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Sample records for calcium binding protein

  1. ALG-2, a multifunctional calcium binding protein?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarabykina, Svetlana; Mollerup, Jens; Winding Gojkovic, P.;

    2004-01-01

    ALG-2 was originally discovered as a pro-apoptotic protein in a genetic screen. Due to its ability to bind calcium with high affinity it was postulated to provide a link between the known effect of calcium in programmed cell death and the molecular death execution machinery. This review article...

  2. Antibodies against the calcium-binding protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plant microsomes contain a protein clearly related to a calcium-binding protein, calsequestrin, originally found in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle cells, responsible for the rapid release and uptake of Ca2+ within the cells. The location and role of calsequestrin in plant cells is unknown. To generate monoclonal antibodies specific to plant calsequestrin, mice were immunized with a microsomal fraction from cultured cells of Streptanthus tortuosus (Brassicaceae). Two clones cross-reacted with one protein band with a molecular weight equal to that of calsequestrin (57 kilodaltons) by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. This band is able to bind 45Ca2+ and can be recognized by a polyclonal antibody against the canine cardiac muscle calsequestrin. Rabbit skeletal muscle calsequestrin cross-reacted with the plant monoclonal antibodies. The plant monoclonal antibodies generated here are specific to calsequestrin protein

  3. Calcium binding protein-mediated regulation of voltage-gated calcium channels linked to human diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nasrin NFJATBAKHSH; Zhong-ping FENG

    2011-01-01

    Calcium ion entry through voltage-gated calcium channels is essential for cellular signalling in a wide variety of cells and multiple physiological processes. Perturbations of voltage-gated calcium channel function can lead to pathophysiological consequences. Calcium binding proteins serve as calcium sensors and regulate the calcium channel properties via feedback mechanisms. This review highlights the current evidences of calcium binding protein-mediated channel regulation in human diseases.

  4. The Effect of Calcium on the Binding of Calmodulin to Calcium/Calmodulin Protein Kinase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, Angela R.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a follow-up laboratory experiment demonstrating the formation change when calcium binds to calmodulin. This conformation change allows this complex to bind to a target protein. Presents the necessary information to conduct the experiment and discusses the results. (YDS)

  5. Calcium-binding ability of soy protein hydrolysates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Lan Bao; Mei Song; Jing Zhang; Yang Chen; Shun Tang Guo

    2007-01-01

    This present study investigated the ability of various soy protein hydrolysates (SPHs) in binding calcium. It was demonstrated that the amount of Ca-bound depended greatly on the SPHs obtained using different proteases, which included: neutrase,flavourzyme, protease M and pepsin. The maximum level of Ca-bound (66.9 mg/g) occurred when protease M was used to hydrolyze soy protein. Peptide fragments exhibiting high Ca-binding capacity had molecular weights of either 14.4 or 8-9 kDa. The level of Ca-bound increased linearly with the increment of carboxyl content in SPHs, and further deamidation on SPHs from protease M improved Ca-binding of the hydrolysate.

  6. Identification of CP12 as a Novel Calcium-Binding Protein in Chloroplasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostinho Gomes Rocha

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Calcium plays an important role in the regulation of several chloroplast processes. However, very little is still understood about the calcium fluxes or calcium-binding proteins present in plastids. Indeed, classical EF-hand containing calcium-binding proteins appears to be mostly absent from plastids. In the present study we analyzed the stroma fraction of Arabidopsis chloroplasts for the presence of novel calcium-binding proteins using 2D-PAGE separation followed by calcium overlay assay. A small acidic protein was identified by mass spectrometry analyses as the chloroplast protein CP12 and the ability of CP12 to bind calcium was confirmed with recombinant proteins. CP12 plays an important role in the regulation of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham Cycle participating in the assembly of a supramolecular complex between phosphoribulokinase and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, indicating that calcium signaling could play a role in regulating carbon fixation.

  7. Mycobacterial PE_PGRS Proteins Contain Calcium-Binding Motifs with Parallel β-roll Folds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nandita; Bachhawat; Balvinder; Singh

    2007-01-01

    The PE_PGRS family of proteins unique to mycobacteria is demonstrated to con- rain multiple calcium-binding and glycine-rich sequence motifs GGXGXD/NXUX. This sequence repeat constitutes a calcium-binding parallel/3-roll or parallel β-helix structure and is found in RTX toxins secreted by many Gram-negative bacteria. It is predicted that the highly homologous PE_PGRS proteins containing multiple copies of the nona-peptide motif could fold into similar calcium-binding structures. The implication of the predicted calcium-binding property of PE_PGRS proteins in the Ught of macrophage-pathogen interaction and pathogenesis is presented.

  8. Aging-related changes in calcium binding proteins in rat perirhinal cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Moyer, James R.; Furtak, Sharon C.; McGann, John P.; Brown, Thomas H.

    2009-01-01

    Dysregulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis has been linked to neuropathological symptoms observed in aging and age-related disease. Alterations in the distribution and relative frequency of calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs), which are important in regulating intracellular calcium levels, may contribute to disruption of calcium homeostasis. Here we examined the laminar distribution of three CaBPs in rat perirhinal cortex (PR) as a function of aging. Calbindin-D28k (CB), parvalbumin (PV)...

  9. Annexins V and VI: major calcium-dependent atrial secretory granule-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubell, A F; Bester, A J; Thibault, G

    1991-11-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide is stored by atrial myocytes in secretory granules, known as atrial specific granules, and is released from these granules by exocytosis. We have isolated a group of atrial proteins by affinity chromatography that bind to atrial specific granules in a calcium-dependent manner. The two major proteins isolated (32.5 kd and 67 kd) are calcium-binding proteins and have been identified as annexins V and VI by immunoblotting with specific antisera. The calcium dependence of their binding to atrial specific granules has been characterized in vitro and indicates that this interaction takes place at micromolar levels of calcium. In addition, the group of proteins isolated includes another calcium-binding protein of 20 kd, as well as GTP-binding proteins of 22 to 26 kd. Membrane interactions during exocytosis are presumably mediated by the interaction of specific proteins with the granule membrane. The properties of the proteins described here, and their ability to bind to atrial specific granules in a calcium-dependent manner, make them likely candidates in the search for regulatory proteins mediating atrial natriuretic peptide secretion. PMID:1834552

  10. Neutrophils and the calcium-binding protein MRP-14 mediate carrageenan-induced antinociception in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana L. Pagano

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: We have previously shown that the calcium-binding protein MRP-14 secreted by neutrophils mediates the antinociceptive response in an acute inflammatory model induced by the intraperitoneal injection of glycogen in mice.

  11. Calmodulin-binding domains in Alzheimer's disease proteins: extending the calcium hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, Danton H; Myre, Michael A

    2004-08-01

    The calcium hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) invokes the disruption of calcium signaling as the underlying cause of neuronal dysfunction and ultimately apoptosis. As a primary calcium signal transducer, calmodulin (CaM) responds to cytosolic calcium fluxes by binding to and regulating the activity of target CaM-binding proteins (CaMBPs). Ca(2+)-dependent CaMBPs primarily contain domains (CaMBDs) that can be classified into motifs based upon variations on the basic amphiphilic alpha-helix domain involving conserved hydrophobic residues at positions 1-10, 1-14 or 1-16. In contrast, an IQ or IQ-like domain often mediates Ca(2+)-independent CaM-binding. Based on these attributes, a search for CaMBDs reveals that many of the proteins intimately linked to AD may be calmodulin-binding proteins, opening new avenues for research on this devastating disease. PMID:15249195

  12. Evolution and functional diversity of the Calcium Binding Proteins (CaBPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee P Haynes

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian central nervous system (CNS exhibits a remarkable ability to process, store and transfer information. Key to these activities is the use of highly regulated and unique patterns of calcium signals encoded by calcium channels and decoded by families of specific calcium-sensing proteins. The largest family of eukaryotic calcium sensors are those related to the small EF-hand containing protein calmodulin (CaM. In order to maximise the usefulness of calcium as a signalling species and to permit the evolution and fine tuning of the mammalian CNS, families of related proteins have arisen that exhibit characteristic calcium binding properties and tissue-, cellular- and sub-cellular distribution profiles. The Calcium Binding Proteins (CaBPs represent one such family of vertebrate specific calmodulin like proteins that have emerged in recent years as important regulators of essential neuronal target proteins. Bioinformatic analyses indicate that the CaBPs consist of two subfamilies and that the ancestral members of these are CaBP1 and CaBP8. The CaBPs have distinct intracellular localisations based on different targeting mechanisms including a novel type-II transmembrane domain in CaBPs 7 and 8. Recent work has led to the identification of new target interactions and possible functions for the CaBPs suggesting that they have multiple physiological roles with relevance for the normal functioning of the CNS.

  13. Calcium ion binding properties and the effect of phosphorylation on the intrinsically disordered Starmaker protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtas, Magdalena; Hołubowicz, Rafał; Poznar, Monika; Maciejewska, Marta; Ożyhar, Andrzej; Dobryszycki, Piotr

    2015-10-27

    Starmaker (Stm) is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) involved in otolith biomineralization in Danio rerio. Stm controls calcium carbonate crystal formation in vivo and in vitro. Phosphorylation of Stm affects its biomineralization properties. This study examined the effects of calcium ions and phosphorylation on the structure of Stm. We have shown that CK2 kinase phosphorylates 25 or 26 residues in Stm. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that Stm's affinity for calcium binding is dependent on its phosphorylation state. Phosphorylated Stm (StmP) has an estimated 30 ± 1 calcium binding sites per protein molecule with a dissociation constant (KD) of 61 ± 4 μM, while the unphosphorylated protein has 28 ± 3 sites and a KD of 210 ± 22 μM. Calcium ion binding induces a compaction of the Stm molecule, causing a significant decrease in its hydrodynamic radius and the formation of a secondary structure. The screening effect of Na(+) ions on calcium binding was also observed. Analysis of the hydrodynamic properties of Stm and StmP showed that Stm and StmP molecules adopt the structure of native coil-like proteins. PMID:26445027

  14. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic study of calcium-binding protein 5 from Entamoeba histolytica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium-binding protein 5 from E. histolytica was cloned, expressed in E. coli and purified. The purified protein crystallized in space group C222 and the crystals diffracted to 2 Å resolution. Entamoeba histolytica is the causative agent of human amoebiasis. Phagocytosis is the major route of food intake by this parasite and is responsible for its virulence. Calcium and calcium-binding proteins play major roles in its phagocytosis. Calcium-binding protein 5 from E. histolytica (EhCaBP5) is a cytoplasmic protein; its expression is very sensitive to serum starvation and it seems to be involved in binding to myosin I. In this study, EhCaBP5 was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using affinity and size-exclusion chromatography. The purified protein crystallized in space group C222 and the crystals diffracted to 2 Å resolution. The Matthews coefficient indicated the presence of one molecule in the asymmetric unit, with a VM of 2.35 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 47.7%

  15. Mechanism of Fluorescence and Conformational Changes of the Sarcoplasmic Calcium Binding Protein of the Sand Worm Nereis diversicolor upon Ca2+ or Mg2+ Binding

    OpenAIRE

    Sillen, Alain; Verheyden, Stefan; Delfosse, Lotte; Braem, Tania; Robben, Johan; Volckaert, Guido; Engelborghs, Yves

    2003-01-01

    The calcium-binding protein isolated from the sarcoplasm of the muscles of the sand worm Nereis diversicolor has four EF-hands and three active binding sites for Ca2+ or Mg2+. Nereis diversicolor sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein contains three tryptophan residues at positions 4, 57, and 170, respectively. The Wt protein shows a very limited fluorescence increase upon binding of Ca2+ or Mg2+. Single-tryptophan-containing mutants were produced and purified. The fluorescence titrations of th...

  16. Chimeric Plant Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Gene with a Neural Visinin-Like Calcium-Binding Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Shameekumar; Takezawa, D.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1995-01-01

    Calcium, a universal second messenger, regulates diverse cellular processes in eukaryotes. Ca-2(+) and Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-regulated protein phosphorylation play a pivotal role in amplifying and diversifying the action of Ca-2(+)- mediated signals. A chimeric Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) gene with a visinin-like Ca-2(+)- binding domain was cloned and characterized from lily. The cDNA clone contains an open reading frame coding for a protein of 520 amino acids. The predicted structure of CCaMK contains a catalytic domain followed by two regulatory domains, a calmodulin-binding domain and a visinin-like Ca-2(+)-binding domain. The amino-terminal region of CCaMK contains all 11 conserved subdomains characteristic of serine/threonine protein kinases. The calmodulin-binding region of CCaMK has high homology (79%) to alpha subunit of mammalian Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. The calmodulin-binding region is fused to a neural visinin-like domain that contains three Ca-2(+)-binding EF-hand motifs and a biotin-binding site. The Escherichia coli-expressed protein (approx. 56 kDa) binds calmodulin in a Ca-2(+)-dependent manner. Furthermore, Ca-45-binding assays revealed that CCaMK directly binds Ca-2(+). The CCaMK gene is preferentially expressed in developing anthers. Southern blot analysis revealed that CCaMK is encoded by a single gene. The structural features of the gene suggest that it has multiple regulatory controls and could play a unique role in Ca-2(+) signaling in plants.

  17. Binding of fluorescent lanthanides to rat liver mitochondrial membranes and calcium ion-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, R B; Wallach, D F

    1976-05-21

    (1) Tb3+ binding to mitochondrial membranes can be monitored by enhanced ion fluorescence at 545 nm with excitation at 285 nm. At low protein concentrations (less than 30 mug/ml) no inner filter effects are observed. (2) This binding is localized at the external surface of the inner membrane and is unaffected by inhibitors of respiration or oxidative phosphorylation. (3) A soluble Ca2+ binding protein isolated according to Lehninger, A.L. ((1971) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 42, 312-317) also binds Tb3+ with enhanced ion fluorescence upon excitation at 285 nm. The excitation spectrum of the isolated protein and of the intact mitochondria are indicative of an aromatic amino acid at the cation binding site. (4) Further characterization of the Tb3+-protein interaction revealed that there is more than one binding site per protein molecule and that these sites are clustered (less than 20 A). Neuraminidase treatment or organic solvent extraction of the protein did not affect fluorescent Tb3+ binding. (5) pH dependency studies of Tb3+ binding to the isolated protein or intact mitochondria demonstrated the importance of an ionizable group of pK greater than 6. At pH less than 7.5 the amount of Tb3+ bound to the isolated protein decreased with increase in pH as monitored by Tb3+ fluorescence. With intact mitochondria the opposite occurred with a large increase in Tb3+ fluorescence at higher pH. This increase was not observed when the mitochondria were preincubated with antimycin A and rotenone. PMID:6061

  18. Expression and Distribution of Calcium-Binding Protein S100P in Human Placenta during Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Hai-Yan Zhu; Xiao-Mei Tong; Xiao-Na Lin; Ling-Ying Jiang; Jun-Xia Wang; Song-Ying Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Background: S100P is a member of the S100 family of calcium-binding proteins, and it participates in pathophysiological events, such as tumor growth and invasion. Based on the striking similarities between trophoblast cells and tumor cells with regard to proliferative and invasive properties, we raised the question of whether and how S100P expresses in trophoblast cells during development. This study aimed to investigate the expression pattern of S100P in the human placenta dur...

  19. NMR assignments, secondary structure, and global fold of calerythrin, an EF-hand calcium-binding protein from Saccharopolyspora erythraea.

    OpenAIRE

    Aitio, H.; Annila, A; Heikkinen, S.; Thulin, E.; Drakenberg, T; Kilpeläinen, I.

    1999-01-01

    Calerythrin is a 20 kDa calcium-binding protein isolated from gram-positive bacterium Saccharopolyspora erythraea. Based on amino acid sequence homology, it has been suggested that calerythrin belongs to the family of invertebrate sarcoplasmic EF-hand calcium-binding proteins (SCPs), and therefore it is expected to function as a calcium buffer. NMR spectroscopy was used to obtain structural information on the protein in solution. Backbone and side chain 1H, 13C, and 15N assignments were obtai...

  20. Death-Associated Protein Kinase Activity Is Regulated by Coupled Calcium/Calmodulin Binding to Two Distinct Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Bertrand; Huart, Anne-Sophie; Temmerman, Koen; Vahokoski, Juha; Mertens, Haydyn D T; Komadina, Dana; Hoffmann, Jan-Erik; Yumerefendi, Hayretin; Svergun, Dmitri I; Kursula, Petri; Schultz, Carsten; McCarthy, Andrew A; Hart, Darren J; Wilmanns, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    The regulation of many protein kinases by binding to calcium/calmodulin connects two principal mechanisms in signaling processes: protein phosphorylation and responses to dose- and time-dependent calcium signals. We used the calcium/calmodulin-dependent members of the death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) family to investigate the role of a basic DAPK signature loop near the kinase active site. In DAPK2, this loop comprises a novel dimerization-regulated calcium/calmodulin-binding site, in addition to a well-established calcium/calmodulin site in the C-terminal autoregulatory domain. Unexpectedly, impairment of the basic loop interaction site completely abolishes calcium/calmodulin binding and DAPK2 activity is reduced to a residual level, indicative of coupled binding to the two sites. This contrasts with the generally accepted view that kinase calcium/calmodulin interactions are autonomous of the kinase catalytic domain. Our data establish an intricate model of multi-step kinase activation and expand our understanding of how calcium binding connects with other mechanisms involved in kinase activity regulation. PMID:27133022

  1. Purification and characterisation of a glutamic acid-containing peptide with calcium-binding capacity from whey protein hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shun-Li; Zhao, Li-Na; Cai, Xixi; Wang, Shao-Yun; Huang, Yi-Fan; Hong, Jing; Rao, Ping-Fan

    2015-02-01

    The bioavailability of dietary ionised calcium is affected by intestinal basic environment. Calcium-binding peptides can form complexes with calcium to improve its absorption and bioavailability. The aim of this study was focused on isolation and characterisation of a calcium-binding peptide from whey protein hydrolysates. Whey protein was hydrolysed using Flavourzyme and Protamex with substrate to enzyme ratio of 25:1 (w/w) at 49 °C for 7 h. The calcium-binding peptide was isolated by DEAE anion-exchange chromatography, Sephadex G-25 gel filtration and reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). A purified peptide of molecular mass 204 Da with strong calcium binding ability was identified on chromatography/electrospray ionisation (LC/ESI) tandem mass spectrum to be Glu-Gly (EG) after analysis and alignment in database. The calcium binding capacity of EG reached 67·81 μg/mg, and the amount increased by 95% compared with whey protein hydrolysate complex. The UV and infrared spectrometer analysis demonstrated that the principal sites of calcium-binding corresponded to the carboxyl groups and carbonyl groups of glutamic acid. In addition, the amino group and peptide amino are also the related groups in the interaction between EG and calcium ion. Meanwhile, the sequestered calcium percentage experiment has proved that EG-Ca is significantly more stable than CaCl2 in human gastrointestinal tract in vitro. The findings suggest that the purified dipeptide has the potential to be used as ion-binding ingredient in dietary supplements. PMID:25592629

  2. Solution structure and internal dynamics of NSCP, a compact calcium-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabah, Ghada; Popescu, Razvan; Cox, Jos A; Engelborghs, Yves; Craescu, Constantin T

    2005-04-01

    The solution structure of Nereis diversicolor sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein (NSCP) in the calcium-bound form was determined by NMR spectroscopy, distance geometry and simulated annealing. Based on 1859 NOE restraints and 262 angular restraints, 17 structures were generated with a rmsd of 0.87 A from the mean structure. The solution structure, which is highly similar to the structure obtained by X-ray crystallography, includes two open EF-hand domains, which are in close contact through their hydrophobic surfaces. The internal dynamics of the protein backbone were determined by studying amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange rates and 15N nuclear relaxation. The two methods revealed a highly compact and rigid structure, with greatly restricted mobility at the two termini. For most of the amide protons, the free energy of exchange-compatible structural opening is similar to the free energy of structural stability, suggesting that isotope exchange of these protons takes place through global unfolding of the protein. Enhanced conformational flexibility was noted in the unoccupied Ca2+-binding site II, as well as the neighbouring helices. Analysis of the experimental nuclear relaxation and the molecular dynamics simulations give very similar profiles for the backbone generalized order parameter (S2), a parameter related to the amplitude of fast (picosecond to nanosecond) movements of N(H)-H vectors. We also noted a significant correlation between this parameter, the exchange rate, and the crystallographic B factor along the sequence. PMID:15819893

  3. Calsequestrinlike calcium-binding protein is expressed in calcium-accumulating cells of Pistia stratiotes.

    OpenAIRE

    Franceschi, V R; Li, X; Zhang, D.(Department of Physics, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, United States of America); Okita, T W

    1993-01-01

    To contend with high calcium (Ca) levels in the environment, many plant species contain crystal idioblasts, specialized cells which accumulate large amounts of Ca as oxalate crystals. The biochemical processes involved in the accumulation of Ca in crystal idioblasts are unknown, as these cells constitute only a minor proportion of the total plant tissue. To address how crystal idioblasts buffer cytosolic Ca during crystal formation, we purified these cells from water lettuce and assessed thei...

  4. Mechanism of fluorescence and conformational changes of the sarcoplasmic calcium binding protein of the sand worm Nereis diversicolor upon Ca2+ or Mg2+ binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillen, Alain; Verheyden, Stefan; Delfosse, Lotte; Braem, Tania; Robben, Johan; Volckaert, Guido; Engelborghs, Yves

    2003-09-01

    The calcium-binding protein isolated from the sarcoplasm of the muscles of the sand worm Nereis diversicolor has four EF-hands and three active binding sites for Ca(2+) or Mg(2+). Nereis diversicolor sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein contains three tryptophan residues at positions 4, 57, and 170, respectively. The Wt protein shows a very limited fluorescence increase upon binding of Ca(2+) or Mg(2+). Single-tryptophan-containing mutants were produced and purified. The fluorescence titrations of these mutants show a limited decrease of the affinity for calcium, but no alterations of the cooperativity. Upon adding calcium, Trp170 shows a strong fluorescence increase, Trp57 an extensive fluorescence decrease, and Trp4 shows no fluorescence change. Therefore mutant W4F/W170F is ideally suited to analyze the fluorescence titrations and to study the binding mechanism. Mutations of the calcium ligands at the z-position in the three binding sites show no effect at site I and a total loss of cooperativity at sites III and IV. The quenching of Trp57 upon calcium binding is dependent on the presence of arginine R25, but this residue is not just a simple dynamic quencher. The role of the salt bridge R25-D58 is also investigated. PMID:12944301

  5. Calciomics:prediction and analysis of EF-hand calcium binding proteins by protein engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Jenny; Jie

    2010-01-01

    Ca2+ plays a pivotal role in the physiology and biochemistry of prokaryotic and mammalian organisms.Viruses also utilize the universal Ca2+ signal to create a specific cellular environment to achieve coexistence with the host,and to propagate.In this paper we first describe our development of a grafting approach to understand site-specific Ca2+ binding properties of EF-hand proteins with a helix-loop-helix Ca2+ binding motif,then summarize our prediction and identification of EF-hand Ca2+ binding sites on a genome-wide scale in bacteria and virus,and next report the application of the grafting approach to probe the metal binding capability of predicted EF-hand motifs within the streptococcal hemoprotein receptor(Shr) of Streptococcus pyrogenes and the nonstructural protein 1(nsP1) of Sindbis virus.When methods such as the grafting approach are developed in conjunction with prediction algorithms we are better able to probe continuous Ca2+-binding sites that have been previously underrepresented due to the limitation of conventional methodology.

  6. Functional manipulation of a calcium-binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica guided by paramagnetic NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Ashok K; Patel, Sunita; Somlata; Shukla, Manish; Saraswathi, Deepa; Bhattacharya, Alok; Chary, Kandala V R

    2013-08-01

    EhCaBP1, one of the calcium-binding proteins from Entamoeba histolytica, is a two-domain EF-hand protein. The two domains of EhCaBP1 are structurally and functionally different from each other. However, both domains are required for structural stability and a full range of functional diversity. Analysis of sequence and structure of EhCaBP1 and other CaBPs indicates that the C-terminal domain of EhCaBP1 possesses a unique structure compared with other family members. This had been attributed to the absence of a Phe-Phe interaction between highly conserved Phe residues at the -4 position in EF-hand III (F[-4]; Tyr(81)) and at the 13th position in EF-hand IV (F[+13]; Phe(129)) of the C-terminal domain. Against this backdrop, we mutated the Tyr residue at the -4th position of EF III to the Phe residue (Y81F), to bring in the Phe-Phe interaction and understand the nature of structural and functional changes in the protein by NMR spectroscopy, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and biological assays, such as imaging and actin binding. The Y81F mutation in EhCaBP1 resulted in a more compact structure for the C-terminal domain of the mutant as in the case of calmodulin and troponin C. The compact structure is favored by the presence of a π-π interaction between Phe(81) and Phe(129) along with several hydrophobic interactions of Phe(81), which are not seen in the wild-type protein. Furthermore, the biological assays reveal preferential membrane localization of the mutant, loss of its colocalization with actin in the phagocytic cups, whereas retaining its ability to bind G- and F-actin. PMID:23782698

  7. Localisation of calcium-binding proteins in ram spermatozoa using the immunofluorescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Localization of two calcium-binding proteins (proteins A and B) believed to be involve in membrane fusion on whole spermatozoa were carried out in two stages; before and after the acrosome reaction, the reaction being a prerequisite to fertilization. Determination of the acrosome reaction and sperm viability is carried out using fluorescent dyes i.e., FITC-conjugated Pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA) and propidium iodide (PI) respectively. Polyclonal antibodies were raised in rabbits. Ejaculated semen was diluted in buffer and loaded into tubes. Acrosome reaction was induced with calcium ionophore A23187 at 390 degree C. PI was added to the sub-samples at time 0 and 45 minutes. Excess PI, ionophore and seminal plasma was filtered out with a syringe. Smears were made on slides and air-dried. The cells were pemeabilised with ethanol and rinsed in PBS. Batch 1 slides were incubated with FITC-PSA in the dark while batch H slides were incubated in 1% sheep serum. Batch II slides were then rinsed in PBS twice and incubated in both antiserum and pre-immune serum (negative control). These slides were then incubated in FITC-conjugated secondary antibody (anti-rabbit IgG) and kept in the dark. After final washing and mounted, both batches of slides were viewed immediately using fluorescence microscope. Results obtained before acrosome reaction showed localization of both antibodies to the whole sperm head, along the midpiece and tail. The acrosomes were also intact and cells were viable. After the acrosome reaction, localization of both antibodies were observed at the post-acrosomal region, midpiece, tail and the equatorial segment with no binding to the acrosome. Cells were mainly acrosome-reacted and dying. No binding was observed with pre-immune serum. Results indicate that the antigens were present in the acrosome and the change in binding suggests that the antigens have been redistributed after commencement of the acrosome reaction. The findings suggest that the proteins

  8. Immunomicroscopic localization of the 10,000 molecular weight calcium-binding protein in the human enterocyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staun, M; Friis, S; Dabelsteen, E; Hansen, Gert Helge

    1989-01-01

    The cellular localization of the 10,000 molecular weight calcium-binding protein (CaBP or Calbindin-D) in the small intestinal epithelium of man was investigated by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy (immunogold staining). Indirect immunofluorescence on frozen sections showed...

  9. (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR assignments of a calcium-binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Deepshikha; Bhattacharya, Alok; Chary, Kandala V R

    2016-04-01

    We report almost complete sequence specific (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR assignments of a 150-residue long calmodulin-like calcium-binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica (EhCaBP6), as a prelude to its structural and functional characterization. PMID:26377206

  10. Biophysical characterization and functional studies on calbindin-D28K: A vitamin D-induced calcium-binding protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitamin D dependent calcium binding protein, or calbindin-D, is the principal protein induced in the intestine in response to the steroid hormone 1,25(OH)2-vitamin D3. A definitive role for calbindin-D in vitamin D3 mediated biological responses remains unclear. Biophysical and functional studies on chick intestinal calbindin-D28K (CaBP) were initiated so that some insight might be gained into its relevance to the process of intestinal calcium transport. Calbindin-D belongs to a class of high affinity calcium binding proteins which includes calmodulin, parvalbumin and troponin C. The Ca 2+ binding stoichiometry and binding constants for calbindin-D28K were quantitated by Quin 2 titration analysis. The protein was found to bind 5-6 Ca 2+ ions with a KD on the order of 10-8, in agreement with the 6 domains identified from the amino acid sequence. A slow Ca 2+ exchange rate (80 s-1) as assessed by 43Ca NMR and extensive calcium dependent conformational changes in 1H NMR spectra were also observed. Functional studies on chick intestinal CaBP were carried out by two different methods. Interactions between CaBP and intestinal cellular components were assessed via photoaffinity labeling techniques. Specific calcium dependent complexes for CaBP were identified with bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase and brush border membrane proteins of 60 and 150 kD. CaBP was also found to co-migrate with the alkaline phosphatase activity of chick intestinal brush border membranes as evaluated by gel filtration chromatography. The second procedure for evaluating CaBP functionality has involved the quantitation of CaBP association with vesicular transport components as assessed by ELISA. CaBP, immunoreactivity was observed in purified lysosomes, microsomes and microtubules

  11. Structural and functional diversification in the teleost S100 family of calcium-binding proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korsching Sigrun I

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among the EF-Hand calcium-binding proteins the subgroup of S100 proteins constitute a large family with numerous and diverse functions in calcium-mediated signaling. The evolutionary origin of this family is still uncertain and most studies have examined mammalian family members. Results We have performed an extensive search in several teleost genomes to establish the s100 gene family in fish. We report that the teleost S100 repertoire comprises fourteen different subfamilies which show remarkable similarity across six divergent teleost species. Individual species feature distinctive subsets of thirteen to fourteen genes that result from local gene duplications and gene losses. Eight of the fourteen S100 subfamilies are unique for teleosts, while six are shared with mammalian species and three of those even with cartilaginous fish. Several S100 family members are found in jawless fish already, but none of them are clear orthologs of cartilaginous or bony fish s100 genes. All teleost s100 genes show the expected structural features and are subject to strong negative selection. Many aspects of the genomic arrangement and location of mammalian s100 genes are retained in the teleost s100 gene family, including a completely conserved intron/exon border between the two EF hands. Zebrafish s100 genes exhibit highly specific and characteristic expression patterns, showing both redundancy and divergence in their cellular expression. In larval tissue expression is often restricted to specific cell types like keratinocytes, hair cells, ionocytes and olfactory receptor neurons as demonstrated by in situ hybridization. Conclusion The origin of the S100 family predates at least the segregation of jawed from jawless fish and some extant family members predate the divergence of bony from cartilaginous fish. Despite a complex pattern of gene gains and losses the total repertoire size is remarkably constant between species. On the expression

  12. Dictyostelium calcium-binding protein 4a interacts with nucleomorphin, a BRCT-domain protein that regulates nuclear number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nucleomorphin from Dictyostelium discoideum is a nuclear calmodulin-binding protein that is a member of the BRCT-domain containing cell cycle checkpoint proteins. Two differentially expressed isoforms, NumA and NumB, share an extensive acidic domain (DEED) that when deleted produces highly multinucleated cells. We performed a yeast two-hybrid screen of a Dictyostelium cDNA library using NumA as bait. Here we show that nucleomorphin interacts with calcium-binding protein 4a (CBP4a) in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Further deletion analysis suggests this interaction requires residues found within the DEED domain. NumA and CBP4a mRNAs are expressed at the same stages of development. CBP4a belongs to a large family of Dictyostelium CBPs, for which no cellular or developmental functions had previously been determined. Since the interaction of CBP4a with nucleomorphin requires the DEED domain, this suggests that CBP4a may respond to Ca2+-signalling through modulating factors that might function in concert to regulate nuclear number

  13. Dictyostelium calcium-binding protein 4a interacts with nucleomorphin, a BRCT-domain protein that regulates nuclear number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myre, Michael A; O'Day, Danton H

    2004-09-17

    Nucleomorphin from Dictyostelium discoideum is a nuclear calmodulin-binding protein that is a member of the BRCT-domain containing cell cycle checkpoint proteins. Two differentially expressed isoforms, NumA and NumB, share an extensive acidic domain (DEED) that when deleted produces highly multinucleated cells. We performed a yeast two-hybrid screen of a Dictyostelium cDNA library using NumA as bait. Here we show that nucleomorphin interacts with calcium-binding protein 4a (CBP4a) in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Further deletion analysis suggests this interaction requires residues found within the DEED domain. NumA and CBP4a mRNAs are expressed at the same stages of development. CBP4a belongs to a large family of Dictyostelium CBPs, for which no cellular or developmental functions had previously been determined. Since the interaction of CBP4a with nucleomorphin requires the DEED domain, this suggests that CBP4a may respond to Ca(2+)-signalling through modulating factors that might function in concert to regulate nuclear number. PMID:15325281

  14. Distribution and Morphology of Calcium-Binding Proteins Immunoreactive Neurons following Chronic Tungsten Multielectrode Implants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurelio M Freire

    Full Text Available The development of therapeutic approaches to improve the life quality of people suffering from different types of body paralysis is a current major medical challenge. Brain-machine interface (BMI can potentially help reestablishing lost sensory and motor functions, allowing patients to use their own brain activity to restore sensorimotor control of paralyzed body parts. Chronic implants of multielectrodes, employed to record neural activity directly from the brain parenchyma, constitute the fundamental component of a BMI. However, before this technique may be effectively available to human clinical trials, it is essential to characterize its long-term impact on the nervous tissue in animal models. In the present study we evaluated how chronic implanted tungsten microelectrode arrays impact the distribution and morphology of interneurons reactive to calcium-binding proteins calbindin (CB, calretinin (CR and parvalbumin (PV across the rat's motor cortex. Our results revealed that chronic microelectrode arrays were well tolerated by the nervous tissue, with recordings remaining viable for up to 6 months after implantation. Furthermore, neither the morphology nor the distribution of inhibitory neurons were broadly impacted. Moreover, restricted microglial activation was observed on the implanted sites. On the whole, our results confirm and expand the notion that tungsten multielectrodes can be deemed as a feasible candidate to future human BMI studies.

  15. Flexibility of EF-hand motifs: structural and thermodynamic studies of Calcium Binding Protein-1 from Entamoeba histolytica with Pb2+, Ba2+, and Sr2+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EF-hand proteins can be activated by the binding of various heavy metals other than calcium, and such complexes can disturb the calcium-signaling pathway and cause toxicity and disease causing state. So far, no comprehensive study has been done to understand different heavy metals binding to calcium signaling proteins. Energetically, Ca2+ is preferred in three sites, while in one site Ba2+ has better binding energy. The Sr2+-coordination in the EF hand motifs is similar to that of the native Ca2+ bound structure, except for the lack of water coordination. Sr2+-coordination seems to be a pre-formed in nature since all seven coordinating atoms are from the protein itself, which also correlates with entropy contributions in Sr2+ binding. These findings improve our understanding of metal association with calcium binding proteins and of metal induced conformational changes.

  16. CALCIUM-INDUCED LIPID PEROXIDATION IS MEDIATED BY RHODNIUS HEME-BINDING PROTEIN (RHBP) AND PREVENTED BY VITELLIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paes, Marcia C; Silveira, Alan B; Ventura-Martins, Guilherme; Luciano, Monalisa; Coelho, Marsen G P; Todeschini, Adriane R; Bianconi, M Lucia; Atella, Georgia C; Silva-Neto, Mário A C

    2015-10-01

    Lipid peroxidation is promoted by the quasi-lipoxygenase (QL) activity of heme proteins and enhanced by the presence of free calcium. Unlike mammalian plasma, the hemolymph of Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of Chagas disease, contains both a free heme-binding protein (RHBP) and circulating lipoproteins. RHBP binds and prevents the heme groups of the proteins from participating in lipid peroxidation reactions. Herein, we show that despite being bound to RHBP, heme groups promote lipid peroxidation through a calcium-dependent QL reaction. This reaction is readily inhibited by the presence of ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA), the antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene or micromolar levels of the main yolk phosphoprotein vitellin (Vt). The inhibition of lipid peroxidation is eliminated by the in vitro dephosphorylation of Vt, indicating that this reaction depends on the interaction of free calcium ions with negatively charged phosphoamino acids. Our results demonstrate that calcium chelation mediated by phosphoproteins occurs via an antioxidant mechanism that protects living organisms from lipid peroxidation. PMID:26111116

  17. Control of Neuronal Excitability by Calcium Binding Proteins: A New Mathematical Model for Striatal Fast-Spiking Interneurons

    OpenAIRE

    Don Patrick Bischop

    2012-01-01

    Calcium binding proteins, such as parvalbumin (PV), are abundantly expressed in distinctive patterns in the central nervous system but their physiological function remains poorly under-stood. Notably, at the level of the striatum, where PV is only expressed in the fast-spiking (FS) interneurons. FS interneurons form an inhibitory network modulating the output of the striatum by synchronizing medium-sized spiny neurons (MSN). So far the existing conductance-based computational models for FS ne...

  18. Control of neuronal excitability by calcium binding proteins : a new mathematical model for striatal fast-spiking interneurons

    OpenAIRE

    Don Patrick Bischop

    2012-01-01

    Calcium binding proteins, such as parvalbumin (PV), are abundantly expressed in distinctive patterns in the central nervous system but their physiological function remains poorly understood. Notably, at the level of the striatum, where PV is only expressed in the fast spiking (FS) interneurons. FS interneurons form an inhibitory network modulating the output of the striatum by synchronizing medium-sized spiny neurons (MSN). So far the existing conductance-based computational models for FS n...

  19. Calcium binding by dietary fibre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietary fibre from plants low in phytate bound calcium in proportion to its uronic-acid content. This binding by the non-cellulosic fraction of fibre reduces the availability of calcium for small-intestinal absorption, but the colonic microbial digestion of uronic acids liberates the calcium. Thus the ability to maintain calcium balance on high-fibre diets may depend on the adaptive capacity on the colon for calcium. (author)

  20. Juvenile hormone diol kinase, a calcium-binding protein with kinase activity, from the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sheng; Zhang, Qi-Rui; Xu, Wei-Hua; Schooley, David A

    2005-11-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) diol kinase (JHDK) is an important enzyme involved in the JH degradation pathway. Bombyx mori (Bommo)-JHDK cDNA (637bp) contains an open reading frame encoding a 183-amino acid protein, which reveals a high degree of identity to the two previously reported JHDKs. JHDK is similar to GTP-binding proteins with three conserved sequence elements involved in purine nucleotide binding, contains eight alpha-helices and three EF-hand motifs, and resembles the three-dimensional model of 2SCP and some other calcium-binding proteins. The Bommo-JHDK gene has only a single copy in the silkworm haploid genome, contains only one exon, and its 5'-upstream sequence does not have a JH response element. Although Bommo-JHDK is highly expressed in the gut of the silkworm, its mRNA expression remains at a constant level during larval development suggesting this enzyme is constitutive and not regulated by JH, at least at the transcriptional level. Recombinant Bommo-JHDK catalyzed the conversion of 10S-JH diol into JH diol phosphate, confirming its enzymatic function. Recombinant enzyme formed a dimer and had biochemical characteristics similar to other JHDKs. Bommo-JHDK, a calcium-binding protein with kinase activity, provides unique insights on how JH levels are regulated in the silkworm. PMID:16203205

  1. Specific reduction of calcium-binding protein (28-kilodalton calbindin-D) gene expression in aging and neurodegenerative diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present studies establish that there are specific, significant decreases in the neuronal calcium-binding protein (28-kDa calbindin-D) gene expression in aging and in neurodegenerative diseases. The specificity of the changes observed in calbindin mRNA levels was tested by reprobing blots with calmodulin, cyclophilin, and B-actin cDNAs. Gross brain regions of the aging rat exhibited specific, significant decreases in calbindin·mRNA and protein levels in the cerebellum, corpus striatum, and brain-stem region but not in the cerebral cortex or hippocampus. Discrete areas of the aging human brain exhibited significant decreases in calbindin protein and mRNA in the cerebellum, corpus striatum, and nucleus basalis but not in the neocortex, hippocampus, amygdala, locus ceruleus, or nucleus raphe dorsalis. Comparison of diseased human brain tissue with age- and sex-matched controls yielded significant decreases calbindin protein and mRNA in the substantia nigra (Parkinson disease), in the corpus striatum (Huntington disease), in the nucleus basalis (Alzheimer disease), and in the hippocampus and nucleus raphe dorsalis (Parkinson, Huntington, and Alzheimer diseases) but not in the cerebellum, neocortex, amygdala, or locus ceruleus. These findings suggest that decreased calbindin gene expression may lead to a failure of calcium buffering or intraneuronal calcium homeostasis, which contributes to calcium-mediated cytotoxic events during aging and in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases

  2. Vitamin D-dependent rat renal calcium-binding protein: development of a radioimmunoassay, tissue distribution, and immunologic identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sensitive double antibody RIA has been developed for the 28,000 mol wt rat renal vitamin D-dependent calcium-binding protein. Using this assay, concentrations of calcium-binding protein (CaBP) as low as 30 ng can be measured. The assay is precise (intraassay variability, 5.0%) and reproductible (interassay variability, 8.2%). Measurements of renal CaBP by RIA showed a good correlation with measurements of CaBP by the chelex resin assay and by polyacrylamide gel analysis by densitometric tracing using a purified CaBP marker. The concentration of CaBP in the vitamin D-replete rat kidney is 7.3 +/- 1.0 (mean +/- SEM) micrograms/mg protein. In vitamin D-deficient rats the level of renal CaBP is 2.6 +/- 0.3 micrograms/mg protein. Tissue distribution of immunoreactive rat renal CaBP showed the highest concentration of CaBP in the rat cerebellum (38.3 +/- 5.1 micrograms/mg protein). Lower concentrations of immunoreactive CaBP were detected in several other rat tissues. No immunoreactive CaBP was detected in rat or human serum. In necropsy human kidney and cerebellum, high levels of immunoreactive CaBP were also detected (1.5 +/- 0.1 and 27.3 +/- 2.1 micrograms/mg protein, respectively). When extracts of rat kidney and brain and human cerebellum and kidney were assayed at several dilutions, immunodisplacement curves parallel to that of pure renal CaBP were observed, indicating immunochemical similarity. Fractionation of extracts of rat cerebellum, human kidney, and human cerebellum on Sephadex G-100 revealed immunoreactivity and calcium-binding activity in the 28,000 mol wt region similar to rat kidney

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the calcium-binding protein CalD from Streptomyces coelicolor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The calcium-binding protein encoded by the CalD gene in S. coelicolor A3(2) has been crystallized as a prelude towards the determination of its three-dimensional structure by X-ray crystallography. Calcium ions play an important regulatory role in eukaryotes. However, the regulatory roles of Ca2+ in prokaryotes are poorly understood. CalD, an 18 kDa calcium-binding protein from the model actinomycete Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2), was purified and crystallized for structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Crystals of CalD that were suitable for X-ray diffraction were obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffraction data were collected in-house to 1.56 Å resolution. The crystals belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 32.9, b = 51.0, c = 87.0 Å, α = β = γ = 90.0°. There is one protein molecule per asymmetric unit

  4. Fasciola hepatica calcium-binding protein FhCaBP2: structure of the dynein light chain-like domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh H; Thomas, Charlotte M; Timson, David J; van Raaij, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    The common liver fluke Fasciola hepatica causes an increasing burden on human and animal health, partly because of the spread of drug-resistant isolates. As a consequence, there is considerable interest in developing new drugs to combat liver fluke infections. A group of potential targets is a family of calcium-binding proteins which combine an N-terminal domain with two EF-hand motifs and a C-terminal domain with predicted similarity to dynein light chains (DLC-like domain). The function of these proteins is unknown, although in several species, they have been localised to the tegument, an important structure at the host-parasite interface. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of the DLC-like domain of F. hepatica calcium-binding protein 2 (FhCaBP2), solved using single-wavelength anomalous diffraction and refined at 2.3 Å resolution in two different crystal forms. The FhCaBP2 DLC-like domain has a structure similar to other DLC domains, with an anti-parallel β-sheet packed against an α-helical hairpin. Like other DLC domains, it dimerises through its β2-strand, which extends in an arch and forms the fifth strand in an extended β-sheet of the other monomer. The structure provides molecular details of the dimerisation of FhCaBP2, the first example from this family of parasite proteins. PMID:27083189

  5. Purification and partial characterization of a novel calcium-binding protein from Bacillus cereus T spores and inhibition of germination by calmodulin antagonists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel calcium-binding protein has been purified from the dormant spores of Bacillus cereus T. B. cereus T spores were extensively washed, broken, and heated at 90 degree C for 2 min. Using calcium-dependent hydrophobic interaction chromatography plus DEAE-cellulose and hydroxylapatite columns, a single protein was obtained which possessed calcium-binding capacity and some characteristics of calmodulin. This heat-stable protein was retained by hydrophobic matrices or a calmodulin antagonist in a calcium-dependent manner. The crude spore extract displaced bovine brain calmodulin from its antibody in a radioimmunoassay and the immunoreactive specific activity of the partially purified fraction which eluted from phenyl-Sepharose was ca. 200-fold greater than the crude spore extract. Purity of this protein was verified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyarcylamide gel electrophoresis and reversed-phase HPLC. Calcium-binding ability was verified with a competitive calcium binding assay using Chelex-100 resin and 45Ca autoradiography. SDS-PAGE and amino acid composition indicated the molecular weight of the protein was 24-kDa. The effects of two calmodulin antagonists, trifluoperazine (TFP) and N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide (W-7) on L-alanine-induced germination of Bacillus cereus T spores were examined by measuring commitment to germination, loss of heat resistance, release of calcium, decrease in optical density at 660 nm and phase-contrast microscopy

  6. Expresion of calcium binding proteins (CaBPs) in skeletal muscles of rats with altered thyroid status

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Escudero, Astrid; Říčný, Jan; Soukup, Tomáš

    Fyziologický ústav AV ČR, v. v. i.. Roč. 56, č. 3 (2007), 8P-8P ISSN 0862-8408. [Fyziologické dny /83./. 06.02.2007-08.02.2007, Brno] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA304/05/0327 Grant ostatní: MYORES(XE) 511978 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : cpr1 * rat muscle phenotype * calcium binding protein * thyroid hormone effects Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  7. Control of neuronal excitability by calcium binding proteins: a new mathematical model for striatal fast-spiking interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischop, D P; Orduz, D; Lambot, L; Schiffmann, S N; Gall, D

    2012-01-01

    Calcium binding proteins, such as parvalbumin (PV), are abundantly expressed in distinctive patterns in the central nervous system but their physiological function remains poorly understood. Notably, at the level of the striatum, where PV is only expressed in the fast-spiking (FS) interneurons. FS interneurons form an inhibitory network modulating the output of the striatum by synchronizing medium-sized spiny neurons (MSN). So far the existing conductance-based computational models for FS neurons did not allow the study of the coupling between PV concentration and electrical activity. In the present paper, we propose a new mathematical model for the striatal FS interneurons that includes apamin-sensitive small conductance Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels (SK) and the presence of a calcium buffer. Our results show that a variation in the concentration of PV can modulate substantially the intrinsic excitability of the FS interneurons and therefore may be involved in the information processing at the striatal level. PMID:22787441

  8. Control of neuronal excitability by calcium binding proteins : a new mathematical model for striatal fast-spiking interneurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don Patrick Bischop

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Calcium binding proteins, such as parvalbumin, are abundantly expressed in very distinctive patterns in the central nervous system but their physiological function remains poorly understood. Notably, at the level of the striatum, parvalbumin is only expressed in the fast spiking (FS interneurons, which form a inhibitory network modulating the output of the striatum by synchronizing medium-sized spiny neurons (MSN. So far the existing conductance-based computational models for FS neurons did not allow the study of the the coupling between parvalbumin concentration and electrical activity. In the present paper, we propose a new mathematical model for the striatal FS interneurons that includes apamin-sensitive small conductance \\ca -dependent \\kk channels (SK and takes into account the presence of a calcium buffer. Our results demonstrate that a variation in the concentration of parvalbumin can modulate substantially the intrinsic excitability of the FS interneurons and therefore may be involved in the information processing at the striatal level.

  9. Curcumin specifically binds to the human calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV: fluorescence and molecular dynamics simulation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoda, Nasimul; Naz, Huma; Jameel, Ehtesham; Shandilya, Ashutosh; Dey, Sharmistha; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Ahmad, Faizan; Jayaram, B

    2016-03-01

    Calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CAMK4) plays significant role in the regulation of calcium-dependent gene expression, and thus, it is involved in varieties of cellular functions such as cell signaling and neuronal survival. On the other hand, curcumin, a naturally occurring yellow bioactive component of turmeric possesses wide spectrum of biological actions, and it is widely used to treat atherosclerosis, diabetes, cancer, and inflammation. It also acts as an antioxidant. Here, we studied the interaction of curcumin with human CAMK4 at pH 7.4 using molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, fluorescence binding, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) methods. We performed MD simulations for both neutral and anionic forms of CAMK4-curcumin complexes for a reasonably long time (150 ns) to see the overall stability of the protein-ligand complex. Molecular docking studies revealed that the curcumin binds in the large hydrophobic cavity of kinase domain of CAMK4 through several hydrophobic and hydrogen-bonded interactions. Additionally, MD simulations studies contributed in understanding the stability of protein-ligand complex system in aqueous solution and conformational changes in the CAMK4 upon binding of curcumin. A significant increase in the fluorescence intensity at 495 nm was observed (λexc = 425 nm), suggesting a strong interaction of curcumin to the CAMK4. A high binding affinity (KD = 3.7 × 10(-8) ± .03 M) of curcumin for the CAMK4 was measured by SPR further indicating curcumin as a potential ligand for the CAMK4. This study will provide insights into designing a new inspired curcumin derivatives as therapeutic agents against many life-threatening diseases. PMID:25929263

  10. Nuclear Expression of S100A4 Calcium-Binding Protein Increases Cholangiocarcinoma Invasiveness and Metastasization

    OpenAIRE

    Fabris, Luca; Cadamuro, Massimiliano; Moserle, Lidia; Dziura, James; Cong, Xiangyu; Sambado, Luisa; Nardo, Giorgia; Sonzogni, Aurelio; Colledan, Michele; Furlanetto, Alberto; Bassi, Nicolò; Massani, Marco; Cillo, Umberto; Mescoli, Claudia; Indraccolo, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) carries a severe prognosis because of its strong invasiveness and early metastasization. In several patients, otherwise eligible for surgical resection, micrometastasis are already present at the time of surgery. The mechanisms responsible for CCA invasiveness are unclear. S100A4, a member of the S100 family of small Ca2+-binding proteins, is expressed in mesenchymal cells, regulates cell motility in several cell types, and is expressed in some epithelial cancers. Thu...

  11. Quantitative immunobinding assay for vitamin D-dependent calcium-binding protein (calbindin-D28k) using nitrocellulose filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sensitive dot immunobinding assay has been developed for the quantitative determination of vitamin D-dependent calcium-binding protein (calbindin-D28k; CaBP) in rat and human kidney and brain. Protein samples are spotted onto nitrocellulose sheets, fixed, and then rinsed with Tris-buffered saline. The remaining protein binding sites are blocked with bovine serum albumin, gelatin, or nonfat dry milk protein and the filters are then incubated sequentially with antiserum to calbindin-D28k (1:500 dilution) and 125I-protein A (200,000 cpm/ml). After washing, the radioactivity bound to each sample is quantitated by counting in a gamma counter. The sensitivity of the assay is such that 10 ng calbindin-D28k can be accurately quantitated. The highest levels of CaBP were detected in kidney (7.8 +/- 0.5 micrograms/mg protein) and cerebellum (22.1 +/- 1.4 micrograms/mg protein). Ten micrograms calmodulin, lactalbumin, or parvalbumin and 100 micrograms liver extract showed no reactivity in the assay. The assay is precise (intraassay variability, 4.0%) and reproducible (interassay variability, 8.8%). There was good agreement between the data in this assay and the data we obtained using radioimmunoassay (RIA). The assay has several advantages over the RIA. Iodination of pure antigen is not required and it is possible to detect membrane-bound and insoluble antigens using this assay. Also, the antiserum and 125I-protein A solutions can be saved and reused. This assay represents a major modification of the original immunobinding assays which used the less sensitive peroxidase stain. It is also an improvement over previous 125I immunobinding assays which were not quantitative but were used as antigen spot tests or which required iodination of the antibody

  12. Purification of Regucalcin from the Seminal Vesicular Fluid: A Calcium Binding Multi-Functional Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harikrishna, P; Shende, A M; Reena, K K; Thomas, Jobin; Bhure, S K

    2016-08-01

    Regucalcin is a multi-functional protein having roles in calcium homeostasis as well as in anti-apoptotic, anti-prolific and anti-oxidative functions. Recently, it has been reported from the male reproductive tract, but its role in male reproduction needs further investigation; for which the native regucalcin of reproductive origin will be more appropriate. The gel exclusion chromatography followed by diethyl aminoethane cellulose chromatography and two-dimentional cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis used for its purification are time consuming and less specific. Here, the regucalcin gene from buffalo testis has been cloned, expressed and purified in recombinant form, and subsequently used for raising hyper-immune serum. The Western blot of seminal vesicular fluid probed with anti-regucalcin polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies showed the presence of 28 and 34 kDa bands specific to regucalcin. Further, an affinity matrix has been prepared using anti-regucalcin polyclonal antibodies. An immuno-affinity chromatography method has been standardized to isolate regucalcin from seminal vesicular fluid. The initial complexity of the protein mixture in the seminal vesicular fluid has been reduced by a heat coagulation step. The purified protein on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed a single band at 68 kDa that has been further confirmed as regucalcin by Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. The RGN purified from seminal vesicular fluid will be more appropriate for studying its possible role in male reproduction, especially sperm cell capacitation, hyperactivation, acrosome reaction and cryopreservation. The study can be applied in purifying regucalcin from different tissues or species with minor modifications in the methodology. PMID:27460579

  13. Ectopic expression of the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin in mouse liver endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, M B; Berchtold, M W; Rülicke, T; Schwaller, B; Gotzos, V; Pinzani, M; Reichen, J; Celio, M R

    1997-01-01

    normal mice but virtually not affected in the transgenic animals. This suggests that ectopically expressed parvalbumin is involved in the regulation of Ca2+ signals in the sinusoidal endothelial cells. This animal model could be of interest to those working on the physiology of liver circulation.......To elucidate the physiological role of the Ca2+ binding protein parvalbumin, we have generated transgenic mice carrying the full-length complementary DNA (cDNA) of rat parvalbumin under the control of the heavy-metal inducible metallothionein IIA promoter. Immunohistochemical and biochemical...... methods have been used to detect the presence of ectopic parvalbumin expression in different tissues. Here we show the expression of parvalbumin in endothelial cells lining the liver sinusoids in situ and after isolation in vitro. The hemodynamic effects of endothelin 1, a peptide hormone mediating potent...

  14. Structural Insights into Membrane Targeting by the Flagellar Calcium-binding Protein (FCaBP) a Myristoylated and Palmitoylated Calcium Sensor in Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J Wingard; J Ladner; M Vanarotti; A Fisher; H Robinson; K Buchanan; D Engman; J Ames

    2011-12-31

    The flagellar calcium-binding protein (FCaBP) of the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is targeted to the flagellar membrane where it regulates flagellar function and assembly. As a first step toward understanding the Ca{sup 2+}-induced conformational changes important for membrane-targeting, we report here the x-ray crystal structure of FCaBP in the Ca{sup 2+}-free state determined at 2.2{angstrom} resolution. The first 17 residues from the N terminus appear unstructured and solvent-exposed. Residues implicated in membrane targeting (Lys-19, Lys-22, and Lys-25) are flanked by an exposed N-terminal helix (residues 26-37), forming a patch of positive charge on the protein surface that may interact electrostatically with flagellar membrane targets. The four EF-hands in FCaBP each adopt a 'closed conformation' similar to that seen in Ca{sup 2+}-free calmodulin. The overall fold of FCaBP is closest to that of grancalcin and other members of the penta EF-hand superfamily. Unlike the dimeric penta EF-hand proteins, FCaBP lacks a fifth EF-hand and is monomeric. The unstructured N-terminal region of FCaBP suggests that its covalently attached myristoyl group at the N terminus may be solvent-exposed, in contrast to the highly sequestered myristoyl group seen in recoverin and GCAP1. NMR analysis demonstrates that the myristoyl group attached to FCaBP is indeed solvent-exposed in both the Ca{sup 2+}-free and Ca{sup 2+}-bound states, and myristoylation has no effect on protein structure and folding stability. We propose that exposed acyl groups at the N terminus may anchor FCaBP to the flagellar membrane and that Ca{sup 2+}-induced conformational changes may control its binding to membrane-bound protein targets..

  15. Flexibility of EF-hand motifs: structural and thermodynamic studies of Calcium Binding Protein-1 from Entamoeba histolytica with Pb2+, Ba2+, and Sr2+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Shivesh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background EF-hand proteins can be activated by the binding of various heavy metals other than calcium, and such complexes can disturb the calcium-signaling pathway and cause toxicity and disease causing state. So far, no comprehensive study has been done to understand different heavy metals binding to calcium signaling proteins. Results In this work, the flexibility of the EF-hand motifs are examined by crystallographic and thermodynamic studies of binding of Pb2+, Ba2+ and Sr2+ to Calcium Binding Protein-1 from Entamoeba histolytica (EhCaBP1. The structures of the EhCaBP1- heavy metal complexes are found to be overall similar, nevertheless specific differences in metal coordination, and small differences in the coordination distances between the metal and the ligands in the metal binding loop. The largest such distances occur for the Ba2+- EhCaBP1 complex, where two bariums are bound with partial occupancy at the EF2 motif. Thermodynamic studies confirm that EhCaBP1 has five binding sites for Ba2+ compared to four binding sites for the other metals. These structures and thermodynamic studies reveal that the EF-hand motifs can accommodate several heavy atoms with similar binding affinities. The binding of Ca2+ to the 1st, 2nd and 4th sites and the binding of Ba2+ to the 1st, 2nd, 4th and 5th sites are both enthalpically and entropically driven, whereas the binding of Sr2+ to the 1st, 2nd and 4th sites are simply enthalpy driven, interestingly in agreement with ITC data, Sr2+ do not coordinate with water in this structure. For all the metals, binding to the 3rd site is only entropy driven. Conclusion Energetically, Ca2+ is preferred in three sites, while in one site Ba2+ has better binding energy. The Sr2+-coordination in the EF hand motifs is similar to that of the native Ca2+ bound structure, except for the lack of water coordination. Sr2+ coordination seems to be a pre-formed in nature since all seven coordinating atoms are from the

  16. Neuroprotective Effect of Ginseng against Alteration of Calcium Binding Proteins Immunoreactivity in the Mice Hippocampus after Radiofrequency Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhiraj Maskey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium binding proteins (CaBPs such as calbindin D28-k, parvalbumin, and calretinin are able to bind Ca2+ with high affinity. Changes in Ca2+ concentrations via CaBPs can disturb Ca2+ homeostasis. Brain damage can be induced by the prolonged electromagnetic field (EMF exposure with loss of interacellular Ca2+ balance. The present study investigated the radioprotective effect of ginseng in regard to CaBPs immunoreactivity (IR in the hippocampus through immunohistochemistry after one-month exposure at 1.6 SAR value by comparing sham control with exposed and ginseng-treated exposed groups separately. Loss of dendritic arborization was noted with the CaBPs in the Cornu Ammonis areas as well as a decrease of staining intensity of the granule cells in the dentate gyrus after exposure while no loss was observed in the ginseng-treated group. A significant difference in the relative mean density was noted between control and exposed groups but was nonsignificant in the ginseng-treated group. Decrease in CaBP IR with changes in the neuronal staining as observed in the exposed group would affect the hippocampal trisynaptic circuit by alteration of the Ca2+ concentration which could be prevented by ginseng. Hence, ginseng could contribute as a radioprotective agent against EMF exposure, contributing to the maintenance of Ca2+ homeostasis by preventing impairment of intracellular Ca2+ levels in the hippocampus.

  17. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of calcium-binding protein-2 from Entamoeba histolytica and its complexes with strontium and the IQ1 motif of myosin V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium-binding protein-2 (EhCaBP2) crystals were grown using MPD as a precipitant. EhCaBP2 also crystallized in complex with strontium (replacing calcium) at similar conditions. Preliminary data for EhCaBP2 crystals in complex with an IQ motif are also reported. Calcium plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of amoebiasis, a major disease caused by Entamoeba histolytica. Two domains with four canonical EF-hand-containing calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) have been identified from E. histolytica. Even though they have very high sequence similarity, these bind to different target proteins in a Ca2+-dependent manner, leading to different functional pathways. Calcium-binding protein-2 (EhCaBP2) crystals were grown using MPD as a precipitant. The crystals belong to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 111.74, b = 68.83, c = 113.25 Å, β = 116.7°. EhCaBP2 also crystallized in complex with strontium (replacing calcium) at similar conditions. The crystals belong to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 69.18, b = 112.03, c = 93.42 Å, β = 92.8°. Preliminary data for EhCaBP2 crystals in complex with an IQ motif are also reported. This complex was crystallized with MPD and ethanol as precipitating agents. These crystals belong to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.5, b = 69.86, c = 86.5 Å, β = 97.9°

  18. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of calcium-binding protein-2 from Entamoeba histolytica and its complexes with strontium and the IQ1 motif of myosin V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourinath, S., E-mail: sgourinath@mail.jnu.ac.in; Padhan, Narendra; Alam, Neelima; Bhattacharya, Alok [School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2005-04-01

    Calcium-binding protein-2 (EhCaBP2) crystals were grown using MPD as a precipitant. EhCaBP2 also crystallized in complex with strontium (replacing calcium) at similar conditions. Preliminary data for EhCaBP2 crystals in complex with an IQ motif are also reported. Calcium plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of amoebiasis, a major disease caused by Entamoeba histolytica. Two domains with four canonical EF-hand-containing calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) have been identified from E. histolytica. Even though they have very high sequence similarity, these bind to different target proteins in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent manner, leading to different functional pathways. Calcium-binding protein-2 (EhCaBP2) crystals were grown using MPD as a precipitant. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 111.74, b = 68.83, c = 113.25 Å, β = 116.7°. EhCaBP2 also crystallized in complex with strontium (replacing calcium) at similar conditions. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 69.18, b = 112.03, c = 93.42 Å, β = 92.8°. Preliminary data for EhCaBP2 crystals in complex with an IQ motif are also reported. This complex was crystallized with MPD and ethanol as precipitating agents. These crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.5, b = 69.86, c = 86.5 Å, β = 97.9°.

  19. FhCaBP2: a Fasciola hepatica calcium-binding protein with EF-hand and dynein light chain domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Charlotte M; Timson, David J

    2015-09-01

    FhCaBP2 is a Fasciola hepatica protein which belongs to a family of helminth calcium-binding proteins which combine an N-terminal domain containing two EF-hand motifs and a C-terminal dynein light chain-like (DLC-like) domain. Its predicted structure showed two globular domains joined by a flexible linker. Recombinant FhCaBP2 interacted reversibly with calcium and manganese ions, but not with magnesium, barium, strontium, copper (II), colbalt (II), iron (II), nickel, lead or potassium ions. Cadmium (II) ions appeared to bind non-site-specifically and destabilize the protein. Interaction with either calcium or magnesium ions results in a conformational change in which the protein's surface becomes more hydrophobic. The EF-hand domain alone was able to interact with calcium and manganese ions; the DLC-like domain was not. Alteration of a residue (Asp-58 to Ala) in the second EF-hand motif in this domain abolished ion-binding activity. This suggests that the second EF-hand is the one responsible for ion-binding. FhCaBP2 homodimerizes and the extent of dimerization was not affected by calcium ions or by the aspartate to alanine substitution in the second EF-hand. The isolated EF-hand and DLC-like domains are both capable of homodimerization. FhCaBP2 interacted with the calmodulin antagonists trifluoperazine, chlorpromazine, thiamylal and W7. Interestingly, while chlorpromazine and thiamylal interacted with the EF-hand domain (as expected), trifluoperazine and W7 bound to the DLC-like domain. Overall, FhCaBP2 has distinct biochemical properties compared with other members of this protein family from Fasciola hepatica, a fact which supports the hypothesis that these proteins have different physiological roles. PMID:26152524

  20. Limited proteolysis combined with isotope labeling and quantitative LC-MALDI MS for monitoring protein conformational changes: a study on calcium-binding sites of cardiac Troponin C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions are important for understanding biological functions of proteins. A new technique based on the partial proteolysis of proteins combined with quantitative mass spectrometry is developed as a means of tracking structural changes after the formation of a protein-ligand complex. In this technique, a protein of interest with and without the binding of a ligand is digested with an enzyme to generate a set of peptides, followed by separation of the peptides by liquid chromatography. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) is used to identify chromatographically separated peptides, and locate their sequence alignments in the parent protein. Using an isotopically labeled protein as a sample against an unlabeled protein standard, quantitative information can be gathered. This overcomes the inherent lack of quantitative capability of MALDI MS. The utility of the technique to investigate protein-ligand interactions is demonstrated in a model system involving calcium binding to cardiac Troponin C (cTnC). Using this technique, the general location of the three calcium-binding sites of cTnC can be determined by using several different enzymes to generate overlapping peptide maps of cTnC

  1. Subdivisions of the auditory midbrain (n. mesencephalicus lateralis, pars dorsalis in zebra finches using calcium-binding protein immunocytochemistry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Logerot

    Full Text Available The midbrain nucleus mesencephalicus lateralis pars dorsalis (MLd is thought to be the avian homologue of the central nucleus of the mammalian inferior colliculus. As such, it is a major relay in the ascending auditory pathway of all birds and in songbirds mediates the auditory feedback necessary for the learning and maintenance of song. To clarify the organization of MLd, we applied three calcium binding protein antibodies to tissue sections from the brains of adult male and female zebra finches. The staining patterns resulting from the application of parvalbumin, calbindin and calretinin antibodies differed from each other and in different parts of the nucleus. Parvalbumin-like immunoreactivity was distributed throughout the whole nucleus, as defined by the totality of the terminations of brainstem auditory afferents; in other words parvalbumin-like immunoreactivity defines the boundaries of MLd. Staining patterns of parvalbumin, calbindin and calretinin defined two regions of MLd: inner (MLd.I and outer (MLd.O. MLd.O largely surrounds MLd.I and is distinct from the surrounding intercollicular nucleus. Unlike the case in some non-songbirds, however, the two MLd regions do not correspond to the terminal zones of the projections of the brainstem auditory nuclei angularis and laminaris, which have been found to overlap substantially throughout the nucleus in zebra finches.

  2. Immunocytochemical localization of the calcium-binding proteins calbindin D28K, calretinin, and parvalbumin in bat visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hang-Gu; Gu, Ya-Nan; Lee, Kyoung-Pil; Lee, Ji-Gun; Kim, Chan-Wook; Lee, Ji-Won; Jeong, Tae-Hee; Jeong, Young-Wun; Jeon, Chang-Jin

    2016-03-01

    It is a common misconception that bats are blind, and various studies have suggested that bats have visual abilities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the cytoarchitecture of calbindin D28K (CB)-, calretinin (CR)-, and parvalbumin (PV)-immunoreactive (IR) neurons in the bat visual cortex using immunocytochemistry. The highest density of CB- and PV-IR neurons was located in layer IV of the visual cortex. The majority of CB- and PV-IR neurons were characterized by a stellate or round/oval shape. CR-IR neurons were predominantly located in layers II/III, and the cells were principally round/oval in shape. Two-color immunofluorescence revealed that 65.96%, 24.24%, and 77.00% of the CB-, CR-, and PV-IR neurons, respectively, contained gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). We observed calcium-binding protein (CBP)-IR neurons in specific layers of the bat visual cortex and in specific cell types. Many of the CBP-IR neurons were GABAergic interneurons. These data provide useful clues to aid in understanding the functional aspects of the bat visual system. PMID:26536416

  3. Calcium-dependent and -independent binding of the pentraxin serum amyloid P component to glycosaminoglycans and amyloid proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, B; Sørensen, I J; Nybo, Mads; Nielsen, E H; Kaplan, B; Svehag, S E

    1997-01-01

    beta2M) by ELISA. An increase in the dose-dependent binding of SAP to heparan sulfate, AA-protein and beta2M was observed as the pH decreased from 8.0 to 5.0. Furthermore, a lower, but significant Ca2(+)-independent binding of SAP to heparan sulfate, dermatan sulfate, AA protein and the amyloid...

  4. Identification of a novel calcium binding motif based on the detection of sequence insertions in the animal peroxidase domain of bacterial proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saray Santamaría-Hernando

    Full Text Available Proteins of the animal heme peroxidase (ANP superfamily differ greatly in size since they have either one or two catalytic domains that match profile PS50292. The orf PP_2561 of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 that we have called PepA encodes a two-domain ANP. The alignment of these domains with those of PepA homologues revealed a variable number of insertions with the consensus G-x-D-G-x-x-[GN]-[TN]-x-D-D. This motif has also been detected in the structure of pseudopilin (pdb 3G20, where it was found to be involved in Ca(2+ coordination although a sequence analysis did not reveal the presence of any known calcium binding motifs in this protein. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that a peptide containing this consensus motif bound specifically calcium ions with affinities ranging between 33-79 µM depending on the pH. Microcalorimetric titrations of the purified N-terminal ANP-like domain of PepA revealed Ca(2+ binding with a K(D of 12 µM and stoichiometry of 1.25 calcium ions per protein monomer. This domain exhibited peroxidase activity after its reconstitution with heme. These data led to the definition of a novel calcium binding motif that we have termed PERCAL and which was abundantly present in animal peroxidase-like domains of bacterial proteins. Bacterial heme peroxidases thus possess two different types of calcium binding motifs, namely PERCAL and the related hemolysin type calcium binding motif, with the latter being located outside the catalytic domains and in their C-terminal end. A phylogenetic tree of ANP-like catalytic domains of bacterial proteins with PERCAL motifs, including single domain peroxidases, was divided into two major clusters, representing domains with and without PERCAL motif containing insertions. We have verified that the recently reported classification of bacterial heme peroxidases in two families (cd09819 and cd09821 is unrelated to these insertions. Sequences matching PERCAL were detected in all kingdoms of

  5. OsCCD1, a novel small calcium-binding protein with one EF-hand motif, positively regulates osmotic and salt tolerance in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Pei; Zou, Juanzi; Kong, Lin; Hu, Shiqi; Wang, Biying; Yang, Jun; Xie, Guosheng

    2016-06-01

    Calcium-binding proteins play key roles in the signal transduction in the growth and stress response in eukaryotes. However, a subfamily of proteins with one EF-hand motif has not been fully studied in higher plants. Here, a novel small calcium-binding protein with a C-terminal centrin-like domain (CCD1) in rice, OsCCD1, was characterized to show high similarity with a TaCCD1 in wheat. As a result, OsCCD1 can bind Ca(2+) in the in vitro EMSA and the fluorescence staining calcium-binding assays. Transient expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged OsCCD1 in rice protoplasts showed that OsCCD1 was localized in the nucleus and cytosol of rice cells. OsCCD1 transcript levels were transiently induced by osmotic stress and salt stress through the calcium-mediated ABA signal. The rice seedlings of T-DNA mutant lines showed significantly less tolerance to osmotic and salt stresses than wild type plants (p<0.01). Conversely, its overexpressors can significantly enhance the tolerance to osmotic and salt stresses than wild type plants (p<0.05). Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that, OsDREB2B, OsAPX1 and OsP5CS genes are involved in the rice tolerance to osmotic and salt stresses. In sum, OsCCD1 gene probably affects the DREB2B and its downstream genes to positively regulate osmotic and salt tolerance in rice seedlings. PMID:27095404

  6. Calcium-binding Protein Calretinin Immunoreactivity in the Dog Superior Colliculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied calretinin-immunoreactive (IR) fibers and cells in the canine superior colliculus (SC) and studied the distribution and effect of enucleation on the distribution of this protein. Localization of calretinin was immunocytochemically observed. A dense plexus of anti-calretinin-IR fibers was found within the upper part of the superficial gray layer (SGL). Almost all of the labeled fibers were small in diameter with few varicosities. The intermediate and deep layers contained many calretinin-IR neurons. Labeled neurons within the intermediate gray layer (IGL) formed clusters in many sections. By contrast, labeled neurons in the deep gray layer (DGL) did not form clusters. Calretinin-IR neurons in the IGL and DGL varied in morphology and included round/oval, vertical fusiform, stellate, and horizontal neurons. Neurons with varicose dendrites were also labeled in the IGL. Most of the labeled neurons were small to medium in size. Monocular enucleation produced an almost complete reduction of calretinin-IR fibers in the SC contralateral to the enucleation. However, many calretinin-IR cells appeared in the contralateral superficial SC. Enucleation appeared to have no effect on the distribution of calretinin-IR neurons in the contralateral intermediate and deep layers of the SC. The calretinin-IR neurons in the superficial dog SC were heterogeneous small- to medium-sized neurons including round/oval, vertical fusiform, stellate, pyriform, and horizontal in shape. Two-color immunofluorescence revealed that no cells in the dog SC expressed both calretinin and GABA. Many horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled retinal ganglion cells were seen after injections into the superficial layers. The vast majority of the double-labeled cells (HRP and calretinin) were small cells. The present results indicate that antibody to calretinin labels subpopulations of neurons in the dog SC, which do not express GABA. The results also suggest that the calretinin-IR afferents in the

  7. Kinetics of binding of dihydropyridine calcium channel ligands to skeletal muscle membranes: Evidence for low-affinity sites and for the involvement of G proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed kinetic studies of the binding of the calcium channel antagonist (+)-[3H]PN200-110 to membrane preparations form rabbit skeletal muscle have demonstrated that, in addition to the high-affinity sites that are readily measured in equilibrium and kinetic experiments, there are also dihydropyridine binding sites with much lower affinities. These sites were detected by the ability of micromolar concentrations of several dihydropyridines to accelerate the rate of dissociation of (+)-[3H]PN200-110 from its high-affinity sites. The observed increase in rate was dependent on the concentration of competing ligand, and half-maximal effects occurred at approximately 10 μM for the agonist (±)-Bay K8644 and for the antagonists nifedipine, (±)-nitrendipine, and (+)-PN200-110. The low-affinity sites appear to be stereospecific since (-)-PN200-110 (1-200 μM) did not affect the dissociation rate. The possible involvement of guanine nucleotide binding proteins in dihydropyridine binding has been investigated by studying the effects of guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTPγS) and guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDPβS) on binding parameters. GTPγS did increase the ability of (±)-[3H]PN200-110. These results suggest that skeletal muscle dihydropyridine receptors have low-affinity binding sites that may be involved in the regulation of calcium channel function and that activation of a guanine nucleotide binding protein may modulate the binding of agonists but not of antagonists to these sites

  8. Comparative distribution of relaxin-3 inputs and calcium-binding protein-positive neurons in rat amygdala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio N Santos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The neural circuits involved in mediating complex behaviors are being rapidly elucidated using various newly developed and powerful anatomical and molecular techniques, providing insights into the neural basis for anxiety disorders, depression, addiction, and dysfunctional social behaviors. Many of these behaviors and associated physiological processes involve the activation of the amygdala in conjunction with cortical and hippocampal circuits. Ascending subcortical projections provide modulatory inputs to the extended amygdala and its related nodes (or ‘hubs’ within these key circuits. One such input arises from the nucleus incertus (NI in the tegmentum, which sends amino acid- and peptide-containing projections throughout the forebrain. Notably, a distinct population of GABAergic NI neurons expresses the highly-conserved neuropeptide, relaxin-3, and relaxin-3 signaling has been implicated in the modulation of reward/motivation and anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors in rodents via actions within the extended amygdala. Thus, a detailed description of the relaxin-3 innervation of the extended amygdala would provide an anatomical framework for an improved understanding of NI and relaxin-3 modulation of these and other specific amygdala-related functions. Therefore, in this study, we examined the distribution of NI projections and relaxin-3-positive elements (axons/fibers/terminals within the amygdala, relative to the distribution of neurons expressing the calcium-binding proteins, parvalbumin, calretinin and/or calbindin. Anterograde tracer injections into the NI revealed a topographic distribution of NI efferents within the amygdala that was near identical to the distribution of relaxin-3-immunoreactive fibers. Highest densities of anterogradely-labeled elements and relaxin-3-immunoreactive fibers were observed in the medial nucleus of the amygdala, medial divisions of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST and in the endopiriform

  9. Comparative Distribution of Relaxin-3 Inputs and Calcium-Binding Protein-Positive Neurons in Rat Amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Fabio N; Pereira, Celia W; Sánchez-Pérez, Ana M; Otero-García, Marcos; Ma, Sherie; Gundlach, Andrew L; Olucha-Bordonau, Francisco E

    2016-01-01

    The neural circuits involved in mediating complex behaviors are being rapidly elucidated using various newly developed and powerful anatomical and molecular techniques, providing insights into the neural basis for anxiety disorders, depression, addiction, and dysfunctional social behaviors. Many of these behaviors and associated physiological processes involve the activation of the amygdala in conjunction with cortical and hippocampal circuits. Ascending subcortical projections provide modulatory inputs to the extended amygdala and its related nodes (or "hubs") within these key circuits. One such input arises from the nucleus incertus (NI) in the tegmentum, which sends amino acid- and peptide-containing projections throughout the forebrain. Notably, a distinct population of GABAergic NI neurons expresses the highly-conserved neuropeptide, relaxin-3, and relaxin-3 signaling has been implicated in the modulation of reward/motivation and anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors in rodents via actions within the extended amygdala. Thus, a detailed description of the relaxin-3 innervation of the extended amygdala would provide an anatomical framework for an improved understanding of NI and relaxin-3 modulation of these and other specific amygdala-related functions. Therefore, in this study, we examined the distribution of NI projections and relaxin-3-positive elements (axons/fibers/terminals) within the amygdala, relative to the distribution of neurons expressing the calcium-binding proteins, parvalbumin (PV), calretinin (CR) and/or calbindin. Anterograde tracer injections into the NI revealed a topographic distribution of NI efferents within the amygdala that was near identical to the distribution of relaxin-3-immunoreactive fibers. Highest densities of anterogradely-labeled elements and relaxin-3-immunoreactive fibers were observed in the medial nucleus of the amygdala, medial divisions of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) and in the endopiriform nucleus. In

  10. Novel control of cardiac myofilament response to calcium by S-glutahionylation at specific sites of myosin binding protein C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.JohnSolaro

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Our previous studies demonstrated a relation between glutathionylation of cardiac myosin binding protein C and diastolic dysfunction in a hypertensive mouse model stressed by treatment with salt, deoxycorticosterone acetate, and unilateral nephrectomy. Although these results strongly indicated an important role for S-glutathionylation of myosin binding protein C as a modifier of myofilament function, indirect effects of other post-translational modifications may have occurred. Moreover, we did not determine the sites of thiol modification by glutathionylation. To address these issues, we developed an in vitro method to mimic the in situ S-glutathionylation of myofilament proteins and determined direct functional effects and sites of oxidative modification employing Western blotting and mass spectrometry. We induced glutathionylation in vitro by treatment of isolated myofibrils and detergent extracted fiber bundles (skinned fibers with oxidized glutathione (GSSG. Immuno-blotting results revealed increased glutathionylation with GSSG treatment of a protein band around 140 kDa. Using tandem mass spectrometry, we identified the 140 kDa band as cardiac myosin binding protein C and determined the sites of glutathionylation to be at cysteines 655, 479, and 627. Determination of the relation between Ca2+-activation of myofibrillar acto-myosin ATPase rate demonstrated an increased Ca2+-sensitivity induced by the S-glutathionylation. Force generating skinned fiber bundles also showed an increase in Ca-sensitivity when treated with oxidized glutathione, which was reversed with the reducing agent, dithiothreitol. Our data demonstrate that a specific and direct effect of S-glutathionylation of myosin binding protein C is a significant increase in myofilament Ca2+-sensitivity. Our data also provide new insights into the functional significance of oxidative modification of myosin binding protein C and the potential role of domains not previously considered to

  11. Binding of calcium and carbonate to polyacrylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribello, Gareth A; Liew, CheeChin; Parrinello, Michele

    2009-05-21

    Polyacrylate molecules can be used to slow the growth of calcium carbonate. However, little is known about the mechanism by which the molecules impede the growth rate. A recent computational study (Bulo et al. Macromolecules 2007, 40, 3437) used metadynamics to investigate the binding of calcium to polyacrylate chains and has thrown some light on the coiling and precipitation of these polymers. We extend these simulations to examine the binding of calcium and carbonate to polyacrylate chains. We show that calcium complexed with both carbonate and polyacrylate is a very stable species. The free energies of calcium-carbonate-polyacrylate complexes, with different polymer configurations, are calculated, and differences in the free energy of the binding of carbonate are shown to be due to differences in the amount of steric hindrance about the calcium, which prevents the approach of the carbonate ion. PMID:19400592

  12. Antisense expression of a gene encoding a calcium-binding protein in transgenic tobacco leads to altered morphology and enhanced chlorophyll

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Girdhar K Pandey; Amita Pandey; Vanga Siva Reddy; Renu Deswal; Alok Bhattacharya; Kailash C Upadhyaya; Sudhir K Sopory

    2007-03-01

    Entamoeba histolytica contains a novel calcium-binding protein like calmodulin, which was discovered earlier, and we have reported the presence of its homologue(s) and a dependent protein kinase in plants. To understand the functions of these in plants, a cDNA encoding a calcium-binding protein isolated from Entamoeba histolytica (EhCaBP) was cloned into vector pBI121 in antisense orientation and transgenic tobacco plants were raised. These plants showed variation in several phenotypic characters, of which two distinct features, more greenness and leaf thickness, were inherited in subsequent generations. The increase in the level of total chlorophyll in different plants ranged from 60% to 70%. There was no major change in chloroplast structure and in the protein level of D1, D2, LHCP and RuBP carboxylase. These morphological changes were not seen in antisense calmodulin transgenic tobacco plants, nor was the calmodulin level altered in EhCaBP antisense plants.

  13. Bioinformatic analysis and molecular modelling of human ameloblastin suggest a two-domain intrinsically unstructured calcium-binding protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vymětal, Jiří; Slabý, I.; Spahr, A.; Vondrášek, Jiří; Lyngstadaas, S. P.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 2 (2008), s. 124-134. ISSN 0909-8836 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/05/0009; GA ČR GA203/06/1727; GA MŠk LC512 Grant ostatní: EU(XE) QLK3-CT-2001-00090 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : ameloblastin * bioinformatic modelling * calcium * intrinsically unstructured protein Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.957, year: 2008

  14. Interdependence of calcium and cobalamin binding by wild-type and mutant BtuB protein in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Bradbeer, C; Gudmundsdottir, A

    1990-01-01

    The binding of calcium and cobalamin to outer membranes from cells of Escherichia coli that contained amplified levels of wild-type or mutant btuB was studied. The mutant (BBam50) had an aspartyl-prolyl dipeptide inserted after the original 50th amino acid residue of the mature BtuB protein, which is within a region that shows extensive homology with the ferric siderophore receptors. This insertion resulted in cleavage of the BtuB in two places. The larger form retained the insertion but had ...

  15. High resolution solution structure of apo calcyclin and structural variations in the S100 family of calcium-binding proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three-dimensional solution structure of apo rabbit lung calcyclin has been refined to high resolution through the use of heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy and 13C,15N- enriched protein. Upon completing the assignment of virtually all of the 15N, 13C and 1H NMR resonances, the solution structure was determined from a combination of 2814 NOE- derived distance constraints, and 272 torsion angle constraints derived from scalar couplings. A large number of critical inter- subunit NOEs (386) were identified from 13C- select,13C-filtered NOESY experiments, providing a highly accurate dimer interface. The combination of distance geometry and restrained molecular dynamics calculations yielded structures with excellent agreement with the experimental data and high precision (rmsd from the mean for the backbone atoms in the eight helices: 0.33 A). Calcyclin exhibits a symmetric dimeric fold of two identical 90 amino acid subunits, characteristic of the S100 subfamily of EF-hand Ca2+-binding proteins. The structure reveals a readily identified pair of putative sites for binding of Zn2+. In order to accurately determine the structural features that differentiate the various S100 proteins, distance difference matrices and contact maps were calculated for the NMR structural ensembles of apo calcyclin and rat and bovine S100B. These data show that the most significant variations among the structures are in the positioning of helix III and in loops, the regions with least sequence similarity. Inter-helical angles and distance differences for the proteins show that the positioning of helix III of calcyclin is most similar to that of bovine S100B, but that the helix interfaces are more closely packed in calcyclin than in either S100B structure. Surprisingly large differences were found in the positioning of helix III in the two S100B structures, despite there being only four non-identical residues, suggesting that one or both of the S100B structures requires further refinement

  16. Molecular cloning and expression of EgTCTP, encoding a calcium binding protein, enhances the growth of callus in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis, Jacq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisa Nakkaew

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP has now been identified in evolutionarily diverse organisms and isthought to play an important role in cell growth and cell division. We have identified an EgTCTP gene from Elaeis guineensisJacq. It is a putative protein of 168 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 19.2 kDa. EgTCTP has a high homology(84% - 91% identity at the amino acid level to other plant TCTPs from Hevea brasiliensis, Arachis hypogaea and Glycinemax. The recombinant EgTCTP protein is a calcium binding protein. Transgenic embryonic calli overexpressing EgTCTP havea faster growth rate than non-transformed and empty vector transformed calli. The results show that the enhancement ofEgTCTP gene expression in oil palm embryogenic calli may result in faster multiplication of the embryogenic calli. EgTCTPacts as another Ca2+-modulated protein that is involved in the cell cycle progression.

  17. A novel method for evaluating microglial activation using ionized calcium-binding adaptor protein-1 staining: cell body to cell size ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Bertha Hovens

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to validate a newly developed methodology of semi-automatic image analysis to analyze microglial morphology as marker for microglial activation in ionized calcium-binding adaptor protein-1 (IBA-1 stained brain sections. Methods: The novel method was compared to currently used analysis methods, visual characterization of activation stage and optical density measurement, in brain sections of young and aged rats that had undergone surgery or remained naοve. Results: The cell body to cell size ratio of microglia was strongly correlated to the visual characterization activation stage. In addition, we observed specific surgery and age-related changes in cell body size, size of the dendritic processes and cell body to cell size ratio. Conclusion: The novel analysis method provides a sensitive marker for microglial activation in the rat brain, which is quick and easy to perform and provides additional information about microglial morphology.

  18. Effects of altered gravity on the expression of Calcium -binding and matrix proteins in the inner ear of developing fish following ∆g-expositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbig, Reinhard; Hendrik Anken, Ralf; Weigele, Jochen

    The results of the Foton-M3 mission (OmegaHab) give evidence that the otoliths of the fish form OmegaHab were larger as compared to the ground control. Additionally the shape (raphe) and morphology especially the mode of crystallization of the otoliths were affected during growth in weightlessness. The reason for these changes is assumed to originate from changes in the composition of the otolith matrix and Ca-binding proteins (OMP). The OMPs play an important role in controlling the crystallization process and additionally the morphology of crystals, determining the crystallpolymorph and the strength of the crystals. The matrix of otoliths is a complex functional structure containing several calcium-binding proteins, structural proteins and protease inhibitors. Furthermore it is composed of otolith matrix protein-1, Otolin, Otoconin, SPARC and Neuroserpin, which is a specific expression in the otolth matrix for chichlid fish. During embryonic development of the fish inner ear, these proteins show a spacial and temporal expression pattern. The formation of the inner ear -including otoliths and sensory cells -starting from the otocyst-anlage -can be subdivided in several major developmental stages e.g. the forming of the otic cavity (stage 7/8), the tetha cell or seeding stage (stage 8, 9), the development of the semicircular channels (stage 12), the transition to further daily growth (post stage15) and the development of the third otolith, asteriscus (stage 23). These developmental phases contain different constitutions or involvements of matrix proteins. We investigated the matrixprotein composition of the chichlid fish Oreochromis mossambicus and found that the otolith matrix differentiate between other fishes. In this case some matrix proteins seem to be uniform in fishes, other known matrix proteins are lacking and we have also references to new candidates for matrix proteins chichlids. In this case we investigated the expression of the matrix proteins otolith

  19. Structures of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases reveal mechanism of activation by calcium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wernimont, Amy K; Artz, Jennifer D.; Jr, Patrick Finerty; Lin, Yu-Hui; Amani, Mehrnaz; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Senisterra, Guillermo; Vedadi, Masoud; Tempel, Wolfram; Mackenzie, Farrell; Chau, Irene; Lourido, Sebastian; Sibley, L. David; Hui, Raymond (Toronto); (WU-MED)

    2010-09-21

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) have pivotal roles in the calcium-signaling pathway in plants, ciliates and apicomplexan parasites and comprise a calmodulin-dependent kinase (CaMK)-like kinase domain regulated by a calcium-binding domain in the C terminus. To understand this intramolecular mechanism of activation, we solved the structures of the autoinhibited (apo) and activated (calcium-bound) conformations of CDPKs from the apicomplexan parasites Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. In the apo form, the C-terminal CDPK activation domain (CAD) resembles a calmodulin protein with an unexpected long helix in the N terminus that inhibits the kinase domain in the same manner as CaMKII. Calcium binding triggers the reorganization of the CAD into a highly intricate fold, leading to its relocation around the base of the kinase domain to a site remote from the substrate binding site. This large conformational change constitutes a distinct mechanism in calcium signal-transduction pathways.

  20. Calmodulin Binding Proteins and Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, Danton H; Eshak, Kristeen; Myre, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    The small, calcium-sensor protein, calmodulin, is ubiquitously expressed and central to cell function in all cell types. Here the literature linking calmodulin to Alzheimer's disease is reviewed. Several experimentally-verified calmodulin-binding proteins are involved in the formation of amyloid-β plaques including amyloid-β protein precursor, β-secretase, presenilin-1, and ADAM10. Many others possess potential calmodulin-binding domains that remain to be verified. Three calmodulin binding proteins are associated with the formation of neurofibrillary tangles: two kinases (CaMKII, CDK5) and one protein phosphatase (PP2B or calcineurin). Many of the genes recently identified by genome wide association studies and other studies encode proteins that contain putative calmodulin-binding domains but only a couple (e.g., APOE, BIN1) have been experimentally confirmed as calmodulin binding proteins. At least two receptors involved in calcium metabolism and linked to Alzheimer's disease (mAchR; NMDAR) have also been identified as calmodulin-binding proteins. In addition to this, many proteins that are involved in other cellular events intimately associated with Alzheimer's disease including calcium channel function, cholesterol metabolism, neuroinflammation, endocytosis, cell cycle events, and apoptosis have been tentatively or experimentally verified as calmodulin binding proteins. The use of calmodulin as a potential biomarker and as a therapeutic target is discussed. PMID:25812852

  1. A calcium-binding protein, rice annexin OsANN1, enhances heat stress tolerance by modulating the production of H2O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Bei; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Dongliang; Wang, Haiqi; Yin, Jingya; Wang, Rui; He, Mengli; Cui, Meng; Shang, Zhonglin; Wang, Dekai; Zhu, Zhengge

    2015-09-01

    OsANN1 is a member of the annexin protein family in rice. The function of this protein and the mechanisms of its involvement in stress responses and stress tolerance are largely unknown. Here it is reported that OsANN1 confers abiotic stress tolerance by modulating antioxidant accumulation under abiotic stress. OsANN1-knockdown [RNA interference (RNAi)] plants were more sensitive to heat and drought stresses, whereas OsANN1-overexpression (OE) lines showed improved growth with higher expression of OsANN1 under abiotic stress. Overexpression of OsANN1 promoted SOD (superoxide dismutase) and CAT (catalase) activities, which regulate H2O2 content and redox homeostasis, suggesting the existence of a feedback mechanism between OsANN1 and H2O2 production under abiotic stress. Higher expression of OsANN1 can provide overall cellular protection against abiotic stress-induced damage, and a significant accumulation of OsANN1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) signals was found in the cytosol after heat shock treatment. OsANN1 also has calcium-binding and ATPase activities in vitro, indicating that OsANN1 has multiple functions in rice growth. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays demonstrated that OsANN1 interacts with OsCDPK24. This cross-talk may provide additional layers of regulation in the abiotic stress response. PMID:26085678

  2. Calcium Binding by Ro 60 Multiple Antigenic Peptides on PVDF Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, Biji T; Bachmann, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies directed against ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles are observed in systemic lupus erythematosus. Ro RNP particle is one such target. It is composed of a 60 kDa protein (Ro 60 or SS-A) that is non-covalently associated with at least one of the four short uridine-rich RNAs (the hY RNAs). Previously, we showed that multiple antigenic peptides (MAPs) made from the sequence of the Ro 60 autoantigen could be used, using double-immunodiffusion studies, enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay, affinity chromatography, and surface plasmon resonance, to show intramolecular and intermolecular protein-protein interaction within the Ro 60 RNP particle. We also observed that calcium is important in mediating this interaction. We hypothesized, therefore, that 60 kDa Ro is a calcium-binding protein. To investigate this, we electrophoresed 60 kDa Ro MAPs, transferred them to PVDF membrane, and assayed calcium binding using the Quin-2 system. Several Ro 60 MAPs were found to bind calcium using this assay, as well as bovine serum albumin, another calcium-binding protein. However, a MAP constructed from the Sm autoantigen did not bind to calcium. These data, along with our observation regarding the involvement of calcium in protein-protein interaction occurring between Ro 60 antigen and Ro 60 MAPs, makes us propose that Ro 60 antigen is a calcium-binding protein. PMID:26139264

  3. Calcium binding to low molecular weight compounds and health promoting products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vavrusova, Martina

    absorption. Therefore, calcium as an essential nutrient should not be underestimated in our diet. Milk and dairy products are good sources of bioavailable calcium due to specific protein binding. Other sources of calcium, apart from a balanced and healthy diet, are calcium supplements and calcium fortified...... food. Therefore, an understanding of the basic chemistry of calcium binding to low molecular weight compounds can contribute to a general knowledge about calcium bioavailability and also to product improvement. Calcium precipitation with palmitate was described by a first-order reaction for conditions...... calcium Dgluconate only slowly precipitated after a lag phase. On the other hand, the slow dissolution of calcium D-gluconate by sodium L-lactate in aqueous solution with the reverse lactate/gluconate ratio did not result in a similar solution since fast precipitation prevented formation of a homogenous...

  4. Characterization, Evolution and Tissue-specific Expression of AmphiCalbin, a Novel Gene Encoding EF-hand Calcium-binding Protein in Amphioxus Branchiostoma belcheri

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing LUAN; Shicui ZHANG; Zhenhui LIU; Chunxin FAN; Guangdong JI; Lei LI

    2007-01-01

    An amphioxus full-length cDNA, AmphiCalbin, encoding a novel EF-hand calcium-binding protein (EFCaBP), was isolated from the gut cDNA library of amphioxus Branchiostoma belcheri. It consists of 1321 bp with a 636 bp open reading frame encoding a protein of 211 amino acids with a molecular mass of approximately 24.5 kDa. The phylogenetic analysis offers two interesting inferences. First, AmphiCalbin clusters with a group of unnamed EFCaBPs that are differentiated from other identified EFCaBPs. Second,AmphiCalbin falls at the base of the vertebrate unnamed EFCaBPs clade, probably representing their prototype.This is also corroborated by the fact that AmphiCalbin has an exon-intron organization identical to that of vertebrate unnamed EFCaBP genes. Both tissue-section in situ hybridization and whole-mount in situ hybridization prove a tissue-specific expression pattern of AmphiCalbin, with high levels of expression in the digestive system and gonads. It is proposed that AmphiCalbin might play a role in the digestive system and gonads. These observations lay the foundation for further understanding of the function of the unnamed EFCaBPs.

  5. Studies on the mode of action of calciferol. XIII. Development of a radioimmunoassay for vitamin D-dependent chick intestinal calcium-binding protein and tissue distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A RIA for chick intestinal calcium-binding protein (CaBP) has been developed with a sensitivity of 1 ng. The antiserum was generated in rabbits injected with highly purified vitamin D-dependent chick intestinal CaBP. The assay employs the double antibody technique, and 125I-labeled CaBP was prepared using chloramine T. Low molecular weight peptide hormones and normal rabbit, rat, and human serum proteins show no cross-reactivity in the assay. Measurements of chick intestinal and kidney CaBP by RIA showed a good correlation with measurements of CaBP by the radial immunodiffusion method. The assay is reproducible (interassay variability, 16.3%) and precise (intraassay variability, 4.0%). The concentration of immunoreactive CaBP (iCaBP) in chick serum (2.7 ng/ml serum) can now be measured as early as 8 h after the administration of 6.5 nmol 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3; a maximum of 11 ng/ml is reached at 20 h. The level of CaBP in chick serum was found to be dependent on the dose of vitamin D3 or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 administered to the animal

  6. Studies on the mode of action of calciferol. XIII. Development of a radioimmunoassay for vitamin D-dependent chick intestinal calcium-binding protein and tissue distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christakos, S.; Friedlander, E.J.; Frandsen, B.R.; Norman, A.W.

    1979-05-01

    A RIA for chick intestinal calcium-binding protein (CaBP) has been developed with a sensitivity of 1 ng. The antiserum was generated in rabbits injected with highly purified vitamin D-dependent chick intestinal CaBP. The assay employs the double antibody technique, and /sup 125/I-labeled CaBP was prepared using chloramine T. Low molecular weight peptide hormones and normal rabbit, rat, and human serum proteins show no cross-reactivity in the assay. Measurements of chick intestinal and kidney CaBP by RIA showed a good correlation with measurements of CaBP by the radial immunodiffusion method. The assay is reproducible (interassay variability, 16.3%) and precise (intraassay variability, 4.0%). The concentration of immunoreactive CaBP (iCaBP) in chick serum (2.7 ng/ml serum) can now be measured as early as 8 h after the administration of 6.5 nmol 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/; a maximum of 11 ng/ml is reached at 20 h. The level of CaBP in chick serum was found to be dependent on the dose of vitamin D/sub 3/ or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/ administered to the animal.

  7. Calcium absorption and calcium binding protein synthesis in the chick: evidence for a 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol-like factor in solanum malacoxylon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasserman, R.H.; Bar, A.; Corradino, R.A.; Taylor, A.N.; Peterlik, M.

    1974-01-01

    Some properties of the vitamin D dependent CaBP have been briefly summarized. In addition to providing possible insight into the molecular basis of vitamin D action, the measurement of intestinal CaBP in animals subjected to different conditions and treatments has proven useful in assessing the effective vitamin D status of that animal. Using measurements of both the degree of intestinal /sup 47/Ca absorption in situ and duodenal CaBP levels, some aspects of the vitamin D-like factor in the South American plant Solanum malacoxylon were investigated. A vitamin D assay based on CaBP as end point indicated that the plant contains about 1.3 x 10/sup 5/ IU vitamin D/sub 3/ equivalents per kg. The Solanum factor, together with an adequate calcium intake, are necessary conditions for the product of gross toxic symptoms in the chick. Using experimental conditions that inhibit the conversion of 25-(OH)D/sub 3/ to 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/ by the kidney enzyme system (i.e., a high stable strontium diet), it was shown that the Solanum factor can cause a reversal of this inhibition. This suggested that the Solanum factor mimics the action of 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/, and this was confirmed by Walling and Kimberg (personal communication) since, in their hands, the administration of S. malacoxylon extract to nephrectomized rats was able to stimulate intestinal calcium transport in vitro. Similar results were brought forth at this meeting by Dr. Mautalen of Argentina. The Solanum factor was effective in an intestinal organ culture system, indicating that the factor acts directly on the gut and, if modification of the factor is needed for biological activity, the necessary enzymes are present in the intestinal tissue.

  8. Location and nature of calcium-binding sites in salivary acidic proline-rich phosphoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The location of the calcium-binding sites in the human acidic proline-rich proteins, salivary proteins A and C, was determined by equilibrium dialysis of the tryptic peptides with buffers containing 45Ca. All the calcium-binding sites are located in the NH2-terminal tryptic peptide (TX peptide). The nature of the calcium binding sites in the TX peptide and native salivary proteins A and C, as well as dephosphorylated proteins was compared. Two types of sites can be distinguished in peptide TX. Type I sites have an apparent dissociation constant (K) of 38 μM and are responsible for the binding of 2.6 mol of Ca/mol of peptide. The corresponding figures for Type II sites are 780 μM and 5.3 mol of Ca/mol of peptide. In the native proteins, the amount of calcium bound at the type II sites decreases to 3.9 mol of Ca/mol of proteins A and C and K increases to 1100 μM. The amount of calcium bound at type I sites decreases to 1.5 mol/mol of protein A and 0.6 mol/mol of protein C, but there is no change in K. Dephosphorylation affects the calcium binding at both types of sites. The experiments indicate that the COOH-terminal parts of the native proteins affect the number and the nature of the protein calcium-binding sites. Proton and phosphorous NMR data demonstrate that β-COOH in aspartic acid, as well as phosphoserine, are part of the calcium-binding sites. The difference in calcium binding to salivary proteins A and C may be due at least partially to differences in the environment of one or more aspartic acids

  9. Location and nature of calcium-binding sites in salivary acidic proline-rich phosphoproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennick, A. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario); McLaughlin, A.C.; Grey, A.A.; Madapallimattam, G.

    1981-05-25

    The location of the calcium-binding sites in the human acidic proline-rich proteins, salivary proteins A and C, was determined by equilibrium dialysis of the tryptic peptides with buffers containing /sup 45/Ca. All the calcium-binding sites are located in the NH/sub 2/-terminal tryptic peptide (TX peptide). The nature of the calcium binding sites in the TX peptide and native salivary proteins A and C, as well as dephosphorylated proteins was compared. Two types of sites can be distinguished in peptide TX. Type I sites have an apparent dissociation constant (K) of 38 ..mu..M and are responsible for the binding of 2.6 mol of Ca/mol of peptide. The corresponding figures for Type II sites are 780 ..mu..M and 5.3 mol of Ca/mol of peptide. In the native proteins, the amount of calcium bound at the type II sites decreases to 3.9 mol of Ca/mol of proteins A and C and K increases to 1100 ..mu..M. The amount of calcium bound at type I sites decreases to 1.5 mol/mol of protein A and 0.6 mol/mol of protein C, but there is no change in K. Dephosphorylation affects the calcium binding at both types of sites. The experiments indicate that the COOH-terminal parts of the native proteins affect the number and the nature of the protein calcium-binding sites. Proton and phosphorous NMR data demonstrate that ..beta..-COOH in aspartic acid, as well as phosphoserine, are part of the calcium-binding sites. The difference in calcium binding to salivary proteins A and C may be due at least partially to differences in the environment of one or more aspartic acids.

  10. Calcium binding to calmodulin by molecular dynamics with effective polarization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kohagen, Miriam; Lepšík, Martin; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 22 (2014), s. 3964-3969. ISSN 1948-7185 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016; GA MŠk LH12001 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : EF-hand motif * free energy calculations * charge scaling * calcium-binding protein * umbrella sampling Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 7.458, year: 2014

  11. Protein kinase C interaction with calcium: a phospholipid-dependent process.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bazzi, M D

    1990-08-21

    The calcium-binding properties of calcium- and phospholipid-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) were investigated by equilibrium dialysis in the presence and the absence of phospholipids. Calcium binding to PKC displayed striking and unexpected behavior; the free proteins bound virtually no calcium at intracellular calcium concentrations and bound limited calcium (about 1 mol\\/mol of PKC) at 200 microM calcium. However, in the presence of membranes containing acidic phospholipids, PKC bound at least eight calcium ions per protein. The presence of 1 microM phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu) in the dialysis buffer had little effect on these calcium-binding properties. Analysis of PKC-calcium binding by gel filtration under equilibrium conditions gave similar results; only membrane-associated PKC bound significant amounts of calcium. Consequently, PKC is a member of what may be a large group of proteins that bind calcium in a phospholipid-dependent manner. The calcium concentrations needed to induce PKC-membrane binding were similar to those needed for calcium binding (about 40 microM calcium at the midpoint). However, the calcium concentration required for PKC-membrane binding was strongly influenced by the phosphatidylserine composition of the membranes. Membranes with higher percentages of phosphatidylserine required lower concentrations of calcium. These properties suggested that the calcium sites may be generated at the interface between PKC and the membrane. Calcium may function as a bridge between PKC and phospholipids. These studies also suggested that calcium-dependent PKC-membrane binding and PKC function could be regulated by a number of factors in addition to calcium levels and diacylglycerol content of the membrane.

  12. Distribution of NADPH-diaphorase in the superior colliculus of Cebus monkeys, and co-localization with calcium-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, J G M; Mendez-Otero, R; Gattass, Ricardo

    2003-08-01

    We examined the distribution of the enzyme dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase (NADPH-d) in the superior colliculus (SC) of the New World monkey Cebus apella, and the co-localization of this enzyme with the calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) calbindin-D28K, parvalbumin and calretinin. Despite the intensely labeled neuropil, rare NADPH-d-positive cells were observed in the stratum griseum superficiale (SGS). Most of the labeled cells in the SC were found in the intermediate layers, with a great number also in the deeper layers. This pattern is very similar to that described in the opossum (Didelphis marsupialis) and in the cat, and different from the pattern found in the rat, which shows labeled cells mainly in the SGS. Cells doubly stained for NADPH-d and CaBPs were observed throughout the SC, although in a small number. Of the NADPH-d-positive cells, 20.3% were doubly labeled for NADPH-d and parvalbumin, 10.2% revealed co-localization with calretinin, and 5.6% with calbindin. The low number of double-stained cells for NADPH-d and the CaBPs indicates that these molecules must participate in different functional circuits within the SC. PMID:12871769

  13. Calcium binding to beta-2-microglobulin at physiological pH drives the occurrence of conformational changes which cause the protein to precipitate into amorphous forms that subsequently transform into amyloid aggregates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhdeep Kumar

    Full Text Available Using spectroscopic, calorimetric and microscopic methods, we demonstrate that calcium binds to beta-2-microglobulin (β2m under physiological conditions of pH and ionic strength, in biological buffers, causing a conformational change associated with the binding of up to four calcium atoms per β2m molecule, with a marked transformation of some random coil structure into beta sheet structure, and culminating in the aggregation of the protein at physiological (serum concentrations of calcium and β2m. We draw attention to the fact that the sequence of β2m contains several potential calcium-binding motifs of the DXD and DXDXD (or DXEXD varieties. We establish (a that the microscopic aggregation seen at physiological concentrations of β2m and calcium turns into actual turbidity and visible precipitation at higher concentrations of protein and β2m, (b that this initial aggregation/precipitation leads to the formation of amorphous aggregates, (c that the formation of the amorphous aggregates can be partially reversed through the addition of the divalent ion chelating agent, EDTA, and (d that upon incubation for a few weeks, the amorphous aggregates appear to support the formation of amyloid aggregates that bind to the dye, thioflavin T (ThT, resulting in increase in the dye's fluorescence. We speculate that β2m exists in the form of microscopic aggregates in vivo and that these don't progress to form larger amyloid aggregates because protein concentrations remain low under normal conditions of kidney function and β2m degradation. However, when kidney function is compromised and especially when dialysis is performed, β2m concentrations probably transiently rise to yield large aggregates that deposit in bone joints and transform into amyloids during dialysis related amyloidosis.

  14. Preparation and identification of water-soluble calcium-binding protein from grape (Vitis vinifera L.) seeds%葡萄籽中水溶性钙结合蛋白的分离和鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕晨艳; 赵广华

    2015-01-01

    Calcium is an essential nutrient required for critical biological functions such as nerve conduction, muscle contraction, mitosis, blood coagulation, and structural support of the skeleton.Dietary calcium intake is of general interest for human beings, particularly for infants and young children, when growth is accelerated. Milk and milk products as effective calcium supplements are generally accepted by human race with their high bioavailability. However, less consumption of milk in industrialized countries leads to inadequate calcium intake. Therefore, it is important to explore an alternate source for calcium supplement. On the other hand, dried grape seeds are likewise rich in lipids (22.07%), carbohydrates (12.51%) and proteins (11.94%) (w/w) and grape seeds as by-product during juice production can be an alternative source of protein. Meanwhile, this study demonstrates that grape seeds are rich in calcium ((5.62±0.01) g/kg for embryonic cells and (6.32± 0.01) g/kg for intact grape seeds), which was identified by ICP-AES. The calcium was mainly distributed in the stroma of the amyloplasts and around the starch granules, which was observed under TEM (Transmission Electron Microscope). Further study indicates that water-soluble protein from grape (Vitis viniferaL.) seeds (WSPG) contained two major components, one of which was 11S globulin-like protein mainly responsible for the binding of calcium in WSPG and the other was a novel protein (Protein A). The calcium contents of protein isolate from each step were identified by ICP-AES as well. When a traditional alkali extraction and acid precipitation method was used for isolation of WSPG, many binding calcium ions were lost. It is worth noting that the protein composition of grape seed protein obtained by both 30%-50% (NH4)2SO4 sediment and the alkali extraction and acid precipitation method was nearly identical, which consisted of protein A and protein B at a ratio of 2 to 3, but the content of calcium in the

  15. Immunoselection of cDNAs to avian intestinal calcium binding protein 28K and a novel calmodulin-like protein: assessment of mRNA regulation by the Vitamin D hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium's role in a variety of cellular processes has been well documented. The storage, distribution, and delivery of calcium are regulated by a family of binding proteins including troponin C, calmodulin, parvalbumin, and vitamin D dependent calcium binding protein (CaBP-28), all of which have evolved from a common ancestral gene. To evaluate vitamin D regulation of gene transcription, a CaBP-28 cDNA (767 base pairs) was isolated from a chicken intestine λgt11 library utilizing a polyvalent CaBP-28 antibody as a probe. Coincident with the identification of the CaBP-28 cDNA, a group of cDNAs also was isolated (with the anti-CaBP-28 antibody) that demonstrated 84% nucleotide homology and 99% deduced amino acid homology with chicken brain calmodulin (CaM). This new CaM-like cDNA was named neoCaM. There is little nucleotide homology between the CaBP-28 cDNA and neoCaM. The CaBP-28 cDNA hybridizes with three transcripts of 2000, 2900, and 3300 bases which are dramatically induced by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3], while the neoCaM cDNA recognizes three distinct (from CaBP-28) transcripts. Two of these mRNAs are 1400 and 1800 bases as described for brain CaM, but another large 4000-base transcript is detected with neoCaM. Neither the CaM nor the neoCaM transcript reveals any modulation by 1,25(OH)2D3. Herein, the authors discuss the possible significance of not only the isolation of both cDNAs with a single antibody but also the relation of neoCaM to other well-characterized CaM cDNAs

  16. Calcineurin homologous protein: a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein family

    OpenAIRE

    Di Sole, Francesca; Vadnagara, Komal; MOE, ORSON W.; Babich, Victor

    2012-01-01

    The calcineurin homologous protein (CHP) belongs to an evolutionarily conserved Ca2+-binding protein subfamily. The CHP subfamily is composed of CHP1, CHP2, and CHP3, which in vertebrates share significant homology at the protein level with each other and between other Ca2+-binding proteins. The CHP structure consists of two globular domains containing from one to four EF-hand structural motifs (calcium-binding regions composed of two helixes, E and F, joined by a loop), the myristoylation, a...

  17. Expression of calcium-binding proteins and selected neuropeptides in the human, chimpanzee, and crab-eating macaque claustrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea ePirone

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The claustrum is present in all mammalian species examined so far and its morphology, chemoarchitecture, physiology, phylogenesis and ontogenesis are still a matter of debate. Several morphologically distinct types of immunostained cells were described in different mammalian species. To date, a comparative study on the neurochemical organization of the human and non-human primates claustrum has not been fully described yet, partially due to technical reasons linked to the postmortem sampling interval. The present study analyzes the localization and morphology of neurons expressing parvalbumin (PV, calretinin (CR, NPY, and somatostatin (SOM in the claustrum of man (# 5, chimpanzee (# 1 and crab-eating monkey (#3. Immunoreactivity for the used markers was observed in neuronal cell bodies and processes distributed throughout the anterior-posterior extent of human, chimpanzee and macaque claustrum. Both CR- and PV-immunoreactive (ir neurons were mostly localized in the central and ventral region of the claustrum of the three species while SOM- and NPY-ir neurons seemed to be equally distributed throughout the ventral-dorsal extent. In the chimpanzee claustrum SOM-ir elements were not observed. No co-localization of PV with CR was found, thus suggesting the existence of two non-overlapping populations of PV and CR-ir interneurons. The expression of most proteins (CR, PV, NPY, was similar in all species. The only exception was the absence of SOM-ir elements in the claustrum of the chimpanzee, likely due to species specific variability. Our data suggest a possible common structural organization shared with the adjacent insular region, a further element that emphasizes a possible common ontogeny of the claustrum and the neocortex.

  18. Use of technical biochemical in combination for the detection of proteins of union to calcium in Plasmodium falciparum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium plays a fundamental role in the development of Plasmodium falciparum, the intracellular parasite that causes malaria. With the purpose of understanding the mechanism by which calcium acts in this parasite, calcium-binding proteins were detected in this organism the combined use of the metachromatic dye Stains-all and the 45Ca overlay assay allowed the identification, in mature parasites. Of 9 calcium - binding proteins. 6 of which seem to be different from any reported calcium-binding protein. Additionally, it was determined that the combined use of these techniques can be useful for the detection and purification of calcium-binding proteins

  19. Analytical models of calcium binding in a calcium channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anomalous mole fraction effect of L-type calcium channels is analyzed using a Fermi like distribution with the experimental data of Almers and McCleskey [J. Physiol. 353, 585 (1984)] and the atomic resolution model of Lipkind and Fozzard [Biochemistry 40, 6786 (2001)] of the selectivity filter of the channel. Much of the analysis is algebraic, independent of differential equations. The Fermi distribution is derived from the configuration entropy of ions and water molecules with different sizes, different valences, and interstitial voids between particles. It allows us to calculate potentials and distances (between the binding ion and the oxygen ions of the glutamate side chains) directly from the experimental data using algebraic formulas. The spatial resolution of these results is comparable with those of molecular models, but of course the accuracy is no better than that implied by the experimental data. The glutamate side chains in our model are flexible enough to accommodate different types of binding ions in different bath conditions. The binding curves of Na+ and Ca2+ for [CaCl2] ranging from 10−8 to 10−2 M with a fixed 32 mM background [NaCl] are shown to agree with published Monte Carlo simulations. The Poisson-Fermi differential equation—that includes both steric and correlation effects—is then used to obtain the spatial profiles of energy, concentration, and dielectric coefficient from the solvent region to the filter. The energy profiles of ions are shown to depend sensitively on the steric energy that is not taken into account in the classical rate theory. We improve the rate theory by introducing a steric energy that lumps the effects of excluded volumes of all ions and water molecules and empty spaces between particles created by Lennard-Jones type and electrostatic forces. We show that the energy landscape varies significantly with bath concentrations. The energy landscape is not constant

  20. A guanine nucleotide-binding protein mediates the inhibition of voltage-dependent calcium current by somatostatin in a pituitary cell line.

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, D L; Weight, F F; Luini, A

    1986-01-01

    Somatostatin reduces voltage-dependent Ca2+ current (ICa) and intracellular free Ca2+ concentration in the AtT-20/D16-16 pituitary cell line. We tested whether guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G or N proteins) are involved in the signal transduction mechanism between the somatostatin receptor and voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. Treatment of the cells with pertussis toxin, which selectively ADP ribosylates the GTP binding proteins Gi and Go and suppresses the ability of Gi to couple inhib...

  1. Asporin competes with decorin for collagen binding, binds calcium and promotes osteoblast collagen mineralization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalamajski, Sebastian; Aspberg, Anders; Lindblom, Karin;

    2009-01-01

    The interactions of the ECM (extracellular matrix) protein asporin with ECM components have previously not been investigated. Here, we show that asporin binds collagen type I. This binding is inhibited by recombinant asporin fragment LRR (leucine-rich repeat) 10-12 and by full-length decorin, but...... not by biglycan. We demonstrate that the polyaspartate domain binds calcium and regulates hydroxyapatite formation in vitro. In the presence of asporin, the number of collagen nodules, and mRNA of osteoblastic markers Osterix and Runx2, were increased. Moreover, decorin or the collagen-binding asporin...... fragment LRR 10-12 inhibited the pro-osteoblastic activity of full-length asporin. Our results suggest that asporin and decorin compete for binding to collagen and that the polyaspartate in asporin directly regulates collagen mineralization. Therefore asporin has a role in osteoblast-driven collagen...

  2. S100 calcium binding protein B as a biomarker of delirium duration in the intensive care unit – an exploratory analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan BA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Babar A Khan,1–3 Mark O Farber,1 Noll Campbell,2–5 Anthony Perkins,2,3 Nagendra K Prasad,6 Siu L Hui,1–3 Douglas K Miller,1–3 Enrique Calvo-Ayala,1 John D Buckley,1 Ruxandra Ionescu,1 Anantha Shekhar,1 E Wesley Ely,7,8 Malaz A Boustani1–3 1Indiana University School of Medicine, 2Indiana University Center for Aging Research, 3Regenstrief Institute, Inc., 4Wishard Health Services, Indianapolis, 5Department of Pharmacy Practice, Purdue University College of Pharmacy, West Lafayette, 6Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indianapolis, IN, 7Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 8VA Tennessee Valley Geriatric Research Education Clinical Center (GRECC, Nashville, TN, USA Background: Currently, there are no valid and reliable biomarkers to identify delirious patients predisposed to longer delirium duration. We investigated the hypothesis that elevated S100 calcium binding protein B (S100β levels will be associated with longer delirium duration in critically ill patients. Methods: A prospective observational cohort study was performed in the medical, surgical, and progressive intensive care units (ICUs of a tertiary care, university affiliated, and urban hospital. Sixty-three delirious patients were selected for the analysis, with two samples of S100β collected on days 1 and 8 of enrollment. The main outcome measure was delirium duration. Using the cutoff of <0.1 ng/mL and $0.1 ng/mL as normal and abnormal levels of S100β, respectively, on day 1 and day 8, four exposure groups were created: Group A, normal S100β levels on day 1 and day 8; Group B, normal S100β level on day 1 and abnormal S100β level on day 8; Group C, abnormal S100β level on day 1 and normal on day 8; and Group D, abnormal S100β levels on both day 1 and day 8. Results: Patients with abnormal levels of S100β showed a trend towards higher delirium duration (P=0.076; Group B (standard deviation (7.0 [3.2] days, Group C (5.5 [6.3] days, and Group D

  3. Increased absolute calcium binding to albumin in hypoalbuminaemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Besarab, A; Caro, J F

    1981-01-01

    The amount of calcium bound to protein was measured in 30 patients with differing diseases and varying degrees of hypoalbuminaemia. Total serum calcium increased directly with both serum albumin and ultrafilterable calcium concentrations. The estimated amount of calcium bound per gram of albumin varied inversely with the albumin concentration, decreasing from 2.1 to 1.0 mg calcium/g albumin as albumin concentration increased from 1.7 to 3.1 g/dl. Circulating parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentr...

  4. Effects of ATP on calcium binding to synaptic plasma membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The release of labeled norepinephrine from preloaded synaptosomes requires the presence of potassium and calcium. ATP-dependent binding of calcium to synaptic plasma membranes (SPM) may provide a means of maintaining the cation in a readily available pool for the triggering of transmitter release. A high Ca-binding capacity was demonstrated in SPM. The Km for calcium is 5.5 X 10(-5) M. The dependence of the system on the gamma phosphate of ATP was demonstrated by an increase in Ca-binding with increasing ATP concentration and by competitive inhibition of binding by ADP and AMP. Magnesium is also required for ATP-dependent Ca-binding. The optimum pH for the Ca binding was 7.0. Pretreatment of SPM with phospholipase A2 lowered the binding capacity. Sulfhydryl groups are also critical for ATP-dependent Ca binding to occur. A model for ATP-dependent Ca-binding was proposed

  5. Melittin binding causes a large calcium-dependent conformational change in calmodulin.

    OpenAIRE

    Kataoka, M.(LAPP, CNRS/IN2P3 and Université de Savoie, Annecy-le-Vieux, France); Head, J F; Seaton, B A; Engelman, D M

    1989-01-01

    The interaction between calmodulin and its target protein is a key step in many calcium-regulated cellular functions. Melittin binds tightly to calmodulin in the presence of calcium and is a competitive inhibitor of calmodulin function. Using melittin as a model for the target peptide of calmodulin, we have found a large Ca2+-dependent conformational change of calmodulin in solution induced by peptide binding. Mg2+ does not substitute for Ca2+ in producing the conformation change. Small-angle...

  6. Dysferlin Binds SNAREs (Soluble N-Ethylmaleimide-sensitive Factor (NSF) Attachment Protein Receptors) and Stimulates Membrane Fusion in a Calcium-sensitive Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codding, Sara J; Marty, Naomi; Abdullah, Nazish; Johnson, Colin P

    2016-07-01

    Resealing of tears in the sarcolemma of myofibers is a necessary step in the repair of muscle tissue. Recent work suggests a critical role for dysferlin in the membrane repair process and that mutations in dysferlin are responsible for limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2B and Miyoshi myopathy. Beyond membrane repair, dysferlin has been linked to SNARE-mediated exocytotic events including cytokine release and acid sphingomyelinase secretion. However, it is unclear whether dysferlin regulates SNARE-mediated membrane fusion. In this study we demonstrate a direct interaction between dysferlin and the SNARE proteins syntaxin 4 and SNAP-23. In addition, analysis of FRET and in vitro reconstituted lipid mixing assays indicate that dysferlin accelerates syntaxin 4/SNAP-23 heterodimer formation and SNARE-mediated lipid mixing in a calcium-sensitive manner. These results support a function for dysferlin as a calcium-sensing SNARE effector for membrane fusion events. PMID:27226605

  7. Neuronal Calcium Sensor 1 Has Two Variants with Distinct Calcium Binding Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baisheng; Boeckel, Göran R.; Huynh, Larry; Nguyen, Lien; Cao, Wenxiang; De La Cruz, Enrique M.; Kaftan, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS-1 Var1) is a calcium-binding protein expressed in most tissues. We examined a poorly characterized variant of NCS-1 (Var2), identified only in humans where the N-terminal 22 amino acid residues of native NCS-1(MGKSNSKLKPEVVEELTRKTY) were replaced with 4 different residues (MATI). Because alterations in the level of expression of NCS-1 Var1 and the expression of NCS-1 variants have been correlated with several neurological diseases, the relative expression and functional role of NCS-1 Var2 was examined. We found that NCS-1 Var2 mRNA levels are not found in mouse tissues and are expressed at levels ~1000-fold lower than NCS-1 Var1 in three different human cell lines (SHSY5Y, HEK293, MB231). Protein expression of both variants was only identified in cell lines overexpressing exogenous NCS-1 Var2. The calcium binding affinity is ~100 times weaker in purified NCS-1 Var2 than NCS-1 Var1. Because truncation of NCS-1 Var1 has been linked to functional changes in neurons, we determined whether the differing properties of the NCS-1 variants could potentially contribute to the altered cell function. In contrast to previous reports showing that overexpression of NCS-1 Var1 increases calcium-dependent processes, functional differences in cells overexpressing NCS-1 Var2 were undetectable in assays for cell growth, cell death and drug (paclitaxel) potency. Our results suggest that NCS-1 Var1 is the primary functional version of NCS-1. PMID:27575489

  8. Neuronal Calcium Sensor 1 Has Two Variants with Distinct Calcium Binding Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baisheng; Boeckel, Göran R; Huynh, Larry; Nguyen, Lien; Cao, Wenxiang; De La Cruz, Enrique M; Kaftan, Edward J; Ehrlich, Barbara E

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS-1 Var1) is a calcium-binding protein expressed in most tissues. We examined a poorly characterized variant of NCS-1 (Var2), identified only in humans where the N-terminal 22 amino acid residues of native NCS-1(MGKSNSKLKPEVVEELTRKTY) were replaced with 4 different residues (MATI). Because alterations in the level of expression of NCS-1 Var1 and the expression of NCS-1 variants have been correlated with several neurological diseases, the relative expression and functional role of NCS-1 Var2 was examined. We found that NCS-1 Var2 mRNA levels are not found in mouse tissues and are expressed at levels ~1000-fold lower than NCS-1 Var1 in three different human cell lines (SHSY5Y, HEK293, MB231). Protein expression of both variants was only identified in cell lines overexpressing exogenous NCS-1 Var2. The calcium binding affinity is ~100 times weaker in purified NCS-1 Var2 than NCS-1 Var1. Because truncation of NCS-1 Var1 has been linked to functional changes in neurons, we determined whether the differing properties of the NCS-1 variants could potentially contribute to the altered cell function. In contrast to previous reports showing that overexpression of NCS-1 Var1 increases calcium-dependent processes, functional differences in cells overexpressing NCS-1 Var2 were undetectable in assays for cell growth, cell death and drug (paclitaxel) potency. Our results suggest that NCS-1 Var1 is the primary functional version of NCS-1. PMID:27575489

  9. Binding of [125I]iodipine to parathyroid cell membranes: Evidence of a dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The parathyroid cell is unusual, in that an increase in extracellular calcium concentrations inhibits PTH release. Calcium channels are glycoproteins that span cell membranes and allow entry of extracellular calcium into cells. We have demonstrated that the calcium channel agonist (+)202-791, which opens calcium channels, inhibits PTH release and that the antagonist (-)202-791, which closes calcium channels, stimulates PTH release. To identify the calcium channels responsible for these effects, we used a radioligand that specifically binds to calcium channels. Bovine parathyroid cell membranes were prepared and incubated under reduced lighting with [125I] iodipine (SA, 2000 Ci/mmol), which recognizes 1,4-dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels. Bound ligand was separated from free ligand by rapid filtration through Whatman GF/B filters. Nonspecific binding was measured by the inclusion of nifedipine at 10 microM. Specific binding represented approximately 40% of the total binding. The optimal temperature for [125I] iodipine binding was 4 C, and binding reached equilibrium by 30 min. The equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) was approximately 550 pM, and the maximum number of binding sites was 780 fmol/mg protein. Both the calcium channel agonist (+)202-791 and antagonist (-)202-791 competitively inhibited [125I] iodipine binding, with 50% inhibition concentrations of 20 and 300 nM, respectively. These data indicate the presence of dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels on parathyroid cell membranes

  10. Cloning, characterization, and heterologous expression of the Saccharopolyspora erythraea (Streptomyces erythraeus) gene encoding an EF-hand calcium-binding protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Swan, D G; Cortes, J; Hale, R S; Leadlay, P F

    1989-01-01

    The regulatory effects of Ca2+ in eucaryotic cells are mostly mediated by a superfamily of Ca2+-binding proteins (CABs) that contain one or more characteristic Ca2+-binding structural motifs, referred to as EF hands. We have cloned and sequenced the structural gene for an authentic EF-hand CAB from the spore-forming gram-positive bacterium Saccharopolyspora erythraea (formerly Streptomyces erythraeus). When the gene was introduced into Streptomyces lividans on the high-copy plasmid vector pIJ...

  11. Structure and calcium-binding studies of calmodulin-like domain of human non-muscle α-actinin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drmota Prebil, Sara; Slapšak, Urška; Pavšič, Miha; Ilc, Gregor; Puž, Vid; de Almeida Ribeiro, Euripedes; Anrather, Dorothea; Hartl, Markus; Backman, Lars; Plavec, Janez; Lenarčič, Brigita; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    The activity of several cytosolic proteins critically depends on the concentration of calcium ions. One important intracellular calcium-sensing protein is α-actinin-1, the major actin crosslinking protein in focal adhesions and stress fibers. The actin crosslinking activity of α-actinin-1 has been proposed to be negatively regulated by calcium, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. To address this, we determined the first high-resolution NMR structure of its functional calmodulin-like domain (CaMD) in calcium-bound and calcium-free form. These structures reveal that in the absence of calcium, CaMD displays a conformationally flexible ensemble that undergoes a structural change upon calcium binding, leading to limited rotation of the N- and C-terminal lobes around the connecting linker and consequent stabilization of the calcium-loaded structure. Mutagenesis experiments, coupled with mass-spectrometry and isothermal calorimetry data designed to validate the calcium binding stoichiometry and binding site, showed that human non-muscle α-actinin-1 binds a single calcium ion within the N-terminal lobe. Finally, based on our structural data and analogy with other α-actinins, we provide a structural model of regulation of the actin crosslinking activity of α-actinin-1 where calcium induced structural stabilisation causes fastening of the juxtaposed actin binding domain, leading to impaired capacity to crosslink actin. PMID:27272015

  12. Calcium Carbonate Formation by Genetically Engineered Inorganic Binding Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresswell, Carolyn Gayle

    Understanding how organisms are capable of forming (synthesize, crystallize, and organize) solid minerals into complex architectures has been a fundamental question of biomimetic materials chemistry and biomineralization for decades. This study utilizes short peptides selected using a cell surface display library for the specific polymorphs of calcium carbonate, i.e., aragonite and calcite, to identify two sets of sequences which can then be used to examine their effects in the formation, crystal structure, morphology of the CaCO3 minerals. A procedure of counter selection, along with fluorescence microscopy (FM) characterization, was adapted to insure that the sequences on the cells were specific to their respective substrate, i.e., aragonite or calcite. From the resulting two sets of sequences selected, five distinct strong binders were identified with a variety of biochemical characteristics and synthesized for further study. Protein derived peptides, using the known sequences of the proteins that are associated with calcite or aragonite, were also designed using a bioinformatics-based similarity analysis of the two sets of binders. In particular, an aragonite binding protein segment, AP7, a protein found in nacre, was chosen for this design and the resulting effects of the designed peptides and the AP7 were examined. Specifically, the binding affinities of the selected and the protein derived peptides off the cells were then tested using FM; these studies resulted in different binding characteristics of the synthesized and cellular bound peptides. Two of the peptides that displayed strong binding on the cells bound to neither of the CaCO 3 substrates and both the high and low similarity protein-derived peptides bound to both polymorphs. However, two of the peptides were found to only bind to their respective polymorph showing; these results are significant in that with this study it is demonstrated that the designed peptides based on experimental library

  13. Relation of Plasma Fatty Acid Binding Proteins 4 and 5 With the Metabolic Syndrome, Inflammation and Coronary Calcium in Patients With Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Bagheri, Roshanak; Qasim, Atif N.; Mehta, Nehal N.; Terembula, Karen; Kapoor, Shiv; Braunstein, Seth; Schutta, Mark; Iqbal, Nayyar; Lehrke, Michael; Reilly, Muredach P.

    2010-01-01

    Fatty acid–binding proteins (FABPs) 4 and 5 play coordinated roles in rodent models of inflammation, insulin resistance, and atherosclerosis, but little is known of their role in human disease. The aim of this study was to examine the hypothesis that plasma adipocyte and macrophage FABP4 and FABP5 levels would provide additive value in the association with metabolic and inflammatory risk factors for cardiovascular disease as well as subclinical atherosclerosis. Using the Penn Diabetes Heart S...

  14. Serca1 Truncated Proteins Unable to Pump Calcium Reduce the Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Concentration and Induce Apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Chami, Mounia; Gozuacik, Devrim; Lagorce, David; Brini, Marisa; Falson, Pierre; Peaucellier, Gérard; Pinton, Paolo; Lecoeur, Hervé; Gougeon, Marie-Lyse; le Maire, Marc; Rizzuto, Rosario; Bréchot, Christian; Paterlini-Bréchot, Patrizia

    2001-01-01

    By pumping calcium from the cytosol to the ER, sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPases (SERCAs) play a major role in the control of calcium signaling. We describe two SERCA1 splice variants (S1Ts) characterized by exon 4 and/or exon 11 splicing, encoding COOH terminally truncated proteins, having only one of the seven calcium-binding residues, and thus unable to pump calcium. As shown by semiquantitative RT-PCR, S1T transcripts are differentially expressed in several adult and fetal human...

  15. Calmodulin Binding Proteins and Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Day, Danton H.; Eshak, Kristeen; Myre, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The small, calcium-sensor protein, calmodulin, is ubiquitously expressed and central to cell function in all cell types. Here the literature linking calmodulin to Alzheimer’s disease is reviewed. Several experimentally-verified calmodulin-binding proteins are involved in the formation of amyloid-β plaques including amyloid-β protein precursor, β-secretase, presenilin-1, and ADAM10. Many others possess potential calmodulin-binding domains that remain to be verified. Three calmodulin binding proteins are associated with the formation of neurofibrillary tangles: two kinases (CaMKII, CDK5) and one protein phosphatase (PP2B or calcineurin). Many of the genes recently identified by genome wide association studies and other studies encode proteins that contain putative calmodulin-binding domains but only a couple (e.g., APOE, BIN1) have been experimentally confirmed as calmodulin binding proteins. At least two receptors involved in calcium metabolism and linked to Alzheimer’s disease (mAchR; NMDAR) have also been identified as calmodulin-binding proteins. In addition to this, many proteins that are involved in other cellular events intimately associated with Alzheimer’s disease including calcium channel function, cholesterol metabolism, neuroinflammation, endocytosis, cell cycle events, and apoptosis have been tentatively or experimentally verified as calmodulin binding proteins. The use of calmodulin as a potential biomarker and as a therapeutic target is discussed. PMID:25812852

  16. Effect of albumin and free calcium concentrations on calcium binding in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Besarab, A; DeGuzman, A; Swanson, J W

    1981-01-01

    In vivo equilibrium dialysis studies were performed to define further the characteristics of calcium binding to bovine albumin. The concentration range for albumin (1 to 9 g/dl) as well as ultrafilterable calcium (0.5 to 2.5 mM) studied encompassed those that might be ordinarily encountered in most clinical situations. Major differences in the regressions of total calcium on ultrafilterable calcium occurred at albumin concentrations of 1, 2, and 9 g/dl but only small differences at albumin co...

  17. BINDING ISOTHERMS SURFACTANT-PROTEINS

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Irina Moater; Cristiana Radulescu; Ionica Ionita

    2011-01-01

    The interactions between surfactants and proteins shows some similarities with interactions between surfactants and polymers, but the hydrophobic amphoteric nature of proteins and their secondary and tertiary structure components make them different from conventional polymer systems. Many studies from the past about surfactant - proteins bonding used the dialysis techniques. Other techniques used to determine the binding isotherm, included ultrafiltration, ultracentrifugation, potentiometry, ...

  18. SERCA1 truncated proteins unable to pump calcium reduce the endoplasmic reticulum calcium concentration and induce apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chami, M; Gozuacik, D; Lagorce, D; Brini, M; Falson, P; Peaucellier, G; Pinton, P; Lecoeur, H; Gougeon, M L; le Maire, M; Rizzuto, R; Bréchot, C; Paterlini-Bréchot, P

    2001-06-11

    By pumping calcium from the cytosol to the ER, sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPases (SERCAs) play a major role in the control of calcium signaling. We describe two SERCA1 splice variants (S1Ts) characterized by exon 4 and/or exon 11 splicing, encoding COOH terminally truncated proteins, having only one of the seven calcium-binding residues, and thus unable to pump calcium. As shown by semiquantitative RT-PCR, S1T transcripts are differentially expressed in several adult and fetal human tissues, but not in skeletal muscle and heart. S1T proteins expression was detected by Western blot in nontransfected cell lines. In transiently transfected cells, S1T homodimers were revealed by Western blot using mildly denaturing conditions. S1T proteins were shown, by confocal scanning microscopy, to colocalize with endogenous SERCA2b into the ER membrane. Using ER-targeted aequorin (erAEQ), we have found that S1T proteins reduce ER calcium and reverse elevation of ER calcium loading induced by SERCA1 and SERCA2b. Our results also show that SERCA1 variants increase ER calcium leakage and are consistent with the hypothesis of a cation channel formed by S1T homodimers. Finally, when overexpressed in liver-derived cells, S1T proteins significantly induce apoptosis. These data reveal a further mechanism modulating Ca(2+) accumulation into the ER of nonmuscle cells and highlight the relevance of S1T proteins to the control of apoptosis. PMID:11402072

  19. Changes in parathyroid hormone receptor binding affinity during egg laying: implications for calcium homeostasis in chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuoka, T; Kawashima, M; Takahashi, T; Iwata, A; Oka, N; Tanaka, K

    1996-12-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) receptor bindings were examined in the membrane fraction of the calvaria and the kidney of the hen by the use of [125I]PTH-related protein (PTHrP) binding assays. The binding specificity, reversibility, and saturation of the receptor were demonstrated. The equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) and the maximum binding capacity (Bmax) were obtained by Scatchard analyses. In both calvaria and kidney, Kd and Bmax values decreased at 3 h before oviposition in egg-laying hens, but not in nonlaying hens. Administration of 17 beta-estradiol or progesterone in vivo caused a decrease in the Kd and Bmax values. Ionized calcium concentrations in the blood plasma showed a decrease at 13 h before oviposition. The results suggest that the PTH receptor binding in the calvaria and the kidney is affected by ovarian steroid hormones and may play a role in maintaining the calcium homeostasis in the egg-laying hen. PMID:8970893

  20. Influence of calcium depletion on iron-binding properties of milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, V A; Ellis, A; Ye, A; Das, S; Singh, H

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the effects of calcium depletion on the binding of iron in milk. A weakly acidic cation-exchange resin was used to remove 3 different levels (18-22, 50-55, and 68-72%) of calcium from milk. Five levels of iron (5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 mM) were added to each of these calcium-depleted milks (CDM) and the resultant milks were analyzed for particle size, microstructure, and the distribution of protein and minerals between the colloidal and soluble phases. The depletion of calcium affected the distribution of protein and minerals in normal milk. Iron added to normal milk and low-CDM (~20% calcium depletion) bound mainly to the colloidal phase (material sedimented at 100,000 × g for 1 h at 20 °C), with little effect on the integrity of the casein micelles. Depletion of ~70% of the calcium from milk resulted in almost complete disintegration of the casein micelles, as indicated by all the protein remaining in the soluble phase upon ultracentrifugation. Addition of up to ~20 mM iron to high CDM resulted in the formation of small fibrous structures that remained in the soluble phase of milk. It appeared that the iron bound to soluble (nonsedimentable) caseins in high-CDM. We observed a decrease in the aqueous phosphorus content of all milks upon iron addition, irrespective of their calcium content. We considered the interaction between aqueous phosphorus and added iron to be responsible for the high iron-binding capacity of the proteins in milk. The soluble protein-iron complexes formed in high-CDM (~70% calcium depletion) could be used as an effective iron fortificant for a range of food products because of their good solubility characteristics. PMID:25648803

  1. Protein Dynamics in an RNA Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kathleen

    2006-03-01

    Using ^15N NMR relaxation measurements, analyzed with the Lipari-Szabo formalism, we have found that the human U1A RNA binding protein has ps-ns motions in those loops that make contact with RNA. Specific mutations can alter the extent and pattern of motions, and those proteins inevitably lose RNA binding affinity. Proteins with enhanced mobility of loops and termini presumably lose affinity due to increased conformational sampling by those parts of the protein that interact directly with RNA. There is an entropic penalty associated with locking down those elements upon RNA binding, in addition to a loss of binding efficiency caused by the increased number of conformations adopted by the protein. However, in addition to local conformational heterogeneity, analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories by Reorientational Eigenmode Dynamics reveals that loops of the wild type protein undergo correlated motions that link distal sites across the binding surface. Mutations that disrupt correlated motions result in weaker RNA binding, implying that there is a network of interactions across the surface of the protein. (KBH was a Postdoctoral Fellow with Al Redfield from 1985-1990). This work was supported by the NIH (to KBH) and NSF (SAS).

  2. Grafting of protein-protein binding sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A strategy for grafting protein-protein binding sites is described. Firstly, key interaction residues at the interface of ligand protein to be grafted are identified and suitable positions in scaffold protein for grafting these key residues are sought. Secondly, the scaffold proteins are superposed onto the ligand protein based on the corresponding Ca and Cb atoms. The complementarity between the scaffold protein and the receptor protein is evaluated and only matches with high score are accepted. The relative position between scaffold and receptor proteins is adjusted so that the interface has a reasonable packing density. Then the scaffold protein is mutated to corresponding residues in ligand protein at each candidate position. And the residues having bad steric contacts with the receptor proteins, or buried charged residues not involved in the formation of any salt bridge are mutated. Finally, the mutated scaffold protein in complex with receptor protein is co-minimized by Charmm. In addition, we deduce a scoring function to evaluate the affinity between mutated scaffold protein and receptor protein by statistical analysis of rigid binding data sets.

  3. Protein Adsorption of Calcium Phosphate Ceramics in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In order to provide valuable information for the design of new calcium phosphate bone repair materials, bone tissue engineering scaffold materials, and other clinical application, the interaction between calcium phosphate materials and proteins were investigated. The adsorption of the calcium phosphate ceramic to the protein was investigated by using FT- IR, XPS, SEM, and SDS- PAGE. As the results shown, the proteins were strongly adsorbed by the CPC, and a shift of the feature peak of the protein and also a chemical shift in the Ca2p and O1s bind energy of CPC was observed. This indicated that the acidic amino-group and alkaline amino- residue on the proteins' surface bonded to the Ca2 + in the β- TCP crystal by ionic bond and the proteins' alkaline amino groups to the oxygen in PO3-4 by hydrogen bond and electrostatic attraction. The adsorption mechanism of the protein in the CPC can be described as three ndsorption layers: irreversible chemical adsorption layer, physical adsorption layer and biomineralized adsorption layer.

  4. Calcium binding protects E-cadherin from cleavage by Helicobacter pylori HtrA

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Thomas P.; Goetz, Camilla; Huemer, Markus; Schneider, Gisbert; Wessler, Silja

    2016-01-01

    Background The cell adhesion and tumor suppressor protein E-cadherin is an important factor in the establishment and maintenance of epithelial integrity. E-cadherin is a single transmembrane protein, which consists of an intracellular domain (IC), a transmembrane domain (TD), and five extracellular domains (EC). EC domains form homophilic interactions in cis and trans that require calcium binding to the linker region between the EC domains. In our previous studies, we identified the serine pr...

  5. Viral infection controlled by a calcium-dependent lipid-binding module in ALIX

    OpenAIRE

    Bissig, Christin; Lenoir, Marc; Velluz, Marie-Claire; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael; Gruenberg, Jean

    2013-01-01

    ALIX plays a role in nucleocapsid release during viral infection, as does lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA). However, the mechanism remains unclear. Here we report that LBPA is recognized within an exposed site in ALIX Bro1 domain predicted by MODA, an algorithm for discovering membrane-docking areas in proteins. LBPA interactions revealed a strict requirement for a structural calcium tightly bound near the lipid interaction site. Unlike other calcium– and phospholipid-binding proteins, the all...

  6. High-capacity calcium-binding chitinase III from pomegranate seeds (Punica granatum Linn.) is located in amyloplasts

    OpenAIRE

    Lv, Chenyan; Masuda, Taro; Yang, Haixia; Sun, Lei; Zhao, Guanghua

    2011-01-01

    We have recently identified a new class III chitinase from pomegranate seeds (PSC). Interestingly, this new chitinase naturally binds calcium ions with high capacity and low affinity, suggesting that PSC is a Ca-storage protein. Analysis of the amino acid sequence showed that this enzyme is rich in acidic amino acid residues, especially Asp, which are responsible for calcium binding. Different from other known chitinases, PSC is located in the stroma of amyloplasts in pomegranate seeds. Trans...

  7. All three Ca[superscript 2+]-binding loops of photoproteins bind calcium ions: The crystal structures of calcium-loaded apo-aequorin and apo-obelin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Lu; Vysotski, Eugene S.; Markova, Svetlana V.; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Lee, John; Rose, John; Wang, Bi-Cheng (Georgia)

    2010-07-13

    The crystal structures of calcium-loaded apoaequorin and apo-obelin have been determined at resolutions 1.7 {angstrom} and 2.2 {angstrom}, respectively. A calcium ion is observed in each of the three EF-hand loops that have the canonical calcium-binding sequence, and each is coordinated in the characteristic pentagonal bipyramidal configuration. The calcium-loaded apo-proteins retain the same compact scaffold and overall fold as the unreacted photoproteins containing the bound substrate, 2-hydroperoxycoelenterazine, and also the same as the Ca{sup 2+}-discharged obelin bound with the product, coelenteramide. Nevertheless, there are easily discerned shifts in both helix and loop regions, and the shifts are not the same between the two proteins. It is suggested that these subtle shifts are the basis of the ability of these photoproteins to sense Ca{sup 2+} concentration transients and to produce their bioluminescence response on the millisecond timescale. A mechanism of intrastructural transmission of the calcium signal is proposed.

  8. The nucleation and growth of calcium phosphate crystals at protein and phosphatidylserine liposome surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nancollas, G H; Tsortos, A; Zieba, A

    1996-01-01

    The kinetics of calcium phosphate crystal growth at the surfaces of proteins and phospholipids has been investigated using free drift and constant composition methods in supersaturated calcium phosphate solutions (relative supersaturations: with respect to hydroxyapatite, HAP, sigma HAP = 15.0, and with respect to octacalcium phosphate, OCP, sigma OCP = 1.9). Fibrinogen and collagen molecules adsorbed at hydrophobic surfaces as well as uncross-linked collagen fibrils induce ion binding and subsequent nucleation of calcium phosphate. The formation of OCP on phosphatidylserine vesicles introduced to highly supersaturated calcium phosphate solutions probably involves the interaction of the calcium ions with the ionized carboxylic groups of the phospholipid. PMID:9813627

  9. Binding of calcium in the EF-hand of Escherichia coli lytic transglycosylase Slt35 is important for stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asselt, Erik J. van; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    1999-01-01

    The Escherichia coli lytic transglycosylase Slt35 contains a single metal ion-binding site that resembles EF-hand calcium-binding sites. The Slt35 EF-hand is only the second observation of such a domain in a prokaryotic protein. Two crystal structures at 2.1 Å resolution show that both Ca2+ ions and

  10. Protein-specific localization of a rhodamine-based calcium-sensor in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Marcel; Porth, Isabel; Hauke, Sebastian; Braun, Felix; Herten, Dirk-Peter; Wombacher, Richard

    2016-06-28

    A small synthetic calcium sensor that can be site-specifically coupled to proteins in living cells by utilizing the bio-orthogonal HaloTag labeling strategy is presented. We synthesized an iodo-derivatized BAPTA chelator with a tetramethyl rhodamine fluorophore that allows further modification by Sonogashira cross-coupling. The presented calcium sensitive dye shows a 200-fold increase in fluorescence upon calcium binding. The derivatization with an aliphatic linker bearing a terminal haloalkane-function by Sonogashira cross-coupling allows the localization of the calcium sensor to Halo fusion proteins which we successfully demonstrate in in vitro and in vivo experiments. The herein reported highly sensitive tetramethyl rhodamine based calcium indicator, which can be selectively localized to proteins, is a powerful tool to determine changes in calcium levels inside living cells with spatiotemporal resolution. PMID:27072883

  11. Viral infection controlled by a calcium-dependent lipid-binding module in ALIX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissig, Christin; Lenoir, Marc; Velluz, Marie-Claire; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael; Gruenberg, Jean

    2013-05-28

    ALIX plays a role in nucleocapsid release during viral infection, as does lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA). However, the mechanism remains unclear. Here we report that LBPA is recognized within an exposed site in ALIX Bro1 domain predicted by MODA, an algorithm for discovering membrane-docking areas in proteins. LBPA interactions revealed a strict requirement for a structural calcium tightly bound near the lipid interaction site. Unlike other calcium- and phospholipid-binding proteins, the all-helical triangle-shaped fold of the Bro1 domain confers selectivity for LBPA via a pair of hydrophobic residues in a flexible loop, which undergoes a conformational change upon membrane association. Both LBPA and calcium binding are necessary for endosome association and virus infection, as are ALIX ESCRT binding and dimerization capacity. We conclude that LBPA recruits ALIX onto late endosomes via the calcium-bound Bro1 domain, triggering a conformational change in ALIX to mediate the delivery of viral nucleocapsids to the cytosol during infection. PMID:23664863

  12. Calcium Binding to Amino Acids and Small Glycine Peptides in Aqueous Solution: Toward Peptide Design for Better Calcium Bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ning; Skibsted, Leif H

    2016-06-01

    Deprotonation of amino acids as occurs during transfer from stomach to intestines during food digestion was found by comparison of complex formation constants as determined electrochemically for increasing pH to increase calcium binding (i) by a factor of around 6 for the neutral amino acids, (ii) by a factor of around 4 for anions of the acidic amino acids aspartic and glutamic acid, and (iii) by a factor of around 5.5 for basic amino acids. Optimized structures of the 1:1 complexes and ΔHbinding for calcium binding as calculated by density functional theory (DFT) confirmed in all complexes a stronger calcium binding and shorter calcium-oxygen bond length in the deprotonated form. In addition, the stronger calcium binding was also accompanied by a binding site shift from carboxylate binding to chelation by α-amino group and carboxylate oxygen for leucine, aspartate, glutamate, alanine, and asparagine. For binary amino acid mixtures, the calcium-binding constant was close to the predicted geometric mean of the individual amino acid binding constants indicating separate binding of calcium to two amino acids when present together in solution. At high pH, corresponding to conditions for calcium absorption, the binding affinity increased in the order Lys < Arg < Cys < Gln < Gly ∼ Ala < Asn < His < Leu < Glu< Asp. In a series of glycine peptides, calcium-binding affinity was found to increase in the order Gly-Leu ∼ Gly-Gly < Ala-Gly < Gly-His ∼ Gly-Lys-Gly < Glu-Cys-Gly < Gly-Glu, an ordering confirmed by DFT calculations for the dipeptides and which also accounted for large synergistic effects in calcium binding for up to 6 kJ/mol when compared to the corresponding amino acid mixtures. PMID:27159329

  13. Probing protein phosphatase substrate binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlys-Larsen, Kim B.; Sørensen, Kasper Kildegaard; Jensen, Knud Jørgen; Gammeltoft, Steen

    2012-01-01

    Proteomics and high throughput analysis for systems biology can benefit significantly from solid-phase chemical tools for affinity pull-down of proteins from complex mixtures. Here we report the application of solid-phase synthesis of phosphopeptides for pull-down and analysis of the affinity...... profile of the integrin-linked kinase associated phosphatase (ILKAP), a member of the protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) family. Phosphatases can potentially dephosphorylate these phosphopeptide substrates but, interestingly, performing the binding studies at 4 °C allowed efficient binding to phosphopeptides......, without the need for phosphopeptide mimics or phosphatase inhibitors. As no proven ILKAP substrates were available, we selected phosphopeptide substrates among known PP2Cδ substrates including the protein kinases: p38, ATM, Chk1, Chk2 and RSK2 and synthesized directly on PEGA solid supports through a BAL...

  14. The role of uncoupling protein 3 regulating calcium ion uptake into mitochondria during sarcopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikawa, Takeshi; Choi, Inho; Haruna, Marie; Hirasaka, Katsuya; Maita Ohno, Ayako; Kondo Teshima, Shigetada

    Overloaded mitochondrial calcium concentration contributes to progression of mitochondrial dysfunction in aged muscle, leading to sarcopenia. Uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) is primarily expressed in the inner membrane of skeletal muscle mitochondria. Recently, it has been reported that UCP3 is associated with calcium uptake into mitochondria. However, the mechanisms by which UCP3 regulates mitochondrial calcium uptake are not well understood. Here we report that UCP3 interacts with HS-1 associated protein X-1 (Hax-1), an anti-apoptotic protein that is localized in mitochondria, which is involved in cellular responses to calcium ion. The hydrophilic sequences within the loop 2, matrix-localized hydrophilic domain of mouse UCP3 are necessary for binding to Hax-1 of the C-terminal domain in adjacent to mitochondrial innermembrane. Interestingly, these proteins interaction occur the calcium-dependent manner. Indeed, overexpression of UCP3 significantly enhanced calcium uptake into mitochondria on Hax-1 endogenously expressing C2C12 myoblasts. In addition, Hax-1 knock-down enhanced calcium uptake into mitochondria on both UCP3 and Hax-1 endogenously expressing C2C12 myotubes, but not myoblasts. Finally, the dissociation of UCP3 and Hax-1 enhances calcium uptake into mitochondria in aged muscle. These studies identify a novel UCP3-Hax-1 complex regulates the influx of calcium ion into mitochondria in muscle. Thus, the efficacy of UCP3-Hax-1 in mitochondrial calcium regulation may provide a novel therapeutic approach against mitochondrial dysfunction-related disease containing sarcopenia.

  15. The TRPV5/6 calcium channels contain multiple calmodulin binding sites with differential binding properties.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovalevskaya, N.V.; Bokhovchuk, F.M.; Vuister, G.W.

    2012-01-01

    The epithelial Ca(2+) channels TRPV5/6 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 5/6) are thoroughly regulated in order to fine-tune the amount of Ca(2+) reabsorption. Calmodulin has been shown to be involved into calcium-dependent inactivation of TRPV5/6 channels by binding directly to the distal C-t

  16. Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemons, G.K.

    1997-04-29

    Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described. 11 figs.

  17. Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemons, Gisela K. (Berkeley, CA)

    1997-01-01

    Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described.

  18. Assembly and Calcium Binding Properties of Quantum Dot-Calmodulin Calcium Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eun, Su-yong; Nguyen-ta, Kim; Yoo, Hoon; Silva, Gabriel A; Kim, Soon-jong

    2016-02-01

    We have developed the first nanoengineered quantum dot molecular complex designed to measure changes of calcium ion (Ca2+) concentration at high spatial and temporal resolutions in real time. The sensor is ratiometric and composed of three components: a quantum dot (QD) emitting at 620 nm as a fluorescence donor, an organic dye (Alexa Fluor 647) as a fluorescence acceptor, and a calmodulin-M13 (CaM-M13) protein part as a calcium sensing component. In this work, we have determined the maximal number of CaM-M13 required for saturating a single QD particle to be approximately 16. The dissociation constant, Kd of the QD-based calcium ion sensor was also estimated to be around 30 microM. PMID:27433729

  19. Testosterone increases urinary calcium excretion and inhibits expression of renal calcium transport proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hsu, Yu-Juei; Dimke, Henrik Anthony; Schoeber, Joost P H;

    2010-01-01

    Although gender differences in the renal handling of calcium have been reported, the overall contribution of androgens to these differences remains uncertain. We determined here whether testosterone affects active renal calcium reabsorption by regulating calcium transport proteins. Male mice had...... higher urinary calcium excretion than female mice and their renal calcium transporters were expressed at a lower level. We also found that orchidectomized mice excreted less calcium in their urine than sham-operated control mice and that the hypocalciuria was normalized after testosterone replacement...... calcium transport. Thus, our study shows that gender differences in renal calcium handling are, in part, mediated by the inhibitory actions of androgens on TRPV5-mediated active renal calcium transport....

  20. Molecular Structure and Target Recognition of Neuronal Calcium Sensor Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    James Ames; Mitsuhiko Ikura

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal calcium sensor (NCS) proteins, a sub-branch of the calmodulin superfamily, are expressed in the brain and retina where they transduce calcium signals and are genetically linked to degenerative diseases. The amino acid sequences of NCS proteins are highly conserved but their physiological functions are quite distinct. Retinal recoverin and guanylate cyclase activating proteins (GCAPs) both serve as calcium sensors in retinal rod cells, neuronal frequenin (NCS1) modulates synaptic acti...

  1. Molecular structure and target recognition of neuronal calcium sensor proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Ames, James B.; Lim, Sunghyuk; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal calcium sensor (NCS) proteins, a sub-branch of the EF-hand superfamily, are expressed in the brain and retina where they transduce calcium signals and are genetically linked to degenerative diseases. The amino acid sequences of NCS proteins are highly conserved but their physiological functions are quite distinct. Retinal recoverin and guanylate cyclase activating proteins (GCAPs) both serve as calcium sensors in retinal rod cells, neuronal frequenin (NCS1) modulates synaptic activit...

  2. Calcium-binding capacity of centrin2 is required for linear POC5 assembly but not for nucleotide excision repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago J Dantas

    Full Text Available Centrosomes, the principal microtubule-organising centres in animal cells, contain centrins, small, conserved calcium-binding proteins unique to eukaryotes. Centrin2 binds to xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein (XPC, stabilising it, and its presence slightly increases nucleotide excision repair (NER activity in vitro. In previous work, we deleted all three centrin isoforms present in chicken DT40 cells and observed delayed repair of UV-induced DNA lesions, but no centrosome abnormalities. Here, we explore how centrin2 controls NER. In the centrin null cells, we expressed centrin2 mutants that cannot bind calcium or that lack sites for phosphorylation by regulatory kinases. Expression of any of these mutants restored the UV sensitivity of centrin null cells to normal as effectively as expression of wild-type centrin. However, calcium-binding-deficient and T118A mutants showed greatly compromised localisation to centrosomes. XPC recruitment to laser-induced UV-like lesions was only slightly slower in centrin-deficient cells than in controls, and levels of XPC and its partner HRAD23B were unaffected by centrin deficiency. Interestingly, we found that overexpression of the centrin interactor POC5 leads to the assembly of linear, centrin-dependent structures that recruit other centrosomal proteins such as PCM-1 and NEDD1. Together, these observations suggest that assembly of centrins into complex structures requires calcium binding capacity, but that such assembly is not required for centrin activity in NER.

  3. Calcium-Binding Capacity of Centrin2 Is Required for Linear POC5 Assembly but Not for Nucleotide Excision Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Tiago J.; Daly, Owen M.; Conroy, Pauline C.; Tomas, Martin; Wang, Yifan; Lalor, Pierce; Dockery, Peter; Ferrando-May, Elisa; Morrison, Ciaran G.

    2013-01-01

    Centrosomes, the principal microtubule-organising centres in animal cells, contain centrins, small, conserved calcium-binding proteins unique to eukaryotes. Centrin2 binds to xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein (XPC), stabilising it, and its presence slightly increases nucleotide excision repair (NER) activity in vitro. In previous work, we deleted all three centrin isoforms present in chicken DT40 cells and observed delayed repair of UV-induced DNA lesions, but no centrosome abnormalities. Here, we explore how centrin2 controls NER. In the centrin null cells, we expressed centrin2 mutants that cannot bind calcium or that lack sites for phosphorylation by regulatory kinases. Expression of any of these mutants restored the UV sensitivity of centrin null cells to normal as effectively as expression of wild-type centrin. However, calcium-binding-deficient and T118A mutants showed greatly compromised localisation to centrosomes. XPC recruitment to laser-induced UV-like lesions was only slightly slower in centrin-deficient cells than in controls, and levels of XPC and its partner HRAD23B were unaffected by centrin deficiency. Interestingly, we found that overexpression of the centrin interactor POC5 leads to the assembly of linear, centrin-dependent structures that recruit other centrosomal proteins such as PCM-1 and NEDD1. Together, these observations suggest that assembly of centrins into complex structures requires calcium binding capacity, but that such assembly is not required for centrin activity in NER. PMID:23844208

  4. Hydrogen peroxide-mediated oxidative stress disrupts calcium binding on calmodulin: More evidence for oxidative stress in vitiligo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with acute vitiligo have low epidermal catalase expression/activities and accumulate 10-3 M H2O2. One consequence of this severe oxidative stress is an altered calcium homeostasis in epidermal keratinocytes and melanocytes. Here, we show decreased epidermal calmodulin expression in acute vitiligo. Since 10-3M H2O2 oxidises methionine and tryptophan residues in proteins, we examined calcium binding to calmodulin in the presence and absence of H2O2 utilising 45calcium. The results showed that all four calcium atoms exchanged per molecule of calmodulin. Since oxidised calmodulin looses its ability to activate calcium ATPase, enzyme activities were followed in full skin biopsies from lesional skin of patients with acute vitiligo (n = 6) and healthy controls (n = 6). The results yielded a 4-fold decrease of ATPase activities in the patients. Computer simulation of native and oxidised calmodulin confirmed the loss of all four calcium ions from their specific EF-hand domains. Taken together H2O2-mediated oxidation affects calcium binding in calmodulin leading to perturbed calcium homeostasis and perturbed L-phenylalanine-uptake in the epidermis of acute vitiligo

  5. A protein involved in the assembly of an extracellular calcium storage matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, Lilah; Shechter, Assaf; Tom, Moshe; Yudkovski, Yana; Weil, Simy; Aflalo, Eliahu David; Pamuru, Ramachandra Reddy; Khalaila, Isam; Bentov, Shmuel; Berman, Amir; Sagi, Amir

    2010-04-23

    Gastroliths, the calcium storage organs of crustaceans, consist of chitin-protein-mineral complexes in which the mineral component is stabilized amorphous calcium carbonate. To date, only three proteins, GAP 65, gastrolith matrix protein (GAMP), and orchestin, have been identified in gastroliths. Here, we report a novel protein, GAP 10, isolated from the gastrolith of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus and specifically expressed in its gastrolith disc. The encoding gene was cloned by partial sequencing of the protein extracted from the gastrolith matrix. Based on an assembled microarray cDNA chip, GAP 10 transcripts were found to be highly (12-fold) up-regulated in premolt gastrolith disc and significantly down-regulated in the hypodermis at the same molt stage. The deduced protein sequence of GAP 10 lacks chitin-binding domains and does not show homology to known proteins in the GenBank data base. It does, however, have an amino acid composition that has similarity to proteins extracted from invertebrate and ascidian-calcified extracellular matrices. The GAP 10 sequence contains a predicted signal peptide and predicted phosphorylation sites. In addition, the protein is phosphorylated and exhibits calcium-binding ability. Repeated daily injections of GAP 10 double strand RNA to premolt C. quadricarinatus resulted in a prolonged premolt stage and in the development of gastroliths with irregularly rough surfaces. These findings suggest that GAP 10 may be involved in the assembly of the gastrolith chitin-protein-mineral complex, particularly in the deposition of amorphous calcium carbonate. PMID:20150428

  6. Comprehensive Behavioral Analysis of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase IV Knockout Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Takao, Keizo; Tanda, Koichi; Nakamura, Kenji; Kasahara, Jiro; Nakao, Kazuki; Katsuki, Motoya; Nakanishi, Kazuo; Yamasaki, Nobuyuki; Toyama, Keiko; Adachi, Minami; UMEDA, MASAHIRO; Araki, Tsutomu; Fukunaga, Kohji; Kondo, Hisatake; Sakagami, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    Calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV) is a protein kinase that activates the transcription factor CREB, the cyclic AMP-response element binding protein. CREB is a key transcription factor in synaptic plasticity and memory consolidation. To elucidate the behavioral effects of CaMKIV deficiency, we subjected CaMKIV knockout (CaMKIV KO) mice to a battery of behavioral tests. CaMKIV KO had no significant effects on locomotor activity, motor coordination, social interaction, pain...

  7. Advances on Plant Pathogenic Mycotoxin Binding Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chao-hua; DONG Jin-gao

    2002-01-01

    Toxin-binding protein is one of the key subjects in plant pathogenic mycotoxin research. In this paper, new advances in toxin-binding proteins of 10 kinds of plant pathogenic mycotoxins belonging to Helminthosporium ,Alternaria ,Fusicoccum ,Verticillium were reviewed, especially the techniques and methods of toxin-binding proteins of HS-toxin, HV-toxin, HMT-toxin, HC-toxin. It was proposed that the isotope-labeling technique and immunological chemistry technique should be combined together in research of toxin-binding protein, which will be significant to study the molecular recognition mechanism between host and pathogenic fungus.

  8. Retinoid-binding proteins: similar protein architectures bind similar ligands via completely different ways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ru Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinoids are a class of compounds that are chemically related to vitamin A, which is an essential nutrient that plays a key role in vision, cell growth and differentiation. In vivo, retinoids must bind with specific proteins to perform their necessary functions. Plasma retinol-binding protein (RBP and epididymal retinoic acid binding protein (ERABP carry retinoids in bodily fluids, while cellular retinol-binding proteins (CRBPs and cellular retinoic acid-binding proteins (CRABPs carry retinoids within cells. Interestingly, although all of these transport proteins possess similar structures, the modes of binding for the different retinoid ligands with their carrier proteins are different. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, we analyzed the various retinoid transport mechanisms using structure and sequence comparisons, binding site analyses and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that in the same family of proteins and subcellular location, the orientation of a retinoid molecule within a binding protein is same, whereas when different families of proteins are considered, the orientation of the bound retinoid is completely different. In addition, none of the amino acid residues involved in ligand binding is conserved between the transport proteins. However, for each specific binding protein, the amino acids involved in the ligand binding are conserved. The results of this study allow us to propose a possible transport model for retinoids. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results reveal the differences in the binding modes between the different retinoid-binding proteins.

  9. Arabidopsis chloroplast chaperonin 10 is a calmodulin-binding protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    Calcium regulates diverse cellular activities in plants through the action of calmodulin (CaM). By using (35)S-labeled CaM to screen an Arabidopsis seedling cDNA expression library, a cDNA designated as AtCh-CPN10 (Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast chaperonin 10) was cloned. Chloroplast CPN10, a nuclear-encoded protein, is a functional homolog of E. coli GroES. It is believed that CPN60 and CPN10 are involved in the assembly of Rubisco, a key enzyme involved in the photosynthetic pathway. Northern analysis revealed that AtCh-CPN10 is highly expressed in green tissues. The recombinant AtCh-CPN10 binds to CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Deletion mutants revealed that there is only one CaM-binding site in the last 31 amino acids of the AtCh-CPN10 at the C-terminal end. The CaM-binding region in AtCh-CPN10 has higher homology to other chloroplast CPN10s in comparison to GroES and mitochondrial CPN10s, suggesting that CaM may only bind to chloroplast CPN10s. Furthermore, the results also suggest that the calcium/CaM messenger system is involved in regulating Rubisco assembly in the chloroplast, thereby influencing photosynthesis. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  10. Penicillin-Binding Protein Imaging Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Kocaoglu, Ozden; Carlson, Erin E.

    2013-01-01

    Penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) are membrane-associated proteins involved in the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan (PG), the main component of bacterial cell walls. These proteins were discovered and named for their affinity to bind the β-lactam antibiotic penicillin. The importance of the PBPs has long been appreciated; however, the apparent functional redundancy of the ~5–15 proteins that most bacteria possess makes determination of their individual roles difficult. Existing techniques to st...

  11. NRIP, a novel calmodulin binding protein, activates calcineurin to dephosphorylate human papillomavirus E2 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Szu-Wei; Tsao, Yeou-Ping; Lin, Chia-Yi; Chen, Show-Li

    2011-07-01

    Previously, we found a gene named nuclear receptor interaction protein (NRIP) (or DCAF6 or IQWD1). We demonstrate that NRIP is a novel binding protein for human papillomavirus 16 (HPV-16) E2 protein. HPV-16 E2 and NRIP can directly associate into a complex in vivo and in vitro, and the N-terminal domain of NRIP interacts with the transactivation domain of HPV-16 E2. Only full-length NRIP can stabilize E2 protein and induce HPV gene expression, and NRIP silenced by two designed small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) decreases E2 protein levels and E2-driven gene expression. We found that NRIP can directly bind with calmodulin in the presence of calcium through its IQ domain, resulting in decreased E2 ubiquitination and increased E2 protein stability. Complex formation between NRIP and calcium/calmodulin activates the phosphatase calcineurin to dephosphorylate E2 and increase E2 protein stability. We present evidences for E2 phosphorylation in vivo and show that NRIP acts as a scaffold to recruit E2 and calcium/calmodulin to prevent polyubiquitination and degradation of E2, enhancing E2 stability and E2-driven gene expression. PMID:21543494

  12. Hunting Increases Phosphorylation of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type II in Adult Barn Owls

    OpenAIRE

    Nichols, Grant S.; DeBello, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile barn owls readily adapt to prismatic spectacles, whereas adult owls living under standard aviary conditions do not. We previously demonstrated that phosphorylation of the cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) provides a readout of the instructive signals that guide plasticity in juveniles. Here we investigated phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (pCaMKII) in both juveniles and adults. In contrast to CREB, we found no differences in pCaMKII e...

  13. Multiple calcium channels in synaptosomes: voltage dependence of 1,4-dihydropyridine binding and effects on function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The voltage dependence of binding of the calcium channel antagonist, (+)-(3H]PN200-110, to rat brain synaptosomes and the effects of dihydropyridines on 45Ca2+ uptake have been investigated. Under nondepolarizing conditions (+)-(3H)PN200-110 binds to a single class of sites with a K/sub d/ of 0.07 nM and a binding capacity of 182 fmol/mg of protein. When the synaptosomal membrane potential was dissipated either by osmotic lysis of the synaptosomes or by depolarization induced by raising the external K+ concentration, there was a decrease in affinity with no change in the number of sites. The effects of calcium channel ligands on 45Ca2+ uptake by synaptosomes have been measured as a function of external potassium concentration, i.e., membrane potential. Depolarization led to a rapid influx of 45Ca2+ whose magnitude was voltage-dependent. Verapamil almost completely inhibited calcium uptake at all potassium concentrations studies. In contrast, the effects of dihydropyridines (2 μM) appear to be voltage-sensitive. At relatively low levels of depolarization nitrendipine and PN200-110 completely inhibited 45Ca2+ influx, whereas the agonist Bay K8644 slightly potentiated the response. At higher K+ concentrations an additional dihydropyridine-insensitive component of calcium uptake was observed. These results provide evidence for the presence of dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels in synaptosomes which may be activated under conditions of partial depolarization

  14. Mercury-binding proteins of Mytilus edulis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roesijadi, G.; Morris, J. E.; Calabrese, A.

    1981-11-01

    Mytilus edulis possesses low molecular weight, mercury-binding proteins. The predominant protein isolated from gill tissue is enriched in cysteinyl residues (8%) and possesses an amino acid composition similar to cadmium-binding proteins of mussels and oysters. Continuous exposure of mussels to 5 ..mu..g/l mercury results in spillover of mercury from these proteins to high molecular weight proteins. Antibodies to these proteins have been isolated, and development of immunoassays is presently underway. Preliminary studies to determine whether exposure of adult mussels to mercury will result in induction of mercury-binding proteins in offspring suggest that such proteins occur in larvae although additional studies are indicated for a conclusive demonstration.

  15. Calcium-binding affinity and calcium-enhanced activity of Clostridium thermocellum endoglucanase D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvaux, S; Beguin, P; Aubert, J P; Bhat, K M; Gow, L A; Wood, T M; Bairoch, A

    1990-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum endoglucanase D (EC 3.2.1.4: EGD), which is encoded by the celD gene, was found to bind Ca2+ with an association constant of 2.03 x 10(6) M-1. Ca2+ stimulated the activity of EGD towards swollen Avicel by 2-fold. In the presence of Ca2+, the Kd of the enzyme towards p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-cellobioside and carboxymethylcellulose was decreased by 4-fold. Furthermore, Ca2+ increased the half-life of the enzyme at 75 degrees C from 13 to 47 min. Since the 3' sequence of celD encodes a duplicated region sharing similarities with the Ca2+-binding site of several Ca2+-binding proteins, a deleted clone was constructed and used to purify a truncated form of the enzyme which no longer contained the duplicated region. The truncated enzyme was very similar to EGD expressed from the intact gene with respect to activity, Ca2(+)-binding kinetics and Ca2+ effects on substrate binding and thermostability. Thus the latter parameters do not appear to be mediated through the duplicated conserved region. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:2302168

  16. Computational Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins and Binding Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingna Si

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Proteins and RNA interaction have vital roles in many cellular processes such as protein synthesis, sequence encoding, RNA transfer, and gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Approximately 6%–8% of all proteins are RNA-binding proteins (RBPs. Distinguishing these RBPs or their binding residues is a major aim of structural biology. Previously, a number of experimental methods were developed for the determination of protein–RNA interactions. However, these experimental methods are expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Alternatively, researchers have developed many computational approaches to predict RBPs and protein–RNA binding sites, by combining various machine learning methods and abundant sequence and/or structural features. There are three kinds of computational approaches, which are prediction from protein sequence, prediction from protein structure, and protein-RNA docking. In this paper, we review all existing studies of predictions of RNA-binding sites and RBPs and complexes, including data sets used in different approaches, sequence and structural features used in several predictors, prediction method classifications, performance comparisons, evaluation methods, and future directions.

  17. Inhibition of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels by RGK Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buraei, Zafir; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Due to their essential biological roles, voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are regulated by a myriad of molecules and mechanisms. Fifteen years ago, RGK proteins were discovered to bind the VGCC β subunit (Cavβ) and potently inhibit high-voltage activated Ca(2+) channels. RGKs (Rad, Rem, Rem2 and Gem/Kir) are a family of monomeric small GTPases belonging to the superfamily of Ras GTPases. They exert dual inhibitory effects on VGCCs, decreasing surface expression and suppressing surface channels through immobilization of the voltage sensor or reduction of channel open probability. While Cavβ is required for all forms of RGK inhibition, not all inhibition is mediated by the RGK-Cavβ interaction. Some RGK proteins also interact directly with the pore-forming α1 subunit of some types of VGCCs (Cavα1). Importantly, RGK proteins tonically inhibit VGCCs in native cells, regulating cardiac and neural functions. This minireview summarizes the mechanisms, molecular determinants, and physiological impact of RGK inhibition of VGCCs. PMID:25966691

  18. Randomized crossover study comparing the phosphate-binding efficacy of calcium ketoglutarate versus calcium carbonate in patients on chronic hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bro, S; Rasmussen, R A; Handberg, J; Olgaard, K; Feldt-Rasmussen, B

    1998-02-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the phosphate-binding efficacy, side effects, and cost of therapy of calcium ketoglutarate granulate as compared with calcium carbonate tablets in patients on chronic hemodialysis. The study design used was a randomized, crossover open trial, and the main outcome measurements were plasma ionized calcium levels, plasma phosphate levels, plasma intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels, requirements for supplemental aluminum-aminoacetate therapy, patient tolerance, and cost of therapy. Nineteen patients on chronic hemodialysis were treated with a dialysate calcium concentration of 1.25 mmol/L and a fixed alfacalcidol dose for at least 2 months. All had previously tolerated therapy with calcium carbonate. Of the 19 patients included, 10 completed both treatment arms. After 12 weeks of therapy, the mean (+/-SEM) plasma ionized calcium level was significantly lower in the ketoglutarate arm compared with the calcium carbonate arm (4.8+/-0.1 mg/dL v 5.2+/-0.1 mg/dL; P = 0.004), whereas the mean plasma phosphate (4.5+/-0.3 mg/dL v 5.1+/-0.1 mg/dL) and PTH levels (266+/-125 pg/mL v 301+/-148 pg/mL) did not differ significantly between the two treatment arms. Supplemental aluminum-aminoacetate was not required during calcium ketoglutarate treatment, while two patients needed this supplement when treated with calcium carbonate. Five of 17 (29%) patients were withdrawn from calcium ketoglutarate therapy within 1 to 2 weeks due to intolerance (anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea, general uneasiness), whereas the remaining 12 patients did not experience any side effects at all. The five patients with calcium ketoglutarate intolerance all had pre-existing gastrointestinal symptoms; four of them had received treatment with cimetidine or omeprazol before inclusion into the study. Calculations based on median doses after 12 weeks showed that the cost of the therapy in Denmark was 10 times higher for calcium ketoglutarate compared with calcium

  19. Effects of calcium chelators on calcium distribution and protein solubility in rennet casein dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Irene; O' Sullivan, Michael; O' Riordan, Dolores

    2016-04-15

    This study investigated the effects of calcium chelating salts on calcium-ion activity (ACa(++)), calcium distribution, and protein solubility in model CaCl2 solutions (50 mmol L(-1)) or rennet casein dispersions (15 g/100 g). Disodium phosphate and trisodium citrate at concentrations of 10 and 30 mmol L(-1) and at ratios of 1:0, 2:1, 1:1, 1:2 and 0:1 were added to both systems. The CaCl2 system, despite its simplicity, was a good indicator of chelating salt-calcium interactions in rennet casein dispersions. Adding trisodium citrate either alone or as part of a mixed chelating salt system resulted in high levels of dispersed "chelated" calcium; conversely, disodium phosphate addition resulted in lower levels, while the ACa(++) decreased with increasing concentration of both chelating salts. Neither chelating salt produced high levels of soluble protein. Thus calcium chelating salts may play a more subtle role in modulating hydration during manufacture of casein-based matrices than simply solubilising calcium or protein. PMID:26616945

  20. Radiation damage to DNA-binding proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DNA-binding properties of proteins are strongly affected upon irradiation. The tetrameric lactose repressor (a dimer of dimers) losses its ability to bind operator DNA as soon as at least two damages per protomer of each dimer occur. The monomeric MC1 protein losses its ability to bind DNA in two steps : i) at low doses only the specific binding is abolished, whereas the non-specific one is still possible; ii) at high doses all binding vanishes. Moreover, the DNA bending induced by MC1 binding is less pronounced for a protein that underwent the low dose irradiation. When the entire DNA-protein complexes are irradiated, the observed disruption of the complexes is mainly due to the damage of the proteins and not to that of DNA. The doses necessary for complex disruption are higher than those inactivating the free protein. This difference, larger for MC1 than for lactose repressor, is due to the protection of the protein by the bound DNA. The oxidation of the protein side chains that are accessible to the radiation-induced hydroxyl radicals seems to represent the inactivating damage

  1. Alcohol Binding to the Odorant Binding Protein LUSH: Multiple Factors Affecting Binding Affinities

    OpenAIRE

    Ader, Lauren; Jones, David N. M.; Lin, Hai

    2010-01-01

    Density function theory (DFT) calculations have been carried out to investigate the binding of alcohols to the odorant binding protein LUSH from Drosophila melanogaster. LUSH is one of the few proteins known to bind to ethanol at physiologically relevant concentrations and where high-resolution structural information is available for the protein bound to alcohol at these concentrations. The structures of the LUSH–alcohol complexes identify a set of specific hydrogen-bonding interactions as cr...

  2. Calcium-stimulated autophosphorylation site of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Siems, W. F.; Jones, J. P.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2001-01-01

    The existence of two molecular switches regulating plant chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK), namely the C-terminal visinin-like domain acting as Ca(2+)-sensitive molecular switch and calmodulin binding domain acting as Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation-sensitive molecular switch, has been described (Sathyanarayanan, P. V., Cremo, C. R., and Poovaiah, B. W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 30417-30422). Here we report the identification of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site of CCaMK by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight-mass spectrometry. Thr(267) was confirmed as the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site by post-source decay experiments and by site-directed mutagenesis. The purified T267A mutant form of CCaMK did not show Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation, autophosphorylation-dependent variable calmodulin affinity, or Ca(2+)/calmodulin stimulation of kinase activity. Sequence comparison of CCaMK from monocotyledonous plant (lily) and dicotyledonous plant (tobacco) suggests that the autophosphorylation site is conserved. This is the first identification of a phosphorylation site specifically responding to activation by second messenger system (Ca(2+) messenger system) in plants. Homology modeling of the kinase and calmodulin binding domain of CCaMK with the crystal structure of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 1 suggests that the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site is located on the surface of the kinase and far from the catalytic site. Analysis of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation with increasing concentration of CCaMK indicates the possibility that the Ca(2+)-stimulated phosphorylation occurs by an intermolecular mechanism.

  3. The calcium-binding protein Mtsl/S100A4 in normal, degenerating and demyelinated spinal cord of the adult mouse%The calcium-binding protein Mtsl/S100A4 in normal,degenerating and demyelinated spinal cord of the adult mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Zhengyu; XIONG Liang; HUANG Xiaolin; ZHOU Ning; Kozlova-Aldskogius Elena

    2008-01-01

    目的:研究止常、退行性病变以及脱髓鞘小鼠脊髓内Mtsl/S100A4蛋白的表达模式,及其对胶质细胞反应的影响.方法:以野生型和Mtsl/S100A4基因敲除型小鼠为试验动物,采用背根损伤、坐骨神经损伤、溴乙啶局部微量注射的方法复制退行性病变及脱髓鞘脊髓动物模型,应用免疫荧光技术,检测S100A4、GFAP、NG2、Mac1的表达情况.结果:野生型小鼠脊髓内,仅白质星型胶质细胞表达S100A4蛋白,且主要分布于Lissauer束:背根或坐骨神经损伤后,白质星形胶质细胞内的S100A4及GFAP表达上调.野生型与S100A4基因敲除小鼠GFAP表达量无显著差异;溴乙啶注射7d后,野生型小鼠脊髓脱髓鞘区域内她S100A4呈云雾状分布,胶质细胞反应局限于注射侧,并且形成清晰的胶质瘢痕,而S100A4基凶敲除小鼠则未见上述病理变化.结论:S100A4蛋白在小鼠脊髓内的表达模式与大鼠相似;退行性变的脊髓内,细胞内上调的S100A4蛋白并不影响胶质细胞的反应;脱髓鞘脊髓内,细胞外的S100A4蛋白明显影响胶质细胞反应,包括胶质瘢痕的形成.%Objective:To investigate the expression pattern of Mtsl/S100A4 in mouse spinal cord;to investigate the effects of Mtsl/S100A4 on glial cell responses.Method:The study was carried out on Mtsl/S100A4 wild type and knock-out mice.The degenerative spinal cord model was established by dorsal root or sciatic nerve injury.The de-myelinated spinal cord model was established by ethidium bromide injections.Then the expressions of S100A4,GFA P,NG2 and Mael were measured.Result:The expressions of Mtsl/S100A4 in mice spinal cord were similar to that in rats.In WT mice this protein expressed in a thin layer of fiber bundles in the tract of Lissauer,and in white matter astrocytes.There was intracellular up-regulation of Mtsl/S100A4 in white matter astrocytes of WT mice after dorsal root or sciatic nerve injury,with no difference in glial cell response

  4. RNA-induced silencing attenuates G protein-mediated calcium signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Finly; Sahu, Shriya; Golebiewska, Urszula; Scarlata, Suzanne

    2016-05-01

    Phospholipase Cβ (PLCβ) is activated by G protein subunits in response to environmental stimuli to increase intracellular calcium. In cells, a significant portion of PLCβ is cytosolic, where it binds a protein complex required for efficient RNA-induced silencing called C3PO (component 3 promoter of RISC). Binding between C3PO and PLCβ raises the possibility that RNA silencing activity can affect the ability of PLCβ to mediate calcium signals. By use of human and rat neuronal cell lines (SK-N-SH and PC12), we show that overexpression of one of the main components of C3PO diminishes Ca(2+) release in response to Gαq/PLCβ stimulation by 30 to 40%. In untransfected SK-N-SH or PC12 cells, the introduction of siRNA(GAPDH) [small interfering RNA(glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase)] reduces PLCβ-mediated calcium signals by ∼30%, but addition of siRNA(Hsp90) (heat shock protein 90) had little effect. Fluorescence imaging studies suggest an increase in PLCβ-C3PO association in cells treated with siRNA(GAPDH) but not siRNA(Hsp90). Taken together, our studies raise the possibility that Ca(2+) responses to extracellular stimuli can be modulated by components of the RNA silencing machinery.-Philip, F., Sahu, S., Golebiewska, U., Scarlata, S. RNA-induced silencing attenuates G protein-mediated calcium signals. PMID:26862135

  5. STUDY OF SERUM TOTAL CALCIUM, IO NIZED CALCIUM AND TOTAL PROTEIN CONCENTRATIONS IN POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SK.Deepthi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Menopause and ageing is associated with accelerated loss of cortical bone. Osteoporotic fractures are common cause of morbidity and mortality in adult Indian women due to ageing. This study was conducted to evaluate the levels of serum calcium, ionized calcium and total protein levels in postmenopausal women and to assess its relation with ageing. Study includes 70 women (40 post menopausal and 30 prem enopausal women serum alkaline phosphatase, serum calcium, ionized calcium and total proteins, serum albumin were estimated in both cases and controls. There is decrease in serum calcium in postmenopausal; wo men when compared to premenopausal women. There was no significant change in ionized calcium in both cases and controls. ALP is highly significant P<0.001. In postmenopausal women suggesting there is high alkaline phosphotase activity in postmenopausal women as a result of the inhibitory effects of estrogen on bone turnover rate which is dependent on age and body mass index. Decrease in serum albumin was seen in postmenopausal wo men which is the reason for decrease in serum calcium level which is inturn related to ageing effect.

  6. Calcium-phospholipid enhanced protein phosphorylation in human placenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent protein phosphorylation has not been studied in placenta. Human placental cytosol was subjected to an endogenous protein phosphorylation assay using [γ-32P]ATP in the presence of calcium and phosphatidylserine. Protein phosphorylation was assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. When compared to basal levels, calcium (10-6 M) in combination with phosphatidylserine (50 μg/ml) significantly enhanced (P 32P incorporation into phosphoproteins having mol wt 47,000, 43,000, and 37,000. Half-maximal 22P incorporation was observed with 3.5 x 10-7 M Ca2+ in the presence of phosphatidylserine (50 μg/ml). The effect of phosphatidylserine was biphasic. In the presence of Ca 10-6 M, 32P incorporation increased to a maximum at 70 +g/ml of phosphatidylserine. The increase was suppressed at 150 μg/ml. Tetracaine caused a dose-dependent inhibition of calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent enhancement of the three phosphoproteins. Calcium in the absence of phospholipid enhanced the phosphorylation of a protein of 98,000 mol wt. Phosphatidylserine suppressed this enhancement. Calmodulin (10-6 M) had no detectable effect upon phosphorylation beyond that of calcium alone, but the calmodulin inhibitor R-24571 specifically inhibited the calcium-stimulated 98,000 mol wt phosphoprotein. Calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent phospholipid-dependent phosphoproteins are present in human placental cytosol; whether calcium-activated, calmodulin-dependent phosphoproteins also are present remains a question

  7. The BRCA1 Tumor Suppressor Binds to Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptors to Stimulate Apoptotic Calcium Release*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedgepeth, Serena C.; Garcia, M. Iveth; Wagner, Larry E.; Rodriguez, Ana M.; Chintapalli, Sree V.; Snyder, Russell R.; Hankins, Gary D. V.; Henderson, Beric R.; Brodie, Kirsty M.; Yule, David I.; van Rossum, Damian B.; Boehning, Darren

    2015-01-01

    The inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) is a ubiquitously expressed endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident calcium channel. Calcium release mediated by IP3Rs influences many signaling pathways, including those regulating apoptosis. IP3R activity is regulated by protein-protein interactions, including binding to proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors to regulate cell death. Here we show that the IP3R binds to the tumor suppressor BRCA1. BRCA1 binding directly sensitizes the IP3R to its ligand, IP3. BRCA1 is recruited to the ER during apoptosis in an IP3R-dependent manner, and, in addition, a pool of BRCA1 protein is constitutively associated with the ER under non-apoptotic conditions. This is likely mediated by a novel lipid binding activity of the first BRCA1 C terminus domain of BRCA1. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation by which BRCA1 can act as a proapoptotic protein. PMID:25645916

  8. Megalin binds and mediates cellular internalization of folate binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birn, Henrik; Zhai, Xiaoyue; Holm, Jan;

    2005-01-01

    to express high levels of megalin, is inhibitable by excess unlabeled FBP and by receptor associated protein, a known inhibitor of binding to megalin. Immortalized rat yolk sac cells, representing an established model for studying megalin-mediated uptake, reveal (125)I-labeled FBP uptake which is...

  9. Biophysical studies on calcium and carbohydrate binding to carbohydrate recognition domain of Gal/GalNAc lectin from Entamoeba histolytica: insights into host cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rupali; Verma, Kuldeep; Chandra, Mintu; Mukherjee, Madhumita; Datta, Sunando

    2016-09-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, an enteric parasite expresses a Gal/GalNAc-specific lectin that contributes to its virulence by establishing adhesion to host cell. In this study, carbohydrate recognition domain of Hgl (EhCRD) was purified and biophysical studies were conducted to understand the thermodynamic basis of its binding to carbohydrate and Ca(++) Here, we show that carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of the lectin binds to calcium through DPN motif. To decipher the role of calcium in carbohydrate binding and host cell adhesion, biophysical and cell-based studies were carried out. We demonstrated that the presence of the cation neither change the affinity of the lectin for carbohydrates nor alters its conformation. Mutation of the calcium-binding motif in EhCRD resulted in complete loss of ability to bind calcium but retained its affinity for carbohydrates. Purified EhCRD significantly diminished adhesion of the amebic trophozoites to Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells as well as triggered red blood cell agglutination. The calcium-binding defective mutant abrogated amebic adhesion to CHO cells similar to the wild-type protein, but it failed to agglutinate RBCs suggesting a differential role of the cation in these two processes. This study provides the first molecular description of the role of calcium in Gal/GalNAc mediated host cell adhesion. PMID:27008865

  10. The early asthmatic response is associated with glycolysis, calcium binding and mitochondria activity as revealed by proteomic analysis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Yu-Dong

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inhalation of allergens by allergic asthmatics results in the early asthmatic response (EAR, which is characterized by acute airway obstruction beginning within a few minutes. The EAR is the earliest indicator of the pathological progression of allergic asthma. Because the molecular mechanism underlying the EAR is not fully defined, this study will contribute to a better understanding of asthma. Methods In order to gain insight into the molecular basis of the EAR, we examined changes in protein expression patterns in the lung tissue of asthmatic rats during the EAR using 2-DE/MS-based proteomic techniques. Bioinformatic analysis of the proteomic data was then performed using PPI Spider and KEGG Spider to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism. Results In total, 44 differentially expressed protein spots were detected in the 2-DE gels. Of these 44 protein spots, 42 corresponded to 36 unique proteins successfully identified using mass spectrometry. During subsequent bioinformatic analysis, the gene ontology classification, the protein-protein interaction networking and the biological pathway exploration demonstrated that the identified proteins were mainly involved in glycolysis, calcium binding and mitochondrial activity. Using western blot and semi-quantitative RT-PCR, we confirmed the changes in expression of five selected proteins, which further supports our proteomic and bioinformatic analyses. Conclusions Our results reveal that the allergen-induced EAR in asthmatic rats is associated with glycolysis, calcium binding and mitochondrial activity, which could establish a functional network in which calcium binding may play a central role in promoting the progression of asthma.

  11. Affinity purification of proteins binding to GST fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaffield, J C; Johnston, S A

    2001-05-01

    This unit describes the use of proteins fused to glutathione-S-transferase (GST fusion proteins) to affinity purify other proteins, a technique also known as GST pulldown purification. The describes a strategy in which a GST fusion protein is bound to agarose affinity beads and the complex is then used to assay the binding of a specific test protein that has been labeled with [35S]methionine by in vitro translation. However, this method can be adapted for use with other types of fusion proteins; for example, His6, biotin tags, or maltose-binding protein fusions (MBP), and these may offer particular advantages. A describes preparation of an E. coli extract that is added to the reaction mixture with purified test protein to reduce nonspecific binding. PMID:18265191

  12. Serotonin binding in vitro by releasable proteins from human blood platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the substances released from human blood platelets are serotonin and various proteins. It was hypothesized that one of these proteins binds serotonin and that serotonin might be important to the protein's function or that the protein might be important to serotonin's function. Two platelet-specific proteins, platelet factor 4 (PF4) and β-thromboglobulin (βTG) were found to bind serotonin in vitro. Endogenous PF4 was isolated by serotonin-affinity chromatography and was identified by radioimmunoassay. Purified [125I] -PF4 and native PF4 bound to and eluted from a serotonin-affinity column similarly. Ultrafiltration of the homologous protein, βTG, with [14C]-serotonin demonstrated binding of about 8 moles serotonin per mole tetrameric βTG with a dissociation constant of about 4 X 10(sup-8) M. Equilibrium dialysis of PF4 with radiolabelled serotonin was attempted, but no binding constant values were obtained because serotonin apparently bound to the dialysis membrane. Since EDTA was one of the two agents that eluted PF4 from the serotonin-affinity gel, calcium binding by PF4 was investigated by equilibrium dialysis. Evidence was obtained for positively cooperative binding of calcium ions by PF4. It is concluded that PF4 and βTG bind serotonin in vitro, that they may also bind in vivo when platelets undergo release, and that the functions of serotonin, PF4 and βTG may be mediated in part by serotonin-protein associations

  13. Calprotectin S100A9 Calcium-binding Loops I and II Are Essential for Keratinocyte Resistance to Bacterial Invasion*

    OpenAIRE

    Champaiboon, Chantrakorn; Sappington, Kaia J.; Guenther, Brian D.; Ross, Karen F.; Herzberg, Mark C.

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial cells expressing calprotectin, a heterodimer of S100A8 and S100A9 proteins, are more resistant to bacterial invasion. To determine structural motifs that affect resistance to bacterial invasion, mutations were constructed in S100A9 targeting the calcium-binding loops I and II (E36Q, E78Q, E36Q,E78Q) and the C terminus (S100A91–99 and S100A91–112), which contains putative antimicrobial zinc-binding and phosphorylation sites. The S100A8 and mutated S100A9 enco...

  14. Treponema pallidum Fibronectin-Binding Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Cameron, Caroline E.; Brown, Elizabeth L.; Kuroiwa, Janelle M. Y.; Schnapp, Lynn M.; Brouwer, Nathan L.

    2004-01-01

    Putative adhesins were predicted by computer analysis of the Treponema pallidum genome. Two treponemal proteins, Tp0155 and Tp0483, demonstrated specific attachment to fibronectin, blocked bacterial adherence to fibronectin-coated slides, and supported attachment of fibronectin-producing mammalian cells. These results suggest Tp0155 and Tp0483 are fibronectin-binding proteins mediating T. pallidum-host interactions.

  15. Structure and calcium binding activity of LipL32, the major surface antigen of pathogenic Leptospira sp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leptospirosis, caused by the spirochaete Leptospira is an important emerging infectious disease. LipL32 is the major exposed outer membrane protein found exclusively in pathogenic leptospira. It is highly immunogenic and has been shown to bind to host extracellular matrix components, including collagens, fibronectin and laminin. In this work we crystallized recombinant LipL32 protein and determined its structure to 2.25 A resolution. Initial phases were determined using the multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion technique with data collected from selenomethionine-containing crystals at the MX2 beamline at the LNLS. The LipL32 monomer is made of a jelly-roll fold core from which protrude several peripheral secondary structures. Some structural features suggested that LipL32 could bind Ca2+ ions and indeed, spectroscopic data (circular (dichroism. intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and extrinsic 1-amino-2-anaphthol-4-sulfonic acid fluorescence) confirmed the calcium binding properties of LipL32. (author)

  16. Dengue virus utilizes calcium modulating cyclophilin-binding ligand to subvert apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianling; Huang, Rongjie; Liao, Weiyong; Chen, Zhaoni; Zhang, Shijun; Huang, Renbin

    2012-02-24

    Dengue virus (DENV) capsid (C) proteins are the major structural component of virus particles. This study aimed to identify the host interacting partners of DENV C protein that could contribute to viral pathogenesis. DENV C protein was screened against human liver cDNA yeast two-hybrid library. We identified calcium modulating cyclophilin-binding ligand (CAML) as a novel interacting partner of DENV C protein. We report for the first time that CAML influenced DENV production. DENV production was significantly attenuated in CAML knock-down cells at 36h post-infection. CAML did not influence DENV entry, genome uncoating, viral transcription, viral translation and virus secretion. Our study pinpointed that CAML influenced the process of apoptosis by altering mitochondrial membrane potential and caspase-3 activation from 36h post-infection. Over-expression of CAML protected Huh7 cells from apoptosis and knock down of CAML favoured apoptosis following infection with DENV. We also showed that CAML expression was up-regulated during DENV infection. Increased CAML levels protected DENV-infected cells from undergoing apoptosis by preventing mitochondrial damage and caspase-3 activation which in turn favoured DENV production from 36h post-infection. Overall, this study demonstrated that DENV manipulated the levels of CAML to subvert the apoptotic process which in turn favoured efficient virus production. PMID:22281498

  17. Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein and Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Atshaves, B.P.; Martin, G G; Hostetler, H.A.; McIntosh, A.L.; Kier, A B; Schroeder, F.

    2010-01-01

    While low levels of unesterified long chain fatty acids (LCFAs) are normal metabolic intermediates of dietary and endogenous fat, LCFAs are also potent regulators of key receptors/enzymes, and at high levels become toxic detergents within the cell. Elevated levels of LCFAs are associated with diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. Consequently, mammals evolved fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) that bind/sequester these potentially toxic free fatty acids in the cytosol and present them f...

  18. Calcium-binding properties of troponin C in detergent-skinned heart muscle fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to obtain information with regard to behavior of the Ca2+ receptor, troponin C (TnC), in intact myofilament lattice of cardiac muscle, we investigated Ca2+-binding properties of canine ventricular muscle fibers skinned with Triton X-100. Analysis of equilibrium Ca2+-binding data of the skinned fibers in ATP-free solutions suggested that there were two distinct classes of binding sites which were saturated over the physiological range of negative logarithm of free calcium concentration (pCa): class I (KCa = 7.4 X 10(7) M-1, KMg = 0.9 X 10(3) M-1) and class II (KCa = 1.2 X 10(6) M-1, KMg = 1.1 X 10(2) M-1). The class I and II were considered equivalent, respectively, to the Ca2+-Mg2+ and Ca2+-specific sites of TnC. The assignments were supported by TnC content of the skinned fibers determined by electrophoresis and 45Ca autoradiograph of electroblotted fiber proteins. Dissociation of rigor complexes by ATP caused a downward shift of the binding curve between pCa 7 and 5, an effect which could be largely accounted for by lowering of KCa of the class II sites. When Ca2+ binding and isometric force were measured simultaneously, it was found that the threshold pCa for activation corresponds to the range of pCa where class II sites started to bind Ca2+ significantly. We concluded that the low affinity site of cardiac TnC plays a key role in Ca2+ regulation of contraction under physiological conditions, just as it does in the regulation of actomyosin ATPase. Study of kinetics of 45Ca washout from skinned fibers and myofibrils revealed that cardiac TnC in myofibrils contains Ca2+-binding sites whose off-rate constant for Ca2+ is significantly lower than the Ca2+ off-rate constant hitherto documented for the divalent ion-binding sites of either cardiac/slow muscle TnC or fast skeletal TnC

  19. Nickel binding sites in histone proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Zoroddu, Maria Antonietta; Peana, Massimiliano Francesco; Solinas, Costantino; Medici, Serenella

    2012-01-01

    Nickel compounds are well known as human carcinogens, though the molecular events that are responsible for this are not well understood. It has been proposed that a crucial element in the mechanism of carcinogenesis is the binding of Ni(II) ions within the cell nucleus. It is known that DNA polymer binds Ni(II) only weakly, leaving the proteins of the cell nucleus as the likely Ni(II) targets. Being histone proteins the most abundant among them, they can be considered the primary sites fo...

  20. Ice-Binding Proteins and Their Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar Dolev, Maya; Braslavsky, Ido; Davies, Peter L

    2016-06-01

    Ice-binding proteins (IBPs) are a diverse class of proteins that assist organism survival in the presence of ice in cold climates. They have different origins in many organisms, including bacteria, fungi, algae, diatoms, plants, insects, and fish. This review covers the gamut of IBP structures and functions and the common features they use to bind ice. We discuss mechanisms by which IBPs adsorb to ice and interfere with its growth, evidence for their irreversible association with ice, and methods for enhancing the activity of IBPs. The applications of IBPs in the food industry, in cryopreservation, and in other technologies are vast, and we chart out some possibilities. PMID:27145844

  1. Characterization of calcium and magnesium binding domains of human 5-lipoxygenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two calcium binding sites, separated by about 9.3 A, present in the loops that connect the β-sheets of N-terminal domain contain the ligating residues F14, A15, G16, D79, and D18, D19, L76, respectively. Magnesium is found to bind in regions, which are marginally different owing to the disparity in the ionic radii of Ca2+ and Mg2+. The entropy analysis on the loops of 5-lipoxygenase, implementing the wormlike chain model, explains that the N-terminal β-barrel is well suited to accommodate calcium binding sites. The large buried side chain area of W102 (compared to W13 and W75) and comparatively smaller fraction of side chain exposed to polar atoms corroborate the calcium induced higher affinity to phosphatidylcholine (PC). However, W80 lying in close proximity of the calcium binding sites is expected to have considerable PC affinity but negligible calcium induced effect on PC binding

  2. Differential expression of calcium-related genes in gastric cancer cells transfected with cellular prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jie; Luo, Guanhong; Ning, Xiaoxuan; Shi, Yongquan; Zhai, Huihong; Sun, Shiren; Jin, Haifeng; Liu, Zhenxiong; Zhang, Faming; Lu, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Yunping; Chen, Xiong; Zhang, Hongbo; Guo, Xuegang; Wu, Kaichun; Fan, Daiming

    2007-06-01

    The prion protein (PrPC) has a primary role in the pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, which causes prion disorders partially due to Ca2+ dysregulation. In our previous work, we found that overexpressed PrPC in gastric cancer was involved in apoptosis, cell proliferation, and metastasis of gastric cancer. To better understand how PrPC acts in gastric cancer, a human microarray was performed to select differentially regulated genes that correlate with the biological function of PrPC. The microarray data were analyzed and revealed 3798 genes whose expression increased at least 2-fold in gastric cancer cells transfected with PrPC. These genes encode proteins involved in several aspects of cell biology, among which, we specially detected molecules related to calcium, especially the S100 calcium-binding proteins, and found that PrPC upregulates S100A1, S100A6, S100B, and S100P but downregulates CacyBP in gastric cancer cells. We also found that intracellular Ca2+ levels in cells transfected with PrPC increased, whereas these levels decreased in knockdowns of these cells. Taken together, PrPC might increase intracellular Ca2+, partially through calcium-binding proteins, or PrPC might upregulate the expression of S100 proteins, partially through stimulating the intracellular calcium level in gastric cancer. Though the underlying mechanisms need further exploration, this study provides a new insight into the role of PrPC in gastric cancer and enriches our knowledge of prion protein. PMID:17612632

  3. 14-3-3 Proteins Buffer Intracellular Calcium Sensing Receptors to Constrain Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Grant

    Full Text Available Calcium sensing receptors (CaSR interact with 14-3-3 binding proteins at a carboxyl terminal arginine-rich motif. Mutations identified in patients with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia, autosomal dominant hypocalcemia, pancreatitis or idiopathic epilepsy support the functional importance of this motif. We combined total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and biochemical approaches to determine the mechanism of 14-3-3 protein regulation of CaSR signaling. Loss of 14-3-3 binding caused increased basal CaSR signaling and plasma membrane levels, and a significantly larger signaling-evoked increase in plasma membrane receptors. Block of core glycosylation with tunicamycin demonstrated that changes in plasma membrane CaSR levels were due to differences in exocytic rate. Western blotting to quantify time-dependent changes in maturation of expressed wt CaSR and a 14-3-3 protein binding-defective mutant demonstrated that signaling increases synthesis to maintain constant levels of the immaturely and maturely glycosylated forms. CaSR thus operates by a feed-forward mechanism, whereby signaling not only induces anterograde trafficking of nascent receptors but also increases biosynthesis to maintain steady state levels of net cellular CaSR. Overall, these studies suggest that 14-3-3 binding at the carboxyl terminus provides an important buffering mechanism to increase the intracellular pool of CaSR available for signaling-evoked trafficking, but attenuates trafficking to control the dynamic range of responses to extracellular calcium.

  4. Coupling calcium/calmodulin-mediated signaling and herbivore-induced plant response calmodulin-binding transcription factor AtSR1/CAMTA3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium/calmodulin (Ca2+/CaM) has long been considered a crucial component in wound signaling pathway. However, no functional significance of Ca2+/CaM-binding proteins has been identified in plant responses to herbivore attack/wounding stress. We have reported earlier that a family of Ca2+/CaM-bindi...

  5. Signal transduction by guanine nucleotide binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, A M

    1987-01-01

    High affinity binding of guanine nucleotides and the ability to hydrolyze bound GTP to GDP are characteristics of an extended family of intracellular proteins. Subsets of this family include cytosolic initiation and elongation factors involved in protein synthesis, and cytoskeletal proteins such as tubulin (Hughes, S.M. (1983) FEBS Lett. 164, 1-8). A distinct subset of guanine nucleotide binding proteins is membrane-associated; members of this subset include the ras gene products (Ellis, R.W. et al. (1981) Nature 292, 506-511) and the heterotrimeric G-proteins (also termed N-proteins) (Gilman, A.G. (1984) Cell 36, 577-579). Substantial evidence indicates that G-proteins act as signal transducers by coupling receptors (R) to effectors (E). A similar function has been suggested but not proven for the ras gene products. Known G-proteins include Gs and Gi, the G-proteins associated with stimulation and inhibition, respectively, of adenylate cyclase; transducin (TD), the G-protein coupling rhodopsin to cGMP phosphodiesterase in rod photoreceptors (Bitensky, M.W. et al. (1981) Curr. Top. Membr. Transp. 15, 237-271; Stryer, L. (1986) Annu. Rev. Neurosci. 9, 87-119), and Go, a G-protein of unknown function that is highly abundant in brain (Sternweis, P.C. and Robishaw, J.D. (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 13806-13813; Neer, E.J. et al. (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 14222-14229). G-proteins also participate in other signal transduction pathways, notably that involving phosphoinositide breakdown. In this review, I highlight recent progress in our understanding of the structure, function, and diversity of G-proteins. PMID:2435586

  6. Activation of purified calcium channels by stoichiometric protein phosphorylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purified dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels from rabbit skeletal muscle were reconstituted into phosphatidylcholine vesicles to evaluate the effect of phosphorylation by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PK-A) on their function. Both the rate and extent of 45Ca2+ uptake into vesicles containing reconstituted calcium channels were increased severalfold after incubation with ATP and PK-A. The degree of stimulation of 45Ca2+ uptake was linearly proportional to the extent of phosphorylation of the alpha 1 and beta subunits of the calcium channel up to a stoichiometry of approximately 1 mol of phosphate incorporated into each subunit. The calcium channels activated by phosphorylation were determined to be incorporated into the reconstituted vesicles in the inside-out orientation and were completely inhibited by low concentrations of dihydropyridines, phenylalkylamines, Cd2+, Ni2+, and Mg2+. The results demonstrate a direct relationship between PK-A-catalyzed phosphorylation of the alpha 1 and beta subunits of the purified calcium channel and activation of the ion conductance activity of the dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels

  7. Presence of calcium-binding motifs in PilY1 homologs correlates with Ca-mediated twitching motility and evolutionary history across diverse bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jennifer K; Cruz, Luisa F; Evans, Michael R; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2015-02-01

    Twitching motility, involving type IV pili, is essential for host colonization and virulence of many pathogenic bacteria. Studies of PilY1, a tip-associated type IV pili protein, indicate that PilY1 functions as a switch between pilus extension and retraction, resulting in twitching motility. Recent work detected a calcium-binding motif in PilY1 of some animal bacterial pathogens and demonstrated that binding of calcium to PilY1 with this motif regulates twitching. Though studies of PilY1 in non-animal pathogens are limited, our group demonstrated that twitching motility in the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, which contains three PilY1 homologs, is increased by calcium supplementation. A study was conducted to investigate the phylogenetic relationship between multiple PilY1 homologs, the presence of calcium-binding motifs therein, and calcium-mediated twitching motility across diverse bacteria. Strains analyzed contained one to three PilY1 homologs, but phylogenetic analyses indicated that PilY1 homologs containing the calcium-binding motif Dx[DN]xDGxxD are phylogenetically divergent from other PilY1 homologs. Plant-associated bacteria included in these analyses were then examined for a calcium-mediated twitching response. Results indicate that bacteria must have at least one PilY1 homolog containing the Dx[DN]xDGxxD motif to display a calcium-mediated increase in twitching motility, which likely reflects an adaption to environmental calcium concentrations. PMID:25688068

  8. Membrane Incorporation, Channel Formation, and Disruption of Calcium Homeostasis by Alzheimer's β-Amyloid Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Kawahara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Oligomerization, conformational changes, and the consequent neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's β-amyloid protein (AβP play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Mounting evidence suggests that oligomeric AβPs cause the disruption of calcium homeostasis, eventually leading to neuronal death. We have demonstrated that oligomeric AβPs directly incorporate into neuronal membranes, form cation-sensitive ion channels (“amyloid channels”, and cause the disruption of calcium homeostasis via the amyloid channels. Other disease-related amyloidogenic proteins, such as prion protein in prion diseases or α-synuclein in dementia with Lewy bodies, exhibit similarities in the incorporation into membranes and the formation of calcium-permeable channels. Here, based on our experimental results and those of numerous other studies, we review the current understanding of the direct binding of AβP into membrane surfaces and the formation of calcium-permeable channels. The implication of composition of membrane lipids and the possible development of new drugs by influencing membrane properties and attenuating amyloid channels for the treatment and prevention of AD is also discussed.

  9. Odorant-binding proteins in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing-Jiang

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of the molecular and biochemical mechanisms that mediate chemoreception in insects has been greatly improved after the discovery of olfactory and taste receptor proteins. However, after 50 years of the discovery of first insect sex pheromone from the silkmoth Bombyx mori, it is still unclear how hydrophobic compounds reach the dendrites of sensory neurons in vivo across aqueous space and interact with the sensory receptors. The presence of soluble polypeptides in high concentration in the lymph of chemosensilla still poses unanswered questions. More than two decades after their discovery and despite the wealth of structural and biochemical information available, the physiological function of odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) is not well understood. Here, I review the structural properties of different subclasses of insect OBPs and their binding to pheromones and other small ligands. Finally, I discuss current ideas and models on the role of such proteins in insect chemoreception. PMID:20831949

  10. Quantifying drug-protein binding in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) provides precise quantitation of isotope labeled compounds that are bound to biological macromolecules such as DNA or proteins. The sensitivity is high enough to allow for sub-pharmacological (''micro-'') dosing to determine macromolecular targets without inducing toxicities or altering the system under study, whether it is healthy or diseased. We demonstrated an application of AMS in quantifying the physiologic effects of one dosed chemical compound upon the binding level of another compound in vivo at sub-toxic doses [4].We are using tissues left from this study to develop protocols for quantifying specific binding to isolated and identified proteins. We also developed a new technique to quantify nanogram to milligram amounts of isolated protein at precisions that are comparable to those for quantifying the bound compound by AMS

  11. Brain hyaluronan binding protein inhibits tumor growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高锋; 曹曼林; 王蕾

    2004-01-01

    Background Great efforts have been made to search for the angiogenic inhibitors in avascular tissues. Several proteins isolated from cartilage have been proved to have anti-angiogenic or anti-tumour effects. Because cartilage contains a great amount of hyaluronic acid (HA) oligosaccharides and abundant HA binding proteins (HABP), therefore, we speculated that HABP might be one of the factors regulating vascularization in cartilage or anti-angiogenesis in tumours. The purpose of this research was to evaluale the effects of hyaluronan binding protein on inhibiting tumour growth both in vivo and vitro. Methods A unique protein termed human brain hyaluronan (HA) binding protein (b-HABP) was cloned from human brain cDNA library. MDA-435 human breast cancer cell line was chosen as a transfectant. The in vitro underlying mechanisms were investigated by determining the possibilities of MDA-435/b-HABP colony formation on soft agar, the effects of the transfectant on the proliferation of endothelial cells and the expression levels of caspase 3 and FasL from MDA-435/b-HABP. The in vivo study included tumour growth on the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of chicken embryos and nude mice. Results Colony formation assay revealed that the colonies formed by MDA-435/b-HABP were greatly reduced compared to mock transfectants. The conditioned media from MDA-435/b-HABP inhibited the growth of endothelial cells in culture. Caspase 3 and FasL expressions were induced by MDA-435/b-HABP. The size of tumours of MDA-435/b-HABP in both CAM and nude mice was much smaller than that of MDA-435 alone. Conclusions Human brain hyaluronan binding protein (b-HABP) may represent a new kind of naturally existing anti-tumour substance. This brain-derived glycoprotein may block tumour growth by inducing apoptosis of cancer cells or by decreasing angiogenesis in tumour tissue via inhibiting proliferation of endothelial cells.

  12. Proteome-wide Identification of Novel Ceramide-binding Proteins by Yeast Surface cDNA Display and Deep Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Ha, Kevin; Lee, Nam-Kyung; Su, Yang; Liu, Bin

    2016-04-01

    Although the bioactive sphingolipid ceramide is an important cell signaling molecule, relatively few direct ceramide-interacting proteins are known. We used an approach combining yeast surface cDNA display and deep sequencing technology to identify novel proteins binding directly to ceramide. We identified 234 candidate ceramide-binding protein fragments and validated binding for 20. Most (17) bound selectively to ceramide, although a few (3) bound to other lipids as well. Several novel ceramide-binding domains were discovered, including the EF-hand calcium-binding motif, the heat shock chaperonin-binding motif STI1, the SCP2 sterol-binding domain, and the tetratricopeptide repeat region motif. Interestingly, four of the verified ceramide-binding proteins (HPCA, HPCAL1, NCS1, and VSNL1) and an additional three candidate ceramide-binding proteins (NCALD, HPCAL4, and KCNIP3) belong to the neuronal calcium sensor family of EF hand-containing proteins. We used mutagenesis to map the ceramide-binding site in HPCA and to create a mutant HPCA that does not bind to ceramide. We demonstrated selective binding to ceramide by mammalian cell-produced wild type but not mutant HPCA. Intriguingly, we also identified a fragment from prostaglandin D2synthase that binds preferentially to ceramide 1-phosphate. The wide variety of proteins and domains capable of binding to ceramide suggests that many of the signaling functions of ceramide may be regulated by direct binding to these proteins. Based on the deep sequencing data, we estimate that our yeast surface cDNA display library covers ∼60% of the human proteome and our selection/deep sequencing protocol can identify target-interacting protein fragments that are present at extremely low frequency in the starting library. Thus, the yeast surface cDNA display/deep sequencing approach is a rapid, comprehensive, and flexible method for the analysis of protein-ligand interactions, particularly for the study of non-protein ligands. PMID

  13. Inotropic effect, binding properties, and calcium flux effects of the calcium channel agonist CGP 28392 in intact cultured embryonic chick ventricular cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CGP 28392 is a recently described dihydropyridine derivative with positive inotropic properties. To study the mechanism of action of this putative calcium channel agonist, we have related the effects of CGP 28392 on contraction (measured with an optical video system) and radioactive calcium uptake to ligand-binding studies in cultured, spontaneously beating chick embryo ventricular cells. CGP 28392 produced a concentration-dependent increase in amplitude and velocity of contraction (EC50 = 2 x 10(-7) M; maximum contractile effect = 85% of the calcium 3.6 mM response). Nifedipine produced a shift to the right of the concentration-effect curve for CGP 28392 without decreasing the maximum contractile response, suggesting competitive antagonism (pA2 = 8.3). Computer analysis of displacement of [3H]nitrendipine binding to intact heart cells by unlabeled CGP 28392 indicated a K /sub D/ = 2.2 +/- 0.95 x 10(-7) M, in good agreement with the EC50 for the inotropic effect. CGP 28392 increased the rate of radioactive calcium influx (+39% at 10 seconds) without altering beating rate, while nifedipine decreased radioactive calcium influx and antagonized the CGP 28392-induced increase in calcium influx. Our results indicate that, in intact cultured myocytes, CGP 28392 acts as a calcium channel agonist and competes for the dihydropyridine-binding site of the slow calcium channel. In contrast to calcium channel blockers, CGP 28392 increases calcium influx and enhances the contractile state

  14. Structural investigations of calcium binding and its role in activity and activation of outer membrane phospholipase A from Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, H.J.; Kingma, R.L.; Kalk, K.H.; Egmond, M.R.; Dijkstra, B.W.

    2001-01-01

    Outer membrane phospholipase A (OMPLA) is an integral membrane enzyme that catalyses the hydrolysis of phospholipids. Enzymatic activity is regulated by reversible dimerisation and calcium-binding. We have investigated the role of calcium by X-ray crystallography. In monomeric OMPLA, one calcium ion

  15. A structural classification of substrate-binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berntsson, Ronnie P. -A.; Smits, Sander H. J.; Schmitt, Lutz; Slotboom, Dirk-Jan; Poolman, Bert; Rydström, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Substrate-binding proteins (SBP) are associated with a wide variety of protein complexes. The proteins are part of ATP-binding cassette transporters for substrate uptake, ion gradient driven transporters, DNA-binding proteins, as well as channels and receptors from both pro-and eukaryotes. A wealth

  16. Specific association of growth-associated protein 43 with calcium release units in skeletal muscles of lower vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.A. Caprara

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43, is a strictly conserved protein among vertebrates implicated in neuronal development and neurite branching. Since GAP43 structure contains a calmodulin-binding domain, this protein is able to bind calmodulin and gather it nearby membrane network, thus regulating cytosolic calcium and consequently calcium-dependent intracellular events. Even if for many years GAP43 has been considered a neuronal-specific protein, evidence from different laboratories described its presence in myoblasts, myotubes and adult skeletal muscle fibers. Data from our laboratory showed that GAP43 is localized between calcium release units (CRUs and mitochondria in mammalian skeletal muscle suggesting that, also in skeletal muscle, this protein can be a key player in calcium/calmodulin homeostasis. However, the previous studies could not clearly distinguish between a mitochondrion- or a triad-related positioning of GAP43. To solve this question, the expression and localization of GAP43 was studied in skeletal muscle of Xenopus and Zebrafish known to have triads located at the level of the Z-lines and mitochondria not closely associated with them. Western blotting and immunostaining experiments revealed the expression of GAP43 also in skeletal muscle of lower vertebrates (like amphibians and fishes, and that the protein is localized closely to the triad junction. Once more, these results and GAP43 structural features, support an involvement of the protein in the dynamic intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, a common conserved role among the different species.

  17. Molecular Structure and Target Recognition of Neuronal Calcium Sensor Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Ames

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal calcium sensor (NCS proteins, a sub-branch of the calmodulin superfamily, are expressed in the brain and retina where they transduce calcium signals and are genetically linked to degenerative diseases. The amino acid sequences of NCS proteins are highly conserved but their physiological functions are quite distinct. Retinal recoverin and guanylate cyclase activating proteins (GCAPs both serve as calcium sensors in retinal rod cells, neuronal frequenin (NCS1 modulates synaptic activity and neuronal secretion, K+ channel interacting proteins (KChIPs regulate ion channels to control neuronal excitability, and DREAM (KChIP3 is a transcriptional repressor that regulates neuronal gene expression. Here we review the molecular structures of myristoylated forms of NCS1, recoverin, and GCAP1 that all look very different, suggesting that the sequestered myristoyl group helps to refold these highly homologous proteins into very different structures. The molecular structure of NCS target complexes have been solved for recoverin bound to rhodopsin kinase, NCS-1 bound to phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase, and KChIP1 bound to A-type K+ channels. We propose that N-terminal myristoylation is critical for shaping each NCS family member into a different structure, which upon Ca2+-induced extrusion of the myristoyl group exposes a unique set of previously masked residues that interact with a particular physiological target.

  18. EDTA-insoluble, calcium-binding proteoglycan in bovine bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Y.; Lester, G. E.; Caterson, B.; Yamauchi, M.

    1995-01-01

    A calcium ion precipitable, trypsin-generated proteoglycan fragment has been isolated from the demineralized, EDTA-insoluble matrices of bone. The demineralized matrix was completely digested with trypsin, increasing concentrations of CaCl2 were added to the supernatant, and the resulting precipitates were analyzed. The amount of precipitate gradually increased with higher concentrations of calcium and was reversibly solubilized by EDTA. After molecular sieve and anion exchange chromatography, a proteoglycan-containing peak was obtained. Immunochemical analysis showed that this peak contained chondroitin 4-sulfate and possibly keratan sulfate. Amino acid analysis showed that this proteoglycan contained high amounts of aspartic acid/asparagine (Asx), serine (Ser), glutamic acid/glutamine (Glx), proline (Pro), and glycine (Gly); however, it contained little leucine (Leu) which suggests that it is not a member of the leucine-rich small proteoglycan family. In addition, significant amounts of phosphoserine (P-Ser) and hydroxyproline (Hyp) were identified in hydrolysates of this fraction. A single band (M(r) 59 kDa) was obtained on SDS-PAGE that stained with Stains-all but not with Coomassie Brilliant Blue R-250. If bone powder was trypsinized prior to demineralization, this proteoglycan-containing fraction was not liberated. Collectively, these results indicate that a proteoglycan occurs in the demineralized matrix that is precipitated with CaCl2 and is closely associated with both mineral and collagen matrices. Such a molecule might facilitate the structural network for the induction of mineralization in bone.

  19. Mesoscale crystallization of calcium phosphate nanostructures in protein (casein) micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thachepan, Surachai; Li, Mei; Mann, Stephen

    2010-11-01

    Aqueous micelles of the multi-protein calcium phosphate complex, casein, were treated at 60 °C and pH 7 over several months. Although partial dissociation of the micelles into 12 nm sized amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP)/protein nanoparticles occurred within a period of 14 days, crystallization of the ACP nanoclusters into bundles of hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanofilaments was not observed until after 12 weeks. The HAP nanofilaments were formed specifically within the partially disrupted protein micelles suggesting a micelle-mediated pathway of mesoscale crystallization. Similar experiments using ACP-containing synthetic micelles prepared from β-casein protein alone indicated that co-aligned bundles of HAP nanofilaments were produced within the protein micelle interior after 24 hours at temperatures as low as 35 °C. The presence of Mg2+ ions in the casein micelles, as well as a possible synergistic effect associated with the multi-protein nature of the native aggregates, could account for the marked inhibition in mesoscale crystallization observed in the casein micelles compared with the single-component β-casein constructs.Aqueous micelles of the multi-protein calcium phosphate complex, casein, were treated at 60 °C and pH 7 over several months. Although partial dissociation of the micelles into 12 nm sized amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP)/protein nanoparticles occurred within a period of 14 days, crystallization of the ACP nanoclusters into bundles of hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanofilaments was not observed until after 12 weeks. The HAP nanofilaments were formed specifically within the partially disrupted protein micelles suggesting a micelle-mediated pathway of mesoscale crystallization. Similar experiments using ACP-containing synthetic micelles prepared from β-casein protein alone indicated that co-aligned bundles of HAP nanofilaments were produced within the protein micelle interior after 24 hours at temperatures as low as 35 °C. The presence of Mg2+ ions in

  20. Water-mediated interactions influence the binding of thapsigargin to sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium adenosinetriphosphatase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Eleonora S.; Villadsen, Jesper; Tenori, Eleonora;

    2013-01-01

    A crystal structure suggests four water molecules are present in the binding cavity of thapsigargin in sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA). Computational chemistry indicates that three of these water molecules mediate an extensive hydrogen-bonding network between thapsigargin...

  1. The Actin Binding Protein Adseverin Regulates Osteoclastogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Hassanpour, Siavash; Jiang, Hongwei; Wang, Yongqiang; Kuiper, Johannes W. P.; Glogauer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Adseverin (Ads), a member of the Gelsolin superfamily of actin binding proteins, regulates the actin cytoskeleton architecture by severing and capping existing filamentous actin (F-actin) strands and nucleating the assembly of new F-actin filaments. Ads has been implicated in cellular secretion, exocytosis and has also been shown to regulate chondrogenesis and megakaryoblastic leukemia cell differentiation. Here we report for the first time that Ads is involved in regulating osteoclastogenesi...

  2. Where metal ions bind in proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Yamashita, M M; Wesson, L.; Eisenman, G.; Eisenberg, D.

    1990-01-01

    The environments of metal ions (Li+, Na+, K+, Ag+, Cs+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Mn2+, Cu2+, Zn2+) in proteins and other metal-host molecules have been examined. Regardless of the metal and its precise pattern of ligation to the protein, there is a common qualitative feature to the binding site: the metal is ligated by a shell of hydrophilic atomic groups (containing oxygen, nitrogen, or sulfur atoms) and this hydrophilic shell is embedded within a larger shell of hydrophobic atomic groups (containing car...

  3. Structural Studies of Soybean Calmodulin Isoform 4 Bound to the Calmodulin-binding Domain of Tobacco Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase-1 Provide Insights into a Sequential Target Binding Mode*

    OpenAIRE

    Ishida, Hiroaki; Rainaldi, Mario; Vogel, Hans J.

    2009-01-01

    The calcium regulatory protein calmodulin (CaM) binds in a calcium-dependent manner to numerous target proteins. The calmodulin-binding domain (CaMBD) region of Nicotiana tabacum MAPK phosphatase has an amino acid sequence that does not resemble the CaMBD of any other known Ca2+-CaM-binding proteins. Using a unique fusion protein strategy, we have been able to obtain a high resolution solution structure of the complex of soybean Ca2+-CaM4 (SCaM4) and this CaMBD. Complete isotope labeling of b...

  4. Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase CPK21 Functions in Abiotic Stress Response in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sandra Franz; Britta Ehlert; Anja Liese; Joachim Kurth; Anne-Claire Cazalé; Tina Romeis

    2011-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases(CDPKs)comprise a family of plant serine/threonine protein kinases in which the calcium sensing domain and the kinase effector domain are combined within one molecule.So far,a biological function in abiotic stress signaling has only been reported for few CDPK isoforms,whereas the underlying biochemical mechanism for these CDPKs is still mainly unknown.Here,we show that CPK21 from Arabidopsis thaliana is biochemically activated in vivo in response to hyperosmotic stress.Loss-of-function seedlings of cpk21 are more tolerant to hyperosmotic stress and mutant plants show increased stress responses with respect to marker gene expression and metabolite accumulation.In transgenic Arabidopsis complementation lines in the cpk21 mutant background,in which either CPK21 wildtype,or a full-length enzyme variant carrying an amino-acid substitution were stably expressed,stress responsitivity was restored by CPK21 but not with the kinase inactive variant.The biochemical characterization of in planta synthesized and purified CPK21 protein revealed that within the calcium-binding domain,N-terminal EF1- and EF2-motifs compared to C-terminal EF3- and EF4-motifs differ in their contribution to calcium-regulated kinase activity,suggesting a crucial role for the N-terminal EF-hand pair.Our data provide evidence for CPK21 contributing in abiotic stress signaling and suggest that the N-terminal EF-hand pair is a calcium-sensing determinant controlling specificity of CPK21 function.

  5. Generation of a Homozygous Transgenic Rat Strain Stably Expressing a Calcium Sensor Protein for Direct Examination of Calcium Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Kornélia Szebényi; András Füredi; Orsolya Kolacsek; Enikő Pergel; Zsuzsanna Bősze; Balázs Bender; Péter Vajdovich; József Tóvári; László Homolya; Gergely Szakács; László Héja; Ágnes Enyedi; Balázs Sarkadi; Ágota Apáti; Orbán, Tamás I.

    2015-01-01

    In drug discovery, prediction of selectivity and toxicity require the evaluation of cellular calcium homeostasis. The rat is a preferred laboratory animal for pharmacology and toxicology studies, while currently no calcium indicator protein expressing rat model is available. We established a transgenic rat strain stably expressing the GCaMP2 fluorescent calcium sensor by a transposon-based methodology. Zygotes were co-injected with mRNA of transposase and a CAG-GCaMP2 expressing construct, an...

  6. Reverse calcium affinity purification of Fab with calcium derivatized hydroxyapatite

    OpenAIRE

    Gagnon, Pete; Cheung, Chia-wei; Yazaki, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    This study introduces the application of calcium-derivatized hydroxyapatite for purification of Fab. Fab binds to native hydroxyapatite but fails to bind to the calcium derivatized form. IgG, Fc, and most other protein contaminants bind to the calcium form. This supports Fab purification by a simple flow-through method that achieves greater than 95% purity from papain digests and mammalian cell culture supernatants. Alternatively, Fab can be concentrated on native hydroxyapatite then eluted s...

  7. DNA and RNA Quadruplex-Binding Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Václav Brázda

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Four-stranded DNA structures were structurally characterized in vitro by NMR, X-ray and Circular Dichroism spectroscopy in detail. Among the different types of quadruplexes (i-Motifs, minor groove quadruplexes, G-quadruplexes, etc., the best described are G-quadruplexes which are featured by Hoogsteen base-paring. Sequences with the potential to form quadruplexes are widely present in genome of all organisms. They are found often in repetitive sequences such as telomeric ones, and also in promoter regions and 5' non-coding sequences. Recently, many proteins with binding affinity to G-quadruplexes have been identified. One of the initially portrayed G-rich regions, the human telomeric sequence (TTAGGGn, is recognized by many proteins which can modulate telomerase activity. Sequences with the potential to form G-quadruplexes are often located in promoter regions of various oncogenes. The NHE III1 region of the c-MYC promoter has been shown to interact with nucleolin protein as well as other G-quadruplex-binding proteins. A number of G-rich sequences are also present in promoter region of estrogen receptor alpha. In addition to DNA quadruplexes, RNA quadruplexes, which are critical in translational regulation, have also been predicted and observed. For example, the RNA quadruplex formation in telomere-repeat-containing RNA is involved in interaction with TRF2 (telomere repeat binding factor 2 and plays key role in telomere regulation. All these fundamental examples suggest the importance of quadruplex structures in cell processes and their understanding may provide better insight into aging and disease development.

  8. Effects of protein incorporation on calcium phosphate coating

    OpenAIRE

    Leonor, I. B.; C.M. Alves; Azevedo, Helena S.; Reis, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    The incorporation of proteins into calcium phosphate (Ca–P) coatings is expected to alter their properties. The aim of this work is, therefore, to study the effect of protein concentration on the formation of Ca–P film. A biodegradable blend of corn starch/ethylene vinyl alcohol (SEVA-C) was used as substrate and bioactive glass (45S5 Bioglass®) was used as a nucleating agent. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) and α-amylase were added, separately, at a concentration of 0.5, 1, and 5 mg/mLto simulate...

  9. Protein and ligand adaptation in a retinoic acid binding protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Pattanayek, R.; Newcomer, M E

    1999-01-01

    A retinoic acid binding protein isolated from the lumen of the rat epididymis (ERABP) is a member of the lipocalin superfamily. ERABP binds both the all-trans and 9-cis isomers of retinoic acid, as well as the synthetic retinoid (E)-4-[2-(5,6,7,8)-tetrahydro-5,5,8,8-tetramethyl-2 napthalenyl-1 propenyl]-benzoic acid (TTNPB), a structural analog of all-trans retinoic acid. The structure of ERABP with a mixture of all-trans and 9-cis retinoic acid has previously been reported. To elucidate any ...

  10. Dissection of the Critical Binding Determinants of Cellular Retinoic Acid Binding Protein II by Mutagenesis and Fluorescence Binding Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Vasileiou, Chrysoula; Lee, Kin Sing Stephen; Crist, Rachael M.; Vaezeslami, Soheila; Goins, Sarah M.; Geiger, James H.; Borhan, Babak

    2009-01-01

    The binding of retinoic acid to mutants of Cellular Retinoic Acid Binding Protein II (CRABPII) was evaluated to better understand the importance of the direct protein/ligand interactions. The important role of Arg111 for the correct structure and function of the protein was verified and other residues that directly affect retinoic acid binding have been identified. Furthermore, retinoic acid binding to CRABPII mutants that lack all previously identified interacting amino acids was rescued by ...

  11. Interaction of Calcium-bound C-reactive Protein with Fibronectin Is Controlled by pH: IN VIVO IMPLICATIONS*

    OpenAIRE

    Suresh, Madathilparambil V.; Singh, Sanjay K.; Agrawal, Alok

    2004-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) binds with high affinity to fibronectin (Fn), a major component of the extracellular matrix (ECM), but at physiological pH the binding is inhibited by calcium ions (Ca2+). Because CRP circulates in the blood in Ca2+-bound form, the occurrence of CRP-Fn interactions in vivo has been doubtful. To define the basis of inhibition of CRP-Fn interaction by Ca2+ at pH 7.0, we hypothesized that Fn-binding site on CRP consisted of amino acids co-ordinating Ca2+. Site-directed m...

  12. Landscape of protein-small ligand binding modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Kota; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-09-01

    Elucidating the mechanisms of specific small-molecule (ligand) recognition by proteins is a long-standing conundrum. While the structures of these molecules, proteins and ligands, have been extensively studied, protein-ligand interactions, or binding modes, have not been comprehensively analyzed. Although methods for assessing similarities of binding site structures have been extensively developed, the methods for the computational treatment of binding modes have not been well established. Here, we developed a computational method for encoding the information about binding modes as graphs, and assessing their similarities. An all-against-all comparison of 20,040 protein-ligand complexes provided the landscape of the protein-ligand binding modes and its relationships with protein- and chemical spaces. While similar proteins in the same SCOP Family tend to bind relatively similar ligands with similar binding modes, the correlation between ligand and binding similarities was not very high (R(2)  = 0.443). We found many pairs with novel relationships, in which two evolutionally distant proteins recognize dissimilar ligands by similar binding modes (757,474 pairs out of 200,790,780 pairs were categorized into this relationship, in our dataset). In addition, there were an abundance of pairs of homologous proteins binding to similar ligands with different binding modes (68,217 pairs). Our results showed that many interesting relationships between protein-ligand complexes are still hidden in the structure database, and our new method for assessing binding mode similarities is effective to find them. PMID:27327045

  13. Measuring Binding Affinity of Protein-Ligand Interaction Using Spectrophotometry: Binding of Neutral Red to Riboflavin-Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenprakhon, Pirom; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2010-01-01

    The dissociation constant, K[subscript d], of the binding of riboflavin-binding protein (RP) with neutral red (NR) can be determined by titrating RP to a fixed concentration of NR. Upon adding RP to the NR solution, the maximum absorption peak of NR shifts to 545 nm from 450 nm for the free NR. The change of the absorption can be used to determine…

  14. EF-hand Ca 2+-binding bioluminescent proteins: effects of mutations and alternative divalent cations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Laura; Ensor, Mark; Daunert, Sylvia

    2007-02-01

    Bioluminescent photoproteins, such as aequorin and obelin, are proteins that emit light upon binding calcium. Aequorin and obelin contain four EF-hand domains arranged into a globular structure. The loop region of these EF-hand domains binds calcium by coordinating it in a pentagonal bipyramidal structure with oxygen atoms. The binding of calcium to these EF-hands causes a slight conformational change in the protein, which leads to the oxidation of the internally sequestered chromophore, coelenterazine, producing coelenteramide and CO II. The excited coelenteramide then relaxes radiatively, emitting bioluminescence at 471 nm in aequorin or 491 nm in obelin. Although calcium is the traditional, and generally the most powerful, triggering ligand in this bioluminescence reaction, alternative di- and trivalent cations can also bind to the EF-hand loops and stimulate luminescence. Species capable of this cross-reactivity include: Cd 2+, Ba 2+, Mn 2+, Sr 2+, Mg 2+, and several lanthanides. Magnesium is also known to modulate the bioluminescence of wild-type aequorin, increase its stability, and decrease its aggregation tendency. Both wild-type aequorin and wild-type obelin contain several cysteine residues, aequorin has three and obelin has five. It is believed that these cysteine residues play an important, but as of yet unknown, role in the bioluminescence of these proteins, since mutating most of these residues causes significant loss in bioluminescent activity. In order to explore whether or not these cysteine residues contributed to the specificity of the EF-hand domains for cations we generated four aequorin and obelin mutants and observed their luminescent intensity and decay kinetics by stimulation with calcium, barium, and magnesium. It was found that the cysteine mutations do appear to alter the effects that alternative divalent cations have on the bioluminescence of both aequorin and obelin.

  15. Calcium and protein phosphorylation in the transduction of gravity signal in corn roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, M.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1991-01-01

    The involvement of calcium and protein phosphorylation in the transduction of gravity signal was studied using corn roots of a light-insensitive variety (Zea mays L., cv. Patriot). The gravitropic response was calcium-dependent. Horizontal placement of roots preloaded with 32P for three minutes resulted in changes in protein phosphorylation of polypeptides of 32 and 35 kD. Calcium depletion resulted in decreased phosphorylation of these phosphoproteins and replenishment of calcium restored the phosphorylation.

  16. Testin, a novel binding partner of the calcium-sensing receptor, enhances receptor-mediated Rho-kinase signalling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → A yeast two-hybrid screen revealed testin bound to the calcium-sensing receptor. → The second zinc finger of LIM domain 1 of testin is critical for interaction. → Testin bound to a region of the receptor tail important for cell signalling. → Testin and receptor interaction was confirmed in mammalian (HEK293) cells. → Overexpression of testin enhanced receptor-mediated Rho signalling in HEK293 cells. -- Abstract: The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) plays an integral role in calcium homeostasis and the regulation of other cellular functions including cell proliferation and cytoskeletal organisation. The multifunctional nature of the CaR is manifested through ligand-dependent stimulation of different signalling pathways that are also regulated by partner binding proteins. Following a yeast two-hybrid library screen using the intracellular tail of the CaR as bait, we identified several novel binding partners including the focal adhesion protein, testin. Testin has not previously been shown to interact with cell surface receptors. The sites of interaction between the CaR and testin were mapped to the membrane proximal region of the receptor tail and the second zinc-finger of LIM domain 1 of testin, the integrity of which was found to be critical for the CaR-testin interaction. The CaR-testin association was confirmed in HEK293 cells by coimmunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy studies. Ectopic expression of testin in HEK293 cells stably expressing the CaR enhanced CaR-stimulated Rho activity but had no effect on CaR-stimulated ERK signalling. These results suggest an interplay between the CaR and testin in the regulation of CaR-mediated Rho signalling with possible effects on the cytoskeleton.

  17. Alternative polyadenylation and RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erson-Bensan, Ayse Elif

    2016-08-01

    Our understanding of the extent of microRNA-based gene regulation has expanded in an impressive pace over the past decade. Now, we are beginning to better appreciate the role of 3'-UTR (untranslated region) cis-elements which harbor not only microRNA but also RNA-binding protein (RBP) binding sites that have significant effect on the stability and translational rate of mRNAs. To add further complexity, alternative polyadenylation (APA) emerges as a widespread mechanism to regulate gene expression by producing shorter or longer mRNA isoforms that differ in the length of their 3'-UTRs or even coding sequences. Resulting shorter mRNA isoforms generally lack cis-elements where trans-acting factors bind, and hence are differentially regulated compared with the longer isoforms. This review focuses on the RBPs involved in APA regulation and their action mechanisms on APA-generated isoforms. A better understanding of the complex interactions between APA and RBPs is promising for mechanistic and clinical implications including biomarker discovery and new therapeutic approaches. PMID:27208003

  18. An explicitly solvated full atomistic model of the cardiac thin filament and application on the calcium binding affinity effects from familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy linked mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michael; Schwartz, Steven

    2015-03-01

    The previous version of our cardiac thin filament (CTF) model consisted of the troponin complex (cTn), two coiled-coil dimers of tropomyosin (Tm), and 29 actin units. We now present the newest revision of the model to include explicit solvation. The model was developed to continue our study of genetic mutations in the CTF proteins which are linked to familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathies. Binding of calcium to the cTnC subunit causes subtle conformational changes to propagate through the cTnC to the cTnI subunit which then detaches from actin. Conformational changes propagate through to the cTnT subunit, which allows Tm to move into the open position along actin, leading to muscle contraction. Calcium disassociation allows for the reverse to occur, which results in muscle relaxation. The inclusion of explicit TIP3 water solvation allows for the model to get better individual local solvent to protein interactions; which are important when observing the N-lobe calcium binding pocket of the cTnC. We are able to compare in silica and in vitro experimental results to better understand the physiological effects from mutants, such as the R92L/W and F110V/I of the cTnT, on the calcium binding affinity compared to the wild type.

  19. Comparison of the Folding Mechanism of Highly Homologous Proteins in the Lipid-binding Protein Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    The folding mechanism of two closely related proteins in the intracellular lipid binding protein family, human bile acid binding protein (hBABP) and rat bile acid binding protein (rBABP) were examined. These proteins are 77% identical (93% similar) in sequence Both of these singl...

  20. Isolation of a Thiamine-binding Protein from Rice Germ and Distribution of Similar Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, M; Yoshida, T; Toda, T; Iwashima, A; Mitsunaga, T

    1996-01-01

    A thiamine-binding protein was purified from rice germ (Oryza sativa L.) by extraction, salting-out with ammonium sulfate, and column chromatography. From the results of molecular mass, Kd and Bmax values for thiamine-binding, binding specificity for thiamine phosphates and analog, the protein was suggested to be identical to the thiamine-binding protein in rice bran. The thiamine-binding protein w as more efficiently purified from rice germ than from rice bran. The protein was rich in glutamic acid (and/or glutamine) and glycine. The protein did not show immunological similarity to thiamine-binding proteins in buckwheat and sesame seeds. However proteins similar to the thiamine-binding protein from rice germ existed in gramineous seeds. They were suggested to have thiamine-binding activity and to be of the same molecular mass as the thiamine-binding protein. PMID:27299548

  1. Identification of Treponema pallidum penicillin-binding proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, T M; Miller, J N; Lovett, M A

    1987-01-01

    Penicillin-binding proteins of 180, 89, 80, 68, 61, 41, and 38 kilodaltons were identified in Treponema pallidum (Nichols) by their covalent binding of [35S]benzylpenicillin. Penicillin-binding proteins are localized in the plasma membranes of many bacterial species and may serve as useful markers for determining plasma membrane intactness in T. pallidum fractionation studies.

  2. Calcium-regulated in vivo protein phosphorylation in Zea mays L. root tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghothama, K. G.; Reddy, A. S.; Friedmann, M.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1987-01-01

    Calcium dependent protein phosphorylation was studied in corn (Zea mays L.) root tips. Prior to in vivo protein phosphorylation experiments, the effect of calcium, ethyleneglycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N-N' -tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and calcium ionophore (A-23187) on phosphorus uptake was studied. Calcium increased phosphorus uptake, whereas EGTA and A-23187 decreased it. Consequently, phosphorus concentration in the media was adjusted so as to attain similar uptake in different treatments. Phosphoproteins were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Distinct changes in phosphorylation were observed following altered calcium levels. Calcium depletion in root tips with EGTA and A-23187 decreased protein phosphorylation. However, replenishment of calcium following EGTA and ionophore pretreatment enhanced phosphorylation of proteins. Preloading of the root tips with 32P in the presence of EGTA and A-23187 followed by a ten minute calcium treatment, resulted in increased phosphorylation indicating the involvement of calcium, calcium and calmodulin-dependent kinases. Calmodulin antagonist W-7 was effective in inhibiting calcium-promoted phosphorylation. These studies suggest a physiological role for calcium-dependent phosphorylation in calcium-mediated processes in plants.

  3. The Cobalamin-binding Protein in Zebrafish is an Intermediate Between the Three Cobalamin-binding Proteins in Human

    OpenAIRE

    Greibe, Eva Holm; Fedosov, Sergey; Nexø, Ebba

    2012-01-01

    In humans, three soluble extracellular cobalamin-binding proteins; transcobalamin (TC), intrinsic factor (IF), and haptocorrin (HC), are involved in the uptake and transport of cobalamin. In this study, we investigate a cobalamin-binding protein from zebrafish (Danio rerio) and summarize current knowledge concerning the phylogenetic evolution of kindred proteins. We identified a cobalamin binding capacity in zebrafish protein extracts (8.2 pmol/fish) and ambient water (13.5 pmol/fish) associa...

  4. Structure and calcium binding activity of LipL32, the major surface antigen of pathogenic Leptospira sp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauk, Pricila; Roman-Ramos, Henrique; Ho, Paulo Lee [Instituto Butantan, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Biotecnologia; Guzzo, Cristiane R.; Farah, Chuck S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Bioquimica

    2009-07-01

    Leptospirosis, caused by the spirochaete Leptospira is an important emerging infectious disease. LipL32 is the major exposed outer membrane protein found exclusively in pathogenic leptospira. It is highly immunogenic and has been shown to bind to host extracellular matrix components, including collagens, fibronectin and laminin. In this work we crystallized recombinant LipL32 protein and determined its structure to 2.25 A resolution. Initial phases were determined using the multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion technique with data collected from selenomethionine-containing crystals at the MX2 beamline at the LNLS. The LipL32 monomer is made of a jelly-roll fold core from which protrude several peripheral secondary structures. Some structural features suggested that LipL32 could bind Ca{sup 2+} ions and indeed, spectroscopic data (circular (dichroism. intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and extrinsic 1-amino-2-anaphthol-4-sulfonic acid fluorescence) confirmed the calcium binding properties of LipL32. (author)

  5. [3H]-nitrendipine binding sites in normal and cardiomyopathic hamsters: absence of a selective increase in putative calcium channels in cardiomyopathic hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, S E; Rafuse, V F; Gordon, T

    1988-11-01

    The number of putative calcium channels in cardiac muscle from young adult hamsters (60 days old) was compared in normal (F1B) hamsters and two different mutant strains (CHF 146 and Bio 14.6) which express cardiomyopathy and muscular dystrophy. Equilibrium binding assays of high affinity sites for [3H]-nitrendipine in ventricular homogenate preparations showed that the maximum number of [3H]-nitrendipine binding sites (Bmax), which corresponds to the number of putative calcium channels, was not significantly different in normal and cardiomyopathic hearts: 79(SEM 9), 64(14) and 69(10) fmol.mg-1 protein in 4-6 hearts from F1B, Bio 14.6 and CHF 146 hamster strains, respectively. Similar results were obtained with binding data after partial purification of the preparation. These data are in agreement with earlier studies comparing two normal strains (CHF 148 and random bred Syrian hamsters) with cardiomyopathic (CHF 146) hamsters, and conflict with other studies comparing normal and cardiomyopathic hamsters. Comparisons with the conflicting data suggest (a) that change in the number of high affinity [3H]-nitrendipine binding sites is not responsible for calcium overload and cell necrosis in cardiomyopathy, and (b) that increased numbers of low affinity [3H]-nitrendipine binding sites may emerge in cardiomyopathic hearts. PMID:2855722

  6. Glycan masking of Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein for probing protein binding function and vaccine development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowmya Sampath

    Full Text Available Glycan masking is an emerging vaccine design strategy to focus antibody responses to specific epitopes, but it has mostly been evaluated on the already heavily glycosylated HIV gp120 envelope glycoprotein. Here this approach was used to investigate the binding interaction of Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein (PvDBP and the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC and to evaluate if glycan-masked PvDBPII immunogens would focus the antibody response on key interaction surfaces. Four variants of PVDBPII were generated and probed for function and immunogenicity. Whereas two PvDBPII glycosylation variants with increased glycan surface coverage distant from predicted interaction sites had equivalent binding activity to wild-type protein, one of them elicited slightly better DARC-binding-inhibitory activity than wild-type immunogen. Conversely, the addition of an N-glycosylation site adjacent to a predicted PvDBP interaction site both abolished its interaction with DARC and resulted in weaker inhibitory antibody responses. PvDBP is composed of three subdomains and is thought to function as a dimer; a meta-analysis of published PvDBP mutants and the new DBPII glycosylation variants indicates that critical DARC binding residues are concentrated at the dimer interface and along a relatively flat surface spanning portions of two subdomains. Our findings suggest that DARC-binding-inhibitory antibody epitope(s lie close to the predicted DARC interaction site, and that addition of N-glycan sites distant from this site may augment inhibitory antibodies. Thus, glycan resurfacing is an attractive and feasible tool to investigate protein structure-function, and glycan-masked PvDBPII immunogens might contribute to P. vivax vaccine development.

  7. STRUCTURAL FEATURES OF PLANT CHITINASES AND CHITIN-BINDING PROTEINS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BEINTEMA, JJ

    1994-01-01

    Structural features of plant chitinases and chitin-binding proteins are discussed. Many of these proteins consist of multiple domains,of which the chitin-binding hevein domain is a predominant one. X-ray and NMR structures of representatives of the major classes of these proteins are available now,

  8. Cobalamin and folate binding proteins in human tumour tissue.

    OpenAIRE

    Sheppard, K; Bradbury, D A; Davies, J. M.; Ryrie, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    The serum of an 84 year old man with disseminated carcinoma was found to contain extremely high concentrations of cobalamin and of a cobalamin binding protein with trans-cobalamin I characteristics. Tumour tissue samples obtained at necropsy contained considerably higher concentrations of cobalamin binding protein (R-binder) than normal tissues. Tumour tissues also contained increased concentrations of specific folate binding protein. In all tissues studied a close correlation existed between...

  9. Minimalistic predictor of protein binding energy: contribution of solvation factor to protein binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeong-Mo; Serohijos, Adrian W R; Murphy, Sean; Lucarelli, Dennis; Lofranco, Leo L; Feldman, Andrew; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2015-02-17

    It has long been known that solvation plays an important role in protein-protein interactions. Here, we use a minimalistic solvation-based model for predicting protein binding energy to estimate quantitatively the contribution of the solvation factor in protein binding. The factor is described by a simple linear combination of buried surface areas according to amino-acid types. Even without structural optimization, our minimalistic model demonstrates a predictive power comparable to more complex methods, making the proposed approach the basis for high throughput applications. Application of the model to a proteomic database shows that receptor-substrate complexes involved in signaling have lower affinities than enzyme-inhibitor and antibody-antigen complexes, and they differ by chemical compositions on interfaces. Also, we found that protein complexes with components that come from the same genes generally have lower affinities than complexes formed by proteins from different genes, but in this case the difference originates from different interface areas. The model was implemented in the software PYTHON, and the source code can be found on the Shakhnovich group webpage: http://faculty.chemistry.harvard.edu/shakhnovich/software. PMID:25692584

  10. A pollen-specific novel calmodulin-binding protein with tetratricopeptide repeats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safadi, F.; Reddy, V. S.; Reddy, A. S.

    2000-01-01

    Calcium is essential for pollen germination and pollen tube growth. A large body of information has established a link between elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) at the pollen tube tip and its growth. Since the action of Ca(2+) is primarily mediated by Ca(2+)-binding proteins such as calmodulin (CaM), identification of CaM-binding proteins in pollen should provide insights into the mechanisms by which Ca(2+) regulates pollen germination and tube growth. In this study, a CaM-binding protein from maize pollen (maize pollen calmodulin-binding protein, MPCBP) was isolated in a protein-protein interaction-based screening using (35)S-labeled CaM as a probe. MPCBP has a molecular mass of about 72 kDa and contains three tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR) suggesting that it is a member of the TPR family of proteins. MPCBP protein shares a high sequence identity with two hypothetical TPR-containing proteins from Arabidopsis. Using gel overlay assays and CaM-Sepharose binding, we show that the bacterially expressed MPCBP binds to bovine CaM and three CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. To map the CaM-binding domain several truncated versions of the MPCBP were expressed in bacteria and tested for their ability to bind CaM. Based on these studies, the CaM-binding domain was mapped to an 18-amino acid stretch between the first and second TPR regions. Gel and fluorescence shift assays performed with CaM and a CaM-binding synthetic peptide further confirmed MPCBP binding to CaM. Western, Northern, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis have shown that MPCBP expression is specific to pollen. MPCBP was detected in both soluble and microsomal proteins. Immunoblots showed the presence of MPCBP in mature and germinating pollen. Pollen-specific expression of MPCBP, its CaM-binding properties, and the presence of TPR motifs suggest a role for this protein in Ca(2+)-regulated events during pollen germination and growth.

  11. Solution Structure and Backbone Dynamics of Human Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein: Fatty Acid Binding Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Jun; Lücke, Christian; Chen, Zhongjing; Qiao, Ye; Klimtchuk, Elena; Hamilton, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), a cytosolic protein most abundant in liver, is associated with intracellular transport of fatty acids, nuclear signaling, and regulation of intracellular lipolysis. Among the members of the intracellular lipid binding protein family, L-FABP is of particular interest as it can i), bind two fatty acid molecules simultaneously and ii), accommodate a variety of bulkier physiological ligands such as bilirubin and fatty acyl CoA. To better understand the p...

  12. RNA-Binding Proteins in Trichomonas vaginalis: Atypical Multifunctional Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa E. Figueroa-Angulo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron homeostasis is highly regulated in vertebrates through a regulatory system mediated by RNA-protein interactions between the iron regulatory proteins (IRPs that interact with an iron responsive element (IRE located in certain mRNAs, dubbed the IRE-IRP regulatory system. Trichomonas vaginalis, the causal agent of trichomoniasis, presents high iron dependency to regulate its growth, metabolism, and virulence properties. Although T. vaginalis lacks IRPs or proteins with aconitase activity, possesses gene expression mechanisms of iron regulation at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. However, only one gene with iron regulation at the transcriptional level has been described. Recently, our research group described an iron posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism in the T. vaginalis tvcp4 and tvcp12 cysteine proteinase mRNAs. The tvcp4 and tvcp12 mRNAs have a stem-loop structure in the 5'-coding region or in the 3'-UTR, respectively that interacts with T. vaginalis multifunctional proteins HSP70, α-Actinin, and Actin under iron starvation condition, causing translation inhibition or mRNA stabilization similar to the previously characterized IRE-IRP system in eukaryotes. Herein, we summarize recent progress and shed some light on atypical RNA-binding proteins that may participate in the iron posttranscriptional regulation in T. vaginalis.

  13. Isolation of a crystal matrix protein associated with calcium oxalate precipitation in vacuoles of specialized cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingxiang; Zhang, Dianzhong; Lynch-Holm, Valerie J; Okita, Thomas W; Franceschi, Vincent R

    2003-10-01

    The formation of calcium (Ca) oxalate crystals is considered to be a high-capacity mechanism for regulating Ca in many plants. Ca oxalate precipitation is not a stochastic process, suggesting the involvement of specific biochemical and cellular mechanisms. Microautoradiography of water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes) tissue exposed to 3H-glutamate showed incorporation into developing crystals, indicating potential acidic proteins associated with the crystals. Dissolution of crystals leaves behind a crystal-shaped matrix "ghost" that is capable of precipitation of Ca oxalate in the original crystal morphology. To assess whether this matrix has a protein component, purified crystals were isolated and analyzed for internal protein. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed the presence of one major polypeptide of about 55 kD and two minor species of 60 and 63 kD. Amino acid analysis indicates the matrix protein is relatively high in acidic amino acids, a feature consistent with its solubility in formic acid but not at neutral pH. 45Ca-binding assays demonstrated the matrix protein has a strong affinity for Ca. Immunocytochemical localization using antibody raised to the isolated protein showed that the matrix protein is specific to crystal-forming cells. Within the vacuole, the surface and internal structures of two morphologically distinct Ca oxalate crystals, raphide and druse, were labeled by the antimatrix protein serum, as were the surfaces of isolated crystals. These results demonstrate that a specific Ca-binding protein exists as an integral component of Ca oxalate crystals, which holds important implications with respect to regulation of crystal formation. PMID:14555781

  14. Conformational and thermodynamic properties of peptide binding to the human S100P protein

    OpenAIRE

    Gribenko, Alexey V.; Guzmán-Casado, Mercedes; Lopez, Maria M.; Makhatadze, George I.

    2002-01-01

    S100P is a member of the S100 subfamily of calcium-binding proteins that are believed to be associated with various diseases, and in particular deregulation of S100P expression has been documented for prostate and breast cancer. Previously, we characterized the effects of metal binding on the conformational properties of S100P and proposed that S100P could function as a Ca2+ conformational switch. In this study we used fluorescence and CD spectroscopies and isothermal titration calorimetry to...

  15. Inhibition of tristetraprolin deadenylation by poly(A) binding protein

    OpenAIRE

    Rowlett, Robert M.; Chrestensen, Carol A.; Schroeder, Melanie J.; Harp, Mary G.; Pelo, Jared W.; Shabanowitz, Jeffery; DeRose, Robert; Hunt, Donald F.; Sturgill, Thomas W.; Worthington, Mark T.

    2008-01-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is the prototype for a family of RNA binding proteins that bind the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) messenger RNA AU-rich element (ARE), causing deadenylation of the TNF poly(A) tail, RNA decay, and silencing of TNF protein production. Using mass spectrometry sequencing we identified poly(A) binding proteins-1 and -4 (PABP1 and PABP4) in high abundance and good protein coverage from TTP immunoprecipitates. PABP1 significantly enhanced TNF ARE binding by RNA EMSA and prevente...

  16. Calcium-dependent protein kinases in plants: evolution, expression and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valmonte, Gardette R; Arthur, Kieren; Higgins, Colleen M; MacDiarmid, Robin M

    2014-03-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CPKs) are plant proteins that directly bind calcium ions before phosphorylating substrates involved in metabolism, osmosis, hormone response and stress signaling pathways. CPKs are a large multigene family of proteins that are present in all plants studied to date, as well as in protists, oomycetes and green algae, but are not found in animals and fungi. Despite the increasing evidence of the importance of CPKs in developmental and stress responses from various plants, a comprehensive genome-wide analysis of CPKs from algae to higher plants has not been undertaken. This paper describes the evolution of CPKs from green algae to plants using a broadly sampled phylogenetic analysis and demonstrates the functional diversification of CPKs based on expression and functional studies in different plant species. Our findings reveal that CPK sequence diversification into four major groups occurred in parallel with the terrestrial transition of plants. Despite significant expansion of the CPK gene family during evolution from green algae to higher plants, there is a high level of sequence conservation among CPKs in all plant species. This sequence conservation results in very little correlation between CPK evolutionary groupings and functional diversity, making the search for CPK functional orthologs a challenge. PMID:24363288

  17. Stabilization of amorphous calcium carbonate by phosphate rich organic matrix proteins and by single phosphoamino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentov, Shmuel; Weil, Simy; Glazer, Lilah; Sagi, Amir; Berman, Amir

    2010-08-01

    Stable amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is a unique material produced naturally exclusively as a biomineral. It was demonstrated that proteins extracted from biogenic stable ACC induce and stabilize synthetic ACC in vitro. Polyphosphate molecules were similarly shown to induce amorphous calcium carbonate formation in vitro. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that biogenic ACC induction and stabilization is mediated by the phosphorylated residues of phosphoproteins. We show that extracellular organic matrix extracted from gastroliths of the red claw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus induce stable ACC formation in vitro. The proteinaceous fraction of this organic matrix is highly phosphorylated and is incorporated into the ACC mineral phase during precipitation. We have identified the major phosphoproteins of the organic matrix and showed that they have high calcium binding capacity. Based on the above, in vitro precipitation experiments with single phosphoamino acids were performed, indicating that phosphoserine or phosphothreonine alone can induce the formation of highly stable ACC. The results indicate that phosphoproteins may play a major role in the control of ACC formation and stabilization and that their phosphoamino acid moieties are key components in this process. PMID:20416381

  18. Sequence-specific 1H NMR assignments, secondary structure, and location of the calcium binding site in the first epidermal growth factor like domain of blood coagulation factor IX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Factor IX is a blood clotting protein that contains three regions, including a γ-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain, two tandemly connected epidermal growth factor like (EGF-like) domains, and a serine protease region. The protein exhibits a high-affinity calcium binding site in the first EGF0like domain, in addition to calcium binding in the Gla domain. The first EGF-like domain, factor IX (45-87), has been synthesized. Sequence-specific resonance assignment of the peptide has been made by using 2D NMR techniques, and its secondary structure has been determined. The protein is found to have two antiparallel β-sheets, and preliminary distance geometry calculations indicate that the protein has two domains, separated by Trp28, with the overall structure being similar to that of EGF. An NMR investigation of the calcium-bound first EGF-like domain indicates the presence and location of a calcium binding site involving residues on both strands of one of the β-sheets as well as the N-terminal region of the peptide. These results suggest that calcium binding in the first EGF-like domain could induce long-range (possibly interdomain) conformational changes in factor IX, rather than causing structural alterations in the EGF-like domain itself

  19. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Cho, Christine [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Govindappa, Sowmya [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Apicella, Michael A. [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Ramaswamy, S., E-mail: ramas@instem.res.in [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India)

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  20. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states

  1. A mathematical model of T lymphocyte calcium dynamics derived from single transmembrane protein properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Dorothee Schmeitz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Fate decision processes of T lymphocytes are crucial for health and disease. Whether a T lymphocyte is activated, divides, gets anergic or initiates apoptosis depends on extracellular triggers and intracellular signalling. Free cytosolic calcium dynamics plays an important role in this context. The relative contributions of store-derived calcium entry and calcium entry from extracellular space to T lymphocyte activation are still a matter of debate. Here we develop a quantitative mathematical model of T lymphocyte calcium dynamics in order to establish a tool which allows to disentangle cause-effect relationships between ion fluxes and observed calcium time courses. The model is based on single transmembrane protein characteristics which have been determined in independent experiments. This reduces the number of unknown parameters in the model to a minimum and ensures the predictive power of the model. Simulation results are subsequently used for an analysis of whole cell calcium dynamics measured under various experimental conditions. The model accounts for a variety of these conditions, which supports the suitability of the modelling approach. The simulation results suggest a model in which calcium dynamics dominantly relies on the opening of channels in calcium stores while calcium entry through calcium-release activated channels (CRAC is more associated with the maintenance of the T lymphocyte calcium levels and prevents the cell from calcium depletion. Our findings indicate that CRAC guarantees a long-term stable calcium level which is required for cell survival and sustained calcium enhancement.

  2. Rapid determination of thyroxine binding proteins of human serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arima,Terukatsu

    1976-02-01

    Full Text Available A simple method is described for determing thyroxine binding proteins in human serum by electrophoresis at pH 8.6, using cellulose acetate membrane as the supporting medium. The procedure had high reliability in sera of normal subjects, pregnant women and patients with decreased thyroxine binding capacity of thyroxine binding globulin.

  3. Modulation of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization by citrate through selective binding to atomic steps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, S R; Wierzbicki, A; Salter, E A; Zepeda, S; Orme, C A; Hoyer, J R; Nancollas, G H; Cody, A M; De Yoreo, J J

    2004-10-19

    The majority of human kidney stones are composed primarily of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals. Thus, determining the molecular mechanisms by which urinary constituents modulate calcium oxalate crystallization is crucial for understanding and controlling urolithiassis in humans. A comprehensive molecular-scale view of COM shape modification by citrate, a common urinary constituent, obtained through a combination of in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and molecular modeling is now presented. We show that citrate strongly influences the growth morphology and kinetics on the (-101) face but has much lower effect on the (010) face. Moreover, binding energy calculations show that the strength of the citrate-COM interaction is much greater at steps than on terraces and is highly step-specific. The maximum binding energy, -166.5 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, occurs for the [101] step on the (-101) face. In contrast, the value is only -56.9 kJ {center_dot} mol-1 for the [012] step on the (010) face. The binding energies on the (-101) and (010) terraces are also much smaller, -65.4 and -48.9 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} respectively. All other binding energies lie between these extremes. This high selectivity leads to preferential binding of citrate to the acute [101] atomic steps on the (-101) face. The strong citrate-step interactions on this face leads to pinning of all steps, but the anisotropy in interaction strength results in anisotropic reductions in step kinetics. These anisotropic changes in step kinetics are, in turn, responsible for changes in the shape of macroscopic COM crystals. Thus, the molecular scale growth morphology and the bulk crystal habit in the presence of citrate are similar, and the predictions of molecular simulations are fully consistent with the experimental observations.

  4. Thermodynamics of ligand binding to acyl-coenzyme A binding protein studied by titration calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færgeman, Nils J.; Sigurskjold, B W; Kragelund, B B;

    1996-01-01

    Ligand binding to recombinant bovine acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) was examined using isothermal microcalorimetry. Microcalorimetric measurements confirm that the binding affinity of acyl-CoA esters for ACBP is strongly dependent on the length of the acyl chain with a clear preference for acyl-...

  5. SCOWLP classification: Structural comparison and analysis of protein binding regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Gerd

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detailed information about protein interactions is critical for our understanding of the principles governing protein recognition mechanisms. The structures of many proteins have been experimentally determined in complex with different ligands bound either in the same or different binding regions. Thus, the structural interactome requires the development of tools to classify protein binding regions. A proper classification may provide a general view of the regions that a protein uses to bind others and also facilitate a detailed comparative analysis of the interacting information for specific protein binding regions at atomic level. Such classification might be of potential use for deciphering protein interaction networks, understanding protein function, rational engineering and design. Description Protein binding regions (PBRs might be ideally described as well-defined separated regions that share no interacting residues one another. However, PBRs are often irregular, discontinuous and can share a wide range of interacting residues among them. The criteria to define an individual binding region can be often arbitrary and may differ from other binding regions within a protein family. Therefore, the rational behind protein interface classification should aim to fulfil the requirements of the analysis to be performed. We extract detailed interaction information of protein domains, peptides and interfacial solvent from the SCOWLP database and we classify the PBRs of each domain family. For this purpose, we define a similarity index based on the overlapping of interacting residues mapped in pair-wise structural alignments. We perform our classification with agglomerative hierarchical clustering using the complete-linkage method. Our classification is calculated at different similarity cut-offs to allow flexibility in the analysis of PBRs, feature especially interesting for those protein families with conflictive binding regions

  6. Structural Changes in the Lectin Domain of CD23, the Low-Affinity IgE Receptor, upon Calcium Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurzburg, Beth A.; Tarchevskaya, Svetlana S.; Jardetzky, Theodore S. (NWU)

    2010-03-08

    CD23, the low-affinity receptor for IgE (Fc{var_epsilon}RII), regulates IgE synthesis and also mediates IgE-dependent antigen transport and processing. CD23 is a unique Fc receptor belonging to the C-type lectin-like domain superfamily and binds IgE in an unusual, non-lectin-like manner, requiring calcium but not carbohydrate. We have solved the high-resolution crystal structures of the human CD23 lectin domain in the presence and absence of Ca{sup 2+}. The crystal structures differ significantly from a previously determined NMR structure and show that calcium binding occurs at the principal binding site, but not at an auxiliary site that appears to be absent in human CD23. Conformational differences between the apo and Ca{sup 2+} bound structures suggest how IgE-Fc binding can be both calcium-dependent and carbohydrate-independent.

  7. Calcium-dependent and calcium-independent signals in the conglutinin-binding assay (KgBa) for immune complexes. Influence of anti-collagen-antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmskov, U; Haas, Henning de; Teisner, B;

    1992-01-01

    of IgG to solid phase bovine conglutinin was also observed to a variable degree in normal and pathological sera. However, in this situation the IgG binding was largely calcium-independent, was not inhibited by GlcNAc and did not decrease after prolonged incubation of the serum at 37 degrees C. The...

  8. Sequence and structural features of binding site residues in protein-protein complexes: comparison with protein-nucleic acid complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Selvaraj S; Jayaram B; Saranya N; Gromiha M; Fukui Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Protein-protein interactions are important for several cellular processes. Understanding the mechanism of protein-protein recognition and predicting the binding sites in protein-protein complexes are long standing goals in molecular and computational biology. Methods We have developed an energy based approach for identifying the binding site residues in protein–protein complexes. The binding site residues have been analyzed with sequence and structure based parameters such...

  9. Clinical relevance of drug binding to plasma proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascenzi, Paolo; Fanali, Gabriella; Fasano, Mauro; Pallottini, Valentina; Trezza, Viviana

    2014-12-01

    Binding to plasma proteins highly influences drug efficacy, distribution, and disposition. Serum albumin, the most abundant protein in plasma, is a monomeric multi-domain macromolecule that displays an extraordinary ligand binding capacity, providing a depot and carrier for many endogenous and exogenous compounds, such as fatty acids and most acidic drugs. α-1-Acid glycoprotein, the second main plasma protein, is a glycoprotein physiologically involved in the acute phase reaction and is the main carrier for basic and neutral drugs. High- and low-density lipoproteins play a limited role in drug binding and are natural drug delivery system only for few lipophilic drugs or lipid-based formulations. Several factors influence drug binding to plasma proteins, such as pathological conditions, concurrent administration of drugs, sex, and age. Any of these factors, in turn, influences drug efficacy and toxicity. Here, biochemical, biomedical, and biotechnological aspects of drug binding to plasma proteins are reviewed.

  10. Comparison of docking methods for carbohydrate binding in calcium-dependent lectins and prediction of the carbohydrate binding mode to sea cucumber lectin CEL-III

    OpenAIRE

    Nurisso, Alessandra; Kozmon, Stanislav; Imberty, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Lectins display a variety of strategies for specific recognition of carbohydrates. In several lectin families from different origin, one or two calcium ions are involved in the carbohydrate binding site with direct coordination of the sugar hydroxyl groups. Our work implied a molecular docking study involving a set of bacterial and animal calcium-dependant lectins in order to compare the ability of three docking programs to reproduce key carbohydrate-metal interactions. Fl...

  11. Microcalorimetric study of protein adsorption onto calcium hydroxyapatites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandori, Kazuhiko; Murata, Kanae; Ishikawa, Tatsuo

    2007-02-13

    To clarify the adsorption mechanism of proteins onto calcium hydroxyapatite (Hap), the present study measured adsorption (DeltaHads) and desorption (DeltaHdes) enthalpies of bovine serum albumin (BSA; isoelectric point (iep) 4.7, molecular mass (Ms) 67,200 Da, acidic protein), myoglobin (MGB; iep=7.0, Ms=17,800 Da, neutral protein), and lysozyme (LSZ; iep=11.1, Ms=14,600 Da, basic protein) onto Hap by a flow microcalorimeter (FMC). Five kinds of large platelike particles of CaHPO4.2H2O (DCPD) after hydrolyzing at room temperature with different concentrations of NaOH aqueous solution ([NaOH]) for 1 h were used. DCPD converted completely to Hap after treatment at [NaOH]>or=2%, and the crystallinity of Hap was increased with an increase in [NaOH] up to 10%. The amounts of protein adsorbed (Deltanads) and desorbed (Deltandes) were measured simultaneously by monitoring the protein concentration downstream from the FMC with a UV detector. The Deltanads values were also measured statically by a batch method in each system. The Deltanads values measured by the FMC and static measurements fairly agreed with each other. Results revealed that DeltaHBSAads was decreased with an increase in [NaOH]; in other words, DeltaHBSAads was decreased with the improvement of Hap's crystallinity, suggesting that the BSA adsorption readily proceeded onto Hap. This fact indicated a high affinity of Hap to protein. This affinity was further recognized by DeltaHBSAdes because its positive value was increased by increasing [NaOH]. These opposite tendencies in DeltaHBSAads and DeltaHBSAdes revealed that Hap possessed a high adsorption affinity to BSA (i.e., enthalpy facilitated protein adsorption but hindered its desorption). The fraction of BSA desorption was also decreased with an increase in [NaOH], confirming the high affinity of Hap to protein. Similar results were observed on the LSZ system, though the enthalpy values were smaller than those of BSA. In the case of neutral MGB, Delta

  12. The actin binding protein adseverin regulates osteoclastogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanpour, Siavash; Jiang, Hongwei; Wang, Yongqiang; Kuiper, Johannes W P; Glogauer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Adseverin (Ads), a member of the Gelsolin superfamily of actin binding proteins, regulates the actin cytoskeleton architecture by severing and capping existing filamentous actin (F-actin) strands and nucleating the assembly of new F-actin filaments. Ads has been implicated in cellular secretion, exocytosis and has also been shown to regulate chondrogenesis and megakaryoblastic leukemia cell differentiation. Here we report for the first time that Ads is involved in regulating osteoclastogenesis (OCG). Ads is induced during OCG downstream of RANK-ligand (RANKL) stimulation and is highly expressed in mature osteoclasts. The D5 isoform of Ads is not involved in regulating OCG, as its expression is not induced in response to RANKL. Three clonal Ads knockdown RAW264.7 (RAW) macrophage cell lines with varying degrees of Ads expression and OCG deficiency were generated. The most drastic OCG defect was noted in the clonal cell line with the greatest degree of Ads knockdown as indicated by a lack of TRAcP staining and multinucleation. RNAi mediated knockdown of Ads in osteoclast precursors resulted in distinct morphological changes characterized by altered F-actin distribution and increased filopodia formation. Ads knockdown precursor cells experienced enhanced migration while fusion of knockdown precursors cells was limited. Transient reintroduction of de novo Ads back into the knockdown system was capable of rescuing TRAcP expression but not osteoclast multinucleation most likely due to the transient nature of Ads expression. This preliminary study allows us to conclude that Ads is a RANKL induced early regulator of OCG with a potential role in pre-osteoclast differentiation and fusion. PMID:25275604

  13. The actin binding protein adseverin regulates osteoclastogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siavash Hassanpour

    Full Text Available Adseverin (Ads, a member of the Gelsolin superfamily of actin binding proteins, regulates the actin cytoskeleton architecture by severing and capping existing filamentous actin (F-actin strands and nucleating the assembly of new F-actin filaments. Ads has been implicated in cellular secretion, exocytosis and has also been shown to regulate chondrogenesis and megakaryoblastic leukemia cell differentiation. Here we report for the first time that Ads is involved in regulating osteoclastogenesis (OCG. Ads is induced during OCG downstream of RANK-ligand (RANKL stimulation and is highly expressed in mature osteoclasts. The D5 isoform of Ads is not involved in regulating OCG, as its expression is not induced in response to RANKL. Three clonal Ads knockdown RAW264.7 (RAW macrophage cell lines with varying degrees of Ads expression and OCG deficiency were generated. The most drastic OCG defect was noted in the clonal cell line with the greatest degree of Ads knockdown as indicated by a lack of TRAcP staining and multinucleation. RNAi mediated knockdown of Ads in osteoclast precursors resulted in distinct morphological changes characterized by altered F-actin distribution and increased filopodia formation. Ads knockdown precursor cells experienced enhanced migration while fusion of knockdown precursors cells was limited. Transient reintroduction of de novo Ads back into the knockdown system was capable of rescuing TRAcP expression but not osteoclast multinucleation most likely due to the transient nature of Ads expression. This preliminary study allows us to conclude that Ads is a RANKL induced early regulator of OCG with a potential role in pre-osteoclast differentiation and fusion.

  14. Concentration-dependent Cu(II) binding to prion protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Lu, Wenchang; Bernholc, Jerry

    2008-03-01

    The prion protein plays a causative role in several neurodegenerative diseases, including mad cow disease in cattle and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. The normal function of the prion protein is unknown, but it has been linked to its ability to bind copper ions. Experimental evidence suggests that copper can be bound in three distinct modes depending on its concentration, but only one of those binding modes has been fully characterized experimentally. Using a newly developed hybrid DFT/DFT method [1], which combines Kohn-Sham DFT with orbital-free DFT, we have examined all the binding modes and obtained their detailed binding geometries and copper ion binding energies. Our results also provide explanation for experiments, which have found that when the copper concentration increases the copper binding mode changes, surprisingly, from a stronger to a weaker one. Overall, our results indicate that prion protein can function as a copper buffer. 1. Hodak, Lu, Bernholc, JCP, in press.

  15. Pumilio Puf domain RNA-binding proteins in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Abbasi, Nazia; Park, Youn-Il; Choi, Sang-Bong

    2011-01-01

    Pumilio proteins are a class of RNA-binding proteins harboring Puf domains (or PUM-HD; Pumilio-Homology Domain), named after the founding members, Pumilio (from Drosophila melanogaster) and FBF (Fem-3 mRNA-Binding Factor from Caenorhabditis elegans). The domains contain multiple tandem repeats each of which recognizes one RNA base and is comprised of 35–39 amino acids. Puf domain proteins have been reported in organisms ranging from single-celled yeast to higher multicellular eukaryotes, such...

  16. Grafting odorant binding proteins on diamond bio-MEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Manai, Raafa; Scorsone, E.; Rousseau, L.; Ghassemi, F.; Possas Abreu, M.; Lissorgues, G.; Tremillon, N.; Ginisty, H; Arnault, J.-C.; Tuccori, E.; Bernabei, M.; Cali, K.; Persaud, K C; Bergonzo, P.

    2014-01-01

    Odorant binding proteins (OBPs) are small soluble proteins found in olfactory systems that are capable of binding several types of odorant molecules. Cantilevers based on polycrystalline diamond surfaces are very promising as chemical transducers. Here two methods were investigated for chemically grafting porcine OBPs on polycrystalline diamond surfaces for biosensor development. The first approach resulted in random orientation of the immobilized proteins over the surface. The second approac...

  17. The clinical significance of fatty acid binding proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara Choromańska; Piotr Myśliwiec; Jacek Dadan; Hady Razak Hady; Adrian Chabowski

    2011-01-01

    Excessive levels of free fatty acids are toxic to cells. The human body has evolved a defense mechanism in the form of small cytoplasmic proteins called fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) that bind long-chain fatty acids (LCFA), and then refer them to appropriate intracellular disposal sites (oxidation in mitochondria and peroxisomes or storage in the endoplasmic reticulum). So far, nine types of these proteins have been described, and their name refers to the place in which they were first ...

  18. Cooperative binding modes of Cu(II) in prion protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Chisnell, Robin; Lu, Wenchang; Bernholc, Jerry

    2007-03-01

    The misfolding of the prion protein, PrP, is responsible for a group of neurodegenerative diseases including mad cow disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. It is known that the PrP can efficiently bind copper ions; four high-affinity binding sites located in the octarepeat region of PrP are now well known. Recent experiments suggest that at low copper concentrations new binding modes, in which one copper ion is shared between two or more binding sites, are possible. Using our hybrid Thomas-Fermi/DFT computational scheme, which is well suited for simulations of biomolecules in solution, we investigate the geometries and energetics of two, three and four binding sites cooperatively binding one copper ion. These geometries are then used as inputs for classical molecular dynamics simulations. We find that copper binding affects the secondary structure of the PrP and that it stabilizes the unstructured (unfolded) part of the protein.

  19. Evolution of EF-hand calcium-modulated proteins. II. Domains of several subfamilies have diverse evolutionary histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, S.; Moncrief, N. D.; Kretsinger, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    In the first report in this series we described the relationships and evolution of 152 individual proteins of the EF-hand subfamilies. Here we add 66 additional proteins and define eight (CDC, TPNV, CLNB, LPS, DGK, 1F8, VIS, TCBP) new subfamilies and seven (CAL, SQUD, CDPK, EFH5, TPP, LAV, CRGP) new unique proteins, which we assume represent new subfamilies. The main focus of this study is the classification of individual EF-hand domains. Five subfamilies--calmodulin, troponin C, essential light chain, regulatory light chain, CDC31/caltractin--and three uniques--call, squidulin, and calcium-dependent protein kinase--are congruent in that all evolved from a common four-domain precursor. In contrast calpain and sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein (SARC) each evolved from its own one-domain precursor. The remaining 19 subfamilies and uniques appear to have evolved by translocation and splicing of genes encoding the EF-hand domains that were precursors to the congruent eight and to calpain and to SARC. The rates of evolution of the EF-hand domains are slower following formation of the subfamilies and establishment of their functions. Subfamilies are not readily classified by patterns of calcium coordination, interdomain linker stability, and glycine and proline distribution. There are many homoplasies indicating that similar variants of the EF-hand evolved by independent pathways.

  20. Thermodynamic parameters of the binding of retinol to binding proteins and to membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retinol (vitamin A alcohol) is a hydrophobic compound and distributes in vivo mainly between binding proteins and cellular membranes. To better clarify the nature of the interactions of retinol with these phases which have a high affinity for it, the thermodynamic parameters of these interactions were studied. The temperature-dependence profiles of the binding of retinol to bovine retinol binding protein, bovine serum albumin, unilamellar vesicles of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, and plasma membranes from rat liver were determined. It was found that binding of retinol to retinol binding protein is characterized by a large increase in entropy and no change in enthalpy. Binding to albumin is driven by enthalpy and is accompanied by a decrease in entropy. Partitioning of retinal into unilamellar vesicles and into plasma membranes is stabilized both by enthalpic and by entropic components. The implications of these finding are discussed

  1. Structural and biochemical characterization reveals LysGH15 as an unprecedented "EF-hand-like" calcium-binding phage lysin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingmin Gu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The lysin LysGH15, which is derived from the staphylococcal phage GH15, demonstrates a wide lytic spectrum and strong lytic activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. Here, we find that the lytic activity of the full-length LysGH15 and its CHAP domain is dependent on calcium ions. To elucidate the molecular mechanism, the structures of three individual domains of LysGH15 were determined. Unexpectedly, the crystal structure of the LysGH15 CHAP domain reveals an "EF-hand-like" calcium-binding site near the Cys-His-Glu-Asn quartet active site groove. To date, the calcium-binding site in the LysGH15 CHAP domain is unique among homologous proteins, and it represents the first reported calcium-binding site in the CHAP family. More importantly, the calcium ion plays an important role as a switch that modulates the CHAP domain between the active and inactive states. Structure-guided mutagenesis of the amidase-2 domain reveals that both the zinc ion and E282 are required in catalysis and enable us to propose a catalytic mechanism. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy and titration-guided mutagenesis identify residues (e.g., N404, Y406, G407, and T408 in the SH3b domain that are involved in the interactions with the substrate. To the best of our knowledge, our results constitute the first structural information on the biochemical features of a staphylococcal phage lysin and represent a pivotal step forward in understanding this type of lysin.

  2. Mineral-binding milk proteins and peptides; occurrence, biochemical and technological characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegarud, G E; Langsrud, T; Svenning, C

    2000-11-01

    Minerals and trace elements in cow's milk occur as inorganic ions and salts or form complexes with proteins and peptides, carbohydrates, fats and small molecules. The main mineral binder or chelators of calcium are the caseins, alphas1-casein, alphas2-casein, beta-casein and kappa-casein, but also whey proteins and lactoferrin bind specific minerals like calcium, magnesium, zinc, iron, sodium and potassium. Less documented is the binding of trace elements. Peptides obtained by in vitro or in vivo hydrolysis act as mineral trappers through specific and non-specific binding sites. They may then function as carriers, chelators, of various minerals and thus enhance or inhibit bioavailability. Peptides from milk proteins have found interesting new applications in the food industry as products with improved functionality or as ingredients of dietary products, or used in pharmaceutical industry. Fortification of foods with minerals in a low concentration has for a long time been used in some countries to overcome mineral deficiency, which is an increasing problem in humans. These types of foods are being used to create a new generation of super foods in the industry today. PMID:11242452

  3. Sequence and structural features of binding site residues in protein-protein complexes: comparison with protein-nucleic acid complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaraj S

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interactions are important for several cellular processes. Understanding the mechanism of protein-protein recognition and predicting the binding sites in protein-protein complexes are long standing goals in molecular and computational biology. Methods We have developed an energy based approach for identifying the binding site residues in protein–protein complexes. The binding site residues have been analyzed with sequence and structure based parameters such as binding propensity, neighboring residues in the vicinity of binding sites, conservation score and conformational switching. Results We observed that the binding propensities of amino acid residues are specific for protein-protein complexes. Further, typical dipeptides and tripeptides showed high preference for binding, which is unique to protein-protein complexes. Most of the binding site residues are highly conserved among homologous sequences. Our analysis showed that 7% of residues changed their conformations upon protein-protein complex formation and it is 9.2% and 6.6% in the binding and non-binding sites, respectively. Specifically, the residues Glu, Lys, Leu and Ser changed their conformation from coil to helix/strand and from helix to coil/strand. Leu, Ser, Thr and Val prefer to change their conformation from strand to coil/helix. Conclusions The results obtained in this study will be helpful for understanding and predicting the binding sites in protein-protein complexes.

  4. Stereoselective binding of chiral drugs to plasma proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi SHEN; Lu WANG; Hui ZHOU; Hui-di JIANG; Lu-shan YU; Su ZENG

    2013-01-01

    Chiral drugs show distinct biochemical and pharmacological behaviors in the human body.The binding of chiral drugs to plasma proteins usually exhibits stereoselectivity,which has a far-reaching influence on their pharmacological activities and pharmacokinetic profiles.In this review,the stereoselective binding of chiral drugs to human serum albumin (HSA),α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP)and lipoprotein,three most important proteins in human plasma,are detailed.Furthermore,the application of AGP variants and recombinant fragments of HSA for studying enantiomer binding properties is also discussed.Apart from the stereoselectivity of enantiomer-protein binding,enantiomer-enantiomer interactions that may induce allosteric effects are also described.Additionally,the techniques and methods used to determine drug-protein binding parameters are briefly reviewed.

  5. Single-column purification of the tag-free, recombinant form of the neuronal calcium sensor protein, hippocalcin expressed in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Anuradha; Viviano, Jeffrey; Morozov, Yaroslav; Venkataraman, Venkat

    2016-07-01

    Hippocalcin is a 193 aa protein that is a member of the neuronal calcium sensor protein family, whose functions are regulated by calcium. Mice that lack the function of this protein are compromised in the long term potentiation aspect of memory generation. Recently, mutations in the gene have been linked with dystonia in human. The protein has no intrinsic enzyme activity but is known to bind to variety of target proteins. Very little information is available on how the protein executes its critical role in signaling pathways, except that it is regulated by binding of calcium. Further delineation of its function requires large amounts of pure protein. In this report, we present a single-step purification procedure that yields high quantities of the bacterially expressed, recombinant protein. The procedure may be adapted to purify the protein from inclusion bodies or cytosol in its myristoylated or non-myristoylated forms. MALDI-MS (in source decay) analyses demonstrates that the myristoylation occurs at the glycine residue. The protein is also biologically active as measured through tryptophan fluorescence, mobility shift and guanylate cyclase activity assays. Thus, further analyses of hippocalcin, both structural and functional, need no longer be limited by protein availability. PMID:27001424

  6. Interaction of SR 33557 with skeletal muscle calcium channel blocker receptors in the baboon: characterization of its binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procedure for the isolation of primate skeletal microsomal membranes was initiated. Membranes exhibited specific enzymatic markers such as 5'-nucleotidase, Ca2+,Mg(2+)-adenosine triphosphatase and an ATP-dependent calcium uptake. Baboon skeletal microsomes bound specifically with high-affinity potent Ca2+ channel blockers such as dihydropyridine, phenylalkylamine and benzothiazepine derivatives. Scatchard analysis of equilibrium binding assays with [3H](+)-PN 200-110, [3H](-)-desmethoxyverapamil [( 3H](-)-D888) and [3H]-d-cis-dilitiazem were consistent with a single class of binding sites for the three radioligands. The pharmacological profile of SR 33557, an original compound with calcium antagonist properties, was investigated using radioligand binding studies. SR 33557 totally inhibited the specific binding of the three main classes of Ca2+ channel effectors and interacted allosterically with them. In addition, SR 33557 bound with high affinity to a homogeneous population of binding sites in baboon skeletal muscle

  7. The Pumilio protein binds RNA through a conserved domain that defines a new class of RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamore, P D; Williamson, J R; Lehmann, R

    1997-01-01

    Translation of hunchback(mat) (hb[mat]) mRNA must be repressed in the posterior of the pre-blastoderm Drosophila embryo to permit formation of abdominal segments. This translational repression requires two copies of the Nanos Response Element (NRE), a 16-nt sequence in the hb[mat] 3' untranslated region. Translational repression also requires the action of two proteins: Pumilio (PUM), a sequence-specific RNA-binding protein; and Nanos, a protein that determines the location of repression. Binding of PUM to the NRE is thought to target hb(mat) mRNA for repression. Here, we show the RNA-binding domain of PUM to be an evolutionarily conserved, 334-amino acid region at the carboxy-terminus of the approximately 158-kDa PUM protein. This contiguous region of PUM retains the RNA-binding specificity of full-length PUM protein. Proteins with sequences homologous to the PUM RNA-binding domain are found in animals, plants, and fungi. The high degree of sequence conservation of the PUM RNA-binding domain in other far-flung species suggests that the domain is an ancient protein motif, and we show that conservation of sequence reflects conservation of function: that is, the homologous region from a human protein binds RNA with sequence specificity related to but distinct from Drosophila PUM. PMID:9404893

  8. Guardian of Genetic Messenger-RNA-Binding Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Anji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA in cells is always associated with RNA-binding proteins that regulate all aspects of RNA metabolism including RNA splicing, export from the nucleus, RNA localization, mRNA turn-over as well as translation. Given their diverse functions, cells express a variety of RNA-binding proteins, which play important roles in the pathologies of a number of diseases. In this review we focus on the effect of alcohol on different RNA-binding proteins and their possible contribution to alcohol-related disorders, and discuss the role of these proteins in the development of neurological diseases and cancer. We further discuss the conventional methods and newer techniques that are employed to identify RNA-binding proteins.

  9. Convergent evolution among immunoglobulin G-binding bacterial proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Frick, I M; Wikström, M.; Forsén, S.; Drakenberg, T; Gomi, H.; Sjöbring, U; Björck, L

    1992-01-01

    Protein G, a bacterial cell-wall protein with high affinity for the constant region of IgG (IgGFc) antibodies, contains homologous repeats responsible for the interaction with IgGFc. A synthetic peptide corresponding to an 11-amino acid-long sequence in the COOH-terminal region of the repeats was found to bind to IgGFc and block the interaction with protein G. Moreover, two other IgGFc-binding bacterial proteins (proteins A and H), which do not contain any sequences homologous to the peptide,...

  10. Characterization of a cocaine binding protein in human placenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    [3H]-Cocaine binding sites are identified in human placental villus tissue plasma membranes. These binding sites are associated with a protein and show saturable and specific binding of [3H]-cocaine with a high affinity site of 170 fmole/mg protein. The binding is lost with pretreatment with trypsin or heat. The membrane bound protein is solubilized with the detergent 3-(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethyl-ammonio-1-propane sulphonate (CHAPS) with retention of its saturable and specific binding of [3H]-cocaine. The detergent-protein complex migrates on a sepharose CL-6B gel chromatography column as a protein with an apparent molecular weight of 75,900. The protein has an S20,w value of 5.1. The binding of this protein to norcocaine, pseudococaine, nomifensine, imipramine, desipramine, amphetamine and dopamine indicates that it shares some, but not all, the properties of the brain cocaine receptor. The physiologic significance of this protein in human placenta is currently unclear

  11. Electrochemistry of heparin binding to tau protein on Au surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Anionic heparin binds tau protein film on Au • N-terminal of tau protein is critical for heparin binding • Negatively charged heparin binds positively charged tau domains • Heparin binding to tau increases charge transfer resistance - ABSTRACT: The tau protein is a neurodegenerative disease biomarker. The in vitro aggregation of tau is triggered by electrostatic charge imbalance induced by an anionic inducing agent, such as heparin. The binding of the tau-heparin complex is based on electrostatic interactions, but the exact binding mode of heparin to the tau protein has not been fully identified. In this work, the effects of the tau protein orientation on gold (Au) electrode to heparin were explored by the cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. To modulate the accessibility of N-terminal of the tau to heparin, the tau films on Au surfaces were fabricated in two ways: immobilization of tau via the N-terminal of tau protein (N-tau-Au) or by the Cys291/Cys322 residues, located in the R-repeat domains of the tau protein (Cys-tau-Au). The sulfur-Au bonding was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The charge transfer resistance was measured for N-tau-Au and Cys-tau-Au as a function of heparin concentration. The heparin concentration range was varied from 0.2 pM to 216 μM with the optimal binding concentration at 21 nM (the highest charge transfer resistance value). The heparin binding to tau films was investigated in the presence of [Fe(CN)6]3−/4− or benzoquinone redox probes. The tau-heparin binding was greater for the Cys-tau-Au surface over N-tau-Au, indicating specific tau domains may be required for optimal heparin binding

  12. Acyl-CoA-binding protein/diazepam-binding inhibitor gene and pseudogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, S; Hummel, R; Ravn, S;

    1992-01-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) is a 10 kDa protein isolated from bovine liver by virtue of its ability to bind and induce the synthesis of medium-chain acyl-CoA esters. Surprisingly, it turned out to be identical to a protein named diazepam-binding Inhibitor (DBI) claimed to be an endogenous...... remarkable correspondence between the structural modules of ACBP/DBI as determined by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the exon-intron architecture of the ACBP/DBI gene. Detailed analyses of transcription of the ACBP/DBI gene in brain and liver were performed to map transcription initiation...

  13. Calcium phosphate–gold nanoparticles nanocomposite for protein adsorption and mediator-free H2O2 biosensor construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work reports a new method for the preparation and application of a kind of biocompatible calcium phosphate–gold nanoparticles (Ca3(PO4)2–AuNPs) nanocomposite. UV–vis spectroscopy and transmittance electron microscopy (TEM) have been used to monitor the formation process of the nanocomposite and to examine the interaction between calcium phosphate and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The nanocomposite has multiple sites and improved conductivity which make it suitable for the binding of proteins to construct electrochemical sensors. Myoglobin (Mb) adsorbed on the nanocomposite retained its native structure which was proved by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Direct electron transfer between the adsorbed Mb and the electrode was observed. Further results demonstrated that the adsorbed Mb has good electrocatalytic activity towards the reduction of H2O2 in the absence of any mediator. Highlights: ► Using gelatin modified gold nanoparticles to prepare needle-like calcium phosphate. ► Calcium phosphate provides multiple sites for protein adsorption. ► Gold nanoparticles act as electron tunneling. ► Myoglobin adsorbed on the material showed direct electrochemistry and good catalysis.

  14. Biochemical analysis of the interaction of calcium with toposome: a major protein component of the sea urchin egg and embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayley, Michael; Sun, Ming; Merschrod, Erika F; Davis, Philip J; Robinson, John J

    2008-04-01

    We have investigated the biochemical and functional properties of toposome, a major protein component of sea urchin eggs and embryos. Atomic force microscopy was utilized to demonstrate that a Ca(2+)-driven change in secondary structure facilitated toposome binding to a lipid bilayer. Thermal denaturation studies showed that toposome was dependent upon calcium in a manner paralleling the effect of this cation on secondary and tertiary structure. The calcium-induced, secondary, and tertiary structural changes had no effect on the chymotryptic cleavage pattern. However, the digestion pattern of toposome bound to phosphatidyl serine liposomes did vary as a function of calcium concentration. We also investigated the interaction of this protein with various metal ions. Calcium, Mg(2+), Ba(2+), Cd(2+), Mn(2+), and Fe(3+) all bound to toposome. In addition, Cd(2+) and Mn(2+) displaced Ca(2+), prebound to toposome, while Mg(2+), Ba(2+), and Fe(3+) had no effect. Collectively, these results further enhance our understanding of the role of Ca(2+) in modulating the biological activity of toposome. PMID:17786928

  15. Niobium Uptake and Release by Bacterial Ferric Ion Binding Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanbo Shi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ferric ion binding proteins (Fbps transport FeIII across the periplasm and are vital for the virulence of many Gram negative bacteria. Iron(III is tightly bound in a hinged binding cleft with octahedral coordination geometry involving binding to protein side chains (including tyrosinate residues together with a synergistic anion such as phosphate. Niobium compounds are of interest for their potential biological activity, which has been little explored. We have studied the binding of cyclopentadienyl and nitrilotriacetato NbV complexes to the Fbp from Neisseria gonorrhoeae by UV-vis spectroscopy, chromatography, ICP-OES, mass spectrometry, and Nb K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. These data suggest that NbV binds strongly to Fbp and that a dinuclear NbV centre can be readily accommodated in the interdomain binding cleft. The possibility of designing niobium-based antibiotics which block iron uptake by pathogenic bacteria is discussed.

  16. A short introduction to the new principle of binding ration calcium with sodium zeolite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, R J; Bjerrum, M J; Classen, H;

    2003-01-01

    This paper summarise the development of the new principle of preventing parturient hypocalcaemia by reducing the bioavailability of ration calcium with calcium binders, based on the idea that a negative calcium balance would stimulate natural defence mechanisms against threatening hypocalcaemia. ...

  17. Intake of protein, calcium and sodium in public child day care centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovana Longo-Silva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE:To assess calcium, protein and sodium intake, of children that attend public day-care centers and to compare it with the recommended one.METHODS:Cross-sectional descriptive study in seven public day care centers of São Paulo city, Southeast Brazil, which enrolled 366 children between 12 and 36 months of age. The data collection occurred between September and December 2010. Each day care center was evaluated for three non-consecutive days, totaling 42 days and 210 meals. Dietary intake was assessed by a direct food weighing method. For the nutritional calculation, DietWin(r Profissional 2.0 was used, and the adequacy was calculated according to the recommendations of the National School Feeding Program for energy, protein, calcium and sodium. The calcium/protein relation was also calculated, as well as calcium density (mg/1,000kcal.RESULTS: The energy (406.4kcal, protein (18.2g and calcium (207.6mg consumption did not reach the recommended values ​​in all the evaluated day care centers. Sodium intake exceeded up to three times the recommendation. The calcium/protein ratio of 11.7mg/g was less than the adequate one (20mg/g.CONCLUSIONS: There was inadequacy of calcium, protein and sodium dietary intake, in children attending public day-care centers.

  18. Studies of the silencing of Baculovirus DNA binding protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quadt, I.; Lent, van J.W.M.; Knebel-Morsdorf, D.

    2007-01-01

    Baculovirus DNA binding protein (DBP) binds preferentially single-stranded DNA in vitro and colocalizes with viral DNA replication sites. Here, its putative role as viral replication factor has been addressed by RNA interference. Silencing of DBP in Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovir

  19. Expected and unexpected features of protein-binding RNA aptamers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Nils; Andreasen, Peter A; Dupont, Daniel M

    2016-01-01

    RNA molecules with high affinity to specific proteins can be isolated from libraries of up to 10(16) different RNA sequences by systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). These so-called protein-binding RNA aptamers are often interesting, e.g., as modulators of protein...... function for therapeutic use, for probing the conformations of proteins, for studies of basic aspects of nucleic acid-protein interactions, etc. Studies on the interactions between RNA aptamers and proteins display a number of expected and unexpected features, including the chemical nature of the...... interacting RNA-protein surfaces, the conformation of protein-bound aptamer versus free aptamer, the conformation of aptamer-bound protein versus free protein, and the effects of aptamers on protein function. Here, we review current insights into the details of RNA aptamer-protein interactions. For further...

  20. The interrelationship between ligand binding and self-association of the folate binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jan; Schou, Christian; Babol, Linnea N.;

    2011-01-01

    The folate binding protein (FBP) regulates homeostasis and intracellular trafficking of folic acid, a vitamin of decisive importance in cell division and growth. We analyzed whether interrelationship between ligand binding and self-association of FBP plays a significant role in the physiology of...

  1. Natural ligand binding and transfer from liver fatty acid binding protein (LFABP) to membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gerónimo, Eduardo; Hagan, Robert M; Wilton, David C; Córsico, Betina

    2010-09-01

    Liver fatty acid-binding protein (LFABP) is distinctive among fatty acid-binding proteins because it binds more than one molecule of long-chain fatty acid and a variety of diverse ligands. Also, the transfer of fluorescent fatty acid analogues to model membranes under physiological ionic strength follows a different mechanism compared to most of the members of this family of intracellular lipid binding proteins. Tryptophan insertion mutants sensitive to ligand binding have allowed us to directly measure the binding affinity, ligand partitioning and transfer to model membranes of natural ligands. Binding of fatty acids shows a cooperative mechanism, while acyl-CoAs binding presents a hyperbolic behavior. Saturated fatty acids seem to have a stronger partition to protein vs. membranes, compared to unsaturated fatty acids. Natural ligand transfer rates are more than 200-fold higher compared to fluorescently-labeled analogues. Interestingly, oleoyl-CoA presents a markedly different transfer behavior compared to the rest of the ligands tested, probably indicating the possibility of specific targeting of ligands to different metabolic fates. PMID:20541621

  2. Autoinhibition of Mint1 adaptor protein regulates amyloid precursor protein binding and processing

    OpenAIRE

    Matos, Maria F.; Xu, Yibin; Dulubova, Irina; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Richardson, John M.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Rizo, Josep; Ho, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Mint adaptor proteins bind to the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and regulate APP processing associated with Alzheimer’s disease; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying Mint regulation in APP binding and processing remain unclear. Biochemical, biophysical, and cellular experiments now show that the Mint1 phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domain that binds to APP is intramolecularly inhibited by the adjacent C-terminal linker region. The crystal structure of a C-terminally extended Mint1 PT...

  3. DSCG binding protein and process for preparing same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pecht, I.; Mazurek, N.

    1987-07-28

    An essentially pure protein is described consisting essentially of the protein, (CBP), present in nature in membranes of basophile cells and in mast cells, having a molecular weight of about 60,000 +- 2,000 determined by SDS polyacrylamide electrophoresis an isoelectric point of about 3.9 and an amino acid composition of about 4 units of asparagine, 3 units of threonine and serine, 3 units glycine, 2 units alanine, 2 units proline, 1 unit cysteine, 2 units valine, 1 unit methionine, 1 unit isoleucine, 2 units leucine, 1 unit tyrosine, 1 unit phenylalanine, 2 units histamine, 2 units lysine and 1 unit arginine. The protein is able to build calcium and having a calcium dependent affinity to the disodium salt of 1,2 bis(-2 carboxychromon-5-yloxy)-2-hydroxy propane (DSCG).

  4. A Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase Interactswith and Activates A Calcium Channel toRequlate Pollen Tube Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Calcium, as a ubiquitous second messenger, plays essential roles in tip-growing cells, such as animal neu-rons, plant pollen tubes, and root hairs. However, little is known concerning the regulatory mechanisms that code anddecode Ca2+ signals in plants. The evidence presented here indicates that a calcium-dependent protein kinase, CPK32,controls polar growth of pollen tubes. Overexpression of CPK32 disrupted the polar growth along with excessive Ca2+accumulation in the tip. A search of downstream effector molecules for CPK32 led to identification of a cyclic nucleotide-gated channel, CNGC18, as an interacting partner for CPK32. Co-expression of CPK32 and CNGC18 resulted in activationof CNGC18 in Xenopus oocytes where expression of CNGC18 alone did not exhibit significant calcium channel activity.Overexpression of CNGC18 produced a growth arrest phenotype coupled with accumulation of calcium in the tip, simi-lar to that induced by CPK32 overexpression. Co-expression of CPK32 and CNGC18 had a synergistic effect leading tomore severe depolarization of pollen tube growth. These results provide a potential feed-forward mechanism in whichcalcium-activated CPK32 activates CNGC18, further promoting calcium entry during the elevation phase of Ca2+ oscilla-tions in the polar growth of pollen tubes.

  5. Identification of lectin-binding proteins in Chlamydia species.

    OpenAIRE

    Swanson, A F; Kuo, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    Lectin-binding proteins of chlamydiae were detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. All three Chlamydia species tested expressed two proteins when whole-elementary-body lysates were reacted with the biotinylated lectin Dolichos biflorus agglutinin. The protein with a molecular mass of 18 kilodaltons (kDa) responded strongly compared with a higher-molecular-mass protein that varied from 27 to 32 kDa with each chlamydia strain tested. Among six l...

  6. Optimizing a coarse-grained model for the recognition of protein-protein binding

    OpenAIRE

    Emperador, Agustí; Orozco, Modesto

    2015-01-01

    We are optimizing a force-field to be used with our coarsegrained protein model for the recognition of protein -protein binding. We have found that, apart from ranking correctly the ligand-receptor conformations generated in a protein-protein docking algorithm, our model is able to distinguish binding (experimental structure) from nonbinding (false positive) conformations for many complexes. This suggests us that the model could have a good performance in complete cross-d...

  7. PRELIMINARY STUDY OF EXTRACTABLE PROTEIN BINDING USING MALEIC ANHYDRIDE COPOLYMER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thirawan Nipithakul; Ladawan Watthanachote; Nanticha Kalapat

    2012-01-01

    A preliminary study of using maleic anhydride copolymer for protein binding has been carried out.The polymeric films were prepared by compression of the purified resin and annealing the film to induce efficient back formation of the anhydride groups.The properties of the film surface were analyzed by attenuated total reflection Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy and water contact angle measurements.The protein content was determined by Bradford assay.To obtain optimum conditions,immersion time for protein binding was examined.Results revealed that proteins can be successfully immobilized onto the film surface via covalent linkage.The efficiency of the covalent binding of the extractable protein to maleic anhydride-polyethylene film was estimated at 69.87 μtg/cm2,although the film had low anhydride content (3%) on the surface.

  8. Binding of CCAAT displacement protein CDP to adenovirus packaging sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erturk, Ece; Ostapchuk, Philomena; Wells, Susanne I; Yang, Jihong; Gregg, Keqin; Nepveu, Alain; Dudley, Jaquelin P; Hearing, Patrick

    2003-06-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) type 5 DNA packaging is initiated in a polar fashion from the left end of the genome. The packaging process is dependent upon the cis-acting packaging domain located between nucleotides 194 and 380. Seven A/T-rich repeats have been identified within this domain that direct packaging. A1, A2, A5, and A6 are the most important repeats functionally and share a bipartite sequence motif. Several lines of evidence suggest that there is a limiting trans-acting factor(s) that plays a role in packaging. Two cellular activities that bind to minimal packaging domains in vitro have been previously identified. These binding activities are P complex, an uncharacterized protein(s), and chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor (COUP-TF). In this work, we report that a third cellular protein, octamer-1 protein (Oct-1), binds to minimal packaging domains. In vitro binding analyses and in vivo packaging assays were used to examine the relevance of these DNA binding activities to Ad DNA packaging. The results of these experiments reveal that COUP-TF and Oct-1 binding does not play a functional role in Ad packaging, whereas P-complex binding directly correlates with packaging function. We demonstrate that P complex contains the cellular protein CCAAT displacement protein (CDP) and that full-length CDP is found in purified virus particles. In addition to cellular factors, previous evidence indicates that viral factors play a role in the initiation of viral DNA packaging. We propose that CDP, in conjunction with one or more viral proteins, binds to the packaging sequences of Ad to initiate the encapsidation process. PMID:12743282

  9. Characterization of cap binding proteins associated with the nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eucaryotic mRNAs a carry 7-methylguanosine triphosphate residue (called cap structure) at their 5' terminus. The cap plays an important role in RNA recognition. Cap binding proteins (CBP) of HeLa cells were identified by photoaffinity labelling using the cap analogue γ-(32P)-(4-(benzoyl-phenyl)methylamido)-7-methylguanosine-5'-triphosphate (BP-m7GTP). Photoreaction of this cap analogue with HeLa cell initiation factors resulted in specific labelling of two polypeptides of Msub(r) 37000 and 26000. The latter was also labelled in crude initiation factors prepared from reticulocytes and is identical to the cap binding protein CBP I previously identified. These cap binding proteins were also affinity labelled in poliovirus infected cell extracts. Photoaffinity reaction with BP-m7GTP of whole HeLa cell homogenate showed three additional polypeptides with Msub(r) 120000, 89000 and 80000. These cap binding proteins were found to be associated with the nucleus and are therefore referred to as nuclear cap binding proteins, i.e. NCBP 1, NCBP 2 and NCBP 3. They were also present in splicing extracts. Photoaffinity labelling in these nuclear extracts was differentially inhibited by various cap analogues and capped mRNAs. Affinity chromatography on immobilized globin mRNA led to a partial separation of the three nuclear cap binding proteins. Chromatography on m7GTP-Sepharose resulted in a specific binding of NCBP 3. The different behaviour of the cap binding proteins suggests that they are functionally distinct and that they might be involved in different processes requiring cap recognition. (Author)

  10. A Novel Kinesin-Like Protein with a Calmodulin-Binding Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W.; Takezawa, D.; Narasimhulu, S. B.; Reddy, A. S. N.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1996-01-01

    Calcium regulates diverse developmental processes in plants through the action of calmodulin. A cDNA expression library from developing anthers of tobacco was screened with S-35-labeled calmodulin to isolate cDNAs encoding calmodulin-binding proteins. Among several clones isolated, a kinesin-like gene (TCK1) that encodes a calmodulin-binding kinesin-like protein was obtained. The TCK1 cDNA encodes a protein with 1265 amino acid residues. Its structural features are very similar to those of known kinesin heavy chains and kinesin-like proteins from plants and animals, with one distinct exception. Unlike other known kinesin-like proteins, TCK1 contains a calmodulin-binding domain which distinguishes it from all other known kinesin genes. Escherichia coli-expressed TCK1 binds calmodulin in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. In addition to the presence of a calmodulin-binding domain at the carboxyl terminal, it also has a leucine zipper motif in the stalk region. The amino acid sequence at the carboxyl terminal of TCK1 has striking homology with the mechanochemical motor domain of kinesins. The motor domain has ATPase activity that is stimulated by microtubules. Southern blot analysis revealed that TCK1 is coded by a single gene. Expression studies indicated that TCKI is expressed in all of the tissues tested. Its expression is highest in the stigma and anther, especially during the early stages of anther development. Our results suggest that Ca(2+)/calmodulin may play an important role in the function of this microtubule-associated motor protein and may be involved in the regulation of microtubule-based intracellular transport.

  11. High-throughput analysis of protein-DNA binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Zorrilla, José M; Solano, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Sequence-specific protein-DNA interactions mediate most regulatory processes underlying gene expression, such as transcriptional regulation by transcription factors (TFs) or chromatin organization. Current knowledge about DNA-binding specificities of TFs is based mostly on low- to medium-throughput methodologies that are time-consuming and often fail to identify DNA motifs recognized by a TF with lower affinity but retaining biological relevance. The use of protein-binding microarrays (PBMs) offers a high-throughput alternative for the identification of protein-DNA specificities. PBM consists in an array of pseudorandomized DNA sequences that are optimized to include all the possible 10- or 11-mer DNA sequences, allowing the determination of binding specificities of most eukaryotic TFs. PBMs that can be synthesized by several manufacturing companies as single-stranded DNA are converted into double-stranded in a simple primer extension reaction. The protein of interest fused to an epitope tag is then incubated onto the PBM, and specific DNA-protein complexes are revealed in a series of immunological reactions coupled to a fluorophore. After scanning and quantifying PBMs, specific DNA motifs recognized by the protein are identified with ready-to-use scripts, generating comprehensive but accessible information about the DNA-binding specificity of the protein. This chapter describes detailed procedures for preparation of double-stranded PBMs, incubation with recombinant protein, and detection of protein-DNA complexes. Finally, we outline some cues for evaluating the biological role of DNA motifs obtained in vitro. PMID:24057393

  12. High-Fidelity DNA Sensing by Protein Binding Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Tlusty, Tsvi; Libchaber, Albert; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.93.258103

    2010-01-01

    One of the major functions of RecA protein in the cell is to bind single-stranded DNA exposed upon damage, thereby triggering the SOS repair response.We present fluorescence anisotropy measurements at the binding onset, showing enhanced DNA length discrimination induced by adenosine triphosphate consumption. Our model explains the observed DNA length sensing as an outcome of out-of equilibrium binding fluctuations, reminiscent of microtubule dynamic instability. The cascade architecture of the binding fluctuations is a generalization of the kinetic proofreading mechanism. Enhancement of precision by an irreversible multistage pathway is a possible design principle in the noisy biological environment.

  13. Ubiquitin-binding proteins: similar, but different

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Katrine M; Hofmann, Kay; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    ubiquitin conjugation to endoplasmic reticulum degradation), UEV [ubiquitin E2 (ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme) variant] and NZF (nuclear protein localization gene 4 zinc finger) domain-containing proteins appear to have more specialized functions. Here we discuss functional and structural properties of...

  14. Pulmonary surfactant protein A (SP-A) specifically binds dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phospholipids are the major components of pulmonary surfactant. Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine is believed to be especially essential for the surfactant function of reducing the surface tension at the air-liquid interface. Surfactant protein A (SP-A) with a reduced denatured molecular mass of 26-38 kDa, characterized by a collagen-like structure and N-linked glycosylation, interacts strongly with a mixture of surfactant-like phospholipids. In the present study the direct binding of SP-A to phospholipids on a thin layer chromatogram was visualized using 125I-SP-A as a probe, so that the phospholipid specificities of SP-A binding and the structural requirements of SP-A and phospholipids for the binding could be examined. Although 125I-SP-A bound phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyeline, it was especially strong in binding dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, but failed to bind phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylserine. Labeled SP-A also exhibited strong binding to distearoylphosphatidylcholine, but weak binding to dimyristoyl-, 1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-, and dilinoleoylphosphatidylcholine. Unlabeled SP-A readily competed with labeled SP-A for phospholipid binding. SP-A strongly bound dipalmitoylglycerol produced by phospholipase C treatment of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, but not palmitic acid. This protein also failed to bind lysophosphatidylcholine produced by phospholipase A2 treatment of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine. 125I-SP-A shows almost no binding to dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol and dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine. The addition of 10 mM EGTA into the binding buffer reduced much of the 125I-SP-A binding to phospholipids. Excess deglycosylated SP-A competed with labeled SP-A for binding to dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, but the excess collagenase-resistant fragment of SP-A failed

  15. Lipid A binding proteins in macrophages detected by ligand blotting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endotoxin (LPS) stimulates a variety of eukaryotic cells. These actions are involved in the pathogenesis of Gram-negative septicemia. The site of action of the LPS toxic moiety, lipid A (LA), is unclear. Their laboratory has previously identified a bioactive LA precursor lipid IV/sub A/, which can be enzymatically labeled with 32P/sub i/ (109 dpm/nmole) and purified (99%). They now show that this ligand binds to specific proteins immobilized on nitrocellulose (NC) from LPS-sensitive RAW 264.7 cultured macrophages. NC blots were incubated with [32P]-IV/sub A/ in a buffer containing BSA, NaCl, polyethylene glycol, and azide. Binding was assessed using autoradiography or scintillation counting. Dot blot binding of the radioligand was inhibited by excess cold IV/sub A/, LA, or ReLPS but not by phosphatidylcholine, cardiolipin, phosphatidylinositol, or phosphatidic acid. Binding was trypsin-sensitive and dependent on protein concentration. Particulate macrophage proteins were subjected to SDS-PAGE and then electroblotted onto NC. Several discrete binding proteins were observed. Identical treatment of fetal bovine serum or molecular weight standards revealed no detectable binding. By avoiding high nonspecific binding of intact membranes, this ligand blotting assay may be useful in elucidating the molecular actions of LPS

  16. Mining the characteristic interaction patterns on protein-protein binding interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Liu, Zhihai; Han, Li; Li, Chengke; Wang, Renxiao

    2013-09-23

    Protein-protein interactions are observed in various biological processes. They are important for understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms and can be potential targets for developing small-molecule regulators of such processes. Previous studies suggest that certain residues on protein-protein binding interfaces are "hot spots". As an extension to this concept, we have developed a residue-based method to identify the characteristic interaction patterns (CIPs) on protein-protein binding interfaces, in which each pattern is a cluster of four contacting residues. Systematic analysis was conducted on a nonredundant set of 1,222 protein-protein binding interfaces selected out of the entire Protein Data Bank. Favored interaction patterns across different protein-protein binding interfaces were retrieved by considering both geometrical and chemical conservations. As demonstrated on two test tests, our method was able to predict hot spot residues on protein-protein binding interfaces with good recall scores and acceptable precision scores. By analyzing the function annotations and the evolutionary tree of the protein-protein complexes in our data set, we also observed that protein-protein interfaces sharing common characteristic interaction patterns are normally associated with identical or similar biological functions. PMID:23930922

  17. Transfected parvalbumin alters calcium homeostasis in teratocarcinoma PCC7 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, B K; Kabos, P; Belhage, B;

    1996-01-01

    Indirect evidence supports a protective role of some EF-hand calcium-binding proteins against calcium-induced neurotoxicity. Little is known about how these proteins influence cytosolic calcium levels. After cloning the parvalbumin cDNA into an expression vector, teratocarcinoma cells (PCC7) were...

  18. Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase Genes in Corn Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takezawa, D.; Patil, S.; Bhatia, A.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1996-01-01

    Two cDNAs encoding Ca-2(+) - Dependent Protein Kinases (CDPKs), Corn Root Protein Kinase 1 and 2 (CRPK 1, CRPK 2) were isolated from the root tip library of corn (Zea mays L., cv. Merit) and their nucleotide sequences were determined. Deduced amino acid sequences of both the clones have features characteristic of plant CDPKS, including all 11 conserved serine/threonine kinase subdomains, a junction domain and a calmodulin-like domain with four Ca-2(+), -binding sites. Northern analysis revealed that CRPKI mRNA is preferentially expressed in roots, especially in the root tip; whereas, the expression of CRPK2 mRNA was very low in all the tissues tested. In situ hybridization experiments revealed that CRPKI mRNA is highly expressed in the root apex, as compared to other parts of the root. Partially purified CDPK from the root tip phosphorylates syntide-2, a common peptide substrate for plant CDPKs, and the phosphorylation was stimulated 7-fold by the addition of Ca-2(+). Our results show that two CDPK isoforms are expressed in corn roots and they may be involved in the Ca-2(+)-dependent signal transduction process.

  19. The cobalamin-binding protein in zebrafish is an intermediate between the three cobalamin-binding proteins in human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Greibe

    Full Text Available In humans, three soluble extracellular cobalamin-binding proteins; transcobalamin (TC, intrinsic factor (IF, and haptocorrin (HC, are involved in the uptake and transport of cobalamin. In this study, we investigate a cobalamin-binding protein from zebrafish (Danio rerio and summarize current knowledge concerning the phylogenetic evolution of kindred proteins. We identified a cobalamin binding capacity in zebrafish protein extracts (8.2 pmol/fish and ambient water (13.5 pmol/fish associated with a single protein. The protein showed resistance toward degradation by trypsin and chymotrypsin (like human IF, but unlike human HC and TC. The cobalamin analogue, cobinamide, bound weaker to the zebrafish cobalamin binder than to human HC, but stronger than to human TC and IF. Affinity for another analogue, adenosyl-pseudo-cobalamin was low compared with human HC and TC, but high compared with human IF. The absorbance spectrum of the purified protein in complex with hydroxo-cobalamin resembled those of human HC and IF, but not TC. We searched available databases to further explore the phylogenies of the three cobalamin-binding proteins in higher vertebrates. Apparently, TC-like proteins are the oldest evolutionary derivatives followed by IF and HC (the latter being present only in reptiles and most but not all mammals. Our findings suggest that the only cobalamin-binding protein in zebrafish is an intermediate between the three human cobalamin binders. These findings support the hypothesis about a common ancestral gene for all cobalamin-binding proteins in higher vertebrates.

  20. Analysis of the ligand binding properties of recombinant bovine liver-type fatty acid binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolf, B; Oudenampsen-Krüger, E; Börchers, T;

    1995-01-01

    The coding part of the cDNA for bovine liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) has been amplified by RT-PCR, cloned and used for the construction of an Escherichia coli (E. coli) expression system. The recombinant protein made up to 25% of the soluble E. coli proteins and could be isolated...... by a simple two step protocol combining ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration. Dissociation constants for binding of oleic acid, arachidonic acid, oleoyl-CoA, lysophosphatidic acid and the peroxisomal proliferator bezafibrate to L-FABP have been determined by titration calorimetry. All ligands were...... bound in a 2:1 stoichiometry, the dissociation constants for the first ligand bound were all in the micro molar range. Oleic acid was bound with the highest affinity and a Kd of 0.26 microM. Furthermore, binding of cholesterol to L-FABP was investigated with the Lipidex assay, a liposome binding assay...

  1. Rapid identification of DNA-binding proteins by mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordhoff, E; Krogsdam, A M; Jorgensen, H F;

    1999-01-01

    We report a protocol for the rapid identification of DNA-binding proteins. Immobilized DNA probes harboring a specific sequence motif are incubated with cell or nuclear extract. Proteins are analyzed directly off the solid support by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass...

  2. Solid-binding Proteins for Modification of Inorganic Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Brandon Laurence

    Robust and simple strategies to directly functionalize graphene- and diamond-based nanostructures with proteins are of considerable interest for biologically driven manufacturing, biosensing and bioimaging. In this work, we identify a new set of carbon binding peptides that vary in overall hydrophobicity and charge, and engineer two of these sequences (Car9 and Car15) within the framework of various proteins to exploit their binding ability. In addition, we conducted a detailed analysis of the mechanisms that underpin the interaction of the fusion proteins with carbon and silicon surfaces. Through these insights, we were able to develop proteins suitable for dispersing graphene flakes and carbon nanotubes in aqueous solutions, while retaining protein activity. Additionally, our investigation into the mechanisms of adhesion for our carbon binding peptides inspired a cheap, disposable protein purification system that is more than 10x cheaper than commonly used His-tag protein purification. Our results emphasize the importance of understanding both bulk and molecular recognition events when exploiting the adhesive properties of solid-binding peptides and proteins in technological applications.

  3. Zeatin-binding proteins in barley leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highly labelled tritium-zeatin was used in the work to clarify for the first time a protein factor that is present in cytokinin-sensitive vegetative organs of plants (barley leaves) and which possesses the properties of a cytokinin receptor. Aliquots of tritium-zeatin were mixed with a solution of protein and incubated for several hours in buffer. Following incubation, protein was precipitated by ammonium sulfate at 90% of saturation, and radioactivity of the precipitate was checked in a dioxane scintillator with an efficiency of about 35%. It is shown that the characteristics of interaction of the clarified specific protein sites with cytokinins in regard to a number of criteria correspond to the characteristics expected of receptors of these phytohormones

  4. Zeatin-binding proteins in barley leaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanov, G.A.; Kulaeva, O.N.; Taryan, V.Y.

    1986-01-01

    Highly labelled tritium-zeatin was used in the work to clarify for the first time a protein factor that is present in cytokinin-sensitive vegetative organs of plants (barley leaves) and which possesses the properties of a cytokinin receptor. Aliquots of tritium-zeatin were mixed with a solution of protein and incubated for several hours in buffer. Following incubation, protein was precipitated by ammonium sulfate at 90% of saturation, and radioactivity of the precipitate was checked in a dioxane scintillator with an efficiency of about 35%. It is shown that the characteristics of interaction of the clarified specific protein sites with cytokinins in regard to a number of criteria correspond to the characteristics expected of receptors of these phytohormones.

  5. Relating the shape of protein binding sites to binding affinity profiles: is there an association?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bitter István

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various pattern-based methods exist that use in vitro or in silico affinity profiles for classification and functional examination of proteins. Nevertheless, the connection between the protein affinity profiles and the structural characteristics of the binding sites is still unclear. Our aim was to investigate the association between virtual drug screening results (calculated binding free energy values and the geometry of protein binding sites. Molecular Affinity Fingerprints (MAFs were determined for 154 proteins based on their molecular docking energy results for 1,255 FDA-approved drugs. Protein binding site geometries were characterized by 420 PocketPicker descriptors. The basic underlying component structure of MAFs and binding site geometries, respectively, were examined by principal component analysis; association between principal components extracted from these two sets of variables was then investigated by canonical correlation and redundancy analyses. Results PCA analysis of the MAF variables provided 30 factors which explained 71.4% of the total variance of the energy values while 13 factors were obtained from the PocketPicker descriptors which cumulatively explained 94.1% of the total variance. Canonical correlation analysis resulted in 3 statistically significant canonical factor pairs with correlation values of 0.87, 0.84 and 0.77, respectively. Redundancy analysis indicated that PocketPicker descriptor factors explain 6.9% of the variance of the MAF factor set while MAF factors explain 15.9% of the total variance of PocketPicker descriptor factors. Based on the salient structures of the factor pairs, we identified a clear-cut association between the shape and bulkiness of the drug molecules and the protein binding site descriptors. Conclusions This is the first study to investigate complex multivariate associations between affinity profiles and the geometric properties of protein binding sites. We found that

  6. Theoretical studies of binding of mannose-binding protein to monosaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aida-Hyugaji, Sachiko; Takano, Keiko; Takada, Toshikazu; Hosoya, Haruo; Kojima, Naoya; Mizuochi, Tsuguo; Inoue, Yasushi

    2004-11-01

    Binding properties of mannose-binding protein (MBP) to monosaccharides are discussed based on ab initio molecular orbital calculations for cluster models constructed. The calculated binding energies indicate that MBP has an affinity for N-acetyl- D-glucosamine, D-mannose, L-fucose, and D-glucose rather than D-galactose and N-acetyl- D-galactosamine, which is consistent with the biochemical experimental results. Electrostatic potential surfaces at the binding site of four monosaccharides having binding properties matched well with that of MBP. A vacant frontier orbital was found to be localized around the binding site of MBP, suggesting that MBP-monosaccharide interaction may occur through electrostatic and orbital interactions.

  7. Heterotrimeric G protein participated in modulation of cytoplasmic calcium concentration in pollen cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG Zhonglin; MA Ligeng; WANG Xuechen; SUN Daye

    2003-01-01

    Cytoplasmic free calcium concentration([Ca2+]c) in pollen cells of Lilium daviddi is measured with confocal laser scanning microscopy to investigate the effect of heterotrimeric G protein (G protein) on [Ca2+]c and the possible signal transduction pathway of G protein triggering cellular calcium signal. After application, cholera toxin (CTX), an agonist of G protein, triggers a transient increase of [Ca2+]c in pollen cells, and evokes a spatial-temporal characteristic calcium dynamics; while pertussis toxin (PTX), a G protein antagonist, leads to the decrease of [Ca2+]c. Both L-type Ca2+ channel blocker verapamil and inhibitor of IP3 receptor heparin inhibit CTX-induced [Ca2+]c increase. The results show that G protein may play a role in the modulation of [Ca2+]c through enhancing the extracellular Ca2+ influx and releasing of Ca2+ from intracellular stores.

  8. Cholesterol-binding viral proteins in virus entry and morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Cornelia

    2010-01-01

    Up to now less than a handful of viral cholesterol-binding proteins have been characterized, in HIV, influenza virus and Semliki Forest virus. These are proteins with roles in virus entry or morphogenesis. In the case of the HIV fusion protein gp41 cholesterol binding is attributed to a cholesterol recognition consensus (CRAC) motif in a flexible domain of the ectodomain preceding the trans-membrane segment. This specific CRAC sequence mediates gp41 binding to a cholesterol affinity column. Mutations in this motif arrest virus fusion at the hemifusion stage and modify the ability of the isolated CRAC peptide to induce segregation of cholesterol in artificial membranes.Influenza A virus M2 protein co-purifies with cholesterol. Its proton translocation activity, responsible for virus uncoating, is not cholesterol-dependent, and the transmembrane channel appears too short for integral raft insertion. Cholesterol binding may be mediated by CRAC motifs in the flexible post-TM domain, which harbours three determinants of binding to membrane rafts. Mutation of the CRAC motif of the WSN strain attenuates virulence for mice. Its affinity to the raft-non-raft interface is predicted to target M2 protein to the periphery of lipid raft microdomains, the sites of virus assembly. Its influence on the morphology of budding virus implicates M2 as factor in virus fission at the raft boundary. Moreover, M2 is an essential factor in sorting the segmented genome into virus particles, indicating that M2 also has a role in priming the outgrowth of virus buds.SFV E1 protein is the first viral type-II fusion protein demonstrated to directly bind cholesterol when the fusion peptide loop locks into the target membrane. Cholesterol binding is modulated by another, proximal loop, which is also important during virus budding and as a host range determinant, as shown by mutational studies. PMID:20213541

  9. Kinetics of the inhibition of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II by pea protein-derived peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2005-11-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) catalyzes the phosphorylation of various cellular proteins and excessive activities have been implicated in the pathogenesis of various chronic diseases. We hypothesized that positively charged peptides can be produced through enzymatic hydrolysis of pea proteins; such peptides could then bind to negatively charged calmodulin (CaM) at a physiological pH level and inhibit CaMKII activity. Pea protein isolate was hydrolyzed with an alkaline protease (alcalase) and filtered through a 1000-mol wt cutoff membrane. The permeate, which contained low-molecular weight peptides, was used to isolate cationic peptides on an SP-Sepharose column by ion exchange chromatography. Separation of the permeate on the SP-Sepharose column yielded two fractions with net positive charges that were subsequently used for enzyme inhibition studies. Fraction I eluted earlier from the column and contained lower contents of lysine and arginine than Fraction II, which eluted later. Results show that both peptide fractions inhibited CaMKII activity mostly in a competitive manner, although kinetic data suggested that inhibition by Fraction II may be of the mixed type. Kinetic analysis (K(m) and K(i)) showed that affinity of peptides in Fraction II for CaM was more than that in Fraction I, which was directly correlated with the higher inhibitory properties of Fraction II against CaMKII. The results suggest that it may be possible to use pea protein-derived cationic peptides to modulate CaMKII activities. PMID:16111873

  10. Nicotine reward and affective nicotine withdrawal signs are attenuated in calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV knockout mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kia J Jackson

    Full Text Available The influx of Ca(2+ through calcium-permeable nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs leads to activation of various downstream processes that may be relevant to nicotine-mediated behaviors. The calcium activated protein, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV phosphorylates the downstream transcription factor cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB, which mediates nicotine responses; however the role of CaMKIV in nicotine dependence is unknown. Given the proposed role of CaMKIV in CREB activation, we hypothesized that CaMKIV might be a crucial molecular component in the development of nicotine dependence. Using male CaMKIV genetically modified mice, we found that nicotine reward is attenuated in CaMKIV knockout (-/- mice, but cocaine reward is enhanced in these mice. CaMKIV protein levels were also increased in the nucleus accumbens of C57Bl/6 mice after nicotine reward. In a nicotine withdrawal assessment, anxiety-related behavior, but not somatic signs or the hyperalgesia response are attenuated in CaMKIV -/- mice. To complement our animal studies, we also conducted a human genetic association analysis and found that variants in the CaMKIV gene are associated with a protective effect against nicotine dependence. Taken together, our results support an important role for CaMKIV in nicotine reward, and suggest that CaMKIV has opposing roles in nicotine and cocaine reward. Further, CaMKIV mediates affective, but not physical nicotine withdrawal signs, and has a protective effect against nicotine dependence in human genetic association studies. These findings further indicate the importance of calcium-dependent mechanisms in mediating behaviors associated with drugs of abuse.

  11. Detergent activation of the binding protein in the folate radioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A minor cow's whey protein associated with β-lactoglobulin is used as binding protein in the competitive radioassay for serum and erythrocyte folate. Seeking to optimize the assay, we tested the performance of binder solutions of increasing purity. The folate binding protein was isolated from cow's whey by means of CM-Sepharose CL-6B cation-exchange chromatography, and further purified on a methotrexate-AH-Sepharose 4B affinity matrix. In contrast to β-lactoglobulin, the purified protein did not bind folate unless the detergents cetyltrimethylammonium (10 mmol/Ll) or Triton X-100 (1 g/L) were present. Such detergent activation was not needed in the presence of serum. There seems to be a striking analogy between these phenomena and the well-known reactivation of certain purified membrane-derived enzymes by surfactants

  12. Drug Promiscuity in PDB: Protein Binding Site Similarity Is Key.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Joachim Haupt

    Full Text Available Drug repositioning applies established drugs to new disease indications with increasing success. A pre-requisite for drug repurposing is drug promiscuity (polypharmacology - a drug's ability to bind to several targets. There is a long standing debate on the reasons for drug promiscuity. Based on large compound screens, hydrophobicity and molecular weight have been suggested as key reasons. However, the results are sometimes contradictory and leave space for further analysis. Protein structures offer a structural dimension to explain promiscuity: Can a drug bind multiple targets because the drug is flexible or because the targets are structurally similar or even share similar binding sites? We present a systematic study of drug promiscuity based on structural data of PDB target proteins with a set of 164 promiscuous drugs. We show that there is no correlation between the degree of promiscuity and ligand properties such as hydrophobicity or molecular weight but a weak correlation to conformational flexibility. However, we do find a correlation between promiscuity and structural similarity as well as binding site similarity of protein targets. In particular, 71% of the drugs have at least two targets with similar binding sites. In order to overcome issues in detection of remotely similar binding sites, we employed a score for binding site similarity: LigandRMSD measures the similarity of the aligned ligands and uncovers remote local similarities in proteins. It can be applied to arbitrary structural binding site alignments. Three representative examples, namely the anti-cancer drug methotrexate, the natural product quercetin and the anti-diabetic drug acarbose are discussed in detail. Our findings suggest that global structural and binding site similarity play a more important role to explain the observed drug promiscuity in the PDB than physicochemical drug properties like hydrophobicity or molecular weight. Additionally, we find ligand

  13. Protein-protein binding affinities calculated using the LIE method

    OpenAIRE

    Andberg, Tor Arne Heim

    2011-01-01

    Absolute binding free energies for the third domain of the turkey ovomucoid inhibitor in complex with Streptomyces griseus proteinase B and porcine pancreatic elastase has been calculated using the linear interaction energy method.

  14. The Role Stress Granules and RNA Binding Proteins in Neurodegeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Vanderweyde, Tara; Youmans, Katie; Liu-Yesucevitz, Liqun; Wolozin, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    The eukaryotic stress response involves translational suppression of non-housekeeping proteins and the sequestration of unnecessary mRNA transcripts into stress granules (SGs). This process is dependent on mRNA binding proteins (RBPs) that interact with capped mRNA transcripts through RNA recognition motifs, and exhibit reversible aggregation through hydrophobic poly-glycine domains, some of which are homologous to yeast prion proteins. The activity and aggregation of RBPs appears to be impor...

  15. Pentatricopeptide repeats: Modular blocks for building RNA-binding proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Filipovska, Aleksandra; Rackham, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins control diverse aspects of RNA metabolism across the eukaryotic domain. Recent computational and structural studies have provided new insights into how they recognize RNA, and show that the recognition is sequence-specific and modular. The modular code for RNA-binding by PPR proteins holds great promise for the engineering of new tools to target RNA and identifying RNAs bound by natural PPR proteins.

  16. The Actin Filament-Binding Protein Coronin Regulates Motility in Plasmodium Sporozoites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bane, Kartik S.; Singer, Mirko; Reinig, Miriam; Klug, Dennis; Heiss, Kirsten; Baum, Jake; Mueller, Ann-Kristin; Frischknecht, Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    Parasites causing malaria need to migrate in order to penetrate tissue barriers and enter host cells. Here we show that the actin filament-binding protein coronin regulates gliding motility in Plasmodium berghei sporozoites, the highly motile forms of a rodent malaria-causing parasite transmitted by mosquitoes. Parasites lacking coronin show motility defects that impair colonization of the mosquito salivary glands but not migration in the skin, yet result in decreased transmission efficiency. In non-motile sporozoites low calcium concentrations mediate actin-independent coronin localization to the periphery. Engagement of extracellular ligands triggers an intracellular calcium release followed by the actin-dependent relocalization of coronin to the rear and initiation of motility. Mutational analysis and imaging suggest that coronin organizes actin filaments for productive motility. Using coronin-mCherry as a marker for the presence of actin filaments we found that protein kinase A contributes to actin filament disassembly. We finally speculate that calcium and cAMP-mediated signaling regulate a switch from rapid parasite motility to host cell invasion by differentially influencing actin dynamics. PMID:27409081

  17. Neuron class-specific requirements for Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein in critical period development of calcium signaling in learning and memory circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Caleb A; Broadie, Kendal

    2016-05-01

    Neural circuit optimization occurs through sensory activity-dependent mechanisms that refine synaptic connectivity and information processing during early-use developmental critical periods. Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP), the gene product lost in Fragile X syndrome (FXS), acts as an activity sensor during critical period development, both as an RNA-binding translation regulator and channel-binding excitability regulator. Here, we employ a Drosophila FXS disease model to assay calcium signaling dynamics with a targeted transgenic GCaMP reporter during critical period development of the mushroom body (MB) learning/memory circuit. We find FMRP regulates depolarization-induced calcium signaling in a neuron-specific manner within this circuit, suppressing activity-dependent calcium transients in excitatory cholinergic MB input projection neurons and enhancing calcium signals in inhibitory GABAergic MB output neurons. Both changes are restricted to the developmental critical period and rectified at maturity. Importantly, conditional genetic (dfmr1) rescue of null mutants during the critical period corrects calcium signaling defects in both neuron classes, indicating a temporally restricted FMRP requirement. Likewise, conditional dfmr1 knockdown (RNAi) during the critical period replicates constitutive null mutant defects in both neuron classes, confirming cell-autonomous requirements for FMRP in developmental regulation of calcium signaling dynamics. Optogenetic stimulation during the critical period enhances depolarization-induced calcium signaling in both neuron classes, but this developmental change is eliminated in dfmr1 null mutants, indicating the activity-dependent regulation requires FMRP. These results show FMRP shapes neuron class-specific calcium signaling in excitatory vs. inhibitory neurons in developing learning/memory circuitry, and that FMRP mediates activity-dependent regulation of calcium signaling specifically during the early

  18. Binding and aggregation of pro-atrial natriuretic factor by calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, G; Doubell, A F

    1992-04-01

    Analysis of atrial secretory granule content by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis followed by a 45Ca2+ overlay assay indicates that a 17,000 protein binds 45Ca2+. This protein, which can be immunostained by atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) antiserum, corresponds to proANF. Ca2+ binding is proportional to the amount of proANF and pH dependent. Generation of ANF-(1-98) by thrombin digestion of proANF does not affect Ca2+ binding. Blocking the carboxyl groups of proANF and the use of NH2-terminal fragments bearing those carboxyl groups demonstrated that the Ca(2+)-interaction site is probably located within the highly acidic portion (11-30) of the propeptide. Ca2+ binding to proANF induces its aggregation that can be verified by sedimentation. ProANF aggregation is Ca2+ dependent, being optimal at 10 mM, partially pH dependent, and greatly increased by high concentrations of proANF. However, because of its relatively low-binding affinity, Ca2+ can be substituted by other divalent cations such as Sr2+, Ba2+, or Mg2+. The high level of Ca2+ in atrial secretory granules and the aggregation of proANF in the presence of Ca2+ suggest a possible involvement of these physicochemical properties in the condensed state of the matrix of secretory granules. Indeed, detergent solubilization of the membrane of the secretory granules in presence of Ca2+ resulted only in a partial dissolution of the dense core matrix. We therefore postulate that, in the Golgi complex, proANF and Ca2+ associate to form a condensed aggregate that helps package secretory material into secretory vesicles. PMID:1533094

  19. Profiling Protein Kinases and Other ATP Binding Proteins in Arabidopsis Using Acyl-ATP Probes*

    OpenAIRE

    Villamor, J. G.; Kaschani, F.; Colby, T; Oeljeklaus, J.; Zhao, D; Kaiser, M.; Patricelli, M. P.; R. A. L. van der Hoorn

    2013-01-01

    Many protein activities are driven by ATP binding and hydrolysis. Here, we explore the ATP binding proteome of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana using acyl-ATP (AcATP)1 probes. These probes target ATP binding sites and covalently label lysine residues in the ATP binding pocket. Gel-based profiling using biotinylated AcATP showed that labeling is dependent on pH and divalent ions and can be competed by nucleotides. The vast majority of these AcATP-labeled proteins are known ATP binding prot...

  20. Natural history of S-adenosylmethionine-binding proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mushegian Arcady R

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background S-adenosylmethionine is a source of diverse chemical groups used in biosynthesis and modification of virtually every class of biomolecules. The most notable reaction requiring S-adenosylmethionine, transfer of methyl group, is performed by a large class of enzymes, S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferases, which have been the focus of considerable structure-function studies. Evolutionary trajectories of these enzymes, and especially of other classes of S-adenosylmethionine-binding proteins, nevertheless, remain poorly understood. We addressed this issue by computational comparison of sequences and structures of various S-adenosylmethionine-binding proteins. Results Two widespread folds, Rossmann fold and TIM barrel, have been repeatedly used in evolution for diverse types of S-adenosylmethionine conversion. There were also cases of recruitment of other relatively common folds for S-adenosylmethionine binding. Several classes of proteins have unique unrelated folds, specialized for just one type of chemistry and unified by the theme of internal domain duplications. In several cases, functional divergence is evident, when evolutionarily related enzymes have changed the mode of binding and the type of chemical transformation of S-adenosylmethionine. There are also instances of functional convergence, when biochemically similar processes are performed by drastically different classes of S-adenosylmethionine-binding proteins. Comparison of remote sequence similarities and analysis of phyletic patterns suggests that the last universal common ancestor of cellular life had between 10 and 20 S-adenosylmethionine-binding proteins from at least 5 fold classes, providing for S-adenosylmethionine formation, polyamine biosynthesis, and methylation of several substrates, including nucleic acids and peptide chain release factor. Conclusion We have observed several novel relationships between families that were not known to be

  1. Plasma membrane calcium ATPase proteins as novel regulators of signal transduction pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mary; Louisa; Holton; Michael; Emerson; Ludwig; Neyses; Angel; L; Armesilla

    2010-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that plasma membrane calcium ATPases (PMCAs) play a key role as regulators of calcium-triggered signal transduction pathways via interaction with partner proteins. PMCAs regulate these pathways by targeting specific proteins to cellular sub-domains where the levels of intracellular freecalcium are kept low by the calcium ejection properties of PMCAs. According to this model, PMCAs have been shown to interact functionally with the calcium-sensitive proteins neuronal nitric oxide synthase, calmodulindependent serine protein kinase, calcineurin and endothelial nitric oxidase synthase. Transgenic animals with altered expression of PMCAs are being used to evaluate the physiological significance of these interactions. To date, PMCA interactions with calcium-dependent partner proteins have been demonstrated to play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system via regulation of the nitric oxide and calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells pathways. This new evidence suggests that PMCAs play a more sophisticated role than the mere ejection of calcium from the cells, by acting as modulators of signaling transduction pathways.

  2. Hunting Increases Phosphorylation of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type II in Adult Barn Owls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant S. Nichols

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile barn owls readily adapt to prismatic spectacles, whereas adult owls living under standard aviary conditions do not. We previously demonstrated that phosphorylation of the cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB provides a readout of the instructive signals that guide plasticity in juveniles. Here we investigated phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (pCaMKII in both juveniles and adults. In contrast to CREB, we found no differences in pCaMKII expression between prism-wearing and control juveniles within the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX, the major site of plasticity. For prism-wearing adults that hunted live mice and are capable of adaptation, expression of pCaMKII was increased relative to prism-wearing adults that fed passively on dead mice and are not capable of adaptation. This effect did not bear the hallmarks of instructive information: it was not localized to rostral ICX and did not exhibit a patchy distribution reflecting discrete bimodal stimuli. These data are consistent with a role for CaMKII as a permissive rather than an instructive factor. In addition, the paucity of pCaMKII expression in passively fed adults suggests that the permissive default setting is “off” in adults.

  3. Quantitative analysis of EGR proteins binding to DNA: assessing additivity in both the binding site and the protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stormo Gary D

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recognition codes for protein-DNA interactions typically assume that the interacting positions contribute additively to the binding energy. While this is known to not be precisely true, an additive model over the DNA positions can be a good approximation, at least for some proteins. Much less information is available about whether the protein positions contribute additively to the interaction. Results Using EGR zinc finger proteins, we measure the binding affinity of six different variants of the protein to each of six different variants of the consensus binding site. Both the protein and binding site variants include single and double mutations that allow us to assess how well additive models can account for the data. For each protein and DNA alone we find that additive models are good approximations, but over the combined set of data there are context effects that limit their accuracy. However, a small modification to the purely additive model, with only three additional parameters, improves the fit significantly. Conclusion The additive model holds very well for every DNA site and every protein included in this study, but clear context dependence in the interactions was detected. A simple modification to the independent model provides a better fit to the complete data.

  4. A Genetic Screen Identifies Putative Targets and Binding Partners of CREB-Binding Protein in the Developing Drosophila Eye

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Jason; Bhandari, Rohan; Kumar, Justin P.

    2005-01-01

    Drosophila CREB-binding protein (dCBP) is a very large multidomain protein, which belongs to the CBP/p300 family of proteins that were first identified by their ability to bind the CREB transcription factor and the adenoviral protein E1. Since then CBP has been shown to bind to >100 additional proteins and functions in a multitude of different developmental contexts. Among other activities, CBP is known to influence development by remodeling chromatin, by serving as a transcriptional coactiva...

  5. Tetrapyrrole binding affinity of the murine and human p22HBP heme-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micaelo, Nuno M; Macedo, Anjos L; Goodfellow, Brian J; Félix, Vítor

    2010-11-01

    We present the first systematic molecular modeling study of the binding properties of murine (mHBP) and human (hHBP) p22HBP protein (heme-binding protein) with four tetrapyrrole ring systems belonging to the heme biosynthetic pathway: iron protoporphyrin IX (HEMIN), protoporphyrin IX (PPIX), coproporphyrin III (CPIII), coproporphyrin I (CPI). The relative binding affinities predicted by our computational study were found to be similar to those observed experimentally, providing a first rational structural analysis of the molecular recognition mechanism, by p22HBP, toward a number of different tetrapyrrole ligands. To probe the structure of these p22HBP protein complexes, docking, molecular dynamics and MM-PBSA methodologies supported by experimental NMR ring current shift data have been employed. The tetrapyrroles studied were found to bind murine p22HBP with the following binding affinity order: HEMIN> PPIX> CPIII> CPI, which ranged from -22.2 to -6.1 kcal/mol. In general, the protein-tetrapyrrole complexes are stabilized by non-bonded interactions between the tetrapyrrole propionate groups and basic residues of the protein, and by the preferential solvation of the complex compared to the unbound components. PMID:20800521

  6. Peeping into human renal calcium oxalate stone matrix: characterization of novel proteins involved in the intricate mechanism of urolithiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanu Priya Aggarwal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The increasing number of patients suffering from urolithiasis represents one of the major challenges which nephrologists face worldwide today. For enhancing therapeutic outcomes of this disease, the pathogenic basis for the formation of renal stones is the need of hour. Proteins are found as major component in human renal stone matrix and are considered to have a potential role in crystal-membrane interaction, crystal growth and stone formation but their role in urolithiasis still remains obscure. METHODS: Proteins were isolated from the matrix of human CaOx containing kidney stones. Proteins having MW>3 kDa were subjected to anion exchange chromatography followed by molecular-sieve chromatography. The effect of these purified proteins was tested against CaOx nucleation and growth and on oxalate injured Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK renal epithelial cells for their activity. Proteins were identified by Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF MS followed by database search with MASCOT server. In silico molecular interaction studies with CaOx crystals were also investigated. RESULTS: Five proteins were identified from the matrix of calcium oxalate kidney stones by MALDI-TOF MS followed by database search with MASCOT server with the competence to control the stone formation process. Out of which two proteins were promoters, two were inhibitors and one protein had a dual activity of both inhibition and promotion towards CaOx nucleation and growth. Further molecular modelling calculations revealed the mode of interaction of these proteins with CaOx at the molecular level. CONCLUSIONS: We identified and characterized Ethanolamine-phosphate cytidylyltransferase, Ras GTPase-activating-like protein, UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase 2, RIMS-binding protein 3A, Macrophage-capping protein as novel proteins from the matrix of human calcium oxalate stone which play a critical role in kidney stone

  7. Randomized crossover study comparing the phosphate-binding efficacy of calcium ketoglutarate versus calcium carbonate in patients on chronic hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro, S; Rasmussen, R A; Handberg, J;

    1998-01-01

    , diarrhea, general uneasiness), whereas the remaining 12 patients did not experience any side effects at all. The five patients with calcium ketoglutarate intolerance all had pre-existing gastrointestinal symptoms; four of them had received treatment with cimetidine or omeprazol before inclusion into the...

  8. Predicting the binding patterns of hub proteins: a study using yeast protein interaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carson M Andorf

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein-protein interactions are critical to elucidating the role played by individual proteins in important biological pathways. Of particular interest are hub proteins that can interact with large numbers of partners and often play essential roles in cellular control. Depending on the number of binding sites, protein hubs can be classified at a structural level as singlish-interface hubs (SIH with one or two binding sites, or multiple-interface hubs (MIH with three or more binding sites. In terms of kinetics, hub proteins can be classified as date hubs (i.e., interact with different partners at different times or locations or party hubs (i.e., simultaneously interact with multiple partners. METHODOLOGY: Our approach works in 3 phases: Phase I classifies if a protein is likely to bind with another protein. Phase II determines if a protein-binding (PB protein is a hub. Phase III classifies PB proteins as singlish-interface versus multiple-interface hubs and date versus party hubs. At each stage, we use sequence-based predictors trained using several standard machine learning techniques. CONCLUSIONS: Our method is able to predict whether a protein is a protein-binding protein with an accuracy of 94% and a correlation coefficient of 0.87; identify hubs from non-hubs with 100% accuracy for 30% of the data; distinguish date hubs/party hubs with 69% accuracy and area under ROC curve of 0.68; and SIH/MIH with 89% accuracy and area under ROC curve of 0.84. Because our method is based on sequence information alone, it can be used even in settings where reliable protein-protein interaction data or structures of protein-protein complexes are unavailable to obtain useful insights into the functional and evolutionary characteristics of proteins and their interactions. AVAILABILITY: We provide a web server for our three-phase approach: http://hybsvm.gdcb.iastate.edu.

  9. A calcium sensor – protein kinase signaling module diversified in plants and is retained in all lineages of Bikonta species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Linda; Edel, Kai H.; Batistič, Oliver; Kudla, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) signaling is a universal mechanism of signal transduction and involves Ca2+ signal formation and decoding of information by Ca2+ binding proteins. Calcineurin B-like proteins (CBLs), which upon Ca2+ binding activate CBL-interacting protein kinases (CIPKs) regulate a multitude of physiological processes in plants. Here, we combine phylogenomics and functional analyses to investigate the occurrence and structural conservation of CBL and CIPK proteins in 26 species representing all major clades of eukaryotes. We demonstrate the presence of at least singular CBL-CIPK pairs in representatives of Archaeplastida, Chromalveolates and Excavates and their general absence in Opisthokonta and Amoebozoa. This denotes CBL-CIPK complexes as evolutionary ancient Ca2+ signaling modules that likely evolved in the ancestor of all Bikonta. Furthermore, we functionally characterize the CBLs and CIPK from the parabasalid human pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis. Our results reveal strict evolutionary conservation of functionally important structural features, preservation of biochemical properties and a remarkable cross-kingdom protein-protein interaction potential between CBLs and CIPKs from Arabidopsis thaliana and T. vaginalis. Together our findings suggest an ancient evolutionary origin of a functional CBL-CIPK signaling module close to the root of eukaryotic evolution and provide insights into the initial evolution of signaling networks and Ca2+ signaling specificity. PMID:27538881

  10. A calcium sensor - protein kinase signaling module diversified in plants and is retained in all lineages of Bikonta species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Linda; Edel, Kai H; Batistič, Oliver; Kudla, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling is a universal mechanism of signal transduction and involves Ca(2+) signal formation and decoding of information by Ca(2+) binding proteins. Calcineurin B-like proteins (CBLs), which upon Ca(2+) binding activate CBL-interacting protein kinases (CIPKs) regulate a multitude of physiological processes in plants. Here, we combine phylogenomics and functional analyses to investigate the occurrence and structural conservation of CBL and CIPK proteins in 26 species representing all major clades of eukaryotes. We demonstrate the presence of at least singular CBL-CIPK pairs in representatives of Archaeplastida, Chromalveolates and Excavates and their general absence in Opisthokonta and Amoebozoa. This denotes CBL-CIPK complexes as evolutionary ancient Ca(2+) signaling modules that likely evolved in the ancestor of all Bikonta. Furthermore, we functionally characterize the CBLs and CIPK from the parabasalid human pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis. Our results reveal strict evolutionary conservation of functionally important structural features, preservation of biochemical properties and a remarkable cross-kingdom protein-protein interaction potential between CBLs and CIPKs from Arabidopsis thaliana and T. vaginalis. Together our findings suggest an ancient evolutionary origin of a functional CBL-CIPK signaling module close to the root of eukaryotic evolution and provide insights into the initial evolution of signaling networks and Ca(2+) signaling specificity. PMID:27538881

  11. Virulent Diuraphis noxia Aphids Over-Express Calcium Signaling Proteins to Overcome Defenses of Aphid-Resistant Wheat Plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak K Sinha

    Full Text Available The Russian wheat aphid, Diuraphis noxia, an invasive phytotoxic pest of wheat, Triticum aestivum, and barley, Hordeum vulgare, causes huge economic losses in Africa, South America, and North America. Most acceptable and ecologically beneficial aphid management strategies include selection and breeding of D. noxia-resistant varieties, and numerous D. noxia resistance genes have been identified in T. aestivum and H. vulgare. North American D. noxia biotype 1 is avirulent to T. aestivum varieties possessing Dn4 or Dn7 genes, while biotype 2 is virulent to Dn4 and avirulent to Dn7. The current investigation utilized next-generation RNAseq technology to reveal that biotype 2 over expresses proteins involved in calcium signaling, which activates phosphoinositide (PI metabolism. Calcium signaling proteins comprised 36% of all transcripts identified in the two D. noxia biotypes. Depending on plant resistance gene-aphid biotype interaction, additional transcript groups included those involved in tissue growth; defense and stress response; zinc ion and related cofactor binding; and apoptosis. Activation of enzymes involved in PI metabolism by D. noxia biotype 2 aphids allows depletion of plant calcium that normally blocks aphid feeding sites in phloem sieve elements and enables successful, continuous feeding on plants resistant to avirulent biotype 1. Inhibition of the key enzyme phospholipase C significantly reduced biotype 2 salivation into phloem and phloem sap ingestion.

  12. Calcium mobilization from fish scales is mediated by parathyroid hormone related protein via the parathyroid hormone type 1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotllant, J; Redruello, B; Guerreiro, P M; Fernandes, H; Canario, A V M; Power, D M

    2005-12-15

    The scales of bony fish represent a significant reservoir of calcium but little is known about their contribution, as well as of bone, to calcium balance and how calcium deposition and mobilization are regulated in calcified tissues. In the present study we report the action of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) on calcium mobilization from sea bream (Sparus auratus) scales in an in vitro bioassay. Ligand binding studies of piscine 125I-(1-35(tyr))PTHrP to the membrane fraction of isolated sea bream scales revealed the existence of a single PTH receptor (PTHR) type. RT-PCR of fish scale cDNA using specific primers for two receptor types found in teleosts, PTH1R, and PTH3R, showed expression only of PTH1R. The signalling mechanisms mediating binding of the N-terminal amino acid region of PTHrP were investigated. A synthetic peptide (10(-8) M) based on the N-terminal 1-34 amino acid residues of Fugu rubripes PTHrP strongly stimulated cAMP synthesis and [3H]myo-inositol incorporation in sea bream scales. However, peptides (10(-8) M) with N-terminal deletions, such as (2-34), (3-34) and (7-34)PTHrP, were defective in stimulating cAMP production but stimulated [3H]myo-inositol incorporation. (1-34)PTHrP induced significant osteoclastic activity in scale tissue as indicated by its stimulation of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase. In contrast, (7-34)PTHrP failed to stimulate the activity of this enzyme. This activity could also be abolished by the adenylyl cyclase inhibitor SQ-22536, but not by the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122. The results of the study indicate that one mechanism through which N-terminal (1-34)PTHrP stimulates osteoclastic activity of sea bream scales, is through PTH1R and via the cAMP/AC intracellular signalling pathway. It appears, therefore, that fish scales can act as calcium stores and that (1-34)PTHrP regulates calcium mobilization from them; it remains to be established if this mechanism contributes to calcium homeostasis in vivo

  13. Characterization of adenosine binding proteins in human placental membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have characterized two adenosine binding proteins in human placenta. In membranes, one site is detected with [3H] -N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine ([3H]NECA). This site is similar to the adenosine A2 receptor. We call this site the adenosine A2-like binding site. In detergent extracts, the second site is detected and has the characteristics of an adenosine A1 receptor. The soluble adenosine A2-like binding site cannot be detected without a rapid assay. Binding to the adenosine A1 receptor with [3H]-2-chloroadenosine and [3H]NECA is time dependent, saturable, and reversible. Equilibrium displacement analysis with adenosine agonists reveals an A1 specificity: 2-chloroadenosine > R-phenylisopropyladenosine > 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine. The antagonist potency order is 1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine > isobutylmethylxanthine > theophylline. Competition analysis of membranes with the A,-selective ligands [3H]-cyclohexyladenosine [3H] cylopentylxanthine revealed adenosine A1 agonist and antagonist potency orders. We have purified the adenosine A2-like binding site. The adenosine A2-like binding site is an ubiquitous major cellular protein. It is glycosylated, highly asymmetric, and acidic. The native protein is an homodimer with a subunit molecular mass of 98 kDa. The sedimentation coefficient and partial specific volume of the binding complex are 6.9 s and 0.698 ml/g, respectively. The Stokes' radius is 70 Angstrom. The native molecular mass of the detergent-protein complex is 230 kDa. The adenosine A2-like binding site has an agonist potency order of 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine > 2-chloroadenosine >> R-phenylisopropyladenosine and an antagonist potency order of isobutylmethylxanthine > theophylline >> 1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine

  14. Characterization of adenosine binding proteins in human placental membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchison, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    We have characterized two adenosine binding proteins in human placenta. In membranes, one site is detected with ({sup 3}H) -N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (({sup 3}H)NECA). This site is similar to the adenosine A{sub 2} receptor. We call this site the adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site. In detergent extracts, the second site is detected and has the characteristics of an adenosine A{sub 1} receptor. The soluble adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site cannot be detected without a rapid assay. Binding to the adenosine A{sub 1} receptor with ({sup 3}H)-2-chloroadenosine and ({sup 3}H)NECA is time dependent, saturable, and reversible. Equilibrium displacement analysis with adenosine agonists reveals an A{sub 1} specificity: 2-chloroadenosine > R-phenylisopropyladenosine > 5{prime}-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine. The antagonist potency order is 1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine > isobutylmethylxanthine > theophylline. Competition analysis of membranes with the A,-selective ligands ({sup 3}H)-cyclohexyladenosine ({sup 3}H) cylopentylxanthine revealed adenosine A{sub 1} agonist and antagonist potency orders. We have purified the adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site. The adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site is an ubiquitous major cellular protein. It is glycosylated, highly asymmetric, and acidic. The native protein is an homodimer with a subunit molecular mass of 98 kDa. The sedimentation coefficient and partial specific volume of the binding complex are 6.9 s and 0.698 ml/g, respectively. The Stokes' radius is 70 {Angstrom}. The native molecular mass of the detergent-protein complex is 230 kDa. The adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site has an agonist potency order of 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine > 2-chloroadenosine >> R-phenylisopropyladenosine and an antagonist potency order of isobutylmethylxanthine > theophylline >> 1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine.

  15. Identification of albumin-binding proteins in capillary endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    Isolated fat tissue microvessels and lung, whose capillary endothelia express in situ specific binding sites for albumin, were homogenized and subjected to SDS-gel electrophoresis and electroblotting. The nitrocellulose strips were incubated with either albumin-gold (Alb-Au) and directly visualized, or with [125I]albumin (monomeric or polymeric) and autoradiographed. The extracts of both microvascular endothelium and the lung express albumin-binding proteins (ABPs) represented by two pairs of...

  16. Yeast TATA-binding protein TFIID binds to TATA elements with both consensus and nonconsensus DNA sequences.

    OpenAIRE

    S. Hahn; Buratowski, S.; Sharp, P A; Guarente, L

    1989-01-01

    The DNA binding properties of the yeast TATA element-binding protein TFIID were investigated. The affinity (apparent equilibrium dissociation constant) of TFIID for the adenovirus major late promoter consensus TATA element is 2 x 10(-9) M, a value similar to the affinity of gene-specific regulatory proteins for their binding sites. TFIID binding is highly specific and recognizes nonspecific sites with approximately 10(5)-fold lower affinity. Despite this specificity, TFIID also binds with hig...

  17. Differential plasma protein binding to metal oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoparticles rapidly interact with the proteins present in biological fluids, such as blood. The proteins that are adsorbed onto the surface potentially dictate the biokinetics of the nanomaterials and their fate in vivo. Using nanoparticles with different sizes and surface characteristics, studies have reported the effects of physicochemical properties on the composition of adsorbed plasma proteins. However, to date, few studies have been conducted focusing on the nanoparticles that are commonly exposed to the general public, such as the metal oxides. Using previously established ultracentrifugation approaches, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, the current study investigated the binding of human plasma proteins to commercially available titanium dioxide, silicon dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles. We found that, despite these particles having similar surface charges in buffer, they bound different plasma proteins. For TiO2, the shape of the nanoparticles was also an important determinant of protein binding. Agglomeration in water was observed for all of the nanoparticles and both TiO2 and ZnO further agglomerated in biological media. This led to an increase in the amount and number of different proteins bound to these nanoparticles. Proteins with important biological functions were identified, including immunoglobulins, lipoproteins, acute-phase proteins and proteins involved in complement pathways and coagulation. These results provide important insights into which human plasma proteins bind to particular metal oxide nanoparticles. Because protein absorption to nanoparticles may determine their interaction with cells and tissues in vivo, understanding how and why plasma proteins are adsorbed to these particles may be important for understanding their biological responses.

  18. The liver fatty acid binding protein--comparison of cavity properties of intracellular lipid-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J; Ory, J; Reese-Wagoner, A; Banaszak, L

    1999-02-01

    The crystal and solution structures of all of the intracellular lipid binding proteins (iLBPs) reveal a common beta-barrel framework with only small local perturbations. All existing evidence points to the binding cavity and a poorly delimited 'portal' region as defining the function of each family member. The importance of local structure within the cavity appears to be its influence on binding affinity and specificity for the lipid. The portal region appears to be involved in the regulation of ligand exchange. Within the iLBP family, liver fatty acid binding protein or LFABP, has the unique property of binding two fatty acids within its internalized binding cavity rather than the commonly observed stoichiometry of one. Furthermore, LFABP will bind hydrophobic molecules larger than the ligands which will associate with other iLBPs. The crystal structure of LFABP contains two bound oleate molecules and provides the explanation for its unusual stoichiometry. One of the bound fatty acids is completely internalized and has its carboxylate interacting with an arginine and two serines. The second oleate represents an entirely new binding mode with the carboxylate on the surface of LFABP. The two oleates also interact with each other. Because of this interaction and its inner location, it appears the first oleate must be present before the second more external molecule is bound. PMID:10331654

  19. Binding dynamics of single-stranded DNA binding proteins to fluctuating bubbles in breathing DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the dynamics of a single local denaturation zone in a DNA molecule, a so-called DNA bubble, in the presence of single-stranded DNA binding proteins (SSBs). In particular, we develop a dynamical description of the process in terms of a two-dimensional master equation for the time evolution of the probability distribution of having a bubble of size m with n bound SSBs, for the case when m and n are the slowest variables in the system. We derive explicit expressions for the equilibrium statistical weights for a given m and n, which depend on the statistical weight u associated with breaking a base-pair interaction, the loop closure exponent c, the cooperativity parameter σ0, the SSB size λ, and binding strength κ. These statistical weights determine, through the detailed balance condition, the transfer coefficient in the master equation. For the case of slow and fast binding dynamics the problem can be reduced to one-dimensional master equations. In the latter case, we perform explicitly the adiabatic elimination of the fast variable n. Furthermore, we find that for the case that the loop closure is neglected and the binding dynamics is vanishing (but with arbitrary σ0) the eigenvalues and the eigenvectors of the master equation can be obtained analytically, using an orthogonal polynomial approach. We solve the general case numerically (i.e., including SSB binding and the loop closure) as a function of statistical weight u, binding protein size λ, and binding strength κ, and compare to the fast and slow binding limits. In particular, we find that the presence of SSBs in general increases the relaxation time, compared to the case when no binding proteins are present. By tuning the parameters, we can drive the system from regular bubble fluctuation in the absence of SSBs to full denaturation, reflecting experimental and in vivo situations

  20. Differentiation inducing factor-1 (DIF-1) induces gene and protein expression of the Dictyostelium nuclear calmodulin-binding protein nucleomorphin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, Danton H; Poloz, Yekaterina; Myre, Michael A

    2009-02-01

    The nucleomorphin gene numA1 from Dictyostelium codes for a multi-domain, calmodulin binding protein that regulates nuclear number. To gain insight into the regulation of numA, we assessed the effects of the stalk cell differentiation inducing factor-1 (DIF-1), an extracellular signalling molecule, on the expression of numA1 RNA and protein. For comparison, the extracellular signalling molecules cAMP (mediates chemotaxis, prestalk and prespore differentiation) and ammonia (NH(3)/NH(4)(+); antagonizes DIF) were also studied. Starvation, which is a signal for multicellular development, results in a greater than 80% decrease in numA1 mRNA expression within 4 h. Treatment with ammonium chloride led to a greater than 90% inhibition of numA1 RNA expression within 2 h. In contrast, the addition of DIF-1 completely blocked the decrease in numA1 gene expression caused by starvation. Treatment of vegetative cells with cAMP led to decreases in numA1 RNA expression that were equivalent to those seen with starvation. Western blotting after various morphogen treatments showed that the maintenance of vegetative levels of numA1 RNA by DIF-1 in starved cells was reflected in significantly increased numA1 protein levels. Treatment with cAMP and/or ammonia led to decreased protein expression and each of these morphogens suppressed the stimulatory effects of DIF-1. Protein expression levels of CBP4a, a calcium-dependent binding partner of numA1, were regulated in the same manner as numA1 suggesting this potential co-regulation may be related to their functional relationship. NumA1 is the first calmodulin binding protein shown to be regulated by developmental morphogens in Dictyostelium being upregulated by DIF-1 and down-regulated by cAMP and ammonia. PMID:19000924

  1. Holo- And Apo- Structures of Bacterial Periplasmic Heme Binding Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, W.W.; Li, H.; Eakanunkul, S.; Tong, Y.; Wilks, A.; Guo, M.; Poulos, T.L.

    2009-06-01

    An essential component of heme transport in Gram-negative bacterial pathogens is the periplasmic protein that shuttles heme between outer and inner membranes. We have solved the first crystal structures of two such proteins, ShuT from Shigella dysenteriae and PhuT from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both share a common architecture typical of Class III periplasmic binding proteins. The heme binds in a narrow cleft between the N- and C-terminal binding domains and is coordinated by a Tyr residue. A comparison of the heme-free (apo) and -bound (holo) structures indicates little change in structure other than minor alterations in the heme pocket and movement of the Tyr heme ligand from an 'in' position where it can coordinate the heme iron to an 'out' orientation where it points away from the heme pocket. The detailed architecture of the heme pocket is quite different in ShuT and PhuT. Although Arg{sup 228} in PhuT H-bonds with a heme propionate, in ShuT a peptide loop partially takes up the space occupied by Arg{sup 228}, and there is no Lys or Arg H-bonding with the heme propionates. A comparison of PhuT/ShuT with the vitamin B{sub 12}-binding protein BtuF and the hydroxamic-type siderophore-binding protein FhuD, the only two other structurally characterized Class III periplasmic binding proteins, demonstrates that PhuT/ShuT more closely resembles BtuF, which reflects the closer similarity in ligands, heme and B{sub 12}, compared with ligands for FhuD, a peptide siderophore.

  2. Cloning of a Calcium Binding Protein Gene from Citrus sinensis and Construction of Sense and Antisense Expression Vectors%柑桔钙离子结合蛋白基因克隆及植物表达载体构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贝学军; 钟广炎

    2012-01-01

    以伏令夏橙叶片中分离的总RNA为模板,经RT-PCR扩增到一条约600 bp、含钙离子结 合蛋白基因(CsCaBP)的片段,将此片段克隆到pMD-19T中,经测序分析该片段与甜橙基因组中的对应序列完全吻合.设计2对带有限制性内切酶位点的特异性引物,以cDNA为模板扩增到2个CsCaBP片段,并连接到TA克隆载体pMD-19T上;经双酶切消化后,分别以正反2个方向插入到植物表达载体pFGC5941的查耳酮合成酶(CHSA)内含子两侧,构建成功CsCaBP的RNA干扰载体,但未获得转基因植株.将CsCaBP的正向片段定向克隆到具有CaMV35S启动子的pFGC5941表达质粒上,构建成功CsCaBP过量表达载体.将构建好的表达载体导入根癌农杆菌LBA4404菌株,转化酸橙下胚轴,经PCR检测,获得9株过量表达转基因植株,荧光定量PCR验证发现目的基因在转基因植株中有不同程度的表达.%A calcium binding protein gene (CsCaBP) was amplified by Reverse Transcription Polymerse Chain Reaction (RT-PCR)from Citrus sinensis cv. 'Valencia', and a 600 bp-long PCR product was obtained and cloned into pMD-19T plasmid. Sequence analysis showed that the nucleotide sequence of the cDNA was exactly the same as the corresponding genomic sequence. Two PCR products were re-amplified from cDNA and inserted in inverted orientations into the RNAi vector at the two sides of the intron of chalcone synthase gene. The over-expression construct was obtained by inserting the full-length CsCaBP cDNA into pF(iC5941 under the control of 35S promoter. Both constructs were verified by PCR and sequencing. The constructs were transformed into Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and the transformants were tested positive by PCR. Transformation of Citrus auantittm hypocotyledon segments by co-culturing the segments with the bacteria followed by regeneration of transgenic plants yielded only the overexpression transgenic plants but not the RNAi plant.

  3. The plasma protein binding of HIDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By using Sephadex gel column chromatography to separate substances into their various components according to molecular weight, we have investigated the effect of incubating several brands of HIDA in plasma, in vitro. The results show that such incubation has no effect on either dimethyl HIDA, or diethyl HIDA, but that in the case of para-butyl HIDA, incubation in plasma increases the Rf value to that of HSA (human serum albumin). This indicates that para-butyl HIDA becomes bound to plasma proteins, in contrast to both dimethyl HIDA and diethyl HIDA. (orig.)

  4. Promotion of beta-glucan synthase activity in corn microsomal membranes by calcium and protein phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliyath, G.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1988-01-01

    Regulation of the activity of beta-glucan synthase was studied using microsomal preparations from corn coleoptiles. The specific activity as measured by the incorporation of glucose from uridine diphospho-D-[U-14C]glucose varied between 5 to 15 pmol (mg protein)-1 min-1. Calcium promoted beta-glucan synthase activity and the promotion was observed at free calcium concentrations as low as 1 micromole. Kinetic analysis of substrate-velocity curve showed an apparent Km of 1.92 x 10(-4) M for UDPG. Calcium increased the Vmax from 5.88 x 10(-7) mol liter-1 min-1 in the absence of calcium to 9.52 x 10(-7) mol liter-1 min-1 and 1.66 x 10(-6) mol liter-1 min-1 in the presence of 0.5 mM and 1 mM calcium, respectively. The Km values remained the same under these conditions. Addition of ATP further increased the activity above the calcium-promoted level. Sodium fluoride, a phosphoprotein phosphatase inhibitor, promoted glucan synthase activity indicating that phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are involved in the regulation of the enzyme activity. Increasing the concentration of sodium fluoride from 0.25 mM to 10 mM increased glucan synthase activity five-fold over the + calcium + ATP control. Phosphorylation of membrane proteins also showed a similar increase under these conditions. Calmodulin, in the presence of calcium and ATP stimulated glucan synthase activity substantially, indicating that calmodulin could be involved in the calcium-dependent phosphorylation and promotion of beta-glucan synthase activity. The role of calcium in mediating auxin action is discussed.

  5. Characterization of a calmodulin binding protein kinase from Arabidopsis thalian

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A full-length calmodulin binding protein kinase cDNA, AtCBK1, from Arabidopsis has been isolated by screening of an Arabidopsis cDNA library and by 5′-RACE. Northern blot and in situ hybridization indicated that the expression of AtCBK1 was more abundant in the vascular bundles and the meristems than in other tissues. The phylogenetic analyses reveal that AtCBK1 is different from animal CaMKs and it falls into CRK subgroup, indicating that they may come from different ancestors. The result suggests that AtCBK1 encodes a CaM-binding serine/threonine protein kinase.

  6. Detection of Fibronectin-Binding Proteins in Clostridium perfringens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokoyama,Masako

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens is an anaerobic spore-forming pathogen of humans and animals. C. perfringens type A strains, 13, CPN50, and NCTC8237, isolated from human gas gangrene, bound specifically to human fi bronectin (Fn. The trypsin-treatment of the bacterial cells significantly reduced the Fn-binding. A ligand blotting analysis of all three C. perfringens strains revealed that 5 protein bands of 34 kDa, 29 kDa, 26 kDa, 17 kDa, and 12 kDa specifically bound to biotinylated Fn. These results suggest that C. perfringens possesses certain Fn-binding proteins on the cell surface.

  7. Crystal structures of the ligand-binding region of uPARAP: effect of calcium ion binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Cai; Jürgensen, Henrik J; Engelholm, Lars H; Li, Rui; Liu, Min; Jiang, Longguang; Luo, Zhipu; Behrendt, Niels; Huang, Mingdong

    2016-08-01

    The proteins of the mannose receptor (MR) family share a common domain organization and have a broad range of biological functions. Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (uPARAP) (or Endo180) is a member of this family and plays an important role in extracellular matrix remodelling through interaction with its ligands, including collagens and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). We report the crystal structures of the first four domains of uPARAP (also named the ligand-binding region, LBR) at pH 7.4 in Ca(2+)-bound and Ca(2+)-free forms. The first domain (cysteine-rich or CysR domain) folds into a new and unique conformation different from the β-trefoil fold of typical CysR domains. The so-called long loop regions (LLRs) of the C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD) 1 and 2 (the third and fourth domain) mediate the direct contacts between these domains. These LLRs undergo a Ca(2+)-dependent conformational change, and this is likely to be the key structural determinant affecting the overall conformation of uPARAP. Our results provide a molecular mechanism to support the structural flexibility of uPARAP, and shed light on the structural flexibility of other members of the MR family. PMID:27247422

  8. The Medicago truncatula DMI1 protein modulates cytosolic calcium signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peiter, Edgar; Sun, Jongho; Heckmann, Anne Birgitte Lau;

    2007-01-01

    Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum potassium channel (MthK). The cytosolic C terminus of DMI1 contains a RCK (regulator of the conductance of K+) domain that in MthK acts as a calcium-regulated gating ring controlling the activity of the channel. Here we show that a dmi1 mutant lacking the entire C terminus acts...

  9. In vivo screening of proteins likely to bind uranium in exposed rat kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium is a naturally abundant element which has been used in several industries. Internal exposure could occur via three main pathways that are ingestion, inhalation and wounds. It has been recently shown that chronic ingestion of uranium in drinking water induces an important uranium accumulation in kidney with a perturbation of iron metabolism in this organ. Whereas uranium speciation is a key parameter to elucidate the chemical reactivity and the mobility of an element, it remains poorly documented in most of environmental and biological media. A few examples of uranium complexation with biomolecules have been published recently but most of them are in vitro studies whereas in vivo experiments remain poorly investigated. In order to better understand possible competition of uranium towards metals involved in the metal-protein binding, i.e. iron, copper, calcium, a study on uranium speciation was investigated by doing an in vivo screening of target proteins likely to bind it in kidneys of exposed rats. Rats were chronically exposed via contaminated drinking water at 40 mgL-1 and killed 9 months after the beginning of exposure. Kidneys were dissected out and protein extract was prepared. Then, separation of renal proteins by isoelectric focusing gel electrophoresis (IEF) and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) followed by LA-ICPMS analysis were performed. IEF-LA-ICP MS showed that uranium could specifically bind few proteins in kidney whereas 2-DE-LA-ICP MS could indicate that uranium is not covalently bound to proteins in this organ. The results suggested that even at moderate concentrations of exposure, uranium can be observed chelated with some renal proteins that is very encouraging to understand the entry, storage and elimination of this element in kidneys. (orig.)

  10. Binding-regulated click ligation for selective detection of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ya; Han, Peng; Wang, Zhuxin; Chen, Weiwei; Shu, Yongqian; Xiang, Yang

    2016-04-15

    Herein, a binding-regulated click ligation (BRCL) strategy for endowing selective detection of proteins is developed with the incorporation of small-molecule ligand and clickable DNA probes. The fundamental principle underlying the strategy is the regulating capability of specific protein-ligand binding against the ligation between clickable DNA probes, which could efficiently combine the detection of particular protein with enormous DNA-based sensing technologies. In this work, the feasibly of the BRCL strategy is first verified through agarose gel electrophoresis and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements, and then confirmed by transferring it to a nanomaterial-assisted fluorescence assay. Significantly, the BRCL strategy-based assay is able to respond to target protein with desirable selectivity, attributing to the specific recognition between small-molecule ligand and its target. Further experiments validate the general applicability of the sensing method by tailoring the ligand toward different proteins (i.e., avidin and folate receptor), and demonstrate its usability in complex biological samples. To our knowledge, this work pioneers the practice of click chemistry in probing specific small-molecule ligand-protein binding, and therefore may pave a new way for selective detection of proteins. PMID:26599478

  11. The RNA-binding protein repertoire of Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Marondedze, Claudius

    2016-07-11

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) have essential roles in determining the fate of RNA from synthesis to decay and have been studied on a protein-by-protein basis, or computationally based on a number of well-characterised RNA-binding domains. Recently, high-throughput methods enabled the capture of mammalian RNA-binding proteomes. To gain insight into the role of Arabidopsis thaliana RBPs at the systems level, we have employed interactome capture techniques using cells from different ecotypes grown in cultures and leaves. In vivo UV-crosslinking of RNA to RBPs, oligo(dT) capture and mass spectrometry yielded 1,145 different proteins including 550 RBPs that either belong to the functional category ‘RNA-binding’, have known RNA-binding domains or have orthologs identified in mammals, C. elegans, or S. cerevisiae in addition to 595 novel candidate RBPs. We noted specific subsets of RBPs in cultured cells and leaves and a comparison of Arabidopsis, mammalian, C. elegans, and S. cerevisiae RBPs reveals a common set of proteins with a role in intermediate metabolism, as well as distinct differences suggesting that RBPs are also species and tissue specific. This study provides a foundation for studies that will advance our understanding of the biological significance of RBPs in plant developmental and stimulus specific responses.

  12. All-Purpose Containers? Lipid-Binding Protein - Drug Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Beringhelli

    Full Text Available The combined use of in vitro (19F-NMR and in silico (molecular docking procedures demonstrates the affinity of a number of human calycins (lipid-binding proteins from ileum, liver, heart, adipose tissue and epidermis, and retinol-binding protein from intestine for different drugs (mainly steroids and vastatins. Comparative evaluations on the complexes outline some of the features relevant for interaction (non-polar character of the drugs; amino acids and water molecules in the protein calyx most often involved in binding. Dissociation constants (Ki for drugs typically lie in the same range as Ki for natural ligands; in most instances (different proteins and docking conditions, vastatins are the strongest interactors, with atorvastatin ranking top in half of the cases. The affinity of some calycins for some of the vastatins is in the order of magnitude of the drug Cmax after systemic administration in humans. The possible biological implications of this feature are discussed in connection with drug delivery parameters (route of administration, binding to carrier proteins, distribution to, and accumulation in, human tissues.

  13. Drug-drug plasma protein binding interactions of ivacaftor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Elena K; Huang, Johnny X; Carbone, Vincenzo; Baker, Mark; Azad, Mohammad A K; Cooper, Matthew A; Li, Jian; Velkov, Tony

    2015-06-01

    Ivacaftor is a novel cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) potentiator that improves the pulmonary function for patients with CF bearing a G551D CFTR-protein mutation. Because ivacaftor is highly bound (>97%) to plasma proteins, there is the strong possibility that co-administered CF drugs may compete for the same plasma protein binding sites and impact the free drug concentration. This, in turn, could lead to drastic changes in the in vivo efficacy of ivacaftor and therapeutic outcomes. This biochemical study compares the binding affinity of ivacaftor and co-administered CF drugs for human serum albumin (HSA) and α1 -acid glycoprotein (AGP) using surface plasmon resonance and fluorimetric binding assays that measure the displacement of site-selective probes. Because of their ability to strongly compete for the ivacaftor binding sites on HSA and AGP, drug-drug interactions between ivacaftor are to be expected with ducosate, montelukast, ibuprofen, dicloxacillin, omeprazole, and loratadine. The significance of these plasma protein drug-drug interactions is also interpreted in terms of molecular docking simulations. This in vitro study provides valuable insights into the plasma protein drug-drug interactions of ivacaftor with co-administered CF drugs. The data may prove useful in future clinical trials for a staggered treatment that aims to maximize the effective free drug concentration and clinical efficacy of ivacaftor. PMID:25707701

  14. Carboxyethylester-polyrotaxanes as a new calcium chelating polymer: synthesis, calcium binding and mechanism of trypsin inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooya, Tooru; Eguchi, Masaru; Ozaki, Atsushi; Yui, Nobuhiko

    2002-08-21

    A carboxyethylester-polyrotaxane was synthesized as a novel calcium chelating polymer in the field of oral drug delivery and characterized in terms of mechanism of trypsin inhibition. Here, carboxyethylester (CEE) groups are introduced to all the primary hydroxyl groups in alpha-cyclodextrins (alpha-CDs), which are threaded onto a poly(ethylene glycol) chain capped with bulky end-groups (polyrotaxane). The solubility of the CEE-polyrotaxane in physiological conditions increased with pH, indicating ionization-related solubility similar to conventional polyacrylates. The ability of calcium (Ca2+) chelation was found to increase in the order of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA)>CEE-polyrotaxanez.Gt;CEE-alpha-CD, suggesting that the increased density of carboxyl groups enhances the Ca2+ chelating ability. The activity of trypsin was inhibited by these compounds in the same order of the calcium chelation. However, the inhibitory effect of CEE-polyrotaxane was reduced by adding excess Ca2+ without precipitation that was observed in the presence of PAA. Such the reduced inhibition and precipitation by CEE-alpha-CD was not observed. Therefore, the inhibitory effect of CEE-polyrotaxane is due to Ca2+ chelation from trypsin without non-specific interaction. PMID:12176224

  15. Calcium binding-mediated sustained release of minocycline from hydrophilic multilayer coatings targeting infection and inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiling Zhang

    Full Text Available Infection and inflammation are common complications that seriously affect the functionality and longevity of implanted medical implants. Systemic administration of antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs often cannot achieve sufficient local concentration to be effective, and elicits serious side effects. Local delivery of therapeutics from drug-eluting coatings presents a promising solution. However, hydrophobic and thick coatings are commonly used to ensure sufficient drug loading and sustained release, which may limit tissue integration and tissue device communications. A calcium-mediated drug delivery mechanism was developed and characterized in this study. This novel mechanism allows controlled, sustained release of minocycline, an effective antibiotic and anti-inflammatory drug, from nanoscale thin hydrophilic polyelectrolyte multilayers for over 35 days at physiologically relevant concentrations. pH-responsive minocycline release was observed as the chelation between minocycline and Ca(2+ is less stable at acidic pH, enabling 'smart' drug delivery in response to infection and/or inflammation-induced tissue acidosis. The release kinetics of minocycline can be controlled by varying initial loading, Ca(2+ concentration, and Ca(2+ incorporation into different layers, enabling facile development of implant coatings with versatile release kinetics. This drug delivery platform can potentially be used for releasing any drug that has high Ca(2+ binding affinity, enabling its use in a variety of biomedical applications.

  16. Aluminium and calcium ions binding to pectin in sugar beet juice: Model of electrical double layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuljanin Tatjana A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In sugar industry, there is a problem of the presence of undesirable macromolecules such as pectins in sugar beet juice. Separation of these compounds is done mostly by CaO. Calcium may cause undesirable process of alkalization of soil in the near environment of the sugar factory. The theoretical basis of new juice purificatin method based on the application of Al2(SO43, CaSO4 and their mixtures are presented. Two model solutions of pectin (0.1 % w/w are investigated using a method of measuring zeta potential. Pure salts Al2(SO43 and CaSO4, showed better binding properties with the pectin than mixtures. Amount of all studied pure salts and mixtures of Al3+ and Ca2+ ions were significantly less (142 - 710 mg/gpectin than the average amount of CaO used in classical process (about 9 g/gpectin. Mechanism of discharge of pectin macromolecules in the presence of mixtures of these ions using a model of double electric layer are suggested.

  17. Fatty Acid- and Retinoid-binding Proteins Have Distinct Binding Pockets for the Two Types of Cargo*

    OpenAIRE

    Jordanova, Rositsa; Groves, Matthew R.; Kostova, Elena; Woltersdorf, Christian; Liebau, Eva; Tucker, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Parasitic nematodes cause serious diseases in humans, animals, and plants. They have limited lipid metabolism and are reliant on lipid-binding proteins to acquire these metabolites from their hosts. Several structurally novel families of lipid-binding proteins in nematodes have been described, including the fatty acid- and retinoid-binding protein family (FAR). In Caenorhabditis elegans, used as a model for studying parasitic nematodes, eight C. elegans FAR proteins have been described. The c...

  18. Drug bioactivation, covalent binding to target proteins and toxicity relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shufeng; Chan, Eli; Duan, Wei; Huang, Min; Chen, Yu-Zong

    2005-01-01

    A number of therapeutic drugs with different structures and mechanisms of action have been reported to undergo metabolic activation by Phase I or Phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes. The bioactivation gives rise to reactive metabolites/intermediates, which readily confer covalent binding to various target proteins by nucleophilic substitution and/or Schiff's base mechanism. These drugs include analgesics (e.g., acetaminophen), antibacterial agents (e.g., sulfonamides and macrolide antibiotics), anticancer drugs (e.g., irinotecan), antiepileptic drugs (e.g., carbamazepine), anti-HIV agents (e.g., ritonavir), antipsychotics (e.g., clozapine), cardiovascular drugs (e.g., procainamide and hydralazine), immunosupressants (e.g., cyclosporine A), inhalational anesthetics (e.g., halothane), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDSs) (e.g., diclofenac), and steroids and their receptor modulators (e.g., estrogens and tamoxifen). Some herbal and dietary constituents are also bioactivated to reactive metabolites capable of binding covalently and inactivating cytochrome P450s (CYPs). A number of important target proteins of drugs have been identified by mass spectrometric techniques and proteomic approaches. The covalent binding and formation of drug-protein adducts are generally considered to be related to drug toxicity, and selective protein covalent binding by drug metabolites may lead to selective organ toxicity. However, the mechanisms involved in the protein adduct-induced toxicity are largely undefined, although it has been suggested that drug-protein adducts may cause toxicity either through impairing physiological functions of the modified proteins or through immune-mediated mechanisms. In addition, mechanism-based inhibition of CYPs may result in toxic drug-drug interactions. The clinical consequences of drug bioactivation and covalent binding to proteins are unpredictable, depending on many factors that are associated with the administered drugs and patients

  19. Regulation of Intestinal Epithelial Calcium Transport Proteins by Stanniocalcin-1 in Caco2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Jinmei; Guo, Rui; Wan, Chunyun; Wu, Liming; Yang, Shijin; Guo, Dingzong

    2016-01-01

    Stanniocalcin-1 (STC1) is a calcium and phosphate regulatory hormone. However, the exact molecular mechanisms underlying how STC1 affects Ca(2+) uptake remain unclear. Here, the expression levels of the calcium transport proteins involved in transcellular transport in Caco2 cells were examined following over-expression or inhibition of STC1. These proteins include the transient receptor potential vanilloid members (TRPV) 5 and 6, the plasma membrane calcium ATPase 1b (PMCA1b), the sodium/calcium exchanger (NCX1), and the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Both gene and protein expressions of TRPV5 and TRPV6 were attenuated in response to over-expression of STC1, and the opposite trend was observed in cells treated with siRNASTC1. To further investigate the ability of STC1 to influence TRPV6 expression, cells were treated with 100 ng/mL of recombinant human STC1 (rhSTC1) for 4 h following pre-transfection with siRNASTC1 for 48 h. Intriguingly, the increase in the expression of TRPV6 resulting from siRNASTC1 was reversed by rhSTC1. No significant effect of STC1 on the expression of PMCA1b, NCX1 or VDR was observed in this study. In conclusion, the effect of STC1 on calcium transport in intestinal epithelia is due to, at least in part, its negative regulation of the epithelial channels TRPV5/6 that mediate calcium influx. PMID:27409607

  20. Plant RNA binding proteins for control of RNA virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Huh, Sung Un; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    Plant RNA viruses have effective strategies to infect host plants through either direct or indirect interactions with various host proteins, thus suppressing the host immune system. When plant RNA viruses enter host cells exposed RNAs of viruses are recognized by the host immune system through processes such as siRNA-dependent silencing. Interestingly, some host RNA binding proteins have been involved in the inhibition of RNA virus replication, movement, and translation through RNA-specific b...

  1. Free enthalpies of replacing water molecules in protein binding pockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riniker, Sereina; Barandun, Luzi J; Diederich, François; Krämer, Oliver; Steffen, Andreas; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2012-12-01

    Water molecules in the binding pocket of a protein and their role in ligand binding have increasingly raised interest in recent years. Displacement of such water molecules by ligand atoms can be either favourable or unfavourable for ligand binding depending on the change in free enthalpy. In this study, we investigate the displacement of water molecules by an apolar probe in the binding pocket of two proteins, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and tRNA-guanine transglycosylase, using the method of enveloping distribution sampling (EDS) to obtain free enthalpy differences. In both cases, a ligand core is placed inside the respective pocket and the remaining water molecules are converted to apolar probes, both individually and in pairs. The free enthalpy difference between a water molecule and a CH(3) group at the same location in the pocket in comparison to their presence in bulk solution calculated from EDS molecular dynamics simulations corresponds to the binding free enthalpy of CH(3) at this location. From the free enthalpy difference and the enthalpy difference, the entropic contribution of the displacement can be obtained too. The overlay of the resulting occupancy volumes of the water molecules with crystal structures of analogous ligands shows qualitative correlation between experimentally measured inhibition constants and the calculated free enthalpy differences. Thus, such an EDS analysis of the water molecules in the binding pocket may give valuable insight for potency optimization in drug design. PMID:23247390

  2. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate competitively inhibits phorbol ester binding to protein kinase C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium phospholipid dependent protein kinase C (PKC) is activated by diacylglycerol (DG) and by phorbol esters and is recognized to be the phorbol ester receptor of cells; DG displaces phorbol ester competitively from PKC. A phospholipid, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), can also activate PKC in the presence of phosphatidylserine (PS) and Ca2+ with a KPIP2 of 0.04 mol %. Preliminary experiments have suggested a common binding site for PIP2 and DG on PKC. Here, the authors investigate the effect of PIP2 on phorbol ester binding to PKC in a mixed micellar assay. In the presence of 20 mol % PS, PIP2 inhibited specific binding of [3H]phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) in a dose-dependent fashion up to 85% at 1 mol %. Inhibition of binding was more pronounced with PIP2 than with DG. Scatchard analysis indicated that the decrease in binding of PDBu in the presence of PIP2 is the result of an altered affinity for the phorbol ester rather than of a change in maximal binding. The plot of apparent dissociation constants (Kd') against PIP2 concentration was linear over a range of 0.01-1 mol % with a Ki of 0.043 mol % and confirmed the competitive nature of inhibition between PDBu and PIP2. Competition between PIP2 and phorbol ester could be determined in a liposomal assay system also. These results indicate that PIP2, DG, and phorbol ester all compete for the same activator-receiving region on the regulatory moiety of protein kinase C, and they lend support to the suggestion that PIP2 is a primary activator of the enzyme

  3. The distribution of ligand-binding pockets around protein-protein interfaces suggests a general mechanism for pocket formation

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Mu; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions are ubiquitous in a biological cell. Here, we report a comprehensive study of the distribution of protein-ligand interaction sites, namely ligand-binding pockets, around protein-protein interfaces where protein-protein interactions occur. We inspected a representative set of 1,611 representative protein-protein complexes and identified pockets with a potential for binding small molecule ligands. The majority of these pockets are within a 6 Å dis...

  4. Pumilio Puf domain RNA-binding proteins in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Nazia; Park, Youn-Il; Choi, Sang-Bong

    2011-03-01

    Pumilio proteins are a class of RNA-binding proteins harboring Puf domains (or PUM-HD; Pumilio-Homology Domain), named after the founding members, Pumilio (from Drosophila melanogaster) and FBF (Fem-3 mRNA-Binding Factor from Caenorhabditis elegans). The domains contain multiple tandem repeats each of which recognizes one RNA base and is comprised of 35-39 amino acids. Puf domain proteins have been reported in organisms ranging from single-celled yeast to higher multicellular eukaryotes, such as humans and plants. In yeast and animals, they are involved in a variety of posttranscriptional RNA metabolism including RNA decay, RNA transport, rRNA processing and translational repression. However, their roles in plants are largely unknown. Recently, we have characterized the first member of the Puf family of RNA-binding proteins, APUM23, in Arabidopsis. Here, we discuss and summarize the diverse roles and targets of Puf proteins previously reported in other organisms and then highlight the potential regulatory roles of Puf proteins in Arabidopsis, using our recent study as an example. PMID:21350339

  5. Synthesis and structural characterization of a calcium coordination polymer based on a 3-bridging tetradentate binding mode of glycine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subramanian Natarajan; Bikshandarkoil R Srinivasan; J Kalyana Sundar; K Ravikumar; R V Krishnakumar; J Suresh

    2012-07-01

    A new coordination polymer namely [[Ca6(H-gly)12(H2O)18]Cl12·6H2O] (1) (H-gly = glycine) has been isolated from the calcium chloride-glycine-water system and structurally characterized. Each Ca(II) in 1 is eight-coordinated and is bonded to eight oxygen atoms three of which are from terminal water molecules and five oxygen atoms from four symmetry related zwitterionic glycine ligands. The H-gly ligands exhibit two different binding modes viz. a monodentate carboxylate ligation and a 3-tetradentate bridging carboxylate binding mode, which results in the formation of a one-dimensional coordination polymer. In the infinite chain the Ca(II) atoms are organized in a zigzag fashion. A comparative study reveals a rich and diverse structural chemistry of calcium halide-glycine compounds.

  6. Characterization of [125I]omega-conotoxin binding to brain N calcium channels and (-)[3H] desmethoxyverapamil binding to novel calcium channels in osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This dissertation provides molecular evidence for a diversity of Ca2+ channels in neuronal and non-neuronal tissues. First, I demonstrated specific, reversible, saturable binding sites for omega [125I]conotoxin GVIA (omega[125I]CTX) in rat brain and rabbit sympathetic ganglion. Omega [125I]CTX binding has a unique pharmacology, ion selectivity, and anatomical distribution in rat brain. Omega [125I]CTX binding was solubilized, retaining an appropriate pharmacology and ion selectivity. Omega[125I]CTX binding may be associated with a Ca2+ channel because the K/sub D/ of omega [125I]CTX is similar to the IC50 of inhibition of depolarization-induced 45Ca2+ flux into rat brain synaptosomes. Specific (-)[3H]desmethoxyverapamil ((-)[3H]DMV) binding sites were demonstrated on osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cell membranes

  7. Characterization of the comparative drug binding to intra- (liver fatty acid binding protein) and extra- (human serum albumin) cellular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Andrew; Hallifax, David; Nussio, Matthew R; Shapter, Joseph G; Mackenzie, Peter I; Brian Houston, J; Knights, Kathleen M; Miners, John O

    2015-01-01

    1. This study compared the extent, affinity, and kinetics of drug binding to human serum albumin (HSA) and liver fatty acid binding protein (LFABP) using ultrafiltration and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). 2. Binding of basic and neutral drugs to both HSA and LFABP was typically negligible. Binding of acidic drugs ranged from minor (fu > 0.8) to extensive (fu LFABP was observed for the acidic drugs torsemide and sulfinpyrazone, and for β-estradiol (a polar, neutral compound). 3. The extent of binding of acidic drugs to HSA was up to 40% greater than binding to LFABP. SPR experiments demonstrated comparable kinetics and affinity for the binding of representative acidic drugs (naproxen, sulfinpyrazone, and torsemide) to HSA and LFABP. 4. Simulations based on in vitro kinetic constants derived from SPR experiments and a rapid equilibrium model were undertaken to examine the impact of binding characteristics on compartmental drug distribution. Simulations provided mechanistic confirmation that equilibration of intracellular unbound drug with the extracellular unbound drug is attained rapidly in the absence of active transport mechanisms for drugs bound moderately or extensively to HSA and LFABP. PMID:25801059

  8. Targeting of nucleotide-binding proteins by HAMLET--a conserved tumor cell death mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, J C S; Nadeem, A; Rydström, A; Puthia, M; Svanborg, C

    2016-02-18

    HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills tumor cells broadly suggesting that conserved survival pathways are perturbed. We now identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET binding partners, accounting for about 35% of all HAMLET targets in a protein microarray comprising 8000 human proteins. Target kinases were present in all branches of the Kinome tree, including 26 tyrosine kinases, 10 tyrosine kinase-like kinases, 13 homologs of yeast sterile kinases, 4 casein kinase 1 kinases, 15 containing PKA, PKG, PKC family kinases, 15 calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinases and 13 kinases from CDK, MAPK, GSK3, CLK families. HAMLET acted as a broad kinase inhibitor in vitro, as defined in a screen of 347 wild-type, 93 mutant, 19 atypical and 17 lipid kinases. Inhibition of phosphorylation was also detected in extracts from HAMLET-treated lung carcinoma cells. In addition, HAMLET recognized 24 Ras family proteins and bound to Ras, RasL11B and Rap1B on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. Direct cellular interactions between HAMLET and activated Ras family members including Braf were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. As a consequence, oncogenic Ras and Braf activity was inhibited and HAMLET and Braf inhibitors synergistically increased tumor cell death in response to HAMLET. Unlike most small molecule kinase inhibitors, HAMLET showed selectivity for tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The results identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET targets and suggest that dysregulation of the ATPase/kinase/GTPase machinery contributes to cell death, following the initial, selective recognition of HAMLET by tumor cells. The findings thus provide a molecular basis for the conserved tumoricidal effect of HAMLET, through dysregulation of kinases and oncogenic GTPases, to which tumor cells are addicted. PMID:26028028

  9. Coupling calcium/calmodulin-mediated signaling and herbivore-induced plant response through calmodulin-binding transcription factor AtSR1/CAMTA3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yongjian; Xi, Jing; Du, Liqun; Suttle, Jeffrey C; Poovaiah, B W

    2012-05-01

    Calcium/calmodulin (Ca(2+)/CaM) has long been considered a crucial component in wound signaling pathway. However, very few Ca(2+)/CaM-binding proteins have been identified which regulate plant responses to herbivore attack/wounding stress. We have reported earlier that a family of Ca(2+)/CaM-binding transcription factors designated as AtSRs (also known as AtCAMTAs) can respond differentially to wounding stress. Further studies revealed that AtSR1/CAMTA3 is a negative regulator of plant defense, and Ca(2+)/CaM-binding to AtSR1 is indispensable for the suppression of salicylic acid (SA) accumulation and disease resistance. Here we report that Ca(2+)/CaM-binding is also critical for AtSR1-mediated herbivore-induced wound response. Interestingly, atsr1 mutant plants are more susceptible to herbivore attack than wild-type plants. Complementation of atsr1 mutant plants by overexpressing wild-type AtSR1 protein can effectively restore plant resistance to herbivore attack. However, when mutants of AtSR1 with impaired CaM-binding ability were overexpressed in atsr1 mutant plants, plant resistance to herbivore attack was not restored, suggesting a key role for Ca(2+)/CaM-binding in wound signaling. Furthermore, it was observed that elevated SA levels in atsr1 mutant plants have a negative impact on both basal and induced biosynthesis of jasmonates (JA). These results revealed that Ca(2+)/CaM-mediated signaling regulates plant response to herbivore attack/wounding by modulating the SA-JA crosstalk through AtSR1. PMID:22371088

  10. Identification of Enhancer Binding Proteins Important for Myxococcus xanthus Development▿

    OpenAIRE

    Giglio, Krista M.; Eisenstatt, Jessica; Garza, Anthony G.

    2009-01-01

    Enhancer binding proteins (EBPs) control the temporal expression of fruiting body development-associated genes in Myxococcus xanthus. Eleven previously uncharacterized EBP genes were inactivated. Six EBP gene mutations produced minor but reproducible defects in fruiting body development. One EBP gene mutation that affected A-motility produced strong developmental defects.

  11. The Role of Microtubule End Binding (EB) Proteins in Ciliogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Jacob Morville

    biflagellate green alga Chlamydomonas (Pedersen et al., 2003), and is required for ciliogenesis in mouse fibroblasts (Schroder et al., 2007). However, the exact mechanism(s) involved and roles of the two additional mammalian members of the end binding (EB) protein family, EB2 and EB3, in ciliogenesis are...

  12. Monomeric Yeast Frataxin is an Iron-Binding Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook,J.; Bencze, K.; Jankovic, A.; Crater, A.; Busch, C.; Bradley, P.; Stemmler, A.; Spaller, M.; Stemmler, T.

    2006-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia, an autosomal cardio- and neurodegenerative disorder that affects 1 in 50 000 humans, is caused by decreased levels of the protein frataxin. Although frataxin is nuclear-encoded, it is targeted to the mitochondrial matrix and necessary for proper regulation of cellular iron homeostasis. Frataxin is required for the cellular production of both heme and iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters. Monomeric frataxin binds with high affinity to ferrochelatase, the enzyme involved in iron insertion into porphyrin during heme production. Monomeric frataxin also binds to Isu, the scaffold protein required for assembly of Fe-S cluster intermediates. These processes (heme and Fe-S cluster assembly) share requirements for iron, suggesting that monomeric frataxin might function as the common iron donor. To provide a molecular basis to better understand frataxin's function, we have characterized the binding properties and metal-site structure of ferrous iron bound to monomeric yeast frataxin. Yeast frataxin is stable as an iron-loaded monomer, and the protein can bind two ferrous iron atoms with micromolar binding affinity. Frataxin amino acids affected by the presence of iron are localized within conserved acidic patches located on the surfaces of both helix-1 and strand-1. Under anaerobic conditions, bound metal is stable in the high-spin ferrous state. The metal-ligand coordination geometry of both metal-binding sites is consistent with a six-coordinate iron-(oxygen/nitrogen) based ligand geometry, surely constructed in part from carboxylate and possibly imidazole side chains coming from residues within these conserved acidic patches on the protein. On the basis of our results, we have developed a model for how we believe yeast frataxin interacts with iron.

  13. Monomeric Yeast Frataxin is an Iron-Binding Protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedreich's ataxia, an autosomal cardio- and neurodegenerative disorder that affects 1 in 50 000 humans, is caused by decreased levels of the protein frataxin. Although frataxin is nuclear-encoded, it is targeted to the mitochondrial matrix and necessary for proper regulation of cellular iron homeostasis. Frataxin is required for the cellular production of both heme and iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters. Monomeric frataxin binds with high affinity to ferrochelatase, the enzyme involved in iron insertion into porphyrin during heme production. Monomeric frataxin also binds to Isu, the scaffold protein required for assembly of Fe-S cluster intermediates. These processes (heme and Fe-S cluster assembly) share requirements for iron, suggesting that monomeric frataxin might function as the common iron donor. To provide a molecular basis to better understand frataxin's function, we have characterized the binding properties and metal-site structure of ferrous iron bound to monomeric yeast frataxin. Yeast frataxin is stable as an iron-loaded monomer, and the protein can bind two ferrous iron atoms with micromolar binding affinity. Frataxin amino acids affected by the presence of iron are localized within conserved acidic patches located on the surfaces of both helix-1 and strand-1. Under anaerobic conditions, bound metal is stable in the high-spin ferrous state. The metal-ligand coordination geometry of both metal-binding sites is consistent with a six-coordinate iron-(oxygen/nitrogen) based ligand geometry, surely constructed in part from carboxylate and possibly imidazole side chains coming from residues within these conserved acidic patches on the protein. On the basis of our results, we have developed a model for how we believe yeast frataxin interacts with iron

  14. The RNA binding domain of Pumilio antagonizes poly-adenosine binding protein and accelerates deadenylation

    OpenAIRE

    Weidmann, Chase A.; Raynard, Nathan A.; Blewett, Nathan H.; Van Etten, Jamie; Goldstrohm, Aaron C.

    2014-01-01

    This article analyzes the mechanism by which Pumilio represses the translation of its targets. The results show, rather surprisingly, that promotion of deadenylation is not required for expression. Instead, Pumilio interacts with poly(A) binding protein and somehow interferes with its activity.

  15. Cooperative binding of copper(I) to the metal binding domains in Menkes disease protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P Y; Bonander, N; Møller, L B;

    1999-01-01

    We have optimised the overexpression and purification of the N-terminal end of the Menkes disease protein expressed in Escherichia coli, containing one, two and six metal binding domains (MBD), respectively. The domain(s) have been characterised using circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spec...

  16. Ca2+ Binding Protein S100A1 Competes with Calmodulin and PIP2 for Binding Site on the C-Terminus of the TPRV1 Receptor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gryčová, Lenka; Holendová, Blanka; Lánský, Zdeněk; Bumba, Ladislav; Jirků, Michaela; Boušová, Kristýna; Teisinger, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 3 (2015), s. 386-392. ISSN 1948-7193 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/10/1159; GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/11/0717; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-11851S; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 ; RVO:67985823 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : TRPV1 * vanilloid receptor * calmodulin * S100A1 * calcium binding protein * surface plasmon resonance * fluorescence anisotropy Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.362, year: 2014

  17. The RNA binding domain of Pumilio antagonizes poly-adenosine binding protein and accelerates deadenylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidmann, Chase A; Raynard, Nathan A; Blewett, Nathan H; Van Etten, Jamie; Goldstrohm, Aaron C

    2014-08-01

    PUF proteins are potent repressors that serve important roles in stem cell maintenance, neurological processes, and embryonic development. These functions are driven by PUF protein recognition of specific binding sites within the 3' untranslated regions of target mRNAs. In this study, we investigated mechanisms of repression by the founding PUF, Drosophila Pumilio, and its human orthologs. Here, we evaluated a previously proposed model wherein the Pumilio RNA binding domain (RBD) binds Argonaute, which in turn blocks the translational activity of the eukaryotic elongation factor 1A. Surprisingly, we found that Argonautes are not necessary for repression elicited by Drosophila and human PUFs in vivo. A second model proposed that the RBD of Pumilio represses by recruiting deadenylases to shorten the mRNA's polyadenosine tail. Indeed, the RBD binds to the Pop2 deadenylase and accelerates deadenylation; however, this activity is not crucial for regulation. Rather, we determined that the poly(A) is necessary for repression by the RBD. Our results reveal that poly(A)-dependent repression by the RBD requires the poly(A) binding protein, pAbp. Furthermore, we show that repression by the human PUM2 RBD requires the pAbp ortholog, PABPC1. Pumilio associates with pAbp but does not disrupt binding of pAbp to the mRNA. Taken together, our data support a model wherein the Pumilio RBD antagonizes the ability of pAbp to promote translation. Thus, the conserved function of the PUF RBD is to bind specific mRNAs, antagonize pAbp function, and promote deadenylation. PMID:24942623

  18. Cross-linking of surface Ig receptors on murine B lymphocytes stimulates the expression of nuclear tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate-response element-binding proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiles, T.C.; Liu, J.L.; Rothstein, T.L. (Boston Univ. Medical Center, MA (USA))

    1991-03-15

    Cross-linking of sIg on primary B lymphocytes leads to increased nuclear DNA-binding activity specific for the tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate-response element (TRE), as judged by gel mobility shift assays. Stimulation of B cells to enter S phase of the cell cycle by treatment with the combination of phorbol ester plus calcium ionophore also stimulated nuclear TRE-binding activity within 2 h, with maximal expression at 4 h; however, phorbol ester and calcium ionophore were not as effective in stimulating binding activity when examined separately. Stimulated nuclear expression of TRE-binding activity appears to require protein synthesis. Fos- and Jun/AP-1-related proteins participate directly in the identified nucleoprotein complex, as shown by the ability of c-fos- and c-jun-specific antisera to either alter or completely abolish electrophoretic migration of the complex in native gels. Further, UV photo-cross-linking studies identified two major TRE-binding protein species, whose sizes correspond to TRE-binding proteins derived from HeLa cell nuclear extracts. The results suggest that in primary B cells nuclear TRE-binding activity represents a downstream signaling event that occurs subsequent to changes in protein kinase C activity and intracellular Ca2+ but that can be triggered physiologically through sIg.

  19. Extracellular Ca2+ is a danger signal activating the NLRP3 inflammasome through G protein-coupled calcium sensing receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossol, Manuela; Pierer, Matthias; Raulien, Nora; Quandt, Dagmar; Meusch, Undine; Rothe, Kathrin; Schubert, Kristin; Schöneberg, Torsten; Schaefer, Michael; Krügel, Ute; Smajilovic, Sanela; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Baerwald, Christoph; Wagner, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    calcium activates the NLRP3 inflammasome via stimulation of G protein-coupled calcium sensing receptors. Activation is mediated by signalling through the calcium-sensing receptor and GPRC6A via the phosphatidyl inositol/Ca(2+) pathway. The resulting increase in the intracellular calcium concentration...... this effect was inhibited in GPRC6A(-/-) mice. Our results demonstrate that G-protein-coupled receptors can activate the inflammasome, and indicate that increased extracellular calcium has a role as a danger signal and amplifier of inflammation....

  20. Binding of Streptococcus mutans SR protein to human monocytes: production of tumor necrosis factor, interleukin 1, and interleukin 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soell, M; Holveck, F; Schöller, M; Wachsmann, R D; Klein, J P

    1994-05-01

    To examine the possible implication of protein SR, an I/II-related antigen from Streptococcus mutans OMZ 175 (serotype f), in inflammatory reactions, we tested the immunomodulatory effects of protein SR on human monocytes. Using biotinylated protein, we provide evidence that protein SR binds to human monocytes in dose-, time-, and calcium-dependent manners through specific interactions. These results were confirmed by competition experiments using either soluble human monocyte extract or anti-SR immunoglobulin G. Binding occurred through lectin-like interactions between SR and carbohydrate portions of monocyte membrane glycoproteins, since binding could be inhibited by several sugars, especially fucose and N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA), which were confirmed by ligand blotting to be the primer ligands recognized by SR on human monocyte extracts. The ability of protein SR to stimulate the production of cytokines by human circulating monocytes was then examined. The release of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin 1 beta, and interleukin 6 is time and dose dependent and not affected by the addition of polymyxin B. Activation of monocytes resulted from specific binding of SR to NANA and fucose present on cell surface glycoproteins since TNF-alpha release could be inhibited by sialidase and pronase treatment of monocytes and by NANA and fucose. These results confirm that sialic acid and fucose present on cell surface macromolecules and especially glycoproteins are needed for the binding of SR to monocytes and for the release of TNF-alpha. PMID:8168943

  1. Autophosphorylation-dependent inactivation of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is characterized by the presence of a visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain unlike other known calmodulin- dependent kinases. Ca(2+)-Binding to the visinin-like domain leads to autophosphorylation and changes in the affinity for calmodulin [Sathyanarayanan P.V., Cremo C.R. & Poovaiah B.W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 30417-30422]. Here, we report that the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation of CCaMK results in time-dependent loss of enzyme activity. This time-dependent loss of activity or self-inactivation due to autophosphorylation is also dependent on reaction pH and ATP concentration. Inactivation of the enzyme resulted in the formation of a sedimentable enzyme due to self-association. Specifically, autophosphorylation in the presence of 200 microm ATP at pH 7.5 resulted in the formation of a sedimentable enzyme with a 33% loss in enzyme activity. Under similar conditions at pH 6.5, the enzyme lost 67% of its activity and at pH 8.5, 84% enzyme activity was lost. Furthermore, autophosphorylation at either acidic or alkaline reaction pH lead to the formation of a sedimentable enzyme. Transmission electron microscopic studies on autophosphorylated kinase revealed particles that clustered into branched complexes. The autophosphorylation of wild-type kinase in the presence of AMP-PNP (an unhydrolyzable ATP analog) or the autophosphorylation-site mutant, T267A, did not show formation of branched complexes under the electron microscope. Autophosphorylation- dependent self-inactivation may be a mechanism of modulating the signal transduction pathway mediated by CCaMK.

  2. Isolation, characterization, and bioinformatic analysis of calmodulin-binding protein cmbB reveals a novel tandem IP22 repeat common to many Dictyostelium and Mimivirus proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, Danton H; Suhre, Karsten; Myre, Michael A; Chatterjee-Chakraborty, Munmun; Chavez, Sara E

    2006-08-01

    A novel calmodulin-binding protein cmbB from Dictyostelium discoideum is encoded in a single gene. Northern analysis reveals two cmbB transcripts first detectable at 4 h during multicellular development. Western blotting detects an approximately 46.6 kDa protein. Sequence analysis and calmodulin-agarose binding studies identified a "classic" calcium-dependent calmodulin-binding domain (179IPKSLRSLFLGKGYNQPLEF198) but structural analyses suggest binding may not involve classic alpha-helical calmodulin-binding. The cmbB protein is comprised of tandem repeats of a newly identified IP22 motif ([I,L]Pxxhxxhxhxxxhxxxhxxxx; where h = any hydrophobic amino acid) that is highly conserved and a more precise representation of the FNIP repeat. At least eight Acanthamoeba polyphaga Mimivirus proteins and over 100 Dictyostelium proteins contain tandem arrays of the IP22 motif and its variants. cmbB also shares structural homology to YopM, from the plague bacterium Yersenia pestis. PMID:16777069

  3. In vivo threonine phosphorylation of immunoglobulin binding protein (BiP) maps to its protein binding domain

    OpenAIRE

    Gaut, James R.

    1997-01-01

    lmmunoglobin binding protein (BiP) molecules exist as both monomers and oligomers and phosphorylated BiP is restricted to the oligomeric pool. Modified BiP is not bound to proteins such as immunoglobulin heavy chain and consequently, may constitute an inactive form. Unlike earlier analysis of mammalian BiP isolated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, results here demonstrated that immunoprecipitated BiP displayed predominantly threonine phosphorylation with only a trace of detectable phos...

  4. Engineering periplasmic ligand binding proteins as glucose nanosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constance J. Jeffery

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes affects over 100 million people worldwide. Better methods for monitoring blood glucose levels are needed for improving disease management. Several labs have previously made glucose nanosensors by modifying members of the periplasmic ligand binding protein superfamily. This minireview summarizes recent developments in constructing new versions of these proteins that are responsive within the physiological range of blood glucose levels, employ new reporter groups, and/or are more robust. These experiments are important steps in the development of novel proteins that have the characteristics needed for an implantable glucose nanosensor for diabetes management: specificity for glucose, rapid response, sensitivity within the physiological range of glucose concentrations, reproducibility, and robustness.

  5. Fibrillin binds calcium and is coded by cDNAs that reveal a multidomain structure and alternatively spliced exons at the 5[prime] end

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corson, G.M.; Chalberg, S.C.; Charbonneau, N.L.; Sakai, L.Y. (Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland (United States)); Dietz, H.C. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States))

    1993-08-01

    Fibrillin is an important structural protein of the extracellular matrix. It is a large cysteine-rich glycoprotein with extensive intrachain disulfide bonds, likely contributed by multiple EGF-like repeats. The authors have previously published 6.9 kb of FBN1 cDNA sequence. FBN1 cDNA clones that extend the sequence 3089 bp in the 5[prime] direction are described in this report. The deduced primary structure suggests that fibrillin in composed of multiple domains. The most predominant features the presence of 43 calcium binding EGF-like repeats. They demonstrate here that fibrillin molecules bind calcium. In addition, three alternatively spliced exons at the 5[prime] end are described. Analysis of 5.8 kb of surrounding genomic sequence revealed a 1.8-kb CpG island spanning the alternatively spliced exons and the next downstream exon. Since FBN1 is the gene responsible for Marfan syndrome, the information presented here will be useful in identifying new mutations and in understanding the function of fibrillin in the pathogenesis of the disease. 42 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Predicting protein ligand binding motions with the conformation explorer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flores Samuel C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of the structure of proteins bound to known or potential ligands is crucial for biological understanding and drug design. Often the 3D structure of the protein is available in some conformation, but binding the ligand of interest may involve a large scale conformational change which is difficult to predict with existing methods. Results We describe how to generate ligand binding conformations of proteins that move by hinge bending, the largest class of motions. First, we predict the location of the hinge between domains. Second, we apply an Euler rotation to one of the domains about the hinge point. Third, we compute a short-time dynamical trajectory using Molecular Dynamics to equilibrate the protein and ligand and correct unnatural atomic positions. Fourth, we score the generated structures using a novel fitness function which favors closed or holo structures. By iterating the second through fourth steps we systematically minimize the fitness function, thus predicting the conformational change required for small ligand binding for five well studied proteins. Conclusions We demonstrate that the method in most cases successfully predicts the holo conformation given only an apo structure.

  7. A homeodomain protein binds to. gamma. -globin gene regulatory sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavelle, D.; Ducksworth, J.; Eves, E.; Gomes, G.; Keller, M.; Heller, P.; DeSimone, J. (Univ. of Illinois, Chicago (United States) Veterans Administration Westside Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States))

    1991-08-15

    Developmental regulation of {gamma}-globin gene expression probably occurs through developmental-stage-specific trans-acting factors able to promote the interaction of enhancer elements located in the far upstream locus control region with regulatory elements in the {gamma} gene promoters and 3{prime}{sup A}{gamma} enhancer located in close proximity to the genes. The authors have detected a nuclear protein in K562 and baboon fetal bone marrow nuclear extracts capable of binding to A+T-rich sequences in the locus control region, {gamma} gene promoter, and 3{prime} {sup A}{gamma} enhancer. SDS/polyacrylamide gel analysis of the purified K562 binding activity revealed a single protein of 87 kDa. A K562 cDNA clone was isolated encoding a {beta}-galactosidase fusion protein with a DNA binding specificity identical to that of the K562/fetal bone marrow nuclear protein. The cDNA clone encodes a homeodomain homologous to the Drosophila antennapedia protein.

  8. Treponema pallidum receptor binding proteins interact with fibronectin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, K.M.; Baseman, J.B.; Alderete, J.F.

    1983-06-01

    Analysis of plasma proteins avidly bound to T. pallidum surfaces revealed the ability of T. pallidum to acquire numerous host macromolecules. No acquisition was evident by the avirulent spirochete, T. phagedenis biotype Reiter. Western blotting technology using hyperimmune antifibronectin serum as a probe revealed the ability of virulent treponemes to avidly bind fibronectin from a complex medium such as plasma. The specificity of the tiplike adherence of motile T. pallidum to fibronectin-coated glass surfaces and to fibronectin on HEp-2 cells was reinforced by the observation that pretreatment of coverslips or cell monolayers with monospecific antiserum against fibronectin substantially reduced T. pallidum attachment. The stoichiometric binding of T. pallidum to fibronectin-coated coverslips and the inability of unlabeled or /sup 35/S-radiolabeled treponemes to interact with glass surfaces treated with other plasma proteins further established the specific nature of the interaction between virulent T. pallidum and fibronectin. The avid association between three outer envelope proteins of T. pallidum and fibronectin was also demonstrated. These treponemal surface proteins have been previously identified as putative receptor-binding proteins responsible for T. pallidum parasitism of host cells. The data suggest that surface fibronectin mediates tip-oriented attachment of T. pallidum to host cells via a receptor-ligand mechanism of recognition.

  9. Treponema pallidum receptor binding proteins interact with fibronectin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of plasma proteins avidly bound to T. pallidum surfaces revealed the ability of T. pallidum to acquire numerous host macromolecules. No acquisition was evident by the avirulent spirochete, T. phagedenis biotype Reiter. Western blotting technology using hyperimmune antifibronectin serum as a probe revealed the ability of virulent treponemes to avidly bind fibronectin from a complex medium such as plasma. The specificity of the tiplike adherence of motile T. pallidum to fibronectin-coated glass surfaces and to fibronectin on HEp-2 cells was reinforced by the observation that pretreatment of coverslips or cell monolayers with monospecific antiserum against fibronectin substantially reduced T. pallidum attachment. The stoichiometric binding of T. pallidum to fibronectin-coated coverslips and the inability of unlabeled or 35S-radiolabeled treponemes to interact with glass surfaces treated with other plasma proteins further established the specific nature of the interaction between virulent T. pallidum and fibronectin. The avid association between three outer envelope proteins of T. pallidum and fibronectin was also demonstrated. These treponemal surface proteins have been previously identified as putative receptor-binding proteins responsible for T. pallidum parasitism of host cells. The data suggest that surface fibronectin mediates tip-oriented attachment of T. pallidum to host cells via a receptor-ligand mechanism of recognition

  10. Characterization of flavonoid-protein interactions using fluorescence spectroscopy: Binding of pelargonidin to dairy proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Maya, Izlia J; Campos-Terán, José; Hernández-Arana, Andrés; McClements, David Julian

    2016-12-15

    In this study, the interaction between the flavonoid pelargonidin and dairy proteins: β-lactoglobulin (β-LG), whey protein (WPI), and caseinate (CAS) was investigated. Fluorescence experiments demonstrated that pelargonidin quenched milk proteins fluorescence strongly. However, the protein secondary structure was not significantly affected by pelargonidin, as judged from far-UV circular dichroism. Analysis of fluorescence data indicated that pelargonidin-induced quenching does not arise from a dynamical mechanism, but instead is due to protein-ligand binding. Therefore, quenching data were analyzed using the model of independent binding sites. Both β-LG and CAS, but not WPI, showed hyperbolic binding isotherms indicating that these proteins firmly bound pelargonidin at both pH 7.0 and 3.0 (binding constants ca. 1.0×10(5) at 25.0°C). To investigate the underlying thermodynamics, binding constants were determined at 25.0, 35.0, and 45.0°C. These results pointed to binding processes that depend on the structural conformation of the milk proteins. PMID:27451201

  11. Effect of Langmuir monolayer of bovine serum albumin protein on the morphology of calcium carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) Langmuir monolayer, as a model of biomineralization-associated proteins, was used to study its effect on regulated biomineralization of calcium carbonate. The effects of the BSA Langmuir monolayer and the concentration of the subphase solution on the nucleation and growth processes and morphology of the calcium carbonate crystal were investigated. The morphology and polymorphic phase of the resulting calcium carbonate crystals were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). Moreover, the interaction mechanisms of the subphase solution with the BSA Langmuir monolayer were discussed. It was found that BSA Langmuir monolayer could be used as a template to successfully manipulate the polymorphic phase and crystal morphology of calcium carbonate and had obvious influence on the oriented crystallization and growth. The final morphology or aggregation mode of the calcite crystal was closely dependent on the concentration of calcium bicarbonate solution. It is expected that this research would help to better understand the mechanism of biomineralization by revealing the interactions between protein matrices and crystallization of calcium carbonate crystal.

  12. Streptococcal IgA-binding proteins bind in the Calpha 2-Calpha 3 interdomain region and inhibit binding of IgA to human CD89.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleass, R J; Areschoug, T; Lindahl, G; Woof, J M

    2001-03-16

    Certain pathogenic bacteria express surface proteins that bind to the Fc part of human IgA or IgG. These bacterial proteins are important as immunochemical tools and model systems, but their biological function is still unclear. Here, we describe studies of three streptococcal proteins that bind IgA: the Sir22 and Arp4 proteins of Streptococcus pyogenes and the unrelated beta protein of group B streptococcus. Analysis of IgA domain swap and point mutants indicated that two loops at the Calpha2/Calpha3 domain interface are critical for binding of the streptococcal proteins. This region is also used in binding the human IgA receptor CD89, an important mediator of IgA effector function. In agreement with this finding, the three IgA-binding proteins and a 50-residue IgA-binding peptide derived from Sir22 blocked the ability of IgA to bind CD89. Further, the Arp4 protein inhibited the ability of IgA to trigger a neutrophil respiratory burst via CD89. Thus, we have identified residues on IgA-Fc that play a key role in binding of different streptococcal IgA-binding proteins, and we have identified a mechanism by which a bacterial IgA-binding protein may interfere with IgA effector function. PMID:11096107

  13. The Cobalamin-binding Protein in Zebrafish is an Intermediate Between the Three Cobalamin-binding Proteins in Human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greibe, Eva Holm; Fedosov, Sergey; Nexø, Ebba

    2012-01-01

    the oldest evolutionary derivatives followed by IF and HC (the latter being present only in reptiles and most but not all mammals). Our findings suggest that the only cobalamin-binding protein in zebrafish is an intermediate between the three human cobalamin binders. These findings support the...

  14. Comparative study of methyl-CpG-binding domain proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ropers H Hilger

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methylation at CpG dinucleotides in genomic DNA is a fundamental epigenetic mechanism of gene expression control in vertebrates. Proteins with a methyl-CpG-binding domain (MBD can bind to single methylated CpGs and most of them are involved in transcription control. So far, five vertebrate MBD proteins have been described as MBD family members: MBD1, MBD2, MBD3, MBD4 and MECP2. Results We performed database searches for new proteins containing an MBD and identified six amino acid sequences which are different from the previously described ones. Here we present a comparison of their MBD sequences, additional protein motifs and the expression of the encoding genes. A calculated unrooted dendrogram indicates the existence of at least four different groups of MBDs within these proteins. Two of these polypeptides, KIAA1461 and KIAA1887, were only present as predicted amino acid sequences based on a partial human cDNA. We investigated their expression by Northern blot analysis and found transcripts of ~8 kb and ~5 kb respectively, in all eight normal tissues studied. Conclusions Eleven polypeptides with a MBD could be identified in mouse and man. The analysis of protein domains suggests a role in transcriptional regulation for most of them. The knowledge of additional existing MBD proteins and their expression pattern is important in the context of Rett syndrome.

  15. Polyamine binding to proteins in oat and Petunia protoplasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Y.; Applewhite, P. B.; Galston, A. W.

    1989-01-01

    Previous work (A Apelbaum et al. [1988] Plant Physiol 88: 996-998) has demonstrated binding of labeled spermidine (Spd) to a developmentally regulated 18 kilodalton protein in tobacco tissue cultures derived from thin surface layer explants. To assess the general importance of such Spd-protein complexes, we attempted bulk isolation from protoplasts of Petunia and oat (Avena sativa). In Petunia, as in tobacco, fed radioactive Spd is bound to protein, but in oat, Spd is first converted to 1,3,-diaminopropane (DAP), probably by polyamine oxidase action. In oat, binding of DAP to protein depends on age of donor leaf and conditions of illumination and temperature, and the extraction of the DAP-protein complex depends upon buffer and pH. The yield of the DAP-protein complex was maximized by extraction of frozen-thawed protoplasts with a pH 8.8 carbonate buffer containing SDS. Its molecular size, based on Sephacryl column fractionation of ammonium sulfate precipitated material, exceeded 45 kilodaltons. Bound Spd or DAP can be released from their complexes by the action of Pronase, but not DNAse, RNAse, or strong salt solutions, indicating covalent attachment to protein.

  16. Prediction of DNA-binding specificity in zinc finger proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sumedha Roy; Shayoni Dutta; Kanika Khanna; Shruti Singla; Durai Sundar

    2012-07-01

    Zinc finger proteins interact via their individual fingers to three base pair subsites on the target DNA. The four key residue positions −1, 2, 3 and 6 on the alpha-helix of the zinc fingers have hydrogen bond interactions with the DNA. Mutating these key residues enables generation of a plethora of combinatorial possibilities that can bind to any DNA stretch of interest. Exploiting the binding specificity and affinity of the interaction between the zinc fingers and the respective DNA can help to generate engineered zinc fingers for therapeutic purposes involving genome targeting. Exploring the structure–function relationships of the existing zinc finger–DNA complexes can aid in predicting the probable zinc fingers that could bind to any target DNA. Computational tools ease the prediction of such engineered zinc fingers by effectively utilizing information from the available experimental data. A study of literature reveals many approaches for predicting DNA-binding specificity in zinc finger proteins. However, an alternative approach that looks into the physico-chemical properties of these complexes would do away with the difficulties of designing unbiased zinc fingers with the desired affinity and specificity. We present a physico-chemical approach that exploits the relative strengths of hydrogen bonding between the target DNA and all combinatorially possible zinc fingers to select the most optimum zinc finger protein candidate.

  17. Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins: a structural perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briony eForbes

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBP-1 to -6 bind insulin-like growth factors-I and -II (IGF-I and IGF-II with high affinity. These binding proteins maintain IGFs in the circulation and direct them to target tissues, where they promote cell growth, proliferation, differentiation and survival via the type 1 IGF receptor (IGF-1R. IGFBPs also interact with many other molecules, which not only influence their modulation of IGF action but also mediate IGF-independent activities that influence processes such as cell migration and apoptosis by influencing gene transcription.IGFBPs-1 to -6 are structurally similar proteins consisting of three distinct domains, N-terminal, Linker and C-terminal. There have been major advances in our understanding of IGFBP structure in the last decade and a half. While there is still no structure of an intact IGFBP to date, several structures of individual N- and C-domains have been solved. The structure of a complex of N-BP-4:IGF-I:C-BP-4 has also been solved, providing a detailed picture of the structural features of the IGF binding site and the mechanism of binding. Structural studies have also identified features important for interaction with extracellular matrix components and integrins. This review summarises structural studies reported so far and highlights features important for binding not only IGF but also other partners. It also highlights future directions in which structural studies will add to our knowledge of the role played by the IGFBP family in normal growth and development, as well as in disease.

  18. Characterization of a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homolog from maize roots showing light-regulated gravitropism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y. T.; Hidaka, H.; Feldman, L. J.

    1996-01-01

    Roots of many species respond to gravity (gravitropism) and grow downward only if illuminated. This light-regulated root gravitropism is phytochrome-dependent, mediated by calcium, and inhibited by KN-93, a specific inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II). A cDNA encoding MCK1, a maize homolog of mammalian CaMK, has been isolated from roots of maize (Zea mays L.). The MCK1 gene is expressed in root tips, the site of perception for both light and gravity. Using the [35S]CaM gel-overlay assay we showed that calmodulin-binding activity of the MCK1 is abolished by 50 microM KN-93, but binding is not affected by 5 microM KN-93, paralleling physiological findings that light-regulated root gravitropism is inhibited by 50 microM KN-93, but not by 5 microM KN-93. KN-93 inhibits light-regulated gravitropism by interrupting transduction of the light signal, not light perception, suggesting that MCK1 may play a role in transducing light. This is the first report suggesting a physiological function for a CaMK homolog in light signal transduction.

  19. Stable Isotope Labeling Strategy for Protein-Ligand Binding Analysis in Multi-Component Protein Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeArmond, Patrick D.; West, Graham M.; Huang, Hai-Tsang; Fitzgerald, Michael C.

    2011-03-01

    Described here is a stable isotope labeling protocol that can be used with a chemical modification- and mass spectrometry-based protein-ligand binding assay for detecting and quantifying both the direct and indirect binding events that result from protein-ligand binding interactions. The protocol utilizes an H{2/16}O2 and H{2/18}O2 labeling strategy to evaluate the chemical denaturant dependence of methionine oxidation in proteins both in the presence and absence of a target ligand. The differential denaturant dependence to the oxidation reactions performed in the presence and absence of ligand provides a measure of the protein stability changes that occur as a result of direct interactions of proteins with the target ligand and/or as a result of indirect interactions involving other protein-ligand interactions that are either induced or disrupted by the ligand. The described protocol utilizes the 18O/16O ratio in the oxidized protein samples to quantify the ligand-induced protein stability changes. The ratio is determined using the isotopic distributions observed for the methionine-containing peptides used for protein identification in the LC-MS-based proteomics readout. The strategy is applied to a multi-component protein mixture in this proof-of-principle experiment, which was designed to evaluate the technique's ability to detect and quantify the direct binding interaction between cyclosporin A and cyclophilin A and to detect the indirect binding interaction between cyclosporin A and calcineurin (i.e., the protein-protein interaction between cyclophilin A and calcineurin that is induced by cyclosporin A binding to cyclophilin A).

  20. [Penicillin-binding proteins of various strains of Lactobacillus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griaznova, N S; Subbotina, N A; Beliavskaia, I V; Taisova, A S; Afonin, V I; Tiurin, M V; Shenderov, B A; Sazykina, Iu O; Navashin, S M

    1990-02-01

    Sensitivity of different species of Lactobacillus i.e. L. casei, L. plantarum, L. acidophillus, L. buchneri, L. jugurti and others to penicillins and cephalosporins of various generations was studied. Penicillin binding proteins (PBPs) of the Lactobacillus species were specified. It was shown that the number of PBPs depended on the Lactobacillus species. L. casei had the least number of PBPs (4) and L. brevis had the highest number of PBPs (11). Competition of 14C-benzylpenicillin with ampicillin, cefotaxime, ceftizoxime and cefoperazone for binding to separate PBPs in three strains of different Lactobacillus species was investigated. PMID:2110806

  1. Photoaffinity labelling of high affinity dopamine binding proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, G.M.; McCarry, B.E.; Mishra, R.K.

    1986-03-01

    A photoactive analogue of the dopamine agonist 2-amino-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronapthalene (ADTN) has been synthesized and used to photoaffinity label dopamine binding proteins prepared from bovine caudate nucleus. N-(3-)N'-4-azidobenzamidol)-aminopropyl)-aminopropyl)-ADTN (AzB-AP-ADTN) was incubated with caudate membranes and irradiated with UV light. Membranes were then repeatedly washed by centrifugation to remove excess photolabel. A binding assay, using (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 (a D/sub 1/ specific antagonist), was then performed to evaluate the loss of receptor density in the photolyzed preparation. AzB-AP-ADTN irreversibly blocked (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 binding in a dose-dependent manner. Scatchard analysis revealed a decrease in the B/sub max/, with no significant change in the K/sub d/, of (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 binding. Compounds which compete for D/sub 1/ receptor binding (such as dopamine, SKF 38393 or apomorphine), proteted the SCH 23390 binding site from inactivation. This data would suggest that the novel photoaffinity ligand, AzB-AP-ADTN, can covalently label the D/sub 1/ (adenylate cyclase linked) dopamine receptor.

  2. Deoxyribonucleic-binding homeobox proteins are augmented in human cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Mercurio, A M; Chung, S Y;

    1990-01-01

    Homeobox genes encode sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins that are involved in the regulation of gene expression during embryonic development. In this study, we examined the expression of homeobox proteins in human cancer. Antiserum was obtained against a synthetic peptide derived from the...... isolated and used to elicit a rabbit antiserum. In immunostaining, both antisera reacted with the nuclei of cultured tumor cells. In tissue sections of human carcinoma, nuclear immunoreactivity was observed in the tumor cells in 40 of 42 cases examined. Adjacent normal epithelial tissue obtained from the...... presence of the homeobox transcript in human carcinoma was documented by in situ hybridization and RNase protection mapping. These results demonstrate that human cancer is associated with the expression of homeobox proteins. Such homeobox proteins, as well as other regulatory proteins, could be involved in...

  3. Poisson-Boltzmann Calculations of Nonspecific Salt Effects on Protein-Protein Binding Free Energies

    OpenAIRE

    Bertonati, Claudia; Honig, Barry; Alexov, Emil

    2007-01-01

    The salt dependence of the binding free energy of five protein-protein hetero-dimers and two homo-dimers/tetramers was calculated from numerical solutions to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. Overall, the agreement with experimental values is very good. In all cases except one involving the highly charged lactoglobulin homo-dimer, increasing the salt concentration is found both experimentally and theoretically to decrease the binding affinity. To clarify the source of salt effects, the salt-dep...

  4. Sensitive red protein calcium indicators for imaging neural activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dana, Hod; Mohar, Boaz; Sun, Yi; Narayan, Sujatha; Gordus, Andrew; Hasseman, Jeremy P; Tsegaye, Getahun; Holt, Graham T; Hu, Amy; Walpita, Deepika; Patel, Ronak; Macklin, John J; Bargmann, Cornelia I; Ahrens, Misha B; Schreiter, Eric R; Jayaraman, Vivek; Looger, Loren L; Svoboda, Karel; Kim, Douglas S

    2016-01-01

    Genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) allow measurement of activity in large populations of neurons and in small neuronal compartments, over times of milliseconds to months. Although GFP-based GECIs are widely used for in vivo neurophysiology, GECIs with red-shifted excitation and emission spectra have advantages for in vivo imaging because of reduced scattering and absorption in tissue, and a consequent reduction in phototoxicity. However, current red GECIs are inferior to the state-of-the-art GFP-based GCaMP6 indicators for detecting and quantifying neural activity. Here we present improved red GECIs based on mRuby (jRCaMP1a, b) and mApple (jRGECO1a), with sensitivity comparable to GCaMP6. We characterized the performance of the new red GECIs in cultured neurons and in mouse, Drosophila, zebrafish and C. elegans in vivo. Red GECIs facilitate deep-tissue imaging, dual-color imaging together with GFP-based reporters, and the use of optogenetics in combination with calcium imaging. PMID:27011354

  5. The Pumilio protein binds RNA through a conserved domain that defines a new class of RNA-binding proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Zamore, P. D.; Williamson, J R; Lehmann, R.

    1997-01-01

    Translation of hunchback(mat) (hb[mat]) mRNA must be repressed in the posterior of the pre-blastoderm Drosophila embryo to permit formation of abdominal segments. This translational repression requires two copies of the Nanos Response Element (NRE), a 16-nt sequence in the hb[mat] 3' untranslated region. Translational repression also requires the action of two proteins: Pumilio (PUM), a sequence-specific RNA-binding protein; and Nanos, a protein that determines the location of repression. Bin...

  6. Detection of an endothelin-1-binding protein complex by low temperature SDS-PAGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We found that the complex of ET-1 and its binding protein was stable enough to be separated by SDS-PAGE when electrophoresis was run at a low temperature. Cross-linking was not necessary for the detection of 125I-ET-1 and its binding protein complex by autoradiography. This simple method could be used in qualitative (estimation of apparent molecular weight of ET-1 binding protein) and quantitative (determination of relative content of ET-binding protein) analysis of the ET-binding protein complex. ET-binding protein complexes of various animal species and organs were investigated by this method

  7. Iron-Binding Protein Degradation by Cysteine Proteases of Naegleria fowleri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moisés Martínez-Castillo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Naegleria fowleri causes acute and fulminant primary amoebic meningoencephalitis. This microorganism invades its host by penetrating the olfactory mucosa and then traveling up the mesaxonal spaces and crossing the cribriform plate; finally, the trophozoites invade the olfactory bulbs. During its invasion, the protozoan obtains nutrients such as proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and cationic ions (e.g., iron, calcium, and sodium from the host. However, the mechanism by which these ions are obtained, particularly iron, is poorly understood. In the present study, we evaluated the ability of N. fowleri to degrade iron-binding proteins, including hololactoferrin, transferrin, ferritin, and hemoglobin. Zymography assays were performed for each substrate under physiological conditions (pH 7 at 37°C employing conditioned medium (CM and total crude extracts (TCEs of N. fowleri. Different degradation patterns with CM were observed for hololactoferrin, transferrin, and hemoglobin; however, CM did not cause ferritin degradation. In contrast, the TCEs degraded only hololactoferrin and transferrin. Inhibition assays revealed that cysteine proteases were involved in this process. Based on these results, we suggest that CM and TCEs of N. fowleri degrade iron-binding proteins by employing cysteine proteases, which enables the parasite to obtain iron to survive while invading the central nervous system.

  8. Phosphorylation of bovine interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IRBP is the major soluble (glycolipo) protein of the interphotoreceptor matrix (IPM) and a putative intercellular retinoid-transport vehicle. The authors have now examined phosphorylation of proteins in a crude bovine IPM wash using γ-32P-ATP. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) of IPM proteins showed several phosphorylated protein bands, one of them migrating in the same position as purified IRBP. When an aliquot of phosphorylated IPM proteins was incubated overnight with 3H-retinol and subjected to either size-exclusion or ion-exchange HPLC, a peak of 32P was observed in both cases which coincided with 3H-retinol binding and had a retention time identical to that of purified IRBP. When phosphorylated IPM was subjected to Con A Sepharose affinity chromatography and the 50mM methyl α-D-mannoside eluate chromatographed on ion-exchange HPLC, the 32P-peak was not present although a substantial amount of non-phosphorylated IRBP was recovered as assessed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. However, when the Con A Sepharose beads were dissolved in SDS and subjected to SDS-PAGE and Western blotting, a band of phosphorylated IRBP was observed, indicating that the phosphorylated IRBP was more tightly bound to the Con A Sepharose. The authors conclude that a fraction of IRBP can be phosphorylated by a yet to be characterized protein kinase and that the binding characteristics of IRBP are markedly altered by phosphorylation

  9. Crystal Structure of Human Retinoblastoma Binding Protein 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorobiev, S.; Su, M; Seetharaman, J; Huang, Y; Chen, C; Maglaqui, M; Janjua, H; Montelione, G; Tong, L; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    As a step towards better integrating protein three-dimensional (3D) structural information in cancer systems biology, the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (NESG) (www.nesg.org) has constructed a Human Cancer Pathway Protein Interaction Network (HCPIN) by analysis of several classical cancer-associated signaling pathways and their physical protein-protein interactions. Many well-known cancer-associated proteins play central roles as hubs or bottlenecks in the HCPIN (http://nmr.cabm.rutgers.edu/hcpin). NESG has selected more than 1000 human proteins and protein domains from the HCPIN for sample production and 3D structure determination. The long-range goal of this effort is to provide a comprehensive 3D structure-function database for human cancer-associated proteins and protein complexes, in the context of their interaction networks. Human retinoblastoma binding protein 9 (RBBP9) is one of the HCPIN proteins targeted by NESG. RBBP9 was initially identified as the product of a new gene, Bog (for B5T over-expressed gene), in several transformed rat liver epithelial cell lines resistant to the growth-inhibitory effect of TGF-1 as well as in primary human liver tumors. RBBP9 contains the retinoblastoma (Rb) binding motif LxCxE in its sequence, and was shown to interact with Rb by yeast two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Mutation of the Leu residue in this motif to Gln blocked the binding to Rb. RBBP9 can displace E2F1 from E2F1-Rb complexes, and over expression of RBBP9 overcomes TGF-1 induced growth arrest and results in transformation of rat liver epithelial cells leading to hepatoblastoma-like tumors in nude mice. RBBP9 may also play a role in cellular responses to chronic low dose radiation. A close homolog of RBBP9, sharing 93% amino acid sequence identity and also known as RBBP10, interacts with a protein with sua5-yciO-yrdC domains.

  10. Datasets depicting mobility retardation of NCS proteins observed upon incubation with calcium, but not with magnesium, barium or strontium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viviano, Jeffrey; Krishnan, Anuradha; Scully, Jenna; Wu, Hao; Venkataraman, Venkat

    2016-06-01

    In this data article we show the specificity of the Ca(2+)-induced mobility shift in three proteins that belong to the neuronal calcium sensor (NCS) protein family: Hippocalcin, GCAP1 and GCAP2. These proteins did not display a shift in mobility in native gels when incubated with divalent cations other than Ca(2+) - such as Mg(2+), Ba(2+), and Sr(2+), even at 10× concentrations. The data is similar to that obtained with another NCS protein, neurocalcin delta (Viviano et al., 2016, "Electrophoretic Mobility Shift in Native Gels Indicates Calcium-dependent Structural Changes of Neuronal Calcium Sensor Proteins", [1]). PMID:27222862

  11. Predicting the Impact of Missense Mutations on Protein-Protein Binding Affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Minghui; Petukh, Marharyta; Alexov, Emil; Panchenko, Anna R

    2014-04-01

    The crucial prerequisite for proper biological function is the protein's ability to establish highly selective interactions with macromolecular partners. A missense mutation that alters the protein binding affinity may cause significant perturbations or complete abolishment of the function, potentially leading to diseases. The availability of computational methods to evaluate the impact of mutations on protein-protein binding is critical for a wide range of biomedical applications. Here, we report an efficient computational approach for predicting the effect of single and multiple missense mutations on protein-protein binding affinity. It is based on a well-tested simulation protocol for structure minimization, modified MM-PBSA and statistical scoring energy functions with parameters optimized on experimental sets of several thousands of mutations. Our simulation protocol yields very good agreement between predicted and experimental values with Pearson correlation coefficients of 0.69 and 0.63 and root-mean-square errors of 1.20 and 1.90 kcal mol(-1) for single and multiple mutations, respectively. Compared with other available methods, our approach achieves high speed and prediction accuracy and can be applied to large datasets generated by modern genomics initiatives. In addition, we report a crucial role of water model and the polar solvation energy in estimating the changes in binding affinity. Our analysis also reveals that prediction accuracy and effect of mutations on binding strongly depends on the type of mutation and its location in a protein complex. PMID:24803870

  12. DNA binding protein identification by combining pseudo amino acid composition and profile-based protein representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Wang, Shanyi; Wang, Xiaolong

    2015-10-01

    DNA-binding proteins play an important role in most cellular processes. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an efficient predictor for identifying DNA-binding proteins only based on the sequence information of proteins. The bottleneck for constructing a useful predictor is to find suitable features capturing the characteristics of DNA binding proteins. We applied PseAAC to DNA binding protein identification, and PseAAC was further improved by incorporating the evolutionary information by using profile-based protein representation. Finally, Combined with Support Vector Machines (SVMs), a predictor called iDNAPro-PseAAC was proposed. Experimental results on an updated benchmark dataset showed that iDNAPro-PseAAC outperformed some state-of-the-art approaches, and it can achieve stable performance on an independent dataset. By using an ensemble learning approach to incorporate more negative samples (non-DNA binding proteins) in the training process, the performance of iDNAPro-PseAAC was further improved. The web server of iDNAPro-PseAAC is available at http://bioinformatics.hitsz.edu.cn/iDNAPro-PseAAC/.

  13. The surface protein Shr of Streptococcus pyogenes binds heme and transfers it to the streptococcal heme-binding protein Shp

    OpenAIRE

    Lei Benfang; Liu Mengyao; Zhu Hui

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The heme acquisition machinery in Streptococcus pyogenes is believed to consist of the surface proteins, Shr and Shp, and heme-specific ATP-binding cassette transporter HtsABC. Shp has been shown to rapidly transfer its heme to the lipoprotein component, HtsA, of HtsABC. The function of Shr and the heme source of Shp have not been established. Results The objective of this study was to determine whether Shr binds heme and is a heme source of Shp. To achieve the objective, ...

  14. Human neutrophil calmodulin-binding proteins: identification of the calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular events in linking neutrophil activation and ligand binding to specific membrane receptors are mediated in part by an increase in intracellular Ca2+. One mechanism by which Ca2+ may trigger neutrophil activation is through Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-regulated proteins and enzymes. To determine which Ca2+/CaM-regulated enzymes may be present in the neutrophil, they have used Western blotting techniques and 125I-CaM to identify neutrophil CaM-binding proteins. Eleven proteins with molecular weights ranging from 230K to 13.5K bound 125I-CaM in a Ca2+-dependent manner. One predominant region of 125I-Cam binding was to a 59K protein; a protein with an identical mobility was labeled by an antisera against brain CaM-dependent phosphatase. Ca2+-dependent phosphatase activity, which was inhibited by the CaM antagonist trifluoperazine, was detected in a neutrophil extract; a radioimmunoassay for the phosphatase indicated that it was present in the extract at approximately 0.2 μg/mg protein. Most of the CaM-binding proteins, including the 59K protein, were rapidly degraded upon lysis of the neutrophil. There was a close correlation between the degradation of the 59K protein and the loss of Ca2+-dependent phosphatase activity in the neutrophil extract. Thus, human neutrophils contain numerous CaM-binding proteins which are presumably Ca2+/calmodulin-regulated enzymes and proteins; the 59K protein is a CaM-dependent phosphatase

  15. Protein-binding RNA aptamers affect molecular interactions distantly from their binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M Dupont

    Full Text Available Nucleic acid aptamer selection is a powerful strategy for the development of regulatory agents for molecular intervention. Accordingly, aptamers have proven their diligence in the intervention with serine protease activities, which play important roles in physiology and pathophysiology. Nonetheless, there are only a few studies on the molecular basis underlying aptamer-protease interactions and the associated mechanisms of inhibition. In the present study, we use site-directed mutagenesis to delineate the binding sites of two 2´-fluoropyrimidine RNA aptamers (upanap-12 and upanap-126 with therapeutic potential, both binding to the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA. We determine the subsequent impact of aptamer binding on the well-established molecular interactions (plasmin, PAI-1, uPAR, and LRP-1A controlling uPA activities. One of the aptamers (upanap-126 binds to the area around the C-terminal α-helix in pro-uPA, while the other aptamer (upanap-12 binds to both the β-hairpin of the growth factor domain and the kringle domain of uPA. Based on the mapping studies, combined with data from small-angle X-ray scattering analysis, we construct a model for the upanap-12:pro-uPA complex. The results suggest and highlight that the size and shape of an aptamer as well as the domain organization of a multi-domain protein such as uPA, may provide the basis for extensive sterical interference with protein ligand interactions considered distant from the aptamer binding site.

  16. A novel chitin binding crayfish molar tooth protein with elasticity properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynyakov, Jenny; Bentov, Shmuel; Abehsera, Shai; Khalaila, Isam; Manor, Rivka; Katzir Abilevich, Lihie; Weil, Simy; Aflalo, Eliahu D; Sagi, Amir

    2015-01-01

    The molar tooth of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus is part of the mandible, and is covered by a layer of apatite (calcium phosphate). This tooth sheds and is regenerated during each molting cycle together with the rest of the exoskeleton. We discovered that molar calcification occurs at the pre-molt stage, unlike calcification of the rest of the new exoskeleton. We further identified a novel molar protein from C. quadricarinatus and cloned its transcript from the molar-forming epithelium. We termed this protein Cq-M13. The temporal level of transcription of Cq-M13 in an NGS library of molar-forming epithelium at different molt stages coincides with the assembly and mineralization pattern of the molar tooth. The predicted protein was found to be related to the pro-resilin family of cuticular proteins. Functionally, in vivo silencing of the transcript caused molt cycle delay and a recombinant version of the protein was found to bind chitin and exhibited elastic properties. PMID:26010981

  17. A Novel Chitin Binding Crayfish Molar Tooth Protein with Elasticity Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynyakov, Jenny; Bentov, Shmuel; Abehsera, Shai; Khalaila, Isam; Manor, Rivka; Katzir Abilevich, Lihie; Weil, Simy; Aflalo, Eliahu D.; Sagi, Amir

    2015-01-01

    The molar tooth of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus is part of the mandible, and is covered by a layer of apatite (calcium phosphate). This tooth sheds and is regenerated during each molting cycle together with the rest of the exoskeleton. We discovered that molar calcification occurs at the pre-molt stage, unlike calcification of the rest of the new exoskeleton. We further identified a novel molar protein from C. quadricarinatus and cloned its transcript from the molar-forming epithelium. We termed this protein Cq-M13. The temporal level of transcription of Cq-M13 in an NGS library of molar-forming epithelium at different molt stages coincides with the assembly and mineralization pattern of the molar tooth. The predicted protein was found to be related to the pro-resilin family of cuticular proteins. Functionally, in vivo silencing of the transcript caused molt cycle delay and a recombinant version of the protein was found to bind chitin and exhibited elastic properties. PMID:26010981

  18. A novel chitin binding crayfish molar tooth protein with elasticity properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Tynyakov

    Full Text Available The molar tooth of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus is part of the mandible, and is covered by a layer of apatite (calcium phosphate. This tooth sheds and is regenerated during each molting cycle together with the rest of the exoskeleton. We discovered that molar calcification occurs at the pre-molt stage, unlike calcification of the rest of the new exoskeleton. We further identified a novel molar protein from C. quadricarinatus and cloned its transcript from the molar-forming epithelium. We termed this protein Cq-M13. The temporal level of transcription of Cq-M13 in an NGS library of molar-forming epithelium at different molt stages coincides with the assembly and mineralization pattern of the molar tooth. The predicted protein was found to be related to the pro-resilin family of cuticular proteins. Functionally, in vivo silencing of the transcript caused molt cycle delay and a recombinant version of the protein was found to bind chitin and exhibited elastic properties.

  19. Phospholipid mediated activation of calcium dependent protein kinase 1 (CaCDPK1 from chickpea: a new paradigm of regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar Dixit

    Full Text Available Phospholipids, the major structural components of membranes, can also have functions in regulating signaling pathways in plants under biotic and abiotic stress. The effects of adding phospholipids on the activity of stress-induced calcium dependent protein kinase (CaCDPK1 from chickpea are reported here. Both autophosphorylation as well as phosphorylation of the added substrate were enhanced specifically by phosphatidylcholine and to a lesser extent by phosphatidic acid, but not by phosphatidylethanolamine. Diacylgylerol, the neutral lipid known to activate mammalian PKC, stimulated CaCDPK1 but at higher concentrations. Increase in V(max of the enzyme activity by these phospholipids significantly decreased the K(m indicating that phospholipids enhance the affinity towards its substrate. In the absence of calcium, addition of phospholipids had no effect on the negligible activity of the enzyme. Intrinsic fluorescence intensity of the CaCDPK1 protein was quenched on adding PA and PC. Higher binding affinity was found with PC (K(½ = 114 nM compared to PA (K(½ = 335 nM. We also found that the concentration of PA increased in chickpea plants under salt stress. The stimulation by PA and PC suggests regulation of CaCDPK1 by these phospholipids during stress response.

  20. Glycosylation status of vitamin D binding protein in cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Rehder, Douglas S.; Nelson, Randall W.; Borges, Chad R.

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of the results of activity studies, previous reports have suggested that vitamin D binding protein (DBP) is significantly or even completely deglycosylated in cancer patients, eliminating the molecular precursor of the immunologically important Gc macrophage activating factor (GcMAF), a glycosidase-derived product of DBP. The purpose of this investigation was to directly determine the relative degree of O-linked trisaccharide glycosylation of serum-derived DBP in human breast, co...

  1. Interactions of human mannose-binding protein with lipoteichoic acids.

    OpenAIRE

    Polotsky, V Y; Fischer, W; Ezekowitz, R A; Joiner, K A

    1996-01-01

    We explored the interaction of human recombinant mannose-binding protein and lipoteichoic acids (LTAs) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The best ligand was Micrococcus luteus lipomannan, followed by Enterococcus spp. LTA containing mono-, di-, and oligoglucosyl substituents. LTAs lacking terminal sugars (those of Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus) or containing galactosyl substituents (those of Listeria spp. and Lactococcus spp.) were poor ligands. These results are consis...

  2. Vibrational Softening of a Protein on Ligand Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balog, Erica [Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary; Perahia, David [Ecole Normale Superieure de Cachan, Cachan, France; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; Merzel, Franci [National Institute of Chemistry, Solvenia

    2011-01-01

    Neutron scattering experiments have demonstrated that binding of the cancer drug methotrexate softens the low-frequency vibrations of its target protein, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). Here, this softening is fully reproduced using atomic detail normal-mode analysis. Decomposition of the vibrational density of states demonstrates that the largest contributions arise from structural elements of DHFR critical to stability and function. Mode-projection analysis reveals an increase of the breathing-like character of the affected vibrational modes consistent with the experimentally observed increased adiabatic compressibility of the protein on complexation.

  3. G Protein Regulation of Neuronal Calcium Channels: Back to the Future

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Proft, Juliane; Weiss, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 6 (2015), s. 890-906. ISSN 0026-895X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-13556S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : voltage gated calcium channels Cav * G proteins * GPCR Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.128, year: 2014

  4. Spermidine-Induced Improvement of Reconsolidation of Memory Involves Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardi, Bruna Amanda; Ribeiro, Daniela Aymone; Signor, Cristiane; Muller, Michele; Gais, Mayara Ana; Mello, Carlos Fernando; Rubin, Maribel Antonello

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we determined whether the calcium-dependent protein kinase (PKC) signaling pathway is involved in the improvement of fear memory reconsolidation induced by the intrahippocampal administration of spermidine in rats. Male Wistar rats were trained in a fear conditioning apparatus using a 0.4-mA footshock as an unconditioned stimulus.…

  5. Calmodulin-dependent protein kinases mediate calcium-induced slow motility of mammalian outer hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puschner, B; Schacht, J

    1997-08-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells in vitro respond to elevation of intracellular calcium with slow shape changes over seconds to minutes ('slow motility'). This process is blocked by general calmodulin antagonists suggesting the participation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent enzymatic reactions. The present study proposes a mechanism for these reactions. Length changes of outer hair cells isolated from the guinea pig cochlea were induced by exposure to the calcium ionophore ionomycin. ATP levels remained unaffected by this treatment ruling out depletion of ATP (by activation of calcium-dependent ATPases) as a cause of the observed shape changes. Involvement of protein kinases was suggested by the inhibition of shape changes by K252a, a broad-spectrum inhibitor of protein kinase activity. Furthermore, the inhibitors ML-7 and ML-9 blocked the shape changes at concentrations compatible with inhibition of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). KN-62, an inhibitor of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), also attenuated the length changes. Inhibitors with selectivity for cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases (H-89, staurosporine) were tested to assess potential additional contributions by such enzymes. The dose dependence of their action supported the notion that the most likely mechanism of slow motility involves phosphorylation reactions catalyzed by MLCK or CaMKII or both. PMID:9282907

  6. Identifying Interactions that Determine Fragment Binding at Protein Hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radoux, Chris J; Olsson, Tjelvar S G; Pitt, Will R; Groom, Colin R; Blundell, Tom L

    2016-05-12

    Locating a ligand-binding site is an important first step in structure-guided drug discovery, but current methods do little to suggest which interactions within a pocket are the most important for binding. Here we illustrate a method that samples atomic hotspots with simple molecular probes to produce fragment hotspot maps. These maps specifically highlight fragment-binding sites and their corresponding pharmacophores. For ligand-bound structures, they provide an intuitive visual guide within the binding site, directing medicinal chemists where to grow the molecule and alerting them to suboptimal interactions within the original hit. The fragment hotspot map calculation is validated using experimental binding positions of 21 fragments and subsequent lead molecules. The ligands are found in high scoring areas of the fragment hotspot maps, with fragment atoms having a median percentage rank of 97%. Protein kinase B and pantothenate synthetase are examined in detail. In each case, the fragment hotspot maps are able to rationalize a Free-Wilson analysis of SAR data from a fragment-based drug design project. PMID:27043011

  7. Characterization of auxin-binding proteins from zucchini plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, G. R.; Rice, M. S.; Lomax, T. L.

    1993-01-01

    We have previously identified two auxin-binding polypeptides in plasma membrane (PM) preparations from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) (Hicks et al. 1989, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 86, 4948-4952). These polypeptides have molecular weights of 40 kDa and 42 kDa and label specifically with the photoaffinity auxin analog 5-N3-7-3H-IAA (azido-IAA). Azido-IAA permits both the covalent and radioactive tagging of auxin-binding proteins and has allowed us to characterize further the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides, including the nature of their attachment to the PM, their relationship to each other, and their potential function. The azido-IAA-labeled polypeptides remain in the pelleted membrane fraction following high-salt and detergent washes, which indicates a tight and possibly integral association with the PM. Two-dimensional electrophoresis of partially purified azido-IAA-labeled protein demonstrates that, in addition to the major isoforms of the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides, which possess isoelectric points (pIs) of 8.2 and 7.2, respectively, several less abundant isoforms that display unique pIs are apparent at both molecular masses. Tryptic and chymotryptic digestion of the auxin-binding proteins indicates that the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides are closely related or are modifications of the same polypeptide. Phase extraction with the nonionic detergent Triton X-114 results in partitioning of the azido-IAA-labeled polypeptides into the aqueous (hydrophilic) phase. This apparently paradoxical behavior is also exhibited by certain integral membrane proteins that aggregate to form channels. The results of gel filtration indicate that the auxin-binding proteins do indeed aggregate strongly and that the polypeptides associate to form a dimer or multimeric complex in vivo. These characteristics are consistent with the hypothesis that the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides are subunits of a multimeric integral membrane protein which has an auxin-binding site, and which may

  8. Architecture of the sugar binding sites in carbohydrate binding proteins--a computer modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, V S; Lam, K; Qasba, P K

    1998-11-01

    Different sugars, Gal, GalNAc and Man were docked at the monosaccharide binding sites of Erythrina corallodenron (EcorL), peanut lectin (PNA), Lathyrus ochrus (LOLI), and pea lectin (PSL). To study the lectin-carbohydrate interactions, in the complexes, the hydroxymethyl group in Man and Gal favors, gg and gt conformations respectively, and is the dominant recognition determination. The monosaccharide binding site in lectins that are specific to Gal/GalNAc is wider due to the additional amino acid residues in loop D as compared to that in lectins specific to Man/Glc, and affects the hydrogen bonds of the sugar involving residues from loop D, but not its orientation in the binding site. The invariant amino acid residues Asp from loop A, and Asn and an aromatic residue (Phe or Tyr) in loop C provides the basic architecture to recognize the common features in C4 epimers. The invariant Gly in loop B together with one or two residues in the variable region of loop D/A holds the sugar tightly at both ends. Loss of any one of these hydrogen bonds leads to weak interaction. While the subtle variations in the sequence and conformation of peptide fragment that resulted due to the size and location of gaps present in amino acid sequence in the neighborhood of the sugar binding site of loop D/A seems to discriminate the binding of sugars which differ at C4 atom (galacto and gluco configurations). The variations at loop B are important in discriminating Gal and GalNAc binding. The present study thus provides a structural basis for the observed specificities of legume lectins which uses the same four invariant residues for binding. These studies also bring out the information that is important for the design/engineering of proteins with the desired carbohydrate specificity. PMID:9849627

  9. MARCKS protein is phosphorylated and regulates calcium mobilization during human acrosomal exocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo J Rodriguez Peña

    Full Text Available Acrosomal exocytosis is a calcium-regulated exocytosis that can be triggered by PKC activators. The involvement of PKC in acrosomal exocytosis has not been fully elucidated, and it is unknown if MARCKS, the major substrate for PKC, participates in this exocytosis. Here, we report that MARCKS is expressed in human spermatozoa and localizes to the sperm head and the tail. Calcium- and phorbol ester-triggered acrosomal exocytosis in permeabilized sperm was abrogated by different anti-MARCKS antibodies raised against two different domains, indicating that the protein participates in acrosomal exocytosis. Interestingly, an anti-phosphorylated MARCKS antibody was not able to inhibit secretion. Similar results were obtained using recombinant proteins and phospho-mutants of MARCKS effector domain (ED, indicating that phosphorylation regulates MARCKS function in acrosomal exocytosis. It is known that unphosphorylated MARCKS sequesters PIP2. This phospholipid is the precursor for IP3, which in turn triggers release of calcium from the acrosome during acrosomal exocytosis. We found that PIP2 and adenophostin, a potent IP3-receptor agonist, rescued MARCKS inhibition in permeabilized sperm, suggesting that MARCKS inhibits acrosomal exocytosis by sequestering PIP2 and, indirectly, MARCKS regulates the intracellular calcium mobilization. In non-permeabilized sperm, a permeable peptide of MARCKS ED also inhibited acrosomal exocytosis when stimulated by a natural agonist such as progesterone, and pharmacological inducers such as calcium ionophore and phorbol ester. The preincubation of human sperm with the permeable MARCKS ED abolished the increase in calcium levels caused by progesterone, demonstrating that MARCKS regulates calcium mobilization. In addition, the phosphorylation of MARCKS increased during acrosomal exocytosis stimulated by the same activators. Altogether, these results show that MARCKS is a negative modulator of the acrosomal exocytosis

  10. Development of computational methods for the prediction of protein structure, protein binding, and mutational effects using free energy calculations.

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    A molecular understanding of protein-protein or protein-ligand binding is of crucial importance for the design of proteins or ligands with defined binding characteristics. The comprehensive analysis of biomolecular binding and the coupled rational in silico design of protein-ligand interfaces requires both, accurate and computationally fast methods for the prediction of free energies. Accurate free energy methods usually involve atomistic molecular dynamics simulations that are computationall...

  11. SiteComp: a server for ligand binding site analysis in protein structures

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yingjie; Yoo, Seungyeul; Sanchez, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Computational characterization of ligand-binding sites in proteins provides preliminary information for functional annotation, protein design and ligand optimization. SiteComp implements binding site analysis for comparison of binding sites, evaluation of residue contribution to binding sites and identification of sub-sites with distinct molecular interaction properties.

  12. Cellular localization of the Ca2+ binding TCH3 protein of Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosiewicz, D. M.; Polisensky, D. H.; Braam, J.

    1995-01-01

    TCH3 is an Arabidopsis touch (TCH) gene isolated as a result of its strong and rapid upregulation in response to mechanical stimuli, such as touch and wind. TCH3 encodes an unusual calcium ion-binding protein that is closely related to calmodulin but has the potential to bind six calcium ions. Here it is shown that TCH3 shows a restricted pattern of accumulation during Arabidopsis vegetative development. These data provide insight into the endogenous signals that may regulate TCH3 expression and the sites of TCH3 action. TCH3 is abundant in the shoot apical meristem, vascular tissue, the root columella and pericycle cells that give rise to lateral roots. In addition, TCH3 accumulation in cells of developing shoots and roots closely correlates with the process of cellular expansion. Following wind stimulation, TCH3 becomes more abundant in specific regions including the branchpoints of leaf primordia and stipules, pith parenchyma, and the vascular tissue. The consequences of TCH3 upregulation by wind are therefore spatially restricted and TCH3 may function at these sites to modify cell or tissue characteristics following mechanical stimulation. Because TCH3 accumulates specifically in cells and tissues that are thought to be under the influence of auxin, auxin levels may regulate TCH3 expression during development. TCH3 is upregulated in response to low levels of exogenous indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), but not by inactive auxin-related compounds. These results suggest that TCH3 protein may play roles in mediating physiological responses to auxin and mechanical environmental stimuli.

  13. Imaging the recruitment and loss of proteins and lipids at single sites of calcium-triggered exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trexler, Adam J; Sochacki, Kem A; Taraska, Justin W

    2016-08-01

    How and when the dozens of molecules that control exocytosis assemble in living cells to regulate the fusion of a vesicle with the plasma membrane is unknown. Here we image with two-color total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy the local changes of 27 proteins at single dense-core vesicles undergoing calcium-triggered fusion. We identify two broad dynamic behaviors of exocytic molecules. First, proteins enriched at exocytic sites are associated with DCVs long before exocytosis, and near the time of membrane fusion, they diffuse away. These proteins include Rab3 and Rab27, rabphilin3a, munc18a, tomosyn, and CAPS. Second, we observe a group of classical endocytic proteins and lipids, including dynamins, amphiphysin, syndapin, endophilin, and PIP2, which are rapidly and transiently recruited to the exocytic site near the time of membrane fusion. Dynamin mutants unable to bind amphiphysin were not recruited, indicating that amphiphysin is involved in localizing dynamin to the fusion site. Expression of mutant dynamins and knockdown of endogenous dynamin altered the rate of cargo release from single vesicles. Our data reveal the dynamics of many key proteins involved in exocytosis and identify a rapidly recruited dynamin/PIP2/BAR assembly that regulates the exocytic fusion pore of dense-core vesicles in cultured endocrine beta cells. PMID:27307587

  14. Promoter-distal RNA polymerase II binding discriminates active from inactive CCAAT/ enhancer-binding protein beta binding sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Daniel; Roberts, Brian S.; Carleton, Julia B.; Partridge, E. Christopher; White, Michael A.; Cohen, Barak A.; Cooper, Gregory M.; Gertz, Jason; Myers, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) bind to thousands of DNA sequences in mammalian genomes, but most of these binding events appear to have no direct effect on gene expression. It is unclear why only a subset of TF bound sites are actively involved in transcriptional regulation. Moreover, the key genomic features that accurately discriminate between active and inactive TF binding events remain ambiguous. Recent studies have identified promoter-distal RNA polymerase II (RNAP2) binding at enhancer elements, suggesting that these interactions may serve as a marker for active regulatory sequences. Despite these correlative analyses, a thorough functional validation of these genomic co-occupancies is still lacking. To characterize the gene regulatory activity of DNA sequences underlying promoter-distal TF binding events that co-occur with RNAP2 and TF sites devoid of RNAP2 occupancy using a functional reporter assay, we performed cis-regulatory element sequencing (CRE-seq). We tested more than 1000 promoter-distal CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (CEBPB)-bound sites in HepG2 and K562 cells, and found that CEBPB-bound sites co-occurring with RNAP2 were more likely to exhibit enhancer activity. CEBPB-bound sites further maintained substantial cell-type specificity, indicating that local DNA sequence can accurately convey cell-type–specific regulatory information. By comparing our CRE-seq results to a comprehensive set of genome annotations, we identified a variety of genomic features that are strong predictors of regulatory element activity and cell-type–specific activity. Collectively, our functional assay results indicate that RNAP2 occupancy can be used as a key genomic marker that can distinguish active from inactive TF bound sites. PMID:26486725

  15. Functional interactions between polypyrimidine tract binding protein and PRI peptide ligand containing proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Miguel B; Ascher, David B; Gooding, Clare; Lang, Emma; Maude, Hannah; Turner, David; Llorian, Miriam; Pires, Douglas E V; Attig, Jan; Smith, Christopher W J

    2016-08-15

    Polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTBP1) is a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) that plays roles in most stages of the life-cycle of pre-mRNA and mRNAs in the nucleus and cytoplasm. PTBP1 has four RNA binding domains of the RNA recognition motif (RRM) family, each of which can bind to pyrimidine motifs. In addition, RRM2 can interact via its dorsal surface with proteins containing short peptide ligands known as PTB RRM2 interacting (PRI) motifs, originally found in the protein Raver1. Here we review our recent progress in understanding the interactions of PTB with RNA and with various proteins containing PRI ligands. PMID:27528752

  16. The human enhancer-binding protein Gata3 binds to several T-cell receptor regulatory elements.

    OpenAIRE

    Marine, J; Winoto, A

    1991-01-01

    The tissue-specific developmental regulation of the alpha, beta, gamma and delta T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) genes is controlled by the corresponding distinct enhancers and their enhancer-binding proteins. To find a common TCR regulatory element, we have studied the ability of the newly described enhancer-binding protein Gata3 to bind to the sequence motif (A/T)GATA(G/A) shared between enhancer elements of all four TCR genes. Gata3 was shown in the chicken to be an enhancer-binding protein ...

  17. Calcium Sulfate with Stearic Acid as an Encouraging Carrier for Reindeer Bone Protein Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pekka Jalovaara

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Various bone proteins and growth factors in specific concentrations are required for bone formation. If the body cannot produce sufficient quantities of these factors, bone trauma can be healed with an implant that includes the required factors in a carrier. This study was designed to evaluate various calcium salt candidates that can be used as carrier with reindeer bone protein extract to induce ectopic bone formation in the muscle pouch model of mouse. The bone protein extract was either impregnated into the disc form of carrier or mixed with carrier powder before implantation. The radiographic analysis indicated increased bone formation in all of the active groups containing the bone protein extract compared to the controls within 21 days follow-up. The highest bone formation was seen in the group with calcium sulfate with stearic acid where new bone and calcified cartilage were clearly visible. The greatest bone formation occurred in the groups that had bone protein extract readily available. This indicates that the bone forming factors in sufficient concentrations are required at the early stage of bone formation. The calcium sulfate with stearic acid was the most suitable and effective carrier for reindeer bone protein extract.

  18. Bile salt recognition by human liver fatty acid binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favretto, Filippo; Santambrogio, Carlo; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Molinari, Henriette; Grandori, Rita; Assfalg, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) act as intracellular carriers of lipid molecules, and play a role in global metabolism regulation. Liver FABP (L-FABP) is prominent among FABPs for its wide ligand repertoire, which includes long-chain fatty acids as well as bile acids (BAs). In this work, we performed a detailed molecular- and atomic-level analysis of the interactions established by human L-FABP with nine BAs to understand the binding specificity for this important class of cholesterol-derived metabolites. Protein-ligand complex formation was monitored using heteronuclear NMR, steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. BAs were found to interact with L-FABP with dissociation constants in the narrow range of 0.6-7 μm; however, the diverse substitution patterns of the sterol nucleus and the presence of side-chain conjugation resulted in complexes endowed with various degrees of conformational heterogeneity. Trihydroxylated BAs formed monomeric complexes in which single ligand molecules occupied similar internal binding sites, based on chemical-shift perturbation data. Analysis of NMR line shapes upon progressive addition of taurocholate indicated that the binding mechanism departed from a simple binary association equilibrium, and instead involved intermediates along the binding path. The co-linear chemical shift behavior observed for L-FABP complexes with cholate derivatives added insight into conformational dynamics in the presence of ligands. The observed spectroscopic features of L-FABP/BA complexes, discussed in relation to ligand chemistry, suggest possible molecular determinants of recognition, with implications regarding intracellular BA transport. Our findings suggest that human L-FABP is a poorly selective, universal BA binder. PMID:25639618

  19. Interactome map uncovers phosphatidylserine transport by oxysterol-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kenji; Anand, Kanchan; Chiapparino, Antonella; Kumar, Arun; Poletto, Mattia; Kaksonen, Marko; Gavin, Anne-Claude

    2013-09-12

    The internal organization of eukaryotic cells into functionally specialized, membrane-delimited organelles of unique composition implies a need for active, regulated lipid transport. Phosphatidylserine (PS), for example, is synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum and then preferentially associates--through mechanisms not fully elucidated--with the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. Lipids can travel via transport vesicles. Alternatively, several protein families known as lipid-transfer proteins (LTPs) can extract a variety of specific lipids from biological membranes and transport them, within a hydrophobic pocket, through aqueous phases. Here we report the development of an integrated approach that combines protein fractionation and lipidomics to characterize the LTP-lipid complexes formed in vivo. We applied the procedure to 13 LTPs in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: the six Sec14 homology (Sfh) proteins and the seven oxysterol-binding homology (Osh) proteins. We found that Osh6 and Osh7 have an unexpected specificity for PS. In vivo, they participate in PS homeostasis and the transport of this lipid to the plasma membrane. The structure of Osh6 bound to PS reveals unique features that are conserved among other metazoan oxysterol-binding proteins (OSBPs) and are required for PS recognition. Our findings represent the first direct evidence, to our knowledge, for the non-vesicular transfer of PS from its site of biosynthesis (the endoplasmic reticulum) to its site of biological activity (the plasma membrane). We describe a new subfamily of OSBPs, including human ORP5 and ORP10, that transfer PS and propose new mechanisms of action for a protein family that is involved in several human pathologies such as cancer, dyslipidaemia and metabolic syndrome. PMID:23934110

  20. Arylfluorosulfates Inactivate Intracellular Lipid Binding Protein(s) through Chemoselective SuFEx Reaction with a Binding Site Tyr Residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wentao; Dong, Jiajia; Plate, Lars; Mortenson, David E; Brighty, Gabriel J; Li, Suhua; Liu, Yu; Galmozzi, Andrea; Lee, Peter S; Hulce, Jonathan J; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Saez, Enrique; Powers, Evan T; Wilson, Ian A; Sharpless, K Barry; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2016-06-15

    Arylfluorosulfates have appeared only rarely in the literature and have not been explored as probes for covalent conjugation to proteins, possibly because they were assumed to possess high reactivity, as with other sulfur(VI) halides. However, we find that arylfluorosulfates become reactive only under certain circumstances, e.g., when fluoride displacement by a nucleophile is facilitated. Herein, we explore the reactivity of structurally simple arylfluorosulfates toward the proteome of human cells. We demonstrate that the protein reactivity of arylfluorosulfates is lower than that of the corresponding aryl sulfonyl fluorides, which are better characterized with regard to proteome reactivity. We discovered that simple hydrophobic arylfluorosulfates selectively react with a few members of the intracellular lipid binding protein (iLBP) family. A central function of iLBPs is to deliver small-molecule ligands to nuclear hormone receptors. Arylfluorosulfate probe 1 reacts with a conserved tyrosine residue in the ligand-binding site of a subset of iLBPs. Arylfluorosulfate probes 3 and 4, featuring a biphenyl core, very selectively and efficiently modify cellular retinoic acid binding protein 2 (CRABP2), both in vitro and in living cells. The X-ray crystal structure of the CRABP2-4 conjugate, when considered together with binding site mutagenesis experiments, provides insight into how CRABP2 might activate arylfluorosulfates toward site-specific reaction. Treatment of breast cancer cells with probe 4 attenuates nuclear hormone receptor activity mediated by retinoic acid, an endogenous client lipid of CRABP2. Our findings demonstrate that arylfluorosulfates can selectively target single iLBPs, making them useful for understanding iLBP function. PMID:27191344

  1. Buffer Interference with Protein Dynamics: A Case Study on Human Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Dong; Yang, Daiwen

    2009-01-01

    Selection of suitable buffer types is often a crucial step for generating appropriate protein samples for NMR and x-ray crystallographic studies. Although the possible interaction between MES buffer (2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid) and proteins has been discussed previously, the interaction is usually thought to have no significant effects on the structures of proteins. In this study, we demonstrate the direct, albeit weak, interaction between MES and human liver fatty acid binding prote...

  2. Shrimp arginine kinase being a binding protein of WSSV envelope protein VP31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cuiyan; Gao, Qiang; Liang, Yan; Li, Chen; Liu, Chao; Huang, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Viral entry into the host is the earliest stage of infection in the viral life cycle in which attachment proteins play a key role. VP31 (WSV340/WSSV396), an envelope protein of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), contains an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide domain known as a cellular attachment site. At present, the process of VP31 interacting with shrimp host cells has not been explored. Therefore, the VP31 gene was cloned into pET30a (+), expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21 and purified with immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. Four gill cellular proteins of shrimp (Fenneropenaeus chinensis) were pulled down by an affinity column coupled with recombinant VP31 (rVP31), and the amino acid sequences were identified with MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Hemocyanin, beta-actin, arginine kinase (AK), and an unknown protein were suggested as the putative VP31 receptor proteins. SDS-PAGE showed that AK is the predominant binding protein of VP31. An i n vitro binding activity experiment indicated that recombinant AK's (rAK) binding activity with rVP31 is comparable to that with the same amount of WSSV. These results suggested that AK, as a member of the phosphagen kinase family, plays a role in WSSV infection. This is the first evidence showing that AK is a binding protein of VP31. Further studies on this topic will elucidate WSSV infection mechanism in the future.

  3. SLOB, a SLOWPOKE channel binding protein, regulates insulin pathway signaling and metabolism in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L Sheldon

    Full Text Available There is ample evidence that ion channel modulation by accessory proteins within a macromolecular complex can regulate channel activity and thereby impact neuronal excitability. However, the downstream consequences of ion channel modulation remain largely undetermined. The Drosophila melanogaster large conductance calcium-activated potassium channel SLOWPOKE (SLO undergoes modulation via its binding partner SLO-binding protein (SLOB. Regulation of SLO by SLOB influences the voltage dependence of SLO activation and modulates synaptic transmission. SLO and SLOB are expressed especially prominently in median neurosecretory cells (mNSCs in the pars intercerebralis (PI region of the brain; these cells also express and secrete Drosophila insulin like peptides (dILPs. Previously, we found that flies lacking SLOB exhibit increased resistance to starvation, and we reasoned that SLOB may regulate aspects of insulin signaling and metabolism. Here we investigate the role of SLOB in metabolism and find that slob null flies exhibit changes in energy storage and insulin pathway signaling. In addition, slob null flies have decreased levels of dilp3 and increased levels of takeout, a gene known to be involved in feeding and metabolism. Targeted expression of SLOB to mNSCs rescues these alterations in gene expression, as well as the metabolic phenotypes. Analysis of fly lines mutant for both slob and slo indicate that the effect of SLOB on metabolism and gene expression is via SLO. We propose that modulation of SLO by SLOB regulates neurotransmission in mNSCs, influencing downstream insulin pathway signaling and metabolism.

  4. Roles for GTP-binding proteins in Vigna unguiculata responding to Nod factors or chitin elicitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    μNod factors are lipo-chito-oligosaccharides secreted by Rhizobium to initiate deformation of legume root hairs and other changes such as increases in intracellular calcium in responsive root hairs. We studied the effects of Nod factors and G-protein modulators on root hair deformation and found significant deformation of root hairs after 30 min exposure to the compounds. Since G-proteins have been implicated in the root hair response to Nod factors in vivo, we examined the GTP-binding profiles of root microsomal membrane fractions isolated from the nodulation competent zone of the legume Vigna unguiculata. GTP competitively binds to microsomal membrane fractions labelled with [35S]GTPγS with a high affinity, yielding a two-site displacement curve with displacement constants (Ki) of 0.58 μM and 0.16 μM. Competition with either ATP or GDP revealed a one-site displacement curve with Ki of 4.14 and 11.7 μM respectively. To test if exposure to Nod factors affect the GTP-binding profile, we isolated microsomal membrane fractions from roots pretreated with either NodNGR[S] (from Rhizobium sp. NGR234) or the four-sugar, tetracetylchitotetraose (TACT) backbone of Nod factors. Pretreatment with NodNGR[S] results in an increased affinity for GTP of several hundred-fold. Roots pretreated with TACT also showed a similar but slightly smaller increase in affinity for GTP. To begin identification of possible candidates microsomal proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE and GTP-binding proteins were probed with [35S]GTPγS. Microsomal membrane factions isolated from roots pretreated with NodNGR[S] revealed two proteins (27 kDa and 25 kDa) with a higher affinity for GTPγS. Western blotting of the microsomal membrane preparation with anti-Rac antibodies also showed changes in Rac associated signal in microsomal membranes prepared from either NodNGR[S] or TACT pretreated roots. These results provide further support for a role for small, monomeric G-proteins in the Nod factor signal

  5. Local Unfolding of Fatty Acid Binding Protein to Allow Ligand Entry for Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Tianshu; Fan, Jing-Song; Zhou, Hu; Lin, Qingsong; Yang, Daiwen

    2016-06-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins are responsible for the transportation of fatty acids in biology. Despite intensive studies, the molecular mechanism of fatty acid entry to and exit from the protein cavity is still unclear. Here a cap-closed variant of human intestinal fatty acid binding protein was generated by mutagenesis, in which the helical cap is locked to the β-barrel by a disulfide linkage. Structure determination shows that this variant adopts a closed conformation, but still uptakes fatty acids. Stopped-flow experiments indicate that a rate-limiting step exists before the ligand association and this step corresponds to the conversion of the closed form to the open one. NMR relaxation dispersion and H-D exchange data demonstrate the presence of two excited states: one is native-like, but the other adopts a locally unfolded structure. Local unfolding of helix 2 generates an opening for ligands to enter the protein cavity, and thus controls the ligand association rate. PMID:27105780

  6. Interplay between binding affinity and kinetics in protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huaiqing; Huang, Yongqi; Liu, Zhirong

    2016-07-01

    To clarify the interplay between the binding affinity and kinetics of protein-protein interactions, and the possible role of intrinsically disordered proteins in such interactions, molecular simulations were carried out on 20 protein complexes. With bias potential and reweighting techniques, the free energy profiles were obtained under physiological affinities, which showed that the bound-state valley is deep with a barrier height of 12 - 33 RT. From the dependence of the affinity on interface interactions, the entropic contribution to the binding affinity is approximated to be proportional to the interface area. The extracted dissociation rates based on the Arrhenius law correlate reasonably well with the experimental values (Pearson correlation coefficient R = 0.79). For each protein complex, a linear free energy relationship between binding affinity and the dissociation rate was confirmed, but the distribution of the slopes for intrinsically disordered proteins showed no essential difference with that observed for ordered proteins. A comparison with protein folding was also performed. Proteins 2016; 84:920-933. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27018856

  7. Computational analysis of HIV-1 protease protein binding pockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Gene M; Reddy, A Srinivas; Kumar, Sunil; Bailey, Barbara A; Garg, Rajni

    2010-10-25

    Mutations that arise in HIV-1 protease after exposure to various HIV-1 protease inhibitors have proved to be a difficult aspect in the treatment of HIV. Mutations in the binding pocket of the protease can prevent the protease inhibitor from binding to the protein effectively. In the present study, the crystal structures of 68 HIV-1 proteases complexed with one of the nine FDA approved protease inhibitors from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) were analyzed by (a) identifying the mutational changes with the aid of a developed mutation map and (b) correlating the structure of the binding pockets with the complexed inhibitors. The mutations of each crystal structure were identified by comparing the amino acid sequence of each structure against the HIV-1 wild-type strain HXB2. These mutations were visually presented in the form of a mutation map to analyze mutation patterns corresponding to each protease inhibitor. The crystal structure mutation patterns of each inhibitor (in vitro) were compared against the mutation patterns observed in in vivo data. The in vitro mutation patterns were found to be representative of most of the major in vivo mutations. We then performed a data mining analysis of the binding pockets from each crystal structure in terms of their chemical descriptors to identify important structural features of the HIV-1 protease protein with respect to the binding conformation of the HIV-1 protease inhibitors. Data mining analysis is performed using several classification techniques: Random Forest (RF), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), and logistic regression (LR). We developed two hybrid models, RF-LDA and RF-LR. Random Forest is used as a feature selection proxy, reducing the descriptor space to a few of the most relevant descriptors determined by the classifier. These descriptors are then used to develop the subsequent LDA, LR, and hierarchical classification models. Clustering analysis of the binding pockets using the selected descriptors used to

  8. Human pentraxin 3 binds to the complement regulator c4b-binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Braunschweig

    Full Text Available The long pentraxin 3 (PTX3 is a soluble recognition molecule with multiple functions including innate immune defense against certain microbes and the clearance of apoptotic cells. PTX3 interacts with recognition molecules of the classical and lectin complement pathways and thus initiates complement activation. In addition, binding of PTX3 to the alternative complement pathway regulator factor H was shown. Here, we show that PTX3 binds to the classical and lectin pathway regulator C4b-binding protein (C4BP. A PTX3-binding site was identified within short consensus repeats 1-3 of the C4BP α-chain. PTX3 did not interfere with the cofactor activity of C4BP in the fluid phase and C4BP maintained its complement regulatory activity when bound to PTX3 on surfaces. While C4BP and factor H did not compete for PTX3 binding, the interaction of C4BP with PTX3 was inhibited by C1q and by L-ficolin. PTX3 bound to human fibroblast- and endothelial cell-derived extracellular matrices and recruited functionally active C4BP to these surfaces. Whereas PTX3 enhanced the activation of the classical/lectin pathway and caused enhanced C3 deposition on extracellular matrix, deposition of terminal pathway components and the generation of the inflammatory mediator C5a were not increased. Furthermore, PTX3 enhanced the binding of C4BP to late apoptotic cells, which resulted in an increased rate of inactivation of cell surface bound C4b and a reduction in the deposition of C5b-9. Thus, in addition to complement activators, PTX3 interacts with complement inhibitors including C4BP. This balanced interaction on extracellular matrix and on apoptotic cells may prevent excessive local complement activation that would otherwise lead to inflammation and host tissue damage.

  9. Liver fatty acid-binding protein binds monoacylglycerol in vitro and in mouse liver cytosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagakos, William S; Guan, Xudong; Ho, Shiu-Ying; Sawicki, Luciana Rodriguez; Corsico, Betina; Kodukula, Sarala; Murota, Kaeko; Stark, Ruth E; Storch, Judith

    2013-07-01

    Liver fatty acid-binding protein (LFABP; FABP1) is expressed both in liver and intestinal mucosa. Mice null for LFABP were recently shown to have altered metabolism of not only fatty acids but also monoacylglycerol, the two major products of dietary triacylglycerol hydrolysis (Lagakos, W. S., Gajda, A. M., Agellon, L., Binas, B., Choi, V., Mandap, B., Russnak, T., Zhou, Y. X., and Storch, J. (2011) Am. J. Physiol. Gastrointest. Liver Physiol. 300, G803-G814). Nevertheless, the binding and transport of monoacylglycerol (MG) by LFABP are uncertain, with conflicting reports in the literature as to whether this single chain amphiphile is in fact bound by LFABP. In the present studies, gel filtration chromatography of liver cytosol from LFABP(-/-) mice shows the absence of the low molecular weight peak of radiolabeled monoolein present in the fractions that contain LFABP in cytosol from wild type mice, indicating that LFABP binds sn-2 MG in vivo. Furthermore, solution-state NMR spectroscopy demonstrates two molecules of sn-2 monoolein bound in the LFABP binding pocket in positions similar to those found for oleate binding. Equilibrium binding affinities are ∼2-fold lower for MG compared with fatty acid. Finally, kinetic studies examining the transfer of a fluorescent MG analog show that the rate of transfer of MG is 7-fold faster from LFABP to phospholipid membranes than from membranes to membranes and occurs by an aqueous diffusion mechanism. These results provide strong support for monoacylglycerol as a physiological ligand for LFABP and further suggest that LFABP functions in the efficient intracellular transport of MG. PMID:23658011

  10. Liver Fatty Acid-binding Protein Binds Monoacylglycerol in Vitro and in Mouse Liver Cytosol*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagakos, William S.; Guan, Xudong; Ho, Shiu-Ying; Sawicki, Luciana Rodriguez; Corsico, Betina; Kodukula, Sarala; Murota, Kaeko; Stark, Ruth E.; Storch, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Liver fatty acid-binding protein (LFABP; FABP1) is expressed both in liver and intestinal mucosa. Mice null for LFABP were recently shown to have altered metabolism of not only fatty acids but also monoacylglycerol, the two major products of dietary triacylglycerol hydrolysis (Lagakos, W. S., Gajda, A. M., Agellon, L., Binas, B., Choi, V., Mandap, B., Russnak, T., Zhou, Y. X., and Storch, J. (2011) Am. J. Physiol. Gastrointest. Liver Physiol. 300, G803–G814). Nevertheless, the binding and transport of monoacylglycerol (MG) by LFABP are uncertain, with conflicting reports in the literature as to whether this single chain amphiphile is in fact bound by LFABP. In the present studies, gel filtration chromatography of liver cytosol from LFABP−/− mice shows the absence of the low molecular weight peak of radiolabeled monoolein present in the fractions that contain LFABP in cytosol from wild type mice, indicating that LFABP binds sn-2 MG in vivo. Furthermore, solution-state NMR spectroscopy demonstrates two molecules of sn-2 monoolein bound in the LFABP binding pocket in positions similar to those found for oleate binding. Equilibrium binding affinities are ∼2-fold lower for MG compared with fatty acid. Finally, kinetic studies examining the transfer of a fluorescent MG analog show that the rate of transfer of MG is 7-fold faster from LFABP to phospholipid membranes than from membranes to membranes and occurs by an aqueous diffusion mechanism. These results provide strong support for monoacylglycerol as a physiological ligand for LFABP and further suggest that LFABP functions in the efficient intracellular transport of MG. PMID:23658011

  11. Isolation and characterization of Dictyostelium thymidine kinase 1 as a calmodulin-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, Danton H; Chatterjee-Chakraborty, Munmun; Wagler, Stephanie; Myre, Michael A

    2005-06-17

    Probing of a cDNA expression library from multicellular development of Dictyostelium discoideum using a recombinant radiolabelled calmodulin probe (35S-VU1-CaM) led to the isolation of a cDNA encoding a putative CaM-binding protein (CaMBP). The cDNA contained an open reading frame of 951 bp encoding a 227aa polypeptide (25.5 kDa). Sequence comparisons led to highly significant matches with cytosolic thymidine kinases (TK1; EC 2.7.1.21) from a diverse number of species including humans (7e-56; 59% Identities; 75% Positives) indicating that the encoded protein is D. discoideum TK1 (DdTK1; ThyB). DdTK1 has not been previously characterized in this organism. In keeping with its sequence similarity with DdTK1, antibodies against humanTK1 recognize DdTK1, which is expressed during growth but decreases in amount after starvation. A CaM-binding domain (CaMBD; 20GKTTELIRRIKRFNFANKKC30) was identified and wild type DdTK1 plus two constructs (DdTK deltaC36, DdTK deltaC75) possessing the domain were shown to bind CaM in vitro but only in the presence of calcium while a construct (DdTK deltaN72) lacking the region failed to bind to CaM. Thus, DdTK1 is a Ca2+-dependent CaMBP. Sequence alignments against TK1 from vertebrates to viruses show that CaM-binding region is highly conserved. The identified CaMBD overlaps the ATP-binding (P-loop) domain suggesting CaM might affect the activity of this kinase. Recombinant DdTK is enzymatically active and showed stimulation by CaM (113+/-0.5%) an in vitro enhancement that was prevented by co-addition of the CaM antagonists W7 (91.2+/-0.8%) and W13 (96.6+/-0.6%). The discovery that TK1 from D. discoideum, and possibly other species including humans and a large number of human viruses, is a Ca2+-dependent CaMBP opens up new avenues for research on this medically relevant protein. PMID:15883042

  12. Targeting Human Cancer by a Glycosaminoglycan Binding Malaria Protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salanti, Ali; Clausen, Thomas M.; Agerbæk, Mette Ø.;

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum engineer infected erythrocytes to present the malarial protein, VAR2CSA, which binds a distinct type chondroitin sulfate (CS) exclusively expressed in the placenta. Here, we show that the same CS modification is present on a high proportion of malignant cells and that it can...... be specifically targeted by recombinant VAR2CSA (rVAR2). In tumors, placental-like CS chains are linked to a limited repertoire of cancer-associated proteoglycans including CD44 and CSPG4. The rVAR2 protein localizes to tumors in vivo and rVAR2 fused to diphtheria toxin or conjugated to hemiasterlin compounds...... strongly inhibits in vivo tumor cell growth and metastasis. Our data demonstrate how an evolutionarily refined parasite-derived protein can be exploited to target a common, but complex, malignancy-associated glycosaminoglycan modification....

  13. The clinical significance of fatty acid binding proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Choromańska

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Excessive levels of free fatty acids are toxic to cells. The human body has evolved a defense mechanism in the form of small cytoplasmic proteins called fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs that bind long-chain fatty acids (LCFA, and then refer them to appropriate intracellular disposal sites (oxidation in mitochondria and peroxisomes or storage in the endoplasmic reticulum. So far, nine types of these proteins have been described, and their name refers to the place in which they were first identified or where they can be found in the greatest concentration. The most important FABPs were isolated from the liver (L-FABP, heart (H-FABP, intestine (I-FABP, brain (B-FABP, epidermis (E-FABP and adipocytes (A-FABP. Determination of H-FABP is used in the diagnosis of myocardial infarction, and L-FABP in kidney lesions of different etiologies. It is postulated that FABPs play an important role in the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases. Elevated levels of A-FABP have been found in the pericardial fat tissue and were associated with cardiac dysfunction in obese people. A rise in A-FABP has been observed in patients with type II diabetes. I-FABP is known as a marker of cell damage in the small intestine. Increased concentration of B-FABP has been associated with human brain tumors such as glioblastoma and astrocytoma, as well as with neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and other disorders of cognitive function. The aim of this work was to present current data on the clinical significance of fatty acid binding proteins.

  14. Structure and mechanism of calmodulin binding to a signaling sphingolipid reveal new aspects of lipid-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Erika; Harmat, Veronika; Tóth, Judit; Vértessy, Beáta G; Módos, Károly; Kardos, József; Liliom, Károly

    2010-10-01

    Lipid-protein interactions are rarely characterized at a structural molecular level due to technical difficulties; however, the biological significance of understanding the mechanism of these interactions is outstanding. In this report, we provide mechanistic insight into the inhibitory complex formation of the lipid mediator sphingosylphosphorylcholine with calmodulin, the most central and ubiquitous regulator protein in calcium signaling. We applied crystallographic, thermodynamic, kinetic, and spectroscopic approaches using purified bovine calmodulin and bovine cerebral microsomal fraction to arrive at our conclusions. Here we present 1) a 1.6-Å resolution crystal structure of their complex, in which the sphingolipid occupies the conventional hydrophobic binding site on calmodulin; 2) a peculiar stoichiometry-dependent binding process: at low or high protein-to-lipid ratio calmodulin binds lipid micelles or a few lipid molecules in a compact globular conformation, respectively, and 3) evidence that the sphingolipid displaces calmodulin from its targets on cerebral microsomes. We have ascertained the specificity of the interaction using structurally related lipids as controls. Our observations reveal the structural basis of selective calmodulin inhibition by the sphingolipid. On the basis of the crystallographic and biophysical characterization of the calmodulin-sphingosylphosphorylcholine interaction, we propose a novel lipid-protein binding model, which might be applicable to other interactions as well. PMID:20522785

  15. Cloud computing for protein-ligand binding site comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Che-Lun; Hua, Guan-Jie

    2013-01-01

    The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery. PMID:23762824

  16. Calcium binding in α-amylases: An X-ray diffraction study at 2.1-angstrom resolution of two enzymes from Aspergillus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray diffraction analysis (at 2.1-angstrom resolution) of an acid alpha-amylase from Aspergillus niger allowed a detailed description of the stereochemistry of the calcium-binding sites. The primary site (which is essential in maintaining proper folding around the active site) contains a tightly bound Ca2+ with an unusually high number of eight ligands. A secondary binding site was identified at the bottom of the substrate binding cleft; it involves the residues presumed to play a catalytic role (Asp206 and Glu230). This explains the inhibitory effect of calcium observed at higher concentrations. Neutral Aspergillus oryzae (TAKA) α-amylase was also refined in a new crystal at 2.1-angstrom resolution. The structure of this homologous (over 80%) enzyme and addition kinetic studies support all the structural conclusions regarding both calcium-binding sites

  17. Integrating protein structures and precomputed genealogies in the Magnum database: Examples with cellular retinoid binding proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley Michael E

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When accurate models for the divergent evolution of protein sequences are integrated with complementary biological information, such as folded protein structures, analyses of the combined data often lead to new hypotheses about molecular physiology. This represents an excellent example of how bioinformatics can be used to guide experimental research. However, progress in this direction has been slowed by the lack of a publicly available resource suitable for general use. Results The precomputed Magnum database offers a solution to this problem for ca. 1,800 full-length protein families with at least one crystal structure. The Magnum deliverables include 1 multiple sequence alignments, 2 mapping of alignment sites to crystal structure sites, 3 phylogenetic trees, 4 inferred ancestral sequences at internal tree nodes, and 5 amino acid replacements along tree branches. Comprehensive evaluations revealed that the automated procedures used to construct Magnum produced accurate models of how proteins divergently evolve, or genealogies, and correctly integrated these with the structural data. To demonstrate Magnum's capabilities, we asked for amino acid replacements requiring three nucleotide substitutions, located at internal protein structure sites, and occurring on short phylogenetic tree branches. In the cellular retinoid binding protein family a site that potentially modulates ligand binding affinity was discovered. Recruitment of cellular retinol binding protein to function as a lens crystallin in the diurnal gecko afforded another opportunity to showcase the predictive value of a browsable database containing branch replacement patterns integrated with protein structures. Conclusion We integrated two areas of protein science, evolution and structure, on a large scale and created a precomputed database, known as Magnum, which is the first freely available resource of its kind. Magnum provides evolutionary and structural

  18. In vitro binding of selenium by rat liver mitochondrial selenium-binding protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Last year the authors reported that upon freezing and thawing mitochondria from rats injected with [75Se]Na2SeO3 (75Se-selenite), a 75Se-binding protein (SeBP) was released. They have studied further in vitro labelling of SeBP. This matrix protein was labelled in vitro when lysed mitochondria (containing non-matrix material) were incubated with 75Se-selenite but not when matrix material alone was incubated with 75Se-selenite. Thus, there are one or more promoters of in vitro SeBP labelling in the non-matrix fraction. SeBP was also labelled in vitro when 75Se-selenite was added to matrix alone and dialyzed. Dialysis tubing, and not the dialysis process, promoted labelling by affecting SeBP and not by affecting 75Se-selenite. Labelling did not occur when matrix alone and 75Se-selenite were incubated (not dialyzed) in a glass test tube but did occur in a polystyrene test tube. They hypothesize that non-covalent interactions occur between SeBP and dialysis tubing or polystyrene that expose Se binding sites on the protein. A similar mechanism involving mitochondrial non-matrix material may function in vivo. Non-denaturing disc gel electrophoresis of partially purified SeBP labelled in vivo or in vitro suggested that the same protein was labelled in both conditions. Using in vitro binding techniques, SeBP was also found in sheep liver mitochondrial matrix. This supports the theory that SeBP is important in Se metabolism

  19. Ablation of prion protein immunoreactivity by heating in saturated calcium hydroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holtzapple Mark T

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prions, the infectious agents that cause transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs, are relatively resistant to destruction by physical, enzymatic, and chemical treatments. Hydrolysis in boiling saturated calcium hydroxide (limewater utilizes inexpensive chemicals to digest protein components of offal. The purpose of this work was to determine if incubating brain material from scrapie-infected sheep in near-boiling saturated calcium hydroxide solution (Ca(OH2 would abolish immunoreactivity of the infectious prion (PrPSc as determined by western blot. Findings After incubating for as few as 10 minutes in saturated calcium hydroxide at 99°C, immunoreactivity of protease resistant bands by western blot analysis is completely lost. Conclusion Boiling in limewater may offer an alternative for disposal of carcasses and enable alternative uses for rendered products from potentially infected carcasses.

  20. Functional zinc-binding motifs in enzymes and DNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallee, B L; Auld, D S

    1992-01-01

    Zinc is now known to be an integral component of a large number and variety of enzymes and proteins involved in virtually all aspects of metabolism, thus accounting for the fact that this element is essential for growth and development. The chemistry of zinc, superficially bland, in reality has turned out to be ideally appropriate and versatile for the unexpected development of multiple and unique chemical structures which biology has used for specific life processes. The present discussion will centre on those distinctive zinc-binding motifs that are critical both to enzyme function and the expression of the genetic message. X-Ray diffraction structure determination of 15 zinc enzymes belonging to IUB classes I-IV provide absolute standards of reference for the identity and nature of zinc ligands in their families. Three types of zinc enzyme binding motifs emerge through analysis of these: catalytic, coactive or cocatalytic, and structural. In contrast to zinc enzymes virtually all DNA-binding proteins contain multiple zinc atoms. With the availability of NMR and X-ray structure analyses three distinct motifs now emerge for those: zinc fingers, twists and clusters. PMID:1290939

  1. The Movable Type Method Applied to Protein-Ligand Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zheng; Ucisik, Melek N.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2013-01-01

    Accurately computing the free energy for biological processes like protein folding or protein-ligand association remains a challenging problem. Both describing the complex intermolecular forces involved and sampling the requisite configuration space make understanding these processes innately difficult. Herein, we address the sampling problem using a novel methodology we term “movable type”. Conceptually it can be understood by analogy with the evolution of printing and, hence, the name movable type. For example, a common approach to the study of protein-ligand complexation involves taking a database of intact drug-like molecules and exhaustively docking them into a binding pocket. This is reminiscent of early woodblock printing where each page had to be laboriously created prior to printing a book. However, printing evolved to an approach where a database of symbols (letters, numerals, etc.) was created and then assembled using a movable type system, which allowed for the creation of all possible combinations of symbols on a given page, thereby, revolutionizing the dissemination of knowledge. Our movable type (MT) method involves the identification of all atom pairs seen in protein-ligand complexes and then creating two databases: one with their associated pairwise distant dependent energies and another associated with the probability of how these pairs can combine in terms of bonds, angles, dihedrals and non-bonded interactions. Combining these two databases coupled with the principles of statistical mechanics allows us to accurately estimate binding free energies as well as the pose of a ligand in a receptor. This method, by its mathematical construction, samples all of configuration space of a selected region (the protein active site here) in one shot without resorting to brute force sampling schemes involving Monte Carlo, genetic algorithms or molecular dynamics simulations making the methodology extremely efficient. Importantly, this method explores the

  2. Zinc ions bind to and inhibit activated protein C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Tianqing; Ubhayasekera, Wimal; Nickolaus, Noëlle;

    2010-01-01

    Zn2+ ions were found to efficiently inhibit activated protein C (APC), suggesting a potential regulatory function for such inhibition. APC activity assays employing a chromogenic peptide substrate demonstrated that the inhibition was reversible and the apparent K I was 13 +/- 2 microM. k cat was...... seven fold decreased whereas K M was unaffected in the presence of 10 microM Zn2+. The inhibitory effect of Zn2+ on APC activity was also observed when factor Va was used as a substrate in an assay coupled to a prothrombinase assay. The interaction of Zn2+ with APC was accompanied by a reversible...... fold enhanced, presumably due to the Ca2+-induced conformational change affecting the conformation of the Zn2+-binding site. The inhibition mechanism was non-competitive both in the absence and presence of Ca2+. Comparisons of sequences and structures suggested several possible sites for zinc binding...

  3. A unique bivalent binding and inhibition mechanism by the yatapoxvirus interleukin 18 binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Krumm

    Full Text Available Interleukin 18 (IL18 is a cytokine that plays an important role in inflammation as well as host defense against microbes. Mammals encode a soluble inhibitor of IL18 termed IL18 binding protein (IL18BP that modulates IL18 activity through a negative feedback mechanism. Many poxviruses encode homologous IL18BPs, which contribute to virulence. Previous structural and functional studies on IL18 and IL18BPs revealed an essential binding hot spot involving a lysine on IL18 and two aromatic residues on IL18BPs. The aromatic residues are conserved among the very diverse mammalian and poxviruses IL18BPs with the notable exception of yatapoxvirus IL18BPs, which lack a critical phenylalanine residue. To understand the mechanism by which yatapoxvirus IL18BPs neutralize IL18, we solved the crystal structure of the Yaba-Like Disease Virus (YLDV IL18BP and IL18 complex at 1.75 Å resolution. YLDV-IL18BP forms a disulfide bonded homo-dimer engaging IL18 in a 2∶2 stoichiometry, in contrast to the 1∶1 complex of ectromelia virus (ECTV IL18BP and IL18. Disruption of the dimer interface resulted in a functional monomer, however with a 3-fold decrease in binding affinity. The overall architecture of the YLDV-IL18BP:IL18 complex is similar to that observed in the ECTV-IL18BP:IL18 complex, despite lacking the critical lysine-phenylalanine interaction. Through structural and mutagenesis studies, contact residues that are unique to the YLDV-IL18BP:IL18 binding interface were identified, including Q67, P116 of YLDV-IL18BP and Y1, S105 and D110 of IL18. Overall, our studies show that YLDV-IL18BP is unique among the diverse family of mammalian and poxvirus IL-18BPs in that it uses a bivalent binding mode and a unique set of interacting residues for binding IL18. However, despite this extensive divergence, YLDV-IL18BP binds to the same surface of IL18 used by other IL18BPs, suggesting that all IL18BPs use a conserved inhibitory mechanism by blocking a putative receptor-binding

  4. Intramitochondrial localization of universal minicircle sequence-binding protein, a trypanosomatid protein that binds kinetoplast minicircle replication origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Elneel, K; Robinson, D R; Drew, M E; Englund, P T; Shlomai, J

    2001-05-14

    Kinetoplast DNA (kDNA), the mitochondrial DNA of the trypanosomatid Crithidia fasciculata, is a unique structure containing 5,000 DNA minicircles topologically linked into a massive network. In vivo, the network is condensed into a disk-shaped structure. Replication of minicircles initiates at unique origins that are bound by universal minicircle sequence (UMS)-binding protein (UMSBP), a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein. This protein, encoded by a nuclear gene, localizes within the cell's single mitochondrion. Using immunofluorescence, we found that UMSBP localizes exclusively to two neighboring sites adjacent to the face of the kDNA disk nearest the cell's flagellum. This site is distinct from the two antipodal positions at the perimeter of the disk that is occupied by DNA polymerase beta, topoisomerase II, and a structure-specific endonuclease. Although we found constant steady-state levels of UMSBP mRNA and protein and a constant rate of UMSBP synthesis throughout the cell cycle, immunofluorescence indicated that UMSBP localization within the kinetoplast is not static. The intramitochondrial localization of UMSBP and other kDNA replication enzymes significantly clarifies our understanding of the process of kDNA replication. PMID:11352934

  5. Factors Affecting the Binding of a Recombinant Heavy Metal-Binding Domain (CXXC motif Protein to Heavy Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamala Boonyodying

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A number of heavy metal-binding proteins have been used to study bioremediation. CXXC motif, a metal binding domain containing Cys-X-X-Cys motif, has been identified in various organisms. These proteins are capable of binding various types of heavy metals. In this study, heavy metal binding domain (CXXC motif recombinant protein encoded from mcsA gene of S. aureus were cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The factors involved in the metal-binding activity were determined in order to analyze the potential of recombinant protein for bioremediation. A recombinant protein can be bound to Cd2+, Co2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+. The thermal stability of a recombinant protein was tested, and the results showed that the metal binding activity to Cu2+ and Zn2+ still exist after treating the protein at 85ºC for 30 min. The temperature and pH that affected the metal binding activity was tested and the results showed that recombinant protein was still bound to Cu2+ at 65ºC, whereas a pH of 3-7 did not affect the metal binding E. coli harboring a pRset with a heavy metal-binding domain CXXC motif increased the resistance of heavy metals against CuCl2 and CdCl2. This study shows that metal binding domain (CXXC motif recombinant protein can be effectively bound to various types of heavy metals and may be used as a potential tool for studying bioremediation.

  6. The MTA family proteins as novel histone H3 binding proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Meng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase complex (Mi2/NRD/NuRD/NURD has a broad role in regulation of transcription, DNA repair and cell cycle. Previous studies have revealed a specific interaction between NURD and histone H3N-terminal tail in vitro that is not observed for another HDAC1/2-containing complex, Sin3A. However, the subunit(s responsible for specific binding of H3 by NURD has not been defined. Results In this study, we show among several class I HDAC-containing corepressor complexes only NURD exhibits a substantial H3 tail-binding activity in vitro. We present the evidence that the MTA family proteins within the NURD complex interact directly with H3 tail. Extensive in vitro binding assays mapped the H3 tail-binding domain to the C-terminal region of MTA1 and MTA2. Significantly, although the MTA1 and MTA2 mutant proteins with deletion of the C-terminal H3 tail binding domain were assembled into the endogenous NURD complex when expressed in mammalian cells, the resulting NURD complexes were deficient in binding H3 tail in vitro, indicating that the MTA family proteins are required for the observed specific binding of H3 tail peptide by NURD in vitro. However, chromatin fractionation experiments show that the NURD complexes with impaired MTA1/2-H3 tail binding activity remained to be associated with chromatin in cells. Conclusions Together our study reveals a novel histone H3-binding activity for the MTA family proteins and provides evidence that the MTA family proteins mediate the in vitro specific binding of H3 tail peptide by NURD complex. However, multiple mechanisms are likely to contribute to the chromatin association of NURD complex in cells. Our finding also raises the possibility that the MTA family proteins may exert their diverse biological functions at least in part through their direct interaction with H3 tail.

  7. Using persistent homology and dynamical distances to analyze protein binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacev-Nikolic, Violeta; Bubenik, Peter; Nikolić, Dragan; Heo, Giseon

    2016-03-01

    Persistent homology captures the evolution of topological features of a model as a parameter changes. The most commonly used summary statistics of persistent homology are the barcode and the persistence diagram. Another summary statistic, the persistence landscape, was recently introduced by Bubenik. It is a functional summary, so it is easy to calculate sample means and variances, and it is straightforward to construct various test statistics. Implementing a permutation test we detect conformational changes between closed and open forms of the maltose-binding protein, a large biomolecule consisting of 370 amino acid residues. Furthermore, persistence landscapes can be applied to machine learning methods. A hyperplane from a support vector machine shows the clear separation between the closed and open proteins conformations. Moreover, because our approach captures dynamical properties of the protein our results may help in identifying residues susceptible to ligand binding; we show that the majority of active site residues and allosteric pathway residues are located in the vicinity of the most persistent loop in the corresponding filtered Vietoris-Rips complex. This finding was not observed in the classical anisotropic network model. PMID:26812805

  8. Crystal structure of tetranectin, a trimeric plasminogen-binding protein with an alpha-helical coiled coil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, B B; Kastrup, J S; Rasmussen, H;

    1997-01-01

    to a long alpha-helix. Tetranectin has been classified in a distinct group of the C-type lectin superfamily but has structural similarity to the proteins in the group of collectins. Tetranectin has three intramolecular disulfide bridges. Two of these are conserved in the C-type lectin superfamily......, whereas the third is present only in long-form CRDs. Tetranectin represents the first structure of a long-form CRD with intact calcium-binding sites. In tetranectin, the third disulfide bridge tethers the CRD to the long helix in the coiled coil. The trimerization of tetranectin as well as the fixation of...

  9. Interaction of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome and proteasome protein complexes with multiubiquitin chain-binding proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seeger, Michael; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Wilkinson, Caroline R M; Wallace, Mairi; Samejima, Itaru; Taylor, Martin S; Gordon, Colin

    2003-01-01

    Fission yeast Rhp23 and Pus1 represent two families of multiubiquitin chain-binding proteins that associate with the proteasome. We show that both proteins bind to different regions of the proteasome subunit Mts4. The binding site for Pus1 was mapped to a cluster of repetitive sequences also foun...

  10. Maintaining cholesterol homeostasis:Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lutz W. Weber; Meinrad Boll; Andreas Stampfl

    2004-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of how hepatocytes maintain cholesterol homeostasis has become much more transparent with the discovery of sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) in recent years. These membrane proteins are members of the basic helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (bHLHZip) family of transcription factors. They activate the expression of at least 30 genes involved in the synthesis of cholesterol and lipids. SREBPs are synthesized as precursor proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where they form a complex with another protein, SREBP cleavage activating protein (SCAP).The SCAP molecule contains a sterol sensory domain. In the presence of high cellular sterol concentrations SCAP confines SREBP to the ER. With low cellular concentrations, SCAP escorts SREBP to activation in the Golgi. There, SREBP undergoes two proteolytic cleavage steps to release the mature, biologically active transcription factor, nuclear SREBP (nSREBP). nSREBP translocates to the nucleus and binds to sterol response elements (SRE) in the promoter/enhancer regions of target genes. Additional transcription factors are required to activate transcription of these genes. Three different SREBPs are known, SREBPs-1a, -1c and -2. SREBP-1a and -1c are isoforms produced from a single gene by alternate splicing. SREBP-2is encoded by a different gene and does not display any isoforms. It appears that SREBPs alone, in the sequence described above, can exert complete control over cholesterol synthesis, whereas many additional factors (hormones,cytokines, etc.) are required for complete control of lipid metabolism. Medicinal manipulation of the SREBP/SCAP system is expected to prove highly beneficial in the management of cholesterol-related disease.

  11. DnaT is a PriC-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien-Chih; Huang, Cheng-Yang

    2016-09-01

    DnaT and PriC are replication restart primosomal proteins required for re-initiating chromosomal DNA replication. DnaT is a component of the PriA-dependent primosome, while PriC belongs to the PriC-dependent primosome. Whether DnaT can interact with PriC is still unknown. In this study, we define a direct interaction between PriC, a key initiator protein in PriC-mediated DNA replication restart, and DnaT, a DnaB/C complex loader protein, from Klebsiella pneumoniae. In fluorescence titrations, PriC bound to single-stranded DNA with a binding-site size of approximately 9 nt. Gold nanoparticle assay showed that the solution of DnaT-PriC changed from red to purple, which indicated the protein-protein interactions due to gold nanoparticle aggregate. In addition, this DnaT-PriC complex could be co-purified by the heparin HP column. Surface plasmon resonance analysis showed that the Kd value of DnaT bound to PriC was 2.9 × 10(-8) M. These results constitute a pioneering study of the DnaT-PriC interaction and present a putative link between the two independent replication restart pathways, namely, PriA- and PriC-dependent primosome assemblies. Further research can directly focus on determining how DnaT binds to the PriC-SSB-DNA tricomplex and regulates the PriC-dependent replication restart. PMID:27387236

  12. Subcellular targeting of nine calcium-dependent protein kinase isoforms from Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammann, Christian; Ichida, Audrey; Hong, Bimei; Romanowsky, Shawn M.; Hrabak, Estelle M.; Harmon, Alice C.; Pickard, Barbara G.; Harper, Jeffrey F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are specific to plants and some protists. Their activation by calcium makes them important switches for the transduction of intracellular calcium signals. Here, we identify the subcellular targeting potentials for nine CDPK isoforms from Arabidopsis, as determined by expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions in transgenic plants. Subcellular locations were determined by fluorescence microscopy in cells near the root tip. Isoforms AtCPK3-GFP and AtCPK4-GFP showed a nuclear and cytosolic distribution similar to that of free GFP. Membrane fractionation experiments confirmed that these isoforms were primarily soluble. A membrane association was observed for AtCPKs 1, 7, 8, 9, 16, 21, and 28, based on imaging and membrane fractionation experiments. This correlates with the presence of potential N-terminal acylation sites, consistent with acylation as an important factor in membrane association. All but one of the membrane-associated isoforms targeted exclusively to the plasma membrane. The exception was AtCPK1-GFP, which targeted to peroxisomes, as determined by covisualization with a peroxisome marker. Peroxisome targeting of AtCPK1-GFP was disrupted by a deletion of two potential N-terminal acylation sites. The observation of a peroxisome-located CDPK suggests a mechanism for calcium regulation of peroxisomal functions involved in oxidative stress and lipid metabolism.

  13. Distinct binding and immunogenic properties of the gonococcal homologue of meningococcal factor h binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilse Jongerius

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of sepsis and meningitis. The bacterium recruits factor H (fH, a negative regulator of the complement system, to its surface via fH binding protein (fHbp, providing a mechanism to avoid complement-mediated killing. fHbp is an important antigen that elicits protective immunity against the meningococcus and has been divided into three different variant groups, V1, V2 and V3, or families A and B. However, immunisation with fHbp V1 does not result in cross-protection against V2 and V3 and vice versa. Furthermore, high affinity binding of fH could impair immune responses against fHbp. Here, we investigate a homologue of fHbp in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, designated as Gonococcal homologue of fHbp (Ghfp which we show is a promising vaccine candidate for N. meningitidis. We demonstrate that Gfhp is not expressed on the surface of the gonococcus and, despite its high level of identity with fHbp, does not bind fH. Substitution of only two amino acids in Ghfp is sufficient to confer fH binding, while the corresponding residues in V3 fHbp are essential for high affinity fH binding. Furthermore, immune responses against Ghfp recognise V1, V2 and V3 fHbps expressed by a range of clinical isolates, and have serum bactericidal activity against N. meningitidis expressing fHbps from all variant groups.

  14. Distinct binding and immunogenic properties of the gonococcal homologue of meningococcal factor h binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongerius, Ilse; Lavender, Hayley; Tan, Lionel; Ruivo, Nicola; Exley, Rachel M; Caesar, Joseph J E; Lea, Susan M; Johnson, Steven; Tang, Christoph M

    2013-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of sepsis and meningitis. The bacterium recruits factor H (fH), a negative regulator of the complement system, to its surface via fH binding protein (fHbp), providing a mechanism to avoid complement-mediated killing. fHbp is an important antigen that elicits protective immunity against the meningococcus and has been divided into three different variant groups, V1, V2 and V3, or families A and B. However, immunisation with fHbp V1 does not result in cross-protection against V2 and V3 and vice versa. Furthermore, high affinity binding of fH could impair immune responses against fHbp. Here, we investigate a homologue of fHbp in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, designated as Gonococcal homologue of fHbp (Ghfp) which we show is a promising vaccine candidate for N. meningitidis. We demonstrate that Gfhp is not expressed on the surface of the gonococcus and, despite its high level of identity with fHbp, does not bind fH. Substitution of only two amino acids in Ghfp is sufficient to confer fH binding, while the corresponding residues in V3 fHbp are essential for high affinity fH binding. Furthermore, immune responses against Ghfp recognise V1, V2 and V3 fHbps expressed by a range of clinical isolates, and have serum bactericidal activity against N. meningitidis expressing fHbps from all variant groups. PMID:23935503

  15. Metabolomic changes in fatty liver can be modified by dietary protein and calcium during energy restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taru K Pilvi, Tuulikki Seppänen-Laakso, Helena Simolin, Piet Finckenberg, Anne Huotari, Karl-Heinz Herzig, Riitta Korpela, Matej Orešič, Eero M Mervaala

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To characterise the effect of energy restriction (ER on liver lipid and primary metabolite profile by using metabolomic approach. We also investigated whether the effect of energy restriction can be further enhanced by modification of dietary protein source and calcium.METHODS: Liver metabolomic profile of lean and obese C57Bl/6J mice (n = 10/group were compared with two groups of weight-reduced mice. ER was performed on control diet and whey protein-based high-calcium diet (whey + Ca. The metabolomic analyses were performed using the UPLC/MS based lipidomic platform and the HPLC/MS/MS based primary metabolite platform.RESULTS: ER on both diets significantly reduced hepatic lipid accumulation and lipid droplet size, while only whey + Ca diet significantly decreased blood glucose (P 0.05, vs lean. These changes were accompanied with up-regulated TCA cycle and pentose phosphate pathway metabolites.CONCLUSION: ER-induced changes on hepatic metabolomic profile can be significantly affected by dietary protein source. The therapeutic potential of whey protein and calcium should be further studied.

  16. Metabolomic changes in fatty liver can be modified by dietary protein and calcium during energy restriction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Taru K Pilvi; Tuulikki Sepp(a)nen-Laakso; Helena Simolin; Piet Finckenberg; Anne Huotari; Karl-Heinz Herzig; Riitta Korpela; Matej Ore(s)i(c); Eero M Mervaala

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To characterise the effect of energy restriction (ER) on liver lipid and primary metabolite profile by using metabolomic approach. We also investigated whether the effect of energy restriction can be further enhanced by modification of dietary protein source and calcium.METHODS: Liver metabolomic profile of lean and obese C57BI/6] mice (n = 10/group) were compared with two groups of weight-reduced mice. ER was performed on control diet and whey protein-based high-calcium diet (whey + Ca). The metabolomic an alyses were performed using the UPLC/MS based lipidomic platform and the HPLC/MS/MS based primary metabolite platform.RESULTS: ER on both diets significantly reduced hepatic lipid accumulation and lipid droplet size, while only whey + Ca diet significantly decreased blood glucose (P 0.05, vs lean). These changes were accompanied with up-regulated TCA cycle and pentose phosphate pathway metabolites.CONCLUSION: ER-induced changes on hepatic metabolomic profile can be significantly affected by dietary protein source. The therapeutic potential of whey protein and calcium should be further studied.

  17. The Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal toxin binds biotin-containing proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    C. Du; Nickerson, K W

    1996-01-01

    Brush border membrane vesicles from larvae of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta, contain protein bands of 85 and 120 kDa which react directly with streptavidin conjugated to alkaline phosphatase. The binding could be prevented either by including 10 microM biotin in the reaction mixture or by prior incubation of the brush border membrane vesicles with an activated 60- to 65-kDa toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis HD-73. The ability of B. thuringiensis toxins to recognize biotin-containing pro...

  18. Structural and binding properties of two paralogous fatty acid binding proteins of Taenia solium metacestode.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seon-Hee Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fatty acid (FA binding proteins (FABPs of helminths are implicated in acquisition and utilization of host-derived hydrophobic substances, as well as in signaling and cellular interactions. We previously demonstrated that secretory hydrophobic ligand binding proteins (HLBPs of Taenia solium metacestode (TsM, a causative agent of neurocysticercosis (NC, shuttle FAs in the surrounding host tissues and inwardly transport the FAs across the parasite syncytial membrane. However, the protein molecules responsible for the intracellular trafficking and assimilation of FAs have remained elusive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We isolated two novel TsMFABP genes (TsMFABP1 and TsMFABP2, which encoded 133- and 136-amino acid polypeptides with predicted molecular masses of 14.3 and 14.8 kDa, respectively. They shared 45% sequence identity with each other and 15-95% with other related-members. Homology modeling demonstrated a characteristic β-barrel composed of 10 anti-parallel β-strands and two α-helices. TsMFABP2 harbored two additional loops between β-strands two and three, and β-strands six and seven, respectively. TsMFABP1 was secreted into cyst fluid and surrounding environments, whereas TsMFABP2 was intracellularly confined. Partially purified native proteins migrated to 15 kDa with different isoelectric points of 9.2 (TsMFABP1 and 8.4 (TsMFABP2. Both native and recombinant proteins bound to 11-([5-dimethylaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl]aminoundecannoic acid, dansyl-DL-α-amino-caprylic acid, cis-parinaric acid and retinol, which were competitively inhibited by oleic acid. TsMFABP1 exhibited high affinity toward FA analogs. TsMFABPs showed weak binding activity to retinol, but TsMFABP2 showed relatively high affinity. Isolation of two distinct genes from an individual genome strongly suggested their paralogous nature. Abundant expression of TsMFABP1 and TsMFABP2 in the canal region of worm matched well with the histological distributions

  19. Unusual Heme Binding in the Bacterial Iron Response Regulator Protein (Irr): Spectral Characterization of Heme Binding to Heme Regulatory Motif

    OpenAIRE

    Ishikawa, Haruto; Nakagaki, Megumi; Bamba, Ai; Uchida, Takeshi; Hori, Hiroshi; O'Brian, Mark R.; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Ishimori, Koichiro

    2011-01-01

    We characterized heme binding in the bacterial iron response regulator (Irr) protein, which is a simple heme-regulated protein having a single “heme-regulatory motif”, HRM, and plays a key role in the iron homeostasis of a nitrogen fixing bacterium. The heme titration to wild-type and mutant Irr clearly showed that Irr has two heme binding sites: one of the heme binding sites is in the HRM, where 29Cys is the axial ligand, and the other one, the secondary heme binding site, is located outside...

  20. Comparison of VILIP-1 and VILIP-3 Binding to Phospholipid Monolayers

    OpenAIRE

    Rebaud, Samuel; Simon, Anne; Wang, Conan K.; Mason, Lyndel; Blum, Loïc; Hofmann, Andreas; Girard-Egrot, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    The neuronal calcium sensor proteins Visinin-like Proteins 1 (VILIP-1) and 3 (VILIP-3) are effectors of guanylyl cyclase and acetyl choline receptors, and transduce calcium signals in the brain. The “calcium-myristoyl” switch, which involves a post-translationally added myristoyl moiety and calcium binding, is thought to regulate their membrane binding capacity and therefore, play a critical role in their mechanism of action. In the present study, we investigated the effect of membrane compos...

  1. Roles of RNA-Binding Proteins in DNA Damage Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Mihoko

    2016-01-01

    Living cells experience DNA damage as a result of replication errors and oxidative metabolism, exposure to environmental agents (e.g., ultraviolet light, ionizing radiation (IR)), and radiation therapies and chemotherapies for cancer treatments. Accumulation of DNA damage can lead to multiple diseases such as neurodegenerative disorders, cancers, immune deficiencies, infertility, and also aging. Cells have evolved elaborate mechanisms to deal with DNA damage. Networks of DNA damage response (DDR) pathways are coordinated to detect and repair DNA damage, regulate cell cycle and transcription, and determine the cell fate. Upstream factors of DNA damage checkpoints and repair, "sensor" proteins, detect DNA damage and send the signals to downstream factors in order to maintain genomic integrity. Unexpectedly, we have discovered that an RNA-processing factor is involved in DNA repair processes. We have identified a gene that contributes to glioblastoma multiforme (GBM)'s treatment resistance and recurrence. This gene, RBM14, is known to function in transcription and RNA splicing. RBM14 is also required for maintaining the stem-like state of GBM spheres, and it controls the DNA-PK-dependent non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway by interacting with KU80. RBM14 is a RNA-binding protein (RBP) with low complexity domains, called intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), and it also physically interacts with PARP1. Furthermore, RBM14 is recruited to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in a poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR)-dependent manner (unpublished data). DNA-dependent PARP1 (poly-(ADP) ribose polymerase 1) makes key contributions in the DNA damage response (DDR) network. RBM14 therefore plays an important role in a PARP-dependent DSB repair process. Most recently, it was shown that the other RBPs with intrinsically disordered domains are recruited to DNA damage sites in a PAR-dependent manner, and that these RBPs form liquid compartments (also known as "liquid-demixing"). Among the

  2. Protein-protein binding before and after photo-modification of albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozinek, Sarah C.; Glickman, Randolph D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Brancaleon, Lorenzo

    2016-03-01

    Bioeffects of directed-optical-energy encompass a wide range of applications. One aspect of photochemical interactions involves irradiating a photosensitizer with visible light in order to induce protein unfolding and consequent changes in function. In the past, irradiation of several dye-protein combinations has revealed effects on protein structure. Beta lactoglobulin, human serum albumin (HSA) and tubulin have all been photo-modified with meso-tetrakis(4- sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin (TSPP) bound, but only in the case of tubulin has binding caused a verified loss of biological function (loss of ability to form microtubules) as a result of this light-induced structural change. The current work questions if the photo-induced structural changes that occur to HSA, are sufficient to disable its biological function of binding to osteonectin. The albumin-binding protein, osteonectin, is about half the molecular weight of HSA, so the two proteins and their bound product can be separated and quantified by size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography. TSPP was first bound to HSA and irradiated, photo-modifying the structure of HSA. Then native HSA or photo-modified HSA (both with TSPP bound) were compared, to assess loss in HSA's innate binding ability as a result of light-induced structure modification.

  3. Trends for isolated amino acids and dipeptides: Conformation, divalent ion binding, and remarkable similarity of binding to calcium and lead

    CERN Document Server

    Ropo, Matti; Baldauf, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    We derive structural and binding energy trends for twenty amino acids, their dipeptides, and their interactions with the divalent cations Ca$^{2+}$, Ba$^{2+}$, Sr$^{2+}$, Cd$^{2+}$, Pb$^{2+}$, and Hg$^{2+}$. The underlying data set consists of 45,892 first-principles predicted conformers with relative energies up to about 4 eV (about 400kJ/mol). We show that only very few distinct backbone structures of isolated amino acids and their dipeptides emerge as lowest-energy conformers. The isolated amino acids predominantly adopt structures that involve an acidic proton shared between the carboxy and amino function. Dipeptides adopt one of two intramolecular-hydrogen bonded conformations C$_5$ or equatorial C$_7$. Upon complexation with a divalent cation, the accessible conformational space shrinks and intramolecular hydrogen bonding is prevented due to strong electrostatic interaction of backbone and side chain functional groups with cations. Clear correlations emerge from the binding energies of the six divalent ...

  4. Enhanced expression of a calcium-dependent protein kinase from the moss Funaria hygrometrica under nutritional starvation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Doyel Mitra; Man Mohan Johri

    2000-12-01

    Among the downstream targets of calcium in plants, calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) form an interesting class of kinases which are activated by calcium binding. They have been implicated in a diverse array of responses to hormonal and environmental stimuli. In order to dissect the role of CDPKs in the moss Funaria hygrometrica, a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based approach was adopted to clone the gene. Using degenerate PCR primers against conserved regions of CDPKs, a 900 bp amplicon was obtained from the genomic DNA of Funaria. Southern hybridization under low stringency conditions indicated the presence of several CDPK related sequences in the Funaria genome. This observation is consistent with reports of multigene families of CDPKs in other plants. The 900 bp fragment was subsequently used to isolate a 2.2 kb partial genomic clone of the CDPK gene from Funaria. The genomic clone encodes an open reading frame (ORF) of 518 amino acids. Interestingly, unlike other CDPK genes from plants, the entire 1.5 kb ORF is not interrupted by introns. The deduced amino acid sequence of the Funaria gene shows extensive homology with CDPKs from higher plants, 73% identity with the Fragaria CDPK and 71% identity with CDPK isoform 7 of Arabidopsis. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the Funaria CDPK is closer to the CDPKs from higher plants like strawberry and Arabidopsis as compared to those from lower plants such as the liverwort Marchantia, the green alga Chlamydomonas or another moss Tortula. Northern analysis shows enhanced expression of the CDPK transcript within 24–48 h of starvation for nitrogen, phosphorus or sulphur. So far the only other kinase which is known to be induced by nutrient starvation in plants is the wpk 4 which is a snf-1 related kinase (SnRKs). To our knowledge this is the first report that implicates a CDPK in the starvation response.

  5. Calcium distribution in globoid crystals of cucurbita cotyledon protein bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, J N; Spitzer, E; Vollmer, C M

    1979-05-01

    Energy-dispersive x-ray analysis was used to investigate the location of globoid crystals with relatively high Ca levels within cotyledons of Cucurbita maxima, Cucurbita mixta, and Cucurbita andreana. The small globoid crystals in both upper and lower epidermal cells commonly contained Ca. Ca was present in globoid crystals of all provascular regions with the exception of the very small provascular regions of C. maxima. In C. maxima and C. mixta cotyledons, some cases were observed where Ca was found in the globoid crystals of the first layer of mesophyll cells surrounding the provascular region, but in general Ca was absent from globoid crystals of palisade and spongy mesophyll cells. In C. andreana, globoid crystals of palisade and spongy mesophyll cells commonly contained at least some Ca. Cell position and cell type are factors affecting the Ca content of globoid crystals in protein bodies. PMID:16660825

  6. Identification of Actin-Binding Proteins from Maize Pollen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staiger, C.J.

    2004-01-13

    Specific Aims--The goal of this project was to gain an understanding of how actin filament organization and dynamics are controlled in flowering plants. Specifically, we proposed to identify unique proteins with novel functions by investigating biochemical strategies for the isolation and characterization of actin-binding proteins (ABPs). In particular, our hunt was designed to identify capping proteins and nucleation factors. The specific aims included: (1) to use F-actin affinity chromatography (FAAC) as a general strategy to isolate pollen ABPs (2) to produce polyclonal antisera and perform subcellular localization in pollen tubes (3) to isolate cDNA clones for the most promising ABPs (4) to further purify and characterize ABP interactions with actin in vitro. Summary of Progress By employing affinity chromatography on F-actin or DNase I columns, we have identified at least two novel ABPs from pollen, PrABP80 (gelsolin-like) and ZmABP30, We have also cloned and expressed recombinant protein, as well as generated polyclonal antisera, for 6 interesting ABPs from Arabidopsis (fimbrin AtFIM1, capping protein a/b (AtCP), adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (AtCAP), AtCapG & AtVLN1). We performed quantitative analyses of the biochemical properties for two of these previously uncharacterized ABPs (fimbrin and capping protein). Our studies provide the first evidence for fimbrin activity in plants, demonstrate the existence of barbed-end capping factors and a gelsolin-like severing activity, and provide the quantitative data necessary to establish and test models of F-actin organization and dynamics in plant cells.

  7. Role of Tamm-Horsfall protein and uromodulin in calcium oxalate crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the defenses against nephrolithiasis is provided by macromolecules that modulate the nucleation, growth, aggregation and retention of crystals in the kidneys. The aim of the present study was to determine the behavior of two of these proteins, Tamm-Horsfall and uromodulin, in calcium oxalate crystallization in vitro. We studied a group of 10 male stone formers who had formed at least one kidney stone composed of calcium oxalate. They were classified as having idiopathic nephrolithiasis and had no well-known metabolic risk factors involved in kidney stone pathogenesis. Ten normal men were used as controls, as was a group consisting of five normal women and another consisting of five pregnant women. Crystallization was induced by a fixed supersaturation of calcium oxalate and measured with a Coulter Counter. All findings were confirmed by light and scanning electron microscopy. The number of particulate material deposited from patients with Tamm-Horsfall protein was higher than that of the controls (P<0.001. However, Tamm-Horsfall protein decreased the particle diameter of the stone formers when analyzed by the mode of the volume distribution curve (P<0.002 (5.64 ± 0.55 µm compared to 11.41 ± 0.48 µm of uromodulin; 15.94 ± 3.93 µm and 12.45 ± 0.97 µm of normal men Tamm-Horsfall protein and uromodulin, respectively; 8.17 ± 1.57 µm and 9.82 ± 0.95 µm of normal women Tamm-Horsfall protein and uromodulin, respectively; 12.17 ± 1.41 µm and 12.99 ± 0.51 µm of pregnant Tamm-Horsfall protein and uromodulin, respectively. Uromodulin produced fewer particles than Tamm-Horsfall protein in all groups. Nonetheless, the total volume of the crystals produced by uromodulin was higher than that produced by Tamm-Horsfall protein. Our results indicate a different effect of Tamm-Horsfall protein and uromodulin. This dual behavior suggests different functions. Tamm-Horsfall protein may act on nucleation and inhibit crystal aggregation, while

  8. A sequence-based dynamic ensemble learning system for protein ligand-binding site prediction

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Peng

    2015-12-03

    Background: Proteins have the fundamental ability to selectively bind to other molecules and perform specific functions through such interactions, such as protein-ligand binding. Accurate prediction of protein residues that physically bind to ligands is important for drug design and protein docking studies. Most of the successful protein-ligand binding predictions were based on known structures. However, structural information is not largely available in practice due to the huge gap between the number of known protein sequences and that of experimentally solved structures

  9. Periplasmic Binding Proteins in Thermophiles: Characterization and Potential Application of an Arginine-Binding Protein from Thermotoga maritima: A Brief Thermo-Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabato D'Auria

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Arginine-binding protein from the extremophile Thermotoga maritima is a 27.7 kDa protein possessing the typical two-domain structure of the periplasmic binding proteins family. The protein is characterized by a very high specificity and affinity to bind to arginine, also at high temperatures. Due to its features, this protein could be taken into account as a potential candidate for the design of a biosensor for arginine. It is important to investigate the stability of proteins when they are used for biotechnological applications. In this article, we review the structural and functional features of an arginine-binding protein from the extremophile Thermotoga maritima with a particular eye on its potential biotechnological applications.

  10. Protein interactions and ligand binding: From protein subfamilies to functional specificity

    OpenAIRE

    Rausell, A.; de Juan, D.; Pazos, F; Valencia, A.

    2010-01-01

    The divergence accumulated during the evolution of protein families translates into their internal organization as subfamilies, and it is directly reflected in the characteristic patterns of differentially conserved residues. These specifically conserved positions in protein subfamilies are known as “specificity determining positions” (SDPs). Previous studies have limited their analysis to the study of the relationship between these positions and ligand-binding specificity, demonstrating sign...

  11. Paracetamol and cytarabine binding competition in high affinity binding sites of transporting protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sułkowska, A.; Bojko, B.; Równicka, J.; Sułkowski, W. W.

    2006-07-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen, AA) the most popular analgesic drug is commonly used in the treatment of pain in patients suffering from cancer. In our studies, we evaluated the competition in binding with serum albumin between paracetamol (AA) and cytarabine, antyleukemic drug (araC). The presence of one drug can alter the binding affinity of albumin towards the second one. Such interaction can result in changing of the free fraction of the one of these drugs in blood. Two spectroscopic methods were used to determine high affinity binding sites and the competition of the drugs. Basing on the change of the serum albumin fluorescence in the presence of either of the drugs the quenching ( KQ) constants for the araC-BSA and AA-BSA systems were calculated. Analysis of UV difference spectra allowed us to describe the changes in drug-protein complexes (araC-albumin and AA-albumin) induced by the presence of the second drug (AA and araC, respectively). The mechanism of competition between araC and AA has been proposed.

  12. Calcium-dependent molecular spring elements in the giant protein titin

    OpenAIRE

    Labeit, Dietmar; Watanabe, Kaori; Witt, Christian; Fujita, Hideaki; Wu, Yiming; Lahmers, Sunshine; Funck, Theodor; Labeit, Siegfried; Granzier, Henk

    2003-01-01

    Titin (also known as connectin) is a giant protein with a wide range of cellular functions, including providing muscle cells with elasticity. Its physiological extension is largely derived from the PEVK segment, rich in proline (P), glutamate (E), valine (V), and lysine (K) residues. We studied recombinant PEVK molecules containing the two conserved elements: ≈28-residue PEVK repeats and E-rich motifs. Single molecule experiments revealed that calcium-induced conformational changes reduce the...

  13. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of Calcium-dependent Protein Kinase in Tomato

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Zhangjian; Lv, Xiangzhang; Xia, Xiaojian; Zhou, Jie; Shi, Kai; Yu, Jingquan; Zhou, Yanhong

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) play critical roles in regulating growth, development and stress response in plants. Information about CDPKs in tomato, however, remains obscure although it is one of the most important model crops in the world. In this study, we performed a bioinformatics analysis of the entire tomato genome and identified 29 CDPK genes. These CDPK genes are found to be located in 12 chromosomes, and could be divided into four groups. Analysis of the gene structure a...

  14. Calcium-containing phosphopeptides pave the secretory pathway for efficient protein traffic and secretion in fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Martín, Juan F.

    2014-01-01

    Casein phosphopeptides (CPPs) containing chelated calcium drastically increase the secretion of extracellular homologous and heterologous proteins in filamentous fungi. Casein phosphopeptides released by digestion of alpha − and beta-casein are rich in phosphoserine residues (SerP). They stimulate enzyme secretion in the gastrointestinal tract and enhance the immune response in mammals, and are used as food supplements. It is well known that casein phosphopeptides transport Ca2+ across the me...

  15. Cobalamin binding proteins in patients with HIV infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    P-Cobalamins have been reported to be decreased in patients with HIV infection. Because of this, we found it of interest to examine both cobalamin-saturated binding proteins (holo-transcobalamin, holo-TC and holo-haptocorrin, holo-HC) and cobalamin unsaturated binding proteins (apo-transcobalamin, apo-TC and apo-haptocorrin, apo-HC). The results are given as range and (median). Eighteen male HIV-infected patients with plasma cobalamins below 200 pmol/l were studied. We found low concentrations of holo-TC (37-88(47.5)pmol/l) and holo-HC (64-184(135.3)pmol/l). The concentration of apo-TC and apo-HC was increased (480-1730(1025)pmol/l; 70-800(235)pmol/l). It is concluded that, in HIV-infected patients, low plasma cobalamin does not reflect a low concentration of transcobalamin or haptocorrin. In 20 HIV-infected patients and 31 patients with malignant haematological diseases, the TC isopeptide patterns were determined. In the HIV group, an increased frequency of TC isopeptide X was found and the overall distribution of TC isopeptides was significantly different from the reference population (p<0.05). There was no difference between the group of patients with malignant haematological diseases and the reference group. (au)

  16. Localization of Cellular Retinol-Binding Protein and Retinol-Binding Protein in Cells Comprising the Blood-Brain Barrier of Rat and Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Paul N.; Bok, Dean; Ong, David E.

    1990-06-01

    Brain is not generally recognized as an organ that requiries vitamin A, perhaps because no obvious histologic lesions have been observed in severely vitamin A-deficient animals. However, brain tissue does contain cellular vitamin A-binding proteins and a nuclear receptor protein for retinoic acid. In the present study, immunohistochemical techniques were used to determine the cell-specific location of cellular retinol-binding protein in human and rat brain tissue. Cellular retinol-binding protein was localized specifically within the endothelial cells of the brain microvasculature and within the cuboidal epithelial cells of the choroid plexus, two primary sites of the mammalian blood-brain barrier. In addition, autoradiographic procedures demonstrated binding sites for serum retinol-binding protein in the choroidal epithelium. These observations suggest that a significant movement of retinol across the blood-brain barrier may occur.

  17. Localization of cellular retinol-binding protein and retinol-binding protein in cells comprising the blood-brain barrier of rat and human

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, P.N.; Ong, D.E. (Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (USA)); Bok, D. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (USA))

    1990-06-01

    Brain is not generally recognized as an organ that requires vitamin A, perhaps because no obvious histologic lesions have been observed in severely vitamin A-deficient animals. However, brain tissue does contain cellular vitamin A-binding proteins and a nuclear receptor protein for retinoic acid. In the present study, immunohistochemical techniques were used to determine the cell-specific location of cellular retinol-binding protein in human and rat brain tissue. Cellular retinol-binding protein was localized specifically within the cuboidal epithelial cells of the choroid plexus, two primary sites of the mammalian blood-brain barrier. In addition, autoradiographic procedures demonstrated binding sites for serum retinol-binding protein in the choroidal epithelium. These observations suggest that a significant movement of retinol across the blood-brain barrier may occur.

  18. Protein kinase A binds and activates heat shock factor 1.

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    Ayesha Murshid

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many inducible transcription factors are regulated through batteries of posttranslational modifications that couple their activity to inducing stimuli. We have studied such regulation of Heat Shock Factor 1 (HSF1, a key protein in control of the heat shock response, and a participant in carcinogenisis, neurological health and aging. As the mechanisms involved in the intracellular regulation of HSF1 in good health and its dysregulation in disease are still incomplete we are investigating the role of posttranslational modifications in such regulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a proteomic study of HSF1 binding partners, we have discovered its association with the pleiotropic protein kinase A (PKA. HSF1 binds avidly to the catalytic subunit of PKA, (PKAcα and becomes phosphorylated on a novel serine phosphorylation site within its central regulatory domain (serine 320 or S320, both in vitro and in vivo. Intracellular PKAcα levels and phosphorylation of HSF1 at S320 were both required for HSF1 to be localized to the nucleus, bind to response elements in the promoter of an HSF1 target gene (hsp70.1 and activate hsp70.1 after stress. Reduction in PKAcα levels by small hairpin RNA led to HSF1 exclusion from the nucleus, its exodus from the hsp70.1 promoter and decreased hsp70.1 transcription. Likewise, null mutation of HSF1 at S320 by alanine substitution for serine led to an HSF1 species excluded from the nucleus and deficient in hsp70.1 activation. CONCLUSIONS: These findings of PKA regulation of HSF1 through S320 phosphorylation add to our knowledge of the signaling networks converging on this factor and may contribute to elucidating its complex roles in the stress response and understanding HSF1 dysregulation in disease.

  19. Plant Cytosolic Acyl-CoA-Binding Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zi-Wei; Chye, Mee-Len

    2016-01-01

    A gene family encoding six members of acyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBP) exists in Arabidopsis and they are designated as AtACBP1-AtACBP6. They have been observed to play pivotal roles in plant lipid metabolism, consistent to the abilities of recombinant AtACBP in binding different medium- and long-chain acyl-CoA esters in vitro. While AtACBP1 and AtACBP2 are membrane-associated proteins with ankyrin repeats and AtACBP3 contains a signaling peptide for targeting to the apoplast, AtACBP4, AtACBP5 and AtACBP6 represent the cytosolic forms in the AtACBP family. They were verified to be subcellularly localized in the cytosol using diverse experimental methods, including cell fractionation followed by western blot analysis, immunoelectron microscopy and confocal laser-scanning microscopy using autofluorescence-tagged fusions. AtACBP4 (73.2 kDa) and AtACBP5 (70.1 kDa) are the largest, while AtACBP6 (10.4 kDa) is the smallest. Their binding affinities to oleoyl-CoA esters suggested that they can potentially transfer oleoyl-CoA esters from the plastids to the endoplasmic reticulum, facilitating the subsequent biosynthesis of non-plastidial membrane lipids in Arabidopsis. Recent studies on ACBP, extended from a dicot (Arabidopsis) to a monocot, revealed that six ACBP are also encoded in rice (Oryza sativa). Interestingly, three small rice ACBP (OsACBP1, OsACBP2 and OsACBP3) are present in the cytosol in comparison to one (AtACBP6) in Arabidopsis. In this review, the combinatory and distinct roles of the cytosolic AtACBP are discussed, including their functions in pollen and seed development, light-dependent regulation and substrate affinities to acyl-CoA esters. PMID:26662549

  20. Electrophilicities and Protein Covalent Binding of Demethylation Metabolites of Colchicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiucai; Lin, Dongju; Li, Weiwei; Wang, Kai; Peng, Ying; Zheng, Jiang

    2016-03-21

    Colchicine, an alkaloid existing in plants of Liliaceous colchicum, has been widely used in the treatment of gout and familial Mediterranean fever. The administration of colchicine was found to cause liver injury in humans. The mechanisms of colchicine-induced liver toxicity remain unknown. The objectives of this study were to determine the electrophilicities of demethylation metabolites of colchicine and investigate the protein adductions derived from the reactive metabolites of colchicine. Four demethylated colchicine (1-, 2-, 3-, and 10-DMCs), namely, M1-M4, were detected in colchicine-fortified microsomal incubations. Four N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) conjugates (M5-M8) derived from colchicine were detected in the microsomes in the presence of NAC. M5 and M6 were derived from 10-DMC. M7 resulted from the reaction of 2-DMC or 3-DMC with NAC, and M8 originated from 10-DMC. Microsomal protein covalent binding was observed after exposure to colchicine. Two cysteine adducts (CA-1 and CA-2) derived from 10-DMC were found in proteolytically digested microsomal protein samples after incubation with colchicine. The findings allow us to define the chemical property of demethylation metabolites of colchicine and the interaction between protein and the reactive metabolites of colchicine generated in situ. PMID:26845511