGCCs has an effect similar but not identical to blockage of L-type VGCCs. PMID:19441076

  6. Regulation of the epithelial calcium channel TRPV5 by extracellular factors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Topala, C.N.; Bindels, R.J.M.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Recent studies have greatly increased our knowledge concerning the regulation of renal calcium handling. This review focuses on newly identified calciotropic factors present in the pro-urine and the mechanisms by which they control the transient receptor potential channel vanilloi

  7. Blood calcium dynamics after prophylactic treatment of subclinical hypocalcemia with oral or intravenous calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, C D; Van der List, M; Aly, S S; Rossow, H A; Silva-del-Río, N

    2014-11-01

    Total serum Ca dynamics and urine pH levels were evaluated after prophylactic treatment of subclinical hypocalcemia after parturition in 33 multiparous Jersey × Holstein crossbreed cows. Cows were blocked according to their calcemic status at the time of treatment [normocalcemic (8.0-9.9 mg/dL; n = 15) or hypocalcemic (5.0-7.9 mg/dL; n = 18)] and randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatments: control [no Ca supplementation (n = 11)]; intravenous Ca [Ca-IV (n = 11), 500 mL of 23% calcium gluconate (10.7 g of Ca and 17.5 g of boric acid as a solubilizing agent; Durvet, Blue Springs, MO)]; or oral Ca [Ca-Oral (n = 11), 1 oral bolus (Bovikalc bolus, Boehringer Ingelheim, St. Joseph, MO) containing CaCl2 and CaSO4 (43 g of Ca) 2 times 12h apart]. Total serum Ca levels were evaluated at 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 36, and 48 h, and urine pH was evaluated at 0, 1, 12, 24, 36, and 4 8h after treatment initiation. Total serum Ca levels were higher for Ca-IV than for control and Ca-Oral cows at 1, 2, and 4h after treatment initiation, but lower than Ca-Oral cows at 20, 24, and 36 h and lower than control cows at 36 and 48 h. At 1h after treatment initiation, when serum Ca levels for Ca-IV cows peaked (11.4 mg/dL), a greater proportion of Ca-IV (n = 8) cows had total serum Ca levels >10mg/dL than control (n = 0) and Ca-Oral (n = 1) cows. At 24h after treatment initiation, when Ca-IV cows reached the total serum Ca nadir (6.4 mg/dL), a greater proportion of Ca-IV (n = 10) cows had serum Ca levels cows. Treatment, time, and treatment × time interaction were significant for urine pH. Mean urine pH was lower for Ca-Oral cows (6.69) than for control (7.52) and Ca-IV (7.19) cows. Urine pH levels at 1h after treatment were lower for Ca-IV cows compared with both control and Ca-Oral cows, a finding likely associated with the iatrogenic administration of boric acid added as a solubilizing agent of the intravenous Ca solution used. At 12, 24, and 36 h, urine pH levels were lower for Ca

  8. Alpha-1 giardin is an annexin with highly unusual calcium-regulated mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeratunga, Saroja K; Osman, Asiah; Hu, Nien-Jen; Wang, Conan K; Mason, Lyndel; Svärd, Staffan; Hope, Greg; Jones, Malcolm K; Hofmann, Andreas

    2012-10-19

    Alpha-giardins constitute the annexin proteome (group E annexins) in the intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia and, as such, represent the evolutionary oldest eukaryotic annexins. The dominance of alpha-giardins in the cytoskeleton of Giardia with its greatly reduced actin content emphasises the importance of the alpha-giardins for the structural integrity of the parasite, which is particularly critical in the transformation stage between cyst and trophozoite. In this study, we report the crystal structures of the apo- and calcium-bound forms of α1-giardin, a protein localised to the plasma membrane of Giardia trophozoites that has recently been identified as a vaccine target. The calcium-bound crystal structure of α1-giardin revealed the presence of a type III site in the first repeat as known from other annexin structures, as well as a novel calcium binding site situated between repeats I and IV. By means of comparison, the crystal structures of three different alpha-giardins known to date indicate that these proteins engage different calcium coordination schemes, among each other, as well as compared to annexins of groups A-D. Evaluation of the calcium-dependent binding to acidic phosphoplipid membranes revealed that this process is not only mediated but also regulated by the environmental calcium concentration. Uniquely within the large family of annexins, α1-giardin disengages from the phospholipid membrane at high calcium concentrations possibly due to formation of a dimeric species. The observed behaviour is in line with changing calcium levels experienced by the parasite during excystation and may thus provide first insights into the molecular mechanisms underpinning the transformation and survival of the parasite in the host. PMID:22796298

  9. [Roles of intracellular calcium and monomeric G-proteins in regulating exocytosis of human neutrophils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Wang, Jun-Han; Wu, Jian-Min; Xu, Tao; Zhang, Chun-Guang

    2003-12-25

    Neutrophils play a major role in host defense against microbial infection. There are some clues indicate that neutrophils may also play a role in the pathophysiology of the airway obstruction in chronic asthma. We studied the roles of intracellular calcium and GTP gamma S in the regulation of neutrophils exocytosis using pipette perfusion and membrane capacitance measurement technique in whole cell patch clamp configuration. The results showed that the membrane capacitance increase induced by calcium revealed a biphasic process. The first phase occurred when the calcium level was between 0.2-14 micromol/L with a plateau amplitude of 1.23 pF and a calcium EC50 of 1.1 micromol/L. This phase might correspond to the release of the tertiary granules. The second phase occurred when the calcium concentration was between 20-70 micromol/L with a plateau increment of 6.36 pF, the calcium EC50 being about 33 micromol/L. This phase might represent the release of the primary and secondary granules. Intracellular calcium also simultaneously increased the exocytotic rate and the eventual extent in neutrophils. On the other hand, GTP gamma S can increase the exocytotic rate in a dose-dependent manner but had no effect on the eventual extent of membrane capacitance increment (>6 pF) if the cell was stimulated for a long period (>20 min). GTP gamma S (ranging from 20 to 100 micromol/L) induced the neutrophils to release all four types of the granules at very low intracellular calcium level. PMID:14695488

  10. Nuclear proton dynamics and interactions with calcium signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulikova, Alzbeta; Swietach, Pawel

    2016-07-01

    Biochemical signals acting on the nucleus can regulate gene expression. Despite the inherent affinity of nucleic acids and nuclear proteins (e.g. transcription factors) for protons, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate nuclear pH (pHnuc), and how these could be exploited to control gene expression. Here, we show that pHnuc dynamics can be imaged using the DNA-binding dye Hoechst 33342. Nuclear pores allow the passage of medium-sized molecules (calcein), but protons must first bind to mobile buffers in order to gain access to the nucleoplasm. Fixed buffering residing in the nucleus of permeabilized cells was estimated to be very weak on the basis of the large amplitude of pHnuc transients evoked by photolytic H(+)-uncaging or exposure to weak acids/bases. Consequently, the majority of nuclear pH buffering is sourced from the cytoplasm in the form of mobile buffers. Effective proton diffusion was faster in nucleoplasm than in cytoplasm, in agreement with the higher mobile-to-fixed buffering ratio in the nucleus. Cardiac myocyte pHnuc changed in response to maneuvers that alter nuclear Ca(2+) signals. Blocking Ca(2+) release from inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors stably alkalinized the nucleus. This Ca(2+)-pH interaction may arise from competitive binding to common chemical moieties. Competitive binding to mobile buffers may couple the efflux of Ca(2+)via nuclear pores with a counterflux of protons. This would generate a stable pH gradient between cytoplasm and nucleus that is sensitive to the state of nuclear Ca(2+) signaling. The unusual behavior of protons in the nucleus provides new mechanisms for regulating cardiac nuclear biology. PMID:26183898

  11. Store-operated channels regulate intracellular calcium in mammalian rods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Tünde; Barabas, Peter; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Punzo, Claudio; Kefalov, Vladimir; Križaj, David

    2012-08-01

    Exposure to daylight closes cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) and voltage-operated Ca(2+) -permeable channels in mammalian rods. The consequent lowering of the cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)), if protracted, can contribute to light-induced damage and apoptosis in these cells. We here report that mouse rods are protected against prolonged lowering of [Ca(2+)](i) by store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE). Ca(2+) stores were depleted in Ca(2+)-free saline supplemented with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) sequestration blocker cyclopiazonic acid. Store depletion elicited [Ca(2+)](i) signals that exceeded baseline [Ca(2+)](i) by 5.9 ± 0.7-fold and were antagonized by an inhibitory cocktail containing 2-APB, SKF 96365 and Gd(3+). Cation influx through SOCE channels was sufficient to elicit a secondary activation of L-type voltage-operated Ca2+ entry. We also found that TRPC1, the type 1 canonical mammalian homologue of the Drosophila photoreceptor TRP channel, is predominantly expressed within the outer nuclear layer of the retina. Rod loss in Pde6b(rdl) (rd1), Chx10/Kip1(-/-rdl) and Elovl4(TG2) dystrophic models was associated with ∼70% reduction in Trpc1 mRNA content whereas Trpc1 mRNA levels in rodless cone-full Nrl(-/-) retinas were decreased by ∼50%. Genetic ablation of TRPC1 channels, however, had no effect on SOCE, the sensitivity of the rod phototransduction cascade or synaptic transmission at rod and cone synapses. Thus, we localized two new mechanisms, SOCE and TRPC1, to mammalian rods and characterized the contribution of SOCE to Ca(2+) homeostasis. By preventing the cytosolic [Ca(2+)](i) from dropping too low under sustained saturating light conditions, these signalling pathways may protect Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms within the ER and the cytosol without affecting normal rod function. PMID:22674725

  12. Peripheral serotonin regulates maternal calcium trafficking in mammary epithelial cells during lactation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimena Laporta

    Full Text Available Lactation is characterized by massive transcellular flux of calcium, from the basolateral side of the mammary alveolar epithelium (blood into the ductal lumen (milk. Regulation of calcium transport during lactation is critical for maternal and neonatal health. The monoamine serotonin (5-HT is synthesized by the mammary gland and functions as a homeostatic regulation of lactation. Genetic ablation of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1, which encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in non-neuronal serotonin synthesis, causes a deficiency in circulating serotonin. As a consequence maternal calcium concentrations decrease, mammary epithelial cell morphology is altered, and cell proliferation is decreased during lactation. Here we demonstrate that serotonin deficiency decreases the expression and disrupts the normal localization of calcium transporters located in the apical (PMCA2 and basolateral (CaSR, ORAI-1 membranes of the lactating mammary gland. In addition, serotonin deficiency decreases the mRNA expression of calcium transporters located in intracellular compartments (SERCA2, SPCA1 and 2. Mammary expression of serotonin receptor isoform 2b and its downstream pathways (PLCβ3, PKC and MAP-ERK1/2 are also decreased by serotonin deficiency, which might explain the numerous phenotypic alterations described above. In most cases, addition of exogenous 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan to the Tph1 deficient mice rescued the phenotype. Our data supports the hypothesis that serotonin is necessary for proper mammary gland structure and function, to regulate blood and mammary epithelial cell transport of calcium during lactation. These findings can be applicable to the treatment of lactation-induced hypocalcemia in dairy cows and can have profound implications in humans, given the wide-spread use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors as antidepressants during pregnancy and lactation.

  13. Peripheral serotonin regulates maternal calcium trafficking in mammary epithelial cells during lactation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laporta, Jimena; Keil, Kimberly P; Vezina, Chad M; Hernandez, Laura L

    2014-01-01

    Lactation is characterized by massive transcellular flux of calcium, from the basolateral side of the mammary alveolar epithelium (blood) into the ductal lumen (milk). Regulation of calcium transport during lactation is critical for maternal and neonatal health. The monoamine serotonin (5-HT) is synthesized by the mammary gland and functions as a homeostatic regulation of lactation. Genetic ablation of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1), which encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in non-neuronal serotonin synthesis, causes a deficiency in circulating serotonin. As a consequence maternal calcium concentrations decrease, mammary epithelial cell morphology is altered, and cell proliferation is decreased during lactation. Here we demonstrate that serotonin deficiency decreases the expression and disrupts the normal localization of calcium transporters located in the apical (PMCA2) and basolateral (CaSR, ORAI-1) membranes of the lactating mammary gland. In addition, serotonin deficiency decreases the mRNA expression of calcium transporters located in intracellular compartments (SERCA2, SPCA1 and 2). Mammary expression of serotonin receptor isoform 2b and its downstream pathways (PLCβ3, PKC and MAP-ERK1/2) are also decreased by serotonin deficiency, which might explain the numerous phenotypic alterations described above. In most cases, addition of exogenous 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan to the Tph1 deficient mice rescued the phenotype. Our data supports the hypothesis that serotonin is necessary for proper mammary gland structure and function, to regulate blood and mammary epithelial cell transport of calcium during lactation. These findings can be applicable to the treatment of lactation-induced hypocalcemia in dairy cows and can have profound implications in humans, given the wide-spread use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors as antidepressants during pregnancy and lactation. PMID:25299122

  14. Effect of solute concentration on fibroin regulated biomineralization of calcium phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we used UV/Visible method to study the effect of solute concentration on fibroin regulated biomineralization of calcium phosphate. During the reaction process, ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer was used to track the extinction in the reaction solution. It is found that kinetics of the biomineralization can be strongly affected by the presence of fibroin. Fibroin with higher concentration has more positive effect on the biomineralization process. Under the appropriate reaction conditions, wave crest and wave trough appear in the kinetic curves of fibroin biomineralization. The wave crest and wave trough phenomenon is mainly related with the process of phase separation. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) result shows the calcium phosphate before the wave trough is mainly amorphous calcium phosphate, while after the wave trough crystal of hydroxyapatite (HA) and brushite (DCPD) are the mainly ingredients

  15. Crystallization and self-assembly of flowerlike superstructures of calcium carbonate regulated by pepsin Langmuir monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flowerlike superstructures of calcium carbonate were synthesized at air–water interface in the presence of pepsin Langmuir monolayers as the biomimetic template. The phase structure, morphology, and microstructure of the products obtained at various crystallization stages were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The structural and morphological evolution processes of the products from monodispersed nanoparticles to nanoparticle aggregates and flowerlike superstructures were investigated. Results indicate that the flowerlike superstructures of calcium carbonate are assembled from amorphous calcium carbonate nanoparticles. The growth and assembly of calcium carbonate minerals are significantly regulated by the pepsin Langmuir monolayers. Namely, the pepsin Langmuir monolayers stabilize amorphous calcium carbonate nanoparticles and direct their transformation to amorphous aggregates via non-oriented aggregation. The present approach presents a feasible way to manipulate the growth of inorganic crystal, which, hopefully, is to help better reveal the role of proteins in mineralization process and understand the mechanism of biomineralization. -- Highlights: ► Pepsin Langmuir monolayer as biomimetic template. ► Flower-like calcite crystals experience a novel assembly and growth process. ► The morphologic evolution and phase transformation were observed. ► The trace of initial nucleation site of CaCO3 at the interface was observed. ► The template directs the crystallization and growth process.

  16. Crystallization and self-assembly of flowerlike superstructures of calcium carbonate regulated by pepsin Langmuir monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Zhonghui [Key Laboratory for Special Functional Materials of Ministry of Education, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); School of Physics and Chemistry, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 (China); Hu, Binbin; Dai, Shuxi [Key Laboratory for Special Functional Materials of Ministry of Education, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Du, Zuliang, E-mail: zld@henu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Special Functional Materials of Ministry of Education, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China)

    2012-10-15

    Flowerlike superstructures of calcium carbonate were synthesized at air-water interface in the presence of pepsin Langmuir monolayers as the biomimetic template. The phase structure, morphology, and microstructure of the products obtained at various crystallization stages were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The structural and morphological evolution processes of the products from monodispersed nanoparticles to nanoparticle aggregates and flowerlike superstructures were investigated. Results indicate that the flowerlike superstructures of calcium carbonate are assembled from amorphous calcium carbonate nanoparticles. The growth and assembly of calcium carbonate minerals are significantly regulated by the pepsin Langmuir monolayers. Namely, the pepsin Langmuir monolayers stabilize amorphous calcium carbonate nanoparticles and direct their transformation to amorphous aggregates via non-oriented aggregation. The present approach presents a feasible way to manipulate the growth of inorganic crystal, which, hopefully, is to help better reveal the role of proteins in mineralization process and understand the mechanism of biomineralization. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pepsin Langmuir monolayer as biomimetic template. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Flower-like calcite crystals experience a novel assembly and growth process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The morphologic evolution and phase transformation were observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The trace of initial nucleation site of CaCO{sub 3} at the interface was observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The template directs the crystallization and growth process.

  17. Effects of adrenalectomy on the control and adrenergic regulation of cytosolic free calcium in hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freudenrich, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of adrenalectomy on the control and ..cap alpha..-adrenergic regulation of the concentration of cytosolic free calcium (Ca/sub i/) in hepatocytes. In hepatocytes isolated from adrenalectomized (adx) and sham-operated male rats 7-1 days after surgery, Ca/sub i/ at rest and in response to epinephrine (EPI) was measured with the calcium-sensitive photoprotein aequorin, /sup 45/Ca efflux was measured, and Ca/sup 2 +/ release from intracellular stores in response to inositol triphosphate (IP/sub 3/) was measured in saponin-permeabilized cells. Liver calmodulin content was also assayed by radioimmunoassay. It was found in adx rats that the resting Ca/sub i/ was elevated, the rise in Ca/sub i/ during EPI stimulation was reduced at physiological EPI concentrations, and the rise in calcium efflux evoked by EPI was reduced. Furthermore, the slope of the relationship between Ca/sub i/ and calcium efflux was reduced 60% in adx. Adx did not alter the characteristics of Ca/sup 2 +/ release from intracellular calcium pools in response to IP/sub 3/ in permeabilized cells. Finally, the liver calmodulin contents were not significantly different between the 2 groups.

  18. In vitro photoacoustic sensing of calcium dynamics with arsenazo III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dana, N.; Fowler, R. A.; Allen, A.; Zoldan, J.; Suggs, L.; Emelianov, S.

    2016-07-01

    Imaging of cellular electric potential via calcium-ion sensitive contrast agents is a useful tool, but current techniques lack sufficient depth penetration. We explore contrast-enhanced photoacoustic (PA) imaging, using Arsenazo III dye, to visualize cardiac myocyte depolarization in vitro. Phantom results show strong linearity of PA signal with dye concentration (R 2  >  0.95), and agree spectrally with extinction measurements with varying calcium concentration. Cell studies indicate a significant (>100-fold) increase in PA signal for dye-treated cells, as well as a 10-fold increase in peak-to-peak variation during a 30 s window. This suggests contrast-enhanced PA imaging may have sufficient sensitivity and specificity for depth-resolved visualization of tissue depolarization in real-time.

  19. Calcium binding to calmodulin by molecular dynamics with effective polarization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kohagen, Miriam; Lepšík, Martin; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 22 (2014), s. 3964-3969. ISSN 1948-7185 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016; GA MŠk LH12001 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : EF-hand motif * free energy calculations * charge scaling * calcium-binding protein * umbrella sampling Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 7.458, year: 2014

  20. On the physiological/pathological link between Aβ peptide, cholesterol, calcium ions and membrane deformation: A molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannuzzo, Martina

    2016-06-01

    The dynamic interplay between cholesterol, asymmetrically (at physiological condition) or symmetrically (hallmark of aging) distributed in membrane, and β amyloid peptides is investigated by a computational approach. The drawn overall picture, starting from the very appearance of β amyloid peptides and going through their self-assembling into potentially toxic oligomeric species, reinforces some of the experimental and theoretical shots recently reported in literature, while new important molecular hints on the physiological role played by the β amyloid peptide are proposed. The so dreaded formation of amyloid pores selective for the passage of calcium ions could in fact explain their physiological concomitant recruitment in the regulation of synaptic plasticity. PMID:27003127

  1. Plasma membrane calcium pump regulation by metabolic stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jason; IE; Bruce

    2010-01-01

    The plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase(PMCA)is an ATPdriven pump that is critical for the maintenance of low resting[Ca2+]i in all eukaryotic cells.Metabolic stress, either due to inhibition of mitochondrial or glycolytic metabolism,has the capacity to cause ATP depletion and thus inhibit PMCA activity.This has potentially fatal consequences,particularly for non-excitable cells in which the PMCA is the major Ca2+efflux pathway.This is because inhibition of the PMCA inevitably leads to cytosolic Ca2+ overload and the consequent cell death.However,the relationship between metabolic stress,ATP depletion and inhibition of the PMCA is not as simple as one would have originally predicted.There is increasing evidence that metabolic stress can lead to the inhibition of PMCA activity independent of ATP or prior to substantial ATP depletion.In particular,there is evidence that the PMCA has its own glycolytic ATP supply that can fuel the PMCA in the face of impaired mitochondrial function.Moreover, membrane phospholipids,mitochondrial membrane potential,caspase/calpain cleavage and oxidative stress have all been implicated in metabolic stress-induced inhibition of the PMCA.The major focus of this review is to challenge the conventional view of ATP-dependent regulation of the PMCA and bring together some of the alternative or additional mechanisms by which metabolic stress impairs PMCA activity resulting in cytosolic Ca2+ overload and cytotoxicity.

  2. BIN1 regulates dynamic t-tubule membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ying; Hong, TingTing

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac transverse tubules (t-tubules) are specific membrane organelles critical in calcium signaling and excitation-contraction coupling required for beat-to-beat heart contraction. T-tubules are highly branched and form an interconnected network that penetrates the myocyte interior to form junctions with the sarcoplasmic reticulum. T-tubules are selectively enriched with specific ion channels and proteins crucial in calcium transient development necessary in excitation-contraction coupling, thus t-tubules are a key component of cardiac myocyte function. In this review, we focus primarily on two proteins concentrated within the t-tubular network, the L-type calcium channel (LTCC) and associated membrane anchor protein, bridging integrator 1 (BIN1). Here, we provide an overview of current knowledge in t-tubule morphology, composition, microdomains, as well as the dynamics of the t-tubule network. Secondly, we highlight multiple aspects of BIN1-dependent t-tubule function, which includes forward trafficking of LTCCs to t-tubules, LTCC clustering at t-tubule surface, microdomain organization and regulation at t-tubule membrane, and the formation of a slow diffusion barrier within t-tubules. Lastly, we describe progress in characterizing how acquired human heart failure can be attributed to abnormal BIN1 transcription and associated t-tubule remodeling. Understanding BIN1-regulated cardiac t-tubule biology in human heart failure management has the dual benefit of promoting progress in both biomarker development and therapeutic target identification. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel. PMID:26578114

  3. Volume regulation by human lymphocytes. Role of calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human peripheral blood lymphocytes regulate their volumes in hypotonic solutions. In hypotonic media in which Na+ is the predominant cation, an initial swelling phase is followed by a regulatory volume decrease (RVD) associated with a net loss of cellular K+. In media in which K+ is the predominant cation, the rapid initial swelling is followed by a slower second swelling phase. 86Rb+ fluxes increased during RVD and returned to normal when the original volume was approximately regained. Effects similar to those induced by hypotonic stress could also be produced by raising the intracellular Ca++ level. In isotonic, Ca++-containing media cells were found to shrink upon addition of the Ca++ ionophore A23187 in K+-free media, but to swell in K+-rich media. Exposure to Ca++ plus A23187 also increased 86Rb+ fluxes. Quinine (75 microM), an inhibitor of the Ca++-activated K+ pathway in other systems blocked RVD, the associated K+ loss, and the increase in 86Rb+ efflux. Quinine also inhibited the volume changes and the increased 86Rb fluxes induced by Ca++ plus ionophore. The calmodulin inhibitors trifluoperazine, pimozide and chlorpromazine blocked RVD as well as Ca++ plus A23187-induced volume changes. Trifluoperazine also prevented the increase in 86Rb+ fluxes and K+ loss induced by hypotonicity. Chlorpromazine sulfoxide, a relatively ineffective calmodulin antagonist, was considerably less potent as an inhibitor of RVD than chlorpromazine. It is suggested than an elevation in cytoplasmic [Ca++], triggered by cell swelling, increases the plasma membrane permeability to K+, the ensuing increased efflux of K+, associated anions, and osmotically obliged water, leading to cell shrinking

  4. Role of time delay on intracellular calcium dynamics driven by non-Gaussian noises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Wei-Long; Zeng, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Effect of time delay (τ) on intracellular calcium dynamics with non-Gaussian noises in transmission processes of intracellular Ca2+ is studied by means of second-order stochastic Runge-Kutta type algorithm. By simulating and analyzing time series, normalized autocorrelation function, and characteristic correlation time of cytosolic and calcium store’s Ca2+ concentration, the results exhibit: (i) intracellular calcium dynamics’s time coherence disappears and stability strengthens as τ → 0.1s; (ii) for the case of τ  0.1s, they show different variation as τ increases, the former changes from underdamped motion to a level line, but the latter changes from damped motion to underdamped motion; and (iii) at the moderate value of time delay, reverse resonance occurs both in cytosol and calcium store. PMID:27121687

  5. Dynamics of bacterial gene regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Atul

    2009-03-01

    The phenomenon of diauxic growth is a classical problem of bacterial gene regulation. The most well studied example of this phenomenon is the glucose-lactose diauxie, which occurs because the expression of the lac operon is strongly repressed in the presence of glucose. This repression is often explained by appealing to molecular mechanisms such as cAMP activation and inducer exclusion. I will begin by analyzing data showing that these molecular mechanisms cannot explain the strong lac repression because they exert a relatively weak effect. I will then present a minimal model accounting only for enzyme induction and dilution, which yields strong repression despite the absence of catabolite repression and inducer exclusion. The model also explains the growth patterns observed in batch and continuous cultures of various bacterial strains and substrate mixtures. The talk will conclude with a discussion of the experimental evidence regarding positive feedback, the key component of the minimal model.

  6. Improved workability of injectable calcium sulfate bone cement by regulation of self-setting properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) powder as an injectable bone cement was prepared by hydrothermal synthesis of calcium sulfate dihydrate (CSD). The prepared materials showed X-ray diffraction peaks corresponding to the CSH structure without any secondary phases, implying complete conversion from CSD phase to CSH phase. Thermogravimetric (TG) analyses showed the crystal water content of CSH was about 6.0% (wt.), which is near to the theoretic crystal water value of CSH. From scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs, sheet crystal structure of CSD was observed to transform into rod-like crystal structure of CSH. Most interesting and important of all, CSD as setting accelerator was also introduced into CSH powder to regulate self-setting properties of injectable CSH paste, and thus the self-setting time of CSH paste can be regulated from near 30 min to less than 5 min by adding various amounts of setting accelerator. Because CSD is not only the reactant of preparing CSH but also the final solidified product of CSH, the setting accelerator has no significant effect on the other properties of materials, such as mechanical properties. In vitro biocompatibility and in vivo histology studies have demonstrated that the materials have good biocompatibility and good efficacy in bone regeneration. All these will further improve the workability of CSH in clinic applications. Highlights: ► Calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) can be an injectable bone cement. ► CSH was produced by hydrothermal synthesis of calcium sulfate dihydrate (CSD). ► CSD was introduced into CSH powder to regulate self-setting properties of CSH. ► Setting accelerator has no significant effect on the other properties of materials. ► Injectable CSH has good biocompatibility and good efficacy in bone regeneration

  7. Improved workability of injectable calcium sulfate bone cement by regulation of self-setting properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zonggang, E-mail: chenzg@sdu.edu.cn [National Glycoengineering Research Center, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, Huanye [Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Liu, Xi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lian, Xiaojie [College of Mechanics, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Guo, Zhongwu [National Glycoengineering Research Center, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Jiang, Hong-Jiang [Wendeng Hospital of Traditional Chinese Orthopedics and Traumatology, Shandong 264400 (China); Cui, Fu-Zhai, E-mail: cuifz@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2013-04-01

    Calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) powder as an injectable bone cement was prepared by hydrothermal synthesis of calcium sulfate dihydrate (CSD). The prepared materials showed X-ray diffraction peaks corresponding to the CSH structure without any secondary phases, implying complete conversion from CSD phase to CSH phase. Thermogravimetric (TG) analyses showed the crystal water content of CSH was about 6.0% (wt.), which is near to the theoretic crystal water value of CSH. From scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs, sheet crystal structure of CSD was observed to transform into rod-like crystal structure of CSH. Most interesting and important of all, CSD as setting accelerator was also introduced into CSH powder to regulate self-setting properties of injectable CSH paste, and thus the self-setting time of CSH paste can be regulated from near 30 min to less than 5 min by adding various amounts of setting accelerator. Because CSD is not only the reactant of preparing CSH but also the final solidified product of CSH, the setting accelerator has no significant effect on the other properties of materials, such as mechanical properties. In vitro biocompatibility and in vivo histology studies have demonstrated that the materials have good biocompatibility and good efficacy in bone regeneration. All these will further improve the workability of CSH in clinic applications. Highlights: ► Calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) can be an injectable bone cement. ► CSH was produced by hydrothermal synthesis of calcium sulfate dihydrate (CSD). ► CSD was introduced into CSH powder to regulate self-setting properties of CSH. ► Setting accelerator has no significant effect on the other properties of materials. ► Injectable CSH has good biocompatibility and good efficacy in bone regeneration.

  8. Dynamical patterns of calcium signaling in a functional model of neuron-astrocyte networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, D.E.; Koreshkov, R.N.; Brazhe, N.A.;

    2009-01-01

    We propose a functional mathematical model for neuron-astrocyte networks. The model incorporates elements of the tripartite synapse and the spatial branching structure of coupled astrocytes. We consider glutamate-induced calcium signaling as a specific mode of excitability and transmission in...... astrocytic-neuronal networks. We reproduce local and global dynamical patterns observed experimentally....

  9. Dynamical patterns of calcium signaling in a functional model of neuron–astrocyte networks

    OpenAIRE

    Postnov, D. E.; Koreshkov, R. N.; Brazhe, N. A.; Brazhe, A. R.; Sosnovtseva, O. V.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a functional mathematical model for neuron-astrocyte networks. The model incorporates elements of the tripartite synapse and the spatial branching structure of coupled astrocytes. We consider glutamate-induced calcium signaling as a specific mode of excitability and transmission in astrocytic–neuronal networks. We reproduce local and global dynamical patterns observed experimentally.

  10. Death-Associated Protein Kinase Activity Is Regulated by Coupled Calcium/Calmodulin Binding to Two Distinct Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Bertrand; Huart, Anne-Sophie; Temmerman, Koen; Vahokoski, Juha; Mertens, Haydyn D T; Komadina, Dana; Hoffmann, Jan-Erik; Yumerefendi, Hayretin; Svergun, Dmitri I; Kursula, Petri; Schultz, Carsten; McCarthy, Andrew A; Hart, Darren J; Wilmanns, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    The regulation of many protein kinases by binding to calcium/calmodulin connects two principal mechanisms in signaling processes: protein phosphorylation and responses to dose- and time-dependent calcium signals. We used the calcium/calmodulin-dependent members of the death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) family to investigate the role of a basic DAPK signature loop near the kinase active site. In DAPK2, this loop comprises a novel dimerization-regulated calcium/calmodulin-binding site, in addition to a well-established calcium/calmodulin site in the C-terminal autoregulatory domain. Unexpectedly, impairment of the basic loop interaction site completely abolishes calcium/calmodulin binding and DAPK2 activity is reduced to a residual level, indicative of coupled binding to the two sites. This contrasts with the generally accepted view that kinase calcium/calmodulin interactions are autonomous of the kinase catalytic domain. Our data establish an intricate model of multi-step kinase activation and expand our understanding of how calcium binding connects with other mechanisms involved in kinase activity regulation. PMID:27133022

  11. In vivo analysis of the calcium signature in the plant Golgi apparatus reveals unique dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordenes, Viviana R; Moreno, Ignacio; Maturana, Daniel; Norambuena, Lorena; Trewavas, Anthony J; Orellana, Ariel

    2012-11-01

    The Golgi apparatus is thought to play a role in calcium homeostasis in plant cells. However, the calcium dynamics in this organelle is unknown in plants. To monitor the [Ca2+]Golgiin vivo, we obtained and analyzed Arabidopsis thaliana plants that express aequorin in the Golgi. Our results show that free [Ca2+] levels in the Golgi are higher than in the cytosol (0.70 μM vs. 0.05 μM, respectively). Stimuli such as cold shock, mechanical stimulation and hyperosmotic stress, led to a transient increase in cytosolic calcium; however, no instant change in the [Ca2+]Golgi concentration was detected. Nevertheless, a delayed increase in the [Ca2+]Golgi up to 2-3 μM was observed. Cyclopiazonic acid and thapsigargin inhibited the stimuli-induced [Ca2+]Golgi increase, suggesting that [Ca2+]Golgi levels are dependent upon the activity of Ca2+-ATPases. Treatment of these plants with the synthetic auxin analog, 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D), produced a slow decrease of free calcium in the organelle. Our results indicate that the plant Golgi apparatus is not involved in the generation of cytosolic calcium transients and exhibits its own dynamics modulated in part by the activity of Ca2+ pumps and hormones. PMID:22831913

  12. Role of calcium signaling in down-regulation of aggrecan induced by cyclic tensile strain in annulus fibrosus cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Zhi-liang; ZHOU Yue; LI Hua-zhuang; CAO Guo-yong; TENG Hai-jun

    2006-01-01

    Objective:To study the role of intracellular calcium signal pathway in the down-regulation of aggrecan induced by cyclic tensile strain in the annulus fibrosus cells. Methods :The expression of aggrecan mRNA and core protein were respectively detected with RT-PCR and western blot after the channels transmitting calcium ions were blocked with EGTA, gadolinium and verapamil. Results:EGTA, gadolinium and verapamil partially prevented the effects of cyclic tensile strain on the expression of aggrecan in annulus fibrosus cells. Conclusion:The calcium signaling is involved in the down-regulation of proteoglycan resulting from cyclic tensile strain in the annulus fibrosus cells.

  13. Regulation of gamma T-cell antigen receptor expression by intracellular calcium in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line DND41.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta-Zaragoza, O; Martínez-Valdez, H; Madrid-Marina, V

    1996-01-01

    The calcium ionophore, ionomycin, promotes an increase of intracellular calcium and regulates mRNA expression of gamma/delta-TcR gene in human T lymphocytes. The mechanism of this regulation is not yet clear. Thus, the regulation by intracellular calcium requires elucidation. We studied the gamma-TcR gene expression in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line DND41 (CD4- CD8-) by Northern blot and flow cytometric analysis. The mRNA levels of gamma-TcR increased by ionomycin, anti-CD3, and with TPA. TPA had an antagonistic effect to both ionomycin and anti-CD3. Also, TPA inhibits the increased intracellular calcium promoted by ionomycin but not the increase promoted by anti-CD3 and ionomycin. Our results suggest that intracellular calcium induces mRNA and protein expression of gamma-TcR chain. This effect is antagonized by protein kinase C-activation. Thus, we conclude that the target cells of the differential regulation on gamma-TcR mRNA expression by intracellular calcium modulators are the CD4- CD8- cells, and this is due to cytosolic calcium mobilization. PMID:8854386

  14. Calcium Regulation and Bone Mineral Metabolism in Elderly Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vickram Tejwani

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The elderly chronic kidney disease (CKD population is growing. Both aging and CKD can disrupt calcium (Ca2+ homeostasis and cause alterations of multiple Ca2+-regulatory mechanisms, including parathyroid hormone, vitamin D, fibroblast growth factor-23/Klotho, calcium-sensing receptor and Ca2+-phosphate product. These alterations can be deleterious to bone mineral metabolism and soft tissue health, leading to metabolic bone disease and vascular calcification and aging, termed CKD-mineral and bone disorder (MBD. CKD-MBD is associated with morbid clinical outcomes, including fracture, cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality. In this paper, we comprehensively review Ca2+ regulation and bone mineral metabolism, with a special emphasis on elderly CKD patients. We also present the current treatment-guidelines and management options for CKD-MBD.

  15. The calcium uniporter regulates the permeability transition pore in isolated cortical mitochondria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Yu; Shilei Wang; Peng Wang; Yu Li; Shuhong Li; Li Wang; Hongbing Chen; Yanting Wang

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the influence of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter on the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, the present study observed mitochondrial morphology in cortical neurons isolated from adult rats using transmission electron microscopy, and confirmed the morphology and activity of isolated mitochondria by detecting succinic dehydrogenase and monoamine oxidase, two mitochondrial enzymes. Isolated mitochondria were treated with either ruthenium red, an inhibitor of the uniporter, spermine, an activator of the uniporter, or in combination with cyclosporin A, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. Results showed that ruthenium red inhibited CaCl2-induced mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening, spermine enhanced opening, and cyclosporin A attenuated the effects of spermine. Results demonstrated that the mitochondrial calcium uniporter plays a role in regulating the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in mitochondria isolated from the rat brain cortex.

  16. Regulation of peroxisome dynamics by phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeljeklaus, Silke; Schummer, Andreas; Mastalski, Thomas; Platta, Harald W; Warscheid, Bettina

    2016-05-01

    Peroxisomes are highly dynamic organelles that can rapidly change in size, abundance, and protein content in response to alterations in nutritional and other environmental conditions. These dynamic changes in peroxisome features, referred to as peroxisome dynamics, rely on the coordinated action of several processes of peroxisome biogenesis. Revealing the regulatory mechanisms of peroxisome dynamics is an emerging theme in cell biology. These mechanisms are inevitably linked to and synchronized with the biogenesis and degradation of peroxisomes. To date, the key players and basic principles of virtually all steps in the peroxisomal life cycle are known, but regulatory mechanisms remained largely elusive. A number of recent studies put the spotlight on reversible protein phosphorylation for the control of peroxisome dynamics and highlighted peroxisomes as hubs for cellular signal integration and regulation. Here, we will present and discuss the results of several studies performed using yeast and mammalian cells that convey a sense of the impact protein phosphorylation may have on the modulation of peroxisome dynamics by regulating peroxisomal matrix and membrane protein import, proliferation, inheritance, and degradation. We further put forward the idea to make use of current data on phosphorylation sites of peroxisomal and peroxisome-associated proteins reported in advanced large-scale phosphoproteomic studies. PMID:26775584

  17. Activity-dependent regulation of calcium and ribosomes in the chick cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, C L; Hyson, R L

    2016-03-01

    Cochlea removal results in the death of 20-30% of neurons in the chick cochlear nucleus, nucleus magnocellularis (NM). Two potentially cytotoxic events, a dramatic rise in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) and a decline in the integrity of ribosomes are observed within 1h of deafferentation. Glutamatergic input from the auditory nerve has been shown to preserve NM neuron health by activating metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), maintaining both normal [Ca(2+)]i and ribosomal integrity. One interpretation of these results is that a common mGluR-activated signaling cascade is required for the maintenance of both [Ca(2+)]i and ribosomal integrity. This could happen if both responses are influenced directly by a common messenger, or if the loss of mGluR activation causes changes in one component that secondarily causes changes in the other. The present studies tested this common-mediator hypothesis in slice preparations by examining activity-dependent regulation of [Ca(2+)]i and ribosomes in the same tissue after selectively blocking group I mGluRs (1-Aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA)) or group II mGluRs (LY 341495) during unilateral auditory nerve stimulation. Changes in [Ca(2+)]i of NM neurons were measured using fura-2 ratiometric calcium imaging and the tissue was subsequently processed for Y10B immunoreactivity (Y10B-ir), an antibody that recognizes a ribosomal epitope. The group I mGluR antagonist blocked the activity-dependent regulation of both [Ca(2+)]i and Y10B-ir, but the group II antagonist blocked only the activity-dependent regulation of Y10B-ir. That is, even when group II receptors were blocked, stimulation continued to maintain low [Ca(2+)]i, but it did not maintain Y10B-ir. These results suggest a dissociation in how calcium and ribosomes are regulated in NM neurons and that ribosomes can be regulated through a mechanism that is independent of calcium regulation. PMID:26739326

  18. Calcium Regulation of Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Budding: Mechanistic Implications for Host-Oriented Therapeutic Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ziying; Madara, Jonathan J; Herbert, Andrew; Prugar, Laura I; Ruthel, Gordon; Lu, Jianhong; Liu, Yuliang; Liu, Wenbo; Liu, Xiaohong; Wrobel, Jay E; Reitz, Allen B; Dye, John M; Harty, Ronald N; Freedman, Bruce D

    2015-10-01

    Hemorrhagic fever viruses, including the filoviruses (Ebola and Marburg) and arenaviruses (Lassa and Junín viruses), are serious human pathogens for which there are currently no FDA approved therapeutics or vaccines. Importantly, transmission of these viruses, and specifically late steps of budding, critically depend upon host cell machinery. Consequently, strategies which target these mechanisms represent potential targets for broad spectrum host oriented therapeutics. An important cellular signal implicated previously in EBOV budding is calcium. Indeed, host cell calcium signals are increasingly being recognized to play a role in steps of entry, replication, and transmission for a range of viruses, but if and how filoviruses and arenaviruses mobilize calcium and the precise stage of virus transmission regulated by calcium have not been defined. Here we demonstrate that expression of matrix proteins from both filoviruses and arenaviruses triggers an increase in host cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration by a mechanism that requires host Orai1 channels. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Orai1 regulates both VLP and infectious filovirus and arenavirus production and spread. Notably, suppression of the protein that triggers Orai activation (Stromal Interaction Molecule 1, STIM1) and genetic inactivation or pharmacological blockade of Orai1 channels inhibits VLP and infectious virus egress. These findings are highly significant as they expand our understanding of host mechanisms that may broadly control enveloped RNA virus budding, and they establish Orai and STIM1 as novel targets for broad-spectrum host-oriented therapeutics to combat these emerging BSL-4 pathogens and potentially other enveloped RNA viruses that bud via similar mechanisms. PMID:26513362

  19. Calcium Regulation of Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Budding: Mechanistic Implications for Host-Oriented Therapeutic Intervention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziying Han

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic fever viruses, including the filoviruses (Ebola and Marburg and arenaviruses (Lassa and Junín viruses, are serious human pathogens for which there are currently no FDA approved therapeutics or vaccines. Importantly, transmission of these viruses, and specifically late steps of budding, critically depend upon host cell machinery. Consequently, strategies which target these mechanisms represent potential targets for broad spectrum host oriented therapeutics. An important cellular signal implicated previously in EBOV budding is calcium. Indeed, host cell calcium signals are increasingly being recognized to play a role in steps of entry, replication, and transmission for a range of viruses, but if and how filoviruses and arenaviruses mobilize calcium and the precise stage of virus transmission regulated by calcium have not been defined. Here we demonstrate that expression of matrix proteins from both filoviruses and arenaviruses triggers an increase in host cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration by a mechanism that requires host Orai1 channels. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Orai1 regulates both VLP and infectious filovirus and arenavirus production and spread. Notably, suppression of the protein that triggers Orai activation (Stromal Interaction Molecule 1, STIM1 and genetic inactivation or pharmacological blockade of Orai1 channels inhibits VLP and infectious virus egress. These findings are highly significant as they expand our understanding of host mechanisms that may broadly control enveloped RNA virus budding, and they establish Orai and STIM1 as novel targets for broad-spectrum host-oriented therapeutics to combat these emerging BSL-4 pathogens and potentially other enveloped RNA viruses that bud via similar mechanisms.

  20. Mapping the spatiotemporal dynamics of calcium signaling in cellular neural networks using optical flow

    CERN Document Server

    Buibas, Marius; Nizar, Krystal; Silva, Gabriel A

    2009-01-01

    An optical flow gradient algorithm was applied to spontaneously forming networks of neurons and glia in culture imaged by fluorescence optical microscopy in order to map functional calcium signaling with single pixel resolution. Optical flow estimates the direction and speed of motion of objects in an image between subsequent frames in a recorded digital sequence of images (i.e. a movie). Computed vector field outputs by the algorithm were able to track the spatiotemporal dynamics of calcium signaling patterns. We begin by briefly reviewing the mathematics of the optical flow algorithm, describe how to solve for the displacement vectors, and how to measure their reliability. We then compare computed flow vectors with manually estimated vectors for the progression of a calcium signal recorded from representative astrocyte cultures. Finally, we applied the algorithm to preparations of primary astrocytes and hippocampal neurons and to the rMC-1 Muller glial cell line in order to illustrate the capability of the ...

  1. IGF-1 induces IP3 -dependent calcium signal involved in the regulation of myostatin gene expression mediated by NFAT during myoblast differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés, Juan A; Flores, Sylvia; Fuentes, Eduardo N; Osorio-Fuentealba, Cesar; Jaimovich, Enrique; Molina, Alfredo

    2013-07-01

    Skeletal muscle differentiation is a complex and highly regulated process characterized by cell cycle arrest, which is associated with morphological changes including myoblast alignment, elongation, and fusion into multinucleated myotubes. This is a balanced process dynamically coordinated by positive and negative signals such as the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1) and myostatin (MSTN), respectively. In this study, we report that the stimulation of skeletal myoblasts during differentiation with IGF-1 induces a rapid and transient calcium increase from intracellular stores, which are principally mediated through the phospholipase C gamma (PLC γ)/inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3 )-dependent signaling pathways. This response was completely blocked when myoblasts were incubated with LY294002 or transfected with the dominant-negative p110 gamma, suggesting a fundamental role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) in PLCγ activation. Additionally, we show that calcium released via IP3 and induced by IGF-1 stimulates NFAT-dependent gene transcription and nuclear translocation of the GFP-labeled NFATc3 isoform. This activation was independent of extracellular calcium influx and calcium release mediated by ryanodine receptor (RyR). Finally, we examined mstn mRNA levels and mstn promoter activity in myoblasts stimulated with IGF-1. We found a significant increase in mRNA contents and in reporter activity, which was inhibited by cyclosporin A, 11R-VIVIT, and by inhibitors of the PI3Kγ, PLCγ, and IP3 receptor. Our results strongly suggest that IGF-1 regulates myostatin transcription through the activation of the NFAT transcription factor in an IP3 /calcium-dependent manner. This is the first study to demonstrate a role of calcium-dependent signaling pathways in the mRNA expression of myostatin. PMID:23255067

  2. Drosophila mushroom body Kenyon cells generate spontaneous calcium transients mediated by PLTX-sensitive calcium channels.

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Shaojuan Amy; Campusano, Jorge M.; Su, Hailing; O'Dowd, Diane K.

    2005-01-01

    Spontaneous calcium oscillations in mushroom bodies of late stage pupal and adult Drosophila brains have been implicated in memory consolidation during olfactory associative learning. This study explores the cellular mechanisms regulating calcium dynamics in Kenyon cells, principal neurons in mushroom bodies. Fura-2 imaging shows that Kenyon cells cultured from late stage Drosophila pupae generate spontaneous calcium transients in a cell autonomous fashion, at a frequency similar to calcium o...

  3. Calmodulin effects on steroids-regulated plasma membrane calcium pump activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylinska, Ludmila; Kowalska, Iwona; Ferenc, Bozena

    2009-03-01

    It is now generally accepted that non-genomic steroids action precedes their genomic effects by modulation of intracellular signaling pathways within seconds after application. Ca(2+) is a very potent and ubiquitous ion in all cells, and its concentration is precisely regulated. The most sensitive on Ca(2+) increase is ATP-consuming plasma membrane calcium pump (PMCA). The enzyme is coded by four genes, but isoforms diversity was detected in excitable and non-excitable cells. It is the only ion pump stimulated directly by calmodulin (CaM). We examined the role of PMCA isoforms composition and CaM effect in regulation of Ca(2+) uptake by estradiol, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), pregnenolone (PREG), and their sulfates in a concentration range from 10(-9) to 10(-6) M, using the membranes from rat cortical synaptosomes, differentiated PC12 cells, and human erythrocytes. In excitable membranes with full set of PMCAs steroids apparently increased Ca(2+) uptake, although to a variable extent. In most of the cases, CaM decreased transport by 30-40% below controls. Erythrocyte PMCA was regulated by the steroids somewhat differently than excitable cells. CaM strongly increased the potency for Ca(2+) extrusion in membranes incubated with 17-beta-estradiol and PREG. Our results indicated that steroids may sufficiently control cytoplasmic calcium concentration within physiological and therapeutic range. The response depended on the cell type, PMCA isoforms expression profile, CaM presence, and the steroids structure. PMID:19226536

  4. Calcium ionophore A23187 as a regulator of gene expression in mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    The calcium ionophore A23187 can reversibly induce the expression of two glucose-regulated genes, p3C5 and p4A3. This induction requires a continuous presence of the ionophore for over 2 h. Although extracellular Ca2+ is important for the optimal effect of A23187, it is not necessary for the induction, since a similar response with a lower magnitude can be triggered in cells cultured in low Ca2+ medium buffered with EGTA. Both the basal and induced levels of p3C5 and p4A3 transcripts can be m...

  5. The influence of pore-water advection, benthic photosynthesis, and respiration on calcium carbonate dynamics in reef sands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rao, A.M.F.; Polerecky, L.; Ionescu, D.; Meysman, F.J.R.; de-Beer, D.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate diel calcium carbonate (CaCO3) dynamics in permeable coral reef sands, we measured pore-water profiles and fluxes of oxygen (O2), nutrients, pH, calcium (Ca2+), and alkalinity (TA) across the sediment-water interface in sands of different permeability

  6. Two chromogranin a-derived peptides induce calcium entry in human neutrophils by calmodulin-regulated calcium independent phospholipase A2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antimicrobial peptides derived from the natural processing of chromogranin A (CgA are co-secreted with catecholamines upon stimulation of chromaffin cells. Since PMNs play a central role in innate immunity, we examine responses by PMNs following stimulation by two antimicrobial CgA-derived peptides. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: PMNs were treated with different concentrations of CgA-derived peptides in presence of several drugs. Calcium mobilization was observed by using flow cytometry and calcium imaging experiments. Immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy have shown the intracellular localization of the peptides. The calmodulin-binding and iPLA2 activating properties of the peptides were shown by Surface Plasmon Resonance and iPLA2 activity assays. Finally, a proteomic analysis of the material released after PMNs treatment with CgA-derived peptides was performed by using HPLC and Nano-LC MS-MS. By using flow cytometry we first observed that after 15 s, in presence of extracellular calcium, Chromofungin (CHR or Catestatin (CAT induce a concentration-dependent transient increase of intracellular calcium. In contrast, in absence of extra cellular calcium the peptides are unable to induce calcium depletion from the stores after 10 minutes exposure. Treatment with 2-APB (2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, a store operated channels (SOCs blocker, inhibits completely the calcium entry, as shown by calcium imaging. We also showed that they activate iPLA2 as the two CaM-binding factors (W7 and CMZ and that the two sequences can be aligned with the two CaM-binding domains reported for iPLA2. We finally analyzed by HPLC and Nano-LC MS-MS the material released by PMNs following stimulation by CHR and CAT. We characterized several factors important for inflammation and innate immunity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: For the first time, we demonstrate that CHR and CAT, penetrate into PMNs, inducing extracellular calcium entry by a CaM-regulated i

  7. Fluctuations in Cytosolic Calcium Regulate the Neuronal Malate-Aspartate NADH Shuttle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Satrústegui, Jorgina; Bak, Lasse K

    2015-01-01

    The malate-aspartate NADH shuttle (MAS) operates in neurons and other cells to translocate reducing equivalents from the cytosol to the mitochondrial matrix, thus allowing a continued flux through the glycolytic pathway and metabolism of extracellular lactate. Recent discoveries have taught us that...... MAS is regulated by fluctuations in cytosolic Ca(2+) levels, and that this regulation is required to maintain a tight coupling between neuronal activity and mitochondrial respiration and oxidative phosphorylation. At cytosolic Ca(2+) fluctuations below the threshold of the mitochondrial calcium...... uniporter, there is a positive correlation between Ca(2+) and MAS activity; however, if cytosolic Ca(2+) increases above the threshold, MAS activity is thought to be reduced by an intricate mechanism. The latter forces the neurons to partly rely on anaerobic glycolysis producing lactate that may be...

  8. A model of calcium signaling and degranulation dynamics induced by laser irradiation in mast cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI XiaoMin; ZHENG YuFan; LIU ZengRong; YANG WenZhong

    2008-01-01

    Recent experiments show that calcium signaling and degranulation dynamics induced by low power laser irradiation in mast cells must rely on extracellular Ca2+ influx. An analytical expression of Ca2+ flux through TRPV4 cation channel in response to interaction of laser photon energy and extracellular Ca2+ is deduced, and a model characterizing dynamics of calcium signaling and degranulation activated by laser irradiation in mast cells is established. The model indicates that the characteristics of calcium signaling and degranulation dynamics are determined by interaction between laser photon energy and Ca2+ influx. Extracellular Ca2+ concentration is so high that even small photon energy can activate mast cells, thus avoiding the possible injury caused by laser irradiation with shorter wavelengths. The model predicts that there exists a narrow parameter domain of photon energy and extracellular Ca2+ concentration of which results in cytosolic Ca2+ limit cycle oscillations, and shows that PKC activity is in direct proportion to the frequency of Ca2+ oscillations. With the model it is found that sustained and stable maximum plateau of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration can get optimal degranulation rate. Furthermore, the idea of introducing the realistic physical energy into model is applicable to modeling other physical signal transduction systems.

  9. Inference of neuronal network spike dynamics and topology from calcium imaging data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Lütcke

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Two-photon calcium imaging enables functional analysis of neuronal circuits by inferring action potential (AP occurrence ('spike trains' from cellular fluorescence signals. It remains unclear how experimental parameters such as signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and acquisition rate affect spike inference and whether additional information about network structure can be extracted. Here we present a simulation framework for quantitatively assessing how well spike dynamics and network topology can be inferred from noisy calcium imaging data. For simulated AP-evoked calcium transients in neocortical pyramidal cells, we analyzed the quality of spike inference as a function of SNR and data acquisition rate using a recently introduced peeling algorithm. Given experimentally attainable values of SNR and acquisition rate, neural spike trains could be reconstructed accurately and with up to millisecond precision. We then applied statistical neuronal network models to explore how remaining uncertainties in spike inference affect estimates of network connectivity and topological features of network organization. We define the experimental conditions suitable for inferring whether the network has a scale-free structure and determine how well hub neurons can be identified. Our findings provide a benchmark for future calcium imaging studies that aim to reliably infer neuronal network properties.

  10. Role of AQP2 in activation of calcium entry by hypotonicity: implications in cell volume regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galizia, L; Flamenco, M P; Rivarola, V; Capurro, C; Ford, P

    2008-03-01

    We previously reported in a rat cortical collecting duct cell line (RCCD(1)) that the presence of aquaporin 2 (AQP2) in the cell membrane is critical for the rapid activation of regulatory volume decrease mechanisms (RVD) (Ford et al. Biol Cell 97: 687-697, 2005). The aim of our present work was to investigate the signaling pathway that links AQP2 to this rapid RVD activation. Since it has been previously described that hypotonic conditions induce intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) increases in different cell types, we tested the hypothesis that AQP2 could have a role in activation of calcium entry by hypotonicity and its implication in cell volume regulation. Using a fluorescent probe technique, we studied [Ca(2+)](i) and cell volume changes in response to a hypotonic shock in WT-RCCD(1) (not expressing aquaporins) and in AQP2-RCCD(1) (transfected with AQP2) cells. We found that after a hypotonic shock only AQP2-RCCD(1) cells exhibit a substantial increase in [Ca(2+)](i). This [Ca(2+)](i) increase is strongly dependent on extracellular Ca(2+) and is partially inhibited by thapsigargin (1 muM) indicating that the rise in [Ca(2+)](i) reflects both influx from the extracellular medium and release from intracellular stores. Exposure of AQP2-RCCD(1) cells to 100 muM gadolinium reduced the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) suggesting the involvement of a mechanosensitive calcium channel. Furthermore, exposure of cells to all of the above described conditions impaired rapid RVD. We conclude that the expression of AQP2 in the cell membrane is critical to produce the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) which is necessary to activate RVD in RCCD(1) cells. PMID:18094031

  11. Crystal structure analysis reveals Pseudomonas PilY1 as an essential calcium-dependent regulator of bacterial surface motility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orans, Jillian; Johnson, Michael D.L.; Coggan, Kimberly A.; Sperlazza, Justin R.; Heiniger, Ryan W.; Wolfgang, Matthew C.; Redinbo, Matthew R. (UNC)

    2010-09-21

    Several bacterial pathogens require the 'twitching' motility produced by filamentous type IV pili (T4P) to establish and maintain human infections. Two cytoplasmic ATPases function as an oscillatory motor that powers twitching motility via cycles of pilus extension and retraction. The regulation of this motor, however, has remained a mystery. We present the 2.1 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa pilus-biogenesis factor PilY1, and identify a single site on this protein required for bacterial translocation. The structure reveals a modified {beta}-propeller fold and a distinct EF-hand-like calcium-binding site conserved in pathogens with retractile T4P. We show that preventing calcium binding by PilY1 using either an exogenous calcium chelator or mutation of a single residue disrupts Pseudomonas twitching motility by eliminating surface pili. In contrast, placing a lysine in this site to mimic the charge of a bound calcium interferes with motility in the opposite manner - by producing an abundance of nonfunctional surface pili. Our data indicate that calcium binding and release by the unique loop identified in the PilY1 crystal structure controls the opposing forces of pilus extension and retraction. Thus, PilY1 is an essential, calcium-dependent regulator of bacterial twitching motility.

  12. S-acylation dependent post-translational cross-talk regulates large conductance calcium- and voltage- activated potassium (BK channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MichaelJShipston

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms that control surface expression and/or activity of large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK channels are important determinants of their (pathophysiological function. Indeed, BK channel dysfunction is associated with major human disorders ranging from epilepsy to hypertension and obesity. S-acylation (S-palmitoylation represents a major reversible, post-translational modification controlling the properties and function of many proteins including ion channels. Recent evidence reveals that both pore-forming and regulatory subunits of BK channels are S-acylated and control channel trafficking and regulation by AGC-family protein kinases. The pore-forming α-subunit is S-acylated at two distinct sites within the N- and C-terminus, each site being regulated by different palmitoyl acyl transferases (zDHHCs and acyl thioesterases. (APTs. S-acylation of the N-terminus controls channel trafficking and surface expression whereas S-acylation of the C-terminal domain determines regulation of channel activity by AGC-family protein kinases. S-acylation of the regulatory β4-subunit controls ER exit and surface expression of BK channels but does not affect ion channel kinetics at the plasma membrane. Furthermore, a significant number of previously identified BK-channel interacting proteins have been shown, or are predicted to be, S-acylated. Thus, the BK channel multi-molecular signalling complex may be dynamically regulated by this fundamental post-translational modification and thus S-acylation likely represents an important determinant of BK channel physiology in health and disease.

  13. A forward genetic screen reveals that calcium-dependent protein kinase 3 regulates egress in Toxoplasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Garrison

    Full Text Available Egress from the host cell is a crucial and highly regulated step in the biology of the obligate intracellular parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. Active egress depends on calcium fluxes and appears to be a crucial step in escaping the attack from the immune system and, potentially, in enabling the parasites to shuttle into appropriate cells for entry into the brain of the host. Previous genetic screens have yielded mutants defective in both ionophore-induced egress and ionophore-induced death. Using whole genome sequencing of one mutant and subsequent analysis of all mutants from these screens, we find that, remarkably, four independent mutants harbor a mis-sense mutation in the same gene, TgCDPK3, encoding a calcium-dependent protein kinase. All four mutations are predicted to alter key regions of TgCDPK3 and this is confirmed by biochemical studies of recombinant forms of each. By complementation we confirm a crucial role for TgCDPK3 in the rapid induction of parasite egress and we establish that TgCDPK3 is critical for formation of latent stages in the brains of mice. Genetic knockout of TgCDPK3 confirms a crucial role for this kinase in parasite egress and a non-essential role for it in the lytic cycle.

  14. Red Liriope platyphylla stimulated the insulin secretion through the regulation of calcium concentration in rat insulinoma cells and animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye-Ryun; Kim, Ji-Eun; Lee, Young-Ju; Kwak, Moon-Hwa; Im, Dong-Soon; Hwang, Dae-Youn

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Red L. platyphylla (RLP) on calcium and glucose levels during insulin secretion. To achieve this, alteration of insulin and calcium concentrations was measured in rat insulinoma-1 (INS-1) cells and animal models in response to RLP treatment. In INS-1 cells, maximum secretion of insulin was detected upon treatment with 200 µg/mL of RLP for 20 min. Nifedipine, an L-type calcium channel blocker, effectively inhibited insulin secretion from INS-1 cells. Regarding calcium levels, the maximum concentration of intracellular calcium in INS-1 cells was obtained by treatment with 100 µg/mL of RLP, whereas this level was reduced under conditions of 200 µg/mL of RLP. Further, RLP-treated INS-1 cells showed a higher level of intracellular calcium than that of L. platyphylla (LP), Korea White Ginseng (KWG), or Korea Red Ginseng (KRG)-treated cells. This RLP-induced increase in intracellular calcium was abrogated but not completely abolished upon treatment with 40 µM nifedipine in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the insulin level was dramatically elevated upon co-treatment with high concentrations of glucose and RLP, whereas it was maintained at a low level in response to glucose and RLP co-treatment at low concentrations. In an animal experiment, the serum concentration of calcium increased or decreased upon RLP treatment according to glucose level compared to vehicle treatment. Therefore, these results suggest that insulin secretion induced by RLP treatment may be tightly correlated with calcium regulation, which suggests RLP is an excellent candidate for diabetes treatment. PMID:23825481

  15. Calcium-regulated in vivo protein phosphorylation in Zea mays L. root tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghothama, K. G.; Reddy, A. S.; Friedmann, M.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1987-01-01

    Calcium dependent protein phosphorylation was studied in corn (Zea mays L.) root tips. Prior to in vivo protein phosphorylation experiments, the effect of calcium, ethyleneglycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N-N' -tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and calcium ionophore (A-23187) on phosphorus uptake was studied. Calcium increased phosphorus uptake, whereas EGTA and A-23187 decreased it. Consequently, phosphorus concentration in the media was adjusted so as to attain similar uptake in different treatments. Phosphoproteins were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Distinct changes in phosphorylation were observed following altered calcium levels. Calcium depletion in root tips with EGTA and A-23187 decreased protein phosphorylation. However, replenishment of calcium following EGTA and ionophore pretreatment enhanced phosphorylation of proteins. Preloading of the root tips with 32P in the presence of EGTA and A-23187 followed by a ten minute calcium treatment, resulted in increased phosphorylation indicating the involvement of calcium, calcium and calmodulin-dependent kinases. Calmodulin antagonist W-7 was effective in inhibiting calcium-promoted phosphorylation. These studies suggest a physiological role for calcium-dependent phosphorylation in calcium-mediated processes in plants.

  16. Light-regulated root gravitropism: a role for, and characterization of, a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homolog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y. T.; Feldman, L. J.

    1997-01-01

    Roots of many species grow downward (orthogravitropism) only when illuminated. Previous work suggests that this is a calcium-regulated response and that both calmodulin and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases participate in transducing gravity and light stimuli. A genomic sequence has been obtained for a calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase homolog (MCK1) expressed in root caps, the site of perception for both light and gravity. This homolog consists of 7265 base pairs and contains 11 exons and 10 introns. Since MCK1 is expressed constitutively in both light and dark, it is unlikely that the light directly affects MCK1 expression, though the activity of the protein may be affected by light. In cultivars showing light-regulated gravitropism, we hypothesize that MCK1, or a homolog, functions in establishing the auxin asymmetry necessary for orthogravitropism.

  17. Changes in calcium regulating hormone and sex hormone in male patients with liver cirrhosis and their clinical significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To explore the significance of the changes in calcium regulating hormone and sex hormone in male patients with liver cirrhosis, a prospective study was performed on 48 male patients with liver cirrhosis and 43 controls. The serum levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcitonin (CT), osteocalcin (BGP), estradiol (E2) and testosterone (T) were determined by IRMA or RIA. Serum levels of calcium(Ca2+), phosphorus (P3+) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were determined, and bone mineral density (BMD) was measured in all patients and controls. Cirrhotic patients showed lower serum CT, BGP, Ca2+, P3+ T, and BMD. The serum levels of PTH, E2, ALP and BLP were increased significantly in the cirrhosis group. When the condition of cirrhosis deteriorated, above-mentioned changes became much more obvious. Significant disorders of calcium regulating hormone and sex hormone in end-stage cirrhotic patients resulted in osteoporosis

  18. Growth Control in Colon Epithelial Cells: Gadolinium Enhances Calcium-Mediated Growth Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Attili, Durga; Jenkins, Brian; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; Dame, Michael K.; Varani, James

    2012-01-01

    Gadolinium, a member of the lanthanoid family of transition metals, interacts with calcium-binding sites on proteins and other biological molecules. The overall goal of the present investigation was to determine if gadolinium could enhance calcium-induced epithelial cell growth inhibition in the colon. Gadolinium at concentrations as low as 1–5 µM combined with calcium inhibits proliferation of human colonic epithelial cells more effectively than calcium alone. Gadolinium had no detectable ef...

  19. Temporal dynamics and regulation of lake metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stæhr, Peter Anton; Jensen, Kaj Sand

    2007-01-01

    We studied temporal dynamics and regulation of oxygen metabolism in the upper mixed layer of a nutrientrich shallow Danish lake by continuous measurements of oxygen, irradiance, wind, and temperature and frequent measurements of algal chlorophyll, organic pools, and inorganic nutrients. Chlorophyll...... minima from fall to spring after broad-scale changes in irradiance, temperature, mixing depth, and biomass and growth rate of the algal community and concentrations of inorganic nutrients. Lake metabolism was annually balanced (mean GPP :R 1.04 in 2003 and 1.01 in 2004), with net autotrophy occurring......, which integrates growth and loss processes over longer periods. The continuous approach to lake metabolism provides better data and can provide a more accurate picture than averages of a few discrete measurements. Weekly averages reflected the characteristic seasonal peaks and troughs also observed for...

  20. Calcium regulation in frog peripheral nerve by the blood-nerve barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this research were: (a) to investigate the characteristics of calcium transport across the perineurium and the endoneurial capillaries, and (b) to gain a better understanding of the extent of calcium homeostasis in the endoneurial space. To study the nature of calcium transport across the perineurium, the flux of radiotracer 45Ca was measured through the perineurial cylinder, isolated from the frog sciatic nerve, and through the perineurium into the nerve in situ. To study the nature of calcium transport across the endoneurial capillaries, the permeability-surface area product (PA) of 45Ca was determined as a function of the calcium concentration in the blood. To study calcium homeostasis, the calcium content of the frog sciatic nerve was determined as a function of chronic changes in plasma [Ca

  1. Dendritic spine changes in the development of alcohol addiction regulated by α-calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

    OpenAIRE

    Zofia Mijakowska

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Alcohol has many adverse effects on the brain. Among them are dendritic spine morphology alterations, which are believed to be the basis of alcohol addiction. Autophosphorylation of α-calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (αCaMKII) has been shown to regulate spine morphology in vitro. Here we show that αCaMKII can also regulate addiction related behaviour and dendritic spine morphology changes caused by alcohol consumption in vivo. Method 12 αCaMKII-autophosphorylatio...

  2. Detection of differentially regulated subsarcolemmal calcium signals activated by vasoactive agonists in rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells

    OpenAIRE

    Subedi, Krishna P; Paudel, Omkar; Sham, James S.K.

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular calcium (Ca2+) plays pivotal roles in distinct cellular functions through global and local signaling in various subcellular compartments, and subcellular Ca2+ signal is the key factor for independent regulation of different cellular functions. In vascular smooth muscle cells, subsarcolemmal Ca2+ is an important regulator of excitation-contraction coupling, and nucleoplasmic Ca2+ is crucial for excitation-transcription coupling. However, information on Ca2+ signals in these subce...

  3. Importance of Calcium

    OpenAIRE

    TANDOĞAN, Berivan; ULUSU, N. Nuray

    2005-01-01

    Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body. Calcium regulates many cellular processes and has important structural roles in living organisms. Skeletal muscle structure and function, polymerisation of fibrin and the conduction of impulses in the nervous system are regulated by calcium. Calcium is an important intracellular messenger in protozoa, plants, and animals. Calcium-transporting systems which are located in the plasma membrane and in the organelles, regulate the ionic concentrati...

  4. Calcium-Mediated Regulation of Proton-Coupled Sodium Transport - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumaker, Karen S [Professor

    2013-10-24

    The long-term goal of our experiments was to understand mechanisms that regulate energy coupling by ion currents in plants. Activities of living organisms require chemical, mechanical, osmotic or electrical work, the energy for which is supplied by metabolism. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has long been recognized as the universal energy currency, with metabolism supporting the synthesis of ATP and the hydrolysis of ATP being used for the subsequent work. However, ATP is not the only energy currency in living organisms. A second and very different energy currency links metabolism to work by the movement of ions passing from one side of a membrane to the other. These ion currents play a major role in energy capture and they support a range of physiological processes from the active transport of nutrients to the spatial control of growth and development. In Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), the activity of a plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger, SALT OVERLY SENSITIVE1 (SOS1), is essential for regulation of sodium ion homeostasis during plant growth in saline conditions. Mutations in SOS1 result in severely reduced seedling growth in the presence of salt compared to the growth of wild type. SOS1 is a secondary active transporter coupling movement of sodium ions out of the cell using energy stored in the transplasma membrane proton gradient, thereby preventing the build-up of toxic levels of sodium in the cytosol. SOS1 is regulated by complexes containing the SOS2 and CALCINEURIN B-LIKE10 (CBL10) or SOS3 proteins. CBL10 and SOS3 (also identified as CBL4) encode EF-hand calcium sensors that interact physically with and activate SOS2, a serine/threonine protein kinase. The CBL10/SOS2 or SOS3/SOS2 complexes then activate SOS1 Na+/H+ exchange activity. We completed our studies to understand how SOS1 activity is regulated. Specifically, we asked: (1) how does CBL10 regulate SOS1 activity? (2) What role do two putative CBL10-interacting proteins play in SOS1 regulation? (3) Are

  5. The GCaMP3 – A GFP-based calcium sensor for imaging calcium dynamics in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    OpenAIRE

    Borges-Pereira, Lucas; Campos, Bruna R.K.L.; Garcia, Celia R. S.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) signaling pathways are vital for all eukaryotic cells. It is well established that changes in Ca2+ concentration can modulate several physiological processes such as muscle contraction, neurotransmitter secretion and metabolic regulation (Giacomello et al. (2007) [1], Rizzuto and Pozzan (2003) [2]). In the complex life cycle of Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of human malaria, Ca2+ is involved in the processes of protein secretion, motility, cell invasion, cell progr...

  6. Role of Dynamical Instability in the Ab Initio Phase Diagram of Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gennaro, Marco; Saha, Srijan Kumar; Verstraete, Matthieu J.

    2013-07-01

    In the 32-119 GPa pressure range and at room temperature, a simple cubic phase was reported for calcium in many different experiments. Standard linear response theory, both within density functional perturbation theory and frozen phonon calculations, presents dynamical instabilities for the simple cubic structure in the whole pressure range. Many other possible candidate phases, as well as several possible stabilization mechanisms for the simple cubic phase, have been proposed as the result of ab initio predictions but the role of temperature on the relative stability of the different phases has not been systematically investigated. We revisit the stability of the three most important candidate phases of calcium for the intermediate pressure range and for various temperatures, taking explicitly into account thermal corrections relative to electronic as well as phononic entropy and anharmonic contributions. This corrects the discrepancies among previous theoretical results and experiments and presents a different picture of the temperature driven phase transition, which results from dynamical anharmonic stabilization of simple cubic and destabilization of the tetragonal phase.

  7. Solution structure and internal dynamics of NSCP, a compact calcium-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabah, Ghada; Popescu, Razvan; Cox, Jos A; Engelborghs, Yves; Craescu, Constantin T

    2005-04-01

    The solution structure of Nereis diversicolor sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein (NSCP) in the calcium-bound form was determined by NMR spectroscopy, distance geometry and simulated annealing. Based on 1859 NOE restraints and 262 angular restraints, 17 structures were generated with a rmsd of 0.87 A from the mean structure. The solution structure, which is highly similar to the structure obtained by X-ray crystallography, includes two open EF-hand domains, which are in close contact through their hydrophobic surfaces. The internal dynamics of the protein backbone were determined by studying amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange rates and 15N nuclear relaxation. The two methods revealed a highly compact and rigid structure, with greatly restricted mobility at the two termini. For most of the amide protons, the free energy of exchange-compatible structural opening is similar to the free energy of structural stability, suggesting that isotope exchange of these protons takes place through global unfolding of the protein. Enhanced conformational flexibility was noted in the unoccupied Ca2+-binding site II, as well as the neighbouring helices. Analysis of the experimental nuclear relaxation and the molecular dynamics simulations give very similar profiles for the backbone generalized order parameter (S2), a parameter related to the amplitude of fast (picosecond to nanosecond) movements of N(H)-H vectors. We also noted a significant correlation between this parameter, the exchange rate, and the crystallographic B factor along the sequence. PMID:15819893

  8. Microtubule-Dependent Mitochondria Alignment Regulates Calcium Release in Response to Nanomechanical Stimulus in Heart Myocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Miragoli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Arrhythmogenesis during heart failure is a major clinical problem. Regional electrical gradients produce arrhythmias, and cellular ionic transmembrane gradients are its originators. We investigated whether the nanoscale mechanosensitive properties of cardiomyocytes from failing hearts have a bearing upon the initiation of abnormal electrical activity. Hydrojets through a nanopipette indent specific locations on the sarcolemma and initiate intracellular calcium release in both healthy and heart failure cardiomyocytes, as well as in human failing cardiomyocytes. In healthy cells, calcium is locally confined, whereas in failing cardiomyocytes, calcium propagates. Heart failure progressively stiffens the membrane and displaces sub-sarcolemmal mitochondria. Colchicine in healthy cells mimics the failing condition by stiffening the cells, disrupting microtubules, shifting mitochondria, and causing calcium release. Uncoupling the mitochondrial proton gradient abolished calcium initiation in both failing and colchicine-treated cells. We propose the disruption of microtubule-dependent mitochondrial mechanosensor microdomains as a mechanism for abnormal calcium release in failing heart.

  9. Growth Control in Colon Epithelial Cells: Gadolinium Enhances Calcium-Mediated Growth Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attili, Durga; Jenkins, Brian; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; Dame, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Gadolinium, a member of the lanthanoid family of transition metals, interacts with calcium-binding sites on proteins and other biological molecules. The overall goal of the present investigation was to determine if gadolinium could enhance calcium-induced epithelial cell growth inhibition in the colon. Gadolinium at concentrations as low as 1–5 µM combined with calcium inhibits proliferation of human colonic epithelial cells more effectively than calcium alone. Gadolinium had no detectable effect on calcium-induced differentiation in the same cells based on change in cell morphology, induction of E-cadherin synthesis, and translocation of E-cadherin from the cytosol to the cell surface. When the colon epithelial cells were treated with gadolinium and then exposed to increased calcium concentrations, movement of extracellular calcium into the cell was suppressed. In contrast, gadolinium treatment had no effect on ionomycin-induced release of stored intracellular calcium into the cytoplasm. Whether these in vitro observations can be translated into an approach for reducing abnormal proliferation in the colonic mucosa (including polyp formation) is not known. These results do, however, provide an explanation for our recent findings that a multi-mineral supplement containing all of the naturally occurring lanthanoid metals including gadolinium are more effective than calcium alone in preventing colon polyp formation in mice on a high-fat diet. PMID:23008064

  10. Regulation of NKG2D-ligand cell surface expression by intracellular calcium after HDAC-inhibitor treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Helle; Hagemann-Jensen, Michael Henrik; Lauridsen, Felicia Kathrine Bratt;

    2013-01-01

    In this study we demonstrate that histone deacetylase (HDAC)-inhibitor mediated cell surface expression of the structural different NKG2D-ligands MICA/B and ULBP2 is calcium-dependent. Treatment with the calcium chelator EGTA inhibited constitutive as well as HDAC-inhibitor induced MICA/B and ULBP2...... cell surface expression on melanoma cells and Jurkat T-cells. A NKG2D-dependent cytolytic assay and staining with a recombinant NKG2D-Fc fusion protein showed that calcium chelation impaired the functional ability of NKG2D-ligands induced by HDAC-inhibitor treatment. The HDAC-inhibitor induced cell...... surface expression of ULBP2, but not MICA/B, was sensitive to treatment calmidazolium and trifluoperazine, two agents known to block calcium signaling. siRNA-mediated knock-down of the calcium-regulated proteins calmodulin or calpain did however not affect NKG2D-ligand cell surface expression on Jurkat T...

  11. Novel function of perforin in negatively regulating CD4+T cell activation by affecting calcium signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Enguang Bi; Kairui Mao; Jia Zou; Yuhan Zheng; Bing Sun; Chunjian Huang; Yu Hu; Xiaodong Wu; Weiwen Deng; Guomei Lin; Zhiduo Liu; Lin Tian; Shuhui Sun

    2009-01-01

    Perforin is a pore-forming protein engaged mainly in mediating target T cell death and is employed by cytotoxic Tlymphocytes (CTLs) and natural killer cells. However, whether it also plays a role in conventional CD4+ T cell func-tion remains unclear. Here we report that in perforin-deficient (PKO) mice, CD4+ T cells are hyperproliferative in response to T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation. This feature of hyperproliferation is accompanied by the enhancement both in cell division and in IL-2 secretion. It seems that the perforin deficiency does not influence T cell development in thymus spleen and lymph node. In vivo, perforin deficiency results in increased antigen-specific T cell prolifera-tion and antibody production. Furthermore, PKO mice are more susceptible to experimental autoimmune uveitis. To address the molecular mechanism, we found that after TCR stimulation, CD44 T cells from PKO mice display an increased intracellular calcium flux and subsequently enhance activation of transcription factor NFATI. Our results indicate that perforin plays a negative role in regulating CD4+ T cell activation and immune response by affecting TCR-dependent Ca2+ signaling.

  12. Reduced bone density and major hormones regulating calcium metabolism in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiriike, N; Iketani, T; Nakanishi, S; Nagata, T; Inoue, K; Okuno, M; Ochi, H; Kawakita, Y

    1992-11-01

    Bone density of lumbar vertebrae (L2 to L4) and the whole body in 29 patients with anorexia nervosa were measured by dual photon absorptiometry, and the results were compared with those of 10 age-matched normal controls. The patients had significantly lower bone mineral density (BMD) in L3 and L2-4 than controls. However, there was no difference in whole-body BMD. L3 and L2-4 BMD was positively correlated with body weight and was negatively correlated with duration of illness and amenorrhea. Patients who had been more active 6 months before the time of the study had significantly higher L3 BMD than the less active patients. Most patients had an abnormally low serum estrogen level, whereas the mean serum levels of thyroid hormone (T3, T4), cortisol, calcitonin, parathyroid hormone and vitamin D were within the normal range. No correlation was found between L3 or L2-4 BMD and the levels of these hormones. These results suggest that severe weight loss, low physical activity, longer duration of amenorrhea and deficiency of estrogen contribute to bone loss in patients with anorexia nervosa, whereas calcium-regulating hormones such as parathyroid hormone, calcitonin and vitamin D are unlikely to be a primary contributor to bone loss. PMID:1485525

  13. Inhibition of Calcium Influx Reduces Dysfunction and Apoptosis in Lipotoxic Pancreatic β-Cells via Regulation of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuren Zhou

    Full Text Available Lipotoxicity plays an important role in pancreatic β-cell failure during the development of type 2 diabetes. Prolonged exposure of β-cells to elevated free fatty acids level could cause deterioration of β-cell function and induce cell apoptosis. Therefore, inhibition of fatty acids-induced β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis might provide benefit for the therapy of type 2 diabetes. The present study examined whether regulation of fatty acids-triggered calcium influx could protect pancreatic β-cells from lipotoxicity. Two small molecule compounds, L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine and potassium channel activator diazoxide were used to inhibit palmitic acid-induced calcium influx. And whether the compounds could reduce palmitic acid-induced β-cell failure and the underlying mechanism were also investigated. It was found that both nifedipine and diazoxide protected MIN6 pancreatic β-cells and primary cultured murine islets from palmitic acid-induced apoptosis. Meanwhile, the impaired insulin secretion was also recovered to varying degrees by these two compounds. Our results verified that nifedipine and diazoxide could reduce palmitic acid-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress to generate protective effects on pancreatic β-cells. More importantly, it suggested that regulation of calcium influx by small molecule compounds might provide benefits for the prevention and therapy of type 2 diabetes.

  14. Calcium regulation of HCN channels supports persistent activity in a multiscale model of neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neymotin, S A; McDougal, R A; Bulanova, A S; Zeki, M; Lakatos, P; Terman, D; Hines, M L; Lytton, W W

    2016-03-01

    Neuronal persistent activity has been primarily assessed in terms of electrical mechanisms, without attention to the complex array of molecular events that also control cell excitability. We developed a multiscale neocortical model proceeding from the molecular to the network level to assess the contributions of calcium (Ca(2+)) regulation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels in providing additional and complementary support of continuing activation in the network. The network contained 776 compartmental neurons arranged in the cortical layers, connected using synapses containing AMPA/NMDA/GABAA/GABAB receptors. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) produced inositol triphosphate (IP3) which caused the release of Ca(2+) from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stores, with reuptake by sarco/ER Ca(2+)-ATP-ase pumps (SERCA), and influence on HCN channels. Stimulus-induced depolarization led to Ca(2+) influx via NMDA and voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCCs). After a delay, mGluR activation led to ER Ca(2+) release via IP3 receptors. These factors increased HCN channel conductance and produced firing lasting for ∼1min. The model displayed inter-scale synergies among synaptic weights, excitation/inhibition balance, firing rates, membrane depolarization, Ca(2+) levels, regulation of HCN channels, and induction of persistent activity. The interaction between inhibition and Ca(2+) at the HCN channel nexus determined a limited range of inhibition strengths for which intracellular Ca(2+) could prepare population-specific persistent activity. Interactions between metabotropic and ionotropic inputs to the neuron demonstrated how multiple pathways could contribute in a complementary manner to persistent activity. Such redundancy and complementarity via multiple pathways is a critical feature of biological systems. Mediation of activation at different time scales, and through different pathways, would be expected to protect against disruption, in

  15. Role of Calcium Signaling in the Transcriptional Regulation of the Apicoplast Genome of Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabna Cheemadan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium is a universal second messenger that plays an important role in regulatory processes in eukaryotic cells. To understand calcium-dependent signaling in malaria parasites, we analyzed transcriptional responses of Plasmodium falciparum to two calcium ionophores (A23187 and ionomycin that cause redistribution of intracellular calcium within the cytoplasm. While ionomycin induced a specific transcriptional response defined by up- or downregulation of a narrow set of genes, A23187 caused a developmental arrest in the schizont stage. In addition, we observed a dramatic decrease of mRNA levels of the transcripts encoded by the apicoplast genome during the exposure of P. falciparum to both calcium ionophores. Neither of the ionophores caused any disruptions to the DNA replication or the overall apicoplast morphology. This suggests that the mRNA downregulation reflects direct inhibition of the apicoplast gene transcription. Next, we identify a nuclear encoded protein with a calcium binding domain (EF-hand that is localized to the apicoplast. Overexpression of this protein (termed PfACBP1 in P. falciparum cells mediates an increased resistance to the ionophores which suggests its role in calcium-dependent signaling within the apicoplast. Our data indicate that the P. falciparum apicoplast requires calcium-dependent signaling that involves a novel protein PfACBP1.

  16. Calcium regulation of EGF-induced ERK5 activation: role of Lad1-MEKK2 interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Yao

    Full Text Available The ERK5 cascade is a MAPK pathway that transmits both mitogenic and stress signals, yet its mechanism of activation is not fully understood. Using intracellular calcium modifiers, we found that ERK5 activation by EGF is inhibited both by the depletion and elevation of intracellular calcium levels. This calcium effect was found to occur upstream of MEKK2, which is the MAP3K of the ERK5 cascade. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed that EGF increases MEKK2 binding to the adaptor protein Lad1, and this interaction was reduced by the intracellular calcium modifiers, indicating that a proper calcium concentration is required for the interactions and transmission of EGF signals to ERK5. In vitro binding assays revealed that the proper calcium concentration is required for a direct binding of MEKK2 to Lad1. The binding of these proteins is not affected by c-Src-mediated phosphorylation on Lad1, but slightly affects the Tyr phosphorylation of MEKK2, suggesting that the interaction with Lad1 is necessary for full Tyr phosphorylation of MEKK2. In addition, we found that changes in calcium levels affect the EGF-induced nuclear translocation of MEKK2 and thereby its effect on the nuclear ERK5 activity. Taken together, these findings suggest that calcium is required for EGF-induced ERK5 activation, and this effect is probably mediated by securing proper interaction of MEKK2 with the upstream adaptor protein Lad1.

  17. Curcumin specifically binds to the human calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV: fluorescence and molecular dynamics simulation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoda, Nasimul; Naz, Huma; Jameel, Ehtesham; Shandilya, Ashutosh; Dey, Sharmistha; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Ahmad, Faizan; Jayaram, B

    2016-03-01

    Calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CAMK4) plays significant role in the regulation of calcium-dependent gene expression, and thus, it is involved in varieties of cellular functions such as cell signaling and neuronal survival. On the other hand, curcumin, a naturally occurring yellow bioactive component of turmeric possesses wide spectrum of biological actions, and it is widely used to treat atherosclerosis, diabetes, cancer, and inflammation. It also acts as an antioxidant. Here, we studied the interaction of curcumin with human CAMK4 at pH 7.4 using molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, fluorescence binding, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) methods. We performed MD simulations for both neutral and anionic forms of CAMK4-curcumin complexes for a reasonably long time (150 ns) to see the overall stability of the protein-ligand complex. Molecular docking studies revealed that the curcumin binds in the large hydrophobic cavity of kinase domain of CAMK4 through several hydrophobic and hydrogen-bonded interactions. Additionally, MD simulations studies contributed in understanding the stability of protein-ligand complex system in aqueous solution and conformational changes in the CAMK4 upon binding of curcumin. A significant increase in the fluorescence intensity at 495 nm was observed (λexc = 425 nm), suggesting a strong interaction of curcumin to the CAMK4. A high binding affinity (KD = 3.7 × 10(-8) ± .03 M) of curcumin for the CAMK4 was measured by SPR further indicating curcumin as a potential ligand for the CAMK4. This study will provide insights into designing a new inspired curcumin derivatives as therapeutic agents against many life-threatening diseases. PMID:25929263

  18. Calcium dynamics in root cells of Arabidopsis thaliana visualized with selective plane illumination microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Costa

    Full Text Available Selective Plane Illumination Microscopy (SPIM is an imaging technique particularly suited for long term in-vivo analysis of transparent specimens, able to visualize small organs or entire organisms, at cellular and eventually even subcellular resolution. Here we report the application of SPIM in Calcium imaging based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing the genetically encoded-FRET-based Ca(2+ probe Cameleon, in the cytosol or nucleus, were used to demonstrate that SPIM enables ratiometric fluorescence imaging at high spatial and temporal resolution, both at tissue and single cell level. The SPIM-FRET technique enabled us to follow nuclear and cytosolic Ca(2+ dynamics in Arabidopsis root tip cells, deep inside the organ, in response to different stimuli. A relevant physiological phenomenon, namely Ca(2+ signal percolation, predicted in previous studies, has been directly visualized.

  19. A First Principles Molecular Dynamics Study Of Calcium Ion In Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lightstone, F; Schwegler, E; Allesch, M; Gygi, F; Galli, G

    2005-01-28

    In this work we report on Car-Parrinello simulations of the divalent calcium ion in water, aimed at understanding the structure of the hydration shell and at comparing theoretical results with a series of recent experiments. Our paper shows some of the progress in the investigation of aqueous solutions brought about by the advent of ab initio molecular dynamics and highlights the importance of accessing subtle details of ion-water interactions from first-principles. Calcium plays a vital role in many biological systems, including signal transduction, blood clotting and cell division. In particular, calcium ions are known to interact strongly with proteins as they tend to bind well to both negatively charged (e.g. in aspartate and glutamate) and uncharged oxygens (e.g. in main-chain carbonyls). The ability of calcium to coordinate multiple ligands (from 6 to 8 oxygen atoms) with an asymmetric coordination shell enables it to cross-link different segments of a protein and induce large conformational changes. The great biochemical importance of the calcium ion has led to a number of studies to determine its hydration shell and its preferred coordination number in water. Experimental studies have used a variety of techniques, including XRD, EXAFS, and neutron diffraction to elucidate the coordination of Ca{sup 2+} in water. The range of coordination numbers (n{sub C}) inferred by X-ray diffraction studies varies from 6 to 8, and is consistent with that reported in EXAFS experiments (8 and 7.2). A wider range of values (6 to 10) was found in early neutron diffraction studies, depending on concentration, while a more recent measurement by Badyal, et al. reports a value close to 7. In addition to experimental measurements, many theoretical studies have been carried out to investigate the solvation of Ca{sup 2+} in water and have also reported a wide range of coordination numbers. Most of the classical molecular dynamics (MD) and QM/MM simulations report n{sub C} in the

  20. Regulation of salt and ABA responses by CIPK14, a calcium sensor interacting protein kinase in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Calcium and protein kinase serve as the common mediators to regulate plant responses to multiple stresses including salt and ABA stimulus. Here we reported a novel protein kinase (CIPK14) that regulated the responses to ABA treatment and salt stress in Arabidopsis. CIPK14 transcripts, capable been checked in roots, stems, leaves and flowers, were highly expressed in flowers and roots. CIPK14 was induced by ABA and salt treatments. The disruption of CIPK14 altered the transcriptional pattern of a gene marker line related to ABA and salt responses, and the results suggested that CIPK14 probably was responsible to the control of the salt and ABA responses. Comparing with wild types, the lines inserted with the T-DNA in which CIPK14 gene expression was knocked out were also more sensitive to ABA and salt stimulus, showing low germination rate and the less root elongation. While, when these conditioned seeds were treated with norflurazon, their germination percentages could recover to a certain extent. We also found that exogenous calcium could have an effect on the transcription of CIPK14 under ABA and salt treatments, and it seemed that calcium ion might work upstream CIPK14 to regulate the plant response to ABA and salt response.

  1. Regulation of salt and ABA responses by CIPK14, a calcium sensor interacting protein kinase in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN YuZhi; LI Xu; GUO Ming; DENG KeQin; LIN dianZhong; TANG DongYing; GUO XinHong; LIU XuanMing

    2008-01-01

    Calcium and protein kinsse serve as the common mediators to regulate plant responses to multiple stresses including salt and ABA stimulus. Here we reported a novel protein kinase (CIPK14) that regulated the responses to ABA treatment and salt stress in Arabidopsis. CIPK14 transcripts, capable been checked in roots, stems, leaves and flowers, were highly expressed in flowers and roots. CIPK14 was induced by ABA and salt treatments. The disruption of CIPK14 altered the transcriptional pattern of a gene marker line related to ABA and salt responses, and the results suggested that CIPK14 probably was responsible to the control of the salt and ABA responses. Comparing with wild types, the lines inserted with the T-DNA in which CIPK14 gene expression was knocked out were also more sensitive to ABA and salt stimulus, showing low germination rate and the less root elongation. While, when these conditioned seeds were treated with norflurazon, their germination percentages could recover to a certain extent. We also found that exogenous calcium could have an effect on the transcription of CIPK14 under ABA end salt treatments, and it seemed that calcium ion might work upstream ClPK14 to regulate the plant response to ABA and salt response.

  2. Calcium regulates the commitment of murine erythroleukemia cells to terminal erythroid differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    1981-01-01

    An alteration in the rate of calcium transport appears to be the rate- limiting event for the commitment of murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells to initiate a program of terminal erythroid differentiation. The dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-induced commitment of MEL cells to erythroid differentiation can be inhibited by treatment of cells with the calcium- chelating agent EGTA. Upon removal of EGTA, cells initiate commitment without the 12-h lag normally observed after treatment with DMSO alone. Tre...

  3. Calcium and Vitamin D in the Regulation of Energy Balance: Where Do We Stand?

    OpenAIRE

    Soares, Mario J; Kaveri Pathak; Emily K Calton

    2014-01-01

    There is a pandemic of obesity and associated chronic diseases. Dietary calcium and vitamin D have many extra-skeletal roles in human health. In this review we have summarized the current understanding of their influence on human energy balance by examining the epidemiological, clinical, animal, cellular and molecular evidence. We opine that while calcium and vitamin D are functional nutrients in the battle against obesity, there is a need for prospective human trials to tilt the balance of e...

  4. Differential regulation of calcium signalling pathways by components of Piper methysticum (‘Awa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoda, L.M.N; Showman, A.; Baker, J.D.; Lange, I.; Koomoa, D.L.; Stokes, A.J.; Borris, R.P.; Turner, H.

    2015-01-01

    Kava is a soporific, anxiolytic and relaxant in widespread ritual and recreational use throughout the Pacific. Traditional uses of kava by indigenous Pacific Island peoples reflect a complex pharmacopeia, centered on GABA-ergic effects of the well-characterized kavalactones. However, peripheral effects of kava suggest active components other than the CNS-targeted kavalactones. We have previously shown that immunocytes exhibit calcium mobilization in response to traditionally-prepared kava extracts, and that the kavalactones do not induce these calcium responses. Here, we characterize the complex calcium-mobilizing activity of traditionally-prepared and partially HPLC-purified kava extracts, noting induction of both calcium entry and store release pathways. Kava components activate intracellular store depletion of thapsigargin-sensitive and –insensitive stores that are coupled to the calcium release activated (CRAC) current, and cause calcium entry through non-store-operated pathways. Together with the pepper-like potency reported by kava users, these studies lead us to hypothesize that kava extracts contain one or more ligands for the transient receptor potential (TRP) family of ion channels. Indeed, TRP-like conductances are observed in kava-treated cells under patch clamp. Thus TRP-mediated cellular effects may be responsible for some of the reported pharmacology of kava. PMID:25640812

  5. Structural Features of Ion Transport and Allosteric Regulation in Sodium-Calcium Exchanger (NCX) Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giladi, Moshe; Tal, Inbal; Khananshvili, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) proteins extrude Ca(2+) from the cell to maintain cellular homeostasis. Since NCX proteins contribute to numerous physiological and pathophysiological events, their pharmacological targeting has been desired for a long time. This intervention remains challenging owing to our poor understanding of the underlying structure-dynamic mechanisms. Recent structural studies have shed light on the structure-function relationships underlying the ion-transport and allosteric regulation of NCX. The crystal structure of an archaeal NCX (NCX_Mj) along with molecular dynamics simulations and ion flux analyses, have assigned the ion binding sites for 3Na(+) and 1Ca(2+), which are being transported in separate steps. In contrast with NCX_Mj, eukaryotic NCXs contain the regulatory Ca(2+)-binding domains, CBD1 and CBD2, which affect the membrane embedded ion-transport domains over a distance of ~80 Å. The Ca(2+)-dependent regulation is ortholog, isoform, and splice-variant dependent to meet physiological requirements, exhibiting either a positive, negative, or no response to regulatory Ca(2+). The crystal structures of the two-domain (CBD12) tandem have revealed a common mechanism involving a Ca(2+)-driven tethering of CBDs in diverse NCX variants. However, dissociation kinetics of occluded Ca(2+) (entrapped at the two-domain interface) depends on the alternative-splicing segment (at CBD2), thereby representing splicing-dependent dynamic coupling of CBDs. The HDX-MS, SAXS, NMR, FRET, equilibrium (45)Ca(2+) binding and stopped-flow techniques provided insights into the dynamic mechanisms of CBDs. Ca(2+) binding to CBD1 results in a population shift, where more constraint conformational states become highly populated without global conformational changes in the alignment of CBDs. This mechanism is common among NCXs. Recent HDX-MS studies have demonstrated that the apo CBD1 and CBD2 are stabilized by interacting with each other, while Ca(2+) binding to CBD1

  6. Effects of adrenalectomy on the alpha-adrenergic regulation of cytosolic free calcium in hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freudenrich, C.C.; Borle, A.B.

    1988-06-25

    We have previously published that bilateral adrenalectomy in the rat reduces the Ca2+-mediated alpha-adrenergic activation of hepatic glycogenolysis, while it increases the cellular calcium content of hepatocytes. In the experiments presented here, the concentration of cytosolic free calcium (Ca2+i) at rest and in response to epinephrine was measured in aequorin-loaded hepatocytes isolated from sham and adrenalectomized male rats. We found that in adrenalectomized rats the resting Ca2+i was elevated, the rise in Ca2+i evoked by epinephrine was reduced, and the rise in /sup 45/Ca efflux that follows such stimulation was depressed. Furthermore, the slope of the relationship between Ca2+i and calcium efflux was decreased 60% in adrenalectomized. Adrenalectomy did not change Ca2+ release from intracellular calcium pools in response to IP3 in saponin-permeabilized hepatocytes. The EC50 for inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate and the maximal Ca2+ released were similar in both sham and adrenalectomized animals. Finally, the liver calmodulin content determined by radioimmunoassay was not significantly different between sham and adrenalectomized rats. These results suggest that 1) adrenalectomy reduces calcium efflux from the hepatocyte, probably by an effect on the plasma membrane (Ca2+-Mg2+)-ATPase-dependent Ca2+ pump and thus alters cellular calcium homeostasis; 2) adrenalectomy decreases the rise in Ca2+i in response to epinephrine; 3) this decreased rise in Ca2+i is not due to defects in the intracellular Ca2+ storage and mobilization processes; and 4) the effects of adrenalectomy on cellular calcium metabolism and on alpha-adrenergic activation of glycogenolysis are not caused by a reduction in soluble calmodulin.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation on the interaction mechanism between polymer inhibitors and calcium phosphate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jian-Ping Zeng; Xiao-Rong Qian; Feng-He Wang; Jing-Ling Shao; Yun-Shan Bai

    2014-05-01

    Investigation on the microscopic interaction between polymer inhibitors and calcium phosphate contributes to the understanding of their scale inhibition mechanism. The results obtained may provide a theoretical guidance to developing new scale inhibitors. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to simulate the interaction between hydrolyzed polymaleic anhydride (HPMA), polyaspartic acid (PASP), polyepoxysuccinic acid (PESA), polyacrylic acid (PAA) and the (001) and (110) surfaces of hydroxyapatite (HA) crystal with and without water. Results show that the simulations of polymer inhibitors and the (001) surface of HA with water is closer to the actual situation. On the same HA (001), binding energy of four polymer inhibitors with water has the order of HPMA > PASP > PESA > PAA. On the different surface of HA, the binding energy does not vary much between the same polymer and the two surfaces of HA. But, deformation energies of the same polymer with and without water vary widely. Pair correlation function of Ca (HA)-O (-C=O) implies that the Ca-O bonds formed between the calcium atoms of HA crystal and oxygen atoms of the carboxyl groups in polymers, and water molecules change the distances between polymer inhibitors and HA crystal. The system of polymer-HA is mainly contributed by the non-bond interaction. Polymer inhibitors do not interact directly with HA crystal, but indirectly through the interactions between inhibitor-H2O and H2O-HA. Water molecules cannot be ignored when the interaction models are constructed, i.e., solvent effect must be considered.

  8. The calcium sensor Copine-6 regulates spine structural plasticity and learning and memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard, Judith R.; Kriz, Alexander; Galic, Milos; Angliker, Nico; Rajalu, Mathieu; Vogt, Kaspar E.; Ruegg, Markus A.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) represents the cellular response of excitatory synapses to specific patterns of high neuronal activity and is required for learning and memory. Here we identify a mechanism that requires the calcium-binding protein Copine-6 to translate the initial calcium signals into changes in spine structure. We show that Copine-6 is recruited from the cytosol of dendrites to postsynaptic spine membranes by calcium transients that precede LTP. Cpne6 knockout mice are deficient in hippocampal LTP, learning and memory. Hippocampal neurons from Cpne6 knockouts lack spine structural plasticity as do wild-type neurons that express a Copine-6 calcium mutant. The function of Copine-6 is based on its binding, activating and recruiting the Rho GTPase Rac1 to cell membranes. Consistent with this function, the LTP deficit of Cpne6 knockout mice is rescued by the actin stabilizer jasplakinolide. These data show that Copine-6 links activity-triggered calcium signals to spine structural plasticity necessary for learning and memory. PMID:27194588

  9. G Protein Regulation of Neuronal Calcium Channels: Back to the Future

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Proft, Juliane; Weiss, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 6 (2015), s. 890-906. ISSN 0026-895X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-13556S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : voltage gated calcium channels Cav * G proteins * GPCR Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.128, year: 2014

  10. Characterization of a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homolog from maize roots showing light-regulated gravitropism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y. T.; Hidaka, H.; Feldman, L. J.

    1996-01-01

    Roots of many species respond to gravity (gravitropism) and grow downward only if illuminated. This light-regulated root gravitropism is phytochrome-dependent, mediated by calcium, and inhibited by KN-93, a specific inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II). A cDNA encoding MCK1, a maize homolog of mammalian CaMK, has been isolated from roots of maize (Zea mays L.). The MCK1 gene is expressed in root tips, the site of perception for both light and gravity. Using the [35S]CaM gel-overlay assay we showed that calmodulin-binding activity of the MCK1 is abolished by 50 microM KN-93, but binding is not affected by 5 microM KN-93, paralleling physiological findings that light-regulated root gravitropism is inhibited by 50 microM KN-93, but not by 5 microM KN-93. KN-93 inhibits light-regulated gravitropism by interrupting transduction of the light signal, not light perception, suggesting that MCK1 may play a role in transducing light. This is the first report suggesting a physiological function for a CaMK homolog in light signal transduction.

  11. Study on Characteristics of Calcium Uptake by Young Fruit of Apple (Malus pumila) and Its Regulation by Hormone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Field trial, pot experiment with 45Ca tracer, plant analysis were used to investigate the characteristics of calcium uptake by young fruit of apple and its regulation by IAA, GA and NAA. The results indicated that calcium should be applied directly on the surface of young fruits because calcium applied on leaves could be hardly transfered to fruits. The proper Ca applying period was the first month of young fruits formation, and the proper concentration of CaCl2 applied was 0. 5%. Applying Ca directly on the surface of young fruits could increase the weight and quality of fruits. The process of transfering Ca2+ from fruit surface into pulp tissue could be accelerated by IAA, GA or NAA, which also led to an increment on 2% HOAc extractable Ca. Meanwhile, the Ca existed in the stalk and leaves could be strongly transported into fruits by applying IAA on the fruit surface, resulting in too much accumulation of Ca in fruit and bad quality of fruit, while no such sighs were observed with GA or NAA.

  12. Influence of Soil Reaction on Phosphorus, Potassium, Calcium and Magnesium Dynamics in Grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lepomir Čoga

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Influence of soil reaction on phosphorus, potassium, calcium and magnesium dynamics in grapevine was studied on the variety Sauvignon Blanc in 2007, in the Plešivica wine-growing region. Investigations were conducted on three vitisol subtypes: dystric cambisol (pHKCl 3.73-3.76, pseudogley (pHKCl 4.67-4.69 and rendzina on marl (pHKCl 7.21-7.27. To establish the amount and dynamics of P, K, Ca and Mg in plant material, leaf samples were taken three times during the growing period: at the flowering and veraison stages and at the end of the growing period. At all sampling times, significantly higher leaf contents of P, Ca and Mg were found on alkaline soil compared to acid soils, while differences in K levels were not statistically significant. Differences in P contents may be explained by better solubility and thereby better availability of P from Ca-phosphates compared to Al, Mn and Fe-phosphates in acid soils. In addition, the cation ratio K/(Ca+Mg that has a significant influence on grape quality, was also determined in leaves. Compared to optimal values (0.30–0.40, the least favourable ratio K/ (Ca+Mg was recorded at flowering on acid soils (0.38–0.77 and at harvest on calcareous soil (0.12–0.27. Differences in the content of sugar and total acids in must indicate a positive correlation between leaf contents of P, Ca and Mg and sugar content of must, and a negative correlation between leaf contents of P, Ca and Mg and the total acid content of must.

  13. Impact of Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Release on Calcium Dynamics and Action Potential Morphology in Human Atrial Myocytes: A Computational Study

    OpenAIRE

    Koivumäki, Jussi T.; Korhonen, Topi; Tavi, Pasi

    2011-01-01

    Electrophysiological studies of the human heart face the fundamental challenge that experimental data can be acquired only from patients with underlying heart disease. Regarding human atria, there exist sizable gaps in the understanding of the functional role of cellular Ca2+ dynamics, which differ crucially from that of ventricular cells, in the modulation of excitation-contraction coupling. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to develop a mathematical model of the human atrial myoc...

  14. On the molecular basis and regulation of cellular capacitative calcium entry: Roles for Trp proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Birnbaumer, Lutz; Zhu, Xi; Jiang, Meisheng; Boulay, Guylain; Peyton, Michael; Vannier, Brigitte; Brown, Darren; Platano, Daniela; Sadeghi, Hamid; Stefani, Enrico; Birnbaumer, Mariel

    1996-01-01

    During the last 2 years, our laboratory has worked on the elucidation of the molecular basis of capacitative calcium entry (CCE) into cells. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that CCE channels are formed of subunits encoded in genes related to the Drosophila trp gene. The first step in this pursuit was to search for mammalian trp genes. We found not one but six mammalian genes and cloned several of their cDNAs, some in their full length. As assayed in mammalia...

  15. Cytoskeletal network morphology regulates intracellular transport dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ando, David; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular transport is essential for maintaining proper cellular function in most eukaryotic cells, with perturbations in active transport resulting in several types of disease. Efficient delivery of critical cargos to specific locations is accomplished through a combination of passive diffusion and active transport by molecular motors that ballistically move along a network of cytoskeletal filaments. Although motor-based transport is known to be necessary to overcome cytoplasmic crowding and the limited range of diffusion within reasonable time scales, the topological features of the cytoskeletal network that regulate transport efficiency and robustness have not been established. Using a continuum diffusion model, we observed that the time required for cellular transport was minimized when the network was localized near the nucleus. In simulations that explicitly incorporated network spatial architectures, total filament mass was the primary driver of network transit times. However, filament traps that r...

  16. A Putative Calcium-Permeable Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channel, CNGC18, Regulates Polarized Pollen Tube Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A tip-focused Ca2+ gradient is tightly coupled to polarized pollen tube growth, and tip-localized influxes of extracellular Ca2+ are required for this process. However the molecular identity and regulation of the potential Ca2+ channels remains elusive.The present study has implicated CNGC18 (cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 18) in polarized pollen tube growth, because its overexpression induced wider and shorter pollen tubes. Moreover, CNGC18 overexpression induced depolarization of pollen tube growth was suppressed by lower extracellular calcium ([Ca2+]ex). CNGC18-yellow fluorescence protein (YFP)was preferentially localized to the apparent post-Golgi vesicles and the plasma membrane (PM) in the apex of pollen tubes.The PM localization was affected by tip-localized ROP1 signaling. Expression of wild type ROP1 or an active form of ROP1enhanced CNGC18-YFP localization to the apical region of the PM, whereas expression of RopGAP1 (a ROP1 deactivator)blocked the PM localization. These results support a role for PM-localized CNGC18 in the regulation of polarized pollen tube growth through Its potential function in the modulation of calcium influxes.

  17. Phospholipid mediated activation of calcium dependent protein kinase 1 (CaCDPK1 from chickpea: a new paradigm of regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar Dixit

    Full Text Available Phospholipids, the major structural components of membranes, can also have functions in regulating signaling pathways in plants under biotic and abiotic stress. The effects of adding phospholipids on the activity of stress-induced calcium dependent protein kinase (CaCDPK1 from chickpea are reported here. Both autophosphorylation as well as phosphorylation of the added substrate were enhanced specifically by phosphatidylcholine and to a lesser extent by phosphatidic acid, but not by phosphatidylethanolamine. Diacylgylerol, the neutral lipid known to activate mammalian PKC, stimulated CaCDPK1 but at higher concentrations. Increase in V(max of the enzyme activity by these phospholipids significantly decreased the K(m indicating that phospholipids enhance the affinity towards its substrate. In the absence of calcium, addition of phospholipids had no effect on the negligible activity of the enzyme. Intrinsic fluorescence intensity of the CaCDPK1 protein was quenched on adding PA and PC. Higher binding affinity was found with PC (K(½ = 114 nM compared to PA (K(½ = 335 nM. We also found that the concentration of PA increased in chickpea plants under salt stress. The stimulation by PA and PC suggests regulation of CaCDPK1 by these phospholipids during stress response.

  18. Role of volume-regulated and calcium-activated anion channels in cell volume homeostasis, cancer and drug resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay; Sørensen, Belinda Halling; Sauter, Daniel Rafael Peter;

    2015-01-01

    Volume-regulated channels for anions (VRAC) / organic osmolytes (VSOAC) play essential roles in cell volume regulation and other cellular functions, e.g. proliferation, cell migration and apoptosis. LRRC8A, which belongs to the leucine rich-repeat containing protein family, was recently shown to be...... an essential component of both VRAC and VSOAC. Reduced VRAC and VSOAC activities are seen in drug resistant cancer cells. ANO1 is a calcium-activated chloride channel expressed on the plasma membrane of e.g. secretory epithelia. ANO1 is amplified and highly expressed in a large number of carcinomas...... important cellular functions as well as their role in cancer and drug resistance....

  19. Comparative aspects of calcium dynamics in calcified tissues in the goldfish Carassius auratus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The comparative nature of calcium physiology in bone, scales and otoliths was studied in young goldfish, Carassius auratus. Net calcium uptake by the fish was estimated to be 143 μg/g body weight/day. Of that, 79 % was distributed in bone, 13 % in scales, 3.5 % in otoliths and 4.5 % in soft tissues. Scales showed the highest incorporation of 45Ca per mg-tissue weight after 1 or 2 days in 45Ca-containing water; bone came second and otoliths last. However, 35 days after transfer to non-radioactive water, the order of descending radioactivity had changed to otoliths, bone and scales, reflecting different rates of calcium turnover. In bone, prelabeled 45Ca activity increased for the first 2 days after transfer and then decreased gradually (biological half-life, Tsub(0.5) = 94 days). In otoliths, prelabeled radioactivity consistently increased for 35 days. Scales showed two phases of calcium turnover. They lost about 33 % of their prelabeled radioactivity during the first 7 days (Tsub(0.5) = 10.5 days) in non-radioactive water, but thereafter the rate of decrease slowed down greatly (Tsub(0.5) = 210 days). These two phases of calcium turnover were found in the osseous layer (including calcium crystals in the fibrillary plate) of scales, indicating the presence of physiologically labile as well as stable forms of calcium in the layer. (author)

  20. Dynamic Presentation of Immobilized Ligands Regulated through Biomolecular Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Bo; Liu, Yang; Riesberg, Jeremiah J.; Shen, Wei

    2010-01-01

    To mimic the dynamic regulation of signaling ligands immobilized on extracellular matrices or on the surfaces of neighboring cells for guidance of cell behavior and fate selection, we have harnessed biomolecular recognition in combination with polymer engineering to create dynamic surfaces on which the accessibility of immobilized ligands to cell surface receptors can be reversibly interconverted under physiological conditions. The cell-adhesive RGD peptide is chosen as a model ligand. RGD is...

  1. Dynamics of intrinsic dendritic calcium signaling during tonic firing of thalamic reticular neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Chausson

    Full Text Available The GABAergic neurons of the nucleus reticularis thalami that control the communication between thalamus and cortex are interconnected not only through axo-dendritic synapses but also through gap junctions and dendro-dendritic synapses. It is still unknown whether these dendritic communication processes may be triggered both by the tonic and the T-type Ca(2+ channel-dependent high frequency burst firing of action potentials displayed by nucleus reticularis neurons during wakefulness and sleep, respectively. Indeed, while it is known that activation of T-type Ca(2+ channels actively propagates throughout the dendritic tree, it is still unclear whether tonic action potential firing can also invade the dendritic arborization. Here, using two-photon microscopy, we demonstrated that dendritic Ca(2+ responses following somatically evoked action potentials that mimic wake-related tonic firing are detected throughout the dendritic arborization. Calcium influx temporally summates to produce dendritic Ca(2+ accumulations that are linearly related to the duration of the action potential trains. Increasing the firing frequency facilitates Ca(2+ influx in the proximal but not in the distal dendritic compartments suggesting that the dendritic arborization acts as a low-pass filter in respect to the back-propagating action potentials. In the more distal compartment of the dendritic tree, T-type Ca(2+ channels play a crucial role in the action potential triggered Ca(2+ influx suggesting that this Ca(2+ influx may be controlled by slight changes in the local dendritic membrane potential that determine the T-type channels' availability. We conclude that by mediating Ca(2+ dynamic in the whole dendritic arborization, both tonic and burst firing of the nucleus reticularis thalami neurons might control their dendro-dendritic and electrical communications.

  2. Improved model of hydrated calcium ion for molecular dynamics simulations using classical biomolecular force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jejoong; Wilson, James; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2016-10-01

    Calcium ions (Ca(2+) ) play key roles in various fundamental biological processes such as cell signaling and brain function. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been used to study such interactions, however, the accuracy of the Ca(2+) models provided by the standard MD force fields has not been rigorously tested. Here, we assess the performance of the Ca(2+) models from the most popular classical force fields AMBER and CHARMM by computing the osmotic pressure of model compounds and the free energy of DNA-DNA interactions. In the simulations performed using the two standard models, Ca(2+) ions are seen to form artificial clusters with chloride, acetate, and phosphate species; the osmotic pressure of CaAc2 and CaCl2 solutions is a small fraction of the experimental values for both force fields. Using the standard parameterization of Ca(2+) ions in the simulations of Ca(2+) -mediated DNA-DNA interactions leads to qualitatively wrong outcomes: both AMBER and CHARMM simulations suggest strong inter-DNA attraction whereas, in experiment, DNA molecules repel one another. The artificial attraction of Ca(2+) to DNA phosphate is strong enough to affect the direction of the electric field-driven translocation of DNA through a solid-state nanopore. To address these shortcomings of the standard Ca(2+) model, we introduce a custom model of a hydrated Ca(2+) ion and show that using our model brings the results of the above MD simulations in quantitative agreement with experiment. Our improved model of Ca(2+) can be readily applied to MD simulations of various biomolecular systems, including nucleic acids, proteins and lipid bilayer membranes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 752-763, 2016. PMID:27144470

  3. Integrin-linked kinase regulates interphase and mitotic microtubule dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simin Lim

    Full Text Available Integrin-linked kinase (ILK localizes to both focal adhesions and centrosomes in distinct multiprotein complexes. Its dual function as a kinase and scaffolding protein has been well characterized at focal adhesions, where it regulates integrin-mediated cell adhesion, spreading, migration and signaling. At the centrosomes, ILK regulates mitotic spindle organization and centrosome clustering. Our previous study showed various spindle defects after ILK knockdown or inhibition that suggested alteration in microtubule dynamics. Since ILK expression is frequently elevated in many cancer types, we investigated the effects of ILK overexpression on microtubule dynamics. We show here that overexpressing ILK in HeLa cells was associated with a shorter duration of mitosis and decreased sensitivity to paclitaxel, a chemotherapeutic agent that suppresses microtubule dynamics. Measurement of interphase microtubule dynamics revealed that ILK overexpression favored microtubule depolymerization, suggesting that microtubule destabilization could be the mechanism behind the decreased sensitivity to paclitaxel, which is known to stabilize microtubules. Conversely, the use of a small molecule inhibitor selective against ILK, QLT-0267, resulted in suppressed microtubule dynamics, demonstrating a new mechanism of action for this compound. We further show that treatment of HeLa cells with QLT-0267 resulted in higher inter-centromere tension in aligned chromosomes during mitosis, slower microtubule regrowth after cold depolymerization and the presence of a more stable population of spindle microtubules. These results demonstrate that ILK regulates microtubule dynamics in both interphase and mitotic cells.

  4. Calmodulin and calcium differentially regulate the neuronal Nav1.1 voltage-dependent sodium channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Both Ca++-Calmodulin (CaM) and Ca++-free CaM bind to the C-terminal region of Nav1.1. → Ca++ and CaM have both opposite and convergent effects on INav1.1. → Ca++-CaM modulates INav1.1 amplitude. → CaM hyperpolarizes the voltage-dependence of activation, and increases the inactivation rate. → Ca++ alone antagonizes CaM for both effects, and depolarizes the voltage-dependence of inactivation. -- Abstract: Mutations in the neuronal Nav1.1 voltage-gated sodium channel are responsible for mild to severe epileptic syndromes. The ubiquitous calcium sensor calmodulin (CaM) bound to rat brain Nav1.1 and to the human Nav1.1 channel expressed by a stably transfected HEK-293 cell line. The C-terminal region of the channel, as a fusion protein or in the yeast two-hybrid system, interacted with CaM via a consensus C-terminal motif, the IQ domain. Patch clamp experiments on HEK1.1 cells showed that CaM overexpression increased peak current in a calcium-dependent way. CaM had no effect on the voltage-dependence of fast inactivation, and accelerated the inactivation kinetics. Elevating Ca++ depolarized the voltage-dependence of fast inactivation and slowed down the fast inactivation kinetics, and for high concentrations this effect competed with the acceleration induced by CaM alone. Similarly, the depolarizing action of calcium antagonized the hyperpolarizing shift of the voltage-dependence of activation due to CaM overexpression. Fluorescence spectroscopy measurements suggested that Ca++ could bind the Nav1.1 C-terminal region with micromolar affinity.

  5. Calmodulin and calcium differentially regulate the neuronal Nav1.1 voltage-dependent sodium channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudioso, Christelle; Carlier, Edmond; Youssouf, Fahamoe [INSERM U641, Institut Jean Roche, Marseille F-13344 (France); Universite de la Mediterranee, Faculte de Medecine Secteur Nord, IFR 11, Marseille F-13344 (France); Clare, Jeffrey J. [Eaton Pharma Consulting, Eaton Socon, Cambridgeshire PE19 8EF (United Kingdom); Debanne, Dominique [INSERM U641, Institut Jean Roche, Marseille F-13344 (France); Universite de la Mediterranee, Faculte de Medecine Secteur Nord, IFR 11, Marseille F-13344 (France); Alcaraz, Gisele, E-mail: gisele.alcaraz@univmed.fr [INSERM U641, Institut Jean Roche, Marseille F-13344 (France); Universite de la Mediterranee, Faculte de Medecine Secteur Nord, IFR 11, Marseille F-13344 (France)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} Both Ca{sup ++}-Calmodulin (CaM) and Ca{sup ++}-free CaM bind to the C-terminal region of Nav1.1. {yields} Ca{sup ++} and CaM have both opposite and convergent effects on I{sub Nav1.1}. {yields} Ca{sup ++}-CaM modulates I{sub Nav1.1} amplitude. {yields} CaM hyperpolarizes the voltage-dependence of activation, and increases the inactivation rate. {yields} Ca{sup ++} alone antagonizes CaM for both effects, and depolarizes the voltage-dependence of inactivation. -- Abstract: Mutations in the neuronal Nav1.1 voltage-gated sodium channel are responsible for mild to severe epileptic syndromes. The ubiquitous calcium sensor calmodulin (CaM) bound to rat brain Nav1.1 and to the human Nav1.1 channel expressed by a stably transfected HEK-293 cell line. The C-terminal region of the channel, as a fusion protein or in the yeast two-hybrid system, interacted with CaM via a consensus C-terminal motif, the IQ domain. Patch clamp experiments on HEK1.1 cells showed that CaM overexpression increased peak current in a calcium-dependent way. CaM had no effect on the voltage-dependence of fast inactivation, and accelerated the inactivation kinetics. Elevating Ca{sup ++} depolarized the voltage-dependence of fast inactivation and slowed down the fast inactivation kinetics, and for high concentrations this effect competed with the acceleration induced by CaM alone. Similarly, the depolarizing action of calcium antagonized the hyperpolarizing shift of the voltage-dependence of activation due to CaM overexpression. Fluorescence spectroscopy measurements suggested that Ca{sup ++} could bind the Nav1.1 C-terminal region with micromolar affinity.

  6. Glucose-stimulated calcium dynamics in islets of Langerhans in acute mouse pancreas tissue slices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andraž Stožer

    Full Text Available In endocrine cells within islets of Langerhans calcium ions couple cell stimulation to hormone secretion. Since the advent of modern fluorimetry, numerous in vitro studies employing primarily isolated mouse islets have investigated the effects of various secretagogues on cytoplasmic calcium, predominantly in insulin-secreting beta cells. Due to technical limitations, insights of these studies are inherently limited to a rather small subpopulation of outermost cells. The results also seem to depend on various factors, like culture conditions and duration, and are not always easily reconcilable with findings in vivo. The main controversies regard the types of calcium oscillations, presence of calcium waves, and the level of synchronized activity. Here, we set out to combine the in situ acute mouse pancreas tissue slice preparation with noninvasive fluorescent calcium labeling and subsequent confocal laser scanning microscopy to shed new light on the existing controversies utilizing an innovative approach enabling the characterization of responses in many cells from all layers of islets. Our experiments reproducibly showed stable fast calcium oscillations on a sustained plateau rather than slow oscillations as the predominant type of response in acute tissue slices, and that calcium waves are the mechanistic substrate for synchronization of oscillations. We also found indirect evidence that even a large amplitude calcium signal was not sufficient and that metabolic activation was necessary to ensure cell synchronization upon stimulation with glucose. Our novel method helped resolve existing controversies and showed the potential to help answer important physiological questions, making it one of the methods of choice for the foreseeable future.

  7. Visualizing Presynaptic Calcium Dynamics and Vesicle Fusion with a Single Genetically Encoded Reporter at Individual Synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Rachel E; Burrone, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic transmission depends on the influx of calcium into the presynaptic compartment, which drives neurotransmitter release. Genetically encoded reporters are widely used tools to understand these processes, particularly pHluorin-based reporters that report vesicle exocytosis and endocytosis through pH dependent changes in fluorescence, and genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) that exhibit changes in fluorescence upon binding to calcium. The recent expansion of the color palette of available indicators has made it possible to image multiple probes simultaneously within a cell. We have constructed a single molecule reporter capable of concurrent imaging of both presynaptic calcium influx and exocytosis, by fusion of sypHy, the vesicle associated protein synaptophysin containing a GFP-based pHluorin sensor, with the red-shifted GECI R-GECO1. Due to the fixed stoichiometry of the two probes, the ratio of the two responses can also be measured, providing an all optical correlate of the calcium dependence of release. Here, we have characterized stimulus-evoked sypHy-RGECO responses of hippocampal synapses in vitro, exploring the effects of different stimulus strengths and frequencies as well as variations in external calcium concentrations. By combining live sypHy-RGECO imaging with post hoc fixation and immunofluorescence, we have also investigated correlations between structural and functional properties of synapses. PMID:27507942

  8. Calcium and IP3 dynamics in cardiac myocytes: Experimental and computational perspectives and approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix eHohendanner

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Calcium plays a crucial role in excitation-contraction coupling (ECC, but it is also a pivotal second messenger activating Ca2+-dependent transcription factors in a process termed excitation-transcription coupling (ETC. Evidence accumulated over the past decade indicates a pivotal role of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R-mediated Ca2+ release in the regulation of cytosolic and nuclear Ca2+ signals. IP3 is generated by stimulation of plasma membrane receptors that couple to phospholipase C (PLC, liberating IP3 from phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2. An intriguing aspect of IP3 signaling is the presence of the entire PIP2-PLC-IP3 signaling cascade as well as the presence of IP3Rs at the inner and outer membranes of the nuclear envelope (NE which functions as a Ca2+ store. The observation that the nucleus is surrounded by its own putative Ca2+ store raises the possibility that nuclear IP3-dependent Ca2+ release plays a critical role in ETC. This provides a potential mechanism of regulation that acts locally and autonomously from the global cytosolic Ca2+ signal underlying ECC. Moreover, there is evidence that: (i the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR and NE are a single contiguous Ca2+ store; (ii the nuclear pore complex is the major gateway for Ca2+ and macromolecules to pass between the cytosol and the nucleoplasm; (iii the inner membrane of the NE hosts key Ca2+ handling proteins including the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX/GM1 complex, ryanodine receptors (RyRs, nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate receptors (NAADPRs, Na+/K+ ATPase and Na+/H+ exchanger. Thus, it appears that the nucleus represents a Ca2+ signaling domain equipped with its own ion channels and transporters that allow for complex local Ca2+ signals. Many experimental and modeling approaches have been used for the study of intracellular Ca2+ signaling but the key to understanding of the dual role of Ca2+ mediating ECC and ECT lays in quantitative differences of

  9. Regulation of proteolysis in Bacillus subtilis: effects of calcium ions and energy poisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacillus subtilis cells carry out extensive intracellular proteolysis (k = 0.15-0.23/h) during sporulation. Protein degradation was measured in cells growing in chemically defined sporulation medium, by following the release of [14C]-leucine from the cells during spore formation. Sodium arsenate, carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenyl hydrazone, and sodium azide strongly inhibited proteolysis without altering cell viability greatly, which suggested that bulk proteolysis in B. subtilis is energy dependent. The authors have tested the hypothesis that the energy requirement may be for pumping in Ca2+. When [Ca2+] was -6, rates of proteolysis in sporulating cells were reduced 4-8 times that in cells in calcium ion- sufficient medium. Further, omission of Ca2+ from the medium prevented the increase in the activity of the major intracellular serine protease. However, the presence of energy poisons in the media at levels which inhibited proteolysis, had no detectable effect on the uptake of by cells [45Ca]. The authors concluded that B. subtilis cells required both metabolic energy and calcium ions for normal proteolysis

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation exploration of cooperative migration mechanism of calcium ions in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yongqi; Li, Huifang; Bu, Yuxiang

    2009-10-01

    Calcium ATPase is a member of the P-type ATPase, and it pumps calcium ions from the cytoplasm into the reticulum against a concentration gradient. Several X-ray structures of different conformations have been solved in recent years, providing basis for elucidating the active transport mechanism of Ca2+ ions. In this work, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed at atomic level to investigate the dynamical process of calcium ions moving from the outer mouth of the protein to their binding sites. Five initial locations of Ca2+ ions were considered, and the simulations lasted for 2 or 6 ns, respectively. Specific pathways leading to the binding sites and large structural rearrangements around binding sites caused by uptake of calcium ions were identified. A cooperative binding mechanism was observed from our simulation. Firstly, the first Ca2+ ion binds to site I, and then, the second Ca2+ ion approaches. The interactions between the second Ca2+ and the residues around site I disturb the binding state of site I and weaken its binding ability for the first bound Ca2+. Because of the electrostatic repulsion of the second Ca2+ and the electrostatic attraction of site II, the first bound Ca2+ shifts from site I to site II. Concertedly, the second Ca2+ binds to site I, forming a binding state with two Ca2+ ions, one at site I and the other at site II. Both of Glu908 and Asp800 coordinate with the two Ca2+ ions simultaneously during the concerted binding process, which is believed to be the hinge to achieve the concerted binding. In our simulations, four amino acid residues that serve as the channel to link the outer mouth and the binding sites during the binding process were recognized, namely Tyr837, Tyr763, Asn911, and Ser767. The analyses regarding the activity of the proteins via mutations of some key residues also supported our cooperative mechanism. PMID:19242958

  11. Calcium and Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  12. Regulation of calcium and phosphoinositides at endoplasmic reticulum-membrane junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Eamonn J; Jensen, Jill B; Hille, Bertil

    2016-04-15

    Effective cellular function requires both compartmentalization of tasks in space and time, and coordination of those efforts. The endoplasmic reticulum's (ER) expansive and ramifying structure makes it ideally suited to serve as a regulatory platform for organelle-organelle communication through membrane contacts. These contact sites consist of two membranes juxtaposed at a distance less than 30 nm that mediate the exchange of lipids and ions without the need for membrane fission or fusion, a process distinct from classical vesicular transport. Membrane contact sites are positioned by organelle-specific membrane-membrane tethering proteins and contain a growing number of additional proteins that organize information transfer to shape membrane identity. Here we briefly review the role of ER-containing membrane junctions in two important cellular functions: calcium signalling and phosphoinositide processing. PMID:27068956

  13. 15N NMR relaxation studies of calcium-loaded parvalbumin show tight dynamics compared to those of other EF-hand proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldellon, C; Alattia, J R; Strub, M P;

    1998-01-01

    Dynamics of the rat alpha-parvalbumin calcium-loaded form have been determined by measurement of 15N nuclear relaxation using proton-detected heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. The relaxation data were analyzed using spectral density functions and the Lipari-Szabo formalism. The major dynamic features...

  14. Dynamic changes in calcium and phosphate plasma concentrations in the patients on peritoneal dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Nataša

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The disturbances of active forms of vitamin D synthesis and disturbances in calcium and posphate metabolism develop early in chronic renal failure, when creatinine clearance is about 30 ml/min. Chronic hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis only partially correct the biochemical environment of patients on chronic renal replacement therapy because of end-stage renal disease. These dialysis modalities can’t significantly affect the endocrine disturbances of chronic renal failure and they have minimal modulatory effect. The management of disturbed calcium (Ca and phosphate (P metabolism and the maintainance of Ca × P product below 4.4 mmol/l thanks to the use of dialysate solutions with the appropriate calcium concentration and the careful dosage of phosphate binders, calcium and active vitamin D metabolits, are extremely important for the prevention of renal osteodystrophy, secondary hyperparathyroidism as well as low-bone turnover disease. The aim of the study was to analyze the plasma levels of calcium, phosphate, albumin, alkaline phosphatase and parathormon (PTH in 58 patients who were treated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD from March to August 2003. The use of phosphate binders and the substitution with active vitamin D metabolits were also analyzed. Methods. We examined 58 patients, 30 males and 28 female, mean-age 52 years (range, 26-78 years, affected by end-stage renal disease of the different leading cause. The average time on peritoneal dialysis program was 20 months (2-66 months. Most of the patients were treated by CAPD, while only few of them performed automatic, cyclic or intermittent peritoneal dialysis. Most of the patients used a dialysate with 1.75 mmol/l calcium concentration. Results. The study showed that our patients on chronic CAPD program during several months had normal calcemia, phosphatemia and the level of alkaline phosphatase, and that they had Ca × P product in the recommended

  15. The mitochondrial calcium uniporter regulates breast cancer progression via HIF-1α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosatto, Anna; Sommaggio, Roberta; Kummerow, Carsten; Bentham, Robert B; Blacker, Thomas S; Berecz, Tunde; Duchen, Michael R; Rosato, Antonio; Bogeski, Ivan; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Rizzuto, Rosario; Mammucari, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) represents the most aggressive breast tumor subtype. However, the molecular determinants responsible for the metastatic TNBC phenotype are only partially understood. We here show that expression of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU), the selective channel responsible for mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, correlates with tumor size and lymph node infiltration, suggesting that mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake might be instrumental for tumor growth and metastatic formation. Accordingly, MCU downregulation hampered cell motility and invasiveness and reduced tumor growth, lymph node infiltration, and lung metastasis in TNBC xenografts. In MCU-silenced cells, production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) is blunted and expression of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is reduced, suggesting a signaling role for mROS and HIF-1α, downstream of mitochondrial Ca(2+) Finally, in breast cancer mRNA samples, a positive correlation of MCU expression with HIF-1α signaling route is present. Our results indicate that MCU plays a central role in TNBC growth and metastasis formation and suggest that mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake is a potential novel therapeutic target for clinical intervention. PMID:27138568

  16. T-type Calcium Channel Regulation of Neural Tube Closure and EphrinA/EPHA Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Abdul-Wajid

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A major class of human birth defects arise from aberrations during neural tube closure (NTC. We report on a NTC signaling pathway requiring T-type calcium channels (TTCCs that is conserved between primitive chordates (Ciona and Xenopus. With loss of TTCCs, there is a failure to seal the anterior neural folds. Accompanying loss of TTCCs is an upregulation of EphrinA effectors. Ephrin signaling is known to be important in NTC, and ephrins can affect both cell adhesion and repulsion. In Ciona, ephrinA-d expression is downregulated at the end of neurulation, whereas, with loss of TTCC, ephrinA-d remains elevated. Accordingly, overexpression of ephrinA-d phenocopied TTCC loss of function, while overexpression of a dominant-negative Ephrin receptor was able to rescue NTC in a Ciona TTCC mutant. We hypothesize that signaling through TTCCs is necessary for proper anterior NTC through downregulation of ephrins, and possibly elimination of a repulsive signal.

  17. Dynamics of the two process model of human sleep regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenngott, Max; McKay, Cavendish

    2011-04-01

    We examine the dynamics of the two process model of human sleep regulation. In this model, sleep propensity is governed by the interaction between a periodic threshold (process C) and a saturating growth/decay (process S). We find that the parameter space of this model admits sleep cycles with a wide variety of characteristics, many of which are not observed in normal human sleepers. We also examine the effects of phase dependent feedback on this model.

  18. Detection of differentially regulated subsarcolemmal calcium signals activated by vasoactive agonists in rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedi, Krishna P.; Paudel, Omkar

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular calcium (Ca2+) plays pivotal roles in distinct cellular functions through global and local signaling in various subcellular compartments, and subcellular Ca2+ signal is the key factor for independent regulation of different cellular functions. In vascular smooth muscle cells, subsarcolemmal Ca2+ is an important regulator of excitation-contraction coupling, and nucleoplasmic Ca2+ is crucial for excitation-transcription coupling. However, information on Ca2+ signals in these subcellular compartments is limited. To study the regulation of the subcellular Ca2+ signals, genetically encoded Ca2+ indicators (cameleon), D3cpv, targeting the plasma membrane (PM), cytoplasm, and nucleoplasm were transfected into rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) and Ca2+ signals were monitored using laser scanning confocal microscopy. In situ calibration showed that the Kd for Ca2+ of D3cpv was comparable in the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm, but it was slightly higher in the PM. Stimulation of digitonin-permeabilized cells with 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) elicited a transient elevation of Ca2+ concentration with similar amplitude and kinetics in the nucleoplasm and cytoplasm. Activation of G protein-coupled receptors by endothelin-1 and angiotensin II preferentially elevated the subsarcolemmal Ca2+ signal with higher amplitude in the PM region than the nucleoplasm and cytoplasm. In contrast, the receptor tyrosine kinase activator, platelet-derived growth factor, elicited Ca2+ signals with similar amplitudes in all three regions, except that the rise-time and decay-time were slightly slower in the PM region. These data clearly revealed compartmentalization of Ca2+ signals in the subsarcolemmal regions and provide the basis for further investigations of differential regulation of subcellular Ca2+ signals in PASMCs. PMID:24352334

  19. Molecular structure and regulation of the epithelial calcium channels TRPV5 and TRPV6

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Q.

    2007-01-01

    Ca2+ homeostasis is of utmost importance for the normal development and function of the body. Active transcellular Ca2+ transport involves a chain of Ca2+ transport proteins mediating apical Ca2+ influx, transport to the basolateral membrane and extrusion into the bloodstream. Regulation of the two

  20. Calcium-sensing receptors regulate cardiomyocyte Ca2+ signaling via the sarcoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrion interface during hypoxia/reoxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Fang-hao

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Communication between the SR (sarcoplasmic reticulum, SR and mitochondria is important for cell survival and apoptosis. The SR supplies Ca2+ directly to mitochondria via inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs at close contacts between the two organelles referred to as mitochondrion-associated ER membrane (MAM. Although it has been demonstrated that CaR (calcium sensing receptor activation is involved in intracellular calcium overload during hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/Re, the role of CaR activation in the cardiomyocyte apoptotic pathway remains unclear. We postulated that CaR activation plays a role in the regulation of SR-mitochondrial inter-organelle Ca2+ signaling, causing apoptosis during H/Re. To investigate the above hypothesis, cultured cardiomyocytes were subjected to H/Re. We examined the distribution of IP3Rs in cardiomyocytes via immunofluorescence and Western blotting and found that type 3 IP3Rs were located in the SR. [Ca2+]i, [Ca2+]m and [Ca2+]SR were determined using Fluo-4, x-rhod-1 and Fluo 5N, respectively, and the mitochondrial membrane potential was detected with JC-1 during reoxygenation using laser confocal microscopy. We found that activation of CaR reduced [Ca2+]SR, increased [Ca2+]i and [Ca2+]m and decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential during reoxygenation. We found that the activation of CaR caused the cleavage of BAP31, thus generating the pro-apoptotic p20 fragment, which induced the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria and the translocation of bak/bax to mitochondria. Taken together, these results reveal that CaR activation causes Ca2+ release from the SR into the mitochondria through IP3Rs and induces cardiomyocyte apoptosis during hypoxia/reoxygenation.

  1. Compartmentalization of the submembrane calcium activity during calcium influx and its significance in transmitter release.

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, S M; Llinás, R R

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative modeling indicates that, in presynaptic terminals, the intracellular calcium concentration profile during inward calcium current is characterized by discrete peaks of calcium immediately adjacent to the calcium channels. This restriction of intracellular calcium concentration suggests a remarkably well specified intracellular architecture such that calcium, as a second messenger, may regulate particular intracellular domains with a great degree of specificity.

  2. Phagocytosis-induced 45calcium efflux in polymorphonuclear leucocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of calcium ions in regulating the structure and function of non-muscle cells is a subject of intense study. Several lines of evidence that calcium may be essential in the function of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNL) and an important control element in the process of phagocytosis. Direct studies of calcium distribution and fluxes have only recently been undertaken. To our knowledge, no report of calcium movements during normal phagocytosis has been published. In the context of an overall study of calcium dynamics in the PMNL, we report here initial studies on 45Ca efflux in prelabelled guinea pig PMNL. The results demonstrate the energy-dependence of resting calcium efflux and an increased efflux upon addition of phagocytic particles which is not dependent on particle internalization

  3. Analysis of the intraspinal calcium dynamics and its implications on the plasticity of spiking neurons

    CERN Document Server

    Yeung, L C; Shouval, H Z; Yeung, Luk C.; Castellani, Gastone C.; Shouval, Harel Z.

    2004-01-01

    The influx of calcium ions into the dendritic spines through the N-metyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) channels is believed to be the primary trigger for various forms of synaptic plasticity. In this paper, the authors calculate analytically the mean values of the calcium transients elicited by a spiking neuron undergoing a simple model of ionic currents and back-propagating action potentials. The relative variability of these transients, due to the stochastic nature of synaptic transmission, is further considered using a simple Markov model of NMDA receptos. One finds that both the mean value and the variability depend on the timing between pre- and postsynaptic action-potentials. These results could have implications on the expected form of synaptic-plasticity curve and can form a basis for a unified theory of spike time-dependent, and rate based plasticity.

  4. Role of Scaffolding Proteins in the Regulation of TRPC-Dependent Calcium Entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane ion channels, and in particular TRPC channels need a specific membrane environment and association with scaffolding, signaling, and cytoskeleton proteins in order to play their important functional role. The molecular composition of TRPC channels is an important factor in determining channel activation mechanisms. TRPC proteins are incorporated in macromolecular complexes including several key Ca(2 +) signaling proteins as well as proteins involved in vesicle trafficking, cytoskeletal interactions, and scaffolding. Evidence has been provided for association of TRPC with calmodulin (CaM), IP3R, PMCA, Gq/11, RhoA, and a variety of scaffolding proteins. The interaction between TRPC channels with adaptor proteins, determines their mode of regulation as well as their cellular localization and function. Adaptor proteins do not display any enzymatic activity but act as scaffold for the building of signaling complexes. The scaffolding proteins are involved in the assembling of these Ca(2+) signaling complexes, the correct sub-cellular localization of protein partners, and the regulation of the TRPC channelosome. In particular, these proteins, via their multiple protein-protein interaction motifs, can interact with various ion channels involved in the transmembrane potential, and membrane excitability. Scaffolding proteins are key components for the functional organization of TRPC channelosomes that serves as a platform regulating slow Ca(2+) entry, spatially and temporally controlled [Ca(2+)]i signals and Ca(2+) -dependent cellular functions. PMID:27161237

  5. Elevation of circulating serotonin improves calcium dynamics in the peripartum dairy cow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Samantha R; Prichard, Austin P; Endres, Elizabeth L; Newhouse, Stefanie A; Peters, Tonia L; Crump, Peter M; Akins, Matthew S; Crenshaw, Thomas D; Bruckmaier, Rupert M; Hernandez, Laura L

    2016-07-01

    Hypocalcemia is a metabolic disorder that affects dairy cows during the transition from pregnancy to lactation. Twelve multiparous Holstein cows and twelve multiparous Jersey cows were intravenously infused daily for approximately 7 days prepartum with either saline or 1.0mg/kg bodyweight of the immediate precursor to serotonin synthesis, 5hydroxy-l-tryptophan (5-HTP). On infusion days, blood was collected before, after, and at 2, 4, and 8h postinfusion. Blood and urine were collected daily before the infusion period, for 14 days postpartum and on day 30 postpartum. Milk was collected daily during the postpartum period. Feed intake and milk yield were unaffected by 5-HTP infusion postpartum. Cows infused with 5-HTP had elevated circulating serotonin concentrations prepartum. Infusion with 5-HTP induced a transient hypocalcemia in Jersey cows prepartum, but not in any other treatment. Holstein cows infused with saline had the highest milk calcium on the day of and day after parturition. Postpartum, circulating total calcium tended to be elevated, and urine deoxypyridinoline (DPD) concentrations were elevated in Holstein cows infused with 5-HTP. Overall, Jerseys had higher urine DPD concentrations postpartum when compared with Holsteins. Taken together, these data warrant further investigation of the potential therapeutic benefit of 5-HTP administration prepartum for prevention of hypocalcemia. Further research should focus on delineation of mechanisms associated with 5-HTP infusion that control calcium homeostasis during the peripartum period in Holstein and Jersey cows. PMID:27390301

  6. Troponin T3 regulates nuclear localization of the calcium channel Cavβ1a subunit in skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The voltage-gated calcium channel (Cav) β1a subunit (Cavβ1a) plays an important role in excitation–contraction coupling (ECC), a process in the myoplasm that leads to muscle-force generation. Recently, we discovered that the Cavβ1a subunit travels to the nucleus of skeletal muscle cells where it helps to regulate gene transcription. To determine how it travels to the nucleus, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening of the mouse fast skeletal muscle cDNA library and identified an interaction with troponin T3 (TnT3), which we subsequently confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization assays in mouse skeletal muscle in vivo and in cultured C2C12 muscle cells. Interacting domains were mapped to the leucine zipper domain in TnT3 COOH-terminus (160–244 aa) and Cavβ1a NH2-terminus (1–99 aa), respectively. The double fluorescence assay in C2C12 cells co-expressing TnT3/DsRed and Cavβ1a/YFP shows that TnT3 facilitates Cavβ1a nuclear recruitment, suggesting that the two proteins play a heretofore unknown role during early muscle differentiation in addition to their classical role in ECC regulation. - Highlights: • Previously, we demonstrated that Cavβ1a is a gene transcription regulator. • Here, we show that TnT3 interacts with Cavβ1a. • We mapped TnT3 and Cavβ1a interaction domain. • TnT3 facilitates Cavβ1a nuclear enrichment. • The two proteins play a heretofore unknown role during early muscle differentiation

  7. Regulation of calcium signaling in dendritic cells by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumilina, Ekaterina; Xuan, Nguyen Thi; Matzner, Nicole; Bhandaru, Madhuri; Zemtsova, Irina M; Lang, Florian

    2010-06-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen-presenting cells that provide a link between innate and adaptive immunity. Ca(2+)-dependent signaling plays a central regulatory role in DC responses to diverse antigens. DCs are a primary target of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) [1,25(OH)(2)D(3)], a secosteroid hormone, that, in addition to its well-established action on Ca(2+) homeostasis, possesses immunomodulatory properties. Surprisingly, nothing is known about its effects on DC cytosolic Ca(2+) activity. The present study explored whether 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) modifies the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in DCs. Here we show that mouse DCs expressed K(+)-independent (NCX1-3) and K(+)-dependent (NCKX1, 3, 4, and 5) Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchangers. Acute application of LPS (100 ng/ml) to DCs increased [Ca(2+)](i), an effect significantly blunted by prior incubation with 1,25(OH)(2)D(3). 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) increased the membrane abundance of the NCKX1 protein, up-regulated the K(+)- and Na(+)-dependent Ca(2+) entry and enhanced the K(+)-dependent Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger currents. The NCKX blocker 3',4'-dichlorobenzamyl (DBZ) reversed the inhibitory effect of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) on the LPS-induced increase of [Ca(2+)](i). Expression of the costimulatory molecule CD86 was down-regulated by 1,25(OH)(2)D(3), an effect reversed by DBZ. In summary, 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) blunts the LPS-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i) by stimulation of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger-dependent Ca(2+) extrusion, an effect that contributes to 1,25(OH)(2)D(3)-mediated immunosuppression. The results disclose completely novel mechanisms in the regulation of DC maturation and function. PMID:20124438

  8. Assessing the effects of quality regulation in Norway with a quality regulated version of dynamic DEA

    OpenAIRE

    Geymüller, Philipp von; Burger, Anton

    2007-01-01

    In order to find out why energy-not-supplied in Norway - the most important indicator for the quality of service in the quality-regulation regime there - decreased more pronounced before the introduction of quality-regulation in 2001 than after it, we develop a dynamic quality-DEA-model and apply it to a representative sample of distribution-net operators. Our model enables us to calculate a counter-factual and thus to tentatively answer the question: What would have happened, had there been ...

  9. Model Vestibular Nuclei Neurons Can Exhibit a Boosting Nonlinearity Due to an Adaptation Current Regulated by Spike-Triggered Calcium and Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Adam D.

    2016-01-01

    In vitro studies have previously found a class of vestibular nuclei neurons to exhibit a bidirectional afterhyperpolarization (AHP) in their membrane potential, due to calcium and calcium-activated potassium conductances. More recently in vivo studies of such vestibular neurons were found to exhibit a boosting nonlinearity in their input-output tuning curves. In this paper, a Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) type neuron model, originally developed to reproduce the in vitro AHP, is shown to produce a boosting nonlinearity similar to that seen in vivo for increased the calcium conductance. Indicative of a bifurcation, the HH model is reduced to a generalized integrate-and-fire (IF) model that preserves the bifurcation structure and boosting nonliearity. By then projecting the neuron model’s phase space trajectories into 2D, the underlying geometric mechanism relating the AHP and boosting nonlinearity is revealed. Further simplifications and approximations are made to derive analytic expressions for the steady steady state firing rate as a function of bias current, μ, as well as the gain (i.e. its slope) and the position of its peak at μ = μ*. Finally, although the boosting nonlinearity has not yet been experimentally observed in vitro, testable predictions indicate how it might be found. PMID:27427914

  10. TRPV4 regulates calcium homeostasis, cytoskeletal remodeling, conventional outflow and intraocular pressure in the mammalian eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryskamp, Daniel A.; Frye, Amber M.; Phuong, Tam T. T.; Yarishkin, Oleg; Jo, Andrew O.; Xu, Yong; Lakk, Monika; Iuso, Anthony; Redmon, Sarah N.; Ambati, Balamurali; Hageman, Gregory; Prestwich, Glenn D.; Torrejon, Karen Y.; Križaj, David

    2016-01-01

    An intractable challenge in glaucoma treatment has been to identify druggable targets within the conventional aqueous humor outflow pathway, which is thought to be regulated/dysregulated by elusive mechanosensitive protein(s). Here, biochemical and functional analyses localized the putative mechanosensitive cation channel TRPV4 to the plasma membrane of primary and immortalized human TM (hTM) cells, and to human and mouse TM tissue. Selective TRPV4 agonists and substrate stretch evoked TRPV4-dependent cation/Ca2+ influx, thickening of F-actin stress fibers and reinforcement of focal adhesion contacts. TRPV4 inhibition enhanced the outflow facility and lowered perfusate pressure in biomimetic TM scaffolds populated with primary hTM cells. Systemic delivery, intraocular injection or topical application of putative TRPV4 antagonist prodrug analogs lowered IOP in glaucomatous mouse eyes and protected retinal neurons from IOP-induced death. Together, these findings indicate that TRPV4 channels function as a critical component of mechanosensitive, Ca2+-signaling machinery within the TM, and that TRPV4-dependent cytoskeletal remodeling regulates TM stiffness and outflow. Thus, TRPV4 is a potential IOP sensor within the conventional outflow pathway and a novel target for treating ocular hypertension. PMID:27510430

  11. Postprandial Energy Metabolism in the Regulation of Body Weight: Is there a Mechanistic Role for Dietary Calcium?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario J. Soares

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available There has been much interest in the mechanisms by which calcium may attenuate weight gain or accelerate body fat loss. This review focuses on postprandial energy metabolism and indicates that dietary calcium increases whole body fat oxidation after single and multiple meals. There is, as yet, no conclusive evidence for a greater diet induced thermogenesis, an increased lipolysis or suppression of key lipogenic enzyme systems. There is however convincing evidence that higher calcium intakes promote a modest energy loss through increased fecal fat excretion. Overall, there is a role for dietary calcium in human energy metabolism. Future studies need to define threshold intakes for metabolic and gastrointestinal outcomes.

  12. PACSIN1 regulates the dynamics of AMPA receptor trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widagdo, Jocelyn; Fang, Huaqiang; Jang, Se Eun; Anggono, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic trafficking of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) into and out of synapses plays an important role in synaptic plasticity. We previously reported that the protein kinase C and casein kinase II substrate in neurons (PACSIN) forms a complex with AMPARs through its interaction with the protein interacting with C-kinase 1 (PICK1) to regulate NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-induced AMPAR endocytosis and cerebellar long-term depression. However, the molecular mechanism by which PACSIN regulates the dynamics of AMPAR trafficking remains unclear. Using a pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein, pHluorin, tagged to the extracellular domain of the GluA2 subunit of AMPARs, we demonstrate dual roles for PACSIN1 in controlling the internalization and recycling of GluA2 after NMDAR activation. Structure and function analysis reveals a requirement for the PACSIN1 F-BAR and SH3 domains in controlling these NMDAR-dependent processes. Interestingly, the variable region, which binds to PICK1, is not essential for NMDAR-dependent GluA2 internalization and is required only for the correct recycling of AMPARs. These results indicate that PACSIN is a versatile membrane deformation protein that links the endocytic and recycling machineries essential for dynamic AMPAR trafficking in neurons. PMID:27488904

  13. PACSIN1 regulates the dynamics of AMPA receptor trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widagdo, Jocelyn; Fang, Huaqiang; Jang, Se Eun; Anggono, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic trafficking of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) into and out of synapses plays an important role in synaptic plasticity. We previously reported that the protein kinase C and casein kinase II substrate in neurons (PACSIN) forms a complex with AMPARs through its interaction with the protein interacting with C-kinase 1 (PICK1) to regulate NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-induced AMPAR endocytosis and cerebellar long-term depression. However, the molecular mechanism by which PACSIN regulates the dynamics of AMPAR trafficking remains unclear. Using a pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein, pHluorin, tagged to the extracellular domain of the GluA2 subunit of AMPARs, we demonstrate dual roles for PACSIN1 in controlling the internalization and recycling of GluA2 after NMDAR activation. Structure and function analysis reveals a requirement for the PACSIN1 F-BAR and SH3 domains in controlling these NMDAR-dependent processes. Interestingly, the variable region, which binds to PICK1, is not essential for NMDAR-dependent GluA2 internalization and is required only for the correct recycling of AMPARs. These results indicate that PACSIN is a versatile membrane deformation protein that links the endocytic and recycling machineries essential for dynamic AMPAR trafficking in neurons. PMID:27488904

  14. Non-equilibrium dynamics of stochastic gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Anandamohan

    2015-01-01

    The process of gene regulation is comprised of intrinsically random events resulting in large cell-to-cell variability in mRNA and protein numbers. With gene expression being the central dogma of molecular biology, it is essential to understand the origin and role of these fluctuations. An intriguing observation is that the number of mRNA present in a cell are not only random and small but also that they are produced in bursts. The gene switches between an active and an inactive state, and the active gene transcribes mRNA in bursts. Transcriptional noise being bursty, so are the number of proteins and the subsequent gene expression levels. It is natural to ask the question: what is the reason for the bursty mRNA dynamics? And can the bursty dynamics be shown to be entropically favorable by studying the reaction kinetics underlying the gene regulation mechanism? The dynamics being an out-of-equilibrium process, the fluctuation theorem for entropy production in the reversible reaction channel is discussed. We compute the entropy production rate for varying degrees of burstiness. We find that the reaction parameters that maximize the burstiness simultaneously maximize the entropy production rate. PMID:25288134

  15. A sensor for calcium uptake

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Sean; Meyer, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria — the cell’s power plants — increase their energy production in response to calcium signals in the cytoplasm. A regulator of the elusive mitochondrial calcium channel has now been identified.

  16. Regulation of Arabidopsis defense responses against Spodoptera littoralis by CPK-mediated calcium signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishihama Nobuaki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant Ca2+ signals are involved in a wide array of intracellular signaling pathways after pest invasion. Ca2+-binding sensory proteins such as Ca2+-dependent protein kinases (CPKs have been predicted to mediate the signaling following Ca2+ influx after insect herbivory. However, until now this prediction was not testable. Results To investigate the roles CPKs play in a herbivore response-signaling pathway, we screened the characteristics of Arabidopsis CPK mutants damaged by a feeding generalist herbivore, Spodoptera littoralis. Following insect attack, the cpk3 and cpk13 mutants showed lower transcript levels of plant defensin gene PDF1.2 compared to wild-type plants. The CPK cascade was not directly linked to the herbivory-induced signaling pathways that were mediated by defense-related phytohormones such as jasmonic acid and ethylene. CPK3 was also suggested to be involved in a negative feedback regulation of the cytosolic Ca2+ levels after herbivory and wounding damage. In vitro kinase assays of CPK3 protein with a suite of substrates demonstrated that the protein phosphorylates transcription factors (including ERF1, HsfB2a and CZF1/ZFAR1 in the presence of Ca2+. CPK13 strongly phosphorylated only HsfB2a, irrespective of the presence of Ca2+. Furthermore, in vivo agroinfiltration assays showed that CPK3-or CPK13-derived phosphorylation of a heat shock factor (HsfB2a promotes PDF1.2 transcriptional activation in the defense response. Conclusions These results reveal the involvement of two Arabidopsis CPKs (CPK3 and CPK13 in the herbivory-induced signaling network via HsfB2a-mediated regulation of the defense-related transcriptional machinery. This cascade is not involved in the phytohormone-related signaling pathways, but rather directly impacts transcription factors for defense responses.

  17. Dictyostelium calcium-binding protein 4a interacts with nucleomorphin, a BRCT-domain protein that regulates nuclear number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nucleomorphin from Dictyostelium discoideum is a nuclear calmodulin-binding protein that is a member of the BRCT-domain containing cell cycle checkpoint proteins. Two differentially expressed isoforms, NumA and NumB, share an extensive acidic domain (DEED) that when deleted produces highly multinucleated cells. We performed a yeast two-hybrid screen of a Dictyostelium cDNA library using NumA as bait. Here we show that nucleomorphin interacts with calcium-binding protein 4a (CBP4a) in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Further deletion analysis suggests this interaction requires residues found within the DEED domain. NumA and CBP4a mRNAs are expressed at the same stages of development. CBP4a belongs to a large family of Dictyostelium CBPs, for which no cellular or developmental functions had previously been determined. Since the interaction of CBP4a with nucleomorphin requires the DEED domain, this suggests that CBP4a may respond to Ca2+-signalling through modulating factors that might function in concert to regulate nuclear number

  18. The calcium pump plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase 2 (PMCA2) regulates breast cancer cell proliferation and sensitivity to doxorubicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Amelia A; Milevskiy, Michael J G; Lee, Wei C; Curry, Merril C; Smart, Chanel E; Saunus, Jodi M; Reid, Lynne; da Silva, Leonard; Marcial, Daneth L; Dray, Eloise; Brown, Melissa A; Lakhani, Sunil R; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J; Monteith, Gregory R

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of Ca(2+) transport is vital in physiological processes, including lactation, proliferation and apoptosis. The plasmalemmal Ca(2+) pump isoform 2 (PMCA2) a calcium ion efflux pump, was the first protein identified to be crucial in the transport of Ca(2+) ions into milk during lactation in mice. In these studies we show that PMCA2 is also expressed in human epithelia undergoing lactational remodeling and also report strong PMCA2 staining on apical membranes of luminal epithelia in approximately 9% of human breast cancers we assessed. Membrane protein expression was not significantly associated with grade or hormone receptor status. However, PMCA2 mRNA levels were enriched in Basal breast cancers where it was positively correlated with survival. Silencing of PMCA2 reduced MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell proliferation, whereas silencing of the related isoforms PMCA1 and PMCA4 had no effect. PMCA2 silencing also sensitized MDA-MB-231 cells to the cytotoxic agent doxorubicin. Targeting PMCA2 alone or in combination with cytotoxic therapy may be worthy of investigation as a therapeutic strategy in breast cancer. PMCA2 mRNA levels are also a potential tool in identifying poor responders to therapy in women with Basal breast cancer. PMID:27148852

  19. Dictyostelium calcium-binding protein 4a interacts with nucleomorphin, a BRCT-domain protein that regulates nuclear number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myre, Michael A; O'Day, Danton H

    2004-09-17

    Nucleomorphin from Dictyostelium discoideum is a nuclear calmodulin-binding protein that is a member of the BRCT-domain containing cell cycle checkpoint proteins. Two differentially expressed isoforms, NumA and NumB, share an extensive acidic domain (DEED) that when deleted produces highly multinucleated cells. We performed a yeast two-hybrid screen of a Dictyostelium cDNA library using NumA as bait. Here we show that nucleomorphin interacts with calcium-binding protein 4a (CBP4a) in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Further deletion analysis suggests this interaction requires residues found within the DEED domain. NumA and CBP4a mRNAs are expressed at the same stages of development. CBP4a belongs to a large family of Dictyostelium CBPs, for which no cellular or developmental functions had previously been determined. Since the interaction of CBP4a with nucleomorphin requires the DEED domain, this suggests that CBP4a may respond to Ca(2+)-signalling through modulating factors that might function in concert to regulate nuclear number. PMID:15325281

  20. The role of symmetry in the regulation of brain dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Evelyn; Giusti, Chad; Cieslak, Matthew; Grafton, Scott; Bassett, Danielle

    Synchronous neural processes regulate a wide range of behaviors from attention to learning. Yet structural constraints on these processes are far from understood. We draw on new theoretical links between structural symmetries and the control of synchronous function, to offer a reconceptualization of the relationships between brain structure and function in human and non-human primates. By classifying 3-node motifs in macaque connectivity data, we find the most prevalent motifs can theoretically ensure a diversity of function including strict synchrony as well as control to arbitrary states. The least prevalent motifs are theoretically controllable to arbitrary states, which may not be desirable in a biological system. In humans, regions with high topological similarity of connections (a continuous notion related to symmetry) are most commonly found in fronto-parietal systems, which may account for their critical role in cognitive control. Collectively, our work underscores the role of symmetry and topological similarity in regulating dynamics of brain function.

  1. The synthesis of spherical calcium carbonate composite in amphiphilic PS-b-PAA solution and its thermal dynamic characteristic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE Linhai; JIN Dalai

    2004-01-01

    Spherical calcium carbonate composite is synthesized in the solution of amphiphilic block copolymer of polystyrene(PS) and poly(acrylic acid)(PAA). SEM and XRD measurements show that the diameter of the particulates decreases with the augment of the PS-b-PAA concentration, crystalline in the composite is calcite and its morphology as well as the structure is changed too. TG-DTA together with IR analysis is applied to investigating the thermal dynamic behavior of the composite. The results show that the composite is mainly composed of two phases, that is, the nano- crystalline calcium carbonate and the PS-b-PA-Ca composites. PS phase decomposes first with a large heat release at about 330℃. However, the PAA chains have relatively high thermal stability, probably due to the structural Ca-O bond, and decomposes at above 400℃. Matching opinions are used to explain the possible reasons for the regular as well as the particular characteristics of the composite corresponding to a certain copolymer concentration.

  2. Environmental regulation and the export dynamics of energy technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pollution haven hypothesis affirms that an open market regime will encourage the flow of low-technology polluting industries towards developing countries because of potential comparative advantages related to low environmental standards. In contrast, the hypothesis suggested by Porter and van der Linde claims that innovating firms operate in a dynamic competitive situation which allows global diffusion of environmental-friendly technologies. Environmental regulation may represent a relevant mechanism through which technological change is induced. In this way, countries that are subject to more stringent environmental regulations may become net exporters of environmental technologies. This paper provides new evidence on the evolution of export flows of environmental technologies across different countries for the energy sector. Advanced economies, particularly the European Union, have increasingly focused on the role of energy policies as tools for sustaining the development path. The Kyoto Protocol commitments, together with growing import dependence on energy products, have brought attention to the analysis of innovation processes in this specific sector. The analysis uses a gravity model in order to test the determinants and the transmission channels through which environmental technologies for renewable energies and energy efficiency are exported to advanced and developing countries. Our results are consistent with the Porter and van der Linde hypothesis where environmental regulation represents a significant source of comparative advantages. What strongly emerges is that the stringency of environmental regulation supplemented by the strength of the National Innovation System is a crucial driver of export performance in the field of energy technologies. (author)

  3. Reconstructing a Network of Stress-Response Regulators via Dynamic System Modeling of Gene Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Sheng Wu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Unicellular organisms such as yeasts have evolved mechanisms to respond to environmental stresses by rapidly reorganizing the gene expression program. Although many stress-response genes in yeast have been discovered by DNA microarrays, the stress-response transcription factors (TFs that regulate these stress-response genes remain to be investigated. In this study, we use a dynamic system model of gene regulation to describe the mechanism of how TFs may control a gene’s expression. Then, based on the dynamic system model, we develop the Stress Regulator Identification Algorithm (SRIA to identify stress-response TFs for six kinds of stresses. We identified some general stress-response TFs that respond to various stresses and some specific stress-response TFs that respond to one specifi c stress. The biological significance of our findings is validated by the literature. We found that a small number of TFs is probably suffi cient to control a wide variety of expression patterns in yeast under different stresses. Two implications can be inferred from this observation. First, the response mechanisms to different stresses may have a bow-tie structure. Second, there may be regulatory cross-talks among different stress responses. In conclusion, this study proposes a network of stress-response regulators and the details of their actions.

  4. Muscarinic cholinergic regulation of L-type calcium channel in heart of embryonic mice at different developmental stages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-minLIANG; MingTANG; Chang-jinLIU; Hong-yanLUO; Yuan-longSONG; Xin-wuHU; Jiao-yaXI; Lin-linGAO; BinNIE; Su-yunLI; Ling-lingLAI; JuergenHESCHELER

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the muscarinic regulation of L-type calcium current (ICa-L) during development. METHODS:The whole cell patch-clamp technique was used to record ICa-L in mice embryonic cardiomyocytes at different stages (the early developmental stage, EDS; the intermediate developmental stage, IDS; and the late developmental stage, LDS). Carbachol (CCh) was used to stimulate M-receptor in the embryonic cardiomyocytes of mice.RESULTS: The expression of lCa.L density did not change in different developmental stages (P>0.05). There was no difference in the sensitivity of ICa-L to CCh during development (P>0.05). This inhibitory action of CCh was mediated by inhibition of cyclic AMP since 8-bromo-cAMP completely reversed the muscarinic inhibitory action. IBMX, a non-selective inhibitor of phosphodiesterase (PDE), reversed the inhibitory action of M-receptor on ICa-L current by 71.2 %±9.2% (n=8) and 11.3%±2.5% (n=9) in EDS and LDS respectively. However forskolin, an agonist of adenylyl cyclase (AC), reversed the action of CCh by 14.5%±3.5% (n=5) and 82.7%± 10.4% (n=7) in EDS and LDS respectively. CONCLUSION: The inhibitory action of CCh on lca.L current was mediated in different pathways: in EDS, the inhibitory action of M-receptor on ICa-L channel mainly depended on the stimulation of PDE. However, in LDS, the regulation by M-receptor on lCa.L channel mainly depended on the inactivation of AC.

  5. Molecular Mechanisms Contributing to TARP Regulation of Channel Conductance and Polyamine Block of Calcium-Permeable AMPA Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Ian D.; Gratacòs-Batlle, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Many properties of fast synaptic transmission in the brain are influenced by transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs) that modulate the pharmacology and gating of AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs). Although much is known about TARP influence on AMPAR pharmacology and kinetics through their modulation of the extracellular ligand-binding domain (LBD), less is known about their regulation of the ion channel region. TARP-induced modifications in AMPAR channel behavior include increased single-channel conductance and weakened block of calcium-permeable AMPARs (CP-AMPARs) by endogenous intracellular polyamines. To investigate how TARPs modify ion flux and channel block, we examined the action of γ-2 (stargazin) on GluA1 and GluA4 CP-AMPARs. First, we compared the permeation of organic cations of different sizes. We found that γ-2 increased the permeability of several cations but not the estimated AMPAR pore size, suggesting that TARP-induced relief of polyamine block does not reflect altered pore diameter. Second, to determine whether residues in the TARP intracellular C-tail regulate polyamine block and channel conductance, we examined various γ-2 C-tail mutants. We identified the membrane proximal region of the C terminus as crucial for full TARP-attenuation of polyamine block, whereas complete deletion of the C-tail markedly enhanced the TARP-induced increase in channel conductance; thus, the TARP C-tail influences ion permeation. Third, we identified a site in the pore-lining region of the AMPAR, close to its Q/R site, that is crucial in determining the TARP-induced changes in single-channel conductance. This conserved residue represents a site of TARP action, independent of the AMPAR LBD. PMID:25164663

  6. Chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in tobacco: differential regulation by calmodulin isoforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Xia, M.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1998-01-01

    cDNA clones of chimeric Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) from tobacco (TCCaMK-1 and TCCaMK-2) were isolated and characterized. The polypeptides encoded by TCCaMK-1 and TCCaMK-2 have 15 different amino acid substitutions, yet they both contain a total of 517 amino acids. Northern analysis revealed that CCaMK is expressed in a stage-specific manner during anther development. Messenger RNA was detected when tobacco bud sizes were between 0.5 cm and 1.0 cm. The appearance of mRNA coincided with meiosis and became undetectable at later stages of anther development. The reverse polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification assay using isoform-specific primers showed that both of the CCaMK mRNAs were expressed in anther with similar expression patterns. The CCaMK protein expressed in Escherichia coli showed Ca2+-dependent autophosphorylation and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent substrate phosphorylation. Calmodulin isoforms (PCM1 and PCM6) had differential effects on the regulation of autophosphorylation and substrate phosphorylation of tobacco CCaMK, but not lily CCaMK. The evolutionary tree of plant serine/threonine protein kinases revealed that calmodulin-dependent kinases form one subgroup that is distinctly different from Ca2+-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) and other serine/threonine kinases in plants.

  7. GABAergic synaptic transmission regulates calcium influx during spike-timing dependent plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Balena

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Coincident pre- and postsynaptic activity of hippocampal neurons alters the strength of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA-mediated inhibition through a Ca2+-dependent regulation of cation-chloride cotransporters. This long-term synaptic modulation is termed GABAergic spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP. In the present study, we examined whether the properties of the GABAergic synapses themselves modulate the required postsynaptic Ca2+ influx during GABAergic STDP induction. To do this we first identified GABAergic synapses between cultured hippocampal neurons based on their relatively long decay time constants and their reversal potentials which lay close to the resting membrane potential. GABAergic STDP was then induced by coincidentally (± 1 ms firing the pre- and postsynaptic neurons at 5 Hz for 30 seconds, while postsynaptic Ca2+ was imaged with the Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent dye Fluo4-AM. In all cases, the induction of GABAergic STDP increased postsynaptic Ca2+ above resting levels. We further found that the magnitude of this increase correlated with the amplitude and polarity of the GABAergic postsynaptic current (GPSC; hyperpolarizing GPSCs reduced the Ca2+ influx in comparison to both depolarizing GPSCs, and postsynaptic neurons spiked alone. This relationship was influenced by both the driving force for Cl- and GABAA conductance (which had positive correlations with the Ca2+ influx. The spike-timing order during STDP induction did not influence the correlation between GPSC amplitude and Ca2+ influx, which is likely accounted for by the symmetrical GABAergic STDP window.

  8. Regulation of Calcium on Peanut Photosynthesis Under Low Night Temperature Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yi-fei; HAN Xiao-ri; ZHAN Xiu-mei; YANG Jin-feng; WANG Yu-zhi; SONG Qiao-bo; CHEN Xin

    2013-01-01

    The effects of different levels of CaCl2 on photosynthesis under low night temperature (8°C) stress in peanuts were studied in order to ifnd out the appropriate concentration of Ca2+ through the artiifcial climate chamber potted culture test. The results indicated that Ca2+, by means of improving the stomatal conductivity of peanut leaves under low night temperature stress, may mitigate the decline of photosynthetic rate in the peanut leaves. The regulation with 15 mmol L-1 CaCl2 (Ca15) was the most effective, compared with other treatments. Subsequently, the improvement of Ca2+ on peanut photosynthesis under low night temperature stress was validated further through spraying withCa15, Ca2+ chelator (ethylene glycol bis(2-aminoethyl) tetraacetic acid; EGTA) and calmodulin antagonists (trilfuonerazine; TFP).And CaM (Ca2+-modulin) played an important role in the nutritional signal transduction for Ca2+ mitigating photosynthesis limitations in peanuts under low night temperature stress.

  9. Calcium regulation in individual peripheral sensory nerve terminals of the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gover, Tony D; Moreira, Thaís H V; Kao, Joseph P Y; Weinreich, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Ca2+ is vital for release of neurotransmitters and trophic factors from peripheral sensory nerve terminals (PSNTs), yet Ca2+ regulation in PSNTs remains unexplored. To elucidate the Ca2+ regulatory mechanisms in PSNTs, we determined the effects of a panel of pharmacological agents on electrically evoked Ca2+ transients in rat corneal nerve terminals (CNTs) in vitro that had been loaded with the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator, Oregon Green 488 BAPTA-1 dextran or fura-2 dextran in vivo. Inhibition of the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase, disruption of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, or inhibition of the Na+–Ca2+ exchanger did not measurably alter the amplitude or decay kinetics of the electrically evoked Ca2+ transients in CNTs. By contrast, inhibition of the plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA) by increasing the pH slowed the decay of the Ca2+ transient by 2-fold. Surprisingly, the energy for ion transport across the plasma membrane of CNTs is predominantly from glycolysis rather than mitochondrial respiration, as evidenced by the observation that Ca2+ transients were suppressed by iodoacetate but unaffected by mitochondrial inhibitors. These observations indicate that, following electrical activity, the PMCA is the predominant mechanism of Ca2+ clearance from the cytosol of CNTs and glycolysis is the predominant source of energy. PMID:17095566

  10. Fast Responding Voltage Regulator and Dynamic VAR Compensator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Divan, Deepak [Varentec, Incorporated, San Jose, CA (United States); Moghe, Rohit [Varentec, Incorporated, San Jose, CA (United States); Tholomier, Damien [Varentec, Incorporated, San Jose, CA (United States)

    2014-12-31

    The objectives of this project were to develop a dynamic VAR compensator (DVC) for voltage regulation through VAR support to demonstrate the ability to achieve greater levels of voltage control on electricity distribution networks, and faster response compared to existing grid technology. The goal of the project was to develop a prototype Fast Dynamic VAR Compensator (Fast DVC) hardware device, and this was achieved. In addition to developing the dynamic VAR compensator device, Varentec in partnership with researchers at North Carolina State University (NCSU) successfully met the objectives to model the potential positive impact of such DVCs on representative power networks. This modeling activity validated the ability of distributed dynamic VAR compensators to provide fast voltage regulation and reactive power control required to respond to grid disturbances under high penetration of fluctuating and intermittent distributed energy resources (DERs) through extensive simulation studies. Specifically the following tasks were set to be accomplished: 1) Development of dynamic VAR compensator to support dynamic voltage variations on the grid through VAR control 2) Extensive testing of the DVC in the lab environment 3) Present the operational DVC device to the DOE at Varentec’s lab 4) Formulation of a detailed specification sheet, unit assembly document, test setup document, unit bring-up plan, and test plan 5) Extensive simulations of the DVC in a system with high PV penetration. Understanding the operation with many DVC on a single distribution system 6) Creation and submittal of quarterly and final reports conveying the design documents, unit performance data, modeling simulation charts and diagrams, and summary explanations of the satisfaction of program goals. This report details the various efforts that led to the development of the Fast DVC as well as the modeling & simulation results. The report begins with the introduction in Section II which outlines the

  11. Effects of AMPK on high glucose stimulated apoptosis of endothelial cells via regulation of calcium influx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting LU

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the inhibitory effect of adenosine monophosphate (AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK on high glucose-stimulated endothelial cell apoptosis and its mechanism. Methods MS-1 endothelial cells were cultured in vitro, and they were treated with AMPK agonist, AMPK inhibitor, 2-APB (a blocker of store operated Ca2+ channel (SOCC and (or high glucose, and a control group without any intervention were set up. TUNEL assay was performed to determine apoptotic cells. Laser scanning confocal microscopy was used to assess the Ca2+ influx into cells, and Western-blotting was performed to determine the expressions of Stim1 and Orai1 of the store operated Ca2+ channel (SOCC proteins. Results Apoptosis of endothelial cells was induced significantly, and the expressions of Stim1 and Orai1 were upregulated in high glucose group compared with that in control group (P<0.05. The rate of apoptosis of high glucose-induced endothelial cell was found to be increased in AMPK inhibitor group and decreased in AMPK agonist group, and the expressions of Stim1 and Orai1 were found to be down-regulated in AMPK agonist group as compared with that in high glucose group (P<0.05. Compared with the control group, high glucose stimulation significantly induced the Ca2+ influx to endothelial cells; compared with high glucose group, 2-APB significantly inhibited high glucose-induced Ca2+ influx to endothelial cells, and blocked the inducing effect of high-glucose on endothelial cell apoptosis. Compared with high glucose group, AMPK agonist significantly inhibited high glucose-induced cell Ca2+ influx. Conclusion By reducing the expressions of Stim1 and Orai1, AMPK may inhibit SOCC-mediated Ca2+ influx, and block the high glucose-stimulated endothelial cell apoptosis, thus play an important protective role in sustaining endothelial cell function. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.10.01

  12. Vacuolar ATPase regulates surfactant secretion in rat alveolar type II cells by modulating lamellar body calcium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendranath Reddy Chintagari

    Full Text Available Lung surfactant reduces surface tension and maintains the stability of alveoli. How surfactant is released from alveolar epithelial type II cells is not fully understood. Vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase is the enzyme responsible for pumping H(+ into lamellar bodies and is required for the processing of surfactant proteins and the packaging of surfactant lipids. However, its role in lung surfactant secretion is unknown. Proteomic analysis revealed that vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase dominated the alveolar type II cell lipid raft proteome. Western blotting confirmed the association of V-ATPase a1 and B1/2 subunits with lipid rafts and their enrichment in lamellar bodies. The dissipation of lamellar body pH gradient by Bafilomycin A1 (Baf A1, an inhibitor of V-ATPase, increased surfactant secretion. Baf A1-stimulated secretion was blocked by the intracellular Ca(2+ chelator, BAPTA-AM, the protein kinase C (PKC inhibitor, staurosporine, and the Ca(2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII, KN-62. Baf A1 induced Ca(2+ release from isolated lamellar bodies. Thapsigargin reduced the Baf A1-induced secretion, indicating cross-talk between lamellar body and endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+ pools. Stimulation of type II cells with surfactant secretagogues dissipated the pH gradient across lamellar bodies and disassembled the V-ATPase complex, indicating the physiological relevance of the V-ATPase-mediated surfactant secretion. Finally, silencing of V-ATPase a1 and B2 subunits decreased stimulated surfactant secretion, indicating that these subunits were crucial for surfactant secretion. We conclude that V-ATPase regulates surfactant secretion via an increased Ca(2+ mobilization from lamellar bodies and endoplasmic reticulum, and the activation of PKC and CaMKII. Our finding revealed a previously unrealized role of V-ATPase in surfactant secretion.

  13. Sensory Flask Cells in Sponge Larvae Regulate Metamorphosis via Calcium Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Nagayasu; Stoupin, Daniel; Degnan, Sandie M; Degnan, Bernard M

    2015-12-01

    The Porifera (sponges) is one of the earliest phyletic lineages to branch off the metazoan tree. Although the body-plan of sponges is among the simplest in the animal kingdom and sponges lack nervous systems that communicate environmental signals to other cells, their larvae have sensory systems that generate coordinated responses to environmental cues. In eumetazoans (Cnidaria and Bilateria), the nervous systems of larvae often regulate metamorphosis through Ca(2+)-dependent signal transduction. In sponges, neither the identity of the receptor system that detects an inductive environmental cue (hereafter "metamorphic cues") nor the signaling system that mediates settlement and metamorphosis are known. Using a combination of behavioral assays and surgical manipulations, we show here that specialized epithelial cells-referred to as flask cells-enriched in the anterior third of the Amphimedon queenslandica larva are most likely to be the sensory cells that detect the metamorphic cues. Surgical removal of the region enriched in flask cells in a larva inhibits the initiation of metamorphosis. The flask cell has an apical sensory apparatus with a cilium surrounded by an apical F-actin-rich protrusion, and numerous vesicles, hallmarks of eumetazoan sensory-neurosecretory cells. We demonstrate that these flask cells respond to metamorphic cues by elevating intracellular Ca(2+) levels, and that this elevation is necessary for the initiation of metamorphosis. Taken together, these analyses suggest that sponge larvae have sensory-secretory epithelial cells capable of converting exogenous cues into internal signals via Ca(2+)-mediated signaling, which is necessary for the initiation of metamorphosis. Similarities in the morphology, physiology, and function of the sensory flask cells in sponge larvae with the sensory/neurosecretory cells in eumetazoan larvae suggest this sensory system predates the divergence of Porifera and Eumetazoa. PMID:25898842

  14. Developmental regulation of the gene for chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in anthers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poovaiah, B. W.; Xia, M.; Liu, Z.; Wang, W.; Yang, T.; Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Franceschi, V. R.

    1999-01-01

    Chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) was cloned from developing anthers of lily (Lilium longiflorum Thumb. cv. Nellie White) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi). Previous biochemical characterization and structure/function studies had revealed that CCaMK has dual modes of regulation by Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin. The unique structural features of CCaMK include a catalytic domain, a calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain. The existence of these three features in a single polypeptide distinguishes it from other kinases. Western analysis revealed that CCaMK is expressed in a stage-specific manner in developing anthers. Expression of CCaMK was first detected in pollen mother cells and continued to increase, reaching a peak around the tetrad stage of meiosis. Following microsporogenesis, CCaMK expression rapidly decreased and at later stages of microspore development, no expression was detected. A tobacco genomic clone of CCaMK was isolated and transgenic tobacco plants were produced carrying the CCaMK promoter fused to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. Both CCaMK mRNA and protein were detected in the pollen sac and their localizations were restricted to the pollen mother cells and tapetal cells. Consistent results showing a stage-specific expression pattern were obtained by beta-glucuronidase analysis, in-situ hybridization and immunolocalization. The stage- and tissue-specific appearance of CCaMK in anthers suggests that it could play a role in sensing transient changes in free Ca(2+) concentration in target cells, thereby controlling developmental events in the anther.

  15. Vacuolar ATPase regulates surfactant secretion in rat alveolar type II cells by modulating lamellar body calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintagari, Narendranath Reddy; Mishra, Amarjit; Su, Lijing; Wang, Yang; Ayalew, Sahlu; Hartson, Steven D; Liu, Lin

    2010-01-01

    Lung surfactant reduces surface tension and maintains the stability of alveoli. How surfactant is released from alveolar epithelial type II cells is not fully understood. Vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase) is the enzyme responsible for pumping H(+) into lamellar bodies and is required for the processing of surfactant proteins and the packaging of surfactant lipids. However, its role in lung surfactant secretion is unknown. Proteomic analysis revealed that vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase) dominated the alveolar type II cell lipid raft proteome. Western blotting confirmed the association of V-ATPase a1 and B1/2 subunits with lipid rafts and their enrichment in lamellar bodies. The dissipation of lamellar body pH gradient by Bafilomycin A1 (Baf A1), an inhibitor of V-ATPase, increased surfactant secretion. Baf A1-stimulated secretion was blocked by the intracellular Ca(2+) chelator, BAPTA-AM, the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, staurosporine, and the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), KN-62. Baf A1 induced Ca(2+) release from isolated lamellar bodies. Thapsigargin reduced the Baf A1-induced secretion, indicating cross-talk between lamellar body and endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pools. Stimulation of type II cells with surfactant secretagogues dissipated the pH gradient across lamellar bodies and disassembled the V-ATPase complex, indicating the physiological relevance of the V-ATPase-mediated surfactant secretion. Finally, silencing of V-ATPase a1 and B2 subunits decreased stimulated surfactant secretion, indicating that these subunits were crucial for surfactant secretion. We conclude that V-ATPase regulates surfactant secretion via an increased Ca(2+) mobilization from lamellar bodies and endoplasmic reticulum, and the activation of PKC and CaMKII. Our finding revealed a previously unrealized role of V-ATPase in surfactant secretion. PMID:20169059

  16. A maize calcium-dependent protein kinase gene, ZmCPK4, positively regulated abscisic acid signaling and enhanced drought stress tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shanshan; Zhang, Dan; Wang, Li; Pan, Jiaowen; Liu, Yang; Kong, Xiangpei; Zhou, Yan; Li, Dequan

    2013-10-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) play essential roles in calcium-mediated signal transductions in plant response to abiotic stress. Several members have been identified to be regulators for plants response to abscisic acid (ABA) signaling. Here, we isolated a subgroup I CDPK gene, ZmCPK4, from maize. Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed that the ZmCPK4 transcripts were induced by various stresses and signal molecules. Transient and stable expression of the ZmCPK4-GFP fusion proteins revealed ZmCPK4 localized to the membrane. Moreover, overexpression of ZmCPK4 in the transgenic Arabidopsis enhanced ABA sensitivity in seed germination, seedling growth and stomatal movement. The transgenic plants also enhanced drought stress tolerance. Taken together, the results suggest that ZmCPK4 might be involved in ABA-mediated regulation of stomatal closure in response to drought stress. PMID:23911729

  17. Mineral Dynamics of Blood and Milk in Dairy Buffaloes Fed on Calcium and Phosphorus Supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Begum, A. Azim, S. Akhter1, M. I. Anjum* and M. Afzal

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to determine the effect of supplementation of calcium (Ca and phosphorus (P on nutrient utilization, milk production, its composition and reproductive performance of Nili-Ravi buffaloes. Twelve lactating buffaloes were randomly divided into three groups, with 4 animals in each group, fed diets containing 80, 100 and 120% NRC recommended Ca and P, respectively. Daily feed consumption and milk yield (MY were recorded. Fortnightly collected milk samples were analyzed for total solids (TS, milk protein (MP, milk fat (MF, lactose, Ca and P contents. Calcium and P concentrations were also determined in blood serum. Milk yield was 10%, MF 4% and TS 3.7% higher in buffaloes fed on 120% Ca and P than those fed on 100% Ca and P of NRC recommendation but dry matter intake was similar among all groups. However, MP, lactose and solids not fat were not affected by mineral supplementation. In milk, slightly increased concentrations of Ca and P were noted during the last two weeks of experiment in all groups. Dietary protein digestibility was higher in buffaloes fed 120% Ca and P, crude fibre and dry matter digestibility was higher in 80 and 100% Ca and P supplemented groups respectively however, difference was non-significant among the groups. Serum P concentration was higher but Ca was lower in 120% Ca and P supplemented group compared to other two groups however, these values were within the normal range. Buffaloes fed 120% Ca and P conceived 100% but in buffaloes fed 100 and 80% Ca and P, conception rates were 75 and 50% respectively. Number of services per conception was lower in buffaloes fed 120% Ca and P supplemented diet. It may be concluded that 120% Ca and P supplementation increased milk production and reproductive performance of lactating buffaloes.

  18. Precise regulation of gene expression dynamics favors complex promoter architectures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Müller

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Promoters process signals through recruitment of transcription factors and RNA polymerase, and dynamic changes in promoter activity constitute a major noise source in gene expression. However, it is barely understood how complex promoter architectures determine key features of promoter dynamics. Here, we employ prototypical promoters of yeast ribosomal protein genes as well as simplified versions thereof to analyze the relations among promoter design, complexity, and function. These promoters combine the action of a general regulatory factor with that of specific transcription factors, a common motif of many eukaryotic promoters. By comprehensively analyzing stationary and dynamic promoter properties, this model-based approach enables us to pinpoint the structural characteristics underlying the observed behavior. Functional tradeoffs impose constraints on the promoter architecture of ribosomal protein genes. We find that a stable scaffold in the natural design results in low transcriptional noise and strong co-regulation of target genes in the presence of gene silencing. This configuration also exhibits superior shut-off properties, and it can serve as a tunable switch in living cells. Model validation with independent experimental data suggests that the models are sufficiently realistic. When combined, our results offer a mechanistic explanation for why specific factors are associated with low protein noise in vivo. Many of these findings hold for a broad range of model parameters and likely apply to other eukaryotic promoters of similar structure.

  19. Finite Element Model to Study One Dimensional Calcium Dyanmics in Cardiac Myocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Kunal B.; Adlakha, Neeru

    2015-12-01

    The multi physical process involving calcium ions regulate expansion and contraction of cardiac myocytes. This mechanism of expansion and contraction of cardiac myocytes is responsible for contraction and expansion of heart for pumping of blood into arteries and receiving blood into heart from vein. Thus calcium dynamics in cardiac myocytes is responsible for the activities of the myocytes cells and functioning of the heart. The specific spatiotemporal calcium ion dynamics is required to trigger, sustain and terminate activity of the cell. In this paper an attempt has been done to propose a model to study calcium dynamics in cardiac myocytes for a one-dimensional unsteady state case. The model incorporates the process like diffusion, reaction involving source and excess buffers. Appropriate boundary conditions and initial conditions have been framed. The finite element method has been employed to obtain the solution. The numerical results have been used to study the effect of buffers and source influx on calcium dynamics in cardiac myocytes.

  20. Mating triggers dynamic immune regulations in wood ant queens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castella, G; Christe, P; Chapuisat, M

    2009-03-01

    Mating can affect female immunity in multiple ways. On the one hand, the immune system may be activated by pathogens transmitted during mating, sperm and seminal proteins, or wounds inflicted by males. On the other hand, immune defences may also be down-regulated to reallocate resources to reproduction. Ants are interesting models to study post-mating immune regulation because queens mate early in life, store sperm for many years, and use it until their death many years later, while males typically die after mating. This long-term commitment between queens and their mates limits the opportunity for sexual conflict but raises the new constraint of long-term sperm survival. In this study, we examine experimentally the effect of mating on immunity in wood ant queens. Specifically, we compared the phenoloxidase and antibacterial activities of mated and virgin Formica paralugubris queens. Queens had reduced levels of active phenoloxidase after mating, but elevated antibacterial activity 7 days after mating. These results indicate that the process of mating, dealation and ovary activation triggers dynamic patterns of immune regulation in ant queens that probably reflect functional responses to mating and pathogen exposure that are independent of sexual conflict. PMID:19170815

  1. Red Liriope platyphylla stimulated the insulin secretion through the regulation of calcium concentration in rat insulinoma cells and animal models

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hye-Ryun; Kim, Ji-Eun; Lee, Young-Ju; Kwak, Moon-Hwa; Im, Dong-Soon; Hwang, Dae-Youn

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Red L. platyphylla (RLP) on calcium and glucose levels during insulin secretion. To achieve this, alteration of insulin and calcium concentrations was measured in rat insulinoma-1 (INS-1) cells and animal models in response to RLP treatment. In INS-1 cells, maximum secretion of insulin was detected upon treatment with 200 µg/mL of RLP for 20 min. Nifedipine, an L-type calcium channel blocker, effectively inhibited insulin secretion from ...

  2. Regulation of the murine renal vitamin D receptor by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and calcium

    OpenAIRE

    Healy, Kevin D.; Zella, Julia B.; Prahl, Jean M.; DeLuca, Hector F.

    2003-01-01

    Renal vitamin D receptor (VDR) is required for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-[1,25(OH)2D3]-induced renal reabsorption of calcium and for 1,25(OH)2D3-induced 1,25(OH)2D3 24-hydroxylase. The long-term effect of vitamin D and dietary calcium on the expression of renal VDR was examined in the nonobese diabetic mouse. Vitamin D-deficient and vitamin D-replete mice were maintained on diets containing 0.02%, 0.25%, 0.47%, and 1.20% calcium with or without 50 ng of 1,25(OH)2D3 ...

  3. Regulation of the arachidonic acid-stimulated respiratory burst in neutrophils by intra- cellular and extracellular calcium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The respiratory burst is an important physiological function ofthe neutrophils in killing the bacteria invading in human body. We used chemiluminescence method to measure the exogenous arachidonic acid-stimulated respiratory burst, and measured the cytosolic free calcium concentration in neutrophils by the fluorescence method. It was found that, on one hand, the arachidonic acid-stimulated respiratory burst was enhanced by elevating the cytosolic free calcium concentration in neutrophils with a potent endomembrane Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor, Thapsgargin; on the other hand, chelating the intracellular or extracellular calcium by EGTA or BAPTA inhibited the respiratory burst. Results showed that calcium plays an important regulatory role in the signaling pathway involved in the exogenous arachidonic acid-stimulated respiratory burst of neutrophils.

  4. The calcium-sensing receptor-dependent regulation of cell-cell adhesion and keratinocyte differentiation requires Rho and Filamin A

    OpenAIRE

    Tu, Chia-Ling; Chang, Wenhan; Bikle, Daniel D.

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular Ca2+ (Ca2+o) acting through the calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) induces E-cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion and cellular signals mediating cell differentiation in epidermal keratinocytes. Previous studies indicate that the CaR regulates cell-cell adhesion through the Fyn/Src tyrosine kinases. Here we investigate whether Rho GTPase is a part of the CaR-mediated signaling cascade regulating cell adhesion and differentiation. Suppressing endogenous Rho A expression by small inter...

  5. Activation of TonEBP by Calcium Controls β1,3-Glucuronosyltransferase-I Expression, a Key Regulator of Glycosaminoglycan Synthesis in Cells of the Intervertebral Disc*

    OpenAIRE

    Hiyama, Akihiko; Gajghate, Sachin; Sakai, Daisuke; Mochida, Joji; Shapiro, Irving M.; Risbud, Makarand V.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to study the expression and regulation of β1,3-Glucuronosyltransferase-I (GlcAT-I), a key enzyme regulating GAG synthesis in cells of the intervertebral disc. There was a robust expression of GlcAT-I in the nucleus pulposus in vivo. Treatment with the calcium ionophore ionomycin resulted in increased GlcAT-I expression, whereas GlcAT-I promoter constructs lacking TonE site or a mutant TonE were unresponsive to the ionophore. Experimen...

  6. Calcium - urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003603.htm Calcium - urine To use the sharing features on this ... enable JavaScript. This test measures the amount of calcium in urine. All cells need calcium in order ...

  7. Calcium supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007477.htm Calcium supplements To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. WHO SHOULD TAKE CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS? Calcium is an important mineral for the ...

  8. Dynamical Processes in Ageing, Gene Regulation and Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Kristian Moss

    project we constructed a mathematical model and showed that if DNA damage is primarily caused by geno-toxic agents, it would be advantageous for cells to have a fragile DNA repair mechanism. The second part of my Ph.D. thesis covers gene regulation. In the first project we show how RNA polymerase can be...... unstable activation and stable repression is a requirement for the motif to produce oscillations. The last part of this thesis studies the emergence of communication networks. In this study we constructed a simple e-mail game. E-mails from two session with 16 players, who had never met before, showed how...... players develop favourite communication partners. We observed how this dynamic caused a communication network to form. By quantifying the information flow in this network, we were able to shown how that the network functions as an anti-exploration mechanism against "information leeches"....

  9. Dynamic Transcriptional and Epigenetic Regulation of Human Epidermal Keratinocyte Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavazza, Alessia; Miccio, Annarita; Romano, Oriana; Petiti, Luca; Malagoli Tagliazucchi, Guidantonio; Peano, Clelia; Severgnini, Marco; Rizzi, Ermanno; De Bellis, Gianluca; Bicciato, Silvio; Mavilio, Fulvio

    2016-04-12

    Human skin is maintained by the differentiation and maturation of interfollicular stem and progenitors cells. We used DeepCAGE, genome-wide profiling of histone modifications and retroviral integration analysis, to map transcripts, promoters, enhancers, and super-enhancers (SEs) in prospectively isolated keratinocytes and transit-amplifying progenitors, and retrospectively defined keratinocyte stem cells. We show that >95% of the active promoters are in common and differentially regulated in progenitors and differentiated keratinocytes, while approximately half of the enhancers and SEs are stage specific and account for most of the epigenetic changes occurring during differentiation. Transcription factor (TF) motif identification and correlation with TF binding site maps allowed the identification of TF circuitries acting on enhancers and SEs during differentiation. Overall, our study provides a broad, genome-wide description of chromatin dynamics and differential enhancer and promoter usage during epithelial differentiation, and describes a novel approach to identify active regulatory elements in rare stem cell populations. PMID:27050947

  10. Calcium Oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    Dupont, Geneviève; Combettes, Laurent; Bird, Gary S.; Putney, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Calcium signaling results from a complex interplay between activation and inactivation of intracellular and extracellular calcium permeable channels. This complexity is obvious from the pattern of calcium signals observed with modest, physiological concentrations of calcium-mobilizing agonists, which typically present as sequential regenerative discharges of stored calcium, a process referred to as calcium oscillations. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the underlyin...

  11. Calcineurin and Calcium Channel CchA Coordinate the Salt Stress Response by Regulating Cytoplasmic Ca2+ Homeostasis in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sha; Liu, Xiao; Qian, Hui; Zhang, Shizhu; Lu, Ling

    2016-06-01

    The eukaryotic calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin is crucial for the environmental adaption of fungi. However, the mechanism of coordinate regulation of the response to salt stress by calcineurin and the high-affinity calcium channel CchA in fungi is not well understood. Here we show that the deletion of cchA suppresses the hyphal growth defects caused by the loss of calcineurin under salt stress in Aspergillus nidulans Additionally, the hypersensitivity of the ΔcnaA strain to extracellular calcium and cell-wall-damaging agents can be suppressed by cchA deletion. Using the calcium-sensitive photoprotein aequorin to monitor the cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c) in living cells, we found that calcineurin negatively regulates CchA on calcium uptake in response to external calcium in normally cultured cells. However, in salt-stress-pretreated cells, loss of either cnaA or cchA significantly decreased the [Ca(2+)]c, but a deficiency in both cnaA and cchA switches the [Ca(2+)]c to the reference strain level, indicating that calcineurin and CchA synergistically coordinate calcium influx under salt stress. Moreover, real-time PCR results showed that the dysfunction of cchA in the ΔcnaA strain dramatically restored the expression of enaA (a major determinant for sodium detoxification), which was abolished in the ΔcnaA strain under salt stress. These results suggest that double deficiencies of cnaA and cchA could bypass the requirement of calcineurin to induce enaA expression under salt stress. Finally, YvcA, a member of the transient receptor potential channel (TRPC) protein family of vacuolar Ca(2+) channels, was proven to compensate for calcineurin-CchA in fungal salt stress adaption.IMPORTANCE The feedback inhibition relationship between calcineurin and the calcium channel Cch1/Mid1 has been well recognized from yeast. Interestingly, our previous study (S. Wang et al., PLoS One 7:e46564, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal

  12. Dynamic regulation of aquaporin-4 water channels in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ying; Tran, Minh; Linninger, Andreas A

    2015-10-01

    Aquaporin-4 water channels play a central role in brain water regulation in neurological disorders. Aquaporin-4 is abundantly expressed at the astroglial endfeet facing the cerebral vasculature and the pial membrane, and both its expression level and subcellular localization significantly influence brain water transport. However, measurements of aquaporin-4 levels in animal models of brain injury often report opposite trends of change at the injury core and the penumbra. Furthermore, aquaporin-4 channels play a beneficial role in brain water clearance in vasogenic edema, but a detrimental role in cytotoxic edema and exacerbate cell swelling. In light of current evidence, we still do not have a complete understanding of the role of aquaporin-4 in brain water transport. In this review, we propose that the regulatory mechanisms of aquaporin-4 at the transcriptional, translational, and post-translational levels jointly regulate water permeability in the short and long time scale after injury. Furthermore, in order to understand why aquaporin-4 channels play opposing roles in cytotoxic and vasogenic edema, we discuss experimental evidence on the dynamically changing osmotic gradients between blood, extracellular space, and the cytosol during the formation of cytotoxic and vasogenic edema. We conclude with an emerging picture of the distinct osmotic environments in cytotoxic and vasogenic edema, and propose that the directions of aquaporin-4-mediated water clearance in these two types of edema are distinct. The difference in water clearance pathways may provide an explanation for the conflicting observations of the roles of aquaporin-4 in edema resolution. PMID:26526878

  13. Involvement of phospholipase C and intracellular calcium signaling in the gonadotropin-releasing hormone regulation of prolactin release from lactotrophs of tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tipsmark, Christian Kølbæk; Weber, G M; Strom, C N;

    2005-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is a potent stimulator of prolactin (PRL) secretion in various vertebrates including the tilapia, Oreochromis mossambicus. The mechanism by which GnRH regulates lactotroph cell function is poorly understood. Using the advantageous characteristics of the teleost...... pituitary gland from which a nearly pure population of PRL cells can be isolated, we examined whether GnRH might stimulate PRL release through an increase in phospholipase C (PLC), inositol triphosphate (IP3), and intracellular calcium (Ca(i)2+) signaling. Using Ca(i)2+ imaging and the calcium-sensitive dye...... fura-2, we found that chicken GnRH-II (cGnRH-II) induced a rapid dose-dependent increase in Ca(i)2+ in dispersed tilapia lactotrophs. The Ca(i)2+ signal was abolished by U-73122, an inhibitor of PLC-dependent phosphoinositide hydrolysis. Correspondingly, cGnRH-II-induced tPRL188 secretion was inhibited...

  14. A tyrosine-phosphorylated 55-kilodalton motility-associated bovine sperm protein is regulated by cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphates and calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, S; Trautman, K D; Goueli, S A; Carr, D W

    1997-06-01

    Sperm motility is regulated by protein phosphorylation. We have recently shown that a serine/threonine phosphatase system is involved in motility regulation. Two of the components of the phosphatase system, GSK-3 and PP1gamma2, are regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation. During our investigation of sperm tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins we discovered a 55-kDa protein whose tyrosine phosphorylation correlates closely to the motility state of sperm. This protein is tyrosine phosphorylated to a much higher degree in motile caudal than in immotile caput epididymal sperm. Motility inhibition of caudal epididymal sperm by protein kinase A (PKA) anchoring inhibition or by ionomycin-induced calcium overload led to the virtual disappearance of tyrosine phosphorylation of the 55-kDa protein. Conversely, treatment of sperm with motility activators, isobutylmethylxanthine or 8-bromo-cAMP, resulted in increased tyrosine phosphorylation of the protein. The protein was present in the soluble 100 000 x g supernatants of sperm extracts and was heat labile. Chromatography through diethylaminoethyl-cellulose and Western blot analysis showed that this 55-kDa protein is not a regulatory subunit of PKA or alpha-tubulin. Our results represent the identification of a soluble protein whose tyrosine phosphorylation varies directly with motility and suggest that motility regulation may involve cross talk between PKA, calcium, and tyrosine kinase pathways. PMID:9166697

  15. A new role for follicle-stimulating hormone in the regulation of calcium flux in Sertoli cells: Inhibition of Na+/Ca++ exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elucidation of mechanisms regulating intracellular calcium levels in steroidogenic tissues is important for understanding control of cellular function. We have previously described FSH receptor-mediated flux of 45Ca++ into cultured rat Sertoli cells and receptor-enriched proteoliposomes via voltage-sensitive and voltage-independent calcium channels. In the present study, we report heretofore unrecognized inhibitory effects of FSH on Na+/Ca++ exchange in these two systems. An outwardly directed Na+ gradient, developed by preincubating Sertoli cell monolayers in buffer made hypertonic with NaCl, resulted in uptake of 45Ca++ that was unaffected by calcium channel blocking agents, ruthenium red or methoxyverapamil, but was enhanced by ouabain, a specific inhibitor of Na+/K(+)-ATPase. Sodium-dependent 45Ca++ flux into Sertoli cells was inhibited in a concentration-related manner by increased extracellular Na+ (up to 135 mM). FSH consistently and reproducibly (28.9 +/- 3.8%, 10 separate assays) reduced sodium-dependent 45Ca++ influx in the absence or presence of ouabain. A lesser effect on Na+/Ca++ exchange was seen when Li+ replaced Na+ in the preincubation buffer, and a marked reduction occurred when Sertoli cells were incubated in buffer containing KCl, presumably due to membrane depolarization. FSH-sensitive Na+/45Ca++ exchange was also observed when using FSH receptor-enriched proteoliposomes. Our earlier calcium channel studies indicated that FSH affects Ca++ entry into Sertoli cells via a receptor-mediated process. The results reported here demonstrate that the interaction of FSH with its receptor is associated with changes in Na+/Ca++ exchange as well, and suggest that this activity may also be involved in regulating intracellular free Ca++ levels in the Sertoli cell

  16. L-type calcium channels play a critical role in maintaining lens transparency by regulating phosphorylation of aquaporin-0 and myosin light chain and expression of connexins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupalatha Maddala

    Full Text Available Homeostasis of intracellular calcium is crucial for lens cytoarchitecture and transparency, however, the identity of specific channel proteins regulating calcium influx within the lens is not completely understood. Here we examined the expression and distribution profiles of L-type calcium channels (LTCCs and explored their role in morphological integrity and transparency of the mouse lens, using cDNA microarray, RT-PCR, immunoblot, pharmacological inhibitors and immunofluorescence analyses. The results revealed that Ca (V 1.2 and 1.3 channels are expressed and distributed in both the epithelium and cortical fiber cells in mouse lens. Inhibition of LTCCs with felodipine or nifedipine induces progressive cortical cataract formation with time, in association with decreased lens weight in ex-vivo mouse lenses. Histological analyses of felodipine treated lenses revealed extensive disorganization and swelling of cortical fiber cells resembling the phenotype reported for altered aquaporin-0 activity without detectable cytotoxic effects. Analysis of both soluble and membrane rich fractions from felodipine treated lenses by SDS-PAGE in conjunction with mass spectrometry and immunoblot analyses revealed decreases in β-B1-crystallin, Hsp-90, spectrin and filensin. Significantly, loss of transparency in the felodipine treated lenses was preceded by an increase in aquaporin-0 serine-235 phosphorylation and levels of connexin-50, together with decreases in myosin light chain phosphorylation and the levels of 14-3-3ε, a phosphoprotein-binding regulatory protein. Felodipine treatment led to a significant increase in gene expression of connexin-50 and 46 in the mouse lens. Additionally, felodipine inhibition of LTCCs in primary cultures of mouse lens epithelial cells resulted in decreased intracellular calcium, and decreased actin stress fibers and myosin light chain phosphorylation, without detectable cytotoxic response. Taken together, these observations

  17. Calcium Dynamics Encode the Magnitude of a Graded Memory Underlying Sensorimotor Adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    Dembrow, Nikolai C.; Diana L Pettit; Harold H Zakon

    2010-01-01

    The role of Ca2+ in the induction of neural correlates of memory has frequently been described in binary terms despite the fact that many forms of memory are graded in their strength and/or persistence. We find that Ca2+ dynamics encode the magnitude of sensorimotor adaptation of the electromotor output in a weakly electric fish. The neural correlate of this memory is a synaptically induced Ca2+-dependent enhancement of intrinsic excitability of neurons responsible for setting the electromoto...

  18. Pneumococal Surface Protein A (PspA Regulates Programmed Death Ligand 1 Expression on Dendritic Cells in a Toll-Like Receptor 2 and Calcium Dependent Manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Vashishta

    Full Text Available Pneumonia leads to high mortality in children under the age of five years worldwide, resulting in close to 20 percent of all deaths in this age group. Therefore, investigations into host-pathogen interactions during Streptococcus pneumoniae infection are key in devising strategies towards the development of better vaccines and drugs. To that end, in this study we investigated the role of S. pneumoniae and its surface antigen Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA in modulating the expression of co-stimulatory molecule Programmed Death Ligand 1 (PD-L1 expression on dendritic cells (DCs and the subsequent effects of increased PD-L1 on key defence responses. Our data indicate that stimulation of DCs with PspA increases the surface expression of PD-L1 in a time and dose dependent manner. Characterization of mechanisms involved in PspA induced expression of PD-L1 indicate the involvement of Toll-Like Receptor 2 (TLR2 and calcium homeostasis. While calcium release from intracellular stores positively regulated PD-L1 expression, calcium influx from external milieu negatively regulated PD-L1 expression. Increase in PD-L1 expression, when costimulated with PspA and through TLR2 was higher than when stimulated with PspA or through TLR2. Further, knockdown of TLR2 and the intermediates in the TLR signaling machinery pointed towards the involvement of a MyD88 dependent pathway in PspA induced PD-L1 expression. Incubation of DCs with S. pneumoniae resulted in the up-regulation of PD-L1 expression, while infection with a strain lacking surface PspA failed to do so. Our data also suggests the role of PspA in ROS generation. These results suggest a novel and specific role for PspA in modulating immune responses against S. pneumoniae by regulating PD-L1 expression.

  19. Calcium Imaging Perspectives in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chidananda Nagamangala Kanchiswamy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The calcium ion (Ca2+ is a versatile intracellular messenger. It provides dynamic regulation of a vast array of gene transcriptions, protein kinases, transcription factors and other complex downstream signaling cascades. For the past six decades, intracellular Ca2+ concentration has been significantly studied and still many studies are under way. Our understanding of Ca2+ signaling and the corresponding physiological phenomenon is growing exponentially. Here we focus on the improvements made in the development of probes used for Ca2+ imaging and expanding the application of Ca2+ imaging in plant science research.

  20. Calcium-myristoyl Tug is a new mechanism for intramolecular tuning of calcium sensitivity and target enzyme interaction for guanylyl cyclase-activating protein 1: dynamic connection between N-fatty acyl group and EF-hand controls calcium sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peshenko, Igor V; Olshevskaya, Elena V; Lim, Sunghyuk; Ames, James B; Dizhoor, Alexander M

    2012-04-20

    Guanylyl cyclase-activating protein 1 (GCAP1), a myristoylated Ca(2+) sensor in vision, regulates retinal guanylyl cyclase (RetGC). We show that protein-myristoyl group interactions control Ca(2+) sensitivity, apparent affinity for RetGC, and maximal level of cyclase activation. Mutating residues near the myristoyl moiety affected the affinity of Ca(2+) binding to EF-hand 4. Inserting Phe residues in the cavity around the myristoyl group increased both the affinity of GCAP1 for RetGC and maximal activation of the cyclase. NMR spectra show that the myristoyl group in the L80F/L176F/V180F mutant remained sequestered inside GCAP1 in both Ca(2+)-bound and Mg(2+)-bound states. This mutant displayed much higher affinity for the cyclase but reduced Ca(2+) sensitivity of the cyclase regulation. The L176F substitution improved affinity of myristoylated and non-acylated GCAP1 for the cyclase but simultaneously reduced the affinity of Ca(2+) binding to EF-hand 4 and Ca(2+) sensitivity of the cyclase regulation by acylated GCAP1. The replacement of amino acids near both ends of the myristoyl moiety (Leu(80) and Val(180)) minimally affected regulatory properties of GCAP1. N-Lauryl- and N-myristoyl-GCAP1 activated RetGC in a similar fashion. Thus, protein interactions with the central region of the fatty acyl chain optimize GCAP1 binding to RetGC and maximize activation of the cyclase. We propose a dynamic connection (or "tug") between the fatty acyl group and EF-hand 4 via the C-terminal helix that attenuates the efficiency of RetGC activation in exchange for optimal Ca(2+) sensitivity. PMID:22383530

  1. Geochemical reactions and dynamics during titration of a contaminated groundwater with high uranium, aluminum, and calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Baohua; Brooks, Scott C.; Roh, Yul; Jardine, Philip M.

    2003-08-01

    This study investigated possible geochemical reactions during titration of a contaminated groundwater with a low pH but high concentrations of aluminum, calcium, magnesium, manganese, and trace contaminant metals/radionuclides such as uranium, technetium, nickel, and cobalt. Both Na-carbonate and hydroxide were used as titrants, and a geochemical equilibrium reaction path model was employed to predict aqueous species and mineral precipitation during titration. Although the model appeared to be adequate to describe the concentration profiles of some metal cations, solution pH, and mineral precipitates, it failed to describe the concentrations of U during titration and its precipitation. Most U (as uranyl, UO 22+) as well as Tc (as pertechnetate, TcO 4-) were found to be sorbed and coprecipitated with amorphous Al and Fe oxyhydroxides at pH below ˜5.5, but slow desorption or dissolution of U and Tc occurred at higher pH values when Na 2CO 3 was used as the titrant. In general, the precipitation of major cationic species followed the order of Fe(OH) 3 and/or FeCo 0.1(OH) 3.2, Al 4(OH) 10SO 4, MnCO 3, CaCO 3, conversion of Al 4(OH) 10SO 4 to Al(OH) 3,am, Mn(OH) 2, Mg(OH) 2, MgCO 3, and Ca(OH) 2. The formation of mixed or double hydroxide phases of Ni and Co with Al and Fe oxyhydroxides was thought to be responsible for the removal of Ni and Co in solution. Results of this study indicate that, although the hydrolysis and precipitation of a single cation are known, complex reactions such as sorption/desorption, coprecipitation of mixed mineral phases, and their dissolution could occur simultaneously. These processes as well as the kinetic constraints must be considered in the design of the remediation strategies and modeling to better predict the activities of various metal species and solid precipitates during pre- and post-groundwater treatment practices.

  2. FORMATION OF MICRO-POROUS SPHERICAL PARTICLES OF CALCIUM SILICATE (XONOTLITE) IN DYNAMIC HYDROTHERMAL PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maoqiang Li; Hongxun Liang

    2004-01-01

    Stirring during hydrothermal synthesis plays an important role in the formation of porous spherical xonotlite particles. The size of spherical particles formed during dynamic hydrothermal process is related to the size of minimum vortices in the reaction slurry, which is determined by stirring speed. The kinetics of growth of xonotlite particles is determined by measuring the apparent viscosity of the reactant slurry at various reaction time and reaction temperatures. It is found that the growth of particles follows the contracting-volume equation, and the activation energies for nucleation and growth are 104 and 123 kJ·mol-1, respectively.

  3. A quantitative and dynamic model for plant stem cell regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Geier

    Full Text Available Plants maintain pools of totipotent stem cells throughout their entire life. These stem cells are embedded within specialized tissues called meristems, which form the growing points of the organism. The shoot apical meristem of the reference plant Arabidopsis thaliana is subdivided into several distinct domains, which execute diverse biological functions, such as tissue organization, cell-proliferation and differentiation. The number of cells required for growth and organ formation changes over the course of a plants life, while the structure of the meristem remains remarkably constant. Thus, regulatory systems must be in place, which allow for an adaptation of cell proliferation within the shoot apical meristem, while maintaining the organization at the tissue level. To advance our understanding of this dynamic tissue behavior, we measured domain sizes as well as cell division rates of the shoot apical meristem under various environmental conditions, which cause adaptations in meristem size. Based on our results we developed a mathematical model to explain the observed changes by a cell pool size dependent regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation, which is able to correctly predict CLV3 and WUS over-expression phenotypes. While the model shows stem cell homeostasis under constant growth conditions, it predicts a variation in stem cell number under changing conditions. Consistent with our experimental data this behavior is correlated with variations in cell proliferation. Therefore, we investigate different signaling mechanisms, which could stabilize stem cell number despite variations in cell proliferation. Our results shed light onto the dynamic constraints of stem cell pool maintenance in the shoot apical meristem of Arabidopsis in different environmental conditions and developmental states.

  4. Oleuropein-Enriched Olive Leaf Extract Affects Calcium Dynamics and Impairs Viability of Malignant Mesothelioma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Marchetti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant mesothelioma is a poor prognosis cancer in urgent need of alternative therapies. Oleuropein, the major phenolic of olive tree (Olea europaea L., is believed to have therapeutic potentials for various diseases, including tumors. We obtained an oleuropein-enriched fraction, consisting of 60% w/w oleuropein, from olive leaves, and assessed its effects on intracellular Ca2+ and cell viability in mesothelioma cells. Effects of the oleuropein-enriched fraction on Ca2+ dynamics and cell viability were studied in the REN mesothelioma cell line, using fura-2 microspectrofluorimetry and MTT assay, respectively. Fura-2-loaded cells, transiently exposed to the oleuropein-enriched fraction, showed dose-dependent transient elevations of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration (Ca2+i. Application of standard oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol, and of the inhibitor of low-voltage T-type Ca2+ channels NNC-55-0396, suggested that the effect is mainly due to oleuropein acting through its hydroxytyrosol moiety on T-type Ca2+ channels. The oleuropein-enriched fraction and standard oleuropein displayed a significant antiproliferative effect, as measured on REN cells by MTT cell viability assay, with IC50 of 22 μg/mL oleuropein. Data suggest that our oleuropein-enriched fraction from olive leaf extract could have pharmacological application in malignant mesothelioma anticancer therapy, possibly by targeting T-type Ca2+ channels and thereby dysregulating intracellular Ca2+ dynamics.

  5. Effects of rapid and slow potassium repolarization currents and calcium dynamics on hysteresis in restitution of action potential duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Runze; Patwardhan, Abhijit

    2007-04-01

    We used a mathematical model to investigate effects of repolarizing currents I(kr) and I(ks), calcium (Ca) current I(CaL), and Ca dynamics in network sarcoplasmic reticulum and junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum (JSR) on hysteresis in restitution of action potential duration. Enhanced I(kr) increased slope of restitution, hysteresis loop thickness, and delay between peaks of diastolic intervals and action potential duration. Increase in I(ks) decreased loop thickness and peak delay. Decrease in I(CaL) had effects similar to increasing I(kr), except slope of restitution decreased markedly. Uptake of Ca into the network sarcoplasmic reticulum had less effect on hysteresis than transfer of Ca into JSR. Faster transfer of Ca into JSR markedly decreased loop thickness and peak delay. Our results provide insight into mechanisms responsible for this newly identified property of restitution. Such information will be valuable in studies where modification of hysteresis is used to investigate its role in arrhythmogenesis. PMID:16895773

  6. Heavy metals in fish scales: accumulation and effects on calcium regulation in the mummichog, Fundulus heteroclitus L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scales of Fundulus heteroclitus were used to study the effects of heavy metals on fish calcification. Fish were subjected to laboratory zinc- or cadmium-exposure and scales analyzed for calcium, phosphorus, metals, and organic content. In regenerating scales, both metals caused reductions in scale calcium and phosphorus during the early stages of calcification. In later stages, phosphorus was elevated by cadmium. In calcium-45 uptake experiments metal-specific results were observed. Cd affected calcification indirectly by reducing Ca2+ uptake by the gills while Zn, acted directly at the site of calcification and was accumulated by the scales. Experiments with isolated gills in vitro using metabolic inhibitors suggested that initial Ca2+ uptake occurs by facilitated diffusion and that Cd2+ ions are effective at displacing Ca2+ ions from the calcium carrier. In saltwater fish, Ca2+ transport across the basolateral membranes of gill chloride cells is partially dependent on a metal-insensitive Ca2+-ATPase but most Ca2+ uptake appears to occur passively. In isolated scales, Ca2+ transport was energy dependent and was inhibited by both Cd and Zn

  7. Heavy metals in fish scales: accumulation and effects on calcium regulation in the mummichog, Fundulus heteroclitus L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauer, G.R.

    1986-01-01

    The scales of Fundulus heteroclitus were used to study the effects of heavy metals on fish calcification. Fish were subjected to laboratory zinc- or cadmium-exposure and scales analyzed for calcium, phosphorus, metals, and organic content. In regenerating scales, both metals caused reductions in scale calcium and phosphorus during the early stages of calcification. In later stages, phosphorus was elevated by cadmium. In calcium-45 uptake experiments metal-specific results were observed. Cd affected calcification indirectly by reducing Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake by the gills while Zn, acted directly at the site of calcification and was accumulated by the scales. Experiments with isolated gills in vitro using metabolic inhibitors suggested that initial Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake occurs by facilitated diffusion and that Cd/sup 2 +/ ions are effective at displacing Ca/sup 2 +/ ions from the calcium carrier. In saltwater fish, Ca/sup 2 +/ transport across the basolateral membranes of gill chloride cells is partially dependent on a metal-insensitive Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase but most Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake appears to occur passively. In isolated scales, Ca/sup 2 +/ transport was energy dependent and was inhibited by both Cd and Zn.

  8. Poly(acrylic acid)-regulated Synthesis of Rod-Like Calcium Carbonate Nanoparticles for Inducing the Osteogenic Differentiation of MC3T3-E1 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Yao, Chenxue; Cui, Zhengyang; Luo, Dandan; Lee, In-Seop; Yao, Juming; Chen, Cen; Kong, Xiangdong

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carbonate, especially with nanostructure, has been considered as a good candidate material for bone regeneration due to its excellent biodegradability and osteoconductivity. In this study, rod-like calcium carbonate nanoparticles (Rod-CC NPs) with desired water dispersibility were achieved with the regulation of poly (acrylic acid). Characterization results revealed that the Rod-CC NPs had an average length of 240 nm, a width of 90 nm with an average aspect ratio of 2.60 and a negative ζ-potential of -22.25 ± 0.35 mV. The degradation study illustrated the nanoparticles degraded 23% at pH 7.4 and 45% at pH 5.6 in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution within three months. When cultured with MC3T3-E1 cells, the Rod-CC NPs exhibited a positive effect on the proliferation of osteoblast cells. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity assays together with the osteocalcin (OCN) and bone sialoprotein (BSP) expression observations demonstrated the nanoparticles could induce the differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells. Our study developed well-dispersed rod-like calcium carbonate nanoparticles which have great potential to be used in bone regeneration. PMID:27164090

  9. Poly(acrylic acid-regulated Synthesis of Rod-Like Calcium Carbonate Nanoparticles for Inducing the Osteogenic Differentiation of MC3T3-E1 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Calcium carbonate, especially with nanostructure, has been considered as a good candidate material for bone regeneration due to its excellent biodegradability and osteoconductivity. In this study, rod-like calcium carbonate nanoparticles (Rod-CC NPs with desired water dispersibility were achieved with the regulation of poly (acrylic acid. Characterization results revealed that the Rod-CC NPs had an average length of 240 nm, a width of 90 nm with an average aspect ratio of 2.60 and a negative ζ-potential of −22.25 ± 0.35 mV. The degradation study illustrated the nanoparticles degraded 23% at pH 7.4 and 45% at pH 5.6 in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS solution within three months. When cultured with MC3T3-E1 cells, the Rod-CC NPs exhibited a positive effect on the proliferation of osteoblast cells. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity assays together with the osteocalcin (OCN and bone sialoprotein (BSP expression observations demonstrated the nanoparticles could induce the differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells. Our study developed well-dispersed rod-like calcium carbonate nanoparticles which have great potential to be used in bone regeneration.

  10. Differences in intracellular calcium dynamics cause differences in α-granule secretion and phosphatidylserine expression in platelets adhering on glass and TiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Swati; Donati, Alessia; Reviakine, Ilya

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the activation of purified human platelets due to their adhesion on glass and TiO2 in the absence of extracellular calcium was investigated. Differences in α-granule secretion between platelets adhering on the two surfaces were detected by examining the expression and secretion of the α-granule markers P-selectin (CD62P) and β-thromboglobulin. Similarly, differences in the expression of phosphatidylserine (PS), and in the activation of the major integrin GPIIb/IIIa, on the surfaces of the adhering platelets, were also observed. While all of these activation markers were expressed in platelets adhering on glass, the surface markers were not expressed in platelets adhering on TiO2, and β-thromboglobulin secretion levels were substantially reduced. Differences in marker expression and secretion correlated with differences in the intracellular calcium dynamics. Calcium ionophore treatment triggered α-granule secretion and PS expression in TiO2-adhering platelets but had no effect on the activation of GPIIb/IIIa. These results demonstrate specificity in the way surfaces of artificial materials activate platelets, link differences in the intracellular calcium dynamics observed in the platelets adhering on the two surfaces to the differences in some of the platelet responses (α-granule secretion and PS expression), but also highlight the involvement of synergistic, calcium-independent pathways in platelet activation. The ability to control activation in surface-adhering platelets makes this an attractive model system for studying platelet signaling pathways and for tissue engineering applications. PMID:27124595

  11. OsCCD1, a novel small calcium-binding protein with one EF-hand motif, positively regulates osmotic and salt tolerance in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Pei; Zou, Juanzi; Kong, Lin; Hu, Shiqi; Wang, Biying; Yang, Jun; Xie, Guosheng

    2016-06-01

    Calcium-binding proteins play key roles in the signal transduction in the growth and stress response in eukaryotes. However, a subfamily of proteins with one EF-hand motif has not been fully studied in higher plants. Here, a novel small calcium-binding protein with a C-terminal centrin-like domain (CCD1) in rice, OsCCD1, was characterized to show high similarity with a TaCCD1 in wheat. As a result, OsCCD1 can bind Ca(2+) in the in vitro EMSA and the fluorescence staining calcium-binding assays. Transient expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged OsCCD1 in rice protoplasts showed that OsCCD1 was localized in the nucleus and cytosol of rice cells. OsCCD1 transcript levels were transiently induced by osmotic stress and salt stress through the calcium-mediated ABA signal. The rice seedlings of T-DNA mutant lines showed significantly less tolerance to osmotic and salt stresses than wild type plants (p<0.01). Conversely, its overexpressors can significantly enhance the tolerance to osmotic and salt stresses than wild type plants (p<0.05). Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that, OsDREB2B, OsAPX1 and OsP5CS genes are involved in the rice tolerance to osmotic and salt stresses. In sum, OsCCD1 gene probably affects the DREB2B and its downstream genes to positively regulate osmotic and salt tolerance in rice seedlings. PMID:27095404

  12. Interorganellar Membrane Microdomains: Dynamic Platforms in the Control of Calcium Signaling and Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra d'Azzo

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic interplay among intracellular organelles occurs at specific membrane tethering sites, where two organellar membranes come in close apposition but do not fuse. Such membrane microdomains allow for rapid and efficient interorganelle communication that contributes to the maintenance of cell physiology. Pathological conditions that interfere with the proper composition, number, and physical vicinity of the apposing membranes initiate a cascade of events resulting in cell death. Membrane contact sites have now been identified that tether the extensive network of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER membranes with the mitochondria, the plasma membrane (PM, the Golgi and the endosomes/lysosomes. Thus far, the most extensively studied are the MAMs, or mitochondria associated ER membranes, and the ER-PM junctions that share functional properties and crosstalk to one another. Specific molecular components that define these microdomains have been shown to promote the interaction in trans between these intracellular compartments and the transfer or exchange of Ca2+ ions, lipids, and metabolic signaling molecules that determine the fate of the cell.

  13. A Genome-wide Functional Characterization of Arabidopsis Regulatory Calcium Sensors in Pollen Tubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liming Zhou; Ying FU; Zhenbiao Yang

    2009-01-01

    Calcium, an ubiquitous second messenger, plays an essential and versatile role in cellular signaling. The diverse function of calcium signals is achieved by an excess of calcium sensors. Plants possess large numbers of calcium sensors, most of which have not been functionally characterized. To identify physiologically relevant calcium sensors in a specific cell type, we conducted a genome-wide functional survey in pollen tubes, for which spatiotemporal calcium signals are well-characterized and required for polarized tip growth. Pollen-specific members of calmodulin (CAM), CaM-like (CML), calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) and calcineurin B-like protein (CBL) families were tagged with green fluorescence protein (GFP) and their localization patterns and overexpression phenotypes were characterized in tobacco pollen tubes. We found that several fusion proteins showed distinct overexpression phenotypes and subcellular localization patterns. CDPK24.GFP was localized to the vegetative nucleus and the generative cell/sperms. CDPK32-GFP caused severe growth depolarization. CBL2-GFP and CBL3-GFP exhibited dynamic patterns of subcellular localization, including several endomembrane compartments, the apical plasma membrane (PM), and cytoskeleton-like structures in pollen tubes. Their overexpression also inhibited pollen tube elongation and induced growth depolarization. These putative calcium sensors are excellent candidates for the calcium sensors responsible for the regulation of calcium homeostasis and calcium-dependent tip growth and growth oscillation in pollen tubes,

  14. Vcx1 and ESCRT components regulate intracellular pH homeostasis in the response of yeast cells to calcium stress

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Papoušková, Klára; Jiang, L.; Sychrová, Hana

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 2 (2015), fov007. ISSN 1567-1356 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/10/0307; GA MŠk(CZ) LH14297; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : calcium * ESCRT * pHin * Vcx1 Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.818, year: 2014

  15. Differential Dendritic Integration of Synaptic Potentials and Calcium in Cerebellar Interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran-Van-Minh, Alexandra; Abrahamsson, Therése; Cathala, Laurence; DiGregorio, David A

    2016-08-17

    Dendritic voltage integration determines the transformation of synaptic inputs into output firing, while synaptic calcium integration drives plasticity mechanisms thought to underlie memory storage. Dendritic calcium integration has been shown to follow the same synaptic input-output relationship as dendritic voltage, but whether similar operations apply to neurons exhibiting sublinear voltage integration is unknown. We examined the properties and cellular mechanisms of these dendritic operations in cerebellar molecular layer interneurons using dendritic voltage and calcium imaging, in combination with synaptic stimulation or glutamate uncaging. We show that, while synaptic potentials summate sublinearly, concomitant dendritic calcium signals summate either linearly or supralinearly depending on the number of synapses activated. The supralinear dendritic calcium triggers a branch-specific, short-term suppression of neurotransmitter release that alters the pattern of synaptic activation. Thus, differential voltage and calcium integration permits dynamic regulation of neuronal input-output transformations without altering intrinsic nonlinear integration mechanisms. PMID:27537486

  16. Downregualtion of dynamin-related protein 1 attenuates glutamate-induced excitotoxicity via regulating mitochondrial function in a calcium dependent manner in HT22 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chi; Yuan, Xian-rui; Li, Hao-yu; Zhao, Zi-jin; Liao, Yi-wei; Wang, Xiang-yu; Su, Jun; Sang, Shu-shan; Liu, Qing, E-mail: xiangyaliuqing@163.com

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Downregulation of Drp-1 attenuates glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. •Downregulation of Drp-1 inhibits glutamate-induced apoptosis. •Downregulation of Drp-1 reduces glutamate-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. •Downregulation of Drp-1 preserves intracellular calcium homeostasis. -- Abstract: Glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity is involved in many acute and chronic brain diseases. Dynamin related protein 1 (Drp-1), one of the GTPase family of proteins that regulate mitochondrial fission and fusion balance, is associated with apoptotic cell death in cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Here we investigated the effect of downregulating Drp-1 on glutamate excitotoxicity-induced neuronal injury in HT22 cells. We found that downregulation of Drp-1 with specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) increased cell viability and inhibited lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release after glutamate treatment. Downregulation of Drp-1 also inhibited an increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and cleavage of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Drp-1 siRNA transfection preserved the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), reduced cytochrome c release, enhanced ATP production, and partly prevented mitochondrial swelling. In addition, Drp-1 knockdown attenuated glutamate-induced increases of cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+}, and preserved the mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} buffering capacity after excitotoxicity. Taken together, these results suggest that downregulation of Drp-1 protects HT22 cells against glutamate-induced excitatory damage, and this neuroprotection may be dependent at least in part on the preservation of mitochondrial function through regulating intracellular calcium homeostasis.

  17. Absorption of calcium ions on oxidized graphene sheets and study its dynamic behavior by kinetic and isothermal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathy, Mahmoud; Abdel Moghny, Th.; Mousa, Mahmoud Ahmed; El-Bellihi, Abdel-Hameed A.-A.; Awadallah, Ahmed E.

    2016-07-01

    Sorption of calcium ion from the hard underground water using novel oxidized graphene (GO) sheets was studied in this paper. Physicochemical properties and microstructure of graphene sheets were investigated using Raman spectrometer, thermogravimetry analyzer, transmission electron microscope, scanning electron microscope. The kinetics adsorption of calcium on graphene oxide sheets was examined using Lagergren first and second orders. The results show that the Lagergren second-order was the best-fit model that suggests the conception process of calcium ion adsorption on the Go sheets. For isothermal studies, the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were used at temperatures ranging between 283 and 313 K. Thermodynamic parameters resolved at 283, 298 and 313 K indicating that the GO adsorption was exothermic spontaneous process. Finally, the graphene sheets show high partiality toward calcium particles and it will be useful in softening and treatment of hard water.

  18. Dendritic spine changes in the development of alcohol addiction regulated by α-calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Mijakowska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Alcohol has many adverse effects on the brain. Among them are dendritic spine morphology alterations, which are believed to be the basis of alcohol addiction. Autophosphorylation of α-calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (αCaMKII has been shown to regulate spine morphology in vitro. Here we show that αCaMKII can also regulate addiction related behaviour and dendritic spine morphology changes caused by alcohol consumption in vivo. Method 12 αCaMKII-autophosphorylation deficient female mice (T286A and 12 wild type littermates were used in the study. T286A strain was created by Giese et al. (1998. Mice were housed and tested in two IntelliCages from NewBehavior (www.newbehavior.com. IntelliCage is an automated learning system. After 95 days of alcohol drinking interrupted by tests for motivation, persistence in alcohol seeking and probability of relapse, mice were ascribed to ‘high’ or ‘low’ drinkers group according to their performance in the tests. Additional criterion was the amount of alcohol consumed during the whole experiment. Result of each test was evaluated separately. 1/3 of the mice that scored highest in each criterion were considered ‘positive’ for this trait. ‘Positive’ animals were given 1 point, negative 0 points. Mice that were positive in at least 2 criteria were ascribed to ‘high’ drinkers (‘+’ group. Remaining mice – to ‘low’ drinkers (‘–‘. This method of behavioral phenotyping, developed by Radwanska and Kaczmarek (2012, is inspired by DSM-IV. Since the results of this evaluation are discrete (i.e. by definition all the animals score between 0 to +4, we developed also a continuous method of addiction rating, which we call ‘addiction index’. The result of the second method is a sum of the standardized (z-score results of the above mentioned tests. We use it to examine the correlations between addiction-like behavior and spine parameters. Control group (12 WT, 8

  19. Voltage-gated potassium channel Kvl.3 in rabbit ciliary epithelium regulates the membrane potential via coupling intracellular calcium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan-feng; ZHUO Ye-hong; BI Wei-na; BAI Yu-jing; LI Yan-na; WANG Zhi-jian

    2008-01-01

    Background The cell layer of the ciliary epithelium is responsible for aqueous humor secretion and maintenance.Ion channels play an important role in these processes.The main aim of this study was to determine whether the well-characterized members of the Kvl family (Kv1.3) contribute to the Kv currents in ciliary epithelium.Methods New Zealand White rabbits were maintained in a 12 hours light/dark cycle.Ciliary epithelium samples were isolated from the rabbits.We used Western blotting and immunocytochemistry to identify the expression and location of a voltage-gated potassium channel Kvl.3 in ciliary body epithelium.Membrane potential change after adding of Kv1.3 inhibitor margatoxin (MgTX) was observed with a fluorescence method.Results Western blotting and immunocytochemical studies showed that the Kv1.3 protein expressed in pigment ciliary epithelium and nonpigment ciliary epithelium,however it seemed to express more in the apical membrane of the nonpigmented epithelial cells.One nmol/L margatoxin,a specific inhibitor of Kv1.3 channels caused depolarization of the cultured nonpigmented epithelium (NPE) membrane potential.The cytosotic calcium increased after NPE cell depolarization,this increase of cytosolic calcium was partially blocked by 12.5 μmol/L dantrolene and 10 μmol/L nifedipine.These observations suggest that Kv1.3 channels modulate ciliary epithelium potential and effect calcium dependent mechanisms.Conclusion Kv1.3 channels contribute to K+ efflux at the membrane of rabbit ciliary epithelium.

  20. Regulation of the sodium/potassium/chloride cotransporter by calcium and cyclic AMP in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, B.L.; Smith, L.; Smith, J.B.

    1987-05-01

    The activity of the Na/K/Cl cotransporter in smooth muscle cells cultured from rat aorta was assayed by measuring the initial rate of furosemide-inhibitable /sup 86/Rb influx or efflux. Five uM furosemide or 0.2 uM bumetanide inhibited influx by 50%. Furosemide-inhibitable /sup 86/Rb influx depended on the presence of all 3 ions in the external medium. The dependence on Na and K was hyperbolic with apparent Km values of 45 and 5 mM, respectively. The dependence on Cl was sigmoidal. Assuming a stoichiometry of 1:1:2 for Na:K:Cl, a Km for Cl of 60 mM was obtained from a Hofstee plot of the data. Rapidly growing cells had 3 fold higher cotransport activity than quiescent cells. Angiotensin II (ANG) stimulated furosemide-inhibitable /sup 86/Rb efflux by 2 fold. An ANG receptor antagonist prevented ANG from increasing cotransport activity. Two calcium ionophores, A23187 and ionomycin, increased cotransport activity by 2 fold. Phorbol myristate acetate had no effect on cotransport activity. Isoproterenol, dibutyryl cyclic AMP, cholera toxin, or methylisobutylxanthine inhibited furosemide-sensitive /sup 86/Rb influx by 35 to 50%. From these findings they conclude that increasing cytoplasmic free calcium stimulates cotransport activity, whereas increasing cellular cyclic AMP inhibits the cotransporter.

  1. Valve dynamic and thermal cycle model in stepless capacity regulation for reciprocating compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jiangming; Hong, Weirong

    2012-11-01

    The existing researches of stepless capacity regulation system by depressing the suction valve for reciprocation compressor always adopt hypothesis that the compressor valves are open or close instantaneously, the valve dynamic has not been taken account into thermal cycle computation, the influence of capacity regulation system on suction valves dynamic performance and cylinder thermal cycle operation has not been considered. This paper focuses on theoretical and experimental analysis of the valve dynamic and thermal cycle for reciprocating compressor in the situation of stepless capacity regulation. The valve dynamics equation, gas forces for normal and back flow, and the cylinder pressure varying with suction valve unloader moment during compression thermal cycle are discussed. A new valve dynamic model based on L-K real gas state equation for reciprocating compressor is first deduced to reduce the calculation errors induced by the ideal gas state equation. The variations of valve dynamic and cylinder pressure during part of compression stroke are calculated numerically. The calculation results reveal the non-normal thermal cycle and operation condition of compressor in stepless capacity regulation situation. The numerical simulation results of the valve dynamic and thermal cycle parameters are also verified by the stepless capacity regulation experiments in the type of 3L-10-8 reciprocating compressor. The experimental results agree with the numerical simulation results, which show that the theoretical models proposed are effective and high-precision. The proposed theoretical models build the theoretical foundation to design the real stepless capacity regulation system.

  2. Status of calcium regulating hormonal systems in delayed period in persons exposed to occupational exposure of low doses of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose of study is consideration of endocrine system participation in development of calcium exchange disorders in persons exposed to action of low dose radiation . By radio- immune method in blood serum of 150 liquidators of Chernobyl accident consequences the concentration the following hormones were determined: parathormone, T3, T4, TSH, cortisol, ACTH, testosteron, insulin. Content of these hormones have been studied in according to following radiation factors: value of absorbed doses of external irradiation, degree of radioactive contamination of zone and exposition duration. It was determined, that basically dishormone disorders development have been concerned with parathormone, cortisol, hormones of thyroid axis, and in some cases to ACTH and insulin. Liquidators' frequencies of normal and changed concentration of calcium regulating hormones are sited in tabular form. It was established, that examined persons in result hormone disorders have of decrease functions of pituitary glands (76.78 %), pancreas (55 %), thyroid gland (24.31 %) and sex glands (19.23 %) and simultaneously cases of increase functions of parathyroid gland (58.2 %), adrenal glands (52.32 %) and adeno-pituitary glands (17.39). It is concluded, that inter hormonal correlation disorders are accompanying with morphologic and functional futures of secretory activity changes

  3. Effect of sepsis on calcium uptake and content in skeletal muscle and regulation in vitro by calcium of total and myofibrillar protein breakdown in control and septic muscle: Results from a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because high calcium concentration in vitro stimulates muscle proteolysis, calcium has been implicated in the pathogenesis of increased muscle breakdown in different catabolic conditions. Protein breakdown in skeletal muscle is increased during sepsis, but the effect of sepsis on muscle calcium uptake and content is not known. In this study the influence of sepsis, induced in rats by cecal ligation and puncture, on muscle calcium uptake and content was studied. Sixteen hours after cecal ligation and puncture or sham operation, calcium content of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus (SOL) muscles was determined with an atomic absorption spectrometer. Calcium uptake was measured in intact SOL muscles incubated in the presence of calcium 45 (45Ca) for between 1 and 120 minutes. Total and myofibrillar protein breakdown was determined in SOL muscles, incubated in the presence of different calcium concentrations (0; 2.5; 5.0 mmol/L), and measured as release into the incubation medium of tyrosine and 3-methylhistidine (3-MH), respectively. Calcium content was increased by 51% (p less than 0.001) during sepsis in SOL and by 10% (p less than 0.05) in EDL muscle. There was no difference in 45Ca uptake between control and septic muscles during the early phase (1 to 5 minutes) of incubation. During more extended incubation (30 to 120 minutes), muscles from septic rats took up significantly more 45Ca than control muscles (p less than 0.05). Tyrosine release by incubated SOL muscles from control and septic rats was increased when calcium was added to the incubation medium, and at a calcium concentration of 2.5 mmol/L, the increase in tyrosine release was greater in septic than in control muscle. Addition of calcium to the incubation medium did not affect 3-MH release in control or septic muscle

  4. Switched Dynamical Latent Force Models for Modelling Transcriptional Regulation

    CERN Document Server

    López-Lopera, Andrés F

    2015-01-01

    In order to develop statistical approaches for transcription networks, statistical community has proposed several methods to infer activity levels of proteins, from time-series measurements of targets' expression levels. A few number of approaches have been proposed in order to outperform the representation of fast switching time instants, but computational overheads are significant due to complex inference algorithms. Using the theory related to latent force models (LFM), the development of this project provide a switched dynamical hybrid model based on Gaussian processes (GPs). To deal with discontinuities in dynamical systems (or latent driving force), an extension of the single input motif approach is introduced, that switches between different protein concentrations, and different dynamical systems. This creates a versatile representation for transcription networks that can capture discrete changes and non-linearities in the dynamics. The proposed method is evaluated on both simulated data and real data,...

  5. Dynamic regulation of mitochondrial genome maintenance in germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasashima, Katsumi; Nagao, Yasumitsu; Endo, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria play a crucial role in the development and function of germ cells. Mitochondria contain a maternally inherited genome that should be transmitted to offspring without reactive oxygen species-induced damage during germ line development. Germ cells are also involved in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) bottleneck; thus, the appropriate regulation of mtDNA in these cells is very important for this characteristic transmission. In this review, we focused on unique regulation of the mitochondrial genome in animal germ cells; paternal elimination and the mtDNA bottleneck in females. We also summarized the mitochondrial nucleoid factors involved in various mtDNA regulation pathways. Among them, mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), which has pleiotropic and essential roles in mtDNA maintenance, appears to have putative roles in germ cell regulation. PMID:24482608

  6. Mating triggers dynamic immune regulations in wood ant queens.

    OpenAIRE

    Castella G.; Christe P.; Chapuisat M.

    2009-01-01

    Mating can affect female immunity in multiple ways. On the one hand, the immune system may be activated by pathogens transmitted during mating, sperm and seminal proteins, or wounds inflicted by males. On the other hand, immune defences may also be down-regulated to reallocate resources to reproduction. Ants are interesting models to study post-mating immune regulation because queens mate early in life, store sperm for many years, and use it until their death many years later, while males typ...

  7. Dynamic regulation of mitochondrial genome maintenance in germ cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kasashima, Katsumi; Nagao, Yasumitsu; Endo, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria play a crucial role in the development and function of germ cells. Mitochondria contain a maternally inherited genome that should be transmitted to offspring without reactive oxygen species-induced damage during germ line development. Germ cells are also involved in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) bottleneck; thus, the appropriate regulation of mtDNA in these cells is very important for this characteristic transmission. In this review, we focused on unique regulation of the mitocho...

  8. Regulation of Microtubule Dynamics in Axon Regeneration: Insights from C. elegans [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngang Heok Tang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of an axon to regenerate is regulated by its external environment and by cell-intrinsic factors. Studies in a variety of organisms suggest that alterations in axonal microtubule (MT dynamics have potent effects on axon regeneration. We review recent findings on the regulation of MT dynamics during axon regeneration, focusing on the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. In C. elegans the dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK promotes axon regeneration, whereas the exchange factor for Arf6 (EFA-6 inhibits axon regeneration. Both DLK and EFA-6 respond to injury and control axon regeneration in part via MT dynamics. How the DLK and EFA-6 pathways are related is a topic of active investigation, as is the mechanism by which EFA-6 responds to axonal injury. We evaluate potential candidates, such as the MT affinity-regulating kinase PAR-1/MARK, in regulation of EFA-6 and axonal MT dynamics in regeneration.

  9. Leaching of calcium sulfo-aluminate cement pastes by water at regulated pH and temperature: Experimental investigation and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two cement pastes, prepared with a ye'elimite-rich calcium sulfo-aluminate binder containing 0% or 20% gypsum, were leached by water at regulated pH (7) and temperature (20 C) for three months with the aim of understanding and modeling the degradation processes. The cumulative quantities of Ca2+, OH- and SO42- ions in the leachates increased linearly versus the square root of time, showing that leaching was controlled by diffusion. The gypsum-free material exhibited the highest decalcification rate. Examination of the solid samples after three months revealed three zones: - the surface layer, highly porous and composed of AH3, perovskite and possibly C-(A)-S-H, - an intermediate zone, less porous, in which several precipitation and dissolution fronts occurred, and - the sound core. The hydrated phase evolution along depth was accurately determined and qualitatively reproduced with a model coupling transport by diffusion and chemical reactions. (authors)

  10. Synthesis of fusogenic lipids through activation of phospholipase D1 by GTPases and the kinase RSK2 is required for calcium-regulated exocytosis in neuroendocrine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Nicolas

    2010-02-01

    Exocytosis of hormones occurs through the fusion of large dense-core secretory vesicles with the plasma membrane. This highly regulated process involves key proteins such as SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein-attachment protein receptors) and also specific lipids at the site of membrane fusion. Among the different lipids required for exocytosis, our recent observations have highlighted the crucial role of PA (phosphatidic acid) in the late stages of membrane fusion in various exocytotic events. An RNAi (RNA interference) strategy coupled with the detection of PA in living cells has pointed to plasma membrane-associated PLD1 (phospholipase D(1)) as the main producer of PA in response to secretagogue stimulation. We have identified several GTPases which regulate the activation level of PLD(1) in neuroendocrine cells. Finally, RSK2 (ribosomal S6 kinase 2) appears to phosphorylate and regulate the activity of PLD(1) in a calcium-dependent manner. Altogether our results have unravelled a complex set of regulatory pathways controlling the synthesis of fusogenic lipids at the secretory granule fusion site by PLD(1). PMID:20074053

  11. miR-155 acts as an anti-inflammatory factor in atherosclerosis-associated foam cell formation by repressing calcium-regulated heat stable protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyi; Kong, Deyong; Chen, Heming; Liu, Shuiyi; Hu, Hui; Wu, Tangwei; Wang, Jing; Chen, Weiqun; Ning, Yong; Li, Yong; Lu, Zhongxin

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis (AS) is chronic inflammation in response to lipid accumulation. MicroRNA-155 (miR-155) is being increasingly studied to evaluate its potential as diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets in many diseases. However, delineating the role of miR-155 in AS remains difficult. Here, we detected constitutive expression of several microRNAs (miRNAs) possibly associated with cardiovascular disease in foam cells and clinical specimens from patients with AS. Among them, we found that the level of miR-155 in foam cells was the most significantly elevated in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, the expression of miR-155 was elevated in the plasma and plaque of patients with AS. We also reported for the first time that miR-155 targets calcium-regulated heat stable protein 1 (CARHSP1), which regulates the stability of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) mRNA. Furthermore, we investigated the mechanism by which the miR-155 level is elevated. miR-155 upregulation is due to transcriptional regulation by nuclear factor (NF)-κB, which is activated by the inflammatory factor TNF-α. In summary, increased miR-155 relieves chronic inflammation by a negative feedback loop and plays a protective role during atherosclerosis-associated foam cell formation by signaling through the miR-155-CARHSP1-TNF-α pathway. PMID:26899994

  12. Explaining and predicting the impact of regulation on innovation: towards a dynamic model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montalvo Corral, C.

    2007-01-01

    Although much work has been done on the regulation and governance of innovation, it provides few formal analytical tools to enable us to learn about the dynamics of the regulatory system in terms of the interaction between regulators and firms. If governance occurs in a context of mutual interdepend

  13. Mechanisms regulating regional cerebral activation during dynamic handgrip in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williamson, James; Friedman, D B; Mitchell, J H; Secher, N H; Friberg, L

    1996-01-01

    type of afferent input required for this cerebral activation. The rCBF was measured at +5.0 and +9.0 cm above the orbitomeatal (OM) plane in 13 subjects during 1) rest; 2) dynamic left-hand contractions; 3) postcontraction ischemia (metaboreceptor afferents); and 4) biceps brachii tendon vibration...

  14. Using calcium silicate to regulate the physicochemical and biological properties when using β-tricalcium phosphate as bone cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is an osteoconductive material. For this research we have combined it with a low degradation calcium silicate (CS) to enhance its bioactive and osteostimulative properties. To check its effectiveness, a series of β-TCP/CS composites with different ratios were prepared to make new bioactive and biodegradable biocomposites for bone repair. Regarding the formation of bone-like apatite, the diametral tensile strength as well as the ion release and weight loss of composites were compared both before and after immersions in simulated body fluid (SBF). In addition, we also examined the behavior of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured on β-TCP/CS composites. The results show that the apatite deposition ability of the β-TCP/CS composites improves as the CS content is increased. For composites with more than a 60% CS content, the samples become completely covered by a dense bone-like apatite layer. At the end of the immersion period, weight losses of 24%, 32%, 34%, 38%, 41%, and 45% were observed for the composites containing 0%, 20%, 40%, 80%, 80% and 100% β-TCP cements, respectively. In addition, the antibacterial activity of CS/β-TCP composite improves as the CS-content is increased. In vitro cell experiments show that the CS-rich composites promote human dental pulp cell (hDPC) proliferation and differentiation. However, when the CS quantity in the composite is less than 60%, the quantity of cells and osteogenesis protein of hDPCs is stimulated by Si released from the β-TCP/CS composites. The degradation of β-TCP and the osteogenesis of CS give strong reason to believe that these calcium-based composite cements will prove to be effective bone repair materials. - Highlights: • CS improved the physicochemical properties and osteogenic activity of β-TCP. • Higher CS in the composite, the shorter setting time and the higher DTS was found. • With a CS more than 40%, the osteogenesis and angiogenesis proteins were promoted by

  15. Using calcium silicate to regulate the physicochemical and biological properties when using β-tricalcium phosphate as bone cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Chia-Tze; Huang, Tsui-Hsien [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yi-Jyun [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Dental Department, Taichung Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Hung, Chi-Jr [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chi-Chang, E-mail: chichang31@gmail.com [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Shie, Ming-You, E-mail: eviltacasi@gmail.com [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-01

    β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is an osteoconductive material. For this research we have combined it with a low degradation calcium silicate (CS) to enhance its bioactive and osteostimulative properties. To check its effectiveness, a series of β-TCP/CS composites with different ratios were prepared to make new bioactive and biodegradable biocomposites for bone repair. Regarding the formation of bone-like apatite, the diametral tensile strength as well as the ion release and weight loss of composites were compared both before and after immersions in simulated body fluid (SBF). In addition, we also examined the behavior of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured on β-TCP/CS composites. The results show that the apatite deposition ability of the β-TCP/CS composites improves as the CS content is increased. For composites with more than a 60% CS content, the samples become completely covered by a dense bone-like apatite layer. At the end of the immersion period, weight losses of 24%, 32%, 34%, 38%, 41%, and 45% were observed for the composites containing 0%, 20%, 40%, 80%, 80% and 100% β-TCP cements, respectively. In addition, the antibacterial activity of CS/β-TCP composite improves as the CS-content is increased. In vitro cell experiments show that the CS-rich composites promote human dental pulp cell (hDPC) proliferation and differentiation. However, when the CS quantity in the composite is less than 60%, the quantity of cells and osteogenesis protein of hDPCs is stimulated by Si released from the β-TCP/CS composites. The degradation of β-TCP and the osteogenesis of CS give strong reason to believe that these calcium-based composite cements will prove to be effective bone repair materials. - Highlights: • CS improved the physicochemical properties and osteogenic activity of β-TCP. • Higher CS in the composite, the shorter setting time and the higher DTS was found. • With a CS more than 40%, the osteogenesis and angiogenesis proteins were promoted by

  16. Real-Time Welfare-Maximizing Regulation Allocation in Dynamic Aggregator-EVs System

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Sun; Dong, Min; Liang, Ben

    2013-01-01

    The concept of vehicle-to-grid (V2G) has gained recent interest as more and more electric vehicles (EVs) are put to use. In this paper, we consider a dynamic aggregator-EVs system, where an aggregator centrally coordinates a large number of dynamic EVs to perform regulation service. We propose a Welfare-Maximizing Regulation Allocation (WMRA) algorithm for the aggregator to fairly allocate the regulation amount among its EVs. Compared to previous works, WMRA accommodates a wide spectrum of vi...

  17. Calredoxin represents a novel type of calcium-dependent sensor-responder connected to redox regulation in the chloroplast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochmal, Ana Karina; Zinzius, Karen; Charoenwattanasatien, Ratana; Gäbelein, Philipp; Mutoh, Risa; Tanaka, Hideaki; Schulze, Stefan; Liu, Gai; Scholz, Martin; Nordhues, André; Offenborn, Jan Niklas; Petroutsos, Dimitris; Finazzi, Giovanni; Fufezan, Christian; Huang, Kaiyao; Kurisu, Genji; Hippler, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) and redox signalling play important roles in acclimation processes from archaea to eukaryotic organisms. Herein we characterized a unique protein from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that has the competence to integrate Ca(2+)- and redox-related signalling. This protein, designated as calredoxin (CRX), combines four Ca(2+)-binding EF-hands and a thioredoxin (TRX) domain. A crystal structure of CRX, at 1.6 Å resolution, revealed an unusual calmodulin-fold of the Ca(2+)-binding EF-hands, which is functionally linked via an inter-domain communication path with the enzymatically active TRX domain. CRX is chloroplast-localized and interacted with a chloroplast 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (PRX1). Ca(2+)-binding to CRX is critical for its TRX activity and for efficient binding and reduction of PRX1. Thereby, CRX represents a new class of Ca(2+)-dependent 'sensor-responder' proteins. Genetically engineered Chlamydomonas strains with strongly diminished amounts of CRX revealed altered photosynthetic electron transfer and were affected in oxidative stress response underpinning a function of CRX in stress acclimation. PMID:27297041

  18. Calcium transcriptionally regulates the biofilm machinery of Xylella fastidiosa to promote continued biofilm development in batch cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jennifer K; Chen, Hongyu; McCarty, Sara E; Liu, Lawrence Y; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2016-05-01

    The functions of calcium (Ca) in bacteria are less characterized than in eukaryotes, where its role has been studied extensively. The plant-pathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa has several virulence features that are enhanced by increased Ca concentrations, including biofilm formation. However, the specific mechanisms driving modulation of this feature are unclear. Characterization of biofilm formation over time showed that 4 mM Ca supplementation produced denser biofilms that were still developing at 96 h, while biofilm in non-supplemented media had reached the dispersal stage by 72 h. To identify changes in global gene expression in X. fastidiosa grown in supplemental Ca, RNA-Seq of batch culture biofilm cells was conducted at three 24-h time intervals. Results indicate that a variety of genes are differentially expressed in response to Ca, including genes related to attachment, motility, exopolysaccharide synthesis, biofilm formation, peptidoglycan synthesis, regulatory functions, iron homeostasis, and phages. Collectively, results demonstrate that Ca supplementation induces a transcriptional response that promotes continued biofilm development, while biofilm cells in nonsupplemented media are driven towards dispersion of cells from the biofilm structure. These results have important implications for disease progression in planta, where xylem sap is the source of Ca and other nutrients for X. fastidiosa. PMID:26913481

  19. Calredoxin represents a novel type of calcium-dependent sensor-responder connected to redox regulation in the chloroplast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochmal, Ana Karina; Zinzius, Karen; Charoenwattanasatien, Ratana; Gäbelein, Philipp; Mutoh, Risa; Tanaka, Hideaki; Schulze, Stefan; Liu, Gai; Scholz, Martin; Nordhues, André; Offenborn, Jan Niklas; Petroutsos, Dimitris; Finazzi, Giovanni; Fufezan, Christian; Huang, Kaiyao; Kurisu, Genji; Hippler, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) and redox signalling play important roles in acclimation processes from archaea to eukaryotic organisms. Herein we characterized a unique protein from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that has the competence to integrate Ca2+- and redox-related signalling. This protein, designated as calredoxin (CRX), combines four Ca2+-binding EF-hands and a thioredoxin (TRX) domain. A crystal structure of CRX, at 1.6 Å resolution, revealed an unusual calmodulin-fold of the Ca2+-binding EF-hands, which is functionally linked via an inter-domain communication path with the enzymatically active TRX domain. CRX is chloroplast-localized and interacted with a chloroplast 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (PRX1). Ca2+-binding to CRX is critical for its TRX activity and for efficient binding and reduction of PRX1. Thereby, CRX represents a new class of Ca2+-dependent ‘sensor-responder' proteins. Genetically engineered Chlamydomonas strains with strongly diminished amounts of CRX revealed altered photosynthetic electron transfer and were affected in oxidative stress response underpinning a function of CRX in stress acclimation. PMID:27297041

  20. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Bradleigh; Tyerman, Stephen D.; Burton, Rachel A.; Gilliham, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact the development, physical traits and disease susceptibility of fruit through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g., blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples). This review works toward an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved knowledge of the calcium-regulated

  1. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Bradleigh; Tyerman, Stephen D; Burton, Rachel A; Gilliham, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact the development, physical traits and disease susceptibility of fruit through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g., blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples). This review works toward an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved knowledge of the calcium-regulated

  2. Confinement and dynamical regulation in two-dimensional convective turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bian, N.H.; Garcia, O.E.

    2003-01-01

    -frequency bursting in the fluctuation level and the convective heat flux integral, both resulting in a state of large-scale intermittency. The first one involves the control of convective transport by sheared mean flows. This regulation relies on the conservative transfer of kinetic energy from tilted fluctuations......In this work the nature of confinement improvement implied by the self-consistent generation of mean flows in two-dimensional convective turbulence is studied. The confinement variations are linked to two distinct regulation mechanisms which are also shown to be at the origin of low...... to the mean component of the flow. Bursting can also result from the quasi-linear modification of the linear instability drive which is the mean pressure gradient. For each bursting process the relevant zero-dimensional model equations are given. These are finally coupled in a minimal model of...

  3. Leading at the Front: How EB Proteins Regulate Microtubule Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Taviare

    2012-02-01

    Microtubules are the most rigid of the cytoskeletal filaments, they provide the cell's scaffolding, form the byways on which motor proteins transport intracellular cargo and reorganize to form the mitotic spindle when the cell needs to divide. These biopolymers are composed of alpha and beta tubulin monomers that create hollow cylindrical nanotubes with an outer diameter of 25 nm and an inner diameter of 17 nm. At steady state concentrations, microtubules undergo a process known as dynamic instability. During dynamic instability the length of individual microtubules is changing as the filament alternates between periods of growth to shrinkage (catastrophe) and shrinkage to growth (rescue). This process can be enhanced or diminished with the addition of microtubule associated proteins (MAPs). MAPs are microtubule binding proteins that stabilize, destabilize, or nucleate microtubules. We will discuss the effects of the stabilizing end-binding proteins (EB1, EB2 and EB3), on microtubule dynamics observed in vitro. The EBs are a unique family of MAPs known to tip track and enhance microtubule growth by stabilizing the ends. This is a different mechanism than those employed by structural MAPs such as tau or MAP4.

  4. Dynamic regulation of β1 subunit trafficking controls vascular contractility

    OpenAIRE

    Leo, M. Dennis; Bannister, John P.; Narayanan, Damodaran; Nair, Anitha; Grubbs, Jordan E.; Gabrick, Kyle S.; Boop, Frederick A.; Jaggar, Jonathan H.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma membrane ion channels composed of pore-forming and auxiliary subunits regulate physiological functions in virtually all cell types. A conventional view is that ion channels assemble with their auxiliary subunits prior to surface trafficking of the multiprotein complex. Arterial myocytes express large-conductance Ca2+-activated potassium (BK) channel α and auxiliary β1 subunits that modulate contractility and blood pressure and flow. The data here show that although most BKα subunits ar...

  5. Metric dynamics for membrane transformation through regulated cell proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Hiroshi C.

    2016-01-01

    This study develops an equation for describing three-dimensional membrane transformation through proliferation of its component cells regulated by morphogen density distributions on the membrane. The equation is developed in a two-dimensional coordinate system mapped on the membrane, referred to as the membrane coordinates. When the membrane expands, the membrane coordinates expand in the same manner so that the membrane is invariant in the coordinates. In the membrane coordinate system, the ...

  6. Multilevel complexity of calcium signaling:Modeling angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luca; Munaron; Marco; Scianna

    2012-01-01

    Intracellular calcium signaling is a universal,evolutionary conserved and versatile regulator of cell biochemistry.The complexity of calcium signaling and related cell machinery can be investigated by the use of experimental strategies,as well as by computational approaches.Vascular endothelium is a fascinating model to study the specific properties and roles of calcium signals at multiple biological levels.During the past 20 years,live cell imaging,patch clamp and other techniques have allowed us to detect and interfere with calcium signaling in endothelial cells(ECs),providing a huge amount of information on the regulation of vascularization(angiogenesis) in normal and tumoral tissues.These data range from the spatiotemporal dynamics of calcium within different cell microcompartments to those in entire multicellular and organized EC networks.Beside experimental strategies,in silico endothelial models,specifically designed for simulating calcium signaling,are contributing to our knowledge of vascular physiol-ogy and pathology.They help to investigate and predict the quantitative features of proangiogenic events moving through subcellular,cellular and supracellular levels.This review focuses on some recent developments of computational approaches for proangiogenic endothelial calcium signaling.In particular,we discuss the creation of hybrid simulation environments,which combine and integrate discrete Cellular Potts Models.They are able to capture the phenomenological mechanisms of cell morphological reorganization,migration,and intercellular adhesion,with single-cell spatiotemporal models,based on reaction-diffusion equations that describe the agonist-induced intracellular calcium events.

  7. Influence of calcium oxalate crystal accumulation on the calcium content of seeds from Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Paul A

    2012-04-01

    Crystals of calcium oxalate often form in cells adjacent to the vascular bundles in the tissues along the xylem stream. This spatial crystal pattern suggests a role for calcium oxalate formation in regulating calcium transport and partitioning to edible organs such as seeds. To investigate this potential role, microscopic and biochemical comparisons were conducted on the different tissues of Medicago truncatula wild-type and the calcium oxalate defective (cod) 5 which lacks the ability to accumulate prismatic crystals in the cells adjacent to the vascular bundles. Calcium measurements showed that cod5 seeds had more calcium and cod5 pods contained less calcium than the corresponding wild-type tissues. Roots, stems, and leaves from cod5 and wild-type had similar calcium content. Although cod5 was devoid of prismatic crystals, cod5 pods were observed to form druse crystals of calcium oxalate not found in wild-type pods. Taken together these findings suggest a functional role for calcium oxalate formation in regulating calcium transport to the seeds. Regulating calcium uptake at the roots also appeared to be another point of control in determining seed calcium content. Overall, regulating the long distance transport and partitioning of calcium to the seeds appears to be a complex process with multiple points of control. PMID:22325887

  8. Trolox-sensitive reactive oxygen species regulate mitochondrial morphology, oxidative phosphorylation and cytosolic calcium handling in healthy cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Distelmaier, F.; Valsecchi, F.; Forkink, M.; Emst-de Vries, S.E. van; Swarts, H.G.P.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.; Verwiel, E.T.P.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Koopman, W.J.H.

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: Cell regulation by signaling reactive oxygen species (sROS) is often incorrectly studied through extracellular oxidant addition. Here, we used the membrane-permeable antioxidant Trolox to examine the role of sROS in mitochondrial morphology, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), and cytosolic ca

  9. Up-Regulation of Interleukin-9 and the Interleukin-9-Associated Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel hCLCA1 in Nasal Mucosa Following In Vivo Allergen Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauber Hans-Peter

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin (IL-9 is a pleiotropic T helper 2-type cytokine that has been shown to be up-regulated in allergic airway disease, including asthma. IL-9 has been demonstrated to be a potent stimulus for the production and secretion of mucus from airway epithelial cells via induction of a calcium-activated chloride channel, hCLCA1. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of IL-9 and hCLCA1 following allergen challenge in the nasal mucosa of allergic rhinitis patients. Nasal biopsies were obtained from allergic rhinitis patients out of allergen season both before (baseline and after local antigen challenge with either ragweed or diluent (control. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization were used to assess IL-9 protein and hCLCA1 messenger ribonucleic acid. Eosinophils and T cells were detected using immunohistochemistry. IL-9 and hCLCA1 were very low at baseline, and expression was significantly up-regulated following ragweed challenge. Whereas the number of eosinophils increased after allergen challenge, T-cell counts did not change significantly. The results of this study demonstrate the relationship between specific allergen challenge and expression of both IL-9 and hCLCA1, suggesting a possible mechanism for the increased production of mucus from airway epithelial cells in allergic rhinitis.

  10. Dynamic model of gene regulation for the lac operon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gene regulatory network is a collection of DNA which interact with each other and with other matter in the cell. The lac operon is an example of a relatively simple genetic network and is one of the best-studied structures in the Escherichia coli bacteria. In this work we consider a deterministic model of the lac operon with a noise term, representing the stochastic nature of the regulation. The model is written in terms of a system of simultaneous first order differential equations with delays. We investigate an analytical and numerical solution and analyse the range of values for the parameters corresponding to a stable solution.

  11. Dynamic model of gene regulation for the lac operon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Maia; Ben-Halim, Asma

    2011-03-01

    Gene regulatory network is a collection of DNA which interact with each other and with other matter in the cell. The lac operon is an example of a relatively simple genetic network and is one of the best-studied structures in the Escherichia coli bacteria. In this work we consider a deterministic model of the lac operon with a noise term, representing the stochastic nature of the regulation. The model is written in terms of a system of simultaneous first order differential equations with delays. We investigate an analytical and numerical solution and analyse the range of values for the parameters corresponding to a stable solution.

  12. Dynamic model of gene regulation for the lac operon

    OpenAIRE

    Angelova, Maia; Ben-Halim, Asma

    2011-01-01

    Gene regulatory network is a collection of DNA which interact with each other and with other matter in the cell. The lac operon is an example of a relatively simple genetic network and is one of the best-studied structures in the Escherichia coli bacteria. In this work we consider a deterministic model of the lac operon with a noise term, representing the stochastic nature of the regulation. The model is written in terms of a system of simultaneous first order differential equations with dela...

  13. Modeling the dynamics of regulated resource systems : a fishery example

    OpenAIRE

    Ussif, Al-Amin M.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we develop a discrete-time model of jointly managed fisheries. Most modern real world fisheries are shared or jointly exploited and are under some kind of regulation. The regulatory part of the fishery in this paper is partitioned into two stages. In the first stage, which is our main focus, total allowable catch quotas (TACs) based on biological and/or economic considerations are determined in a way that guarantees the safety of the stock from a conservation viewpoint. In addit...

  14. Regulation of phytoplankton dynamics by vitamin B12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sañudo-Wilhelmy, S. A.; Gobler, C. J.; Okbamichael, M.; Taylor, G. T.

    2006-02-01

    Despite the biological necessity of vitamin B12 (cobalamin), its importance in phytoplankton ecology has been ignored for nearly three decades. Here we report strong and selective responses of phytoplankton communities to varying low levels (5-87 pM) of dissolved B12 in several coastal embayments. The ecological importance of this vitamin is inferred from observed declines in dissolved B12 levels as field populations of large (>5 μm) phytoplankton increased. In contrast, biomass of small (cobalamin, and implicates B12 as an important organic regulator of photoautotrophic fertility in marine systems.

  15. Interhemispheric inhibition is dynamically regulated during action observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueugneau, Nicolas; Bove, Marco; Ballay, Yves; Papaxanthis, Charalambos

    2016-05-01

    It is now well established that the motor system plays a pivotal role in action observation and that the neurophysiological processes underlying perception and action overlaps. However, while various experiments have shown a specific facilitation of the contralateral motor cortex during action observation, no information is available concerning the dynamics of interhemispheric interactions. The aim of the present study was, therefore, to assess interhemispheric inhibition during the observation of others' actions. We designed a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) experiment in which we measured both corticospinal excitability and interhemispheric inhibition, this latter by means of the ipsilateral silent period (iSP), while participants observed two motor tasks (tapping or grasping). We show that the iSP is enhanced during movement observation and that this modulation is tuned to the kinematics of the observed movements. An additional experiment was performed in which the TMS intensity was adjusted to match corticospinal excitability between rest and action observation. This resulted in a relative decrease of iSP. Overall, our data strongly suggest that action observation, as action execution, involves interhemispheric inhibitory mechanisms between the two motor cortices, and that this neural activity appears to be firmly shaped by the ongoing observed movement and its intrinsic dynamics. PMID:27082878

  16. Calcium-Permeable AMPA Receptors in the Nucleus Accumbens Regulate Depression-Like Behaviors in the Chronic Neuropathic Pain State

    OpenAIRE

    Goffer, Yossef; Xu, Duo; Eberle, Sarah E.; D'amour, James; Lee, Michelle; Tukey, David; Froemke, Robert C.; Ziff, Edward B.; Wang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Depression is a salient emotional feature of chronic pain. Depression alters the pain threshold and impairs functional recovery. To date, however, there has been limited understanding of synaptic or circuit mechanisms that regulate depression in the pain state. Here, we demonstrate that depression-like behaviors are induced in a rat model of chronic neuropathic pain. Using this model, we show that chronic pain selectively increases the level of GluA1 subunits of AMPA-type glutamate receptors ...

  17. USP2-45 Is a Circadian Clock Output Effector Regulating Calcium Absorption at the Post-Translational Level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Pouly

    Full Text Available The mammalian circadian clock influences most aspects of physiology and behavior through the transcriptional control of a wide variety of genes, mostly in a tissue-specific manner. About 20 clock-controlled genes (CCGs oscillate in virtually all mammalian tissues and are generally considered as core clock components. One of them is Ubiquitin-Specific Protease 2 (Usp2, whose status remains controversial, as it may be a cogwheel regulating the stability or activity of core cogwheels or an output effector. We report here that Usp2 is a clock output effector related to bodily Ca2+ homeostasis, a feature that is conserved across evolution. Drosophila with a whole-body knockdown of the orthologue of Usp2, CG14619 (dUsp2-kd, predominantly die during pupation but are rescued by dietary Ca2+ supplementation. Usp2-KO mice show hyperabsorption of dietary Ca2+ in small intestine, likely due to strong overexpression of the membrane scaffold protein NHERF4, a regulator of the Ca2+ channel TRPV6 mediating dietary Ca2+ uptake. In this tissue, USP2-45 is found in membrane fractions and negatively regulates NHERF4 protein abundance in a rhythmic manner at the protein level. In clock mutant animals (Cry1/Cry2-dKO, rhythmic USP2-45 expression is lost, as well as the one of NHERF4, confirming the inverse relationship between USP2-45 and NHERF4 protein levels. Finally, USP2-45 interacts in vitro with NHERF4 and endogenous Clathrin Heavy Chain. Taken together these data prompt us to define USP2-45 as the first clock output effector acting at the post-translational level at cell membranes and possibly regulating membrane permeability of Ca2+.

  18. Regulation of the Tyrosine Kinase Pyk2 by Calcium Is through Production of Reactive Oxygen Species in Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes*

    OpenAIRE

    Lysechko, Tara L.; Cheung, Samuel M. S.; Ostergaard, Hanne L.

    2010-01-01

    Pyk2 was identified as a Ca2+-dependent kinase, however, the regulation of Pyk2 by Ca2+ in T cells remains controversial. We found that Ca2+ mobilization preferentially induced Pyk2 phosphorylation in cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Furthermore, Pyk2 phosphorylation in CTL was not absolutely Ca2+ dependent but relied on the strength of T cell receptor stimulation. Ionomycin-stimulated Pyk2 phosphorylation did not require calmodulin activity, because phosphorylation was not inhibited by the cal...

  19. The ATPase activity of saponin-treated rat erythrocytes: regulation by monovalent cations, calcium, ouabain, and furosemide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrunyaka, V V; Panyushkina, E A; Severina, E P; Orlov, S N

    1990-12-14

    The ATPase activities were studied in rat erythrocytes permeabilized with saponin. The concentrations of calcium and magnesium ions were varied within the range of 0.1-60 microM and 50-370 microM, respectively, by using EGTA-citrate buffer. The maximal activity of Ca2(+)-ATPase of permeabilized erythrocytes was by one order of magnitude higher, whereas the Ca2(+)-binding affinity was 1.5-2 times higher than that in erythrocyte ghosts washed an isotonic solution containing EGTA. Addition of the hemolysate restored the kinetic parameters of ghost Ca2(+)-ATPase practically completely, whereas in the presence of exogenous calmodulin only part of Ca2(+)-ATPase activity was recovered. Neither calmodulin nor R24571, a highly potent specific inhibitor of calmodulin-dependent reactions, influenced the Ca2(+)-ATPase activity of permeabilized erythrocytes. At Ca2+ concentrations below 0.7 microM, ouabain (0.5-1 mM) activated whereas at higher Ca2+ concentrations it inhibited the Ca2(+)-ATPase activity. Taking this observation into account the Na+/K(+)-ATPase was determined as the difference of between the ATPase activities in the presence of Na+ and K+ and in the presence of K+ alone. At physiological concentration of Mg2+ (370 microM), the addition of 0.3-1 microM Ca2+ increased Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity by 1.5-3-fold. Higher concentrations of this cation inhibited the enzyme. At low Mg2+ concentration (e.g., 50 microM) only Na+/K(+)-ATPase inhibition by Ca2+ was seen. It was found that at [NaCl] less than 20 mM furosemide was increased ouabain-inhibited component of ATPase in Ca2(+)-free media. This activating effect of furosemide was enhanced with a diminution of [Na+] upto 2 mM and did not reach the saturation level unless the 2 mM of drug was used. The activating effect of furosemide on Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity confirmed by experiments in which the ouabain-inhibited component was measured by the 86Rb+ influx into intact erythrocytes. PMID:2175654

  20. Dynamic control of biped locomotion robot using optimal regulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For moving in indoor space, it is generally recognized that biped locomotion is suitable. This paper proposes a hierarchical control strategy for the lower level where the position control or the force control at each joint is implemented. In the upper level control, the robot motion is divided into a sagittal plane and a lateral plane. We applied the optimal control algorithm to the motion control in the lateral plane in order to improve the robustness of the control system. The effects of these control schemes are shown by the experiments using the new walking robot BLR-G 1 and the parallel calculation system. BLR-G 1 has 9 degrees of freedom and equips the foot-pressure-sensors and a rate gyroscope. Complete dynamic walking is realized, in which the cycle for each step is about 1.0 second. (author)

  1. Dynamical Self-regulation in Self-propelled Particle Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Gopinath, Arvind; Marchetti, M Cristina; Baskaran, Aparna

    2011-01-01

    We study a continuum model of overdamped self-propelled particles with an aligning interaction in two dimensions. By combining analytical and numerical work, we map out the phase diagram for generic parameters. We find that the system self-organizes into two robust structures in different regions of parameter space: solitary waves of ordered swarms moving through a low density disordered background, and stationary asters. The self-regulating nature of the flow yields phase separation, ubiquitous in this class of systems, and controls the formation of solitary waves. Self-propulsion and the associated active convection play a crucial role in aster formation. A new result of our work is a phase diagram that displays these different regimes in a unified manner.

  2. Dynamic regulation of cerebral DNA repair genes by psychological stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, Kristin; Aalling, Nadia; Wörtwein, Gitta;

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal genotoxic insults from oxidative stress constitute a putative molecular link between stress and depression on the one hand, and cognitive dysfunction and dementia risk on the other. Oxidative modifications to DNA are repaired by specific enzymes; a process that plays a critical role...... for maintaining genomic integrity. The aim of the present study was to characterize the pattern of cerebral DNA repair enzyme regulation after stress through the quantification of a targeted range of gene products involved in different types of DNA repair. 72 male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either...... restraint stress (6h/day) or daily handling (controls), and sacrificed after 1, 7 or 21 stress sessions. The mRNA expression of seven genes (Ogg1, Ape1, Ung1, Neil1, Xrcc1, Ercc1, Nudt1) involved in the repair of oxidatively damaged DNA was determined by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction...

  3. Calcium in plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Schwartau

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the review on the role of calcium in many physiological processes of plant organisms, including growth and development, protection from pathogenic influences, response to changing environmental factors, and many other aspects of plant physiology. Initial intake of calcium ions is carried out by Ca2+-channels of plasma membrane and they are further transported by the xylem owing to auxins’ attractive ability. The level of intake and selectivity of calcium transport to ove-ground parts of the plant is controlled by a symplast. Ca2+enters to the cytoplasm of endoderm cells through calcium channels on the cortical side of Kaspary bands, and is redistributed inside the stele by the symplast, with the use of Ca2+-АТPases and Ca2+/Н+-antiports. Owing to regulated expression and activity of these calcium transporters, calclum can be selectively delivered to the xylem. Important role in supporting calcium homeostasis is given to the vacuole which is the largest depo of calcium. Regulated quantity of calcium movement through the tonoplast is provided by a number of potential-, ligand-gated active transporters and channels, like Ca2+-ATPase and Ca2+/H+ exchanger. They are actively involved in the inactivation of the calcium signal by pumping Ca2+ to the depo of cells. Calcium ATPases are high affinity pumps that efficiently transfer calcium ions against the concentration gradient in their presence in the solution in nanomolar concentrations. Calcium exchangers are low affinity, high capacity Ca2+ transporters that are effectively transporting calcium after raising its concentration in the cell cytosol through the use of protons gradients. Maintaining constant concentration and participation in the response to stimuli of different types also involves EPR, plastids, mitochondria, and cell wall. Calcium binding proteins contain several conserved sequences that provide sensitivity to changes in the concentration of Ca2+ and when you

  4. Comparative Proteomics of Ovarian Cancer Aggregate Formation Reveals an Increased Expression of Calcium-activated Chloride Channel Regulator 1 (CLCA1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musrap, Natasha; Tuccitto, Alessandra; Karagiannis, George S; Saraon, Punit; Batruch, Ihor; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2015-07-10

    Ovarian cancer is a lethal gynecological disease that is characterized by peritoneal metastasis and increased resistance to conventional chemotherapies. This increased resistance and the ability to spread is often attributed to the formation of multicellular aggregates or spheroids in the peritoneal cavity, which seed abdominal surfaces and organs. Given that the presence of metastatic implants is a predictor of poor survival, a better understanding of how spheroids form is critical to improving patient outcome, and may result in the identification of novel therapeutic targets. Thus, we attempted to gain insight into the proteomic changes that occur during anchorage-independent cancer cell aggregation. As such, an ovarian cancer cell line, OV-90, was cultured in adherent and non-adherent conditions using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). Anchorage-dependent cells (OV-90AD) were grown in tissue culture flasks, whereas anchorage-independent cells (OV-90AI) were grown in suspension using the hanging-drop method. Cellular proteins from both conditions were then identified using LC-MS/MS, which resulted in the quantification of 1533 proteins. Of these, 13 and 6 proteins were up-regulated and down-regulated, respectively, in aggregate-forming cells compared with cells grown as monolayers. Relative gene expression and protein expression of candidates were examined in other cell line models of aggregate formation (TOV-112D and ES-2), which revealed an increased expression of calcium-activated chloride channel regulator 1 (CLCA1). Moreover, inhibitor and siRNA transfection studies demonstrated an apparent effect of CLCA1 on cancer cell aggregation. Further elucidation of the role of CLCA1 in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is warranted. PMID:26004777

  5. GABAB Receptors Expressed in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells Mediate Intracellular Calcium Concentration Regulation and Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Translocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu-Ping Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available GABAB receptors regulate the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i in a number of cells (e.g., retina, airway epithelium and smooth muscle, but whether they are expressed in vascular endothelial cells and similarly regulate the [Ca2+]i is not known. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of GABAB receptors, a subclass of receptors to the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA, in cultured human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs, and to explore if altering receptor activation modified [Ca2+]i and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS translocation. Real-time PCR, western blots and immunofluorescence were used to determine the expression of GABAB1 and GABAB2 in cultured HAECs. The effects of GABAB receptors on [Ca2+]i in cultured HAECs were demonstrated using fluo-3. The influence of GABAB receptors on eNOS translocation was assessed by immunocytochemistry. Both GABAB1 and GABAB2 mRNA and protein were expressed in cultured HAECs, and the GABAB1 and GABAB2 proteins were colocated in the cell membrane and cytoplasm. One hundred μM baclofen caused a transient increase of [Ca2+]i and eNOS translocation in cultured HAECs, and the effects were attenuated by pretreatment with the selective GABAB receptor antagonists CGP46381 and CGP55845. GABAB receptors are expressed in HAECs and regulate the [Ca2+]i and eNOS translocation. Cultures of HAECs may be a useful in vitro model for the study of GABAB receptors and vascular biology.

  6. Ibuprofen regulation of microtubule dynamics in cystic fibrosis epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymut, Sharon M; Kampman, Claire M; Corey, Deborah A; Endres, Tori; Cotton, Calvin U; Kelley, Thomas J

    2016-08-01

    High-dose ibuprofen, an effective anti-inflammatory therapy for the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF), has been shown to preserve lung function in a pediatric population. Despite its efficacy, few patients receive ibuprofen treatment due to potential renal and gastrointestinal toxicity. The mechanism of ibuprofen efficacy is also unclear. We have previously demonstrated that CF microtubules are slower to reform after depolymerization compared with respective wild-type controls. Slower microtubule dynamics in CF cells are responsible for impaired intracellular transport and are related to inflammatory signaling. Here, it is identified that high-dose ibuprofen treatment in both CF cell models and primary CF nasal epithelial cells restores microtubule reformation rates to wild-type levels, as well as induce extension of microtubules to the cell periphery. Ibuprofen treatment also restores microtubule-dependent intracellular transport monitored by measuring intracellular cholesterol transport. These effects are specific to ibuprofen as other cyclooxygenase inhibitors have no effect on these measures. Effects of ibuprofen are mimicked by stimulation of AMPK and blocked by the AMPK inhibitor compound C. We conclude that high-dose ibuprofen treatment enhances microtubule formation in CF cells likely through an AMPK-related pathway. These findings define a potential mechanism to explain the efficacy of ibuprofen therapy in CF. PMID:27317686

  7. Multimodal encoding in a simplified model of intracellular calcium signaling

    OpenAIRE

    De Pitta`, Maurizio; Volman, Vladislav; Levine, Herbert; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2009-01-01

    Many cells use calcium signalling to carry information from the extracellular side of the plasma membrane to targets in their interior. Since virtually all cells employ a network of biochemical reactions for Ca2+ signalling, much effort has been devoted to understand the functional role of Ca2+ responses and to decipher how their complex dynamics is regulated by the biochemical network of Ca2+-related signal transduction pathways. Experimental observations show that Ca2+ signals in response t...

  8. A confocal study of mechanism of 5-hydroxytryptaminoinduced intracellular calcium dynamics in cultured ratstomach fundus smooth muscle cells with a new Ca2+indicator STDIn-AM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Xiaoling; (张小玲); YAN; Hongtao; (阎宏涛)

    2002-01-01

    A new fluorescent Ca2+ indicator STDIn-AM for detecting i transients in cultured smooth muscle cells is presented. By making a comparison, the difference between STDIn and fluo-3 is discussed in detail. Using the new Ca2+ indicator, the mechanism of 5-hydroxytryptamino (5-HT) induced intracellular calcium dynamics in stomach fundus smooth muscle cells (SFSMC) of rats is investigated. It is shown that in contrast with fluo-3, STDIn is uniformly distributed in the cytosolic compartment but excluded from the nucleus, when it is transfected into cells. This feature makes it a real cytosol Ca2+ indicator and can reflect changes of cytosol more accurately than that of fluo-3. In addition, STDIn responds to the i transients more sensitive and faster than fluo-3. The results also show that, the L-type Ca2+ channel inhibitor Mn9202 and the PLC inhibitor Compound 48/80 can significantly inhibit the i elevation induced by 5-HT, while the PKC inhibitor D-Sphingosine can enhance the effect of 5-HT. The results suggest that 5-HT acts by the way of 5-HT2 receptors on SFSMC, then through 5-HT2 receptors coupled IP3/Ca2+ and GC/PKC double signal transduction pathways to make Ca2+ release from intracellular Ca2+ stores and Ca2+ influx possibly through L-type calcium channels.

  9. Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... before being swallowed; do not swallow them whole. Drink a full glass of water after taking either the regular or chewable tablets or capsules. Some liquid forms of calcium carbonate must be shaken well before use.Do not ...

  10. Calcium Electroporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gibot, Laure; Madi, Moinecha;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calcium electroporation describes the use of high voltage electric pulses to introduce supraphysiological calcium concentrations into cells. This promising method is currently in clinical trial as an anti-cancer treatment. One very important issue is the relation between tumor cell kill...... efficacy-and normal cell sensitivity. METHODS: Using a 3D spheroid cell culture model we have tested the effect of calcium electroporation and electrochemotherapy using bleomycin on three different human cancer cell lines: a colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT29), a bladder transitional cell carcinoma (SW780......), and a breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB231), as well as on primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDF-n). RESULTS: The results showed a clear reduction in spheroid size in all three cancer cell spheroids three days after treatment with respectively calcium electroporation (p<0.0001) or...

  11. Calcium Calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Latvia - Lebanon - Libya - Lithuania - Luxembourg - Macedonia, Republic of - Malaysia - Malta - Mexico - Moldova - Morocco - Netherlands - New Zealand - Nigeria - ... and Statistics Popular content Calcium content of common foods What is Osteoporosis? The Board Introduction to Bone ...

  12. Dynamic regulation of β1 subunit trafficking controls vascular contractility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, M. Dennis; Bannister, John P.; Narayanan, Damodaran; Nair, Anitha; Grubbs, Jordan E.; Gabrick, Kyle S.; Boop, Frederick A.; Jaggar, Jonathan H.

    2014-01-01

    Ion channels composed of pore-forming and auxiliary subunits control physiological functions in virtually all cell types. A conventional view is that channels assemble with their auxiliary subunits before anterograde plasma membrane trafficking of the protein complex. Whether the multisubunit composition of surface channels is fixed following protein synthesis or flexible and open to acute and, potentially, rapid modulation to control activity and cellular excitability is unclear. Arterial smooth muscle cells (myocytes) express large-conductance Ca2+-activated potassium (BK) channel α and auxiliary β1 subunits that are functionally significant modulators of arterial contractility. Here, we show that native BKα subunits are primarily (∼95%) plasma membrane-localized in human and rat arterial myocytes. In contrast, only a small fraction (∼10%) of total β1 subunits are located at the cell surface. Immunofluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy demonstrated that intracellular β1 subunits are stored within Rab11A-postive recycling endosomes. Nitric oxide (NO), acting via cGMP-dependent protein kinase, and cAMP-dependent pathways stimulated rapid (≤1 min) anterograde trafficking of β1 subunit-containing recycling endosomes, which increased surface β1 almost threefold. These β1 subunits associated with surface-resident BKα proteins, elevating channel Ca2+ sensitivity and activity. Our data also show that rapid β1 subunit anterograde trafficking is the primary mechanism by which NO activates myocyte BK channels and induces vasodilation. In summary, we show that rapid β1 subunit surface trafficking controls functional BK channel activity in arterial myocytes and vascular contractility. Conceivably, regulated auxiliary subunit trafficking may control ion channel activity in a wide variety of cell types. PMID:24464482

  13. Role of calcium mobilization in the regulation of spontaneous transient outward currents in porcine coronary artery myocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; PengYun; ZENG; XiaoRong; YANG; Yan; CAI; Fang; LIU; ZhiFei; LI; MiaoLing; PEI; Jie; ZHOU; Wen

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to further study the characteristics and regulation of spontaneous transient outward currents (STOCs) in freshly isolated porcine coronary artery smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). STOCs were recorded using the perforated whole-cell patch-clamp configuration. STOCs were voltage-dependent and superimposed stochastically onto whole-cell Ca2+-activated-K+ (BKCa) currents. Charybdotoxin (ChTX, 200 nmol/L), a selective blocker of BKCa channels, completely inhibited STOCs within 10 min. STOCs activity was greatly suppressed when extracellular Ca2+ concentration decreased from 1.8 mmol/L to 200 nmol/L, further removal of Ca2+ abolished STOCs activity. Ca2+ ionophore A23187 (10 μmol/L) increased STOCs activity significantly. Verapamil (20 μmol/L) and CdCl2 (200 μmol/L), two kinds of organic L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (L-VDCCs) antagonists, had little effect on STOCs. In addition, the ryanodine receptors (RyRs) agonist caffeine (5 mmol/L) significantly activated STOCs. Application of ryanodine (50 μmol/L) to block RyRs abolished STOCs, subsequent washout of ryanodine or application of caffeine failed to reproduce STOCs activity. Inhibition of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) by 2APB (40 μmol/L) greatly suppressed the activity of STOCs, application of caffeine (5 mmol/L) in the presence of 2APB caused a burst of outward currents followed by inhibition of STOCs. These results suggest that STOCs in porcine coronary ASMCs are mediated by BKCa channels. Extracellular Ca2+ is essential for STOCs activity, while Ca2+ entry through L-VDCCs has little effect on STOCs. Intracellular Ca2+ release induced by RyRs is responsible for the regulation of STOCs, whereas IP3Rs might also be involved.

  14. Role of calcium and AMP kinase in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and GLUT4 levels in muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojuka, Edward O

    2004-05-01

    Contractile activity induces mitochondrial biogenesis and increases glucose transport capacity in muscle. There has been much research on the mechanisms responsible for these adaptations. The present paper reviews the evidence, which indicates that the decrease in the levels of high-energy phosphates, leading to activation of AMP kinase (AMPK), and the increase in cytosolic Ca(2+), which activates Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CAMK), are signals that initiate these adaptative responses. Although the events downstream of AMPK and CAMK have not been well characterized, these events lead to activation of various transcription factors, including: nuclear respiratory factors (NRF) 1 and 2, which cause increased expression of proteins of the respiratory chain; PPAR-alpha, which up regulates the levels of enzymes of beta oxidation; mitochondrial transcription factor A, which activates expression of the mitochondrial genome; myocyte-enhancing factor 2A, the transcription factor that regulates GLUT4 expression. The well-orchestrated expression of the multitude of proteins involved in these adaptations is mediated by the rapid activation of PPAR gamma co-activator (PGC) 1, a protein that binds to various transcription factors to maximize transcriptional activity. Activating AMPK using 5-aminoimidizole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-D-riboside (AICAR) and increasing cytoplasmic Ca(2+) using caffeine, W7 or ionomycin in L6 myotubes increases the concentration of mitochondrial enzymes and GLUT4 and enhances the binding of NRF-1 and NRF-2 to DNA. AICAR and Ca-releasing agents also increase the levels of PGC-1, mitochondrial transcription factor A and myocyte-enhancing factors 2A and 2D. These results are similar to the responses seen in muscle during the adaptation to endurance exercise and show that L6 myotubes are a suitable model for studying the mechanisms by which exercise causes the adaptive responses in muscle mitochondria and glucose transport. PMID:15294043

  15. Evidence for a possible calcium flux dependent cardiomyopathy in hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that the impaired functional cardiac reserve to exercise in hyperthyroidism is related to alterations in the regulation of calcium transport. In 2l hyperthyroid patients, the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was measured using equilibrium gated radionuclide angiocardiography at rest and during supine dynamic exercise. After a recovery period, the patients performed a second exercise study after random administration of Verapamil, a calcium entry blocker (11 pts), or propanolol, a beta adrenergic antagonist (10 pts) for comparison. The results showed i) normal resting LVEF with no significant change during exercise before any medication, ii) resting LVEF significantly decreased after Propanolol, and no significantly changed after Verapamil, iii) during exercise, significant increase of LVEF after Verapamil, and no significant change after Propanolol. These results are consistent with previous studies showing that abnormal change in LVEF during exercise in hyperthyroidism seems independent of beta adrenergic activation, and suggest a reversible functional cardiomyopathy dependent of calcium transporting systems

  16. The effect of variable calcium and very low calcium diets on human calcium metabolism. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, J.

    1971-01-01

    The effects of a very low calcium diet, with variable high and low protein intake, on the dynamics of calcium metabolism and the mechanism of calciuretics, are examined. The experiment, using male subjects, was designed to study the role of intestinal calcium absorption on urinary calcium excretion, and the rate of production of endogeneously secreted calcium in the gastrointestinal tract. The study showed an average of 70% fractional absorption rate during very low calcium intake, and that a decrease in renal tubular reabsorption of calcium is responsible for calciuretic effects of high protein intake. The study also indicates that there is a tendency to develop osteoporosis after long periods of low calcium intake, especially with a concurrent high protein intake.

  17. Negative regulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor on free calcium ion levels following facial nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fugao Zhu; Dawei Sun; Yanqing Wang; Rui Zhou; Junfeng Wen; Xiuming Wan; Yanjun Wang; Banghua Liu

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that muscarinic, and nicotinic receptors increase free Ca2+ levels in the facial nerve nucleus via various channels following facial nerve injury. However, intracellular Ca2+ overload can trigger either necrotic or apoptotic cell death. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), an important inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, exists in the facial nerve nucleus. It is assumed that GABA negatively regulates free Ca2+ levels in the facial nerve nucleus. The present study investigated GABA type A (GABAA) receptor expression in the facial nerve nucleus in a rat model of facial nerve injury using immunohistochemistry and laser confocal microscopy, as well as the regulatory effects of GABAA receptor on nicotinic receptor response following facial nerve injury. Subunits α1, α3, α5, β1, β2, δ, and γ3 of GABAA receptors were expressed in the facial nerve nucleus following facial nerve injury. In addition, GABAA receptor expression significantly inhibited the increase in nicotinic receptor-mediated free Ca2+ levels in the facial nerve nucleus following facial nerve injury in a concentration-dependent fashion. These results suggest that GABAA receptors exhibit negative effects on nicotinic receptor responses following facial nerve injury.

  18. Expression and Regulation of Cav3.2 T-Type Calcium Channels during Inflammatory Hyperalgesia in Mouse Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaya Watanabe

    Full Text Available The Cav3.2 isoform of the T-type calcium channel is expressed in primary sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG, and these channels contribute to nociceptive and neuropathic pain in rats. However, there are conflicting reports on the roles of these channels in pain processing in rats and mice. In addition, the function of T-type channels in persistent inflammatory hyperalgesia is poorly understood. We performed behavioral and comprehensive histochemical analyses to characterize Cav3.2-expressing DRG neurons and examined the regulation of T-type channels in DRGs from C57BL/6 mice with carrageenan-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia. We show that approximately 20% of mouse DRG neurons express Cav3.2 mRNA and protein. The size of the majority of Cav3.2-positive DRG neurons (69 ± 8% ranged from 300 to 700 μm2 in cross-sectional area and 20 to 30 μm in estimated diameter. These channels co-localized with either neurofilament-H (NF-H or peripherin. The peripherin-positive cells also overlapped with neurons that were positive for isolectin B4 (IB4 and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP but were distinct from transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1-positive neurons during normal mouse states. In mice with carrageenan-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia, Cav3.2 channels, but not Cav3.1 or Cav3.3 channels, were upregulated in ipsilateral DRG neurons during the sub-acute phase. The increased Cav3.2 expression partially resulted from an increased number of Cav3.2-immunoreactive neurons; this increase in number was particularly significant for TRPV1-positive neurons. Finally, preceding and periodic intraplantar treatment with the T-type calcium channel blockers mibefradil and NNC 55-0396 markedly reduced and reversed mechanical hyperalgesia during the acute and sub-acute phases, respectively, in mice. These data suggest that Cav3.2 T-type channels participate in the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia, and this channel might play an

  19. Protein kinase C regulates the activity of voltage-sensitive calcium channels of the rat chromaffin cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phorbol dibutyrate (PB), an activator of protein kinase C was used as a tool to study the role of protein kinase C in the secretion of catecholamines (CA) from the perfused adrenal gland of rat. Secretion of CA evoked by splanchnic nerve stimulation, nicotine (N), carbamylcholine (C) and 35 mM K (K) was enhanced (about 2-fold) by 30 nM PB, but that evoked by muscarine (M) was not. In Ca-free and 1 mM EGTA Krebs solution, N and M did not evoke secretion, and PB also had no effect. If Ca concentration of the perfusion medium was maintained at 0.1 mM, N-evoked secretion was reduced over 80% but M-evoked secretion was still about 60% of the control value. Addition of PB to this medium did not modify secretion evoked by M, but N-evoked secretion was facilitated by 3-fold. Ca45 flux data showed that N-, C-, and K-evoked secretion of CA was associated with 2- to 3-fold increase in Ca45 uptake. However, M-evoked secretion did not cause Ca45 uptake. These results suggest that N utilizes extracellular whereas M utilizes mostly intracellular Ca ions for the secretion of CA. PB alone did not affect Ca45 uptake, but after stimulation with N, C and K, Ca45 uptake was further enhanced by PB. It is concluded that protein kinase C phosphorylates membrane proteins that control opening and closing of Ca channels regulated by nicotine receptors and changes in membrane potentials

  20. Capital Regulation, Liquidity Requirements and Taxation in a Dynamic Model of Banking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Nicolo, G.; Gamba, A.; Lucchetta, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper formulates a dynamic model of a bank exposed to both credit and liquidity risk, which can resolve financial distress in three costly forms: fire sales, bond issuance ad equity issuance. We use the model to analyze the impact of capital regulation, liquidity requirements and taxation on ba

  1. Capital Regulation, Liquidity Requirements and Taxation in a Dynamic Model of Banking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Nicolo, G.; Gamba, A.; Lucchetta, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper formulates a dynamic model of a bank exposed to both credit and liquidity risk, which can resolve financial distress in three costly forms: fire sales, bond issuance and equity issuance. We use the model to analyze the impact of capital regulation, liquidity requirements and taxation on b

  2. ABT737 enhances cholangiocarcinoma sensitivity to cisplatin through regulation of mitochondrial dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cholangiocarcinoma responses weakly to cisplatin. Mitochondrial dynamics participate in the response to various stresses, and mainly involve mitophagy and mitochondrial fusion and fission. Bcl-2 family proteins play critical roles in orchestrating mitochondrial dynamics, and are involved in the resistance to cisplatin. Here we reported that ABT737, combined with cisplatin, can promote cholangiocarcinoma cells to undergo apoptosis. We found that the combined treatment decreased the Mcl-1 pro-survival form and increased Bak. Cells undergoing cisplatin treatment showed hyperfused mitochondria, whereas fragmentation was dominant in the mitochondria of cells exposed to the combined treatment, with higher Fis1 levels, decreased Mfn2 and OPA1 levels, increased ratio of Drp1 60 kD to 80 kD form, and more Drp1 located on mitochondria. More p62 aggregates were observed in cells with fragmented mitochondria, and they gradually translocated to mitochondria. Mitophagy was induced by the combined treatment. Knockdown p62 decreased the Drp1 ratio, increased Tom20, and increased cell viability. Our data indicated that mitochondrial dynamics play an important role in the response of cholangiocarcinoma to cisplatin. ABT737 might enhance cholangiocarcinoma sensitivity to cisplatin through regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and the balance within Bcl-2 family proteins. Furthermore, p62 seems to be critical in the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics. - Highlights: • Cholangiocarcinoma may adapt to cisplatin through mitochondrial fusion. • ABT737 sensitizes cholangiocarcinoma to cisplatin by promoting fission and mitophagy. • p62 might participate in the regulation of mitochondrial fission and mitophagy

  3. ABT737 enhances cholangiocarcinoma sensitivity to cisplatin through regulation of mitochondrial dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Zhongqi [Department of Hepatobiliary & Pancreas Surgery, The First Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130021 (China); Yu, Huimei [Department of Pathophysiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130021 (China); Cui, Ni [Bethune Medical College, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130021 (China); Kong, Xianggui; Liu, Xiaomin; Chang, Yulei [State Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Applications, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, Jilin 130033 (China); Wu, Yao [Department of Pathophysiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130021 (China); Sun, Liankun, E-mail: sunlk@jlu.edu.cn [Department of Pathophysiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130021 (China); Wang, Guangyi, E-mail: wgymd@sina.com [Department of Hepatobiliary & Pancreas Surgery, The First Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130021 (China)

    2015-07-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma responses weakly to cisplatin. Mitochondrial dynamics participate in the response to various stresses, and mainly involve mitophagy and mitochondrial fusion and fission. Bcl-2 family proteins play critical roles in orchestrating mitochondrial dynamics, and are involved in the resistance to cisplatin. Here we reported that ABT737, combined with cisplatin, can promote cholangiocarcinoma cells to undergo apoptosis. We found that the combined treatment decreased the Mcl-1 pro-survival form and increased Bak. Cells undergoing cisplatin treatment showed hyperfused mitochondria, whereas fragmentation was dominant in the mitochondria of cells exposed to the combined treatment, with higher Fis1 levels, decreased Mfn2 and OPA1 levels, increased ratio of Drp1 60 kD to 80 kD form, and more Drp1 located on mitochondria. More p62 aggregates were observed in cells with fragmented mitochondria, and they gradually translocated to mitochondria. Mitophagy was induced by the combined treatment. Knockdown p62 decreased the Drp1 ratio, increased Tom20, and increased cell viability. Our data indicated that mitochondrial dynamics play an important role in the response of cholangiocarcinoma to cisplatin. ABT737 might enhance cholangiocarcinoma sensitivity to cisplatin through regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and the balance within Bcl-2 family proteins. Furthermore, p62 seems to be critical in the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics. - Highlights: • Cholangiocarcinoma may adapt to cisplatin through mitochondrial fusion. • ABT737 sensitizes cholangiocarcinoma to cisplatin by promoting fission and mitophagy. • p62 might participate in the regulation of mitochondrial fission and mitophagy.

  4. Calcium microdomains near R-type calcium channels control the induction of presynaptic LTP at parallel fiber to Purkinje cell synapses

    OpenAIRE

    Myoga, Michael H.; Regehr, Wade G.

    2011-01-01

    R-type calcium channels in postsynaptic spines signal through functional calcium microdomains to regulate a calcium-calmodulin sensitive potassium channel that in turn regulates postsynaptic hippocampal LTP. Here we ask whether R-type calcium channels in presynaptic terminals also signal through calcium microdomains to control presynaptic LTP. We focus on presynaptic LTP at parallel fiber to Purkinje cell synapses in the cerebellum (PF-LTP), which is mediated by calcium/calmodulin-stimulated ...

  5. Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease; CPPD disease; Acute CPPD arthritis; Pseudogout ... Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis is caused by the collection of salt called calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD). The buildup ...

  6. Effects of whole body heating on dynamic baroreflex regulation of heart rate in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, C. G.; Zhang, R.; Levine, B. D.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to identify whether dynamic baroreflex regulation of heart rate (HR) is altered during whole body heating. In 14 subjects, dynamic baroreflex regulation of HR was assessed using transfer function analysis. In normothermic and heat-stressed conditions, each subject breathed at a fixed rate (0. 25 Hz) while beat-by-beat HR and systolic blood pressure (SBP) were obtained. Whole body heating significantly increased sublingual temperature, HR, and forearm skin blood flow. Spectral analysis of HR and SBP revealed that the heat stress significantly reduced HR and SBP variability within the high-frequency range (0.2-0.3 Hz), reduced SBP variability within the low-frequency range (0.03-0.15 Hz), and increased the ratio of low- to high-frequency HR variability (all P blood pressure. Reduced vagal baroreflex regulation of HR may contribute to reduced orthostatic tolerance known to occur in humans during heat stress.

  7. Nuclear deformability and telomere dynamics are regulated by cell geometric constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhija, Ekta; Jokhun, D S; Shivashankar, G V

    2016-01-01

    Forces generated by the cytoskeleton can be transmitted to the nucleus and chromatin via physical links on the nuclear envelope and the lamin meshwork. Although the role of these active forces in modulating prestressed nuclear morphology has been well studied, the effect on nuclear and chromatin dynamics remains to be explored. To understand the regulation of nuclear deformability by these active forces, we created different cytoskeletal states in mouse fibroblasts using micropatterned substrates. We observed that constrained and isotropic cells, which lack long actin stress fibers, have more deformable nuclei than elongated and polarized cells. This nuclear deformability altered in response to actin, myosin, formin perturbations, or a transcriptional down-regulation of lamin A/C levels in the constrained and isotropic geometry. Furthermore, to probe the effect of active cytoskeletal forces on chromatin dynamics, we tracked the spatiotemporal dynamics of heterochromatin foci and telomeres. We observed increased dynamics and decreased correlation of the heterochromatin foci and telomere trajectories in constrained and isotropic cell geometry. The observed enhanced dynamics upon treatment with actin depolymerizing reagents in elongated and polarized geometry were regained once the reagent was washed off, suggesting an inherent structural memory in chromatin organization. We conclude that active forces from the cytoskeleton and rigidity from lamin A/C nucleoskeleton can together regulate nuclear and chromatin dynamics. Because chromatin remodeling is a necessary step in transcription control and its memory, genome integrity, and cellular deformability during migration, our results highlight the importance of cell geometric constraints as critical regulators in cell behavior. PMID:26699462

  8. Testosterone increases urinary calcium excretion and inhibits expression of renal calcium transport proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hsu, Yu-Juei; Dimke, Henrik Anthony; Schoeber, Joost P H;

    2010-01-01

    Although gender differences in the renal handling of calcium have been reported, the overall contribution of androgens to these differences remains uncertain. We determined here whether testosterone affects active renal calcium reabsorption by regulating calcium transport proteins. Male mice had...... higher urinary calcium excretion than female mice and their renal calcium transporters were expressed at a lower level. We also found that orchidectomized mice excreted less calcium in their urine than sham-operated control mice and that the hypocalciuria was normalized after testosterone replacement...... calcium transport. Thus, our study shows that gender differences in renal calcium handling are, in part, mediated by the inhibitory actions of androgens on TRPV5-mediated active renal calcium transport....

  9. Troponin T3 regulates nuclear localization of the calcium channel Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a} subunit in skeletal muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Tan; Taylor, Jackson; Jiang, Yang [Department of Internal Medicine-Gerontology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Pereyra, Andrea S. [Department of Histology, National University of La Plata, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Messi, Maria Laura; Wang, Zhong-Min [Department of Internal Medicine-Gerontology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Hereñú, Claudia [Department of Histology, National University of La Plata, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Delbono, Osvaldo, E-mail: odelbono@wakehealth.edu [Department of Internal Medicine-Gerontology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Neuroscience Program, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    The voltage-gated calcium channel (Ca{sub v}) β{sub 1a} subunit (Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a}) plays an important role in excitation–contraction coupling (ECC), a process in the myoplasm that leads to muscle-force generation. Recently, we discovered that the Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a} subunit travels to the nucleus of skeletal muscle cells where it helps to regulate gene transcription. To determine how it travels to the nucleus, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening of the mouse fast skeletal muscle cDNA library and identified an interaction with troponin T3 (TnT3), which we subsequently confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization assays in mouse skeletal muscle in vivo and in cultured C2C12 muscle cells. Interacting domains were mapped to the leucine zipper domain in TnT3 COOH-terminus (160–244 aa) and Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a} NH{sub 2}-terminus (1–99 aa), respectively. The double fluorescence assay in C2C12 cells co-expressing TnT3/DsRed and Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a}/YFP shows that TnT3 facilitates Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a} nuclear recruitment, suggesting that the two proteins play a heretofore unknown role during early muscle differentiation in addition to their classical role in ECC regulation. - Highlights: • Previously, we demonstrated that Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a} is a gene transcription regulator. • Here, we show that TnT3 interacts with Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a}. • We mapped TnT3 and Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a} interaction domain. • TnT3 facilitates Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a} nuclear enrichment. • The two proteins play a heretofore unknown role during early muscle differentiation.

  10. The speed of swelling kinetics modulates cell volume regulation and calcium signaling in astrocytes: A different point of view on the role of aquaporins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mola, Maria Grazia; Sparaneo, Angelo; Gargano, Concetta Domenica; Spray, David C; Svelto, Maria; Frigeri, Antonio; Scemes, Eliana; Nicchia, Grazia Paola

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory volume decrease (RVD) is a process by which cells restore their original volume in response to swelling. In this study, we have focused on the role played by two different Aquaporins (AQPs), Aquaporin-4 (AQP4), and Aquaporin-1 (AQP1), in triggering RVD and in mediating calcium signaling in astrocytes under hypotonic stimulus. Using biophysical techniques to measure water flux through the plasma membrane of wild-type (WT) and AQP4 knockout (KO) astrocytes and of an astrocyte cell line (DI TNC1) transfected with AQP4 or AQP1, we here show that AQP-mediated fast swelling kinetics play a key role in triggering and accelerating RVD. Using calcium imaging, we show that AQP-mediated fast swelling kinetics also significantly increases the amplitude of calcium transients inhibited by Gadolinium and Ruthenium Red, two inhibitors of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) channels, and prevented by removing extracellular calcium. Finally, inhibition of TRPV4 or removal of extracellular calcium does not affect RVD. All together our study provides evidence that (1) AQP influenced swelling kinetics is the main trigger for RVD and in mediating calcium signaling after hypotonic stimulus together with TRPV4, and (2) calcium influx from the extracellular space and/or TRPV4 are not essential for RVD to occur in astrocytes. PMID:26413835

  11. Motivational dynamics of eating regulation: a self-determination theory perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verstuyf Joke

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Within Western society, many people have difficulties adequately regulating their eating behaviors and weight. Although the literature on eating regulation is vast, little attention has been given to motivational dynamics involved in eating regulation. Grounded in Self-Determination Theory (SDT, the present contribution aims to provide a motivational perspective on eating regulation. The role of satisfaction and thwarting of the basic psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness is introduced as a mechanism to (a explain the etiology of body image concerns and disordered eating and (b understand the optimal regulation of ongoing eating behavior for healthy weight maintenance. An overview of empirical studies on these two research lines is provided. In a final section, the potential relevance and value of SDT in relation to prevailing theoretical models in the domain of eating regulation is discussed. Although research on SDT in the domain of eating regulation is still in its early stages and more research is clearly needed, this review suggests that the SDT represents a promising framework to more thoroughly study and understand the motivational processes involved in eating regulation and associated problems.

  12. Calcium and bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone strength and calcium ... calcium (as well as phosphorus) to make healthy bones. Bones are the main storage site of calcium in ... your body does not absorb enough calcium, your bones can get weak or will not grow properly. ...

  13. Get Enough Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Calcium Print This Topic En español Get Enough Calcium Browse Sections The Basics Overview Foods and Vitamins ... 2 of 4 sections Take Action! Take Action: Calcium Sources Protect your bones – get plenty of calcium ...

  14. Calcium carbonate overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tums overdose; Calcium overdose ... Calcium carbonate can be dangerous in large amounts. ... Some products that contain calcium carbonate are certain: ... and mineral supplements Other products may also contain calcium ...

  15. Dynamic regulation of partner abundance mediates response of reef coral symbioses to environmental change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunning, R; Vaughan, N; Gillette, P; Capo, T R; Matté, J L; Baker, A C

    2015-05-01

    Regulating partner abunclance may allow symmotic organisms to mediate interaction outcomes, facilitating adaptive responses to environmental change. To explore the capacity for-adaptive regulation in an ecologically important endosymbiosis, we studied the population dynamics of symbiotic algae in reef-building corals under different abiotic contexts. We found high natural variability in symbiont abundance in corals across reefs, but this variability converged to different symbiont-specific abundances when colonies were maintained under constant conditions. When conditions changed seasonally, symbiont abundance readjusted to new equilibria. We explain these patterns using an a priori model of symbiotic costs and benefits to the coral host, which shows that the observed changes in symbiont abundance are consistent with the maximization of interaction benefit under different environmental conditions. These results indicate that, while regulating symbiont abundance helps hosts sustain maximum benefit in a dynamic environment, spatiotemporal variation in abiotic factors creates a broad range of symbiont abundances (and interaction outcomes) among corals that may account for observed natural variability in performance (e.g., growth rate) and stress tolerance (e.g., bleaching susceptibility). This cost or benefit framework provides a new perspective on the dynamic regulation of reef coral symbioses and illustrates that the dependence of interaction outcomes on biotic and abiotic contexts may be important in understanding how diverse mutualisms respond to environmental change. PMID:26236853

  16. Effects of whole body heating on dynamic baroreflex regulation of heart rate in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, C. G.; Zhang, R.; Levine, B. D.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to identify whether dynamic baroreflex regulation of heart rate (HR) is altered during whole body heating. In 14 subjects, dynamic baroreflex regulation of HR was assessed using transfer function analysis. In normothermic and heat-stressed conditions, each subject breathed at a fixed rate (0. 25 Hz) while beat-by-beat HR and systolic blood pressure (SBP) were obtained. Whole body heating significantly increased sublingual temperature, HR, and forearm skin blood flow. Spectral analysis of HR and SBP revealed that the heat stress significantly reduced HR and SBP variability within the high-frequency range (0.2-0.3 Hz), reduced SBP variability within the low-frequency range (0.03-0.15 Hz), and increased the ratio of low- to high-frequency HR variability (all P body heating reduced high-frequency dynamic baroreflex regulation of HR associated with spontaneous changes in blood pressure. Reduced vagal baroreflex regulation of HR may contribute to reduced orthostatic tolerance known to occur in humans during heat stress.

  17. Rate-dependent force, intracellular calcium, and action potential voltage alternans are modulated by sarcomere length and heart failure induced-remodeling of thin filament regulation in human heart failure: A myocyte modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zile, Melanie A; Trayanova, Natalia A

    2016-01-01

    Microvolt T-wave alternans (MTWA) testing identifies heart failure patients at risk for lethal ventricular arrhythmias at near-resting heart rates (human myocytes and to investigate how the link between those alternans was affected by pacing rate and by physiological conditions such as sarcomere length and heart failure induced-remodeling of mechanical parameters. To achieve this, a mechanically-based, strongly coupled human electromechanical myocyte model was constructed. Reducing the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium uptake current (Iup) to 27% was incorporated to simulate abnormal calcium handling in human heart failure. Mechanical remodeling was incorporated to simulate altered thin filament activation and crossbridge (XB) cycling rates. A dynamical pacing protocol was used to investigate the development of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca]i), voltage, and active force alternans at different pacing rates. FORCE-ALT only occurred in simulations incorporating reduced Iup, demonstrating that alternans in the intracellular calcium concentration (CA-ALT) induced FORCE-ALT. The magnitude of FORCE-ALT was found to be largest at clinically relevant pacing rates (heart failure induced-remodeling of mechanical parameters and sarcomere length due to the presence of myofilament feedback. These findings provide important insight into the relationship between heart-failure-induced electrical and mechanical alternans and how they are altered by physiological conditions at near-resting heart rates. PMID:26724571

  18. Neuron class-specific requirements for Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein in critical period development of calcium signaling in learning and memory circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Caleb A; Broadie, Kendal

    2016-05-01

    Neural circuit optimization occurs through sensory activity-dependent mechanisms that refine synaptic connectivity and information processing during early-use developmental critical periods. Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP), the gene product lost in Fragile X syndrome (FXS), acts as an activity sensor during critical period development, both as an RNA-binding translation regulator and channel-binding excitability regulator. Here, we employ a Drosophila FXS disease model to assay calcium signaling dynamics with a targeted transgenic GCaMP reporter during critical period development of the mushroom body (MB) learning/memory circuit. We find FMRP regulates depolarization-induced calcium signaling in a neuron-specific manner within this circuit, suppressing activity-dependent calcium transients in excitatory cholinergic MB input projection neurons and enhancing calcium signals in inhibitory GABAergic MB output neurons. Both changes are restricted to the developmental critical period and rectified at maturity. Importantly, conditional genetic (dfmr1) rescue of null mutants during the critical period corrects calcium signaling defects in both neuron classes, indicating a temporally restricted FMRP requirement. Likewise, conditional dfmr1 knockdown (RNAi) during the critical period replicates constitutive null mutant defects in both neuron classes, confirming cell-autonomous requirements for FMRP in developmental regulation of calcium signaling dynamics. Optogenetic stimulation during the critical period enhances depolarization-induced calcium signaling in both neuron classes, but this developmental change is eliminated in dfmr1 null mutants, indicating the activity-dependent regulation requires FMRP. These results show FMRP shapes neuron class-specific calcium signaling in excitatory vs. inhibitory neurons in developing learning/memory circuitry, and that FMRP mediates activity-dependent regulation of calcium signaling specifically during the early

  19. GsAPK, an ABA-activated and calcium-independent SnRK2-type kinase from G. soja, mediates the regulation of plant tolerance to salinity and ABA stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Yang

    Full Text Available Plant Snf1 (sucrose non-fermenting-1 related protein kinase (SnRK, a subfamily of serine/threonine kinases, has been implicated as a crucial upstream regulator of ABA and osmotic signaling as in many other signaling cascades. In this paper, we have isolated a novel plant specific ABA activated calcium independent protein kinase (GsAPK from a highly salt tolerant plant, Glycine soja (50109, which is a member of the SnRK2 family. Subcellular localization studies using GFP fusion protein indicated that GsAPK is localized in the plasma membrane. We found that autophosphorylation and Myelin Basis Protein phosphorylation activity of GsAPK is only activated by ABA and the kinase activity also was observed when calcium was replaced by EGTA, suggesting its independence of calcium in enzyme activity. We also found that cold, salinity, drought, and ABA stress alter GsAPK gene transcripts and heterogonous overexpression of GsAPK in Arabidopsis alters plant tolerance to high salinity and ABA stress. In summary, we demonstrated that GsAPK is a Glycine soja ABA activated calcium independent SnRK-type kinase presumably involved in ABA mediated stress signal transduction.

  20. The spatial pattern of atrial cardiomyocyte calcium signalling modulates contraction

    OpenAIRE

    Mackenzie, L; Roderick, H Llewelyn; Berridge, MJ; Conway, SJ; Bootman, MD

    2004-01-01

    We examined the regulation of calcium signalling in atrial cardiomyocytes during excitation-contraction coupling, and how changes in the distribution of calcium impacts on contractility. Under control conditions, calcium transients originated in subsarcolemmal locations and showed local regeneration through activation of calcium-induced calcium release from ryanodine receptors. Despite functional ryanodine receptors being expressed at regular (~2 μm) intervals throughout atrial myocytes, the ...

  1. Role of tumour necrosis factor-a in the regulation of T-type calcium channel current in HL-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Fang; Xue, Yu-Mei; Wei, Wei; Yang, Hui; Liu, Fang-Zhou; Chen, Shao-Xian; Kuang, Su-Juan; Zhu, Jie-Ning; Wu, Shu-Lin; Deng, Chun-Yu

    2016-07-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that inflammation contributes to the initiation and perpetuation of atrial fibrillation (AF). Although tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels are increased in patients with AF, the role of TNF-α in the pathogenesis of AF remains unclear. Besides L-type Ca(2+) currents (IC a,L ), T-type Ca(2+) currents (IC a,T ) also plays an important role in the pathogenesis of AF. This study was designed to use the whole-cell voltage-clamp technique and biochemical assays to explore if TNF-α is involved in the pathogenesis of AF through regulating IC a,T in atrial myocytes. It was found that compared with sinus rhythm (SR) controls, T-type calcium channel (TCC) subunit mRNA levels were decreased, while TNF-α expression levels were increased, in human atrial tissue from patients with AF. In murine atrial myocyte HL-1 cells, after culturing for 24 h, 12.5, 25 and 50 ng/mL TNF-α significantly reduced the protein expression levels of the TCC α1G subunit in a concentration-dependent manner. The peak current was reduced by the application of 12.5 or 25 ng/mL TNF-α in a concentration-dependent manner (from -15.08 ± 1.11 pA/pF in controls to -11.89 ± 0.83 pA/pF and -8.54 ± 1.55 pA/pF in 12.5 or 25 ng/mL TNF-α group respectively). TNF-α application also inhibited voltage-dependent inactivation of IC a,T, shifted the inactivation curve to the left. These results suggest that TNF-α is involved in the pathogenesis of AF, probably via decreasing IC a,T current density in atrium-derived myocytes through impaired channel function and down-regulation of channel protein expression. This pathway thus represents a potential pathogenic mechanism in AF. PMID:27119319

  2. Calcium and ROS: A mutual interplay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görlach, Agnes; Bertram, Katharina; Hudecova, Sona; Krizanova, Olga

    2015-12-01

    Calcium is an important second messenger involved in intra- and extracellular signaling cascades and plays an essential role in cell life and death decisions. The Ca(2+) signaling network works in many different ways to regulate cellular processes that function over a wide dynamic range due to the action of buffers, pumps and exchangers on the plasma membrane as well as in internal stores. Calcium signaling pathways interact with other cellular signaling systems such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although initially considered to be potentially detrimental byproducts of aerobic metabolism, it is now clear that ROS generated in sub-toxic levels by different intracellular systems act as signaling molecules involved in various cellular processes including growth and cell death. Increasing evidence suggests a mutual interplay between calcium and ROS signaling systems which seems to have important implications for fine tuning cellular signaling networks. However, dysfunction in either of the systems might affect the other system thus potentiating harmful effects which might contribute to the pathogenesis of various disorders. PMID:26296072

  3. A high throughput Chromatin ImmunoPrecipitation approach reveals principles of dynamic gene regulation in mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Garber, Manuel; Yosef, Nir; Goren, Alon; Raychowdhury, Raktima; Thielke, Anne; Guttman, Mitchell; Robinson, James; Minie, Brian; Chevrier, Nicolas; Itzhaki, Zohar; Blecher-Gonen, Ronnie; Bornstein, Chamutal; Amann-Zalcenstein, Daniela; Weiner, Assaf; Friedrich, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the principles governing mammalian gene regulation has been hampered by the difficulty in measuring in-vivo binding dynamics of large numbers of transcription factors (TF) to DNA. Here, we develop a high-throughput Chromatin ImmunoPrecipitation (HT-ChIP) method to systematically map protein-DNA interactions. HT-ChIP was applied to define the dynamics of DNA binding by 25 TFs and 4 chromatin marks at 4 time-points following pathogen stimulus of dendritic cells. Analyzing over 180...

  4. Cooperative linear output regulation for networked systems by dynamic measurement output feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shaobao; Feng, Gang; Wang, Juan; Luo, Xiaoyuan; Guan, Xinping

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the cooperative linear output regulation problem of a class of heterogeneous networked systems with a common reference input but with different disturbances for individual nodes. A novel distributed control law is presented based on dynamic measurement output feedback. It is shown that the overall networked closed-loop control system is asymptotically stable and the output regulation errors asymptotically approach zero as time goes to infinity under a sufficient and necessary condition. Finally, a numerical example is provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control law.

  5. Cdc28–Cln3 phosphorylation of Sla1 regulates actin patch dynamics in different modes of fungal growth

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Guisheng; Wang, Yan-Ming; Wang, Yue

    2012-01-01

    A dynamic balance between targeted transport and endocytosis is critical for polarized cell growth. However, how actin-mediated endocytosis is regulated in different growth modes remains unclear. Here we report differential regulation of cortical actin patch dynamics between the yeast and hyphal growth in Candida albicans. The mechanism involves phosphoregulation of the endocytic protein Sla1 by the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) Cdc28–Cln3 and the actin-regulating kinase Prk1. Mutational stud...

  6. Regulation of Excitability, Pacemaking, and Bursting: Insights from Dopamine Neuron Electrophysiology

    OpenAIRE

    Drion, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    The present thesis attempts to extract the dynamical mechanisms underlying neuronal excitability and its regulation, through the use of experimental and mathematical techniques. In particular, tools of dynamical system theory are used to extract physiologically relevant key players in the firing activity of various neuron types. The main contribution of the thesis highlights the role of voltage-gated calcium-permeable channels in neuron excitability and fi ring patterns. Calcium chann...

  7. Effects of whole body heating on dynamic baroreflex regulation of heart rate in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, C. G.; Zhang, R.; Levine, B. D.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to identify whether dynamic baroreflex regulation of heart rate (HR) is altered during whole body heating. In 14 subjects, dynamic baroreflex regulation of HR was assessed using transfer function analysis. In normothermic and heat-stressed conditions, each subject breathed at a fixed rate (0. 25 Hz) while beat-by-beat HR and systolic blood pressure (SBP) were obtained. Whole body heating significantly increased sublingual temperature, HR, and forearm skin blood flow. Spectral analysis of HR and SBP revealed that the heat stress significantly reduced HR and SBP variability within the high-frequency range (0.2-0.3 Hz), reduced SBP variability within the low-frequency range (0.03-0.15 Hz), and increased the ratio of low- to high-frequency HR variability (all P humans during heat stress.

  8. Calcium waves along the cleavage furrows in cleavage-stage Xenopus embryos and its inhibition by heparin

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Calcium signaling is known to be associated with cytokinesis; however, the detailed spatio-temporal pattern of calcium dynamics has remained unclear. We have studied changes of intracellular free calcium in cleavage-stage Xenopus embryos using fluorescent calcium indicator dyes, mainly Calcium Green-1. Cleavage formation was followed by calcium transients that localized to cleavage furrows and propagated along the furrows as calcium waves. The calcium transients at the cleavage furrows were o...

  9. The Dynamic Metabolism of Hyaluronan Regulates the Cytosolic Concentration of UDP-GlcNAc

    OpenAIRE

    Hascall, Vincent C.; Wang, Aimin; Tammi, Markku; Oikari, Sanna; Tammi, Raija; Passi, Alberto; Vigetti, Davide; Hanson, Richard W.; Hart, Gerald W.

    2014-01-01

    Hyaluronan, a macromolecular glycosaminoglycan, is normally synthesized by hyaluronan synthases at the plasma membrane using cytosolic UDP-GlcUA and UDP-GlcNAc substrates and extruding the elongating chain into the extracellular space. The cellular metabolism (synthesis and catabolism) of hyaluronan is dynamic. UDP-GlcNAc is also the substrate for O-GlcNAc transferase, which is central to control of many cytosolic pathways. This Perspective outlines recent data for regulation of hyaluronan sy...

  10. Pink1 regulates mitochondrial dynamics through interaction with the fission/fusion machinery

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yufeng; Ouyang, Yingshi; Yang, Lichuan; Beal, M. Flint; McQuibban, Angus; Vogel, Hannes; Lu, Bingwei

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondria form dynamic tubular networks that undergo frequent morphological changes through fission and fusion, the imbalance of which can affect cell survival in general and impact synaptic transmission and plasticity in neurons in particular. Some core components of the mitochondrial fission/fusion machinery, including the dynamin-like GTPases Drp1, Mitofusin, Opa1, and the Drp1-interacting protein Fis1, have been identified. How the fission and fusion processes are regulated under norma...

  11. Probing molecular mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone: biophysical modeling identifies key regulators of functional dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshuman Dixit

    Full Text Available Deciphering functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone machinery is an important objective in cancer biology aiming to facilitate discovery of targeted anti-cancer therapies. Despite significant advances in understanding structure and function of molecular chaperones, organizing molecular principles that control the relationship between conformational diversity and functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 activity lack a sufficient quantitative characterization. We combined molecular dynamics simulations, principal component analysis, the energy landscape model and structure-functional analysis of Hsp90 regulatory interactions to systematically investigate functional dynamics of the molecular chaperone. This approach has identified a network of conserved regions common to the Hsp90 chaperones that could play a universal role in coordinating functional dynamics, principal collective motions and allosteric signaling of Hsp90. We have found that these functional motifs may be utilized by the molecular chaperone machinery to act collectively as central regulators of Hsp90 dynamics and activity, including the inter-domain communications, control of ATP hydrolysis, and protein client binding. These findings have provided support to a long-standing assertion that allosteric regulation and catalysis may have emerged via common evolutionary routes. The interaction networks regulating functional motions of Hsp90 may be determined by the inherent structural architecture of the molecular chaperone. At the same time, the thermodynamics-based "conformational selection" of functional states is likely to be activated based on the nature of the binding partner. This mechanistic model of Hsp90 dynamics and function is consistent with the notion that allosteric networks orchestrating cooperative protein motions can be formed by evolutionary conserved and sparsely connected residue clusters. Hence, allosteric signaling through a small network of distantly connected

  12. A voltage regulator system with dynamic bandwidth boosting for passive UHF RFID transponders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a voltage regulator system for passive UHF RFID transponders, which contains a rectifier, a limiter, and a regulator. The rectifier achieves power by rectifying the incoming RF energy. Due to the huge variation of the rectified voltage, a limiter at the rectifier output is used to clamp the rectified voltage. In this paper, the design of a limiter circuit is discussed in detail, which can provide a stable limiting voltage with low sensitivity to temperature variation and process dispersion. The key aspect of the voltage regulator system is the dynamic bandwidth boosting in the regulator. By sensing the excess current that is bypassed in the limiter during periods of excess energy, the bias current as well as the bandwidth of the regulator are increased, the output supply voltage can recover quickly from line transients during the periods of no RF energy to a full blast of RF energy. This voltage regulator system is implemented in a 0.18 μm CMOS process. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  13. When fat is not bad: the regulation of actin dynamics by phospholipid signaling molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman ePleskot

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The actin cytoskeleton plays a key role in the plant morphogenesis and is involved in polar cell growth, movement of subcellular organelles, cell division, and plant defense. Organization of actin cytoskeleton undergoes dynamic remodeling in response to internal developmental cues and diverse environmental signals. This dynamic behavior is regulated by numerous actin-binding proteins that integrate various signaling pathways. Production of the signaling lipids phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidic acid affects the activity and subcellular distribution of several actin-binding proteins, and typically correlates with increased actin polymerization. Here we review current knowledge of the inter-regulatory dynamics between signaling phospholipids and the actin cytoskeleton in plant cells.

  14. Noncoding transcription by alternative rna polymerases dynamically regulates an auxin-driven chromatin loop

    KAUST Repository

    Ariel, Federico D.

    2014-08-01

    The eukaryotic epigenome is shaped by the genome topology in three-dimensional space. Dynamic reversible variations in this epigenome structure directly influence the transcriptional responses to developmental cues. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis long intergenic noncoding RNA (lincRNA) APOLO is transcribed by RNA polymerases II and V in response to auxin, a phytohormone controlling numerous facets of plant development. This dual APOLO transcription regulates the formation of a chromatin loop encompassing the promoter of its neighboring gene PID, a key regulator of polar auxin transport. Altering APOLO expression affects chromatin loop formation, whereas RNA-dependent DNA methylation, active DNA demethylation, and Polycomb complexes control loop dynamics. This dynamic chromatin topology determines PID expression patterns. Hence, the dual transcription of a lincRNA influences local chromatin topology and directs dynamic auxin-controlled developmental outputs on neighboring genes. This mechanism likely underscores the adaptive success of plants in diverse environments and may be widespread in eukaryotes. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

  15. Evidence for dynamic network regulation of Drosophila photoreceptor function from mutants lacking the neurotransmitter histamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An eDau

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic feedback from interneurons to photoreceptors can help to optimize visual information flow by balancing its allocation on retinal pathways under changing light conditions. But little is known about how this critical network operation is regulated dynamically. Here, we investigate this question by comparing signaling properties and performance of wild-type Drosophila R1-R6 photoreceptors to those of the hdcJK910 mutant, which lacks the neurotransmitter histamine and therefore cannot transmit information to interneurons. Recordings show that hdcJK910 photoreceptors sample similar amounts of information from naturalistic stimulation to wild-type photoreceptors, but this information is packaged in smaller responses, especially under bright illumination. Analyses reveal how these altered dynamics primarily resulted from network overload that affected hdcJK910 photoreceptors in two ways. First, the missing inhibitory histamine input to interneurons almost certainly depolarized them irrevocably, which in turn increased their excitatory feedback to hdcJK910 R1-R6s. This tonic excitation depolarized the photoreceptors to artificially high potentials, reducing their operational range. Second, rescuing histamine input to interneurons in hdcJK910 mutant also restored their normal phasic feedback modulation to R1-R6s, causing photoreceptor output to accentuate dynamic intensity differences at bright illumination, similar to the wild-type. These results provide mechanistic explanations of how synaptic feedback connections optimize information packaging in photoreceptor output and novel insight into the operation and design of dynamic network regulation of sensory neurons.

  16. Evidence for Dynamic Network Regulation of Drosophila Photoreceptor Function from Mutants Lacking the Neurotransmitter Histamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dau, An; Friederich, Uwe; Dongre, Sidhartha; Li, Xiaofeng; Bollepalli, Murali K; Hardie, Roger C; Juusola, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic feedback from interneurons to photoreceptors can help to optimize visual information flow by balancing its allocation on retinal pathways under changing light conditions. But little is known about how this critical network operation is regulated dynamically. Here, we investigate this question by comparing signaling properties and performance of wild-type Drosophila R1-R6 photoreceptors to those of the hdc (JK910) mutant, which lacks the neurotransmitter histamine and therefore cannot transmit information to interneurons. Recordings show that hdc (JK910) photoreceptors sample similar amounts of information from naturalistic stimulation to wild-type photoreceptors, but this information is packaged in smaller responses, especially under bright illumination. Analyses reveal how these altered dynamics primarily resulted from network overload that affected hdc (JK910) photoreceptors in two ways. First, the missing inhibitory histamine input to interneurons almost certainly depolarized them irrevocably, which in turn increased their excitatory feedback to hdc (JK910) R1-R6s. This tonic excitation depolarized the photoreceptors to artificially high potentials, reducing their operational range. Second, rescuing histamine input to interneurons in hdc (JK910) mutant also restored their normal phasic feedback modulation to R1-R6s, causing photoreceptor output to accentuate dynamic intensity differences at bright illumination, similar to the wild-type. These results provide mechanistic explanations of how synaptic feedback connections optimize information packaging in photoreceptor output and novel insight into the operation and design of dynamic network regulation of sensory neurons. PMID:27047343

  17. Inferring causal metabolic signals that regulate the dynamic TORC1-dependent transcriptome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ana Paula; Dimopoulos, Sotiris; Busetto, Alberto Giovanni; Christen, Stefan; Dechant, Reinhard; Falter, Laura; Haghir Chehreghani, Morteza; Jozefczuk, Szymon; Ludwig, Christina; Rudroff, Florian; Schulz, Juliane Caroline; González, Asier; Soulard, Alexandre; Stracka, Daniele; Aebersold, Ruedi; Buhmann, Joachim M; Hall, Michael N; Peter, Matthias; Sauer, Uwe; Stelling, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Cells react to nutritional cues in changing environments via the integrated action of signaling, transcriptional, and metabolic networks. Mechanistic insight into signaling processes is often complicated because ubiquitous feedback loops obscure causal relationships. Consequently, the endogenous inputs of many nutrient signaling pathways remain unknown. Recent advances for system-wide experimental data generation have facilitated the quantification of signaling systems, but the integration of multi-level dynamic data remains challenging. Here, we co-designed dynamic experiments and a probabilistic, model-based method to infer causal relationships between metabolism, signaling, and gene regulation. We analyzed the dynamic regulation of nitrogen metabolism by the target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) pathway in budding yeast. Dynamic transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic measurements along shifts in nitrogen quality yielded a consistent dataset that demonstrated extensive re-wiring of cellular networks during adaptation. Our inference method identified putative downstream targets of TORC1 and putative metabolic inputs of TORC1, including the hypothesized glutamine signal. The work provides a basis for further mechanistic studies of nitrogen metabolism and a general computational framework to study cellular processes. PMID:25888284

  18. Changes in dynamics upon oligomerization regulate substrate binding and allostery in amino acid kinase family members.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Marcos

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Oligomerization is a functional requirement for many proteins. The interfacial interactions and the overall packing geometry of the individual monomers are viewed as important determinants of the thermodynamic stability and allosteric regulation of oligomers. The present study focuses on the role of the interfacial interactions and overall contact topology in the dynamic features acquired in the oligomeric state. To this aim, the collective dynamics of enzymes belonging to the amino acid kinase family both in dimeric and hexameric forms are examined by means of an elastic network model, and the softest collective motions (i.e., lowest frequency or global modes of motions favored by the overall architecture are analyzed. Notably, the lowest-frequency modes accessible to the individual subunits in the absence of multimerization are conserved to a large extent in the oligomer, suggesting that the oligomer takes advantage of the intrinsic dynamics of the individual monomers. At the same time, oligomerization stiffens the interfacial regions of the monomers and confers new cooperative modes that exploit the rigid-body translational and rotational degrees of freedom of the intact monomers. The present study sheds light on the mechanism of cooperative inhibition of hexameric N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase by arginine and on the allosteric regulation of UMP kinases. It also highlights the significance of the particular quaternary design in selectively determining the oligomer dynamics congruent with required ligand-binding and allosteric activities.

  19. Calcium paradox and calcium entry blockers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Slade, A.M.; Nayler, W.G.; Meijler, F.L.

    1984-01-01

    Reperfusion of isolated hearts with calcium-containing solution after a short period of calcium-free perfusion results in irreversible cell damage (calcium paradox). This phenomenon is characterized by an excessive influx of calcium into the cells, the rapid onset of myocardial contracture, exhausti

  20. A dynamic-biased dual-loop-feedback CMOS LDO regulator with fast transient response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wang; Maomao, Sun

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a low-dropout regulator (LDO) for portable applications with dual-loop feedback and a dynamic bias circuit. The dual-loop feedback structure is adopted to reduce the output voltage spike and the response time of the LDO. The dynamic bias circuit enhances the slew rate at the gate of the power transistor. In addition, an adaptive miller compensation technique is employed, from which a single pole system is realized and over a 59° phase margin is achieved under the full range of the load current. The proposed LDO has been implemented in a 0.6-μm CMOS process. From the experimental results, the regulator can operate with a minimum dropout voltage of 200 mV at a maximum 300 mA load and IQ of 113 μA. The line regulation and load regulation are improved to 0.1 mV/V and 3.4 μV/mA due to the sufficient loop gain provided by the dual feedback loops. Under a full range load current step, the voltage spikes and the recovery time of the proposed LDO is reduced to 97 mV and 0.142 μs respectively.

  1. Post-translational Control of the Temporal Dynamics of Transcription Factor Activity Regulates Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Xiao-Jiang; Yuan, Liqun; Tiberi, Luca; Claeys, Annelies; De Geest, Natalie; Yan, Jiekun; van der Kant, Rob; Xie, Wei R; Klisch, Tiemo J; Shymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic; Bollen, Mathieu; Beullens, Monique; Zoghbi, Huda Y; Vanderhaeghen, Pierre; Hassan, Bassem A

    2016-01-28

    Neurogenesis is initiated by the transient expression of the highly conserved proneural proteins, bHLH transcriptional regulators. Here, we discover a conserved post-translational switch governing the duration of proneural protein activity that is required for proper neuronal development. Phosphorylation of a single Serine at the same position in Scute and Atonal proneural proteins governs the transition from active to inactive forms by regulating DNA binding. The equivalent Neurogenin2 Threonine also regulates DNA binding and proneural activity in the developing mammalian neocortex. Using genome editing in Drosophila, we show that Atonal outlives its mRNA but is inactivated by phosphorylation. Inhibiting the phosphorylation of the conserved proneural Serine causes quantitative changes in expression dynamics and target gene expression resulting in neuronal number and fate defects. Strikingly, even a subtle change from Serine to Threonine appears to shift the duration of Atonal activity in vivo, resulting in neuronal fate defects. PMID:26824657

  2. 丝胶对碳酸钙晶体生长的调控作用研究%Study on the regulation and control of silk sericin on the crystal formation of Calcium Carbonate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁少; 王海龙; 须苏菊; 孔祥东

    2012-01-01

    以水溶性丝胶为有机模板调控碳酸钙晶体生长,探讨了丝胶质量浓度差异对晶体生长的影响作用.采用场发射扫描电镜(FESEM)、X射线衍射(XRD)、红外光谱(FTIR)对所制备的样品进行表征.结果表明:通过控制丝胶质量浓度可调控碳酸钙的晶体生长,引起晶体形貌与尺寸的显著变化,并抑制碳酸钙特定晶面的生长.制备了刺球状碳酸钙和片层结构组装而成的类正方体碳酸钙,并对其形成机理进行了初步探讨,结果表明丝胶与无机晶体之间存在复杂的相互作用,丝胶对碳酸钙晶体的生长具有调制作用.%This study uses silk sericin as organic template to regulate the crystal formation of calcium carbonate in the presence of protein, discusses the mass concentration of silk sericin on the crystal growth. The obtained samples are characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The result shows that controlling the the mass concentration of silk sericin can regulate the crystal growth of calcium carbonate, significantly change the appearance and size of crystal and restrain the specific crystal growth of calcium carbonate. Cube-like calcium carbonate formed by thorn spherical calcium carbonate aggregates and lamellar structure was prepared, the formation mechanism of which is discussed preliminarily. The result shows that interaction between silk sericin and mineral crystal was very complex and silk sericin had a significant effect on the formation of calcium carbonate crystal.

  3. Calcium-controlled conformational choreography in the N-terminal half of adseverin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumnarnsilpa, Sakesit; Robinson, Robert C.; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Leyrat, Cedric

    2015-09-01

    Adseverin is a member of the calcium-regulated gelsolin superfamily of actin-binding proteins. Here we report the crystal structure of the calcium-free N-terminal half of adseverin (iA1-A3) and the Ca2+-bound structure of A3, which reveal structural similarities and differences with gelsolin. Solution small-angle X-ray scattering combined with ensemble optimization revealed a dynamic Ca2+-dependent equilibrium between inactive, intermediate and active conformations. Increasing calcium concentrations progressively shift this equilibrium from a main population of inactive conformation to the active form. Molecular dynamics simulations of iA1-A3 provided insights into Ca2+-induced destabilization, implicating a critical role for the A2 type II calcium-binding site and the A2A3 linker in the activation process. Finally, mutations that disrupt the A1/A3 interface increase Ca2+-independent F-actin severing by A1-A3, albeit at a lower efficiency than observed for gelsolin domains G1-G3. Together, these data address the calcium dependency of A1-A3 activity in relation to the calcium-independent activity of G1-G3.

  4. Role of Ca2+ and L-Phe in regulating functional cooperativity of disease-associated "toggle" calcium-sensing receptor mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhang

    Full Text Available The Ca(2+-sensing receptor (CaSR regulates Ca(2+ homeostasis in the body by monitoring extracellular levels of Ca(2+ ([Ca(2+]o and amino acids. Mutations at the hinge region of the N-terminal Venus flytrap domain (VFTD produce either receptor inactivation (L173P, P221Q or activation (L173F, P221L related to hypercalcemic or hypocalcemic disorders. In this paper, we report that both L173P and P221Q markedly impair the functional positive cooperativity of the CaSR as reflected by [Ca(2+]o-induced [Ca(2+]i oscillations, inositol-1-phosphate (IP1 accumulation and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2 activity. In contrast, L173F and P221L show enhanced responsiveness of these three functional readouts to [Ca(2+]o. Further analysis of the dynamics of the VFTD mutants using computational simulation studies supports disruption in the correlated motions in the loss-of-function CaSR mutants, while these motions are enhanced in the gain-of-function mutants. Wild type (WT CaSR was modulated by L-Phe in a heterotropic positive cooperative way, achieving an EC50 similar to those of the two activating mutations. The response of the inactivating P221Q mutant to [Ca(2+]o was partially rescued by L-Phe, illustrating the capacity of the L-Phe binding site to enhance the positive homotropic cooperativity of CaSR. L-Phe had no effect on the other inactivating mutant. Moreover, our results carried out both in silico and in intact cells indicate that residue Leu(173, which is close to residues that are part of the L-Phe-binding pocket, exhibited impaired heterotropic cooperativity in the presence of L-Phe. Thus, Pro(221 and Leu(173 are important for the positive homo- and heterotropic cooperative regulation elicited by agonist binding.

  5. Lipid Regulated Intramolecular Conformational Dynamics of SNARE-Protein Ykt6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yawei; Seeger, Markus; Weng, Jingwei; Song, Song; Wang, Wenning; Tan, Yan-Wen

    2016-08-01

    Cellular informational and metabolic processes are propagated with specific membrane fusions governed by soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNARE). SNARE protein Ykt6 is highly expressed in brain neurons and plays a critical role in the membrane-trafficking process. Studies suggested that Ykt6 undergoes a conformational change at the interface between its longin domain and the SNARE core. In this work, we study the conformational state distributions and dynamics of rat Ykt6 by means of single-molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (smFRET) and Fluorescence Cross-Correlation Spectroscopy (FCCS). We observed that intramolecular conformational dynamics between longin domain and SNARE core occurred at the timescale ~200 μs. Furthermore, this dynamics can be regulated and even eliminated by the presence of lipid dodecylphoshpocholine (DPC). Our molecular dynamic (MD) simulations have shown that, the SNARE core exhibits a flexible structure while the longin domain retains relatively stable in apo state. Combining single molecule experiments and theoretical MD simulations, we are the first to provide a quantitative dynamics of Ykt6 and explain the functional conformational change from a qualitative point of view.

  6. Lipid Regulated Intramolecular Conformational Dynamics of SNARE-Protein Ykt6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yawei; Seeger, Markus; Weng, Jingwei; Song, Song; Wang, Wenning; Tan, Yan-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Cellular informational and metabolic processes are propagated with specific membrane fusions governed by soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNARE). SNARE protein Ykt6 is highly expressed in brain neurons and plays a critical role in the membrane-trafficking process. Studies suggested that Ykt6 undergoes a conformational change at the interface between its longin domain and the SNARE core. In this work, we study the conformational state distributions and dynamics of rat Ykt6 by means of single-molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (smFRET) and Fluorescence Cross-Correlation Spectroscopy (FCCS). We observed that intramolecular conformational dynamics between longin domain and SNARE core occurred at the timescale ~200 μs. Furthermore, this dynamics can be regulated and even eliminated by the presence of lipid dodecylphoshpocholine (DPC). Our molecular dynamic (MD) simulations have shown that, the SNARE core exhibits a flexible structure while the longin domain retains relatively stable in apo state. Combining single molecule experiments and theoretical MD simulations, we are the first to provide a quantitative dynamics of Ykt6 and explain the functional conformational change from a qualitative point of view. PMID:27493064

  7. Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein (ox-LDL) Cholesterol Induces the Expression of miRNA-223 and L-type Calcium Channel Protein in Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fengping; Xu, Xin; Yuan, Shuguo; Tan, Liangqiu; Gao, Lingjun; Ma, Shaochun; Zhang, Shebin; Ma, Zhanzhong; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Fenglian; Chen, Baofeng; Zhang, Beibei; Pang, Jungang; Huang, Xiuyan; Weng, Jiaqiang

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia causing high morbidity and mortality. While changing of the cellular calcium homeostasis plays a critical role in AF, the L-type calcium channel α1c protein has suggested as an important regulator of reentrant spiral dynamics and is a major component of AF-related electrical remodeling. Our computational modeling predicted that miRNA-223 may regulate the CACNA1C gene which encodes the cardiac L-type calcium channel α1c subunit. We found that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) cholesterol significantly up-regulates both the expression of miRNA-223 and L-type calcium channel protein. In contrast, knockdown of miRNA-223 reduced L-type calcium channel protein expression, while genetic knockdown of endogenous miRNA-223 dampened AF vulnerability. Transfection of miRNA-223 by adenovirus-mediated expression enhanced L-type calcium currents and promoted AF in mice while co-injection of a CACNA1C-specific miR-mimic counteracted the effect. Taken together, ox-LDL, as a known factor in AF-associated remodeling, positively regulates miRNA-223 transcription and L-type calcium channel protein expression. Our results implicate a new molecular mechanism for AF in which miRNA-223 can be used as an biomarker of AF rheumatic heart disease. PMID:27488468

  8. Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein (ox-LDL) Cholesterol Induces the Expression of miRNA-223 and L-type Calcium Channel Protein in Atrial Fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fengping; Xu, Xin; Yuan, Shuguo; Tan, Liangqiu; Gao, Lingjun; Ma, Shaochun; Zhang, Shebin; Ma, Zhanzhong; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Fenglian; Chen, Baofeng; Zhang, Beibei; Pang, Jungang; Huang, Xiuyan; Weng, Jiaqiang

    2016-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia causing high morbidity and mortality. While changing of the cellular calcium homeostasis plays a critical role in AF, the L-type calcium channel α1c protein has suggested as an important regulator of reentrant spiral dynamics and is a major component of AF-related electrical remodeling. Our computational modeling predicted that miRNA-223 may regulate the CACNA1C gene which encodes the cardiac L-type calcium channel α1c subunit. We found that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) cholesterol significantly up-regulates both the expression of miRNA-223 and L-type calcium channel protein. In contrast, knockdown of miRNA-223 reduced L-type calcium channel protein expression, while genetic knockdown of endogenous miRNA-223 dampened AF vulnerability. Transfection of miRNA-223 by adenovirus-mediated expression enhanced L-type calcium currents and promoted AF in mice while co-injection of a CACNA1C-specific miR-mimic counteracted the effect. Taken together, ox-LDL, as a known factor in AF-associated remodeling, positively regulates miRNA-223 transcription and L-type calcium channel protein expression. Our results implicate a new molecular mechanism for AF in which miRNA-223 can be used as an biomarker of AF rheumatic heart disease.

  9. Carbon and nitrogen dynamics across a bedrock-regulated subarctic pH gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczyk, N.; Heim, E. W.; Sadowsky, J.; Remiszewski, K.; Varner, R. K.; Bryce, J. G.; Frey, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    Bedrock geochemistry has been shown to influence landscape evolution due to nutrient limitation on primary production. There may also be less direct interactions between bedrock-derived chemicals and ecosystem function. Effects of calcium (Ca) and pH on soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling have been shown in acid impacted forests o f North America. Understanding intrinsic factors that affect C and nutrient dynamics in subarctic ecosystems has implications for how these ecosystems will respond to a changing climate. How the soil microbial community allocates enzymes to acquire resources from the environment can indicate whether a system is nutrient or energy limited. This study examined whether bedrock geochemistry exerts pressure on nutrient cycles in the overlying soils. In thin, weakly developed soils, bedrock is the primary mineral material and is a source of vital nutrients. Nitrogen (N) and C are not derived from bedrock, but their cycling is still affected by reactions with geologically-derived chemicals. Our study sites near Abisko, Sweden (~68°N) were selected adjacent to five distinct bedrock outcrops (quartzite, slate, carbonate, and two different metasedimenty units). All sites were at a similar elevation (~700 m a.s.l.) and had similar vegetation (subarctic heath). Nutrient concentrations in bedrock and soils were measured in addition to soil microbial biomass and extracellular enzyme activity. We found a statistically significant correlation between soil Ca concentrations and soil pH (r = 0.88, p enzyme activity (r = -0.89, p enzyme activity and soil C-to-N ratio (r = 0.78, p < 0.01). These results suggest that soil Ca concentrations influence C and N cycling dynamics in these soils through their effect on soil pH.

  10. Multi-Equilibria Regulation Agent-Based Model of Opinion Dynamics in Social Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Koulouris

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the Multiple Equilibria Regulation (MER model, i.e., an agent-based simulation model, to represent opinion dynamics in social networks. It relies on a small set of micro-prerequisites (intra-individual balance and confidence bound, leading to emergence of (nonstationary macro-outcomes. These outcomes may refer to consensus, polarization or fragmentation of opinions about taxation (e.g., congestion pricing or other policy measures, according to the way communication is structured. In contrast with other models of opinion dynamics, it allows for the impact of both the regulation of intra-personal discrepancy and the interpersonal variability of opinions on social learning and network dynamics. Several simulation experiments are presented to demonstrate, through the MER model, the role of different network structures (complete, star, cellular automata, small-world and random graphs on opinion formation dynamics and the overall evolution of the system. The findings can help to identify specific topological characteristics, such as density, number of neighbourhoods and critical nodes-agents, that affect the stability and system dynamics. This knowledge can be used to better organize the information diffusion and learning in the community, enhance the predictability of outcomes and manage possible conflicts. It is shown that a small-world organization, which depicts more realistic aspects of real-life and virtual social systems, provides increased predictability and stability towards a less fragmented and more manageable grouping of opinions, compared to random networks. Such macro-level organizations may be enhanced with use of web-based technologies to increase the density of communication and public acceptability of policy measures.

  11. ER sheet persistence is coupled to myosin 1c–regulated dynamic actin filament arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joensuu, Merja; Belevich, Ilya; Rämö, Olli; Nevzorov, Ilya; Vihinen, Helena; Puhka, Maija; Witkos, Tomasz M.; Lowe, Martin; Vartiainen, Maria K.; Jokitalo, Eija

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) comprises a dynamic three-dimensional (3D) network with diverse structural and functional domains. Proper ER operation requires an intricate balance within and between dynamics, morphology, and functions, but how these processes are coupled in cells has been unclear. Using live-cell imaging and 3D electron microscopy, we identify a specific subset of actin filaments localizing to polygons defined by ER sheets and tubules and describe a role for these actin arrays in ER sheet persistence and, thereby, in maintenance of the characteristic network architecture by showing that actin depolymerization leads to increased sheet fluctuation and transformations and results in small and less abundant sheet remnants and a defective ER network distribution. Furthermore, we identify myosin 1c localizing to the ER-associated actin filament arrays and reveal a novel role for myosin 1c in regulating these actin structures, as myosin 1c manipulations lead to loss of the actin filaments and to similar ER phenotype as observed after actin depolymerization. We propose that ER-associated actin filaments have a role in ER sheet persistence regulation and thus support the maintenance of sheets as a stationary subdomain of the dynamic ER network. PMID:24523293

  12. ER sheet persistence is coupled to myosin 1c-regulated dynamic actin filament arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joensuu, Merja; Belevich, Ilya; Rämö, Olli; Nevzorov, Ilya; Vihinen, Helena; Puhka, Maija; Witkos, Tomasz M; Lowe, Martin; Vartiainen, Maria K; Jokitalo, Eija

    2014-04-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) comprises a dynamic three-dimensional (3D) network with diverse structural and functional domains. Proper ER operation requires an intricate balance within and between dynamics, morphology, and functions, but how these processes are coupled in cells has been unclear. Using live-cell imaging and 3D electron microscopy, we identify a specific subset of actin filaments localizing to polygons defined by ER sheets and tubules and describe a role for these actin arrays in ER sheet persistence and, thereby, in maintenance of the characteristic network architecture by showing that actin depolymerization leads to increased sheet fluctuation and transformations and results in small and less abundant sheet remnants and a defective ER network distribution. Furthermore, we identify myosin 1c localizing to the ER-associated actin filament arrays and reveal a novel role for myosin 1c in regulating these actin structures, as myosin 1c manipulations lead to loss of the actin filaments and to similar ER phenotype as observed after actin depolymerization. We propose that ER-associated actin filaments have a role in ER sheet persistence regulation and thus support the maintenance of sheets as a stationary subdomain of the dynamic ER network. PMID:24523293

  13. Systems-level analysis of the regulation and function of p53 dynamics in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, Eric

    Living cells use complex signaling pathways to detect environmental stimuli and generate appropriate responses. As methods for quantifying intracellular signaling have improved, several signaling pathways have been found to transmit information using signals that pulse in time. The transcription factor p53 is a key tumor suppressor and stress-response regulator that exhibits pulsatile dynamics. In response to DNA double-strand breaks, the concentration of p53 in the cell nucleus increases in pulses with a fixed amplitude, duration, and period; the mean number of pulses increases with DNA damage. p53 regulates the expression of over 100 target genes involved in a range of cellular stress responses including apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and changes in metabolism. p53 pulsing directly impacts p53 function: altering p53 dynamics by pharmacologically inhibiting p53 degradation changes patterns of target gene expression and cell fate. While p53 pulsing serves an important signaling function, it is less clear what it accomplishes mechanistically. Here we will describe our recent efforts to determine the impact of p53 pulsing on the dynamics and coordination of target gene expression.

  14. Regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics by redox signaling and oxidative stress: implications for neuronal development and trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Gonzalez-Billault

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A proper balance between chemical reduction and oxidation (known as redox balance is essential for normal cellular physiology. Deregulation in the production of oxidative species leads to DNA damage, lipid peroxidation and aberrant post-translational modification of proteins, which in most cases induces injury, cell death and disease. However, physiological concentrations of oxidative species are necessary to support important cell functions, such as chemotaxis, hormone synthesis, immune response, cytoskeletal remodeling, Ca2+ homeostasis and others. Recent evidence suggests that redox balance regulates actin and microtubule dynamics in both physiological and pathological contexts. Microtubules and actin microfilaments contain certain amino acid residues that are susceptible to oxidation, which reduces the ability of microtubules to polymerize and causes severing of actin microfilaments in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. In contrast, inhibited production of reactive oxygen species (e.g., due to NOXs leads to aberrant actin polymerization, decreases neurite outgrowth and affects the normal development and polarization of neurons. In this review, we summarize emerging evidence suggesting that both general and specific enzymatic sources of redox species exert diverse effects on cytoskeletal dynamics. Considering the intimate relationship between cytoskeletal dynamics and trafficking, we also discuss the potential effects of redox balance on intracellular transport via regulation of the components of the microtubule and actin cytoskeleton as well as cytoskeleton-associated proteins, which may directly impact localization of proteins and vesicles across the soma, dendrites and axon of neurons.

  15. Pitch Angle Regulation of Floating Wind Turbines with Dynamic Uncertainty and External Disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najah F. Jasim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the problem of pitch angle regulation of floating wind turbines with the presence of dynamic uncertainty and unknown disturbances usually encountered in offshore wind turbines, where two control laws are derived for two different cases to continuously achieve zero pitch angle for the floating turbine. In the first case, the timevarying unknown coefficients that characterize the turbine's dynamics are assumed reasonably bounded by known functions, where robust controller is designed in terms of these known functions to achieve zero pitch angle for the turbine with exponential rate of convergence. While in the second case, the turbine's dynamics are considered to be characterized by unknown coefficients of unknown bounds. In this case, a slidingmode adaptive controller is constructed in terms of estimated values for the unknown coefficients, where these values are continuously updated by adaptive laws associated with the proposed controller to ensure asymptotic convergence to zero for the turbine's pitch angle. Simulations are performed to demonstrate the validity of the proposed controllers to achieve the required regulation objective.

  16. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2015-11-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils.

  17. A hybrid model of molecular regulation and population dynamics for yeast autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Huiqin; Lei, Jinzhi

    2016-08-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved lysosome-based degradation process that is involved in maintaining cellular homeostasis and stress responses. Dysregulation of autophagy is known to associate with many diseases. In this paper, we establish a Hybrid model of Molecular regulation and Population dynamics (HMP model) for yeast autophagy to study how autophagy regulation at molecular level affects the cell population dynamics under the stress of starvation. The model includes interactions between amino acids, TORC1, Atg1 complex, and Atg8 lipidation at the molecular level, and cell death and division at the cell behavior level. Two feedback loops are involved in autophagy induction, in which the negative feedback of TORC1 activation has been known previously, and the positive feedback between TORC1 and Atg1 complex formation is introduced according to the similarity of Drosophila and mammalian cells. We demonstrate that the two feedback loops play distinct roles in autophagy regulation. The positive feedback is pro-survival, whereas the negative feedback has little effect on the survival of population during starvation. In addition, autophagy deficient cells can be rescued from starvation by amino acid exchanges from their neighboring wild type cells. PMID:27103581

  18. PDGF-mediated protection of SH-SY5Y cells against Tat toxin involves regulation of extracellular glutamate and intracellular calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) protein Tat has been implicated in mediating neuronal apoptosis, one of the hallmark features of HIV-associated dementia (HAD). Mitigation of the toxic effects of Tat could thus be a potential mechanism for reducing HIV toxicity in the brain. In this study we demonstrated that Tat-induced neurotoxicity was abolished by NMDA antagonist-MK801, suggesting the role of glutamate in this process. Furthermore, we also found that pretreatment of SH-SY5Y cells with PDGF exerted protection against Tat toxicity by decreasing extracellular glutamate levels. We also demonstrated that extracellular calcium chelator EGTA was able to abolish PDGF-mediated neuroprotection, thereby underscoring the role of calcium signaling in PDGF-mediated neuroprotection. We also showed that Erk signaling pathway was critical for PDGF-mediated protection of cells. Additionally, blocking calcium entry with EGTA resulted in suppression of PDGF-induced Erk activation. These findings thus underscore the role of PDGF-mediated calcium signaling and Erk phosphorylation in the protection of cells against HIV Tat toxicity.

  19. Engineering calcium oxalate crystal formation in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many plants accumulate crystals of calcium oxalate. Just how these crystals form remains unknown. To gain insight into the mechanisms regulating calcium oxalate crystal formation, a crystal engineering approach was initiated utilizing the non-crystal accumulating plant, Arabidopsis. The success of t...

  20. Is bursting more effective than spiking in evoking pituitary hormone secretion? A spatiotemporal simulation study of calcium and granule dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliavini, Alessia; Tabak, Joël; Bertram, Richard; Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2016-04-01

    Endocrine cells of the pituitary gland secrete a number of hormones, and the amount of hormone released by a cell is controlled in large part by the cell's electrical activity and subsequent Ca(2+)influx. Typical electrical behaviors of pituitary cells include continuous spiking and so-called pseudo-plateau bursting. It has been shown that the amplitude of Ca(2+)fluctuations is greater in bursting cells, leading to the hypothesis that bursting cells release more hormone than spiking cells. In this work, we apply computer simulations to test this hypothesis. We use experimental recordings of electrical activity as input to mathematical models of Ca(2+)channel activity, buffered Ca(2+)diffusion, and Ca(2+)-driven exocytosis. To compare the efficacy of spiking and bursting on the same cell, we pharmacologically block the large-conductance potassium (BK) current from a bursting cell or add a BK current to a spiking cell via dynamic clamp. We find that bursting is generally at least as effective as spiking at evoking hormone release and is often considerably more effective, even when normalizing to Ca(2+)influx. Our hybrid experimental/modeling approach confirms that adding a BK-type K(+)current, which is typically associated with decreased cell activity and reduced secretion, can actually produce an increase in hormone secretion, as suggested earlier. PMID:26786781

  1. Addition of Phenylboronic Acid to Malus domestica Pollen Tubes Alters Calcium Dynamics, Disrupts Actin Filaments and Affects Cell Wall Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Kefeng; Gao, Sai; Zhang, Weiwei; Xing, Yu; Cao, Qingqin; Qin, Ling

    2016-01-01

    A key role of boron in plants is to cross-link the cell wall pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) through borate diester linkages. Phenylboronic acid (PBA) can form the same reversible ester bonds but cannot cross-link two molecules, so can be used as an antagonist to study the function of boron. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of PBA on apple (Malus domestica) pollen tube growth and the underlying regulatory mechanism. We observed that PBA caused an inhibition of pollen germination, tube growth and led to pollen tube morphological abnormalities. Fluorescent labeling, coupled with a scanning ion-selective electrode technique, revealed that PBA induced an increase in extracellular Ca2+ influx, thereby elevating the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration [Ca2+]c and disrupting the [Ca2+]c gradient, which is critical for pollen tube growth. Moreover the organization of actin filaments was severely perturbed by the PBA treatment. Immunolocalization studies and fluorescent labeling, together with Fourier-transform infrared analysis (FTIR) suggested that PBA caused an increase in the abundance of callose, de-esterified pectins and arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) at the tip. However, it had no effect on the deposition of the wall polymers cellulose. These effects are similar to those of boron deficiency in roots and other organs, indicating that PBA can induce boron deficiency symptoms. The results provide new insights into the roles of boron in pollen tube development, which likely include regulating [Ca2+]c and the formation of the actin cytoskeleton, in addition to the synthesis and assembly of cell wall components. PMID:26886907

  2. Models of calcium signalling

    CERN Document Server

    Dupont, Geneviève; Kirk, Vivien; Sneyd, James

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses the ways in which mathematical, computational, and modelling methods can be used to help understand the dynamics of intracellular calcium. The concentration of free intracellular calcium is vital for controlling a wide range of cellular processes, and is thus of great physiological importance. However, because of the complex ways in which the calcium concentration varies, it is also of great mathematical interest.This book presents the general modelling theory as well as a large number of specific case examples, to show how mathematical modelling can interact with experimental approaches, in an interdisciplinary and multifaceted approach to the study of an important physiological control mechanism. Geneviève Dupont is FNRS Research Director at the Unit of Theoretical Chronobiology of the Université Libre de Bruxelles;Martin Falcke is head of the Mathematical Cell Physiology group at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin;Vivien Kirk is an Associate Professor in the Depar...

  3. Cognitive radio policy and regulation techno-economic studies to facilitate dynamic spectrum access

    CERN Document Server

    Holland, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    This book offers a timely reflection on how the proliferation of advanced wireless communications technologies, particularly cognitive radio (CR) can be enabled by thoroughly-considered policy and appropriate regulation. It looks at the prospects of CR from the divergent standpoints of technological development and economic market reality. The book provides a broad survey of various techno-economic and policy aspects of CR development, and provides the reader with an understanding of the complexities involved as well as a toolbox of possible solutions to enable the evolutionary leap towards successful implementation of disruptive CR technology or indeed any other novel wireless technologies. Cognitive Radio Policy and Regulation showcases the original ideas and concepts introduced into the field of CR and dynamic spectrum access policy over nearly four years of work within COST Action IC0905 TERRA, a think-tank with participants from more than 20 countries. The book’s subject matter includes: • deploymen...

  4. Proteomic analysis of arginine methylation sites in human cells reveals dynamic regulation during transcriptional arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvestersen, Kathrine B; Horn, Heiko; Jungmichel, Stephanie;

    2014-01-01

    contain regulated functions on their own. Collectively, we present a site-specific MMA dataset in human cells and demonstrate for the first time that MMA is a dynamic post-translational modification regulated during transcriptional arrest by a hitherto uncharacterized arginine demethylase....... mono-methylation (MMA) sites. We thereby identify 1,027 site-specific MMA sites on 494 human proteins, discovering numerous novel mono-methylation targets and confirming the majority of currently known MMA substrates. Nuclear RNA-binding proteins involved in RNA processing, RNA localization......, transcription, and chromatin remodeling are predominantly found modified with MMA. Despite this, MMA sites prominently are located outside RNA-binding domains as compared to the proteome-wide distribution of arginine residues. Quantification of arginine methylation in cells treated with Actinomycin D uncovers...

  5. NMR insights into dynamics regulated target binding of DLC8 dimer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conformational dynamics play a crucial role in biological function. Dynein light chain protein (DLC8) acts as a cargo adaptor, and exists as a dimer under physiological conditions and dissociates into monomer below pH 4. In the present NMR study, we identified some dynamic residues in the dimer using chemical shift perturbation approach by applying small pH change. As evidenced by gel filtration and CD studies, this small pH change does not alter the globular structural features of the protein. In fact, these changes result in small local stability perturbations as monitored using temperature dependence of amide proton chemical shifts, and influence the dynamics of the dimer substantially. Further, interaction studies of the protein with a peptide containing the recognition motif of cargo indicated that the efficacy of peptide binding decreases when the pH is reduced from 7 to 6. These observations taken together support the conception that dynamics can regulate cargo binding/trafficking by the DLC8 dimer

  6. Pressure Regulators as Valves for Saving Compressed Air and their Influence on System Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dvořák Lukáš

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pressure regulators in the field of pneumatic mechanisms can be used as valves for saving compressed air. For example it can be used to reduce the pressure when the piston rod is retracting unloaded and thus it is possible to save some energy. However the problem is that saving valve can significantly affect the dynamics of the pneumatic system. The lower pressure in the piston rod chamber causes extension of time for retraction of the piston rod. This article compare the air consumption experimentally determined and calculated, measured curves of pressure in cylinder chambers and piston speed when saving valve is set up differently.

  7. Pressure Regulators as Valves for Saving Compressed Air and their Influence on System Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Dvořák Lukáš; Fojtášek Kamil

    2015-01-01

    Pressure regulators in the field of pneumatic mechanisms can be used as valves for saving compressed air. For example it can be used to reduce the pressure when the piston rod is retracting unloaded and thus it is possible to save some energy. However the problem is that saving valve can significantly affect the dynamics of the pneumatic system. The lower pressure in the piston rod chamber causes extension of time for retraction of the piston rod. This article compare the air consumption expe...

  8. Pressure Regulators as Valves for Saving Compressed Air and their Influence on System Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvořák, Lukáš; Fojtášek, Kamil

    2015-05-01

    Pressure regulators in the field of pneumatic mechanisms can be used as valves for saving compressed air. For example it can be used to reduce the pressure when the piston rod is retracting unloaded and thus it is possible to save some energy. However the problem is that saving valve can significantly affect the dynamics of the pneumatic system. The lower pressure in the piston rod chamber causes extension of time for retraction of the piston rod. This article compare the air consumption experimentally determined and calculated, measured curves of pressure in cylinder chambers and piston speed when saving valve is set up differently.

  9. Long range dynamic effects of point-mutations trap a response regulator in an active conformation

    OpenAIRE

    Bobay, Benjamin G.; Thompson, Richele J.; Hoch, James A.; Cavanagh, John

    2010-01-01

    When a point-mutation in a protein elicits a functional change, it is most common to assign this change to local structural perturbations. Here we show that point-mutations, distant from an essential highly dynamic kinase recognition loop in the response regulator Spo0F, lock this loop in an active conformation. This ‘conformational trapping’ results in functionally hyperactive Spo0F. Consequently, point-mutations are seen to affect functionally critical motions both close to and far from the...

  10. AAA+ Chaperone ClpX Regulates Dynamics of Prokaryotic Cytoskeletal Protein FtsZ*

    OpenAIRE

    Sugimoto, Shinya; Yamanaka, Kunitoshi; Nishikori, Shingo; Miyagi, Atsushi; Ando, Toshio; Ogura, Teru

    2009-01-01

    AAA+ chaperone ClpX has been suggested to be a modulator of prokaryotic cytoskeletal protein FtsZ, but the details of recognition and remodeling of FtsZ by ClpX are largely unknown. In this study, we have extensively investigated the nature of FtsZ polymers and mechanisms of ClpX-regulated FtsZ polymer dynamics. We found that FtsZ polymerization is inhibited by ClpX in an ATP-independent manner and that the N-terminal domain of ClpX plays a crucial role for the inhibition of FtsZ polymerizati...

  11. SPOT14-Positive Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells in the Hippocampus Respond Dynamically to Neurogenic Regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlen Knobloch

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs in the adult brain is tightly controlled to prevent exhaustion and to ensure proper neurogenesis. Several extrinsic stimuli affect NSPC regulation. However, the lack of unique markers led to controversial results regarding the in vivo behavior of NSPCs to different stimuli. We recently identified SPOT14, which controls NSPC proliferation through regulation of de novo lipogenesis, selectively in low-proliferating NSPCs. Whether SPOT14-expressing (SPOT14+ NSPCs react in vivo to neurogenic regulators is not known. We show that aging is accompanied by a marked disappearance of SPOT14+ NSPCs, whereas running, a positive neurogenic stimulus, increases proliferation of SPOT14+ NSPCs. Furthermore, transient depletion of highly proliferative cells recruits SPOT14+ NSPCs into the proliferative pool. Additionally, we have established endogenous SPOT14 protein staining, reflecting transgenic SPOT14-GFP expression. Thus, our data identify SPOT14 as a potent marker for adult NSPCs that react dynamically to positive and negative neurogenic regulators.

  12. DISC1-dependent Regulation of Mitochondrial Dynamics Controls the Morphogenesis of Complex Neuronal Dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkett, Rosalind; Modi, Souvik; Birsa, Nicol; Atkin, Talia A; Ivankovic, Davor; Pathania, Manav; Trossbach, Svenja V; Korth, Carsten; Hirst, Warren D; Kittler, Josef T

    2016-01-01

    The DISC1 protein is implicated in major mental illnesses including schizophrenia, depression, bipolar disorder, and autism. Aberrant mitochondrial dynamics are also associated with major mental illness. DISC1 plays a role in mitochondrial transport in neuronal axons, but its effects in dendrites have yet to be studied. Further, the mechanisms of this regulation and its role in neuronal development and brain function are poorly understood. Here we have demonstrated that DISC1 couples to the mitochondrial transport and fusion machinery via interaction with the outer mitochondrial membrane GTPase proteins Miro1 and Miro2, the TRAK1 and TRAK2 mitochondrial trafficking adaptors, and the mitochondrial fusion proteins (mitofusins). Using live cell imaging, we show that disruption of the DISC1-Miro-TRAK complex inhibits mitochondrial transport in neurons. We also show that the fusion protein generated from the originally described DISC1 translocation (DISC1-Boymaw) localizes to the mitochondria, where it similarly disrupts mitochondrial dynamics. We also show by super resolution microscopy that DISC1 is localized to endoplasmic reticulum contact sites and that the DISC1-Boymaw fusion protein decreases the endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria contact area. Moreover, disruption of mitochondrial dynamics by targeting the DISC1-Miro-TRAK complex or upon expression of the DISC1-Boymaw fusion protein impairs the correct development of neuronal dendrites. Thus, DISC1 acts as an important regulator of mitochondrial dynamics in both axons and dendrites to mediate the transport, fusion, and cross-talk of these organelles, and pathological DISC1 isoforms disrupt this critical function leading to abnormal neuronal development. PMID:26553875

  13. DISC1-dependent Regulation of Mitochondrial Dynamics Controls the Morphogenesis of Complex Neuronal Dendrites*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkett, Rosalind; Modi, Souvik; Birsa, Nicol; Atkin, Talia A.; Ivankovic, Davor; Pathania, Manav; Trossbach, Svenja V.; Korth, Carsten; Hirst, Warren D.; Kittler, Josef T.

    2016-01-01

    The DISC1 protein is implicated in major mental illnesses including schizophrenia, depression, bipolar disorder, and autism. Aberrant mitochondrial dynamics are also associated with major mental illness. DISC1 plays a role in mitochondrial transport in neuronal axons, but its effects in dendrites have yet to be studied. Further, the mechanisms of this regulation and its role in neuronal development and brain function are poorly understood. Here we have demonstrated that DISC1 couples to the mitochondrial transport and fusion machinery via interaction with the outer mitochondrial membrane GTPase proteins Miro1 and Miro2, the TRAK1 and TRAK2 mitochondrial trafficking adaptors, and the mitochondrial fusion proteins (mitofusins). Using live cell imaging, we show that disruption of the DISC1-Miro-TRAK complex inhibits mitochondrial transport in neurons. We also show that the fusion protein generated from the originally described DISC1 translocation (DISC1-Boymaw) localizes to the mitochondria, where it similarly disrupts mitochondrial dynamics. We also show by super resolution microscopy that DISC1 is localized to endoplasmic reticulum contact sites and that the DISC1-Boymaw fusion protein decreases the endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria contact area. Moreover, disruption of mitochondrial dynamics by targeting the DISC1-Miro-TRAK complex or upon expression of the DISC1-Boymaw fusion protein impairs the correct development of neuronal dendrites. Thus, DISC1 acts as an important regulator of mitochondrial dynamics in both axons and dendrites to mediate the transport, fusion, and cross-talk of these organelles, and pathological DISC1 isoforms disrupt this critical function leading to abnormal neuronal development. PMID:26553875

  14. Cortactin Controls Cell Motility and Lamellipodial Dynamics by Regulating ECM Secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Bong Hwan; Zhu, Xiaodong; Kaverina, Irina; Weaver, Alissa

    2011-01-01

    Background Branched actin assembly is critical for both cell motility and membrane trafficking. The branched actin regulator, cortactin, is generally considered to promote cell migration by controlling leading edge lamellipodial dynamics. However, recent reports indicate that lamellipodia are not required for cell movement, suggesting an alternate mechanism. Results Since cortactin also regulates membrane trafficking and adhesion dynamics, we hypothesized that altered secretion of extracellular matrix (ECM) and/or integrin trafficking might underlie motility defects of cortactin-knockdown (KD) cells. Consistent with a primary defect in ECM secretion, both motility and lamellipodial defects of cortactin-KD cells were fully rescued by plating on increasing concentrations of exogenous ECM. Furthermore, cortactin-KD cell speed defects were rescued on cell-free autocrine ECM produced by control cells but not on ECM produced by cortactin-KD cells. Investigation of the mechanism revealed that whereas endocytosed FN is redeposited at the basal cell surface by control cells, cortactin-KD cells exhibit defective FN secretion and abnormal FN retention in a late endocytic/lysosomal compartment. Cortactin-KD motility and FN deposition defects were phenocopied by KD in control cells of the lysosomal fusion regulator Synaptotagmin-7. Rescue of cortactin-KD cells by expression of cortactin binding domain mutants revealed that interaction with Arp2/3 complex and actin filaments is essential for rescue of both cell motility and autocrine ECM secretion phenotypes whereas binding of SH3 domain partners is not required. Conclusions Efficient cell motility, promoted by cortactin regulation of branched actin networks, involves processing and resecretion of internalized ECM from a late endosomal/lysosomal compartment. PMID:21856159

  15. Calcium and bones (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the growth, maintenance, and reproduction of the human ... body, are continually being re-formed and incorporate calcium into their structure. Calcium is essential for the ...

  16. Coronary Calcium Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Coronary Calcium Scan? A coronary calcium scan is a test ... you have calcifications in your coronary arteries. Coronary Calcium Scan Figure A shows the position of the ...

  17. Calcium hydroxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrate - calcium; Lime milk; Slaked lime ... Calcium hydroxide ... These products contain calcium hydroxide: Cement Limewater Many industrial solvents and cleaners (hundreds to thousands of construction products, flooring strippers, brick cleaners, cement ...

  18. Calcium source (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getting enough calcium to keep bones from thinning throughout a person's life may be made more difficult if that person has ... as a tendency toward kidney stones, for avoiding calcium-rich food sources. Calcium deficiency also effects the ...

  19. Calcium in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet - calcium ... Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the human body. It helps form and maintain healthy teeth and bones. A proper level of calcium in the body over a lifetime can help ...

  20. Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD) Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD) Fast Facts The risk of ... young people, too. Proper diagnosis depends on detecting calcium pyrophosphate crystals in the fluid of an affected ...

  1. Filamin and phospholipase C-ε are required for calcium signaling in the Caenorhabditis elegans spermatheca.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismar Kovacevic

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Caenorhabditis elegans spermatheca is a myoepithelial tube that stores sperm and undergoes cycles of stretching and constriction as oocytes enter, are fertilized, and exit into the uterus. FLN-1/filamin, a stretch-sensitive structural and signaling scaffold, and PLC-1/phospholipase C-ε, an enzyme that generates the second messenger IP3, are required for embryos to exit normally after fertilization. Using GCaMP, a genetically encoded calcium indicator, we show that entry of an oocyte into the spermatheca initiates a distinctive series of IP3-dependent calcium oscillations that propagate across the tissue via gap junctions and lead to constriction of the spermatheca. PLC-1 is required for the calcium release mechanism triggered by oocyte entry, and FLN-1 is required for timely initiation of the calcium oscillations. INX-12, a gap junction subunit, coordinates propagation of the calcium transients across the spermatheca. Gain-of-function mutations in ITR-1/IP3R, an IP3-dependent calcium channel, and loss-of-function mutations in LFE-2, a negative regulator of IP3 signaling, increase calcium release and suppress the exit defect in filamin-deficient animals. We further demonstrate that a regulatory cassette consisting of MEL-11/myosin phosphatase and NMY-1/non-muscle myosin is required for coordinated contraction of the spermatheca. In summary, this study answers long-standing questions concerning calcium signaling dynamics in the C. elegans spermatheca and suggests FLN-1 is needed in response to oocyte entry to trigger calcium release and coordinated contraction of the spermathecal tissue.

  2. Ipl1/Aurora-dependent phosphorylation of Sli15/INCENP regulates CPC–spindle interaction to ensure proper microtubule dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Nakajima, Yuko; Cormier, Anthony; Tyers, Randall G.; Pigula, Adrianne; Peng, Yutian; Drubin, David G; Barnes, Georjana

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic microtubules facilitate chromosome arrangement before anaphase, whereas during anaphase microtubule stability assists chromosome separation. Changes in microtubule dynamics at the metaphase–anaphase transition are regulated by Cdk1. Cdk1-mediated phosphorylation of Sli15/INCENP promotes preanaphase microtubule dynamics by preventing chromosomal passenger complex (CPC; Sli15/INCENP, Bir1/Survivin, Nbl1/Borealin, Ipl1/Aurora) association with spindles. However, whether Cdk1 has sole con...

  3. Enabled Negatively Regulates Diaphanous-Driven Actin Dynamics In Vitro and In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Bilancia, C.G.; Winkelman, J.D.; Tsygankov, D.; Nowotarski, S.H.; Sees, J.A.; Comber, K.; Evans, I.; Lakhani, V.; Wood, W.; Elston, T.C.; Kovar, D.R.; Peifer, M

    2014-01-01

    Summary Actin regulators facilitate cell migration by controlling cell protrusion architecture and dynamics. As the behavior of individual actin regulators becomes clear, we must address why cells require multiple regulators with similar functions and how they cooperate to create diverse protrusions. We characterized Diaphanous (Dia) and Enabled (Ena) as a model, using complementary approaches: cell culture, biophysical analysis, and Drosophila morphogenesis. We found that Dia and Ena have di...

  4. Signaling pathways in ascidian oocyte maturation: the roles of cAMP/Epac, intracellular calcium levels, and calmodulin kinase in regulating GVBD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Charles C

    2011-01-01

    Most mature ascidian oocytes undergo germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) when released by the ovary into sea water (SW). Acidic SW blocks this but they can be stimulated by raising the pH, increasing intracellular cAMP levels by cell permeant forms, inhibiting its breakdown or causing synthesis. Boltenia villosa oocytes undergo GVBD in response to these drugs. However, the cAMP receptor protein kinase A (PKA) does not appear to be involved, as oocytes are not affected by the kinase inhibitor H-89. Also, the PKA independent Epac agonist 8CPT-2Me-cAMP stimulates GVBD in acidic SW. GVBD is inhibited in calcium free sea water (CaFSW). The intracellular calcium chelator BAPTA-AM blocks GVBD at 10 µM. GVBD is also inhibited when the ryanodine receptors (RYR) are blocked by tetracaine or ruthenium red but not by the IP(3) inhibitor D-609. However, dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA), a protein kinase activator, stimulates GVBD in BAPTA, tetracaine or ruthenium red blocked oocytes. The calmodulin kinase inhibitor KN-93 blocks GVBD at 10 µM. This and preceding papers support the hypothesis that the maturation inducing substance (MIS) produced by the follicle cells in response to increased pH causes activation of a G protein which triggers cAMP synthesis. The cAMP then activates an Epac molecule, which causes an increase in intracellular calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum ryanodine receptor. The increased intracellular calcium subsequently activates calmodulin kinase, which causes an increase in cdc25 phosphatase activity, activating MPF and the progression of the oocyte into meiosis. PMID:21774024

  5. Calcium-independent phospholipase A2 regulates retinal pigment epithelium proliferation and may be important in the pathogenesis of retinal diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolko, M; Kiilgaard, J F; Wang, J; Poulsen, K A; Andreasen, J R; la Cour, M; Nissen, M H; Heegaard, S; Bazan, N G; Prause, J U

    2009-01-01

    Calcium-independent phospholipase A2, group VIA (iPLA2-VIA) is involved in cell proliferation. This study aimed to evaluate the role of iPLA2-VIA in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell proliferation and in retinal diseases involving RPE proliferation. A human RPE cell line (ARPE-19) was used to...... proliferation suggesting that iPLA2-VIA may be considered as a possible pharmaceutical target in retinal diseases involving RPE proliferation and migration....

  6. Immunoselection of cDNAs to avian intestinal calcium binding protein 28K and a novel calmodulin-like protein: assessment of mRNA regulation by the Vitamin D hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium's role in a variety of cellular processes has been well documented. The storage, distribution, and delivery of calcium are regulated by a family of binding proteins including troponin C, calmodulin, parvalbumin, and vitamin D dependent calcium binding protein (CaBP-28), all of which have evolved from a common ancestral gene. To evaluate vitamin D regulation of gene transcription, a CaBP-28 cDNA (767 base pairs) was isolated from a chicken intestine λgt11 library utilizing a polyvalent CaBP-28 antibody as a probe. Coincident with the identification of the CaBP-28 cDNA, a group of cDNAs also was isolated (with the anti-CaBP-28 antibody) that demonstrated 84% nucleotide homology and 99% deduced amino acid homology with chicken brain calmodulin (CaM). This new CaM-like cDNA was named neoCaM. There is little nucleotide homology between the CaBP-28 cDNA and neoCaM. The CaBP-28 cDNA hybridizes with three transcripts of 2000, 2900, and 3300 bases which are dramatically induced by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3], while the neoCaM cDNA recognizes three distinct (from CaBP-28) transcripts. Two of these mRNAs are 1400 and 1800 bases as described for brain CaM, but another large 4000-base transcript is detected with neoCaM. Neither the CaM nor the neoCaM transcript reveals any modulation by 1,25(OH)2D3. Herein, the authors discuss the possible significance of not only the isolation of both cDNAs with a single antibody but also the relation of neoCaM to other well-characterized CaM cDNAs

  7. Effects of seawater alkalinity on calcium and acid-base regulation in juvenile European lobster (Homarus gammarus) during a moult cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlemiss, Karen L; Urbina, Mauricio A; Wilson, Rod W

    2016-03-01

    Fluxes of NH4(+) (acid) and HCO3(-) (base), and whole body calcium content were measured in European lobster (Homarus gammarus) during intermoult (megalopae stage), and during the first 24h for postmoult juveniles under control (~2000 μeq/L) and low seawater alkalinity (~830 μeq/L). Immediately after moulting, animals lost 45% of the total body calcium via the shed exoskeleton (exuvia), and only 11% was retained in the uncalcified body. At 24h postmoult, exoskeleton calcium increased to ~46% of the intermoult stage. Ammonia excretion was not affected by seawater alkalinity. After moulting, bicarbonate excretion was immediately reversed from excretion to uptake (~4-6 fold higher rates than intermoult) over the whole 24h postmoult period, peaking at 3-6h. These data suggest that exoskeleton calcification is not completed by 24h postmoult. Low seawater alkalinity reduced postmoult bicarbonate uptake by 29% on average. Net acid-base flux (equivalent to net base uptake) followed the same pattern as HCO3(-) fluxes, and was 22% lower in low alkalinity seawater over the whole 24h postmoult period. The common occurrence of low alkalinity in intensive aquaculture systems may slow postmoult calcification in juvenile H. gammarus, increasing the risk of mortalities through cannibalism. PMID:26691956

  8. Microsecond molecular dynamics simulations of Mg²⁺- and K⁺-bound E1 intermediate states of the calcium pump.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Michel Espinoza-Fonseca

    Full Text Available We have performed microsecond molecular dynamics (MD simulations to characterize the structural dynamics of cation-bound E1 intermediate states of the calcium pump (sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca²⁺-ATPase, SERCA in atomic detail, including a lipid bilayer with aqueous solution on both sides. X-ray crystallography with 40 mM Mg²⁺ in the absence of Ca²⁺ has shown that SERCA adopts an E1 structure with transmembrane Ca²⁺-binding sites I and II exposed to the cytosol, stabilized by a single Mg²⁺ bound to a hybrid binding site I'. This Mg²⁺-bound E1 intermediate state, designated E1•Mg²⁺, is proposed to constitute a functional SERCA intermediate that catalyzes the transition from E2 to E1•2Ca²⁺ by facilitating H⁺/Ca²⁺ exchange. To test this hypothesis, we performed two independent MD simulations based on the E1•Mg²⁺ crystal structure, starting in the presence or absence of initially-bound Mg²⁺. Both simulations were performed for 1 µs in a solution containing 100 mM K⁺ and 5 mM Mg²⁺ in the absence of Ca²⁺, mimicking muscle cytosol during relaxation. In the presence of initially-bound Mg²⁺, SERCA site I' maintained Mg²⁺ binding during the entire MD trajectory, and the cytosolic headpiece maintained a semi-open structure. In the absence of initially-bound Mg²⁺, two K⁺ ions rapidly bound to sites I and I' and stayed loosely bound during most of the simulation, while the cytosolic headpiece shifted gradually to a more open structure. Thus MD simulations predict that both E1•Mg²⁺ and E•2K+ intermediate states of SERCA are populated in solution in the absence of Ca²⁺, with the more open 2K+-bound state being more abundant at physiological ion concentrations. We propose that the E1•2K⁺ state acts as a functional intermediate that facilitates the E2 to E1•2Ca²⁺ transition through two mechanisms: by pre-organizing transport sites for Ca²⁺ binding, and by partially opening the

  9. The demography of climate-driven and density-regulated population dynamics in a perennial plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlgren, Johan P; Bengtsson, Karin; Ehrlén, Johan

    2016-04-01

    Identifying the internal and external drivers of population dynamics is a key objective in ecology, currently accentuated by the need to forecast the effects of climate change on species distributions and abundances. The interplay between environmental and density effects is one particularly important aspect of such forecasts. We examined the simultaneous impact of climate and intraspecific density on vital rates of the dwarf shrub Fumana procumbens over 20 yr, using generalized additive mixed models. We then analyzed effects on population dynamics using integral projection models. The population projection models accurately captured observed fluctuations in population size. Our analyses suggested the population was intrinsically regulated but with annual fluctuations in response to variation in weather. Simulations showed that implicitly assuming variation in demographic rates to be driven solely by the environment can overestimate extinction risks if there is density dependence. We conclude that density regulation can dampen effects of climate change on Fumana population size, and discuss the need to quantify density dependence in predictions of population responses to environmental changes. PMID:27220206

  10. Characterizing regulated reservoirs dynamics in regional to global scale hydrologic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beighley, E.; Yoon, Y.; Lee, H.; Pavelsky, T.; Allen, G. H.

    2015-12-01

    Lakes and reservoirs are widely used for water supply and flood control resulting in regulated release of outflows that are nonconcurrent with inflows. In hydrologic modeling applications, accounting for the regulated behavior of reservoirs distributed throughout a river system poses a significant challenge because detailed reservoir operation rules or strategies can be difficult or not possible to obtain. Building on this problem, this study addresses the science questions: Can we model reservoir water storage changes and outlet discharges based on satellite measurements of river water surface elevation and inundated area, and How does repeat cycle, mission duration and measurement uncertainty impact our ability to characterize reservoir behavior? A modeling framework suitable for regional to global applications and based on the forthcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission is presented. Although our framework can be combined with data assimilation techniques for real-time flood forecasting, our goal is to represent reservoir storage patterns in large-scale hydrologic models for simulating: (i) impacts of future climate and/or land cover conditions on water resources, and (ii) synthetic storm events (e.g., 100-yr flood) or event catalogs for flood hazard and risk assessments. In-situ and remotely sensed reservoir dynamics are presented for select locations in the Mississippi River Basin and used in the Hillslope River Routing (HRR) hydrologic model to simulate downstream flow dynamics.

  11. In vivo Calcium Imaging of Evoked Calcium Waves in the Embryonic Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Yuryev, Mikhail; Pellegrino, Christophe; Jokinen, Ville; Andriichuk, Liliia; Khirug, Stanislav; Khiroug, Leonard; Rivera, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of intracellular calcium fluxes are instrumental in the proliferation, differentiation, and migration of neuronal cells. Knowledge thus far of the relationship between these calcium changes and physiological processes in the developing brain has derived principally from ex vivo and in vitro experiments. Here, we present a new method to image intracellular calcium flux in the cerebral cortex of live rodent embryos, whilst attached to the dam through the umbilical cord. Using this ...

  12. Role of mitochondria and network connectivity in intercellular calcium oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Dokukina, I V; Grachev, E A; Gunton, J D; Dokukina, Irina V.; Gracheva, Maria E.; Grachev, Eugene A.; Gunton, James D.

    2005-01-01

    Mitochondria are large-scale regulators of cytosolic calcium under normal cellular conditions. In this paper we model the complex behavior of mitochondrial calcium during the action of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate on a single cell and find results that are in good agreement with recent experimental studies. We also study the influence of the cellular network connectivity on intercellular signalling via gap junction diffusion. We include in our model the dependence of the junctional conductivity on the cytosolic calcium concentrations in adjacent cells. We consider three different mechanisms of calcium wave propagation through gap junctions: via calcium diffusion, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate diffusion, and both calcium and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate diffusion. We show that inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate diffusion is the mechanism of calcium wave propagation and that calcium diffusion is the mechanism of synchronization of cytosolic calcium oscillations in adjacent cells. We also study the role of different to...

  13. Role of calcium in gravity perception of plant roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Michael L.

    Calcium ions may play a key role in linking graviperception by the root cap to the asymmetric growth which occurs in the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. Application of calcium-chelating agents to the root cap inhibits gravitropic curvature without affecting growth. Asymmetric application of calcium to one side of the root cap induces curvature toward the calcium source, and gravistimulation induces polar movement of applied 45Ca2+ across the root cap toward the lower side. The action of calcium may be linked to auxin movement in roots since 1) auxin transport inhibitors interfere both with gravitropic curvature and gravi-induced polar calcium movement and 2) asymmetric application of calcium enhances auxin movement across the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. Indirect evidence indicates that the calcium-modulated regulator protein, calmodulin, may be involved in either the transport or action of calcium in the gravitropic response mechanism of roots.

  14. Murine Mesenchymal Stem Cell Commitment to Differentiation Is Regulated by Mitochondrial Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forni, Maria Fernanda; Peloggia, Julia; Trudeau, Kyle; Shirihai, Orian; Kowaltowski, Alicia J

    2016-03-01

    Mouse skin mesenchymal stem cells (msMSCs) are dermis CD105(+) CD90(+) CD73(+) CD29(+) CD34(-) mesodermal precursors which, after in vitro induction, undergo chondro, adipo, and osteogenesis. Extensive metabolic reconfiguration has been found to occur during differentiation, and the bioenergetic status of a cell is known to be dependent on the quality and abundance of the mitochondrial population, which may be regulated by fusion and fission. However, little is known regarding the impact of mitochondrial dynamics on the differentiation process. We addressed this knowledge gap by isolating MSCs from Swiss female mice, inducing these cells to differentiate into osteo, chondro, and adipocytes and measuring changes in mass, morphology, dynamics, and bioenergetics. Mitochondrial biogenesis was increased in adipogenesis, as evaluated through confocal microscopy, citrate synthase activity, and mtDNA content. The early steps of adipo and osteogenesis involved mitochondrial elongation, as well as increased expression of mitochondrial fusion proteins Mfn1 and 2. Chondrogenesis involved a fragmented mitochondrial phenotype, increased expression of fission proteins Drp1, Fis1, and 2, and enhanced mitophagy. These events were accompanied by profound bioenergetic alterations during the commitment period. Moreover, knockdown of Mfn2 in adipo and osteogenesis and the overexpression of a dominant negative form of Drp1 during chondrogenesis resulted in a loss of differentiation ability. Overall, we find that mitochondrial morphology and its regulating processes of fission/fusion are modulated early on during commitment, leading to alterations in the bioenergetic profile that are important for differentiation. We thus propose a central role for mitochondrial dynamics in the maintenance/commitment of mesenchymal stem cells. PMID:26638184

  15. Coupling Effect of Ion Channel Clusters on Calcium Signalling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on a modified intracellular Ca2+ model involving diffusive coupling of two calcium ion channel clusters, the effects of coupling on calcium signalling are numerically investigated. The simulation results indicate that the diffusive coupling of clusters together with internal noise determine the calcium dynamics of single cluster, and for either homogeneous or heterogeneous coupled clusters, the synchronization of clusters, which is important to calcium signalling, is enhanced by the coupling effect

  16. Coupling Effect of Ion Channel Clusters on Calcium Signalling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Jun; JIA Ya; YI Ming; MA Jun; YU Guang

    2008-01-01

    @@ Based on a modified intracellular Ca2+ model involving diffusive coupling of two calcium ion channel clusters,the effects of coupling on calcium signalling are numerically investigated.The simulation results indicate that the diffusive coupling of clusters together with internal noise determine the calcium dynamics of single cluster,and for either homogeneous or heterogeneous coupled clusters,the synchronization of clusters,which is important to calcium signalling,is enhanced by the coupling effect.

  17. Conformational dynamics of a G-protein α subunit is tightly regulated by nucleotide binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goricanec, David; Stehle, Ralf; Egloff, Pascal; Grigoriu, Simina; Plückthun, Andreas; Wagner, Gerhard; Hagn, Franz

    2016-06-28

    Heterotrimeric G proteins play a pivotal role in the signal-transduction pathways initiated by G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation. Agonist-receptor binding causes GDP-to-GTP exchange and dissociation of the Gα subunit from the heterotrimeric G protein, leading to downstream signaling. Here, we studied the internal mobility of a G-protein α subunit in its apo and nucleotide-bound forms and characterized their dynamical features at multiple time scales using solution NMR, small-angle X-ray scattering, and molecular dynamics simulations. We find that binding of GTP analogs leads to a rigid and closed arrangement of the Gα subdomain, whereas the apo and GDP-bound forms are considerably more open and dynamic. Furthermore, we were able to detect two conformational states of the Gα Ras domain in slow exchange whose populations are regulated by binding to nucleotides and a GPCR. One of these conformational states, the open state, binds to the GPCR; the second conformation, the closed state, shows no interaction with the receptor. Binding to the GPCR stabilizes the open state. This study provides an in-depth analysis of the conformational landscape and the switching function of a G-protein α subunit and the influence of a GPCR in that landscape. PMID:27298341

  18. The BRCA1 Breast Cancer Suppressor: Regulation of Transport, Dynamics, and Function at Multiple Subcellular Locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Beric R.

    2012-01-01

    Inherited mutations in the BRCA1 gene predispose to a higher risk of breast/ovarian cancer. The BRCA1 tumor suppressor is a 1863 amino acid protein with multiple protein interaction domains that facilitate its roles in regulating DNA repair and maintenance, cell cycle progression, transcription, and cell survival/apoptosis. BRCA1 was first identified as a nuclear phosphoprotein, but has since been shown to contain different transport sequences including nuclear export and nuclear localization signals that enable it to shuttle between specific sites within the nucleus and cytoplasm, including DNA repair foci, centrosomes, and mitochondria. BRCA1 nuclear transport and ubiquitin E3 ligase enzymatic activity are tightly regulated by the BRCA1 dimeric binding partner BARD1 and further modulated by cancer mutations and diverse signaling pathways. This paper will focus on the transport, dynamics, and multiple intracellular destinations of BRCA1 with emphasis on how regulation of these events has impact on, and determines, a broad range of important cellular functions. PMID:24278741

  19. TLR Stimulation Dynamically Regulates Heme and Iron Export Gene Expression in Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Philip

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic bacteria have evolved multiple mechanisms to capture iron or iron-containing heme from host tissues or blood. In response, organisms have developed defense mechanisms to keep iron from pathogens. Very little of the body’s iron store is available as free heme; rather nearly all body iron is complexed with heme or other proteins. The feline leukemia virus, subgroup C (FeLV-C receptor, FLVCR, exports heme from cells. It was unknown whether FLVCR regulates heme-iron availability after infection, but given that other heme regulatory proteins are upregulated in macrophages in response to bacterial infection, we hypothesized that macrophages dynamically regulate FLVCR. We stimulated murine primary macrophages or macrophage cell lines with LPS and found that Flvcr is rapidly downregulated in a TLR4/MD2-dependent manner; TLR1/2 and TLR3 stimulation also decreased Flvcr expression. We identified several candidate TLR-activated transcription factors that can bind to the Flvcr promoter. Macrophages must balance the need to sequester iron from systemic circulating or intracellular pathogens with the macrophage requirement for heme and iron to produce reactive oxygen species. Our findings underscore the complexity of this regulation and point to a new role for FLVCR and heme export in macrophages responses to infection and inflammation.

  20. TLR Stimulation Dynamically Regulates Heme and Iron Export Gene Expression in Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Mary; Chiu, Edison Y.; Hajjar, Adeline M.; Abkowitz, Janis L.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria have evolved multiple mechanisms to capture iron or iron-containing heme from host tissues or blood. In response, organisms have developed defense mechanisms to keep iron from pathogens. Very little of the body's iron store is available as free heme; rather nearly all body iron is complexed with heme or other proteins. The feline leukemia virus, subgroup C (FeLV-C) receptor, FLVCR, exports heme from cells. It was unknown whether FLVCR regulates heme-iron availability after infection, but given that other heme regulatory proteins are upregulated in macrophages in response to bacterial infection, we hypothesized that macrophages dynamically regulate FLVCR. We stimulated murine primary macrophages or macrophage cell lines with LPS and found that Flvcr is rapidly downregulated in a TLR4/MD2-dependent manner; TLR1/2 and TLR3 stimulation also decreased Flvcr expression. We identified several candidate TLR-activated transcription factors that can bind to the Flvcr promoter. Macrophages must balance the need to sequester iron from systemic circulating or intracellular pathogens with the macrophage requirement for heme and iron to produce reactive oxygen species. Our findings underscore the complexity of this regulation and point to a new role for FLVCR and heme export in macrophages responses to infection and inflammation. PMID:27006955

  1. Subcellular targeting and dynamic regulation of PTEN: Implications for neuronal cells and neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Lieberam

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available PTEN is a lipid and protein phosphatase that regulates a diverse range of cellular mechanisms. PTEN is mainly present in the cytosol and transiently associates with the plasma membrane to dephosphorylate PI(3,4,5P3, thereby antagonizing the PI3-Kinase signaling pathway. Recently, PTEN has been shown to associate also with organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum, the mitochondria or the nucleus, and to be secreted outside of the cell. In addition, PTEN dynamically localizes to specialized sub-cellular compartments such as the neuronal growth cone or dendritic spines. The diverse localizations of PTEN imply a tight temporal and spatial regulation, orchestrated by mechanisms such as posttranslational modifications, formation of distinct protein-protein interactions or the activation/recruitment of PTEN downstream of external cues. The regulation of PTEN function is thus not only important at the enzymatic activity level, but is also associated to its spatial distribution. In this review we will summarize (i recent findings that highlight mechanisms controlling PTEN movement and sub-cellular localization, and (ii current understanding of how PTEN localization is achieved by mechanisms controlling posttranslational modification, by association with binding partners and by PTEN structural or activity requirements. Finally, we will discuss the possible roles of compartmentalized PTEN in developing and mature neurons in health and disease.

  2. Dynamic Regulation of APE1/Ref-1 as a Therapeutic Target Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sunga; Joo, Hee Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) is a multifunctional protein that plays a central role in the cellular response to DNA damage and redox regulation against oxidative stress. APE1/Ref-1 functions in the DNA base excision repair pathway, the redox regulation of several transcription factors, and the control of intracellular redox status through the inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. APE1/Ref-1 is predominantly localized in the nucleus; however, its subcellular localization is dynamically regulated and it may be found in the mitochondria or elsewhere in the cytoplasm. Studies have identified a nuclear localization signal and a mitochondrial target sequence in APE1/Ref-1, as well as the involvement of the nuclear export system, as determinants of APE1/Ref-1 subcellular distribution. Recently, it was shown that APE1/Ref-1 is secreted in response to hyperacetylation at specific lysine residues. Additionally, post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation, S-nitrosation, and ubiquitination appear to play a role in fine-tuning the activities and subcellular localization of APE1/Ref-1. In this review, we will introduce the multifunctional role of APE1/Ref-1 and its potential usefulness as a therapeutic target in cancer and cardiovascular disease. PMID:27231670

  3. P12 - PTHC1: A Continuing Cell Line Expressing PTH and Genes Involved in Calcium Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Fabbri, S.; Mazzotta, C.; Ciuffi, S.; Mavilia, C.; Galli, G.; Zonefrati, R; Strigoli, D.; Cavalli, L.; Cavalli, T.; Brandi, M.L.

    2010-01-01

    The main organs regulating serum levels of ionised calcium (Ca2+) are the parathyroids, which are composed of two different cell types: chief cells and oxyphil cells. Chief cells, through the calcium sensing receptor (CaSR), are affected by changes in calcium concentration, modifying PTH secretion in proportion to calcium levels. Current understanding of calcium regulation mechanisms connected to PTH and of the signalling pathways involved derive from in vitro studies carried out on primary c...

  4. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to beta-palmitate and increased calcium absorption pursuant to Article 14 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    triglycerides may increase calcium absorption by decreasing faecal calcium excretion as calcium soaps, albeit a significant effect on calcium absorption was demonstrated in one study only. The Panel concludes that the evidence provided is insufficient to establish a cause and effect relationship between the...

  5. Microbial regulation of nitrogen dynamics along the hillslope of a natural forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo eIsobe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Topography affects the soil physicochemistry, soil N dynamics, and plant distribution and growth in forests. In Japan, many forests are found in mountainous areas and these traits are often highly variable along steep slopes. In this study, we investigated how the microbial population dynamics reflected the bioavailable N dynamics with the physicochemical gradient along the slope in soils of a natural forest in Japan. We measured the gross rates of NH4+ production, nitrification, and NH4+/ NO3− immobilization using the N isotope dilution method to analyze the N dynamics in the soils. We also determined the abundance of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene and bacterial and archaeal ammonia monooxygenase gene (amoA using qPCR to assess the populations of total bacteria and nitrifiers. We found that gross rates of NH4+ production and nitrification were higher in the lower part of the slope, they were positively correlated with the abundance of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene and archaeal amoA, respectively; and the availability of N, particularly NO3−, for plants was higher in the lower part of the slope because of the higher microbial nitrification activity and low microbial NO3− immobilization activity. In addition, path analysis indicated that gross rates of NH4+ production and nitrification were regulated mainly by the substrate (dissolved organic N and NH4+ concentrations and population sizes of total bacteria and nitrifiers, respectively, and their population sizes were strongly affected by the soil physicochemistry such as pH and water content. Our results suggested that the soil physicochemical gradient along the slope caused the spatial gradient of gross rates of NH4+ production and nitrification by altering the communities of ammonifiers and nitrifiers in the forest slope, which also affected plant distribution and growth via the supply of bioavailable N to plants.

  6. Calcium and Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home › Patients › Treatment › Calcium/Vitamin D Calcium/Vitamin D Getting enough calcium and vitamin D is essential ... counter medications and calcium supplements. What is Vitamin D and What Does it Do? Vitamin D plays ...

  7. Microtubule nucleation in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells is regulated by the concerted action of GIT1/βPIX proteins and calcium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sulimenko, Vadym; Hájková, Zuzana; Černohorská, Markéta; Sulimenko, Tetyana; Sládková, Vladimíra; Dráberová, Lubica; Vinopal, Stanislav; Dráberová, Eduarda; Dráber, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 194, č. 9 (2015), s. 4099-4111. ISSN 0022-1767 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP302/12/1673; GA ČR GPP302/11/P709; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-09807S; GA ČR GA15-22194S; GA MŠk(CZ) LD13015; GA MŠk LH12050; GA MZd NT14467 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Bone Marrow-Derived Mast Cells * Microtubule Nucleation * GIT1/beta PIX Proteins * Calcium Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.922, year: 2014

  8. Dynamic voltage regulation and power export in a distribution system using distributed generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aamir HANIF; Muhammad Ahmed CHOUDHRY

    2009-01-01

    The major aim of power quality (PQ) enhancing techniques is to maintain a specified voltage magnitude at a desired frequency for sensitive loads irrespective of faults on the power distribution network. The dynamic voltage restorer (DVR) is a device used to mitigate voltage sags to regulate load voltage. This paper presents a mathematical model for leading series voltage injection to mitigate sags thereby achieving the improvement of the utility power factor as well as power sharing between the DVR and utility. The power sharing will be as per requirement to compensate the sags considering the available distributed generation (DG). The approach of mitigating voltage sags using the concept of leading series voltage injection is suitable for those locations where phase shift in the voltage will not cause any problem. The MATLAB/SIMULINK SimPowerSystem toolbox has been used to obtain simulation results to verify the proposed mathematical model.

  9. Investigations of stability and dynamic performances of switching regulators employing current-injected control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, F. C.; Carter, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    The stability and dynamic performances of a buck/boost regulator employing a current-injected control are examined. Small-signal models for the power state, the multi-loop error processor and the duty-cycle pulse-modulator are developed. The error-processor model which incorporates the current-injected loop, the dc loop and the compensation network permits evaluation of the effects of each individual control loop and their combined efforts toward shaping the performance characteristics of the closed-loop system. Comparisons are made between this modeling approach and earlier approaches. Some important yet subtle dissimilarities are discussed. This model predicts the constant-frequency 50 percent duty-cycle instability which is inherent to the current-injected control.

  10. Dendritic cell podosome dynamics does not depend on the F-actin regulator SWAP-70.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Götz

    Full Text Available In addition to classical adhesion structures like filopodia or focal adhesions, dendritic cells similar to macrophages and osteoclasts assemble highly dynamic F-actin structures called podosomes. They are involved in cellular processes such as extracellular matrix degradation, bone resorption by osteoclasts, and trans-cellular diapedesis of lymphocytes. Besides adhesion and migration, podosomes enable dendritic cells to degrade connective tissue by matrix metalloproteinases. SWAP-70 interacts with RhoGTPases and F-actin and regulates migration of dendritic cells. SWAP-70 deficient osteoclasts are impaired in F-actin-ring formation and bone resorption. In the present study, we demonstrate that SWAP-70 is not required for podosome formation and F-actin turnover in dendritic cells. Furthermore, we found that toll-like receptor 4 ligand induced podosome disassembly and podosome-mediated matrix degradation is not affected by SWAP-70 in dendritic cells. Thus, podosome formation and function in dendritic cells is independent of SWAP-70.

  11. Diospyrin derivative, an anticancer quinonoid, regulates apoptosis at endoplasmic reticulum as well as mitochondria by modulating cytosolic calcium in human breast carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Binod; Kumar, Amit; Ghosh, Subhalakshmi; Pandey, Badri N; Mishra, Kaushala P; Hazra, Banasri

    2012-01-13

    Diospyrin diethylether (D7), a bisnaphthoquinonoid derivative, exhibited an oxidative stress-dependent apoptosis in several human cancer cells and tumor models. The present study was aimed at evaluation of the increase in cytosolic calcium [Ca(2+)](c) leading to the apoptotic cell death triggered by D7 in MCF7 human breast carcinoma cells. A phosphotidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) inhibitor, viz. U73122, and an antioxidant, viz. N-acetylcysteine, could significantly prevent the D7-induced rise in [Ca(2+)](c) and PC-PLC activity. Using an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Ca(2+) mobilizer (thapsigargin) and an ER-IP3R antagonist (heparin), results revealed ER as a major source of [Ca(2+)](c) which led to the activation of calpain and caspase12, and cleavage of fodrin. These effects including apoptosis were significantly inhibited by the pretreatment of Bapta-AM (a cell permeable Ca(2+)-specific chelator), or calpeptin (a calpain inhibitor). Furthermore, D7-induced [Ca(2+)](c) was found to alter mitochondrial membrane potential and induce cytochrome c release, which was inhibited by either Bapta-AM or ruthenium red (an inhibitor of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter). Thus, these results provided a deeper insight into the D7-induced redox signaling which eventually integrated the calcium-dependent calpain/caspase12 activation and mitochondrial alterations to accentuate the induction of apoptotic cell death. PMID:22209849

  12. Relating a calcium indicator signal to the unperturbed calcium concentration time-course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abarbanel Henry DI

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optical indicators of cytosolic calcium levels have become important experimental tools in systems and cellular neuroscience. Indicators are known to interfere with intracellular calcium levels by acting as additional buffers, and this may strongly alter the time-course of various dynamical variables to be measured. Results By investigating the underlying reaction kinetics, we show that in some ranges of kinetic parameters one can explicitly link the time dependent indicator signal to the time-course of the calcium influx, and thus, to the unperturbed calcium level had there been no indicator in the cell.

  13. A Study of Phosphorus and Calcium Dynamics in an Integrated Rainbow Trout and Spinach (Nores variety) Aquaponic System with Different Crop Densities

    OpenAIRE

    Stefan Mihai Petrea; Victor Cristea; Lorena Dediu; Maria Contoman; Mirela Cretu; Alina Antache; Marian Coada; Alexandru Cristian Bandi

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study is to quantify both calcium and phosphorus budgets for an integrated rainbow trout – spinach (Nores variety) aquaponic system, where three crops densities were used (BH1 –59 crops/m2, BH2 – 48 crops/m2 and BH3 – 39 crops/m2 and a control variant). Fish were fed with two types of feed (41% and 50% protein), using 3 different feeding regimes. Total calcium and total phosphorus retention rates for each of the three tested spinach biomass densities were individually determi...

  14. Lamin A/C and emerin regulate MKL1-SRF activity by modulating actin dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chin Yee; Jaalouk, Diana E; Vartiainen, Maria K; Lammerding, Jan

    2013-05-23

    Laminopathies, caused by mutations in the LMNA gene encoding the nuclear envelope proteins lamins A and C, represent a diverse group of diseases that include Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, and Hutchison-Gilford progeria syndrome. Most LMNA mutations affect skeletal and cardiac muscle by mechanisms that remain incompletely understood. Loss of structural function and altered interaction of mutant lamins with (tissue-specific) transcription factors have been proposed to explain the tissue-specific phenotypes. Here we report in mice that lamin-A/C-deficient (Lmna(-/-)) and Lmna(N195K/N195K) mutant cells have impaired nuclear translocation and downstream signalling of the mechanosensitive transcription factor megakaryoblastic leukaemia 1 (MKL1), a myocardin family member that is pivotal in cardiac development and function. Altered nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of MKL1 was caused by altered actin dynamics in Lmna(-/-) and Lmna(N195K/N195K) mutant cells. Ectopic expression of the nuclear envelope protein emerin, which is mislocalized in Lmna mutant cells and also linked to EDMD and DCM, restored MKL1 nuclear translocation and rescued actin dynamics in mutant cells. These findings present a novel mechanism that could provide insight into the disease aetiology for the cardiac phenotype in many laminopathies, whereby lamin A/C and emerin regulate gene expression through modulation of nuclear and cytoskeletal actin polymerization. PMID:23644458

  15. Lamin A/C and emerin regulate MKL1/SRF activity by modulating actin dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chin Yee; Jaalouk, Diana E.; Vartiainen, Maria K.; Lammerding, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Laminopathies, caused by mutations in the LMNA gene encoding the nuclear envelope proteins lamins A and C, represent a diverse group of diseases that include Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy (EDMD), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, and Hutchison-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS).1 The majority of LMNA mutations affect skeletal and cardiac muscle by mechanisms that remain incompletely understood. Loss of structural function and disturbed interaction of mutant lamins with (tissue-specific) transcription factors have been proposed to explain the tissue-specific phenotypes.1 We report here that lamin A/C-deficient (Lmna−/−) and Lmna N195K mutant cells have impaired nuclear translocation and downstream signaling of the mechanosensitive transcription factor megakaryoblastic leukaemia 1 (MKL1), a myocardin family member that is pivotal in cardiac development and function.2 Disturbed nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of MKL1 was caused by altered actin dynamics in Lmna−/− and N195K mutant cells. Ectopic expression of the nuclear envelope protein emerin, which is mislocalized in Lmna mutant cells and also linked to EDMD and DCM, restored MKL1 nuclear translocation and rescued actin dynamics in mutant cells. These findings present a novel mechanism that could provide insight into the disease etiology for the cardiac phenotype in many laminopathies, whereby lamins A/C and emerin regulate gene expression through modulation of nuclear and cytoskeletal actin polymerization. PMID:23644458

  16. Mechanisms of allosteric gene regulation by NMR quantification of microsecond-millisecond protein dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleckner, Ian R; Gollnick, Paul; Foster, Mark P

    2012-01-13

    The trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) is a paradigmatic allosteric protein that regulates the tryptophan biosynthetic genes associated with the trp operon in bacilli. The ring-shaped 11-mer TRAP is activated for recognition of a specific trp-mRNA target by binding up to 11 tryptophan molecules. To characterize the mechanisms of tryptophan-induced TRAP activation, we have performed methyl relaxation dispersion (MRD) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments that probe the time-dependent structure of TRAP in the microsecond-to-millisecond "chemical exchange" time window. We find significant side chain flexibility localized to the RNA and tryptophan binding sites of the apo protein and that these dynamics are dramatically reduced upon ligand binding. Analysis of the MRD NMR data provides insights into the structural nature of transiently populated conformations sampled in solution by apo TRAP. The MRD data are inconsistent with global two-state exchange, indicating that conformational sampling in apo TRAP is asynchronous. These findings imply a temporally heterogeneous population of structures that are incompatible with RNA binding and substantiate the study of TRAP as a paradigm for probing and understanding essential dynamics in allosteric, regulatory proteins. PMID:22115774

  17. Dynamic and Stable Cohesins Regulate Synaptonemal Complex Assembly and Chromosome Segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyuricza, Mercedes R; Manheimer, Kathryn B; Apte, Vandana; Krishnan, Badri; Joyce, Eric F; McKee, Bruce D; McKim, Kim S

    2016-07-11

    Assembly of the synaptonemal complex (SC) in Drosophila depends on two independent pathways defined by the chromosome axis proteins C(2)M and ORD. Because C(2)M encodes a Kleisin-like protein and ORD is required for sister-chromatid cohesion, we tested the hypothesis that these two SC assembly pathways depend on two cohesin complexes. Through single- and double-mutant analysis to study the mitotic cohesion proteins Stromalin (SA) and Nipped-B (SCC2) in meiosis, we provide evidence that there are at least two meiosis-specific cohesin complexes. One complex depends on C(2)M, SA, and Nipped-B. Despite the presence of mitotic cohesins SA and Nipped-B, this pathway has only a minor role in meiotic sister-centromere cohesion and is primarily required for homolog interactions. C(2)M is continuously incorporated into pachytene chromosomes even though SC assembly is complete. In contrast, the second complex, which depends on meiosis-specific proteins SOLO, SUNN, and ORD is required for sister-chromatid cohesion, localizes to the centromeres and is not incorporated during prophase. Our results show that the two cohesin complexes have unique functions and are regulated differently. Multiple cohesin complexes may provide the diversity of activities required by the meiotic cell. For example, a dynamic complex may allow the chromosomes to regulate meiotic recombination, and a stable complex may be required for sister-chromatid cohesion. PMID:27291057

  18. Bio-inspired Dynamic Gradients Regulated by Supramolecular Bindings in Receptor-Embedded Hydrogel Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Xinglong; Zhang, Yihe; Wu, Jing; Jonkheijm, Pascal; Li, Guangtao; Jiang, Lei; Huskens, Jurriaan; An, Qi

    2016-08-01

    The kinetics of supramolecular bindings are fundamentally important for molecular motions and spatial-temporal distributions in biological systems, but have rarely been employed in preparing artificial materials. This report proposes a bio-inspired concept to regulate dynamic gradients through the coupled supramolecular binding and diffusion process in receptor-embedded hydrogel matrices. A new type of hydrogel that uses cyclodextrin (CD) as both the gelling moiety and the receptors is prepared as the diffusion matrices. The diffusible guest, 4-aminoazobenzene, quickly and reversibly binds to matrices-bound CD during diffusion and generates steeper gradients than regular diffusion. Weakened bindings induced through UV irradiation extend the gradients. Combined with numerical simulation, these results indicate that the coupled binding-diffusion could be viewed as slowed diffusion, regulated jointly by the binding constant and the equilibrium receptor concentrations, and gradients within a bio-relevant extent of 4 mm are preserved up to 90 h. This report should inspire design strategies of biomedical or cell-culturing materials. PMID:27547643

  19. Ornithine decarboxylase and extracellular polyamines regulate microvascular sprouting and actin cytoskeleton dynamics in endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The polyamines are essential for cancer cell proliferation during tumorigenesis. Targeted inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), i.e. a key enzyme of polyamine biosynthesis, by α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) has shown anti-neoplastic activity in various experimental models. This activity has mainly been attributed to the anti-proliferative effect of DFMO in cancer cells. Here, we provide evidence that unperturbed ODC activity is a requirement for proper microvessel sprouting ex vivo as well as the migration of primary human endothelial cells. DFMO-mediated ODC inhibition was reversed by extracellular polyamine supplementation, showing that anti-angiogenic effects of DFMO were specifically related to polyamine levels. ODC inhibition was associated with an abnormal morphology of the actin cytoskeleton during cell spreading and migration. Moreover, our data suggest that de-regulated actin cytoskeleton dynamics in DFMO treated endothelial cells may be related to constitutive activation of the small GTPase CDC42, i.e. a well-known regulator of cell motility and actin cytoskeleton remodeling. These insights into the potential role of polyamines in angiogenesis should stimulate further studies testing the combined anti-tumor effect of polyamine inhibition and established anti-angiogenic therapies in vivo.

  20. Structures of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases reveal mechanism of activation by calcium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wernimont, Amy K; Artz, Jennifer D.; Jr, Patrick Finerty; Lin, Yu-Hui; Amani, Mehrnaz; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Senisterra, Guillermo; Vedadi, Masoud; Tempel, Wolfram; Mackenzie, Farrell; Chau, Irene; Lourido, Sebastian; Sibley, L. David; Hui, Raymond (Toronto); (WU-MED)

    2010-09-21

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) have pivotal roles in the calcium-signaling pathway in plants, ciliates and apicomplexan parasites and comprise a calmodulin-dependent kinase (CaMK)-like kinase domain regulated by a calcium-binding domain in the C terminus. To understand this intramolecular mechanism of activation, we solved the structures of the autoinhibited (apo) and activated (calcium-bound) conformations of CDPKs from the apicomplexan parasites Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. In the apo form, the C-terminal CDPK activation domain (CAD) resembles a calmodulin protein with an unexpected long helix in the N terminus that inhibits the kinase domain in the same manner as CaMKII. Calcium binding triggers the reorganization of the CAD into a highly intricate fold, leading to its relocation around the base of the kinase domain to a site remote from the substrate binding site. This large conformational change constitutes a distinct mechanism in calcium signal-transduction pathways.

  1. Computational study of a calcium release-activated calcium channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Keka; Shantappa, Anil

    2016-05-01

    The naturally occurring proteins that form hole in membrane are commonly known as ion channels. They play multiple roles in many important biological processes. Deletion or alteration of these channels often leads to serious problems in the physiological processes as it controls the flow of ions through it. The proper maintenance of the flow of ions, in turn, is required for normal health. Here we have investigated the behavior of a calcium release-activated calcium ion channel with pdb entry 4HKR in Drosophila Melanogaster. The equilibrium energy as well as molecular dynamics simulation is performed first. The protein is subjected to molecular dynamics simulation to find their energy minimized value. Simulation of the protein in the environment of water and ions has given us important results too. The solvation energy is also found using Charmm potential.

  2. Mice deficient in carbonic anhydrase type 8 exhibit motor dysfunctions and abnormal calcium dynamics in the somatic region of cerebellar granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, Matthew G; Weber, John T

    2015-06-01

    The waddles (wdl) mouse is characterized by a namesake "side-to-side" waddling gait due to a homozygous mutation of the Car8 gene. This mutation results in non-functional copies of the protein carbonic anhydrase type 8. Rota-rod testing was conducted to characterize the wdl mutations' effect on motor output. Results indicated that younger homozygotes outperformed their older cohorts, an effect not seen in previous studies. Heterozygotes, which were thought to be free of motor impairment, displayed motor learning deficiencies when compared with wild type performance. Acute cerebellar slices were then utilized for fluorescent calcium imaging experiments, which revealed significant alterations in cerebellar granule cell somatic calcium signaling when exposed to glutamate. The contribution of GABAergic signaling to these alterations was also verified using bath application of bicuculline. Changes in somatic calcium signals were found to be applicable to an in vivo scenario by comparing group responses to electrical stimulation of afferent mossy fiber projections. Finally, intracellular calcium store function was also found to be altered by the wdl mutation when slices were treated with thapsigargin. These findings, taken together with previous work on the wdl mouse, indicate a widespread disruption in cerebellar circuitry hampering proper neuronal communication. PMID:25721739

  3. A Study of Phosphorus and Calcium Dynamics in an Integrated Rainbow Trout and Spinach (Nores variety Aquaponic System with Different Crop Densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Mihai Petrea

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to quantify both calcium and phosphorus budgets for an integrated rainbow trout – spinach (Nores variety aquaponic system, where three crops densities were used (BH1 –59 crops/m2, BH2 – 48 crops/m2 and BH3 – 39 crops/m2 and a control variant. Fish were fed with two types of feed (41% and 50% protein, using 3 different feeding regimes. Total calcium and total phosphorus retention rates for each of the three tested spinach biomass densities were individually determined by water chemical and plant biochemical analysis. Also, the concentration of those two macroelements was determined from fish meat and fish faeces.  Significant differences (p<0.05 were recorded between fish faeces total phosphorus content and between total calcium and total phosphorus retention rates for each of the three variants of tested crops densities (significant higher at BH1 compared to BH3, p < 0.05. It is recommended that lower densities to be used for a better crop absorption of both calcium and phosphorus or a lower hydraulic flow regime and a better light intensity to be applied in case of the used integrated aquaponic system.

  4. Diospyrin derivative, an anticancer quinonoid, regulates apoptosis at endoplasmic reticulum as well as mitochondria by modulating cytosolic calcium in human breast carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Diospyrin diethylether (D7) caused oxidative stress-dependent activation of PC-PLC. ► Activated PC-PLC induced a sustained-release of Ca2+ from endoplasmic reticulum. ► The elevated cytosolic Ca+2 led to the calpain-caspase12 dependent apoptosis. ► D7-Induced Ca+2 also found to accentuate the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. -- Abstract: Diospyrin diethylether (D7), a bisnaphthoquinonoid derivative, exhibited an oxidative stress-dependent apoptosis in several human cancer cells and tumor models. The present study was aimed at evaluation of the increase in cytosolic calcium [Ca2+]c leading to the apoptotic cell death triggered by D7 in MCF7 human breast carcinoma cells. A phosphotidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) inhibitor, viz. U73122, and an antioxidant, viz. N-acetylcysteine, could significantly prevent the D7-induced rise in [Ca2+]c and PC-PLC activity. Using an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Ca2+ mobilizer (thapsigargin) and an ER-IP3R antagonist (heparin), results revealed ER as a major source of [Ca2+]c which led to the activation of calpain and caspase12, and cleavage of fodrin. These effects including apoptosis were significantly inhibited by the pretreatment of Bapta-AM (a cell permeable Ca2+-specific chelator), or calpeptin (a calpain inhibitor). Furthermore, D7-induced [Ca2+]c was found to alter mitochondrial membrane potential and induce cytochrome c release, which was inhibited by either Bapta-AM or ruthenium red (an inhibitor of mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter). Thus, these results provided a deeper insight into the D7-induced redox signaling which eventually integrated the calcium-dependent calpain/caspase12 activation and mitochondrial alterations to accentuate the induction of apoptotic cell death.

  5. Calcium dynamics in the healing of tooth extraction sockets in mice evaluated using 45Ca-autoradiography and Electron Probe Micro Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The calcium distribution in tooth extraction sockets of mice was examined using 45-Calcium autoradiography (ARG) and Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA). Mice were divided into 8 groups (n=8) according to the number of days (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 10, 20 respectively) after extraction. Frozen sections were taken from mice on each experimental day after injection of 45-Calcium (RI). The process of formation of new bone was observed using ARG. An ultimate analysis was performed by EPMA. Histological analysis was performed with toluidine blue- and alizarin red S-staining. In toluidine blue-staining, an osteoblast was found along the socket wall at 4 days and non-calcified periodontal ligament was recognized until 5 days after extraction. In alizarin red S-staining, new bone was recognized separated from the socket wall at 4 days after extraction. 45Ca-labeling was detected strongly in the periosteum of the mandible, the surface of cement and periodontal ligament in control animals. 45Ca-labeling was moved from the bottom to the top of the tooth extraction socket during the period from 1 to 5 days after extraction, but in the periodontal ligament lower than in the granulation tissue. 45Ca-labeling was detected in the socket at 7, 10 and 20 days. At 4 days, calcium phosphate was observed in the central portion of the socket using EPMA. 45Ca-labeling showed deposition of calcium phosphate for alveolar bone and new bone. These results suggest that the granulation tissue may be involved in the initial calcification in the tooth extraction socket and lead to the formation of new bone in it. (author)

  6. Modulation of Intracellular Calcium Levels by Calcium Lactate Affects Colon Cancer Cell Motility through Calcium-Dependent Calpain

    OpenAIRE

    Pasupathi Sundaramoorthy; Jae Jun Sim; Yeong-Su Jang; Siddhartha Kumar Mishra; Keun-Yeong Jeong; Poonam Mander; Oh Byung Chul; Won-Sik Shim; Seung Hyun Oh; Ky-Youb Nam; Hwan Mook Kim

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cell motility is a key phenomenon regulating invasion and metastasis. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) plays a major role in cellular adhesion and metastasis of various cancers. The relationship between dietary supplementation of calcium and colon cancer has been extensively investigated. However, the effect of calcium (Ca2+) supplementation on calpain-FAK-motility is not clearly understood. We sought to identify the mechanism of FAK cleavage through Ca2+ bound lactate (CaLa), its downstrea...

  7. Calcium signaling in cognition and aging-dependent cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ana M M; Bading, Hilmar

    2011-01-01

    Calcium-dependent signals are key triggers of the molecular mechanisms underlying learning and memory and dysregulation of calcium homeostasis in the aging brain has been proposed to underlie aging-dependent cognitive decline. Mechanisms triggered by calcium in neurons include activity-dependent activation of transcription responsible for the synthesis of molecules underlying the long-term changes of neuronal function. Effectors of calcium signaling with a primordial role in transcription regulation are calcium signal-regulated transcription factors. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the contribution of key calcium signal-regulated transcription factors, namely CREB, NFAT, and DREAM, to memory formation. We further describe evidence for dysregulation of the activity of these factors during aging. PMID:21698696

  8. Effect of Food Regulation on the Spanish Food Processing Industry: A Dynamic Productivity Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Magdalena Kapelko; Alfons Oude Lansink; Stefanou, Spiro E.

    2015-01-01

    This article develops the decomposition of the dynamic Luenberger productivity growth indicator into dynamic technical change, dynamic technical inefficiency change and dynamic scale inefficiency change in the dynamic directional distance function context using Data Envelopment Analysis. These results are used to investigate for the Spanish food processing industry the extent to which dynamic productivity growth and its components are affected by the introduction of the General Food Law in 20...

  9. Stochastic models of intracellular calcium signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellular signaling operates in a noisy environment shaped by low molecular concentrations and cellular heterogeneity. For calcium release through intracellular channels–one of the most important cellular signaling mechanisms–feedback by liberated calcium endows fluctuations with critical functions in signal generation and formation. In this review it is first described, under which general conditions the environment makes stochasticity relevant, and which conditions allow approximating or deterministic equations. This analysis provides a framework, in which one can deduce an efficient hybrid description combining stochastic and deterministic evolution laws. Within the hybrid approach, Markov chains model gating of channels, while the concentrations of calcium and calcium binding molecules (buffers) are described by reaction–diffusion equations. The article further focuses on the spatial representation of subcellular calcium domains related to intracellular calcium channels. It presents analysis for single channels and clusters of channels and reviews the effects of buffers on the calcium release. For clustered channels, we discuss the application and validity of coarse-graining as well as approaches based on continuous gating variables (Fokker–Planck and chemical Langevin equations). Comparison with recent experiments substantiates the stochastic and spatial approach, identifies minimal requirements for a realistic modeling, and facilitates an understanding of collective channel behavior. At the end of the review, implications of stochastic and local modeling for the generation and properties of cell-wide release and the integration of calcium dynamics into cellular signaling models are discussed

  10. Stochastic models of intracellular calcium signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rüdiger, Sten, E-mail: sten.ruediger@physik.hu-berlin.de

    2014-01-10

    Cellular signaling operates in a noisy environment shaped by low molecular concentrations and cellular heterogeneity. For calcium release through intracellular channels–one of the most important cellular signaling mechanisms–feedback by liberated calcium endows fluctuations with critical functions in signal generation and formation. In this review it is first described, under which general conditions the environment makes stochasticity relevant, and which conditions allow approximating or deterministic equations. This analysis provides a framework, in which one can deduce an efficient hybrid description combining stochastic and deterministic evolution laws. Within the hybrid approach, Markov chains model gating of channels, while the concentrations of calcium and calcium binding molecules (buffers) are described by reaction–diffusion equations. The article further focuses on the spatial representation of subcellular calcium domains related to intracellular calcium channels. It presents analysis for single channels and clusters of channels and reviews the effects of buffers on the calcium release. For clustered channels, we discuss the application and validity of coarse-graining as well as approaches based on continuous gating variables (Fokker–Planck and chemical Langevin equations). Comparison with recent experiments substantiates the stochastic and spatial approach, identifies minimal requirements for a realistic modeling, and facilitates an understanding of collective channel behavior. At the end of the review, implications of stochastic and local modeling for the generation and properties of cell-wide release and the integration of calcium dynamics into cellular signaling models are discussed.

  11. KATNAL1 regulation of sertoli cell microtubule dynamics is essential for spermiogenesis and male fertility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee B Smith

    Full Text Available Spermatogenesis is a complex process reliant upon interactions between germ cells (GC and supporting somatic cells. Testicular Sertoli cells (SC support GCs during maturation through physical attachment, the provision of nutrients, and protection from immunological attack. This role is facilitated by an active cytoskeleton of parallel microtubule arrays that permit transport of nutrients to GCs, as well as translocation of spermatids through the seminiferous epithelium during maturation. It is well established that chemical perturbation of SC microtubule remodelling leads to premature GC exfoliation demonstrating that microtubule remodelling is an essential component of male fertility, yet the genes responsible for this process remain unknown. Using a random ENU mutagenesis approach, we have identified a novel mouse line displaying male-specific infertility, due to a point mutation in the highly conserved ATPase domain of the novel KATANIN p60-related microtubule severing protein Katanin p60 subunit A-like1 (KATNAL1. We demonstrate that Katnal1 is expressed in testicular Sertoli cells (SC from 15.5 days post-coitum (dpc and that, consistent with chemical disruption models, loss of function of KATNAL1 leads to male-specific infertility through disruption of SC microtubule dynamics and premature exfoliation of spermatids from the seminiferous epithelium. The identification of KATNAL1 as an essential regulator of male fertility provides a significant novel entry point into advancing our understanding of how SC microtubule dynamics promotes male fertility. Such information will have resonance both for future treatment of male fertility and the development of non-hormonal male contraceptives.

  12. The F-actin modifier villin regulates insulin granule dynamics and exocytosis downstream of islet cell autoantigen 512

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Mziaut

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: Our findings show that villin controls the size of the F-actin cages restricting SGs and, thus, regulates their dynamics and availability for exocytosis. Evidence that villin acts downstream of Ica512 also indicates that SGs directly influence the remodeling properties of the cortical actin cytoskeleton for tight control of insulin secretion.

  13. Calcium in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... best source. Milk and dairy products such as yogurt, cheeses, and buttermilk contain a form of calcium ... the amount of calcium in a dairy product. Yogurt, most cheeses, and buttermilk are excellent sources of ...

  14. Fenoprofen calcium overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenoprofen calcium is a type of medicine called a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. It is a prescription pain medicine used to relieve symptoms of arthritis . Fenoprofen calcium overdose occurs when someone takes more than the ...

  15. Calcium channel blocker overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002580.htm Calcium channel blocker overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Calcium channel blockers are a type of medicine used ...

  16. Fenoprofen calcium overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002649.htm Fenoprofen calcium overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Fenoprofen calcium is a type of medicine called a nonsteroidal ...

  17. Diospyrin derivative, an anticancer quinonoid, regulates apoptosis at endoplasmic reticulum as well as mitochondria by modulating cytosolic calcium in human breast carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Binod [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Radiation and Cancer Biology Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kumar, Amit [Radiation and Cancer Biology Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Ghosh, Subhalakshmi [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Pandey, Badri N., E-mail: bnp@barc.gov.in [Radiation and Cancer Biology Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Mishra, Kaushala P. [Radiation and Cancer Biology Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Hazra, Banasri, E-mail: banasrihazra@yahoo.co.in [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diospyrin diethylether (D7) caused oxidative stress-dependent activation of PC-PLC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activated PC-PLC induced a sustained-release of Ca{sup 2+} from endoplasmic reticulum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The elevated cytosolic Ca{sup +2} led to the calpain-caspase12 dependent apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer D7-Induced Ca{sup +2} also found to accentuate the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. -- Abstract: Diospyrin diethylether (D7), a bisnaphthoquinonoid derivative, exhibited an oxidative stress-dependent apoptosis in several human cancer cells and tumor models. The present study was aimed at evaluation of the increase in cytosolic calcium [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} leading to the apoptotic cell death triggered by D7 in MCF7 human breast carcinoma cells. A phosphotidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) inhibitor, viz. U73122, and an antioxidant, viz. N-acetylcysteine, could significantly prevent the D7-induced rise in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} and PC-PLC activity. Using an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Ca{sup 2+} mobilizer (thapsigargin) and an ER-IP3R antagonist (heparin), results revealed ER as a major source of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} which led to the activation of calpain and caspase12, and cleavage of fodrin. These effects including apoptosis were significantly inhibited by the pretreatment of Bapta-AM (a cell permeable Ca{sup 2+}-specific chelator), or calpeptin (a calpain inhibitor). Furthermore, D7-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} was found to alter mitochondrial membrane potential and induce cytochrome c release, which was inhibited by either Bapta-AM or ruthenium red (an inhibitor of mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} uniporter). Thus, these results provided a deeper insight into the D7-induced redox signaling which eventually integrated the calcium-dependent calpain/caspase12 activation and mitochondrial alterations to accentuate the induction of apoptotic cell death.

  18. Regulation of physicochemical properties, osteogenesis activity, and fibroblast growth factor-2 release ability of β-tricalcium phosphate for bone cement by calcium silicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Ching-Chuan [Antai Medical Care Cooperation Antai Tian-Sheng Memorial Hospital, Pingtung, Taiwan (China); Kao, Chia-Tze; Hung, Chi-Jr [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yi-Jyun [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Dental Department, Taichung Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Huang, Tsui-Hsien, E-mail: thh@csmu.edu.tw [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Shie, Ming-You, E-mail: eviltacasi@gmail.com [Institute of Oral Science, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2014-04-01

    β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is an osteoconductive material. For this research we have combined it with a low degradation calcium silicate (CS) to enhance its bioactive and osteostimulative properties. To check its effectiveness, a series of β-TCP/CS composites with different ratios were prepared to make new bioactive and biodegradable biocomposites for bone repair. Formation of bone-like apatite, the diametral tensile strength, and weight loss of composites were considered before and after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). In addition, we also examined the effects of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) released from β-TCP/CS composites and in vitro human dental pulp cell (hDPC) and studied its behavior. The results showed that the apatite deposition ability of the β-TCP/CS composites was enhanced as the CS content was increased. For composites with more than 50% CS contents, the samples were completely covered by a dense bone-like apatite layer. At the end of the immersion point, weight losses of 19%, 24%, 33%, 42%, and 51% were observed for the composites containing 0%, 30%, 50%, 70% and 100% β-TCP cements, respectively. In vitro cell experiments show that the CS-rich composites promote human dental pulp cell (hDPC) proliferation and differentiation. However, when the CS quantity in the composite is less than 70%, the amount of cells and osteogenesis protein of hDPCs was stimulated by FGF-2 released from β-TCP/CS composites. The combination of FGF-2 in degradation of β-TCP and osteogenesis of CS gives a strong reason to believe that these calcium-based composite cements may prove to be promising bone repair materials. - Highlights: • CS improved physicochemical properties and osteogenic activity of β-TCP. • The higher the CS in the cement, the shorter the setting time and the higher the DTS. • The cell behavior was stimulated by FGF-2 released from composite containing 50% CS. • β-TCP/CS composite with FGF-2 has optimal properties for

  19. Regulation of physicochemical properties, osteogenesis activity, and fibroblast growth factor-2 release ability of β-tricalcium phosphate for bone cement by calcium silicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is an osteoconductive material. For this research we have combined it with a low degradation calcium silicate (CS) to enhance its bioactive and osteostimulative properties. To check its effectiveness, a series of β-TCP/CS composites with different ratios were prepared to make new bioactive and biodegradable biocomposites for bone repair. Formation of bone-like apatite, the diametral tensile strength, and weight loss of composites were considered before and after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). In addition, we also examined the effects of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) released from β-TCP/CS composites and in vitro human dental pulp cell (hDPC) and studied its behavior. The results showed that the apatite deposition ability of the β-TCP/CS composites was enhanced as the CS content was increased. For composites with more than 50% CS contents, the samples were completely covered by a dense bone-like apatite layer. At the end of the immersion point, weight losses of 19%, 24%, 33%, 42%, and 51% were observed for the composites containing 0%, 30%, 50%, 70% and 100% β-TCP cements, respectively. In vitro cell experiments show that the CS-rich composites promote human dental pulp cell (hDPC) proliferation and differentiation. However, when the CS quantity in the composite is less than 70%, the amount of cells and osteogenesis protein of hDPCs was stimulated by FGF-2 released from β-TCP/CS composites. The combination of FGF-2 in degradation of β-TCP and osteogenesis of CS gives a strong reason to believe that these calcium-based composite cements may prove to be promising bone repair materials. - Highlights: • CS improved physicochemical properties and osteogenic activity of β-TCP. • The higher the CS in the cement, the shorter the setting time and the higher the DTS. • The cell behavior was stimulated by FGF-2 released from composite containing 50% CS. • β-TCP/CS composite with FGF-2 has optimal properties for

  20. Integumentary L-histidine transport in a euryhaline polychaete worm: Regulatory roles of calcium and cadmium in the transport event

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahearn, Heather Rae Hammers; Ahearn, Gregory A.; Gomme, Jørgen

    Epithelial transport, integument, polychaete worm, Nereis succinea, Annelida, transport regulation, calcium, cadmium, heavy metal......Epithelial transport, integument, polychaete worm, Nereis succinea, Annelida, transport regulation, calcium, cadmium, heavy metal...

  1. Calcium and magnesium disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, Jesse P

    2014-07-01

    Hypocalcemia is a clinical disorder that can be life threatening to the cow (milk fever) and predisposes the animal to various other metabolic and infectious disorders. Calcium homeostasis is mediated primarily by parathyroid hormone, which stimulates bone calcium resorption and renal calcium reabsorption. Parathyroid hormone stimulates the production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D to enhance diet calcium absorption. High dietary cation-anion difference interferes with tissue sensitivity to parathyroid hormone. Hypomagnesemia reduces tissue response to parathyroid hormone. PMID:24980727

  2. Design and optimization of photo bioreactor for O2 regulation and control by system dynamics and computer simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dawei; Li, Ming; Zhou, Rui; Sun, Yi

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a valid kinetic model of photo bioreactor (PBR) used for highly-effective cultivation of blue algae, Spirulina platensis, was developed for fully describing the dynamic characteristics of O(2) concentration, then a closed-loop PBR with Linear-Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) servo controller was established and optimized via digital simulation and dynamic response optimization, and the effectiveness of the closed-loop PBR was further tested and accredited by real-time simulation. The result showed that the closed-loop PBR could regulate and control the O(2) concentration in its gas phase according to the reference with desired dynamic response performance, hence microalgae with unique characteristic could be selected as a powerful tool for O(2) regulation and control whenever O(2) concentration in Bioregenerative Life Support System (BLSS) deviates from the nominal level in emergencies, and greatly enhance safety and reliability of BLSS on space and ground missions. PMID:22153599

  3. Calcium-sensitive regulation of monoamine oxidase-A contributes to the production of peroxyradicals in hippocampal cultures: implications for Alzheimer disease-related pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li XinMin

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calcium (Ca2+ has recently been shown to selectively increase the activity of monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A, a mitochondria-bound enzyme that generates peroxyradicals as a natural by-product of the deamination of neurotransmitters such as serotonin. It has also been suggested that increased intracellular free Ca2+ levels as well as MAO-A may be contributing to the oxidative stress associated with Alzheimer disease (AD. Results Incubation with Ca2+ selectively increases MAO-A enzymatic activity in protein extracts from mouse hippocampal HT-22 cell cultures. Treatment of HT-22 cultures with the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 also increases MAO-A activity, whereas overexpression of calbindin-D28K (CB-28K, a Ca2+-binding protein in brain that is greatly reduced in AD, decreases MAO-A activity. The effects of A23187 and CB-28K are both independent of any change in MAO-A protein or gene expression. The toxicity (via production of peroxyradicals and/or chromatin condensation associated with either A23187 or the AD-related β-amyloid peptide, which also increases free intracellular Ca2+, is attenuated by MAO-A inhibition in HT-22 cells as well as in primary hippocampal cultures. Conclusion These data suggest that increases in intracellular Ca2+ availability could contribute to a MAO-A-mediated mechanism with a role in AD-related oxidative stress.

  4. Structural basis for regulation of human calcium-sensing receptor by magnesium ions and an unexpected tryptophan derivative co-agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen; Zhang, Tuo; Zou, Juan; Miller, Cassandra Lynn; Gorkhali, Rakshya; Yang, Jeong-Yeh; Schilmiller, Anthony; Wang, Shuo; Huang, Kenneth; Brown, Edward M; Moremen, Kelley W; Hu, Jian; Yang, Jenny J

    2016-05-01

    Ca(2+)-sensing receptors (CaSRs) modulate calcium and magnesium homeostasis and many (patho)physiological processes by responding to extracellular stimuli, including divalent cations and amino acids. We report the first crystal structure of the extracellular domain (ECD) of human CaSR bound with Mg(2+) and a tryptophan derivative ligand at 2.1 Å. The structure reveals key determinants for cooperative activation by metal ions and aromatic amino acids. The unexpected tryptophan derivative was bound in the hinge region between two globular ECD subdomains, and represents a novel high-affinity co-agonist of CaSR. The dissection of structure-function relations by mutagenesis, biochemical, and functional studies provides insights into the molecular basis of human diseases arising from CaSR mutations. The data also provide a novel paradigm for understanding the mechanism of CaSR-mediated signaling that is likely shared by the other family C GPCR [G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein)-coupled receptor] members and can facilitate the development of novel CaSR-based therapeutics. PMID:27386547

  5. Intracellular calcium levels are differentially regulated in T lymphocytes triggered by anti-CD2 and anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinozzi, F; Agea, E; Bistoni, O; Belia, S; Travetti, A; Gerli, R; Muscat, C; Bertotto, A

    1995-03-01

    Antigen and/or mitogen-driven T-cell activation is mediated by a rise in intracellular free Ca2+, as second messenger. A regulatory key role for this process is represented by membrane-associated [Ca2+/Mg2+] ATP-ase that is mainly devoted to extrusion of intracellular ion excess. In the present study we have investigated the kinetics of CA2+ fluxes in both resting and already activated (Jurkat T-cell line) T lymphocytes after CD3 and CD2 (T11(2) and T11(3)) triggering and focused our attention on plasma membrane [Ca2+/Mg2+] ATP-ase activity. In both resting T cells and Jurkat cell line, the CD2 stimulation was able to determine a rise in intracellular free Ca2+ higher than that observed after CD3 triggering. In addition, this calcium signal was independent of negative feedback control exerted by [Ca2+/Mg2+] ATP-ase, as well as of IP3 generation. Thus the CD2 molecular system may, together with cell-adhesion properties, act as an amplifier of Ca2+ signals that, if delivered in the context of other molecular systems, such as CD3 or MHC class II antigens, are essentially devoted to the polyclonal co-stimulatory recruitment of a larger cellular repertoire. PMID:7662514

  6. The secretory pathway calcium ATPase PMR-1/SPCA1 has essential roles in cell migration during Caenorhabditis elegans embryonic development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vida Praitis

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining levels of calcium in the cytosol is important for many cellular events, including cell migration, where localized regions of high calcium are required to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics, contractility, and adhesion. Studies show inositol-trisphosphate receptors (IP3R and ryanodine receptors (RyR, which release calcium into the cytosol, are important regulators of cell migration. Similarly, proteins that return calcium to secretory stores are likely to be important for cell migration. The secretory protein calcium ATPase (SPCA is a Golgi-localized protein that transports calcium from the cytosol into secretory stores. SPCA has established roles in protein processing, metal homeostasis, and inositol-trisphosphate signaling. Defects in the human SPCA1/ATP2C1 gene cause Hailey-Hailey disease (MIM# 169600, a genodermatosis characterized by cutaneous blisters and fissures as well as keratinocyte cell adhesion defects. We have determined that PMR-1, the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog of SPCA1, plays an essential role in embryogenesis. Pmr-1 strains isolated from genetic screens show terminal phenotypes, such as ventral and anterior enclosure failures, body morphogenesis defects, and an unattached pharynx, which are caused by earlier defects during gastrulation. In Pmr-1 embryos, migration rates are significantly reduced for cells moving along the embryo surface, such as ventral neuroblasts, C-derived, and anterior-most blastomeres. Gene interaction experiments show changing the activity of itr-1/IP3R and unc-68/RyR modulates levels of embryonic lethality in Pmr-1 strains, indicating pmr-1 acts with these calcium channels to regulate cell migration. This analysis reveals novel genes involved in C. elegans cell migration, as well as a new role in cell migration for the highly conserved SPCA gene family.

  7. Calcium en cardioplegie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Meijler, F.L.

    1985-01-01

    Coronary perfusion with a calcium-free solution, followed by reperfusion with a calcium containing solution, may result in acute myocardial cell death and in irreversible loss of the e1ectrical and mechanical activity of the heart. This phenomenon is known as the calcium paradox. A number of cardiop

  8. Robust Takagi-Sugeno Fuzzy Dynamic Regulator for Trajectory Tracking of a Pendulum-Cart System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Llama

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Starting from a nonlinear model for a pendulum-cart system, on which viscous friction is considered, a Takagi-Sugeno (T-S fuzzy augmented model (TSFAM as well as a TSFAM with uncertainty (TSFAMwU is proposed. Since the design of a T-S fuzzy controller is based on the T-S fuzzy model of the nonlinear system, then, to address the trajectory tracking problem of the pendulum-cart system, three T-S fuzzy controllers are proposed via parallel distributed compensation: (1 a T-S fuzzy servo controller (TSFSC designed from the TSFAM; (2 a robust TSFSC (RTSFSC designed from the TSFAMwU; and (3 a robust T-S fuzzy dynamic regulator (RTSFDR designed from the RTSFSC with the addition of a T-S fuzzy observer, which estimates cart and pendulum velocities. Both TSFAM and TSFAMwU are comprised of two fuzzy rules and designed via local approximation in fuzzy partition spaces technique. Feedback gains for the three fuzzy controllers are obtained via linear matrix inequalities approach. A swing-up controller is developed to swing the pendulum up from its pendant position to its upright position. Real-time experiments validate the effectiveness of the proposed schemes, keeping the pendulum in its upright position while the cart follows a reference signal, standing out the RTSFDR.

  9. ETS family transcriptional regulators drive chromatin dynamics and malignancy in squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hanseul; Schramek, Daniel; Adam, Rene C; Keyes, Brice E; Wang, Ping; Zheng, Deyou; Fuchs, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-initiating stem cells (SCs) exhibit distinct patterns of transcription factors and gene expression compared to healthy counterparts. Here, we show that dramatic shifts in large open-chromatin domain (super-enhancer) landscapes underlie these differences and reflect tumor microenvironment. By in vivo super-enhancer and transcriptional profiling, we uncover a dynamic cancer-specific epigenetic network selectively enriched for binding motifs of a transcription factor cohort expressed in squamous cell carcinoma SCs (SCC-SCs). Many of their genes, including Ets2 and Elk3, are themselves regulated by SCC-SC super-enhancers suggesting a cooperative feed-forward loop. Malignant progression requires these genes, whose knockdown severely impairs tumor growth and prohibits progression from benign papillomas to SCCs. ETS2-deficiency disrupts the SCC-SC super-enhancer landscape and downstream cancer genes while ETS2-overactivation in epidermal-SCs induces hyperproliferation and SCC super-enhancer-associated genes Fos, Junb and Klf5. Together, our findings unearth an essential regulatory network required for the SCC-SC chromatin landscape and unveil its importance in malignant progression. PMID:26590320

  10. Enhancement of Transient Stability Limit and Voltage Regulation with Dynamic Loads Using Robust Excitation Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Jahangir; Mahmud, Apel; Roy, Naruttam K.; Pota, Hemanshu R.

    2013-10-01

    In stressed power systems with large induction machine component, there exist undamped electromechanical modes and unstable monotonic voltage modes. This article proposes a sequential design of an excitation controller and a power system stabiliser (PSS) to stabilise the system. The operating region, with induction machines in stressed power systems, is often not captured using a linearisation around an operating point, and to alleviate this situation a robust controller is designed which guarantees stable operation in a large region of operation. A minimax linear quadratic Gaussian design is used for the design of the supplementary control to automatic voltage regulators, and a classical PSS structure is used to damp electromechanical oscillations. The novelty of this work is in proposing a method to capture the unmodelled nonlinear dynamics as uncertainty in the design of the robust controller. Tight bounds on the uncertainty are obtained using this method which enables high-performance controllers. An IEEE benchmark test system has been used to demonstrate the performance of the designed controller.

  11. Angiogenin enhances cell migration by regulating stress fiber assembly and focal adhesion dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saisai Wei

    Full Text Available Angiogenin (ANG acts on both vascular endothelial cells and cancer cells, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. In this study, we carried out a co-immunoprecipitation assay in HeLa cells and identified 14 potential ANG-interacting proteins. Among these proteins, β-actin, α-actinin 4, and non-muscle myosin heavy chain 9 are stress fiber components and involved in cytoskeleton organization and movement, which prompted us to investigate the mechanism of action of ANG in cell migration. Upon confirmation of the interactions between ANG and the three proteins, further studies revealed that ANG co-localized with β-actin and α-actinin 4 at the leading edge of migrating cells. Down-regulation of ANG resulted in fewer but thicker stress fibers with less dynamics, which was associated with the enlargements of focal adhesions. The focal adhesion kinase activity and cell migration capacity were significantly decreased in ANG-deficient cells. Taken together, our data demonstrated that the existence of ANG in the cytoplasm optimizes stress fiber assembly and focal adhesion formation to accommodate cell migration. The finding that ANG promoted cancer cell migration might provide new clues for tumor metastasis research.

  12. Extracellular calcium sensing and extracellular calcium signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, E. M.; MacLeod, R. J.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    , localized changes in Ca(o)(2+) within the ECF can originate from several mechanisms, including fluxes of calcium ions into or out of cellular or extracellular stores or across epithelium that absorb or secrete Ca(2+). In any event, the CaR and other receptors/sensors for Ca(o)(2+) and probably for other extracellular ions represent versatile regulators of numerous cellular functions and may serve as important therapeutic targets.

  13. Abortive and propagating intracellular calcium waves: analysis from a hybrid model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nara Guisoni

    Full Text Available The functional properties of inositol(1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3 receptors allow a variety of intracellular Ca(2+ phenomena. In this way, global phenomena, such as propagating and abortive Ca(2+ waves, as well as local events such as puffs, have been observed. Several experimental studies suggest that many features of global phenomena (e.g., frequency, amplitude, speed wave depend on the interplay of biophysical processes such as diffusion, buffering, efflux and influx rates, which in turn depend on parameters such as buffer concentration, Ca(2+ pump density, cytosolic IP3 level, and intercluster distance. Besides, it is known that cells are able to modify some of these parameters in order to regulate the Ca(2+ signaling. By using a hybrid model, we analyzed different features of the hierarchy of calcium events as a function of two relevant parameters for the calcium signaling, the intercluster distance and the pump strength or intensity. In the space spanned by these two parameters, we found two modes of calcium dynamics, one dominated by abortive calcium waves and the other by propagating waves. Smaller distances between the release sites promote propagating calcium waves, while the increase of the efflux rate makes the transition from propagating to abortive waves occur at lower values of intercluster distance. We determined the frontier between these two modes, in the parameter space defined by the intercluster distance and the pump strength. Furthermore, we found that the velocity of simulated calcium waves accomplishes Luther's law, and that an effective rate constant for autocatalytic calcium production decays linearly with both the intercluster distance and the pump strength.

  14. Cardiac calcium release channel (ryanodine receptor) in control and cardiomyopathic human hearts: mRNA and protein contents are differentially regulated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainte Beuve, C; Allen, P D; Dambrin, G; Rannou, F; Marty, I; Trouvé, P; Bors, V; Pavie, A; Gandgjbakch, I; Charlemagne, D

    1997-04-01

    Abnormal intracellular calcium handling in cardiomyopathic human hearts has been associated with an impaired function of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, but previous reports on the gene expression of the ryanodine receptors (Ry2) are contradictory. We measured the mRNA levels, the protein levels and the number of high affinity [3H]ryanodine binding sites in the left ventricle of non-failing (n = 9) and failing human hearts [idiopathic dilated (IDCM n = 16), ischemic (ICM n = 7) or mixed (MCM n = 8) cardiomyopathies]. Ry2 mRNA levels were significantly reduced in IDCM (-30%) and unchanged in MCM and ICM and Ry2 protein levels were similar. In contrast, we observed a two-fold increase in the number of high affinity Ry2 (B(max) = 0.43 +/- 0.11 v 0.22 +/- 0.13 pmol/mg protein, respectively; P<0.01) and an unchanged K(d). Furthermore, levels of myosin heavy chain mRNA and protein per g of tissue were similar in failing and non-failing hearts, suggesting that the observed differences in Ry2 are not caused by the increase in fibrosis in failing heart. Therefore, the dissociation between the two-fold increase in the number of high affinity ryanodine receptors observed in all failing hearts and the slightly decreased mRNA level or unchanged protein level suggests that the ryanodine binding properties are affected in failing myocardium and that such modifications rather than a change in gene expression alter the channel activity and could contribute to abnormalities in intracellular Ca2+ handling. PMID:9160875

  15. The calcium-dependent protein kinase CPK28 regulates development by inducing growth phase-specific, spatially restricted alterations in jasmonic acid levels independent of defense responses in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matschi, Susanne; Hake, Katharina; Herde, Marco; Hause, Bettina; Romeis, Tina

    2015-03-01

    Phytohormones play an important role in development and stress adaptations in plants, and several interacting hormonal pathways have been suggested to accomplish fine-tuning of stress responses at the expense of growth. This work describes the role played by the CALCIUM-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE CPK28 in balancing phytohormone-mediated development in Arabidopsis thaliana, specifically during generative growth. cpk28 mutants exhibit growth reduction solely as adult plants, coinciding with altered balance of the phytohormones jasmonic acid (JA) and gibberellic acid (GA). JA-dependent gene expression and the levels of several JA metabolites were elevated in a growth phase-dependent manner in cpk28, and accumulation of JA metabolites was confined locally to the central rosette tissue. No elevated resistance toward herbivores or necrotrophic pathogens was detected for cpk28 plants, either on the whole-plant level or specifically within the tissue displaying elevated JA levels. Abolishment of JA biosynthesis or JA signaling led to a full reversion of the cpk28 growth phenotype, while modification of GA signaling did not. Our data identify CPK28 as a growth phase-dependent key negative regulator of distinct processes: While in seedlings, CPK28 regulates reactive oxygen species-mediated defense signaling; in adult plants, CPK28 confers developmental processes by the tissue-specific balance of JA and GA without affecting JA-mediated defense responses. PMID:25736059

  16. Molecular structure and pathophysiological roles of the Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammucari, Cristina; Raffaello, Anna; Vecellio Reane, Denis; Rizzuto, Rosario

    2016-10-01

    Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake regulates a wide array of cell functions, from stimulation of aerobic metabolism and ATP production in physiological settings, to induction of cell death in pathological conditions. The molecular identity of the Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter (MCU), the highly selective channel responsible for Ca(2+) entry through the IMM, has been described less than five years ago. Since then, research has been conducted to clarify the modulation of its activity, which relies on the dynamic interaction with regulatory proteins, and its contribution to the pathophysiology of organs and tissues. Particular attention has been placed on characterizing the role of MCU in cardiac and skeletal muscles. In this review we summarize the molecular structure and regulation of the MCU complex in addition to its pathophysiological role, with particular attention to striated muscle tissues. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Channels edited by Pierre Sonveaux, Pierre Maechler and Jean-Claude Martinou. PMID:26968367

  17. A coarse-grained model to study calcium activation of the cardiac thin filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Schwartz, Steven

    2015-03-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is one of the most common heart disease caused by genetic mutations. Cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation involve regulation of crossbridge binding to the cardiac thin filament, which regulates actomyosin interactions through calcium-dependent alterations in the dynamics of cardiac troponin (cTn) and tropomyosin (Tm). An atomistic model of cTn complex interacting with Tm has been studied by our group. A more realistic model requires the inclusion of the dynamics of actin filament, which is almost 6 times larger than cTn and Tm in terms of atom numbers, and extensive sampling of the model becomes very resource-demanding. By using physics-based protein united-residue force field, we introduce a coarse-grained model to study the calcium activation of the thin filament resulting from cTn's allosteric regulation of Tm dynamics on actin. The time scale is much longer than that of all-atom molecular dynamics simulation because of the reduction of the degrees of freedom. The coarse-grained model is a good template for studying cardiac thin filament mutations that cause FHC, and reduces the cost of computational resources.

  18. Development of a method based on inductively coupled plasma-dynamic reaction cell-mass spectrometry for the simultaneous determination of phosphorus, calcium and strontium in bone and dental tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Muynck, David [Ghent University, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Krijgslaan 281-S12, BE-9000 Ghent (Belgium)], E-mail: David.DeMuynck@UGent.be; Vanhaecke, Frank [Ghent University, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Krijgslaan 281-S12, BE-9000 Ghent (Belgium)], E-mail: Frank.Vanhaecke@UGent.be

    2009-05-15

    A method, based on the use of a quadrupole-based inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry instrument equipped with a quadrupole-based collision/reaction cell (dynamic reaction cell, DRC), was developed for the simultaneous determination of phosphorus, calcium and strontium in bone and dental (enamel and dentine) tissue. The use of NH{sub 3}, introduced at a gas flow rate of 0.8 mL min{sup -1} in the dynamic reaction cell, combined with a rejection parameter q (RPq) setting of 0.65, allows interference-free determination of calcium via its low-abundant isotopes {sup 42}Ca, {sup 43}Ca and {sup 44}Ca, and of strontium via its isotopes {sup 86}Sr and {sup 88}Sr that are freed from overlap due to the occurrence of ArCa{sup +} and/or Ca{sub 2}{sup +} ions. Also the determination of phosphorus ({sup 31}P, mono-isotopic) was shown to be achievable using the same dynamic reaction cell operating conditions. The bone certified reference materials NIST SRM 1400 Bone Ash and NIST SRM 1486 Bone Meal were used for validation of the measurement protocol that was shown capable of providing accurate and reproducible results. Detection limits of P, Ca and Sr in dental tissue digests were established as 3 {mu}g L{sup -1} for P, 2 {mu}g L{sup -1} for Ca and 0.2 {mu}g L{sup -1} for Sr. This method can be used to simultaneously (i) evaluate the impact of diagenesis on the elemental and isotopic composition of buried skeletal tissue via its Ca/P ratio and (ii) determine its Sr concentration. The measurement protocol was demonstrated as fit-for-purpose by the analysis of a set of teeth of archaeological interest for their Ca/P ratio and Sr concentration.

  19. Development of a method based on inductively coupled plasma-dynamic reaction cell-mass spectrometry for the simultaneous determination of phosphorus, calcium and strontium in bone and dental tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Muynck, David; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2009-05-01

    A method, based on the use of a quadrupole-based inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry instrument equipped with a quadrupole-based collision/reaction cell (dynamic reaction cell, DRC), was developed for the simultaneous determination of phosphorus, calcium and strontium in bone and dental (enamel and dentine) tissue. The use of NH 3, introduced at a gas flow rate of 0.8 mL min - 1 in the dynamic reaction cell, combined with a rejection parameter q (RPq) setting of 0.65, allows interference-free determination of calcium via its low-abundant isotopes 42Ca, 43Ca and 44Ca, and of strontium via its isotopes 86Sr and 88Sr that are freed from overlap due to the occurrence of ArCa + and/or Ca 2+ ions. Also the determination of phosphorus ( 31P, mono-isotopic) was shown to be achievable using the same dynamic reaction cell operating conditions. The bone certified reference materials NIST SRM 1400 Bone Ash and NIST SRM 1486 Bone Meal were used for validation of the measurement protocol that was shown capable of providing accurate and reproducible results. Detection limits of P, Ca and Sr in dental tissue digests were established as 3 µg L - 1 for P, 2 µg L - 1 for Ca and 0.2 µg L - 1 for Sr. This method can be used to simultaneously (i) evaluate the impact of diagenesis on the elemental and isotopic composition of buried skeletal tissue via its Ca/P ratio and (ii) determine its Sr concentration. The measurement protocol was demonstrated as fit-for-purpose by the analysis of a set of teeth of archaeological interest for their Ca/P ratio and Sr concentration.

  20. Development of a method based on inductively coupled plasma-dynamic reaction cell-mass spectrometry for the simultaneous determination of phosphorus, calcium and strontium in bone and dental tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method, based on the use of a quadrupole-based inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry instrument equipped with a quadrupole-based collision/reaction cell (dynamic reaction cell, DRC), was developed for the simultaneous determination of phosphorus, calcium and strontium in bone and dental (enamel and dentine) tissue. The use of NH3, introduced at a gas flow rate of 0.8 mL min-1 in the dynamic reaction cell, combined with a rejection parameter q (RPq) setting of 0.65, allows interference-free determination of calcium via its low-abundant isotopes 42Ca, 43Ca and 44Ca, and of strontium via its isotopes 86Sr and 88Sr that are freed from overlap due to the occurrence of ArCa+ and/or Ca2+ ions. Also the determination of phosphorus (31P, mono-isotopic) was shown to be achievable using the same dynamic reaction cell operating conditions. The bone certified reference materials NIST SRM 1400 Bone Ash and NIST SRM 1486 Bone Meal were used for validation of the measurement protocol that was shown capable of providing accurate and reproducible results. Detection limits of P, Ca and Sr in dental tissue digests were established as 3 μg L-1 for P, 2 μg L-1 for Ca and 0.2 μg L-1 for Sr. This method can be used to simultaneously (i) evaluate the impact of diagenesis on the elemental and isotopic composition of buried skeletal tissue via its Ca/P ratio and (ii) determine its Sr concentration. The measurement protocol was demonstrated as fit-for-purpose by the analysis of a set of teeth of archaeological interest for their Ca/P ratio and Sr concentration.

  1. Interaction between Calcium and Actin in Guard Cell and Pollen Signaling Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hua Chen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Calcium (Ca2+ plays important roles in plant growth, development, and signal transduction. It is a vital nutrient for plant physical design, such as cell wall and membrane, and also serves as a counter-cation for biochemical, inorganic, and organic anions, and more particularly, its concentration change in cytosol is a ubiquitous second messenger in plant physiological signaling in responses to developmental and environmental stimuli. Actin cytoskeleton is well known for its importance in cellular architecture maintenance and its significance in cytoplasmic streaming and cell division. In plant cell system, the actin dynamics is a process of polymerization and de-polymerization of globular actin and filamentous actin and that acts as an active regulator for calcium signaling by controlling calcium evoked physiological responses. The elucidation of the interaction between calcium and actin dynamics will be helpful for further investigation of plant cell signaling networks at molecular level. This review mainly focuses on the recent advances in understanding the interaction between the two aforementioned signaling components in two well-established model systems of plant, guard cell, and pollen.

  2. Finite Volume Model to Study Calcium Diffusion in Neuron Involving JRYR, JSERCA and JLEAK

    OpenAIRE

    tripathi, Amrita; Adlakha, Neeru

    2013-01-01

    Calcium dynamics is the highly responsible for intracellular electrical (action potential) and chemical (neurotransmitter) signaling in neuron cell. The Mathematical modeling of calcium dynamics in neurons lead to the reaction diffusion equation which involves the parameters like diffusion coefficient, free calcium, bound calcium, buffers and bound buffer. Here the parameters like receptors, serca and leak are also incorporated in the model. Appropriate boundary conditions have been framed ba...

  3. Quantitative transcription dynamic analysis reveals candidate genes and key regulators for ethanol tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Menggen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Derived from our lignocellulosic conversion inhibitor-tolerant yeast, we generated an ethanol-tolerant strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae NRRL Y-50316 by enforced evolutionary adaptation. Using a newly developed robust mRNA reference and a master equation unifying gene expression data analyses, we investigated comparative quantitative transcription dynamics of 175 genes selected from previous studies for an ethanol-tolerant yeast and its closely related parental strain. Results A highly fitted master equation was established and applied for quantitative gene expression analyses using pathway-based qRT-PCR array assays. The ethanol-tolerant Y-50316 displayed significantly enriched background of mRNA abundance for at least 35 genes without ethanol challenge compared with its parental strain Y-50049. Under the ethanol challenge, the tolerant Y-50316 responded in consistent expressions over time for numerous genes belonging to groups of heat shock proteins, trehalose metabolism, glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, fatty acid metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, pleiotropic drug resistance gene family and transcription factors. The parental strain showed repressed expressions for many genes and was unable to withstand the ethanol stress and establish a viable culture and fermentation. The distinct expression dynamics between the two strains and their close association with cell growth, viability and ethanol fermentation profiles distinguished the tolerance-response from the stress-response in yeast under the ethanol challenge. At least 82 genes were identified as candidate and key genes for ethanol-tolerance and subsequent fermentation under the stress. Among which, 36 genes were newly recognized by the present study. Most of the ethanol-tolerance candidate genes were found to share protein binding motifs of transcription factors Msn4p/Msn2p, Yap1p, Hsf1p and Pdr1p/Pdr3p. Conclusion Enriched background of transcription abundance

  4. Glial calcium signaling in physiology and pathophysioilogy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexei VERKHRASKY

    2006-01-01

    Neuronal-glial circuits underlie integrative processes in the nervous system.Function of glial syncytium is,to a very large extent,regulated by the intracellular calcium signaling system.Glial calcium signals are triggered by activation of multiple receptors,expressed in glial membrane,which regulate both Ca2+ entry and Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum.The endoplasmic reticulum also endows glial cells with intracellular excitable media,which is able to produce and maintain long-ranging signaling in a form of propagating Ca2+ waves.In pathological conditions,calcium signals regulate glial response to injury,which might have both protective and detrimental effects on the nervous tissue.

  5. Calcium signals and calcium channels in osteoblastic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, R. L.; Akanbi, K. A.; Farach-Carson, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) channels are present in non-excitable as well as in excitable cells. In bone cells of the osteoblast lineage, Ca2+ channels play fundamental roles in cellular responses to external stimuli including both mechanical forces and hormonal signals. They are also proposed to modulate paracrine signaling between bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts at local sites of bone remodeling. Calcium signals are characterized by transient increases in intracellular Ca2+ levels that are associated with activation of intracellular signaling pathways that control cell behavior and phenotype, including patterns of gene expression. Development of Ca2+ signals is a tightly regulated cellular process that involves the concerted actions of plasma membrane and intracellular Ca2+ channels, along with Ca2+ pumps and exchangers. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge concerning the structure, function, and role of Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ signals in bone cells, focusing on the osteoblast.

  6. Effects of vestibular nerve transection on the calcium incorporation of fish otoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anken, Ralf H.; Edelmann, Elke; Rahmann, Hinrich

    2001-08-01

    Previous investigations revealed that the growth of fish inner ear otoliths (otolith size and calcium-incorporation) depends on the amplitude and the direction of gravity, suggesting the existence of a (negative) feedback mechanism. In search for the regulating unit, the vestibular nerve was transected unilaterally in neonate swordtail fish ( Xiphophorus helleri) which were subsequently incubated in the calcium-tracer alizarin-complexone. Calcium incorporation ceased on the transected head sides, indicating that calcium uptake is neurally regulated.

  7. Apamin-Sensitive Small Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels were Negatively Regulated by Captopril in Volume-Overload Heart Failure Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongyuan, Bai; Xin, Dong; Jingwen, Zhang; Li, Gao; Yajuan, Ni

    2016-08-01

    In heart failure (HF), the malignant arrhythmias occur frequently; a study demonstrated that upregulation of I KAS resulted in recurrent spontaneous ventricular fibrillation in HF. However, the regulation of SK channels was poorly understood. The activation of SK channels depended on [Ca(2+)]i and PP2A; studies suggested that angiotensin II can regulate them. So, we hypothesized that in HF, the excess of angiotensin may regulate the SK channels and result in the remodeling of SK channels. To test the hypothesis, we used volume-overload-induced HF rat model, treated with captopril, performed whole-cell patch clamp to record apamin-sensitive currents (I KAS), and I-V curve was studied. The sensitivity of I KAS to [Ca(2+)]i was also explored by setting various [Ca(2+)]i (10, 100, 500, 900, 1000, and 10,000 nM), and the steady-state Ca(2+) response of I KAS was attained and performed Hill fitting with the equation (y = 1/[1 + (EC50/x) (n) ]). Immunofluorescent staining, real-time PCR, Western blot were also carried out to furtherly investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms of the regulation. Captopril significantly decreased the mean density of I KAS when [Ca(2+)]i was 500, 900, 1000, and 10000 nM. The Hill fitting showed significantly different EC50 values and the Hill coefficients and showed captopril significantly shifted rightward the steady-state Ca(2+) response of I KAS. The results of real-time PCR and Western blot demonstrated captopril decreased the mRNA and protein expression of SK3 channels. Captopril significantly downregulated the sensitivity of SK channels to [Ca(2+)]i and the SK3 channels expression in HF, and reversed the SK channels remodeling. PMID:26924798

  8. DMPD: Receptor tyrosine kinases and the regulation of macrophage activation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14726496 Receptor tyrosine kinases and the regulation of macrophage activation. Cor...(.csml) Show Receptor tyrosine kinases and the regulation of macrophage activation. PubmedID 14726496 Title Receptor tyrosine kinases

  9. CCN3 and calcium signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chang Long

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The CCN family of genes consists presently of six members in human (CCN1-6 also known as Cyr61 (Cystein rich 61, CTGF (Connective Tissue Growth Factor, NOV (Nephroblastoma Overexpressed gene, WISP-1, 2 and 3 (Wnt-1 Induced Secreted Proteins. Results obtained over the past decade have indicated that CCN proteins are matricellular proteins, which are involved in the regulation of various cellular functions, such as proliferation, differentiation, survival, adhesion and migration. The CCN proteins have recently emerged as regulatory factors involved in both internal and external cell signaling. CCN3 was reported to physically interact with fibulin-1C, integrins, Notch and S100A4. Considering that, the conformation and biological activity of these proteins are dependent upon calcium binding, we hypothesized that CCN3 might be involved in signaling pathways mediated by calcium ions. In this article, we review the data showing that CCN3 regulates the levels of intracellular calcium and discuss potential models that may account for the biological effects of CCN3.

  10. Dynamic Trk and G Protein Signalings Regulate Dopaminergic Neurodifferentiation in Human Trophoblast Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tony Tung-Yin; Tsai, Cheng-Fang; Chen, Hung-Sheng; Lai, Feng-Jie; Yokoyama, Kazunari K.; Hsieh, Tsung-Hsun; Wu, Ruey-Meei; Lee, Jau-nan

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms in the generation of neural stem cells from pluripotent stem cells is a fundamental step towards successful management of neurodegenerative diseases in translational medicine. Albeit all-trans retinoic acid (RA) has been associated with axon outgrowth and nerve regeneration, the maintenance of differentiated neurons, the association with degenerative disease like Parkinson's disease, and its regulatory molecular mechanism from pluripotent stem cells to neural stem cells remain fragmented. We have previously reported that RA is capable of differentiation of human trophoblast stem cells to dopamine (DA) committed progenitor cells. Intracranial implantation of such neural progenitor cells into the 6-OHDA-lesioned substantia nigra pars compacta successfully regenerates dopaminergic neurons and integrity of the nigrostriatal pathway, ameliorating the behavioral deficits in the Parkinson’s disease rat model. Here, we demonstrated a dynamic molecular network in systematic analysis by addressing spatiotemporal molecular expression, intracellular protein-protein interaction and inhibition, imaging study, and genetic expression to explore the regulatory mechanisms of RA induction in the differentiation of human trophoblast stem cells to DA committed progenitor cells. We focused on the tyrosine receptor kinase (Trk), G proteins, canonical Wnt2B/β-catenin, genomic and non-genomic RA signaling transductions with Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene expression as the differentiation endpoint. We found that at the early stage, integration of TrkA and G protein signalings aims for axonogenesis and morphogenesis, involving the novel RXRα/Gαq/11 and RARβ/Gβ signaling pathways. While at the later stage, five distinct signaling pathways together with epigenetic histone modifications emerged to regulate expression of TH, a precursor of dopamine. RA induction generated DA committed progenitor cells in one day. Our results provided substantial mechanistic

  11. Effect of dietary calcium and phosphorus on intestinal calcium absorption and vitamin D metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To understand better dietary regulation of intestinal calcium absorption, a quantitative assessment of the metabolites in plasma and duodenum of rats given daily doses of radioactive vitamin D3 and diets differing in calcium and phosphorus content was made. All known vitamin D metabolites were ultimately identified by high-pressure liquid chromatography. In addition to the known metabolites (25-hydroxyvitamin D3, 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, 25,26-dihydroxyvitamin D3, and 1,24,25-trihydroxyvitamin D3), several new and unidentified metabolites were found. In addition to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and 1,24,25-trihydroxyvitamin D3, the levels of some of the unknown metabolites could be correlated with intestinal calcium transport. However, whether or not any of these metabolites plays a role in the stimulation of intestinal calcium absorption by low dietary calcium or low dietary phosphorus remains unknown

  12. Enhanced expression of extracellular calcium sensing receptor in monocyte-differentiated versus undifferentiated HL-60 cells: potential role in regulation of a nonselective cation channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Ye, C.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Sanders, J. L.; Vassilev, P. M.; Brown, E. M.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Human promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL-60) have been used widely as a model for studying the differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells in vitro. After treatment with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) [1,25(OH)(2)D(3)], HL-60 cells differentiate into cells with the phenotype of monocytes/macrophages. We previously showed that peripheral blood monocytes and the murine J774 monocytic cell line express the CaR, and myeloid progenitors in the bone marrow and myeloid cells in peripheral blood other than monocytes express lower levels of the CaR. Therefore, we investigated whether undifferentiated HL-60 cells express a functional G protein-coupled, extracellular calcium (Ca(2+)(o))-sensing receptor (CaR) and if the expression of the CaR increases as these cells differentiate along the monocytic lineage. The use of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with CaR-specific primers, followed by sequencing of the amplified products, identified an authentic CaR transcript in undifferentiated HL-60 cells. Both immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis using a CaR-specific antiserum detected low levels of CaR protein expression in undifferentiated HL-60 cells. The levels of CaR protein increased considerably following treatment of the cells with PMA (50 nM) or 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) (100 nM) for 5 days. Northern analysis using a CaR-specific riboprobe identified CaR transcripts in undifferentiated HL-60 cells, but CaR mRNA levels did not change appreciably after treatment with either agent, suggesting that upregulation of CaR protein occurs at a translational level. PMA-treated HL-60 cells expressed a nonselective cation channel (NCC), and the calcimimetic CaR activator, NPS R-467, but not its less active stereoisomer, NPS S-467, as well as the polycationic CaR agonist, neomycin, activated this NCC, demonstrating that the CaR expressed in these cells is functionally active. Therefore, HL-60 cells exhibit an increase in Ca

  13. Transgenic plants with increased calcium stores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Sarah (Inventor); Tsou, Pei-Lan (Inventor); Robertson, Dominique (Inventor); Boss, Wendy (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention provides transgenic plants over-expressing a transgene encoding a calcium-binding protein or peptide (CaBP). Preferably, the CaBP is a calcium storage protein and over-expression thereof does not have undue adverse effects on calcium homeostasis or biochemical pathways that are regulated by calcium. In preferred embodiments, the CaBP is calreticulin (CRT) or calsequestrin. In more preferred embodiments, the CaBP is the C-domain of CRT, a fragment of the C-domain, or multimers of the foregoing. In other preferred embodiments, the CaBP is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum by operatively associating the transgene encoding the CaBP with an endoplasmic reticulum localization peptide. Alternatively, the CaBP is targeted to any other sub-cellular compartment that permits the calcium to be stored in a form that is biologically available to the plant. Also provided are methods of producing plants with desirable phenotypic traits by transformation of the plant with a transgene encoding a CaBP. Such phenotypic traits include increased calcium storage, enhanced resistance to calcium-limiting conditions, enhanced growth and viability, increased disease and stress resistance, enhanced flower and fruit production, reduced senescence, and a decreased need for fertilizer production. Further provided are plants with enhanced nutritional value as human food or animal feed.

  14. Mitochondrial dynamics, quality control and miRNA regulation in skeletal muscle: implications for obesity and related metabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlmans, Dennis; Houzelle, Alexandre; Schrauwen, Patrick; Hoeks, Joris

    2016-06-01

    The western dietary habits and sedentary lifestyle largely contributes to the growing epidemic of obesity. Mitochondria are at the front line of cellular energy homoeostasis and are implicated in the pathophysiology of obesity and obesity-related metabolic disease. In recent years, novel aspects in the regulation of mitochondrial metabolism, such as mitochondrial dynamics, mitochondrial protein quality control and post-transcriptional regulation of genes coding for mitochondrial proteins, have emerged. In this review, we discuss the recent findings concerning the dysregulation of these processes in skeletal muscle in obesogenic conditions. PMID:27129097

  15. DMPD: Regulation of mitochondrial antiviral signaling pathways. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18549796 Regulation of mitochondrial antiviral signaling pathways. Moore CB, Ting J...P. Immunity. 2008 Jun;28(6):735-9. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Regulation of mitochondrial antiviral ...signaling pathways. PubmedID 18549796 Title Regulation of mitochondrial antiviral signaling pathways. Author

  16. DMPD: New insights into the regulation of TLR signaling. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16698941 New insights into the regulation of TLR signaling. Miggin SM, O'Neill LA. ...J Leukoc Biol. 2006 Aug;80(2):220-6. Epub 2006 May 12. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show New insights into ...the regulation of TLR signaling. PubmedID 16698941 Title New insights into the regulation of TLR signaling.

  17. DMPD: New insights into NF-kappaB regulation and function. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18775672 New insights into NF-kappaB regulation and function. Sun SC, Ley SC. Trend...s Immunol. 2008 Oct;29(10):469-78. Epub 2008 Sep 3. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show New insights into NF-...kappaB regulation and function. PubmedID 18775672 Title New insights into NF-kappaB regulation and function.

  18. DMPD: Regulation of endogenous apolipoprotein E secretion by macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18388328 Regulation of endogenous apolipoprotein E secretion by macrophages. Kockx ...svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Regulation of endogenous apolipoprotein E secretion by macrophages. PubmedID 18388...328 Title Regulation of endogenous apolipoprotein E secretion by macrophages. Aut

  19. DMPD: Innate immune responses: crosstalk of signaling and regulation of genetranscription. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16753195 Innate immune responses: crosstalk of signaling and regulation of genetran...l) (.csml) Show Innate immune responses: crosstalk of signaling and regulation of genetranscription. PubmedI...D 16753195 Title Innate immune responses: crosstalk of signaling and regulation o

  20. DMPD: The SAP family of adaptors in immune regulation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15541655 The SAP family of adaptors in immune regulation. Latour S, Veillette A. Se...min Immunol. 2004 Dec;16(6):409-19. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show The SAP family of adaptors in immune ...regulation. PubmedID 15541655 Title The SAP family of adaptors in immune regulation. Authors Latour S, Veill